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Sample records for breast cancer recurrence

  1. Opioids and breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe; Ahern, Thomas P;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioids may alter immune function, thereby potentially affecting cancer recurrence. The authors investigated the association between postdiagnosis opioid use and breast cancer recurrence. METHODS: Patients with incident, early stage breast cancer who were diagnosed during 1996 through...... 2008 in Denmark were identified from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group Registry. Opioid prescriptions were ascertained from the Danish National Prescription Registry. Follow-up began on the date of primary surgery for breast cancer and continued until breast cancer recurrence, death......, emigration, 10 years, or July 31, 2013, whichever occurred first. Cox regression models were used to compute hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals associating breast cancer recurrence with opioid prescription use overall and by opioid type and strength, immunosuppressive effect, chronic use (≥6 months...

  2. Radiotherapy for recurrent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinico-radiobiological characteristics of radiotherapy for relapsed breast cancer were studied. Adequate choice of tissue mass to be exposed appeared much more important than any change in focal dose within 50-80 Gy, to achieve higher frequency of locoregional therapeutic effect. However, recurrent tumors more than 3 large lower radiosensitivity involving a sharp rise in the likelihood of dissemination. Radiotherapy for primary tumor did not affect the radiosensitivity of recurrent malignancies but slowed down the rate of its growth. Also, it might promote the dissemination acceleration

  3. Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival For some ... after Beginning 5 or 10 Years of Adjuvant Tamoxifen 5 Years 10 Years Risk of Recurrence 25. ...

  4. Manganese superoxide dismutase and breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre; Christensen, Mariann; Lash, Timothy;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) inhibits oxidative damage and cancer therapy effectiveness. A polymorphism in its encoding gene (SOD2: Val16Ala rs4880) may confer poorer breast cancer survival, but data are inconsistent. We examined the association of SOD2 genotype and breast......-metastatic breast cancer from 1990-2001, received adjuvant Cyclo, and were registered in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. We identified 118 patients with BCR and 213 matched breast cancer controls. We genotyped SOD2 and used conditional logistic regression to compute the odds ratio (OR) and associated 95...... cancer recurrence (BCR) among patients treated with cyclophosphamide-based chemotherapy (Cyclo). We compared our findings with published studies using meta-analyses. METHODS: We conducted a population-based case-control study of BCR among women in Jutland, Denmark. Subjects were diagnosed with non...

  5. RECURRENCE PATTERN FOLLOWING BREAST - CONSERVING SURGERY FOR EARLY BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govindaraj

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study the Local Recurrence and metastasis pattern after Breast - Conserving Surgery for early breast cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From 2010 to 2014 in department of surgery in VIMS Bellary, 70 patients with stage I or II invasive breast carcinoma were treated with breast - conserving surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. In this study we investigated the prognostic value of clinical and pathological factors in early breast cancer patients treated with BCS. All of the surgeries were performed by a single surgical team. Recurrence and its risk factors were evaluated.

  6. Stress Reduction in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Recurrent Gynecologic or Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-08

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Fatigue; Leydig Cell Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Pain; Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Pseudomyxoma Peritonei; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer

  7. Breast cancer with inguinal node recurrence

    OpenAIRE

    Shikha Goyal; Tarun Puri; Pramod K Julka

    2015-01-01

    Surgery and irradiation for breast cancer may interfere with conventional pathways of spread, leading to bizarre patterns of dissemination through lymphatics or through hematogenous route. Lymphoscintigraphic studies may help identify nodal involvement. Other possible reasons could be occurrence of primary breast cancer in accessory breast tissue retained in the vulva following involution of milk line. We describe a case of triple negative breast cancer, who developed contralateral breast can...

  8. Breast cancer with inguinal node recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surgery and irradiation for breast cancer may interfere with conventional pathways of spread, leading to bizarre patterns of dissemination through lymphatics or through hematogenous route. Lymphoscintigraphic studies may help identify nodal involvement. Other possible reasons could be occurrence of primary breast cancer in accessory breast tissue retained in the vulva following involution of milk line. We describe a case of triple negative breast cancer, who developed contralateral breast cancer during treatment. Three years later, she developed isolated inguinal nodal metastases, which responded to local radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, the patient relapsed after 2 years and could not be salvaged thereafter

  9. Breast cancer with inguinal node recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Shikha; Puri, Tarun; Julka, Pramod K

    2015-03-01

    Surgery and irradiation for breast cancer may interfere with conventional pathways of spread, leading to bizarre patterns of dissemination through lymphatics or through hematogenous route. Lymphoscintigraphic studies may help identify nodal involvement. Other possible reasons could be occurrence of primary breast cancer in accessory breast tissue retained in the vulva following involution of milk line. We describe a case of triple negative breast cancer, who developed contralateral breast cancer during treatment. Three years later, she developed isolated inguinal nodal metastases, which responded to local radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, the patient relapsed after 2 years and could not be salvaged thereafter. PMID:25455282

  10. Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-20

    Benign Breast Neoplasm; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Paget Disease of the Breast; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  11. Recurrent Breast Cancer in a Patient with a Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libby R. Copeland-Halperin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a patient with recurrent infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast encasing a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. We also review the current literature regarding reports of breast malignancy around a ventriculoperitoneal shunt, as well as the potential relevance of such shunts to the preoperative evaluation and management of patients with breast cancer.

  12. Electrochemotherapy for large cutaneous recurrence of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Louise Wichmann; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Hendel, Helle Westergren;

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous recurrences of breast cancer may cause considerable discomfort due to ulceration, oozing, and pain and can also be difficult to treat. Electrochemotherapy is a localised anticancer treatment using electric pulses to make cell membranes permeable, augmenting uptake of chemotherapeutic dr...... drugs, and thus enabling highly efficient tumour cell kill. This is the first systematic investigation of electrochemotherapy for larger cutaneous recurrences of breast cancer....

  13. Beliefs and Behaviors about Breast Cancer Recurrence Risk Reduction among African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Ansa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence suggests that breast cancer recurrence risk is linked to lifestyle behaviors. This study examined correlations between breast cancer recurrence, risk reduction beliefs, and related behaviors among African American breast cancer survivors (AA BCSs. Study participants included 191 AA BCSs, mean age = 56.3 years, who completed a lifestyle assessment tool. Most respondents believed that being overweight (52.7%, lack of physical activity (48.7%, and a high fat diet (63.2% are associated with breast cancer recurrence. Over 65% considered themselves overweight; one third (33.5% agreed that losing weight could prevent recurrence, 33.0% disagreed, while the remaining 33.5% did not know; and nearly half (47.9% believed that recurrence could be prevented by increasing physical activity. Almost 90% survivors with BMI < 25 Kg/M2 reported no recurrence compared to 75.7% with BMI ≥ 25 Kg/M2 (p = 0.06; nearly all of the women (99.2% answered “yes” to seeking professional help to lose weight, 79.7% of which were recurrence-free (p = 0.05. These results provide information about AA BCSs’ beliefs and behaviors protective against breast cancer recurrence. Additional research is warranted to determine the effectiveness of educational interventions for AA BCSs that promote consumption of a healthy diet and engaging in regular physical activity.

  14. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer VI: therapy of locoregional breast cancer recurrences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To update the practical guidelines for radiotherapy of patients with locoregional breast cancer recurrences based on the current German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines 2012. A comprehensive survey of the literature using the search phrases ''locoregional breast cancer recurrence'', ''chest wall recurrence'', ''local recurrence'', ''regional recurrence'', and ''breast cancer'' was performed, using the limits ''clinical trials'', ''randomized trials'', ''meta-analysis'', ''systematic review'', and ''guidelines''. Patients with isolated in-breast or regional breast cancer recurrences should be treated with curative intent. Mastectomy is the standard of care for patients with ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence. In a subset of patients, a second breast conservation followed by partial breast irradiation (PBI) is an appropriate alternative to mastectomy. If a second breast conservation is performed, additional irradiation should be mandatory. The largest reirradiation experience base exists for multicatheter brachytherapy; however, prospective clinical trials are needed to clearly define selection criteria, long-term local control, and toxicity. Following primary mastectomy, patients with resectable locoregional breast cancer recurrences should receive multimodality therapy including systemic therapy, surgery, and radiation +/- hyperthermia. This approach results in high local control rates and long-term survival is achieved in a subset of patients. In radiation-naive patients with unresectable locoregional recurrences, radiation therapy is mandatory. In previously irradiated patients with a high risk of a second local recurrence after surgical resection or in patients with unresectable recurrences, reirradiation should be strongly considered. Indication and dose concepts

  15. Supraclavicular recurrence after early breast cancer: a curable condition?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders N; Møller, Susanne; Steffensen, Karina D;

    2010-01-01

    treatment and primary patient characteristics, treatment response, and survival after supraclavicular recurrence (SR) in a large patient population. From the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group treatment database 1977-2003, 305 patients were identified with SR without distant disease as site of first......The prognosis of ipsilateral supraclavicular lymph node recurrence after early breast cancer appears to be worse than for other loco-regional recurrences, but better than for distant metastases. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between different types of salvage...... recurrence. Salvage treatment types as well as other factors were related to response and survival. The median follow-up time for progression after SR was 25 months. Complete remission was 76% among patients receiving excision surgery, 67% with combined loco-regional and systemic therapy, and 48% with...

  16. Accessory breast tissue in axilla masquerading as breast cancer recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyal Shikha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic or accessory breast tissue is most commonly located in the axilla, though it may be present anywhere along the milk line. Development is hormone dependent, similar to normal breast tissue. These lesions do not warrant any intervention unless they produce discomfort, thus their identification and distinction from other breast pathologies, both benign and malignant, is essential. We report a case with locally advanced breast cancer who presented with an ipsilateral axillary mass following surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Subsequent evaluation with excision biopsy showed duct ectasia in axillary breast tissue and the patient was continued on hormone therapy with tamoxifen.

  17. Exemestane Following Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences and Prolongs Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postmenopausal women with early-stage hormone receptor-positive breast cancer had delayed disease recurrence and longer survival after taking 2-3 years of tamoxifen followed by exemestane for a total of 5 years compared to taking tamoxifen for 5 years.

  18. Multidisciplinary treatment for advanced and recurrent breast cancer including brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukiyama, Iwao; Ohno, Tatsuya (Tochigi Cancer Center, Utsunomiya (Japan). Hospital); Takizawa, Yoshikazu; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Egawa, Sunao; Ogino, Takashi

    1994-06-01

    Between 1986 and 1992, 10 patients (12 lesions) of advanced breast cancer were treated with multidisciplinary treatment including brachytherapy. The lesions treated included 5 primary breast tumors, 3 metastatic lesions in the contra lateral breast, 2 recurrences after external beam irradiation, 1 metastasis to the axillary lymph node and 1 metastasis to the upper arm skin. The interstitial irradiation techniques used were [sup 192]Ir low dose-rate irradiation for 5 lesions and high dose-rate for 7 lesions (including 3 with mould irradiation). External hyperthermia as performed for 6 lesions and interstitial hyperthermia were performed for 4 lesions. The local response was CR for 3 lesions, PRa for 8 lesions, PRb for 1 lesion with the local response rate being 100%. Excellent local control could be achieved by combination external and interstitial irradiation, indicating that radiotherapy is definitely useful for the treatment of advanced breast cancer. (author).

  19. Risk of regional recurrence in triple-negative breast cancer patients: a Dutch cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, van Lori M.; Smit, Leonie H.M.; Duijsens, Gaston H.N.M.; Vries, de Bart; Siesling, Sabine; Lobbes, Marc B.I.; Boer, de Maaike; Wilt, de Johannes H.W.; Smidt, Marjolein L.

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer is associated with early recurrence and low survival rates. Several trials investigate the safety of a more conservative approach of axillary treatment in clinically T1-2N0 breast cancer. Triple-negative breast cancer comprises only 15 % of newly diagnosed breast cancer

  20. Manganese Superoxide Dismtase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ording, Anne Gulbech; Cronin Fenton, Deirdre; Christensen, Mariann;

    2013-01-01

    Manganese Superoxide Dismtase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil......Manganese Superoxide Dismtase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil...

  1. Why do younger women have higher breast cancer recurrence rates after breast-conserving surgery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preventing breast cancer recurrence after breast-conserving surgery is an important issue. The main factors contributing to such recurrence are positive margins, absence of radiotherapy and young age. To investigate the clinical significance of age in breast-conserving surgery, we examined the relationship between clinicopathological findings or outcome and age, especially young age. The cases were divided into three groups by age; 35 years old or less, 36-50y.o. and 51y.o. or higher. Between April 1989 and March 2003, 743 patients were treated with breast-conserving surgery. There were 49 patients aged 35 years old or less (6.6%). Younger age significantly correlated with positive surgical margin, lymph node metastases, higher proliferative activity, negative estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone receptor (PgR), larger tumor size, and shorter nipple-tumor distances. Although younger patients had a higher recurrence rate irrespective of radiotherapy, margin status had an impact on recurrence rate. Thus, the reason young age was a significant factor for breast recurrence after breast-conserving surgery was that young patients frequently had numerous risk factors such as positive margin, higher proliferative activity, positive nodes, negative ER/PgR and larger tumor. However, negative surgical margins could reduce recurrence rates even in young women. These results suggest that more suitable criteria and strategies may be needed for young patients with breast cancer. (author)

  2. Recurrent read-through fusion transcripts in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Varley, Katherine E.; Gertz, Jason; Roberts, Brian S.; Davis, Nicholas S.; Bowling, Kevin M.; Kirby, Marie K.; Nesmith, Amy S.; Oliver, Patsy G.; Grizzle, William E.; Forero, Andres; Buchsbaum, Donald J.; LoBuglio, Albert F.; Myers, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Read-through fusion transcripts that result from the splicing of two adjacent genes in the same coding orientation are a recently discovered type of chimeric RNA. We sought to determine if read-through fusion transcripts exist in breast cancer. We performed paired-end RNA-seq of 168 breast samples, including 28 breast cancer cell lines, 42 triple negative breast cancer primary tumors, 42 estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer primary tumors, and 56 non-malignant breast tissue samples....

  3. Treatment of locally advanced/locally recurrent breast cancer and inflammatory breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Masao [Tenri Hospital, Nara (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    This paper summarizes the treatment of locally advanced breast cancer, inflammatory breast cancer, and locally recurrent breast cancer. A multidisciplinary approach considering subclinical distant metastases is needed to treat these types of breast cancer. Subclinical distant metastasis is observed in about 80% of case of locally advanced cancer, and treatment of subclinical distant metastases, e.g., by endocrinotherapy and chemotherapy, is therefore essential to improving the prognosis. The standard therapy for unresectable locally advanced breast cancer consists of induction chemotherapy with anthracyclines and local treatment with mastectomy or irradiation. Previous reports have stated that induction chemotherapy was effective in 60-80% of the primary lesions or lymph node metastasis, and the CR rates were in the 10-20% range. Combination therapy with induction chemotherapy clearly improved the outcome over local treatment alone. The usual irradiation dose is 50 to 60 Gy/5 to 7 weeks to the whole breast or the thoracic wall. Boost irradiation at a dose of 10 to 25 Gy is performed in unresectable cases. The boost irradiation dose to the lymph node area is usually 45 to 50 Gy/5 to 6 weeks in cases without gross lesions and 10 to 15 Gy in cases with gross lesions. Combination therapy consisting of conservative pectoral mastectomy and postoperative adjuvant chemo- endocrino-therapy (i.e., adjuvant therapy) has become the standard regimen for treating resectable locally advanced breast cancer, because it significantly improves the recurrence rate and survival rate compared to local treatment alone. Some clinical have studies indicated that neoadjuvant therapy (i.e., induction chemotherapy + surgery/radiation therapy) is comparable or superior to adjuvant therapy in terms of improving the prognosis. However, the efficacy and most appropriate method of breast-conserving therapy after induction chemotherapy are still unclear. More clinical trials are needed. It has been

  4. Use of magnetic resonance imaging in detection of breast cancer recurrence: a systematic review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, Edel Marie

    2012-09-01

    Diagnosis of breast cancer recurrence can be difficult as a result of the presence of scar tissue in the breast. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be superior to traditional imaging in diagnosis of recurrence because of its ability to differentiate malignancy from scarring. Current guidelines on investigation of suspected breast cancer recurrence recommend MRI when other investigations have equivocal findings. We performed the first systematic review on this topic.

  5. Mucoadhesive Oral Wound Rinse in Preventing and Treating Stomatitis in Patients With ER- or PR-Positive Metastatic or Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer That Cannot be Removed by Surgery Receiving Everolimus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-04

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Oral Complications; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  6. Mechanisms driving local breast cancer recurrence in a model of breast-conserving surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smith, Myles J

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to identify mechanisms driving local recurrence in a model of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer. BACKGROUND: Breast cancer recurrence after BCS remains a clinically significant, but poorly understood problem. We have previously reported that recurrent colorectal tumours demonstrate altered growth dynamics, increased metastatic burden and resistance to apoptosis, mediated by upregulation of phosphoinositide-3-kinase\\/Akt (PI3K\\/Akt). We investigated whether similar characteristics were evident in a model of locally recurrent breast cancer. METHODS: Tumours were generated by orthotopic inoculation of 4T1 cells in two groups of female Balb\\/c mice and cytoreductive surgery performed when mean tumour size was above 150 mm(3). Local recurrence was observed and gene expression was examined using Affymetrix GeneChips in primary and recurrent tumours. Differential expression was confirmed with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Phosphorylation of Akt was assessed using Western immunoblotting. An ex vivo heat shock protein (HSP)-loaded dendritic cell vaccine was administered in the perioperative period. RESULTS: We observed a significant difference in the recurrent 4T1 tumour volume and growth rate (p < 0.05). Gene expression studies suggested roles for the PI3K\\/Akt system and local immunosuppression driving the altered growth kinetics. We demonstrated that perioperative vaccination with an ex vivo HSP-loaded dendritic cell vaccine abrogated recurrent tumour growth in vivo (p = 0.003 at day 15). CONCLUSION: Investigating therapies which target tumour survival pathways such as PI3K\\/Akt and boost immune surveillance in the perioperative period may be useful adjuncts to contemporary breast cancer treatment.

  7. Identification of Prognostic Genes for Recurrent Risk Prediction in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lee H.; Kuo, Wen-Hung; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Chen, Pei-Chun; Hsiao, Chuhsing K.; Chuang, Eric Y.; Chang, Li-Yun; Hsieh, Fon-Jou; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Chang, King-Jen

    2011-01-01

    Discrepancies in the prognosis of triple negative breast cancer exist between Caucasian and Asian populations. Yet, the gene signature of triple negative breast cancer specifically for Asians has not become available. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to construct a prediction model for recurrence of triple negative breast cancer in Taiwanese patients. Whole genome expression profiling of breast cancers from 185 patients in Taiwan from 1995 to 2008 was performed, and the results were co...

  8. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer VI: therapy of locoregional breast cancer recurrences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, Wolfgang [St. Claraspital, Abteilung fuer Radioonkologie, Basel (Switzerland); Budach, W. [Heinrich-Heine-University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, J. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany); Feyer, P. [Vivantes Hospital Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Krug, D. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Piroth, M.D. [Witten/Herdecke University, HELIOS-Hospital Wuppertal, Wuppertal (Germany); Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Municipal Hospital, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayer, F. [Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Wenz, F. [University of Heidelberg, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Haase, W.; Souchon, R.; Collaboration: Breast Cancer Expert Panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO)

    2016-04-15

    To update the practical guidelines for radiotherapy of patients with locoregional breast cancer recurrences based on the current German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines 2012. A comprehensive survey of the literature using the search phrases ''locoregional breast cancer recurrence'', ''chest wall recurrence'', ''local recurrence'', ''regional recurrence'', and ''breast cancer'' was performed, using the limits ''clinical trials'', ''randomized trials'', ''meta-analysis'', ''systematic review'', and ''guidelines''. Patients with isolated in-breast or regional breast cancer recurrences should be treated with curative intent. Mastectomy is the standard of care for patients with ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence. In a subset of patients, a second breast conservation followed by partial breast irradiation (PBI) is an appropriate alternative to mastectomy. If a second breast conservation is performed, additional irradiation should be mandatory. The largest reirradiation experience base exists for multicatheter brachytherapy; however, prospective clinical trials are needed to clearly define selection criteria, long-term local control, and toxicity. Following primary mastectomy, patients with resectable locoregional breast cancer recurrences should receive multimodality therapy including systemic therapy, surgery, and radiation +/- hyperthermia. This approach results in high local control rates and long-term survival is achieved in a subset of patients. In radiation-naive patients with unresectable locoregional recurrences, radiation therapy is mandatory. In previously irradiated patients with a high risk of a second local recurrence after surgical resection or in patients with unresectable recurrences, reirradiation should be strongly considered. Indication and dose concepts

  9. Reirradiation of recurrent breast cancer with and without concurrent chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kretschmer Matthias

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment options for loco-regional recurrent breast cancer after previous irradiation are limited. The efficacy of chemotherapy might be hampered because of impaired tissue perfusion in preirradiated tissue. Thus, mastectomy or local excision and reconstructive surgery are the preferred treatments. However, in recent years evidence accumulates that a second breast conserving approach with reirradiation as part of the treatment might be feasible and safe and, furthermore, reirradiation might be an option for palliation. Here we report on the experience of a single community centre in reirradiation of recurrent breast cancer. Methods The report is based on 29 patients treated with reirradiation. All data were prospectively collected. The median age was 63 years (range 35 to 82 yrs. The interval between initial diagnosis and diagnosis before start of reirradiation was 11.6 months to 295.5 months. The mean total dose (initial dose and reirradiation dose was 106.2 Gy (range 80.4 to 126 Gy and the mean BED3 Gy 168,5 Gy (range 130,6 to 201,6. The mean interval between initial radiotherapy and reirradiation was 92.9 months (range 8.7 to 290.1. Inoperable or incompletely resected patients were offered concurrent chemotherapy with either 5-FU or capecitabine. All patients received 3D-conformal radiotherapy with 1.6 to 2.5 Gy/fraction five times weekly. The treatment volume comprised all visible lesions or lesions detectable on CT/MRI/FDG-PET/CT or the tumour bed or recurrent tumour. Results The local progression-free survival of all patients at one and two years was 81% and 63%. Patients who had no surgery of the recurrence (16/29 had local progression-free survival at one and two years of 72% and 25% with a median progression-free survival time of 17 months. Partial remission and good symptom relief was achieved in 56% (9/16 or complete response of symptoms and/or tumour in 44% (7/16. Patients who had no distant metastases and had at

  10. Reirradiation of recurrent breast cancer with and without concurrent chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment options for loco-regional recurrent breast cancer after previous irradiation are limited. The efficacy of chemotherapy might be hampered because of impaired tissue perfusion in preirradiated tissue. Thus, mastectomy or local excision and reconstructive surgery are the preferred treatments. However, in recent years evidence accumulates that a second breast conserving approach with reirradiation as part of the treatment might be feasible and safe and, furthermore, reirradiation might be an option for palliation. Here we report on the experience of a single community centre in reirradiation of recurrent breast cancer. The report is based on 29 patients treated with reirradiation. All data were prospectively collected. The median age was 63 years (range 35 to 82 yrs). The interval between initial diagnosis and diagnosis before start of reirradiation was 11.6 months to 295.5 months. The mean total dose (initial dose and reirradiation dose) was 106.2 Gy (range 80.4 to 126 Gy) and the mean BED3 Gy 168,5 Gy (range 130,6 to 201,6). The mean interval between initial radiotherapy and reirradiation was 92.9 months (range 8.7 to 290.1). Inoperable or incompletely resected patients were offered concurrent chemotherapy with either 5-FU or capecitabine. All patients received 3D-conformal radiotherapy with 1.6 to 2.5 Gy/fraction five times weekly. The treatment volume comprised all visible lesions or lesions detectable on CT/MRI/FDG-PET/CT or the tumour bed or recurrent tumour. The local progression-free survival of all patients at one and two years was 81% and 63%. Patients who had no surgery of the recurrence (16/29) had local progression-free survival at one and two years of 72% and 25% with a median progression-free survival time of 17 months. Partial remission and good symptom relief was achieved in 56% (9/16) or complete response of symptoms and/or tumour in 44% (7/16). Patients who had no distant metastases and had at least an R1-resection had a local progression

  11. Breast cancer recurrence risk related to concurrent use of SSRI antidepressants and tamoxifen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lash, Timothy L; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre; Ahern, Thomas P;

    2010-01-01

    been recommended for breast cancer patients taking tamoxifen. This study provides epidemiologic evidence to support this recommendation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We conducted a case-control study of breast cancer recurrence nested in the population of female residents of Denmark who were diagnosed with...... association between SSRI use while taking tamoxifen and risk of recurrent breast cancer. RESULTS: About the same proportion of recurrent cases (37 of 366) and matched controls (35 of 366) received at least one prescription for citalopram or its s-stereoisomer while taking tamoxifen (adjusted odds ratio = 1.......1, 95% confidence interval = 0.7, 1.7). Breast cancer patients taking other SSRIs were also at no increased risk of recurrence (adjusted odds ratio = 0.9, 95% confidence interval = 0.5, 1.8). DISCUSSION: Breast cancer patients with indications for an SSRI may be prescribed citalopram - and possibly...

  12. A nested case-control study of adjuvant hormonal therapy persistence and compliance, and early breast cancer recurrence in women with stage I-III breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    PUBLISHED Background: Non-persistence and non-compliance are common in women prescribed hormonal therapy for breast cancer, but little is known about their influence on recurrence. Methods: A nested case–control study of associations between hormonal therapy non-persistence and non-compliance and the risk of early recurrence in women with stage I–III breast cancer was undertaken. Cases, defined as women with a breast cancer recurrence within 4 years of hormonal therapy initiati...

  13. A nested case–control study of adjuvant hormonal therapy persistence and compliance, and early breast cancer recurrence in women with stage I–III breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Barron, T I; Cahir, C; Sharp, L.; Bennett, K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Non-persistence and non-compliance are common in women prescribed hormonal therapy for breast cancer, but little is known about their influence on recurrence. Methods: A nested case–control study of associations between hormonal therapy non-persistence and non-compliance and the risk of early recurrence in women with stage I–III breast cancer was undertaken. Cases, defined as women with a breast cancer recurrence within 4 years of hormonal therapy initiation, were matched to contr...

  14. Increased Incidence of Loco-Regional Recurrences Among African American Women with Terminal Stage Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gerardo Colón-Otero; Sherry King; Vandelyn Smith; Carolyn Bieber; Julia Crook; Solberg, Lawrence A.; Robert Shannon; Perez, Edith A.

    2008-01-01

    A prospective analysis of women with terminal breast cancer admitted to CHNE from November 2006-August 2007 evaluated anecdotal observations that African American (AA) women are likelier than Caucasian women to evidence loco-regional recurrences (LRR). Women with terminal breast cancer who were admitted to CHNE, a not-for-profit hospice serving over 90% of Northeast Florida hospice patients, were eligible for participation. 134 terminal breast cancer patients were assessed by hospice nurses f...

  15. Bilateral metachronous breast cancer with bilateral recurrences: A case report and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Hyun; Sohn, Yu Mee [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The incidence of bilateral breast cancer has been reported to range from 0.4% to 14%, and it increases gradually as a result of improved early detection capabilities and longer survival times. We report a rare case where the bilateral breast cancers occurred as a metachronous bilateral breast cancer with bilateral recurrences, detected by mammography, and the rapid growth of tumor that manifested as microcalcification and skin thickening within 3 months.

  16. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cencer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-Fluororacil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ording, Anne Gulbech; Cronin Fenton, Deirdre; Christensen, Mariann;

    2012-01-01

    Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cencer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-Fluororacil......Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cencer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-Fluororacil...

  17. [A case of recurrent breast cancer that responded to bevacizumab].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagino, Shigeta; Iwata, Keiko; Nakura, Makoto; Yoshizumi, Tetsuya; Tsuneda, Atsushi; Kiriyama, Masato

    2013-11-01

    We report a case of a 59-year-old woman who was forced to undergo mastectomy of the right breast (Rt Bt) plus axillary lymph node (Ax) dissection for right breast cancer at another hospital. The pathological diagnosis was invasive ductal carcinoma( scirrhou[s sci], pT2N2M0, Stage IIIA, estrogen recepto[r ER[]+], progesterone recepto[r PgR[]+], human epidermal growth factor receptor-2[HER2][2+]). Although no recurrence was observed after postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and endocrine therapy, skin metastasis on the left back and pleuritis carcinomatosa were detected at our hospital 9 years and 6 months after the operation. Thereafter, bone metastasis, contralateral lymph node metastasis, and frequent occurrence of hepatic metastasis were sequentially detected. The patient was treated with chemotherapy (a total of 4 regimens) and endocrine therapy in addition to radiation therapy for lymph node metastasis over a period of approximately 2 years and 3 months; however, disease control was poor. Therefore, combined chemotherapy with paclitaxel and bevacizumab was initiated from February 2012. Soon after the initiation of combination therapy, the serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level gradually reduced and computed tomography (CT) revealed that the multiple-organ metastases had remarkably reduced in size. The response was classified as a clinical partial response (cPR). Although adverse events such as peripheral neuropathy, nose bleeding, and high blood pressure were observed, these were all of lesser that Grade 2 severity. The efficacy of chemotherapy was noted for 11 months. PMID:24394122

  18. Weight Gain, Metabolic Syndrome, and Breast Cancer Recurrence: Are Dietary Recommendations Supported by the Data?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin E. Champ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome, which can include weight gain and central obesity, elevated serum insulin and glucose, and insulin resistance, has been strongly associated with breast cancer recurrence and worse outcomes after treatment. Epidemiologic and prospective data do not show conclusive evidence as to which dietary factors may be responsible for these results. Current strategies employ low-fat diets which emphasize supplementing calories with increased intake of fruit, grain, and vegetable carbohydrate sources. Although results thus far have been inconclusive, recent randomized trials employing markedly different dietary strategies in noncancer patients may hold the key to reducing multiple risk factors in metabolic syndrome simultaneously which may prove to increase the long-term outcome of breast cancer patients and decrease recurrences. Since weight gain after breast cancer treatment confers a poor prognosis and may increase recurrence rates, large-scale randomized trials are needed to evaluate appropriate dietary interventions for our breast cancer patients.

  19. Study Confirms Letrozole Prevents More Breast Cancer Recurrences than Tamoxifen

    Science.gov (United States)

    After a median of 8 years of follow-up, women with estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer who received 5 years of letrozole were less likely to have their cancer recur or to die during follow-up than women who received 5 years of tamoxifen.

  20. Local recurrences after breast-conserving treatments in breast cancer: risk factors and effect on survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the risk factors for local and distant failure in node-negative breast cancer treated with breast-conservative surgery and radiotherapy and to determine the relationship between these two events. We retrospectively selected 908 patients who received conservative surgery and radiotherapy but no chemotherapy between 1980 and 1995, for a mode-negative breast cancer. Patients were divided in two groups according to the status of the margins of resection. All pathology specimens were reviewed. In case of negative margins, the risk factors for local recurrences picked up by the Cox model were histologic multi-focus (P=0.0076), peritumoral vessel invasion (P=0.021) and age ≥40 years (P=0.024), and in case of involved margins, negative oestrogen receptors (P=0.0012), histologic multi-focus (P=0.0028), and absence of hormonal therapy (P=0.017). The 10-year local recurrence rate was 18 % in case of negative margins and 29 % in case of involved margins, although in the latter case patients received high-dose adjuvant radiotherapy. Accordingly, the 10-year distant failure rates were 16 % and 27 %, respectively. Many arguments suggest that local and distant failures are closely related. Patients with histologic multi-focus or positive margins are at high risk of local failure and then of distant failure, and require a more aggressive initial treatment. (author)

  1. Tamoxifen's protection against breast cancer recurrence is not reduced by concurrent use of the SSRI citalopram

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lash, T L; Pedersen, L; Cronin-Fenton, D;

    2008-01-01

    serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), so these widely used drugs - when taken concurrently - may reduce tamoxifen's prevention of breast cancer recurrence. We studied citalopram use in 184 cases of breast cancer recurrence and 184 matched controls without recurrence after equivalent follow-up. Cases and...... prescription databases from the National Health Service. Seventeen cases (9%) and 21 controls (11%) received at least one prescription for the SSRI citalopram while taking tamoxifen (adjusted conditional odds ratio=0.85, 95% confidence interval=0.42, 1.7). We also observed no reduction of tamoxifen...... effectiveness among regular citalopram users (>or=30% overlap with tamoxifen use). These results suggest that concurrent use of citalopram does not reduce tamoxifen's prevention of breast cancer recurrence....

  2. Serum uPAR as Biomarker in Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Mathematical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wenrui; Friedman, Avner

    2016-01-01

    There are currently over 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States and, according to the American Cancer Society, 10 to 20 percent of these women will develop recurrent breast cancer. Early detection of recurrence can avoid unnecessary radical treatment. However, self-examination or mammography screening may not discover a recurring cancer if the number of surviving cancer cells is small, while biopsy is too invasive and cannot be frequently repeated. It is therefore important to identify non-invasive biomarkers that can detect early recurrence. The present paper develops a mathematical model of cancer recurrence. The model, based on a system of partial differential equations, focuses on tissue biomarkers that include the plasminogen system. Among them, only uPAR is known to have significant correlation to its concentration in serum and could therefore be a good candidate for serum biomarker. The model includes uPAR and other associated cytokines and cells. It is assumed that the residual cancer cells that survived primary cancer therapy are concentrated in the same location within a region with a very small diameter. Model simulations establish a quantitative relation between the diameter of the growing cancer and the total uPAR mass in the cancer. This relation is used to identify uPAR as a potential serum biomarker for breast cancer recurrence. PMID:27078836

  3. Serum uPAR as Biomarker in Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Mathematical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wenrui; Friedman, Avner

    2016-01-01

    There are currently over 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States and, according to the American Cancer Society, 10 to 20 percent of these women will develop recurrent breast cancer. Early detection of recurrence can avoid unnecessary radical treatment. However, self-examination or mammography screening may not discover a recurring cancer if the number of surviving cancer cells is small, while biopsy is too invasive and cannot be frequently repeated. It is therefore important to identify non-invasive biomarkers that can detect early recurrence. The present paper develops a mathematical model of cancer recurrence. The model, based on a system of partial differential equations, focuses on tissue biomarkers that include the plasminogen system. Among them, only uPAR is known to have significant correlation to its concentration in serum and could therefore be a good candidate for serum biomarker. The model includes uPAR and other associated cytokines and cells. It is assumed that the residual cancer cells that survived primary cancer therapy are concentrated in the same location within a region with a very small diameter. Model simulations establish a quantitative relation between the diameter of the growing cancer and the total uPAR mass in the cancer. This relation is used to identify uPAR as a potential serum biomarker for breast cancer recurrence. PMID:27078836

  4. Breast cancer recurrence: follow up after treatment for primary breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hiramanek, N

    2004-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer will affect one in 12 Australian women in their lifetime. After potentially curative treatment, it is usual for patients to be followed up for many years. However, controversies surround follow up, and its value is uncertain.

  5. Par-4 Down-regulation Promotes Breast Cancer Recurrence by Preventing Multinucleation following Targeted Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, James V.; Pan, Tien-chi; Ruth, Jason; Feng, Yi; Zhou, Alice; Pant, Dhruv; Grimley, Joshua S.; Wandless, Thomas J.; DeMichele, Angela; Chodosh, Lewis A.

    2013-01-01

    Most deaths from breast cancer result from tumor recurrence, but the mechanisms underlying tumor relapse are largely unknown. We now report that Par-4 is down-regulated during tumor recurrence and that Par-4 down-regulation is necessary and sufficient to promote recurrence. Tumor cells with low Par-4 expression survive therapy by evading a program of Par-4-dependent multinucleation and apoptosis that is otherwise engaged following treatment. Low Par-4 expression is associated with poor respon...

  6. Correlation of breast recurrence (inflammatory type or not) after breast conserving surgery with radiation therapy and clinicopathological factors in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To clarify risk factors for breast recurrence of inflammatory type after breast conserving therapy, we examined clinicopathological findings and therapies given after initial surgery. Nine cases of inflammatory breast recurrence out of 133 recurrent cases collected from a collaborative group supported by a grant-in-aid for Cancer Research by Japanese Ministry of Health and Welfare (7-24, Chairman: H. Koyama) were analyzed by a case control study. And forty-three recurrent cases in Kumamoto City Hospital were also analyzed similarly. Inflammatory breast recurrence after breast conserving surgery is characterized as follows: Most cases have negative surgical margin and may be unresponsive to radiation therapy, unlike non-inflammatory breast recurrence. Lymph node metastasis is involved in recurrence, but the difference in patients with only distant metastasis was positive lymphatic invasion. Distant metastasis coexisted at the time of recurrence, and secondary surgery was impossible in most cases. The prognosis after recurrence was unfavorable. These findings suggest that inflammatory recurrence is manifestation of so-called ''occult'' inflammatory breast cancer. (author)

  7. Recurrent BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in breast cancer patients of African ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Fackenthal, James D; Zheng, Yonglan; Huo, Dezheng; Hou, Ningqi; Niu, Qun; Zvosec, Cecilia; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Hennis, Anselm J; Leske, Maria Cristina; Nemesure, Barbara; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I

    2012-07-01

    Recurrent mutations constituted nearly three quarters of all BRCA1 mutations and almost half of all BRCA2 mutations identified in the first cohort of the Nigerian Breast Cancer Study. To further characterize breast/ovarian cancer risks associated with BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in the African diaspora, we genotyped recurrent mutations among Nigerian, African American, and Barbadian breast cancer patients. A replication cohort of 356 Nigerian breast cancer patients was genotyped for 12 recurrent BRCA1/2 mutant alleles (Y101X, 1742insG, 4241delTG, M1775R, 4359insC, C64Y, 1623delTTAAA, Q1090X, and 943ins10 from BRCA1, and 1538delAAGA, 2630del11, and 9045delGAAA from BRCA2) by means of SNaPshot followed by direct sequencing or by direct sequencing alone. In addition, 260 African Americans and 118 Barbadians were genotyped for six of the recurrent BRCA1 mutations by SNaPshot assay. Of all the BRCA1/2 recurrent mutations we identified in the first cohort, six were identified in 11 patients in the replication study. These mutation carriers constitute 3.1 % [95 % Confidence Interval (CI) 1.6-5.5 %] of the replication cohort. By comparison, 6.9 % (95 % CI 4.7-9.7 %) of the discovery cohort carried BRCA1/2 recurrent mutations. For the subset of recurrent mutations we tested in breast cancer cases from Barbados or the United States, only two 943ins10 carriers were identified in African Americans. Nigerian breast cancer patients from Ibadan carry a broad and unique spectrum of BRCA1/2 mutations. Our data suggest that BRCA1/2 mutation testing limited to recurrent mutations is not sufficient to understand the BRCA1/2-associated breast cancer risk in African populations in the diaspora. As the cost of Sanger sequencing is considerably reduced, deploying innovative technologies such as high throughput DNA sequencing of BRCA1/2 and other cancer susceptibility genes will be essential for identifying high-risk individuals and families to reduce the burden of aggressive early onset breast

  8. A clinical study of radiotherapy with CHFU for advanced and recurrent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the usefulness of combination therapy with radiation and CHFU for advanced and recurrent breast cancer according to a clinical cotrolled multicenter trial from 1982 to 1984. One hundred cases were registered and 82 of them were availabe. Treatment sites were the lymph nodes, skin, bone and lung, and the overall response rate was 58% in CR and 19% in PR, while the duration of remission was 18 weeks in CR. Side effects were found in 10% of the patients. Combination therapy with radiation and HCFU may be useful in multimodal tretment for advanced recurrent breast cancer. (author)

  9. FDG-PET/CT in the diagnosis of recurrent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. An advantage of PET/CT has been demonstrated for diagnosis of several tumor entities. In patients with breast cancer, early diagnosis and accurate restaging of recurrence after surgery is important for selection of the most appropriate therapeutic strategy. Purpose. To evaluate the accuracy of integrated positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), for follow-up of patients with suspected recurrent breast cancer. Material and Methods. Forty-seven patients with suspected recurrent breast cancer underwent PET/CT. The PET and PET/CT images were interpreted without knowledge of the results of other diagnostic modalities, and compared with each other with reference to the final diagnosis. Results. Twenty-five (53%) patients suffered tumor recurrence. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy of PET/CT were 96%, 91%, 92%, 95%, and 94%, respectively. In comparison with PET, PET/CT had a higher sensitivity and accuracy (96% vs. 80% and 94% vs. 81%, respectively). The difference in diagnostic accuracy between PET/CT and PET was significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The present findings indicate that PET/CT is an accurate, sensitive and reliable modality for screening and detection of breast cancer recurrence. PET/CT appears to be an effective surveillance tool, as it is able to cover the whole body in a single procedure and shows good performance

  10. FDG-PET/CT in the diagnosis of recurrent breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Ryusuke; Kumita, Shin-ichiro; Yoshida, Tamiko; Ishihara, Keiichi; Kiriyama, Tomonari; Hakozaki, Kenta (Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)), Email: rywakana@nms.ac.jp; Yanagihara, Keiko; Lida, Shinya (Department Surgery for Organ Function and Biological Regulation, Graduate School of Medicine, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)); Tsuchiya, Shin-ichi (Division of Diagnostic Pathology, Nippon Medical School Hospital, Tokyo (Japan))

    2012-02-15

    Background. An advantage of PET/CT has been demonstrated for diagnosis of several tumor entities. In patients with breast cancer, early diagnosis and accurate restaging of recurrence after surgery is important for selection of the most appropriate therapeutic strategy. Purpose. To evaluate the accuracy of integrated positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), for follow-up of patients with suspected recurrent breast cancer. Material and Methods. Forty-seven patients with suspected recurrent breast cancer underwent PET/CT. The PET and PET/CT images were interpreted without knowledge of the results of other diagnostic modalities, and compared with each other with reference to the final diagnosis. Results. Twenty-five (53%) patients suffered tumor recurrence. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy of PET/CT were 96%, 91%, 92%, 95%, and 94%, respectively. In comparison with PET, PET/CT had a higher sensitivity and accuracy (96% vs. 80% and 94% vs. 81%, respectively). The difference in diagnostic accuracy between PET/CT and PET was significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The present findings indicate that PET/CT is an accurate, sensitive and reliable modality for screening and detection of breast cancer recurrence. PET/CT appears to be an effective surveillance tool, as it is able to cover the whole body in a single procedure and shows good performance

  11. The 10-Year Local Recurrence and Partial Breast Radiotherapy for Early Breast Cancer Treated by Conservative Surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhizhen Wang; Ruiying Li

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the local recurrence and the role of whole breast radiotherapy for early breast cancer treated by conservative surgery.METHODS From April 1990 to December 2000, 49 patients with early primary breast cancer were treated by conservative surgery in our hospital. The cases were comprised of Stage 0, 1; Stage Ⅰ, 31; and Stage Ⅱa,17. Forty cases underwent quadrantectomy plus axillary lymph node dissection, and the other 9 cases had lumpectomy alone. Irradiation, which was received by 39 patients, was administered by using low tangential half fields with 6 MV X-ray to decrease the pulmonary irradiative volume.The dose to the whole breast was 45 Gy/22~23f/4.5W, then a 15 Gy boost dose was delivered to the tumor bed by an electron beam. The other patients underwent an irradiated regional field according to postoperative pathology.RESULTS All patients were followed-up for 10 years or more. The 10year local recurrence rates, distant metastasis rates and survival rates were 6.1%, 4.1% and 98.0% respectively. All of the 3 patients who had a local recurrence had infiltrative carcinomas and negative lymph nodes.The 10-year local recurrence rate was higher (2.6% vs. 20.0%) with nonpostoperative whole breast radiotherapy, but the statistical difference was not marked because of the low number of cases. All of the recurrent lesions localized within 3 cm of the primary lesion.CONCLUSION Original recurrence of the tumor was the main type of local recurrence. Radiotherapy after conservative surgery is very essential.After conservative surgery it is feasible that irradiation can be delivered alone to the neighboring region of the tumor bed. Partial breast radiotherapy can substitute for whole breast radiotherapy.

  12. Recurrent and second breast cancer detected on follow-up mammography and breast ultrasound after breast-conserving surgery: Findings and clinicopathologic factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ga Young; Cha, Joo Hee; Kim, Hak Hee; Shin, Hee Jung; Chae, Eun Young; Choi, Woo Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    To assess the imaging and clinicopathologic outcomes of recurrent and second breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery for invasive ductal carcinomas detected on follow-up mammography and breast ultrasound (US). Seventy-six women with an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) or regional lymph node recurrence and/or contralateral breast cancer (RLNR and CBC) after breast-conserving surgery were included in this study. The mammography and US images were analyzed and the clinicopathologic parameters were compared between the groups. Thirty had an IBTR, and 46 had a RLNR and CBC. The IBTR group's mammography and US images frequently revealed calcification and masses on the breast, respectively. The most frequent site of RLNR detected during follow-up mammography and breast US was the axilla. In univariate analysis, the tumors in the IBTR group were predominantly estrogen receptor (ER)-negative, HER-2 overexpression, and p53-positive. ER and HER-2 were shown by the multivariate analysis to be independent parameters associated for both types of recurrences. A mass or calcification is frequently present in IBTR and the axillary lymph node is the most frequent site of RLNR. ER and HER-2 status are major independent factors associated with recurrent and second breast cancer.

  13. Compliance of patients concerning recommended radiotherapy in breast cancer. Association with recurrence, age, and hormonal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: In this study, we investigated how often guidelines for radiation therapy in patients with breast cancer are not complied with, which patient group is mostly affected, and how this influences local recurrence. Patients and methods: All patients (n = 1,903) diagnosed between November 2003 and December 2008 with primary invasive or intraductal breast cancer in the interdisciplinary breast center of the Charite Hospital Berlin were included and followed for a median 2.18 years. Results: Patients who, in contrast to the recommendation of the interdisciplinary tumor board, did not undergo postoperative radiation experienced a fivefold higher local recurrence rate (p < 0.0005), corresponding to a 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival of 74.5% in this group. The 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival of patients following the recommendations was 93.3%. Guideline compliance was dependent on age of patients, acceptance of adjuvant hormonal treatment or chemotherapy, and increased diameter of the primary tumor. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed an association between compliance and age or hormonal therapy. Conclusion: In order to avoid local recurrence patients should be motivated to comply with guideline driven therapy. Since a higher number of local recurrences is observed in health services research compared to clinical research, studies on the value of adjuvant treatment following local recurrence should be performed. (orig.)

  14. Investigation of irradiation conditions for recurrent breast cancer in JRR-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiguchi, H., E-mail: horiguchi.hironori@jaea.go.jp [Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Nakamura, T. [Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Kumada, H. [Proton Medical Research Centre, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Yanagie, H. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and management, Graduate School of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)] [Cooperative Unit of Medicine and Engineering, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, M. [Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan); Sagawa, H. [Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for recurrent breast cancers are considered at Japan Research Reactor No. 4 (JRR-4). In this study, the irradiation technique for a total mastectomy patient with recurrent cancer was optimized by dosimetric calculations using JAEA computational dosimetry system (JCDS). The evaluation was performed using an en face technique and a tangents technique with thermal neutron beam mode at JRR-4. The results revealed that equivalent doses of lung, heart, liver and skin were similar in each irradiation technique due to the isotropic scattering of thermal neutrons in the body. On the other hand, the irradiation time with the tangents technique was a few times longer than with the en face technique. We concluded that the en face technique was an optimal irradiation technique for recurrent breast cancers using thermal neutron beam mode in terms of shorter irradiation time and easier patient positioning.

  15. Ipsilateral Breast Recurrence After Breast Conserving Surgery in Patients with Small (≤ 2 cm) Breast Cancer Treated with Modern Adjuvant Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Siponen, E.T.; Vaalavirta, L.; Joensuu, H; Vironen, J.; Heikkilä, P.; Leidenius, M.H.K.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Modern multimodality treatment greatly influences the rate and the predictive factors for ipsilateral cancer recurrence (IBR) after breast conserving surgery. Material and Methods The study is based on 1,297 patients with pT1 breast cancer and treated with breast conserving surgery in February 2001 to August 2005. The median duration of follow-up was 57 months. Results IBR occurred in only 27 (2.1%) patients...

  16. Factors influencing local recurrence after excision and radiotherapy for primary breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between November 1979 and December 1986, 262 patients were treated for primary breast cancer by local excision and radiotherapy at the City Hospital, Nottingham. Local recurrence within the treated breast occurred in 56 patients (21 per cent), in 18 (6.8 per cent) of whom it was gross and uncontrollable. Analysis of clinicopathological features shows patient age, nodal status, tumour size, presence of definitive vascular invasion, adjacent ductal carcinoma in situ and grade to be predictive of local recurrence. A Cox's multivariate analysis of these factors shows the first four to be independently significant. The factors can be combined as a prognostic index which allows identification of patients at high risk of local recurrence. On the basis of these findings the authors altered their selection policy for patients suitable for breast conservation. (author)

  17. Nomogram of Naive Bayesian Model for Recurrence Prediction of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woojae; Kim, Ku Sang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Breast cancer has a high rate of recurrence, resulting in the need for aggressive treatment and close follow-up. However, previously established classification guidelines, based on expert panels or regression models, are controversial. Prediction models based on machine learning show excellent performance, but they are not widely used because they cannot explain their decisions and cannot be presented on paper in the way that knowledge is customarily represented in the clinical world. The principal objective of this study was to develop a nomogram based on a naïve Bayesian model for the prediction of breast cancer recurrence within 5 years after breast cancer surgery. Methods The nomogram can provide a visual explanation of the predicted probabilities on a sheet of paper. We used a data set from a Korean tertiary teaching hospital of 679 patients who had undergone breast cancer surgery between 1994 and 2002. Seven prognostic factors were selected as independent variables for the model. Results The accuracy was 80%, and the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) of the model was 0.81. Conclusions The nomogram can be easily used in daily practice to aid physicians and patients in making appropriate treatment decisions after breast cancer surgery. PMID:27200218

  18. Risk factors for recurrence after conservative treatment in early breast cancer; Preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate our experience in the breast-conserving treatment for early breast cancer with special regard to recurrence pattern and related risk factors. Two hundred and sixteen patients with AJC stage I and II beast cancer who received breast conserving treatment between January 1991 and December 1994 were evaluated. Age distribution ranged from 23-80 year old with a median age of 44. One hundred and seventeen patients had T1 lesions and 99 patients had T2 lesions. Axillary lymph nodes were involved in 73 patients. All patients received a breast conserving surgery (wide excision to quadrantectomy) and axillary node dissection followed by radiotherapy. Ninety six patients received chemotherapy before or after radiotherapy. During the follow-up period (3-60 months, median 30 months), local recurrence were noted in six patients (true; 3, elsewhere; 1, skin; 2). Sixteen patients developed distant metastases as the first sign of recurrence at 8-38 months (median 20 months) after surgery. Among them, three patients simultaneously developed local recurrence with distant metastases. Contralateral breast cancer developed in one patient and non-mammary cancers developed in three patients. The actuarial 5 year survival rate was 88.4% (stage I: 96.7%, stage IIa: 95.2%, stage IIb 69.9%). Age, T stage, number of involved axillary lymph nodes, and AJC stage were risk factors for distant metastases in univariate analysis. In the multivariate analysis, the number of involved axillary lymph nodes was the most significant risk factor for metastases. Local recurrence was not common in the early years after radiotherapy. Distant metastases occurred at a steady rate during the first three years and was more common in the patients with larger tumors, higher number of involved axillary nodes, and younger age. (author)

  19. Experience in treatment of patients with locally advanced or recurrent breast cancer. Intraarterial infusion chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of local control and breast conservation, intraarterial infusion chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy has been indicated in patients with locally advanced breast cancer both in primary and recurrent cases. The present series, evaluated during the past 4 years, consisted of 15 patients 35-83 years of age, with invasive ductal carcinoma, including 10 with primary breast cancer (stage IIIb: 1, IV: 9) and 5 with postoperative recurrence (stage IIIb: 2, IV: 3). Intraarterial chemotherapy is started, basically infusing ADM 50 mg, MMC 10 mg and CDDP 50 mg into the internal thoracic and/or subclavian artery 1-3 times, followed by reduction surgery (quadrantectomy: 4, wide resection: 2) and radiotherapy to the breast, supraclavicular, parasternal and cervical regions according to tumor extent. Local response after arterial infusion was CR: 2, PR: 10, NC: 3 (response rate: 73% ). The response rate of distant metastases after arterial infusion was 73%. Of 10 patients with primary breast cancer, recurrence was noted in 1. Breast conservation was successful in 8 of 10 patients. One of them, in stage IIIb, has survived for 4.5 years with no evidence of disease and with breast conservation. Five patients with postoperative recurrence showed CR with no recurrence after intraarterial chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Acute skin reaction occurred in 6 patients, and was especially frequent in patients with postoperative recurrence (4 of 5). According to these results, combined therapy affords breast conservation even in patients with locally advanced breast cancer, and improves patient's QOL in stage IV. (author)

  20. TOP2A RNA Expression and Recurrence in Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparano, Joseph A.; Goldstein, Lori J.; Davidson, Nancy E.; Sledge, George W.; Gray, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between TOP2A RNA expression and recurrence in patients with operable estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. We evaluated TOP2A expression in a pooled analysis of 4 independent data sets with gene expression data including 752 patients with early stage, ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer, most of whom received either no adjuvant therapy or endocrine therapy without chemotherapy. We also used an algorithm to simulate the Oncotype DX Recurrence Score (simRS) and the proliferation component of the Recurrence Score (simPS). Results are expressed as the hazard ratio (HR) for estimates of the effect of a one standard deviation increase in the value of the log gene expression (x + 1SD vs. x) as a continuous function. TOP2A expression was significantly associated with recurrence (HR 1.56, pcancer, a population known to have low incidence of TOP2A gene alterations. These findings confirm prior reports indicating that TOP2A expression provides prognostic information in ER-positive breast cancer. TOP2A expression may also be useful for identifying those with an intermediate RS who are more likely to relapse, although additional validation in datasets including measured rather than simulated RS will be required. PMID:22706628

  1. Pre-operative FDG PET/CT findings related to early tumor recurrence in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to identify any pre-operative FDG PET/CT findings related to early recurrence in the breast cancer patients. One hundred eighteen breast cancer patients who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT scan for preoperative staging from September 2004 to September 2005 were included. All patients received operation and follow-up examination. From the FDG PET/CT images, (1) the peak standard uptake values (pSUV) of the primary tumor, (2) pSUV of axillary lymph node (LN) were recorded. 7 out of 118 patients had tumor recurrence within 26 months after the surgery. The mean pSUV of primary tumors with early recurrence (6.113.22) was significantly higher than the mean pSUV of the early recurrence negative follow-up group (3.432.43). The mean pSUVs of the axillary LN showed no significant difference between the early recurrence group and recurrence negative (2.122.17 vs 2.411.13). Of 111 patients with no evidence of recurrence, 71 patients showed no perceptible FDG uptake in the axillary LNs. On the other hand, all of the 7 recurrent breast cancer cases show increased FDG uptakes of axillary LN. In the recurrence negative group, no axillary LN demonstrated perceptibly increased FDG uptakes in 64% (71/111 cases); increased FDG uptake was noted in 36% (40/111 cases). In breast cancer patients who had early recurrence, the pSUV of the primary tumor was significantly higher than that of early recurrence negative patients. Though the pSUV of the axillary LN was not a predictor of recurrent breast cancer, all recurrent breast cancer patients had FDG uptake in axillary LN

  2. Outcomes after curative or palliative surgery for locoregional recurrent breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Alexander Andersen; Mele, Marco; Damsgaard, Tine Engberg

    2014-01-01

    Background Locoregional recurrence (LRR) after breast cancer is an independent predictor for later systemic disease and poor long-term outcome. As the surgical treatment is complex and often leaves the patient with extensive defects, reconstructive procedures involving flaps, and thus plastic...... surgical assistance, are often required. The aim of the present study was to evaluate our institution’s approach to surgical treatment for locoregional recurrence of a breast cancer. Methods In the present retrospective, single-centre study, we evaluate our experience with 12 patients who underwent surgery...... occurred in four (33 %) of the patients. Median overall survival was 22 months, regardless of the surgery being curative or palliative. A median disease-free survival of 18 months was achieved for patients having achieved radicality. Conclusions Both wide local excision and full thickness chest wall...

  3. Prognostic significance of local recurrence in breast cancer after postmastectomy radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We have retrospectively analyzed the impact of local recurrence in patients with adjuvant radiation therapy after mastectomy for breast cancer. Patients and Methods: From January 1985 through December 1993, 959 patients were irradiated after mastectomy for breast cancer. The age ranged from 34 to 79 years, the median follow-up was 3.1 years (range; 0.3-12.2 years). 368 (38%) were pre- and 591 (62%) postmenopausal. 35% had T3-4 tumors, 62% had axillary lymph node involvement, and 66% received additional systemic hormonal and/or cytotoxic therapy. Postmastectomy radiotherapy was administered in case of positive axillary nodes and in high-risk pN0-patients. The chest wall and lymphatics (axilla, parasternal and supraclavicular nodes) were irradiated with an anterior photon field with 50 Gy and the chest wall with an electron field with 44 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Results: The overall survival was 70.5% after 5 and 59.8% after 10 years. 53 patients (5.5%) developed a locoregional recurrence 2-96 months after treatment (median 26 months). The local control rate was 92.7% after 5 and 86.4% after 10 years. Axillary lymph node involvement was the most important and (in a multivariate analysis the only) risk factor for local recurrence (p=0.0001). Patients with local control had a significantly better 10-year distant-disease-free survival and overall survival as compared to patients with local recurrence (44.5% vs 15.4%, p=0.002 and 62.1% vs 34.8%, p=0.004). Local recurrence increased the risk of death by a factor of 1.7 and in a Cox regression model, axillary lymph node status, T-category and local recurrence were significant prognostic factors for overall survival. In patients with local recurrence, the initial axillary lymph node status was the most important prognostic factor for survival after local recurrence. The 3-year survival after local relapse was 86% for patients with pN0 status vs 27% in with positive axillary nodes (p=0.025). Conclusions: Local

  4. Concurrent radiotherapy and taxane chemotherapy in patients with locoregional recurrence of breast cancer. A retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: locoregional breast cancer recurrence is characterized by a high rate of systemic and local re-recurrence. Data on concurrent radiochemotherapy (RCT) in these cases are scarce. The purpose of this study was to evaluate feasibility, toxicity and efficacy of local control of a radiotherapy combined with a chemotherapy containing a taxane. Patients and methods: between May 1999 and November 2004, 36 women referred to the authors' clinic because of locoregional breast cancer recurrence that was either inoperable (n = 29) or resected (n = 7) received concurrent irradiation and taxane monotherapy weekly (TAX/RT; n = 28: paclitaxel 90 mg/m2 n = 24, or docetaxel 35 mg/m2, n = 4) or taxane + cisplatin therapy (TAX/CIS/RT; n = 8; paclitaxel 135 mg/m2 d1 and cisplatin 20 mq/m2 d1-5 q28). Results: comparing TAX/RT with TAX/CIS/RT, the complete remission rate in patients with macroscopic tumor prior to RCT was significantly higher for TAX/RT than for TAX/CIS/RT (7/19 vs. 0/8; p = 0.046), but overall remission rates were comparable, i.e., partial remission: 11/20 versus 6/8 cases, stable disease (no change): 1/20 versus 2/8 cases, and response rate: 95% versus 75%, respectively. The cumulative local recurrence-free survival rate at 1 and 2 years post-treatment was 83% and 68% and that of systemic recurrence-free survival 56% and 29%, respectively. The main toxic reactions of third-degree and higher were dermatitis in TAX/RT (57% vs. 11% for TAX/CIS/RT) and leukocytopenia in TAX/CIS/RT (62% vs. 7% for TAX/RT). Conclusion: concurrent irradiation and taxane chemotherapy weekly, in particular with paclitaxel, is recommended due to response and acceptable side effects for treatment of inoperable locoregional breast cancer recurrence. (orig.)

  5. Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-12

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  6. Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-23

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Breast Adenocarcinoma; Inflammatory Breast Carcinoma

  7. Weight Gain, Metabolic Syndrome, and Breast Cancer Recurrence: Are Dietary Recommendations Supported by the Data?

    OpenAIRE

    Champ, Colin E.; Volek, Jeff S.; Joshua Siglin; Lianjin Jin; Simone, Nicole L.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome, which can include weight gain and central obesity, elevated serum insulin and glucose, and insulin resistance, has been strongly associated with breast cancer recurrence and worse outcomes after treatment. Epidemiologic and prospective data do not show conclusive evidence as to which dietary factors may be responsible for these results. Current strategies employ low-fat diets which emphasize supplementing calories with increased intake of fruit, grain, and vegetable carboh...

  8. A case of recurrent organizing pneumonia after radiation therapy for postoperative breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the case of a 61-year-old female patient with breast cancer who developed recurrent organizing pneumonia outside the radiation field after radiation therapy for postoperative breast cancer. The patient had received tangential radiation therapy and aromatase inhibitors for postoperative breast cancer. Chest computed tomography confirmed an irregular nodule and ground-glass opacities in the left lower lobe outside the radiation field 10 months after radiation therapy. The nodule demonstrated high uptake on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography; therefore, lung cancer could not be ruled out. We performed partial resection of the lung, and a diagnosis of organized pneumonia was made on histopathological examination of the resected specimen. Three days after surgery, a chest radiograph revealed an abnormal shadow in the right lower field. The possibility of organizing pneumonia was considered when pulmonary infiltrate did not respond to conventional antibiotic therapy and the patient recovered completely after treatment with steroids. Furthermore, chest CT performed 4 months after surgery revealed consolidation in the right lower lobe. Again, the patient recovered completely with steroid treatment, indicating the possibility of recurrent organizing pneumonia. The number of such reported cases has increased in recent years; however, the etiology remains unclear. In the case presented, aromatase inhibitor therapy combined with radiation therapy may have been the cause of the organizing pneumonia. (author)

  9. Increased Incidence of Loco-Regional Recurrences Among African American Women with Terminal Stage Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Colón-Otero

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A prospective analysis of women with terminal breast cancer admitted to CHNE from November 2006-August 2007 evaluated anecdotal observations that African American (AA women are likelier than Caucasian women to evidence loco-regional recurrences (LRR. Women with terminal breast cancer who were admitted to CHNE, a not-for-profit hospice serving over 90% of Northeast Florida hospice patients, were eligible for participation. 134 terminal breast cancer patients were assessed by hospice nurses for LRR presence via chest wall examination. 80% of them (107 were Caucasian, 17% (23 were AA and 3% (4 were of other ethnicities. Evidence of LRR were noted in 13% of the women (17/134. The pro- portion of patients with LRR was higher in AA women than Caucasian women (26% vs. 10%, 6/23 vs. 11/107, respectively, although this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.08. The majority of Caucasian women with LRR consented to a medical record review, but a minority of AA women consented (8/11 vs. 2/6, respectively, p = 0.16.Conclusion: Evaluating disparities in breast cancer care outcomes is possible by reviewing data from patients served by hospice programs that aid a majority of patients within a community. This pilot data suggests that AA women with breast cancer have a higher incidence of loco-regional failure as a component of their terminal breast cancer disease than Caucasian women. A smaller proportion of AA patients and families agreed to participate in a medical record review study than Caucasians. Larger studies are necessary to confirm these findings, to elucidate factors contributing to disparities and to develop potential solutions.

  10. 6.3 MeV fast neutrons in the treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikaya, V. V.; Musabaeva, L. I.; Lisin, V. A.; Startseva, Zh. A.

    2016-08-01

    The study included 135 breast cancer patients (70 patients with locally recurrent breast cancer and 65 patients with locally advanced breast cancer with unfavorable prognostic factors) who received the neutron therapy alone or in combination with the photon therapy. The neutron therapy was shown to be effective in multimodality treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer. The 8-year survival rate in patients without repeated breast cancer recurrence was 87.6 ± 8.7% after the neutron and neutron-photon therapy and 54.3 ± 9.2% after the electron beam therapy.

  11. Elevated expression of chemokine C-C ligand 2 in stroma is associated with recurrent basal-like breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Min; Yu, Elaine; Staggs, Vincent; Fan, Fang; Cheng, Nikki

    2016-08-01

    Despite advances in treatment, up to 30% of breast cancer patients experience disease recurrence accompanied by more aggressive disease and poorer prognosis. Treatment of breast cancer is complicated by the presence of multiple breast cancer subtypes, including: luminal, Her2 overexpressing, and aggressive basal-like breast cancers. Identifying new biomarkers specific to breast cancer subtypes could enhance the prediction of patient prognosis and contribute to improved treatment strategies. The microenvironment influences breast cancer progression through expression of growth factors, angiogenic factors and other soluble proteins. In particular, chemokine C-C ligand 2 (CCL2) regulates macrophage recruitment to primary tumors and signals to cancer cells to promote breast tumor progression. Here we employed a software-based approach to evaluate the prognostic significance of CCL2 protein expression in breast cancer subtypes in relation to its expression in the epithelium or stroma or in relation to fibroblast-specific protein 1 (Fsp1), a mesenchymal marker. Immunohistochemistry analysis of tissue microarrays revealed that CCL2 significantly correlated with Fsp1 expression in the stroma and tumor epithelium of invasive ductal carcinoma. In the overall cohort of invasive ductal carcinomas (n=427), CCL2 and Fsp1 expression in whole tissues, stroma and epithelium were inversely associated with cancer stage and tumor size. When factoring in molecular subtype, stromal CCL2 was observed to be most highly expressed in basal-like breast cancers. By Cox regression modeling, stromal CCL2, but not epithelial CCL2, expression was significantly associated with decreased recurrence-free survival. Furthermore, stromal CCL2 (HR=7.51 P=0.007) was associated with a greater hazard than cancer stage (HR=2.45, P=0.048) in multivariate analysis. These studies indicate that stromal CCL2 is associated with decreased recurrence-free survival in patients with basal-like breast cancer, with

  12. First experiences with technetium-99m furifosmin as tumour-seeking agent in breast cancer and recurrent ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent in vitro studies suggest that technetium-99m furifosmin may have tumour-seeking properties. We analysed the diagnostic value of 99mTc-furifosmin scintigraphy in nine patients with documented carcinoma of the breast and in eight patients with continued recurrent ovarian cancer. In the breast, 99mTc-furifosmin failed to visualize the primary malignant tumour and the associated malignant lymph nodes in all patients. In contrast, multiple sites of increased tracer uptake were demonstrated in one patient with acute benign inflammatory breast disease. In four of eight patients with recurrent ovarian cancer, 99mTc-furifosmin scintigraphy demonstrated early (5 min p.i.) localized increased uptake corresponding to adhesions to the bowel as diagnosed by computed tomography, but failed to reveal further abnormalities in all patients. The present study demonstrates that furifosmin is of no value in the imaging of breast cancer and recurrent ovarian cancer. These results do not continue the pattern observed in cell culture studies and are quite in contrast to the findings of mammoscintigraphy using 99mTc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile and 99mTc-tetrofosmin. (orig.). With 3 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Long-term prognosis of patients with local recurrence after conservative surgery and radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Voogd (Adri); F.J. van Oost (F.); E.J. Rutgers; S. Elkhuizen (Sylvia); A.N. van Geel (Albert); L.J.E.E. Scheijmans (L. J E E); M.J.C. van der Sangen (Maurice); G. Botke (G.); C.J.M. Hoekstra (C. J M); J.J. Jobsen (Jan); C.J.H. van de Velde (Cornelis); M.F. von Meyenfeldt (Maarten); J.M. Tabak (J.); J.L. Peterse (J.); M.J. Vijver (Marc ); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem); G. van Tienhoven (Geertjan)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractWe have studied the long-term prognosis of 266 patients considered to have isolated local recurrence in the breast following conservative surgery and radiotherapy for early breast cancer. The median follow-up of the patients still alive after diagnosis of local relapse was 11.2 years. At

  14. Full-thickness chest wall resection for locally recurrent breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedel, Godehard

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In spite of available recommendations, therapeutic procedures of locally recurrent breast cancer are very different. In a retrospective study, the possibilities and results of complete, full-thickness chest wall resection are presented.Methods: Between 1985 and 2004, 51 women underwent complete, full-thickness chest wall resection with primary coverage. Primary surgical therapy of breast cancer had been mastectomy in 88%. Median age of patients undergoing surgery for a local recurrence was 57 (29 - 81 years. The median interval between surgery of the primary tumour and of the local recurrence was 70.3 (10.7 - 327.2 months; median follow-up was 29.4 (1.8 - 230.9 months. 40 (78.4% patients required rib resections, 15 (29.4% of them in combination with partial sternal resection. In 4 (7.8% patients complete and in 7 (13.7% patients partial sternal resection without additional rib resection were performed.Coverage was mainly realized using latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps (n=44; 86.3%. Survival rates were calculated by means of the Kaplan-Meier method, the relative risk using univariate and multivariate Cox-regression analysis.Results: In the total collective, cumulative 5-, 10- and 15-year survival (YS rates were 39%, 31% and 23%, respectively, median survival 46.4 months. R0 resection was associated with a 5-YS of 42%. Prognostic factors were age at the time of primary surgery, disease-free interval and tumour invasion of bony structures. Mortality was 2%, morbidity 35%.Conclusion: Full-thickness chest wall resection of locally recurrent breast cancer is possible in almost any patient when performed by a team of thoracic and plastic surgeons. Only radical resection provides good long-term results with low mortality and morbidity.

  15. Carcinoma en Cuirasse from Recurrent Breast Cancer seen on FDG-PET/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aung Zaw Win

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our patient was a 36-year-old female diagnosed with Grade II ER+/PR−/Her-2 − ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS in the left breast. She underwent left lumpectomy and received treatment with tamoxifen and radiotherapy. Three years later, she presented with multiple diffused skin nodules on the chest and upper left arm. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT exam showed widespread metastasis in the chest, upper left arm, left axillary lymph nodes, and left suprascapular muscle. FDG-PET/CT imaging of breast carcinoma en cuirasse is very rare. FDG-PET/CT is useful in detecting recurrent breast cancer.

  16. Effectiveness of bisphosphonate use and risk of contralateral breast cancer and recurrence in women with early-stage breast cancer treated with tamoxifen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Marilyn L; Shi, Jiaxiao M; Habel, Laurel A; Song, Jun; Chung, Joanie W-L; Avila, Chantal C; Schottinger, Joanne E; Cheetham, T Craig; Fletcher, Suzanne W; Haque, Reina

    2016-04-01

    The effectiveness of bisphosphonates (BP) in reducing risk of second breast cancer and recurrence in observational studies has been minimally studied. We examined the association of oral BP use on risk of contralateral breast cancer (CBC) and recurrence in 16,781 women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer from 1996 to 2007, treated with tamoxifen, and followed through December 31, 2009 at Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC, n = 8857) and Southern California (KPSC, n = 7924). Sociodemographic, clinical, and pharmacy information were extracted from electronic medical records and cancer registries. CBC was identified from cancer registries, and recurrences from electronic health records and chart reviews. Multivariate Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) treating BP use and hormonal therapy as time-varying variables. After mean 6.4 years of follow-up, 494 (3.0 %) women developed CBC. BP use post-breast cancer diagnosis (>93 % alendronate) ranged from 14.5 to 24.9 % at both study sites. Overall, there was no association of BP use with reduced risk of CBC (ever use, HR = 0.96; 95 % CI 0.67-1.38 and continuous use, HR = 1.03; 95 % CI 0.88, 1.20). Similar null associations were observed for recurrence (ever use, HR = 0.98; 95 % CI 0.82, 1.17 and continuous use, HR = 1.00; 95 % CI 0.92, 1.09). Associations varied somewhat by site yet confidence intervals overlapped. BP use was not associated with reduced risk of recurrence or new primary disease among women diagnosed with early breast cancer and treated with tamoxifen. PMID:27002508

  17. Sternal resection and reconstruction for local recurrence of breast cancer using the sternal allograft transplantation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'amore, Andrea; Nizar, Asadi; Dolci, Giampiero; Cassanelli, Nicola; Caroli, Guido; Luciano, Giulia; Greco, Domenico; Bini, Alessandro; Stella, Franco

    2013-03-01

    Sternal involvement in patients with breast cancer is relatively rare and its treatment is still controversial. Surgery is usually indicated in cases of single metastases in a multimodality protocol. Partial or complete sternectomy associated or not with the resection of surrounding tissues is the technique of choice to obtain safety margins and radical treatment of the disease. The most challenging part of the operation is the reconstruction of the anterior chest wall in order to avoid secondary complications and respiratory failure. In the last few years, different techniques and materials have been used to reconstruct the sternum. We report our experience in two patients with recurrent breast cancer using the sternal allograft technique to replace the sternum after partial sternectomy. The use of a sternal-allograft provides excellent functional and cosmetic results without complications during the follow-up period. The implantation technique is simple and reproducible. PMID:22884436

  18. Hyperthermia combined with radiation therapy for superficial breast cancer and chest wall recurrence: A review of the randomised data

    OpenAIRE

    Zagar, Timothy M.; OLESON, JAMES R.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Craciunescu, Oana I; BLACKWELL, KIMBERLY L.; Prosnitz, Leonard R.; Jones, Ellen L.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperthermia has long been used in combination with radiation for the treatment of superficial malignancies, in part due to its radiosensitising capabilities. Patients who suffer superficial recurrences of breast cancer, be it in their chest wall following mastectomy, or in their breast after breast conservation, typically have poor clinical outcomes. They often develop distant metastatic disease, but one must not overlook the problems associated with an uncontrolled local failure. Morbidity ...

  19. Risk of breast cancer recurrence in patients receiving manual lymphatic drainage: a hospital-based cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao PC

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pei-Chi Hsiao,1,2 Jung-Tai Liu,3 Chien-Liang Lin,4 Willy Chou,1,2 Shiang-Ru Lu5 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chi-Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan; 2Department of Recreation and Health Care Management, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan, Taiwan; 3Departments of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chi-Mei Medical Center Liouying Campus, Tainan, Taiwan; 4Department of Hematology and Oncology, Chi-Mei Medical Center Liouying Campus, Tainan, Taiwan; 5Department of Neurology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan Background: This retrospective cohort study evaluated whether manual lymphatic drainage (MLD therapy increases the risk of recurrence of breast cancer. Methods: We analyzed 1,106 women who were diagnosed with stage 0­–3 breast cancer between 2007 and 2011 and experienced remission after surgery and adjuvant therapy. The patients were divided into two groups: group A (n=996, in which patients did not participate in any MLD therapy, regardless of whether they developed breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL after cancer treatment; and group B (n=110, in which patients participated in MLD therapy for BCRL. All patients were monitored until October 2013 to determine whether breast cancer recurrence developed, including local or regional recurrence and distant metastasis. Patients who developed cancer recurrence prior to MLD therapy were excluded from analysis. Risk factors associated with cancer recurrence were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results: During the monitoring period, 166 patients (15.0% developed cancer recurrence, including 154 (15.5% in group A and 12 (10.9% in group B. The median period from surgery to cancer recurrence was 1.85 (interquartile range 1.18–2.93 years. Independent risk factors for cancer recurrence were tumor histological grading of grade 3, high number (≥3 of axillary lymph node invasion, and a large tumor size (>5 cm. Factors

  20. Association between genomic recurrence risk and well-being among breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene expression profiling (GEP) is increasingly used in the rapidly evolving field of personalized medicine. We sought to evaluate the association between GEP-assessed of breast cancer recurrence risk and patients’ well-being. Participants were Dutch women from 10 hospitals being treated for early stage breast cancer who were enrolled in the MINDACT trial (Microarray In Node-negative and 1 to 3 positive lymph node Disease may Avoid ChemoTherapy). As part of the trial, they received a disease recurrence risk estimate based on a 70-gene signature and on standard clinical criteria as scored via a modified version of Adjuvant! Online. /Women completed a questionnaire 6–8 weeks after surgery and after their decision regarding adjuvant chemotherapy. The questionnaire assessed perceived understanding, knowledge, risk perception, satisfaction, distress, cancer worry and health-related quality of life (HRQoL), 6–8 weeks after surgery and decision regarding adjuvant chemotherapy. Women (n = 347, response rate 62%) reported high satisfaction with and a good understanding of the GEP information they received. Women with low risk estimates from both the standard and genomic tests reported the lowest distress levels. Distress was higher predominately among patients who had received high genomic risk estimates, who did not receive genomic risk estimates, or who received conflicting estimates based on genomic and clinical criteria. Cancer worry was highest for patients with higher risk perceptions and lower satisfaction. Patients with concordant high-risk profiles and those for whom such profiles were not available reported lower quality of life. Patients were generally satisfied with the information they received about recurrence risk based on genomic testing. Some types of genomic test results were associated with greater distress levels, but not with cancer worry or HRQoL. ISRCTN: http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN18543567/MINDACT

  1. Novel use of an air-filled breast prosthesis to allow radiotherapy to recurrent colonic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Duffy, F

    2011-03-01

    AiM: The authors present the novel and successful use of an air-filled breast prosthesis for extra pelvic exclusion of small bowel to facilitate adjuvant radiotherapy following resection of recurrent adenocarcinoma of the ascending bowel. The therapeutic use of radiotherapy in colon cancer can cause acute or chronic radiation enteropathy. Mobile small bowel can be sequestered in \\'dead space\\' or by adhesions exposing it to adjuvant radiotherapy. A variety of pelvic partitioning methods have been described to exclude bowel from radiation fields using both native and prosthetic materials.

  2. Five recurrent BRCA1/2 mutations are responsible for cancer predisposition in the majority of Slovenian breast cancer families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novakovic Srdjan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both recurrent and population specific mutations have been found in different areas of the world and more specifically in ethnically defined or isolated populations. The population of Slovenia has over several centuries undergone limited mixing with surrounding populations. The current study was aimed at establishing the mutation spectrum of BRCA1/2 in the Slovenian breast/ovarian cancer families taking advantage of a complete cancer registration database. A second objective was to determine the cancer phenotype of these families. Methods The original population database was composed of cancer patients from the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana in Slovenia which also includes current follow-up status on these patients. The inclusion criteria for the BRCA1/2 screening were: (i probands with at least two first degree relatives with breast and ovarian cancer; (ii probands with only two first degree relatives of breast cancer where one must be diagnosed less than 50 years of age; and (iii individual patients with breast and ovarian cancer, bilateral breast cancer, breast cancer diagnosed before the age of 40 and male breast cancer without any other cancer in the family. Results Probands from 150 different families met the inclusion criteria for mutation analysis of which 145 consented to testing. A BRCA1/2 mutation was found in 56 (39%. Two novel large deletions covering consecutive exons of BRCA1 were found. Five highly recurrent specific mutations were identified (1806C>T, 300T>G, 300T>A, 5382insC in the BRCA1 gene and IVS16-2A>G in the BRCA2 gene. The IVS16-2A>G in the BRCA2 gene appears to be a unique founder mutation in the Slovenian population. A practical implication is that only 4 PCR fragments can be used in a first screen and reveal the cancer predisposing mutation in 67% of the BRCA1/2 positive families. We also observed an exceptionally high frequency of 4 different pathogenic missense mutations, all affecting one of

  3. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-09

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  4. The impact of tamoxifen on breast recurrence, cosmesis, complications, and survival in estrogen receptor positive early stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In the NSABP B14 trial evaluating tamoxifen (tam) in axillary node negative, estrogen receptor positive tumors fewer breast recurrences were observed in patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation who received tam compared to the observation arm. An additional series, however, has suggested that tam adversely impacts on the cosmetic result. To further address these issues we compared the outcome of estrogen receptor positive tumors treated with conservative surgery and radiation with or without tam. Materials and Methods: From 1982 to 1991, 491 women with estrogen receptor positive stage I-II breast cancer underwent excisional biopsy, axillary dissection and radiation. The median age of the patient population was 60 years (range 39-85). The median followup was 5.3 years (range .1-12.8). 69% had T1 tumors and 83% had histologically negative axillary nodes. Reexcision was performed in 49%. The final margin of resection was negative in 64%, unknown in 18%, and close or positive in 19%. None of the patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. 154 patients received tam and 337 received no adjuvant therapy. Patients who received tam were more often axillary node positive (44% tam vs 5% no tam) and less often had unknown margins (9% tam vs 22% no tam). There were no significant differences for the 2 groups for median age, primary tumor size, histology, race, or use of reexcision. Results: The 5 yr act rate of breast recurrence was 4% for the tam patients compared to 7% for patients not receiving tam (p=.21). At 8 yrs, the breast recurrence rates were 4% for the tam patients compared to 11% for the no tam patients (p=.05). However, at 9 years the rates were 17% tam vs 14% no tam (p=.21). The benefit from tam in terms of a decreased 5 year actuarial breast recurrence rate was most evident for patients who did not have a reexcision (3% tam vs 10% no tam, p=.15), had unknown margins (7% tam vs 13% no tam, p=.37) or close margins (0% tam vs 11% no tam, p=.34

  5. High serum YKL-40 levels in patients with primary breast cancer is related to short recurrence free survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Julia S; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Riisbro, Rikke;

    2003-01-01

    normal serum YKL-40. In the present study we evaluated the associations of preoperative serum YKL-40 in 271 patients with primary breast cancer in relation to relapse-free survival and overall survival. The median follow-up time was 5.9 years. There were 77 relapses and 69 patients died. The median serum......YKL-40 is a growth factor for connective tissue cells and stimulates migration of endothelial cells. YKL-40 is secreted by cancer cells, and elevated serum YKL-40 in patients with metastatic breast cancer and colorectal cancer is associated with a poorer prognosis as compared to patients with...... YKL-40 in patients with primary breast cancer at time of operation is only elevated in a small group of patients, but these patients have a shorter recurrence free interval. Further studies are required to determine the biological function of YKL-40 in breast cancer....

  6. A Case Report of Local Recurrence Developing 24 Years After Mastectomy for Breast Cancer Recurrence From Breast Cancer After 24 Years

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Linlin; Hu, Xudong; Wang, Suzhen; Yong-Sheng, Gao; Yu, Qingxi; Gao, Song; Zhang, Hui; Wei, Yuchun; ZHAO Qian; Yuan, Shuang-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Breast cancer is a commonly diagnosed cancer, in which most patients’ metastases (about 75%) occurred in 5 years after the initial diagnosis, especially in 3 years. Recrudescence exceeding 20 years is rarely reported in the past several decades. Case information: A 68-year-old female patient presented with breast cancer in which 3 focal increased 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the right supraclavicular lymph node, the mediastinum and sternum were found on positron emi...

  7. Time Interval From Breast-Conserving Surgery to Breast Irradiation in Early Stage Node-Negative Breast Cancer: 17-Year Follow-Up Results and Patterns of Recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A retrospectivechart review was conducted to determine whether the time interval from breast-conserving surgery to breast irradiation (surgery-radiation therapy interval) in early stage node-negative breast cancer had any detrimental effects on recurrence rates. Methods and Materials: There were 566 patients with T1 to T3, N0 breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and breast irradiation and without adjuvant systemic treatment between 1985 and 1992. The surgery-to-radiation therapy intervals used for analysis were 0 to 8 weeks (201 patients), >8 to 12 weeks (233 patients), >12 to 16 weeks (91 patients), and >16 weeks (41 patients). Kaplan-Meier estimates of time to local recurrence, disease-free survival, distant disease-free survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were calculated. Results: Median follow-up was 17.4 years. Patients in all 4 time intervals were similar in terms of characteristics and pathologic features. There were no statistically significant differences among the 4 time groups in local recurrence (P=.67) or disease-free survival (P=.82). The local recurrence rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 4.9%, 11.5%, and 15.0%, respectively. The distant disease relapse rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 10.6%, 15.4%, and 18.5%, respectively. The disease-free failure rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 20%, 32.3%, and 39.8%, respectively. Cause-specific survival rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 92%, 84.6%, and 79.8%, respectively. The overall survival rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 89.3%, 79.2%, and 66.9%, respectively. Conclusions: Surgery-radiation therapy intervals up to 16 weeks from breast-conserving surgery are not associated with any increased risk of recurrence in early stage node-negative breast cancer. There is a steady local recurrence rate of 1% per year with adjuvant radiation alone

  8. Time Interval From Breast-Conserving Surgery to Breast Irradiation in Early Stage Node-Negative Breast Cancer: 17-Year Follow-Up Results and Patterns of Recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vujovic, Olga, E-mail: olga.vujovic@lhsc.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Yu, Edward [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Cherian, Anil [Station Health Centre, Royal Air Force Lossiemouth, Moray (United Kingdom); Dar, A. Rashid [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Stitt, Larry [Department of Biometry, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Perera, Francisco [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: A retrospectivechart review was conducted to determine whether the time interval from breast-conserving surgery to breast irradiation (surgery-radiation therapy interval) in early stage node-negative breast cancer had any detrimental effects on recurrence rates. Methods and Materials: There were 566 patients with T1 to T3, N0 breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and breast irradiation and without adjuvant systemic treatment between 1985 and 1992. The surgery-to-radiation therapy intervals used for analysis were 0 to 8 weeks (201 patients), >8 to 12 weeks (233 patients), >12 to 16 weeks (91 patients), and >16 weeks (41 patients). Kaplan-Meier estimates of time to local recurrence, disease-free survival, distant disease-free survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were calculated. Results: Median follow-up was 17.4 years. Patients in all 4 time intervals were similar in terms of characteristics and pathologic features. There were no statistically significant differences among the 4 time groups in local recurrence (P=.67) or disease-free survival (P=.82). The local recurrence rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 4.9%, 11.5%, and 15.0%, respectively. The distant disease relapse rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 10.6%, 15.4%, and 18.5%, respectively. The disease-free failure rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 20%, 32.3%, and 39.8%, respectively. Cause-specific survival rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 92%, 84.6%, and 79.8%, respectively. The overall survival rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 89.3%, 79.2%, and 66.9%, respectively. Conclusions: Surgery-radiation therapy intervals up to 16 weeks from breast-conserving surgery are not associated with any increased risk of recurrence in early stage node-negative breast cancer. There is a steady local recurrence rate of 1% per year with adjuvant radiation alone.

  9. Impact of statin use on cancer recurrence and mortality in breast cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manthravadi, Sashidhar; Shrestha, Anuj; Madhusudhana, Sheshadri

    2016-09-15

    Statins have shown antineoplastic properties in preclinical studies with breast cancer cells. They inhibit the enzyme "HMG CoA reductase" and the expression of this enzyme in cancer cells has been implicated as a favorable prognostic factor in patients with breast cancer. After a search of MEDLINE and Embase from inception through November 2015, 817 abstracts were reviewed to identify studies that described an association between statin use and outcomes in breast cancer. A total of 14 studies which included 75,684 women were identified. In a meta-analysis of 10 studies, statin use was associated with improved recurrence-free survival (RFS; HR 0.64; 95% CI 0.53-0.79, I(2)  = 44%). Furthermore, this RFS benefit appeared to be confined to use of lipophilic statins (HR 0.72; 95% CI 0.59-0.89) as hydrophilic statin use was not associated with improvement in RFS (HR 0.80; 95% CI 0.44-1.46). Statin users similarly showed improved overall survival in a meta-analysis with substantial heterogeneity (8 studies, HR 0.66; 95% CI 0.44-0.99, I(2)  = 89%). Statin users also had improved cancer-specific survival, although this relationship was measured with less precision (six studies, HR 0.70; 95% CI 0.46-1.06, I(2)  = 86%). In conclusion, breast cancer patients who use statins, or specifically, lipophilic statins show improved recurrence-free survival. Statin users also had improved overall survival and cancer-specific survival. These findings should be assessed in a prospective randomized cohort and the choice of statin, dose and biomarkers that may predict the efficacy of these drugs should be identified. PMID:27176735

  10. Recurrence and mortality according to Estrogen Receptor status for breast cancer patients undergoing conservative surgery. Ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence dynamics provides clues for tumour biology within the residual breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the study was designed to determine how tumour hormone receptor status affects the subsequent pattern over time (dynamics) of breast cancer recurrence and death following conservative primary breast cancer resection. Time span from primary resection until both first recurrence and death were considered among 2825 patients undergoing conservative surgery with or without breast radiotherapy. The hazard rates for ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence (IBTR), distant metastasis (DM) and mortality throughout 10 years of follow-up were assessed. DM dynamics displays the same bimodal pattern (first early peak at about 24 months, second late peak at the sixth-seventh year) for both estrogen receptor (ER) positive (P) and negative (N) tumours and for all local treatments and metastatic sites. The hazard rates for IBTR maintain the bimodal pattern for ERP and ERN tumours; however, each IBTR recurrence peak for ERP tumours is delayed in comparison to the corresponding timing of recurrence peaks for ERN tumours. Mortality dynamics is markedly different for ERP and ERN tumours with more early deaths among patients with ERN than among patients with ERP primary tumours. DM dynamics is not influenced by the extent of conservative primary tumour resection and is similar for both ER phenotypes across different metastatic sites, suggesting similar mechanisms for tumour development at distant sites despite apparently different microenvironments. The IBTR risk peak delay observed in ERP tumours is an exception to the common recurrence risk rhythm. This suggests that the microenvironment within the residual breast tissue may enforce more stringent constraints upon ERP breast tumour cell growth than other tissues, prolonging the latency of IBTR. This local environment is, however, apparently less constraining to ERN cells, as IBTR dynamics is similar to the corresponding recurrence dynamics among other distant tissues

  11. Significant survival improvement of patients with recurrent breast cancer in the periods 2001-2008 vs. 1992-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishimura Sumiko

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is unclear whether individualized treatments based on biological factors have improved the prognosis of recurrent breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the survival improvement of patients with recurrent breast cancer after the introduction of third generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs and trastuzumab. Methods A total of 407 patients who received first diagnosis of recurrent breast cancer and treatment at National Kyushu Cancer Center between 1992 and 2008 were retrospectively evaluated. As AIs and trastuzumab were approved for clinical use in Japan in 2001, the patients were divided into two time cohorts depending on whether the cancer recurred before or after 2001. Cohort A: 170 patients who were diagnosed between 1992 and 2000. Cohort B: 237 patients who were diagnosed between 2001 and 2008. Tumor characteristics, treatments, and outcome were compared. Results Fourteen percent of cohort A and 76% of cohort B received AIs and/or trastuzumab (P Conclusions The prognosis of patients with recurrent breast cancer was improved over time following the introduction of AIs and trastuzumab and the survival improvement was apparent in HR- and/or HER-2-positive tumors.

  12. Stereotactic Image-Guided Navigation During Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-27

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  13. FDG PET/CT and CA 15-3 in the early diagnosis of recurrent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most widely used tumour marker in the follow-up of breast cancer is CA 15-3. But its use is still in debate. There is general agreement that a progressive increase of CA 15-3 might be the early signal of tumour relapse, even when found in an asymptomatic patient. The aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic effectiveness of PET/CT with FDG in the detection of breast cancer recurrence in cases of isolated elevation of CA 15-3. Methods: Fourteen patients, previously treated for breast cancer, with no clinical evidence of recurrence, negative conventional radiological examination but with an increase of CA15-3 were studied. 18FDG-PET/CT was performed. Results were correlated with histology, other imaging methods and clinical follow-up. Results: PET/CT was positive for 7 patients. One patient presented a recurrence with negative PET/CT. With an overall sensitivity of 87,5%, this exam identified a recurrence for 50% of the patients with isolated CA 15-3 elevation. Conclusion: These results suggest that tumour marker-guided PET/CT with FDG is a useful technique for the early detection of breast cancer recurrence. Further studies, with a greater number of patients and a longer follow-up, are necessary to evaluate the red diagnostic and therapeutic impact of this association. (authors)

  14. Germline DNA copy number aberrations identified as potential prognostic factors for breast cancer recurrence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Sapkota

    Full Text Available Breast cancer recurrence (BCR is a common treatment outcome despite curative-intent primary treatment of non-metastatic breast cancer. Currently used prognostic and predictive factors utilize tumor-based markers, and are not optimal determinants of risk of BCR. Germline-based copy number aberrations (CNAs have not been evaluated as determinants of predisposition to experience BCR. In this study, we accessed germline DNA from 369 female breast cancer subjects who received curative-intent primary treatment following diagnosis. Of these, 155 experienced BCR and 214 did not, after a median duration of follow up after breast cancer diagnosis of 6.35 years (range = 0.60-21.78 and 8.60 years (range = 3.08-13.57, respectively. Whole genome CNA genotyping was performed on the Affymetrix SNP array 6.0 platform. CNAs were identified using the SNP-Fast Adaptive States Segmentation Technique 2 algorithm implemented in Nexus Copy Number 6.0. Six samples were removed due to poor quality scores, leaving 363 samples for further analysis. We identified 18,561 CNAs with ≥1 kb as a predefined cut-off for observed aberrations. Univariate survival analyses (log-rank tests identified seven CNAs (two copy number gains and five copy neutral-loss of heterozygosities, CN-LOHs showing significant differences (P<2.01×10(-5 in recurrence-free survival (RFS probabilities with and without CNAs.We also observed three additional but distinct CN-LOHs showing significant differences in RFS probabilities (P<2.86×10(-5 when analyses were restricted to stratified cases (luminal A, n = 208 only. After adjusting for tumor stage and grade in multivariate analyses (Cox proportional hazards models, all the CNAs remained strongly associated with the phenotype of BCR. Of these, we confirmed three CNAs at 17q11.2, 11q13.1 and 6q24.1 in representative samples using independent genotyping platforms. Our results suggest further investigations on the potential use of germline DNA

  15. Prognosis after local recurrence after conservative surgery and radiation for early-stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the long-term prognosis of patients who develop a local recurrence (LR) after conservative surgery (CS) and radiation therapy (RT) for early-stage invasive breast cancer. Methods and materials: Between 1970 and 1987, 2102 patients with clinical Stage I-II breast cancer were treated with CS+RT. LR was defined as any recurrence within the ipsilateral breast with or without simultaneous regional nodal or distant metastasis. Patients were at risk for a LR until the first of distant metastases, second nonbreast malignancy, or death (DF/S/D). The final study population comprised 341 patients with LR. The median time to LR was 72 months. The median follow-up time after LR was 85 months. A proportional hazards model of time from LR to DF/S/D was done to investigate the influence of factors at initial diagnosis and at LR on subsequent outcome. Results: The actuarial freedom from DF/S/D 5 years after LR was 65% and the survival was 81%. Variables significantly associated with time to DF/S/D were: LR histology (invasive vs. ductal carcinoma in situ, hazard ratio [HR] = 4.1, p 5 years, HR = 2.6, p 5 years, HR = 1.8, p = 0.006); and age at initial diagnosis (≥60 vs. < 60, HR = 1.6, p = 0.01). Conclusions: Many patients with LR after CS+RT have prolonged distant disease-free survival, particularly those able to be treated with mastectomy. Patients with a noninvasive LR, longer interval to LR, or age <60 had a longer time to distant failure, second malignancy, or death than other patients

  16. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. Breast cancer kills more women in the United States than ... cancer. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are a number of risk factors. ...

  17. FDG PET and tumour markers in the diagnosis of recurrent and metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siggelkow, Wulf; Rath, Werner; Buell, Udalrich; Zimny, Michael

    2004-06-01

    Breast cancer continues to be one of the most common cancers in North America and Western Europe. Positron emission tomography with 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG PET) represents a non-invasive functional imaging modality that is based on metabolic characteristics of malignant tumours. In breast cancer, FDG PET is more accurate than conventional methods for staging of distant metastases or local recurrences and enables early assessment of treatment response in patients undergoing primary chemotherapy. Recent data indicate a rationale for the use of FDG PET in cases of asymptomatically elevated tumour marker levels in the presence of uncertain results of conventional imaging. Despite the fact that PET cannot rule out microscopic disease, it does have particular value in providing, in a single examination, a reliable assessment of the true extent of the disease. This technique is complementary to morphological imaging for primary diagnosis, staging and re-staging. It may become the method of choice for the assessment of asymptomatic patients with elevated tumour marker levels. This method, however, cannot replace invasive procedures if microscopic disease is of clinical relevance. PMID:15146295

  18. FDG PET and tumour markers in the diagnosis of recurrent and metastatic breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siggelkow, Wulf [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Universitaets-Frauenklinik, Klinikum der RWTH Aachen, Pauwels-Strasse 30, 52074, Aachen (Germany); Rath, Werner [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Buell, Udalrich; Zimny, Michael [Department of Nuclear Medicine, RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2004-06-01

    Breast cancer continues to be one of the most common cancers in North America and Western Europe. Positron emission tomography with 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG PET) represents a non-invasive functional imaging modality that is based on metabolic characteristics of malignant tumours. In breast cancer, FDG PET is more accurate than conventional methods for staging of distant metastases or local recurrences and enables early assessment of treatment response in patients undergoing primary chemotherapy. Recent data indicate a rationale for the use of FDG PET in cases of asymptomatically elevated tumour marker levels in the presence of uncertain results of conventional imaging. Despite the fact that PET cannot rule out microscopic disease, it does have particular value in providing, in a single examination, a reliable assessment of the true extent of the disease. This technique is complementary to morphological imaging for primary diagnosis, staging and re-staging. It may become the method of choice for the assessment of asymptomatic patients with elevated tumour marker levels. This method, however, cannot replace invasive procedures if microscopic disease is of clinical relevance. (orig.)

  19. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-09

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  20. Needles in a haystack: finding recurrent genomic changes in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cidado, Justin; Beaver, Julia A.; Park, Ben Ho

    2013-01-01

    Significant advances over the past decade have enabled scientists to obtain increasingly detailed molecular profiles of breast cancer. The recent analysis by The Cancer Genome Atlas published in the September 2012 issue of Nature is the most comprehensive description of breast cancer 'omics' to date. This study is impressive in its scope and scale, with the findings reconfirming the heterogeneity of breast cancer and highlighting the future challenges in translating these findings for clinica...

  1. Validating a Prognostic Scoring System for Postmastectomy Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study is designed to validate a previously developed locoregional recurrence risk (LRR) scoring system and further define which groups of patients with breast cancer would benefit from postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). Methods and Materials: An LRR risk scoring system was developed previously at our institution using breast cancer patients initially treated with modified radical mastectomy between 1990 and 2001. The LRR score comprised 4 factors: patient age, lymphovascular invasion, estrogen receptor negativity, and number of involved lymph nodes. We sought to validate the original study by examining a new dataset of 1545 patients treated between 2002 and 2007. Results: The 1545 patients were scored according to the previously developed criteria: 920 (59.6%) were low risk (score 0-1), 493 (31.9%) intermediate risk (score 2-3), and 132 (8.5%) were high risk (score ≥4). The 5-year locoregional control rates with and without PMRT in low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups were 98% versus 97% (P=.41), 97% versus 91% (P=.0005), and 89% versus 50% (P=.0002) respectively. Conclusions: This analysis of an additional 1545 patients treated between 2002 and 2007 validates our previously reported LRR scoring system and suggests appropriate patients for whom PMRT will be beneficial. Independent validation of this scoring system by other institutions is recommended

  2. Validating a Prognostic Scoring System for Postmastectomy Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Skye Hung-Chun, E-mail: skye@kfsyscc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Clinical Research Office, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Tsai, Stella Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yu, Ben-Long [Department of Surgery, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Horng, Cheng-Fang [Clinical Research Office, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chii-Ming [Department of Surgery, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jian, James J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chu, Nan-Min [Department of Medical Oncology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tsou, Mei-Hua [Department of Pathology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, Mei-Ching [Department of Medical Oncology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Andrew T. [Department of Medical Oncology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Prosnitz, Leonard R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: This study is designed to validate a previously developed locoregional recurrence risk (LRR) scoring system and further define which groups of patients with breast cancer would benefit from postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). Methods and Materials: An LRR risk scoring system was developed previously at our institution using breast cancer patients initially treated with modified radical mastectomy between 1990 and 2001. The LRR score comprised 4 factors: patient age, lymphovascular invasion, estrogen receptor negativity, and number of involved lymph nodes. We sought to validate the original study by examining a new dataset of 1545 patients treated between 2002 and 2007. Results: The 1545 patients were scored according to the previously developed criteria: 920 (59.6%) were low risk (score 0-1), 493 (31.9%) intermediate risk (score 2-3), and 132 (8.5%) were high risk (score ≥4). The 5-year locoregional control rates with and without PMRT in low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups were 98% versus 97% (P=.41), 97% versus 91% (P=.0005), and 89% versus 50% (P=.0002) respectively. Conclusions: This analysis of an additional 1545 patients treated between 2002 and 2007 validates our previously reported LRR scoring system and suggests appropriate patients for whom PMRT will be beneficial. Independent validation of this scoring system by other institutions is recommended.

  3. Predictive value of serum medroxyprogesterone acetate concentration for response in advanced or recurrent breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, R; Nagao, K; Matsuda, M; Baba, K; Matsuoka, Y; Yamashita, H; Fukuda, M; Higuchi, A; Ikeda, K

    1997-08-01

    Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) is one of the most commonly prescribed drugs for endocrine therapy of metastatic breast cancer. In this study, the serum MPA concentration was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and evaluated for its usefulness in predicting the response in 79 cases of advanced or recurrent breast cancers. Overall, 29 patients (37%) achieved an objective response. The response rate correlated significantly with the oestrogen receptor (ER) status (P = 0.03), proliferative activity determined by DNA polymerase alpha (P = 0.04), the disease-free interval (DFI) (P = 0.05) and the serum MPA concentration (P < 0.001). Patients with ER-positive tumours, lower proliferative activity, a longer (DFI) or a higher serum MPA concentration responded more frequently. The mean serum MPA concentration in the responders with ER-positive tumours (P = 0.01) or tumours with a lower proliferative activity (P = 0.008) were significantly lower than in cases with ER-negative tumours or tumours with a higher proliferative activity, respectively. Cases with soft tissue metastases showed responses at significantly lower MPA concentrations (P = 0.003) than those with bone or visceral metastases. Furthermore, there was a dramatic decrease in the MPA concentration when a responder with a high concentration became unresponsive to the therapy. Thus, the serum MPA concentration is a determining factor for the response to treatment. PMID:9337682

  4. Benefits of Medroxyprogesterone Acetate (MPA) in Advanced or Recurrent Breast Cancer with Higher Serum Concertration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura; Nagao; Matsuda; Baba; Matsuoka; Yamashita; Fukuda; Higuchi; Saiki

    1995-10-31

    The efficacy of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) therapy in controlling progressive measurable metastatic breast cancer was assessed in 61 patients. In addition serum MPA concentrations were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and subjective effects of treatment were monitored. Overall 24 patients (39.3%) achieved an objective response(2 complete responses [ CR ] and 22 partial responses [ PR ]). There was no significant relationships between response to therapy and menopausal status, metastatic sites, previous therapy, histological type, or disease-free interval. Patients with estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PgR) receptor-positive tumors responded more frequently. Significant differences in serum MPA concentrations were seen between responders and non-responders, objective tumor shrinkage being seen in patients with serum levels in excess of 55 ng/ml. There were few cases responding to the therapy with serum MPA concentrations lower than 25 ng/ml. The serum MPA levels significantly correlated with an improvement in the performance status and survival. Patients with serum MPA concentrations lower than 25 ng/ml had significantly poorer survival. There was a significant relationship between MPA level and dose per area of boby surface (mg/ m(2)) in cases with CR or PR or no change (NC). However, the serum levels of patients with progressive disease despite therapy were lower than the expected levels based on the body surface area. This study demonstrated that serum MPA concentration is a determining factor for therapeutic benefit in advanced or recurrent breast cancer. PMID:11091543

  5. What Is Breast Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... breast cancer? ” and Non-cancerous Breast Conditions . How Breast Cancer Spreads Breast cancer can spread through the lymph ...

  6. Breast cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Owens, Thomas W.; Naylor, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumors are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to th...

  7. Locoregional Recurrence of Breast Cancer in Patients Treated With Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiotherapy Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Breast conservation surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) have been linked with high locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rates. The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical outcomes in patients who exhibited LRR and IBTR after being treated by BCS and RT following NCT. Methods and Materials: In total, 251 breast cancer patients treated with BCS and RT following NCT between 2001 and 2006 were included. All patients had been shown to be clinically node-positive. Clinical stage at diagnosis (2003 AJCC) was II in 68% of patients and III in 32% of patients. Of those, 50%, 35%, and 15% of patients received anthracycline-based, taxane-based, and combined anthracycline-taxane NCT, respectively. All patients received RT. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), 26 (10%) patients had LRR, 19 of these patients had IBTR. Five-year actuarial rates of IBTR-free and LRR-free survival were 91% and 89%, respectively. In multivariate analyses, lack of hormone suppression therapy was found to increase both LRR and IBTR rates. Hazard ratios were 7.99 (p < 0.0001) and 4.22 (p = 0.004), respectively. Additionally, pathology stage N2 to N3 increased LRR rate (hazard ratio, 4.22; p = 0.004), and clinical AJCC stage III IBTR rate (hazard ratio, 9.05; p = 0.034). Achievement of pathological complete response and presence of multifocal tumors did not affect LRR or IBTR. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced disease, who were clinically node-positive at presentation, BCS after NCT resulted in acceptably low rates of IBTR and LRR. Mastectomy should be considered as an option in patients who present with clinical stage III tumors or who are not treated with adjuvant hormone suppression therapy, because they exhibit high IBTR rates after NCT and BCS.

  8. Re-surgery and chest wall re-irradiation for recurrent breast cancer - a second curative approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repeat radiation is a rarely used treatment strategy that must be performed with caution. The efficacy and toxicity of a second curative radiotherapy series was investigated in cases of recurrent breast cancer. Forty-two patients treated from 1993 to 2003 with resection (n = 30) and postoperative re-irradiation or definitive re-irradiation (n = 12) for recurrent breast cancer were enrolled in the study. Concurrent hyperthermia was performed in 29 patients. The median age was 57 years. The median pre-radiation exposure was 54Gy. Re-irradiation was conventionally fractionated to a median total dose of 60Gy. After a median follow-up of 41 months (range 3-92 months) higher graded late toxicity > G3 according to CTC 3.0 and LENT-SOMA was not observed. The estimated 5-year local control rate reached 62%. The estimated 5-year overall survival rate was 59%. Significantly inferior survival was associated with recurrence within two years (40 vs. 71%, p < ([0-9]).01) and presence of macroscopic tumour load (24 vs. 75%, p = 0.03). Repeat radiotherapy for recurrent breast cancer with total radiation doses of 60 Gy and the addition of hyperthermia in the majority of patients was feasible, with acceptable late morbidity and improved prognosis, particularly in patients with previous resection of recurrent tumours

  9. Effect of radiotherapy after mastectomy and axillary surgery on 10-year recurrence and 20-year breast cancer mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGale, P; Taylor, C; Correa, C;

    2014-01-01

    nodes, radiotherapy reduced locoregional recurrence (2p<0·00001), overall recurrence (RR 0·68, 95% CI 0·57-0·82, 2p=0·00006), and breast cancer mortality (RR 0·80, 95% CI 0·67-0·95, 2p=0·01). 1133 of these 1314 women were in trials in which systemic therapy (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and......BACKGROUND: Postmastectomy radiotherapy was shown in previous meta-analyses to reduce the risks of both recurrence and breast cancer mortality in all women with node-positive disease considered together. However, the benefit in women with only one to three positive lymph nodes is uncertain. We...... significant effect on locoregional recurrence (two-sided significance level [2p]>0·1), overall recurrence (rate ratio [RR], irradiated vs not, 1·06, 95% CI 0·76-1·48, 2p>0·1), or breast cancer mortality (RR 1·18, 95% CI 0·89-1·55, 2p>0·1). For 1314 women with axillary dissection and one to three positive...

  10. Pak1, adjuvant tamoxifen therapy, and breast cancer recurrence risk in a Danish population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahern, Thomas P; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Lash, Timothy L;

    2016-01-01

    kinase 1 (Pak1) in primary tumors predicts tamoxifen failure. Material and methods We measured the association between Pak1 expression and breast cancer recurrence in a Danish population-based case-control study. Pak1 cytoplasmic expression level and nuclear positivity were determined by...... (ER-/TAM-). Pak1 staining was assessed by a single, blinded pathologist, and associations were estimated with conditional logistic regression models. Results We included 541 recurrence cases and 1:1 matched controls from the ER+/TAM + group and 300 recurrence cases and 1:1 matched controls from the ER...

  11. Impact on regional recurrence and survival of axillary surgery in women with node-negative primary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, C K; Düring, M; Christiansen, P M;

    2009-01-01

    -negative primary breast cancer treated solely by surgery. Median follow-up was 9 years. RESULTS: The number of lymph nodes removed correlated with a reduction in the rate of subsequent axillary recurrence (from 2.1 to 0.4 per cent; P = 0.037), local recurrence (from 7.4 to 3.8 per cent; P < 0.001) distant......BACKGROUND: This study examined whether axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) with removal of many normal lymph nodes resulted in a reduced rate of axillary recurrence and better survival, as reported in recent studies. METHODS: The follow-up analyses were based on 8657 patients with node...

  12. Long-term effects of first degree family history of breast cancer in young women: Recurrences and bilateral breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jobsen, Jan J.; Palen, van der Job; Brinkhuis, Mariël; Ong, Francisca; Struikmans, Henk

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to analyze the impact of first degree relative (FDR) of young breast cancer patients. Methods. Data were used from our prospective population-based cohort study which started in 1983. The family history (FH) was registered with regard to FDR: the presence or abs

  13. Local recurrences and distant metastases after breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy for early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To identify predicting factors for local failure and increased risk of distant metastases by statistical analysis of the data after breast-conserving treatment for early breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1976 and December 1993, 528 patients with nonmetastatic T1 (tumors ≤ 1 cm [n = 197], >1 cm [n = 220]) or T2 (tumors ≤ 3 cm [n 111]) carcinoma of the breast underwent wide excision (n = 435) or quadrantectomy (n = 93) with axillary dissection (negative nodal status [n-]: 396; 1-3 involved nodes: 100; >3 involved nodes: 32). Radiotherapy consisted of 45 Gy to the entire breast via tangential fields. Patients with positive axillary lymph nodes received 45 Gy to the axillary and supraclavicular area. Patients with positive axillary nodes and/or inner or central tumor locations received 50 Gy to the internal mammary lymph node area. A boost dose was delivered to the primary site by iridium 192 implant in 298 patients (mean total dose: 15.2 ± 0.07 Gy, range: 15-25 Gy) or by electrons in 225 patients (mean total dose: 14.8 ± 0.09 Gy, range: 5-20 Gy). The mean age was 52.5 ± 0.5 years (range: 26-86 years) and 267 patients were postmenopausal. Histologic types were as follows: 463 infiltrating ductal carcinomas, 39 infiltrating lobular carcinomas, and 26 other histotypes. Grade distribution according to the Scarff, Bloom, and Richardson (SBR) classification was as follows: 149 grade 1, 271 grade 2, 73 grade 3, and 35 nonclassified. The mean tumor size was 1.6 ± 0.3 cm (range: 0.3-3 cm). The intraductal component of the primary tumor was extensive (EIC = IC ≥ 25%) in 39 patients. Tumors were microscopically bifocal in 33 cases. Margins were assessed in the majority of cases by inking of the resection margins and were classified as positive in 13 cases, close (≤2 mm) in 21, negative (>2 mm tumor-free margin) in 417, and indeterminate in 77. Peritumoral vascular invasion was observed in 40 patients. Tamoxifen was administered for at

  14. Isolated loco-regional recurrence of breast cancer is more common in young patients and following breast conserving therapy: Long-term results of European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bock, Truuske; van der Hage, J.A.; Putter, H.; Bonnema, J.; Bartelink, H.; van de Velde, C.J.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate prognostic factors for isolated loco-regional recurrence in patients treated for invasive stage I or H breast cancer. The study population comprised 3602 women who had undergone primary surgery for early stage breast cancer, who were enrolled in European Organis

  15. The Role of the 21-Gene Recurrence Score in Breast Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, Josee-Lyne; Amir, Eitan

    2016-08-01

    Several multi-gene assays have been developed to predict the risk of recurrence in patients with estrogen receptor-positive early breast cancer and in whom endocrine therapy is planned. The 21-gene assay is widely used and its prognostic value has been retrospectively validated, showing significant differences in the risk of distant recurrence for patients at high versus low risk. Its role in predicting chemotherapy benefit has also been established, showing a clear benefit for high-risk patients and minimal benefit in those at low risk. These findings have been prospectively investigated in TAILORx (Trial Assigning Individualized Options for Treatment), where available data from the low-risk cohort confirms the prognostic value of this diagnostic test. The prognostic utility of the 21-gene assay increases when combined with clinicopathologic variables, and data from integrated models suggest that its use should be limited to patients with tumor characteristics suggestive of potential chemotherapy benefit. Furthermore, the 21-gene assay has been shown to impact clinical decision making in a cost-effective manner, although direct evidence of benefit from modified treatment recommendations is yet to be proven. The prognostic value of this test has also been shown in populations with node-positive or locally advanced disease treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and ongoing trials aim to prospectively validate these findings. PMID:27235162

  16. Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-07

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  17. One life saved by four prevented recurrencies? Update of the early breast cancer trialists confirms. Postoperative radiotherapy improves survival after breast conserving surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Staedtisches Klinikum Karlsruhe (Germany). Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Sedlmayer, F. [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg (Austria); Budach, W. [University Hospital Duesseldorf (DE)] (and others)

    2012-06-15

    The debate about the impact of local control on survival in early breast cancer patients is still going on, in spite of the continuously growing evidence that avoidance of locoregional disease reduces the risk of tumor-specific death. Recently, B. Fisher, one of the pioneers of breast conserving therapy claimed that during the last two decades, as a result of the use of systemic therapy in conjunction with breast conserving surgery and radiation, the incidence of locoregional recurrence has been reduced to a level where further reduction is likely to have little impact on survival. The penultimate meta-analysis of the Early Breast Cancer Trialists' Collaborative Group (EBCTCG) reported the effect of radiotherapy in early breast cancer on recurrence and survival in 2005 and provided the essential message that four prevented local recurrences at 5 years would avoid one breast cancer death in 15 years. The scientific community has eagerly awaited the quinquennial update of the EBCTCG which has now been published. A total of 17 randomized studies comparing postoperative radiotherapy vs. none were analyzed and comprised 7 new studies in addition to follow-up data of from 9 previously reported trials. A total of 10,801 patients with pT1-2 tumors were included, the majority of whom (n=7,287) were node negative, while 1,050 were node positive (2,464 unknown). In contrast to the previous meta-analysis, all patients received breast conserving surgery, consisting of lumpectomy (n=8,422) or more extensive techniques like quadrantectomy or sectoral resection (n= 2,399). The effect of radiotherapy on 10-year recurrences of any type and their relation to the 15-year breast cancer death rate were studied in correlation to various prognostic parameters and treatment characteristics (e.g., surgery, tamoxifen use). Moreover, a subgroup analysis was performed according to low, intermediate, and high initial risk of recurrence, from which the expected absolute benefit was derived

  18. The natural history of local regional breast cancer recurrence: prognosis and implications for systemic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the natural history and long term outcome of breast cancer patients sustaining local regional failure as their first site of relapse in an effort to design a prospective study evaluating systemic therapy at the time of local regional relapse. Materials and Methods: Between January 1970 and December 1992, over 4000 patients with a diagnosis of breast cancer were treated at our facilities with mastectomy or conservative surgery with radiation therapy (CS+RT). A total of 195 patients sustained a local regional relapse, without evidence of distant metastasis, as the first site of failure and serve as the population base for this study. The 195 patients with local-regional recurrence of disease were distributed as follows: 59 patients relapsed in the ipsilateral breast following CS+RT within 5 years of original diagnosis (EARLYBR); 45 patients relapsed in the ipsilateral breast >5 years from original diagnosis (LATEBR); 52 patients relapsed in the chest wall following mastectomy (CWREC); and 23 patients failed in the regional lymphatics following mastectomy or CS+RT (REGREC). Patients with EARLYBR or LATEBR were generally treated with salvage mastectomy and patients with CWREC or REGREC were treated with definitive irradiation to the chest wall and/or regional nodes. Systemic therapy at the time of locoregional relapse was highly individualized, ranging from observation to tamoxifen to high dose chemotherapy with transplantation. Patient charts were reviewed with all clinical, pathologic, treatment, and outcome parameters entered onto a computerized database. Survival curves were calculated using the life table method with differences between survival curves compared by the Mantle-Haensel statistic. Survival, disease-free survival and distant metastasis rates were calculated from the date of original diagnosis, as well as from the date of local regional relapse. Local regional recurrence-free time was calculated from

  19. Oncotype-DX recurrence score distribution in breast cancer patients with BRCA1/2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, R; Sulkes, A; Shochat, T; Tsoref, D; Rizel, S; Liebermann, N; Hendler, D; Neiman, V; Ben-Aharon, I; Friedman, E; Paluch-Shimon, S; Margel, D; Kedar, I; Yerushalmi, R

    2016-06-01

    Oncotype-DX assay has never been validated for BRCA mutation carriers. This study compares the recurrence score (RS) distribution in BRCA-positive breast cancer patients with that of a general population (GP) of patients and reports their outcomes. Eligible patients were BRCA carriers who performed the Oncotype-DX assay. Two sets of databases were cross-linked: BRCA carriers at Rabin Medical Center and Sheba Medical Center with Oncotype-DX tests performed through Clalit Health Services HMO, from 2003 to 2015. Fifty-eight BRCA patients were included (20 BRCA1, 38 BRCA2). The GP included 1020 patients. Compared to the GP, BRCA1 patients were younger, had higher rate of grade three tumors, and higher Ki67. BRCA2 patients had lower PR index, higher rate of grade three tumors, and higher Ki67. Among the GP, 52.9, 37.9, and 9.1 % had low, intermediate, and high risk RS, respectively. Corresponding rates were 15, 35, and 50 % in BRCA1 patients, and 18.4, 52.6, and 29 % in BRCA2 patients. Subgroup analysis revealed a similar RS distribution pattern regardless of the nodal status. Median follow-up was 45 months. Four BRCA patients (7 %) developed disease recurrence. RS of these patients were in the intermediate and low range. All recurrences occurred in chemo-naïve patients who had not undergone bilateral oophorectomy. This study revealed significantly different RS distributions between BRCA patients and the GP. RS values shifted toward high and intermediate risk categories. This pattern held regardless of the nodal status and was more pronounced in the BRCA1 group. PMID:27225387

  20. Prediction of sensitivity to anticancer agents for patients with advanced or recurrent breast cancer by Tc-99m sestamibi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tc-99m Sestamibi (99mTc-MIBI) is known to be a substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) that effluxes the drugs out of cancer cells. The overexpression of P-gp involved in multidrug resistance phenomenon in patients with advanced or recurrent breast cancers was shown in the plasma membrane of breast cancer cells. In this study, we examined the usefulness of 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy for the prediction of sensitivity to anticancer agents in 8 cases with advanced or recurrent breast cancer. The retrospective analysis showed that the sensitivity to the chemotherapy could be evaluated in 3 cases by 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy, but in the other 5 cases 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy was not eligible for the prediction of sensitivity. Two out of 3 cases showed over 50% in reduction rate of target tumors (PR) with higher accumulation of 99mTc-MIBI, while another case with PD showed lower. These results suggest that the accumulation of 99mTc-MIBI could be associated with the sensitivity to P-gp-related anticancer agents, and that the functional analysis of P-gp by 99mTc-MIBI might be useful for the prediction of responsiveness of chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer. (author)

  1. Clinical impact of [18F]FDG-PET in patients with suspected recurrent breast cancer based on asymptomatically elevated tumor marker serum levels. A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the impact of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) on the detection of recurrent breast cancer based on asymptomatically elevated tumor markers levels. Whole-body FDG-PET was performed in 30 patients with suspected recurrent breast cancer and asymptomatic tumor marker increase but negative or equivocal other imaging modality results. A blood sample was drawn in each case for marker assay (CA 15-3 and CEA) on the same day as the FDG-PET. All of these 30 asymptomatic patients had either CA 15-3>32 U/ml or CEA>5 ng/ml. The final diagnosis of recurrent breast cancer was established by operation/biopsy histopathological findings or clinical follow-up for >1 year by additional morphological imaging techniques. Among the 30 patients, the final diagnosis of recurrent breast cancer was established in 38 sites in 28 patients. FDG-PET accurately detected 35/38 sites in 25/28 patients with recurrence. The diagnostic sensitivity and accuracy of FDG-PET in patients with suspected recurrent breast cancer and asymptomatically elevated tumor markers were 96 and 90%, respectively. FDG-PET is a useful technique for detecting recurrent breast cancer suspected from asymptomatically elevated tumor markers levels and has an important clinical impact on the management of these patients. (author)

  2. Radiation dose escalation for loco-regional recurrence of breast cancer after mastectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation is a standard component of treatment for patients with locoregional recurrence (LRR) of breast cancer following mastectomy. The current study reports the results of a 10% radiation dose escalation in these patients. 159 patients treated at MD Anderson Cancer Center between 1994-2006 with isolated LRR after mastectomy alone were reviewed. Patients in the standard treatment group (65 pts, 40.9%) were treated to 50 Gy comprehensively plus a boost of 10 Gy. The dose escalated group (94 pts, 59.1%) was treated to 54 Gy comprehensively and a minimum 12 Gy boost. Median dose in the standard dose and dose escalated group was 60 Gy (±1 Gy, 95% CI) and 66 Gy (±0.5 Gy, 95% CI) respectively. Median follow up for living patients was 94 months from time of recurrence. The actuarial five year locoregional control (LRC) rate was 77% for the entire study population. The five year overall survival and disease-free survival was 55% and 41%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, initial tumor size (p = 0.03), time to initial LRR (p = 0.03), absence of gross tumor at the time of radiation (p = 0.001) and Her2 status (p = 0.03) were associated with improved LRC. Five year LRC rates were similar in patients with a complete response to chemotherapy without surgery and patients with a complete surgical excision (77% vs 83%, p = NS), compared to a 63% LRC rate in patients with gross disease at the time of radiation (p = 0.024). LRC rates were 80% in the standard dose group and 75% in the dose escalated group (p = NS). While LRR following mastectomy is potentially curable, distant metastasis and local control rates remain suboptimal. Radiation dose escalation did not appear to improve LRC. Given significant local failure rates, these patients are good candidates for additional strategies to improve their outcomes

  3. Patterns of recurrence and treatment in male breast cancer: A clue to prognosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques Abreu, Miguel; Henriques Abreu, Pedro; Afonso, Noémia; Pereira, Deolinda; Henrique, Rui; Lopes, Carlos

    2016-10-15

    Male breast cancer (MBC) patients seem to have inferior survival compared to female (FBC) ones, which is not fully explained by usual prognostic factors. Recurrence analysis could show differences in relapse patterns and/or in patients' approaches that justify these outcomes. Retrospective analysis of MBC patients treated in a cancer center between 1990 and 2014, looking for relapse. For each patient, three matched FBC patients were selected by: diagnosis' year, age (within 5 years), stage and tumors' type (only luminal-like were considered). Differences between cohorts were assessed by χ(2) test and hierarchical clustering was performed to define subgroups according to relapse local. Survival curves were calculated by Kaplan-Meier and compared using log-rank test. Statistical significance was defined as p survivals were poorer for male, median: 5 years [95% confidence interval (CI): 4.1-5.9 years] and 1 year (95% CI: 0-2.1 years) vs. 10 years (95% CI: 7.8-12.2 years) and 2 years (95% CI: 1.6-2.4 years), p survival, even after controlling important factors, namely the local of relapse. Palliative systemic treatment had favorable impact in prognosis and its frequently avoidance in male could justify the outcomes differences. PMID:27280781

  4. Effects of chemotherapy and hormonal therapy for early breast cancer on recurrence and 15-year survival : an overview of the randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abe, O; Abe, R; Enomoto, K; Kikuchi, K; Koyama, H; Masuda, H; Nomura, Y; Sakai, K; Sugimachi, K; Tominaga, T; Uchino, J; Yoshida, M; Haybittle, JL; Davies, C; Harvey, VJ; Holdaway, TM; Kay, RG; Mason, BH; Forbes, JF; Wilcken, N; Gnant, M; Jakesz, R; Ploner, M; Yosef, HMA; Focan, C; Lobelle, JP; Peek, U; Oates, GD; Powell, J; Durand, M; Mauriac, L; Di Leo, A; Dolci, S; Piccart, MJ; Masood, MB; Parker, D; Price, JJ; Hupperets, PSGJ; Jackson, S; Ragaz, J; Berry, D; Broadwater, G; Cirrincione, C; Muss, H; Norton, L; Weiss, RB; Abu-Zahra, HT; Portnoj, SM; Baum, M; Cuzick, J; Houghton, J; Riley, D; Gordon, NH; Davis, HL; Beatrice, A; Mihura, J; Naja, A; Lehingue, Y; Romestaing, P; Dubois, JB; Delozier, T; Mace-Lesec'h, J; Rambert, P; Andrysek, O; Barkmanova, J; Owen, [No Value; Meier, P; Howell, A; Ribeiro, GC; Swindell, R; Alison, R; Boreham, J; Clarke, M; Collins, R; Darby, S; Davies, C; Elphinstone, P; Evans, [No Value; Godwin, J; Gray, R; Harwood, C; Hicks, C; James, S; MacKinnon, E; McGale, P; McHugh, T; Mead, G; Peto, R; Wang, Y; Albano, J; de Oliveira, CF; Gervasio, H; Gordilho, J; Johansen, H; Mouridsen, HT; Gelman, RS; Harris, [No Value; Henderson, IC; Shapiro, CL; Andersen, KW; Axelsson, CK; Blichert-Toft, M; Moller, S; Mouridsen, HT; Overgaard, J; Overgaard, M; Rose, C; Cartensen, B; Palshof, T; Trampisch, HJ; Dalesio, O; de Vries, EGE; Rodenhuis, S; van Tinteren, H; Comis, RL; Davidson, NE; Gray, R; Robert, N; Sledge, G; Tormey, DC; Wood, W; Cameron, D; Chetty, U; Forrest, P; Jack, W; Rossbach, J; Klijn, JGM; Treurniet-Donker, AD; van Putten, WLJ; Costa, A; Veronesi, U; Bartelink, H; Duchateau, L; Legrand, C; Sylvester, R; van der Hage, JA; van de Velde, CJH; Cunningham, MP; Catalano, R; Creech, RH; Bonneterre, J; Fargeot, P; Fumoleau, P; Kerbrat, P; Namer, M; Jonat, W; Kaufmann, M; Schumacher, M; von Minckwitz, G; Bastert, G; Rauschecker, H; Sauer, R; Sauerbrei, W; Schauer, A; Schumacher, M; de Schryver, A; Vakaet, L; Belfiglio, M; Nicolucci, A; Pellegrini, F; Sacco, M; Valentini, M; McArdle, CS; Smith, DC; Galligioni, E; Boccardo, F; Rubagotti, A; Dent, DM; Gudgeon, CA; Hacking, A; Erazo, A; Medina, JY; Izuo, M; Morishita, Y; Takei, H; Fentiman, IS; Hayward, JL; Rubens, RD; Skilton, D; Graeff, H; Janicke, F; Meisner, C; Scheurlen, H; Kaufmann, M; von Fournier, D; Dafni, U; Fountzilas, G; Klefstrom, P; Blomqvist, C; Saarto, T; Margreiter, R; Asselain, B; Salmon, RJ; Vilcoq, [No Value; Arriagada, R; Hill, C; Laplanche, A; Le, MG; Spielmann, M; Bruzzi, P; Montanaro, E; Rosso, R; Sertoli, MR; Venturini, M; Amadori, D; Benraadt, J; Kooi, M; van de Velde, AO; van Dongen, JA; Vermorken, JB; Castiglione, M; Cavalli, F; Coates, A; Collins, J; Forbes, J; Gelber, RD; Goldhirsch, A; Lindtner, J; Price, KN; Rudenstam, CM; Senn, HJ; Bliss, JM; Chilvers, CED; Coombes, RC; Hall, E; Marty, M; Borovik, R; Brufman, G; Hayat, H; Robinson, E; Wigler, N; Bonadonna, G; Camerini, T; De Palo, G; Del Vecchio, M; Formelli, F; Valagussa, P; Martoni, A; Pannuti, F; Cocconi, G; Colozza, A; Camisa, R; Aogi, K; Takashima, S; Abe, O; Ikeda, T; Inokuchi, K; Kikuchi, K; Sawa, K; Sonoo, H; Korzeniowski, S; Skolyszewski, J; Ogawa, M; Yamashita, J; Bonte, J; Christiaens, R; Paridaens, R; Van den Boegart, W; Martin, P; Romain, S; Hakes, T; Hudis, CA; Norton, L; Wittes, R; Giokas, G; Kondylis, D; Lissaios, B; de la Huerta, R; Sainz, MG; Altemus, R; Cowan, K; Danforth, D; Lichter, A; Lippman, M; O'Shaughnessy, J; Pierce, LJ; Steinberg, S; Venzon, D; Zujewski, J; Paradiso, A; De Lena, M; Schittulli, F; Myles, JD; Pater, JL; Pritchard, KI; Nomura, Y; Anderson, S; Bass, G; Brown, A; Bryant, J; Costantino, J; Dignam, J; Fisher, B; Redmond, C; Wieand, S; Wolmark, N; Baum, M; Jackson, IM; Palmer, MK; Ingle, JN; Suman, VJ; Bengtsson, NO; Jonsson, H; Larsson, LG; Lythgoe, JP; Swindell, R; Kissin, M; Erikstein, B; Hannisdal, E; Jacobsen, AB; Varhaug, JE; Erikstein, B; Gundersen, S; Hauer-Jensen, M; Host, H; Jacobsen, AB; Nissen-Meyer, R; Blamey, RW; Mitchell, AK; Morgan, DAL; Robertson, JFR; Di Palma, M; Mathe, G; Misset, JL; Clark, RM; Levine, M; Morimoto, K; Sawa, K; Takatsuka, Y; Crossley, E; Harris, A; Talbot, D; Taylor, M; Cocconi, G; di Blasio, B; Ivanov, [No Value; Semiglazov, [No Value; Brockschmidt, J; Cooper, MR; Ueo, H; Falkson, CI; A'Hern, R; Ashley, S; Powles, TJ; Smith, IE; Yarnold, [No Value; Gazet, JC; Cocoran, N; Deshpande, N; di Martino, L; Douglas, P; Hacking, A; Host, H; Lindtner, A; Notter, G; Bryant, AJS; Ewing, GH; Firth, LA; Krushen-Kosloski, JL; Nissen-Meyer, R; Foster, L; George, WD; Stewart, HJ; Stroner, P; Malmstrom, P; Moller, TR; Ryden, S; Tengrup, [No Value; Tennvall-Nittby, L; Carstenssen, J; Dufmats, M; Hatschek, T; Nordenskjold, B; Soderberg, M; Carpenter, JT; Albain, K; Crowley, J; Green, S; Martino, S; Osborne, CK; Ravdin, PM; Glas, U; Johansson, U; Rutqvist, LE; Singnomklao, T; Wallgren, A; Castiglione, M; Goldhirsch, A; Maibach, R; Senn, HJ; Thurlimann, B; Brenner, H; Hercbergs, A; Yoshimoto, M; DeBoer, G; Paterson, AHG; Pritchard, KI; Meakin, JW; Panzarella, T; Pritchard, KI; Shan, Y; Shao, YF; Wang, [No Value; Zhao, DB; Boreham, J; Chen, ZM; Pan, HC; Peto, R; Bahi, J; Reid, M; Spittle, M; Deutsch, GP; Senanayake, F; Kwong, DLW; Bianco, AR; Carlomagno, C; De Laurentiis, M; De Placido, S; Buzdar, AU; Smith, T; Bergh, J; Holmberg, L; Liljegren, G; Nilsson, J; Seifert, M; Sevelda, P; Zielinsky, CC; Buchanan, RB; Cross, M; Royle, GT; Dunn, JA; Hills, RK; Lee, M; Morrison, JM; Spooner, D; Litton, A; Chlebowski, RT; Caffier, H

    2005-01-01

    Background Quinquennial overviews (1985-2000) of the randomised trials in early breast cancer have assessed the 5-year and 10-year effects of various systemic adjuvant therapies on breast cancer recurrence and survival. Here, we report the 10-year and 15-year effects. Methods Collaborative meta-anal

  5. Radiation therapy after breast augmentation or reconstruction in early or recurrent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourteen patients whose augmented or reconstructed breasts were treated with radiation therapy were analyzed. Silicone gel implants were used in 13 patients and free-injected silicone in one patient. The total radiation dose ranged from 4400 to 6200 cGy using tangential photon fields or an en face electron field by megavoltage equipment. In several cases, electron boost radiation was added to the tumor bed. The majority of the patients tolerated therapy well with minimal transient skin reactions; only three patients required a treatment break secondary to moist desquamation. Three patients developed documented implant encapsulation, although the majority retained good to excellent cosmesis. In summary, when breast carcinoma arises in the augmented or reconstructed breast, conservative management (i.e., limited surgery and definitive irradiation) is feasible without compromising the therapy or the cosmetic result. Thus, conservative management should be offered as an option to patients who are interested in breast prosthesis conservation

  6. High Mammographic Breast Density Is Independent Predictor of Local But Not Distant Recurrence After Lumpectomy and Radiotherapy for Invasive Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Biologically meaningful predictors for locoregional recurrence (LRR) in patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) are lacking. Tissue components, including extracellular matrix, could confer resistance to ionizing radiation. Fibroglandular and extracellular matrix components of breast tissue relative to adipose tissue can be quantified by the mammographic breast density (MBD), the proportion of dense area relative to the total breast area on mammography. We hypothesized that the MBD might be a predictor of LRR after BCS and RT for invasive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a nested case-control study of 136 women with invasive breast cancer who had undergone BCS and RT and had had the MBD ascertained before, or at, diagnosis. Women with known recurrence were matched to women without recurrence by year of diagnosis. The median follow-up was 7.7 years. The percentage of MBD was measured using a computer-based threshold method. Results: Patients with a high MBD (≥75% density) vs. low (≤25%) were at increased risk of LRR (hazard ratio, 4.30; 95% confidence interval, 0.88-021.0; p = 0.071) but not distant recurrence. In addition, we found a complete inverse correlation between high MBD and obesity (body mass index, ≥30 kg/m2). In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, patients with MBD in the greatest quartile were at significantly greater risk of LRR (hazard ratio, 6.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-27.7; p = 0.01). Obesity without a high MBD also independently predicted for LRR (hazard ratio, 19.3; 95% confidence interval, 4.5-81.7; p < 0.001). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that a high MBD and obesity are significant independent predictors of LRR after BCS and RT for invasive breast cancer. Additional studies are warranted to validate these findings

  7. [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/Computed Tomography (CT) in Suspected Recurrent Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Malene Grubbe; Gerke, Oke; Baun, Christina;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively investigate the diagnostic accuracy of [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) with dual-time-point imaging, contrast-enhanced CT (ceCT), and bone scintigraphy (BS) in patients with suspected breast cancer recurrence....... PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred women with suspected recurrence of breast cancer underwent 1-hour and 3-hour FDG-PET/CT, ceCT, and BS within approximately 10 days. The study was powered to estimate the precision of the individual imaging tests. Images were visually interpreted using a four......-point assessment scale, and readers were blinded to other test results. The reference standard was biopsy along with treatment decisions and clinical follow-up (median, 17 months). RESULTS: FDG-PET/CT resulted in no false negatives and fewer false positives than the other imaging techniques. Accuracy of results...

  8. Clinical Outcome of Breast Conservation Therapy for Breast Cancer in Hong Kong: Prognostic Impact of Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence and 2005 St. Gallen Risk Categories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of breast conservation therapy (BCT) for invasive breast cancers in our predominantly Chinese population. Methods and Materials: Clinical outcomes of 412 T1-2 invasive breast cancers treated by wide local excision and external radiotherapy from 1994 to 2003 were retrospectively analyzed. Only 7% lesions were first detected by mammograms. Adjuvant tamoxifen and chemotherapy were added in 74% and 45% patients, respectively. Results: The median follow-up was 5.4 years. The 5-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rate, distant failure-free survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival were 4%, 92%, 96%, and 98%, respectively. The 5-year distant failure-free survival for the low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk categories (2005 St. Gallen) were 98%, 91%, and 80%, respectively (p 0.0003). Cosmetic results were good to excellent in more than 90% of the assessable patients. Grade 3 histology (hazard ratio [HR], 4.461; 95% CI, 1.216-16.360; p = 0.024), age (HR, 0.915; 95% CI, 0.846-0.990; p = 0.027), and close/positive final margins (HR, 3.499; 95% CI, 1.141-10.729; p = 0.028) were significant independent risk factors for IBTR. Both St. Gallen risk categories (p = 0.003) and IBTR (HR, 5.885; 95% CI, 2.494-13.889; p < 0.0005) were independent prognostic factors for distant failure-free survival. Conclusions: Despite the low percentage of mammographically detected lesions, the overall clinical outcome of BCT for invasive breast cancers in the Chinese population is comparable to the Western series. The 2005 St. Gallen risk category is a promising clinical tool, but further validation by large studies is warranted

  9. Loco-regional recurrences after mastectomy in breast cancer: prognostic factors and implications for postoperative irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Potential risk factors including DNA flow cytometric-derived parameters predicting loco-regional recurrence (LRR) in early breast cancer were investigated.Materials and methods: This study included 608 patients treated by modified radical mastectomy between 1982 and 1987. Recommendations regarding local treatment as well as adjuvant systemic therapy did not change during this period. Patients treated by adjuvant chemotherapy were randomized to receive additional medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) treatment. Only 59 (10%) patients received postoperative irradiation (XRT) to the chest wall and/or axillary lymph nodes; another 121 (20%) patients received XRT to the internal mammary nodes because of centromedially located tumours.Results: Patients were followed for a median period of 7.5 years. The event-free survival at 10 years was 50%. The cumulative incidence rate of LRR at 10 years was 18% (n=93), either with (n=30) or without (n=63) concurrent distant metastases. The chest wall, regional lymph nodes or both were involved in 41 (44%), 38 (41%) and 12 (13%) patients, respectively. Multivariate analysis according to the Cox model revealed two factors associated with LRR, i.e. pT (P<0.05) and nodal status (P<0.0510%) and low risk (<10%) group for LRR could be identified.Conclusions: Results indicate that T-stage and nodal status, combined with ECE, may help to identify patients at risk for loco-regional recurrence, whereas DNA flow cytometry does not. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  10. An evaluation of factors predicting breast recurrence and prognosis after recurrence, on distinguishing intramammary and extramammary recurrence, in breast-conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recurrence of cancer in the breast is an important problem in breast-conserving therapy. We evaluated risk factors for recurrence from the viewpoint of recurrence type and outcome after recurrence. Of 533 cases of breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery from April 1989 through July 2000, disease in 66 recurred (12.4%) and were classified as 23 cases of breast recurrence only, 16 cases of both breast recurrence and distant metastasis, and 27 cases of distant metastasis only. The clinical factors examined included age, lymphatic invasion, nodal status, extensive intraductal component (EIC), proliferative activity, and estrogen receptor (ER) status. Of the 39 cases of breast recurrence, 19 had intramammary tumors and 20 had extramammary tumors of the skin, subcutaneous tissue, or muscle, including 8 cases with inflammatory breast recurrence. Multivariate analysis showed that factors correlated with breast recurrence were age, ER status, proliferative activity, and surgical margin. EIC-comedo was related to intramammary recurrence, whereas lymphatic invasion and nodal status were related to extramammary recurrence. Postoperative irradiation was an effective treatment for tumors in young women and tumors with positive margins or a comedo component. Outcome after breast recurrence depended on nodal status at primary operation, and survival rates were worst in patients with inflammatory breast recurrence. In conclusion, age, EIC-comedo status, the surgical margin, and negative ER status were correlated with breast recurrence. Countermeasures against these factors should be investigated. (author)

  11. Novel use of an air-filled breast prosthesis to allow radiotherapy to recurrent colonic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Duffy, F

    2012-02-01

    AiM: The authors present the novel and successful use of an air-filled breast prosthesis for extra pelvic exclusion of small bowel to facilitate adjuvant radiotherapy following resection of recurrent adenocarcinoma of the ascending bowel. The therapeutic use of radiotherapy in colon cancer can cause acute or chronic radiation enteropathy. Mobile small bowel can be sequestered in \\'dead space\\' or by adhesions exposing it to adjuvant radiotherapy. A variety of pelvic partitioning methods have been described to exclude bowel from radiation fields using both native and prosthetic materials. METHOD: In this case a 68 year old presented with ascending colon adenocarcinoma invading the peritoneum and underwent en bloc peritoneal resection. Thirty-seven months later surveillance CT identified a local recurrence. Subsequent resection resulted in a large iliacus muscle defect which would sequester small bowel loops thus exposing the patient to radiation enteropathy. The lateral position of the defect precluded the use of traditional pelvic partitioning methods which would be unlikely to remain in place long enough to allow radiotherapy. A lightweight air-filled breast prosthesis (Allergan 133 FV 750 cms) secured in place with an omentoplasty was used to fill the defect. RESULTS: Following well tolerated radiotherapy the prosthesis was deflated under ultrasound guidance and removed via a 7-cm transverse incision above the right iliac crest. The patient is disease free 18 months later with no evidence of treatment related morbidity. CONCLUSION: The use of a malleable air-filled prosthesis for pelvic partitioning allows specific tailoring of the prosthesis size and shape for individual patient defects. It is also lightweight enough to be secured in place using an omentoplasty to prevent movement related prosthesis migration. In the absence of adequate omentum a mesh sling may be considered to allow fixation. In this case the anatomy of the prosthesis position allowed for its

  12. Chk1 phosphorylated at serine345 is a predictor of early local recurrence and radio-resistance in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsubhi, Nouf; Middleton, Fiona; Abdel-Fatah, Tarek M A; Stephens, Peter; Doherty, Rachel; Arora, Arvind; Moseley, Paul M; Chan, Stephen Y T; Aleskandarany, Mohammed A; Green, Andrew R; Rakha, Emad A; Ellis, Ian O; Martin, Stewart G; Curtin, Nicola J; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2016-02-01

    Radiation-induced DNA damage activates the DNA damage response (DDR). DDR up-regulation may predict radio-resistance and increase the risk of early local recurrence despite radiotherapy in early stage breast cancers. In 1755 early stage breast cancers, DDR signalling [ATM, ATR, total Ckh1, Chk1 phosphorylated at serine(345) (pChk1), Chk2, p53], base excision repair [PARP1, POLβ, XRCC1, FEN1, SMUG1], non-homologous end joining (Ku70/Ku80, DNA-PKcs) and homologous recombination [RAD51, BRCA1, γH2AX, BLM, WRN, RECQL5, PTEN] protein expression was correlated to time to early local recurrence. Pre-clinically, radio-sensitization by inhibition of Chk1 activation by ATR inhibitor (VE-821) and inhibition of Chk1 (V158411) were investigated in MDA-MB-231 (p53 mutant) and MCF-7 (p53 wild-type) breast cancer cells. In the whole cohort, 208/1755 patients (11.9%) developed local recurrence of which 126 (61%) developed local recurrence within 5 years of initiation of primary therapy. Of the 20 markers tested, only pChk1 and p53 significantly associated with early local recurrence (p value = 0.015 and 0.010, respectively). When analysed together, high cytoplasmic pChk1-nuclear pChk1 (p = 0.039), high cytoplasmic pChk1-p53 (p = 0.004) and high nuclear pChk1-p53 (p = 0.029) co-expression remain significantly linked to early local recurrence. In multivariate analysis, cytoplasmic pChk1 level independently predicted early local recurrence (p = 0.025). In patients who received adjuvant local radiotherapy (n = 949), p53 (p = 0.014) and high cytoplasmic pChk1-p53 (p = 0.017) remain associated with early local recurrence. Pre-clinically, radio-sensitisation by VE-821 or V158411 was observed in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells and was more pronounced in MCF-7 cells. We conclude that pChk1 is a predictive biomarker of radiotherapy resistance and early local recurrence. PMID:26459098

  13. Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence: Head-to-head comparison with CT and bone scintigraphy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baun, Christina; Falch Braas, Kirsten; Gerke, Oke;

    Departments of Nuclear Medicine, *Radiology, **Oncolocy, and ***Surgery, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark Purpose: Breast cancer (BC) is the most common type of cancer among women in Denmark and about 1/3 of the affected women experience recurrence. The prognosis is good if loco regional recurrence......Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence: Head-to-head comparison with CT and bone scintigraphy  Kirsten Falch, Christina Baun, Oke Gerke, , Ziba A. Farahani, Poul F. Høilund-Carlsen, Lisbet B. Larsen*, Marianne Ewertz**, Katrine Søe*** and Malene G. Hildebrandt...... had sensitivities of 67% and 81% and specificities of 100% and 48%, respectively. Conclusion: These interim results suggest that FDG PET/CT may have a role in the diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected recurrent breast cancer. The 3-hour FDG-PET scan may be diagnostically superior to the other...

  14. Promoter methylation-associated loss of ID4 expression is a marker of tumour recurrence in human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    . Interestingly, ID4 promoter methylation was a factor for unfavourable recurrence-free survival (P=0.036) and increased risk for lymph node metastasis (P=0.030). ID4 is indeed a novel tumour suppressor gene in normal human breast tissue and is epigenetically silenced during cancer development, indicating increased risk for tumour relapse. Thus, ID4 methylation status could serve as a prognostic biomarker in human breast cancer

  15. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing Identifies a Recurrent Mutation in MCPH1 Associating with Hereditary Breast Cancer Susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuomo Mantere

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is strongly influenced by hereditary risk factors, a majority of which still remain unknown. Here, we performed a targeted next-generation sequencing of 796 genes implicated in DNA repair in 189 Finnish breast cancer cases with indication of hereditary disease susceptibility and focused the analysis on protein truncating mutations. A recurrent heterozygous mutation (c.904_916del, p.Arg304ValfsTer3 was identified in early DNA damage response gene, MCPH1, significantly associating with breast cancer susceptibility both in familial (5/145, 3.4%, P = 0.003, OR 8.3 and unselected cases (16/1150, 1.4%, P = 0.016, OR 3.3. A total of 21 mutation positive families were identified, of which one-third exhibited also brain tumors and/or sarcomas (P = 0.0007. Mutation carriers exhibited significant increase in genomic instability assessed by cytogenetic analysis for spontaneous chromosomal rearrangements in peripheral blood lymphocytes (P = 0.0007, suggesting an effect for MCPH1 haploinsufficiency on cancer susceptibility. Furthermore, 40% of the mutation carrier tumors exhibited loss of the wild-type allele. These findings collectively provide strong evidence for MCHP1 being a novel breast cancer susceptibility gene, which warrants further investigations in other populations.

  16. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing Identifies a Recurrent Mutation in MCPH1 Associating with Hereditary Breast Cancer Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantere, Tuomo; Winqvist, Robert; Kauppila, Saila; Grip, Mervi; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Tervasmäki, Anna; Rapakko, Katrin; Pylkäs, Katri

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is strongly influenced by hereditary risk factors, a majority of which still remain unknown. Here, we performed a targeted next-generation sequencing of 796 genes implicated in DNA repair in 189 Finnish breast cancer cases with indication of hereditary disease susceptibility and focused the analysis on protein truncating mutations. A recurrent heterozygous mutation (c.904_916del, p.Arg304ValfsTer3) was identified in early DNA damage response gene, MCPH1, significantly associating with breast cancer susceptibility both in familial (5/145, 3.4%, P = 0.003, OR 8.3) and unselected cases (16/1150, 1.4%, P = 0.016, OR 3.3). A total of 21 mutation positive families were identified, of which one-third exhibited also brain tumors and/or sarcomas (P = 0.0007). Mutation carriers exhibited significant increase in genomic instability assessed by cytogenetic analysis for spontaneous chromosomal rearrangements in peripheral blood lymphocytes (P = 0.0007), suggesting an effect for MCPH1 haploinsufficiency on cancer susceptibility. Furthermore, 40% of the mutation carrier tumors exhibited loss of the wild-type allele. These findings collectively provide strong evidence for MCHP1 being a novel breast cancer susceptibility gene, which warrants further investigations in other populations. PMID:26820313

  17. Triciribine Phosphate, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IV Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-13

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  18. Evaluate Risk/Benefit of Nab Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine and Carboplatin Compared to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin in Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-24

    Breast Tumor; Breast Cancer; Cancer of the Breast; Estrogen Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; HER2- Negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  19. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I found something when I did my breast self-exam. What should I do now? How often should I have mammograms? I have breast cancer. What are my treatment options? How often should I do breast self-exams? I have breast cancer. Is my daughter ...

  20. Canonical correlation analysis for data reduction in data mining applied to predictive models for breast cancer recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Amir Reza; Gill, Hans; Ahlfeldt, Hans; Shahsavar, Nosrat

    2005-01-01

    Data mining methods can be used for extracting specific medical knowledge such as important predictors for recurrence of breast cancer in pertinent data material. However, when there is a huge quantity of variables in the data material it is first necessary to identify and select important variables. In this study we present a preprocessing method for selecting important variables in a dataset prior to building a predictive model.In the dataset, data from 5787 female patients were analysed. To cover more predictors and obtain a better assessment of the outcomes, data were retrieved from three different registers: the regional breast cancer, tumour markers, and cause of death registers. After retrieving information about selected predictors and outcomes from the different registers, the raw data were cleaned by running different logical rules. Thereafter, domain experts selected predictors assumed to be important regarding recurrence of breast cancer. After that, Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) was applied as a dimension reduction technique to preserve the character of the original data.Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was applied to the resulting dataset for two different analyses with the same settings. Performance of the predictive models was confirmed by ten-fold cross validation. The results showed an increase in the accuracy of the prediction and reduction of the mean absolute error. PMID:16160255

  1. Caloric Restriction in Treating Patients With Stage 0-I Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-11

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer

  2. Stereotactic Radiosurgery as Part of Multimodal Treatment in a Bulky Leptomeningeal Recurrence of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertke, Matthew H; Burton, Eric C; Shaughnessy, Joseph N

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer metastatic to the brain and/or leptomeningeal spread of disease is a frequently encountered clinical situation, especially given the extended course of disease in these patients. Systemic therapies can often effectively prolong extracranial disease control, making effective strategies to control central nervous system-based disease even more critical. We present a case of bulky leptomeningeal relapse of breast cancer in the setting of prior whole brain radiation therapy. In order to treat the patient's bulky disease and leptomeningeal spread while avoiding the potential toxicities of repeat whole brain radiation, the patient was treated with frameless stereotactic radiosurgery and intrathecal chemotherapy. This is the first report of this treatment approach for leptomeningeal relapse of breast cancer. The patient had an excellent response to treatment and durable intracranial control. PMID:27081584

  3. Rib fractures after reirradiation plus hyperthermia for recurrent breast cancer. Predictive factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combining reirradiation (reRT) and hyperthermia (HT) has shown high therapeutic value for patients with locoregional recurrent breast cancer (LR). However, additional toxicity of reirradiation (e.g., rib fractures) may occur. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of potential risk factors on the occurrence of rib fractures. From 1982-2005, 234 patients were treated with adjuvant reRT + HT after surgery for LR. ReRT consisted typically of 8 fractions of 4 Gy twice a week, or 12 fractions of 3 Gy four times a week. A total of 118 patients were irradiated with abutted photon and electron fields. In all, 60 patients were irradiated using either one or alternating combinations of abutted AP electron fields. Hyperthermia was given once or twice a week. The 5-year infield local control (LC) rate was 70 %. Rib fractures were detected in 16 of 234 patients (actuarial risk: 7 % at 5 years). All rib fractures occurred in patients treated with a combination of photon and abutted electron fields (p = 0.000); in 15 of 16 patients fractures were located in the abutment regions. The other significant predictive factors for rib fractures were a higher fraction dose (p = 0.040), large RT fields, and treatment before the year 2000. ReRT + HT results in long-term LC. The majority of rib fractures were located in the photon/electron abutment area, emphasizing the disadvantage of field overlap. Large abutted photon/electron fields combined with 4 Gy fractions increase the number of rib fractures in this study group. However, as these factors were highly correlated no relative importance of the individual factors could be estimated. Increasing the number of HT sessions a week does not increase the risk of rib fractures. (orig.)

  4. Discovery of potential prognostic long non-coding RNA biomarkers for predicting the risk of tumor recurrence of breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Meng; Zhong, Lei; Xu, Wanying; Sun, Yifan; Zhang, Zhaoyue; Zhao, Hengqiang; Yang, Lei; Sun, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Deregulation of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) expression has been proven to be involved in the development and progression of cancer. However, expression pattern and prognostic value of lncRNAs in breast cancer recurrence remain unclear. Here, we analyzed lncRNA expression profiles of breast cancer patients who did or did not develop recurrence by repurposing existing microarray datasets from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, and identified 12 differentially expressed lncRNAs that were closely associated with tumor recurrence of breast cancer patients. We constructed a lncRNA-focus molecular signature by the risk scoring method based on the expression levels of 12 relapse-related lncRNAs from the discovery cohort, which classified patients into high-risk and low-risk groups with significantly different recurrence-free survival (HR = 2.72, 95% confidence interval 2.07-3.57; p = 4.8e-13). The 12-lncRNA signature also represented similar prognostic value in two out of three independent validation cohorts. Furthermore, the prognostic power of the 12-lncRNA signature was independent of known clinical prognostic factors in at least two cohorts. Functional analysis suggested that the predicted relapse-related lncRNAs may be involved in known breast cancer-related biological processes and pathways. Our results highlighted the potential of lncRNAs as novel candidate biomarkers to identify breast cancer patients at high risk of tumor recurrence. PMID:27503456

  5. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  6. Breast Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Screening ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  7. HSP90 Inhibitor AT13387 and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Advanced Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-08

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  8. DEAR1 is a dominant regulator of acinar morphogenesis and an independent predictor of local recurrence-free survival in early-onset breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven T Lott

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer in young women tends to have a natural history of aggressive disease for which rates of recurrence are higher than in breast cancers detected later in life. Little is known about the genetic pathways that underlie early-onset breast cancer. Here we report the discovery of DEAR1 (ductal epithelium-associated RING Chromosome 1, a novel gene encoding a member of the TRIM (tripartite motif subfamily of RING finger proteins, and provide evidence for its role as a dominant regulator of acinar morphogenesis in the mammary gland and as an independent predictor of local recurrence-free survival in early-onset breast cancer. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Suppression subtractive hybridization identified DEAR1 as a novel gene mapping to a region of high-frequency loss of heterozygosity (LOH in a number of histologically diverse human cancers within Chromosome 1p35.1. In the breast epithelium, DEAR1 expression is limited to the ductal and glandular epithelium and is down-regulated in transition to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS, an early histologic stage in breast tumorigenesis. DEAR1 missense mutations and homozygous deletion (HD were discovered in breast cancer cell lines and tumor samples. Introduction of the DEAR1 wild type and not the missense mutant alleles to complement a mutation in a breast cancer cell line, derived from a 36-year-old female with invasive breast cancer, initiated acinar morphogenesis in three-dimensional (3D basement membrane culture and restored tissue architecture reminiscent of normal acinar structures in the mammary gland in vivo. Stable knockdown of DEAR1 in immortalized human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs recapitulated the growth in 3D culture of breast cancer cell lines containing mutated DEAR1, in that shDEAR1 clones demonstrated disruption of tissue architecture, loss of apical basal polarity, diffuse apoptosis, and failure of lumen formation. Furthermore, immunohistochemical staining of a tissue

  9. MR imaging of brachial plexopathy in breast cancer patients without palpable recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingawi, S.S. (Department of Radiology, St. Paul' s Hospital, Vancouver, BC (Canada) Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada) Radiology Department, Vancouver General Hospital, BC (Canada)); Bilbey, J.H. (Department of Radiology, St. Paul' s Hospital, Vancouver, BC (Canada)); Munk, P.L.; Marchinkow, L.O. (Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)); Poon, P.Y. (Department of Diagnostic Imaging, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada)); Allan, B.M. (Department of Neurology, Vancouver Hospital, Vancouver, BC (Canada)); Olivotto, I.A. (Division of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada))

    1999-06-01

    Objective. To investigate the role of MR imaging in detecting brachial plexus (BP) abnormalities in breast cancer patients with plexopathy but without palpable masses.Design. MR imaging of the BP was performed on 26 breast cancer patients with brachial plexopathy without palpable regional masses, using 0.5 T and 1.5 T imaging systems. Findings were correlated with the clinical diagnoses.Patients. Twenty-six patients with brachial plexopathy and history of breast cancer were enrolled in the study. All patients presented with plexopathy symptoms. Fourteen patients were positive and 12 patients were indeterminate for BP metastasis according to clinical criteria.Results and conclusion. MR imaging demonstrated masses involving the BP representing metastases in two patients. Nine patients had other regional abnormalities with a normal brachial plexus. It is concluded that MR imaging is useful in the assessment and direction of therapy of brachial plexopathy in breast cancer patients by detecting both metastases to the BP as well as other abnormalities, unrelated to the BP, which may explain the patient's symptoms. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab., 18 refs.

  10. Locoregional recurrence of triple-negative breast cancer: effect of type of surgery and adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayoumi Y

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Yasser Bayoumi,1 Ayman AbdelSamie,2 Ahmed Abdelsaid,3 Aida Radwan4 1Radiation Oncology, 2Medical Oncology, 3Surgical Oncology, 4Medical Physics, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt Background/purpose: The aim was to evaluate the prognostic significance of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT and surgical type on local recurrence-free survival (LRFS and overall survival (OS in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC in the Egyptian population. Patients and methods: We evaluated 111 patients with stage I–III TNBC diagnosed at our institute during the period from 2004 to 2009. Patients were stratified according to PORT into two groups: a PORT group and a non-PORT group. The influence of PORT and surgical type on LRFS and OS were evaluated. A cross-matching was done to the non-TNBC group of patients to compare the recurrence and survival rates between them and the studied group of TNBC patients. Results: The mean age of TNBC patients at diagnosis was 63±7 years. The majority of the patients had stage III disease (68.5% and 73% had clinical or pathological positive lymph nodes. Sixty percent (67/111 of patients had modified radical mastectomy and 44/111 (40% patients had breast-conserving treatment. PORT was given for 63% of patients, while systemic treatment was given in 89% of patients. At the time of analysis, 13 patients (11% developed local recurrence: five of 70 (7% in the PORT group and eight of 41 (19.5% in the non-PORT group. Five-year LRFS for the whole group of patients was 88%±6%, which was significantly affected by PORT. The surgical type did not affect local recurrence significantly. Five-year OS for the whole group was 54%±8%. PORT and surgical type did not affect OS significantly (P-value 0.09 and 0.11, respectively. Five-year LRFS was 88%±6% and 90%±11% for TNBC and non-TNBC patients, respectively (P-value 0.8; however, OS for TNBC was significantly lower than for non-TNBC (P-value 0.04. Conclusion: TNBC is an

  11. Breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MatthewJNaylor

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumours are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs. Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to the pathology of breast cancer will greatly aid the pursuit of novel therapies targeted at eliminating these cells. This review will summarise what is currently known about the origins of breast CSCs, their role in disease progression and ways in which they may be targeted therapeutically.

  12. Quantification of Cell-free HER-2 DNA in Plasma from Breast Cancer Patients: Sensitivity for Detection of Metastatic Recurrence and Gene Amplification

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Diana Sørensen; Rikke Fredslund Andersen; Niels Pallisgaard; Jonna Skov Madsen; Erik Hugger Jakobsen; Ivan Brandslund

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the free-circu‐ lating plasma HER-2 DNA (cfHER-2 DNA) and to assess the ability of analysis to discriminate between patients with primary breast cancer and healthy controls in order to detect metastatic recurrence in comparison with serum HER-2 protein and also HER-2 gene amplification. The study population consisted of 100 patients with primary breast cancer and 50 healthy female donors. An additional 22 patients with metastases were subsequently ...

  13. Basal Subtype of Invasive Breast Cancer Is Associated With a Higher Risk of True Recurrence After Conventional Breast-Conserving Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wo, Jennifer Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Nguyen, Paul L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Abi Raad, Rita F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sreedhara, Meera [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Freer, Phoebe E. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Georgian-Smith, Dianne [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bellon, Jennifer R.; Wong, Julia S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Smith, Barbara L. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harris, Jay R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether breast cancer subtype is associated with patterns of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), either true recurrence (TR) or elsewhere local recurrence (ELR), among women with pT1-T2 invasive breast cancer (IBC) who receive breast-conserving therapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: From Jan 1998 to Dec 2003, 1,223 women with pT1-T2N0-3 IBC were treated with BCT (lumpectomy plus whole-breast radiation). Ninety percent of patients received adjuvant systemic therapy, but none received trastuzumab. Biologic cancer subtypes were approximated by determining estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), progesterone receptor-positive (PR+), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive (HER-2+) expression, classified as luminal A (ER+ or PR+ and HER-2 negative [HER-2-]), luminal B (ER+ or PR+ and HER-2+), HER-2 (ER- and PR- and HER-2+), and basal (ER- and PR- and HER-2- ) subtypes. Imaging, pathology, and operative reports were reviewed by two physicians independently, including an attending breast radiologist. Readers were blinded to subtype and outcome. TR was defined as IBTR within the same quadrant and within 3 cm of the primary tumor. All others were defined as ELR. Results: At a median follow-up of 70 months, 24 patients developed IBTR (5-year cumulative incidence of 1.6%), including 15 TR and 9 ELR patients. At 5 years, basal (4.4%) and HER-2 (9%) subtypes had a significantly higher incidence of TR than luminal B (1.2%) and luminal A (0.2%) subtypes (p < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, basal subtype (hazard ratio [HR], 4.8, p = 0.01), younger age at diagnosis (HR, 0.97; p = 0.05), and increasing tumor size (HR, 2.1; p = 0.04) were independent predictors of TR. Only younger age (HR, 0.95; p = 0.01) significantly predicted for ELR. Conclusions: Basal and HER-2 subtypes are significantly associated with higher rates of TR among women with pT1-T2 IBC after BCT. Younger age predicts for both TR and ELR. Strategies to reduce TR in basal

  14. Basal Subtype of Invasive Breast Cancer Is Associated With a Higher Risk of True Recurrence After Conventional Breast-Conserving Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether breast cancer subtype is associated with patterns of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), either true recurrence (TR) or elsewhere local recurrence (ELR), among women with pT1–T2 invasive breast cancer (IBC) who receive breast-conserving therapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: From Jan 1998 to Dec 2003, 1,223 women with pT1–T2N0-3 IBC were treated with BCT (lumpectomy plus whole-breast radiation). Ninety percent of patients received adjuvant systemic therapy, but none received trastuzumab. Biologic cancer subtypes were approximated by determining estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), progesterone receptor-positive (PR+), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive (HER-2+) expression, classified as luminal A (ER+ or PR+ and HER-2 negative [HER-2−]), luminal B (ER+ or PR+ and HER-2+), HER-2 (ER− and PR− and HER-2+), and basal (ER− and PR− and HER-2− ) subtypes. Imaging, pathology, and operative reports were reviewed by two physicians independently, including an attending breast radiologist. Readers were blinded to subtype and outcome. TR was defined as IBTR within the same quadrant and within 3 cm of the primary tumor. All others were defined as ELR. Results: At a median follow-up of 70 months, 24 patients developed IBTR (5-year cumulative incidence of 1.6%), including 15 TR and 9 ELR patients. At 5 years, basal (4.4%) and HER-2 (9%) subtypes had a significantly higher incidence of TR than luminal B (1.2%) and luminal A (0.2%) subtypes (p < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, basal subtype (hazard ratio [HR], 4.8, p = 0.01), younger age at diagnosis (HR, 0.97; p = 0.05), and increasing tumor size (HR, 2.1; p = 0.04) were independent predictors of TR. Only younger age (HR, 0.95; p = 0.01) significantly predicted for ELR. Conclusions: Basal and HER-2 subtypes are significantly associated with higher rates of TR among women with pT1–T2 IBC after BCT. Younger age predicts for both TR and ELR. Strategies to reduce

  15. Breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... perform breast self-exams each month. However, the importance of self-exams for detecting breast cancer is ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  16. GDC-0941 and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Androgen Receptor-Negative Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-17

    Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  17. Prognostic factors for local recurrence in patients with limited surgery and irradiation of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between January 1975 and December 1984, 239 patients after breast conserving surgery were referred to the University Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radiobiology of Vienna. Of these patients 214 were available for analysis with regard to locoregional control and cosmetic outcome. The breast received supervoltage irradiation from two tangential fields, in 82% with a tumor dose of 50 Gy and in 15% 50 to 60 Gy. In addition 70% of the patients received a boost dose with 7.5 to 15 MeV electrons to the tumor bed and the scar. The overall local failure rate was 10.2%. For patients with T1, 2 and negative axillary nodes or less than four positive lymph nodes (N=160) a recurrence rate of 7.1% was observed. Factors correlated to a higher local recurrence rate were in this retrospective study axillary status (>3 positive lymph nodes), histopathologic grade (G III), absence of clear margin after surgery and absence of additional electron boost. (orig.)

  18. The Genomic Grade Assay Compared With Ki67 to Determine Risk of Distant Breast Cancer Recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ignatiadis, Michail; Azim, Hatem A; Desmedt, Christine;

    2016-01-01

    with centrally reviewed immunohistochemical testing of Ki67 antigen proliferation. Design, Setting, and Participants: This is an internationally collaborative substudy of a large phase 3 4-arm adjuvant trial. Patients had endocrine receptor-positive, node-positive, or node-negative nonmetastatic...... primary breast cancer. Patients included in this study had available formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples of their primary tumors and were randomized to either a 5-year tamoxifen monotherapy arm or a 5-year letrozole monotherapy arm. Associations between either GG assay results or log2-transformed Ki...... receptors, and ERBB2 (formerly HER2 or HER2/neu). The likelihood ratio statistic was used to assess the added prognostic value. Interventions: Central evaluation and comparison, blinded for clinical information, of the GG assay, breast cancer histological grade, and Ki67. Main Outcomes and Measures: Distant...

  19. Engaging African Americans in developing an intervention to reduce breast cancer recurrence: A brief report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Selina A.; Whitehead, Mary S.; Sheats, Joyce Q.; Fontenot, Brittney; Alema-Mensah, Ernest; Ansa, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Background To develop a culturally appropriate lifestyle intervention, involvement of its intended users is needed. Methods Members of an African American (AA) breast cancer support group participated in two 4-hour guided discussions, which were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed to guide the content. Results The support group collaborated with researchers to develop 24 experiential nutrition education sessions using a social cognitive framework and incorporating self-regulation skills (goal-setting, self-monitoring, problem-solving, stimulus control) and social support to enhance self-efficacy for changes in dietary intake. Conclusions Community engagement fostered autonomy, built collaboration, and enhanced the capacity of AA breast cancer survivors to participate in developing a lifestyle intervention.

  20. 14-3-3ζ Overexpression Defines High Risk for Breast Cancer Recurrence and Promotes Cancer Cell Survival

    OpenAIRE

    Neal, Christopher L.; Yao, Jun; Yang, Wentao; ZHOU, XIAOYAN; Nguyen, Nina T.; LU, JING; Danes, Christopher G.; Guo, Hua; Lan, Keng-Hsueh; Ensor, Joe; Hittelman, Walter; Hung, Mien-Chie; Yu, Dihua

    2009-01-01

    The ubiquitously expressed 14-3-3 proteins are involved in numerous important cellular functions. The loss of 14-3-3σ is a common event in breast cancer; however, the role of other 14-3-3s in breast cancer is unclear. Recently, we found that 14-3-3ζ overexpression occurs in early stage breast diseases and contributes to transformation of human mammary epithelial cells. Here, we show that 14-3-3ζ overexpression also persisted in invasive ductal carcinoma and contributed to the further progress...

  1. Application of BNCT to the treatment of HER2+ breast cancer recurrences: Research and developments in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of the Argentine BNCT Project a new research line has been started to study the application of BNCT to the treatment of locoregional recurrences of HER2+ breast cancer subtype. Based on former studies, the strategy considers the use of immunoliposomes as boron carriers nanovehicles to target HER2 overexpressing cells. The essential concerns of the current stage of this proposal are the development of carriers that can improve the efficiency of delivery of boron compounds and the dosimetric assessment of treatment feasibility. For this purpose, an specific pool of clinical cases that can benefit from this application was determined. In this work, we present the proposal and the advances related to the different stages of current research. - Highlights: • A new proposal of BNCT for HER2+ breast cancer treatment is introduced. • The proposal considers development of immunoliposomes as boron carrier nanovehicles. • Locoregional recurrences after treatment were identified as candidates for initial BNCT studies. • First analysis show acceptable neutron flux distributions provided by RA-6 BNCT facility

  2. A recurrent chromosome translocation breakpoint in breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines targets the neuregulin/NRG1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adélaïde, José; Huang, Huai-En; Murati, Anne; Alsop, Amber E; Orsetti, Béatrice; Mozziconacci, Marie-Joëlle; Popovici, Cornel; Ginestier, Christophe; Letessier, Anne; Basset, Céline; Courtay-Cahen, Céline; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Theillet, Charles; Birnbaum, Daniel; Edwards, Paul A W; Chaffanet, Max

    2003-08-01

    The 8p11-21 region is a frequent target of alterations in breast cancer and other carcinomas. We surveyed 34 breast tumor cell lines and 9 pancreatic cancer cell lines for alterations of this region by use of multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) and BAC-specific FISH. We describe a recurrent chromosome translocation breakpoint that targets the NRG1 gene on 8p12. NRG1 encodes growth factors of the neuregulin/heregulin-1 family that are ligands for tyrosine kinase receptors of the ERBB family. Breakpoints within the NRG1 gene were found in four of the breast tumor cell lines: ZR-75-1, in a dic(8;11); HCC1937, in a t(8;10)(p12;p12.1); SUM-52, in an hsr(8)(p12); UACC-812, in a t(3;8); and in two of the pancreatic cancer cell lines: PaTu I, in a der(8)t(4;8); and SUIT-2, in a del(8)(p). Mapping by two-color FISH showed that the breaks were scattered over 1.1 Mb within the NRG1 gene. It is already known that the MDA-MB-175 breast tumor cell line has a dic(8;11), with a breakpoint in NRG1 that fuses NRG1 to the DOC4 gene on 11q13. Thus, we have found a total of seven breakpoints, in two types of cancer cell lines, that target the NRG1 gene. This suggests that the NRG1 locus is a recurring target of translocations in carcinomas. PCR analysis of reverse-transcribed cell line RNAs revealed an extensive complexity of the NRG1 transcripts but failed to detect a consistent pattern of mRNA isoforms in the cell lines with NRG1 breakpoint. PMID:12800145

  3. The recurrence pattern following delayed breast reconstruction after mastectomy for breast cancer suggests a systemic effect of surgery on occult dormant micrometastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillekås, Hanna; Demicheli, Romano; Ardoino, Ilaria; Jensen, Svein A H; Biganzoli, Elia; Straume, Oddbjørn

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the recurrence dynamics in breast cancer patients after delayed reconstruction. We hypothesized that surgical reconstruction might stimulate dormant micrometastases and reduce time to recurrence. All mastectomy breast cancer patients with delayed surgical reconstruction at Haukeland University Hospital, between 1977 and 2007, n = 312, were studied. Our control group consisted of 1341 breast cancer patients without reconstruction. For each case, all patients in the control group with identical T and N stages and age ±2 years were considered. A paired control was randomly selected from this group. 10 years after primary surgery, 39 of the cases had relapsed, compared to 52 of the matched controls. The reconstructed group was analyzed for relapse dynamics after mastectomy; the first peak in relapses was similarly timed, but smaller than for the controls, while the second peak was similar in time and size. Second, the relapse pattern was analyzed with reconstruction as the starting point. A peak in recurrences was found after 18 months, and a lower peak at the 5th-6th year. The height of the peak correlated with the extent of surgery and initial T and N stages. Timing of the peak was not affected, neither was the cumulative effect. The relapse pattern, when time origin is placed both at mastectomy and at reconstruction, is bimodal with a peak position at the same time points, at 2 years and at 5-6 years. The timing of the transition from dormant micrometastases into clinically detectable macrometastases might be explained by an enhancing effect of surgery. PMID:27306422

  4. Ten-Year Locoregional Recurrence Risks in Women With Nodal Micrometastatic Breast Cancer Staged With Axillary Dissection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupe, Krystine [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, BC (Canada); Truong, Pauline T., E-mail: ptruong@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, BC (Canada); Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Alexander, Cheryl; Speers, Caroline [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, BC (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, BC (Canada); Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To compare the locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates in patients with nodal mirometastases (pNmic) with those in patients with node-negative (pN0) and macroscopic node-positive (pNmac) breast cancer; and to evaluate the LRR rates according to locoregional treatment of pNmic disease. Methods and Materials: The subjects were 9,616 women diagnosed between 1989 and 1999 with Stage pT1-T2, pN0, pNmic, or pNmac, M0 breast cancer. All women had undergone axillary dissection. The Kaplan-Meier local recurrence, regional recurrence, and LRR rates were compared among those with pN0 (n = 7,977), pNmic (n = 490) and pNmac (n = 1,149) and according to locoregional treatment. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify the significant factors associated with LRR. Results: The median follow-up was 11 years. The 10-year Kaplan-Meier recurrence rate in the pN0, pNmic, and pNmac cohorts was 6.1%, 6.8%, and 8.7% for local recurrence; 3.1%, 6.2%, and 10.3% for regional recurrence; and 8.0%, 11.6%, and 15.2% for LRR, respectively (all p < .001). In the pNmic patients, the 10-year regional recurrence rate was 6.4% with breast-conserving surgery plus breast radiotherapy (RT), 5.4% with breast-conserving surgery plus locoregional RT, 4.6% with mastectomy alone, 11.1% with mastectomy plus chest wall RT, and 10.7% with mastectomy plus locoregional RT. In patients with pNmic disease and age <45 years, Grade 3 histologic features, lymphovascular invasion, nodal ratio >0.25, and estrogen receptor-negative disease, the 10-year LRR rates were 15-20%. On multivariate analysis of the entire cohort, pNmic was associated with greater LRR than Stage pN0 (hazard ratio [HR], 1.6; p = .002). On multivariate analysis of pNmic patients only, age <45 years was associated with significantly greater LRR (HR, 1.9; p = .03), and trends for greater LRR were observed with a nodal ratio >0.25 (HR, 2.0; p = .07) and lymphovascular invasion (HR, 1.7; p = .07). Conclusion: Women with pNmic had a greater

  5. The impact of tamoxifen on breast recurrence, cosmesis, complications, and survival in estrogen receptor-positive early-stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of tamoxifen on breast recurrence, cosmesis, complications, overall and cause-specific survival in women with Stage I-II breast cancer and estrogen receptor positive tumors undergoing conservative surgery and radiation. Methods and Materials: From 1982 to 1991, 491 women with estrogen receptor positive Stage I-II breast cancer underwent excisional biopsy, axillary dissection, and radiation. The median age of the patient population was 60 years with 21% < 50 years of age. The median follow-up was 5.3 years (range 0.1 to 12.8). Sixty-nine percent had T1 tumors and 83% had histologically negative axillary nodes. Reexcision was performed in 49% and the final margin of resection was negative in 64%. One hundred fifty-four patients received tamoxifen and 337 patients received no adjuvant therapy. None of the patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups for age, race, clinical tumor size, histology, the use of reexcision, or median total dose to the primary. Patients who received tamoxifen were more often axillary node positive (44% tamoxifen vs. 5% no tamoxifen), and, therefore, a greater percentage received treatment to the breast and regional nodes. The tamoxifen patients less often had unknown margins of resection (9% tamoxifen vs. 22% no tamoxifen). The 5-year actuarial breast recurrence rate was 4% for the tamoxifen patients compared to 7% for patients not receiving tamoxifen (p 0.21). Tamoxifen resulted in a modest decrease in the 5-year actuarial risk of a breast recurrence in axillary node-negative patients, in those with unknown or close margins of resection, and in those who underwent a single excision. Axillary node-positive patients had a clinically significant decrease in the 5-year actuarial breast recurrence rate (21 vs. 4%; p 0.08). The 5-year actuarial rate of distant metastasis was not significantly decreased by the addition of adjuvant tamoxifen in all

  6. Superficial hyperthermia in the treatment of locally recurrent or advanced breast cancer - clinical experiences in Prague, Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Superficial hyperthermia in combination with radiotherapy represents very effective local treatment of locally recurrent breast cancer. We will present a group of patients treated in our institution since February 2003 to November 2004. The aim of this work is the evaluation of local response to the treatment in our group of patients. Since February 2003 to November 2004 we treated group of 32 women with locally recurrent breast cancer. 24 patients were treated for local recurrence, 5 patients were treated for supraclavicular lymph node metastasis and 3 patients were treated for locally advanced tumor. 27 patients were evaluable for local response and its duration. Hyperthermia was combined with radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was done on 6 MeV linear accelerator, usually using 2 tangential fields with wedges. Dose of radiotherapy was usually 50 Gy/25 fractions (only in the cases of reirradiation with large volume we applied 40 Gy/20 fr). Hyperthermia was done using Lund hyperthermia system for superficial microwave hyperthermia working on 434 MHz and was applied once a week, 5 to 6 applications during the course of radiotherapy, mainly immediately after radiotherapy, for 60 min. The temperature was measured using termistor probes superficially, minimally in the six points. We tried to achieve temperatures in the range from 42 to 43.5oC, but the actually measured temperatures were limited by the tolerance of patients. The anesthetics were not used. We achieved response in 26 from 27 patients. CR on the chest wall or in the supraclavicular region was achieved in 17 cases, PR in 9 cases and in 1 case was seen only stabilization of disease. Duration of response was in range from 3 to 24 months, with median of 9 months. We did not see any serious side effects resulting from hyperthermia treatment, only in the cases of reirradiation we observed slower healing of the post irradiation skin reaction. Superficial hyperthermia represents useful tool for the

  7. Ten-Year Locoregional Recurrence Risks in Women With Nodal Micrometastatic Breast Cancer Staged With Axillary Dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates in patients with nodal mirometastases (pNmic) with those in patients with node-negative (pN0) and macroscopic node-positive (pNmac) breast cancer; and to evaluate the LRR rates according to locoregional treatment of pNmic disease. Methods and Materials: The subjects were 9,616 women diagnosed between 1989 and 1999 with Stage pT1-T2, pN0, pNmic, or pNmac, M0 breast cancer. All women had undergone axillary dissection. The Kaplan-Meier local recurrence, regional recurrence, and LRR rates were compared among those with pN0 (n = 7,977), pNmic (n = 490) and pNmac (n = 1,149) and according to locoregional treatment. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify the significant factors associated with LRR. Results: The median follow-up was 11 years. The 10-year Kaplan-Meier recurrence rate in the pN0, pNmic, and pNmac cohorts was 6.1%, 6.8%, and 8.7% for local recurrence; 3.1%, 6.2%, and 10.3% for regional recurrence; and 8.0%, 11.6%, and 15.2% for LRR, respectively (all p 0.25, and estrogen receptor-negative disease, the 10-year LRR rates were 15–20%. On multivariate analysis of the entire cohort, pNmic was associated with greater LRR than Stage pN0 (hazard ratio [HR], 1.6; p = .002). On multivariate analysis of pNmic patients only, age 0.25 (HR, 2.0; p = .07) and lymphovascular invasion (HR, 1.7; p = .07). Conclusion: Women with pNmic had a greater risk of LRR than those with pN0 disease. Patients with pNmic in association with young age, Grade 3 histologic features, lymphovascular invasion, nodal ratio >0.25, and estrogen receptor-negative disease experienced 10-year LRR rates of ∼15–20%, warranting consideration of locoregional RT.

  8. Prognostic index score and clinical prediction model of local regional recurrence after mastectomy in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop clinical prediction models for local regional recurrence (Lr) of breast carcinoma after mastectomy that will be superior to the conventional measures of tumor size and nodal status. Methods and Materials: Clinical information from 1,010 invasive breast cancer patients who had primary modified radical mastectomy formed the database of the training and testing of clinical prognostic and prediction models of LRR. Cox proportional hazards analysis and Bayesian tree analysis were the core methodologies from which these models were built. To generate a prognostic index model, 15 clinical variables were examined for their impact on LRR. Patients were stratified by lymph node involvement (<4 vs. ≥4) and local regional status (recurrent vs. control) and then, within strata, randomly split into training and test data sets of equal size. To establish prediction tree models, 255 patients were selected by the criteria of having had LRR (53 patients) or no evidence of LRR without postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) (202 patients). Results: With these models, patients can be divided into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups on the basis of axillary nodal status, estrogen receptor status, lymphovascular invasion, and age at diagnosis. In the low-risk group, there is no influence of PMRT on either LRR or survival. For intermediate-risk patients, PMRT improves LR control but not metastases-free or overall survival. For the high-risk patients, however, PMRT improves both LR control and metastasis-free and overall survival. Conclusion: The prognostic score and predictive index are useful methods to estimate the risk of LRR in breast cancer patients after mastectomy and for estimating the potential benefits of PMRT. These models provide additional information criteria for selection of patients for PMRT, compared with the traditional selection criteria of nodal status and tumor size

  9. Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  10. Stages of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  11. Rib fractures after reirradiation plus hyperthermia for recurrent breast cancer. Predictive factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenborg, Sabine; Valk, Christel; Os, Rob van; Voerde Sive Voerding, Paul zum; Crezee, Hans; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Rasch, Coen [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiation Oncology, Z1-215, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oei, Bing; Venselaar, Jack [Institute Verbeeten (BVI), Tilburg (Netherlands); Randen, Adrienne van [University of Amsterdam (AMC), Department of Radiology Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-04-15

    Combining reirradiation (reRT) and hyperthermia (HT) has shown high therapeutic value for patients with locoregional recurrent breast cancer (LR). However, additional toxicity of reirradiation (e.g., rib fractures) may occur. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of potential risk factors on the occurrence of rib fractures. From 1982-2005, 234 patients were treated with adjuvant reRT + HT after surgery for LR. ReRT consisted typically of 8 fractions of 4 Gy twice a week, or 12 fractions of 3 Gy four times a week. A total of 118 patients were irradiated with abutted photon and electron fields. In all, 60 patients were irradiated using either one or alternating combinations of abutted AP electron fields. Hyperthermia was given once or twice a week. The 5-year infield local control (LC) rate was 70 %. Rib fractures were detected in 16 of 234 patients (actuarial risk: 7 % at 5 years). All rib fractures occurred in patients treated with a combination of photon and abutted electron fields (p = 0.000); in 15 of 16 patients fractures were located in the abutment regions. The other significant predictive factors for rib fractures were a higher fraction dose (p = 0.040), large RT fields, and treatment before the year 2000. ReRT + HT results in long-term LC. The majority of rib fractures were located in the photon/electron abutment area, emphasizing the disadvantage of field overlap. Large abutted photon/electron fields combined with 4 Gy fractions increase the number of rib fractures in this study group. However, as these factors were highly correlated no relative importance of the individual factors could be estimated. Increasing the number of HT sessions a week does not increase the risk of rib fractures. (orig.) [German] Der kombinierte Einsatz von Rebestrahlung (reRT) und Hyperthermie (HT) zeigt eine hohe Wirksamkeit bei Patienten mit lokoregional rezidiviertem Brustkrebs (LR). Jedoch koennen zusaetzliche toxische Effekte von reRT (z. B. Rippenfrakturen

  12. Low p53 Binding Protein 1 (53BP1) Expression Is Associated With Increased Local Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate whether the expression of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) has prognostic significance in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (BCS+RT). Methods and Materials: A tissue microarray of early-stage breast cancer treated with BCS+RT from a cohort of 514 women was assayed for 53BP1, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry. Through log–rank tests and univariate and multivariate models, the staining profile of each tumor was correlated with clinical endpoints, including ipsilateral breast recurrence–free survival (IBRFS), distant metastasis–free survival (DMFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Of the 477 (93%) evaluable tumors, 63 (13%) were scored as low. Low expression of 53BP1 was associated with worse outcomes for all endpoints studied, including 10-year IBRFS (76.8% vs. 90.5%; P=.01), OS (66.4% vs. 81.7%; P=.02), CSS (66.0% vs. 87.4%; P<.01), DMFS (55.9% vs. 87.0%; P<.01), and RFS (45.2% vs. 80.6%; P<.01). Multivariate analysis incorporating various clinico-pathologic markers and 53BP1 expression found that 53BP1 expression was again an independent predictor of all endpoints (IBRFS: P=.0254; OS: P=.0094; CSS: P=.0033; DMFS: P=.0006; RFS: P=.0002). Low 53BP1 expression was also found to correlate with triple-negative (TN) phenotype (P<.01). Furthermore, in subset analysis of all TN breast cancer, negative 53BP1 expression trended for lower IBRFS (72.3% vs. 93.9%; P=.0361) and was significant for worse DMFS (48.2% vs. 86.8%; P=.0035) and RFS (37.8% vs. 83.7%; P=.0014). Conclusion: Our data indicate that low 53BP1 expression is an independent prognostic indicator for local relapse among other endpoints in early-stage breast cancer and TN breast cancer patients treated with BCS+RT. These results should be verified in larger cohorts of patients to validate their

  13. Menopausal status dependence of the timing of breast cancer recurrence after surgical removal of the primary tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information on the metastasis process in breast cancer patients undergoing primary tumour removal may be extracted from an analysis of the timing of clinical recurrence. The hazard rate for local-regional and/or distant recurrence as the first event during the first 4 years after surgery was studied in 1173 patients undergoing mastectomy alone as primary treatment for operable breast cancer. Subset analyses were performed according to tumour size, axillary nodal status and menopausal status. A sharp two-peaked hazard function was observed for node-positive pre-menopausal patients, whereas results from node-positive post-menopausal women always displayed a single broad peak. The first narrow peak among pre-menopausal women showed a very steep rise to a maximum about 8–10 months after mastectomy. The second peak was considerably broader, reaching its maximum at 28–30 months. Post-menopausal patients displayed a wide, nearly symmetrical peak with maximum risk at about 18–20 months. Peaks displayed increasing height with increasing axillary lymph node involvement. No multi-peaked pattern was evident for either pre-menopausal or post-menopausal node-negative patients; however, this finding should be considered cautiously because of the limited number of events. Tumour size influenced recurrence risk but not its timing. Findings resulting from the different subsets of patients were remarkably coherent and each observed peak maintained the same position on the time axis in all analysed subsets. The risk of early recurrence for node positive patients is dependent on menopausal status. The amount of axillary nodal involvement and the tumour size modulate the risk value at any given time. For pre-menopausal node-positive patients, the abrupt increase of the first narrow peak of the recurrence risk suggests a triggering event that synchronises early risk. We suggest that this event is the surgical removal of the primary tumour. The later, broader, more symmetrical risk

  14. Breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 20-year follow-up of A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki has a crucial role in determining the relationship of radiation to the occurrence of breast cancer. In 1967, Wanebo et al have first reported 27 cases of breast cancer during the period 1950-1966 among the Adult Health Study population of A-bomb survivors. Since then, follow-up surveys for breast cancer have been made using the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort, and the incidence of breast cancer has increased year by year; that is breast cancer was identified in 231 cases by the first LSS series (1950-1969), 360 cases by the second LSS series (1950-1974), 564 cases by the third LSS series (1950-1980), and 816 cases in the fourth LSS series (1950-1085). The third LSS series have revealed a high risk for radiation-induced breast cancer in women aged 10 or less at the time of exposure (ATE). Both relative and absolute risks are found to be decreased with increasing ages ATE. Based on the above-mentioned findings and other studies on persons exposed medical radiation, radiation-induced breast cancer is characterized by the following: (1) the incidence of breast cancer is linearly increased with increasing radiation doses; (2) both relative and absolute risks for breast cancer are high in younger persons ATE; (3) age distribution of breast cancer in proximally exposed A-bomb survivors is the same as that in both distally A-bomb survivors and non-exposed persons, and there is no difference in histology between the former and latter groups. Thus, immature mammary gland cells before the age of puberty are found to be most radiosensitive. (N.K.)

  15. Dual time point imaging fluorine-18 flourodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for evaluation of large loco-regional recurrences of breast cancer treated with electrochemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Louise Wichmann; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Skougaard, Kristin;

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemotherapy is a local anticancer treatment very efficient for treatment of small cutaneous metastases. The method is now being investigated for large cutaneous recurrences of breast cancer that are often confluent masses of malignant tumour with various degrees of inflammation. To this end...

  16. Early ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences after breast conservation affect survival: An analysis of the National Cancer Institute randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast-conservation therapy (BCT) on survival. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-one women were randomized to BCT. Patients with an IBTR were analyzed to determine survival. Analysis was performed with Kaplan-Meier estimates, log-rank tests, and time-dependent covariate Cox models. Results: At a median follow-up of 18.4 years, 27 patients had an IBTR. The median survival time after IBTR was 13.1 years. The 5-year survival rate was 91.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 81.5-100%). The 10-year survival rate was 54.3% (95% CI, 35.8-82.6%). According to a Cox model with time-dependent covariates, the hazard ratio or relative risk of dying for those with an IBTR at <5.3 years after BCT relative to patients without an IBTR after BCT is 1.47 (95% CI, 1.02-2.12%; p = 0.04). The hazard ratio for those who relapse after 5.3 years is 0.59 (95% CI, 0.22-1.61%; p = 0.31). Age at randomization, original tumor size, and the presence of positive regional nodes at initial presentation were not found to be associated with decreased survival. Conclusions: There seems to be a significant association of early IBTR after BCT with decreased survival. Local control should be maximized

  17. Local Recurrence in Women With Stage I Breast Cancer: Declining Rates Over Time in a Large, Population-Based Cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, Joycelin, E-mail: canavanjoycelin@gmail.com [Radiation Therapy Program and Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Truong, Pauline T.; Smith, Sally L. [Radiation Therapy Program and Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Lu, Linghong; Lesperance, Mary [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Olivotto, Ivo A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary (Canada)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether local recurrence (LR) risk has changed over time among women with stage I breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 5974 women aged ≥50 years diagnosis with pT1N0 breast cancer from 1989 to 2006, treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy. Clinicopathologic characteristics, treatment, and LR outcomes were compared among 4 cohorts stratified by year of diagnosis: 1989 to 1993 (n=1077), 1994 to 1998 (n=1633), 1999 to 2002 (n=1622), and 2003 to 2006 (n=1642). Multivariable analysis was performed, with year of diagnosis as a continuous variable. Results: Median follow-up time was 8.6 years. Among patients diagnosed in 1989 to 1993, 1994 to 1998, 1999 to 2002, and 2003 to 2006, the proportions of grade 1 tumors increased (16% vs 29% vs 40% vs 39%, respectively, P<.001). Surgical margin clearance rates increased from 82% to 93% to 95% and 88%, respectively (P<.001). Over time, the proportions of unknown estrogen receptor (ER) status decreased (29% vs 10% vs 1.2% vs 0.5%, respectively, P<.001), whereas ER-positive tumors increased (56% vs 77% vs 86% vs 86%, respectively, P<.001). Hormone therapy use increased (23% vs 23% vs 62% vs 73%, respectively, P<.001), and chemotherapy use increased (2% vs 5% vs 10% vs 13%, respectively, P<.001). The 5-year cumulative incidence rates of LR over the 4 time periods were 2.8% vs 1.7% vs 0.9% vs 0.8%, respectively (Gray's test, P<.001). On competing risk multivariable analysis, year of diagnosis was significantly associated with decreased LR (hazard ratio, 0.92 per year, P=.0003). Relative to grade 1 histology, grades 2, 3, and unknown were associated with increased LR. Hormone therapy use was associated with reduced LR. Conclusion: Significant changes in the multimodality management of stage I breast cancer have occurred over the past 2 decades. More favorable-risk tumors were diagnosed, and margin clearance and systemic therapy use

  18. Local Recurrence in Women With Stage I Breast Cancer: Declining Rates Over Time in a Large, Population-Based Cohort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate whether local recurrence (LR) risk has changed over time among women with stage I breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 5974 women aged ≥50 years diagnosis with pT1N0 breast cancer from 1989 to 2006, treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy. Clinicopathologic characteristics, treatment, and LR outcomes were compared among 4 cohorts stratified by year of diagnosis: 1989 to 1993 (n=1077), 1994 to 1998 (n=1633), 1999 to 2002 (n=1622), and 2003 to 2006 (n=1642). Multivariable analysis was performed, with year of diagnosis as a continuous variable. Results: Median follow-up time was 8.6 years. Among patients diagnosed in 1989 to 1993, 1994 to 1998, 1999 to 2002, and 2003 to 2006, the proportions of grade 1 tumors increased (16% vs 29% vs 40% vs 39%, respectively, P<.001). Surgical margin clearance rates increased from 82% to 93% to 95% and 88%, respectively (P<.001). Over time, the proportions of unknown estrogen receptor (ER) status decreased (29% vs 10% vs 1.2% vs 0.5%, respectively, P<.001), whereas ER-positive tumors increased (56% vs 77% vs 86% vs 86%, respectively, P<.001). Hormone therapy use increased (23% vs 23% vs 62% vs 73%, respectively, P<.001), and chemotherapy use increased (2% vs 5% vs 10% vs 13%, respectively, P<.001). The 5-year cumulative incidence rates of LR over the 4 time periods were 2.8% vs 1.7% vs 0.9% vs 0.8%, respectively (Gray's test, P<.001). On competing risk multivariable analysis, year of diagnosis was significantly associated with decreased LR (hazard ratio, 0.92 per year, P=.0003). Relative to grade 1 histology, grades 2, 3, and unknown were associated with increased LR. Hormone therapy use was associated with reduced LR. Conclusion: Significant changes in the multimodality management of stage I breast cancer have occurred over the past 2 decades. More favorable-risk tumors were diagnosed, and margin clearance and systemic therapy use

  19. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Request Permissions Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  20. Patient subsets with T1-T2, node-negative breast cancer at high locoregional recurrence risk after mastectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To identify patient subsets with T1-T2N0 breast cancer at high risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) who may warrant consideration for postmastectomy radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Data were analyzed for 1505 women referred between 1989 and 1999 with pathologic T1-T2N0M0 breast cancer treated with mastectomy with clear margins and no adjuvant radiotherapy. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify statistically significant factors associated with LRR. Recursive partitioning was used to develop a classification tree model for LRR given the prognostic variables. Results: The median follow-up was 7.0 years. The 10-year Kaplan-Meier LRR rate was 7.8%. On logistic regression analysis, the statistically significant factors predicting LRR were histologic grade (p <0.0001), lymphovascular invasion (LVI) (p <0.0001), T stage (p = 0.05), and systemic therapy use (p = 0.01). In the recursive partitioning model, the first split in the classification tree was histologic grade. For 972 patients without high-grade histologic features, the 10-year Kaplan-Meier LRR rate was 5.5%. For 533 patients with Grade 3 disease (LRR rate 12.1%), the concomitant presence of LVI was associated with a LRR rate of 21.2% (n = 126). In patients with Grade 3 disease without LVI, T2 tumors conferred a LRR rate of 13.4% (n = 194), which increased to 23.2% for patients who did not receive systemic therapy (n = 63). Conclusion: Women with pT1-T2N0 breast cancer experienced a LRR risk of approximately 20% in the presence of Grade 3 disease with LVI or Grade 3 disease, T2 tumors, and no systemic therapy. These subsets of node-negative patients warrant consideration of for postmastectomy radiotherapy

  1. Linkage disequilibrium pattern of the ATM gene in breast cancer patients and controls; association of SNPs and haplotypes to radio-sensitivity and post-lumpectomy local recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ATM protein is activated as a result of ionizing radiation, and genetic variants of the ATM gene may therefore affect the level of radiation-induced damage. Individuals heterozygous for ATM mutations have been reported to have an increased risk of malignancy, especially breast cancer. Norwegian breast cancer patients (272) treated with radiation (252 of which were evaluated for radiation-induced adverse side effects), 95 Norwegian women with no known history of cancer and 95 American breast cancer patients treated with radiation (44 of which developed ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence, IBTR) were screened for sequence variations in all exons of the ATM gene as well as known intronic variants by denaturating high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC) followed by sequencing to determine the nature of the variant. A total of 56 variants were identified in the three materials combined. A borderline significant association with breast cancer risk was found for the 1229 T>C (Val>Ala) substitution in exon 11 (P-value 0.055) between the Norwegian controls and breast cancer patients as well as a borderline significant difference in haplotype distribution (P-value 0.06). Adverse side effects, such as: development of costal fractures and telangiectasias, subcutaneous and lung fibrosis, pleural thickening and atrophy were evaluated in the Norwegian patients. Significant associations were found for several of the identified variants such as rs1800058 (Leu > Phe) where a decrease in minor allele frequency was found with increasing level of adverse side effects for the clinical end-points pleural thickening and lung fibrosis, thus giving a protective effect. Overall our results indicate a role for variation in the ATM gene both for risk of developing breast cancer, and in radiation induced adverse side effects. No association could be found between risk of developing ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence and any of the sequence variants found in the American patient

  2. Linkage disequilibrium pattern of the ATM gene in breast cancer patients and controls; association of SNPs and haplotypes to radio-sensitivity and post-lumpectomy local recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fosså Sophie D

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ATM protein is activated as a result of ionizing radiation, and genetic variants of the ATM gene may therefore affect the level of radiation-induced damage. Individuals heterozygous for ATM mutations have been reported to have an increased risk of malignancy, especially breast cancer. Materials and methods Norwegian breast cancer patients (272 treated with radiation (252 of which were evaluated for radiation-induced adverse side effects, 95 Norwegian women with no known history of cancer and 95 American breast cancer patients treated with radiation (44 of which developed ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence, IBTR were screened for sequence variations in all exons of the ATM gene as well as known intronic variants by denaturating high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC followed by sequencing to determine the nature of the variant. Results and Conclusion A total of 56 variants were identified in the three materials combined. A borderline significant association with breast cancer risk was found for the 1229 T>C (Val>Ala substitution in exon 11 (P-value 0.055 between the Norwegian controls and breast cancer patients as well as a borderline significant difference in haplotype distribution (P-value 0.06. Adverse side effects, such as: development of costal fractures and telangiectasias, subcutaneous and lung fibrosis, pleural thickening and atrophy were evaluated in the Norwegian patients. Significant associations were found for several of the identified variants such as rs1800058 (Leu > Phe where a decrease in minor allele frequency was found with increasing level of adverse side effects for the clinical end-points pleural thickening and lung fibrosis, thus giving a protective effect. Overall our results indicate a role for variation in the ATM gene both for risk of developing breast cancer, and in radiation induced adverse side effects. No association could be found between risk of developing ipsilateral breast tumour

  3. Second conservative radiosurgical treatment for ipsilateral breast cancer recurrence; Second traitement conservateur radiochirurgical dans les recidives locales du cancer du sein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelli, J.; Courdi, A.; Hannoun-Levi, J.M. [Departement de radiotherapie oncologique, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue de Valombrose, 06189 Nice cedex (France); Figl, A.; Raoust, I.; Lallement, M.; Flipo, B. [Departement de chirurgie mammaire, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue de Valombrose, 06189 Nice cedex (France); Ettore, F. [Departement d' anatomopathologie, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue de Valombrose, 06189 Nice cedex (France); Chapelier, C. [Departement de radiologie, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue de Valombrose, 06189 Nice cedex (France); Ferrero, J.M. [Departement d' oncologie medicale, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue de Valombrose, 06189 Nice cedex (France)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose. - Currently, radical mastectomy represents the gold standard for ipsilateral breast cancer recurrence. However, we already showed that a second conservative treatment was feasible combining lumpectomy plus low-dose rate interstitial brachytherapy. In this study, we reported the preliminary results of a second conservative treatment using a high-dose rate brachytherapy. Patients and methods. - From June 2005 to July 2009, 42 patients presenting with an ipsilateral breast cancer recurrence underwent a second conservative treatment. Plastic tubes were implanted intraoperatively at the time of the lumpectomy. After a post-implant CT scan, a total dose of 34 Gy in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive days was delivered through an ambulatory procedure. The toxicity evaluation used the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results. - The median follow-up was 21 months (6-50 months), median age at the time of the local recurrence was 65 years (30-85 years). The median delay between the primary and the recurrence was 11 years (1-35 years). The location of the recurrence was in the tumor bed for 22 patients (52.4%), in the same quadrant for 14 patients (33.3%) and unknown for six patients (14.3%). The median tumor size of the recurrence was 12 mm (2-30 mm). The median number of plastic tubes and plans were nine (5-12) and two (1-3) respectively. The median CTV was 68 cm{sup 3} (31.2-146 cm{sup 3}). The rate of second local control was 97%. Twenty-two patients (60%) experienced complications. The most frequent side effect consisted in cutaneous and sub-cutaneous fibrosis (72% of all the observed complications). Conclusion. - A second conservative treatment for ipsilateral breast cancer recurrence using high-dose rate brachytherapy appears feasible leading to encouraging results in terms of second local control with an acceptable toxicity. Considering that a non-inferiority randomized trial comparing mastectomy versus second conservative treatment could be

  4. De novo recurrent germline mutation of the BRCA2 gene in a patient with early onset breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    van der Luijt, R. B.; van Zon, P. H A; Jansen, R.; van der Sijs-Bos, C. J M; Warlam-Rodenhuis, C.; Ausems, M.

    2001-01-01

    Germline mutations in either of the two major breast cancer predisposition genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, account for a significant proportion of hereditary breast/ovarian cancer. Identification of breast cancer patients carrying mutations of these genes is primarily based on a positive family history of breast/ovarian cancer or early onset of the disease or both. In the course of mutation screening of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in a hospital based series of patients with risk factors for hereditary ...

  5. Questionnaires in Identifying Upper Extremity Function and Quality of Life After Treatment in Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-24

    Musculoskeletal Complication; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Therapy-Related Toxicity

  6. Capecitabine maintenance therapy in patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, W. [General Hospital of the Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Department of Medical Oncology, Haidian District, Beijing, China, Department of Medical Oncology, General Hospital of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Haidian District, Beijing (China); School of Medicine, Nankai University, Tianjin (China); Zhu, Y.Y.; Li, Y.; Gao, P.; Han, C.; You, J.H.; Linghu, R.X.; Jiao, S.C.; Yang, J.L. [General Hospital of the Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Department of Medical Oncology, Haidian District, Beijing, China, Department of Medical Oncology, General Hospital of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Haidian District, Beijing (China)

    2013-11-25

    Our objective was to investigate the efficacy and safety of capecitabine maintenance therapy (CMT) after capecitabine-based combination chemotherapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer. The clinical data of 139 metastatic breast cancer patients treated from March 2008 to May 2012 with capecitabine-based combination chemotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. When initial disease control was achieved by the combination chemotherapy, we used CMT for 50 patients, while 37 patients were treated with a different (non-CMT) maintenance therapy. We compared time to progression (TTP), objective response rate, disease control rate, clinical benefit rate, and safety of the two groups, and a sub-group analysis was performed according to pathological characteristics. Sixty-four percent of the patients received a median of six cycles of a docetaxel+capecitabine combination chemotherapy regimen (range 1-45); the median TTP (MTTP) for the complete treatment was 9.43 months (95%CI=8.38-10.48 months) for the CMT group and 4.5 months (95%CI=4.22-4.78 months; P=0.004) for the non-CMT group. The MTTPs for the maintenance therapies administered after the initial capecitabine combined chemotherapy were 4.11 months (95%CI=3.34-4.87 months) for the CMT group and 2.0 months (95%CI=1.63-2.38 months) for the non-CMT group. Gastrointestinal side effects, decreased white blood cells and palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia were the main adverse reactions experienced with the combination chemotherapies, CMT and non-CMT treatments. No significant differences in the incidence of adverse reactions were detected in the CMT and non-CMT patients. After initial disease control was achieved with the capecitabine-based combination chemotherapy, CMT can significantly prolong TTP rates with a favorable safety profile.

  7. Capecitabine maintenance therapy in patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Si

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to investigate the efficacy and safety of capecitabine maintenance therapy (CMT after capecitabine-based combination chemotherapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer. The clinical data of 139 metastatic breast cancer patients treated from March 2008 to May 2012 with capecitabine-based combination chemotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. When initial disease control was achieved by the combination chemotherapy, we used CMT for 50 patients, while 37 patients were treated with a different (non-CMT maintenance therapy. We compared time to progression (TTP, objective response rate, disease control rate, clinical benefit rate, and safety of the two groups, and a sub-group analysis was performed according to pathological characteristics. Sixty-four percent of the patients received a median of six cycles of a docetaxel+capecitabine combination chemotherapy regimen (range 1-45; the median TTP (MTTP for the complete treatment was 9.43 months (95%CI=8.38-10.48 months for the CMT group and 4.5 months (95%CI=4.22-4.78 months; P=0.004 for the non-CMT group. The MTTPs for the maintenance therapies administered after the initial capecitabine combined chemotherapy were 4.11 months (95%CI=3.34-4.87 months for the CMT group and 2.0 months (95%CI=1.63-2.38 months for the non-CMT group. Gastrointestinal side effects, decreased white blood cells and palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia were the main adverse reactions experienced with the combination chemotherapies, CMT and non-CMT treatments. No significant differences in the incidence of adverse reactions were detected in the CMT and non-CMT patients. After initial disease control was achieved with the capecitabine-based combination chemotherapy, CMT can significantly prolong TTP rates with a favorable safety profile.

  8. Capecitabine maintenance therapy in patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our objective was to investigate the efficacy and safety of capecitabine maintenance therapy (CMT) after capecitabine-based combination chemotherapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer. The clinical data of 139 metastatic breast cancer patients treated from March 2008 to May 2012 with capecitabine-based combination chemotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. When initial disease control was achieved by the combination chemotherapy, we used CMT for 50 patients, while 37 patients were treated with a different (non-CMT) maintenance therapy. We compared time to progression (TTP), objective response rate, disease control rate, clinical benefit rate, and safety of the two groups, and a sub-group analysis was performed according to pathological characteristics. Sixty-four percent of the patients received a median of six cycles of a docetaxel+capecitabine combination chemotherapy regimen (range 1-45); the median TTP (MTTP) for the complete treatment was 9.43 months (95%CI=8.38-10.48 months) for the CMT group and 4.5 months (95%CI=4.22-4.78 months; P=0.004) for the non-CMT group. The MTTPs for the maintenance therapies administered after the initial capecitabine combined chemotherapy were 4.11 months (95%CI=3.34-4.87 months) for the CMT group and 2.0 months (95%CI=1.63-2.38 months) for the non-CMT group. Gastrointestinal side effects, decreased white blood cells and palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia were the main adverse reactions experienced with the combination chemotherapies, CMT and non-CMT treatments. No significant differences in the incidence of adverse reactions were detected in the CMT and non-CMT patients. After initial disease control was achieved with the capecitabine-based combination chemotherapy, CMT can significantly prolong TTP rates with a favorable safety profile

  9. Breast cancer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Cancer specialists will soon be able to compare mammograms with computerized images of breast cancer from across Europe, in a bid to improve diagnosis and treatment....The new project, known as MammoGrid, brings together computer and medical imaging experts, cancer specialists, radiologists and epidemiologists from Bristol, Oxford, Cambridge, France and Italy" (1 page).

  10. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... click the brackets in the lower right-hand corner of the video screen. To reduce the videos, ... with breast cancer are under way. With early detection, and prompt and appropriate treatment, the outlook for ...

  11. Breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article is about the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of breast cancer. Positive diagnosis is based on clinical mammary exam, mammography, mammary ultrasonography, and histological study. Before the chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment are evaluated the risks

  12. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Next Topic Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast cancer have some type ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  13. Learning about Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  14. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  15. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  16. Clinical significance of radiation therapy in breast recurrence and prognosis in breast-conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant risk factors for recurrence of breast cancer after breast-conserving therapy, which has become a standard treatment for breast cancer, are positive surgical margins and the failure to perform radiation therapy. In this study, we evaluated the clinical significance of radiation therapy after primary surgery or breast recurrence. In 344 cases of breast-conserving surgery, disease recurred in 43 cases (12.5%), which were classified as follows: 17 cases of breast recurrence, 13 cases of breast and distant metastasis, and 13 cases of distant metastasis. Sixty-two patients (16.7%) received radiation therapy. A positive surgical margin and younger age were significant risk factors for breast recurrence in patients not receiving postoperative radiation therapy but not in patients receiving radiation therapy. Radiation therapy may be beneficial for younger patients with positive surgical margins. Furthermore, radiation therapy after recurrence was effective in the cases not treated with postoperative radiation but not in cases with inflammatory recurrence. Patients with breast recurrence alone had significantly higher survival rates than did patients with distant metastases regardless of breast recurrence. These findings suggest that the adaptation criteria of radiation therapy for local control must be clarified. (author)

  17. Lung Cancer Indicators Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study describes prognostic factors for lung cancer spread and recurrence, as well as subsequent risk of death from the disease. The investigators observed that regardless of cancer stage, grade, or type of lung cancer, patients in the study were more

  18. Role of radiotherapy and prognostic factors in breast cancer patients at high-risk of recurrence treated with modified radical mastectomy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze the outcome and prognostic factors in breast cancer at high-risk of recurrence and evaluate the role of radiotherapy. Methods: 381 breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy and axillary dissection were retrospectively analyzed. The including criterias were pathologic diagnosis of invasive breast cancer, T3-T4 and/or four or more positive axillary nodes. The survival rates was calculated by Kaplan-Meier method, and compared by Logrank test. Cox regression model was used to select potential prognostic variables. Results: The median follow up was 48 months. The 5-year overall survival (OS) and locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) rates were 76.8% and 89.7%, respectively. Radiotherapy significantly improved the OS (80.9% vs. 62.3%, χ2=15.47, P=0.001) and LRFS (93.4% vs. 77.1%, χ2=19.95, P=0.000). The use of ipsilateral chest wall and supraclavicular nodal radiation was associated with increased 5-year chest wall recurrence free survival (96.8%: 86.2%, χ2=12.66, P= 0.001) and 5-year supraclavicular node recurrence free survival (97.7% :90.7%, χ2=9.98, P=0.002). However, axillary irradiation had no impact on 5-year axillary recurrence free survival (98.4%:96.1%, χ=0.74, P=0.389). In multivariate analysis, absence of radiotherapy (χ2=14.42, P=0.000), 10 or more positive axillary nodes (χ2=21.60, P=0.000), and T4 stage (χ2=10.79, P=0.001) were independent unfavorable prognostic factors for overall survival. Conclusions: Radiotherapy improves the overall survival of breast cancer patients with T3, T4 and/or four or more positive axillary nodes. The chest wall and supraclavicular nodal radiation should be given to this group of patients. (authors)

  19. A Retrospective Study of the Impact of 21-Gene Recurrence Score Assay on Treatment Choice in Node Positive Micrometastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Thomas G.; Fox, Kevin R.; Smith, J. Stanley; Laronga, Christine; McSwain, Anita; Paul, Devchand; Schultz, Michael; Stilwill, Joseph; Teal, Christine; Weisberg, Tracey; Vacchino, Judith F.; Sing, Amy P.; Cherepanov, Dasha; Hsiao, Wendy; Chang, Eunice; Broder, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    To assess clinical utility of the 21-gene assay (Oncotype DX® Recurrence Score®), we determined whether women with HER2(−)/ER+ pN1mi breast cancer with low (<18) Recurrence Scores results are given adjuvant chemotherapy in a lower proportion than those with high scores (≥31). This was a multicenter chart review of ≥18 year old women with pN1mi breast cancer, HER2(−)/ER+ tumors, ductal/lobular/mixed histology, with the assay ordered on or after 1 January 2007. One hundred and eighty one patients had a mean age of 60.7 years; 82.9% had ECOG performance status 0; 33.7% had hypertension, 22.7% had osteoporosis, 18.8% had osteoarthritis, and 8.8% had type-2 diabetes. Mean Recurrence Score was 17.8 (range: 0–50). 48.6% had a mastectomy; 55.8% had a lumpectomy. 19.8% of low-risk group patients were recommended chemotherapy vs. 57.9% in the intermediate-risk group and 100% in the high-risk group (p < 0.001). A total of 80.2% of the low-risk group were recommended endocrine therapy alone, while 77.8% of the high-risk group were recommended both endocrine and chemotherapy (p < 0.001). The Oncotype DX Recurrence Score result provides actionable information that can be incorporated into treatment planning for women with HER2(−)/ER+ pN1mi breast cancer. The Recurrence Score result has clinical utility in treatment planning for HER2(−)/ER+ pN1mi breast cancer patients. PMID:25789420

  20. A Retrospective Study of the Impact of 21-Gene Recurrence Score Assay on Treatment Choice in Node Positive Micrometastatic Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G. Frazier

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available To assess clinical utility of the 21-gene assay (Oncotype DX® Recurrence Score®, we determined whether women with HER2(−/ER+ pN1mi breast cancer with low (<18 Recurrence Scores results are given adjuvant chemotherapy in a lower proportion than those with high scores (≥31. This was a multicenter chart review of ≥18 year old women with pN1mi breast cancer, HER2(−/ER+ tumors, ductal/lobular/mixed histology, with the assay ordered on or after 1 January 2007. One hundred and eighty one patients had a mean age of 60.7 years; 82.9% had ECOG performance status 0; 33.7% had hypertension, 22.7% had osteoporosis, 18.8% had osteoarthritis, and 8.8% had type-2 diabetes. Mean Recurrence Score was 17.8 (range: 0–50. 48.6% had a mastectomy; 55.8% had a lumpectomy. 19.8% of low-risk group patients were recommended chemotherapy vs. 57.9% in the intermediate-risk group and 100% in the high-risk group (p < 0.001. A total of 80.2% of the low-risk group were recommended endocrine therapy alone, while 77.8% of the high-risk group were recommended both endocrine and chemotherapy (p < 0.001. The Oncotype DX Recurrence Score result provides actionable information that can be incorporated into treatment planning for women with HER2(−/ER+ pN1mi breast cancer. The Recurrence Score result has clinical utility in treatment planning for HER2(−/ER+ pN1mi breast cancer patients.

  1. RO4929097 and Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy or Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients With Brain Metastases From Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-22

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Tumors Metastatic to Brain; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  2. The Prognostic Value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for Early Recurrence in Operable Breast Cancer: Comparison with TNM Stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O, Joo Hyun; Choi, Woo Hee; Han, Eun Ji; Choi, Eunkyoung; Chae, Byung Joo; Park, Yonggyu; Kim, Sung Hoon [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    We evaluated whether the maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) of primary tumor from the initial staging by {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) of patients with breast cancer could identify patients at risk for early recurrence within 2 years, particularly in comparison to the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage. We reviewed the staging {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT images of patients with primary breast cancer and their medical records. The SUV{sub max} of the primary tumor was measured. The presence or absence of FDG uptake in the axillary lymph node (ALN) was also assessed. The patient's pathologic primary tumor stage (pT), pathologic regional lymph node stage (pN), stage grouping, age, estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status, and neoadjuvant chemotherapy history were evaluated with the FDG uptake parameters for recurrence within 2 years following the end of first-line therapy. Recurrence within 2 years was present in 9.1%(n =40) out of the 441 patients assessed. The FDG uptake in ALN, pT, pN, stage grouping and neoadjuvant chemotherapy history were prognostic for early recurrence, while primary tumor SUV{sub max}, age, and ER or PR status were not significant on logistic regression. On multivariate analysis, only the stage grouping (odds ratio 2.79; 95 % CI 1.73, 4.48; p <0.0001) and neoadjuvant chemotherapy history (odds ratio 2.70; 95 % CI 1.22, 5.98; p =0.0141) could identify patients at increased risk for recurrence within 2 years. Primary tumor FDG uptake measured by SUV{sub max}, and visual assessment of FDG uptake in the ALN in the initial staging PET/CT of patients with breast cancer may not have additional prognostic value compared with the AJCC stage grouping for early recurrence.

  3. Survivin expression in in situ and invasive breast cancer relates to COX-2 expression and DCIS recurrence

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, N.; Haywood, P.; Flint, P; Knox, W F; Bundred, N J

    2006-01-01

    In lung cancer cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression has been reported to stabilise survivin, an inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) which prevents cell death by blocking activated caspases. COX-2 expression limits the ubiquitination of survivin, protecting it from degradation. To determine if COX-2 expression in breast cancer showed an association with survivin expression, we assessed the levels of each protein in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive breast cancer (IBC); relating expression p...

  4. Recurrent breast sparganosis: Clinical and radiological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Yoon; Woo, Ok Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyu Ran; Seo, Bo Kyoung [Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    We report a case of recurrent sparganosis of the breast within 6 months following surgical removal of worms from the breast. The patient was referred to our hospital with a palpable mass in the right breast. On admission, breast ultrasonography revealed a tortuous tubular hypoechoic lesion with indistinct margins within a surrounding hyperechoic area, which strongly suggested sparganosis. We performed surgical excision and confirmed sparganosis. After 6 months, the patient detected a new mass in her right breast and visited our hospital. Breast ultrasonography revealed similar features in a different area of the same breast. We confirmed recurrent sparganosis surgically.

  5. Statins and breast cancer prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahern, Thomas P; Lash, Timothy L; Damkier, Per;

    2014-01-01

    Much preclinical and epidemiological evidence supports the anticancer effects of statins. Epidemiological evidence does not suggest an association between statin use and reduced incidence of breast cancer, but does support a protective effect of statins-especially simvastatin-on breast cancer...... recurrence. Here, we argue that the existing evidence base is sufficient to justify a clinical trial of breast cancer adjuvant therapy with statins and we advocate for such a trial to be initiated without delay. If a protective effect of statins on breast cancer recurrence is supported by trial evidence......, then the indications for a safe, well tolerated, and inexpensive treatment can be expanded to improve outcomes for breast cancer survivors. We discuss several trial design opportunities-including candidate predictive biomarkers of statin safety and efficacy-and off er solutions to the key challenges...

  6. Local recurrence after breast-conserving therapy for invasive breast cancer: High incidence in young patients and association with poor survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study risk factors for local recurrence (LR) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) for invasive breast cancer and, for patients with an LR, the mode of detection, location, treatment, influence of radiation therapy, and impact on survival. Methods and Materials: 1360 patients (median age 52 years; range 24-88) with a total of 1393 pT1-2 N0-1 tumors treated with BCT between 1980-1994 were studied (median follow-up 52 months). The adequacy of radiation treatment of the patients developing LR was studied in a quality control study. The impact of LR on overall survival and distant metastasis was studied in a Cox regression model with LR as a time-dependent covariate. Results: A total of 88 LR occurred with a 5- and 10-year LR risk of 8 and 12%. Age was the only significant risk factor. Compared to patients >65 years old, patients <45 years old and patients 45-65 years old had a relative risk (RR) of 4.09 and 2.41, respectively, of developing LR. Risk on LR was found to increase gradually with younger age. Radiation therapy was considered adequate and did not play a role in influencing the LR rate. Almost 65% of the LR were true or marginal recurrences. Of all LR, 80% appeared during the first 5 years and were detected with equal frequency by the patient herself, the physician, and annual mammography. LR was a major predictor for distant metastasis (RR: 4.90; 3.15-7.62) and death (RR: 4.29; 2.93-6.28). Conclusion: Young age is a major risk factor for LR and there is a significant gradual increase in LR with decreasing age. LR is associated with a higher risk of distant metastasis and death. Whether LR is the cause of or a marker for distant metastasis remains unresolved

  7. Long-Term Outcomes in Patients With Isolated Supraclavicular Nodal Recurrence After Mastectomy and Doxorubicin-Based Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine the outcome of patients who developed an isolated locoregional recurrence (LRR) involving the supraclavicular fossa (SCV) after initial treatment with modified radical mastectomy and chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Records from 140 breast cancer patients treated on five prospective trials with mastectomy and doxorubicin-based chemotherapy, with or without radiation, who developed a LRR were reviewed. Kaplan-Meier survival times were calculated using date of LRR as time zero. Results: The median follow-up after LRR was 2.9 years (N = 140; interquartile range, 1.3-6.6 years). In all, 47 of 140 patients (34%) had an SCV component to their LRR. These patients had lower 3-y distant metastasis-free survival (40% vs. 54%, p = 0.003) and overall survival (49% vs. 69%, p = 0.04) than patients without an SCV component. Multivariate analysis revealed that LRR involving an SCV component (hazard ratio, 1.96, p = 0.004) and patients with lymphovascular space invasion in their primary tumors (hazard ratio, 1.65, p = 0.029) were independently associated with a poor distant metastasis-free survival. However, among 23 patients with isolated SCV recurrence, Overall survival was not statistically significantly different between isolated chest wall recurrence and isolated SCV recurrence. Patients with isolated SCV recurrence displayed a median follow-up of 3.3 years (IR, 1.2-5.2). Only 6 LRR of 23 patients were treated with aggressive local therapy, including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation (alone or in combination). Conclusions: Although breast cancer recurrence with SCV involvement carries a high risk of distant metastasis and death, among women with recurrence limited to the SCV alone, overall survival after isolated SCV recurrence can be long (25% >5 years).

  8. Locoregional recurrence risk factors in breast cancer patients with positive axillary lymph nodes and the impact of postmastectomy radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locoregional recurrence (LRR) after mastectomy reduces the patient's quality of life and survival. There is a consensus that postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) helps establish locoregional control and reduces LRR in patients with ≥4 metastatic nodes. However, in patients with 1-3 metastatic nodes, the incidence of LRR and the role of PMRT have been the subject of substantial controversy. This study assessed the risk factors for LRR and the efficacy of PMRT in Japanese breast cancer patients with metastatic nodes. This study analyzed 789 cases of invasive breast carcinoma with metastatic nodes from 1998 to 2008. We divided the study population into 4 groups: 1-3 positive nodes with/without chemotherapy and ≥4 positive nodes with/without chemotherapy. Risk factors for LRR were identified and the relationship between LRR and PMRT was analyzed. During the median follow-up of 59.6 months, 61 (7.7%) patients experienced LRR. In patients who received chemotherapy, independent LRR risk factors were high nuclear grade, severe lymphatic invasion, vascular invasion, and progesterone receptor-negative status in patients with 1-3 positive nodes, and severe lymphatic invasion and estrogen receptor-negative status in patients with ≥4 nodes. Although patients treated with PMRT had good outcomes, there was no significant difference, and PMRT did not significantly improve the outcome of the patients with all risk factors. With systemic therapy and adequate dissection, PMRT by itself was of limited value in establishing locoregional control. The indication for PMRT in patients with 1-3 positive nodes remains controversial. (author)

  9. T cell-prolymphocytic leukemia detected in a patient of breast cancer at the time of recurrence: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Singhal, Manish; Raina, Vinod; GUPTA Ritu; Das, Prasenjit

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Therapy related second malignancy of the hematological system is small but real risk after adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. It includes acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS); however T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) has not been described earlier in relation to breast cancer and its therapy. T-PLL is a rare chronic T-cell lymphoproliferative disease with a mature post-thymic T-cell immunophenotype and aggressive clinical course. Case presen...

  10. Risk factors for local recurrence after breast-conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast-conserving therapy has been widely accepted as a standard treatment for early breast cancer both in Western countries and in Japan. In Western countries, many studies have investigated the risk factors for local recurrence after breast-conserving therapy (BCT), but few such studies have been done in Japan. To determine the risk factors for local recurrence in 399 breast cancer patients (stage I and II, n=396; stage III, n=3) who had undergone BCT with or without postoperative radiation therapy, we evaluated their clinicopathological features by univariate and multivariate analyses. The patients were treated at Osaka National Hospital between February 1988 and December 1997. Univariate analysis showed that a young age (≤45 years; P=0.0005) was a significant risk factor for local recurrence, while radiation therapy (P=0.0058) and adjuvant endocrine therapy (P=0.0041) significantly reduced the risk of local recurrence. In patients with BCT, without radiation therapy a positive surgical margin significantly increased the risk of local recurrence (P=0.0470). Multivariate analysis showed that a young age (P=0.0285) was a significant independent risk factor for local recurrence, while radiation therapy (P=0.0457) significantly decreased recurrence. In patients with a negative surgical margin, radiation therapy (P=0.0158) and adjuvant endocrine therapy (P=0.0421) significantly reduced the relative risk of local recurrence, to 0.160 and 0.366, respectively. In patients with a positive surgical margin, radiation therapy marginally significantly (P=0.0756) reduced the relative risk of local recurrence, to 0.181, and adjuvant endocrine therapy significantly (P=0.0119) reduced the risk, to 0.076. Young age and lack of radiation therapy or adjuvant endocrine therapy were risk factors for local recurrence in breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving therapy, with surgical margin status also being a possible risk factor. (author)

  11. 5-Year results of pulsed dose rate brachytherapy applied as a boost after breast-conserving therapy in patients at high risk for local recurrence from breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate effect, toxicity, and cosmesis of a prospectively applied pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy boost schedule in patients with stage I/II/IIIa invasive breast cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 113 patients were treated after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and external beam radiotherapy (median 50 Gy, range 46-52). The boost dose was graded in accordance to the pathologic tumor characteristics: 20-25 Gy: incomplete resection (n=34), vascular invasion (n=27), close margin resection (n=41); 15 Gy: T2G3 stage (n=11). PDR brachytherapy (37 GBq, 192Ir source) was carried out after geometric volume optimization with 1 Gy/pulse/h. The implantation and dose specification were performed similar to the rules of the Paris system. Results: The overall local failure rate after a median follow-up of 61 months was 4.4% (5/113). The actuarial 5- and 8-year local recurrence-free survival rates were 95% and 93%, respectively. Cosmesis was rate by 90% of the patients as excellent or good. 14/113 patients experienced grade III (all caused by planar telangiectasia) and none of the patients grade IV late toxicity of the skin (RTOG/EORTC). A boost dose of 25 Gy resulted in a significantly higher rate of late toxicity (Fisher's exact test, p<0.01). Conclusions: PDR brachytherapy is safe, effective, and provides good cosmesis. A CLDR breast boost can be replaced by PDR brachytherapy without significant loss of therapeutic ratio. (orig.)

  12. Partial breast irradiation for locally recurrent breast cancer within a second breast conserving treatment: Alternative to mastectomy? Results from a prospective trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the outcome of multi-catheter pulse dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy of re-irradiation for local ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence (IBTR) in regard to local control, survival, morbidity and quality of life (QoL). Patients and methods: Between 1999 and 2006, 39 patients were included with histologically confirmed IBTR, Karnofsky index ⩾80% and refusal of mastectomy. Exclusion criteria were multicentric invasive growth pattern, unclear surgical margins, distant metastasis and a postoperative breast not suitable for interstitial brachytherapy. Primary endpoint was local tumour control. Morbidity, cosmetic outcome and QoL were assessed in 24/39 patients. Results: The five year actuarial local control rate was 93% after a mean follow up of 57 (±30) months with two second local relapses. Overall survival and disease free survival, both at 5 years, were 87% and 77%, respectively. Late side effects Grade 1–2 were observed in 20/24 patients after a mean follow-up of 30 (±18) months. Late side effects ⩾Grade 3 occurred in 4/24 patients. Cosmetic outcome was excellent to fair in 76% of women. Overall QoL was comparable to a healthy control group. Mean scores of scales and items of QLQ-BR23 were comparable to primary breast conserving therapy. Conclusions: Accelerated PDR-brachytherapy following breast conserving surgery (BCS) for local IBTR results in local tumour control comparable to mastectomy. Morbidity is moderate; the cosmetic outcome is good and hardly any impairment on QoL is observed.

  13. Breast Cancer -- Male

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Overview Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  14. Haplotype analysis suggest common founders in carriers of the recurrent BRCA2 mutation, 3398delAAAAG, in French Canadian hereditary breast and/ovarian cancer families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foulkes William D

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 3398delAAAAG mutation in BRCA2 was recently found to recur in breast and/or ovarian cancer families from the French Canadian population of Quebec, a population that has genetic attributes consistent with a founder effect. To characterize the contribution of this mutation in this population, this study established the frequency of this mutation in breast and ovarian cancer cases unselected for family history of cancer, and determined if mutation carriers shared a common ancestry. Methods The frequency was estimated by assaying the mutation in series of French Canadian breast cancer cases diagnosed before age 41 (n = 60 or 80 (n = 127 years of age, and ovarian cancer cases (n = 80 unselected for family history of cancer by mutation analysis. Haplotype analysis was performed to determine if mutation carriers shared a common ancestry. Members from 11 families were analyzed using six polymorphic microsatellite markers (cen-D13S260-D13S1699-D13S1698-D13S1697-D13S1701-D13S171-tel spanning approximately a 3.6 cM interval at the chromosomal region 13q13.1, which contains BRCA2. Allele frequencies were estimated by genotyping 47 unaffected female individuals derived from the same population. Haplotype reconstruction of unaffected individuals was performed using the program PHASE. Results The recurrent BRCA2 mutation occurred in 1 of 60 (1.7% women diagnosed with breast cancer before 41 years of age and one of 80 (1.3% women with ovarian cancer. No mutation carriers were identified in the series of breast cancer cases diagnosed before age 80. Mutation carriers harboured one of two haplotypes, 7-3-9-3 – [3/4]-7, that varied with marker D13S1701 and which occurred at a frequency of 0.001. The genetic analysis of D13S1695, a polymorphic marker located approximately 0.3 cM distal to D13S171, did not favour a genetic recombination event to account for the differences in D13S1701 alleles within the haplotype. Although mutation carriers

  15. Prognostic Value of Triple-Negative Phenotype at the Time of Locally Recurrent, Conservatively Treated Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic value of triple-negative (TN) ER, PR, Her2/neu basal-like carcinoma of the breast, at the time of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after conservative surgery and radiation treatment (RT). Methods and Materials: A tissue microarray was constructed of 47 IBTR specimens of patients who experienced an IBTR after conservative surgery and RT that were processed and stained for ER, PR, and HER2/neu. Results: At a median post-recurrence follow-up of 7.5 years, the 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease metastasis-free survival (DMFS) after IBTR were 91.4% and 83.0%, respectively. Median time to tumor recurrence (TTR) and IBTR was shorter in the TN phenotype (3.88 vs. 5.00 years; p = 0.09). The TN tumors were not associated with size of local recurrence or recurrence elsewhere in the breast. Despite administration of standard chemotherapy at the time of IBTR, the 5-year DMFS and 5-year OS for the TN cohort were 48.6% and 72.7%, respectively. The 5-year DMFS was 48.6% for TN tumors and 90.8% for non-TN tumors (p < 0.01). By univariate analysis, significant factors associated with poor 5-year DMFS and OS after IBTR included: TN phenotype (p < 0.01), TTR 3 years or less (p < 0.01), local recurrence at or near the original tumor site (p = 0.08). In multivariate analysis, TN was a significant independent predictor of poorer 5-year DMFS (relative risk, 5.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.83-19.01; p < 0.01) after IBTR. Conclusions: Although patients experiencing an IBTR have a relatively favorable prognosis, those with IBTR events of the TN phenotype had a rather poor prognosis despite receiving standard chemotherapy. Strategies with novel systemic therapies to improve outcomes in patients experiencing IBTR of the TN phenotype are warranted

  16. Patients With T1 to T2 Breast Cancer With One to Three Positive Nodes Have Higher Local and Regional Recurrence Risks Compared With Node-Negative Patients After Breast-Conserving Surgery and Whole-Breast Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate locoregional recurrence according to nodal status in women with T1 to T2 breast cancer and zero to three positive nodes (0-3N+) treated with breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods and Materials: The study subjects comprised 5,688 women referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency between 1989 and 1999 with pT1 to T2, 0-3N+, M0 breast cancer, who underwent breast-conserving surgery with clear margins and radiotherapy (RT) of the whole breast. The 10-year Kaplan-Meier local, regional, and locoregional recurrence (LR, RR, and LRR, respectively) were compared between the N0 (n = 4,433) and 1-3N+ (n = 1,255) cohorts. The LRR was also examined in patients with one to three positive nodes (1-3N+) treated with and without nodal RT. Multivariate analysis was performed using Cox regression modeling. Results: Median follow-up was 8.6 years. Systemic therapy was used in 97% of 1-3N+ and 41% of N0 patients. Nodal RT was used in 35% of 1-3N+ patients. The 10-year recurrence rates in N0 and 1-3N+ cohorts were as follows: LR 5.1% vs. 5.8% (p = 0.04); RR 2.3% vs. 6.1% (p < 0.001), and LRR 6.7% vs. 10.1% (p < 0.001). Among 817 1-3N+ patients treated without nodal RT, 10-year LRR were 13.8% with age <50 years, 20.3% with Grade III, and 23.4% with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative disease. On multivariate analysis, 1-3N+ status was associated with significantly higher LRR (hazard ratio [HR], 1.85; 95% confidence interval, 1.34-2.55, p < 0.001), whereas nodal RT significantly reduced LRR (HR, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.92, p = 0.02). Conclusion: Patients with 1-3N+ and young age, Grade III, or ER-negative disease have high LRR risks approximating 15% to 20% despite BCS, whole-breast RT and systemic therapy. These patients may benefit with more comprehensive RT volume encompassing the regional nodes

  17. Breast Cancer Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other less common types of breast cancer include: Medullary Mucinous Tubular Metaplastic Papillary breast cancer Inflammatory breast cancer is a faster-growing type of cancer that accounts for about 1% to 5% of all breast cancers. Paget’s disease is a type of cancer that begins in ...

  18. Breast cancer screenings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000837.htm Breast cancer screenings To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Breast cancer screenings can help find breast cancer early, before ...

  19. Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  20. Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men ... usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. Other breast symptoms can include Dimpled ...

  1. A comparative study between the effectiveness of chemoendocrine therapy and chemoendocrine therapy combined with radiation for the treatment of advanced and/or recurrent breast cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The members of the Surgical and Radiation Oncology Group for Breast Cancers have conducted a controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of chemoendocrine therapy alone or combined with radiotherapy for advanced and/or recurrent breast cancers. The subjects were divided into two groups, based on the therapeutic regimen: Group A, 18 lesions, received an alternating TAM/MPA plus 5-FU chemotherapy, and Group B, 15 lesions, received this same chemoendocrine therapy combined with radiation (45 to 60 Gy for 4 to 6 weeks). In Group A, 4 out of 18 lesions (22.2%) responsed to the treatment, whereas in Group B, 10 out of 15 (66.7%) responded to the treatment (p=0.0265). Further, in Group A, only 2 lesions (11.1%) achieved a complete remission (CR), whereas in Group B, 9 lesions (60%) achieved a CR (p=0.0094). The incidence of leukopenia, however, was higher in Group B, but this did not affect the continuance of therapy. It was thus concluded that the combined therapy was more effective and contributed to the improvement of a greater number of the advanced and/or recurrent breast cancer cases. (author)

  2. Postmastectomy radiotherapy improves disease-free survival of high risk of locoregional recurrence breast cancer patients with T1-2 and 1 to 3 positive nodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Yu He

    Full Text Available The indications for post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT with T1-2 breast cancer and 1-3 positive axillary lymph nodes is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of PMRT in T1-2 breast cancer with 1-3 positive axillary lymph node.We retrospectively reviewed the file records of 79 patients receiving PMRT and not receiving PMRT (618 patients.The median follow-up was 65 months. Multivariate analysis showed that PMRT was an independent prognostic factor of locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS (P = 0.010. Subgroup analysis of patients who did not undergo PMRT showed that pT stage, number of positive axillary lymph nodes, and molecular subtype were independent prognostic factors of LRFS. PMRT improved LRFS in the entire group (P = 0.005, but did not affect distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS (P = 0.494, disease-free survival (DFS (P = 0.215, and overall survival (OS (P = 0.645. For patients without PMRT, the 5-year LRFS of low-risk patients (0-1 risk factor for locoregional recurrence of 94.5% was significantly higher than that of high-risk patients (2-3 risk factors for locoregional recurrence (80.9%, P < 0.001. PMRT improved LRFS (P = 0.001 and DFS (P = 0.027 in high-risk patients, but did not improve LRFS, DMFS, DFS, and OS in low-risk patients.PMRT is beneficial in patients with high risk of locoregional recurrence breast cancer patients with T1-2 and 1 to 3 positive nodes.

  3. Accelerated partial breast irradiation with interstitial brachytherapy as second conservative treatment for ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence: Multicentric study of the GEC-ESTRO Breast Cancer Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyse the clinical outcome after salvage lumpectomy and multi-catheter brachytherapy (MCB) for ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence (IBTR). Material and methods: Between 09/00 and 09/10, 217 patients presenting an IBTR underwent lumpectomy and MCB (low, pulsed, or high-dose rate). Survival rates without second local recurrence (2nd LR), distant metastasis (DM), and overall survival (OS) were analysed as well as late effects and cosmetic results. Univariate and multivariate analyses (MVA) based on IBTR data were performed to find prognostic factors for 2nd LR, DM, and OS. Results: Median follow-up after the IBTR was 3.9 years [range: 1.1–10.3]. Five and 10-year actuarial 2nd LR rates were 5.6% [range: 1.5–9.5] and 7.2% [range: 2.1–12.1], respectively. Five and 10-year actuarial DM rates were 9.6% [range: 5.7–15.2] and 19.1% [range: 7.8–28.3], respectively. Five and 10-year actuarial OS rates were 88.7% [range: 83.1–94.8] and 76.4% [range: 66.9–87.3], respectively. In MVA, histological grade was prognostic factor for 2nd LR (p = 0.008) and OS (p = 0.02); while tumour size was prognostic factor for DM (p = 0.03). G3-4 complication rate was 11%. Excellent/good cosmetic result was achieved in 85%. Conclusion: This study suggests that in case of IBTR, lumpectomy plus MCB is feasible and effective in preventing 2nd LR with an OS rate at least equivalent to those achieved with salvage mastectomy

  4. Breast cancer therapies weighed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even as the National Institutes of Health came under fire last week for giving short shrift to women in the institute's basic and clinical research programs, the report of a recent NIH consensus conference points up the need for more research on how to treat early breast cancer. Although the experts were able to agree on the best surgical treatment for women with early breast cancer, they couldn't resolve the more controversial issue of whether the patients should subsequently receive systemic treatment - chemotherapy or hormone therapy - to prevent recurrence of their disease. The panel reaffirmed that the removal of the lump and nearby lymph nodes, followed by irradiation, is just as effective as a mastectomy. But then came the contentious question: should women with early breast cancer, especially those without detectable lymph node metastases, receive drug therapy to prevent recurrence of the disease? Currently, 70% of such cancers are successfully treated with surgery and radiation alone. For this reason, about 2 years ago, the National Cancer Institute issued a clinical alert saying that addition treatment with drugs or hormones is a credible therapeutic option worthy of careful attention for all early stage patients. This pronouncement engendered a storm of criticism. A consensus panel concluded that in cases where tumors are 1 centimeter or less in diameter and no lymph nodes are affected, the likelihood of recurrence is so small that the benefits of adjuvant therapy would be insignificant. But for the patients with larger tumors, the panel concluded that the decision is an individual one that depends on personal preferences and a variety of prognostic factors that can help to indicate whether a woman is at high risk of having a recurrence and should therefore have adjuvant therapy

  5. Risk of Ipsilateral and Contralateral Cancer in BRCA Mutation Carriers with Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Leila; Meric-Bernstam, Funda

    2011-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with breast cancer have a high risk of ipsilateral breast cancer tumor recurrence (IBTR) and a high lifetime risk of contralateral breast cancer (CBC). The IBTR risk is significantly higher in women who elect breast conservation. Oophorectomy has a protective effect for both ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence and CBC. Patients with younger age of breast cancer onset have a significantly greater risk of CBC. Given the higher risk of IBTR and CBC, when indicat...

  6. Prospective multicenter study of combined treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy in breast cancer women with the rare clinical scenario of ipsilateral supraclavicular node recurrence without distant metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of chemotherapy combined with curative radiotherapy in breast cancer patients who presented with recurrent ipsilateral supraclavicular lymph node metastases (ISLM) without 'nonregional disease,' we designed an observational study performed prospectively. Patients and Methods: Forty-four consecutive patients with ISLM from breast cancer as part of recurrent regional disease without distant metastases were included in this study. All patients received chemotherapy with doxorubicin-based schema or paclitaxel for six courses and curative radiotherapy (60 Gy/30 fractions of 2 Gy/5 days a week). An 'involved field' radiation was delivered during the interval between the third and fourth chemotherapy course; hormonal therapy was given based on receptor status. Results: The rate of overall clinical response after chemotherapy and radiotherapy was 94.9%. Median time to progression and overall survival were 28 and 40 months, respectively; the 5-year actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 35% (95% confidence interval, 19-51) and 20% (95% confidence interval, 6-34), respectively. Conclusion: A curative course of intravenous chemotherapy and radical irradiation is feasible in patients with ISLM. All patients presenting recurrence in supraclavicular nodes should be treated with definitive locoregional treatments and systemic therapy because the outcomes are better than might be historically assumed

  7. Status of Survival and Recurrence of Breast-conserving Surgery for Early Breast Cancer Patients%早期乳腺癌患者保乳手术后的生存和复发状况研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章骏; 赵怡; 王群; 张舟; 邢戍健

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the survival and recurrence of breast -conserving surgery for early breast cancer pa -tients.Methods 100 cases of early breast cancer patients were divided into breast -conserving surgery group (BCT group) and modified radical mastectomy group (radical groups) according to different treatment ,each with 50 cases.Surgical situation and prognosis of the 2 groups,and risk factors of local recurrence after breast -conserving surgery were compared .Results Operation time,blood loss,average drainage,length of hospital stay and complications of the 2 groups had statistically significant difference (P 0.05);BCT group had higher de-gree of satisfaction with the breast shape ;Age was independent factor for local recurrence of early breast cancer after breast -con-serving surgery.Conclusion Breast-conserving surgery for early breast cancer has better survival ,local control rate and cosmetic results.%目的:探讨早期乳腺癌患者保乳手术后的生存和复发状况。方法100例早期乳腺癌患者根据治疗方式的不同分为保乳术组(保乳组)50例及改良根治术组(根治组)50例。对比分析保乳术与根治术的手术情况和预后以及影响保乳术后局部复发的危险因素。结果保乳组手术时间、术中出血量、平均引流量、住院时间以及并发症发生率与根治组比较差异显著,具有统计学意义(P <0.05);两组患者术后的局部复发情况无明显差异(P >0.05);保乳术组对乳房外形满意度较高;年龄是影响早期乳腺癌患者保乳手术后局部复发的独立因素。结论早期乳腺癌患者行保乳术后能获得良好生存率、局部控制率和美容效果。

  8. Breast Cancer Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  9. Breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains outstanding papers presented at the 3rd International Copenhagen Symposium on Detection of Breast Cancer, 1985. The Symposium was an opportunity to learn from extensive screening procedures carried out at outstanding centers in the United States, Sweden, the Netherlands, and England. Furthermore, the symposium dealt with new modalities such as ultrasonography, magnification techniques, and magnetic resonance; and very important contributions concerning self-examination, fine needle aspiration biopsy, and radiation risks were presented. A whole section was also dedicated to the highly important cooperation between radiologist, surgeon, and pathologist. (orig./MG)

  10. Breast cancer in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in situ-male; Intraductal carcinoma-male; Inflammatory breast cancer-male; Paget disease of the nipple-male; Breast cancer-male ... The cause of breast cancer is not clear. But there are risk ... breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to radiation Higher ...

  11. Prognostic Discrimination Using a 70-Gene Signature among Patients with Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer and an Intermediate 21-Gene Recurrence Score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Gwe Ahn

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Oncotype DX® recurrence score (RS predictor has been clinically utilized to appropriately select adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with estrogen receptor (ER-positive early breast cancer. However, the selection of chemotherapy for patients with intermediate RSs remains controversial. We assessed the prognostic value of a 70-gene signature (70GS among patients with ER-positive breast cancer and intermediate RSs. In addition, we sought to identify genes associated with poor 70GS scores based on gene expression profiling (GEP. GEP was performed using gene expression data from 186 patients with ER-positive breast cancer. The RS and 70GS score were calculated on the basis of GEP. Among 186 patients, 82 ER-positive patients with intermediate RSs were identified. These patients were stratified by 70GS, overall survival (OS significantly differed according to 70GS (p = 0.013. In a supervised hierarchical analysis according to 70GS, the expression of several representative genes for cell proliferation was significantly higher in the poor 70GS cluster than in the good 70GS cluster. Furthermore, among these patients, FOXM1, AURKA, AURKB, and BIRC5 displayed prognostic significance for OS. In conclusion, 70GS can help to discriminate survival differences among ER-positive patients with intermediate RSs. FOXM1, AURKA, AURKB, and BIRC5, are associated with poor 70GS scores.

  12. Imaging male breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, S., E-mail: sdoyle2@nhs.net [Primrose Breast Care Unit, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Steel, J.; Porter, G. [Primrose Breast Care Unit, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Male breast cancer is rare, with some pathological and radiological differences from female breast cancer. There is less familiarity with the imaging appearances of male breast cancer, due to its rarity and the more variable use of preoperative imaging. This review will illustrate the commonest imaging appearances of male breast cancer, with emphasis on differences from female breast cancer and potential pitfalls in diagnosis, based on a 10 year experience in our institution.

  13. A survey of patients with inflammatory skin recurrence corresponding to the area of previous irradiation after postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the unusual patterns of local recurrence in breast cancer patient is an inflammatory skin recurrence (ISR) sharply demarcating the area of previous radiation fields. To clarify the characteristics of this recurrence, we conducted a nationwide survey. We sent a survey to radiation oncologists at 200 institutions in Japan and received answers from 92. Of these, 24 institutions had some experience with patients who developed ISR affecting the previously irradiated area. The case details of 16 patients from 11 institutions were available and analyzed in this study. Eight patients experienced ISR after breast conservative therapy (groupA) and 8 patients experienced ISR after post-mastectomy radiotherapy (groupB). The postoperative pathological examination of groups A and B showed positive axillary lymph-nodes in 7/8 and 8/8 patients, positive lymphatic invasion in 4/7 and 7/8 patients, and estrogen receptor (ER) status negative in 7/8 and 6/7 patients respectively. Median survival period was 266 days in groupA and 1105 days in groupB (p=0.0001). Patients who developed the ISR tended to have several characteristics, including positive lymph-node metastases, intensive lymphatic invasion, and ER status negative. Physicians should contemplate the diagnosis of ISR next to radiation recall or radiation dermatitis, especially when the aforementioned risk factors are present. (author)

  14. New treatment option for women with hormone-sensitive breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A drug used for treating breast cancer, known as exemestane, is more effective than a common breast cancer prevention drug, tamoxifen, in preventing breast cancer recurrence in young women who also receive post-surgical treatment to suppress ovarian funct

  15. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI in Patients With Advanced Breast or Pancreatic Cancer With Metastases to the Liver or Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-28

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Liver Metastases; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  16. Phenotypic features and genetic characterization of male breast cancer families: identification of two recurrent BRCA2 mutations in north-east of Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miolo GianMaria

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer in men is an infrequent occurrence, accounting for ~1% of all breast tumors with an incidence of about 1:100,000. The relative rarity of male breast cancer (MBC limits our understanding of the epidemiologic, genetic and clinical features of this tumor. Methods From 1997 to 2003, 10 MBC patients were referred to our Institute for genetic counselling and BRCA1/2 testing. Here we report on the genetic and phenotypic characterization of 10 families with MBC from the North East of Italy. In particular, we wished to assess the occurrence of specific cancer types in relatives of MBC probands in families with and without BRCA2 predisposing mutations. Moreover, families with recurrent BRCA2 mutations were also characterized by haplotype analysis using 5 BRCA2-linked dinucleotide repeat markers and 8 intragenic BRCA2 polymorphisms. Results Two pathogenic mutations in the BRCA2 gene were observed: the 9106C>T (Q2960X and the IVS16-2A>G (splicing mutations, each in 2 cases. A BRCA1 mutation of uncertain significance 4590C>G (P1491A was also observed. In families with BRCA2 mutations, female breast cancer was more frequent in the first and second-degree relatives compared to the families with wild type BRCA1/2 (31.9% vs. 8.0% p = 0.001. Reconstruction of the chromosome phasing in three families and the analysis of three isolated cases with the IVS16-2A>G BRCA2 mutation identified the same haplotype associated with MBC, supporting the possibility that this founder mutation previously detected in Slovenian families is also present in the North East of our Country. Moreover, analysis of one family with the 9106C>T BRCA2 mutation allowed the identification of common haplotypes for both microsatellite and intragenic polymorphisms segregating with the mutation. Three isolated cases with the same mutation shared the same intragenic polymorphisms and three 5' microsatellite markers, but showed a different haplotype for 3' markers

  17. The Impact of the Size of Nodal Metastases on Recurrence Risk in Breast Cancer Patients With 1-3 Positive Axillary Nodes After Mastectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Eleanor E.R., E-mail: Eleanor.harris@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Freilich, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Lin, Hui-Yi [Biostatistics Core, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Chuong, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Acs, Geza [Department of Anatomic Pathology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Use of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with 1-3 positive nodes is controversial. The objective of this study was to determine whether the size of nodal metastases in this subset could predict who would benefit from PMRT. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 250 breast cancer patients with 1-3 positive nodes after mastectomy treated with contemporary surgery and systemic therapy at our institution. Of these patients, 204 did not receive PMRT and 46 did receive PMRT. Local and regional recurrence risks were stratified by the size of the largest nodal metastasis measured as less than or equal to 5 mm or greater than 5 mm. Results: The median follow-up was 65.6 months. In the whole group, regional recurrences occurred in 2% of patients in whom the largest nodal metastasis measured 5 mm or less vs 6% for those with metastases measuring greater than 5 mm. For non-irradiated patients only, regional recurrence rates were 2% and 9%, respectively. Those with a maximal nodal size greater than 5 mm had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of regional recurrence (P=.013). The 5-year cumulative incidence of a regional recurrence in the non-irradiated group was 2.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7%-7.2%) for maximal metastasis size of 5 mm or less, 6.9% (95% CI, 1.7%-17.3%) for metastasis size greater than 5 mm, and 16% (95% CI, 3.4%-36.8%) for metastasis size greater than 10 mm. The impact of the maximal nodal size on regional recurrences became insignificant in the multivariable model. Conclusions: In patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes undergoing mastectomy without radiation, nodal metastasis greater than 5 mm was associated with regional recurrence after mastectomy, but its effect was modified by other factors (such as tumor stage). The size of the largest nodal metastasis may be useful to identify high-risk patients who may benefit from radiation therapy after mastectomy.

  18. Low-dose Photofrin-induced PDT offers excellent clinical response with minimal morbidity in chest wall recurrence of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Ron; Mang, Thomas S.

    2000-03-01

    Limited therapeutic options exist when chest wall recurrence form breast cancer progresses despite standard salvage treatment. As photodynamic therapy offers excellent response for cutaneous lesions this may be a possible indication for PDT. A total of 102 treatment fields were illuminated on 9 women with biopsy proven chest wall recurrence of breast cancer which was progressing despite salvage surgery, radiation, and chemi-hormonal therapy. PDT consisted of outpatient IV infusion of Photofrin at 0.8 mg/kg followed 48 hours laser by illumination at 140-170 J/cm2 via a KTP Yag laser coupled to a dye unit. No patient was lost to follow up. At 6 months post PDT; complete response, defined as total lesion elimination was 89 percent, partial response 8 percent, and no response 3 percent. No photosensitivity was seen and no patient developed scarring, fibrosis, or healing difficulties. Low dose Photofrin induced PDT is very active against chest wall lesions. Despite fragile and heavily pre-treated tissues, excellent clinical and cosmetic outcome was obtained. PDT is an underutilized modality for this indication.

  19. Patterns and Risk Factors of Locoregional Recurrence in T1-T2 Node Negative Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Mastectomy: Implications for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) can reduce locoregional recurrences (LRR) in high-risk patients, but its role in the treatment of lymph node negative (LN-) breast cancer remains unclear. The aim of this study was to identify a subgroup of T1-T2 breast cancer patients with LN- who might benefit from PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 1,136 node-negative T1-T2 breast cancer cases treated with mastectomy without PMRT at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1980 and 2004. We estimated cumulative incidence rates for LRR overall and in specific subgroups, and used Cox proportional hazards models to identify potential risk factors. Results: Median follow-up was 9 years. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR was 5.2% (95% CI: 3.9-6.7%). Chest wall was the most common (73%) site of LRR. Tumor size, margin, patient age, systemic therapy, and lymphovascular invasion (LVI) were significantly associated with LRR on multivariate analysis. These five variables were subsequently used as risk factors for stratified analysis. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR for patients with no risk factors was 2.0% (95% CI: 0.5-5.2%), whereas the incidence for patients with three or more risk factors was 19.7% (95% CI: 12.2-28.6%). Conclusion: It has been suggested that patients with T1-T2N0 breast cancer who undergo mastectomy represent a favorable group for which PMRT renders little benefit. However, this study suggests that select patients with multiple risk factors including LVI, tumor size ≥2 cm, close or positive margin, age ≤50, and no systemic therapy are at higher risk of LRR and may benefit from PMRT.

  20. Fulvestrant With or Without Lapatinib in Treating Postmenopausal Women With Stage III or Stage IV Breast Cancer That is Hormone Receptor-Positive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  1. Influence of Lymphatic Invasion on Locoregional Recurrence Following Mastectomy: Indication for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer Patients With One to Three Positive Nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The indication for postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with one to three positive lymph nodes has been in discussion. The purpose of this study was to identify patient groups for whom PMRT may be indicated, focusing on varied locoregional recurrence rates depending on lymphatic invasion (ly) status. Methods and Materials: Retrospective analysis of 1,994 node-positive patients who had undergone mastectomy without postoperative radiotherapy between January 1990 and December 2000 at our hospital was performed. Patient groups for whom PMRT should be indicated were assessed using statistical tests based on the relationship between locoregional recurrence rate and ly status. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that the ly status affected the locoregional recurrence rate to as great a degree as the number of positive lymph nodes (p < 0.001). Especially for patients with one to three positive nodes, extensive ly was a more significant factor than stage T3 in the TNM staging system for locoregional recurrence (p < 0.001 vs. p = 0.295). Conclusion: Among postmastectomy patients with one to three positive lymph nodes, patients with extensive ly seem to require local therapy regimens similar to those used for patients with four or more positive nodes and also seem to require consideration of the use of PMRT.

  2. Influence of Lymphatic Invasion on Locoregional Recurrence Following Mastectomy: Indication for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer Patients With One to Three Positive Nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunuma, Ryoichi, E-mail: r-matsunuma@nifty.com [Department of Surgery, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); First Department of Surgery, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan); Oguchi, Masahiko [Radiation Oncology Department, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Fujikane, Tomoko [Department of Surgery, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Matsuura, Masaaki [Bioinformatics Group, Genome Center of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research and Division of Cancer Genomics, Cancer Institute of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Sakai, Takehiko; Kimura, Kiyomi; Morizono, Hidetomo; Iijima, Kotaro; Izumori, Ayumi; Miyagi, Yumi; Nishimura, Seiichiro; Makita, Masujiro [Department of Surgery, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Gomi, Naoya [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Horii, Rie [Division of Pathology, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Akiyama, Futoshi [Division of Pathology, Cancer Institute of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Iwase, Takuji [Department of Surgery, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: The indication for postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with one to three positive lymph nodes has been in discussion. The purpose of this study was to identify patient groups for whom PMRT may be indicated, focusing on varied locoregional recurrence rates depending on lymphatic invasion (ly) status. Methods and Materials: Retrospective analysis of 1,994 node-positive patients who had undergone mastectomy without postoperative radiotherapy between January 1990 and December 2000 at our hospital was performed. Patient groups for whom PMRT should be indicated were assessed using statistical tests based on the relationship between locoregional recurrence rate and ly status. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that the ly status affected the locoregional recurrence rate to as great a degree as the number of positive lymph nodes (p < 0.001). Especially for patients with one to three positive nodes, extensive ly was a more significant factor than stage T3 in the TNM staging system for locoregional recurrence (p < 0.001 vs. p = 0.295). Conclusion: Among postmastectomy patients with one to three positive lymph nodes, patients with extensive ly seem to require local therapy regimens similar to those used for patients with four or more positive nodes and also seem to require consideration of the use of PMRT.

  3. Dual time point imaging fluorine-18 flourodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for evaluation of large loco-regional recurrences of breast cancer treated with electrochemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemotherapy is a local anticancer treatment very efficient for treatment of small cutaneous metastases. The method is now being investigated for large cutaneous recurrences of breast cancer that are often confluent masses of malignant tumour with various degrees of inflammation. To this end 18-Flourine-Flourodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (FDG-PET/CT) could be a method for response evaluation. However, a standard FDG-PET/CT scan cannot differentiate inflammatory tissue from malignant tissue. Dual point time imaging (DTPI) FDG-PET has the potential of doing so. The purpose of this study was to investigate if DTPI FDG-PET/CT could assess response to electrochemotherapy and to assess the optimal timing of imaging. Within a phase II clinical trial 11 patients with cutaneous recurrences had FDG-PET/CT scans at three time points: 60 min, 120 min and 180 min after FDG injection. The scans were performed before and 3 weeks after electrochemotherapy. A significant reduction in maximum standard uptake value at 60 min post injection was seen after treatment. Furthermore a change in the FDG uptake pattern was observed; from increasing uptake in up to 180 min post injection before treatment to stabilization of FDG uptake at 120 min post injection after treatment. The change in FDG uptake pattern over time lead to change of response in three target lesions; two lesions changed from stable metabolic disease to partial metabolic response and one lesion changed from partial metabolic response to stable metabolic disease. To ensure detection of the change in uptake pattern, scanning 60 and 180 min post injection seems optimal. The present study shows that FDG-PET/CT 60 and 180 min after tracer injection is a promising tool for response evaluation of cutaneous recurrences of breast cancer treated with electrochemotherapy

  4. [A comparative study between low-dose and high-dose medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) in the treatment of advanced and recurrent breast cancer--in relation to dose, serum concentration and response. Osaka Breast Cancer Research Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, J; Yayoi, E; Takatsuka, Y; Aikawa, T; Maeura, Y; Kobayashi, T; Miyauchi, K; Kotsuma, Y

    1997-05-01

    A prospective randomized study was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of MPA in the treatment of breast cancer by comparing low dose (600 mg/day) with high dose (1,200 mg/day) of MPA. In 35 evaluable cases, the response rate to treatment was 40.0% (8/20) with low dose MPA and 26.7% (4/15) with high dose MPA. There was no significant difference between the two groups. The serum MPA concentration measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay was 23.2 +/- 17.6 ng/ml in the low-dose group and 89.5 +/- 56.7 ng/ml in the high-dose group. Intrapatient variability in serum MPA concentration was relatively stable, but interpatient variability was large. No correlation was found between the response rate and serum MPA concentration. The above results indicate that a low dose of MPA (600 mg/day) is a useful treatment with high effectiveness and safety in advanced and recurrent breast cancer patients. Though no exact data on the optimal serum concentration could not be obtained, it was obvious that a successful response cannot be expected from a serum MPA concentration of less than 17 ng/ml, which was the average serum concentration in NC and PD patients of the low-dose group. PMID:9170519

  5. Adjuvant Bisphosphonates for Postmenopausal Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A summary of a meta-analysis of randomized trials of bisphosphonates as adjuvant therapy for women with early-stage breast cancer that shows the drugs can reduce the rate of disease recurrence in bone.

  6. The utility of 18 F-FDG PET/CT for suspected recurrent breast cancer: impact and prognostic stratification

    OpenAIRE

    Cochet, Alexandre; David, Steven; Moodie, Kate; Drummond, Elizabeth; Dutu, Gaelle; MacManus, Michael; Chua, Boon; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The incremental value of 18FDG PET/CT in patients with breast cancer (BC) compared to conventional imaging (CI) in clinical practice is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the management impact and prognostic value of 18 F-FDG PET/CT in this setting. Methods Sixty-three patients who were referred to our institution for suspicion of BC relapse were retrospectively enrolled. All patients had been evaluated with CI and underwent PET/CT. At a median follow-up of 61 months, s...

  7. Management of neuropathic pain following treatment for breast cancer in the absence of recurrence: a challenge for the radiation oncologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews various management options for treatment-induced neuropathic pain in breast cancer. First-line options include tricyclic antidepressants and anticonvulsant drugs. Opioids should be prescribed according to published guidelines. Second-line treatments include lignocaine, mexiletine and ketamine. Sympatholytic therapies are available to patients with features of chronic regional pain syndrome. Anti-inflammatory agents are used for neurogenic inflammation. Surgical interventions are considered for refractory neuropathic pain. Interdisciplinary management is appropriate when persisting pain causes physical and psychosocial disabilities. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  8. Compliance of patients concerning recommended radiotherapy in breast cancer. Association with recurrence, age, and hormonal therapy; Compliance der Patientinnen in Bezug zur empfohlenen Strahlentherapie beim Mammakarzinom. Zusammenhang mit Rezidiv, Alter und Hormontherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winzer, K.J.; Gruber, C. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Brustzentrum; Badakhshi, H. [Virchow Klinikum, Verlin (Germany). Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Hinkelbein, M. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Denkert, C. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Pathologie

    2012-09-15

    Background and purpose: In this study, we investigated how often guidelines for radiation therapy in patients with breast cancer are not complied with, which patient group is mostly affected, and how this influences local recurrence. Patients and methods: All patients (n = 1,903) diagnosed between November 2003 and December 2008 with primary invasive or intraductal breast cancer in the interdisciplinary breast center of the Charite Hospital Berlin were included and followed for a median 2.18 years. Results: Patients who, in contrast to the recommendation of the interdisciplinary tumor board, did not undergo postoperative radiation experienced a fivefold higher local recurrence rate (p < 0.0005), corresponding to a 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival of 74.5% in this group. The 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival of patients following the recommendations was 93.3%. Guideline compliance was dependent on age of patients, acceptance of adjuvant hormonal treatment or chemotherapy, and increased diameter of the primary tumor. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed an association between compliance and age or hormonal therapy. Conclusion: In order to avoid local recurrence patients should be motivated to comply with guideline driven therapy. Since a higher number of local recurrences is observed in health services research compared to clinical research, studies on the value of adjuvant treatment following local recurrence should be performed. (orig.)

  9. High local recurrence risk is not associated with large survival reduction after postmastectomy radiotherapy in high-risk breast cancer: A subgroup analysis of DBCG 82 b&c

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyndi, Marianne; Overgaard, Marie; Nielsen, Hanne M;

    2008-01-01

    radiotherapy in the DBCG82 b&c trials. Tissue microarrays had been constructed and sections stained for estrogen, progesterone and HER2 receptors. Median potential follow-up time was 17years. Endpoints were LR as isolated first event, breast cancer mortality and overall survival. RESULTS: Among patients......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: International consensus reports recommend postmastectomy radiotherapy only to patients at high risk of a local recurrence (LR). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The present analysis included 1000 out of 3083 high-risk breast cancer patients randomly assigned to postmastectomy...... in 15-year breast cancer mortality after radiotherapy (11%) was seen. The largest absolute reduction in 5-year LR probability after radiotherapy was seen for the poor prognosis group (36%). However, this large LR reduction did not translate into any reduction in 15-year breast cancer mortality (0...

  10. Breast cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  11. Types of Breast Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about this condition, see Inflammatory Breast Cancer . Paget disease of the nipple This type of breast cancer ... carcinoma (this is a type of metaplastic carcinoma) Medullary carcinoma Mucinous (or colloid) carcinoma Papillary carcinoma Tubular ...

  12. Low local recurrence rate without postmastectomy radiation in node-negative breast cancer patients with tumors 5 cm and larger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the need for adjuvant radiotherapy following mastectomy for patients with node-negative breast tumors 5 cm or larger. Methods and Materials: Between 1981 and 2002, a total of 70 patients with node-negative breast cancer and tumors 5 cm or larger were treated with mastectomy and adjuvant systemic therapies but without radiotherapy at three institutions. We retrospectively assessed rates and risk factors for locoregional failure (LRF), overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS) in these patients. Results: With a median follow-up of 85 months, the 5-year actuarial LRF rate was 7.6% (95% confidence interval, 3%-16%). LRF was primarily in the chest wall (4/5 local failures), and lymphatic-vascular invasion (LVI) was statistically significantly associated with LRF risk by the log-rank test (p = 0.017) and in Cox proportional hazards analysis (p 0.038). The 5-year OS and DFS rates were 83% and 86% respectively. LVI was also significantly associated with OS and DFS in both univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusions: This series demonstrates a low LRF rate of 7.6% among breast cancer patients with node-negative tumors 5 cm and larger after mastectomy and adjuvant systemic therapy. Our data indicate that further adjuvant radiation therapy to increase local control may not be indicated by tumor size alone in the absence of positive lymph nodes. LVI was significantly associated with LRF in our series, indicating that patients with this risk factor require careful consideration with regard to further local therapy

  13. Using the lymph nodal ratio to predict the risk of locoregional recurrence in lymph node-positive breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy without radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the prognostic value of axillary lymph node ratio (LNR) as compared to the number of involved nodes (pN stage) in patients with axillary lymph node-positive breast cancer treated with mastectomy without radiation. We performed a retrospective analysis of the clinical data of patients with stage II-III node-positive breast cancer (N=1068) between 1998 and 2007. Locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) and overall survival (OS) were compared based on the LNR and pN staging. A total of 780 cases were classified as pN1, 183 as pN2, and 105 as pN3. With respect to LNR, 690 cases had a LNR from 0.01-0.20, 269 cases a LNR from 0.21-0.65, and 109 cases a LNR > 0.65. The median follow-up time was 62 months. Univariate analysis showed that both LNR and pN stage were prognostic factors of LRFS and OS (p<0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated that LNR was an independent prognostic factor of LRFS and OS (p<0.05). pN stage had no significant effect on LRFS or OS (p>0.05). In subgroup analysis, the LNR identified groups of patients with different survival rates based on pN stage. LNR is superior to pN staging as a prognostic factor in lymph node-positive breast cancer after mastectomy, and should be used as one of the indications for adjuvant radiation therapy

  14. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Prevention en español Cáncer de mama You may have heard about special events, like walks or races, to raise money for breast cancer research. Or maybe you've seen people wear ...

  15. Identification of Risk Factors for Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients with Nodal Stage N0 and N1: Who Could Benefit from Post-Mastectomy Radiotherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunjin Jwa

    Full Text Available The locoregional recurrence (LRR rate was reported as high as approximately 20% in stage I-II breast cancer following mastectomy. To investigate the risk factors for LRR in pT1-2N0-1 breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy but not radiation, and to define a subgroup of patients at high risk of LRR who may benefit from postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT.In total, 390 patients with pT1-2N0M0 (n = 307 and pT1-2N1M0 (n = 83 breast cancer who underwent total mastectomy without adjuvant radiotherapy from 2002 to 2011 were enrolled in the study.After a median follow-up period of 5.6 years (range, 0.6-11.3 years, 21 patients had 18 systemic relapses and 12 LRRs including six in the chest wall and eight in the regional nodal area. The 5-year LRR-free survival (LRRFS rates were 97.0% in pN0, 98.8% in pN1, and 97.4% in all patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that age < 50 years (Hazard Ratio, 11.4; p = 0.01 and no adjuvant chemotherapy (Hazard Ratio, 10.2; p = 0.04 were independent risk factors for LRR in pN0 patients. Using these factors, the 5-year LRRFS rates were 100% without any risk factors, 96.4% with one risk factor, and 86.7% with two risk factors. In pN1 patients, multivariate analysis revealed that having a hormone receptor negative tumor (Hazard Ratio, 18.3; p = 0.03 was the only independent risk factor for LRR. The 5-year LRRFS rates were 100.0% for luminal type, and 92.3% for non-luminal type cancer.Patients with pT1-2N0-1 breast cancer who underwent total mastectomy without PMRT could be stratified by nodal stage and risk factors for LRR. PMRT may have of value for node negative patients aged less than 50 years and who are not treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, and for non-luminal type patients with one to three positive nodes.

  16. THERAPEUTIC OPTIONS FOR BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Georgescu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer remains a major public health problem, being the second cause of cancer death in women. There is a marked tendency to restrict the extension of surgical gesture, which directly leads to two different attitudes: radical surgery and conservative surgery, to which, at least in our country, there are still some delays. Prospective and retrospective studies have shown that, in 20 years, conservative and radical therapy had about the same rate of survival and disease-free interval, at least for stage I and II breast cancer, the only real counterargument against conservative surgery being that, in principle, the higher rate of recurrence local constraint can be solved by postoperative radiotherapy. Finally, the survival rate is the main parameter of evaluation, assessing the effectiveness of the treatment in breast cancer, and in all its other forms.

  17. In Vitro Chemosensitivity Testing of Primary and Recurrent Breast Carcinomas and Its Clinical Significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi LI; Haiping SONG; Wenshan HE; Yuan TIAN; Tao HUANG

    2008-01-01

    In this study, in vitro chemosensitivity testing was conducted on primary cultured breast cancer cells from 96 patients with breast cancer, and the results showed that the cells from a few patients with primary breast cancer developed multidrug resistance (MDR) prior to the first chemotherapy exposure. All the cells from the recurrent cancer patients had MDR. The findings suggested that patients having MDR would benefit from high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) regimens. In vitro chemosensitivity screening, which was aimed at improving the therapeutic efficacy and minimizing side effects, helps in choosing individualized treatment for breast cancer.

  18. Breast Cancer Rates by State

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... from breast cancer each year. Rates of Getting Breast Cancer by State The number of people who get ...

  19. Your Body After Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast Cancer , Coping with Cancer Your Body After Breast Cancer Article date: September 28, 2012 By Melissa Weber ... age 24, she was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer in 2010. “I had no control over what ...

  20. Breast cancer biology for the radiation oncologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the first textbook of its kind devoted to describing the biological complexities of breast cancer in a way that is relevant to the radiation oncologist. Radiation Oncology has long treated breast cancer as a single biological entity, with all treatment decisions being based on clinical and pathologic risk factors. We are now beginning to understand that biological subtypes of breast cancer may have different risks of recurrence as well as different intrinsic sensitivity to radiotherapy. Multi-gene arrays that have for years been used to predict the risk of distant recurrence and the value of systemic chemotherapy may also have utility in predicting the risk of local recurrence. Additionally, the targeted agents used to treat breast cancer may interact with radiotherapy in ways that can be beneficial or undesirable. All of these emerging issues are extensively discussed in this book, and practical evidence-based treatment recommendations are presented whenever possible.

  1. Breast cancer biology for the radiation oncologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, Jonathan [Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Small, William [Loyola Univ. Chicago, Maywood, IL (United States). Stritch School of Medicine, Cardianl Bernardin Cancer Center; Woloschak, Gayle E. (ed.) [Northwestern Univ. Feinberg, Chicago, IL (United States). School of Medicine

    2015-10-01

    This is the first textbook of its kind devoted to describing the biological complexities of breast cancer in a way that is relevant to the radiation oncologist. Radiation Oncology has long treated breast cancer as a single biological entity, with all treatment decisions being based on clinical and pathologic risk factors. We are now beginning to understand that biological subtypes of breast cancer may have different risks of recurrence as well as different intrinsic sensitivity to radiotherapy. Multi-gene arrays that have for years been used to predict the risk of distant recurrence and the value of systemic chemotherapy may also have utility in predicting the risk of local recurrence. Additionally, the targeted agents used to treat breast cancer may interact with radiotherapy in ways that can be beneficial or undesirable. All of these emerging issues are extensively discussed in this book, and practical evidence-based treatment recommendations are presented whenever possible.

  2. A patient with angiosarcoma of the breast after breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An 89-year-old woman underwent breast-conserving surgery and axillary lymph node dissection (right AC region, T2N0M0, stage 2A, invasive ductal carcinoma, papillotubular type) for right breast cancer in February 2005. She received postoperative radiotherapy to the residual breast. She then developed marked edema of the right arm and right breast. A mass developed in the right breast in March 2011 and March 2013. This was originally suspected to be an ipsilateral breast recurrence of the cancer, but turned to be angiosarcoma after developing recurrent mass in March 2013, which histopathology was proved to be showed angiosarcoma of the breast. The patient subsequently had repeated intradermal and subcutaneous metastases and recurrence. She is currently receiving chemotherapy with docetaxel (30 mg/m2 biweekly). This interesting case of angiosarcoma of the breast after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer is reported. (author)

  3. Cyclophosphamide or Denileukin Diftitox Followed By Expanding a Patient's Own T Cells in the Laboratory in Treating Patients With HER-2/Neu Overexpressing Metastatic Breast Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Previously Treated With HER-2/Neu Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-07

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  4. Doxifluridine, medroxyprogesterone acetate and cyclophosphamide (DMpC) combination therapy found effective for case of chest wall recurrent breast cancer with bone and pleural metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 67-year-old woman in poor general condition consulted my clinic with complaints of dyspnea and right chest wall pain. There was a huge and moist ulcer, caused by recurrence and post-radiation, on her right anterior to posterior chest wall. A chest X-ray demonstrated massive pleural effusion. Bone scinti gram showed multiple metastases in the spine, femur and pelvis. Her general condition was so poor that standard chemotherapy was unsuitable. Therefore, the patient was orally administered DMpC (doxifluridine, medroxyprogesterone acetate and cyclophosphamide) combination therapy. The pleural effusion had completely disappeared after 11 weeks, and the elevated serum CA15-3 and CEA value returned to a normal range 13 weeks later. No side effects were observed from this therapy. The patient clinically achieved good quality of life (QOL) in 6 months form this therapy with zoredronic acid administration. DMpC therapy appears to have few side effects and might be an effective treatment option for recurrent breast cancer patients with a poor general health condition. (author)

  5. Therapeutic application of injectable thermosensitive hydrogel in preventing local breast cancer recurrence and improving incision wound healing in a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Na; Gong, Changyang; Qian, Zhiyong; Luo, Feng; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Helan; Wei, Yuquan

    2012-08-01

    Many drug delivery systems (DDSs) have been investigated for local targeting of malignant disease with the intention of increasing anti-tumor activity and minimizing systemic toxicity. An injectable thermosensitive hydrogel was applied to prevent locoregional recurrence of 4T1 breast cancer in a mouse model. The presented hydrogel, which is based on poly(ethyleneglycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG, PECE), flows freely at normal temperature, forms a gel within seconds in situ at body temperature, and eventually releases the drug in a consistent and sustained fashion as it gradually biodegrades. Locoregional recurrence after primary tumor removal was significantly inhibited in mice treated with the paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded PECE hydrogel subcutaneously (9.1%) administered, compared with the blank hydrogel (80.0%), systemic (77.8%) and locally (75.0%) administered PTX, and the control group (100%) (P 0.05), in agreement with histopathological examinations. This novel DDSs represents a promising approach for local adjuvant therapy in malignant disease.

  6. Changes in the ER, PgR, HER2, p53 and Ki-67 biological markers between primary and recurrent breast cancer: discordance rates and prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tashima Rumiko

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In breast cancer, ER/PgR, HER2, and Ki-67 are important biological markers for predicting prognosis and making effective treatment decisions. In addition, changes in markers due to relapse are also clinically experienced; however, the frequency and clinical significance are still not fully understood. Thus, changes in markers and their correlations with prognosis were investigated. Patients and Methods Out of the patients with relapse from 1997 to March 2011, there were 97 consecutive patients from whom the lesion was resected and evaluated by immunostaining. The biopsy sites were chest wall, lymph node, ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence, lungs, bones, ovaries and brain. The markers sought were ER, PgR, HER2, p53 and Ki-67. Results The hormone receptor positive rate from the primary tumor to recurrence decreased from 63.9% to 57.7% and from 56.7% to 43.3% for ER and PgR, respectively. Changes in the positive/negative evaluation were seen at the rate of 10.3% and 25.8% for ER and PgR, respectively. The Ki-67 index increased significantly from a mean of 29.1% at primary tumor to 36.3% at relapse. When divided into 2 groups ( Conclusion Estrogen receptor and PgR decreased while Ki-67 increased due to relapse; however, the rate of change was high for PgR and Ki-67. Change in the subtypes was seen in 25%. In addition, PgR at relapse and Ki-67 at primary tumor were significant factors for post-relapse prognosis while PgR becoming negative was a poor prognostic factor. These findings are important for making effective treatment decisions.

  7. A phase II trial of ixabepilone and cyclophosphamide as neoadjuvant therapy for patients with HER2-negative breast cancer: correlation of pathologic complete response with the 21-gene recurrence score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardley, Denise A; Peacock, Nancy W; Shastry, Mythili; Burris, Howard A; Bechhold, Rebecca G; Hendricks, Carolyn B; Yoshizawa, Carl N; Sing, Amy P; Hainsworth, John D

    2015-11-01

    Ixabepilone and the taxanes have similar activity in the first-line treatment of metastatic breast cancer, and ixabepilone is sometimes effective in taxane-refractory patients. We conducted a phase 2 trial to evaluate ixabepilone in combination with cyclophosphamide as neoadjuvant treatment for patients with locally advanced HER2-negative breast cancer. Response to neoadjuvant treatment was correlated with the baseline 21-gene Recurrence Score® (Oncotype DX; Genomic Health Inc, Redwood City, CA). Eligible women with HER2-negative locally advanced breast cancer received ixabepilone 40 mg/m(2) plus cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m(2) on day 1 of each 21-day cycle. Following 6 cycles, patients underwent definitive surgery. Primary endpoint was rate of pathologic complete response (pCR). Breast biopsy tumor samples were obtained at pretreatment and at surgery in patients with residual disease. Tumor specimens were analyzed using the 21-gene assay. One hundred sixty-eight patients (median age 52 years; 45 % triple-negative) were enrolled; 161 (96 %) underwent definitive surgery following neoadjuvant ixabepilone/cyclophosphamide. Overall, 27 patients (17 %) achieved pCR, including 19 of 73 (26 %) triple-negative patients. The most frequently occurring grade 3/4 toxicity was neutropenia (98 patients; 58 %). Recurrence Scores were highly correlated with achievement of pCR (0/36 with low or intermediate Recurrence Scores vs. 19/72 with high Recurrence Scores; p = 0.002). There was high concordance between baseline and post-treatment Recurrence Scores in the 72 patients with paired samples. The combination of ixabepilone and cyclophosphamide yielded a pCR rate of 17 %, similar to other neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimens. Pathologic complete responses occurred only in patients with high-risk baseline Recurrence Scores. PMID:26507191

  8. Breast Cancer Immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JuhuaZhou; YinZhong

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide. Although tumorectomy, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormone replacement therapy have been used for the treatment of breast cancer, there is no effective therapy for patients with invasive and metastatic breast cancer. Immunotherapy may be proved effective in treating patients with advanced breast cancer. Breast cancer immunotherapy includes antibody based immunotherapy, cancer vaccine immunotherapy, adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy and T cell receptor gene transfer immunotherapy. Antibody based immunotherapy such as the monoclonal antibody against HER-2/neu (trastuzumab) is successfully used in the treatment of breast cancer patients with over-expressed HER-2/neu, however, HER-2/neu is over-expressed only in 25-30% of breast cancer patients. Cancer vaccine immunotherapy is a promising method to treat cancer patients. Cancer vaccines can be used to induce specific anti-tumor immunity in breast cancer patients, but cannot induce objective tumor regression. Adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy is an effective method in the treatment of melanoma patients. Recent advances in anti-tumor T cell generation ex vivo and limited clinical trial data have made the feasibility of adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer patients. T cell receptor gene transfer can redirect the specificity of T cells. Chimeric receptor, scFv(anti-HER-2/neu)/zeta receptor, was successfully used to redirect cytotoxic T lymphocyte hybridoma cells to obtain anti-HER-2/neu positive tumor cells, suggesting the feasibility of treatment of breast cancer patients with T cell receptor gene transfer immunotherapy. Clinical trials will approve that immunotherapy is an effective method to cure breast cancer disease in the near future. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  9. Breast Cancer Immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juhua Zhou; Yin Zhong

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide. Although tumorectomy,radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormone replacement therapy have been used for the treatment of breast cancer, there is no effective therapy for patients with invasive and metastatic breast cancer. Immunotherapy may be proved effective in treating patients with advanced breast cancer. Breast cancer immunotherapy includes antibody based immunotherapy, cancer vaccine immunotherapy, adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy and T cell receptor gene transfer immunotherapy. Antibody based immunotherapy such as the monoclonal antibody against HER-2/neu (trastuzumab) is successfully used in the treatment of breast cancer patients with over-expressed HER-2/neu, however, HER-2/neu is over-expressed only in 25-30% of breast cancer patients. Cancer vaccine immunotherapy is a promising method to treat cancer patients. Cancer vaccines can be used to induce specific anti-tumor immunity in breast cancer patients, but cannot induce objective tumor regression. Adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy is an effective method in the treatment of melanoma patients. Recent advances in anti-tumor T cell generation ex vivo and limited clinical trial data have made the feasibility of adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer patients. T cell receptor gene transfer can redirect the specificity of T cells. Chimeric receptor, scFv(anti-HER-2/neu)/zeta receptor, was successfully used to redirect cytotoxic T lymphocyte hybridoma cells to obtain anti-HER-2/neu positive tumor cells, suggesting the feasibility of treatment of breast cancer patients with T cell receptor gene transfer immunotherapy. Clinical trials will approve that immunotherapy is an effective method to cure breast cancer disease in the near future.

  10. Early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer remains a common disease throughout the world. Here we review new knowledge about early breast cancer obtained during the past 5 years. The prognosis of early breast cancer is generally favorable. Especially, ductal carcinoma in situ has been regarded as a non-life-threatening disease. Therefore, early diagnosis and early onset of the treatment has been important. Early age at menarche, late age at first birth, and late age at menopause are related to breast cancer risk. Examination by mammography and ultrasonography is still the most effective means of detection for premenopausal and postmenopausal women, respectively. Additionally, there have been important advances in MRI, sentinel lymph node biopsy, breast-conserving surgery, partial breast irradiation, neoadjuvant systemic therapy, and adjuvant systemic therapy. Another approach to keeping the disease under control is the elucidation of breast cancer's molecular biological features. Assessment of potential molecular targets can lead to early diagnosis and molecular targeted treatment. (author)

  11. Breast Cancer Risk in American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Risk in American Women On This Page What ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

  12. Utility of second-look examinations in the management of a new hypermetabolic lesion detected by fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT for diagnosis of loco-regional recurrence in patients with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Young; Cho, Kyu Ran; Park, Eun Kyung; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Woo, Ok Hee; Song, Sung Eun; Oh, Yu Whan; Bae, Jeong Won [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    To investigate the clinical significance of a new hypermetabolic lesion detected by fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT (FDG-PET/CT) as well as the utility of second-look examinations to evaluate loco-regional recurrence of breast cancer. Our database revealed 922 breast cancer patients who underwent surgery from January 2008 to July 2011. We included 20 patients with negative findings on routine follow-up but with new hypermetabolic lesions on FDG-PET/CT. All underwent second-look examination [breast ultrasound (US) = 14, chest CT scan = 6]. A total of 17 cases were pathologically verified and 3 were diagnosed with follow-up imaging. The locations were in the axillae (n = 7), breast (n = 6), chest wall (n = 3), cervical/supraclavicular (n = 3), and internal mammary (n = 1). Of the 20 hypermetabolic lesions, 10 were pathologically confirmed malignancies. Of the 14 patients who had undergone US, 7 had suspicious findings and 5 were confirmed as malignancies. Of a total of 6 patients who had undergone CT scans, 5 had suspicious findings and all turned out to be malignancies. The positive predictive value of the second-look examination was 83.3% (10/12). Second-look examination and pathologic confirmation should be performed for newly appearing hypermetabolic lesions on FDG-PET/CT in order to exclude loco-regional recurrence in breast cancer patients.

  13. Oxalate induces breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Castellaro, Andrés M.; Tonda, Alfredo; Cejas, Hugo H.; Ferreyra, Héctor; Caputto, Beatriz L.; Pucci, Oscar A.; Gil, German A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Microcalcifications can be the early and only presenting sign of breast cancer. One shared characteristic of breast cancer is the appearance of mammographic mammary microcalcifications that can routinely be used to detect breast cancer in its initial stages, which is of key importance due to the possibility that early detection allows the application of more conservative therapies for a better patient outcome. The mechanism by which mammary microcalcifications are formed is still l...

  14. Familial breast cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Phipps, R. F.; Perry, P M

    1988-01-01

    Familial breast cancer is important because of all the known risk factors associated with developing the disease. The one with the most predictability is a positive family history. It is also important because a family history causes anxiety in the families concerned, and young women will often ask their chance of developing the disease. This form of breast cancer accounts for 10% of causes and has factors that distinguish it from the sporadic variety. Relatives of familial breast cancer pati...

  15. Locoregional Recurrence Risk for Patients With T1,2 Breast Cancer With 1-3 Positive Lymph Nodes Treated With Mastectomy and Systemic Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) has been shown to benefit breast cancer patients with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes, but it is unclear how modern changes in management have affected the benefits of PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates in 1027 patients with T1,2 breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy with or without PMRT during an early era (1978-1997) and a later era (2000-2007). These eras were selected because they represented periods before and after the routine use of sentinel lymph node surgery, taxane chemotherapy, and aromatase inhibitors. Results: 19% of 505 patients treated in the early era and 25% of the 522 patients in the later era received PMRT. Patients who received PMRT had significantly higher-risk disease features. PMRT reduced the rate of LRR in the early era cohort, with 5-year rates of 9.5% without PMRT and 3.4% with PMRT (log-rank P=.028) and 15-year rates 14.5% versus 6.1%, respectively; (Cox regression analysis: adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 0.37, P=.035). However, PMRT did not appear to benefit patients treated in the later cohort, with 5-year LRR rates of 2.8% without PMRT and 4.2% with PMRT (P=.48; Cox analysis: AHR 1.41, P=.48). The most significant factor predictive of LRR for the patients who did not receive PMRT was the era in which the patient was treated (AHR 0.35 for later era, P<.001). Conclusion: The risk of LRR for patients with T1,2 breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy and systemic treatment is highly dependent on the era of treatment. Modern treatment advances and the selected use of PMRT for those with high-risk features have allowed for identification of a cohort at very low risk for LRR without PMRT

  16. Is Biological Subtype Prognostic of Locoregional Recurrence Risk in Women With pT1-2N0 Breast Cancer Treated With Mastectomy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truong, Pauline T., E-mail: ptruong@bccancer.bc.ca [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Sadek, Betro T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lesperance, Maria F. [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Alexander, Cheryl S. [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Shenouda, Mina; Raad, Rita Abi; Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine locoregional and distant recurrence (LRR and DR) in women with pT1-2N0 breast cancer according to approximated subtype and clinicopathologic characteristics. Methods and Materials: Two independent datasets were pooled and analyzed. The study participants were 1994 patients with pT1-2N0M0 breast cancer, treated with mastectomy without radiation therapy. The patients were classified into 1 of 5 subtypes: luminal A (ER+ or PR+/HER 2−/grade 1-2, n=1202); luminal B (ER+ or PR+/HER 2−/grade 3, n=294); luminal HER 2 (ER+ or PR+/HER 2+, n=221); HER 2 (ER−/PR−/HER 2+, n=105) and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) (ER−/PR−/HER 2−, n=172). Results: The median follow-up time was 4.3 years. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier (KM) LRR were 1.8% in luminal A, 3.1% in luminal B, 1.7% in luminal HER 2, 1.9% in HER 2, and 1.9% in TNBC cohorts (P=.81). The 5-year KM DR was highest among women with TNBC: 1.8% in luminal A, 5.0% in luminal B, 2.4% in luminal HER 2, 1.1% in HER 2, and 9.6% in TNBC cohorts (P<.001). Among 172 women with TNBC, the 5-year KM LRR were 1.3% with clear margins versus 12.5% with close or positive margins (P=.04). On multivariable analysis, factors that conferred higher LRR risk were tumors >2 cm, lobular histology, and close/positive surgical margins. Conclusions: The 5-year risk of LRR in our pT1-2N0 cohort treated with mastectomy was generally low, with no significant differences observed between approximated subtypes. Among the subtypes, TNBC conferred the highest risk of DR and an elevated risk of LRR in the presence of positive or close margins. Our data suggest that although subtype alone cannot be used as the sole criterion to offer postmastectomy radiation therapy, it may reasonably be considered in conjunction with other clinicopathologic factors including tumor size, histology, and margin status. Larger cohorts and longer follow-up times are needed to define which women with node-negative disease have high postmastectomy LRR

  17. Locoregional Recurrence Risk for Patients With T1,2 Breast Cancer With 1-3 Positive Lymph Nodes Treated With Mastectomy and Systemic Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Arizona School of Medicine, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Allen, Pamela; Woodward, Wendy; Kim, Michelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kuerer, Henry M. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Drinka, Eva Katherine; Sahin, Aysegul [Department of Pathology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Strom, Eric A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buzdar, Aman; Valero, Vicente; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hunt, Kelly K. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A., E-mail: tbuchhol@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) has been shown to benefit breast cancer patients with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes, but it is unclear how modern changes in management have affected the benefits of PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates in 1027 patients with T1,2 breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy with or without PMRT during an early era (1978-1997) and a later era (2000-2007). These eras were selected because they represented periods before and after the routine use of sentinel lymph node surgery, taxane chemotherapy, and aromatase inhibitors. Results: 19% of 505 patients treated in the early era and 25% of the 522 patients in the later era received PMRT. Patients who received PMRT had significantly higher-risk disease features. PMRT reduced the rate of LRR in the early era cohort, with 5-year rates of 9.5% without PMRT and 3.4% with PMRT (log-rank P=.028) and 15-year rates 14.5% versus 6.1%, respectively; (Cox regression analysis: adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 0.37, P=.035). However, PMRT did not appear to benefit patients treated in the later cohort, with 5-year LRR rates of 2.8% without PMRT and 4.2% with PMRT (P=.48; Cox analysis: AHR 1.41, P=.48). The most significant factor predictive of LRR for the patients who did not receive PMRT was the era in which the patient was treated (AHR 0.35 for later era, P<.001). Conclusion: The risk of LRR for patients with T1,2 breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy and systemic treatment is highly dependent on the era of treatment. Modern treatment advances and the selected use of PMRT for those with high-risk features have allowed for identification of a cohort at very low risk for LRR without PMRT.

  18. Breast cancer in women using digoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biggar, Robert J; Andersen, Louise Elisabeth; Kroman, Niels;

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Digoxin use is associated with increased incidence of breast and uterus cancers. We postulated that digoxin use might affect tumor characteristics and increase relapse risk in women with breast cancer. METHODS: Incident breast cancer cases in Danish women (n = 49,312; 1995 to 2008...... Cox regression models. RESULTS: At diagnosis, tumors in digoxin users were more likely ER+ (85.4% vs. 78.6%: P = 0.002) and have grade 1 ductal histology (37.2% vs. 25.7%; P = 0.004), compared to non-users. 45 relapses occurred in women already using digoxin at breast cancer diagnosis (1,487 person...... cancers arising in digoxin-using women had better prognostic features. After adjustment for markers, overall breast cancer relapse risk in digoxin users was not increased significantly, although recurrence hazards for ER+ tumors were higher in the first year following diagnosis....

  19. Lifestyle, nutrition and breast cancer: facts and presumptions for consideration

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrini, Krizia; Ghelfi, Francesca; Mannucci, Roberta; Titta, Lucilla

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide, and the high incidence of this cancer coupled with improvements in initial treatments has led to an ever-increasing number of breast cancer survivors. Among the prospective epidemiological studies on diet and breast cancer incidence and recurrence, to date, there is no association that is strong, reproducible and statistically significant, with the exception of alcohol intake, overweight, and weight gain. Nevertheless, many beliefs a...

  20. Identification of genes involved in breast cancer and breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolou P

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Panagiotis Apostolou, Maria Toloudi, Ioannis Papasotiriou Research and Development Department, Research Genetic Cancer Centre Ltd, Florina, Greece Abstract: Breast cancer is the most frequent type of cancer in women. Great progress has been made in its treatment but relapse is common. One hypothesis to account for the high recurrence rates is the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs, which have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple malignant cell types. This study aimed to determine genes that are expressed in breast cancer and breast CSCs and to investigate their correlation with stemness. RNA was extracted from established breast cancer cell lines and from CSCs derived from five different breast cancer patients. DNA microarray analysis was performed and any upregulated genes were also studied in other cancer types, including colorectal and lung cancer. For genes that were expressed only in breast cancer, knockdown-based experiments were performed. Finally, the gene expression levels of stemness transcription factors were measured. The outcome of the analysis indicated a group of genes that were aberrantly expressed mainly in breast cancer cells with stemness properties. Knockdown experiments confirmed the impact of several of these on NANOG, OCT3/4, and SOX2 transcription factors. It seems that several genes that are not directly related with hormone metabolism and basic signal transduction pathways might have an important role in relapse and disease progression and, thus, can be targeted for new treatment approaches for breast cancer. Keywords: breast cancer, cancer stem cells, stemness, DNA microarray

  1. Selecting breast cancer patients with T1-T2 tumors and one to three positive axillary nodes at high postmastectomy locoregional recurrence risk for adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To define the individual factors and combinations of factors associated with increased risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) that may justify postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in patients with T1-T2 breast cancer and one to three positive nodes. Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 821 women referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency between 1989 and 1997 with pathologic T1-T2 breast cancer and one to three positive nodes treated with mastectomy without adjuvant RT. The 10-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of isolated LRR and LRR with or without simultaneous distant recurrence (LRR ± SDR) were analyzed according to age, histologic findings, tumor location, size, and grade, lymphovascular invasion status, estrogen receptor (ER) status, margin status, number of positive nodes, number of nodes removed, percentage of positive nodes, and systemic therapy use. Multivariate analyses were performed using Cox proportional hazards modeling. A risk classification model was developed using combinations of the statistically significant factors identified on multivariate analysis. Results: The median follow-up was 7.7 years. Systemic therapy was used in 94% of patients. Overall, the 10-year Kaplan-Meier isolated LRR and LRR ± SDR rate was 12.7% and 15.9%, respectively. Without PMRT, a 10-year LRR risk of >20% was identified in women with one to three positive nodes plus at least one of the following factors: age 25% of nodes positive (all p 25% of nodes positive, medial tumor location, and ER-negative status were statistically significant predictors of isolated LRR and LRR ± SDR. In the classification model, the first split was according to age (25% of nodes positive was associated with a risk of LRR ± SDR of 58.0% compared with 23.8% for those with ≤25% of nodes positive (p = 0.01). Of 698 women >45 years, the presence of >25% of nodes positive also conferred a greater LRR ± SDR risk (26.7%) compared with women with ≤25% of nodes positive (10.8%; p

  2. Breast cancer (metastatic)

    OpenAIRE

    Stebbing, Justin; Slater, Sarah; Slevin, Maurice

    2007-01-01

    Median survival from metastatic breast cancer is 12 months without treatment, but young people can survive up to 20 years with the disease, whereas in other metastatic cancers this would be considered very unusual.

  3. Significance of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence after breast conserving treatment: role of surgical removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Romano Demicheli; Ilaria Ardoino; Federico Ambrogi; Roberto Agresti; Elia Biganzoli

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the pattern over time (dynamics) of further recurrence and death after ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) in breast cancer patients undergoing breast conserving treatment (BCT).Methods:A total of 338 evaluable patients experiencing IBTR were extracted from a database of 3,293 patients undergoing BCT.The hazard rates for recurrence and mortality throughout 10 years of follow-up after IBTR were assessed and were compared to the analogous estimates associated to the primary treatment.Results:In a time frame with the time origin at the surgical treatment for IBTR,the hazard rate for further recurrence displays a bimodal pattern (peaks at the second and at the sixth year).Patients receiving mastectomy for IBTR reveal recurrence and mortality dynamics similar to that of node positive (N+) patients receiving mastectomy as primary surgery,apart from the first two-three years,when IBTR patients do worse.If the patients with time to IBTR longer than 2.5 years are considered,differences disappear.Conclusions:The recurrence and mortality dynamics following IBTR surgical removal is similar to the corresponding dynamics following primary tumor removal.In particular,patients with time to IBTR in excess of 2.5 years behave like N+ patients following primary tumor removal.Findings may be suitably explained by assuming that the surgical manoeuvre required by IBTR treatment is able to activate a sudden growing phase for tumor foci most of which,as suggested by the systemic model of breast cancer,would have reached the clinical level according to their own dynamics.

  4. Carboplatin and Eribulin Mesylate in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-23

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  5. Effect of local therapy on locoregional recurrence in postmenopausal women with breast cancer in the Tamoxifen Exemestane Adjuvant Multinational (TEAM) trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The TEAM trial investigated the efficacy and safety of adjuvant endocrine therapy consisting of either exemestane or the sequence of tamoxifen followed by exemestane in postmenopausal hormone-sensitive breast cancer. The present analyses explored the association between locoregional therapy and recurrence (LRR) in this population. Material and methods: Between 2001 and 2006, 9779 patients were randomized. Local treatment was breast conserving surgery plus radiotherapy (BCS + RT), mastectomy without radiotherapy (MST-only), or mastectomy plus radiotherapy (MST + RT). Patients with unknown data on surgery, radiotherapy, tumor or nodal stage (n = 199), and patients treated by lumpectomy without radiotherapy (n = 349) were excluded. Results: After a median follow-up of 5.2 years, 270 LRRs occurred (2.9%) among 9231 patients. The 5-years actuarial incidence of LRR was 4.2% (95% CI 3.3–4.9%) for MST-only, 3.4% (95% CI 2.4–4.2%) for MST + RT and 1.9% (95% CI 1.5–2.3%) for BCS + RT. After adjustment for prognostic factors, the hazard ratio (HR, reference BCS + RT) for LRR remained significantly higher for MST-only (HR 1.53; 95% CI 1.10–2.11), not for MST + RT (HR 0.78; 95% CI 0.50–1.22). Conclusion: This explorative analysis showed a higher LRR risk after MST-only than after BCS + RT, even after adjustment for prognostic factors. As this effect was not seen for MST + RT versus BCS + RT, it might be explained by the beneficial effects of radiation treatment

  6. Neuroendocrine breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Graça, Susana; Esteves, Joana; Costa, Sílvia; Vale, Sílvio; Maciel, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Neuroendocrine breast cancer is thought to account for about 1% of all breast cancers. This rare type of breast malignancy is more common in older women and presents as a low-grade, slow-growing cancer. The most definitive markers that indicate neuroendocrine carcinoma are the presence of chromogranin, synaptophysin or neuron-specific enolase, in at least 50% of malignant tumour cells. The authors present a case report of an 83-year-old woman, admitted to their institution with right breast l...

  7. Palbociclib in Treating Patients With Metastatic HER-2 Positive or Triple-Negative Breast Cancer With Brain Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-13

    Breast Carcinoma Metastatic in the Brain; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; HER2/Neu Positive; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  8. Contralateral breast cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of breast-conserving treatment approaches for breast cancer has now become a standard option for early stage disease. Numerous randomized studies have shown medical equivalence when mastectomy is compared to lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy for the local management of this common problem. With an increased emphasis on patient involvement in the therapeutic decision making process, it is important to identify and quantify any unforeseen risks of the conservation approach. One concern that has been raised is the question of radiation- related contralateral breast cancer after breast radiotherapy. Although most studies do not show statistically significant evidence that patients treated with breast radiotherapy are at increased risk of developing contralateral breast cancer when compared to control groups treated with mastectomy alone, there are clear data showing the amount of scattered radiation absorbed by the contralateral breast during a routine course of breast radiotherapy is considerable (several Gy) and is therefore within the range where one might be concerned about radiogenic contralateral tumors. While radiation related risks of contralateral breast cancer appear to be small enough to be statistically insignificant for the majority of patients, there may exist a smaller subset which, for genetic or environmental reasons, is at special risk for scatter related second tumors. If such a group could be predicted, it would seem appropriate to offer either special counselling or special prevention procedures aimed at mitigating this second tumor risk. The use of genetic testing, detailed analysis of breast cancer family history, and the identification of patients who acquired their first breast cancer at a very early age may all be candidate screening procedures useful in identifying such at- risk groups. Since some risk mitigation strategies are convenient and easy to utilize, it makes sense to follow the classic 'ALARA' (as low as reasonably

  9. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breast cancer: consensus statement for standardized diagnosis and treatment. Annals of Oncology 2011; 22(3):515-523. [PubMed Abstract] Fouad TM, Kogawa T, Reuben JM, Ueno NT. The role of inflammation in inflammatory breast cancer. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology 2014; 816:53-73. [PubMed ...

  10. Pathologic tumor size and lymph node status predict for different rates of locoregional recurrence after mastectomy for breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant versus adjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the pathologic factors associated with postmastectomy locoregional recurrence (LRR) in breast cancer patients not receiving radiation who were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NEO) vs. adjuvant chemotherapy (ADJ). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the rates of LRR of subsets of women treated in prospective trials who underwent mastectomy and received chemotherapy but not radiation. These trials were designed to answer chemotherapy questions. There were 150 patients in the NEO group and 1031 patients in the ADJ group. In the NEO group, 55% had clinical Stage IIIA or higher vs. 9% in the ADJ group (p5 cm (46% vs. 28%, p=0.028). The risk of LRR by the number of +LNs was similar in the NEO and ADJ groups, except for the subset of patients with ≥4 +LNs (53% vs. 23%, p5 cm, or clinical Stage IIIA or greater disease, regardless of whether they receive neoadjuvant or postoperative chemotherapy. The information assessing LRR rates in patients with clinical Stage II disease who receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy, particularly if 1-3 lymph nodes remain pathologically involved, is insufficient to determine whether these patients should receive radiotherapy

  11. PCNA immunostaining in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, M C; Furnival, C M; Parsons, P G; Townsend, E

    1993-08-01

    Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) has been shown to be of prognostic value in patients with certain types of cancer. The aim of this study was to determine if the abundance of PCNA is inversely correlated with survival of patients with breast cancer. Paraffin blocks were available from 68 patients, all of whom had been followed clinically for at least 5 years. Sections from 20 patients showed no reactivity to PCNA and were excluded from the study because it was not possible to distinguish between true negatives and false negatives (those due to poor fixation of the original specimens). The PCNA index (the number of stained cancer cells as a percentage of the total number of cancer cells present) was calculated for the remaining 48 patients. Results were analysed by Wilcoxon's rank sum test (two tailed) and Pearson's correlation coefficient. There was no statistical difference between the PCNA indices of those patients dead from their disease within 5 years of diagnosis compared with those alive and without signs of breast cancer at 5 years. There was also no correlation between PCNA index and size of the cancer, involvement of axillary lymph nodes, time to recurrence or time to death. There was, however, a significant correlation between PCNA index and histological grade (P = 0.029). It appears that PCNA staining of stored paraffin sections is of little prognostic value in patients with breast cancer. PMID:8101708

  12. Multivariate Study of Local Recurrence of HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer after Breast-conserving Surgery%HER-2阳性乳腺癌保乳术后局部复发的多因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王敏; 王先明

    2013-01-01

    目的 研究人类表皮生长因子受体2 (HER-2)阳性乳腺癌保乳治疗后影响局部复发的风险因素. 方法 收集我院2002年6月~2012年6月间收治的82例HER-2阳性乳腺癌保乳治疗后的随访资料,分析年龄、HER-2状态、雌激素受体(ER)/孕激素受体(PR)状态、淋巴结转移状态、肿瘤大小、抗HER-2治疗对局部复发的影响. 结果 82例中位随访52 (8~118)个月,同侧乳房局部复发9例(10.97%),远位转移11例(13.4%),5年无病生存率82.9%,5年无远处转移生存率93.9%,5年总体生存率98.7%.单因素分析显示,淋巴结状态是影响局部复发的风险因素;复发高峰时间为术后第2年至第3年,以及第5年至第6年;多因素分析显示淋巴结状态及HER-2状态是局部复发的独立影响因素.82例病人中,接受曲妥珠单抗治疗35例,112个月出现1例局部复发,复发率2.86% (1/35);未接受者47例,11~108个月出现局部复发8例,复发率17.02% (8/47).差异有显著性统计学意义(P<0.001).结论 保乳治疗后出现两个局部复发高峰时间段,淋巴结状态和HER-2表达状态是局部复发的独立影响因素,抗HER-2治疗可降低局部复发和远处转移.对于具有高危因素的患者更需积极治疗.%Objective To study risk factors of postsurgical local recurrence after breast-conserving surgery in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) positive breast cancer.Methods The follow-up medical data of 82 patients with HER-2 positive breast cancer after breast-conserving therapy in our hospital during 6 years from June 2002 to June 2012 were collected,and the influences of age,HER-2 status,estrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone hormone receptor (PR) status,lymph node metastasis status,tumor size and antiHER-2 therapy over local recurrences were analyzed.Results The median follow-up period was 52 (8 ~118)months; 9 cases (10.97%) had ipsilateral breasts local recurrence,while 11 cases (13.4

  13. Synchronous bilateral breast cancer in a male

    OpenAIRE

    Rubio Hernández, María Caridad; Díaz Prado, Yenia Ivet; Pérez, Suanly Rodríguez; Díaz, Ronald Rodríguez; Aleaga, Zaili Gutiérrez

    2013-01-01

    Male breast cancer, which represents only 1% of all breast cancers, is occasionally associated with a family history of breast cancer. Sporadic male breast cancers presenting with another primary breast cancer are extremely rare. In this article, we report on a 70-year-old male patient with bilateral multifocal and synchronous breast cancer and without a family history of breast cancer.

  14. CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  15. Aetio-pathogenesis of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Haruna Abdulkareem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a literature review on the aetiology and pathogenesis of breast cancer, which is the most common cancer worldwide, and the second leading cause of cancer death, especially in Western countries. Several aetiological factors have been implicated in its pathogenesis, and include age, genetics, family history, diet, alcohol, obesity, lifestyle, physical inactivity, as well as endocrine factors. These factors act separately or together in the causation of breast cancer. More recently, triple negative breast cancer has been described in certain categories of patients and is associated with poorer prognosis and earlier recurrence compared with the conventional breast cancer. Therefore, adequate knowledge of these factors is important in identifying high risk groups and individuals, which will help in screening, early detection and follow-up. This will help to decrease the morbidity and mortality from this life-threatening disease.

  16. Effect of time interval between breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy on ipsilateral breast recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine the effect of the time interval (interval) between breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and the start of radiation therapy (RT) on the subsequent risk of ipsilateral breast cancer recurrence (IBR). Methods and Materials: We reviewed interval and a number of prognostic and treatment factors among 1,962 women treated with BCS and RT for invasive breast cancer diagnosed between January 1, 1989 and December 31, 1993 in British Columbia, Canada. Subjects were female, less than 90 years old at diagnosis, not treated with chemotherapy, not stage T4 or M1, and had survived more than 30 days from diagnosis. The cumulative incidence of IBR was estimated in four interval groups: 0-5, 6-8, 9-12, and 13+ weeks. Only 23 women had an interval of greater than 20 weeks between BCS and start of RT. To assess whether an imbalance of prognostic and treatment factors could be obscuring real differences between the interval groups, Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were conducted. Results: Median follow-up was 71 months. The crude incidence of IBR for the entire sample was 3.9%. The cumulative incidence of IBR in the 6-8, 9-12, and 13+ week groups was not statistically significantly different from the cumulative incidence of IBR in the 0-5 week group. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that patients not using tamoxifen (p 0.027) and those with grade 3 histology (p = 0.003) were more likely to recur in the breast. Interval between BCS and RT was not a statistically significant predictor of breast recurrence when entered into a model incorporating tamoxifen use and tumor grade (0-5 vs. 6-8 weeks, p = 0.872; 0-5 vs. 9-12 weeks, p = 0.665; 0-5 vs. 13+ weeks, p = 0.573). Conclusions: We found no univariate or multivariate difference in ipsilateral breast cancer recurrence between intervals of 0 to 20 weeks from breast conserving surgery to start of radiation therapy, in a population-based, low risk group of women not receiving adjuvant chemotherapy, after

  17. HER2 overexpression a major risk factor for recurrence in pT1a-bN0M0 breast cancer: results from a French regional cohort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The management of pT1a-bN0M0 breast cancer remains an area of controversy. Data from 714 patients classified as having pT1a-bN0M0 breast cancer and treated, from 1999 to 2004 in the Languedoc-Roussillon France, were analyzed. The human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status analyses were centralized. The objective of this study was to describe the prognosis of pT1a-bN0M0 breast cancer according to HER2 distribution and hormonal status. The median follow-up was 6.4 years. Ten-year overall survival was 94%. HER2 overexpression was observed in 6.1% of the patients. The 10-year prognosis of patients with HER2-positive tumors was worse than that of those with HER2-negative (disease-free survival 73% vs. 89%, P < 0.0001). Tumor size (T1a/T1b) was not a relevant prognostic factor. The co-expression of HER2 with hormonal receptors (HR) was associated with high recurrence at 10 years. In both univariate and multivariate analyses, the most relevant prognostic factor for this population was HER2 amplification. In multivariate analysis, patients with HER2-positive tumors had higher risk of mortality (HR, 3.89; 95% CI, 1.58–9.56). In pT1a-bN0M0 breast cancers, HER2 amplification or overexpression is a risk factor for recurrence. In HER2-positive breast cancers, HR expression is associated with a poor prognosis despite the hormone therapy. For this population, a personalized management may be required

  18. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Balance › Breast Cancer and Bone Loss Fact Sheet Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July, 2010 Download PDFs English ... JoAnn Pinkerton, MD What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  19. Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT is an option for patients with localized breast recurrences after previous external-beam radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaefer Joerg

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For patients suffering of recurrent breast cancer within the irradiated breast, generally mastectomy is recommended. The normal tissue tolerance does not permit a second full-dose course of radiotherapy to the entire breast after a second breast-conserving surgery (BCS. A novel option is to treat these patients with partial breast irradiation (PBI. This approach is based on the hypothesis that re-irradiation of a limited volume will be effective and result in an acceptable frequency of side effects. The following report presents a single center experience with intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT during excision of recurrent breast cancer in the previously irradiated breast. Methods Between 4/02 and 11/06, 15 patients were treated for in-breast recurrences at a median of 10 years (3–25 after previous EBRT (10 recurrences in the initial tumor bed, 3 elsewhere in-breast failures, 2 invasive recurrences after previous DCIS. Additional 2 patients were selected for IORT with new primary breast cancer after previous partial breast EBRT for treatment of Hodgkin's disease. IORT with a single dose of 14.7 – 20 Gy 50 kV X-rays at the applicator surface was delivered with the Intrabeam™-device (Carl Zeiss, Oberkochen, Germany. Results After a median follow-up of 26 months (1–60, no local recurrence occurred. 14 out of 17 patients are alive and free of disease progression. Two patients are alive with distant metastases. One patient died 26 months after BCS/IORT due to pulmonary metastases diagnosed 19 months after BCS/IORT. Acute toxicity after IORT was mild with no Grade 3/4 toxicities and cosmetic outcome showed excellent/good/fair results in 7/7/3 cases. Conclusion IORT for recurrent breast cancer using low energy X-rays is a valuable option for patients with recurrent breast cancer after previous radiotherapy.

  20. Locoregional recurrence in patients suffering from a triple-negative breast cancer: interest of a systematic adjuvant ganglionary irradiation; Recidives locoregionales chez les patientes atteintes d'un cancer du sein triple-negatif: interet d'une irradiation ganglionnaire adjuvante systematique?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clerc, J.; Sunyach, M.P.; Duruisseaux, M.; Mignotte, H.; Bajard, A.; Tredan, O.; Carrie, C.; Arnaud, A. [Centre Leon-Berard, Lyon (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report the assessment of locoregional recurrence percentage within women suffering from a triple-negative breast cancer without ganglionary attack, in order to examine the interest of a systematic adjuvant ganglionary irradiation. Nearly 250 women have been treated for a breast cancer between 1999 and 2009 in the Leon-Berard Centre in Lyons. All had surgery followed or not by a chemotherapy and/or a radiotherapy. The locoregional recurrence rate is not very high, but the authors cannot yet be sure to systematically propose this treatment. Short communication

  1. Breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From March 1987 through September 1989, a total of 31 patients with early breast cancer were treated with breat-conserving surgery and radiotherapy. As of February 1989, all patients are alive without recurrence. Cosmetic results were satisfactory (excellent; 25%, good; 75%) at 1 year after radiotherapy. Mild radiation pneumonitis requiring medication developed in 3 patients. (author)

  2. Prognostic role of syncytin expression in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Lars-Inge; Holck, Susanne; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2007-01-01

    prognostic indicator for recurrence-free survival. In addition, we examined a second series of 54 consecutively operated breast cancer patients of all categories and the results supported the conclusions made from the first study. Thus, syncytin expression constitutes a positive prognostic factor in breast......Breast cancer cells were recently found to produce syncytin, an endogenous retroviral protein implicated in cell fusion, immune regulation, and nitric oxide synthase expression. To determine whether syncytin has a prognostic role in breast cancer, we investigated a series of 165 premenopausal lymph...... cancer - a phenomenon that may be related to the involvement of syncytin in mediating fusions between breast cancer cells and entodhelial cells....

  3. Long-term hazard of recurrence in HER2+ breast cancer patients untreated with anti-HER2 therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strasser-Weippl, Kathrin; Horick, Nora; Smith, Ian E;

    2015-01-01

    receptor-positive (HR+ (hormone receptor-positive); ER+ (estrogen receptor-positive) or PR+ (progesterone receptor-positive)) disease had a significantly better DFS than patients with HER2+ HR- (ER-/PR-) disease (hazard ratio 0.72, P=0.02). This difference was explainable by a significantly higher hazard...... of recurrence in years 1 to 5 in HER2+ HR- compared to HER2+ HR+ patients, with a mean risk of recurrence of 9%/year for HR- versus 5%/year in HR+ patients (hazard ratio 0.59, P=0.002 for years 1 to 5). The high early risk of recurrence of HER2+ HR- patients declined sharply over time, so that it was similar...... to that seen in HER2+ HR+ patients in years 6 to 10 (hazard ratio 0.97, P=0.92 for years 6 to 10). CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that outcomes in HER2+ patients with early BC not receiving anti-HER2 therapy strongly depend on HR expression. The very high early risk of relapse seen in HER2+ HR- patients...

  4. Pregnancy After Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemignani; Petrek

    1999-05-01

    BACKGROUND: The issue of pregnancy following the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer is important because the incidence of breast cancer is increasing in women of childbearing age. The fact that many women are delaying childbearing, whether for educational, professional, or personal reasons, increases the number of women who will undergo breast cancer treatment before completing childbearing. METHODS: Data on pregnancy in breast cancer survivors are limited and consist only of retrospective data. This paper reviews the published literature on the influence of subsequent pregnancy on breast cancer, including three recent large-scale population-based studies. RESULTS: The survival of women with breast carcinoma who subsequently become pregnant is not reported to be decreased in any of the published series. However, several biases may be present that justify the concern regarding the conclusions. CONCLUSIONS: Further research on the safety of subsequent pregnancy after breast carcinoma treatment is needed. To address these issues, patients are currently being accrued for a large, prospective, multicenter study of young breast carcinoma patients. PMID:10758557

  5. Methylxanthines and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, C; Brinton, L A; Hoover, R N

    1987-10-15

    We investigated the relationship between methylxanthine consumption and breast cancer using data from a case-control study which included 1,510 cases and 1,882 controls identified through a nation-wide breast cancer screening program. There was no evidence of a positive association between methylxanthine consumption and risk of breast cancer. In fact, there was some suggestion of a negative association, particularly in women diagnosed after age 50. In addition, there was no evidence of increased risk with past or recent methylxanthine consumption, or with the consumption of caffeine or specific beverages, most notably brewed or instant caffeinated coffee and tea. PMID:3117709

  6. Predictors of recurrence in stage I invasive breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. The aim of the retrospective study was to determine whether 6 classical prognostic factors might predict a disease-free survival (DSF) in stage I breast carcinoma. Patients and methods. We analysed 181 patients who were operated on from 1991 through 1995. Measurements were made to find the association between the incidence of recurrence and prognostic features (size; histological subtype; lymphatic/vascular invasion (LVI); histological grade; hormone receptor status; age). Results. There were 4 cases with locoregional recurrences (2.2%), 6 with locoregional and distant metastases (3.3 %) and 13 women with distant metastases (7.2 %). In univariate analysis, the following prognostic factors were significantly related to DSF: tumour size, age and LVI. In the multivariate analysis age (p = 0.007) and LVI (p 0.00001) remained firmly associated with DSF, although the tumour size (p 0.067) lost its significance. Conclusions. Our experience indicates that the combined use of the tumour size, LVI and age may be a better predictor of recurrence in T1N0M0 breast cancer. (author)

  7. GATA3 mRNA expression, but not mutation, associates with longer progression-free survival in ER-positive breast cancer patients treated with first-line tamoxifen for recurrent disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingjing; Prager-van der Smissen, Wendy J C; Look, Maxime P; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Smid, Marcel; Meijer-van Gelder, Marion E; Foekens, John A; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W M

    2016-06-28

    In breast cancer, GATA3 mutations have been associated with a favorable prognosis and the response to neoadjuvant aromatase inhibitor treatment. Therefore, we investigated whether GATA3 mutations predict the outcome of tamoxifen treatment in the advanced setting. In a retrospective study consisting of 235 hormone-naive patients with ER-positive breast cancer who received tamoxifen as first-line treatment for recurrent disease, GATA3 mutations (in 14.0% of patients) did not significantly associate with either the overall response rate (ORR) or with the length of progression-free survival (PFS) after the start of tamoxifen therapy. Interestingly, among 148 patients for whom both mutation and mRNA expression data were available, GATA3 mutations associated with an increased expression of GATA3. However, only 23.7% of GATA3 high tumors had a mutation. Evaluation of the clinical significance of GATA3 mRNA revealed that it was associated with prolonged PFS, but not with the ORR, also in multivariate analysis. Thus, GATA3 mRNA expression, but not GATA3 mutation, is an independent predictor of prolonged PFS in ER-positive breast cancer patients who received first-line tamoxifen for recurrent disease. Besides GATA3 mutation, other mechanisms must exist that underlie increased GATA3 levels. PMID:27018307

  8. Study on Related Factors of Recurrence and Metastasis of Breast Cancer after Surgery%乳腺癌术后复发和转移的相关因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    艾秀清; 韩有溪; 木克代斯·拜克提亚尔; 木妮热·木沙江

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨乳腺癌术后复发和转移的相关因素。方法137例乳腺癌术后患者,将术后复发转移的35例作为A组,102例未发生复发转移者作为B组。收集两组患者临床资料并进行对比,通过多因素Logistic回归分析乳腺癌复发和转移的相关因素。结果年龄<40岁患者的复发转移率为47.83%,显著高于年龄≥40岁患者的(P<0.05);肿瘤直径>5 cm患者的复发转移率为72.73%,显著高于肿瘤直径<2 cm患者的(P<0.05);淋巴结转移数目1~3个患者的复发转移率为34.15%,淋巴结转移数目>3个患者的复发转移率为50.00%,均显著高于无淋巴结转移患者的( P<0.05);CA15-3阳性患者复发转移率为38.71%,显著高于CA15-3阴性患者的(P<0.05)。结论年龄<40岁、肿瘤直径大、淋巴结转移数目多、CA15-3阳性是乳腺癌复发转移的危险因素,临床上应加强监测危险因素,强化术后放疗的抗肿瘤措施,以降低乳腺癌术后复发和转移的发生率。%Objective To explore the related factors of recurrence and metastasis of breast cancer .Methods The clini-cal data of 137 breast cancer patients was analyzed .35 cases of relapse and metastasis of breast cancer patients was group A ,102 cases non-relapse and metastasis of breast cancer patients was group B .The factors related to recurrence and metastasis of breast cancer were compared by multivariate logistic regression analysis .Results The recurrence and metastasis rate in patients with age under 40 was 47.83%,significantly higher than patients who were 40 or over 40(P5 cm with was 72.73%,significantly higher than that of tumor diameter <2 cm ( P<0.05);the recurrence and metastasis rate of patients with 1-3 metastatic lymph nodes was 34.15%,that of patients with 3 metastatic lymph nodes was 50.00%,significantly higher than that of patients without lymphatic metastasis (P<0.05);recurrence

  9. Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-18

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  10. Imaging Surveillance of Patients with Breast Cancer after Primary Treatment: Current Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung [Department of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-01

    Women who have been treated for breast cancer are at risk for second breast cancers, such as ipsilateral recurrence or contralateral metachronous breast cancer. As the number of breast cancer survivors increases, interest in patient management and surveillance after treatment has also increased. However, post-treatment surveillance programs for patients with breast cancer have not been firmly established. In this review, we focus on the imaging modalities that have been used in post-treatment surveillance for patients with breast cancer, such as mammography, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography, the effectiveness of each modality for detecting recurrence, and how they can be applied to manage patients.

  11. Early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The therapy of early breast cancer has been changing during the last decennium. It requires a multi-disciplinary approach and in each of these disciplines improvements have been implemented. The result is that treatment schedules can now be adapted to specific subgroups. In this review early breast cancer is defined as operable disease, using the criteria set out by Haagensen. Emphasis is given to describing the new developments in prognostic criteria, since these form the basis for creating subgroups for specific treatment schedules. Distinction is made between the factors relating to growth rate and those relating to metastatic potential. Data on screening promises a beneficial effect of the implementation of screening in national health care programs. Important shifts are seen in treatment schedules; the place of postoperative radiotherapy after classic ablative treatment is being challenged, whereas it plays a major role in the new breast conserving therapy schedules. The data mentioned in the review suggest that a large proportion of 'operable' cases can be treated with breast conservation but details in the technique of breast conserving therapy are still under investigation. They form a major part of the coming prospective studies in breast cancer. Improvements in reconstruction techniques, creating better cosmetic results, make reconstruction more competitive with breast conserving therapy. The use of chemotherapy and endocrine manipulation in early breast cancer has now been clearly confirmed by the overview technique by the Peto-group, thanks to all efforts of individual trialists together. (orig.)

  12. Therapeutic response to a novel enzyme-targeting radiosensitization treatment (Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas) in patients with recurrent breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    AOYAMA, NOBUTAKA; OGAWA, YASUHIRO; YASUOKA, MIKI; TAKAHASHI, MASAO; IWASA, HITOMI; MIYATAKE, KANA; YAMANISHI, TOMOAKI; HAMADA, NORIHIKO; TAMURA, TAIJI; NISHIOKA, AKIHITO; YAMAGAMI, TAKUJI

    2016-01-01

    Linear accelerator-based radiotherapy has little effect on the majority of locally advanced neoplasms. Thus, the novel radiosensitizer Kochi Oxydol Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas, Type II (KORTUC II), which contains hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate, was developed. The effectiveness of KORTUC II for the treatment of chemotherapy-resistant supraclavicular lymph node metastases has been previously demonstrated. The present study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of KORTUC II in patients with recurrent breast cancer. A total of 20 patients (age range, 39–84 years) were enrolled in the study. The majority of patients underwent positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) examinations prior to and 1–7 months following KORTUC II treatment, and every 6 months thereafter when possible. The radiotherapy regimen was 2.75 Gy/fraction, 5 fractions/week, for 16–18 fractions, with a total radiation dose of 44.00–49.50 Gy (X-ray irradiation), or 4.00 Gy/fraction, 3 fractions/week, for 10–12 fractions, with a total radiation dose of 40.00–48.00 Gy (electron beam irradiation). The injection of 3–6 ml of the KORTUC II agent was initiated at the fifth radiotherapy fraction, and was performed twice/week under ultrasonographic guidance. The therapeutic effects were evaluated by PET-CT examinations prior and subsequent to KORTUC II treatment, which was observed to be well tolerated with minimal adverse effects. Of the 24 lesions presented by the 20 patients, 18 exhibited complete response, 5 partial response, 0 stable disease and 1 progressive disease. The overall survival rate was 100% at 1 year and 95% at 2 years. The mean duration of follow-up at the end of June 2014 was 51 months. Based on the results of the PET-CT studies conducted, KORTUC II treatment demonstrated marked therapeutic effects, with satisfactory treatment outcomes and acceptable adverse events.

  13. Health Management of Breast Cancer Survivors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Li; Juan Chen; Zhendong Chen

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is defined as a chronic disease.Increasing amounts of attention have been paid to the health management of breast cancer survivors. An important issue is how to find the most appropriate method of follow-up in order to detect long-term complications of treatment, local recurrence and distant metastasis and to administer appropriate treatment to the survivors with recurrence in a timely fashion. Different oncology organizations have published guidelines for following up breast cancer survivors. However, there are few articles on this issue in China. Using the published follow-up guidelines,we analyzed their main limitations and discussed the content,follow-up interval and economic benefits of following up breast cancer survivors in an effort to provide suggestions to physicians.Based on a large number of clinical trials, we discussed the role of physical examination, mammography, liver echograph, chest radiography, bone scan and so on. We evaluated the effects of the above factors on detection of distant disease, survival time,improvement in quality of life and time to diagnosis of recurrence.The results of follow-up carried out by oncologists and primary health care physicians were compared. We also analyzed the correlation factors for the cost of such follow-up. It appears that follow-up for breast cancer survivors can be carried out effectively by trained primary health care physicians. If anything unusual arises, the patients should be transferred to specialists.

  14. Living Beyond Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prosthesis Complementary Therapy Types of Complementary Therapy Acupuncture Art Therapy Diet, Nutrition and Exercise Expressive Writing Guided ... SIGN UP FOR OUR MAILING LIST SIGN UP Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Living Beyond Breast Cancer Conference ...

  15. Breast Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the risk of breast cancer: Having an abortion. Making diet changes such as eating less fat or more ... does not give formal guidelines or recommendations for making decisions about health care. Reviewers and Updates Editorial Boards ...

  16. Preeclampsia and breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pacheco, Nadja Livia Pekkola; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In parous women preeclampsia has been associated with reduced risk of developing breast cancer. Characteristics of births following preeclamptic pregnancies may help understand mechanisms involved in the breast cancer risk reduction inferred by preeclampsia. METHODS: We conducted...... a register-based cohort study of all Danish women giving birth during 1978-2010 (n = 778,701). The association between preeclampsia and breast cancer was evaluated overall and according to birth characteristics by means of incidence rate ratios (IRR) estimated in Poisson regression models. RESULTS: Compared...... with women with non-preeclamptic pregnancies only, women with one or more preeclamptic pregnancies were 19% significantly less likely to develop breast cancer (IRR = 0.81 [95% CI 0.72-0.93]). We found some indication of greater risk reduction in women with term births, one or more previous births...

  17. Breast cancer risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Marzena Kamińska; Tomasz Ciszewski; Karolina Łopacka-Szatan; Paweł Miotła; Elżbieta Starosławska

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neopla...

  18. Diet and breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Isabelle Romieu

    2011-01-01

    Both diet and nutrition have been studied in relationship with breast cancer risk, as the great variation among different countries in breast cancer incidence could possibly be explained through the inflammatory and immune response, as well as antioxidant intake, among others.To date, no clear association with diet beyond overweight and weight gain has been found, except for alcohol consumption. Nonetheless, the small number of studies done in middle to low income countries where variability ...

  19. Women and breast cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Lippman, M E

    1987-01-01

    One in every 12 women will develop breast cancer; the incidence increases with age, dietary fat intake, caloric intake, height, and weight. The 10-year survival rate of breast cancer patients who refuse therapy is virtually zero. Segmental mastectomy plus radiation and lumpectomy, combined with systemic (adjuvant)chemotherapy, are alternatives under investigation at the National Institutes of Health that may increase the survival rate by decreasing metastatic complications.

  20. Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Jin; Ping Mu

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of breast cancer-associated deaths. Despite the significant improvement in current therapies in extending patient life, 30–40% of patients may eventually suffer from distant relapse and succumb to the disease. Consequently, a deeper understanding of the metastasis biology is key to developing better treatment strategies and achieving long-lasting therapeutic efficacies against breast cancer. This review covers recent breakthroughs in the discovery of various me...

  1. Rupture of an expander prosthesis mimics axillary cancer recurrence.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ismael, T

    2005-10-01

    Regional silicone gel migration from a ruptured breast implant has been reported at different locations including the upper extremity, chest wall muscles, axilla and back. We report a patient who presented with an axillary mass that mimicked a regional recurrence 5 years after breast cancer reconstruction with a latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap and silicon gel expander-prosthesis. Surgical exploration revealed that the mass contained silicone gel around the port of the breast expander that had ruptured. The mass was confluent with an intracapsular silicone leak through a tract along the tube of the expander port.

  2. Tailored tamoxifen treatment for breast cancer patients : A perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, Nynke G L; Linn, Sabine C.; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H.

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen, an endocrine agent, is widely used in the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. It has greatly reduced disease recurrence and mortality rates of breast cancer patients, however, not all patients benefit from tamoxifen treatment because in approximately 25% to 30% of the p

  3. Tailored Tamoxifen Treatment for Breast Cancer Patients : A Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, Nynke G. L.; Linn, Sabine C.; Schellens, Jan H. M.; Beijnen, Jos H.

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen, an endocrine agent, is widely used in the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. It has greatly reduced disease recurrence and mortality rates of breast cancer patients, however, not all patients benefit from tamoxifen treatment because in approximately 25% to 30% of the p

  4. Bioanalysis and clinical pharmacology of tamoxifen in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, N.G.L.

    2014-01-01

    Tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulator, is widely used in the treatment of ER-positive breast cancer. It has been used for over 40 years and has dramatically reduced recurrence and mortality rates of ER-positive breast cancer patients. However, not all patients benefit from tamoxife

  5. Novel sequence variants and a high frequency of recurrent polymorphisms in BRCA1 gene in Sri Lankan breast cancer patients and at risk individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angunawala Preethika

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast Cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among Sri Lankan women. Germline mutations in the susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 in hereditary breast/ovarian cancer, though low in prevalence, are highly penetrant and show geographical variations. There have been only a few reports from Asia on mutations in BRCA1/2 genes and none from Sri Lanka. Methods A total of 130 patients with (N = 66 and without (N = 64 a family history of breast cancer, 70 unaffected individuals with a family history of breast cancer and 40 control subjects were analysed for BRCA1 mutations. All but exon 11 were screened by single strand conformation analysis (SSCP and heteroduplex analysis. PCR products which showed abnormal patterns in SSCP were sequenced. Exon 11 was directly sequenced. Results Nineteen sequence variants were found in BRCA1 gene. Two novel deleterious frame-shift mutations; c.3086delT/exon11 (in one patient and c.5404delG/exon21 (in one patient and two of her family members were identified. A possibly pathogenic novel missense mutation (c.856T>G/exon 11 and three novel intronic variants (IVS7+36C>T, IVS7+41C>T, IVS7+49del15 were characterised. Ten previously reported common polymorphisms and three previously reported intronic variants were also observed. Conclusion After screening of 66 patients with family history and 64 sporadic breast cancer patients, 2 deleterious mutations (c.3086delT and c.5404delG in two families were identified and two more possibly pathogenic mutations (c.856T>G and IVS17-2A>T in two families were identified. Data base BRCA1 - Gene Bank: Accession # U14680 Version # 14680.1

  6. Clinical and immunological evaluation of anti-apoptosis protein, survivin-derived peptide vaccine in phase I clinical study for patients with advanced or recurrent breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asanuma Hiroko

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously reported that survivin-2B, a splicing variant of survivin, was expressed in various types of tumors and that survivin-2B peptide might serve as a potent immunogenic cancer vaccine. The objective of this study was to examine the toxicity of and to clinically and immunologically evaluate survivin-2B peptide in a phase I clinical study for patients with advanced or recurrent breast cancer. Methods We set up two protocols. In the first protocol, 10 patients were vaccinated with escalating doses (0.1–1.0 mg of survivin-2B peptide alone 4 times every 2 weeks. In the second protocol, 4 patients were vaccinated with the peptide at a dose of 1.0 mg mixed with IFA 4 times every 2 weeks. Results In the first protocol, no adverse events were observed during or after vaccination. In the second protocol, two patients had induration at the injection site. One patient had general malaise (grade 1, and another had general malaise (grade 1 and fever (grade 1. Peptide vaccination was well tolerated in all patients. In the first protocol, tumor marker levels increased in 8 patients, slightly decreased in 1 patient and were within the normal range during this clinical trial in 1 patient. With regard to tumor size, two patients were considered to have stable disease (SD. Immunologically, in 3 of the 10 patients (30%, an increase of the peptide-specific CTL frequency was detected. In the second protocol, an increase of the peptide-specific CTL frequency was detected in all 4 patients (100%, although there were no significant beneficial clinical responses. ELISPOT assay showed peptide-specific IFN-γ responses in 2 patients in whom the peptide-specific CTL frequency in tetramer staining also was increased in both protocols. Conclusion This phase I clinical study revealed that survivin-2B peptide vaccination was well tolerated. The vaccination with survivin-2B peptide mixed with IFA increased the frequency of peptide-specific CTL more

  7. Gene Test May Spare Some Breast Cancer Patients from Chemo

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157730.html Gene Test May Spare Some Breast Cancer Patients From ... researchers report. The test is called the 21-gene recurrence score (Oncotype DX). Among women that the ...

  8. Quantification of Cell-free HER-2 DNA in Plasma from Breast Cancer Patients: Sensitivity for Detection of Metastatic Recurrence and Gene Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Diana Sørensen

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: Amplified HER-2 DNA can be detected in plasma when using a ratio between cfHER-2 DNA and a reference gene. cfHER-2 DNA could not be used to dis‐ criminate between patients with primary breast cancer and healthy controls, and could not predict the development of metastatic disease.

  9. Vaccine Therapy and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Breast or Stage II-IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-07

    Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  10. BREAST TUMOUR PRESENTING AS RECURRENT DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis development during the course of treatment of breast carcinoma has been well described, but carcinoma breast presenting with DVT for the first time is highly unusual. We present the case of a 45 year old women with recurrent deep vein thrombosis of left lower limb. During the second episode she was found to have infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the right breast with axillary lymph node metastasis. To our knowledge there have been only one literature report of breast carci...

  11. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix

  12. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, James S., E-mail: james.lawson@unsw.edu.au; Heng, Benjamin [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia)

    2010-04-30

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix.

  13. Identification of genes involved in breast cancer and breast cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Apostolou P; Toloudi M; Papasotiriou I

    2015-01-01

    Panagiotis Apostolou, Maria Toloudi, Ioannis Papasotiriou Research and Development Department, Research Genetic Cancer Centre Ltd, Florina, Greece Abstract: Breast cancer is the most frequent type of cancer in women. Great progress has been made in its treatment but relapse is common. One hypothesis to account for the high recurrence rates is the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple malignant cell types. This study aimed t...

  14. Breast cancer statistics and markers

    OpenAIRE

    Mallika Siva Donepudi; Kasturi Kondapalli; Seelam Jeevan Amos; Pavithra Venkanteshan

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the familiar diseases in women. Incidence and mortality due to cancer, particularly breast cancer has been increasing for last 50 years, even though there is a lacuna in the diagnosis of breast cancer at early stages. According to World Health Organization (WHO) 2012 reports, breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women, accounting 23% of all cancer deaths. In Asia, one in every three women faces the risk of breast cancer in their lifetime as per reports of WHO...

  15. Breast Cancer Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The BioScan System was developed by OmniCorder Technologies, Inc. at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The system is able to locate cancerous lesions by detecting the cancer's ability to recruit a new blood supply. A digital sensor detects infrared energy emitted from the body and identifies the minute differences accompanying the blood flow changes associated with cancerous cells. It also has potential use as a monitoring device during cancer treatment. This technology will reduce the time taken to detect cancerous cells and allow for earlier intervention, therefore increasing the overall survival rates of breast cancer patients.

  16. Exemestane in early breast cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Untch

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Michael Untch1, Christian Jackisch21Interdisciplinary Breast Centre, Helios Klinikum Berlin-Buch, University Charité, Berlin, Germany; 2Department of Gynecology/Obstetrics, Klinikum Offenbach GmbH, Offenbach, GermanyAbstract: The adjuvant treatment of women with endocrine-sensitive early breast cancer has been dominated for the last 40 years by tamoxifen. However, the side-effects associated with this therapy have prompted a search for safer and biochemically more selective endocrine agents and led to the development of the third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs anastrozole, letrozole and exemestane. Promising results in advanced disease have paved the way for treating early breast cancer, and AIs are increasingly replacing tamoxifen in the adjuvant setting. Several large, randomized trials with AIs have been completed or are ongoing in women with early-stage breast cancer, documenting the significant impact that these drugs are making on the risk for recurrence of breast cancer. As a result, there is increasing and widespread use of AI therapy for the treatment of early-stage endocrine-responsive breast cancer. This review summarizes the data for exemestane in the adjuvant setting, showing that a switch to exemestane after 2 to 3 years of tamoxifen therapy is associated with a statistically significant survival benefit and is regarded as being sensitive by international and national experts.Keywords: early breast cancer, adjuvant setting, endocrine-sensitive, tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitor, exemestane, switch, IES 31, NSABP B-33, TEAM

  17. Endocurietherapy of breast cancer III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We recently introduced the implantation of Iridium192 as a method of local treatment of breast cancer in Austria. The afterloading technique is described. This modality should be used as a boost to the 'high-risk' areas following conservative breast surgery and combined with megavoltage external irradiation. Interstitial implantation may also be used as a primary form of treatment. A report on 35 patients is presented, 25 of whom underwent a curative schedule for T1-2, N0-1 tumors. 10 patients were treated individually. The aesthetic results are very pleasing. There were no severe complications and no early local recurrences. The interpretation of the results can be only in the form of trends because of the short follow-up time of 1 year. (Author)

  18. Evidence based radiation oncology: Breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiotherapy is, similar to surgery, a local treatment. In the case of breast cancer, it is generally given after conservative or after more extensive, tumour and patient adapted, surgery. The target volumes can be the breast and/or the thoracic wall and/or the regional lymph node areas. The integration and the extent of radiotherapy as part of the comprehensive treatment of the breast cancer patient, including the amount of surgery and the sequencing with the systemic treatments, has to be well discussed with all medical specialists involved in treating breast cancer on a multidisciplinary basis. Guidelines for the appropriate prescription and execution of radiotherapy are of utmost importance. However, individualisation based on the individual patients' and tumours' characteristics should always be envisaged. Materials and methods: Based on a review of the literature the level of evidence that is available for the indications for radiotherapy is summarised, as well as the main clinical questions that are unanswered today. An overview of the recent and ongoing clinical trails in breast cancer will highlight some of the current ongoing debates. Conclusions: In the case of breast cancer, radiotherapy, given after as well conservative as extensive risk-adapted surgery, significantly reduces the risk of local and regional recurrences. Especially for patients with an intermediate to high absolute risk for local recurrences, a positive influence on overall survival has been shown, notably when appropriate radiotherapy techniques are used. Most important is that the best results that we can offer to our breast cancer patients for all clinical endpoints (local and regional control; quality of life; cosmetic results; survival) can be obtained by a multidisciplinary and patient-oriented approach, involving all those involved in the treatment of breast cancer patients

  19. Breast cancer chemoprevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Sestak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Trials with tamoxifen have clearly shown that the risk of developing oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer can be reduced by at least 50% with prophylactic agents. The current challenge is to find new agents which achieve this or better efficacy, but with fewer side effects. Recent results indicate that the SERM raloxifene has similar efficacy to tamoxifen, but leads to fewer endometrial cancers, gynecological symptoms, and thromboembolic events. Results for contralateral tumors in adjuvant trials suggest that aromatase inhibitors may be able to prevent up to 70%–80% of ER-positive breast cancers, and this is currently being investigated in two large prevention trials, one using anastrozole (IBIS-II and the other exemestane (MAP.3. New agents are needed for receptor negative breast cancer and several possibilities are currently under investigation.

  20. Life After Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Life After Breast Cancer Treatment Once breast cancer treatment ends, you may face a new set of issues and concerns. ... fear. If fear starts to disrupt your daily life, talk to your doctor. Getting the support and ...

  1. Vitamin D and Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Theresa; Klein, Paula; Grossbard, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D metabolism and its mechanism of action, the current evidence on the relationship between vitamin D and breast cancer, and the optimal dosing of vitamin D for breast cancer prevention are summarized.

  2. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of ... 000 women will have been diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, and nearly 41,000 women will die from ...

  3. Reactive intramammary lymph node mimicking recurrence on MRI study in a patient with prior breast conservation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kembhavi, Seema A; Himanshu Choudhary; Kedar Deodhar; Thakur, Meenakshi H

    2013-01-01

    Breast conservative therapy (BCT) is a well accepted form of treatment for patients with early stage breast cancer. The incidence of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence is higher in patients undergoing BCT than in those patients undergoing Modified Radical Mastectomy (MRM) without any adverse effect on survival. Patients treated with BCT are put on active surveillance using clinical breast examination and mammography. The radiologist reading the follow-up mammograms is on high alert and any n...

  4. Legal termination of a pregnancy resulting from transplanted cryopreserved ovarian tissue due to cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, EH; Offersen, Birgitte Vrou; Andersen, Claus Yding;

    2013-01-01

    To report on a woman who conceived naturally and had a normal intrauterine pregnancy following transplantation of frozen/thawed ovarian tissue but decided to have an early abortion due to recurrence of breast cancer.......To report on a woman who conceived naturally and had a normal intrauterine pregnancy following transplantation of frozen/thawed ovarian tissue but decided to have an early abortion due to recurrence of breast cancer....

  5. Exercise after breast cancer treatment: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieli-Conwright CM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Christina M Dieli-Conwright, Breanna Z Orozco Division of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy, Women's Health and Exercise Laboratory, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Over the past 2 decades, great strides have been made in the field of exercise-oncology research, particularly with breast cancer. This area of research is particularly important since there are >2.8 million breast cancer survivors who are in need of an intervention that can offset treatment-related side effects. Noticeable reductions in physical fitness (ie, cardiopulmonary fitness and muscular strength, negative changes in body composition (ie, increase in body mass, decrease in lean body mass, and increase in fat mass, increased fatigue, depression, or anxiety are some of the common side effects of cancer treatments that negatively impact overall quality of life and increase the risk for the development of comorbidities. Exercise plays a vital role in improving cardiopulmonary function, psychological events, muscular strength, and endurance in breast cancer survivors, and thus should be considered as a key factor of lifestyle intervention to reverse negative treatment-related side effects. The purpose of this review is to address current perspectives on the benefits of aerobic and resistance exercise after breast cancer treatments. This review is focused on the well-established benefits of exercise on physical and emotional well-being, bone health, lymphedema management, and the postulated benefits of exercise on risk reduction for recurrence of breast cancer. Keywords: breast cancer, exercise, physical well-being

  6. MODERN VIEWS ON BILATERAL BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. A. Fesik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented modern literature data on the features of the pathogenesis, course, clinical and morphological expression and tumor characteristics, parameters and nodal metastasis of hematogenous bilateral breast cancer. Highlight the results of domestic and foreign studies in recent years to determine the prognostic factors and recurrence of synchronous and metachronous bilateral breast cancer. It was revealed that the frequency of bilateral breast tumor lesions varies widely, ranging from 0.1 to 20%, with metachronous tumors recorded significantly higher (69.6% than the synchronous (22.7%. The probability of occurrence of metachronous breast cancer is higher in women with a family history, as well as if they have a gene mutation BRCA-1. Found that the most common histological type of breast tumor with bilateral lesions is invasive ductal. However, the incidence of invasive lobular cancer and non-invasive lobular cancer is slightly higher among synchronous bilateral cancer compared with unilateral disease. Studies have shown that in a double-sided synchronous breast cancer tumor, as a rule, has a lower degree of differentiation, and the higher the expression level of estrogen receptors and progesterone receptors. Relevance of the issue because the identification of patterns in the study of lymphatic and hematogenous features bilateral metastasis of mammary tumors provides a basis for speculation about the differences in the progression of neoplastic disease in these groups and is a cause for further detailed research in this area to identify and evaluate the prognosis and also the choice of tactics of such patients.

  7. The implications of breast cancer molecular phenotype for radiation oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ShirinSioshansi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The identification of distinct molecular subtypes of breast cancer has advanced the understanding and treatment of breast cancer by providing insight into prognosis, patterns of recurrence and effectiveness of therapy. The prognostic significance of molecular phenotype with regard to distant recurrences and overall survival are well established in the literature and has been readily incorporated into systemic therapy management decisions. However, despite the accumulating data suggesting similar prognostic significance for locoregional recurrence, integration of molecular phenotype into local management decision making has lagged. Although there are some conflicting reports, collectively the literature supports a low risk of local recurrence in the hormone receptor positive luminal subtypes compared to hormone receptor negative subtypes (triple negative and HER2-enriched. The development of targeted therapies, such as trastuzumab for the treatment of HER2-enriched subtype, has been shown to mitigate the increased risk of local recurrence. Unfortunately, no such remedy exists to address the increased risk of local recurrence for patients with triple negative tumors, making it a clinical challenge for radiation oncologists. In this review we discuss the correlation between molecular subtype and local recurrence following either breast conservation therapy or mastectomy. We also explore the possible mechanisms for increased local recurrence in triple negative breast cancer and radiotherapeutic implications for this population, such as the safety of breast conservation, consideration of dose escalation and the appropriateness of accelerated partial breast irradiation.

  8. Chemoradiotherapy response in recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficacy of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in recurrent versus primary rectal cancer has not been investigated. We compared radiological downsizing between primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT and determined the optimal size reduction threshold for response validated by survival outcomes. The proportional change in tumor length for primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT was compared using the independent sample t-test. Overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan–Meier product limit method and differences between survival for tumor size reduction thresholds of 30% (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors [RECIST]), 40%, and 50% after CRT in primary and recurrent rectal cancer groups. A total of 385 patients undergoing CRT were analyzed, 99 with recurrent rectal cancer and 286 with primary rectal cancer. The mean proportional reduction in maximum craniocaudal length was significantly higher for primary rectal tumors (33%) compared with recurrent rectal cancer (11%) (P < 0.01). There was no difference in OS for either primary or recurrent rectal cancer when ≤30% or ≤40% definitions were used. However, for both primary and recurrent tumors, significant differences in median 3-year OS were observed when a RECIST cut-off of 50% was used. OS was 99% versus 77% in primary and 100% versus 42% in recurrent rectal cancer (P = 0.002 and P = 0.03, respectively). Only patients that demonstrated >50% size reduction showed a survival benefit. Recurrent rectal cancer appears radioresistant compared with primary tumors for tumor size after CRT. Further investigation into improving/intensifying chemotherapy and radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer is justified

  9. Molecular Characteristics and Metastasis Predictor Genes of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: A Clinical Study of Triple-Negative Breast Carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Wen-Hung; Chang, Yao-Yin; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Hsiao, Chuhsing Kate; Chang, King-Jen; Chuang, Eric Y.

    2012-01-01

    Background Triple-negative breast cancer is a subtype of breast cancer with aggressive tumor behavior and distinct disease etiology. Due to the lack of an effective targeted medicine, treatment options for triple-negative breast cancer are few and recurrence rates are high. Although various multi-gene prognostic markers have been proposed for the prediction of breast cancer outcome, most of them were proven clinically useful only for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers. Reliable identif...

  10. Impact of Postmastectomy Radiation on Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients With 1-3 Positive Lymph Nodes Treated With Modern Systemic Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tendulkar, Rahul D., E-mail: tendulr@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rehman, Sana; Shukla, Monica E.; Reddy, Chandana A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Moore, Halle; Budd, G. Thomas [Department of Solid Tumor Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Dietz, Jill; Crowe, Joseph P. [Department of General Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Macklis, Roger [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) remains controversial for patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes (LN+). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of all 369 breast cancer patients with 1-3 LN+ who underwent mastectomy without neoadjuvant systemic therapy between 2000 and 2007 at Cleveland Clinic. Results: We identified 271 patients with 1-3 LN+ who did not receive PMRT and 98 who did receive PMRT. The median follow-up time was 5.2 years, and the median number of LN dissected was 11. Of those not treated with PMRT, 79% received adjuvant chemotherapy (of whom 70% received a taxane), 79% received hormonal therapy, and 5% had no systemic therapy. Of the Her2/neu amplified tumors, 42% received trastuzumab. The 5-year rate of locoregional recurrence (LRR) was 8.9% without PMRT vs 0% with PMRT (P=.004). For patients who did not receive PMRT, univariate analysis showed 6 risk factors significantly (P<.05) correlated with LRR: estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor negative (hazard ratio [HR] 2.6), lymphovascular invasion (HR 2.4), 2-3 LN+ (HR 2.6), nodal ratio >25% (HR 2.7), extracapsular extension (ECE) (HR 3.7), and Bloom-Richardson grade III (HR 3.1). The 5-year LRR rate was 3.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1%-6.8%] for patients with 0-1 risk factor vs 14.6% [95% CI, 8.4%-20.9%] for patients with {>=}2 risk factors (P=.0006), respectively. On multivariate analysis, ECE (HR 4.3, P=.0006) and grade III (HR 3.6, P=.004) remained significant risk factors for LRR. The 5-year LRR was 4.1% in patients with neither grade III nor ECE, 8.1% with either grade III or ECE, and 50.4% in patients with both grade III and ECE (P<.0001); the corresponding 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rates were 91.8%, 85.4%, and 59.1% (P=.0004), respectively. Conclusions: PMRT offers excellent control for patients with 1-3 LN+, with no locoregional failures to date. Patients with 1-3 LN+ who have grade III disease and/or ECE should be strongly considered

  11. Impact of Postmastectomy Radiation on Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients With 1-3 Positive Lymph Nodes Treated With Modern Systemic Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) remains controversial for patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes (LN+). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of all 369 breast cancer patients with 1-3 LN+ who underwent mastectomy without neoadjuvant systemic therapy between 2000 and 2007 at Cleveland Clinic. Results: We identified 271 patients with 1-3 LN+ who did not receive PMRT and 98 who did receive PMRT. The median follow-up time was 5.2 years, and the median number of LN dissected was 11. Of those not treated with PMRT, 79% received adjuvant chemotherapy (of whom 70% received a taxane), 79% received hormonal therapy, and 5% had no systemic therapy. Of the Her2/neu amplified tumors, 42% received trastuzumab. The 5-year rate of locoregional recurrence (LRR) was 8.9% without PMRT vs 0% with PMRT (P=.004). For patients who did not receive PMRT, univariate analysis showed 6 risk factors significantly (P25% (HR 2.7), extracapsular extension (ECE) (HR 3.7), and Bloom-Richardson grade III (HR 3.1). The 5-year LRR rate was 3.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1%-6.8%] for patients with 0-1 risk factor vs 14.6% [95% CI, 8.4%-20.9%] for patients with ≥2 risk factors (P=.0006), respectively. On multivariate analysis, ECE (HR 4.3, P=.0006) and grade III (HR 3.6, P=.004) remained significant risk factors for LRR. The 5-year LRR was 4.1% in patients with neither grade III nor ECE, 8.1% with either grade III or ECE, and 50.4% in patients with both grade III and ECE (P<.0001); the corresponding 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rates were 91.8%, 85.4%, and 59.1% (P=.0004), respectively. Conclusions: PMRT offers excellent control for patients with 1-3 LN+, with no locoregional failures to date. Patients with 1-3 LN+ who have grade III disease and/or ECE should be strongly considered for PMRT.

  12. 乳腺癌改良根治术后复发转移相关因素%Related factors for recurrence and metastasis of breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    淦锦; 黄桂林; 李志刚; 马辉

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨影响乳腺癌患者术后复发转移的相关因素及其临床意义.方法 回顾性分析213例行乳腺癌改良根治术乳腺癌患者的临床资料,分析组织病理学特征与术后复发转移的相关性.结果 乳腺癌患者的复发转移在组织病理类型、原发肿瘤大小、腋淋巴结转移数目、pTNM分期、脉管癌栓、激素受体、nm23及P53蛋白表达、化疗方案、是否放疗及内分泌治疗上差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),在年龄、绝经情况上差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);Logistic回归分析结果显示,原发肿瘤大小、腋窝淋巴结转移数目是乳腺癌患者复发转移的独立危险因素;nm23蛋白阳性表达、蒽环联合紫杉类化疗方案及内分泌治疗是乳腺癌患者复发转移的独立保护因素.结论 根据可能影响乳腺癌复发转移的因素,给予患者个体化综合治疗,可降低复发转移风险,提高乳腺癌患者生存率.%Objective To explore the related factors for recurrence and metastasis of breast cancer after radical mastectomy and its significance. Methods The clinical data of 213 cases of breast cancer receiving radical mastectomy were analyzed retrospectively to study the correlation of clinical and pathological features with postoperative recurrence and metastasis. Results There were significant differences in the recurrence and metastasis of breast cancer in different pathological types, tumor sizes, numbers of axillary lymph node metastasis, pTNM stages, vascular invasions, hormone receptors, nm23 and P53 protein expressions, chemotherapies, radiotherapies and endocrine therapies (P〈0. 05). There were no significant differences in different patient's ages and menopausal situations (P 〉 0. 05). Logistic regression analysis showed that primary tumor size and axillary lymph node metastases were independent risk factors, and nm23 protein expression, postoperative chemotherapy and endocrine therapy were independent

  13. RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelttari, Liisa M.; Khan, Sofia; Vuorela, Mikko; Kiiski, Johanna I.; Vilske, Sara; Nevanlinna, Viivi; Ranta, Salla; Schleutker, Johanna; Winqvist, Robert; Kallioniemi, Anne; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Figueroa, Jonine; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Dunning, Alison M.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Rosenberg, Efraim H.; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Surowy, Harald; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Van Dyck, Laurien; Janssen, Hilde; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Hallberg, Emily; Olson, Janet E.; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hooning, Maartje J.; Collée, Margriet; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert N.; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Couch, Fergus J.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Orr, Nick; Swerdlow, Anthony; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Mattson, Johanna; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Common variation on 14q24.1, close to RAD51B, has been associated with breast cancer: rs999737 and rs2588809 with the risk of female breast cancer and rs1314913 with the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAD51B variants in breast cancer predisposition, particularly in the context of familial breast cancer in Finland. We sequenced the coding region of RAD51B in 168 Finnish breast cancer patients from the Helsinki region for identification of possible recurrent founder mutations. In addition, we studied the known rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 SNPs and RAD51B haplotypes in 44,791 breast cancer cases and 43,583 controls from 40 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) that were genotyped on a custom chip (iCOGS). We identified one putatively pathogenic missense mutation c.541C>T among the Finnish cancer patients and subsequently genotyped the mutation in additional breast cancer cases (n = 5259) and population controls (n = 3586) from Finland and Belarus. No significant association with breast cancer risk was seen in the meta-analysis of the Finnish datasets or in the large BCAC dataset. The association with previously identified risk variants rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 was replicated among all breast cancer cases and also among familial cases in the BCAC dataset. The most significant association was observed for the haplotype carrying the risk-alleles of all the three SNPs both among all cases (odds ratio (OR): 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11–1.19, P = 8.88 x 10−16) and among familial cases (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.16–1.32, P = 6.19 x 10−11), compared to the haplotype with the respective protective alleles. Our results suggest that loss-of-function mutations in RAD51B are rare, but common variation at the RAD51B region is significantly associated with familial breast cancer risk. PMID:27149063

  14. RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liisa M Pelttari

    Full Text Available Common variation on 14q24.1, close to RAD51B, has been associated with breast cancer: rs999737 and rs2588809 with the risk of female breast cancer and rs1314913 with the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAD51B variants in breast cancer predisposition, particularly in the context of familial breast cancer in Finland. We sequenced the coding region of RAD51B in 168 Finnish breast cancer patients from the Helsinki region for identification of possible recurrent founder mutations. In addition, we studied the known rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 SNPs and RAD51B haplotypes in 44,791 breast cancer cases and 43,583 controls from 40 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC that were genotyped on a custom chip (iCOGS. We identified one putatively pathogenic missense mutation c.541C>T among the Finnish cancer patients and subsequently genotyped the mutation in additional breast cancer cases (n = 5259 and population controls (n = 3586 from Finland and Belarus. No significant association with breast cancer risk was seen in the meta-analysis of the Finnish datasets or in the large BCAC dataset. The association with previously identified risk variants rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 was replicated among all breast cancer cases and also among familial cases in the BCAC dataset. The most significant association was observed for the haplotype carrying the risk-alleles of all the three SNPs both among all cases (odds ratio (OR: 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.11-1.19, P = 8.88 x 10-16 and among familial cases (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.16-1.32, P = 6.19 x 10-11, compared to the haplotype with the respective protective alleles. Our results suggest that loss-of-function mutations in RAD51B are rare, but common variation at the RAD51B region is significantly associated with familial breast cancer risk.

  15. The Prognosis of Breast Cancer Patients after Mastectomy and Immediate Breast Reconstruction: A Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xue; ZHU, CHENFANG; Gu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background An increasing number of patients with breast cancer are being offered immediate breast reconstruction (IBR). The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of IBR on the prognosis of patients with breast cancer. Methods We searched the electronic databases of Medline (Pubmed), ISI Web of Knowledge, Embase, and Google Scholar databases for studies reporting the overall recurrence, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) of patients after mastectomy only and mastectom...

  16. Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-17

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  17. The impact of the Oncotype DX Recurrence Score on treatment decisions and clinical outcomes in patients with early breast cancer: the Maccabi Healthcare Services experience with a unified testing policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegelmann-Danieli, Nava; Silverman, Barbara; Zick, Aviad; Beit-Or, Anat; Katzir, Itzhak; Porath, Avi

    2013-01-01

    The Oncotype DX Recurrence Score is a validated prognosticator in oestrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer. Our retrospective analysis of a prospectively defined cohort summarises the clinical implications associated with Oncotype DX testing according to the Maccabi Healthcare Services (MHS) policy. The MHS eligibility criteria for testing included ER+ N0/pN1mic invasive tumours, discussion of test implications with an oncologist, ductal carcinoma 0.6–1 cm Grade 2–3, HER2 negative ductal carcinomas with 1.1–4.0 cm Grade 1–2, or lobular carcinoma. Large (> 1 cm) Grade 3 tumours could have grade reassessed. We linked Recurrence Score results with patients’ information and used chi-squared tests to assess the associations thereof. Between January 2008 and December 2011, tests were performed on 751 patients (MHS-eligible, 713); 54%, 38%, and 8% of patients had low, intermediate, and high Recurrence Score results, respectively. Recurrence Score distribution varied significantly with age (P = 0.002), with increasing Recurrence Score values with decreasing age. The proportion of patients with high Recurrence Score results varied by grade/size combination and histology, occurring in 32% of small (≤ 1 cm) Grade 3 and 3% of larger (1.1–4 cm) Grade 1 ductal tumours and only in 2% of lobular carcinomas. Chemotherapy was administered to 1%, 13%, and 61% of patients with low, intermediate, and high Recurrence Score results, respectively (P < 0.0001), but only to 2% of intermediate score patients ≥ 65 years. Luteinising-hormone-releasing hormone agonists with tamoxifen were used in 27% of low Recurrence Score patients ≤ 50 years. With a median follow-up of 26 months, no systemic recurrences were documented, whereas four patients exhibited locoregional recurrences. In summary, in this low-to-moderate risk patient population, testing identified 46% of patients as intermediate/high risk. Treatment decisions were influenced by Recurrence Score results and

  18. Proton pump inhibitor-induced Sweet’s syndrome: report of acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis in a woman with recurrent breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sweet’s syndrome, also referred to as acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, can either occur as an idiopathic disorder or associated with another condition, including cancer, or induced by exposure to a drug. Proton pump inhibitors selectively inhibit gastric parietal cell H+-K+-adenosine triphosphatase and are most commonly used for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Purpose: Proton pump inhibitor-associated Sweet’s syndrome is described in a woman with recurrent ...

  19. Aromatase inhibitor strategies in metastatic breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L McArthur

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Heather L McArthur, Patrick G MorrisBreast Cancer Medicine Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Despite ongoing therapeutic innovations, metastatic breast cancer (MBC remains a treatable but incurable disease. In the developed world, a diagnosis of MBC without a preceding diagnosis of early stage disease is a rare event. However, approximately one-third of women with early stage breast cancer ultimately experience a distant recurrence. Because the majority of breast cancers express estrogen and/or progesterone receptors and are accordingly considered hormone-sensitive, therapeutic strategies that interfere with hormone-mediated tumorigenesis have been a cornerstone of the breast cancer management paradigm for decades. Historically, the selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen has been the most extensively studied and widely used hormone maneuver in breast cancer. However, a recent therapeutic innovation, namely the successful development of third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs, has had a dramatic impact on the treatment paradigm for women with hormone-sensitive MBC. Because of the demonstrated efficacy in postmenopausal breast cancer patients, the generally favorable side-effect profile, and the convenience of oral administration, AIs are now in widespread clinical use. Currently, there are three clinically available third-generation AIs: two reversible, nonsteroidal AIs, letrozole and anastrozole; and one irreversible, steroidal AI, exemestane. All three agents are at least as efficacious as tamoxifen as monotherapy for postmenopausal women with hormone-sensitive MBC. Current clinical research aims to improve upon existing strategies by evaluating AIs in combination with systemic chemotherapy regimens and/or novel targeted agents. It is hoped that these therapeutic innovations will lead to ongoing improvements in quality of life parameters and ideally survival for women

  20. Breast cancer screening

    OpenAIRE

    Skrabanek, P

    1988-01-01

    Consensus is still lacking on guidelines for breast-cancer screening with mammography: who should be screened, how frequently at what age, to what benefits and at what risks. American, Dutch, Swedish and Italian studies spanning the 1960s to the 1980s reveal a benefit from screening (reduced mortality from breast cancer) that occurs unambiguously only in women 50 years of age and over. Physicians who choose to screen mammographically their over-49-year-old female patients must do so with the ...

  1. Inheritance of proliferative breast disease in breast cancer kindreds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies have emphasized that genetic susceptibility to breast cancer is rare and is expressed primarily as premenopausal breast cancer, bilateral breast cancer, or both. Proliferative breast disease (PBD) is a significant risk factor for the development of breast cancer and appears to be a precursor lesion. PBD and breast cancer were studied in 103 women from 20 kindreds that were selected for the presence of two first degree relatives with breast cancer and in 31 control women. Physical examination, screening mammography, and four-quadrant fine-needle breast aspirates were performed. Cytologic analysis of breast aspirates revealed PBD in 35% of clinically normal female first degree relatives of breast cancer cases and in 13% of controls. Genetic analysis suggests that genetic susceptibility causes both PBD and breast cancer in these kindreds. This study supports the hypothesis that this susceptibility is responsible for a considerable portion of breast cancer, including unilateral and postmenopausal breast cancer

  2. Data on the recurrence of breast tumors fit a model in which dormant cells are subject to slow attrition but can randomly awaken to become malignant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, Wilfred D; Litman, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    appears to be a random event. Inasmuch as the kinetics of cancer recurrence in published data sets closely follows the model found for the appearance of sporadic retinoblastoma, tumor recurrence could be triggered by mutations in awakening- suppressor mechanisms. The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene...... was identified by tracing its occurrence in familial retinoblastoma pedigrees. Will it be possible to track the postulated cancer recurrence, awakening suppressor gene(s) in early recurrence breast cancer patients?...

  3. Pattern of follow-up care and early relapse detection in breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, S.M.E.; Vegt, de F.; Siesling, S.; Flobbe, K.; Aben, K.K.H.; Heiden-van der Loo, van der M.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Dijck, van J.A.A.M.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Routine breast cancer follow-up aims at detecting second primary breast cancers and loco regional recurrences preclinically. We studied breast cancer follow-up practice and mode of relapse detection during the first 5 years of follow-up to determine the efficiency of the follow-up schedule. The Neth

  4. [Breast cancer update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armuss, A

    2014-06-01

    Breast Cancer, with a life-time prevalence of about 10-12%, is the most common cancer in women. In 2013, the actress Angelina Jolie, by announcing she had a double mastectomy, increased the awareness of a family history of breast and ovarian cancer and the treatment available to reduce the inherited risks. In Germany, each year about 25 out of 100,000 women (age-standardized according to European Standard) die of the disease. The number of newly diagnosed cases is about 72,000 per year. In comparison, many other countries record higher levels. Investing in the development of new therapies has therefore been key for many years. Prevention programs, such as the mammography screening are publicly touted, in both cases with the aim to reduce breast cancer mortality. To accurately assess the risk in underwriting, it is important to know about the risk factors for the development of breast cancer, as well as the latest advances in prevention, therapy and their prognostic classification. The following article provides an overview. PMID:25000626

  5. Ovarian stimulation in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Elkin; González, Naira; Muñoz, Luis; Aguilar, Jesús; Velasco, Juan A García

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent malignancy among women under 50. Improvements in diagnosis and treatment have yielded an important decrease in mortality in the last 20 years. In many cases, chemotherapy and radiotherapy develop side effects on the reproductive function. Therefore, before the anti-cancer treatment impairs fertility, clinicians should offer some techniques for fertility preservation for women planning motherhood in the future. In order to obtain more available oocytes for IVF, the ovary must be stimulated. New protocols which prevent exposure to increased estrogen during gonadotropin stimulation, measurements to avoid the delay in starting anti-cancer treatment or the outcome of ovarian stimulation have been addressed in this review. There is no evidence of association between ovarian stimulation and breast cancer. It seems that there are more relevant other confluent factors than ovarian stimulation. Factors that can modify the risk of breast cancer include: parity, age at full-term birth, age of menarche, and family history. There is an association between breast cancer and exogenous estrogen. Therefore, specific protocols to stimulate patients with breast cancer include anti-estrogen agents such as letrozole. By using letrozole plus recombinant follicular stimulating hormone, patients develop a multifollicular growth with only a mild increase in estradiol serum levels. Controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) takes around 10 days, and we discuss new strategies to start COS as soon as possible. Protocols starting during the luteal phase or after inducing the menses currently prevent a delay in starting ovarian stimulation. Patients with breast cancer have a poorer response to COS compared with patients without cancer who are stimulated with conventional protocols of gonadotropins. Although many centres offer fertility preservation and many patients undergo ovarian stimulation, there are not enough studies to evaluate the recurrence, breast cancer

  6. Virtual Weight Loss Program in Maintaining Weight in African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Cancer Survivor; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  7. Quadrantectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conservative treatment of early breast cancer always requires irradiation of residual mammary tissue. The preliminary results obtained in 45 early breast cancer patients, who received quadrantectomy plus axillary dissection, followed by radiation of residual breast are reported. Radiation was performed by the two opposed field technique. In some cases the residual breast tissue was compressed using a special accessory provided with the Theratron 780. In addition to the tumor dose of 50 GY, 10 GY boots was added to the surgical scar using 7 MeV electrons. The 6 patients with positive axillary nodes received 6 courses of adjuvant chemotherapy (CMF) after radiotherapy. All patients are currently alive and free of disease. The 64% (29 patients) were followed up for at least 5 years, and 36% (16 patients) for at least 3 years. Only 2 cases of local recurrence were encountered (4,4%). The esthetic result was satisfactory in all cases. No side effects due to treatment were noted

  8. Breast Cancer in Art Painting

    OpenAIRE

    Forma Ewa; Bernaciak Magdalena; Bryś Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is an emotive cancer. It is a disease that affects a visible sexual organ and it is the commonest single cause of death of women between 40 and 60 years of age. Nevertheless, this type of cancer was infrequently depicted in art paintings. In this article the themes from the breast cancer in famous art paintings are discussed.

  9. Breast Cancer - Early Diagnosis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-28

    This podcast answers a listener's question about how to tell if she has breast cancer.  Created: 4/28/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/28/2011.

  10. Hereditary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin J; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie;

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are only detected in 25% of families with a strong history of breast cancer, though hereditary factors are expected to be involved in the remaining families with no recognized mutation. Molecular characterization is expected to provide new insight into the t......Pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are only detected in 25% of families with a strong history of breast cancer, though hereditary factors are expected to be involved in the remaining families with no recognized mutation. Molecular characterization is expected to provide new insight...... into the tumor biology to guide the search of new high-risk alleles and provide better classification of the growing number of BRCA1/2 variants of unknown significance (VUS). In this review, we provide an overview of hereditary breast cancer, its genetic background, and clinical implications, before focusing...... on the pathologically and molecular features associated with the disease. Recent transcriptome and genome profiling studies of tumor series from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers as well as familial non-BRCA1/2 will be discussed. Special attention is paid to its association with molecular breast cancer subtypes as well...

  11. Breast Cancer and Fatigue

    OpenAIRE

    Bardwell, Wayne A; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia

    2008-01-01

    Fatigue is a common and disabling symptom in breast cancer patients and survivors. A rather nebulous concept, fatigue overlaps with sleepiness and depressed mood. In this chapter, we cover methods for assessing fatigue; describe the occurrence of fatigue before, during and after initial treatment; present possible underlying mechanisms of fatigue; and, enumerate approaches to its treatment.

  12. Prostate cancer is not breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Venniyoor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancers of the prostate and breast are hormone dependent cancers. There is a tendency to equate them and apply same algorithms for treatment. It is pointed out that metastatic prostate cancer with bone-only disease is a potentially fatal condition with a much poorer prognosis than metastatic breast cancer and needs a more aggressive approach.

  13. Prostate cancer is not breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ajit Venniyoor

    2016-01-01

    Cancers of the prostate and breast are hormone dependent cancers. There is a tendency to equate them and apply same algorithms for treatment. It is pointed out that metastatic prostate cancer with bone-only disease is a potentially fatal condition with a much poorer prognosis than metastatic breast cancer and needs a more aggressive approach.

  14. Progestins and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, Jorge R

    2007-10-01

    Progestins exert their progestational activity by binding to the progesterone receptor (form A, the most active and form B, the less active) and may also interact with other steroid receptors (androgen, glucocorticoid, mineralocorticoid, estrogen). They can have important effects in other tissues besides the endometrium, including the breast, liver, bone and brain. The biological responses of progestins cover a very large domain: lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, water and electrolyte regulation, hemostasis, fibrinolysis, and cardiovascular and immunological systems. At present, more than 200 progestin compounds have been synthesized, but the biological response could be different from one to another depending on their structure, metabolism, receptor affinity, experimental conditions, target tissue or cell line, as well as the biological response considered. There is substantial evidence that mammary cancer tissue contains all the enzymes responsible for the local biosynthesis of estradiol (E(2)) from circulating precursors. Two principal pathways are implicated in the final steps of E(2) formation in breast cancer tissue: the 'aromatase pathway', which transforms androgens into estrogens, and the 'sulfatase pathway', which converts estrone sulfate (E(1)S) into estrone (E(1)) via estrone sulfatase. The final step is the conversion of weak E(1) to the potent biologically active E(2) via reductive 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activity. It is also well established that steroid sulfotransferases, which convert estrogens into their sulfates, are present in breast cancer tissues. It has been demonstrated that various progestins (e.g. nomegestrol acetate, medrogestone, promegestone) as well as tibolone and their metabolites can block the enzymes involved in E(2) bioformation (sulfatase, 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase) in breast cancer cells. These substances can also stimulate the sulfotransferase activity which converts estrogens into the biologically

  15. Differentiation of FDG-avid loco-regional recurrent and compromised benign lesions after surgery for breast cancer with dual-time point F-18-fluorodeoxy-glucose PET/CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of dual-time point F-18-fluorodeoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scans to differentiate FDG-avid loco-regional recurrent and compromised benign lesions after surgery for breast cancer. A total of 64 FDG-avid recurrent lesions (local tumor recurrence or lymph node metastases) in 52 patients and 38 FDG-avid compromised benign lesions after surgery in 37 patients were included in the study. FDG PET/CT study was performed at 60 and 120 min after intravenous injection of 3.5 MBq/kg FDG. The maximum SUV (SUVmax) on the early and delayed scans and the percent change of SUVmax (%ΔSUVmax) between the two time points were measured. The optimal differential parameter was determined by receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis. The average early SUVmax, delayed SUVmax and ΔSUVmax% were 4.9±2.6, 6.0±3.6 and 18.2%±18.8 in FDG-avid recurrent lesions, and 2.1±0.8, 1.8±1.0 and -17.8%±21.3 in FDG-avid benign lesions, respectively. Delayed SUVmax was significantly increased compared with early SUVmax in recurrent lesions (P2.5 and %ΔSUVmax>0%, with a sensitivity of 90.6%, specificity of 81.5%, accuracy of 87.2%, negative predictive value (NPV) of 89.2%, and positive predictive value (PPV) of 83.7%, which were better than the respective values obtained with the use of delayed SUVmax>2.5 alone or %ΔSUVmax>0% alone (P2.5 (P<0.005). This approach with SUVmax estimation appears to improve the differentiation between FDG-avid loco-regional recurrent of breast cancer and compromised benign lesions after surgery, since delayed scanning significantly enhances the difference in FDG uptake between these lesions. (author)

  16. Impact of Screening and Risk Factors for Local Recurrence and Survival After Conservative Surgery and Radiotherapy for Early Breast Cancer: Results From a Large Series With Long-Term Follow-Up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunkler, Ian H., E-mail: I.Kunkler@ed.ac.uk [Edinburgh Cancer Centre, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Kerr, Gillian R. [Edinburgh Cancer Centre, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Thomas, Jeremy S. [Department of Pathology, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Jack, Wilma J.L. [Edinburgh Breast Unit, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Bartlett, John M.S. [Edinburgh Cancer Research Centre, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Pedersen, Hans C. [DAKO (Denmark); Cameron, David A. [Edinburgh Cancer Centre, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Dixon, J. Michael; Chetty, Udi [Edinburgh Breast Unit, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate conventional prognostic factors for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), distant metastasis (DM), and survival after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in screen-detected and symptomatic cases on surveillance up to 25 years. Patients and Methods: A total of 1812 consecutive patients in three cohorts (1981-1989, 1990-1992, and 1993-1998) with T12N01M0 invasive breast cancer were treated with BCT (median follow-up, 14 years). Tumor type and grade were reviewed by a single pathologist. Hormone receptor status was measured by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess independent prognostic variables for relapse and survival. Results: A total of 205 IBTR occurred, with 5-, 10-, 15-, and 20-year actuarial relapse rates of 4.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.35-5.5%), 8.4% (95% CI 7.1-9.8%), 14.1% (95% CI 12.0-16%), and 17.4% (95% CI 14.5-20.2%). Number of nodes, young age, pathologic tumor size, and multifocality were significant factors for IBTR. Three hundred seventy-eight patients developed DM. The actuarial metastatic rate was 12% at 5 years and 17.9% at 10 years. Young age, number of positive nodes, pathologic tumor size, and tumor grade were significant factors for DM relapse. When conventional prognostic indices were taken into account screen-detected cancers showed no improvement in overall relapse or survival rate compared with symptomatic cases but did show a reduced risk of DM after IBTR. After 10 years IBTR relapse continued at a constant rate of 0.87% per annum. Conclusions: The Edinburgh BCT series has shown that screen-detected invasive breast cancers do not have significantly different clinical outcomes compared with symptomatic cases when pathologic risk factors are taken into account. This suggests that these patients be managed in a similar way.

  17. Impact of Screening and Risk Factors for Local Recurrence and Survival After Conservative Surgery and Radiotherapy for Early Breast Cancer: Results From a Large Series With Long-Term Follow-Up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate conventional prognostic factors for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), distant metastasis (DM), and survival after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in screen-detected and symptomatic cases on surveillance up to 25 years. Patients and Methods: A total of 1812 consecutive patients in three cohorts (1981–1989, 1990–1992, and 1993–1998) with T12N01M0 invasive breast cancer were treated with BCT (median follow-up, 14 years). Tumor type and grade were reviewed by a single pathologist. Hormone receptor status was measured by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess independent prognostic variables for relapse and survival. Results: A total of 205 IBTR occurred, with 5-, 10-, 15-, and 20-year actuarial relapse rates of 4.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.35–5.5%), 8.4% (95% CI 7.1–9.8%), 14.1% (95% CI 12.0–16%), and 17.4% (95% CI 14.5–20.2%). Number of nodes, young age, pathologic tumor size, and multifocality were significant factors for IBTR. Three hundred seventy-eight patients developed DM. The actuarial metastatic rate was 12% at 5 years and 17.9% at 10 years. Young age, number of positive nodes, pathologic tumor size, and tumor grade were significant factors for DM relapse. When conventional prognostic indices were taken into account screen-detected cancers showed no improvement in overall relapse or survival rate compared with symptomatic cases but did show a reduced risk of DM after IBTR. After 10 years IBTR relapse continued at a constant rate of 0.87% per annum. Conclusions: The Edinburgh BCT series has shown that screen-detected invasive breast cancers do not have significantly different clinical outcomes compared with symptomatic cases when pathologic risk factors are taken into account. This suggests that these patients be managed in a similar way.

  18. Early diagnosis of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern data are presentd on epidemology etiopathogensis and statistics of breast cancer. Home and international clinical and histological classifications is given. Much attention is paid to the methods for early diagnosis of pretumor diseases and breast cancer: clinical roentgenomammography, thrmography and computerized tomomammography. The role of self-examination in cancer early detection has been analyzed. Special attention is paid to system of detection of minimal and unpalpable form of breast cancer, screening of these tumors. 113 refs.; 60 figs.; 6 tabs

  19. Triple negative breast cancer: an Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhtar M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Murtaza Akhtar, Subhrajit Dasgupta, Murtuza Rangwala Department of Surgery, NKP Salve Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India Introduction: Breast cancer is the most common female cancer in the world. Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC is a recently identified biological variant with aggressive tumor behavior and poor prognosis. Data of hormonal status from the Indian population is scarce due to financial constraints in performing immunohistochemistry evaluation. The present study aims to prospectively analyze receptor status of all breast cancer patients and identify TNBC and compare their clinical profile and short term survival with other non-TNBC group. Materials and methods: All cytologically and histopathologically confirmed cases of carcinoma breast were prospectively enrolled. In a longitudinal study at tertiary care hospital in central India based on the hormonal status, they were further divided into TNBC and other groups. Comparison of risk factors, clinical profile and short-term survival was carried out. Results: A total 85 patients were enrolled and of them 37 (43.7% were TNBC. On comparing risk factors ie, age, age at menarche, total reproductive age, age at first child birth, and menopausal status – no statistical significance was observed between the TNBC and non-TNBC groups. But on comparison of clinical profile TNBC tumors were significantly large with majority of patients presenting as locally advanced breast cancer (83%. No statistical difference was observed in axillary lymph node status between two groups. TNBC tumors were histologically more aggressive (grade 3 compared to other groups. No statistically significant difference was observed in short term overall survival but all three deaths were observed in the TNBC group only and two local recurrences after surgery were observed in the TNBC group. Conclusion: TNBC forms a large proportion of carcinoma breast patients in a central

  20. Does adjuvant systemic therapy contribute to decrease of breast recurrence after breast-conserving surgery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preventing breast recurrence after breast-conserving surgery is an important issue. The main factors contributing to breast recurrences are positive margins and absence of radiotherapy. In late years a standard adjuvant treatment is widely used in Japan. We examined whether these standard treatments contributed to reduction of a breast recurrence. By March 2003, 845 patients were treated by breast-conserving surgery, and the cases were divided into two groups by operation period; 426 cases until 1998 (the first half group) and 202 patients with follow-up periods more than 2 years (the latter group). There were much positive margins and patients with radiotherapy in a latter group in background factor. An endocrine therapy for estrogen receptor (ER) positive was performed in 68.1% in first half period, and in contrast 94.2% in the latter period, and chemotherapy was performed in 87% (mainly Epirubicin) for ER negative in the latter period, and 77% (mainly oral agent) in the first half period. There was a significant difference of breast recurrence-free survival between 2 groups; an early recurrence was seen in 19 cases (4.5%) in the first half period and 2 cases (1.0%) in the latter group. In particular the difference was significant in patients with absence of radiotherapy or negative ER. Multivariate analysis revealed that the operation time was a significant factor for breast recurrence. In conclusion, an apparent reduction of breast recurrence may be brought by a standard adjuvant therapy. (authors)

  1. Breast cancer surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachetta, Eleonora; Osano, Silvia; Astegiano, Francesco; Martincich, Laura

    2016-10-01

    Since several studies have demonstrated the inadequate diagnostic performance of mammography in high risk women, over the past two decades, different breast imaging tests have been evaluated as additional diagnostic methods to mammography, and the most relevant ones are the techniques that do not imply the use of X-rays, considering the young age of these patients and the higher radio-sensitivity. Breast dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has risen growing interest not only because of the absence of use of X-rays, but also because it provides morpho-functional features, which may depict biological characteristics of breast tissues, including invasive and in situ cancers. Different multicenter non-randomized prospective studies aimed to evaluate breast DCE-MRI as an integral part of surveillance programs, agreed about the evidence that in high risk women screening with DCE-MRI is more effective than either mammography and/or ultrasound. Moreover, this modality leads to the identifications of cancers at a more favorable stage, allowing a real advantage in terms of tumor size and nodal involvement. The medical community is evaluating to suggest DCE-MRI alone as screening modality in high-risk women, as it was reported that in these cases the sensitivity of MRI plus conventional imaging was not significantly higher than that of MRI alone. Breast MRI is now recommended as part of screening program for high risk women by both European and American guidelines. PMID:26924173

  2. Exercise after breast cancer treatment: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieli-Conwright, Christina M; Orozco, Breanna Z

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, great strides have been made in the field of exercise-oncology research, particularly with breast cancer. This area of research is particularly important since there are >2.8 million breast cancer survivors who are in need of an intervention that can offset treatment-related side effects. Noticeable reductions in physical fitness (ie, cardiopulmonary fitness and muscular strength), negative changes in body composition (ie, increase in body mass, decrease in lean body mass, and increase in fat mass), increased fatigue, depression, or anxiety are some of the common side effects of cancer treatments that negatively impact overall quality of life and increase the risk for the development of comorbidities. Exercise plays a vital role in improving cardiopulmonary function, psychological events, muscular strength, and endurance in breast cancer survivors, and thus should be considered as a key factor of lifestyle intervention to reverse negative treatment-related side effects. The purpose of this review is to address current perspectives on the benefits of aerobic and resistance exercise after breast cancer treatments. This review is focused on the well-established benefits of exercise on physical and emotional well-being, bone health, lymphedema management, and the postulated benefits of exercise on risk reduction for recurrence of breast cancer. PMID:26543382

  3. Utilization and impact of 21-gene recurrence score assay for breast cancer in clinical practice across the United States: lessons learned from the 2010 to 2012 National Cancer Data Base analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orucevic, Amila; Heidel, Robert E; Bell, John L

    2016-06-01

    The aim of our study is to investigate patient selection for the 21-gene recurrence score assay (RS) for breast cancer (BC) and the RS impact on chemotherapy administration (Chemo) in clinical practice across the United States through the retrospective observational study of National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) patients from 2010 to 2012. NCDB captures ~70 % of all newly diagnosed malignancies in the USA annually. The 2010-2012 period depicts data from the beginning of the NCDB that required recording of molecular assays and their data release in April 2015. De-identified demographic and clinical variables of patients that had RS results were analyzed. 513,080 patients had BC; 406,525 were estrogen receptor-positive (ER+). 74,334/91,651 patients with RS recorded as a numerical value (0-100) were analyzed (18.2 % of ER+). Patients' ages ranged from 18 to 90 (mean = 58.8, median = 59); 99.1 % were females. Patients of Caucasian race, from regions with $63,000 median household income were more likely to be tested than patients of other races, education, or income (p 1 cm tumors; 16.4 % included ≥N1 disease; 9.9 % included T1a, T3, Stage III and IV, or HER2-positive cancers. Low-risk RS result had 92.2 % negative predictive value for no Chemo. Intermediate-risk RS result had 40.1 % positive predictive value (PPV); high-risk RS had 81.2 % PPV for Chemo. RS is obtained in ~1/5 of ER + BC patients across the USA. Further studies investigating influence and implementation of the newest evidence-based management guidelines regarding patients' selection for RS test and chemotherapy administration upon obtaining of test results are warranted. PMID:27206678

  4. Race, Age, and Obesity Disparities in Adult Physical Activity Levels in Breast Cancer Patients And Controls

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Cheryl L.; Owusu, Cynthia; Nock, Nora L.; Li LI; Berger, Nathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity has been shown to be inversely associated with breast cancer recurrence and survival. Although physical activity is known to decline with age, rates of change in physical activity have not been well characterized in breast cancer patients and subgroups with known disparities in breast cancer survival, especially in minorities, the elderly, and the obese. We evaluated moderate and strenuous physical activity from high school through diagnosis in 1,220 breast cancer patients, ...

  5. The evolving role of oestrogen receptor beta in clinical breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Speirs, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    Controversy surrounds the potential clinical importance of oestrogen receptor (ER)β in breast cancer, and three recent papers have sought to resolve this. In the present issue of Breast Cancer Research Novelli and colleagues explored the significance of ERβ1 expression in 936 breast cancer patients, and they showed diverse relationships according to lymph node status. A second paper examined 442 breast cancers in which ERβ1 was an independent predictor of recurrence, disease-free survival and...

  6. Hypoxia regulates stemness of breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Jing; Xiao, Yong; Zhu, Xiao-Yan; Ning, Zhou-yu; Xu, Hai-fan; Wu, Hui-Min

    2016-01-01

    Human breast cancers include cancer stem cell populations as well as non-tumorigenic cancer cells. Breast cancer stem cells possess self-renewal capability and thus are the root cause of recurrence and metastasis of malignant tumors. Hypoxia is a fundamental pathological feature of solid tumor tissues and exerts a wide range of effects on the biological behavior of cancer cells. However, there is little information on the role of hypoxia in modulating the stemness of breast cancer cells. In t...

  7. Treatment of Recurrent Ovarian Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neville F. Hacker

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent ovarian cancer is a common clinical problem and the management of eachpatient must be individualized. Diagnosis is usually based on a progressively rising CA-125titre, and a CT scan of the pelvis and abdomen, together with a chest X-ray should be performed.Although there is no study to support immediate treatment in the asymptomaticpatient, our approach is to commence such patients on Tamoxifen. Chemotherapy isreserved for asymptomatic patients or those who progress on Tamoxifen. The longer thetreatment-free interval of 18-24 months. The choice of non-platinum second or subsequentline chemotherapy is based on many factors including likelihood of benefit, potential toxicity,schedule and convenience to the patient, as well as organ function and residual toxicityfrom prior treatment. Aggressive secondary cytoreductive surgery can significantly prolongsurvival in those with a disease-free interval of 24 months or more and in those in whom allmacroscopic disease can be removed. Radiation therapy to the tumour bed following resectionof localized disease may be beneficial in selected patients. Quality of life issues are particularlyimportant for this group of patients and have not been adequately studies.Communication regarding the objectives of therapy is important, and the multidisciplinaryapproach should include palliative care and psycho-social support, in addition to the moretraditional medical options.

  8. Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk A woman’s hormone ... be conducted to determine whether having an induced abortion, or a miscarriage (also known as spontaneous abortion), ...

  9. You, Your Teenage Daughter and Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brateman, Libby

    1991-01-01

    Discusses breast cancer and teenagers, focusing on how parents can introduce the subject and encourage breast self-examination. The article provides information on breast cancer statistics, mammography, and American Cancer Society services. (SM)

  10. Molecular imaging of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, A.L.L.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women. Imaging techniques play a pivotal role in breast cancer management, especially in lesion detection, treatment planning and evaluation, and prognostication. These imaging techniques have however limitations such as the use of ionizing radiatio

  11. Why the stroma matters in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Conklin, Matthew W; Patricia J Keely

    2012-01-01

    Survival and recurrence rates in breast cancer are variable for common diagnoses, and therefore the biological underpinnings of the disease that determine those outcomes are yet to be fully understood. As a result, translational medicine is one of the fastest growing arenas of study in tumor biology. With advancements in genetic and imaging techniques, archived biopsies can be examined for purposes other than diagnosis. There is a great deal of evidence that points to the stroma as the major ...

  12. Tamoxifen Resistance in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Minsun

    2012-01-01

    Tamoxifen is a central component of the treatment of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer as a partial agonist of ER. It has been clinically used for the last 30 years and is currently available as a chemopreventive agent in women with high risk for breast cancer. The most challenging issue with tamoxifen use is the development of resistance in an initially responsive breast tumor. This review summarizes the roles of ER as the therapeutic target of tamoxifen in cancer treatment, clin...

  13. Green Tea and Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Anna H.; Butler, Lesley M.

    2011-01-01

    The identification of modifiable lifestyle factors that could reduce the risk of breast cancer is a research priority. Despite the enormous chemo preventive potential of green tea and compelling evidence from animal studies, its role in breast cancer development in humans is still unclear. Part of the uncertainty is related to the relatively small number of epidemiological studies on green tea and breast cancer and that the overall results from case-control studies and prospective cohort stud...

  14. Dosimetry of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The systemic therapy of breast cancer has also changed profoundly during the last 60 years, and in this time the integration of treatment modalities involve a major area of investigation. The dosimetry of breast cancer presents different complications which can range from the Physician's handling of the neoplasia up to the simple aspects of physical simulation, contour design, radiation fields, irregular surfaces and computer programs containing mathematical equations which differ little or largely with the reality of the radiation distribution into the volume to be irradiated. We have studied the problem using two types of measurements to determine how the radiation distribution is in irregular surfaces, and designing an easier skill to be used with each patient, in order to optimize the treatment with respect to the simulation and verification process. (author). 7 refs

  15. Estrogens and breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HANKINSON SUSAN E

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we summarize the epidemiologic evidence for the associations of oral contraceptives and postmenopausal hormones with risk of breast cancer. We also describe the biologic plausibility of these relationships. Overall, there appears to be little, if any, increase in risk with oral contraceptive use in general, even among users for 10 or more years. However, compared to never users, current oral contraceptive users appear to have a modest elevation in risk that subsides within about 10 years after cessation of use. For postmenopausal hormones, the weight of the evidence suggests little or no increase in risk among users of short duration, or for use in the past. However, current longer term use is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer that increases with duration. This increase in risk is large enough, and well enough supported, to be considered along with the other risks and benefits of postmenopausal hormone therapy.

  16. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Triple Negative Breast Cancer (Currently Accruing Only Triple-negative Breast Cancer Patients Since 6/8/2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-stromal Tumor; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral

  17. A case-control study on the risk factors of recurrence and metastasis in breast cancer%乳腺癌复发转移影响因素的病例对照研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张立力; 刘翠婷

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the risk factors of breast cancer recurrence for the cause exploration and prevention of the disease.Methods With matched case-control method,a survey was conducted among survival cases of histologically diagnosed breast cancer patients in Southern hospital from January 2004 to December 2007 in Guangzhou city.The survival cases were divided into case group and control group according to the inclusion criteria.Unconditional logistic model was used to analyze the data.Results Multiple factors logistic regression analysis showed mental stimulations [OR =10.926,95%CI (5.041-23.682)],oral contraceptive pills history [OR=2.634,95%CI(1.548-4.482)],benign breast disease history [OR=5.183,95%CI(2.100-12.790)],human epiderma growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) positive [OR=2.257,95%CI (1.326-3.843)],lymph node metastasis [OR=2.021,95%CI (1.272-3.212)],distant metastasis [OR=3.718,95%CI (2.125-6.503)] might be associated with the increasing breast cancer recurrence risk.Regular exercise [OR=0.460,95%CI(0.234-0.905)],low stage of disease [OR=0.106,95%CI(0.022-0.498)],breast nursing time [OR=0.053,95%CI(0.009-0.316)],dietary intake of soy isflavones[OR=0.154,95%CI (0.032-0.745)] might be associated with the decreasing breast cancer recurrence risk.Conclusions Clinical medical staff should take attention to the breast cancer who had benign breast disease history to ensure timely check-ups,early detection,early diagnosis and early treatment.Improving physical and psychological quality,reducing oral contraceptive pills,prolonging breast nursing time,and increasing dietary intake of soy isflavones were important to the prevention of breast cancer recurrence.%目的 探讨乳腺癌术后复发转移的影响因素,为确定乳腺癌复发转移高危人群的筛检与随访指标提供科学依据.方法 采用病例对照研究,2004年1月至2010年12月在广州市南方医院经病理确诊乳腺癌的生存病例,根据纳入标准分为病

  18. Proteomic classification of breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kamel, Dalia

    2012-11-01

    Being a significant health problem that affects patients in various age groups, breast cancer has been extensively studied to date. Recently, molecular breast cancer classification has advanced significantly with the availability of genomic profiling technologies. Proteomic technologies have also advanced from traditional protein assays including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry to more comprehensive approaches including mass spectrometry and reverse phase protein lysate arrays (RPPA). The purpose of this manuscript is to review the current protein markers that influence breast cancer prediction and prognosis and to focus on novel advances in proteomic classification of breast cancer.

  19. Breast reconstruction in conserving breast cancer surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast conserving treatment (BCT) combined with radiotherapy have provedthe test of time as a sound oncological operation regarding survival andlocal recurrence. Successful BCT is a balance between adequate surgery andmaintaining the breast's appearance. Unsatisfactory outcome reaches 20-30% instandard techniques of BCD. Concepts described to widen the spectrum of BCT,have made an improvement of cosmetic outcome and facilitated a liberal safetymargin. Volume displacement techniques, such as glandular flap, mammoplasty,donut mastopexy and batwing mastopexy proved useful in large breasts andvolume replacement, such as latissimus dorsi flap and local flaps are ofgreat advantage to replace defects in small and medium sized breasts. Some ofthese techniques are simple, but comprehensive knowledge and training arerequired for sophisticated ones. The objectives of this article are to shedlight on different techniques adopted by surgeons to perform BCT inconjunction with various oncoplastic techniques and to discuss the factorsthat influence their applications to achieve best oncological and aestheticoutcome. (author)

  20. Oncologic Safety of Immediate Breast Reconstruction for Invasive Breast Cancer Patients: A Matched Case Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Shin-Hoo; Han, Wonshik; Yoo, Tae-Kyung; Lee, Han-Byoel; Jin, Ung Sik; Chang, Hak; Minn, Kyung Won; Noh, Dong-Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) and disease-free survival (DFS) between patients undergoing mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) and those undergoing mastectomy alone. Methods A retrospective review of patients who underwent mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction for resectable invasive breast cancer between 2002 and 2010 at a single center was conducted. These cases were matched to patients who underwent ma...

  1. Partial Breast Irradiation Versus Whole Breast Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Decision Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the quality-adjusted life expectancy between women treated with partial breast irradiation (PBI) vs. whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) for estrogen receptor-positive early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to describe health states in the 15 years after radiotherapy for estrogen receptor-positive early-stage breast cancer. Breast cancer recurrences were separated into local recurrences and elsewhere failures. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) risk was extracted from the Oxford overview, and rates and utilities were adapted from the literature. We studied two cohorts of women (aged 40 and 55 years), both of whom received adjuvant tamoxifen. Results: Assuming a no evidence of disease (NED)-PBI utility of 0.93, quality-adusted life expectancy after PBI (and WBRT) was 12.61 (12.57) and 12.10 (12.06) years for 40-year-old and 55-year-old women, respectively. The NED-PBI utility thresholds for preferring PBI over WBRT were 0.923 and 0.921 for 40-year-old and 55-year-old women, respectively, both slightly greater than the NED-WBRT utility. Outcomes were sensitive to the utility of NED-PBI, the PBI hazard ratio for local recurrence, the baseline IBTR risk, and the percentage of IBTRs that were local. Overall the degree of superiority of PBI over WBRT was greater for 55-year-old women than for 40-year-old women. Conclusions: For most utility values of the NED-PBI health state, PBI was the preferred treatment modality. This result was highly sensitive to patient preferences and was also dependent on patient age, PBI efficacy, IBTR risk, and the fraction of IBTRs that were local

  2. Breast cancer risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamińska, Marzena; Ciszewski, Tomasz; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Miotła, Paweł; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual's life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence. PMID:26528110

  3. Breast cancer risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Kamińska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women’s ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual’s life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence.

  4. Understanding breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robin L

    2010-01-01

    With mammography firmly established as an integral part of efforts to reduce breast cancer mortality, many believe it is time to concentrate on prevention. Part of the multifaceted approach to preventing and treating this disease is unraveling its molecular, genetic and physiological makeup. Another aspect is ensuring that women have the information they need to make informed decisions about screening and treatment. Studies also point to the influence of nutrition, exercise, medicines and a patient's adherence to screening on cancer risk and recovery. PMID:20445140

  5. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer I. Breast-conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The present paper is an update of the practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer published in 2006 by the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). These recommendations have been elaborated on the basis of the S3 guidelines of the German Cancer Society that were revised in March 2007 by an interdisciplinary panel. Methods: The DEGRO expert panel performed a comprehensive survey of the literature, comprising lately published meta-analyses, data from recent randomized trials and guidelines of international breast cancer societies, referring to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. In addition to the more general statements of the German Cancer Society, this paper emphasizes specific radiotherapeutic aspects. It is focused on radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. Technique, targeting, and dose are described in detail. Results: Postoperative radiotherapy significantly reduces rates of local recurrence. The more pronounced the achieved reduction is, the more substantially it translates into improved survival. Four prevented local recurrences result in one avoided breast cancer death. This effect is independent of age. An additional boost provides a further absolute risk reduction for local recurrence irrespective of age. Women > 50 years have a hazard ratio of 0.59 in favor of the boost. For DCIS, local recurrence was 2.4% per patient year even in a subgroup with favorable prognostic factors leading to premature closure of the respective study due to ethical reasons. For partial-breast irradiation as a sole method of radiotherapy, results are not yet mature enough to allow definite conclusions. Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, whole-breast irradiation remains the gold standard of treatment. The indication for boost irradiation should no longer be restricted to women ≤ 50 years. Partial-breast irradiation is still an experimental treatment and therefore discouraged outside controlled

  6. Breast-preserving (conservative) therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conservative surgery (sectoral or segmental + axillary dissection) was performed in 278 patients with breast cancer (Tl-2N0M0) at the Institute Clinic in 1990-1995. Following thorough morphological examination, 148 patients were selected to form a clinical study group for an investigation of the role of postoperative radiotherapy in the conservative treatment of breast cancer. Two groups - irradiation of the remaining breast tissue and controls - were formed on the basis of randomized data. Follow-up continues 3-60 months (average duration - 37,7 months). Local recurrence was detected in 3 out of 73 patients of group 1. A similar relapse was detected in 6 out of 75 patients of group 2. No significant difference in total survival rates in the two groups was observed (97,3 and 96,0%)

  7. Interleukin-19 in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Yin Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory cytokines within the tumor microenvironment are linked to progression in breast cancer. Interleukin- (IL- 19, part of the IL-10 family, contributes to a range of diseases and disorders, such as asthma, endotoxic shock, uremia, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. IL-19 is expressed in several types of tumor cells, especially in squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, tongue, esophagus, and lung and invasive duct carcinoma of the breast. In breast cancer, IL-19 expression is correlated with increased mitotic figures, advanced tumor stage, higher metastasis, and poor survival. The mechanisms of IL-19 in breast cancer have recently been explored both in vitro and in vivo. IL-19 has an autocrine effect in breast cancer cells. It directly promotes proliferation and migration and indirectly provides a microenvironment for tumor progression, which suggests that IL-19 is a prognostic marker in breast cancer and that antagonizing IL-19 may have therapeutic potential.

  8. Epidemiology of male breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Joli R; Moysich, Kirsten B; Swede, Helen

    2005-01-01

    Breast cancer in men is a rare disease, accounting for approximately 1% of all breast cancer cases. Although the epidemiologic literature regarding female breast cancer is extensive, relatively little is known about the etiology of male breast cancer (MBC). This review is intended to summarize the existing body of evidence on genetic and epidemiologic risk factors for breast cancer in men. Overall, the epidemiology of MBC presents similarities with the epidemiology of female breast cancer. Major genetic factors associated with an increased risk of breast cancer for men include BRCA2 mutations, which are believed to account for the majority of inherited breast cancer in men, Klinefelter syndrome, and a positive family history. Suspected genetic factors include AR gene mutations, CYP17 polymorphism, Cowden syndrome, and CHEK2. Epidemiologic risk factors for MBC include disorders relating to hormonal imbalances, such as obesity, testicular disorders (e.g., cryptorchidism, mumps orchitis, and orchiectomy), and radiation exposure. Suspected epidemiologic risk factors include prostate cancer,prostate cancer treatment, gynecomastia, occupational exposures (e.g., electromagnetic fields, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and high temperatures), dietary factors (e.g., meat intake and fruit and vegetable consumption), and alcohol intake. PMID:15668471

  9. Positron Emission Tomography in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercher-Conejero, Jose Luis; Pelegrí-Martinez, Laura; Lopez-Aznar, Diego; Cózar-Santiago, María del Puig

    2015-01-01

    Gradually, FDG-PET/CT has been strengthening within the diagnostic algorithms of oncological diseases. In many of these, PET/CT has shown to be useful at different stages of the disease: diagnosis, staging or re-staging, treatment response assessment, and recurrence. Some of the advantages of this imaging modality versus CT, MRI, bone scan, mammography, or ultrasound, are based on its great diagnostic capacity since, according to the radiopharmaceutical used, it reflects metabolic changes that often occur before morphological changes and therefore allows us to stage at diagnosis. Moreover, another advantage of this technique is that it allows us to evaluate the whole body so it can be very useful for the detection of distant disease. With regard to breast cancer, FDG-PET/CT has proven to be important when recurrence is suspected or in the evaluation of treatment response. The technological advancement of PET equipment through the development of new detectors and equipment designed specifically for breast imaging, and the development of more specific radiopharmaceuticals for the study of the different biological processes of breast cancer, will allow progress not only in making the diagnosis of the disease at an early stage but also in enabling personalized therapy for patients with breast cancer. PMID:26854143

  10. Positron Emission Tomography in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis Vercher-Conejero

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gradually, FDG-PET/CT has been strengthening within the diagnostic algorithms of oncological diseases. In many of these, PET/CT has shown to be useful at different stages of the disease: diagnosis, staging or re-staging, treatment response assessment, and recurrence. Some of the advantages of this imaging modality versus CT, MRI, bone scan, mammography, or ultrasound, are based on its great diagnostic capacity since, according to the radiopharmaceutical used, it reflects metabolic changes that often occur before morphological changes and therefore allows us to stage at diagnosis. Moreover, another advantage of this technique is that it allows us to evaluate the whole body so it can be very useful for the detection of distant disease. With regard to breast cancer, FDG-PET/CT has proven to be important when recurrence is suspected or in the evaluation of treatment response. The technological advancement of PET equipment through the development of new detectors and equipment designed specifically for breast imaging, and the development of more specific radiopharmaceuticals for the study of the different biological processes of breast cancer, will allow progress not only in making the diagnosis of the disease at an early stage but also in enabling personalized therapy for patients with breast cancer.

  11. Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kemp, W.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    At present, the risk of a woman developing invasive breast cancer during her life is about 1 in 8. This makes breast cancer the most prevalent type of cancer in women worldwide. As the risk of dying from breast cancer for a woman is about 1 in 36, early breast cancer detection and effective treatmen

  12. Breast Tissue Composition and Susceptibility to Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Boyd, Norman F.; Lisa J Martin; Bronskill, Michael; Martin J. Yaffe; Duric, Neb; Minkin, Salomon

    2010-01-01

    Breast density, as assessed by mammography, reflects breast tissue composition. Breast epithelium and stroma attenuate x-rays more than fat and thus appear light on mammograms while fat appears dark. In this review, we provide an overview of selected areas of current knowledge about the relationship between breast density and susceptibility to breast cancer. We review the evidence that breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer, the histological and other risk factors that are associat...

  13. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for breast cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  14. Radiotherapy alone in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This retrospective analysis was conducted on breast cancer patients treated by radiotherapy alone at The Princess Margaret Hospital and at the Institut Gustave-Roussy. These patients had either operable tumours, but were unfit for general anesthesia, or had inoperable tumors due to local contraindications to surgery. Previous results showed that a radiation dose increase of 15 Gy can decrease the relative risk of tumour or lymph node recurrence twofold. In this third report, the same data were analyzed to determine the treatment-related complication rates and to correlate these to the radiation dose levels. Overall results were analyzed on 453 patients, but detailed analyses on complications were conducted on 372 patients not developing local recurrence in the first 6 months of follow-up. Each complication was graded on a 3-level previously defined scale. Most frequent complications were skin changes of different degrees, which were usually asymptomatic. More disabling complications were arm edema, impaired shoulder mobility, rib fractures and brachial plexopathy. The incidence of disabling complications was low. The only factor significantly increasing the risk of complications was the radiation dose level to the tumour and axilla. Technical factors such as overlapping fields should also be taken into account. As the more effective control of tumour and lymph nodes obtained in patients treated with higher radiation doses is counterbalanced by an increase in the complication rate, the dose to be delivered for each patient should be carefully chosen according to individual risk factors. (author). figs

  15. Prognostic Impact of Time to Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence after Breast Conserving Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosset, Marie; Hamy, Anne-Sophie; Mallon, Peter; Delomenie, Myriam; Mouttet, Delphine; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Lae, Marick; Fourquet, Alain; Rouzier, Roman; Reyal, Fabien; Feron, Jean-Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Background The poor prognosis of patients who experience ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast conserving surgery (BCS) is established. A short time between primary cancer and IBTR is a prognostic factor but no clinically relevant threshold was determined. Classification of IBTR may help tailor treatment strategies. Purpose We determined a specific time frame, which differentiates IBTR into early and late recurrence, and identified prognostic factors for patients with IBTR at time of the recurrence. Methods We analyzed 2209 patients with IBTR after BCS. We applied the optimal cut-points method for survival data to determine the cut-off times to IBTR. A subgroup analysis was performed by hormone receptor (HR) status. Survival analyses were performed using a Cox proportional hazard model to determine clinical features associated with distant-disease-free survival (DDFS) after IBTR. We therefor built decision trees. Results On the 828 metastatic events observed, the majority occurred within the first 3 months after IBTR: 157 in the HR positive group, 98 in the HR negative group. We found different prognostic times to IBTR: 49 months in the HR positive group, 33 in the HR negative group. After multivariate analysis, time to IBTR was the first discriminant prognostic factor in both groups (HR 0.65 CI95% [0.54–0.79] and 0.42 [0.30–0.57] respectively). The other following variables were significantly correlated with the DDFS: the initial number of positive lymph nodes for both groups, the initial tumor size and grade for HR positive tumors. Conclusion A short interval time to IBTR is the strongest factor of poor prognosis and reflects occult distant disease. It would appear that prognosis after IBTR depends more on clinical and histological parameters than on surgical treatment. A prospective trial in a low-risk group of patients to validate the safety of salvage BCS instead of mastectomy in IBTR is needed. PMID:27494111

  16. Pattern of Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyze the incidence and prognostic factors of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in a large, population-based, single-center study with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 3595 cases in which BCT was performed in 3824 women with stage I or II breast cancer. The incidence of IBTR was analyzed over time and was based on IBTR as first event. Results: The 15-year local relapse-free survival was 90.9%. The hazard estimates for IBTR showed a time course with 2 peaks, the first at approximately 5 years and the second, twice as high, at 12 years. Stratifying subjects by age and margin status showed that, for women ≤40 years old with negative margins, adjuvant systemic therapy led to a 5-fold reduced risk of recurrence compared to none, and the presence of lymph vascular space invasion (LVSI) had a 3-fold increased risk compared to its absence. For women >40 years old, the presence of LVSI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.5) and the presence of lobular carcinoma in situ in the lumpectomy specimen (HR 2.3) were the only 2 risk factors. Conclusions: We demonstrated a pattern in risk of IBTR over time, with 2 peaks, first at approximately 5 years and a second, much higher peak at approximately 12 years, especially for women ≤40 years old. For women ≤40 years old with tumor-free resection margins, we noted that the absence of adjuvant systemic therapy and the presence of LVSI were independent prognostic factors of IBTR. For women >40 years old, the presence of LVSI and the presence of lobular carcinoma in situ were independent risk factors

  17. Pattern of Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobsen, Jan, E-mail: j.jobsen@mst.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Palen, Job van der [Department of Epidemiology, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Department of Research Methodology, Measurement, and Data Analysis, Faculty of Behavioral Science, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Riemersma, Sietske [Laboratory for Pathology Oost Nederland, Hengelo (Netherlands); Heijmans, Harald [Department of Surgery, Ziekenhuis Groep Twente, Hengelo (Netherlands); Ong, Francisca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Struikmans, Henk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden (Netherlands); Radiotherapy Centre West, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands)

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To analyze the incidence and prognostic factors of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in a large, population-based, single-center study with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 3595 cases in which BCT was performed in 3824 women with stage I or II breast cancer. The incidence of IBTR was analyzed over time and was based on IBTR as first event. Results: The 15-year local relapse-free survival was 90.9%. The hazard estimates for IBTR showed a time course with 2 peaks, the first at approximately 5 years and the second, twice as high, at 12 years. Stratifying subjects by age and margin status showed that, for women ≤40 years old with negative margins, adjuvant systemic therapy led to a 5-fold reduced risk of recurrence compared to none, and the presence of lymph vascular space invasion (LVSI) had a 3-fold increased risk compared to its absence. For women >40 years old, the presence of LVSI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.5) and the presence of lobular carcinoma in situ in the lumpectomy specimen (HR 2.3) were the only 2 risk factors. Conclusions: We demonstrated a pattern in risk of IBTR over time, with 2 peaks, first at approximately 5 years and a second, much higher peak at approximately 12 years, especially for women ≤40 years old. For women ≤40 years old with tumor-free resection margins, we noted that the absence of adjuvant systemic therapy and the presence of LVSI were independent prognostic factors of IBTR. For women >40 years old, the presence of LVSI and the presence of lobular carcinoma in situ were independent risk factors.

  18. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  19. Reproduction and Breast Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Hanf, Volker; Hanf, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    Reproduction is doubtlessly one of the main biological meanings of life. It is therefore not surprising that various aspects of reproduction impact on breast cancer risk. Various developmental levels may become targets of breast tumorigenesis. This review follows the chronologic sequence of events in the life of a female at risk, starting with the intrauterine development. Furthermore, the influence of both contraceptive measures and fertility treatment on breast cancer development is dealt w...

  20. Breast cancers in elderly women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and leading cause of cancer mortality in women worldwide. Nearly half of the global total of breast cancer cases occurs in patients > 65 years of age. Advanced age at the diagnosis of breast cancer is associated with more favorable tumor biology, as indicated by increased hormone sensitivity, attenuated HER- 2/neu overexpression, and lower grades and proliferative indices Elderly patients, however, are more likely to present with larger and more advanced tumors, and recent reports suggest that lymph node involvement increases with age. Elderly patients care less likely to be treated according to accepted treatment guidelines and under treatment can, as a consequence, have a strong negative impact on survival.Breast cancer in elderly patients represents a great social problem and is expected to remain one of the most common cancers in the next half century. (author)

  1. Breast cancer and autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliff, Lisa

    2013-03-01

    Case Study Amy is a 44-year-old woman with severe autism. She lives with her sister Susan, who is her caregiver and guardian. Amy is ambulatory and able to dress and feed herself. She is a healthy individual with no other significant comorbidities. She walks daily and enjoys her sister's company. Amy's life expectancy is greater than 10 years. However, she is difficult to care for medically, as she will not allow a physical examination and strikes out when strangers try to touch her. She is nonverbal and unable to participate in decision-making. INITIAL DIAGNOSIS Amy has a history of breast cancer diagnosed 2 years ago, originally presenting as a stage I lesion (T2N0) that was palpated by her caregiver while bathing. She underwent right simple mastectomy with sentinel lymph node resection. Susan recalls that the mastectomy was a very challenging ordeal, as Amy kept pulling out IV lines, drains, and dressings. Susan felt that Amy withdrew from her after the procedure as she most likely associated Susan with the cause of the pain, making her role as caregiver more difficult. Pathology confirmed an invasive ductal carcinoma, moderately differentiated, 2.4 cm, estrogen/progesterone receptor negative, HER2/neu negative, with negative surgical margins. Two right axillary sentinel lymph nodes were negative for disease. The standard of care for a patient with these tumor features is surgery plus adjuvant chemotherapy (National Comprehensive Cancer Network [NCCN], 2012). According to the Adjuvant Online! database (2012), Amy's risk for relapse was approximately 40% without adjuvant treatment; her risk for mortality was approximately 29%. After meeting with a medical oncologist, Amy did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. According to Susan, she was not offered the choice, and the decision was not explained to them. She was simply told that it was not necessary. Aside from pathology, previous records were unavailable for review. Medical assessment of Amy's level of autism

  2. Decline in breast cancer mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njor, Sisse Helle; Schwartz, Walter; Blichert-Toft, Mogens;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: When estimating the decline in breast cancer mortality attributable to screening, the challenge is to provide valid comparison groups and to distinguish the screening effect from other effects. In Funen, Denmark, multidisciplinary breast cancer management teams started before screening...... was introduced; both activities came later in the rest of Denmark. Because Denmark had national protocols for breast cancer treatment, but hardly any opportunistic screening, Funen formed a "natural experiment", providing valid comparison groups and enabling the separation of the effect of screening...... from other factors. METHODS: Using Poisson regression we compared the observed breast cancer mortality rate in Funen after implementation of screening with the expected rate without screening. The latter was estimated from breast cancer mortality in the rest of Denmark controlled for historical...

  3. Breast cancer stem cells: implications for therapy of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, Brian J.; Schmidt, Chris W.; Lakhani, Sunil R; Reynolds, Brent A.; Lopez, J. Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    The concept of cancer stem cells responsible for tumour origin, maintenance, and resistance to treatment has gained prominence in the field of breast cancer research. The therapeutic targeting of these cells has the potential to eliminate residual disease and may become an important component of a multimodality treatment. Recent improvements in immunotherapy targeting of tumour-associated antigens have advanced the prospect of targeting breast cancer stem cells, an approach that might lead to...

  4. Pregnancy associated breast cancer and pregnancy after breast cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Doğer, Emek; Çalışkan, Eray; Mallmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and its frequency is increasing as more women postpone their pregnancies to their thirties and forties. Breast cancer diagnosis during pregnancy and lactation is difficult and complex both for the patient and doctors. Delay in diagnosis is frequent and treatment modalities are difficult to accept for the pregnant women. The common treatment approach is surgery after diagnosis, chemotherapy after the first trimester and...

  5. Effects of Recombinant Erythropoietin on Breast Cancer-Initiating Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tiffany M. Phillips; Kwanghee Kim; Erina Vlashi; McBride, William H.; Frank Pajonk

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cancer anemia causes fatigue and correlates with poor treatment outcome. Erythropoietin has been introduced in an attempt to correct these defects. However, five recent clinical trials reported a negative impact of erythropoietin on survival and/or tumor control, indicating that experimental evaluation of a possible direct effect of erythropoietin on cancer cells is required. Cancer recurrence is thought to rely on the proliferation of cancer initiating cells (CICs). In breast can...

  6. Development of a New Subclavian Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy Method for Locally or Recurrent Advanced Breast Cancer Using an Implanted Catheter-Port System After Redistribution of Arterial Tumor Supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locally or recurrent advanced breast cancers can receive arterial blood supply from various arteries, such as the internal thoracic artery (ITA), the lateral thoracic artery, and the other small arterial branches originating from the subclavian artery. Failure to catheterize and subsequent formation of collateral arterial blood supply from various arteries are some of the reasons why the response to conventional selective transarterial infusion chemotherapy is limited and variable. To overcome this problem, we developed a new subclavian arterial infusion chemotherapy method using an implanted catheter-port system after redistribution of arterial tumor blood supply by embolizing the ITA. We named this technique ('redistributed subclavian arterial infusion chemotherapy' (RESAIC)). Using RESAIC, patients can be treated on an outpatient basis for extended periods of time. Eleven patients underwent RESAIC, and the complete remission and partial response rate in 10 evaluable patients was 90%: complete remission [CR] n = 4, partial remission n = 4, stable disease n = 1, and not evaluable n = 1. Three of four patients with CR had no distant metastasis, and modified radical mastectomy was performed 1 month after conclusion of RESAIC. The resected specimens showed no residual cancer cells, and pathologically confirmed complete remission was diagnosed in each of these cases. Although temporary grade-3 myelosuppression was seen in three patients who were previously treated by systemic chemotherapy, there was no other drug-induced toxicity or procedure-related complications. RESAIC produced a better response and showed no major complications compared with other studies despite the advanced stage of the cancers.

  7. Mitochondrial Defects in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefa Salgado

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria play important roles in cellular energy metabolism, free radical generation, and apoptosis. Mitochondrial DNA has been proposed to be involved in carcinogenesis because of its high susceptibility to mutations and limited repair mechanisms in comparison to nuclear DNA. Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer type among women in the world and, although exhaustive research has been done on nuclear DNA changes, several studies describe a variety of mitochondrial DNA alterations present in breast cancer. In this review article, we to provide a summary of the mitochondrial genomic alterations reported in breast cancer and their functional consequences.

  8. Unemployment among breast cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Kathrine; Ewertz, Marianne; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg;

    2014-01-01

    cancer. METHOD: This study included 14,750 women diagnosed with breast cancer in Denmark 2001-2009 identified through a population-based clinical database and linked with information from Danish administrative population based registers for information on labour market affiliation, socio......AIM: Though about 20% of working age breast cancer survivors do not return to work after treatment, few studies have addressed risk factors for unemployment. The majority of studies on occupational consequences of breast cancer focus on non-employment, which is a mixture of sickness absence...

  9. Cost-effectiveness of a 21-gene recurrence score assay versus Canadian clinical practice in women with early-stage estrogen- or progesterone-receptor-positive, axillary lymph-node negative breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 21-gene recurrence score (RS) assay may inform adjuvant systematic treatment decisions in women with early stage breast cancer. We sought to investigate the cost effectiveness of using the RS-assay versus current clinical practice (CCP) in women with early-stage estrogen- or progesterone-receptor-positive, axilliary lymph-node negative breast cancer (ER+/ PR + LN- ESBC) from the perspective of the Canadian public healthcare system. We developed a Markov model to project the lifetime clinical and economic consequences of ESBC. We evaluated adjuvant therapy separately in post- and pre-menopausal women with ER+/ PR + LN- ESBC. We assumed that the RS-assay would reclassify pre- and post-menopausal women among risk levels (low, intermediate and high) and guide adjuvant systematic treatment decisions. The model was parameterized using 7 year follow up data from the Manitoba Cancer Registry, cost data from Manitoba administrative databases, and secondary sources. Costs are presented in 2010 CAD. Future costs and benefits were discounted at 5%. The RS-assay compared to CCP generated cost-savings in pre-menopausal women and had an ICER of $60,000 per QALY gained in post-menopausal women. The cost effectiveness was most sensitive to the proportion of women classified as intermediate risk by the RS-assay who receive adjuvant chemotherapy and the risk of relapse in the RS-assay model. The RS-assay is likely to be cost effective in the Canadian healthcare system and should be considered for adoption in women with ER+/ PR + LN- ESBC. However, ongoing assessment and validation of the assay in real-world clinical practice is warranted

  10. Breast cancer in Kumasi, Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in Ghanaian women.To describes the characteristics of breast cancer patients attending the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi, Ghana.The study was conducted at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital. Between July 1st 2004 and June 30th 2009 patients presenting with breast lumps were assessed by clinical examination, imaging studies and pathological examination. Relevant clinical and pathological were recorded prospectively data on all patients with microscopically proven breast cancer. The cancers were graded according to the modified Bloom-Richardson system. Tissue immunoperoxidase stains for oestrogen, progesterone receptors and c-erb2 oncogene were performed with commercially prepared antigens and reagents.Nineteen thousand four hundred and twenty – three (19,423) patients were seen during the study period. There were 330 (1.7%) patients with histologically proven breast cancer. The mean age was 49.1 years. A palpable breast lump was detected in 248 patients (75.2%). Two hundred and eighty –one patients (85.2%) presented with Stages III and IV , 271 (82.1%) invasive and 230 ( 85.2%) high grade carcinomas. Oestrogen and progesterone receptors were positive in 32 and 9 cases respectively. Her2 protein was positive in 11 cases. In Kumasi, as in other parts of Ghana, breast cancer affects mostly young pre-menopausal who present with advanced disease. The cancers have unfavourable prognostic features and are unlikely to respond to hormonal therapy. (au)

  11. Aluminium, antiperspirants and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbre, P D

    2005-09-01

    Aluminium salts are used as the active antiperspirant agent in underarm cosmetics, but the effects of widespread, long term and increasing use remain unknown, especially in relation to the breast, which is a local area of application. Clinical studies showing a disproportionately high incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant of the breast together with reports of genomic instability in outer quadrants of the breast provide supporting evidence for a role for locally applied cosmetic chemicals in the development of breast cancer. Aluminium is known to have a genotoxic profile, capable of causing both DNA alterations and epigenetic effects, and this would be consistent with a potential role in breast cancer if such effects occurred in breast cells. Oestrogen is a well established influence in breast cancer and its action, dependent on intracellular receptors which function as ligand-activated zinc finger transcription factors, suggests one possible point of interference from aluminium. Results reported here demonstrate that aluminium in the form of aluminium chloride or aluminium chlorhydrate can interfere with the function of oestrogen receptors of MCF7 human breast cancer cells both in terms of ligand binding and in terms of oestrogen-regulated reporter gene expression. This adds aluminium to the increasing list of metals capable of interfering with oestrogen action and termed metalloestrogens. Further studies are now needed to identify the molecular basis of this action, the longer term effects of aluminium exposure and whether aluminium can cause aberrations to other signalling pathways in breast cells. Given the wide exposure of the human population to antiperspirants, it will be important to establish dermal absorption in the local area of the breast and whether long term low level absorption could play a role in the increasing incidence of breast cancer. PMID:16045991

  12. Obesity and risk of recurrence or death after adjuvant endocrine therapy with letrozole or tamoxifen in the breast international group 1-98 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewertz, Marianne; Gray, Kathryn P; Regan, Meredith M;

    2012-01-01

    To examine the association of baseline body mass index (BMI) with the risk of recurrence or death in postmenopausal women with early-stage breast cancer receiving adjuvant tamoxifen or letrozole in the Breast International Group (BIG) 1-98 trial at 8.7 years of median follow-up.......To examine the association of baseline body mass index (BMI) with the risk of recurrence or death in postmenopausal women with early-stage breast cancer receiving adjuvant tamoxifen or letrozole in the Breast International Group (BIG) 1-98 trial at 8.7 years of median follow-up....

  13. High expression of Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway genes indicates a risk of recurrence of breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng KS

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Kuo-Shyang Jeng,1 I-Shyan Sheen,2 Wen-Juei Jeng,2 Ming-Che Yu,3 Hsin-I Hsiau,3 Fang-Yu Chang31Department of Surgery, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou Medical Center, Chang-Gung University, Tao-Yuan, 3Department of Medical Research, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, TaiwanBackground: Abnormal activation of the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH signaling pathway contributing to carcinogenesis of some organs has been reported in the literature. We hypothesize that activation of the SHH pathway contributes to the recurrence of breast carcinoma.Methods: Fifty consecutive patients with invasive breast carcinoma following curative resection were enrolled in this prospective study. The ratios of messenger RNA (mRNA expression for Sonic Hedgehog (SHH, patched homolog-1 (PTCH-1, glioma-associated oncogene-1 (GLI-1, and smoothened (SMOH were measured between breast carcinoma tissue and paired noncancerous breast tissue. These ratios were compared with their clinicopathologic characteristics. These factors and the mRNA ratios were compared between patients with recurrence and those without recurrence.Results: The size of the invasive cancer correlated significantly with the ratio of SHH mRNA (P=0.001, that of PTCH-1 mRNA (P=0.005, and that of SMOH mRNA (P=0.021. Lymph node involvement correlated significantly with the ratio of SMOH mRNA (P=0.041. The correlation between Her-2 neu and the ratio of GLI-1 mRNA was statistically significant (P=0.012. Each ratio of mRNA of SHH, PTCH-1, GLI-1, and SMOH correlated significantly with cancer recurrence (P<0.001 for each.Conclusion: We suggest that high expression of SHH mRNA, PTCH-1 mRNA, GLI-1 mRNA, and SMOH mRNA in breast cancer tissue correlates with invasiveness and is a potential biomarker to predict postoperative recurrence.Keywords: SHH pathway, breast carcinoma, prediction, recurrence

  14. Diet and breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Romieu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Both diet and nutrition have been studied in relationship with breast cancer risk, as the great variation among different countries in breast cancer incidence could possibly be explained through the inflammatory and immune response, as well as antioxidant intake, among others.To date, no clear association with diet beyond overweight and weight gain has been found, except for alcohol consumption. Nonetheless, the small number of studies done in middle to low income countries where variability of food intake is wider,is beginning to show interesting results.Tanto la dieta como la nutrición han sido estudiadas en relación con el riesgo de cáncer de mama, dada la gran variación de incidencia de cáncer entre países, y la posibilidad de explicarla a través de la respuesta inflamatoria o inmune, así como ingesta de antioxidantes,entre otros.Hasta la fecha, ninguna asociación clara con la dieta ha sido encontrada, excepto para el consumo de alcohol, más allá del sobrepeso y del incremento de peso. Sin embargo, los estudios que se están realizando en países de mediano a bajo nivel de ingresos, con mayor variabilidad de ingesta de alimentos, comienzan a mostrar resultados interesantes.

  15. Male breast cancer: is the scenario changing

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni Dhananjay M; Rodrigues Gabriel S; Kaur Kanchan; Contractor Kaiyumars B; Singhal Hemant

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The overall incidence of male breast cancer is around 1% of all breast cancers and is on the rise. In this review we aim to present various aspects of male breast cancer with particular emphasis on incidence, risk factors, patho-physiology, treatment, prognostic factors, and outcome. Methods Information on all aspects of male breast cancer was gathered from available relevant literature on male breast cancer from the MEDLINE database over the past 32 years from 1975 to 200...

  16. Risk of Needle-track Seeding After Diagnostic Image-guided Core Needle Biopsy in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, Rebecca; Horiuchi, Kent; Parker, Steve H.; Ratzer, Erick R.; Fenoglio, Michael E.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Image-guided core needle biopsy (IGCNB) is an accepted technique for sampling nonpalpable mammographically detected suspicious breast lesions. However, the concern for needle-track seeding in malignant lesions remains. An alternative to IGCNB is needle-localization breast biopsy (NLBB). No study has been done to compare the local recurrence rate of breast cancer after IGCNB versus NLBB. Methods: We have retrospectively reviewed the local recurrence of breast cancer in patients diag...

  17. Loco-regional recurrence after mastectomy in high-risk breast cancer-risk and prognosis. An analysis of patients from the DBCG 82 b and c randomization trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: In the DBCG 82 b and c trials, 3083 patients with stages II and III breast cancer were randomised to receive post-mastectomy radiotherapy (RT) versus no RT in addition to systemic therapy. The study showed a decrease in loco-regional recurrences and an improved survival in patients receiving RT. The aim of the present study was to identify risk factors for loco-regional recurrence (LRR), to evaluate the treatment of LRR and to examine the prognosis after LRR. Patients and methods: The 18-year probabilities of LRR were calculated for different prognostic factors using the Kaplan-Meier method. The efficacy of different LRR treatments was compared. The 5-year survival and distant metastases (DM) probability after LRR was calculated with regard to initial randomization group, primary tumor and recurrence related variables. Results: Of the 3083 patients, 535 had a LRR alone as first site of failure. In univariate analyses, large primary tumor size, ductal carcinoma, high malignancy grade, fascia invasion, few removed nodes, many positive nodes and extracapsular invasion were all risk factors for developing LRR. Combined treatment with surgery and RT at the time of LRR increased the persistent loco-regional control. The 5-year probability of subsequent DM was 73% irrespective of initial randomization group. In multivariate analysis, large primary tumor size, many positive nodes, extracapsular invasion, supra/infraclaviculary failures, multiple LRR and a short interval less than 2 years to first LRR were poor prognostic factors for survival. Conclusions: Twenty-seven percent of LRR patients had no DM 5 years after failure. Initial randomization group did not alter the prognosis after LRR. Combined treatment of the LRR with surgery and RT improved persistent loco-regional control compared with surgery or RT alone

  18. Molecular Concordance Between Primary Breast Cancer and Matched Metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Thomassen, Mads;

    2016-01-01

    receptors, transcriptomics, and genome aberrations in primary tumors and metastases. In conclusion, biopsy of metastatic lesions at recurrence of breast cancer is encouraged to provide optimal treatment of the disease. Furthermore, molecular profiling of metastatic tissue provides invaluable mechanistic......Clinical management of breast cancer is increasingly personalized and based on molecular profiling. Often, primary tumors are used as proxies for systemic disease at the time of recurrence. However, recent studies have revealed substantial discordances between primary tumors and metastases, both....... The purpose of this review is to illuminate the extent of cancer genome evolution through disease progression and the degree of molecular concordance between primary breast cancers and matched metastases. We present an overview of the most prominent studies investigating the expression of endocrine...

  19. Can antioxidants predispose to cancer recurrence?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Krishnananda Prabhu; Gummadi Maheshwar Reddy; Anjali Rao

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To measure and compare pre-and post-treatment levels of serum total glutathione-S-transferase (GST) in stage IV cervical cancer patients and erythrocytic glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) and plasma ceruloplasmin (CP) and total GST in stage IV oral cancer patients and to correlate with the response to treatment during a two year follow-up period in respective cancer groups. Methods:Thirty-four biopsy-proven stage IV oral cancer and cervical cancer patients (n=17 in each group) who underwent same mode of treatment were chosen for this study. Erythrocytic MDA and GSH, CP and serum total GST were measured in all patients before the onset of treatment, and the GST level was only measured in cervical cancer patients after radiotherapy. The levels were compared with their respective prognosis in 2 years. Results:Oral cancer patients with higher pretreatment levels of GSH, CP and GST came with cancer recurrence within 2 years after the onset of treatment. Cervical cancer patients with higher post radiotherapy levels of serum total GST had higher recurrence tate. Conclusions:This study indicates there may be a role for these antioxidant parameters namely GST, GSH, CP in assessment of long term survival and prognosis of cancer patients.

  20. Breast cancer with axillary lymph node involvement; Cancer du sein avec atteinte ganglionnaire axillaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belaid, A.; Kanoun, S.; Kallel, A.; Ghorbel, I.; Azoury, F.; Heymann, S.; Marsiglia, H.; Bourgier, C. [Departement de radiotherapie, Unite fonctionnelle de Senologie, institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France); Belaid, A.; Ghorbel, I. [Service de radiotherapie Carcinologique, institut Salah-Azaiez, Tunis (Tunisia); Kanoun, S. [Service de radiotherapie, hopital Farhat-Hached, Sousse (Tunisia); Kallel, A. [dUnite de radiotherapie, clinique Ennasr (Tunisia); Pichenot, C.; Verstraet, R. [Departement de physique, institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France); Marsiglia, H. [Universite de Florence (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer of women in western countries. There are one million new cases per year in the world which represents 22% of all female cancers, and more than 370.000 deaths due to breast cancer per year (14% of cancer mortality). More than half of breast cancers are associated with axillary nodal involvement. Post-operative radiation therapy (XRT) is a crucial part of locoregional treatment in axillary nodal involvement breast cancer owing to a 15-years risk reduction of locoregional recurrence of 70% and to a 5.4% risk reduction of specific mortality. In 3D-conformal irradiation in such breast cancers, target volumes are chest wall when mastectomy was performed or breast and boost of tumor bed in case of breast conservative surgery, and supra-clavicular and/or axillary and/or internal mammary node areas. The main organs at risk are ipsilateral lung, heart and brachial plexus. The aim of this article is to describe epidemiologic, radio anatomic and prognostic features of axillary nodal involvement breast cancer and to propose guidelines for 3D-conformal treatment planning in locally advanced breast cancers. This review is illustrated by a case report. (authors)

  1. Breast Cancer In Women Infographic

    Science.gov (United States)

    This infographic shows the Breast Cancer Subtypes in Women. It’s important for guiding treatment and predicting survival. Know the Science: HR = Hormone receptor. HR+ means tumor cells have receptors for the hormones estrogen or progesterone, which can promote the growth of HR+ tumors. Hormone therapies like tamoxifen can be used to treat HR+ tumors. HER2 = Human epidermal growth Factor receptor, HER2+ means tumor cells overexpress (make high levels of) a protein, called HE2/neu, which has been shown to be associated with certain aggressive types of breast cancer. Trastuzumab and some other therapies can target cells that overexpress HER2. HR+/HER2, aka “LuminalA”. 73% of all breast cancer cases: best prognosis, most common subtype for every race, age, and poverty level. HR-/HER2, aka “Triple Negative”: 13% of all breast cancer cases, Worst prognosis, Non-Hispanic blacks have the highest rate of this subtype at every age and poverty level. HR+/HER2+, aka “Luminal B”, 10% of all breast cancer cases, little geographic variation by state. HR-/HER2+, aka”HER2-enriched”, 5% of all breast cancer cases, lowest rates for all races and ethnicities. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  2. Breast Cancer and Women with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Breast Cancer and Women with Disabilities Language: English Español (Spanish) ... years old, get a mammogram every two years. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. And ...

  3. The role of general nuclear medicine in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Lacey R, E-mail: lgreene@csu.edu.au [Faculty of Science, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, New South Wales (Australia); Wilkinson, Deborah [Faculty of Health, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Faculty of Science, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    The rising incidence of breast cancer worldwide has prompted many improvements to current care. Routine nuclear medicine is a major contributor to a full gamut of clinical studies such as early lesion detection and stratification; guiding, monitoring, and predicting response to therapy; and monitoring progression, recurrence or metastases. Developments in instrumentation such as the high-resolution dedicated breast device coupled with the diagnostic versatility of conventional cameras have reinserted nuclear medicine as a valuable tool in the broader clinical setting. This review outlines the role of general nuclear medicine, concluding that targeted radiopharmaceuticals and versatile instrumentation position nuclear medicine as a powerful modality for patients with breast cancer.

  4. The role of general nuclear medicine in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rising incidence of breast cancer worldwide has prompted many improvements to current care. Routine nuclear medicine is a major contributor to a full gamut of clinical studies such as early lesion detection and stratification; guiding, monitoring, and predicting response to therapy; and monitoring progression, recurrence or metastases. Developments in instrumentation such as the high-resolution dedicated breast device coupled with the diagnostic versatility of conventional cameras have reinserted nuclear medicine as a valuable tool in the broader clinical setting. This review outlines the role of general nuclear medicine, concluding that targeted radiopharmaceuticals and versatile instrumentation position nuclear medicine as a powerful modality for patients with breast cancer

  5. Current management of locally recurrent rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Bak; Laurberg, Søren; Holm, Thorbjörn

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: A review of the literature was undertaken to provide an overview of the surgical management of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC) after the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME). Method: A systematic literature search was undertaken using PubMed, Embase, Web of...

  6. DEGRO practical guidelines. Radiotherapy of breast cancer I. Radiotherapy following breast conserving therapy for invasive breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The aim of the present paper is to update the practical guidelines for postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy of breast cancer published in 2007 by the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society for Radiooncology (Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO). The present recommendations are based on a revision of the German interdisciplinary S-3 guidelines published in July 2012. Methods: A comprehensive survey of the literature concerning radiotherapy following breast conserving therapy (BCT) was performed using the search terms 'breast cancer', 'radiotherapy', and 'breast conserving therapy'. Data from lately published meta-analyses, recent randomized trials, and guidelines of international breast cancer societies, yielding new aspects compared to 2007, provided the basis for defining recommendations according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. In addition to the more general statements of the DKG (Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft), this paper addresses indications, target definition, dosage, and technique of radiotherapy of the breast after conservative surgery for invasive breast cancer. Results: Among numerous reports on the effect of radiotherapy during BCT published since the last recommendations, the recent EBCTCG report builds the largest meta-analysis so far available. In a 15 year follow-up on 10,801 patients, whole breast irradiation (WBI) halves the average annual rate of disease recurrence (RR 0.52, 0.48-0.56) and reduces the annual breast cancer death rate by about one sixth (RR 0.82, 0.75-0.90), with a similar proportional, but different absolute benefit in prognostic subgroups (EBCTCG 2011). Furthermore, there is growing evidence that risk-adapted dose augmentation strategies to the tumor bed as well as the implementation of high precision RT techniques (e.g., intraoperative radiotherapy) contribute substantially to a further reduction of local relapse rates. A main focus of ongoing research lies in partial breast

  7. DEGRO practical guidelines. Radiotherapy of breast cancer I. Radiotherapy following breast conserving therapy for invasive breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlmayer, F. [Paracelsus Medical Univ. Hospital, Salzburg (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology; Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Staedtisches Klinium Karlsruhe (Germany). Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Budach, W. [University Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany)] [and others

    2013-10-15

    Background and purpose: The aim of the present paper is to update the practical guidelines for postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy of breast cancer published in 2007 by the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society for Radiooncology (Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO). The present recommendations are based on a revision of the German interdisciplinary S-3 guidelines published in July 2012. Methods: A comprehensive survey of the literature concerning radiotherapy following breast conserving therapy (BCT) was performed using the search terms 'breast cancer', 'radiotherapy', and 'breast conserving therapy'. Data from lately published meta-analyses, recent randomized trials, and guidelines of international breast cancer societies, yielding new aspects compared to 2007, provided the basis for defining recommendations according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. In addition to the more general statements of the DKG (Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft), this paper addresses indications, target definition, dosage, and technique of radiotherapy of the breast after conservative surgery for invasive breast cancer. Results: Among numerous reports on the effect of radiotherapy during BCT published since the last recommendations, the recent EBCTCG report builds the largest meta-analysis so far available. In a 15 year follow-up on 10,801 patients, whole breast irradiation (WBI) halves the average annual rate of disease recurrence (RR 0.52, 0.48-0.56) and reduces the annual breast cancer death rate by about one sixth (RR 0.82, 0.75-0.90), with a similar proportional, but different absolute benefit in prognostic subgroups (EBCTCG 2011). Furthermore, there is growing evidence that risk-adapted dose augmentation strategies to the tumor bed as well as the implementation of high precision RT techniques (e.g., intraoperative radiotherapy) contribute substantially to a further reduction of local relapse rates. A main focus of ongoing

  8. Quality indicators for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poortmans, Philip; Aznar, Marianne; Bartelink, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy for breast cancer has considerably changed over the years, from simple simulator-based 2-dimensional techniques to sophisticated image-guided individualized treatments, with maximally protected normal structures. This has led to a substantial improvement in the outcome of breast...

  9. Consumer Health Education. Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, Cooperative Extension Service.

    This short booklet is designed to be used by health educators when teaching women about breast cancer and its early detection and the procedure for breast self-examination. It includes the following: (1) A one-page teaching plan consisting of objectives, subject matter, methods (including titles of films and printed materials), target audience,…

  10. [Prophylactic axillary radiotherapy for breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, S; Louvel, G; Rivin Del Campo, E; Boros, A; Oueslati, H; Deutsch, É

    2015-06-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy, after breast conserving surgery or mastectomy for breast cancer, improves overall survival while decreasing the risk of recurrence. However, prophylactic postoperative radiotherapy of locoregional lymph nodes for breast cancer, particularly of the axillary region, is still controversial since the benefits and the risks due to axillary irradiation have not been well defined. To begin with, when performing conformal radiotherapy, volume definition is crucial for the analysis of the risk-benefit balance of any radiation treatment. Definition and contouring of the axillary lymph node region is discussed in this work, as per the recommendations of the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO). Axillary recurrences are rare, and the recent trend leads toward less aggressive surgery with regard to the axilla. In this literature review we present the data that lead us to avoid adjuvant axillary radiotherapy in pN0, pN0i+ and pN1mi patients even without axillary clearance and to perform it in some other situations. Finally, we propose an update about the potential toxicity of adjuvant axillary irradiation, which is essential for therapeutic decision-making based on current evidence, and to guide us in the evolution of our techniques and indications of axillary radiotherapy. PMID:26044178

  11. Male breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottini, Laura; Palli, Domenico; Rizzo, Sergio; Federico, Mario; Bazan, Viviana; Russo, Antonio

    2010-02-01

    Male breast cancer (MaleBC) is a rare disease, accounting for development; low-penetrance gene mutations (i.e. CHEK-2) are more common but involve a lower risk increase. About 90% of all male breast tumors have proved to be invasive ductal carcinomas, expressing high levels of hormone receptors with evident therapeutic returns. The most common clinical sign of BC onset in men is a painless palpable retroareolar lump, which should be evaluated by means of mammography, ultrasonography and core biopsy or fine needle aspiration (FNA). To date, there are no published data from prospective randomized trials supporting a specific therapeutic approach in MaleBC. Tumor size together with the number of axillary nodes involved are the main prognostic factors and should guide the treatment choice. Locoregional approaches include surgery and radiotherapy (RT), depending upon the initial clinical presentation. When systemic treatment (adjuvant, neoadjuvant and metastatic) is delivered, the choice between hormonal and or chemotherapy (CT) should depend upon the clinical and biological features, according to the FBC management guidelines. However great caution is required because of high rates of age-related comorbidities. PMID:19427229

  12. Mammographic screening for breast cancer: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Warwick; Peters, Gudrun

    2013-01-01

    In 2011, BreastScreen Australia celebrated 20 years of mammographic screening for breast cancer in Australia. There has been a reduction in mortality from breast cancer over the last two decades, coincident with mammographic screening. However, there are concerns that mammographic screening may result in overdiagnosis of breast cancer and that the reduction in mortality from breast cancer is the result of better treatment rather than screening. This article reviews the evidence on which mammo...

  13. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... linking the development of this disease, in many cases, with exposure to the hormone estrogen. The focus of recent breast cancer prevention studies has been on testing the effectiveness of drugs called selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). SERMs are ...

  14. Palbociclib for Advanced Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    An interim analysis of the PALOMA3 trial shows that women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer who received palbociclib plus fulvestrant had longer progression-free survival rates than women who received a placebo plus fulvestrant.

  15. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exposure, high levels of estrogen, and a family history of breast cancer can increase a man’s risk ... also show the dimpled appearance called peau d’orange (like the skin of an orange). There may ...

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... trials is available from the NCI website . Locally Advanced or Inflammatory Breast Cancer Treatment of locally advanced ... NIH). NIH is the federal government’s center of biomedical research. The PDQ summaries are based on an ...

  17. Conservative treatment for breast cancer. Complications requiring reconstructive surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Women who select conservative treatment for carcinoma of the breast (tumor excision followed by supervoltage radiation therapy) place a premium on breast preservation and aesthetics. When local control fails and they require a mastectomy, or when the aesthetic appearance is unacceptable, they may request breast reconstruction. The goal of this study is to evaluate a series of 10 patients who required reconstructive breast surgery after complications of conservative treatment. Patient classification: I. Breast or chest wall necrosis (3). II. Breast fibrosis and gross asymmetry (3). III. Local recurrence of breast cancer (5). IV. Positive margins after the initial lumpectomy (1). The mean age was 34 years. Radiation dosage average was 5252 rads with two patients receiving iridium-192 implant boosts. The reconstructive management was complex and usually required a major musculocutaneous flap because of the radiation effects

  18. Dormancy in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banys M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Malgorzata Banys,1,2 Andreas D Hartkopf,1 Natalia Krawczyk,1 Tatjana Kaiser,1 Franziska Meier-Stiegen,1 Tanja Fehm,1 Hans Neubauer11Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Marienkrankenhaus Hamburg, Hamburg, GermanyAbstract: Tumor dormancy describes a prolonged quiescent state in which tumor cells are present, but disease progression is not yet clinically apparent. Breast cancer is especially known for long asymptomatic periods, up to 25 years, with no evidence of the disease, followed by a relapse. Factors that determine the cell's decision to enter a dormant state and that control its duration remain unclear. In recent years, considerable progress has been made in understanding how tumor cells circulating in the blood interact and extravasate into secondary sites and which factors might determine whether these cells survive, remain dormant, or become macrometastases. The mechanisms of tumor cell dormancy are still not clear. Two different hypotheses are currently discussed: tumor cells persist either by completely withdrawing from the cell cycle or by continuing to proliferate at a slow rate that is counterbalanced by cell death. Because dormant disseminated tumor cells may be the founders of metastasis, one hypothesis is that dormant tumor cells, or at least a fraction of them, share stem cell-like characteristics that may be responsible for their long half-lives and their suggested resistance to standard chemotherapy. Therefore, knowledge of the biology of tumor cell dormancy may be the basis from which to develop innovative targeted therapies to control or eliminate this tumor cell fraction. In this review, we discuss biological mechanisms and clinical implications of tumor dormancy in breast cancer patients.Keywords: tumor dormancy, disseminated tumor cell, circulating tumor cell, targeted therapy

  19. Can Breast Cancer in Men Be Found Early?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BRCA mutations, including prostate cancer , pancreatic cancer , and testicular cancer . Because breast cancer in men can be caused ... Breast Cancer In Men? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating Breast Cancer ...

  20. Optimal approach in early breast cancer: Radiation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Poortmans, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy significantly reduces by at least 70% the relative risk of local and regional recurrences for breast cancer after surgery. A positive influence on overall survival has been clearly demonstrated, especially for patients with a high absolute risk for locoregional recurrences. However, this is partially counterbalanced by late toxicity (dependent upon the radiation dose) especially to cardiac structures. Apart from this toxicity, a clear influence of radiation-therapy-related f...

  1. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cyclophosphamide, and Filgrastim Followed By Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  2. Leptomeningeal metastases in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Brian J.; Kesari, Santosh

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) metastasis from breast cancer may be characterized as either parenchymal brain metastasis (BM) or leptomeningeal (LM) metastasis. BM are much more common (about 80% of all CNS metastases), and have been more extensively studied than LM. CNS metastasis in breast cancer has been associated with reduced overall survival, with the shortest survival generally observed in cases of LM. Here, we review the epidemiology, prognostic factors, diagnostic tools, currently avai...

  3. Update on inflammatory breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lerebours, Florence; Bieche, Ivan; Lidereau, Rosette

    2005-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is both the least frequent and the most severe form of epithelial breast cancer. The diagnosis is based on clinical inflammatory signs and is reinforced by pathological findings. Significant progress has been made in the management of IBC in the past 20 years. Yet survival among IBC patients is still only one-half that among patients with non-IBC. Identification of the molecular determinants of IBC would probably lead to more specific treatments and to improve...

  4. Endobronchial metastasis in breast cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Albertini, R E; Ekberg, N L

    1980-01-01

    Ten patients with endobronchial metastasis from primary breast cancer were found among 1200 fibreoptic bronchoscopies. Six of these patients had radiological signs suggesting bronchial obstruction. The diagnosis was verified in nine cases by means of bronchoscopic biopsy or cytology and in one by thoracotomy. Endobronchial metastasis should be considered when symptoms or chest films suggest endobronchial disease in a patient with a history of breast cancer.

  5. Combined re-excision and perioperative interstitial brachytherapy for salvage of breast conservation therapy recurrences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate local control, survival and cosmetic outcome of combined second lumpectomy and interstitial brachytherapy as salvage treatment for isolated local recurrence of breast cancer after breast conserving therapy. Materials and Methods: Between 1983 and 1996, 32 patients with isolated breast recurrence previously treated by breast conserving therapy, underwent salvage lumpectomy and perioperative brachytherapy. Initial staging and treatment were performed between 1975 and 1994. Median age at diagnosis was 45 years (range 31-67 years), 79% were pre or peri menopausal. Tumors were staged according to the AJCC-system with pathologic findings. Distribution of stage was T1 (n=24), T2 (n=8), in 79% of the patients axillary lymph nodes were negative and all were free of systemic disease. Breast conserving treatment consisted of lumpectomy plus axillary lymph nodes dissection, the mean excised breast tissue volume was 290 cc. All patient received external beam radiation therapy to a dose of 50 Gy/25 fr delivered on breast and nodal areas. Tumor bed was boosted to a total dose of 56 Gy (range 52-66 Gy) by external beam irradiation. Cosmetic outcome after initial therapy was excellent to good in all patients. The mean interval from the initial treatment and first local recurrence was 51 months. The tumor size at recurrence range between 0.2-2.5cm (median 1cm). Recurrence occurs on the boost area of the primary tumor in 13 patients, in other part of the breast in 14 and in the field edge in 5 patients. Treatment of the recurrence consisted of salvage lumpectomy, with a mean excised tissue volume of 51 cc. In all cases perioperative brachytherapy was also performed by introperative plastic tubes positioning. The implant target volume was determined according to surgery findings. Iridium wires were placed into the tubes with a delay of 3 to 4 days. Brachytherapy set up included one (n=20) or two (n=12) planes implants. The mean implant volume determined according

  6. Soy Isoflavones Supplementation in Treating Women at High Risk For or With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-06

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  7. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule in breast cancer: prognostic indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) (CD166) is an immunoglobulin molecule that has been implicated in cell migration. The present study examined the expression of ALCAM in human breast cancer and assessed its prognostic value. The immunohistochemical distribution and location of ALCAM was assessed in normal breast tissue and carcinoma. The levels of ALCAM transcripts in frozen tissue (normal breast, n = 32; breast cancer, n = 120) were determined using real-time quantitative PCR. The results were then analyzed in relation to clinical data including the tumor type, the grade, the nodal involvement, distant metastases, the tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) stage, the Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI), and survival over a 6-year follow-up period. Immunohistochemical staining on tissue sections in ducts/acini in normal breast and in breast carcinoma was ALCAM-positive. Differences in the number of ALCAM transcripts were found in different types of breast cancer. The level of ALCAM transcripts was lower (P = 0.05) in tumors from patients who had metastases to regional lymph nodes compared with those patients without, in higher grade tumors compared with Grade 1 tumors (P < 0.01), and in TNM Stage 3 tumors compared with TNM Stage 1 tumors (P < 0.01). Tumors from patients with poor prognosis (with NPI > 5.4) had significantly lower levels (P = 0.014) of ALCAM transcripts compared with patients with good prognosis (with NPI < 3.4), and tumors from patients with local recurrence had significantly lower levels than those patients without local recurrence or metastases (P = 0.04). Notably, tumors from patients who died of breast cancer had significantly lower levels of ALCAM transcripts (P = 0.0041) than those with primary tumors but no metastatic disease or local recurrence. Patients with low levels of ALCAM transcripts had significantly (P = 0.009) more incidents (metastasis, recurrence, death) compared with patients with primary breast tumors with high levels of

  8. Neoadjuvant treatment for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Semiglazov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available linical trials have shown that the status of the women achieving complete pathomorphological repression (CPR of a tumor is characterized by significantly improved survival as compared to that of those who have not to an equal degree. The achievement of CPR as an intermediate marker for improved survival is chiefly observed in women with aggressive subtypes of breast cancer (BC: triple-negative and HER-2-positive. In patients with the latter subtype, addition of trastuzumab to neoadjuvant chemotherapy doubles the rate of CPR and correlates with higher survival rates. The performed clinical trials have established that neoadjuvant endocrine therapy is the most suitable treatment for patients with steroid hormone receptor overexpression. Whether it may be used in combination with targeted (anti-HER-2 therapy for estrogen and HER-2 coexpression is being investigated. Neoadjuvant therapy for suitable BC stages can accelerate the assessment of novel medications through identification of predictive biological markers for response (CPR in particular. Although standard neoadjuvant therapy gives an obvious benefit to patients with CPR, other patients with the so-called residual disease are at high recurrence risk.

  9. A Weight Loss Intervention for African American Breast Cancer Survivors, 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Stolley, Melinda R.; Sharp, Lisa K.; Oh, April; Schiffer, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer survival rates are lower for African American women than for white women. Obesity, high-fat diets, and lack of regular physical activity increase risk for breast cancer recurrence, comorbid conditions, and premature death. Eighty-two percent of African American women are overweight or obese, partly because of unhealthy eating and exercise patterns. Although successful weight loss and lifestyle interventions for breast cancer survivors are documented, none has consid...

  10. An Analysis of The Methods Employed for Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahjabeen Mirza Beg

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer research over the last decade has been tremendous. The ground breaking innovations and novel methods help in the early detection, in setting the stages of the therapy and in assessing the response of the patient to the treatment. The prediction of the recurrent cancer is also crucial for the survival of the patient. This paper studies various techniques used for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Different methods are explored for their merits and de-merits for the diagnosis of breast lesion. Some of the methods are yet unproven but the studies look very encouraging. It was found that the recent use of the combination of Artificial Neural Networks in most of the instances gives accurate results for the diagnosis of breast cancer and their use can also be extended to other diseases.

  11. Partial-Breast Irradiation Versus Whole-Breast Irradiation for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Accelerated partial-breast irradiation (PBI) is a new treatment paradigm for patients with early-stage breast cancer. Although PBI may lead to greater local recurrence rates, it may be cost-effective because of better tolerability and lower cost. We aim to determine the incremental cost-effectiveness of PBI compared with whole-breast radiation therapy (WBRT) for estrogen receptor-positive postmenopausal women treated for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to describe health states in the 15 years after radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer. External beam (EB) and MammoSite (MS) PBI were considered and assumed to be equally effective, but carried different costs. Patients received tamoxifen, but not chemotherapy. Utilities, recurrence risks, and costs were adapted from the literature; the baseline utility for no disease after radiotherapy was set at 0.92. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to model uncertainty in the PBI hazard ratio, recurrence pattern, and patient utilities. Costs (in 2004 US dollars) and quality-adjusted life-years were discounted at 3%/y. Results: The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for WBRT compared with EB-PBI was $630,000/quality-adjusted life-year; WBRT strongly dominated MS-PBI. One-way sensitivity analysis found that results were sensitive to PBI hazard ratio, recurrence pattern, baseline recurrence risk, and no evidence of disease PBI utility values. Probabilistic sensitivity showed that EB-PBI was the most cost-effective technique over a wide range of assumptions and societal willingness-to-pay values. Conclusions: EB-PBI was the most cost-effective strategy for postmenopausal women with early-stage breast cancer. Unless the quality of life after MS-PBI proves to be superior, it is unlikely to be cost-effective.

  12. RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Pelttari, Liisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Common variation on 14q24.1, close to RAD51B, has been associated with breast cancer: rs999737 and rs2588809 with the risk of female breast cancer and rs1314913 with the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAD51B variants in breast cancer predisposition, particularly in the context of familial breast cancer in Finland. We sequenced the coding region of RAD51B in 168 Finnish breast cancer patients from the Helsinki region for identification of possi...

  13. Risk-adapted targeted intraoperative radiotherapy versus whole-breast radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Wenz, Frederik; Bulsara, Max;

    2014-01-01

    The TARGIT-A trial compared risk-adapted radiotherapy using single-dose targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) versus fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for breast cancer. We report 5-year results for local recurrence and the first analysis of overall survival....

  14. Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia after radiotherapy for breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fumagalli Giorgio; Sanguinetti Claudio M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We report a case of fever, dyspnea, respiratory failure and migratory, recurrent and bilateral lung opacities 4 months after radiotherapy and hormone therapy following surgery for breast cancer. Computerized tomography (CT) scans showed infiltrates outside the radiation fields. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed lymphocytic alveolitis, whereas laboratory analysis demonstrated a mild systemic inflammation. Systemic steroids resulted in clinical and radiological improvement, but a disease...

  15. Lifestyle changes for prevention of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hashemi, Seyed Hesam Bani; Karimi, Samieh; Mahboobi, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cause of death from cancer among women. Lifestyle changes are shown to be important in the prevention of breast cancer. Diet, physical activity, smoking, alcohol use, and vitamin and mineral use are key factors influencing the risk of breast cancer among women. Because these factors are related to each other, it is difficult to assess their individual roles in breast cancer. Some of these factors are alterable, meaning that women can decrease their risk...

  16. Breast cancer during pregnancy and lactation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report 3 cases of gestational breast cancer that were encountered by the authors over a year period (1998) and discuss the diagnostic dilemma and modern management options. The first case was a 38-year-old Saudi female who was 8 month pregnant presented with 3 month history of left breast lump and intermittent bloody nipple discharge. She started menarche at the age of 13 years and denied any past history of benign breast diseases or oral contraceptive pill. There was no family history of malignant breast disease. Clinical examination revealed an irregular hard lump (3x3 cm) in the subareolar area of the left breast with no palpable axillary or supraclavicular lymph nodes. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) showed infiltrating ductal carcinoma. She underwent left simple mastectomy and axillary clearance together with cesarian section (CS) and tubal ligation at the same time. Histology revealed grade II infiltrating ductal carcinoma with 2 of the 11 level I nodes were positive for malignancy. She later underwent adjuvant chemoradiation and remained well with no evidence of locoregional recurrence 34 months later. The second case was a 40-year-old Saudi female who has been lactating for 10 months presented with a left breast lump of one week duration. There was no history of breast pain or nipple discharge and denied any past history of benign breast disease. There was no family history of breast cancer. Clinically, there was a 2x3 cm irregular left breast mass, in the upper outer quadrant with no palpable axillary lymphadenopathy. Mammography revealed suspicious opacity in the left breast but bone scan and ultrasonography showed no bone or liver metastases. Fine needle aspiration cytology showed suspicious of malignancy. She underwent a wide excision and left axillary clearance. Histopathology showed grade II medullary carcinoma and 2 out of 20 axillary lymph nodes were malignant. She later underwent systemic chemotherapy and radiation to left breast and

  17. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Lung ... Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health ...

  18. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Treatment Pediatric Supportive Care Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Research Metastatic Cancer Metastatic Cancer Research Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia ...

  19. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Kelly M. [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); Kirby, John A. [Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Lennard, Thomas W.J. [Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Meeson, Annette P., E-mail: annette.meeson@ncl.ac.uk [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); North East England Stem Cell Institute, Bioscience Centre, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-19

    In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP), have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC), combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis.

  20. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP), have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC), combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis

  1. Breast conservation treatment of early stage breast cancer: patterns of failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study retrospectively assesses the patterns of failure in conservatively treated early stage breast cancer patients by correlating various clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related factors with local, axillary, and distant relapse. Methods and Materials: Between 1973 and 1990, 796 patients (817 breasts) received breast conservation surgery followed by radiotherapy. Local recurrences were counted as events even if they occurred simultaneously or after the appearance of axillary or distant metastases. Results: The 10-year actuarial relative disease-free survival (DFS) rate for T1N0, T2N0, and T1-2N1 was 82%, 71%, and 54%, respectively. Stage N0 patients had a significant DFS advantage over N1 patients (p = 0.02). The 15-year actuarial local recurrence-free rate for T1 and T2 tumors was 82% and 87%, respectively (p = nonsignificant). Univariate analysis identified three significant risk factors for local relapse: (a) 48 breasts with tumors showing an extensive intraductal component had a crude local recurrence rate of 23% compared to 8% for 769 breasts without intraductal component (p 0.0016); (b) the actuarial 10-year local recurrence-free rate for patients under age 40 years was 64% compared to 88% for patients over 40 years (p < 0.0001); (c) the 10-year actuarial local recurrence-free rate for 416 postmenopausal women without adjuvant tamoxifen was 83% compared to 97% for 107 postmenopausal women with tamoxifen (p = 0.0479). Salvage therapy for operable local recurrent patients resulted in a 8-year actuarial DFS rate of 47%, significantly lower than that obtained with primary treatment. The incidence of axillary relapse as the first sign of recurrence was 2%, and could be correlated with the lack of axillary dissection (p < 0.0000005) and primary tumor size (p = 0.03). Radiotherapy to the axilla did not influence axillary relapse. Actuarial 5-year DFS rate after treatment of isolated axillary recurrence was 27%. Axillary failure was a marker for

  2. Clinical analysis of 21-gene recurrence score assay applied in early-stage breast cancer patients%21基因检测复发风险评分在早期乳腺癌中的临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文彦; 王昕; 王阳; 高纪东; 王靖; 宣立学; 方仪; 王翔

    2015-01-01

    目的探讨ER阳性、淋巴结无转移的早期乳腺癌患者21基因检测复发风险评分与临床病理特征的相关性。方法2011年12月至2014年5月在本院接受21基因检测复发风险评分共86例早期乳腺癌患者,回顾性分析其临床病理资料。根据复发分数分为低复发风险组61例(70.93%),中/高复发风险组25例(29.07%,包括中复发风险23例及高复发风险2例)。计数资料比较采用χ2检验、Fisher精确概率法及连续性校正χ2检验。非参数检验采用独立样本Mann-Whitney U检验。多因素分析采用Logistic回归分析。结果两组在肿瘤直径、Ki67、PR表达上差异有统计学意义(χ2=3.167、8.167, P=0.075、0.004,P=0.022)。差异性检验结果显示以PR、Ki67、p53蛋白表达情况进行分组时,复发分数分布差异有统计学意义(Z=-2.671、-2.814、-2.168,P=0.004、0.005、0.030)。多因素分析得出肿瘤直径(P=0.032,OR=3.834,95%CI=1.121~13.134)、Ki67(P=0.023,OR=4.598,95%CI=1.231~17.170)、p53蛋白表达情况(P=0.006,OR=5.390,95%CI=1.635~17.167)是复发分数的独立影响因素。19例患者接受术后辅助化疗(22.1%,19/86),其中低风险组3例(4.9%,3/61),中/高风险组16例(60.9%,16/25)。中位随访15.5个月,1例患者出现局部复发,无远处转移或死亡事件。结论在早期乳腺癌患者中,21基因复发风险评分与肿瘤直径、Ki67、p53等临床病理指标关系密切。%Objective To explore the correlation of 21-gene recurrence score assay with the clinicopathological characteristics in early-stage breast cancer patients with ER positive and axillary lymph node negative. Methods This study enrolled 81 early breast cancer patients who underwent 21-gene recurrence score assay in our hospital from December 2011 to May 2014,and their clinicopathological data were analyzed. According to their recurrence score,they were classified into low recurrence risk group (61 cases,70. 93%) and moderate/high risk

  3. [Immunotherapy opportunities in breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusztai, Lajos; Ladányi, Andrea; Székely, Borbála; Dank, Magdolna

    2016-03-01

    The prognostic value of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer has long been recognized by histopathologists. These observations were reaffirmed by recent immunohistochemistry and gene expression profiling studies that also revealed an association between greater chemotherapy sensitivity and extensive lymphocytic infiltration in early stage breast cancers treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. These results suggest that local anti-tumor immune response can at least partially control cancer growth and may mediate the antitumor effects of chemotherapy. However, until recently, there was no direct clinical evidence to demonstrate that enhancing anti-tumor immune response could lead to clinical benefit in breast cancer patients. The recent development of clinically effective immune checkpoint inhibitors made it possible to test the therapeutic impact of augmenting the local anti-tumor immune response. Two Phase I clinical trials using single agent anti-PD-1 (MK-3475, pembrolizumab) and anti-PD-L1 (MPDL3280A, atezolizumab) antibodies demonstrated close to 20% tumor response rates in heavily pretreated, metastatic, triple negative breast cancers. The most remarkable feature of the responses was their long duration. Several patients had disease control close to a year, or longer, which has not previously been seen with chemotherapy regimens in this patient population. A large number of clinical trials are currently underway with these and similar drugs in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant and metastatic settings to define the role of this new treatment modality in breast cancer. PMID:26934349

  4. Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing breast cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  5. Anal metastasis from recurrent breast lobular carcinoma: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria Puglisi; Emanuela Varaldo; Michela Assalino; Gianluca Ansaldo; Giancarlo Torre; Giacomo Borgonovo

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of isolated gastrointestinal metastasis from breast lobular carcinoma, which mimicked primary anal cancer. In July 2000, an 88-year-old woman presented with infiltrating lobular cancer (pT1/G2/N2). The patient received postoperative radiotherapy and hormonal therapy. Four years later,she presented with an anal polypoid lesion. The mass was removed for biopsy. Immunohistochemical staining suggested a breast origin. Radiotherapy was chosen for this patient, which resulted in complete regression of the lesion. The patient died 3 years after the first manifestation of gastrointestinal metastasis.According to the current literature, we consider the immunohistochemistry features that are essential to support the suspicion of gastrointestinal breast metastasis, and since we consider the gastrointestinal involvement as a sign of systemic disease, the therapy should be less aggressive and systemic.

  6. DNA methylation markers for breast cancer prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Dedeurwaerder, Sarah; Fuks, François

    2012-01-01

    Currently, most of the prognostic and predictive gene expression signatures emerging for breast cancer concern the tumor component. In Dedeurwaerder et al. we show that DNA methylation profiling of breast tumors is a particularly sensitive means of capturing features of the immune component of breast tumors. Most importantly, correlation is observed between T-cell marker genes and breast cancer clinical outcome.

  7. What Is Breast Cancer in Men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the breast are glandular tissue (they make breast milk in women), so cancers starting in these areas are sometimes called adenocarcinomas. ... collections of cells that, in women, produce breast milk) and grows into the ... about 2% of male breast cancers. This is because men do not usually have ...

  8. Molecular Imaging in Breast Cancer: From Whole-Body PET/CT to Dedicated Breast PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Koolen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET, with or without integrated computed tomography (CT, using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG is based on the principle of elevated glucose metabolism in malignant tumors, and its use in breast cancer patients is frequently being investigated. It has been shown useful for classification, staging, and response monitoring, both in primary and recurrent disease. However, because of the partial volume effect and limited resolution of most whole-body PET scanners, sensitivity for the visualization of small tumors is generally low. To improve the detection and quantification of primary breast tumors with FDG PET, several dedicated breast PET devices have been developed. In this nonsystematic review, we shortly summarize the value of whole-body PET/CT in breast cancer and provide an overview of currently available dedicated breast PETs.

  9. A Systematic Overview of Radiation Therapy Effects in Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic review of radiation therapy trials in several tumour types was performed by The Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). The procedures for evaluation of the scientific literature are described separately. This synthesis of the literature on radiation therapy for breast cancer is based on data from 29 randomized trials, 6 meta-analyses and 5 retrospective studies. In total, 40 scientific articles are included, involving 41,204 patients. The results were compared with those of a similar overview from 1996 including 285,982 patients. The conclusions reached can be summarized as follows: There is strong evidence for a substantial reduction in locoregional recurrence rate following postmastectomy radiation therapy to the chest wall and the regional nodal areas. There is strong evidence that postmastectomy radiation therapy increases the disease-free survival rate. There are conflicting data regarding the impact of postmastectomy radiotherapy upon overall survival. There is strong evidence that breast cancer specific survival is improved by postmastectomy radiotherapy. There is strong evidence for a decrease in non-breast cancer specific survival after postmastectomy radiotherapy. There is some evidence that overall survival is increased by optimal postmastectomy radiation therapy. There is strong evidence that postmastectomy radiotherapy in addition to surgery and systemic therapy in mainly node-positive patients decreases local recurrence rate and improves survival. There is moderate evidence that the decrease in non-breast cancer specific survival is attributed to cardiovascular disease in irradiated patients. There are conflicting data whether breast conservation surgery plus radiotherapy is comparable to modified radical mastectomy alone in terms of local recurrence rate. There is strong evidence that breast conservation surgery plus radiotherapy is comparable to modified radical mastectomy alone in terms of disease-free survival

  10. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneously die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  11. Aromatase Inhibitors and Other Compounds for Lowering Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer? Breast Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Show All Cancer Types News and Features Cancer Glossary ACS Bookstore Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects ...

  12. Do We Know What Causes Breast Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Next Topic Can breast cancer be prevented? Do we know what causes breast cancer? Many risk factors ... Genes have instructions for how our cells function. We usually look like our parents because they are ...

  13. Breast Cancer Prevention and Early Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Breast Cancer Prevention and Early Detection Download Printable Version [PDF] » ( ... the factors that may affect your risk for breast cancer, and find out what you can do to ...

  14. Breast Cancer: Match of Her Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Breast Cancer The Match of Her Life Past Issues / Spring - ... Martina Navratilova stays strong in her battle against breast cancer and her work to help Americans live healthier, ...

  15. Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program supports a multidisciplinary network of scientists, clinicians, and community partners to examine the effects of environmental exposures that may predispose a woman to breast cancer throughout her life.

  16. Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Overview–for health professionals Research Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer On This Page Can antiperspirants or deodorants cause breast cancer? What do scientists know about the ingredients in ...

  17. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer in Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topic Targeted therapy for breast cancer in men Hormone therapy for breast cancer in men Hormone therapy ... fatigue, and pain at the injection site. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogs and anti-androgens LHRH ...

  18. Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... Distinguished Medical Service Award for their pioneering breast cancer research. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson, NIH In this ...

  19. Why Breast Cancer Survivors Should Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_159781.html Why Breast Cancer Survivors Should Exercise Moderate physical activity can ease stress that impairs ... to memory problems among breast cancer survivors, but exercise can help, according to new research. "We found ...

  20. Dilemma of Pregnant Ladies with Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zainur Rashid Z; S Sulaiha S A; Lew K G; Nurhana S

    2009-01-01

    Gestational breast cancer (GBC) or pregnancyassociatedbreast cancer was defined as breast cancerdiagnosed during pregnancy and within 1 year ofdelivery. Breast cancer is the second commonest cancerafter cervical seen in pregnancy and lactation.Nevertheless, the incidence is low and accounts forapproximately 1 in 3000 of pregnancies. A delay indiagnosis is common and 70% to 89% of patients withoperable primary lesions already have positive axillarylymph nodes. Breast cancer identified during p...