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Sample records for breast tumor phenotype

  1. Breast tumor copy number aberration phenotypes and genomic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genomic DNA copy number aberrations are frequent in solid tumors, although the underlying causes of chromosomal instability in tumors remain obscure. Genes likely to have genomic instability phenotypes when mutated (e.g. those involved in mitosis, replication, repair, and telomeres) are rarely mutated in chromosomally unstable sporadic tumors, even though such mutations are associated with some heritable cancer prone syndromes. We applied array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to the analysis of breast tumors. The variation in the levels of genomic instability amongst tumors prompted us to investigate whether alterations in processes/genes involved in maintenance and/or manipulation of the genome were associated with particular types of genomic instability. We discriminated three breast tumor subtypes based on genomic DNA copy number alterations. The subtypes varied with respect to level of genomic instability. We find that shorter telomeres and altered telomere related gene expression are associated with amplification, implicating telomere attrition as a promoter of this type of aberration in breast cancer. On the other hand, the numbers of chromosomal alterations, particularly low level changes, are associated with altered expression of genes in other functional classes (mitosis, cell cycle, DNA replication and repair). Further, although loss of function instability phenotypes have been demonstrated for many of the genes in model systems, we observed enhanced expression of most genes in tumors, indicating that over expression, rather than deficiency underlies instability. Many of the genes associated with higher frequency of copy number aberrations are direct targets of E2F, supporting the hypothesis that deregulation of the Rb pathway is a major contributor to chromosomal instability in breast tumors. These observations are consistent with failure to find mutations in sporadic tumors in genes that have roles in maintenance or manipulation of the genome

  2. Genomic and phenotypic profiles of two Brazilian breast cancer cell lines derived from primary human tumors

    OpenAIRE

    CORRÊA, NATÁSSIA C.R.; Kuasne, Hellen; Faria, Jerusa A. Q. A.; SEIXAS, CIÇA C.S.; SANTOS, IRIA G.D.; ABREU, FRANCINE B.; Nonogaki, Suely; Rocha, Rafael M.; Silva, Gerluza Aparecida Borges; Gobbi, Helenice; Silvia R Rogatto; Alfredo M. Goes; Gomes, Dawidson A

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women worldwide. Research using breast cancer cell lines derived from primary tumors may provide valuable additional knowledge regarding this type of cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the phenotypic profiles of MACL-1 and MGSO-3, the only Brazilian breast cancer cell lines available for comparative studies. We evaluated the presence of hormone receptors, proliferation, differentiation and stem cell markers, using ...

  3. Genomic and phenotypic profiles of two Brazilian breast cancer cell lines derived from primary human tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corrêa, Natássia C R; Kuasne, Hellen; Faria, Jerusa A Q A;

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women worldwide. Research using breast cancer cell lines derived from primary tumors may provide valuable additional knowledge regarding this type of cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the phenotypic profiles of MACL-1...... and MGSO-3, the only Brazilian breast cancer cell lines available for comparative studies. We evaluated the presence of hormone receptors, proliferation, differentiation and stem cell markers, using immunohistochemical staining of the primary tumor, cultured cells and xenografts implanted....... This shift in expression may be due to the selection of an 'establishment' phenotype in vitro. Whole-genome DNA evaluation showed a large amount of copy number alterations (CNAs) in the two cell lines. These findings render MACL-1 and MGSO-3 the first characterized Brazilian breast cancer cell lines...

  4. Fructose as a carbon source induces an aggressive phenotype in MDA-MB-468 breast tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    MONZAVI-KARBASSI, BEHJATOLAH; HINE, R. JEAN; STANLEY, JOSEPH S.; RAMANI, VISHNU PRAKASH; CARCEL-TRULLOLS, JAIME; WHITEHEAD, TRACY L.; KELLY, THOMAS; SIEGEL, ERIC R.; ARTAUD, CECILE; SHAAF, SAEID; SAHA, RINKU; JOUSHEGHANY, FARIBA; HENRY-TILLMAN, RONDA; KIEBER-EMMONS, THOMAS

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation is a universal feature of cancer cells, and certain glycan structures are well-known markers for tumor progression. Availability and composition of sugars in the microenvironment may affect cell glycosylation. Recent studies of human breast tumor cell lines indicate their ability to take up and utilize fructose. Here we tested the hypothesis that adding fructose to culture as a carbon source induces phenotypic changes in cultured human breast tumor cells that are associated with metastatic disease. MDA-MB-468 cells were adapted to culture media in which fructose was substituted for glucose. Changes in cell surface glycan structures, expression of genes related to glycan assembly, cytoskeleton F-actin, migration, adhesion and invasion were determined. Cells cultured in fructose expressed distinct cell-surface glycans. The addition of fructose affected sialylation and fucosylation patterns. Fructose feeding also increased binding of leukoagglutinating Phaseolus vulgaris isolectin, suggesting a possible rise in expression of branching β-1, 6 GlcNAc structures. Rhodamine-phalloidin staining revealed an altered F-actin cytoskeletal system. Fructose accelerated cellular migration and increased invasion. These data suggest that changing the carbon source of the less aggressive MDA-MB-468 cell line induced characteristics associated with more aggressive phenotypes. These data could be of fundamental importance due to the markedly increased consumption of sweeteners containing free fructose in recent years, as they suggest that the presence of fructose in nutritional micro-environment of tumor cells may negatively affect the outcome for some breast cancer patients. PMID:20664930

  5. Tumor-derived CCL-2 and CXCL-8 as possible prognostic markers of breast cancer: correlation with estrogen and progestrone receptor phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoneim, H M; Maher, Sara; Abdel-Aty, Asmaa; Saad, A; Kazem, A; Demian, S R

    2009-01-01

    Prognosis of breast cancer is believed to be a multifactorial process best achieved by complex factors including host and tumor-derived biomarkers together with traditional clinicopathological parameters and tumor histologic markers. The present study aimed at evaluating the prognostic significance of chemokine ligand-2 (CCL-2) and interleukin-8 (CXCL-8) expression in extracts of breast carcinomas through correlation with clinicopathological aspects as well as estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) phenotyping. The study was conducted on 30 Egyptian breast cancer patients diagnosed by fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and subjected to modified radical mastectomy. Excised tissues were used to prepare tissue sections and extracts for histopathological and immunohistochemical studies. Expression of CCL-2 and CXCL-8 was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). 26 patients had invasive ductal carcinoma, grades II and III with metastasis to axillary lymph nodes and ER and PR positive phenotype. Expression of CCL-2 and CXCL-8 was significantly influenced by patient's age, menopausal status, nodal involvement, tumor grade and the ER phenotype. In contrast, it was not affected by either tumor size or PR staining pattern. Both chemokines correlated positively to each other and to tumor grade and negatively to age, menopausal status of patients and ER phenotyping. It is concluded that the angiogenic chemokine CXCL-8 and the macrophage chemoattractant CCL-2 might be useful prognostic markers where their routine follow up might be of importance in assessment of tumor aggressiveness in clinical settings. PMID:22059352

  6. The impact of HER2 phenotype of circulating tumor cells in metastatic breast cancer: a retrospective study in 107 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In metastatic breast cancer (MBC), antigen profiles of metastatic tissue and primary tumor differ in up to 20 % of patients. Reassessment of predictive markers, including human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) expression, might help to optimize MBC treatment. While tissue sampling is invasive and often difficult to repeat, circulating tumor cell (CTC) analysis requires only a blood sample and might provide an easy-to-repeat, real-time “liquid biopsy” approach. The present retrospective study was conducted to compare HER2 expression in primary tumors, metastatic tissue, and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from MBC patients and to analyze the potential impact of HER2 overexpression by CTCs on progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in MBC. CTC-positive (five or more CTCs/7.5 mL blood; CellSearch®, Janssen Diagnostics) MBC patients starting a new line of systemic treatment were eligible for the study. HER2 status of CTCs was determined by immunofluorescence (CellSearch®). HER2 status of primary (PRIM) and metastatic (MET) tumor tissue was determined by immunohistochemistry. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Kaplan–Meier plots. One hundred seven patients (median age (range) 57 (33–81) years) were included. 100/107 (93 %) patients were followed-up for a median [95 % confidence interval (CI)] of 28.5 [25.1–40.1] months. Of 37/107 (35 %) CTC-HER2-positive patients only 10 (27 %) were PRIM-HER2-positive. 6/46 (13 %) patients were MET-HER2-positive; only 2/10 (20 %) CTC-HER2-positive patients were MET-HER2-positive. Overall accuracy between CTC-HER2 expression and PRIM-HER2 and MET-HER2 status was 69 % and 74 %, respectively. Kaplan–Meier plots of PFS and OS by CTC-HER2 status revealed significantly longer median [95 % CI] PFS of CTC-HER2-positive versus CTC-HER2-negative patients (7.4 [4.7–13.7] versus 4.34 [3.5–5.9] months; p = 0.035). CTC-HER2-positive status showed no significant difference for OS (13.7 [7.7–30

  7. Sleep Duration and Breast Cancer Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Khawaja; Santosh Rao; Li Li; Thompson, Cheryl L.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that short sleep is associated with an increased risk of cancer; however, little has been done to study the role of sleep on tumor characteristics. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between sleep duration and tumor phenotype in 972 breast cancer patients. Sleep duration was inversely associated with tumor grade (univariate P = 0.032), particularly in postmenopausal women (univariate P = 0.018). This association did not reach statistical significance after...

  8. SLUG/SNAI2 and Tumor Necrosis Factor Generate Breast Cells With CD44+/CD24- Phenotype

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    Bhat-Nakshatri Poornima

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer cells with CD44+/CD24- cell surface marker expression profile are proposed as cancer stem cells (CSCs. Normal breast epithelial cells that are CD44+/CD24- express higher levels of stem/progenitor cell associated genes. We, amongst others, have shown that cancer cells that have undergone epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT display the CD44+/CD24- phenotype. However, whether all genes that induce EMT confer the CD44+/CD24- phenotype is unknown. We hypothesized that only a subset of genes associated with EMT generates CD44+/CD24- cells. Methods MCF-10A breast epithelial cells, a subpopulation of which spontaneously acquire the CD44+/CD24- phenotype, were used to identify genes that are differentially expressed in CD44+/CD24- and CD44-/CD24+ cells. Ingenuity pathway analysis was performed to identify signaling networks that linked differentially expressed genes. Two EMT-associated genes elevated in CD44+/CD24- cells, SLUG and Gli-2, were overexpressed in the CD44-/CD24+ subpopulation of MCF-10A cells and MCF-7 cells, which are CD44-/CD24+. Flow cytometry and mammosphere assays were used to assess cell surface markers and stem cell-like properties, respectively. Results Two thousand thirty five genes were differentially expressed (p Conclusions EMT-mediated generation of CD44+/CD24- or CD44+/CD24+ cells depends on the genes that induce or are associated with EMT. Our studies reveal a role for TNF in altering the phenotype of breast CSC. Additionally, the CD44+/CD24+ phenotype, in the context of SLUG overexpression, can be associated with breast CSC "stemness" behavior based on mammosphere forming ability.

  9. Multiparametric classification links tumor microenvironments with tumor cell phenotype.

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    Bojana Gligorijevic

    2014-11-01

    occurred in spatially distinct microenvironments of primary tumors. We show how machine-learning analysis can classify heterogeneous microenvironments in vivo to enable prediction of motility phenotypes and tumor cell fate. The ability to predict the locations of tumor cell behavior leading to metastasis in breast cancer models may lead towards understanding the heterogeneity of response to treatment.

  10. A mouse model for triple-negative breast cancer tumor-initiating cells (TNBC-TICs) exhibits similar aggressive phenotype to the human disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) exhibit characteristics quite distinct from other kinds of breast cancer, presenting as an aggressive disease--recurring and metastasizing more often than other kinds of breast cancer, without tumor-specific treatment options and accounts for 15% of all types of breast cancer with higher percentages in premenopausal African-American and Hispanic women. The reason for this aggressive phenotype is currently the focus of intensive research. However, progress is hampered by the lack of suitable TNBC cell model systems. To understand the mechanistic basis for the aggressiveness of TNBC, we produced a stable TNBC cell line by sorting for 4T1 cells that do not express the estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR) or the gene for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). As a control, we produced a stable triple-positive breast cancer (TPBC) cell line by transfecting 4T1 cells with rat HER2, ER and PgR genes and sorted for cells with high expression of ER and PgR by flow cytometry and high expression of the HER2 gene by Western blot analysis. We isolated tumor-initiating cells (TICs) by sorting for CD24+/CD44high/ALDH1+ cells from TNBC (TNBC-TICs) and TPBC (TPBC-TICs) stable cell lines. Limiting dilution transplantation experiments revealed that CD24+/CD44high/ALDH1+ cells derived from TNBC (TNBC-TICs) and TPBC (TPBC-TICs) were significantly more effective at repopulating the mammary glands of naïve female BALB/c mice than CD24-/CD44-/ALDH1- cells. Implantation of the TNBC-TICs resulted in significantly larger tumors, which metastasized to the lungs to a significantly greater extent than TNBC, TPBC-TICs, TPBC or parental 4T1 cells. We further demonstrated that the increased aggressiveness of TNBC-TICs correlates with the presence of high levels of mouse twenty-five kDa heat shock protein (Hsp25/mouse HspB1) and seventy-two kDa heat shock protein (Hsp72/HspA1A). Taken together, we have developed a TNBC-TICs model system

  11. Sleep Duration and Breast Cancer Phenotype

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    Ali Khawaja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that short sleep is associated with an increased risk of cancer; however, little has been done to study the role of sleep on tumor characteristics. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between sleep duration and tumor phenotype in 972 breast cancer patients. Sleep duration was inversely associated with tumor grade (univariate P=0.032, particularly in postmenopausal women (univariate P=0.018. This association did not reach statistical significance after adjustments for age, race, body mass index, hormone replacement therapy use, alcohol consumption, smoking, and physical activity in the entire study sample (P=0.052, but it remained statistically significant (P=0.049 among post-menopausal patients. We did not observe a statistically significant association between sleep duration and stage at diagnosis, ER, or HER2 receptor status. These results present a modest association between short duration of sleep and higher grade breast cancer in post-menopausal women. Further work needs to be done to validate these findings.

  12. Correlation between Duffy blood group phenotype and breast cancer incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different ethnicities have different distribution of Duffy blood group (DBG) phenotypes and different breast cancer morbidity. A study in our lab demonstrated that Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines (DARC, also known as DBGP, the Duffy protein phenotype), led to the inhibition of tumorigenesis. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that DBGP is correlated with breast cancer occurrence. DBGP proteins were examined by indirect antiglobulin testing with anti-FYa and anti-FYb antibodies. The phenotypes were classified into four groups according to the agglutination reactions: FYa + FYb+, FYa + FYb-, FYa-FYb + and FYa-FYb-. The phenotypes and pathological diagnosis of consecutively hospitalized female patients (n = 5,022) suffering from breast cancer at the Shanghai Cancer Hospital and Henan Province Cancer Hospital were investigated. The relationships between DBGP expression with breast cancer occurrence, axillary lymph status, histological subtype, tumor size pathological grade and overall survival were analyzed. The incidence of breast cancer was significantly different between FYa + FYb + (29.8%), FYa + FYb- (33.2%), FYa-FYb + (45.6%) and FYa-FYb- (59.1%; P = 0.001). Significant different numbers of breast cancer patients had metastases to the axillary lymph nodes in the FYa + FYb + group (25.1%), FYa + FYb- (36.9%), FYa-FYb + (41.0%) and FYa-FYb- (50.0%, (P = 0.005). There was a statistical significance (p = 0.022) of the overall survival difference between patients with difference phenotypes. No significant difference was observed in cancer size (t-test, p > 0.05), histological cancer type (Fisher's exact test, p > 0.05) or histological grade (Fisher's exact test, p > 0.05) between every each DBGP group. DBGP is correlated with breast cancer incidence and axillary lymph node metastasis and overall survival. Further investigations are required to determine the underlying mechanism of Duffy blood group phenotype on breast cancer risk

  13. Correlation between Duffy blood group phenotype and breast cancer incidence

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    Liu Xiao-feng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different ethnicities have different distribution of Duffy blood group (DBG phenotypes and different breast cancer morbidity. A study in our lab demonstrated that Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines (DARC, also known as DBGP, the Duffy protein phenotype, led to the inhibition of tumorigenesis. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that DBGP is correlated with breast cancer occurrence. Methods DBGP proteins were examined by indirect antiglobulin testing with anti-FYa and anti-FYb antibodies. The phenotypes were classified into four groups according to the agglutination reactions: FYa + FYb+, FYa + FYb-, FYa-FYb + and FYa-FYb-. The phenotypes and pathological diagnosis of consecutively hospitalized female patients (n = 5,022 suffering from breast cancer at the Shanghai Cancer Hospital and Henan Province Cancer Hospital were investigated. The relationships between DBGP expression with breast cancer occurrence, axillary lymph status, histological subtype, tumor size pathological grade and overall survival were analyzed. Results The incidence of breast cancer was significantly different between FYa + FYb + (29.8%, FYa + FYb- (33.2%, FYa-FYb + (45.6% and FYa-FYb- (59.1%; P = 0.001. Significant different numbers of breast cancer patients had metastases to the axillary lymph nodes in the FYa + FYb + group (25.1%, FYa + FYb- (36.9%, FYa-FYb + (41.0% and FYa-FYb- (50.0%, (P = 0.005. There was a statistical significance (p = 0.022 of the overall survival difference between patients with difference phenotypes. No significant difference was observed in cancer size (t-test, p > 0.05, histological cancer type (Fisher's exact test, p > 0.05 or histological grade (Fisher's exact test, p > 0.05 between every each DBGP group. Conclusions DBGP is correlated with breast cancer incidence and axillary lymph node metastasis and overall survival. Further investigations are required to determine the underlying mechanism of Duffy blood group phenotype

  14. Hypoxic conditions induce a cancer-like phenotype in human breast epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaapil, Marica; Helczynska, Karolina; Villadsen, René;

    2012-01-01

    Solid tumors are less oxygenated than their tissue of origin. Low intra-tumor oxygen levels are associated with worse outcome, increased metastatic potential and immature phenotype in breast cancer. We have reported that tumor hypoxia correlates to low differentiation status in breast cancer. Less...... is known about effects of hypoxia on non-malignant cells. Here we address whether hypoxia influences the differentiation stage of non-malignant breast epithelial cells and potentially have bearing on early stages of tumorigenesis....

  15. Epigenetic reversion of breast carcinoma phenotype is accompaniedby DNA sequestration

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    Sandal, Tone; Valyi-Nagy, Klara; Spencer, Virginia A.; Folberg,Robert; Bissell, Mina J.; Maniotis, Andrew J.

    2006-07-19

    The importance of microenvironment and context in regulation of tissue-specific genes is finally well established. DNA exposure to, or sequestration from, nucleases can be used to detect differences in higher order chromatin structure in intact cells without disturbing cellular or tissue architecture. To investigate the relationship between chromatin organization and tumor phenotype, we utilized an established 3-D assay where normal and malignant human breast cells can be easily distinguished by the morphology of the structures they make (acinus-like vs tumor-like, respectively). We show that these phenotypes can be distinguished also by sensitivity to AluI digestion where the malignant cells are resistant to digestion relative to non-malignant cells. Reversion of the T4-2 breast cancer cells by either cAMP analogs, or a phospatidylinositol 3-kinase (P13K) inhibitor not only reverted the phenotype, but also the chromatin sensitivity to AluI. By using different cAMP-analogs, we show that the cAMP-induced phenotypic reversion, polarization, and shift in DNA organization act through a cAMP-dependent-protein-kinase A-coupled signaling pathway. Importantly, inhibitory antibody to fibronectin also reverted the malignant phenotype, polarized the acini, and changed chromatin sequestration. These experiments show not only that modifying the tumor microenvironment can alter the organization of tumor cells but also that architecture of the tissues and the global chromatin organization are coupled and yet highly plastic.

  16. Disabling of the erbB Pathway Followed by IFN-γ Modifies Phenotype and Enhances Genotoxic Eradication of Breast Tumors

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    Yasuhiro Nagai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Reversion of the malignant phenotype of erbB2-transformed cells can be driven by anti-erbB2/neu monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, which disrupt the receptor’s kinase activity. We examined the biologic effects of IFN-γ alone or after anti-erbB2/neu mAb treatment of erbB2-positive cells. IFN-γ had no effect on its own. Treatment of the tumors with anti-erbB2/neu mAbs followed by IFN-γ led to dramatic inhibition of tumor growth in vitro and in vivo with minimal mAb dosing. Sequential therapy enhanced the effects of chemotherapy. Moreover, IFN-γ with mAb treatment of mice with IFNγR knockdown tumors did not demonstrate marked synergistic eradication effects, indicating an unexpected role of IFN-γ on the tumor itself. Additionally, mAb and IFN-γ treatment also induced immune host responses that enhanced tumor eradication. Biochemical analyses identified loss of Snail expression in tumor cells, reflecting diminution of tumor-stem-cell-like properties as a consequence of altered activity of GSK3-β and KLF molecules.

  17. The implications of breast cancer molecular phenotype for radiation oncology

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    ShirinSioshansi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The identification of distinct molecular subtypes of breast cancer has advanced the understanding and treatment of breast cancer by providing insight into prognosis, patterns of recurrence and effectiveness of therapy. The prognostic significance of molecular phenotype with regard to distant recurrences and overall survival are well established in the literature and has been readily incorporated into systemic therapy management decisions. However, despite the accumulating data suggesting similar prognostic significance for locoregional recurrence, integration of molecular phenotype into local management decision making has lagged. Although there are some conflicting reports, collectively the literature supports a low risk of local recurrence in the hormone receptor positive luminal subtypes compared to hormone receptor negative subtypes (triple negative and HER2-enriched. The development of targeted therapies, such as trastuzumab for the treatment of HER2-enriched subtype, has been shown to mitigate the increased risk of local recurrence. Unfortunately, no such remedy exists to address the increased risk of local recurrence for patients with triple negative tumors, making it a clinical challenge for radiation oncologists. In this review we discuss the correlation between molecular subtype and local recurrence following either breast conservation therapy or mastectomy. We also explore the possible mechanisms for increased local recurrence in triple negative breast cancer and radiotherapeutic implications for this population, such as the safety of breast conservation, consideration of dose escalation and the appropriateness of accelerated partial breast irradiation.

  18. S100 protein in breast tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Li, F; X Men; Zhang, W

    2014-01-01

    S100 protein is the largest subtribe in calcium binding protein family. According to recent researches, abnormal expression of S100 protein is often related to tumor, including breast tumor. Breast tumor is the most common malignant disease in female with high mortality mainly due to metastasis. Estimating early diagnostic and prognostic markers are helpful to conduct treatment for patients with breast cancer. Accumulating investigations focused on the role of S100 proteins in breast tumor de...

  19. Low penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with specific breast tumor subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Sherman, Mark E;

    2011-01-01

    were defined by five markers (ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, EGFR) and other pathological and clinical features. Analyses included up to 30 040 invasive breast cancer cases and 53 692 controls from 31 studies within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We confirmed previous reports of stronger associations......Breast cancers demonstrate substantial biological, clinical and etiological heterogeneity. We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes. Subtypes.......016): rs3803662 (16q12), rs889312 (5q11), rs3817198 (11p15) and rs13387042 (2q35); however, only two of them (16q12 and 2q35) were associated with tumors with the core basal phenotype (P ≤ 0.002). These analyses are consistent with different biological origins of breast cancers, and indicate that tumor...

  20. Human breast cancer cell lines contain stem-like cells that self-renew, give rise to phenotypically diverse progeny and survive chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Fillmore, Christine M.; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The phenotypic and functional differences between cells that initiate human breast tumors (cancer stem cells) and those that comprise the tumor bulk are difficult to study using only primary tumor tissue. We embarked on this study hypothesizing that breast cancer cell lines would contain analogous hierarchical differentiation programs to those found in primary breast tumors. Methods Eight human breast cell lines (human mammary epithelial cells, and MCF10A, MCF7, SUM149, SUM159, S...

  1. Ets2 in tumor fibroblasts promotes angiogenesis in breast cancer.

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    Julie A Wallace

    Full Text Available Tumor fibroblasts are active partners in tumor progression, but the genes and pathways that mediate this collaboration are ill-defined. Previous work demonstrates that Ets2 function in stromal cells significantly contributes to breast tumor progression. Conditional mouse models were used to study the function of Ets2 in both mammary stromal fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Conditional inactivation of Ets2 in stromal fibroblasts in PyMT and ErbB2 driven tumors significantly reduced tumor growth, however deletion of Ets2 in epithelial cells in the PyMT model had no significant effect. Analysis of gene expression in fibroblasts revealed a tumor- and Ets2-dependent gene signature that was enriched in genes important for ECM remodeling, cell migration, and angiogenesis in both PyMT and ErbB2 driven-tumors. Consistent with these results, PyMT and ErbB2 tumors lacking Ets2 in fibroblasts had fewer functional blood vessels, and Ets2 in fibroblasts elicited changes in gene expression in tumor endothelial cells consistent with this phenotype. An in vivo angiogenesis assay revealed the ability of Ets2 in fibroblasts to promote blood vessel formation in the absence of tumor cells. Importantly, the Ets2-dependent gene expression signatures from both mouse models were able to distinguish human breast tumor stroma from normal stroma, and correlated with patient outcomes in two whole tumor breast cancer data sets. The data reveals a key function for Ets2 in tumor fibroblasts in signaling to endothelial cells to promote tumor angiogenesis. The results highlight the collaborative networks that orchestrate communication between stromal cells and tumor cells, and suggest that targeting tumor fibroblasts may be an effective strategy for developing novel anti-angiogenic therapies.

  2. Ets2 in tumor fibroblasts promotes angiogenesis in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Julie A; Li, Fu; Balakrishnan, Subhasree; Cantemir-Stone, Carmen Z; Pecot, Thierry; Martin, Chelsea; Kladney, Raleigh D; Sharma, Sudarshana M; Trimboli, Anthony J; Fernandez, Soledad A; Yu, Lianbo; Rosol, Thomas J; Stromberg, Paul C; Lesurf, Robert; Hallett, Michael; Park, Morag; Leone, Gustavo; Ostrowski, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    Tumor fibroblasts are active partners in tumor progression, but the genes and pathways that mediate this collaboration are ill-defined. Previous work demonstrates that Ets2 function in stromal cells significantly contributes to breast tumor progression. Conditional mouse models were used to study the function of Ets2 in both mammary stromal fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Conditional inactivation of Ets2 in stromal fibroblasts in PyMT and ErbB2 driven tumors significantly reduced tumor growth, however deletion of Ets2 in epithelial cells in the PyMT model had no significant effect. Analysis of gene expression in fibroblasts revealed a tumor- and Ets2-dependent gene signature that was enriched in genes important for ECM remodeling, cell migration, and angiogenesis in both PyMT and ErbB2 driven-tumors. Consistent with these results, PyMT and ErbB2 tumors lacking Ets2 in fibroblasts had fewer functional blood vessels, and Ets2 in fibroblasts elicited changes in gene expression in tumor endothelial cells consistent with this phenotype. An in vivo angiogenesis assay revealed the ability of Ets2 in fibroblasts to promote blood vessel formation in the absence of tumor cells. Importantly, the Ets2-dependent gene expression signatures from both mouse models were able to distinguish human breast tumor stroma from normal stroma, and correlated with patient outcomes in two whole tumor breast cancer data sets. The data reveals a key function for Ets2 in tumor fibroblasts in signaling to endothelial cells to promote tumor angiogenesis. The results highlight the collaborative networks that orchestrate communication between stromal cells and tumor cells, and suggest that targeting tumor fibroblasts may be an effective strategy for developing novel anti-angiogenic therapies. PMID:23977064

  3. Inference of tumor evolution during chemotherapy by computational modeling and in situ analysis of genetic and phenotypic cellular diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almendro, Vanessa; Cheng, Yu-Kang; Randles, Amanda; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Marusyk, Andriy; Ametller, Elisabet; Gonzalez-Farre, Xavier; Muñoz, Montse; Russnes, Hege G; Helland, Aslaug; Rye, Inga H; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Maruyama, Reo; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Dowsett, Mitchell; Jones, Robin L; Reis-Filho, Jorge; Gascon, Pere; Gönen, Mithat; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-01-01

    Cancer therapy exerts a strong selection pressure that shapes tumor evolution, yet our knowledge of how tumors change during treatment is limited. Here, we report the analysis of cellular heterogeneity for genetic and phenotypic features and their spatial distribution in breast tumors pre- and post-

  4. Tumor and serum ferritin in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to assess whether serum ferritin may be considered as a tumoral marker in breast cancer, we have measured in 38 patients the contents of ferritin in the tumor and the pre- and postoperative ferritin concentrations in serum. The study of isoferritins by iso-electric focusing was also performed in tumor extracts and in the corresponding sera

  5. The Human Cell Surfaceome of Breast Tumors

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    Júlia Pinheiro Chagas da Cunha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cell surface proteins are ideal targets for cancer therapy and diagnosis. We have identified a set of more than 3700 genes that code for transmembrane proteins believed to be at human cell surface. Methods. We used a high-throuput qPCR system for the analysis of 573 cell surface protein-coding genes in 12 primary breast tumors, 8 breast cell lines, and 21 normal human tissues including breast. To better understand the role of these genes in breast tumors, we used a series of bioinformatics strategies to integrates different type, of the datasets, such as KEGG, protein-protein interaction databases, ONCOMINE, and data from, literature. Results. We found that at least 77 genes are overexpressed in breast primary tumors while at least 2 of them have also a restricted expression pattern in normal tissues. We found common signaling pathways that may be regulated in breast tumors through the overexpression of these cell surface protein-coding genes. Furthermore, a comparison was made between the genes found in this report and other genes associated with features clinically relevant for breast tumorigenesis. Conclusions. The expression profiling generated in this study, together with an integrative bioinformatics analysis, allowed us to identify putative targets for breast tumors.

  6. Cancer-Associated Adipocytes Exhibit an ActivatedPhenotype and Contribute to Breast Cancer Invasion

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Early local tumor invasion in breast cancer results in a likely encounter between cancer cells and matureadipocytes, but the role of these fat cells in tumor progression remains unclear. We show that murine and humantumor cells cocultivated with mature adipocytes exhibit increased invasive capacities in vitro and in vivo, usingan original two-dimensional coculture system. Likewise, adipocytes cultivated with cancer cells also exhibit analtered phenotype in terms of delipidation and decreased ...

  7. Laminin isoform expression in breast tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Holler, Eggehard

    2005-01-01

    Certain laminins of vascular basement membranes have been identified in human breast tumors and brain gliomas that share the same β1 chain. These laminins are new carcinoma angiogenic markers and might represent potential targets for antiangiogenic therapy.

  8. Genomic tumor evolution of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Fumiaki; Saji, Shigehira; Toi, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    Owing to recent technical development of comprehensive genome-wide analysis such as next generation sequencing, deep biological insights of breast cancer have been revealed. Information of genomic mutations and rearrangements in patients' tumors is indispensable to understand the mechanism in carcinogenesis, progression, metastasis, and resistance to systemic treatment of breast cancer. To date, comprehensive genomic analyses illustrate not only base substitution patterns and lists of driver mutations and key rearrangements, but also a manner of tumor evolution. Breast cancer genome is dynamically changing and evolving during cancer development course from non-invasive disease via invasive primary tumor to metastatic tumor, and during treatment exposure. The accumulation pattern of base substitution and genomic rearrangement looks gradual and punctuated, respectively, in analogy with contrasting theories for evolution manner of species, Darwin's phyletic gradualism, and Eldredge and Gould's "punctuated equilibrium". Liquid biopsy is a non-invasive method to detect the genomic evolution of breast cancer. Genomic mutation patterns in circulating tumor cells and circulating cell-free tumor DNA represent those of tumors existing in patient body. Liquid biopsy methods are now under development for future application to clinical practice of cancer treatment. In this article, latest knowledge regarding breast cancer genome, especially in terms of 'tumor evolution', is summarized. PMID:25998191

  9. SU-E-J-248: Contributions of Tumor and Stroma Phenotyping in Computer-Aided Diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H; Lan, L; Sennett, C; Giger, M [Univ Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To gain insight into the role of parenchyma stroma in the characterization of breast tumors by incorporating computerized mammographic parenchyma assessment into breast CADx in the task of distinguishing between malignant and benign lesions. Methods: This study was performed on 182 biopsy-proven breast mass lesions, including 76 benign and 106 malignant lesions. For each full-field digital mammogram (FFDM) case, our quantitative imaging analysis was performed on both the tumor and a region-of-interest (ROI) from the normal contralateral breast. The lesion characterization includes automatic lesion segmentation and feature extraction. Radiographic texture analysis (RTA) was applied on the normal ROIs to assess the mammographic parenchymal patterns of these contralateral normal breasts. Classification performance of both individual computer extracted features and the output from a Bayesian artificial neural network (BANN) were evaluated with a leave-one-lesion-out method using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis with area under the curve (AUC) as the figure of merit. Results: Lesion characterization included computer-extracted phenotypes of spiculation, size, shape, and margin. For parenchymal pattern characterization, five texture features were selected, including power law beta, contrast, and edge gradient. Merging of these computer-selected features using BANN classifiers yielded AUC values of 0.79 (SE=0.03) and 0.67 (SE=0.04) in the task of distinguishing between malignant and benign lesions using only tumor phenotypes and texture features from the contralateral breasts, respectively. Incorporation of tumor phenotypes with parenchyma texture features into the BANN yielded improved classification performance with an AUC value of 0.83 (SE=0.03) in the task of differentiating malignant from benign lesions. Conclusion: Combining computerized tumor and parenchyma phenotyping was found to significantly improve breast cancer diagnostic accuracy

  10. SU-E-J-248: Contributions of Tumor and Stroma Phenotyping in Computer-Aided Diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To gain insight into the role of parenchyma stroma in the characterization of breast tumors by incorporating computerized mammographic parenchyma assessment into breast CADx in the task of distinguishing between malignant and benign lesions. Methods: This study was performed on 182 biopsy-proven breast mass lesions, including 76 benign and 106 malignant lesions. For each full-field digital mammogram (FFDM) case, our quantitative imaging analysis was performed on both the tumor and a region-of-interest (ROI) from the normal contralateral breast. The lesion characterization includes automatic lesion segmentation and feature extraction. Radiographic texture analysis (RTA) was applied on the normal ROIs to assess the mammographic parenchymal patterns of these contralateral normal breasts. Classification performance of both individual computer extracted features and the output from a Bayesian artificial neural network (BANN) were evaluated with a leave-one-lesion-out method using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis with area under the curve (AUC) as the figure of merit. Results: Lesion characterization included computer-extracted phenotypes of spiculation, size, shape, and margin. For parenchymal pattern characterization, five texture features were selected, including power law beta, contrast, and edge gradient. Merging of these computer-selected features using BANN classifiers yielded AUC values of 0.79 (SE=0.03) and 0.67 (SE=0.04) in the task of distinguishing between malignant and benign lesions using only tumor phenotypes and texture features from the contralateral breasts, respectively. Incorporation of tumor phenotypes with parenchyma texture features into the BANN yielded improved classification performance with an AUC value of 0.83 (SE=0.03) in the task of differentiating malignant from benign lesions. Conclusion: Combining computerized tumor and parenchyma phenotyping was found to significantly improve breast cancer diagnostic accuracy

  11. Inference of tumor evolution during chemotherapy by computational modeling and in situ analysis of genetic and phenotypic cellular diversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer therapy exerts a strong selection pressure that shapes tumor evolution, yet our knowledge of how tumors change during treatment is limited. Here, we report the analysis of cellular heterogeneity for genetic and phenotypic features and their spatial distribution in breast tumors pre- and post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We found that intratumor genetic diversity was tumor-subtype specific, and it did not change during treatment in tumors with partial or no response. However, lower pretreatment genetic diversity was significantly associated with pathologic complete response. In contrast, phenotypic diversity was different between pre- and post-treatment samples. We also observed significant changes in the spatial distribution of cells with distinct genetic and phenotypic features. We used these experimental data to develop a stochastic computational model to infer tumor growth patterns and evolutionary dynamics. Our results highlight the importance of integrated analysis of genotypes and phenotypes of single cells in intact tissues to predict tumor evolution

  12. Heritable clustering and pathway discovery in breast cancer integrating epigenetic and phenotypic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potter Dustin

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to recapitulate tumor progression pathways using epigenetic data, we developed novel clustering and pathway reconstruction algorithms, collectively referred to as heritable clustering. This approach generates a progression model of altered DNA methylation from tumor tissues diagnosed at different developmental stages. The samples act as surrogates for natural progression in breast cancer and allow the algorithm to uncover distinct epigenotypes that describe the molecular events underlying this process. Furthermore, our likelihood-based clustering algorithm has great flexibility, allowing for incomplete epigenotype or clinical phenotype data and also permitting dependencies among variables. Results Using this heritable clustering approach, we analyzed methylation data obtained from 86 primary breast cancers to recapitulate pathways of breast tumor progression. Detailed annotation and interpretation are provided to the optimal pathway recapitulated. The result confirms the previous observation that aggressive tumors tend to exhibit higher levels of promoter hypermethylation. Conclusion Our results indicate that the proposed heritable clustering algorithms are a useful tool for stratifying both methylation and clinical variables of breast cancer. The application to the breast tumor data illustrates that this approach can select meaningful progression models which may aid the interpretation of pathways having biological and clinical significance. Furthermore, the framework allows for other types of biological data, such as microarray gene expression or array CGH data, to be integrated.

  13. Genotyping and Phenotyping of Male Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kornegoor, R.

    2012-01-01

    Male breast cancer is a rare disease and most of the knowledge has been extrapolated from females, although these entities are likely different. A better understanding of male breast carcinogenesis is crucial for developing novel targets suitable for personalized treatment. A major problem in studyi

  14. Three-dimensional in vitro co-culture model of breast tumor using magnetic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaganathan, Hamsa; Gage, Jacob; Leonard, Fransisca; Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi; Souza, Glauco R; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Godin, Biana

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigate a novel in vitro model to mimic heterogeneous breast tumors without the use of a scaffold while allowing for cell-cell and tumor-fibroblast interactions. Previous studies have shown that magnetic levitation system under conventional culturing conditions results in the formation of three-dimensional (3D) structures, closely resembling in vivo tissues (fat tissue, vasculature, etc.). Three-dimensional heterogeneous tumor models for breast cancer were designed to effectively model the influences of the tumor microenvironment on drug efficiency. Various breast cancer cells were co-cultured with fibroblasts and then magnetically levitated. Size and cell density of the resulting tumors were measured. The model was phenotypically compared to in vivo tumors and examined for the presence of ECM proteins. Lastly, the effects of tumor stroma in the 3D in vitro model on drug transport and efficiency were assessed. Our data suggest that the proposed 3D in vitro breast tumor is advantageous due to the ability to: (1) form large-sized (millimeter in diameter) breast tumor models within 24 h; (2) control tumor cell composition and density; (3) accurately mimic the in vivo tumor microenvironment; and (4) test drug efficiency in an in vitro model that is comparable to in vivo tumors. PMID:25270048

  15. Phenotype-dependent effects of EpCAM expression on growth and invasion of human breast cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) has been shown to be overexpressed in breast cancer and stem cells and has emerged as an attractive target for immunotherapy of breast cancer patients. This study analyzes the effects of EpCAM on breast cancer cell lines with epithelial or mesenchymal phenotype. For this purpose, shRNA-mediated knockdown of EpCAM gene expression was performed in EpCAMhigh breast cancer cell lines with epithelial phenotype (MCF-7, T47D and SkBR3). Moreover, EpCAMlow breast carcinoma cell lines with mesenchymal phenotype (MDA-MB-231, Hs578t) and inducible overexpression of EpCAM were used to study effects on proliferation, migration and in vivo growth. In comparison to non-specific silencing controls (n/s-crtl) knockdown of EpCAM (E#2) in EpCAMhigh cell lines resulted in reduced cell proliferation under serum-reduced culture conditions. Moreover, DNA synthesis under 3D culture conditions in collagen was significantly reduced. Xenografts of MCF-7 and T47D cells with knockdown of EpCAM formed smaller tumors that were less invasive. EpCAMlow cell lines with tetracycline-inducible overexpression of EpCAM showed no increased cell proliferation or migration under serum-reduced growth conditions. MDA-MB-231 xenografts with EpCAM overexpression showed reduced invasion into host tissue and more infiltrates of chicken granulocytes. The role of EpCAM in breast cancer strongly depends on the epithelial or mesenchymal phenotype of tumor cells. Cancer cells with epithelial phenotype need EpCAM as a growth- and invasion-promoting factor, whereas tumor cells with a mesenchymal phenotype are independent of EpCAM in invasion processes and tumor progression. These findings might have clinical implications for EpCAM-based targeting strategies in patients with invasive breast cancer

  16. AZU-1: A Candidate Breast Tumor Suppressor and Biomarker for Tumor Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Schmeichel, Karen L; Mian, I. Saira; Lelie`vre, Sophie; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2000-02-04

    To identify genes misregulated in the final stages of breast carcinogenesis, we performed differential display to compare the gene expression patterns of the human tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells, HMT-3522-T4-2, with those of their immediate premalignant progenitors, HMT-3522-S2. We identified a novel gene, called anti-zuai-1 (AZU-1), that was abundantly expressed in non- and premalignant cells and tissues but was appreciably reduced in breast tumor cell types and in primary tumors. The AZU-1 gene encodes an acidic 571-amino-acid protein containing at least two structurally distinct domains with potential protein-binding functions: an N-terminal serine and proline-rich domain with a predicted immunoglobulin-like fold and a C-terminal coiled-coil domain. In HMT-3522 cells, the bulk of AZU-1 protein resided in a detergent-extractable cytoplasmic pool and was present at much lower levels in tumorigenic T4-2 cells than in their nonmalignant counterparts. Reversion of the tumorigenic phenotype of T4-2 cells, by means described previously, was accompanied by the up-regulation of AZU-1. In addition, reexpression of AZU-1 in T4-2 cells, using viral vectors, was sufficient to reduce their malignant phenotype substantially, both in culture and in vivo. These results indicate that AZU-1 is a candidate breast tumor suppressor that may exert its effects by promoting correct tissue morphogenesis.

  17. Low penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with specific breast tumor subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Sherman, Mark E;

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancers demonstrate substantial biological, clinical and etiological heterogeneity. We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes. Subtype...

  18. Phyllode tumor of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinically variable course of phyllode tumor with its complex histological picture -ranging from benign to malignant- poses problems for the preoperative diagnosis and, in particular, the therapeutic approach. Mammograms of 99 patients with this disease, observed and treated from 1975-1989, were reviewed to determine mammographic histologic correlations useful for early diagnosis. Opacity, size, shape, margin characteristics, the presence of calcifications and radiolucent halo were determined from the mammograms. The most useful characteristics were opacity and the character of the tumor's margins. However, mammographic features alone could not distinguish phyllode tumor from fibroadenoma. (author). 12 refs.; 2 figs.; 3 tabs

  19. Primary Neuroendocrine Tumor of the Breast: Imaging Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Eun Deok [Department of Clinical Pathology, Uijeongbu St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Uijeongbu 480-717 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Kyun [Department of Radiology, Uijeongbu St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Uijeongbu 480-717 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Soo [Department of Surgery, Uijeongbu St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Uijeongbu 480-717 (Korea, Republic of); Whang, In Yong [Department of Radiology, Uijeongbu St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Uijeongbu 480-717 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Focal neuroendocrine differentiation can be found in diverse histological types of breast tumors. However, the term, neuroendocrine breast tumor, indicates the diffuse expression of neuroendocrine markers in more than 50% of the tumor cell population. The imaging features of neuroendocrine breast tumor have not been accurately described due to extreme rarity of this tumor type. We present a case of a pathologically confirmed, primary neuroendocrine breast tumor in a 42-year-old woman, with imaging findings difficult to be differentiated from that of invasive ductal carcinoma.

  20. Prevalence of papillomaviruses, polyomaviruses, and herpesviruses in triple-negative and inflammatory breast tumors from algeria compared with other types of breast cancer tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilys Corbex

    Full Text Available The possible role of viruses in breast cancer etiology remains an unresolved question. We hypothesized that if some viruses are involved, it may be in a subgroup of breast cancers only. Epidemiological arguments drove our interest in breast cancer subgroups that are more frequent in Africa, namely inflammatory breast cancer (IBC and triple-negative breast cancer. We tested whether viral prevalence was significantly higher in these subgroups.One hundred fifty-five paraffin-embedded malignant breast tumors were randomly selected at the pathology laboratory of the University Hospital of Annaba (Algeria to include one third of IBC and two thirds of non-IBC. They were tested for the presence of DNA from 61 viral agents (46 human papillomaviruses, 10 polyomaviruses, and 5 herpesviruses using type-specific multiplex genotyping assays, which combine multiplex PCR and bead-based Luminex technology.Viral DNA was found in 22 (17.9% of 123 tumors. The most prevalent viruses were EBV1 and HPV16. IBC tumors carried significantly more viruses (any type than non-IBC tumors (30% vs. 13%, p<0.04. Similarly, triple-negative tumors displayed higher virus-positivity than non-triple-negative tumors (44% vs. 14%, p<0.009.Our results suggest an association between the presence of viral DNA and aggressive breast cancer phenotypes (IBC, triple-negative. While preliminary, they underline the importance of focusing on subgroups when studying viral etiology in breast cancer. Further studies on viruses in breast cancer should be conducted in much larger samples to confirm these initial findings.

  1. The Role and Clinical Relevance of Disseminated Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banys, Malgorzata, E-mail: maggybanys@yahoo.de [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf D-40225 (Germany); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Marienkrankenhaus Hamburg, Hamburg D-22087 (Germany); Krawczyk, Natalia; Fehm, Tanja [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf D-40225 (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    Tumor cell dissemination is a common phenomenon observed in most cancers of epithelial origin. One-third of breast cancer patients present with disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in bone marrow at time of diagnosis; these patients, as well as patients with persistent DTCs, have significantly worse clinical outcome than DTC-negative patients. Since DTC phenotype may differ from the primary tumor with regard to ER and HER2 status, reevaluation of predictive markers on DTCs may optimize treatment choices. In the present review, we report on the clinical relevance of DTC detection in breast cancer.

  2. The Role and Clinical Relevance of Disseminated Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Banys

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cell dissemination is a common phenomenon observed in most cancers of epithelial origin. One-third of breast cancer patients present with disseminated tumor cells (DTCs in bone marrow at time of diagnosis; these patients, as well as patients with persistent DTCs, have significantly worse clinical outcome than DTC-negative patients. Since DTC phenotype may differ from the primary tumor with regard to ER and HER2 status, reevaluation of predictive markers on DTCs may optimize treatment choices. In the present review, we report on the clinical relevance of DTC detection in breast cancer.

  3. Choice of treatment and diagnostic tactics at nonpalpable breast tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. P. Kulikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of inspection, treatment and dynamic supervision of 166 patients with nonpalpable breast tumors are presented. Distribution of tumors on BI-RADS system is given. Possibilities of a mammography and ultrasonography in diagnostics of a preclinical breast cancer are shown. Practical recommendations about a choice of an optimum way of presurgical verification of nonpalpable tumors are offered. Indications for surgical treat- ment and dynamic supervision are specified at nonpalpable breast tumors.

  4. Ewing’s sarcoma: an uncommon breast tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawsen Meddeb

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ewing’s sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumors (EWS/PNET are rare malignant and aggressive tumors, usually seen in the trunk and lower limbs of children and young adults. They are uncommon in the breast. We report a case of a 43-year-old woman who developed a painless breast mass. An initial core needle biopsy concluded to a fibrocystic dystrophy contrasting with a rapidly growing mass; thus a large lumpectomy was done. Diagnosis of primary PNET of the breast was established, based on both histopathological examination and immunohistochemical findings. Surgical margins were positive, therefore, left modified radical mastectomy with axillary lymph nodes dissection was performed. The patient was given 6 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy containing cyclophosphamide, adriamycin and vincristine. Twenty months later, she is in life without recurrence or metastasis. EWS/PNET may impose a diagnostic challenge. Indeed, mammography and ultrasonography features are non specific. The histopathological pattern is variable depending on the degree of neuroectodermal differentiation. Immuno-phenotyping is necessary and genetic study is the only confirmatory tool of diagnosis showing a characteristic cytogenetic anomaly; t (11; 22 translocation.

  5. HSET overexpression fuels tumor progression via centrosome clustering-independent mechanisms in breast cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Pannu, Vaishali; Rida, Padmashree C. G.; Ogden, Angela; Turaga, Ravi Chakra; Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; Bowen, Nathan J.; Rudd, Katie; Gupta, Meenakshi V.; Reid, Michelle D.; Cantuaria, Guilherme; Walczak, Claire E.; Aneja, Ritu

    2015-01-01

    Human breast tumors harbor supernumerary centrosomes in almost 80% of tumor cells. Although amplified centrosomes compromise cell viability via multipolar spindles resulting in death-inducing aneuploidy, cancer cells tend to cluster extra centrosomes during mitosis. As a result cancer cells display bipolar spindle phenotypes to maintain a tolerable level of aneuploidy, an edge to their survival. HSET/KifC1, a kinesin-like minus-end directed microtubule motor has recently found fame as a cruci...

  6. Coexistence of Granular Cell Tumor and Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer in Contralateral Breasts: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Di Bonito

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Granular cell tumor (GCT is a benign tumor of the breast that can mimic, on breast imaging, invasive carcinomas. Biological evolution of mammary GCT is unknown, especially if it is associated with an invasive carcinoma in the same or contralateral breast. This report details the morphological features of these synchronous lesions highlighting their biological characteristics and suggesting an appropriate follow up.

  7. Impact of tumor chronology and tumor biology on lymph node metastasis in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Smeets, Ann; Ryckx, Andries; Belmans, Ann; Wildiers, Hans; Neven, Patrick; Floris, Giuseppe; Schöffski, Patrick; Christiaens, Marie-Rose

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis The significance of nodal metastasis in breast cancer is under discussion. We investigated the impact of variables of tumor chronology and tumor biology on the presence of lymph node metastases. Purpose Lymph node involvement is the main prognostic factor in breast cancer. However, it is under discussion whether nodal metastasis in breast cancer only reflects the chronological age of the tumor or whether it is also a marker of tumor biology. The goal of our study was to investigate t...

  8. Tumoral pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieman, Stephanie M; Landercasper, Jeffrey; Johnson, Jeanne M; Ellis, Richard L; Wester, Susan M; Lambert, Pamela J; Ross, Lauren A

    2008-12-01

    Tumoral pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) is a rare benign proliferative disease of the breast. The majority of the literature reports of PASH have not contained detailed descriptions of the imaging characteristics of PASH. A 10-year retrospective study of patients with tumoral PASH and a 20-year Ovid MEDLINE search were performed to determine whether specific imaging and needle biopsy results could characterize PASH preoperatively. We identified 22 patients with tumoral PASH. Seventeen (77%) of 22 women had a palpable lump and 14 (72%) of 21 had a density on mammography. Ultrasound (US) findings included mixed or hypoechoic echogenicity in 83 per cent and ill-defined borders in 62 per cent. Eight (36%) patients had lesions with a Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) classification of 4 or 5. The sensitivity of preoperative core needle biopsy (CNB) to identify PASH was 83 per cent. A review of the literature revealed that 90 per cent of patients with PASH had some malignant imaging characteristics and 95 per cent had a mass on mammography. The imaging characteristics of PASH exhibited marked variability. Excision of PASH after CNB may be considered for patients with symptoms, enlarging lesions, or lesions classified as BI-RADS 4 or 5. PASH diagnosed by CNB allows selected patients to avoid excision. PMID:19097540

  9. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging of Tumor Metabolic Markers for Cancer Diagnosis, Metabolic Phenotyping, and Characterization of Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuhong He

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells display heterogeneous genetic characteristics, depending on the tumor dynamic microenvironment. Abnormal tumor vasculature and poor tissue oxygenation generate a fraction of hypoxic tumor cells that have selective advantages in metastasis and invasion and often resist chemo- and radiation therapies. The genetic alterations acquired by tumors modify their biochemical pathways, which results in abnormal tumor metabolism. An elevation in glycolysis known as the “Warburg effect” and changes in lipid synthesis and oxidation occur. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS has been used to study tumor metabolism in preclinical animal models and in clinical research on human breast, brain, and prostate cancers. This technique can identify specific genetic and metabolic changes that occur in malignant tumors. Therefore, the metabolic markers, detectable by MRS, not only provide information on biochemical changes but also define different metabolic tumor phenotypes. When combined with the contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, which has a high sensitivity for cancer diagnosis, in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI improves the diagnostic specificity of malignant human cancers and is becoming an important clinical tool for cancer management and care. This article reviews the MRSI techniques as molecular imaging methods to detect and quantify metabolic changes in various tumor tissue types, especially in extracranial tumor tissues that contain high concentrations of fat. MRI/MRSI methods have been used to characterize tumor microenvironments in terms of blood volume and vessel permeability. Measurements of tissue oxygenation and glycolytic rates by MRS also are described to illustrate the capability of the MR technology in probing molecular information non-invasively in tumor tissues and its important potential for studying molecular mechanisms of human cancers in physiological conditions.

  10. Quantitative molecular phenotyping with topically applied SERS nanoparticles for intraoperative guidance of breast cancer lumpectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Kang, Soyoung; Khan, Altaz; Ruttner, Gabriel; Leigh, Steven Y.; Murray, Melissa; Abeytunge, Sanjee; Peterson, Gary; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Dintzis, Suzanne; Javid, Sara; Liu, Jonathan T. C.

    2016-02-01

    There is a need to image excised tissues during tumor-resection procedures in order to identify residual tumors at the margins and to guide their complete removal. The imaging of dysregulated cell-surface receptors is a potential means of identifying the presence of diseases with high sensitivity and specificity. However, due to heterogeneities in the expression of protein biomarkers in tumors, molecular-imaging technologies should ideally be capable of visualizing a multiplexed panel of cancer biomarkers. Here, we demonstrate that the topical application and quantification of a multiplexed cocktail of receptor-targeted surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles (NPs) enables rapid quantitative molecular phenotyping (QMP) of the surface of freshly excised tissues to determine the presence of disease. In order to mitigate the ambiguity due to nonspecific sources of contrast such as off-target binding or uneven delivery, a ratiometric method is employed to quantify the specific vs. nonspecific binding of the multiplexed NPs. Validation experiments with human tumor cell lines, fresh human tumor xenografts in mice, and fresh human breast specimens demonstrate that QMP imaging of excised tissues agrees with flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, and that this technique may be achieved in less than 15 minutes for potential intraoperative use in guiding breast-conserving surgeries.

  11. Simulation of avascular tumor growth by agent-based game model involving phenotype-phenotype interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Wang, Hengtong; Zhang, Jiangang; Chen, Ke; Li, Yumin

    2015-01-01

    All tumors, both benign and metastatic, undergo an avascular growth stage with nutrients supplied by the surrounding tissue. This avascular growth process is much easier to carry out in more qualitative and quantitative experiments starting from tumor spheroids in vitro with reliable reproducibility. Essentially, this tumor progression would be described as a sequence of phenotypes. Using agent-based simulation in a two-dimensional spatial lattice, we constructed a composite growth model in which the phenotypic behavior of tumor cells depends on not only the local nutrient concentration and cell count but also the game among cells. Our simulation results demonstrated that in silico tumors are qualitatively similar to those observed in tumor spheroid experiments. We also found that the payoffs in the game between two living cell phenotypes can influence the growth velocity and surface roughness of tumors at the same time. Finally, this current model is flexible and can be easily extended to discuss other situations, such as environmental heterogeneity and mutation. PMID:26648395

  12. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of breast tumors: analysis of 604 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the diagnostic value of ultrasound examination in breast tumors. Methods: The ultrasonography and pathological results of 604 patients with breast tumors were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The ultrasonographic diagnosis was correct in 512/604 (84.8%) with 94.1% (80/85) accuracy in cysts, 92.2% (141/153), and 72.3% (73/101) in intraductal papilloma. The overall diagnostic accuracy of malignant and benign tumors was 80.3% and 85.9%, respectively. 25 malignancies was misdiagnosed as benign with features of ill-defined boundary, low level echo, lack of blood supply or calcification. Conclusion: Ultrasonographic diagnosis more accurate in benign breast tumors. Main reasons for misdiagnosis included atypical features of some breast tumors, insufficient knowledge of ultrasonic appearances of rare breast tumors; lack of correlation with clinical findings, and unfamiliarity with the imaging parameters. (authors)

  13. Genomic agonism and phenotypic antagonism between estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Hari; Greene, Marianne E; Tarulli, Gerard; Zarnke, Allison L; Bourgo, Ryan J; Laine, Muriel; Chang, Ya-Fang; Ma, Shihong; Dembo, Anna G; Raj, Ganesh V; Hickey, Theresa E; Tilley, Wayne D; Greene, Geoffrey L

    2016-06-01

    The functional role of progesterone receptor (PR) and its impact on estrogen signaling in breast cancer remain controversial. In primary ER(+) (estrogen receptor-positive)/PR(+) human tumors, we report that PR reprograms estrogen signaling as a genomic agonist and a phenotypic antagonist. In isolation, estrogen and progestin act as genomic agonists by regulating the expression of common target genes in similar directions, but at different levels. Similarly, in isolation, progestin is also a weak phenotypic agonist of estrogen action. However, in the presence of both hormones, progestin behaves as a phenotypic estrogen antagonist. PR remodels nucleosomes to noncompetitively redirect ER genomic binding to distal enhancers enriched for BRCA1 binding motifs and sites that link PR and ER/PR complexes. When both hormones are present, progestin modulates estrogen action, such that responsive transcriptomes, cellular processes, and ER/PR recruitment to genomic sites correlate with those observed with PR alone, but not ER alone. Despite this overall correlation, the transcriptome patterns modulated by dual treatment are sufficiently different from individual treatments, such that antagonism of oncogenic processes is both predicted and observed. Combination therapies using the selective PR modulator/antagonist (SPRM) CDB4124 in combination with tamoxifen elicited 70% cytotoxic tumor regression of T47D tumor xenografts, whereas individual therapies inhibited tumor growth without net regression. Our findings demonstrate that PR redirects ER chromatin binding to antagonize estrogen signaling and that SPRMs can potentiate responses to antiestrogens, suggesting that cotargeting of ER and PR in ER(+)/PR(+) breast cancers should be explored. PMID:27386569

  14. ADP ribosylation factor like 2 (Arl2 regulates breast tumor aggressivity in immunodeficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Beghin

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that ADP ribosylation factor like 2 (Arl2, a small GTPase, content influences microtubule dynamics and cell cycle distribution in breast tumor cells, as well as the degree and distribution of phosphorylated P53. Here we show, in two different human breast adenocarcinoma models, that Arl2 content has a major impact on breast tumor cell aggressivity both in vitro and in vivo. Cells with reduced content of Arl2 displayed reduced contact inhibition, increased clonogenic or cluster formation as well as a proliferative advantage over control cells in an in vitro competition assay. These cells also caused larger tumors in SCID mice, a phenotype which was mimicked by the in vivo administration of siRNA directed against Arl2. Cells with increased Arl2 content displayed reduced aggressivity, both in vitro and in vivo, with enhanced necrosis and were also found to contain increased PP2A phosphatase activity. A rt-PCR analysis of fresh human tumor breast samples suggested that low Arl2 expression was associated with larger tumor size and greater risk of lymph node involvement at diagnosis. These data underline the role of Arl2, a small GTPase, as an important regulator of breast tumor cell aggressivity, both in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Primary extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor of breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Smita; Arora, Jyoti; Parakh, Anushri; Goel, Ruchika Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma (EES) is a rare soft tissue tumor that is morphologically indistinguishable from skeletal ES. We report a case of a 25-year-old female with recurrent EES/primitive neuroectodermal tumor of right breast with imaging findings on mammogram, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging breast, and positron emission tomography–computed tomography.

  16. Radioisotope-thermographic studies in patients with breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper provides an analysis of the results of concomitant radioisotope-thermographic studies of 152 patients with malignant and benign breast tumors. The efficacy of concomitant radioisotope- thermographic studies in breast tumor diagnosis was evaluated. The efficacy of chemo- and radiotherapy was also evaluated

  17. Dose determination in breast tumor in brachytherapy using Iridium-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermoluminescent dosimetry studies in vivo and in vitro aiming to determing radiation dose in the breast tumor, in brachytherapy using Iridium-192 was done. The correlation between radiation doses in tumor and external surface of the breast was investigated for correcting the time interval of radiation source implantation. (author)

  18. Molecular Markers for Breast Cancer: Prediction on Tumor Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Bruna Karina Banin Hirata; Julie Massayo Maeda Oda; Roberta Losi Guembarovski; Carolina Batista Ariza; Carlos Eduardo Coral de Oliveira; Maria Angelica Ehara Watanabe

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers with greater than 1,300,000 cases and 450,000 deaths each year worldwide. The development of breast cancer involves a progression through intermediate stages until the invasive carcinoma and finally into metastatic disease. Given the variability in clinical progression, the identification of markers that could predict the tumor behavior is particularly important in breast cancer. The determination of tumor markers is a useful tool for clinical m...

  19. Chemotherapy of WAP-T mouse mammary carcinomas aggravates tumor phenotype and enhances tumor cell dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannasch, Katharina; Wegwitz, Florian; Lenfert, Eva; Maenz, Claudia; Deppert, Wolfgang; Alves, Frauke

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the effects of the standard chemotherapy, cyclophosphamide/adriamycin/5-fluorouracil (CAF) on tumor growth, dissemination and recurrence after orthotopic implantation of murine G-2 cells were analyzed in the syngeneic immunocompetent whey acidic protein-T mouse model (Wegwitz et al., PLoS One 2010; 5:e12103; Schulze-Garg et al., Oncogene 2000; 19:1028-37). Single-dose CAF treatment reduced tumor size significantly, but was not able to eradicate all tumor cells, as recurrent tumor growth was observed 4 weeks after CAF treatment. Nine days after CAF treatment, residual tumors showed features of regressive alterations and were composed of mesenchymal-like tumor cells, infiltrating immune cells and some tumor-associated fibroblasts with an intense deposition of collagen. Recurrent tumors were characterized by coagulative necrosis and less tumor cell differentiation compared with untreated tumors, suggesting a more aggressive tumor phenotype. In support, tumor cell dissemination was strongly enhanced in mice that had developed recurrent tumors in comparison with untreated controls, although only few disseminated tumor cells could be detected in various organs 9 days after CAF application. In vitro experiments revealed that CAF treatment of G-2 cells eliminates the vast majority of epithelial tumor cells, whereas tumor cells with a mesenchymal phenotype survive. These results together with the in vivo findings suggest that tumor cells that underwent epithelial-mesenchymal transition and/or exhibit stem-cell-like properties are difficult to eliminate using one round of CAF chemotherapy. The model system described here provides a valuable tool for the characterization of the effects of chemotherapeutic regimens on recurrent tumor growth and on tumor cell dissemination, thereby enabling the development and preclinical evaluation of novel therapeutic strategies to target mammary carcinomas. PMID:25449528

  20. The Potential Role of Hedgehog Signaling in the Luminal/Basal Phenotype of Breast Epithelia and in Breast Cancer Invasion and Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flemban, Arwa [Department of Biological, Biomedical and Analytical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, University of West of England, Bristol BS16 1QY (United Kingdom); Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah 24382 (Saudi Arabia); Qualtrough, David, E-mail: david.qualtrough@uwe.ac.uk [Department of Biological, Biomedical and Analytical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, University of West of England, Bristol BS16 1QY (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-16

    The epithelium of the lactiferous ducts in the breast is comprised of luminal epithelial cells and underlying basal myoepithelial cells. The regulation of cell fate and transit of cells between these two cell types remains poorly understood. This relationship becomes of greater importance when studying the subtypes of epithelial breast carcinoma, which are categorized according to their expression of luminal or basal markers. The epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a pivotal event in tumor invasion. It is important to understand mechanisms that regulate this process, which bears relation to the normal dynamic of epithelial/basal phenotype regulation in the mammary gland. Understanding this process could provide answers for the regulation of EMT in breast cancer, and thereby identify potential targets for therapy. Evidence points towards a role for hedgehog signaling in breast tissue homeostasis and also in mammary neoplasia. This review examines our current understanding of role of the hedgehog-signaling (Hh) pathway in breast epithelial cells both during breast development and homeostasis and to assess the potential misappropriation of Hh signals in breast neoplasia, cancer stem cells and tumor metastasis via EMT.

  1. The Potential Role of Hedgehog Signaling in the Luminal/Basal Phenotype of Breast Epithelia and in Breast Cancer Invasion and Metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The epithelium of the lactiferous ducts in the breast is comprised of luminal epithelial cells and underlying basal myoepithelial cells. The regulation of cell fate and transit of cells between these two cell types remains poorly understood. This relationship becomes of greater importance when studying the subtypes of epithelial breast carcinoma, which are categorized according to their expression of luminal or basal markers. The epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a pivotal event in tumor invasion. It is important to understand mechanisms that regulate this process, which bears relation to the normal dynamic of epithelial/basal phenotype regulation in the mammary gland. Understanding this process could provide answers for the regulation of EMT in breast cancer, and thereby identify potential targets for therapy. Evidence points towards a role for hedgehog signaling in breast tissue homeostasis and also in mammary neoplasia. This review examines our current understanding of role of the hedgehog-signaling (Hh) pathway in breast epithelial cells both during breast development and homeostasis and to assess the potential misappropriation of Hh signals in breast neoplasia, cancer stem cells and tumor metastasis via EMT

  2. The Potential Role of Hedgehog Signaling in the Luminal/Basal Phenotype of Breast Epithelia and in Breast Cancer Invasion and Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arwa Flemban

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The epithelium of the lactiferous ducts in the breast is comprised of luminal epithelial cells and underlying basal myoepithelial cells. The regulation of cell fate and transit of cells between these two cell types remains poorly understood. This relationship becomes of greater importance when studying the subtypes of epithelial breast carcinoma, which are categorized according to their expression of luminal or basal markers. The epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT is a pivotal event in tumor invasion. It is important to understand mechanisms that regulate this process, which bears relation to the normal dynamic of epithelial/basal phenotype regulation in the mammary gland. Understanding this process could provide answers for the regulation of EMT in breast cancer, and thereby identify potential targets for therapy. Evidence points towards a role for hedgehog signaling in breast tissue homeostasis and also in mammary neoplasia. This review examines our current understanding of role of the hedgehog-signaling (Hh pathway in breast epithelial cells both during breast development and homeostasis and to assess the potential misappropriation of Hh signals in breast neoplasia, cancer stem cells and tumor metastasis via EMT.

  3. The Potential Role of Hedgehog Signaling in the Luminal/Basal Phenotype of Breast Epithelia and in Breast Cancer Invasion and Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemban, Arwa; Qualtrough, David

    2015-01-01

    The epithelium of the lactiferous ducts in the breast is comprised of luminal epithelial cells and underlying basal myoepithelial cells. The regulation of cell fate and transit of cells between these two cell types remains poorly understood. This relationship becomes of greater importance when studying the subtypes of epithelial breast carcinoma, which are categorized according to their expression of luminal or basal markers. The epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a pivotal event in tumor invasion. It is important to understand mechanisms that regulate this process, which bears relation to the normal dynamic of epithelial/basal phenotype regulation in the mammary gland. Understanding this process could provide answers for the regulation of EMT in breast cancer, and thereby identify potential targets for therapy. Evidence points towards a role for hedgehog signaling in breast tissue homeostasis and also in mammary neoplasia. This review examines our current understanding of role of the hedgehog-signaling (Hh) pathway in breast epithelial cells both during breast development and homeostasis and to assess the potential misappropriation of Hh signals in breast neoplasia, cancer stem cells and tumor metastasis via EMT. PMID:26389956

  4. ADAM12 produced by tumor cells rather than stromal cells accelerates breast tumor progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frohlich, Camilla; Nehammer, Camilla; Albrechtsen, Reidar;

    2011-01-01

    ADAM12 deficiency reduces breast tumor progression in the PyMT model. However, the catalytic activity of ADAM12 appears to be dispensable for its tumor-promoting effect. Interestingly, we demonstrate that ADAM12 endogenously expressed in tumor-associated stroma in the PyMT model does not influence......Expression of ADAM12 is low in most normal tissues, but is markedly increased in numerous human cancers, including breast carcinomas. We have previously shown that overexpression of ADAM12 accelerates tumor progression in a mouse model of breast cancer (PyMT). In the present study, we found that...... tumor progression, but that ADAM12 expression by tumor cells is necessary for tumor progression in these mice. This finding is consistent with our observation that in human breast carcinoma ADAM12 is almost exclusively located in tumor cells and only rarely seen in the tumor-associated stroma. We...

  5. Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-12

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  6. Prognostic Value of Triple-Negative Phenotype at the Time of Locally Recurrent, Conservatively Treated Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic value of triple-negative (TN) ER, PR, Her2/neu basal-like carcinoma of the breast, at the time of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after conservative surgery and radiation treatment (RT). Methods and Materials: A tissue microarray was constructed of 47 IBTR specimens of patients who experienced an IBTR after conservative surgery and RT that were processed and stained for ER, PR, and HER2/neu. Results: At a median post-recurrence follow-up of 7.5 years, the 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease metastasis-free survival (DMFS) after IBTR were 91.4% and 83.0%, respectively. Median time to tumor recurrence (TTR) and IBTR was shorter in the TN phenotype (3.88 vs. 5.00 years; p = 0.09). The TN tumors were not associated with size of local recurrence or recurrence elsewhere in the breast. Despite administration of standard chemotherapy at the time of IBTR, the 5-year DMFS and 5-year OS for the TN cohort were 48.6% and 72.7%, respectively. The 5-year DMFS was 48.6% for TN tumors and 90.8% for non-TN tumors (p < 0.01). By univariate analysis, significant factors associated with poor 5-year DMFS and OS after IBTR included: TN phenotype (p < 0.01), TTR 3 years or less (p < 0.01), local recurrence at or near the original tumor site (p = 0.08). In multivariate analysis, TN was a significant independent predictor of poorer 5-year DMFS (relative risk, 5.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.83-19.01; p < 0.01) after IBTR. Conclusions: Although patients experiencing an IBTR have a relatively favorable prognosis, those with IBTR events of the TN phenotype had a rather poor prognosis despite receiving standard chemotherapy. Strategies with novel systemic therapies to improve outcomes in patients experiencing IBTR of the TN phenotype are warranted

  7. Thermal detection of a prevascular tumor embedded in breast tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyingi, Ephraim; Wiandt, Tamas; Maggelakis, Sophia A

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model of heat transfer in a prevascular breast tumor. The model uses the steady state temperature of the breast at the skin surface to determine whether there is an underlying tumor and if so, verifies whether the tumor is growing or dormant. The model is governed by the Pennes equations and we present numerical simulations for versions of the model in two and three dimensions. PMID:26280188

  8. Influences of tumor stroma on the malignant phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Dau; Moeslund, Mette; Wandall, Hans H;

    2008-01-01

    , fibronectin and laminin 5 are all characteristics of the tumor stroma. Less is, however, known of the significance of the biophysical properties of the tumor stroma. The purpose of the present study was to investigate how cellular and mechanical properties of the three-dimensional collagen matrix may...... and laminin 5 was investigated. RESULTS: We found that expression of glycosylated oncofetal fibronectin was increased in the invasive phenotype of oral carcinoma cell lines. Furthermore we demonstrated that certain concentrations of collagen in the connective tissue equivalent, appears to stimulate...

  9. Paracrine Interactions between Adipocytes and Tumor Cells Recruit and Modify Macrophages to the Mammary Tumor Microenvironment: The Role of Obesity and Inflammation in Breast Adipose Tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between obesity and breast cancer (BC) has focused on serum factors. However, the mammary gland contains adipose tissue (AT) which may enable the crosstalk between adipocytes and tumor cells contributing to tumor macrophage recruitment. We hypothesize that the breast AT (bAT) is inflamed in obese females and plays a major role in breast cancer development. The effects of this interplay on macrophage chemotaxis were examined in vitro, using co-cultures of mouse macrophages, mammary tumor cells and adipocytes. Macrophages were exposed to the adipocyte and tumor paracrine factors leptin, CCL2 and lauric acid (alone or in combinations). In cell supernatants Luminex identified additional molecules with chemotactic and other pro-tumor functions. Focus on the adipokine leptin, which has been shown to have a central role in breast cancer pathogenesis, indicated it modulates macrophage phenotypes and functions. In vivo experiments demonstrate that mammary tumors from obese mice are larger and that bAT from obese tumor-bearers contains higher numbers of macrophages/CLS and hypertrophic adipocytes than bAT from lean tumor-bearers, thus confirming it is more inflamed. Also, bAT distal from the tumor is more inflamed in obese than in lean mice. Our results reveal that bAT plays a role in breast cancer development in obesity

  10. Paracrine Interactions between Adipocytes and Tumor Cells Recruit and Modify Macrophages to the Mammary Tumor Microenvironment: The Role of Obesity and Inflammation in Breast Adipose Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santander, Ana M.; Lopez-Ocejo, Omar; Casas, Olivia; Agostini, Thais; Sanchez, Lidia; Lamas-Basulto, Eduardo; Carrio, Roberto [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1600 NW 10th Ave, Miami, FL 33136 (United States); Cleary, Margot P. [Hormel Institute, University of Minnesota, Austin, MN 55912 (United States); Gonzalez-Perez, Ruben R. [Department of Microbiology, Biochemistry and Immunology, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30314 (United States); Torroella-Kouri, Marta, E-mail: mtorroella@med.miami.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1600 NW 10th Ave, Miami, FL 33136 (United States); Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1475 NW 12th Ave, Miami, FL 33136 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The relationship between obesity and breast cancer (BC) has focused on serum factors. However, the mammary gland contains adipose tissue (AT) which may enable the crosstalk between adipocytes and tumor cells contributing to tumor macrophage recruitment. We hypothesize that the breast AT (bAT) is inflamed in obese females and plays a major role in breast cancer development. The effects of this interplay on macrophage chemotaxis were examined in vitro, using co-cultures of mouse macrophages, mammary tumor cells and adipocytes. Macrophages were exposed to the adipocyte and tumor paracrine factors leptin, CCL2 and lauric acid (alone or in combinations). In cell supernatants Luminex identified additional molecules with chemotactic and other pro-tumor functions. Focus on the adipokine leptin, which has been shown to have a central role in breast cancer pathogenesis, indicated it modulates macrophage phenotypes and functions. In vivo experiments demonstrate that mammary tumors from obese mice are larger and that bAT from obese tumor-bearers contains higher numbers of macrophages/CLS and hypertrophic adipocytes than bAT from lean tumor-bearers, thus confirming it is more inflamed. Also, bAT distal from the tumor is more inflamed in obese than in lean mice. Our results reveal that bAT plays a role in breast cancer development in obesity.

  11. Paracrine Interactions between Adipocytes and Tumor Cells Recruit and Modify Macrophages to the Mammary Tumor Microenvironment: The Role of Obesity and Inflammation in Breast Adipose Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Santander

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between obesity and breast cancer (BC has focused on serum factors. However, the mammary gland contains adipose tissue (AT which may enable the crosstalk between adipocytes and tumor cells contributing to tumor macrophage recruitment. We hypothesize that the breast AT (bAT is inflamed in obese females and plays a major role in breast cancer development. The effects of this interplay on macrophage chemotaxis were examined in vitro, using co-cultures of mouse macrophages, mammary tumor cells and adipocytes. Macrophages were exposed to the adipocyte and tumor paracrine factors leptin, CCL2 and lauric acid (alone or in combinations. In cell supernatants Luminex identified additional molecules with chemotactic and other pro-tumor functions. Focus on the adipokine leptin, which has been shown to have a central role in breast cancer pathogenesis, indicated it modulates macrophage phenotypes and functions. In vivo experiments demonstrate that mammary tumors from obese mice are larger and that bAT from obese tumor-bearers contains higher numbers of macrophages/CLS and hypertrophic adipocytes than bAT from lean tumor-bearers, thus confirming it is more inflamed. Also, bAT distal from the tumor is more inflamed in obese than in lean mice. Our results reveal that bAT plays a role in breast cancer development in obesity.

  12. Hypoxic conditions induce a cancer-like phenotype in human breast epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marica Vaapil

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Solid tumors are less oxygenated than their tissue of origin. Low intra-tumor oxygen levels are associated with worse outcome, increased metastatic potential and immature phenotype in breast cancer. We have reported that tumor hypoxia correlates to low differentiation status in breast cancer. Less is known about effects of hypoxia on non-malignant cells. Here we address whether hypoxia influences the differentiation stage of non-malignant breast epithelial cells and potentially have bearing on early stages of tumorigenesis. METHODS: Normal human primary breast epithelial cells and immortalized non-malignant mammary epithelial MCF-10A cells were grown in a three-dimensional overlay culture on laminin-rich extracellular matrix for up to 21 days at normoxic or hypoxic conditions. Acinar morphogenesis and expression of markers of epithelial differentiation and cell polarization were analyzed by immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry, qPCR and immunoblot. RESULTS: In large ductal carcinoma in situ patient-specimens, we find that epithelial cells with high HIF-1α levels and multiple cell layers away from the vasculature are immature compared to well-oxygenated cells. We show that hypoxic conditions impaired acinar morphogenesis of primary and immortalized breast epithelial cells grown ex vivo on laminin-rich matrix. Normoxic cultures formed polarized acini-like spheres with the anticipated distribution of marker proteins associated with mammary epithelial polarization e.g. α6-integrin, laminin 5 and Human Milk Fat Globule/MUC1. At hypoxia, cells were not polarized and the sub-cellular distribution pattern of the marker proteins rather resembled that reported in vivo in breast cancer. The hypoxic cells remained in a mitotic state, whereas proliferation ceased with acinar morphogenesis at normoxia. We found induced expression of the differentiation repressor ID1 in the undifferentiated hypoxic MCF-10A cell structures. Acinar

  13. Endothelial cell pseudopods and angiogenesis of breast cancer tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Sun LuZhe; Short Nicholas; Cameron Ivan L; Hardman W Elaine

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background A neoplastic tumor cannot grow beyond a millimeter or so in diameter without recruitment of endothelial cells and new blood vessels to supply nutrition and oxygen for tumor cell survival. This study was designed to investigate formation of new blood vessels within a human growing breast cancer tumor model (MDA MB231 in mammary fat pad of nude female mouse). Once the tumor grew to 35 mm3, it developed a well-vascularized capsule. Histological sections of tumors greater than...

  14. Circulating tumor cells in breast cancer beyond the genotype of primary tumor for tailored therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Chuanli; Han, Chongxu; Fu, Deyuan; Wang, Daxin; Chen, Hui; Chen, Yong; Shen, Ming

    2016-04-01

    Although TNM staging based on tumor, node lymph status and metastasis status-is the most widely used method in the clinic to classify breast cancer (BC) and assess prognosis, it offers limited information for different BC subgroups. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are regarded as minimal residual disease and are proven to have a strong relationship with BC. Detection of ≥5 CTCs per 7.5 mL in peripheral blood predicts poor prognosis in metastatic BC irrespective of other clinical parameters, whereas, in early-stage BC, detection of CK19(+) CTCs are also associated with poor prognosis. Increasing data and clinical trials show that CTCs can improve prognostic accuracy and help tailor treatment for patients with BC. However, heterogeneous CTCs in the process of an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in BC makes it a challenge to detect these rare cells. Moreover, the genotypic and phenotypic features of CTCs are different from primary BC tumors. Molecular analysis of CTCs in BC may benefit patients by identifying those amenable to tailored therapy. We propose that CTCs should be used alongside the TNM staging system and the genotype of primary tumor to guide tailored BC diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26178386

  15. Breast cancer cells mechanosensing in engineered matrices: Correlation with aggressive phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji; Wu, Yang; Schimmel, Nicholas; Al-Ameen, Mohammad Ali; Ghosh, Gargi

    2016-08-01

    The pathogenesis of cancer is often driven by the modulation of the tumor microenvironment. Recent reports have highlighted that the progressive stiffening of tumor matrix is crucial for malignant transformation. Though extensive work has been done analyzing the mechanotransductive signals involved in tumor progression, it is still not clear whether the stiffness induced changes in cancer cell behavior is conserved across the invasive/aggressive phenotype of cells. Here, we used synthetic hydrogel based cell culture platform to correlate the aggressive potential of the breast cancer cells to the responses to matrix stiffness. The cellular functions such as proliferation, migration, and angiogenic capability were characterized. We report that the proliferation and motility of the highly aggressive cell line MDA-MB-231 increased with increase in matrix rigidity. We also demonstrated for the first time that the change in matrix stiffness stimulated the angiogenic activity of these cells as manifested from enhanced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Inhibition of actomyosin contractility attenuated proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells on stiff matrices while promoted the growth on soft gels. In addition, the release of VEGF was reduced upon inhibition of contractility. The less and non-aggressive breast cancer cells, SKBr3 and MCF-7 respectively displayed less dependency on matrix stiffness. PMID:26874251

  16. Giant phyllodes tumor of the breast: a clinical observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Volchenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a case of giant phyllodes tumor of the breast. Phyllodes tumor is a rare type of fibroepithelial tumor composed of epithelial and connective tissue with the predominant development of a connective tissue component. Surgery is the only radical treatment.

  17. Chemokine axes in breast cancer: factors of the tumor microenvironment reshape the CCR7-driven metastatic spread of luminal-A breast tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzenfeld, Polina; Kossover, Olga; Körner, Cindy; Meshel, Tsipi; Wiemann, Stefan; Seliktar, Dror; Legler, Daniel F; Ben-Baruch, Adit

    2016-06-01

    Chemokine axes have been shown to mediate site-specific metastasis in breast cancer, but their relevance to different subtypes has been hardly addressed. Here, with the focus on the CCR7-CCL21 axis, patient datasets demonstrated that luminal-A tumors express relatively low CCR7 levels compared with more aggressive disease subtypes. Furthermore, lymph node metastasis was not associated with high CCR7 levels in luminal-A patients. The metastatic pattern of luminal-A breast tumors may be influenced by the way luminal-A tumor cells interpret signals provided by factors of the primary tumor microenvironment. Thus, CCR7-expressing human luminal-A cells were stimulated simultaneously by factors representing 3 tumor microenvironment arms typical of luminal-A tumors, hormonal, inflammatory, and growth stimulating: estrogen + TNF-α + epidermal growth factor. Such tumor microenvironment stimulation down-regulated the migration of CCR7-expressing tumor cells toward CCL21 and inhibited the formation of directional protrusions toward CCL21 in a novel 3-dimensional hydrogel system. CCL21-induced migration of CCR7-expressing tumor cells depended on PI3K and MAPK activation; however, when CCR7-expressing cancer cells were prestimulated by tumor microenvironment factors, CCL21 could not effectively activate these signaling pathways. In vivo, pre-exposure of the tumor cells to tumor microenvironment factors has put restraints on CCL21-mediated lymph node-homing cues and shifted the metastatic pattern of CCR7-expressing cells to the aggressive phenotype of dissemination to bones. Several of the aspects were also studied in the CXCR4-CXCL12 system, demonstrating similar patient and in vitro findings. Thus, we provide novel evidence to subtype-specific regulation of the CCR7-CCL21 axis, with more general implications to chemokine-dependent patterns of metastatic spread, revealing differential regulation in the luminal-A subtype. PMID:26936935

  18. An EMT-driven alternative splicing program occurs in human breast cancer and modulates cellular phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina M Shapiro

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, a mechanism important for embryonic development, plays a critical role during malignant transformation. While much is known about transcriptional regulation of EMT, alternative splicing of several genes has also been correlated with EMT progression, but the extent of splicing changes and their contributions to the morphological conversion accompanying EMT have not been investigated comprehensively. Using an established cell culture model and RNA-Seq analyses, we determined an alternative splicing signature for EMT. Genes encoding key drivers of EMT-dependent changes in cell phenotype, such as actin cytoskeleton remodeling, regulation of cell-cell junction formation, and regulation of cell migration, were enriched among EMT-associated alternatively splicing events. Our analysis suggested that most EMT-associated alternative splicing events are regulated by one or more members of the RBFOX, MBNL, CELF, hnRNP, or ESRP classes of splicing factors. The EMT alternative splicing signature was confirmed in human breast cancer cell lines, which could be classified into basal and luminal subtypes based exclusively on their EMT-associated splicing pattern. Expression of EMT-associated alternative mRNA transcripts was also observed in primary breast cancer samples, indicating that EMT-dependent splicing changes occur commonly in human tumors. The functional significance of EMT-associated alternative splicing was tested by expression of the epithelial-specific splicing factor ESRP1 or by depletion of RBFOX2 in mesenchymal cells, both of which elicited significant changes in cell morphology and motility towards an epithelial phenotype, suggesting that splicing regulation alone can drive critical aspects of EMT-associated phenotypic changes. The molecular description obtained here may aid in the development of new diagnostic and prognostic markers for analysis of breast cancer progression.

  19. Radiologic findings of metastatic tumors to the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Heum; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Jeong Mi; Kim, Hak Hee; Kim, Ji Young; Park, Young Ha; Shinn, Kyung Sub [The Catholic Univ. of Korea College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-09-01

    To analyze the radiologic findings of metastatic tumors of the breast. We retrospectively analyzed the findings of mammography (n = 12), ultrasonography (n = 9) and CT (n = 4) of 13 patients with metastatic tumors of the breast. Methods for confirmation were biopsy (n = 8) and clinical follow-up (n = 5). The patient' s ages ranged from 24 to 63 (mean 43)years. Primary malignancies were contralateral breast cancer (n = 3), non-Hodgkin' s lymphoma (n = 3), stomach cancer (n = 2), uterine cervix cancer (n = 1), laryngeal cancer (n = 1), esophageal melanoma (n = 1), malignant thymoma (n 1), and lung cancer (n = 1). Patterns of metastasis from contralateral breast cancer and the stomach cancer were diffuse and infiltrative, while metastasis from other cancers was of the focal mass-forming type. The radiologic findings of metastasis from contralateral breast cancer (n = 3) were diffuse skin thickening and increased density or echogenicity in the medial aspect of the breast, while in cases involving metastasis from stomach cancer (n = 2) radiographs revealed extensive skin thickening, increased density or echogenicity, lymphedema and ipsilateral lymphadenopathy in the left breast. In cases of metastatic tumors to the breast in which focal masses were seen on mammography (n = 7), marginal spiculation or microcalcification of the tumors was not present. In six such cases, ultrasonography revealed well-defined margin, posterior acoustic shadowing or an irregular thick echogenic boundary was not seen. It two patients who underwent CT scanning, well-defined masses with moderate contrast enhancement were present. Radiographs of metastatic tumors to the breast from contralateral breast cancer and stomach cancer showed diffuse infiltration. The metastatic tumors with focal masses showed oval to round, smooth-mar-ginated, well-defined masses without spiculation or microcalcification on mammography, and a well-defined mass without posterior acoustic shadowing or irregular

  20. Radiologic findings of metastatic tumors to the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the radiologic findings of metastatic tumors of the breast. We retrospectively analyzed the findings of mammography (n = 12), ultrasonography (n = 9) and CT (n = 4) of 13 patients with metastatic tumors of the breast. Methods for confirmation were biopsy (n = 8) and clinical follow-up (n = 5). The patient' s ages ranged from 24 to 63 (mean 43)years. Primary malignancies were contralateral breast cancer (n = 3), non-Hodgkin' s lymphoma (n = 3), stomach cancer (n = 2), uterine cervix cancer (n = 1), laryngeal cancer (n = 1), esophageal melanoma (n = 1), malignant thymoma (n 1), and lung cancer (n = 1). Patterns of metastasis from contralateral breast cancer and the stomach cancer were diffuse and infiltrative, while metastasis from other cancers was of the focal mass-forming type. The radiologic findings of metastasis from contralateral breast cancer (n = 3) were diffuse skin thickening and increased density or echogenicity in the medial aspect of the breast, while in cases involving metastasis from stomach cancer (n = 2) radiographs revealed extensive skin thickening, increased density or echogenicity, lymphedema and ipsilateral lymphadenopathy in the left breast. In cases of metastatic tumors to the breast in which focal masses were seen on mammography (n = 7), marginal spiculation or microcalcification of the tumors was not present. In six such cases, ultrasonography revealed well-defined margin, posterior acoustic shadowing or an irregular thick echogenic boundary was not seen. It two patients who underwent CT scanning, well-defined masses with moderate contrast enhancement were present. Radiographs of metastatic tumors to the breast from contralateral breast cancer and stomach cancer showed diffuse infiltration. The metastatic tumors with focal masses showed oval to round, smooth-mar-ginated, well-defined masses without spiculation or microcalcification on mammography, and a well-defined mass without posterior acoustic shadowing or irregular thick

  1. In vitro analysis of the invasive phenotype of SUM 149, an inflammatory breast cancer cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmawardhane Suranganie F

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC is the most lethal form of locally invasive breast cancer known. However, very little information is available on the cellular mechanisms responsible for manifestation of the IBC phenotype. To understand the unique phenotype of IBC, we compared the motile and adhesive interactions of an IBC cell line, SUM 149, to the non-IBC cell line SUM 102. Results Our results demonstrate that both IBC and non-IBC cell lines exhibit similar adhesive properties to basal lamina, but SUM 149 showed a marked increase in adhesion to collagen I. In vitro haptotaxis assays demonstrate that SUM 149 was less invasive, while wound healing assays show a less in vitro migratory phenotype for SUM 149 cells relative to SUM 102 cells. We also demonstrate a role for Rho and E-cadherin in the unique invasive phenotype of IBC. Immunoblotting reveals higher E-cadherin and RhoA expression in the IBC cell line but similar RhoC expression. Rhodamine phalloidin staining demonstrates increased formation of actin stress fibers and larger focal adhesions in SUM 149 relative to the SUM 102 cell line. Conclusion The observed unique actin and cellular architecture as well as the invasive and adhesive responses to the extracellular matrix of SUM 149 IBC cells suggest that the preference of IBC cells for connective tissue, possibly a mediator important for the vasculogenic mimicry via tubulogenesis seen in IBC pathological specimens. Overexpression of E-cadherin and RhoA may contribute to passive dissemination of IBC by promoting cell-cell adhesion and actin cytoskeletal structures that maintain tissue integrity. Therefore, we believe that these findings indicate a passive metastatic mechanism by which IBC cells invade the circulatory system as tumor emboli rather than by active migratory mechanisms.

  2. Resection of the primary tumor in stage IV breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shien, Tadahiko; Doihara, Hiroyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Stage IV breast cancer refers to breast cancer that has already metastasized to distant regions when initially diagnosed. Treatment for stage IV is intended to “prolong survival and palliate symptoms”. Resection of a primary tumor is considered to be “effective only at alleviating chest symptoms and providing local control” in spite of the advances of imaging examination and medication for breast cancer. Molecular target and endocrine drugs are very effective and useful to tailor-make a treat...

  3. Circulating tumor cells in newly diagnosed inflammatory breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mego, Michal; Giordano, Antonio; De Giorgi, Ugo; Masuda, Hiroko; Hsu, Limin; Giuliano, Mario; Fouad, Tamer M.; Dawood, Shaheenah; Ueno, Naoto T.; Valero, Vicente; Andreopoulou, Eleni; Alvarez, Ricardo H.; Wendy A Woodward; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Cristofanilli, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are an independent prognostic factor for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is one of the most aggressive forms of breast cancer. The prognostic value of a CTC count in newly diagnosed IBC has not been established. The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic value of a baseline CTC count in patients with newly diagnosed IBC. Methods This retrosp...

  4. Genes related to suppression of malignant phenotype induced by Maitake D-Fraction in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Eliana Noelia; Orozco, Manuela; Eloy Nieto, Alvaro; Balogh, Gabriela Andrea

    2013-07-01

    It is already known that the Maitake (D-Fraction) mushroom is involved in stimulating the immune system and activating certain cells that attack cancer, including macrophages, T-cells, and natural killer cells. According to the U.S. National Cancer Institute, polysaccharide complexes present in Maitake mushrooms appear to have significant anticancer activity. However, the exact molecular mechanism of the Maitake antitumoral effect is still unclear. Previously, we have reported that Maitake (D-Fraction) induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells by activation of BCL2-antagonist/killer 1 (BAK1) gene expression. At the present work, we are identifying which genes are responsible for the suppression of the tumoral phenotype mechanism induced by Maitake (D-Fraction) in breast cancer cells. Human breast cancer MCF-7 cells were treated with and without increased concentrations of Maitake D-Fraction (36, 91, 183, 367 μg/mL) for 24 h. Total RNA were isolated and cDNA microarrays were hybridized containing 25,000 human genes. Employing the cDNA microarray analysis, we found that Maitake D-Fraction modified the expression of 4068 genes (2420 were upmodulated and 1648 were downmodulated) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner during 24 h of treatment. The present data shows that Maitake D-Fraction suppresses the breast tumoral phenotype through a putative molecular mechanism modifying the expression of certain genes (such as IGFBP-7, ITGA2, ICAM3, SOD2, CAV-1, Cul-3, NRF2, Cycline E, ST7, and SPARC) that are involved in apoptosis stimulation, inhibition of cell growth and proliferation, cell cycle arrest, blocking migration and metastasis of tumoral cells, and inducing multidrug sensitivity. Altogether, these results suggest that Maitake D-Fraction could be a potential new target for breast cancer chemoprevention and treatment. PMID:23875900

  5. Apparent diffusion coefficients of breast tumors. Clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) for the differential diagnosis of breast tumors and to determine the relation between ADC and tumor cellularity. One hundred and thirty-six female patients (age range, 17-83 years; average age, 51.7 years) with 140 histologically proven breast tumors underwent diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (DWI) using the spin-echo echo-planar technique, and the ADCs of the tumors were calculated using 3 different b values, 0, 500, and 1000 s/mm2. The diagnoses consisted of fibroadenoma (FA, n=16), invasive ductal carcinoma, not otherwise specified (IDC, n=117), medullary carcinoma (ME, n=3) and mucinous carcinoma (MU, n=4). Tumor cellularity was calculated from surgical specimens. The ADCs of breast tumors and cellularity were compared between different histological types by analysis of variance and Scheffe's post hoc test. The correlation between tumor cellularity and ADC was analyzed by Pearson correlation test. Significant differences were observed in ADCs between FA and all types of cancers (P2=0.451). The ADC may potentially help in differentiating benign and malignant breast tumors. Tumor ADC correlates inversely with tumor cellularity. (author)

  6. Breast Fine Needle Tumor Classification using Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Yasmeen M. George; Bassant Mohamed Elbagoury; Hala H. Zayed; Roushdy, Mohamed I.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an intelligent diagnosis system for breast cancer classification. Artificial Neural Networks and Support Vector Machines were being developed to classify the benign and malignant of breast tumor in fine needle aspiration cytology. First the features were extracted from 92 FNAC image. Then these features were presented to several neural network architectures to investigate the most suitable network model for classifying the tumor effectively. Four classi...

  7. Medial tumor localization in breast cancer. An unappreciated risk factor?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braeeutigam, Elisabeth; Feichtinger, Johann; Spiegl, Kurt; Hammer, Josef [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Barmherzige Schwestern Hospital, Linz (Austria); Track, Christine [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Barmherzige Schwestern Hospital, Linz (Austria); Comprehensive Breast Health Center, Barmherzige Schwestern Hospital, Linz (Austria); Seewald, Dietmar H. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital Voecklabruck (Austria)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: to demonstrate the unfavorable results in survival rates in patients with medial breast cancer compared to patients with laterally located tumors of the mammary gland. Patients and Methods: Between 1984 and 1995, 1,089 patients presenting with a total of 1,100 pT1-2 invasive carcinomas of the breast were treated at the authors' institution. 707 presented with tumors in the lateral quadrants, 294 with tumors in the medial quadrants, and 99 with tumors in the central quadrant. Treatment protocols involved breast-conserving surgery and whole-breast radiotherapy in all women, followed by a tumor bed boost dose according to risk factors for local recurrence. All axillary node-positive patients underwent systemic therapy (six cycles of classic CMF and/or 2-5 years of tamoxifen 20 mg/day). Rates of actuarial survival and local control were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method and differences in survival curves were compared by use of the log-rank test. Results: the mean follow-up of survivors was 97 months (range 36-192 months). Comparing patients with medial and lateral tumors, the actuarial survival data were significantly better for patients with lateral tumors. At 10 years, overall survival for patients with medial tumors was 71%, for patients with lateral tumors 81.8% (p < 0.025), disease-specific survival for patients with medial tumors 79.9%, for patients with lateral tumors 89.1% (p < 0.025). There was no significant difference in local tumor control according to tumor location. Conclusion: medial tumor location is associated with a lower survival rate, but not with inferior local tumor control. Failure to identify nodal metastases confined to the internal mammary chain may lead to undertreatment with systemic/local agents and compromised survival. (orig.)

  8. Medial tumor localization in breast cancer. An unappreciated risk factor?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: to demonstrate the unfavorable results in survival rates in patients with medial breast cancer compared to patients with laterally located tumors of the mammary gland. Patients and Methods: Between 1984 and 1995, 1,089 patients presenting with a total of 1,100 pT1-2 invasive carcinomas of the breast were treated at the authors' institution. 707 presented with tumors in the lateral quadrants, 294 with tumors in the medial quadrants, and 99 with tumors in the central quadrant. Treatment protocols involved breast-conserving surgery and whole-breast radiotherapy in all women, followed by a tumor bed boost dose according to risk factors for local recurrence. All axillary node-positive patients underwent systemic therapy (six cycles of classic CMF and/or 2-5 years of tamoxifen 20 mg/day). Rates of actuarial survival and local control were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method and differences in survival curves were compared by use of the log-rank test. Results: the mean follow-up of survivors was 97 months (range 36-192 months). Comparing patients with medial and lateral tumors, the actuarial survival data were significantly better for patients with lateral tumors. At 10 years, overall survival for patients with medial tumors was 71%, for patients with lateral tumors 81.8% (p < 0.025), disease-specific survival for patients with medial tumors 79.9%, for patients with lateral tumors 89.1% (p < 0.025). There was no significant difference in local tumor control according to tumor location. Conclusion: medial tumor location is associated with a lower survival rate, but not with inferior local tumor control. Failure to identify nodal metastases confined to the internal mammary chain may lead to undertreatment with systemic/local agents and compromised survival. (orig.)

  9. Value of ultrasound elastography in detecting small breast tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Li-na; WANG Yi; WANG Yong; HUANG Yong-hong

    2011-01-01

    Background Detecting small breast tumors is difficult for conventional ultrasound. The goal of this study was to assess the value of ultrasound elastography in characterizing small breast tumors and to compare its sensitivity, specificity and accuracy with conventional ultrasound. Methods A total of 308 breast tumors less than 2 cm in size from 283 in-hospital patients examined with both conventional ultrasound and ultrasound elastography were retrospectively analyzed. The results were compared to surgical pathology. Results There were 104 malignant and 204 benign lesions. The sensitivities of sonography and sonoelastography were similar (P <0.05), and the sensitivity of the two modalities combined improved remarkably to 97.1%. The mean elastic score of malignant and benign tumors less than 2 cm were 3.76±1.01 and 1.73±0.99, respectively (P<0.05), and the mean elastic score of the false-negative lesions on conventional ultrasound was 3.61 ±1.14. Conclusions Ultrasound elastography in combination with conventional ultrasound can improve the sensitivity for detecting small breast tumors. It is also valuable in detecting small malignant tumors which are difficult to diagnose with conventional ultrasound. Ultrasound elastography can be a useful adjunct to conventional ultrasound in diagnosing small breast tumors.

  10. Modeling Breast Tumor Development with a Humanized Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in breast cancer growth and progression to metastasis. Here, we describe a method to examine stromal-epithelial interactions during tumor formation and progression utilizing human-derived mammary epithelial cells and breast stromal cells. This method outlines the isolation of each cell type from reduction mammoplasty tissue, the culture and genetic modification of both epithelial and stromal cells using lentiviral technology, and the method of humanizing and implantation of transformed epithelial cells into the cleared mammary fat pads of immunocompromised mice. This model system may be a useful tool to dissect signaling interactions that contribute to invasive tumor behavior and therapeutic resistance. PMID:27581027

  11. Active Roles of Tumor Stroma in Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahraa I. Khamis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the major cause of death for breast cancer patients. Tumors are heterogenous cellular entities composed of cancer cells and cells of the microenvironment in which they reside. A reciprocal dynamic interaction occurs between the tumor cells and their surrounding stroma under physiological and pathological conditions. This tumor-host communication interface mediates the escape of tumor cells at the primary site, survival of circulating cancer cells in the vasculature, and growth of metastatic cancer at secondary site. Each step of the metastatic process is accompanied by recruitment of stromal cells from the microenvironment and production of unique array of growth factors and chemokines. Stromal microenvironment may play active roles in breast cancer metastasis. Elucidating the types of cells recruited and signal pathways involved in the crosstalk between tumor cells and stromal cells will help identify novel strategies for cotargeting cancer cells and tumor stromal cells to suppress metastasis and improve patient outcome.

  12. Breast cancer stem cells, cytokine networks, and the tumor microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    Korkaya, Hasan; Liu, Suling; Wicha, Max S.

    2011-01-01

    Many tumors, including breast cancer, are maintained by a subpopulation of cells that display stem cell properties, mediate metastasis, and contribute to treatment resistance. These cancer stem cells (CSCs) are regulated by complex interactions with the components of the tumor microenvironment — including mesenchymal stem cells, adipocytes, tumor associated fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and immune cells — through networks of cytokines and growth factors. Since these components have a direct...

  13. The microenvironment determines the breast cancer cells' phenotype: organization of MCF7 cells in 3D cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stromal-epithelial interactions mediate breast development, and the initiation and progression of breast cancer. In the present study, we developed 3-dimensional (3D) in vitro models to study breast cancer tissue organization and the role of the microenvironment in phenotypic determination. The human breast cancer MCF7 cells were grown alone or co-cultured with primary human breast fibroblasts. Cells were embedded in matrices containing either type I collagen or a combination of reconstituted basement membrane proteins and type I collagen. The cultures were carried out for up to 6 weeks. For every time point (1-6 weeks), the gels were fixed and processed for histology, and whole-mounted for confocal microscopy evaluation. The epithelial structures were characterized utilizing immunohistochemical techniques; their area and proliferation index were measured using computerized morphometric analysis. Statistical differences between groups were analyzed by ANOVA, Dunnett's T3 post-hoc test and chi-square. Most of the MCF7 cells grown alone within a collagen matrix died during the first two weeks; those that survived organized into large, round and solid clusters. The presence of fibroblasts in collagen gels reduced MCF7 cell death, induced cell polarity, and the formation of round and elongated epithelial structures containing a lumen. The addition of reconstituted basement membrane to collagen gels by itself had also survival and organizational effects on the MCF7 cells. Regardless of the presence of fibroblasts, the MCF7 cells both polarized and formed a lumen. The addition of fibroblasts to the gel containing reconstituted basement membrane and collagen induced the formation of elongated structures. Our results indicate that a matrix containing both type I collagen and reconstituted basement membrane, and the presence of normal breast fibroblasts constitute the minimal permissive microenvironment to induce near-complete tumor phenotype reversion. These human

  14. A CLDN1-negative phenotype predicts poor prognosis in triple-negative breast cancer.

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    Fei Ma

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is a heterogeneous disease with no definitive prognostic markers. As a major component of tight junctions, claudins (CLDNs presumably play an important role in carcinogenesis and progression of breast cancer. This study was aimed at determining the relationship between the expression of CLDNs and the clinical outcomes of TNBCs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The surgical specimens of primary breast tumors from a consecutive cohort of 173 TNBC patients were retrospectively collected. The membranous expression of CLDN1, CLDN2, CLDN4, and CLDN7 was measured by immunohistochemistry. Then, the associations between CLDN expression, clinicopathological features, and clinical outcomes were assessed. RESULTS: Positive CLDN1, CLDN2, CLDN4, and CLDN7 membrane expression was detected in 44.5%, 54.9%, 76.9%, and 73.4% of the cohort specimens, respectively. A lack of CLDN1 expression was related to only lymph node metastasis (P = 0.014. The rate of CLDN4-positive tumors was significantly increased in tumors of a higher grade (P = 0.003. Importantly, negative CLDN1 expression was associated with worse relapse-free survival (RFS in both lymph node positive (LN+ and negative (LN- cases (both P<0.001. Similarly it was also associated with shorter overall survival (OS(P = 0.003 in LN+ cases; P = 0.018 in LN- cases. In the LN+ subgroup, CLDN2-negative cases had a significantly higher risk of recurrence (P = 0.008. Multivariate analysis revealed that negative CLDN1 expression was an independent prognostic factor for high risk of both recurrence and death (HR 5.529, 95% CI 2.664-11.475, P<0.001; HR 3.459, 95% CI 1.555-7.696, P = 0.002. However, neither CLDN4 nor CLDN7 expression was associated with survival. CONCLUSION: In TNBC, the CLDN1-negative phenotype predicts a high risk of recurrence and death. The absence of CLDN1 expression is strongly suggested to be an independent adverse prognostic factor

  15. Disseminated breast cancer cells acquire a highly malignant and aggressive metastatic phenotype during metastatic latency in the bone.

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    Carolyn G Marsden

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disseminated tumor cells (DTCs in the bone marrow may exist in a dormant state for extended periods of time, maintaining the ability to proliferate upon activation, engraft at new sites, and form detectable metastases. However, understanding of the behavior and biology of dormant breast cancer cells in the bone marrow niche remains limited, as well as their potential involvement in tumor recurrence and metastasis. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the tumorigenicity and metastatic potential of dormant disseminated breast cancer cells (prior to activation in the bone marrow. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Total bone marrow, isolated from mice previously injected with tumorspheres into the mammary fat pad, was injected into the mammary fat pad of NUDE mice. As a negative control, bone marrow isolated from non-injected mice was injected into the mammary fat pad of NUDE mice. The resultant tumors were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers. Mouse lungs, livers, and kidneys were analyzed by H+E staining to detect metastases. The injection of bone marrow isolated from mice previously injected with tumorspheres into the mammary fat pad, resulted in large tumor formation in the mammary fat pad 2 months post-injection. However, the injection of bone marrow isolated from non-injected mice did not result in tumor formation in the mammary fat pad. The DTC-derived tumors exhibited accelerated development of metastatic lesions within the lung, liver and kidney. The resultant tumors and the majority of metastatic lesions within the lung and liver exhibited a mesenchymal-like phenotype. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Dormant DTCs within the bone marrow are highly malignant upon injection into the mammary fat pad, with the accelerated development of metastatic lesions within the lung, liver and kidney. These results suggest the acquisition of a more aggressive phenotype of DTCs during

  16. Emodin Inhibits Breast Cancer Growth by Blocking the Tumor-Promoting Feedforward Loop between Cancer Cells and Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowycz, Stephen; Wang, Junfeng; Hodge, Johnie; Wang, Yuzhen; Yu, Fang; Fan, Daping

    2016-08-01

    Macrophage infiltration correlates with severity in many types of cancer. Tumor cells recruit macrophages and educate them to adopt an M2-like phenotype through the secretion of chemokines and growth factors, such as MCP1 and CSF1. Macrophages in turn promote tumor growth through supporting angiogenesis, suppressing antitumor immunity, modulating extracellular matrix remodeling, and promoting tumor cell migration. Thus, tumor cells and macrophages interact to create a feedforward loop supporting tumor growth and metastasis. In this study, we tested the ability of emodin, a Chinese herb-derived compound, to inhibit breast cancer growth in mice and examined the underlying mechanisms. Emodin was used to treat mice bearing EO771 or 4T1 breast tumors. It was shown that emodin attenuated tumor growth by inhibiting macrophage infiltration and M2-like polarization, accompanied by increased T-cell activation and reduced angiogenesis in tumors. The tumor inhibitory effects of emodin were lost in tumor-bearing mice with macrophage depletion. Emodin inhibited IRF4, STAT6, and C/EBPβ signaling and increased inhibitory histone H3 lysine 27 tri-methylation (H3K27m3) on the promoters of M2-related genes in tumor-associated macrophages. In addition, emodin inhibited tumor cell secretion of MCP1 and CSF1, as well as expression of surface anchoring molecule Thy-1, thus suppressing macrophage migration toward and adhesion to tumor cells. These results suggest that emodin acts on both breast cancer cells and macrophages and effectively blocks the tumor-promoting feedforward loop between the two cell types, thereby inhibiting breast cancer growth and metastasis. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1931-42. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196773

  17. Tumor-suppressor activity of RRIG1 in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retinoid receptor-induced gene-1 (RRIG1) is a novel gene that has been lost in several types of human cancers. The aim of this study was to determine whether RRIG1 plays a role in breast cancer, such as in the suppression of breast cancer cell growth and invasion. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect RRIG1 expression in breast tissue specimens. Gene transfection was used to restore or knock down RRIG1 expression in breast cancer cell lines for analysis of cell viability, colony formation, and migration/invasion potential. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot assays were used to detect the changes in gene expression. The RhoA activation assay was used to assess RRIG1-induced inhibition of RhoA activity. The immunohistochemical data showed that RRIG1 expression was reduced in breast cancer tissues compared with normal and atypical hyperplastic breast tissues. RRIG1 expression was inversely correlated with lymph node metastasis of breast cancer but was not associated with the status of hormone receptors, such as estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, or HER2. Furthermore, restoration of RRIG1 expression inhibited proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion of breast cancer cells. Expression of RRIG1 also reduced phosphorylated Erk1/2 and Akt levels; c-Jun, MMP9, and Akt expressions; and RhoA activity. In contrast, knockdown of RRIG1 expression promoted breast cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion potential. The data from the current study indicated that RRIG1 expression was reduced or lost in breast cancer and that restoration of RRIG1 expression suppressed breast cancer cell growth and invasion capacity. Future studies will determine the underlying molecular mechanisms and define RRIG1 as a tumor-suppressor gene in breast cancer

  18. Background parenchymal enhancement in breast MRIs of breast cancer patients: Impact on tumor size estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Ji Eun [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hun, E-mail: rad-ksh@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ah Won [Department of Hospital Pathology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Objective: To evaluate whether the degree of background parenchymal enhancement affects the accuracy of tumor size estimation based on breast MRI. Methods: Three hundred and twenty-two patients who had known breast cancer and underwent breast MRIs were recruited in our study. The total number of breast cancer cases was 339. All images were assessed retrospectively for the level of background parenchymal enhancement based on the BI-RADS criteria. Maximal lesion diameters were measured on the MRIs, and tumor types (mass vs. non-mass) were assessed. Tumor size differences between the MRI-based estimates and estimates based on pathological examinations were analyzed. The relationship between accuracy and tumor types and clinicopathologic features were also evaluated. Results: The cases included minimal (47.5%), mild (28.9%), moderate (12.4%) and marked background parenchymal enhancement (11.2%). The tumors of patients with minimal or mild background parenchymal enhancement were more accurately estimated than those of patients with moderate or marked enhancement (72.1% vs. 56.8%; p = 0.003). The tumors of women with mass type lesions were significantly more accurately estimated than those of the women with non-mass type lesions (81.6% vs. 28.6%; p < 0.001). The tumor of women negative for HER2 was more accurately estimated than those of women positive for HER2 (72.2% vs. 51.6%; p = 0.047). Conclusion: Moderate and marked background parenchymal enhancement is related to the inaccurate estimation of tumor size based on MRI. Non-mass type breast cancer and HER2-positive breast cancer are other factors that may cause inaccurate assessment of tumor size.

  19. Background parenchymal enhancement in breast MRIs of breast cancer patients: Impact on tumor size estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate whether the degree of background parenchymal enhancement affects the accuracy of tumor size estimation based on breast MRI. Methods: Three hundred and twenty-two patients who had known breast cancer and underwent breast MRIs were recruited in our study. The total number of breast cancer cases was 339. All images were assessed retrospectively for the level of background parenchymal enhancement based on the BI-RADS criteria. Maximal lesion diameters were measured on the MRIs, and tumor types (mass vs. non-mass) were assessed. Tumor size differences between the MRI-based estimates and estimates based on pathological examinations were analyzed. The relationship between accuracy and tumor types and clinicopathologic features were also evaluated. Results: The cases included minimal (47.5%), mild (28.9%), moderate (12.4%) and marked background parenchymal enhancement (11.2%). The tumors of patients with minimal or mild background parenchymal enhancement were more accurately estimated than those of patients with moderate or marked enhancement (72.1% vs. 56.8%; p = 0.003). The tumors of women with mass type lesions were significantly more accurately estimated than those of the women with non-mass type lesions (81.6% vs. 28.6%; p < 0.001). The tumor of women negative for HER2 was more accurately estimated than those of women positive for HER2 (72.2% vs. 51.6%; p = 0.047). Conclusion: Moderate and marked background parenchymal enhancement is related to the inaccurate estimation of tumor size based on MRI. Non-mass type breast cancer and HER2-positive breast cancer are other factors that may cause inaccurate assessment of tumor size

  20. HER2 and uPAR cooperativity contribute to metastatic phenotype of HER2-positive breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Vineesh Indira; Eppenberger-Castori, Serenella; Venkatesh, Thejaswini; Vine, Kara Lea; Ranson, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-positive breast carcinoma is highly aggressive and mostly metastatic in nature though curable/manageable in part by molecular targeted therapy. Recent evidence suggests a subtype of cells within HER2-positive breast tumors that concomitantly expresses the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) with inherent stem cell/mesenchymal-like properties promoting tumor cell motility and a metastatic phenotype. This HER-positive/uPAR-positive subtype may be partially responsible for the failure of HER2-targeted treatment strategies. Herein we discuss and substantiate the cumulative preclinical and clinical evidence on HER2-uPAR cooperativity in terms of gene co-amplification and/or mRNA/protein co-overexpression. We then propose a regulatory signaling model that we hypothesize to maintain upregulation and cooperativity between HER2 and uPAR in aggressive breast cancer. An improved understanding of the HER2/uPAR interaction in breast cancer will provide critical biomolecular information that may help better predict disease course and response to therapy. PMID:25897424

  1. Glutathione Transferase GSTπ In Breast Tumors Evaluated By Three Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Molina

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The glutathione transferases are involved in intracellular detoxification reactions. One of these, GSTπ, is elevated in some breast cancer cells, particularly cells selected for resistance to anticancer agents. We evaluated GSTπ expression in 60 human breast tumors by three techniques, immunohistochemistry, Northern hybridization, and Western blot analysis. There was a significant positive correlation between the three methods, with complete concordance seen in 64% of the tumors. There was strong, inverse relationship between GSTπ expression and steroid receptor status with all of the techniques utili zed. [n addition, there was a trend toward higher GSTπ expression in poorly differentiated tumors, but no correlation was found between tumor GSTπ content and DNA ploidy or %S-phase. GSTπ expression was also detected in adjacent benign breast tissue as well as infiltrating lymphocytes; this expression may contribute to GSTπ measurements using either Northern hybridization or Western blot analysis. These re sults suggest that immunohistochemistry is the method of choice for measuring GSTπ in breast tumors.

  2. Investigating the KLF4 Gene Expression as a New Molecular Marker in Breast Tumors

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    MA Hosseinpour Feizi

    2013-12-01

    Results: The results showed that: 1 KLF4 is over expressed in Breast tumors rather than adjacent normal tissues. 2 KLF4 is an oncogene in breast tumors (at least in IDC type. 3 The KLF4 expression levels are related significantly with nature of malignant breast tumors. Conclusion: Findings do not confirm KLF4 as a diagnostic marker in classification and identification of tumoral tissues from non-tumoral ones in breast, but we can use this marker to identify at least 50% of invasive Ductal Carcinoma in breast and utilize it as a potential predictive factor to demonstrate severity degree in various tumors.

  3. Dynamic MRI and tumor angiogenesis of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the mechanism underlying early enhanced MR images of breast cancer by dynamic MR imaging from the aspect of tumor angiogenesis. The images depicted by dynamic MR imaging of breast cancer were divided into the following two groups: a marginal strong enhancement (MSE) pattern and a variable pattern without marginal strong enhancement (non-MSE). Twenty patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (maximum diameter <2 cm) were examined by dynamic MR imaging, and the histological materials were submitted to two-dimensional computer image analysis with immunohistochemistry and histochemistry; morphological microvessel characteristics and microvessel density were examined; and the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was investigated. In the MSE cases, vessel wall irregularity of capillaries and venules in the peripheral area adjacent to the tumor correlated (p<0.0001) with the enhancement pattern, and the total microvessel density (especially of arterioles with a maximum diameter less than 50 μm) of the peripheral area adjacent to the tumor was significantly higher than that of the tumor area. However, in the non-MSE cases, total microvessel density showed no significant difference between the peripheral area adjacent to the tumor and the tumor area, whereas the capillary density of the tumor area was four times greater than that of the peripheral area adjacent to the tumor. The expression of VEGF was strongly positive for the tumor nest adjacent to the capillaries. These results suggest that the enhanced images of the MSE pattern depend on abundant blood supply from arterioles and that the images of the non-MSE pattern might be reflective of angiogenic activity including variable VEGF expression of tumor cells. Thus the mechanism underlying early dynamic MR images of breast cancer was a complex result of tumor angiogenesis and the microcirculatory environment. (author)

  4. Race-associated biological differences among Luminal A breast tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcy, Monica; Fleming, Jodie; Robinson, Whitney R; Kirk, Erin L; Perou, Charles M; Troester, Melissa A

    2015-07-01

    African-American (AA) women have higher breast cancer-specific mortality rates. A higher prevalence of the worse outcome Basal-like breast cancer subtype contributes to this, but AA women also have higher mortality even within the more favorable outcome Luminal A breast cancers. These differences may reflect treatment or health care access issues, inherent biological differences, or both. To identify potential biological differences by race among Luminal A breast cancers, gene expression data from 108 CAU and 57 AA breast tumors were analyzed. Race-associated genes were evaluated for associations with survival. Finally, expression of race- and survival-associated genes was evaluated in normal tissue of AA and CAU women. Six genes (ACOX2, MUC1, CRYBB2, PSPH, SQLE, TYMS) were differentially expressed by race among Luminal A breast cancers and were associated with survival (HR 1.25). For all six genes, tumors in AA had higher expression of poor prognosis genes (CRYBB2, PSPH, SQLE, TYMS) and lower expression of good prognosis genes (ACOX2, MUC1). A score based on all six genes predicted survival in a large independent dataset (HR = 1.9 top vs. bottom quartile, 95% CI: 1.4-2.5). For four genes, normal tissue of AA and CAU women showed similar expression (ACOX2, MUC1, SQLE, TYMS); however, the poor outcome-associated genes CRYBB2 and PSPH were more highly expressed in AA versus CAU women's normal tissue. This analysis identified gene expression differences that may contribute to mortality disparities and suggests that among Luminal A breast tumors there are biological differences between AA and CAU patients. Some of these differences (CRYBB2 and PSPH) may exist from the earliest stages of tumor development, or may even precede malignancy. PMID:26109344

  5. Expression of Toll-Like Receptors on Breast Tumors: Taking a Toll on Tumor Microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer remains a major cause of death in women in the developed world. As Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are widely expressed on tumor cells and play important roles in the initiation and progression of cancer, they may thus serve as important targets and have an effective perspective on breast cancer treatment. Expression of TLRs on breast cancer cells and mononuclear inflammatory cells can promote inflammation and cell survival in the tumor microenvironment. Inflammation and cancer are related. It is well known that persistent inflammatory conditions can induce cancer formation, due to production of cytokines and chemokines, which play a crucial role in promoting angiogenesis, metastasis, and subversion of adaptive immunity. TLR signaling in tumor cells can mediate tumor cell immune escape and tumor progression, and it is regarded as one of the mechanisms for chronic inflammation in tumorigenesis and progression. This paper delineates the expression of various TLRs in promotion of inflammation and development of mammary tumors. Understanding the mechanisms through which TLRs on breast cancer cells and inflammatory cells regulate growth, survival, and metastatic progression can make them potential targets for breast cancer therapy

  6. The Malignant Phenotype of Breast Cancer Cells Is Reduced by COX-2 Silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Stasinopoulos

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The cyclooxygenase (COX pathway is currently targeted for therapeutic intervention in different cancers. We have previously shown that silencing of COX-2 in the poorly differentiated metastatic breast cell line MDA-MB-231 by RNA interference markedly delayed tumor onset and inhibited metastasis. To understand the functional effects of COX-2 silencing underlying the inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis previously reported, we investigated changes in these cells for a number of cancer-associated phenotypes. Cyclooxygenase-2-silenced cells were less able to acidify tissue culture medium, a response that could partly be attributed to decreased lactate production or export detected by reduced lactate in the medium. Consistent with the significantly reduced transcript levels of hyaluronan synthase 2, an enzyme responsible for the total level of hyaluronan secreted by these cells, COX-2 silencing resulted in lower hyaluronan levels secreted in culture medium. Inhibition of human umbilical vein endothelial cell network association in a coculture assay was also observed in COX-2-silenced cells. These data highlight the functional role of COX-2 in pathways that mediate increased malignancy.

  7. HER2-positive circulating tumor cells in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michail Ignatiadis

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs detection and phenotyping are currently evaluated in Breast Cancer (BC. Tumor cell dissemination has been suggested to occur early in BC progression. To interrogate dissemination in BC, we studied CTCs and HER2 expression on CTCs across the spectrum of BC staging. METHODS: Spiking experiments with 6 BC cell lines were performed and blood samples from healthy women and women with BC were analyzed for HER2-positive CTCs using the CellSearch®. RESULTS: Based on BC cell lines experiments, HER2-positive CTCs were defined as CTCs with HER2 immunofluorescence intensity that was at least 2.5 times higher than the background. No HER2-positive CTC was detected in 42 women without BC (95% confidence interval (CI 0-8.4% whereas 4.1% (95%CI 1.4-11.4% of 73 patients with ductal/lobular carcinoma in situ (DCIS/LCIS had 1 HER2-positive CTC/22.5 mL, 7.9%, (95%CI 4.1-14.9% of 101 women with non metastatic (M0 BC had ≥1 HER2-positive CTC/22.5 mL (median 1 cell, range 1-3 cells and 35.9% (95%CI 22.7-51.9% of 39 patients with metastatic BC had ≥1 HER2-positive CTC/7.5 mL (median 1.5 cells, range 1-42 cells. In CTC-positive women with DCIS/LCIS or M0 BC, HER2-positive CTCs were more commonly detected in HER2-positive (5 of 5 women than HER2-negative BC (5 of 12 women (p = 0.03. CONCLUSION: HER2-positive CTCs were detected in DCIS/LCIS or M0 BC irrespective of the primary tumor HER2 status. Nevertheless, their presence was more common in women with HER2-positive disease. Monitoring of HER2 expression on CTCs might be useful in trials with anti-HER2 therapies.

  8. Characterization of adjacent breast tumors using oligonucleotide microarrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current methodology often cannot distinguish second primary breast cancers from multifocal disease, a potentially important distinction for clinical management. In the present study we evaluated the use of oligonucleotide-based microarray analysis in determining the clonality of tumors by comparing gene expression profiles. Total RNA was extracted from two tumors with no apparent physical connection that were located in the right breast of an 87-year-old woman diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). The RNA was hybridized to the Affymetrix Human Genome U95A Gene Chip® (12,500 known human genes) and analyzed using the Gene Chip Analysis Suite® 3.3 (Affymetrix, Inc, Santa Clara, CA, USA) and JMPIN® 3.2.6 (SAS Institute, Inc, Cary, NC, USA). Gene expression profiles of tumors from five additional patients were compared in order to evaluate the heterogeneity in gene expression between tumors with similar clinical characteristics. The adjacent breast tumors had a pairwise correlation coefficient of 0.987, and were essentially indistinguishable by microarray analysis. Analysis of gene expression profiles from different individuals, however, generated a pairwise correlation coefficient of 0.710. Transcriptional profiling may be a useful diagnostic tool for determining tumor clonality and heterogeneity, and may ultimately impact on therapeutic decision making

  9. Expression profiling of circulating tumor cells in metastatic breast cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lang, J.; Scott, J.H.; Wolf, D.M.; Novák, Petr; Punj, V.; Magbanua, M.J.M.; Zhu, W.Z.; Mineyev, N.; Haqq, CH.; Crothers, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 149, č. 1 (2015), s. 121-131. ISSN 0167-6806 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Circulating tumor cells * Micrometastases * Breast cancer * EpCAM Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 3.940, year: 2014

  10. A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF SURGICAL TREATMENT FOR BREAST MALIGNANT TUMORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范志民; 刘国津; 盖学良; 王晓军; 辛志泳

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To review the evolution of the current surgical treatment for breast malignant tumors over the past twenty years in the First Hospital of Jilin University (the former Bethune University of Medical Sciences). Methods: 1195 eligible patients with primary breast malignant tumor diagnosed and surgically treated at the First Teaching Hospital from January 1980 and December 2000 were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The peak frequency was in 40-49 years of age (40.00%), the age of the patients with breast malignant tumors trends to become young. The most common pTNM classification was Stage Ⅱ. The most common histological type was infiltrating ductal carcinoma (398 patients, 33.31%), and simple carcinoma (279 patients, 23.53%). Modified radical mastectomy was the most common operation procedure performed (779 patients, 65.19%), and was increasingly used while radical mastectomy was adopted decreasingly in recent decade. Conclusion: The variation of operation procedures performed on patients with breast malignant tumors reflected the advance of our understanding of the biology of cancer and the progression of new treatment principles.

  11. Boswellia sacra essential oil induces tumor cell-specific apoptosis and suppresses tumor aggressiveness in cultured human breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail Mahmoud M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gum resins obtained from trees of the Burseraceae family (Boswellia sp. are important ingredients in incense and perfumes. Extracts prepared from Boswellia sp. gum resins have been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic effects. Essential oil prepared by distillation of the gum resin traditionally used for aromatic therapy has also been shown to have tumor cell-specific anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. The objective of this study was to optimize conditions for preparing Boswellea sacra essential oil with the highest biological activity in inducing tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity and suppressing aggressive tumor phenotypes in human breast cancer cells. Methods Boswellia sacra essential oil was prepared from Omani Hougari grade resins through hydrodistillation at 78 or 100 oC for 12 hours. Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Boswellia sacra essential oil-mediated cell viability and death were studied in established human breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF7, MDA-MB-231 and an immortalized normal human breast cell line (MCF10-2A. Apoptosis was assayed by genomic DNA fragmentation. Anti-invasive and anti-multicellular tumor properties were evaluated by cellular network and spheroid formation models, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to study Boswellia sacra essential oil-regulated proteins involved in apoptosis, signaling pathways, and cell cycle regulation. Results More abundant high molecular weight compounds, including boswellic acids, were present in Boswellia sacra essential oil prepared at 100 oC hydrodistillation. All three human breast cancer cell lines were sensitive to essential oil treatment with reduced cell viability and elevated cell death, whereas the immortalized normal human breast cell line was more resistant to essential oil

  12. Tumor initiating but differentiated luminal-like breast cancer cells are highly invasive in the absence of basal-like activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jiyoung; Villadsen, René; Sørlie, Therese;

    2012-01-01

    The majority of human breast cancers exhibit luminal epithelial differentiation. However, most aggressive behavior, including invasion and purported cancer stem cell activity, are considered characteristics of basal-like cells. We asked the following questions: Must luminal-like breast cancer cells....... We enriched for populations with or without prominent basal-like traits from individual tumors or single cell cloning from cell lines and recovered cells with a luminal-like phenotype. Tumor cells with basal-like traits mimicked phenotypic and functional behavior associated with stem cells assessed...... by gene expression, mammosphere formation and lineage markers. Luminal-like cells without basal-like traits, surprisingly, were fully capable of initiating invasive tumors in NOD SCID gamma (NSG) mice. In fact, these phenotypically pure luminal-like cells generated larger and more invasive tumors...

  13. Didymin reverses phthalate ester-associated breast cancer aggravation in the breast cancer tumor microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Ya-Ling; Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Tsai, Eing-Mei; HUNG, JEN-YU; CHANG, WEI-AN; Hou, Ming-Feng; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2015-01-01

    The present study demonstrated two novel findings. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first study to demonstrate that regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), produced by breast tumor-associated monocyte-derived dendritic cells (TADCs) following breast cancer cell exposure to phthalate esters, may contribute to the progression of cancer via enhancement of cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Furthermore, the present study revealed that didym...

  14. Adenosis tumor of the breast: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Pyeong Ho; Oh, Ki Keun; Jung, Mi Kyeong; Jung, Woo Hee; Shim, Jung Yeon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-05-15

    Adenosis tumor is a rare tumor of the breast and primarily consists of adenosis. Authors report a case of surgically proved adenosis tumor in a 31-year-old woman. Mammogram showed a lobulated, well-circumscribed mass with several surrounding radiolucent halos. In the center of the mass several linear radiolucent densities were seen with the appearance of a conglomerated well-circumscribed mass such as fibroadenoma. These linear radiolucent densities were consistent with the fat between the fibrous sclerosis in pathologic specimen. Ultrasonogram showed a well-circumscribed mass with homogeneous low echogenicity, partial posterior enhancement, and bilateral acoustic shadowings.

  15. Adenosis tumor of the breast: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adenosis tumor is a rare tumor of the breast and primarily consists of adenosis. Authors report a case of surgically proved adenosis tumor in a 31-year-old woman. Mammogram showed a lobulated, well-circumscribed mass with several surrounding radiolucent halos. In the center of the mass several linear radiolucent densities were seen with the appearance of a conglomerated well-circumscribed mass such as fibroadenoma. These linear radiolucent densities were consistent with the fat between the fibrous sclerosis in pathologic specimen. Ultrasonogram showed a well-circumscribed mass with homogeneous low echogenicity, partial posterior enhancement, and bilateral acoustic shadowings

  16. Expression of p53 and CD44 in Canine Breast Tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yun; CUI Wen; CHENG Xi; FENG Xinchang

    2008-01-01

    The p53 and CD44 expression of 10 cases in canine breast tumor were examined utilizing immunohistochemical assay with rabbit anti-mouse polyclonal antibodies against p53 or CD44,respectively.The p53 expression was significantly higher in malignant than in benign breast tumor.The expression of CD44 was not significantly different in malignant breast cancer and benign breast tumor.This suggests that p53 can be used as an indicator for animal prognosis.

  17. Exploiting evolutionary principles to prolong tumor control in preclinical models of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez-Navas, Pedro M; Kam, Yoonseok; Das, Tuhin; Hassan, Sabrina; Silva, Ariosto; Foroutan, Parastou; Ruiz, Epifanio; Martinez, Gary; Minton, Susan; Gillies, Robert J; Gatenby, Robert A

    2016-02-24

    Conventional cancer treatment strategies assume that maximum patient benefit is achieved through maximum killing of tumor cells. However, by eliminating the therapy-sensitive population, this strategy accelerates emergence of resistant clones that proliferate unopposed by competitors-an evolutionary phenomenon termed "competitive release." We present an evolution-guided treatment strategy designed to maintain a stable population of chemosensitive cells that limit proliferation of resistant clones by exploiting the fitness cost of the resistant phenotype. We treated MDA-MB-231/luc triple-negative and MCF7 estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) breast cancers growing orthotopically in a mouse mammary fat pad with paclitaxel, using algorithms linked to tumor response monitored by magnetic resonance imaging. We found that initial control required more intensive therapy with regular application of drug to deflect the exponential tumor growth curve onto a plateau. Dose-skipping algorithms during this phase were less successful than variable dosing algorithms. However, once initial tumor control was achieved, it was maintained with progressively smaller drug doses. In 60 to 80% of animals, continued decline in tumor size permitted intervals as long as several weeks in which no treatment was necessary. Magnetic resonance images and histological analysis of tumors controlled by adaptive therapy demonstrated increased vascular density and less necrosis, suggesting that vascular normalization resulting from enforced stabilization of tumor volume may contribute to ongoing tumor control with lower drug doses. Our study demonstrates that an evolution-based therapeutic strategy using an available chemotherapeutic drug and conventional clinical imaging can prolong the progression-free survival in different preclinical models of breast cancer. PMID:26912903

  18. Tumor marker CA 15-3 in breast cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hanifa Fejzić; Svjetlana Mujagić; Sanida Azabagić; Mensura Burina

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a correlation between the serum concentration of the tumor marker CA 15-3 and breast cancer, which has not been proven by the existence of regional and distant metastases, and breast cancer with the presence of regional and distant metastases. Patients and methods. The study was a retrospective-prospective study, and was conducted on 100 women aged 40-70 years of age in the period of January 2007 until June 2011, in whom, afte...

  19. Radiation reoxygenation of tumors in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of the phenomenon of radiation reoxygenation of tumors in patients after preoperative radiotherapy was shown during the determination of oxygen pressure (PO2) in 3-8 zones of breast adenocarcinoma in 20 non-irradiated and in 20 irradiated patients by the polarographic method in surgery. An increase in the mean values of PO2, a decrease in the number of hypoxic zones and a certain increase in the number of anoxic zones were noted. Similar results were obtained in the studies of PO2 in irradiated normal tissues of the breast

  20. HSET overexpression fuels tumor progression via centrosome clustering-independent mechanisms in breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannu, Vaishali; Rida, Padmashree C.G.; Ogden, Angela; Turaga, Ravi Chakra; Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; Bowen, Nathan J.; Rudd, Katie; Gupta, Meenakshi V.; Reid, Michelle D.; Cantuaria, Guilherme; Walczak, Claire E.; Aneja, Ritu

    2015-01-01

    Human breast tumors harbor supernumerary centrosomes in almost 80% of tumor cells. Although amplified centrosomes compromise cell viability via multipolar spindles resulting in death-inducing aneuploidy, cancer cells tend to cluster extra centrosomes during mitosis. As a result cancer cells display bipolar spindle phenotypes to maintain a tolerable level of aneuploidy, an edge to their survival. HSET/KifC1, a kinesin-like minus-end directed microtubule motor has recently found fame as a crucial centrosome clustering molecule. Here we show that HSET promotes tumor progression via mechanisms independent of centrosome clustering. We found that HSET is overexpressed in breast carcinomas wherein nuclear HSET accumulation correlated with histological grade and predicted poor progression-free and overall survival. In addition, deregulated HSET protein expression was associated with gene amplification and/or translocation. Our data provide compelling evidence that HSET overexpression is pro-proliferative, promotes clonogenic-survival and enhances cell-cycle kinetics through G2 and M-phases. Importantly, HSET co-immunoprecipitates with survivin, and its overexpression protects survivin from proteasome-mediated degradation, resulting in its increased steady-state levels. We provide the first evidence of centrosome clustering-independent activities of HSET that fuel tumor progression and firmly establish that HSET can serve both as a potential prognostic biomarker and as a valuable cancer-selective therapeutic target. PMID:25788277

  1. HSET overexpression fuels tumor progression via centrosome clustering-independent mechanisms in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannu, Vaishali; Rida, Padmashree C G; Ogden, Angela; Turaga, Ravi Chakra; Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; Bowen, Nathan J; Rudd, Katie; Gupta, Meenakshi V; Reid, Michelle D; Cantuaria, Guilherme; Walczak, Claire E; Aneja, Ritu

    2015-03-20

    Human breast tumors harbor supernumerary centrosomes in almost 80% of tumor cells. Although amplified centrosomes compromise cell viability via multipolar spindles resulting in death-inducing aneuploidy, cancer cells tend to cluster extra centrosomes during mitosis. As a result cancer cells display bipolar spindle phenotypes to maintain a tolerable level of aneuploidy, an edge to their survival. HSET/KifC1, a kinesin-like minus-end directed microtubule motor has recently found fame as a crucial centrosome clustering molecule. Here we show that HSET promotes tumor progression via mechanisms independent of centrosome clustering. We found that HSET is overexpressed in breast carcinomas wherein nuclear HSET accumulation correlated with histological grade and predicted poor progression-free and overall survival. In addition, deregulated HSET protein expression was associated with gene amplification and/or translocation. Our data provide compelling evidence that HSET overexpression is pro-proliferative, promotes clonogenic-survival and enhances cell-cycle kinetics through G2 and M-phases. Importantly, HSET co-immunoprecipitates with survivin, and its overexpression protects survivin from proteasome-mediated degradation, resulting in its increased steady-state levels. We provide the first evidence of centrosome clustering-independent activities of HSET that fuel tumor progression and firmly establish that HSET can serve both as a potential prognostic biomarker and as a valuable cancer-selective therapeutic target. PMID:25788277

  2. Tumor progression: analysis of the instability of the metastatic phenotype, sensitivity to radiation and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major complications for tumor therapy are 1) tumor spread (metastasis); 2) the mixed nature of tumors (heterogeneity); and 3) the capacity of tumors to evolve (progress). To study these tumor characteristics, the rat 13762NF mammary adenocarcinoma was cloned and studied for metastatic properties and sensitivities to therapy (chemotherapy, radiation and hyperthermia). The cell clones were heterogeneous and no correlation between metastatic potential and therapeutic sensitivities was observed. Further, these phenotypes were unstable during pasage in vitro; yet, the changes were clone dependent and reproducible using different cryoprotected cell stocks. To understand the phenotypic instability, subclones were isolated from low and high passage cell clones. The results demonstrated that 1) tumor cells are heterogeneous for multiple phenotypes; 2) tumor cells are unstable for multiple phenotypes; 3) the magnitude, direction and time of occurrence of phenotypic drift is clone dependent; 4) the sensitivity of cell clones to ionizing radiation (γ or heat) and chemotherapy agents is independent of their metastatic potential; 5) shifts in metastatic potential and sensitivity to therapy may occur simultaneously but are not linked; and 6) tumor cells independently diverge to form several subpopulations with unique phenotypic profiles

  3. BRCA1 Protein Expression Level and CD44+ Phenotype in Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadat Molanae

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: CD44+/CD24-/low breast cancer cells have tumour-initiating properties with stemcell-like features. Breast cancer gene 1 (BRCA1 is a tumour suppressor gene that playsa crucial role in DNA repair and maintenance of chromosome stability. The clinicopathologicalfeatures of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers suggest that BRCA1 mayfunction as a stem-cell regulator.Materials and Methods: In the present experimental study we examined the expressionand localization of the BRCA1 protein and investigated the prognostic value aswell as its relationship with the putative cancer stem cell (CSC marker (CD44 in 156tumour samples from a well-characterized series of unselected breast carcinomas usingimmunohistochemistry. Statistical analysis of the data was performed using SPSSsoftware version 16 (Chicago, IL, USA.Results: In breast tumours, the loss of nuclear expression was detected in 23 cases(15%, whereas cytoplasmic expression of BRCA1 was observed in 133 breast carcinomas(85%. Altered BRCA1 expression was significantly associated with high grade and poorprognosis breast tumours (p=0.006. We further established an inverse significant correlationbetween BRCA1 expression levels and CD44+ cancer cell phenotype (p=0.02Conclusion: Loss of BRCA1 expression is a marker of tumour aggressiveness andcorrelates with CD44+ tumour cell phenotype. Taken together, the present study supportsthe idea that the loss of BRCA1 results in persistent errors in DNA replication inbreast stem cells and provides targets for additional carcinogenic events.

  4. Overexpression of IL-15 promotes tumor destruction via NK1.1+ cells in a spontaneous breast cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural Killer (NK) cells play an important role in tumor prevention, but once tumors form, the numbers as well as the cytotoxic functions of NK cells are reduced. IL-15 is a cytokine that increases and activates NK cells. Here we will examine the anti-tumor role of IL-15 in a spontaneous breast cancer model. To achieve this, Polyoma Middle T (MT) mice that form spontaneous breast cancer were crossed with mice that either overexpress IL-15 (IL-15 transgenic (TG)) or mice that lack IL-15 (IL-15 knockout (KO)). We compared survival curves and tumor formation in IL-15 KO/MT, MT and IL-15 TG/MT groups. In addition, the phenotype, activation and contribution of NK cells and CD8 T cells to tumor formation were examined in each of these mouse strains via flow cytometry, ELISA, adoptive transfer and antibody depletion experiments. IL-15KO/MT tumors formed and progressed to endpoint more quickly than MT tumors. These tumors displayed little apoptosis and poor CD8 T cell infiltration. In contrast, IL-15 TG/MT mice had increased survival and the tumors displayed extensive cell death, high proportions of activated NK cells and a higher infiltration of CD8 T cells than MT tumors. CD8 T cells in IL-15 TG/MT tumors were capable of secreting IFNγ, possessed markers of memory, did not display an exhausted phenotype and were frequently NK1.1+. Long-term antibody depletion studies in IL-15 TG/MT mice revealed that NK1.1+, but not CD8 T cells, were critical for tumor destruction. Lastly, human NK cells, when exposed to a similar cytokine environment as that found in IL-15TG/MT tumors, were capable of killing human breast cancer cells. This study reveals that high levels of IL-15 can promote tumor destruction and reduce metastasis in breast cancer via effects on NK1.1+ cells. Our results suggest that strategies aimed at increasing NK cell activation may be effective against solid epithelial cancers. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1264-3) contains

  5. The usefulness of US with contrast agent on breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the usefulness of US with contrast agent breast tumors. Fifteen breast tumors in fourteen patients underwent color Doppler US before and after intravenous injection of a microbubble contrast agent (Levovist, Schering AG, Berlin, Germany). Benign lesions were 8 and malignant lesions were 7 among these. Real-time power Doppler ultrasonographic images were recorded on a videotape and representative images were color-printed. Tumor vascularity was analyzed on real-time images in regard to its presence or absence, and changes in diameter and number of vessels, presence or absence of blush around the vessels. Two observers reached a consensus. Results of malignant tumors were compared with those of benign tumors. Color Doppler signal intensity increased in 12 of 15 cases (80%). Number of vessel increased in 9 of 15 cases (60%) and diameter of vessel increased in 12 of 15 cases (80%). Vascular blush around the enhanced vessel was present in 5 of 15 patients (53%). Color Doppler signal increased in 5 of 8 benign lesions (63%) and 7 of 7 malignant lesions (100%). Number of vessel increased in 4 of 8 benign lesion (50%) and 5 of 7 malignant lesions (71%). Diameter of vessel increased in 5 of 8 benign lesions (63%) and 7 of 7 malignant lesions (100%). Blush around the enhanced vessel was present in one of 8 benign lesions (13%) and 4 of 7 malignant lesions (57%). The time to peak enhancement was shorter in malignant cases (mean=45 sec) than benign cases (mean=82 sec). US with contrast agent on breast tumors is effective to detect blood flow within the mass and may be helpful to differentiate malignant from benign lesions.

  6. The usefulness of US with contrast agent on breast tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hye An; Jung, Jung Im; Kim, Hak Hee; Son, Sang Bum; Byun, Jae Young; Lee, Jae Mun; Hahn, Sung Tae; Kim, Choon Yul [College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-09-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of US with contrast agent breast tumors. Fifteen breast tumors in fourteen patients underwent color Doppler US before and after intravenous injection of a microbubble contrast agent (Levovist, Schering AG, Berlin, Germany). Benign lesions were 8 and malignant lesions were 7 among these. Real-time power Doppler ultrasonographic images were recorded on a videotape and representative images were color-printed. Tumor vascularity was analyzed on real-time images in regard to its presence or absence, and changes in diameter and number of vessels, presence or absence of blush around the vessels. Two observers reached a consensus. Results of malignant tumors were compared with those of benign tumors. Color Doppler signal intensity increased in 12 of 15 cases (80%). Number of vessel increased in 9 of 15 cases (60%) and diameter of vessel increased in 12 of 15 cases (80%). Vascular blush around the enhanced vessel was present in 5 of 15 patients (53%). Color Doppler signal increased in 5 of 8 benign lesions (63%) and 7 of 7 malignant lesions (100%). Number of vessel increased in 4 of 8 benign lesion (50%) and 5 of 7 malignant lesions (71%). Diameter of vessel increased in 5 of 8 benign lesions (63%) and 7 of 7 malignant lesions (100%). Blush around the enhanced vessel was present in one of 8 benign lesions (13%) and 4 of 7 malignant lesions (57%). The time to peak enhancement was shorter in malignant cases (mean=45 sec) than benign cases (mean=82 sec). US with contrast agent on breast tumors is effective to detect blood flow within the mass and may be helpful to differentiate malignant from benign lesions.

  7. Associations of breast cancer risk factors with tumor subtypes: a pooled analysis from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaohong R; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L;

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors.......Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors....

  8. Associations of Breast Cancer Risk Factors With Tumor Subtypes : A Pooled Analysis From the Breast Cancer Association Consortium Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Xiaohong R.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L.; Couch, Fergus J.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Milne, Roger L.; Gaudet, Mia; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Cox, Angela; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Rebecca; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Blows, Fiona; Driver, Kristy; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Sinn, Peter; Vrieling, Alina; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomaeki, Kristiina; Heikkilae, Paeivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; Chanock, Stephen; Figueroa, Jonine; Brinton, Louise; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Liu, Jianjun; Van 't Veer, Laura J.; Van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Knight, Julia A.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; O'Malley, Frances P.; Weerasooriya, Nayana; John, Esther M.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hartmann, Arndt; Weihbrecht, Sebastian B.; Wachter, David L.; Jud, Sebastian M. S.; Loehberg, Christian R.; Baglietto, Laura; English, Dallas R.; Giles, Graham G.; McLean, Catriona A.; Severi, Gianluca; Lambrechts, Diether; Vandorpe, Thijs; Weltens, Caroline; Paridaens, Robert; Smeets, Ann; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E.; Cafourek, Victoria; Fredericksen, Zachary; Kosel, Matthew; Vachon, Celine; Cramp, Helen E.; Connley, Daniel; Cross, Simon S.; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Doerk, Thilo; Bremer, Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Karstens, Johann H.; Ay, Aysun; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menendez Rodriguez, Primitiva; Zamora, Pilar; Bentez, Javier; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Hamann, Ute; Pesch, Beate; Bruening, Thomas; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Eccles, Diana M.; Tapper, William J.; Gerty, Sue M.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Jones, Angela; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; McInerney, Niall; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yang, Show-Lin; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Shou-Tung; Hsu, Giu-Cheng; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gorski, Bohdan; Gronwald, Jacek; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Jager, Agnes; Kriege, Mieke; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; Collee, Margriet; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Pylkaes, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Mononen, Kari; Grip, Mervi; Hirvikoski, Pasi; Winqvist, Robert; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Auvinen, Paeivi; Soini, Ylermi; Sironen, Reijo; Bojesen, Stig E.; Orsted, David Dynnes; Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Radice, Paolo; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hunter, David J.; Tamimi, Rulla; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James; Odefrey, Fabrice; Gaborieau, Valerie; Devilee, Peter; Huijts, P. E. A.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Seynaeve, C.; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Hopper, John L.; Hammet, Fleur; Tsimiklis, Helen; Smith, Letitia D.; Southey, Melissa C.; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Easton, Douglas; Pharoah, Paul; Sherman, Mark E.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors. Methods We pooled tumor marker and epidemiological risk factor data from 35 568 invasive breast cancer case patients f

  9. Aberrant methylation of the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) gene promoter is associated with the inflammatory breast cancer phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Auwera, I; Laere, S.J.; Van den Bosch, S M; Van den Eynden, G. G.; Trinh, B X; van Dam, P A; Colpaert, C G; van Engeland, M; Van Marck, E A; Vermeulen, P B; Dirix, L Y

    2008-01-01

    Aberrant methylation of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene promoter occurs in about 40% of breast tumours and has been correlated with reduced APC protein levels. To what extent epigenetic alterations of the APC gene may differ according to specific breast cancer phenotypes, remains to be elucidated. Our aim was to explore the role of APC methylation in the inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) phenotype. The status of APC gene promoter hypermethylation was investigated in DNA from normal b...

  10. Ultrasound imaging of breast tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Kenneth; Umphrey, Heidi; Lockhart, Mark; Robbin, Michelle; Forero-Torres, Andres

    2015-09-01

    A novel image processing strategy is detailed for simultaneous measurement of tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology parameters from a sequence of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) images. After normalization and tumor segmentation, a global time-intensity curve describing contrast agent flow was analyzed to derive surrogate measures of tumor perfusion (i.e., peak intensity, time-to-peak intensity, area under the curve, wash-in rate, wash-out rate). A maximum intensity image was generated from these same segmented image sequences, and each vascular component was skeletonized via a thinning algorithm. This skeletonized data set and collection of vessel segments were then investigated to extract parameters related to the neovascular network and physical architecture (i.e., vessel-to-tissue ratio, number of bifurcations, vessel count, average vessel length and tortuosity). An efficient computation of local perfusion parameters was also introduced and operated by averaging time-intensity curve data over each individual neovascular segment. Each skeletonized neovascular segment was then color-coded by these local measures to produce a parametric map detailing spatial properties of tumor perfusion. Longitudinal DCE-US image data sets were collected in six patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer using a Philips iU22 ultrasound system equipped with a L9-3 transducer and Definity contrast agent. Patients were imaged using US before and after contrast agent dosing at baseline and again at weeks 6, 12, 18 and 24 after treatment started. Preliminary clinical results suggested that breast tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy may be associated with temporal and spatial changes in DCE-US-derived parametric measures of tumor perfusion. Moreover, changes in neovascular morphology parametric measures may also help identify any breast tumor response (or lack thereof) to systemic treatment. Breast cancer management from early detection to therapeutic

  11. RANKL/RANK/MMP-1 molecular triad contributes to the metastatic phenotype of breast and prostate cancer cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Casimiro

    Full Text Available The osteolytic nature of bone metastasis results from a tumor-driven increased bone resorption. Bone remodeling is orchestrated by the molecular triad RANK-RANKL-OPG. This process is dysregulated in bone metastases, mostly via induction of RANKL by tumor-derived factors. These factors increase expression of RANKL, which induce osteoclast formation, function, and survival, thereby increasing bone resorption. RANK is unexpectedly expressed by cancer cells, and the activation of RANKL-RANK pathway correlates with an increased invasive phenotype. To investigate the interaction between RANK expression in human breast and prostate cancer cells and their pro-metastatic phenotype we analyzed the activation of RANKL-RANK pathway and its effects on cell migration, invasion, gene expression in vitro, and osteolysis-inducing ability in vivo. RANKL activates kinase signaling pathways, stimulates cell migration, increases cell invasion, and up-regulates MMP-1 expression. In vivo, MMP-1 knockdown resulted in smaller x-ray osteolytic lesions and osteoclastogenesis, and decreased tumor burden. Therefore, RANKL inhibition in bone metastatic disease may decrease the levels of the osteoclastogenesis inducer MMP-1, contributing to a better clinical outcome.

  12. Comprehensive Quantitative Analysis of Ovarian and Breast Cancer Tumor Peptidomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhe; Wu, Chaochao; Xie, Fang; Slysz, Gordon W.; Tolic, Nikola; Monroe, Matthew E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Payne, Samuel H.; Fujimoto, Grant M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Levine, Douglas; Townsend, Reid; Davies, Sherri; Li, Shunqiang; Ellis, Matthew; Boja, Emily; Rivers, Robert; Rodriguez, Henry; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-01-02

    Aberrant degradation of proteins is associated with many pathological states, including cancers. Mass spectrometric analysis of tumor peptidomes, the intracellular and intercellular products of protein degradation, has the potential to provide biological insights on proteolytic processing in cancer. However, attempts to use the information on these smaller protein degradation products from tumors for biomarker discovery and cancer biology studies have been fairly limited to date, largely due to the lack of effective approaches for robust peptidomics identification and quantification, and the prevalence of confounding factors and biases associated with sample handling and processing. Herein, we have developed an effective and robust analytical platform for comprehensive analyses of tissue peptidomes, which is suitable for high throughput quantitative studies. The reproducibility and coverage of the platform, as well as the suitability of clinical ovarian tumor and patient-derived breast tumor xenograft samples with post-excision delay of up to 60 min before freezing for peptidomics analysis, have been demonstrated. Moreover, our data also show that the peptidomics profiles can effectively separate breast cancer subtypes, reflecting tumor-associated protease activities. Peptidomics complements results obtainable from conventional bottom-up proteomics, and provides insights not readily obtainable from such approaches.

  13. Comprehensive Quantitative Analysis of Ovarian and Breast Cancer Tumor Peptidomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhe; Wu, Chaochao; Xie, Fang; Slysz, Gordon W.; Tolic, Nikola; Monroe, Matthew E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Payne, Samuel H.; Fujimoto, Grant M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Levine, Douglas; Townsend, Reid; Davies, Sherri; Li, Shunqiang; Ellis, Matthew; Boja, Emily; Rivers, Robert; Rodriguez, Henry; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant degradation of proteins is associated with many pathological states, including cancers. Mass spectrometric analysis of tumor peptidomes, the intracellular and intercellular products of protein degradation, has the potential to provide biological insights on proteolytic processing in cancer. However, attempts to use the information on these smaller protein degradation products from tumors for biomarker discovery and cancer biology studies have been fairly limited to date, largely due to the lack of effective approaches for robust peptidomics identification and quantification, and the prevalence of confounding factors and biases associated with sample handling and processing. Herein, we have developed an effective and robust analytical platform for comprehensive analyses of tissue peptidomes, and which is suitable for high throughput quantitative studies. The reproducibility and coverage of the platform, as well as the suitability of clinical ovarian tumor and patient-derived breast tumor xenograft samples with post-excision delay of up to 60 min before freezing for peptidomics analysis, have been demonstrated. Moreover, our data also show that the peptidomics profiles can effectively separate breast cancer subtypes, reflecting tumor-associated protease activities. Peptidomics complements results obtainable from conventional bottom-up proteomics, and provides insights not readily obtainable from such approaches.

  14. Immunomorphologic lymph node changes in rats bearing experimental breast tumors.

    OpenAIRE

    Ciocca, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper regional lymph nodes draining tumors and also nonregional lymph nodes have been studied at the light- and electron-microscopic levels. These nodes were obtained from rats bearing long-evolving autochthonous breast cancers. They were compared with a control group of the same age. A morphometric quantitative analysis was done to evaluate immunologically competent cell populations. In the experimental group there were no differences between regional and distal lymph nodes in the tu...

  15. Intrinsic Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Markers of Breast Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Shwayta Kukreti; Albert Cerussi; Bruce Tromberg; Enrico Gratton

    2009-01-01

    We have discovered quantitative optical biomarkers unique to cancer by developing a double-differential spectroscopic analysis method for near-infrared (NIR, 650–1000 nm) spectra acquired non-invasively from breast tumors. These biomarkers are characterized by specific NIR absorption bands. The double-differential method removes patient specific variations in molecular composition which are not related to cancer, and reveals these specific cancer biomarkers. Based on the spectral regions of a...

  16. Tumor-to-tumor metastasis: an unusual case of breast cancer metastatic to a solitary fibrous tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Velez-Cubian, Frank O.; Gabordi, Robert C.; Smith, Prudence V.; Toloza, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm that most commonly involves the visceral or parietal pleura, but that has also been described arising from virtually all organs. This neoplasm exhibits rich vascularity, a characteristic it shares with renal cell carcinoma, making these tumors especially suitable for harboring metastases. We present a case of a 64-year-old woman with history of right breast cancer treated six years previously and who presents with a left pulmonary SF...

  17. A defined chromosome 6q fragment (at D6S310) harbors a putative tumor suppressor gene for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theile, M; Seitz, S; Arnold, W; Jandrig, B; Frege, R; Schlag, P M; Haensch, W; Guski, H; Winzer, K J; Barrett, J C; Scherneck, S

    1996-08-15

    Recent evidence obtained by cytogenetic and molecular studies indicates that in breast cancer chromosome 6q is often affected by genetic changes suggesting the existence of putative tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). However the function of gene(s) on this chromosome in breast cancer suppression is not understood. To substantiate further the presence of breast cancer related TSGs at 6q and to define their location, we first performed microcell-mediated transfer of chromosome 6 to CAL51 breast cancer cells for studying possible suppression of malignant phenotype and secondly, we analysed DNAs from 46 primary breast cancers for loss of constitutive heterozygosity (LOH) using 24 poly-morphic microsatellite markers. The chromosome transfer resulted in loss of tumorigenicity and reversion of other neoplastic properties of the microcell hybrids. Polymorphism analysis of single hybrids revealed that they harbored only a small donor chromosome fragment defined by the marker D6S310 (6q23.3-q25) and flanked by D6S292 and D6S311. The LOH data suggest that four tumor suppressor gene loci mapped to the central and distal portion of 6q may be independently deleted in breast cancer. One of these regions corresponds to the region identified by chromosome transfer. PMID:8761288

  18. Elusive identities and overlapping phenotypes of proangiogenic myeloid cells in tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffelt, Seth B; Lewis, Claire E; Naldini, Luigi; Brown, J Martin; Ferrara, Napoleone; De Palma, Michele

    2010-04-01

    It is now established that bone marrow-derived myeloid cells regulate tumor angiogenesis. This was originally inferred from studies of human tumor biopsies in which a positive correlation was seen between the number of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, such as macrophages and neutrophils, and tumor microvessel density. However, unequivocal evidence was only provided once mouse models were used to examine the effects on tumor angiogenesis by genetically or pharmacologically targeting myeloid cells. Since then, identifying the exact myeloid cell types involved in this process has proved challenging because of myeloid cell heterogeneity and the expression of overlapping phenotypic markers in tumors. As a result, investigators often simply refer to them now as "bone marrow-derived myeloid cells." Here we review the findings of various attempts to phenotype the myeloid cells involved and discuss the therapeutic implications of correctly identifying-and thus being able to target-this proangiogenic force in tumors. PMID:20167863

  19. Circulating tumor cells in breast cancer: A tool whose time has come of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristofanilli Massimo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are isolated tumor cells disseminated from the site of disease in metastatic and/or primary cancers, including breast cancer, that can be identified and measured in the peripheral blood of patients. As recent technical advances have rendered it easier to reproducibly and repeatedly sample this population of cells with a high degree of accuracy, these cells represent an attractive surrogate marker of the site of disease. Currently, CTCs are being integrated into clinical trial design as a surrogate for phenotypic and genotypic markers in correlation with development of molecularly targeted therapies. As CTCs play a crucial role in tumor dissemination, translational research is implicating CTCs in several biological processes, including epithelial to mesenchymal transition. In this mini-review, we review CTCs in metastatic breast cancer, and discuss their clinical utility for assessing prognosis and monitoring response to therapy. We will also introduce their utility in pharmacodynamic monitoring for rational selection of molecularly targeted therapies and briefly address how they can help elucidate the biology of cancer metastasis.

  20. Targeted Elimination of Breast Cancer Cells with Low Proteasome Activity is Sufficient for Tumor Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Vlashi, Erina; Lagadec, Chann; Chan, Mabel; Frohnen, Patricia; Jean McDonald, Alexandra; Pajonk, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancers are thought to be organized hierarchically with a small number of breast cancer stem cells, able to regrow a tumor after sublethal treatment while their progeny lack this feature. Furthermore, breast cancer stem cells are highly resistant to conventional anti-cancer treatments. According to the cancer stem cell hypothesis, all cancer stem cells in a tumor have to be eliminated to achieve cancer cure. In this study we tested if targeted elimination of breast cancer stem cells le...

  1. Tumor Cells Express FcγRl Which Contributes to Tumor Cell Growth and a Metastatic Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bud Nelson

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available High levels of circulating immune complexes containing tumor-associated antigens are associated with a poor prognosis for individuals with cancer. The ability of B cells, previously exposed to tumor-associated antigens, to promote both in vitro and in vivo tumor growth formed the rationale to evaluate the mechanism by which immune complexes may promote tumor growth. In elucidating this mechanism, FcγRl expression by tumor cells was characterized by flow cytometry, polymerase chain reaction, and sequence analysis. Immune complexes containing shed tumor antigen and anti-shed tumor antigen Ab cross-linked FcγRl-expressing tumor cells, which resulted in an induction of tumor cell proliferation and of shed tumor antigen production. Use of selective tyrosine kinase inhibitors demonstrated that tumor cell proliferation induced by immune complex cross-linking of FcγRl is dependent on the tyrosine kinase signal transduction pathway. A selective inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase also inhibited this induction of tumor cell proliferation. These findings support a role for immune complexes and FcγRl expression by tumor cells in augmentation of tumor growth and a metastatic phenotype.

  2. Endothelial cell pseudopods and angiogenesis of breast cancer tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun LuZhe

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A neoplastic tumor cannot grow beyond a millimeter or so in diameter without recruitment of endothelial cells and new blood vessels to supply nutrition and oxygen for tumor cell survival. This study was designed to investigate formation of new blood vessels within a human growing breast cancer tumor model (MDA MB231 in mammary fat pad of nude female mouse. Once the tumor grew to 35 mm3, it developed a well-vascularized capsule. Histological sections of tumors greater than 35 mm3 were stained with PAS, with CD-31 antibody (an endothelial cell maker, or with hypoxia inducible factor 1α antibody (HIF. The extent of blood vessel and endothelial cell pseudopod volume density was measured by ocular grid intercept counting in the PAS stained slides. Results The tumor area within 100–150 μm of the well-vascularized capsule had few blood vessels and only occasional endothelial cell pseudopods, whereas the area greater than 150 μm from the capsule had more blood vessels, capillaries, and a three-fold increase in volume density of pseudopods sprouting from the capillary endothelial cells. This subcortical region, rich in pseudopods, some of which were observed to have vacuoles/lumens, was strongly positive for presence of HIF. In some larger tumors, pseudopods were observed to insinuate for mm distances through hypoxic regions of the tumor. Conclusion The positive correlation between presence of HIF and the increased extent of pseudopods suggests volume density measure of the latter as a quantifiable marker of tumor hypoxia. Apparently, hypoxic regions of the tumor produce HIF leading to production of vascular endothelial growth factors that stimulate sprouting of capillary endothelial cells and formation of endothelial cell pseudopods.

  3. Musashi1 regulates breast tumor cell proliferation and is a prognostic indicator of poor survival

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Xiao-Yang; Penalva Luiz OF; Yuan Hongyan; Linnoila R Ilona; Lu Jiachun; Okano Hideyuki; Glazer Robert I

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Musashi1 (Msi1) is a conserved RNA-binding protein that regulates the Notch and Wnt pathways, and serves as a stem cell marker in the breast and other tissues. It is unknown how Msi1 relates to other breast cancer markers, whether it denotes tumor initiating cells (TICs), and how it affects gene expression and tumor cell survival in breast cancer cells. Results Msi1 expression was analyzed in 20 breast cancer cell lines and in 140 primary breast tumors by western blotting ...

  4. Tumor Autonomous Effects of Vitamin D Deficiency Promote Breast Cancer Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jasmaine D; Aggarwal, Abhishek; Swami, Srilatha; Krishnan, Aruna V; Ji, Lijuan; Albertelli, Megan A; Feldman, Brian J

    2016-04-01

    Patients with breast cancer (BCa) frequently have preexisting vitamin D deficiency (low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D) when their cancer develops. A number of epidemiological studies show an inverse association between BCa risk and vitamin D status in humans, although some studies have failed to find an association. In addition, several studies have reported that BCa patients with vitamin D deficiency have a more aggressive molecular phenotype and worse prognostic indicators. However, it is unknown whether this association is mechanistically causative and, if so, whether it results from systemic or tumor autonomous effects of vitamin D signaling. We found that ablation of vitamin D receptor expression within BCa cells accelerates primary tumor growth and enables the development of metastases, demonstrating a tumor autonomous effect of vitamin D signaling to suppress BCa metastases. We show that vitamin D signaling inhibits the expression of the tumor progression gene Id1, and this pathway is abrogated in vitamin D deficiency in vivo in 2 murine models of BCa. These findings are relevant to humans, because we discovered that the mechanism of VDR regulation of Inhibitor of differentiation 1 (ID1) is conserved in human BCa cells, and there is a negative correlation between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and the level of ID1 in primary tumors from patients with BCa. PMID:26934299

  5. Phyllodes tumor of the breast with lung metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The case report of a 63-year-old patient is described, who was admitted to 'Dr. Juan Bruno Zayas Alfonso' Teaching General Hospital of Santiago de Cuba due to persistent dry cough, little expectoration (sometimes yellowish), asthenia and loss of weight. On physical examination a tumor was palpated in the right breast, which was confirmed through sonography and mammogram. The results of the fine-needle biopsy were positive for neoplastic cells, consistent with carcinoma. Chest radiography and computerized axial tomography revealed the presence of lung metastatic images, reason why tumor excision with a safety margin of 2 cm was performed. The presence of phyllodes tumor was confirmed by means of the histopathologic study, so that it was necessary to indicate 3 cycles of chemotherapy (CISCYVADACT scheme), of which only two were administered as the old woman had an unfavorable course and she died 3 months later

  6. Tailoring Chemotherapy in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Based on Tumor Biology or Tumor Burden?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribnikar, Domen; Cardoso, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    The question of whether to offer adjuvant chemotherapy to patients with early-stage breast cancer has always been challenging to answer. It is well known that a substantial proportion of patients with early-stage breast cancer are over treated, especially when staging and hormonal and HER2 receptors are solely taken into consideration. The advances in our knowledge of breast cancer biology and its clinical implications were the basis for the discovery of additional reliable prognostic markers to aid decision making for adjuvant treatment. Gene expression profiling is a molecular tool that more precisely defines the intrinsic characteristics of each individual tumor. The application of this technology has led to the development of gene signatures/profiles with relevant prognostic-and some predictive-value that have become important tools in defining which patients with early-stage breast cancer can be safely spared from chemotherapy. However, the exact clinical utility of these tools will only be determined after the results of two large prospective randomized trials, MINDACT and TailorX, evaluating their role become available. Notwithstanding the existence of these genomic tools, tumor burden (defined as tumor size and nodal status) still has independent prognostic value and must be incorporated in decision making. In addition, these gene signatures have limited predictive value, and new biomarkers and new targets are needed. Therefore close collaboration between clinicians and scientists is crucial. Lastly, issues of cost-effectiveness, reimbursement, and availability are crucial and widely variable around the globe. PMID:27249737

  7. 'A novel in vivo model for the study of human breast cancer metastasis using primary breast tumor-initiating cells from patient biopsies'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of breast cancer metastasis depends on the use of established breast cancer cell lines that do not accurately represent the heterogeneity and complexity of human breast tumors. A tumor model was developed using primary breast tumor-initiating cells isolated from patient core biopsies that would more accurately reflect human breast cancer metastasis. Tumorspheres were isolated under serum-free culture conditions from core biopsies collected from five patients with clinical diagnosis of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Isolated tumorspheres were transplanted into the mammary fat pad of NUDE mice to establish tumorigenicity in vivo. Tumors and metastatic lesions were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin (H+E) staining and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Tumorspheres were successfully isolated from all patient core biopsies, independent of the estrogen receptor α (ERα)/progesterone receptor (PR)/Her2/neu status or tumor grade. Each tumorsphere was estimated to contain 50-100 cells. Transplantation of 50 tumorspheres (1-5 × 103 cells) in combination with Matrigel into the mammary fat pad of NUDE mice resulted in small, palpable tumors that were sustained up to 12 months post-injection. Tumors were serially transplanted three times by re-isolation of tumorspheres from the tumors and injection into the mammary fat pad of NUDE mice. At 3 months post-injection, micrometastases to the lung, liver, kidneys, brain and femur were detected by measuring content of human chromosome 17. Visible macrometastases were detected in the lung, liver and kidneys by 6 months post-injection. Primary tumors variably expressed cytokeratins, Her2/neu, cytoplasmic E-cadherin, nuclear β catenin and fibronectin but were negative for ERα and vimentin. In lung and liver metastases, variable redistribution of E-cadherin and β catenin to the membrane of tumor cells was observed. ERα was re-expressed in lung metastatic cells in two of five samples. Tumorspheres isolated under defined culture

  8. Imaging findings in phyllodes tumors of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study the radiological appearance and pathological features of breast phyllodes tumors (PTs), and to enhance the recognition of the tumor. Materials and methods: Clinical and imaging findings were retrospectively reviewed in 24 women with PTs confirmed by surgical pathology. All of the 24 patients had preoperative MRI and sonography, and 10 had preoperative mammography. Results: The histologic findings were benign, borderline and malignant PTs in 16.7% (4/24), 45.8% (11/24) and 37.5% (9/24) of cases, respectively. The tumor size (p = 0.001), irregular shape on sonographic imaging (p = 0.039), internal non-enhanced septations (p = 0.009), silt-like changes in enhanced images (p = 0.006) and signal changes from T2-weighted to enhanced images on MRI (p = 0.001) correlated significantly with the histologic grade; the BI-RADS category of the MRI could reflect the PT's histologic grade with a correlation coefficient of 0.440 (p = 0.031). If the category BI-RADS ≥4a was considered to be a suspicious malignant lesion, the diagnostic accuracy of mammography, US and MRI would be 70% (7/10), 62.5% (15/24) and 95.8% (23/24), respectively. Conclusion: The tumor size and several US and MRI findings can be used to help preoperatively determine the histologic grade of breast PTs. When a patient presents with a progressively enlarging, painless breast mass, MRI should be recommended first.

  9. Mind the gap: Racial differences in breast cancer incidence and biologic phenotype, but not stage, among low-income women participating in a government-funded screening program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Joan E.; Walters, Christine A.; Hill, Elizabeth G.; Ford, Marvella E.; Barker-Elamin, Tiffany; Bennett, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Breast cancer mortality rates in South Carolina (SC) are 40% higher among African-American (AA) than European-American (EA) women. Proposed reasons include race-associated variations in care and/or tumor characteristics, which may be subject to income effects. We evaluated race-associated differences in tumor biologic phenotype and stage among low-income participants in a government-funded screening program. Methods Best Chance Network (BCN) data were linked with the SC Central Cancer Registry. Characteristics of breast cancers diagnosed in BCN participants aged 47–64 years during 1996–2006 were abstracted. Race-specific case proportions and incidence rates based on estrogen receptor (ER) status and histologic grade were estimated. Results Among 33,880 low-income women accessing BCN services, repeat breast cancer screening utilization was poor, especially among EAs. Proportionally, stage at diagnosis did not differ by race (607 cancers, 53% among AAs), with about 40% advanced stage. Compared to EAs, invasive tumors in AAs were 67% more likely (proportions) to be of poor-prognosis phenotype (both ER-negative and high-grade); this was more a result of the 46% lesser AA incidence (rates) of better-prognosis (ER+ lower-grade) cancer than the 32% greater incidence of poor-prognosis disease (p-values <0.01). When compared to the general SC population, racial disparities in poor prognostic features within the BCN population were attenuated; this was due to more frequent adverse tumor features in EAs rather than improvements for AAs. Conclusion Among low-income women in SC, closing the breast cancer racial and income mortality gaps will require improved early diagnosis, addressing causes of racial differences in tumor biology, and improved care for cancers of poor-prognosis biology. PMID:23239148

  10. Effect of breast cancer phenotype on diagnostic performance of MRI in the prediction to response to neoadjuvant treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bufi, Enida, E-mail: reagandus@alice.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Belli, Paolo; Di Matteo, Marialuisa [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Terribile, Daniela; Franceschini, Gianluca [Department of Surgery, Breast Unit, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Nardone, Luigia [Department of Radiotherapy, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Petrone, Gianluigi [Department of Pathology, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Bonomo, Lorenzo [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University, Rome (Italy)

    2014-09-15

    Aim: The estimation of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is useful in the surgical decision in breast cancer. We addressed the diagnostic reliability of conventional MRI, of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and of a merged criterion coupling morphological MRI and DWI. Diagnostic performance was analysed separately in different tumor subtypes, including HER2+ (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2)/HR+ (hormone receptor) (hybrid phenotype). Materials and methods: Two-hundred and twenty-five patients underwent MRI before and after NAC. The response to treatment was defined according to the RECIST classification and the evaluation of DWI with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). The complete pathological response – pCR was assessed (Mandard classification). Results: Tumor phenotypes were Luminal (63.6%), Triple Negative (16.4%), HER2+ (7.6%) or Hybrid (12.4%). After NAC, pCR was observed in 17.3% of cases. Average ADC was statistically higher after NAC (p < 0.001) among patients showing pCR vs. those who had not pCR. The RECIST classification showed adequate performance in predicting the pCR in Triple Negative (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, ROC AUC = 0.9) and in the HER2+ subgroup (AUC = 0.826). Lower performance was found in the Luminal and Hybrid subgroups (AUC 0.693 and 0.611, respectively), where the ADC criterion yielded an improved performance (AUC = 0.787 and 0.722). The coupling of morphological and DWI criteria yielded maximally improved performance in the Luminal and Hybrid subgroups (AUC = 0.797 and 0.761). Conclusion: The diagnostic reliability of MRI in predicting the pCR to NAC depends on the tumor phenotype, particularly in the Luminal and Hybrid subgroups. In these cases, the coupling of morphological MRI evaluation and DWI assessment may facilitate the diagnosis.

  11. Effect of breast cancer phenotype on diagnostic performance of MRI in the prediction to response to neoadjuvant treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: The estimation of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is useful in the surgical decision in breast cancer. We addressed the diagnostic reliability of conventional MRI, of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and of a merged criterion coupling morphological MRI and DWI. Diagnostic performance was analysed separately in different tumor subtypes, including HER2+ (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2)/HR+ (hormone receptor) (hybrid phenotype). Materials and methods: Two-hundred and twenty-five patients underwent MRI before and after NAC. The response to treatment was defined according to the RECIST classification and the evaluation of DWI with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). The complete pathological response – pCR was assessed (Mandard classification). Results: Tumor phenotypes were Luminal (63.6%), Triple Negative (16.4%), HER2+ (7.6%) or Hybrid (12.4%). After NAC, pCR was observed in 17.3% of cases. Average ADC was statistically higher after NAC (p < 0.001) among patients showing pCR vs. those who had not pCR. The RECIST classification showed adequate performance in predicting the pCR in Triple Negative (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, ROC AUC = 0.9) and in the HER2+ subgroup (AUC = 0.826). Lower performance was found in the Luminal and Hybrid subgroups (AUC 0.693 and 0.611, respectively), where the ADC criterion yielded an improved performance (AUC = 0.787 and 0.722). The coupling of morphological and DWI criteria yielded maximally improved performance in the Luminal and Hybrid subgroups (AUC = 0.797 and 0.761). Conclusion: The diagnostic reliability of MRI in predicting the pCR to NAC depends on the tumor phenotype, particularly in the Luminal and Hybrid subgroups. In these cases, the coupling of morphological MRI evaluation and DWI assessment may facilitate the diagnosis

  12. Impact of Triple-Negative Phenotype on Prognosis of Patients With Breast Cancer Brain Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To elucidate survival times and identify potential prognostic factors in patients with triple-negative (TN) phenotype who harbored brain metastases arising from breast cancer and who underwent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: A total of 103 breast cancer patients with brain metastases were treated with SRS and then studied retrospectively. Twenty-four patients (23.3%) were TN. Survival times were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, with a log–rank test computing the survival time difference between groups. Univariate and multivariate analyses to predict potential prognostic factors were performed using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. Results: The presence of TN phenotype was associated with worse survival times, including overall survival after the diagnosis of primary breast cancer (43 months vs. 82 months), neurologic survival after the diagnosis of intracranial metastases, and radiosurgical survival after SRS, with median survival times being 13 months vs. 25 months and 6 months vs. 16 months, respectively (p < 0.002 in all three comparisons). On multivariate analysis, radiosurgical survival benefit was associated with non-TN status and lower recursive partitioning analysis class at the initial SRS. Conclusion: The TN phenotype represents a significant adverse prognostic factor with respect to overall survival, neurologic survival, and radiosurgical survival in breast cancer patients with intracranial metastasis. Recursive partitioning analysis class also served as an important and independent prognostic factor.

  13. Impact of Triple-Negative Phenotype on Prognosis of Patients With Breast Cancer Brain Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Zhiyuan [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Schlesinger, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Toulmin, Sushila [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Rich, Tyvin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Sheehan, Jason, E-mail: jps2f@virginia.edu [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To elucidate survival times and identify potential prognostic factors in patients with triple-negative (TN) phenotype who harbored brain metastases arising from breast cancer and who underwent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: A total of 103 breast cancer patients with brain metastases were treated with SRS and then studied retrospectively. Twenty-four patients (23.3%) were TN. Survival times were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, with a log-rank test computing the survival time difference between groups. Univariate and multivariate analyses to predict potential prognostic factors were performed using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. Results: The presence of TN phenotype was associated with worse survival times, including overall survival after the diagnosis of primary breast cancer (43 months vs. 82 months), neurologic survival after the diagnosis of intracranial metastases, and radiosurgical survival after SRS, with median survival times being 13 months vs. 25 months and 6 months vs. 16 months, respectively (p < 0.002 in all three comparisons). On multivariate analysis, radiosurgical survival benefit was associated with non-TN status and lower recursive partitioning analysis class at the initial SRS. Conclusion: The TN phenotype represents a significant adverse prognostic factor with respect to overall survival, neurologic survival, and radiosurgical survival in breast cancer patients with intracranial metastasis. Recursive partitioning analysis class also served as an important and independent prognostic factor.

  14. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in breast cancer: a diagnostic tool for prognosis and molecular analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoshen Dong; R.Katherine Alpaugh; Massimo Cristofanilli

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer (MBC) is characterized by a combination of tumor growth,proliferation and metastatic progression and is typically managed with palliative intent.The benefit of standard systemic therapies is relatively limited and the disease is considered incurable suggesting the need to investigate the biological drivers of the various phases of the metastatic process in order to improve the selection of molecularly driven therapies.The detection,enumeration and molecular analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) provide an intriguing opportunity to advance this knowledge.CTCs enumerated by the Food and Drugs Administration-cleared CellSearchTM system are an independent prognostic factor of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in MBC patients.Several published papers demonstrated the poor prognosis for MBC patients that presented basal CTC count ≥5 in 7.5 mL of blood.Therefore,the enumeration of CTCs during treatment for MBC provides a tool with the ability to predict progression of disease earlier than standard timing of anatomical assessment using conventional radiological tests.During the metastatic process cancer cells exhibit morphological and phenotypic plasticity undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT).This important phenomenon is associated with down regulation of epithelial marker (e.g.,EpCAM) with potential limitations in the applicability of current CTCs enrichment methods.Such observations translated in a number of investigations aimed at improving our capabilities to enumerate and perform molecular characterization of CTCs.Theoretically,the phenotypic analysis of CTCs can represent a "liquid" biopsy of breast tumor that is able to identify a new potential target against the metastatic disease and advance the development and monitoring of personalized therapies.

  15. Cyclooxygenase-2 in tumor-associated macrophages promotes breast cancer cell survival by triggering a positive-feedback loop between macrophages and cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hongzhong; Yang, Bing; Huang, Jing; Lin, Yong; Xiang, Tingxiu; Wan, Jingyuan; Li, Hongyuan; Chouaib, Salem; Ren, Guosheng

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play an important role in cancer cell survival, however, the mechanism of which remains elusive. In this study, we found that COX-2 was abundantly expressed in breast TAMs, which was correlated to poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. Ectopic over-expression of COX-2 in TAMs enhanced breast cancer cell survival both in vitro and in vivo. COX-2 in TAMs was determined to be essential for the induction and maintenance of M2-phenotype macrophage polarity. C...

  16. In vivo measurement of tumor estradiol and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angiogenesis, crucial for tumor progression, is a process regulated in the tissue micro-environment. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent stimulatory factor of angiogenesis and a negative prognostic indicator of breast cancer. VEGF is biologically active in the extracellular space and hitherto, there has been a lack of techniques enabling sampling of angiogenic molecules such as VEGF in situ. The majority of breast cancers are estrogen-dependent, and estrogen has been shown to regulate VEGF in normal breast tissue and experimental breast cancer. We investigated if microdialysis may be applicable in human breast cancer for sampling of extracellular VEGF in situ and to explore if there is an association with local estradiol and VEGF levels in normal and cancerous breast tissue. Microdialysis was used to sample VEGF and estradiol in tumors and adjacent normal breast tissue in postmenopausal breast cancer patients. VEGF and estradiol were also measured in plasma, and immunohistochemical staining for VEGF was performed on tumor sections. We show that in vivo levels of extracellular VEGF were significantly higher in breast cancer tumors than in normal adjacent breast tissue. There was a significant positive correlation between estradiol and extracellular VEGF in normal breast tissue. However, no correlation was detected between estradiol and VEGF in tumors or between tumor VEGF and plasma VEGF. We conclude that VEGF and estradiol correlates significantly in normal breast tissue. Microdialysis may be used to provide novel insight in breast tumor biology and the regulation of molecules in the extracellular space of human breast tumors in vivo

  17. Mass spectrometry images acylcarnitines, phosphatidylcholines, and sphingomyelin in MDA-MB-231 breast tumor models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chughtai, K; Jiang, L.; Greenwood, T.R.; Glunde, K.; Heeren, R.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The lipid compositions of different breast tumor microenvironments are largely unknown due to limitations in lipid imaging techniques. Imaging lipid distributions would enhance our understanding of processes occurring inside growing tumors, such as cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis

  18. Significance of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence after breast conserving treatment: role of surgical removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Romano Demicheli; Ilaria Ardoino; Federico Ambrogi; Roberto Agresti; Elia Biganzoli

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the pattern over time (dynamics) of further recurrence and death after ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) in breast cancer patients undergoing breast conserving treatment (BCT).Methods:A total of 338 evaluable patients experiencing IBTR were extracted from a database of 3,293 patients undergoing BCT.The hazard rates for recurrence and mortality throughout 10 years of follow-up after IBTR were assessed and were compared to the analogous estimates associated to the primary treatment.Results:In a time frame with the time origin at the surgical treatment for IBTR,the hazard rate for further recurrence displays a bimodal pattern (peaks at the second and at the sixth year).Patients receiving mastectomy for IBTR reveal recurrence and mortality dynamics similar to that of node positive (N+) patients receiving mastectomy as primary surgery,apart from the first two-three years,when IBTR patients do worse.If the patients with time to IBTR longer than 2.5 years are considered,differences disappear.Conclusions:The recurrence and mortality dynamics following IBTR surgical removal is similar to the corresponding dynamics following primary tumor removal.In particular,patients with time to IBTR in excess of 2.5 years behave like N+ patients following primary tumor removal.Findings may be suitably explained by assuming that the surgical manoeuvre required by IBTR treatment is able to activate a sudden growing phase for tumor foci most of which,as suggested by the systemic model of breast cancer,would have reached the clinical level according to their own dynamics.

  19. FGFR2 Promotes Breast Tumorigenicity through Maintenance of Breast Tumor-Initiating Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sungeun; Dubrovska, Anna; Salamone, Richard J.; Walker, John R.; Grandinetti, Kathryn B.; Bonamy, Ghislain M.C.; Orth, Anthony P.; Elliott, Jimmy; Porta, Diana Graus; Garcia-Echeverria, Carlos; Reddy, Venkateshwar A.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that some cancers contain a population of stem-like TICs (tumor-initiating cells) and eliminating TICs may offer a new strategy to develop successful anti-cancer therapies. As molecular mechanisms underlying the maintenance of the TIC pool are poorly understood, the development of TIC-specific therapeutics remains a major challenge. We first identified and characterized TICs and non-TICs isolated from a mouse breast cancer model. TICs displayed increased tumorigenic...

  20. A case of tumor-forming pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hiroyuki; Miyairi, Junichi; Hata, Motoyuki; Kirii, Yasusi; Tsuchiya, Shinichi

    2013-04-01

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH), characterized by the presence of slit-like spaces embedded in a hyalinized stroma, is sometimes observed during pathologic examination of breast-tissue specimens. Because tumor-forming PASH is rare, we report a case of a 41-year-old woman admitted to our hospital with a tumor in her left breast. Ultrasonography and aspiration biopsy cytology revealed a benign tumor. After performing Mammotome(®) biopsy, the lesion was diagnosed as PASH of the breast based on characteristic findings of histology and immunohistochemical studies. Because PASH tumors do not usually become malignant, we decided to perform ultrasonographic follow-up without tumor excision. PMID:20072822

  1. Core Needle Biopsy of Breast Cancer Tumors Increases Distant Metastases in a Mouse Model12

    OpenAIRE

    Mathenge, Edward Gitau; Dean, Cheryl Ann; Clements, Derek; Vaghar-Kashani, Ahmad; Photopoulos, Steffany; Coyle, Krysta Mila; Giacomantonio, Michael; Malueth, Benjamin; Nunokawa, Anna; Jordan, Julie; Lewis, John D.; Gujar, Shashi Ashok; Marcato, Paola; Lee, Patrick W.K.; Giacomantonio, Carman Anthony

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Incisional biopsies, including the diagnostic core needle biopsy (CNB), routinely performed before surgical excision of breast cancer tumors are hypothesized to increase the risk of metastatic disease. In this study, we experimentally determined whether CNB of breast cancer tumors results in increased distant metastases and examine important resultant changes in the primary tumor and tumor microenvironment associated with this outcome. METHOD: To evaluate the effect of CNB on me...

  2. Significance of Micrometastases: Circulating Tumor Cells and Disseminated Tumor Cells in Early Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adjuvant systemic therapy targets minimal residual disease. Our current clinical approach in the adjuvant setting is to presume, rather than confirm, the presence of minimal residual disease. Based on assessment of the primary tumor, we estimate an individual’s recurrence risk. Subsequent treatment decisions are based on characteristics of the primary tumor, with the presumption of consistent biology and treatment sensitivity between micrometastases and the primary lesion. An alternative approach is to identify micrometastatic disease. Detection of disseminated tumor cells (DTC) in the bone marrow and circulating tumor cells (CTC) from peripheral blood collection may offer quantification and biocharacterization of residual disease. This paper will review the prognostic and predictive potential of micrometastatic disease in early breast cancer

  3. Significance of Micrometastases: Circulating Tumor Cells and Disseminated Tumor Cells in Early Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oakman, Catherine; Pestrin, Marta [‘Sandro Pitigliani’ Medical Oncology Unit, Department of Oncology, Hospital of Prato, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Piazza Ospedale 2, 59100, Prato (Italy); Bessi, Silvia; Galardi, Francesca [Translational Research Unit, Hospital of Prato, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Piazza Ospedale 2, 59100, Prato (Italy); Di Leo, Angelo, E-mail: adileo@usl4.toscana.it [‘Sandro Pitigliani’ Medical Oncology Unit, Department of Oncology, Hospital of Prato, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Piazza Ospedale 2, 59100, Prato (Italy)

    2010-06-08

    Adjuvant systemic therapy targets minimal residual disease. Our current clinical approach in the adjuvant setting is to presume, rather than confirm, the presence of minimal residual disease. Based on assessment of the primary tumor, we estimate an individual’s recurrence risk. Subsequent treatment decisions are based on characteristics of the primary tumor, with the presumption of consistent biology and treatment sensitivity between micrometastases and the primary lesion. An alternative approach is to identify micrometastatic disease. Detection of disseminated tumor cells (DTC) in the bone marrow and circulating tumor cells (CTC) from peripheral blood collection may offer quantification and biocharacterization of residual disease. This paper will review the prognostic and predictive potential of micrometastatic disease in early breast cancer.

  4. Exon-level transcriptome profiling in murine breast cancer reveals splicing changes specific to tumors with different metastatic abilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandine Bemmo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is the second most frequent type of cancer affecting women. We are increasingly aware that changes in mRNA splicing are associated with various characteristics of cancer. The most deadly aspect of cancer is metastasis, the process by which cancer spreads from the primary tumor to distant organs. However, little is known specifically about the involvement of alternative splicing in the formation of macroscopic metastases. Our study investigates transcript isoform changes that characterize tumors of different abilities to form growing metastases. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To identify alternative splicing events (ASEs that are associated with the fully metastatic phenotype in breast cancer, we used Affymetrix Exon Microarrays to profile mRNA isoform variations genome-wide in weakly metastatic (168FARN and 4T07 and highly metastatic (4T1 mammary carcinomas. Statistical analysis identified significant expression changes in 7606 out of 155,994 (4% exons and in 1725 out of 189,460 (1% intronic regions, which affect 2623 out of 16,654 (16% genes. These changes correspond to putative alternative isoforms-several of which are novel-that are differentially expressed between tumors of varying metastatic phenotypes. Gene pathway analysis showed that 1224 of genes expressing alternative isoforms were involved in cell growth, cell interactions, cell proliferation, cell migration and cell death and have been previously linked to cancers and genetic disorders. We chose ten predicted splice variants for RT-PCR validation, eight of which were successfully confirmed (MED24, MFI2, SRRT, CD44, CLK1 and HNRNPH1. These include three novel intron retentions in CD44, a gene in which isoform variations have been previously associated with the metastasis of several cancers. CONCLUSION: Our findings reveal that various genes are differently spliced and/or expressed in association with the metastatic phenotype of tumor cells. Identification of

  5. Growth Factors and Breast Tumors, Comparison of Selected Growth Factors with Traditional Tumor Markers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kučera, R.; Černá, M.; Ňaršanská, A.; Svobodová, Š.; Straková, M.; Vrzalová, J.; Fuchsová, R.; Třešková, I.; Kydlíček, T.; Třeška, V.; Pecen, Ladislav; Topolčan, O.; Padziora, P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 12 (2011), s. 4653-4656. ISSN 0250-7005 Grant ostatní: GA MZd(CZ) NS9727; GA MZd(CZ) NS10238; GA MZd(CZ) NS10253 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : growth factor * breast cancer * tumor markers * CA 15-3 * CEA * IGF1 * EGF * HGF Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 1.725, year: 2011

  6. Gastric Composite Tumor of Alpha Fetoprotein-Producing Carcinoma/Hepatoid Adenocarcinoma and Endocrine Carcinoma with Reference to Cellular Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Suzuki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-fetoprotein-producing carcinoma (AFPC/hepatoid adenocarcinoma (HAC and neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC are uncommon in the stomach. Composite tumors consisting of these carcinomas and their histologic phenotypes are not well known. Between 2002 and 2007, to estimate the prevalence of composite tumors consisting of tubular adenocarcinoma, AFPC/HAC and NEC, we reviewed specimens obtained from 294 consecutive patients treated surgically for gastric cancer. We examined histological phenotype of tumors of AFPC or NEC containing the composite tumor by evaluating immunohistochemical expressions of MUC2, MUC5AC, MUC6, CDX2, and SOX2. Immunohistochemically, AFPC/HAC dominantly showed the intestinal or mixed phenotype, and NEC frequently showed the gastric phenotype. In the composite tumor, the tubular and hepatoid components showed the gastric phenotype, and the neuroendocrine component showed the mixed type. The unique composite tumor predominantly showed the gastric phenotype, and the hepatoid and neuroendocrine components were considered to be differentiated from the tubular component.

  7. Annexin A1 expression in breast cancer: tumor subtypes and prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sobral-Leite, Marcelo; Wesseling, Jelle; Smit, Vincent T. H. B. M.; Nevanlinna, Heli; van Miltenburg, Martine H; Sanders, Joyce; Hofland, Ingrid; Blows, Fiona M.; Coulson, Penny; Patrycja, Gazinska; Schellens, Jan H. M.; Fagerholm, Rainer; Heikkilä, Päivi; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Annexin A1 (ANXA1) is a protein related with the carcinogenesis process and metastasis formation in many tumors. However, little is known about the prognostic value of ANXA1 in breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association between ANXA1 expression, BRCA1/2 germline carriership, specific tumor subtypes and survival in breast cancer patients. ...

  8. Persistence of disseminated tumor cells after neoadjuvant treatment for locally advanced breast cancer predicts poor survival

    OpenAIRE

    Mathiesen, Randi R.; Borgen, Elin; Renolen, Anne; Løkkevik, Erik; Nesland, Jahn M; Anker, Gun; Østenstad, Bjørn; Lundgren, Steinar; Risberg, Terje; Mjaaland, Ingvil; Kvalheim, Gunnar; Lønning, Per E.; Naume, Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Presence of disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in bone marrow (BM) and circulating tumor cells (CTC) in peripheral blood (PB) predicts reduced survival in early breast cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of and alterations in DTC- and CTC-status in locally advanced breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) and to evaluate their prognostic impact. Methods ...

  9. In vitro analysis of the invasive phenotype of SUM 149, an inflammatory breast cancer cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Dharmawardhane Suranganie F; Wall Kristin M; Hoffmeyer Michaela R

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most lethal form of locally invasive breast cancer known. However, very little information is available on the cellular mechanisms responsible for manifestation of the IBC phenotype. To understand the unique phenotype of IBC, we compared the motile and adhesive interactions of an IBC cell line, SUM 149, to the non-IBC cell line SUM 102. Results Our results demonstrate that both IBC and non-IBC cell lines exhibit similar adhesive prop...

  10. Inorganic Nanovehicle Targets Tumor in an Orthotopic Breast Cancer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Goeun; Kwon, Oh-Joon; Oh, Yeonji; Yun, Chae-Ok; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2014-03-01

    The clinical efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutic agent, methotrexate (MTX), can be limited by its very short plasma half-life, the drug resistance, and the high dosage required for cancer cell suppression. In this study, a new drug delivery system is proposed to overcome such limitations. To realize such a system, MTX was intercalated into layered double hydroxides (LDHs), inorganic drug delivery vehicle, through a co-precipitation route to produce a MTX-LDH nanohybrid with an average particle size of approximately 130 nm. Biodistribution studies in mice bearing orthotopic human breast tumors revealed that the tumor-to-liver ratio of MTX in the MTX-LDH-treated-group was 6-fold higher than that of MTX-treated-one after drug treatment for 2 hr. Moreover, MTX-LDH exhibited superior targeting effect resulting in high antitumor efficacy inducing a 74.3% reduction in tumor volume compared to MTX alone, and as a consequence, significant survival benefits. Annexin-V and propidium iodine dual staining and TUNEL analysis showed that MTX-LDH induced a greater degree of apoptosis than free MTX. Taken together, our data demonstrate that a new MTX-LDH nanohybrid exhibits a superior efficacy profile and improved distribution compared to MTX alone and has the potential to enhance therapeutic efficacy via inhibition of tumor proliferation and induction of apoptosis.

  11. Breast tumor specific mutation in GATA3 affects physiological mechanisms regulating transcription factor turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Adomas, Aleksandra B; Grimm, Sara A.; Malone, Christine; Takaku, Motoki; Sims, Jennifer K.; Wade, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The transcription factor GATA3 is a favorable prognostic indicator in estrogen receptor-α (ERα)-positive breast tumors in which it participates with ERα and FOXA1 in a complex transcriptional regulatory program driving tumor growth. GATA3 mutations are frequent in breast cancer and have been classified as driver mutations. To elucidate the contribution(s) of GATA3 alterations to cancer, we studied two breast cancer cell lines, MCF7, which carries a heterozygous frameshift mutation ...

  12. Racial disparities in risk of second breast tumors after ductal carcinoma in situ

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ying; Colditz, Graham A.; Gehlert, Sarah; Goodman, Melody

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the impact of race/ethnicity on second breast tumors among women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). We identified 102,489 women diagnosed with primary DCIS between 1988 and 2009 from the 18 NCI-SEER Registries. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate race/ethnicity-associated relative risks (RRs) and their 95 % confidence intervals (CI) of ipsilateral breast tumors (IBT; defined as DCIS or invasive carcinoma in the ipsilateral breast)...

  13. Correlation of primary tumor size and axillary nodal status with tumor suppressor gene p53 in breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topić Brano

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Correlation of standard path morphological prognostic parameters, primary tumor size and axillary nodal status with new prognostic factor in breast carcinoma: tumor suppressor gene p53 was analyzed. The studied sample included 65 women who underwent surgery for breast carcinoma at the Surgical Clinic of Clinical Center Banja Luka, from January 1st 1997 till January 1st 1999. Statistical data analysis was performed and correlation of prognostic factors was determined. The majority of authors in this field agree that the primary tumor size and axillary nodal status are the two most important prognostic factors. These factors are the best predictors of prognosis and survival of women who had the tumor and were operated on. Tumor markers were immunohistochemically determined in the last ten years and, according to the majority of authors, are still considered the additional or relative prognostic factors in breast carcinoma. Their prognostic value and significance increase almost daily. Most frequently determined tumor markers are bcl-2, pS2, Ki-67 and p53. There was a positive, directly proportional relationship between primary tumor size and tumor suppressor gene p53, but there was no positive correlation between the axillary nodal status and tumor suppressor gene p53. Significance of determination of new tumor markers as the prognostic factors was emphasized. These markers represent a powerful tool in the early detection and prevention of breast carcinoma.

  14. Exosome derived from epigallocatechin gallate treated breast cancer cells suppresses tumor growth by inhibiting tumor-associated macrophage infiltration and M2 polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) play an important role in tumor microenvironment. Particularly, M2 macrophages contribute to tumor progression, depending on the expression of NF-κB. Tumor-derived exosomes can modulate tumor microenvironment by transferring miRNAs to immune cells. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) has well known anti-tumor effects; however, no data are available on the influence of EGCG on communication with cancer cells and TAM. Murine breast cancer cell lines, 4T1, was used for in vivo and ex vivo studies. Exosome was extracted from EGCG-treated 4T1 cells, and the change of miRNAs was screened using microarray. Tumor cells or TAM isolated from murine tumor graft were incubated with exosomes derived from EGCG-treated and/or miR-16 inhibitor-transfected 4T1 cells. Chemokines for monocytes (CSF-1 and CCL-2), cytokines both with high (IL-6 and TGF-β) and low (TNF-α) expression in M2 macrophages, and molecules in NF-κB pathway (IKKα and Iκ-B) were evaluated by RT-qPCR or western blot. EGCG suppressed tumor growth in murine breast cancer model, which was associated with decreased TAM and M2 macrophage infiltration. Expression of chemokine for monocytes (CSF-1 and CCL-2) were low in tumor cells from EGCG-treated mice, and cytokines of TAM was skewed from M2- into M1-like phenotype by EGCG as evidenced by decreased IL-6 and TGF-β and increased TNF-α. Ex vivo incubation of isolated tumor cells with EGCG inhibited the CSF-1 and CCL-2 expression. Ex vivo incubation of TAM with exosomes from EGCG-treated 4T1 cells led to IKKα suppression and concomitant I-κB accumulation; increase of IL-6 and TGF-β; and, decrease of TNF-α. EGCG up-regulated miR-16 in 4T1 cells and in the exosomes. Treatment of tumor cells or TAM with exosomes derived from EGCG-treated and miR-16-knock-downed 4T1 cells restored the above effects on chemokines, cytokines, and NF-κB pathway elicited by EGCG-treated exosomes. Our data demonstrate that EGCG up-regulates miR-16 in

  15. Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Relapse: Local Recurrence Versus New Primary Tumor and the Effect of Whole-Breast Radiotherapy on the Rate of New Primaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The justification for partial breast radiotherapy after breast conservation surgery assumes that ipsilateral breast tumor relapses (IBTR) outside the index quadrant are mostly new primary (NP) tumors that develop despite radiotherapy. We tested the hypothesis that whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT) is ineffective in preventing NP by comparing development rates in irradiated and contralateral breasts after tumor excision and WBRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 1,410 women with breast cancer who were entered into a prospective randomized trial of radiotherapy fractionation and monitored annually for ipsilateral breast tumor relapses (IBTR) and contralateral breast cancer (CLBC). Cases of IBTR were classified into local recurrence (LR) or NP tumors based on location and histology and were subdivided as definite or likely depending on clinical data. Rates of ipsilateral NP and CLBC were compared over a 15-year period of follow-up. Results: At a median follow-up of 10.1 years, there were 150 documented cases of IBTR: 118 (79%) cases were definite or likely LR; 27 (18%) cases were definite or likely NP; and 5 (3%) cases could not be classified. There were 71 cases of CLBC. The crude proportion of definite-plus-likely NP was 1.9% (27/1,410) patients compared with 5% (71/1,410) CLBC patients. Cumulative incidence rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 0.8%, 2.0%, and 3.5%, respectively, for definite-plus-likely NP and 2.4%, 5.8%, and 7.9%, respectively for CLBC, suggesting a difference in the rates of NP and CLBC. Conclusions: This analysis suggests that WBRT reduces the rate of ipsilateral NP tumors. The late presentation of NP has implications for the reporting of trials that are testing partial breast radiotherapy.

  16. Glioma Cells in the Tumor Periphery Have a Stem Cell Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sune Munthe

    Full Text Available Gliomas are highly infiltrative tumors incurable with surgery. Although surgery removes the bulk tumor, tumor cells in the periphery are left behind resulting in tumor relapses. The aim of the present study was to characterize the phenotype of tumor cells in the periphery focusing on tumor stemness, proliferation and chemo-resistance. This was investigated in situ in patient glioma tissue as well as in orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts. We identified 26 gliomas having the R132 mutation in Isocitrate DeHydrogenase 1 (mIDH1. A double immunofluorescence approach identifying mIDH1 positive tumor cells and a panel of markers was used. The panel comprised of six stem cell-related markers (CD133, Musashi-1, Bmi-1, Sox-2, Nestin and Glut-3, a proliferation marker (Ki-67 as well as a chemo-resistance marker (MGMT. Computer-based automated classifiers were designed to measure the mIDH1 positive nucleus area-fraction of the chosen markers. Moreover, orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts from five different patient-derived spheroid cultures were obtained and the tumor cells identified by human specific immunohistochemical markers. The results showed that tumor cells in the periphery of patient gliomas expressed stem cell markers, however for most markers at a significantly lower level than in the tumor core. The Ki-67 level was slightly reduced in the periphery, whereas the MGMT level was similar. In orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts all markers showed similar levels in the core and periphery. In conclusion tumor cells in the periphery of patient gliomas have a stem cell phenotype, although it is less pronounced than in the tumor core. Novel therapies aiming at preventing recurrence should therefore take tumor stemness into account. Migrating cells in orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts preserve expression and stem cell markers. The orthotopic model therefore has a promising translational potential.

  17. Trading in your spindles for blebs: the amoeboid tumor cell phenotype in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Morley

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa remains a principal cause of mortality in developed countries. Because no clinical interventions overcome resistance to androgen ablation therapy, management of castration resistance and metastatic disease remains largely untreatable. Metastasis is a multistep process in which tumor cells lose cell-cell contacts, egress from the primary tumor, intravasate, survive shear stress within the vasculature and extravasate into tissues to colonize ectopic sites. Tumor cells reestablish migratory behaviors employed during nonneoplastic processes such as embryonic development, leukocyte trafficking and wound healing. While mesenchymal motility is an established paradigm of dissemination, an alternate, 'amoeboid' phenotype is increasingly appreciated as relevant to human cancer. Here we discuss characteristics and pathways underlying the phenotype, and highlight our findings that the cytoskeletal regulator DIAPH3 governs the mesenchymal-amoeboid transition. We also describe our identification of a new class of tumor-derived microvesicles, large oncosomes, produced by amoeboid cells and with potential clinical utility in prostate and other cancers.

  18. High throughput functional genomics: identification of novel genes with tumor suppressor phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig-Hoffmann, Kerstin; Bonin-Debs, Angelika L; Boche, Irene; Gawin, Beate; Gnirke, Andrea; Hergersberg, Christoph; Madeo, Frank; Kazinski, Michael; Klein, Matthias; Korherr, Christian; Link, Dieter; Röhrig, Sascha; Schäfer, Rolf; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2005-01-20

    We have used a combination of high throughput functional genomics, computerized database mining and expression analyses to discover novel human tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). A genome-wide high throughput cDNA phenotype screen was established to identify genes that induce apoptosis or reduce cell viability. TSGs are expressed in normal tissue and frequently act by reduction of growth of transformed cells or induce apoptosis. In agreement with that and thus serving as platform validation, our pro-apoptotic hits included genes for which tumor suppressing activities were known, such as kangai1 and CD81 antigen. Additional genes that so far have been claimed as putative TSGs or associated with tumor inhibitory activities (prostate differentiation factor, hRAS-like suppressor 3, DPH2L1-like and the metastasis inhibitor Kiss1) were confirmed in their proposed TSG-like phenotype by functionally defining their growth inhibitory or pro-apoptotic function towards cancer cells. Finally, novel genes were identified for which neither association with cell growth nor with apoptosis were previously described. A subset of these genes show characteristics of TSGs because they (i) reduce the growth or induce apoptosis in tumor cells; (ii) show reduced expression in tumor vs. normal tissue; and (iii) are located on chromosomal (LOH-) loci for which cancer-associated deletions are described. The pro-apoptotic phenotype and differential expression of these genes in normal and malignant tissue make them promising target candidates for the diagnosis and therapy of various tumors. PMID:15455385

  19. Didymin reverses phthalate ester-associated breast cancer aggravation in the breast cancer tumor microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    HSU, YA-LING; HSIEH, CHIA-JUNG; TSAI, EING-MEI; HUNG, JEN-YU; CHANG, WEI-AN; HOU, MING-FENG; KUO, PO-LIN

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrated two novel findings. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first study to demonstrate that regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), produced by breast tumor-associated monocyte-derived dendritic cells (TADCs) following breast cancer cell exposure to phthalate esters, may contribute to the progression of cancer via enhancement of cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Furthermore, the present study revealed that didymin, a dietary flavonoid glycoside present in citrus fruits, was able to reverse phthalate ester-mediated breast cancer aggravation. MDA-MB-231 cells were treated with butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) or di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP). Subsequently, the conditioned medium (CM) was harvested and cultured with monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mdDCs). Cultures of MDA-MB-231 cells with the conditioned medium of BBP-, DBP- or DEHP-MDA-MB-231 tumor-associated mdDCs (BBP-, DBP- or DEHP-MDA-TADC-CM) demonstrated enhanced proliferation, migration and invasion. Exposure of the MDA-MB-231 cells to DBP induced the MDA-TADCs to produce the inflammatory cytokine RANTES, which subsequently induced MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Depleting RANTES reversed the effects of DBP-MDA-TADC-mediated MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation, migration and invasion. In addition, didymin was observed to suppress phthalate-mediated breast cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. The present study suggested that didymin was capable of preventing phthalate ester-associated cancer aggravation. PMID:26893687

  20. Association of Notch pathway down-regulation with Triple Negative/Basal-like breast carcinomas and high tumor-infiltrating FOXP3+ Tregs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Martínez, Fernando; Gutiérrez-Aviñó, Francisco José; Sanmartín, Elena; Pomares-Navarro, Eloy; Villalba-Riquelme, Cristina; García-Martínez, Araceli; Lerma, Enrique; Peiró, Gloria

    2016-06-01

    T regulatory cells (Tregs) are a lineage of lymphocytes involved in immune response suppression that are characterized by the expression of the forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) transcription factor. Notch pathway regulates FOXP3 transcription in Tregs, but its role in breast cancer is unknown. We aimed at studying whether Notch pathway regulates FOXP3 expression and Tregs content in breast cancer, and its association with luminal breast carcinomas. We analyzed by quantitative Real-Time PCR the mRNA levels of FOXP3, Notch pathway genes (Notch1, Notch2, Notch4 and Jagged1) and STAT3 in a series of 152 breast carcinomas including hormone receptor-positive and -negative phenotypes (luminal and Triple Negative/Basal-like). We also studied the protein expression of Notch1, STAT3 and FOXP3 by immunohistochemistry. High FOXP3 mRNA levels correlated with larger tumor size (p=0.010), histological grade 3 (p=0.008) and positive lymph-node status (p=0.031). Also, low levels of Notch pathway genes mRNA correlated with poor prognostic factors such as larger tumor size, positive lymph-node status, tumor phenotype and infiltrating tumor Tregs. A survival analysis for the patients showed that large tumor size, histological grade 3, vascular invasion, infiltrating Tregs and low Notch1 mRNA expression were significantly associated with a decreased patients' overall survival (p≤0.05). On a multivariate analysis, high Tregs content (HR=3.00, 95% CI 1.04-8.90, p=0.042) and low Notch1 mRNA levels (HR=3.33, 95% CI 1.02-10.86, p=0.046) were independent markers for overall survival. Our results support that the Notch pathway up-regulation promotes luminal breast carcinomas, whereas down-regulation correlates with the expression of FOXP3, favors tumor Tregs infiltration and associates with Triple Negative/Basal-like tumors. PMID:27118257

  1. Apocrine carcinoma of the male breast: a case report of an exceptional tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Sekal, Mohammed; Znati, Kaoutar; Harmouch, Taoufiq; Riffi, Afaf Amarti

    2014-01-01

    Apocrine carcinoma of the male breast is an exceptional malignant tumor. It does not have a particular clinical or radiological appearance, but it's microscopically characterized by the presence of granular cells and foamy cells representing over 90% of tumor cells. These cells express most of the time the GCDFP-15 and the androgen receptors. This tumor is a distinct molecular entity. In this observation, we report the case of a 70 year old man presenting apocrine carcinoma of the left breast...

  2. Invasive Cribriform Carcinoma Arising in Malignant Phyllodes Tumor of Breast: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Yoomi; Lee, Kyoung Yul; Jang, Min Hye; Seol, Hyesil; Kim, Sung-Won; Park, So Yeon

    2012-01-01

    Phyllodes tumor is an uncommon fibroepithelial neoplasm of the breast. And it is characterized by expanded stroma with increased cellularity and elongated epithelium-lined clefts. Mammary carcinomas within phyllodes tumors have been rarely reported. To date, however, no reports have described the invasive cribriform carcinoma arising in malignant phyllodes tumor. Here, we report a 62-year-old woman who presented with a large breast mass. Microscopically, the mass was a typical malignant phyll...

  3. Benign granular-cell tumor of the breast: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Meenal Jagannathan, MD(RD, DMRD, DNB(RD, FRCR

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Granular-cell tumor is an uncommon cause of breast mass in premenopausal women that presents as a painless chronic lump. It mimics infiltrating carcinoma clinically and radiologically. Granular-cell tumor is usually benign, and the treatment is wide local excision. Definitive pre-operative diagnosis helps to avoid unnecessary mastectomy. We present clinical, mamographic, and sonographic characteristics of a benign granular-cell tumor of the breast in a 57-year-old woman.

  4. HER family kinase domain mutations promote tumor progression and can predict response to treatment in human breast cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Boulbes, Delphine R.

    2014-11-11

    Resistance to HER2-targeted therapies remains a major obstacle in the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. Understanding the molecular pathways that contribute to the development of drug resistance is needed to improve the clinical utility of novel agents, and to predict the success of targeted personalized therapy based on tumor-specific mutations. Little is known about the clinical significance of HER family mutations in breast cancer. Because mutations within HER1/EGFR are predictive of response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) in lung cancer, we investigated whether mutations in HER family kinase domains are predictive of response to targeted therapy in HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. We sequenced the HER family kinase domains from 76 HER2-overexpressing invasive carcinomas and identified 12 missense variants. Patients whose tumors carried any of these mutations did not respond to HER2 directed therapy in the metastatic setting. We developed mutant cell lines and used structural analyses to determine whether changes in protein conformation could explain the lack of response to therapy. We also functionally studied all HER2 mutants and showed that they conferred an aggressive phenotype and altered effects of the TKI lapatinib. Our data demonstrate that mutations in the finely tuned HER kinase domains play a critical function in breast cancer progression and may serve as prognostic and predictive markers.

  5. Improved characterization of molecular phenotypes in breast lesions using 18F-FDG PET image homogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Kunlin; Bhagalia, Roshni; Sood, Anup; Brogi, Edi; Mellinghoff, Ingo K.; Larson, Steven M.

    2015-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using uorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) is commonly used in the assessment of breast lesions by computing voxel-wise standardized uptake value (SUV) maps. Simple metrics derived from ensemble properties of SUVs within each identified breast lesion are routinely used for disease diagnosis. The maximum SUV within the lesion (SUVmax) is the most popular of these metrics. However these simple metrics are known to be error-prone and are susceptible to image noise. Finding reliable SUV map-based features that correlate to established molecular phenotypes of breast cancer (viz. estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) expression) will enable non-invasive disease management. This study investigated 36 SUV features based on first and second order statistics, local histograms and texture of segmented lesions to predict ER and PR expression in 51 breast cancer patients. True ER and PR expression was obtained via immunohistochemistry (IHC) of tissue samples from each lesion. A supervised learning, adaptive boosting-support vector machine (AdaBoost-SVM), framework was used to select a subset of features to classify breast lesions into distinct phenotypes. Performance of the trained multi-feature classifier was compared against the baseline single-feature SUVmax classifier using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results show that texture features encoding local lesion homogeneity extracted from gray-level co-occurrence matrices are the strongest discriminator of lesion ER expression. In particular, classifiers including these features increased prediction accuracy from 0.75 (baseline) to 0.82 and the area under the ROC curve from 0.64 (baseline) to 0.75.

  6. Recent translational research: stem cells as the roots of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Chia-Cheng

    2006-01-01

    Common phenotypes of cancer and stem cells suggest that breast cancers arise from stem cells. Breast epithelial cells with stem cell phenotypes have been shown to be more susceptible to immortalization and neoplastic transformation. Breast tumor stem cells with CD44+/CD24-/lowLineage- markers have been isolated. The role of these cells in tumor progression and clinical outcome is not clear. The relationship between breast stem cell and tumor stem cell may be elucidated by further studies of c...

  7. Modulation of circulating angiogenic factors and tumor biology by aerobic training in breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lee W; Fels, Diane R; West, Miranda; Allen, Jason D; Broadwater, Gloria; Barry, William T; Wilke, Lee G; Masko, Elisabeth; Douglas, Pamela S; Dash, Rajesh C; Povsic, Thomas J; Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Marcom, P Kelly; Blackwell, Kimberly L; Kimmick, Gretchen; Turkington, Timothy G; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2013-09-01

    Aerobic exercise training (AET) is an effective adjunct therapy to attenuate the adverse side-effects of adjuvant chemotherapy in women with early breast cancer. Whether AET interacts with the antitumor efficacy of chemotherapy has received scant attention. We carried out a pilot study to explore the effects of AET in combination with neoadjuvant doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide (AC+AET), relative to AC alone, on: (i) host physiology [exercise capacity (VO2 peak), brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (BA-FMD)], (ii) host-related circulating factors [circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEP) cytokines and angiogenic factors (CAF)], and (iii) tumor phenotype [tumor blood flow ((15)O-water PET), tissue markers (hypoxia and proliferation), and gene expression] in 20 women with operable breast cancer. AET consisted of three supervised cycle ergometry sessions/week at 60% to 100% of VO2 peak, 30 to 45 min/session, for 12 weeks. There was significant time × group interactions for VO2 peak and BA-FMD, favoring the AC+AET group (P blood flow in the AC+AET group. There were no differences in any tumor tissue markers (P > 0.05). Whole-genome microarray tumor analysis revealed significant differential modulation of 57 pathways (P < 0.01), including many that converge on NF-κB. Data from this exploratory study provide initial evidence that AET can modulate several host- and tumor-related pathways during standard chemotherapy. The biologic and clinical implications remain to be determined. PMID:23842792

  8. miRNA expression profiling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE hereditary breast tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljana Tanić

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary breast cancer constitutes only 5–10% of all breast cancer cases and is characterized by strong family history of breast and/or other associated cancer types. Only ~25% of hereditary breast cancer cases carry a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene, while mutations in other rare high and moderate-risk genes and common low penetrance variants may account for additional 20% of the cases. Thus the majority of cases are still unaccounted for and designated as BRCAX tumors. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that play important roles as regulators of gene expression and are deregulated in cancer. To characterize hereditary breast tumors based on their miRNA expression profiles we performed global microarray miRNA expression profiling on a retrospective cohort of 80 FFPE breast tissues, including 66 hereditary breast tumors (13 BRCA1, 10 BRCA2 and 43 BRCAX, 10 sporadic breast carcinomas and 4 normal breast tissues, using Exiqon miRCURY LNA™ microRNA Array v.11.0. Here we describe in detail the miRNA microarray expression data and tumor samples used for the study of BRCAX tumor heterogeneity (Tanic et al., 2013 and biomarkers associated with positive BRCA1/2 mutation status (Tanic et al., 2014. Additionally, we provide the R code for data preprocessing and quality control.

  9. Oncogenic driver genes and the inflammatory microenvironment dictate liver tumor phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matter, Matthias S; Marquardt, Jens U; Andersen, Jesper B;

    2016-01-01

    The majority of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) develops in the background of chronic liver inflammation caused by viral hepatitis and alcoholic or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. However, the impact of different types of chronic inflammatory microenvironments on the phenotypes of tumors generated by...

  10. ESR1 gene promoter region methylation in free circulating DNA and its correlation with estrogen receptor protein expression in tumor tissue in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor expression of estrogen receptor (ER) is an important marker of prognosis, and is predictive of response to endocrine therapy in breast cancer. Several studies have observed that epigenetic events, such methylation of cytosines and deacetylation of histones, are involved in the complex mechanisms that regulate promoter transcription. However, the exact interplay of these factors in transcription activity is not well understood. In this study, we explored the relationship between ER expression status in tumor tissue samples and the methylation of the 5′ CpG promoter region of the estrogen receptor gene (ESR1) isolated from free circulating DNA (fcDNA) in plasma samples from breast cancer patients. Patients (n = 110) with non-metastatic breast cancer had analyses performed of ER expression (luminal phenotype in tumor tissue, by immunohistochemistry method), and the ESR1-DNA methylation status (fcDNA in plasma, by quantitative methylation specific PCR technique). Our results showed a significant association between presence of methylated ESR1 in patients with breast cancer and ER negative status in the tumor tissue (p = 0.0179). There was a trend towards a higher probability of ESR1-methylation in those phenotypes with poor prognosis i.e. 80% of triple negative patients, 60% of HER2 patients, compared to 28% and 5.9% of patients with better prognosis such as luminal A and luminal B, respectively. Silencing, by methylation, of the promoter region of the ESR1 affects the expression of the estrogen receptor protein in tumors of breast cancer patients; high methylation of ESR1-DNA is associated with estrogen receptor negative status which, in turn, may be implicated in the patient’s resistance to hormonal treatment in breast cancer. As such, epigenetic markers in plasma may be of interest as new targets for anticancer therapy, especially with respect to endocrine treatment

  11. Hormone receptor and ERBB2 status in gene expression profiles of human breast tumor samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Dvorkin-Gheva

    Full Text Available The occurrence of large publically available repositories of human breast tumor gene expression profiles provides an important resource to discover new breast cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets. For example, knowledge of the expression of the estrogen and progesterone hormone receptors (ER and PR, and that of the ERBB2 in breast tumor samples enables choice of therapies for the breast cancer patients that express these proteins. Identifying new biomarkers and therapeutic agents affecting the activity of signaling pathways regulated by the hormone receptors or ERBB2 might be accelerated by knowledge of their expression levels in large gene expression profiling data sets. Unfortunately, the status of these receptors is not invariably reported in public databases of breast tumor gene expression profiles. Attempts have been made to employ a single probe set to identify ER, PR and ERBB2 status, but the specificity or sensitivity of their prediction is low. We enquired whether estimation of ER, PR and ERBB2 status of profiled tumor samples could be improved by using multiple probe sets representing these three genes and others with related expression.We used 8 independent datasets of human breast tumor samples to define gene expression signatures comprising 24, 51 and 14 genes predictive of ER, PR and ERBB2 status respectively. These signatures, as demonstrated by sensitivity and specificity measures, reliably identified hormone receptor and ERBB2 expression in breast tumors that had been previously determined using protein and DNA based assays. Our findings demonstrate that gene signatures can be identified which reliably predict the expression status of the estrogen and progesterone hormone receptors and that of ERBB2 in publically available gene expression profiles of breast tumor samples. Using these signatures to query transcript profiles of breast tumor specimens may enable discovery of new biomarkers and therapeutic targets for

  12. GATA-3 links tumor differentiation and dissemination in a luminal breast cancer model

    OpenAIRE

    Kouros-Mehr, Hosein; Bechis, Seth K.; Slorach, Euan M.; Littlepage, Laurie E.; Egeblad, Mikala; Ewald, Andrew J.; Pai, Sung-Yun; Ho, I-Cheng; Werb, Zena

    2008-01-01

    How breast cancers are able to disseminate and metastasize is poorly understood. Using hyperplasia transplant system, we show that tumor dissemination and metastasis occur in discrete steps during tumor progression. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that loss of the transcription factor GATA-3 marked progression from adenoma to early carcinoma and onset of tumor dissemination. Restoration of GATA-3 in late carcinomas induced tumor differentiation suppressed tumor dissemination. Targeted deletio...

  13. Ultra-wideband microwave imaging of breast cancer tumors via Bayesian inverse scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouda, A. E.; Teixeira, F. L.

    2014-02-01

    We develop a new algorithm for ultra-wideband (UWB) microwave imaging of breast cancer tumors using Bayesian inverse scattering. A key feature of the proposed algorithm is that constitutive properties of breast tissues are reconstructed from scattered UWB microwave signals together with the confidence level of the reconstruction. Having such confidence level enables minimization of both false alarms and missed detections. Results from the application of the proposed algorithm demonstrate the accuracy in estimating both location and permittivity of breast tumors without the need for a priori knowledge of pointwise properties of the background breast tissue.

  14. Malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast presenting with hypoglycemia: a case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phyllodes tumors are rare fibroepithelial neoplasms that account for less than 1% of all breast tumors and are typically found in middle-aged women. Phyllodes tumors that present with hypoglycemia are even rarer. No one morphologic finding is reliable in predicting the clinical behavior of this tumor. Surgery has been the primary mode of treatment to date. However, the extent of resection and the role of adjuvant radiotherapy or chemotherapy are still controversial. Here, we present a challenging case of malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast associated with hypoglycemia, and review the literature regarding clinical findings, pathologic risk factors for recurrence, and treatment recommendations

  15. The clinical significance of tumor infiltrating lymphoctyes in breast cancer: does subtype matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) are commonly detected in breast tumors but their bearing on disease outcome is uncertain. The importance of TILs appears to be subtype-specific and varies depending on the histologic characteristics of the tumor. As our understanding of tumorigenesis is increasing the relevance of immunobiology will become apparent

  16. Analysis of dendritic cells in tumor-free and tumor-containing sentinel lymph nodes from patients with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy allows identification of the first lymph node into which a primary tumor drains. In breast cancer, identification of tumor cells in the SLNs is a predictor of the tumor's metastatic potential. In the present article, we tested the hypotheses that a positive immune response can occur in tumor-free SLNs and that the activation state of dendritic cells (DCs), the major antigen presenting cells within SLNs, predicts the immune status and metastatic potential of the tumor. Fifty paraffin-embedded SLN sections, 25 tumor-free and 25 tumor-containing, from patients with breast cancer were analyzed by immunohistochemistry to determine the immune maturation state of their DCs. In addition, 12 lymph nodes from noncancer-containing breasts were analyzed. Tissues were stained with antibodies against CD3, MHC class II, CD1a, CD83, IL-10, and IL-12. Mature DCs were defined by CD83 expression and immature DCs by CD1a expression. We found a trend toward higher numbers of mature CD83-positive DCs in tumor-free SLNs than in tumor-containing SLNs (P = 0.07). In addition, tumor-free SLNs were more likely to contain cells expressing IL-10 (P = 0.02) and, to a lesser extent, IL-12 (P = 0.12). In contrast, when all SLNs, both tumor-free and tumor-containing, were compared with uninvolved lymph nodes, the numbers of mature and immature DCs were similar. Our results suggest tumor-free SLNs are immunologically competent and potentially a site of tumor-specific T-cell activation, as evidenced by the presence of greater numbers of mature DCs and cytokine-producing cells in tumor-free SLNs

  17. CD44 isoforms are heterogeneously expressed in breast cancer and correlate with tumor subtypes and cancer stem cell markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CD44 cell adhesion molecule is aberrantly expressed in many breast tumors and has been implicated in the metastatic process as well as in the putative cancer stem cell (CSC) compartment. We aimed to investigate potential associations between alternatively spliced isoforms of CD44 and CSCs as well as to various breast cancer biomarkers and molecular subtypes. We used q-RT-PCR and exon-exon spanning assays to analyze the expression of four alternatively spliced CD44 isoforms as well as the total expression of CD44 in 187 breast tumors and 13 cell lines. ALDH1 protein expression was determined by IHC on TMA. Breast cancer cell lines showed a heterogeneous expression pattern of the CD44 isoforms, which shifted considerably when cells were grown as mammospheres. Tumors characterized as positive for the CD44+/CD24- phenotype by immunohistochemistry were associated to all isoforms except the CD44 standard (CD44S) isoform, which lacks all variant exons. Conversely, tumors with strong expression of the CSC marker ALDH1 had elevated expression of CD44S. A high expression of the CD44v2-v10 isoform, which retain all variant exons, was correlated to positive steroid receptor status, low proliferation and luminal A subtype. The CD44v3-v10 isoform showed similar correlations, while high expression of CD44v8-v10 was correlated to positive EGFR, negative/low HER2 status and basal-like subtype. High expression of CD44S was associated with strong HER2 staining and also a subgroup of basal-like tumors. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis of CD44 isoform expression data divided tumors into four main clusters, which showed significant correlations to molecular subtypes and differences in 10-year overall survival. We demonstrate that individual CD44 isoforms can be associated to different breast cancer subtypes and clinical markers such as HER2, ER and PgR, which suggests involvement of CD44 splice variants in specific oncogenic signaling pathways. Efforts to link CD44 to CSCs

  18. Morphological predictors of nipple areola involvement in malignant breast tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Kalyan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Context: Nipple areola (NA sparing mastectomy has an acceptable complication rate, is oncologically safe and facilitates an improved cosmetic result, aiding greatly in reducing psychological trauma associated with breast loss. Questions regarding preoperative case selection for NA sparing mastectomy are pertinent. Aims: The principle objective was to develop a simple model based on correlation of malignant involvement of NA with morphological factors in breast cancer cases to accurately predict the cancerous involvement of nipple areola preoperatively. Settings and Design: The present cross-sectional study was carried out on 136 patients of breast cancer. The period of study spanned 3 years from 2004 to 2007. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 17 different morphological parameters which had proven prognostic significance in breast cancer cases for their relationship with NA involvement. Data regarding cytological parameters were available in 120 cases out of the total number of 136 cases. Simple and conventional methods appropriate for any under-resourced set-up were employed to enhance the economic viability and acceptability of the project. Statistical Analysis used: Statistical analysis in this study was mostly done using SPSS version: 14 software. P-value < 0.05 was considered significant when assessing correlation between two parameters. Results: The frequency of NA involvement detected in this study was 19.1%. In univariate analysis, 13 of the 17 morphological parameters were found to have strong statistical association (P < 0.05 with NA involvement. In multivariate analysis, only four parameters-macroscopic NA changes, tumor-NA distance ( < 1.5cm, histological lymph node grade and extra capsular extension in lymph node were found to have independent role for NA involvement prediction. This multivariate Cox and Snell Regression model with Cox and Snell Regression Square of 0.551 can predict accurately 98.5% cases of nipple involvement

  19. Pattern of Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyze the incidence and prognostic factors of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in a large, population-based, single-center study with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 3595 cases in which BCT was performed in 3824 women with stage I or II breast cancer. The incidence of IBTR was analyzed over time and was based on IBTR as first event. Results: The 15-year local relapse-free survival was 90.9%. The hazard estimates for IBTR showed a time course with 2 peaks, the first at approximately 5 years and the second, twice as high, at 12 years. Stratifying subjects by age and margin status showed that, for women ≤40 years old with negative margins, adjuvant systemic therapy led to a 5-fold reduced risk of recurrence compared to none, and the presence of lymph vascular space invasion (LVSI) had a 3-fold increased risk compared to its absence. For women >40 years old, the presence of LVSI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.5) and the presence of lobular carcinoma in situ in the lumpectomy specimen (HR 2.3) were the only 2 risk factors. Conclusions: We demonstrated a pattern in risk of IBTR over time, with 2 peaks, first at approximately 5 years and a second, much higher peak at approximately 12 years, especially for women ≤40 years old. For women ≤40 years old with tumor-free resection margins, we noted that the absence of adjuvant systemic therapy and the presence of LVSI were independent prognostic factors of IBTR. For women >40 years old, the presence of LVSI and the presence of lobular carcinoma in situ were independent risk factors

  20. Pattern of Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobsen, Jan, E-mail: j.jobsen@mst.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Palen, Job van der [Department of Epidemiology, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Department of Research Methodology, Measurement, and Data Analysis, Faculty of Behavioral Science, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Riemersma, Sietske [Laboratory for Pathology Oost Nederland, Hengelo (Netherlands); Heijmans, Harald [Department of Surgery, Ziekenhuis Groep Twente, Hengelo (Netherlands); Ong, Francisca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Struikmans, Henk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden (Netherlands); Radiotherapy Centre West, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands)

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To analyze the incidence and prognostic factors of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in a large, population-based, single-center study with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 3595 cases in which BCT was performed in 3824 women with stage I or II breast cancer. The incidence of IBTR was analyzed over time and was based on IBTR as first event. Results: The 15-year local relapse-free survival was 90.9%. The hazard estimates for IBTR showed a time course with 2 peaks, the first at approximately 5 years and the second, twice as high, at 12 years. Stratifying subjects by age and margin status showed that, for women ≤40 years old with negative margins, adjuvant systemic therapy led to a 5-fold reduced risk of recurrence compared to none, and the presence of lymph vascular space invasion (LVSI) had a 3-fold increased risk compared to its absence. For women >40 years old, the presence of LVSI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.5) and the presence of lobular carcinoma in situ in the lumpectomy specimen (HR 2.3) were the only 2 risk factors. Conclusions: We demonstrated a pattern in risk of IBTR over time, with 2 peaks, first at approximately 5 years and a second, much higher peak at approximately 12 years, especially for women ≤40 years old. For women ≤40 years old with tumor-free resection margins, we noted that the absence of adjuvant systemic therapy and the presence of LVSI were independent prognostic factors of IBTR. For women >40 years old, the presence of LVSI and the presence of lobular carcinoma in situ were independent risk factors.

  1. Natural selection of tumor variants in the generation of “tumor escape” phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Khong, Hung T.; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2002-01-01

    The idea that tumors must “escape” from immune recognition contains the implicit assumption that tumors can be destroyed by immune responses either spontaneously or as the result of immunotherapeutic intervention. Simply put, there is no need for tumor escape without immunological pressure. Here, we review evidence supporting the immune escape hypothesis and critically explore the mechanisms that may allow such escape to occur. We discuss the idea that the central engine for generating immuno...

  2. Interleukin-6 Induced "Acute" Phenotypic Microenvironment Promotes Th1 Anti-Tumor Immunity in Cryo-Thermal Therapy Revealed By Shotgun and Parallel Reaction Monitoring Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ting; Liu, Ping; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Kun; Yang, Li; Moritz, Robert L; Yan, Wei; Xu, Lisa X

    2016-01-01

    Cryo-thermal therapy has been emerged as a promising novel therapeutic strategy for advanced breast cancer, triggering higher incidence of tumor regression and enhanced remission of metastasis than routine treatments. To better understand its anti-tumor mechanism, we utilized a spontaneous metastatic mouse model and quantitative proteomics to compare N-glycoproteome changes in 94 serum samples with and without treatment. We quantified 231 highly confident N-glycosylated proteins using iTRAQ shotgun proteomics. Among them, 53 showed significantly discriminated regulatory patterns over the time course, in which the acute phase response emerged as the most enhanced pathway. The anti-tumor feature of the acute response was further investigated using parallel reaction monitoring target proteomics and flow cytometry on 23 of the 53 significant proteins. We found that cryo-thermal therapy reset the tumor chronic inflammation to an "acute" phenotype, with up-regulation of acute phase proteins including IL-6 as a key regulator. The IL-6 mediated "acute" phenotype transformed IL-4 and Treg-promoting ICOSL expression to Th1-promoting IFN-γ and IL-12 production, augmented complement system activation and CD86(+)MHCII(+) dendritic cells maturation and enhanced the proliferation of Th1 memory cells. In addition, we found an increased production of tumor progression and metastatic inhibitory proteins under such "acute" environment, favoring the anti-metastatic effect. Moreover, cryo-thermal on tumors induced the strongest "acute" response compared to cryo/hyperthermia alone or cryo-thermal on healthy tissues, accompanying by the most pronounced anti-tumor immunological effect. In summary, we demonstrated that cryo-thermal therapy induced, IL-6 mediated "acute" microenvironment shifted the tumor chronic microenvironment from Th2 immunosuppressive and pro-tumorigenic to Th1 immunostimulatory and tumoricidal state. Moreover, the magnitude of "acute" and "danger" signals play a key

  3. Mutation Screening in the Mitochondrial D-Loop Region of Tumoral and Non-tumoral Breast Cancer in Iranian Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Heidari

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations in mitochondrial coding and non coding regions seem to be important in carcinogenesis. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate coding region (mt-tRNAPhe and tRNAPro and non-coding sequence, mitochondrial displacement loop (mtDNA D-loop, in the cancerous and non-cancerous lesions of Iranian patients with breast cancer (BC. Genomic DNA was extracted from 50 breast tumors and surrounding normal tissue pairs as well as from 50 unrelated normal breast tissues from Iranian Kurdish population. Subsequently, PCR amplification was performed using specific primers, and then PCR products were subjected to direct sequencing. 41 genetic variants were identified in mtDNA D-loop among tumoral and non-tumoral tissues but not in tRNAPhe and tRNAPro sequences. Our findings indicated that C182T, 194insT, 285insA and 16342delT were just found in BC tumors whereas 302insC, C309T and C16069T found in both tumors and surrounding normal tissues. Although our findings showed that the observed genetic variations were not restricted to breast cancer tissues, some genetic changes were found only in BC tumors. Our results, in agreement with the evidence from earlier studies, confirm that the mtDNA genetic alterations might be implicated in tumor initiation, progression and development. text-align: justify;

  4. How to measure breast cancer tumoral size at MR imaging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the accuracy of different MR sequences to measure tumor size. Methods: Eighty-six women (mean age: 53 years (30–78)) who underwent preoperative MRI for breast cancer were included. Maximal diameters of the index tumor (IT) and of the whole extent of the tumor (WET) were measured on T2-weighted (T2W) sequences, on dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) T1-weighted (T1W) sequences and on Maximal Intensity Projection (MIP) reconstructions. Agreements with pathological size were evaluated using concordance correlation coefficient (k). Results: Median pathological size of IT was 20 mm (13–25 mm, interquartile range). Median pathological size of the WET was 29 mm (16–50 mm, interquartile range). Measurement of IT showed a good concordance with pathological size, with best results using T2W (k = 0.690) compared to MIP (k = 0.667), early-subtracted DCE frame (k = 0.630) and early-native DCE frame (k = 0.588). IT was visible on T2W in 83.7% and accurately measured within 5 mm in 69.9%. Measurement of WET was superior using early-subtracted DCE frame (k = 0.642) compared to late-native frame (k = 0.635), early-native frame (k = 0.631), late-subtracted frame (k = 0.620) and MIP (k = 0.565). However, even using early-subtracted frame, WET was accurately measured within 5 mm only 39.3%. Conclusion: If visible, IT size is best measured on T2W with a good accuracy (69%) whereas WET is best estimated on early-subtracted DCE frame. However, when adjacent additional sites exist around IT, suspected surrounding disease components need to be proved by pathological analysis

  5. Different Array CGH profiles within hereditary breast cancer tumors associated to BRCA1 expression and overall survival

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, Carolina; Aravena, Andrés; Tapia, Teresa; Rozenblum, Ester; Solís, Luisa; Corvalán, Alejandro; Camus, Mauricio; Alvarez, Manuel; Munroe, David; Maass, Alejandro; Carvallo, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Background Array CGH analysis of breast tumors has contributed to the identification of different genomic profiles in these tumors. Loss of DNA repair by BRCA1 functional deficiency in breast cancer has been proposed as a relevant contribution to breast cancer progression for tumors with no germline mutation. Identifying the genomic alterations taking place in BRCA1 not expressing tumors will lead us to a better understanding of the cellular functions affected in this heterogeneous disease. M...

  6. Prognostic Impact of Time to Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence after Breast Conserving Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosset, Marie; Hamy, Anne-Sophie; Mallon, Peter; Delomenie, Myriam; Mouttet, Delphine; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Lae, Marick; Fourquet, Alain; Rouzier, Roman; Reyal, Fabien; Feron, Jean-Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Background The poor prognosis of patients who experience ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast conserving surgery (BCS) is established. A short time between primary cancer and IBTR is a prognostic factor but no clinically relevant threshold was determined. Classification of IBTR may help tailor treatment strategies. Purpose We determined a specific time frame, which differentiates IBTR into early and late recurrence, and identified prognostic factors for patients with IBTR at time of the recurrence. Methods We analyzed 2209 patients with IBTR after BCS. We applied the optimal cut-points method for survival data to determine the cut-off times to IBTR. A subgroup analysis was performed by hormone receptor (HR) status. Survival analyses were performed using a Cox proportional hazard model to determine clinical features associated with distant-disease-free survival (DDFS) after IBTR. We therefor built decision trees. Results On the 828 metastatic events observed, the majority occurred within the first 3 months after IBTR: 157 in the HR positive group, 98 in the HR negative group. We found different prognostic times to IBTR: 49 months in the HR positive group, 33 in the HR negative group. After multivariate analysis, time to IBTR was the first discriminant prognostic factor in both groups (HR 0.65 CI95% [0.54–0.79] and 0.42 [0.30–0.57] respectively). The other following variables were significantly correlated with the DDFS: the initial number of positive lymph nodes for both groups, the initial tumor size and grade for HR positive tumors. Conclusion A short interval time to IBTR is the strongest factor of poor prognosis and reflects occult distant disease. It would appear that prognosis after IBTR depends more on clinical and histological parameters than on surgical treatment. A prospective trial in a low-risk group of patients to validate the safety of salvage BCS instead of mastectomy in IBTR is needed. PMID:27494111

  7. Chloroquine has tumor-inhibitory and tumor-promoting effects in triple-negative breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    TUOMELA, JOHANNA; SANDHOLM, JOUKO; KAUPPILA, JOONAS H.; LEHENKARI, PETRI; HARRIS, KEVIN W.; SELANDER, KATRI S.

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptor-9 (TLR9) is an intracellular DNA receptor that is widely expressed in breast and other cancers. We previously demonstrated that low tumor TLR9 expression upon diagnosis is associated with significantly shortened disease-specific survival times in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). There are no targeted therapies for this subgroup of patients whose prognosis is among the worst in breast cancer. Due to the previously detected in vitro anti-invasive effects of chloroquine in these cell lines, the present study aimed to investigate the in vivo effects of chloroquine against two clinical subtypes of TNBC that differ in TLR9 expression. Chloroquine suppressed matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 mRNA expression and protein activity, whereas MMP-13 mRNA expression and proteolytic activity were increased. Despite enhancing TLR9 mRNA expression, chloroquine suppressed TLR9 protein expression in vitro. Daily treatment of mice with intraperitoneal (i.p.) chloroquine (80 mg/kg/day) for 22 days, did not inhibit the growth of control siRNA or TLR9 siRNA MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. In conclusion, despite the favorable in vitro effects on TNBC invasion and viability, particularly in hypoxic conditions, chloroquine does not prevent the growth of the triple-negative MDA-MB-231 cells with high or low TLR9 expression levels in vivo. This may be explained by the activating effects of chloroquine on MMP-13 expression or by the fact that chloroquine, by suppressing TLR9 expression, permits the activation of currently unknown molecular pathways, which allow the aggressive behavior of TNBC cells with low TLR9 expression in hypoxia. PMID:24273604

  8. IGFBP3 mRNA expression in benign and malignant breast tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Zefang; Shin, Aesun; Cai, Qiuyin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Most previous studies have focused on evaluating the association between circulating insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) levels and breast cancer risk. Emerging evidence over the past few years suggests that IGFBP-3 may act directly on mammary epithelial cells. Methods To understand the role of IGFBP-3 in breast tumorigenesis, we investigated IGFBP3 mRNA expression levels in benign and malignant breast tumors and their adjacent normal tissues using real-time qu...

  9. The Impact of the Tumor Localization to the Lung Toxicity after Adjuvant Therapy of Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mutlu H et al.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: During and after adjuvant therapy of breast cancer organ toxicity could exist. Lung toxicity was the one of these frequent treatment complications. In our study the impact of the tumor localization to the lung toxicity after adjuvant therapy of breast cancer was investigated. Material and Method: A total of 78 subjects from Kayseri Education and Research Hospital and Mersin State Hospital were included in the study. For each breast the total number of patients...

  10. Chitosan-Based Thermoreversible Hydrogel as an in Vitro Tumor Microenvironment for Testing Breast Cancer Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Tsao, Ching-Ting; Kievit, Forrest M.; Wang, Kui; Erickson, Ariane E.; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Zhang, Miqin

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is a major health problem for women worldwide. Although in vitro culture of established breast cancer cell lines is the most widely used model for preclinical assessment, it poorly represents the behavior of breast cancers in vivo. Acceleration of the development of effective therapeutic strategies requires a cost-efficient in vitro model that can more accurately resemble the in vivo tumor microenvironment. Here, we report the use of a thermoreversible poly(ethylene glycol)-g-ch...

  11. Gene expression profiling of circulating tumor cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from breast cancer patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hensler, M.; Vancurova, I.; Becht, E.; Palata, O.; Strnad, P.; Tesarova, P.; Cabinakova, M.; Švec, David; Kubista, Mikael; Bartunkova, J.; Spisek, R.; Sojka, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 4 (2016), e1102827. ISSN 2162-402X Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Breast cancer * gene expression profiling * circulating tumor cells Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology

  12. Locomotor proteins in tissues of primary tumors and metastases of ovarian and breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondakova, I. V.; Yunusova, N. V.; Spirina, L. V.; Shashova, E. E.; Kolegova, E. S.; Kolomiets, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Villert, A. B.

    2016-08-01

    The paper discusses the capability for active movement in an extracellular matrix, wherein remodeling of the cytoskeleton by actin binding proteins plays a significant role in metastases formation. We studied the expression of actin binding proteins and β-catenin in tissues of primary tumors and metastases of ovarian and breast cancer. Contents of p45 Ser β-catenin and the actin severing protein gelsolin were decreased in metastases of ovarian cancer relative to primary tumors. The level of the cofilin, functionally similar to gelsolin, was significantly higher in metastases compared to primary ovarian and breast tumor tissue. In breast cancer, significant increase in the number of an actin monomer binder protein thymosin-β4 was observed in metastases as compared to primary tumors. The data obtained suggest the involvement of locomotor proteins in metastases formation in ovarian and breast cancer.

  13. Breast tomosynthesis: Accuracy of tumor measurement compared with digital mammography and ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Mammographic tumor size measurement can be difficult because breast structures are superimposed onto a two-dimensional (2D) plane, potentially obscuring the tumor outline. Breast tomosynthesis (BT) is a 3D X-ray imaging technique in which low-dose images are acquired over a limited angular range at a total dose comparable to digital mammography (DM). These low-dose images are used to mathematically reconstruct a 3D image volume of the breast, thus reducing the problem of superimposed tissue. Purpose: To investigate whether breast cancer size can be more accurately assessed with breast tomosynthesis than with digital mammography and ultrasonography (US), by reducing the disturbance effect of the projected anatomy. Material and Methods: A prototype BT system was used. The main inclusion criterion for BT examination was subtle but suspicious findings of breast cancer on 2D mammography. Sixty-two women with 73 breast cancers were included. BT, DM, and US sizes were measured independently by experienced radiologists without knowledge of the pathology results, which were used as reference. Results: The tumor outline could be determined in significantly more cases with BT (63) and US (60) than DM (49). BT and US size correlated well with pathology (R=0.86 and R=0.85, respectively), and significantly better than DM size (R=0.71). Accordingly, staging was significantly more accurate with BT than with DM. Conclusion: The study indicates that BT is superior to DM in the assessment of breast tumor size and stage

  14. Breast tomosynthesis: Accuracy of tumor measurement compared with digital mammography and ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foernvik, Daniel; Svahn, Tony; Timberg, Pontus; Tingberg, Anders (Dept. of Medical Radiation Physics, Lund Univ., Malmoe (Sweden)), e-mail: daniel.fornvik@med.lu.se; Zackrisson, Sophia; Andersson, Ingvar (Diagnostic Centre of Imaging and Functional Medicine, Malmoe Univ. Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden)); Ljungberg, Otto (Dept. of Pathology, Malmoe Univ. Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden))

    2010-04-15

    Background: Mammographic tumor size measurement can be difficult because breast structures are superimposed onto a two-dimensional (2D) plane, potentially obscuring the tumor outline. Breast tomosynthesis (BT) is a 3D X-ray imaging technique in which low-dose images are acquired over a limited angular range at a total dose comparable to digital mammography (DM). These low-dose images are used to mathematically reconstruct a 3D image volume of the breast, thus reducing the problem of superimposed tissue. Purpose: To investigate whether breast cancer size can be more accurately assessed with breast tomosynthesis than with digital mammography and ultrasonography (United States), by reducing the disturbance effect of the projected anatomy. Material and Methods: A prototype BT system was used. The main inclusion criterion for BT examination was subtle but suspicious findings of breast cancer on 2D mammography. Sixty-two women with 73 breast cancers were included. BT, DM, and US sizes were measured independently by experienced radiologists without knowledge of the pathology results, which were used as reference. Results: The tumor outline could be determined in significantly more cases with BT (63) and US (60) than DM (49). BT and US size correlated well with pathology (R=0.86 and R=0.85, respectively), and significantly better than DM size (R=0.71). Accordingly, staging was significantly more accurate with BT than with DM. Conclusion: The study indicates that BT is superior to DM in the assessment of breast tumor size and stage

  15. Non-invasive estimation of the metabolic heat production of breast tumors using digital infrared imaging

    CERN Document Server

    González, Francisco Javier

    2011-01-01

    In this work the metabolic heat generated by breast tumors was estimated indirectly and noninvasively from digital infrared images and numerically simulating a simplified breast model and a cancerous tumor, this parameter can be of clinical importance since it has been related to the doubling volume's time and malignancy for that particular tumor. The results indicate that digital infrared imaging has the potential to estimate in a non-invasive way the malignancy of a tumor by calculating its metabolic heat generation from bioheat thermal transfer models.

  16. The use of breast conserving surgery: linking insurance claims with tumor registry data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to use insurance claims and tumor registry data to examine determinants of breast conserving surgery (BCS) in women with early stage breast cancer. Breast cancer cases registered in the Hawaii Tumor Registry (HTR) from 1995 to 1998 were linked with insurance claims from a local health plan. We identified 722 breast cancer cases with stage I and II disease. Surgical treatment patterns and comorbidities were identified using diagnostic and procedural codes in the claims data. The HTR database provided information on demographics and disease characteristics. We used logistic regression to assess determinants of BCS vs. mastectomy. The linked data set represented 32.8% of all early stage breast cancer cases recorded in the HTR during the study period. Due to the nature of the health plan, 79% of the cases were younger than 65 years. Women with early stage breast cancer living on Oahu were 70% more likely to receive BCS than women living on the outer islands. In the univariate analysis, older age at diagnosis, lower tumor stage, smaller tumor size, and well-differentiated tumor grade were related to receiving BCS. Ethnicity, comorbidity count, menopausal and marital status were not associated with treatment type. In addition to developing solutions that facilitate access to radiation facilities for breast cancer patients residing in remote locations, future qualitative research may help to elucidate how women and oncologists choose between BCS and mastectomy

  17. Differential Gene Expression in Primary Breast Tumors Associated with Lymph Node Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Ellsworth, Rachel E; Field, Lori A.; Brad Love; Kane, Jennifer L.; Hooke, Jeffrey A.; Craig D. Shriver

    2011-01-01

    Lymph node status remains one of the most useful prognostic indicators in breast cancer; however, current methods to assess nodal status disrupt the lymphatic system and may lead to secondary complications. Identification of molecular signatures discriminating lymph node-positive from lymph node-negative primary tumors would allow for stratification of patients requiring surgical assesment of lymph nodes. Primary breast tumors from women with negative ( = 4 1 ) and positive ( = 3 5 ) lymp...

  18. CXCR4-SDF-1 interaction potentially mediates trafficking of circulating tumor cells in primary breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mego, M.; Cholujova, D.; Minarik, G.; Sedlackova, T.; Gronesova, P.; Karaba, M.; Benca, J.; Cingelova, S.; Cierna, Z.; Manasova, D.; Pindak, D.; Sufliarsky, J.; Cristofanilli, M; Reuben, J. M.; Mardiak, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cytokines are involved in cancer invasion and metastasis. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) play key role in tumor dissemination and are an independent survival predictor in breast cancer patients. The aim of this study was to assess correlation between CTCs and plasma cytokines in primary breast cancer (PBC) patients. Methods This study included 147 chemotherapy naïve PBC patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were depleted of hematopoetic cells using RossetteSep™ negati...

  19. A Rare Case of Breast Malignant Phyllodes Tumor With Metastases to the Kidney

    OpenAIRE

    Karczmarek-Borowska, Bożenna; Bukala, Agnieszka; Syrek-Kaplita, Karolina; Ksiazek, Mariusz; Filipowska, Justyna; Gradalska-Lampart, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Phyllodes tumors are rare breast neoplasms. Surgery is the treatment of choice. The role of postoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy is still under dispute, as there are no equivocal prognostic factors. Treatment failure results in the occurrence of distant metastasis—mainly to the lungs, bones, liver, and brain. We have described the case of a woman with a malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast that was surgically treated. She did not receive adjuvant therapy because there is no...

  20. Cytokines secreted by macrophages isolated from tumor microenvironment of inflammatory breast cancer patients possess chemotactic properties

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Mona M.; El-Ghonaimy, Eslam A.; Nouh, Mohamed A.; Schneider, Robert J.; Sloane, Bonnie F.; El-Shinawi, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Although there is a growing literature describing the role of macrophages in breast cancer, the role of macrophages in inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is unclear. The aim of present study was to isolate and characterize tumor associated macrophages of IBC and non-IBC patients and define their role in IBC. Tumor infiltrating monocytes/macrophages (CD14+ and CD68+) were measured by immunohistochem-istry using specific monoclonal antibodies. Blood drained from axillary vein tributaries was coll...

  1. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α promotes primary tumor growth and tumor-initiating cell activity in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Schwab, Luciana P; Peacock, Danielle L.; Majumdar, Debeshi; Ingels, Jesse F; Jensen, Laura C; Smith, Keisha D; Cushing, Richard C; Seagroves, Tiffany N

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Overexpression of the oxygen-responsive transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) correlates with poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. The mouse mammary tumor virus polyoma virus middle T (MMTV-PyMT) mouse is a widely utilized preclinical mouse model that resembles human luminal breast cancer and is highly metastatic. Prior studies in which the PyMT model was used demonstrated that HIF-1α is essential to promoting carcinoma onset and lung metastasis, although...

  2. Computational Model for Tumor Oxygenation Applied to Clinical Data on Breast Tumor Hemoglobin Concentrations Suggests Vascular Dilatation and Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welter, Michael; Fredrich, Thierry; Rinneberg, Herbert; Rieger, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational model for trans-vascular oxygen transport in synthetic tumor and host tissue blood vessel networks, aiming at qualitatively explaining published data of optical mammography, which were obtained from 87 breast cancer patients. The data generally show average hemoglobin concentration to be higher in tumors versus host tissue whereas average oxy-to total hemoglobin concentration (vascular segment RBC-volume-weighted blood oxygenation) can be above or below normal. Starting from a synthetic arterio-venous initial network the tumor vasculature was generated by processes involving cooption, angiogenesis, and vessel regression. Calculations of spatially resolved blood flow, hematocrit, oxy- and total hemoglobin concentrations, blood and tissue oxygenation were carried out for ninety tumor and associated normal vessel networks starting from various assumed geometries of feeding arteries and draining veins. Spatial heterogeneity in the extra-vascular partial oxygen pressure distribution can be related to various tumor compartments characterized by varying capillary densities and blood flow characteristics. The reported higher average hemoglobin concentration of tumors is explained by growth and dilatation of tumor blood vessels. Even assuming sixfold metabolic rate of oxygen consumption in tumorous versus host tissue, the predicted oxygen hemoglobin concentrations are above normal. Such tumors are likely associated with high tumor blood flow caused by high-caliber blood vessels crossing the tumor volume and hence oxygen supply exceeding oxygen demand. Tumor oxy- to total hemoglobin concentration below normal could only be achieved by reducing tumor vessel radii during growth by a randomly selected factor, simulating compression caused by intra-tumoral solid stress due to proliferation of cells and extracellular matrix. Since compression of blood vessels will impede chemotherapy we conclude that tumors with oxy- to total hemoglobin concentration

  3. Oncofetal Epigenetic Bivalency in Breast Cancer Cells: H3K4 and H3K27 Tri-Methylation as a Biomarker for Phenotypic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messier, Terri L; Boyd, Joseph R; Gordon, Jonathan A R; Stein, Janet L; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Gary S

    2016-11-01

    Alterations in the epigenetic landscape are fundamental drivers of aberrant gene expression that contribute to cancer progression and pathology. Understanding specific modes of epigenetic regulation can be used to identify novel biomarkers or targets for therapeutic intervention to clinically treat solid tumors and leukemias. The bivalent marking of gene promoters by H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 is a primary mechanism to poise genes for expression in pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESC). In this study we interrogated three well-established mammary cell lines to model epigenetic programming observed among breast cancer subtypes. Evidence is provided for a distinct bivalent signature, activating and repressive histone marks co-residing at the same gene promoter, in the MCF7 (ESR/PGR+) luminal breast cancer cell line. We identified a subset of genes, enriched for developmental pathways that regulate cellular phenotype and signaling, and partially recapitulate the bivalent character observed in ESC. We validated the biological relevance of this "oncofetal epigenetic" signature using data from ESR/PGR+ tumor samples from breast cancer patients. This signature of oncofetal epigenetic control is an informative biomarker and may provide novel therapeutic targets, selective for both recurring and treatment-resistant cancers. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2474-2481, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26916849

  4. Preliminary clinical observation of 99mTc-MIBI breast tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An effective, noninvasive diagnostic method of breast cancer is investigated. 99mTc-MIBI breast tumor imaging was performed in 78 patients with palpable breast mass. All was pathologically proved after operation. Of 78 patients, 42 were breast carcinoma, among them 35 were detected using 99MTc-MIBI scintigraphy. The smallest detectable mass was a infiltrating ductal carcinoma measuring 1.5 cm x 1.5 cm x 1.2 cm. Of 36 patients with benign lesions, 30 with negative result, among the 6 positive one, 5 were big adenoma, 1 was plasma cell mastitis. The sensitivity and specificity of 99mTc-MIBI imaging in detecting breast cancer wa 83.3% either. 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy can be used as an accessory method in detecting breast cancer. But it was useless for differentiation between breast cancer and big adenoma

  5. Nucleolin overexpression in breast cancer cell sub-populations with different stem-like phenotype enables targeted intracellular delivery of synergistic drug combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Nuno A; Rodrigues, Ana S; Rodrigues-Santos, Paulo; Alves, Vera; Gregório, Ana C; Valério-Fernandes, Ângela; Gomes-da-Silva, Lígia C; Rosa, Manuel Santos; Moura, Vera; Ramalho-Santos, João; Simões, Sérgio; Moreira, João Nuno

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (CSC) are thought responsible for tumor growth and relapse, metastization and active evasion to standard chemotherapy. The recognition that CSC may originate from non-stem cancer cells (non-SCC) through plastic epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition turned these into relevant cell targets. Of crucial importance for successful therapeutic intervention is the identification of surface receptors overexpressed in both CSC and non-SCC. Cell surface nucleolin has been described as overexpressed in cancer cells as well as a tumor angiogenic marker. Herein we have addressed the questions on whether nucleolin was a common receptor among breast CSC and non-SCC and whether it could be exploited for targeting purposes. Liposomes functionalized with the nucleolin-binding F3 peptide, targeted simultaneously, nucleolin-overexpressing putative breast CSC and non-SCC, which was paralleled by OCT4 and NANOG mRNA levels in cells from triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) origin. In murine embryonic stem cells, both nucleolin mRNA levels and F3 peptide-targeted liposomes cellular association were dependent on the stemness status. An in vivo tumorigenic assay suggested that surface nucleolin overexpression per se, could be associated with the identification of highly tumorigenic TNBC cells. This proposed link between nucleolin expression and the stem-like phenotype in TNBC, enabled 100% cell death mediated by F3 peptide-targeted synergistic drug combination, suggesting the potential to abrogate the plasticity and adaptability associated with CSC and non-SCC. Ultimately, nucleolin-specific therapeutic tools capable of simultaneous debulk multiple cellular compartments of the tumor microenvironment may pave the way towards a specific treatment for TNBC patient care. PMID:26283155

  6. Sulfatase 1 and Sulfatase 2 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Associated Signaling Pathways, Tumor Phenotypes, and Survival

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ju Dong; Sun, Zhifu; Hu, Chunling; Lai, Jinping; Dove, Rebecca; Nakamura, Ikuo; Lee, Ju-Seog; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.; Kang, Koo Jeong; Chu, In-Sun; Lewis R Roberts

    2011-01-01

    The heparin-degrading endosulfatases sulfatase 1 (SULF1) and sulfatase 2 (SULF2) have opposing effects in hepatocarcinogenesis despite structural similarity. Using mRNA expression arrays, we analyzed the correlations of SULF expression with signaling networks in human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and the associations of SULF expression with tumor phenotype and patient survival. Data from two mRNA microarray analyses of 139 and 36 HCCs and adjacent tissues were used as training and validat...

  7. Period-2: a tumor suppressor gene in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Shulin; Coffelt, Seth B.; Mao, Lulu; Yuan, Lin; Cheng, Qi; Hill, Steven M

    2008-01-01

    Previous reports have suggested that the ablation of the Period 2 gene (Per 2) leads to enhanced development of lymphoma and leukemia in mice. Employing immunoblot analyses, we have demonstrated that PER 2 is endogenously expressed in human breast epithelial cell lines but is not expressed or is expressed at significantly reduced level in human breast cancer cell lines. Expression of PER 2 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells significantly inhibited the growth of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, and,...

  8. Suppression of Spry1 inhibits triple-negative breast cancer malignancy by decreasing EGF/EGFR mediated mesenchymal phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Qing He; Hongyu Jing; Lucy Liaw; Lindsey Gower; Calvin Vary; Shucheng Hua; Xuehui Yang

    2016-01-01

    Sprouty (Spry) proteins have been implicated in cancer progression, but their role in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), a subtype of lethal and aggressive breast cancer, is unknown. Here, we reported that Spry1 is significantly expressed in TNBC specimen and MDA-MB-231 cells. To understand Spry1 regulation of signaling events controlling breast cancer phenotype, we used lentiviral delivery of human Spry1 shRNAs to suppress Spry1 expression in MDA-MB-231, an established TNBC cell line. Spr...

  9. Alcohol and breast cancer tumor subtypes in a Spanish Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Castelao, J Esteban; Gude, Francisco; Fernandez, Maite Peña; Aguado-Barrera, Miguel E; Ponte, Sara Miranda; Redondo, Carmen M; Castelo, Manuel Enguix; Dominguez, Alejandro Novo; Garzón, Víctor Muñoz; Carracedo, Angel; Martínez, María Elena

    2016-01-01

    Although alcohol intake is an established risk factor for overall breast cancer, few studies have looked at the relationship between alcohol use and breast cancer risk by the four major subtypes of breast cancer and very few data exist in the alcohol-breast cancer relationship in Spanish women. A population-based case-control study was conducted in Galicia, Spain. A total of 1766 women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 1997 and 2014 and 833 controls participated in the study. Data on demographics, breast cancer risk factors, and clinico-pathological characteristics were collected. We examined the alcohol-breast cancer association according to the major breast cancer subtypes [hormone-receptor-positive, HER2-negative (luminal A); hormone-receptor-positive, HER2-positive (luminal B); hormone-receptor-negative, HER2-negative (TNBC); and hormone-receptor-negative, HER2-positive (HER2 overexpressing)] as well as grade and morphology in Spanish women. With the exception of HER2 overexpressing, the risk of all subtypes of breast cancer significantly increased with increasing alcohol intake. The association was similar for hormonal receptor positive breast cancer, i.e., luminal A and luminal B breast cancer (odds ratio, OR 2.16, 95 % confidence interval, CI 1.55-3.02; and OR 1.98, 95 % CI 1.11-3.53, respectively), and for TNBC (TNBC: OR 1.93, 95 % CI 1.07-3.47). The alcohol-breast cancer association was slightly more pronounced among lobular breast cancer (OR 2.76, 95 % CI 1.62-4.69) than among ductal type breast cancers (OR 2.21, 95 % CI 1.61-3.03). In addition, significant associations were shown for all grades, I, II and III breast cancer (OR 1.98, 95 % CI 1.26-3.10; OR 2.34, 95 % CI 1.66-3.31; and OR 2.16, 95 % CI 1.44-3.25 for Grades I, II and III, respectively). To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the association of breast cancer subtypes and alcohol intake in Spanish women. Our findings indicate that breast cancer risk increased

  10. Phenotypic switch induced by simulated microgravity on MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiello, Maria Grazia; Cucina, Alessandra; Proietti, Sara; Palombo, Alessandro; Coluccia, Pierpaolo; D'Anselmi, Fabrizio; Dinicola, Simona; Pasqualato, Alessia; Morini, Veronica; Bizzarri, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    Microgravity exerts dramatic effects on cell morphology and functions, by disrupting cytoskeleton and adhesion structures, as well as by interfering with biochemical pathways and gene expression. Impairment of cells behavior has both practical and theoretical significance, given that investigations of mechanisms involved in microgravity-mediated effects may shed light on how biophysical constraints cooperate in shaping complex living systems. By exposing breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells to simulated microgravity (~0.001 g), we observed the emergence of two morphological phenotypes, characterized by distinct membrane fractal values, surface area, and roundness. Moreover, the two phenotypes display different aggregation profiles and adherent behavior on the substrate. These morphological differences are mirrored by the concomitant dramatic functional changes in cell processes (proliferation and apoptosis) and signaling pathways (ERK, AKT, and Survivin). Furthermore, cytoskeleton undergoes a dramatic reorganization, eventually leading to a very different configuration between the two populations. These findings could be considered adaptive and reversible features, given that, by culturing microgravity-exposed cells into a normal gravity field, cells are enabled to recover their original phenotype. Overall these data outline the fundamental role gravity plays in shaping form and function in living systems. PMID:25215287

  11. Tumor markers and bone scan in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The objective of this study was to compare the levels of CA15-3 and CEA with the bone scan findings in patients with breast cancer. Retrospective analysis of 76 bone scans from 61 patients diagnosed with breast cancer in the last 5 years was performed by two nuclear medicine specialists. All bone scans were performed after surgical treatment of the disease. Patients with loco-regional residual disease or distant metastases in the liver, lung or the brain were excluded from the study. According to the bone scan the patients were divided in 5 groups: normal bone scan (N), equivocal bone scan (E), single metastasis (1MS), three metastases (3MS) and multiple metastases (MMS). Tumor markers were determined within a month before or after the bone scan was performed. Cut-off value for CA 15-3 was 35 U/ml, and for CEA 3 ng/ml. Statistical analysis was performed using descriptive statistic and Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Bone metastases were revealed in 38% of the patients referred for bone scintigraphy out of which 26% had MMS, 7.8% had single MS and 4% had 3MS. The results of 6.5% of the patients were determined as equivocal. The values of CA15-3 were higher in all patient groups compared with the group that had normal bone scan, but this difference reached statistical significance only in groups with 3MS and MMS (p < 0.01). The values of CEA were significantly higher only in patients with multiple metastases when compared with group N (p < 0.01). Values higher than cut-off value for CA 15-3 was found in 9 patients out of 42 in the group with normal bone scan. The highest value of CA 15-3 in this group was 47 U/ml. Only one patient in this group showed elevated levels for CEA. Three patients in the group with single metastasis had normal CA 15-3, while CEA was elevated only in one patient. All patients in the group with 3MS had elevated levels of CA 15-3 while CEA was in the normal range. All patients with MMS had elevated CA 15-3 values while CEA was elevated in

  12. Alcohol and breast cancer tumor subtypes in a Spanish Cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Castelao, J.Esteban; Gude, Francisco; Fernandez, Maite Peña; Miguel E. Aguado-Barrera; Ponte, Sara Miranda; Carmen M Redondo; Castelo, Manuel Enguix; Dominguez, Alejandro Novo; Garzón, Víctor Muñoz; Carracedo, Angel; Martínez, María Elena

    2016-01-01

    Although alcohol intake is an established risk factor for overall breast cancer, few studies have looked at the relationship between alcohol use and breast cancer risk by the four major subtypes of breast cancer and very few data exist in the alcohol-breast cancer relationship in Spanish women. A population-based case-control study was conducted in Galicia, Spain. A total of 1766 women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 1997 and 2014 and 833 controls participated in the study. Data...

  13. The Impact of the Tumor Localization to the Lung Toxicity after Adjuvant Therapy of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutlu H et al.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: During and after adjuvant therapy of breast cancer organ toxicity could exist. Lung toxicity was the one of these frequent treatment complications. In our study the impact of the tumor localization to the lung toxicity after adjuvant therapy of breast cancer was investigated. Material and Method: A total of 78 subjects from Kayseri Education and Research Hospital and Mersin State Hospital were included in the study. For each breast the total number of patients was 39 (right and left breast. All of the patients were in remission and treatments of the patients had finished 6 months before inclusion. All patients were examined with respiratory function test. Results: There was no statistically significant between FEV1, FEC, FEV1/FVC values in the patient groups for the right and left breast cancer. Discussion: Despite the small number of patients included, our study showed that tumor localization does not affect the lung toxicity due to the chemoradiotherapy.

  14. Active adjoint modeling method in microwave induced thermoacoustic tomography for breast tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaozhang; Zhao, Zhiqin; Wang, Jinguo; Chen, Guoping; Liu, Qing Huo

    2014-07-01

    To improve the model-based inversion performance of microwave induced thermoacoustic tomography for breast tumor imaging, an active adjoint modeling (AAM) method is proposed. It aims to provide a more realistic breast acoustic model used for tumor inversion as the background by actively measuring and reconstructing the structural heterogeneity of human breast environment. It utilizes the reciprocity of acoustic sensors, and adapts the adjoint tomography method from seismic exploration. With the reconstructed acoustic model of breast environment, the performance of model-based inversion method such as time reversal mirror is improved significantly both in contrast and accuracy. To prove the advantage of AAM, a checkerboard pattern model and anatomical realistic breast models have been used in full wave numerical simulations. PMID:24956614

  15. Efficacy of helical CT in evaluating local tumor extent of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the diagnostic accuracy of helical CT (HCT) in the determination of local tumor extent of breast cancer. One hundred forty consecutive patients with breast cancer, including 87 invasive ductal carcinomas without extensive intraductal components (EIC), 44 invasive ductal carcinomas with EIC, 2 non-invasive ductal carcinomas, and 7 invasive lobular carcinomas, were included in the study. Three-dimensional tumor diameter including whole extent was measured on HCT, and the amount of invasion to fat tissue, skin, pectoral muscle, and chest wall was estimated using a three-step scale. These results were then compared with the pathological findings. Breast cancers appeared as areas of high attenuation compared with the surrounding breast tissue in all patients. Tumor extent was correctly diagnosed by HCT to within a maximum difference of 1 cm in 88 patients (63%) and within 2 cm in 122 patients (87%). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in diagnosing muscular invasion of breast cancer using HCT were 100%, 99%, and 99%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in diagnosing skin invasion of breast cancer using HCT were 84%, 93%, and 91%, respectively. HCT was able to visualize all of the tumors and detect the correct tumor extent in most patients. (author)

  16. Performance analysis of a dedicated breast MR-HIFU system for tumor ablation in breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, R.; Merckel, L. G.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Schubert, G.; Köhler, M.; Knuttel, F. M.; Mali, W. P. Th M.; Moonen, C. T. W.; van den Bosch, M. A. A. J.; Bartels, L. W.

    2015-07-01

    MR-guided HIFU ablation is a promising technique for the non-invasive treatment of breast cancer. A phase I study was performed to assess the safety and treatment accuracy and precision of MR-HIFU ablation in breast cancer patients (n=10 ) using a newly developed MR-HIFU platform dedicated to applications in the breast. In this paper a technical analysis of the performance of the dedicated breast MR-HIFU system during breast tumors ablation is described. The main points of investigation were the spatial targeting accuracy and precision of the system and the performance of real-time respiration-corrected MR thermometry. The mean targeting accuracy was in the range of 2.4-2.6 mm, whereas the mean targeting precision was in the range of 1.5-1.8 mm. To correct for respiration-induced magnetic field fluctuations during MR temperature mapping a look-up-table (LUT)-based correction method was used. An optimized procedural sedation protocol in combination with the LUT-based correction method allowed for precise MR thermometry during the ablation procedure (temperature standard deviation HIFU system allows for safe, accurate and precise ablation of breast tumors.

  17. Fibroblast Activation Protein Expression by Stromal Cells and Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julia, Tchou; Zhang Paul, J; Yingtao, Bi; Celine, Satija; Rajrupa, Marjumdar; Stephen, TL; Lo, A; Haiying, Chen; Carolyn, Mies; June, Carl H; Jose, Conejo-Garcia; Ellen, Puré

    2013-01-01

    Summary Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) has long been known to be expressed in the stroma of breast cancer. However, very little is known if the magnitude of FAP expression within the stroma may have prognostic value and reflect the heterogeneous biology of the tumor cell. An earlier study had suggested that stromal FAP expression in breast cancer was inversely proportional to prognosis. We, therefore, hypothesized that stromal FAP expression may correlate with clinicopathologic variables and may serve as an adjunct prognostic factor in breast cancer. We evaluated the expression of FAP in a panel of breast cancer tissues (n=52) using a combination of immunostain analyses at the tissue and single cell level using freshly frozen or freshly digested human breast tumor samples respectively. Our results showed that FAP expression was abundantly expressed in the stroma across all breast cancer subtypes without significant correlation with clinicopathologic factors. We further identified a subset of FAP positive or FAP+ stromal cells that also expressed CD45, a pan-leukocyte marker. Using freshly dissociated human breast tumor specimens (n=5), we demonstrated that some of these FAP+ CD45+ cells were CD11b+CD14+MHC-II+ indicating that they were likely tumor associated macrophages (TAMs). Although FAP+CD45+ cells have been demonstrated in the mouse tumor stroma, our results demonstrating that human breast TAMs expressed FAP was novel and suggested that existing and future FAP directed therapy may have dual therapeutic benefits targeting both stromal mesenchymal cells and immune cells such as TAMs. More work is needed to explore the role of FAP as a potential targetable molecule in breast cancer treatment. PMID:24074532

  18. MED12 exon 2 mutations in phyllodes tumors of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exon 2 of MED12, a subunit of the transcriptional mediator complex, has been frequently mutated in uterine leiomyomas and breast fibroadenomas; however, it has been rarely mutated in other tumors. Although the mutations were also found in uterine leiomyosarcomas, the frequency was significantly lower than in uterine leiomyomas. Here, we examined the MED12 mutation in phyllodes tumors, another biphasic tumor with epithelial and stromal components related to breast fibroadenomas. Mutations in MED12 exon 2 were analyzed in nine fibroadenomas and eleven phyllodes tumors via Sanger sequencing. A panel of cancer- and sarcoma-related genes was also analyzed using Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing. Six mutations in fibroadenomas, including those previously reported (6/9, 67%), and five mutations in phyllodes tumors (5/11, 45%) were observed. Three mutations in the phyllodes tumors were missense mutations at Gly44, which is common in uterine leiomyomas and breast fibroadenomas. In addition, two deletion mutations (in-frame c.133-144del12 and loss of splice acceptor c.100-68-137del106) were observed in the phyllodes tumors. No other recurrent mutation was observed with next-generation sequencing. Frequent mutations in MED12 exon 2 in the phyllodes tumors suggest that it may share genetic etiology with uterine leiomyoma, a subgroup of uterine leiomyosarcomas and breast fibroadenoma

  19. Breast tumor characteristics of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers on MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, J.; Mann, R.; Kok, T.; Obdeijn, I. M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Blickman, J. G.; Boetes, C.

    2008-01-01

    The appearance of malignant lesions in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA-MCs) on mammography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was evaluated. Thus, 29 BRCA-MCs with breast cancer were retrospectively evaluated and the results compared with an age, tumor size and tumor type matched control g

  20. Breast tumor characteristics of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers on MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Veltman; R. Mann; T. Kok (Theo); A.I.M. Obdeijn (Inge-Marie); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); J.G. Blickman; C. Boetes

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe appearance of malignant lesions in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA-MCs) on mammography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was evaluated. Thus, 29 BRCA-MCs with breast cancer were retrospectively evaluated and the results compared with an age, tumor size and tumor type match

  1. Body Mass Index is Associated with Gene Methylation in Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hair, Brionna Y.; Troester, Melissa A.; Edmiston, Sharon N.; Parrish, Eloise A.; Robinson, Whitney R.; Wu, Michael C.; Olshan, Andrew F.; Swift-Scanlan, Theresa; Conway, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Background Although obesity is associated with breast cancer incidence and prognosis, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Identification of obesity-associated epigenetic changes in breast tissue may advance mechanistic understanding of breast cancer initiation and progression. The goal of this study, therefore, was to investigate associations between obesity and gene methylation in breast tumors. Methods Using the Illumina GoldenGate Cancer I Panel, we estimated the association between body mass index (BMI) and gene methylation in 345 breast tumor samples from Phase I of the Carolina Breast Cancer Study, a population based case-control study. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify sites that were differentially methylated by BMI. Stratification by tumor estrogen receptor status was also conducted. Results In the majority of the 935 probes analyzed (87%), the average beta value increased with obesity (BMI ≥ 30). Obesity was significantly associated with differential methylation (false discovery rate q-value < 0.05) in just 2 gene loci in breast tumor tissue overall and in 21 loci among estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors. Obesity was associated with methylation of genes that function in immune response, cell growth, and DNA repair. Conclusions Obesity is associated with altered methylation overall, and with hypermethylation among ER-positive tumors in particular, suggesting that obesity may influence the methylation of genes with known relevance to cancer. Some of these differences in methylation by obese status may influences levels of gene expression within breast cells. Impact If our results are validated, obesity-associated methylation sites could serve as targets for prevention and treatment research. PMID:25583948

  2. Chronic inhibition of tumor cell-derived VEGF enhances the malignant phenotype of colorectal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vascular endothelial growth factor-a (VEGF)-targeted therapies have become an important treatment for a number of human malignancies. The VEGF inhibitors are actually effective in several types of cancers, however, the benefits are transiently, and the vast majority of patients who initially respond to the therapies will develop resistance. One of possible mechanisms for the acquired resistance may be the direct effect(s) of VEGF inhibitors on tumor cells expressing VEGF receptors (VEGFR). Thus, we investigated here the direct effect of chronic VEGF inhibition on phenotype changes in human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. To chronically inhibit cancer cell-derived VEGF, human CRC cell lines (HCT116 and RKO) were chronically exposed (2 months) to an anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody (mAb) or were disrupted the Vegf gene (VEGF-KO). Effects of VEGF family members were blocked by treatment with a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (VEGFR-TKI). Hypoxia-induced apoptosis under VEGF inhibited conditions was measured by TUNEL assay. Spheroid formation ability was assessed using a 3-D spheroid cell culture system. Chronic inhibition of secreted/extracellular VEGF by an anti-VEGF mAb redundantly increased VEGF family member (PlGF, VEGFR1 and VEGFR2), induced a resistance to hypoxia-induced apoptosis, and increased spheroid formation ability. This apoptotic resistance was partially abrogated by a VEGFR-TKI, which blocked the compensate pathway consisted of VEGF family members, or by knockdown of Vegf mRNA, which inhibited intracellular function(s) of all Vegf gene products. Interestingly, chronic and complete depletion of all Vegf gene products by Vegf gene knockout further augmented these phenotypes in the compensate pathway-independent manner. These accelerated phenotypes were significantly suppressed by knockdown of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α that was up-regulated in the VEGF-KO cell lines. Our findings suggest that chronic inhibition of tumor cell-derived VEGF

  3. Electrical impedance scanning in breast tumor imaging: correlation with the growth pattern of lesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kan; WANG Ting; FU Feng; JI Zhen-yu; LIU Rui-gang; LIAO Qi-mei; DONG Xiu-zhen

    2009-01-01

    Background This study researched the electric impedance properties of breast tissue and demonstrated the differentcharacteristic of electrical impedance scanning (EIS) images.Methods The impedance character of 40 malignant tumors, 34 benign tumors and some normal breast tissue from 69patients undergoing breast surgery was examined by EIS in vivo measurement and mammography screening, with aseries of frequencies set between 100 Hz-100 kHz in the ex vivo spectroscopy measurement.Results Of the 39 patients with 40 malignant tumors, 24 showed bright spots, 11 showed dark areas in EIS and 5showed no specific image. Of the 30 patients with 34 benign tumors there were almost no specific abnormality shown inthe EIS results. Primary ex vivo spectroscopy experiments showed that the resistivity of various breast tissue take thefollowing pattern: adipose tissue>cancerous tissue>mammary gland and benign tumor tissue.Conclusions There are significant differences in the electrical impedance properties between cancerous tissue andhealthy tissue. The impedivity of benign tumor is lower, and is at the same level with that of the mammary glandulartissue. The distinct growth pattern of breast lesions determined the different electrical impedance characteristics in theEIS results.

  4. High frequency of loss of allelic integrity at Wilms′ tumor suppressor gene-1 locus in advanced breast tumors associated with aggressiveness of the tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Gupta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The product of Wilms′ tumor suppressor gene (WT1, a nuclear transcription factor, regulates the expression of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF and transforming growth factor (TGF systems, both of which are implicated in breast tumorigenesis and are known to facilitate angiogenesis. In the present study, WT1 allelic integrity was examined by Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH studies in infiltrating breast carcinoma (n=60, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS (n=10 and benign breast disease (n=5 patients, to determine its possible association with tumor progression. Methods: LOH at the WT1 locus (11p13 as determined by PCR-RFLP for Hinf1 restriction site and was subsequently examined for its association with intratumoral expression of various growth factors i.e. TGF-β1, IGF-II, IGF-1R and angiogenesis (VEGF and Intratumoral micro-vessel density in breast carcinoma. Results: Six of 22 (27.2% genetically heterozygous of infiltrating breast carcinoma and 1 of 4 DCIS cases showed loss of one allele at WT1 locus. Histologically, the tumors with LOH at WT1 were Intraductal carcinoma (IDC and were of grade II and III. There was no correlation in the appearance of LOH at WT1 locus with age, tumor stage, menopausal status, chemotherapy status and lymph node metastasis. The expression of factor IGF-II and its receptor, IGF-1R was significantly higher in carcinoma having LOH at WT1 locus. A positive correlation was observed between the TGF-β1, VEGF expression and IMD scores in infiltrating carcinoma. Conclusions: The current study indicates that the high frequency of loss of allelic integrity at Wilms′ tumor suppressor gene-1 locus in high-graded breast tumors is associated with aggressiveness of the tumor.

  5. Differential Expression of Growth Factor Receptors and Membrane-Bound Tumor Markers for Imaging in Male and Female Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Vermeulen, Jeroen F.; Robert Kornegoor; Elsken van der Wall; Petra van der Groep; Paul J. van Diest

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Male breast cancer accounts for 0.5-1% of all breast cancers and is generally diagnosed at higher stage than female breast cancers and therefore might benefit from earlier detection and targeted therapy. Except for HER2 and EGFR, little is known about expression of growth factor receptors in male breast cancer. We therefore investigated expression profiles of growth factor receptors and membrane-bound tumor markers in male breast cancer and gynecomastia, in comparison with femal...

  6. Solitary fibrous tumor of the male breast: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sessa Fausto

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Extrapleural solitary fibrous tumors are very rare and occasionally they appear in extraserosal soft tissues or parenchymatous organs. In such cases the right preoperative diagnosis is often difficult and challenging, because both radiological and cytological examinations are not exhaustive. For these reasons, surgical excision is frequently the only way to reach the correct diagnosis and to achieve definitive treatment. A few cases of solitary fibrous tumors have been also described in the breast. Although rare, this lesion opens difficulties in preoperative diagnosis entering in differential diagnosis with other benign lesions as well as with breast cancer. In this article we describe a case of a solitary fibrous tumor of the breast in a 49-year-old man. Problems related to differential diagnosis and the possible pitfalls that can be encountered in the diagnostic iter of such rare tumor are discussed.

  7. Induction of tumor necrosis factor expression and resistance in an human breast tumor cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a polypeptide cytokine that is cytotoxic to some but not all tumor cells. The basis for resistance to the cytotoxic effects of this agent remains unclear. We have studied the development of TNF resistance in human ZR-75-1 breast carcinoma cells. ZR-75-1 cells have undetectable levels of TNF RNA and protein. However, TNF transcripts are transiently induced in these cells by exposure to recombinant human TNF. This induction of TNF RNA is associated with production of TNF-like protein in cell lysates and culture supernatants. Stable resistance to TNF-induced cytotoxicity develops when ZR-75-1 cells are exposed to increased concentrations of TNF. The TNF-resistant cells, designated ZR-75-1R, continuously express TNF transcripts and a TNF-like protein. Furthermore, ZR-75-1R cell supernatants contain cytotoxic activity that is abrogated by polyclonal antibody against TNF. The ZR-75-1R cells also possess TNF receptors that are occupied or down-regulated by the TNF-like protein. These findings thus suggest that (i) TNF induces TNF transcripts and production of a TNF-like protein in ZR-75-1 cells and (ii) resistance to TNF-induced cytotoxicity is associated with stable TNF expression

  8. Computer-Aided Evaluation of Breast MRI for the Residual Tumor Extent and Response Monitoring in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lyou, Chae Yeon; Cho, Nariya; Kim, Sun Mi; Jang, Mijung; Park, Jeong-Seon; Baek, Seung Yon; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the accuracy of a computer-aided evaluation program (CAE) of breast MRI for the assessment of residual tumor extent and response monitoring in breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Materials and Methods Fifty-seven patients with breast cancers who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy before surgery and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI before and after chemotherapy were included as part of this study. For the assessment of residual tumor extent after compl...

  9. Variation of the prognostic significance of HER-2 expression in breast cancer according to tumor size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swede, Helen; Moysich, Kirsten B; Winston, Janet S; Hurd, Thelma C; Edge, Stephen B; Romero-Gutierrez, Maritza; Brooks, John S J; Michalek, Arthur M

    2003-01-01

    The prognostic importance of HER-2 status in breast cancer has been investigated extensively, but findings have not been uniform across immunohistochemical studies using fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens. We speculate that studies with an overrepresentation of large tumors might not produce evidence for an independent effect of a single marker because breast tumors of larger size tend to exhibit multiple adverse attributes as the malignancy advances through the metastatic cascade. Further, it has been posited that results from certain studies of biologic markers might be generalizable only to larger tumors because tumor repositories tend to house a disproportionate number of larger tumors. To test our hypothesis that the prognostic effect of HER-2 status might be modified by the size of the tumor, we conducted a survival analysis of a nested case-case sample of 156 women diagnosed with primary breast cancer from 1983 to 1995. Relative risks (RRs) and confidence intervals (CIs) for recurrence in relation to HER-2 status were estimated using a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. Immunohistochemistry of archival tissue was used to detect HER-2 expression. Positive HER-2 status was associated with recurrence (RR = 4.24, 95% CI 1.30-13.78) among patients with axillary lymph node-positive involvement. This analysis identified an interaction (p < 0.01) between tumor size and overexpression. Stratification by tumor size revealed an increased risk of recurrence associated with HER-2-positive tumors that were tumors larger than 2 cm. Eligible patients without available tumor tissue tended to have smaller tumors compared to study participants. Our results might partly explain the variation in evidence across HER-2 prognostic studies using fixed tissue and might apply to other putative markers of prognosis in breast cancer. PMID:12603382

  10. Monocytes mediate metastatic breast tumor cell adhesion to endothelium under flow

    OpenAIRE

    Evani, Shankar J.; Prabhu, Rajesh G.; Gnanaruban, V.; Finol, Ender A.; Anand K. Ramasubramanian

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial adhesion is necessary for the hematogenous dissemination of tumor cells. However, the metastatic breast tumor cell MDA-MB-231 does not bind to the endothelium under physiological flow conditions, suggesting alternate mechanisms of adhesion. Since monocytes are highly represented in the tumor microenvironment, and also bind to endothelium during inflammation, we hypothesized that the monocytes assist in the arrest of MDA-MB-231 on the endothelium. Using in vitro models of the dynam...

  11. Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC) Are Associated with Defects in Adaptive Immunity in Patients with Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mego, M; Gao, H; Cohen, EN; Anfossi, S; Giordano, A; Sanda, T; Fouad, TM; De Giorgi, U; Giuliano, M; Woodward, WA; Alvarez, RH; Valero, V; Ueno, NT; Hortobagyi, GN; Cristofanilli, M; Reuben, JM

    2016-01-01

    Background: Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) play a crucial role in tumor dissemination and are prognostic in primary and metastatic breast cancer. Peripheral blood (PB) immune cells contribute to an unfavorable microenvironment for CTC survival. This study aimed to correlate CTCs with the PB T-cell immunophenotypes and functions of patients with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). Methods: This study included 65 IBC patients treated at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. PB was obtained from patients prior to starting a new line of chemotherapy for CTCs enumeration by CellSearch®, and T cell phenotype and function by flow cytometry; the results were correlated with CTCs and clinical outcome. Results: At least 1 CTC (≥1) or ≥5 CTCs was detected in 61.5% or 32.3% of patients, respectively. CTC count did not correlate with total lymphocytes; however, patients with ≥1 CTC or ≥5 CTCs had lower percentages (%) of CD3+ and CD4+ T cells compared with patients with no CTCs or <5 CTCs, respectively. Patients with ≥1 CTC had a lower percentage of T-cell receptor (TCR)-activated CD8+ T cells synthesizing TNF-α and IFN-γ and a higher percentage of T-regulatory lymphocytes compared to patients without CTCs. In multivariate analysis, tumor grade and % CD3+ T-cells were associated with ≥1 CTC, whereas ≥5 CTC was associated with tumor grade, stage, % CD3+ and % CD4+ T cells, and % TCR-activated CD8 T-cells synthesizing IL-17. Conclusions: IBC patients with CTCs in PB had abnormalities in adaptive immunity that could potentially impact tumor cell dissemination and initiation of the metastatic cascade. PMID:27326253

  12. Upregulation of HYAL1 expression in breast cancer promoted tumor cell proliferation, migration, invasion and angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Xiang Tan

    Full Text Available Hyaluronic acid (HA is a component of the Extra-cellular matrix (ECM, it is closely correlated with tumor cell growth, proliferation, metastasis and angiogenesis, etc. Hyaluronidase (HAase is a HA-degrading endoglycosidase, levels of HAase are elevated in many cancers. Hyaluronidase-1 (HYAL1 is the major tumor-derived HAase. We previously demonstrated that HYAL1 were overexpression in human breast cancer. Breast cancer cells with higher HAase expression, exhibited significantly higher invasion ability through matrigel than those cells with lower HAase expression, and knockdown of HYAL1 expression in breast cancer cells resulted in decreased cell growth, adhesion, invasion and angiogenesis. Here, to further elucidate the function of HYAL1 in breast cancer, we investigated the consequences of forcing HYAL1 expression in breast cancer cells by transfection of expression plasmid. Compared with control, HYAL1 up-regulated cells showed increased the HAase activity, and reduced the expression of HA in vitro. Meantime, upregulation of HYAL1 promoted the cell growth, migration, invasion and angiogenesis in vitro. Moreover, in nude mice model, forcing HYAL1 expression induced breast cancer cell xenograft tumor growth and angiogenesis. Interestingly, the HA expression was upregulated by forcing HYAL1 expression in vivo. These findings suggested that HYAL1-HA system is correlated with the malignant behavior of breast cancer.

  13. Ultrashort Microwave-Pumped Real-Time Thermoacoustic Breast Tumor Imaging System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fanghao; Ji, Zhong; Ding, Wenzheng; Lou, Cunguang; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2016-03-01

    We report the design of a real-time thermoacoustic (TA) scanner dedicated to imaging deep breast tumors and investigate its imaging performance. The TA imaging system is composed of an ultrashort microwave pulse generator and a ring transducer array with 384 elements. By vertically scanning the transducer array that encircles the breast phantom, we achieve real-time, 3D thermoacoustic imaging (TAI) with an imaging speed of 16.7 frames per second. The stability of the microwave energy and its distribution in the cling-skin acoustic coupling cup are measured. The results indicate that there is a nearly uniform electromagnetic field in each XY-imaging plane. Three plastic tubes filled with salt water are imaged dynamically to evaluate the real-time performance of our system, followed by 3D imaging of an excised breast tumor embedded in a breast phantom. Finally, to demonstrate the potential for clinical applications, the excised breast of a ewe embedded with an ex vivo human breast tumor is imaged clearly with a contrast of about 1:2.8. The high imaging speed, large field of view, and 3D imaging performance of our dedicated TAI system provide the potential for clinical routine breast screening. PMID:26552081

  14. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote growth and angiogenesis of breast and prostate tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ting; Lee, Yuk Wai; Rui, Yun Feng; Cheng, Tin Yan; Jiang, Xiao Hua; Li, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to migrate to tumor tissues. This behavior of MSCs has been exploited as a tumor-targeting strategy for cell-based cancer therapy. However, the effects of MSCs on tumor growth are controversial. This study was designed to determine the effect of MSCs on the growth of breast and prostate tumors. Methods Bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) were isolated and characterized. Effects of BM-MSCs on tumor cell proliferation were analyzed in a co-cul...

  15. Glucosamine-Bound Near-Infrared Fluorescent Probes with Lysosomal Specificity for Breast Tumor Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Li

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive imaging of lysosomes will be useful 1 to elucidate the role of lysosomal parameters in cancer, 2 to diagnose malignant lesions, and 3 to evaluate future lysosome-targeted anticancer therapies. Lysosome-specific labeling of glucosamine-bound near-infrared (NIR fluorescent probes, IR-1 and IR-2, but not control probe IR-15 without the glucosamine moiety, was observed by fluorescence microscopy in human breast epithelial cell lines. Lysosome labeling and tumor specificity of these NIR probes were investigated by dynamic optical imaging and immunofluorescence staining in human breast tumor xenografts. IR-1 and IR-2 demonstrated faster lysosome labeling rates in highly aggressive MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435 cells compared with less aggressive MCF-7 and nontumorigenic MCF-12A cells. IR-1 and IR-2, but not IR-15, accumulated in human MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-435, and MCF-7 breast tumor xenografts in vivo. IR-2 demonstrated the highest maximum fluorescence and tumor/normal tissue ratios in all tumor models. Specific lysosome labeling from IR-2 in vivo was validated by colocalization of the NIR fluorescence with CD63 immunofluorescence in tumor sections. IR-1 and IR-2 demonstrated high lysosome-labeling ability and breast tumor-targeting specificity in vitro and in vivo. They are promising for diagnosing malignant lesions and may provide a means for evaluating and monitoring future lysosome-targeted anticancer therapies.

  16. Nestin expression associates with poor prognosis and triple negative phenotype in locally advanced (T4 breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Piras

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Nestin, an intermediate filament protein, has traditionally been noted for its importance as a neural stem cell marker. However, in recent years, expression of nestin has shown to be associated with general proliferation of progenitor cell populations within neoplasms. There is no reported study addressing nestin expression in T4 breast cancer patients. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate, through immunohistochemistry, the expression and distribution of nestin in T4 breast cancer, in order to determine its association with clinical and pathological parameters as well as with patients’ outcome. Nestin was detectable in tumoral cells and in endothelial cells of blood microvessels, and it is significantly expressed in triple-negative and in inflammatory breast cancer (IBC subgroups of T4 breast tumours. The Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the presence of nestin in tumoral cells significantly predicted poor prognosis at 5-years survival (P=0.02 and with borderline significance at 10-years of survival (P=0.05 in T4 breast cancer patients. On the basis of these observations, we speculate that nestin expression may characterize tumours with an aggressive clinical behavior, suggesting that the presence of nestin in tumoral cells and vessels may be considered an important factor that leads to a poor prognosis. Further studies are awaited to define the biological role of nestin in the etiology of these subgroups of breast cancers.

  17. The multifaceted mechanism of Leptin signaling within tumor microenvironment in driving breast cancer growth and progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiano eAndò

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Adipokines represent likely candidates to mediate the increased breast cancer risk and the enhanced progression associated with obesity. Other contributors to obesity-related cancer progression are insulin/IGF-1 pathways and hormones. Among these, the adipokine leptin is the most intensively studied in both metabolism in general and in cancer due to the fact that leptin levels increase in proportion of fat mass. Leptin is primarily synthesized from adipocytes, but it is also produced by other cells including fibroblasts. In this latter case, it has been well demonstrated how cancer-associated fibroblasts express leptin receptor and secrete leptin which sustains a short autocrine loop and is able to target tumor epithelial cells enhancing breast cancer cell motility and invasiveness. In addition, it has been reported that leptin may induce breast cancer to undergo a transition from epithelial to spindle-like mesenchymal morphology, activating the signaling pathways devoted to the EMT. Thus, it emerges how leptin may play a crucial role in mediating malignant cell and tumor microenvironment interactions. Here, we present an overview of the role of leptin in breast cancer, covering the following topics: 1 leptin as an amplifier of estrogen signaling in tumor epithelial cells contributing to the promotion of carcinogenesis; 2 leptin as a crucial player in mediating tumor-stroma interaction and influencing EMT-linked mechanisms, that may sustain breast cancer growth and progression; 3 leptin and leptin receptor targeting as novel therapeutic strategies for breast cancer treatment.

  18. Phenotypical Reversion and Differentiation of Breast Cancer in vitro by Sodium Phenylacetate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of a nontoxic differentiation inducer, sodium phenylacetate (NaPA) on breast cancer MCF-7 and MDA-453 cells in vitro. Methods The anchorage growth assay, ELISA, immunofluorescence analysis and electron microscopy were used to study the effect of NaPA on MCF-7 and MDA-453 cells. Results NaPA treatment resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of MCF-7 or MDA-453 cell growth, including anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent growth, but il did not significantly inhibit the growth of normal amnion tissue Wish cells and adult hepatic cells L-02. In addition, NaPA could enhance the expressions of intercellular adhesion molecule-1(ICAM-1), human leukocyte antigen ( HLA ) class Ⅰ and Ⅱ molecules on the surface of MCF-7 and MDA-453 cells. Electron micrographs demonstrated richer rough endoplasmic reticulum,mitochondria in NaPA-treated MCF-7 and MDA-453 cells, in contrast to the scant before-mentwned structures but scattered cytoplasmic polyribosomes in the untreated ones. Conclusion NaPA is effective in inducing phenotype reversion and differentiation of breast cancer, and potential in cancer intervention.

  19. Automated detection of breast tumor in MRI and comparison of kinetic features for assessing tumor response to chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is used increasingly in diagnosis of breast cancer and assessment of treatment efficacy in current clinical practice. The purpose of this preliminary study is to develop and test a new quantitative kinetic image feature analysis method and biomarker to predict response of breast cancer patients to neoadjuvant chemotherapy using breast MR images acquired before the chemotherapy. For this purpose, we developed a computer-aided detection scheme to automatically segment breast areas and tumors depicting on the sequentially scanned breast MR images. From a contrast-enhancement map generated by subtraction of two image sets scanned pre- and post-injection of contrast agent, our scheme computed 38 morphological and kinetic image features from both tumor and background parenchymal regions. We applied a number of statistical data analysis methods to identify effective image features in predicting response of the patients to the chemotherapy. Based on the performance assessment of individual features and their correlations, we applied a fusion method to generate a final image biomarker. A breast MR image dataset involving 68 patients was used in this study. Among them, 25 had complete response and 43 had partially response to the chemotherapy based on the RECIST guideline. Using this image feature fusion based biomarker, the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve is AUC = 0.850±0.047. This study demonstrated that a biomarker developed from the fusion of kinetic image features computed from breast MR images acquired pre-chemotherapy has potentially higher discriminatory power in predicting response of the patients to the chemotherapy.

  20. Magnetic Fluorescent Nanoformulation for Intracellular Drug Delivery to Human Breast Cancer, Primary Tumors, and Tumor Biopsies: Beyond Targeting Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Boubbou, Kheireddine; Ali, Rizwan; Bahhari, Hassan M; AlSaad, Khaled O; Nehdi, Atef; Boudjelal, Mohamed; AlKushi, Abdulmohsen

    2016-06-15

    We report the development of a chemotherapeutic nanoformulation made of polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized magnetofluorescent nanoparticles (Fl-PMNPs) loaded with anticancer drugs as a promising drug carrier homing to human breast cancer cells, primary tumors, and solid tumors. First, nanoparticle uptake and cell death were evaluated in three types of human breast cells: two metastatic cancerous MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells and nontumorigenic MCF-10A cells. While Fl-PMNPs were not toxic to cells even at the highest concentrations used, Dox-loaded Fl-PMNPs showed significant potency, effectively killing the different breast cancer cells, albeit at different affinities. Interestingly and superior to free Dox, Dox-loaded Fl-PMNPs were found to be more effective in killing the metastatic cells (2- to 3-fold enhanced cytotoxicities for MDA-MB-231 compared to MCF-7), compared to the normal noncancerous MCF-10A cells (up to 8-fold), suggesting huge potentials as selective anticancer agents. Electron and live confocal microscopy imaging mechanistically confirmed that the nanoparticles were successfully endocytosed and packaged into vesicles inside the cytoplasm, where Dox is released and then translocated to the nucleus exerting its cytotoxic action and causing apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, commendable and enhanced penetration in 3D multilayered primary tumor cells derived from primary lesions as well as in patient breast tumor biopsies was observed, killing the tumor cells inside. The designed nanocarriers described here can potentially open new opportunities for breast cancer patients, especially in theranostic imaging and hyperthermia. While many prior studies have focused on targeting ligands to specific receptors to improve efficacies, we discovered that even with passive-targeted tailored delivery system enhanced toxic responses can be attained. PMID:27269304

  1. Quantitative methylation profiling in tumor and matched morphologically normal tissues from breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, we determined the gene hypermethylation profiles of normal tissues adjacent to invasive breast carcinomas and investigated whether these are associated with the gene hypermethylation profiles of the corresponding primary breast tumors. A quantitative methylation-specific PCR assay was used to analyze the DNA methylation status of 6 genes (DAPK, TWIST, HIN-1, RASSF1A, RARβ2 and APC) in 9 normal breast tissue samples from unaffected women and in 56 paired cancerous and normal tissue samples from breast cancer patients. Normal tissue adjacent to breast cancer displayed statistically significant differences to unrelated normal breast tissues regarding the aberrant methylation of the RASSF1A (P = 0.03), RARβ2 (P = 0.04) and APC (P = 0.04) genes. Although methylation ratios for all genes in normal tissues from cancer patients were significantly lower than in the cancerous tissue from the same patient (P ≤ 0.01), in general, a clear correlation was observed between methylation ratios measured in both tissue types for all genes tested (P < 0.01). When analyzed as a categorical variable, there was a significant concordance between methylation changes in normal tissues and in the corresponding tumor for all genes tested but RASSF1A. Notably, in 73% of patients, at least one gene with an identical methylation change in cancerous and normal breast tissues was observed. Histologically normal breast tissues adjacent to breast tumors frequently exhibit methylation changes in multiple genes. These methylation changes may play a role in the earliest stages of the development of breast neoplasia

  2. Evaluation of some ratio effects in 99mTc-MIBI imaging of breast tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The effectiveness of using some ratios in 99mTc-MIBI imaging fbr the diagnosis of breast tumors was evaluated. After 100 patients with the breast tumor underwent 99mTc-MIBI imaging, the ratios of tunor to contralateral uptake (T/N). tumor to heart uptake (T/H), and tumor to sternum uptake (T/S) were obtained and then analysed about their reproducibility and values in differentiating benign breast lesion the from malignant tumor. To detect breast cancers, the sensitivity, specificit y and accuracy of T/N were 92%, 90% and 91%, respectively. However, those of T/S were 70% (p <0.01), 74% (p <0.05), 72% (p <0.01), and those of T/H were 74%(p <0.05). 76% (p >0.05). 75% (p <0.01). The average coefticients of variation(CV) of T/N, T/S and T/H were 9.439±9.712. 4.856+4.420 (p >0.05), and 3.736±3.489 (p <0.05). It was found that T/N had the best sensitivity, specificity and accuracy todetect the breast cancer, but its reproducibility is poor. On the other hand, T/H has better reproducibility.

  3. An Artificial Immune System-Based Support Vector Machine Approach for Classifying Ultrasound Breast Tumor Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen-Jie; Lin, Shih-Wei; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2015-10-01

    A rapid and highly accurate diagnostic tool for distinguishing benign tumors from malignant ones is required owing to the high incidence of breast cancer. Although various computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems have been developed to interpret ultrasound images of breast tumors, feature selection and the setting of parameters are still essential to classification accuracy and the minimization of computational complexity. This work develops a highly accurate CAD system that is based on a support vector machine (SVM) and the artificial immune system (AIS) algorithm for evaluating breast tumors. Experiments demonstrate that the accuracy of the proposed CAD system for classifying breast tumors is 96.67%. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of the proposed CAD system are 96.67, 96.67, 95.60, and 97.48%, respectively. The receiver operator characteristic (ROC) area index A z is 0.9827. Hence, the proposed CAD system can reduce the number of biopsies and yield useful results that assist physicians in diagnosing breast tumors. PMID:25561066

  4. EXPERIENCE OF MANAGEMENT OF PHYLLODES TUMOR OF BREAST AT A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharath

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Phyllodes tumors of the breast are a rare fibroepithelial lesions, which is locally aggressive neoplasm. The aim of the study was to report our experience at ESIC MC PGIMSR Hospital (Rajajinagar, Bengaluru acquired during period of 3 years. METHODS It was a prospective observational study, which included documentation of clinical presentation, pre-operative workup, surgical treatment, complications, histopathological examination and the outcome in a series of 52 cases diagnosed as phyllodes tumor from January 2013 to December 2015. RESULTS The analysis of this series showed that mean time of onset was 12 months [6 – 18 months], the chief complaint was lump in the breast in all the patients; tumor size ranged between 4.5 – 22.5cm (mean: 13.5cm; the right breast was affected in 31 cases, surgical treatment was used in all cases which included 44 cases who underwent wide local excision and 8 cases simple mastectomy; the tumor was classified based on histopathological examination as benign in 44 cases (85%, borderline in 2 cases (4% and malignant in 6 cases (11%; all the patients were followed up, the rate of recurrence was 10%. None of the patient had distant metastasis and no deaths were reported during the study period. CONCLUSIONS Phyllodes tumors of the breast clinically resemble fibroadenoma and have an unpredictable outcome, thus a wide local excision, with an adequate margin of normal breast tissue is the preferred initial therapy.

  5. Unusual malignant tumors of the breast: MRI features and pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linda, Anna, E-mail: annalinda33@gmail.co [Institute of Radiology, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Santa Maria della Misericordia, Pl.e Santa Maria della Misericordia, 33100 Udine (Italy); Zuiani, Chiara; Girometti, Rossano; Londero, Viviana [Institute of Radiology, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Santa Maria della Misericordia, Pl.e Santa Maria della Misericordia, 33100 Udine (Italy); Machin, Piernicola [Institute of Pathology, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Santa Maria della Misericordia, Pl.e Santa Maria della Misericordia, 33100 Udine (Italy); Brondani, Giovanni; Bazzocchi, Massimo [Institute of Radiology, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Santa Maria della Misericordia, Pl.e Santa Maria della Misericordia, 33100 Udine (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    Unusual malignant breast tumors are well-differentiated subtypes of invasive ductal carcinoma, including mucinous, tubular, medullary and papillary carcinomas, and account for about 10% of malignant breast tumors. They are increasingly being encountered during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations of the breast. Therefore, breast radiologists should be aware of their appearance on MRI. This review provides an overview of MRI characteristics of a range of unusual tumors (mucinous carcinoma, medullary carcinoma, tubular carcinoma, intraductal papillary carcinoma, intracystic papillary carcinoma and invasive papillary carcinoma), highlighting specific clues for diagnosis and correlating MRI and pathologic features. Many unusual breast tumors exhibit MRI features similar to those of benign or low suspicious lesions (oval shape, well-defined margins, high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, continuous increase kinetics, i.e. type I dynamic curve), leading to a possible misdiagnosis. Nevertheless, an understanding of pathologic features of these tumors, especially tissue content (mucinous, fibrous) and growth pattern, can help to define some specific clues for their diagnosis.

  6. T-cell receptor v-alpha and v-Beta gene usage in interleukin-2-cultured tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes from patients with breast-cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, E; Scholler, J; Straten, P; Duun, Sune Bro; Zeuthen, Jakob

    1994-01-01

    surface through the T cell receptor (TCR) complex. We have studied the phenotype, cytotoxicity, and expression of TCR variable (V) alpha and beta chain on in vitro IL-2-cultured TIL isolated from primary malignant breast tumors from 11 patients. 10/11 cultures were dominated by CD4(+) (T-helper) cells....... The different TIL cultures exhibited varying levels of cytotoxicity against the natural killer (NK)-sensitive cell line K562 and breast cancer cell line T47D. The level of clonality, as measured by PCR-based analyses of usage of the different V segments was low, as only a few tumors showed patterns of...... restricted V gene expression. The mean number of V alpha segments per TIL culture was higher than the number of V beta segments per culture. A significant negative correlation was observed between the number of CD4+ cells and the number of V beta segments per culture, and no other correlations between...

  7. β class II tubulin predominates in normal and tumor breast tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antimitotic chemotherapeutic agents target tubulin, the major protein in mitotic spindles. Tubulin isotype composition is thought to be both diagnostic of tumor progression and a determinant of the cellular response to chemotherapy. This implies that there is a difference in isotype composition between normal and tumor tissues. To determine whether such a difference occurs in breast tissues, total tubulin was fractionated from lysates of paired normal and tumor breast tissues, and the amounts of β-tubulin classes I + IV, II, and III were measured by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Only primary tumor tissues, before chemotherapy, were examined. Her2/neu protein amplification occurs in about 30% of breast tumors and is considered a marker for poor prognosis. To gain insight into whether tubulin isotype levels might be correlated with prognosis, ELISAs were used to quantify Her2/neu protein levels in these tissues. β-Tubulin isotype distributions in normal and tumor breast tissues were similar. The most abundant β-tubulin isotypes in these tissues were β-tubulin classes II and I + IV. Her2/neu levels in tumor tissues were 5–30-fold those in normal tissues, although there was no correlation between the Her2/neu biomarker and tubulin isotype levels. These results suggest that tubulin isotype levels, alone or in combination with Her2/neu protein levels, might not be diagnostic of tumorigenesis in breast cancer. However, the presence of a broad distribution of these tubulin isotypes (for example, 40–75% β-tubulin class II) in breast tissue, in conjunction with other factors, might still be relevant to disease progression and cellular response to antimitotic drugs

  8. Step-wise and punctuated genome evolution drive phenotype changes of tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanenko, Aleksei, E-mail: a.a.stepanenko@gmail.com [Department of Biosynthesis of Nucleic Acids, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Andreieva, Svitlana; Korets, Kateryna; Mykytenko, Dmytro [Department of Biosynthesis of Nucleic Acids, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Huleyuk, Nataliya [Institute of Hereditary Pathology, National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, Lviv 79008 (Ukraine); Vassetzky, Yegor [CNRS UMR8126, Université Paris-Sud 11, Institut de Cancérologie Gustave Roussy, Villejuif 94805 (France); Kavsan, Vadym [Department of Biosynthesis of Nucleic Acids, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • There are the step-wise continuous and punctuated phases of cancer genome evolution. • The system stresses during the different phases may lead to very different responses. • Stable transfection of an empty vector can result in genome and phenotype changes. • Functions of a (trans)gene can be opposite/versatile in cells with different genomes. • Contextually, temozolomide can both promote and suppress tumor cell aggressiveness. - Abstract: The pattern of genome evolution can be divided into two phases: the step-wise continuous phase (step-wise clonal evolution, stable dominant clonal chromosome aberrations (CCAs), and low frequency of non-CCAs, NCCAs) and punctuated phase (marked by elevated NCCAs and transitional CCAs). Depending on the phase, system stresses (the diverse CIN promoting factors) may lead to the very different phenotype responses. To address the contribution of chromosome instability (CIN) to phenotype changes of tumor cells, we characterized CCAs/NCCAs of HeLa and HEK293 cells, and their derivatives after genotoxic stresses (a stable plasmid transfection, ectopic expression of cancer-associated CHI3L1 gene or treatment with temozolomide) by conventional cytogenetics, copy number alterations (CNAs) by array comparative genome hybridization, and phenotype changes by cell viability and soft agar assays. Transfection of either the empty vector pcDNA3.1 or pcDNA3.1-CHI3L1 into 293 cells initiated the punctuated genome changes. In contrast, HeLa-CHI3L1 cells demonstrated the step-wise genome changes. Increased CIN correlated with lower viability of 293-pcDNA3.1 cells but higher colony formation efficiency (CFE). Artificial CHI3L1 production in 293-CHI3L1 cells increased viability and further contributed to CFE. The opposite growth characteristics of 293-CHI3L1 and HeLa-CHI3L1 cells were revealed. The effect and function of a (trans)gene can be opposite and versatile in cells with different genetic network, which is defined by

  9. Step-wise and punctuated genome evolution drive phenotype changes of tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • There are the step-wise continuous and punctuated phases of cancer genome evolution. • The system stresses during the different phases may lead to very different responses. • Stable transfection of an empty vector can result in genome and phenotype changes. • Functions of a (trans)gene can be opposite/versatile in cells with different genomes. • Contextually, temozolomide can both promote and suppress tumor cell aggressiveness. - Abstract: The pattern of genome evolution can be divided into two phases: the step-wise continuous phase (step-wise clonal evolution, stable dominant clonal chromosome aberrations (CCAs), and low frequency of non-CCAs, NCCAs) and punctuated phase (marked by elevated NCCAs and transitional CCAs). Depending on the phase, system stresses (the diverse CIN promoting factors) may lead to the very different phenotype responses. To address the contribution of chromosome instability (CIN) to phenotype changes of tumor cells, we characterized CCAs/NCCAs of HeLa and HEK293 cells, and their derivatives after genotoxic stresses (a stable plasmid transfection, ectopic expression of cancer-associated CHI3L1 gene or treatment with temozolomide) by conventional cytogenetics, copy number alterations (CNAs) by array comparative genome hybridization, and phenotype changes by cell viability and soft agar assays. Transfection of either the empty vector pcDNA3.1 or pcDNA3.1-CHI3L1 into 293 cells initiated the punctuated genome changes. In contrast, HeLa-CHI3L1 cells demonstrated the step-wise genome changes. Increased CIN correlated with lower viability of 293-pcDNA3.1 cells but higher colony formation efficiency (CFE). Artificial CHI3L1 production in 293-CHI3L1 cells increased viability and further contributed to CFE. The opposite growth characteristics of 293-CHI3L1 and HeLa-CHI3L1 cells were revealed. The effect and function of a (trans)gene can be opposite and versatile in cells with different genetic network, which is defined by

  10. CoREST1 promotes tumor formation and tumor stroma interactions in a mouse model of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohini Mazumdar

    Full Text Available Regulators of chromatin structure and gene expression contribute to tumor formation and progression. The co-repressor CoREST1 regulates the localization and activity of associated histone modifying enzymes including lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1 and histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1. Although several CoREST1 associated proteins have been reported to enhance breast cancer progression, the role of CoREST1 in breast cancer is currently unclear. Here we report that knockdown of CoREST1 in the basal-type breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, led to significantly reduced incidence and diminished size of tumors compared to controls in mouse xenograft studies. Notably, CoREST1-depleted cells gave rise to tumors with a marked decrease in angiogenesis. CoREST1 knockdown led to a decrease in secreted angiogenic and inflammatory factors, and mRNA analysis suggests that CoREST1 promotes expression of genes related to angiogenesis and inflammation including VEGF-A and CCL2. CoREST1 knockdown decreased the ability of MDA-MB-231 conditioned media to promote endothelial cell tube formation and migration. Further, tumors derived from CoREST1-depleted cells had reduced macrophage infiltration and the secretome of CoREST1 knockdown cells was deficient in promoting macrophage migration and macrophage-mediated angiogenesis. Taken together, these findings reveal that the epigenetic regulator CoREST1 promotes tumorigenesis in a breast cancer model at least in part through regulation of gene expression patterns in tumor cells that have profound non-cell autonomous effects on endothelial and inflammatory cells in the tumor microenvironment.

  11. Salinomycin efficiency assessment in non-tumor (HB4a) and tumor (MCF-7) human breast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Andressa Megumi; D Epiro, Gláucia Fernanda Rocha; Marques, Lilian Areal; Semprebon, Simone Cristine; Sartori, Daniele; Ribeiro, Lúcia Regina; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio

    2016-06-01

    The search for anticancer drugs has led researchers to study salinomycin, an ionophore antibiotic that selectively destroys cancer stem cells. In this study, salinomycin was assessed in two human cell lines, a breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and a non-tumor breast cell line (HB4a), to verify its selective action against tumor cells. Real-time assessment of cell proliferation showed that HB4a cells are more resistant to salinomycin than MCF-7 tumor cell line, and these data were confirmed in a cytotoxicity assay. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values show the increased sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to salinomycin. In the comet assay, only MCF-7 cells showed the induction of DNA damage. Flow cytometric analysis showed that cell death by apoptosis/necrosis was only induced in the MCF-7 cells. The increased expression of GADD45A and CDKN1A genes was observed in all cell lines. Decreased expression of CCNA2 and CCNB1 genes occurred only in tumor cells, suggesting G2/M cell cycle arrest. Consequently, cell death was activated in tumor cells through strong inhibition of the antiapoptotic genes BCL-2, BCL-XL, and BIRC5 genes in MCF-7 cells. These data demonstrate the selectivity of salinomycin in killing human mammary tumor cells. The cell death observed only in MCF-7 tumor cells was confirmed by gene expression analysis, where there was downregulation of antiapoptotic genes. These data contribute to clarifying the mechanism of action of salinomycin as a promising antitumor drug and, for the first time, we observed the higher resistance of HB4a non-tumor breast cells to salinomycin. PMID:26932586

  12. Musashi1 regulates breast tumor cell proliferation and is a prognostic indicator of poor survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiao-Yang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musashi1 (Msi1 is a conserved RNA-binding protein that regulates the Notch and Wnt pathways, and serves as a stem cell marker in the breast and other tissues. It is unknown how Msi1 relates to other breast cancer markers, whether it denotes tumor initiating cells (TICs, and how it affects gene expression and tumor cell survival in breast cancer cells. Results Msi1 expression was analyzed in 20 breast cancer cell lines and in 140 primary breast tumors by western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Lentivirus RNA interference was used to reduce Msi1 expression in breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and T47D grown as spheroid cultures and to assess stem cell gene expression and the growth of these cell lines as xenografts. In normal human breast tissue, Msi1 was expressed in 10.6% of myoepithelum and 1.2% of ductal epithelium in the terminal ductal lobular unit (TDLU, whereas, less than 0.05% of ductal epithelium and myoepithelium in large ducts outside the TDLU expressed Msi1. Msi1 was expressed in 55% of the breast cancer cell lines and correlated with ErbB2 expression in 50% of the cell lines. Msi1 was expressed in 68% of primary tumors and in 100% of lymph node metastases, and correlated with 5 year survival. Msi1 was enriched in CD133+ MCF-7 and T47D cells and in spheroid cultures of these cells, and Msi1 'knockdown' (KD with a lentivirus-expressed shRNA decreased the number and size of spheroid colonies. Msi1 KD reduced Notch1, c-Myc, ErbB2 and pERK1/2 expression, and increased p21CIP1 expression, which is consistent with known Msi1 target mRNAs. Msi1 KD also reduced the expression of the somatic and embryonic stem cell markers, CD133, Bmi1, Sox2, Nanog and Oct4. Xenografts of MCF-7 and T47D Msi1 KD cells resulted in a marked reduction of tumor growth, reduced Msi1 and Notch1 expression and increased p21CIP1 expression. Conclusion Msi1 is a negative prognostic indicator of breast cancer patient survival, and is

  13. CD44+/CD24- breast cancer cells exhibit phenotypic reversion in three-dimensional self-assembling peptide RADA16 nanofiber scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi K

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Kun Mi,1 Zhihua Xing2 1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sichuan Cancer Hospital and Institute, 2Laboratory of Ethnopharmacology, Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China Background: Self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds have been shown to be a ­permissive biological material for tissue repair, cell proliferation, differentiation, etc. Recently, a subpopulation (CD44+/CD24- of breast cancer cells has been reported to have stem/progenitor cell properties. The aim of this study was to investigate whether this subpopulation of cancer cells have different phenotypes in self-assembling COCH3-RADARADARADARADA-CONH2 (RADA16 peptide nanofiber scaffold compared with Matrigel® (BD Biosciences, Two Oak Park, Bedford, MA, USA and collagen I.Methods: CD44 and CD24 expression was determined by flow cytometry. Cell proliferation was measured by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine assay and DNA content measurement. Immunostaining was used to indicate the morphologies of cells in three-dimensional (3D cultures of different scaffolds and the localization of β-catenin in the colonies. Western blot was used to determine the expression of signaling proteins. In vitro migration assay and inoculation into nude mice were used to evaluate invasion and tumorigenesis in vivo.Results: The breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-435S contained a high percentage (>99% of CD44+/CD24- cells, which exhibited phenotypic reversion in 3D RADA16 nanofiber scaffold compared with collagen I and Matrigel. The newly formed reverted acini-like colonies reassembled a basement membrane and reorganized their cytoskeletons. At the same time, cells cultured and embedded in RADA16 peptide scaffold exhibited growth arrest. Also, they exhibited different migration potential, which links their migration ability with their cellular morphology. Consistent with studies in vitro, the in vivo tumor

  14. Methylation profiling of 48 candidate genes in tumor and matched normal tissues from breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zibo; Guo, Xinwu; Wu, Yepeng; Li, Shengyun; Yan, Jinhua; Peng, Limin; Xiao, Zhi; Wang, Shouman; Deng, Zhongping; Dai, Lizhong; Yi, Wenjun; Xia, Kun; Tang, Lili; Wang, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Gene-specific methylation alterations in breast cancer have been suggested to occur early in tumorigenesis and have the potential to be used for early detection and prevention. The continuous increase in worldwide breast cancer incidences emphasizes the urgent need for identification of methylation biomarkers for early cancer detection and patient stratification. Using microfluidic PCR-based target enrichment and next-generation bisulfite sequencing technology, we analyzed methylation status of 48 candidate genes in paired tumor and normal tissues from 180 Chinese breast cancer patients. Analysis of the sequencing results showed 37 genes differentially methylated between tumor and matched normal tissues. Breast cancer samples with different clinicopathologic characteristics demonstrated distinct profiles of gene methylation. The methylation levels were significantly different between breast cancer subtypes, with basal-like and luminal B tumors having the lowest and the highest methylation levels, respectively. Six genes (ACADL, ADAMTSL1, CAV1, NPY, PTGS2, and RUNX3) showed significant differential methylation among the 4 breast cancer subtypes and also between the ER +/ER- tumors. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis, we identified a panel of 13 hypermethylated genes as candidate biomarkers that performed a high level of efficiency for cancer prediction. These 13 genes included CST6, DBC1, EGFR, GREM1, GSTP1, IGFBP3, PDGFRB, PPM1E, SFRP1, SFRP2, SOX17, TNFRSF10D, and WRN. Our results provide evidence that well-defined DNA methylation profiles enable breast cancer prediction and patient stratification. The novel gene panel might be a valuable biomarker for early detection of breast cancer. PMID:25636590

  15. Occult Breast Lobular Carcinoma with Numerous Circulating Tumor Cells in Peripheral Blood

    OpenAIRE

    Kanako Ogura; Maki Amano; Toshiharu Matsumoto; Asumi Sakaguchi; Taijiro Kosaka; Toshiaki Kitabatake; Kuniaki Kojima

    2015-01-01

    We experienced a very rare case of occult breast lobular carcinoma with numerous circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood. The diagnosis was very difficult because there were no symptoms of breast cancer and the preceding chief complaints such as general fatigue and weight loss or abnormality of peripheral blood findings were suggestive of a hematological disease. We could make a correct diagnosis of this case by checking the findings of complete blood count and bone marrow biopsy at the s...

  16. Electric Field Analysis of Human Breast Tumors for Treatment by Electroporation

    OpenAIRE

    Agoramurthy, Poornima

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is a frequently diagnosed disease in women, second only to cancers of the skin. According to the American Cancer Society there were approximately 210,000 new cases of breast cancer estimated in 2010 in the US, 20 % of which resulted in death. With such a high rate of incidence, there is clearly a need for alternate treatments, especially for in-operable tumors and chemo- and radio-resistive patients. Electrochemotherapy, a method by which high intensity, short duration electri...

  17. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts express pro-inflammatory factors in human breast and ovarian tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erez, Neta, E-mail: netaerez@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Pathology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Glanz, Sarah [Department of Pathology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Raz, Yael [Department of Pathology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, LIS Maternity Hospital, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, affiliated with Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Avivi, Camilla [Department of Pathology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, affiliated with Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Barshack, Iris [Department of Pathology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Department of Pathology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, affiliated with Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •CAFs in human breast and ovarian tumors express pro-inflammatory factors. •Expression of pro-inflammatory factors correlates with tumor invasiveness. •Expression of pro-inflammatory factors is associated with NF-κb activation in CAFs. -- Abstract: Inflammation has been established in recent years as a hallmark of cancer. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts (CAFs) support tumorigenesis by stimulating angiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation and invasion. We previously demonstrated that CAFs also mediate tumor-enhancing inflammation in a mouse model of skin carcinoma. Breast and ovarian carcinomas are amongst the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in women and cancer-related inflammation is linked with both these tumor types. However, the role of CAFs in mediating inflammation in these malignancies remains obscure. Here we show that CAFs in human breast and ovarian tumors express high levels of the pro-inflammatory factors IL-6, COX-2 and CXCL1, previously identified to be part of a CAF pro-inflammatory gene signature. Moreover, we show that both pro-inflammatory signaling by CAFs and leukocyte infiltration of tumors are enhanced in invasive ductal carcinoma as compared with ductal carcinoma in situ. The pro-inflammatory genes expressed by CAFs are known NF-κB targets and we show that NF-κB is up-regulated in breast and ovarian CAFs. Our data imply that CAFs mediate tumor-promoting inflammation in human breast and ovarian tumors and thus may be an attractive target for stromal-directed therapeutics.

  18. Period-2: a tumor suppressor gene in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Shulin; Coffelt, Seth B; Mao, Lulu; Yuan, Lin; Cheng, Qi; Hill, Steven M

    2008-01-01

    Previous reports have suggested that the ablation of the Period 2 gene (Per 2) leads to enhanced development of lymphoma and leukemia in mice. Employing immunoblot analyses, we have demonstrated that PER 2 is endogenously expressed in human breast epithelial cell lines but is not expressed or is expressed at significantly reduced level in human breast cancer cell lines. Expression of PER 2 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells significantly inhibited the growth of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, and, when PER 2 was co-expressed with the Crytochrome 2 (Cry 2) gene, an even greater growth-inhibitory effect was observed. The inhibitory effect of PER 2 on breast cancer cells was also demonstrated by its suppression of the anchorage-independent growth of MCF-7 cells as evidenced by the reduced number and size of colonies. A corresponding blockade of MCF-7 cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle was also observed in response to the expression of PER 2 alone or in combination with CRY 2. Expression of PER 2 also induced apoptosis of MCF-7 breast cancer cells as demonstrated by an increase in PARP [poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase] cleavage. Finally, our studies demonstrate that PER 2 expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells is associated with a significant decrease in the expression of cyclin D1 and an up-regulation of p53 levels. PMID:18334030

  19. Mammographic density and histopathologic characteristics of screen-detected tumors in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High mammographic density might mask breast tumors, resulting in delayed diagnosis or missed cancers. To investigate the association between mammographic density and histopathologic tumor characteristics (histologic type, size, grade, and lymph node status) among women screened in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program. Information about 1760 screen-detected ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and 7366 invasive breast cancers diagnosed among women aged 50–69 years, 1996–2010, was analyzed. The screening mammograms were classified subjectively according to the amount of fibroglandular tissue into fatty, medium dense, and dense by breast radiologists. Chi-square test was used to compare the distribution of tumor characteristics by mammographic density. Odds ratio (OR) of tumor characteristics by density was estimated by means of logistic regression, adjusting for screening mode (screen-film and full-field digital mammography), and age. Mean and median tumor size of invasive breast cancers was 13.8 and 12 mm, respectively, for women with fatty breasts, and 16.2 and 14 mm for those with dense breasts. Lymph node positive tumors were identified among 20.6% of women with fatty breasts compared with 27.2% of those with dense breasts (P < 0.001). The proportion of DCIS was significantly lower for women with fatty (15.8%) compared with dense breasts (22.0%). Women with dense breasts had an increased risk of large (OR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.18–1.73) and lymph node positive tumors (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.05–1.51) compared with women with fatty and medium dense breasts. High mammographic density was positively associated with tumor size and lymph node positive tumors

  20. Significance of Epithelial-mesenchaymal Transition Phenotype in Invasive Tumor Front Cells of Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Yinghua; Caiqing ZHANG; Zhixin CAO; XU, Jiawen; Wang, Lingcheng; Lin, Xiaoyan

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective The invasive tumor front (ITF) refers to cells or invasive nests in the junctional region of a tumor and its host. The ITF contains the most invasive cells of a tumor, and has a high prognostic value in carcinoma. The aim of this study is to investigate the epithelial-mesenchymal transformation phenotype in ITF cells of lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and analyze the relationship between clinicopathological features and clinical outcomes of patients. Methods Semiq...

  1. Ang-2/VEGF bispecific antibody reprograms macrophages and resident microglia to anti-tumor phenotype and prolongs glioblastoma survival

    OpenAIRE

    Kloepper, Jonas; Riedemann, Lars; Amoozgar, Zohreh; Seano, Giorgio; Susek, Katharina; Yu, Veronica; Dalvie, Nisha; Amelung, Robin L.; Datta, Meenal; Song, Jonathan W.; Askoxylakis, Vasileios; Taylor, Jennie W.; Lu-Emerson, Christine; Batista, Ana; Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D.

    2016-01-01

    Improving survival of patients with glioblastoma (GBM) using antiangiogenic therapy remains a challenge. In this study we show that dual blockade of angiopoietin-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor delays tumor growth and enhances survival benefits through reprogramming of tumor-associated macrophages toward an antitumor phenotype as well as by pruning immature tumor vessels. The antitumor immunomodulatory potential of this dual blockade supports clinical testing of this approach for GBM...

  2. Disseminated Breast Cancer Cells Acquire a Highly Malignant and Aggressive Metastatic Phenotype during Metastatic Latency in the Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Marsden, Carolyn G; Wright, Mary Jo; Carrier, Latonya; Moroz, Krzysztof; Rowan, Brian G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in the bone marrow may exist in a dormant state for extended periods of time, maintaining the ability to proliferate upon activation, engraft at new sites, and form detectable metastases. However, understanding of the behavior and biology of dormant breast cancer cells in the bone marrow niche remains limited, as well as their potential involvement in tumor recurrence and metastasis. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the tumorig...

  3. Mutation Screening in the Mitochondrial D-Loop Region of Tumoral and Non-tumoral Breast Cancer in Iranian Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mansour Heidari; Samira Saee-Rad; Kazem Zendehdel; Reza Raoofian; Ramesh Omranipour; Cyrus Azimi; Babak Rahmani

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in mitochondrial coding and non coding regions seem to be important in carcinogenesis. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate coding region (mt-tRNAPhe and tRNAPro) and non-coding sequence, mitochondrial displacement loop (mtDNA D-loop), in the cancerous and non-cancerous lesions of Iranian patients with breast cancer (BC). Genomic DNA was extracted from 50 breast tumors and surrounding normal tissue pairs as well as from 50 unrelated normal brea...

  4. Outpatient screening and its place in better detection of breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The five-year experience of application of the polyclinic screening program for detection of breast tumors is analyzed. In this period, mammographic studies were made in 9169 women included into a breast cancer-risk group. Of them 1370 young female patients with well-developed glandular tissue, that makes mammographic diagnosis of presumed masses difficult underwent breast ultrasonography. Abnormalities were found in 6092 (66,44%) patients. Breast cancer and nodal benign masses were detected in 278 (3,03%) and 669 (7,30%) women, respectively. The detection rates of unpalpable breast malignant and benign masses carcinomas were 0,4 and 3,03%, respectively. The findings allow to recommend the proposed screening programme for wide in large polyclinic complexes

  5. Bisected, complex N-glycans and galectins in mouse mammary tumor progression and human breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Miwa, Hazuki E.; Koba, Wade R; Fine, Eugene J; Giricz, Orsi; Kenny, Paraic A; Stanley, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Bisected, complex N-glycans on glycoproteins are generated by the glycosyltransferase MGAT3 and cause reduced cell surface binding of galectins. Previously, we showed that MGAT3 reduces growth factor signaling and retards mammary tumor progression driven by the Polyoma middle T antigen (PyMT) expressed in mammary epithelium under the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter. However, the penetrance of the tumor phenotype became variable in mixed FVB/N and C57BL/6 female mice and we therefore...

  6. Population prevalence of hereditary breast cancer phenotypes and implementation of a genetic cancer risk assessment program in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edenir I. Palmero

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2004, a population-based cohort (the Núcleo Mama Porto Alegre - NMPOA Cohort was started in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil and within that cohort, a hereditary breast cancer study was initiated, aiming to determine the prevalence of hereditary breast cancer phenotypes and evaluate acceptance of a genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA program. Women from that cohort who reported a positive family history of cancer were referred to GCRA. Of the 9218 women enrolled, 1286 (13.9% reported a family history of cancer. Of the 902 women who attended GCRA, 55 (8% had an estimated lifetime risk of breast cancer ³ 20% and 214 (23.7% had pedigrees suggestive of a breast cancer predisposition syndrome; an unexpectedly high number of these fulfilled criteria for Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome (122 families, 66.7%. The overall prevalence of a hereditary breast cancer phenotype was 6.2% (95%CI: 5.67-6.65. These findings identified a problem of significant magnitude in the region and indicate that genetic cancer risk evaluation should be undertaken in a considerable proportion of the women from this community. The large proportion of women who attended GCRA (72.3% indicates that the program was well-accepted by the community, regardless of the potential cultural, economic and social barriers.

  7. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R arrests growth of breast-cancer brain metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yong; Miwa, Shinji; Zhang, Nan; Hoffman, Robert M.; Zhao, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Brain metastasis is a morbid, treatment-resistant, end-stage frequent occurrence in breast cancer patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on breast cancer brain metastases. High brain-metastatic variants of murine 4T1 breast cancer cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) were injected orthotopically in the mammary fat pad in non-transgenic nude mice or in the left ventricle of non-transgenic nude mice and transgenic nu...

  8. A novel 3-D mineralized tumor model to study breast cancer bone metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth P Pathi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metastatic bone disease is a frequent cause of morbidity in patients with advanced breast cancer, but the role of the bone mineral hydroxyapatite (HA in this process remains unclear. We have developed a novel mineralized 3-D tumor model and have employed this culture system to systematically investigate the pro-metastatic role of HA under physiologically relevant conditions in vitro. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells were cultured within non-mineralized or mineralized polymeric scaffolds fabricated by a gas foaming-particulate leaching technique. Tumor cell adhesion, proliferation, and secretion of pro-osteoclastic interleukin-8 (IL-8 was increased in mineralized tumor models as compared to non-mineralized tumor models, and IL-8 secretion was more pronounced for bone-specific MDA-MB231 subpopulations relative to lung-specific breast cancer cells. These differences were pathologically significant as conditioned media collected from mineralized tumor models promoted osteoclastogenesis in an IL-8 dependent manner. Finally, drug testing and signaling studies with transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta confirmed the clinical relevance of our culture system and revealed that breast cancer cell behavior is broadly affected by HA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that HA promotes features associated with the neoplastic and metastatic growth of breast carcinoma cells in bone and that IL-8 may play an important role in this process. The developed mineralized tumor models may help to reveal the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms that may ultimately enable more efficacious therapy of patients with advanced breast cancer.

  9. Dopamine receptor antagonist thioridazine inhibits tumor growth in a murine breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Tao; He, Sisi; Shen, Guobo; Ye, Tinghong; Guo, Fuchun; Wang, Yongsheng

    2015-09-01

    Neuropsychological factors have been shown to influence tumor progression and therapeutic response. The present study investigated the effect of the dopamine receptor antagonist thioridazine on murine breast cancer. The anti‑tumor efficacy of thioridazine was assessed using a murine breast cancer model. Cell apoptosis and proliferation were analyzed in vitro using flow cytometry (FCM) and the MTT assay, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to assess Akt, phosphorylated (p)‑Akt, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3, p‑STAT3 and p‑p65 in tumor cells following treatment with thioridazine. The Ki67 index and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)‑positive apoptotic cells were assessed in the tumor sections. Thioridazine was found to reduce tumor growth, inhibit tumor cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner in vitro. Thioridazine was also found to markedly inhibit tumor proliferation and induce tumor cell apoptosis in vivo as shown by the lower Ki67 index and increase in TUNEL‑positive cells. In addition, thioridazine was observed to inhibit the activation of the canonical nuclear factor κ‑light‑chain‑enhancer of activated B cells pathway and exert anti‑tumor effects by remodeling the tumor stroma, as well as inhibit angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. In conclusion, thioridazine was found to significantly inhibit breast tumor growth and the potential for thioridazine to be used in cancer therapy may be re‑evaluated and investigated in clinical settings. PMID:26095429

  10. Dietary quercetin exacerbates the development of estrogen-induced breast tumors in female ACI rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phytoestrogens are plant compounds that structurally mimic the endogenous estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2). Despite intense investigation, the net effect of phytoestrogen exposure on the breast remains unclear. The objective of the current study was to examine the effects of quercetin on E2-induced breast cancer in vivo. Female ACI rats were given quercetin (2.5 g/kg food) for 8 months. Animals were monitored weekly for palpable tumors, and at the end of the experiment, rats were euthanized, breast tumor and different tissues excised so that they could be examined for histopathologic changes, estrogen metabolic activity and oxidant stress. Quercetin alone did not induce mammary tumors in female ACI rats. However, in rats implanted with E2 pellets, co-exposure to quercetin did not protect rats from E2-induced breast tumor development with 100% of the animals developing breast tumors within 8 months of treatment. No changes in serum quercetin levels were observed in quercetin and quercetin + E2-treated groups at the end of the experiment. Tumor latency was significantly decreased among rats from the quercetin + E2 group relative to those in the E2 group. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity was significantly downregulated in quercetin-exposed mammary tissue. Analysis of 8-isoprostane F2α (8-iso-PGF2α) levels as a marker of oxidant stress showed that quercetin did not decrease E2-induced oxidant stress. These results indicate that quercetin (2.5 g/kg food) does not confer protection against breast cancer, does not inhibit E2-induced oxidant stress and may exacerbate breast carcinogenesis in E2-treated ACI rats. Inhibition of COMT activity by quercetin may expose breast cells chronically to E2 and catechol estrogens. This would permit longer exposure times to the carcinogenic metabolites of E2 and chronic exposure to oxidant stress as a result of metabolic redox cycling to estrogen metabolites, and thus quercetin may exacerbate E2-induced breast tumors in female

  11. Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes in Triple Negative Breast Cancer: The Future of Immune Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Teijido, Paula; Cabal, María Luque; Fernández, Ignacio Peláez; Pérez, Yolanda Fernández

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a highly heterogeneous tumor. There is increasing evidence of the role of tumor lymphocytic immune infiltrates in this subtype of breast cancer. Robust levels of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) have been associated with improved disease-free and overall survival rates in TNBC patients with and without any treatment. Recent efforts have been made to develop a standardized methodology for evaluating TILs. The presence of TILs in the breast tumor microenvironment can also predict responses not only to neoadjuvant but also to adjuvant chemotherapy treatments. High numbers of TILs correlate with increased pathological complete responses (pCR) in TNBC. TILs are prognostic and predictive of response to standard therapies; thus, the immune system appears to play an active role in a subgroup of breast cancer. There is an increasing interest in directly targeting the immune system as part of breast cancer therapy, mainly in patients with TNBC. New immune modulatory agents, including immune checkpoints inhibitors, have shown promising activity in a subgroup of metastatic TNBC. Increased programmed cell death protein 1 ligand (PD-L1) expression on the surface of TNBC provides the rationale for implementing therapeutic strategies targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 axis in TNBC. The programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) inhibitor pembrolizumab, and the PD-L1 inhibitor atezolizumab have shown promising results in clinical trials. PMID:27081325

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of breast tumor imaging properties with compact, discrete gamma cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe Monte Carlo simulation results for breast tumor imaging using a compact, discrete gamma camera. The simulations were designed to analyze and optimize camera design, particularly collimator configuration and detector pixel size. Simulated planar images of 5--15 mm diameter tumors in a phantom patient (including a breast, torso, and heart) were generated for imaging distances of 5--55 mm, pixel sizes of 2 x 2--4 x 4 mm2, and hexagonal and square hole collimators with sensitivities from 4,000 to 16,000 counts/mCi/sec. Other factors considered included T/B (tumor-to-background tissue uptake ratio) and detector energy resolution. Image properties were quantified by computing the observed tumor fwhm (full-width at half-maximum) and S/N (sum of detected tumor events divided by the statistical noise). Results suggest that hexagonal and square hole collimators perform comparably, that higher sensitivity collimators provide higher tumor S/N with little increase in the observed tumor fwhm, that smaller pixels only slightly improve tumor fwhm and S/N, and that improved detector energy resolution has little impact on either the observed tumor fwhm or the observed tumor S/N

  13. Loss of membranous VEGFR1 expression is associated with an adverse phenotype and shortened survival in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebok, Patrick; Huber, Julia; Burandt, Eike-Christian; Lebeau, Annette; Marx, Andreas Holger; Terracciano, Luigi; Heilenkötter, Uwe; Jänicke, Fritz; Müller, Volkmar; Paluchowski, Peter; Geist, Stefan; Wilke, Christian; Simon, Ronald; Sauter, Guido; Quaas, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Angiogenesis is a key process in tumor growth and progression, which is controlled by vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) and their receptors (VEGFRs). In order to better understand the prevalence and prognostic value of VEGFR1 expression in breast cancer, a tissue microarray containing >2,100 breast cancer specimens, with clinical follow‑up data, was analyzed by immunohistochemistry using an antibody directed against the membrane‑bound full‑length receptor protein. The results demonstrated that membranous VEGFR1 staining was detected in all (5 of 5) normal breast specimens. In carcinoma specimens, membranous staining was negative in 3.1%, weak in 6.3%, moderate in 10.9%, and strong in 79.7% of the 1,630 interpretable tissues. Strong staining was significantly associated with estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor expression, but was inversely associated with advanced tumor stage (P=0.0431), high Bloom-Richardson-Ellis Score for Breast Cancer grade and low Ki67 labeling index (both Ptamoxifen as the sole therapy (P=0.001). In conclusion, these data indicated that membrane‑bound VEGFR1 is frequently expressed in normal and cancerous breast epithelium. In addition, reduced or lost VEGFR1 expression may serve as a marker for poor prognosis in patients with breast cancer, who might not optimally benefit from endocrine therapy. PMID:27357606

  14. Pathological predictive factors for tumor response in locally advanced breast carcinomas treated with anthracyclin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trupti Patel

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Pathological parameters like type of tumor, presence of LVE and tumor necrosis in the core biopsy can predict the response to NACT in routine stain. Tumor necrosis and type of breast carcinoma are predictive parameters for tumor responsiveness to NACT. LVE was reliable in predicting axillary lymph node metastasis.

  15. Knockdown of c-Myc expression by RNAi inhibits MCF-7 breast tumor cells growth in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Elevated expression of c-Myc is a frequent genetic abnormality seen in this malignancy. For a better understanding of its role in maintaining the malignant phenotype, we used RNA interference (RNAi) directed against c-Myc in our study. RNAi provides a new, reliable method to investigate gene function and has the potential for gene therapy. The aim of the study was to examine the anti-tumor effects elicited by a decrease in the protein level of c-Myc by RNAi and its possible mechanism of effects in MCF-7 cells. A plasmid-based polymerase III promoter system was used to deliver and express short interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting c-myc to reduce its expression in MCF-7 cells. Western blot analysis was used to measure the protein level of c-Myc. We assessed the effects of c-Myc silencing on tumor growth by a growth curve, by soft agar assay and by nude mice experiments in vivo. Standard fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis and TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labelling assay were used to determine apoptosis of the cells. Our data showed that plasmids expressing siRNA against c-myc markedly and durably reduced its expression in MCF-7 cells by up to 80%, decreased the growth rate of MCF-7 cells, inhibited colony formation in soft agar and significantly reduced tumor growth in nude mice. We also found that depletion of c-Myc in this manner promoted apoptosis of MCF-7 cells upon serum withdrawal. c-Myc has a pivotal function in the development of breast cancer. Our data show that decreasing the c-Myc protein level in MCF-7 cells by RNAi could significantly inhibit tumor growth both in vitro and in vivo, and imply the therapeutic potential of RNAi on the treatment of breast cancer by targeting overexpression oncogenes such as c-myc, and c-myc might be a potential therapeutic target for human breast cancer

  16. Renal cell carcinoma primary cultures maintain genomic and phenotypic profile of parental tumor tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by recurrent copy number alterations (CNAs) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH), which may have potential diagnostic and prognostic applications. Here, we explored whether ccRCC primary cultures, established from surgical tumor specimens, maintain the DNA profile of parental tumor tissues allowing a more confident CNAs and LOH discrimination with respect to the original tissues. We established a collection of 9 phenotypically well-characterized ccRCC primary cell cultures. Using the Affymetrix SNP array technology, we performed the genome-wide copy number (CN) profiling of both cultures and corresponding tumor tissues. Global concordance for each culture/tissue pair was assayed evaluating the correlations between whole-genome CN profiles and SNP allelic calls. CN analysis was performed using the two CNAG v3.0 and Partek software, and comparing results returned by two different algorithms (Hidden Markov Model and Genomic Segmentation). A very good overlap between the CNAs of each culture and corresponding tissue was observed. The finding, reinforced by high whole-genome CN correlations and SNP call concordances, provided evidence that each culture was derived from its corresponding tissue and maintained the genomic alterations of parental tumor. In addition, primary culture DNA profile remained stable for at least 3 weeks, till to third passage. These cultures showed a greater cell homogeneity and enrichment in tumor component than original tissues, thus enabling a better discrimination of CNAs and LOH. Especially for hemizygous deletions, primary cultures presented more evident CN losses, typically accompanied by LOH; differently, in original tissues the intensity of these deletions was weaken by normal cell contamination and LOH calls were missed. ccRCC primary cultures are a reliable in vitro model, well-reproducing original tumor genetics and phenotype, potentially useful for future functional approaches

  17. GATA3 in breast cancer: tumor suppressor or oncogene?

    OpenAIRE

    Takaku, Motoki; Grimm, Sara A; Wade, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    GATA3 is a highly conserved, essential transcription factor expressed in a number of tissues, including the mammary gland. GATA3 expression is required for normal development of the mammary gland where it is estimated to be the most abundant transcription factor in luminal epithelial cells. In breast cancer, GATA3 expression is highly correlated with the luminal transcriptional program. Recent genomic analysis of human breast cancers has revealed high frequency mutation in GATA3 in luminal tu...

  18. Mesenchymal and stemness circulating tumor cells in early breast cancer diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial event likely involved in dissemination of epithelial cancer cells. This process enables them to acquire migratory/invasive properties, contributing to tumor and metastatic spread. To know if this event is an early one in breast cancer, we developed a clinical trial. The aim of this protocol was to detect circulating tumor cells endowed with mesenchymal and/or stemness characteristics, at the time of initial diagnosis. Breast cancer patients (n = 61), without visceral or bone metastasis were enrolled and analysis of these dedifferentiated circulating tumor cells (ddCTC) was realized. AdnaGen method was used for enrichment cell selection. Then, ddCTC were characterized by RT-PCR study of the following genes: PI3Kα, Akt-2, Twist1 (EMT markers) and ALDH1, Bmi1 and CD44 (stemness indicators). Among the studied primary breast cancer cohort, presence of ddCTC was detected in 39% of cases. This positivity is independant from tumor clinicopathological factors apart from the lymph node status. Our data uniquely demonstrated that in vivo EMT occurs in the primary tumors and is associated with an enhanced ability of tumor cells to intravasate in the early phase of cancer disease. These results suggest that analysis of circulating tumor cells focused on cells showing mesenchymal or stemness characteristics might facilitate assessment of new drugs in clinical trials

  19. Malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast presenting with hypoglycemia: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacioles T

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Toni Pacioles,1 Rahul Seth,2,3 Cesar Orellana,3 Ivy John,4 Veera Panuganty,3 Ruban Dhaliwal3,5 1Department of Hematology and Oncology, Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center, Marshall University, Huntington, WV, USA; 2Division of Hematology and Oncology, 3Department of Medicine, 4Department of Pathology, 5Division of Endocrinology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA Abstract: Phyllodes tumors are rare fibroepithelial neoplasms that account for less than 1% of all breast tumors and are typically found in middle-aged women. Phyllodes tumors that present with hypoglycemia are even rarer. No one morphologic finding is reliable in predicting the clinical behavior of this tumor. Surgery has been the primary mode of treatment to date. However, the extent of resection and the role of adjuvant radiotherapy or chemotherapy are still controversial. Here, we present a challenging case of malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast associated with hypoglycemia, and review the literature regarding clinical findings, pathologic risk factors for recurrence, and treatment recommendations. Keywords: breast cancer, fibroepithelial neoplasm, neuroendocrine tumor, adjuvant treatment, non-islet cell tumor-induced hypoglycemia

  20. The methods of tumors bed localization and boost dose delivery during conservative breast cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast-conserving therapy (BCT) consists of whole breast irradiation, usually at a dose of 50 Gy, and a boost dose of 10-20 Gy to the tumor bed. A decreased risk of local recurrence in patients administered the boost has been confirmed in a large randomized trial. The precise localization of the tumor bed (boost dose volume) is often difficult, while the recommended intraoperative placement of metal markers into the tumor cavity walls is not always performed. It is more common to localize the tumor bed using other available data, such as tumor site at the initial clinical examination or mammograms, skin scar localization, postoperative induration of the mammary gland, and histological examination. All these methods are considered less exact than the volume outlined by surgical clips. Alternative approaches allowing precise delivery of radiotherapy to the tumor bed are intraoperative placement of brachytherapy catheters or intraoperative external beam irradiation. In this review we discuss the methods used of determining the tumor bed and the different radiotherapy boost techniques used in breast cancer patients managed with BCT. We also present guidelines of the American Brachytherapy Society for the use of brachytherapy as a boost method. (author)

  1. Activated FXR Inhibits Leptin Signaling and Counteracts Tumor-promoting Activities of Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts in Breast Malignancy

    OpenAIRE

    Cinzia Giordano; Ines Barone; Valentina Vircillo; Salvatore Panza; Rocco Malivindi; Luca Gelsomino; Michele Pellegrino; Vittoria Rago; Loredana Mauro; Marilena Lanzino; Maria Luisa Panno; Daniela Bonofiglio; Stefania Catalano; Sebastiano Andò

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the principal components of the tumor stroma, play a central role in cancer development and progression. As an important regulator of the crosstalk between breast cancer cells and CAFs, the cytokine leptin has been associated to breast carcinogenesis. The nuclear Farnesoid X Receptor-(FXR) seems to exert an oncosuppressive role in different tumors, including breast cancer. Herein, we demonstrated, for the first time, that the synthetic FXR agonist GW4064,...

  2. Frondoside A inhibits human breast cancer cell survival, migration, invasion and the growth of breast tumor xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Marzouqi, Nadia; Iratni, Rabah; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Arafat, Kholoud; Ahmed Al Sultan, Mahmood; Yasin, Javed; Collin, Peter; Mester, Jan; Adrian, Thomas E; Attoub, Samir

    2011-10-01

    Breast cancer is a major challenge for pharmacologists to develop new drugs to improve the survival of cancer patients. Frondoside A is a triterpenoid glycoside isolated from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria frondosa. It has been demonstrated that Frondoside A inhibited the growth of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We investigated the impact of Frondoside A on human breast cancer cell survival, migration and invasion in vitro, and on tumor growth in nude mice, using the human estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. The non-tumorigenic MCF10-A cell line derived from normal human mammary epithelium was used as control. Frondoside A (0.01-5 μM) decreased the viability of breast cancer cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, with 50%-effective concentration (EC50) of 2.5 μM at 24h. MCF10-A cells were more resistant to the cytotoxic effect of Frondoside A (EC50 superior to 5 μM at 24 h). In the MDA-MB-231 cells, Frondoside A effectively increased the sub-G1 (apoptotic) cell fraction through the activation of p53, and subsequently the caspases 9 and 3/7 cell death pathways. In addition, Frondoside A induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of MDA-MB-231 cell migration and invasion. In vivo, Frondoside A (100 μg/kg/dayi.p. for 24 days) strongly decreased the growth of MDA-MB-231 tumor xenografts in athymic mice, without manifest toxic side-effects. Moreover, we found that Frondoside A could enhance the killing of breast cancer cells induced by the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel. These findings identify Frondoside A as a promising novel therapeutic agent for breast cancer. PMID:21741966

  3. Breast tumor segmentation in high resolution x-ray phase contrast analyzer based computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, E., E-mail: emmanuel.brun@esrf.fr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), Grenoble 380000, France and Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Garching 85748 (Germany); Grandl, S.; Sztrókay-Gaul, A.; Gasilov, S. [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, 81377 Munich (Germany); Barbone, G. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Mittone, A.; Coan, P. [Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Garching 85748, Germany and Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, 81377 Munich (Germany); Bravin, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), Grenoble 380000 (France)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Phase contrast computed tomography has emerged as an imaging method, which is able to outperform present day clinical mammography in breast tumor visualization while maintaining an equivalent average dose. To this day, no segmentation technique takes into account the specificity of the phase contrast signal. In this study, the authors propose a new mathematical framework for human-guided breast tumor segmentation. This method has been applied to high-resolution images of excised human organs, each of several gigabytes. Methods: The authors present a segmentation procedure based on the viscous watershed transform and demonstrate the efficacy of this method on analyzer based phase contrast images. The segmentation of tumors inside two full human breasts is then shown as an example of this procedure’s possible applications. Results: A correct and precise identification of the tumor boundaries was obtained and confirmed by manual contouring performed independently by four experienced radiologists. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate that applying the watershed viscous transform allows them to perform the segmentation of tumors in high-resolution x-ray analyzer based phase contrast breast computed tomography images. Combining the additional information provided by the segmentation procedure with the already high definition of morphological details and tissue boundaries offered by phase contrast imaging techniques, will represent a valuable multistep procedure to be used in future medical diagnostic applications.

  4. Alterations in growth phenotype and radiosensitivity after fractionated irradiation of breast carcinoma cells from a single patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose was to investigate growth regulation and radiosensitivity in surviving clonogens after fractionated irradiation. Four breast carcinoma cell lines isolated from the primary tumor (21NT, 21PT) and metastases (21MT-1, 21MT-2) of a single patient were exposed to cumulative radiation doses of 30 Gy yielding cell lines designated -IR with respect to their parent. The irradiated lines were then compared to their parent for serum- and growth factor-requirements under defined media conditions, ability to proliferate in soft agar, concentration of TGF-alpha in conditioned medium, and radiosensitivity. The irradiated lines showed no change in proliferative doubling times under serum- and growth factor-supplemented media conditions. A single line, 21MT-1-IR, acquired a limited ability to proliferate in serum- and growth factor-deplete medium with a day 2-4 doubling time of 44.5 hr. Three lines, 21MT-1-IR, 21MT-2-IR, and 21NT-IR, formed colonies in soft agar in contrast to none of the unirradiated parent lines. There were significant 6-8 fold increases in conditioned media TGF-alpha concentrations for 21MT-2-IR and 21NT-IR cells. The 21MT-1-IR and 21NT-IR cells were significantly less radiosensitive than their respective parent lines. This decrease in radiosensitivity appeared to be at least partially mediated by a released factor as the radiosensitivity of 21MT-1 cells was significantly decreased by pre-incubation with conditioned medium from 21MT-1-IR cells. Radiation-induced changes in growth phenotype vary with respect to clonal origin of the cell line and may influence the radiosensitivity of surviving clonogens after fractionated treatment. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Usefulness of preoperative breast MRI in breast cancer patients diagnosed with tumor removal using a US-guided mammotome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the MRI findings that suggested the presence of a residual cancer after a mammotome biopsy in pathologically proven breast cancer patients and the usefulness of MRI to diagnose a residual cancer and additional lesions. We reviewed 41 breast cancer patients that underwent an ultrasonography-guided mammotome biopsy for complete resection of a breast lesion. MRI was performed for preoperative assessment and MRI findings suggestive of a residual cancer at the procedure site were analyzed and correlated to the pathological findings. Additional enhancements on breast MRI were analyzed, and the diagnostic accuracy of MRI for occult additional lesions was calculated. A total of 32 (78.0%) patients had a residual tumor. A mass was the most common MRI finding that suggested a residual cancer. Thick rim enhancement or a mass with a non-mass like enhancement were the most suspicious findings that suggested the presence of a residual cancer. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI for the detection of a residual cancer were 81.3%, 66.7% and 78.0%, respectively. Additional malignant lesions were found in 7 cases. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI for the detection of additional lesions were 100%, 60.0% and 76.5%, respectively. Further complete surgery should be performed, as residual tumors are found in 50% of the negative MRI examinations, whereas preoperative MRI is helpful to evaluate occult additional lesions

  6. Evaluating mononuclear cells as nanoparticle delivery vehicles for the treatment of breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murton, Jaclyn K.; Hu, Chelin; Ahmed, Mona M.; Hathaway, Helen J.; Nysus, Monique; Anderson Daniels, Tamara; Norenberg, Jeffrey P.; Adolphi, Natalie L.

    2015-08-01

    In breast cancer, certain types of circulating immune cells respond to long-range chemical signals from tumors by leaving the blood stream to actively infiltrate tumor tissue. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether immune cells could be used to deliver therapeutic nanoparticles into breast tumors in mice. Mononuclear splenocytes (MS) were harvested from donor mice, labeled with Indium-111, injected intravenously into immune-competent recipient mice (3 tumor-bearing and 3 control), and imaged longitudinally by SPECT/CT. For comparison, the biodistribution of bonemarrow derived macrophages (BMDM) in one pair of mice was also imaged. Quantitative analysis of the SPECT images demonstrates that, after 24 hours, the concentration of MS detected in mammary tumors is more than 3-fold higher than the concentration detected in normal mammary glands. The ratio of MS concentration in mammary tissue to MS concentration in non-target tissues (muscle, lung, heart, liver, spleen, and kidney) was enhanced in tumor-bearing mice (compared to controls), with statistical significance achieved for mammary/muscle (p<0.01), mammary/lung (p<0.05), and mammary/kidney (p<0.05). By contrast, BMDM did not show a different affinity for tumors relative to normal mammary tissue. MS were incubated with 100 nm red fluorescent nanoparticles, and flow cytometry demonstrated that ~35% of the MS population exhibited strong phagocytic uptake of the nanoparticles. After intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice, fluorescence microscopy images of tumor sections show qualitatively that nanoparticle-loaded MS retain the ability to infiltrate mammary tumors. Taken together, these results suggest that MS carriers are capable of actively targeting therapeutic nanoparticles to breast tumors.

  7. Interleukin-6 Induced “Acute” Phenotypic Microenvironment Promotes Th1 Anti-Tumor Immunity in Cryo-Thermal Therapy Revealed By Shotgun and Parallel Reaction Monitoring Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ting; Liu, Ping; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Kun; Yang, Li; Moritz, Robert L.; Yan, Wei; Xu, Lisa X.

    2016-01-01

    Cryo-thermal therapy has been emerged as a promising novel therapeutic strategy for advanced breast cancer, triggering higher incidence of tumor regression and enhanced remission of metastasis than routine treatments. To better understand its anti-tumor mechanism, we utilized a spontaneous metastatic mouse model and quantitative proteomics to compare N-glycoproteome changes in 94 serum samples with and without treatment. We quantified 231 highly confident N-glycosylated proteins using iTRAQ shotgun proteomics. Among them, 53 showed significantly discriminated regulatory patterns over the time course, in which the acute phase response emerged as the most enhanced pathway. The anti-tumor feature of the acute response was further investigated using parallel reaction monitoring target proteomics and flow cytometry on 23 of the 53 significant proteins. We found that cryo-thermal therapy reset the tumor chronic inflammation to an “acute” phenotype, with up-regulation of acute phase proteins including IL-6 as a key regulator. The IL-6 mediated “acute” phenotype transformed IL-4 and Treg-promoting ICOSL expression to Th1-promoting IFN-γ and IL-12 production, augmented complement system activation and CD86+MHCII+ dendritic cells maturation and enhanced the proliferation of Th1 memory cells. In addition, we found an increased production of tumor progression and metastatic inhibitory proteins under such “acute” environment, favoring the anti-metastatic effect. Moreover, cryo-thermal on tumors induced the strongest “acute” response compared to cryo/hyperthermia alone or cryo-thermal on healthy tissues, accompanying by the most pronounced anti-tumor immunological effect. In summary, we demonstrated that cryo-thermal therapy induced, IL-6 mediated “acute” microenvironment shifted the tumor chronic microenvironment from Th2 immunosuppressive and pro-tumorigenic to Th1 immunostimulatory and tumoricidal state. Moreover, the magnitude of “acute” and

  8. Differential pattern and prognostic significance of CD4+, FOXP3+ and IL-17+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in ductal and lobular breast cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical relevance of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in breast cancer is controversial. Here, we used a tumor microarray including a large series of ductal and lobular breast cancers with long term follow up data, to analyze clinical impact of TIL expressing specific phenotypes and distribution of TILs within different tumor compartments and in different histological subtypes. A tissue microarray (TMA) including 894 ductal and 164 lobular breast cancers was stained with antibodies recognizing CD4, FOXP3, and IL-17 by standard immunohistochemical techniques. Lymphocyte counts were correlated with clinico-pathological parameters and survival. CD4+ lymphocytes were more prevalent than FOXP3+ TILs whereas IL-17+ TILs were rare. Increased numbers of total CD4+ and FOXP3+ TIL were observed in ductal, as compared with lobular carcinomas. High grade (G3) and estrogen receptor (ER) negative ductal carcinomas displayed significantly (p < 0.001) higher CD4+ and FOXP3+ lymphocyte infiltration while her2/neu over-expression in ductal carcinomas was significantly (p < 0.001) associated with higher FOXP3+ TIL counts. In contrast, lymphocyte infiltration was not linked to any clinico-pathological parameters in lobular cancers. In univariate but not in multivariate analysis CD4+ infiltration was associated with significantly shorter survival in patients bearing ductal, but not lobular cancers. However, a FOXP3+/CD4+ ratio > 1 was associated with improved overall survival even in multivariate analysis (p = 0.033). Ductal and lobular breast cancers appear to be infiltrated by different lymphocyte subpopulations. In ductal cancers increased CD4+ and FOXP3+ TIL numbers are associated with more aggressive tumor features. In survival analysis, absolute numbers of TILs do not represent major prognostic indicators in ductal and lobular breast cancer. Remarkably however, a ratio > 1 of total FOXP3+/CD4+ TILs in ductal carcinoma appears to represent an independent favorable prognostic

  9. Nectin-4 is a new histological and serological tumor associated marker for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease at the molecular level. Evolution is difficult to predict according to classical histoclinical prognostic factors. Different studies highlight the importance of large-scale molecular expression analyses to improve taxonomy of breast cancer and prognostic classification. Identification of new molecular markers that refine this taxonomy and improve patient management is a priority in the field of breast cancer research. Nectins are cell adhesion molecules involved in the regulation of epithelial physiology. We present here Nectin-4/PVRL4 as a new histological and serological tumor associated marker for breast carcinoma. Expression of Nectin-4 protein was measured on a panel of 78 primary cells and cell lines from different origins and 57 breast tumors by FACS analysis and immunohistochemistry (IHC), respectively. mRNA expression was measured by quantitative PCR. Serum Nectin-4 was detected by ELISA and compared with CEA and CA15.3 markers, on panels of 45 sera from healthy donors, 53 sera from patients with non-metastatic breast carcinoma (MBC) at diagnosis, and 182 sera from patients with MBC. Distribution of histological/serological molecular markers and histoclinical parameters were compared using the standard Chi-2 test. Nectin-4 was not detected in normal breast epithelium. By contrast, Nectin-4 was expressed in 61% of ductal breast carcinoma vs 6% in lobular type. Expression of Nectin-4 strongly correlated with the basal-like markers EGFR, P53, and P-cadherin, and negatively correlated with the luminal-like markers ER, PR and GATA3. All but one ER/PR-negative tumors expressed Nectin-4. The detection of Nectin-4 in serum improves the follow-up of patients with MBC: the association CEA/CA15.3/Nectin-4 allowed to monitor 74% of these patients compared to 67% with the association CEA/CA15.3. Serum Nectin-4 is a marker of disease progression, and levels correlate with the number of metastases (P = 0.038). Serum

  10. Nectin-4 is a new histological and serological tumor associated marker for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauvan Richard

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease at the molecular level. Evolution is difficult to predict according to classical histoclinical prognostic factors. Different studies highlight the importance of large-scale molecular expression analyses to improve taxonomy of breast cancer and prognostic classification. Identification of new molecular markers that refine this taxonomy and improve patient management is a priority in the field of breast cancer research. Nectins are cell adhesion molecules involved in the regulation of epithelial physiology. We present here Nectin-4/PVRL4 as a new histological and serological tumor associated marker for breast carcinoma. Methods Expression of Nectin-4 protein was measured on a panel of 78 primary cells and cell lines from different origins and 57 breast tumors by FACS analysis and immunohistochemistry (IHC, respectively. mRNA expression was measured by quantitative PCR. Serum Nectin-4 was detected by ELISA and compared with CEA and CA15.3 markers, on panels of 45 sera from healthy donors, 53 sera from patients with non-metastatic breast carcinoma (MBC at diagnosis, and 182 sera from patients with MBC. Distribution of histological/serological molecular markers and histoclinical parameters were compared using the standard Chi-2 test. Results Nectin-4 was not detected in normal breast epithelium. By contrast, Nectin-4 was expressed in 61% of ductal breast carcinoma vs 6% in lobular type. Expression of Nectin-4 strongly correlated with the basal-like markers EGFR, P53, and P-cadherin, and negatively correlated with the luminal-like markers ER, PR and GATA3. All but one ER/PR-negative tumors expressed Nectin-4. The detection of Nectin-4 in serum improves the follow-up of patients with MBC: the association CEA/CA15.3/Nectin-4 allowed to monitor 74% of these patients compared to 67% with the association CEA/CA15.3. Serum Nectin-4 is a marker of disease progression, and levels

  11. Malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast presenting with hypoglycemia: a case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Pacioles T; Seth R; Orellana C; John I; Panuganty V; Dhaliwal R

    2014-01-01

    Toni Pacioles,1 Rahul Seth,2,3 Cesar Orellana,3 Ivy John,4 Veera Panuganty,3 Ruban Dhaliwal3,5 1Department of Hematology and Oncology, Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center, Marshall University, Huntington, WV, USA; 2Division of Hematology and Oncology, 3Department of Medicine, 4Department of Pathology, 5Division of Endocrinology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA Abstract: Phyllodes tumors are rare fibroepithelial neoplasms that account for less than 1% of all breast tumors a...

  12. Genetic and epigenetic silencing of the beclin 1 gene in sporadic breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beclin 1, an important autophagy-related protein in human cells, is involved in cell death and cell survival. Beclin 1 mapped to human chromosome 17q21. It is widely expressed in normal mammary epithelial cells. Although down-regulated expression with mono-allelic deletions of beclin 1 gene was frequently observed in breast tumors, whether there was other regulatory mechanism of beclin 1 was to be investigated. We studied the expression of beclin 1 and explored the possible regulatory mechanisms on its expression in breast tumors. 20 pairs of tumors and adjacent normal tissues from patients with sporadic breast invasive ductal cancer (IDCs) were collected. The mRNA expression of beclin 1 was detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was determined by real-time quantitative PCR and microsatellite methods. The protein expression of beclin 1, p53, BRCA1 and BRCA2 was assessed by immunohistochemistry. CpG islands in 5' genomic region of beclin 1 gene were identified using MethylPrimer Program. Sodium bisulfite sequencing was used in examining the methylation status of each CpG island. Decreased beclin 1 mRNA expression was detected in 70% of the breast tumors, and the protein levels were co-related to the mRNA levels. Expression of beclin 1 mRNA was demonstrated to be much higher in the BRCA1 positive tumors than that in the BRCA1 negative ones. Loss of heterozygosity was detected in more than 45% of the breast tumors, and a dense cluster of CpG islands was found from the 5' end to the intron 2 of the beclin 1 gene. Methylation analysis showed that the promoter and the intron 2 of beclin 1 were aberrantly methylated in the tumors with decreased expression. These data indicated that LOH and aberrant DNA methylation might be the possible reasons of the decreased expression of beclin 1 in the breast tumors. The findings here shed some new light on the regulatory mechanisms of beclin 1 in breast cancer

  13. Mutational myriad of tumor suppressor p53 in Filipino breast cancer: results and perspectives in molecular pathology and epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    .093) as compared to late-presenting tumors (age of diagnosis ≥ 50 yrs.). Incidentally, exon 7 encodes the L3 domain of p53 that interacts with the DNA minor groove while forming a stabilized complex with zinc and its mutations are correlated with poor prognosis and resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, specifically, but not limited to, doxorubicin and cisplatinum (Aas et al., 1997). Whereas, residency in rural or urban regions fail to elicit any significantly disparate mutational profile, women from Manila have slightly higher p53 mutation rates (43% of the total cases) when compared with those referred from provincial hospitals (33% of the total cases). Social class appears to affect p53 at exons 6 (p=0.050: biased to the 'high-income' bracket) and 8 (p=0.052): biased to the 'low-income' bracket). The mutational myriad of tumor suppressor p53 in Filipino breast cancer in this thesis underscores the important fine-structured biophysical correlates of the p53 core domain (exons 5-8) with that of the neoplasm's cell biology, pathology and epidemiology. In future studies, p53 analysis will be used to identify the underlying causes of the unusually high breast cancer incidence in Manila by offering a possible glimpse into the temporal interactions of genetics (WT, GST, NMT, MSH1/2, PTEN, BRCA1/2, ETC), hormonal and environmental cues leading to a tumor phenotype). (Author)

  14. Repeat high-dose external beam irradiation for in-breast tumor recurrence after previous lumpectomy and whole breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether excision of an in-breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) plus 5000 cGy in 25 fractions to the new operative area is both tolerated and effective as treatment for an IBTR after previous lumpectomy and whole breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: Thirty-nine women with an IBTR after lumpectomy and breast irradiation for invasive carcinoma (n 31) or ductal carcinoma in situ (n = 8) were treated with excision of the IBTR and radiotherapy (RT), 5000 cGy in 25 fractions, to the operative area using electrons of appropriate energy. The interval from completion of the first course of RT to diagnosis of the IBTR ranged from 16 to 291 months (median 63). Results: The repeat course of RT to the new operative area was well tolerated in all patients, and no late sequelae occurred other than skin pigmentation changes. Eight patients, including 2 with suspicious bone scans at the time of IBTR, developed distant metastases, and 7 died 21-71 months (median 48) after retreatment. One patient was alive with distant metastases at 27 months after retreatment. Four of the 8 patients who developed distant metastases also had a second IBTR, and 3 died with persistent disease in the breast. An additional 4 patients, for a total of 8, had a second IBTR. Three were alive and free of disease after mastectomy, and 1 was alive and free of disease after mastectomy and additional RT for chest wall recurrence. An additional patient developed recurrence in the axilla 9 months after reirradiation and was treated with surgery; she died free of disease at 63 months. One patient underwent mastectomy for suspected persistent disease 2 months after completion of repeat RT; no evidence of recurrent tumor was found in the removed breast. Thus, 30 women (76.9%) had an intact breast free of tumor at death or at last follow-up 1-180 months (median 51.5) after reirradiation. Using the Kaplan-Meier life table analysis, the estimated overall and disease-free 5-year survival rate for the

  15. Silibinin inhibits accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and tumor growth of murine breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC)s increase in blood and accumulate in the tumor microenvironment of tumor-bearing animals, contributing to immune suppression in cancer. Silibinin, a natural flavonoid from the seeds of milk thistle, has been developed as an anti-inflammatory agent and supportive care agent to reduce the toxicity of cancer chemotherapy. The goals of this study were to evaluate the effect of silibinin on MDSCs in tumor-bearing mice and antitumor activity of silibinin in a mouse model of breast cancer. 4T1 luciferase-transfected mammary carcinoma cells were injected into in the mammary fat pad female BALB/c mice, and female CB17-Prkdc Scid/J mice. Silibinin treatment started on day 4 or day 14 after tumor inoculation continued every other day. Tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescent imaging (BLI) measuring total photon flux. Flow cytometry measured total leukocytes, CD11b+ Gr-1+ MDSC, and T cells in the blood and tumors of tumor-bearing mice. The effects of silibinin on 4T1 cell viability in vitro were measured by BLI. Treatment with silibinin increased overall survival in mice harboring tumors derived from the 4T1-luciferase breast cancer cell line, and reduced tumor volumes and numbers of CD11b+Gr-1+ MDSCs in the blood and tumor, and increased the content of T cells in the tumor microenvironment. Silibinin failed to inhibit tumor growth in immunocompromised severe combined immunodeficiency mice, supporting the hypothesis that anticancer effect of silibinin is immune-mediated. The antitumor activity of silibinin requires an intact host immune system and is associated with decreased accumulation of blood and tumor-associated MDSCs

  16. Prevention of Distant Lung Metastasis After Photodynamic Therapy Application in a Breast Cancer Tumor Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, João Paulo Figueiró; Muehlmann, Luis Alexandre; Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; Portilho, Flávia Arruda; de Souza, Ludmilla Regina; Silva, Jaqueline Rodrigues; Lacava, Zulmira Guerrero Marques; Bocca, Anamelia Lorenzetti; Chaves, Sacha Braun; Azevedo, Ricardo Bentes

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the activity of photodynamic therapy mediated by aluminum-chlorophthalocyanine contained in a polymeric nanostructured carrier composed by methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic anhydride (PVM/MA) against local subcutaneous breast cancer tumors and its effects against distant metastasis in a mouse tumor model. In our results, we observed a decrease in breast cancer tumor growth, prevention of distant lung metastases, and a significant increased survival in mice treated with photodynamic therapy. In addition to these results, we observed that tumor-bearing mice without treatment developed a significant extension of liver hematopoiesis that was significantly reduced in mice treated with photodynamic therapy. We hypothesized and showed that this reduction in (1) metastasis and (2) liver hematopoiesis may be related to the systemic activity of immature hematopoietic cells, specifically the myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which were suppressed in mice treated with photodynamic therapy. These cells produce a tolerogenic tumor environment that protects tumor tissues from immunological surveillance. Therefore, we suggest that photodynamic therapy could be employed in combination with other conventional therapies; such as surgery and radiotherapy, to improve the overall survival of patients diagnosed with breast cancer, as observed in our experimental resuIts. PMID:27301195

  17. Morphine Promotes Tumor Angiogenesis and Increases Breast Cancer Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Bimonte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphine is considered a highly potent analgesic agent used to relieve suffering of patients with cancer. Several in vitro and in vivo studies showed that morphine also modulates angiogenesis and regulates tumour cell growth. Unfortunately, the results obtained by these studies are still contradictory. In order to better dissect the role of morphine in cancer cell growth and angiogenesis we performed in vitro studies on ER-negative human breast carcinoma cells, MDA.MB231 and in vivo studies on heterotopic mouse model of human triple negative breast cancer, TNBC. We demonstrated that morphine in vitro enhanced the proliferation and inhibited the apoptosis of MDA.MB231 cells. In vivo studies performed on xenograft mouse model of TNBC revealed that tumours of mice treated with morphine were larger than those observed in other groups. Moreover, morphine was able to enhance the neoangiogenesis. Our data showed that morphine at clinical relevant doses promotes angiogenesis and increases breast cancer progression.

  18. Interplay of Stem Cell Characteristics, EMT, and Microtentacles in Circulating Breast Tumor Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charpentier, Monica [Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 655 W. Baltimore St., Bressler Bldg., Rm 10-20, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum National Cancer Institute Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 655 W. Baltimore St., Bressler Bldg., Rm 10-29, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Martin, Stuart, E-mail: ssmartin@som.umaryland.edu [Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum National Cancer Institute Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 655 W. Baltimore St., Bressler Bldg., Rm 10-29, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Physiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 655 W. Baltimore St., Bressler Bldg., Rm 10-29, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2013-11-14

    Metastasis, not the primary tumor, is responsible for the majority of breast cancer-related deaths. Emerging evidence indicates that breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) cooperate to produce circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that are highly competent for metastasis. CTCs with both CSC and EMT characteristics have recently been identified in the bloodstream of patients with metastatic disease. Breast CSCs have elevated tumorigenicity required for metastatic outgrowth, while EMT may promote CSC character and endows breast cancer cells with enhanced invasive and migratory potential. Both CSCs and EMT are associated with a more flexible cytoskeleton and with anoikis-resistance, which help breast carcinoma cells survive in circulation. Suspended breast carcinoma cells produce tubulin-based extensions of the plasma membrane, termed microtentacles (McTNs), which aid in reattachment. CSC and EMT-associated upregulation of intermediate filament vimentin and increased detyrosination of α-tubulin promote the formation of McTNs. The combined advantages of CSCs and EMT and their associated cytoskeletal alterations increase metastatic efficiency, but understanding the biology of these CTCs also presents new therapeutic targets to reduce metastasis.

  19. Application of imaging mass spectrometry for the molecular diagnosis of human breast tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xinxin; He, Jiuming; Li, Tiegang; Lu, Zhaohui; Sun, Jian; Meng, Yunxiao; Abliz, Zeper; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Distinguishing breast invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a key step in breast surgery, especially to determine whether DCIS is associated with tumor cell micro-invasion. However, there is currently no reliable method to obtain molecular information for breast tumor analysis during surgery. Here, we present a novel air flow-assisted ionization (AFAI) mass spectrometry imaging method that can be used in ambient environments to differentiate breast cancer by analyzing lipids. In this study, we demonstrate that various subtypes and histological grades of IDC and DCIS can be discriminated using AFAI-MSI: phospholipids were more abundant in IDC than in DCIS, whereas fatty acids were more abundant in DCIS than in IDC. The classification of specimens in the subtype and grade validation sets showed 100% and 78.6% agreement with the histopathological diagnosis, respectively. Our work shows the rapid classification of breast cancer utilizing AFAI-MSI. This work suggests that this method could be developed to provide surgeons with nearly real-time information to guide surgical resections. PMID:26868906

  20. Interplay of Stem Cell Characteristics, EMT, and Microtentacles in Circulating Breast Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Martin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis, not the primary tumor, is responsible for the majority of breast cancer-related deaths. Emerging evidence indicates that breast cancer stem cells (CSCs and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT cooperate to produce circulating tumor cells (CTCs that are highly competent for metastasis. CTCs with both CSC and EMT characteristics have recently been identified in the bloodstream of patients with metastatic disease. Breast CSCs have elevated tumorigenicity required for metastatic outgrowth, while EMT may promote CSC character and endows breast cancer cells with enhanced invasive and migratory potential. Both CSCs and EMT are associated with a more flexible cytoskeleton and with anoikis-resistance, which help breast carcinoma cells survive in circulation. Suspended breast carcinoma cells produce tubulin-based extensions of the plasma membrane, termed microtentacles (McTNs, which aid in reattachment. CSC and EMT-associated upregulation of intermediate filament vimentin and increased detyrosination of α-tubulin promote the formation of McTNs. The combined advantages of CSCs and EMT and their associated cytoskeletal alterations increase metastatic efficiency, but understanding the biology of these CTCs also presents new therapeutic targets to reduce metastasis.

  1. Interplay of Stem Cell Characteristics, EMT, and Microtentacles in Circulating Breast Tumor Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metastasis, not the primary tumor, is responsible for the majority of breast cancer-related deaths. Emerging evidence indicates that breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) cooperate to produce circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that are highly competent for metastasis. CTCs with both CSC and EMT characteristics have recently been identified in the bloodstream of patients with metastatic disease. Breast CSCs have elevated tumorigenicity required for metastatic outgrowth, while EMT may promote CSC character and endows breast cancer cells with enhanced invasive and migratory potential. Both CSCs and EMT are associated with a more flexible cytoskeleton and with anoikis-resistance, which help breast carcinoma cells survive in circulation. Suspended breast carcinoma cells produce tubulin-based extensions of the plasma membrane, termed microtentacles (McTNs), which aid in reattachment. CSC and EMT-associated upregulation of intermediate filament vimentin and increased detyrosination of α-tubulin promote the formation of McTNs. The combined advantages of CSCs and EMT and their associated cytoskeletal alterations increase metastatic efficiency, but understanding the biology of these CTCs also presents new therapeutic targets to reduce metastasis

  2. Desmoid tumors of the bilateral breasts in a patient without Gardner syndrome: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Charles S; Jeffrey, Brenda; Korentager, Richard; Hughes, Kenneth

    2012-08-01

    Desmoid tumors constitute 0.02% to 0.03% of all tumors. Consequently, few case reports exist for breast desmoids, even fewer identifying bilateral disease. We present a case report of a patient with bilateral breast desmoids and shoulder desmoid without evidence of FAP or Gardner syndrome. This case report explores the clinical, radiographic, pathologic, and treatment elements for desmoid tumors as well as a review of the literature. PMID:21629058

  3. Molecular Subtyping of Serous Ovarian Tumors Reveals Multiple Connections to Intrinsic Breast Cancer Subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Johansson, Ida; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Transcriptional profiling of epithelial ovarian cancer has revealed molecular subtypes correlating to biological and clinical features. We aimed to determine gene expression differences between malignant, benign and borderline serous ovarian tumors, and investigate similarities with the...... well-established intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer. METHODS: Global gene expression profiling using Illumina's HT12 Bead Arrays was applied to 59 fresh-frozen serous ovarian malignant, benign and borderline tumors. Nearest centroid classification was performed applying previously published...... gene profiles for the ovarian and breast cancer subtypes. Correlations to gene expression modules representing key biological breast cancer features were also sought. Validation was performed using an independent, publicly available dataset. RESULTS: 5,944 genes were significantly differentially...

  4. Tumor regression of multiple bone metastases from breast cancer after administration of strontium-89 chloride (Metastron)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of tumor regression of multiple bone metastases from breast carcinoma after administration of strontium-89 chloride. This case suggests that strontium-89 chloride can not only relieve bone metastases pain not responsive to analgesics, but may also have a tumoricidal effect on bone metastases

  5. TIMP-1 as a tumor marker in breast cancer - an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtz, Sidse Ørnbjerg; Rasmussen, Anne-Sofie Schrohl; Mouridsen, Henning;

    2008-01-01

    association between TIMP-1 and prognosis in breast cancer and new studies within this area have focused on the possibility of using blood samples or paraffin embedded tissue instead of tumor tissue extracts for measurements of TIMP-1. Interestingly, recent studies have investigated the association between...

  6. A Case of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Complicated by Pulmonary Tumor Thrombotic Microangiopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hak Jin; Kwak, Mi Hyang; Kong, Sun-Young; Seong, Moon-Woo; Kang, Han-Sung; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy (PTTM) is a rare, malignancy-related complication that causes marked pulmonary hypertension, right heart failure, and death. We report on a patient with locally advanced breast cancer whose course was complicated by fatal PTTM based on clinical and laboratory findings.

  7. Non-invasive thermal IR detection of breast tumor development in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Jason R.; Young, Madison A.; Dréau, D.; Trammell, Susan R.

    2015-03-01

    Lumpectomy coupled with radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy comprises the treatment of breast cancer for many patients. We are developing an enhanced thermal IR imaging technique that can be used in real-time to guide tissue excision during a lumpectomy. This novel enhanced thermal imaging method is a combination of IR imaging (8- 10 μm) and selective heating of blood (~0.5 °C) relative to surrounding water-rich tissue using LED sources at low powers. Post-acquisition processing of these images highlights temporal changes in temperature and is sensitive to the presence of vascular structures. In this study, fluorescent and enhanced thermal imaging modalities were used to estimate breast cancer tumor volumes as a function of time in 19 murine subjects over a 30-day study period. Tumor volumes calculated from fluorescent imaging follow an exponential growth curve for the first 22 days of the study. Cell necrosis affected the tumor volume estimates based on the fluorescent images after Day 22. The tumor volumes estimated from enhanced thermal imaging show exponential growth over the entire study period. A strong correlation was found between tumor volumes estimated using fluorescent imaging and the enhanced IR images, indicating that enhanced thermal imaging is capable monitoring tumor growth. Further, the enhanced IR images reveal a corona of bright emission along the edges of the tumor masses. This novel IR technique could be used to estimate tumor margins in real-time during surgical procedures.

  8. FGFR2 intronic SNPs and breast cancer risk; associations with tumor characteristics and interactions with exogenous exposures and other known breast cancer risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Marian, Catalin; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M; Nie, Jing; Kallakury, Bhaskar V.; Ambrosone, Christine B; Trevisan, Maurizio; Edge, Stephen; Shields, Peter G.; Freudenheim, Jo L.

    2010-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have revealed several new candidate genes for breast cancer, including FGFR2. The associations were also replicated in several other independent studies. The next important step is to study whether these common variants interact with known breast cancer risk factors, exogenous exposures, and tumor characteristics. In a population-based case-control study of 1170 breast cancer cases and 2115 controls, we examined genetic associations of four intronic FGFR...

  9. Validation of a Web-Based Tool to Predict the Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence (IBTR! 2.0) after Breast-Conserving Therapy for Korean Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Seung Pil; Hur, Sung Mo; Lee, Se Kyung; Kim, Sangmin; Choi, Min-Young; Bae, Soo Youn; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Min Kuk; Kil, Won Ho; Choe, Jun-Ho; Kim, Jung-Han; Kim, Jee Soo; Nam, Seok Jin; Bae, Jeoung Won; Lee, Jeong Eon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose IBTR! 2.0 is a web-based nomogram that predicts the 10-year ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rate after breast-conserving therapy. We validated this nomogram in Korean patients. Methods The nomogram was tested for 520 Korean patients, who underwent breast-conserving surgery followed by radiation therapy. Predicted and observed 10-year outcomes were compared for the entire cohort and for each group, predefined by nomogram-predicted risks: group 1, 10%. Results In overall pati...

  10. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in breast tumors: prevalence in a group of Mexican patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is one of the main health problems in developed countries, occupying first place in mortality in women. It is well-known that there are risk factors associated with breast cancer development. Nonetheless, in 50–80% of cases known risk factors have not been identified, this has generated the attempt to identify new factors related with this neoplasia as viral infections. The aim of this work is investigate the prevalence of HPV DNA in patients with breast lesions at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia de Mexico. Fifty-one cases of breast cancer were selected from the files of the institute and compared by age and tumor size with 43 cases of non malignant breast lesions (fibroadenoma, fibrocystic disease and phyllodes tumor). Paraffin embedded specimens were selected, HPV DNA was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequenced for different types of HPV in case of positivity for HPV-DNA. Descriptive analysis of clinical and pathological variables was performed and comparisons between positive and negative cases was done. All patients were mexican, mean age was 53.3, median age of menarche was 13 and median tumor size 9 cms. Cervicovaginal cytology was performed to all patients, 1 patient (1.9%) of cancer group had HPV and none in the other group, no cases were diagnosed with cervical dysplasia. In the group of carcinomas 36 (70.5%) were negative and 15 (29.4%) were positive to HPV-DNA, 10(66.6%) were positive for HPV 16, 3(20%) for HPV 18, two cases (13.4%) were positive for both. In the group of benign conditions all were negative to HPV-DNA. Presence of HPV in breast cancer in our group of cases is high in comparison to other authors; larger numbers of cases need to be analyzed in order to establish the exact role of this virus in the pathogenesis of breast cancer

  11. Tumor cell phenotype is sustained by selective MAPK oxidation in mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad Galli

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are major cellular sources of hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2, the production of which is modulated by oxygen availability and the mitochondrial energy state. An increase of steady-state cell H(2O(2 concentration is able to control the transition from proliferating to quiescent phenotypes and to signal the end of proliferation; in tumor cells thereby, low H(2O(2 due to defective mitochondrial metabolism can contribute to sustain proliferation. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs orchestrate signal transduction and recent data indicate that are present in mitochondria and regulated by the redox state. On these bases, we investigated the mechanistic connection of tumor mitochondrial dysfunction, H(2O(2 yield, and activation of MAPKs in LP07 murine tumor cells with confocal microscopy, in vivo imaging and directed mutagenesis. Two redox conditions were examined: low 1 microM H(2O(2 increased cell proliferation in ERK1/2-dependent manner whereas high 50 microM H(2O(2 arrested cell cycle by p38 and JNK1/2 activation. Regarding the experimental conditions as a three-compartment model (mitochondria, cytosol, and nuclei, the different responses depended on MAPKs preferential traffic to mitochondria, where a selective activation of either ERK1/2 or p38-JNK1/2 by co-localized upstream kinases (MAPKKs facilitated their further passage to nuclei. As assessed by mass spectra, MAPKs activation and efficient binding to cognate MAPKKs resulted from oxidation of conserved ERK1/2 or p38-JNK1/2 cysteine domains to sulfinic and sulfonic acids at a definite H(2O(2 level. Like this, high H(2O(2 or directed mutation of redox-sensitive ERK2 Cys(214 impeded binding to MEK1/2, caused ERK2 retention in mitochondria and restricted shuttle to nuclei. It is surmised that selective cysteine oxidations adjust the electrostatic forces that participate in a particular MAPK-MAPKK interaction. Considering that tumor mitochondria are dysfunctional, their inability to

  12. EFFECT OF LYMPHOKINES ON DRUG RESISTANCE OF BREAST TUMOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. T. Alimkhodzhayeva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the effect of cytokines isolated from autologous peripheral lymphocytes on the kinetics of breast cancer, which is exhibited by induced apoptosis and inhibited proliferation. The effect achieved leads to the conclusion that the isolated cytokines have antitumor action.

  13. Lack of association between level of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 and estimates of tumor angiogenesis in early breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offersen, Birgitte Vrou; Riisbro, Rikke; Knoop, Ann;

    2007-01-01

    Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) is involved in tumor invasion and progression. High levels of PAI-1 are associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer, and PAI-1 has been shown to play a role in angiogenic processes. Since estimates of tumor angiogenesis may predict poor prognosis...... we studied the relationship between PAI-1 and estimates of angiogenesis in breast cancer. Tumor tissue specimens from 438 breast cancer patients were included. Median follow-up was 10.3 years. Protein levels of PAI-1 were measured using an ELISA. Angiogenesis scores were performed using a Chalkley.......009) were independent markers of death from breast cancer. This study confirms high PAI-1 or high Chalkley counts as markers of poor prognosis in breast cancer patients, and suggests that the prognostic impact of PAI-1 is independent of its supposed involvement in tumor angiogenesis. Udgivelsesdato: 2007...

  14. Effects of "Moxibustion Serum" on Proliferation and Phenotypes of Tumor Infiltrating Lvmphocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈云飞; 赵粹英; 陈汉平; 秦慧莲; 方舫

    2003-01-01

    @@ Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) were cultured with "moxibustion serum" (MS), and the results were examined by flow cytometry. The results indicated that MS could enhance the proliferation of TIL,accelerate it to reach the exponential growth phase, and assist recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2) to enhance successively the percentage of CD3+ positive cells, maintain the number of CD4+ positive T cells, promote greatly the percentage of CD8+ positive T cells among TILs, and reverse the CD4+/CD8+ ratio. Such cooperative effects rely on relative specificity of acupoints. It is suggested that MS is beneficial to the growth of TIL both in the aspects of proliferation and phenotypes.

  15. [Linear and adhesive phenotype of tumor lymphocytes and clinical course of chronic leucosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golenkov, A K; Baryshnikov, A Iu; Mitina, T A; Novikov, V V

    2005-01-01

    Determination of chronic lymphatic leukemia immunological phenotype, performed by the authors, was based upon the study of quantitative expression of membrane differentiation antigens on peripheral blood lymphocytes. The research included study of co-expression of adhesion molecules, belonging to the following families: beta 2 integrins (CD 11 beta, CD 18), immunoglobulins (CD 50), and CD 38 on tumor blood B-lymphocytes of various CD-types and T-lymphocytes in chronic leucosis. The authors developed a functional model of trans-endothelial migration of peripheral blood lymphocytes in chronic chronic lymphatic leukemia, taking into account their membrane adhesive characteristics and serum level of CD 50. The researchers determined clinical importance of the expression of linear and adhesive antigens on peripheral blood lymphocytes, and soluble HLA-1 (sHLA-1) serum levels in patients with chronic lymphatic leukemia. PMID:15960204

  16. Proteomic profiling of 13 paired ductal infiltrating breast carcinomas and non-tumoral adjacent counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucci-Minafra, Ida; Cancemi, Patrizia; Marabeti, Maria Rita; Albanese, Nadia Ninfa; Di Cara, Gianluca; Taormina, Pietra; Marrazzo, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    According to recent statistics, breast cancer remains one of the leading causes of death among women in Western countries. Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease, presently classified into several subtypes according to their cellular origin. Among breast cancer histotypes, infiltrating ductal carcinoma represents the most common and potentially aggressive form. Despite the current progress achieved in early cancer detection and treatment, including the new generation of molecular therapies, there is still need for identification of multiparametric biomarkers capable of discriminating between cancer subtypes and predicting cancer progression for personalized therapies. One established step in this direction is the proteomic strategy, expected to provide enough information on breast cancer profiling. To this aim, in the present study we analyzed 13 breast cancer tissues and their matched non-tumoral tissues by 2-DE. Collectively, we identified 51 protein spots, corresponding to 34 differentially expressed proteins, which may represent promising candidate biomarkers for molecular-based diagnosis of breast cancer and for pattern discovery. The relevance of these proteins as factors contributing to breast carcinogenesis is discussed. PMID:21136615

  17. Interferon-γ and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Polarize Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Uniformly to a Th1 Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ping; Zhao, Yuanlong; Liu, Hui; Chen, Jinguo; Ren, Jiaqiang; Jin, Jianjian; Bedognetti, Davide; Liu, Shutong; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco; Stroncek, David

    2016-01-01

    Activated T cells polarize mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to a proinflammatory Th1 phenotype which likely has an important role in amplifying the immune response in the tumor microenvironment. We investigated the role of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), two factors produced by activated T cells, in MSC polarization. Gene expression and culture supernatant analysis showed that TNF-α and IFN-γ stimulated MSCs expressed distinct sets of proinflammatory factors. The combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α was synergistic and induced a transcriptome most similar to that found in MSCs stimulated with activated T cells and similar to that found in the inflamed tumor microenvironment; a Th1 phenotype with the expression of the immunosuppressive factors IL-4, IL-10, CD274/PD-L1 and indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO). Single cell qRT-PCR analysis showed that the combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α polarized uniformly to this phenotype. The combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α results in the synergist uniform polarization of MSCs toward a primarily Th1 phenotype. The stimulation of MSCs by IFN-γ and TNF-α released from activated tumor infiltrating T cells is likely responsible for the production of many factors that characterize the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27211104

  18. Decreased expression of SOX17 is associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, De-Yuan; Tan, Hao-Sheng; Wei, Jin-Li; Zhu, Chang-Ren; Jiang, Ji-Xin; Zhu, Yu-Xiang; Cai, Feng-Lin; Chong, Mei-Hong; Ren, Chuan-Li

    2015-09-01

    The SOX17 (SRY-related HMG-box) transcription factor is involved in a variety of biological processes and is related to the tumorigenesis and progression of multiple tumors. However, the clinical application of SOX17 for breast cancer prognosis is currently limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinicopathologic and prognostic significance of SOX17 expression in human breast cancer. qPCR and western blot assays were performed to measure the expression of SOX17 in breast cancer cell lines and 30 matched pairs of breast cancer and corresponding noncancerous tissues. A SOX17 overexpression cell model was used to examine changes in cell growth in vitro. Immunohistochemical analyses were performed to retrospectively examine the prognostic impact of SOX17 expression in 187 additional breast cancer patients. Our results showed that SOX17 expression was decreased at both the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in the breast cancer cell lines and tissues, and that SOX17 overexpression could strongly suppress cell growth in vitro. Furthermore, the lack of SOX17 protein expression was strongly correlated with higher tumor grade (P = 0.002), lymph node metastasis (P SOX17 expression (P = 0.002 and 0.001, respectively). Univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that lower SOX17 expression was an independent prognostic factor for DFS (P = 0.007; HR = 2.854; 95 % CI 1.326-6.147) and OS (P = 0.005; HR = 5.035; 95 % CI 1.648-15.385) for breast cancer. Our findings indicate that SOX17 expression is a useful prognostic biomarker for breast cancer. PMID:25971583

  19. A novel thermal treatment modality for controlling breast tumor growth and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yifan; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X

    2012-01-01

    The new concept of keeping primary tumor under control in situ to suppress distant foci sheds light on the novel treatment of metastatic tumor. Hyperthermia is considered as one of the means for controlling tumor growth. In this study, a novel thermal modality was built to introduce hyperthermia effect on tumor to suppress its growth and progression using 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma, a common animal model of metastatic breast cancer. A mildly raised temperature (i.e.39°C) was imposed on the skin surface of the implanted tumor using a thermal heating pad. Periodic heating (12 hours per day) was carried out for 3 days, 7 days, 14 days, and 21 days, respectively. The tumor growth rate was found significantly decreased in comparison to the control without hyperthermia. Biological evidences associated with tumor angiogenesis and metastasis were examined using histological analyses. Accordingly, the effect of mild hyperthermia on immune cell infiltration into tumors was also investigated. It was demonstrated that a delayed tumor growth and malignancy progression was achieved by mediating tumor cell apoptosis, vascular injury, degrading metastasis potential and as well as inhibiting the immunosuppressive cell myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) recruitment. Further mechanistic studies will be performed to explore the quantitative relationship between tumor progression and thermal dose in the near future. PMID:23367225

  20. Study of thermal effect on breast tumor metabolism and growth using metabonomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Guangchen; Jia, Wei; Hu, Xiaofang; Xu, Lisa X

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the biological effects of long-term mild hyperthermia treatment on tumor metabolism and growth were investigated using 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma, a common animal model of metastatic breast cancer. Periodic thermal treatment (12 hours per day) was applied to tumors and carried out for 3 days, 7 days, 14 days, and 21 days, respectively. The metabolites of tumor tissues were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results showed that the growth rate of thermally treated tumors was inversely related to the abundance of long chain fatty acids and acyl glycerols identified in tumor tissues. In the first two weeks, the growth of thermally treated tumors was significantly inhibited, while there was an obvious accumulation of long chain fatty acids and acyl glycerols in tumor tissues. In the third week, the thermally treated tumors adapted to the thermal environment and started to regrow, while the abundance of long chain fatty acids and acyl glycerols decreased in the tumor tissues. These observations suggested that the blockade of long chain fatty acid synthesis during mild hyperthermia treatment of tumors could improve the long-term treatment effect by limiting the supply of substance and energy for tumor re-growth. PMID:24110083

  1. Steroid Tumor Environment in Male and Female Mice Model of Canine and Human Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Caceres

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC shares clinical and histopathological characteristics with human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC and has been proposed as a good model for studying the human disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of female and male mice to reproduce IMC and IBC tumors and identify the hormonal tumor environment. To perform the study sixty 6–8-week-old male and female mice were inoculated subcutaneously with a suspension of 106 IPC-366 and SUM149 cells. Tumors and serum were collected and used for hormonal analysis. Results revealed that IPC-366 reproduced tumors in 90% of males inoculated after 2 weeks compared with 100% of females that reproduced tumor at the same time. SUM149 reproduced tumors in 40% of males instead of 80% of females that reproduced tumors after 4 weeks. Both cell lines produce distant metastasis in lungs being higher than the metastatic rates in females. EIA analysis revealed that male tumors had higher T and SO4E1 concentrations compared to female tumors. Serum steroid levels were lower than those found in tumors. In conclusion, IBC and IMC male mouse model is useful as a tool for IBC research and those circulating estrogens and intratumoral hormonal levels are crucial in the development and progression of tumors.

  2. Steroid Tumor Environment in Male and Female Mice Model of Canine and Human Inflammatory Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceres, Sara; Peña, Laura; Silvan, Gema; Illera, Maria J; Woodward, Wendy A; Reuben, James M; Illera, Juan C

    2016-01-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) shares clinical and histopathological characteristics with human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) and has been proposed as a good model for studying the human disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of female and male mice to reproduce IMC and IBC tumors and identify the hormonal tumor environment. To perform the study sixty 6-8-week-old male and female mice were inoculated subcutaneously with a suspension of 10(6)IPC-366 and SUM149 cells. Tumors and serum were collected and used for hormonal analysis. Results revealed that IPC-366 reproduced tumors in 90% of males inoculated after 2 weeks compared with 100% of females that reproduced tumor at the same time. SUM149 reproduced tumors in 40% of males instead of 80% of females that reproduced tumors after 4 weeks. Both cell lines produce distant metastasis in lungs being higher than the metastatic rates in females. EIA analysis revealed that male tumors had higher T and SO4E1 concentrations compared to female tumors. Serum steroid levels were lower than those found in tumors. In conclusion, IBC and IMC male mouse model is useful as a tool for IBC research and those circulating estrogens and intratumoral hormonal levels are crucial in the development and progression of tumors. PMID:27195300

  3. Towards intraoperative assessment of tumor margins in breast surgery using optical coherence elastography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Brendan F.; Wijesinghe, Philip; Allen, Wes M.; Chin, Lixin; Latham, Bruce; Saunders, Christobel M.; Sampson, David D.

    2016-03-01

    Surgical excision of tumor is a critical factor in the management of breast cancer. The most common surgical procedure is breast-conserving surgery. The surgeon's goal is to remove the tumor and a rim of healthy tissue surrounding the tumor: the surgical margin. A major issue in breast-conserving surgery is the absence of a reliable tool to guide the surgeon in intraoperatively assessing the margin. A number of techniques have been proposed; however, the re-excision rate remains high and has been reported to be in the range 30-60%. New tools are needed to address this issue. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) shows promise as a tool for intraoperative tumor margin assessment in breast-conserving surgery. Further advances towards clinical translation are limited by long scan times and small fields of view. In particular, scanning over sufficient areas to assess the entire margin in an intraoperative timeframe has not been shown to be feasible. Here, we present a protocol allowing ~75% of the surgical margins to be assessed within 30 minutes. To achieve this, we have incorporated a 65 mm-diameter (internal), wide-aperture annular piezoelectric transducer, allowing the entire surface of the excised tumor mass to be automatically imaged in an OCT mosaic comprised of 10 × 10 mm tiles. As OCT is effective in identifying adipose tissue, our protocol uses the wide-field OCT to selectively guide subsequent local OCE scanning to regions of solid tissue which often present low contrast in OCT images. We present promising examples from freshly excised human breast tissue.

  4. Epigenetic regulation of multiple tumor-related genes leads to suppression of breast tumorigenesis by dietary genistein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Li

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the most lethal diseases in women; however, the precise etiological factors are still not clear. Genistein (GE, a natural isoflavone found in soybean products, is believed to be a potent chemopreventive agent for breast cancer. One of the most important mechanisms for GE inhibition of breast cancer may involve its potential in impacting epigenetic processes allowing reversal of aberrant epigenetic events during breast tumorigenesis. To investigate epigenetic regulation for GE impedance of breast tumorigenesis, we monitored epigenetic alterations of several key tumor-related genes in an established breast cancer transformation system. Our results show that GE significantly inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner in precancerous breast cells and breast cancer cells, whereas it exhibited little effect on normal human mammary epithelial cells. Furthermore, GE treatment increased expression of two crucial tumor suppressor genes, p21(WAF1 (p21 and p16(INK4a (p16, although it decreased expression of two tumor promoting genes, BMI1 and c-MYC. GE treatment led to alterations of histone modifications in the promoters of p21 and p16 as well as the binding ability of the c-MYC-BMI1 complex to the p16 promoter contributing to GE-induced epigenetic activation of these tumor suppressor genes. In addition, an orally-fed GE diet prevented breast tumorigenesis and inhibited breast cancer development in breast cancer mice xenografts. Our results suggest that genistein may repress early breast tumorigenesis by epigenetic regulation of p21 and p16 by impacting histone modifications as well as the BMI1-c-MYC complex recruitment to the regulatory region in the promoters of these genes. These studies will facilitate more effective use of soybean product in breast cancer prevention and also help elucidate the mechanisms during the process of early breast tumorigenesis.

  5. PDK1 promotes tumor growth and metastasis in a spontaneous breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, J; Yang, M; Chen, S; Li, D; Chang, Z; Dong, Z

    2016-06-23

    Because malignant cells have altered, usually accelerated, energy consumption, targeting metabolic signaling represents a prevailing strategy for tumor therapy. Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) is a proximal signaling molecule of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, which is required for metabolic activation. It is still lacking definitive evidence whether inactivation of PDK1 can overwhelm tumorigenesis in vivo. Herein we revealed that mammary-specific ablation of PDK1 could delay tumor initiation, progression and metastasis in a spontaneous mouse tumor model. We also demonstrated that inducible deletion of PDK1 could noticeably shrink the growing breast tumors. However, a small portion of PDK1-deficient tumorigenic cells eventually established tumor lesions, albeit at a relatively later phase, most likely owing to compensatory upregulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2) phosphorylation. Consequently, simultaneous inhibition of PDK1 and Erk1/2 impeded the survival of breast cancer cells. Thus we identify PDK1 as a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer, particularly in combination with an Erk1/2 inhibitor. PMID:26455327

  6. Tumor and reproductive traits are linked by RNA metabolism genes in the mouse ovary: a transcriptome-phenotype association analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sharp John J; Cherry James M; Zhang Gen-Mu; Owens Garrison A; Urzúa Ulises; Munroe David J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The link between reproductive life history and incidence of ovarian tumors is well known. Periods of reduced ovulations may confer protection against ovarian cancer. Using phenotypic data available for mouse, a possible association between the ovarian transcriptome, reproductive records and spontaneous ovarian tumor rates was investigated in four mouse inbred strains. NIA15k-DNA microarrays were employed to obtain expression profiles of BalbC, C57BL6, FVB and SWR adult ova...

  7. Ultrasound Shear Wave Simulation of Breast Tumor Using Nonlinear Tissue Elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Woo Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI can assess the elasticity of tissues, but the shear modulus estimated in SWEI is often less sensitive to a subtle change of the stiffness that produces only small mechanical contrast to the background tissues. Because most soft tissues exhibit mechanical nonlinearity that differs in tissue types, mechanical contrast can be enhanced if the tissues are compressed. In this study, a finite element- (FE- based simulation was performed for a breast tissue model, which consists of a circular (D: 10 mm, hard tumor and surrounding tissue (soft. The SWEI was performed with 0% to 30% compression of the breast tissue model. The shear modulus of the tumor exhibited noticeably high nonlinearity compared to soft background tissue above 10% overall applied compression. As a result, the elastic modulus contrast of the tumor to the surrounding tissue was increased from 0.46 at 0% compression to 1.45 at 30% compression.

  8. Combining phenotypic and proteomic approaches to identify membrane targets in a ‘triple negative’ breast cancer cell type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rust Steven

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The continued discovery of therapeutic antibodies, which address unmet medical needs, requires the continued discovery of tractable antibody targets. Multiple protein-level target discovery approaches are available and these can be used in combination to extensively survey relevant cell membranomes. In this study, the MDA-MB-231 cell line was selected for membranome survey as it is a ‘triple negative’ breast cancer cell line, which represents a cancer subtype that is aggressive and has few treatment options. Methods The MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cell line was used to explore three membranome target discovery approaches, which were used in parallel to cross-validate the significance of identified antigens. A proteomic approach, which used membrane protein enrichment followed by protein identification by mass spectrometry, was used alongside two phenotypic antibody screening approaches. The first phenotypic screening approach was based on hybridoma technology and the second was based on phage display technology. Antibodies isolated by the phenotypic approaches were tested for cell specificity as well as internalisation and the targets identified were compared to each other as well as those identified by the proteomic approach. An anti-CD73 antibody derived from the phage display-based phenotypic approach was tested for binding to other ‘triple negative’ breast cancer cell lines and tested for tumour growth inhibitory activity in a MDA-MB-231 xenograft model. Results All of the approaches identified multiple cell surface markers, including integrins, CD44, EGFR, CD71, galectin-3, CD73 and BCAM, some of which had been previously confirmed as being tractable to antibody therapy. In total, 40 cell surface markers were identified for further study. In addition to cell surface marker identification, the phenotypic antibody screening approaches provided reagent antibodies for target validation studies. This is illustrated

  9. Tumor suppressor genes are frequently methylated in lymph node metastases of breast cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jia

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Metastasis represents a major adverse step in the progression of breast carcinoma. Lymph node invasion is the most relevant prognostic factor; however little is known on the molecular events associated with lymph node metastasis process. This study is to investigate the status and role of methylation in lymph node metastatic tumors. Materials and methods Bisulfite pyrosequencing is used to screen 6 putative tumor suppressor genes (HIN-1, RASSF1A, RIL, CDH13, RARβ2 and E-cadherin in 38 pairs of primary breast tumors and lymph node metastases. Results We found that HIN-1, CDH13, RIL, RASSF1A and RARβ2 were frequently methylated both in primary and metastatic tissues (range: 55.3%~89.5%. E-cadherin was not frequently methylated in either setting (range: 18.4%~23.7%. The methylation status of HIN-1, CDH13, RIL, and RARβ2 in lymph nodes metastasis were correlated with that in primary tumors. The Pearson correlation values ranged from 0.624 to 0.472 (p values HIN-1 methylation and hormone status in metastatic lymph nodes. Hypermethylation of HIN-1 in metastasis lymph nodes was significantly associated with expression of ER (odds ratio, 1.070; P = 0.024 and with PR (odds ratio, 1.046; P = 0.026. Conclusions This study suggests that hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes is extended from primary to metastatic tumors during tumor progression.

  10. Integrative bioinformatics analysis of transcriptional regulatory programs in breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Aburatani Hiroyuki; Tsutsumi Shuichi; Imoto Seiya; Smith Andrew D; Niida Atsushi; Zhang Michael Q; Akiyama Tetsu

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Microarray technology has unveiled transcriptomic differences among tumors of various phenotypes, and, especially, brought great progress in molecular understanding of phenotypic diversity of breast tumors. However, compared with the massive knowledge about the transcriptome, we have surprisingly little knowledge about regulatory mechanisms underling transcriptomic diversity. Results To gain insights into the transcriptional programs that drive tumor progression, we integr...

  11. Local tumor control and cosmetic outcome following breast-conserving surgery and radiation up to a total dose of 56 Gy without boost in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate overall survival, local tumor control and cosmetic outcome after breast-conserving surgery followed by radiotherapy without boost irradiation. Patients and Methods: In a retrospective study 270 breast cancer patients were treated with breast conserving surgery combined with a homogenous radiation of the tumor bearing breast up to a total dose of 56 Gy without local boost irradiation. Mean follow-up was 48 months. Local tumor control, side effects, cosmetic results and contentment with treatment were assessed using physical examinations and interviews based on a standardized questionnaire. Results: Cause-specific survival at 5 years after treatment was 88.3%, actuarial disease-free survival at 5 years was 76.1%. Within 23 to 78 months after treatment 12 patients suffered from ipsilateral breast recurrence. The actuarial freedom from local recurrence (single tumor manifestation) was 96.8% at 5 years after treatment, 89% at 10 years. The occurrence of local failures was not significantly correlated to tumor size, margins, grading, nodal status, age or lymphangiosis. 15.6% of the patients developed distant metastases. In all patients treatment was performed without interruption. Side effects were predominantly of mild degree, no severe side effects were detected. 73% of physicians and 81% of patients scored their cosmetic outcome as excellent or good. 93% of patients would again decide in favor of this procedure. Whereas, use of adjuvant chemotherapy as well as subcutaneous reconstruction of breast tissue did not significantly affect breast cosmesis, analysis demonstrated impaired cosmetic results related to a larger breast size. Conclusion: The data of this study show that tumor control achieved by breast conserving surgery in combination with a radiation technique up to a total dose of 56 Gy which omits boost irradiation is within the range of literature data. Side effects of the therapy were tolerable. The treatment displayed a good

  12. HER4 selectively coregulates estrogen stimulated genes associated with breast tumor cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Wen; Jones, Frank E., E-mail: fjones3@tulane.edu

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •HER4/4ICD is an obligate coactivator for 37% of estrogen regulated genes. •HER4/4ICD coactivated genes selectively regulate estrogen stimulated proliferation. •Estrogen stimulated tumor cell migration occurs independent of HER4/4ICD. •Disrupting HER4/4ICD and ER coactivated gene expression may suppress breast cancer. -- Abstract: The EGFR-family member HER4 undergoes regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) to generate an intracellular domain (4ICD) that functions as a transcriptional coactivator. Accordingly, 4ICD coactivates the estrogen receptor (ER) and associates with ER at target gene promoters in breast tumor cells. However, the extent of 4ICD coactivation of ER and the functional significance of the 4ICD/ER transcriptional complex is unclear. To identify 4ICD coactivated genes we performed a microarray gene expression analysis of β-estradiol treated cells comparing control MCF-7 breast cancer cells to MCF-7 cells where HER4 expression was stably suppressed using a shRNA. In the MCF-7 cell line, β-estradiol significantly stimulated or repressed by 2-fold or more 726 or 53 genes, respectively. Significantly, HER4/4ICD was an obligate coactivator for 277 or 38% of the β-estradiol stimulated genes. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of β-estradiol regulated genes identified significant associations with multiple cellular functions regulating cellular growth and proliferation, cell cycle progression, cancer metastasis, decreased hypoplasia, tumor cell migration, apoptotic resistance of tumor cells, and increased transcription. Genes coactivated by 4ICD displayed functional specificity by only significantly contributing to cellular growth and proliferation, cell cycle progression, and decreased hypoplasia. In direct concordance with these in situ results we show that HER4 knockdown in MCF-7 cells results in a loss of estrogen stimulated tumor cell proliferation and cell cycle progression, whereas, estrogen stimulated tumor cell migration was

  13. Inhibition of autophagy stimulate molecular iodine-induced apoptosis in hormone independent breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Molecular iodine (I2) causes non-apoptotic cell death in MDA-MB231 breast tumor cells. ► Autophagy is activated as a survival mechanism in response to I2 in MDA-MB231. ► Autophagy inhibition sensitizes tumor cells to I2-induced apoptotic cell death. ► Autophagy inhibitor potentiates apoptosis and tumor regressive effects of I2 in mice. -- Abstract: Estrogen receptor negative (ER−ve) and p53 mutant breast tumors are highly aggressive and have fewer treatment options. Previously, we showed that molecular Iodine (I2) induces apoptosis in hormone responsive MCF-7 breast cancer cells, and non-apoptotic cell death in ER−ve–p53 mutant MDA-MB231 cells (Shrivastava, 2006). Here we show that I2 (3 μM) treatment enhanced the features of autophagy in MDA-MB231 cells. Since autophagy is a cell survival response to most anti-cancer therapies, we used both in vitro and in vivo systems to determine whether ER−ve mammary tumors could be sensitized to I2-induced apoptosis by inhibiting autophagy. Autophagy inhibition with chloroquine (CQ) and inhibitors for PI3K (3MA, LY294002) and H+/ATPase (baflomycin) resulted in enhanced cell death in I2 treated MDA-MB231 cells. Further, CQ (20 μM) in combination with I2, showed apoptotic features such as increased sub-G1 fraction (∼5-fold), expression of cleaved caspase-9 and -3 compared to I2 treatment alone. Flowcytometry of I2 and CQ co-treated cells revealed increase in mitochondrial membrane permeability (p 2 treatment. For in vivo studies ICRC mice were transplanted subcutaneously with MMTV-induced mammary tumors. A significant reduction in tumor volumes, as measured by MRI, was found in I2 and CQ co-treated mice relative to I2 or vehicle treated mice. These data indicate that inhibition of autophagy renders ER−ve breast tumor cells more sensitive to I2 induced apoptosis. Thus, I2 together with autophagy inhibitor could have a potential tumorostatic role in ER−ve aggressive breast tumors that may be

  14. HER4 selectively coregulates estrogen stimulated genes associated with breast tumor cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •HER4/4ICD is an obligate coactivator for 37% of estrogen regulated genes. •HER4/4ICD coactivated genes selectively regulate estrogen stimulated proliferation. •Estrogen stimulated tumor cell migration occurs independent of HER4/4ICD. •Disrupting HER4/4ICD and ER coactivated gene expression may suppress breast cancer. -- Abstract: The EGFR-family member HER4 undergoes regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) to generate an intracellular domain (4ICD) that functions as a transcriptional coactivator. Accordingly, 4ICD coactivates the estrogen receptor (ER) and associates with ER at target gene promoters in breast tumor cells. However, the extent of 4ICD coactivation of ER and the functional significance of the 4ICD/ER transcriptional complex is unclear. To identify 4ICD coactivated genes we performed a microarray gene expression analysis of β-estradiol treated cells comparing control MCF-7 breast cancer cells to MCF-7 cells where HER4 expression was stably suppressed using a shRNA. In the MCF-7 cell line, β-estradiol significantly stimulated or repressed by 2-fold or more 726 or 53 genes, respectively. Significantly, HER4/4ICD was an obligate coactivator for 277 or 38% of the β-estradiol stimulated genes. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of β-estradiol regulated genes identified significant associations with multiple cellular functions regulating cellular growth and proliferation, cell cycle progression, cancer metastasis, decreased hypoplasia, tumor cell migration, apoptotic resistance of tumor cells, and increased transcription. Genes coactivated by 4ICD displayed functional specificity by only significantly contributing to cellular growth and proliferation, cell cycle progression, and decreased hypoplasia. In direct concordance with these in situ results we show that HER4 knockdown in MCF-7 cells results in a loss of estrogen stimulated tumor cell proliferation and cell cycle progression, whereas, estrogen stimulated tumor cell migration was

  15. Early metabolic response using FDG PET/CT and molecular phenotypes of breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Wonshik

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was aimed 1 to investigate the predictive value of FDG PET/CT (fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography for histopathologic response and 2 to explore the results of FDG PET/CT by molecular phenotypes of breast cancer patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods Seventy-eight stage II or III breast cancer patients who received neoadjuvant docetaxel/doxorubicin chemotherapy were enrolled in this study. FDG PET/CTs were acquired before chemotherapy and after the first cycle of chemotherapy for evaluating early metabolic response. Results The mean pre- and post-chemotherapy standard uptake value (SUV were 7.5 and 3.9, respectively. The early metabolic response provided by FDG PET/CT after one cycle of neoadjuvant chemotherapy was correlated with the histopathologic response after completion of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (P = 0.002. Sensitivity and negative predictive value were 85.7% and 95.1%, respectively. The estrogen receptor negative phenotype had a higher pre-chemotherapy SUV (8.6 vs. 6.4, P = 0.047 and percent change in SUV (48% vs. 30%, P = 0.038. In triple negative breast cancer (TNBC, the pre-chemotherapy SUV was higher than in non-TNBC (9.8 vs. 6.4, P = 0.008. Conclusions The early metabolic response using FDG PET/CT could have a predictive value for the assessment of histopathologic non-response of stage II/III breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Our findings suggest that the initial SUV and the decline in SUV differed based on the molecular phenotype. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01396655

  16. K5/K14-positive cells contribute to salivary gland-like breast tumors with myoepithelial differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boecker, Werner; Stenman, Goeran; Loening, Thomas; Andersson, Mattias K; Bankfalvi, Agnes; von Holstein, Sarah; Heegaard, Steffen; Lange, Alina; Berg, Tobias; Samoilova, Vera; Tiemann, Katharina; Buchwalow, Igor

    2013-01-01

    different cell lineages and define their cellular hierarchy in tumors with myoepithelial differentiation. isTILT analysis of a series of 28 breast, salivary, and lacrimal gland tumors, including pleomorphic adenomas (n=8), epithelial-myoepithelial tumors (n=9), and adenoid cystic carcinomas (n=11) revealed...

  17. Lung metastasis genes couple breast tumor size and metastatic spread

    OpenAIRE

    Minn, Andy J.; Gupta, Gaorav P.; Padua, David; Bos, Paula; Nguyen, Don X.; Nuyten, Dimitry; Kreike, Bas; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Yixin; Ishwaran, Hemant; Foekens, John A; van de Vijver, Marc; Massagué, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The association between large tumor size and metastatic risk in a majority of clinical cancers has led to questions as to whether these observations are causally related or whether one is simply a marker for the other. This is partly due to an uncertainty about how metastasis-promoting gene expression changes can arise in primary tumors. We investigated this question through the analysis of a previously defined “lung metastasis gene-expression signature” (LMS) that mediates experimental breas...

  18. Phenotypic profile of dendritic and T cells in the lymph node of Balb/C mice with breast cancer submitted to dendritic cells immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Alessandra; Antoniazi Michelin, Marcia; Cândido Murta, Eddie Fernando

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common malignant neoplasm and the cause of death by cancer among women worldwide. Its development influenced by various mutations that occur in the tumor cell and by the immune system's status, which has a direct influence on the tumor microenvironment and, consequently, on interactions with non-tumor cells involved in the immunological response. Strategies using dendritic cells (DCs) or antigen-presenting cells (APCs), therapeutic mode, in cancer have been developed for some time. The proper interaction between DCs and T cells upon antigen presentation is of greatest importance for an antitumor immune response activation. Thus, various receptors on the surface of T cells must be able to recognize ligands that are located on the surface of APCs. However, little is known about the real behavior and interaction forms of CDs and T cells after vaccination. Due to the crucial importance of DCs in an effective anti-tumor immune response activation and the search for compliant results in inducing this response by immunotherapies with DCs, the phenotypic profile of DCs and T cells in lymph nodes obtained from female Balb/C mice with breast cancer induced by 4T1 cells and DCs treated with vaccines was investigated. We evaluated through flow cytometry based on the surface and intracellular molecules marking; as well as the presence of cytokines and chemokines, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, IFN-γ, TNF-α and TGF-β in the supernatant of the culture of Balb/C lymph nodes by ELISA. The results show that the vaccination with DCs, in the maturation parameters used in this study, was able to stimulate the secretion of cytokines such as IFN-γ and IL-12 and inhibit the secretion of TGF-β and IL-10 in nodal lymph infiltrates, as well as co-stimulatory activating (CD86) and adhesion molecules in DCs and T cells LFA-1/ICAM-1 and inhibit the secretion of CTLA-4 present in lymph nodes. Facts that led to aTh1 profile polarization, immuno competent in relation

  19. Photoacoustic imaging of breast tumor vascularization: a comparison with MRI and histopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijblom, Michelle; Piras, Daniele; van den Engh, Frank M.; Klaase, Joost M.; Brinkhuis, Mariël.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer and the leading cause of cancer death among females. Early diagnosis improves the survival chances for the disease and that is why there is an ongoing search for improved methods for visualizing breast cancer. One of the hallmarks of breast cancer is the increase in tumor vascularization that is associated with angiogenesis: a crucial factor for survival of malignancies. Photoacoustic imaging can visualize the malignancyassociated increased hemoglobin concentration with optical contrast and ultrasound resolution, without the use of ionizing radiation or contrast agents and is therefore theoretically an ideal method for breast imaging. Previous clinical studies using the Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope (PAM), which works in forward mode using a single wavelength (1064 nm), showed that malignancies can indeed be identified in the photoacoustic imaging volume as high contrast areas. However, the specific appearance of the malignancies led to questions about the contrast mechanism in relation to tumor vascularization. In this study, the photoacoustic lesion appearance obtained with an updated version of PAM is compared with the lesion appearance on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), both in general (19 patients) and on an individual basis (7 patients). Further, in 3 patients an extended histopathology protocol is being performed in which malignancies are stained for vascularity using an endothelial antibody: CD31. The correspondence between PAM and MRI and between PAM and histopathology makes it likely that the high photoacoustic contrast at 1064 nm is indeed largely the consequence of the increased tumor vascularization.

  20. Molecular deficiency (ies) in MT1 melatonin signaling pathway underlies the melatonin-unresponsive phenotype in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Lulu; Yuan, Lin; Xiang, Shulin; Zeringue, Samantha B.; Dauchy, Robert T.; Blask, David E; Hauch, Adam; Hill, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin, has been shown repeatedly to inhibit the growth of human breast tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Its anti-proliferative effects have been well-studied in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and several other estrogen receptor α (ERα)-positive human breast cancer cell lines. However, the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line, an ERα negative cell line widely used in breast cancer research, has been shown to be unresponsive to melatonin’s growth-suppressive effect in vitro. Here we examine...

  1. Dendritic cells loaded with killed breast cancer cells induce differentiation of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early clinical trials, mostly in the setting of melanoma, have shown that dendritic cells (DCs) expressing tumor antigens induce some immune responses and some clinical responses. A major difficulty is the extension to other tumors, such as breast carcinoma, for which few defined tumor-associated antigens are available. We have demonstrated, using both prostate carcinoma and melanoma as model systems, that DCs loaded with killed allogeneic tumor cell lines can induce CD8+ T cells to differentiate into cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) specific for shared tumor antigens. The present study was designed to determine whether DCs would capture killed breast cancer cells and present their antigens to autologous CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. We show that killed breast cancer cells are captured by immature DCs that, after induced maturation, can efficiently present MHC class I and class II peptides to CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes. The elicited CTLs are able to kill the target cells without a need for pretreatment with interferon gamma. CTLs can be obtained by culturing the DCs loaded with killed breast cancer cells with unseparated peripheral blood lymphocytes, indicating that the DCs can overcome any potential inhibitory effects of breast cancer cells. Loading DCs with killed breast cancer cells may be considered a novel approach to breast cancer immunotherapy and to identification of shared breast cancer antigens

  2. Is early dynamic lymphoscintigraphy for detection of sentinel lymph nodes always achievable in breast tumor?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article, we will discuss the achievement of early dynamic lymphoscintigraphic protocol and compare detection of sentinel node between benign and malignant breast tumors, and whether pathologic factor is related or not. During a six-month period, consecutive fifty-nine patients were enrolled into our study. The average age of patients was 47.6±9.8 years and all of them were clinically suspected of having breast cancer. The average tumor was 2.1±1.1 cm in size. First, Tc-99m sulfur colloid was injected around corners of palpable mass or biopsy cavity by the hybrid injection method. Immediately thereafter, dynamic protocol of lymphoscintigraphy, with 10 sec per frame for 60 frames was performed by established simultaneous dual-head vertical angle imaging technique. And delayed two-hour image was also acquired. All patients underwent surgery sixteen to twenty hours later and had a final pathological diagnosis. Among 59 patients, 14 of them were diagnosed with fibroadenoma and the other 45 cases with malignant conditions, infiltrating duct carcinoma mostly. The average age of the two groups was similar. From the summation image of dynamic study, identified axillary sentinel nodal activity was found as 80% in the group of benign breast tumor, but only 48% in the group of malignant breast tumor. In more than 88% of patients, sentinel lymph node was detectable on the delayed two-hour image between the two groups. Early dynamic protocol of pre-operative lymphoscintigraphy is helpful to clarify the relationship between the local lymphatic drainage basin and sentinel nodal uptake. However, this short period of protocol is not always achievable to detect sentinel node, especially in the group with breast malignant lesions. (author)

  3. Mutational Profiling Can Establish Clonal or Independent Origin in Synchronous Bilateral Breast and Other Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Bao

    Full Text Available Synchronous tumors can be independent primary tumors or a primary-metastatic (clonal pair, which may have clinical implications. Mutational profiling of tumor DNA is increasingly common in the clinic. We investigated whether mutational profiling can distinguish independent from clonal tumors in breast and other cancers, using a carefully defined test based on the Clonal Likelihood Score (CLS = 100 x # shared high confidence (HC mutations/ # total HC mutations.Statistical properties of a formal test using the CLS were investigated. A high CLS is evidence in favor of clonality; the test is implemented as a one-sided binomial test of proportions. Test parameters were empirically determined using 16,422 independent breast tumor pairs and 15 primary-metastatic tumor pairs from 10 cancer types using The Cancer Genome Atlas.We validated performance of the test with its established parameters, using five published data sets comprising 15,758 known independent tumor pairs (maximum CLS = 4.1%, minimum p-value = 0.48 and 283 known tumor clonal pairs (minimum CLS 13%, maximum p-value 0.99, supporting independence. A plausible molecular mechanism for the shift from hormone receptor positive to triple negative was identified in the clonal pair.We have developed the statistical properties of a carefully defined Clonal Likelihood Score test from mutational profiling of tumor DNA. Under identified conditions, the test appears to reliably distinguish between synchronous tumors of clonal and of independent origin in several cancer types. This approach may have scientific and clinical utility.

  4. Early diagnosis of breast cancer dissemination by tumor markers follow-up and method of prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mathematical model of prediction of progression was tested in patients with breast cancer employing long-term monitoring of tumor markers CEA, CA 15/3, MSA and TPA, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (FW), and the enzymes gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LD) in serum. At the same time, specificity, sensitivity, lead time and positive predictive value were evaluated along with false positivity for the all these parameters and their combinations. A model was proposed for the follow up of patients with breast cancer after the completion of basic therapy. (author)

  5. Pseudoangio-matous stromal hyperplasia: A rare tumor of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Kedar Singh; Bhandari, Geeta; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Sawai, Malvika

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) is a benign breast entity described first by Vuitch et al., in 1986. PASH is a benign stromal lesion containing complex anastomosing channels lined by slender spindle cells. It can be mistaken with fibroadenoma on ultrasound examination and histologically with low-grade angiosarcoma and phyllodes tumor. Here, presented is a case report of a 30-year-old female who presented with huge palpable lump in left breast. Ultrasonography revealed the lesion as giant fibroadenoma and fine needle aspiration cytology report was suggestive of cystosarcoma phyllodes. Excision and reduction mammoplasty was done and histopathology report was suggestive of PASH. PMID:26881624

  6. Downregulation of miR-342 is associated with tamoxifen resistant breast tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richer Jennifer K

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor resistance to the selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen remains a serious clinical problem especially in patients with tumors that also overexpress HER2. We have recently demonstrated that the clinically important isoform of HER2, HERΔ16, promotes therapeutically refractory breast cancer including resistance to endocrine therapy. Likewise additional breast tumor cell models of tamoxifen resistance have been developed that do not involve HER2 overexpression. However, a unifying molecular mechanism of tamoxifen resistance has remained elusive. Results Here we analyzed multiple cell models of tamoxifen resistance derived from MCF-7 cells to examine the influence of microRNAs (miRNAs on tamoxifen resistance. We compared miRNA expression profiles of tamoxifen sensitive MCF-7 cells and tamoxifen resistant MCF-7/HER2Δ16 cells. We observed significant and dramatic downregulation of miR-342 in the MCF-7/HER2Δ16 cell line as well as the HER2 negative but tamoxifen resistant MCF-7 variants TAMR1 and LCC2. Restoring miR-342 expression in the MCF-7/HER2Δ16 and TAMR1 cell lines sensitized these cells to tamoxifen-induced apoptosis with a dramatic reduction in cell growth. Expression of miR-342 was also reduced in a panel of tamoxifen refractory human breast tumors, underscoring the potential clinical importance of miR-342 downregulation. Towards the goal of identifying direct and indirect targets of miR-342 we restored miR-342 expression in MCF-7/HER2Δ16 cells and analyzed changes in global gene expression by microarray. The impact of miR-342 on gene expression in MCF-7/HER2Δ16 cells was not limited to miR-342 in silica predicted targets. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis of the dataset revealed a significant influence of miR-342 on multiple tumor cell cycle regulators. Conclusions Our findings suggest that miR-342 regulates tamoxifen response in breast tumor cell lines and our clinical data indicates a trend towards

  7. Tumor stromal vascular endothelial growth factor A is predictive of poor outcome in inflammatory breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a highly angiogenic disease; thus, antiangiogenic therapy should result in a clinical response. However, clinical trials have demonstrated only modest responses, and the reasons for these outcomes remain unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the prognostic value of protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A), one of the main targets of antiangiogenic therapy, and its receptors (VEGF-R1 and -R2) in IBC tumor specimens. Specimens from IBC and normal breast tissues were obtained from Algerian patients. Tumor epithelial and stromal staining of VEGF-A, VEGF-R1, and VEGF-R2 was evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis in tumors and normal breast tissues; this expression was correlated with clinicopathological variables and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) and disease-free survival (DFS) duration. From a set of 117 IBC samples, we evaluated 103 ductal IBC tissues and 25 normal specimens. Significantly lower epithelial VEGF-A immunostaining was found in IBC tumor cells than in normal breast tissues (P <0.01), cytoplasmic VEGF-R1 and nuclear VEGF-R2 levels were slightly higher, and cytoplasmic VEGF-R2 levels were significantly higher (P = 0.04). Sixty-two percent of IBC tumors had high stromal VEGF-A expression. In univariate analysis, stromal VEGF-A levels predicted BCSS and DFS in IBC patients with estrogen receptor-positive (P <0.01 for both), progesterone receptor-positive (P = 0.04 and P = 0.03), HER2+ (P = 0.04 and P = 0.03), and lymph node involvement (P <0.01 for both). Strikingly, in a multivariate analysis, tumor stromal VEGF-A was identified as an independent predictor of poor BCSS (hazard ratio [HR]: 5.0; 95% CI: 2.0-12.3; P <0.01) and DFS (HR: 4.2; 95% CI: 1.7-10.3; P <0.01). To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that tumor stromal VEGF-A expression is a valuable prognostic indicator of BCSS and DFS at diagnosis and can therefore be used to

  8. A network of clinically and functionally relevant genes is involved in the reversion of the tumorigenic phenotype of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells after transfer of human chromosome 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Susanne; Frege, Renate; Jacobsen, Anja; Weimer, Jörg; Arnold, Wolfgang; von Haefen, Clarissa; Niederacher, Dieter; Schmutzler, Rita; Arnold, Norbert; Scherneck, Siegfried

    2005-01-27

    Several investigations have supposed that tumor suppressor genes might be located on human chromosome 8. We used microcell-mediated transfer of chromosome 8 into MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and generated independent hybrids with strongly reduced tumorigenic potential. Loss of the transferred chromosome results in reappearance of the malignant phenotype. Expression analysis identified a set of 109 genes (CT8-ps) differentially expressed in microcell hybrids as compared to the tumorigenic MDA-MB-231 and rerevertant cells. Of these, 44.9% are differentially expressed in human breast tumors. The expression pattern of CT8-ps was associated with prognostic factors such as tumor size and grading as well as loss of heterozygosity at the short arm of chromosome 8. We identified CT8-ps networks suggesting that these genes act cooperatively to cause reversion of tumorigenicity in MDA-MB-231 cells. Our findings provide a conceptual basis and experimental system to identify and evaluate genes and gene networks involved in the development and/or progression of breast cancer. PMID:15580292

  9. Phenotypic features and genetic characterization of male breast cancer families: identification of two recurrent BRCA2 mutations in north-east of Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miolo GianMaria

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer in men is an infrequent occurrence, accounting for ~1% of all breast tumors with an incidence of about 1:100,000. The relative rarity of male breast cancer (MBC limits our understanding of the epidemiologic, genetic and clinical features of this tumor. Methods From 1997 to 2003, 10 MBC patients were referred to our Institute for genetic counselling and BRCA1/2 testing. Here we report on the genetic and phenotypic characterization of 10 families with MBC from the North East of Italy. In particular, we wished to assess the occurrence of specific cancer types in relatives of MBC probands in families with and without BRCA2 predisposing mutations. Moreover, families with recurrent BRCA2 mutations were also characterized by haplotype analysis using 5 BRCA2-linked dinucleotide repeat markers and 8 intragenic BRCA2 polymorphisms. Results Two pathogenic mutations in the BRCA2 gene were observed: the 9106C>T (Q2960X and the IVS16-2A>G (splicing mutations, each in 2 cases. A BRCA1 mutation of uncertain significance 4590C>G (P1491A was also observed. In families with BRCA2 mutations, female breast cancer was more frequent in the first and second-degree relatives compared to the families with wild type BRCA1/2 (31.9% vs. 8.0% p = 0.001. Reconstruction of the chromosome phasing in three families and the analysis of three isolated cases with the IVS16-2A>G BRCA2 mutation identified the same haplotype associated with MBC, supporting the possibility that this founder mutation previously detected in Slovenian families is also present in the North East of our Country. Moreover, analysis of one family with the 9106C>T BRCA2 mutation allowed the identification of common haplotypes for both microsatellite and intragenic polymorphisms segregating with the mutation. Three isolated cases with the same mutation shared the same intragenic polymorphisms and three 5' microsatellite markers, but showed a different haplotype for 3' markers

  10. Celecoxib increases miR-222 while deterring aromatase-expressing breast tumor growth in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is one of the most deadly diseases in women. Inhibiting the synthesis of estrogen is effective in treating patients with estrogen-responsive breast cancer. Previous studies have demonstrated that use of cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors is associated with reduced breast cancer risk. In the present study, we employed an established mouse model for postmenopausal breast cancer to evaluate the potential mechanisms of the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib. Aromatase-expressing MCF-7 cells were transplanted into ovariectomized athymic mice. The animals were given celecoxib at 1500 ppm or aspirin at 200 ppm by oral administration with androstenedione injection. Our results showed that both COX inhibitors could suppress the cancer xenograft growth without changing the plasma estrogen level. Protein expression of ERα, COX-2, Cyclin A, and Bcl-xL were reduced in celecoxib-treated tumor samples, whereas only Bcl-xL expression was suppressed in those treated with aspirin. Among the breast cancer-related miRNAs, miR-222 expression was elevated in samples treated with celecoxib. Further studies in culture cells verified that the increase in miR-222 expression might contribute to ERα downregulation but not the growth deterrence of cells. Overall, this study suggested that both celecoxib and aspirin could prevent breast cancer growth by regulating proteins in the cell cycle and apoptosis without blocking estrogen synthesis. Besides, celecoxib might affect miR expression in an undesirable fashion

  11. Metformin enhances tamoxifen-mediated tumor growth inhibition in ER-positive breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamoxifen, an endocrine therapy drug used to treat breast cancer, is designed to interrupt estrogen signaling by blocking the estrogen receptor (ER). However, many ER-positive patients are low reactive or resistant to tamoxifen. Metformin is a widely used anti-diabetic drug with noteworthy anti-cancer effects. We investigated whether metformin has the additive effects with tamoxifen in ER-positive breast cancer therapy. The efficacy of metformin alone and in combination with tamoxifen against ER-positive breast cancer was analyzed by cell survival, DNA replication activity, plate colony formation, soft-agar, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and nude mice model assays. The involved signaling pathways were detected by western blot assay. When metformin was combined with tamoxifen, the concentration of tamoxifen required for growth inhibition was substantially reduced. Moreover, metformin enhanced tamoxifen-mediated inhibition of proliferation, DNA replication activity, colony formation, soft-agar colony formation, and induction of apoptosis in ER-positive breast cancer cells. In addition, these tamoxifen-induced effects that were enhanced by metformin may be involved in the bax/bcl-2 apoptotic pathway and the AMPK/mTOR/p70S6 growth pathway. Finally, two-drug combination therapy significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo. The present work shows that metformin and tamoxifen additively inhibited the growth and augmented the apoptosis of ER-positive breast cancer cells. It provides leads for future research on this drug combination for the treatment of ER-positive breast cancer

  12. Increased B Regulatory Phenotype in Non-Metastatic Lymph Nodes of Node-Positive Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdipour, F; Razmkhah, M; Hosseini, A; Bagheri, M; Safaei, A; Talei, A-R; Ghaderi, A

    2016-03-01

    Tumour-draining lymph nodes (TDLNs) are centre in orchestrating the immune responses against cancer. The cellularity and lymphocyte subpopulations change in the process of cancer progression and lymph node involvement. B lymphocyte subsets and their function in breast cancer-draining lymph nodes have not been well elucidated. Here, we studied the influence of tumour metastasis on the frequencies of different B cell subsets including naïve and memory B cells as well as those which are known to be enriched in the regulatory pool in TDLNs of 30 patients with breast cancer. Lymphocytes were obtained from a fresh piece of each lymph node and stained for CD19 and other B cell-associated markers and subjected to flow cytometry. Our investigation revealed that metastatic TDLN showed a significant decrease in active, memory and class-switched B cells while the frequencies of B cells with regulatory phenotypes were not changed. However, CD27(hi) CD25(+) and CD1d(hi) CD5(+) B regulatory subsets significantly increased in non-metastatic lymph nodes (nMLNs) of node-positive patients compared with node-negative patients. Our data provided evidence that in breast cancer, metastasis of tumour to axillary lymph nodes altered B cell populations in favour of resting, inactive and unswitched phenotypes. We assume that the lymphatic involvement may cause an increase in a subset of regulatory B cells in non-metastatic lymph nodes. PMID:26708831

  13. Breast cancer tumor growth is efficiently inhibited by dendritic cell transfusion in a murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viet Quoc Pham

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability of dendritic cells to efficiently present tumor-derived antigens when primed with tumor cell lysates makes them attractive as an approach for cancer treatment. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of dendritic cell transfusion dose on breast cancer tumor growth in a murine model. Dendritic cells were produced from allogeneic bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells that were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with 20 ng/mL GM-CSF and 20 ng/mL IL-4 for 7 days. These cells were checked for maturation before being primed with a cancer cell-derived antigen. Cancer cell antigens were produced by a rapid freeze-thaw procedure using a 4T1 cell line. Immature dendritic cells were loaded with 4T1 cellderived antigens. Dendritic cells were transfused into mice bearing tumors at three different doses, included 5.104, 105, and 106 cells/mouse with a control consisting of RPMI 1640 media alone. The results showed that dendritic cell therapy inhibited breast cancer tumors in a murine model; however, this effect depended on dendritic cell dose. After 17 days, in the treated groups, tumor size decreased by 43%, 50%, and 87.5% for the doses of 5 and times; 104, 105, and 106 dendritic cells, respectively, while tumor size in the control group decreased by 44%. This result demonstrated that dendritic cell therapy is a promising therapy for breast cancer treatment. [Biomed Res Ther 2014; 1(3.000: 85-92

  14. Cancer associated fibroblasts promote tumor growth and metastasis by modulating the tumor immune microenvironment in a 4T1 murine breast cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Liao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Local inflammation associated with solid tumors commonly results from factors released by tumor cells and the tumor stroma, and promotes tumor progression. Cancer associated fibroblasts comprise a majority of the cells found in tumor stroma and are appealing targets for cancer therapy. Here, our aim was to determine the efficacy of targeting cancer associated fibroblasts for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate that cancer associated fibroblasts are key modulators of immune polarization in the tumor microenvironment of a 4T1 murine model of metastatic breast cancer. Elimination of cancer associated fibroblasts in vivo by a DNA vaccine targeted to fibroblast activation protein results in a shift of the immune microenvironment from a Th2 to Th1 polarization. This shift is characterized by increased protein expression of IL-2 and IL-7, suppressed recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages, myeloid derived suppressor cells, T regulatory cells, and decreased tumor angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Additionally, the vaccine improved anti-metastatic effects of doxorubicin chemotherapy and enhanced suppression of IL-6 and IL-4 protein expression while increasing recruitment of dendritic cells and CD8(+ T cells. Treatment with the combination therapy also reduced tumor-associated Vegf, Pdgfc, and GM-CSF mRNA and protein expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings demonstrate that cancer associated fibroblasts promote tumor growth and metastasis through their role as key modulators of immune polarization in the tumor microenvironment and are valid targets for therapy of metastatic breast cancer.

  15. Use of Raman Spectroscopy in Characterizing Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Breast Tumor Samples (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Frances; Cade, Nicholas; Cook, Richard; Springall, Robert; Gillet, Cheryl; Richards, David; Festy, Frederic

    2009-04-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) sections of breast tissue are used by pathologists to correctly type and grade the primary tumor and to assess the extent of a patient's disease. The cut sections represent a reproducible likeness of the morphology of the tissue when viewed through a microscope, although the fixation technique creates some artifacts. What is not known is how the sections differ chemically from how the tumor would look or behave within the breast. Raman spectroscopy is, like many other optical techniques, fast, noninvasive, and generally inexpensive. The advantage Raman has over other techniques is its powerful ability to identify specific chemicals, molecules, and bonds within a sample. Using Raman spectroscopy the chemicals present in both fresh tissue and FFPE sections can be identified and compared, allowing any differences between them to be identified. This information may be useful to the pathologist as an aid to further treatment regimes or novel molecular techniques, and as an aid to patient management. If these sections are found to be chemically similar to fresh tissue, they could be used to further characterize breast tumors, particularly rare tumors, using Raman spectroscopy.

  16. Human breast tumor imaging using 111In labeled monoclonal antibody: Anthymic mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The monoclonal antibody (MoAb) 323/A3, an IgG1, was raised against the human breast tumor cell line MCF-7 and recognized a 43 Kd membrane associated glycoprotein. Histochemical studies with the antibody detected 75% of metastatic lymph nodes, 59% of primary breast tumors, and showed some staining in 20% of benign breast lesions. For radionuclide imaging, the MoAb 323/A3 was labeled with both 125I and 111In, via covalently coupled diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) by the mixed anhydride method. The antibody activity of the DTPA modified 323/A3 was assessed by an immunoassay using viable and fixed MCF-7 target cells. Male athymic nude mice bearing BT-20 human mammary tumors were injected with dual 125I/111In labeled DTPA 323/A3 via the tail veins. The animals were imaged with a gamma camera equipped with a pinhole collimator at 1-3 h, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 days after the tracer administration. On day 5 or 6, the animals were killed, and the biodistribution of the radiotracers was determined for the blood, thyroid, heart, lungs, liver, spleen, kidneys, gastro-intestinal tract and tumor. Target to blood ratio at 6 days for the 111In tracer was 24:1 in the group with a mean tumor weight of 0.492 g, and 13:1 in another group with a mean tumor weight of 0.1906 g (day 5). However, the 125I activity showed only 3.6:1 and 5.4:1 target to blood ratios in the corresponding groups. The larger tumors localized less 111I tracer (27.13%±7.57% injected dose/g, Mean±SD) than the smaller tumors (52.75%±22.25% ID/g). Analysis of the gamma images showed that the maximum tracer concentration occurred in the tumors at about 2 to 3 days after intravenous tracer administration. The excellent tumor resolution observed with BT-20 tumors may be due to increased 43 Kd glycoprotein antigen density in this tumor cell line. (orig.)

  17. Computer-aided breast MR image feature analysis for prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To identify a new clinical marker based on quantitative kinetic image features analysis and assess its feasibility to predict tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods: The authors assembled a dataset involving breast MR images acquired from 68 cancer patients before undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Among them, 25 patients had complete response (CR) and 43 had partial and nonresponse (NR) to chemotherapy based on the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. The authors developed a computer-aided detection scheme to segment breast areas and tumors depicted on the breast MR images and computed a total of 39 kinetic image features from both tumor and background parenchymal enhancement regions. The authors then applied and tested two approaches to classify between CR and NR cases. The first one analyzed each individual feature and applied a simple feature fusion method that combines classification results from multiple features. The second approach tested an attribute selected classifier that integrates an artificial neural network (ANN) with a wrapper subset evaluator, which was optimized using a leave-one-case-out validation method. Results: In the pool of 39 features, 10 yielded relatively higher classification performance with the areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) ranging from 0.61 to 0.78 to classify between CR and NR cases. Using a feature fusion method, the maximum AUC = 0.85 ± 0.05. Using the ANN-based classifier, AUC value significantly increased to 0.96 ± 0.03 (p < 0.01). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that quantitative analysis of kinetic image features computed from breast MR images acquired prechemotherapy has potential to generate a useful clinical marker in predicting tumor response to chemotherapy

  18. Computer-aided breast MR image feature analysis for prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin, E-mail: Bin.Zheng-1@ou.edu [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Hollingsworth, Alan B. [Mercy Women’s Center, Mercy Health Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73120 (United States); Qian, Wei [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To identify a new clinical marker based on quantitative kinetic image features analysis and assess its feasibility to predict tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods: The authors assembled a dataset involving breast MR images acquired from 68 cancer patients before undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Among them, 25 patients had complete response (CR) and 43 had partial and nonresponse (NR) to chemotherapy based on the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. The authors developed a computer-aided detection scheme to segment breast areas and tumors depicted on the breast MR images and computed a total of 39 kinetic image features from both tumor and background parenchymal enhancement regions. The authors then applied and tested two approaches to classify between CR and NR cases. The first one analyzed each individual feature and applied a simple feature fusion method that combines classification results from multiple features. The second approach tested an attribute selected classifier that integrates an artificial neural network (ANN) with a wrapper subset evaluator, which was optimized using a leave-one-case-out validation method. Results: In the pool of 39 features, 10 yielded relatively higher classification performance with the areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) ranging from 0.61 to 0.78 to classify between CR and NR cases. Using a feature fusion method, the maximum AUC = 0.85 ± 0.05. Using the ANN-based classifier, AUC value significantly increased to 0.96 ± 0.03 (p < 0.01). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that quantitative analysis of kinetic image features computed from breast MR images acquired prechemotherapy has potential to generate a useful clinical marker in predicting tumor response to chemotherapy.

  19. A molecular analysis by gene expression profiling reveals Bik/NBK overexpression in sporadic breast tumor samples of Mexican females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is one of the most frequent causes of death in Mexican women over 35 years of age. At molecular level, changes in many genetic networks have been reported as associated with this neoplasia. To analyze these changes, we determined gene expression profiles of tumors from Mexican women with breast cancer at different stages and compared these with those of normal breast tissue samples. 32P-radiolabeled cDNA was synthesized by reverse transcription of mRNA from fresh sporadic breast tumor biopsies, as well as normal breast tissue. cDNA probes were hybridized to microarrays and expression levels registered using a phosphorimager. Expression levels of some genes were validated by real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemical assays. We identified two subgroups of tumors according to their expression profiles, probably related with cancer progression. Ten genes, unexpressed in normal tissue, were turned on in some tumors. We found consistent high expression of Bik gene in 14/15 tumors with predominant cytoplasmic distribution. Recently, the product of the Bik gene has been associated with tumoral reversion in different neoplasic cell lines, and was proposed as therapy to induce apoptosis in cancers, including breast tumors. Even though a relationship among genes, for example those from a particular pathway, can be observed through microarrays, this relationship might not be sufficient to assign a definitive role to Bik in development and progression of the neoplasia. The findings herein reported deserve further investigation

  20. Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV-like DNA sequences in the breast tumors of father, mother, and daughter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiernik Peter H

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diagnosis of late onset breast cancer in a father, mother, and daughter living in the same house for decades suggested the possibility of an environmental agent as a common etiological factor. Both molecular and epidemiological data have indicated a possible role for the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV, the etiological agent of breast cancer in mice, in a certain percentage of human breast tumors. The aim of this study was to determine if MMTV might be involved in the breast cancer of this cluster of three family members. Results MMTV-like envelope (env and long terminal repeat (LTR sequences containing the MMTV superantigen gene (sag were detected in the malignant tissues of all three family members. The amplified env gene sequences were 98.0%–99.6% homologous to the MMTV env sequences found in the GR, C3H, and BR6 mouse strains. The amplified LTR sequences containing sag sequences segregated to specific branches of the MMTV phylogenetic tree and did not form a distinct branch of their own. Conclusion The presence of MMTV-like DNA sequences in the malignant tissues of all three family members suggests the possibility of MMTV as an etiological agent. Phylogenetic data suggest that the MMTV-like DNA sequences are mouse and not human derived and that the ultimate reservoir of MMTV is most likely the mouse. Although the route by which these family members came to be infected with MMTV is unknown, the possibility exists that such infection may have resulted from a shared exposure to mice.

  1. Tumor Cells Express FcγRl Which Contributes to Tumor Cell Growth and a Metastatic Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    M. Bud Nelson; Nyhus, Julie K; Oravecz-Wilson, Katherine I; Emilio Barbera-Guillem

    2001-01-01

    High levels of circulating immune complexes containing tumor-associated antigens are associated with a poor prognosis for individuals with cancer. The ability of B cells, previously exposed to tumor-associated antigens, to promote both in vitro and in vivo tumor growth formed the rationale to evaluate the mechanism by which immune complexes may promote tumor growth. In elucidating this mechanism, FcγRl expression by tumor cells was characterized by flow cytometry, polymerase chain reaction, a...

  2. Tumor Cells Express FcγRI Which Contributes to Tumor Cell Growth and a Metastatic Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, M. Bud; Nyhus, Julie K; Oravecz-Wilson, Katherine I; Barbera-Guillem, Emilio

    2001-01-01

    High levels of circulating immune complexes containing tumor-associated antigens are associated with a poor prognosis for individuals with cancer. The ability of B cells, previously exposed to tumor-associated antigens, to promote both in vitro and in vivo tumor growth formed the rationale to evaluate the mechanism by which immune complexes may promote tumor growth. In elucidating this mechanism, FcγRI expression by tumor cells was characterized by flow cytometry, polymerase chain reaction, a...

  3. Identification of a panel of tumor-associated antigens from breast carcinoma cell lines, solid tumors and testis cDNA libraries displayed on lambda phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cianfriglia Maurizio

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor-associated antigens recognized by humoral effectors of the immune system are a very attractive target for human cancer diagnostics and therapy. Recent advances in molecular techniques have led to molecular definition of immunogenic tumor proteins based on their reactivity with autologous patient sera (SEREX. Methods Several high complexity phage-displayed cDNA libraries from breast carcinomas, human testis and breast carcinoma cell lines MCF-7, MDA-MB-468 were constructed. The cDNAs were expressed in the libraries as fusion to bacteriophage lambda protein D. Lambda-displayed libraries were efficiently screened with sera from patients with breast cancer. Results A panel of 21 clones representing 18 different antigens, including eight proteins of unknown function, was identified. Three of these antigens (T7-1, T11-3 and T11-9 were found to be overexpressed in tumors as compared to normal breast. A serological analysis of the 21 different antigens revealed a strong cancer-related profile for at least five clones (T6-2, T6-7, T7-1, T9-21 and T9-27. Conclusions Preliminary results indicate that patient serum reactivity against five of the antigens is associated with tumor disease. The novel T7-1 antigen, which is overexpressed in breast tumors and recognized specifically by breast cancer patient sera, is potentially useful in cancer diagnosis.

  4. Identification of a panel of tumor-associated antigens from breast carcinoma cell lines, solid tumors and testis cDNA libraries displayed on lambda phage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor-associated antigens recognized by humoral effectors of the immune system are a very attractive target for human cancer diagnostics and therapy. Recent advances in molecular techniques have led to molecular definition of immunogenic tumor proteins based on their reactivity with autologous patient sera (SEREX). Several high complexity phage-displayed cDNA libraries from breast carcinomas, human testis and breast carcinoma cell lines MCF-7, MDA-MB-468 were constructed. The cDNAs were expressed in the libraries as fusion to bacteriophage lambda protein D. Lambda-displayed libraries were efficiently screened with sera from patients with breast cancer. A panel of 21 clones representing 18 different antigens, including eight proteins of unknown function, was identified. Three of these antigens (T7-1, T11-3 and T11-9) were found to be overexpressed in tumors as compared to normal breast. A serological analysis of the 21 different antigens revealed a strong cancer-related profile for at least five clones (T6-2, T6-7, T7-1, T9-21 and T9-27). Preliminary results indicate that patient serum reactivity against five of the antigens is associated with tumor disease. The novel T7-1 antigen, which is overexpressed in breast tumors and recognized specifically by breast cancer patient sera, is potentially useful in cancer diagnosis

  5. Immunolocalization of BRCA1 protein in tumor breast tissue: prescreening of BRCA1 mutation in Tunisian patients with hereditary breast cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Troudi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available BRCA1 is a tumor suppressor gene which is inactivated by mutation in familial breast and ovarian cancers. Over 300 different disease causing germ-line mutations have been described; 60% are unique to an individual family. This diversity and the large size of the gene lead us to search for a prescreening method for BRCA1 mutations. Since BRCA1 is a nuclear protein in normal cells, but reported by some authors to be cytoplasmic in breast tumor cells of patients with BRCA1 mutation, we evaluated immunohistochemistry as a prescreening technique to identify BRCA1 mutations in patients with familial presentation of breast cancer. Using a monoclonal antibody against the carboxy-terminal region of BRCA1, we performed immunohistochemistry on 18 tumor samples from patients with hereditary breast cancer. Cytoplasmic staining of BRCA1 was observed in 10 cases. Of the 18 tumors, 12 (66% showed either BRCA mutation or BRCA1 accumulation or both, indicating that BRCA1 function might be lost in breast tumor cells not only through mutation, but also via abnormal cytoplasmic location. The immunohistochemical test used in this study would not be efficient as a pre-screening method of deleterious mutations, but it appeared useful to investigate tumor physiology.

  6. MTUS1 tumor suppressor and its miRNA regulators in fibroadenoma and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Murat; Kaplan, Mehmet; Bozgeyik, Ibrahim; Ozcan, Onder; Celik, Ozgur Ilhan; Bozgeyik, Esra; Yumrutas, Onder

    2016-08-10

    Breast cancer is major public health problem predominantly effects female population. Current therapeutic approaches to deal with breast cancer are still lack of effectiveness. Thus, identifying/developing novel strategies to fight against breast cancer is very important. The frequent deletions at 8p21.3-22 chromosomal location nearby D8S254 marker enabled the discovery of a novel tumor suppressor gene, MTUS1. Subsequently, MTUS1 was demonstrated to be less expressed in a variety cancer types including breast cancer. Also, it is obvious that gene expression is widely regulated by miRNAs. Here, we aimed to report differential expression of MTUS1 and its regulatory miRNAs in breast cancer and fibroadenoma tissues. Dynamic analysis of MTUS1 expression levels and its miRNAs regulators were attained by Fluidigm 96×96 Dynamic Array Expression chips and reactions were performed in Fluidigm BioMark™ HD System qPCR. Consequently, MTUS1 mRNA levels were significantly diminished in breast cancer tissues and elevated in fibroadenoma tissues. Also, among MTUS1 targeting miRNAs, miR-183-5p was identified to be overexpressed in breast cancer and down-regulated in fibroadenoma tissues. Also, expression levels of MTUS1 and miR-183-5p were well correlated with clinical parameters. In particular, MTUS1 expression was found to be diminished and miR-183-5p expression was elevated with the advancing stage. In conclusion, as a potential therapeutic target, miR-183-5p can be a chief regulator of MTUS1 and MTUS1-miR-183-5p axis may have significant influence in the pathology of breast cancer. PMID:27155522

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells mediate the clinical phenotype of inflammatory breast cancer in a preclinical model

    OpenAIRE

    Lacerda, Lara; Debeb, Bisrat G; Smith, Daniel; Larson, Richard; Solley, Travis; Xu, Wei; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Gong, Yun; Levy, Lawrence B; Buchholz, Thomas; Ueno, Naoto T.; Klopp, Ann; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is an aggressive type of breast cancer, characterized by very rapid progression, enlargement of the breast, skin edema causing an orange peel appearance (peau d’orange), erythema, thickening, and dermal lymphatic invasion. It is characterized by E-cadherin overexpression in the primary and metastatic disease, but to date no robust molecular features that specifically identify IBC have been reported. Further, models that recapitulate all of these c...

  8. Early identification of non-responding locally advanced breast tumors receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Giessen, Martijn; Schaafsma, Boudewijn E.; Charehbili, Ayoub; Smit, Vincent T. H. B. M.; Kroep, Judith R.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan; Chan, Alan; Löwik, Clemens W. G. M.; Dijkstra, Jouke; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Wasser, Martin N. J. M.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2015-02-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) may be advantageous for monitoring tumor response during chemotherapy treatment, particularly in the early treatment stages. In this paper we perform a second analysis on the data of a clinical trial with 25 breast cancer patients that received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Patients were monitored using delayed contrast enhanced MRI and additionally with diffuse optical spectroscopy at baseline, after 1 cycle of chemotherapy, halfway therapy and before surgery. In this analysis hemoglobin content between tumor tissue and healthy tissue of the same breast is compared on all four monitoring time points. Furthermore, the predictive power of the tumor-healthy tissue difference of HbO2 for non-responder prediction is assessed. The difference in HbO2 content between tumor and healthy tissue was statistically significantly higher in responding tumors than in non-responding tumors at baseline (10.88 vs -0.57 μM, P=0.014) and after one cycle of chemotherapy (6.45 vs -1.31 μM, P=0.048). Before surgery this difference had diminished. In the data of this study, classification on the HbO2 difference between tumor and healthy tissue was able to predict tumor (non-)response at baseline and after 1 cycle with an area-under-curve of 0.95 and 0.88, respectively. While this result suggests that tumor response can be predicted before chemotherapy onset, one should be very careful with interpreting these results. A larger patient population is needed to confirm this finding.

  9. The radiological appearances and pathological features of phyllodes tumor of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the radiological appearances and pathological features and enhance thc knowledge of phyllodes tumor (PT) of the breast. Methods: The radiological appearances and pathological features of 13 patients with pathologically proved PT were analyzed retrospectively. Both radiological findings and pathological classification were conducted with double blind method. Results: The radiological findings in 13 PT patients were circular, often with lobulated borders. In 9 cases, the tumors were with smooth borders and were surrounded by a clear halo (complete capsule could been seen in pathology), of them 6 were low grade and 3 were middle grade. In 4 cases, part of tumor margin was poorly defined (part of tumor infiltrated growth could been seen in pathology in 3 cases), of them 3 were middle or high grade malignancy, 1 was low grade. In 8 cases with tumor measured less than 5 cm in diameter, middle and high grade malignancy was seen in 5 cases. In 5 cases tumors measured 5.0 - 10.0 cm in diameter, low grade malignancy was seen in 4 cases. Conclusion: A loblated large mass in the breast with a clear halo was the features of PT, but it had no characteristics. In middle-aged women, the mass with rapid growth help establish the diagnosis. The radiological appearances of the tumor appear to be related to its pathological classification, an unclear borderline of the tumor may indicate a high degree of malignancy, but the sign is unreliable. Size of the tumor does not appear to be related to its pathological classification. The diagnosis still depends on the histopathological examination

  10. Inhibition of Mouse Breast Tumor-Initiating Cells by Calcitriol and Dietary Vitamin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Youngtae; Swami, Srilatha; Krishnan, Aruna V; Williams, Jasmaine D; Martin, Shanique; Horst, Ronald L; Albertelli, Megan A; Feldman, Brian J; Feldman, David; Diehn, Maximilian

    2015-08-01

    The anticancer actions of vitamin D and its hormonally active form, calcitriol, have been extensively documented in clinical and preclinical studies. However, the mechanisms underlying these actions have not been completely elucidated. Here, we examined the effect of dietary vitamin D and calcitriol on mouse breast tumor-initiating cells (TICs, also known as cancer stem cells). We focused on MMTV-Wnt1 mammary tumors, for which markers for isolating TICs have previously been validated. We confirmed that these tumors expressed functional vitamin D receptors and estrogen receptors (ER) and exhibited calcitriol-induced molecular responses including ER downregulation. Following orthotopic implantation of MMTV-Wnt1 mammary tumor cells into mice, calcitriol injections or a vitamin D-supplemented diet caused a striking delay in tumor appearance and growth, whereas a vitamin D-deficient diet accelerated tumor appearance and growth. Calcitriol inhibited TIC tumor spheroid formation in a dose-dependent manner in primary cultures and inhibited TIC self-renewal in secondary passages. A combination of calcitriol and ionizing radiation inhibited spheroid formation more than either treatment alone. Further, calcitriol significantly decreased TIC frequency as evaluated by in vivo limiting dilution analyses. Calcitriol inhibition of TIC spheroid formation could be overcome by the overexpression of β-catenin, suggesting that the inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin pathway is an important mechanism mediating the TIC inhibitory activity of calcitriol in this tumor model. Our findings indicate that vitamin D compounds target breast TICs reducing tumor-initiating activity. Our data also suggest that combining vitamin D compounds with standard therapies may enhance anticancer activity and improve therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25934710

  11. Expression of Fas (CD95/APO-1) ligand by human breast cancers: significance for tumor immune privilege.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, J

    2012-02-03

    Breast cancers have been shown to elicit tumor-specific immune responses. As in other types of cancer, the antitumor immune response fails to contain breast tumor growth, and a reduction in both the quantity and cytotoxic effectiveness of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) is associated with a poorer prognosis. Fas ligand (FasL) induces apoptotic death of activated lymphocytes that express its cell surface receptor, FasR (CD95\\/APO-1). FasL-mediated apoptosis of activated lymphocytes contributes to normal immune downregulation through its roles in tolerance acquisition, immune response termination, and maintenance of immune privilege in the eye, testis, and fetus. In this report, we demonstrate that breast carcinomas express FasL. Using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, we show that breast tumors constitutively express FasL at both the mRNA and protein levels, respectively. FasL expression is prevalent in breast cancer: 100% of breast tumors (17 of 17) were found to express FasL, and expression occurred over more than 50% of the tumor area in all cases. By immunohistochemistry, FasR was found to be coexpressed with FasL throughout large areas of all the breast tumors. This suggests that the tumor cells had acquired intracellular defects in FasL-mediated apoptotic signaling. FasL and FasR expression were independent of tumor type or infiltrative capacity. FasL expressed by tumor cells has previously been shown to kill Fas-sensitive lymphoid cells in vitro and has been associated with apoptosis of TILs in vivo. We conclude that mammary carcinomas express FasL in vivo as a potential inhibitor of the antitumor immune response.

  12. Decreased Autocrine EGFR Signaling in Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells Inhibits Tumor Growth in Bone and Mammary Fat Pad

    OpenAIRE

    Nickerson, Nicole K.; Mohammad, Khalid S.; Gilmore, Jennifer L.; Crismore, Erin; Bruzzaniti, Angela; Guise, Theresa A.; Foley, John

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasis to bone triggers a vicious cycle of tumor growth linked to osteolysis. Breast cancer cells and osteoblasts express the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and produce ErbB family ligands, suggesting participation of these growth factors in autocrine and paracrine signaling within the bone microenvironment. EGFR ligand expression was profiled in the bone metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells (MDA-231), and agonist-induced signaling was examined in both breast cancer and oste...

  13. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R prevents experimental human breast cancer bone metastasis in nude mice

    OpenAIRE

    Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Zhang, Yong; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Uehara, Fuminari; Yamamoto, Mako; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Kimura, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Bouvet, Michael; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Hoffman, Robert M.; Ming ZHAO

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a lethal and morbid late stage of breast cancer that is currently treatment resistant. More effective mouse models and treatment are necessary. High bone-metastatic variants of human breast cancer cells were selected in nude mice by cardiac injection. After cardiac injection of a high bone-metastatic variant of breast cancer, all untreated mice had bone metastases compared to only 20% with parental cells. Treatment with tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R completely...

  14. TGFβ and Hypoxia Drive Breast Cancer Bone Metastases through Parallel Signaling Pathways in Tumor Cells and the Bone Microenvironment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lauren K. DUNN; Pierrick G.J. FOURNIE; Khalid S. MOHAMMAD; C. Ryan MCKENNA; Holly W. DAVIS; Maria NIEWOLNA; Xianghong PENG; John M. CHIRGWIN; Theresa A.GUISE

    2009-01-01

    @@ Breast cancers frequently metastasize to bone, a site of hypoxia and high concentrations of active TGFβ. Skeletal metastases involve interactions between tumor and bone cells driven by locally secreted proteins, many of which are increased by hypoxia and TGFβ.

  15. Adipocyte hypoxia promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related gene expression and estrogen receptor-negative phenotype in breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yao-Borengasser, Aiwei; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Hedges, Rebecca A.; ROGERS, LORA J; KADLUBAR, SUSAN A; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The development of breast cancer is linked to the loss of estrogen receptor (ER) during the course of tumor progression, resulting in loss of responsiveness to hormonal treatment. The mechanisms underlying dynamic ERα gene expression change in breast cancer remain unclear. A range of physiological and biological changes, including increased adipose tissue hypoxia, accompanies obesity. Hypoxia in adipocytes can establish a pro-malignancy environment in breast tissues. Epidemiological studies h...

  16. Breast Cancer Disparities: A Multicenter Comparison of Tumor Diagnosis, Characteristics, and Surgical Treatment in China and the U.S.

    OpenAIRE

    Sivasubramaniam, Priya G.; Zhang, Bai-Lin; Zhang, Qian; Smith, Jennifer S.; Zhang, Bin; Tang, Zhong-Hua; Chen, Guo-Ji; Xie, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Xiao-Zhou; Yang, Hong-jian; He, Jian-Jun; Hui LI; Li, Jia-Yuan; Fan, Jin-Hu; Qiao, You-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Incidence rates for breast cancer continue to rise in the People’s Republic of China. The purpose of this study was to analyze differences in characteristics of breast malignancies between China and the U.S. Chinese women were diagnosed at younger ages with higher stage and larger tumors and underwent more aggressive surgical treatment. Prospective trials should be conducted to address screening, surgical, and tumor discrepancies between China and the U.S.

  17. Infrared imaging of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line phenotypes in 2D and 3D cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolina, Margarita; Goormaghtigh, Erik

    2015-04-01

    One current challenge in the field of breast cancer infrared imaging is the identification of carcinoma cell subtypes in the tissue. Neither sequencing nor immunochemistry is currently able to provide a cell by cell thorough classification. The latter is needed to build accurate statistical models capable of recognizing the diversity of breast cancer cell lines that may be present in a tissue section. One possible approach for overcoming this problem is to obtain the IR spectral signature of well-characterized tumor cell lines in culture. Cultures in three-dimensional matrices appear to generate an environment that mimics better the in vivo environment. There are, at present, series of breast cancer cell lines that have been thoroughly characterized in two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) cultures by full transcriptomics analyses. In this work, we describe the methods used to grow, to process, and to characterize a triple-negative breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, in 3D laminin-rich extracellular matrix (lrECM) culture and compare it with traditional monolayer cultures and tissue sections. While unsupervised analyses did not completely separate spectra of cells grown in 2D from 3D lrECM cultures, a supervised statistical analysis resulted in an almost perfect separation. When IR spectral responses of epithelial tumor cells from clinical triple-negative breast carcinoma samples were added to these data, a principal component analysis indicated that they cluster closer to the spectra of 3D culture cells than to the spectra of cells grown on a flat plastic substrata. This result is encouraging because of correlating well-characterized cell line features with clinical biopsies. PMID:25568895

  18. Bromine-77-labeled estrogen receptor-binding radiopharmaceuticals for breast tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two derivatives of 16α-bromoestradiol, both with and without an 11β-methoxy substituent, have been labeled with bromine-77 and evaluated as potential breast tumor imaging agents. Extensive characterization of these radiotracers in animal models has demonstrated their effective concentration in estrogen target tissues. Preliminary clinical studies have demonstrated the potential of radiolabeled estrogens for breast tumor imaging; however, the suboptimal decay properties of bromine-77 limit the utility of these agents in imaging studies. These results with 77-Br-labeled estrogens suggest that estrogen derivatives labeled with other radionuclides should provide enhanced image resolution with various imaging devices. Although the decay characteristics of bromine-77 are such that it is not ideally suited to imaging with conventional gamma cameras, it may be a useful radionuclide for therapeutic applications

  19. Improvement in breast tumor discrimination by support vector machines and speckle-emphasis texture analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ruey-Feng; Wu, Wen-Jie; Moon, Woo Kyung; Chen, Dar-Ren

    2003-05-01

    Recent statistics show that breast cancer is a major cause of death among women in developed countries. Hence, finding an accurate and effective diagnostic method is very important. In this paper, we propose a high precision computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for sonography. We utilize a support vector machine (SVM) to classify breast tumors according to their texture information surrounding speckle pixels. We test our system with 250 pathologically-proven breast tumors including 140 benign and 110 malignant ones. Also we compare the diagnostic performances of three texture features, i.e., speckle-emphasis texture feature, nonspeckle-emphasis texture feature and conventional all pixels texture feature, applied to breast sonography using SVM. In our experiment, the accuracy of SVM with speckle information for classifying malignancies is 93.2% (233/250), the sensitivity is 95.45% (105/110), the specificity is 91.43% (128/140), the positive predictive value is 89.74% (105/117) and the negative predictive value is 96.24% (128/133). Based on the experimental results, speckle phenomenon is a useful tool to be used in computer-aided diagnosis; its performance is better than those of the other two features. Speckle phenomenon, which is considered as noise in sonography, can intrude into judgments of a physician using naked eyes but it is another story for application in a computer-aided diagnosis algorithm. PMID:12754067

  20. Tumor markers in breast cancer - European Group on Tumor Markers recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Molina, Rafael; Barak, Vivian; van Dalen, Arie; Duffy, Michael J.; Einarsson, Roland; Gion, Massimo; Goike, Helena; Lamerz, Rolf; Nap, Marius; Sölétormos, György; Stieber, Petra

    2005-01-01

    Recommendations are presented for the routine clinical use of serum and tissue-based markers in the diagnosis and management of patients with breast cancer. Their low sensitivity and specificity preclude the use of serum markers such as the MUC-1 mucin glycoproteins ( CA 15.3, BR 27.29) and carcinoembryonic antigen in the diagnosis of early breast cancer. However, serial measurement of these markers can result in the early detection of recurrent disease as well as indicate the efficacy of the...

  1. Activated FXR Inhibits Leptin Signaling and Counteracts Tumor-promoting Activities of Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts in Breast Malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Cinzia; Barone, Ines; Vircillo, Valentina; Panza, Salvatore; Malivindi, Rocco; Gelsomino, Luca; Pellegrino, Michele; Rago, Vittoria; Mauro, Loredana; Lanzino, Marilena; Panno, Maria Luisa; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Catalano, Stefania; Andò, Sebastiano

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the principal components of the tumor stroma, play a central role in cancer development and progression. As an important regulator of the crosstalk between breast cancer cells and CAFs, the cytokine leptin has been associated to breast carcinogenesis. The nuclear Farnesoid X Receptor-(FXR) seems to exert an oncosuppressive role in different tumors, including breast cancer. Herein, we demonstrated, for the first time, that the synthetic FXR agonist GW4064, inhibiting leptin signaling, affects the tumor-promoting activities of CAFs in breast malignancy. GW4064 inhibited growth, motility and invasiveness induced by leptin as well as by CAF-conditioned media in different breast cancer cell lines. These effects rely on the ability of activated FXR to increase the expression of the suppressor of the cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) leading to inhibition of leptin-activated signaling and downregulation of leptin-target genes. In vivo xenograft studies, using MCF-7 cells alone or co-injected with CAFs, showed that GW4064 administration markedly reduced tumor growth. Interestingly, GW4064-treated tumors exhibited decreased levels of leptin-regulated proteins along with a strong staining intensity for SOCS3. Thus, FXR ligands might represent an emerging potential anti-cancer therapy able to block the tumor supportive role of activated fibroblasts within the breast microenvironment. PMID:26899873

  2. Correlation of primary tumor FDG uptake with clinicopathologic prognostic factors in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation of primary tumor FDG uptake to clinicopathological prognostic factors in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. We retrospectively reviewed 136 of 215 female patients with pathologically proven invasive ductal breast cancer from January 2008 to December 2011 who underwent F-18 FDG PET/CT for initial staging and follow-up after curative treatment with analysis of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epithelial growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of the primary breast tumor was measured and compared with hormonal receptor and HER2 overexpression status. The high SUVmax of primary breast tumors is significantly correlated with the clinicopathological factors: tumor size, histologic grade, TNM stage, negativity of ER, negativity of PR, HER2 overexpression and triple negativity. The recurrent group with non-triple negative cancer had a higher SUVmax compared with the non-recurrent group, though no significant difference in FDG uptake was noted between the recurrence and non-recurrent groups in subjects with triple-negative cancer. Lymph node involvement was the independent risk factor for cancer recurrence in the multivariate analysis. In conclusion, high FDG uptake in primary breast tumors is significantly correlated with clinicopathological factors, such as tumor size, histologic grade, TNM stage, negativity of the hormonal receptor, HER2 overexpression and triple negativity. Therefore, FDG PET/CT is a helpful prognostic tool to direct the further management of patients with breast cancer

  3. Biomarker and Phenotypic Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Lymphedema | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

     DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Lymphedema (LE) following treatment for breast cancer is the most common form of secondary LE in the industrialized world. It occurs in 20% to 87% of patients following treatment for breast cancer and results in significant disability. At the |

  4. Fibroblasts induce epithelial to mesenchymal transition in breast tumor cells which is prevented by fibroblasts treatment with histamine in high concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porretti, Juliana C; Mohamad, Nora A; Martín, Gabriela A; Cricco, Graciela P

    2014-06-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of cancer cells is an essential process in cancer progression. Cancer cells that undergone EMT loose cell-cell contacts, acquire mesenchymal properties and develop migratory and invasive abilities. In previous studies we have demonstrated that histamine may modify the invasive phenotype of pancreatic and mammary tumor cells. In this work we proposed to investigate whether histamine may also influence the interaction between tumor cells and normal fibroblasts. The potential activation of normal CCD-1059Sk fibroblasts by histamine and EMT phenotypic changes induced in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast tumor cells by the conditioned media (CM) derived from fibroblasts were evaluated. Initially, we determined the presence of H1, H2 and H4 histamine receptors and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) mRNA in CCD-1059Sk fibroblasts. MMP2 gelatinolytic activity, cell migration and alpha-smooth muscle actin expression were increased in fibroblasts by low doses (histamine. MCF-7 cells cultured with CM from fibroblasts exhibited spindle-shaped morphology, cell spreading and cytoplasmic expression of β-catenin but there was no change in MMP2 activity and cell migration. MDA-MB-231 cells cultured with CM from fibroblasts showed a more elongated phenotype, cell spreading, cytoplasmic β-catenin, increased MMP2 activity and endogenous TGF-β1 expression, and enhanced cell migration and invasion. Notably, all these features were reversed when mammary tumor cells were cultured with CM from fibroblasts treated with 20μM histamine. In conclusion, high doses of histamine may prevent the activation of fibroblasts and also avert the EMT related changes induced in epithelial tumor cells by fibroblasts CM. PMID:24685678

  5. Phosphoprotein Secretome of Tumor Cells as a Source of Candidates for Breast Cancer Biomarkers in Plasma*

    OpenAIRE

    Zawadzka, Anna M.; Schilling, Birgit; Cusack, Michael P.; Sahu, Alexandria K.; Drake, Penelope; Fisher, Susan J.; Benz, Christopher C.; Gibson, Bradford W.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease whose molecular diversity is not well reflected in clinical and pathological markers used for prognosis and treatment selection. As tumor cells secrete proteins into the extracellular environment, some of these proteins reach circulation and could become suitable biomarkers for improving diagnosis or monitoring response to treatment. As many signaling pathways and interaction networks are altered in cancerous tissues by protein phosphorylation, changes...

  6. p53 Mutation analysis in breast tumors by a DNA microarray method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennis, Meredith; Krishnan, Shiva; Bonner, Matthew; Ambrosone, Christine B; Vena, John E; Moysich, Kirsten; Swede, Helen; McCann, Susan; Hall, Per; Shields, Peter G; Freudenheim, Jo L

    2006-01-01

    The p53 gene acts as a regulator of cell growth and DNA repair in normal cells; inactivation of the gene seems to lead to cancer. It is the most commonly mutated gene in human cancers, and a high-throughput sequencing method is needed for cancer etiology studies using large sample sets. In our population-based case-control study of breast cancer, the p53 gene was amplified by PCR for 392 subjects from seven hospitals in Western New York using the Affymetrix GeneChip technology. One hundred thirty-eight (35%) of the breast tumors had p53 mutations, of which 88% were located in exons 5 to 8. New hotspots were identified at codons 179, 195, 196, 213, 217, 249, 254, 278, 281, and 298, and previously reported hotspots were found at codons 175, 248, and 273. Manual sequencing for exons 5 to 9 of the p53 gene was done for 139 tumors to validate the Affymetrix assay. The two methods had 100% concordance for mutations detectable by the Affymetrix assay. We also successfully assayed paraffin-embedded breast and lung tumors from as early as 1958 and employed a nested PCR strategy to improve weak PCR amplification. To have statistical power, the investigation of gene environment interactions and cancer requires a large number of tumor analyses, which are frequently only available from archived tissue from multiple sources. We have shown the utility of the Affymetrix GeneChip method under these challenging conditions and provided new data for the mutational spectra of breast cancer in a population-based study. PMID:16434591

  7. Breast cancer as photodynamic therapy target: Enhanced therapeutic efficiency by overview of tumor complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Lamberti, María Julia; Vittar, Natalia Belén Rumie; RIVAROLA, VIVIANA ALICIA

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a minimally invasive and clinically approved procedure for eliminating selected malignant cells with specific light activation of a photosensitizer agent. Whereas interstitial and intra-operative approaches have been investigated for the ablation of a broad range of superficial or bulky solid tumors such as breast cancer, the majority of approved photodynamic therapy protocols are for the treatment of superficial lesions of skin and luminal organs. This review article ...

  8. Relevance of Echo-Structure and Texture Features: An Application in Ultrasound Breast Tumor Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal Raghunath; Mullick, Jhinuk Basu; KV, Dr. Rajagopal;

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Echostructure is an essential parameter for the evaluation of circumscribed lesions and can be described as a texture feature on ultrasound images. Present study evaluates the possibility of distinguishing between benign and malignant breast tumors using various texture features. Materials a...... only are the shape and size but also the echo structure of the mass is important. This technique can be considered as assistance to the radiologist to provide additional information in differentiation of benign from malignant findings....

  9. Glucosamine-Bound Near-Infrared Fluorescent Probes with Lysosomal Specificity for Breast Tumor Imaging1

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Cong; Greenwood, Tiffany R; Glunde, Kristine

    2008-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of lysosomes will be useful 1) to elucidate the role of lysosomal parameters in cancer, 2) to diagnose malignant lesions, and 3) to evaluate future lysosome-targeted anticancer therapies. Lysosome-specific labeling of glucosamine-bound near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes, IR-1 and IR-2, but not control probe IR-15 without the glucosamine moiety, was observed by fluorescence microscopy in human breast epithelial cell lines. Lysosome labeling and tumor specificity of thes...

  10. Glucosamine-Bound Near-Infrared Fluorescent Probes with Lysosomal Specificity for Breast Tumor Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Cong Li; Greenwood, Tiffany R; Kristine Glunde

    2008-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of lysosomes will be useful 1) to elucidate the role of lysosomal parameters in cancer, 2) to diagnose malignant lesions, and 3) to evaluate future lysosome-targeted anticancer therapies. Lysosome-specific labeling of glucosamine-bound near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes, IR-1 and IR-2, but not control probe IR-15 without the glucosamine moiety, was observed by fluorescence microscopy in human breast epithelial cell lines. Lysosome labeling and tumor specificity of thes...

  11. Overexpression of calreticulin in malignant and benign breast tumors: relationship with humoral immunity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eric-Nikolic, A.; Milanovic, Z.; Sánchez, Daniel; Pekáriková, Aneta; Džodic, R.; Matic, I. Z.; Tučková, Ludmila; Jevric, M.; Buta, M.; Raškovic, S.; Juranic, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 1 (2012), s. 48-55. ISSN 0030-2414 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500200709; GA MŠk 2B06155; GA ČR GD310/08/H077 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Breast tumor * Calreticulin * ELISA anti-calreticulin antibodies Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.165, year: 2012

  12. NOTCH2 in breast cancer: association of SNP rs11249433 with gene expression in ER-positive breast tumors without TP53 mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambs Stefan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS has identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs11249433 in the 1p11.2 region as a novel genetic risk factor for breast cancer, and this association was stronger in patients with estrogen receptor (ER+ versus ER- cancer. Results We found association between SNP rs11249433 and expression of the NOTCH2 gene located in the 1p11.2 region. Examined in 180 breast tumors, the expression of NOTCH2 was found to be lowest in tumors with TP53 mutations and highest in TP53 wild-type/ER+ tumors (p = 0.0059. In the latter group, the NOTCH2 expression was particularly increased in carriers of the risk genotypes (AG/GG of rs11249433 when compared to the non-risk AA genotype (p = 0.0062. Similar association between NOTCH2 expression and rs11249433 was observed in 60 samples of purified monocytes from healthy controls (p = 0.015, but not in total blood samples from 302 breast cancer patients and 76 normal breast tissue samples. We also identified the first possible dominant-negative form of NOTCH2, a truncated version of NOTCH2 consisting of only the extracellular domain. Conclusion This is the first study to show that the expression of NOTCH2 differs in subgroups of breast tumors and by genotypes of the breast cancer-associated SNP rs11249433. The NOTCH pathway has key functions in stem cell differentiation of ER+ luminal cells in the breast. Therefore, increased expression of NOTCH2 in carriers of rs11249433 may promote development of ER+ luminal tumors. Further studies are needed to investigate possible mechanisms of regulation of NOTCH2 expression by rs11249433 and the role of NOTCH2 splicing forms in breast cancer development.

  13. How to Boost the Breast Tumor Bed? A Multidisciplinary Approach in Eight Steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To describe a new procedure for breast radiotherapy that will improve tumor bed localization and radiotherapy treatment using a multidisciplinary approach. Patients and Methods: This pilot study was conducted by departments of radiation oncology, surgery, and radiology. A new procedure has been implemented, summarized as eight steps: from pre-surgery contrast CT to surgery, tumor bed planning target volume (PTV) determination, and finally breast and tumor bed irradiation. Results: Twenty patients presenting with T1N0M0 tumors were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent lumpectomy with the placement of surgical clips in the tumor bed region. During surgery, 1 to 5 clips were placed in the lumpectomy cavity before the plastic procedure. All patients underwent pre- and postoperative CT scans in the treatment position. The two sets of images were registered with a match-point registration. All volumes were contoured and the results evaluated. The PTV included the clips region, the gross tumor volume, and the surgical scar, with an overall margin of 5-10 mm in all directions, corresponding to localization and setup uncertainties. For each patient the boost PTV was discussed and compared with our standard forward-planned PTV. Conclusions: We demonstrate the feasibility of a tumor bed localization and treatment procedure that seems adaptable to routine practice. Our study shows the advantages of a multidisciplinary approach for tumor bed localization and treatment. The use of more than 1 clip associated with pre- to postoperative CT image registration allows better definition of the PTV boost volume

  14. Targeting breast cancer stem cells by dendritic cell vaccination in humanized mice with breast tumor: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Phuc Van; Le, Hanh Thi; Vu, Binh Thanh; Pham, Viet Quoc; Le, Phong Minh; Phan, Nhan Lu-Chinh; Trinh, Ngu Van; Nguyen, Huyen Thi-Lam; Nguyen, Sinh Truong; Nguyen, Toan Linh; Phan, Ngoc Kim

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer (BC) is one of the leading cancers in women. Recent progress has enabled BC to be cured with high efficiency. However, late detection or metastatic disease often renders the disease untreatable. Additionally, relapse is the main cause of death in BC patients. Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) are considered to cause the development of BC and are thought to be responsible for metastasis and relapse. This study aimed to target BCSCs using dendritic cells (DCs) to treat tumor-bearing humanized mice models. Materials and methods NOD/SCID mice were used to produce the humanized mice by transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells. Human BCSCs were injected into the mammary fat pad to produce BC humanized mice. Both hematopoietic stem cells and DCs were isolated from the human umbilical cord blood, and immature DCs were produced from cultured mononuclear cells. DCs were matured by BCSC-derived antigen incubation for 48 hours. Mature DCs were vaccinated to BC humanized mice with a dose of 106 cells/mice, and the survival percentage was monitored in both treated and untreated groups. Results The results showed that DC vaccination could target BCSCs and reduce the tumor size and prolong survival. Conclusion These results suggested that targeting BCSCs with DCs is a promising therapy for BC. PMID:27499638

  15. Early ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences after breast conservation affect survival: An analysis of the National Cancer Institute randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast-conservation therapy (BCT) on survival. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-one women were randomized to BCT. Patients with an IBTR were analyzed to determine survival. Analysis was performed with Kaplan-Meier estimates, log-rank tests, and time-dependent covariate Cox models. Results: At a median follow-up of 18.4 years, 27 patients had an IBTR. The median survival time after IBTR was 13.1 years. The 5-year survival rate was 91.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 81.5-100%). The 10-year survival rate was 54.3% (95% CI, 35.8-82.6%). According to a Cox model with time-dependent covariates, the hazard ratio or relative risk of dying for those with an IBTR at <5.3 years after BCT relative to patients without an IBTR after BCT is 1.47 (95% CI, 1.02-2.12%; p = 0.04). The hazard ratio for those who relapse after 5.3 years is 0.59 (95% CI, 0.22-1.61%; p = 0.31). Age at randomization, original tumor size, and the presence of positive regional nodes at initial presentation were not found to be associated with decreased survival. Conclusions: There seems to be a significant association of early IBTR after BCT with decreased survival. Local control should be maximized

  16. Expression level of novel tumor suppressor gene FATS is associated with the outcome of node positive breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun; GU Lin; ZHAO Lu-jun; ZHANG Xi-feng; QIU Li; LI Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Background Recently, we reported the identification of a previously uncharacterized and evolutionarily conserved gene, fragile-site associated tumor suppressor (FATS), at a frequently deleted region in irradiation (IR)-induced tumors.However, the role of FATS in breast cancer development and its clinical significance has not been defined. The aim of this study was to determine the role of FA7S in breast cancer development and to evaluate its clinical significance in breast cancer.Methods The expression level of FATS mRNA was determined in 106 breast carcinomas and 23 paired normal breast tissues using quantitative real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The relationship between FATS expression and clinicopathological parameters were also analyzed.Results The mRNA level of FATS was down-regulated in breast cancer compared with paired normal tissues. Low expression of FATS was correlated with high nuclear grade. There was a tendency to a favorable outcome for patients with high expression of FATS (P=0.346). However, low expression of FATS was associated with poor outcome of breast cancer patients with node positive (P=0.011). Furthermore, the mRNA level of FATS showed an independent value in predicting the outcome of breast cancer patients with positive lymph nodes.Conclusion FATS is involved in the carcinogenesis and development of breast cancer and could be a potential biomarker and prognostic factor for breast cancer therapy.

  17. Aberrant DNA methylation at genes associated with a stem cell-like phenotype in cholangiocarcinoma tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriraksa, Ruethairat; Zeller, Constanze; Dai, Wei; Siddiq, Afshan; Walley, Andrew J; Limpaiboon, Temduang; Brown, Robert

    2013-12-01

    Genetic abnormalities of cholangiocarcinoma have been widely studied; however, epigenomic changes related to cholangiocarcinogenesis have been less well characterized. We have profiled the DNA methylomes of 28 primary cholangiocarcinoma and six matched adjacent normal tissues using Infinium's HumanMethylation27 BeadChips with the aim of identifying gene sets aberrantly and epigenetically regulated in this tumor type. Using a linear model for microarray data, we identified 1610 differentially methylated autosomal CpG sites, with 809 hypermethylated (representing 603 genes) and 801 hypomethylated (representing 712 genes) in cholangiocarcinoma versus adjacent normal tissues (false-discovery rate ≤ 0.05). Gene ontology and gene set enrichment analyses identified gene sets significantly associated with hypermethylation at linked CpG sites in cholangiocarcinoma including homeobox genes and target genes of PRC2, EED, SUZ12, and histone H3 trimethylation at lysine 27. We confirmed frequent hypermethylation at the homeobox genes HOXA9 and HOXD9 by bisulfite pyrosequencing in a larger cohort of cholangiocarcinoma (n = 102). Our findings indicate a key role for hypermethylation of multiple CpG sites at genes associated with a stem cell-like phenotype as a common molecular aberration in cholangiocarcinoma. These data have implications for cholangiocarcinogenesis, as well as possible novel treatment options using histone methyltransferase inhibitors. PMID:24089088

  18. Downregulation of Smurf2, a tumor-suppressive ubiquitin ligase, in triple-negative breast cancers: Involvement of the RB-microRNA axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HECT family ubiquitin ligase Smurf2 regulates cell polarity, migration, division, differentiation and death, by targeting diverse substrates that are critical for receptor signaling, cytoskeleton, chromatin remodeling and transcription. Recent studies suggest that Smurf2 functions as a tumor suppressor in mice. However, no inactivating mutation of SMURF2 has been reported in human, and information about Smurf2 expression in human cancer remains limited or complicated. Here we demonstrate that Smurf2 expression is downregulated in human breast cancer tissues, especially of the triple-negative subtype, and address the mechanism of Smurf2 downregulation in triple-negative breast cancer cells. Human breast cancer tissues (47 samples expressing estrogen receptor (ER) and 43 samples with triple-negative status) were examined by immunohistochemistry for the expression of Smurf2. Ten widely-studied human breast cancer cell lines were examined for the expression of Smurf2. Furthermore, microRNA-mediated regulation of Smurf2 was investigated in triple-negative cancer cell lines. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that benign mammary epithelial cells expressed high levels of Smurf2, so did cells in ductal carcinomas in situ. In contrast, invasive ductal carcinomas showed focal or diffuse decrease in Smurf2 expression, which was observed more frequently in triple-negative tumors than in ER-positive tumors. Consistently, human triple-negative breast cancer cell lines such as BT549, MDA-MB-436, DU-4475 and MDA-MB-468 cells showed significantly lower expression of Smurf2 protein, compared to ER + or HER2+ cell lines. Studies using quantitative PCR and specific microRNA inhibitors indicated that increased expression of miR-15a, miR-15b, miR-16 and miR-128 was involved in Smurf2 downregulation in those triple-negative cancer cell lines, which have mutations in the retinoblastoma (RB) gene. Forced expression of RB increased levels of Smurf2 protein with concomitant decreases in

  19. Adipose progenitor cells increase fibronectin matrix strain and unfolding in breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased stiffness represents a hallmark of breast cancer that has been attributed to the altered physicochemical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, the role of fibronectin (Fn) in modulating the composition and mechanical properties of the tumor-associated ECM remains unclear. We have utilized a combination of biochemical and physical science tools to evaluate whether paracrine signaling between breast cancer cells and adipose progenitor cells regulates Fn matrix assembly and stiffness enhancement in the tumor stroma. In particular, we utilized fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging to map the molecular conformation and stiffness of Fn that has been assembled by 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in response to conditioned media from MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells. Our results reveal that soluble factors secreted by tumor cells promote Fn expression, unfolding, and stiffening by adipose progenitor cells and that transforming growth factor-β serves as a soluble cue underlying these changes. In vivo experiments using orthotopic co-transplantation of primary human adipose-derived stem cells and MDA-MB231 into SCID mice support the pathological relevance of our results. Insights gained by these studies advance our understanding of the role of Fn in mammary tumorigenesis and may ultimately lead to improved anti-cancer therapies

  20. Distribution of Selenium and Oxidative Stress in Breast Tumor-Bearing Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chung Chen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effects of breast tumors on the blood and tissue distribution of essential trace mineral selenium (Se, and oxidative stress status of mice. Female 10-week-old BALB/cByJNarl mice were randomly assigned into control (CNL and breast tumor-bearing (TB groups. TB mice were injected subcutaneously into the right hind thigh with 5 × 106 EMT6 mouse mammary tumor cells. After 22 days, we measured Se concentrations, Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase (GPx activities, and malondialdehyde (MDA products (indicator of oxidative stress in plasma, various tissues, and plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF concentrations. There were no significant differences in body weights and daily intake between both groups. Compared with the CNL group, TB mice have decreases in plasma Se concentrations and GPx activities, as well as higher plasma VEGF and MDA concentrations. Plasma Se concentrations were also negatively correlated with plasma MDA and VEGF concentrations. Furthermore, tissue Se concentrations and GPx activities in TB animals were lower; whereas the MDA concentrations higher in various tissues including liver, kidney, brain, lung, spleen, and thymic tissues. In conclusion, disruption of Se homeostasis critically reflects oxidative stress in target tissues, thus may increase the risk for progression of breast cancer and metastasis.

  1. Predicting local recurrence following breast-conserving treatment: parenchymal signal enhancement ratio (SER) around the tumor on preoperative MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Young; Cho, Nariya; Koo, Hye Ryoung; Yun, Bo La; Bae, Min Sun; Moon, Woo Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National Univ. Coll. of Medicine, Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], e-mail: river7774@gmail.com; Chie, Eui Kyu [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National Univ. Coll. of Medicine, Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    Background: The level of background parenchymal enhancement around tumor is known to be associated with breast cancer risk. However, there is no study investigating predictive power of parenchymal signal enhancement ratio (SER) around tumor for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Purpose: To investigate whether the breast parenchymal SER around the tumor on preoperative dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is associated with subsequent IBTR in breast cancer patients who had undergone breast-conserving treatment. Material and Methods: Nineteen consecutive women (mean age, 44 years; range, 34-63 years) with breast cancer who developed IBTR following breast-conserving treatment and 114 control women matched for age, as well as T and N stages were included. We compared the clinicopathologic features of the two groups including nuclear grade, histologic grade, hormonal receptor status, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) status, lymphovascular invasion, negative margin width, use of adjuvant therapy, and parenchymal SER around the tumor on preoperative DCE-MRI. The SER was measured on a slice showing the largest dimension of the tumor. Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent factors associated with IBTR. Results: In univariate analysis, ER negativity (odds ratio [OR] = 4.7; P = 0.040), PR negativity (OR = 4.0; P = 0.013), HER-2 positivity (OR = 3.6; P = 0.026), and a parenchymal SER greater than 0.53 (OR = 23.3; P = 0.011) were associated with IBTR. In multivariate analysis, ER negativity (OR = 3.8; P = 0.015) and a parenchymal SER greater than 0.53 (OR = 13.2; P = 0.040) on preoperative MRI were independent factors associated with IBTR. Conclusion: In addition to ER negativity, a higher parenchymal SER on preoperative MRI was an independent factor associated with subsequent IBTR in patients with breast cancer who had undergone breast-conserving treatment.

  2. Autoantibodies to Tailor-Made Panels of Tumor-Associated Antigens in Breast Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettie Piura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies (AAbs to tumor-associated antigens (TAAs have been identified in the sera of cancer patients. In a previous review published in this journal, we have focused on recent knowledge related to circulating AAbs to individual TAAs in breast carcinoma. This review will focus on recent knowledge related to AAb assays to tailor-made panels of TAAs in breast carcinoma. So far, AAb assays to the following tailor-made panels of TAAs have been assessed in breast carcinoma: (1 p53, c-myc, HER2, NY-ESO-1, BRCA2, and MUC1, (2 IMP1, p62, Koc, p53, c-MYC, cyclin B1, and survivin, (3 PPIA, PRDX2, FKBP52, HSP-60, and MUC1, (4 MUC1, HER2, p53, and IGFBP2, (5 p53, HER2, IGFBP-2, and TOPO2α, (6 survivin and livin, (7 ASB-9, SERAC1, and RELT, and (8 p16, p53, and c-myc. Assessment of serum AAbs to a tailor-made panel of TAAs provides better sensitivity to diagnosis of breast carcinoma than measuring serum AAbs to a single TAA. Nevertheless, measurement of serum AAbs to a panel of TAAs for screening and early diagnosis of breast carcinoma is still investigational and should be carried out along with traditional diagnostic studies.

  3. Malignant breast tumors among Atomic Bomb Survivors, Hirsoshima and Nagasaki, 1950 to 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1950 to 1974, 360 cases of malignant breast tumors were identified among the 63,000 females of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation's (Hiroshima and Nagasaki) Extended Life-Span Study sample of survivors of the 1945 atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; 288 of these females were residing in one of these two cities at the time of bombing (ATB). Two-thirds of all cases were classified as breast cancers on the basis of microscopic review of slides, and 108 cases received an estimated breast tissue dose of at least 10 rads. The number of cases of radiogenic breast cancer could be well estimated by a linear function of radiation dose for tissue doses below 200 rads. Excess risk estimates, based on this function, for women 10 to 19, 20 to 29, 30 to 39, and 50 years old or older ATB were 7.3, 4.2, 2.6, and 4.7 cases per million women per year per rad, respectively. Women irradiated in their forties showed no dose effect. Among all women who received at least 10 rads, those irradiated before age 20 years will have experienced the highest rates of breast cancer throughout their lifetimes. Separate excess risk estimates for Hiroshima and Nagasaki did not differ significantly, which indicates that for radiogenic breast cancer the effects of neutrons (emitted only in the Hiroshima explosion) and gamma radiation were about equal. Radiation did not reduce the latency period for the development of breast cancer, which was at least 10 years. The distribution of histologic types of cancers did not vary significantly with radiation dose. The data suggested that irradiation prior to menarche conferred a greater risk than irradiation after menarche

  4. Malignant breast tumors among Atomic Bomb Survivors, Hirsoshima and Nagasaki, 1950 to 1974

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, M. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima, Japan); Norman, J.E. Jr.; Asano, M.; Tokuoka, S.; Ezaki, H.; Nishimori, I.; Tsuji, Y.

    1979-06-01

    From 1950 to 1974, 360 cases of malignant breast tumors were identified among the 63,000 females of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation's (Hiroshima and Nagasaki) Extended Life-Span Study sample of survivors of the 1945 atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; 288 of these females were residing in one of these two cities at the time of bombing (ATB). Two-thirds of all cases were classified as breast cancers on the basis of microscopic review of slides, and 108 cases received an estimated breast tissue dose of at least 10 rads. The number of cases of radiogenic breast cancer could be well estimated by a linear function of radiation dose for tissue doses below 200 rads. Excess risk estimates, based on this function, for women 10 to 19, 20 to 29, 30 to 39, and 50 years old or older ATB were 7.3, 4.2, 2.6, and 4.7 cases per million women per year per rad, respectively. Women irradiated in their forties showed no dose effect. Among all women who received at least 10 rads, those irradiated before age 20 years will have experienced the highest rates of breast cancer throughout their lifetimes. Separate excess risk estimates for Hiroshima and Nagasaki did not differ significantly, which indicates that for radiogenic breast cancer the effects of neutrons (emitted only in the Hiroshima explosion) and gamma radiation were about equal. Radiation did not reduce the latency period for the development of breast cancer, which was at least 10 years. The distribution of histologic types of cancers did not vary significantly with radiation dose. The data suggested that irradiation prior to menarche conferred a greater risk than irradiation after menarche.

  5. Basal-Like Phenotype in a Breast Carcinoma Case Series from Sudan: Prevalence and Clinical/Pathological Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Dafaallah Awadelkarim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal-like breast cancer, an aggressive subtype associated with high grade, poor prognosis, and younger age, is reported frequently in Africa. We analyzed the expression of the basal cytokeratins (CKs 5/6 and 17 in a case series from Central Sudan and investigated correlations among basal CK status, ER, PgR, and Her-2/neu, and individual/clinicopathological data. Of 113 primary breast cancers 26 (23%, 38 (34%, and 46 (41% were, respectively, positive for CK5/6, CK17, and combined basal CKs (CK5/6 and/or CK17. Combined basal CK+ status was associated with higher grade (P<.03 and inversely correlated with ER (P<.002, PgR (P=.004 and combined ER and/or PgR (P<.0002. Two clusters based on all tested markers were generated by hierarchical cluster analysis and k-mean clustering: I: designated ``hormone receptors positive/luminal-like’’ and II: designated ``hormone receptors negative’’, including both basal-like and Her-2/neu+ tumors. The most important factors for dataset variance were ER status, followed by PgR, CK17, and CK5/6 statuses. Overall basal CKs were expressed in a fraction of cases comparable to that reported for East and West African case series. Lack of associations with age and tumor size may represent a special feature of basal-like breast cancer in Sudan.

  6. Luminal breast cancer metastasis is dependent on estrogen signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Ganapathy, Vidya; Banach-Petrosky, Whitney; Xie, Wen; Kareddula, Aparna; Nienhuis, Hilde; Miles, Gregory; Reiss, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Luminal breast cancer is the most frequently encountered type of human breast cancer and accounts for half of all breast cancer deaths due to metastatic disease. We have developed new in vivo models of disseminated human luminal breast cancer that closely mimic the human disease. From initial lesions in the tibia, locoregional metastases develop predictably along the iliac and retroperitoneal lymph node chains. Tumors cells retain their epithelioid phenotype throughout the process of dissemin...

  7. Pleomorphic Adenoma of Breast: A Radiological and Pathological Study of a Common Tumor in an Uncommon Location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula S. Ginter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleomorphic adenoma occurs commonly in the major salivary glands but is uncommonly encountered in the breast. In both of these locations, the tumor is typically grossly circumscribed and has a “mixed” histological appearance, being composed of myoepithelial and epithelial components amid a myxochondroid matrix. Herein, we report a case of pleomorphic adenoma of the breast which was preoperatively thought to represent a fibroadenoma on clinical and radiological grounds. It is the rarity of the tumor in the breast, rather than its histological appearance, that causes diagnostic difficulty.

  8. Serum‐derived exosomes from mice with highly metastatic breast cancer transfer increased metastatic capacity to a poorly metastatic tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Gorczynski, Reginald M.; Erin, Nuray; Zhu, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Altered interaction between CD200 and CD200R represents an example of “checkpoint blockade” disrupting an effective, tumor‐directed, host response in murine breast cancer cells. In CD200R1KO mice, long‐term cure of EMT6 breast cancer, including metastatic spread to lung and liver, was achieved in BALB/c mice. The reverse was observed with 4THM tumors, an aggressive, inflammatory breast cancer, with increased tumor metastasis in CD200R1KO. We explored possible explanations for this di...

  9. Increased expression of CYP4Z1 promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4Z1, a novel CYP4 family member, is over-expressed in human mammary carcinoma and associated with high-grade tumors and poor prognosis. However, the precise role of CYP4Z1 in tumor progression is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer. Stable expression of CYP4Z1 in T47D and BT-474 human breast cancer cells significantly increased mRNA expression and production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, and decreased mRNA levels and secretion of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), without affecting cell proliferation and anchorage-independent cell growth in vitro. Notably, the conditioned medium from CYP4Z1-expressing cells enhanced proliferation, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and promoted angiogenesis in the zebrafish embryo and chorioallantoic membrane of the chick embryo. In addition, there were lower levels of myristic acid and lauric acid, and higher contents of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in CYP4Z1-expressing T47D cells compared with vector control. CYP4Z1 overexpression significantly increased tumor weight and microvessel density by 2.6-fold and 1.9-fold in human tumor xenograft models, respectively. Moreover, CYP4Z1 transfection increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt, while PI3K or ERK inhibitors and siRNA silencing reversed CYP4Z1-mediated changes in VEGF-A and TIMP-2 expression. Conversely, HET0016, an inhibitor of the CYP4 family, potently inhibited the tumor-induced angiogenesis with associated changes in the intracellular levels of myristic acid, lauric acid and 20-HETE. Collectively, these data suggest that increased CYP4Z1 expression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer partly via PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 activation. -- Highlights: ► CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes human breast cancer growth and angiogenesis. ► The pro-angiogenic effects of CYP4Z1 have

  10. Increased expression of CYP4Z1 promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Wei [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Chai, Hongyan [Center for Gene Diagnosis, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Li, Ying; Zhao, Haixia; Xie, Xianfei; Zheng, Hao; Wang, Chenlong; Wang, Xue [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Yang, Guifang [Department of Pathology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Cai, Xiaojun [Department of Ophthalmology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Falck, John R. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States); Yang, Jing, E-mail: yangjingliu@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2012-10-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4Z1, a novel CYP4 family member, is over-expressed in human mammary carcinoma and associated with high-grade tumors and poor prognosis. However, the precise role of CYP4Z1 in tumor progression is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer. Stable expression of CYP4Z1 in T47D and BT-474 human breast cancer cells significantly increased mRNA expression and production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, and decreased mRNA levels and secretion of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), without affecting cell proliferation and anchorage-independent cell growth in vitro. Notably, the conditioned medium from CYP4Z1-expressing cells enhanced proliferation, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and promoted angiogenesis in the zebrafish embryo and chorioallantoic membrane of the chick embryo. In addition, there were lower levels of myristic acid and lauric acid, and higher contents of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in CYP4Z1-expressing T47D cells compared with vector control. CYP4Z1 overexpression significantly increased tumor weight and microvessel density by 2.6-fold and 1.9-fold in human tumor xenograft models, respectively. Moreover, CYP4Z1 transfection increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt, while PI3K or ERK inhibitors and siRNA silencing reversed CYP4Z1-mediated changes in VEGF-A and TIMP-2 expression. Conversely, HET0016, an inhibitor of the CYP4 family, potently inhibited the tumor-induced angiogenesis with associated changes in the intracellular levels of myristic acid, lauric acid and 20-HETE. Collectively, these data suggest that increased CYP4Z1 expression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer partly via PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 activation. -- Highlights: ► CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes human breast cancer growth and angiogenesis. ► The pro-angiogenic effects of CYP4Z1 have

  11. Ang-2/VEGF bispecific antibody reprograms macrophages and resident microglia to anti-tumor phenotype and prolongs glioblastoma survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloepper, Jonas; Riedemann, Lars; Amoozgar, Zohreh; Seano, Giorgio; Susek, Katharina; Yu, Veronica; Dalvie, Nisha; Amelung, Robin L; Datta, Meenal; Song, Jonathan W; Askoxylakis, Vasileios; Taylor, Jennie W; Lu-Emerson, Christine; Batista, Ana; Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D; Jung, Keehoon; Snuderl, Matija; Muzikansky, Alona; Stubenrauch, Kay G; Krieter, Oliver; Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Xu, Lei; Munn, Lance L; Duda, Dan G; Fukumura, Dai; Batchelor, Tracy T; Jain, Rakesh K

    2016-04-19

    Inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway has failed to improve overall survival of patients with glioblastoma (GBM). We previously showed that angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) overexpression compromised the benefit from anti-VEGF therapy in a preclinical GBM model. Here we investigated whether dual Ang-2/VEGF inhibition could overcome resistance to anti-VEGF treatment. We treated mice bearing orthotopic syngeneic (Gl261) GBMs or human (MGG8) GBM xenografts with antibodies inhibiting VEGF (B20), or Ang-2/VEGF (CrossMab, A2V). We examined the effects of treatment on the tumor vasculature, immune cell populations, tumor growth, and survival in both the Gl261 and MGG8 tumor models. We found that in the Gl261 model, which displays a highly abnormal tumor vasculature, A2V decreased vessel density, delayed tumor growth, and prolonged survival compared with B20. In the MGG8 model, which displays a low degree of vessel abnormality, A2V induced no significant changes in the tumor vasculature but still prolonged survival. In both the Gl261 and MGG8 models A2V reprogrammed protumor M2 macrophages toward the antitumor M1 phenotype. Our findings indicate that A2V may prolong survival in mice with GBM by reprogramming the tumor immune microenvironment and delaying tumor growth. PMID:27044098

  12. Tumor-evoked regulatory B cells promote breast cancer metastasis by converting resting CD4⁺ T cells to T-regulatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkhanud, Purevdorj B; Damdinsuren, Bazarragchaa; Bodogai, Monica; Gress, Ronald E; Sen, Ranjan; Wejksza, Katarzyna; Malchinkhuu, Enkhzol; Wersto, Robert P; Biragyn, Arya

    2011-05-15

    Pulmonary metastasis of breast cancer requires recruitment and expansion of T-regulatory cells (Treg) that promote escape from host protective immune cells. However, it remains unclear precisely how tumors recruit Tregs to support metastatic growth. Here we report the mechanistic involvement of a unique and previously undescribed subset of regulatory B cells. These cells, designated tumor-evoked Bregs (tBreg), phenotypically resemble activated but poorly proliferative mature B2 cells (CD19(+) CD25(High) CD69(High)) that express constitutively active Stat3 and B7-H1(High) CD81(High) CD86(High) CD62L(Low) IgM(Int). Our studies with the mouse 4T1 model of breast cancer indicate that the primary role of tBregs in lung metastases is to induce TGF-β-dependent conversion of FoxP3(+) Tregs from resting CD4(+) T cells. In the absence of tBregs, 4T1 tumors cannot metastasize into the lungs efficiently due to poor Treg conversion. Our findings have important clinical implications, as they suggest that tBregs must be controlled to interrupt the initiation of a key cancer-induced immunosuppressive event that is critical to support cancer metastasis. PMID:21444674

  13. LARG at chromosome 11q23 has functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor in human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, Danny C.T.; Rudduck, Christina; Chin, Koei; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Lie, Daniel K.H.; Chua, Constance L.M.; Wong, Chow Yin; Hong, Ga Sze; Gray, Joe; Lee, Ann S.G.

    2008-05-06

    Deletion of 11q23-q24 is frequent in a diverse variety of malignancies, including breast and colorectal carcinoma, implicating the presence of a tumor suppressor gene at that chromosomal region. We show here that LARG, from 11q23, has functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor. We examined a 6-Mb region on 11q23 by high-resolution deletion mapping, utilizing both loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis and microarray comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). LARG (also called ARHGEF12), identified from the analyzed region, was underexpressed in 34% of primary breast carcinomas and 80% of breast cancer cell lines including the MCF-7 line. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification on 30 primary breast cancers and six breast cancer cell lines showed that LARG had the highest frequency of deletion compared to the BCSC-1 and TSLC1 genes, two known candidate tumor suppressor genes from 11q. In vitro analysis of breast cancer cell lines that underexpress LARG showed that LARG could be reactivated by trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, but not by 5-Aza-2{prime}-deoxycytidine, a demethylating agent. Bisulfite sequencing and quantitative high-throughput analysis of DNA methylation confirmed the lack of CpG island methylation in LARG in breast cancer. Restoration of LARG expression in MCF-7 cells by stable transfection resulted in reduced proliferation and colony formation, suggesting that LARG has functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor gene.

  14. Is breast conservative surgery a reasonable option in multifocal or multicentric tumors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houvenaeghel, Gilles; Tallet, Agnès; Jalaguier-Coudray, Aurélie; Cohen, Monique; Bannier, Marie; Jauffret-Fara, Camille; Lambaudie, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of multifocal (MF) and multicentric (MC) carcinomas varies widely among clinical studies, depending on definitions and methods for pathological sampling. Magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used because it can help identify additional and conventionally occult tumors with high sensitivity. However, false positive lesions might incorrectly influence treatment decisions. Therefore, preoperative biopsies must be performed to avoid unnecessary surgery. Most studies have shown higher lymph node involvement rates in MF/MC tumors than in unifocal tumors. However, the rate of local recurrences is usually low after breast conservative treatment (BCT) of MC/MF tumors. It has been suggested that BCT is a reasonable option for MC/MF tumors in women aged 50-69 years, with small tumors and absence of extensive ductal carcinoma in situ. A meta-analysis showed an apparent decreased overall survival in MC/MF tumors but data are controversial. Surgery should achieve both acceptable cosmetic results and negative margins, which requires thorough preoperative radiological workup and localization of lesions. Boost radiotherapy techniques must be evaluated since double boosts might result in increased toxicity, namely fibrosis. In conclusion, BCT is feasible in selected patients with MC/MF but the choice of surgery must be discussed in a multidisciplinary team comprising at least radiologists, surgeons and radiotherapists. PMID:27081646

  15. Polyclonal breast cancer metastases arise from collective dissemination of keratin 14-expressing tumor cell clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Kevin J; Padmanaban, Veena; Silvestri, Vanesa; Schipper, Koen; Cohen, Joshua D; Fairchild, Amanda N; Gorin, Michael A; Verdone, James E; Pienta, Kenneth J; Bader, Joel S; Ewald, Andrew J

    2016-02-16

    Recent genomic studies challenge the conventional model that each metastasis must arise from a single tumor cell and instead reveal that metastases can be composed of multiple genetically distinct clones. These intriguing observations raise the question: How do polyclonal metastases emerge from the primary tumor? In this study, we used multicolor lineage tracing to demonstrate that polyclonal seeding by cell clusters is a frequent mechanism in a common mouse model of breast cancer, accounting for >90% of metastases. We directly observed multicolored tumor cell clusters across major stages of metastasis, including collective invasion, local dissemination, intravascular emboli, circulating tumor cell clusters, and micrometastases. Experimentally aggregating tumor cells into clusters induced a >15-fold increase in colony formation ex vivo and a >100-fold increase in metastasis formation in vivo. Intriguingly, locally disseminated clusters, circulating tumor cell clusters, and lung micrometastases frequently expressed the epithelial cytoskeletal protein, keratin 14 (K14). RNA-seq analysis revealed that K14(+) cells were enriched for desmosome and hemidesmosome adhesion complex genes, and were depleted for MHC class II genes. Depletion of K14 expression abrogated distant metastases and disrupted expression of multiple metastasis effectors, including Tenascin C (Tnc), Jagged1 (Jag1), and Epiregulin (Ereg). Taken together, our findings reveal K14 as a key regulator of metastasis and establish the concept that K14(+) epithelial tumor cell clusters disseminate collectively to colonize distant organs. PMID:26831077

  16. Clinical Outcome of Breast Conservation Therapy for Breast Cancer in Hong Kong: Prognostic Impact of Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence and 2005 St. Gallen Risk Categories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of breast conservation therapy (BCT) for invasive breast cancers in our predominantly Chinese population. Methods and Materials: Clinical outcomes of 412 T1-2 invasive breast cancers treated by wide local excision and external radiotherapy from 1994 to 2003 were retrospectively analyzed. Only 7% lesions were first detected by mammograms. Adjuvant tamoxifen and chemotherapy were added in 74% and 45% patients, respectively. Results: The median follow-up was 5.4 years. The 5-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rate, distant failure-free survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival were 4%, 92%, 96%, and 98%, respectively. The 5-year distant failure-free survival for the low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk categories (2005 St. Gallen) were 98%, 91%, and 80%, respectively (p 0.0003). Cosmetic results were good to excellent in more than 90% of the assessable patients. Grade 3 histology (hazard ratio [HR], 4.461; 95% CI, 1.216-16.360; p = 0.024), age (HR, 0.915; 95% CI, 0.846-0.990; p = 0.027), and close/positive final margins (HR, 3.499; 95% CI, 1.141-10.729; p = 0.028) were significant independent risk factors for IBTR. Both St. Gallen risk categories (p = 0.003) and IBTR (HR, 5.885; 95% CI, 2.494-13.889; p < 0.0005) were independent prognostic factors for distant failure-free survival. Conclusions: Despite the low percentage of mammographically detected lesions, the overall clinical outcome of BCT for invasive breast cancers in the Chinese population is comparable to the Western series. The 2005 St. Gallen risk category is a promising clinical tool, but further validation by large studies is warranted

  17. Early developments in gene-expression profiling of breast tumors: potential for increasing black–white patient disparities in breast cancer outcomes?

    OpenAIRE

    Odierna, Donna H.; Afable-Munsuz, Aimee; Ikediobi, Ogechi; Beattie, Mary; Knight, Sara; Ko, Michelle; Wilson, Adrienne; Ponce, Ninez A.

    2011-01-01

    New prognostic tests, such as gene-expression profiling (GEP) of breast tumors, are expected to prolong survival and improve the quality of life for many breast cancer patients. In this article, we argue that GEP has not been adequately validated in minority populations, and that both biological and social factors might affect the broad utility of these tests in diverse populations. We suggest that the widespread use of this technology could potentially lead to suboptimal treatment for black ...

  18. MR-determined metabolic phenotype of breast cancer in prediction of lymphatic spread, grade, and hormone status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathen, Tone F; Jensen, Line R; Sitter, Beathe; Fjösne, Hans E; Halgunset, Jostein; Axelson, David E; Gribbestad, Ingrid S; Lundgren, Steinar

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the use of metabolic phenotype, described by high-resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR MAS MRS), as a tool for prediction of histological grade, hormone status, and axillary lymphatic spread in breast cancer patients. Biopsies from breast cancer (n = 91) and adjacent non-involved tissue (n = 48) were excised from patients (n = 77) during surgery. HR MAS MR spectra of intact samples were acquired. Multivariate models relating spectral data to histological grade, lymphatic spread, and hormone status were designed. The multivariate methods applied were variable reduction by principal component analysis (PCA) or partial least-squares regression-uninformative variable elimination (PLS-UVE), and modelling by PLS, probabilistic neural network (PNN), or cascade correlation neural network. In the end, model verification by prediction of blind samples (n = 12) was performed. Validation of PNN training resulted in sensitivity and specificity ranging from 83 to 100% for all predictions. Verification of models by blind sample testing showed that hormone status was well predicted by both PNN and PLS (11 of 12 correct), lymphatic spread was best predicted by PLS (8 of 12), whereas PLS-UVE PNN was the best approach for predicting grade (9 of 12 correct). MR-determined metabolic phenotype may have a future role as a supplement for clinical decision-making-concerning adjuvant treatment and the adaptation to more individualised treatment protocols. PMID:17061040

  19. Knockdown of ROS1 gene sensitizes breast tumor growth to doxorubicin in a syngeneic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiash, Snigdha; Chua, Ming Jang; Chowdhury, Ezharul Hoque

    2016-06-01

    Treatment of breast cancer, the second leading cause of female deaths worldwide, with classical drugs is often accompanied by treatment failure and relapse of disease condition. Development of chemoresistance and drug toxicity compels compromising the drug concentration below the threshold level with the consequence of therapeutic inefficacy. Moreover, amplification and over-activation of proto-oncogenes in tumor cells make the treatment more challenging. The oncogene, ROS1 which is highly expressed in diverse types of cancers including breast carcinoma, functions as a survival protein aiding cancer progression. Thus we speculated that selective silencing of ROS1 gene by carrier-mediated delivery of siRNA might sensitize the cancer cells to the classical drugs at a relatively low concentration. In this investigation we showed that intracellular delivery of c-ROS1-targeting siRNA using pH-sensitive inorganic nanoparticles of carbonate apatite sensitizes mouse breast cancer cells (4T1) to doxorubicin, but not to cisplatin or paclitaxel, with the highest enhancement in chemosensitivity obtained at 40 nM of the drug concentration. Although intravenous administrations of ROS1-loaded nanoparticles reduced growth of the tumor, a further substantial effect on growth retardation was noted when the mice were treated with the siRNA- and Dox-bound particles, thus suggesting that silencing of ROS1 gene could sensitize the mouse breast cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo to doxorubicin as a result of synergistic effect of the gene knockdown and the drug action, eventually preventing activation of the survival pathway protein, AKT1. Our findings therefore provide valuable insight into the potential cross-talk between the pathways of ROS1 and doxorubicin for future development of effective therapeutics for breast cancer. PMID:27035628

  20. Chemotherapeutic (cyclophosphamide) effects on rat breast tumor hemodynamics monitored by multi-channel NIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae G.; Zhao, Dawen; Mason, Ralph P.; Liu, Hanli

    2005-04-01

    We previously suggested that the two time constants quantified from the increase of tumor oxyhemoglobin concentration, ▵ [HbO2], during hyperoxic gas intervention are associated with two blood flow/perfusion rates in well perfused and poorly perfused regions of tumors. In this study, our hypothesis is that when cancer therapy is applied to a tumor, changes in blood perfusion will occur and be detected by the NIRS. For experiments, systemic chemotherapy, cyclophosphamide (CTX), was applied to two groups of rats bearing syngeneic 13762NF mammary adenocarcinomas: one group received a single high dose i. p. (200 mg/kg CTX) and the other group continuous low doses (20 mg/kg CTX i. p. for 10 days). Time courses of changes in tumor ▵ [HbO2] were measured at four different locations on the breast tumors non-invasively with an inhaled gas sequence of air-oxygen-air before and after CTX administration. Both rat body weight and tumor volume decreased after administration of high dose CTX, but continuous low doses showed decrease of tumor volume only. Baselines (without any therapy) intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity of vascular oxygenation during oxygen inhalation were similar to our previous observations. After CTX treatment, significant changes in vascular hemodynamic response to oxygen inhalation were observed from both groups. By fitting the increase of ▵ [HbO2] during oxygen inhalation, we have obtained changes of vascular structure ratio and also of perfusion rate ratio before and after chemotherapy. The preliminary results suggest that cyclophosphamide has greatest effect on the well perfused tumor vasculature. Overall, our study supports our earlier hypothesis, proving that the effects of chemotherapy in tumor may be monitored non-invasively by using NIRS to detect changes of hemodynamics induced with respiratory challenges.

  1. Factors affecting breast milk composition and potential consequences for development of the allergic phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munblit, D; Boyle, R J; Warner, J O

    2015-03-01

    There is conflicting evidence on the protective role of breastfeeding in relation to allergic sensitization and disease. The factors in breast milk which influence these processes are still unclear and under investigation. We know that colostrum and breast milk contain a variety of molecules which can influence immune responses in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue of a neonate. This review summarizes the evidence that variations in colostrum and breast milk composition can influence allergic outcomes in the infant, and the evidence that maternal and environmental factors can modify milk composition. Taken together, the data presented support the possibility that maternal dietary interventions may be an effective way to promote infant health through modification of breast milk composition. PMID:25077553

  2. Chloroquine Engages the Immune System to Eradicate Irradiated Breast Tumors in Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study used chloroquine to direct radiation-induced tumor cell death pathways to harness the antitumor activity of the immune system. Methods and Materials: Chloroquine given immediately after tumor irradiation increased the cure rate of MCaK breast cancer in C3H mice. Chloroquine blocked radiation-induced autophagy and drove MCaK cells into a more rapid apoptotic and more immunogenic form of cell death. Results: Chloroquine treatment made irradiated tumor vaccines superior at inducing strong interferon gamma-associated immune responses in vivo and protecting mice from further tumor challenge. In vitro, chloroquine slowed antigen uptake and degradation by dendritic cells, although T-cell stimulation was unaffected. Conclusions: This study illustrates a novel approach to improve the efficacy of breast cancer radiation therapy by blocking endosomal pathways, which enhances radiation-induced cell death within the field and drives antitumor immunity to assist therapeutic cure. The study illuminates and merges seemingly disparate concepts regarding the importance of autophagy in cancer therapy

  3. Patched Targeting Peptides for Imaging and Treatment of Hedgehog Positive Breast Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Smith

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High tumor hedgehog expression is correlated with poor prognosis in invasive ductal carcinoma. Peptides which bind the patched receptor have recently been reported to have a growth inhibitory effect in tumors with activated hedgehog signaling. We sought to examine growth inhibition with these peptides in breast cancer cells and use these peptides as molecular imaging probes to follow changes in hedgehog expression after chemotherapy. Significant growth inhibition was observed in breast cancer cell lines treated with PTCH-blocking peptides. Significant in vitro uptake was observed with both FITC- and 99mTc-EC-peptide conjugates. In vivo imaging studies displayed greater accumulation of 99mTc-labeled peptides within tumors as compared to adjacent muscle tissue. Patched receptor expression increased after treatment and this correlated with an increase in tumor radiotracer uptake. These studies suggest that peptides which bind the sonic hedgehog docking site in patched receptor correlate with patched expression and can be used to image patched in vivo. Further, our data suggest that radiolabeled peptides may enable us to examine the activity of the hedgehog signaling pathway and to evaluate response to anti-cancer therapies.

  4. Patched Targeting Peptides for Imaging and Treatment of Hedgehog Positive Breast Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel; Kong, Fanlin; Yang, David; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2014-01-01

    High tumor hedgehog expression is correlated with poor prognosis in invasive ductal carcinoma. Peptides which bind the patched receptor have recently been reported to have a growth inhibitory effect in tumors with activated hedgehog signaling. We sought to examine growth inhibition with these peptides in breast cancer cells and use these peptides as molecular imaging probes to follow changes in hedgehog expression after chemotherapy. Significant growth inhibition was observed in breast cancer cell lines treated with PTCH-blocking peptides. Significant in vitro uptake was observed with both FITC- and 99mTc-EC-peptide conjugates. In vivo imaging studies displayed greater accumulation of 99mTc-labeled peptides within tumors as compared to adjacent muscle tissue. Patched receptor expression increased after treatment and this correlated with an increase in tumor radiotracer uptake. These studies suggest that peptides which bind the sonic hedgehog docking site in patched receptor correlate with patched expression and can be used to image patched in vivo. Further, our data suggest that radiolabeled peptides may enable us to examine the activity of the hedgehog signaling pathway and to evaluate response to anti-cancer therapies. PMID:25276795

  5. Chloroquine Engages the Immune System to Eradicate Irradiated Breast Tumors in Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratikan, Josephine Anna [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Sayre, James William [Public Health Biostatistics/Radiology at UCLA, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Schaue, Dörthe, E-mail: dschaue@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: This study used chloroquine to direct radiation-induced tumor cell death pathways to harness the antitumor activity of the immune system. Methods and Materials: Chloroquine given immediately after tumor irradiation increased the cure rate of MCaK breast cancer in C3H mice. Chloroquine blocked radiation-induced autophagy and drove MCaK cells into a more rapid apoptotic and more immunogenic form of cell death. Results: Chloroquine treatment made irradiated tumor vaccines superior at inducing strong interferon gamma-associated immune responses in vivo and protecting mice from further tumor challenge. In vitro, chloroquine slowed antigen uptake and degradation by dendritic cells, although T-cell stimulation was unaffected. Conclusions: This study illustrates a novel approach to improve the efficacy of breast cancer radiation therapy by blocking endosomal pathways, which enhances radiation-induced cell death within the field and drives antitumor immunity to assist therapeutic cure. The study illuminates and merges seemingly disparate concepts regarding the importance of autophagy in cancer therapy.

  6. Postmenopausal obesity promotes tumor angiogenesis and breast cancer progression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jian-Wei; Young, Emily; Patterson, Sharla G; Makey, Kristina L; Wells, Jeremy; Huang, Min; Tucker, Kevan B; Miele, Lucio

    2011-05-15

    Obese postmenopausal women have a 50% higher risk of breast cancer than non-obese women. There is not an animal model that mimics postmenopausal obesity related to breast cancer progression. Using age-relevant C57BL/6 mice, this study determined whether postmenopausal obesity increases VEGF expression, tumor angiogenesis, and breast tumor growth. Ovariectomy (OVX) was performed in 12 sixty week-old female mice, then followed by a low-fat (5%, LF, n=6) or a high-fat (60%, HF, n=6) diet for 12 weeks. In the eighth week of the dietary program, 10(6) E0771 (mouse breast cancer) cells were injected in the left fourth mammary gland. Tumor size was monitored for 4 weeks. Body weights were monitored weekly. At the end of the experiment, blood samples, visceral fat and tumors were collected for measuring VEGF expression using ELISA and intratumoral microvessel density (IMD) using CD31 immunochemistry. Body weight was significantly increased in OVX/HF mice, compared to OVX/LF group (55.3±1.7 vs. 41.5±1.5 g; p < 0.01). There was a two-fold increase in the ratio of visceral fat/BW in OVX/HF mice, compared to those in OVX/LF group (0.062±0.005 vs. 0.032±0.003; p < 0.01). Postmenopausal obesity significantly increased breast tumor weight over the control (4.62±0.63 vs. 1.98±0.27 g; p < 0.01) and IMD (173±3.7 vs. 139±4.3 IM#/mm^2; p < 0.01). Tumor VEGF levels were higher in OVX/HF mice, compared to OVX/LF group (73.3±3.8 vs. 49.5±4.3 pg/mg protein; p < 0.01). Plasma VEGF levels (69±7.1 vs. 48±3.5 pg/ml) and visceral fat VEGF levels (424.4±39.5 vs. 208.5±22.4 pg/mg protein) were significantly increased in OVX/HF mice, compared to OVX/LF group, respectively (n=6; p < 0.01). Interestingly, adipose tissue primary culture showed that subcutaneous fat released more VEGF, compared to visceral fat (6.77±1.14 vs. 0.94±0.16 pg/mg tissue; n=6; p < 0.01). These findings support the hypothesis that postmenopausal obesity promotes tumor angiogenesis and breast cancer

  7. Using diffuse optical tomograpy to monitor tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, Jacqueline E.; Lim, Emerson; Kim, Hyun Keol; Flexman, Molly; Brown, Mindy; Refrice, Susan; Kalinsky, Kevin; Hershman, Dawn; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2013-03-01

    Breast cancer patients often undergo neoadjuvant chemotherapy to reduce the size of the tumor before surgery. Tumors which demonstrate a pathologic complete response associate with improved disease-free survival; however, as low as 10% of patients may achieve this status. The goal is to predict response to anti-cancer therapy early, so as to develop personalized treatments and optimize the patient's results. Previous studies have shown that tumor response can be predicted within a few days of treatment initiation. We have developed a diffuse optical tomography (DOT) imaging system for monitoring the response of breast cancer patients to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Our breast imaging system is a continuous wave system that uses four wavelengths in the near-infrared spectrum (765 nm, 808 nm, 827 nm, and 905 nm). Both breasts are imaged simultaneously with a total of 64 sources and 128 detectors. Three dimensional reconstructions for oxy-hemoglobin concentration ([HbO2]), deoxy-hemoglobin ([Hb]) concentrations, and water are performed using a PDE-constrained multispectral imaging method that uses the diffusion approximation as a model for light propagation. Each patient receives twelve weekly treatments of Taxane followed by four cycles of Doxorubicin and Cyclophosphamide (AC) given every other week. There are six DOT imaging time points: baseline, week 3 and 5 of Paclitaxel, before cycle 1 and 2 of AC, and before surgery. Preliminary results show that there is statistical significance for the percent change of [HbO2], [Hb], [HbT], and percent water at week 2 from the baseline between patients with a pathologic response to chemotherapy.

  8. Which patients don't need a tumor-bed boost after whole-breast radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Retrospective dose-response data suggest that a boost of about 15 Gy to the tumor bed following whole-breast radiotherapy reduces the risk of local recurrence (IBTR) by as much as 2-fold. Even if this benefit is confirmed by prospective trials, boost irradiation may not be considered cost-effective in patients having an IBTR risk of less than 1% per annum. Methods: Published prospective trials of invasive breast cancers (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project; Stockholm Adjuvant Tamoxifen Trial) in which patients received 50 Gy whole-breast irradiation, without a boost, were analyzed to identify subgroups with IBTR risk less than 1% per year. All studies were based on lumpectomy (rather than segmental or quadrant excision) and eligibility required the absence of cancer cells at the margins. It was assumed that clinical and pathological factors, other than those defining trial eligibility, were of negligible importance regarding IBTR risk, with the exception of young age. Results: All patients not receiving adjuvant systemic therapy, including tumors<1 cm, have IBTR risk justifying boost irradiation. Of patients receiving systemic therapy, only patients with node-negative, estrogen receptor-positive tumors have low IBTR risk (3% at 10 years), provided that tamoxifen is administered. Of patients receiving only adjuvant chemotherapy, low IBTR risk seems to be associated with administration concomitantly with radiotherapy. IBTR risk in patients receiving chemotherapy sequentially with respect to radiotherapy probably is high enough to justify a boost. A boost is probably indicated in all patients younger than 40 years, regardless of other factors. (orig.)

  9. Radio-photothermal therapy mediated by a single compartment nanoplatform depletes tumor initiating cells and reduces lung metastasis in the orthotopic 4T1 breast tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Min; Zhao, Jun; Tian, Mei; Song, Shaoli; Zhang, Rui; Gupta, Sanjay; Tan, Dongfeng; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, Chun

    2015-11-01

    Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and have demonstrated promising application in the clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([64Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress breast tumor metastasis through eradication of TICs. Positron electron tomography (PET) imaging and biodistribution studies showed that more than 90% of [64Cu]CuS NPs was retained in subcutaneously grown BT474 breast tumor 24 h after intratumoral (i.t.) injection, indicating the NPs are suitable for the combination therapy. Combined RT/PTT therapy resulted in significant tumor growth delay in the subcutaneous BT474 breast cancer model. Moreover, RT/PTT treatment significantly prolonged the survival of mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast tumors compared to no treatment, RT alone, or PTT alone. The RT/PTT combination therapy significantly reduced the number of tumor nodules in the lung and the formation of tumor mammospheres from treated 4T1 tumors. No obvious side effects of the CuS NPs were noted in the treated mice in a pilot toxicity study. Taken together, our data support the feasibility of a therapeutic approach for the suppression of tumor metastasis through localized RT/PTT therapy.Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and have demonstrated promising application in the clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([64Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress

  10. Tiling array-CGH for the assessment of genomic similarities among synchronous unilateral and bilateral invasive breast cancer tumor pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ringnér Markus

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Today, no objective criteria exist to differentiate between individual primary tumors and intra- or intermammary dissemination respectively, in patients diagnosed with two or more synchronous breast cancers. To elucidate whether these tumors most likely arise through clonal expansion, or whether they represent individual primary tumors is of tumor biological interest and may have clinical implications. In this respect, high resolution genomic profiling may provide a more reliable approach than conventional histopathological and tumor biological factors. Methods 32 K tiling microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH was used to explore the genomic similarities among synchronous unilateral and bilateral invasive breast cancer tumor pairs, and was compared with histopathological and tumor biological parameters. Results Based on global copy number profiles and unsupervised hierarchical clustering, five of ten (p = 1.9 × 10-5 unilateral tumor pairs displayed similar genomic profiles within the pair, while only one of eight bilateral tumor pairs (p = 0.29 displayed pair-wise genomic similarities. DNA index, histological type and presence of vessel invasion correlated with the genomic analyses. Conclusion Synchronous unilateral tumor pairs are often genomically similar, while synchronous bilateral tumors most often represent individual primary tumors. However, two independent unilateral primary tumors can develop synchronously and contralateral tumor spread can occur. The presence of an intraductal component is not informative when establishing the independence of two tumors, while vessel invasion, the presence of which was found in clustering tumor pairs but not in tumor pairs that did not cluster together, supports the clustering outcome. Our data suggest that genomically similar unilateral tumor pairs may represent a more aggressive disease that requires the addition of more severe treatment modalities, and

  11. Magnetic resonance characterization of tumor microvessels in experimental breast tumors using a slow clearance blood pool contrast agent (carboxymethyldextran-A2-Gd-DOTA) with histopathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preda, Anda [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, Center for Pharmaceutical and Molecular Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Novikov, Viktor; Moeglich, Martina; Turetschek, Karl; Shames, David M.; Roberts, Timothy P.L.; Brasch, Robert C. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, Center for Pharmaceutical and Molecular Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Floyd, Eugenia; Carter, Wayne O. [Pfizer Central Research, Groton, CT (United States); Corot, Claire [Guerbet Laboratories, Aulnay sous Bois (France)

    2005-11-01

    Carboxymethyldextran (CMD)-A2-Gd-DOTA, a slow clearance blood pool contrast agent with a molecular weight of 52.1 kDa, designed to have intravascular residence for more than 1 h, was evaluated for its potential to characterize and differentiate the microvessels of malignant and benign breast tumors. Precontrast single-slice inversion-recovery snapshot FLASH and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using an axial T1-weighted three-dimensional spoiled gradient recalled sequence was performed in 30 Sprague-Dawley rats with chemically induced breast tumors. Endothelial transfer coefficient and fractional plasma volume of the breast tumors were estimated from MRI data acquired with CMD-A2-Gd-DOTA enhancement injected at a dose of 0.1 mmol Gd/kg body weight using a two-compartment bidirectional model of the tumor tissue. The correlation between MRI microvessel characteristics and histopathological tumor grade was determined using the Scarff-Bloom-Richardson method. Using CMD-A2-Gd-DOTA, no significant correlations were found between the MR-estimated endothelial transfer coefficient or plasma volumes with histological tumor grade. Analysis of CMD-A2-Gd-DOTA-enhanced MR kinetic data failed to demonstrate feasibility for the differentiation of benign from malignant tumors or for image-based tumor grading. (orig.)

  12. Magnetic resonance characterization of tumor microvessels in experimental breast tumors using a slow clearance blood pool contrast agent (carboxymethyldextran-A2-Gd-DOTA) with histopathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carboxymethyldextran (CMD)-A2-Gd-DOTA, a slow clearance blood pool contrast agent with a molecular weight of 52.1 kDa, designed to have intravascular residence for more than 1 h, was evaluated for its potential to characterize and differentiate the microvessels of malignant and benign breast tumors. Precontrast single-slice inversion-recovery snapshot FLASH and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using an axial T1-weighted three-dimensional spoiled gradient recalled sequence was performed in 30 Sprague-Dawley rats with chemically induced breast tumors. Endothelial transfer coefficient and fractional plasma volume of the breast tumors were estimated from MRI data acquired with CMD-A2-Gd-DOTA enhancement injected at a dose of 0.1 mmol Gd/kg body weight using a two-compartment bidirectional model of the tumor tissue. The correlation between MRI microvessel characteristics and histopathological tumor grade was determined using the Scarff-Bloom-Richardson method. Using CMD-A2-Gd-DOTA, no significant correlations were found between the MR-estimated endothelial transfer coefficient or plasma volumes with histological tumor grade. Analysis of CMD-A2-Gd-DOTA-enhanced MR kinetic data failed to demonstrate feasibility for the differentiation of benign from malignant tumors or for image-based tumor grading. (orig.)

  13. Correlation of PET images of metabolism, proliferation and hypoxia to characterize tumor phenotype in patients with cancer of the oropharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spatial organization of tumor phenotype is of great interest to radiotherapy target definition and outcome prediction. We characterized tumor phenotype in patients with cancers of the oropharynx through voxel-based correlation of PET images of metabolism, proliferation, and hypoxia. Methods: Patients with oropharyngeal cancer received 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT, 18F-fluorothymidine (FLT) PET/CT, and 61Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM) PET/CT. Images were co-registered and standardized uptake values (SUV) were calculated for all modalities. Voxel-based correlation was evaluated with Pearson’s correlation coefficient in tumor regions. Additionally, sensitivity studies were performed to quantify the effects of image segmentation, registration, noise, and segmentation on R. Results: On average, FDG PET and FLT PET images were most highly correlated (RFDG:FLT = 0.76, range 0.53–0.85), while Cu-ATSM PET showed greater heterogeneity in correlation to other tracers (RFDG:Cu-ATSM = 0.64, range 0.51–0.79; RFLT:Cu-ATSM = 0.61, range 0.21–0.80). Of the tested parameters, correlation was most sensitive to image registration. Misregistration of one voxel lead to ΔRFDG = 0.25, ΔRFLT = 0.39, and ΔRCu-ATSM = 0.27. Image noise and reconstruction also had quantitative effects on correlation. No significant quantitative differences were found between GTV, expanded GTV, or CTV regions. Conclusions: Voxel-based correlation represents a first step into understanding spatial organization of tumor phenotype. These results have implications for radiotherapy target definition and provide a framework to test outcome prediction based on pretherapy distribution of phenotype.

  14. Variable expression levels of keratin and vimentin reveal differential EMT status of circulating tumor cells and correlation with clinical characteristics and outcome of patients with metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CTCs expressing variable levels of epithelial and mesenchymal markers in breast cancer have previously been reported. However, no information exists for keratin expression levels of CTCs in association with disease status, whereas assays for the characterization of transitional EMT phenotypes of CTCs in breast cancer are rather lacking. We investigated the correlation between keratin expression of CTCs and patients’ outcome and characterized the EMT status of CTCs via the establishment of a numerical “ratio” value of keratin and vimentin expression levels on a single cell basis. Keratin expression was evaluated in 1262 CTCs from 61 CTC-positive patients with metastatic breast cancer, using analysis of images obtained through the CellSearch System. For the determination of vimentin/keratin (vim/K) ratios, expression levels of keratin and vimentin were measured in cytospin preparations of luminal (MCF-7 and T47D) and basal (MDA.MB231 and Hs578T) breast cancer cell lines and 110 CTCs from 5 CTC-positive patients using triple immunofluorescence laser scanning microscopy and image analysis. MCF-7 and T47D displayed lower vim/K ratios compared to MDA.MB231 and Hs578T cells, while MCF-7 cells that had experimentally undergone EMT were characterized by varying intermediate vim/K ratios. CTCs were consisted of an heterogeneous population presenting variable vim/K values with 46% of them being in the range of luminal breast cancer cell lines. Keratin expression levels of CTCs detected by the CellSearch System correlated with triple negative (p = 0.039) and ER-negative (p = 0.025) breast cancer, and overall survival (p = 0.038). Keratin expression levels of CTCs correlate with tumor characteristics and clinical outcome. Moreover, CTCs display significant heterogeneity in terms of the degree of EMT phenotype that probably reflects differential invasive potential. The assessment of the vim/K ratios as a surrogate marker for the EMT status of CTCs merits further

  15. Elusive Identities and Overlapping Phenotypes of Proangiogenic Myeloid Cells in Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Lewis, Claire E.; Naldini, Luigi; Brown, J. Martin; Ferrara, Napoleone; De Palma, Michele

    2010-01-01

    It is now established that bone marrow-derived myeloid cells regulate tumor angiogenesis. This was originally inferred from studies of human tumor biopsies in which a positive correlation was seen between the number of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, such as macrophages and neutrophils, and tumor microvessel density. However, unequivocal evidence was only provided once mouse models were used to examine the effects on tumor angiogenesis by genetically or pharmacologically targeting myeloid c...

  16. Sulfatase 1 and sulfatase 2 in hepatocellular carcinoma: associated signaling pathways, tumor phenotypes, and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ju Dong; Sun, Zhifu; Hu, Chunling; Lai, Jinping; Dove, Rebecca; Nakamura, Ikuo; Lee, Ju-Seog; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Kang, Koo Jeong; Chu, In-Sun; Roberts, Lewis R

    2011-02-01

    The heparin-degrading endosulfatases sulfatase 1 (SULF1) and sulfatase 2 (SULF2) have opposing effects in hepatocarcinogenesis despite structural similarity. Using mRNA expression arrays, we analyzed the correlations of SULF expression with signaling networks in human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and the associations of SULF expression with tumor phenotype and patient survival. Data from two mRNA microarray analyses of 139 and 36 HCCs and adjacent tissues were used as training and validation sets. Partek and Metacore software were used to identify SULF correlated genes and their associated signaling pathways. Associations between SULF expression, the hepatoblast subtype of HCC, and survival were examined. Both SULF1 and 2 had strong positive correlations with periostin, IQGAP1, TGFB1, and vimentin and inverse correlations with HNF4A and IQGAP2. Genes correlated with both SULFs were highly associated with the cell adhesion, cytoskeletal remodeling, blood coagulation, TGFB, and Wnt/β-catenin and epithelial mesenchymal transition signaling pathways. Genes uniquely correlated with SULF2 were more associated with neoplastic processes than genes uniquely correlated with SULF1. High SULF expression was associated with the hepatoblast subtype of HCC. There was a bimodal effect of SULF1 expression on prognosis, with patients in the lowest or highest tertile having a worse prognosis than those in the middle tertile. SULFs have complex effects on HCC signaling and patient survival. There are functionally similar associations with cell adhesion, ECM remodeling, TGFB, and WNT pathways, but also unique associations of SULF1 and SULF2. The roles and targeting of the SULFs in cancer require further investigation. PMID:21104785

  17. Exosomal Proteome Profiling: A Potential Multi-Marker Cellular Phenotyping Tool to Characterize Hypoxia-Induced Radiation Resistance in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefani N. Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Radiation and drug resistance are significant challenges in the treatment of locally advanced, recurrent and metastatic breast cancer that contribute to mortality. Clinically, radiotherapy requires oxygen to generate cytotoxic free radicals that cause DNA damage and allow that damage to become fixed in the genome rather than repaired. However, approximately 40% of all breast cancers have hypoxic tumor microenvironments that render cancer cells significantly more resistant to irradiation. Hypoxic stimuli trigger changes in the cell death/survival pathway that lead to increased cellular radiation resistance. As a result, the development of noninvasive strategies to assess tumor hypoxia in breast cancer has recently received considerable attention. Exosomes are secreted nanovesicles that have roles in paracrine signaling during breast tumor progression, including tumor-stromal interactions, activation of proliferative pathways and immunosuppression. The recent development of protocols to isolate and purify exosomes, as well as advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have facilitated the comprehensive analysis of exosome content and function. Using these tools, studies have demonstrated that the proteome profiles of tumor-derived exosomes are indicative of the oxygenation status of patient tumors. They have also demonstrated that exosome signaling pathways are potentially targetable drivers of hypoxia-dependent intercellular signaling during tumorigenesis. This article provides an overview of how proteomic tools can be effectively used to characterize exosomes and elucidate fundamental signaling pathways and survival mechanisms underlying hypoxia-mediated radiation resistance in breast cancer.

  18. Household income is associated with the p53 mutation frequency in human breast tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne M Starks

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A study from Scotland reported that the p53 mutation frequency in breast tumors is associated with socio-economic deprivation. METHODS: We analyzed the association of the tumor p53 mutational status with tumor characteristics, education, and self-reported annual household income (HI among 173 breast cancer patients from the greater Baltimore area, United States. RESULTS: p53 mutational frequency was significantly associated with HI. Patients with < $15,000 HI had the highest p53 mutation frequency (21%, followed by the income group between $15,000 and $60,000 (18%, while those above $60,000 HI had the fewest mutations (5%. When dichotomized at $60,000, 26 out of 135 patients in the low income category had acquired a p53 mutation, while only 2 out of 38 with a high income carried a mutation (P < 0.05. In the adjusted logistic regression analysis with 3 income categories (trend test, the association between HI and p53 mutational status was independent of tumor characteristics, age, race/ethnicity, tobacco smoking and body mass. Further analyses revealed that HI may impact the p53 mutational frequency preferentially in patients who develop an estrogen receptor (ER-negative disease. Within this group, 42% of the low income patients (< $15,000 HI carried a mutation, followed by the middle income group (21%, while those above $60,000 HI did not carry mutations (Ptrend < 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: HI is associated with the p53 mutational frequency in patients who develop an ER-negative disease. Furthermore, high income patients may acquire fewer p53 mutations than other patients, suggesting that lifetime exposures associated with socio-economic status may impact breast cancer biology.

  19. Small interfering RNA targeted to secretory clusterin blocks tumor growth, motility, and invasion in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaohe Niu; Xinhui Li; Bin Hu; Rong Li; Ligang Wang; Lilin Wu; Xingang Wang

    2012-01-01

    Clusterin/apolipoprotein J (Clu) is a ubiquitously expressed secreted heterodimeric glycoprotein that is implicated in several physiological processes.It has been reported that the elevated level of secreted clusterin (sClu) protein is associated with poor survival in breast cancer patients and can induce metastasis in rodent models.In this study,we investigated the effects of sClu inhibition with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) on cell motility,invasion,and growth in vitro and in vivo.MDA-MB-231 cells were transfected with pSuper-siRNA/sClu.Cell survival and proliferation were examined by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium and clonogenic survival assay.The results showed that sClu silencing significantly inhibited the proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells.The invasion and migration ability were also dramatically decreased,which was detected by matrigel assays.TUNEL staining and caspase-3 activity assay demonstrated that sClu silencing also could increase the apoptosis rate of cells,resulting in the inhibition of cell growth.We also determined the effects of sClu silencing on tumor growth and metastatic progression in an orthotopic breast cancer model.The results showed that orthotopic primary tumors derived from MDA-MB-231/pSuper sClu siRNA cells grew significantly slower than tumors derived from parental MDA-MB-231 or MDA-MB-231/pSuper scramble siRNA cells,and metastasize less to the lungs.These data suggest that secretory clusterin plays a significant role in tumor growth and metastatic progression.Knocking-down sClu gene expression may provide a valuable method for breast cancer therapy.

  20. Levels of plasma circulating cell free nuclear and mitochondrial DNA as potential biomarkers for breast tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diesch Claude

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the aim to simplify cancer management, cancer research lately dedicated itself more and more to discover and develop non-invasive biomarkers. In this connection, circulating cell-free DNA (ccf DNA seems to be a promising candidate. Altered levels of ccf nuclear DNA (nDNA and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA have been found in several cancer types and might have a diagnostic value. Methods Using multiplex real-time PCR we investigated the levels of ccf nDNA and mtDNA in plasma samples from patients with malignant and benign breast tumors, and from healthy controls. To evaluate the applicability of plasma ccf nDNA and mtDNA as a biomarker for distinguishing between the three study-groups we performed ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis. We also compared the levels of both species in the cancer group with clinicopathological parameters. Results While the levels of ccf nDNA in the cancer group were significantly higher in comparison with the benign tumor group (P P P P = 0.022. The level of ccf nDNA was also associated with tumor-size (2 cmP = 0.034. Using ROC curve analysis, we were able to distinguish between the breast cancer cases and the healthy controls using ccf nDNA as marker (cut-off: 1866 GE/ml; sensitivity: 81%; specificity: 69%; P P Conclusion Our data suggests that nuclear and mitochondrial ccf DNA have potential as biomarkers in breast tumor management. However, ccf nDNA shows greater promise regarding sensitivity and specificity.

  1. Hydrazinocurcumin Encapsuled Nanoparticles “Re-Educate” Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Exhibit Anti-Tumor Effects on Breast Cancer Following STAT3 Suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiwen; Tian, Wenxia; Cai, Xiaozhong; Wang, Xiaofei; Dang, Weiqi; Tang, Hao; Cao, Hong; Lin WANG; CHEN, TINGMEI

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are essential cellular components within tumor microenvironment (TME). TAMs are educated by TME to transform to M2 polarized population, showing a M2-like phenotype, IL-10high, IL-12low, TGF-βhigh. STAT3 signaling triggers crosstalk between tumor cells and TAMs, and is crucial for the regulation of malignant progression. In our study, legumain-targeting liposomal nanoparticles (NPs) encapsulating HC were employed to suppress STAT3 activity and “re-educate” ...

  2. Can Biomarker Assessment on Circulating Tumor Cells Help Direct Therapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) count has prognostic significance in metastatic breast cancer, but the predictive utility of CTCs is uncertain. Molecular studies on CTCs have often been limited by a low number of CTCs isolated from a high background of leukocytes. Improved enrichment techniques are now allowing molecular characterisation of single CTCs, whereby molecular markers on single CTCs may provide a real-time assessment of tumor biomarker status from a blood test or “liquid biopsy”, potentially negating the need for a more invasive tissue biopsy. The predictive ability of CTC biomarker analysis has predominantly been assessed in relation to HER2, with variable and inconclusive results. Limited data exist for other biomarkers, such as the estrogen receptor. In addition to the need to define and validate the most accurate and reproducible method for CTC molecular analysis, the clinical relevance of biomarkers, including gain of HER2 on CTC after HER2 negative primary breast cancer, remains uncertain. This review summarises the currently available data relating to biomarker evaluation on CTCs and its role in directing management in metastatic breast cancer, discusses limitations, and outlines measures that may enable future development of this approach

  3. Can Biomarker Assessment on Circulating Tumor Cells Help Direct Therapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Turner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cell (CTC count has prognostic significance in metastatic breast cancer, but the predictive utility of CTCs is uncertain. Molecular studies on CTCs have often been limited by a low number of CTCs isolated from a high background of leukocytes. Improved enrichment techniques are now allowing molecular characterisation of single CTCs, whereby molecular markers on single CTCs may provide a real-time assessment of tumor biomarker status from a blood test or “liquid biopsy”, potentially negating the need for a more invasive tissue biopsy. The predictive ability of CTC biomarker analysis has predominantly been assessed in relation to HER2, with variable and inconclusive results. Limited data exist for other biomarkers, such as the estrogen receptor. In addition to the need to define and validate the most accurate and reproducible method for CTC molecular analysis, the clinical relevance of biomarkers, including gain of HER2 on CTC after HER2 negative primary breast cancer, remains uncertain. This review summarises the currently available data relating to biomarker evaluation on CTCs and its role in directing management in metastatic breast cancer, discusses limitations, and outlines measures that may enable future development of this approach.

  4. Can Biomarker Assessment on Circulating Tumor Cells Help Direct Therapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Natalie [Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Department, Prato Hospital, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Pestrin, Marta [Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Department, Prato Hospital, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Translational Research Laboratory, Prato Hospital, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Galardi, Francesca; De Luca, Francesca [Translational Research Laboratory, Prato Hospital, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Malorni, Luca [Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Department, Prato Hospital, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Translational Research Laboratory, Prato Hospital, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Di Leo, Angelo, E-mail: adileo@usl4.toscana.it [Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Department, Prato Hospital, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy)

    2014-03-25

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) count has prognostic significance in metastatic breast cancer, but the predictive utility of CTCs is uncertain. Molecular studies on CTCs have often been limited by a low number of CTCs isolated from a high background of leukocytes. Improved enrichment techniques are now allowing molecular characterisation of single CTCs, whereby molecular markers on single CTCs may provide a real-time assessment of tumor biomarker status from a blood test or “liquid biopsy”, potentially negating the need for a more invasive tissue biopsy. The predictive ability of CTC biomarker analysis has predominantly been assessed in relation to HER2, with variable and inconclusive results. Limited data exist for other biomarkers, such as the estrogen receptor. In addition to the need to define and validate the most accurate and reproducible method for CTC molecular analysis, the clinical relevance of biomarkers, including gain of HER2 on CTC after HER2 negative primary breast cancer, remains uncertain. This review summarises the currently available data relating to biomarker evaluation on CTCs and its role in directing management in metastatic breast cancer, discusses limitations, and outlines measures that may enable future development of this approach.

  5. [MRI-guided breast microbiospy or macrobiopsy: which is the best option for a small tumor?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, B; Bretz-Grenier, M-F; Foessel, L; Guillaume, A; Gangi, A; Mathelin, C

    2014-06-01

    The choice of the optimum therapeutic strategy for breast cancer depends on the histological diagnosis of the sample obtained by biopsy. The microbiopsy is the preferred method as it provides an accurate diagnosis of the histological type as well as the main prognostic factors, whilst being simple, fast and inexepensive. However, some infraclinic breast tumors are not accessible by conventional guidance due to excessive depth inside the breast, their small size or technical inability to image them by mammography or ultrasonography. In those cases, the MRI guidance may help to perform the biopsy. Most MRI biopsies are made by large-core needle that are known to alter the histological structure of the tumor and to disturb the anatomopatholgical analysis (size and surgical margin). Those are very important elements to know before treatment. Our case report details an original technique of MRI microbiopsy of a deep 4mm opacity found on the occasion of a patient's mammography. The operative specimen revealed an invasive ductal carcinoma of 4mm diameter which scored III on the Elston and Ellis scale (oestrogen and progesterone receptors tested negative and HER-2 was over-expressed). It was associated with a high grade in situ ductal carcinoma. No systemic treatment was prescribed due to the small size of the carcinoma. The development of partially or totally amagnetic microbiopsy pistols would help perform microbiopses guided by MRI. PMID:24852912

  6. Phylloedes tumor of breast: findings at mammography, sonography and color Doppler imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phylloides tumor of the breast is rare. the purposes of this study were to find the characteristic findings at mammography, sonography, and color Doppler imaging and to evaluate the usefulness of color Doppler study as an additional modality in the diagnosis of phylloides tumor and differentiation between benign and malignant varieties. Eight cases, who were pathologically proven as pylloides tumors, were retrospectively studied. The findings at histologic examination suggested benign in five, malignantin two, and borderline in one. We analyzed the mammograms of all eight patients and sonogram and color Doppler images of four patients. Phylloides tumors were seen as dense masses with lobulated margins in mammograms. On sonography, they showed relatively well-defined masses with in homogenous internal echo pattern and central echogenic areas. They were characterized by the presence of arterial and venous flows in the center and periphery of the lesion on color Doppler imaging and spectral analysis. We conclude that mammographic, sonographic and even color Doppler findings are not predictive of benign or malignant nature of the phylloides tumor. However, mammography and sonography with color Doppler interrogation are helpful in the diagnosis of phylloides tumor

  7. Hereditary breast and gynecological tumors: Italian legal issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DI Vella, Giancarlo

    2016-10-01

    The availability of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that lower the risk for developing hereditary family-related tumors is weighed against Italian ethical and legal provisions. The healthcare environment in which a professional works should require that he possess specific technical, relational and medical competencies based upon legal orientation in addition to scientific evidence. Particular emphasis is attributed to the doctor-patient relationship, with explicit reference to the following: 1) all of the information at hand that is required to achieve a "therapeutic alliance" that combines the best interests of the patient with treatment options; 2) the completeness and intelligibility of health records, as they are likely to explain the background logic and the following of scientific clinical procedure; 3) the observance of guidelines and protocols, and their relevance to the legal responsibility of the individual and health care companies; 4) the need of a multidisciplinary approach in the treatment of these patients and the obligation of the team to have malpractice insurance. Advances on "provisions concerning liability of health personnel", which is currently awaiting approval, allows the professional to protect the patient's health without the fear of being unnecessarily censured, and unjustified from a pen