WorldWideScience

Sample records for breast cancer recurrence

  1. Opioids and breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe; Ahern, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioids may alter immune function, thereby potentially affecting cancer recurrence. The authors investigated the association between postdiagnosis opioid use and breast cancer recurrence. METHODS: Patients with incident, early stage breast cancer who were diagnosed during 1996 through...... 2008 in Denmark were identified from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group Registry. Opioid prescriptions were ascertained from the Danish National Prescription Registry. Follow-up began on the date of primary surgery for breast cancer and continued until breast cancer recurrence, death......, emigration, 10 years, or July 31, 2013, whichever occurred first. Cox regression models were used to compute hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals associating breast cancer recurrence with opioid prescription use overall and by opioid type and strength, immunosuppressive effect, chronic use (≥6 months...

  2. Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival For some women with breast cancer , taking adjuvant ... Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival was originally published by the National Cancer Institute.” ...

  3. Manganese superoxide dismutase and breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Christensen, Mariann; Lash, Timothy L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) inhibits oxidative damage and cancer therapy effectiveness. A polymorphism in its encoding gene (SOD2: Val16Ala rs4880) may confer poorer breast cancer survival, but data are inconsistent. We examined the association of SOD2 genotype and breast......-metastatic breast cancer from 1990-2001, received adjuvant Cyclo, and were registered in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. We identified 118 patients with BCR and 213 matched breast cancer controls. We genotyped SOD2 and used conditional logistic regression to compute the odds ratio (OR) and associated 95...... cancer recurrence (BCR) among patients treated with cyclophosphamide-based chemotherapy (Cyclo). We compared our findings with published studies using meta-analyses. METHODS: We conducted a population-based case-control study of BCR among women in Jutland, Denmark. Subjects were diagnosed with non...

  4. Stress Reduction in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Recurrent Gynecologic or Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-08

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Fatigue; Leydig Cell Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Pain; Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Pseudomyxoma Peritonei; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer

  5. Electrochemotherapy for large cutaneous recurrence of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Louise Wichmann; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Hendel, Helle Westergren

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous recurrences of breast cancer may cause considerable discomfort due to ulceration, oozing, and pain and can also be difficult to treat. Electrochemotherapy is a localised anticancer treatment using electric pulses to make cell membranes permeable, augmenting uptake of chemotherapeutic...... drugs, and thus enabling highly efficient tumour cell kill. This is the first systematic investigation of electrochemotherapy for larger cutaneous recurrences of breast cancer....

  6. Targeting Breast Cancer Recurrence via Hedgehog-mediated Sensitization of Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    defective quiescence is a predisposing factor for breast cancer . Under normal conditions, nulliparous MMTV-myc have a very low incidence of... parity in this model. Such a finding would implicate control of quiescence in breast cancer initiation and would further suggest that mammary stem...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0430 TITLE: Targeting Breast Cancer Recurrence via

  7. Breast cancer recurrence after reoperation for surgical bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rikke Nørgaard; Bhaskaran, K; Heide-Jørgensen, U

    2017-01-01

    database and the Danish National Patient Register (DNPR), a cohort of women with incident stage I-III breast cancer, who underwent breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy during 1996-2008 was identified. Information on reoperation for bleeding within 14 days of the primary surgery was retrieved from......BACKGROUND: Bleeding activates platelets that can bind tumour cells, potentially promoting metastatic growth in patients with cancer. This study investigated whether reoperation for postoperative bleeding is associated with breast cancer recurrence. METHODS: Using the Danish Breast Cancer Group.......i. 0·89 to 1·26). The estimates did not vary by site of breast cancer recurrence. CONCLUSION: In this large cohort study, there was no evidence of an association between reoperation for bleeding and breast cancer recurrence....

  8. Smoking and Breast Cancer Recurrence after Breast Conservation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D. Bishop

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prior studies have shown earlier recurrence and decreased survival in patients with head and neck cancer who smoked while undergoing radiation therapy. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether smoking status at the time of partial mastectomy and radiation therapy for breast cancer affected recurrence or survival. Method. A single institution retrospective chart review was performed to correlate smoking status with patient demographics, tumor characteristics, and outcomes for patients undergoing partial mastectomy and radiation therapy. Results. There were 624 patients who underwent breast conservation surgery between 2002 and 2010 for whom smoking history and follow-up data were available. Smoking status was associated with race, patient age, and tumor stage, but not with grade, histology, or receptor status. African American women were more likely to be current smokers (22% versus 7%, P<0.001. With a mean follow-up of 45 months, recurrence was significantly higher in current smokers compared to former or never smokers (P=0.039. In a multivariate model adjusted for race and tumor stage, recurrence among current smokers was 6.7 times that of never smokers (CI 2.0–22.4. Conclusions. Although the numbers are small, this study suggests that smoking may negatively influence recurrence rates after partial mastectomy and radiation therapy. A larger study is needed to confirm these observations.

  9. Sentinel Lymph Node Dissection in Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uth, Charlotte Caspara; Christensen, Mette Haulund; Oldenbourg, Mette Holmqvist

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND) in the treatment of patients with locally recurrent breast cancer. A total of 147 patients with locally recurrent breast cancer were included from five different breast surgery departments in Denmark. Data...... on previous breast and axillary surgery, adjuvant treatment, second operation in the breast and axilla, and lymphoscintigraphy were collected retrospectively from the original patient files. SLND after recurrence (SLNDAR) was successful in 72 of 144 patients (50 %). The detection rate was significantly higher...... recurrent breast cancer and can spare a clinically significant number of patients an unnecessary ALND and the following risk of sequelae. In patients who had previous ALND, SLNDAR identified metastases that would have been overlooked following the current guidelines. A large proportion of patients had...

  10. Veliparib and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-04

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  11. Recurrent read-through fusion transcripts in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, Katherine E; Gertz, Jason; Roberts, Brian S; Davis, Nicholas S; Bowling, Kevin M; Kirby, Marie K; Nesmith, Amy S; Oliver, Patsy G; Grizzle, William E; Forero, Andres; Buchsbaum, Donald J; LoBuglio, Albert F; Myers, Richard M

    2014-07-01

    Read-through fusion transcripts that result from the splicing of two adjacent genes in the same coding orientation are a recently discovered type of chimeric RNA. We sought to determine if read-through fusion transcripts exist in breast cancer. We performed paired-end RNA-seq of 168 breast samples, including 28 breast cancer cell lines, 42 triple negative breast cancer primary tumors, 42 estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer primary tumors, and 56 non-malignant breast tissue samples. We analyzed the sequencing data to identify breast cancer associated read-through fusion transcripts. We discovered two recurrent read-through fusion transcripts that were identified in breast cancer cell lines, confirmed across breast cancer primary tumors, and were not detected in normal tissues (SCNN1A-TNFRSF1A and CTSD-IFITM10). Both fusion transcripts use canonical splice sites to join the last splice donor of the 5' gene to the first splice acceptor of the 3' gene, creating an in-frame fusion transcript. Western blots indicated that the fusion transcripts are translated into fusion proteins in breast cancer cells. Custom small interfering RNAs targeting the CTSD-IFITM10 fusion junction reduced expression of the fusion transcript and reduced breast cancer cell proliferation. Read-through fusion transcripts between adjacent genes with different biochemical functions represent a new type of recurrent molecular defect in breast cancer that warrant further investigation as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Both breast cancer associated fusion transcripts identified in this study involve membrane proteins (SCNN1A-TNFRSF1A and CTSD-IFITM10), which raises the possibility that they could be breast cancer-specific cell surface markers.

  12. Adjustment of women and their husbands to recurrent breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northouse, L L; Laten, D; Reddy, P

    1995-12-01

    The psychosocial adjustment of women with recurrent breast cancer (N = 81) and their husbands (N = 74) were compared to determine if they report different levels of adjustment, support, symptom distress, hopelessness, and uncertainty. Women with recurrent breast cancer reported more emotional distress than their husbands, but both had a similar number of psychosocial role problems. Women and husbands differed in the amount of support and uncertainty they reported but not in the levels of symptom distress or hopelessness they perceived. Women, in contrast to their husbands, expressed more surprise that their cancer recurred and found the recurrent phase of illness more distressing than the initial diagnosis.

  13. Beliefs and Behaviors about Breast Cancer Recurrence Risk Reduction among African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Ansa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence suggests that breast cancer recurrence risk is linked to lifestyle behaviors. This study examined correlations between breast cancer recurrence, risk reduction beliefs, and related behaviors among African American breast cancer survivors (AA BCSs. Study participants included 191 AA BCSs, mean age = 56.3 years, who completed a lifestyle assessment tool. Most respondents believed that being overweight (52.7%, lack of physical activity (48.7%, and a high fat diet (63.2% are associated with breast cancer recurrence. Over 65% considered themselves overweight; one third (33.5% agreed that losing weight could prevent recurrence, 33.0% disagreed, while the remaining 33.5% did not know; and nearly half (47.9% believed that recurrence could be prevented by increasing physical activity. Almost 90% survivors with BMI < 25 Kg/M2 reported no recurrence compared to 75.7% with BMI ≥ 25 Kg/M2 (p = 0.06; nearly all of the women (99.2% answered “yes” to seeking professional help to lose weight, 79.7% of which were recurrence-free (p = 0.05. These results provide information about AA BCSs’ beliefs and behaviors protective against breast cancer recurrence. Additional research is warranted to determine the effectiveness of educational interventions for AA BCSs that promote consumption of a healthy diet and engaging in regular physical activity.

  14. An overview of risk factors for recurrent breast cancer | Mannell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary: The multidisciplinary management of Breast Cancer (BC) has evolved over the past 50 years: the patient is offered a choice of surgical procedures with or without radiation therapy, cytotoxics and treatments targeting the nuclei of the cancer cells. This has resulted in a reduction of disease recurrence and a ...

  15. Accessory breast tissue in axilla masquerading as breast cancer recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyal Shikha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic or accessory breast tissue is most commonly located in the axilla, though it may be present anywhere along the milk line. Development is hormone dependent, similar to normal breast tissue. These lesions do not warrant any intervention unless they produce discomfort, thus their identification and distinction from other breast pathologies, both benign and malignant, is essential. We report a case with locally advanced breast cancer who presented with an ipsilateral axillary mass following surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Subsequent evaluation with excision biopsy showed duct ectasia in axillary breast tissue and the patient was continued on hormone therapy with tamoxifen.

  16. Exemestane Following Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences and Prolongs Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postmenopausal women with early-stage hormone receptor-positive breast cancer had delayed disease recurrence and longer survival after taking 2-3 years of tamoxifen followed by exemestane for a total of 5 years compared to taking tamoxifen for 5 years.

  17. Selective attention and fear of cancer recurrence in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custers, J A E; Becker, E S; Gielissen, M F M; Van Laarhoven, H W M; Rinck, M; Prins, J B

    2015-02-01

    Anxious people show an attentional bias towards threatening information. It was investigated whether an attentional bias exists for cancer-related stimuli in breast cancer survivors and if different levels of fear of cancer recurrence would lead to different patterns of selective attention. Breast cancer survivors with high (n = 35) and low (n = 32) fear of cancer recurrence were compared to 40 healthy female hospital employees. Specificity of attentional biases was investigated using a modified Emotional Stroop Task. Self-report measures were used to assess depression and anxiety, feelings of fatigue, and experienced traumas. Compared to control participants, breast cancer survivors with both high and low levels of fear of cancer recurrence showed increased interference for cancer-related words, but not for other word types. The findings suggest a specific attentional bias for cancer-related words in breast cancer survivors that is independent of level of fear of cancer recurrence.

  18. Supraclavicular recurrence after early breast cancer: a curable condition?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders N; Møller, Susanne; Dahl Steffensen, Karina

    2011-01-01

    The prognosis of ipsilateral supraclavicular lymph node recurrence after early breast cancer appears to be worse than for other loco-regional recurrences, but better than for distant metastases. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between different types of salvage...... recurrence. Salvage treatment types as well as other factors were related to response and survival. The median follow-up time for progression after SR was 25 months. Complete remission was 76% among patients receiving excision surgery, 67% with combined loco-regional and systemic therapy, and 48...

  19. Manganese Superoxide Dismtase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ording, Anne Gulbech; Cronin Fenton, Deirdre; Christensen, Mariann

    2012-01-01

    Manganese Superoxide Dismtase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil...

  20. The relationship between illness representations, risk perception and fear of cancer recurrence in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman-Gibb, Laurie A; Janz, Nancy K; Katapodi, Maria C; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J; Northouse, Laurel

    2017-09-01

    Fear of cancer recurrence, although distinct from distress continues to be under-evaluated, captured, or treated when standard distress scales are used to assess concerns of cancer survivors. We tested a model assessing the association of demographic and clinical factors, illness representations, and perceived risk with fear of cancer recurrence in breast cancer survivors. We recruited 117 breast cancer survivors at least one year after completing breast cancer treatment from Internet discussion boards for this cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational study. Participants completed a survey that assessed their level of fear of cancer recurrence as well as their illness representations, perceived risk of recurrence, and demographic and medical characteristics. Our model explained 62% of the variance in fear of cancer recurrence. Emotional representations (β = .46, p < .01), symptom attribution (β = .21, p < .01), timeline (β = .23, p < .01), and consequences (β = .16, p < .03) were significantly related to fear of recurrence. By contrast, the majority of clinical and demographic variables were not significant contributors to fear of recurrence. Upon completion of cancer treatment, survivors with more emotional representations of the experience and those who attribute unrelated symptoms to their breast cancer have a higher level of fear of recurrence. Evaluation of these factors during treatment may help mitigate fear of recurrence in the survivorship phase of the breast cancer trajectory. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Genomic hotspots but few recurrent fusion genes in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimereli, Danai; Fumagalli, Debora; Brown, David; Gacquer, David; Rothé, Françoise; Salgado, Roberto; Larsimont, Denis; Sotiriou, Christos; Detours, Vincent

    2018-02-13

    The advent of next generation sequencing technologies has boosted the interest in exploring the role of fusion genes in the development and progression of solid tumors. In breast cancer, most of the detected gene fusions seem to be "passenger" events while the presence of recurrent and driver fusions is still under study. We performed RNA sequencing in 55 well-characterized breast cancer samples and 10 adjacent normal breast tissues, complemented by an analysis of SNP array data. We explored the presence of fusion genes and defined their association with breast cancer subtypes, clinical-pathologic characteristics and copy number aberrations. Overall, 370 fusions were detected across the majority of the samples. HER2+ samples had significantly more fusions than triple negative and luminal subtypes. The number of fusions was correlated with histological grade, Ki67 and tumor size. Clusters of fusion genes were observed across the genome and a significant correlation of fusions with copy number aberrations and more specifically amplifications was also revealed. Despite the large number of fusion events, only a few were recurrent, while recurrent individual genes forming fusions with different partners were also detected including the estrogen receptor 1 gene in the previously detected ESR1 - CCDC170 fusion. Overall we detected novel gene fusion events while we confirmed previously reported fusions. Genomic hotspots of fusion genes, differences between subtypes and small number of recurrent fusions are the most relevant characteristics of these events in breast cancer. Further investigation is necessary to comprehend the biological significance of these fusions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Gamma-secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097 in Treating Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, or Recurrent Triple Negative Invasive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-28

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  3. A qualitative exploration of fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) amongst Australian and Canadian breast cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thewes, B.; Lebel, S.; Leclair, C.S.; Butow, P.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Few studies have explored coping strategies used by cancer survivors to deal with fear of cancer recurrence (FCR), and little research has been conducted on the specific content of recurrence fears. This study aims to qualitatively explore the strategies used by younger breast cancer

  4. Selective Attention and Fear of Cancer Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Custers, J. A. E.; Becker, E. S.; Gielissen, M. F. M.; van Laarhoven, H. W. M.; Rinck, M.; Prins, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    Anxious people show an attentional bias towards threatening information. It was investigated whether an attentional bias exists for cancer-related stimuli in breast cancer survivors and if different levels of fear of cancer recurrence would lead to different patterns of selective attention. Breast

  5. Factors affecting couples' adjustment to recurrent breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northouse, L L; Dorris, G; Charron-Moore, C

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that affect the adjustment of women and their husbands to recurrent breast cancer and to examine the mutual effect that partners have on one another. An exploratory study was designed to determine the relationship between four predictor variables (support, uncertainty, symptom distress, hopelessness) and women's and husbands' adjustments. The sample consisted of 155 subjects; 81 women, who had a first recurrence of breast cancer, and 74 husbands. Multiple standardized instruments with established reliability and validity were used to measure the study variables. The independent variables were measured with the Social Support Questionnaire, the Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale, McCorkle Symptom Distress Scale and the Beck Hopelessness Scale. The dependent variable, psychosocial adjustment, was measured with the Brief Symptom Inventory and the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale. The results indicated that the independent variables accounted for 43% of the variance in women's distress and 32% of the variance in husbands' distress; they also explained 66% of the variance in women's role adjustment problems and 57% of the variance in husbands' role problems. Symptom distress and hopelessness accounted for the most variance in women's and husbands' levels of adjustment. A significant and positive relationship was found between women's and husbands' adjustment scores, indicating that partners have a mutual influence on one another. The findings suggest that there are multiple factors that influence couples' adjustment to recurrent breast cancer, and that these factors need to be taken into consideration when planning care for women and their partners.

  6. Risk of regional recurrence in triple-negative breast cancer patients: a Dutch cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, L.M. van; Smit, L.H.; Duijsens, G.H.; Vries, B. de; Siesling, S.; Lobbes, M.B.; Boer, M. de; Wilt, J.H.W. de; Smidt, M.L.

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer is associated with early recurrence and low survival rates. Several trials investigate the safety of a more conservative approach of axillary treatment in clinically T1-2N0 breast cancer. Triple-negative breast cancer comprises only 15 % of newly diagnosed breast

  7. A qualitative exploration of fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) amongst Australian and Canadian breast cancer survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Thewes, B; LEBEL, S.; Seguin Leclair, C.; Butow, P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Few studies have explored coping strategies used by cancer survivors to deal with fear of cancer recurrence (FCR), and little research has been conducted on the specific content of recurrence fears. This study aims to qualitatively explore the strategies used by younger breast cancer survivors to cope with FCR and whether women with low, medium and high levels of FCR employ different coping strategies. An additional aim was to understand the specific content of worst recurrence fears....

  8. Recurrent read-through fusion transcripts in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Varley, Katherine E.; Gertz, Jason; Roberts, Brian S.; Davis, Nicholas S.; Bowling, Kevin M.; Kirby, Marie K.; Nesmith, Amy S.; Oliver, Patsy G.; Grizzle, William E.; Forero, Andres; Buchsbaum, Donald J.; LoBuglio, Albert F.; Myers, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Read-through fusion transcripts that result from the splicing of two adjacent genes in the same coding orientation are a recently discovered type of chimeric RNA. We sought to determine if read-through fusion transcripts exist in breast cancer. We performed paired-end RNA-seq of 168 breast samples, including 28 breast cancer cell lines, 42 triple negative breast cancer primary tumors, 42 estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer primary tumors, and 56 non-malignant breast tissue samples....

  9. Predicting fear of breast cancer recurrence and self-efficacy in survivors by age at diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziner, Kim Wagler; Sledge, George W; Bell, Cynthia J; Johns, Shelley; Miller, Kathy D; Champion, Victoria L

    2012-05-01

    To determine the effect that age at diagnosis has on fear of breast cancer recurrence and to identify the predictors of fear of recurrence using self-efficacy as a mediator. Cross-sectional survey. Two university cancer centers and one cooperative group in the midwestern United States. 1,128 long-term survivors. Survivors were eligible if they were aged 18-45 years (younger group) or 55-70 years (older group) at cancer diagnosis, had received chemotherapy, and were three to eight years postdiagnosis. Fear of recurrence was compared between younger and older groups. Multiple regression analyses were used to test variables' prediction of fear of recurrence and breast cancer survivor self-efficacy, as well as breast cancer survivor self-efficacy mediation effects. Fear of recurrence, breast cancer survivor self-efficacy, and age at diagnosis. Survivors diagnosed at a younger age had significantly higher fear of recurrence, as well as health, role, womanhood, death, and parenting worries. Perceived risk of recurrence, trait anxiety, and breast cancer reminders explained significant variance in fear of recurrence and breast cancer survivor self-efficacy. Breast cancer survivor self-efficacy partially mediated the effects of variables on fear of recurrence. The findings suggest that breast cancer survivor self-efficacy may have a protective effect for survivors who are younger at diagnosis and have higher perceived risk of recurrence, higher trait anxiety, and more breast cancer reminders. Oncology nurses already use the skills required to support self-efficacy. Additional research is needed to define and test breast cancer survivor self-efficacy interventions. Oncology nurses are in a key role to assess fear of recurrence and provide self-efficacy interventions to reduce it in breast cancer survivors. Strategies to efficiently address fear of recurrence to reduce psychological distress in survivorship follow-up care are warranted.

  10. Treatment of locally advanced/locally recurrent breast cancer and inflammatory breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Masao [Tenri Hospital, Nara (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    This paper summarizes the treatment of locally advanced breast cancer, inflammatory breast cancer, and locally recurrent breast cancer. A multidisciplinary approach considering subclinical distant metastases is needed to treat these types of breast cancer. Subclinical distant metastasis is observed in about 80% of case of locally advanced cancer, and treatment of subclinical distant metastases, e.g., by endocrinotherapy and chemotherapy, is therefore essential to improving the prognosis. The standard therapy for unresectable locally advanced breast cancer consists of induction chemotherapy with anthracyclines and local treatment with mastectomy or irradiation. Previous reports have stated that induction chemotherapy was effective in 60-80% of the primary lesions or lymph node metastasis, and the CR rates were in the 10-20% range. Combination therapy with induction chemotherapy clearly improved the outcome over local treatment alone. The usual irradiation dose is 50 to 60 Gy/5 to 7 weeks to the whole breast or the thoracic wall. Boost irradiation at a dose of 10 to 25 Gy is performed in unresectable cases. The boost irradiation dose to the lymph node area is usually 45 to 50 Gy/5 to 6 weeks in cases without gross lesions and 10 to 15 Gy in cases with gross lesions. Combination therapy consisting of conservative pectoral mastectomy and postoperative adjuvant chemo- endocrino-therapy (i.e., adjuvant therapy) has become the standard regimen for treating resectable locally advanced breast cancer, because it significantly improves the recurrence rate and survival rate compared to local treatment alone. Some clinical have studies indicated that neoadjuvant therapy (i.e., induction chemotherapy + surgery/radiation therapy) is comparable or superior to adjuvant therapy in terms of improving the prognosis. However, the efficacy and most appropriate method of breast-conserving therapy after induction chemotherapy are still unclear. More clinical trials are needed. It has been

  11. Trajectories of fear of recurrence in women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Laura B; Langford, Dale J; Paul, Steven M; Berman, Molly B; Shumay, Dianne M; Kober, Kord; Merriman, John D; West, Claudia; Neuhaus, John M; Miaskowski, Christine

    2015-07-01

    Although fear of recurrence (FCR) is common among cancer survivors, it remains unclear what factors predict initial levels (e.g., prior to surgery) or changes in FCR in the post-treatment period. Among women treated for breast cancer, this study evaluated the effects of demographic, clinical, symptom, and psychosocial adjustment characteristics on the initial (preoperative) levels of FCR and trajectories of FCR over 6 months following surgery. Prior to and for 6 months following breast cancer surgery, 396 women were assessed for demographic and clinical (disease and treatment) characteristics, symptoms, psychological adjustment characteristics, and quality of life (QOL). FCR was assessed using a four-item subscale from the QOL instrument. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to examine changes in FCR scores and to identify predictors of inter-individual differences in preoperative FCR levels and trajectories over 6 months. From before surgery to 6 months post-operatively, women with breast cancer showed a high degree of inter-individual variability in FCR. Preoperatively, women who lived with someone, experienced greater changes in spiritual life, had higher state anxiety, had more difficulty coping, or experienced more distress due to diagnosis or distress to family members reported higher FCR scores. Patients who reported better overall physical health and higher FCR scores at enrollment demonstrated a steeper decrease in FCR scores over time. These findings highlight inter-individual heterogeneity in initial levels and changes in FCR over time among women undergoing breast cancer surgery. Further work is needed to identify and provide interventions for women experiencing FCR during and after breast cancer treatment.

  12. The Cancer Worry Scale: detecting fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custers, José A E; van den Berg, Sanne W; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Bleiker, Eveline M A; Gielissen, Marieke F M; Prins, Judith B

    2014-01-01

    In 9% to 34% of cancer patients, the fear of cancer recurrence becomes so overwhelming that it affects quality of life. Clinicians need a brief questionnaire with a cutoff point that is able to differentiate between high- and low-fearful survivors. This study investigated if the Cancer Worry Scale (CWS) could serve as an instrument to detect high levels of fear of recurrence in female breast cancer survivors. One hundred ninety-four female breast cancer patients were assessed up to 11 years after their primary treatment for cancer. The women returned the questionnaires including the 8-item CWS, 2 items of the Cancer Acceptance Scale, the Checklist Individual Strength-Fatigue subscale, and the Cancer Empowerment Questionnaire. A cutoff score of 13 versus 14 (low: ≤13, high: ≥14) on the CWS was optimal for detecting severe levels of fear of recurrence. A cutoff score of 11 versus 12 (low: ≤11, high: ≥12) was optimal for screening. The Cronbach α coefficient of the CWS was .87; evidence to support the convergent and divergent validity of the CWS was also obtained. The CWS is able to detect high levels of fear of recurrence. The CWS is a reliable and valid questionnaire to assess fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors. With the CWS, it is possible for nurses to screen breast cancer survivors for severe levels of fear of cancer recurrence. Thereby, nurses can screen and assist survivors in accessing appropriate and available support.

  13. Prognosis of metastatic breast cancer: are there differences between patients with de novo and recurrent metastatic breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbezoo, D J A; van Kampen, R J W; Voogd, A C; Dercksen, M W; van den Berkmortel, F; Smilde, T J; van de Wouw, A J; Peters, F P J; van Riel, J M G H; Peters, N A J B; de Boer, M; Peer, P G M; Tjan-Heijnen, V C G

    2015-04-28

    We aimed to determine the prognostic impact of time between primary breast cancer and diagnosis of distant metastasis (metastatic-free interval, MFI) on the survival of metastatic breast cancer patients. Consecutive patients diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer in 2007-2009 in eight hospitals in the Southeast of the Netherlands were included and categorised based on MFI. Survival curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine the prognostic impact of de novo metastatic breast cancer vs recurrent metastatic breast cancer (MFI ⩽24 months and >24 months), adjusted for age, hormone receptor and HER2 status, initial site of metastasis and use of prior (neo)adjuvant systemic therapy. Eight hundred and fifteen patients were included and divided in three subgroups based on MFI; 154 patients with de novo metastatic breast cancer, 176 patients with MFI 24 months. Patients with de novo metastatic breast cancer had a prolonged survival compared with patients with recurrent metastatic breast cancer with MFI 24 months (median, 29.4 vs 27.9 months, P=0.73). Adjusting for other prognostic factors, patients with MFI 24 months with de novo metastatic breast cancer no significant difference in mortality risk was found. The association between MFI and survival was seen irrespective of use of (neo)adjuvant systemic therapy. Patients with de novo metastatic breast cancer had a significantly better outcome when compared with patients with MFI 24 months, patients with de novo metastatic breast cancer had similar outcome.

  14. Surveillance mammography for detecting ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence and metachronous contralateral breast cancer: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Clare; Boachie, Charles; Fraser, Cynthia; MacLennan, Graeme; Mowatt, Graham; Thomas, Ruth E. [University of Aberdeen, Health Services Research Unit, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Ragupathy, Senthil Kumar Arcot [NHS Grampian, Radiology Department, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Heys, Steve D. [University of Aberdeen and Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, NHS Grampian, Division of Applied Medicine, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Gilbert, Fiona J. [University of Aberdeen and Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, NHS Grampian, Aberdeen Biomedical Imaging Centre, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of surveillance mammography for detecting ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence and metachronous contralateral breast cancer in women previously treated for primary breast cancer. A systematic review of surveillance mammography compared with ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specialist-led clinical examination or unstructured primary care follow-up, using histopathological assessment for test positives and follow-up for test negatives as the reference standard. Nine studies met our inclusion criteria. Variations in study comparisons precluded meta-analysis. For routine ipsilateral breast tumour detection, surveillance mammography sensitivity ranged from 64-67% and specificity ranged from 85-97%. For MRI, sensitivity ranged from 86-100% and specificity was 93%. For non-routine ipsilateral breast tumour detection, sensitivity and specificity for surveillance mammography ranged from 50-83% and 57-75% and for MRI 93-100% and 88-96%. For routine metachronous contralateral breast cancer detection, one study reported sensitivity of 67% and specificity of 50% for both surveillance mammography and MRI. Although mammography is associated with high sensitivity and specificity, MRI is the most accurate test for detecting ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence and metachronous contralateral breast cancer in women previously treated for primary breast cancer. Results should be interpreted with caution because of the limited evidence base. (orig.)

  15. Use of magnetic resonance imaging in detection of breast cancer recurrence: a systematic review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, Edel Marie

    2012-09-01

    Diagnosis of breast cancer recurrence can be difficult as a result of the presence of scar tissue in the breast. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be superior to traditional imaging in diagnosis of recurrence because of its ability to differentiate malignancy from scarring. Current guidelines on investigation of suspected breast cancer recurrence recommend MRI when other investigations have equivocal findings. We performed the first systematic review on this topic.

  16. Mucoadhesive Oral Wound Rinse in Preventing and Treating Stomatitis in Patients With ER- or PR-Positive Metastatic or Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer That Cannot be Removed by Surgery Receiving Everolimus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-25

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Oral Complications; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  17. Contemporary risks of local and regional recurrence and contralateral breast cancer in patients treated for primary breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalders, K. C.; Van Bommel, A. C M; Van Dalen, T.; Sonke, G. S.; Van Diest, P. J.; Boersma, L. J.; Van Der Heiden-Van Der Loo, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer treatment has evolved extensively over the past two decades with a shift towards less invasive local treatment and increased systemic treatment. The present study aimed to investigate the rates of local (LR) and regional (RR) recurrence and contralateral breast cancer

  18. Bisphosphonate use and risk of recurrence, second primary breast cancer, and breast cancer mortality in a population-based cohort of breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Kathleen E; Korde, Larissa A; Doody, David R; Hsu, Li; Porter, Peggy L

    2017-12-18

    Studies of bisphosphonate use and breast cancer recurrence have produced conflicting results. Analyses of large adjuvant trials suggest that bisphosphonates reduce recurrence risk only in postmenopausal women. We assessed the effect of non-cancer treatment related bisphosphonate use on breast cancer outcomes in a population-based prognostic cohort of women with early stage invasive breast cancer (n=1813; median follow-up 11.8 years). Using medical record, interview, and cancer registry data, information was assembled on risk factors, cancer treatment, medication use, and outcomes. Statistical analyses utilized Cox proportional hazards regression models. Bisphosphonate use was associated with a significantly decreased risk of a breast cancer event (locoregional/distant recurrence or second primary breast cancer) (HR ever use = 0.65, 95% CI 0.47-0.90). Reduced risks were observed in both pre/peri and postmenopausal women, in both ER-negative and ER-positive breast cancers, and for both earlier and later recurrences. Bisphosphonate use was also associated with a significantly decreased risk of breast cancer mortality (HR 0.40, 95% CI 0.23-0.69). Bisphosphonate use was associated with a reduction in risk of breast cancer events and improved breast cancer specific survival in women with early stage breast cancer. We hypothesize that the benefit of bisphosphonates on breast cancer outcomes may be present primarily in women with low bone density and regardless of menopausal status. Our findings suggest further consideration of bone density status as a modifier of bisphosphonate's potential beneficial benefits on breast cancer outcomes is warranted. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Mechanisms driving local breast cancer recurrence in a model of breast-conserving surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smith, Myles J

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to identify mechanisms driving local recurrence in a model of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer. BACKGROUND: Breast cancer recurrence after BCS remains a clinically significant, but poorly understood problem. We have previously reported that recurrent colorectal tumours demonstrate altered growth dynamics, increased metastatic burden and resistance to apoptosis, mediated by upregulation of phosphoinositide-3-kinase\\/Akt (PI3K\\/Akt). We investigated whether similar characteristics were evident in a model of locally recurrent breast cancer. METHODS: Tumours were generated by orthotopic inoculation of 4T1 cells in two groups of female Balb\\/c mice and cytoreductive surgery performed when mean tumour size was above 150 mm(3). Local recurrence was observed and gene expression was examined using Affymetrix GeneChips in primary and recurrent tumours. Differential expression was confirmed with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Phosphorylation of Akt was assessed using Western immunoblotting. An ex vivo heat shock protein (HSP)-loaded dendritic cell vaccine was administered in the perioperative period. RESULTS: We observed a significant difference in the recurrent 4T1 tumour volume and growth rate (p < 0.05). Gene expression studies suggested roles for the PI3K\\/Akt system and local immunosuppression driving the altered growth kinetics. We demonstrated that perioperative vaccination with an ex vivo HSP-loaded dendritic cell vaccine abrogated recurrent tumour growth in vivo (p = 0.003 at day 15). CONCLUSION: Investigating therapies which target tumour survival pathways such as PI3K\\/Akt and boost immune surveillance in the perioperative period may be useful adjuncts to contemporary breast cancer treatment.

  20. Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baun, Christina; Falch Braas, Kirsten; Gerke, Oke

    Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence: head-to-head comparison with CT and bonescintigraphy......Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence: head-to-head comparison with CT and bonescintigraphy...

  1. Serum HER-2: Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values for detecting metastatic recurrence in breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Patricia Diana; Jakobsen, Erik Hugger; Madsen, Jonna Skov

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of serum HER-2 for detecting metastatic recurrence in breast cancer patients.......The aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of serum HER-2 for detecting metastatic recurrence in breast cancer patients....

  2. Selective attention and fear of cancer recurrence in breast cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Custers, J.A.E.; Becker, E.S.; Gielissen, M.F.M.; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van; Rinck, M.; Prins, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anxious people show an attentional bias towards threatening information. PURPOSE: It was investigated whether an attentional bias exists for cancer-related stimuli in breast cancer survivors and if different levels of fear of cancer recurrence would lead to different patterns of

  3. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer VI: therapy of locoregional breast cancer recurrences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, Wolfgang [St. Claraspital, Abteilung fuer Radioonkologie, Basel (Switzerland); Budach, W. [Heinrich-Heine-University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, J. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany); Feyer, P. [Vivantes Hospital Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Krug, D. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Piroth, M.D. [Witten/Herdecke University, HELIOS-Hospital Wuppertal, Wuppertal (Germany); Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Municipal Hospital, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayer, F. [Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Wenz, F. [University of Heidelberg, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Haase, W.; Souchon, R.; Collaboration: Breast Cancer Expert Panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO)

    2016-04-15

    To update the practical guidelines for radiotherapy of patients with locoregional breast cancer recurrences based on the current German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines 2012. A comprehensive survey of the literature using the search phrases ''locoregional breast cancer recurrence'', ''chest wall recurrence'', ''local recurrence'', ''regional recurrence'', and ''breast cancer'' was performed, using the limits ''clinical trials'', ''randomized trials'', ''meta-analysis'', ''systematic review'', and ''guidelines''. Patients with isolated in-breast or regional breast cancer recurrences should be treated with curative intent. Mastectomy is the standard of care for patients with ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence. In a subset of patients, a second breast conservation followed by partial breast irradiation (PBI) is an appropriate alternative to mastectomy. If a second breast conservation is performed, additional irradiation should be mandatory. The largest reirradiation experience base exists for multicatheter brachytherapy; however, prospective clinical trials are needed to clearly define selection criteria, long-term local control, and toxicity. Following primary mastectomy, patients with resectable locoregional breast cancer recurrences should receive multimodality therapy including systemic therapy, surgery, and radiation +/- hyperthermia. This approach results in high local control rates and long-term survival is achieved in a subset of patients. In radiation-naive patients with unresectable locoregional recurrences, radiation therapy is mandatory. In previously irradiated patients with a high risk of a second local recurrence after surgical resection or in patients with unresectable recurrences, reirradiation should be strongly considered. Indication and dose concepts

  4. Reirradiation of recurrent breast cancer with and without concurrent chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kretschmer Matthias

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment options for loco-regional recurrent breast cancer after previous irradiation are limited. The efficacy of chemotherapy might be hampered because of impaired tissue perfusion in preirradiated tissue. Thus, mastectomy or local excision and reconstructive surgery are the preferred treatments. However, in recent years evidence accumulates that a second breast conserving approach with reirradiation as part of the treatment might be feasible and safe and, furthermore, reirradiation might be an option for palliation. Here we report on the experience of a single community centre in reirradiation of recurrent breast cancer. Methods The report is based on 29 patients treated with reirradiation. All data were prospectively collected. The median age was 63 years (range 35 to 82 yrs. The interval between initial diagnosis and diagnosis before start of reirradiation was 11.6 months to 295.5 months. The mean total dose (initial dose and reirradiation dose was 106.2 Gy (range 80.4 to 126 Gy and the mean BED3 Gy 168,5 Gy (range 130,6 to 201,6. The mean interval between initial radiotherapy and reirradiation was 92.9 months (range 8.7 to 290.1. Inoperable or incompletely resected patients were offered concurrent chemotherapy with either 5-FU or capecitabine. All patients received 3D-conformal radiotherapy with 1.6 to 2.5 Gy/fraction five times weekly. The treatment volume comprised all visible lesions or lesions detectable on CT/MRI/FDG-PET/CT or the tumour bed or recurrent tumour. Results The local progression-free survival of all patients at one and two years was 81% and 63%. Patients who had no surgery of the recurrence (16/29 had local progression-free survival at one and two years of 72% and 25% with a median progression-free survival time of 17 months. Partial remission and good symptom relief was achieved in 56% (9/16 or complete response of symptoms and/or tumour in 44% (7/16. Patients who had no distant metastases and had at

  5. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Request Permissions Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... as possible. Learn more about palliative care . Recurrent breast cancer If the cancer does return after treatment for ...

  6. Application of Canonical Correlation Analysis for Detecting Risk Factors Leading to Recurrence of Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Lotfnezhad Afshar, Hadi; Olfatbakhsh, Asiie; Mehrdad, Neda

    2016-01-01

    Background: Advances in treatment options of breast cancer and development of cancer research centers have necessitated the collection of many variables about breast cancer patients. Detection of important variables as predictors and outcomes among them, without applying an appropriate statistical method is a very challenging task. Because of recurrent nature of breast cancer occurring in different time intervals, there are usually more than one variable in the outcome set. For the prevention...

  7. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cencer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-Fluororacil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ording, Anne Gulbech; Cronin Fenton, Deirdre; Christensen, Mariann

    2012-01-01

    Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cencer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-Fluororacil...

  8. Contribution of problem-solving skills to fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akechi, Tatuo; Momino, Kanae; Yamashita, Toshinari; Fujita, Takashi; Hayashi, Hironori; Tsunoda, Nobuyuki; Iwata, Hiroji

    2014-05-01

    Although fear of recurrence is a major concern among breast cancer survivors after surgery, no standard strategies exist that alleviate their distress. This study examined the association of patients' problem-solving skills and fear of recurrence and psychological distress among breast cancer survivors. Randomly selected, ambulatory, female patients with breast cancer participated in this study. They were asked to complete the Concerns about Recurrence Scale (CARS) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine their associations. Data were obtained from 317 patients. Patients' problem-solving skills were significantly associated with all subscales of fear of recurrence and overall worries measured by the CARS. In addition, patients' problem-solving skills were significantly associated with both their anxiety and depression. Our findings warrant clinical trials to investigate effectiveness of psychosocial intervention program, including enhancing patients' problem-solving skills and reducing fear of recurrence among breast cancer survivors.

  9. Analysis of loco-regional and distant recurrences in breast cancer after conservative surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Mostafa; Alhussini, Mahmoud; Basha, Ahmed; Awad, A T

    2016-05-14

    A number of patients treated conservatively for breast cancer will develop loco-regional and distant recurrences. Our aim was to determine how their occurrence may be linked to the evolution of the disease. We analyzed 238 women treated by conservative breast surgery and breast irradiation in a single institution. We evaluated the prognostic factors associated with loco-regional and distant recurrences and the prognostic value of local and regional recurrences on systemic progression. After a median follow-up of 5 year (range 1-10), 16 (6.72%) patients in the breast conservative surgery (BCS) groups had loco-regional recurrence. For distant recurrence, 10 (4.2%) patients had experienced distant recurrence. Lympho-vascular invasion (HR 2.55; 95% CI, 076 to 8.49) and an extensive intraductal component (HR, 2.22; 95% CI, 0.69 to 7.15) and nodal status are risk factors for loco-regional recurrence (LRR) after breast conservative therapy (BCT). Tumor size, nodal status, high histologic grade, and breast cancer diagnosed at a young age (≤35 years) are correlated with higher distant recurrence rates after BCT. Risk factors for LRR after BCS include lympho-vascular invasion, extensive inraductal component, and high nodal status, where as risk factors for distant recurrence include tumor size, nodal status, high histologic grade, and breast cancer diagnosed at a young age (≤35 years).

  10. Bilateral metachronous breast cancer with bilateral recurrences: A case report and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Hyun; Sohn, Yu Mee [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The incidence of bilateral breast cancer has been reported to range from 0.4% to 14%, and it increases gradually as a result of improved early detection capabilities and longer survival times. We report a rare case where the bilateral breast cancers occurred as a metachronous bilateral breast cancer with bilateral recurrences, detected by mammography, and the rapid growth of tumor that manifested as microcalcification and skin thickening within 3 months.

  11. Immediate reconstruction with autologous fat grafting: influence in loco regional recurrence in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    STUMPF, CAMILE CESA; BIAZUS, JORGE VILLANOVA; ZUCATTO, FERNANDO SCHUH ÂNGELA ERGUY; Cericatto, Rodrigo; Cavalheiro, José Antônio Crespo; Damin, Andrea Pires Souto; Melo, Márcia Portela de

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate local and systemic recurrence of breast cancer in patients submitted to autologous fat grafting in the immediate reconstruction after conservative surgery for breast cancer. Methods: this is a historical cohort study comparing 167 patients submitted to conservative surgery without reconstruction (conservative surgery group) with 27 patients submitted to conservative treatment with immediate graft reconstruction, following the Coleman's technique (lipofillin...

  12. How breast cancer survivors cope with fear of recurrence : A focus group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, J.; den Oudsten, B.L.; Jacobs, P.M.; Roukema, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this qualitative study was to examine the ways in which breast cancer survivors cope with fear of recurrence. Methods Three focus groups were held with breast cancer survivors. Focus group interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using qualitative techniques.

  13. Tamoxifen's protection against breast cancer recurrence is not reduced by concurrent use of the SSRI citalopram

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lash, T L; Pedersen, L; Cronin-Fenton, D

    2008-01-01

    serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), so these widely used drugs - when taken concurrently - may reduce tamoxifen's prevention of breast cancer recurrence. We studied citalopram use in 184 cases of breast cancer recurrence and 184 matched controls without recurrence after equivalent follow-up. Cases...... and controls were nested in a population of female residents of Northern Denmark with stages I-III oestrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer 1985-2001 and who took tamoxifen for 1, 2, or most often for 5 years. We ascertained prescription histories by linking participants' central personal registry numbers...... effectiveness among regular citalopram users (>or=30% overlap with tamoxifen use). These results suggest that concurrent use of citalopram does not reduce tamoxifen's prevention of breast cancer recurrence....

  14. Application of Canonical Correlation Analysis for Detecting Risk Factors Leading to Recurrence of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Lotfnezhad Afshar, Hadi; Olfatbakhsh, Asiie; Mehrdad, Neda

    2016-03-01

    Advances in treatment options of breast cancer and development of cancer research centers have necessitated the collection of many variables about breast cancer patients. Detection of important variables as predictors and outcomes among them, without applying an appropriate statistical method is a very challenging task. Because of recurrent nature of breast cancer occurring in different time intervals, there are usually more than one variable in the outcome set. For the prevention of this problem that causes multicollinearity, a statistical method named canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is a good solution. The purpose of this study was to analyze the data related to breast cancer recurrence of Iranian females using the CCA method to determine important risk factors. In this cross-sectional study, data of 584 female patients (mean age of 45.9 years) referred to Breast Cancer Research Center (Tehran, Iran) were analyzed anonymously. SPSS and NORM softwares (2.03) were used for data transformation, running and interpretation of CCA and replacing missing values, respectively. Data were obtained from Breast Cancer Research Center, Tehran, Iran. Analysis showed seven important predictors resulting in breast cancer recurrence in different time periods. Family history and loco-regional recurrence more than 5 years after diagnosis were the most important variables among predictors and outcomes sets, respectively. Canonical correlation analysis can be used as a useful tool for management and preparing of medical data for discovering of knowledge hidden in them.

  15. The Concerns About Recurrence Questionnaire: validation of a brief measure of fear of cancer recurrence amongst Danish and Australian breast cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thewes, B.; Zachariae, R.; Christensen, S.; Nielsen, T.; Butow, P.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is prevalent amongst survivors, and breast cancer survivors are particularly vulnerable. Currently, there are few well-validated brief measures of FCR and none specific to breast cancer. This manuscript describes the development and initial validation of a

  16. Identification of a circulating microRNA signature to distinguish recurrence in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Dezheng; Clayton, Wendy M; Yoshimatsu, Toshio F; Chen, Jianjun; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I

    2016-08-23

    There is an urgent need for novel noninvasive prognostic biomarkers for monitoring the recurrence of breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to identify circulating microRNAs that can predict breast cancer recurrence. We conducted a microRNA profiling experiment in serum samples from 48 breast cancer patients using Exiqon miRCURY microRNA RT-PCR panels. Significantly differentiated miRNAs for recurrence in the discovery profiling were further validated in an independent set of sera from 20 patients with breast cancer recurrences and 22 patients without recurrences. We identified seven miRNAs that were differentially expressed between breast cancer patients with and without recurrences, including four miRNAs upregulated (miR-21-5p, miR-375, miR-205-5p, and miR-194-5p) and three miRNAs downregulated (miR-382-5p, miR-376c-3p, and miR-411-5p) for recurrent patients. Using penalized logistic regression, we built a 7-miRNA signature for breast cancer recurrence, which had an excellent discriminating capacity (concordance index=0.914). This signature was significantly associated with recurrence after adjusting for known prognostic factors, and it was applicable to both hormone-receptor positive (concordance index=0.890) and triple-negative breast cancers (concordance index=0.942). We also found the 7-miRNA signature were reliably measured across different runs of PCR experiments (intra-class correlation coefficient=0.780) and the signature was significantly higher in breast cancer patients with recurrence than healthy controls (p=1.1x10-5). In conclusion, circulating miRNAs are promising biomarkers and the signature may be developed into a minimally invasive multi-marker blood test for continuously monitoring the recurrence of breast cancer. It should be further validated for different subtypes of breast cancers in longitudinal studies.

  17. Review of guidance on recurrence risk management for general practitioners in breast cancer, colorectal cancer and melanoma guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spronk, Inge; Korevaar, Joke C; Burgers, Jako S; Albreht, Tit; Schellevis, François G

    2017-04-01

    General practitioners (GPs) will face cancer recurrences more frequently due to the rising number of cancer survivors and greater involvement of GPs in the follow-up care. Currently, GPs are uncertain about managing recurrence risks and may need more guidance. To explore what guidance is available for GPs on managing recurrence risks for breast cancer, colorectal cancer and melanoma, and to examine whether recurrence risk management differs between these tumour types. Breast cancer, colorectal cancer and melanoma clinical practice guidelines were identified via searches on internet and the literature, and experts were approached to identify guidelines. Guidance on recurrence risk management that was (potentially) relevant for GPs was extracted and summarized into topics. We included 24 breast cancer, 21 colorectal cancer and 15 melanoma guidelines. Identified topics on recurrence risk management were rather similar among the three tumour types. The main issue in the guidelines was recurrence detection through consecutive diagnostic testing. Guidelines agree on both routine and nonroutine tests, but, recommended frequencies for follow-up are inconsistent, except for mammography screening for breast cancer. Only six guidelines provided targeted guidance for GPs. This inventory shows that recurrence risk management has overlapping areas between tumour types, making it more feasible for GPs to provide this care. However, few guidance on recurrence risk management is specific for GPs. Recommendations on time intervals of consecutive diagnostic tests are inconsistent, making it difficult for GPs to manage recurrence risks and illustrating the need for more guidance targeted for GPs.

  18. Predictors of loco-regional recurrence and cancer-related death after breast cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausei, Stefano; Rovera, Francesca; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Tornese, Deborah; Fachinetti, Anna; Boni, Luigi; Dionigi, Renzo

    2010-01-01

    To determine which tumor-related factors might predispose the patient to loco-regional recurrence or death and the impact of these factors on the different types of events. We retrospectively analyzed the data of 1991 women between January 1998 and March 2010 for a first primary nonmetastatic breast cancer and treated with surgery and neo-adjuvant/adjuvant therapy. The overall survival distribution was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The prognostic impact of several factors on cumulative overall and loco-regional recurrence free survival was evaluated by univariate (log-rank test) and multivariate analysis (Cox regression). At log-rank test, pT, nodal status, histotype, grading, lymphangioinvasive growth, tumor diameter, estrogen receptors (ER) status, progesterone receptors (PR) status, expression of Ki67, and expression of Her2/neu had a prognostic value on loco-regional recurrence or overall survival. In the multivariate analysis grading remained the only independent predictor of loco-regional recurrences. With regard to overall survival, the Cox model selected grading along with nodal status and PR status. Loco-regional recurrences after breast cancer surgery are not frequent events. They are markers of tumor aggressiveness and predictor of an increased likelihood of cancer-related death. However, loco-regional recurrence and systemic tumor progression are partially independent events, since some prognostic factors differ. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Weight Gain, Metabolic Syndrome, and Breast Cancer Recurrence: Are Dietary Recommendations Supported by the Data?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin E. Champ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome, which can include weight gain and central obesity, elevated serum insulin and glucose, and insulin resistance, has been strongly associated with breast cancer recurrence and worse outcomes after treatment. Epidemiologic and prospective data do not show conclusive evidence as to which dietary factors may be responsible for these results. Current strategies employ low-fat diets which emphasize supplementing calories with increased intake of fruit, grain, and vegetable carbohydrate sources. Although results thus far have been inconclusive, recent randomized trials employing markedly different dietary strategies in noncancer patients may hold the key to reducing multiple risk factors in metabolic syndrome simultaneously which may prove to increase the long-term outcome of breast cancer patients and decrease recurrences. Since weight gain after breast cancer treatment confers a poor prognosis and may increase recurrence rates, large-scale randomized trials are needed to evaluate appropriate dietary interventions for our breast cancer patients.

  20. Validity of Danish Breast Cancer Group (DBCG) registry data used in the predictors of breast cancer recurrence (ProBeCaRe) premenopausal breast cancer cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Kjærsgaard, Anders; Ahern, Thomas P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Validation studies of the Danish Breast Cancer Group (DBCG) registry show good agreement with medical records for adjuvant treatment data, but inconsistent recurrence information. No studies have validated changes in menopausal status or endocrine therapy during follow-up. In a longit......BACKGROUND: Validation studies of the Danish Breast Cancer Group (DBCG) registry show good agreement with medical records for adjuvant treatment data, but inconsistent recurrence information. No studies have validated changes in menopausal status or endocrine therapy during follow......-up. In a longitudinal study, we validated DBCG data using medical records as the gold standard. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From a cohort of 5959 premenopausal women diagnosed during 2002-2010 with stage I-III breast cancer, we selected 151 patients - 77 estrogen-receptor-positive and 74 estrogen-receptor-negative - from......). The PPV for DBCG-recorded recurrence was 100%. However, of 19 patients who had a recurrence documented in their medical record, 13 had the recurrence registered in DBCG. CONCLUSIONS: DBCG data are valid for most epidemiological studies of breast cancer treatment. Data on menopausal transition may be less...

  1. Recurrent BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Mexican women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; Royer, Robert; Llacuachaqui, Marcia; Akbari, Mohammad R; Giuliano, Anna R; Martínez-Matsushita, Louis; Angeles-Llerenas, Angélica; Ortega-Olvera, Carolina; Ziv, Elad; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Phelan, Catherine M; Narod, Steven A

    2015-03-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes confer an estimated 58% to 80% lifetime risk of breast cancer. In general, screening is done for cancer patients if a relative has been diagnosed with breast or ovarian cancer. There are few data on the prevalence of mutations in these genes in Mexican women with breast cancer and this hampers efforts to develop screening policies in Mexico. We screened 810 unselected women with breast cancer from three cities in Mexico (Mexico City, Veracruz, and Monterrey) for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, including a panel of 26 previously reported mutations. Thirty-five mutations were identified in 34 women (4.3% of total) including 20 BRCA1 mutations and 15 BRCA2 mutations. Twenty-two of the 35 mutations were recurrent mutations (62.8%). Only five of the 34 mutation carriers had a first-degree relative with breast cancer (three with BRCA1 and two with BRCA2 mutations). These results support the rationale for a strategy of screening for recurrent mutations in all women with breast cancer in Mexico, as opposed to restricting screening to those with a sister or mother with breast or ovarian cancer. These results will impact cancer genetic testing in Mexico and the identification of at-risk individuals who will benefit from increased surveillance. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 24(3); 498-505. ©2014 AACR. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Local-Regional Recurrence of Triple Negative Breast Cancer after Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Gary M.; Anderson, Penny R.; Li, Tianyu; Nicolaou, Nicos

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To study results of radiation on the local control of triple receptor negative breast cancer (negative estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR) and HER-2/neu receptors). Materials and Methods Conservative surgery and radiation were used in 753 patients with T1–T2 breast cancer. Three groups were defined by receptor status: ER or PR (+) group 1; ER and PR (−) but HER-2 (+) group 2; and triple negative (TN) group 3. Factors analyzed were age, menopause, race, stage, tumor size, node status, presentation, grade, extensive in-situ disease, margins, and systemic therapy. The primary endpoint was 5-year local-regional recurrence (LRR) isolated or total with distant metastases. Results ER and PR negative patients were statistically significantly more likely to be black, T2, have tumors detectable on both mammogram and physical exam, grade 3, and receive chemotherapy. There were no significant differences in ER and PR negative patients by Her-2 status. There was a significant difference in rates of first distant metastases (3%, 12% and 7% for groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively, p=0.009). However, the isolated 5-year LRR was not significantly different (2.3%, 4.6%, and 3.2%, respectively, p=0.36) between the 3 groups.. Conclusions Patients with TN breast cancer are not at significantly increased risk for isolated LRR at 5-years so remain appropriate candidates for breast conservation. PMID:19156929

  3. Expression of mucin 1 possessing a 3'-sulfated core1 in recurrent and metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ideo, Hiroko; Hinoda, Yuji; Sakai, Kohei; Hoshi, Ikue; Yamamoto, Shigeru; Oka, Masaaki; Maeda, Kazunari; Maeda, Noriko; Hazama, Shoichi; Amano, Junko; Yamashita, Katsuko

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer threatening the lives of women between the ages of 30 and 64. The cancer antigen 15-3 assay (CA15-3) has been widely used for the detection of breast cancer recurrence; however, its sensitivity and specificity are inadequate. We previously found that the breast cancer cell line YMBS secretes mucin 1 possessing 3'-sulfated core1 (3Score1-MUC1) into the medium. Therefore, we here evaluated whether 3Score1-MUC1 is secreted into the blood streams of breast cancer patients, and whether it can serve as an improved breast cancer marker. We developed a lectin-sandwich immunoassay, called Gal4/MUC1, using a 3'-sulfated core1-specific galectin-4 and a MUC1 monoclonal antibody. Using the Gal4/MUC1 assay method, we found that 3Score1-MUC1 was profoundly expressed in the blood streams of patients with recurrent and/or metastatic breast cancer. The positive ratio of the Gal4/MUC1 assay was higher than that of the CA15-3 assay in both primary (n = 240) and relapsed (n = 43) patients, especially in the latter of which the positive ratio of Gal4/MUC1 was 86%. whereas that of CA15-3 was 47%. Furthermore, serum Gal4/MUC1 levels could more sensitively reflect the recurrence of primary breast cancer patients after surgery. Therefore, the Gal4/MUC1 assay should be an excellent alternative to the CA15-3 tumor marker for tracking the recurrence and metastasis of breast cancer. © 2015 UICC.

  4. In Sickness and in Health: Maintaining Intimacy After Breast Cancer Recurrence

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Barbara L.

    2009-01-01

    Sexual well-being after breast cancer recurrence has received little clinical attention. In discussing the sexual difficulties after recurrence we draw upon our longitudinal studies of newly diagnosed patients. It is noted that sexuality declines after a patient’s initial diagnosis and treatment, with further decline after recurrence. However, data suggest that couples strive to maintain intimacy as the health of the patient falters, providing further evidence of the resilience of patients co...

  5. Prognostic Factors for Local, Loco-regional and Systemic Recurrence in Early-stage Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kümmel, A; Kümmel, S; Barinoff, J; Heitz, F; Holtschmidt, J; Weikel, W; Lorenz-Salehi, F; du Bois, A; Harter, P; Traut, A; Blohmer, J U; Ataseven, B

    2015-07-01

    Aim: The risk of recurrence in breast cancer depends on factors such as treatment but also on the intrinsic subtype. We analyzed the risk factors for local, loco-regional and systemic recurrence, evaluated the differences and analyzed the risk of recurrence for different molecular subtypes. Material and Methods: A total of 3054 breast cancer patients who underwent surgery followed by adjuvant treatment at HSK hospital or Essen Mitte Hospital between 1998 and 2011 were analyzed. Based on immunohistochemical parameters, cancers were divided into the following subgroups: luminal A, luminal B (HER2-), luminal B (HER2+), HER2+ and TNBC (triple negative breast cancer). Results: 67 % of tumors were classified as luminal A, 13 % as luminal B (HER2-), 6 % as luminal B (HER2+), 3 % as HER2+ and 11 % as TNBC. After a median follow-up time of 6.6 years there were 100 local (3.3 %), 32 loco-regional (1 %) and 248 distant recurrences (8 %). Five-year recurrence-free survival for the overall patient collective was 92 %. On multivariate analysis, positive nodal status, TNBC subtype and absence of radiation therapy were found to be independent risk factors for all forms of recurrence. Age loco-regional recurrence was low. In addition to nodal status, subgroup classification was found to be an important factor affecting the risk of recurrence.

  6. Pre-diagnostic alcohol consumption and breast cancer recurrence and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Marianne; Olsen, Anja; Christensen, Jane

    2013-01-01

    The association between pre-diagnostic alcohol consumption and breast cancer recurrence and breast cancer specific mortality was investigated in 1,052 women diagnosed with early breast cancer in a prospective cohort of 29,875 women. Known clinical, lifestyle and socioeconomic risk factors were...... evaluated and adjusted for in multivariate analysis. We found a modest but significant association between pre-diagnostic alcohol consumption and breast cancer recurrence with a median follow-up of six years after date of diagnosis, both when using baseline measures of alcohol intake (HR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.......02-2.67; >2 units/day vs. ≤1 unit/day) and cumulated alcohol intake (HR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.06-3.85; >40 drinking years vs. 0...

  7. Higher locoregional recurrence rate for triple-negative breast cancer following neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chi; Wang, Shuang; Israel, Hayley P; Yan, Sherry X; HOROWITZ, DAVID P.; Crockford, Seth; Gidea-Addeo, Daniela; K. S. Clifford Chao; Kalinsky, Kevin; Connolly, Eileen P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer subtype, determined by expression of estrogen/progesterone receptor (ER/PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-2, is predictive for prognosis. The importance of subtype to locoregional recurrence (LRR) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is unknown, particularly after adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). Methods We retrospectively identified 160-breast cancer patients registered at Columbia University Medical Center from 1999 to 2012 treated with NAC, surger...

  8. Microcalcification-Associated Breast Cancer: Presentation, Successful First Excision, Long-Term Recurrence and Survival Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rominger, Marga B; Steinmetz, Carolin; Westerman, Ronny; Ramaswamy, Annette; Albert, Ute-Susann

    2015-12-01

    In this study we evaluated mammographic, histological and immunohistochemical findings for microcalcification-associated breast cancer with regards to breast-conserving therapy, recurrence and survival rate. We retrospectively analyzed 99 consecutive, non-palpable and microcalcification-associated breast cancers (94 women) that were treated surgically between January 2002 and December 2003 at a national academic breast cancer center. Calcifications were classified according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS). Descriptors, surgical outcome and histological findings were assessed. Recurrences and survival rates were evaluated based on medical records, standardized patient questionnaires and/or contacting the physician. 42 of the 99 lesions (42.4%) were invasive carcinomas, 57 (57.6%) were pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). 6 out of 99 (6.1%) lesions were triple negative, and 29 (29.3%) were HER2/neu positive. Successful first excision rate was 76/99 lesions (76.8%). Breast conservation was achieved in 73.7% (73/99). 10 women showed local recurrences without negatively impacting survival. The recurrences included round/punctate, amorphous, fine pleomorphic, and fine linear or fine-linear branching descriptors. The breast cancer-specific long-term survival rate was 91/94 (96.8%) for a mean follow-up of 81.4 months. The 3 patients who died due to breast carcinoma showed fine pleomorphic calcifications, and had nodal-positive invasive carcinoma at diagnosis. Microcalcification-associated breast cancers are frequently treated with breast-conserving therapy. Continuous clinical and mammographic follow-up is recommended for all descriptors.

  9. Correlation of breast recurrence (inflammatory type or not) after breast conserving surgery with radiation therapy and clinicopathological factors in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Reiki [Kumamoto City Hospital (Japan); Koyama, Hiroki

    1998-09-01

    To clarify risk factors for breast recurrence of inflammatory type after breast conserving therapy, we examined clinicopathological findings and therapies given after initial surgery. Nine cases of inflammatory breast recurrence out of 133 recurrent cases collected from a collaborative group supported by a grant-in-aid for Cancer Research by Japanese Ministry of Health and Welfare (7-24, Chairman: H. Koyama) were analyzed by a case control study. And forty-three recurrent cases in Kumamoto City Hospital were also analyzed similarly. Inflammatory breast recurrence after breast conserving surgery is characterized as follows: Most cases have negative surgical margin and may be unresponsive to radiation therapy, unlike non-inflammatory breast recurrence. Lymph node metastasis is involved in recurrence, but the difference in patients with only distant metastasis was positive lymphatic invasion. Distant metastasis coexisted at the time of recurrence, and secondary surgery was impossible in most cases. The prognosis after recurrence was unfavorable. These findings suggest that inflammatory recurrence is manifestation of so-called ``occult`` inflammatory breast cancer. (author)

  10. Recurrent BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in breast cancer patients of African ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Fackenthal, James D; Zheng, Yonglan; Huo, Dezheng; Hou, Ningqi; Niu, Qun; Zvosec, Cecilia; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Hennis, Anselm J; Leske, Maria Cristina; Nemesure, Barbara; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I

    2012-07-01

    Recurrent mutations constituted nearly three quarters of all BRCA1 mutations and almost half of all BRCA2 mutations identified in the first cohort of the Nigerian Breast Cancer Study. To further characterize breast/ovarian cancer risks associated with BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in the African diaspora, we genotyped recurrent mutations among Nigerian, African American, and Barbadian breast cancer patients. A replication cohort of 356 Nigerian breast cancer patients was genotyped for 12 recurrent BRCA1/2 mutant alleles (Y101X, 1742insG, 4241delTG, M1775R, 4359insC, C64Y, 1623delTTAAA, Q1090X, and 943ins10 from BRCA1, and 1538delAAGA, 2630del11, and 9045delGAAA from BRCA2) by means of SNaPshot followed by direct sequencing or by direct sequencing alone. In addition, 260 African Americans and 118 Barbadians were genotyped for six of the recurrent BRCA1 mutations by SNaPshot assay. Of all the BRCA1/2 recurrent mutations we identified in the first cohort, six were identified in 11 patients in the replication study. These mutation carriers constitute 3.1 % [95 % Confidence Interval (CI) 1.6-5.5 %] of the replication cohort. By comparison, 6.9 % (95 % CI 4.7-9.7 %) of the discovery cohort carried BRCA1/2 recurrent mutations. For the subset of recurrent mutations we tested in breast cancer cases from Barbados or the United States, only two 943ins10 carriers were identified in African Americans. Nigerian breast cancer patients from Ibadan carry a broad and unique spectrum of BRCA1/2 mutations. Our data suggest that BRCA1/2 mutation testing limited to recurrent mutations is not sufficient to understand the BRCA1/2-associated breast cancer risk in African populations in the diaspora. As the cost of Sanger sequencing is considerably reduced, deploying innovative technologies such as high throughput DNA sequencing of BRCA1/2 and other cancer susceptibility genes will be essential for identifying high-risk individuals and families to reduce the burden of aggressive early onset breast

  11. Chromosome 1q21.3 amplification is a trackable biomarker and actionable target for breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goh, Jian Yuan; Feng, Min; Wang, Wenyu

    2017-01-01

    Tumor recurrence remains the main reason for breast cancer-associated mortality, and there are unmet clinical demands for the discovery of new biomarkers and development of treatment solutions to benefit patients with breast cancer at high risk of recurrence. Here we report the identification...... of chromosomal copy-number amplification at 1q21.3 that is enriched in subpopulations of breast cancer cells bearing characteristics of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) and that strongly associates with breast cancer recurrence. Amplification is present in ∼10-30% of primary tumors but in more than 70% of recurrent...... tumors, regardless of breast cancer subtype. Detection of amplification in cell-free DNA (cfDNA) from blood is strongly associated with early relapse in patients with breast cancer and could also be used to track the emergence of tumor resistance to chemotherapy. We further show that 1q21.3-encoded S100...

  12. Accuracy of Perceived Risk of Recurrence among Patients with Early-stage Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Pérez, Maria; Aft, Rebecca L.; Massman, Kerry; Robinson, Erica; Myles, Stephanie; Schootman, Mario; Gillanders, William E.; Jeffe, Donna B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Accurate breast cancer recurrence-risk perceptions might motivate health-promoting behaviors and alleviate undue anxiety. Although a few studies have examined early-stage breast cancer survivors' perceived risk of recurrence, none have assessed the accuracy of survivors' perceived risk of recurrence. Methods First primary ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and early-invasive breast cancer (EIBC) survivors reported their perceived risk of recurrence during 6- and 12-month post-surgery interviews. We estimated patients' 10-year risk of recurrence from published clinical trials, and, for EIBC patients, risk of distant recurrence was based on their breast-cancer-specific mortality calculated using Adjuvant! Online. Patients' perceived risk was compared with their calculated risk and categorized as “Accurate,” “Underestimated,” “Overestimated,” and “Uncertain.” Multinomial logit marginal-effects models were fitted using “Accurate” as the reference. Results Only 17% of 531 patients accurately perceived their risk at six months, most of whom inaccurately perceived their risk at 12 months (P = 0.0143). Patients who were non-white (OR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.12 to 2.56) and received radiation therapy (OR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.07 to 3.77) were more likely to underestimate their risk. Patients with DCIS (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.08 to 2.70), lower social support (OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.95), and anxiety (OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.01 to 2.47) were more likely to overestimate their risk. Conclusion Few breast cancer survivors accurately perceived their risk of recurrence. Impact The accuracy of perceived risk may be increased by better physician-patient communications about their prognosis, provision of social support, and treatment for coexisting anxiety. PMID:20160274

  13. Predictors and patterns of fear of cancer recurrence in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinty, Heather L; Small, Brent J; Laronga, Christine; Jacobsen, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    This prospective, longitudinal study examined fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) among breast cancer survivors having mammograms. FCR was hypothesized to increase prior to the mammogram, decrease from immediately pre- to immediately post-mammogram with negative results, and then increase following the mammogram. The possible presence of different trajectories of FCR was also examined. Based on the cognitive-behavioral model (CBM) of health anxiety, greater perceived risk of recurrence, worse perceived consequences of recurrence, lower treatment efficacy beliefs, lower coping self-efficacy, and more engagement in reassurance-seeking behaviors were hypothesized to be associated with greater FCR across all study time points. Following treatment completion for Stage 0-IIIA breast cancer, 161 women completed the following measures: perceived risk and perceived consequences of recurrence, treatment efficacy beliefs, coping self-efficacy, and reassurance-seeking behaviors. Participants reported FCR at 3 time points before and 3 after the mammogram. Growth curve analysis was used to test for changes in FCR over time and growth mixture modeling examined different trajectories in FCR and the ability of the CBM to predict these trajectories. As hypothesized, FCR significantly changed over time; scores increased prior to the mammogram, decreased immediately following receipt of negative mammography results, and increased during the month following the mammogram. Growth mixture models revealed 2 classes, higher-FCR and lower-FCR, which were predicted by the CBM. These study findings support the use of the CBM in predicting which cancer survivors experience greater FCR and indicates that CBM-driven interventions may prove beneficial for reducing distressing FCR. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Body mass index, PAM50 subtype, recurrence, and survival among patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cespedes Feliciano, Elizabeth M; Kwan, Marilyn L; Kushi, Lawrence H; Chen, Wendy Y; Weltzien, Erin K; Castillo, Adrienne L; Sweeney, Carol; Bernard, Philip S; Caan, Bette J

    2017-07-01

    Studies of obesity and survival among patients with breast cancer produce conflicting results, possibly because of heterogeneity by molecular subtype. This study examined whether the association of body mass index (BMI) at diagnosis with breast cancer recurrence and survival varied across subtypes defined by PAM50 (Prediction Analysis of Microarray 50) gene expression. Included were 1559 Kaiser Permanente Northern California members ages 18 to 79 years who had PAM50 assays and were diagnosed with American Joint Committee on Cancer stage I through III breast cancer from 1996 to 2013. Patients reported weight and height. Cox regression models were adjusted for age, menopause, race/ethnicity, stage, and chemotherapy. Over a median of 9 years (maximum, 19 years), 378 women developed recurrent disease, and 312 died from breast cancer. Overall, BMI was not associated with breast cancer recurrence or survival when controlling for subtype (eg, the hazard ratio per 5 kg/m(2) of BMI was 1.05 [95% confidence interval, 0.95-1.15] for breast cancer-specific death). However, associations varied by subtype. Among women with luminal A cancers, those who had class II/III obesity, but not class I obesity or overweight, had worse outcomes. When women who had a BMI ≥35 kg/m(2) were compared with those who had a BMI from 18.5 to <25 kg/m(2) , the hazard ratio was 2.24 (95% confidence interval,1.22-4.11) for breast cancer-specific death and 1.24 (95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.54) for recurrence. There was no association within luminal B, basal-like or human epidermal growth factor over-expressing subtypes. Among patients who had accurately classified breast cancer subtypes based on gene expression, a BMI ≥35 kg/m(2) was adversely associated with outcomes only among those who had luminal A cancers. Research is needed into whether tailoring recommendations for weight management to tumor characteristics will improve outcomes. Cancer 2017;123:2535-42. © 2017 American Cancer

  15. Recurrent and second breast cancer detected on follow-up mammography and breast ultrasound after breast-conserving surgery: Findings and clinicopathologic factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ga Young; Cha, Joo Hee; Kim, Hak Hee; Shin, Hee Jung; Chae, Eun Young; Choi, Woo Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    To assess the imaging and clinicopathologic outcomes of recurrent and second breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery for invasive ductal carcinomas detected on follow-up mammography and breast ultrasound (US). Seventy-six women with an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) or regional lymph node recurrence and/or contralateral breast cancer (RLNR and CBC) after breast-conserving surgery were included in this study. The mammography and US images were analyzed and the clinicopathologic parameters were compared between the groups. Thirty had an IBTR, and 46 had a RLNR and CBC. The IBTR group's mammography and US images frequently revealed calcification and masses on the breast, respectively. The most frequent site of RLNR detected during follow-up mammography and breast US was the axilla. In univariate analysis, the tumors in the IBTR group were predominantly estrogen receptor (ER)-negative, HER-2 overexpression, and p53-positive. ER and HER-2 were shown by the multivariate analysis to be independent parameters associated for both types of recurrences. A mass or calcification is frequently present in IBTR and the axillary lymph node is the most frequent site of RLNR. ER and HER-2 status are major independent factors associated with recurrent and second breast cancer.

  16. 20-Year Risks of Breast-Cancer Recurrence after Stopping Endocrine Therapy at 5 Years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, Hongchao; Gray, Richard; Braybrooke, Jeremy; Davies, Christina; Taylor, Carolyn; McGale, Paul; Peto, Richard; Pritchard, Kathleen I.; Bergh, Jonas; Dowsett, Mitch; Hayes, Daniel F.; Albain, K.; Anderson, S.; Arriagada, R.; Barlow, W.; Bartlett, J.; Bergsten‐Nordström, E.; Bliss, J.; Boccardo, F.; Bradley, R.; Brain, E.; Cameron, D.; Clarke, M.; Coates, A.; Coleman, R.; Correa, C.; Costantino, J.; Cuzick, J.; Davidson, N.; Dodwell, D.; Di Leo, A.; Ewertz, M.; Forbes, J.; Gelber, R.; Gnant, M.; Goldhirsch, A.; Goodwin, P.; Hill, C.; Ingle, J.; Jagsi, R.; Janni, W.; Loibl, S.; MacKinnon, E.; Martin, M.; Mukai, H.; Norton, L.; Ohashi, Y.; Paik, S.; Perez, E.; Piccart, M.; Pierce, L.; Poortmans, P.; Raina, V.; Ravdin, P.; Regan, M.; Robertson, J.; Rutgers, E.; Slamon, D.; Sparano, J.; Swain, S.; Tutt, A.; Viale, G.; von Minckwitz, G.; Wang, X.; Whelan, T.; Wilcken, N.; Winer, E.; Wolmark, N.; Wood, W.; Zambetti, M.; Alberro, J. A.; Ballester, B.; Deulofeu, P.; Fábregas, R.; Fraile, M.; Gubern, J. M.; Janer, J.; Moral, A.; de Pablo, J. L.; Peñalva, G.; Puig, P.; Ramos, M.; Rojo, R.; Santesteban, P.; Serra, C.; Solà, M.; Solarnau, L.; Solsona, J.; Veloso, E.; Vidal, S.; Abe, O.; Abe, R.; Enomoto, K.; Kikuchi, K.; Koyama, H.; Masuda, H.; Nomura, Y.; Sakai, K.; Sugimachi, K.; Toi, M.; Tominaga, T.; Uchino, J.; Yoshida, M.; Haybittle, J. L.; Leonard, C. F.; Calais, G.; Garaud, P.; Collett, V.; Delmestri, A.; Sayer, J.; Harvey, V. J.; Holdaway, I. M.; Kay, R. G.; Mason, B. H.; Forbes, J. F.; Balic, M.; Bartsch, R.; Fesl, C.; Fitzal, F.; Fohler, H.; Greil, R.; Jakesz, R.; Marth, C.; Mlineritsch, B.; Pfeiler, G.; Singer, C. F.; Steger, G. G.; Stöger, H.; Canney, P.; Yosef, H. M. A.; Focan, C.; Peek, U.; Oates, G. D.; Powell, J.; Durand, M.; Mauriac, L.; Dolci, S.; Larsimont, D.; Nogaret, J. M.; Philippson, C.; Piccart, M. J.; Masood, M. B.; Parker, D.; Price, J. J.; Lindsay, M. A.; Mackey, J.; Hupperets, P. S. G. J.; Bates, T.; Blamey, R. W.; Chetty, U.; Ellis, I. O.; Mallon, E.; Morgan, D. A. L.; Patnick, J.; Pinder, S.; Lohrisch, C.; Nichol, A.; Bramwell, V. H.; Chen, B. E.; Gelmon, K.; Goss, P. E.; Levine, M. N.; Parulekar, W.; Pater, J. L.; Shepherd, L. E.; Tu, D.; Berry, D.; Broadwater, G.; Cirrincione, C.; Muss, H.; Weiss, R. B.; Abu‐Zahra, H. T.; Portnoj, S. M.; Bowden, S.; Brookes, C.; Dunn, J.; Fernando, I.; Lee, M.; Poole, C.; Rea, D.; Spooner, D.; Barrett‐Lee, P. J.; Mansel, R. E.; Monypenny, I. J.; Gordon, N. H.; Davis, H. L.; Sestak, I.; Lehingue, Y.; Romestaing, P.; Dubois, J. B.; Delozier, T.; Griffon, B.; Mace Lesec’h, J.; de La Lande, B.; Mouret‐Fourme, E.; Mustacchi, G.; Petruzelka, L.; Pribylova, O.; Owen, J. R.; Harbeck, N.; Jänicke, F.; Meisner, C.; Schmitt, M.; Thomssen, C.; Meier, P.; Shan, Y.; Shao, Y. F.; Zhao, D. B.; Chen, Z. M.; Howell, A.; Swindell, R.; Boddington, C.; Burrett, J. A.; Cutter, D.; Duane, F.; Evans, V.; Gettins, L.; Godwin, J.; James, S.; Kerr, A.; Liu, H.; Mannu, G.; McHugh, T.; Morris, P.; Read, S.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Z.; Albano, J.; de Oliveira, C. F.; Gervásio, H.; Gordilho, J.; Ejlertsen, B.; Jensen, M. B.; Johansen, H.; Mouridsen, H.; Palshof, T.; Gelman, R. S.; Harris, J. R.; Henderson, C.; Shapiro, C. L.; Christiansen, P.; Mouridsen, H. T.; Fehm, T.; Trampisch, H. J.; Dalesio, O.; de Vries, E. G. E.; Rodenhuis, S.; van Tinteren, H.; Comis, R. L.; Davidson, N. E.; Robert, N.; Sledge, G.; Solin, L. J.; Sparano, J. A.; Tormey, D. C.; Dixon, J. M.; Forrest, P.; Jack, W.; Kunkler, I.; Rossbach, J.; Klijn, J. G. M.; Treurniet‐Donker, A. D.; van Putten, W. L. J.; Rotmensz, N.; Veronesi, U.; Bartelink, H.; Bijker, N.; Bogaerts, J.; Cardoso, F.; Cufer, T.; Julien, J. P.; van de Velde, C. J. H.; Cunningham, M. P.; Brufsky, A. M.; Coleman, R. E.; Llombart, H. A.; Huovinen, R.; Joensuu, H.; Costa, A.; Bonadonna, G.; Gianni, L.; Valagussa, P.; Goldstein, L. J.; Bonneterre, J.; Fargeot, P.; Fumoleau, P.; Kerbrat, P.; Luporsi, E.; Namer, M.; Carrasco, E.; Segui, M. A.; Eiermann, W.; Hilfrich, J.; Jonat, W.; Kaufmann, M.; Kreienberg, R.; Schumacher, M.; Bastert, G.; Rauschecker, H.; Sauer, R.; Sauerbrei, W.; Schauer, A.; Blohmer, J. U.; Costa, S. D.; Eidtmann, H.; Gerber, B.; Jackisch, C.; de Schryver, A.; Vakaet, L.; Belfiglio, M.; Nicolucci, A.; Pellegrini, F.; Pirozzoli, M. C.; Sacco, M.; Valentini, M.; McArdle, C. S.; Smith, D. C.; Stallard, S.; Dent, D. M.; Gudgeon, C. A.; Hacking, A.; Murray, E.; Panieri, E.; Werner, I. D.; Galligioni, E.; Leone, B.; Vallejo, C. T.; Zwenger, A.; Lopez, M.; Erazo, A.; Medina, J. Y.; Horiguchi, J.; Takei, H.; Fentiman, I. S.; Hayward, J. L.; Rubens, R. D.; Skilton, D.; Scheurlen, H.; Sohn, H. C.; Untch, M.; Dafni, U.; Markopoulos, C.; Fountzilas, G.; Mavroudis, D.; Klefstrom, P.; Blomqvist, C.; Saarto, T.; Gallen, M.; Tinterri, C.; Margreiter, R.; de Lafontan, B.; Mihura, J.; Roché, H.; Asselain, B.; Salmon, R. J.; Vilcoq, J. R.; André, F.; Delaloge, S.; Koscielny, S.; Michiels, S.; Rubino, C.; A'Hern, R.; Ellis, P.; Kilburn, L.; Yarnold, J. R.; Benraadt, J.; Kooi, M.; van de Velde, A. O.; van Dongen, J. A.; Vermorken, J. B.; Castiglione, M.; Colleoni, M.; Collins, J.; Gelber, R. D.; Lindtner, J.; Price, K. N.; Regan, M. M.; Rudenstam, C. M.; Senn, H. J.; Thuerlimann, B.; Bliss, J. M.; Chilvers, C. E. D.; Coombes, R. C.; Hall, E.; Marty, M.; Buyse, M.; Possinger, K.; Schmid, P.; Wallwiener, D.; Bighin, C.; Bruzzi, P.; del Mastro, L.; Dozin, B.; Pastorino, S.; Pronzato, P.; Sertoli, M. R.; Foster, L.; George, W. D.; Stewart, H. J.; Stroner, P.; Borovik, R.; Hayat, H.; Inbar, M. J.; Peretz, T.; Robinson, E.; Camerini, T.; Formelli, F.; Martelli, G.; Di Mauro, M. G.; Perrone, F.; Amadori, D.; Martoni, A.; Pannuti, F.; Camisa, R.; Musolino, A.; Passalacqua, R.; Iwata, H.; Shien, T.; Ikeda, T.; Inokuchi, K.; Sawa, K.; Sonoo, H.; Sadoon, M.; Tulusan, A. H.; Kohno, N.; Miyashita, M.; Takao, S.; Ahn, J. H.; Jung, K. H.; Korzeniowski, S.; Skolyszewski, J.; Ogawa, M.; Yamashita, J.; Bastiaannet, E.; Liefers, G. J.; Christiaens, R.; Neven, P.; Paridaens, R.; van den Bogaert, W.; Braun, S.; Martin, P.; Romain, S.; Janauer, M.; Seifert, M.; Sevelda, P.; Zielinski, C. C.; Hakes, T.; Hudis, C. A.; Wittes, R.; Giokas, G.; Kondylis, D.; Lissaios, B.; de la Huerta, R.; Sainz, M. G.; Ro, J.; Camphausen, K.; Danforth, D.; Lichter, A.; Lippman, M.; Smart, D.; Steinberg, S.; D’Amico, C.; Lioce, M.; Paradiso, A.; Ohno, S.; Bass, G.; Brown, A.; Bryant, J.; Dignam, J.; Fisher, B.; Geyer, C.; Mamounas, E. P.; Redmond, C.; Wickerham, L.; Aihara, T.; Hozumi, Y.; Baum, M.; Jackson, I. M.; Palmer, M. K.; Ingle, J. N.; Suman, V. J.; Bengtsson, N. O.; Emdin, S.; Jonsson, H.; Venturini, M.; Lythgoe, J. P.; Kissin, M.; Erikstein, B.; Hannisdal, E.; Jacobsen, A. B.; Reinertsen, K. V.; Varhaug, J. E.; Gundersen, S.; Hauer‐Jensen, M.; Høst, H.; Nissen‐Meyer, R.; Mitchell, A. K.; Robertson, J. F. R.; Ueo, H.; Di Palma, M.; Mathé, G.; Misset, J. L.; Levine, M.; Morimoto, K.; Takatsuka, Y.; Crossley, E.; Harris, A.; Talbot, D.; Taylor, M.; Cocconi, G.; di Blasio, B.; Ivanov, V.; Paltuev, R.; Semiglazov, V.; Brockschmidt, J.; Cooper, M. R.; Falkson, C. I.; Hadji, P.; A’Hern, R.; Makris, A.; Parton, M.; Pennert, K.; Powles, T. J.; Smith, I. E.; Gazet, J. C.; Browne, L.; Graham, P.; Corcoran, N.; Clack, G.; van Poznak, C.; Deshpande, N.; di Martino, L.; Douglas, P.; Lindtner, A.; Notter, G.; Bryant, A. J. S.; Ewing, G. H.; Firth, L. A.; Krushen‐Kosloski, J. L.; Anderson, H.; Killander, F.; Malmström, P.; Rydén, L.; Arnesson, L. G.; Carstensen, J.; Dufmats, M.; Fohlin, H.; Nordenskjöld, B.; Söderberg, M.; Carpenter, J. T.; Murray, N.; Royle, G. T.; Simmonds, P. D.; Crowley, J.; Gralow, J.; Hortobagyi, G.; Livingston, R.; Martino, S.; Osborne, C. K.; Ravdin, P. M.; Bondesson, T.; Celebioglu, F.; Dahlberg, K.; Fornander, T.; Fredriksson, I.; Frisell, J.; Göransson, E.; Iiristo, M.; Johansson, U.; Lenner, E.; Löfgren, L.; Nikolaidis, P.; Perbeck, L.; Rotstein, S.; Sandelin, K.; Skoog, L.; Svane, G.; af Trampe, E.; Wadström, C.; Maibach, R.; Thürlimann, B.; Holli, K.; Rouhento, K.; Safra, T.; Brenner, H.; Hercbergs, A.; Yoshimoto, M.; Paterson, A. H. G.; Fyles, A.; Meakin, J. W.; Panzarella, T.; Bahi, J.; Lemonnier, J.; Martin, A. L.; Reid, M.; Spittle, M.; Bishop, H.; Bundred, N. J.; Forsyth, S.; Pinder, S. E.; Deutsch, G. P.; Kwong, D. L. W.; Pai, V. R.; Senanayake, F.; Rubagotti, A.; Hackshaw, A.; Houghton, J.; Ledermann, J.; Monson, K.; Tobias, J. S.; Carlomagno, C.; de Laurentiis, M.; de Placido, S.; Williams, L.; Bell, R.; Hinsley, S.; Marshall, H. C.; Pierce, L. J.; Solomayer, E.; Horsman, J. M.; Lester, J.; Winter, M. C.; Buzdar, A. U.; Hsu, L.; Love, R. R.; Ahlgren, J.; Garmo, H.; Holmberg, L.; Liljegren, G.; Lindman, H.; Wärnberg, F.; Asmar, L.; Jones, S. E.; Aft, R.; Gluz, O.; Liedtke, C.; Nitz, U.; Litton, A.; Wallgren, A.; Karlsson, P.; Linderholm, B. K.; Chlebowski, R. T.; Caffier, H.

    2017-01-01

    The administration of endocrine therapy for 5 years substantially reduces recurrence rates during and after treatment in women with early-stage, estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. Extending such therapy beyond 5 years offers further protection but has additional side effects. Obtaining

  17. Apolipoprotein D expression does not predict breast cancer recurrence among tamoxifen-treated patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella Klebaner

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein D (ApoD has been proposed as a predictor of breast cancer recurrence among estrogen receptor-positive (ER+, tamoxifen-treated patients.We conducted a population-based case-control study nested in a population of 11,251 women aged 35-69 years at diagnosis with Stage I-III breast cancer between 1985 and 2001 on Denmark's Jutland Peninsula and registered with the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. We identified 541 recurrent or contralateral breast cancers cases among women with ER+ disease treated with tamoxifen for at least 1 year and 300 cases in women with ER- disease never treated with tamoxifen. We matched one control subject per case and assessed ApoD expression in the tumor cell nucleus and cytoplasm using tissue microarray immunohistochemistry. We computed the odds ratio (OR associating ApoD expression with recurrence and adjusted for potential confounding using logistic regression.Cytoplasmic ApoD expression was seen in 68% of ER+ tumors, in 66% of ER- tumors, and in 66% of controls across both groups. In women with ER+ tumors, the associations of cytoplasmic ApoD expression with recurrence (OR = 1.0; 95% CI = 0.7 to 1.4 and increasing cytoplasmic expression with recurrence (OR = 1.0; 95% CI = 0.996 to 1.003 were null, as were those for women with ER- tumors. Associations for nuclear ApoD expression and combined nuclear and cytoplasmic expression were similarly near-null.ApoD expression is likely not a predictor of recurrence in tamoxifen-treated patients.This study eliminates the previously suggested marker ApoD as a predictor of recurrence among tamoxifen-treated women.

  18. Meta-analysis of aberrant lymphatic drainage in recurrent breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, M; Baker, R; Rubio, I T

    2016-11-01

    Sentinel node biopsy (SNB) in recurrent breast cancer offers targeted axillary staging compared with axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) or no treatment. The evidence for lymphatic mapping in recurrent breast cancer is reviewed, focusing on aberrant drainage and its implications for patient management. A meta-analysis of studies evaluating lymphatic mapping in recurrent breast cancer was performed. Outcomes included sentinel node identification, aberrant lymphatic pathways and metastatic node rates in aberrant drainage and ipsilateral axilla. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95 per cent confidence intervals (c.i.) were estimated using fixed-effect analyses, or random-effects analyses in the event of statistically significant heterogeneity. Seven studies reported data on lymphatic mapping in 1053 patients with recurrent breast cancer. The intraoperative sentinel node identification rate was 59·6 (95 per cent c.i. 56·7 to 62·6) per cent, and significantly greater when the original axillary surgery was SNB compared with ALND (OR 2·97, 95 per cent c.i. 1·66 to 5·32). The rate of aberrant lymphatic drainage identification was 25·7 (23·0 to 28·3) per cent, and significantly greater when the original axillary surgery was ALND (OR 0·27, 0·19 to 0·38). The metastatic sentinel node rate was 10·4 (8·6 to 12·3) per cent, and a significantly greater metastatic nodal burden was identified in the ipsilateral axilla (OR 6·31, 1·03 to 38·79). Lymphatic mapping is feasible in recurrent breast cancer. It avoids ALND in over 50 per cent of patients who have undergone SNB, and allows the 4 per cent of patients with metastatically involved aberrant nodes to receive targeted surgical and adjuvant therapies. © 2016 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A qualitative exploration of fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) amongst Australian and Canadian breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thewes, B; Lebel, S; Seguin Leclair, C; Butow, P

    2016-05-01

    Few studies have explored coping strategies used by cancer survivors to deal with fear of cancer recurrence (FCR), and little research has been conducted on the specific content of recurrence fears. This study aims to qualitatively explore the strategies used by younger breast cancer survivors to cope with FCR and whether women with low, medium and high levels of FCR employ different coping strategies. An additional aim was to understand the specific content of worst recurrence fears. Twenty Australian and 10 Canadian women aged ≤ 45 years diagnosed with stages 0-II disease at least 1 year prior completed telephone interviews. The transcripts of audio-taped interviews were analysed using the qualitative methodology of transcendental realism. Women with higher FCR described using distraction and avoidance and fewer coping skills. The fear of death was a common worst fear at all levels of FCR. However, participants with higher FCR described more elaborate fears of death often involving themes of pain and suffering. Cross-cultural differences were not observed. Women with higher FCR report using fewer and more avoidance-based coping techniques. Whilst many participants feared death, those with higher FCR reported more elaborate death fears. Women with high levels of FCR may benefit from learning a greater repertoire of coping skills. Understanding the specific content of FCR can help refine existing psychological treatment protocols for FCR. Implications for FCR treatment are discussed.

  20. Nestin and cluster of differentiation 146 expression in breast cancer: Predicting early recurrence by targeting metastasis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampaki, Ekaterini Christina; Tampakis, Athanasios; Nonni, Afroditi; Kontzoglou, Konstantinos; Patsouris, Efstratios; Kouraklis, Gregory

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the expression of stem-cell markers nestin and cluster of differentiation 146 with clinicopathological characteristics in breast cancer and to determine whether a prognostic impact of nestin and CD146 expression exists regarding occurrence of disease relapse in breast cancer. A total of 141 patients who were histologically diagnosed with breast cancer and underwent radical operations from November 2006 to October 2013 in Laiko General Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, were enrolled in the study. CD146 and nestin protein expression were evaluated using immunohistochemistry. Nestin expression was observed in 18.4% (26/141) of the cases, while CD146 expression was observed in 35.5% (50/141) of the cases. Nestin expression is significantly higher in younger patients with breast cancer. Nestin and CD146 expression were not correlated with the tumor size and the presence of lymph node metastasis. On the contrary, a significantly higher expression of nestin and CD146 was observed with triple-negative cancers (p metastasis, 30 months after the primary treatment. CD146 but not nestin, however, predicted independently (p = 0.047) disease recurrence. Nestin and CD146 are expressed in breast cancer cells with highly aggressive potency. They might contribute to disease relapse in breast cancer by activating the epithelial-mesenchymal transition pathway and assist tumor neovascularization.

  1. Carcinoma en Cuirasse from Recurrent Breast Cancer seen on FDG-PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Aung Zaw; Aparici, Carina Mari

    2015-01-01

    Our patient was a 36-year-old female diagnosed with Grade II ER+/PR-/Her-2 - ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in the left breast. She underwent left lumpectomy and received treatment with tamoxifen and radiotherapy. Three years later, she presented with multiple diffused skin nodules on the chest and upper left arm. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) exam showed widespread metastasis in the chest, upper left arm, left axillary lymph nodes, and left suprascapular muscle. FDG-PET/CT imaging of breast carcinoma en cuirasse is very rare. FDG-PET/CT is useful in detecting recurrent breast cancer.

  2. Meta-Analysis of Local Invasive Breast Cancer Recurrence After Electron Intraoperative Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harness, Jay K; Davies, Kalatu; Via, Christina; Brooks, Elizabeth; Zambelli-Weiner, April; Shah, Chirag; Vicini, Frank

    2017-11-06

    Electron intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) can be used during breast conserving surgery to treat early-stage invasive breast cancer. Using data from current clinical and observational studies, this study aimed to assess the impact of single-fraction electron IORT on local recurrence rates. Studies on single-fraction electron IORT during breast conserving surgery were identified through a search of PubMed and Google Scholar, as well as through secondary referencing. Local recurrence rate was the main outcome of interest. A meta-analysis of proportions using a binomial distribution to model the within-study variability and a random effects model was conducted to estimate a pooled local recurrence rate. To estimate a 5-year recurrence rate, a single-sample Poisson-normal model was applied to model the probability of events occurring during a fixed period (60 months). The study identified 13 publications. The analysis demonstrated a pooled monthly local recurrence rate of 0.02% per person-month (95% confidence interval CI 0.00-0.06%) for the studies with a follow-up period shorter than 5 years, 0.03% per person-month (95% CI 0.02-0.06%) for studies with a follow-up period of 5 years or longer, and 0.02% per person-month (95% CI 0.01-0.04%) overall. Based on this model, the predicted 5-year local recurrence rate was 2.7% (range 1.9-3.7%). According to the published literature, the rate of breast cancer local recurrence after electron IORT was 0.02% per person-month, with an adjusted 5-year recurrence rate of 2.7%. These findings support the recent guidelines from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) supporting the use of electron IORT for low-risk patients.

  3. The effect of surgery type on survival and recurrence in very young women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, May Lynn; Paszat, Lawrence Frank; Fernandes, Kimberly A; Sutradhar, Rinku; McCready, David R; Rakovitch, Eileen; Warner, Ellen; Wright, Frances C; Hodgson, Nicole; Brackstone, Muriel; Baxter, Nancy N

    2017-02-01

    The impact of surgical treatment on outcomes in breast cacner in very young women remains unclear. We sought to determine the effect of surgery type on risk of recurrence and survival in a population-based cohort. All women diagnosed with breast cancer aged ≤35 (1994-2003) were identified from the Ontario Cancer Registry. Patient, tumor, and treatment variables, including primary surgery, recurrences, and death were abstracted from chart review. Cox regression models were fit to determine the effect of surgery type on recurrence and overall survival. We identified 1,381 patients with 11-year median follow-up of which 793 (57%) had BCS. Of the remaining mastectomy patients, 52% had postmastectomy radiation. Overall, 41% of patients sustained a recurrence of any type and 31% died. Controlling for known confounders, there was no association between type of surgery and death from any cause (HR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.78, 1.25) or first recurrence (HR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.75, 1.14). Distant recurrence was most common (13% in BCS; 25.3% in mastectomy) with local recurrence 12.4% after BCS and 7.5% after mastectomy. In this cohort of very young women who were selected for treatment with BCS and mastectomy, we found similar oncologic outcomes. J. Surg. Oncol. 2017;115:122-130. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A Case of Recurrent Breast Cancer Identified by Pulmonary Tumor Thrombotic Microangiopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Abe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy (PTTM is a rare, cancer-related, pulmonary complication that causes hypoxia and pulmonary hypertension. We report on a 42-year-old woman who was diagnosed with recurrent breast cancer that was detected due to the presence of PTTM. Eleven months after surgery for heterochronous bilateral cancer of the left breast, she developed progressive dyspnea but computerized tomography showed no pulmonary thromboembolism, and a transthoracic echocardiography revealed mild pulmonary hypertension. She was diagnosed with PTTM by cytology from pulmonary artery catheterization and perfusion lung scintigraphy. Also, the patients complained of back pain after admission, bone scintigraphy showed multiple bone metastases. Despite the early diagnosis of PTTM, her platelet count decreased, her performance status rapidly deteriorated, and her dyspnea worsened. Thus, we could not treat her with chemotherapy. She died due to respiratory failure 19 days after admission. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of recurrent breast cancer identified by the manifestation of PTTM. Although PTTM is a rare phenomenon, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute dyspnea or pulmonary hypertension in patients with breast cancer. Furthermore, upon diagnosis, the patient should be referred to a cardiologist as soon as possible.

  5. Towards an evidence-based model of fear of cancer recurrence for breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custers, José A E; Gielissen, Marieke F M; de Wilt, Johannes H W; Honkoop, Aafke; Smilde, Tineke J; van Spronsen, Dick-Johan; van der Veld, William; van der Graaf, Winette T A; Prins, Judith B

    2017-02-01

    In order to understand the multidimensional mechanism of fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) and to identify potential targets for interventions, it is important to empirically test the theoretical model of FCR. This study aims at assessing the validity of Lee-Jones et al.'s FCR model. A total of 1205 breast cancer survivors were invited to participate in this study. Participants received a questionnaire booklet including questionnaires on demographics and psychosocial variables including FCR. Data analysis consisted of the estimation of direct and indirect effects in mediator models. A total of 460 women (38 %) participated in the study. Median age was 55.8 years (range 32-87). Indirect effects of external and internal cues via FCR were found for all mediation models with limited planning for the future (R (2) = .28) and body checking (R (2) = .11-.15) as behavioral response variables, with the largest effects for limited planning for the future. A direct relation was found between feeling sick and seeking professional advice, not mediated by FCR. In the first tested models of FCR, all internal and external cues were associated with higher FCR. In the models with limited planning for the future and body checking as behavioral response, an indirect effect of cues via FCR was found supporting the theoretical model of Lee-Jones et al. An evidence-based model of FCR may facilitate the development of appropriate interventions to manage FCR in breast cancer survivors.

  6. A pilot randomized controlled trial of cognitive bias modification to reduce fear of breast cancer recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenthal, Wendy G; Corner, Geoffrey W; Slivjak, Elizabeth T; Roberts, Kailey E; Li, Yuelin; Breitbart, William; Lacey, Stephanie; Tuman, Malwina; DuHamel, Katherine N; Blinder, Victoria S; Beard, Courtney

    2017-04-15

    The most common, persistent concern among survivors of breast cancer is the fear that their disease will return, yet to the authors' knowledge, few interventions targeting fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) have been developed to date. The current pilot study examined the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of a home-delivered cognitive bias modification intervention to reduce FCR. The intervention, called Attention and Interpretation Modification for Fear of Breast Cancer Recurrence (AIM-FBCR), targeted 2 types of cognitive biases (ie, attention and interpretation biases). A total of 110 survivors of breast cancer were randomized to receive 8 sessions of 1 of 2 versions of AIM-FBCR or a control condition program. Computer-based assessments of cognitive biases and a self-report measure of FCR were administered before the intervention, after the intervention, and 3 months after the intervention. Improvements in health worries (P = .019) and interpretation biases (rates of threat endorsement [Pcancer. Future research should attempt to replicate these findings in a larger-scale trial using a more sophisticated, user-friendly program and additional measures of improvement in more diverse samples. Cancer 2017;123:1424-1433. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  7. Exploring cancer register data to find risk factors for recurrence of breast cancer – application of Canonical Correlation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorstenson Sten

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A common approach in exploring register data is to find relationships between outcomes and predictors by using multiple regression analysis (MRA. If there is more than one outcome variable, the analysis must then be repeated, and the results combined in some arbitrary fashion. In contrast, Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA has the ability to analyze multiple outcomes at the same time. One essential outcome after breast cancer treatment is recurrence of the disease. It is important to understand the relationship between different predictors and recurrence, including the time interval until recurrence. This study describes the application of CCA to find important predictors for two different outcomes for breast cancer patients, loco-regional recurrence and occurrence of distant metastasis and to decrease the number of variables in the sets of predictors and outcomes without decreasing the predictive strength of the model. Methods Data for 637 malignant breast cancer patients admitted in the south-east region of Sweden were analyzed. By using CCA and looking at the structure coefficients (loadings, relationships between tumor specifications and the two outcomes during different time intervals were analyzed and a correlation model was built. Results The analysis successfully detected known predictors for breast cancer recurrence during the first two years and distant metastasis 2–4 years after diagnosis. Nottingham Histologic Grading (NHG was the most important predictor, while age of the patient at the time of diagnosis was not an important predictor. Conclusion In cancer registers with high dimensionality, CCA can be used for identifying the importance of risk factors for breast cancer recurrence. This technique can result in a model ready for further processing by data mining methods through reducing the number of variables to important ones.

  8. Low-dose aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, selective COX-2 inhibitors and breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe; Ahern, Thomas P

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and selective COX-2 inhibitors may improve outcomes in breast cancer patients. We investigated the association of aspirin, NSAIDs, and use of selective COX-2 inhibitors with breast cancer recurrence. METHODS: We identified incide...

  9. Haptoglobin phenotype is not a predictor of recurrence free survival in high-risk primary breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C.W. Gast; H. van Tinteren (Harm); M. Bontenbal (Marijke); R.Q.G.C.M. van Hoesel (René); M.A. Nooij; S. Rodenhuis (Sjoerd); P.N. Span (Paul); V.C.G. Tjan-Heijnen (Vivianne); E. de Vries (Esther); N. Harris (Nathan); J.W.R. Twisk (Jos); J.H.M. Schellens (Jan); J.H. Beijnen (Jos)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Better breast cancer prognostication may improve selection of patients for adjuvant therapy. We conducted a retrospective follow-up study in which we investigated sera of high-risk primary breast cancer patients, to search for proteins predictive of recurrence free survival.

  10. Haptoglobin phenotype is not a predictor of recurrence free survival in high-risk primary breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gast, Marie-Christine W.; van Tinteren, Harm; Bontenbal, Marijke; van Hoesel, Rene Q. G. C. M.; Nooij, Marianne A.; Rodenhuis, Sjoerd; Span, Paul N.; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C. G.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Harris, Nathan; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Schellens, Jan H. M.; Beijnen, Jos H.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Better breast cancer prognostication may improve selection of patients for adjuvant therapy. We conducted a retrospective follow-up study in which we investigated sera of high-risk primary breast cancer patients, to search for proteins predictive of recurrence free survival. Methods: Two

  11. Haptoglobin phenotype is not a predictor of recurrence free survival in high-risk primary breast cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gast, M.C.; Tinteren, H van; Bontenbal, M.; Hoesel, R.Q. van; Nooij, M.A.; Rodenhuis, S.; Span, P.N.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.; Vries, E.G.F. de; Harris, N.; Twisk, J.W.; Schellens, J.H.M.; Beijnen, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Better breast cancer prognostication may improve selection of patients for adjuvant therapy. We conducted a retrospective follow-up study in which we investigated sera of high-risk primary breast cancer patients, to search for proteins predictive of recurrence free survival. METHODS: Two

  12. Quality of life of women with recurrent breast cancer and their family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northouse, Laurel L; Mood, Darlene; Kershaw, Trace; Schafenacker, Ann; Mellon, Suzanne; Walker, Julie; Galvin, Elizabeth; Decker, Veronica

    2002-10-01

    Little information is available about the effects of recurrent breast cancer on the quality of life of women and their family members. The present study assessed patients' and family members' quality of life within 1 month after recurrence, and effects of multiple factors on quality-of-life scores. Patient/family member dyads (N = 189) participated in this study. A stress-appraisal model guided selection of person factors, social/family factors, illness-related factors, appraisal factors, and quality of life, measured with psychometrically sound instruments. Quality of life was measured with both generic (Medical Outcomes Study SF-36) and cancer-specific (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy) scales. Patients reported significant impairments in physical, functional, and emotional well-being. Family members reported significant impairments in their own emotional well-being. Structural equation modeling revealed that self-efficacy, social support, and family hardiness had positive effects on quality of life, whereas symptom distress, concerns, hopelessness, and negative appraisal of illness or caregiving had detrimental effects. Study variables accounted for a sizable amount of variance in patients' and family members' physical and mental dimensions of quality of life (72% to 81%). Contrary to findings observed in studies of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients and spouses, little relationship was found between recurrent patients' and family members' quality of life. Women with recurrent breast cancer are in need of programs to assist them with the severe effects of the disease on their quality of life. Programs need to include family members to help counteract the negative effects of the recurrent disease on their mental health, and to enable them to continue as effective caregivers.

  13. Sexual well-being among partnered women with breast cancer recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Barbara L; Carpenter, Kristen M; Yang, Hae-Chung; Shapiro, Charles L

    2007-07-20

    A woman's risk for sexual disruption after breast cancer recurrence has received little clinical or research attention. Breast cancer patients recently diagnosed with recurrence (n = 60) were initially assessed at baseline and completed follow-ups at 4, 8, and 12 months. They were compared by age, stage, and duration and frequency of follow-up with matched patients who remained disease free (n = 120). Using linear mixed modeling, the groups were compared in their trajectories of change on measures of sexuality, relationship satisfaction, cancer-specific stress, and physical functioning. Recurrence subgroups, those with locoregional versus distant disease and those younger versus older than 52 years, were also compared. At baseline, the recurrence group had significantly lower intercourse frequency and physical functioning compared with the disease-free group and these differences were maintained. There were no significant differences in the frequencies of kissing or sexual and relationship satisfactions. For the recurrence group patients, the heightened stress of the diagnostic/early recurrence treatment period declined to the lower disease-free levels by 12 months. This effect was largely due to improvement of the patients with distant disease. Finally, sexual changes were most notable for younger patients. To our knowledge, this is the first longitudinal, controlled study of sexuality-sexuality in the context of other quality of life domains-for women coping with recurrence. Despite disruption, patients maintained their sexual lives. Younger and distant recurrence patients, however, may have greatest risk of sexual disruption. The factors contributing to sexual disruption remain unknown, and studies investigating strategies to help patients maintain this aspect of quality of life are needed.

  14. Investigation of Three Approaches to Address Fear of Recurrence Among Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-16

    Breast Neoplasms; Breast Cancer; Breast Carcinoma; Malignant Neoplasm of Breast; Cancer of Breast; Mammary Neoplasm, Human; Human Mammary Carcinoma; Malignant Tumor of Breast; Mammary Cancer; Mammary Carcinoma; Anxiety; Fear; Neoplasm Remission, Spontaneous; Spontaneous Neoplasm Regression; Regression, Spontaneous Neoplasm; Remission, Spontaneous Neoplasm; Spontaneous Neoplasm Remission

  15. Outcomes after curative or palliative surgery for locoregional recurrent breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Alexander Andersen; Mele, Marco; Damsgaard, Tine Engberg

    2014-01-01

    Background Locoregional recurrence (LRR) after breast cancer is an independent predictor for later systemic disease and poor long-term outcome. As the surgical treatment is complex and often leaves the patient with extensive defects, reconstructive procedures involving flaps, and thus plastic...... surgical assistance, are often required. The aim of the present study was to evaluate our institution’s approach to surgical treatment for locoregional recurrence of a breast cancer. Methods In the present retrospective, single-centre study, we evaluate our experience with 12 patients who underwent surgery...... occurred in four (33 %) of the patients. Median overall survival was 22 months, regardless of the surgery being curative or palliative. A median disease-free survival of 18 months was achieved for patients having achieved radicality. Conclusions Both wide local excision and full thickness chest wall...

  16. The Genomic Grade Assay Compared With Ki67 to Determine Risk of Distant Breast Cancer Recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ignatiadis, Michail; Azim, Hatem A; Desmedt, Christine

    2016-01-01

    % (95% CI, 90%-98%), and for GG3 patients, the 10-year DRFI was 87% (95% CI, 80%-94%). Conclusions and Relevance: Either the GG assay or centrally reviewed Ki67 significantly improves clinicopathological models to determine distant recurrence of breast cancer. Compared with the histological grade...... was developed and named the Genomic Grade (GG). The GG assay has the potential to increase the clinical application of the GGI, but robust demonstration of the clinical validity of the GG assay is required. Objective: To evaluate the prognostic ability of the GG assay to detect breast cancer recurrence compared...... and survival end points were evaluated using Cox regression models stratified for chemotherapy use; the 2 vs 4 arm randomization option; and endocrine therapy assignment with and without adjustment for clinicopathological parameters, including centrally reviewed histological grade, hormone receptors, and ERBB2...

  17. Comparison of Locoregional Recurrence with Mastectomy vs. Breast Conserving Surgery in Pregnancy Associated Breast Cancer (PABC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paniti Sukumvanich

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We have compared outcomes, including the locoregional recurrence, between mastectomy and breast conserving therapy in PABC. Patients were divided into those who were treated with mastectomies (group 1 and those with breast conserving surgery (group 2. The groups were comparable except for lower mean age in group 2 and more patients with stage III disease and higher number of nodes positive in the group 1. Five-year actuarial LRR, distant metastases free survival and overall survival in group 1 vs. 2 were 10% vs. 37%, 73% vs. 81% and 57% vs. 59% respectively. The patients with PABC treated with breast conserving therapy, despite having lower stage disease, have a higher risk of local regional recurrence in comparison with those treated with mastectomy.

  18. Young and worried: Age and fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebel, Sophie; Beattie, Sara; Arès, Isabelle; Bielajew, Catherine

    2013-06-01

    Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is a frequently cited and unmet need of cancer survivors. While the relation between age and FCR is well documented, the mechanisms that may explain this phenomenon remain to be investigated. This study examined four possible mechanisms of the relation between age and FCR: motherhood, severity of the cancer (defined as cancer stage and chemotherapy), anxiety, and illness intrusiveness. 3,239 women with breast cancer (mean time since diagnosis: 6.6 years) completed the Concerns About Recurrence Scale (CARS), the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and the Illness Intrusiveness Ratings Scale (IIRS) within a larger web-based study. Women were divided into four groups based on their current age: 65. Multivariate analyses were performed with age category and motherhood as the independent variables and the CARS subscales as the dependent variables, controlling for age of children and relevant covariates. Severity of the cancer, anxiety, and illness intrusiveness were simultaneously tested as mediators of the relation between age and FCR. Results indicated that age category was related to FCR, F = 10.37, p cancer was not. Younger age was associated with more FCR among breast cancer patients, regardless of motherhood status. Our findings suggest new, potentially valuable ways of managing FCR by helping affected people to reduce anxiety and illness intrusiveness. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-08

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Breast Adenocarcinoma; Inflammatory Breast Carcinoma

  20. The diagnostic value of PET/CT in recurrence and distant metastasis in breast cancer patients and impact on disease free survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina M. Abo-Sheisha

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: In breast cancer, PET/CT is superior to conventional imaging procedures for detection of recurrence, distant metastases and PET/CT can be used to improve prediction of the clinical outcome of breast cancer patients.

  1. What Factors Influence Women's Perceptions of their Systemic Recurrence Risk after Breast Cancer Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kamaria L; Janz, Nancy K; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J; Jagsi, Reshma; Wallner, Lauren P; Kurian, Allison W; Katz, Steven J; Abrahamse, Paul; Hawley, Sarah T

    2017-08-01

    Breast cancer patients' misunderstanding of their systemic cancer recurrence risk has consequences on decision-making and quality of life. Little is known about how women derive their risk estimates. Using Los Angeles and Georgia's SEER registries (2014-2015), a random sample of early-stage breast cancer patients was sent surveys about 2 to 3 months after surgery ( N = 3930; RR, 68%). We conducted an inductive thematic analysis of open-ended responses about why women chose their risk estimates in a uniquely large sub-sample ( N = 1,754). Clinician estimates of systemic recurrence risk were provided for patient sub-groups with DCIS and with low-, intermediate-, and high-risk invasive disease. Women's perceived risk of systemic recurrence (0% to 100%) was categorized as overestimation, reasonably accurate estimation, or underestimation (0% for invasive disease) and was compared across identified factors and by clinical presentation. Women identified 9 main factors related to their clinical experience (e.g., diagnosis and testing; treatment) and non-clinical beliefs (e.g., uncertainty; spirituality). Women who mentioned at least one clinical experience factor were significantly less likely to overestimate their risk (12% v. 43%, P women who were influenced by "communication with a clinician" had reasonably accurate recurrence estimates (68%). "Uncertainty" and "family and personal history" were associated with overestimation, particularly for women with DCIS (75%; 84%). "Spirituality, religion, and faith" was associated with an underestimation of risk (63% v. 20%, P cancer patients' understanding of their numeric risk of systemic recurrence. Clinician discussions about recurrence risk should address uncertainty and relevance of family and personal history.

  2. 6.3 MeV fast neutrons in the treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velikaya, V. V., E-mail: viktoria.v.v@inbox.ru; Startseva, Zh. A., E-mail: zhanna.alex@rambler.ru [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, Kooperativny Street 5, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Avenue 30, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Musabaeva, L. I., E-mail: musabaevaLI@oncology.tomsk.ru; Lisin, V. A., E-mail: Lisin@oncology.tomsk.ru [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, Kooperativny Street 5, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-02

    The study included 135 breast cancer patients (70 patients with locally recurrent breast cancer and 65 patients with locally advanced breast cancer with unfavorable prognostic factors) who received the neutron therapy alone or in combination with the photon therapy. The neutron therapy was shown to be effective in multimodality treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer. The 8-year survival rate in patients without repeated breast cancer recurrence was 87.6 ± 8.7% after the neutron and neutron-photon therapy and 54.3 ± 9.2% after the electron beam therapy.

  3. Recurrence risk perception and quality of life following treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Sarah T; Janz, Nancy K; Griffith, Kent A; Jagsi, Reshma; Friese, Christopher R; Kurian, Allison W; Hamilton, Ann S; Ward, Kevin C; Morrow, Monica; Wallner, Lauren P; Katz, Steven J

    2017-02-01

    Little is known about different ways of assessing risk of distant recurrence following cancer treatment (e.g., numeric or descriptive). We sought to evaluate the association between overestimation of risk of distant recurrence of breast cancer and key patient-reported outcomes, including quality of life and worry. We surveyed a weighted random sample of newly diagnosed patients with early-stage breast cancer identified through SEER registries of Los Angeles County & Georgia (2013-14) ~2 months after surgery (N = 2578, RR = 71%). Actual 10-year risk of distant recurrence after treatment was based on clinical factors for women with DCIS & low-risk invasive cancer (Stg 1A, ER+, HER2-, Gr 1-2). Women reported perceptions of their risk numerically (0-100%), with values ≥10% for DCIS & ≥20% for invasive considered overestimates. Perceptions of "moderate, high or very high" risk were considered descriptive overestimates. In our analytic sample (N = 927), we assessed factors correlated with both types of overestimation and report multivariable associations between overestimation and QoL (PROMIS physical & mental health) and frequent worry. 30.4% of women substantially overestimated their risk of distant recurrence numerically and 14.7% descriptively. Few factors other than family history were significantly associated with either type of overestimation. Both types of overestimation were significantly associated with frequent worry, and lower QoL. Ensuring understanding of systemic recurrence risk, particularly among patients with favorable prognosis, is important. Better risk communication by clinicians may translate to better risk comprehension among patients and to improvements in QoL.

  4. Recurrent triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC tissues contain a higher amount of phosphatidylcholine (32:1 than non-recurrent TNBC tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Hosokawa

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is one of the breast cancer subtype that displays a high risk of early recurrence and short overall survival. Improvement of the prognosis of patients with TNBC requires identifying a predictive factor of recurrence, which would make it possible to provide beneficial personalized treatment. However, no clinically reliable predictive factor is currently known. In this study, we investigated the predictive factor of recurrence in TNBC using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-imaging mass spectrometry for lipid profiling of breast cancer specimens obtained from three and six patients with recurrent and non-recurrent TNBC, respectively. The signal for phosphatidylcholine (PC (32:1 at m/z 732.5 was significantly higher in the recurrence group compared to the non-recurrence group (P = 0.024. PC (32:1 was more abundant in the cancer epithelial area than it was in the surrounding stroma, suggesting that abnormal lipid metabolism was associated with malignant transformation. Our results indicate PC (32:1 as a candidate predictive factor of TNBC recurrence. A future prospective study investigating whether personalized therapy based on PC (32:1 intensity improves the prognosis of patients with TNBC is recommended.

  5. Chemotherapy for isolated locoregional recurrence of breast cancer (CALOR): a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aebi, Stefan; Gelber, Shari; Anderson, Stewart J; Láng, István; Robidoux, André; Martín, Miguel; Nortier, Johan W R; Paterson, Alexander H G; Rimawi, Mothaffar F; Cañada, José Manuel Baena; Thürlimann, Beat; Murray, Elizabeth; Mamounas, Eleftherios P; Geyer, Charles E; Price, Karen N; Coates, Alan S; Gelber, Richard D; Rastogi, Priya; Wolmark, Norman; Wapnir, Irene L

    2014-02-01

    Patients with isolated locoregional recurrences (ILRR) of breast cancer have a high risk of distant metastasis and death from breast cancer. We aimed to establish whether adjuvant chemotherapy improves the outcome of such patients. The CALOR trial was a pragmatic, open-label, randomised trial that accrued patients with histologically proven and completely excised ILRR after unilateral breast cancer who had undergone a mastectomy or lumpectomy with clear surgical margins. Eligible patients were enrolled from hospitals worldwide and were centrally randomised (1:1) to chemotherapy (type selected by the investigator; multidrug for at least four courses recommended) or no chemotherapy, using permuted blocks, and stratified by previous chemotherapy, oestrogen-receptor and progesterone-receptor status, and location of ILRR. Patients with oestrogen-receptor-positive ILRR received adjuvant endocrine therapy, radiation therapy was mandated for patients with microscopically involved surgical margins, and anti-HER2 therapy was optional. The primary endpoint was disease-free survival. All analyses were by intention to treat. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00074152. From Aug 22, 2003, to Jan 31, 2010, 85 patients were randomly assigned to receive chemotherapy and 77 were assigned to no chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 4·9 years (IQR 3·6-6 ·0), 24 (28%) patients had disease-free survival events in the chemotherapy group compared with 34 (44%) in the no chemotherapy group. 5-year disease-free survival was 69% (95% CI 56-79) with chemotherapy versus 57% (44-67) without chemotherapy (hazard ratio 0·59 [95% CI 0·35-0·99]; p=0·046). Adjuvant chemotherapy was significantly more effective for women with oestrogen-receptor-negative ILRR (pinteraction=0·046), but analyses of disease-free survival according to the oestrogen-receptor status of the primary tumour were not statistically significant (pinteraction=0·43). Of the 81 patients who

  6. Chromosome 1q21.3 amplification is a trackable biomarker and actionable target for breast cancer recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Jian Yuan; Feng, Min; Wang, Wenyu; Oguz, Gokce; Yatim, Siti Maryam J M; Lee, Puay Leng; Bao, Yi; Lim, Tse Hui; Wang, Panpan; Tam, Wai Leong; Kodahl, Annette R; Lyng, Maria B; Sarma, Suman; Lin, Selena Y; Lezhava, Alexander; Yap, Yoon Sim; Lim, Alvin S T; Hoon, Dave S B; Ditzel, Henrik J; Lee, Soo Chin; Tan, Ern Yu; Yu, Qiang

    2017-11-01

    Tumor recurrence remains the main reason for breast cancer-associated mortality, and there are unmet clinical demands for the discovery of new biomarkers and development of treatment solutions to benefit patients with breast cancer at high risk of recurrence. Here we report the identification of chromosomal copy-number amplification at 1q21.3 that is enriched in subpopulations of breast cancer cells bearing characteristics of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) and that strongly associates with breast cancer recurrence. Amplification is present in ∼10-30% of primary tumors but in more than 70% of recurrent tumors, regardless of breast cancer subtype. Detection of amplification in cell-free DNA (cfDNA) from blood is strongly associated with early relapse in patients with breast cancer and could also be used to track the emergence of tumor resistance to chemotherapy. We further show that 1q21.3-encoded S100 calcium-binding protein (S100A) family members, mainly S100A7, S100A8, and S100A9 (S100A7/8/9), and IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1) establish a reciprocal feedback loop driving tumorsphere growth. Notably, this functional circuitry can be disrupted by the small-molecule kinase inhibitor pacritinib, leading to preferential impairment of the growth of 1q21.3-amplified breast tumors. Our study uncovers the 1q21.3-directed S100A7/8/9-IRAK1 feedback loop as a crucial component of breast cancer recurrence, serving as both a trackable biomarker and an actionable therapeutic target for breast cancer.

  7. Carcinoma en Cuirasse from Recurrent Breast Cancer seen on FDG-PET/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aung Zaw Win

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our patient was a 36-year-old female diagnosed with Grade II ER+/PR−/Her-2 − ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS in the left breast. She underwent left lumpectomy and received treatment with tamoxifen and radiotherapy. Three years later, she presented with multiple diffused skin nodules on the chest and upper left arm. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT exam showed widespread metastasis in the chest, upper left arm, left axillary lymph nodes, and left suprascapular muscle. FDG-PET/CT imaging of breast carcinoma en cuirasse is very rare. FDG-PET/CT is useful in detecting recurrent breast cancer.

  8. [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/Computed Tomography (CT) in Suspected Recurrent Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Malene Grubbe; Gerke, Oke; Baun, Christina

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively investigate the diagnostic accuracy of [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) with dual-time-point imaging, contrast-enhanced CT (ceCT), and bone scintigraphy (BS) in patients with suspected breast cancer recurrence....... PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred women with suspected recurrence of breast cancer underwent 1-hour and 3-hour FDG-PET/CT, ceCT, and BS within approximately 10 days. The study was powered to estimate the precision of the individual imaging tests. Images were visually interpreted using a four...... the receiver operating curve and higher sensitivity, specificity, and superior likelihood ratios. CONCLUSION: FDG-PET/CT was accurate in diagnosing recurrence in breast cancer patients. It allowed for distant recurrence to be correctly ruled out and resulted in only a small number of false-positive cases...

  9. Simultaneous breast and axillary recurrence in a patient with a history of breast cancer and ipsilateral upper extremity melanoma: challenges in diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Malcolm; Hadzikadic Gusic, Lejla; Dabbs, David J; Kelley, Joseph; Diego, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    Nodal patterns of spread for breast cancer and melanoma have been extensively studied in the literature. The phenomenon of upper extremity melanoma and ipsilateral breast cancer has been previously reported. We describe a rare case of a simultaneous locoregional recurrence of both malignancies. A patient with a previous diagnosis of stage 1A melanoma of the left upper extremity at age 29 developed left breast invasive ductal carcinoma 1 year later. The patient underwent a wide local excision with negative margins for the melanoma and a partial mastectomy with axillary dissection followed by chemotherapy and radiation therapy for her breast cancer. Five years later she was diagnosed with a dual recurrence while 36 weeks pregnant. Regular follow-up according to the NCCN guidelines is critical in diagnosing a recurrence of malignancy. Pathologic analysis is paramount in dictating management strategies in rare cases of dual recurrence.

  10. Pattern of Local Recurrence and Distant Metastasis in Breast Cancer By Molecular Subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xingrao; Baig, Ayesha; Kasymjanova, Goulnar; Kafi, Kamran; Holcroft, Christina; Mekouar, Hind; Carbonneau, Annie; Bahoric, Boris; Sultanem, Khalil; Muanza, Thierry

    2016-12-09

     No longer considered a single disease entity, breast cancer is being classified into several distinct molecular subtypes based on gene expression profiling. These subtypes appear to carry prognostic implications and have the potential to be incorporated into treatment decisions. In this study, we evaluated patterns of local recurrence (LR), distant metastasis (DM), and association of survival with molecular subtype in breast cancer patients in the post-adjuvant radiotherapy setting.  The medical records of 1,088 consecutive, non-metastatic breast cancer patients treated at a single institution between 2004 and 2012 were reviewed. Estrogen/progesterone receptors (ER/PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) enrichment were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Patients were categorized into one of four subtypes: luminal-A (LA; ER/PR+, HER2-, Grade 1-2), luminal-B (LB; ER/PR+, HER2-, Grade > 2), HER2 over-expression (HER2; ER/PR-, HER2+), and triple negative (TN; ER/PR-, HER2-).  Results: The median follow-up time was 6.9 years. During the follow-up, 16% (174/1,088) of patients failed initial treatment and developed either LR (48) or DM (126). The prevalence of LR was the highest in TN (12%) and the lowest in LA (2%). Breast or chest wall relapse was the most frequent site (≈80%) of recurrence in LA, LB, and HER2 subtypes, whereas the regional lymph nodes and chest wall were the common sites of relapse in the TN group (50.0%). DM rates were 6.4% in LA, 12.1% in LB, 19.2% in HER2, and 27.4% in TN subgroups. Five-year survival rates were 84%, 83%, 84%, and 77% in the LA, LB, HER2 and TN subgroups, respectively. There was a statistically significant association between survival and molecular subtypes in an univariate analysis. In the adjusted multivariate analysis, the following variables were independent prognostic factors for survival: T stage, N stage, and molecular subtype.  Of the four subtypes, the LA subtype tends to have the best prognosis

  11. [A Case of Recurrent Breast Cancer with Carcinomatous Pleurisy Successfully Treated with Biweekly Paclitaxel and Bevacizumab].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takashi; Goto, Yoshinari; Sakiyama, Kana; Kimura, Morihiko

    2016-11-01

    A 72-year-old woman underwent mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection for left breast cancer at the age of 43 years, and was diagnosed with breast cancer metastasis to the pleura at the age of 68 years. She had been sequentially treated with hormonal therapies, but complained of a cough and dyspnea after 4 years. Chest radiography showed right pleural effusion, and cytological examination of the pleural effusion revealed adenocarcinoma cells. Biweekly paclitaxel and bevacizumab therapy was administered. Two months later, the pleural effusion had disappeared. Biweekly paclitaxel and bevacizumab therapy was continued without any severe adverse events. After 30 months, the patient has remained free of carcinomatous pleurisy recurrence. Therefore, biweekly paclitaxel and bevacizumab therapy can be safely and effectively administered to elderly patients with carcinomatous pleurisy.

  12. Viral Therapy In Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Cancer or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-16

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; HER2/Neu Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  13. Risk of breast cancer recurrence in patients receiving manual lymphatic drainage: a hospital-based cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao PC

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pei-Chi Hsiao,1,2 Jung-Tai Liu,3 Chien-Liang Lin,4 Willy Chou,1,2 Shiang-Ru Lu5 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chi-Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan; 2Department of Recreation and Health Care Management, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan, Taiwan; 3Departments of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chi-Mei Medical Center Liouying Campus, Tainan, Taiwan; 4Department of Hematology and Oncology, Chi-Mei Medical Center Liouying Campus, Tainan, Taiwan; 5Department of Neurology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan Background: This retrospective cohort study evaluated whether manual lymphatic drainage (MLD therapy increases the risk of recurrence of breast cancer. Methods: We analyzed 1,106 women who were diagnosed with stage 0­–3 breast cancer between 2007 and 2011 and experienced remission after surgery and adjuvant therapy. The patients were divided into two groups: group A (n=996, in which patients did not participate in any MLD therapy, regardless of whether they developed breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL after cancer treatment; and group B (n=110, in which patients participated in MLD therapy for BCRL. All patients were monitored until October 2013 to determine whether breast cancer recurrence developed, including local or regional recurrence and distant metastasis. Patients who developed cancer recurrence prior to MLD therapy were excluded from analysis. Risk factors associated with cancer recurrence were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results: During the monitoring period, 166 patients (15.0% developed cancer recurrence, including 154 (15.5% in group A and 12 (10.9% in group B. The median period from surgery to cancer recurrence was 1.85 (interquartile range 1.18–2.93 years. Independent risk factors for cancer recurrence were tumor histological grading of grade 3, high number (≥3 of axillary lymph node invasion, and a large tumor size (>5 cm. Factors

  14. Concurrent radiotherapy and taxane chemotherapy in patients with locoregional recurrence of breast cancer. A retrospective analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semrau, S.; Klautke, G.; Fietkau, R. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. of Rostock (Germany); Gerber, B.; Reimer, T. [Dept. of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Univ. of Rostock. Suedstadt Hospital, Rostock (Germany)

    2006-10-15

    Background and purpose: locoregional breast cancer recurrence is characterized by a high rate of systemic and local re-recurrence. Data on concurrent radiochemotherapy (RCT) in these cases are scarce. The purpose of this study was to evaluate feasibility, toxicity and efficacy of local control of a radiotherapy combined with a chemotherapy containing a taxane. Patients and methods: between May 1999 and November 2004, 36 women referred to the authors' clinic because of locoregional breast cancer recurrence that was either inoperable (n = 29) or resected (n = 7) received concurrent irradiation and taxane monotherapy weekly (TAX/RT; n = 28: paclitaxel 90 mg/m{sup 2} n = 24, or docetaxel 35 mg/m{sup 2}, n = 4) or taxane + cisplatin therapy (TAX/CIS/RT; n = 8; paclitaxel 135 mg/m{sup 2} d1 and cisplatin 20 mq/m{sup 2} d1-5 q28). Results: comparing TAX/RT with TAX/CIS/RT, the complete remission rate in patients with macroscopic tumor prior to RCT was significantly higher for TAX/RT than for TAX/CIS/RT (7/19 vs. 0/8; p = 0.046), but overall remission rates were comparable, i.e., partial remission: 11/20 versus 6/8 cases, stable disease (no change): 1/20 versus 2/8 cases, and response rate: 95% versus 75%, respectively. The cumulative local recurrence-free survival rate at 1 and 2 years post-treatment was 83% and 68% and that of systemic recurrence-free survival 56% and 29%, respectively. The main toxic reactions of third-degree and higher were dermatitis in TAX/RT (57% vs. 11% for TAX/CIS/RT) and leukocytopenia in TAX/CIS/RT (62% vs. 7% for TAX/RT). Conclusion: concurrent irradiation and taxane chemotherapy weekly, in particular with paclitaxel, is recommended due to response and acceptable side effects for treatment of inoperable locoregional breast cancer recurrence. (orig.)

  15. Breast Cancer Detected at Screening US: Survival Rates and Clinical-Pathologic and Imaging Factors Associated with Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Yeon; Han, Boo-Kyung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Choi, Woo Jung; Choi, Yunhee; Kim, Hak Hee; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2017-08-01

    Purpose To determine the survival rates and clinical-pathologic and imaging factors associated with recurrence in women with breast cancer detected at screening ultrasonography (US). Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board, and the requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. A retrospective review of the databases of four institutions identified 501 women (median age, 47 years; range, 27-74 years) with breast cancer (425 invasive cancers and 76 ductal carcinoma in situ) detected at screening US between January 2004 and March 2011. Five-year overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) rates were estimated, and the clinical-pathologic and imaging data were collected. Multivariate analysis was performed by using Cox proportional hazard regression to determine factors associated with recurrence. Results At a median follow-up of 7.0 years (range, 5.0-12.1 years), 15 (3.0%) recurrences were detected: five in ipsilateral breast and 10 in contralateral breast. The 5-year OS and RFS rates were 100% and 98.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 96.8%, 99.2%), respectively. In patients with invasive cancers, age younger than 40 years (hazard ratio: 3.632 [95% CI: 1.099, 11.998]; P = .032), the triple-negative subtype (hazard ratio: 7.498 [95% CI: 2.266, 24.816]; P = .001), and Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category 4A lesions (hazard ratio: 5.113 [95% CI: 1.532, 17.195]; P = .008) were associated with recurrence. Conclusion Women with breast cancers detected at screening US have excellent outcomes, with a 5-year RFS rate of 98.0%. However, in patients with invasive breast cancer, age younger than 40 years, the triple-negative subtype, and BI-RADS category 4A lesions were associated with recurrence. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  16. Clinico-Pathologic Subtypes of Breast Cancer Primary Tumors Are Related to Prognosis after Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Cesar; Camus, Mauricio; Medina, Lidia; Oddo, David; Artigas, Rocío; Pérez Sepúlveda, Alejandra; Domínguez, Francisco; Razmilic, Dravna; Navarro, María Elena; Galindo, Hector; Acevedo, Francisco

    2016-12-01

    Background: Pathological factors, based mainly on immunohistochemistry (IHC) and histological differentiation, are mostly used to differentiate breast cancer (BC) subtypes. Our present aim was to describe the characteristics and survival of a relapsing BC patient cohort based on clinico-pathologic subtypes determined for the primary tumors. Methods: We used a clinico- pathological definition of BC subtypes based on histological grade (HG), estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR),and epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) expression assessed by IHC. We determined variables associated with loco-regional recurrence (LRR), second primaries (SP), systemic recurrence (SR) and post-recurrence survival (PRS). Results: Out of 1,702 patients, 240 (14%) had an event defined as recurrence. Those with recurrent disease were significantly younger than those without,and were initially diagnosed at more advanced stages, with larger tumors, greater lymph nodal involvement and higher HG. With a median follow up of 61 months (1-250), 4.6% of patients without recurrence and 56.6% of patients with an event defined as recurrence had died. The median PRS for the LRR group was 77 months; 75 months for those who developed a SP and 22 months for patients with an SR (p <0.0001). In SR cases, the median PRS was shorter for ER- tumors than for ER+ tumors (15 vs. 26 months, respectively; p = 0.0019, HR 0.44; CI: 0.25-0.44). Conclusions: Subtype, defined through classic histopathologic parameters determined for primary tumors, was found to eb related to type of recurrence and also to prognosis after relapse. Creative Commons Attribution License

  17. Novel use of an air-filled breast prosthesis to allow radiotherapy to recurrent colonic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Duffy, F

    2011-03-01

    AiM: The authors present the novel and successful use of an air-filled breast prosthesis for extra pelvic exclusion of small bowel to facilitate adjuvant radiotherapy following resection of recurrent adenocarcinoma of the ascending bowel. The therapeutic use of radiotherapy in colon cancer can cause acute or chronic radiation enteropathy. Mobile small bowel can be sequestered in \\'dead space\\' or by adhesions exposing it to adjuvant radiotherapy. A variety of pelvic partitioning methods have been described to exclude bowel from radiation fields using both native and prosthetic materials.

  18. Local recurrence after breast-conserving therapy for invasive breast cancer: high incidence in young patients and association with poor survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elkhuizen, P. H.; van de Vijver, M. J.; Hermans, J.; Zonderland, H. M.; van de Velde, C. J.; Leer, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study risk factors for local recurrence (LR) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) for invasive breast cancer and, for patients with an LR, the mode of detection, location, treatment, influence of radiation therapy, and impact on survival. METHODS AND MATERIALS: 1360 patients (median age

  19. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-12

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  20. Impact of age, intrinsic subtype and local treatment on long-term local-regional recurrence and breast cancer mortality among low-risk breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, Tinne; Alsner, Jan; Tramm, Trine

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the long-term prognostic impact of age, local treatment and intrinsic subtypes on the risk of local-regional recurrence (LRR) and breast cancer mortality among low-risk patients.MATERIAL AND METHODS: Cohort study with prospectively collected data, balanced five-year age groups...... no prognostic impact on the 20-year LRR risk, regardless of age. A distinct 20-year mortality pattern was observed among the younger patients: 11% of patients with LumB tumor died of breast cancer within the first five years after primary surgery, 23% of patients with Lum-HER2+ tumor died within a 5-10-year......, including 514 Danish lymph node negative breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1989 and 1998, treated with mastectomy (N = 320) or breast-conserving therapy (BCT) (N = 194) and without systemic treatment. Intrinsic subtype approximation was performed by combining information on estrogen-, progesterone...

  1. A family-based program of care for women with recurrent breast cancer and their family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northouse, Laurel L; Walker, Julie; Schafenacker, Ann; Mood, Darlene; Mellon, Suzanne; Galvin, Elizabeth; Harden, Janet; Freeman-Gibb, Laurie

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the FOCUS Program (family involvement, optimistic attitude, coping effectiveness, uncertainty reduction, and symptom management), a family-based program of care for women with recurrent breast cancer and their family caregivers. Randomized clinical trial. Midwest region of the United States. The family-based program of care consisted of five components: family involvement, optimistic attitude, coping effectiveness, uncertainty reduction, and symptom management. The program was delivered in three home visits and two follow-up phone calls over a five-month period of time. Patients with recurrent breast cancer and their family members reported high satisfaction with the FOCUS Program. Although the FOCUS Program had a number of strengths, limitations of the program also were identified that need to be addressed in future family-based interventions. A need exists for family-based programs of care that enable both patients and their family members to manage the multiple demands associated with recurrent breast cancer.

  2. An Exploratory Analysis of Fear of Recurrence among African-American Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Teletia R.; Huntley, Edward D.; Sween, Jennifer; Makambi, Kepher; Mellman, Thomas A.; Williams, Carla D.; Carter-Nolan, Pamela; Frederick, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Background Fear of recurrence (FOR) is a psychological concern that has been studied extensively in cancer survivors but has not been adequately examined in African-American breast cancer survivors. Purpose This exploratory study describes the extent and nature of FOR in African-American breast cancer survivors. FOR is examined in relation to socio-demographic characteristics, treatment-related characteristics, psychological distress, and quality of life (QOL). Methods Participants completed questionnaires assessing FOR, psychological distress, QOL, and demographic and treatment characteristics. Pearson r correlations, t tests, and ANOVAs were used to determine the association between FOR and demographic and treatment-related characteristics. Hierarchical multiple regression models were performed to investigate the degree to which FOR dimensions account for the variance in QOL and psychological distress. Results Fifty-one African-American breast cancer survivors participated in this study. The mean age of participants was 64.24 (SD = 12.3). Overall fears as well as concerns about death and health were rated as low to moderate. Role worries and womanhood worries were very low. Inverse relationships were observed between age and FOR dimensions. FOR was positively correlated with measures of psychological distress and negatively correlated with QOL. FOR significantly accounted for a portion of the variance in QOL and distress after controlling for other variables. Conclusions This study suggests that African-American women in this sample demonstrated some degree of FOR. Results indicate that FOR among African-American breast cancer survivors decreases with age and time since diagnosis and co-occurs with psychological distress as well as diminished quality of life. PMID:21915625

  3. The cancer worry scale: detecting fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Custers, J.A.E.; Berg, S.W. van den; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van; Bleiker, E.M.; Gielissen, M.F.M.; Prins, J.B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 9% to 34% of cancer patients, the fear of cancer recurrence becomes so overwhelming that it affects quality of life. Clinicians need a brief questionnaire with a cutoff point that is able to differentiate between high- and low-fearful survivors. OBJECTIVE: This study investigated if

  4. Mortality and recurrence rates among systemically untreated high risk breast cancer patients included in the DBCG 77 trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maj Britt; Nielsen, Torsten O.; Knoop, Ann S.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Following loco-regional treatment for early breast cancer accurate prognostication is essential for communicating benefits of systemic treatment. The aim of this study was to determine time to recurrence and long-term mortality rates in high risk patients according to patient characte......Background: Following loco-regional treatment for early breast cancer accurate prognostication is essential for communicating benefits of systemic treatment. The aim of this study was to determine time to recurrence and long-term mortality rates in high risk patients according to patient...

  5. Significant survival improvement of patients with recurrent breast cancer in the periods 2001-2008 vs. 1992-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishimura Sumiko

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is unclear whether individualized treatments based on biological factors have improved the prognosis of recurrent breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the survival improvement of patients with recurrent breast cancer after the introduction of third generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs and trastuzumab. Methods A total of 407 patients who received first diagnosis of recurrent breast cancer and treatment at National Kyushu Cancer Center between 1992 and 2008 were retrospectively evaluated. As AIs and trastuzumab were approved for clinical use in Japan in 2001, the patients were divided into two time cohorts depending on whether the cancer recurred before or after 2001. Cohort A: 170 patients who were diagnosed between 1992 and 2000. Cohort B: 237 patients who were diagnosed between 2001 and 2008. Tumor characteristics, treatments, and outcome were compared. Results Fourteen percent of cohort A and 76% of cohort B received AIs and/or trastuzumab (P Conclusions The prognosis of patients with recurrent breast cancer was improved over time following the introduction of AIs and trastuzumab and the survival improvement was apparent in HR- and/or HER-2-positive tumors.

  6. Chemotherapy for Isolated Locoregional Recurrence of Breast Cancer: The CALOR Randomised Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aebi, Stefan; Gelber, Shari; Anderson, Stewart J.; Láng, István; Robidoux, André; Martín, Miguel; Nortier, Johan W.R.; Paterson, Alexander H.G.; Rimawi, Mothaffar F.; Cañada, José Manuel Baena; Thürlimann, Beat; Murray, Elizabeth; Mamounas, Eleftherios P.; Geyer, Charles E.; Price, Karen N.; Coates, Alan S.; Gelber, Richard D.; Rastogi, Priya; Wolmark, Norman; Wapnir, Irene L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with isolated locoregional recurrences (ILRR) of breast cancer have a high risk of distant metastasis and death from breast cancer. We investigated adjuvant chemotherapy for such patients in a randomised clinical trial. METHODS The CALOR trial (clinicaltrials.gov NCT00074152) accrued patients 2003-2010. The 162 patients with resected ILRR were centrally randomised using permuted blocks and stratified by prior chemotherapy, ER/PgR status, and location of ILRR. Eighty-five were allocated to chemotherapy (type selected by the investigator; multidrug for at least four courses recommended) and 77 to no chemotherapy. Patients with oestrogen receptor-positive ILRR received adjuvant endocrine therapy; radiation therapy was mandated for patients with microscopically involved surgical margins, and anti-HER2 therapy was optional. The primary endpoint was disease-free survival (DFS). All analyses were by intention to treat. FINDINGS At a median follow up of 4·9 (IQR 3.6,6.0) years we observed 24 DFS events and nine deaths in the chemotherapy group compared with 34 DFS events and 21 deaths in the no chemotherapy group. Five-year DFS was 69% vs. 57%, (hazard ratio for chemotherapy versus no chemotherapy, 0·59; 95% confidence interval 0·35 to 0·99; P=0·046) and five-year overall survival was 88% vs. 76%, (hazard ratio, 0·41; 95% CI, 0·19 to 0·89; P=0·02). Adjuvant chemotherapy was significantly more effective for women with oestrogen receptor-negative disease measured in the recurrence (interaction P=0·04), but analyses of DFS based on the oestrogen receptor status of the primary tumour were not statistically significant (interaction P=0·43). Among the 85 patients who received standard chemotherapy, 12 reported SAEs. INTERPRETATION Adjuvant chemotherapy should be recommended for patients with completely resected isolated locoregional recurrences of breast cancer, especially if the recurrence is oestrogen receptor negative. FUNDING Public Service

  7. Germline DNA copy number aberrations identified as potential prognostic factors for breast cancer recurrence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Sapkota

    Full Text Available Breast cancer recurrence (BCR is a common treatment outcome despite curative-intent primary treatment of non-metastatic breast cancer. Currently used prognostic and predictive factors utilize tumor-based markers, and are not optimal determinants of risk of BCR. Germline-based copy number aberrations (CNAs have not been evaluated as determinants of predisposition to experience BCR. In this study, we accessed germline DNA from 369 female breast cancer subjects who received curative-intent primary treatment following diagnosis. Of these, 155 experienced BCR and 214 did not, after a median duration of follow up after breast cancer diagnosis of 6.35 years (range = 0.60-21.78 and 8.60 years (range = 3.08-13.57, respectively. Whole genome CNA genotyping was performed on the Affymetrix SNP array 6.0 platform. CNAs were identified using the SNP-Fast Adaptive States Segmentation Technique 2 algorithm implemented in Nexus Copy Number 6.0. Six samples were removed due to poor quality scores, leaving 363 samples for further analysis. We identified 18,561 CNAs with ≥1 kb as a predefined cut-off for observed aberrations. Univariate survival analyses (log-rank tests identified seven CNAs (two copy number gains and five copy neutral-loss of heterozygosities, CN-LOHs showing significant differences (P<2.01×10(-5 in recurrence-free survival (RFS probabilities with and without CNAs.We also observed three additional but distinct CN-LOHs showing significant differences in RFS probabilities (P<2.86×10(-5 when analyses were restricted to stratified cases (luminal A, n = 208 only. After adjusting for tumor stage and grade in multivariate analyses (Cox proportional hazards models, all the CNAs remained strongly associated with the phenotype of BCR. Of these, we confirmed three CNAs at 17q11.2, 11q13.1 and 6q24.1 in representative samples using independent genotyping platforms. Our results suggest further investigations on the potential use of germline DNA

  8. A case of recurrence-mimicking charcoal granuloma in a breast cancer patient: Ultrasound,CT, PET/CT and breast-specific gamma imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dae Woong; Park, Ji Yeon; Park, Noh Hyuck; Kim, Seon Jeong; Shin, Hyuck Jai; Lee, Jeong Ju [Myongji Hospital, Seonam University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Seong Yoon [Div. of Hematology-Oncology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Charcoal remains stable without causing a foreign body reaction and it may be used for preoperative localization of a non-palpable breast mass. However, cases of post-charcoal-marking granuloma have only rarely been reported in the breast, and a charcoal granuloma can be misdiagnosed as malignancy. Herein, we report the ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/CT, and breast-specific gamma imaging findings of recurrence-mimicking charcoal granuloma after breast conserving surgery, following localization with charcoal in a breast cancer patient.

  9. Stereotactic Image-Guided Navigation During Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-12

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  10. Correlates of fear of cancer recurrence in women with ductal carcinoma in situ and early invasive breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Pérez, Maria; Schootman, Mario; Aft, Rebecca L.; Gillanders, William E.; Jeffe, Donna B.

    2011-01-01

    Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is a common and persistent concern among breast cancer survivors. Little is known about factors associated with FCR in women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or early invasive breast cancer (EIBC). Women with first primary DCIS, or stages I–IIA breast cancer were prospectively enrolled in a quality-of-life study and completed interviews at 4–6 weeks, 6 months, and 2 years after definitive surgical treatment. In three stepwise multivariable linear regression models, including both time-independent and time-varying variables measured at each respective interview, we identified independent correlates of mean FCR scores (range 1–6) using four items from the Concern About Recurrence Scale (CARS) at 2-year follow-up. Of 506 disease-free patients at 2-year follow-up (mean [SD] age, 58 [10] years; 81% White; 34% DCIS), the average FCR score of 2.0 was low. However, 145 (29%) reported moderate-to-high levels of FCR (scores 3.0–6.0). All three models showed that younger age, stage IIA breast cancer (vs. DCIS), lower social support, and elevated anxiety were consistently associated with higher FCR at 2-year follow-up (each P < 0.05; final models R2 = 0.25–0.32). DCIS patients reported lower FCR than stage IIA patients (each P ≤ 0.01) but had similar FCR as stage I patients. Although mean FCR was low, 29% of DCIS and EIBC survivors reported moderate-to-high levels of FCR at 2-year follow-up. Management of anxiety, provision of social support, and patient education may help reduce FCR among DCIS and EIBC survivors, especially among younger survivors. PMID:21553295

  11. Joint Estimation of Cardiac Toxicity and Recurrence Risks After Comprehensive Nodal Photon Versus Proton Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stick, Line B; Yu, Jen; Maraldo, Maja V

    2017-01-01

    providing evidence-based estimates of the heterogeneity of treatment effects in consecutive cases for the 2 radiation treatment modalities. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Forty-one patients referred for postlumpectomy comprehensive nodal photon irradiation for left-sided breast cancer were included. Comparative...... absolute risk of breast cancer recurrence after 10 years was 0.10% (range, 0.0%-0.9%) with photons and 0.02% (range, 0.0%-0.07%) with protons. The association between age of the patient and benefit from proton therapy was weak, almost non-existing (Spearman rank correlations of -0.15 and -0.......30 with and without cardiac risk factors, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Modern photon therapy yields limited risk of cardiac toxicity in most patients, but proton therapy can reduce the predicted risk of cardiac toxicity by up to 2.9% and the risk of breast cancer recurrence by 0.9% in individual patients. Predicted...

  12. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-18

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  13. The impact of loco-regional recurrences on metastatic progression in early-stage breast cancer : a multistate model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bock, G. H.; Putter, H.; Bonnema, J.; van der Hage, J. A.; Bartelink, H.; van de Velde, C. J.

    To study whether the effects of prognostic factors associated with the occurrence of distant metastases (DM) at primary diagnosis change after the incidence of loco-regional recurrences (LRR) among women treated for invasive stage I or II breast cancer. The study population consisted of 3,601 women,

  14. A pilot study to investigate the role of the 26S proteasome in radiotherapy resistance and loco-regional recurrence following breast conserving therapy for early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfadl, Dalia; Hodgkinson, Victoria C; Long, Ervine D; Scaife, Lucy; Drew, Philip J; Lind, Michael J; Cawkwell, Lynn

    2011-08-01

    Breast conserving therapy is a currently accepted method for managing patients with early stage breast cancer. However, approximately 7% of patients may develop loco-regional tumour recurrence within 5 years. We previously reported that expression of the 26S proteasome may be associated with radio-resistance. Here we aimed to analyse the 26S proteasome in a pilot series of early breast cancers and correlate the findings with loco-regional recurrence. Fourteen patients with early breast cancer who developed loco-regional recurrence within 4 years of completing breast conserving therapy were selected according to strict criteria and compared with those from 14 patients who were disease-free at 10 years. Decreased expression of the 26S proteasome was significantly associated with radio-resistance, manifested as the development of a loco-regional recurrence within 4 years of breast conserving therapy (p = 0.018). This small pilot study provides further suggestion that the 26S proteasome may be associated with response to radiotherapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Using natural language processing to improve efficiency of manual chart abstraction in research: the case of breast cancer recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrell, David S; Halgrim, Scott; Tran, Diem-Thy; Buist, Diana S M; Chubak, Jessica; Chapman, Wendy W; Savova, Guergana

    2014-03-15

    The increasing availability of electronic health records (EHRs) creates opportunities for automated extraction of information from clinical text. We hypothesized that natural language processing (NLP) could substantially reduce the burden of manual abstraction in studies examining outcomes, like cancer recurrence, that are documented in unstructured clinical text, such as progress notes, radiology reports, and pathology reports. We developed an NLP-based system using open-source software to process electronic clinical notes from 1995 to 2012 for women with early-stage incident breast cancers to identify whether and when recurrences were diagnosed. We developed and evaluated the system using clinical notes from 1,472 patients receiving EHR-documented care in an integrated health care system in the Pacific Northwest. A separate study provided the patient-level reference standard for recurrence status and date. The NLP-based system correctly identified 92% of recurrences and estimated diagnosis dates within 30 days for 88% of these. Specificity was 96%. The NLP-based system overlooked 5 of 65 recurrences, 4 because electronic documents were unavailable. The NLP-based system identified 5 other recurrences incorrectly classified as nonrecurrent in the reference standard. If used in similar cohorts, NLP could reduce by 90% the number of EHR charts abstracted to identify confirmed breast cancer recurrence cases at a rate comparable to traditional abstraction.

  16. A Hybrid Computer-aided-diagnosis System for Prediction of Breast Cancer Recurrence (HPBCR) Using Optimized Ensemble Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohebian, Mohammad R; Marateb, Hamid R; Mansourian, Marjan; Mañanas, Miguel Angel; Mokarian, Fariborz

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a collection of diseases that involves growing abnormal cells with the potential to invade or spread to the body. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women. A method for 5-year breast cancer recurrence prediction is presented in this manuscript. Clinicopathologic characteristics of 579 breast cancer patients (recurrence prevalence of 19.3%) were analyzed and discriminative features were selected using statistical feature selection methods. They were further refined by Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) as the inputs of the classification system with ensemble learning (Bagged Decision Tree: BDT). The proper combination of selected categorical features and also the weight (importance) of the selected interval-measurement-scale features were identified by the PSO algorithm. The performance of HPBCR (hybrid predictor of breast cancer recurrence) was assessed using the holdout and 4-fold cross-validation. Three other classifiers namely as supported vector machines, DT, and multilayer perceptron neural network were used for comparison. The selected features were diagnosis age, tumor size, lymph node involvement ratio, number of involved axillary lymph nodes, progesterone receptor expression, having hormone therapy and type of surgery. The minimum sensitivity, specificity, precision and accuracy of HPBCR were 77%, 93%, 95% and 85%, respectively in the entire cross-validation folds and the hold-out test fold. HPBCR outperformed the other tested classifiers. It showed excellent agreement with the gold standard (i.e. the oncologist opinion after blood tumor marker and imaging tests, and tissue biopsy). This algorithm is thus a promising online tool for the prediction of breast cancer recurrence.

  17. Prediction of breast cancer recurrence using lymph node metabolic and volumetric parameters from {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in operable triple-negative breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong-il [CHA University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, CHA Bundang Medical Center, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Joong [Veterans Health Service Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paeng, Jin Chul; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, June-Key [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Keon Wook [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    Triple-negative breast cancer has a poor prognosis. We evaluated several metabolic and volumetric parameters from preoperative {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in the prognosis of triple-negative breast cancer and compared them with current clinicopathologic parameters. A total of 228 patients with triple-negative breast cancer (mean age 47.0 ± 10.8 years, all women) who had undergone preoperative PET/CT were included. The PET/CT metabolic parameters evaluated included maximum, peak, and mean standardized uptake values (SUVmax, SUVpeak, and SUVmean, respectively). The volumetric parameters evaluated included metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG). Metabolic and volumetric parameters were evaluated separately for tumor (T) and lymph nodes (N). The prognostic value of these parameters was compared with that of clinicopathologic parameters. All lymph node metabolic and volumetric parameters showed significant differences between patients with and without recurrence. However, tumor metabolic and volumetric parameters showed no significant differences. In a univariate survival analysis, all lymph node metabolic and volumetric parameters (SUVmax-N, SUVpeak-N, SUVmean-N, MTV-N, and TLG-N; all P < 0.001), T stage (P = 0.010), N stage (P < 0.001), and TNM stage (P < 0.001) were significant parameters. In a multivariate survival analysis, SUVmax-N (P = 0.005), MTV (P = 0.008), and TLG (P = 0.006) with TNM stage (all P < 0.001) were significant parameters. Lymph node metabolic and volumetric parameters were significant predictors of recurrence in patients with triple-negative breast cancer after surgery. Lymph node metabolic and volumetric parameters were useful parameters for evaluating prognosis in patients with triple-negative breast cancer by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT, rather than tumor parameters. (orig.)

  18. Increasing Breast Cancer Surveillance Among African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    one or both breasts were affected. Family Member (e.g. grandmother, aunt) Paternal or Maternal Type or Location of Cancer (e.g. breast ...Local recurrences and distant metastases after breast -conserving surgery and radiation therapy for early breast cancer . Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys...AD_________________ AWARD NUMBER: DAMD17-03-1-0454 TITLE: Increasing Breast Cancer Surveillance

  19. Comparison of autogeneic and allogeneic natural killer cells immunotherapy on the clinical outcome of recurrent breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang S

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Shuzhen Liang,1,2 Kecheng Xu,1,2 Lizhi Niu,1,2 Xiaohua Wang,1 Yingqing Liang,1 Mingjie Zhang,3 Jibing Chen,1,2 Mao Lin1,2 1Department of Central Laboratory, Fuda Cancer Hospital, Jinan University School of Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China; 2Fuda Cancer Institute, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China; 3Hank Bioengineering Co., Ltd, Shenzhen, China Abstract: In the present study, we aimed to compare the clinical outcome of autogeneic and allogeneic natural killer (NK cells immunotherapy for the treatment of recurrent breast cancer. Between July 2016 and February 2017, 36 patients who met the enrollment criteria were randomly assigned to two groups: autogeneic NK cells immunotherapy group (group I, n=18 and allogeneic NK cells immunotherapy group (group II, n=18. The clinical efficacy, quality of life, immune function, circulating tumor cell (CTC level, and other related indicators were evaluated. We found that allogeneic NK cells immunotherapy has better clinical efficacy than autogeneic therapy. Moreover, allogeneic NK cells therapy improves the quality of life, reduces the number of CTCs, reduces carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen 15-3 (CA15-3 expression, and significantly enhances immune function. To our knowledge, this is the first clinical trial to compare the clinical outcome of autogeneic and allogeneic NK cells immunotherapy for recurrent breast cancer. Keywords: clinical outcome, autogeneic, allogeneic, natural killer cells, recurrent breast cancer

  20. Brain metastases as site of first and isolated recurrence of breast cancer: the role of systemic therapy after local treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwińska, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The role of systemic treatment was assessed after local therapy for breast cancer patients who developed central nervous system (CNS) metastases as a first and isolated recurrence. Subjects were 128 breast cancer patients with brain metastases as the first and isolated site of recurrence that were selected from 673 consecutive breast cancer patients with brain metastases treated at the same institution. Median survival from brain metastases in patients with and without systemic treatment after local therapy was respectively 15 and 4 months (p brain metastasis in patients with solitary brain metastasis, with and without systemic treatment after local therapy, was respectively 22 and 7 months (p = 0.003). Cox multivariate analysis demonstrated that good performance status, solitary brain metastasis and systemic therapy undertaken after local treatment were factors which prolonged survival. However patient survival was adversely affected by those having leptomeningeal metastasis associated with brain parenchymal lesions. Systemic therapy, undertaken after local treatment improved survival in those patients with breast cancer and brain metastases as the site of first and isolated recurrence. Further study is required in order to fully establish the role of systemic treatment for this patient group.

  1. Isolated loco-regional recurrence of breast cancer is more common in young patients and following breast conserving therapy : Long-term results of European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bock, Truuske; van der Hage, J.A.; Putter, H.; Bonnema, J.; Bartelink, H.; van de Velde, C.J.

    The aim of this study was to evaluate prognostic factors for isolated loco-regional recurrence in patients treated for invasive stage I or H breast cancer. The study population comprised 3602 women who had undergone primary surgery for early stage breast cancer, who were enrolled in European

  2. Beliefs about medicine and illness are associated with fear of cancer recurrence in women taking adjuvant endocrine therapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corter, Arden L; Findlay, Michael; Broom, Reuben; Porter, David; Petrie, Keith J

    2013-02-01

    Adjuvant endocrine therapy for early-stage breast cancer has greatly reduced the morbidity and mortality associated with breast cancer recurrence. Despite this, a significant proportion of women report fears of cancer recurrence. This study examined the associations between fear of cancer recurrence (FoR) and illness perceptions, medication beliefs, and treatment side effects in women taking adjuvant endocrine therapy following breast cancer. A total of 153 post-menopausal women with early-stage breast cancer completed a postal survey. Analyses were conducted to examine the association between FoR and illness perceptions, medication beliefs, treatment side effects, demographic factors, and emotional distress and to identify which of these factors would be most strongly associated with FoR in a regression model. All illness perceptions (apart from personal control) were associated with FoR, as were patient beliefs about endocrine therapy. Although treatment side effects, being unemployed, and higher levels of anxiety and depression were associated with FoR, only illness perceptions (identity, treatment control, timeline, and emotional representation) and medication necessity beliefs were significantly correlated with FoR in the final model. It appears that, in addition to directly targeting FoR, it may be worthwhile to address the illness and medication beliefs supporting the fear. Additionally, helping women to differentiate everyday symptoms from those indicative of breast cancer may help to reduce fear of recurrence. What is already known on this subject? A significant proportion of women report fear of cancer recurrence following breast cancer. The literature shows that illness perceptions, side effects of treatment, and beliefs about medicines are related to fear of recurrence among cancer patients. However, because these variables have often been looked at in isolation, it is not clear whether some perceptions or cues are more likely to relate to fear of

  3. Impact on survival of early detection of isolated breast recurrences after the primary treatment for breast cancer : a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, W.L.; Jansen, L.; Post, W.J.; Bonnema, J.; van de Velde, J.C.; de Bock, G.H.

    Purpose The purpose was to establish the impact on survival of early detection of a local recurrence of breast cancer as compared to late detection. Design A meta-analysis was carried out using Cochrane review manager software (RevMan version 4.2). Studies were included if women were treated for

  4. Selective genomic copy number imbalances and probability of recurrence in early-stage breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A Thompson

    Full Text Available A number of studies of copy number imbalances (CNIs in breast tumors support associations between individual CNIs and patient outcomes. However, no pattern or signature of CNIs has emerged for clinical use. We determined copy number (CN gains and losses using high-density molecular inversion probe (MIP arrays for 971 stage I/II breast tumors and applied a boosting strategy to fit hazards models for CN and recurrence, treating chromosomal segments in a dose-specific fashion (-1 [loss], 0 [no change] and +1 [gain]. The concordance index (C-Index was used to compare prognostic accuracy between a training (n = 728 and test (n = 243 set and across models. Twelve novel prognostic CNIs were identified: losses at 1p12, 12q13.13, 13q12.3, 22q11, and Xp21, and gains at 2p11.1, 3q13.12, 10p11.21, 10q23.1, 11p15, 14q13.2-q13.3, and 17q21.33. In addition, seven CNIs previously implicated as prognostic markers were selected: losses at 8p22 and 16p11.2 and gains at 10p13, 11q13.5, 12p13, 20q13, and Xq28. For all breast cancers combined, the final full model including 19 CNIs, clinical covariates, and tumor marker-approximated subtypes (estrogen receptor [ER], progesterone receptor, ERBB2 amplification, and Ki67 significantly outperformed a model containing only clinical covariates and tumor subtypes (C-Index(full model, train[test]  =  0.72[0.71] ± 0.02 vs. C-Index(clinical + subtype model, train[test]  =  0.62[0.62] ± 0.02; p<10(-6. In addition, the full model containing 19 CNIs significantly improved prognostication separately for ER-, HER2+, luminal B, and triple negative tumors over clinical variables alone. In summary, we show that a set of 19 CNIs discriminates risk of recurrence among early-stage breast tumors, independent of ER status. Further, our data suggest the presence of specific CNIs that promote and, in some cases, limit tumor spread.

  5. Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-07

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  6. Treatment results of breast cancer patients with locoregional recurrence after mastectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yuri; Gong, Gyun Gyub; Lee, Hee Jin [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2013-09-15

    To analyze the results of locoregional and systemic therapy in the breast cancer patients with locoregional recurrence (LRR) after mastectomy. Seventy-one patients who received radiotherapy for isolated LRR after mastectomy between January 1999 and December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Among the 71 patients, 59 (83.1%) underwent wide excision and radiotherapy and 12 (16.9%) received radiotherapy alone. Adjuvant hormonal therapy was given to 45 patients (63.4%). Oncologic outcomes including locoregional recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) and prognostic factors were analyzed. Median follow-up time was 49.2 months. Of the 71 patients, 5 (7%) experienced second isolated LRR, and 40 (56%) underwent distant metastasis (DM). The median DFS was 35.6 months, and the 3- and 5-year DFS were 49.1% and 28.6%, respectively. The median OS was 86.7 months, and the 5-year OS was 62.3%. Patients who received hormone therapy together showed better 5-year DFS and OS than the patients treated with locoregional therapy only (31.6% vs. 22.1%, p = 0.036; 66.5% vs. 55.2%, p = 0.022). In multivariate analysis, higher N stage at recurrence was a significant prognostic factor for DFS and OS. Disease free interval (≤ 30 months vs. >30 months) from mastectomy to LRR was also significant for OS. The patients who received hormone therapy showed superior DFS and showed trend to better OS. DM was a major pattern of failure after the treatment of LRR after mastectomy. The role of systemic treatment for LRR after mastectomy should be investigated at prospective trials.

  7. One life saved by four prevented recurrencies? Update of the early breast cancer trialists confirms. Postoperative radiotherapy improves survival after breast conserving surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Staedtisches Klinikum Karlsruhe (Germany). Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Sedlmayer, F. [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg (Austria); Budach, W. [University Hospital Duesseldorf (DE)] (and others)

    2012-06-15

    The debate about the impact of local control on survival in early breast cancer patients is still going on, in spite of the continuously growing evidence that avoidance of locoregional disease reduces the risk of tumor-specific death. Recently, B. Fisher, one of the pioneers of breast conserving therapy claimed that during the last two decades, as a result of the use of systemic therapy in conjunction with breast conserving surgery and radiation, the incidence of locoregional recurrence has been reduced to a level where further reduction is likely to have little impact on survival. The penultimate meta-analysis of the Early Breast Cancer Trialists' Collaborative Group (EBCTCG) reported the effect of radiotherapy in early breast cancer on recurrence and survival in 2005 and provided the essential message that four prevented local recurrences at 5 years would avoid one breast cancer death in 15 years. The scientific community has eagerly awaited the quinquennial update of the EBCTCG which has now been published. A total of 17 randomized studies comparing postoperative radiotherapy vs. none were analyzed and comprised 7 new studies in addition to follow-up data of from 9 previously reported trials. A total of 10,801 patients with pT1-2 tumors were included, the majority of whom (n=7,287) were node negative, while 1,050 were node positive (2,464 unknown). In contrast to the previous meta-analysis, all patients received breast conserving surgery, consisting of lumpectomy (n=8,422) or more extensive techniques like quadrantectomy or sectoral resection (n= 2,399). The effect of radiotherapy on 10-year recurrences of any type and their relation to the 15-year breast cancer death rate were studied in correlation to various prognostic parameters and treatment characteristics (e.g., surgery, tamoxifen use). Moreover, a subgroup analysis was performed according to low, intermediate, and high initial risk of recurrence, from which the expected absolute benefit was derived

  8. The impact of motherhood on perceived stress, illness intrusiveness and fear of cancer recurrence in young breast cancer survivors over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arès, Isabelle; Lebel, Sophie; Bielajew, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Parenting while coping with breast cancer can be challenging for many young women, yet little is known about the impact of motherhood on their well-being over time. The first part of this study examined differences in perceived stress, illness intrusiveness and fear of cancer recurrence between young breast cancer survivors with and without children in two separate time frames (0-5 and 5-15 years since diagnosis). The second part identified determinants for these elements of well-being in young mothers exclusively. Seven hundred and forty two young North American women previously diagnosed with breast cancer completed measures of perceived stress, illness intrusiveness, fear of cancer recurrence and parenting stress (mothers only) via a web-based survey. Compared to young survivors without children, young mothers reported higher levels of fear of cancer recurrence and illness intrusiveness in intimate life domains during both time frames. Part 2 revealed how maternal age, age of children, time since diagnosis and parenting stress impacted on well-being in this group. Young mothers with breast cancer need support to manage their fears of having a recurrence and to cope with problems in intimacy well into remission. This study identifies the most vulnerable groups of mothers.

  9. Effects of chemotherapy and hormonal therapy for early breast cancer on recurrence and 15-year survival : an overview of the randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abe, O; Abe, R; Enomoto, K; Kikuchi, K; Koyama, H; Masuda, H; Nomura, Y; Sakai, K; Sugimachi, K; Tominaga, T; Uchino, J; Yoshida, M; Haybittle, JL; Davies, C; Harvey, VJ; Holdaway, TM; Kay, RG; Mason, BH; Forbes, JF; Wilcken, N; Gnant, M; Jakesz, R; Ploner, M; Yosef, HMA; Focan, C; Lobelle, JP; Peek, U; Oates, GD; Powell, J; Durand, M; Mauriac, L; Di Leo, A; Dolci, S; Piccart, MJ; Masood, MB; Parker, D; Price, JJ; Hupperets, PSGJ; Jackson, S; Ragaz, J; Berry, D; Broadwater, G; Cirrincione, C; Muss, H; Norton, L; Weiss, RB; Abu-Zahra, HT; Portnoj, SM; Baum, M; Cuzick, J; Houghton, J; Riley, D; Gordon, NH; Davis, HL; Beatrice, A; Mihura, J; Naja, A; Lehingue, Y; Romestaing, P; Dubois, JB; Delozier, T; Mace-Lesec'h, J; Rambert, P; Andrysek, O; Barkmanova, J; Owen, [No Value; Meier, P; Howell, A; Ribeiro, GC; Swindell, R; Alison, R; Boreham, J; Clarke, M; Collins, R; Darby, S; Davies, C; Elphinstone, P; Evans, [No Value; Godwin, J; Gray, R; Harwood, C; Hicks, C; James, S; MacKinnon, E; McGale, P; McHugh, T; Mead, G; Peto, R; Wang, Y; Albano, J; de Oliveira, CF; Gervasio, H; Gordilho, J; Johansen, H; Mouridsen, HT; Gelman, RS; Harris, [No Value; Henderson, IC; Shapiro, CL; Andersen, KW; Axelsson, CK; Blichert-Toft, M; Moller, S; Mouridsen, HT; Overgaard, J; Overgaard, M; Rose, C; Cartensen, B; Palshof, T; Trampisch, HJ; Dalesio, O; de Vries, EGE; Rodenhuis, S; van Tinteren, H; Comis, RL; Davidson, NE; Gray, R; Robert, N; Sledge, G; Tormey, DC; Wood, W; Cameron, D; Chetty, U; Forrest, P; Jack, W; Rossbach, J; Klijn, JGM; Treurniet-Donker, AD; van Putten, WLJ; Costa, A; Veronesi, U; Bartelink, H; Duchateau, L; Legrand, C; Sylvester, R; van der Hage, JA; van de Velde, CJH; Cunningham, MP; Catalano, R; Creech, RH; Bonneterre, J; Fargeot, P; Fumoleau, P; Kerbrat, P; Namer, M; Jonat, W; Kaufmann, M; Schumacher, M; von Minckwitz, G; Bastert, G; Rauschecker, H; Sauer, R; Sauerbrei, W; Schauer, A; Schumacher, M; de Schryver, A; Vakaet, L; Belfiglio, M; Nicolucci, A; Pellegrini, F; Sacco, M; Valentini, M; McArdle, CS; Smith, DC; Galligioni, E; Boccardo, F; Rubagotti, A; Dent, DM; Gudgeon, CA; Hacking, A; Erazo, A; Medina, JY; Izuo, M; Morishita, Y; Takei, H; Fentiman, IS; Hayward, JL; Rubens, RD; Skilton, D; Graeff, H; Janicke, F; Meisner, C; Scheurlen, H; Kaufmann, M; von Fournier, D; Dafni, U; Fountzilas, G; Klefstrom, P; Blomqvist, C; Saarto, T; Margreiter, R; Asselain, B; Salmon, RJ; Vilcoq, [No Value; Arriagada, R; Hill, C; Laplanche, A; Le, MG; Spielmann, M; Bruzzi, P; Montanaro, E; Rosso, R; Sertoli, MR; Venturini, M; Amadori, D; Benraadt, J; Kooi, M; van de Velde, AO; van Dongen, JA; Vermorken, JB; Castiglione, M; Cavalli, F; Coates, A; Collins, J; Forbes, J; Gelber, RD; Goldhirsch, A; Lindtner, J; Price, KN; Rudenstam, CM; Senn, HJ; Bliss, JM; Chilvers, CED; Coombes, RC; Hall, E; Marty, M; Borovik, R; Brufman, G; Hayat, H; Robinson, E; Wigler, N; Bonadonna, G; Camerini, T; De Palo, G; Del Vecchio, M; Formelli, F; Valagussa, P; Martoni, A; Pannuti, F; Cocconi, G; Colozza, A; Camisa, R; Aogi, K; Takashima, S; Abe, O; Ikeda, T; Inokuchi, K; Kikuchi, K; Sawa, K; Sonoo, H; Korzeniowski, S; Skolyszewski, J; Ogawa, M; Yamashita, J; Bonte, J; Christiaens, R; Paridaens, R; Van den Boegart, W; Martin, P; Romain, S; Hakes, T; Hudis, CA; Norton, L; Wittes, R; Giokas, G; Kondylis, D; Lissaios, B; de la Huerta, R; Sainz, MG; Altemus, R; Cowan, K; Danforth, D; Lichter, A; Lippman, M; O'Shaughnessy, J; Pierce, LJ; Steinberg, S; Venzon, D; Zujewski, J; Paradiso, A; De Lena, M; Schittulli, F; Myles, JD; Pater, JL; Pritchard, KI; Nomura, Y; Anderson, S; Bass, G; Brown, A; Bryant, J; Costantino, J; Dignam, J; Fisher, B; Redmond, C; Wieand, S; Wolmark, N; Baum, M; Jackson, IM; Palmer, MK; Ingle, JN; Suman, VJ; Bengtsson, NO; Jonsson, H; Larsson, LG; Lythgoe, JP; Swindell, R; Kissin, M; Erikstein, B; Hannisdal, E; Jacobsen, AB; Varhaug, JE; Erikstein, B; Gundersen, S; Hauer-Jensen, M; Host, H; Jacobsen, AB; Nissen-Meyer, R; Blamey, RW; Mitchell, AK; Morgan, DAL; Robertson, JFR; Di Palma, M; Mathe, G; Misset, JL; Clark, RM; Levine, M; Morimoto, K; Sawa, K; Takatsuka, Y; Crossley, E; Harris, A; Talbot, D; Taylor, M; Cocconi, G; di Blasio, B; Ivanov, [No Value; Semiglazov, [No Value; Brockschmidt, J; Cooper, MR; Ueo, H; Falkson, CI; A'Hern, R; Ashley, S; Powles, TJ; Smith, IE; Yarnold, [No Value; Gazet, JC; Cocoran, N; Deshpande, N; di Martino, L; Douglas, P; Hacking, A; Host, H; Lindtner, A; Notter, G; Bryant, AJS; Ewing, GH; Firth, LA; Krushen-Kosloski, JL; Nissen-Meyer, R; Foster, L; George, WD; Stewart, HJ; Stroner, P; Malmstrom, P; Moller, TR; Ryden, S; Tengrup, [No Value; Tennvall-Nittby, L; Carstenssen, J; Dufmats, M; Hatschek, T; Nordenskjold, B; Soderberg, M; Carpenter, JT; Albain, K; Crowley, J; Green, S; Martino, S; Osborne, CK; Ravdin, PM; Glas, U; Johansson, U; Rutqvist, LE; Singnomklao, T; Wallgren, A; Castiglione, M; Goldhirsch, A; Maibach, R; Senn, HJ; Thurlimann, B; Brenner, H; Hercbergs, A; Yoshimoto, M; DeBoer, G; Paterson, AHG; Pritchard, KI; Meakin, JW; Panzarella, T; Pritchard, KI; Shan, Y; Shao, YF; Wang, [No Value; Zhao, DB; Boreham, J; Chen, ZM; Pan, HC; Peto, R; Bahi, J; Reid, M; Spittle, M; Deutsch, GP; Senanayake, F; Kwong, DLW; Bianco, AR; Carlomagno, C; De Laurentiis, M; De Placido, S; Buzdar, AU; Smith, T; Bergh, J; Holmberg, L; Liljegren, G; Nilsson, J; Seifert, M; Sevelda, P; Zielinsky, CC; Buchanan, RB; Cross, M; Royle, GT; Dunn, JA; Hills, RK; Lee, M; Morrison, JM; Spooner, D; Litton, A; Chlebowski, RT; Caffier, H

    2005-01-01

    Background Quinquennial overviews (1985-2000) of the randomised trials in early breast cancer have assessed the 5-year and 10-year effects of various systemic adjuvant therapies on breast cancer recurrence and survival. Here, we report the 10-year and 15-year effects. Methods Collaborative

  10. Reducing Breast Cancer Recurrence with Weight Loss, a Vanguard Trial: The Exercise and Nutrition to Enhance Recovery and Good Health for You (ENERGY) Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Rock, Cheryl L.; Byers, Tim E.; Colditz, Graham A; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Ganz, Patricia A; WOLIN, KATHLEEN Y.; Elias, Anthony; Krontiras, Helen; Liu, Jingxia; Naughton, Michael; Pakiz, Bilgé; Parker, Barbara A.; Sedjo, Rebecca L; Wyatt, Holly

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common invasive cancer among women in developed countries. Obesity is a major risk factor for breast cancer recurrence and mortality in both pre-and postmenopausal women. Co-morbid medical conditions are common among breast cancer survivors. The Exercise and Nutrition to Enhance Recovery and Good Health for You (ENERGY) study is a 4-year randomized clinical trial of 693 overweight/obese women aged ≥21 years diagnosed with any early stage breast cancer (stages I[≥1 cm...

  11. Claudin-2 is an independent negative prognostic factor in breast cancer and specifically predicts early liver recurrences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbung, Siker; Kovács, Anikó; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Malmström, Per; Fernö, Mårten; Hatschek, Thomas; Hedenfalk, Ingrid

    2014-02-01

    Predicting any future metastatic site of early-stage breast cancer is important as it significantly influences the prognosis of advanced disease. This study aimed at investigating the potential of claudin-2, over-expressed in breast cancer liver metastases, as a biomarker for predicting liver metastatic propensity in primary breast cancer. Claudin-2 expression was analyzed in two independent cohorts. Cohort 1 included 304 women with metastatic breast cancer diagnosed between 2002 and 2007, while cohort 2 included 237 premenopausal women with early-stage node-negative breast cancer diagnosed between 1991 and 1994. Global transcriptional profiling of fine-needle aspirates from metastases was performed, followed by immunohistochemical analyses in archival primary tumor tissue. Associations between claudin-2 expression and relapse site were assessed by univariable and multivariable Cox regression models including conventional prognostic factors. Two-sided statistical tests were used. CLDN2 was significantly up-regulated (P liver metastases compared to other metastatic sites. Claudin-2 protein was more frequently expressed in primary tumors from patients who subsequently developed liver metastases (P = 0.02) and high expression was associated with a shorter metastasis-free interval (cohort 1, HR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.0-1.9; cohort 2, HR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.3-3.5). Specifically, a significantly shorter interval between primary tumor diagnosis and liver-specific recurrence was observed among patients with high levels of claudin-2 expression in the primary tumor (cohort 1, HR = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.3-3.9). These results suggest a novel role for claudin-2 as a prognostic biomarker with the ability to predict not only the likelihood of a breast cancer recurrence, but more interestingly, the liver metastatic potential of the primary tumor. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Design and characterization of tunable hydrogels to examine microenvironmental regulation of breast cancer recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicki, Lisa A.

    Late recurrence of breast cancer within distant metastatic tissue sites is often difficult to diagnose and treat, resulting in poor prognosis for patients. It is hypothesized that cells may go dormant by interactions with or lack of adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) within these tissues, which differs from native breast tissue. The metastatic ECM is a complex microenvironment, containing a mixture of mechanical and chemical cues to which cells respond. To investigate how the ECM regulates cancer recurrence, two-dimensional (2D, plates) and three-dimensional (3D, naturally-derived scaffolds) in vitro culture models have been used. However, lack of complexity (2D), mechanical property control (2D, 3D), and chemical property control (3D) makes it challenging to identify key factors involved in regulating dormancy or activation in these systems. The development of synthetic polymer-based scaffolds in recent years provides an alternate route to investigating cellular response to the presentation of microenvironmental cues in 3D. Initially bioinert, these scaffolds may be modified with chemical ligands to permit cell-matrix interactions and their mechanical properties may be precisely tuned to mimic different tissue sites. The goal of this dissertation is to develop and characterize a novel synthetic material for cell culture applications and to examine how physical and chemical factors in this microenvironment regulate breast cancer activation. Specifically, we have developed a novel poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel scaffold for in vitro cell culture. PEG modified with thiols and peptides containing alloxycarbonyl-protected lysines (containing a reactive vinyl) react rapidly upon the application of light in the presence of a photoinitiator, lithium acylphosphinate ( minutes). Scaffold mechanical properties are tuned by varying macromer concentration to mimic soft metastatic site tissue ECMs (Young's modulus 600 - 6000 Pa). These properties remain

  13. Prediction of breast cancer recurrence using lymph node metabolic and volumetric parameters from (18)F-FDG PET/CT in operable triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Il; Kim, Yong Joong; Paeng, Jin Chul; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key; Kang, Keon Wook

    2017-06-14

    Triple-negative breast cancer has a poor prognosis. We evaluated several metabolic and volumetric parameters from preoperative (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in the prognosis of triple-negative breast cancer and compared them with current clinicopathologic parameters. A total of 228 patients with triple-negative breast cancer (mean age 47.0 ± 10.8 years, all women) who had undergone preoperative PET/CT were included. The PET/CT metabolic parameters evaluated included maximum, peak, and mean standardized uptake values (SUVmax, SUVpeak, and SUVmean, respectively). The volumetric parameters evaluated included metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG). Metabolic and volumetric parameters were evaluated separately for tumor (T) and lymph nodes (N). The prognostic value of these parameters was compared with that of clinicopathologic parameters. All lymph node metabolic and volumetric parameters showed significant differences between patients with and without recurrence. However, tumor metabolic and volumetric parameters showed no significant differences. In a univariate survival analysis, all lymph node metabolic and volumetric parameters (SUVmax-N, SUVpeak-N, SUVmean-N, MTV-N, and TLG-N; all P P = 0.010), N stage (P P P = 0.005), MTV (P = 0.008), and TLG (P = 0.006) with TNM stage (all P triple-negative breast cancer after surgery. Lymph node metabolic and volumetric parameters were useful parameters for evaluating prognosis in patients with triple-negative breast cancer by (18)F-FDG PET/CT, rather than tumor parameters.

  14. Elevated nuclear expression of the SMRT corepressor in breast cancer is associated with earlier tumor recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carolyn L; Migliaccio, Ilenia; Chaubal, Vaishali; Wu, Meng-Fen; Pace, Margaret C; Hartmaier, Ryan; Jiang, Shiming; Edwards, Dean P; Gutiérrez, M Carolina; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Oesterreich, Steffi

    2012-11-01

    Silencing mediator of retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptor (SMRT), also known as nuclear corepressor 2 (NCOR2) is a transcriptional corepressor for multiple members of the nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors, including estrogen receptor-α (ERα). In the classical model of corepressor action, SMRT binds to antiestrogen-bound ERα at target promoters and represses ERα transcriptional activity and gene expression. Herein SMRT mRNA and protein expression was examined in a panel of 30 breast cancer cell lines. Expression of both parameters was found to vary considerably amongst lines and the correlation between protein and mRNA expression was very poor (R (2) = 0.0775). Therefore, SMRT protein levels were examined by immunohistochemical staining of a tissue microarray of 866 patients with stage I-II breast cancer. Nuclear and cytoplasmic SMRT were scored separately according to the Allred score. The majority of tumors (67 %) were negative for cytoplasmic SMRT, which when detected was found at very low levels. In contrast, nuclear SMRT was broadly detected. There was no significant difference in time to recurrence (TTR) according to SMRT expression levels in the ERα-positive tamoxifen-treated patients (P = 0.297) but the difference was significant in the untreated patients (P = 0.01). In multivariate analysis, ERα-positive tamoxifen-untreated patients with high nuclear SMRT expression (SMRT 5-8, i.e., 2nd to 4th quartile) had a shorter TTR (HR = 1.94, 95 % CI, 1.24-3.04; P = 0.004) while there was no association with SMRT expression for ERα-positive tamoxifen-treated patients. There was no association between SMRT expression and overall survival for patients, regardless of whether they received tamoxifen. Thus while SMRT protein expression was not predictive of outcome after antiestrogen therapy, it may have value in predicting tumor recurrence in patients not receiving adjuvant tamoxifen therapy.

  15. Polymorphisms in the MTHFR gene are associated with recurrence risk in lymph node-positive breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suner A

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ali Suner,1 Hakan Buyukhatipoglu,1 Gokmen Aktas,1 Tulay Kus,1 Mustafa Ulaslı,2 Serdar Oztuzcu,2 Mehmet Emin Kalender,1 Alper Sevinc,1 Seval Kul,3 Celaletdin Camci1 1Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Gaziantep Oncology Hospital, University of Gaziantep, Gaziantep, Turkey; 2Department of Medical Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Gaziantep, Gaziantep, Turkey; 3Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Gaziantep, Gaziantep, Turkey Purpose: The aim of this study is to clarify the relationship between recurrence risk of breast cancer and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T polymorphisms.Patients and methods: Breast cancer patients who had undergone surgery in Gaziantep University Oncology Hospital between June 2005 and June 2012 were followed-up and retrospectively enrolled in this study. Blood samples were collected from all patients to assess MTHFR C677T polymorphisms. Stage according to tumor–node–metastasis system, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status, grade of disease, menopausal status, and administered chemotherapy or hormonal therapy were recorded. Effects of these parameters on recurrence risk were evaluated using univariate analysis and multivariate binary logistic regression model.Results: Association of MTHFR C677T polymorphisms with recurrence risk was evaluated in 298 patients whose median age was 47 years (range: 21–79 years. In all patients, age (odds ratio [OR] =0.953, P=0.005 and N3 lymph node status (OR =6.293, P=0.001 were found to affect the recurrence risk. While MTHFR homozygote genotype did not have an effect on recurrence risk in all patients, increased risk was observed in lymph node-positive subgroup (OR =4.271; 95% CI 1.515–12.023; P=0.006. Adjusting for age, tumor size (T, and node status (N, MTHFR homozygote genotype had more statistically significant risk for recurrence (OR =3.255; 95

  16. The diagnostic and prognostic value of serum bone Gla protein (osteocalcin) in patients with recurrent breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamby, C; Egsmose, C; Söletormos, G

    1993-01-01

    Serum bone Gla protein (S-BGP), a marker of bone metabolism, was measured in 60 patients included in a staging programme for recurrent breast cancer. Other diagnostic procedures comprised S-alkaline phosphatase (S-AP), bone scan (B-scan), bilateral iliac crest bone marrow biopsies, and radiological...... bone survey. The sites of recurrence were bone (61%), bone marrow (46%), soft tissue (52%), lung (13%), pleura (11%), liver (4%), and brain (2%). Radiology and bone biopsy served as key diagnoses as to the presence or absence of bone metastases. The diagnostic efficiency of B-scan and S-AP was greater...

  17. An evaluation of factors predicting breast recurrence and prognosis after recurrence, on distinguishing intramammary and extramammary recurrence, in breast-conserving surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Reiki; Nagao, Kazuharu; Miyayama, Haruhiko [Kumamoto City Hospital (Japan)] (and others)

    2001-06-01

    Recurrence of cancer in the breast is an important problem in breast-conserving therapy. We evaluated risk factors for recurrence from the viewpoint of recurrence type and outcome after recurrence. Of 533 cases of breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery from April 1989 through July 2000, disease in 66 recurred (12.4%) and were classified as 23 cases of breast recurrence only, 16 cases of both breast recurrence and distant metastasis, and 27 cases of distant metastasis only. The clinical factors examined included age, lymphatic invasion, nodal status, extensive intraductal component (EIC), proliferative activity, and estrogen receptor (ER) status. Of the 39 cases of breast recurrence, 19 had intramammary tumors and 20 had extramammary tumors of the skin, subcutaneous tissue, or muscle, including 8 cases with inflammatory breast recurrence. Multivariate analysis showed that factors correlated with breast recurrence were age, ER status, proliferative activity, and surgical margin. EIC-comedo was related to intramammary recurrence, whereas lymphatic invasion and nodal status were related to extramammary recurrence. Postoperative irradiation was an effective treatment for tumors in young women and tumors with positive margins or a comedo component. Outcome after breast recurrence depended on nodal status at primary operation, and survival rates were worst in patients with inflammatory breast recurrence. In conclusion, age, EIC-comedo status, the surgical margin, and negative ER status were correlated with breast recurrence. Countermeasures against these factors should be investigated. (author)

  18. Lymphatic mapping and sentinel node harvesting in patients with recurrent breast cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roumen, R.M.H.; Kuijt, G.P.; Liem, I.H.

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the feasibility and consequences of lymphatic mapping and a ("repeat") sentinel lymph node (SLN) procedure in patients with breast cancer relapse after previous breast and axillary surgery. METHODS: Review and presentation of a patient cohort. All SLN procedures included

  19. Cytochrome P-450 2D6 (CYP2D6) Genotype and Breast Cancer Recurrence in Tamoxifen-Treated Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahern, Thomas P; Hertz, Daniel L; Damkier, Per

    2017-01-01

    Tamoxifen therapy for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer reduces the risk of recurrence by approximately one-half. Cytochrome P-450 2D6, encoded by the polymorphic cytochrome P-450 2D6 gene (CYP2D6), oxidizes tamoxifen to its most active metabolites. Steady-state concentrations of endoxifen...... (4-hydroxy-N-desmethyltamoxifen), the most potent antiestrogenic metabolite, are reduced in women whose CYP2D6 genotypes confer poor enzyme function. Thirty-one studies of the association of CYP2D6 genotype with breast cancer survival have yielded heterogeneous results. Some influential studies...... genotyped DNA from tumor-infiltrated tissues, and their results may have been susceptible to germline genotype misclassification from loss of heterozygosity at the CYP2D6 locus. We systematically reviewed 6 studies of concordance between genotypes obtained from paired nonneoplastic and breast tumor...

  20. Breast and ovarian cancer survivors' experience of participating in a cognitive-existential group intervention addressing fear of cancer recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheu, Christine; Lebel, Sophie; Tomei, Christina; Singh, Mina; Esplen, Mary Jane

    2015-08-01

    Currently, very few clinical approaches are offered to cancer survivors dealing with fear of cancer recurrence (FCR). This paper provides an overview of cancer survivors' experience and satisfaction after taking part in a six-week, cognitive-existential (CE) group intervention that aimed to address FCR. In this qualitative descriptive study, 12 women with breast or ovarian cancer provided in-depth interviews of their experience in taking part in the CE group intervention. Analysis of their accounts revealed struggles to face their fears. Yet, by embracing their group experience, the women learned how to confront their fears and gain emotional control. The women reported that the group work was highly valuable. From the women's analysed accounts, the authors have proposed recommendations for changes to the group work process before moving the study to a full clinical trial. The study's findings also provide valuable insights to other cancer survivor groups who may also be experiencing FCR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of age, intrinsic subtype and local treatment on long-term local-regional recurrence and breast cancer mortality among low-risk breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurberg, Tinne; Alsner, Jan; Tramm, Trine; Jensen, Vibeke; Lyngholm, Christina D; Christiansen, Peer M; Overgaard, Jens

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term prognostic impact of age, local treatment and intrinsic subtypes on the risk of local-regional recurrence (LRR) and breast cancer mortality among low-risk patients. Cohort study with prospectively collected data, balanced five-year age groups, including 514 Danish lymph node negative breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1989 and 1998, treated with mastectomy (N = 320) or breast-conserving therapy (BCT) (N = 194) and without systemic treatment. Intrinsic subtype approximation was performed by combining information on estrogen-, progesterone-, HER2 receptor and Ki67. The majority of the tumors had a luminal subtype: 70% Luminal-A (LumA), 16% Luminal-B (LumB), and 10% Luminal-HER2 + (Lum-HER2+). The distribution of intrinsic subtypes between younger (≤45 years) and older (>45 years) patients was similar. Intrinsic subtypes had no prognostic impact on the 20-year LRR risk, regardless of age. A distinct 20-year mortality pattern was observed among the younger patients: 11% of patients with LumB tumor died of breast cancer within the first five years after primary surgery, 23% of patients with Lum-HER2+ tumor died within a 5-10-year period, whereas patients with LumA tumor died with a constant low rate throughout the 20-year period. After 20 years of follow-up, patients with LumA tumor had breast cancer mortality comparable to that of patients with LumB tumor (20%) and lower than Lum-HER2+ tumor (39%). Among the older patients, no distinct mortality pattern was observed, and the 20-year breast cancer mortality was not associated with intrinsic subtypes. Among low-risk patients, 96% of the tumors were Luminal and the distribution of intrinsic subtypes between younger (≤45 years) and older (>45 years) patients was similar. The observed higher frequency of LRR among younger low-risk BCT patients was not associated intrinsic subtype. The 20-year breast cancer mortality was non-significant for LumA tumors among the older patients

  2. Novel use of an air-filled breast prosthesis to allow radiotherapy to recurrent colonic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Duffy, F

    2012-02-01

    AiM: The authors present the novel and successful use of an air-filled breast prosthesis for extra pelvic exclusion of small bowel to facilitate adjuvant radiotherapy following resection of recurrent adenocarcinoma of the ascending bowel. The therapeutic use of radiotherapy in colon cancer can cause acute or chronic radiation enteropathy. Mobile small bowel can be sequestered in \\'dead space\\' or by adhesions exposing it to adjuvant radiotherapy. A variety of pelvic partitioning methods have been described to exclude bowel from radiation fields using both native and prosthetic materials. METHOD: In this case a 68 year old presented with ascending colon adenocarcinoma invading the peritoneum and underwent en bloc peritoneal resection. Thirty-seven months later surveillance CT identified a local recurrence. Subsequent resection resulted in a large iliacus muscle defect which would sequester small bowel loops thus exposing the patient to radiation enteropathy. The lateral position of the defect precluded the use of traditional pelvic partitioning methods which would be unlikely to remain in place long enough to allow radiotherapy. A lightweight air-filled breast prosthesis (Allergan 133 FV 750 cms) secured in place with an omentoplasty was used to fill the defect. RESULTS: Following well tolerated radiotherapy the prosthesis was deflated under ultrasound guidance and removed via a 7-cm transverse incision above the right iliac crest. The patient is disease free 18 months later with no evidence of treatment related morbidity. CONCLUSION: The use of a malleable air-filled prosthesis for pelvic partitioning allows specific tailoring of the prosthesis size and shape for individual patient defects. It is also lightweight enough to be secured in place using an omentoplasty to prevent movement related prosthesis migration. In the absence of adequate omentum a mesh sling may be considered to allow fixation. In this case the anatomy of the prosthesis position allowed for its

  3. Interventions to Manage Uncertainty and Fear of Recurrence in Female Breast Cancer Survivors: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Gretchen; Madsen, Lydia T; Dains, Joyce E

    2016-12-01

    Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is one of the largest unmet needs in the breast cancer survivor population. This review addresses this unmet need with the question. The purpose of this article is to better understand potential interventions to manage FCR when caring for breast cancer survivors. Databases used were PubMed, CINAHL®, Google Scholar, EMBASE, and Scopus. Articles published in English from 2009-2014 with female breast cancer survivors and interventions that address FCR as an endpoint or outcome measure or objectively illustrate an improvement in FCR were included. One hundred ninety-eight articles were initially identified in this literature review search. Upon detailed review of content for relevance, seven articles met criteria to be included in this review. This literature review provided current evidence of published interventions to manage uncertainty in the female breast cancer survivor population, as well as future research recommendations. Interventions surrounding being mindful, managing uncertainty, having more effective patient-provider communication, and handling stress through counseling are options for managing FCR.

  4. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing Identifies a Recurrent Mutation in MCPH1 Associating with Hereditary Breast Cancer Susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuomo Mantere

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is strongly influenced by hereditary risk factors, a majority of which still remain unknown. Here, we performed a targeted next-generation sequencing of 796 genes implicated in DNA repair in 189 Finnish breast cancer cases with indication of hereditary disease susceptibility and focused the analysis on protein truncating mutations. A recurrent heterozygous mutation (c.904_916del, p.Arg304ValfsTer3 was identified in early DNA damage response gene, MCPH1, significantly associating with breast cancer susceptibility both in familial (5/145, 3.4%, P = 0.003, OR 8.3 and unselected cases (16/1150, 1.4%, P = 0.016, OR 3.3. A total of 21 mutation positive families were identified, of which one-third exhibited also brain tumors and/or sarcomas (P = 0.0007. Mutation carriers exhibited significant increase in genomic instability assessed by cytogenetic analysis for spontaneous chromosomal rearrangements in peripheral blood lymphocytes (P = 0.0007, suggesting an effect for MCPH1 haploinsufficiency on cancer susceptibility. Furthermore, 40% of the mutation carrier tumors exhibited loss of the wild-type allele. These findings collectively provide strong evidence for MCHP1 being a novel breast cancer susceptibility gene, which warrants further investigations in other populations.

  5. A gene expression signature that can predict the recurrence of tamoxifen-treated primary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanrion, Maïa; Negre, Vincent; Fontaine, Hélène; Salvetat, Nicolas; Bibeau, Frédéric; Mac Grogan, Gaëtan; Mauriac, Louis; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Molina, Franck; Theillet, Charles; Darbon, Jean-Marie

    2008-03-15

    The identification of a molecular signature predicting the relapse of tamoxifen-treated primary breast cancers should help the therapeutic management of estrogen receptor-positive cancers. A series of 132 primary tumors from patients who received adjuvant tamoxifen were analyzed for expression profiles at the whole-genome level by 70-mer oligonucleotide microarrays. A supervised analysis was done to identify an expression signature. We defined a 36-gene signature that correctly classified 78% of patients with relapse and 80% of relapse-free patients (79% accuracy). Using 23 independent tumors, we confirmed the accuracy of the signature (78%) whose relevance was further shown by using published microarray data from 60 tamoxifen-treated patients (63% accuracy). Univariate analysis using the validation set of 83 tumors showed that the 36-gene classifier is more efficient in predicting disease-free survival than the traditional histopathologic prognostic factors and is as effective as the Nottingham Prognostic Index or the "Adjuvant!" software. Multivariate analysis showed that the molecular signature is the only independent prognostic factor. A comparison with several already published signatures demonstrated that the 36-gene signature is among the best to classify tumors from both training and validation sets. Kaplan-Meier analyses emphasized its prognostic power both on the whole cohort of patients and on a subgroup with an intermediate risk of recurrence as defined by the St. Gallen criteria. This study identifies a molecular signature specifying a subgroup of patients who do not gain benefits from tamoxifen treatment. These patients may therefore be eligible for alternative endocrine therapies and/or chemotherapy.

  6. Radiation dose escalation for loco-regional recurrence of breast cancer after mastectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skinner Heath D

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation is a standard component of treatment for patients with locoregional recurrence (LRR of breast cancer following mastectomy. The current study reports the results of a 10% radiation dose escalation in these patients. Methods 159 patients treated at MD Anderson Cancer Center between 1994-2006 with isolated LRR after mastectomy alone were reviewed. Patients in the standard treatment group (65 pts, 40.9% were treated to 50 Gy comprehensively plus a boost of 10 Gy. The dose escalated group (94 pts, 59.1% was treated to 54 Gy comprehensively and a minimum 12 Gy boost. Median dose in the standard dose and dose escalated group was 60 Gy (±1 Gy, 95% CI and 66 Gy (±0.5 Gy, 95% CI respectively. Median follow up for living patients was 94 months from time of recurrence. Results The actuarial five year locoregional control (LRC rate was 77% for the entire study population. The five year overall survival and disease-free survival was 55% and 41%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, initial tumor size (p = 0.03, time to initial LRR (p = 0.03, absence of gross tumor at the time of radiation (p = 0.001 and Her2 status (p = 0.03 were associated with improved LRC. Five year LRC rates were similar in patients with a complete response to chemotherapy without surgery and patients with a complete surgical excision (77% vs 83%, p = NS, compared to a 63% LRC rate in patients with gross disease at the time of radiation (p = 0.024. LRC rates were 80% in the standard dose group and 75% in the dose escalated group (p = NS. Conclusions While LRR following mastectomy is potentially curable, distant metastasis and local control rates remain suboptimal. Radiation dose escalation did not appear to improve LRC. Given significant local failure rates, these patients are good candidates for additional strategies to improve their outcomes.

  7. Application of a drug-induced apoptosis assay to identify treatment strategies in recurrent or metastatic breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Bosserman

    Full Text Available A drug-induced apoptosis assay has been developed to determine which chemotherapy drugs or regimens can produce higher cell killing in vitro. This study was done to determine if this assay could be performed in patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer patients, to characterize the patterns of drug-induced apoptosis, and to evaluate the clinical utility of the assay. A secondary goal was to correlate assay use with clinical outcomes.In a prospective, non-blinded, multi institutional controlled trial, 30 evaluable patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer who were treated with chemotherapy had tumor samples submitted for the MiCK drug-induced apoptosis assay. After receiving results within 72 hours after biopsy, physicians could use the test to determine therapy (users, or elect to not use the test (non-users.The assay was able to characterize drug-induced apoptosis in tumor specimens from breast cancer patients and identified which drugs or combinations gave highest levels of apoptosis. Patterns of drug activity were also analyzed in triple negative breast cancer. Different drugs from a single class of agents often produced significantly different amounts of apoptosis. Physician frequently (73% used the assay to help select chemotherapy treatments in patients, Patients whose physicians were users had a higher response (CR+PR rate compared to non-users (38.1% vs 0%, p = 0.04 and a higher disease control (CR+PR+Stable rate (81% vs 25%, p<0.01. Time to relapse was longer in users 7.4 mo compared to non-users 2.2 mo (p<0.01.The MiCK assay can be performed in breast cancer specimens, and results are often used by physicians in breast cancer patients with recurrent or metastatic disease. These results from a good laboratory phase II study can be the basis for a future larger prospective multicenter study to more definitively establish the value of the assay.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00901264.

  8. CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*17 variants and effect of tamoxifen on breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkier, Per; Kjærsgaard, Anders; Barker, Kimberly A

    2017-01-01

    and recurrence of breast cancer. We used outcome and genotyping data from the large publicly available International Tamoxifen Pharmacogenomics Consortium (ITPC) dataset. Cox regression was used to compute the hazard ratios (HRs) for recurrence. CYP2C19 genotype data was available for 2 423 patients...

  9. Effectiveness of routine visits and routine tests in detecting isolated locoregional recurrences after treatment for early-stage invasive breast cancer : A meta-analysis and systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bock, GH; Bonnema, J; van der Hage, J; Kievit, J; van de Velde, CJH

    2004-01-01

    Purpose To review the effectiveness of routine visits and routine tests in detecting isolated locoregional recurrences in asymptomatic patients after treatment for early-stage invasive breast cancer. Methods Systematic review and meta-analysis. The proportion of isolated locoregional recurrences

  10. Impact of primary local treatment on the development of distant metastases or death through locoregional recurrence in young breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bantema-Joppe, E. J.; van den Heuvel, E. R.; de Munck, L.; de Bock, G. H.; Smit, W. G. J. M.; Timmer, P. R.; Dolsma, W. V.; Jansen, L.; Siesling, S.; Langendijk, J. A.; Maduro, J. H.; Schroder, Carolien; Schroder, Carolien

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis whether breast conserving therapy (BCT) compared with mastectomy is associated with a negative outcome in terms of distant metastases or death (DMD) and investigated the relation between locoregional recurrence (LRR) and DMD in young breast cancer (BC)

  11. Impact of primary local treatment on the development of distant metastases or death through locoregional recurrence in young breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bantema-Joppe, E.J.; van den Heuvel, E.R.; de Munck, L.; de Bock, G.H.; Smit, W.G.J.M.; Timmer, P.R.; Dolsma, W.V.; Jansen, L.; Schroder, C.P.; Siesling, Sabine; Langendijk, J.A.; Maduro, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis whether breast conserving therapy (BCT) compared with mastectomy is associated with a negative outcome in terms of distant metastases or death (DMD) and investigated the relation between locoregional recurrence (LRR) and DMD in young breast cancer (BC)

  12. Towards personalized follow-up : a conditional prediction model and nomogram for risk of locoregional recurrence in early breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, Annemieke; Vliegen, Ingrid; Sonke, G.S.; Klaase, J.M.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Siesling, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to develop and validate a conditional logistic regression model for the prediction of locoregional recurrence (LRR) of breast cancer. To make a translation to clinical practice a web based nomogram was made. Methods Women first diagnosed with early breast

  13. Aurora-A identifies early recurrence and poor prognosis and promises a potential therapeutic target in triple negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Xu

    Full Text Available Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC acquires an unfavorable prognosis, emerging as a major challenge for the treatment of breast cancer. In the present study, 122 TNBC patients were subjected to analysis of Aurora-A (Aur-A expression and survival prognosis. We found that Aur-A high expression was positively associated with initial clinical stage (P = 0.025, the proliferation marker Ki-67 (P = 0.001, and the recurrence rate of TNBC patients (P<0.001. In TNBC patients with Aur-A high expression, the risk of distant recurrence peaked at the first 3 years and declined rapidly thereafter, whereas patients with Aur-A low expression showed a relatively constant risk of recurrence during the entire follow-up period. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that overexpression of Aur-A predicted poor overall survival (P = 0.002 and progression-free survival (P = 0.012 in TNBC. Furthermore, overexpression of Aur-A, associated with high Ki-67, predicted an inferior prognosis compared with low expression of both Aur-A and Ki-67. Importantly, we further found that Aur-A was overexpressed in TNBC cells, and inhibition of this kinase inhibited cell proliferation and prevented cell migration in TNBC. Our findings demonstrated that Aur-A was a potential therapeutic target for TNBC and inhibition of Aur-A kinase was a promising regimen for TNBC cancer therapy.

  14. Canonical correlation analysis for data reduction in data mining applied to predictive models for breast cancer recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Amir Reza; Gill, Hans; Ahlfeldt, Hans; Shahsavar, Nosrat

    2005-01-01

    Data mining methods can be used for extracting specific medical knowledge such as important predictors for recurrence of breast cancer in pertinent data material. However, when there is a huge quantity of variables in the data material it is first necessary to identify and select important variables. In this study we present a preprocessing method for selecting important variables in a dataset prior to building a predictive model.In the dataset, data from 5787 female patients were analysed. To cover more predictors and obtain a better assessment of the outcomes, data were retrieved from three different registers: the regional breast cancer, tumour markers, and cause of death registers. After retrieving information about selected predictors and outcomes from the different registers, the raw data were cleaned by running different logical rules. Thereafter, domain experts selected predictors assumed to be important regarding recurrence of breast cancer. After that, Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) was applied as a dimension reduction technique to preserve the character of the original data.Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was applied to the resulting dataset for two different analyses with the same settings. Performance of the predictive models was confirmed by ten-fold cross validation. The results showed an increase in the accuracy of the prediction and reduction of the mean absolute error.

  15. Association Between Phosphorylated Histone H3 and Oncotype DX Recurrence Scores in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lik Hang; Swanson, Paul E; Tang, Patricia A; Bigras, Gilbert; Yang, Hua

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the association between phosphorylated histone H3 (PhH3) and Oncotype DX recurrence score (RS). All invasive breast carcinoma with RS results from our city between 2007 and 2010 (n=47) were reviewed. Whole-tumor sections were stained for PhH3. Mitotic and PhH3 counts were performed and clinical charts reviewed. PhH3 correlated well with RS (r=0.69, Pcancer.

  16. Effects of a randomized gratitude intervention on death-related fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Amy K; Szczesny, Elana C; Soriano, Emily C; Laurenceau, Jean-Philippe; Siegel, Scott D

    2016-12-01

    Among the most prevalent and distressing concerns endorsed by breast cancer survivors is fear of cancer recurrence (FOR), and one of the most salient facets is the worry that a recurrence of cancer could cause one's death. The primary goal of the present study was to test the effects of a brief, low-cost gratitude intervention on overall FOR and death-related FOR, positing pursuit of meaningful goals as a theoretically driven putative mediator. To replicate published tests of similar gratitude-eliciting interventions, positive affect (PA) was also considered as an outcome. Sixty-seven women with early stage breast cancer were randomly assigned to either a 6-week online gratitude intervention or a 6-week online control condition. Outcomes were assessed at pre- and posttreatment, as well as 1 month and 3 months after the end of treatment. The mediator, meaningful goal pursuit, was measured via assessments over the 6-week intervention period. Results revealed that patients in the gratitude intervention experienced a significant decrease in death-related FOR compared to the control condition. Moreover, this effect was significantly mediated by meaningful goal pursuit (and not by PA). The gratitude intervention was also found to prevent declines in PA observed in the control condition. Overall, findings support the notion that a brief gratitude intervention can promote well-being and psychological adaptation to cancer by stimulating the pursuit of meaningful goals and subsequently reducing death-related FOR. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Evaluate Risk/Benefit of Nab Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine and Carboplatin Compared to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin in Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-05

    Breast Tumor; Breast Cancer; Cancer of the Breast; Estrogen Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; HER2- Negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  18. BREAST CANCER AND EXERCISE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-19

    Prevent Osteoporosis and Osteoporotic Fractures; Improve Quality of Life; Improve Weight Control, and Muscular and Cardiovascular Fitness; Help the Patients to Return to Working Life; Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence; Prevent Other Diseases and Reduce All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer.

  19. Breast Recurrent Hydatid Cyst Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temiz, Ayetullah; Albayrak, Yavuz; Akalp, Sevilay Özmen; Yalçın, Ahmet; Albayrak, Ayşe

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Hydatid cyst is a zoonotic disease seen in endemic areas. It is an important health problem in our country and especially in our Eastern and South-eastern Anatolia Region. Involvement of isolated breast tissue is very rare in hydatid cystdisease. As far as we know, isolated recurrent breast cyst hydatidosis has not been found in the literature. We aimed to present the case of a patient who was diagnosed with recurrent isolated cyst hydatid in the same breast, operated on because of hydatid cyst in the right breast 9 years ago. A hydatid cyst should be considered, particularly in endemic regions, in the differential diagnosis of cystic masses of the breast. If the patient has previously undergone surgery for breast cyst hydatid disease, recurrent cyst hydatid disease should be considered at the differential diagnosis. Celsius.

  20. Unusual Horner's syndrome in recurrent breast cancer: Evaluating using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Hyun; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Seok Ki [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is a widely used imaging modality in the initial diagnosis of cancer, treatment response evaluation and detection of recurrence. Herein, we present the case of a 39-year-old female who presented right ptosis on the follow-up of breast cancer after surgery. Clinicians suspected Horner's syndrome, and the patient underwent FDG PET/CT for the evaluation of recurrence that could cause Horner's syndrome. FDG PET/CT demonstrated a focal hypermetabolic lesion in the right cervicothoracic junction area, corresponding to the preganglionic cervical sympathetic trunk. A subsequent needle biopsy was done, and the lesion was confirmed as metastatic ductal carcinoma. In this case, we could detect the exact location of the recurring lesion that caused Horner's syndrome using FDG PET/CT.

  1. Caloric Restriction in Treating Patients With Stage 0-I Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-25

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer

  2. Study protocol of the CAREST-trial : A randomised controlled trial on the (cost-) effectiveness of a CBT-based online self-help training for fear of cancer recurrence in women with curatively treated breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Helmondt, S.J.; van der Lee, M.L.; de Vries, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background One of the most prevalent long-term consequences of surviving breast cancer is fear of cancer recurrence (FCR), which is associated with higher (mental) healthcare costs and lower surveillance rates. The majority of breast cancer survivors report a need for professional help in dealing

  3. Impact of Regional Anesthesia on Recurrence, Metastasis, and Immune Response in Breast Cancer Surgery: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-González, Oscar; Cuéllar-Guzmán, Luis F; Soliz, José; Cata, Juan P

    The perioperative period is critical in the long-term prognosis of breast cancer patients. The use of regional anesthesia, such as paravertebral block (PVB), could be associated with improvements in long-term survival after breast cancer surgery by modulating the inflammatory and immune response associated with the surgical trauma, reducing opioid and general anesthetic consumption, and promoting cancer cells death by a direct effect of local anesthetics. A systematic literature search was conducted for studies of patients who received PVB for breast cancer surgery. The Jadad score and Ottawa-Newcastle scale were used to assess the methodological quality of randomized controlled trial and observational retrospective studies, respectively. Only high-quality studies were considered for meta-analysis. The selected studies were divided into 3 groups to determine the impact of PVB on (a) recurrence and survival, (b) humoral response, and (c) cellular immune response. We identified 467 relevant studies; 121 of them underwent title and abstract review, 107 were excluded, and 15 studies were selected for full text reading and quality assessment. A meta-analysis was not conducted because of low-quality studies and lack of uniform definition among primary outcomes. Thus, a systematic review of the current evidence was performed. Our study indicates that there are no data to support or refute the use of PVB for reduction of cancer recurrence or improvement in cancer-related survival. However, PVB use is associated with lower levels of inflammation and a better immune response in comparison with general anesthesia and opioid-based analgesia.

  4. Surveillance for cancer recurrence in long-term young breast cancer survivors randomly selected from a statewide cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Tarsha; Duquette, Debra; Underhill, Meghan; Ming, Chang; Mendelsohn-Victor, Kari E; Anderson, Beth; Milliron, Kara J; Copeland, Glenn; Janz, Nancy K; Northouse, Laurel L; Duffy, Sonia M; Merajver, Sofia D; Katapodi, Maria C

    2018-01-20

    This study examined clinical breast exam (CBE) and mammography surveillance in long-term young breast cancer survivors (YBCS) and identified barriers and facilitators to cancer surveillance practices. Data collected with a self-administered survey from a statewide, randomly selected sample of YBCS diagnosed with invasive breast cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ younger than 45 years old, stratified by race (Black vs. White/Other). Multivariate logistic regression models identified predictors of annual CBEs and mammograms. Among 859 YBCS (n = 340 Black; n = 519 White/Other; mean age = 51.0 ± 5.9; diagnosed 11.0 ± 4.0 years ago), the majority (> 85%) reported an annual CBE and a mammogram. Black YBCS in the study were more likely to report lower rates of annual mammography and more barriers accessing care compared to White/Other YBCS. Having a routine source of care, confidence to use healthcare services, perceived expectations from family members and healthcare providers to engage in cancer surveillance, and motivation to comply with these expectations were significant predictors of having annual CBEs and annual mammograms. Cost-related lack of access to care was a significant barrier to annual mammograms. Routine source of post-treatment care facilitated breast cancer surveillance above national average rates. Persistent disparities regarding access to mammography surveillance were identified for Black YBCS, primarily due to lack of access to routine source of care and high out-of-pocket costs. Public health action targeting cancer surveillance in YBCS should ensure routine source of post-treatment care and address cost-related barriers. Clinical Trials Registration Number: NCT01612338.

  5. Joint Estimation of Cardiac Toxicity and Recurrence Risks After Comprehensive Nodal Photon Versus Proton Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stick, Line B., E-mail: line.bjerregaard.stick@regionh.dk [Department of Clinical Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Yu, Jen [Maryland Proton Treatment Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Maraldo, Maja V. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Aznar, Marianne C. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Pedersen, Anders N. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Bentzen, Søren M. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Maryland Proton Treatment Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center and Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Vogelius, Ivan R. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: The study aims to perform joint estimation of the risk of recurrence caused by inadequate radiation dose coverage of lymph node targets and the risk of cardiac toxicity caused by radiation exposure to the heart. Delivered photon plans are compared with realistic proton plans, thereby providing evidence-based estimates of the heterogeneity of treatment effects in consecutive cases for the 2 radiation treatment modalities. Methods and Materials: Forty-one patients referred for postlumpectomy comprehensive nodal photon irradiation for left-sided breast cancer were included. Comparative proton plans were optimized by a spot scanning technique with single-field optimization from 2 en face beams. Cardiotoxicity risk was estimated with the model of Darby et al, and risk of recurrence following a compromise of lymph node coverage was estimated by a linear dose-response model fitted to the recurrence data from the recently published EORTC (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer) 22922/10925 and NCIC-CTG (National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group) MA.20 randomized controlled trials. Results: Excess absolute risk of cardiac morbidity was small with photon therapy at an attained age of 80 years, with median values of 1.0% (range, 0.2%-2.9%) and 0.5% (range, 0.03%-1.0%) with and without cardiac risk factors, respectively, but even lower with proton therapy (0.13% [range, 0.02%-0.5%] and 0.06% [range, 0.004%-0.3%], respectively). The median estimated excess absolute risk of breast cancer recurrence after 10 years was 0.10% (range, 0.0%-0.9%) with photons and 0.02% (range, 0.0%-0.07%) with protons. The association between age of the patient and benefit from proton therapy was weak, almost non-existing (Spearman rank correlations of −0.15 and −0.30 with and without cardiac risk factors, respectively). Conclusions: Modern photon therapy yields limited risk of cardiac toxicity in most patients, but proton therapy can reduce the

  6. Genetic Ancestry Is not Associated with Breast Cancer Recurrence or Survival in U.S. Latina Women Enrolled in the Kaiser Permanente Pathways Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engmann, Natalie J; Ergas, Isaac J; Yao, Song; Kwan, Marilyn L; Roh, Janise M; Ambrosone, Christine B; Kushi, Lawrence H; Fejerman, Laura

    2017-09-01

    Background: The U.S. Hispanic/Latino population is heterogeneous both socioculturally and by the proportion of European, Indigenous American, and African ancestry of the regions from which individuals originate. A previous study reported that genetic ancestry was associated with breast cancer survival among Latinas, independent of sociodemographic and tumor characteristics, suggesting that a genetic factor associated with ancestry may affect breast cancer survival. Methods: We evaluated the association of genetic ancestry with breast cancer outcomes among 506 Latina women with invasive breast cancer in the Pathways Study, a cohort study within Kaiser Permanente, an integrated health care delivery system. Proportional hazards models were used to assess the effect of ancestry on breast cancer recurrence (53 events), breast cancer-specific mortality (31 events) and all-cause mortality (54 events), with a mean follow-up time of 6 years. Results: Indigenous American ancestry was not associated with breast cancer recurrence [HR = 1.00 per 10% increase; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.86-1.16], breast cancer mortality (HR = 0.95; 95% CI, 0.77-1.17), or all-cause mortality (HR = 0.93; 95% CI, 0.80-1.08). Adjustment for sociodemographic variables, tumor characteristics, and treatment did not alter the associations. Conclusions: Our results suggest that previously reported differences in breast cancer survival by genetic ancestry may be overcome by improving health care access and/or quality. Impact: Improving health care access and quality may reduce breast cancer disparities among U.S. Latinas. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(9); 1466-9. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Locoregional recurrence of triple-negative breast cancer: effect of type of surgery and adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayoumi Y

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Yasser Bayoumi,1 Ayman AbdelSamie,2 Ahmed Abdelsaid,3 Aida Radwan4 1Radiation Oncology, 2Medical Oncology, 3Surgical Oncology, 4Medical Physics, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt Background/purpose: The aim was to evaluate the prognostic significance of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT and surgical type on local recurrence-free survival (LRFS and overall survival (OS in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC in the Egyptian population. Patients and methods: We evaluated 111 patients with stage I–III TNBC diagnosed at our institute during the period from 2004 to 2009. Patients were stratified according to PORT into two groups: a PORT group and a non-PORT group. The influence of PORT and surgical type on LRFS and OS were evaluated. A cross-matching was done to the non-TNBC group of patients to compare the recurrence and survival rates between them and the studied group of TNBC patients. Results: The mean age of TNBC patients at diagnosis was 63±7 years. The majority of the patients had stage III disease (68.5% and 73% had clinical or pathological positive lymph nodes. Sixty percent (67/111 of patients had modified radical mastectomy and 44/111 (40% patients had breast-conserving treatment. PORT was given for 63% of patients, while systemic treatment was given in 89% of patients. At the time of analysis, 13 patients (11% developed local recurrence: five of 70 (7% in the PORT group and eight of 41 (19.5% in the non-PORT group. Five-year LRFS for the whole group of patients was 88%±6%, which was significantly affected by PORT. The surgical type did not affect local recurrence significantly. Five-year OS for the whole group was 54%±8%. PORT and surgical type did not affect OS significantly (P-value 0.09 and 0.11, respectively. Five-year LRFS was 88%±6% and 90%±11% for TNBC and non-TNBC patients, respectively (P-value 0.8; however, OS for TNBC was significantly lower than for non-TNBC (P-value 0.04. Conclusion: TNBC is an

  8. Haptoglobin phenotype is not a predictor of recurrence free survival in high-risk primary breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Nathan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Better breast cancer prognostication may improve selection of patients for adjuvant therapy. We conducted a retrospective follow-up study in which we investigated sera of high-risk primary breast cancer patients, to search for proteins predictive of recurrence free survival. Methods Two sample sets of high-risk primary breast cancer patients participating in a randomised national trial investigating the effectiveness of high-dose chemotherapy were analysed. Sera in set I (n = 63 were analysed by surface enhanced laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS for biomarker finding. Initial results were validated by analysis of sample set II (n = 371, using one-dimensional gel-electrophoresis. Results In sample set I, the expression of a peak at mass-to-charge ratio 9198 (relative intensity ≤ 20 or > 20, identified as haptoglobin (Hp alpha-1 chain, was strongly associated with recurrence free survival (global Log-rank test; p = 0.0014. Haptoglobin is present in three distinct phenotypes (Hp 1-1, Hp 2-1, and Hp 2-2, of which only individuals with phenotype Hp 1-1 or Hp 2-1 express the haptoglobin alpha-1 chain. As the expression of the haptoglobin alpha-1 chain, determined by SELDI-TOF MS, corresponds to the phenotype, initial results were validated by haptoglobin phenotyping of the independent sample set II by native one-dimensional gel-electrophoresis. With the Hp 1-1 phenotype as the reference category, the univariate hazard ratio for recurrence was 0.87 (95% CI: 0.56 – 1.34, p = 0.5221 and 1.03 (95% CI: 0.65 – 1.64, p = 0.8966 for the Hp 2-1 and Hp 2-2 phenotypes, respectively, in sample set II. Conclusion In contrast to our initial results, the haptoglobin phenotype was not identified as a predictor of recurrence free survival in high-risk primary breast cancer in our validation set. Our initial observation in the discovery set was probably the result of a type I error (i.e. false positive

  9. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  10. Tumor cryoablation in combination with natural killer cells therapy and Herceptin in patients with HER2-overexpressing recurrent breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shuzhen; Niu, Lizhi; Xu, Kecheng; Wang, Xiaohua; Liang, Yingqing; Zhang, Mingjie; Chen, Jibing; Lin, Mao

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the clinical benefits of a combination of tumor cryoablation with natural killer (NK) cells therapy and Herceptin for human epidermal growth factor (HER) 2-overexpressing recurrent breast cancer. From May 2015 to May 2016, 48 patients who met the enrollment criteria were assigned to three groups (n=16): cryoablation group (group I), cryoablation-NK cells therapy group (group II) and cryoablation-NK cells therapy-Herceptin group (group III). Safety and short-term effects were evaluated. All the adverse effects were manageable and acceptable. The three-therapy combination treatment not only yielded good clinical efficacy, it also improved the quality of life; reduced levels of circulating tumor cells (CTCs); reduced carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) and cancer antigen 15-3 (CA15-3) expression; enhanced immune function significantly. Furthermore, it can resulte in significant prolongation of progression free survival (PFS). This is the first clinical study to demonstrate the benefit of the three-therapy combination of tumor cryoablation, NK cells therapy, and Herceptin for HER2-overexpressing recurrent breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Basal Subtype of Invasive Breast Cancer Is Associated With a Higher Risk of True Recurrence After Conventional Breast-Conserving Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wo, Jennifer Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Nguyen, Paul L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Abi Raad, Rita F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sreedhara, Meera [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Freer, Phoebe E. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Georgian-Smith, Dianne [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bellon, Jennifer R.; Wong, Julia S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Smith, Barbara L. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harris, Jay R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether breast cancer subtype is associated with patterns of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), either true recurrence (TR) or elsewhere local recurrence (ELR), among women with pT1-T2 invasive breast cancer (IBC) who receive breast-conserving therapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: From Jan 1998 to Dec 2003, 1,223 women with pT1-T2N0-3 IBC were treated with BCT (lumpectomy plus whole-breast radiation). Ninety percent of patients received adjuvant systemic therapy, but none received trastuzumab. Biologic cancer subtypes were approximated by determining estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), progesterone receptor-positive (PR+), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive (HER-2+) expression, classified as luminal A (ER+ or PR+ and HER-2 negative [HER-2-]), luminal B (ER+ or PR+ and HER-2+), HER-2 (ER- and PR- and HER-2+), and basal (ER- and PR- and HER-2- ) subtypes. Imaging, pathology, and operative reports were reviewed by two physicians independently, including an attending breast radiologist. Readers were blinded to subtype and outcome. TR was defined as IBTR within the same quadrant and within 3 cm of the primary tumor. All others were defined as ELR. Results: At a median follow-up of 70 months, 24 patients developed IBTR (5-year cumulative incidence of 1.6%), including 15 TR and 9 ELR patients. At 5 years, basal (4.4%) and HER-2 (9%) subtypes had a significantly higher incidence of TR than luminal B (1.2%) and luminal A (0.2%) subtypes (p < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, basal subtype (hazard ratio [HR], 4.8, p = 0.01), younger age at diagnosis (HR, 0.97; p = 0.05), and increasing tumor size (HR, 2.1; p = 0.04) were independent predictors of TR. Only younger age (HR, 0.95; p = 0.01) significantly predicted for ELR. Conclusions: Basal and HER-2 subtypes are significantly associated with higher rates of TR among women with pT1-T2 IBC after BCT. Younger age predicts for both TR and ELR. Strategies to reduce TR in basal

  12. The diagnostic and prognostic value of serum bone Gla protein (osteocalcin) in patients with recurrent breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamby, C; Egsmose, C; Söletormos, G

    1993-01-01

    Serum bone Gla protein (S-BGP), a marker of bone metabolism, was measured in 60 patients included in a staging programme for recurrent breast cancer. Other diagnostic procedures comprised S-alkaline phosphatase (S-AP), bone scan (B-scan), bilateral iliac crest bone marrow biopsies, and radiological....... S-alkaline phosphatase (S-AP) and S-BGP were the only significant, independent prognostic factors....... bone survey. The sites of recurrence were bone (61%), bone marrow (46%), soft tissue (52%), lung (13%), pleura (11%), liver (4%), and brain (2%). Radiology and bone biopsy served as key diagnoses as to the presence or absence of bone metastases. The diagnostic efficiency of B-scan and S-AP was greater...

  13. Long-term hazard of recurrence in HER2+ breast cancer patients untreated with anti-HER2 therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strasser-Weippl, Kathrin; Horick, Nora; Smith, Ian E

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Worldwide, many patients with HER2+ (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive) early breast cancer (BC) do not receive adjuvant trastuzumab. Hazards of recurrence of these patients with respect to hormone receptor status of the primary tumor have not been described. METHODS......: Using data from 1,260 patients randomized to placebo in the adjuvant TEACH trial, we report 10-year annual hazards of recurrence in HER2+ patients not treated with anti-HER2 therapy. RESULTS: Disease-free survival (DFS) was 75% after 5 and 61% after 10 years, respectively. Patients with HER2+ hormone...... receptor-positive (HR+ (hormone receptor-positive); ER+ (estrogen receptor-positive) or PR+ (progesterone receptor-positive)) disease had a significantly better DFS than patients with HER2+ HR- (ER-/PR-) disease (hazard ratio 0.72, P=0.02). This difference was explainable by a significantly higher hazard...

  14. Power Doppler Ultrasonography and Shear Wave Elastography as Complementary Imaging Methods for Suspected Local Breast Cancer Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jales, Rodrigo Menezes; Dória, Maira Teixeira; Serra, Kátia Piton; Miranda, Mila Meneguelli; Menossi, Carlos Alberto; Schumacher, Klaus; Sarian, Luis Otávio

    2017-12-04

    To prospectively investigate the diagnostic accuracy and clinical consequences of power Doppler morphologic criteria and shear wave elastography (SWE) as complementary imaging methods for evaluation of suspected local breast cancer recurrence in the ipsilateral breast or chest wall. Thirty-two breast masses with a suspicion of local breast cancer recurrence on B-mode ultrasonography underwent complementary power Doppler and SWE evaluations. Power Doppler morphologic criteria were classified as avascular, hypovascular, or hypervascular. Shear wave elastography was classified according to a 5-point scale (SWE score) and SWE maximum elasticity. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed by the sensitivity, specificity, and area under the curve. A decision curve analysis assessed clinical consequences of each method. The reference standard for diagnosis was defined as core needle or excisional biopsy. Histopathologic examinations revealed 9 (28.2%) benign and 23 (71.8%) malignant cases. Power Doppler ultrasonography (US) had sensitivity of 34.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.6%-62.9%) and specificity of 45.4% (95% CI, 19.3%-71.5%). The SWE score (≥3) had sensitivity of 87.0% (95% CI, 66.4%-97.2%) and specificity of 44.4% (95% CI, 13.7%-78.8%). The SWE maximum elasticity (velocity > 6.5cm/s) had sensitivity of 87% (95% CI, 66.4%-97.2%) and specificity of 77.8% (95% CI, 40.0% to 97.2%). The areas under the curves for the SWE score and SWE maximum elasticity were 0.71 (95% CI, 0.53-0.87) and 0.82 (95% CI, 0.64-0.93), respectively (P = .32). Power Doppler US is unsuitable for discrimination between local breast cancer recurrence and fibrosis. Although the SWE score and SWE maximum elasticity can make this discrimination, the use of these methods to determine biopsy may lead to poorer clinical outcomes than the current practice of performing biopsies of all suspicious masses. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  15. Breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Owens

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumours are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs. Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to the pathology of breast cancer will greatly aid the pursuit of novel therapies targeted at eliminating these cells. This review will summarise what is currently known about the origins of breast CSCs, their role in disease progression and ways in which they may be targeted therapeutically.

  16. A feasibility study of the Mini-AFTER telephone intervention for the management of fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors: a mixed-methods study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank, Susanne; Steel, Emma; Fenlon, Deborah; Armes, Jo; Scanlon, Karen; Banks, Elspeth; Humphris, Gerald

    2018-01-01

    Fear of recurrence (FoR) is a major concern for patients following treatment for primary breast cancer, affecting 60-99% of breast cancer survivors. Mini-AFTER is a brief intervention developed to address this fear, that breast care nurses are ideally placed to deliver. However, their interest in delivering such an intervention is unknown and crucial to its introduction. This study aims to assess the perceived feasibility of the Mini-AFTER telephone intervention for implementation by breast care nurses to manage moderate levels of fear of recurrence among breast cancer survivors. A sequential explanatory mixed-methods design will be used, informed by normalisation process theory (NPT). The design will be guided by the stages of NPT. Specifically, understanding and evaluating the process (implementation) that would enable an intervention, such as the Mini-AFTER, not only to be operationalised and normalised into everyday work (embedded) but also sustained in practice (integration). Phase 1: all members on the UK Breast Cancer Care Nursing Network database (n = 905) will be emailed a link to a web-based survey, designed to investigate how breast cancer survivors' FoR is identified and managed within current services and their willingness to deliver the Mini-AFTER. Phase 2: a purposive sample of respondents (n = 20) will be interviewed to build upon the responses in phase 1 and explore breast care nurses' individual views on the importance of addressing fear of recurrence in their clinical consultations, interest in the Mini-AFTER intervention, the content, skills required and challenges to deliver the intervention. This study will provide information about the willingness of breast care nurses (BCNs) to provide a structured intervention to manage fear of recurrence. It will identify barriers and facilitators for effective delivery and inform the future design of a larger trial of the Mini-AFTER intervention.

  17. c-Met PET Imaging Detects Early-Stage Locoregional Recurrence of Basal-Like Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulappu, Appitha; Battle, Mark; Eisenblaetter, Michel; McRobbie, Graeme; Khan, Imtiaz; Monypenny, James; Weitsman, Gregory; Galazi, Myria; Hoppmann, Susan; Gazinska, Patrycja; Wulaningsih, Wulan; Dalsgaard, Grethe Tang; Macholl, Sven; Ng, Tony

    2016-05-01

    Locoregional recurrence of breast cancer poses significant clinical problems because of frequent inoperability once the chest wall is involved. Early detection of recurrence by molecular imaging agents against therapeutically targetable receptors, such as c-Met, would be of potential benefit. The aim of this study was to assess (18)F-AH113804, a peptide-based molecular imaging agent with high affinity for human c-Met, for the detection of early-stage locoregional recurrence in a human basal-like breast cancer model, HCC1954. HCC1954 tumor-bearing xenograft models were established, and (18)F-AH113804 was administered. Distribution of radioactivity was determined via PET at 60 min after radiotracer injection. PET and CT images were acquired 10 d after tumor inoculation, to establish baseline distribution and uptake, and then on selected days after surgical tumor resection. CT images and caliper were used to determine the tumor volume. Radiotracer uptake was assessed by (18)F-AH113804 PET imaging. c-Met expression was assessed by immunofluorescence imaging of tumor samples and correlated with (18)F-AH113804 PET imaging results. Baseline uptake of (18)F-AH113804, determined in tumor-bearing animals after 10 d, was approximately 2-fold higher in the tumor than in muscle tissue or the contralateral mammary fat pad. The tumor growth rate, determined from CT images, was comparable between the animals with recurrent tumors, with detection of tumors of low volume (tumor resection. (18)F-AH113804 PET detected local tumor recurrence as early as 6 d after surgery in the recurrent tumor-bearing animals and exhibited significantly higher (18)F-AH113804 uptake (in comparison to mammary fatty tissue), with a target-to-background (muscle) ratio of approximately 3:1 (P tumor samples, determined by immunofluorescence, correlated with the respective (18)F-AH113804 imaging signals (r = 0.82, P tumor and has potential utility for the detection of locoregional recurrence from an early

  18. GDC-0941 and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Androgen Receptor-Negative Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-22

    Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  19. Pattern of Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jobsen, Jan; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Riemersma, Sietske; Heijmans, Harald; Ong, Francisca; Struikmans, Henk

    2014-01-01

    The rate of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) in breast cancer after breast-conserving therapy was analyzed. We demonstrate that after 12 years' follow-up, there is an especially high recurrence rate for women ≤40 years old. For women ≤40 years old, the absence of adjuvant systemic therapy

  20. Joint Estimation of Cardiac Toxicity and Recurrence Risks After Comprehensive Nodal Photon Versus Proton Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stick, Line B; Yu, Jen; Maraldo, Maja V

    2017-01-01

    absolute risk of breast cancer recurrence after 10 years was 0.10% (range, 0.0%-0.9%) with photons and 0.02% (range, 0.0%-0.07%) with protons. The association between age of the patient and benefit from proton therapy was weak, almost non-existing (Spearman rank correlations of -0.15 and -0.......30 with and without cardiac risk factors, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Modern photon therapy yields limited risk of cardiac toxicity in most patients, but proton therapy can reduce the predicted risk of cardiac toxicity by up to 2.9% and the risk of breast cancer recurrence by 0.9% in individual patients. Predicted...... therapy at an attained age of 80 years, with median values of 1.0% (range, 0.2%-2.9%) and 0.5% (range, 0.03%-1.0%) with and without cardiac risk factors, respectively, but even lower with proton therapy (0.13% [range, 0.02%-0.5%] and 0.06% [range, 0.004%-0.3%], respectively). The median estimated excess...

  1. Low p53 Binding Protein 1 (53BP1) Expression Is Associated With Increased Local Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neboori, Hanmanth J.R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Haffty, Bruce G., E-mail: hafftybg@umdnj.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Wu Hao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Yang Qifeng [Department of Breast Surgery, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Ji' nan (China); Aly, Amal [Division of Medical Oncology, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Goyal, Sharad; Schiff, Devora [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Moran, Meena S. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Golhar, Ryan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Chen Chunxia; Moore, Dirk [Department of Biostatistics, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the expression of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) has prognostic significance in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (BCS+RT). Methods and Materials: A tissue microarray of early-stage breast cancer treated with BCS+RT from a cohort of 514 women was assayed for 53BP1, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry. Through log-rank tests and univariate and multivariate models, the staining profile of each tumor was correlated with clinical endpoints, including ipsilateral breast recurrence-free survival (IBRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Of the 477 (93%) evaluable tumors, 63 (13%) were scored as low. Low expression of 53BP1 was associated with worse outcomes for all endpoints studied, including 10-year IBRFS (76.8% vs. 90.5%; P=.01), OS (66.4% vs. 81.7%; P=.02), CSS (66.0% vs. 87.4%; P<.01), DMFS (55.9% vs. 87.0%; P<.01), and RFS (45.2% vs. 80.6%; P<.01). Multivariate analysis incorporating various clinico-pathologic markers and 53BP1 expression found that 53BP1 expression was again an independent predictor of all endpoints (IBRFS: P=.0254; OS: P=.0094; CSS: P=.0033; DMFS: P=.0006; RFS: P=.0002). Low 53BP1 expression was also found to correlate with triple-negative (TN) phenotype (P<.01). Furthermore, in subset analysis of all TN breast cancer, negative 53BP1 expression trended for lower IBRFS (72.3% vs. 93.9%; P=.0361) and was significant for worse DMFS (48.2% vs. 86.8%; P=.0035) and RFS (37.8% vs. 83.7%; P=.0014). Conclusion: Our data indicate that low 53BP1 expression is an independent prognostic indicator for local relapse among other endpoints in early-stage breast cancer and TN breast cancer patients treated with BCS+RT. These results should be verified in larger cohorts of patients to validate their clinical

  2. Effect of radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery on 10-year recurrence and 15-year breast cancer death: meta-analysis of individual patient data for 10,801 women in 17 randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darby, S.; McGale, P.; Correa, C.; Taylor, C.; Arriagada, R.; Clarke, M.; Cutter, D.; Davies, C.; Ewertz, M.; Godwin, J.; Gray, R.; Pierce, L.; Whelan, T.; Wang, Y.; Peto, R.; Albain, K.; Anderson, S.; Barlow, W.; Bergh, J.; Bliss, J.; Buyse, M.; Cameron, D.; Carrasco, E.; Coates, A.; Collins, R.; Costantino, J.; Cuzick, J.; Davidson, N.; Davies, K.; Delmestri, A.; Di Leo, A.; Dowsett, M.; Elphinstone, P.; Evans, V.; Gelber, R.; Gettins, L.; Geyer, C.; Goldhirsch, A.; Gregory, C.; Hayes, D.; Hill, C.; Ingle, J.; Jakesz, R.; James, S.; Kaufmann, M.; Kerr, A.; MacKinnon, E.; McHugh, T.; Norton, L.; Ohashi, Y.; Paik, S.; Pan, H. C.; Perez, E.; Piccart, M.; Pritchard, K.; Pruneri, G.; Raina, V.; Ravdin, P.; Robertson, J.; Rutgers, E.; Shao, Y. F.; Swain, S.; Valagussa, P.; Viale, G.; Winer, E.; Wood, W.; Abe, O.; Abe, R.; Enomoto, K.; Kikuchi, K.; Koyama, H.; Masuda, H.; Nomura, Y.; Sakai, K.; Sugimachi, K.; Toi, M.; Tominaga, T.; Uchino, J.; Yoshida, M.; Haybittle, J. L.; Leonard, C. F.; Calais, G.; Geraud, P.; Collett, V.; Sayer, J.; Harvey, V. J.; Holdaway, I. M.; Kay, R. G.; Mason, B. H.; Forbes, J. F.; Wilcken, N.; Bartsch, R.; Dubsky, P.; Fesl, C.; Fohler, H.; Gnant, M.; Greil, R.; Lang, A.; Luschin-Ebengreuth, G.; Marth, C.; Mlineritsch, B.; Samonigg, H.; Singer, C. F.; Steger, G. G.; Stöger, H.; Canney, P.; Yosef, H. M. A.; Focan, C.; Peek, U.; Oates, G. D.; Powell, J.; Durand, M.; Mauriac, L.; Dolci, S.; Larsimont, D.; Nogaret, J. M.; Philippson, C.; Piccart, M. J.; Masood, M. B.; Parker, D.; Price, J. J.; Lindsay, M. A.; Mackey, J.; Martin, M.; Hupperets, P. S. G. J.; Bates, T.; Blamey, R. W.; Chetty, U.; Ellis, I. O.; Mallon, E.; Morgan, D. A. L.; Patnick, J.; Pinder, S.; Olivotto, I.; Ragaz, J.; Berry, D.; Broadwater, G.; Cirrincione, C.; Muss, H.; Weiss, R. B.; Abu-Zahra, H. T.; Portnoj, S. M.; Bowden, S.; Brookes, C.; Dunn, J.; Fernando, I.; Lee, M.; Poole, C.; Rea, D.; Spooner, D.; Barrett-Lee, P. J.; Mansel, R. E.; Monypenny, I. J.; Gordon, N. H.; Davis, H. L.; Lehingue, Y.; Romestaing, P.; Dubois, J. B.; Delozier, T.; Griffon, B.; Mace Lesec'h, J.; Rambert, P.; Mustacchi, G.; Petruzelka, A. N.; Pribylova, O.; Owen, J. R.; Harbeck, N.; Jänicke, F.; Meisner, C.; Schmitt, M.; Thomssen, C.; Meier, P.; Shan, Y.; Wang, X.; Zhao, D. B.; Chen, Z. M.; Howell, A.; Swindell, R.; Burrett, J. A.; Hermans, D.; Hicks, C.; Lay, M.; Albano, J.; de Oliveira, C. F.; Gervásio, H.; Gordilho, J.; Johansen, H.; Mouridsen, H. T.; Gelman, R. S.; Harris, J. R.; Henderson, C.; Shapiro, C. L.; Christiansen, P.; Ejlertsen, B.; Jensen, M.-B.; Møller, S.; Carstensen, B.; Palshof, T.; Trampisch, H. J.; Dalesio, O.; de Vries, E. G. E.; Rodenhuis, S.; van Tinteren, H.; Comis, R. L.; Davidson, N. E.; Robert, N.; Sledge, G.; Solin, L. J.; Sparano, J. A.; Tormey, D. C.; Dixon, J. M.; Forrest, P.; Jack, W.; Kunkler, I.; Rossbach, J.; Klijn, J. G. M.; Treurniet-Donker, A. D.; van Putten, W. L. J.; Rotmensz, N.; Veronesi, U.; Bartelink, H.; Bijker, N.; Bogaerts, J.; Cardoso, F.; Cufer, T.; Julien, J. P.; van de Velde, C. J. H.; Cunningham, M. P.; Huovinen, R.; Joensuu, H.; Costa, A.; Tinterri, C.; Bonadonna, G.; Gianni, L.; Goldstein, L. J.; Bonneterre, J.; Fargeot, P.; Fumoleau, P.; Kerbrat, P.; Luporsi, E.; Namer, M.; Eiermann, W.; Hilfrich, J.; Jonat, W.; Kreienberg, R.; Schumacher, M.; Bastert, G.; Rauschecker, H.; Sauer, R.; Sauerbrei, W.; Schauer, A.; Blohmer, J. U.; Costa, S. D.; Eidtmann, H.; Gerber, G.; Jackisch, C.; Loibl, S.; von Minckwitz, G.; de Schryver, A.; Vakaet, L.; Belfiglio, M.; Nicolucci, A.; Pellegrini, F.; Pirozzoli, M. C.; Sacco, M.; Valentini, M.; McArdle, C. S.; Smith, D. C.; Stallard, S.; Dent, D. M.; Gudgeon, C. A.; Hacking, A.; Murray, E.; Panieri, E.; Werner, I. D.; Segui, M. A.; Galligioni, E.; Lopez, M.; Erazo, A.; Medina, J. Y.; Horiguchi, J.; Takei, H.; Fentiman, I. S.; Hayward, J. L.; Rubens, R. D.; Skilton, D.; Scheurlen, H.; Sohn, H. C.; Untch, M.; Dafni, U.; Markopoulos, C.; Dafni, D.; Fountzilas, G.; Mavroudis, D.; Klefstrom, P.; Saarto, T.; Gallen, M.; Margreiter, R.; de Lafontan, B.; Mihura, J.; Roché, H.; Asselain, B.; Salmon, R. J.; Vilcoq, J. R.; Bourgier, C.; Koscielny, S.; Laplanche, A.; Lê, M. G.; Spielmann, M.; A'Hern, R.; Ellis, P.; Kilburn, L.; Yarnold, J. R.; Benraadt, J.; Kooi, M.; van de Velde, A. O.; van Dongen, J. A.; Vermorken, J. B.; Castiglione, M.; Colleoni, M.; Collins, J.; Forbes, J.; Gelber, R. D.; Lindtner, J.; Price, K. N.; Regan, M. M.; Rudenstam, C. M.; Senn, H. J.; Thuerlimann, B.; Bliss, J. M.; Chilvers, C. E. D.; Coombes, R. C.; Hall, E.; Marty, M.; Possinger, K.; Schmid, P.; Wallwiener, D.; Foster, L.; George, W. D.; Stewart, H. J.; Stroner, P.; Borovik, R.; Hayat, H.; Inbar, M. J.; Robinson, E.; Bruzzi, P.; del Mastro, L.; Pronzato, P.; Sertoli, M. R.; Venturini, M.; Camerini, T.; de Palo, G.; Di Mauro, M. G.; Formelli, F.; Amadori, D.; Martoni, A.; Pannuti, F.; Camisa, R.; Cocconi, G.; Colozza, A.; Passalacqua, R.; Aogi, K.; Takashima, S.; Ikeda, T.; Inokuchi, K.; Sawa, K.; Sonoo, H.; Korzeniowski, S.; Skolyszewski, J.; Ogawa, M.; Yamashita, J.; Bastiaannet, E.; van de Water, W.; van Nes, J. G. H.; Christiaens, R.; Neven, P.; Paridaens, R.; van den Bogaert, W.; Braun, S.; Janni, W.; Martin, P.; Romain, S.; Janauer, M.; Seifert, M.; Sevelda, P.; Zielinski, C. C.; Hakes, T.; Hudis, C. A.; Wittes, R.; Giokas, G.; Kondylis, D.; Lissaios, B.; de la Huerta, R.; Sainz, M. G.; Altemus, R.; Camphausen, K.; Cowan, K.; Danforth, D.; Lichter, A.; Lippman, M.; O'Shaughnessy, J.; Pierce, L. J.; Steinberg, S.; Venzon, D.; Zujewski, J. A.; D'Amico, C.; Lioce, M.; Paradiso, A.; Chapman, J.-A. W.; Gelmon, K.; Goss, P. E.; Levine, M. N.; Meyer, R.; Parulekar, W.; Pater, J. L.; Pritchard, K. I.; Shepherd, L. E.; Tu, D.; Ohno, S.; Anderson, A.; Bass, G.; Brown, A.; Bryant, J.; Dignam, J.; Fisher, B.; Mamounas, E. P.; Redmond, C.; Wickerham, L.; Wolmark, N.; Baum, M.; Jackson, I. M.; Palmer, M. K.; Ingle, J. N.; Suman, V. J.; Bengtsson, N. O.; Emdin, S.; Jonsson, H.; Lythgoe, J. P.; Kissin, M.; Erikstein, B.; Hannisdal, E.; Jacobsen, A. B.; Varhaug, J. E.; Gundersen, S.; Hauer-Jensen, M.; Høst, H.; Nissen-Meyer, R.; Mitchell, A. K.; Robertson, J. F. R.; Ueo, H.; Di Palma, M.; Mathé, G.; Misset, J. L.; Levine, M.; Morimoto, K.; Takatsuka, Y.; Crossley, E.; Harris, A.; Talbot, D.; Taylor, M.; Martin, A. L.; di Blasio, B.; Ivanov, V.; Paltuev, R.; Semiglazov, V.; Brockschmidt, J.; Cooper, M. R.; Falkson, C. I.; Ashley, S.; Makris, A.; Powles, T. J.; Smith, I. E.; Gazet, J. C.; Browne, L.; Graham, P.; Corcoran, N.; Deshpande, N.; di Martino, L.; Douglas, P.; Lindtner, A.; Notter, G.; Bryant, A. J. S.; Ewing, G. H.; Firth, L. A.; Krushen-Kosloski, J. L.; Anderson, H.; Killander, F.; Malmström, P.; Rydén, L.; Arnesson, L.-G.; Carstensen, J.; Dufmats, M.; Fohlin, H.; Nordenskjöld, B.; Söderberg, M.; Carpenter, J. T.; Murray, N.; Royle, G. T.; Simmonds, P. D.; Crowley, J.; Gralow, J.; Green, S.; Hortobagyi, G.; Livingston, R.; Martino, S.; Osborne, C. K.; Adolfsson, J.; Bondesson, T.; Celebioglu, F.; Dahlberg, K.; Fornander, T.; Fredriksson, I.; Frisell, J.; Göransson, E.; Iiristo, M.; Johansson, U.; Lenner, E.; Löfgren, L.; Nikolaidis, P.; Perbeck, L.; Rotstein, S.; Sandelin, K.; Skoog, L.; Svane, G.; af Trampe, E.; Wadström, C.; Maibach, R.; Thürlimann, B.; Hakama, M.; Holli, K.; Isola, J.; Rouhento, K.; Saaristo, R.; Brenner, H.; Hercbergs, A.; Yoshimoto, M.; Paterson, A. H. G.; Fyles, A.; Meakin, J. W.; Panzarella, T.; Bahi, J.; Reid, M.; Spittle, M.; Bishop, H.; Bundred, N. J.; Forsyth, S.; Pinder, S. E.; Sestak, I.; Deutsch, G. P.; Kwong, D. L. W.; Pai, V. R.; Senanayake, F.; Boccardo, F.; Rubagotti, A.; Hackshaw, A.; Houghton, J.; Ledermann, J.; Monson, K.; Tobias, J. S.; Carlomagno, C.; de Laurentiis, M.; de Placido, S.; Williams, L.; Broglio, K.; Buzdar, A. U.; Love, R. R.; Ahlgren, J.; Garmo, H.; Holmberg, L.; Liljegren, G.; Lindman, H.; Wärnberg, F.; Asmar, L.; Jones, S. E.; Gluz, O.; Liedtke, C.; Nitz, U.; Litton, A.; Wallgren, A.; Karlsson, P.; Linderholm, B. K.; Chlebowski, R. T.; Caffier, H.

    2011-01-01

    After breast-conserving surgery, radiotherapy reduces recurrence and breast cancer death, but it may do so more for some groups of women than for others. We describe the absolute magnitude of these reductions according to various prognostic and other patient characteristics, and relate the absolute

  3. Effect of radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery on 10-year recurrence and 15-year breast cancer death: meta-analysis of individual patient data for 10,801 women in 17 randomised trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darby, S; McGale, P; Correa, C

    2011-01-01

    After breast-conserving surgery, radiotherapy reduces recurrence and breast cancer death, but it may do so more for some groups of women than for others. We describe the absolute magnitude of these reductions according to various prognostic and other patient characteristics, and relate the absolute...

  4. Differences in risk factors for local and distant recurrence after breast-conserving therapy or mastectomy for stage I and II breast cancer: pooled results of two large European randomized trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogd, A. C.; Nielsen, M.; Peterse, J. L.; Blichert-Toft, M.; Bartelink, H.; Overgaard, M.; van Tienhoven, G.; Andersen, K. W.; Sylvester, R. J.; van Dongen, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: Risk factors for local and distant recurrence after breast-conserving therapy and mastectomy were compared to define guidelines for the decision making between both treatments. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The data of two randomized clinical trials for stage I and II breast cancer patients were

  5. Breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help you not feel alone. Outlook (Prognosis) New, improved treatments are helping people with breast cancer live ... carcinoma in situ Patient Instructions Breast radiation - discharge Chemotherapy - what to ask your doctor Lymphedema - self-care ...

  6. Breast Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... from starting. Risk-reducing surgery . General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  7. An Animal Model of Local Breast Cancer Recurrence in the Setting of Autologous Fat Grafting for Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Wakako; Valentin, Jolene E; Marra, Kacey G; Donnenberg, Albert D; Donnenberg, Vera S; Rubin, J Peter

    2018-01-01

    Autologous fat grafting after breast cancer surgery is commonly performed, but concerns about oncologic risk remain. To model the interaction between fat grafting and breast cancer cells, two approaches were employed. In the first approach, graded numbers of viable MDA-MB-231 or BT-474 cells were admixed directly into human fat grafts and injected subcutaneously into immune-deficient mice to determine if the healing graft is a supportive environment for the tumor. In the second approach, graded doses of MDA-MB-231 cells were suspended in Matrigel and injected into the mammary fat pads of mice. Two weeks after the tumor cells engrafted, 100 μL of human adipose tissue was grafted into the same site. Histologically, MDA-MB-231 cells seeded within fat grafts were observed and stained positive for human-specific pan-cytokeratin and Ki67. The BT-474 cells failed to survive when seeded within fat grafts at any dose. In the second approach, MDA-MB-231 cells had a strong trend toward lower Ki67 staining at all doses. Regression analysis on all groups with fat grafts and MDA-MB-231 revealed fat tissue was associated with lower cancer cell Ki67 staining. Healing fat grafts do not support the epithelial BT-474 cell growth, and support the mesenchymal MDA-MB-231 cell growth only at doses ten times greater than in Matrigel controls. Moreover, fat grafts in association with MDA-MB-231 cancer cells already present in the wound resulted in decreased tumor proliferation and increased fibrosis. These findings suggest that clinical fat grafting does not induce breast cancer cell growth, and may even have a suppressive effect. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2018;7:125-134. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  8. Rib fractures after reirradiation plus hyperthermia for recurrent breast cancer. Predictive factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenborg, Sabine; Valk, Christel; Os, Rob van; Voerde Sive Voerding, Paul zum; Crezee, Hans; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Rasch, Coen [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiation Oncology, Z1-215, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oei, Bing; Venselaar, Jack [Institute Verbeeten (BVI), Tilburg (Netherlands); Randen, Adrienne van [University of Amsterdam (AMC), Department of Radiology Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-04-15

    Combining reirradiation (reRT) and hyperthermia (HT) has shown high therapeutic value for patients with locoregional recurrent breast cancer (LR). However, additional toxicity of reirradiation (e.g., rib fractures) may occur. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of potential risk factors on the occurrence of rib fractures. From 1982-2005, 234 patients were treated with adjuvant reRT + HT after surgery for LR. ReRT consisted typically of 8 fractions of 4 Gy twice a week, or 12 fractions of 3 Gy four times a week. A total of 118 patients were irradiated with abutted photon and electron fields. In all, 60 patients were irradiated using either one or alternating combinations of abutted AP electron fields. Hyperthermia was given once or twice a week. The 5-year infield local control (LC) rate was 70 %. Rib fractures were detected in 16 of 234 patients (actuarial risk: 7 % at 5 years). All rib fractures occurred in patients treated with a combination of photon and abutted electron fields (p = 0.000); in 15 of 16 patients fractures were located in the abutment regions. The other significant predictive factors for rib fractures were a higher fraction dose (p = 0.040), large RT fields, and treatment before the year 2000. ReRT + HT results in long-term LC. The majority of rib fractures were located in the photon/electron abutment area, emphasizing the disadvantage of field overlap. Large abutted photon/electron fields combined with 4 Gy fractions increase the number of rib fractures in this study group. However, as these factors were highly correlated no relative importance of the individual factors could be estimated. Increasing the number of HT sessions a week does not increase the risk of rib fractures. (orig.) [German] Der kombinierte Einsatz von Rebestrahlung (reRT) und Hyperthermie (HT) zeigt eine hohe Wirksamkeit bei Patienten mit lokoregional rezidiviertem Brustkrebs (LR). Jedoch koennen zusaetzliche toxische Effekte von reRT (z. B. Rippenfrakturen

  9. Dual time point imaging fluorine-18 flourodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for evaluation of large loco-regional recurrences of breast cancer treated with electrochemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Louise Wichmann; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Skougaard, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemotherapy is a local anticancer treatment very efficient for treatment of small cutaneous metastases. The method is now being investigated for large cutaneous recurrences of breast cancer that are often confluent masses of malignant tumour with various degrees of inflammation. To this e...

  10. INTRAOPERATIVE PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY IN PATIENT WITH STAGE IIIC BREAST CANCER (8 YEARS WITHOUT RECURRENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kaprin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents  a clinical observation  of the patient  of 38 y.o. with cancer of the left breast stage IIIC урТ4bN3М0L1V1. On the 1st  step of the treatment the patient  had 2 courses of CAF neoadjuvant chemotherapy, on the 2nd  step – extended radical mastectomy on the left with intraoperative photodynamic therapy and closure of the defect with ТRАМ-flap, on the 3rd step – continuation of the chemotherapy (8 courses, on the 4th  step  – radiation  therapy  to the chest wall on the left and zones of regional lymph drainage, targeted therapy  with herceptin  a (1 year. Four years later a silicone implant was inserted  into the left breast. Corrective surgery (reduction  mammoplasty on the right side was performed in april, 2017. Currently, the patient has remission of the disease of the left breast, the period of remission accounts for 8 years. 

  11. Local Recurrence in Women With Stage I Breast Cancer: Declining Rates Over Time in a Large, Population-Based Cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, Joycelin, E-mail: canavanjoycelin@gmail.com [Radiation Therapy Program and Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Truong, Pauline T.; Smith, Sally L. [Radiation Therapy Program and Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Lu, Linghong; Lesperance, Mary [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Olivotto, Ivo A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary (Canada)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether local recurrence (LR) risk has changed over time among women with stage I breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 5974 women aged ≥50 years diagnosis with pT1N0 breast cancer from 1989 to 2006, treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy. Clinicopathologic characteristics, treatment, and LR outcomes were compared among 4 cohorts stratified by year of diagnosis: 1989 to 1993 (n=1077), 1994 to 1998 (n=1633), 1999 to 2002 (n=1622), and 2003 to 2006 (n=1642). Multivariable analysis was performed, with year of diagnosis as a continuous variable. Results: Median follow-up time was 8.6 years. Among patients diagnosed in 1989 to 1993, 1994 to 1998, 1999 to 2002, and 2003 to 2006, the proportions of grade 1 tumors increased (16% vs 29% vs 40% vs 39%, respectively, P<.001). Surgical margin clearance rates increased from 82% to 93% to 95% and 88%, respectively (P<.001). Over time, the proportions of unknown estrogen receptor (ER) status decreased (29% vs 10% vs 1.2% vs 0.5%, respectively, P<.001), whereas ER-positive tumors increased (56% vs 77% vs 86% vs 86%, respectively, P<.001). Hormone therapy use increased (23% vs 23% vs 62% vs 73%, respectively, P<.001), and chemotherapy use increased (2% vs 5% vs 10% vs 13%, respectively, P<.001). The 5-year cumulative incidence rates of LR over the 4 time periods were 2.8% vs 1.7% vs 0.9% vs 0.8%, respectively (Gray's test, P<.001). On competing risk multivariable analysis, year of diagnosis was significantly associated with decreased LR (hazard ratio, 0.92 per year, P=.0003). Relative to grade 1 histology, grades 2, 3, and unknown were associated with increased LR. Hormone therapy use was associated with reduced LR. Conclusion: Significant changes in the multimodality management of stage I breast cancer have occurred over the past 2 decades. More favorable-risk tumors were diagnosed, and margin clearance and systemic therapy use

  12. A randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavioral stress management in breast cancer: survival and recurrence at 11-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagl, Jamie M; Lechner, Suzanne C; Carver, Charles S; Bouchard, Laura C; Gudenkauf, Lisa M; Jutagir, Devika R; Diaz, Alain; Yu, Qilu; Blomberg, Bonnie B; Ironson, Gail; Glück, Stefan; Antoni, Michael H

    2015-11-01

    Non-metastatic breast cancer patients often experience psychological distress which may influence disease progression and survival. Cognitive-behavioral stress management (CBSM) improves psychological adaptation and lowers distress during breast cancer treatment and long-term follow-ups. We examined whether breast cancer patients randomized to CBSM had improved survival and recurrence 8-15 years post-enrollment. From 1998 to 2005, women (N = 240) 2-10 weeks post-surgery for non-metastatic Stage 0-IIIb breast cancer were randomized to a 10-week, group-based CBSM intervention (n = 120) or a 1-day psychoeducational seminar control (n = 120). In 2013, 8-15 years post-study enrollment (11-year median), recurrence and survival data were collected. Cox Proportional Hazards Models and Weibull Accelerated Failure Time tests were used to assess group differences in all-cause mortality, breast cancer-specific mortality, and disease-free interval, controlling for biomedical confounders. Relative to the control, the CBSM group was found to have a reduced risk of all-cause mortality (HR = 0.21; 95 % CI [0.05, 0.93]; p = .040). Restricting analyses to women with invasive disease revealed significant effects of CBSM on breast cancer-related mortality (p = .006) and disease-free interval (p = .011). CBSM intervention delivered post-surgery may provide long-term clinical benefit for non-metastatic breast cancer patients in addition to previously established psychological benefits. Results should be interpreted with caution; however, the findings contribute to the limited evidence regarding physical benefits of psychosocial intervention post-surgery for non-metastatic breast cancer. Additional research is necessary to confirm these results and investigate potential explanatory mechanisms, including physiological pathways, health behaviors, and treatment adherence changes.

  13. Mitochondrial markers predict recurrence, metastasis and tamoxifen-resistance in breast cancer patients: Early detection of treatment failure with companion diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotgia, Federica; Fiorillo, Marco; Lisanti, Michael P

    2017-09-15

    Here, we used a data-mining and informatics approach to discover new biomarkers of resistance to hormonal therapy in breast cancer. More specifically, we investigated whether nuclear-encoded genes associated with mitochondrial biogenesis can be used to predict tumor recurrence, distant metastasis and treatment failure in high-risk breast cancer patients. Overall, this strategy allowed us to directly provide in silico validation of the prognostic value of these mitochondrial components in large and clinically relevant patient populations, with >15 years of follow-up data. For this purpose, we employed a group of 145 ER(+) luminal A breast cancer patients, with lymph-node (LN) metastasis at diagnosis, that were treated with tamoxifen, but not any chemotherapy agents. Using this approach, we identified >60 new individual mitochondrial biomarkers that predicted treatment failure and tumor recurrence, with hazard-ratios (HR) of up to 4.17 (p=2.2e-07). These include mitochondrial chaperones (HSPD1, HSPA9), membrane proteins (VDAC2, TOMM70A) and anti-oxidants (SOD2), as well as 18 different mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs) and >20 distinct components of the OXPHOS complexes. In addition, we combined 4 mitochondrial proteins (HSPD1, UQCRB, MRPL15, COX17), to generate a compact mitochondrial gene signature, associated with a HR of 5.34 (p=1e-09). This signature also successfully predicted distant metastasis and was effective in larger groups of ER(+) (N=2,447), basal (N=540) and HER2(+) (N=193) breast cancers. It was also effective in all breast cancers (N=3,180), if considered together as a single group. Based on this analysis, we conclude that mitochondrial biogenesis should be considered as a new therapeutic target for overcoming tumor recurrence, distant metastasis and treatment failure in patients with breast cancer. In summary, we identified individual mitochondrial biomarkers and 2 compact mitochondrial gene signatures that can be used to predict tamoxifen

  14. Triggers of uncertainty about recurrence and long-term treatment side effects in older African American and Caucasian breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Karen M; Mishel, Merle; Belyea, Michael; Germino, Barbara; Germino, Laura S; Porter, Laura; LaNey, Iris Carlton; Stewart, Janet

    2004-05-01

    To examine the sources of uncertainty in older African American and Caucasian long-term breast cancer survivors by focusing on frequency of triggers of uncertainty about cancer recurrence and physical symptoms linked to long-term treatment side effects. In the context of a larger randomized, controlled treatment-outcome study, data were gathered from 10 monthly follow-up telephone calls by nurses. Rural and urban regions of North Carolina. 244 older women (mean age = 64 years); 73 African American women and 171 Caucasian women who were five to nine years after breast cancer diagnosis. The most frequent triggers were hearing about someone else's cancer and new aches and pains. The most frequent symptoms were fatigue, joint stiffness, and pain. Although no ethnic differences occurred in the experience of symptoms, Caucasian women were more likely than African American women to report that their fears of recurrence were triggered by hearing about someone else's cancer, environmental triggers, and information or controversy about breast cancer discussed in the media. Illness uncertainty persisted long after cancer diagnosis and treatment, with most women experiencing multiple triggers of uncertainty about recurrence and a range of symptoms and treatment side effects. Nurses can help cancer survivors to identify, monitor, and manage illness uncertainty and emotional distress.

  15. Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  16. Stages of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  17. Breast cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammogram - breast cancer screening; Breast exam - breast cancer screening; MRI - breast cancer screening ... is performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. ...

  18. Linkage disequilibrium pattern of the ATM gene in breast cancer patients and controls; association of SNPs and haplotypes to radio-sensitivity and post-lumpectomy local recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fosså Sophie D

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ATM protein is activated as a result of ionizing radiation, and genetic variants of the ATM gene may therefore affect the level of radiation-induced damage. Individuals heterozygous for ATM mutations have been reported to have an increased risk of malignancy, especially breast cancer. Materials and methods Norwegian breast cancer patients (272 treated with radiation (252 of which were evaluated for radiation-induced adverse side effects, 95 Norwegian women with no known history of cancer and 95 American breast cancer patients treated with radiation (44 of which developed ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence, IBTR were screened for sequence variations in all exons of the ATM gene as well as known intronic variants by denaturating high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC followed by sequencing to determine the nature of the variant. Results and Conclusion A total of 56 variants were identified in the three materials combined. A borderline significant association with breast cancer risk was found for the 1229 T>C (Val>Ala substitution in exon 11 (P-value 0.055 between the Norwegian controls and breast cancer patients as well as a borderline significant difference in haplotype distribution (P-value 0.06. Adverse side effects, such as: development of costal fractures and telangiectasias, subcutaneous and lung fibrosis, pleural thickening and atrophy were evaluated in the Norwegian patients. Significant associations were found for several of the identified variants such as rs1800058 (Leu > Phe where a decrease in minor allele frequency was found with increasing level of adverse side effects for the clinical end-points pleural thickening and lung fibrosis, thus giving a protective effect. Overall our results indicate a role for variation in the ATM gene both for risk of developing breast cancer, and in radiation induced adverse side effects. No association could be found between risk of developing ipsilateral breast tumour

  19. Fear of cancer recurrence and unmet needs among breast cancer survivors in the first five years. A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellegaard, Mai-Britt Bjørklund; Grau, Cai; Zachariae, Robert; Bonde Jensen, Anders

    2017-02-01

    It is unclear to which degree the services available after end of treatment are sufficient to meet the needs of women treated for breast cancer. The aim of the present study was to identify patient-reported supportive care needs and the prevalence of fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) following end of treatment in women treated for breast cancer. Using a cross-sectional design, women treated for breast cancer (n = 155; mean age 63) completed questionnaires concerning supportive care needs and FCR. Inclusion criteria were: ≥18 years of age and treated for primary breast cancer at Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark and between three months and five years after diagnosis. Associations between demographic characteristics, clinical factors, side effects, late effects and the two dependent variables, unmet needs (examined with linear regression model), and FCR (examined with logistic regression model) were analyzed. The response rate was 79.9%. Almost all (82.6%) women reported at least one unmet need (mean number 9.3; range 0-34). More than half (59.3%) of the unmet needs were rated as strong unmet needs. The most frequent unmet needs were concerned with doctors collaborate to coordinate care; the need for having ongoing dialog with healthcare providers to receive available local health care services, understandable and up-to-date information, to manage side effects and feeling reassured that the best medical care are given. Having unmet needs were associated with young age, short time since primary surgery, and having clinical FCR. FCR was reported by 54.8% of the women and was associated with short time since primary surgery, having chemotherapy, having unmet needs, and moderate to severe muscle and joint pain and fatigue. Breast cancer survivors experience substantial unmet needs years after end of treatment, particularly among younger women and women having clinical FCR. Furthermore, FCR is frequent among women, particularly when closer in time to

  20. Second conservative radiosurgical treatment for ipsilateral breast cancer recurrence; Second traitement conservateur radiochirurgical dans les recidives locales du cancer du sein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelli, J.; Courdi, A.; Hannoun-Levi, J.M. [Departement de radiotherapie oncologique, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue de Valombrose, 06189 Nice cedex (France); Figl, A.; Raoust, I.; Lallement, M.; Flipo, B. [Departement de chirurgie mammaire, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue de Valombrose, 06189 Nice cedex (France); Ettore, F. [Departement d' anatomopathologie, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue de Valombrose, 06189 Nice cedex (France); Chapelier, C. [Departement de radiologie, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue de Valombrose, 06189 Nice cedex (France); Ferrero, J.M. [Departement d' oncologie medicale, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue de Valombrose, 06189 Nice cedex (France)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose. - Currently, radical mastectomy represents the gold standard for ipsilateral breast cancer recurrence. However, we already showed that a second conservative treatment was feasible combining lumpectomy plus low-dose rate interstitial brachytherapy. In this study, we reported the preliminary results of a second conservative treatment using a high-dose rate brachytherapy. Patients and methods. - From June 2005 to July 2009, 42 patients presenting with an ipsilateral breast cancer recurrence underwent a second conservative treatment. Plastic tubes were implanted intraoperatively at the time of the lumpectomy. After a post-implant CT scan, a total dose of 34 Gy in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive days was delivered through an ambulatory procedure. The toxicity evaluation used the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results. - The median follow-up was 21 months (6-50 months), median age at the time of the local recurrence was 65 years (30-85 years). The median delay between the primary and the recurrence was 11 years (1-35 years). The location of the recurrence was in the tumor bed for 22 patients (52.4%), in the same quadrant for 14 patients (33.3%) and unknown for six patients (14.3%). The median tumor size of the recurrence was 12 mm (2-30 mm). The median number of plastic tubes and plans were nine (5-12) and two (1-3) respectively. The median CTV was 68 cm{sup 3} (31.2-146 cm{sup 3}). The rate of second local control was 97%. Twenty-two patients (60%) experienced complications. The most frequent side effect consisted in cutaneous and sub-cutaneous fibrosis (72% of all the observed complications). Conclusion. - A second conservative treatment for ipsilateral breast cancer recurrence using high-dose rate brachytherapy appears feasible leading to encouraging results in terms of second local control with an acceptable toxicity. Considering that a non-inferiority randomized trial comparing mastectomy versus second conservative treatment could be

  1. Immunohistochemical staining of leptin is associated with grade, stage, lymph node involvement, recurrence, and hormone receptor phenotypes in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Khabaz, Mohamad Nidal; Abdelrahman, Amer; Butt, Nadeem; Damnhory, Lila; Elshal, Mohamed; Aldahlawi, Alia M.; Ashoor, Swsan; Al-Maghrabi, Basim; Dobson, Pauline; Brown, Barry; Al-Sakkaf, Kaltoom; Al-Qahtani, Mohmmad; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah

    2017-01-01

    Background Obesity is part of the established risk factors for breast cancer (BC) in postmenopausal females. Circulating leptin increases in parallel with the increase of body weight and fat reservoir. Methods This research investigated the link between leptin phenotype and the clinicopathological factors in BC. A large set of breast cancer cases (449), and 27 non-cancerous tissue samples of breast were employed for leptin expression recognition using immunohistochemistry staining. Results Cy...

  2. [A patient with thyroid cancer evaluated according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors during treatment for breast cancer recurrence in hepatic and cervical lymph nodes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Keiko; Enomoto, Takumo; Oshida, Sayuri; Habiro, Takeyoshi; Hatate, Kazuhiko; Sengoku, Norihiko; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2013-11-01

    We describe a case of a 69-year-old woman who underwent left breast-preserving surgery and axillary dissection for left-sided breast cancer at 60 years of age. The histopathological diagnosis was papillotubular carcinoma, luminal A (pathological T1N0M0).In the eighth year after surgery, computed tomography (CT) revealed recurrence in the liver and cervical lymph node metastasis. The patient did not respond to 3 months of treatment with letrozole (progressive disease [PD]). Six courses of chemotherapy with epirubicin and cyclophosphamide (EC) were administered. Subsequently, the attending physician was replaced while the patient was receiving paclitaxel( PTX).After 4 courses of treatment with PTX, the liver metastasis disappeared (complete response [CR]).However, the cervical lymph nodes did not shrink (PD).The cytological diagnosis was papillary thyroid cancer with associated cervical lymph node metastasis. Total thyroidectomy and D3b cervical lymph node dissection were performed. The pathological diagnosis was pEx0T1bN1Mx, pStage IVA disease. Replacement of the attending physician is a critical turning point for patients. During chemotherapy or hormone therapy for breast cancer, each organ should be evaluated according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST).In the case of our patient, thyroid cancer was diagnosed according to RECIST. Cancer specialists should bear in mind that the treatment policy may change dramatically depending on the results of RECIST assessment.

  3. Pembrolizumab and Ruxolitinib Phosphate in Treating Patients With Metastatic Stage IV Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-28

    Breast Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  4. Are the American Society for Radiation Oncology Guidelines Accurate Predictors of Recurrence in Early Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Balloon-Based Brachytherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira K. Christoudias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO consensus statement (CS provides guidelines for patient selection for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI following breast conserving surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate recurrence rates based on ASTRO CS groupings. A single institution review of 238 early stage breast cancer patients treated with balloon-based APBI via balloon based brachytherapy demonstrated a 4-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR rate of 5.1%. There were no significant differences in the 4-year actuarial IBTR rates between the “suitable,” “cautionary,” and “unsuitable” ASTRO categories (0%, 7.2%, and 4.3%, resp., P=0.28. ER negative tumors had higher rates of IBTR than ER positive tumors. The ASTRO groupings are poor predictors of patient outcomes. Further studies evaluating individual clinicopathologic features are needed to determine the safety of APBI in higher risk patients.

  5. Protocol of a randomized controlled trial of the fear of recurrence therapy (FORT) intervention for women with breast or gynecological cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Maheu, Christine; Lebel, Sophie; Courbasson, Christine; Lefebvre, Monique; Singh, Mina; Bernstein, Lori J.; Muraca, Linda; Benea, Aronela; Jolicoeur, Lynne; Harris, Cheryl; Ramanakumar, Agnihotram V; Ferguson, Sarah; Sidani, Souraya

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinically significant levels of fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) affect up to 49?% of cancer survivors and are more prevalent among women. FCR is associated with psychological distress, lower quality of life, and increased use of medical resources. Despite its prevalence, FCR is poorly addressed in clinical care. To address this problem, we first developed, and pilot tested a 6-week, 2?h, Cognitive-existential group intervention therapy that targeted FCR in survivors of breast or g...

  6. Lung Cancer Indicators Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study describes prognostic factors for lung cancer spread and recurrence, as well as subsequent risk of death from the disease. The investigators observed that regardless of cancer stage, grade, or type of lung cancer, patients in the study were more

  7. [Selective biopsy of the sentinel lymph node in breast cancer: without axillary recurrences after a mean follow-up of 4.5 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuelos Andrío, Luis; Rodríguez Caravaca, Gil; Argüelles Pintos, Miguel; Mitjavilla Casanova, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the rate of axillary recurrences (AR) in patients with early breast cancer who had not undergone an axillary node dissection (ALND) because of a negative sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). The study includes 173 patients operated on for breast cancer and selective node biopsy. In 32 patients the SLNB was positive and undergone subsequent ALND. We followed up 141 patients with negative SLNB without LDN, with a median follow up of 55 months (range 74-36). The detection rate of SLN was of 99.42%. After a median follow-up of 4.5 years, there were no axillary recurrences. Two patients developed local recurrence, other two patients developed distant metastases and four patients developed a metachronous tumor. Four patients died, none of them because of breast cancer. The results obtained support the SLNB as an accurate technique in the axillary stratification of patients with breast cancer, offering in the cases of negative SLNB a safe axillary control after 4.5 year follow-up. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  8. Questionnaires in Identifying Upper Extremity Function and Quality of Life After Treatment in Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-11

    Musculoskeletal Complication; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Therapy-Related Toxicity

  9. Clinical significance of radiation therapy in breast recurrence and prognosis in breast-conserving surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Reiki; Nagao, Kazuharu; Miyayama, Haruhiko [Kumamoto City Hospital (Japan)] [and others

    1999-03-01

    Significant risk factors for recurrence of breast cancer after breast-conserving therapy, which has become a standard treatment for breast cancer, are positive surgical margins and the failure to perform radiation therapy. In this study, we evaluated the clinical significance of radiation therapy after primary surgery or breast recurrence. In 344 cases of breast-conserving surgery, disease recurred in 43 cases (12.5%), which were classified as follows: 17 cases of breast recurrence, 13 cases of breast and distant metastasis, and 13 cases of distant metastasis. Sixty-two patients (16.7%) received radiation therapy. A positive surgical margin and younger age were significant risk factors for breast recurrence in patients not receiving postoperative radiation therapy but not in patients receiving radiation therapy. Radiation therapy may be beneficial for younger patients with positive surgical margins. Furthermore, radiation therapy after recurrence was effective in the cases not treated with postoperative radiation but not in cases with inflammatory recurrence. Patients with breast recurrence alone had significantly higher survival rates than did patients with distant metastases regardless of breast recurrence. These findings suggest that the adaptation criteria of radiation therapy for local control must be clarified. (author)

  10. Genetic Analysis in Blood and Tumor Samples From Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Estrogen Receptor Positive and HER2 Negative Breast Cancer Receiving Palbociclib and Endocrine Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-16

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  11. Differential presentation and survival of de novo and recurrent metastatic breast cancer over time: 1990-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmgren, Judith A; Mayer, Musa; Atwood, Mary K; Kaplan, Henry G

    2017-10-16

    Differences in de novo (dnMBC) and recurrent metastatic breast cancer (rMBC) presentation and survival over time have not been adequately described. A retrospective cohort study, 1990-2010, with follow up through 2015 of dnMBC patients (stage IV at diagnosis) and rMBC patients with subsequent distant metastatic recurrence (stage I-III initial diagnosis) [dnMBC = 247, rMBC = 911)]. Analysis included Chi squared tests of categorical variables, Kaplan-Meier survival estimates, and Cox proportional adjusted hazard ratios (HzR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Disease specific survival (DSS) was time from diagnosis or distant recurrence to BC death. Over time, 1990-1998, 1999-2004, and 2005-2010, dnMBC incidence was constant (3%) and rMBC incidence decreased [18% to 7% (p negative breast cancer (HR-negative/HER2-negative) (p = 0.049). Five-year dnMBC DSS was 44% vs. 21% for rMBC (p year dnMBC DSS improved over time [28% to 55% (p = 0.008)] and rMBC worsened [23% to 13%, p = 0.065)]. Worse DSS was associated with HR-negative status (HzR = 1.63; 1.41, 1.89), rMBC (HzR = 1.88; 1.58, 2.23), older age (70 +) (HzR = 1.88; 1.58, 2.24), > 1 distant metastases (HzR 1.39; 1.20, 1.62), and visceral dominant disease (HzR 1.22; 1.05, 1.43). After 1998, HER2-positive disease was associated with better DSS (HzR = 0.72, 95% CI 0.56, 0.93). Factors associated with the widening survival gap and non-equivalence between dnMBC and rMBC and decreased rMBC incidence warrant further study.

  12. Getting free of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halttunen, Arja; Hietanen, P; Jallinoja, P

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-two breast cancer patients who were relapse-free and had no need for cancer-related treatment were interviewed 8 years after mastectomy in order to evaluate their feelings of getting free of breast cancer and the meaning of breast cancer in their lives. The study is a part of an intervention...... and follow-up study of 57 breast cancer patients. Half of the 22 patients still had frequent or occasional thoughts of recurrence and over two-thirds still thought they had not been 'cured' of cancer. More than half of the patients admitted that going through breast cancer had made them more mature. Women...... who had less thoughts of recurrence belonged to a group that had gone through an eight-week group psychotherapy intervention, were less depressed and had more other illnesses. Women who felt 'cured' had less limitations and restrictions due to cancer and belonged more often to higher social classes...

  13. No increase of local recurrence rate in breast cancer patients treated with skin-sparing mastectomy followed by immediate breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mierlo, D R J; Lopez Penha, T R; Schipper, R J; Martens, M H; Serroyen, J; Lobbes, M B I; Heuts, E M; Tuinder, S; Smidt, M L

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of local recurrence after SSM with IBR and to determine whether complications lead to postponement of adjuvant therapy. Patients that underwent IBR after SSM between 2004 and 2011 were included. A total of 157 reconstruction procedures were performed in 147 patients for invasive breast cancer (n = 117) and ductal carcinoma in situ (n = 40). The median follow-up was 39 months [range 6-97]. Estimated 5-year local recurrence rate was 2.9% (95% CI 0.1-5.7). The median time to start adjuvant therapy was 27.5 days [range 19-92] in 18 patients with complications, and 23.5 days [range 8-54] in 46 patients without complications (p = 0.025). In our single-institution cohort, IBR after SSM carried an acceptable local recurrence rate. Complications caused a delay of adjuvant treatment but this was within guidelines and therefore not clinically relevant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sensitivity of CA 15-3, CEA and serum HER2 in the early detection of recurrence of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Ann Christina; Sørensen, Patricia Diana; Jacobsen, Erik Hugger

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this project was to investigate the sensitivity of CA 15-3, CEA and HER2 in the early diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer.......The aim of this project was to investigate the sensitivity of CA 15-3, CEA and HER2 in the early diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer....

  15. Cost-effectiveness of the 21-gene recurrence score assay in the context of multifactorial decision making to guide chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Shelby D; Dinan, Michaela A; Schulman, Kevin A; Lyman, Gary H

    2013-03-01

    New evidence is available regarding the utility of the 21-gene recurrence score assay in guiding chemotherapy use for node-negative, estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. We applied this evidence in a decision-analytic model to re-evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the assay. We cross-classified patients by clinicopathologic characteristics from the Adjuvant! risk index and by recurrence score risk group. For non-recurrence score-guided treatment, we assumed patients receiving hormonal therapy alone had low-risk characteristics and patients receiving chemotherapy and hormonal therapy had higher-risk characteristics. For recurrence score-guided treatment, we assigned chemotherapy probabilities conditional on recurrence score risk group and clinicopathologic characteristics. An estimated 40.4% of patients in the recurrence score-guided strategy and 47.3% in the non-recurrence score-guided strategy were expected to receive chemotherapy. The incremental gain in quality-adjusted life-years was 0.16 (95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.28) with the recurrence score-guided strategy. Lifetime medical costs to the health system were $2,692 ($1,546-$3,821) higher with the recurrence score-guided strategy, for an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $16,677/quality-adjusted life-year ($7,613-$37,219). From a societal perspective, the incremental cost-effectiveness was $10,788/quality-adjusted life-year ($6,840-$30,265). The findings provide supportive evidence for the economic value of the 21-gene recurrence score assay in node-negative, estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

  16. A Retrospective Study of the Impact of 21-Gene Recurrence Score Assay on Treatment Choice in Node Positive Micrometastatic Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G. Frazier

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available To assess clinical utility of the 21-gene assay (Oncotype DX® Recurrence Score®, we determined whether women with HER2(−/ER+ pN1mi breast cancer with low (<18 Recurrence Scores results are given adjuvant chemotherapy in a lower proportion than those with high scores (≥31. This was a multicenter chart review of ≥18 year old women with pN1mi breast cancer, HER2(−/ER+ tumors, ductal/lobular/mixed histology, with the assay ordered on or after 1 January 2007. One hundred and eighty one patients had a mean age of 60.7 years; 82.9% had ECOG performance status 0; 33.7% had hypertension, 22.7% had osteoporosis, 18.8% had osteoarthritis, and 8.8% had type-2 diabetes. Mean Recurrence Score was 17.8 (range: 0–50. 48.6% had a mastectomy; 55.8% had a lumpectomy. 19.8% of low-risk group patients were recommended chemotherapy vs. 57.9% in the intermediate-risk group and 100% in the high-risk group (p < 0.001. A total of 80.2% of the low-risk group were recommended endocrine therapy alone, while 77.8% of the high-risk group were recommended both endocrine and chemotherapy (p < 0.001. The Oncotype DX Recurrence Score result provides actionable information that can be incorporated into treatment planning for women with HER2(−/ER+ pN1mi breast cancer. The Recurrence Score result has clinical utility in treatment planning for HER2(−/ER+ pN1mi breast cancer patients.

  17. Breast cancer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Cancer specialists will soon be able to compare mammograms with computerized images of breast cancer from across Europe, in a bid to improve diagnosis and treatment....The new project, known as MammoGrid, brings together computer and medical imaging experts, cancer specialists, radiologists and epidemiologists from Bristol, Oxford, Cambridge, France and Italy" (1 page).

  18. MR Imaging Radiomics Signatures for Predicting the Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence as Given by Research Versions of MammaPrint, Oncotype DX, and PAM50 Gene Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhu, Yitan; Burnside, Elizabeth S; Drukker, Karen; Hoadley, Katherine A; Fan, Cheng; Conzen, Suzanne D; Whitman, Gary J; Sutton, Elizabeth J; Net, Jose M; Ganott, Marie; Huang, Erich; Morris, Elizabeth A; Perou, Charles M; Ji, Yuan; Giger, Maryellen L

    2016-11-01

    Purpose To investigate relationships between computer-extracted breast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging phenotypes with multigene assays of MammaPrint, Oncotype DX, and PAM50 to assess the role of radiomics in evaluating the risk of breast cancer recurrence. Materials and Methods Analysis was conducted on an institutional review board-approved retrospective data set of 84 deidentified, multi-institutional breast MR examinations from the National Cancer Institute Cancer Imaging Archive, along with clinical, histopathologic, and genomic data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. The data set of biopsy-proven invasive breast cancers included 74 (88%) ductal, eight (10%) lobular, and two (2%) mixed cancers. Of these, 73 (87%) were estrogen receptor positive, 67 (80%) were progesterone receptor positive, and 19 (23%) were human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive. For each case, computerized radiomics of the MR images yielded computer-extracted tumor phenotypes of size, shape, margin morphology, enhancement texture, and kinetic assessment. Regression and receiver operating characteristic analysis were conducted to assess the predictive ability of the MR radiomics features relative to the multigene assay classifications. Results Multiple linear regression analyses demonstrated significant associations (R2 = 0.25-0.32, r = 0.5-0.56, P enhancement texture, which indicated tumor heterogeneity. Use of radiomics in the task of distinguishing between good and poor prognosis yielded area under the receiver operating characteristic curve values of 0.88 (standard error, 0.05), 0.76 (standard error, 0.06), 0.68 (standard error, 0.08), and 0.55 (standard error, 0.09) for MammaPrint, Oncotype DX, PAM50 risk of relapse based on subtype, and PAM50 risk of relapse based on subtype and proliferation, respectively, with all but the latter showing statistical difference from chance. Conclusion Quantitative breast MR imaging radiomics shows promise for image-based phenotyping in assessing

  19. Comparison of the Genomic Landscape Between Primary Breast Cancer in African American Versus White Women and the Association of Racial Differences With Tumor Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Tanya; Moy, Beverly; Mroz, Edmund A; Ross, Kenneth; Niemierko, Andrzej; Rocco, James W; Isakoff, Steven; Ellisen, Leif W; Bardia, Aditya

    2015-11-01

    African American women are more likely to die as a result of breast cancer than white women. The influence of somatic genomic profiles on this racial disparity is unclear. We aimed to compare the racial distribution of tumor genomic characteristics and breast cancer recurrence. We assessed white and African American women with stage I to III breast cancer diagnosed from 1988 to 2013 and primary tumors submitted to The Cancer Genome Atlas from 2010 to 2014. We used Cox proportional hazards models to evaluate the association of race and genetic traits with tumor recurrence. We investigated exome sequencing and gene expression data in 663 and 711 white and 105 and 159 African American women, respectively. African Americans had more TP53 mutations (42.9% v 27.6%; P = .003) and fewer PIK3CA mutations (20.0% v 33.9%; P = .008). Intratumor genetic heterogeneity was greater in African American than white tumors overall by 5.1 units (95% CI, 2.4 to 7.7) and within triple-negative tumors by 4.1 units (95% CI, 1.4 to 6.8). African Americans had more basal tumors by the 50-gene set predictor using the predication analysis of microarray method (PAM50; 39.0% v 18.6%; P Racial differences in TP53 mutation, PAM50 basal subtype, and triple-negative tumor prevalence but not intratumor genetic heterogeneity influenced the magnitude and significance of the racial disparity in tumor recurrence. African Americans had greater intratumor genetic heterogeneity and more basal gene expression tumors, even within triple-negative breast cancer. This pattern suggests more aggressive tumor biology in African Americans than whites, which could contribute to racial disparity in breast cancer outcome. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  20. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  1. Fear of cancer recurrence in young early-stage breast cancer survivors: the role of metacognitive style and disease-related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thewes, B; Bell, M L; Butow, P

    2013-09-01

    Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is a common challenge of cancer survivorship, particularly in younger survivors. Maladaptive metacognitions have been shown to be important to the development of a range of emotional disorders but have not previously been explored in the context of FCR. This study aimed to explore the relationship between FCR and a maladaptive metacognitions. This cross-sectional study included young women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer at least 1 year prior to study entry. Participants completed a web-based questionnaire, which included the Fear of Cancer Recurrence Inventory (FCRI) and the brief Metacognitions Questionnaire-30 (MCQ-30). Linear regression was used to calculate unadjusted and adjusted slope estimates of the association of FCR with six metacognition variables, the total score of the MCQ-30 and the five subscales. Two-hundred and eighteen women with a mean age of 39 years at diagnosis participated. All measures of metacognitive style were moderately correlated with FCRI scores (r=0.31-0.49) and significantly associated with FCRI in both unadjusted and adjusted models. Overall metacognitive style explained 36% of the variance in FCR scores in combination with disease and demographic factors. Negative metacognitions (R(2) =0.32) and need for control over cognition (R(2)=0.26) were the MCQ-30 subscales most associated with higher FCR. Unhelpful metacognitions appear to play an important role in FCR in young women with early-stage breast cancer. Treatments that focus on changing unhelpful metacognitions may prove a useful approach for treating clinical FCR in cancer survivors in the future. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a reduced risk of breast cancer. The Mediterranean diet focuses mostly on plant-based foods, such as fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes, and nuts. People who follow the Mediterranean diet choose healthy fats, such as olive oil, over ...

  3. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease. It’s estimated that about 10% of breast cancer cases are hereditary (run in the family). In many of these cases, you inherited a gene from your parents that has mutated (changed from ...

  4. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast-conserving treatment for early breast cancer: risk factors and impact on distant metastases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Komoike, Yoshifumi; Akiyama, Futoshi; Iino, Yuichi; Ikeda, Tadashi; Akashi-Tanaka, Sadako; Ohsumi, Shozo; Kusama, Mikihiro; Sano, Muneaki; Shin, Eisei; Suemasu, Kimito; Sonoo, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Tetsuya; Nishi, Tsunehiro; Nishimura, Reiki; Haga, Shunsuke; Mise, Keiichi; Kinoshita, Takayuki; Murakami, Shigeru; Yoshimoto, Masataka; Tsukuma, Hideaki; Inaji, Hideo

    2006-01-01

    ...) for early stage breast cancer were analyzed from long-term follow-up of BCT in Japan. The purpose of this study was to clarify risk factors of IBTR and the impact of IBTR on development of distant metastases in this ethnic group. Patients (N = 1901...

  5. Low risk of recurrence in breast cancer with negative sentinel node

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Malene Grubbe; Bartram, Peter; Bak, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The sentinel lymph node (SLN) procedure has emerged as a safe staging method with a low morbidity. The objective of the present study was to examine the recurrence rates including especially the axillary recurrence rate in SLN-negative patients after a long follow-up period.......The sentinel lymph node (SLN) procedure has emerged as a safe staging method with a low morbidity. The objective of the present study was to examine the recurrence rates including especially the axillary recurrence rate in SLN-negative patients after a long follow-up period....

  6. Recurrent mutation testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Asian breast cancer patients identify carriers in those with presumed low risk by family history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Peter Choon Eng; Phuah, Sze Yee; Sivanandan, Kavitta; Kang, In Nee; Thirthagiri, Eswary; Liu, Jian Jun; Hassan, Norhashimah; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Thong, Meow Keong; Hui, Miao; Hartman, Mikael; Yip, Cheng Har; Mohd Taib, Nur Aishah; Teo, Soo Hwang

    2014-04-01

    Although the breast cancer predisposition genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 were discovered more than 20 years ago, there remains a gap in the availability of genetic counselling and genetic testing in Asian countries because of cost, access and inaccurate reporting of family history of cancer. In order to improve access to testing, we developed a rapid test for recurrent mutations in our Asian populations. In this study, we designed a genotyping assay with 55 BRCA1 and 44 BRCA2 mutations previously identified in Asian studies, and validated this assay in 267 individuals who had previously been tested by full sequencing. We tested the prevalence of these mutations in additional breast cancer cases. Using this genotyping approach, we analysed recurrent mutations in 533 Malaysian breast cancer cases with Chinese and 1 BRCA1 mutation in Indians account for 60, 24 and 20 % of carrier families, respectively. By contrast, haplotype analyses suggest that a recurrent BRCA2 mutation (c.262_263delCT) found in 5 unrelated Malay families has at least 3 distinct haplotypes. Taken together, our data suggests that panel testing may help to identify carriers, particularly Asian BRCA2 carriers, who do not present with a priori strong family history characteristics.

  7. Prognostic factors of early distant recurrence in hormone receptor-positive, postmenopausal breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant tamoxifen therapy: results of a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debled, Marc; MacGrogan, Gaëtan; Brouste, Véronique; Mathoulin-Pelissier, Simone; Durand, Michel; Mauriac, Louis

    2007-06-01

    Current adjuvant hormone therapy in postmenopausal women with breast cancer is debatable between upfront aromatase inhibitors (AIs) and sequential treatment with tamoxifen. A major concern is the higher rate of early recurrences observed with sequential treatment. The authors conducted a retrospective analysis to identify risk factors of early recurrences in hormone receptor (HR)-positive, postmenopausal women within the first 3 years of adjuvant tamoxifen. Between 1986 and 2000, operable breast cancer patients who received exclusively adjuvant tamoxifen for at least 3 years were selected from the authors' institutional database. Age, histology, pathologic tumor size, modified Scarff-Bloom-Richardson (mSBR) grade, mitotic index, tumor necrosis, peritumoral vascular emboli (PVE), HR status, and the number of involved axillary lymph-node were considered as prognostic factors of recurrence. Among 715 patients who met the inclusion criteria, a distant recurrence occurred in 38 patients (5.3%) within the first 3 years of tamoxifen therapy. Significant prognostic factors of early recurrence were mSBR, axillary lymph node involvement, tumor necrosis, mitotic index, PVE, and pathologic tumor size. Grade 1 and/or lymph node-negative tumors were excluded from the multivariate analysis (1 recurrence in 208 patients). In this model, mSBR grade 3 was the only significant predictive factor of early recurrence (hazard ratio, 3.72; P<.001). In this study, a subset of patients was identified that was at low-risk of early recurrence (mSBR grade 1 and/or negative lymph node status). Women in that subset could be treated using sequential hormone therapy with tamoxifen and AIs. In women with mSBR grade 3 or lymph node-positive tumors, an upfront treatment with AIs seemed to be the current optimal strategy. (c) 2007 American Cancer Society.

  8. Recurrent breast sparganosis: Clinical and radiological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Yoon; Woo, Ok Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyu Ran; Seo, Bo Kyoung [Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    We report a case of recurrent sparganosis of the breast within 6 months following surgical removal of worms from the breast. The patient was referred to our hospital with a palpable mass in the right breast. On admission, breast ultrasonography revealed a tortuous tubular hypoechoic lesion with indistinct margins within a surrounding hyperechoic area, which strongly suggested sparganosis. We performed surgical excision and confirmed sparganosis. After 6 months, the patient detected a new mass in her right breast and visited our hospital. Breast ultrasonography revealed similar features in a different area of the same breast. We confirmed recurrent sparganosis surgically.

  9. Pregnancy associated breast cancer and pregnancy after breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğer, Emek; Çalışkan, Eray; Mallmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and its frequency is increasing as more women postpone their pregnancies to their thirties and forties. Breast cancer diagnosis during pregnancy and lactation is difficult and complex both for the patient and doctors. Delay in diagnosis is frequent and treatment modalities are difficult to accept for the pregnant women. The common treatment approach is surgery after diagnosis, chemotherapy after the first trimester and radiotherapy after delivery. Even though early stage breast cancers have similar prognosis, advanced stage breast cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and lactation have poorer prognosis than similar stage breast cancers diagnosed in non-pregnant women. Women who desire to become pregnant after treatment of breast cancer will have many conflicts. Although the most common concern is recurrence of breast cancer due to pregnancy, the studies conducted showed that pregnancy has no negative effect on breast cancer prognosis. In this review we search for the frequency of breast cancer during pregnancy, the histopathological findings, risk factor, diagnostic and treatment modalities. We reviewed the literature for evidence based findings to help consult the patients on the outcome of breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy and lactation, and also inform the patients who desire to become pregnant after breast cancer according to current evidences. PMID:24592003

  10. [Local recurrence based on size after conservative surgery in breast cancer stage T1-T2. A population-based study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ramos, David; Fortea-Sanchis, Carlos; Escrig-Sos, Javier; Prats-de Puig, Miguel; Queralt-Martín, Raquel; Salvador-Sanchis, José Luís

    2014-01-01

    Conservative surgery can be regarded as the standard treatment for most early stage breast tumors. However, a minority of patients treated with conservative surgery will present local or locoregional recurrence. Therefore, it is of interest to evaluate the possible factors associated with this recurrence. A population-based retrospective study using data from the Tumor Registry of Castellón (Valencia, Spain) of patients operated on for primary nonmetastatic breast cancer between January 2000 and December 2008 was designed. Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank test to estimate 5-year local recurrence were used. Two groups of patients were defined, one with conservative surgery and another with nonconservative surgery. Cox multivariate analysis was conducted. The total number of patients was 410. Average local recurrence was 6.8%. In univariate analysis, only tumor size and lymph node involvement showed significant differences. On multivariate analysis, independent prognostic factors were conservative surgery (hazard ratio [HR] 4.62; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.12-16.82), number of positive lymph nodes (HR 1.07; 95% CI: 1.01-1.17) and tumor size (in mm) (HR 1.02; 95% CI: 1.01-1.06). Local recurrence after breast-conserving surgery is higher in tumors >2 cm. Although tumor size should not be a contraindication for conservative surgery, it should be a risk factor to be considered.

  11. SPECIFIC FEATURE OF HORMONAL PROFILE IN PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY AND RECURRENT BREAST CANCER AND THEIR ROLE IN THE EFFICIENCY OF CHEMOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Kozlova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The hormonal background was studied in 32 menopausal patients who had primary breast cancer (Stage III or its recurrence in the postoperative scar. The patients with the primary process, unlike those with a recurrence, were found to have increased adrenocortical cortisol-forming activity and changed thyroid homeostasis. In both types of the neoplastic process, the blood concentrations of estradi- ol, testosterone, prolactin, follicle-stimulating and luteinizing hormones were disturbed in a substantial number of cases; the distinc- tive feature of the primary process and its recurrence lies in the opposite direction. An association of individual differences in the con- centrations of estradiol and testosterone with the efficiency of neoadjuvant chemotherapy was analyzed in patients with recurrent can- cer.

  12. Relations between arthralgia and fear of recurrence: results of a cross-sectional study of breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant aromatase inhibitors therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Clémentine; Charles, Cécile; Rouby, Pascal; Boinon, Diane; Laurent, Sophie; Rey, Annie; Spielmann, Marc; Dauchy, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore associations between arthralgia and fear of recurrence in breast cancer patients treated by aromatase inhibitors (AI). We sent a set of questionnaires to 100 patients examining their pain characteristics, anxiety (STAI), depression (BDI-SF), quality of life (SF-36), fear of recurrence (FCRI), and representations of AI treatment (ad hoc questionnaire). Nonparametric tests were used to investigate between-group comparisons (arthralgia vs. nonarthralgia) in these domains as well as the associations between arthralgia and fear of recurrence. Of the 77 patients who returned the questionnaires (response rate = 77%), 60 (78%) reported arthralgia. The mean score of fear of recurrence exceeded the pathological threshold in the arthralgia group and was significantly higher than that in the nonarthralgia group (14.8 vs. 10.7, p fear of recurrence and pain intensity (r = 0.274, p Fear of recurrence did not appear to be associated with representations of AI. The study revealed a close relationship between pain intensity and fear of recurrence. In particular, it showed that effective pain management was accompanied by a reduced fear of recurrence. Information, although essential, appeared insufficient to overcome patients' concerns about pain. Therefore, the implement of a systematic screening for arthralgia and the improvement of analgesic treatment are essential issues. New strategies for pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment must be developed.

  13. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease ...

  14. Epidemiology of Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    南, 優子; ミナミ, ユウコ; MINAMI, Yuko

    2007-01-01

    During recent decades, breast cancer incidence has been increasing in Japan. Epidemiological studies have clarified the trend in breast cancer incidence and identified risk factors for breast cancer. Established risk factors for breast cancer include early age at menarche, late age at first birth, low parity, postmenopausal obesity, family history of breast cancer, and history of benign breast disease. Breast-feeding and physical activity may also be associated with breast cancer risk. Detail...

  15. Statins and breast cancer prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahern, Thomas P; Lash, Timothy L; Damkier, Per

    2014-01-01

    Much preclinical and epidemiological evidence supports the anticancer effects of statins. Epidemiological evidence does not suggest an association between statin use and reduced incidence of breast cancer, but does support a protective effect of statins-especially simvastatin-on breast cancer...... recurrence. Here, we argue that the existing evidence base is sufficient to justify a clinical trial of breast cancer adjuvant therapy with statins and we advocate for such a trial to be initiated without delay. If a protective effect of statins on breast cancer recurrence is supported by trial evidence......, then the indications for a safe, well tolerated, and inexpensive treatment can be expanded to improve outcomes for breast cancer survivors. We discuss several trial design opportunities-including candidate predictive biomarkers of statin safety and efficacy-and off er solutions to the key challenges involved...

  16. Pregnancy and abortion in breast cancer patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breast cancer in pregnancy is by itself not an indication for abortion. We document the case histories of 2 patients with breast cancer (recurrent or advanced) who elected to carry pregnancies to term. Pregnancy concurrent with or subsequent to breast cancer is not associated with a worse prognosis than would be observed ...

  17. [Pregnancy and breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Torres, Nicolás; Asbun-Bojalil, Juan; Hernández-Valencia, Marcelino

    2013-01-01

    association of breast cancer and pregnancy is not common. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the pregnancy, young age, stage, treatment, prognosis and mortality of women with breast cancer during pregnancy. retrospective analysis from March 1992 to February 2009, 16 patients were included with breast cancer and pregnancy. They were analized: histological characteristic of tumor, therapeutic response of the oncological treatment, evolution of the pregnancy. From of baby born: Apgar and weight. The woman's mortality with breast cancer during pregnancy was evaluated for age group and for interval of time between late pregnancy and diagnosis posterior of breast cancer and pregnancy. characteristic predominant clinicohistological: stage III (81.2%), T3-T4 (75%), N+ 93.7%, invasive ductal carcinoma (87.5%), histological grade 2-3 (93.7%), receptor estrogeno positive (43.7%); RPpositive (25%); HER-2/neu positive (31.2%). 27 chemotherapy cycles were applied with 5-fluorouracil, epirubicin and cyclophosphamide during the second or third trimester of the pregnancy, there were not severe adverse effects for the mothers and the baby born exposed to chemotherapy. The mean time to disease recurrence was 18.8 months (range, 6-62 months). The rate of mortality for specific age (breast cancer and pregnancy.

  18. Prediction of Low versus High Recurrence Scores in Estrogen Receptor-Positive, Lymph Node-Negative Invasive Breast Cancer on the Basis of Radiologic-Pathologic Features: Comparison with Oncotype DX Test Recurrence Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dialani, Vandana; Gaur, Shantanu; Mehta, Tejas S; Venkataraman, Shambhavi; Fein-Zachary, Valerie; Phillips, Jordana; Brook, Alexander; Slanetz, Priscilla J

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To review mammographic, ultrasonographic (US), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features and pathologic characteristics of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, lymph node-negative invasive breast cancer and to determine the relationship of these characteristics to Oncotype DX (Genomic Health, Redwood City, Calif) test recurrence scores (ODRS) for breast cancer recurrence. Materials and Methods This institutional review board-approved retrospective study was performed in a single large academic medical center. The study population included patients with ER-positive, lymph node-negative invasive breast cancer who underwent genomic testing from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2013. Imaging features of the tumor were classified according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System lexicon by breast imagers who were blinded to the ODRS. Mammography was performed in 86% of patients, US was performed in 84%, and MR imaging was performed in 33%, including morphologic and kinetic evaluation. Images from each imaging modality were evaluated. Each imaging finding, progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status, and tumor grade were then individually correlated with ODRS. Analysis of variance was used to determine differences for each imaging feature. Regression analysis was used to calculate prediction of recurrence on the basis of imaging features combined with histopathologic features. Results The 319 patients had a mean age ± standard deviation of 55 years ± 8.7 (range, 31-82 years). Imaging features with a positive correlation with ODRS included a well-circumscribed oval mass (P = .024) at mammography, vascularity (P = .047) and posterior enhancement (P = .004) at US, and lobulated mass (P = .002) at MR imaging. Recurrence scores were predicted by using these features in combination with PR and HER2 status and tumor grade by using the threshold of more than 30 as a high recurrence score. With a regression tree, there

  19. The role of magnetic resonance imaging in early detection of recurrent breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola I. Saleh

    2017-03-01

    From our study we concluded that MRI is useful examination that can provide very valuable information in patient with suspected recurrence. It is a technique that offers not only information on lesion cross sectional morphology but also on functional lesion features such as tissue perfusion and enhancement kinetics.

  20. Haplotype analysis suggest common founders in carriers of the recurrent BRCA2 mutation, 3398delAAAAG, in French Canadian hereditary breast and/ovarian cancer families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foulkes William D

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 3398delAAAAG mutation in BRCA2 was recently found to recur in breast and/or ovarian cancer families from the French Canadian population of Quebec, a population that has genetic attributes consistent with a founder effect. To characterize the contribution of this mutation in this population, this study established the frequency of this mutation in breast and ovarian cancer cases unselected for family history of cancer, and determined if mutation carriers shared a common ancestry. Methods The frequency was estimated by assaying the mutation in series of French Canadian breast cancer cases diagnosed before age 41 (n = 60 or 80 (n = 127 years of age, and ovarian cancer cases (n = 80 unselected for family history of cancer by mutation analysis. Haplotype analysis was performed to determine if mutation carriers shared a common ancestry. Members from 11 families were analyzed using six polymorphic microsatellite markers (cen-D13S260-D13S1699-D13S1698-D13S1697-D13S1701-D13S171-tel spanning approximately a 3.6 cM interval at the chromosomal region 13q13.1, which contains BRCA2. Allele frequencies were estimated by genotyping 47 unaffected female individuals derived from the same population. Haplotype reconstruction of unaffected individuals was performed using the program PHASE. Results The recurrent BRCA2 mutation occurred in 1 of 60 (1.7% women diagnosed with breast cancer before 41 years of age and one of 80 (1.3% women with ovarian cancer. No mutation carriers were identified in the series of breast cancer cases diagnosed before age 80. Mutation carriers harboured one of two haplotypes, 7-3-9-3 – [3/4]-7, that varied with marker D13S1701 and which occurred at a frequency of 0.001. The genetic analysis of D13S1695, a polymorphic marker located approximately 0.3 cM distal to D13S171, did not favour a genetic recombination event to account for the differences in D13S1701 alleles within the haplotype. Although mutation carriers

  1. Re-irradiation of the chest wall for local breast cancer recurrence. Results of salvage brachytherapy with hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auoragh, A. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Hospital Fuerth, Department of Radiation Oncology, Fuerth (Germany); Strnad, V.; Ott, O.J.; Fietkau, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Beckmann, M.W. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    Following mastectomy and adjuvant external beam radiation therapy in patients with breast cancer, the incidence of local or locoregional recurrence is approximately 9 % (2-20 %). Alongside the often limited possibilities of surgical treatment, radiation therapy combined with superficial hyperthermia is the most effective local therapy. In the present work, a retrospective analysis of salvage brachytherapy combined with superficial hyperthermia for chest wall recurrences is presented. Between 2004 and 2011, 18 patients with a total of 23 target volumes resulting from chest wall recurrences after previously mastectomy and external beam radiation therapy (median 56 Gy, range 50-68 Gy) were treated with superficial brachytherapy as salvage treatment: 8 patients (44 %) had macroscopic tumor, 3 (17 %) had microscopic tumor (R1), and 7 (39 %) had undergone R0 resection and were treated due to risk factors. A dose of 50 Gy was given (high-dose rate [HDR] and pulsed-dose rate [PDR] procedures). In all, 5 of 23 patients (22 %) received additional concurrent chemotherapy, and in 20 of 23 (87 %) target volumes additional superficial hyperthermia was carried out twice weekly. The 5-year local recurrence-free survival was 56 %, the disease-free survival was 28 %, and a 5-year overall survival was 22 %. Late side effects Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) grade 3 were reported in 17 % of the patients: 2 of 18 (11 %) had CTC grade 3 fibrosis, and 1 of 18 (6 %) had a chronic wound healing disorder. Re-irradiation as salvage brachytherapy with superficial hyperthermia for chest wall recurrences is a feasible and safe treatment with good local control results and acceptable late side effects. (orig.) [German] Nach einer Mastektomie und adjuvanter Strahlentherapie bei Patientinnen mit Mammakarzinom kommt es bei 9 % (2-20 %) zum lokalen bzw. lokoregionaeren Rezidiv. Neben den oft limitierten operativen Behandlungsmoeglichkeiten ist die Strahlentherapie mit Oberflaechenhyperthermie die

  2. Breast Cancer Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  3. Breast Cancer -- Male

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  4. Postmastectomy radiotherapy improves disease-free survival of high risk of locoregional recurrence breast cancer patients with T1-2 and 1 to 3 positive nodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Yu He

    Full Text Available The indications for post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT with T1-2 breast cancer and 1-3 positive axillary lymph nodes is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of PMRT in T1-2 breast cancer with 1-3 positive axillary lymph node.We retrospectively reviewed the file records of 79 patients receiving PMRT and not receiving PMRT (618 patients.The median follow-up was 65 months. Multivariate analysis showed that PMRT was an independent prognostic factor of locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS (P = 0.010. Subgroup analysis of patients who did not undergo PMRT showed that pT stage, number of positive axillary lymph nodes, and molecular subtype were independent prognostic factors of LRFS. PMRT improved LRFS in the entire group (P = 0.005, but did not affect distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS (P = 0.494, disease-free survival (DFS (P = 0.215, and overall survival (OS (P = 0.645. For patients without PMRT, the 5-year LRFS of low-risk patients (0-1 risk factor for locoregional recurrence of 94.5% was significantly higher than that of high-risk patients (2-3 risk factors for locoregional recurrence (80.9%, P < 0.001. PMRT improved LRFS (P = 0.001 and DFS (P = 0.027 in high-risk patients, but did not improve LRFS, DMFS, DFS, and OS in low-risk patients.PMRT is beneficial in patients with high risk of locoregional recurrence breast cancer patients with T1-2 and 1 to 3 positive nodes.

  5. Akt Inhibitor MK2206, Lapatinib Ditosylate, and Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic HER2-Positive Breast , Gastric, or Gastroesophageal Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  6. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Mediterranean diet choose healthy fats, such as olive oil, over butter and fish instead of red meat. Breast cancer risk reduction for women with a high risk If your doctor has assessed your family history and determined that you have other factors, such ...

  7. Amplification of LAPTM4B and YWHAZ contributes to chemotherapy resistance and recurrence of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szallasi, Zoltan Imre; Li, Yang; Zou, Lihua

    2010-01-01

    the association in an analysis of multiple independent cohorts. SiRNA-mediated knockdown of either of two of these genes, the antiapoptotic gene YWHAZ and a lysosomal gene LAPTM4B, sensitized tumor cells to anthracyclines, and overexpression of either of the genes induced anthracycline resistance. Overexpression...... chemotherapy drugs is a challenge but is necessary to improve outcomes. By using integrated genomics, we identified a small number of overexpressed and amplified genes from chromosome 8q22 that were associated with early disease recurrence despite anthracycline-based adjuvant chemotherapy. We confirmed...

  8. Predictive Value of Primary Tumor Site for Loco-regional Recurrence in Early Breast Cancer Patients with One to Three Positive Axillary Lymphadenophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Shaoqing; Wen, Ge; Ren, Yufeng; Li, Yiyang; Feng, Lingling; Wang, Chengtao; Huang, Xiaobo; Wen, Bixiu; Zhang, Yujing

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: It remains controversial on high risks for early breast cancer patients with one to three axillary nodes after mastectomy who is predisposition to locoregional recurrence. The present study is to investigate the relationship between primary tumor site and loco-regional recurrence (LRR) and explore the predictive value of clinicopathological characteristics in LRR for early breast cancer patients with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes after mastectomy. Methods: We reviewed the clinical data of 656 consecutively diagnosed patients with pT1-2N1M0 breast cancer who were treated in Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center with radical operation without postoperative radiotherapy between March 1998 and December 2010. The primary tumor sites included outer quadrant in 455 patients (69.36%), inner quadrant in 156 patients (23.78%)and central quadrant in 45 patients (6.86%). LRR and LRR-free survival (LRFS) in combination with clinical and pathological features were analyzed to screen out patients with higher risk of LRR. Results: The median follow-up time was 64.9 months. The 5-, 10-year LRR for the cohort was 8.6% and 12.9%, respectively; the 5-, 10-year LRFS was 86.2% and 76.4%, respectively. Multivariate analyses showed that age of ≤35 years, inner quadrant tumor and non-luminal subtype were independent risk factors for LRR and LRFS. Patients with primary tumor in inner quadrant showed higher LRR and poorer LRFS when risk factors are ≥2 than those with tumors in other sites. Conclusions: Inner quadrant tumor was an independent predictor for LRR and LRFS in patients with early breast cancer and one to three positive axillary lymph nodes, which would be more accurate in combination with other prognostic indexes including patients' age, pathological T stage, Ki67 status, molecular subtypes.

  9. Manganese superoxide dismutase and breast cancer recurrence: a Danish clinical registry-based case-control study, and a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre P Cronin-Fenton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD inhibits oxidative damage and cancer therapy effectiveness. A polymorphism in its encoding gene (SOD2: Val16Ala rs4880 may confer poorer breast cancer survival, but data are inconsistent. We examined the association of SOD2 genotype and breast cancer recurrence (BCR among patients treated with cyclophosphamide-based chemotherapy (Cyclo. We compared our findings with published studies using meta-analyses. METHODS: We conducted a population-based case-control study of BCR among women in Jutland, Denmark. Subjects were diagnosed with non-metastatic breast cancer from 1990-2001, received adjuvant Cyclo, and were registered in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. We identified 118 patients with BCR and 213 matched breast cancer controls. We genotyped SOD2 and used conditional logistic regression to compute the odds ratio (OR and associated 95% confidence intervals (95% CI of BCR. We used random-effects meta-analytic models to evaluate the association of SOD2 polymorphisms and BCR. RESULTS: The frequency of the SOD2-Ala allele was 70% in cases versus 71% in controls; 40% versus 44% were heterozygotes, and 30% versus 25% were homozygotes, respectively. Heterozygote and homozygote carriers of the Ala allele had no increased rate of BCR (OR = 1.1, 95%CI = 0.65, 2.0, and OR = 0.87, 95%CI = 0.47, 1.6, respectively. Five studies informed the meta-analytic models; summary estimates associating BCR for homozygote, or any inheritance of the variant Ala allele were 1.18 (95%CI = 0.74, 1.88, and 1.18, (95%CI = 0.91, 1.54, respectively. CONCLUSION: Our findings do not suggest that MnSOD enzymatic activity, as measured by SOD2 genotype, affects rates of BCR among patients treated with Cyclo.

  10. Hyperthermia and Radiation Therapy in Locoregional Recurrent Breast Cancers: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Niloy R., E-mail: niloyranjan.datta@ksa.ch [Center for Radiation Oncology KSA-KSB, Kantonsspital Aarau, Aarau (Switzerland); Puric, Emsad [Center for Radiation Oncology KSA-KSB, Kantonsspital Aarau, Aarau (Switzerland); Klingbiel, Dirk [Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research, Coordinating Center, Bern (Switzerland); Gomez, Silvia [Center for Radiation Oncology KSA-KSB, Kantonsspital Aarau, Aarau (Switzerland); Bodis, Stephan [Center for Radiation Oncology KSA-KSB, Kantonsspital Aarau, Aarau (Switzerland); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the outcome of hyperthermia (HT) and radiation therapy (RT) in locally recurrent breast cancers (LRBCs). Methods and Materials: A total of 708 abstracts were screened from 8 databases according to the PRISMA guidelines. Single-arm and 2-arm studies, treating LRBCs with HT and RT but without surgery (for local recurrence) or concurrent chemotherapy were considered. The evaluated endpoint was complete response (CR). Results: Thirty-one full text articles, pertaining to 34 studies, were shortlisted for the meta-analysis. Eight were 2-arm (randomized, n=5; nonrandomized, n=3), whereas 26 were single-arm studies. In all, 627 patients were enrolled in 2-arm and 1483 in single-arm studies. Patients were treated with a median of 7 HT sessions, and an average temperature of 42.5°C was attained. Mean RT dose was 38.2 Gy (range, 26-60 Gy). Hyperthermia was most frequently applied after RT. In the 2-arm studies, a CR of 60.2% was achieved with RT + HT versus 38.1% with RT alone (odds ratio 2.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.66-4.18, P<.0001). Risk ratio and risk difference were 1.57 (95% CI 1.25-1.96, P<.0001) and 0.22 (95% CI 0.11-0.33, P<.0001), respectively. In 26 single-arm studies, RT + HT attained a CR of 63.4% (event rate 0.62, 95% CI 0.57-0.66). Moreover, 779 patients had been previously irradiated (696 from single-arm and 83 from 2-arm studies). A CR of 66.6% (event rate 0.64, 95% CI 0.58-0.70) was achieved with HT and reirradiation (mean ± SD dose: 36.7 ± 7.7 Gy). Mean acute and late grade 3/4 toxicities with RT + HT were 14.4% and 5.2%, respectively. Conclusions: Thermoradiation therapy enhances the likelihood of CR rates in LRBCs over RT alone by 22% with minimal acute and late morbidities. For even those previously irradiated, reirradiation with HT provides locoregional control in two-thirds of the patients. Thermoradiation therapy could therefore be considered as an effective

  11. Comparison of standardized uptake value of 18F-FDG-PET-CT with 21-gene recurrence score in estrogen receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sung Gwe; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Hak Woo; Jeon, Tae Joo; Ryu, Young Hoon; Kim, Kun Min; Sohn, Joohyuk; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Seung Ah; Jeong, Joon; Kim, Seung Il

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET-CT) standardized uptake value (SUV) and 21-gene recurrence score (RS) in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive/HER2-negative breast cancer. One hundred sixty-seven patients were identified among those who underwent preoperative 18F-FDG-PET-CT and had RS. Maximum SUV was obtained from 18F-FDG-PET-CT; the cut-off point was 4. The continuous RS and SUV correlated positively (Pearson's R = 0.555; P reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, and SUV (Pearson's R = -0.408; P logistic regression analysis showed that high SUV were associated with higher RS (≥26). SUV, as a biologic parameter represented using a continuous variable, was found to associate with RS in ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer. Further studies may reveal the biology underlying the discordance between the markers.

  12. Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  13. Breast Cancer Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2011 Funding: Increasing Awareness and Support Among Young Women with Breast Cancer Funding: Young Breast Cancer Survivors Funding: Breast Cancer Genomics Statistics Rates by Race and Ethnicity Rates by State ...

  14. Breast Cancer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Breast Cancer Surgery The goal of breast cancer surgery is to remove the whole tumor from the breast. Some lymph nodes ... might still be in the body. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two types of breast cancer ...

  15. Breast cancer in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Iris; Lindsay, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Pregnancy-associated breast cancer is defined as breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy or in the first postpartum year. Breast cancer is one of the more common malignancies to occur during pregnancy and, as more women delay childbearing, the incidence of breast cancer in pregnancy is expected to increase. This article provides an overview of diagnosis, staging, and treatment of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. Recommendations for management of breast cancer in pregnancy are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Low risk of recurrence in elderly patients treated with breast conserving therapy in a single institute

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leij, Femke; van Werkhoven, Erik; Bosma, Sophie; Linn, Sabine C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/166275549; Rutgers, Emiel J.; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Bartelink, Harry; Elkhuizen, Paula H M; Scholten, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To guide decision making in preventing over- or under-treatment in older breast cancer patients who have undergone breast conserving surgery, we analyzed prognostic factors and risk of recurrence in a consecutive series of patients ≥ 65 years old with breast cancer and identified

  17. Hypofractionated Image Guided Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IV Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-26

    Central Nervous System Metastases; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma With Predominant in Situ Component; Liver Metastases; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lung Metastases; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Tumors Metastatic to Brain

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  19. General Information about Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  20. Prognosis after treatment for loco-regional recurrence after mastectomy or breast conserving therapy in two randomised trials (EORTC 10801 and DBCG-82TM). EORTC Breast Cancer Cooperative Group and the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tienhoven, G.; Voogd, A. C.; Peterse, J. L.; Nielsen, M.; Andersen, K. W.; Mignolet, F.; Sylvester, R.; Fentiman, I. S.; van der Schueren, E.; van Zijl, K.; Blichert-Toft, M.; Bartelink, H.; van Dongen, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the prognosis after treatment for loco-regional recurrences (LR) after (modified) radical mastectomy (MRM) or breast conserving therapy (BCT), in terms of overall survival and time to subsequent LR, in patients originally treated in two European

  1. Prognostic Discrimination Using a 70-Gene Signature among Patients with Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer and an Intermediate 21-Gene Recurrence Score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Gwe Ahn

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Oncotype DX® recurrence score (RS predictor has been clinically utilized to appropriately select adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with estrogen receptor (ER-positive early breast cancer. However, the selection of chemotherapy for patients with intermediate RSs remains controversial. We assessed the prognostic value of a 70-gene signature (70GS among patients with ER-positive breast cancer and intermediate RSs. In addition, we sought to identify genes associated with poor 70GS scores based on gene expression profiling (GEP. GEP was performed using gene expression data from 186 patients with ER-positive breast cancer. The RS and 70GS score were calculated on the basis of GEP. Among 186 patients, 82 ER-positive patients with intermediate RSs were identified. These patients were stratified by 70GS, overall survival (OS significantly differed according to 70GS (p = 0.013. In a supervised hierarchical analysis according to 70GS, the expression of several representative genes for cell proliferation was significantly higher in the poor 70GS cluster than in the good 70GS cluster. Furthermore, among these patients, FOXM1, AURKA, AURKB, and BIRC5 displayed prognostic significance for OS. In conclusion, 70GS can help to discriminate survival differences among ER-positive patients with intermediate RSs. FOXM1, AURKA, AURKB, and BIRC5, are associated with poor 70GS scores.

  2. Influence of CA 15-3 blood level and doubling time on diagnostic performances of 18F-FDG PET in breast cancer patients with occult recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aide, Nicolas; Huchet, Virginie; Switsers, Odile; Heutte, Natacha; Delozier, Thierry; Hardouin, Agnes; Bardet, Stéphane

    2007-04-01

    To evaluate the influence of CA 15-3 blood level and doubling time on diagnostic performances of 18F-FDG PET in breast cancer patients with occult recurrence. Thirty-five 18F-FDG PET examinations in 32 patients with CA 15-3 blood level above the normal range, and negative conventional imaging within 3 months before PET examination were included in this retrospective study. PET examinations were reviewed blindly by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians who were unaware of any clinical, biological or radiological information. CA 15-3 assays performed prior to the PET examinations and all using the same technique were collected and used for doubling time calculation if (1) no therapeutic modification occurred in the meantime, and (2) the delay between assays was less than 6 months. Median CA 15-3 blood levels were higher in the positive PET group (100 U x ml(-1)) than in the negative group (65 U x ml(-1)) (P=0.04). The likelihood of depicting recurrence was higher in patients with a short doubling time (60 U x ml(-1) (P=0.05), and when a short doubling time was associated with a CA 15-3 blood level >60 U x ml(-1) (P=0.03). The likelihood of depicting recurrence was influenced by CA 15-3 blood level and doubling time. Further studies are required to confirm that selections of patients based on those criteria could improve the sensitivity of positron emission tomography in the detection of breast cancer recurrence, particularly in the case of low CA 15-3 blood level.

  3. High serum YKL-40 levels in patients with primary breast cancer is related to short recurrence free survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Julia S; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Riisbro, Rikke

    2003-01-01

    YKL-40 is a growth factor for connective tissue cells and stimulates migration of endothelial cells. YKL-40 is secreted by cancer cells, and elevated serum YKL-40 in patients with metastatic breast cancer and colorectal cancer is associated with a poorer prognosis as compared to patients with nor......YKL-40 is a growth factor for connective tissue cells and stimulates migration of endothelial cells. YKL-40 is secreted by cancer cells, and elevated serum YKL-40 in patients with metastatic breast cancer and colorectal cancer is associated with a poorer prognosis as compared to patients...... YKL-40 concentration in the patients was 57 microg/l (range 22-688 microg/l) and significantly elevated (p compared to serum YKL-40 in healthy females. Nineteen percent of the patients had high serum YKL-40 (i.e., >95 percentile of healthy females). Patients with high serum YKL-40 had...... shorter relapse-free interval (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.77, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06-2.95, p = 0.028) and overall survival (HR = 1.78, 95% CI: 1.04-3.05, p = 0.036) than patients with normal serum YKL-40. Serum YKL-40 was higher (p = 0.005) in lymph node positive patients as compared to lymph node...

  4. Breast Cancer Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  5. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breast cancer correctly. Their recommendations are summarized below. Minimum criteria for a diagnosis of inflammatory breast cancer ... Initial biopsy samples from the affected breast show invasive carcinoma. Further examination of tissue from the affected ...

  6. Phenotypic features and genetic characterization of male breast cancer families: identification of two recurrent BRCA2 mutations in north-east of Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miolo GianMaria

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer in men is an infrequent occurrence, accounting for ~1% of all breast tumors with an incidence of about 1:100,000. The relative rarity of male breast cancer (MBC limits our understanding of the epidemiologic, genetic and clinical features of this tumor. Methods From 1997 to 2003, 10 MBC patients were referred to our Institute for genetic counselling and BRCA1/2 testing. Here we report on the genetic and phenotypic characterization of 10 families with MBC from the North East of Italy. In particular, we wished to assess the occurrence of specific cancer types in relatives of MBC probands in families with and without BRCA2 predisposing mutations. Moreover, families with recurrent BRCA2 mutations were also characterized by haplotype analysis using 5 BRCA2-linked dinucleotide repeat markers and 8 intragenic BRCA2 polymorphisms. Results Two pathogenic mutations in the BRCA2 gene were observed: the 9106C>T (Q2960X and the IVS16-2A>G (splicing mutations, each in 2 cases. A BRCA1 mutation of uncertain significance 4590C>G (P1491A was also observed. In families with BRCA2 mutations, female breast cancer was more frequent in the first and second-degree relatives compared to the families with wild type BRCA1/2 (31.9% vs. 8.0% p = 0.001. Reconstruction of the chromosome phasing in three families and the analysis of three isolated cases with the IVS16-2A>G BRCA2 mutation identified the same haplotype associated with MBC, supporting the possibility that this founder mutation previously detected in Slovenian families is also present in the North East of our Country. Moreover, analysis of one family with the 9106C>T BRCA2 mutation allowed the identification of common haplotypes for both microsatellite and intragenic polymorphisms segregating with the mutation. Three isolated cases with the same mutation shared the same intragenic polymorphisms and three 5' microsatellite markers, but showed a different haplotype for 3' markers

  7. Hereditary breast cancer in Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) populations: identification of novel, recurrent and founder BRCA1 mutations in the Tunisian population

    OpenAIRE

    Mahfoudh, Wijden; Bouaouina, Noureddine; Ahmed, Slim Ben; Gabbouj, Sallouha; Shan, Jingxuan; Mathew, Rebecca; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Troudi, Wafa; Elgaaied, Amel Ben Ammar; Hassen, Elham; Chouchane, Lotfi

    2011-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in BRCA1 breast cancer susceptibility gene account for a large proportion of hereditary breast cancer families and show considerable ethnic and geographical variations. The contribution of BRCA1 mutations to hereditary breast cancer has not yet been thoroughly investigated in Middle Eastern and North African populations. In this study, 16 Tunisian high-risk breast cancer families were screened for germline mutations in the entire BRCA1 coding region and exon?intron boundar...

  8. Breast cancer in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in situ - male; Intraductal carcinoma - male; Inflammatory breast cancer - male; Paget disease of the nipple - male; Breast cancer - male ... The cause of breast cancer in men is not clear. But there are risk factors that make breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to ...

  9. Hereditary breast cancer in Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) populations: identification of novel, recurrent and founder BRCA1 mutations in the Tunisian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoudh, Wijden; Bouaouina, Noureddine; Ahmed, Slim Ben; Gabbouj, Sallouha; Shan, Jingxuan; Mathew, Rebecca; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Troudi, Wafa; Elgaaied, Amel Ben Ammar; Hassen, Elham; Chouchane, Lotfi

    2012-02-01

    Germ-line mutations in BRCA1 breast cancer susceptibility gene account for a large proportion of hereditary breast cancer families and show considerable ethnic and geographical variations. The contribution of BRCA1 mutations to hereditary breast cancer has not yet been thoroughly investigated in Middle Eastern and North African populations. In this study, 16 Tunisian high-risk breast cancer families were screened for germline mutations in the entire BRCA1 coding region and exon-intron boundaries using direct sequencing. Six families were found to carry BRCA1 mutations with a prevalence of 37.5%. Four different deleterious mutations were detected. Three truncating mutations were previously described: c.798_799delTT (916 delTT), c.3331_3334delCAAG (3450 delCAAG), c.5266dupC (5382 insC) and one splice site mutation which seems to be specific to the Tunisian population: c.212 + 2insG (IVS5 + 2insG). We also identified 15 variants of unknown clinical significance. The c.798_799delTT mutation occurred at an 18% frequency and was shared by three apparently unrelated families. Analyzing five microsatellite markers in and flanking the BRCA1 locus showed a common haplotype associated with this mutation. This suggests that the c.798_799delTT mutation is a Tunisian founder mutation. Our findings indicate that the Tunisian population has a spectrum of prevalent BRCA1 mutations, some of which appear as recurrent and founding mutations.

  10. Quantification of Cell-Free HER-2 DNA in Plasma from Breast Cancer Patients: Sensitivity for Detection of Metastatic Recurrence and Gene Amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Patricia Diana; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund; Pallisgaard, Niels; Madsen, Jonna Skov; Jakobsen, Erik Hugger; Brandslund, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the free-circulating plasma HER-2 DNA (cfHER-2 DNA) and to assess the ability of analysis to discriminate between patients with primary breast cancer and healthy controls in order to detect metastatic recurrence in comparison with serum HER-2 protein and also HER-2 gene amplification. The study population consisted of 100 patients with primary breast cancer and 50 healthy female donors. An additional 22 patients with metastases were subsequently included. cfHER-2 DNA was quantified with a quantitative PCR method together with a reference gene. Using a cut-off of 2.5 for the ratio of the cfHER-2 DNA/reference gene, three (of 15) tissue HER-2-positive patients had a ratio >2.5 prior to the detection of metastatic disease. In the post-metastatic/pre-chemotherapy setting, 11 (of 23) tissue HER-2-positive patients with metastases had a ratio >2.5. There was no difference between absolute preoperative cfHER-2 DNA values for patients with primary breast cancer and those for healthy controls. There was no difference between cfHER-2 DNA values taken within nine months of development of the metastatic disease and the levels in patients without metastases, but there was a significant difference in the corresponding serum HER-2 protein levels in the tissue HER-2-positive patient group. Amplified HER-2 DNA can be detected in plasma when using a ratio between cfHER-2 DNA and a reference gene. cfHER-2 DNA could not be used to discriminate between patients with primary breast cancer and healthy controls, and could not predict the development of metastatic disease.

  11. Recurrent Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Visit Our Schools Educators at Mayo Clinic train tomorrow’s leaders to deliver compassionate, high-value, safe patient ... Practices Reprint Permissions A single copy of these materials may be reprinted for noncommercial personal use only. " ...

  12. Risk factors for brain metastasis as a first site of disease recurrence in patients with HER2 positive early stage breast cancer treated with adjuvant trastuzumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonyali, Onder; Coskun, Ugur; Yuksel, Sinemis; Inanc, Mevlude; Bal, Oznur; Akman, Tulay; Yazilitas, Dogan; Ulas, Arife; Kucukoner, Mehmet; Aksoy, Asude; Demirci, Umut; Uysal, Mukremin; Tanriverdi, Ozgur; Gunaydin, Yusuf; Sumbul, Ahmet Taner; Yildiz, Ramazan; Karaca, Halit; Oksuzoglu, Berna; Ciltas, Aydin; Buyukberber, Suleyman; Benekli, Mustafa

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine risk factors for brain metastasis as the first site of disease recurrence in patients with HER2-positive early-stage breast cancer (EBC) who received adjuvant trastuzumab. Medical records of 588 female patients who received 52-week adjuvant trastuzumab from 14 centers were evaluated. Cumulative incidence functions for brain metastasis as the first site of disease recurrence and the effect of covariates on brain metastasis were evaluated in a competing risk analysis and competing risks regression, respectively. Median follow-up time was 36 months. Cumulative incidence of brain metastasis at 12 months and 24 months was 0.6% and 2%, respectively. HER2-enriched subtype (ER- and PR-) tumor (p = 0.001, RR: 3.4, 95% CI: 1.33-8.71) and stage 3 disease (p = 0.0032, RR: 9.39, 95% CI: 1.33-8.71) were significant risk factors for development of brain metastasis as the first site of recurrence. In patients with HER2 positive EBC who received adjuvant trastuzumab, HER2-enriched subtype (ER- and PR-) tumor and stage 3 disease were associated with increased risk of brain metastasis as the first site of disease recurrence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Enhanced Metastatic Recurrence Via Lymphatic Trafficking of a High-Metastatic Variant of Human Triple-Negative Breast Cancer After Surgical Resection in Orthotopic Nude Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Shuya; Takehara, Kiyoto; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Bouvet, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M

    2017-03-01

    We previously developed and characterized a highly invasive and metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) variant by serial orthotopic implantation of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells in nude mice. Eventually, a highly invasive and metastatic variant of human TNBC was isolated after lymph node metastases was harvested and orthotopically re-implanted into the mammary gland of nude mice for two cycles. The variant thereby isolated is highly invasive in the mammary gland and metastasized to lymph nodes in 10 of 12 mice compared to 2 of 12 of the parental cell line. In the present report, we observed that high-metastatic MDA-MB-231H-RFP cells produced significantly larger subcutaneous tumors compared with parental MDA-MB-231 cells in nude mice. Extensive lymphatic trafficking by high-metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells was also observed. High-metastatic MDA-MB-231 developed larger recurrent tumors 2 weeks after tumor resection compared with tumors that were not resected in orthotopic models. Surgical resection of the MDA-MB-231 high-metastatic variant primary tumor in orthotopic models also resulted in rapid and enhanced lymphatic trafficking of residual cancer cells and extensive lymph node and lung metastasis that did not occur in the non-surgical mice. These results suggest that surgical resection of high metastatic TNBC can greatly increase the malignancy of residual cancer. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 559-569, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Imaging male breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, S., E-mail: sdoyle2@nhs.net [Primrose Breast Care Unit, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Steel, J.; Porter, G. [Primrose Breast Care Unit, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Male breast cancer is rare, with some pathological and radiological differences from female breast cancer. There is less familiarity with the imaging appearances of male breast cancer, due to its rarity and the more variable use of preoperative imaging. This review will illustrate the commonest imaging appearances of male breast cancer, with emphasis on differences from female breast cancer and potential pitfalls in diagnosis, based on a 10 year experience in our institution.

  15. Protocol of a randomized controlled trial of the fear of recurrence therapy (FORT) intervention for women with breast or gynecological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheu, Christine; Lebel, Sophie; Courbasson, Christine; Lefebvre, Monique; Singh, Mina; Bernstein, Lori J; Muraca, Linda; Benea, Aronela; Jolicoeur, Lynne; Harris, Cheryl; Ramanakumar, Agnihotram V; Ferguson, Sarah; Sidani, Souraya

    2016-04-25

    Clinically significant levels of fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) affect up to 49% of cancer survivors and are more prevalent among women. FCR is associated with psychological distress, lower quality of life, and increased use of medical resources. Despite its prevalence, FCR is poorly addressed in clinical care. To address this problem, we first developed, and pilot tested a 6-week, 2 h, Cognitive-existential group intervention therapy that targeted FCR in survivors of breast or gynecological cancer. Following the positive outcome of the pilot, we are now testing this approach in a randomized clinical trial (RCT). Goal and hypotheses: This multicenter, prospective RCT aims to test the efficacy of the intervention. The study hypotheses are that, compared to a control group, cancer survivors participating in the intervention (1) will have less FCR, (2) will show more favorable outcomes on the following measures: cancer-specific distress, quality of life, illness uncertainty, intolerance of uncertainty, perceived risk of cancer recurrence, and coping skills. We further postulate that the between-group differences will persist three and 6 months post-intervention. Sixteen groups of seven to nine women are being allocated to the intervention or the control group. The control group receives a 6-week, 2 h, structurally equivalent support group. We are recruiting 144 cancer survivors from four hospital sites in three Canadian cities. The sample size was based on the moderate pre/post-test changes found in our pilot study and adjusted to the drop-out rates. The primary outcome, FCR, is measured by the Fear of Cancer Recurrence Inventory. Secondary outcomes measured include cancer-specific distress, perceived risk of cancer recurrence, illness uncertainty, intolerance of uncertainty, coping, and quality of life. We use reliable and recognized valid scales. Participants are to complete the questionnaire package at four times: before the first group session (baseline

  16. A case control study on risk factors involved in inflammatory breast recurrence after breast-conserving surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, R; Koyama, H; Kasumi, F; Takashima, S; Kobayashi, S; Komaki, K; Ohkawa, T; Shin, E; Kodama, H; Fukutomi, T; Nishi, T; Sonoo, H; Sano, S; Kimishima, I; Nakaue, K; Nakamura, S; Kusama, M; Okumura, K

    1998-01-01

    Recurrence that poses the biggest problem after breast-conserving surgery is local recurrence. Particularly, in the case of inflammatory breast recurrence which is rare but has a specific pathologic nature, it is important to elucidate the pathology and risk factors and to consider appropriate countermeasures. In the present study, we classified 133 cases of recurrence following breast-conserving surgery, collected from 18 key hospitals/institutes in Japan. Recurrence types were divided into three groups, namely, inflammatory breast recurrence, noninflammatory breast recurrence and distant metastasis only, and the risk factors involved in recurrence were investigated by the case control study allotting 2 controls to each case. The study population consisted of 9 cases of the inflammatory type, 64 cases of the noninflammatory type and 60 cases of distant metastasis. The significant risk factor for inflammatory breast recurrence was positive lymph node metastasis, which was significantly more frequent in lymphatic invasion-positive cases unlike in the distant metastasis group. The positive surgical margin and nonradiation therapy which have been shown to be significant risk factors for noninflammatory breast recurrence were entirely unrelated with inflammatory breast recurrence. In addition, the inflammatory-type recurrence time was as short as about 12 months irrespective of whether radiation therapy was performed or not. The inflammatory type was accompanied with local wide extension (cancerous embolus of the dermal lymphatic vessels), and distant metastasis (lymphangitis carcinomatosa) at the time of recurrence, and further surgery was impossible in most cases, with a significantly poorer prognosis than the other recurrence types. These findings suggest that this recurrence corresponds to the so-called 'occult' case of primary inflammatory breast carcinoma. We think it important to predict this recurrence by close pathological examination, particularly in patients

  17. Locoregional Recurrence Risk in Breast Cancer Patients with Estrogen Receptor Positive Tumors and Residual Nodal Disease following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy without Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shravan Kandula

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Among breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC and mastectomy, locoregional recurrence (LRR rates are unclear in women with ER+ tumors treated with adjuvant endocrine therapy without postmastectomy radiation (PMRT. To determine if PMRT is needed in these patients, we compared LRR rates of patients with ER+ tumors (treated with adjuvant endocrine therapy with women who have non-ER+ tumors. 85 consecutive breast cancer patients (87 breast tumors treated with NAC and mastectomy without PMRT were reviewed. Patients were divided by residual nodal disease (ypN status (ypN+ versus ypN0 and then stratified by receptor subtype. Among ypN+ patients (n=35, five-year LRR risk in patients with ER+, Her2+, and triple negative tumors was 5%, 33%, and 37%, respectively (p=0.02. Among ypN+/ER+ patients, lymphovascular invasion and grade three disease increased the five-year LRR risk to 13% and 11%, respectively. Among ypN0 patients (n=52, five-year LRR risk in patients with ER+, Her2+, and triple negative tumors was 7%, 22%, and 6%, respectively (p=0.71. In women with ER+ tumors and residual nodal disease, endocrine therapy may be sufficient adjuvant treatment, except in patients with lymphovascular invasion or grade three tumors where PMRT may still be indicated.

  18. Ixabepilone and Liposomal Doxorubicin in Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-11

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Female Reproductive Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  19. Effects of Pre-surgical Vitamin D Supplementation and Ketogenic Diet in a Patient with Recurrent Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branca, Jacopo J V; Pacini, Stefania; Ruggiero, Marco

    2015-10-01

    A woman, mother of one at the age of 19 years, was diagnosed with mammary adenocarcinoma in the right breast in 1985 at the age of 37 years. The patient underwent surgery (quadrantectomy), lymphadenectomy and radiotherapy. In 1999, an adenocarcinoma was diagnosed in the left breast, followed by adequate resection, radiotherapy and anti-oestrogen receptor treatment for 6 years. In March 2014, an infiltrating adenocarcinoma was diagnosed in the remaining part of the right breast that had been operated on and irradiated in 1985. The pre-surgical biopsy, showed weak positivity for progesterone receptor (PgR) (10%, score 2+), and high positivity for the nuclear protein Ki67 (30%). In the three weeks between diagnosis and operation, when no other treatment had been planned, the patient decided to self-administer high doses of oral vitamin D3 (10,000 IU/day), and to follow a strict ketogenic diet. Following right mastectomy, analysis of the surgical specimen showed no positivity for HER2 expression (negative, score 0), and significant increase in positivity of PgR (20%). Positivity for ER and Ki67 were unaltered. This observation indicates that a combination of high-dose vitamin D3 and ketogenic diet leads to changes in some biological markers of breast cancer, i.e. negativization of HER2 expression and increased expression of PgR. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  20. Predicting loco-regional recurrence risk in T1, T2 breast cancer with 1-3 positive axillary nodes postmastectomy: Development of a predictive nomogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadasadawala, T; Kannan, S; Gudi, S; Rishi, A; Budrukkar, A; Parmar, V; Shet, T; Desai, S; Gupta, S; Badwe, R; Sarin, R

    2017-01-01

    Role of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in early breast cancer with 1-3 positive axillary nodes is still controversial. Hence, there is a need to identify subgroup of patients who have sufficiently high risk of disease recurrence to benefit from PMRT. The aim is to evaluate clinical outcomes of patients postmastectomy having pathological T1-T2 tumors with 1-3 positive axillary lymph nodes (LNs) treated with adjuvant systemic therapy and develop a predictive nomogram. Data collected retrospectively from eligible patients from 2005 to 2011. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used for all time-to-event analysis. Various known clinical and pathological risk factors were correlated with outcome using uni- and multi-variable analysis in SPSS version 21. All comparisons were two-tailed and P loco-regional control (LRC) was developed using least absolute shrinkage and selection operator shrinkage model in hdnom.io software. 38/242 (15.7%) patients had recurrent disease at loco-regional (10 patients), distant sites (22 patients) and simultaneous loco-regional and distant sites (6 patients) at a median follow-up 59.5 (range 4-133) months. Five years estimate of LRC, distant disease-free survival (DFS), DFS, cause-specific survival and overall survival was 87.8%, 85.4%, 84.2%, 93.1%, and 91.5%, respectively. Pathological tumor size, margin status, LN ratio as continuous variables and grade and triple negative breast cancer status as categorical variables were the risk factors included in the model for building nomogram. The nomogram developed based on institutional data can be a valuable tool in guiding adjuvant PMRT depending on the risk of 5 years loco-regional recurrence.

  1. Regulation of Metastatic Breast Cancer Dormancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    to begin to unravel the complex resistance seen with metastatic breast cancer , particularly the fear of recurrence 5-10 years after apparent cure...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0062 TITLE: Regulation of Metastatic Breast Cancer Dormancy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Sarah Wheeler CONTRACTING...Metastatic Breast Cancer Dormancy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0062 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sarah Wheeler 5d

  2. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  3. Having children after breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, K H

    1994-01-01

    Having children after breast cancer is an important clinical issue. Evidence from clinical studies on pregnancy subsequent to breast cancer has not shown a survival disadvantage. Clinical experience suggests that desire for children, support from family, and quality of life issues are also important factors in decisions about pregnancy. This qualitative study was done (1) to identify reasons why young women decide to become pregnant after breast cancer; (2) to describe concerns about subsequent pregnancy; (3) to describe helpful behaviors in decision making; and (4) to explore the meaning of having children after breast cancer. Twenty-three women were identified who had early-stage breast cancer and became pregnant after breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy. Sixteen women participated in a semi-structured interview. Qualitative data were analyzed for content. Results indicate that pregnancy subsequent to breast cancer is a powerful stimulus for young women to "get well" again. Reasons for subsequent pregnancy were related to the women's developmental age. Young women expressed concerns about the potential for future disease recurrence, about breast self-examination and mammography during pregnancy, and about surviving to see their children grow up. Perceived helpful behaviors included developing a realistic perspective, living with uncertainty, love and support of spouse, and delineating differences between personal and medical decision making.

  4. Efficacy of Blended Cognitive Behavior Therapy for High Fear of Recurrence in Breast, Prostate, and Colorectal Cancer Survivors: The SWORD Study, a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Wal, Marieke; Thewes, Belinda; Gielissen, Marieke; Speckens, Anne; Prins, Judith

    2017-07-01

    Purpose Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is a common problem experienced by cancer survivors. Approximately one third of survivors report high FCR. This study aimed to evaluate whether blended cognitive behavior therapy (bCBT) can reduce the severity of FCR in cancer survivors curatively treated for breast, prostate, or colorectal cancer. Patients and Methods This randomized controlled trial included 88 cancer survivors with high FCR (Cancer Worry Scale score ≥ 14) from 6 months to 5 years after cancer treatment. Participants were randomly allocated (ratio 1:1, stratified by cancer type) to receive bCBT, including five face-to face and three online sessions (n = 45) or care as usual (CAU; n = 43). Participants completed questionnaires at baseline (T0) and 3 months later (T1). The intervention group completed bCBT between T0 and T1. The primary outcome was FCR severity assessed with the Cancer Worry Scale. Secondary outcomes included other distress-related measures. Statistical (one-way between-group analyses of covariance) and clinical effects (clinically significant improvement) were analyzed by intention to treat. Results Participants who received bCBT reported significantly less FCR than those who received CAU (mean difference, -3.48; 95% CI, -4.69 to -2.28; P < .001) with a moderate-to-large effect size ( d = 0.76). Clinically significant improvement in FCR was significantly higher in the bCBT group than in the CAU group (13 [29%] of 45 compared with 0 [0%] of 43; P < .001); self-rated improvement was also higher in the bCBT group (30 [71%] of 42 compared with 12 [32%] of 38 in the CAU group; P < .001). Conclusion bCBT has a statistically and clinically significant effect on the severity of FCR in cancer survivors and is a promising new treatment approach.

  5. Using association rules mining to explore pattern of Chinese medicinal formulae (prescription) in treating and preventing breast cancer recurrence and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yanhua; Zheng, Xiao; Sit, Cindy; Loo, Wings T Y; Wang, ZhiYu; Xie, Ting; Jia, Bo; Ye, Qiaobo; Tsui, Kamchuen; Chow, Louis W C; Chen, Jianping

    2012-09-19

    Chinese herbal medicine is increasingly widely used as a complementary approach for control of breast cancer recurrence and metastasis. In this paper, we examined the implicit prescription patterns behind the Chinese medicinal formulae, so as to explore the Chinese medicinal compatibility patterns or rules in the treatment or control of breast cancer recurrence and metastasis. This study was based on the herbs recorded in Pharmacopoeia of the People's Republic of China, and the literature sources from Chinese Journal Net and China Master Dissertations Full-text Database (1990 - 2010) to analyze the compatibility rule of the prescription. Each Chinese herb was listed according to the selected medicinal formulae and the added information was organized to establish a database. The frequency and the association rules of the prescription patterns were analyzed using the SPSS Clenmentine Data Mining System. An initial statistical analysis was carried out to categorize the herbs according to their medicinal types and dosage, natures, flavors, channel tropism, and functions. Based on the categorization, the frequencies of occurrence were computed. The main prescriptive features from the selected formulae of the mining data are: (1) warm or cold herbs in the Five Properties category; sweet or bitter herbs in the Five Flavors category and with affinity to the liver meridian are the most frequently prescribed in the 96 medicinal formulae; (2) herbs with tonifying and replenishing, blood-activating and stasis-resolving, spleen-strengthening and dampness-resolving or heat-clearing and detoxicating functions that are frequently prescribed; (3) herbs with blood-tonifying, yin-tonifying, spleen-strengthening and dampness-resolving, heat-clearing and detoxicating, and blood-activating with stasis-resolving functions that are interrelated and prescribed in combination with qi-tonifying herbs. The results indicate that there is a close relationship between recurrence and metastasis

  6. Effect of radiotherapy after mastectomy and axillary surgery on 10-year recurrence and 20-year breast cancer mortality: meta-analysis of individual patient data for 8135 women in 22 randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGale, P.; Taylor, C.; Correa, C.; Cutter, D.; Duane, F.; Ewertz, M.; Gray, R.; Mannu, G.; Peto, R.; Whelan, T.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Z.; Darby, S.; Abe, O.; Abe, R.; Enomoto, K.; Kikuchi, K.; Koyama, H.; Masuda, H.; Nomura, Y.; Ohashi, Y.; Sakai, K.; Sugimachi, K.; Toi, M.; Tominaga, T.; Uchino, J.; Yoshida, M.; Haybittle, J. L.; Leonard, C. F.; Calais, G.; Geraud, P.; Collett, V.; Davies, C.; Delmestri, A.; Sayer, J.; Harvey, V. J.; Holdaway, I. M.; Kay, R. G.; Mason, B. H.; Forbes, J. F.; Wilcken, N.; Bartsch, R.; Dubsky, P.; Fesl, C.; Fohler, H.; Gnant, M.; Greil, R.; Jakesz, R.; Lang, A.; Luschin-Ebengreuth, G.; Marth, C.; Mlineritsch, B.; Samonigg, H.; Singer, C. F.; Steger, G. G.; Stöger, H.; Canney, P.; Yosef, H. M. A.; Focan, C.; Peek, U.; Oates, G. D.; Powell, J.; Durand, M.; Mauriac, L.; Di Leo, A.; Dolci, S.; Larsimont, D.; Nogaret, J. M.; Philippson, C.; Piccart, M. J.; Masood, M. B.; Parker, D.; Price, J. J.; Lindsay, M. A.; Mackey, J.; Martin, M.; Hupperets, P. S. G. J.; Bates, T.; Blamey, R. W.; Chetty, U.; Ellis, I. O.; Mallon, E.; Morgan, D. A. L.; Patnick, J.; Pinder, S.; Olivotto, I.; Ragaz, J.; Berry, D.; Broadwater, G.; Cirrincione, C.; Muss, H.; Norton, L.; Weiss, R. B.; Abu-Zahra, H. T.; Portnoj, S. M.; Bowden, S.; Brookes, C.; Dunn, J.; Fernando, I.; Lee, M.; Poole, C.; Rea, D.; Spooner, D.; Barrett-Lee, P. J.; Mansel, R. E.; Monypenny, I. J.; Gordon, N. H.; Davis, H. L.; Cuzick, J.; Lehingue, Y.; Romestaing, P.; Dubois, J. B.; Delozier, T.; Griffon, B.; Mace Lesech, J.; Brain, E.; de La Lande, B.; Mouret-Fourme, E.; Mustacchi, G.; Petruzelka, L.; Pribylova, O.; Owen, J. R.; Harbeck, N.; Jänicke, F.; Meisner, C.; Schmitt, M.; Thomssen, C.; Meier, P.; Shan, Y.; Shao, Y. F.; Wang, X.; Zhao, D. B.; Chen, Z. M.; Pan, H. C.; Howell, A.; Swindell, R.; Burrett, J. A.; Clarke, M.; Collins, R.; Davies, K.; Elphinstone, P.; Evans, V.; Gettins, L.; Godwin, J.; Gregory, C.; Hermans, D.; Hicks, C.; James, S.; Kerr, A.; Liu, H.; MacKinnon, E.; Lay, M.; McHugh, T.; Morris, P.; Albano, J.; de Oliveira, C. F.; Gervásio, H.; Gordilho, J.; Ejlertsen, B.; Jensen, M.-B.; Johansen, H.; Mouridsen, H.; Palshof, T.; Gelman, R. S.; Harris, J. R.; Hayes, D.; Henderson, C.; Shapiro, C. L.; Winer, E.; Christiansen, P.; Møller, S.; Mouridsen, H. T.; Trampisch, H. J.; Dalesio, O.; de Vries, E. G. E.; Rodenhuis, S.; van Tinteren, H.; Comis, R. L.; Davidson, N. E.; Robert, N.; Sledge, G.; Solin, L. J.; Sparano, J. A.; Tormey, D. C.; Wood, W.; Cameron, D.; Dixon, J. M.; Forrest, P.; Jack, W.; Kunkler, I.; Rossbach, J.; Klijn, J. G. M.; Treurniet-Donker, A. D.; van Putten, W. L.; Rotmensz, N.; Veronesi, U.; Viale, G.; Bartelink, H.; Bijker, N.; Bogaerts, J.; Cardoso, F.; Cufer, T.; Julien, J. P.; Rutgers, E.; van de Velde, C. J. H.; Cunningham, M. P.; Huovinen, R.; Joensuu, H.; Costa, A.; Bonadonna, G.; Gianni, L.; Valagussa, P.; Goldstein, L. J.; Bonneterre, J.; Fargeot, P.; Fumoleau, P.; Kerbrat, P.; Luporsi, E.; Namer, M.; Eiermann, W.; Hilfrich, J.; Jonat, W.; Kaufmann, M.; Kreienberg, R.; Schumacher, M.; Bastert, G.; Rauschecker, H.; Sauer, R.; Sauerbrei, W.; Schauer, A.; Blohmer, J. U.; Costa, S. D.; Eidtmann, H.; Gerber, B.; Jackisch, C.; Loibl, S.; von Minckwitz, G.; de Schryver, A.; Vakaet, L.; Belfiglio, M.; Nicolucci, A.; Pellegrini, F.; Pirozzoli, M. C.; Sacco, M.; Valentini, M.; McArdle, C. S.; Smith, D. C.; Stallard, S.; Dent, D. M.; Gudgeon, C. A.; Hacking, A.; Murray, E.; Panieri, E.; Werner, I. D.; Carrasco, E.; Segui, M. A.; Galligioni, E.; Lopez, M.; Erazo, A.; Medina, J. Y.; Horiguchi, J.; Takei, H.; Fentiman, I. S.; Hayward, J. L.; Rubens, R. D.; Skilton, D.; Scheurlen, H.; Sohn, H. C.; Untch, M.; Dafni, U.; Markopoulos, C.; Fountzilas, G.; Mavroudis, D.; Klefstrom, P.; Blomqvist, C.; Saarto, T.; Gallen, M.; Tinterri, C.; Margreiter, R.; de Lafontan, B.; Mihura, J.; Roché, H.; Asselain, B.; Salmon, R. J.; Vilcoq, J. R.; André, F.; Arriagada, R.; Delaloge, S.; Hill, C.; Koscielny, S.; Michiels, S.; Rubino, C.; A'Hern, R.; Bliss, J.; Ellis, P.; Kilburn, L.; Yarnold, J. R.; Benraadt, J.; Kooi, M.; van de Velde, A. O.; van Dongen, J. A.; Vermorken, J. B.; Castiglione, M.; Coates, A.; Colleoni, M.; Collins, J.; Forbes, J.; Gelber, R. D.; Goldhirsch, A.; Lindtner, J.; Price, K. N.; Regan, M. M.; Rudenstam, C. M.; Senn, H. J.; Thuerlimann, B.; Bliss, J. M.; Chilvers, C. E. D.; Coombes, R. C.; Hall, E.; Marty, M.; Buyse, M.; Possinger, K.; Schmid, P.; Wallwiener, D.; Foster, L.; George, W. D.; Stewart, H. J.; Stroner, P.; Borovik, R.; Hayat, H.; Inbar, M. J.; Peretz, T.; Robinson, E.; Bruzzi, P.; del Mastro, L.; Pronzato, P.; Sertoli, M. R.; Venturini, M.; Camerini, T.; de Palo, G.; Di Mauro, M. G.; Formelli, F.; Amadori, D.; Martoni, A.; Pannuti, F.; Camisa, R.; Cocconi, G.; Colozza, A.; Passalacqua, R.; Aogi, K.; Takashima, S.; Ikeda, T.; Inokuchi, K.; Sawa, K.; Sonoo, H.; Korzeniowski, S.; Skolyszewski, J.; Ogawa, M.; Yamashita, J.; Bastiaannet, E.; van de Water, W.; van Nes, J. G. H.; Christiaens, R.; Neven, P.; Paridaens, R.; van den Bogaert, W.; Braun, S.; Martin, P.; Romain, S.; Janauer, M.; Seifert, M.; Sevelda, P.; Zielinski, C. C.; Hakes, T.; Hudis, C. A.; Wittes, R.; Giokas, G.; Kondylis, D.; Lissaios, B.; de la Huerta, R.; Sainz, M. G.; Altemus, R.; Camphausen, K.; Cowan, K.; Danforth, D.; Lichter, A.; Lippman, M.; O'Shaughnessy, J.; Pierce, L. J.; Steinberg, S.; Venzon, D.; Zujewski, J. A.; D'Amico, C.; Lioce, M.; Paradiso, A.; Chapman, J.-A. W.; Gelmon, K.; Goss, P. E.; Levine, M. N.; Meyer, R.; Parulekar, W.; Pater, J. L.; Pritchard, K. I.; Shepherd, L. E.; Tu, D.; Ohno, S.; Anderson, S.; Bass, G.; Brown, A.; Bryant, J.; Costantino, J.; Dignam, J.; Fisher, B.; Geyer, C.; Mamounas, E. P.; Paik, S.; Redmond, C.; Swain, S.; Wickerham, L.; Wolmark, N.; Baum, M.; Jackson, I. M.; Palmer, M. K.; Perez, E.; Ingle, J. N.; Suman, V. J.; Bengtsson, N. O.; Emdin, S.; Jonsson, H.; Lythgoe, J. P.; Kissin, M.; Erikstein, B.; Hannisdal, E.; Jacobsen, A. B.; Varhaug, J. E.; Gundersen, S.; Hauer-Jensen, M.; Høst, H.; Nissen-Meyer, R.; Reinertsen, K.; Mitchell, A. K.; Robertson, J. F. R.; Ueo, H.; Di Palma, M.; Mathé, G.; Misset, J. L.; Levine, M.; Morimoto, K.; Takatsuka, Y.; Crossley, E.; Harris, A.; Talbot, D.; Taylor, M.; di Blasio, B.; Ivanov, V.; Paltuev, R.; Semiglazov, V.; Brockschmidt, J.; Cooper, M. R.; Falkson, C. I.; Dowsett, M.; Makris, A.; Parton, M.; Pennert, K.; Powles, T. J.; Smith, I. E.; Gazet, J. C.; Browne, L.; Graham, P.; Corcoran, N.; Businico, A.; Deshpande, N.; di Martino, L.; Douglas, P.; Lindtner, A.; Notter, G.; Bryant, A. J. S.; Ewing, G. H.; Firth, L. A.; Krushen-Kosloski, J. L.; Anderson, H.; Killander, F.; Malmström, P.; Rydén, L.; Arnesson, L.-G.; Carstensen, J.; Dufmats, M.; Fohlin, H.; Nordenskjöld, B.; Söderberg, M.; Carpenter, J. T.; Murray, N.; Royle, G. T.; Simmonds, P. D.; Albain, K.; Barlow, W.; Crowley, J.; Gralow, J.; Hortobagyi, G.; Livingston, R.; Martino, S.; Osborne, C. K.; Ravdin, P. M.; Adolfsson, J.; Bergh, J.; Bondesson, T.; Celebioglu, F.; Dahlberg, K.; Fornander, T.; Fredriksson, I.; Frisell, J.; Göransson, E.; Iiristo, M.; Johansson, U.; Lenner, E.; Löfgren, L.; Nikolaidis, P.; Perbeck, L.; Rotstein, S.; Sandelin, K.; Skoog, L.; Svane, G.; af Trampe, E.; Wadström, C.; Janni, W.; Maibach, R.; Thürlimann, B.; Hakama, M.; Holli, K.; Isola, J.; Rouhento, K.; Saaristo, R.; Brenner, H.; Hercbergs, A.; Yoshimoto, M.; Paterson, A. H. G.; Fyles, A.; Meakin, J. W.; Panzarella, T.; Bahi, J.; Reid, M.; Spittle, M.; Bishop, H.; Bundred, N. J.; Forsyth, S.; Pinder, S. E.; Sestak, I.; Deutsch, G. P.; Kwong, D. L. W.; Pai, V. R.; Senanayake, F.; Martin, A. L.; Boccardo, F.; Rubagotti, A.; Hackshaw, A.; Houghton, J.; Ledermann, J.; Monson, K.; Tobias, J. S.; Carlomagno, C.; de Laurentiis, M.; de Placido, S.; Williams, L.; Broglio, K.; Buzdar, A. U.; Hsu, L.; Love, R. R.; Ahlgren, J.; Garmo, H.; Holmberg, L.; Liljegren, G.; Lindman, H.; Wärnberg, F.; Asmar, L.; Jones, S. E.; Gluz, O.; Liedtke, C.; Nitz, U.; Litton, A.; Wallgren, A.; Karlsson, P.; Linderholm, B. K.; Chlebowski, R. T.; Caffier, H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Postmastectomy radiotherapy was shown in previous meta- analyses to reduce the risks of both recurrence and breast cancer mortality in all women with node- positive disease considered together. However, the benefit in women with only one to three positive lymph nodes is uncertain. We

  7. Does Subsequent Pregnancy Influence Breast Cancer Survival

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petrek, Jeanne

    2000-01-01

    Although future childbearing decisions may impact the quality of life of young breast cancer patients, some oncologists are concerned that disease recurrence may be stimulated by hormonal elevations of pregnancy...

  8. A Recurrent Episode of Dermatomyositis Associated with Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Eranki, Vijay Gopal

    2017-01-01

    Objective. It is uncommon for dermatomyositis to be associated with papillary thyroid cancer. We report an unusual case of papillary thyroid cancer presenting with dermatomyositis. Methods. The case history, imaging and laboratory data is reviewed. Results. We report the case of a 62-year-old female with a prior history of dermatomyositis and breast cancer who presented with a recurrent episode of dermatomyositis. Extensive evaluation of the cause of the dermatomyositis recurrence revealed no...

  9. Beating Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Breast Cancer Beating Breast Cancer Past Issues / Winter 2017 Table of Contents Melanie ... Her mother had died at age 49 of breast cancer after three battles with the disease. Ovarian cancer ...

  10. Tamoxifen for Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Karn

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the common cancers. Hormonal therapy along with surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and targeted therapy are vital modalities for the management of breast cancer. Tamoxifen has been the most widely used hormonal therapy for more than two decades. In this article we review the benefits, dose, duration and timing of Tamoxifen therapy in patients with breast cancer. Keywords: breast cancer, hormonal therapy, tamoxifen.

  11. Impact of symptom burden on work-related abilities in patients with locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer: Results from a substudy of the VIRGO observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleeland, Charles S; Mayer, Musa; Dreyer, Nancy A; Yim, Yeun Mi; Yu, Elaine; Su, Zhaohui; Mun, Yong; Sloan, Jeff A; Kaufman, Peter A

    2014-12-01

    Limited data exist on the association of symptom burden, daily activity impairment, and work productivity (WP) in patients with advanced breast cancer. This cross-sectional analysis evaluated baseline patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in patients with locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer (MBC) receiving first-line hormonal therapy or chemotherapy and/or targeted therapy in the VIRGO observational study. The primary PRO study endpoint, symptom severity and interference score, was measured using the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI). Secondary endpoints included Activity Level Scale (ALS), health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire (WPAI:SHP) scores. Overall, 152 patients (chemotherapy cohort, 104; hormonal therapy cohort, 48) answered questionnaires. Fatigue, decreased sexual interest, disturbed sleep, emotional distress, and drowsiness were the most common severe symptoms, and were of moderate-to-severe intensity in 38.8%-52.0% of patients. Mean percent daily activity impairment was 30% for study patients, and WP impairment ranged from 20% to 40% across indices in employed patients (n, 58). Significant positive correlations existed for MDASI severity and interference scores with activity impairment and WP indices (Pearson correlation coefficients [R] = 0.47-0.82; p work-related ability. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Identification of Risk Factors for Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients with Nodal Stage N0 and N1: Who Could Benefit from Post-Mastectomy Radiotherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunjin Jwa

    Full Text Available The locoregional recurrence (LRR rate was reported as high as approximately 20% in stage I-II breast cancer following mastectomy. To investigate the risk factors for LRR in pT1-2N0-1 breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy but not radiation, and to define a subgroup of patients at high risk of LRR who may benefit from postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT.In total, 390 patients with pT1-2N0M0 (n = 307 and pT1-2N1M0 (n = 83 breast cancer who underwent total mastectomy without adjuvant radiotherapy from 2002 to 2011 were enrolled in the study.After a median follow-up period of 5.6 years (range, 0.6-11.3 years, 21 patients had 18 systemic relapses and 12 LRRs including six in the chest wall and eight in the regional nodal area. The 5-year LRR-free survival (LRRFS rates were 97.0% in pN0, 98.8% in pN1, and 97.4% in all patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that age < 50 years (Hazard Ratio, 11.4; p = 0.01 and no adjuvant chemotherapy (Hazard Ratio, 10.2; p = 0.04 were independent risk factors for LRR in pN0 patients. Using these factors, the 5-year LRRFS rates were 100% without any risk factors, 96.4% with one risk factor, and 86.7% with two risk factors. In pN1 patients, multivariate analysis revealed that having a hormone receptor negative tumor (Hazard Ratio, 18.3; p = 0.03 was the only independent risk factor for LRR. The 5-year LRRFS rates were 100.0% for luminal type, and 92.3% for non-luminal type cancer.Patients with pT1-2N0-1 breast cancer who underwent total mastectomy without PMRT could be stratified by nodal stage and risk factors for LRR. PMRT may have of value for node negative patients aged less than 50 years and who are not treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, and for non-luminal type patients with one to three positive nodes.

  13. Identification of Risk Factors for Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients with Nodal Stage N0 and N1: Who Could Benefit from Post-Mastectomy Radiotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jwa, Eunjin; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lim, Hyeon Woo; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kang, Han-Sung; Lee, EunSook; Park, Young Hee

    2015-01-01

    The locoregional recurrence (LRR) rate was reported as high as approximately 20% in stage I-II breast cancer following mastectomy. To investigate the risk factors for LRR in pT1-2N0-1 breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy but not radiation, and to define a subgroup of patients at high risk of LRR who may benefit from postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). In total, 390 patients with pT1-2N0M0 (n = 307) and pT1-2N1M0 (n = 83) breast cancer who underwent total mastectomy without adjuvant radiotherapy from 2002 to 2011 were enrolled in the study. After a median follow-up period of 5.6 years (range, 0.6-11.3 years), 21 patients had 18 systemic relapses and 12 LRRs including six in the chest wall and eight in the regional nodal area. The 5-year LRR-free survival (LRRFS) rates were 97.0% in pN0, 98.8% in pN1, and 97.4% in all patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that age risk factors for LRR in pN0 patients. Using these factors, the 5-year LRRFS rates were 100% without any risk factors, 96.4% with one risk factor, and 86.7% with two risk factors. In pN1 patients, multivariate analysis revealed that having a hormone receptor negative tumor (Hazard Ratio, 18.3; p = 0.03) was the only independent risk factor for LRR. The 5-year LRRFS rates were 100.0% for luminal type, and 92.3% for non-luminal type cancer. Patients with pT1-2N0-1 breast cancer who underwent total mastectomy without PMRT could be stratified by nodal stage and risk factors for LRR. PMRT may have of value for node negative patients aged less than 50 years and who are not treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, and for non-luminal type patients with one to three positive nodes.

  14. Genetic Susceptibility to Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Kristen N.; Vachon, Celine M.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2013-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancers (TNBC), defined by the absence of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 expression, account for 12-24% of all breast cancers. TNBC is associated with early recurrence of disease and poor outcome. Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer susceptibility genes have been associated with up to 15% of TNBC, and TNBC accounts for 70% of breast tumors arising in BRCA1 mutation carriers and 16-23% of breast ...

  15. Low glycemic index diet, exercise and vitamin D to reduce breast cancer recurrence (DEDiCa): design of a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Livia S A; Libra, Massimo; Crispo, Anna; Grimaldi, Maria; De Laurentiis, Michele; Rinaldo, Massimo; D'Aiuto, Massimiliano; Catalano, Francesca; Banna, Giuseppe; Ferrau', Francesco; Rossello, Rosalba; Serraino, Diego; Bidoli, Ettore; Massarut, Samuele; Thomas, Guglielmo; Gatti, Davide; Cavalcanti, Ernesta; Pinto, Monica; Riccardi, Gabriele; Vidgen, Edward; Kendall, Cyril W C; Jenkins, David J A; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Montella, Maurizio

    2017-01-23

    Mechanisms influencing breast cancer (BC) development and recurrence include hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, high insulin-like growth factor-1, high circulating estrogen, inflammation and impaired cellular differentiation/apoptosis. A lifestyle program that targets all the above mechanisms may be warranted. Low glycemic index (GI) foods produce lower post-prandial glucose and insulin responses and have been associated with lower BC risk. Moderate physical activity post-diagnosis reduces BC recurrence and mortality, partly explained by reduced insulin and estrogen levels. Vitamin D increases cell differentiation/apoptosis and high serum vitamin D levels improve BC survival. Yet no trial has evaluated the combined effect of a low GI diet, moderate physical activity and vitamin D supplementation on BC recurrence in the context of a Mediterranean lifestyle setting. Women (30-74 yr) who had undergone surgery for primary histologically confirmed BC (stages I-III) within the previous 12 months, in cancer centres in Italy, will be randomized to follow, for a maximum of 33 months, either a high intensity treatment (HIT) composed of low GI diet + exercise + vitamin D (60 ng/mL serum concentration) or a lower intensity treatment (LITE) with general advice to follow a healthy diet and exercise pattern + vitamin D to avoid insufficiency. Both interventions are on a background of a Mediterranean diet. Considering a 20% recurrence rate within 3 years for BC cases and a predicted rate of 10% in the HIT group, with power of 80% and two-sided alpha of 0.05, the subject number required will be 506 (n = 253 in each arm). Clinic visits will be scheduled every 3 months. Dietary and exercise counselling and vitamin D supplements will be given at each clinic visit when blood samples, anthropometric measures and 7-day food records will be collected. DEDiCa study aims to reduce BC recurrence in women with BC using a lifestyle approach with additional vitamin D and to

  16. Axillary staging for breast cancer during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, S N; Amant, F; Cardonick, E H

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Safety of sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy for breast cancer during pregnancy is insufficiently explored. We investigated efficacy and local recurrence rate in a large series of pregnant patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Women diagnosed with breast cancer who underwent SLN biopsy during...... pregnancy were identified from the International Network on Cancer, Infertility and Pregnancy, the German Breast Group, and the Cancer and Pregnancy Registry. Chart review was performed to record technique and outcome of SLN biopsy, locoregional and distant recurrence, and survival. RESULTS: We identified...... were alive and free of disease. Eleven patients experienced a locoregional relapse, including 1 isolated ipsilateral axillary recurrence (0.7%). Eleven (7.6%) patients developed distant metastases, of whom 9 (6.2%) died of breast cancer. No neonatal adverse events related to SLN procedure during...

  17. Breast cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  18. HEREDITARY BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Bit-Sava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary breast cancer occurs in 5–20 % of cases and it is associated with inherited mutations in particular genes, such as BRCA1 и BRCA2 in most cases. The CHEK2, PTEN, TP53, ATM, RAD51, BLM, PALB2, Nbs genes are associated with low and median risks ofdeveloping breast cancer. Molecular genetic studies identify germinal mutations underlying hereditary breast cancer. In most cases hereditary breast cancer refers to triple-negative phenotype, which is the most aggressive type of breast cancer, that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2. The review presents the diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer. Clinical-morphological aspects allow the new diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer to be identified. Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors demonstrate the potential for effective treatment of BRCA-associated breast cancer.

  19. Breast Cancer and Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guluzar Arzu Turan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women and may accompany infertility. The relationship between infertility treatment and breast cancer has not yet been proven. However, estrogen exposure is well known to cause breast cancer. Recent advances in treatment options have provided young patients with breast cancer a chance of being mother [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(3.000: 317-323

  20. Triple-negative breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chacón, Reinaldo D; Costanzo, María V

    2010-01-01

    Perou's molecular classification defines tumors that neither express hormone receptors nor overexpress HER2 as triple-negative (TN) tumors. These tumors account for approximately 15% of breast cancers. The so-called basaloid tumors are not always synonymous with TN tumors; they differ in the fact that they express different molecular markers, have a higher histologic grade, and have a worse prognosis. Clinically they occur in younger women as interval cancer, and the risk of recurrence is hig...

  1. Fear of recurrence in long-term breast cancer survivors-still an issue. Results on prevalence, determinants, and the association with quality of life and depression from the cancer survivorship--a multi-regional population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Lena; Bertram, Heike; Eberle, Andrea; Holleczek, Bernd; Schmid-Höpfner, Sieglinde; Waldmann, Annika; Zeissig, Sylke R; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker

    2014-05-01

    Fear of recurrence (FoR) is a widespread problem among breast cancer survivors. So far, little is known about prevalence, determinants, and consequences of FoR specifically in long-term breast cancer survivors, even though it was found to be one of the most important concerns in this group. Analyses are based on data of several population-based cohorts of long-term breast cancer survivors, recruited by six German cancer registries. Overall, 2671 women were included in the analyses. FoR was assessed using the short form of the Fear of Progression Questionnaire. Potential determinants of moderate/high FoR and the association with depression and quality of life (QoL) were explored via multiple logistic and linear regression. Even though the majority of women reported low levels of FoR (82%), a substantial percentage experienced moderate (11%) and high (6%) FoR. Younger age (odds ratio = 3.00, confidence intervals = 1.91-4.73 for women below age 55 years) and considering oneself as a tumor patient (odds ratio = 3.36, confidence intervals = 2.66-4.25) were found to exhibit the strongest associations with moderate/high FoR. Overall, psychosocial and sociodemographic factors played a far bigger role in FoR than clinical factors. Higher FoR was associated with higher depression and lower QoL. Fear of recurrence (mostly low levels) is highly prevalent among long-term breast cancer survivors and can negatively affect QoL and well-being. Therefore, it should be given appropriate consideration in research and clinical practice. As specifically younger women tended to be impacted by FoR, it is crucial to be particularly attentive to specific needs of younger survivors. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Breast Cancer KidsHealth / For Kids / Breast Cancer What's in this ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  3. Screening for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niell, Bethany L; Freer, Phoebe E; Weinfurtner, Robert Jared; Arleo, Elizabeth Kagan; Drukteinis, Jennifer S

    2017-11-01

    The goal of screening is to detect breast cancers when still curable to decrease breast cancer-specific mortality. Breast cancer screening in the United States is routinely performed with mammography, supplemental digital breast tomosynthesis, ultrasound, and/or MR imaging. This article aims to review the most commonly used breast imaging modalities for screening, discuss how often and when to begin screening with specific imaging modalities, and examine the pros and cons of screening. By the article's end, the reader will be better equipped to have informed discussions with patients and medical professionals regarding the benefits and disadvantages of breast cancer screening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pregnancy and abortion in breast cancer patients: Two case reports ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breast cancer in pregnancy is by itself not an indication for abortion. We document the case histories of 2 patients with breast cancer (recurrent or advanced) who elected to carry pregnancies to term. Pregnancy concurrent with or subsequent to breast cancer is not associated with a worse prognosis than would be observed ...

  5. A Recurrent Episode of Dermatomyositis Associated with Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Gopal Eranki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. It is uncommon for dermatomyositis to be associated with papillary thyroid cancer. We report an unusual case of papillary thyroid cancer presenting with dermatomyositis. Methods. The case history, imaging and laboratory data is reviewed. Results. We report the case of a 62-year-old female with a prior history of dermatomyositis and breast cancer who presented with a recurrent episode of dermatomyositis. Extensive evaluation of the cause of the dermatomyositis recurrence revealed no recurrence of the breast cancer but a thyroid nodule was identified. The nodule was biopsied and the patient was noted to have papillary thyroid cancer. The patient subsequently underwent total thyroidectomy and had gradual improvement in her dermatomyositis. Conclusion. It is very uncommon for dermatomyositis to be associated with papillary thyroid cancer.

  6. Breast asymmetry and predisposition to breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Scutt, D; Lancaster, GA; Manning, JT

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: It has been shown in our previous work that breast asymmetry is related to several of the known risk factors for breast cancer, and that patients with diagnosed breast cancer have more breast volume asymmetry, as measured from mammograms, than age-matched healthy women. METHODS: In the present study, we compared the breast asymmetry of women who were free of breast disease at time of mammography, but who had subsequently developed breast cancer, with that of age-matched healthy ...

  7. Clinical and genetic aspects of familial breast cancerFrequency of recurrent mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in Czech republic and the role of NBN gene

    OpenAIRE

    Matějů, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Background: An increased risk for development of hereditary breast cancer is associated with germline mutations in BRCA1/2 and the influence of NBN mutations is also supposed. The aim of this study is to specify the frequency of recurrent mutations in BRCA1/2 in unselected breast cancer patients and the frequency of most common pathogenic mutations in NBN in Czech republic, to assess current criteria for genetic testing and to consider the addition of NBN to the tested genes. Methods...

  8. THERAPEUTIC OPTIONS FOR BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Georgescu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer remains a major public health problem, being the second cause of cancer death in women. There is a marked tendency to restrict the extension of surgical gesture, which directly leads to two different attitudes: radical surgery and conservative surgery, to which, at least in our country, there are still some delays. Prospective and retrospective studies have shown that, in 20 years, conservative and radical therapy had about the same rate of survival and disease-free interval, at least for stage I and II breast cancer, the only real counterargument against conservative surgery being that, in principle, the higher rate of recurrence local constraint can be solved by postoperative radiotherapy. Finally, the survival rate is the main parameter of evaluation, assessing the effectiveness of the treatment in breast cancer, and in all its other forms.

  9. Effects of a family intervention on the quality of life of women with recurrent breast cancer and their family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northouse, Laurel; Kershaw, Trace; Mood, Darlene; Schafenacker, Ann

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if patients with advanced breast cancer and their family caregivers, who participated in a family based intervention, report better quality of life and other psychosocial outcomes than dyads who received standard care alone. Using a randomized clinical trial, 134 patients and their family caregivers were assigned to usual care (control) or to usual care plus the family intervention (experimental condition). Dyads were assessed at baseline, three- and six-months later. The intervention consisted of five sessions and addressed family involvement, optimistic attitude, coping effectiveness, uncertainty reduction, and symptom management. Patients in the family intervention reported significantly less hopelessness and less negative appraisal of illness than controls; their family caregivers reported significantly less negative appraisal of caregiving. Intervention effects were evident at three-months, but were not sustained at six-months. No difference was found in the quality of life of dyads in experimental or control conditions. Although the family intervention had positive effects initially, these effects were not sustained over time. Future studies need to consider program dose and duration of effect, outcome measures that are more sensitive to change, and realistic end-points for patients with advanced cancer.

  10. Cyclophosphamide or Denileukin Diftitox Followed By Expanding a Patient's Own T Cells in the Laboratory in Treating Patients With HER-2/Neu Overexpressing Metastatic Breast Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Previously Treated With HER-2/Neu Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-07

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  11. Breast cancer biology for the radiation oncologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, Jonathan [Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Small, William [Loyola Univ. Chicago, Maywood, IL (United States). Stritch School of Medicine, Cardianl Bernardin Cancer Center; Woloschak, Gayle E. (ed.) [Northwestern Univ. Feinberg, Chicago, IL (United States). School of Medicine

    2015-10-01

    This is the first textbook of its kind devoted to describing the biological complexities of breast cancer in a way that is relevant to the radiation oncologist. Radiation Oncology has long treated breast cancer as a single biological entity, with all treatment decisions being based on clinical and pathologic risk factors. We are now beginning to understand that biological subtypes of breast cancer may have different risks of recurrence as well as different intrinsic sensitivity to radiotherapy. Multi-gene arrays that have for years been used to predict the risk of distant recurrence and the value of systemic chemotherapy may also have utility in predicting the risk of local recurrence. Additionally, the targeted agents used to treat breast cancer may interact with radiotherapy in ways that can be beneficial or undesirable. All of these emerging issues are extensively discussed in this book, and practical evidence-based treatment recommendations are presented whenever possible.

  12. Changes in the ER, PgR, HER2, p53 and Ki-67 biological markers between primary and recurrent breast cancer: discordance rates and prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tashima Rumiko

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In breast cancer, ER/PgR, HER2, and Ki-67 are important biological markers for predicting prognosis and making effective treatment decisions. In addition, changes in markers due to relapse are also clinically experienced; however, the frequency and clinical significance are still not fully understood. Thus, changes in markers and their correlations with prognosis were investigated. Patients and Methods Out of the patients with relapse from 1997 to March 2011, there were 97 consecutive patients from whom the lesion was resected and evaluated by immunostaining. The biopsy sites were chest wall, lymph node, ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence, lungs, bones, ovaries and brain. The markers sought were ER, PgR, HER2, p53 and Ki-67. Results The hormone receptor positive rate from the primary tumor to recurrence decreased from 63.9% to 57.7% and from 56.7% to 43.3% for ER and PgR, respectively. Changes in the positive/negative evaluation were seen at the rate of 10.3% and 25.8% for ER and PgR, respectively. The Ki-67 index increased significantly from a mean of 29.1% at primary tumor to 36.3% at relapse. When divided into 2 groups ( Conclusion Estrogen receptor and PgR decreased while Ki-67 increased due to relapse; however, the rate of change was high for PgR and Ki-67. Change in the subtypes was seen in 25%. In addition, PgR at relapse and Ki-67 at primary tumor were significant factors for post-relapse prognosis while PgR becoming negative was a poor prognostic factor. These findings are important for making effective treatment decisions.

  13. Are there patients with T1 to T2, lymph node-negative breast cancer who are "high-risk" for locoregional disease recurrence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamtani, Anita; Patil, Sujata; Stempel, Michelle M; Morrow, Monica

    2017-07-15

    Indications for postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in patients with T1 to T2, lymph node-negative (N0) breast cancer with "high-risk" features are controversial. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 22922 and National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group MA20 trials reporting improved 10-year disease-free survival with lymph node irradiation included patients with high-risk N0 disease, but, to the authors' knowledge, benefits in patients receiving modern systemic therapy are uncertain. The authors retrospectively identified patients with T1 to T2N0 disease who were treated with mastectomy from January 2006 through December 2011. High-risk features included age patients, only 15 received PMRT and were excluded. Of the remaining 657 patients, 187 (28%) had 1 high-risk feature and 449 patients (68%) had ≥ 2 high-risk features. A total of 36 patients with unknown tumor grade were excluded from risk analysis. Approximately 98% of patients underwent sentinel lymph node biopsy alone and 86% received adjuvant systemic therapy. At a median of 5.6 years of follow-up, the locoregional disease recurrence (LRR) rate was 4.7% (31 patients). Increasing tumor size was found to be associated with LRR (hazard ratio, 1.70; P = .006), whereas other high-risk features were not (all P > .05). Receipt of systemic therapy decreased the LRR rate (hazard ratio, 0.40; P = .03). Although crude LRR rates increased from 3.8% to 9.4% with 1 versus ≥ 4 high-risk features, the number of risk factors was not found to be significantly associated with LRR (P = .54). In the current study, a low crude LRR rate (4.7%) was observed in a large unselected cohort of patients with T1 to T2N0 breast cancer with high-risk features who were treated with mastectomy and systemic therapy without PMRT. Although increasing tumor size and the omission of systemic therapy were found to be predictive, other features did not confer a higher LRR

  14. Breast Cancer Rates by State

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by State Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... from breast cancer each year. Rates of Getting Breast Cancer by State The number of people who get ...

  15. Association with pregnancy increases the risk of local recurrence but does not impact overall survival in breast cancer: A case-control study of 87 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genin, A S; De Rycke, Y; Stevens, D; Donnadieu, A; Langer, A; Rouzier, R; Lerebours, F

    2016-12-01

    Pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) constitutes 7% of all BCs in young women. The prognosis of PABC remains controversial. In this study, we evaluated the impact of the association of pregnancy with BC on the rates of overall survival (OS), disease free survival (DFS), and distant and local recurrence-free survival. We conducted a retrospective unicenter case-control study. We enrolled PABC patients treated at our institution between 1992 and 2009. For each case, 2 BC controls were matched for age and year of diagnosis. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the parameters associated with prognosis. Eighty-seven PABC patients were enrolled and matched with 174 controls. The univariate analysis did not reveal any significant differences in OS, DFS or distant recurrence rates between the 2 groups. Pregnancy associated status, a tumor larger than T2 and neoadjuvant chemotherapy as the primary treatment were significantly associated with an increased risk of local relapse. The multivariate analysis showed that the pregnancy associated status and the tumor size were strong prognostic factors of local recurrence. Pregnancy associated status negates the prognostic value of tumor size, as both T0-T2 and T3-T4 PABC patients have the same poor prognosis as control BC patients with T3-T4 tumors. Interestingly, although PABC patients have more locally advanced tumors, they did not have a higher rate of radical surgery than the control BC patients. Pregnancy associated status is a strong prognostic factor of local relapse in BC. In PABC patients, when possible, radical surgery should be the preferred first treatment step. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Are diet quality scores after breast cancer diagnosis associated with improved breast cancer survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izano, Monika A; Fung, Teresa T; Chiuve, Stephanie S; Hu, Frank B; Holmes, Michelle D

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have found that diets rich in fruits and vegetables are associated with reduced breast cancer mortality. However, these eating patterns do not necessarily reflect overall diet quality. The association of breast cancer mortality with a priori defined dietary scores, which are based on recommended dietary guidelines and reflect diet quality, has not been evaluated. We hypothesized that diet quality indices based on recommended guidelines are associated with decreased risk of breast cancer and nonbreast cancer mortality in breast cancer survivors. We examined the association between the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) score, and the Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI)-2010, and the risk of breast cancer mortality and total mortality among women from the Nurses' Health Study diagnosed with breast cancer. Adherence to DASH-style and AHEI-2010 diets were associated with reduced risk of nonbreast cancer mortality (comparing the fifth quintile with the first quintile, relative risk (RR) = 0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.53-0.99, P trend = 0.03 for DASH, and RR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.42-0.77, P trend Diet scores were not significantly associated with breast cancer mortality. Our findings suggest that adherence to a higher quality diet after breast cancer diagnosis does not considerably change the risk of breast cancer death and recurrence. However, healthy dietary choices after breast cancer were associated with reduced risk of nonbreast cancer mortality in women with breast cancer.

  17. Brachytherapy in breast cancer: an effective alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicheł, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Breast conserving surgery (BCS) with following external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) of the conserved breast has become widely accepted in the last decades for the treatment of early invasive breast cancer. The standard technique of EBRT after BCS is to treat the whole breast up to a total dose of 42.5 to 50 Gy. An additional dose is given to treated volume as a boost to a portion of the breast. In the early stage of breast cancer, research has shown that the area requiring radiation treatment to prevent the cancer from local recurrence is the breast tissue that surrounds the area where the initial cancer was removed. Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an approach that treats only the lumpectomy bed plus a 1-2 cm margin rather than the whole breast and as a result allows accelerated delivery of the radiation dose in four to five days. There has been a growing interest for APBI and various approaches have been developed under phase I-III clinical studies; these include multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy, balloon catheter brachytherapy, conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-EBRT) and intra-operative radiation therapy (IORT). Balloon-based brachytherapy approaches include MammoSite, Axxent electronic brachytherapy, Contura, hybrid brachytherapy devices. Another indication for breast brachytherapy is reirradiation of local recurrence after mastectomy. Published results of brachytherapy are very promising. We discuss the current status, indications, and technical aspects of breast cancer brachytherapy. PMID:26327829

  18. Early Life and Risk of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    1999;43:25-38. and the risk of breast cancer. NEngljMed. 1997;336:81-85. 8. Voogd AC, Nielsen M, Peterse JL, et al. Differences in risk 22. Danmarks ...Statistik. Statistical ten-year review. Copenhagen: factors for local and distant recurrence after breast-conserv- Danmarks Statistik, 1996. ing

  19. Stitch Abscess Masquerading as Recurrent Thyroid Cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recurrent thyroid cancer after remnant ablation is a known entity in follow up of differentiated thyroid cancer. It is however unusual for a stitch abscess to present as a recurrent thyroid cancer. We highlight the diagnostic dilemma of a stitch abscess masquerading as a recurrent thyroid cancer in a young female adult in the ...

  20. breast cancer screening in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Is Breast transillumination a viable option for breast cancer screening in limited resource settings? Authors: Elobu EA M.Med, Galukande M M M.Med, MSc, FCS, Namuguzi D M.Med, Muyinda Z M.Med. Affiliations: breast cancer screening in limited resource settings? Authors: Elobu EA1 M.Med, Galukande M1 M M.Med, ...

  1. Causal attribution among women with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina W. B. Peuker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Causal attribution among women with breast cancer was studied. The study included 157 women outpatients with breast cancer. A form for sociodemographic and clinical data and the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R were used. The results showed that women attributed breast cancer primarily to psychological causes, which does not correspond to known multifactorial causes validated by the scientific community. Providing high quality, patient-centered care requires sensitivity to breast cancer women’s beliefs about the causes of their cancer and awareness of how it can influence patient’s health behaviors after diagnosis. If women with breast cancer attribute the illness to modifiable factors then they can keep a healthy lifestyle, improving their recovery and decrease the probability of cancer recurrence after diagnosis.

  2. Utility of second-look examinations in the management of a new hypermetabolic lesion detected by fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT for diagnosis of loco-regional recurrence in patients with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Young; Cho, Kyu Ran; Park, Eun Kyung; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Woo, Ok Hee; Song, Sung Eun; Oh, Yu Whan; Bae, Jeong Won [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    To investigate the clinical significance of a new hypermetabolic lesion detected by fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT (FDG-PET/CT) as well as the utility of second-look examinations to evaluate loco-regional recurrence of breast cancer. Our database revealed 922 breast cancer patients who underwent surgery from January 2008 to July 2011. We included 20 patients with negative findings on routine follow-up but with new hypermetabolic lesions on FDG-PET/CT. All underwent second-look examination [breast ultrasound (US) = 14, chest CT scan = 6]. A total of 17 cases were pathologically verified and 3 were diagnosed with follow-up imaging. The locations were in the axillae (n = 7), breast (n = 6), chest wall (n = 3), cervical/supraclavicular (n = 3), and internal mammary (n = 1). Of the 20 hypermetabolic lesions, 10 were pathologically confirmed malignancies. Of the 14 patients who had undergone US, 7 had suspicious findings and 5 were confirmed as malignancies. Of a total of 6 patients who had undergone CT scans, 5 had suspicious findings and all turned out to be malignancies. The positive predictive value of the second-look examination was 83.3% (10/12). Second-look examination and pathologic confirmation should be performed for newly appearing hypermetabolic lesions on FDG-PET/CT in order to exclude loco-regional recurrence in breast cancer patients.

  3. Metaplastic Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    T?rkan, Halil; G?kg?z, M. ?ehsuvar; Parlak, N. Serhat

    2016-01-01

    Metaplastic Breast Cancer (MBC) is a term referring to a heterogeneous group with malignant epithelial and mesenchymal tissue components. MBC is a rare disease, accounting for 0.2% of all breast cancers. Most MBC are triple negative cancers with poor prognosis and an aggressive clinical course. Herein, we aimed to present a 74-year-old patient with metaplastic breast cancer along with clinical, radiologic and pathologic properties.

  4. Locoregional Recurrence Risk for Patients With T1,2 Breast Cancer With 1-3 Positive Lymph Nodes Treated With Mastectomy and Systemic Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Arizona School of Medicine, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Allen, Pamela; Woodward, Wendy; Kim, Michelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kuerer, Henry M. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Drinka, Eva Katherine; Sahin, Aysegul [Department of Pathology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Strom, Eric A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buzdar, Aman; Valero, Vicente; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hunt, Kelly K. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A., E-mail: tbuchhol@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) has been shown to benefit breast cancer patients with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes, but it is unclear how modern changes in management have affected the benefits of PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates in 1027 patients with T1,2 breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy with or without PMRT during an early era (1978-1997) and a later era (2000-2007). These eras were selected because they represented periods before and after the routine use of sentinel lymph node surgery, taxane chemotherapy, and aromatase inhibitors. Results: 19% of 505 patients treated in the early era and 25% of the 522 patients in the later era received PMRT. Patients who received PMRT had significantly higher-risk disease features. PMRT reduced the rate of LRR in the early era cohort, with 5-year rates of 9.5% without PMRT and 3.4% with PMRT (log-rank P=.028) and 15-year rates 14.5% versus 6.1%, respectively; (Cox regression analysis: adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 0.37, P=.035). However, PMRT did not appear to benefit patients treated in the later cohort, with 5-year LRR rates of 2.8% without PMRT and 4.2% with PMRT (P=.48; Cox analysis: AHR 1.41, P=.48). The most significant factor predictive of LRR for the patients who did not receive PMRT was the era in which the patient was treated (AHR 0.35 for later era, P<.001). Conclusion: The risk of LRR for patients with T1,2 breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy and systemic treatment is highly dependent on the era of treatment. Modern treatment advances and the selected use of PMRT for those with high-risk features have allowed for identification of a cohort at very low risk for LRR without PMRT.

  5. Minimal impact of postmastectomy radiation therapy on locoregional recurrence for breast cancer patients with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes in the modern treatment era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Minoru; Tada, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Akihiko; Watanabe, Gou; Hirakawa, Hisashi; Amari, Masakazu; Kakugawa, Yoichiro; Kawai, Masaaki; Furuta, Akihiko; Sato, Kaoru; Yoshida, Ryuichi; Ebata, Akiko; Sasano, Hironobu; Jingu, Keiichi; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Ishida, Takanori

    2017-06-01

    Given modern treatment strategies, controversy remains regarding whether postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) is necessary for breast cancer patients with 1-3 positive axillary lymph nodes (ALN). Our aim was to assess the significance of PMRT in the modern treatment era for these patients. We have conducted the retrospective multicenter study and identified 658 patients with 1-3 positive ALN who were treated with mastectomy and ALN dissection between 1999 and 2012. Propensity score weighting was used to minimize the influence of confounding factors between the PMRT and no-PMRT groups. The variables including tumor size, lymph nodes status, skin and/or muscle invasion, histological grade, lymphovascular invasion and ER positivity which were statistically unbalanced between the groups were used to define the propensity scores. The median follow-up time was 7.3 years. In the modern era (2006-2012), no significant difference in locoregional recurrence (LRR)-free survival was noted between the PMRT and no-PMRT groups (P = 0.3625). The 8-year LRR-free survival rates of the PMRT and no-PMRT groups were 98.2% and 95.3%, respectively. After matching patients by propensity scores, the PMRT group, compared to the no-PMRT group, exhibited significantly better locoregional control (P = 0.0366) in the entire cohort. The 10-year LRR-free survival rates were 97.8% and 88.4% in the PMRT and no-PMRT groups, respectively. In contrast, no significant difference in LRR-free survival was noted between the PMRT and no-PMRT groups in the modern era (P = 0.5298). The 8-year LRR-free survival rates of patients treated in the modern era were approximately the same between the groups (98.0% and 95.7% in the PMRT and no-PMRT groups, respectively). Particularly, LRR-free survival of HER2 positive breast cancer significantly improved in the modern treatment era, compared with that of the old treatment era (P = 0.0349). PMRT had minimal impact on LRR for breast cancer patients with 1

  6. Is Biological Subtype Prognostic of Locoregional Recurrence Risk in Women With pT1-2N0 Breast Cancer Treated With Mastectomy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truong, Pauline T., E-mail: ptruong@bccancer.bc.ca [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Sadek, Betro T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lesperance, Maria F. [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Alexander, Cheryl S. [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Shenouda, Mina; Raad, Rita Abi; Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine locoregional and distant recurrence (LRR and DR) in women with pT1-2N0 breast cancer according to approximated subtype and clinicopathologic characteristics. Methods and Materials: Two independent datasets were pooled and analyzed. The study participants were 1994 patients with pT1-2N0M0 breast cancer, treated with mastectomy without radiation therapy. The patients were classified into 1 of 5 subtypes: luminal A (ER+ or PR+/HER 2−/grade 1-2, n=1202); luminal B (ER+ or PR+/HER 2−/grade 3, n=294); luminal HER 2 (ER+ or PR+/HER 2+, n=221); HER 2 (ER−/PR−/HER 2+, n=105) and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) (ER−/PR−/HER 2−, n=172). Results: The median follow-up time was 4.3 years. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier (KM) LRR were 1.8% in luminal A, 3.1% in luminal B, 1.7% in luminal HER 2, 1.9% in HER 2, and 1.9% in TNBC cohorts (P=.81). The 5-year KM DR was highest among women with TNBC: 1.8% in luminal A, 5.0% in luminal B, 2.4% in luminal HER 2, 1.1% in HER 2, and 9.6% in TNBC cohorts (P<.001). Among 172 women with TNBC, the 5-year KM LRR were 1.3% with clear margins versus 12.5% with close or positive margins (P=.04). On multivariable analysis, factors that conferred higher LRR risk were tumors >2 cm, lobular histology, and close/positive surgical margins. Conclusions: The 5-year risk of LRR in our pT1-2N0 cohort treated with mastectomy was generally low, with no significant differences observed between approximated subtypes. Among the subtypes, TNBC conferred the highest risk of DR and an elevated risk of LRR in the presence of positive or close margins. Our data suggest that although subtype alone cannot be used as the sole criterion to offer postmastectomy radiation therapy, it may reasonably be considered in conjunction with other clinicopathologic factors including tumor size, histology, and margin status. Larger cohorts and longer follow-up times are needed to define which women with node-negative disease have high postmastectomy LRR

  7. Markers of progression in early-stage invasive breast cancer: a predictive immunohistochemical panel algorithm for distant recurrence risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleskandarany, Mohammed A; Soria, D; Green, A R; Nolan, C; Diez-Rodriguez, Maria; Ellis, I O; Rakha, E A

    2015-06-01

    Accurate distant metastasis (DM) prediction is critical for risk stratification and effective treatment decisions in breast cancer (BC). Many prognostic markers/models based on tissue marker studies are continually emerging using conventional statistical approaches analysing complex/dimensional data association with DM/poor prognosis. However, few of them have fulfilled satisfactory evidences for clinical application. This study aimed at building DM risk assessment algorithm for BC patients. A well-characterised series of early invasive primary operable BC (n = 1902), with immunohistochemical expression of a panel of biomarkers (n = 31) formed the material of this study. Decision tree algorithm was computed using WEKA software, utilising quantitative biomarkers' expression and the absence/presence of distant metastases. Fifteen biomarkers were significantly associated with DM, with six temporal subgroups characterised based on time to development of DM ranging from 15 years of follow-up. Of these 15 biomarkers, 10 had a significant expression pattern where Ki67LI, HER2, p53, N-cadherin, P-cadherin, PIK3CA and TOMM34 showed significantly higher expressions with earlier development of DM. In contrast, higher expressions of ER, PR and BCL2 were associated with delayed occurrence of DM. DM prediction algorithm was built utilising cases informative for the 15 significant markers. Four risk groups of patients were characterised. Three markers p53, HER2 and BCL2 predicted the probability of DM, based on software-generated cut-offs, with a precision rate of 81.1 % for positive predictive value and 77.3 %, for the negative predictive value. This algorithm reiterates the reported prognostic values of these three markers and underscores their central biological role in BC progression. Further independent validation of this pruned panel of biomarkers is therefore warranted.

  8. Breast Cancer Risk in American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Risk in American Women On This Page What ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

  9. [Breast cancer surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, Georges; Berclaz, Gilles; Langer, Igor; Pittet-Cuenod, Brigitte; Delaloye, Jean-François

    2007-10-24

    Breast conserving surgery followed by radiation therapy is the treatment of choice for early breast cancer. For patients who choice or need a mastectomy, breast reconstruction provides an acceptable alternative. Breast cancer surgery has been evolving through minimally invasive approaches. Sentinel node biopsy has already remplaced axillary lymph node dissection in the evaluation of the axilla. Local ablation of the tumor may be a valuable alternative to surgery in the future.

  10. Efficacy of Blended Cognitive Behavior Therapy for High Fear of Recurrence in Breast, Prostate, and Colorectal Cancer Survivors: The SWORD Study, a Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, M.A. van de; Thewes, B.; Gielissen, M.; Speckens, A.; Prins, J.B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is a common problem experienced by cancer survivors. Approximately one third of survivors report high FCR. This study aimed to evaluate whether blended cognitive behavior therapy (bCBT) can reduce the severity of FCR in cancer survivors curatively treated for

  11. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menopause Map Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July 2010 Download PDFs English ... G. Komen Foundation What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Breast cancer Breast cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Breast cancer is a disease in which certain cells in ...

  13. Molecular imaging of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munnink, T. H. Oude; Nagengast, W. B.; Brouwers, A. H.; Schroder, C. P.; Hospers, G. A.; Lub-de Hooge, M. N.; van der Wall, E.; van Diest, P. J.; de Vries, E. G. E.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular imaging of breast cancer can potentially be used for breast cancer screening, staging, restaging, response evaluation and guiding therapies. Techniques for molecular breast cancer imaging include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical imaging, and radionuclide imaging with positron

  14. A Phase 1 trial of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor olaparib (AZD2281) in combination with the anti-angiogenic cediranib (AZD2171) in recurrent epithelial ovarian or triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Joyce F; Tolaney, Sara M; Birrer, Michael; Fleming, Gini F; Buss, Mary K; Dahlberg, Suzanne E; Lee, Hang; Whalen, Christin; Tyburski, Karin; Winer, Eric; Ivy, Percy; Matulonis, Ursula A

    2013-09-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-inhibitors and anti-angiogenics have activity in recurrent ovarian and breast cancer; however, the effect of combined therapy against PARP and angiogenesis in this population has not been reported. We investigated the toxicities and recommended phase 2 dosing (RP2D) of the combination of cediranib, a multitargeted inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-1/2/3 and olaparib, a PARP-inhibitor (NCT01116648). Cediranib tablets once daily and olaparib capsules twice daily were administered orally in a standard 3+3 dose escalation design. Patients with recurrent ovarian or metastatic triple-negative breast cancer were eligible. Patients had measurable disease by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1 or met Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup (GCIG) CA125 criteria. No prior PARP-inhibitors or anti-angiogenics in the recurrent setting were allowed. 28 patients (20 ovarian, 8 breast) enrolled to 4 dose levels. 2 dose limiting toxicities (DLTs) (1 grade 4 neutropenia ≥ 4 days; 1 grade 4 thrombocytopenia) occurred at the highest dose level (cediranib 30 mg daily; olaparib 400 mg twice daily [BID]). The RP2D was cediranib 30 mg daily and olaparib 200 mg BID. Grade 3 or higher toxicities occurred in 75% of patients, and included grade 3 hypertension (25%) and grade 3 fatigue (18%). One grade 3 bowel obstruction occurred. The overall response rate (ORR) in the 18 RECIST-evaluable ovarian cancer patients was 44%, with a clinical benefit rate (ORR plus stable disease (SD) > 24 weeks) of 61%. None of the seven evaluable breast cancer patients achieved clinical response; two patients had stable disease for > 24 weeks. The combination of cediranib and olaparib has haematologic DLTs and anticipated class toxicities, with promising evidence of activity in ovarian cancer patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mammographic microcalcification in an autogenously reconstructed breast simulating recurrent carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wayne; Sheen-Chen, Shyr-Ming; Eng, Hock-Liew; Ko, Sheung-Fat

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is a common cancer among women. The transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap is a popular option because not only does it provide a breast with satisfactory bulk composed of autogenous tissue but it also provides an abdominal dermolipectomy to the patient. Fat necrosis remains a common problem following TRAM flap reconstruction, occurring in 10% to 36% of patients undergoing the procedure. A 44-year-old woman underwent a modified radical mastectomy followed by pedicled TRAM flap reconstruction after 5 months. Follow-up mammography 27 months after TRAM flap reconstruction showed a cluster of microcalcifications in the deep retroareolar area and recurrent breast carcinoma was highly suspected. Physical examination did not detect any abnormality of the reconstructed breast. Stereotactic hook localization was performed and an excisional biopsy was successfully done. The histological features of the resected specimens corresponded to fat necrosis change. Only with the awareness of the existence of such entity and careful follow-up can the occurrence of fat necrosis in TRAM flap reconstructed breasts be accurately detected and appropriately treated.

  16. Breast cancer predisposition syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemel, Deborah; Domchek, Susan M

    2010-10-01

    A small, but important, percentage of breast cancer cases is caused by the inheritance of a single copy of a mutated gene. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the genes most commonly associated with inherited breast cancer; however, mutations in TP53 and PTEN cause Li-Fraumeni syndrome and Cowden syndrome, respectively, both of which are associated with high lifetime risks of breast cancer. Advances in the field of breast cancer genetics have led to an improved understanding of detection and prevention strategies. More recently, strategies to target the underlying genetic defects in BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated breast and ovarian cancers are emerging and may have implications for certain types of sporadic breast cancer. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Psychological morbidity and stress but not social factors influence level of fear of cancer recurrence in young women with early breast cancer: results of a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thewes, B; Bell, M L; Butow, P; Beith, J; Boyle, F; Friedlander, M; McLachlan, S A

    2013-12-01

    Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is a common problem amongst survivors. Past research has shown that young women with breast cancer are particularly vulnerable to FCR, yet few previous studies have specifically examined FCR in this subgroup. The aim of the study is to explore the relationship between FCR, psychological morbidity and social factors. A secondary aim was to explore the relationship between clinical levels of FCR and generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) and hypochondriasis. Two hundred eighteen breast cancer survivors (aged 18-45 years at diagnosis) diagnosed at least 1 year prior were recruited through seven metropolitan oncology clinics and two breast cancer consumer groups. Participants completed a web-based questionnaire, which assessed FCR, psychological functioning, generalised anxiety, hypochondriasis and items exploring past cancer-related experiences, attitudes to future childbearing, social support and correlates were identified using linear regression. Psychological morbidity scales measuring anxiety and psychological functioning and stressful life events were significantly associated with FCR in adjusted and unadjusted models (p cancer experiences, children, social support and attitudes to childrearing were not associated with FCR. Among those with clinical levels of FCR (n = 152), 43% met screening criteria for hypochondriasis, and 36% met screening criteria for GAD. This study shows psychological morbidity is associated with FCR, but the majority of women with high levels of FCR do not also meet the criteria for a clinical level of GAD or hypochondriasis. Understanding the factors that make young women vulnerable to FCR is important to help guide the development of FCR-specific interventions for this subgroup. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Breast cancer statistics, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSantis, Carol; Ma, Jiemin; Bryan, Leah; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the American Cancer Society provides an overview of female breast cancer statistics in the United States, including data on incidence, mortality, survival, and screening. Approximately 232,340 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 39,620 breast cancer deaths are expected to occur among US women in 2013. One in 8 women in the United States will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. Breast cancer incidence rates increased slightly among African American women; decreased among Hispanic women; and were stable among whites, Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives from 2006 to 2010. Historically, white women have had the highest breast cancer incidence rates among women aged 40 years and older; however, incidence rates are converging among white and African American women, particularly among women aged 50 years to 59 years. Incidence rates increased for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers in the youngest white women, Hispanic women aged 60 years to 69 years, and all but the oldest African American women. In contrast, estrogen receptor-negative breast cancers declined among most age and racial/ethnic groups. These divergent trends may reflect etiologic heterogeneity and the differing effects of some factors, such as obesity and parity, on risk by tumor subtype. Since 1990, breast cancer death rates have dropped by 34% and this decrease was evident in all racial/ethnic groups except American Indians/Alaska Natives. Nevertheless, survival disparities persist by race/ethnicity, with African American women having the poorest breast cancer survival of any racial/ethnic group. Continued progress in the control of breast cancer will require sustained and increased efforts to provide high-quality screening, diagnosis, and treatment to all segments of the population. © 2013 American Cancer Society, Inc.

  19. Tumor markers of breast cancer: New prospectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Kabel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Tumor markers are substances produced by the tumors or by other cells of the body in response to cancer or certain benign conditions. Although most of these markers are made by the normal cells as well as by cancer cells, they are produced at much higher levels in cancerous conditions. These markers are used to evaluate the patient's response to treatment and to detect the presence of metastasis or recurrence. Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in females worldwide. The CA 27-29, CA 15-3, CA27.29, carcinoembryonic antigen, tissue polypeptide specific antigen, p53, cathepsin D, cyclin E, nestin and HER-2 are tumor markers that are often expressed in people with breast cancer. They play a crucial role in diagnosis, monitoring response to therapy, early detection of metastasis and determination of recurrence in patients with breast cancer.

  20. A Phase 1 trial of the PARP inhibitor olaparib (AZD2281) in combination with the anti-angiogenic cediranib (AZD2171) in recurrent epithelial ovarian or triple-negative breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Joyce F.; Tolaney, Sara M.; Birrer, Michael; Fleming, Gini F.; Buss, Mary K.; Dahlberg, Suzanne E.; Lee, Hang; Whalen, Christin; Tyburski, Karin; Winer, Eric; Ivy, Percy; Matulonis, Ursula A.

    2014-01-01

    Background PARP-inhibitors and anti-angiogenics have activity in recurrent ovarian and breast cancer; however, the effect of combined therapy against PARP and angiogenesis in this population has not been reported. We investigated the toxicities and recommended phase 2 dosing (RP2D) of the combination of cediranib, a multitargeted inhibitor of VEGFR-1/2/3, and olaparib, a PARP-inhibitor (NCT01116648). Methods Cediranib tablets once daily and olaparib capsules twice daily were administered orally in a standard 3+3 dose escalation design. Patients with recurrent ovarian or metastatic triple-negative breast cancer were eligible. Patients had measurable disease by RECIST 1.1 or met GCIG CA125 criteria. No prior PARP-inhibitors or anti-angiogenics in the recurrent setting were allowed. Results 28 patients (20 ovarian, 8 breast) enrolled to 4 dose levels. 2 DLTs (1 grade 4 neutropenia ≥4 days; 1 grade 4 thrombocytopenia) occurred at the highest dose level (cediranib 30mg daily; olaparib 400mg BID). The RP2D was cediranib 30mg daily and olaparib 200mg BID. Grade 3 or higher toxicities occurred in 75% of patients, and included grade 3 hypertension (25%) and grade 3 fatigue (18%). One grade 3 bowel obstruction occurred. The overall response rate (ORR) in the 18 RECIST-evaluable ovarian cancer patients was 44%, with a clinical benefit rate (ORR plus SD >24 weeks) of 61%. None of the 7 evaluable breast cancer patients achieved clinical response; 2 patients had stable disease for >24 weeks. Interpretation The combination of cediranib and olaparib has hematologic DLTs and anticipated class toxicities, with promising evidence of activity in ovarian cancer patients. PMID:23810467

  1. Neuroendocrine breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça, Susana; Esteves, Joana; Costa, Sílvia; Vale, Sílvio; Maciel, Jorge

    2012-08-13

    Neuroendocrine breast cancer is thought to account for about 1% of all breast cancers. This rare type of breast malignancy is more common in older women and presents as a low-grade, slow-growing cancer. The most definitive markers that indicate neuroendocrine carcinoma are the presence of chromogranin, synaptophysin or neuron-specific enolase, in at least 50% of malignant tumour cells. The authors present a case report of an 83-year-old woman, admitted to their institution with right breast lump. Physical examination, mammography and ultrasonography showed a 2.4 cm nodule, probably a benign lesion (BI-RADS 3). A fine needle aspiration biopsy was performed and revealed proliferative epithelial papillary lesion. She was submitted to excisional biopsy and histology showed endocrine breast cancer well differentiated (G1). Immunohistochemically, tumour cells were positive for synaptophysin. These breast cancers are characterised for their excellent prognosis and conservative treatment is almost always enough to obtain patient cure.

  2. Study protocol of the CAREST-trial: a randomised controlled trial on the (cost-) effectiveness of a CBT-based online self-help training for fear of cancer recurrence in women with curatively treated breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Helmondt, Sanne Jasperine; van der Lee, Marije Liesbeth; de Vries, Jolanda

    2016-07-25

    One of the most prevalent long-term consequences of surviving breast cancer is fear of cancer recurrence (FCR), which is associated with higher (mental) healthcare costs and lower surveillance rates. The majority of breast cancer survivors report a need for professional help in dealing with FCR. An easy-accessible and cost-effective evidence-based psychological intervention for reducing FCR is lacking. In the current study an online self-help training to reduce FCR will be evaluated. In addition, the secondary aim of this study is to identify factors that predict whether women can benefit from the online self-help training or not. A multi-centre, parallel-groups, randomised controlled trial will be conducted to evaluate the (cost-) effectiveness of the CAREST-trial. A sample of 454 women with curatively treated breast cancer will be recruited from 8 hospitals in the Netherlands. Participants will be randomised to the intervention or usual care group (1:1). Self-report measures will be completed at baseline, 3 (post-intervention), 9, and 24 months. Primary outcome is FCR severity; secondary outcomes are healthcare costs, health status, and psychological distress. The online tailored self-help training "Less fear after cancer" is based on cognitive behavioural therapy and consists of 2 basic modules (psycho-education; basic principles of cognitive behavioural therapy) and 4 optional modules (rumination; action; relaxation; reassurance) to choose from. Each module consists of an informative part (texts, videos, audio files) and a practical part (exercises). For every patient, the intervention will be available for three months. Personal online support by an e-mail coach is available. Online self-help training may be an easy-accessible and cost-effective treatment to reduce the impact of FCR at an early stage in a large group of breast cancer survivors. A strength is the 24 months follow-up period in the health economic evaluation. The results of the study will

  3. Novel and recurrent BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in early onset and familial breast and ovarian cancer detected in the Program of Genetic Counseling in Cancer of Valencian Community (eastern Spain). Relationship of family phenotypes with mutation prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Juan Jiménez, Inmaculada; García Casado, Zaida; Palanca Suela, Sarai; Esteban Cardeñosa, Eva; López Guerrero, José Antonio; Segura Huerta, Ángel; Chirivella González, Isabel; Sánchez Heras, Ana Beatriz; Juan Fita, Ma José; Tena García, Isabel; Guillen Ponce, Carmen; Martínez de Dueñas, Eduardo; Romero Noguera, Ignacio; Salas Trejo, Dolores; Goicoechea Sáez, Mercedes; Bolufer Gilabert, Pascual

    2013-12-01

    During the first 6 years of the Program of Genetic Counselling in Cancer of Valencia (eastern Spain), 310 mutations (155 in BRCA1 and 155 in BRCA2) in 1,763 hereditary breast (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC) families were identified. Of the mutations found 105 were distinct (53 in BRCA1 and 52 in BRCA2), eight new and 37 recurrent. Two of the novel mutations were frame-shift placed in exons 2 and 11 of BRCA1 and the remaining six were placed in BRCA2; four frame-shift (three in exon 11 and one in exon 23), one deletion of the entire exon 19 and one in the intervening sequence of exon 22. The BRCA1 mutations with higher recurrence were c.66_68delAG, c.5123C > A, c.1961delA, c.3770_3771delAG and c.5152+5G > A that covered 45.2% of mutations of this gene. The age of onset of BCs of c.68_69delAG mutation carriers occurs later than for the other recurrent mutations of this gene (45 vs. 37 years; p = 0.008). The BRCA2 mutations with higher recurrence were c.9026_9030delATCAT, c.3264insT and c.8978_8991del14 which represented 43.2% of all mutations in this gene, being the most recurrent mutation by far c.9026_9030delATCAT that represents 21.3% of BRCA2 mutations and 10.6% of all mutations. Probands with family histories of BC and OC, or OC and/or BC in at least two first degree relatives, were the more likely to have BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations (35.2% of the total mutations). And that most BRCA1mutations (73.19% mutations) occurred in probands with early-onset BC or with family history of OC.

  4. Exercise regulates breast cancer cell viability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dethlefsen, Christine; Lillelund, Christian; Midtgaard, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Exercise decreases breast cancer risk and disease recurrence, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Training adaptations in systemic factors have been suggested as mediating causes. We aimed to examine if systemic adaptations to training over time, or acute exercise responses......, in breast cancer survivors could regulate breast cancer cell viability in vitro. Methods: Blood samples were collected from breast cancer survivors, partaking in either a 6-month training intervention or across a 2 h acute exercise session. Changes in training parameters and systemic factors were evaluated...... and pre/post exercise-conditioned sera from both studies were used to stimulate breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) in vitro. Results: Six months of training increased VO2peak (16.4 %, p

  5. Towards a personalized surgical margin for breast conserving surgery-Implications of field cancerization in local recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebya, Katarina; Garcia-Smith, Randi; Swaminathan, Radha; Jones, Anna; Russell, John; Joste, Nancy; Bisoffi, Marco; Trujillo, Kristina

    2017-02-01

    The amount of normal tissue that should be excised during breast conserving surgery is widely debated. Tissue adjacent to breast tumors, although histologically normal, possesses many of the molecular abnormalities found in tumor tissues. Here, we propose that the ideal physical distance for a surgical margin may not be universal. Rather, an adequate surgical margin likely varies from patient to patient, depending on the biology of the tissue that remains after surgery. J. Surg. Oncol. 2017;115:109-115. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Other Considerations for Pregnancy and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first 3 months of pregnancy . Other Information About Pregnancy and Breast Cancer Key Points Lactation (breast milk production) and breast- ... has had breast cancer. To Learn More About Breast Cancer and Pregnancy For more information from the National Cancer Institute ...

  7. General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first 3 months of pregnancy . Other Information About Pregnancy and Breast Cancer Key Points Lactation (breast milk production) and breast- ... has had breast cancer. To Learn More About Breast Cancer and Pregnancy For more information from the National Cancer Institute ...

  8. Inflammatory Breast Cancer: High Risk of Contralateral Breast Cancer Compared to Comparably Staged Non-Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, Catherine; Brown, Linda M.; Mai, Phuong L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC), the most lethal form of breast cancer, has characteristics linked to higher risk of contralateral breast cancer. However, no large studies have examined risk of contralateral breast cancer following IBC. Methods We calculated absolute risk of invasive contralateral breast cancer among 5,631 IBC and 174,634 comparably staged non-IBC first breast cancer cases who survived at least 2 months following diagnosis and were reported to 13 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries between January 1, 1973 and December 31, 2006. We considered that contralateral cancers occurring within 2–23 months of first cancer diagnosis may more likely be metastatic/recurrent disease and those occurring 2 or more years after diagnosis independent primaries. Results Absolute risk of contralateral breast cancer was generally greater following IBC than regional/distant non-IBC, regardless of age and hormone receptor status of first cancer diagnosis. Much of the increase in absolute risk following IBC occurred within 2–23 months of first cancer diagnosis, while the risk for non-IBC occurred more gradually over time since diagnosis. For instance, among women first diagnosed before age 50, absolute risks following IBC and non-IBC were 4.9% vs. 1.1% at 2 years, 6.0% vs. 2.2% at 5 years, and 7.7% vs. 6.1% at 20 years after diagnosis. However, patterns of higher risk following IBC than non-IBC were also evident for at least 10–15 years in the subcohort of women who survived at least 24 months without a contralateral cancer. Conclusion Our results suggest that IBC has higher risk of cancer in the contralateral breast than comparably staged non-IBC, possibly due to both metastasic/recurrent disease and independent primaries. PMID:21390499

  9. The diagnostic and prognostic value of serum bone Gla protein (osteocalcin) in patients with recurrent breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamby, C; Egsmose, C; Söletormos, G

    1993-01-01

    bone survey. The sites of recurrence were bone (61%), bone marrow (46%), soft tissue (52%), lung (13%), pleura (11%), liver (4%), and brain (2%). Radiology and bone biopsy served as key diagnoses as to the presence or absence of bone metastases. The diagnostic efficiency of B-scan and S-AP was greater...

  10. Locoregional recurrence in patients suffering from a triple-negative breast cancer: interest of a systematic adjuvant ganglionary irradiation; Recidives locoregionales chez les patientes atteintes d'un cancer du sein triple-negatif: interet d'une irradiation ganglionnaire adjuvante systematique?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clerc, J.; Sunyach, M.P.; Duruisseaux, M.; Mignotte, H.; Bajard, A.; Tredan, O.; Carrie, C.; Arnaud, A. [Centre Leon-Berard, Lyon (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report the assessment of locoregional recurrence percentage within women suffering from a triple-negative breast cancer without ganglionary attack, in order to examine the interest of a systematic adjuvant ganglionary irradiation. Nearly 250 women have been treated for a breast cancer between 1999 and 2009 in the Leon-Berard Centre in Lyons. All had surgery followed or not by a chemotherapy and/or a radiotherapy. The locoregional recurrence rate is not very high, but the authors cannot yet be sure to systematically propose this treatment. Short communication

  11. Role of diffusion weighted imaging and dynamic contrast enhanced MR mammography to detect recurrence in breast cancer patients after sur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safaa Ibrahim Saif El-nasr

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Our study showed better diagnostic performance for DCE-MRI compared to DWI in post operative breast assessment. However, DWI can provide an alternative diagnostic tool to contrast administration “if interpreted in association with conventional MR sequences” thus can be used when contrast media is contraindicated.

  12. PET scan for breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radioactive substance (called a tracer) to look for breast cancer. This tracer can help identify areas of cancer ... only after a woman has been diagnosed with breast cancer. It is done to see if the cancer ...

  13. RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelttari, Liisa M; Khan, Sofia; Vuorela, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    Common variation on 14q24.1, close to RAD51B, has been associated with breast cancer: rs999737 and rs2588809 with the risk of female breast cancer and rs1314913 with the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAD51B variants in breast cancer predisposition......, particularly in the context of familial breast cancer in Finland. We sequenced the coding region of RAD51B in 168 Finnish breast cancer patients from the Helsinki region for identification of possible recurrent founder mutations. In addition, we studied the known rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 SNPs and RAD......51B haplotypes in 44,791 breast cancer cases and 43,583 controls from 40 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) that were genotyped on a custom chip (iCOGS). We identified one putatively pathogenic missense mutation c.541C>T among the Finnish cancer patients...

  14. Male breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lautrup, Marianne D; Thorup, Signe S; Jensen, Vibeke

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Describe prognostic parameters of Danish male breast cancer patients (MBCP) diagnosed from 1980–2009. Determine all-cause mortality compared to the general male population and analyze survival/mortality compared with Danish female breast cancer patients (FBCP) in the same period...

  15. Comparison of standardized uptake value of 18F-FDG-PET-CT with 21-gene recurrence score in estrogen receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Gwe Ahn

    Full Text Available We investigated the relationship between 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET-CT standardized uptake value (SUV and 21-gene recurrence score (RS in estrogen receptor (ER-positive/HER2-negative breast cancer.One hundred sixty-seven patients were identified among those who underwent preoperative 18F-FDG-PET-CT and had RS. Maximum SUV was obtained from 18F-FDG-PET-CT; the cut-off point was 4.The continuous RS and SUV correlated positively (Pearson's R = 0.555; P < 0.001. An inverse correlation was found between progesterone receptor (PR expression by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, and SUV (Pearson's R = -0.408; P < 0.001. Good agreement between dichotomized RS (<26 vs. ≥26 and SUV (<4 vs. ≥4 was observed in 137 of 167 patients (82.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 76.2-87.9. Among patients with low SUV, 114 of 115 (99.1% [95% CI, 97.4-100.0] had tumors with lower RS (<26. Although 23 of 52 women (44.2% [95% CI, 30.7-57.7] with high SUV had higher RS (≥26, all 13 women with high RS (≥31 had high-SUV tumors. Most cases with disagreements between SUV and RS (n = 30 were classified as high SUV/lower RS (n = 29. The discordant group had higher grade or elevated Ki67 expression (≥20% compared with the low SUV/lower RS group (n = 109, but higher PR expression compared with the high SUV/higher RS group (n = 23. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that high SUV were associated with higher RS (≥26.SUV, as a biologic parameter represented using a continuous variable, was found to associate with RS in ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer. Further studies may reveal the biology underlying the discordance between the markers.

  16. Synchronous bilateral breast cancer in a male

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio Hernández, María Caridad; Díaz Prado, Yenia Ivet; Pérez, Suanly Rodríguez; Díaz, Ronald Rodríguez; Aleaga, Zaili Gutiérrez

    2013-01-01

    Male breast cancer, which represents only 1% of all breast cancers, is occasionally associated with a family history of breast cancer. Sporadic male breast cancers presenting with another primary breast cancer are extremely rare. In this article, we report on a 70-year-old male patient with bilateral multifocal and synchronous breast cancer and without a family history of breast cancer. PMID:24319497

  17. Impact on regional recurrence and survival of axillary surgery in women with node-negative primary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, C K; Düring, M; Christiansen, P M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study examined whether axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) with removal of many normal lymph nodes resulted in a reduced rate of axillary recurrence and better survival, as reported in recent studies. METHODS: The follow-up analyses were based on 8657 patients with node-negativ...... leave the concept of the sentinel node biopsy intact, as a highly specific procedure compared to ALND....

  18. CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  19. [Fibrocystic breast disease--breast cancer sequence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habor, V; Habor, A; Copotoiu, C; Panţîru, A

    2010-01-01

    Fibrocystic breast disease has developed a major issue: the breast cancer sequence. Its involvement regarding the increse of breast cancer risk has 2 aspects: it may be either the marker of a prone tissue or a premalignant hystological deffect. Difficult differential diagnosis of benign proliferative breast lession and carcinoma led to the idea of sequency between the two: cancer does not initiate on normal mammary epithelia; it takes several proliferative stages for it to occur. In our series we analized a number of 677 breast surgical procedures where the pathologic examination reveals 115 cases (17%) of coexistence between cancer and fibrocystic breast disease. This aspect has proved to be related to earlier debut of breast cancer, suggesting that epithelial hyperplasia is a risk factor for breast cancer.

  20. Effect of radiotherapy after mastectomy and axillary surgery on 10-year recurrence and 20-year breast cancer mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGale, P; Taylor, C; Correa, C

    2014-01-01

    mastectomy and axillary surgery versus the same surgery but no radiotherapy. Follow-up lasted 10 years for recurrence and to Jan 1, 2009, for mortality. Analyses were stratified by trial, individual follow-up year, age at entry, and pathological nodal status. FINDINGS: 3786 women had axillary dissection...... to at least level II and had zero, one to three, or four or more positive nodes. All were in trials in which radiotherapy included the chest wall, supraclavicular or axillary fossa (or both), and internal mammary chain. For 700 women with axillary dissection and no positive nodes, radiotherapy had...

  1. Breast reconstruction after breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serletti, Joseph M; Fosnot, Joshua; Nelson, Jonas A; Disa, Joseph J; Bucky, Louis P

    2011-06-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Describe the mental, emotional, and physical benefits of reconstruction in breast cancer patients. 2. Compare the most common techniques of reconstruction in patients and detail benefits and risks associated with each. 3. Outline different methods of reconstruction and identify the method considered best for the patient based on timing of the procedures, body type, adjuvant therapies, and other coexisting conditions. 4. Distinguish between some of the different flaps that can be considered for autologous reconstruction. Breast cancer is unfortunately a common disease affecting millions of women, often at a relatively young age. Reconstruction following mastectomy offers women an opportunity to mollify some of the emotional and aesthetic effects of this devastating disease. Although varying techniques of alloplastic and autologous techniques are available, all strive to achieve the same goal: the satisfactory reformation of a breast mound that appears as natural as possible without clothing and at the very least is normal in appearance under clothing. This article summarizes the various approaches to breast reconstruction and offers a balanced view of the risks and benefits of each, all of which in the end offer the opportunity for excellent and predictable results with a high degree of patient satisfaction.

  2. Breast cancer: equal rights?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Fátima Carvalho Fernandes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available There is not any statistics related to encouraging breast cancer along the past century, and there has not been any in present century. It has been published in the scientific and lay press information on the crescent number of women attacked by breast cancer. How to spare women and family members of such pain when they experience this disease? Which rights provide assistance to the women with cancer?

  3. Oxalate induces breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellaro, Andrés M; Tonda, Alfredo; Cejas, Hugo H; Ferreyra, Héctor; Caputto, Beatriz L; Pucci, Oscar A; Gil, German A

    2015-10-22

    Microcalcifications can be the early and only presenting sign of breast cancer. One shared characteristic of breast cancer is the appearance of mammographic mammary microcalcifications that can routinely be used to detect breast cancer in its initial stages, which is of key importance due to the possibility that early detection allows the application of more conservative therapies for a better patient outcome. The mechanism by which mammary microcalcifications are formed is still largely unknown but breast cancers presenting microcalcifications are more often associated with a poorer prognosis. We combined Capillary Electrochromatography, histology, and gene expression (qRT-PCR) to analyze patient-matched normal breast tissue vs. breast tumor. Potential carcinogenicity of oxalate was tested by its inoculation into mice. All data were subjected to statistical analysis. To study the biological significance of oxalates within the breast tumor microenvironment, we measured oxalate concentration in both human breast tumor tissues and adjoining non-pathological breast tissues. We found that all tested breast tumor tissues contain a higher concentration of oxalates than their counterpart non-pathological breast tissue. Moreover, it was established that oxalate induces proliferation of breast cells and stimulates the expression of a pro-tumorigenic gene c-fos. Furthermore, oxalate generates highly malignant and undifferentiated tumors when it was injected into the mammary fatpad in female mice, but not when injected into their back, indicating that oxalate does not induce cancer formation in all types of tissues. Moreover, neither human kidney-epithelial cells nor mouse fibroblast cells proliferate when are treated with oxalate. We found that the chronic exposure of breast epithelial cells to oxalate promotes the transformation of breast cells from normal to tumor cells, inducing the expression of a proto-oncogen as c-fos and proliferation in breast cancer cells

  4. Rupture of an expander prosthesis mimics axillary cancer recurrence.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ismael, T

    2005-10-01

    Regional silicone gel migration from a ruptured breast implant has been reported at different locations including the upper extremity, chest wall muscles, axilla and back. We report a patient who presented with an axillary mass that mimicked a regional recurrence 5 years after breast cancer reconstruction with a latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap and silicon gel expander-prosthesis. Surgical exploration revealed that the mass contained silicone gel around the port of the breast expander that had ruptured. The mass was confluent with an intracapsular silicone leak through a tract along the tube of the expander port.

  5. Clinical Trial Results of the HER-2/neu (E75) Vaccine to Prevent Breast Cancer Recurrence in High-Risk Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Clifton, Guy T.; Holmes, Jarrod P.; Clive, Kevin S.; Patil, Ritesh; Benavides, Linda C.; Gates, Jeremy D.; Sears, Alan K.; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Ponniah, Sathibalan; Peoples, George E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The authors conducted exploratory phase 1–2 clinical trials vaccinating breast cancer patients with E75, a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) A2/A3–restricted HER-2/neu (HER2) peptide, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The vaccine is given as adjuvant therapy to prevent disease recurrence. They previously reported that the vaccine is safe and effective in stimulating expansion of E75-specific cytotoxic T cells. Here, they report 24-month landmark analyses of disease-free survival (DFS). METHODS These dose escalation/schedule optimization trials enrolled lymph node-positive and high-risk lymph node-negative patients with HER2 (immunohistochemistry [IHC] 1-3+) expressing tumors. HLA-A2/A3+ patients were vaccinated; others were followed prospectively as controls for recurrence. DFS was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves; groups were compared using log-rank tests. RESULTS Of 195 enrolled patients, 182 were evaluable: 106 (58.2%) in the vaccinated group and 76 (41.8%) in the control group. The 24-month landmark analysis DFS was 94.3% in the vaccinated group and 86.8% in the control group (P = .08). Importantly, because of trial design, 65% of patients received a lower than optimal vaccine dose. In subset analyses, patients who benefited most from vaccination (vaccinated group vs control group) had lymph node-positive (DFS, 90.2% vs 79.1%; P = .13), HER2 IHC 1+-2+ (DFS, 94.0% vs 79.4%; P = .04), or grade 1 or 2 (DFS, 98.4% vs 86.0%; P = .01) tumors and were optimally dosed (DFS, 97.3% vs 86.8%; P = .08). A booster program has been initiated; no patients receiving booster inoculations have recurred. CONCLUSIONS The E75 vaccine has clinical efficacy that is more prominent in certain patients. A phase 3 trial enrolling lymph node-positive patients with HER2 low-expressing tumors is warranted. PMID:21989902

  6. Adjuvant bisphosphonates in early breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadji, P; Coleman, R E; Wilson, C

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonates have been studied in randomised trials in early breast cancer to investigate their ability to prevent cancer treatment-induced bone loss (CTIBL) and reduce the risk of disease recurrence and metastasis. Treatment benefits have been reported but bisphosphonates do not currently have...... regulatory approval for either of these potential indications. This consensus paper provides a review of the evidence and offers guidance to breast cancer clinicians on the use of bisphosphonates in early breast cancer. Using the nominal group methodology for consensus, a systematic review of the literature...... was augmented by a workshop held in October 2014 for breast cancer and bone specialists to present and debate the available pre-clinical and clinical evidence for the use of adjuvant bisphosphonates. This was followed by a questionnaire to all members of the writing committee to identify areas of consensus...

  7. Therapeutic resistance and cancer recurrence mechanisms ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cancer recurrence is believed to be one of the major reasons for the failure of cancer treatment strategies. Thisbiological phenomenon could arise from the incomplete eradication of tumour cells after chemo- and radiotherapy.Recent developments in the design of models reflecting cancer recurrence and in vivo imaging ...

  8. Therapeutic resistance and cancer recurrence mechanisms ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-07-13

    Jul 13, 2016 ... Cancer recurrence is believed to be one of the major reasons for the failure of cancer treatment strategies. This biological phenomenon could arise from the incomplete eradication of tumour cells after chemo- and radiotherapy. Recent developments in the design of models reflecting cancer recurrence and ...

  9. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... are not listed here. Drugs Approved to Prevent Breast Cancer Evista (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Keoxifene (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Nolvadex (Tamoxifen ...

  10. Breast Cancer in Young Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Campaign Initiatives Participation in Cancer Moonshot Stay Informed Breast Cancer in Young Women Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Syndicate this page Marleah’s family history of breast cancer was her motivation for pursuing a career where ...

  11. Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-30

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  12. Weight, physical activity and breast cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTiernan, Anne

    2018-02-26

    Weight, weight change and physical activity may affect prognosis among women who are diagnosed with breast cancer. Observational studies show associations between overweight/obesity and weight gain with several measures of reduced prognosis in women with breast cancer, and some suggestions of lower survival in women who are underweight or who experience unexplained weight loss after diagnosis. Observational studies have also shown an association between higher levels of physical activity and reduced breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality, although a dose-response relationship has not been established. The effects of purposive dietary weight loss and increase in physical activity on survival or recurrence in breast cancer are not yet established, and randomised controlled trials are needed for definitive data. This paper presents the epidemiologic evidence on weight status, weight change, and physical activity and breast cancer survival; suggests potential mediating mechanisms; summarises evidence on weight loss interventions in breast cancer survivors; describes ongoing randomised clinical trials designed to test the effects of weight loss or physical activity on breast cancer survival; and provides information on available guidelines on weight and physical activity for cancer survivors.

  13. Nanotechnology for breast cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takemi; Decuzzi, Paolo; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Sakamoto, Jason H; Tasciotti, Ennio; Robertson, Fredika M; Ferrari, Mauro

    2009-02-01

    Breast cancer is the field of medicine with the greatest presence of nanotechnological therapeutic agents in the clinic. A pegylated form of liposomally encapsulated doxorubicin is routinely used for treatment against metastatic cancer, and albumin nanoparticulate chaperones of paclitaxel were approved for locally recurrent and metastatic disease in 2005. These drugs have yielded substantial clinical benefit, and are steadily gathering greater beneficial impact. Clinical trials currently employing these drugs in combination with chemo and biological therapeutics exceed 150 worldwide. Despite these advancements, breast cancer morbidity and mortality is unacceptably high. Nanotechnology offers potential solutions to the historical challenge that has rendered breast cancer so difficult to contain and eradicate: the extreme biological diversity of the disease presentation in the patient population and in the evolutionary changes of any individual disease, the multiple pathways that drive disease progression, the onset of 'resistance' to established therapeutic cocktails, and the gravity of the side effects to treatment, which result from generally very poor distribution of the injected therapeutic agents in the body. A fundamental requirement for success in the development of new therapeutic strategies is that breast cancer specialists-in the clinic, the pharmaceutical and the basic biological laboratory-and nanotechnologists-engineers, physicists, chemists and mathematicians-optimize their ability to work in close collaboration. This further requires a mutual openness across cultural and language barriers, academic reward systems, and many other 'environmental' divides. This paper is respectfully submitted to the community to help foster the mutual interactions of the breast cancer world with micro- and nano-technology, and in particular to encourage the latter community to direct ever increasing attention to breast cancer, where an extraordinary beneficial impact may

  14. Clinical and immunological evaluation of anti-apoptosis protein, survivin-derived peptide vaccine in phase I clinical study for patients with advanced or recurrent breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asanuma Hiroko

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously reported that survivin-2B, a splicing variant of survivin, was expressed in various types of tumors and that survivin-2B peptide might serve as a potent immunogenic cancer vaccine. The objective of this study was to examine the toxicity of and to clinically and immunologically evaluate survivin-2B peptide in a phase I clinical study for patients with advanced or recurrent breast cancer. Methods We set up two protocols. In the first protocol, 10 patients were vaccinated with escalating doses (0.1–1.0 mg of survivin-2B peptide alone 4 times every 2 weeks. In the second protocol, 4 patients were vaccinated with the peptide at a dose of 1.0 mg mixed with IFA 4 times every 2 weeks. Results In the first protocol, no adverse events were observed during or after vaccination. In the second protocol, two patients had induration at the injection site. One patient had general malaise (grade 1, and another had general malaise (grade 1 and fever (grade 1. Peptide vaccination was well tolerated in all patients. In the first protocol, tumor marker levels increased in 8 patients, slightly decreased in 1 patient and were within the normal range during this clinical trial in 1 patient. With regard to tumor size, two patients were considered to have stable disease (SD. Immunologically, in 3 of the 10 patients (30%, an increase of the peptide-specific CTL frequency was detected. In the second protocol, an increase of the peptide-specific CTL frequency was detected in all 4 patients (100%, although there were no significant beneficial clinical responses. ELISPOT assay showed peptide-specific IFN-γ responses in 2 patients in whom the peptide-specific CTL frequency in tetramer staining also was increased in both protocols. Conclusion This phase I clinical study revealed that survivin-2B peptide vaccination was well tolerated. The vaccination with survivin-2B peptide mixed with IFA increased the frequency of peptide-specific CTL more

  15. Oncotype Dx Results in Multiple Primary Breast Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Michael J. Toole; Kidwell, Kelley M.; Catherine Van Poznak

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine whether multiple primary breast cancers have similar genetic profiles, specifically Oncotype Dx Recurrence Scores, and whether obtaining Oncotype Dx on each primary breast cancer affects chemotherapy recommendations. METHODS A database of patients with hormone receptor-positive, lymph node-negative, breast cancer was created for those tumors that were sent for Oncotype Dx testing from the University of Michigan Health System from 1/24/2005 to 2/25/2013. Retrospective char...

  16. Treatment Options for Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  17. Recurrent malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinqin; Su, Jing; Lei, Yutao

    2017-12-01

    Phyllodes tumor is a rare fibro epithelial neoplasm of the breast. They resemble fibroadenomas clinically and can be mistakenly ignored sometimes. We report the case of a young woman with her first presentation to hospital due to a hypoglycemia and she underwent 2 excised fibroadenomas in the same breast before diagnosed of malignant phyllodes tumor. She was complaining about 2 masses presented in her right breast 4 months after mastectomy. Recurrent phyllodes tumor of the breast. We conducted an immediate autologous myocutaneous flap transplantation after a wide-excision. Postoperative radiotherapy was recommended. She was in good general condition without tumor relapses during 8 months of follow-up. Recurrent fibroadenomas in the same breast, especially those of large size with rapid growth rate, suggesting a high transformation possibility from fibroadenoma to phyllodes tumor. We recommend an extended tumor resection and immediate or delayed reconstruction of the breast for the recurrent phyllodes tumor with separately multiple relapses.

  18. Breast Cancer Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    treatment with the nonsteroidal anti-inflamma- tory drugs (NSAIDs) ibuprofen or aspirin reduces this inflammatory response and, possibly, postpartum breast...involution with systemic ibuprofen or aspirin did not interrupt mammary epithelial cell regression that normally occurs during this period These data... children of immigrant stress, and social desirability bias. Preliminary data suggest that breast cancer survivors, notably racial/ethnic minorities

  19. Mortality and recurrence risk in relation to the use of lipid-lowering drugs in a prospective breast cancer patient cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nickels, S.; Vrieling, A.; Seibold, P.; Heinz, J.; Obi, N.; Flesch-Janys, D.; Chang-Claude, J.

    2013-01-01

    Lipid-lowering drugs are used for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Statins are the most commonly used lipid-lowering drugs. Evidence from preclinical and observational studies suggests that statins might improve the prognosis of breast cancer patients. We analyzed data from the German

  20. Lymphedema after breast cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brahmi, Sami Aziz; Ziani, Fatima Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Image in medicine Lymphedema is one of the most significant survivorship issues after the surgical treatment of breast cancer and in this population it has been documented to have significant quality...

  1. Learning about Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Learning About Breast Cancer Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research News Features Funding Divisions Funding ...

  2. Preeclampsia and breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pacheco, Nadja Livia Pekkola; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In parous women preeclampsia has been associated with reduced risk of developing breast cancer. Characteristics of births following preeclamptic pregnancies may help understand mechanisms involved in the breast cancer risk reduction inferred by preeclampsia. METHODS: We conducted...... a register-based cohort study of all Danish women giving birth during 1978-2010 (n = 778,701). The association between preeclampsia and breast cancer was evaluated overall and according to birth characteristics by means of incidence rate ratios (IRR) estimated in Poisson regression models. RESULTS: Compared......, and in women giving birth to boys. These findings, however, did not reach statistical significance. Finally, risk reduction was slightly greater following milder forms of preeclampsia. CONCLUSION: Our data is compatible with an approximately 20% reduction in risk of developing breast cancer following...

  3. Recurrent cervical cancer : detection and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duyn, A; Van Eijkeren, M; Kenter, G; Zwinderman, K; Ansink, A

    Background. Only a small proportion of cervical cancer recurrences is detected during routine follow-up. We investigated which percentage of recurrences is detected during follow-up, which diagnostic tools are helpful to detect recurrent disease and which factors are of prognostic significance once

  4. Molecular Characterization of ERα-positive and Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severson, T.M.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer, one of the most common of all cancers, is diagnosed in over 1.5 million people world-wide each year. Overall, treatments for breast cancer are considered relatively successful, however recurrence is a clinical problem of paramount importance. Molecular subtypes of breast cancer,

  5. Legal termination of a pregnancy resulting from transplanted cryopreserved ovarian tissue due to cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Emil Hagen; Offersen, Birgitte Vrou; Andersen, Claus Yding

    2013-01-01

    To report on a woman who conceived naturally and had a normal intrauterine pregnancy following transplantation of frozen/thawed ovarian tissue but decided to have an early abortion due to recurrence of breast cancer.......To report on a woman who conceived naturally and had a normal intrauterine pregnancy following transplantation of frozen/thawed ovarian tissue but decided to have an early abortion due to recurrence of breast cancer....

  6. Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Associated Diabetes Mellitus Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary breast cancer when detected early can be treated by radical mastectomy alone. However, 20-30% of women treated as such later on, develop local or regional recurrence. This leads to an additional treatment with radiotherapy by the oncologist for the sake of the 20-30% of patients that may need it postoperatively.

  7. Breast Cancer in Young Women: Clinical Decision-Making in the Face of Uncertainty: 1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kathryn J Ruddy; Ann H Partridge

    2009-01-01

      Dr. Peppercorn reviews significant controversies regarding optimal care for young women with breast cancer, emphasizing the fragile balance between maximizing reduction of recurrence risk and minimizing...

  8. Flax and Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, Gillian; Fritz, Heidi; Balneaves, Lynda G; Verma, Shailendra; Skidmore, Becky; Fernandes, Rochelle; Kennedy, Deborah; Cooley, Kieran; Wong, Raimond; Sagar, Stephen; Fergusson, Dean; Seely, Dugald

    2014-05-01

    Flax is a food and dietary supplement commonly used for menopausal symptoms. Flax is known for its lignan, α-linolenic acid, and fiber content, components that may possess phytogestrogenic, anti-inflammatory, and hormone modulating effects, respectively. We conducted a systematic review of flax for efficacy in improving menopausal symptoms in women living with breast cancer and for potential impact on risk of breast cancer incidence or recurrence. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and AMED from inception to January 2013 for human interventional or observational data pertaining to flax and breast cancer. Of 1892 records, we included a total of 10 studies: 2 randomized controlled trials, 2 uncontrolled trials, 1 biomarker study, and 5 observational studies. Nonsignificant (NS) decreases in hot flash symptomatology were seen with flax ingestion (7.5 g/d). Flax (25 g/d) increased tumor apoptotic index (Pflax or 50 mg secoisolariciresinol diglycoside daily. Observational data suggests associations between flax and decreased risk of primary breast cancer (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.82; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.69-0.97), better mental health (AOR = 1.76; 95% CI = 1.05-2.94), and lower mortality (multivariate hazard ratio = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.50-0.95) among breast cancer patients. Current evidence suggests that flax may be associated with decreased risk of breast cancer. Flax demonstrates antiproliferative effects in breast tissue of women at risk of breast cancer and may protect against primary breast cancer. Mortality risk may also be reduced among those living with breast cancer. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. Treatment Approaches to Recurrent Phyllodes Tumors of the Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazilet Erözgen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Phyllodes tumors of the breast are a rarely encountered clinical condition. Recurrent cases are even rarer. Treatment protocols vary among breast centers. In our study, we aimed to investigate the prognosis of recurrent breast phyllodes tumors and to present our treatment approach. Methods: Among 31000 patients, who presented to our breast outpatient clinic between March 2005 and December 2011, we retrospectively evaluated three patients with recurrent phyllodes tumors of the breast. Results: The three female patients, aged 24, 28 and 30 years, had been previously operated for phyllodes tumor of the breast. The first tumor localization was the superolateral part of the right breast in all subjects. Recurrences were in the same localizations, but pathologies were more aggressive than the previous reports. In two patients mastectomy and in one breast-conserving surgery were performed. Conclusion: Relapse of phyllodes tumors can result in mastectomy and recurrent phyllodes tumors seem to be more aggressive than the original tumor. (The Me di cal Bul le tin of Ha se ki 2012; 50: 43-7

  10. Identification of genes involved in breast cancer and breast cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Apostolou P; Toloudi M; Papasotiriou I

    2015-01-01

    Panagiotis Apostolou, Maria Toloudi, Ioannis Papasotiriou Research and Development Department, Research Genetic Cancer Centre Ltd, Florina, Greece Abstract: Breast cancer is the most frequent type of cancer in women. Great progress has been made in its treatment but relapse is common. One hypothesis to account for the high recurrence rates is the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple malignant cell types. This study aimed t...

  11. Advancing breast cancer survivorship among African-American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Steven S; Yoo, Wonsuk; Whitehead, Mary S; Smith, Selina A

    2015-09-01

    Advances have occurred in breast cancer survivorship but, for many African-American women, challenges and gaps in relevant information remain. This article identifies opportunities to address disparities in breast cancer survival and quality of life, and thereby to increase breast cancer survivorship among African-American women. For breast cancer survivors, common side effects, lasting for long periods after cancer treatment, include fatigue, loss of strength, difficulty sleeping, and sexual dysfunction. For addressing physical and mental health concerns, a variety of interventions have been evaluated, including exercise and weight training, dietary interventions, yoga and mindfulness-based stress reduction, and support groups or group therapy. Obesity has been associated with breast cancer recurrence and poorer survival. Relative to white survivors, African-American breast cancer survivors are more likely to be obese and less likely to engage in physical activity, although exercise improves overall quality of life and cancer-related fatigue. Considerable information exists about the effectiveness of such interventions for alleviating distress and improving quality of life among breast cancer survivors, but few studies have focused specifically on African-American women with a breast cancer diagnosis. Studies have identified a number of personal factors that are associated with resilience, increased quality of life, and positive adaptation to a breast cancer diagnosis. There is a need for a better understanding of breast cancer survivorship among African-American women. Additional evaluations of interventions for improving the quality of life and survival of African-American breast cancer survivors are desirable.

  12. Advancing Breast Cancer Survivorship among African American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Steven S.; Yoo, Wonsuk; Whitehead, Mary S.; Smith, Selina A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Advances have occurred in breast cancer survivorship but, for many African American women, challenges and gaps in relevant information remain. Methods This article identifies opportunities to address disparities in breast cancer survival and quality of life, and thereby to increase breast cancer survivorship among African American women. Results For breast cancer survivors, common side effects, lasting for long periods after cancer treatment, include fatigue, loss of strength, difficulty sleeping, and sexual dysfunction. For addressing physical and mental health concerns, a variety of interventions have been evaluated, including exercise and weight training, dietary interventions, yoga and mindfulness-based stress reduction, and support groups or group therapy. Obesity has been associated with breast cancer recurrence and poorer survival. Relative to white survivors, African American breast cancer survivors are more likely to be obese and less likely to engage in physical activity, although exercise improves overall quality of life and cancer-related fatigue. Considerable information exists about the effectiveness of such interventions for alleviating distress and improving quality of life among breast cancer survivors, but few studies have focused specifically on African American women with a breast cancer diagnosis. Studies have identified a number of personal factors that are associated with resilience, increased quality of life, and positive adaptation to a breast cancer diagnosis. Conclusions There is a need for a better understanding of breast cancer survivorship among African American women. Additional evaluations of interventions for improving the quality of life and survival of African American breast cancer survivors are desirable. PMID:26303657

  13. Psychological Adjustment in Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Annette L; Bower, Julienne E

    2015-01-01

    Women living with a diagnosis of breast cancer constitute more than 20 % of the cancer survivor population in the United States. Research on trajectories of psychological adjustment in women recently diagnosed with breast suggests that the largest proportion of women evidences relatively low psychological distress either from the point of diagnosis or after a period of recovery. Substantial heterogeneity exists, however, and some women are at risk for lingering depression, anxiety, fear of cancer recurrence and other long-term psychological effects. Most women diagnosed with breast cancer also report a number of benefits that arise from their experience of cancer. Longitudinal studies have illuminated risk and protective factors for psychological adjustment in breast cancer survivors, which we describe in this chapter. Effective psychosocial interventions, as evidenced in randomized controlled trials, also are available for bolstering breast cancer-related adjustment. We offer directions for research to deepen the understanding of biological, psychological, and social contributors to positive adjustment in the context of breast cancer, as well as suggestions for the development of optimally efficient evidence-based psychosocial interventions for women living with the disease.

  14. Impact of Postmastectomy Radiation on Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients With 1-3 Positive Lymph Nodes Treated With Modern Systemic Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tendulkar, Rahul D., E-mail: tendulr@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rehman, Sana; Shukla, Monica E.; Reddy, Chandana A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Moore, Halle; Budd, G. Thomas [Department of Solid Tumor Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Dietz, Jill; Crowe, Joseph P. [Department of General Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Macklis, Roger [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) remains controversial for patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes (LN+). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of all 369 breast cancer patients with 1-3 LN+ who underwent mastectomy without neoadjuvant systemic therapy between 2000 and 2007 at Cleveland Clinic. Results: We identified 271 patients with 1-3 LN+ who did not receive PMRT and 98 who did receive PMRT. The median follow-up time was 5.2 years, and the median number of LN dissected was 11. Of those not treated with PMRT, 79% received adjuvant chemotherapy (of whom 70% received a taxane), 79% received hormonal therapy, and 5% had no systemic therapy. Of the Her2/neu amplified tumors, 42% received trastuzumab. The 5-year rate of locoregional recurrence (LRR) was 8.9% without PMRT vs 0% with PMRT (P=.004). For patients who did not receive PMRT, univariate analysis showed 6 risk factors significantly (P<.05) correlated with LRR: estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor negative (hazard ratio [HR] 2.6), lymphovascular invasion (HR 2.4), 2-3 LN+ (HR 2.6), nodal ratio >25% (HR 2.7), extracapsular extension (ECE) (HR 3.7), and Bloom-Richardson grade III (HR 3.1). The 5-year LRR rate was 3.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1%-6.8%] for patients with 0-1 risk factor vs 14.6% [95% CI, 8.4%-20.9%] for patients with {>=}2 risk factors (P=.0006), respectively. On multivariate analysis, ECE (HR 4.3, P=.0006) and grade III (HR 3.6, P=.004) remained significant risk factors for LRR. The 5-year LRR was 4.1% in patients with neither grade III nor ECE, 8.1% with either grade III or ECE, and 50.4% in patients with both grade III and ECE (P<.0001); the corresponding 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rates were 91.8%, 85.4%, and 59.1% (P=.0004), respectively. Conclusions: PMRT offers excellent control for patients with 1-3 LN+, with no locoregional failures to date. Patients with 1-3 LN+ who have grade III disease and/or ECE should be strongly considered

  15. Utility of mammaglobin and gross cystic disease fluid protein-15 (GCDFP-15) in confirming a breast origin for recurrent tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Shi Yun; Thike, Aye Aye; Cheok, Poh Yian; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2010-10-01

    There are limited data that compare the utility of immunohistochemical detection of mammaglobin with Gross Cystic Disease Fluid Protein-15 (GCDFP-15) in locally recurrent and metastatic breast cancers. Forty-three local and 72 distant recurrences of breast cancer, 8 metastatic lesions to the breast from other organs, and 30 metastases from non-breast primaries were immunohistochemically stained with mammaglobin and GCDFP-15 antibodies. Mammaglobin was expressed in 55 (47.8%) and GCDFP-15 detected in 13 (11.3%) locally and distantly recurrent breast cancers. A higher percentage of tumor cells was stained with mammaglobin at greater staining intensity than GCDFP-15, for both metastatic and locally recurrent breast cancers. The difference in staining intensity as well as mean percentage of tumor cells stained for both markers was statistically significant (p breast from other organs and metastatic lesions from non-breast primaries were uniformly negative for both mammaglobin and GCDFP-15. Our study demonstrates that immunohistochemical analysis of mammaglobin is superior to GCDFP-15 in detecting a tumor of breast origin, and can be incorporated into immunohistochemical panels evaluating tumors from unknown primary sites. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, James S., E-mail: james.lawson@unsw.edu.au; Heng, Benjamin [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia)

    2010-04-30

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix.

  17. Administrative data algorithms to identify second breast cancer events following early-stage invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubak, Jessica; Yu, Onchee; Pocobelli, Gaia; Lamerato, Lois; Webster, Joe; Prout, Marianne N; Ulcickas Yood, Marianne; Barlow, William E; Buist, Diana S M

    2012-06-20

    Studies of breast cancer outcomes rely on the identification of second breast cancer events (recurrences and second breast primary tumors). Cancer registries often do not capture recurrences, and chart abstraction can be infeasible or expensive. An alternative is using administrative health-care data to identify second breast cancer events; however, these algorithms must be validated against a gold standard. We developed algorithms using data from 3152 women in an integrated health-care system who were diagnosed with stage I or II breast cancer in 1993-2006. Medical record review served as the gold standard for second breast cancer events. Administrative data used in algorithm development included procedures, diagnoses, prescription fills, and cancer registry records. We randomly divided the cohort into training and testing samples and used a classification and regression tree analysis to build algorithms for classifying women as having or not having a second breast cancer event. We created several algorithms for researchers to use based on the relative importance of sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) in future studies. The algorithm with high specificity and PPV had 89% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI] = 84% to 92%), 99% specificity (95% CI = 98% to 99%), and 90% PPV (95% CI = 86% to 94%); the high-sensitivity algorithm had 96% sensitivity (95% CI = 93% to 98%), 95% specificity (95% CI = 94% to 96%), and 74% PPV (95% CI = 68% to 78%). Algorithms based on administrative data can identify second breast cancer events with high sensitivity, specificity, and PPV. The algorithms presented here promote efficient outcomes research, allowing researchers to prioritize sensitivity, specificity, or PPV in identifying second breast cancer events.

  18. Dutch digital breast cancer screening: implications for breast cancer care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, Johanna M.; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Adang, Eddy M.; Otten, Johannes D.; Verbeek, André L.; Broeders, Mireille J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In comparison to other European population-based breast cancer screening programmes, the Dutch programme has a low referral rate, similar breast cancer detection and a high breast cancer mortality reduction. The referral rate in the Netherlands has increased over time and is expected to

  19. Expression of the breast cancer resistance protein in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faneyte, Ian F.; Kristel, Petra M. P.; Maliepaard, Marc; Scheffer, George L.; Scheper, Rik J.; Schellens, Jan H. M.; van de Vijver, Marc J.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is involved in in vitro multidrug resistance and was first identified in the breast cancer cell line MCF7/AdrVp. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of BCRP in resistance of breast cancer to anthracycline treatment. EXPERIMENTAL

  20. Breast cancer and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knabben, Laura; Mueller, Michel D

    2017-08-29

    Background In the past decades the incidence of pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) increased. Possible explanations are the trend to postpone childbearing and the general increase in the incidence of breast cancer. Materials and methods A sytematic review of the literature was performed with the aim to report on incidence, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of breast cancer during pregnancy. We also cover the issue of pregnancy following a diagnosis of breast cancer including fertility preservation and prognosis. Results Ultrasound is the imaging method of choice in pregnancy, but mammography can also be performed as the fetal irradiation dose is low. To avoid a delay in diagnosis every sonographic mass in pregnant women which does not clearly correspond to a cyst needs further investigation by biopsy. Treatment should follow as close as possible the guidelines for non-pregnant patients. Administration of chemotherapy is possible after the first trimester. There is a large body of evidence for the use of anthracyclines. In contrast radiotherapy, trastuzumab and antihormonal treatment by tamoxifen are contraindicated during pregnancy. Pregnancy does not seem to influence prognosis. Most adverse obstetric outcomes are related to preterm delivery, which should therefore, whenever possible, be avoided. Young patients with breast cancer and incomplete family planning should be referred for counseling about fertility preservation options before the initiation of adjuvant treatment. A pregnancy following breast cancer does not have a negative impact on prognosis. Conclusion Multidisciplinary management of women with breast cancer in pregnancy is mandatory and data should be collected to allow further improvement in management.

  1. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of ... 000 women will have been diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, and nearly 41,000 women will die from ...

  2. Life After Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Life After Breast Cancer Treatment Once breast cancer treatment ends, you may face a new set of issues and concerns. ... fear. If fear starts to disrupt your daily life, talk with your doctor. Getting the support and ...

  3. Progress in breast cancer: overview

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arteaga, Carlos L

    2013-01-01

    This edition of CCR Focus titled Research in Breast Cancer: Frontiers in Genomics, Biology, and Clinical Investigation reviews six topics that cover areas of translational research of high impact in breast cancer...

  4. Inflammatory breast cancer: an overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uden, D.J. van; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van; Westenberg, A.H.; Wilt, J.H. de; Blanken-Peeters, C.F.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most aggressive entity of breast cancer. Management involves coordination of multidisciplinary management and usually includes neoadjuvant chemotherapy, ablative surgery if a tumor-free resection margin is expected and locoregional radiotherapy. This

  5. Adenoid cystic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClenathan, James H; de la Roza, Gustavo

    2002-06-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma is a rare type of breast cancer that is generally reported in individual case reports or as series from major referral centers. To characterize early diagnostic criteria for adenoid cystic carcinoma and to determine whether breast-preserving surgery with radiotherapy is as effective as mastectomy for eradicating the disease, we reviewed clinical records of a large series of patients treated for adenoid cystic carcinoma of the breast at a large health maintenance organization (HMO) that includes primary care facilities and referral centers. Using the data bank of the Northern California Cancer Registry of the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Region (KPNCR), we retrospectively reviewed medical records of patients treated for adenoid cystic carcinoma of the breast. Follow-up also was done for these patients. Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the breast was diagnosed in 22 of 27,970 patients treated for breast cancer at KPNCR from 1960 through 2000. All 22 patients were female and were available for follow-up. Mean age of patients at diagnosis was 61 years (range, 37 to 94 years). In 17 (77%) of the women, a lump in the breast led to initial suspicion of a tumor; in 4 (23%) of the 22 patients, mammography led to suspicion of a tumor. Median tumor size was 20 mm. Pain was a prominent symptom. Surgical management evolved from radical and modified radical mastectomy to simple mastectomy or lumpectomy during the study period, during which time 1 patient died of previous ordinary ductal carcinoma of the contralateral breast, and 7 died of unrelated disease. At follow-up, 12 of the 13 remaining patients were free of disease; 1 patient died of the disease; and 1 patient remained alive despite late occurrence of lymph node and pulmonary metastases. Whether breast-preserving surgery with radiotherapy is as effective as mastectomy for treating adenoid cystic carcinoma of the breast has not been determined.

  6. The implications of breast cancer molecular phenotype for radiation oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin eSioshansi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The identification of distinct molecular subtypes of breast cancer has advanced the understanding and treatment of breast cancer by providing insight into prognosis, patterns of recurrence and effectiveness of therapy. The prognostic significance of molecular phenotype with regard to distant recurrences and overall survival are well established in the literature and has been readily incorporated into systemic therapy management decisions. However, despite the accumulating data suggesting similar prognostic significance for locoregional recurrence, integration of molecular phenotype into local management decision making has lagged. Although there are some conflicting reports, collectively the literature supports a low risk of local recurrence in the hormone receptor positive luminal subtypes compared to hormone receptor negative subtypes (triple negative and HER2-enriched. The development of targeted therapies, such as trastuzumab for the treatment of HER2-enriched subtype, has been shown to mitigate the increased risk of local recurrence. Unfortunately, no such remedy exists to address the increased risk of local recurrence for patients with triple negative tumors, making it a clinical challenge for radiation oncologists. In this review we discuss the correlation between molecular subtype and local recurrence following either breast conservation therapy or mastectomy. We also explore the possible mechanisms for increased local recurrence in triple negative breast cancer and radiotherapeutic implications for this population, such as the safety of breast conservation, consideration of dose escalation and the appropriateness of accelerated partial breast irradiation.

  7. Comparison of breast-conserving therapy with mastectomy for treatment of early breast cancer in community hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Voogd (Adri); H.W. Nab (Henk); D.J.A. Crommelin; L.H. van der Heijden (L.); N. Kluck (Nadine); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractAlthough the results of clinical trials support breast-conserving therapy as a replacement for mastectomy in early breast cancer, the question remains,whether these results apply in routine clinical practice. In the present analysis the breast cancer-specific survival and recurrence-free

  8. Kindness Interventions in Enhancing Well-Being in Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-05

    Cancer Survivor; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

  9. Cardiac Rehabilitation Program in Improving Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Stage 0-III Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-17

    Cancer Survivor; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  10. BMI1 and H-RAS Cooperate to Drive Breast Cancer Metastasis | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    There have been significant improvements in the diagnosis of breast cancer at early stages of the disease. However, even when patients are identified early, there is a 30 percent chance of recurrence after apparently successful treatment of the initial tumor. The major cause of death for breast cancer patients is metastasis of the tumor to other organs but, unfortunately, the mechanisms of metastatic progression and cancer recurrence are poorly understood.

  11. Exercise after breast cancer treatment: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieli-Conwright CM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Christina M Dieli-Conwright, Breanna Z Orozco Division of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy, Women's Health and Exercise Laboratory, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Over the past 2 decades, great strides have been made in the field of exercise-oncology research, particularly with breast cancer. This area of research is particularly important since there are >2.8 million breast cancer survivors who are in need of an intervention that can offset treatment-related side effects. Noticeable reductions in physical fitness (ie, cardiopulmonary fitness and muscular strength, negative changes in body composition (ie, increase in body mass, decrease in lean body mass, and increase in fat mass, increased fatigue, depression, or anxiety are some of the common side effects of cancer treatments that negatively impact overall quality of life and increase the risk for the development of comorbidities. Exercise plays a vital role in improving cardiopulmonary function, psychological events, muscular strength, and endurance in breast cancer survivors, and thus should be considered as a key factor of lifestyle intervention to reverse negative treatment-related side effects. The purpose of this review is to address current perspectives on the benefits of aerobic and resistance exercise after breast cancer treatments. This review is focused on the well-established benefits of exercise on physical and emotional well-being, bone health, lymphedema management, and the postulated benefits of exercise on risk reduction for recurrence of breast cancer. Keywords: breast cancer, exercise, physical well-being

  12. MODERN VIEWS ON BILATERAL BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. A. Fesik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented modern literature data on the features of the pathogenesis, course, clinical and morphological expression and tumor characteristics, parameters and nodal metastasis of hematogenous bilateral breast cancer. Highlight the results of domestic and foreign studies in recent years to determine the prognostic factors and recurrence of synchronous and metachronous bilateral breast cancer. It was revealed that the frequency of bilateral breast tumor lesions varies widely, ranging from 0.1 to 20%, with metachronous tumors recorded significantly higher (69.6% than the synchronous (22.7%. The probability of occurrence of metachronous breast cancer is higher in women with a family history, as well as if they have a gene mutation BRCA-1. Found that the most common histological type of breast tumor with bilateral lesions is invasive ductal. However, the incidence of invasive lobular cancer and non-invasive lobular cancer is slightly higher among synchronous bilateral cancer compared with unilateral disease. Studies have shown that in a double-sided synchronous breast cancer tumor, as a rule, has a lower degree of differentiation, and the higher the expression level of estrogen receptors and progesterone receptors. Relevance of the issue because the identification of patterns in the study of lymphatic and hematogenous features bilateral metastasis of mammary tumors provides a basis for speculation about the differences in the progression of neoplastic disease in these groups and is a cause for further detailed research in this area to identify and evaluate the prognosis and also the choice of tactics of such patients.

  13. Flubendazole, FDA-approved anthelmintic, targets breast cancer stem-like cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hou, Zhi-Jie; Luo, Xi; Zhang, Wei; Peng, Fei; Cui, Bai; Wu, Si-Jin; Zheng, Fei-Meng; Xu, Jie; Xu, Ling-Zhi; Long, Zi-Jie; Wang, Xue-Ting; Li, Guo-Hui; Wan, Xian-Yao; Yang, Yong-Liang; Liu, Quentin

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem-like cell (CS-like cell) is considered to be responsible for recurrence and drug resistance events in breast cancer, which makes it a potential target for novel cancer therapeutic strategy...

  14. Immunophenotyping of hereditary breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Groep, P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304810789

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary breast cancer runs in families where several family members in different generations are affected. Most of these breast cancers are caused by mutations in the high penetrance genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 which account for about 5% of all breast cancers. However, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 may

  15. Clinical proteomics in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gast, M.C.W.

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer imposes a significant healthcare burden on women worldwide. Early detection is of paramount importance in reducing mortality, yet the diagnosis of breast cancer is hampered by a lack of adequate detection methods. In addition, better breast cancer prognostication may improve selection

  16. Breast cancer in the elderly

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    breast cancer at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Of these, 27. (25.2%) were aged 60 years ... and physician vigilance are keys to early detection and treatment of breast cancer in the elderly. INTRODUCTION ..... Law TM, Hesketli PJ, Porter KA, Lawn-Tsao L,. McAxiaw R and Lopez MJ. Breast cancer in eld ...

  17. Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-30

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  18. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage 0-IIB Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-05

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  19. RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liisa M Pelttari

    Full Text Available Common variation on 14q24.1, close to RAD51B, has been associated with breast cancer: rs999737 and rs2588809 with the risk of female breast cancer and rs1314913 with the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAD51B variants in breast cancer predisposition, particularly in the context of familial breast cancer in Finland. We sequenced the coding region of RAD51B in 168 Finnish breast cancer patients from the Helsinki region for identification of possible recurrent founder mutations. In addition, we studied the known rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 SNPs and RAD51B haplotypes in 44,791 breast cancer cases and 43,583 controls from 40 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC that were genotyped on a custom chip (iCOGS. We identified one putatively pathogenic missense mutation c.541C>T among the Finnish cancer patients and subsequently genotyped the mutation in additional breast cancer cases (n = 5259 and population controls (n = 3586 from Finland and Belarus. No significant association with breast cancer risk was seen in the meta-analysis of the Finnish datasets or in the large BCAC dataset. The association with previously identified risk variants rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 was replicated among all breast cancer cases and also among familial cases in the BCAC dataset. The most significant association was observed for the haplotype carrying the risk-alleles of all the three SNPs both among all cases (odds ratio (OR: 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.11-1.19, P = 8.88 x 10-16 and among familial cases (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.16-1.32, P = 6.19 x 10-11, compared to the haplotype with the respective protective alleles. Our results suggest that loss-of-function mutations in RAD51B are rare, but common variation at the RAD51B region is significantly associated with familial breast cancer risk.

  20. RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelttari, Liisa M.; Khan, Sofia; Vuorela, Mikko; Kiiski, Johanna I.; Vilske, Sara; Nevanlinna, Viivi; Ranta, Salla; Schleutker, Johanna; Winqvist, Robert; Kallioniemi, Anne; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Figueroa, Jonine; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Dunning, Alison M.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Rosenberg, Efraim H.; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Surowy, Harald; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Van Dyck, Laurien; Janssen, Hilde; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Hallberg, Emily; Olson, Janet E.; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hooning, Maartje J.; Collée, Margriet; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert N.; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Couch, Fergus J.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Orr, Nick; Swerdlow, Anthony; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Mattson, Johanna; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Common variation on 14q24.1, close to RAD51B, has been associated with breast cancer: rs999737 and rs2588809 with the risk of female breast cancer and rs1314913 with the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAD51B variants in breast cancer predisposition, particularly in the context of familial breast cancer in Finland. We sequenced the coding region of RAD51B in 168 Finnish breast cancer patients from the Helsinki region for identification of possible recurrent founder mutations. In addition, we studied the known rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 SNPs and RAD51B haplotypes in 44,791 breast cancer cases and 43,583 controls from 40 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) that were genotyped on a custom chip (iCOGS). We identified one putatively pathogenic missense mutation c.541C>T among the Finnish cancer patients and subsequently genotyped the mutation in additional breast cancer cases (n = 5259) and population controls (n = 3586) from Finland and Belarus. No significant association with breast cancer risk was seen in the meta-analysis of the Finnish datasets or in the large BCAC dataset. The association with previously identified risk variants rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 was replicated among all breast cancer cases and also among familial cases in the BCAC dataset. The most significant association was observed for the haplotype carrying the risk-alleles of all the three SNPs both among all cases (odds ratio (OR): 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11–1.19, P = 8.88 x 10−16) and among familial cases (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.16–1.32, P = 6.19 x 10−11), compared to the haplotype with the respective protective alleles. Our results suggest that loss-of-function mutations in RAD51B are rare, but common variation at the RAD51B region is significantly associated with familial breast cancer risk. PMID:27149063

  1. Affluence and Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, Steven; Green, Sheryl; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E

    2016-09-01

    High income, high socioeconomic status, and affluence increase breast cancer incidence. Socioeconomic status in USA breast cancer studies has been assessed by block-group socioeconomic measures. A block group is a portion of a census tract with boundaries that segregate, as far as possible, socioeconomic groups. In this study, we used US Census income data instead of block groups to gauge socioeconomic status of breast cancer patients in relationship with incidence, prognostic markers, and survival. US state breast cancer incidence and mortality data are from the U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group, United States Cancer Statistics: 1999-2011. Three-Year-Average Median Household Income by State, 2010 to 2012, is from the U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, 2011 to 2013 Annual Social and Economic Supplements. County incomes are from the 2005-2009 American Community Survey of the U.S. Census Bureau. The American Community Survey is an ongoing statistical survey that samples a small percentage of the population yearly. Its purpose is to provide communities the information they need to plan investments and services. Breast cancer county incidence and survival data are from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program (SEER) data base. We analyzed SEER data from 198 counties in California, Connecticut, Georgia, Hawaii, Iowa, New Mexico, Utah, and Washington. SEER uses the Collaborative Stage (CS) Data Collection System. We have retained the SEER CS variables. There was a significant relationship of income with breast cancer incidence in 50 USA states and the District of Columbia in White women (r = 0.623, p breast cancer. Income was not correlated with 5-year survival of Black race (p = 0.364) or other races (p = 0.624). The multivariate general linear model with income as covariate, 5-year survival by race as a dependent variable, showed a significant effect of income and White race on 5-year survival (p breast cancer

  2. Concurrent new drug prescriptions and prognosis of early breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre; Lash, Timothy L; Ahern, Thomas P

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myriad reports suggest that frequently used prescription drugs alter the viability of breast cancer cells in pre-clinical studies. Routine use of these drugs, therefore, may impact breast cancer prognosis, and could have important implications for public health. METHODS: The Danish...... the Danish National Prescription Registry, has facilitated large population-based pharmacoepidemiology studies. A unique advantage of using DBCG data for such studies is the ability to investigate the association of drugs with breast cancer recurrence rather than breast cancer mortality - which may...... be misclassified - or all-cause mortality. Here we summarize findings from pharmacoepidemiological studies, based on DBCG data, on the association between routinely used prescription drugs and risk of breast cancer recurrence. RESULTS: Our findings suggest that concurrent use of glucocorticoids, ACE inhibitors...

  3. Pattern of follow-up care and early relapse detection in breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, S.M.E.; de Vegt, F.; Siesling, Sabine; Flobbe, K.; Aben, K.K.H.; van der Heiden-van der Loo, M.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; van Dijck, J.A.A.M.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Routine breast cancer follow-up aims at detecting second primary breast cancers and loco regional recurrences preclinically. We studied breast cancer follow-up practice and mode of relapse detection during the first 5 years of follow-up to determine the efficiency of the follow-up schedule. The

  4. Hereditary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin J; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are only detected in 25% of families with a strong history of breast cancer, though hereditary factors are expected to be involved in the remaining families with no recognized mutation. Molecular characterization is expected to provide new insight...... into the tumor biology to guide the search of new high-risk alleles and provide better classification of the growing number of BRCA1/2 variants of unknown significance (VUS). In this review, we provide an overview of hereditary breast cancer, its genetic background, and clinical implications, before focusing...... on the pathologically and molecular features associated with the disease. Recent transcriptome and genome profiling studies of tumor series from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers as well as familial non-BRCA1/2 will be discussed. Special attention is paid to its association with molecular breast cancer subtypes as well...

  5. Choroid as the first recurrence site: 13 years after breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast carcinoma is one of the most common primary tumors of metastatic choroidal tumors. The average time from the breast cancer diagnosis to metastasis to the eye and orbit has been reported to be approximately 4 years. We report an unusual case of the choroid as the first recurrence site in a 48-year-old woman with a history of breast cancer. In our reported case, the patient had a 13-year interval between the breast cancer surgery and the identification of the first and sole metastasis to the choroid. We present this unusual case, and to analyze the clinical, histopathological and immunohistochemical findings, so as to differential diagnosis from other choroidal tumors.

  6. Breast cancer in systemic lupus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernatsky, S.; Ramsey-Goldman, R.; Petri, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective There is a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) versus the general population. We assessed a large sample of SLE patients, evaluating demographic and clinical characteristics and breast cancer risk. Methods We performed case-cohort analyses within a multi......-center international SLE sample. We calculated the breast cancer hazard ratio (HR) in female SLE patients, relative to demographics, reproductive history, family history of breast cancer, and time-dependent measures of anti-dsDNA positivity, cumulative disease activity, and drugs, adjusted for SLE duration. Results...... There were 86 SLE breast cancers and 4498 female SLE cancer-free controls. Patients were followed on average for 7.6 years. Versus controls, SLE breast cancer cases tended to be white and older. Breast cancer cases were similar to controls regarding anti-dsDNA positivity, disease activity, and most drug...

  7. The expression of TRMT2A, a novel cell cycle regulated protein, identifies a subset of breast cancer patients with HER2 over-expression that are at an increased risk of recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tubbs Raymond

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over-expression of HER2 in a subset of breast cancers (HER2+ is associated with high histological grade and aggressive clinical course. Despite these distinctive features, the differences in response of HER2+ patients to both adjuvant cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted therapy (e.g. trastuzumab suggests that unrecognized biologic and clinical diversity is confounding treatment strategies. Furthermore, the small but established risk of cardiac morbidity with trastuzumab therapy compels efforts towards the identification of biomarkers that might help stratify patients. Methods A single institution tissue array cohort assembled at the Clearview Cancer Institute of Huntsville (CCIH was screened by immunohistochemistry staining using a large number of novel and commercially available antibodies to identify those with a univariate association with clinical outcome in HER2+ patients. Staining with antibody directed at TRMT2A was found to be strongly associated with outcome in HER2+ patients. This association with outcome was tested in two independent validation cohorts; an existing staining dataset derived from tissue assembled at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation (CCF, and in a new retrospective study performed by staining archived paraffin blocks available at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI. Results TRMT2A staining showed a strong correlation with likelihood of recurrence at five years in 67 HER2+ patients from the CCIH discovery cohort (HR 7.0; 95% CI 2.4 to 20.1, p HER2+ patients from the CCF cohort (HR 3.6; 95% CI 1.3 to 10.2, p Conclusions Studies from three independent single institution cohorts support TRMT2A protein expression as a biomarker of increased risk of recurrence in HER2+ breast cancer patients. These results suggest that TRMT2A expression should be further studied in the clinical trial setting to explore its predictive power for response to adjuvant cytotoxic chemotherapy in combination with HER2 targeted

  8. Breast MR Imaging in Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Dipti; Billadello, Laura

    2017-05-01

    The role of breast MR imaging in preoperative evaluation of disease extent remains controversial. MR imaging increases detection of mammographically occult ipsilateral and contralateral disease, but the clinical impact of these incidental cancers in unknown. There are no randomized trials of recurrence or mortality as the primary end point. This missing evidence is needed before the role of extent of disease MR imaging can be outlined. There are specific clinical scenarios in which breast MR imaging plays a clear role. In most cases, the decision to obtain MR imaging depends on physician practice style and patient preference. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pathology of hereditary breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    van der Groep, Petra; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Hereditary breast cancer runs in families where several members in different generations are affected. Most of these breast cancers are caused by mutations in the high penetrance genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 accounting for about 5% of all breast cancers. Other genes that include CHEK2, PTEN, TP53, ATM, STK11/LKB1, CDH1, NBS1, RAD50, BRIP1 and PALB2 have been described to be high or moderate penetrance breast cancer susceptibility genes, all contributing to the hereditary breast cancer spe...

  10. Pregnancy-associated Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Ashley S

    2016-12-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting pregnancy. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer refers to breast cancer that is diagnosed during pregnancy or within the first postpartum year. The incidence is increasing as more women delay childbearing. Breast cancer can be safely diagnosed, staged, and treated during pregnancy while protecting the fetus and mother with excellent outcomes for both. Avoiding diagnostic delays is vital to prognosis. This article provides an overview of the diagnosis, staging, management, and prognosis of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. Relevant current literature is reviewed.

  11. Breast-conservation therapy in early-stage breast cancer patients with a positive family history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, Georges; Mirza, Nadeem Q; Meric, Funda; Hunt, Kelly K; Mirza, Attiqa N; Newman, Lisa A; Ames, Frederick C; Kuerer, Henry M; Ross, Merrick I; Feig, Barry; Babiera, Gildy; Buchholz, Thomas A; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Singletary, S Eva

    2002-11-01

    Our goal was to evaluate the role of breast-conservation therapy in early-stage breast cancer patients with a family history (FH) of breast cancer. Between 1970 and 1994, 1324 female patients with breast cancer were treated with breast-conservation therapy at our institution. From these, we identified 985 patients with stage 0-II breast cancer and who had available information on FH status. FH was considered positive in any patient who had a relative who had been previously diagnosed with breast cancer. Disease-specific survival was calculated from the date of initial diagnosis using the Kaplan-Meier method. The stage distribution for the 985 patients was as follows: 0 in 65 (7%), I in 500 (51%), and II in 420 (43%). The median age was 50 years (range, 21-88), with a median follow-up time of 8.8 years (range,.25-29). The median tumor size was 1.5 cm. FH was positive in 31%. There were no significant differences in locoregional recurrence, distant recurrence, disease-specific survival, or incidence of contralateral breast cancer in patients with a positive FH versus patients with a negative FH. Breast-conservation therapy is not contraindicated in early-stage breast cancer patients with a positive FH.

  12. Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk: 2003 Workshop In ... cancer risk, including studies of induced and spontaneous abortions. They concluded that having an abortion or miscarriage ...

  13. Over surgery in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeill, Fiona; Karakatsanis, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Breast surgery remains the original and most effective 'targeted' therapy: excision of early cancer is curative and for more advanced disease surgery improves local disease control. However in well intentioned pursuit of cure and local disease control, some cancers are over-treated resulting in major physical and emotional morbidity. Less breast surgery is safe, as evidenced by steady reductions in mortality and local recurrence; earlier diagnosis and widespread use of systemic therapies and radiotherapy have allowed more conservative surgery. As tumour biology dictates cancer outcomes not surgery extent, surgery can safely be 'minimum required' rather than 'more is better' with the focus on removal of disease rather than healthy tissue. Surgeons can reduce the burden of surgery further but it is important that less surgery is not over-compensated by more radical or unnecessary systemic therapies and/or radiotherapy with their own toxicities and morbidity. We all need to be alert to the potential drivers of over treatment and over surgery such as failure to work within a multidisciplinary team, failure to design a multimodality treatment plan at diagnosis or overuse of novel assessment technologies of uncertain clinical utility. Pursuit of wide margins and the removal of the contra-lateral healthy breast for marginal risk-reduction gains are also to be discouraged as is routine local/regional surgery in stage 4 disease. The surgeon has a pivotal role in minimizing breast surgery to what is required to achieve the best oncological, functional and aesthetic outcomes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Accelerated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  15. Does Aluminium Trigger Breast Cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Jennrich; Claus Schulte-Uebbing

    2016-01-01

    Summary. Breast cancer is by far the most common cancer in women in the western world. In 90% of breast cancers, environmental factors are among the causes. The frequency with which the tumour occurs in the outer upper part of the breast has risen with above average rates in recent decades. Aluminium salts as ingredients in deodorants and antiperspirants are being absorbed by the body to a greater extent than hitherto assumed. Their toxicity for healthy and diseased breast tissue cells includ...

  16. Phytotherapy and Nutritional Supplements on Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Lopes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequent type of nonskin malignancy among women worldwide. In general, conventional cancer treatment options (i.e., surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, biological therapy, and hormone therapy are not completely effective. Recurrence and other pathologic situations are still an issue in breast cancer patients due to side effects, toxicity of drugs in normal cells, and aggressive behaviour of the tumours. From this point of view, breast cancer therapy and adjuvant methods represent a promising and challenging field for researchers. In the last few years, the use of some types of complementary medicines by women with a history of breast cancer has significantly increased such as phytotherapeutic products and nutritional supplements. Despite this, the use of such approaches in oncologic processes may be problematic and patient’s health risks can arise such as interference with the efficacy of standard cancer treatment. The present review gives an overview of the most usual phytotherapeutic products and nutritional supplements with application in breast cancer patients as adjuvant approach. Regardless of the contradictory results of scientific evidence, we demonstrated the need to perform additional investigation, mainly well-designed clinical trials in order to establish correlations and allow for further validated outcomes concerning the efficacy, safety, and clinical evidence-based recommendation of these products.

  17. Tumor markers of breast cancer: New prospectives

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed M. Kabel

    2017-01-01

    Tumor markers are substances produced by the tumors or by other cells of the body in response to cancer or certain benign conditions. Although most of these markers are made by the normal cells as well as by cancer cells, they are produced at much higher levels in cancerous conditions. These markers are used to evaluate the patient's response to treatment and to detect the presence of metastasis or recurrence. Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in females worldwide. The CA 2...

  18. [Lipofilling and breast cancer: Literature review in 2015?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho Quoc, C; Carrabin, N; Meruta, A; Piat, J-M; Delay, E; Faure, C

    2015-11-01

    The clinical surveillance of a patient treated for breast cancer involves many specialists: a surgeon, an oncologist, a radiotherapist, a gynecologist, and a general practitioner. The patients diagnosed with breast cancer will require regular clinical examination in order to identify possible recurrences. In our team, fat grafting has been used since 1998 for breast reconstruction because its results are natural breasts. Usually used as an adjuvant for flap or implant breast reconstruction, the lipofilling increases the aesthetic result and has a high satisfaction rate among patients. Despite of this advantage, some teams do not use lipofilling in patients with breast cancer history, because of doubts about oncology safety and screening difficulty. We performed an extensive review of the literature available regarding this subject. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the oncology safety of lipofilling in breast reconstruction after breast cancer. A literature review was undertaken using PubMed. The key words searched were: breast lipofilling, breast reconstruction, breast cancer, and recurrence. The results of the literature review showed a reduced number of articles reporting recurrence after lipofilling. The retrospective studies included few patients and searched for multiple variables: histological type, stage, surgery, marginal invasion, distance between cancer surgery and lipofilling. In our research, we found no correct control group, except the series of Petit. The follow-up is relatively short (between 1 and 3years), except for the series of Rigotti. The recurrence cases after lipofilling in patients with extensive in situ carcinoma, in the series of Petit, raised the problem to be cautious with lipofilling after extensive in situ carcinoma. Other factors involved are the age of the patient and the distance between the cancer surgery and the lipofilling. Breast cancer is a disease that is well managed regarding treatment and follow-up. After

  19. Pregnancy after treatment of breast cancer--a population-based study on behalf of Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroman, N.; Jensen, M.B.; Wohlfahrt, J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Estrogen is an established growth factor in breast cancer and it has been hypothesized that pregnancy associated estrogens may increase the risk of recurrence of breast cancer. In 1997 we published a population-based Danish study indicating no negative prognostic effect of pregnancy...... after breast cancer treatment. The present study is a ten-year update. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group has since 1977 collected population-based data on tumour characteristics, treatment regimes, and follow-up status on Danish women with breast cancer. Pregnancy history...... was added from the Danish Civil Registration System, the National Birth Registry, and the National Induced Abortion registry. Cox regression was used to estimate the risk ratio of dying among women with a pregnancy after breast cancer treatment compared with women without such experience. RESULTS: In all...

  20. Estimation of health state utilities in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim SH

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Seon-Ha Kim,1 Min-Woo Jo,2 Minsu Ock,2 Hyeon-Jeong Lee,2 Jong-Won Lee3,4 1Department of Nursing, College of Nursing, Dankook University, Cheonan, 2Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, 3Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, 4Department of Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea Purpose: The aim of this study is to determine the utility of breast cancer health states using the standard gamble (SG and visual analog scale (VAS methods in the Korean general population.Materials and methods: Eight hypothetical breast cancer health states were developed based on patient education material and previous publications. Data from 509 individuals from the Korean general population were used to evaluate breast cancer health states using the VAS and the SG methods, which were obtained via computer-assisted personal interviews. Mean utility values were calculated for each human papillomavirus (HPV-related health state.Results: The rank of health states was identical between two valuation methods. SG values were higher than VAS values in all health states. The utility values derived from SG were 0.801 (noninvasive breast cancer with mastectomy and followed by reconstruction, 0.790 (noninvasive breast cancer with mastectomy only, 0.779 (noninvasive breast cancer with breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy, 0.731 (invasive breast cancer with surgery, radiation therapy, and/or chemotherapy, 0.610 (locally advanced breast cancer with radical mastectomy with radiation therapy, 0.587 (inoperable locally advanced breast cancer, 0.496 (loco-regional recurrent breast cancer, and 0.352 (metastatic breast cancer.Conclusion: Our findings might be useful for economic evaluation of breast cancer screening and interventions in general populations. Keywords: breast neoplasm, Korea, quality-adjusted life years, quality of life

  1. Global Genomic Analysis of Prostate, Breast and Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    subtype of infiltrating ductal carcinoma (7) and the MYB -NFIB fusion in adenoid cystic carcinomas, another rare form of breast cancer (8). Recently...Andren Y, Mark J, Horlings HM, Persson F, Stenman G. Recurrent fusion of MYB and NFIB transcription factor genes in carcinomas of the breast and

  2. Breast Cancer - Early Diagnosis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-28

    This podcast answers a listener's question about how to tell if she has breast cancer.  Created: 4/28/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/28/2011.

  3. Triple negative breast cancer: an Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhtar M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Murtaza Akhtar, Subhrajit Dasgupta, Murtuza Rangwala Department of Surgery, NKP Salve Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India Introduction: Breast cancer is the most common female cancer in the world. Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC is a recently identified biological variant with aggressive tumor behavior and poor prognosis. Data of hormonal status from the Indian population is scarce due to financial constraints in performing immunohistochemistry evaluation. The present study aims to prospectively analyze receptor status of all breast cancer patients and identify TNBC and compare their clinical profile and short term survival with other non-TNBC group. Materials and methods: All cytologically and histopathologically confirmed cases of carcinoma breast were prospectively enrolled. In a longitudinal study at tertiary care hospital in central India based on the hormonal status, they were further divided into TNBC and other groups. Comparison of risk factors, clinical profile and short-term survival was carried out. Results: A total 85 patients were enrolled and of them 37 (43.7% were TNBC. On comparing risk factors ie, age, age at menarche, total reproductive age, age at first child birth, and menopausal status – no statistical significance was observed between the TNBC and non-TNBC groups. But on comparison of clinical profile TNBC tumors were significantly large with majority of patients presenting as locally advanced breast cancer (83%. No statistical difference was observed in axillary lymph node status between two groups. TNBC tumors were histologically more aggressive (grade 3 compared to other groups. No statistically significant difference was observed in short term overall survival but all three deaths were observed in the TNBC group only and two local recurrences after surgery were observed in the TNBC group. Conclusion: TNBC forms a large proportion of carcinoma breast patients in a central

  4. Volume-Based Parameters of {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Improve Disease Recurrence Prediction in Postmastectomy Breast Cancer Patients With 1 to 3 Positive Axillary Lymph Nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Naomi, E-mail: haruhi0321@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Hospital Organization Shikoku Cancer Center, Ehime (Japan); Department of Radiology, Ehime University, Ehime (Japan); Kataoka, Masaaki [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Hospital Organization Shikoku Cancer Center, Ehime (Japan); Sugawara, Yoshifumi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, National Hospital Organization Shikoku Cancer Center, Ehime (Japan); Ochi, Takashi [Department of Radiology, Ehime University, Ehime (Japan); Kiyoto, Sachiko; Ohsumi, Shozo [Department of Breast Oncology, National Hospital Organization Shikoku Cancer Center, Ehime (Japan); Mochizuki, Teruhito [Department of Radiology, Ehime University, Ehime (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether volume-based parameters on pretreatment {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy without adjuvant radiation therapy are predictive of recurrence. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 93 patients with 1 to 3 positive axillary nodes after surgery, who were studied with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography for initial staging. We evaluated the relationship between positron emission tomography parameters, including the maximum standardized uptake value, metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and clinical outcomes. Results: The median follow-up duration was 45 months. Recurrence was observed in 11 patients. Metabolic tumor volume and TLG were significantly related to tumor size, number of involved nodes, nodal ratio, nuclear grade, estrogen receptor (ER) status, and triple negativity (TN) (all P values were <.05). In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, MTV and TLG showed better predictive performance than tumor size, ER status, or TN (area under the curve: 0.85, 0.86, 0.79, 0.74, and 0.74, respectively). On multivariate analysis, MTV was an independent prognostic factor of locoregional recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio 34.42, 95% confidence interval 3.94-882.71, P=.0008) and disease-free survival (DFS) (hazard ratio 13.92, 95% confidence interval 2.65-103.78, P=.0018). The 3-year DFS rate was 93.8% for the lower MTV group (<53.1; n=85) and 25.0% for the higher MTV group (≥53.1; n=8; P<.0001, log–rank test). The 3-year DFS rate for patients with both ER-positive status and MTV <53.1 was 98.2%; and for those with ER-negative status and MTV ≥53.1 it was 25.0% (P<.0001). Conclusions: Volume-based parameters improve recurrence prediction in postmastectomy breast cancer patients with 1 to 3 positive nodes. The addition of MTV to ER status or TN has

  5. Study protocol to investigate the effect of a lifestyle intervention on body weight, psychological health status and risk factors associated with disease recurrence in women recovering from breast cancer treatment [ISRCTN08045231

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutrie Nanette

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer survivors often encounter physiological and psychological problems related to their diagnosis and treatment that can influence long-term prognosis. The aim of this research is to investigate the effects of a lifestyle intervention on body weight and psychological well-being in women recovering from breast cancer treatment, and to determine the relationship between changes in these variables and biomarkers associated with disease recurrence and survival. Methods/design Following ethical approval, a total of 100 patients will be randomly assigned to a lifestyle intervention (incorporating dietary energy restriction in conjunction with aerobic exercise training or normal care control group. Patients randomised to the dietary and exercise intervention will be given individualised healthy eating dietary advice and written information and attend moderate intensity aerobic exercise sessions on three to five days per week for a period of 24 weeks. The aim of this strategy is to induce a steady weight loss of up to 0.5 Kg each week. In addition, the overall quality of the diet will be examined with a view to (i reducing the dietary intake of fat to ~25% of the total calories, (ii eating at least 5 portions of fruit and vegetables a day, (iii increasing the intake of fibre and reducing refined carbohydrates, and (iv taking moderate amounts of alcohol. Outcome measures will include body weight and body composition, psychological health status (stress and depression, cardiorespiratory fitness and quality of life. In addition, biomarkers associated with disease recurrence, including stress hormones, estrogen status, inflammatory markers and indices of innate and adaptive immune function will be monitored. Discussion This research will provide valuable information on the effectiveness of a practical, easily implemented lifestyle intervention for evoking positive effects on body weight and psychological well-being, two

  6. Study protocol to investigate the effect of a lifestyle intervention on body weight, psychological health status and risk factors associated with disease recurrence in women recovering from breast cancer treatment [ISRCTN08045231].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton, John M; Daley, Amanda; Woodroofe, Nicola; Coleman, Robert; Powers, Hilary; Mutrie, Nanette; Siddall, Vanessa; Crank, Helen

    2006-02-09

    Breast cancer survivors often encounter physiological and psychological problems related to their diagnosis and treatment that can influence long-term prognosis. The aim of this research is to investigate the effects of a lifestyle intervention on body weight and psychological well-being in women recovering from breast cancer treatment, and to determine the relationship between changes in these variables and biomarkers associated with disease recurrence and survival. Following ethical approval, a total of 100 patients will be randomly assigned to a lifestyle intervention (incorporating dietary energy restriction in conjunction with aerobic exercise training) or normal care control group. Patients randomised to the dietary and exercise intervention will be given individualised healthy eating dietary advice and written information and attend moderate intensity aerobic exercise sessions on three to five days per week for a period of 24 weeks. The aim of this strategy is to induce a steady weight loss of up to 0.5 Kg each week. In addition, the overall quality of the diet will be examined with a view to (i) reducing the dietary intake of fat to approximately 25% of the total calories, (ii) eating at least 5 portions of fruit and vegetables a day, (iii) increasing the intake of fibre and reducing refined carbohydrates, and (iv) taking moderate amounts of alcohol. Outcome measures will include body weight and body composition, psychological health status (stress and depression), cardiorespiratory fitness and quality of life. In addition, biomarkers associated with disease recurrence, including stress hormones, estrogen status, inflammatory markers and indices of innate and adaptive immune function will be monitored. This research will provide valuable information on the effectiveness of a practical, easily implemented lifestyle intervention for evoking positive effects on body weight and psychological well-being, two important factors that can influence long

  7. Behavioral Symptoms after Breast Cancer Treatment: A Biobehavioral Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Fagundes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Being diagnosed and treated for breast cancer is emotionally and physically challenging. Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of death for women in the United States. Accordingly, women with a breast cancer history are the largest group of female cancer survivors. Psychological stress substantially augments adverse autonomic, endocrine, and immune discharge, including enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines. Importantly, inflammation is a key biological mechanism underlying the symptom cluster of pain, depression, fatigue, and sleep disturbances; there is also good evidence that inflammation contributes to breast cancer recurrence. Stress may exert direct effects on psychological and physiological risk processes. In this review, we take a biobehavioral approach to understanding predictors and mechanisms underlying somatic symptoms in breast cancer survivors.

  8. Cytokines, Neovascularization and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Rationale Angiogenesis is important in the growth and metastases of human breast cancer . We hypothesize that this process is under the control of...staining patern seen in invasive cancer , in situ cancer , and benign breast tissue. Note that staining was graded as the most intensly staining area. The...blocked, tumors do not grow or metastasize . The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that breast cancer cells are capable of participating in this

  9. [Diagnosis and treatment of occult breast cancer in 44 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Su; Liu, Hong

    2011-07-01

    To summarize the experience of diagnosis and treatment of occult breast cancer in 44 cases. Clinicopathological data of 44 cases of occult breast cancer initially presenting axillary mass alone treated in our department during Jan 1997 to Dec 2008 were retrospectively analyzed. The 44 patients with occult breast cancer accounted for 0.42% of all breast cancer patients admitted to our hospital and institute in the same period. The surgery included radical mastectomy in 16 cases, modified radical mastectomy in 19 cases, axillary clearance in 1 case, and simple axillary node excision in 8 cases. Follow-up, ranging from 12-132 months, was available in 38 cases. Among 32 cases who underwent mastectomy or axillary clearance, 2 cases died of distant metastases and 3 cases were still alive with local recurrence at the time of analysis. In two out of six cases who refused further surgical treatment received mastectomy 16 months and 41 months after the primary diagnosis of occult breast cancer, respectively. Others were alive without evidence of recurrence or metastases at the time of analysis. Occult breast cancer should be taken into consideration in cases presenting with axillary metastasis of unknown primary origin. The treatment of occult breast cancer should include modified radical mastectomy/radical mastectomy or breast conserving surgery combined with breast irradiation.

  10. Mindfulness based stress reduction (MBSR(BC)) in breast cancer: evaluating fear of recurrence (FOR) as a mediator of psychological and physical symptoms in a randomized control trial (RCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengacher, Cecile A; Shelton, Melissa M; Reich, Richard R; Barta, Michelle K; Johnson-Mallard, Versie; Moscoso, Manolete S; Paterson, Carly; Ramesar, Sophia; Budhrani, Pinky; Carranza, Irina; Lucas, Jean; Jacobsen, Paul B; Goodman, Matthew J; Kip, Kevin E

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the mechanism(s) of action of mindfulness based stress reduction (MBSR(BC)) including reductions in fear of recurrence and other potential mediators. Eighty-two post-treatment breast cancer survivors (stages 0-III) were randomly assigned to a 6-week MBSR(BC) program (n = 40) or to usual care group (UC) (n = 42). Psychological and physical variables were assessed as potential mediators at baseline and at 6 weeks. MBSR(BC) compared to UC experienced favorable changes for five potential mediators: (1) change in fear of recurrence problems mediated the effect of MBSR(BC) on 6-week change in perceived stress (z = 2.12, p = 0.03) and state anxiety (z = 2.03, p = 0.04); and (2) change in physical functioning mediated the effect of MBSR(BC) on 6-week change in perceived stress (z = 2.27, p = 0.02) and trait anxiety (z = 1.98, p = 0.05). MBSR(BC) reduces fear of recurrence and improves physical functioning which reduces perceived stress and anxiety. Findings support the beneficial effects of MBSR(BC) and provide insight into the possible cognitive mechanism of action.