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Sample records for breast cancer association

  1. Pregnancy-associated Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Ashley S

    2016-12-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting pregnancy. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer refers to breast cancer that is diagnosed during pregnancy or within the first postpartum year. The incidence is increasing as more women delay childbearing. Breast cancer can be safely diagnosed, staged, and treated during pregnancy while protecting the fetus and mother with excellent outcomes for both. Avoiding diagnostic delays is vital to prognosis. This article provides an overview of the diagnosis, staging, management, and prognosis of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. Relevant current literature is reviewed.

  2. Prognosis of pregnancy-associated breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guek Eng; Mayer, Erica L; Partridge, Ann

    2017-06-01

    Conventionally, breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy and within the years following have been referred to collectively as pregnancy-associated breast cancer. However, increasing evidence suggests that breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy is a different entity from that diagnosed postpartum, both in terms of prognosis and biology. Given the increasing number of women who find themselves diagnosed with breast cancer during or following a pregnancy, future research and discussion should separate these two into distinct groups: breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy and breast cancer diagnosed postpartum in an effort to enhance our understanding to inform and improve clinical management and counseling.

  3. Association of breast cancer risk loci with breast cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Lindström, Sara; Shui, Irene; Black, Amanda; Hoover, Robert N; Ziegler, Regina G; Buring, Julie E; Chanock, Stephen J; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Giles, Graham G; Haiman, Christopher; Henderson, Brian E; Hankinson, Susan; Hunter, David J; Joshi, Amit D; Kraft, Peter; Lee, I-Min; Le Marchand, Loic; Milne, Roger L; Southey, Melissa C; Willett, Walter; Gunter, Marc; Panico, Salvatore; Sund, Malin; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Sánchez, María-José; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Peeters, Petra H; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele

    2015-12-15

    The survival of breast cancer patients is largely influenced by tumor characteristics, such as TNM stage, tumor grade and hormone receptor status. However, there is growing evidence that inherited genetic variation might affect the disease prognosis and response to treatment. Several lines of evidence suggest that alleles influencing breast cancer risk might also be associated with breast cancer survival. We examined the associations between 35 breast cancer susceptibility loci and the disease over-all survival (OS) in 10,255 breast cancer patients from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) of which 1,379 died, including 754 of breast cancer. We also conducted a meta-analysis of almost 35,000 patients and 5,000 deaths, combining results from BPC3 and the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) and performed in silico analyses of SNPs with significant associations. In BPC3, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was significantly associated with improved OS (HRper-allele =0.70; 95% CI: 0.58-0.85; ptrend  = 2.84 × 10(-4) ; HRheterozygotes  = 0.71; 95% CI: 0.55-0.92; HRhomozygotes  = 0.48; 95% CI: 0.31-0.76; p2DF  = 1.45 × 10(-3) ). In silico, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was predicted to increase expression of the tumor suppressor cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (CDKN1C). In the meta-analysis, TNRC9-rs3803662 was significantly associated with increased death hazard (HRMETA =1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.15; ptrend  = 6.6 × 10(-4) ; HRheterozygotes  = 0.96 95% CI: 0.90-1.03; HRhomozygotes  = 1.21; 95% CI: 1.09-1.35; p2DF =1.25 × 10(-4) ). In conclusion, we show that there is little overlap between the breast cancer risk single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified so far and the SNPs associated with breast cancer prognosis, with the possible exceptions of LSP1-rs3817198 and TNRC9-rs3803662. © 2015 UICC.

  4. Low penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with specific breast tumor subtypes: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Broeks, A; Schmidt, M.K; Sherman, M.E; Couch, F.J; Hopper, J.L; Dite, G.S; Apicella, C; Smith, L.D; Hammet, F; Southey, M.C; Veer, L.J. van 't; Groot, R. de; Smit, V.T; Fasching, P.A; Beckmann, M.W; Jud, S; Ekici, A.B; Hartmann, A; Hein, A; Schulz-Wendtland, R; Burwinkel, B; Marme, F; Schneeweiss, A; Sinn, H.P; Sohn, C; Tchatchou, S; Bojesen, S.E; Nordestgaard, B.G; Flyger, H; Orsted, D.D; Kaur-Knudsen, D; Milne, R.L; Perez, J.I; Zamora, P; Roiguez, P.M; Benitez, J; Brauch, H; Justenhoven, C; Ko, Y.D; Hamann, U; Fischer, H.P; Bruning, T; Pesch, B; Chang-Claude, J; Wang-Gohrke, S; Bremer, M; Karstens, J.H; Hillemanns, P; Dork, T; Nevanlinna, H.A; Heikkinen, T; Heikkila, P; Blomqvist, C; Aittomaki, K; Aaltonen, K; Lindblom, A; Margolin, S; Mannermaa, A; Kosma, V.M; Kauppinen, J.M; Kataja, V; Auvinen, P; Eskelinen, M; Soini, Y; Chenevix-Trench, G; Spurdle, A.B; Beesley, J; Chen, X; Holland, H; Lambrechts, D; Claes, B; Vandorpe, T; Neven, P; Wildiers, H; Flesch-Janys, D; Hein, R; Loning, T; Kosel, M; Fredericksen, Z.S; Wang, X; Giles, G.G; Baglietto, L; Severi, G; McLean, C; Haiman, C.A; Henderson, B.E; Marchand, L. le; Kolonel, L.N; Alnaes, G.G; Kristensen, V; Borresen-Dale, A.L; Hunter, D.J; Hankinson, S.E; Anulis, I.L; Mulligan, A.M; O'Malley, F.P; Devilee, P; Huijts, P.E; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M; Asperen, C.J. van

    2011-01-01

    .... We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes...

  5. Association between breast and thyroid cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehrer S

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Steven Lehrer, Sheryl Green, John A Martignetti, Kenneth E Rosenzweig Departments of Radiation Oncology and Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA Background: The risk of thyroid cancer is known to be slightly increased in women after treatment for breast cancer. In the current study, we analyzed the incidence of thyroid cancer and breast cancer in 50 US states and in the District of Columbia to ascertain how often these two diseases are associated. Methods: Data on the incidence of thyroid cancer were obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute and data on the incidence of breast cancer were from the American Cancer Society. Data on the average number of children per family with children and mean household income were sourced from the US Bureau of the Census and prevalence of obesity by state is determined from a paper published in 2010 on state-specific obesity prevalence among US adults by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Results: There was a significant association between breast and thyroid cancer (P=0.002. Since the incidence of breast cancer increases with increasing income and obesity, while decreasing with parity, multiple linear regression was performed. Breast cancer incidence was significantly related to thyroid cancer incidence (β=0.271, P=0.039, inversely related to average number of children per family with children (β=-0.271, P=0.039, unrelated to adult obesity (β=0.134, P=0.369, and significantly related to family income (β=0.642, P<0.001. Conclusion: This study identifies an association between breast and thyroid cancer. The association suggests that unexplored breast-thyroid cancer susceptibility loci exist and warrant further study. Keywords: breast cancer, thyroid cancer, genetics, association

  6. Management of pregnancy associated breast cancer | Ohanaka ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The peak age incidence for breast cancer in developing countries is 35-45 years, which is part of the reproductive years of our women. As women defer childbearing on account of education and careers, the incidence of pregnancy associated breast cancer is expected to increase. Aim: This study presents 4 ...

  7. Pregnancy associated breast cancer and pregnancy after breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğer, Emek; Çalışkan, Eray; Mallmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and its frequency is increasing as more women postpone their pregnancies to their thirties and forties. Breast cancer diagnosis during pregnancy and lactation is difficult and complex both for the patient and doctors. Delay in diagnosis is frequent and treatment modalities are difficult to accept for the pregnant women. The common treatment approach is surgery after diagnosis, chemotherapy after the first trimester and radiotherapy after delivery. Even though early stage breast cancers have similar prognosis, advanced stage breast cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and lactation have poorer prognosis than similar stage breast cancers diagnosed in non-pregnant women. Women who desire to become pregnant after treatment of breast cancer will have many conflicts. Although the most common concern is recurrence of breast cancer due to pregnancy, the studies conducted showed that pregnancy has no negative effect on breast cancer prognosis. In this review we search for the frequency of breast cancer during pregnancy, the histopathological findings, risk factor, diagnostic and treatment modalities. We reviewed the literature for evidence based findings to help consult the patients on the outcome of breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy and lactation, and also inform the patients who desire to become pregnant after breast cancer according to current evidences. PMID:24592003

  8. Breast MRI in pregnancy-associated breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Shin Jung; Shin, Sang Soo [Dept. of of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Hyo Soon; Baek, Jang Mi; Seon, Hyun Ju; Heo, Suk Hee; Kim, Jin Woong; Park, Min Ho [Chonnam National University Medical School, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of MR imaging and to describe the MR imaging findings of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. From 2006 to 2013, MR images of 23 patients with pregnancy-associated breast cancer were retrospectively evaluated. MR images were reviewed to evaluate lesion detection and imaging findings of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. MR images were analyzed by using the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System and an additional MR-detected lesion with no mammographic or sonographic abnormality was determined. MR imaging depicted breast cancer in all patients, even in marked background parenchymal enhancement. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer was seen as a mass in 20 patients and as non-mass enhancement with segmental distribution in 3 patients. The most common features of the masses were irregular shape (85%), non-circumscribed margin (85%), and heterogeneous enhancement (60%). An additional site of cancer was detected with MR imaging in 5 patients (21.7%) and the type of surgery was changed. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer was usually seen as an irregular mass with heterogeneous enhancement on MR images. Although these findings were not specific, MR imaging was useful in evaluating the disease extent of pregnancy-associated breast cancer.

  9. Pregnancy associated breast cancer and pregnancy after breast cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Doğer, Emek; Çalışkan, Eray; Mallmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and its frequency is increasing as more women postpone their pregnancies to their thirties and forties. Breast cancer diagnosis during pregnancy and lactation is difficult and complex both for the patient and doctors. Delay in diagnosis is frequent and treatment modalities are difficult to accept for the pregnant women. The common treatment approach is surgery after diagnosis, chemotherapy after the first trimester and...

  10. Are diet quality scores after breast cancer diagnosis associated with improved breast cancer survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izano, Monika A; Fung, Teresa T; Chiuve, Stephanie S; Hu, Frank B; Holmes, Michelle D

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have found that diets rich in fruits and vegetables are associated with reduced breast cancer mortality. However, these eating patterns do not necessarily reflect overall diet quality. The association of breast cancer mortality with a priori defined dietary scores, which are based on recommended dietary guidelines and reflect diet quality, has not been evaluated. We hypothesized that diet quality indices based on recommended guidelines are associated with decreased risk of breast cancer and nonbreast cancer mortality in breast cancer survivors. We examined the association between the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) score, and the Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI)-2010, and the risk of breast cancer mortality and total mortality among women from the Nurses' Health Study diagnosed with breast cancer. Adherence to DASH-style and AHEI-2010 diets were associated with reduced risk of nonbreast cancer mortality (comparing the fifth quintile with the first quintile, relative risk (RR) = 0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.53-0.99, P trend = 0.03 for DASH, and RR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.42-0.77, P trend Diet scores were not significantly associated with breast cancer mortality. Our findings suggest that adherence to a higher quality diet after breast cancer diagnosis does not considerably change the risk of breast cancer death and recurrence. However, healthy dietary choices after breast cancer were associated with reduced risk of nonbreast cancer mortality in women with breast cancer.

  11. Association between breast cancer, breast density, and body adiposity evaluated by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenlian; Huang, Peng; Macura, Katarzyna J; Artemov, Dmitri

    2016-07-01

    Despite the lack of reliable methods with which to measure breast density from 2D mammograms, numerous studies have demonstrated a positive association between breast cancer and breast density. The goal of this study was to study the association between breast cancer and body adiposity, as well as breast density quantitatively assessed from 3D MRI breast images. Breast density was calculated from 3D T1-weighted MRI images. The thickness of the upper abdominal adipose layer was used as a surrogate marker for body adiposity. We evaluated the correlation between breast density, age, body adiposity, and breast cancer. Breast density was calculated for 410 patients with unilateral invasive breast cancer, 73 patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and 361 controls without breast cancer. Breast density was inversely related to age and the thickness of the upper abdominal adipose layer. Breast cancer was only positively associated with body adiposity and age. Age and body adiposity are predictive of breast density. Breast cancer was not associated with breast density; however, it was associated with the thickness of the upper abdominal adipose layer, a surrogate marker for body adiposity. Our results based on a limited number of patients warrant further investigations. • MRI breast density is negatively associated with body adiposity. • MRI breast density is negatively associated with age. • Breast cancer is positively associated with body adiposity. • Breast Cancer is not associated with MRI breast density.

  12. Study of the association between blood types and breast cancer among Isfahanian women with breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Hossein Mirlohi Flavarjani; Behnood Hedayatpour; Nasrollah Bashardoost; Sayed Mohammad Nourian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previous studies suggest a possible association between ABO blood group and the risk of breast cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the presence of a possible association between breast cancer and blood groups ABO and Rh. Materials and Methods: 549 women including 173 cases and 376 controls were selected. The case group included patients with breast cancer and the cancer diagnosis was confirmed for all of them. The control group included women with no reports of bre...

  13. Molecular alterations associated with breast cancer mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Voeghtly

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease and patients with similar pathologies and treatments may have different clinical outcomes. Identification of molecular alterations associated with disease outcome may improve risk assessment and treatments for aggressive breast cancer. METHODS: Allelic imbalance (AI data was generated for 122 invasive breast tumors with known clinical outcome. Levels and patterns of AI were compared between patients who died of disease (DOD and those with ≥5 years disease-free survival (DFS using Student t-test and chi-square analysis with a significance value of P5-years post-diagnosis mortality but not with death from disease within five years, suggesting that patients with short- and long-term mortality may have distinct genetic diseases.

  14. [Treatment of pregnancy-associated breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajti, János; Pieler, József; Simonka, Zsolt; Paszt, Attila; Lázár, György

    2014-08-01

    A 25-year-old primipara, in the thirty-second week of her pregnancy observed a nodule in the upper outer quadrant of her left breast during self-examination. Complex breast examination revealed calcification with 4 cm of diameter. Ductal malignant cells (C5) were identified by fine-needle aspiration biopsy, while core biopsy verified invasive ductal carcinoma, grade III (B5b). No manifestations of metastases were presented. After pregnancy termination wide excision with additional axillary sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed. Because of its positivity block dissection of axillary lymph nodes was carried out. The surgical therapy was followed by adjuvant chemo-, radio- and hormonal therapy. Later an angiomyxoma appeared in the right inguinal region, which was excised in toto. The incidence of pregnancy related malignant diseases is increasing, of which breast cancer predominates. Breast cancer, which is diagnosed during pregnancy or within the first year of delivery is called pregnancy-associated breast cancer. Because of the physiological changes in pregnancy the recognition of the disease is difficult. Therapy is complex, as besides the treatment of the mother, the safety of the fetus should be emphasized. The treatment strategies are different in the three trimesters. The surgical treatment can be performed during the whole pregnancy. The use of radiotherapy is controversial, because of teratogenic effects, while chemotherapy is permitted in the second and third trimesters. Nearly three years after the operation, our patient does not have any symptoms, her son is healthy.

  15. Associations of Breast Cancer Risk Factors With Tumor Subtypes: A Pooled Analysis From the Breast Cancer Association Consortium Studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    ...; Yang, Xiaohong R; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L; Couch, Fergus J; Nevanlinna, Heli; Milne, Roger L; Gaudet, Mia; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Cox, Angela; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Rebecca; Spurdle, Amanda B; Blows, Fiona; ver, Kristy; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Sinn, Peter; Vrieling, Alina; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomaeki, Kristiina; Heikkilae, Paeivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; Chanock, Stephen; Figueroa, Jonine; Brinton, Louise; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Liu, Jianjun; Van 't Veer, Laura J; Van Leeuwen, Flora E; Anulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Knight, Julia A; Mulligan, Anna Marie; O'Malley, Frances P; Weerasooriya, Nayana; John, Esther M; Beckmann, Matthias W; Hartmann, Arndt; Weihbrecht, Sebastian B; Wachter, David L; Jud, Sebastian M. S; Loehberg, Christian R; Baglietto, Laura; English, Dallas R; Giles, Graham G; McLean, Catriona A; Severi, Gianluca; Lambrechts, Diether; Vandorpe, Thijs; Weltens, Caroline; Paridaens, Robert; Smeets, Ann; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E; Cafourek, Victoria; Fredericksen, Zachary; Kosel, Matthew; Vachon, Celine; Cramp, Helen E; Connley, Daniel; Cross, Simon S; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Reed, Malcolm W. R; Doerk, Thilo; Bremer, Michael; Meyer, Aneas; Karstens, Johann H; Ay, Aysun; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menendez Roiguez, Primitiva; Zamora, Pilar; Bentez, Javier; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Hamann, Ute; Pesch, Beate; Bruening, Thomas; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Eccles, Diana M; Tapper, William J; Gerty, Sue M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian P; Jones, Angela; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; McInerney, Niall; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios

    2011-01-01

    ...) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors. Methods We pooled tumor marker and epidemiological risk factor data from 35 568 invasive breast cancer case patients from 34 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium...

  16. Pregnancy associated breast cancer: an institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogia, A; Deo, S V S; Shukla, N K; Mohanti, B K; Raina, V

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) has been defined as breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy or within 1 year of delivery. There is a paucity of data on PABC from India. The aim of our study was to assess the clinical-pathological parameters and outcome of PABC at Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences. We screened approximately 3,750 cases registered from January 2001 to December 2012 and found 26 cases of PABC. Patients' records were obtained from the computer database using International Classification of Diseases code (C-50). The median age was 26 years (range 20-35). The median duration of symptoms was 11.5 months. The American Joint Committee on Cancer stage distribution was Stage I - 1, Stage II - 3, Stage III - 14 and in Stage IV - 8 patients. Median clinical tumor size is 5.5 cm. Four patients were presented with the inflammatory breast cancer. Positive family history was elicited in three patients. Twenty-one patients were diagnosed after delivery, two patients in the first trimester, two patients in the second trimester and three patients in the third trimester. Estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) negativity and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu) positivity was 56% and 38%, respectively. Nearly, 40% of patients had a high-grade tumor and 70% had pathological node positivity. With a median follow-up of 33 months, 3 years relapse free survival and overall survival was 40% and 50% respectively. Bone was the most common site for systemic relapse. PABC constituted 0.7% of all breast cancer patients. It is associated with advanced stage at presentation. Half of them were ER/PR negative and one-third was HER2/neu positive.

  17. Study of the association between blood types and breast cancer among Isfahanian women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavarjani, Amir Hossein Mirlohi; Hedayatpour, Behnood; Bashardoost, Nasrollah; Nourian, Sayed Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies suggest a possible association between ABO blood group and the risk of breast cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the presence of a possible association between breast cancer and blood groups ABO and Rh. 549 women including 173 cases and 376 controls were selected. The case group included patients with breast cancer and the cancer diagnosis was confirmed for all of them. The control group included women with no reports of breast cancer. Blood group sampling of all cases was performed. The obtained information regarding presence or absence of cancer, blood type, age group and type of cancer were analyzed. There is no significant association between blood types ABO (Rh) and the breast cancer. (P > 0.05) It has been found that the prevalence of invasive intraductal carcinoma was 85% among the cases. About 5% of the total diagnosed cancers in the case group were allocated to modularly carcinoma, invasive lobular carcinoma and Paget's disease. There was no relative frequency in specific blood group for these three types of cancer. The blood types ABO (Rh) and breast cancer type showed no significant relation (P = 0.2). According to the obtained results from this study, there was no relative frequency in specific blood group for these three types of cancer and the blood type could not be influenced as a risk factor in breast cancer.

  18. Common non-synonymous SNPs associated with breast cancer susceptibility: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    ...; Milne, Roger L; Burwinkel, Barbara; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Arias-Perez, Jose-Ignacio; Zamora, M Pilar; Menéndez-Rodríguez, Primitiva; Hardisson, David; Mendiola, Marta; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Bolla, Manjeet K; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lambrechts, Diether; Peuteman, Gilian; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Smeets, Ann; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katazyna; Hartman, Mikael; Hui, Miao; Yen Lim, Wei; Wan Chan, Ching; Marme, Federick; Yang, Rongxi; Bugert, Peter; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Hooning, Maartje J; Kriege, Mieke; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Koppert, Linetta B; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha J; Long, Jirong; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Cornelissen, Sten; Braaf, Linde; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Noh, Dong-Young; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Candidate variant association studies have been largely unsuccessful in identifying common breast cancer susceptibility variants, although most studies have been underpowered to detect associations...

  19. Breast Cancer-Associated Thrombotic Microangiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regierer, Anne C; Kuehnhardt, Dagmar; Schulz, Carsten-Oliver; Flath, Bernd; Jehn, Christian F; Scholz, Christian W; Possinger, Kurt; Eucker, Jan

    2011-12-01

    BACKGROUND: Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is defined as thrombocytopenia and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia. Cancer-associated TMA, a rare but fatal condition, seems an entity distinct from classical thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP)/hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). PATIENTS AND METHODS: All patients with breast cancer-associated TMA treated at our institution between 2003 and 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. To elucidate pathophysiological mechanisms, we measured the serum activity of the metalloprotease ADAMTS13. RESULTS: 8 patients were identified. All showed bone marrow infiltration of breast cancer as well as thrombocytopenia, schistocytes, and hemolytic anemia. ADAMTS13 activity was mildly decreased in 4/6 patients (20-108%, normal range 30-120%), but none showed severely low levels as is characteristic of classical TTP. 6 patients were treated with anthracycline-containing fractionated chemotherapy, 5/6 patients experienced partial response. Overall survival was 13 months. Fractionated chemotherapy was well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: Cancer-associated TMA has an underlying mechanism different from classical TTP. While bone marrow infiltration might be of major relevance, ADAMTS13 deficiency seems to be an epiphenomenon. Fractionated chemotherapy resulted in higher remission rates and comparatively long survival.

  20. Association analysis identifies 65 new breast cancer risk loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lindström, Sara; Dennis, Joe

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer risk is influenced by rare coding variants in susceptibility genes, such as BRCA1, and many common, mostly non-coding variants. However, much of the genetic contribution to breast cancer risk remains unknown. Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study of breast ca...

  1. Association analysis identifies 65 new breast cancer risk loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lindström, Sara; Dennis, Joe; Beesley, Jonathan; Hui, Shirley; Kar, Siddhartha; Lemaçon, Audrey; Soucy, Penny; Glubb, Dylan; Rostamianfar, Asha; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Tyrer, Jonathan; Dicks, Ed; Lee, Andrew; Wang, Zhaoming; Allen, Jamie; Keeman, Renske; Eilber, Ursula; French, Juliet D.; Qing Chen, Xiao; Fachal, Laura; McCue, Karen; McCart Reed, Amy E.; Ghoussaini, Maya; Carroll, Jason S.; Jiang, Xia; Finucane, Hilary; Adams, Marcia; Adank, Muriel A.; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Arndt, Volker; Aronson, Kristan J.; Arun, Banu; Auer, Paul L.; Bacot, François; Barrdahl, Myrto; Baynes, Caroline; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Behrens, Sabine; Benitez, Javier; Bermisheva, Marina; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Brinton, Louise; Broberg, Per; Brock, Ian W.; Broeks, Annegien; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Brucker, Sara Y.; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Butterbach, Katja; Cai, Qiuyin; Cai, Hui; Caldés, Trinidad; Canzian, Federico; Carracedo, Angel; Carter, Brian D.; Castelao, Jose E.; Chan, Tsun L.; David Cheng, Ting-Yuan; Seng Chia, Kee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Christiansen, Hans; Clarke, Christine L.; Collée, Margriet; Conroy, Don M.; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Cornelissen, Sten; Cox, David G.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B.; Devilee, Peter; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Durcan, Lorraine; Dwek, Miriam; Eccles, Diana M.; Ekici, Arif B.; Eliassen, A. Heather; Ellberg, Carolina; Elvira, Mingajeva; Engel, Christoph; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fritschi, Lin; Gaborieau, Valerie; Gabrielson, Marike; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M.; García-Sáenz, José A.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Georgoulias, Vassilios; Giles, Graham G.; Glendon, Gord; Goldberg, Mark S.; Goldgar, David E.; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe I.; Grip, Mervi; Gronwald, Jacek; Grundy, Anne; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Hahnen, Eric; Haiman, Christopher A.; Håkansson, Niclas; Hamann, Ute; Hamel, Nathalie; Hankinson, Susan; Harrington, Patricia; Hart, Steven N.; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Hartman, Mikael; Hein, Alexander; Heyworth, Jane; Hicks, Belynda; Hillemanns, Peter; Ho, Dona N.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hopper, John L.; Hou, Ming-Feng; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Huang, Guanmengqian; Humphreys, Keith; Ishiguro, Junko; Ito, Hidemi; Iwasaki, Motoki; Iwata, Hiroji; Jakubowska, Anna; Janni, Wolfgang; John, Esther M.; Johnson, Nichola; Jones, Kristine; Jones, Michael; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kabisch, Maria; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Kang, Daehee; Kasuga, Yoshio; Kerin, Michael J.; Khan, Sofia; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Kiiski, Johanna I.; Kim, Sung-Won; Knight, Julia A.; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Krüger, Ute; Kwong, Ava; Lambrechts, Diether; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Eunjung; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lee, Jong Won; Neng Lee, Chuen; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Li, Jingmei; Lilyquist, Jenna; Lindblom, Annika; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lo, Wing-Yee; Loibl, Sibylle; Long, Jirong; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Lubinski, Jan; Luccarini, Craig; Lux, Michael P.; Ma, Edmond S. K.; MacInnis, Robert J.; Maishman, Tom; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E.; Kostovska, Ivana Maleva; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Manson, JoAnn E.; Margolin, Sara; Mariapun, Shivaani; Martinez, Maria Elena; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; McKay, James; McLean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Menéndez, Primitiva; Menon, Usha; Meyer, Jeffery; Miao, Hui; Miller, Nicola; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Muir, Kenneth; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Mulot, Claire; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nielsen, Sune F.; Noh, Dong-Young; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Norman, Aaron; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Olson, Janet E.; Olsson, Håkan; Olswold, Curtis; Orr, Nick; Pankratz, V. Shane; Park, Sue K.; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Lloyd, Rachel; Perez, Jose I. A.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Pinchev, Mila; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Prentice, Ross; Presneau, Nadege; Prokofyeva, Darya; Pugh, Elizabeth; Pylkäs, Katri; Rack, Brigitte; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rennert, Gadi; Rennert, Hedy S.; Rhenius, Valerie; Romero, Atocha; Romm, Jane; Ruddy, Kathryn J.; Rüdiger, Thomas; Rudolph, Anja; Ruebner, Matthias; Rutgers, Emiel J. T.; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Sandler, Dale P.; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schürmann, Peter; Scott, Rodney J.; Scott, Christopher; Seal, Sheila; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Sharma, Priyanka; Shen, Chen-Yang; Sheng, Grace; Sherman, Mark E.; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Smeets, Ann; Sohn, Christof; Southey, Melissa C.; Spinelli, John J.; Stegmaier, Christa; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Stone, Jennifer; Stram, Daniel O.; Surowy, Harald; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tamimi, Rulla; Taylor, Jack A.; Tengström, Maria; teo, Soo H.; Beth Terry, Mary; Tessier, Daniel C.; Thanasitthichai, Somchai; Thöne, Kathrin; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Tong, Ling; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Ursin, Giske; Untch, Michael; Vachon, Celine; van Asperen, Christi J.; van den Berg, David; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van der Kolk, Lizet; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Vincent, Daniel; Vollenweider, Jason; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weinberg, Clarice R.; Wendt, Camilla; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wildiers, Hans; Willett, Walter; Winqvist, Robert; Wolk, Alicja; Wu, Anna H.; Xia, Lucy; Yamaji, Taiki; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Har Yip, Cheng; Yoo, Keun-Young; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Ying; Zhu, Bin; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ziv, Elad; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L.; Amos, Christopher I.; Couch, Fergus J.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hall, Per; Hunter, David J.; Milne, Roger L.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Dunning, Alison M.; Edwards, Stacey L.; Bader, Gary D.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Simard, Jacques; Kraft, Peter; Easton, Douglas F.

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer risk is influenced by rare coding variants in susceptibility genes, such as BRCA1, and many common, mostly non-coding variants. However, much of the genetic contribution to breast cancer risk remains unknown. Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study of breast

  2. [Association of pulmonary carcinoma and ductal breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khattabi, W; Lakhdar, N; Jabri, H; Afif, H

    2016-08-01

    Multiple primary cancers are relatively rare. The association between lung and breast cancer is exceptional and requires genetic research and predisposing factors. We report the case of a female patient of 43years, hospitalized for atelectasis of the left lung with breast lumps. Bronchial biopsies have concluded a primary lung adenocarcinoma. Breast biopsy objectified ductal invasive breast cancer. The treatment was a palliative chemotherapy. The evolution is marked by the early death of the patient. Although the association of multiple cancers is rare, their discovery requires a particular treatment regimen depends on the staging of each cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Common germline polymorphisms associated with breast cancer-specific survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirie, Ailith; Guo, Qi; Kraft, Peter

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have identified common germline variants nominally associated with breast cancer survival. These associations have not been widely replicated in further studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of previously reported SNPs with breast cancer...

  4. Independent Association of Lobular Involution and Mammographic Breast Density With Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, Celine M.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Vierkant, Robert A.; Anderson, Stephanie S.; Brandt, Kathleen R.; Visscher, Daniel W.; Reynolds, Carol; Frost, Marlene H.; Hartmann, Lynn C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Lobular involution, or age-related atrophy of breast lobules, is inversely associated with breast cancer risk, and mammographic breast density (MBD) is positively associated with breast cancer risk. Methods To evaluate whether lobular involution and MBD are independently associated with breast cancer risk in women with benign breast disease, we performed a nested cohort study among women (n = 2666) with benign breast disease diagnosed at Mayo Clinic between January 1, 1985, and December 31, 1991 and a mammogram available within 6 months of the diagnosis. Women were followed up for an average of 13.3 years to document any breast cancer incidence. Lobular involution was categorized as none, partial, or complete; parenchymal pattern was classified using the Wolfe classification as N1 (nondense), P1, P2 (ductal prominence occupying 25% of the breast, respectively), or DY (extremely dense). Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess associations of lobular involution and MBD with breast cancer risk were estimated using adjusted Cox proportional hazards model. All tests of statistical significance were two-sided. Results After adjustment for MBD, having no or partial lobular involution was associated with a higher risk of breast cancer than having complete involution (none: HR of breast cancer incidence = 2.62, 95% CI = 1.39 to 4.94; partial: HR of breast cancer incidence = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.03 to 2.53; Ptrend = .002). Similarly, after adjustment for involution, having dense breasts was associated with higher risk of breast cancer than having nondense breasts (for DY: HR of breast cancer incidence = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.03 to 2.73; for P2: HR of breast cancer incidence = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.20 to 3.21; for P1: HR of breast cancer incidence = 1.23, 95% CI = 0.67 to 2.26; Ptrend = .02). Having a combination of no involution and dense breasts was associated with higher risk of breast cancer than having complete involution and nondense breasts (HR of

  5. Lobulitis in nonneoplastic breast tissue from breast cancer patients: association with phenotypes that are common in hereditary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbahce, H Evin; Vanderwerf, Steve; Blair, Cindy; Sweeney, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Lobular inflammation (lobulitis) has been demonstrated in benign breast tissue adjacent to in situ and invasive breast cancers and, more recently, in nonneoplastic tissue from prophylactic mastectomy specimens for hereditary high-risk breast carcinoma. The aim of this study is to investigate the incidence of lobulitis in benign breast tissue of patients with breast cancer and associated clinicopathologic features. We reviewed nonneoplastic breast tissue sections from 334 patients with invasive breast carcinoma to study lobulitis in normal breast tissue and to correlate its presence with clinicopathologic features of the associated tumor. Clinical information (age, menopausal status, and follow-up), tumor characteristics (type, grade, size, lymph node status, stage, estrogen and progesterone receptor, HER2), and survival were recorded. Characteristics of women with and without lobulitis were cross-classified with categories of clinical, pathologic, and histologic characteristics, and differences in distributions were tested in univariate and multivariate analysis. Lobulitis was found in 26 (8%) of 334 patients. The lymphocytic infiltrate was predominantly T-cell type. In a multivariate model, lobulitis in patients with breast cancer was significantly associated with younger age, triple (estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER2)-negative cancers, and medullary phenotypes. Lobulitis in nonneoplastic breast tissue, away from tumor, is associated with clinicopathologic features more commonly seen in hereditary breast cancer. © 2013.

  6. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer; A management dilemma in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) is uncommon. Its management is sometimes controversial and may present ethical problems. This paper presents cases treated in the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital from 1990 to 2002. The case records of patients treated for pregnancy-associated breast cancer ...

  7. Nipple aspirate fluid color is associated with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Edward R; Winn, Justin N; Dale, Paul S; Wagner-Mann, Colette

    2006-01-01

    Fluid can be non-invasively aspirated from the breast nipple (nipple aspirate fluid, NAF). NAF may have many colors, including clear, white, yellow, green, and red/brown. While bloody spontaneous nipple discharge has been linked with breast cancer, the association of NAF color with cancer is not established. Our hypothesis was that red/brown NAF color was associated with breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to assess (1) if red/brown NAF is associated with the presence and progression of breast cancer, (2) the influence of prior needle or surgical biopsy on NAF color, and (3) if an association between NAF color and breast cancer was found, to develop a cancer predictive model including NAF color and cytology, and clinical information. Specimens were obtained from 848 breasts between 1999 and 2004 after subjects enrolled in an IRB approved protocol to evaluate biologic markers of breast cancer. Cytologic evaluation was performed on Papanicolaou-stained cytospin preparations of NAF. Red/brown NAF was associated with breast cancer when considering all samples (pwomen who did not undergo recent surgery (p=0.005). Needle biopsy did not, but surgical biopsy did influence NAF color. For the 327 women with NAF collected from both breasts, there was a significant association between red/brown NAF color and the presence of breast cancer (p=0.005). Red/brown NAF was more common in breasts with ductal carcinoma in situ than atypical hyperplasia (p=0.008). The optimal model, included NAF color, cytology, and age, was 92% sensitive and 61% specific in predicting if a woman had breast cancer. NAF color was associated with the presence of breast cancer and the progression from precancer to cancer in a population of women who presented to a breast cancer evaluation clinic. NAF color contributed to a highly predictive breast cancer detection model. Additional studies are warranted to determine the usefulness of NAF color in the assessment of women who present for breast

  8. Evidence that breast tissue stiffness is associated with risk of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman F Boyd

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence from animal models shows that tissue stiffness increases the invasion and progression of cancers, including mammary cancer. We here use measurements of the volume and the projected area of the compressed breast during mammography to derive estimates of breast tissue stiffness and examine the relationship of stiffness to risk of breast cancer. METHODS: Mammograms were used to measure the volume and projected areas of total and radiologically dense breast tissue in the unaffected breasts of 362 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer (cases and 656 women of the same age who did not have breast cancer (controls. Measures of breast tissue volume and the projected area of the compressed breast during mammography were used to calculate the deformation of the breast during compression and, with the recorded compression force, to estimate the stiffness of breast tissue. Stiffness was compared in cases and controls, and associations with breast cancer risk examined after adjustment for other risk factors. RESULTS: After adjustment for percent mammographic density by area measurements, and other risk factors, our estimate of breast tissue stiffness was significantly associated with breast cancer (odds ratio = 1.21, 95% confidence interval = 1.03, 1.43, p = 0.02 and improved breast cancer risk prediction in models with percent mammographic density, by both area and volume measurements. CONCLUSION: An estimate of breast tissue stiffness was associated with breast cancer risk and improved risk prediction based on mammographic measures and other risk factors. Stiffness may provide an additional mechanism by which breast tissue composition is associated with risk of breast cancer and merits examination using more direct methods of measurement.

  9. Evidence that breast tissue stiffness is associated with risk of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Norman F; Li, Qing; Melnichouk, Olga; Huszti, Ella; Martin, Lisa J; Gunasekara, Anoma; Mawdsley, Gord; Yaffe, Martin J; Minkin, Salomon

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from animal models shows that tissue stiffness increases the invasion and progression of cancers, including mammary cancer. We here use measurements of the volume and the projected area of the compressed breast during mammography to derive estimates of breast tissue stiffness and examine the relationship of stiffness to risk of breast cancer. Mammograms were used to measure the volume and projected areas of total and radiologically dense breast tissue in the unaffected breasts of 362 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer (cases) and 656 women of the same age who did not have breast cancer (controls). Measures of breast tissue volume and the projected area of the compressed breast during mammography were used to calculate the deformation of the breast during compression and, with the recorded compression force, to estimate the stiffness of breast tissue. Stiffness was compared in cases and controls, and associations with breast cancer risk examined after adjustment for other risk factors. After adjustment for percent mammographic density by area measurements, and other risk factors, our estimate of breast tissue stiffness was significantly associated with breast cancer (odds ratio = 1.21, 95% confidence interval = 1.03, 1.43, p = 0.02) and improved breast cancer risk prediction in models with percent mammographic density, by both area and volume measurements. An estimate of breast tissue stiffness was associated with breast cancer risk and improved risk prediction based on mammographic measures and other risk factors. Stiffness may provide an additional mechanism by which breast tissue composition is associated with risk of breast cancer and merits examination using more direct methods of measurement.

  10. Evidence That Breast Tissue Stiffness Is Associated with Risk of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Norman F.; Li, Qing; Melnichouk, Olga; Huszti, Ella; Martin, Lisa J.; Gunasekara, Anoma; Mawdsley, Gord; Yaffe, Martin J.; Minkin, Salomon

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence from animal models shows that tissue stiffness increases the invasion and progression of cancers, including mammary cancer. We here use measurements of the volume and the projected area of the compressed breast during mammography to derive estimates of breast tissue stiffness and examine the relationship of stiffness to risk of breast cancer. Methods Mammograms were used to measure the volume and projected areas of total and radiologically dense breast tissue in the unaffected breasts of 362 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer (cases) and 656 women of the same age who did not have breast cancer (controls). Measures of breast tissue volume and the projected area of the compressed breast during mammography were used to calculate the deformation of the breast during compression and, with the recorded compression force, to estimate the stiffness of breast tissue. Stiffness was compared in cases and controls, and associations with breast cancer risk examined after adjustment for other risk factors. Results After adjustment for percent mammographic density by area measurements, and other risk factors, our estimate of breast tissue stiffness was significantly associated with breast cancer (odds ratio = 1.21, 95% confidence interval = 1.03, 1.43, p = 0.02) and improved breast cancer risk prediction in models with percent mammographic density, by both area and volume measurements. Conclusion An estimate of breast tissue stiffness was associated with breast cancer risk and improved risk prediction based on mammographic measures and other risk factors. Stiffness may provide an additional mechanism by which breast tissue composition is associated with risk of breast cancer and merits examination using more direct methods of measurement. PMID:25010427

  11. Hereditary genes and SNPs associated with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Kooshyar Mohammad; Nassiri, Mohammad Reza; Nasiri, Khadijeh

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women affecting up to one third of tehm during their lifespans. Increased expression of some genes due to polymorphisms increases the risk of breast cancer incidence. Since mutations that are recognized to increase breast cancer risk within families are quite rare, identification of these SNPs is very important. The most important loci which include mutations are; BRCA1, BRCA2, PTEN, ATM, TP53, CHEK2, PPM1D, CDH1, MLH1, MRE11, MSH2, MSH6, MUTYH, NBN, PMS1, PMS2, BRIP1, RAD50, RAD51C, STK11 and BARD1. Presence of SNPs in these genes increases the risk of breast cancer and associated diagnostic markers are among the most reliable for assessing prognosis of breast cancer. In this article we reviewed the hereditary genes of breast cancer and SNPs associated with increasing the risk of breast cancer that were recently were reported from candidate gene, meta-analysis and GWAS studies. SNPs of genes associated with breast cancer can be used as a potential tool for improving cancer diagnosis and treatment planning.

  12. Associations of breast cancer risk factors with tumor subtypes: a pooled analysis from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaohong R; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors.......Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors....

  13. Common germline polymorphisms associated with breast cancer-specific survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirie, Ailith; Guo, Qi; Kraft, Peter; Canisius, Sander; Eccles, Diana M; Rahman, Nazneen; Nevanlinna, Heli; Chen, Constance; Khan, Sofia; Tyrer, Jonathan; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lush, Michael; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Lambrechts, Dieter; Weltens, Caroline; Leunen, Karin; van Ongeval, Chantal; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Fagerholm, Rainer; Muranen, Taru A; Olsen, Janet E; Hallberg, Emily; Vachon, Celine; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Broeks, Annegien; Cornelissen, Sten; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Frederick; Le Marchand, Loic; Hopper, John L; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm Wr; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; McLean, Catriona; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John Wm; van den Ouweland, Ans Mw; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Yang, Rongxi; Burwinkel, Barbara; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Holleczek, Bernd; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S; Humphreys, Keith; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert Aem; Seynaeve, Caroline; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Beckmann, Matthias W; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Balleine, Rosemary; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M Pilar; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Hamann, Ute; Kabisch, Maria; Ulmer, Hans Ulrich; Rüdiger, Thomas; Margolin, Sara; Kristensen, Vessela; Nord, Siljie; Evans, D Gareth; Abraham, Jean; Earl, Helena; Poole, Christopher J; Hiller, Louise; Dunn, Janet A; Bowden, Sarah; Yang, Rose; Campa, Daniele; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Hankinson, Susan; Hoover, Robert N; Hüsing, Anika; Kaaks, Rudolf; Machiela, Mitchell J; Willett, Walter; Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Chin, Suet-Feung; Caldas, Carlos; Hunter, David J; Lindstrom, Sara; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Couch, Fergus J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Mannermaa, Arto; Andrulis, Irene L; Hall, Per; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Easton, Douglas F; Bojesen, Stig E; Cox, Angela; Fasching, Peter A; Pharoah, Paul Dp; Schmidt, Marjanka K

    2015-04-22

    Previous studies have identified common germline variants nominally associated with breast cancer survival. These associations have not been widely replicated in further studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of previously reported SNPs with breast cancer-specific survival using data from a pooled analysis of eight breast cancer survival genome-wide association studies (GWAS) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. A literature review was conducted of all previously published associations between common germline variants and three survival outcomes: breast cancer-specific survival, overall survival and disease-free survival. All associations that reached the nominal significance level of P value <0.05 were included. Single nucleotide polymorphisms that had been previously reported as nominally associated with at least one survival outcome were evaluated in the pooled analysis of over 37,000 breast cancer cases for association with breast cancer-specific survival. Previous associations were evaluated using a one-sided test based on the reported direction of effect. Fifty-six variants from 45 previous publications were evaluated in the meta-analysis. Fifty-four of these were evaluated in the full set of 37,954 breast cancer cases with 2,900 events and the two additional variants were evaluated in a reduced sample size of 30,000 samples in order to ensure independence from the previously published studies. Five variants reached nominal significance (P <0.05) in the pooled GWAS data compared to 2.8 expected under the null hypothesis. Seven additional variants were associated (P <0.05) with ER-positive disease. Although no variants reached genome-wide significance (P <5 x 10(-8)), these results suggest that there is some evidence of association between candidate common germline variants and breast cancer prognosis. Larger studies from multinational collaborations are necessary to increase the power to detect associations, between

  14. Obesity-associated Breast Cancer: Analysis of risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engin, Atilla

    2017-01-01

    Several studies show that a significantly stronger association is obvious between increased body mass index (BMI) and higher breast cancer incidence. Furthermore, obese women are at higher risk of all-cause and breast cancer specific mortality when compared to non-obese women with breast cancer. In this context, increased levels of estrogens due to excessive aromatization activity of the adipose tissue, overexpression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, insulin resistance, hyperactivation of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) pathways, adipocyte-derived adipokines, hypercholesterolemia and excessive oxidative stress contribute to the development of breast cancer in obese women. While higher breast cancer risk with hormone replacement therapy is particularly evident among lean women, in postmenopausal women who are not taking exogenous hormones, general obesity is a significant predictor for breast cancer. Moreover, increased plasma cholesterol leads to accelerated tumor formation and exacerbates their aggressiveness. In contrast to postmenopausal women, premenopausal women with high BMI are inversely associated with breast cancer risk. Nevertheless, life-style of women for breast cancer risk is regulated by avoiding the overweight and a high-fat diet. Estrogen-plus-progestin hormone therapy users for more than 5 years have elevated risks of both invasive ductal and lobular breast cancer. Additionally, these cases are more commonly node-positive and have a higher cancer-related mortality. Collectively, in this chapter, the impacts of obesity-related estrogen, cholesterol, saturated fatty acid, leptin and adiponectin concentrations, aromatase activity, leptin and insulin resistance on breast cancer patients are evaluated. Obesity-related prognostic factors of breast cancer also are discussed at molecular basis.

  15. Indirect costs associated with metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yin; Gao, Xin; Mehta, Sonam; Wang, Zhixiao; Faria, Claudio; Schwartzberg, Lee

    2013-10-01

    To compare the indirect costs of productivity loss between metastatic breast cancer (MBC) and early stage breast cancer (EBC) patients, as well as their respective family members. The MarketScan Health and Productivity Management database (2005-2009) was used. Adult BC patients eligible for employee benefits of sick leave and/or short-term disability were identified with ICD-9 codes. Difference in sick leave and short-term disability days was calculated between MBC patients and their propensity score matched EBC cohort and general population (controls) during a 12-month follow-up period. Generalized linear models were used to examine the impact of MBC on indirect costs to patients and their families. A total of 139 MBC, 432 EBC, and 820 controls were eligible for sick leave and 432 MBC, 1552 EBC, and 4682 controls were eligible for short-term disability (not mutually exclusive). After matching, no statistical difference was found in sick leave days and the associated costs between MBC and EBC cohorts. However, MBC patients had significantly higher short-term disability costs than EBC patients and controls (MBC: $6166 ± $9194 vs. EBC: $3690 ± $6673 vs. $558 ± $2487, both p indirect costs compared to EBC patients' families after controlling for key covariates. Productivity loss and associated costs in MBC patients are substantially higher than EBC patients or the general population. These findings underscore the economic burden of MBC from a US societal perspective. Various treatment regimens should be evaluated to identify opportunities to reduce the disease burden from the societal perspective.

  16. Epidemiology of Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    南, 優子; ミナミ, ユウコ; MINAMI, Yuko

    2007-01-01

    During recent decades, breast cancer incidence has been increasing in Japan. Epidemiological studies have clarified the trend in breast cancer incidence and identified risk factors for breast cancer. Established risk factors for breast cancer include early age at menarche, late age at first birth, low parity, postmenopausal obesity, family history of breast cancer, and history of benign breast disease. Breast-feeding and physical activity may also be associated with breast cancer risk. Detail...

  17. Associations of Breast Cancer Risk Factors With Tumor Subtypes : A Pooled Analysis From the Breast Cancer Association Consortium Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Xiaohong R.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L.; Couch, Fergus J.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Milne, Roger L.; Gaudet, Mia; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Cox, Angela; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Rebecca; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Blows, Fiona; Driver, Kristy; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Sinn, Peter; Vrieling, Alina; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomaeki, Kristiina; Heikkilae, Paeivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; Chanock, Stephen; Figueroa, Jonine; Brinton, Louise; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Liu, Jianjun; Van 't Veer, Laura J.; Van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Knight, Julia A.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; O'Malley, Frances P.; Weerasooriya, Nayana; John, Esther M.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hartmann, Arndt; Weihbrecht, Sebastian B.; Wachter, David L.; Jud, Sebastian M. S.; Loehberg, Christian R.; Baglietto, Laura; English, Dallas R.; Giles, Graham G.; McLean, Catriona A.; Severi, Gianluca; Lambrechts, Diether; Vandorpe, Thijs; Weltens, Caroline; Paridaens, Robert; Smeets, Ann; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E.; Cafourek, Victoria; Fredericksen, Zachary; Kosel, Matthew; Vachon, Celine; Cramp, Helen E.; Connley, Daniel; Cross, Simon S.; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Doerk, Thilo; Bremer, Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Karstens, Johann H.; Ay, Aysun; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menendez Rodriguez, Primitiva; Zamora, Pilar; Bentez, Javier; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Hamann, Ute; Pesch, Beate; Bruening, Thomas; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Eccles, Diana M.; Tapper, William J.; Gerty, Sue M.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Jones, Angela; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; McInerney, Niall; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yang, Show-Lin; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Shou-Tung; Hsu, Giu-Cheng; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gorski, Bohdan; Gronwald, Jacek; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Jager, Agnes; Kriege, Mieke; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; Collee, Margriet; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Pylkaes, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Mononen, Kari; Grip, Mervi; Hirvikoski, Pasi; Winqvist, Robert; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Auvinen, Paeivi; Soini, Ylermi; Sironen, Reijo; Bojesen, Stig E.; Orsted, David Dynnes; Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Radice, Paolo; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hunter, David J.; Tamimi, Rulla; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James; Odefrey, Fabrice; Gaborieau, Valerie; Devilee, Peter; Huijts, P. E. A.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Seynaeve, C.; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Hopper, John L.; Hammet, Fleur; Tsimiklis, Helen; Smith, Letitia D.; Southey, Melissa C.; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Easton, Douglas; Pharoah, Paul; Sherman, Mark E.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    Background Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors. Methods We pooled tumor marker and epidemiological risk factor data from 35 568 invasive breast cancer case patients

  18. Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Associated Diabetes Mellitus Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary breast cancer when detected early can be treated by radical mastectomy alone. However, 20-30% of women treated as such later on, develop local or regional recurrence. This leads to an additional treatment with radiotherapy by the oncologist for the sake of the 20-30% of patients that may need it postoperatively.

  19. Genetic variants associated with breast size also influence breast cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriksson Nicholas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While some factors of breast morphology, such as density, are directly implicated in breast cancer, the relationship between breast size and cancer is less clear. Breast size is moderately heritable, yet the genetic variants leading to differences in breast size have not been identified. Methods To investigate the genetic factors underlying breast size, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS of self-reported bra cup size, controlling for age, genetic ancestry, breast surgeries, pregnancy history and bra band size, in a cohort of 16,175 women of European ancestry. Results We identified seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs significantly associated with breast size (p−8: rs7816345 near ZNF703, rs4849887 and (independently rs17625845 flanking INHBB, rs12173570 near ESR1, rs7089814 in ZNF365, rs12371778 near PTHLH, and rs62314947 near AREG. Two of these seven SNPs are in linkage disequilibrium (LD with SNPs associated with breast cancer (those near ESR1 and PTHLH, and a third (ZNF365 is near, but not in LD with, a breast cancer SNP. The other three loci (ZNF703, INHBB, and AREG have strong links to breast cancer, estrogen regulation, and breast development. Conclusions These results provide insight into the genetic factors underlying normal breast development and show that some of these factors are shared with breast cancer. While these results do not directly support any possible epidemiological relationships between breast size and cancer, this study may contribute to a better understanding of the subtle interactions between breast morphology and breast cancer risk.

  20. Low penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with specific breast tumor subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Sherman, Mark E

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancers demonstrate substantial biological, clinical and etiological heterogeneity. We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes. Subtypes...... were defined by five markers (ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, EGFR) and other pathological and clinical features. Analyses included up to 30 040 invasive breast cancer cases and 53 692 controls from 31 studies within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We confirmed previous reports of stronger associations......3803662 (16q12), rs889312 (5q11), rs3817198 (11p15) and rs13387042 (2q35); however, only two of them (16q12 and 2q35) were associated with tumors with the core basal phenotype (P ≤ 0.002). These analyses are consistent with different biological origins of breast cancers, and indicate that tumor...

  1. Low penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with specific breast tumor subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Sherman, Mark E

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancers demonstrate substantial biological, clinical and etiological heterogeneity. We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes. Subtypes...... were defined by five markers (ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, EGFR) and other pathological and clinical features. Analyses included up to 30 040 invasive breast cancer cases and 53 692 controls from 31 studies within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We confirmed previous reports of stronger associations......3803662 (16q12), rs889312 (5q11), rs3817198 (11p15) and rs13387042 (2q35); however, only two of them (16q12 and 2q35) were associated with tumors with the core basal phenotype (P = 0.002). These analyses are consistent with different biological origins of breast cancers, and indicate that tumor...

  2. Association analysis identifies 65 new breast cancer risk loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lindström, Sara; Dennis, Joe; Beesley, Jonathan; Hui, Shirley; Kar, Siddhartha; Lemaçon, Audrey; Soucy, Penny; Glubb, Dylan; Rostamianfar, Asha; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Tyrer, Jonathan; Dicks, Ed; Lee, Andrew; Wang, Zhaoming; Allen, Jamie; Keeman, Renske; Eilber, Ursula; French, Juliet D; Qing Chen, Xiao; Fachal, Laura; McCue, Karen; McCart Reed, Amy E; Ghoussaini, Maya; Carroll, Jason S; Jiang, Xia; Finucane, Hilary; Adams, Marcia; Adank, Muriel A; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Arndt, Volker; Aronson, Kristan J; Arun, Banu; Auer, Paul L; Bacot, François; Barrdahl, Myrto; Baynes, Caroline; Beckmann, Matthias W; Behrens, Sabine; Benitez, Javier; Bermisheva, Marina; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bonanni, Bernardo; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Brinton, Louise; Broberg, Per; Brock, Ian W; Broeks, Annegien; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Brucker, Sara Y; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Butterbach, Katja; Cai, Qiuyin; Cai, Hui; Caldés, Trinidad; Canzian, Federico; Carracedo, Angel; Carter, Brian D; Castelao, Jose E; Chan, Tsun L; David Cheng, Ting-Yuan; Seng Chia, Kee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Christiansen, Hans; Clarke, Christine L; Collée, Margriet; Conroy, Don M; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Cornelissen, Sten; Cox, David G; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Devilee, Peter; Doheny, Kimberly F; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Durcan, Lorraine; Dwek, Miriam; Eccles, Diana M; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, A Heather; Ellberg, Carolina; Elvira, Mingajeva; Engel, Christoph; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fritschi, Lin; Gaborieau, Valerie; Gabrielson, Marike; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; García-Sáenz, José A; Gaudet, Mia M; Georgoulias, Vassilios; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe I; Grip, Mervi; Gronwald, Jacek; Grundy, Anne; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Hahnen, Eric; Haiman, Christopher A; Håkansson, Niclas; Hamann, Ute; Hamel, Nathalie; Hankinson, Susan; Harrington, Patricia; Hart, Steven N; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Hartman, Mikael; Hein, Alexander; Heyworth, Jane; Hicks, Belynda; Hillemanns, Peter; Ho, Dona N; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Hou, Ming-Feng; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Huang, Guanmengqian; Humphreys, Keith; Ishiguro, Junko; Ito, Hidemi; Iwasaki, Motoki; Iwata, Hiroji; Jakubowska, Anna; Janni, Wolfgang; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nichola; Jones, Kristine; Jones, Michael; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kabisch, Maria; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Kang, Daehee; Kasuga, Yoshio; Kerin, Michael J; Khan, Sofia; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Kiiski, Johanna I; Kim, Sung-Won; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela N; Krüger, Ute; Kwong, Ava; Lambrechts, Diether; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Eunjung; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lee, Jong Won; Neng Lee, Chuen; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Li, Jingmei; Lilyquist, Jenna; Lindblom, Annika; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lo, Wing-Yee; Loibl, Sibylle; Long, Jirong; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Lubinski, Jan; Luccarini, Craig; Lux, Michael P; Ma, Edmond S K; MacInnis, Robert J; Maishman, Tom; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Kostovska, Ivana Maleva; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Manson, JoAnn E; Margolin, Sara; Mariapun, Shivaani; Martinez, Maria Elena; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; McKay, James; McLean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Menéndez, Primitiva; Menon, Usha; Meyer, Jeffery; Miao, Hui; Miller, Nicola; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Muir, Kenneth; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Mulot, Claire; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nielsen, Sune F; Noh, Dong-Young; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Norman, Aaron; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Olsson, Håkan; Olswold, Curtis; Orr, Nick; Pankratz, V Shane; Park, Sue K; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Lloyd, Rachel; Perez, Jose I A; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Pinchev, Mila; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Prentice, Ross; Presneau, Nadege; Prokofyeva, Darya; Pugh, Elizabeth; Pylkäs, Katri; Rack, Brigitte; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rennert, Gadi; Rennert, Hedy S; Rhenius, Valerie; Romero, Atocha; Romm, Jane; Ruddy, Kathryn J; Rüdiger, Thomas; Rudolph, Anja; Ruebner, Matthias; Rutgers, Emiel J T; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Sandler, Dale P; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schürmann, Peter; Scott, Rodney J; Scott, Christopher; Seal, Sheila; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Sharma, Priyanka; Shen, Chen-Yang; Sheng, Grace; Sherman, Mark E; Shrubsole, Martha J; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Smeets, Ann; Sohn, Christof; Southey, Melissa C; Spinelli, John J; Stegmaier, Christa; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Stone, Jennifer; Stram, Daniel O; Surowy, Harald; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tamimi, Rulla; Taylor, Jack A; Tengström, Maria; Teo, Soo H; Beth Terry, Mary; Tessier, Daniel C; Thanasitthichai, Somchai; Thöne, Kathrin; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Tong, Ling; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Ursin, Giske; Untch, Michael; Vachon, Celine; van Asperen, Christi J; Van Den Berg, David; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van der Kolk, Lizet; van der Luijt, Rob B; Vincent, Daniel; Vollenweider, Jason; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weinberg, Clarice R; Wendt, Camilla; Whittemore, Alice S; Wildiers, Hans; Willett, Walter; Winqvist, Robert; Wolk, Alicja; Wu, Anna H; Xia, Lucy; Yamaji, Taiki; Yang, Xiaohong R; Har Yip, Cheng; Yoo, Keun-Young; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Ying; Zhu, Bin; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ziv, Elad; Lakhani, Sunil R; Antoniou, Antonis C; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Amos, Christopher I; Couch, Fergus J; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hall, Per; Hunter, David J; Milne, Roger L; García-Closas, Montserrat; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Chanock, Stephen J; Dunning, Alison M; Edwards, Stacey L; Bader, Gary D; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Simard, Jacques; Kraft, Peter; Easton, Douglas F

    2017-11-02

    Breast cancer risk is influenced by rare coding variants in susceptibility genes, such as BRCA1, and many common, mostly non-coding variants. However, much of the genetic contribution to breast cancer risk remains unknown. Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study of breast cancer in 122,977 cases and 105,974 controls of European ancestry and 14,068 cases and 13,104 controls of East Asian ancestry. We identified 65 new loci that are associated with overall breast cancer risk at P < 5 × 10-8. The majority of credible risk single-nucleotide polymorphisms in these loci fall in distal regulatory elements, and by integrating in silico data to predict target genes in breast cells at each locus, we demonstrate a strong overlap between candidate target genes and somatic driver genes in breast tumours. We also find that heritability of breast cancer due to all single-nucleotide polymorphisms in regulatory features was 2-5-fold enriched relative to the genome-wide average, with strong enrichment for particular transcription factor binding sites. These results provide further insight into genetic susceptibility to breast cancer and will improve the use of genetic risk scores for individualized screening and prevention.

  3. Microbial dysbiosis is associated with human breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caiyun Xuan

    Full Text Available Breast cancer affects one in eight women in their lifetime. Though diet, age and genetic predisposition are established risk factors, the majority of breast cancers have unknown etiology. The human microbiota refers to the collection of microbes inhabiting the human body. Imbalance in microbial communities, or microbial dysbiosis, has been implicated in various human diseases including obesity, diabetes, and colon cancer. Therefore, we investigated the potential role of microbiota in breast cancer by next-generation sequencing using breast tumor tissue and paired normal adjacent tissue from the same patient. In a qualitative survey of the breast microbiota DNA, we found that the bacterium Methylobacterium radiotolerans is relatively enriched in tumor tissue, while the bacterium Sphingomonas yanoikuyae is relatively enriched in paired normal tissue. The relative abundances of these two bacterial species were inversely correlated in paired normal breast tissue but not in tumor tissue, indicating that dysbiosis is associated with breast cancer. Furthermore, the total bacterial DNA load was reduced in tumor versus paired normal and healthy breast tissue as determined by quantitative PCR. Interestingly, bacterial DNA load correlated inversely with advanced disease, a finding that could have broad implications in diagnosis and staging of breast cancer. Lastly, we observed lower basal levels of antibacterial response gene expression in tumor versus healthy breast tissue. Taken together, these data indicate that microbial DNA is present in the breast and that bacteria or their components may influence the local immune microenvironment. Our findings suggest a previously unrecognized link between dysbiosis and breast cancer which has potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  4. Prospective Association between Dietary Fiber Intake and Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschasaux, Mélanie; Zelek, Laurent; Pouchieu, Camille; His, Mathilde; Hercberg, Serge; Galan, Pilar; Latino-Martel, Paule; Touvier, Mathilde

    2013-01-01

    Background Mechanistic hypotheses suggest a potential effect of dietary fiber on breast carcinogenesis through the modulation of insulin-like growth factor bioactivity, estrogen metabolism and inflammation. An association between dietary fiber intake and breast cancer risk has been suggested in epidemiological studies but remains inconclusive. In particular, data is lacking regarding the different types of dietary fibers. Objective The objective was to investigate the prospective relationship between dietary fiber intake and breast cancer risk, taking into account different types of dietary fiber (overall, insoluble, soluble and from different food sources: cereals, vegetables, fruits and legumes). Design 4684 women from the SU.VI.MAX cohort were included in this analysis as they completed at least three 24h-dietary records within the first two years of follow-up. Among them, 167 incident invasive breast cancers were diagnosed during a median follow-up of 12.6 years (between 1994 and 2007). The associations between quartiles of dietary fiber intake and breast cancer risk were characterized using multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. Results Total fiber intake was not associated with breast cancer risk (HRQuartile4vs.Quartile1 = 1.29 (95%CI 0.66–2.50), P-trend = 0.5), nor was fiber intake from cereals (P-trend = 0.1), fruits (P-trend = 0.9) and legumes (P-trend = 0.3). In contrast, vegetable fiber intake was related to a decreased risk of breast cancer (HRQ4vs.Q1 = 0.50 (0.29-0.88), P-trend = 0.03). Overall vegetable intake (in g/day) was not associated with breast cancer risk (P-trend = 0.2). Conclusion This prospective study suggests that vegetable fiber intake may contribute to reduce breast cancer risk, in line with experimental mechanistic data. PMID:24244548

  5. Prospective association between dietary fiber intake and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschasaux, Mélanie; Zelek, Laurent; Pouchieu, Camille; His, Mathilde; Hercberg, Serge; Galan, Pilar; Latino-Martel, Paule; Touvier, Mathilde

    2013-01-01

    Mechanistic hypotheses suggest a potential effect of dietary fiber on breast carcinogenesis through the modulation of insulin-like growth factor bioactivity, estrogen metabolism and inflammation. An association between dietary fiber intake and breast cancer risk has been suggested in epidemiological studies but remains inconclusive. In particular, data is lacking regarding the different types of dietary fibers. The objective was to investigate the prospective relationship between dietary fiber intake and breast cancer risk, taking into account different types of dietary fiber (overall, insoluble, soluble and from different food sources: cereals, vegetables, fruits and legumes). 4684 women from the SU.VI.MAX cohort were included in this analysis as they completed at least three 24h-dietary records within the first two years of follow-up. Among them, 167 incident invasive breast cancers were diagnosed during a median follow-up of 12.6 years (between 1994 and 2007). The associations between quartiles of dietary fiber intake and breast cancer risk were characterized using multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. Total fiber intake was not associated with breast cancer risk (HR(Quartile4vs.Quartile1) = 1.29 (95%CI 0.66-2.50), P-trend = 0.5), nor was fiber intake from cereals (P-trend = 0.1), fruits (P-trend = 0.9) and legumes (P-trend = 0.3). In contrast, vegetable fiber intake was related to a decreased risk of breast cancer (HR(Q4vs.Q1) = 0.50 (0.29-0.88), P-trend = 0.03). Overall vegetable intake (in g/day) was not associated with breast cancer risk (P-trend = 0.2). This prospective study suggests that vegetable fiber intake may contribute to reduce breast cancer risk, in line with experimental mechanistic data.

  6. MRI Background Parenchymal Enhancement Is Not Associated with Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Bennani-Baiti

    Full Text Available Previously, a strong positive association between background parenchymal enhancement (BPE at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and breast cancer was reported in high-risk populations. We sought to determine, whether this was also true for non-high-risk patients.540 consecutive patients underwent breast MRI for assessment of breast findings (BI-RADS 0-5, non-high-risk screening (no familial history of breast cancer, no known genetic mutation, no prior chest irradiation, or previous breast cancer diagnosis and subsequent histological work-up. For this IRB-approved study, BPE and fibroglandular tissue FGT were retrospectively assessed by two experienced radiologists according to the BI-RADS lexicon. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to explore associations between BPE, FGT, age and final diagnosis of breast cancer. Subsequently, multivariate logistic regression analysis, considering covariate colinearities, was performed, using final diagnosis as the target variable and BPE, FGT and age as covariates.Age showed a moderate negative correlation with FGT (r = -0.43, p<0.001 and a weak negative correlation with BPE (r = -0.28, p<0.001. FGT and BPE correlated moderately (r = 0.35, p<0.001. Final diagnosis of breast cancer displayed very weak negative correlations with FGT (r = -0.09, p = 0.046 and BPE (r = -0.156, p<0.001 and weak positive correlation with age (r = 0.353, p<0.001. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, the only independent covariate for prediction of breast cancer was age (OR 1.032, p<0.001.Based on our data, neither BPE nor FGT independently correlate with breast cancer risk in non-high-risk patients at MRI. Our model retained only age as an independent risk factor for breast cancer in this setting.

  7. Breast cancer in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Iris; Lindsay, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Pregnancy-associated breast cancer is defined as breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy or in the first postpartum year. Breast cancer is one of the more common malignancies to occur during pregnancy and, as more women delay childbearing, the incidence of breast cancer in pregnancy is expected to increase. This article provides an overview of diagnosis, staging, and treatment of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. Recommendations for management of breast cancer in pregnancy are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Risk factors for pregnancy-associated breast cancer: a report from the Nigerian Breast Cancer Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ningqi; Ogundiran, Temidayo; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Morhason-Bello, Imran; Zheng, Yonglan; Fackenthal, James; Adebamowo, Clement; Anetor, Imaria; Akinleye, Stella; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Huo, Dezheng

    2013-09-01

    Little is known about risk factors for pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC), diagnosed during pregnancy or postpartum. We enrolled 1715 premenopausal women from the Nigerian Breast Cancer Study from 1998 to 2011. Based on recency of last pregnancy from diagnosis, breast cancer cases were categorized as (1) PABC diagnosed 2 years or longer postpartum, (2) PABC diagnosed 3 to 5 years postpartum, or (3) non-PABC diagnosed more than 5 years postpartum. Controls were matched to cases on recency of last pregnancy. Multiple logistic regressions were performed comparing cases and controls within each group. Of the 718 cases, 152 (21.2%) had PABC 2 or more years postpartum, and 145 (20.2%) 3 to 5 years postpartum. Although not statistically significant, women with higher parity tend to have an elevated risk of PABC but reduced risk of non-PABC (p for heterogeneity = 0.097). Family history of breast cancer might be a strong predictor particularly for PABC 2 or more years postpartum (odds ratio, 3.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-10.3). Compared with non-PABC cases, PABC 2 or more years postpartum cases were more likely to carry BRCA1/2 mutations (P = .03). Parity may have different roles in the development of PABC versus other premenopausal breast cancer in Nigerian women. Prospective mothers with multiple births and a family history of breast cancer may have an elevated risk of breast cancer during their immediate postpartum period. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Reproductive factors associated with breast cancer risk in northern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajian-Tilaki, K O; Kaveh-Ahangar, T

    2011-06-01

    Breast cancer is a common malignancy for women in most parts of the world and the incidence in Iranian women is growing. The patients are relatively younger than their western counterparts. The aim of study was to investigate the roles of reproductive factors for breast cancer in Babol. In a case-control study in Babol, we recruited a total of 100 new patients with histologically confirmed breast cancer and 200 age-matched controls selected from outpatient clinics. Demographic and reproductive factors were ascertained by in-person interview using a constructed questionnaire. Several potential confounding factors were adjusted using multiple logistic model. The adjusted odds ratio showed that having higher age at first pregnancy and abortion were associated with increased breast cancer risk (the adjusted OR = 4.1, 95% CI: 1.3-13.2 and 2.93, 95% CI: 1.64-5.24, respectively). By increasing parity, the risk had reduced significantly; among women with parity ≥ 5, the adjusted OR was 0.09 (95% CI 0.01-0.7) compared with nulliparous women, and also for each additional parity, the risk reduced by 50% (OR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.34-0.71). The duration of breast feeding was inversely associated with breast cancer risk, while after additional adjustment for parity, no longer the protective effect of breast feeding was observed. Nulliparity, late age at first birth and abortion were the most important reproductive factors associated with breast cancer risk; therefore, it is recommended to women with these risk factors to perform breast cancer screening tests earlier.

  10. Association of ABO blood group and breast cancer in Jodhpur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Shikha; Chawla, Vinod Kumar; Gupta, Kamal Kant; Gaur, Kusum Lata

    2015-01-01

    There is a large amount of evidence that the ABO blood group system may play a role in disease etiology. However, in relation to breast cancer, these findings are inconsistent and contradictory. Present study was conducted for analysis to access ABO blood groups potential role of in breast carcinoma. The study was conducted on 206 clinically diagnosed breast cancer patients from Radiotherapy Department of Mathura Das Mathur Hospital in Jodhpur, from September 2006 to December 2007. The standard agglutination test was used to determine the blood groups. Association of ABO blood groups and risk of breast cancers was found out with Odd Ratios (ORs) with 95% Confidence Interval (CI). In reference of proportion of breast cancer in blood group AB [OR 1 with 95% CI 0.476 to 2.103), the breast carcinoma in blood group A [OR 7.444 with 95% CI 4.098 to 13.5222) was found at 7.4 times at higher risk than in blood group 'AB'. Breast cancer was found minimum in blood group 'AB' and maximum in blood group 'A'.

  11. Association of MTHFR A1298C polymorphism with breast cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 35 studies which examined the association of MTHFR A1298C polymorphism with breast cancer and/or ovarian cancer were identified. The pooled odds ratios (ORs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the effect of gene polymorphism. And allele model, homozygous model, co-dominant ...

  12. The Benefit of Sonography in Pregnancy-associated Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Eun Ju; Oh, Ki Keun; Kim, Eun Kyung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-09-15

    To evaluate the sonographic, mammographic and MRI features of pregnancy-associated breast cancer with the major focus on the sonographic benefit in a diagnosis of pregnancy associated breast cancer. From 1998 to 2002, sonography was performed on a total 7 patients (age 23 to 38 years), who were pathologically diagnosed with breast cancer during pregnancy. Six of those patients underwent mammography. Five patients underwent a breast MRI, preoperatively. The radiological findings were evaluated retrospectively. Six patients underwent surgery and 1 patient underwent a core biopsy and chemotherapy. The histological, nuclear grading and pathological staging were evaluated. The sonographic findings showed a mass with irregular shapes (n=6), irregular margins (n=6), a non-parallel orientation (n=5), complex echo patterns (n=5). Associated findings could be observed in 3 patients, including Cooper's ligament thickening (n=2), edema (n=2), skin thickening (n=1) and axillary lymphadenopathy (n=3). The sonographic findings were positive and showed masses in 6 patients. All the patients had a dense breast in mammography. The mammographic findings included masses (n=4), masses with microcalcifications (n=2), masses with axillary lymphadenopathy (n=3), calcifications alone (n=1), an asymmetric density alone (n=1), extremely dense breasts with negative findings (n=2). A breast MRI showed an irregular shaped mass (n=4) with a rim-like enhancement (n=3), linear ductal enhancement without a mass (n= 1), and the time intensity cure revealed the typical pattern and level of enhancement in the carcinoma. Sonography is a valuable tool for diagnosing pregnancy-associated breast cancer. However, mammography should be performed if there is a suspicious lesion on sonography in order to confirm the pregnancy-associated breast cancer. Mammography has a lower sensitivity during pregnancy due to the physiologic changes in the breasts. However, calcifications and associated findings are

  13. Common germline polymorphisms associated with breast cancer-specific survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Pirie (Ailith); Q. Guo (Qi); P. Kraft (Peter); S. Canisius (Sander); D. Eccles (Diana); N. Rahman (Nazneen); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); C. Chen (Constance); S. Khan (Sofia); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); M. Lush (Michael); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Shah (Mitul); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. Eriksson (Mats); D. Lambrechts (Diether); C. Weltens (Caroline); K. Leunen; C. van Ongeval (Chantal); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); C. Blomqvist (Carl); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); R. Fagerholm (Rainer); T.A. Muranen (Taru); J.E. Olsen (Janet E.); B. Hallberg (Boubou); C. Vachon (Celine); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Cornelissen (Sten); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F. Schumacher (Frederick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); J.L. Hopper (John); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); J.W.M. Martens (John); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); R. Yang (Rongxi); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); H. Brenner (Hermann); K. Butterbach (Katja); B. Holleczek (B.); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); J. Li (Jingmei); J.S. Brand (Judith S.); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); F. Ficarazzi (Filomena); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); R. Hein (Rebecca); A.B. Ekici (Arif); R. Balleine (Rosemary); K.-A. Phillips (Kelly-Anne); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I.A. Perez (Jose Ignacio Arias); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Durda (Katarzyna); U. Hamann (Ute); M. Kabisch (Maria); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); T. Rud̈iger (Thomas); S. Margolin (Sara); V. Kristensen (Vessela); S. Nord (Siljie); D.G. Evans (Gareth); J. Abraham (Jean); H. Earl (Helena); C.J. Poole (Christopher J.); L. Hiller (Louise); J.A. Dunn (J.); S. Bowden (Sarah); R. Yang (Rose); D. Campa (Daniele); W.R. Diver (Ryan); S.M. Gapstur (Susan M.); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); S.E. Hankinson (Susan); R.N. Hoover (Robert); A. Hüsing (Anika); R. Kaaks (Rudolf); M.J. Machiela (Mitchell J.); W.C. Willett (Walter C.); M. Barrdahl (Myrto); F. Canzian (Federico); S.-F. Chin (Suet-Feung); C. Caldas (Carlos); D. Hunter (David); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); F.J. Couch (Fergus); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A. Mannermaa (Arto); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); P. Hall (Per); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); D.F. Easton (Douglas); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); A. Cox (Angela); P.A. Fasching (Peter); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Previous studies have identified common germline variants nominally associated with breast cancer survival. These associations have not been widely replicated in further studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of previously reported SNPs with

  14. Women's Impression of the Expected Breast Appearance and its Association with Breast Cancer Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komenaka, Ian K; Winton, Lisa M; Bouton, Marcia E; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh; Nodora, Jesse N; Olson, Loyd; Maffi, Terry R; Nesset, Elizabeth M; Martinez, Maria Elena

    2015-01-01

    Significant concern exists from clinicians in all fields that rates of bilateral mastectomy and prophylactic mastectomy are increasing. This study was performed to evaluate women's perception of breast appearance and its association with breast cancer operations. From April 2012 to May 2013, all women attending a breast clinic were shown two breast pictures, "natural" and "augmented," and asked which photograph represented the current expected appearance of breasts. Among breast cancer patients, the choice of breast cancer operation was correlated with picture selection. Of 1,177 consecutive women, mean age was 45 years. Overall, 70 % of patients felt that the augmented appearance is expected. This impression was seen in all racial/ethnic groups: non-Hispanic White 65 %, African American 67 %, Hispanic 71 %, and other groups 70 %. Younger age was strongly associated with the augmented appearance (p breast cancer patients, augmented appearance selection was more likely for patients who underwent reconstruction (92 %; p breasts is currently expected, and this impression was more common in young women. This impression may be another factor contributing to the current trend of more extensive breast cancer operations and implant-based reconstructions.

  15. Five polymorphisms and breast cancer risk: results from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Milne, Roger L; Cox, Angela

    2009-01-01

    cancer cases and 30,000 controls, primarily of European descent, from 30 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We calculated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) as a measure of association. We found that the minor alleles for these polymorphisms were not related......Previous studies have suggested that minor alleles for ERCC4 rs744154, TNF rs361525, CASP10 rs13010627, PGR rs1042838, and BID rs8190315 may influence breast cancer risk, but the evidence is inconclusive due to their small sample size. These polymorphisms were genotyped in more than 30,000 breast...... to invasive breast cancer risk overall in women of European descent: ECCR4 per-allele OR (95% CI) = 0.99 (0.97-1.02), minor allele frequency = 27.5%; TNF 1.00 (0.95-1.06), 5.0%; CASP10 1.02 (0.98-1.07), 6.5%; PGR 1.02 (0.99-1.06), 15.3%; and BID 0.98 (0.86-1.12), 1.7%. However, we observed significant between...

  16. Association of proteasomal activity with metastasis in luminal breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashova, E. E.; Fesik, E. A.; Doroshenko, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    Chimotrypsin-like (ChTL) and caspase-like (CL) proteasomal activities were investigated in different variants of the tumor progression of luminal breast cancer. Patients with primary luminal breast cancer (n = 123) in stage T1-3N0-2M0 who had not received neoadjuvant treatment were included in this study. Proteasome ChTL and CL activities were determined in the samples of tumor and adjacent tissues. The coefficients of chymotrypsin-like (kChTL) and caspase-like (kCL) proteasome activity were also calculated as the ratio of the corresponding activity in the tumor tissue to activity in the adjacent tissue. ChTL, CL, kChTL and kCL in the tissues of luminal A and B breast cancer with lymphogenic metastasis were compared, and their association with hematogenous metastasis was evaluated. On the one hand, CL activity of proteasomes increased in luminal A breast cancer with extensive lymphogenic metastasis (N2), on the other hand it decreased in the luminal B subtype of cancer. The ratio of proteasomal activity in the tumor and adjacent tissues plays a significant role in the hematogenic pathway of breast cancer progression and is associated with poor metastatic-free survival.

  17. Imaging features of breast cancers on digital breast tomosynthesis according to molecular subtype: association with breast cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Hyun; Chang, Jung Min; Shin, Sung Ui; Chu, A Jung; Yi, Ann; Cho, Nariya; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate imaging features of breast cancers on digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) according to molecular subtype and to determine whether the molecular subtype affects breast cancer detection on DBT. This was an institutional review board--approved study with a waiver of informed consent. DBT findings of 288 invasive breast cancers were reviewed according to Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System lexicon. Detectability of breast cancer was quantified by the number of readers (0-3) who correctly detected the cancer in an independent blinded review. DBT features and the cancer detectability score according to molecular subtype were compared using Fisher's exact test and analysis of variance. Of 288 invasive cancers, 194 were hormone receptor (HR)-positive, 48 were human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive and 46 were triple negative breast cancers. The most common DBT findings were irregular spiculated masses for HR-positive cancer, fine pleomorphic or linear branching calcifications for HER2 positive cancer and irregular masses with circumscribed margins for triple negative breast cancers (p Cancer detectability on DBT was not significantly different according to molecular subtype (p = 0.213) but rather affected by tumour size, breast density and presence of mass or calcifications. Breast cancers showed different imaging features according to molecular subtype; however, it did not affect the cancer detectability on DBT. Advances in knowledge: DBT showed characteristic imaging features of breast cancers according to molecular subtype. However, cancer detectability on DBT was not affected by molecular subtype of breast cancers.

  18. Associations of reproductive time events and intervals with breast cancer risk: a report from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhezhou; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Ying; Dai, Qi; Lu, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2014-07-01

    While there is clear evidence for an association between later age at first live birth and increased breast cancer risk, associations with the timing of other reproductive events are less clear. As breast tissues undergo major structural and cellular changes during pregnancy, we examined associations between reproductive time events and intervals with breast cancer risk among parous women from the population-based Shanghai Breast Cancer Study (SBCS). Unconditional logistic regression was used to evaluate associations with breast cancer risk for 3,269 cases and 3,341 controls. In addition to later age at first live birth, later ages at first pregnancy and last pregnancy were significantly associated with increased breast cancer risk (p-trend = 0.002, 0.015, 0.008, respectively); longer intervals from menarche to first or last live birth were also associated with increased risk (p-trend associations for later age at first pregnancy or live birth and longer intervals from menarche to first or last live birth occurred among premenopausal women and ER+/PR+ breast cancers, whereas the association for later age at last pregnancy occurred among postmenopausal women and women with ER+/PR- or ER-/PR+ breast cancers. Because of the high correlation with other reproductive variables, models did not include adjustment for age at first live birth; when included, the significance of all associations was attenuated. These findings suggest that while reproductive time events and intervals play an important role in breast cancer etiology, contributions may differ by menopausal status and hormone receptor status of breast cancers. © 2013 UICC.

  19. Tumor-associated macrophages: unwitting accomplices in breast cancer malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Carly Bess; Yeh, Elizabeth S; Soloff, Adam C

    Deleterious inflammation is a primary feature of breast cancer. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that macrophages, the most abundant leukocyte population in mammary tumors, have a critical role at each stage of cancer progression. Such tumor-associated macrophages facilitate neoplastic transformation, tumor immune evasion and the subsequent metastatic cascade. Herein, we discuss the dynamic process whereby molecular and cellular features of the tumor microenvironment act to license tissue-repair mechanisms of macrophages, fostering angiogenesis, metastasis and the support of cancer stem cells. We illustrate how tumors induce, then exploit trophic macrophages to subvert innate and adaptive immune responses capable of destroying malignant cells. Finally, we discuss compelling evidence from murine models of cancer and early clinical trials in support of macrophage-targeted intervention strategies with the potential to dramatically reduce breast cancer morbidity and mortality.

  20. Analysis of PALB2/FANCN-Associated Breast Cancer Families

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marc Tischkowitz; Bing Xia; Nelly Sabbaghian; Jorge S. Reis-Filho; Nancy Hamel; Guilan Li; Erik H. van Beers; Lili Li; Tayma Khalil; Louise A. Quenneville; Atilla Omeroglu; Aletta Poll; Pierre Lepage; Nora Wong; Petra M. Nederlof; Alan Ashworth; Patricia N. Tonin; Steven A. Narod; David M. Livingston; William D. Foulkes

    2007-01-01

    ... also predispose to breast cancer. Given its close relationship with BRCA2, PALB2 was sequenced in affected probands from 68 BRCA1/BRCA2-negative breast cancer families of Ashkenazi Jewish, French Canadian, or mixed ethnic descent...

  1. Tumor associated macrophage × cancer cell hybrids may acquire cancer stem cell properties in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxian Ding

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers among women, and metastasis makes it lethal. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs that acquire an alternatively activated macrophage (M2 phenotype may promote metastasis. However, the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Here, we examined how TAMs interact with breast cancer cells to promote metastasis. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of the M2-specific antigen CD163 in paraffin-embedded mammary carcinoma blocks to explore fusion events in breast cancer patients. U937 cells were used as a substitute for human monocytes, and these cells differentiated into M2 macrophages following phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA and M-CSF stimulation. M2 macrophages and the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 fused in the presence of 50% polyethylene glycol. Hybrids were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and the relevant cell biological properties were compared with their parental counterparts. Breast cancer stem cell (BCSC-related markers were quantified by immunofluorescence staining, RT-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR and/or western blotting. The tumor-initiating and metastatic capacities of the hybrids and their parental counterparts were assessed in NOD/SCID mice. We found that the CD163 expression rate in breast cancer tissues varied significantly and correlated with estrogen receptor status (p0.05. Characterization of the fusion hybrids revealed a more aggressive phenotype, including increased migration, invasion and tumorigenicity, but reduced proliferative ability, compared with the parental lines. The hybrids also gained a CD44(+CD24(-/low phenotype and over-expressed epithelial-mesenchymal transition-associated genes. These results indicate that TAMs may promote breast cancer metastasis through cell fusion, and the hybrids may gain a BCSC phenotype.

  2. Breast Cancer Rates by State

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by State Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... from breast cancer each year. Rates of Getting Breast Cancer by State The number of people who get ...

  3. Study of the association between blood types and breast cancer among Isfahanian women with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Mirlohi Flavarjani

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: According to the obtained results from this study, there was no relative frequency in specific blood group for these three types of cancer and the blood type could not be influenced as a risk factor in breast cancer.

  4. Effect of Depleting Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Breast Cancer Growth and Response to Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsan, Min-Fu; Gao, Baochong

    2005-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages may comprise up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer and are capable of producing estrogen and angiogenic cytokines that regulate the growth and angiogenesis of breast cancer...

  5. Association of ABO and Rh blood groups with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Ayoub Meo

    2017-11-01

    Conclusion: Blood group “A” and “Rhesus +ve” have high risk of breast cancer, while blood type “AB” and “Rhesus –ve” are at low peril of breast cancer. Physicians should carefully monitor the females with blood group “A” and “Rh +ve” as these females are more prone to develop breast cancer. To reduce breast cancer incidence and its burden, preventive and screening programs for breast cancer especially in young women are highly recommended.

  6. Association between breast cancer genetic susceptibility variants and terminal duct lobular unit involution of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodelon, Clara; Oh, Hannah; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Palakal, Maya; Sherman, Mark E; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Geller, Berta; Vacek, Pamela; Weaver, Donald L; Chicoine, Rachael; Papathomas, Daphne; Xiang, Jackie; Patel, Deesha A; Khodr, Zeina G; Linville, Laura; Clare, Susan E; Visscher, Daniel W; Mies, Carolyn; Hewitt, Stephen M; Brinton, Louise A; Storniolo, Anna Maria V; He, Chunyan; Chanock, Stephen J; Gierach, Gretchen L; Figueroa, Jonine D

    2017-02-15

    Terminal duct lobular units (TDLUs) are the predominant source of future breast cancers, and lack of TDLU involution (higher TDLU counts, higher acini count per TDLU and the product of the two) is a breast cancer risk factor. Numerous breast cancer susceptibility single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified, but whether they are associated with TDLU involution is unknown. In a pooled analysis of 872 women from two studies, we investigated 62 established breast cancer SNPs and relationships with TDLU involution. Poisson regression models with robust variance were used to calculate adjusted per-allele relative risks (with the non-breast cancer risk allele as the referent) and 95% confidence intervals between TDLU measures and each SNP. All statistical tests were two-sided; P associated with at least one TDLU measure: rs616488 (PEX14), rs11242675 (FOXQ1) and rs6001930 (MKL1) were associated with higher TDLU count (p = 0.047, 0.045 and 0.031, respectively); rs1353747 (PDE4D) and rs6472903 (8q21.11) were associated with higher acini count per TDLU (p = 0.007 and 0.027, respectively); and rs1353747 (PDE4D) and rs204247 (RANBP9) were associated with the product of TDLU and acini counts (p = 0.024 and 0.017, respectively). Our findings suggest breast cancer SNPs may not strongly influence TDLU involution. Agnostic genome-wide association studies of TDLU involution may provide new insights on its biologic underpinnings and breast cancer susceptibility. © 2016 UICC.

  7. Association of MTHFR gene polymorphisms with breast cancer survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mechanic Leah E

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene, C677T and A1298C, lead to decreased enzyme activity and affect chemosensitivity of tumor cells. We investigated whether these MTHFR SNPs were associated with breast cancer survival in African-American and Caucasian women. Methods African-American (n = 143 and Caucasian (n = 105 women, who had incident breast cancer with surgery, were recruited between 1993 and 2003 from the greater Baltimore area, Maryland, USA. Kaplan-Meier survival and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between MTHFR SNPs and disease-specific survival. Results We observed opposite effects of the MTHFR polymorphisms A1298C and C677T on breast cancer survival. Carriers of the variant allele at codon 1298 (A/C or C/C had reduced survival when compared to homozygous carriers of the common A allele [Hazard ratio (HR = 2.05; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.05–4.00]. In contrast, breast cancer patients with the variant allele at codon 677 (C/T or T/T had improved survival, albeit not statistically significant, when compared to individuals with the common C/C genotype (HR = 0.65; 95% CI, 0.31–1.35. The effects were stronger in patients with estrogen receptor-negative tumors (HR = 2.70; 95% CI, 1.17–6.23 for A/C or C/C versus A/A at codon 1298; HR = 0.36; 95% CI, 0.12–1.04 for C/T or T/T versus C/C at codon 677. Interactions between the two MTHFR genotypes and race/ethnicity on breast cancer survival were also observed (A1298C, pinteraction = 0.088; C677T, pinteraction = 0.026. Conclusion We found that the MTHFR SNPs, C677T and A1298C, were associated with breast cancer survival. The variant alleles had opposite effects on disease outcome in the study population. Race/ethnicity modified the association between the two SNPs and breast cancer survival.

  8. 9q31.2-rs865686 as a susceptibility locus for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer: Evidence from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Warren (Helen); F. Dudbridge (Frank); O. Fletcher (Olivia); N. Orr (Nick); N. Johnson (Nichola); J.L. Hopper (John); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); M. Mahmoodi (Maryam); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Cornelissen (Sten); L.M. Braaf (Linde); K.R. Muir (Kenneth); A. Lophatananon (Artitaya); A. Chaiwerawattana (Arkom); S. Wiangnon (Surapon); P.A. Fasching (Peter); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); A.B. Ekici (Arif); R. Schulz-Wendtland (Rüdiger); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); C. Sohn (Christof); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); P. Laurent-Puig (Pierre); C. Mulot (Claire); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); R.L. Milne (Roger); J. Benítez (Javier); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); L. Bernstein (Leslie); C.C. Dur (Christina Clarke); H. Brenner (Hermann); H. Müller (Heike); V. Arndt (Volker); A. Langheinz (Anne); A. Meindl (Alfons); M. Golatta (Michael); C.R. Bartram (Claus); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); C. Justenhoven (Christina); T. Brüning (Thomas); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); U. Eilber (Ursula); T. Dörk (Thilo); P. Schürmann (Peter); M. Bremer (Michael); P. Hillemanns (Peter); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); N.N. Antonenkova (Natalia); Y.I. Rogov (Yuri); M. Bermisheva (Marina); D. Prokofyeva (Darya); G. Zinnatullina (Guzel); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J. Hartikainen (Jaana); V. Kataja (Vesa); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); J. Beesley (Jonathan); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); D. Lambrechts (Diether); A. Smeets (Ann); R. Paridaens (Robert); C. Weltens (Caroline); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); K. Buck (Katharina); T.W. Behrens (Timothy); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); L. Bernard (Loris); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); P. Radice (Paolo); F.J. Couch (Fergus); C. Vachon (Celine); X. Wang (Xing); J.E. Olson (Janet); G.G. Giles (Graham); L. Baglietto (Laura); C.A. McLean (Cariona); G. Severi (Gianluca); E.M. John (Esther); A. Miron (Alexander); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); N. Weerasooriya (Nayana); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); J.W.M. Martens (John); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); A. Jager (Agnes); M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); P. Hall (Per); K. Czene (Kamila); J. Liu (Jianjun); J. Li (Jingmei); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); I.W. Brock (Ian); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); F. Blows (Fiona); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Ghoussaini (Maya); A. Ashworth (Alan); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); M. Jones (Marta); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Our recent genome-wide association study identified a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 9q31.2 (rs865686). Methods: To further investigate the rs865686-breast cancer association, we conducted a replication study within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, which

  9. Association of ABO blood group and risk of female breast cancer - A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha B

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among females in rural areas of our country. It constitutes around 20-25% of all female cancers in India. ABO blood group has been observed to be associated with gastric and pancreatic cancer, but its association with breast cancer is unsure. AIMS & OBJECTIVES:1.To find any association between breast cancer and ABO blood group. 2. To know the frequency and risk of each blood group in relation to patients with breast cancer. This study was conducted in the Department of Surgery, Tirunelveli Medical College. Ethical committee approval was obtained.100 breast cancer cases were taken and 100 healthy women with no reports of breast cancer were taken as controls. Blood grouping was done by Standard Agglutination method. Association of ABO blood groups and breast cancer was found out with Odd Ratios (ORs with 95% Confidence Interval (CI. ABO blood group distribution among patients with breast cancer was as follows: Group A- 39%, Group O-31%, Group B- 26% and Group AB- 4% Among 100 healthy controls, ABO blood groups percentage was: Group O- 32%, Group A- 15 %, Group B- 46%, and Group AB- 7%. There is significant association between blood group A and breast Cancer since the p value was <0.05This study showed that there is strong association between ABO blood group system and female breast cancer and the highest risk for breast cancer was in blood group A and minimum in blood group AB.

  10. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer and pregnancy following treatment for breast cancer, in a cohort of women from Victoria, Australia, with a first diagnosis of invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Robin J; Fradkin, Pamela; Parathithasan, Nishanthinie; Robinson, Penelope J; Schwarz, Max; Davis, Susan R

    2013-10-01

    This study examined pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) and pregnancy following treatment for breast cancer. We analysed data from a questionnaire-based, prospective study of women diagnosed with breast cancer. Timing of diagnosis in relation to pregnancy was self-reported in the enrolment questionnaire. Women reported subsequent pregnancies in annual follow-up questionnaires, up to at least 5 years from diagnosis. Women with PABC made up 3.3% of women pregnancies following treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. RAD51 and breast cancer susceptibility: no evidence for rare variant association in the Breast Cancer Family Registry study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Le Calvez-Kelm

    Full Text Available Although inherited breast cancer has been associated with germline mutations in genes that are functionally involved in the DNA homologous recombination repair (HRR pathway, including BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, ATM, BRIP1, CHEK2 and PALB2, about 70% of breast cancer heritability remains unexplained. Because of their critical functions in maintaining genome integrity and already well-established associations with breast cancer susceptibility, it is likely that additional genes involved in the HRR pathway harbor sequence variants associated with increased risk of breast cancer. RAD51 plays a central biological function in DNA repair and despite the fact that rare, likely dysfunctional variants in three of its five paralogs, RAD51C, RAD51D, and XRCC2, have been associated with breast and/or ovarian cancer risk, no population-based case-control mutation screening data are available for the RAD51 gene. We thus postulated that RAD51 could harbor rare germline mutations that confer increased risk of breast cancer.We screened the coding exons and proximal splice junction regions of the gene for germline sequence variation in 1,330 early-onset breast cancer cases and 1,123 controls from the Breast Cancer Family Registry, using the same population-based sampling and analytical strategy that we developed for assessment of rare sequence variants in ATM and CHEK2. In total, 12 distinct very rare or private variants were characterized in RAD51, with 10 cases (0.75% and 9 controls (0.80% carrying such a variant. Variants were either likely neutral missense substitutions (3, silent substitutions (4 or non-coding substitutions (5 that were predicted to have little effect on efficiency of the splicing machinery.Altogether, our data suggest that RAD51 tolerates so little dysfunctional sequence variation that rare variants in the gene contribute little, if anything, to breast cancer susceptibility.

  12. CHEK2*1100delC heterozygosity in women with breast cancer associated with early death, breast cancer-specific death, and increased risk of a second breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Weischer (Maren); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); L.J. van 't Veer (Laura); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); J.L. Hopper (John); P. Hall (Per); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); P. Devilee (Peter); P.A. Fasching (Peter); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); D. Lambrechts (Diether); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Cox (Angela); G.G. Giles (Graham); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); A. Lindblom (Annika); F.J. Couch (Fergus); A. Mannermaa (Arto); G.G. Alnæs (Grethe); E.M. John (Esther); T. Dörk (Thilo); H. Flyger (Henrik); A.M. Dunning (Alison); Q. Wang (Qing); T.A. Muranen (Taru); R.R. van Hien (Richard); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); M.C. Southey (Melissa); K. Czene (Kamila); J.A. Knight (Julia); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); M.R. Christiaens (Marie Rose); J.M. Collee (Margriet); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); G. Severi (Gianluca); F. Marme (Federick); S. Margolin (Sara); J.E. Olson (Janet); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); V. Kristensen (Vessela); A. Miron (Alexander); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); M. Shah (Mitul); C. Blomqvist (Carl); A. Broeks (Annegien); M.E. Sherman (Mark); K. Phillips (Kelly); J. Li (Jingmei); J. Liu (Jianjun); G. Glendon (Gord); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); A.B. Ekici (Arif); K. Leunen; M. Kriege (Mieke); S.S. Cross (Simon); L. Baglietto (Laura); C. Sohn (Christof); X. Wang (Xing); V. Kataja (Vesa); A.L. Børresen-Dale (Anne Lise); A. Meyer (Andreas); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); S.E. Bojesen (Stig)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: We tested the hypotheses that CHEK2*1100delC heterozygosity is associated with increased risk of early death, breast cancer-specific death, and risk of a second breast cancer in women with a first breast cancer. Patients and Methods: From 22 studies participating in the Breast

  13. Association between air pollution and mammographic breast density in the Breast Cancer Surveilance Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghjyan, Lusine; Arao, Robert; Brokamp, Cole; O'Meara, Ellen S; Sprague, Brian L; Ghita, Gabriela; Ryan, Patrick

    2017-04-06

    Mammographic breast density is a well-established strong risk factor for breast cancer. The environmental contributors to geographic variation in breast density in urban and rural areas are poorly understood. We examined the association between breast density and exposure to ambient air pollutants (particulate matter Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (2001-2009). We included women aged ≥40 years with known residential zip codes before the index mammogram (n = 279,967). Breast density was assessed using the American College of Radiology's Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) four-category breast density classification. PM2.5 and O3 estimates for grids across the USA (2001-2008) were obtained from the US Environmental Protection Agency Hierarchical Bayesian Model (HBM). For the majority of women (94%), these estimates were available for the year preceding the mammogram date. Association between exposure to air pollutants and density was estimated using polytomous logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. Women with extremely dense breasts had higher mean PM2.5 and lower O3 exposures than women with fatty breasts (8.97 vs. 8.66 ug/m3 and 33.70 vs. 35.82 parts per billion (ppb), respectively). In regression analysis, women with heterogeneously dense vs. scattered fibroglandular breasts were more likely to have higher exposure to PM2.5 (fourth vs. first quartile odds ratio (OR) = 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16 - 1.23). Women with extremely dense vs. scattered fibroglandular breasts were less likely to have higher levels of ozone exposure (fourth vs. first quartile OR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.73-0.87). Exposure to PM2.5 and O3 may in part explain geographical variation in mammographic density. Further studies are warranted to determine the causal nature of these associations.

  14. Association of Telomere Length with Breast Cancer Prognostic Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoutar Ennour-Idrissi

    Full Text Available Telomere length, a marker of cell aging, seems to be affected by the same factors thought to be associated with breast cancer prognosis.To examine associations of peripheral blood cell-measured telomere length with traditional and potential prognostic factors in breast cancer patients.We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of data collected before surgery from 162 breast cancer patients recruited consecutively between 01/2011 and 05/2012, at a breast cancer reference center. Data on the main lifestyle factors (smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity were collected using standardized questionnaires. Anthropometric factors were measured. Tumor biological characteristics were extracted from pathology reports. Telomere length was measured using a highly reproducible quantitative PCR method in peripheral white blood cells. Spearman partial rank-order correlations and multivariate general linear models were used to evaluate relationships between telomere length and prognostic factors.Telomere length was positively associated with total physical activity (rs = 0.17, P = 0.033; Ptrend = 0.069, occupational physical activity (rs = 0.15, P = 0.054; Ptrend = 0.054 and transportation-related physical activity (rs = 0.19, P = 0.019; P = 0.005. Among post-menopausal women, telomere length remained positively associated with total physical activity (rs = 0.27, P = 0.016; Ptrend = 0.054 and occupational physical activity (rs = 0.26, P = 0.021; Ptrend = 0.056 and was only associated with transportation-related physical activity among pre-menopausal women (rs = 0.27, P = 0.015; P = 0.004. No association was observed between telomere length and recreational or household activities, other lifestyle factors or traditional prognostic factors.Telomeres are longer in more active breast cancer patients. Since white blood cells are involved in anticancer immune responses, these findings suggest that even regular low-intensity physical activity, such as that

  15. Association of ABO and Rh blood groups with breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sultan Ayoub Meo; Faryal Suraya; Badar Jamil; Fwziah Al Rouq; Anusha Sultan Meo; Kamran Sattar; Mohammad Javed Ansari; Alasiri, Saleh A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the association of “ABO” and “Rhesus” blood groups with incidence of breast cancer. Methods: In this study, we identified 70 research documents from data based search engines including “PubMed”, “ISI-Web of Knowledge”, “Embase” and “Google Scholar”. The research papers were selected by using the primary key-terms including “ABO blood type”, “Rhesus” blood type and “breast cancer”. The research documents in which “ABO” and “Rhesus” blood ty...

  16. Clinical and molecular characterization of BRCA-associated breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soenderstrup, I M H; Laenkholm, A V; Jensen, M B

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In breast cancer (BC) patients a cancer predisposing BRCA1/2 mutation is associated with adverse tumor characteristics, risk assessment and treatment allocation. We aimed to estimate overall- (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) according to tumor characteristics and treatment among...... women who within two years of definitive surgery for primary BC were shown to carry a mutation in BRCA1/2 . MATERIAL AND METHODS: From the clinical database of the Danish Breast Cancer Group we included 141 BRCA1 and 96 BRCA2 BC patients. Estrogen receptor and HER2 status were centrally reviewed...... on paraffin-embedded tumor tissue. Information on risk reducing surgery was obtained from the Danish Pathology and Patient Registries and included as time-dependent variables in Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS: Ten-year OS and DFS for BRCA1 BC patients were 78% (95% CI 69-85) and 74% (95% CI 64...

  17. Association of ABO blood group and risk of female breast cancer - A retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Sujatha B; Sherry Jenilin G

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among females in rural areas of our country. It constitutes around 20-25% of all female cancers in India. ABO blood group has been observed to be associated with gastric and pancreatic cancer, but its association with breast cancer is unsure. AIMS & OBJECTIVES:1.To find any association between breast cancer and ABO blood group. 2. To know the frequency and risk of each blood group in relation to patients with breast cancer. This study was conduct...

  18. [Pregnancy-associated breast cancer: current opinions on diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slingerland, Marije; Kroep, Judith R; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan; Scholten, Astrid N; Nortier, J W R Hans

    2012-01-01

    Because of the trend to postpone childbirth until later in life we will be increasingly confronted with pregnancy-associated breast cancer. We report on two patients with pregnancy-associated breast cancer. Complete treatment of this condition during pregnancy by means of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy is possible without any known damage to the foetus, even if the breast cancer is diagnosed early in pregnancy. Treatment should be multidisciplinary and preferably centralized. Pregnancy does not seem to influence the prognosis of breast cancer. All patients with pregnancy-associated breast cancer should be registered in a registration study.

  19. Association of ABO blood group and risk of female breast cancer - A retrospective study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sujatha B; Sherry Jenilin G

    2016-01-01

    .... It constitutes around 20-25% of all female cancers in India. ABO blood group has been observed to be associated with gastric and pancreatic cancer, but its association with breast cancer is unsure. AIMS & OBJECTIVES:1...

  20. Synchronous bilateral breast cancer in a male

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio Hernández, María Caridad; Díaz Prado, Yenia Ivet; Pérez, Suanly Rodríguez; Díaz, Ronald Rodríguez; Aleaga, Zaili Gutiérrez

    2013-01-01

    Male breast cancer, which represents only 1% of all breast cancers, is occasionally associated with a family history of breast cancer. Sporadic male breast cancers presenting with another primary breast cancer are extremely rare. In this article, we report on a 70-year-old male patient with bilateral multifocal and synchronous breast cancer and without a family history of breast cancer. PMID:24319497

  1. Lactation opposes pappalysin-1-driven pregnancy-associated breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takabatake, Yukie; Oxvig, Claus; Nagi, Chandandeep; Adelson, Kerin; Jaffer, Shabnam; Schmidt, Hank; Keely, Patricia J; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Mandeli, John; Germain, Doris

    2016-04-01

    Pregnancy is associated with a transient increase in risk for breast cancer. However, the mechanism underlying pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) is poorly understood. Here, we identify the protease pappalysin-1 (PAPP-A) as a pregnancy-dependent oncogene. Transgenic expression of PAPP-A in the mouse mammary gland during pregnancy and involution promotes the deposition of collagen. We demonstrate that collagen facilitates the proteolysis of IGFBP-4 and IGFBP-5 by PAPP-A, resulting in increased proliferative signaling during gestation and a delayed involution. However, while studying the effect of lactation, we found that although PAPP-A transgenic mice lactating for an extended period of time do not develop mammary tumors, those that lactate for a short period develop mammary tumors characterized by a tumor-associated collagen signature (TACS-3). Mechanistically, we found that the protective effect of lactation is associated with the expression of inhibitors of PAPP-A, STC1, and STC2. Collectively, these results identify PAPP-A as a pregnancy-dependent oncogene while also showing that extended lactation is protective against PAPP-A-mediated carcinogenesis. Our results offer the first mechanism that explains the link between breast cancer, pregnancy, and breastfeeding. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  2. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  3. Epidemiological risk factors associated with inflammatory breast cancer subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Rachel L; El-Zein, Randa; Valero, Vicente; Lucci, Anthony; Bevers, Therese B; Fouad, Tamer; Liao, Weiqin; Ueno, Naoto T; Woodward, Wendy A; Brewster, Abenaa M

    2016-03-01

    In this single-institution case-control study, we identified risk factors associated with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) subtypes based on staining of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and expression of human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2neu) to determine distinct etiologic pathways. We identified 224 women with IBC and 396 cancer-free women seen at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between breast cancer risk factors and the IBC tumor subtypes: luminal (ER+ and/or PR+/HER2neu-), HER2neu+ (any ER and PR, HER2neu+), and triple-negative (ER-/PR-/HER2neu-). In multivariable analysis, compared with women age ≥26 at first pregnancy, women age risk of triple-negative IBC (OR 3.32, 95% CI 1.37-8.05). Women with a history of breast-feeding had a lower risk of triple-negative (OR 0.30; 95% CI 0.15-0.62) and luminal IBC (OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.18-0.68). A history of smoking was associated with an increased risk of luminal IBC (OR 2.37; 95% CI 1.24-4.52). Compared with normal-weight women, those who were overweight or obese (body mass index ≥25 kg/m(2)) had a higher risk of all three tumor subtypes (p risk factor for IBC of any subtype. Modifiable risk factors, age at first pregnancy (≥26), breast-feeding, and smoking may be associated with specific IBC subtypes. These results highlight the importance of evaluating epidemiologic risk factors for IBC for the identification of subtype-specific prevention strategies.

  4. Association of PKCζ expression with clinicopathological characteristics of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Yin

    Full Text Available The protein kinase C (PKC family has been functionally linked to cancer. It has been suggested that atypical PKCs contribute to cell proliferation and cancer progression. With respect to breast cancer, PKCζ has been found to play a key role in intracellular transduction of mitogenic and apoptotic signals using mammary cell lines. However, little is known about its function in vivo. Here we examined the correlation between PKCζ protein levels and important clinicopathologic factors in breast cancer using patient samples. To conduct the study, 30 invasive ductal carcinoma cases and their paired normal tissues were used for tissue microarray analysis (TMA and 16 were used for western blot analysis. In addition, the correlation between PKCζ expression levels and clinicopathologic characteristics was determined in 176 cases with relevant clinical data. Finally, the correlation between PKCζ and epithelial growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 expressions was determined using three breast cancer cell lines by western blot analysis. Both TMA and western blot results showed that PKCζ protein was highly expressed in primary tumors but not in paired normal tissue. The correlation study indicated that high PKCζ levels were associated with premenopausal patients (p = 0.019 and worse prognostic factors, such as advanced clinical stage, more lymph node involvement and larger tumor size. Both disease-free survival and overall survival rates were lower in the high PKCζ group than those in the low PKCζ group. No correlation was observed between PKCζ levels and age, histological grade, or estrogen or progesterone receptor expression status. A positive correlation between PKCζ and HER2 levels was observed in both tumor samples and cell lines. Our observations link PKCζ expression with factors pointing to worse prognosis, higher HER2 levels and a lower survival rate. This suggests that PKCζ protein levels may serve as a prognostic marker of breast cancer.

  5. Role of MicroRNA Regulation in Obesity-Associated Breast Cancer: Nutritional Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasiappan, Ravi; Rajarajan, Dheeran

    2017-11-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy diagnosed in women, and the incidence of breast cancer is increasing every year. Obesity has been identified as one of the major risk factors for breast cancer progression. The mechanisms by which obesity contributes to breast cancer development is not yet understood; however, there are a few mechanisms counted as potential producers of breast cancer in obesity, including insulin resistance, chronic inflammation and inflammatory cytokines, adipokines, and sex hormones. Recent emerging evidence suggests that alterations in microRNA (miRNA) expressions are found in several diseases, including breast cancer and obesity; however, miRNA roles in obesity-linked breast cancer are beginning to unravel. miRNAs are thought to be potential noninvasive biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of cancer patients with comorbid conditions of obesity as well as therapeutic targets. Recent studies have evidenced that nutrients and other dietary factors protect against cancer and obesity through modulation of miRNA expressions. Herein, we summarize a comprehensive overview of up-to-date information related to miRNAs and their molecular targets involved in obesity-associated breast cancer. We also address the mechanisms by which dietary factors modulate miRNA expression and its protective roles in obesity-associated breast cancer. It is hoped that this review would provide new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of obesity-associated breast cancer to reduce the burden of breast cancer. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  6. Estrogen receptor positive breast cancers and their association with environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannel Sylvio

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiological studies to assess risk factors for breast cancer often do not differentiate between different types of breast cancers. We applied a general linear model to determine whether data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program on annual county level age-adjusted incidence rates of breast cancer with and without estrogen receptors (ER+ and ER- were associated with environmental pollutants. Results Our final model explained approximately 38% of the variation in the rate of ER+ breast cancer. In contrast, we were only able to explain 14% of the variation in the rate of ER- breast cancer with the same set of environmental variables. Only ER+ breast cancers were positively associated with the EPA's estimated risk of cancer based on toxic air emissions and the proportion of agricultural land in a county. Meteorological variables, including short wave radiation, temperature, precipitation, and water vapor pressure, were also significantly associated with the rate of ER+ breast cancer, after controlling for age, race, premature mortality from heart disease, and unemployment rate. Conclusions Our findings were consistent with what we expected, given the fact that many of the commonly used pesticides and air pollutants included in the EPA cancer risk score are classified as endocrine disruptors and ER+ breast cancers respond more strongly to estrogen than ER- breast cancers. The findings of this study suggest that ER+ and ER- breast cancers have different risk factors, which should be taken into consideration in future studies that seek to understand environmental risk factors for breast cancer.

  7. HEREDITARY BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Bit-Sava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary breast cancer occurs in 5–20 % of cases and it is associated with inherited mutations in particular genes, such as BRCA1 и BRCA2 in most cases. The CHEK2, PTEN, TP53, ATM, RAD51, BLM, PALB2, Nbs genes are associated with low and median risks ofdeveloping breast cancer. Molecular genetic studies identify germinal mutations underlying hereditary breast cancer. In most cases hereditary breast cancer refers to triple-negative phenotype, which is the most aggressive type of breast cancer, that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2. The review presents the diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer. Clinical-morphological aspects allow the new diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer to be identified. Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors demonstrate the potential for effective treatment of BRCA-associated breast cancer.

  8. Breast cancer cells induce cancer-associated fibroblasts to secrete hepatocyte growth factor to enhance breast tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiaw-Wei Tyan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been well documented that microenvironment consisting of stroma affects breast cancer progression. However, the mechanisms by which cancer cells and fibroblasts, the major cell type in stroma, interact with each other during tumor development remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that the human cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs had higher activity in enhancing breast tumorigenecity compared to the normal tissue-associated fibroblasts (NAFs isolated from the same patients. The expression level of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF in these fibroblasts was positively correlated with their ability to enhance breast tumorigenesis in mice. Deprivation of HGF using a neutralizing antibody reduced CAF-mediated colony formation of human breast cancer cells, indicating that CAFs enhanced cancer cell colony formation mainly through HGF secretion. Co-culture with human breast cancer MDA-MB-468 cells in a transwell system enhanced NAFs to secret HGF as well as promote tumorigenecity. The newly gained ability of these "educated" NAFs became irreversible after continuing this process till fourth passage. These results suggested that breast cancer cells could alter the nature of its surrounding fibroblasts to secrete HGF to support its own progression through paracrine signaling.

  9. The association between complications and quality of life after mastectomy and breast reconstruction for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, John P; Jeevan, Ranjeet; Gulliver-Clarke, Carmel; Pereira, Jerome; Caddy, Christopher M; van der Meulen, Jan H P

    2017-09-15

    Medical treatment for breast cancer is associated with substantial toxicity and patient burden. There is less known about the impact of surgical complications. Understanding this impact could provide important information for patients when they are considering surgical options. Between 2008 and 2009, the UK National Mastectomy and Breast Reconstruction Audit recorded surgical complications for a prospective cohort of 17,844 women treated for breast cancer at 270 hospitals; 6405 of these women were surveyed about their quality of life 18 months after surgery. Breast appearance, emotional well-being, and physical well-being were quantified on 0- to 100-point scales. Linear multiple regression models, controlling for a range of baseline prognostic factors, were used to compare the scores of patients who had complications with the scores of those who did not. The overall complication rate was 10.2%. Complications were associated with little or no impairment in women undergoing mastectomy without reconstruction or with delayed reconstruction. The association was much larger for flap-related complications suffered during immediate reconstruction. The breast-appearance scores (adjusted mean difference, -23.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], -31.0 to -16.6) and emotional well-being scores (adjusted mean difference, -14.0; 95% CI, -22.0 to -6.0) of these patients were much lower than those of any other patient group. Implant-related complications were not associated with a lower quality of life in any surgical group. There is a strong case for prospectively collecting flap-complication rates at the surgeon and surgical unit level and for allowing patients to access these data when they make choices about their breast cancer surgery. Cancer 2017;123:3460-7. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  10. Other Side of Breast Cancer: Factors Associated with Caregiver Burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahidi, Maryam; Mahdavi, Nader; Asghari, Elnaz; Ebrahimi, Hossein; Eivazi Ziaei, Jamal; Hosseinzadeh, Mina; Namdar Areshtanab, Hossein; Kermani, Iraj Asvadi

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to determine factors associated with caregiver burden among primary caregivers of women with breast cancer in Iran. This was a descriptive correlation study conducted in 2012 on 150 main caregivers of patients with breast cancer who came to the oncology clinic of Shahid Ghazi hospital in Tabriz, Iran. A questionnaire which included caregiving-related factors and the Zarit Burden Interview was used for data collection after its validity and reliability were determined. Data was analyzed using SPSS 13.0 software with descriptive and analytic statistics. The association between significant variables and the dependent variable with an observation of the effects of other variables was assessed using the multiple linear regression model. The mean age of caregivers was 39.60 ± 13.80 years old, and 77 (51.3%) of them were men. The mean score of the Zarit Burden Interview was 30.55 ± 19.18. In the regression model, the mean score of activities of daily living, level of education, gender, and financial status were identified as the determining factors of the burden of caregivers. Primary caregivers need to be financially supported by the relevant organizations. Care skills training and providing palliative care seem helpful in reducing the pain and the burden of family caregivers for patients with breast cancer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Differential microRNA expression is associated with androgen receptor expression in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yaqin; Yang, Fang; Sun, Zijia; Zhang, Wenwen; Gu, Jun; Guan, Xiaoxiang

    2017-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is frequently expressed in breast cancer; however, its prognostic value remains unclear. AR expression in breast cancer has been associated with improved outcomes in estrogen receptor (ER)‑positive breast cancer compared with ER‑negative disease. Eliminating AR function in breast cancer is critically important for breast cancer progression. However, the mechanism underlying AR regulation remains poorly understood. The study of microRNAs (miRNAs) has provided important insights into the pathogenesis of hormone‑dependent cancer. To determine whether miRNAs function in the AR regulation of breast cancer, the present study performed miRNA expression profiling in AR‑positive and ‑negative breast cancer cell lines. A total of 153 miRNAs were differentially expressed in AR‑positive compared with AR‑negative breast cancer cells; 52 were upregulated and 101 were downregulated. A number of these have been extensively associated with breast cancer cell functions, including proliferation, invasion and drug‑resistance. Furthermore, through pathway enrichment analysis, signaling pathways associated with the prediction targets of the miRNAs were characterized, including the vascular endothelial growth factor and mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathways. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that the expression of miRNAs may be involved in the mechanism underlying AR regulation of breast cancer, and may improve understanding of the role of AR in breast cancer.

  12. [Pregnancy-Associated Breast Cancer: An analytical observational study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baulies, Sonia; Cusidó, Maite; Tresserra, Francisco; Rodríguez, Ignacio; Ubeda, Belén; Ara, Carmen; Fábregas, Rafael

    2014-03-04

    Pregnancy-associated breast cancer is defined as breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy and up to one year postpartum. A retrospective, analytical, observational study comparing 56 cases of breast cancer and pregnancy (PABC) diagnosed 1976-2008 with 73 patients with breast cancer not associated with pregnancy (non-PABC) was performed. Demographic data, prognostic factors, treatment and survival were reviewed and compared. The prevalence of PABC in our center is 8.3/10,000. The highest frequency (62%) appeared during the postpartum period. The stages are higher in PABC, being 31.3% advanced (EIII and EIV) in PABC versus 13.3% in non-PABC (P < .05). Regarding prognostic factors, 27.3% in PABC had a tumoral grade 3 versus 15.8% of non-PABC. Among women with PABC, 33.3% had negative estrogen receptors, 48.7% negative progesterone receptors and 34.5% positive Her2Neu compared with 22.2, 24.1 and 31%, respectively of non-PABC patients. Finally, positive lymph nodes were found in 52.8% of PABC, versus 33.8% non-PABC (P < .05). Overall and disease-free survival rate at 5 years for PABC was 63.7 and 74.2%, respectively. The poorer survival observed is possibly due to the presence of adverse prognostic features such as lymph node metastases, negative hormone receptors, tumoral grade iii, as well as a delay in diagnosis with a higher rate of advanced stages. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Striking life events associated with primary breast cancer susceptibility in women: a meta-analysis study

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yan; Wang, Changjun; Zhong, Ying; Huang, Xin; Peng, Li; Shan, Guangliang; Wang, Ke; Sun, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The association between striking life events, an important stress and acute anxiety disorder, and the occurrence of primary breast cancer is unclear. The current meta-analysis was designed to assess the relationship between striking life events and primary breast cancer incidence in women. Methods Systematic computerized searching of the PubMed, ScienceDirect, Embase, and BMJ databases with the combinations of controlled descriptors from Mesh, including breast cancer, breast tumor, ca...

  14. Association between invasive ovarian cancer susceptibility and 11 best candidate SNPs from breast cancer genome-wide association study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Honglin; Ramus, Susan J; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger

    2009-01-01

    cases and 6308 controls from eight independent studies. Only rs4954956 was significantly associated with ovarian cancer risk both in the replication study and in combined analyses. This association was stronger for the serous histological subtype [per minor allele odds ratio (OR) 1.07 95% CI 1...... ovarian cancer. Eleven SNPs were initially genotyped in 2927 invasive ovarian cancer cases and 4143 controls from six ovarian cancer case-control studies. Genotype frequencies in cases and controls were compared using a likelihood ratio test in a logistic regression model stratified by study. Initially......Because both ovarian and breast cancer are hormone-related and are known to have some predisposition genes in common, we evaluated 11 of the most significant hits (six with confirmed associations with breast cancer) from the breast cancer genome-wide association study for association with invasive...

  15. Common variants associated with breast cancer in genome-wide association studies are modifiers of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, V. Shane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Tarrell, Robert; Karaus, Mary; McGuffog, Lesley; Pharaoh, Paul D. P.; Ponder, Bruce A. J.; Dunning, Alison M.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Houdayer, Claude; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; Spurdle, Amanda; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Singer, Christian F.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Dressler, Catherina; Fink, Anneliese; Szabo, Csilla I.; Zikan, Michal; Foretova, Lenka; Claes, Kathleen; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Couch, Fergus J.; Gregory, Helen; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Morrison, Patrick; Cole, Trevor; McKeown, Carole; Taylor, Amy; Donaldson, Alan; Paterson, Joan; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, John; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Davidson, Rosemarie; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Izatt, Louise; Pichert, Gabriella; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Chu, Carol; Bishop, Tim; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Holt, Felicity; Male, Alison; Robinson, Anne; Gardiner, Carol; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Walker, Lisa; McLeod, Diane; Eeles, Ros; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Mitra, Anita; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eccles, Diana; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; Tyler, Emma; McBride, Donna; Bérard, Léon; Sinilnikova, Olga; Barjhoux, Laure; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Eisinger, Françoise; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Payrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélèn; Rebischung, Christine; Cassini, Cécile; Olivier-Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Lynch, Henry T.; Hogervorst, Frans; Vernhoef, Senno; Pijpe, Anouk; van 't Veer, Laura; van Leeuwen, Flora; Rookus, Matti; Collée, Margriet; van den Ouweland, Ans; Kriege, Mieke; Schutte, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi; Wijnen, Juul; Vreeswijk, Maaike; Tollenaar, Rob; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet; van der Luijt, Rob; Aalfs, Cora; van Os, Theo; Gille, Hans; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna; van Roozendaal, Kees; Blok, Marinus; Oosterwijk, Jan; van der Hout, Annemieke; Mourits, Marian; Vasen, Hans; Szabo, Csilla; Pohlreich, Petr; Kleibl, Zdenek; Machackova, Eva; Lukesova, Miroslava; de Leeneer, Kim; Poppe, Bruce; de Paepe, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that significantly modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Since these risk modifiers were originally identified as genetic risk factors for breast cancer in genome-wide association studies (GWASs),

  16. Large-scale genotyping identifies 41 new loci associated with breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Hall, Per; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. Common variants at 27 loci have been identified as associated with susceptibility to breast cancer, and these account for ∼9% of the familial risk of the disease. We report here a meta-analysis of 9 genome-wide association studies, including 10......,052 breast cancer cases and 12,575 controls of European ancestry, from which we selected 29,807 SNPs for further genotyping. These SNPs were genotyped in 45,290 cases and 41,880 controls of European ancestry from 41 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). The SNPs were genotyped as part...

  17. Risk Factors Associated with Breast Cancer among Women in Warri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The participants with breast cancer and the comparison group (controls) were matched in the ratio of 1:3 respectively for age and duration of stay in the area of ... The odds of developing breast cancer was four times higher among women who reported daily exposure to fumes from automobiles and electricity generating ...

  18. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new breast cancer susceptibility loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghoussaini, Maya; Fletcher, Olivia; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Turnbull, Clare; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Dicks, Ed; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Conroy, Don; Maranian, Melanie; Ahmed, Shahana; Driver, Kristy; Johnson, Nichola; Orr, Nicholas; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lichtner, Peter; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel; Bui, Minh; Hopper, John L.; Apicella, Carmel; Park, Daniel J.; Southey, Melissa; Hunter, David J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Fasching, Peter A.; Lux, Michael P.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Alonso, M. Rosario; González-Neira, Anna; Benítez, Javier; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Dur, Christina Clarke; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Eilber, Ursula; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Hillemanns, Peter; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Rogov, Yuri I.; Karstens, Johann H.; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofieva, Darya; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Lambrechts, Diether; Yesilyurt, Betul T.; Floris, Giuseppe; Leunen, Karin; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bonanni, Bernardo; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Peterlongo, Paolo; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Stevens, Kristen; Lee, Adam; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; McLean, Catriona; Alnaes, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Børrensen-Dale, Anne-Lise; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Devilee, Peter; van Asperen, Christie J.; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Brinton, Louise; Lissowska, Jolanta; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Cox, Angela; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Shah, Mitul; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Jones, Michael; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Muir, Kenneth R.; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Rattanamongkongul, Suthee; Chaiwerawattana, Arkom; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Perkins, Annie; Swann, Ruth; Velentzis, Louiza; Eccles, Diana M.; Tapper, Will J.; Gerty, Susan M.; Graham, Nikki J.; Ponder, Bruce A. J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Lathrop, Mark; Dunning, Alison M.; Rahman, Nazneen; Peto, Julian; Easton, Douglas F.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. To date, 22 common breast cancer susceptibility loci have been identified accounting for similar to 8% of the heritability of the disease. We attempted to replicate 72 promising associations from two independent genome-wide association studies

  19. Large-scale genotyping identifies 41 new loci associated with breast cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Hall, Per; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Ghoussaini, Maya; Dennis, Joe; Milne, Roger L.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dicks, Ed; Lee, Andrew; Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian; Gibson, Lorna; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Adank, Muriel; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckman, Lars; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lichtner, Peter; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hofman, Albert; Hunter, David J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, François; Tessier, Daniel C.; Canisius, Sander; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Luccarini, Craig; Schoof, Nils; Humphreys, Keith; Li, Jingmei; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Vachon, Celine; Stevens, Kristen N.; Lambrechts, Diether; Moisse, Matthieu; Paridaens, Robert; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Johnson, Nichola; Aitken, Zoe; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Broeks, Annegien; van 't Veer, Laura J.; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Menegaux, Florence; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Zamora, M. Pilar; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W.; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Jager, Agnes; Bui, Quang M.; Stone, Jennifer; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Tsimiklis, Helen; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Fasching, Peter A.; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Jones, Michael; Figueroa, Jonine; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Brüning, Thomas; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bonanni, Bernardo; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi J.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Dörk, Thilo; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E.; Edge, Stephen; Fostira, Florentia; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Sueta, Aiko; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; van den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Phuah, Sze Yee; Cornes, Belinda K.; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Ding, Shian-Ling; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Blot, William J.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Simard, Jacques; Garcia-Closas, Montse; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M.; Benitez, Javier; Easton, Douglas F.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. Common variants at 27 loci have been identified as associated with susceptibility to breast cancer, and these account for ∼9% of the familial risk of the disease. We report here a meta-analysis of 9 genome-wide association studies, including

  20. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new breast cancer susceptibility loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghoussaini, Maya; Fletcher, Olivia; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. To date, 22 common breast cancer susceptibility loci have been identified accounting for ∼8% of the heritability of the disease. We attempted to replicate 72 promising associations from two independent genome-wide association studies (GWAS...

  1. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new breast cancer susceptibility loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghoussaini, M.; Fletcher, O.; Michailidou, K.; Turnbull, C.; Schmidt, M.K.; Dicks, E.; Dennis, J.; Wang, Q.; Humphreys, M.K.; Luccarini, C.; Baynes, C.; Conroy, D.; Maranian, M.; Ahmed, S.; Driver, K.; Johnson, N.; Orr, N.; dos Santos Silva, I.; Waisfisz, Q.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Rivadeneira, F.; Hall, P.; Czene, K.; Irwanto, A.; Liu, J.; Nevanlinna, H.; Aittomaki, K.; Blomqvist, C.; Meindl, A.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Muller-Myhsok, B.; Lichtner, P.; Chang-Claude, J.; Hein, R.; Nickels, S.; Flesch-Janys, D.; Tsimiklis, H.; Makalic, E.; Schmidt, D.; Bui, M.; Hopper, J.L.; Apicella, C.; Park, D.J.; Southey, M.; Hunter, D.J.; Chanock, S.J.; Broeks, A.; Verhoef, S.; Hogervorst, F.B.; Fasching, P.A.; Lux, M.P.; Beckmann, M.W.; Ekici, A.B.; Sawyer, E.; Tomlinson, I.; Kerin, M.; Marme, F.; Schneeweiss, A.; Sohn, C.; Burwinkel, B.; Guenel, P.; Truong, T.; Cordina-Duverger, E.; Menegaux, F.; Bojesen, S.E.; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Nielsen, S.F.; Flyger, H.; Milne, R.L.; Alonso, M.R.; Gonzalez-Neira, A.; Benitez, J.; Anton-Culver, H.; Ziogas, A.; Bernstein, L.; Dur, C.C.; Brenner, H.; Muller, H.; Arndt, V.; Stegmaier, C.; Justenhoven, C.; Brauch, H.; Bruning, T.; Wang-Gohrke, S.; Eilber, U.; Dork, T.; Schurmann, P.; Bremer, M.; Hillemanns, P.; Bogdanova, N.V.; Antonenkova, N.N.; Rogov, Y.I.; Karstens, J.H.; Bermisheva, M.; Prokofieva, D.; Ligtenberg, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. To date, 22 common breast cancer susceptibility loci have been identified accounting for approximately 8% of the heritability of the disease. We attempted to replicate 72 promising associations from two independent genome-wide association studies

  2. Breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help you not feel alone. Outlook (Prognosis) New, improved treatments are helping people with breast cancer live ... carcinoma in situ Patient Instructions Breast radiation - discharge Chemotherapy - what to ask your doctor Lymphedema - self-care ...

  3. Breast Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... from starting. Risk-reducing surgery . General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  4. Common non-synonymous SNPs associated with breast cancer susceptibility: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Roger L.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Arias-Perez, Jose-Ignacio; Zamora, M. Pilar; Menéndez-Rodríguez, Primitiva; Hardisson, David; Mendiola, Marta; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S.; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lambrechts, Diether; Peuteman, Gilian; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Smeets, Ann; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katazyna; Hartman, Mikael; Hui, Miao; Yen Lim, Wei; Wan Chan, Ching; Marme, Federick; Yang, Rongxi; Bugert, Peter; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Hooning, Maartje J.; Kriege, Mieke; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; Koppert, Linetta B.; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Long, Jirong; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Cornelissen, Sten; Braaf, Linde; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Noh, Dong-Young; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Azzollini, Jacopo; Barile, Monica; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; Hopper, John L.; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Makalic, Enes; Southey, Melissa C.; Hwang Teo, Soo; Har Yip, Cheng; Sivanandan, Kavitta; Tay, Wan-Ting; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Therese; Sanchez, Marie; Mulot, Claire; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zhang, Ben; Couch, Fergus J.; Toland, Amanda E.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; McKay, James; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Purrington, Kristen; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Mikael; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Ahmed, Shahana; Shah, Mitul; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Hall, Per; Giles, Graham G.; Benítez, Javier; Dunning, Alison M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Berchuck, Andrew; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Benlloch, Sara; Antoniou, Antonis; McGuffog, Lesley; Offit, Ken; Lee, Andrew; Dicks, Ed; Luccarini, Craig; Tessier, Daniel C.; Bacot, Francois; Vincent, Daniel; LaBoissière, Sylvie; Robidoux, Frederic; Nielsen, Sune F.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Windebank, Sharon A.; Hilker, Christopher A.; Meyer, Jeffrey; Angelakos, Maggie; Maskiell, Judi; van der Schoot, Ellen; Rutgers, Emiel; Verhoef, Senno; Hogervorst, Frans; Boonyawongviroj, Prat; Siriwanarungsan, Pornthep; Schrauder, Michael; Rübner, Matthias; Oeser, Sonja; Landrith, Silke; Williams, Eileen; Ryder-Mills, Elaine; Sargus, Kara; McInerney, Niall; Colleran, Gabrielle; Rowan, Andrew; Jones, Angela; Sohn, Christof; Schneeweiß, Andeas; Bugert, Peter; Álvarez, Núria; Lacey, James; Wang, Sophia; Ma, Huiyan; Lu, Yani; Deapen, Dennis; Pinder, Rich; Lee, Eunjung; Schumacher, Fred; Horn-Ross, Pam; Reynolds, Peggy; Nelson, David; Ziegler, Hartwig; Wolf, Sonja; Hermann, Volker; Lo, Wing-Yee; Justenhoven, Christina; Baisch, Christian; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Brüning, Thomas; Pesch, Beate; Rabstein, Sylvia; Lotz, Anne; Harth, Volker; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Erkkilä, Irja; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; von Smitten, Karl; Antonenkova, Natalia; Hillemanns, Peter; Christiansen, Hans; Myöhänen, Eija; Kemiläinen, Helena; Thorne, Heather; Niedermayr, Eveline; Bowtell, D; Chenevix-Trench, G; deFazio, A; Gertig, D; Green, A; Webb, P; Green, A.; Parsons, P.; Hayward, N.; Webb, P.; Whiteman, D.; Fung, Annie; Yashiki, June; Peuteman, Gilian; Smeets, Dominiek; Brussel, Thomas Van; Corthouts, Kathleen; Obi, Nadia; Heinz, Judith; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Celik, Muhabbet; Olchers, Til; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Scuvera, Giulietta; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Feroce, Irene; Maniscalco, Angela; Rossi, Alessandra; Bernard, Loris; Tranchant, Martine; Valois, Marie-France; Turgeon, Annie; Heguy, Lea; Sze Yee, Phuah; Kang, Peter; Nee, Kang In; Mariapun, Shivaani; Sook-Yee, Yoon; Lee, Daphne; Ching, Teh Yew; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Otsukka, Meeri; Mononen, Kari; Selander, Teresa; Weerasooriya, Nayana; staff, OFBCR; Krol-Warmerdam, E.; Molenaar, J.; Blom, J.; Brinton, Louise; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Peplonska, Beata; Zatonski, Witold; Chao, Pei; Stagner, Michael; Bos, Petra; Blom, Jannet; Crepin, Ellen; Nieuwlaat, Anja; Heemskerk, Annette; Higham, Sue; Cross, Simon; Cramp, Helen; Connley, Dan; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy; Brock, Ian; Luccarini, Craig; Conroy, Don; Baynes, Caroline; Chua, Kimberley

    2014-01-01

    Candidate variant association studies have been largely unsuccessful in identifying common breast cancer susceptibility variants, although most studies have been underpowered to detect associations of a realistic magnitude. We assessed 41 common non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) for which evidence of association with breast cancer risk had been previously reported. Case-control data were combined from 38 studies of white European women (46 450 cases and 42 600 controls) and analyzed using unconditional logistic regression. Strong evidence of association was observed for three nsSNPs: ATXN7-K264R at 3p21 [rs1053338, per allele OR = 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04–1.10, P = 2.9 × 10−6], AKAP9-M463I at 7q21 (rs6964587, OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.03–1.07, P = 1.7 × 10−6) and NEK10-L513S at 3p24 (rs10510592, OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.07–1.12, P = 5.1 × 10−17). The first two associations reached genome-wide statistical significance in a combined analysis of available data, including independent data from nine genome-wide association studies (GWASs): for ATXN7-K264R, OR = 1.07 (95% CI = 1.05–1.10, P = 1.0 × 10−8); for AKAP9-M463I, OR = 1.05 (95% CI = 1.04–1.07, P = 2.0 × 10−10). Further analysis of other common variants in these two regions suggested that intronic SNPs nearby are more strongly associated with disease risk. We have thus identified a novel susceptibility locus at 3p21, and confirmed previous suggestive evidence that rs6964587 at 7q21 is associated with risk. The third locus, rs10510592, is located in an established breast cancer susceptibility region; the association was substantially attenuated after adjustment for the known GWAS hit. Thus, each of the associated nsSNPs is likely to be a marker for another, non-coding, variant causally related to breast cancer risk. Further fine-mapping and functional studies are required to identify the underlying risk-modifying variants and the genes through which they act

  5. CTLA-4 polymorphisms associate with breast cancer susceptibility in Asians: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiming Dai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have investigated the association between cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4 polymorphisms and breast cancer susceptibility, but the results remained inconsistent. Therefore, we evaluated the relationship between four common CTLA-4 polymorphisms and breast cancer risk by a meta-analysis, aiming to derive a comprehensive and precise conclusion. We searched EMBASE, Pubmed, Web of Science, CNKI, and Wanfang databases until July 18th, 2016. Finally, ten eligible studies involving 4,544 breast cancer patients and 4,515 cancer-free controls were included; all these studies were from Asia. Odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (CI were used to evaluate the breast cancer risk in five genetic models. The results indicated that the CTLA-4 +49A>G (rs231775 polymorphism had a significant association with decreased breast cancer risk in allelic, homozygous, dominant and recessive models. Also, the +6230G>A (rs3087243 polymorphism reduced breast cancer risk especially in the Chinese population under homozygous and recessive models. In contrast, the −1661A>G (rs4553808 polymorphism increased breast cancer risk in allelic, heterozygous and dominant models, whereas −1722 T>C (rs733618 did not relate to breast cancer risk. In conclusion, CTLA-4 polymorphisms significantly associate with breast cancer susceptibility in Asian populations, and different gene loci may have different effects on breast cancer development. Further large-scale studies including multi-racial populations are required to confirm our findings.

  6. Preliminary study on association between toxoplasmosis and breast cancer in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Kalantari

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: This study did not find any significant association between toxoplasmosis and breast cancer besides higher rates of seropositivity and serointensity in patients compared with healthy volunteers.

  7. The association of breast density with breast cancer mortality in African American and white women screened in community practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengfan; Ivy, Julie S; Diehl, Kathleen M; Yankaskas, Bonnie C

    2013-01-01

    The effect of breast density on survival outcomes for American women who participate in screening remains unknown. We studied the role of breast density on both breast cancer and other cause of mortality in screened women. Data for women with breast cancer, identified from the community-based Carolina Mammography Registry, were linked with the North Carolina cancer registry and NC death tapes for this study. Cause-specific Cox proportional hazards models were developed to analyze the effect of several covariates on breast cancer mortality-namely, age, race (African American/White), cancer stage at diagnosis (in situ, local, regional, and distant), and breast density (BI-RADS( ® ) 1-4). Two stratified Cox models were considered controlling for (1) age and race, and (2) age and cancer stage, respectively, to further study the effect of density. The cumulative incidence function with confidence interval approximation was used to quantify mortality probabilities over time. For this study, 22,597 screened women were identified as having breast cancer. The non-stratified and stratified Cox models showed no significant statistical difference in mortality between dense tissue and fatty tissue, while controlling for other covariate effects (p value = 0.1242, 0.0717, and 0.0619 for the non-stratified, race-stratified, and cancer stage-stratified models, respectively). The cumulative mortality probability estimates showed that women with dense breast tissues did not have significantly different breast cancer mortality than women with fatty breast tissue, regardless of age (e.g., 10-year confidence interval of mortality probabilities for whites aged 60-69 white: 0.056-0.090 vs. 0.054-0.083). Aging, African American race, and advanced cancer stage were found to be significant risk factors for breast cancer mortality (hazard ratio >1.0). After controlling for cancer incidence, there was not a significant association between mammographic breast density and mortality, adjusting

  8. c-Ski activates cancer-associated fibroblasts to regulate breast cancer cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liyang; Hou, Yixuan; Sun, Yan; Zhao, Liuyang; Tang, Xi; Hu, Ping; Yang, Jiajia; Zeng, Zongyue; Yang, Guanglun; Cui, Xiaojiang; Liu, Manran

    2013-12-01

    Aberrant expression of c-Ski oncoprotein in some tumor cells has been shown to be associated with cancer development. However, the role of c-Ski in cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) of tumor microenvironment has not been characterized. In the current study, we found that c-Ski is highly expressed in CAFs derived from breast carcinoma microenvironment and this CAF-associated c-Ski expression is associated with invasion and metastasis of human breast tumors. We showed that c-Ski overexpression in immortalized breast normal fibroblasts (NFs) induces conversion to breast CAFs by repressing p53 and thereby upregulating SDF-1 in NFs. SDF-1 treatment or p53 knockdown in NFs had similar effects on the activation of NFs as c-Ski overexpression. The c-Ski-activated CAFs show increased proliferation, migration, invasion and contraction compared with NFs. Furthermore, c-Ski-activated CAFs facilitated the migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Our data suggest that c-Ski is an important regulator in the activation of CAFs and may serve as a potential therapeutic target to block breast cancer progression. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. FACTORS ASSOCIATED IN BREAST CANCER MORTALITY IN NORTHWEST PARANAENSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willian Augusto Melo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a disease process that begins when an abnormal cell is transformed by genetic mutation of cellular DNA, and breast cancer usually painless. The objective was to analyze the behavior of mortality from breast cancer in women living in Maringá-PR in the period 2000 to 2009. We used the Information System of the Unified Health System (DATASUS for variables related to race/ethnicity, marital status, education, age, place of occurrence of death. Data were analyzed descriptively and by chi-square Yates Fixed considering a confidence interval of 95% with a significance level of 5%. There were 216 deaths from breast cancer with a higher prevalence in women 60-80 years (58.4%, race white (90.2% and married (53.8%. Women over 60 with low education were more likely to breast cancer mortality was statistically significant (OR95% = 4.45, p = <0.0001

  10. Family history and risk of pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anna L V; Andersson, Therese M-L; Hsieh, Chung-Cheng; Cnattingius, Sven; Dickman, Paul W; Lambe, Mats

    2015-05-01

    The risk of breast cancer is at least two-fold increased in young women with a family history of breast cancer. Pregnancy has a dual effect on breast cancer risk; a short-term increase followed by a long-term protection. We investigated if the risk of breast cancer during and within 10 years following pregnancy is affected by a family history of breast cancer. We followed a cohort of women aged 15-44 years between 1963 and 2009 identified in Swedish population-based registers. Family history was defined as having a mother or sister with breast cancer. We estimated incidence rate ratios of breast cancer during pregnancy and time intervals up to 10 years post-delivery, with a focus on pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC), defined as breast cancer during pregnancy or within 2 years post-delivery. In 3,452,506 women, there were 15,548 cases of breast cancer (1208 were PABC). Compared to nulliparous women, the risk of breast cancer was decreased during pregnancy, similar during first year and increased during second year post-delivery. The pattern was similar in women with or without family history of breast cancer. A peak in risk was observed 5-6 years following the first birth regardless of family history. After a second birth, this peak was only present in women with a family history. Our results indicate that women with a family history of breast cancer do not have a different breast cancer risk during and within 10 years following pregnancy compared to women without a family history.

  11. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Request Permissions Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... as possible. Learn more about palliative care . Recurrent breast cancer If the cancer does return after treatment for ...

  12. Association of Pancreatic Cancer Susceptibility Variants with Risk of Breast Cancer in Women of European and African Ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengfeng; Zheng, Yonglan; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Zheng, Wei; Nathanson, Katherine L; Nemesure, Barbara; Ambs, Stefan; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Huo, Dezheng

    2018-01-01

    Background: Pancreatic cancer mutation signatures closely resemble breast cancer, suggesting that both cancers may have common predisposition mechanisms that may include commonly inherited SNPs. Methods: We examined 23 genetic variants known to be associated with pancreatic cancer as breast cancer risk factors in the Root genome-wide association study (GWAS; 1,657 cases and 2,029 controls of African diaspora) and GAME-ON/DRIVE GWAS (16,003 cases and 41,335 controls of European ancestry). Results: None of the pancreatic cancer susceptibility variants were individually associated with breast cancer risk after adjustment for multiple testing (at α = 0.002) in the two populations. In Root GWAS, a change by one SD in the polygenic risk score (PRS) was not significantly associated with breast cancer. In addition, we did not observe a trend in the relationship between PRS percentiles and breast cancer risk. Conclusions: The association between reported pancreatic cancer genetic susceptibility variants and breast cancer development in women of African or European ancestry is likely weak, if it does exist. Impact: Known GWAS-derived susceptibility variants of pancreatic cancer do not explain its shared genetic etiology with breast cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 27(1); 116-8. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Association between documented family history of cancer and screening for breast and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Patricia A; O'Malley, Jean P; Gough, Andrea; Buckley, David I; Wallace, James; Fagnan, Lyle J; Morris, Cynthia; Mori, Motomi; Heintzman, John D; Lieberman, David

    2013-11-01

    Previous research on ascertainment of cancer family history and cancer screening has been conducted in urban settings. To examine whether documented family history of breast or colorectal cancer is associated with breast or colorectal cancer screening. Medical record reviews were conducted on 3433 patients aged 55 and older from four primary care practices in two rural Oregon communities. Data collected included patient demographic and risk information, including any documentation of family history of breast or colorectal cancer, and receipt of screening for these cancers. A positive breast cancer family history was associated with an increased likelihood of being up-to-date for mammography screening (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.45-3.00 relative to a recorded negative history). A positive family history for colorectal cancer was associated with an increased likelihood of being up-to-date with colorectal cancer screening according to U.S. Preventive Services Task Force low risk guidelines for males (OR 2.89, 95% CI 1.15-7.29) and females (OR 2.47, 95% CI 1.32-4.64) relative to a recorded negative family history. The absence of any recorded family cancer history was associated with a decreased likelihood of being up-to-date for mammography screening (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.56-0.88 relative to recorded negative history) or for colorectal cancer screening (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.60-0.96 in females, OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.53-0.88 in males relative to recorded negative history). Further research is needed to determine if establishing routines to document family history of cancer would improve appropriate use of cancer screening. © 2013.

  14. Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  15. Stages of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  16. Breast cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammogram - breast cancer screening; Breast exam - breast cancer screening; MRI - breast cancer screening ... is performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. ...

  17. HER2-associated radiation resistance of breast cancer stem cells isolated from HER2-negative breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duru, Nadire; Fan, Ming; Candas, Demet; Menaa, Cheikh; Liu, Hsin-Chen; Nantajit, Danupon; Wen, Yunfei; Xiao, Kai; Eldridge, Angela; Chromy, Brett A.; Li, Shiyong; Spitz, Douglas R.; Lam, Kit S.; Wicha, Max S.; Li, Jian Jian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To understand the role of HER2-associated signaling network in breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs); using radiation-resistant breast cancer cells and clinical recurrent breast cancers to evaluate HER2-targeted therapy as a tumor eliminating strategy for recurrent HER2−/low breast cancers. Experimental Design HER2-expressing BCSCs (HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low) were isolated from radiation-treated breast cancer MCF7 cells and in vivo irradiated MCF7 xenograft tumors. Tumor aggressiveness and radiation resistance were analyzed by gap filling, Matrigel invasion, tumor-sphere formation, and clonogenic survival assays. The HER2/CD44 feature was analyzed in 40 primary and recurrent breast cancer specimens. Protein expression profiling in HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low versus HER2−/CD44+/CD24−/low BCSCs was conducted with 2-D DIGE and HPLC-MS/MS analysis and HER2-mediated signaling network was generated by MetaCore™ program. Results Compared to HER2-negative BCSCs, HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low cells showed elevated aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity and aggressiveness tested by matrigel invasion, tumor sphere formation and in vivo tumorigenesis. The enhanced aggressive phenotype and radioresistance of the HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low cells were markedly reduced by inhibition of HER2 via siRNA or Herceptin treatments. Clinical breast cancer specimens revealed that cells co-expressing HER2 and CD44 were more frequently detected in recurrent (84.6%) than primary tumors (57.1%). In addition, 2-D DIGE and HPLC-MS/MS of HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low versus HER2−/CD44+/CD24−/low BCSCs reported a unique HER2-associated protein profile including effectors involved in tumor metastasis, apoptosis, mitochondrial function and DNA repair. A specific feature of HER2-STAT3 network was identified. Conclusion This study provides the evidence that HER2-mediated pro-survival signaling network is responsible for the aggressive phenotype of breast cancer stem cells that could be targeted to control

  18. Association Between Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use and Breast Cancer Chemotherapy Initiation: The Breast Cancer Quality of Care (BQUAL) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; Neugut, Alfred I; Falci, Laura; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Buono, Donna; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S; Roh, Janise M; Ergas, Isaac J; Kwan, Marilyn L; Lee, Marion; Tsai, Wei Yann; Shi, Zaixing; Lamerato, Lois; Kushi, Lawrence H; Hershman, Dawn L

    2016-09-01

    Not all women initiate clinically indicated breast cancer adjuvant treatment. It is important for clinicians to identify women at risk for noninitiation. To determine whether complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is associated with decreased breast cancer chemotherapy initiation. In this multisite prospective cohort study (the Breast Cancer Quality of Care [BQUAL] study) designed to examine predictors of breast cancer treatment initiation and adherence, 685 women younger than 70 years with nonmetastatic invasive breast cancer were recruited from Columbia University Medical Center, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, and Henry Ford Health System and enrolled between May 2006 and July 31, 2010. Overall, 306 patients (45%) were clinically indicated to receive chemotherapy per National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines. Participants were followed for up to 12 months. Baseline interviews assessed current use of 5 CAM modalities (vitamins and/or minerals, herbs and/or botanicals, other natural products, mind-body self-practice, mind-body practitioner-based practice). CAM use definitions included any use, dietary supplement use, mind-body use, and a CAM index summing the 5 modalities. Chemotherapy initiation was assessed via self-report up to 12 months after baseline. Multivariable logistic regression models examined a priori hypotheses testing whether CAM use was associated with chemotherapy initiation, adjusting for demographic and clinical covariates, and delineating groups by age and chemotherapy indication. A cohort of 685 women younger than 70 years (mean age, 59 years; median age, 59 years) with nonmetastatic invasive breast cancer were recruited and followed for up to 12 months to examine predictors of breast cancer treatment initiation. Baseline CAM use was reported by 598 women (87%). Chemotherapy was initiated by 272 women (89%) for whom chemotherapy was indicated, compared with 135 women (36%) for whom chemotherapy was discretionary. Among

  19. Cardiomyopathy Associated With Targeted Therapy for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivagnanam, Kamesh; Rahman, Zia U; Paul, Timir

    2016-02-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents directed against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) have significantly improved the prognosis of patients who are positive for this receptor. However, cardiomyopathy remains as a common adverse effect of using these agents. Literature search was conducted via PubMed using the keywords of "Trastuzumab Cardiomyopathy," "Lapatinib Cardiomyopathy" and "Pertuzumab Cardiomyopathy," which provided 104 results. These articles were then screened for relevance to the targeted subject based on their title and abstracts. Case reports and articles that were not discussing any aspect of cardiomyopathy secondary to targeted therapy for breast cancer and articles not in English were eliminated. After elimination, a bibliography search among selected articles was done and a total of 46 articles were identified. The collected articles were then meticulously analyzed and summarized. The use of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) receptor targeted chemotherapy in breast cancer is limited because of a higher incidence (19-22%) of cardiomyopathy. The incidence of cardiomyopathy is not dose dependent and in most cases it is reversible after discontinuation of the drug and treatment with heart failure medications. Severe adverse outcomes including death or permanent disability are rare. HER-2 targeted chemotherapy for breast cancer has a higher incidence of associated reversible cardiomyopathy. Patients should be monitored by serial echocardiography starting at the beginning of the treatment and followed by every 3 months until the completion of chemotherapy. Co-ordination between oncologists and cardiologists is needed to develop evidence-based protocols to prevent, identify, monitor and treat trastuzumab-induced cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Other Side of Breast Cancer: Factors Associated with Caregiver Burden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Vahidi, PhD Student

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: Primary caregivers need to be financially supported by the relevant organizations. Care skills training and providing palliative care seem helpful in reducing the pain and the burden of family caregivers for patients with breast cancer.

  1. Risk Factors Associated with Breast Cancer among Women in Warri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    Women with high waist-hip ratio tended to be at lower risk of developing breast cancer (odds ratio, OR = 0.24, 95% Cl=0.10-0.60). The odds of developing breast cancer was found to be 4.40. (95% Cl=1.25-15.57) times among women who were always exposed to fumes from motorbikes, vehicles, or generators compared.

  2. Association study of prostate cancer susceptibility variants with risks of invasive ovarian, breast, and colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, H.; Koessler, T.; Ahmed, S.

    2008-01-01

    test of association was a comparison of genotype frequencies between cases and controls, and a test for trend stratified by study where appropriate. Genotype-specific odds ratios (OR) were estimated by logistic regression. SNP rs2660753 (chromosome 3p12) showed evidence of association with ovarian......Several prostate cancer susceptibility loci have recently been identified by genome-wide association studies. These loci are candidates for susceptibility to other epithelial cancers. The aim of this study was to test these tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) for association with invasive...... ovarian, colorectal, and breast cancer. Twelve prostate cancer-associated tag SNPs were genotyped in ovarian (2,087 cases/3,491 controls), colorectal (2,148 cases/2,265 controls) and breast (first set, 4,339 cases/4,552 controls; second set, 3,800 cases/3,995 controls) case-control studies. The primary...

  3. Is there an association between thyroid function abnormalities and breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelousi, Anna; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Zapanti, Evangelia; Nonni, Afroditi; Ktenas, Eftuxios; Mantzou, Aimilia; Kontzoglou, Konstantinos; Kouraklis, Grigorios

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between thyroid function abnormalities and breast cancer and, in particular, the prognostic markers of breast cancer.. Baseline levels of thyrotropin, free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine and thyroid autoantibodies were measured in 97 women with primary breast cancer, 27 women with benign breast disease, and 4 women with atypical ductal hyperplasia. Their baseline levels were compared with those in 48 healthy women with a normal mammography in the last 2 years. There were no significant associations between history of thyroid disease and breast cancer (p = 0.33). The mean baseline levels of triiodothyronine and thyrotropin did not differ significantly between the compared groups. The mean baseline levels of free thyroxine were found to be significantly higher in the breast cancer group, even after adjusting for thyroid replacement therapy. The presence of thyroid antibodies did not differ significantly between the compared groups. In a subgroup analysis, breast cancer cases with thyroid disease and particularly hypothyroidism had a significantly lower incidence of lymph node metastases compared with breast cancer cases without thyroid disease. Our data confirmed the proliferative effect of thyroid hormones on breast cells, which had previously been shown in vitro. Additionally, thyroid disease and particularly hypothyroid function appeared to be associated with a lower incidence of lymph node metastases. Further studies to determine the prognostic role of thyroid hormones in breast cancer are warranted.

  4. Preliminary study on association between toxoplasmosis and breast cancer in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Narges Kalantari; Salman Ghaffari; Masomeh Bayani; Maryam Mitra Elmi; Daryush Moslemi; Novin Nikbakhsh; Fariedh Ghavipanjeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the possible association between Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) infection and breast cancer by examining the seropositivity and serointensity rate of anti-T. gondii antibodies in breast cancer patients and healthy volunteers. Methods: This study was carried out on 66 women with breast cancer which consists of 29 newly diagnosed patients (Group 1) and 37 cases undergoing treatment and regular checkups (Group 2). Also, 60 healthy women (Group 3) with no history of ca...

  5. Benign breast tissue composition in breast cancer patients: association with risk factors, clinical variables, and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuezheng; Sandhu, Rupninder; Figueroa, Jonine D; Gierach, Gretchen L; Sherman, Mark E; Troester, Melissa A

    2014-12-01

    Breast tissue composition (epithelium, non-fatty stroma, and adipose) changes qualitatively and quantitatively throughout the lifespan, and may mediate relationships between risk factors and breast cancer initiation. We sought to identify relationships between tissue composition, risk factors, tumor characteristics, and gene expression. Participants were 146 patients from the Polish Breast Cancer Study, with data on risk factor and clinicopathological characteristics. Benign breast tissue composition was evaluated using digital image analysis of histologic sections. Whole-genome microarrays were performed on the same tissue blocks. Mean epithelial, non-fatty stromal, and adipose proportions were 8.4% (SD = 4.9%), 27.7% (SD = 24.0%), and 64.0% (SD = 24.0%), respectively. Among women associated with obesity (7.6% in nonobese vs. 10.1% in obese; P = 0.02) and with poorly differentiated tumors (7.8% in well/moderate vs. 9.9% in poor; P = 0.05). Gene expression signatures associated with epithelial and stromal proportion were identified and validated. Stroma-associated genes were in metabolism and stem cell maintenance pathways, whereas epithelial genes were enriched for cytokine and immune response pathways. Breast tissue composition was associated with age, body mass index, and tumor grade, with consequences for breast gene expression. Breast tissue morphologic factors may influence breast cancer etiology. Composition and gene expression may act as biomarkers of breast cancer risk and progression. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Genetic polymorphisms in DPF3 associated with risk of breast cancer and lymph node metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoyal Carolyn R

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have identified rare genetic variations responsible for many cases of familial breast cancer but their contribution to total breast cancer incidence is relatively small. More common genetic variations with low penetrance have been postulated to account for a higher proportion of the population risk of breast cancer. Methods and Results In an effort to identify genes that influence non-familial breast cancer risk, we tested over 25,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs located within approximately 14,000 genes in a large-scale case-control study in 254 German women with breast cancer and 268 age-matched women without malignant disease. We identified a marker on chromosome 14q24.3-q31.1 that was marginally associated with breast cancer status (OR = 1.5, P = 0.07. Genotypes for this SNP were also significantly associated with indicators of breast cancer severity, including presence of lymph node metastases (P = 0.006 and earlier age of onset (P = 0.01. The association with breast cancer status was replicated in two independent samples (OR = 1.35, P = 0.05. High-density association fine mapping showed that the association spanned about 80 kb of the zinc-finger gene DPF3 (also known as CERD4. One SNP in intron 1 was found to be more strongly associated with breast cancer status in all three sample collections (OR = 1.6, P = 0.003 as well as with increased lymph node metastases (P = 0.01 and tumor size (P = 0.01. Conclusion Polymorphisms in the 5' region of DPF3 were associated with increased risk of breast cancer development, lymph node metastases, age of onset, and tumor size in women of European ancestry. This large-scale association study suggests that genetic variation in DPF3 contributes to breast cancer susceptibility and severity.

  7. Gene expression analysis in human breast cancer associated blood vessels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan T Jones

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is essential for solid tumour growth, whilst the molecular profiles of tumour blood vessels have been reported to be different between cancer types. Although presently available anti-angiogenic strategies are providing some promise for the treatment of some cancers it is perhaps not surprisingly that, none of the anti-angiogenic agents available work on all tumours. Thus, the discovery of novel anti-angiogenic targets, relevant to individual cancer types, is required. Using Affymetrix microarray analysis of laser-captured, CD31-positive blood vessels we have identified 63 genes that are upregulated significantly (5-72 fold in angiogenic blood vessels associated with human invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC of the breast as compared with blood vessels in normal human breast. We tested the angiogenic capacity of a subset of these genes. Genes were selected based on either their known cellular functions, their enriched expression in endothelial cells and/or their sensitivity to anti-VEGF treatment; all features implicating their involvement in angiogenesis. For example, RRM2, a ribonucleotide reductase involved in DNA synthesis, was upregulated 32-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels; ATF1, a nuclear activating transcription factor involved in cellular growth and survival was upregulated 23-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels and HEX-B, a hexosaminidase involved in the breakdown of GM2 gangliosides, was upregulated 8-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels. Furthermore, in silico analysis confirmed that AFT1 and HEX-B also were enriched in endothelial cells when compared with non-endothelial cells. None of these genes have been reported previously to be involved in neovascularisation. However, our data establish that siRNA depletion of Rrm2, Atf1 or Hex-B had significant anti-angiogenic effects in VEGF-stimulated ex vivo mouse aortic ring assays. Overall, our results provide proof-of-principle that our approach can identify a cohort of

  8. Pregnancy-associated breast cancers are driven by differences in adipose stromal cells present during lactation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCready, Jessica; Arendt, Lisa M; Glover, Eugene; Iyer, Vandana; Briendel, Jerrica L; Lyle, Stephen R; Naber, Stephen P; Jay, Daniel G; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    .... Pregnancy-associated breast cancers (PABCs), cancers diagnosed during pregnancy, lactation, or in the first postpartum year, are typically found at an advanced stage, are more aggressive and have a poorer prognosis...

  9. Imaging Appearance and Clinical Impact of Preoperative Breast MRI in Pregnancy-Associated Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kelly S; Green, Lauren A; Lebron, Lizza; Morris, Elizabeth A

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the imaging features of pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) on breast MRI and to consider the impact of preoperative MRI on patient management. A retrospective review of medical records from January 1994 to May 2014 identified 183 women who presented with a new diagnosis of breast cancer during pregnancy or within 1 year postpartum. MR images were available for 53 of these patients, all of whom were included in the study. Clinical history and available breast images were reviewed. The clinical impact of preoperative breast MRI was also recorded. Of the 53 women, nine (17%) presented during pregnancy and 44 (83%) presented during the first year postpartum. The sensitivity of MRI was 98% (52/53). Among the 53 patients, the most common findings of PABC on MRI included a solitary mass (29 patients [55%]), nonmass enhancement (12 patients [23%]), and multiple masses (eight patients [15%]). For 12 patients (23%), MRI showed a pathologically proven larger tumor size or greater extent of disease than did mammography or ultrasound, with an additional eight patients (15%) having findings suspicious for greater extent of disease but having unavailable pathologic data. Breast MRI changed surgical management for 15 patients (28%), with four patients (8%) requiring a larger lumpectomy, seven (13%) no longer being considered candidates for lumpectomy, two (4%) having contralateral disease, and two (4%) having unsuspected metastasis. Breast MRI had a high sensitivity for PABC in our study population. MRI may play an important role in PABC because it changed the surgical management of 28% of patients.

  10. Macrophage Polarization: Anti-Cancer Strategies to Target Tumor-Associated Macrophage in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Muhammad; Zhang, Jieqiong; Liang, Guikai; Ding, Ling; He, Qiaojun; Yang, Bo

    2017-09-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are the most abundant inflammatory cells and orchestrate different stages of breast cancer development. TAMs participate in the tumor angiogenesis, matrix remodeling, invasion, immunosuppression, metastasis, and chemoresistance in breast cancer. Several clinical studies indicate the association between the high influx of TAMs in tumor with poor prognosis in hepatocellular, ovarian, cervical, and breast cancer. Previously developed hypotheses have proposed that TAMs participate in antitumor responses of the body, while recently many clinical and experimental studies have revealed that TAMs in tumor microenvironment predominantly resemble with M2-like polarized macrophages and produce a high amount of anti-inflammatory factors which are directly responsible for the development of tumor. Various studies have shown that TAMs in tumor either enhance or antagonize the anti-tumor efficacy of cytotoxic agents, antibodies-targeting cancer cells, and therapeutic agents depending on the nature of treatment. Thereby, multiple roles of TAMs suggests that it is very important to develop novel therapeutic strategies to target TAMs in breast tumor. In this review, we have discussed the functional role of TAMs in breast cancer and summarized available recent advances potential therapeutic strategies that effectively target to TAMs cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 2484-2501, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Common breast cancer-predisposition alleles are associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Spurdle, Amanda B; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2008-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer high risks of breast cancer. However, evidence suggests that these risks are modified by other genetic or environmental factors that cluster in families. A recent genome-wide association study has shown that common alleles at single nucleotide...... polymorphisms (SNPs) in FGFR2 (rs2981582), TNRC9 (rs3803662), and MAP3K1 (rs889312) are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. To investigate whether these loci are also associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, we genotyped these SNPs in a sample...... of 10,358 mutation carriers from 23 studies. The minor alleles of SNP rs2981582 and rs889312 were each associated with increased breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio [HR] = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.20-1.45, p(trend) = 1.7 x 10(-8) and HR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.02-1.24, p(trend) = 0...

  12. Factors associated with the prescription of antidepressive medication to breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suppli, Nis P; Deltour, Isabelle; Damkjaer, Lars H

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated factors associated with use of antidepressant medication subsequent to a diagnosis of breast cancer. We also evaluated the effect of participation in a cancer rehabilitation program on use of antidepressants.......We evaluated factors associated with use of antidepressant medication subsequent to a diagnosis of breast cancer. We also evaluated the effect of participation in a cancer rehabilitation program on use of antidepressants....

  13. Association between local inflammation and breast tissue age-related lobular involution among premenopausal and postmenopausal breast cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirette Hanna

    Full Text Available Increased levels of pro-inflammatory markers and decreased levels of anti-inflammatory markers in the breast tissue can result in local inflammation. We aimed to investigate whether local inflammation in the breast tissue is associated with age-related lobular involution, a process inversely related to breast cancer risk. Levels of eleven pro- and anti-inflammatory markers were assessed by immunohistochemistry in normal breast tissue obtained from 164 pre- and postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Involution status of the breast (degree of lobular involution and the predominant lobule type was microscopically assessed in normal breast tissue on hematoxylin-eosin stained mastectomy slides. Multivariate generalized linear models were used to assess the associations. In age-adjusted analyses, higher levels of pro-inflammatory markers IL-6, TNF-α, CRP, COX-2, leptin, SAA1 and IL-8; and anti-inflammatory marker IL-10, were inversely associated with the prevalence of complete lobular involution (all P≤0.04. Higher levels of the pro-inflammatory marker COX-2 were also associated with lower prevalence of predominant type 1/no type 3 lobules in the breast, an indicator of complete involution, in age-adjusted analysis (P = 0.017. Higher tissue levels of inflammatory markers, mainly the pro-inflammatory ones, are associated with less involuted breasts and may consequently be associated with an increased risk of developing breast cancer.

  14. Hypnosis for Hot Flashes and Associated Symptomsin Women with Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, R Lynae; Na, Hyeji; Yek, Ming Hwei; Elkins, Gary

    2017-10-01

    Women with breast cancer experience a host of physical and psychological symptoms, including hot flashes, sleep difficulties, anxiety, and depression. Therefore, treatment for women with breast cancer should target these symptoms and be individualized to patients' specific presentations. The current article reviews the common symptoms associated with breast cancer in women, then examines clinical hypnosis as a treatment for addressing these symptoms and improving the quality of life of women with breast cancer. Clinical hypnosis is an effective, nonpharmaceutical treatment for hot flashes and addressing many symptoms typically experienced by breast cancer patients. A case example is provided to illustrate the use of clinical hypnosis for the treatment of hot flashes with a patient with breast cancer.

  15. Cancer-associated adipocytes promotes breast tumor radioresistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochet, Ludivine; Meulle, Aline [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, INSERM U1048, 1 Avenue du Pr Jean Poulhes, BP 84225, F-31432 Toulouse Cedex (France); Imbert, Sandrine [CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Salles, Bernard [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Valet, Philippe [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, INSERM U1048, 1 Avenue du Pr Jean Poulhes, BP 84225, F-31432 Toulouse Cedex (France); Muller, Catherine, E-mail: muller@ipbs.fr [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} Tumor-surrounding adipocytes contribute to breast cancer progression. {yields} Breast tumor cells previously co-cultivated with mature adipocytes exhibit radioresistance. {yields} Increased in Chk1 phosphorylation is observed in irradiated co-cultivated tumor cells. {yields} IL-6 is over-expressed in tumor cells co-cultivated with adipocytes. {yields} IL-6 exposure confers increased Chk1 phosphorylation and radioresistance in tumor cells. -- Abstract: Mature adipocytes are excellent candidates to influence tumor behavior through heterotypic signaling processes since these cells produce hormones, growth factors, cytokines and other molecules, a heterogeneous group of molecules named adipokines. Using a 2D coculture system, we demonstrate that breast tumor cells previously co-cultivated with mature adipocytes exhibit radioresistance and an earlier and higher increase in the effector kinase Chk1, a phenotype that was associated with decreased cell death as compared to tumor cells grown alone. Interestingly, the adipocytes-induced tumor changes taking place during the coculture time preceding the exposure to IR were sufficient to confer the radioresistant effect. Notorious among the changes brought by adipocytes was the significant increase of IL-6 expression in tumor cells, whose activity may well account for the observed tumor cell protection from IR toxicity. Indeed, our data confirmed the protective role of this cytokine as tumor cells incubated after irradiation with recombinant IL-6 exhibit an increased in Chk1 phosphorylation and a radioresistant phenotype, thus far recapitulating the effects observed in the presence of adipocytes. Our current study sheds light on a new role of tumor-surrounding adipocytes in fostering a radioresistant phenotype in breast tumors, a finding that might have important clinical implications in obese patients that frequently exhibit aggressive diseases.

  16. A Rare Case of BRCA2-Associated Breast Cancer in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidhin, C Nf; Heeney, A; Connolly, C; Swan, N; Foster, A; Geraghty, J

    2015-01-01

    A 30-year old woman was referred to our department with symptomatic breast cancer at 35 weeks gestation. Genetic testing revealed a pathogenic BRCA2 mutation. Labour was induced at 38 weeks. Mastectomy and axillary clearance were performed with a view to adjuvant chemotherapy, radiation and hormonal therapy. Multidisciplinary involvement is crucial for management of BRCA-associated breast cancer, especially in the context of pregnancy. Bilateral mastectomy may be indicated given the increased risk of ipsilateral and contralateral breast cancers. Tamoxifen may lower contralateral breast cancer risk in those in whom risk-reducing surgery is not performed.

  17. Association between genetic risk score for telomere length and risk of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Hung N; Long, Jirong; Wen, Wanqing; Zheng, Ying; Cai, Qiuyin; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2016-10-01

    While leukocyte telomere length (TL) has been associated with breast cancer risk, limited information is available regarding the role of genetically-determined TL on breast cancer risk. We investigated whether aggregated TL-associated variants are associated with the risk of breast cancer in 2,865 breast cancer cases and 2,285 controls from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Genetics Study. Six genetic variants, identified through a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of TL in European-ancestry participants, were included in the study. A separate sample [n = 1,536, from the Shanghai Women's Health Study (SWHS), for whom information on both phenotypical leukocyte TL and genetic information was collected] was used to evaluate the association of six variants with TL in Asians. Three genetic risk scores (GRSs), based on the number of alleles associated with shorter TL that each individual carries for the six variants, were derived for the study: un-weighted, internally weighted (from the SWHS), and externally weighted (from the European-ancestry GWAS study), and evaluated for their association with breast cancer risk by applying logistic regression analysis. Both internally and externally weighted GRSs were significantly associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer (OR 0.83, 95 % CI 0.72-0.95 and OR 0.84, 95 % CI 0.74-0.96, respectively, for tertile 3 vs. tertile 1). Non-genetic risk factors for breast cancer (i.e., age, years of menstruation/reproduction, oral contraceptive usage, and BMI) did not modify the association between GRSs and the risk of breast cancer. Our results suggest that short TL, determined by genetic factors, may be associated with a reduced susceptibility to breast cancer.

  18. Breast cancer predisposition syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemel, Deborah; Domchek, Susan M

    2010-10-01

    A small, but important, percentage of breast cancer cases is caused by the inheritance of a single copy of a mutated gene. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the genes most commonly associated with inherited breast cancer; however, mutations in TP53 and PTEN cause Li-Fraumeni syndrome and Cowden syndrome, respectively, both of which are associated with high lifetime risks of breast cancer. Advances in the field of breast cancer genetics have led to an improved understanding of detection and prevention strategies. More recently, strategies to target the underlying genetic defects in BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated breast and ovarian cancers are emerging and may have implications for certain types of sporadic breast cancer. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Is breast compression associated with breast cancer detection and other early performance measures in a population-based breast cancer screening program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshina, Nataliia; Sebuødegård, Sofie; Hofvind, Solveig

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to investigate early performance measures in a population-based breast cancer screening program stratified by compression force and pressure at the time of mammographic screening examination. Early performance measures included recall rate, rates of screen-detected and interval breast cancers, positive predictive value of recall (PPV), sensitivity, specificity, and histopathologic characteristics of screen-detected and interval breast cancers. Information on 261,641 mammographic examinations from 93,444 subsequently screened women was used for analyses. The study period was 2007-2015. Compression force and pressure were categorized using tertiles as low, medium, or high. χ 2 test, t tests, and test for trend were used to examine differences between early performance measures across categories of compression force and pressure. We applied generalized estimating equations to identify the odds ratios (OR) of screen-detected or interval breast cancer associated with compression force and pressure, adjusting for fibroglandular and/or breast volume and age. The recall rate decreased, while PPV and specificity increased with increasing compression force (p for trend cancer, PPV, sensitivity, and specificity decreased with increasing compression pressure (p for trend breast cancer compared with low compression pressure (1.89; 95% CI 1.43-2.48). High compression force and low compression pressure were associated with more favorable early performance measures in the screening program.

  20. Genome-wide association study in BRCA1 mutation carriers identifies novel loci associated with breast and ovarian cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Olswold, Curtis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Fredericksen, Zachary; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Gaudet, Mia M.; Dicks, Ed; Kosel, Matthew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Lee, Adam; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Jakubowska, Anna; Radice, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Domchek, Susan M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Garber, Judy; Phelan, Catherine M.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Andrulis, Irene L.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Hamann, Ute; Ramus, Susan J.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Caligo, Maria A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tung, Nadine; Claes, Kathleen; Beattie, Mary S.; Southey, Melissa C.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Janavicius, Ramunas; John, Esther M.; Kwong, Ava; Diez, Orland; Balmaña, Judith; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Arun, Banu K.; Rennert, Gad; teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Campbell, Ian; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gille, Johannes J. P.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Blok, Marinus J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; Verhoef, Senno; van Os, Theo A. M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana M.; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Houghton, Catherine; Rogers, Mark T.; Dorkins, Huw; Eason, Jacqueline; Gregory, Helen; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Calender, Alain; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Houdayer, Claude; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Sobol, Hagay; Coupier, Isabelle; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Castera, Laurent; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Léoné, Mélanie; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Viel, Alessandra; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Melloni, Giulia; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Gehrig, Andrea; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Ditsch, Nina; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Engert, Stefanie; Sutter, Christian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Cohn, David E.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Small, Laurie; Friedlander, Michael; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; tea, Muy-Kheng; Lindor, Noralane M.; Kaufman, Bella; Shimon Paluch, Shani; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Vijai, Joseph; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Jønson, Lars; Andersen, Mette K.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Foretova, Lenka; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Mai, Phuong L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Narod, Steven A.; Herzog, Josef; Sand, Sharon R.; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Vaszko, Tibor; Weaver, Joellen; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Buys, Saundra S.; Romero, Atocha; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A.; Duran, Mercedes; Chung, Wendy K.; Lasa, Adriana; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Miron, Alexander; Benitez, Javier; Senter, Leigha; Huo, Dezheng; Chan, Salina B.; Sokolenko, Anna P.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tihomirova, Laima; Friebel, Tara M.; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Lu, Karen H.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; James, Paul A.; Hall, Per; Dunning, Alison M.; Tessier, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie; Slager, Susan L.; Wang, Chen; Hart, Steven; Stevens, Kristen; Simard, Jacques; Pastinen, Tomi; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a

  1. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Olswold, Curtis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Fredericksen, Zachary; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Gaudet, Mia M.; Dicks, Ed; Kosel, Matthew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Lee, Adam; Bacot, Francois; Vincent, Daniel; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Jakubowska, Anna; Radice, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Domchek, Susan M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Garber, Judy; Phelan, Catherine M.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Andrulis, Irene L.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Hamann, Ute; Ramus, Susan J.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Caligo, Maria A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tung, Nadine; Claes, Kathleen; Beattie, Mary S.; Southey, Melissa C.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Janavicius, Ramunas; John, Esther M.; Kwong, Ava; Diez, Orland; Balmana, Judith; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Arun, Banu K.; Rennert, Gad; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Campbell, Ian; van der Hout, Annemarie; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gille, Johannes J. P.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Blok, Marinus J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; Verhoef, Senno; van Os, Theo A. M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana M.; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Houghton, Catherine; Rogers, Mark T.; Dorkins, Huw; Eason, Jacqueline; Gregory, Helen; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Calender, Alain; Hardouin, Agnes; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Houdayer, Claude; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Sobol, Hagay; Coupier, Isabelle; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Castera, Laurent; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Leone, Melanie; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Zlowocka-Perlowska, Elzbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Viel, Alessandra; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Melloni, Giulia; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Gehrig, Andrea; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Ditsch, Nina; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Engert, Stefanie; Sutter, Christian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Cohn, David E.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Small, Laurie; Friedlander, Michael; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Lindor, Noralane M.; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch, Shani Shimon; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Vijai, Joseph; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Jonson, Lars; Andersen, Mette K.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Foretova, Lenka; Teule, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Angel Pujana, Miquel; Mai, Phuong L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Narod, Steven A.; Herzog, Josef; Sand, Sharon R.; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Vaszko, Tibor; Weaver, Joellen; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Buys, Saundra S.; Romero, Atocha; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A.; Duran, Mercedes; Chung, Wendy K.; Lasa, Adriana; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Miron, Alexander; Benitez, Javier; Senter, Leigha; Huo, Dezheng; Chan, Salina B.; Sokolenko, Anna P.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tihomirova, Laima; Friebel, Tara M.; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Lu, Karen H.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; James, Paul A.; Hall, Per; Dunning, Alison M.; Tessier, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie; Slager, Susan L.; Wang, Chen; Hart, Steven; Stevens, Kristen; Simard, Jacques; Pastinen, Tomi; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a

  2. Genome-wide association study in BRCA1 mutation carriers identifies novel loci associated with breast and ovarian cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a fur...

  3. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, F.J.; Wang, X.; McGuffog, L.; Lee, A.; Olswold, C.; Kuchenbaecker, K.B.; Soucy, P.; Fredericksen, Z.; Barrowdale, D.; Dennis, J.; Gaudet, M.M.; Dicks, E.; Kosel, M.; Healey, S.; Sinilnikova, O.M.; Bacot, F.; Vincent, D.; Hogervorst, F.B.; Peock, S.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Jakubowska, A.; Radice, P.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Domchek, S.M.; Piedmonte, M.; Singer, C.F.; Friedman, E.; Thomassen, M.; Hansen, T.V.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Szabo, C.I.; Blanco, I.; Greene, M.H.; Karlan, B.Y.; Garber, J.; Phelan, C.M.; Weitzel, J.N.; Montagna, M.; Olah, E.; Andrulis, I.L.; Godwin, A.K.; Yannoukakos, D.; Goldgar, D.E.; Caldes, T.; Nevanlinna, H.; Osorio, A.; Terry, M.B.; Daly, M.B.; Rensburg, E.J. van; Hamann, U.; Ramus, S.J.; Ewart Toland, A.; Caligo, M.A.; Olopade, O.I.; Tung, N.; Claes, K.; Beattie, M.S.; Southey, M.C.; Imyanitov, E.N.; Tischkowitz, M.; Janavicius, R.; John, E.M.; Kwong, A.; Diez, O.; Balmana, J.; Barkardottir, R.B.; Arun, B.K.; Rennert, G.; Teo, S.H.; Ganz, P.A.; Campbell, I.; Hout, A.H. van der; Deurzen, C.H. van; Seynaeve, C.; Gomez Garcia, E.B.; Leeuwen, F.E. van; Meijers-Heijboer, H.E.; Gille, J.J.P.; Ausems, M.G.; Blok, M.J.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Rookus, M.A.; Devilee, P.; Verhoef, S.; Os, T.A. van; Wijnen, J.T.; Frost, D.; Ellis, S.; Fineberg, E.; Platte, R.; Evans, D.G.; Izatt, L.; Eeles, R.A.; Adlard, J.; Eccles, D.M.; Cook, J.; Brewer, C.; Douglas, F.; Hodgson, S.; Morrison, P.J.; Side, L.E.; Donaldson, A.; Houghton, C.; Rogers, M.T.; Dorkins, H.; Eason, J.; Gregory, H.; McCann, E.; Murray, A.; Calender, A.; Hardouin, A.; Berthet, P.; Delnatte, C.; Nogues, C.; Lasset, C.; Houdayer, C.; Leroux, D.; Rouleau, E.; Prieur, F.; Damiola, F.; Sobol, H.; Coupier, I.; Venat-Bouvet, L.; Castera, L.; Gauthier-Villars, M.; Leone, M.; Pujol, P.; Mazoyer, S.; Bignon, Y.J.; Zlowocka-Perlowska, E.; Gronwald, J.; Lubinski, J.; Durda, K.; Jaworska, K.; Huzarski, T.; Spurdle, A.B.; Viel, A.; Peissel, B.; Bonanni, B.; Melloni, G.; Ottini, L.; Papi, L.; Varesco, L.; Tibiletti, M.G.; Peterlongo, P.; Volorio, S.; Manoukian, S.; Pensotti, V.; Arnold, N.; Engel, C.; Deissler, H.; Gadzicki, D.; Gehrig, A.; Kast, K.; Rhiem, K.; Meindl, A.; Niederacher, D.; Ditsch, N.; Plendl, H.; Preisler-Adams, S.; Engert, S.; Sutter, C.; Varon-Mateeva, R.; Wappenschmidt, B.; Weber, B.H.; Arver, B.; Stenmark-Askmalm, M.; Loman, N.; Rosenquist, R.; Einbeigi, Z.; Nathanson, K.L.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Blank, S.V.; Cohn, D.E.; Rodriguez, G.C.; Small, L.; Friedlander, M.; Bae-Jump, V.L.; Fink-Retter, A.; Rappaport, C.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, D.; Pfeiler, G.; Tea, M.K.; Lindor, N.M.; Kaufman, B.; Shimon Paluch, S.; Laitman, Y.; Skytte, A.B.; Gerdes, A.M.; Pedersen, I.S.; Moeller, S.T.; Kruse, T.A.; Jensen, U.B.; Vijai, J.; Sarrel, K.; Robson, M.; Kauff, N.; Mulligan, A.M.; Glendon, G.; Ozcelik, H.; Ejlertsen, B.; Nielsen, F.C.; Jonson, L.; Andersen, M.K.; Ding, Y.C.; Steele, L.; Foretova, L.; Teule, A.; Lazaro, C.; Brunet, J.; Pujana, M.A.; Mai, P.L.; Loud, J.T.; Walsh, C.; Lester, J.; Orsulic, S.; Narod, S.A.; Herzog, J.; Sand, S.R.; Tognazzo, S.; Agata, S.; Vaszko, T.; Weaver, J.; Stavropoulou, A.V.; Buys, S.S.; Romero, A.; Hoya, M. de la; Aittomaki, K.; Muranen, T.A.; Duran, M.; Chung, W.K.; Lasa, A.; Dorfling, C.M.; Miron, A.; Benitez, J.; Senter, L.; Huo, D.; Chan, S.B.; Sokolenko, A.P.; Chiquette, J.; Tihomirova, L.; Friebel, T.M.; Agnarsson, B.A.; Lu, K.H.; Lejbkowicz, F.; James, P.A.; Hall, P.; Dunning, A.M.; Tessier, D.; Cunningham, J.; Slager, S.L.; Wang, C.; Hart, S.; Stevens, K.; Simard, J.; Pastinen, T.; Pankratz, V.S.; Offit, K.; Easton, D.F.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Antoniou, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a

  4. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Couch (Fergus); X. Wang (Xing); L. McGuffog (Lesley); A. Lee; C. Olswold (Curtis); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); P. Soucy (Penny); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); J. Dennis (Joe); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); E. Dicks (Ed); M. Kosel (Matthew); S. Healey (Sue); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); F. Bacot (Francois); D. Vincent (Daniel); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); S. Peock (Susan); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); A. Jakubowska (Anna); P. Radice (Paolo); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); S.M. Domchek (Susan); M. Piedmonte (Marion); C.F. Singer (Christian); E. Friedman (Eitan); M. Thomassen (Mads); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); C. Szabo (Csilla); I. Blanco (Ignacio); M.H. Greene (Mark); B. Karlan; J. Garber; C. Phelan (Catherine); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); M. Montagna (Marco); E. Olah; I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); D. Goldgar (David); T. Caldes (Trinidad); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); A. Osorio (Ana); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); M.B. Daly (Mary); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); U. Hamann (Ute); S.J. Ramus (Susan); A. Ewart-Toland (Amanda); M.A. Caligo (Maria); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); N. Tung (Nadine); K. Claes (Kathleen); M.S. Beattie (Mary); M.C. Southey (Melissa); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); E.M. John (Esther); A. Kwong (Ava); O. Diez (Orland); J. Balmana (Judith); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); B.K. Arun (Banu); G. Rennert (Gad); S.-H. Teo; P.A. Ganz (Patricia); I. Campbell (Ian); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); F.E. van Leeuwen (F.); H. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.J. Gille (Johan); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); M.J. Blok (Marinus); M.J. Ligtenberg (Marjolijn); M.A. Rookus (Matti); P. Devilee (Peter); S. Verhoef; T.A.M. van Os (Theo); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); D. Frost (Debra); S. Ellis (Steve); E. Fineberg (Elena); R. Platte (Radka); D.G. Evans (Gareth); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Eeles (Rosalind); J.W. Adlard (Julian); D. Eccles (Diana); J. Cook (Jackie); C. Brewer (C.); F. Douglas (Fiona); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); L. Side (Lucy); A. Donaldson (Alan); C. Houghton (Catherine); M.T. Rogers (Mark); H. Dorkins (Huw); J. Eason (Jacqueline); H. Gregory (Helen); E. McCann (Emma); A. Murray (Alexandra); A. Calender (Alain); A. Hardouin (Agnès); P. Berthet (Pascaline); C.D. Delnatte (Capucine); C. Nogues (Catherine); C. Lasset (Christine); C. Houdayer (Claude); D. Leroux (Dominique); E. Rouleau (Etienne); F. Prieur (Fabienne); F. Damiola (Francesca); H. Sobol (Hagay); I. Coupier (Isabelle); L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); L. Castera (Laurent); M. Gauthier-Villars (Marion); M. Léone (Mélanie); P. Pujol (Pascal); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); E. Złowocka-Perłowska (Elzbieta); J. Gronwald (Jacek); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska (Katarzyna); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); A. Viel (Alessandra); B. Peissel (Bernard); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); G. Melloni (Giulia); L. Ottini (Laura); L. Papi (Laura); L. Varesco (Liliana); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Volorio (Sara); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); V. Pensotti (Valeria); N. Arnold (Norbert); C.W. Engel (Christoph); H. Deissler (Helmut); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); K. Kast (Karin); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); A. Meindl (Alfons); D. Niederacher (Dieter); N. Ditsch (Nina); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); S. Engert (Stefanie); C. Sutter (Christian); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); B.H.F. Weber (Bernhard); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); N. Loman (Niklas); R. Rosenquist (R.); Z. Einbeigi (Zakaria); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); D.E. Cohn (David); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); L. Small (Laurie); M. Friedlander (Michael); V.L. Bae-Jump (Victoria L.); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C. Rappaport (Christine); D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; N.M. Lindor (Noralane); B. Kaufman (Bella); S. Shimon Paluch (Shani); Y. Laitman (Yael); A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); S.T. Moeller (Sanne Traasdahl); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; J. Vijai (Joseph); K. Sarrel (Kara); M. Robson (Mark); N. Kauff (Noah); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); F.C. Nielsen (Finn); L. Jønson (Lars); M.K. Andersen (Mette); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); L. Steele (Linda); L. Foretova (Lenka); A. Teulé (A.); C. Lazaro (Conxi); J. Brunet (Joan); M.A. Pujana (Miguel); P.L. Mai (Phuong); J.T. Loud (Jennifer); C.S. Walsh (Christine); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); S. Orsulic (Sandra); S. Narod (Steven); J. Herzog (Josef); S.R. Sand (Sharon); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); S. Agata (Simona); T. Vaszko (Tibor); J. Weaver (JoEllen); A. Stavropoulou (Alexandra); S.S. Buys (Saundra); A. Romero (Alfonso); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); T.A. Muranen (Taru); M. Duran; W.K. Chung (Wendy); A. Lasa (Adriana); C.M. Dorfling (Cecelia); A. Miron (Alexander); J. Benítez (Javier); L. Senter (Leigha); D. Huo (Dezheng); S. Chan (Salina); A. Sokolenko (Anna); J. Chiquette (Jocelyne); L. Tihomirova (Laima); M.O.W. Friebel (Mark ); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); K.H. Lu (Karen); F. Lejbkowicz (Flavio); P.A. James (Paul ); A.S. Hall (Alistair); A.M. Dunning (Alison); Y. Tessier (Yann); J. Cunningham (Jane); S. Slager (Susan); C. Wang (Chen); S. Hart (Stewart); K. Stevens (Kristen); J. Simard (Jacques); T. Pastinen (Tomi); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); K. Offit (Kenneth); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); H. Thorne (Heather); E. Niedermayr (Eveline); Å. Borg (Åke); H. Olsson; H. Jernström (H.); K. Henriksson (Karin); K. Harbst (Katja); M. Soller (Maria); U. Kristoffersson (Ulf); A. Öfverholm (Anna); M. Nordling (Margareta); P. Karlsson (Per); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); A. Liljegren (Annelie); A. Lindblom (Annika); G.B. Bustinza; J. Rantala (Johanna); B. Melin (Beatrice); C.E. Ardnor (Christina Edwinsdotter); M. Emanuelsson (Monica); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); M.H. Pigg (Maritta ); S. Liedgren (Sigrun); M.A. Rookus (M.); S. Verhoef (S.); F.E. van Leeuwen (F.); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); J.L. de Lange (J.); J.M. Collee (Margriet); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); P. Devilee (Peter); T.C.T.E.F. van Cronenburg; C.M. Kets; A.R. Mensenkamp (Arjen); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); Q. Waisfisz (Quinten); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); E.B. Gomez Garcia (Encarna); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); M.J. Mourits; G.H. de Bock (Geertruida); S.D. Ellis (Steve); E. Fineberg (Elena); Z. Miedzybrodzka (Zosia); L. Jeffers (Lisa); T.J. Cole (Trevor); K.-R. Ong (Kai-Ren); J. Hoffman (Jonathan); M. James (Margaret); J. Paterson (Joan); A. Taylor (Amy); A. Murray (Anna); M.J. Kennedy (John); D.E. Barton (David); M.E. Porteous (Mary); S. Drummond (Sarah); C. Brewer (Carole); E. Kivuva (Emma); A. Searle (Anne); S. Goodman (Selina); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); V. Murday (Victoria); N. Bradshaw (Nicola); L. Snadden (Lesley); M. Longmuir (Mark); C. Watt (Catherine); S. Gibson (Sarah); E. Haque (Eshika); E. Tobias (Ed); A. Duncan (Alexis); L. Izatt (Louise); C. Jacobs (Chris); C. Langman (Caroline); A.F. Brady (Angela); S.A. Melville (Scott); K. Randhawa (Kashmir); J. Barwell (Julian); G. Serra-Feliu (Gemma); I.O. Ellis (Ian); F. Lalloo (Fiona); J. Taylor (James); A. Male (Alison); C. Berlin (Cheryl); R. Collier (Rebecca); F. Douglas (Fiona); O. Claber (Oonagh); I. Jobson (Irene); L.J. Walker (Lisa); D. McLeod (Diane); D. Halliday (Dorothy); S. Durell (Sarah); B. Stayner (Barbara); S. Shanley (Susan); N. Rahman (Nazneen); R. Houlston (Richard); A. Stormorken (Astrid); E. Bancroft (Elizabeth); E. Page (Elizabeth); A. Ardern-Jones (Audrey); K. Kohut (Kelly); J. Wiggins (Jennifer); E. Castro (Elena); S.R. Killick; S. Martin (Sue); D. Rea (Dan); A. Kulkarni (Anjana); O. Quarrell (Oliver); C. Bardsley (Cathryn); S. Goff (Sheila); G. Brice (Glen); L. Winchester (Lizzie); C. Eddy (Charlotte); V. Tripathi (Vishakha); V. Attard (Virginia); A. Lehmann (Anna); A. Lucassen (Anneke); G. Crawford (Gabe); D. McBride (Donna); S. Smalley (Sarah); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); F. Damiola (Francesca); L. Barjhoux (Laure); C. Verny-Pierre (Carole); S. Giraud (Sophie); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); B. Buecher (Bruno); V. Moncoutier (Virginie); M. Belotti (Muriel); C. Tirapo (Carole); A. de Pauw (Antoine); B. Bressac-de Paillerets (Brigitte); O. Caron (Olivier); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); N. Uhrhammer (Nancy); V. Bonadona (Valérie); S. Handallou (Sandrine); A. hardouin (Agnès); H. Sobol (Hagay); V. Bourdon (Violaine); T. Noguchi (Tetsuro); A. Remenieras (Audrey); F. Eisinger (François); J.-P. Peyrat; J. Fournier (Joëlle); F. Révillion (Françoise); P. Vennin (Philippe); C. Adenis (Claude); R. Lidereau (Rosette); L. Demange (Liliane); D.W. Muller (Danièle); J.P. Fricker (Jean Pierre); E. Barouk-Simonet (Emmanuelle); F. Bonnet (Françoise); V. Bubien (Virginie); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); M. Longy (Michel); C. Toulas (Christine); R. Guimbaud (Rosine); L. Gladieff (Laurence); V. Feillel (Viviane); H. Dreyfus (Hélène); C. Rebischung (Christine); M. Peysselon (Magalie); F. Coron (Fanny); L. Faivre (Laurence); M. Lebrun (Marine); C. Kientz (Caroline); S.F. Ferrer; M. Frenay (Marc); I. Mortemousque (Isabelle); F. Coulet (Florence); C. Colas (Chrystelle); F. Soubrier; J. Sokolowska (Johanna); M. Bronner (Myriam); H. Lynch (Henry); C.L. Snyder (Carrie); M. Angelakos (Maggie); J. Maskiell (Judi); G.S. Dite (Gillian)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer),

  5. Identification of ten variants associated with risk of estrogen-receptor-negative breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milne, Roger L; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2017-01-01

    Most common breast cancer susceptibility variants have been identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of predominantly estrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease. We conducted a GWAS using 21,468 ER-negative cases and 100,594 controls combined with 18,908 BRCA1 mutation carriers (9......,414 with breast cancer), all of European origin. We identified independent associations at P associations with 10 of 11 variants previously reported in ER-negative disease or BRCA1 mutation carrier GWAS and observed consistent...... associations with ER-negative disease for 105 susceptibility variants identified by other studies. These 125 variants explain approximately 16% of the familial risk of this breast cancer subtype. There was high genetic correlation (0.72) between risk of ER-negative breast cancer and breast cancer risk for BRCA...

  6. Associations of Breast Cancer Risk Factors With Tumor Subtypes: A Pooled Analysis From the Breast Cancer Association Consortium Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L.; Couch, Fergus J.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Milne, Roger L.; Gaudet, Mia; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Cox, Angela; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Rebecca; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Blows, Fiona; Driver, Kristy; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Sinn, Peter; Vrieling, Alina; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Heikkilä, Päivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; Chanock, Stephen; Figueroa, Jonine; Brinton, Louise; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Liu, Jianjun; Van ‘t Veer, Laura J.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Knight, Julia A.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; O’Malley, Frances P.; Weerasooriya, Nayana; John, Esther M.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hartmann, Arndt; Weihbrecht, Sebastian B.; Wachter, David L.; Jud, Sebastian M.; Loehberg, Christian R.; Baglietto, Laura; English, Dallas R.; Giles, Graham G.; McLean, Catriona A.; Severi, Gianluca; Lambrechts, Diether; Vandorpe, Thijs; Weltens, Caroline; Paridaens, Robert; Smeets, Ann; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E.; Cafourek, Victoria; Fredericksen, Zachary; Kosel, Matthew; Vachon, Celine; Cramp, Helen E.; Connley, Daniel; Cross, Simon S.; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Dörk, Thilo; Bremer, Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Karstens, Johann H.; Ay, Aysun; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Arias Pérez, Jose Ignacio; Rodríguez, Primitiva Menéndez; Zamora, Pilar; Benítez, Javier; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Hamann, Ute; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Eccles, Diana M.; Tapper, William J.; Gerty, Sue M.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Jones, Angela; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; McInerney, Niall; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Shou-Tung; Hsu, Giu-Cheng; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Górski, Bohdan; Gronwald, Jacek; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Jager, Agnes; Kriege, Mieke; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; Collée, Margriet; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Mononen, Kari; Grip, Mervi; Hirvikoski, Pasi; Winqvist, Robert; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Auvinen, Päivi; Soini, Ylermi; Sironen, Reijo; Bojesen, Stig E.; Dynnes Ørsted, David; Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Radice, Paolo; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hunter, David J.; Tamimi, Rulla; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Odefrey, Fabrice; Gaborieau, Valerie; Devilee, Peter; Huijts, P.E.A.; Tollenaar, RAEM.; Seynaeve, C.; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Hopper, John L.; Hammet, Fleur; Tsimiklis, Helen; Smith, Letitia D.; Southey, Melissa C.; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Easton, Douglas; Pharoah, Paul; Sherman, Mark E.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors. Methods We pooled tumor marker and epidemiological risk factor data from 35 568 invasive breast cancer case patients from 34 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Logistic regression models were used in case–case analyses to estimate associations between epidemiological risk factors and tumor subtypes, and case–control analyses to estimate associations between epidemiological risk factors and the risk of developing specific tumor subtypes in 12 population-based studies. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results In case–case analyses, of the epidemiological risk factors examined, early age at menarche (≤12 years) was less frequent in case patients with PR− than PR+ tumors (P = .001). Nulliparity (P = 3 × 10−6) and increasing age at first birth (P = 2 × 10−9) were less frequent in ER− than in ER+ tumors. Obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 30 kg/m2) in younger women (≤50 years) was more frequent in ER−/PR− than in ER+/PR+ tumors (P = 1 × 10−7), whereas obesity in older women (>50 years) was less frequent in PR− than in PR+ tumors (P = 6 × 10−4). The triple-negative (ER−/PR−/HER2−) or core basal phenotype (CBP; triple-negative and cytokeratins [CK]5/6+ and/or epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR]+) accounted for much of the heterogeneity in parity-related variables and BMI in younger women. Case–control analyses showed that nulliparity, increasing age at first birth, and obesity in younger women showed the expected associations with the risk of ER+ or PR+ tumors but not triple-negative (nulliparity vs parity, odds ratio [OR] = 0.94, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.75 to 1.19, P = .61; 5-year increase in age at first full-term birth, OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.86 to 1.05, P = .34; obesity in younger women, OR = 1.36, 95

  7. Genetic variation in cell cycle regulatory gene AURKA and association with intrinsic breast cancer subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nicholas J; Bensen, Jeannette T; Poole, Charles; Troester, Melissa A; Gammon, Marilie D; Luo, Jingchun; Millikan, Robert C; Olshan, Andrew F

    2015-12-01

    AURKA is a putative low-penetrance tumor susceptibility gene due to its prominent role in cell cycle regulation and centrosomal function. Germline variation in AURKA was evaluated for association with breast cancer and intrinsic breast cancer subtypes in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS), a population-based case-control study of African Americans (AA) and Caucasians (Cau). Tag and candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on AURKA were genotyped in 1946 cases and 1747 controls. In race-stratified analyses adjusted for age and African ancestry, odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to evaluate SNP associations with breast cancer. In a race-combined analysis with similar adjustment, these associations were also examined by intrinsic breast cancer subtype. Using dominant models, most AURKA SNPs demonstrated no association with breast cancer in the race-stratified analyses. Among AA, rs6092309 showed an inverse association with breast cancer (OR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.53-0.90). In the race-combined analyses, rs6099128 had reduced ORs for luminal A (OR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.60-0.95) and basal-like breast cancer (OR = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.37-0.80). Rs6092309 showed a similar pattern of association with each subtype. Three SNPs (rs6014711, rs911162, rs1047972) had positive associations with basal-like breast cancer, and ORs reduced or close to 1.00 for other subtypes. Our results suggest inverse associations between some AURKA SNPs and overall breast cancer in AA. We found differential associations by specific subtypes and by race. Replication of these findings in larger AA populations would allow more powerful race-stratified subtype analyses. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Association between SIRT1 Gene Polymorphisms and Breast Cancer in Egyptians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Sherine M; Shahin, Nancy N; Shaker, Olfat G

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is reported to cause the highest mortality among female cancer patients. Previous studies have explored the association of silent mating-type information regulator 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1) gene expression with prognosis in breast cancer. However, no studies exist, so far, on the role of SIRT1 gene polymorphism in breast cancer risk or prognosis. The present study aimed to assess the association between SIRT1 gene polymorphisms and breast cancer in Egyptians. The study comprised 980 Egyptian females divided into a breast cancer group (541 patients) and a healthy control group (439 subjects). SIRT1 gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs3758391, rs3740051 and rs12778366 were genotyped using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Allelic and genotypic frequencies were determined in both groups and association with breast cancer and clinicopathological characteristics was assessed. Breast cancer patients exhibited elevated serum SIRT1 levels which varied among different tumor grades. SIRT1 rs3758391 and rs12778366 TT genotypes were more frequent, exhibited higher SIRT1 levels than CC and CT genotypes and were associated with histologic grade and lymph node status. SIRT1 rs12778366 TT genotype also correlated with negative estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) statuses. The T allele frequency for both SNPs was higher in breast cancer patients than in normal subjects. Combined GG and AG genotypes of rs3740051 were more frequent, showed higher serum SIRT1 levels than the AA genotype, and were associated with ER and PR expression. Furthermore, inheritance of the G allele was associated with breast cancer. Our findings reveal that rs3758391 and rs12778366 polymorphisms of SIRT1 gene are associated with breast cancer risk and prognosis in the Egyptian population.

  9. Factors associated with the prescription of antidepressive medication to breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suppli, N. P.; Deltour, I.; Damkjaer, L. H.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated factors associated with use of antidepressant medication subsequent to a diagnosis of breast cancer. We also evaluated the effect of participation in a cancer rehabilitation program on use of antidepressants. Material and methods. We conducted a register-based cohort study of 1 247......-related, treatment-related, and sociodemographic factors and use of antidepressants were evaluated in multivariate Cox proportional hazard models separated on use of antidepressants before diagnosis of breast cancer. Results. The mean follow-up for the 4 150 women in the study was 3.3 years (5-95% range, 0.......3-7.0 years) and 1 020 (25%) were users of antidepressants after diagnosis of breast cancer. Among women who had not used antidepressants before their breast cancer, the diagnosis of a new primary cancer increased the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) to 3.34 (95% CI, 1.50-7.76), and recurrence of breast cancer...

  10. Factors associated with the prescription of antidepressive medication to breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suppli, N. P.; Deltour, I.; Damkjaer, L. H.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated factors associated with use of antidepressant medication subsequent to a diagnosis of breast cancer. We also evaluated the effect of participation in a cancer rehabilitation program on use of antidepressants. Material and methods. We conducted a register-based cohort study of 1 247...... women with breast cancer diagnosed between 1998 and 2006 who attended a week-long rehabilitation program and a comparison group of 2 903 women who did not attend the program matched through the registers of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. The associations between breast cancer......-related, treatment-related, and sociodemographic factors and use of antidepressants were evaluated in multivariate Cox proportional hazard models separated on use of antidepressants before diagnosis of breast cancer. Results. The mean follow-up for the 4 150 women in the study was 3.3 years (5-95% range, 0...

  11. Dietary carbohydrate intake is not associated with the breast cancer incidence rate ratio in postmenopausal Danish women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Trine G; Olsen, Anja; Christensen, Jane; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne

    2005-01-01

    Although many case-control studies have suggested positive associations between carbohydrate intake and breast cancer incidence rates in both pre- and postmenopausal women, there is limited information available from cohort studies. We examined the effect of the intake of different carbohydrates, the glycemic index, and the glycemic load on breast cancer incidence in postmenopausal women taking into consideration tumor estrogen receptor status. Postmenopausal women (n = 23,870; aged 50-65 y) participated in the "Diet, Cancer, and Health" study, and provided information about diet and established risk factors for breast cancer. During follow-up, we identified 634 incidents of breast cancer. Associations between carbohydrate intake and breast cancer incidence were analyzed using Cox's regression models. There was no association for intake of glucose, fructose, sucrose, maltose, lactose, or starch and breast cancer incidence rate, and no association for glycemic index or glycemic load after adjusting for confounding factors. Intake of different carbohydrates was not associated with breast cancer incidence rates for either estrogen receptor positive (ER+) or (ER-) breast cancer. Similarly, glycemic index and glycemic load were not associated with ER+ breast cancer after adjusting for confounding factors. A borderline significant positive association between glycemic index and (ER-) breast cancer was observed (P = 0.05). In conclusion, we found no clear associations between intake of different carbohydrates, total carbohydrate intake, glycemic index, or glycemic load and breast cancer incidence in postmenopausal women. Furthermore, when ER+ and ER- breast cancer cases were analyzed separately, no clear associations were observed.

  12. Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in Wnt signaling pathway genes with breast cancer in Saudi patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saud Alanazi

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease involving genetic and epigenetic alterations in genes encoding proteins that are components of various signaling pathways. Candidate gene approach have identified association of genetic variants in the Wnt signaling pathway genes and increased susceptibility to several diseases including breast cancer. Due to the rarity of somatic mutations in key genes of Wnt pathway, we investigated the association of genetic variants in these genes with predisposition to breast cancers. We performed a case-control study to identify risk variants by examining 15 SNPs located in 8 genes associated with Wnt signaling. Genotypic analysis of individual locus showed statistically significant association of five SNPs located in β-catenin, AXIN2, DKK3, SFRP3 and TCF7L2 with breast cancers. Increased risk was observed only with the SNP in β-catenin while the other four SNPs conferred protection against breast cancers. Majority of these associations persisted after stratification of the cases based on estrogen receptor status and age of on-set of breast cancer. The rs7775 SNP in exon 6 of SFRP3 gene that codes for either arginine or glycine exhibited very strong association with breast cancer, even after Bonferroni's correction. Apart from these five variants, rs3923086 in AXIN2 and rs3763511 in DKK4 that did not show any association in the overall population were significantly associated with early on-set and estrogen receptor negative breast cancers, respectively. This is the first study to utilize pathway based approach to identify association of risk variants in the Wnt signaling pathway genes with breast cancers. Confirmation of our findings in larger populations of different ethnicities would provide evidence for the role of Wnt pathway as well as screening markers for early detection of breast carcinomas.

  13. Breast cancer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Cancer specialists will soon be able to compare mammograms with computerized images of breast cancer from across Europe, in a bid to improve diagnosis and treatment....The new project, known as MammoGrid, brings together computer and medical imaging experts, cancer specialists, radiologists and epidemiologists from Bristol, Oxford, Cambridge, France and Italy" (1 page).

  14. Association Between Imaging Characteristics and Different Molecular Subtypes of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingxiang; Ma, Jie

    2017-04-01

    Breast cancer can be divided into four major molecular subtypes based on the expression of hormone receptor (estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, HER2 status, and molecular proliferation rate (Ki67). In this study, we sought to investigate the association between breast cancer subtype and radiological findings in the Chinese population. Medical records of 300 consecutive invasive breast cancer patients were reviewed from the database: the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. The imaging characteristics of the lesions were evaluated. The molecular subtypes of breast cancer were classified into four types: luminal A, luminal B, HER2 overexpressed (HER2), and basal-like breast cancer (BLBC). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association between the subtype (dependent variable) and mammography or 15 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicators (independent variables). Luminal A and B subtypes were commonly associated with "clustered calcification distribution," "nipple invasion," or "skin invasion" (P cancers showed association with persistent enhancement in the delayed phase on MRI and "clustered calcification distribution" on mammography (P breast tumor, which are potentially useful tools in the diagnosis and subtyping of breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Family history of cancer other than breast or ovarian cancer in first-degree relatives is associated with poor breast cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun-Long; Chen, Chuang; Yuan, Jing-Ping; Li, Juan-Juan; Sun, Sheng-Rong

    2017-04-01

    Whether a first-degree family history of others cancers (FHOC) than breast or ovarian cancer (BOC) is associated with breast cancer prognosis remains unknown. Thus, the aim of the present study was to clarify this issue. Women who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer at the Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University from 2010 to 2013 were included in the study. The demographic and clinicopathological characteristics of these patients were extracted. FHOC was considered positive for any patient who had a relative who had been diagnosed with cancer other than BOC. Disease-free survival (DFS) was calculated based on the date of diagnosis. DFS was analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards model. A total of 434 breast cancer patients were included in this study. Among these patients, 61 (14.06%) had a positive FHOC in first-degree relatives. Patients with a positive FHOC tended to have HER2-positive breast cancer (p = 0.03). In the survival analysis, FHOC was associated with poor DFS in both univariate (HR = 2.21 (1.28-3.83), 95% CI: 1.28-3.83, p breast cancer patients with FHOC, especially in patients with luminal A subtype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Proton MR spectroscopy of normal breasts: Association of risk factors for breast cancer with water and lipid composition of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jane; Wang, Ming-Yang; Kuo, Wen-Hung; Chen, Kuan-Lin; Shih, Tiffany Ting-Fang

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the water and lipid composition of normal women breasts on proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS), and the association of breast cancer risk factors with (1)H-MRS parameters. Three groups of participants were included: group 1, women without a family history of breast cancer (n=49); group 2, women with at least one affected first-degree relative (n=77); group 3, contralateral normal breasts of women with newly diagnosed unilateral breast cancer (n=84). (1)H-MRS parameters were shown below: water fraction 1 (WF1)=(water integral)/(water integral+integral for methylene peak); lipid line width for methylene resonance (LW1) and lipid line width for methyl peaks (LW2) were measured. The association of breast cancer risk factors - age, breast density, body mass index (BMI), menopausal status, group with (1)H-MRS parameters - was analyzed by multiple linear regression. In age-adjusted multiple linear regression, breast density was positively associated with WF1 (P=0.009, 0.001, and associated with LW1 in groups 1 (P=0.040) and 3 (P=0.005). In group 3, premenopausal breasts had lower LW2 than their postmenopausal counterparts (P=0.033). Group 3 had narrower LW2 than group 2 (P=0.007). The risk factors for breast cancer were associated with (1)H-MRS parameters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Novel Associations between Common Breast Cancer Susceptibility Variants and Risk-Predicting Mammographic Density Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Jennifer; Thompson, Deborah J.; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Scott, Christopher; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Hazra, Aditi; Li, Jingmei; Eriksson, Louise; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Jensen, Matt; Cunningham, Julie; Olson, Janet E.; Purrington, Kristen; Couch, Fergus J.; Brown, Judith; Leyland, Jean; Warren, Ruth M. L.; Luben, Robert N.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Smith, Paula; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Jud, Sebastian M.; Heusinger, Katharina; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Douglas, Julie A.; Shah, Kaanan P.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Helvie, Mark A.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Woolcott, Christy; Maskarinec, Gertraud; Haiman, Christopher; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Krishnan, Kavitha; Southey, Melissa C.; Apicella, Carmel; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Ursin, Giske; Grenaker Alnaes, Grethe I.; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Gram, Inger Torhild; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Simard, Jacques; Paroah, Paul; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Douglas F.; Fasching, Peter A.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Hopper, John; Vachon, Celine M.

    2015-01-01

    Mammographic density measures adjusted for age and body mass index (BMI) are heritable predictors of breast cancer risk but few mammographic density-associated genetic variants have been identified. Using data for 10,727 women from two international consortia, we estimated associations between 77 common breast cancer susceptibility variants and absolute dense area, percent dense area and absolute non-dense area adjusted for study, age and BMI using mixed linear modeling. We found strong support for established associations between rs10995190 (in the region of ZNF365), rs2046210 (ESR1) and rs3817198 (LSP1) and adjusted absolute and percent dense areas (all p breast cancer susceptibility variants, associations were found between rs1432679 (EBF1), rs17817449 (MIR1972-2: FTO), rs12710696 (2p24.1), and rs3757318 (ESR1) and adjusted absolute and percent dense areas, respectively. There were associations between rs6001930 (MKL1) and both adjusted absolute dense and non-dense areas, and between rs17356907 (NTN4) and adjusted absolute non-dense area. Trends in all but two associations were consistent with those for breast cancer risk. Results suggested that 18% of breast cancer susceptibility variants were associated with at least one mammographic density measure. Genetic variants at multiple loci were associated with both breast cancer risk and the mammographic density measures. Further understanding of the underlying mechanisms at these loci could help identify etiological pathways implicated in how mammographic density predicts breast cancer risk. PMID:25862352

  18. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  19. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation Factor ERLIN2: Oncogenic Roles and Molecular Targeting of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    significantly associated with disease -specific survival and distant recurrence in breast cancer patients [3-6]. Previous work in our laboratory...transformed, human mammary epithelial cell line derived from the breast tissue of a 36-year-old patient with fibrocystic changes [3]. MCF10A cells were... Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Zeng-Quan Yang CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY, Detroit, MI 48201 REPORT DATE: June 2013 TYPE OF

  20. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a reduced risk of breast cancer. The Mediterranean diet focuses mostly on plant-based foods, such as fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes, and nuts. People who follow the Mediterranean diet choose healthy fats, such as olive oil, over ...

  1. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease. It’s estimated that about 10% of breast cancer cases are hereditary (run in the family). In many of these cases, you inherited a gene from your parents that has mutated (changed from ...

  2. Identification of a DMBT1 polymorphism associated with increased breast cancer risk and decreased promoter activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tchatchou, Sandrine; Riedel, Angela; Lyer, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    ,466 unrelated German controls. Promoter studies in breast cancer cells demonstrate that the risk-increasing DMBT1 -93T allele displays significantly decreased promoter activity compared to the DMBT1 -93C allele, resulting in a loss of promoter activity. The data suggest that DMBT1 polymorphisms in the 5'-region......According to present estimations, the unfavorable combination of alleles with low penetrance but high prevalence in the population might account for the major part of hereditary breast cancer risk. Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 (DMBT1) has been proposed as a tumor suppressor for breast cancer...... and other cancer types. Genomewide mapping in mice further identified Dmbt1 as a potential modulator of breast cancer risk. Here, we report the association of two frequent and linked single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with increased breast cancer risk in women above the age of 60 years: DMBT1 c.-93C...

  3. An investigation of the association of genetic susceptibility risk with somatic mutation burden in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bin; Mukherjee, Anwesha; Machiela, Mitchell J; Song, Lei; Hua, Xing; Shi, Jianxin; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chanock, Stephen J; Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    2016-09-06

    Genome-wide association studies have reported nearly 100 common germline susceptibility loci associated with the risk for breast cancer. Tumour sequencing studies have characterised somatic mutation profiles in breast cancer patients. The relationship between breast cancer susceptibility loci and somatic mutation patterns in breast cancer remains largely unexplored. We used single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping array data and tumour exome sequencing data available from 638 breast cancer patients of European ancestry from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project. We analysed both genotype data and, when necessary, imputed genotypes for 90 known breast cancer susceptibility loci. We performed linear regression models to investigate possible associations between germline risk variants with total somatic mutation count (TSMC), as well as specific mutation types. We examined individual SNP genotypes, as well as a multi-SNP polygenic risk score (PRS). Models were statistically adjusted for age at diagnosis, stage, oestrogen-receptor (ER) and progesterone-receptor (PR) status of breast cancer. We also performed stratified analyses by ER and PR status. We observed a significant inverse association (P=8.75 × 10(-6); FDR=0.001) between the risk allele in rs2588809 of the gene RAD51B and TSMC across all breast cancer patients, for both ER(+) and ER(-) tumours. This association was also evident for different types of mutations. The PRS analysis for all patients, with or without rs2588809, showed a significant inverse association (P=0.01 and 0.04, respectively) with TSMC. This inverse association was significant in ER(+) patients with the ER(+)-specific PRS (P=0.02), but not among ER(-) patients for the ER(-)-specific PRS (P=0.39). We observed an inverse association between common germline risk variants and TSMC, which, if confirmed, could provide new insights into how germline variation informs our understanding of somatic mutation patterns in breast cancer.

  4. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J; Barrowdale, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtype...

  5. CYP2D6 gene variants and their association with breast cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Jean E; Maranian, Mel J; Driver, Kristy E; Platte, Radka; Kalmyrzaev, Bolot; Baynes, Caroline; Luccarini, Craig; Earl, Helena M; Dunning, Alison M; Pharoah, Paul D P; Caldas, Carlos

    2011-06-01

    The gene encoding the phase I enzyme cytochrome P4502D6 (CYP2D6) has been previously investigated for its potential predictive role in the efficacy of breast cancer treatments such as tamoxifen, but its role in breast cancer susceptibility is unclear. This study aims to evaluate the association between germ line variations in CYP2D6 and breast cancer susceptibility. DNA samples from 13,472 cases and controls were genotyped for seven known functional variants [minor allele frequency (MAF) ≥ 0.01] and five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) that tag common genetic variation (MAF > 0.05) in CYP2D6. One relatively rare functional variant, CYP2D6*6, (MAF = 0.01) showed a modest increased association with breast cancer susceptibility (P(trend) = 0.02; OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 1.04-1.68). All other functional and tagSNPs showed no association with breast cancer susceptibility. Common variants of CYP2D6 do not play a significant role in breast cancer susceptibility. However, this study raises questions regarding the role of rare variants, such as CYP2D6*6, in breast cancer susceptibility which merit further investigation. This large case-control study, involving 13,472 women, found no evidence of any association between common CYP2D6 gene variants and breast cancer susceptibility. However, one relatively rare functional variant CYP2D6*6 showed a modest association with breast cancer susceptibility, indicating that the role of rare CYP2D6 variants in breast cancer risk is unclear and requires further investigation in an adequately powered study. ©2011 AACR.

  6. Association of the Timing of Pregnancy With Survival in Women With Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Javaid; Amir, Eitan; Rochon, Paula A; Giannakeas, Vasily; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2017-05-01

    Increasing numbers of women experience pregnancy around the time of, or after, a diagnosis of breast cancer. Understanding the effect of pregnancy on survival in women with breast cancer will help in the counseling and treatment of these women. To compare the overall survival of women diagnosed with breast cancer during pregnancy or in the postpartum period with that of women who had breast cancer but did not become pregnant. This population-based, retrospective cohort study linked health administrative databases in Ontario, Canada, comprising 7553 women aged 20 to 45 years at the time of diagnosis with invasive breast cancer, from January 1, 2003, to December 31, 2014. Any pregnancy in the period from 5 years before, until 5 years after, the index date of the diagnosis of breast cancer. Women were classified into the following 4 exposure groups: no pregnancy (the referent), pregnancy before breast cancer, pregnancy-associated breast cancer, and pregnancy following breast cancer. Five-year actuarial survival rates for all exposure groups, age-adjusted and multivariable hazard ratios [HRs] of pregnancy for overall survival for all exposure groups, and time-dependent hazard ratios for women with pregnancy following breast cancer. Among the 7553 women in the study (mean age at diagnosis, 39.1 years; median, 40 years; range, 20-44 years) the 5-year actuarial survival rate was 87.5% (95% CI, 86.5%-88.4%) for women with no pregnancy, 85.3% (95% CI, 82.8%-87.8%) for women with pregnancy before breast cancer (age-adjusted hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.85-1.27; P = .73), and 82.1% (95% CI, 78.3%-85.9%) for women with pregnancy-associated breast cancer (age-adjusted hazard ratio, 1.18; 95% CI, 0.91-1.53; P = .20). The 5-year actuarial survival rate was 96.7% (95% CI, 94.1%-99.3%) for women who had pregnancy 6 months or more after diagnosis of breast cancer, vs 87.5% (95% CI, 86.5%-88.4%) for women with no pregnancy) (age-adjusted HR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.10-0.49; P

  7. Factors Associated With the Development of Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema After Whole-Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Chirag; Wilkinson, John Ben; Baschnagel, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Ghilezan, Mihai [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); William Beaumont School of Medicine, Oakland University, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Riutta, Justin; Dekhne, Nayana; Balaraman, Savitha [Beaumont Cancer Institute, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); William Beaumont School of Medicine, Oakland University, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Mitchell, Christina; Wallace, Michelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Vicini, Frank, E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Beaumont Cancer Institute, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); William Beaumont School of Medicine, Oakland University, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the rates of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) in patients undergoing whole-breast irradiation as part of breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and to identify clinical, pathologic, and treatment factors associated with its development. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,861 patients with breast cancer were treated at William Beaumont Hospital with whole-breast irradiation as part of their BCT from January 1980 to February 2006, with 1,497 patients available for analysis. Determination of BCRL was based on clinical assessment. Differences in clinical, pathologic, and treatment characteristics between patients with BCRL and those without BCRL were evaluated, and the actuarial rates of BCRL by regional irradiation technique were determined. Results: The actuarial rate of any BCRL was 7.4% for the entire cohort and 9.9%, 14.7%, and 8.3% for patients receiving a supraclavicular field, posterior axillary boost, and internal mammary irradiation, respectively. BCRL was more likely to develop in patients with advanced nodal status (11.4% vs. 6.3%, p = 0.001), those who had a greater number of lymph nodes removed (14 nodes) (9.5% vs. 6.0%, p = 0.01), those who had extracapsular extension (13.4% vs. 6.9%, p = 0.009), those with Grade II/III disease (10.8% vs. 2.9%, p < 0.001), and those who received adjuvant chemotherapy (10.5% vs. 6.7%, p = 0.02). Regional irradiation showed small increases in the rates of BCRL (p = not significant). Conclusions: These results suggest that clinically detectable BCRL will develop after traditional BCT in up to 10% of patients. High-risk subgroups include patients with advanced nodal status, those with more nodes removed, and those who receive chemotherapy, with patients receiving regional irradiation showing a trend toward increased rates.

  8. The Microbiota of Breast Tissue and Its Association with Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbaniak, Camilla; Gloor, Gregory B; Brackstone, Muriel; Scott, Leslie; Tangney, Mark; Reid, Gregor

    2016-08-15

    In the United States, 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime. Along with genetics, the environment contributes to disease development, but what these exact environmental factors are remains unknown. We have previously shown that breast tissue is not sterile but contains a diverse population of bacteria. We thus believe that the host's local microbiome could be modulating the risk of breast cancer development. Using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, we show that bacterial profiles differ between normal adjacent tissue from women with breast cancer and tissue from healthy controls. Women with breast cancer had higher relative abundances of Bacillus, Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcus Escherichia coli (a member of the Enterobacteriaceae family) and Staphylococcus epidermidis, isolated from breast cancer patients, were shown to induce DNA double-stranded breaks in HeLa cells using the histone-2AX (H2AX) phosphorylation (γ-H2AX) assay. We also found that microbial profiles are similar between normal adjacent tissue and tissue sampled directly from the tumor. This study raises important questions as to what role the breast microbiome plays in disease development or progression and how we can manipulate this for possible therapeutics or prevention. This study shows that different bacterial profiles in breast tissue exist between healthy women and those with breast cancer. Higher relative abundances of bacteria that had the ability to cause DNA damage in vitro were detected in breast cancer patients, as was a decrease in some lactic acid bacteria, known for their beneficial health effects, including anticarcinogenic properties. This study raises important questions as to the role of the mammary microbiome in modulating the risk of breast cancer development. Copyright © 2016 Urbaniak et al.

  9. Circulating tumor cell clusters-associated gene plakoglobin and breast cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lingeng; Zeng, Hongmei; Gu, Xinsheng; Ma, Wenxue

    2015-06-01

    Breast cancer recurrence is a major cause of the disease-specific death. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are negatively associated with breast cancer survival. Plakoglobin, a cell adhesion protein, was recently reported as a determinant of CTCs types, single or clustered ones. Here, we aim to summarize the studies on the roles of plakoglobin and evaluate the association of plakoglobin and breast cancer survival. Plakoglobin as a key component in both cell adhesion and the signaling pathways was briefly reviewed first. Then the double-edge functions of plakoglobin in tumors and its association with CTCs and breast cancer metastasis were introduced. Finally, based on an open-access database, the association between plakoglobin and breast cancer survival was investigated using univariate and multivariate survival analyses. Plakoglobin may be a molecule functioning as a double-edge sword. Loss of plakoglobin expression leads to increased motility of epithelial cells, thereby promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transition and further metastasis of cancer. However, studies also show that plakoglobin can function as an oncogene. High expression of plakoglobin results in clustered tumor cells in circulation with high metastatic potential in breast cancer and shortened patient survival. Plakoglobin may be a potential prognostic biomarker that can be exploited to develop as a therapeutic target for breast cancer.

  10. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new breast cancer susceptibility loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoussaini, Maya; Fletcher, Olivia; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Turnbull, Clare; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Dicks, Ed; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Conroy, Don; Maranian, Melanie; Ahmed, Shahana; Driver, Kristy; Johnson, Nichola; Orr, Nicholas; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lichtner, Peter; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel; Bui, Minh; Hopper, John L; Apicella, Carmel; Park, Daniel J; Southey, Melissa; Hunter, David J; Chanock, Stephen J; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Hogervorst, Frans BL; Fasching, Peter A.; Lux, Michael P.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Alonso, M. Rosario; González-Neira, Anna; Benítez, Javier; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Dur, Christina Clarke; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Eilber, Ursula; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Hillemanns, Peter; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Rogov, Yuri I.; Karstens, Johann H.; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofieva, Darya; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Lambrechts, Diether; Yesilyurt, Betul T.; Floris, Giuseppe; Leunen, Karin; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bonanni, Bernardo; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Peterlongo, Paolo; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Stevens, Kristen; Lee, Adam; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; McLean, Catriona; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Børrensen-Dale, Anne-Lise; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Devilee, Peter; van Asperen, Christie J.; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Figueroa, Jonine D; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Brinton, Louise; Lissowska, Jolanta; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; Cox, Angela; Reed, Malcolm WR; Shah, Mitul; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Jones, Michael; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Muir, Kenneth R; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Rattanamongkongul, Suthee; Chaiwerawattana, Arkom; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Perkins, Annie; Swann, Ruth; Velentzis, Louiza; Eccles, Diana M; Tapper, Will J; Gerty, Susan M; Graham, Nikki J; Ponder, Bruce A. J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Lathrop, Mark; Dunning, Alison M.; Rahman, Nazneen; Peto, Julian; Easton, Douglas F

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. To date, 22 common breast cancer susceptibility loci have been identified accounting for ~ 8% of the heritability of the disease. We followed up 72 promising associations from two independent Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) in ~70,000 cases and ~68,000 controls from 41 case-control studies and nine breast cancer GWAS. We identified three new breast cancer risk loci on 12p11 (rs10771399; P=2.7 × 10−35), 12q24 (rs1292011; P=4.3×10−19) and 21q21 (rs2823093; P=1.1×10−12). SNP rs10771399 was associated with similar relative risks for both estrogen receptor (ER)-negative and ER-positive breast cancer, whereas the other two loci were associated only with ER-positive disease. Two of the loci lie in regions that contain strong plausible candidate genes: PTHLH (12p11) plays a crucial role in mammary gland development and the establishment of bone metastasis in breast cancer, while NRIP1 (21q21) encodes an ER co-factor and has a role in the regulation of breast cancer cell growth. PMID:22267197

  11. Association of the MTHFR Gene C677T Polymorphism with Breast Cancer in a Turkish Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Emir F; Karakus, Nevin; Ulusoy, Ali N; Özaslan, Cihangir; Kara, Nurten

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. 1 in every 8 women in the United States have a lifetime risk of getting breast cancer. MTHFR is a key enzyme that regulates the folate metabolism which has an important role in DNA synthesis, repair, and methylation. The aim of the current study was to analyze the association between the MTHFR gene C677T (Ala222Val, rs1801133) polymorphism and breast cancer. 199 breast cancer patients and 195 healthy controls were included in this study. The MTHFR gene C677T polymorphism was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methods. A meta-analysis including 707 breast cancer patients and 880 controls from Turkish populations was also carried out. Statistical analyses were performed using the χ2 test. No statistically significant differences in allele and genotype frequencies were observed between patients and controls (p > 0.05). Although not statistically significant, TT homozygous variants were encountered more frequently in patients than in controls. A statistically significant association was observed between the MTHFR gene C677T polymorphism and the tumor histology of breast cancer patients (p = 0.038). The results of the meta-analysis suggested that there was a high association between breast cancer and the MTHFR gene C677T polymorphism in Turkish populations (p association between the MTHFR gene C677T polymorphism and breast cancer. However, a meta-analysis of the 6 association studies carried out in Turkish populations with 707 patients and 880 controls showed a significant association between breast cancer and the MTHFR gene C677T polymorphism. © 2016 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  12. The protective effect of longer duration of breastfeeding against pregnancy-associated triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElShamy, Wael M

    2016-08-16

    Parity associated breast cancer (PABC) often diagnosed within the 2-5 years after a full term pregnancy. PABC is usually present with more advanced, poorly differentiated, high-grade cancers that show shorter time to progression and often of the triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype. Data from around the world show that pregnancy-associated TNBC is independently associated with poor survival, underscoring the impact of the pregnant breast microenvironment on the biology and consequently the prognosis of these tumors. Although it is not yet clear, a link between pregnancy-associated TNBCs and lack or shorter duration of breastfeeding (not pregnancy per se) has been proposed. Here, we present epidemiological and experimental evidence for the protective effect of longer duration of lactation against pregnancy-associated TNBCs, and propose a putative molecular mechanism for this protective effect and its effect in eliminating any potential TNBC precursors from the breast by the end of the natural breast involution.

  13. Genetic variation at CYP3A is associated with age at menarche and breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Nichola; Dudbridge, Frank; Orr, Nick

    2014-01-01

    . Stratified analyses were conducted to determine whether this association was modified by age at diagnosis, ethnicity, age at menarche or tumor characteristics. RESULTS: We confirmed the association of rs10235235 with breast cancer risk for women of European ancestry but found no evidence......INTRODUCTION: We have previously shown that a tag single nucleotide polymorphism (rs10235235), which maps to the CYP3A locus (7q22.1), was associated with a reduction in premenopausal urinary estrone glucuronide levels and a modest reduction in risk of breast cancer in women age ..., associated with age at menarche in controls (Ptrend = 0.005) but not cases (Ptrend = 0.97). Consequently the association between rs10235235 and breast cancer risk differed according to age at menarche (Phet = 0.02); the rare allele of rs10235235 was associated with a reduction in breast cancer risk for women...

  14. Low penetrance genes associated with increased risk for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, B L; Nathanson, K L

    2000-06-01

    Much effort in recent years has been focused on understanding the factors that contribute to breast cancer risk. Two major susceptibility alleles, BRCA1 and BRCA2, have been identified, and the prevalence and penetrance of mutations in these genes have been studied extensively. However, this work highlights the fact that only a small proportion of breast cancer is due to mutations in the genes. Evidence for additional high penetrance genes exists, but it is becoming clear that an understanding of multiple lower penetrance alleles will be necessary to fully define breast cancer risk. Work in this area has focused on the analysis of polymorphisms of potential functional significance in several classes of genes, including those involved in carcinogen metabolism, oestrogen metabolite biosynthesis, steroid hormone receptor activation and DNA damage response. These studies are reviewed and a strategy to use modification of breast cancer penetrance in families with known mutations in BRCA1 as a means of identifying additional low penetrance, or modifier, genes is discussed.

  15. Progress in the Biological Understanding and Management of Breast Cancer-Associated Central Nervous System Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    Metastasis to the central nervous system (CNS) is a devastating neurological complication of systemic cancer. Brain metastases from breast cancer have been documented to occur in approximately 10%–16% of cases over the natural course of the disease with leptomeningeal metastases occurring in approximately 2%–5% of cases of breast cancer. CNS metastases among women with breast cancer tend to occur among those who are younger, have larger tumors, and have a more aggressive histological subtype such as the triple negative and HER2-positive subtypes. Treatment of CNS metastases involves various combinations of whole brain radiation therapy, surgery, stereotactic radiosurgery, and chemotherapy. We will discuss the progress made in the treatment and prevention of breast cancer-associated CNS metastases and will delve into the biological underpinnings of CNS metastases including evaluating the role of breast tumor subtype on the incidence, natural history, prognostic outcome, and impact of therapeutic efficacy. PMID:23740934

  16. Cisplatin-induced autophagy protects breast cancer cells from apoptosis by regulating yes-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yulin; Ji, Feihu; Liu, Yifeng; He, Mengjia; Zhang, Zhiqian; Yang, Junhong; Wang, Nian; Zhong, Changli; Jin, Qianni; Ye, Xiangsen; Chen, Tingmei

    2017-10-16

    Breast cancer is a common cause of cancer‑related deaths in women. Treatment with cisplatin exhibits some therapeutic efficacy. However, treatment optimization is required, and the mechanisms underlying the cisplatin's proapoptotic effects remain unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that cisplatin induced apoptosis and autophagy in breast cancer cells. Autophagy induced by cisplatin played a protective role in breast cancer cells, which impaired its proapoptotic effect. Mechanistically, for the first time, we found that cisplatin treatment activated the MAPK signaling pathway and promoted autophagy via the ERK signaling pathway. Notably, we found that nuclear translocation of yes-associated protein (YAP) was regulated by cisplatin-induced autophagy, and we identified YAP as a survival input that promoted survival in cisplatin-treated breast cancer cells. These findings revealed that administration of cisplatin along with an autophagy inhibitor is a promising therapeutic strategy for treating breast cancer.

  17. Common Breast Cancer Susceptibility Variants in LSP1 and RAD51L1 Are Associated with Mammographic Density Measures that Predict Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, Celine M.; Scott, Christopher G.; Fasching, Peter A.; Hall, Per; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Li, Jingmei; Stone, Jennifer; Apicella, Carmel; Odefrey, Fabrice; Gierach, Gretchen L.; Jud, Sebastian M.; Heusinger, Katharina; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Pollan, Marina; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo; González-Neira, Anna; Benítez, Javier; van Gils, Carla H.; Lokate, Mariëtte; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Peeters, Petra H.M.; Brown, Judith; Leyland, Jean; Varghese, Jajini S.; Easton, Douglas F.; Thompson, Deborah J.; Luben, Robert N.; Warren, Ruth ML; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Loos, Ruth JF; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Ursin, Giske; Lee, Eunjung; Gayther, Simon A.; Ramus, Susan J.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Leach, Martin O.; Kwan-Lim, Gek; Couch, Fergus J.; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Krishnan, Kavitha; Southey, Melissa C.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Woolcott, Christy; Maskarinec, Gertraud; Haiman, Christopher A; Walker, Kate; Johnson, Nichola; McCormack, Valerie A.; Biong, Margarethe; Alnæs, Grethe I.G.; Gram, Inger Torhild; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Lindström, Sara; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hunter, David J.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Boyd, Norman F.; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Wesolowska, Ewa; Peplonska, Beata; Bukowska, Agnieszka; Reszka, Edyta; Liu, JianJun; Eriksson, Louise; Czene, Kamila; Audley, Tina; Wu, Anna H.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Hopper, John L.; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Background Mammographic density adjusted for age and body mass index (BMI) is a heritable marker of breast cancer susceptibility. Little is known about the biological mechanisms underlying the association between mammographic density and breast cancer risk. We examined whether common low-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility variants contribute to inter-individual differences in mammographic density measures. Methods We established an international consortium (DENSNP) of 19 studies from 10 countries, comprising 16,895 Caucasian women, to conduct a pooled cross-sectional analysis of common breast cancer susceptibility variants in 14 independent loci and mammographic density measures. Dense and non-dense areas, and percent density, were measured using interactive-thresholding techniques. Mixed linear models were used to assess the association between genetic variants and the square roots of mammographic density measures adjusted for study, age, case status, body mass index (BMI) and menopausal status. Results Consistent with their breast cancer associations, the C-allele of rs3817198 in LSP1 was positively associated with both adjusted dense area (p=0.00005) and adjusted percent density (p=0.001) whereas the A-allele of rs10483813 in RAD51L1 was inversely associated with adjusted percent density (p=0.003), but not with adjusted dense area (p=0.07). Conclusion We identified two common breast cancer susceptibility variants associated with mammographic measures of radio-dense tissue in the breast gland. Impact We examined the association of 14 established breast cancer susceptibility loci with mammographic density phenotypes within a large genetic consortium and identified two breast cancer susceptibility variants, LSP1-rs3817198 and RAD51L1-rs10483813, associated with mammographic measures and in the same direction as the breast cancer association. PMID:22454379

  18. Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Pregnancy-Associated Breast Cancer: Results of Analysis of a Nationwide Breast Cancer Registry Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun Gyoung; Jeon, Ye Won; Ko, Byung Kyun; Sohn, Guiyun; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Moon, Byung-In; Youn, Hyun Jo; Kim, Hyun-Ah

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the clinicopathological characteristics of pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) in comparison with non-pregnancy associated breast cancer (non-PABC). A total of 344 eligible patients with PABC were identified in the Korean Breast Cancer Society Registry database. PABC was defined as ductal carcinoma in situ , invasive ductal carcinoma, or invasive lobular carcinoma diagnosed during pregnancy or within 1 year after the birth of a child. Patients with non-PABC were selected from the same database using a 1:2 matching method. The matching variables were operation, age, and initial stage. Patients with PABC had significantly lower survival rates than patient with non-PABC (10-year survival rate: PABC, 76.4%; non-PABC, 85.1%; p =0.011). PABC patients had higher histologic grade and were more frequently hormone receptor negative than non-PABC patients. Being overweight (body mass index [BMI], ≥23 kg/m 2 ), early menarche (≤13 years), late age at first childbirth (≥30 years), and a family history of breast cancer were more common in the PABC group than in the non-PABC group. Multivariate analysis showed the following factors to be significantly associated with PABC (vs. non-PABC): early menarche (odds ratio [OR], 2.165; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.566-2.994; p <0.001), late age at first childbirth (OR, 2.446; 95% CI, 1.722-3.473; p <0.001), and being overweight (OR, 1.389; 95% CI, 1.007-1.917; p =0.045). Early menarche, late age at first childbirth, and BMI ≥23 kg/m 2 were more associated with PABC than non-PABC.

  19. Prognosis for patients diagnosed with pregnancy-associated breast cancer: a paired case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, Wagner Brant; Brandão, Eduardo Carvalho; Soares, Aleida Nazareth; Lucena, Clécio Enio Murta de; Antunes, Carlos Maurício Figueiredo

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have suggested that the occurrence of pregnancy concomitantly with a diagnosis of breast cancer may affect the evolution of the neoplasia. The present study aimed to compare pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) patients with non-pregnant cancer patients (controls) in relation to the time taken to diagnose the disease, tumor characteristics and mortality. DESIGN AND SETTING: A retrospective, paired case-control study was conducted at the Hospital da...

  20. APOBEC3 deletion polymorphism is associated with breast cancer risk among women of European ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Dennis; Li, Guoliang; Cai, Qiuyin; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha J; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Kelley, Mark C; Zheng, Wei; Long, Jirong

    2013-10-01

    Copy number variations occur frequently in the genome and are a significant source of human genetic variation accounting for disease. Recently, we discovered a common deletion located in the APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B genes significantly associated with breast cancer in Chinese women. Investigating this locus in other populations would be an expedient way to evaluate the generalizability of the novel finding. We analyzed the APOBEC3 deletion in a large study of 3273 European-ancestry women (including 1671 breast cancer cases and 1602 controls) from the population-based Nashville Breast Health Study. All participants were genotyped using real-time qualitative PCR. Logistic regression was used to derive odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations between the deletion polymorphism and breast cancer risk. The APOBEC3 deletion was observed in 12.4% of cases and 10.4% of controls. The deletion was significantly associated with breast cancer risk, with ORs and 95% CIs of 1.21 (1.02-1.43) associated with one-copy deletion and 2.29 (1.04-5.06) associated with two-copy deletion compared with women with no deletion (P for trend = 0.005). The positive association of the APOBEC3 deletion with breast cancer risk was similar for estrogen receptor-positive and estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer and was not modified by known breast cancer risk factors. Results from this study confirmed the association of the APOBEC3 deletion with breast cancer risk among women of European ancestry.

  1. Association Between Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use and Breast Cancer Chemotherapy Initiation The Breast Cancer Quality of Care (BQUAL) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; Neugut, Alfred I.; Falci, Laura; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Buono, Donna; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S.; Roh, Janise M.; Ergas, Isaac J.; Kwan, Marilyn L.; Lee, Marion; Tsai, Wei Yann; Shi, Zaixing; Lamerato, Lois; Kushi, Lawrence H.; Hershman, Dawn L.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Not all women initiate clinically indicated breast cancer adjuvant treatment. It is important for clinicians to identify women at risk for noninitiation. OBJECTIVE To determine whether complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is associated with decreased breast cancer chemotherapy initiation. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS In this multisite prospective cohort study (the Breast Cancer Quality of Care [BQUAL] study) designed to examine predictors of breast cancer treatment initiation and adherence, 685 women younger than 70 years with nonmetastatic invasive breast cancer were recruited from Columbia University Medical Center, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, and Henry Ford Health System and enrolled between May 2006 and July 31, 2010. Overall, 306 patients (45%) were clinically indicated to receive chemotherapy per National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines. Participants were followed for up to 12 months. EXPOSURES Baseline interviews assessed current use of 5 CAM modalities (vitamins and/or minerals, herbs and/or botanicals, other natural products, mind-body self-practice, mind-body practitioner-based practice). CAM use definitions included any use, dietary supplement use, mind-body use, and a CAM index summing the 5 modalities. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Chemotherapy initiation was assessed via self-report up to 12 months after baseline. Multivariable logistic regression models examined a priori hypotheses testing whether CAM use was associated with chemotherapy initiation, adjusting for demographic and clinical covariates, and delineating groups by age and chemotherapy indication. RESULTS A cohort of 685 women younger than 70 years (mean age, 59 years; median age, 59 years) with nonmetastatic invasive breast cancer were recruited and followed for up to 12 months to examine predictors of breast cancer treatment initiation. Baseline CAM use was reported by 598 women (87%). Chemotherapy was initiated by 272 women (89%) for whom

  2. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease ...

  3. Second Primary Tumors associated with Breast Cancer: Kuwait Cancer Control Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayaz, Salah; Demian, Gerges Attia; Eissa, Heba El-Sayed; Abuzalouf, Sadeq

    2017-09-01

    To review the clinico-epidemiologic characteristics of patients who presented with two or more primary cancers, one of which was breast cancer (BC) and to develop a follow-up program for the high risk patients. Patients who were diagnosed with BC and one or more non breast cancer (NBC) were retrospectively reviewed. Medical files were retrieved and epidemiological as well as clinical data were analyzed. Sixty-two patients were retrieved. BC was the first primary in 26 patients while it was the second in 36 patients. Two were males and 60 were females. The median age was 48 years and the median follow-up was 11.5 years. The median interval between the 1st and 2nd primary was 6 years. The most commonly associated NBCs were colon and thyroid cancers, each accounts for 24% of cases followed by endometrial cancer, 18%; Hodgkin's disease, 6.5%; renal and ovarian neoplasm and NHL, 5% each. Others included prostate, lung, cervical and gastric cancers, soft tissue sarcoma and osteosarcoma. Thyroid cancer was more common as first cancer while endometrial cancer was more as second cancer. All patients who developed BC following Hodgkin's disease had received chest irradiation. Seven patients developed 3rd primary (4 lung cancers, 2 NHL, and 1 AML). Patients who were diagnosed with BC should be screened for colon and endometrial cancer. Similarly, patients received chest irradiation at young age, and those diagnosed with thyroid or colon cancer should be screened for BC. Protocol of surveillance needs to be defined. Genetic counseling should be offered to individuals who have experienced multiple primary cancers particularly those with family history and young age of onset.

  4. CHEK2*1100delC Heterozygosity in Women With Breast Cancer Associated With Early Death, Breast Cancer-Specific Death, and Increased Risk of a Second Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischer, Maren; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Pharoah, Paul

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE We tested the hypotheses that CHEK2*1100delC heterozygosity is associated with increased risk of early death, breast cancer-specific death, and risk of a second breast cancer in women with a first breast cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS From 22 studies participating in the Breast Cancer...... Association Consortium, 25,571 white women with invasive breast cancer were genotyped for CHEK2*1100delC and observed for up to 20 years (median, 6.6 years). We examined risk of early death and breast cancer-specific death by estrogen receptor status and risk of a second breast cancer after a first breast...... cancer in prospective studies. Results CHEK2*1100delC heterozygosity was found in 459 patients (1.8%). In women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, multifactorially adjusted hazard ratios for heterozygotes versus noncarriers were 1.43 (95% CI, 1.12 to 1.82; log-rank P = .004) for early death...

  5. The association between glucose-lowering drug use and mortality among breast cancer patients with type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, P.A.J.; Cardwell, C.R.; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.; Young, I.S.; Pouwer, F.; Murray, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the association between glucose-lowering drug (GLD) use, including metformin, sulphonylurea derivatives and insulin, after breast cancer diagnosis and breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. 1763 breast cancer patients, diagnosed between 1998 and 2010, with type 2

  6. Prognosis of breast cancer is associated with one-carbon metabolism related nutrients among Korean women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yunhee; Lee, Sang-Ah; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Song, Minkyo; Sung, Hyuna; Jeon, Sujee; Park, Sue K; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Kang, Daehee

    2012-08-28

    The 5-year survival rate for breast cancer among Korean women has increased steadily; however, breast cancer remains the leading cause of cancer mortality among women. One-carbon metabolism, which requires an adequate supply of methyl group donors and B vitamins, may affect the prognosis of breast cancer. This aim of this study was to investigate the associations of dietary intake of vitamin B2, vitamin B6 and folate before diagnosis on the prognosis of breast cancer. We assessed the dietary intake using a food frequency questionnaire with 980 women who were newly diagnosed and histopathologically confirmed to have primary breast cancer from hospitals in Korea, and 141 disease progression events occurred. Cox's proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) adjusting for age, education, recruitment sites, TNM stage, hormone status, nuclear grade and total calorie. There was no significant association between any one-carbon metabolism related nutrients (vitamin B2, B6 and folate) and the progression of breast cancer overall. However, one-carbon metabolism related nutrients were associated with disease progression in breast cancer patients stratified by subtypes. In ER + and/or PR + breast cancers, no association was observed; however, in ER-/PR- breast cancers, a high intake of vitamin B2 and folate statistically elevated the HR of breast cancer progression (HR = 2.28; 95% CI, 1.20-4.35, HR = 1.84; 95% CI, 1.02-3.32, respectively) compared to a low intake. This positive association between the ER/PR status and progression of the disease was profound when the nutrient intakes were categorized in a combined score (Pinteraction = 0.018). In ER-/PR- breast cancers, high combined scores were associated with a significantly poor DFS compared to those belonging to the low score group (HR = 3.84; 95% CI, 1.70-8.71). In conclusion, our results suggest that one-carbon related nutrients have a role in the

  7. Paradoxical Association of Postoperative Plasma Sphingosine-1-Phosphate with Breast Cancer Aggressiveness and Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Ramanathan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P is a bioactive lipid mediator that has been shown to serve an important regulatory function in breast cancer progression. This study analyzes plasma S1P levels in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant therapy as compared to healthy control volunteers. 452 plasma S1P samples among 158 breast cancer patients, along with 20 healthy control volunteers, were analyzed. Mean S1P levels did not significantly differ between cancer patients and controls. Smoking was associated with higher S1P levels in cancer patients. Baseline S1P levels had weak inverse correlation with levels of the inflammatory mediator interleukin- (IL- 17 and CCL-2 and positive correlation with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α. Midpoint S1P levels during adjuvant therapy were lower than baseline, with near return to baseline after completion, indicating a relationship between chemotherapy and circulating S1P. While stage of disease did not correlate with plasma S1P levels, they were lower among patients with Her2-enriched and triple-negative breast cancer as compared to luminal-type breast cancer. Plasma S1P levels are paradoxically suppressed in aggressive breast cancer and during adjuvant chemotherapy, which raises the possibility that postoperative plasma S1P levels do not reflect S1P secretion from resected breast cancer.

  8. Breast Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts: Where We Are and Where We Need to Go

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel J. Buchsbaum

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancers are heterogeneous tissues comprised of multiple components, including tumor cells and microenvironment cells. The tumor microenvironment has a critical role in tumor progression. The tumor microenvironment is comprised of various cell types, including fibroblasts, macrophages and immune cells, as well as extracellular matrix and various cytokines and growth factors. Fibroblasts are the predominant cell type in the tumor microenvironment. However, neither the derivation of tissue-specific cancer-associated fibroblasts nor markers of tissue-specific cancer-associated fibroblasts are well defined. Despite these uncertainties it is increasingly apparent that cancer-associated fibroblasts have a crucial role in tumor progression. In breast cancer, there is evolving evidence showing that breast cancer-associated fibroblasts are actively involved in breast cancer initiation, proliferation, invasion and metastasis. Breast cancer-associated fibroblasts also play a critical role in metabolic reprogramming of the tumor microenvironment and therapy resistance. This review summarizes the current understanding of breast cancer-associated fibroblasts.

  9. Multiple oncogenic viruses are present in human breast tissues before development of virus associated breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, James S; Glenn, Wendy K

    2017-01-01

    Multiple oncogenic viruses including, mouse mammary tumor virus, bovine leukemia virus, human papilloma virus, and Epstein Barr virus, have been identified as separate infectious pathogens in human breast cancer. Here we demonstrate that these four viruses may be present in normal and benign breast tissues 1 to 11 years before the development of same virus breast cancer in the same patients. We combined the data we developed during investigations of the individual four oncogenic viruses and breast cancer. Patients who had benign breast biopsies 1-11 years prior to developing breast cancer were identified by pathology reports from a large Australian pathology service (Douglas Hanly Moir Pathology). Archival formalin fixed specimens from these patients were collected. The same archival specimens were used for (i) investigations of mouse mammary tumour virus (also known as human mammary tumour virus) conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York and at the University of Pisa, Italy, (ii) bovine leukemia virus conducted at the University of California at Berkeley,(iii) human papilloma virus and Epstein Barr virus conducted at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. Seventeen normal breast tissues from cosmetic breast surgery conducted on Australian patients were used as controls. These patients were younger than those with benign and later breast cancer. Standard and in situ polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods were used to identify the four viruses. The detailed methods are outlined in the separate publications.: mouse mammary tumor virus, human papilloma virus and Epstein Barr virus (Infect Agent Cancer 12:1, 2017, PLoS One 12:e0179367, 2017, Front Oncol 5:277, 2015, PLoS One 7:e48788, 2012). Epstein Barr virus and human papilloma virus were identified in the same breast cancer cells by in situ PCR. Mouse mammary tumour virus was identified in 6 (24%) of 25 benign breast specimens and in 9 (36%) of 25 breast cancer specimens

  10. Cross-Cancer Genome-Wide Analysis of Lung, Ovary, Breast, Prostate, and Colorectal Cancer Reveals Novel Pleiotropic Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehringer, Gordon; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul D; Eeles, Rosalind A; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Lindström, Sara; Brennan, Paul; Bickeböller, Heike; Houlston, Richard S; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Risch, Angela; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Berndt, Sonja I; Giovannucci, Edward L; Grönberg, Henrik; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Ma, Jing; Muir, Kenneth; Stampfer, Meir J; Stevens, Victoria L; Wiklund, Fredrik; Willett, Walter C; Goode, Ellen L; Permuth, Jennifer B; Risch, Harvey A; Reid, Brett M; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Chan, Andrew T; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hudson, Thomas J; Kocarnik, Jonathan K; Newcomb, Polly A; Schoen, Robert E; Slattery, Martha L; White, Emily; Adank, Muriel A; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Baglietto, Laura; Blomquist, Carl; Canzian, Federico; Czene, Kamila; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eliassen, A Heather; Figueroa, Jonine D; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M; Johnson, Nichola; Hall, Per; Hazra, Aditi; Hein, Rebecca; Hofman, Albert; Hopper, John L; Irwanto, Astrid; Johansson, Mattias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Meindl, Alfons; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Muranen, Taru A; Nevanlinna, Heli; Peeters, Petra H; Peto, Julian; Prentice, Ross L; Rahman, Nazneen; Sanchez, Maria Jose; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmutzler, Rita K; Southey, Melissa C; Tamimi, Rulla; Travis, Ruth C; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Wang, Zhaoming; Whittemore, Alice S; Yang, Xiaohong R; Zheng, Wei; Buchanan, Daniel D; Casey, Graham; Conti, David V; Edlund, Christopher K; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Jenkins, Mark; Le Marchand, Loïc; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralene M; Schmit, Stephanie L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Woods, Michael O; Rafnar, Thorunn; Gudmundsson, Julius; Stacey, Simon N; Stefansson, Kari; Sulem, Patrick; Chen, Y Ann; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Christiani, David C; Wei, Yongyue; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shiraishi, Kouya; Takahashi, Atsushi; Bossé, Yohan; Obeidat, Ma'en; Nickle, David; Timens, Wim; Freedman, Matthew L; Li, Qiyuan; Seminara, Daniela; Chanock, Stephen J; Gong, Jian; Peters, Ulrike; Gruber, Stephen B; Amos, Christopher I; Sellers, Thomas A; Easton, Douglas F; Hunter, David J; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Hung, Rayjean J

    2016-09-01

    Identifying genetic variants with pleiotropic associations can uncover common pathways influencing multiple cancers. We took a two-stage approach to conduct genome-wide association studies for lung, ovary, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer from the GAME-ON/GECCO Network (61,851 cases, 61,820 controls) to identify pleiotropic loci. Findings were replicated in independent association studies (55,789 cases, 330,490 controls). We identified a novel pleiotropic association at 1q22 involving breast and lung squamous cell carcinoma, with eQTL analysis showing an association with ADAM15/THBS3 gene expression in lung. We also identified a known breast cancer locus CASP8/ALS2CR12 associated with prostate cancer, a known cancer locus at CDKN2B-AS1 with different variants associated with lung adenocarcinoma and prostate cancer, and confirmed the associations of a breast BRCA2 locus with lung and serous ovarian cancer. This is the largest study to date examining pleiotropy across multiple cancer-associated loci, identifying common mechanisms of cancer development and progression. Cancer Res; 76(17); 5103-14. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Association between G-2548A leptin gene polymorphism and breast cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Rostami; Leila Kohan; Mohammad Mohammadian Panah; Fereshteh Fereiduni

    2014-01-01

    Background: Leptin is an adipokine made by fat cells and plays a key role in proliferation, cell survival, migration and immune response. Several studies have suggested that individuals with high serum leptin concentrations would increase the risk of breast cancer. G -2548A polymorphism in the leptin gene is located in the promoter region and is associated with the change of leptin serum level. In this study, the association between G -2548A polymorphism in leptin gene and breast cancer susce...

  12. Matrix metalloproteinase genes are associated with breast cancer risk and survival: the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha L Slattery

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs contribute to cancer through their involvement in cancer invasion and metastasis. We evaluated genetic variation in MMP1 (9 SNPs, MMP2 (8 SNPs, MMP3 (4 SNPs, and MMP9 (3 SNPs and breast cancer risk among Hispanic (2111 cases, 2597 controls and non-Hispanic white (NHW (1481 cases, 1586 controls women in the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study. Ancestral informative markers (n = 104 were assessed to determine Native American (NA ancestry. MMP1 [4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs] and MMP2 (2 SNPs were associated with breast cancer overall. MMP1 rs996999 had strongest associations among women with the most NA ancestry (OR 1.61,95% CI 1.09,2.40 as did MMP3 rs650108 (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.05,1.75 and MMP9 rs3787268 (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.09,2.13. The adaptive rank truncated product (ARTP showed a significant pathway p(artp  value of 0.04, with a stronger association among women with the most NA ancestry (p(artp = 0.02. Significant pathway genes using the ARTP were MMP1 for all women (p(artp = 0.02 and MMP9 for women with the most NA ancestry (p(artp = 0.024; MMP2 was borderline significant overall (p(artp =0.06 and MMP1 and MMP3 were borderline significant for women with the most NA ancestry (p(artp = 0.07 and 0.06 respectively. MMP1 and MMP2 were associated with ER+/PR+ and ER+/PR-tumors; MMP3 and MMP9 were associated with ER-/PR- tumors. The pathway was highly significant with survival (p(artp = 0.0041 with MMP2 having the strongest gene association (p(artp = 0.0007. Our findings suggest that genetic variation in MMP genes influence breast cancer development and survival in this genetically admixed population.

  13. Cytotoxic chemotherapy for pregnancy-associated breast cancer: single institution case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Patrick G; King, Fionnuala; Kennedy, M John

    2009-12-01

    Pregnancy-associated (PA) breast cancer is a rare disease state that poses unique management challenges, specifically controlling the cancer and maximizing the survival of the expectant mother balanced with the health and safety of the developing fetus. As more women delay pregnancy into their 30s and 40s it is expected that this may become a more important clinical problem in the future. Existing data on PA-breast cancer comes from case series using older chemotherapy drugs. A review of practice was carried out to assess current experience with PA-breast cancer, particularly relating to current cytotoxic drugs and targeted agents. The St James's Hospital breast cancer registry, a prospectively maintained database, was used to identify cases of PA-breast cancer over a 6.5-year period and a chart review carried out. Chemotherapy administered during pregnancy, breast cancer specific outcomes, and fetal outcomes were assessed. Five patients were identified with PA-breast cancer; median age 34 years (range 28-35). The median gestation at presentation was 18 weeks (range 14-29). Four women received chemotherapy during pregnancy; three received doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (AC) and one paclitaxel. These agents were generally well tolerated. At median gestation of 36 weeks (range 35-40 weeks) four elective caesareans and one spontaneous delivery occurred. There were no fetal abnormalities. Common cytotoxics can safely be delivered in pregnancy. Further research on newer therapies such as trastuzumab is needed.

  14. Low expression levels of hepsin and TMPRSS3 are associated with poor breast cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelkonen, Mikko; Luostari, Kaisa; Tengström, Maria; Ahonen, Hermanni; Berdel, Bozena; Kataja, Vesa; Soini, Ylermi; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Mannermaa, Arto

    2015-05-27

    Hepsin, (also called TMPRSS1) and TMPRSS3 are type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) that are involved in cancer progression. TTSPs can remodel extracellular matrix (ECM) and, when dysregulated, promote tumor progression and metastasis by inducing defects in basement membrane and ECM molecules. This study investigated whether the gene and protein expression levels of these TTSPs were associated with breast cancer characteristics or survival. Immunohistochemical staining was used to evaluate hepsin levels in 372 breast cancer samples and TMPRSS3 levels in 373 samples. TMPRSS1 mRNA expression was determined in 125 invasive and 16 benign breast tumor samples, and TMPRSS3 mRNA expression was determined in 167 invasive and 23 benign breast tumor samples. The gene and protein expression levels were analyzed for associations with breast cancer-specific survival and clinicopathological parameters. Low TMPRSS1 and TMPRSS3 mRNA expression levels were independent prognostic factors for poor breast cancer survival during the 20-year follow-up (TMPRSS1, P = 0.023; HR, 2.065; 95 % CI, 1.106-3.856; TMPRSS3, P = 0.013; HR, 2.106; 95 % CI, 1.167-3.800). Low expression of the two genes at the mRNA and protein levels associated with poorer survival compared to high levels (log rank P-values 0.015-0.042). Low TMPRSS1 mRNA expression was also an independent marker of poor breast cancer prognosis in patients treated with radiotherapy (P = 0.034; HR, 2.344; 95 % CI, 1.065-5.160). Grade III tumors, large tumor size, and metastasis were associated with low mRNA and protein expression levels. The results suggest that the TTSPs hepsin and TMPRSS3 may have similar biological functions in the molecular pathology of breast cancer. Low mRNA and protein expression levels of the studied TTSPs were prognostic markers of poor survival in breast cancer.

  15. Association between sleep and breast cancer incidence among postmenopausal women in the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogtmann, Emily; Levitan, Emily B; Hale, Lauren; Shikany, James M; Shah, Neomi A; Endeshaw, Yohannes; Lewis, Cora E; Manson, Joann E; Chlebowski, Rowan T

    2013-10-01

    To determine whether the duration of sleep, sleep quality, insomnia, or sleep disturbance was associated with incident breast cancer in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI). Prospective cohort study. Women enrolled in one of the Clinical Trial (CT) arms or the Observational Study (OS) from the WHI conducted in the United States. This study included 110,011 women age 50 to 79 years with no history of cancer. Typical sleep duration, sleep quality, and other self-reported sleep measures over the past 4 weeks were assessed during the screening visits for both the CT and OS participants. The presence of insomnia and level of sleep disturbance was calculated from an index of the WHI Insomnia Rating Scale. The outcome for this study was primary, invasive breast cancer. A total of 5,149 incident cases of breast cancer were identified in this study. No statistically significant associations were found between sleep duration, sleep quality, insomnia, or level of sleep disturbance with the risk of breast cancer after multivariable adjustment. A positive trend was observed for increasing sleeping duration with the risk of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer, but the association estimates for each sleep duration category were weak and nonsignificant. This study does not provide strong support for an association between self-reported sleep duration, sleep quality, insomnia, or sleep disturbance with the risk of breast cancer.

  16. Associations between gene expression profiles of invasive breast cancer and Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System MRI lexicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ga Ram; Ku, You Jin; Cho, Soon Gu; Kim, Sei Joong; Min, Byung Soh

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate whether the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) MRI lexicon could reflect the genomic information of breast cancers and to suggest intuitive imaging features as biomarkers. Matched breast MRI data from The Cancer Imaging Archive and gene expression profile from The Cancer Genome Atlas of 70 invasive breast cancers were analyzed. Magnetic resonance images were reviewed according to the BI-RADS MRI lexicon of mass morphology. The cancers were divided into 2 groups of gene clustering by gene set enrichment an alysis. Clinicopathologic and imaging characteristics were compared between the 2 groups. The luminal subtype was predominant in the group 1 gene set and the triple-negative subtype was predominant in the group 2 gene set (55 of 56, 98.2% vs. 9 of 14, 64.3%). Internal enhancement descriptors were different between the 2 groups; heterogeneity was most frequent in group 1 (27 of 56, 48.2%) and rim enhancement was dominant in group 2 (10 of 14, 71.4%). In group 1, the gene sets related to mammary gland development were overexpressed whereas the gene sets related to mitotic cell division were overexpressed in group 2. We identified intuitive imaging features of breast MRI associated with distinct gene expression profiles using the standard imaging variables of BI-RADS. The internal enhancement pattern on MRI might reflect specific gene expression profiles of breast cancers, which can be recognized by visual distinction.

  17. Associations of persistent organic pollutants in serum and adipose tissue with breast cancer prognostic markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrebola, J.P., E-mail: jparrebola@ugr.es [Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria (ibs. GRANADA), Hospitales Universitarios de Granada (Spain); Virgen de las Nieves University Hospital, Radiation Oncology Department, Oncology Unit, Granada (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP) (Spain); Fernández-Rodríguez, M.; Artacho-Cordón, F. [Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria (ibs. GRANADA), Hospitales Universitarios de Granada (Spain); University of Granada, Radiology and Physical Medicine Department (Spain); Garde, C. [Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria (ibs. GRANADA), Hospitales Universitarios de Granada (Spain); Perez-Carrascosa, F.; Linares, I.; Tovar, I. [Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria (ibs. GRANADA), Hospitales Universitarios de Granada (Spain); Virgen de las Nieves University Hospital, Radiation Oncology Department, Oncology Unit, Granada (Spain); González-Alzaga, B. [Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria (ibs. GRANADA), Hospitales Universitarios de Granada (Spain); Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública, Granada (Spain); Expósito, J. [Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria (ibs. GRANADA), Hospitales Universitarios de Granada (Spain); Virgen de las Nieves University Hospital, Radiation Oncology Department, Oncology Unit, Granada (Spain); Torne, P. [Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria (ibs. GRANADA), Hospitales Universitarios de Granada (Spain); and others

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate associations between exposure to a group of persistent organic pollutants, measured in both adipose tissue and serum samples from breast cancer patients, and a set of tumor prognostic markers. The study population comprised 103 breast cancer patients recruited in Granada, Southern Spain. Data for tumor prognostic markers were retrieved from hospital clinical records and socio-demographic information was gathered by questionnaire. Persistent organic pollutants were quantified by gas chromatography with electron capture detection. Exposure levels were categorized in quartiles, and associations were evaluated using unconditional logistic regression. Adipose tissue HCB concentrations were associated positively with ER and PR expression (p-trends = 0.044 and 0.005, respectively) and negatively with E-Cadherin and p53 expression (p-trends = 0.012 and 0.027, respectively). PCB-180 adipose tissue concentrations were positively associated with HER2 expression (p-trend = 0.036). Serum PCB-138 concentrations were positively associated with ER and PR expression (p-trends = 0.052 and 0.042, respectively). The risk of p53 expression was higher among women in the lowest quartile of serum PCB-138 concentrations, but no significant trend was observed (p-trend = 0.161). These findings indicate that human exposure to certain persistent organic pollutants might be related to breast cancer aggressiveness. We also highlight the influence on exposure assessment of the biological matrix selected, given that both serum and adipose tissue might yield relevant information on breast cancer prognosis. - Highlights: • The role of POP exposure on the pathogenesis breast cancer is still controversial. • POPs were analyzed in serum and adipose tissue from breast cancer patients. • POP concentrations were associated with breast cancer prognostic markers. • POPs in serum and adipose tissue of breast cancer patients may provide different clues.

  18. Age-associated gene expression in normal breast tissue mirrors qualitative age-at-incidence patterns for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirone, Jason R; D'Arcy, Monica; Stewart, Delisha A; Hines, William C; Johnson, Melissa; Gould, Michael N; Yaswen, Paul; Jerry, D Joseph; Smith Schneider, Sallie; Troester, Melissa A

    2012-10-01

    Age is the strongest breast cancer risk factor, with overall breast cancer risk increasing steadily beginning at approximately 30 years of age. However, while breast cancer risk is lower among younger women, young women's breast cancer may be more aggressive. Although, several genomic and epidemiologic studies have shown higher prevalence of aggressive, estrogen-receptor negative breast cancer in younger women, the age-related gene expression that predisposes to these tumors is poorly understood. Characterizing age-related patterns of gene expression in normal breast tissues may provide insights on etiology of distinct breast cancer subtypes that arise from these tissues. To identify age-related changes in normal breast tissue, 96 tissue specimens from patients with reduction mammoplasty, ages 14 to 70 years, were assayed by gene expression microarray. Significant associations between gene expression levels and age were identified for 802 probes (481 increased, 321 decreased with increasing age). Enriched functions included "aging of cells," "shape change," and "chemotaxis," and enriched pathways included Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, Ephrin receptor signaling, and JAK/Stat signaling. Applying the age-associated genes to publicly available tumor datasets, the age-associated pathways defined two groups of tumors with distinct survival. The hazard rates of young-like tumors mirrored that of high-grade tumors in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, providing a biologic link between normal aging and age-related tumor aggressiveness. These data show that studies of normal tissue gene expression can yield important insights about the pathways and biologic pressures that are relevant during tumor etiology and progression. 2012 AACR

  19. DNA methylation modifies the association between obesity and survival after breast cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Lauren E; Chen, Jia; Cho, Yoon Hee; Khankari, Nikhil K; Bradshaw, Patrick T; White, Alexandra J; Garbowski, Gail; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Terry, Mary Beth; Neugut, Alfred I; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Santella, Regina M; Gammon, Marilie D

    2016-02-01

    Mechanisms underlying the poor breast cancer prognosis among obese women are unresolved. DNA methylation levels are linked to obesity and to breast cancer survival. We hypothesized that obesity may work in conjunction with the epigenome to alter prognosis. Using a population-based sample of women diagnosed with first primary breast cancer, we examined modification of the obesity-mortality association by DNA methylation. In-person interviews were conducted approximately 3 months after diagnosis. Weight and height were assessed [to estimate body mass index (BMI)], and blood samples collected. Promoter methylation of 13 breast cancer-related genes was assessed in archived tumor by methylation-specific PCR and Methyl Light. Global methylation in white blood cell DNA was assessed by analysis of long interspersed elements-1 (LINE-1) and with the luminometric methylation assay (LUMA). Vital status among 1308 patients (with any methylation biomarker and complete BMI assessment) was determined after approximately 15 years of follow-up (N = 194/441 deaths due to breast cancer-specific/all-cause mortality). We used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) using two-sided p values of 0.05. Breast cancer-specific mortality was higher among obese (BMI ≥ 30) patients with promoter methylation in APC (HR = 2.47; 95 % CI = 1.43-4.27) and TWIST1 (HR = 4.25; 95 % CI = 1.43-12.70) in breast cancer tissue. Estimates were similar, but less pronounced, for all-cause mortality. Increased all-cause (HR = 1.81; 95 % CI = 1.19-2.74) and breast cancer-specific (HR = 2.61; 95 % CI = 1.45-4.69) mortality was observed among obese patients with the lowest LUMA levels. The poor breast cancer prognosis associated with obesity may depend on methylation profiles, which warrants further investigation.

  20. Productivity Costs Associated With Breast Cancer Among Survivors Aged 18-44 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekwueme, Donatus U; Trogdon, Justin G; Khavjou, Olga A; Guy, Gery P

    2016-02-01

    No study has quantified productivity losses associated with breast cancer in younger women aged 18-44 years. This study estimated productivity costs, including work and home productivity losses, among younger women who reported ever receiving a breast cancer diagnosis. A two-part regression model and 2000-2010 National Health Interview Survey data were used to estimate the number of work and home productivity days missed because of breast cancer, adjusted for socioeconomic characteristics and comorbidities. Estimates for younger women were compared with those for women aged 45-64 years. Data were analyzed in 2013-2014. Per capita, younger women with breast cancer had annual losses of $2,293 (95% CI=$1,069, $3,518) from missed work and $442 (95% CI=$161, $723) from missed home productivity. Total annual breast cancer-associated productivity costs for younger women were $344 million (95% CI=$154 million, $535 million). Older women with breast cancer had lower per capita work loss productivity costs of $1,407 (95% CI=$899, $1,915) but higher total work loss productivity costs estimated at $1,072 million (95% CI=$685 million, $1,460 million) than younger women. Younger women with a history of breast cancer face a disproportionate share of work and home productivity losses. Although older women have lower per capita costs, total productivity costs were higher for older women because the number of older women with breast cancer is higher. The results underscore the importance of continued efforts by the public health community to promote and support the unique needs of younger breast cancer survivors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Association between body mass index and risk of breast cancer in Tunisian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msolly, Awatef; Awatef, Msolly; Gharbi, Olfa; Olfa, Gharbi; Mahmoudi, Kacem; Kacem, Mahmoudi; Limem, Sami; Sami, Limem; Hochlef, Makram; Makram, Hochlef; Ben Ahmed, Slim; Slim, Ben Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    The number of breast cancer in women has increased dramatically in Tunisia. The cause is perceived to stem from adaptation to a westernized life style which increases body mass index (BMI). This study aimed to investigate the association between BMI and breast cancer among Tunisian women. Hospital-based case control study of breast cancer patients seen between November 2006 and April 2009 at the University College Hospital Farhat Hached in Sousse, Tunisia. Standardized questionnaires concerning BMI and other anthropometric data were completed on 400 breast cancer cases and 400 controls. The controls were frequency-matched to the cases by age. BMI at diagnosis was positively correlated with the risk of breast cancer among postmenopausal women (P<.001 for trend). When compared with women with a low BMI (<19), women with a BMI of 23-27 and 27-31 had a 1.7-fold (95% CI, 1.1-2.9) and 2.1-fold (95% CI, 1.1-3.9) increased risk of breast cancer, respectively, after adjustment for non-anthropometric risk factors. BMI at diagnosis was not related to the risk of breast cancer among premenopausal women. The odds ratios for premenopausal women with a BMI of 23-27 and 27-31 were 1.5 (95% CI, 0.8-2.8) and 1.3 (95% CI, 0.4-4.5), respectively. Furthermore, present BMI was not associated with breast cancer risk in either pre- and postmenopausal women. Weight control in obese women may be an effective measure of breast cancer prevention in postmenopausal women.

  2. Digit ratio (2D:4D is associated with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Helena Costa Mendes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Digit ratio (2D:4D has been considered as a proxy biomarker for prenatal hormonal exposure and may represent an individual’s predisposition to breast cancer. The purpose of the present study is to investigate whether there is a link between digit ratio and breast cancer in a Brazilian population.Methods: Digital measurements of the lengths of the index and ring fingers of both hands were obtained from women with breast cancer (n = 100 and age-matched controls (n = 100 using a digital Vernier calliper. Mean digit ratios of right hands, left hands, and right minus left hand 2D:4D (DR-L were compared between both groups. Data were analysed by the Student's t-test for unpaired samples, Mann-Whitney test, and Spearman`s correlation with a significance level of 5%.Results: The patients with breast cancer presented significantly higher right and left 2D:4D (both p < 0.001 and higher DR-L (p = 0.032 than controls. Among breast cancer cases, there was a significantly negative correlation between left 2D:4D and age diagnosed with breast cancer (p = 0.018.Conclusion: Digit ratio offers a valid retrospective biomarker of action of prenatal hormones and might be associated with breast cancer risk and age at onset of breast cancer. It suggests that higher exposure or sensitivity to prenatal oestrogen might be associated with a higher risk of breast cancer and with earlier onset of the disease.

  3. Metabolic Syndrome Is Associated with Increased Breast Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Bhandari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although individual metabolic risk factors are reported to be associated with breast cancer risk, controversy surrounds risk of breast cancer from metabolic syndrome (MS. We report the first systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between MS and breast cancer risk in all adult females. Methods. Studies were retrieved by searching four electronic reference databases [PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL, Web of Science, and ProQuest through June 30, 2012] and cross-referencing retrieved articles. Eligible for inclusion were longitudinal studies reporting associations between MS and breast cancer risk among females aged 18 years and older. Relative risks and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for each study and pooled using random-effects models. Publication bias was assessed quantitatively (Trim and Fill and qualitatively (funnel plots. Heterogeneity was examined using Q and I2 statistics. Results. Representing nine independent cohorts and 97,277 adult females, eight studies met the inclusion criteria. A modest, positive association was observed between MS and breast cancer risk (RR: 1.47, 95% CI, 1.15–1.87; z=3.13; p=0.002; Q=26.28, p=0.001; I2=69.55%. No publication bias was observed. Conclusions. MS is associated with increased breast cancer risk in adult women.

  4. The Association between Leptin Level and Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingping Niu

    Full Text Available Contradictory results have been reported regarding the association between leptin level and breast cancer. Therefore, a meta-analysis was performed to investigate this issue.Published literature from PubMed and the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI Database was retrieved. This study was performed based on different cases and control groups. The combined effect ([Formula: see text] with 95% confidence interval (CI was calculated using fixed-effects or random-effects model analysis.Overall, the mean serum leptin level of case groups was significantly higher than that of control groups. A For 9 studies comparing breast cancer cases and healthy controls the combined effect [Formula: see text] was 0.58 with 95% CI (0.48, 0.68. B For 4 studies comparing premenopausal breast cancer cases and healthy controls the [Formula: see text] was 0.32 (0.12, 0.52. C For 5 studies comparing postmenopausal cases and healthy controls the [Formula: see text] was 0.65 (0.46, 0.84. D For 4 studies comparing breast cancer cases and breast benign controls the [Formula: see text] was 0.38 (0.17, 0.59. E For 2 studies comparing premenopausal breast cancer cases and breast benign controls the [Formula: see text] was 0.33 (-0.25, 0.91. F For 6 studies comparing postmenopausal breast cancer cases and breast benign controls the [Formula: see text] was 0.39 (0.19, 0.60. G For 4 studies comparing lymph node metastasis positive cases and negative controls the [Formula: see text] was 0.72 (0.45, 1.00. H For 3 studies comparing breast benign cases and healthy controls the [Formula: see text] was 0.71 (0.41, 1.01.This meta-analysis suggests that leptin level plays a role in breast cancer and has potential for development as a diagnostic tool.

  5. Breast Cancer Risk and 6q22.33: Combined Results from Breast Cancer Association Consortium and Consortium of Investigators on Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Dunning, Alison M.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Dork, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Karstens, Johann H.; Hillemanns, Peter; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine; Wang, Xianshu; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian; Elliott, Graeme; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Van ‘t Veer, Laura J.; Braaf, Linde M.; Johnson, Nichola; Fletcher, Olivia; Gibson, Lorna; Peto, Julian; Turnbull, Clare; Seal, Sheila; Renwick, Anthony; Rahman, Nazneen; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Hammet, Fleur; Van Dorpe, Thijs; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Hatse, Sigrid; Lambrechts, Diether; Andrulis, Irene L.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Rogov, Juri I.; Prokofieva, Daria; Bermisheva, Marina; Khusnutdinova, Elza; van Asperen, Christi J.; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Devilee, Peter; Margolin, Sara; Lindblom, Annika; Milne, Roger L.; Arias, José Ignacio; Zamora, M. Pilar; Benítez, Javier; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Giles, Graham G.; kConFab; Group, AOCS Study; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; Healey, Sue; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Caligo, Maria A.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Fredericksen, Zachary; Lindor, Noralane; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; SWE-BRCA; Loman, Niklas; Karlsson, Per; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Melin, Beatrice; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; HEBON; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Verheus, Martijn; Rookus, Matti A.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Gille, Hans J.P.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Gómez García, Encarna B.; EMBRACE; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T.; Frost, Debra; Luccarini, Craig; Pichert, Gabriella; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-Ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Gold, Bert; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341) was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication analysis of rs2180341 using data from 31,428 invasive breast cancer cases and 34,700 controls collected from 25 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). In addition, we evaluated whether rs2180341 modifies breast cancer risk in 3,361 BRCA1 and 2,020 BRCA2 carriers from 11 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Based on the BCAC data from women of European ancestry, we found evidence for a weak association with breast cancer risk for rs2180341 (per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.03, 95% CI 1.00–1.06, p = 0.023). There was evidence for heterogeneity in the ORs among studies (I2 = 49.3%; p = breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele OR = 0.89, 95%CI 0.80–1.00, p = 0.048), indicating a potential protective effect of this allele. These data suggest that that 6q22.33 confers a weak effect on breast cancer risk. PMID:22768030

  6. Contralateral breast cancer risk is influenced by the age at onset in BRCA1-associated breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoog, L. C.; Brekelmans, C. T.; Seynaeve, C.; Meijers-Heijboer, E. J.; Klijn, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    BRCA1/2 mutation carriers diagnosed with breast cancer have a strongly elevated life-time risk of developing a contralateral tumour. We studied the contralateral breast cancer risk in 164 patients from 83 families with a proven BRCA1 mutation in relation to the age at diagnosis of the first primary

  7. Large-scale genotyping identifies 41 new loci associated with breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Hall, Per; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Ghoussaini, Maya; Dennis, Joe; Milne, Roger L; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dicks, Ed; Lee, Andrew; Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian; Gibson, Lorna; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Adank, Muriel; van der Luijt, Rob B; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckman, Lars; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lichtner, Peter; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; Hunter, David J; Chanock, Stephen J; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, François; Tessier, Daniel C; Canisius, Sander; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Haiman, Christopher A; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Luccarini, Craig; Schoof, Nils; Humphreys, Keith; Li, Jingmei; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Vachon, Celine; Stevens, Kristen N; Lambrechts, Diether; Moisse, Matthieu; Paridaens, Robert; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Johnson, Nichola; Aitken, Zoe; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Broeks, Annegien; Veer, Laura J Van't; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Menegaux, Florence; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Zamora, M Pilar; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Jager, Agnes; Bui, Quang M; Stone, Jennifer; Dite, Gillian S; Apicella, Carmel; Tsimiklis, Helen; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Jones, Michael; Figueroa, Jonine; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Brüning, Thomas; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bonanni, Bernardo; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi J; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Dörk, Thilo; Kristensen, Vessela N; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Edge, Stephen; Fostira, Florentia; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Sueta, Aiko; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Phuah, Sze Yee; Cornes, Belinda K; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Ding, Shian-Ling; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Blot, William J; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Simard, Jacques; Garcia-Closas, Montse; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Benitez, Javier; Easton, Douglas F

    2013-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. Common variants at 27 loci have been identified as associated with susceptibility to breast cancer, and these account for ∼9% of the familial risk of the disease. We report here a meta-analysis of 9 genome-wide association studies, including 10,052 breast cancer cases and 12,575 controls of European ancestry, from which we selected 29,807 SNPs for further genotyping. These SNPs were genotyped in 45,290 cases and 41,880 controls of European ancestry from 41 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). The SNPs were genotyped as part of a collaborative genotyping experiment involving four consortia (Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study, COGS) and used a custom Illumina iSelect genotyping array, iCOGS, comprising more than 200,000 SNPs. We identified SNPs at 41 new breast cancer susceptibility loci at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)). Further analyses suggest that more than 1,000 additional loci are involved in breast cancer susceptibility.

  8. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer in Taiwanese women: potential treatment delay and impact on survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-Ling; Chan, K Arnold; Hsieh, Fon-Jou; Chang, Li-Yun; Wang, Ming-Yang

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the clinicopathologic characteristics and survival of women diagnosed with pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) in Taiwan. PABC is defined as breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy or within 1 year after obstetric delivery. Our sample of PABC patients (N = 26) included all patients diagnosed at a major medical center in northern Taiwan from 1984 through 2009. Among these patients, 15 were diagnosed during pregnancy and 11 were diagnosed within 1 year after delivery. The comparison group included 104 patients within the same age range as the PABC patients and diagnosed with breast cancer not associated with pregnancy from 2004 through 2009 at the same hospital. Patients' initiating treatment delayed, 5-year and 10-year overall survival were delineated by stratified Kaplan-Meier estimates. Patients' characteristics were associated with initiating treatment delayed was evaluated with multivariate proportional hazards modeling. Antepartum PABC patients were younger and had longer time between diagnosis and treatment initiation than postpartum PABC patients. The predictor of treatment delayed was including birth parity, cancer stage, and pregnancy. The PABC group had larger tumors, more advanced cancer stage, and tumors with less progesterone receptor than the comparison group. The antepartum PABC patients had higher mortality than postpartum PABC and comparison groups within 5 years after diagnosis. Based on these results, we confirmed that pregnant women with breast cancer were more likely to delay treatment. Therefore, we recommend that breast cancer screening should be integrated into the prenatal and postnatal routine visits for early detection of the women's breast problems.

  9. Large-scale genotyping identifies 41 new loci associated with breast cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Hall, Per; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Ghoussaini, Maya; Dennis, Joe; Milne, Roger L; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dicks, Ed; Lee, Andrew; Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian; Gibson, Lorna; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Adank, Muriel; van der Luijt, Rob B; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckman, Lars; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lichtner, Peter; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; Hunter, David J; Chanock, Stephen J; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, François; Tessier, Daniel C; Canisius, Sander; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Haiman, Christopher A; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Luccarini, Craig; Schoof, Nils; Humphreys, Keith; Li, Jingmei; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Vachon, Celine; Stevens, Kristen N; Lambrechts, Diether; Moisse, Matthieu; Paridaens, Robert; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Johnson, Nichola; Aitken, Zoe; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Broeks, Annegien; Van’t Veer, Laura J; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Menegaux, Florence; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Zamora, M Pilar; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Jager, Agnes; Bui, Quang M; Stone, Jennifer; Dite, Gillian S; Apicella, Carmel; Tsimiklis, Helen; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Jones, Michael; Figueroa, Jonine; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Brüning, Thomas; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bonanni, Bernardo; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi J; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Dörk, Thilo; Kristensen, Vessela N; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Edge, Stephen; Fostira, Florentia; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Sueta, Aiko; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Phuah, Sze Yee; Cornes, Belinda K; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Ding, Shian-Ling; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Blot, William J; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Simard, Jacques; Garcia-Closas, Montse; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Benitez, Javier; Easton, Douglas F

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. Common variants at 27 loci have been identified as associated with susceptibility to breast cancer, and these account for ~9% of the familial risk of the disease. We report here a meta-analysis of 9 genome-wide association studies, including 10,052 breast cancer cases and 12,575 controls of European ancestry, from which we selected 29,807 SNPs for further genotyping. These SNPs were genotyped in 45,290 cases and 41,880 controls of European ancestry from 41 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). The SNPs were genotyped as part of a collaborative genotyping experiment involving four consortia (Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study, COGS) and used a custom Illumina iSelect genotyping array, iCOGS, comprising more than 200,000 SNPs. We identified SNPs at 41 new breast cancer susceptibility loci at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8). Further analyses suggest that more than 1,000 additional loci are involved in breast cancer susceptibility. PMID:23535729

  10. Weak associations between sociodemographic factors and breast cancer: possible effects of early detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robsahm, T E; Tretli, S

    2005-02-01

    Differences in incidence and survival of breast cancer have been observed to vary with regard to sociodemographic factors. This might be related to variation in frequency of doctor consultation and in time of diagnosis, since sociodemographic factors appear to influence the individual's attention to cancer symptoms and susceptibility to participate in screening programmes. This study aimed to examine the variation in breast cancer incidence and case fatality in sociodemographic groups in Norway, and to discuss whether any variation can result from temporal variation in detection time. The study included 589 521 women with information on residential history, childbearing pattern, educational level and occupational physical activity. Analyses were conducted using Poisson and Cox regression models. Although all the associations were weak, breast cancer incidence was associated with residence in urban areas, high age at first childbirth and high level of education. The urban women also tended to have better survival compared with the rural women. Childlessness was associated with high incidence and high case fatality. A high educational level was associated with the lowest case fatality. This study may emphasize the importance of discussing potential effects of early cancer detection. This is particularly important in epidemiological studies revealing weak associations between sociodemographic factors and breast cancer. Mortality rates may be less influenced by problems associated with early detection and, thus, analyses of breast cancer-specific mortality could give additional information.

  11. Association of polymorphisms in one-carbon metabolizing genes with breast cancer risk in Syrian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajin, Bassam; Alhaj Sakur, Amir; Ghabreau, Lina; Alachkar, Amal

    2012-08-01

    Dietary folate status as well as polymorphisms in one-carbon metabolism genes may affect the risk of breast cancer through aberrant DNA methylation and altered nucleotide synthesis and DNA repair. A large number of studies investigated the role of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) polymorphisms in breast cancer with inconsistent results. Association between multiple polymorphisms in one-carbon metabolism genes and breast cancer was not studied before in an Arab population. The purpose of the present study is to test the hypothesis that polymorphisms in one-carbon metabolism genes are associated with breast cancer susceptibility in Syrian breast cancer women patients. A total of 245 subjects (119 breast cancer women patients and 126 healthy controls) were genotyped for MTHFR C677T and A1298C and MTRR A66G polymorphisms. Association was tested for under numerous genetic models. A statistically significant association was found for MTHFR A1298C polymorphism especially under the allele contrast model (odds ratio (OR) = 1.68, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.16-2.45), P = 0.006). On the other hand, no significant association was found for MTHFR C677T or MTRR A66G under any of the genetic models tested. The effects of the compound genotypes were also examined. The 66GG genotype was found to be protective against breast cancer when combined with the 677CT or 1298AC genotype (OR = 0.18, 95% CI (0.04-0.82), P = 0.014; OR = 0.3, 95% CI (0.08-1.11), P = 0.058). In conclusion, our study supports the hypothesis that polymorphisms in one-carbon gene metabolisms modulate the risk for breast cancer, particularly the A1298C polymorphism of the MTHFR gene.

  12. Association between Parenchymal Enhancement of the Contralateral Breast in Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging and Outcome of Patients with Unilateral Invasive Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velden, Bas; Dmitriev, Ivan; Loo, C.E.; Pijnappel, Ruud; Gilhuijs, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively investigate whether parenchymal enhancement in dynamic contrast material–enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the contralateral breast in patients with unilateral invasive breast cancer is associated with therapy outcome. Materials and Methods After obtaining

  13. Thyroid Hormone Receptors Predict Prognosis in BRCA1 Associated Breast Cancer in Opposing Ways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heublein, Sabine; Mayr, Doris; Meindl, Alfons; Angele, Martin; Gallwas, Julia; Jeschke, Udo; Ditsch, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Since BRCA1 associated breast cancers are frequently classified as hormone receptor negative or even triple negative, the application of endocrine therapies is rather limited in these patients. Like hormone receptors that bind to estrogen or progesterone, thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. TRs might be interesting biomarkers - especially in the absence of classical hormone receptors. The current study aimed to investigate whether TRs may be specifically expressed in BRCA1 associated cancer cases and whether they are of prognostic significance in these patients as compared to sporadic breast cancer cases. This study analyzed TRα and TRβ immunopositivity in BRCA1 associated (n = 38) and sporadic breast cancer (n = 86). Further, TRs were studied in MCF7 (BRCA1 wildtype) and HCC3153 (BRCA1 mutated) cells. TRβ positivity rate was significantly higher in BRCA1 associated as compared to sporadic breast cancers (p = 0.001). The latter observation remained to be significant when cases that had been matched for clinicopathological criteria were compared (p = 0.037). Regarding BRCA1 associated breast cancer cases TRβ positivity turned out to be a positive prognostic factor for five-year (p = 0.007) and overall survival (p = 0.026) while TRα positivity predicted reduced five-year survival (p = 0.030). Activation of TRβ resulted in down-modulation of CTNNB1 while TRα inhibition reduced cell viability in HCC3153. However, only BRCA1 wildtype MCF7 cells were capable of rapidly degrading TRα1 in response to T3 stimulation. Significantly, this study identified TRβ to be up-regulated in BRCA1 associated breast cancer and revealed TRs to be associated with patients’ prognosis. TRs were also found to be expressed in triple negative BRCA1 associated breast cancer. Further studies need to be done in order to evaluate whether TRs may become interesting targets of endocrine therapeutic approaches, especially when tumors are

  14. Thyroid Hormone Receptors Predict Prognosis in BRCA1 Associated Breast Cancer in Opposing Ways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Heublein

    Full Text Available Since BRCA1 associated breast cancers are frequently classified as hormone receptor negative or even triple negative, the application of endocrine therapies is rather limited in these patients. Like hormone receptors that bind to estrogen or progesterone, thyroid hormone receptors (TRs are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. TRs might be interesting biomarkers - especially in the absence of classical hormone receptors. The current study aimed to investigate whether TRs may be specifically expressed in BRCA1 associated cancer cases and whether they are of prognostic significance in these patients as compared to sporadic breast cancer cases. This study analyzed TRα and TRβ immunopositivity in BRCA1 associated (n = 38 and sporadic breast cancer (n = 86. Further, TRs were studied in MCF7 (BRCA1 wildtype and HCC3153 (BRCA1 mutated cells. TRβ positivity rate was significantly higher in BRCA1 associated as compared to sporadic breast cancers (p = 0.001. The latter observation remained to be significant when cases that had been matched for clinicopathological criteria were compared (p = 0.037. Regarding BRCA1 associated breast cancer cases TRβ positivity turned out to be a positive prognostic factor for five-year (p = 0.007 and overall survival (p = 0.026 while TRα positivity predicted reduced five-year survival (p = 0.030. Activation of TRβ resulted in down-modulation of CTNNB1 while TRα inhibition reduced cell viability in HCC3153. However, only BRCA1 wildtype MCF7 cells were capable of rapidly degrading TRα1 in response to T3 stimulation. Significantly, this study identified TRβ to be up-regulated in BRCA1 associated breast cancer and revealed TRs to be associated with patients' prognosis. TRs were also found to be expressed in triple negative BRCA1 associated breast cancer. Further studies need to be done in order to evaluate whether TRs may become interesting targets of endocrine therapeutic approaches, especially when

  15. Breast Cancer Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  16. Breast Cancer -- Male

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  17. Characterization of genomic alterations in radiation-associated breast cancer among childhood cancer survivors, using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong R Yang

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Epidemiologic studies of radiation-exposed cohorts have been primarily descriptive; molecular events responsible for the development of radiation-associated breast cancer have not been elucidated. In this study, we used array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH to characterize genome-wide copy number changes in breast tumors collected in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS. Array-CGH data were obtained from 32 cases who developed a second primary breast cancer following chest irradiation at early ages for the treatment of their first cancers, mostly Hodgkin lymphoma. The majority of these cases developed breast cancer before age 45 (91%, n = 29, had invasive ductal tumors (81%, n = 26, estrogen receptor (ER-positive staining (68%, n = 19 out of 28, and high proliferation as indicated by high Ki-67 staining (77%, n = 17 out of 22. Genomic regions with low-copy number gains and losses and high-level amplifications were similar to what has been reported in sporadic breast tumors, however, the frequency of amplifications of the 17q12 region containing human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 was much higher among CCSS cases (38%, n = 12. Our findings suggest that second primary breast cancers in CCSS were enriched for an "amplifier" genomic subgroup with highly proliferative breast tumors. Future investigation in a larger irradiated cohort will be needed to confirm our findings.

  18. Association between body mass index and risk of breast cancer among females of north India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahavir Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Worldwide, breast cancer is most common cancer among women. In India and other developing countries, breast carcinoma ranks second only to cervical carcinoma among women. Although studies have been done globally, to find association between BMI and breast cancer, very few studies in India document any such association. Purpose: To find out the association between BMI and breast cancer. Materials and Methods: A Case-control study was done from August 2009 - July 2010 in the wards of General Surgery and Oncosurgery at Pt.B.D.Sharma, PGIMS Rohtak, Haryana. A total of 128 histopathologically confirmed new cases of breast cancer during the study period were taken as cases. Equal number of controls was selected by simple random sampling. Controls were matched for age with range of ±2 years. Subjects were interviewed using a pretested questionnaire after obtaining written informed consent. Data were analyzed by applying appropriate statistical tests using SPSS version 17. Results: Age group of the cases was 25 - 78 years, while that of the controls was 24 - 79 years. Proportion of cases and controls living in rural areas were more than those living in urban areas. A significant association of breast cancer cases was found with high BMI and high fat intake Conclusion: Obesity and high fat intake are the significant risk factors, which are modifiable. So women should be encouraged to take care of all these factors. Maximum cases presented in late stages so public awareness of this fatal disease must be developed.

  19. Identification of ten variants associated with risk of estrogen-receptor-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Roger L; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Beesley, Jonathan; Kar, Siddhartha; Lindström, Sara; Hui, Shirley; Lemaçon, Audrey; Soucy, Penny; Dennis, Joe; Jiang, Xia; Rostamianfar, Asha; Finucane, Hilary; Bolla, Manjeet K; McGuffog, Lesley; Wang, Qin; Aalfs, Cora M; Adams, Marcia; Adlard, Julian; Agata, Simona; Ahmed, Shahana; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Al-Ejeh, Fares; Allen, Jamie; Ambrosone, Christine B; Amos, Christopher I; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Arndt, Volker; Arnold, Norbert; Aronson, Kristan J; Auber, Bernd; Auer, Paul L; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Azzollini, Jacopo; Bacot, François; Balmaña, Judith; Barile, Monica; Barjhoux, Laure; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrdahl, Myrto; Barnes, Daniel; Barrowdale, Daniel; Baynes, Caroline; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Bermisheva, Marina; Bernstein, Leslie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Blazer, Kathleen R; Blok, Marinus J; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William; Bobolis, Kristie; Boeckx, Bram; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Anders; Bojesen, Stig E; Bonanni, Bernardo; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Bozsik, Aniko; Bradbury, Angela R; Brand, Judith S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Brewer, Carole; Brinton, Louise; Broberg, Per; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Brunet, Joan; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Byun, Jinyoung; Cai, Qiuyin; Caldés, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Campbell, Ian; Canzian, Federico; Caron, Olivier; Carracedo, Angel; Carter, Brian D; Castelao, J Esteban; Castera, Laurent; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Chan, Salina B; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chen, Xiaoqing; Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Christiansen, Hans; Claes, Kathleen B M; Clarke, Christine L; Conner, Thomas; Conroy, Don M; Cook, Jackie; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Cornelissen, Sten; Coupier, Isabelle; Cox, Angela; Cox, David G; Cross, Simon S; Cuk, Katarina; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; Davidson, Rosemarie; De Leeneer, Kim; Devilee, Peter; Dicks, Ed; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ditsch, Nina; Doheny, Kimberly F; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dubois, Stéphane; Dugué, Pierre-Antoine; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Durcan, Lorraine; Dwek, Miriam; Dworniczak, Bernd; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Ehrencrona, Hans; Eilber, Ursula; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, A Heather; Engel, Christoph; Eriksson, Mikael; Fachal, Laura; Faivre, Laurence; Fasching, Peter A; Faust, Ulrike; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Foulkes, William D; Friedman, Eitan; Fritschi, Lin; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gaddam, Pragna; Gammon, Marilie D; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M; Garber, Judy; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; García-Sáenz, José A; Gaudet, Mia M; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Georgoulias, Vassilios; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Goodfellow, Paul; Greene, Mark H; Alnæs, Grethe I Grenaker; Grip, Mervi; Gronwald, Jacek; Grundy, Anne; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Qi; Haeberle, Lothar; Hahnen, Eric; Haiman, Christopher A; Håkansson, Niclas; Hallberg, Emily; Hamann, Ute; Hamel, Nathalie; Hankinson, Susan; Hansen, Thomas V O; Harrington, Patricia; Hart, Steven N; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Healey, Catherine S; Hein, Alexander; Helbig, Sonja; Henderson, Alex; Heyworth, Jane; Hicks, Belynda; Hillemanns, Peter; Hodgson, Shirley; Hogervorst, Frans B; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Bob; Hopper, John L; Hu, Chunling; Huang, Guanmengqian; Hulick, Peter J; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Iwasaki, Motoki; Izatt, Louise; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Janni, Wolfgang; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nichola; Jones, Kristine; Jones, Michael; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kabisch, Maria; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Kang, Daehee; Kast, Karin; Keeman, Renske; Kerin, Michael J; Kets, Carolien M; Keupers, Machteld; Khan, Sofia; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Kiiski, Johanna I; Kim, Sung-Won; Knight, Julia A; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela N; Kruse, Torben A; Kwong, Ava; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Laitman, Yael; Lalloo, Fiona; Lambrechts, Diether; Landsman, Keren; Lasset, Christine; Lazaro, Conxi; Le Marchand, Loic; Lecarpentier, Julie; Lee, Andrew; Lee, Eunjung; Lee, Jong Won; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Lesueur, Fabienne; Li, Jingmei; Lilyquist, Jenna; Lincoln, Anne; Lindblom, Annika; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lo, Wing-Yee; Loibl, Sibylle; Long, Jirong; Loud, Jennifer T; Lubinski, Jan; Luccarini, Craig; Lush, Michael; MacInnis, Robert J; Maishman, Tom; Makalic, Enes; Kostovska, Ivana Maleva; Malone, Kathleen E; Manoukian, Siranoush; Manson, JoAnn E; Margolin, Sara; Martens, John W M; Martinez, Maria Elena; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McLean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Menéndez, Primitiva; Meyer, Jeffery; Miao, Hui; Miller, Austin; Miller, Nicola; Mitchell, Gillian; Montagna, Marco; Muir, Kenneth; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Mulot, Claire; Nadesan, Sue; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nevelsteen, Ines; Niederacher, Dieter; Nielsen, Sune F; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Norman, Aaron; Nussbaum, Robert L; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Olswold, Curtis; Ong, Kai-Ren; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Orr, Nick; Osorio, Ana; Pankratz, V Shane; Papi, Laura; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Lloyd, Rachel; Pedersen, Inge Søkilde; Peissel, Bernard; Peixoto, Ana; Perez, Jose I A; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M; Pinchev, Mila; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Poppe, Bruce; Porteous, Mary E; Prentice, Ross; Presneau, Nadege; Prokofieva, Darya; Pugh, Elizabeth; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Pylkäs, Katri; Rack, Brigitte; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Rennert, Hedy S; Rhenius, Valerie; Rhiem, Kerstin; Richardson, Andrea; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Romero, Atocha; Romm, Jane; Rookus, Matti A; Rudolph, Anja; Ruediger, Thomas; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Sanders, Joyce; Sandler, Dale P; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schürmann, Peter; Schwentner, Lukas; Scott, Christopher; Scott, Rodney J; Seal, Sheila; Senter, Leigha; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Sharma, Priyanka; Shen, Chen-Yang; Sheng, Xin; Shimelis, Hermela; Shrubsole, Martha J; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Side, Lucy E; Singer, Christian F; Sohn, Christof; Southey, Melissa C; Spinelli, John J; Spurdle, Amanda B; Stegmaier, Christa; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Surowy, Harald; Sutter, Christian; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tamimi, Rulla M; Tan, Yen Y; Taylor, Jack A; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Tengström, Maria; Teo, Soo H; Terry, Mary B; Tessier, Daniel C; Teulé, Alex; Thöne, Kathrin; Thull, Darcy L; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Tong, Ling; Torres, Diana; Tranchant, Martine; Truong, Thérèse; Tucker, Kathy; Tung, Nadine; Tyrer, Jonathan; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Vachon, Celine; van Asperen, Christi J; Van Den Berg, David; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vega, Ana; Viel, Alessandra; Vijai, Joseph; Vincent, Daniel; Vollenweider, Jason; Walker, Lisa; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weinberg, Clarice R; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Wendt, Camilla; Wesseling, Jelle; Whittemore, Alice S; Wijnen, Juul T; Willett, Walter; Winqvist, Robert; Wolk, Alicja; Wu, Anna H; Xia, Lucy; Yang, Xiaohong R; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Zheng, Wei; Zhu, Bin; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ziv, Elad; Zorn, Kristin K; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Mannermaa, Arto; Olsson, Håkan; Teixeira, Manuel R; Stone, Jennifer; Offit, Kenneth; Ottini, Laura; Park, Sue K; Thomassen, Mads; Hall, Per; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Droit, Arnaud; Bader, Gary D; Pharoah, Paul D P; Couch, Fergus J; Easton, Douglas F; Kraft, Peter; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; García-Closas, Montserrat; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Antoniou, Antonis C; Simard, Jacques

    2017-12-01

    Most common breast cancer susceptibility variants have been identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of predominantly estrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease. We conducted a GWAS using 21,468 ER-negative cases and 100,594 controls combined with 18,908 BRCA1 mutation carriers (9,414 with breast cancer), all of European origin. We identified independent associations at P < 5 × 10-8 with ten variants at nine new loci. At P < 0.05, we replicated associations with 10 of 11 variants previously reported in ER-negative disease or BRCA1 mutation carrier GWAS and observed consistent associations with ER-negative disease for 105 susceptibility variants identified by other studies. These 125 variants explain approximately 16% of the familial risk of this breast cancer subtype. There was high genetic correlation (0.72) between risk of ER-negative breast cancer and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers. These findings may lead to improved risk prediction and inform further fine-mapping and functional work to better understand the biological basis of ER-negative breast cancer.

  20. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Mediterranean diet choose healthy fats, such as olive oil, over butter and fish instead of red meat. Breast cancer risk reduction for women with a high risk If your doctor has assessed your family history and determined that you have other factors, such ...

  1. DNA methylome analysis identifies accelerated epigenetic ageing associated with postmenopausal breast cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambatipudi, Srikant; Horvath, Steve; Perrier, Flavie; Cuenin, Cyrille; Hernandez-Vargas, Hector; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Durand, Geoffroy; Byrnes, Graham; Ferrari, Pietro; Bouaoun, Liacine; Sklias, Athena; Chajes, Véronique; Overvad, Kim; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Kaaks, Rudolf; Barrdahl, Myrto; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Naska, Androniki; Masala, Giovanna; Agnoli, Claudia; Polidoro, Silvia; Tumino, Rosario; Panico, Salvatore; Dollé, Martijn; Peeters, Petra H M; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Sandanger, Torkjel M; Nøst, Therese H; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Quirós, J Ramón; Agudo, Antonio; Rodriguez-Barranco, Miguel; Huerta Castaño, José María; Barricarte, Aurelio; Fernández, Ander Matheu; Travis, Ruth C; Vineis, Paolo; Muller, David C; Riboli, Elio; Gunter, Marc; Romieu, Isabelle; Herceg, Zdenko

    2017-04-01

    A vast majority of human malignancies are associated with ageing, and age is a strong predictor of cancer risk. Recently, DNA methylation-based marker of ageing, known as 'epigenetic clock', has been linked with cancer risk factors. This study aimed to evaluate whether the epigenetic clock is associated with breast cancer risk susceptibility and to identify potential epigenetics-based biomarkers for risk stratification. Here, we profiled DNA methylation changes in a nested case-control study embedded in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort (n = 960) using the Illumina HumanMethylation 450K BeadChip arrays and used the Horvath age estimation method to calculate epigenetic age for these samples. Intrinsic epigenetic age acceleration (IEAA) was estimated as the residuals by regressing epigenetic age on chronological age. We observed an association between IEAA and breast cancer risk (OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.007-1.076, P = 0.016). One unit increase in IEAA was associated with a 4% increased odds of developing breast cancer (OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.007-1.076). Stratified analysis based on menopausal status revealed that IEAA was associated with development of postmenopausal breast cancers (OR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.020-1.11, P = 0.003). In addition, methylome-wide analyses revealed that a higher mean DNA methylation at cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) islands was associated with increased risk of breast cancer development (OR per 1 SD = 1.20; 95 %CI: 1.03-1.40, P = 0.02) whereas mean methylation levels at non-island CpGs were indistinguishable between cancer cases and controls. Epigenetic age acceleration and CpG island methylation have a weak, but statistically significant, association with breast cancer susceptibility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Is vegetarian diet associated with a lower risk of breast cancer in Taiwanese women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yao-Jen; Hou, Yi-Cheng; Chen, Li-Ju; Wu, Jing-Hui; Wu, Chao-Chuan; Chang, Yun-Jau; Chung, Kuo-Piao

    2017-10-10

    Studies on the relationship between vegetarian diet and breast cancer in Asian populations are limited. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between vegetarian diet, dietary patterns, and breast cancer in Taiwanese women. This case-control study compared the dietary patterns of 233 breast cancer patients and 236 age-matched controls. A questionnaire about vegetarian diets and 28 frequently-consumed food items was administered to these 469 patients in the surgical department of Taipei Tzu Chi Hospital. Serum biochemical status was also examined. There were no significant differences between the two groups for age, education, family history, oral contraceptive usage, or regular exercise. However, the cancer group presented with both a higher body mass index and an older age of primiparity (P Vegetarian diet, high isoflavone intake, and high albumin levels were inversely associated with breast cancer risk (P Vegetarians had a higher daily soy isoflavone intake than non-vegetarians (25.9 ± 25.6 mg vs. 18.1 ± 15.6 mg, P Vegetarian diets show as protective role against breast cancer risk, while meat and processed meat dietary patterns are associated with a higher breast cancer risk.

  3. Cross-cancer genome-wide analysis of lung, ovary, breast, prostate and colorectal cancer reveals novel pleiotropic associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehringer, Gordon; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul D.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Schumacher, Fred; Schildkraut, Joellen; Lindström, Sara; Brennan, Paul; Bickeböller, Heike; Houlston, Richard S.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Risch, Angela; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Berndt, Sonja I; Giovannucci, Edward; Grönberg, Henrik; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Ma, Jing; Muir, Kenneth; Stampfer, Meir; Stevens, Victoria L.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Willett, Walter; Goode, Ellen L.; Permuth, Jennifer; Risch, Harvey A.; Reid, Brett M.; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hudson, Thomas J.; Kocarnik, Jonathan K.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Schoen, Robert E.; Slattery, Martha L.; White, Emily; Adank, Muriel A.; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Baglietto, Laura; Blomquist, Carl; Canzian, Federico; Czene, Kamila; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eliassen, A. Heather; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M.; Johnson, Nichola; Hall, Per; Hazra, Aditi; Hein, Rebecca; Hofman, Albert; Hopper, John L.; Irwanto, Astrid; Johansson, Mattias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Meindl, Alfons; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Muranen, Taru A.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Peeters, Petra H.; Peto, Julian; Prentice, Ross L.; Rahman, Nazneen; Sanchez, Maria Jose; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Southey, Melissa C.; Tamimi, Rulla; Travis, Ruth C.; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wang, Zhaoming; Whittemore, Alice S.; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Zheng, Wei; Rafnar, Thorunn; Gudmundsson, Julius; Stacey, Simon N.; Stefansson, Kari; Sulem, Patrick; Chen, Y. Ann; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Christiani, David C.; Wei, Yongyue; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shiraishi, Kouya; Takahashi, Atsushi; Bossé, Yohan; Obeidat, Ma’en; Nickle, David; Timens, Wim; Freedman, Matthew L.; Li, Qiyuan; Seminara, Daniela; Chanock, Stephen J.; Gong, Jian; Peters, Ulrike; Gruber, Stephen B.; Amos, Christopher I.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hunter, David J.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hung, Rayjean J.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying genetic variants with pleiotropic associations can uncover common pathways influencing multiple cancers. We took a two-staged approach to conduct genome-wide association studies for lung, ovary, breast, prostate and colorectal cancer from the GAME-ON/GECCO Network (61,851 cases, 61,820 controls) to identify pleiotropic loci. Findings were replicated in independent association studies (55,789 cases, 330,490 controls). We identified a novel pleiotropic association at 1q22 involving breast and lung squamous cell carcinoma, with eQTL analysis showing an association with ADAM15/THBS3 gene expression in lung. We also identified a known breast cancer locus CASP8/ALS2CR12 associated with prostate cancer, a known cancer locus at CDKN2B-AS1 with different variants associated with lung adenocarcinoma and prostate cancer and confirmed the associations of a breast BRCA2 locus with lung and serous ovarian cancer. This is the largest study to date examining pleiotropy across multiple cancer-associated loci, identifying common mechanisms of cancer development and progression. PMID:27197191

  4. Methylation of the claudin 1 promoter is associated with loss of expression in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francescopaolo Di Cello

    Full Text Available Downregulation of the tight junction protein claudin 1 is a frequent event in breast cancer and is associated with recurrence, metastasis, and reduced survival, suggesting a tumor suppressor role for this protein. Tumor suppressor genes are often epigenetically silenced in cancer. Downregulation of claudin 1 via DNA promoter methylation may thus be an important determinant in breast cancer development and progression. To investigate if silencing of claudin 1 has an epigenetic etiology in breast cancer we compared gene expression and methylation data from 217 breast cancer samples and 40 matched normal samples available through the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA. Moreover, we analyzed claudin 1 expression and methylation in 26 breast cancer cell lines. We found that methylation of the claudin 1 promoter CpG island is relatively frequent in estrogen receptor positive (ER+ breast cancer and is associated with low claudin 1 expression. In contrast, the claudin 1 promoter was not methylated in most of the ER-breast cancers samples and some of these tumors overexpress claudin 1. In addition, we observed that the demethylating agents, azacitidine and decitabine can upregulate claudin 1 expression in breast cancer cell lines that have a methylated claudin 1 promoter. Taken together, our results indicate that DNA promoter methylation is causally associated with downregulation of claudin 1 in a subgroup of breast cancer that includes mostly ER+ tumors, and suggest that epigenetic therapy to restore claudin 1 expression might represent a viable therapeutic strategy in this subtype of breast cancer.

  5. Microcalcification-Associated Breast Cancer: Presentation, Successful First Excision, Long-Term Recurrence and Survival Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rominger, Marga B; Steinmetz, Carolin; Westerman, Ronny; Ramaswamy, Annette; Albert, Ute-Susann

    2015-12-01

    In this study we evaluated mammographic, histological and immunohistochemical findings for microcalcification-associated breast cancer with regards to breast-conserving therapy, recurrence and survival rate. We retrospectively analyzed 99 consecutive, non-palpable and microcalcification-associated breast cancers (94 women) that were treated surgically between January 2002 and December 2003 at a national academic breast cancer center. Calcifications were classified according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS). Descriptors, surgical outcome and histological findings were assessed. Recurrences and survival rates were evaluated based on medical records, standardized patient questionnaires and/or contacting the physician. 42 of the 99 lesions (42.4%) were invasive carcinomas, 57 (57.6%) were pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). 6 out of 99 (6.1%) lesions were triple negative, and 29 (29.3%) were HER2/neu positive. Successful first excision rate was 76/99 lesions (76.8%). Breast conservation was achieved in 73.7% (73/99). 10 women showed local recurrences without negatively impacting survival. The recurrences included round/punctate, amorphous, fine pleomorphic, and fine linear or fine-linear branching descriptors. The breast cancer-specific long-term survival rate was 91/94 (96.8%) for a mean follow-up of 81.4 months. The 3 patients who died due to breast carcinoma showed fine pleomorphic calcifications, and had nodal-positive invasive carcinoma at diagnosis. Microcalcification-associated breast cancers are frequently treated with breast-conserving therapy. Continuous clinical and mammographic follow-up is recommended for all descriptors.

  6. Osteopontin and vasculogenic mimicry formation are associated with response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Ming Gu,1,2 Xinyu Zheng1,2 1Department of Breast Surgery, 2Department of Surgical Oncology, Research Unit of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, People’s Republic of China Introduction: Osteopontin (OPN, a multifunctional phosphoprotein, has been implicated in a series of important physiologic and pathophysiologic processes. In breast cancer, OPN functionally contributes to the tumorigenicity of spheroid-forming cells. It also plays a critical role in enhancing the proliferation, tumorigenicity, and ability to display vasculogenic mimicry (VM of spheroid-forming cells in breast cancer. However, the role of OPN in breast cancer is not clear.Patients and methods: This study investigated OPN expression and VM in breast cancer patients before neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT. Their association with clinicopathologic factors was first analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Then, the response of breast cancer patients to NACT was evaluated. The correlation between the clinicopathologic factors, including the molecular subtype, and the response to NACT was analyzed.Results: Immunohistochemical analysis showed positive staining of OPN in 40% of the breast cancer patients, whereas VM, which was related to tumor stage, was observed in 30% of cases. OPN expression was found to have a significant correlation with VM (P<0.05. The results also indicated that the clinicopathologic factors were not related to the response to NACT, including the molecular subtype. The multivariate analysis of clinicopathologic features correlated with pathological complete response (pCR indicated that OPN(+VM(+ was correlated with pCR (P<0.001.Conclusion: Our findings underlined that the concurrence of OPN-positive expression and VM can predict the pCR to NACT in breast cancer. The efficiency of NACT in certain patients can be easily predicted by detecting the expression of OPN and VM. Keywords: osteopontin, vasculogenic

  7. Breast cancer receptor status assessment and clinicopathological association in Nigerian women: A retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makanjuola SBL

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer markers are becoming increasingly important in breast cancer research due to their impact on prognosis, treatment and survival. The present retrospective study was carried out to quantify the proportion of estrogen (ER, progesterone (PR, and human epithelial receptor 2 (HER2 expressions and their association with tumour grade, age, and tumour size in breast cancer patients in Nigeria. Materials and methods: The paraffin embedded tissue sections were analysed for breast cancer markers using monoclonal antibody SP1 for ER and SP2 for PR and polyclonal antibody ErbB2 for HER2. Results: A total of 286 breast cancer paraffin wax tissue sections were analysed for ER, PR and HER2 expression. Of all the tissue samples examined, 20 (7% were ER-positive, 6 (2.1% were PR-positive, 11 (3.8% were HER2-positive whereas 248 (87% were triple-negative breast carcinoma. ER- and PR-positivity was associated with early grade I and II tumours (P 50mm (P < 0.0001. Conclusion: A small proportion of Nigerian women with breast cancer are ER/PR-positive which are associated with less aggressive, better prognosis and benefit from endocrine therapy. An even smaller proportion of patients with aggressive tumors were HER2-posivite but responsive to Herceptin treatment. Unfortunately, a very high proportion of cases were triple-negative which is associated with very aggressive tumours and no targeted treatment, which may explain the high mortality rates from breast cancer in Nigeria.

  8. Background risk of breast cancer and the association between physical activity and mammographic density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Thang; Eriksson, Mikael; Darabi, Hatef; Bonn, Stephanie E; Brand, Judith S; Cuzick, Jack; Czene, Kamila; Sjölander, Arvid; Bälter, Katarina; Hall, Per

    2015-04-02

    High physical activity has been shown to decrease the risk of breast cancer, potentially by a mechanism that also reduces mammographic density. We tested the hypothesis that the risk of developing breast cancer in the next 10 years according to the Tyrer-Cuzick prediction model influences the association between physical activity and mammographic density. We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study of 38,913 Swedish women aged 40-74 years. Physical activity was assessed using the validated web-questionnaire Active-Q and mammographic density was measured by the fully automated volumetric Volpara method. The 10-year risk of breast cancer was estimated using the Tyrer-Cuzick (TC) prediction model. Linear regression analyses were performed to assess the association between physical activity and volumetric mammographic density and the potential interaction with the TC breast cancer risk. Overall, high physical activity was associated with lower absolute dense volume. As compared to women with the lowest total activity level (association was seen for any type of physical activity among women with association between total activity and absolute dense volume was modified by the TC breast cancer risk (P interaction = 0.05). As anticipated, high physical activity was also associated with lower non-dense volume. No consistent association was found between physical activity and percent dense volume. Our results suggest that physical activity may decrease breast cancer risk through reducing mammographic density, and that the physical activity needed to reduce mammographic density may depend on background risk of breast cancer.

  9. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adoue, Véronique; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Canisius, Sander; Lemaçon, Audrey; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G.; Goldberg, Mark S.; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hallberg, Emily; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hopper, John L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Marchand, Loic Le; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Maranian, Mel; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Milne, Roger L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olswold, Curtis; Peto, Julian; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rudolph, Anja; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Investigators, kConFab/AOCS; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Kristensen, Vessela; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Pastinen, Tomi; Nord, Silje; Simard, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and/or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing several genes, including, HELQ, encoding the protein HEL308 a DNA dependant ATPase and DNA Helicase involved in DNA repair, MRPS18C encoding the Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein S18C and FAM175A (ABRAXAS), encoding a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein involved in DNA damage response and double-strand break (DSB) repair. Expression QTL analysis in breast cancer tissue showed rs11099601 to be associated with HELQ (P = 8.28x10-14), MRPS18C (P = 1.94x10-27) and FAM175A (P = 3.83x10-3), explaining about 20%, 14% and 1%, respectively of the variance inexpression of these genes in breast carcinomas. PMID:27792995

  10. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Adoue, Véronique; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Canisius, Sander; Lemaçon, Audrey; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Goldberg, Mark S; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hallberg, Emily; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Maranian, Mel; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Milne, Roger L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olswold, Curtis; Peto, Julian; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rudolph, Anja; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M W; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Pharoah, Paul D P; Kristensen, Vessela; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Pastinen, Tomi; Nord, Silje; Simard, Jacques

    2016-12-06

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and/or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing several genes, including, HELQ, encoding the protein HEL308 a DNA dependant ATPase and DNA Helicase involved in DNA repair, MRPS18C encoding the Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein S18C and FAM175A (ABRAXAS), encoding a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein involved in DNA damage response and double-strand break (DSB) repair. Expression QTL analysis in breast cancer tissue showed rs11099601 to be associated with HELQ (P = 8.28x10-14), MRPS18C (P = 1.94x10-27) and FAM175A (P = 3.83x10-3), explaining about 20%, 14% and 1%, respectively of the variance inexpression of these genes in breast carcinomas.

  11. The association of inherited variation in the CLOCK gene with breast cancer tumor grade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Gupta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sufficient sleep and maintenance of circadian rhythm are important to health. We have shown that short duration of sleep before diagnosis is associated with higher-grade tumors among breast cancer patients. Earlier studies suggest that genetic variation in the CLOCK gene is associated with risk of cancers, including breast cancer. Studies of the association of genetic variation, including in CLOCK, and tumor grade, a standard marker of tumor aggressiveness, are lacking. Methods: We investigated the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the CLOCK gene and tumor grade and estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status in 293 breast cancer patients. Nine SNPs were determined by standard TaqMan assays. Tumor grade, receptor status, and other clinical variables were abstracted from medical records. Results: Two SNPs were excluded because of poor genotyping performance. None of the remaining seven variants had a statistically significant association with breast cancer tumor grade or with receptor status. Conclusion: As with all novel studies, further work is needed to examine the association of CLOCK and other genes in the circadian rhythm pathway with breast cancer tumor grade in other populations.

  12. Evidence for an association of dietary flavonoid intake with breast cancer risk by estrogen receptor status is limited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Peterson, Julia J; Dwyer, Johanna T; McCullough, Marjorie L

    2014-10-01

    Results from preclinical studies suggest that flavonoids, which are ubiquitous in plant-based diets, lower breast cancer risk. Epidemiologic studies of flavonoid intake and breast cancer risk, however, are limited, and few investigated associations with the more aggressive estrogen receptor (ER)-negative (ER-) tumors. We examined the associations between 7 subclasses of dietary flavonoids and invasive postmenopausal breast cancer risk overall and by ER status in a U.S. prospective cohort. In 1999-2000, 56,630 postmenopausal women completed detailed self-administered questionnaires, among whom 2116 invasive breast cancers were verified during a mean follow-up period of 8.5 y. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate multivariable-adjusted HRs and 95% CIs. Total flavonoid intake was not associated with breast cancer risk. However, there was a modest inverse association between flavone intake and overall breast cancer risk (fifth vs. first quintile HR: 0.88; 95% CI: 0.76, 1.01; P-trend = 0.04) and between flavan-3-ol intake and risk of ER- breast cancer (for an increment of 40 mg/d; HR: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.67, 0.97) but not for ER-positive (ER+) breast cancer risk. The inverse association of flavan-3-ol intake with ER- but not ER+ breast cancer is consistent with other studies that suggest a beneficial role of plant-based diets in ER- breast cancer risk. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  13. Clinical presentation and causes of the delayed diagnosis of breast cancer in patients with pregnancy associated breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali M Al-Amri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective was to assess the clinical presentation, delay of diagnosis, and the causes of delay in the diagnosis of patients with pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC and patients with non-PABC. Patients and Methods: This was a face-to-face interview with women who had histologically confirmed BC. All respondents were interviewed at our hospital. Results: We interviewed 56 patients, 36 with non-PABC and 20 with PABC. Of the 20 patients with PABC, BC was diagnosed in 12 (60% during pregnancy and 8 (40% during postpartum. 18 of the patients (90% with PABC presented mainly with a mass 3 (15% with pain and ulcer, 5 (25% with skin redness and thickening, 6 (30% with nipple retraction and 4 (20% with discharge 12 (60% patients with PABC had delayed diagnosis and 8 (40% of this delay was due to physicians′ reassurance, and 2 (10% because of fear of cancer. Similarly, 35 (97% patients with non-PABC presented with breast mass, 3 (8.3% with infrequent pain 4 (11.11% with inflammation 2 (5.55% with ulcer 2 (5.55% with nipple discharge and4 (11.11% with thickening of the skin compared with PABC patients. Only 4 (11.11% in non-PABC had delayed diagnosis, and for half of them the delay was due to the fear of cancer. Two patients with PABC and non-PABC were afraid of cancer 16.66% and 5.55%, respectively. However, 8 (60% of patients with PABC had delayed diagnosis compared to 0% of patients with non-PABC. Conclusion: In this study, the majority of patients with PABC or non-PABC presented with a breast lump. Other symptoms were more common in patients with PABC than in patients with non-PABC. An increased awareness of clinicians may help reduce delay in the diagnosis of patients with PABC.

  14. Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  15. Breast Cancer Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2011 Funding: Increasing Awareness and Support Among Young Women with Breast Cancer Funding: Young Breast Cancer Survivors Funding: Breast Cancer Genomics Statistics Rates by Race and Ethnicity Rates by State ...

  16. The association between general practitioners' attitudes towards breast cancer screening and women's screening participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Line Flytkjær; Mukai, Thomas Ostersen; Andersen, Berit; Vedsted, Peter

    2012-06-18

    Breast cancer screening in Denmark is organised by the health services in the five regions. Although general practitioners (GPs) are not directly involved in the screening process, they are often the first point of contact to the health care system and thus play an important advisory role. No previous studies, in a health care setting like the Danish system, have investigated the association between GPs' attitudes towards breast cancer screening and women's participation in the screening programme. Data on women's screening participation was obtained from the regional screening authorities. Data on GPs' attitudes towards breast cancer screening was taken from a previous survey among GPs in the Central Denmark Region. This study included women aged 50-69 years who were registered with a singlehanded GP who had participated in the survey. The survey involved 67 singlehanded GPs with a total of 13,288 women on their lists. Five GPs (7%) had a negative attitude towards breast cancer screening. Among registered women, 81% participated in the first screening round. Multivariate analyses revealed that women registered with a GP with a negative attitude towards breast cancer screening were 17% (95% CI: 2-34%) more likely to be non-participants compared with women registered with a GP with a positive attitude towards breast cancer screening. The GPs' attitudes may influence the participation rate even in a system where GPs are not directly involved in the screening process. However, further studies are needed to investigate this association.

  17. Health seeking behavioral analysis associated with breast cancer screening among Asian American women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma GX

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Grace X Ma,1 Wanzhen Gao,1 Sunmin Lee,2 MinQi Wang,3 Yin Tan,1 Steven E Shive,1,41Department of Public Health, Center for Asian Health, College of Health Professions, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA; 3Department of Public and Community Health, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, MD, USA; 4East Stroudsburg University, East Stroudsburg, PA, USAObjective: The purpose of this community-based study was to apply a Sociocultural Health Behavior Model to determine the association of factors proposed in the model with breast cancer screening behaviors among Asian American women.Methods: A cross-sectional design included a sample of 682 Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese women aged 40 years and older. The frequency distribution analysis and Chi-square analysis were used for the initial screening of the following variables: sociodemographic, cultural, enabling, environmental, and social support. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted on factors for breast cancer screening using multinomial logistic regression analysis.Results: Correlates to positive breast cancer screening included demographics (ethnicity, cultural factors (living in the United States for 15 years or more, speaking English well, enabling factors (having a regular physician to visit, health insurance covering the screening, and family/social support factors (those who had a family/friend receiving a mammogram.Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that breast cancer screening programs will be more effective if they include the cultural and health beliefs, enabling, and social support factors associated with breast cancer screening. The use of community organizations may play a role in helping to increase breast cancer screening rates among Asian American women.Keywords: breast cancer screening, Vietnamese, Korean, Chinese, breast

  18. The association between different kinds of fat intake and breast cancer risk in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdieh Khodarahmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available So far several animal and case-control studies have confirmed this hypothesis that dietary fat increases the risk of breast cancer. However, cohort studies have not shown this relationship. The aim of this study was to review the studies on the relationship between dietary fat intake and breast cancer risk among women. Electronic database PubMed and Google Scholar were searched using the key words: Breast cancer, dietary fat, serum estrogen, saturated fatty acids (SFAs, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs. The evidence of the studies regarding to the association of total and subtypes of fat intake with breast cancer risk are inconsistent. Several studies have shown that, among several types of fat, SFAs and w-3 PUFA intake are associated with an increased and reduced risk of breast cancer, respectively. The relationship between MUFAs intake and breast cancer risk is conflicting. Narrow ranges of fat intake among populations, measurement errors, high correlation between specific types of dietary fat, the confounding variables like body fatness and high-energy intake and other dietary components such as fiber and antioxidants might be probable explanations for these inconsistent results. Although we are not at a stage where we can justifiably advise women to reduce their fat intake to decrease the risk of developing breast cancer, it seems the current guidelines to lower total fat consumption and recommendation to consumption of unsaturated fats such as MUFAs and w-3 fatty acids and also reduction of SFAs (meat and dairy products intake to avoid heart disease is also useful for breast cancer risk.

  19. Breast Cancer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Breast Cancer Surgery The goal of breast cancer surgery is to remove the whole tumor from the breast. Some lymph nodes ... might still be in the body. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two types of breast cancer ...

  20. Cross-cancer genome-wide analysis of lung, ovary, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer reveals novel pleiotropic associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fehringer, G. (Gordon); P. Kraft (Peter); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); R. Eeles (Rosalind); Chatterjee, N. (Nilanjan); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick R); J.M. Schildkraut (Joellen); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); P. Brennan (Paul); H. Bickeböller (Heike); R. Houlston (Richard); M.T. Landi (Maria Teresa); N.E. Caporaso (Neil); Risch, A. (Angela); A.A. Al Olama (Ali Amin); S.I. Berndt (Sonja); Giovannucci, E.L. (Edward L.); H. Grönberg (Henrik); Z. Kote-Jarai; Ma, J. (Jing); K.R. Muir (K.); M.J. Stampfer (Meir J.); Stevens, V.L. (Victoria L.); F. Wiklund (Fredrik); W.C. Willett (Walter C.); E.L. Goode (Ellen); Permuth, J.B. (Jennifer B.); H. Risch (Harvey); Reid, B.M. (Brett M.); Bezieau, S. (Stephane); H. Brenner (Hermann); Chan, A.T. (Andrew T.); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); T.J. Hudson (Thomas); Kocarnik, J.K. (Jonathan K.); P. Newcomb (Polly); Schoen, R.E. (Robert E.); Slattery, M.L. (Martha L.); White, E. (Emily); M.A. Adank (Muriel); H. Ahsan (Habibul); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); Baglietto, L. (Laura); Blomquist, C. (Carl); F. Canzian (Federico); K. Czene (Kamila); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); Eliassen, A.H. (A. Heather); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); O. Fletcher (Olivia); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); Johnson, N. (Nichola); P. Hall (Per); A. Hazra (Aditi); R. Hein (Rebecca); Hofman, A. (Albert); J.L. Hopper (John); A. Irwanto (Astrid); M. Johansson (Mattias); R. Kaaks (Rudolf); M.G. Kibriya (Muhammad); P. Lichtner (Peter); J. Liu (Jianjun); E. Lund (Eiliv); Makalic, E. (Enes); A. Meindl (Alfons); B. Müller-Myhsok (B.); Muranen, T.A. (Taru A.); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); P.H.M. Peeters; J. Peto (Julian); R. Prentice (Ross); N. Rahman (Nazneen); M.-J. Sanchez (Maria-Jose); D.F. Schmidt (Daniel); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); M.C. Southey (Melissa); Tamimi, R. (Rulla); S.P.L. Travis (Simon); C. Turnbull (Clare); Uitterlinden, A.G. (Andre G.); Z. Wang (Zhaoming); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); X.R. Yang (Xiaohong); W. Zheng (Wei); D. Buchanan (Daniel); G. Casey (Graham); G. Conti (Giario); C.K. Edlund (Christopher); S. Gallinger (Steve); R. Haile (Robert); M. Jenkins (Mark); Marchand, L. (Loïcle); Li, L. (Li); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); Schmit, S.L. (Stephanie L.); S.N. Thibodeau (Stephen); M.O. Woods (Michael); T. Rafnar (Thorunn); J. Gudmundsson (Julius); S.N. Stacey (Simon); Stefansson, K. (Kari); P. Sulem (Patrick); Chen, Y.A. (Y. Ann); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); Christiani, D.C. (David C.); Wei, Y. (Yongyue); H. Shen (Hongbing); Z. Hu (Zhibin); X.-O. Shu (Xiao-Ou); Shiraishi, K. (Kouya); A. Takahashi (Atsushi); Y. Bossé (Yohan); M. Obeidat; D.C. Nickle (David C.); W. Timens (Wim); M. Freedman (Matthew); Li, Q. (Qiyuan); D. Seminara (Daniela); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); Gong, J. (Jian); U. Peters (Ulrike); S.B. Gruber (Stephen); Amos, C.I. (Christopher I.); T.A. Sellers (Thomas A.); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); D. Hunter (David); C.A. Haiman (Christopher A.); B.E. Henderson (Brian); R.J. Hung (Rayjean)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIdentifying genetic variants with pleiotropic associations can uncover common pathways influencing multiple cancers. We took a two-stage approach to conduct genome-wide association studies for lung, ovary, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer from the GAME-ON/GECCO Network (61,851

  1. Cross-Cancer Genome-Wide Analysis of Lung, Ovary, Breast, Prostate, and Colorectal Cancer Reveals Novel Pleiotropic Associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fehringer, Gordon; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul D.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Lindstrom, Sara; Brennan, Paul; Bickeboller, Heike; Houlston, Richard S.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Risch, Angela; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Berndt, Sonja I.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Gronberg, Henrik; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Ma, Jing; Muir, Kenneth; Stampfer, Meir J.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Willett, Walter C.; Goode, Ellen L.; Permuth, Jennifer B.; Risch, Harvey A.; Reid, Brett M.; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hudson, Thomas J.; Kocarnik, Jonathan K.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Schoen, Robert E.; Slattery, Martha L.; White, Emily; Adank, Muriel A.; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Baglietto, Laura; Blomquist, Carl; Canzian, Federico; Czene, Kamila; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eliassen, A. Heather; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M.; Johnson, Nichola; Hall, Per; Hazra, Aditi; Hein, Rebecca; Hofman, Albert; Hopper, John L.; Irwanto, Astrid; Johansson, Mattias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Meindl, Alfons; Muller-Myhsok, Bertram; Muranen, Taru A.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Peeters, Petra H.; Peto, Julian; Prentice, Ross L.; Rahman, Nazneen; Sanchez, Maria Jose; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Southey, Melissa C.; Tamimi, Rulla; Travis, Ruth C.; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wang, Zhaoming; Whittemore, Alice S.; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Zheng, Wei; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Casey, Graham; Conti, David V.; Edlund, Christopher K.; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Jenkins, Mark; Le Marchand, Loic; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralene M.; Schmit, Stephanie L.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Woods, Michael O.; Rafnar, Thorunn; Gudmundsson, Julius; Stacey, Simon N.; Stefansson, Kari; Sulem, Patrick; Chen, Y. Ann; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Christiani, David C.; Wei, Yongyue; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shiraishi, Kouya; Takahashi, Atsushi; Bosse, Yohan; Obeidat, Ma'en; Nickle, David; Timens, Wim; Freedman, Matthew L.; Li, Qiyuan; Seminara, Daniela; Chanock, Stephen J.; Gong, Jian; Peters, Ulrike; Gruber, Stephen B.; Amos, Christopher I.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hunter, David J.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hung, Rayjean J.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying genetic variants with pleiotropic associations can uncover common pathways influencing multiple cancers. We took a two-stage approach to conduct genome-wide association studies for lung, ovary, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer from the GAME-ON/GECCO Network (61,851 cases, 61,820

  2. Cross-cancer genome-wide analysis of lung, ovary, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer reveals novel pleiotropic associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fehringer, Gordon; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul D.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Lindström, Sara; Brennan, Paul; Bickeböller, Heike; Houlston, Richard S.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Risch, Angela; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Berndt, Sonja I.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Grönberg, Henrik; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Ma, Jing; Muir, Kenneth; Stampfer, Meir J.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Willett, Walter C.; Goode, Ellen L.; Permuth, Jennifer B.; Risch, Harvey A.; Reid, Brett M.; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hudson, Thomas J.; Kocarnik, Jonathan K.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Schoen, Robert E.; Slattery, Martha L.; White, Emily; Adank, Muriel A.; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Baglietto, Laura; Blomquist, Carl; Canzian, Federico; Czene, Kamila; Dos-Santos-silva, Isabel; Eliassen, A. Heather; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M.; Johnson, Nichola; Hall, Per; Hazra, Aditi; Hein, Rebecca; Hofman, Albert; Hopper, John L.; Irwanto, Astrid; Johansson, Mattias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Meindl, Alfons; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Muranen, Taru A.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Peeters, Petra H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074099655; Peto, Julian; Prentice, Ross L.; Rahman, Nazneen; Sanchez, Maria Jose; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Southey, Melissa C.; Tamimi, Rulla; Travis, Ruth C.; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wang, Zhaoming; Whittemore, Alice S.; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Zheng, Wei; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Casey, Graham; Conti, David V.; Edlund, Christopher K.; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Jenkins, Mark; Marchand, Loïcle; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralene M.; Schmit, Stephanie L.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Woods, Michael O.; Rafnar, Thorunn; Gudmundsson, Julius; Stacey, Simon N.; Stefansson, Kari; Sulem, Patrick; Chen, Y. Ann; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Christiani, David C.; Wei, Yongyue; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Shu, Xiao Ou; Shiraishi, Kouya; Takahashi, Atsushi; Bossé, Yohan; Obeidat, Ma'en; Nickle, David; Timens, Wim; Freedman, Matthew L.; Li, Qiyuan; Seminara, Daniela; Chanock, Stephen J.; Gong, Jian; Peters, Ulrike; Gruber, Stephen B.; Amos, Christopher I.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hunter, David J.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hung, Rayjean J.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying genetic variants with pleiotropic associations can uncover common pathways influencing multiple cancers. We took a two-stage approach to conduct genome-wide association studies for lung, ovary, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer from the GAME-ON/GECCO Network (61,851 cases, 61,820

  3. Potential utility of natural products as regulators of breast cancer-associated aromatase promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Larry A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aromatase, the key enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis, converts androstenedione to estrone and testosterone to estradiol. The enzyme is expressed in various tissues such as ovary, placenta, bone, brain, skin, and adipose tissue. Aromatase enzyme is encoded by a single gene CYP 19A1 and its expression is controlled by tissue-specific promoters. Aromatase mRNA is primarily transcribed from promoter I.4 in normal breast tissue and physiological levels of aromatase are found in breast adipose stromal fibroblasts. Under the conditions of breast cancer, as a result of the activation of a distinct set of aromatase promoters (I.3, II, and I.7 aromatase expression is enhanced leading to local overproduction of estrogen that promotes breast cancer. Aromatase is considered as a potential target for endocrine treatment of breast cancer but due to nonspecific reduction of aromatase activity in other tissues, aromatase inhibitors (AIs are associated with undesirable side effects such as bone loss, and abnormal lipid metabolism. Inhibition of aromatase expression by inactivating breast tumor-specific aromatase promoters can selectively block estrogen production at the tumor site. Although several synthetic chemical compounds and nuclear receptor ligands are known to inhibit the activity of the tumor-specific aromatase promoters, further development of more specific and efficacious drugs without adverse effects is still warranted. Plants are rich in chemopreventive agents that have a great potential to be used in chemotherapy for hormone dependent breast cancer which could serve as a source for natural AIs. In this brief review, we summarize the studies on phytochemicals such as biochanin A, genistein, quercetin, isoliquiritigenin, resveratrol, and grape seed extracts related to their effect on the activation of breast cancer-associated aromatase promoters and discuss their aromatase inhibitory potential to be used as safer chemotherapeutic agents for

  4. Associations of Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Tools With Tumor Characteristics and Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Johanna; Li, Jingmei; Darabi, Hatef; Eklund, Martin; Eriksson, Mikael; Humphreys, Keith; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila

    2016-01-20

    The association between established risk factors for breast cancer and subtypes or prognosis of the disease is not well known. We analyzed whether the Tyrer-Cuzick-predicted 10-year breast cancer risk score (TCRS), mammographic density (MD), and a 77-single nucleotide polymorphism polygenic risk score (PRS) were associated with breast cancer tumor prognosticators and risk of distant metastasis. We used a case-only design in a population-based cohort of 5,500 Swedish patients with breast cancer. Logistic and multinomial logistic regression of outcomes, estrogen receptor (ER) status, lymph node involvement, tumor size, and grade was performed with TCRS, PRS, and percent MD as exposures. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) of distant metastasis. Women at high risk for breast cancer based on PRS and/or TCRS were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with favorable prognosticators, such as ER-positive and low-grade tumors. In contrast, PRS weighted on ER-negative disease was associated with ER-negative tumors. When stratifying by age, the associations of TCRS with favorable prognosticators were restricted to women younger than age 50. Women scoring high in both TCRS and PRS had a lower risk of distant metastasis (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.49 to 0.98). MD was not associated with any of the examined prognosticators. Women at high risk for breast cancer based on genetic and lifestyle factors were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancers with a favorable prognosis. Better knowledge of subtype-specific risk factors could be vital for the success of prevention programs aimed at lowering mortality. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  5. The influence of genetic ancestry and ethnicity on breast cancer survival associated with genetic variation in the TGF-β-signaling pathway: The Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Martha L; Lundgreen, Abbie; Stern, Marianna C; Hines, Lisa; Wolff, Roger K; Giuliano, Anna R; Baumgartner, Kathy B; John, Esther M

    2014-03-01

    The TGF-β signaling pathway regulates cellular proliferation and differentiation. We evaluated genetic variation in this pathway, its association with breast cancer survival, and survival differences by genetic ancestry and self-reported ethnicity. The Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study includes participants from the 4-Corners Breast Cancer Study (n = 1,391 cases) and the San Francisco Bay Area Breast Cancer Study (n = 946 cases) who have been followed for survival. We evaluated 28 genes in the TGF-β signaling pathway using a tagSNP approach. Adaptive rank truncated product (ARTP) was used to test the gene and pathway significance by Native American (NA) ancestry and by self-reported ethnicity (non-Hispanic white (NHW) and Hispanic/NA). Genetic variation in the TGF-β signaling pathway was associated with overall breast cancer survival (P ARTP = 0.05), especially for women with low NA ancestry (P ARTP = 0.007) and NHW women (P ARTP = 0.006). BMP2, BMP4, RUNX1, and TGFBR3 were significantly associated with breast cancer survival overall (P ARTP = 0.04, 0.02, 0.002, and 0.04, respectively). Among women with low NA, ancestry associations were as follows: BMP4 (P ARTP = 0.007), BMP6 (P ARTP = 0.001), GDF10 (P ARTP = 0.05), RUNX1 (P ARTP = 0.002), SMAD1 (P ARTP = 0.05), and TGFBR2 (P ARTP = 0.02). A polygenic risk model showed that women with low NA ancestry and high numbers of at-risk alleles had twice the risk of dying from breast cancer as did women with high NA ancestry. Our data suggest that genetic variation in the TGF-β signaling pathway influences breast cancer survival. Associations were similar when the analyses were stratified by genetic ancestry or by self-reported ethnicity.

  6. Immunohistochemical Distribution of a Breast Cancer-Associated Glycoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Rye

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The tissue distribution and specificity of a glycoprotein of Mr 230 OOOkDa which has previously been identified from breast carcinomas in culture and shown to be tumour-associated, has been assessed using a polyclonal antiserum. A wide range of tissues has been examined immunohistochemically. The tissue distribution of the glycoprotein show differences between normal, benign and malignant breast and other epithelial tissues, and are clearly specific for epithelial cells. This glycoprotein as detected by the polyclonal antiserum P5252-2, was either absent or showed a minimal presence in normal breast tissues. Evidence of the expression of the glycoprotein in hyperplastic breast was observed but was considerably less than that seen for carcinomas, for which 70% had greater than 50% of cells exhibiting reactivity with P5252-2. There was no relationship with grade or node status. Similar striking differences in glycoprotein expression between non-neoplastic and neoplastic tissue were observed for stomach, large intestine, thyroid and to lesser extent ovary. The di fferences in the expression of this glycoprotein between normal and malignant tissues is of obvious clinical and pathological potential.

  7. Breast cancer associated a2 isoform vacuolar ATPase immunomodulates neutrophils: potential role in tumor progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Safaa A.; Katara, Gajendra K.; Kulshrestha, Arpita; Jaiswal, Mukesh K.; Amin, Magdy A.; Beaman, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    In invasive breast cancer, tumor associated neutrophils (TAN) represent a significant portion of the tumor mass and are associated with increased angiogenesis and metastasis. Identifying the regulatory factors that control TAN behavior will help in developing ideal immunotherapies. Vacuolar ATPases (V-ATPases), multi-subunit proton pumps, are highly expressed in metastatic breast cancer cells. A cleaved peptide from a2 isoform V-ATPase (a2NTD) has immunomodulatory role in tumor microenvironment. Here, we report for the first time the role of V-ATPase in neutrophils modulation. In invasive breast cancer cells, a2NTD was detected and a2V was highly expressed on the surface. Immunohistochemical analysis of invasive breast cancer tissues revealed that increased neutrophil recruitment and blood vessel density correlated with increased a2NTD levels. In order to determine the direct regulatory role of a2NTD on neutrophils, recombinant a2NTD was used for the treatment of neutrophils isolated from the peripheral blood of healthy volunteers. Neutrophils treated with a2NTD (a2Neuɸ) showed increased secretion of IL-1RA, IL-10, CCL-2 and IL-6 that are important mediators in cancer related inflammation. Moreover, a2Neuɸ exhibited an increased production of protumorigenic factors including IL-8, matrix metaloprotinase-9 and vascular endothelial growth factor. Further, functional characterization of a2Neuɸ revealed that a2Neuɸ derived products induce in vitro angiogenesis as well as increase the invasiveness of breast cancer cells. This study establishes the modulatory effect of breast cancer associated a2V on neutrophils, by the action of a2NTD, which has a positive impact on tumor progression, supporting that a2V can be a potential selective target for breast cancer therapy. PMID:26460736

  8. Association between chronological change of reproductive factors and breast cancer risk defined by hormone receptor status: results from the Seoul Breast Cancer Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seokang; Park, Sue K; Sung, Hyuna; Song, Nan; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Yoo, Keun-Young; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Kang, Daehee

    2013-08-01

    Lifestyle factors have been chronologically changed into western style ones, which could result in the rapid increase of breast cancer incidence in Korea. It is plausible that reproductive factors through hormonal mechanisms are differentially related to the risk of breast cancer subtypes. We investigated the association of reproductive risk factors on breast cancer by birth year groups and also evaluated the differential associations on the hormone receptor-defined subtypes. Using the data from the Seoul Breast Cancer Study (SeBCS), a multicenter case-control study, 3,332 breast cancer patients and 3,620 control subjects were analyzed. The distribution of subtypes among cases was as follows: 61.0 % estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, 51.9 % progesterone receptor (PR)-positive, and 43.4 % both ER/PR-positive status, respectively. Polytomous logistic regression and Wald tests for heterogeneity have been used across the subtypes. The frequencies of reproductive-related risk factors including early age at menarche, nulligravid, age at first full-term pregnancy (FFTP), duration of estrogen exposure before FFTP (EEBF), less number of children, never breastfeeding, and short duration of breastfeeding has increased as women were born later in both cases and controls, respectively (p trend breast cancer patients, either ER- or PR-positive subtypes were increased in women born in 1960s compared to women born in 1940s. Early age at menarche increased the risk of breast cancer regardless of the subtypes while nulligravid, late age at FFTP, and longer duration of EEBP were associated with hormone receptor-positive cancer risk only (p heterogeneity age at menarche, parity, age at FFTP, and duration of EEBF with breast cancer risk were different based on the hormone receptor status and birth year groups in Korea.

  9. Cancer-associated fibroblasts release exosomal microRNAs that dictate an aggressive phenotype in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnarumma, Elvira; Fiore, Danilo; Nappa, Martina; Roscigno, Giuseppina; Adamo, Assunta; Iaboni, Margherita; Russo, Valentina; Affinito, Alessandra; Puoti, Ilaria; Quintavalle, Cristina; Rienzo, Anna; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Thomas, Renato; Condorelli, Gerolama

    2017-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are the major components of the tumor microenvironment. They may drive tumor progression, although the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. Exosomes have emerged as important mediators of intercellular communication in cancer. They mediate horizontal transfer of microRNAs (miRs), mRNAs and proteins, thus affecting breast cancer progression. Differential expression profile analysis identified three miRs (miRs -21, -378e, and -143) increased in exosomes from CAFs as compared from normal fibroblasts. Immunofluorescence indicated that exosomes may be transferred from CAFs to breast cancer cells, releasing their cargo miRs. Breast cancer cells (BT549, MDA-MB-231, and T47D lines) exposed to CAF exosomes or transfected with those miRs exhibited a significant increased capacity to form mammospheres, increased stem cell and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers, and anchorage-independent cell growth. These effects were reverted by transfection with anti-miRs. Similarly to CAF exosomes, normal fibroblast exosomes transfected with miRs -21, -378e, and -143 promoted the stemness and EMT phenotype of breast cancer cells. Thus, we provided evidence for the first time of the role of CAF exosomes and their miRs in the induction of the stemness and EMT phenotype in different breast cancer cell lines. Indeed, CAFs strongly promote the development of an aggressive breast cancer cell phenotype. PMID:28121625

  10. Diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for nonmetastatic breast cancer in Canada, and their associated costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, B P; Petit, C Le; Berthelot, J-M; Tomiak, E M; Verma, S; Evans, W K

    1999-01-01

    In an era of fiscal restraint, it is important to evaluate the resources required to diagnose and treat serious illnesses. As breast cancer is the major malignancy affecting Canadian women, Statistics Canada has analysed the resources required to manage this disease in Canada, and the associated costs. Here we report the cost of initial diagnosis and treatment of nonmetastatic breast cancer, including adjuvant therapies. Treatment algorithms for Stages I, II, and III of the disease were derived by age group (calculated for a cohort of 17 700 Canadian women diagnosed in 1995. Early stage (Stages I and II) breast cancer represented 87% of all incident cases, with 77% of cases occurring in women ≥ 50 years. Variations were noted in the rate of partial vs total mastectomy, according to stage and age group. Direct costs for diagnosis and initial treatment ranged from $8014 for Stage II women ≥ 50 years old, to $10 897 for Stage III women < 50 years old. Except for Stage III women < 50 years old, the largest expenditure was for hospitalization for surgery, followed by radiotherapy costs. Chemotherapy was the largest cost component for Stage III women < 50 years old. This report describes the cost of diagnosis and initial treatment of nonmetastatic breast cancer in Canada, assuming current practice patterns. A second report will describe the lifetime costs of treating all stages of breast cancer. These data will then be incorporated into Statistics Canada's Population Health Model (POHEM) to perform cost-effectiveness studies of new therapeutic interventions for breast cancer, such as the cost-effectiveness of day surgery, or of radiotherapy to all breast cancer patients undergoing breast surgery. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10188886

  11. Polyunsaturated fatty acid content may be increased in the milk of women with pregnancy-associated breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wenyi; Raatz, Susan; Zhang, Ke K; Rosenberger, Thad A; Sauter, Edward R

    2014-11-01

    Pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) is aggressive and difficult to diagnose. High intake of most types of dietary fat is thought to increase breast cancer risk; however, results in humans supporting this premise remain equivocal. Fatty acid (FA) concentrations in the body comprise both dietary intake and endogenous FA production. Most assessments of FA levels have been performed on blood, with little information on the effect of FA levels in breast milk on PABC risk. This study aimed to determine if FA concentrations in the milk from women diagnosed with breast cancer while nursing were different in the cancer-containing breast and opposite breast. We quantified 16 long-chain FA and soluble FA synthase (sFAS) enzyme levels from 4 women diagnosed with PABC, comparing results from the cancer-containing breast to those from the normal breast. Fatty acid concentrations consistently exceeded and trended higher (P cancer-containing breast for 20:4n-6 (arachidonic acid [AA]), 20:5n-3 (eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA]), and 22:5n-6 (docosapentaenoic acid [DPA]). Soluble FA synthase levels were similar in the cancer-containing and normal breasts. Breast milk concentrations of AA, EPA, and DPA increased in the cancer-containing breast of women with PABC. This increase was not associated with higher sFAS levels. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Breast and cervical cancer screening and associated factors among older adult women in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl; Phaswana-Mafuya, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the cancer screening prevalence and correlates in older adults from different racial backgrounds. In the context of heightened efforts for prevention and early diagnosis, we collected information on screening for two major types of cancers: cervical and breast cancer in order to establish their prevalence estimates and correlates among older South African women who participated in the Study of Global Ageing and Adults Health (SAGE) in 2008. We conducted a national population-based cross-sectional study with a multi-stage stratified cluster sample of 3,840 individuals aged 50 years or older in South Africa in 2008. In this analysis, we only considered the female subsample of (n=2202). The measures used included socio-demographic characteristics, health variables, anthropometric and blood pressure measurements. Multivariable regression analysis was performed to assess the association of socio-demographic factors, health variables and cancer screening. Overall, regarding cervical cancer screening, 24.3% ever had a Papanicolaou (PAP) smear test, and regarding breast cancer screening, 15.5% ever had a mammography. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, younger age, higher education, being from the White or Coloured population group, urban residence, greater wealth, and suffering from two or more chronic conditions were associated with cervical cancer screening, and higher education, being from the White or Indian/Asian population group, greater wealth, having a health insurance, and suffering from two or more chronic conditions were associated with breast cancer screening. Cancer screening coverage remains low among elderly women in South Africa in spite of the national guideline recommendations for regular screening in order to reduce the risk of dying from these cancers if not detected early. There is a need to improve accessibility and affordability of early cervical and breast cancer screening for all women to ensure effective prevention

  13. Expression of YES-associated protein (YAP) and its clinical significance in breast cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lanqing; Sun, Ping-Li; Yao, Min; Jia, Meng; Gao, Hongwen

    2017-09-09

    The transcriptional co-activator YES-associated protein (YAP) has been reported to act as both an oncogene and tumor suppressor in breast cancers. In this study, we evaluated YAP expression immunohistochemically in 324 breast cancer tissues and correlated the expression with clinicopathological findings and patient survival data. Additionally, we reviewed the literature to clarify the role of YAP in breast cancer. We detected YAP, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth receptor-2 (HER2) expression and a Ki67 labeling index >20% in 53.4%, 49.0%, 45.0%, 28.3%, and 57.4% of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) tissues, respectively. YAP is mainly localized within the tumor cell nuclei, and its expression was associated with the PR status and Luminal A subtype. YAP expression also inversely correlated with the HER2 and Ki67 levels and lymph node metastasis. Kaplan-Meier curves revealed associations of YAP expression with favorable disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with Luminal A subtype breast cancer and with favorable DFS association among patients with IDC, Luminal B (HER2-) and Luminal B (HER2+) subtype breast cancers. A multivariate Cox analysis revealed that YAP expression and PR status were independent favorable predictors of DFS and OS, respectively, among patients with breast cancer, whereas TNM stage and an old age were independent predictors of a poor DFS. Our results, together with the literature review findings, suggest that YAP could be a prognostic marker in patients with breast cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Oxalate induces breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellaro, Andrés M; Tonda, Alfredo; Cejas, Hugo H; Ferreyra, Héctor; Caputto, Beatriz L; Pucci, Oscar A; Gil, German A

    2015-10-22

    Microcalcifications can be the early and only presenting sign of breast cancer. One shared characteristic of breast cancer is the appearance of mammographic mammary microcalcifications that can routinely be used to detect breast cancer in its initial stages, which is of key importance due to the possibility that early detection allows the application of more conservative therapies for a better patient outcome. The mechanism by which mammary microcalcifications are formed is still largely unknown but breast cancers presenting microcalcifications are more often associated with a poorer prognosis. We combined Capillary Electrochromatography, histology, and gene expression (qRT-PCR) to analyze patient-matched normal breast tissue vs. breast tumor. Potential carcinogenicity of oxalate was tested by its inoculation into mice. All data were subjected to statistical analysis. To study the biological significance of oxalates within the breast tumor microenvironment, we measured oxalate concentration in both human breast tumor tissues and adjoining non-pathological breast tissues. We found that all tested breast tumor tissues contain a higher concentration of oxalates than their counterpart non-pathological breast tissue. Moreover, it was established that oxalate induces proliferation of breast cells and stimulates the expression of a pro-tumorigenic gene c-fos. Furthermore, oxalate generates highly malignant and undifferentiated tumors when it was injected into the mammary fatpad in female mice, but not when injected into their back, indicating that oxalate does not induce cancer formation in all types of tissues. Moreover, neither human kidney-epithelial cells nor mouse fibroblast cells proliferate when are treated with oxalate. We found that the chronic exposure of breast epithelial cells to oxalate promotes the transformation of breast cells from normal to tumor cells, inducing the expression of a proto-oncogen as c-fos and proliferation in breast cancer cells

  15. Preeclampsia and breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pacheco, Nadja Livia Pekkola; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In parous women preeclampsia has been associated with reduced risk of developing breast cancer. Characteristics of births following preeclamptic pregnancies may help understand mechanisms involved in the breast cancer risk reduction inferred by preeclampsia. METHODS: We conducted...... a register-based cohort study of all Danish women giving birth during 1978-2010 (n = 778,701). The association between preeclampsia and breast cancer was evaluated overall and according to birth characteristics by means of incidence rate ratios (IRR) estimated in Poisson regression models. RESULTS: Compared......, and in women giving birth to boys. These findings, however, did not reach statistical significance. Finally, risk reduction was slightly greater following milder forms of preeclampsia. CONCLUSION: Our data is compatible with an approximately 20% reduction in risk of developing breast cancer following...

  16. Reproductive aging-associated common genetic variants and the risk of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. He (Chunyan); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); H. Dreyfus (Hélène); S.J. Hwang; R. Ruiter (Rikje); S. Sanna (Serena); J.E. Buring (Julie); L. Fernández-Rhodes (Lindsay); N. Franceschini (Nora); S.E. Hankinson (Susan); A. Hofman (Albert); K.L. Lunetta (Kathryn); D. Palmieri (Dario); E. Porcu (Eleonora); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); L.M. Rose (Lynda); G.L. Splansky (Greta); L. Stolk (Lisette); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L. Crisponi (Laura); E.W. Demerath (Ellen); J. Murabito (Joanne); P.M. Ridker (Paul); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); D. Hunter (David)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: A younger age at menarche and an older age at menopause are well established risk factors for breast cancer. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified several novel genetic loci associated with these two traits. However, the association between these loci and

  17. Association of ESR1 gene tagging SNPs with breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunning, Alison M; Healey, Catherine S; Baynes, Caroline

    2009-01-01

    associations were revealed. SNP rs3020314, tagging a region of ESR1 intron 4, is associated with an increase in breast cancer susceptibility with a dominant mode of action in European populations. Carriers of the c-allele have an odds ratio (OR) of 1.05 [95% Confidence Intervals (CI) 1.02-1.09] relative to t......We have conducted a three-stage, comprehensive single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-tagging association study of ESR1 gene variants (SNPs) in more than 55,000 breast cancer cases and controls from studies within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). No large risks or highly significant......, and it may subtly alter the ratio of two mRNA splice forms....

  18. The association between physical activity and health-related quality of life among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Woo-Kyoung; Song, Sihan; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Eunsook; Kim, Zisun; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Noh, Dong-Young; Lee, Jung Eun

    2017-06-30

    The quality of life for breast cancer survivors has become increasingly important because of their high survival rate and prolonged life expectancy. The purpose of this study was to examine the association of physical activity following diagnosis and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in breast cancer survivors. We conducted a cross-sectional study of breast cancer survivors. A total of 231 women aged 21-78 years who had been diagnosed with stages I to III breast cancer and had breast cancer surgery at least 6 months prior were recruited from three hospitals between September 2012 and April 2015 and were included in this study. We asked participants about their HRQOL and engagement in physical activity using structured questionnaires. We examined the association between HRQOL levels and physical activity using a generalized linear model. Breast cancer survivors in the high physical activity group (3rd tertile) were more likely to have lower scores for fatigue (p for trend = 0.001) and pain (p for trend = 0.02) and higher scores for sexual function (p for trend = 0.007) than those in the low physical activity group (1st tertile). When we stratified participants by stage, we found increasing scores for physical functioning (p for trend =0.01) and decreasing scores for fatigue (p for trend = 0.02) with increasing levels of physical activity in breast cancer survivors with stage I breast cancer. In survivors with stages II and III, we found statistically significant associations with fatigue (p for trend = 0.02) and sexual functioning (p for trend = 0.001). In conclusion, engagement in physical activity was related to better health-related quality of life among breast cancer survivors. Our findings may warrant further prospective and intervention studies to support the benefit of physical activity in improving the quality of life and survival of Korean breast cancer survivors.

  19. Is educational level associated with breast cancer risk in Iranian women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajian-Tilaki, Karimollah; Kaveh-Ahangar, Tina; Hajian-Tilaki, Erfaneh

    2012-01-01

    A high educational level has been found to be a risk factor of breast cancer. However, it is not clear whether such association persists after adjustment for individual risk factors of breast cancer such as parity in Iranian women. We conducted a case-control study of 100 histologically confirmed breast cancer cases and 200 age-matched controls in a genetically homogenous population, in Babol, northern Iran. Demographic, reproductive, and lifestyle data were collected by in-person interviews and clinical examination. Educational level was classified into three levels: (1) illiterate and primary level, (2) elementary level and those who did not finish high school, and (3) high school graduates and those receiving more education. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) was estimated using multiple logistic regression model after controlling for parity and several other potential confounding factors. The unadjusted OR showed a nonsignificant negative association of educational levels with breast cancer risk, but after controlling for several potential confounding factors, higher education level was significantly correlated with a lower breast cancer risk [OR 0.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.06-0.45 for educational level of elementary plus some high school and OR 0.10, 95% CI 0.03-0.34 for educational level of high school or more compared to illiterate and primary level]. The inverse association of educational level with breast cancer risk observed in this study is not in accordance with education inequalities found in breast cancer risk in Western countries. The present findings provide a rationale for earlier screening in Iranian women with low education.

  20. Association between common risk factors and molecular subtypes in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkoz, Fatma P; Solak, Mustafa; Petekkaya, Ibrahim; Keskin, Ozge; Kertmen, Neyran; Sarici, Furkan; Arik, Zafer; Babacan, Taner; Ozisik, Yavuz; Altundag, Kadri

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women worldwide and characterized its by molecular and clinical heterogeneity. Gene expression profiling studies have classified breast cancers into five subtypes: luminal A, luminal B, HER-2 overexpressing, basal-like, and normal breast-like. Although clinical differences between subtypes have been well described in the literature, etiologic heterogeneity have not been fully studied. The aim of this study was to assess the associations between several hormonal and nonhormonal risk factors and molecular subtypes of breast cancer. This cross-sectional study consisted of 1884 invasive breast cancer cases. Variables studied included family history, age at first full-term pregnancy, number of children, duration of lactation, menstruation history, menopausal status, blood type, smoking, obesity, oral contraceptive use, hormone replacement therapy and in vitro fertilization. The odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Thousand two-hundred and forty nine patients had luminal A, 234 had luminal B, 169 had HER-2 overexpressing and 232 had triple negative breast cancer. The age of ≥40 years was found to be a risk factor for luminal A (OR 1.41 95% CI 1.15-1.74; p=0.001) and HER-2 overexpressing subtype (OR: 1.51, 95% CI: 1.01-2.25; p=0.04). Women who were nulliparous (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.03-2.13; p=0.03) or who had their first full-term pregnancy at age 30 years or older (OR 1.25 95% CI 0.83-1.88; p=0.04) were at increased risk of luminal breast cancer, whereas women with more than two children had a decreased risk (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.47-0.97; p=0.03). Breast-feeding was also a protective factor for luminal subtype (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.53-1.04; p=0.04) when compared to non-luminal breast cancer. We found increased risks for postmenopausal women with HER-2 overexpressing (OR 2.20, 95% CI 0.93-5.17; p=0.04) and luminal A (OR 1.87, 95% CI 0.93-3.90, p=0

  1. Illuminating a Risk for Breast Cancer: A Preliminary Ecological Study on the Association Between Streetlight and Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshet-Sitton, Atalya; Or-Chen, Keren; Huber, Eran; Haim, Abraham

    2017-12-01

    Artificial light at night (ALAN) for elongating photophase is a new source of pollution. We examined the association between measured ALAN levels and breast cancer (BC) standard morbidity ratio (SMR) at a statistical area (SA) level in an urban environment. Sample size consisted of 266 new BC cases ages 35-74. Light measurements (lux) were performed in 11 SAs. A new calculated variable of morbidity per SA size (SMR35-74/km2) was correlated with the light variables per road length, using Pearson correlations (P illumination is associated with a higher BC-SMR in a specific area and age group. Moreover, we suggest an outdoor light threshold of approximately 16 lux as the minimal intensity to affect melatonin levels and BC morbidity. To the best of our knowledge, our attempt is the first to use this method and show such association between streetlight intensity and BC morbidity and therefore should be further developed.

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  3. General Information about Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  4. Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A expression in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Aaron S; Visscher, Daniel W; Hart, Steven N; Wang, Chen; Goetz, Matthew P; Oxvig, Claus; Conover, Cheryl A

    2014-12-01

    Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) is a zinc metalloproteinase in the insulin-like growth factor system that is expressed by tissues outside of pregnancy and involved in normal and dysregulated growth. PAPP-A has been implicated in several cancers. However, studies of PAPP-A expression in breast cancer are limited. In this study, we assessed PAPP-A expression in different subtypes of human malignant breast cancer. Design Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples from 46 female patients with invasive breast cancer were divided into five defined groups [using markers for HER2, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, proliferation] that roughly correlate with molecularly defined subtypes (luminal A, luminal B, luminal/HER2 +, HER2 +, triple negative). These samples were analyzed for PAPP-A expression by immunohistochemistry. PAPP-A staining in tumor tissue was detected in 45 of 46 specimens. There were significantly greater extent and intensity of PAPP-A expression in luminal B specimens with high proliferation index than luminal A specimens (P = 0.01). However, there were no differences between specimens positive or negative for HER2 (P = 0.14) or positive and negative for estrogen receptor (P = 0.31). PAPP-A was detected in almost all breast cancer specimens and a more intense and greater extent of its expression was associated with luminal B specimens compared to luminal A specimens. The role of PAPP-A in breast cancer prognosis, and possibly therapeutics, warrants further investigation.

  5. [Genetic variants in miRNAs and its association with breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Gómez, Susana; Ruiz Esparza-Garrido, Ruth; Velázquez-Flores, Miguel; Dolores-Vergara, Maria; Salamanca-Gómez, Fabio; Arenas-Aranda, Diego Julio

    2014-01-01

    In Mexico, breast cancer represents the first cause of cancer death in females. At the molecular level, non-coding RNAs and especially microRNAs have played an important role in the origin and development of this neoplasm In the Anglo-Saxon population, diverse genetic variants in microRNA genes and in their targets are associated with the development of this disease. In the Mexican population it is not known if these or other variants exist. Identification of these or new variants in our population is fundamental in order to have a better understanding of cancer development and to help establish a better diagnostic strategy. DNA was isolated from mammary tumors, adjacent tissue and peripheral blood of Mexican females with or without cancer. From DNA, five microRNA genes and three of their targets were amplified and sequenced. Genetic variants associated with breast cancer in an Anglo- Saxon population have been previously identified in these sequences. In the samples studied we identified seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Two had not been previously described and were identified only in women with cancer. The new variants may be genetic predisposition factors for the development of breast cancer in our population. Further experiments are needed to determine the involvement of these variants in the development, establishment and progression of breast cancer.

  6. A locus on 19p13 modifies risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers and is associated with hormone receptor-negative breast cancer in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S

    2010-01-01

    Germline BRCA1 mutations predispose to breast cancer. To identify genetic modifiers of this risk, we performed a genome-wide association study in 1,193 individuals with BRCA1 mutations who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer under age 40 and 1,190 BRCA1 carriers without breast cancer diagn...

  7. Bias in Observational Studies of the Association between Menopausal Hormone Therapy and Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per-Henrik Zahl

    Full Text Available During the period 1985-2000 the breast cancer incidence rates increased 50% in the age group invited to mammography screening in Norway and Sweden. Simultaneously, use of hormone replacement treatment therapy (HT increased 5 times. Several influential observational studies showed that HT was associated with 50% to 100% increased risk of breast cancer and most for those using combined (estrogen plus progestin hormone replacement therapy (CHT. In contrast, the randomized WHI trial reported that CHT increased the risk by 10% for those not having previously used hormones and 24% when including previous users in the analyses. In another randomized trial, estrogen use only was not associated with any increased risk at all. After the WHI trial was published in 2003, use of HT dropped 70% within 5 years in Norway and Sweden while breast cancer rates were essentially unchanged. After 2008, HT use has dropped further and breast cancer incidence rates have started increasing again. The study objective is to calculate and to explain potential bias in the observational study design.Here we use data from the randomized WHI trial and analyze these data as done in the observational studies to calculate the magnitude of the potential biases in the observational study design. Time varying effect of hormones and categorization of the follow-up time may increase the hazard ratio for long-term users from 1.10 to 1.48. Selective retrospective reporting of hormone use may further increase the hazard ratio to 1.68.We suggest that the mechanism causing higher hazard ratio of breast cancer (compared to the observational studies is the time-varying effect of CHT on the breast cancer risk and selective retrospective reporting of hormone use. Other risk factors for the increase in breast cancer risk in the age group 50-69 years should be considered, for example, overdiagnosis.

  8. MAGEC2, an epithelial-mesenchymal transition inducer, is associated with breast cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Zhou, Xingchun; Miao, Xia; Zhang, Tao; Hang, Xiaojun; Tie, Ru; Liu, Nan; Tian, Fei; Wang, Fuli; Yuan, Jianlin

    2014-05-01

    MAGEC2 is a member of melanoma antigen (MAGE) family of cancer-testis antigens and associated with tumor relapse and metastasis. Here, we investigated the expression of MAGEC2 in patients with breast cancer and its clinical effects with underlying mechanisms. The expression levels of MAGEC2 were compared between 420 invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and 120 ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast. Correlations between MAGEC2 expression and clinico-pathologic factors or survival of patients with IDC were analyzed. In addition, MAGEC2 expression levels in tumor tissues dissected from the primary focus and matched tumor-invaded axillary lymph nodes were analyzed in 8 breast cancer patients. The functional effects of MAGEC2 overexpression were assessed in vitro using scratch assay and transwell chamber assay. MAGEC2 expression was increased in metastatic breast cancer in comparison to the non-metastatic. MAGEC2 expression was significantly associated with ER negative expression (P = 0.037), high tumor grade (P = 0.014) and stage (P = 0.002), high incidence of axillary lymph node metastasis (P = 0.013), and distant metastasis (P = 0.004). Patients with tumor with MAGEC2 positive expression have a worse prognosis and a shorter metastasis free interval. Multivariate analyses showed that MAGEC2 expression was an independent risk factor for patient overall survival and metastasis-free survival. Breast cancer cells that overexpressed MAGEC2 had stronger migratory and invasive potential than control-treated cells. Epithelial markers (E-cadherin and cytokeratin) were down-regulated in MAGEC2-overexpressing cells compared to controls, whereas mesenchymal markers (vimentin and fibronectin) were upregulated. Our results indicate that MAGEC2 has a role in breast cancer metastasis through inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In addition, MAGEC2 is a novel independent poor prognostic factor in patients with IDC. Thus, targeting MAGEC2 may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for

  9. Life history theory and breast cancer risk: methodological and theoretical challenges: Response to "Is estrogen receptor negative breast cancer risk associated with a fast life history strategy?".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktipis, Athena

    2016-01-01

    In a meta-analysis published by myself and co-authors, we report differences in the life history risk factors for estrogen receptor negative (ER-) and estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancers. Our meta-analysis did not find the association of ER- breast cancer risk with fast life history characteristics that Hidaka and Boddy suggest in their response to our article. There are a number of possible explanations for the differences between their conclusions and the conclusions we drew from our meta-analysis, including limitations of our meta-analysis and methodological challenges in measuring and categorizing estrogen receptor status. These challenges, along with the association of ER+ breast cancer with slow life history characteristics, may make it challenging to find a clear signal of ER- breast cancer with fast life history characteristics, even if that relationship does exist. The contradictory results regarding breast cancer risk and life history characteristics illustrate a more general challenge in evolutionary medicine: often different sub-theories in evolutionary biology make contradictory predictions about disease risk. In this case, life history models predict that breast cancer risk should increase with faster life history characteristics, while the evolutionary mismatch hypothesis predicts that breast cancer risk should increase with delayed reproduction. Whether life history tradeoffs contribute to ER- breast cancer is still an open question, but current models and several lines of evidence suggest that it is a possibility. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Foundation for Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health.

  10. Predicting associations between microRNAs and target genes in breast cancer by bioinformatics analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tianying; Zhang, Xing; Wang, Yonggang; Yu, Xiucui

    2016-08-01

    Breast cancer is the leading type of cancer among females. However, the association between microRNAs (miRNAs) and target genes in breast tumorigenesis is poorly studied. The original data set GSE26659 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus, and then the differentially expressed miRNAs among 77 breast cancer patients and 17 controls were identified using the Limma package in R software. Furthermore, breast cancer-related differentially expressed miRNAs were selected from a human miRNA disease database and their target genes were selected from five miRNA databases. Then, functional analysis was performed for the target genes followed by construction of a miRNA-target gene network. A total of 34 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified, including 13 breast cancer-related miRNAs. Moreover, the target genes of the 13 miRNAs were significantly enriched in regulation of transcription (P=7.43E-09) and pathways related to cancer (P=3.33E-11). Finally, eight upregulated miRNAs (including hsa-miR-425) and five downregulated miRNAs (including hsa-miR-143, hsa-miR-145 and hsa-miR-125b) were identified in the miRNA-target gene network. In conclusion, using bioinformatics approaches, we demonstrate that the changes in regulation of transcription and cancer pathways may play significant roles in the process of breast cancerogenesis. Differentially expressed miRNAs and their target genes may be new targets for breast cancer therapy.

  11. Association of rare MSH6 variants with familial breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wasielewski, Marijke; Riaz, Muhammad; Vermeulen, Joyce; van den Ouweland, Ans; Labrijn-Marks, Ineke; Olmer, Renske; van der Spaa, Linda; Klijn, Jan G. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Dooijes, Dennis; Schutte, Mieke

    2010-01-01

    Germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 predispose to Lynch syndrome (also known as hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer). Recently, we have shown that the CHEK2 1100delC mutation also is associated with Lynch syndrome/Lynch syndrome-associated families

  12. Genetic association of deleted in colorectal carcinoma variants with breast cancer risk: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinghan; Wang, Xijing; Fu, Sidney W; Wang, Meng; Kang, Huafeng; Guan, Haitao; Zhang, Shuqun; Ma, Xiaobin; Lin, Shuai; Liu, Kang; Feng, Yanjing; Dai, Cong; Dai, Zhijun

    2016-05-31

    Deleted in colorectal carcinoma (DCC), a netrin-1 dependence receptor, is correlated with cell progression, migration, and adhesion. Evidence indicated that DCC was frequently down-regulated in many cancers. However, the association of DCC with breast cancer remains uncertain. We conducted a case-control study to investigate the impact of three DCC gene variants (rs2229080, rs7504990, and rs4078288) on breast cancer susceptibility in Chinese women. This study included 560 breast cancer patients and 583 age-matched healthy controls from Northwest China. The three gene variants were genotyped via Sequenom MassARRAY. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were utilized to evaluate the associations. We found that individuals with the rs2229080 C/G, C/C, and C/G-CC genotypes had a higher breast cancer risk, and the minor allele C was associated with increased breast cancer risk in an allele model. We observed a significantly decreased breast cancer risk with the rs7504990 C/T, T/T, and C/T-T/T genotypes, and the minor allele T was protective against breast cancer in an allele model. In addition, rs2229080 was associated with the axillary lymph node (LN) metastasis status. An age-stratified analysis revealed an association between rs2229080 and reduced breast cancer risk among older patients (≥ 49 years). Furthermore, the haplotype analysis showed that the Crs2229080Crs7504990Ars4078288 haplotype was associated with a decreased breast cancer risk. However, the results indicated a lack of association between rs4078288 and breast cancer risk. These findings affirmed that rs2229080 and rs7504990 polymorphisms in DCC might be related with breast cancer susceptibility in Chinese women.

  13. Transcriptional Profiling of Breast Cancer Metastases Identifies Liver Metastasis-Selective Genes Associated with Adverse Outcome in Luminal A Primary Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbung, Siker; Johansson, Ida; Danielsson, Anna; Veerla, Srinivas; Egyhazi Brage, Suzanne; Frostvik Stolt, Marianne; Skoog, Lambert; Carlsson, Lena; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Lidbrink, Elisabet; Linderholm, Barbro; Loman, Niklas; Malmström, Per-Olof; Söderberg, Martin; Walz, Thomas M; Fernö, Mårten; Hatschek, Thomas; Hedenfalk, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    The complete molecular basis of the organ-specificity of metastasis is elusive. This study aimed to provide an independent characterization of the transcriptional landscape of breast cancer metastases with the specific objective to identify liver metastasis-selective genes of prognostic importance following primary tumor diagnosis. A cohort of 304 women with advanced breast cancer was studied. Associations between the site of recurrence and clinicopathologic features were investigated. Fine-needle aspirates of metastases (n = 91) were subjected to whole-genome transcriptional profiling. Liver metastasis-selective genes were identified by significance analysis of microarray (SAM) analyses and independently validated in external datasets. Finally, the prognostic relevance of the liver metastasis-selective genes in primary breast cancer was tested. Liver relapse was associated with estrogen receptor (ER) expression (P = 0.002), luminal B subtype (P = 0.01), and was prognostic for an inferior postrelapse survival (P = 0.01). The major variation in the transcriptional landscape of metastases was also associated with ER expression and molecular subtype. However, liver metastases displayed unique transcriptional fingerprints, characterized by downregulation of extracellular matrix (i.e., stromal) genes. Importantly, we identified a 17-gene liver metastasis-selective signature, which was significantly and independently prognostic for shorter relapse-free (P breast cancer by site of relapse and may be used to further refine prognostication in ER positive primary breast cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Breast Cancer Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  15. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breast cancer correctly. Their recommendations are summarized below. Minimum criteria for a diagnosis of inflammatory breast cancer ... Initial biopsy samples from the affected breast show invasive carcinoma. Further examination of tissue from the affected ...

  16. Breast cancer risk and 6q22.33: combined results from Breast Cancer Association Consortium and Consortium of Investigators on Modifiers of BRCA1/2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Kirchhoff

    Full Text Available Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341 was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication analysis of rs2180341 using data from 31,428 invasive breast cancer cases and 34,700 controls collected from 25 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC. In addition, we evaluated whether rs2180341 modifies breast cancer risk in 3,361 BRCA1 and 2,020 BRCA2 carriers from 11 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA. Based on the BCAC data from women of European ancestry, we found evidence for a weak association with breast cancer risk for rs2180341 (per-allele odds ratio (OR = 1.03, 95% CI 1.00-1.06, p = 0.023. There was evidence for heterogeneity in the ORs among studies (I(2 = 49.3%; p = <0.004. In CIMBA, we observed an inverse association with the minor allele of rs2180341 and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele OR = 0.89, 95%CI 0.80-1.00, p = 0.048, indicating a potential protective effect of this allele. These data suggest that that 6q22.33 confers a weak effect on breast cancer risk.

  17. Risk factors associated with mortality from breast cancer in Waikato, New Zealand: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, S A; Campbell, I D; Scott, N; Lawrenson, R A; Shirley, R; Elwood, J M

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to identify key characteristics associated with mortality from breast cancer among women with newly diagnosed breast cancer in New Zealand (NZ). Case-control study. All primary breast cancers diagnosed between 01/01/2002 and 31/12/2010 in Waikato, NZ, were identified from the Waikato Breast Cancer Register. A total of 258 breast cancer deaths were identified from 1767 invasive cancers diagnosed over this period. Breast cancer deaths (n = 246) were compared with an age and year of diagnosis matched control group (n = 652) who were alive at the time of the death of the corresponding case and subsequently did not die from breast cancer. Diagnosis through symptomatic presentation, advanced stage, higher grade, absent hormone receptors (i.e. oestrogen and progesterone) and HER-2 amplification were associated with significantly higher risks of breast cancer mortality in bivariate analysis. Tumour stage, grade and hormone receptor status remained significant in the multivariable model, while mode of detection and HER-2 status were non-significant. In the bivariate analysis, Māori women had a higher risk of breast cancer mortality compared to NZ European women (OR 1.34) which was statistically non-significant. However in the adjusted model, risk of mortality was lower for Māori compared to NZ European women, although this was not significant statistically (OR 0.85). Mortality pattern from breast cancer in this study were associated with established risk factors. Ethnic inequity in breast cancer mortality in NZ appears to be largely attributable to delay in diagnosis and tumour related factors. Further research in a larger cohort is needed to identify the full impact of these factors on ethnic inequity in breast cancer mortality. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Age- and treatment-related associations with health behavior change among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Chelsea; Sandler, Dale P; Weinberg, Clarice R; Houck, Kevin; Chunduri, Minal; Hodgson, M Elizabeth; Sabatino, Susan A; White, Mary C; Rodriguez, Juan L; Nichols, Hazel B

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify demographic and treatment-related factors associated with health-promoting behavior changes after a breast cancer diagnosis. Changes in health behaviors were also evaluated according to weight, exercise, diet and alcohol consumption patterns before breast cancer diagnosis. We examined self-reported behavior changes among 1415 women diagnosed with breast cancer in the NIEHS Sister Study cohort. Women reported changes in exercising, eating healthy foods, maintaining a healthy body weight, drinking alcohol, smoking, getting enough sleep, spending time with family and friends, and participating in breast cancer awareness events. On average, women were 3.7 years from their breast cancer diagnosis. Overall, 20-36% reported positive changes in exercise, eating healthy foods, maintaining a healthy weight, or alcohol consumption. However, 17% exercised less. With each 5-year increase in diagnosis age, women were 11-16% less likely to report positive change in each of these behaviors (OR = 0.84-0.89; p cancer survivorship guideline-supported behaviors after diagnosis. Positive changes were more common among younger women or those who underwent chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. European ancestry is positively associated with breast cancer risk in Mexican women

    OpenAIRE

    Fejerman, Laura; Romieu, Isabelle; John, Esther M.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Huntsman, Scott; Beckman, Kenneth B.; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.; Burchard, Esteban Gonzalez; Ziv, Elad; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer is 35% lower in Hispanic women living in the San Francisco Bay Area than in non-Hispanic white women. We have previously described a significant association between genetic ancestry and risk of breast cancer in a sample of US Hispanics/Latinas. We re-tested the association in women residing in Mexico because of the possibility that the original finding may be confounded by US specific unmeasured environmental exposures. We genotyped a set of 106 ancestry informa...

  20. A genome-wide association study of breast cancer in women of African ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang; Chen, Gary K; Stram, Daniel O; Millikan, Robert C; Ambrosone, Christine B; John, Esther M; Bernstein, Leslie; Zheng, Wei; Palmer, Julie R; Hu, Jennifer J; Rebbeck, Tim R; Ziegler, Regina G; Nyante, Sarah; Bandera, Elisa V; Ingles, Sue A; Press, Michael F; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward A; Deming, Sandra L; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Demichele, Angela; Chanock, Stephen J; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa; Cai, Qiuyin; Li, Guoliang; Long, Jirong; Huo, Dezheng; Zheng, Yonglan; Cox, Nancy J; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Adebamowo, Clement; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Simon, Michael S; Hennis, Anselm; Nemesure, Barbara; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Leske, M Cristina; Ambs, Stefan; Hutter, Carolyn M; Young, Alicia; Kooperberg, Charles; Peters, Ulrike; Rhie, Suhn K; Wan, Peggy; Sheng, Xin; Pooler, Loreall C; Van Den Berg, David J; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N; Henderson, Brian E; Haiman, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in diverse populations are needed to reveal variants that are more common and/or limited to defined populations. We conducted a GWAS of breast cancer in women of African ancestry, with genotyping of >1,000,000 SNPs in 3,153 African American cases and 2,831 controls, and replication testing of the top 66 associations in an additional 3,607 breast cancer cases and 11,330 controls of African ancestry. Two of the 66 SNPs replicated (p women of African ancestry will demand testing of a substantially larger set of markers from stage 1 in a larger replication sample.

  1. Association of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 and Ki67 in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Christina Annette; Knoop, Ann; Bjerre, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    The role of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) in estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer remains to be fully elucidated. We evaluated TIMP-1 as a prognostic marker in patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen and investigated TIMP-1s association with Ki67 and ER/progesterone ....../progesterone receptor (PR)/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) profiles.......The role of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) in estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer remains to be fully elucidated. We evaluated TIMP-1 as a prognostic marker in patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen and investigated TIMP-1s association with Ki67 and ER...

  2. Association of diabetes and diabetes treatment with incidence of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Esquinas, Esther; Guinó, Elisabeth; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Llorca, Javier; Altzibar, Jone M; Peiró-Pérez, Rosana; Martín, Vicente; Moreno-Iribas, Concepción; Tardón, Adonina; Caballero, Francisco Javier; Puig-Vives, Montse; Guevara, Marcela; Villa, Tania Fernández; Salas, Dolores; Amiano, Pilar; Dierssen-Sotos, Trinidad; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto; Sala, María; Kogevinas, Manolis; Aragonés, Nuria; Moreno, Víctor; Pollán, Marina

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of diabetes and diabetes treatment with risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Histologically confirmed incident cases of postmenopausal breast (N = 916) cancer were recruited from 23 Spanish public hospitals. Population-based controls (N = 1094) were randomly selected from primary care center lists within the catchment areas of the participant hospitals. ORs (95 % CI) were estimated using mixed-effects logistic regression models, using the recruitment center as a random effect term. Breast tumors were classified into hormone receptor positive (ER+ or PR+), HER2+ and triple negative (TN). Diabetes was not associated with the overall risk of breast cancer (OR 1.09; 95 % CI 0.82-1.45), and it was only linked to the risk of developing TN tumors: Among 91 women with TN tumors, 18.7 % were diabetic, while the corresponding figure among controls was 9.9 % (OR 2.25; 95 % CI 1.22-4.15). Regarding treatment, results showed that insulin use was more prevalent among diabetic cases (2.5 %) as compared to diabetic controls (0.7 %); OR 2.98; 95 % CI 1.26-7.01. They also showed that, among diabetics, the risk of developing HR+/HER2- tumors decreased with longer metformin use (ORper year 0.89; 95 % CI 0.81-0.99; based on 24 cases and 43 controls). This study reinforces the need to correctly classify breast cancers when studying their association with diabetes. Given the low survival rates in women diagnosed with TN breast tumors and the potential impact of diabetes control on breast cancer prevention, more studies are needed to better characterize this association.

  3. Factors associated with surgical decision making in women with early-stage breast cancer: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Bride, Maire Brid; Neal, Lonzetta; Dilaveri, Christina A; Sandhu, Nicole P; Hieken, Tina J; Ghosh, Karthik; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L

    2013-03-01

    Current recommendations for surgical management of early-stage breast cancer include breast-conserving surgery with postoperative irradiation. However, studies show that mastectomy is still being used by women with early-stage breast cancer. Review of the medical literature published between 2000 and 2010 to determine the factors associated with the decision of patients for surgical treatment in early-stage breast cancer. The following patient characteristics affect the surgical decision-making process in early-stage breast cancer: age, socioeconomic factors, geographic area in which the patient lives, proximity to a radiation therapy center, testing for BRCA gene, breast imaging, and decision aids. Of increasing importance in the decision making about treatment of women with early-stage breast cancer are the woman's perception of having a surgical choice and the influence of that choice on postoperative quality of life.

  4. Clinicopathological factors associated with survival in patients with breast cancer brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Zhang, Kui; Siegal, Gene P; Wei, Shi

    2017-06-01

    Brain metastasis from breast cancer generally represents a catastrophic event yet demonstrates substantial biological heterogeneity. There have been limited studies solely focusing on the prognosis of patients with such metastasis. In this study, we carried out a comprehensive analysis in 108 consecutive patients with breast cancer brain metastases between 1997 and 2012 to further define clinicopathological factors associated with early onset of brain metastasis and survival outcomes after development of them. We found that lobular carcinoma, higher clinical stages at diagnosis, and lack of coexisting bone metastasis were significantly associated with a worse brain relapse-free survival when compared with brain-only metastasis. High histologic grade, triple-negative breast cancer, and absence of visceral involvement were unfavorable prognostic factors after brain metastasis. Furthermore, high histologic grade, advanced tumor stages, and lack of coexisting bone involvement indicated a worse overall survival. Thus, the previously established prognostic factors in early stage or advanced breast cancers may not entirely apply to patients with brain metastases. Furthermore, the prognostic significance of the clinicopathological factors differed before and after a patient develops brain metastasis. This knowledge might help in establishing an algorithm to further stratify patients with breast cancer into prognostically significant categories for optimal prevention, screening, and treatment of their brain metastasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhanced NFκB and AP-1 transcriptional activity associated with antiestrogen resistant breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Dan H

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signaling pathways that converge on two different transcription factor complexes, NFκB and AP-1, have been identified in estrogen receptor (ER-positive breast cancers resistant to the antiestrogen, tamoxifen. Methods Two cell line models of tamoxifen-resistant ER-positive breast cancer, MCF7/HER2 and BT474, showing increased AP-1 and NFκB DNA-binding and transcriptional activities, were studied to compare tamoxifen effects on NFκB and AP-1 regulated reporter genes relative to tamoxifen-sensitive MCF7 cells. The model cell lines were treated with the IKK inhibitor parthenolide (PA or the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (PS341, alone and in combination with tamoxifen. Expression microarray data available from 54 UCSF node-negative ER-positive breast cancer cases with known clinical outcome were used to search for potential genes signifying upregulated NFκB and AP-1 transcriptional activity in association with tamoxifen resistance. The association of these genes with patient outcome was further evaluated using node-negative ER-positive breast cancer cases identified from three other published data sets (Rotterdam, n = 209; Amsterdam, n = 68; Basel, n = 108, each having different patient age and adjuvant tamoxifen treatment characteristics. Results Doses of parthenolide and bortezomib capable of sensitizing the two endocrine resistant breast cancer models to tamoxifen were capable of suppressing NFκB and AP-1 regulated gene expression in combination with tamoxifen and also increased ER recruitment of the transcriptional co-repressor, NCoR. Transcript profiles from the UCSF breast cancer cases revealed three NFκB and AP-1 upregulated genes – cyclin D1, uPA and VEGF – capable of dichotomizing node-negative ER-positive cases into early and late relapsing subsets despite adjuvant tamoxfien therapy and most prognostic for younger age cases. Across the four independent sets of node-negative ER-positive breast cancer cases

  6. Breast cancer in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in situ - male; Intraductal carcinoma - male; Inflammatory breast cancer - male; Paget disease of the nipple - male; Breast cancer - male ... The cause of breast cancer in men is not clear. But there are risk factors that make breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to ...

  7. Differential promoter methylation of kinesin family member 1a in plasma is associated with breast cancer and DNA repair capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    GUERRERO-PRESTON, RAFAEL; HADAR, TAL; OSTROW, KIMBERLY LASKIE; SOUDRY, ETHAN; ECHENIQUE, MIGUEL; ILI-GANGAS, CARMEN; PÉREZ, GABRIELA; PEREZ, JIMENA; BREBI-MIEVILLE, PRISCILLA; DESCHAMPS, JOSÉ; MORALES, LUISA; BAYONA, MANUEL; SIDRANSKY, DAVID; MATTA, JAIME

    2014-01-01

    Methylation alterations of CpG islands, CpG island shores and first exons are key events in the formation and progression of human cancer, and an increasing number of differentially methylated regions and genes have been identified in breast cancer. Recent studies of the breast cancer methylome using deep sequencing and microarray platforms are providing a novel insight on the different roles aberrant methylation plays in molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Accumulating evidence from a subset of studies suggests that promoter methylation of tumor-suppressor genes associated with breast cancer can be quantified in circulating DNA. However, there is a paucity of studies that examine the combined presence of genetic and epigenetic alterations associated with breast cancer using blood-based assays. Dysregulation of DNA repair capacity (DRC) is a genetic risk factor for breast cancer that has been measured in lymphocytes. We isolated plasma DNA from 340 participants in a breast cancer case control project to study promoter methylation levels of five genes previously shown to be associated with breast cancer in frozen tissue and in cell line DNA: MAL, KIF1A, FKBP4, VGF and OGDHL. Methylation of at least one gene was found in 49% of the cases compared to 20% of the controls. Three of the four genes had receiver characteristic operator curve values of ≥0.50: MAL (0.64), KIF1A (0.51) and OGDHL (0.53). KIF1A promoter methylation was associated with breast cancer and inversely associated with DRC. This is the first evidence of a significant association between genetic and epigenetic alterations in breast cancer using blood-based tests. The potential diagnostic utility of these biomarkers and their relevance for breast cancer risk prediction should be examined in larger cohorts. PMID:24927296

  8. Factors associated with fear of lymphedema after treatment for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammallo, Lauren S; Miller, Cynthia L; Horick, Nora K; Skolny, Melissa N; O'Toole, Jean; Specht, Michelle C; Taghian, Alphonse G

    2014-09-01

    To identify demographic and treatment characteristics associated with postoperative fear of lymphedema. Prospective cohort study. Outpatient breast clinic at a comprehensive cancer center in the northeastern United States. 324 patients undergoing treatment for unilateral breast cancer. Women with breast cancer were prospectively screened for lymphedema (relative volume change of 10% or greater) preoperatively and every three to eight months postoperatively via Perometer arm volume measurements. Fear was simultaneously evaluated via questionnaire. Multivariate linear mixed-effects regression models were used to identify factors associated with mean postoperative fear score and to plot the average fear score over time within axillary surgery type subgroups. Postoperative fear of lymphedema. Higher preoperative fear score (p fear score. The average fear score changed nonlinearly over time (p fear, younger age at diagnosis, and ALND may contribute to postoperative fear of lymphedema. Individualized education that begins preoperatively, continues throughout treatment, and is re-emphasized 24 months postoperatively may help minimize fear of lymphedema.

  9. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer in Taiwanese women: potential treatment delay and impact on survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ling Yang

    Full Text Available This study investigated the clinicopathologic characteristics and survival of women diagnosed with pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC in Taiwan. PABC is defined as breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy or within 1 year after obstetric delivery. Our sample of PABC patients (N = 26 included all patients diagnosed at a major medical center in northern Taiwan from 1984 through 2009. Among these patients, 15 were diagnosed during pregnancy and 11 were diagnosed within 1 year after delivery. The comparison group included 104 patients within the same age range as the PABC patients and diagnosed with breast cancer not associated with pregnancy from 2004 through 2009 at the same hospital. Patients' initiating treatment delayed, 5-year and 10-year overall survival were delineated by stratified Kaplan-Meier estimates. Patients' characteristics were associated with initiating treatment delayed was evaluated with multivariate proportional hazards modeling. Antepartum PABC patients were younger and had longer time between diagnosis and treatment initiation than postpartum PABC patients. The predictor of treatment delayed was including birth parity, cancer stage, and pregnancy. The PABC group had larger tumors, more advanced cancer stage, and tumors with less progesterone receptor than the comparison group. The antepartum PABC patients had higher mortality than postpartum PABC and comparison groups within 5 years after diagnosis. Based on these results, we confirmed that pregnant women with breast cancer were more likely to delay treatment. Therefore, we recommend that breast cancer screening should be integrated into the prenatal and postnatal routine visits for early detection of the women's breast problems.

  10. The association between metabolic health, obesity phenotype and the risk of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Moon Mark; White, Alexandra J; Nichols, Hazel B; O'Brien, Katie M; Weinberg, Clarice R; Sandler, Dale P

    2017-06-15

    Beyond the current emphasis on body mass index (BMI), it is unknown whether breast cancer risk differs between metabolically healthy and unhealthy normal weight or overweight/obese women. The Sister Study is a nationwide prospective cohort study. Data came from 50,884 cohort participants aged 35 to 74 years enrolled from 2003 through 2009. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate multivariable adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for breast cancer risk. Metabolic abnormalities considered included: high waist circumference (≥88 cm); elevated blood pressure (≥130/85 mm Hg or antihypertensive medication); previously diagnosed diabetes or antidiabetic drug treatment; and cholesterol-lowering medication use. During follow-up (mean, 6.4 years), 1,388 invasive breast cancers were diagnosed at least 1 year after enrollment. Compared to women with BMI breast cancer (HR = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.01-1.56), as did women with a BMI ≥25 kg/m2 and no metabolic abnormalities (metabolically healthy overweight/obese phenotype) (HR = 1.24, 95% CI: 0.99-1.55). Furthermore, risk of postmenopausal breast cancer was consistently elevated in women with normal BMI and central obesity (normal weight central obesity phenotype) regardless of the criterion used to define central obesity, with HR for waist circumference ≥88 cm, waist circumference ≥80 cm, and waist-hip ratio ≥0.85 of 1.58, 95% CI: 1.02-2.46; 1.38, 95% CI: 1.09-1.75; and 1.38, 95% CI: 1.02-1.85, respectively. There was an inverse association between premenopausal breast cancer and metabolically healthy overweight/obese phenotype (HR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.52-0.97). Our findings suggest that postmenopausal women who are metabolically unhealthy or have central adiposity may be at increased risk for breast cancer despite normal BMI. © 2017 UICC.

  11. Alu and LINE-1 hypomethylation is associated with HER2 enriched subtype of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Yeon; Seo, An Na; Jung, Hae Yoen; Gwak, Jae Moon; Jung, Namhee; Cho, Nam-Yun; Kang, Gyeong Hoon

    2014-01-01

    The changes in DNA methylation status in cancer cells are characterized by hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands and diffuse genomic hypomethylation. Alu and long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) are non-coding genomic repetitive sequences and methylation of these elements can be used as a surrogate marker for genome-wide methylation status. This study was designed to evaluate the changes of Alu and LINE-1 hypomethylation during breast cancer progression from normal to pre-invasive lesions and invasive breast cancer (IBC), and their relationship with characteristics of IBC. We analyzed the methylation status of Alu and LINE-1 in 145 cases of breast samples including normal breast tissue, atypical ductal hyperplasia/flat epithelial atypia (ADH/FEA), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and IBC, and another set of 129 cases of IBC by pyrosequencing. Alu methylation showed no significant changes during multistep progression of breast cancer, although it tended to decrease during the transition from DCIS to IBC. In contrast, LINE-1 methylation significantly decreased from normal to ADH/FEA, while it was similar in ADH/FEA, DCIS and IBC. In IBC, Alu hypomethylation correlated with negative estrogen receptor (ER) status, and LINE-1 hypomethylation was associated with negative ER status, ERBB2 (HER2) amplification and p53 overexpression. Alu and LINE-1 methylation status was significantly different between breast cancer subtypes, and the HER2 enriched subtype had lowest methylation levels. In survival analyses, low Alu methylation status tended to be associated with poor disease-free survival of the patients. Our findings suggest that LINE-1 hypomethylation is an early event and Alu hypomethylation is probably a late event during breast cancer progression, and prominent hypomethylation of Alu and LINE-1 in HER2 enriched subtype may be related to chromosomal instability of this specific subtype.

  12. Modification of the association between recreational physical activity and survival after breast cancer by promoter methylation in breast cancer-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Lauren E; Chen, Jia; Cho, Yoon Hee; Khankari, Nikhil K; Bradshaw, Patrick T; White, Alexandra J; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Terry, Mary Beth; Neugut, Alfred I; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Santella, Regina M; Gammon, Marilie D

    2017-02-21

    Mechanisms underlying the inverse association between physical activity and survival after breast cancer are unresolved, but DNA methylation may play a role. We hypothesized that promoter methylation of breast cancer-related genes, as well as global methylation, may modify the association between prediagnostic recreational physical activity (RPA) and breast cancer mortality. Using a population-based sample of 1254 women diagnosed with first primary breast cancer, we examined modification of the RPA-mortality association by gene-specific promoter methylation and global methylation. Average lifetime RPA was assessed from menarche to diagnosis through structured in-home interviews. Promoter methylation of 13 breast cancer-related genes was evaluated in archived tumor by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and MethyLight assay. Global methylation in white blood cell DNA was determined at long interspersed nucleotide element 1 and by the luminometric methylation assay. After approximately 15 years of follow-up, 486 patients had died, and 186 of the deaths were breast cancer-related. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate HRs and 95% CIs as well as likelihood ratio tests to assess multiplicative interactions. All-cause mortality was lower only among physically active women with methylated promoter of APC (HR 0.60, 95% CI 0.40-0.80), CCND2 (HR 0.56, 95% CI 0.32-0.99), HIN (HR 0.55, 95% CI 0.38-0.80), and TWIST1 (HR 0.28, 95% CI 0.14-0.56) in tumors, but not among those with unmethylated tumors (significant interaction p breast cancer that is associated with RPA may be more pronounced in women with promoter tumor methylation in biologically plausible genes.

  13. Association of Epstein-Barr virus and passive smoking with the risk of breast cancer among Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Mei-Ling; Xi, Jing; Chen, Li-Juan; Su, Yi; Cen, Yu-Ling; Su, Feng-Xi; Lin, Ying; Zhuang, Zhi-Xiong; Tang, Lu-Ying; Ren, Ze-Fang

    2014-09-01

    Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), as indexed by the higher immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody titers, was reported to be associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Passive smoking plays a role in host immune responses and may modify the association of EBV with breast cancer. We carried out a case-control study using data from 349 incident breast cancer cases and 500 age-matched controls in the Guangzhou Breast Cancer Study to investigate the interactions of EBV antibodies and passive smoking on breast cancer risk. A higher risk of breast cancer was observed in passive smokers who were seropositive for EBV viral capsid antigen IgA or nuclear antigen-1 IgA in serum compared with those with the seronegativity and no passive smoking [odds ratio 3.13 (95% confidence interval, 1.76-5.56)]. There was a significant linear trend for the risk of breast cancer from IgA seropositivity with passive smoking, only IgA seropositivity, only passive smoking, to seronegativity without passive smoking (Ppassive smoking and EBV IgA seropositivity. The present study confirmed the associations of EBV IgA antibodies and passive smoking with the risk of breast cancer and suggested that there was no synergic action between passive smoking and EBV IgA seropositivity on the risk of breast cancer.

  14. Opioids and breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe; Ahern, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioids may alter immune function, thereby potentially affecting cancer recurrence. The authors investigated the association between postdiagnosis opioid use and breast cancer recurrence. METHODS: Patients with incident, early stage breast cancer who were diagnosed during 1996 through...... 2008 in Denmark were identified from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group Registry. Opioid prescriptions were ascertained from the Danish National Prescription Registry. Follow-up began on the date of primary surgery for breast cancer and continued until breast cancer recurrence, death......, emigration, 10 years, or July 31, 2013, whichever occurred first. Cox regression models were used to compute hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals associating breast cancer recurrence with opioid prescription use overall and by opioid type and strength, immunosuppressive effect, chronic use (≥6 months...

  15. Lifestyle influences on the association between pre-diagnostic hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer prognosis - results from The Danish 'Diet, Cancer and Health' prospective cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Marianne; Olsen, Anja; Kroman, Niels

    2014-01-01

    , and Health" diagnosed with breast cancer (BC) were identified and their pre-diagnostic HRT use evaluated for association with tumour biology and breast cancer outcome in multivariate analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Breast cancer specific mortality. RESULTS: Of the 1212 patients originally considered 1064......OBJECTIVES: The association between pre-diagnostic hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and breast cancer specific mortality as well as potential influences from other lifestyle factors on the association was investigated. STUDY DESIGN: Female participants from the prospective cohort "Diet, Cancer...... were included. Of these, 105 women died from breast cancer during a median follow-up of 6.3 years (range 0.2-14.3 years). In multivariate analyses women who used HRT at enrolment into the cohort study had 47% lower risk of dying from breast cancer as compared to women who had previously or never used...

  16. [Pregnancy and breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Torres, Nicolás; Asbun-Bojalil, Juan; Hernández-Valencia, Marcelino

    2013-01-01

    association of breast cancer and pregnancy is not common. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the pregnancy, young age, stage, treatment, prognosis and mortality of women with breast cancer during pregnancy. retrospective analysis from March 1992 to February 2009, 16 patients were included with breast cancer and pregnancy. They were analized: histological characteristic of tumor, therapeutic response of the oncological treatment, evolution of the pregnancy. From of baby born: Apgar and weight. The woman's mortality with breast cancer during pregnancy was evaluated for age group and for interval of time between late pregnancy and diagnosis posterior of breast cancer and pregnancy. characteristic predominant clinicohistological: stage III (81.2%), T3-T4 (75%), N+ 93.7%, invasive ductal carcinoma (87.5%), histological grade 2-3 (93.7%), receptor estrogeno positive (43.7%); RPpositive (25%); HER-2/neu positive (31.2%). 27 chemotherapy cycles were applied with 5-fluorouracil, epirubicin and cyclophosphamide during the second or third trimester of the pregnancy, there were not severe adverse effects for the mothers and the baby born exposed to chemotherapy. The mean time to disease recurrence was 18.8 months (range, 6-62 months). The rate of mortality for specific age (breast cancer and pregnancy.

  17. Association of thyroid, breast and renal cell cancer: a population-based study of the prevalence of second malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Fossen, Victoria L; Wilhelm, Scott M; Eaton, Jennifer L; McHenry, Christopher R

    2013-04-01

    Analysis of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data has shown that the incidence of thyroid cancer is higher in patients with a preexisting malignancy and that the incidence of other malignancies is higher in patients with thyroid cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of a second malignancy in patients treated for thyroid, breast or renal cell cancer and determine what associations, if any, exist between these cancers. This study utilized the novel data system, Explorys, as its population base. Patient cohorts were constructed using ICD-9 codes, and prevalence rates were obtained for each cancer. Rates of second malignancy were obtained and compared to the baseline prevalence for a particular malignancy. Female thyroid cancer patients had a 0.67- and twofold increase in prevalence of a subsequent breast and renal cell cancer. Female breast and renal cell cancer patients had a twofold and 1.5-fold increase in the prevalence of thyroid cancer, respectively. Male patients with thyroid cancer had a 29- and 4.5-fold increase in prevalence of subsequent breast and renal cell cancer. Male patients with breast and renal cell cancer had an increased prevalence of subsequent thyroid cancer, 19- and threefold, respectively. Our study demonstrated a bidirectional association between thyroid, breast and renal cancer in both male and female patients. This may have important implications for patient follow-up and screening after treatment of a primary cancer.

  18. Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart Christine Unitt , Kamaneh Montazeri , ... Disclosures Footnotes Figures & Tables Info & Metrics eLetters Introduction Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. ...

  19. Do fatty breasts increase or decrease breast cancer risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, John A; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2012-01-25

    Few studies have investigated the association of non-dense area or fatty breasts in conjunction with breast density and breast cancer risk. Two articles in a recent issue of Breast Cancer Research investigate the role of absolute non-dense breast area measured on mammograms and find conflicting results: one article finds that non-dense breast area has a modest positive association with breast cancer risk, whereas the other finds that non-dense breast area has a strong protective effect to reduce breast cancer risk. Understanding the interplay of body mass index, menopause status, and measurement of non-dense breast area would help to clarify the contribution of non-dense breast area to breast cancer risk.

  20. Imaging male breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, S., E-mail: sdoyle2@nhs.net [Primrose Breast Care Unit, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Steel, J.; Porter, G. [Primrose Breast Care Unit, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Male breast cancer is rare, with some pathological and radiological differences from female breast cancer. There is less familiarity with the imaging appearances of male breast cancer, due to its rarity and the more variable use of preoperative imaging. This review will illustrate the commonest imaging appearances of male breast cancer, with emphasis on differences from female breast cancer and potential pitfalls in diagnosis, based on a 10 year experience in our institution.

  1. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple loci associated with both mammographic density and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Sara; Thompson, Deborah J; Paterson, Andrew D; Li, Jingmei; Gierach, Gretchen L; Scott, Christopher; Stone, Jennifer; Douglas, Julie A; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Fernandez-Navarro, Pablo; Verghase, Jajini; Smith, Paula; Brown, Judith; Luben, Robert; Wareham, Nicholas J; Loos, Ruth J F; Heit, John A; Pankratz, V Shane; Norman, Aaron; Goode, Ellen L; Cunningham, Julie M; deAndrade, Mariza; Vierkant, Robert A; Czene, Kamila; Fasching, Peter A; Baglietto, Laura; Southey, Melissa C; Giles, Graham G; Shah, Kaanan P; Chan, Heang-Ping; Helvie, Mark A; Beck, Andrew H; Knoblauch, Nicholas W; Hazra, Aditi; Hunter, David J; Kraft, Peter; Pollan, Marina; Figueroa, Jonine D; Couch, Fergus J; Hopper, John L; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Boyd, Norman F; Vachon, Celine M; Tamimi, Rulla M

    2014-10-24

    Mammographic density reflects the amount of stromal and epithelial tissues in relation to adipose tissue in the breast and is a strong risk factor for breast cancer. Here we report the results from meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of three mammographic density phenotypes: dense area, non-dense area and percent density in up to 7,916 women in stage 1 and an additional 10,379 women in stage 2. We identify genome-wide significant (Pbreast cancer susceptibility loci, and four additional regions were found to be associated with breast cancer (Pbreast cancer and illustrate the power of studying intermediate quantitative phenotypes to identify putative disease-susceptibility loci.

  2. Better postdiagnosis diet quality is associated with less cancer-related fatigue in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Stephanie M; Alfano, Catherine M; Neuhouser, Marian L; Smith, Ashley W; Baumgartner, Richard N; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Bernstein, Leslie; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel

    2014-12-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the role of modifiable health behaviors in effective management of cancer-related fatigue is needed. Among breast cancer survivors, we examined how postdiagnosis diet quality, independently and jointly with physical activity, is related to fatigue, and the potential mediating role of inflammation. Seven hundred seventy women diagnosed with stage 0-IIIA breast cancer in the Health, Eating, Activity, and Lifestyle study completed food frequency and physical activity questionnaires 30 months postdiagnosis. We scored diet quality using the Healthy Eating Index 2010 (HEI-2010). Serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured in fasting 30-ml blood samples. Multidimensional fatigue was measured 41 months postdiagnosis using the 22-item revised Piper Fatigue Scale. In multivariate linear models, we determined whether fatigue was associated HEI-2010 quartiles (Q1-Q4), and a variable jointly reflecting HEI quartiles and physical activity levels. Survivors with better-quality diets (Q4 vs. Q1) had lower total fatigue (4.1 vs. 4.8, p-contrast = 0.003) and subscale scores (behavioral severity 3.4 vs. 4.2, p-contrast = 0.003; affective meaning 3.9 vs. 4.8, p-contrast = 0.007; sensory 4.4 vs. 5.2, p-contrast = 0.003; cognitive 4.6 vs. 5.0, p-contrast = 0.046). Least squares estimates of fatigue were similar in models including CRP. Compared to survivors with poor-quality diets and no physical activity, survivors with better-quality diets and meeting physical activity recommendations had significantly lower behavioral severity (3.2 vs. 4.7, p-contrast = 0.002) and sensory (3.8 vs. 4.8. p-contrast = 0.006) fatigue scores. In this large breast cancer survivor cohort, postdiagnosis diet quality was inversely and independently associated with fatigue. Future interventions designed to improve multiple energy balance behaviors can provide insight into their associations with fatigue.

  3. Time-Varying Effects of Prognostic Factors Associated With Disease-Free Survival in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Loki; Pu, Minya; Parker, Barbara A.; Thomson, Cynthia A.; Caan, Bette J.; Flatt, Shirley W.; Madlensky, Lisa; Hajek, Richard A.; Al-Delaimy, Wael K.; Saquib, Nazmus; Gold, Ellen B.

    2009-01-01

    Early detection and effective treatments have dramatically improved breast cancer survivorship, yet the risk of relapse persists even 15 years after the initial diagnosis. It is important to identify prognostic factors for late breast cancer events. The authors investigated time-varying effects of tumor characteristics on breast-cancer-free survival using data on 3,088 breast cancer survivors from 4 US states who participated in a randomized dietary intervention trial in 1995–2006, with maximum follow-up through 15 years (median, 9 years). A piecewise constant penalized spline approach incorporating time-varying coefficients was adopted, allowing for deviations from the proportional hazards assumption. This method is more flexible than standard approaches, provides direct estimates of hazard ratios across time intervals, and is computationally tractable. Having a stage II or III tumor was associated with a 3-fold higher hazard of breast cancer than having a stage I tumor during the first 2.5 years after diagnosis; this hazard ratio decreased to 2.1 after 7.7 years, but higher tumor stage remained a significant risk factor. Similar diminishing effects were found for poorly differentiated tumors. Interestingly, having a positive estrogen receptor status was protective up to 4 years after diagnosis but detrimental after 7.7 years (hazard ratio = 1.5). These results emphasize the importance of careful statistical modeling allowing for possibly time-dependent effects in long-term survivorship studies. PMID:19403844

  4. European ancestry is positively associated with breast cancer risk in Mexican women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejerman, Laura; Romieu, Isabelle; John, Esther M; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Huntsman, Scott; Beckman, Kenneth B; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J; González Burchard, Esteban; Ziv, Elad; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela

    2010-04-01

    The incidence of breast cancer is 35% lower in Hispanic women living in the San Francisco Bay Area than in non-Hispanic White women. We have previously described a significant association between genetic ancestry and risk for breast cancer in a sample of U.S. Hispanics/Latinas. We retested the association in women residing in Mexico because of the possibility that the original finding may be confounded by U.S. specific unmeasured environmental exposures. We genotyped a set of 106 ancestry informative markers in 846 Mexican women with breast cancer and 1,035 unaffected controls and estimated genetic ancestry using a maximum likelihood method. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for ancestry modeled as a categorical and continuous variable were estimated using logistic regression and adjusted for reproductive and other known risk factors. Greater European ancestry was associated with increased breast cancer risk in this new and independent sample of Mexican women residing in Mexico. Compared with women with 0% to 25% European ancestry, the risk was increased for women with 51% to 75% and 76% to 100% European ancestry [odds ratios, 1.35 (95% CI, 0.96-1.91) and 2.44 (95% CI, 0.94-6.35), respectively; P for trend = 0.044]. For every 25% increase in European ancestry (modeled as a continuous variable), there was a 20% increase in risk for breast cancer (95% CI, 1.03-1.41; P = 0.019). These results suggest that nongenetic factors play a crucial role in explaining the difference in breast cancer incidence between Latinas and non-Latina White women, and it also points out to the possibility of a genetic component to this difference.

  5. CHEK2*1100delC Heterozygosity in Women With Breast Cancer Associated With Early Death, Breast Cancer–Specific Death, and Increased Risk of a Second Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weischer, Maren; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Pharoah, Paul; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Nevanlinna, Heli; van't Veer, Laura J.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Hopper, John L.; Hall, Per; Andrulis, Irene L.; Devilee, Peter; Fasching, Peter A.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Lambrechts, Diether; Hooning, Maartje; Cox, Angela; Giles, Graham G.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Lindblom, Annika; Couch, Fergus J.; Mannermaa, Arto; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe; John, Esther M.; Dörk, Thilo; Flyger, Henrik; Dunning, Alison M.; Wang, Qin; Muranen, Taru A.; van Hien, Richard; Figueroa, Jonine; Southey, Melissa C.; Czene, Kamila; Knight, Julia A.; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Collée, Johanna Margriet; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Severi, Gianluca; Marme, Frederik; Margolin, Sara; Olson, Janet E.; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Miron, Alexander; Bogdanova, Natalia; Shah, Mitul; Blomqvist, Carl; Broeks, Annegien; Sherman, Mark; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Glendon, Gord; Seynaeve, Caroline; Ekici, Arif B.; Leunen, Karin; Kriege, Mieke; Cross, Simon S.; Baglietto, Laura; Sohn, Christof; Wang, Xianshu; Kataja, Vesa; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Meyer, Andreas; Easton, Douglas F.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Bojesen, Stig E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We tested the hypotheses that CHEK2*1100delC heterozygosity is associated with increased risk of early death, breast cancer–specific death, and risk of a second breast cancer in women with a first breast cancer. Patients and Methods From 22 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, 25,571 white women with invasive breast cancer were genotyped for CHEK2*1100delC and observed for up to 20 years (median, 6.6 years). We examined risk of early death and breast cancer–specific death by estrogen receptor status and risk of a second breast cancer after a first breast cancer in prospective studies. Results CHEK2*1100delC heterozygosity was found in 459 patients (1.8%). In women with estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer, multifactorially adjusted hazard ratios for heterozygotes versus noncarriers were 1.43 (95% CI, 1.12 to 1.82; log-rank P = .004) for early death and 1.63 (95% CI, 1.24 to 2.15; log-rank P < .001) for breast cancer–specific death. In all women, hazard ratio for a second breast cancer was 2.77 (95% CI, 2.00 to 3.83; log-rank P < .001) increasing to 3.52 (95% CI, 2.35 to 5.27; log-rank P < .001) in women with estrogen receptor–positive first breast cancer only. Conclusion Among women with estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer, CHEK2*1100delC heterozygosity was associated with a 1.4-fold risk of early death, a 1.6-fold risk of breast cancer–specific death, and a 3.5-fold risk of a second breast cancer. This is one of the few examples of a genetic factor that influences long-term prognosis being documented in an extensive series of women with breast cancer. PMID:23109706

  6. Breast Cancer Association with Cytomegalo Virus-A Tertiary Center Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendran, Anilkumar; Chisthi, Meer M

    2017-12-18

    Cytomegalo virus is a ubiquitous virus often associated with congenital infections. Some studied have claimed an association between infection with this virus and development of breast cancer. The aim of this prospective research was to study the difference in Cytomegalo virus sero-positivity among patients with breast cancer and benign breast diseases, and thereby to prove any association. This was a hospital based Case-Control study conducted at the General Surgery wards of our hospital, a tertiary level public sector health care institution. This study was done on 130 patients with breast swellings who underwent surgical excision of their lumps over a 1-year period. Patients with histologically proven malignancies were selected as cases while proven benign cases were deemed to be the controls. IgG and IgM antibodies to Cytomegalo virus were checked in the patients from both groups. All of the studied patients turned out to be positive for Immunoglobulin G against Cytomegalo virus while all the patients were found to be negative for Immunoglobulin M. There was no difference in the antibody titers among the benign and malignant cases in the study. Logistic regression calculation was also carried out including the study parameters and other known risk factors. We conclude that there is no association between Cytomegalo virus sero-positivity and breast cancer. Another conclusion is that the studied adult population has been exposed to Cytomegalo virus in some point of their lives. Further studies of a larger magnitude are essential to confirm our results.

  7. Genome-wide association study identifies a common variant in RAD51B associated with male breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orr, Nick; Lemnrau, Alina; Cooke, Rosie

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study of male breast cancer comprising 823 cases and 2,795 controls of European ancestry, with validation in independent sample sets totaling 438 cases and 474 controls. A SNP in RAD51B at 14q24.1 was significantly associated with male breast cancer risk (P...... = 3.02 × 10(-13); odds ratio (OR) = 1.57). We also refine association at 16q12.1 to a SNP within TOX3 (P = 3.87 × 10(-15); OR = 1.50)....

  8. Mechanisms of breast cancer risk in shift workers: association of telomere shortening with the duration and intensity of night work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samulin Erdem, Johanna; Notø, Heidi Ødegaard; Skare, Øivind; Lie, Jenny-Anne S; Petersen-Øverleir, Marte; Reszka, Edyta; Pepłońska, Beata; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh

    2017-08-01

    Occupational factors such as shiftwork and especially night work that involves disruption of the circadian rhythm may contribute to increased breast cancer risk. Circadian disruption may also affect telomere length (TL). While short TL generally is associated with increased cancer risk, its association with breast cancer risk is inconclusive. We suggest that working schedules might be an important factor in assessment of effects of TL on breast cancer risk. Moreover, telomere shortening might be a potential mechanism for night work-related breast cancer. In this study, effects of shift work on TL and its association with breast cancer risk were investigated in a nested breast cancer case-control study of Norwegian nurses. TL was assessed by qPCR in DNA from 563 breast cancer patients and 619 controls. Here, we demonstrate that TL is affected by intensive night work schedules, as work with six consecutive night for a period of more than 5 years was associated with decreased telomere lengths (-3.18, 95% CI: -6.46 to -0.58, P = 0.016). Furthermore, telomere shortening is associated with increased breast cancer risk in workers with long periods of consecutive night shifts. Thus, nurses with longer telomere lengths had a lower risk for breast cancer if they had worked more than four (OR: 0.37, 95% CI: 0.16-0.79, P = 0.014) or five (OR: 0.31, 95% CI: 0.10-0.83, P = 0.029) consecutive night shifts for a period of 5 years or more. These data suggest that telomere shortening is associated with the duration and intensity of night work and may be a contributing factor for breast cancer risk among female shift workers. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A biobehavioral model of weight loss associated with meditative movement practice among breast cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda K Larkey

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Women with breast cancer often experience weight gain during and after treatment, significantly increasing risk for recurrence as well as all-cause mortality. Based on a growing body of evidence, meditative movement practices may be effective for weight management. First, we describe the effects of stress on factors associated with weight gain for breast cancer survivors. Then, a model is proposed that utilizes existing evidence to suggest how meditative movement supports behavioral, psychological, and neurohormonal changes that may explain weight loss. Application of the model suggests how a novel “mindful-body-wisdom” approach may work to help reduce weight for this at-risk group.

  10. Breast reconstruction after breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serletti, Joseph M; Fosnot, Joshua; Nelson, Jonas A; Disa, Joseph J; Bucky, Louis P

    2011-06-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Describe the mental, emotional, and physical benefits of reconstruction in breast cancer patients. 2. Compare the most common techniques of reconstruction in patients and detail benefits and risks associated with each. 3. Outline different methods of reconstruction and identify the method considered best for the patient based on timing of the procedures, body type, adjuvant therapies, and other coexisting conditions. 4. Distinguish between some of the different flaps that can be considered for autologous reconstruction. Breast cancer is unfortunately a common disease affecting millions of women, often at a relatively young age. Reconstruction following mastectomy offers women an opportunity to mollify some of the emotional and aesthetic effects of this devastating disease. Although varying techniques of alloplastic and autologous techniques are available, all strive to achieve the same goal: the satisfactory reformation of a breast mound that appears as natural as possible without clothing and at the very least is normal in appearance under clothing. This article summarizes the various approaches to breast reconstruction and offers a balanced view of the risks and benefits of each, all of which in the end offer the opportunity for excellent and predictable results with a high degree of patient satisfaction.

  11. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, James S., E-mail: james.lawson@unsw.edu.au; Heng, Benjamin [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia)

    2010-04-30

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix.

  12. Breast Tissue Composition and Susceptibility to Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lisa J.; Bronskill, Michael; Yaffe, Martin J.; Duric, Neb; Minkin, Salomon

    2010-01-01

    Breast density, as assessed by mammography, reflects breast tissue composition. Breast epithelium and stroma attenuate x-rays more than fat and thus appear light on mammograms while fat appears dark. In this review, we provide an overview of selected areas of current knowledge about the relationship between breast density and susceptibility to breast cancer. We review the evidence that breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer, the histological and other risk factors that are associated with variations in breast density, and the biological plausibility of the associations with risk of breast cancer. We also discuss the potential for improved risk prediction that might be achieved by using alternative breast imaging methods, such as magnetic resonance or ultrasound. After adjustment for other risk factors, breast density is consistently associated with breast cancer risk, more strongly than most other risk factors for this disease, and extensive breast density may account for a substantial fraction of breast cancer. Breast density is associated with risk of all of the proliferative lesions that are thought to be precursors of breast cancer. Studies of twins have shown that breast density is a highly heritable quantitative trait. Associations between breast density and variations in breast histology, risk of proliferative breast lesions, and risk of breast cancer may be the result of exposures of breast tissue to both mitogens and mutagens. Characterization of breast density by mammography has several limitations, and the uses of breast density in risk prediction and breast cancer prevention may be improved by other methods of imaging, such as magnetic resonance or ultrasound tomography. PMID:20616353

  13. Are viruses associated with human breast cancer? Scrutinizing the molecular evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Deepti; Buehring, Gertrude Case

    2012-08-01

    The three viruses most studied as possible causes of human breast cancer are mouse mammary tumor virus-like sequences (MMTV-LS), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and oncogenic (high risk) types of human papilloma virus (HPV). The first step in fulfilling traditional criteria for inferring that a cancer is caused by a virus is to demonstrate the virus in the affected tissue. Molecular techniques, compared to host antibody assessment and immunohistochemistry, are the most definitive in establishing viral presence. Results of 85 original molecular research investigations to detect one or more of the three viruses have been extremely divergent with no consensus reached. We evaluated the methodology of these studies for the following: type of molecular assay, DNA/RNA quality control, positive and negative assay controls, type of fixation, genome targets, methods for preventing and detecting molecular contamination, pathology of specimens processed, sample size, and proportion of specimens positive for the viral genome region targeted. Only seven of the studies convincingly demonstrated the presence of an oncogenic virus biomarker (EBV: 4/30 studies (13%); HPV 3/29 studies (10%), whereas 25 convincingly demonstrated absence of the virus studied (MMTV-LS: 4/25 (16%); EBV: 15/30 (50%); 6/29 (21%). The remainder of the studies suffered shortcomings, which, in our opinion, prevented a definitive conclusion. Only one of the studies compared frequency of the virus in breast tissue of breast cancer patients versus appropriate normal control subjects with no history of breast cancer. None of the studies were designed as epidemiologic studies to determine if the presence of the virus was significantly associated with breast cancer. Based on our evaluation, the data in the publications reviewed here remain preliminary, and do not justify a conclusion that MMTV-LS, HPV, or EBV are causally associated with breast cancer. However, they form a valuable basis for redirecting future studies.

  14. The association between general practitioners’ attitudes towards breast cancer screening and women’s screening participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Line

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer screening in Denmark is organised by the health services in the five regions. Although general practitioners (GPs are not directly involved in the screening process, they are often the first point of contact to the health care system and thus play an important advisory role. No previous studies, in a health care setting like the Danish system, have investigated the association between GPs’ attitudes towards breast cancer screening and women’s participation in the screening programme. Methods Data on women’s screening participation was obtained from the regional screening authorities. Data on GPs’ attitudes towards breast cancer screening was taken from a previous survey among GPs in the Central Denmark Region. This study included women aged 50-69 years who were registered with a singlehanded GP who had participated in the survey. Results The survey involved 67 singlehanded GPs with a total of 13,288 women on their lists. Five GPs (7% had a negative attitude towards breast cancer screening. Among registered women, 81% participated in the first screening round. Multivariate analyses revealed that women registered with a GP with a negative attitude towards breast cancer screening were 17% (95% CI: 2-34% more likely to be non-participants compared with women registered with a GP with a positive attitude towards breast cancer screening. Conclusion The GPs' attitudes may influence the participation rate even in a system where GPs are not directly involved in the screening process. However, further studies are needed to investigate this association.

  15. Curvilinear Associations between Benefit Finding and Psychosocial Adjustment to Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Suzanne C.; Carver, Charles S.; Antoni, Michael H.; Weaver, Kathryn E.; Phillips, Kristin M.

    2006-01-01

    Two previously studied cohorts of women with nonmetastatic breast cancer (Ns = 230 and 136) were reexamined. Participants were assessed during the year after surgery and 5-8 years later. Associations were examined between benefit finding (BF) and several indicators of psychosocial adjustment (e.g., perceived quality of life, positive affect,…

  16. The ‘Pokemon’ (ZBTB7) Gene: No Evidence of Association with Sporadic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Antonio; Vega, Ana; Milne, Roger L.; García-Magariños, Manuel; Ruibal, Álvaro; Benítez, Javier; Carracedo, Ángel

    2008-01-01

    It has been proposed that the excess of familiar risk associated with breast cancer could be explained by the cumulative effect of multiple weakly predisposing alleles. The transcriptional repressor FBI1, also known as Pokemon, has recently been identified as a critical factor in oncogenesis. This protein is encoded by the ZBTB7 gene. Here we aimed to determine whether polymorphisms in ZBTB7 are associated with breast cancer risk in a sample of cases and controls collected in hospitals from North and Central Spanish patients. We genotyped 15 SNPs in ZBTB7, including the flanking regions, with an average coverage of 1 SNP/2.4 Kb, in 360 sporadic breast cancer cases and 402 controls. Comparison of allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies between cases and controls did not reveal associations using Pearson’s chi-square test and a permutation procedure to correct for multiple test. In this, the first study of the ZBTB7 gene in relation to, sporadic breast cancer, we found no evidence of an association. PMID:21892298

  17. The 'Pokemon' (ZBTB7) Gene: No Evidence of Association with Sporadic Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Antonio; Vega, Ana; Milne, Roger L; García-Magariños, Manuel; Ruibal, Alvaro; Benítez, Javier; Carracedo, Angel

    2008-01-01

    It has been proposed that the excess of familiar risk associated with breast cancer could be explained by the cumulative effect of multiple weakly predisposing alleles. The transcriptional repressor FBI1, also known as Pokemon, has recently been identified as a critical factor in oncogenesis. This protein is encoded by the ZBTB7 gene. Here we aimed to determine whether polymorphisms in ZBTB7 are associated with breast cancer risk in a sample of cases and controls collected in hospitals from North and Central Spanish patients. We genotyped 15 SNPs in ZBTB7, including the flanking regions, with an average coverage of 1 SNP/2.4 Kb, in 360 sporadic breast cancer cases and 402 controls. Comparison of allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies between cases and controls did not reveal associations using Pearson's chi-square test and a permutation procedure to correct for multiple test. In this, the first study of the ZBTB7 gene in relation to, sporadic breast cancer, we found no evidence of an association.

  18. Increased risk of breast cancer associated with long-term shift work in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Anne; Richardson, Harriet; Burstyn, Igor; Lohrisch, Caroline; SenGupta, Sandip K; Lai, Agnes S; Lee, Derrick; Spinelli, John J; Aronson, Kristan J

    2013-12-01

    Long-term night work has been suggested as a risk factor for breast cancer; however, additional studies with more comprehensive methods of exposure assessment to capture the diversity of shift patterns are needed. As well, few previous studies have considered the role of hormone receptor subtype. Relationships between night shift work and breast cancer were examined among 1134 breast cancer cases and 1179 controls, frequency-matched by age in Vancouver, British Columbia, and Kingston, Ontario. Self-reported lifetime occupational histories were assessed for night shift work, and hormone receptor status obtained from tumour pathology records. With approximately one-third of cases and controls ever employed in night shift work, associations with duration demonstrated no relationship between either 0-14 or 15-29 years, while an association was apparent for ≥30 years (OR=2.21, 95% CI 1.14 to 4.31). This association with long-term night shift work is robust to alternative definitions of prolonged shift work, with similar results for both health and non-health care workers. Long-term night shift work in a diverse mix of occupations is associated with increased breast cancer risk and not limited to nurses, as in most previous studies.

  19. Estimating the alcohol–breast cancer association: a comparison of diet diaries, FFQs and combined measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keogh, R.H.; Park, J.Y.; White, I.R.; Lentjes, M.A.H.; McTaggert, A.; Bhaniani, A.; Cairns, B.J.; Key, T.J.; Greenwood, D.C.; Burley, V.J.; Cade, J.E.; Dahm, C.C.; Pot, G.K.; Stephen, AM; Massett, G.; Brunner, E.J.; Khaw, K.T.

    2012-01-01

    The alcohol-breast cancer association has been established using alcohol intake measurements from Food Frequency Questionnaires (FFQ). For some nutrients diet diary measurements are more highly correlated with true intake compared with FFQ measurements, but it is unknown whether this is true for

  20. Association between changes in fat distribution and biomarkers for breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gemert, Willemijn A.M.; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.; May, Anne M.; Elias, Sjoerd G.; Van Der Palen, Job; Veldhuis, Wouter B.; Stapper, Maaike; Stellato, Rebecca K.; Schuit, Jantine A.; Peeters, Petra H.

    2017-01-01

    We assessed the associations between changes in total and abdominal fat and changes in biomarkers for breast cancer risk using data of the SHAPE-2 trial. In the SHAPE-2 trial, 243 postmenopausal overweight women were included. The intervention in this trial consisted of 5-6 kg weight loss either by

  1. Association between changes in fat distribution and biomarkers for breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gemert, Willemijn A; Monninkhof, Evelyn M; May, Anne M; Elias, Sjoerd G; van der Palen, Job; Veldhuis, Wouter; Stapper, Maaike; Stellato, Rebecca K; Schuit, A.J.; Peeters, Petra H

    We assessed the associations between changes in total and abdominal fat and changes in biomarkers for breast cancer risk using data of the SHAPE-2 trial. In the SHAPE-2 trial, 243 postmenopausal overweight women were included. The intervention in this trial consisted of 5-6 kg weight loss either by

  2. Annexin A1 expression in a pooled breast cancer series : Association with tumor subtypes and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobral-Leite, Marcelo; Wesseling, Jelle; Smit, Vincent T H B M; Nevanlinna, Heli; van Miltenburg, Martine H.; Sanders, Joyce; Hofland, Ingrid; Blows, Fiona M.; Coulson, Penny; Patrycja, Gazinska; Schellens, Jan H M; Fagerholm, Rainer; Heikkilä, Päivi; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Provenzano, Elena; Ali, Hamid Raza; Figueroa, Jonine; Sherman, Mark; Lissowska, Jolanta; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Phillips, Kelly Anne; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Visscher, Daniel; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Arndt, Volker; Holleczek, Bernd; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W M; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van de Water, Bob; Broeks, Annegien; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Pharoah, Paul D P; García-Closas, Montserrat; de Graauw, Marjo; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Aghmesheh, Morteza; Amor, David; Andrews, Lesley; Antill, Yoland; Armitage, Shane; Arnold, Leanne; Balleine, Rosemary; Bankier, Agnes; Bastick, Patti; Beesley, Jonathan; Beilby, John; Bennett, Barbara; Bennett, Ian; Berry, Geoffrey; Blackburn, Anneke; Bogwitz, Michael; Brennan, Meagan; Brown, Melissa; Buckley, Michael; Burgess, Matthew; Burke, Jo; Butow, Phyllis; Byron, Keith; Callen, David; Campbell, Ian; Chauhan, Deepa; Chauhan, Manisha; Christian, Alice; Clarke, Christine; Colley, Alison; Cotton, Dick; Crook, Ashley; Cui, James; Culling, Bronwyn; Cummings, Margaret; Dawson, Sarah Jane; deFazio, Anna; Delatycki, Martin; Dickson, Rebecca; Dixon, Joanne; Dobrovic, Alexander; Dudding, Tracy; Edkins, Ted; Edwards, Stacey; Eisenbruch, Maurice; Farshid, Gelareh; Fawcett, Susan; Fellows, Andrew; Fenton, Georgina; Field, Michael; Firgaira, Frank; Flanagan, James; Fleming, Jean; Fong, Peter; Forbes, John; Fox, Stephen; French, Juliet; Friedlander, Michael; Gaff, Clara; Gardner, Mac; Gattas, Mike; George, Peter; Giles, Graham; Gill, Grantley; Goldblatt, Jack; Greening, Sian; Grist, Scott; Haan, Eric; Hardie, Kate; Harris, Marion; Hart, Stewart; Hayward, Nick; Healey, Sue; Heiniger, Louise; Hopper, John; Humphrey, Evelyn; Hunt, Clare; James, Paul; Jenkins, Mark; Jones, Alison; Kefford, Rick; Kidd, Alexa; Kiely, Belinda; Kirk, Judy; Koehler, Jessica; Kollias, James; Kovalenko, Serguei; Lakhani, Sunil; Leaming, Amanda; Leary, Jennifer; Lim, Jacqueline; Lindeman, Geoff; Lipton, Lara; Lobb, Liz; Mann, Graham; Marsh, Deborah; McLachlan, Sue Anne; Meiser, Bettina; Meldrum, Cliff; Milne, Roger; Mitchell, Gillian; Newman, Beth; Niedermayr, Eveline; Nightingale, Sophie; O'Connell, Shona; O'Loughlin, Imelda; Osborne, Richard; Pachter, Nick; Patterson, Briony; Peters, Lester; Phillips, Kelly; Price, Melanie; Purser, Lynne; Reeve, Tony; Reeve, Jeanne; Richards, Robert; Rickard, Edwina; Robinson, Bridget; Rudzki, Barney; Saleh, Mona; Salisbury, Elizabeth; Sambrook, Joe; Saunders, Christobel; Saunus, Jodi; Sayer, Robyn; Scott, Elizabeth; Scott, Rodney; Scott, Clare; Seshadri, Ram; Sexton, Adrienne; Sharma, Raghwa; Shelling, Andrew; Simpson, Peter; Southey, Melissa; Spurdle, Amanda; Suthers, Graeme; Sykes, Pamela; Tassell, Margaret; Taylor, Donna; Taylor, Jessica; Thierry, Benjamin; Thomas, Susan; Thompson, Ella; Thorne, Heather; Townshend, Sharron; Trainer, Alison; Tran, Lan; Tucker, Kathy; Tyler, Janet; Visvader, Jane; Walker, Logan; Walpole, Ian; Ward, Robin; Waring, Paul; Warner, Bev; Warren, Graham; Williams, Rachael; Wilson, Judy; Winship, Ingrid; Wu, Kathy; Young, Mary Ann; Bowtell, D.; Green, A.; Webb, P.; de Fazio, A.; Gertig, D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Annexin A1 (ANXA1) is a protein related with the carcinogenesis process and metastasis formation in many tumors. However, little is known about the prognostic value of ANXA1 in breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association between ANXA1 expression, BRCA1/2

  3. Fiber intake modulates the association of alcohol intake with breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romieu, Isabelle; Ferrari, Pietro; Chajès, Veronique; de Batlle, Jordi; Biessy, Carine; Scoccianti, Chiara; Dossus, Laure; Christine Boutron, Marie; Bastide, Nadia; Overvad, Kim; Olsen, Anja; Tjønneland, Anne; Kaaks, Rudolf; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Palli, Domenico; Sieri, Sabina; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; van Gils, Carla H.; Peeters, Petra H.; Lund, Eiliv; Skeie, Guri; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Ramón Quirós, J.; Chirlaque, María Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Sánchez, María José; Duell, Eric J.; Amiano Etxezarreta, Pilar; Borgquist, Signe; Hallmans, Göran; Johansson, Ingegerd; Maria Nilsson, Lena; Khaw, Kay Tee; Wareham, Nick; Key, Timothy J.; Travis, Ruth C.; Murphy, Neil; Wark, Petra A.; Riboli, Elio

    2017-01-01

    Alcohol intake has been related to an increased risk of breast cancer (BC) while dietary fiber intake has been inversely associated to BC risk. A beneficial effect of fibers on ethanol carcinogenesis through their impact on estrogen levels is still controversial. We investigated the role of dietary

  4. Identification of ten variants associated with risk of estrogen-receptor-negative breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milne, Roger L.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Beesley, Jonathan; Kar, Siddhartha; Lindström, Sara; Hui, Shirley; Lemaçon, Audrey; Soucy, Penny; Dennis, Joe; Jiang, Xia; Rostamianfar, Asha; Finucane, Hilary K; Bolla, Manjeet K.; McGuffog, Lesley; Wang, Qin; Aalfs, Cora M.; Adams, Marcia; Adlard, Julian; Agata, Simona; Ahmed, Shahana; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Al-Ejeh, Fares; Allen, Jamie; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Amos, Christopher I; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Arndt, Volker; Arnold, Norbert; Aronson, Kristan J; Auber, Bernd; Auer, Paul L.; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Azzollini, Jacopo; Bacot, François; Balmaña, Judith; Barile, Monica; Barjhoux, Laure; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Barrdahl, Myrto; Barnes, Daniel R; Barrowdale, Daniel; Baynes, Caroline; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Benitez, Javier; Bermisheva, Marina; Bernstein, Leslie; Bignon, Yves Jean; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Blok, Marinus J.; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William; Bobolis, Kristie; Boeckx, Bram; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Anders; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Bozsik, Aniko; Bradbury, Angela R; Brand, Judith S.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Brewer, Carole; Brinton, Louise; Broberg, Per; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Brunet, Joan; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S.; Byun, Jinyoung; Cai, Qiuyin; Caldés, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A.; Campbell, Ian; Canzian, Federico; Caron, Olivier; Carracedo, Angel; Carter, Brian D; Castelao, J Esteban; Castera, Laurent; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Chan, Salina B; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Christiansen, Hans; Claes, Kathleen B M; Clarke, Christine L; Conner, Thomas; Conroy, Don M; Cook, Jackie; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Cornelissen, Sten; Coupier, Isabelle; Cox, Angela; Cox, David G.; Cross, Simon S.; Cuk, Katarina; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; Davidson, Rosemarie; De Leeneer, Kim; Devilee, Peter; Dicks, Ed; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ditsch, Nina; Doheny, Kimberly F; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dubois, Stéphane; Dugué, Pierre-Antoine; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M.; Durcan, Lorraine; Dwek, Miriam; Dworniczak, Bernd; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Ehrencrona, Hans; Eilber, Ursula; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ekici, Arif B.; Eliassen, A. Heather; Engel, Christoph; Eriksson, Mikael; Fachal, Laura; Faivre, Laurence; Fasching, Peter A.; Faust, Ulrike; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Foulkes, William D; Friedman, Eitan; Fritschi, Lin; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gaddam, Pragna; Gammon, Marilie D.; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garber, Judy; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; García-Sáenz, José A; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Georgoulias, Vassilios; Gerdes, Anne Marie; Giles, Graham G.; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldberg, Mark S.; Goldgar, David E.; González-Neira, Anna; Goodfellow, Paul; Greene, Mark H.; Alnæs, Grethe I Grenaker; Grip, Mervi; Gronwald, Jacek; Grundy, Anne; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Qi; Haeberle, Lothar; Hahnen, Eric; Haiman, Christopher A.; Håkansson, Niclas; Hallberg, Emily; Hamann, Ute; Hamel, Nathalie; Hankinson, Susan; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Harrington, Patricia; Hart, Steven N; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Healey, Catherine S.; Hein, Alexander; Helbig, Sonja; Henderson, Alex; Heyworth, Jane S.; Hicks, Belynda; Hillemanns, Peter; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Hogervorst, Frans Bl; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hoover, Bob; Hopper, John L.; Hu, Chunling; Huang, Guanmengqian; Hulick, Peter J; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Iwasaki, Motoki; Izatt, Louise; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Janni, Wolfgang; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Johnson, Nichola; Jones, Kristine; Jones, Michael; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kabisch, Maria; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Kang, Daehee; Kast, Karin; Keeman, Renske; Kerin, Michael J.; Kets, Carolien M.; Keupers, Machteld; Khan, Sofia; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Kiiski, Johanna I; Kim, Sung-Won; Knight, Julia A.; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli Matti; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Kruse, Torben A.; Kwong, Ava; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Laitman, Yael; Lalloo, Fiona; Lambrechts, Diether; Landsman, Keren; Lasset, Christine; Lazaro, Conxi; Le Marchand, Loic; Lecarpentier, Julie; Lee, Andrew; Lee, Eunjung; Lee, Jong Won; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Lesueur, Fabienne; Li, Jingmei; Lilyquist, Jenna; Lincoln, Anne; Lindblom, Annika; Lissowska, Jolanta; So, Wing Yee; Loibl, Sibylle; Long, Jirong; Loud, Jennifer T; Lubinski, Jan; Luccarini, Craig; Lush, Michael J.; MacInnis, Robert J; Maishman, Tom; Makalic, Enes; Kostovska, Ivana Maleva; Malone, Kathleen E.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Manson, Joann E.; Margolin, Sara; Martens, John W. M.; Martinez, Maria Elena; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mclean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Menéndez, Primitiva; Meyer, Jeffery; Miao, Hui; Miller, Austin; Miller, Nicola; Mitchell, Gillian; Montagna, Marco; Muir, Kenneth; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Mulot, Claire; Nadesan, Sue; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nevelsteen, Ines; Niederacher, Dieter; Nielsen, Sune F.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Norman, Aaron; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Olson, Janet E.; Olswold, Curtis; Ong, Kai Ren; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Orr, Nick; Osorio, Ana; Pankratz, V Shane; Papi, Laura; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Lloyd, Rachel; Pedersen, Inge Søkilde; Peissel, Bernard; Peixoto, Ana; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M.; Pinchev, Mila; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Poppe, Bruce; Porteous, Mary E.; Prentice, Ross L.; Presneau, Nadege; Prokofieva, Darya; Pugh, Elizabeth; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Pylkäs, Katri; Rack, Brigitte; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Rennert, Hedy S; Rhenius, Valerie; Rhiem, Kerstin; Richardson, Andrea; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Romero, Atocha; Romm, Jane; Rookus, Matti A.; Rudolph, Anja; Ruediger, Thomas; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Sanders, Joyce; Sandler, Dale P; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schürmann, Peter; Schwentner, Lukas; Scott, Christopher; Scott, Rodney J; Seal, Sheila; Senter, Leigha; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Sharma, Priyanka; Shen, Chen Yang; Sheng, Xin; Shimelis, Hermela; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Shu, Xiao Ou; Side, Lucy E.; Singer, Christian F.; Sohn, Christof; Southey, Melissa C.; Spinelli, John J; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Stegmaier, Christa; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Surowy, Harald M.; Sutter, Christian; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Tamimi, Rulla M; Tan, Yen; Taylor, Jack A; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Tengström, Maria; Teo, Soo Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Tessier, Daniel C.; Teulé, Alex; Thöne, Kathrin; Thull, Darcy L; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Toland, Amanda E.; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Tong, Ling; Torres, Diana; Tranchant, Martine; Truong, Thérèse; Tucker, Kathy; Tung, Nadine; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Vachon, Celine; van Asperen, Christi J.; Van Den Berg, David; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vega, Ana; Viel, Alessandra; Vijai, Joseph; Vincent, Daniel; Vollenweider, Jason; Walker, Lisa; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weinberg, Clarice R; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Wendt, Camilla; Wesseling, Jelle; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Willett, Walter; Winqvist, Robert; Wolk, Alicja; Wu, Anna H.; Xia, Lucy; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Zheng, Wei; Zhu, B.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ziv, Elad; Zorn, Kristin K; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Mannermaa, Arto; Olsson, Håkan; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Stone, Jennifer; Offit, Kenneth; Ottini, Laura; Park, Sue K.; Thomassen, Mads; Hall, Per; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Droit, Arnaud; Bader, Gary D.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Couch, Fergus J.; Easton, Douglas F.; Kraft, Peter; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; García-Closas, Montserrat; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Simard, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Most common breast cancer susceptibility variants have been identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of predominantly estrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease. We conducted a GWAS using 21,468 ER-negative cases and 100,594 controls combined with 18,908 BRCA1 mutation carriers (9,414

  5. Identification of ten variants associated with risk of estrogen-receptor-negative breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milne, Roger L.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Beesley, Jonathan; Kar, Siddhartha; Lindstrom, Sara; Hui, Shirley; Lemacon, Audrey; Soucy, Penny; Dennis, Joe; Jiang, Xia; Rostamianfar, Asha; Finucane, Hilary; Bolla, Manjeet K.; McGuffog, Lesley; Wang, Qin; Aalfs, Cora M.; Adams, Marcia; Adlard, Julian; Agata, Simona; Ahmed, Shahana; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Al-Ejeh, Fares; Allen, Jamie; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Amos, Christopher I.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Arndt, Volker; Arnold, Norbert; Aronson, Kristan J.; Auber, Bernd; Auer, Paul L.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Azzollini, Jacopo; Bacot, Francois; Balmana, Judith; Barile, Monica; Barjhoux, Laure; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Barrdahl, Myrto; Barnes, Daniel; Barrowdale, Daniel; Baynes, Caroline; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Benitez, Javier; Bermisheva, Marina; Bernstein, Leslie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Blok, Marinus J.; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William; Bobolis, Kristie; Boeckx, Bram; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Anders; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Bozsik, Aniko; Bradbury, Angela R.; Brand, Judith S.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Brewer, Carole; Brinton, Louise; Broberg, Per; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Brunet, Joan; Bruening, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S.; Byun, Jinyoung; Cai, Qiuyin; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A.; Campbell, Ian; Canzian, Federico; Caron, Olivier; Carracedo, Angel; Carter, Brian D.; Esteban Castelao, J.; Castera, Laurent; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Chan, Salina B.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Christiansen, Hans; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Clarke, Christine L.; Conner, Thomas; Conroy, Don M.; Cook, Jackie; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Cornelissen, Sten; Coupier, Isabelle; Cox, Angela; Cox, David G.; Cross, Simon S.; Cuk, Katarina; Cunningham, Julie M.; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; Davidson, Rosemarie; De Leeneer, Kim; Devilee, Peter; Dicks, Ed; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ditsch, Nina; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Doerk, Thilo; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dubois, Stephane; Dugue, Pierre-Antoine; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M.; Durcan, Lorraine; Dwek, Miriam; Dworniczak, Bernd; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Ehrencrona, Hans; Eilber, Ursula; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ekici, Arif B.; Eliassen, A. Heather; Engel, Christoph; Eriksson, Mikael; Fachal, Laura; Faivre, Laurence; Fasching, Peter A.; Faust, Ulrike; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Foulkes, William D.; Friedman, Eitan; Fritschi, Lin; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gaddam, Pragna; Gammon, Marilie D.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garber, Judy; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Garcia-Saenz, Jose A.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Georgoulias, Vassilios; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giles, Graham G.; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldberg, Mark S.; Goldgar, David E.; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Goodfellow, Paul; Greene, Mark H.; Alnaes, Grethe I. Grenaker; Grip, Mervi; Gronwald, Jacek; Grundy, Anne; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Guenel, Pascal; Guo, Qi; Haeberle, Lothar; Hahnen, Eric; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hakansson, Niclas; Hallberg, Emily; Hamann, Ute; Hamel, Nathalie; Hankinson, Susan; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Harrington, Patricia; Hart, Steven N.; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Healey, Catherine S.; Hein, Alexander; Helbig, Sonja; Henderson, Alex; Heyworth, Jane; Hicks, Belynda; Hillemanns, Peter; Hodgson, Shirley; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hoover, Bob; Hopper, John L.; Hu, Chunling; Huang, Guanmengqian; Hulick, Peter J.; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Iwasaki, Motoki; Izatt, Louise; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Janni, Wolfgang; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Johnson, Nichola; Jones, Kristine; Jones, Michael; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kabisch, Maria; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Kang, Daehee; Kast, Karin; Keeman, Renske; Kerin, Michael J.; Kets, Carolien M.; Keupers, Machteld; Khan, Sofia; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Kiiski, Johanna I.; Kim, Sung-Won; Knight, Julia A.; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Kruse, Torben A.; Kwong, Ava; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Laitman, Yael; Lalloo, Fiona; Lambrechts, Diether; Landsman, Keren; Lasset, Christine; Lazaro, Conxi; Le Marchand, Loic; Lecarpentier, Julie; Lee, Andrew; Lee, Eunjung; Lee, Jong Won; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Lesueur, Fabienne; Li, Jingmei; Lilyquist, Jenna; Lincoln, Anne; Lindblom, Annika; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lo, Wing-Yee; Loibl, Sibylle; Long, Jirong; Loud, Jennifer T.; Lubinski, Jan; Luccarini, Craig; Lush, Michael; MacInnis, Robert J.; Maishman, Tom; Makalic, Enes; Kostovska, Ivana Maleva; Malone, Kathleen E.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Manson, JoAnn E.; Margolin, Sara; Martens, John W. M.; Martinez, Maria Elena; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McLean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Menendez, Primitiva; Meyer, Jeffery; Miao, Hui; Miller, Austin; Miller, Nicola; Mitchell, Gillian; Montagna, Marco; Muir, Kenneth; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Mulot, Claire; Nadesan, Sue; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nevelsteen, Ines; Niederacher, Dieter; Nielsen, Sune F.; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Norman, Aaron; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Olson, Janet E.; Olswold, Curtis; Ong, Kai-ren; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Orr, Nick; Osorio, Ana; Pankratz, V. Shane; Papi, Laura; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Lloyd, Rachel; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Peixoto, Ana; Perez, Jose I. A.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M.; Pinchev, Mila; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Poppe, Bruce; Porteous, Mary E.; Prentice, Ross; Presneau, Nadege; Prokofieva, Darya; Pugh, Elizabeth; Angel Pujana, Miquel; Pylkas, Katri; Rack, Brigitte; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Rennert, Hedy S.; Rhenius, Valerie; Rhiem, Kerstin; Richardson, Andrea; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Romero, Atocha; Romm, Jane; Rookus, Matti A.; Rudolph, Anja; Ruediger, Thomas; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Sanders, Joyce; Sandler, Dale P.; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schuermann, Peter; Schwentner, Lukas; Scott, Christopher; Scott, Rodney J.; Seal, Sheila; Senter, Leigha; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Sharma, Priyanka; Shen, Chen-Yang; Sheng, Xin; Shimelis, Hermela; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Side, Lucy E.; Singer, Christian F.; Sohn, Christof; Southey, Melissa C.; Spinelli, John J.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Stegmaier, Christa; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Surowy, Harald; Sutter, Christian; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I.; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Tan, Yen Y.; Taylor, Jack A.; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Tengstrom, Maria; Teo, Soo H.; Terry, Mary B.; Tessier, Daniel C.; Teule, Alex; Thoene, Kathrin; Thull, Darcy L.; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Toland, Amanda E.; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Tong, Ling; Torres, Diana; Tranchant, Martine; Truong, Therese; Tucker, Kathy; Tung, Nadine; Tyrer, Jonathan; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Vachon, Celine; van Asperen, Christi J.; Van Den Berg, David; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vega, Ana; Viel, Alessandra; Vijai, Joseph; Vincent, Daniel; Vollenweider, Jason; Walker, Lisa; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weinberg, Clarice R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Wendt, Camilla; Wesseling, Jelle; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Willett, Walter; Winqvist, Robert; Wolk, Alicja; Wu, Anna H.; Xia, Lucy; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Zheng, Wei; Zhu, Bin; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ziv, Elad; Zorn, Kristin K.; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Mannermaa, Arto; Olsson, Hakan; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Stone, Jennifer; Offit, Kenneth; Ottini, Laura; Park, Sue K.; Thomassen, Mads; Hall, Per; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Droit, Arnaud; Bader, Gary D.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Couch, Fergus J.; Easton, Douglas F.; Kraft, Peter; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Simard, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Most common breast cancer susceptibility variants have been identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of predominantly estrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease(1). We conducted a GWAS using 21,468 ER-negative cases and 100,594 controls combined with 18,908 BRCA1 mutation carriers

  6. Breast Cancer Risk and 6q22.33: Combined Results from Breast Cancer Association Consortium and Consortium of Investigators on Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Dunning, Alison M.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Dork, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Karstens, Johann H.; Hillemanns, Peter; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine; Wang, Xianshu; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian; Elliott, Graeme; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; van 't Veer, Laura J.; Braaf, Linde M.; Johnson, Nichola; Fletcher, Olivia; Gibson, Lorna; Peto, Julian; Turnbull, Clare; Seal, Sheila; Renwick, Anthony; Rahman, Nazneen; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Hammet, Fleur; van Dorpe, Thijs; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Hatse, Sigrid; Lambrechts, Diether; Andrulis, Irene L.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Rogov, Juri I.; Prokofieva, Daria; Bermisheva, Marina; Khusnutdinova, Elza; van Asperen, Christi J.; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Devilee, Peter; Margolin, Sara; Lindblom, Annika; Milne, Roger L.; Arias, José Ignacio; Zamora, M. Pilar; Benítez, Javier; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Giles, Graham G.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; Healey, Sue; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Caligo, Maria A.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Fredericksen, Zachary; Lindor, Noralane; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Loman, Niklas; Karlsson, Per; Stenmark Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Verheus, Martijn; Rookus, Matti A.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Gille, Hans J. P.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Gómez García, Encarna B.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T.; Frost, Debra; Luccarini, Craig; Pichert, Gabriella; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-Ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Gold, Bert; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Justenhoven, Christina; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Brüning, Thomas; Pesch, Beate; Harth, Volker; Rabstein, Sylvia; Bowtell, D.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; deFazio, A.; Gertig, D.; Green, A.; Webb, P.; Parsons, P.; Hayward, N.; Whiteman, D.; Thorne, Heather; Niedermayr, Eveline; Webb, P. M.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Åke; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Henriksson, Karin; Arver, Brita; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Brandell, Richard Rosenquist; Dahl, Niklas; Verhoef, Senno; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Collée, Margriet; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Jager, Agnes; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.; Tollenaar, Rob A.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Os, Theo A.; Gille, Johan J. P.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna B.; van Roozendaal, Cees E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Mourits, Marian J.; Vasen, Hans F.; Gregory, Helen; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; McKeown, Carole; Boyes, Laura; Donaldson, Alan; Paterson, Joan; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark T.; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, M. John; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Izatt, Louise; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Bishop, Tim; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Houghton, Catherine; Lalloo, Fiona; Holt, Felicity; Male, Alison; Side, Lucy; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Claber, Oonagh; Walker, Lisa; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durrell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Eeles, Ros; Shanley, Susan; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Robinson, Anne; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; Tyler, Emma; McBride, Donna; Traficante, N.; Moore, S.; Hung, J.; Fereday, S.; Harrap, K.; Sadkowsky, T.; Pandeya, N.; Malt, M.; Mellon, A.; Robertson, R.; Vanden Bergh, T.; Jones, M.; Mackenzie, P.; Maidens, J.; Nattress, K.; Chiew, Y. E.; Stenlake, A.; Sullivan, H.; Alexander, B.; Ashover, P.; Brown, S.; Corrish, T.; Green, L.; Jackman, L.; Ferguson, K.; Martin, K.; Martyn, A.; Ranieri, B.; White, J.; Jayde, V.; Bowes, L.; Mamers, P.; Galletta, L.; Giles, D.; Hendley, J.; Alsop, K.; Schmidt, T.; Shirley, H.; Ball, C.; Young, C.; Viduka, S.; Tran, Hoa; Bilic, Sanela; Glavinas, Lydia; Brooks, Julia; Stuart-Harris, R.; Kirsten, F.; Rutovitz, J.; Clingan, P.; Glasgow, A.; Proietto, A.; Braye, S.; Otton, G.; Shannon, J.; Bonaventura, T.; Stewart, J.; Begbie, S.; Friedlander, M.; Bell, D.; Baron-Hay, S.; Ferrier, A.; Gard, G.; Nevell, D.; Pavlakis, N.; Valmadre, S.; Young, B.; Camaris, C.; Crouch, R.; Edwards, L.; Hacker, N.; Marsden, D.; Robertson, G.; Beale, P.; Beith, J.; Carter, J.; Dalrymple, C.; Houghton, R.; Russell, P.; Anderson, L.; Links, M.; Grygiel, J.; Hill, J.; Brand, A.; Byth, K.; Jaworski, R.; Harnett, P.; Sharma, R.; Wain, G.; Ward, B.; Papadimos, D.; Crandon, A.; Cummings, M.; Horwood, K.; Obermair, A.; Perrin, L.; Wyld, D.; Nicklin, J.; Davy, M.; Oehler, M. K.; Hall, C.; Dodd, T.; Healy, T.; Pittman, K.; Henderson, D.; Miller, J.; Pierdes, J.; Achan, A.; Blomfield, P.; Challis, D.; McIntosh, R.; Parker, A.; Brown, B.; Rome, R.; Allen, D.; Grant, P.; Hyde, S.; Laurie, R.; Robbie, M.; Healy, D.; Jobling, T.; Manolitsas, T.; McNealage, J.; Rogers, P.; Susil, B.; Sumithran, E.; Simpson, I.; Phillips, K.; Rischin, D.; Fox, S.; Johnson, D.; Waring, P.; Lade, S.; Loughrey, M.; O'Callaghan, N.; Murray, W.; Mileshkin, L.; Allan, P.; Billson, V.; Pyman, J.; Neesham, D.; Quinn, M.; Hamilton, A.; Underhill, C.; Bell, R.; Ng, L. F.; Blum, R.; Ganju, V.; Hammond, I.; Leung, Y.; McCartney, A.; Stewart, C.; Buck, M.; Haviv, I.; Purdie, D.; Zeps, N.; Gurry, P.; Hankinson, S.; Meltzer, P.; Murray, B.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341) was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication

  7. Associations of common breast cancer susceptibility alleles with risk of breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Robson, Mark; Barrowdale, Daniel; McGuffog, Lesley; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Andrulis, Irene L; Spurdle, Amanda B; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Engel, Christoph; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Nevanlinna, Heli; Thomassen, Mads; Southey, Melissa; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Nussbaum, Robert L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; James, Paul; Karlan, Beth Y; Lester, Jenny; Cass, Ilana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Steele, Linda; v O Hansen, Thomas; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Nielsen, Finn C; Dennis, Joe; Cunningham, Julie; Hart, Steven; Slager, Susan; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Tafur, Isaac; Hander, Mary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Roversi, Gaia; Scuvera, Giulietta; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariani, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Varesco, Liliana; Papi, Laura; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Giannini, Giuseppe; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Ong, Kai-ren; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E; Kennedy, M John; Rogers, Mark T; Porteous, Mary E; Morrison, Patrick J; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Ellis, Steve; Godwin, Andrew K; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Steinemann, Doris; Bogdanova-Markov, Nadja; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Gehrig, Andrea; Markiefka, Birgid; Buecher, Bruno; Lefol, Cédrick; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Barjhoux, Laure; Faivre, Laurence; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Isaacs, Claudine; Van Maerken, Tom; Claes, Kathleen; Piedmonte, Marion; Andrews, Lesley; Hays, John; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Khan, Sofia; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Aalfs, Cora M; de Lange, J L; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Wijnen, Juul T; van Roozendaal, K E P; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van der Luijt, Rob B; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Teulé, Alex; Menendez, Mireia; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Arason, Adalgeir; Maugard, Christine; Soucy, Penny; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Teixeira, Manuel R; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane; Pankratz, Vernon S; Hallberg, Emily; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I; Vijai, Joseph; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Lincoln, Anne; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Phelan, Catherine M; Mai, Phuong L; Greene, Mark H; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A; Friedman, Eitan; Berger, Raanan; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Borg, Ake; Ehrencrona, Hans; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Antoniou, Antonis C; de Bock, G.H.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: More than 70 common alleles are known to be involved in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility, and several exhibit significant heterogeneity in their associations with different BC subtypes. Although there are differences in the association patterns between BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation

  8. Associations of common breast cancer susceptibility alleles with risk of breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Robson, Mark; Barrowdale, Daniel; McGuffog, Lesley; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Andrulis, Irene L.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Engel, Christoph; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Nevanlinna, Heli; Thomassen, Mads; Southey, Melissa; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; James, Paul; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Cass, Ilana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Steele, Linda; v O Hansen, Thomas; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Nielsen, Finn C.; Dennis, Joe; Cunningham, Julie; Hart, Steven; Slager, Susan; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Tafur, Isaac; Hander, Mary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Roversi, Gaia; Scuvera, Giulietta; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariani, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Varesco, Liliana; Papi, Laura; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Giannini, Giuseppe; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Ong, Kai-Ren; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Ellis, Steve; Godwin, Andrew K.; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Steinemann, Doris; Bogdanova-Markov, Nadja; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Gehrig, Andrea; Markiefka, Birgid; Buecher, Bruno; Lefol, Cédrick; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Barjhoux, Laure; Faivre, Laurence; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Isaacs, Claudine; van Maerken, Tom; Claes, Kathleen; Piedmonte, Marion; Andrews, Lesley; Hays, John; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Khan, Sofia; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, J. L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Wijnen, Juul T.; van Roozendaal, K. E. P.; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Teulé, Alex; Menendez, Mireia; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Arason, Adalgeir; Maugard, Christine; Soucy, Penny; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Hallberg, Emily; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Vijai, Joseph; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Lincoln, Anne; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; tea, Muy-Kheng; Phelan, Catherine M.; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A.; Friedman, Eitan; Berger, Raanan; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Borg, Ake; Ehrencrona, Hans; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Perkins, Jo; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; Hoffman, Jonathan; James, Margaret; Paterson, Joan; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; McCann, Emma; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Serra-Feliu, Gemma; Ellis, Ian; Lalloo, Fiona; Taylor, Jane; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Weaver, Joellen; Bove, Betsy; Sinilnikova, Olga; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Calender, Alain; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Handallo, Sandrine; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Remenieras, Audrey; Eisinger, François; Coupier, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Magalie; Coron, Fanny; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Sokolowska, Johanna; Bronner, Myriam; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Damette, Alexandre; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Coene, Ilse; Crombez, Brecht; Segura, Pedro Perez; Romero, Atocha; Diaque, Paula; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Muranen, Taru A.; Erkkilä, Irja; Palola, Virpi; Rookus, M. A.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Verhoef, S.; Schmidt, M. K.; Wijnands, R.; Collée, J. M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Hooning, M. J.; Seynaeve, C.; van Deurzen, C. H. M.; Obdeijn, I. M.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Devilee, P.; van Cronenburg, T. C. T. E. F.; Kets, C. M.; Mensenkamp, A. R.; Ausems, M. G. E. M.; van der Luijt, R. B.; van Os, T. A. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gómez-Garcia, E. B.; Blok, M. J.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; de Bock, G. H.; Vasen, H. F.; Siesling, S.; Overbeek, L. I. H.; Papp, Janos; Vaszko, Tibor; Bozsik, Aniko; Pocza, Timea; Franko, Judit; Balogh, Maria; Domokos, Gabriella; Ferenczi, Judit; Balmaña, J.; Capella, Gabriel; Dumont, Martine; Tranchant, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: More than 70 common alleles are known to be involved in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility, and several exhibit significant heterogeneity in their associations with different BC subtypes. Although there are differences in the association patterns between BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation

  9. Associations of common breast cancer susceptibility alleles with risk of breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); M. Robson (Mark); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); L. McGuffog (Lesley); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C.W. Engel (Christoph); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); M. Thomassen (Mads); M.C. Southey (Melissa); P. Radice (Paolo); S.J. Ramus (Susan); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); A. Lee (Andrew); S. Healey (Sue); R. Nussbaum (Robert); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); M. James (Margaret); B. Karlan; K.J. Lester (Kathryn); I. Cass (Ilana); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); M.J. Daly (Mark); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); L. Tihomirova (Laima); N. Tung (Nadine); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); L. Steele (Linda); T. v O Hansen (Thomas); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); F. Nielsen (Finn); J. Dennis (Joe); J.M. Cunningham (Julie); S. Hart (Stewart); S. Slager (Susan); A. Osorio (Ana); J. Benítez (Javier); M. Duran (Mercedes); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); I. Tafur (Isaac); M. Hander (Mary); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); G. Roversi (Gaia); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); P. Mariani (Paolo); S. Volorio (Sara); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); L. Varesco (Liliana); L. Papi (Laura); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); F. Fostira (Florentia); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); J. Garber (Judy); U. Hamann (Ute); A. Donaldson (Alan); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); F. Douglas (Fiona); A. Brady (A.); J. Cook (Jackie); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); K. Ong; L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Eeles (Ros); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); S.D. Ellis (Steve); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); D. Steinemann (Doris); N. Bogdanova-Markov (Nadja); K. Kast (Karin); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); B. Markiefka (Birgid); B. Buecher (Bruno); C. Lefol (Cédrick); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); E. Rouleau (Etienne); F. Prieur (Fabienne); F. Damiola (Francesca); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Faivre (Laurence); M. Longy (Michel); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); V. Bonadona (Valérie); V. Caux-Moncoutier (Virginie); C. Isaacs (Claudine); T. Van Maerken (Tom); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); M. Piedmonte (Marion); L. Andrews (Lesley); J. Hays (John); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); S. Khan (Sofia); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); J.L. de Lange (J.); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); K.E. van Roozendaal (Kees); A.R. Mensenkamp (Arjen); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); A. Teulé (A.); M. Menéndez (Mireia); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); C. Cybulski (Cezary); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); A. Arason (Adalgeir); C. Maugard; P. Soucy (Penny); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Agata (Simona); P.J. Teixeira; C. Olswold (Curtis); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); B. Hallberg (Boubou); X. Wang (Xianshu); C. Szabo (Csilla); J. Vijai (Joseph); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M. Corines (Marina); A. Lincoln (Anne); A. Berger (Andreas); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; C. Phelan (Catherine); P.L. Mai (Phuong); M.H. Greene (Mark); G. Rennert (Gad); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); G. Glendon (Gord); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A. Bojesen (Anders); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); E. Friedman (Eitan); R. Berger (Raanan); Y. Laitman (Yael); J. Rantala (Johanna); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); N. Loman (Niklas); Å. Borg (Åke); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); J. Simard (Jacques); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); K. Offit (Kenneth); F.J. Couch (Fergus); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); CIMBA; EMBRACE Study; Breast Cancer Family; GEMO Study Collaborators; HEBON; KConFab Investigators

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: More than 70 common alleles are known to be involved in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility, and several exhibit significant heterogeneity in their associations with different BC subtypes. Although there are differences in the association patterns between BRCA1 and BRCA2

  10. Oct-4 and Nanog promote the epithelial-mesenchymal transition of breast cancer stem cells and are associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Minna; Zhang, Xin; Wei, Xiaofei; Gao, Jiyue; Zhao, Zuowei; Liu, Caigang

    2014-01-01

    Oct-4 and Nanog in regulating the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis of breast cancer has not been clarified. We found that both Oct-4 and Nanog expression were significantly associated with tumor pathology and poor prognosis in 126 breast cancer patients. Characterization of CD44+CD24-Cancer stem cell(CSC) derived from breast cancer cells indicated that CSC rapidly formed mammospheres and had potent tumorigenicity in vivo. Furthermore, TGF-β up-regulated the expression of Oct-4, Nanog, N-cadherin, vimentin, Slug, and Snail, but down-regulated E-cadherin and cytokeratin 18 expression, demonstrating that CSC underwent EMT. Knockdown of both Oct-4 and Nanog expression inhibited spontaneous changes in the expression of EMT-related genes, while induction of both Oct-4 and Nanog over-expression enhanced spontaneous changes in the expression of EMT-related genes in CSC. However, perturbing alternation of Oct-4 and Nanog expression also modulated TGF-β-induced EMT-related gene expression in CSC. Induction of Oct-4 and Nanog over-expression enhanced the invasiveness of CSC, but knockdown of both Oct-4 and Nanog inhibited the migration of CSC in vitro. Our data suggest that both Oct-4 and Nanog may serve as biomarkers for evaluating breast cancer prognosis. Our findings indicate that Oct-4 and Nanog positively regulate the EMT process, contributing to breast cancer metastasis. PMID:25301732

  11. Poor prognosis of constitutive gamma-H2AX expressing triple-negative breast cancers is associated with telomere length

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelkerke, A.P.; Kuijk, S.J. van; Martens, J.W.; Sweep, F.C.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Bussink, J.; Span, P.N.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Here, we set out to establish whether endogenous gamma-H2AX is a biomarker in triple-negative breast cancer. METHODS: We explored the association of gamma-H2AX with mutation status and sensitivity to 139 different anticancer drugs in up to 41 breast cancer cell lines. Further, we correlated

  12. Hot flashes in breast cancer survivors and an association with calcium supplement use

    OpenAIRE

    Gretchen Kimmick; Gloria Broadwater; Mara Vitolins

    2010-01-01

    Gretchen Kimmick1,2, Gloria Broadwater2, Mara Vitolins31Medical Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem; 2Cancer Center Biostatistics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham; 3Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USAAims: In breast cancer survivors, we aimed to describe the frequency of hot flashes and night sweats, frequency and type of treatment, and the association of hot flashes and ...

  13. Low expression levels of hepsin and TMPRSS3 are associated with poor breast cancer survival

    OpenAIRE

    Pelkonen, Mikko; Luostari, Kaisa; Tengstr?m, Maria; Ahonen, Hermanni; Berdel, Bozena; Kataja, Vesa; Soini, Ylermi; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Mannermaa, Arto

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepsin, (also called TMPRSS1) and TMPRSS3 are type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) that are involved in cancer progression. TTSPs can remodel extracellular matrix (ECM) and, when dysregulated, promote tumor progression and metastasis by inducing defects in basement membrane and ECM molecules. This study investigated whether the gene and protein expression levels of these TTSPs were associated with breast cancer characteristics or survival. Methods Immunohistochemical stai...

  14. Comparison of 6q25 breast cancer hits from Asian and European Genome Wide Association Studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Hein

    Full Text Available The 6q25.1 locus was first identified via a genome-wide association study (GWAS in Chinese women and marked by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs2046210, approximately 180 Kb upstream of ESR1. There have been conflicting reports about the association of this locus with breast cancer in Europeans, and a GWAS in Europeans identified a different SNP, tagged here by rs12662670. We examined the associations of both SNPs in up to 61,689 cases and 58,822 controls from forty-four studies collaborating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, of which four studies were of Asian and 39 of European descent. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI. Case-only analyses were used to compare SNP effects in Estrogen Receptor positive (ER+ versus negative (ER- tumours. Models including both SNPs were fitted to investigate whether the SNP effects were independent. Both SNPs are significantly associated with breast cancer risk in both ethnic groups. Per-allele ORs are higher in Asian than in European studies [rs2046210: OR (A/G = 1.36 (95% CI 1.26-1.48, p = 7.6 × 10(-14 in Asians and 1.09 (95% CI 1.07-1.11, p = 6.8 × 10(-18 in Europeans. rs12662670: OR (G/T = 1.29 (95% CI 1.19-1.41, p = 1.2 × 10(-9 in Asians and 1.12 (95% CI 1.08-1.17, p = 3.8 × 10(-9 in Europeans]. SNP rs2046210 is associated with a significantly greater risk of ER- than ER+ tumours in Europeans [OR (ER- = 1.20 (95% CI 1.15-1.25, p = 1.8 × 10(-17 versus OR (ER+ = 1.07 (95% CI 1.04-1.1, p = 1.3 × 10(-7, p(heterogeneity = 5.1 × 10(-6]. In these Asian studies, by contrast, there is no clear evidence of a differential association by tumour receptor status. Each SNP is associated with risk after adjustment for the other SNP. These results suggest the presence of two variants at 6q25.1 each independently associated with breast cancer risk in Asians and in Europeans. Of these two, the one tagged by rs2046210 is associated with a greater

  15. Miscellaneous syndromes and their management: occult breast cancer, breast cancer in pregnancy, male breast cancer, surgery in stage IV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colfry, Alfred John

    2013-04-01

    Surgical therapy for occult breast cancer has traditionally centered on mastectomy; however, breast conservation with whole breast radiotherapy followed by axillary lymph node dissection has shown equivalent results. Patients with breast cancer in pregnancy can be safely and effectively treated; given a patient's pregnancy trimester and stage of breast cancer, a clinician must be able to guide therapy accordingly. Male breast cancer risk factors show strong association with BRCA2 mutations, as well as Klinefelter syndrome. Several retrospective trials of surgical therapy in stage IV breast cancer have associated a survival advantage with primary site tumor extirpation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  17. Reproduction and Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanf, Volker; Hanf, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reproduction is doubtlessly one of the main biological meanings of life. It is therefore not surprising that various aspects of reproduction impact on breast cancer risk. Various developmental levels may become targets of breast tumorigenesis. This review follows the chronologic sequence of events in the life of a female at risk, starting with the intrauterine development. Furthermore, the influence of both contraceptive measures and fertility treatment on breast cancer development is dealt with, as well as various pregnancy-associated factors, events, and perinatal outcomes. Finally, the contribution of breast feeding to a reduced breast cancer risk is discussed. PMID:25759622

  18. Downregulation of serine protease HTRA1 is associated with poor survival in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lehner

    Full Text Available HTRA1 is a highly conserved serine protease which has been implicated in suppression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal-transition (EMT and cell motility in breast cancer. Its prognostic relevance for breast cancer is unclear so far. Therefore, we evaluated the impact of HTRA1 mRNA expression on patient outcome using a cohort of 131 breast cancer patients as well as a validation cohort including 2809 publically available data sets. Additionally, we aimed at investigating for the presence of promoter hypermethylation as a mechanism for silencing the HTRA1 gene in breast tumors. HTRA1 downregulation was detected in more than 50% of the breast cancer specimens and was associated with higher tumor stage (p = 0.025. By applying Cox proportional hazard models, we observed favorable overall (OS and disease-free survival (DFS related to high HTRA1 expression (HR = 0.45 [CI 0.23-0.90], p = 0.023; HR = 0.55 [CI 0.32-0.94], p = 0.028, respectively, with even more pronounced impact in node-positive patients (HR = 0.21 [CI 0.07-0.63], p = 0.006; HR = 0.29 [CI 0.13-0.65], p = 0.002, respectively. Moreover, HTRA1 remained a statistically significant factor predicting DFS among established clinical parameters in the multivariable analysis. Its impact on patient outcome was independently confirmed in the validation set (for relapse-free survival (n = 2809: HR = 0.79 [CI 0.7-0.9], log-rank p = 0.0003; for OS (n = 971: HR = 0.63 [CI 0.48-0.83], log-rank p = 0.0009. In promoter analyses, we in fact detected methylation of HTRA1 in a small subset of breast cancer specimens (two out of a series of 12, and in MCF-7 breast cancer cells which exhibited 22-fold lower HTRA1 mRNA expression levels compared to unmethylated MDA-MB-231 cells. In conclusion, we show that downregulation of HTRA1 is associated with shorter patient survival, particularly in node-positive breast cancer. Since HTRA1 loss was demonstrated to

  19. Factors associated with breast and cervical cancer screening behavior among African immigrant women in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcourt, Nonyelum; Ghebre, Rahel G; Whembolua, Guy-Lucien; Zhang, Yan; Warfa Osman, S; Okuyemi, Kolawole S

    2014-06-01

    Immigrant populations in the United States (US) have lower cancer screening rates compared to none immigrant populations. The purpose of this study was to assess the rates of cancer screening and examine factors associated with cancer screening behavior among African immigrant women in Minnesota. A cross sectional survey of a community based sample was conducted among African immigrants in the Twin Cities. Cancer screening outcome measures were mammography and Papanicolau smear test. The revised theoretical model of health care access and utilization and the behavioral model for vulnerable populations were utilized to assess factors associated with cancer screening. Only 61 and 52% of the age eligible women in the sample had ever been screened for breast and cervical cancer respectively. Among these women, duration of residence in the US and ethnicity were significant determinants associated with non-screening. Programs to enhance screening rates among this population must begin to address barriers identified by the community.

  20. Association of common variants in mismatch repair genes and breast cancer susceptibility: a multigene study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pina Julieta

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MMR is responsible for the repair of base-base mismatches and insertion/deletion loops. Besides this, MMR is also associated with an anti-recombination function, suppressing homologous recombination. Losses of heterozygosity and/or microsatellite instability have been detected in a large number of skin samples from breast cancer patients, suggesting a potential role of MMR in breast cancer susceptibility. Methods We carried out a hospital-based case-control study in a Caucasian Portuguese population (287 cases and 547 controls to estimate the susceptibility to non-familial breast cancer associated with some polymorphisms in mismatch repair genes (MSH3, MSH4, MSH6, MLH1, MLH3, PMS1 and MUTYH. Results Using unconditional logistic regression we found that MLH3 (L844P, G>A polymorphism GA (Leu/Pro and AA (Pro/Pro genotypes were associated with a decreased risk: OR = 0.65 (0.45-0.95 (p = 0.03 and OR = 0.62 (0.41-0.94 (p = 0.03, respectively. Analysis of two-way SNP interaction effects on breast cancer revealed two potential associations to breast cancer susceptibility: MSH3 Ala1045Thr/MSH6 Gly39Glu - AA/TC [OR = 0.43 (0.21-0.83, p = 0.01] associated with a decreased risk; and MSH4 Ala97Thr/MLH3 Leu844Pro - AG/AA [OR = 2.35 (1.23-4.49, p = 0.01], GG/AA [OR = 2.11 (1.12-3,98, p = 0.02], and GG/AG [adjusted OR = 1.88 (1.12-3.15, p = 0.02] all associated with an increased risk for breast cancer. Conclusion It is possible that some of these common variants in MMR genes contribute significantly to breast cancer susceptibility. However, further studies with a large sample size will be needed to support our results.

  1. Association of genetic ancestry with breast cancer in ethnically diverse women from Chicago.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umaima Al-Alem

    Full Text Available Non-Hispanic (nH Black and Hispanic women are disproportionately affected by early onset disease, later stage, and with more aggressive, higher grade and ER/PR negative breast cancers. The purpose of this analysis was to examine whether genetic ancestry could account for these variation in breast cancer characteristics, once data were stratified by self-reported race/ethnicity and adjusted for potential confounding by social and behavioral factors.We used a panel of 100 ancestry informative markers (AIMs to estimate individual genetic ancestry in 656 women from the "Breast Cancer Care in Chicago" study, a multi-ethnic cohort of breast cancer patients to examine the association between individual genetic ancestry and breast cancer characteristics. In addition we examined the association of individual AIMs and breast cancer to identify genes/regions that may potentially play a role in breast cancer disease disparities.As expected, nH Black and Hispanic patients were more likely than nH White patients to be diagnosed at later stages, with higher grade, and with ER/PR negative tumors. Higher European genetic ancestry was protective against later stage at diagnosis (OR 0.7 95%CI: 0.54-0.92 among Hispanic patients, and higher grade (OR 0.73, 95%CI: 0.56-0.95 among nH Black patients. After adjustment for multiple social and behavioral risk factors, the association with later stage remained, while the association with grade was not significant. We also found that the AIM SNP rs10954631 on chromosome 7 was associated with later stage (p = 0.02 and higher grade (p = 0.012 in nH Whites and later stage (p = 0.03 in nH Blacks.Non-European genetic ancestry was associated with later stage at diagnosis in ethnic minorities. The relation between genetic ancestry and stage at diagnosis may be due to genetic factors and/or unmeasured environmental factors that are overrepresented within certain racial/ethnic groups.

  2. Association of genetic ancestry with breast cancer in ethnically diverse women from Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alem, Umaima; Rauscher, Garth; Shah, Ebony; Batai, Ken; Mahmoud, Abeer; Beisner, Erin; Silva, Abigail; Peterson, Caryn; Kittles, Rick

    2014-01-01

    Non-Hispanic (nH) Black and Hispanic women are disproportionately affected by early onset disease, later stage, and with more aggressive, higher grade and ER/PR negative breast cancers. The purpose of this analysis was to examine whether genetic ancestry could account for these variation in breast cancer characteristics, once data were stratified by self-reported race/ethnicity and adjusted for potential confounding by social and behavioral factors. We used a panel of 100 ancestry informative markers (AIMs) to estimate individual genetic ancestry in 656 women from the "Breast Cancer Care in Chicago" study, a multi-ethnic cohort of breast cancer patients to examine the association between individual genetic ancestry and breast cancer characteristics. In addition we examined the association of individual AIMs and breast cancer to identify genes/regions that may potentially play a role in breast cancer disease disparities. As expected, nH Black and Hispanic patients were more likely than nH White patients to be diagnosed at later stages, with higher grade, and with ER/PR negative tumors. Higher European genetic ancestry was protective against later stage at diagnosis (OR 0.7 95%CI: 0.54-0.92) among Hispanic patients, and higher grade (OR 0.73, 95%CI: 0.56-0.95) among nH Black patients. After adjustment for multiple social and behavioral risk factors, the association with later stage remained, while the association with grade was not significant. We also found that the AIM SNP rs10954631 on chromosome 7 was associated with later stage (p = 0.02) and higher grade (p = 0.012) in nH Whites and later stage (p = 0.03) in nH Blacks. Non-European genetic ancestry was associated with later stage at diagnosis in ethnic minorities. The relation between genetic ancestry and stage at diagnosis may be due to genetic factors and/or unmeasured environmental factors that are overrepresented within certain racial/ethnic groups.

  3. Overdiagnosis associated with breast cancer screening: A simulation study to compare lead-time adjustment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seigneurin, A; Labarère, J; Duffy, S W; Colonna, M

    2015-12-01

    Estimating overdiagnosis associated with breast cancer screening may use annual incidence rates of cancer. We simulated populations invited to screening programmes to assess two lead-time adjustment methods. Overdiagnosis estimates were computed using the compensatory drop method, which considered the decrease in incidence of cancers among older age groups no longer offered screening, and the method based on the decrease in incidence of late-stage cancers. The true value of overdiagnosis was 0% in all the data sets simulated. The compensatory drop method yielded an overdiagnosis estimate of -0.1% (95% credibility interval -0.5% to 0.5%) when participation rates among the population and risk of cancers were constant. However, if participation rates increased with calendar year as well as risk of cancer with birth cohorts, the overdiagnosis estimated was 11.0% (10.5-11.6%). Using the method based on the incidence of early- and late-stage cancers, overdiagnosis estimates were 8.9% (8.5-9.3%) and 17.6% (17.4-17.9%) when participation rates and risks of cancer were constant or increased with time, respectively. Adjustment for lead time based on the compensatory drop method is accurate only when participation rates and risks of cancer remain constant, whereas the adjustment method based on the incidence of early- and late-stage cancers results in overestimating overdiagnosis regardless of stability of participation rates and breast cancer risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Genome-wide association studies identify four ER negative–specific breast cancer risk loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Couch, Fergus J; Lindstrom, Sara; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Brook, Mark N; orr, Nick; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Riboli, Elio; Feigelson, Heather s; Le Marchand, Loic; Buring, Julie E; Eccles, Diana; Miron, Penelope; Fasching, Peter A; Brauch, Hiltrud; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Carpenter, Jane; Godwin, Andrew K; Nevanlinna, Heli; Giles, Graham G; Cox, Angela; Hopper, John L; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Howat, Will J; Schoof, Nils; Bojesen, Stig E; Lambrechts, Diether; Broeks, Annegien; Andrulis, Irene L; Guénel, Pascal; Burwinkel, Barbara; Sawyer, Elinor J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Fletcher, Olivia; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Mannermaa, Arto; Hamann, Ute; Meindl, Alfons; Lindblom, Annika; Zheng, Wei; Devillee, Peter; Goldberg, Mark S; Lubinski, Jan; Kristensen, Vessela; Swerdlow, Anthony; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Dörk, Thilo; Muir, Kenneth; Matsuo, Keitaro; Wu, Anna H; Radice, Paolo; Teo, Soo Hwang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Blot, William; Kang, Daehee; Hartman, Mikael; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C; Park, Daniel J; Hammet, Fleur; Stone, Jennifer; Veer, Laura J Van’t; Rutgers, Emiel J; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Peto, Julian; Schrauder, Michael G; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Johnson, Nichola; Warren, Helen; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Truong, Therese; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Kerbrat, Pierre; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lichtner, Peter; Lochmann, Magdalena; Justenhoven, Christina; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Greco, Dario; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Margolin, Sara; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Balleine, Rosemary; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Neven, Patrick; Dieudonné, Anne-Sophie; Leunen, Karin; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Bernard, Loris; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Stevens, Kristen; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Mclean, Catriona; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Feng, Ye; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Tollenaar, Robertus A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Kriege, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje J; Van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Signorello, Lisa; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Miao, Hui; Chan, Ching Wan; Chia, Kee Seng; Jakubowska, Anna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Tessier, Daniel C; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bandera, Elisa V; John, Esther M; Chen, Gary K; Hu, Jennifer J; Rodriguez-gil, Jorge L; Bernstein, Leslie; Press, Michael F; Ziegler, Regina G; Millikan, Robert M; Deming-Halverson, Sandra L; Nyante, Sarah; Ingles, Sue A; Waisfisz, Quinten; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel; Bui, Minh; Gibson, Lorna; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schmutzler, Rita K; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckmann, Lars; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Pilarski, Robert; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Slamon, Dennis J; Rauh, Claudia; Lux, Michael P; Jud, Sebastian M; Bruning, Thomas; Weaver, Joellen; Sharma, Priyanka; Pathak, Harsh; Tapper, Will; Gerty, Sue; Durcan, Lorraine; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Peeters, Petra H; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele; Canzian, Federico; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Johansson, Mattias; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Travis, Ruth; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Kolonel, Laurence N; Chen, Constance; Beck, Andy; Hankinson, Susan E; Berg, Christine D; Hoover, Robert N; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D; Chasman, Daniel I; Gaudet, Mia M; Diver, W Ryan; Willett, Walter C; Hunter, David J; Simard, Jacques; Benitez, Javier; Dunning, Alison M; Sherman, Mark E; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chanock, Stephen J; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Vachon, Celine; Easton, Douglas F; Haiman, Christopher A; Kraft, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors represent 20–30% of all breast cancers, with a higher proportion occurring in younger women and women of African ancestry1. The etiology2 and clinical behavior3 of ER-negative tumors are different from those of tumors expressing ER (ER positive), including differences in genetic predisposition4. To identify susceptibility loci specific to ER-negative disease, we combined in a meta-analysis 3 genome-wide association studies of 4,193 ER-negative breast cancer cases and 35,194 controls with a series of 40 follow-up studies (6,514 cases and 41,455 controls), genotyped using a custom Illumina array, iCOGS, developed by the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS). SNPs at four loci, 1q32.1 (MDM4, P = 2.1 × 10−12 and LGR6, P = 1.4 × 10−8), 2p24.1 (P = 4.6 × 10−8) and 16q12.2 (FTO, P = 4.0 × 10−8), were associated with ER-negative but not ER-positive breast cancer (P > 0.05). These findings provide further evidence for distinct etiological pathways associated with invasive ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers. PMID:23535733

  5. Genome-wide association studies identify four ER negative-specific breast cancer risk loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Couch, Fergus J; Lindstrom, Sara; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Brook, Mark N; Orr, Nick; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Riboli, Elio; Feigelson, Heather S; Le Marchand, Loic; Buring, Julie E; Eccles, Diana; Miron, Penelope; Fasching, Peter A; Brauch, Hiltrud; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Carpenter, Jane; Godwin, Andrew K; Nevanlinna, Heli; Giles, Graham G; Cox, Angela; Hopper, John L; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Howat, Will J; Schoof, Nils; Bojesen, Stig E; Lambrechts, Diether; Broeks, Annegien; Andrulis, Irene L; Guénel, Pascal; Burwinkel, Barbara; Sawyer, Elinor J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Fletcher, Olivia; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Mannermaa, Arto; Hamann, Ute; Meindl, Alfons; Lindblom, Annika; Zheng, Wei; Devillee, Peter; Goldberg, Mark S; Lubinski, Jan; Kristensen, Vessela; Swerdlow, Anthony; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Dörk, Thilo; Muir, Kenneth; Matsuo, Keitaro; Wu, Anna H; Radice, Paolo; Teo, Soo Hwang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Blot, William; Kang, Daehee; Hartman, Mikael; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C; Park, Daniel J; Hammet, Fleur; Stone, Jennifer; Veer, Laura J Van't; Rutgers, Emiel J; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Peto, Julian; Schrauder, Michael G; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Johnson, Nichola; Warren, Helen; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Truong, Therese; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Kerbrat, Pierre; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lichtner, Peter; Lochmann, Magdalena; Justenhoven, Christina; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Greco, Dario; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Margolin, Sara; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Balleine, Rosemary; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Berg, David Van Den; Stram, Daniel O; Neven, Patrick; Dieudonné, Anne-Sophie; Leunen, Karin; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Bernard, Loris; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Stevens, Kristen; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Feng, Ye; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Tollenaar, Robertus A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Kriege, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje J; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Signorello, Lisa; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Miao, Hui; Chan, Ching Wan; Chia, Kee Seng; Jakubowska, Anna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Tessier, Daniel C; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bandera, Elisa V; John, Esther M; Chen, Gary K; Hu, Jennifer J; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Bernstein, Leslie; Press, Michael F; Ziegler, Regina G; Millikan, Robert M; Deming-Halverson, Sandra L; Nyante, Sarah; Ingles, Sue A; Waisfisz, Quinten; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel; Bui, Minh; Gibson, Lorna; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schmutzler, Rita K; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckmann, Lars; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Pilarski, Robert; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Slamon, Dennis J; Rauh, Claudia; Lux, Michael P; Jud, Sebastian M; Bruning, Thomas; Weaver, Joellen; Sharma, Priyanka; Pathak, Harsh; Tapper, Will; Gerty, Sue; Durcan, Lorraine; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Peeters, Petra H; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele; Canzian, Federico; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Johansson, Mattias; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Travis, Ruth; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Kolonel, Laurence N; Chen, Constance; Beck, Andy; Hankinson, Susan E; Berg, Christine D; Hoover, Robert N; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D; Chasman, Daniel I; Gaudet, Mia M; Diver, W Ryan; Willett, Walter C; Hunter, David J; Simard, Jacques; Benitez, Javier; Dunning, Alison M; Sherman, Mark E; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chanock, Stephen J; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Vachon, Celine; Easton, Douglas F; Haiman, Christopher A; Kraft, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors represent 20-30% of all breast cancers, with a higher proportion occurring in younger women and women of African ancestry. The etiology and clinical behavior of ER-negative tumors are different from those of tumors expressing ER (ER positive), including differences in genetic predisposition. To identify susceptibility loci specific to ER-negative disease, we combined in a meta-analysis 3 genome-wide association studies of 4,193 ER-negative breast cancer cases and 35,194 controls with a series of 40 follow-up studies (6,514 cases and 41,455 controls), genotyped using a custom Illumina array, iCOGS, developed by the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS). SNPs at four loci, 1q32.1 (MDM4, P = 2.1 × 10(-12) and LGR6, P = 1.4 × 10(-8)), 2p24.1 (P = 4.6 × 10(-8)) and 16q12.2 (FTO, P = 4.0 × 10(-8)), were associated with ER-negative but not ER-positive breast cancer (P > 0.05). These findings provide further evidence for distinct etiological pathways associated with invasive ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers.

  6. Morbidity associated with breast cancer therapy and the place of physiotherapy in its management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica Păcurar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Incidence of breast cancer continues to grow while modern diagnosis and treatment techniques improve long-term survival rates of the patients. Hence, more women will experience morbidity associated to breast cancer treatment. The aim of this article is to provide a review of the morbidity associated with breast cancer treatment and to emphasize the role of physiotherapist within the rehabilitation team. Pain, pectoralis tightness and axillary web syndrome are the most frequently encountered surgical side effects. They contribute to upper arm dysfunction and reduced range of motion. Radiotherapy may lead to skin and pulmonary morbidity, lymphedema and dysfunction of the muscles caught in the radiation field. Chemotherapy and hormone therapy are associated with osteoporosis and weight gain, the latter representing an important risk factor to lymphedema. Secondary lymphedema is the most frequent complication of breast cancer treatment, mostly related to axillary surgery and radiotherapy. Physiotherapeutic techniques may prevent and control lymphedema, scar adherence and pulmonary complications, reduce pain and improve range of motion, which results in a better quality of life for the patients.

  7. Biomedical application of fuzzy association rules for identifying breast cancer biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, F J; Cuadros, M; Cano, C; Concha, A; Blanco, A

    2012-09-01

    Current breast cancer research involves the study of many different prognosis factors: primary tumor size, lymph node status, tumor grade, tumor receptor status, p53, and ki67 levels, among others. High-throughput microarray technologies are allowing to better understand and identify prognostic factors in breast cancer. But the massive amounts of data derived from these technologies require the use of efficient computational techniques to unveil new and relevant biomedical knowledge. Furthermore, integrative tools are needed that effectively combine heterogeneous types of biomedical data, such as prognosis factors and expression data. The objective of this study was to integrate information from the main prognostic factors in breast cancer with whole-genome microarray data to identify potential associations among them. We propose the application of a data mining approach, called fuzzy association rule mining, to automatically unveil these associations. This paper describes the proposed methodology and illustrates how it can be applied to different breast cancer datasets. The obtained results support known associations involving the number of copies of chromosome-17, HER2 amplification, or the expression level of estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer patients. They also confirm the correspondence between the HER2 status predicted by different testing methodologies (immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization). In addition, other interesting rules involving CDC6, SOX11, and EFEMP1 genes are identified, although further detailed studies are needed to statistically confirm these findings. As part of this study, a web platform implementing the fuzzy association rule mining approach has been made freely available at: http://www.genome2.ugr.es/biofar .

  8. Association of Common Genetic Variants With Contralateral Breast Cancer Risk in the WECARE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Mark E; Reiner, Anne S; Brooks, Jennifer D; Concannon, Patrick J; John, Esther M; Mellemkjaer, Lene; Bernstein, Leslie; Malone, Kathleen E; Knight, Julia A; Lynch, Charles F; Woods, Meghan; Liang, Xiaolin; Haile, Robert W; Duggan, David J; Shore, Roy E; Smith, Susan A; Thomas, Duncan C; Stram, Daniel O; Bernstein, Jonine L

    2017-10-01

    Women with unilateral breast cancer (UBC) are at risk of developing a subsequent contralateral breast cancer (CBC). Common variants are associated with breast cancer risk. Whether these influence CBC risk is unknown. Participants were breast cancer cases from the population-based Women's Environmental Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology (WECARE) Study. Sixty-seven established breast cancer risk loci were genotyped directly or by imputation in 1459 case subjects with CBC and 2126 UBC control subjects. An unweighted polygenic risk score (PRS) was created by summing the number of risk alleles for each directly genotyped single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), or for imputed loci, the imputed dosage. A weighted PRS was calculated similarly, but where each SNP's contribution was weighted by the published per-allele log odds ratio. Unweighted and weighted polygenic risk scores and CBC risk were modeled using conditional logistic regression. Cumulative CBC risk was estimated and benchmarked using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results population incidence rates. Both unweighted and weighted PRS were statistically significantly associated with CBC risk. The adjusted risk ratio of CBC in women in the upper quartile of unweighted PRS compared with the lowest quartile was 1.63 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.33 to 2.00). The estimated 10-year cumulative risk for women in the upper quartile of the unweighted PRS was 7.4% (95% CI = 6.0% to 9.1%). For women in the upper quartile of the weighted PRS, the risk ratio for CBC was 1.75 (95% CI = 1.41 to 2.18) compared with women in the lowest quartile. There was no statistically significant heterogeneity by age, treatment (radiation therapy dose, tamoxifen, chemotherapy), estrogen receptor status of the first primary, histology of the first primary, length of at-risk period for CBC, or breast cancer family history. Common genomic variants associated with the development of first primary breast cancer are also associated

  9. Population attributable risk of breast cancer in white women associated with immediately modifiable risk factors

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    Glaser Sally L

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogen/progestin replacement therapy (EPRT, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and breast-feeding duration differ from other factors associated with breast cancer in being immediately modifiable by the individual, thereby representing attractive targets for future breast cancer prevention efforts. To justify such efforts, it is vital to quantify the potential population-level impacts on breast cancer considering population variations in behavior prevalence, risk estimate, and baseline incidence. Methods For each of these four factors, we calculated population attributable risk percents (PARs using population-based survey (2001 and cancer registry data (1998–2002 for 41 subpopulations of white, non-Hispanic California women aged 40–79 years, and ranges of relative risk (RR estimates from the literature. Results Using a single RR estimate, subpopulation PARs ranged from 2.5% to 5.6% for hormone use, from 0.0% to 6.1% for recent consumption of >= 2 alcoholic drinks daily, and 4.6% to 11.0% for physical inactivity. Using a range of RR estimates, PARs were 2–11% for EPRT use, 1–20% for alcohol consumption and 2–15% for physical inactivity. Subpopulation data were unavailable for breastfeeding, but PARs using published RR estimates ranged from 2% to 11% for lifetime breastfeeding >= 31 months. Thus, of 13,019 breast cancers diagnosed annually in California, as many as 1,432 attributable to EPRT use, 2,604 attributable to alcohol consumption, 1,953 attributable to physical inactivity, and 1,432 attributable to never breastfeeding might be avoidable. Conclusion The relatively feasible lifestyle changes of discontinuing EPRT use, reducing alcohol consumption, increasing physical activity, and lengthening breastfeeding duration could lower population breast cancer incidence substantially.

  10. Nuclear Kaiso expression is associated with high grade and triple-negative invasive breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen F Vermeulen

    Full Text Available Kaiso is a BTB/POZ transcription factor that is ubiquitously expressed in multiple cell types and functions as a transcriptional repressor and activator. Little is known about Kaiso expression and localization in breast cancer. Here, we have related pathological features and molecular subtypes to Kaiso expression in 477 cases of human invasive breast cancer. Nuclear Kaiso was predominantly found in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC (p = 0.007, while cytoplasmic Kaiso expression was linked to invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC (p = 0.006. Although cytoplasmic Kaiso did not correlate to clinicopathological features, we found a significant correlation between nuclear Kaiso, high histological grade (p = 0.023, ERα negativity (p = 0.001, and the HER2-driven and basal/triple-negative breast cancers (p = 0.018. Interestingly, nuclear Kaiso was also abundant in BRCA1-associated breast cancer (p<0.001 and invasive breast cancer overexpressing EGFR (p = 0.019. We observed a correlation between nuclear Kaiso and membrane-localized E-cadherin and p120-catenin (p120 (p<0.01. In contrast, cytoplasmic p120 strongly correlated with loss of E-cadherin and low nuclear Kaiso (p = 0.005. We could confirm these findings in human ILC cells and cell lines derived from conditional mouse models of ILC. Moreover, we present functional data that substantiate a mechanism whereby E-cadherin controls p120-mediated relief of Kaiso-dependent gene repression. In conclusion, our data indicate that nuclear Kaiso is common in clinically aggressive ductal breast cancer, while cytoplasmic Kaiso and a p120-mediated relief of Kaiso-dependent transcriptional repression characterize ILC.

  11. A novel role of EMMPRIN/CD147 in transformation of quiescent fibroblasts to cancer-associated fibroblasts by breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Lu, Yang; Qiu, Songbo; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Fan, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    We tested the novel hypothesis that EMMPRIN/CD147, a transmembrane glycoprotein overexpressed in breast cancer cells, has a previously unknown role in transforming fibroblasts to cancer-associated fibroblasts, and that cancer-associated fibroblasts in turn induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of breast cancer cells. Co-culture of fibroblasts with breast cancer cells or treatment of fibroblasts with breast cancer cell conditioned culture medium or recombinant EMMPRIN/CD147 induced expression of α-SMA in the fibroblasts in an EMMPRIN/CD147-dependent manner and promoted epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of breast cancer cells and enhanced cell migration potential. These findings support a novel role of EMMPRIN/CD147 in regulating the interaction between cancer and stroma. PMID:23474495

  12. Demographic changes in breast cancer incidence, stage at diagnosis and age associated with population-based mammographic screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdial, Francys C; Etzioni, Ruth; Duggan, Catherine; Anderson, Benjamin O

    2017-04-01

    Breast cancer incidence and mortality are influenced by early-detection methods, including mammographic screening. Demographic changes in US statistics serve as a model for changes that can be anticipated in countries where mammographic screening has not been implemented. SEER statistics (1973-2013) for breast cancer mortality, incidence, stage at diagnosis, and age at diagnosis were examined. Temporal associations between screening changes and breast cancer demographics in the US were documented. Before 1982 (pre-screening), breast cancer incidence in the US remained stable, with similar incidence of localized and regional cancers, and with in-situ disease comprising breast cancer incidence increased. In 1991, breast cancer age-adjusted mortality rates began decreasing and have continued to decrease. In the post-screening phase, stage distribution stabilized, but now with localized and in-situ disease representing the majority of diagnosed cases. The median age at diagnosis has increased to 61 years. Mammographic screening increases breast cancer incidence, shifts the stage distribution toward earlier stage disease, and in high-income countries, is associated with improved survival. Whether similar improvement in breast cancer survival can be achieved in the absence of mammographic screening has yet to be conclusively demonstrated. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Quantifying the Role of Circulating Unconjugated Estradiol in Mediating the Body Mass Index-Breast Cancer Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, Catherine; Fuhrman, Barbara J; Boyd-Morin, Jennifer; Genkinger, Jeanine M; Gail, Mitchell H; Hoover, Robert N; Ziegler, Regina G

    2016-01-01

    Higher body mass index (BMI) and circulating estrogen levels each increase postmenopausal breast cancer risk, particularly estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) tumors. Higher BMI also increases estrogen production. We estimated the proportion of the BMI-ER(+) breast cancer association mediated through estrogen in a case-control study nested within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Participants included 143 women with invasive ER(+) breast cancer and 268 matched controls, all postmenopausal and never having used hormone therapy at baseline. We used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to measure 15 estrogens and estrogen metabolites in baseline serum. We calculated BMI from self-reported height and weight at baseline. We estimated the mediating effect of unconjugated estradiol on the BMI-ER(+) breast cancer association using Aalen additive hazards and Cox regression models. All estrogens and estrogen metabolites were statistically significantly correlated with BMI, with unconjugated estradiol most strongly correlated [Pearson correlation (r) = 0.45]. Approximately 7% to 10% of the effect of overweight, 12% to 15% of the effect of obesity, and 19% to 20% of the effect of a 5 kg/m(2) BMI increase on ER(+) breast cancer risk was mediated through unconjugated estradiol. The BMI-breast cancer association, once adjusted for unconjugated estradiol, was not modified by further adjustment for two metabolic ratios statistically significantly associated with both breast cancer and BMI. Circulating unconjugated estradiol levels partially mediate the BMI-breast cancer association, but other potentially important estrogen mediators (e.g., bioavailable estradiol) were not evaluated. Further research is required to identify mechanisms underlying the BMI-breast cancer association. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Hereditary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin J; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are only detected in 25% of families with a strong history of breast cancer, though hereditary factors are expected to be involved in the remaining families with no recognized mutation. Molecular characterization is expected to provide new insight...... into the tumor biology to guide the search of new high-risk alleles and provide better classification of the growing number of BRCA1/2 variants of unknown significance (VUS). In this review, we provide an overview of hereditary breast cancer, its genetic background, and clinical implications, before focusing...... on the pathologically and molecular features associated with the disease. Recent transcriptome and genome profiling studies of tumor series from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers as well as familial non-BRCA1/2 will be discussed. Special attention is paid to its association with molecular breast cancer subtypes as well...

  15. Depressed mood in breast cancer survivors: associations with physical activity, cancer-related fatigue, quality of life, and fitness level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiano-Castillo, Noelia; Ariza-García, Angelica; Cantarero-Villanueva, Irene; Fernández-Lao, Carolina; Díaz-Rodríguez, Lourdes; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2014-04-01

    One out of five cancer survivors suffer from depression after oncology treatment. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between depression and quality of life (QoL), cancer-related symptoms, physical activity level, health-related fitness, and salivary flow rate in breast cancer survivors. 108 breast cancer survivors in the year after the conclusion of treatment were included in this cross-sectional study. Demographic and clinically relevant information, cancer-related fatigue (Piper Fatigue Scale), QoL (QLQ-Br23 module), pain intensity VAS scale, salivary flow rate, physical activity level (Minnesota Leisure Time Physical Activity Questionnaire), and health-related fitness were assessed in all participants. Depressed mood was measured with the Profile of Mood States (POMS) Depression subscale. Significant positive correlations between depressed mood and fatigue, systemic side effects, perceived shoulder pain, and breast-arms symptoms (r ranged between .57 and .28, P depressed mood and body image, future perspective, force handgrip, and physical activity level (r ranged between -.41 and -.19; p body image were significant predictors of depressed mood, and when combined, they explained 39.6% of the variance in depressed mood. Cancer-related fatigue, physical activity level, and QoL partially explain the variability of depressed mood in breast cancer survivors. This paper facilitates a better understanding of the relationship between depressed mood and possible factors associated with it. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Breast cancer and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knabben, Laura; Mueller, Michel D

    2017-08-29

    Background In the past decades the incidence of pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) increased. Possible explanations are the trend to postpone childbearing and the general increase in the incidence of breast cancer. Materials and methods A sytematic review of the literature was performed with the aim to report on incidence, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of breast cancer during pregnancy. We also cover the issue of pregnancy following a diagnosis of breast cancer including fertility preservation and prognosis. Results Ultrasound is the imaging method of choice in pregnancy, but mammography can also be performed as the fetal irradiation dose is low. To avoid a delay in diagnosis every sonographic mass in pregnant women which does not clearly correspond to a cyst needs further investigation by biopsy. Treatment should follow as close as possible the guidelines for non-pregnant patients. Administration of chemotherapy is possible after the first trimester. There is a large body of evidence for the use of anthracyclines. In contrast radiotherapy, trastuzumab and antihormonal treatment by tamoxifen are contraindicated during pregnancy. Pregnancy does not seem to influence prognosis. Most adverse obstetric outcomes are related to preterm delivery, which should therefore, whenever possible, be avoided. Young patients with breast cancer and incomplete family planning should be referred for counseling about fertility preservation options before the initiation of adjuvant treatment. A pregnancy following breast cancer does not have a negative impact on prognosis. Conclusion Multidisciplinary management of women with breast cancer in pregnancy is mandatory and data should be collected to allow further improvement in management.

  17. Association between Serum 25-hydroxy Vitamin D Concentration and TaqI Vitamin D Receptor Gene Polymorphism among Jordanian Females with Breast Cancer

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    Manar Fayiz Atoum

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: An inverse association was found between 25(OHD serum level and breast cancer risk. Statistical difference was also found between different VDR TaqI genotypes and circulating levels of 25(OHD among Jordanian females with breast cancer.

  18. A Genetic Polymorphism (rs17251221 in the Calcium-Sensing Receptor is Associated with Breast Cancer Susceptibility and Prognosis

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    Xiaoyan Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR is a typical G protein coupled receptor. The rs17251221 SNP is located in an intron of the CaSR gene, and the G allele is considered a gain of function mutation. Previous studies revealed that rs17251221 polymorphisms contribute to the risk of developing certain types of cancers. This study investigated the rs17251221 SNP in breast cancer by analyzing the correlation of the rs17251221 genotype with breast cancer susceptibility, clinicopathological features and prognosis. Methods: A TaqMan assay was used to genotype the rs17251221 SNP in a case-control study. The expression levels of CaSR in breast cancer tissues were determined using quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR and western blot analysis. The association of the rs17251221 genotype and the clinicopathological characteristics, as well as the prognosis of the breast cancer patient, was assessed statistically. Results: We found that the AG and GG genotypes were associated with lower mRNA and protein levels of CaSR compared to the AA genotype in breast cancer tissues. We also found that the AG and GG genotypes were associated with breast cancer susceptibility, the patient's age at diagnosis, tumor size, lymph node metastasis and estrogen receptor status of breast cancer tissue. More importantly, we found that the genotypes were prognostic markers for both disease-free survival and overall survival of breast cancer. Conclusion: The rs17251221 SNP is a risk factor associated with breast cancer susceptibility, as well as a prognostic indicator. Our data suggest that rs17251221 may be a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer.

  19. Pregnancy-Associated Risk Factors of Postpartum Breast Cancer in Korea: A Nationwide Health Insurance Database Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eun Joo; Seo, Jae Hong; Kim, Log Young; Park, Geun U; Oh, Min-Jeong; Park, Pyoung-Jae; Cho, Geum Joon

    2016-01-01

    Patients with postpartum breast cancer have been reported to have a poor prognosis. The present study aimed to evaluate the pregnancy-related risk factors of postpartum breast cancer in Korea. We collected patient data from the Korea National Health Insurance (KNHI) Claims Database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA) for the 2009-2013 period. We evaluated the pregnancy-related risk factors for postpartum breast cancer in two population groups. For Group 1 (women who had given birth during the 2010-2012 period), data on those who were diagnosed with breast cancer from childbirth to 1-year postpartum were extracted. For Group 2, we extracted the data of women who gave birth in 2010 and traced them until December 31, 2013. In Group 1, 1,384,551 deliveries and 317 postpartum breast cancer patients were recorded in Korea between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2012. Women aged ≥35 years (Odds Ratio [OR], 2.003; 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.567-2.560) and those who gave birth via cesarean delivery (OR, 1.237; 95% CI, 0.986-1.553) were considered to be at a higher risk for breast cancer. Lower risk was noted in primiparous women (OR, 0.737; 95% CI, 0.585-0.928). In Group 2, the data of 457,924 women who gave birth in 2010 were traced until December 31, 2013. Among them, 655 patients were diagnosed with breast cancer, and age ≥35 years and cesarean delivery were associated with an higher risk of breast cancer, whereas primiparous status was associated with