WorldWideScience

Sample records for break repair pathways

  1. Differential usage of alternative pathways of double-strand break repair in Drosophila.

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    Preston, Christine R; Flores, Carlos C; Engels, William R

    2006-02-01

    Double-strand DNA breaks can be repaired by any of several alternative mechanisms that differ greatly in the nature of the final repaired products. We used a reporter construct, designated "Repair reporter 3" (Rr3), to measure the relative usage of these pathways in Drosophila germ cells. The method works by creating a double-strand break at a specific location such that expression of the red fluorescent protein, DsRed, in the next generation can be used to infer the frequency at which each pathway was used. A key feature of this approach is that most data come from phenotypic scoring, thus allowing large sample sizes and considerable precision in measurements. Specifically, we measured the proportion of breaks repaired by (1) conversion repair, (2) nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), or (3) single-strand annealing (SSA). For conversion repair, the frequency of mitotic crossing over in the germ line indicates the relative prevalence of repair by double Holliday junction (DHJ) formation vs. the synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) pathway. We used this method to show that breaks occurring early in germ-line development were much more frequently repaired via single-strand annealing and much less likely to be repaired by end joining compared with identical breaks occurring later in development. Conversion repair was relatively rare when breaks were made either very early or very late in development, but was much more frequent in between. Significantly, the changes in relative usage occurred in a compensatory fashion, such that an increase in one pathway was accompanied by decreases in others. This negative correlation is interpreted to mean that the pathways for double-strand break repair compete with each other to handle a given breakage event.

  2. Repair Pathway Choices and Consequences at the Double-Strand Break

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    Ceccaldi, Raphael; Rondinelli, Beatrice; D’Andrea, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are cytotoxic lesions that threaten genomic integrity. Failure to repair a DSB has deleterious consequences, including genomic instability and cell death. Indeed, misrepair of DSBs can lead to inappropriate end-joining events, which commonly underlie oncogenic transformation due to chromosomal translocations. Typically, cells employ two main mechanisms to repair DSBs: homologous recombination (HR) and classical nonhomologous end joining (C-NHEJ). In addition, alternative error-prone DSB repair pathways, namely alternative end joining (alt-EJ) and single-strand annealing (SSA), have been recently shown to operate in many different conditions and to contribute to genome rearrangements and oncogenic transformation. Here, we review the mechanisms regulating DSB repair pathway choice, together with the potential interconnections between HR and the annealing-dependent error-prone DSB repair pathways. PMID:26437586

  3. Efficient repair of DNA breaks in Drosophila: evidence for single-strand annealing and competition with other repair pathways.

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    Preston, Christine R; Engels, William; Flores, Carlos

    2002-06-01

    We show evidence that DNA double-strand breaks induced in the Drosophila germ line can be repaired very efficiently by the single-strand annealing (SSA) mechanism. A double-strand break was made between two copies of a 1290-bp direct repeat by mobilizing a P transposon. In >80% of the progeny that acquired this chromosome, repair resulted in loss of the P element and loss of one copy of the repeat, as observed in SSA. The frequency of this repair was much greater than seen for gene conversion using an allelic template, which is only approximately 7%. A similar structure, but with a smaller duplication of only 158 bp, also yielded SSA-like repair events, but at a reduced frequency, and gave rise to some products by repair pathways other than SSA. The 1290-bp repeats carried two sequence polymorphisms that were examined in the products. The allele nearest to a nick in the putative heteroduplex intermediate was lost most often. This bias is predicted by the SSA model, although other models could account for it. We conclude that SSA is the preferred repair pathway in Drosophila for DNA breaks between sequence repeats, and it competes with gene conversion by the synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) pathway.

  4. Regulation of repair pathway choice at two-ended DNA double-strand breaks.

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    Shibata, Atsushi

    2017-10-01

    A DNA double-strand break (DSB) is considered to be a critical DNA lesion because its misrepair can cause severe mutations, such as deletions or chromosomal translocations. For the precise repair of DSBs, the repair pathway that is optimal for the particular circumstance needs to be selected. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) functions in G1/S/G2 phase, while homologous recombination (HR) becomes active only in S/G2 phase after DNA replication. DSB end structure is another factor affecting the repair pathway. For example, one-ended DSBs in S phase are mainly repaired by HR due to the lack of a partner DSB end for NHEJ. In contrast, two-ended DSBs, which are mainly induced by ionizing radiation, are repaired by either NHEJ or HR in G2 cells. Under the current model in terms of DSB repair pathway usage in G2 phase, NHEJ repairs ∼70% of two-ended DSBs, whereas HR repairs only ∼30%. Recent studies propose that NHEJ factors can bind all the DSB ends and are then either used to progress that pathway of DSB repair, or the repair proceeds by HR. In addition, molecular regulation by BRCA1 and 53BP1 has also been proposed. At DSB sites, BRCA1 functions to alleviate the 53BP1 barrier to resection by promoting 53BP1 dephosphorylation, followed by RIF1 release and 53BP1 repositioning. This timely 53BP1 repositioning may be important for the establishment of a chromatin environment that promotes the recruitment of EXO1 for resection in HR. This review summarizes current knowledge on factors regulating DSB repair pathway choice in terms of spatiotemporal regulation by focusing on the repair events at two-ended DSBs in G2 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A robust network of double-strand break repair pathways governs genome integrity during C. elegans development.

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    Pontier, Daphne B; Tijsterman, Marcel

    2009-08-25

    To preserve genomic integrity, various mechanisms have evolved to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Depending on cell type or cell cycle phase, DSBs can be repaired error-free, by homologous recombination, or with concomitant loss of sequence information, via nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) or single-strand annealing (SSA). Here, we created a transgenic reporter system in C. elegans to investigate the relative contribution of these pathways in somatic cells during animal development. Although all three canonical pathways contribute to repair in the soma, in their combined absence, animals develop without growth delay and chromosomal breaks are still efficiently repaired. This residual repair, which we call alternative end-joining, dominates DSB repair only in the absence of NHEJ and resembles SSA, but acts independent of the SSA nuclease XPF and repair proteins from other pathways. The dynamic interplay between repair pathways might be developmentally regulated, because it was lost from terminally differentiated cells in adult animals. Our results demonstrate profound versatility in DSB repair pathways for somatic cells of C. elegans, which are thus extremely fit to deal with chromosomal breaks.

  6. MOF phosphorylation by ATM regulates 53BP1-mediated double-strand break repair pathway choice.

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    Gupta, Arun; Hunt, Clayton R; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Udayakumar, Durga; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Singh, Mayank; Ramnarain, Deepti B; Hittelman, Walter N; Namjoshi, Sarita; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Hazra, Tapas K; Ludwig, Thomas; Pandita, Raj K; Tyler, Jessica K; Pandita, Tej K

    2014-07-10

    Cell-cycle phase is a critical determinant of the choice between DNA damage repair by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). Here, we report that double-strand breaks (DSBs) induce ATM-dependent MOF (a histone H4 acetyl-transferase) phosphorylation (p-T392-MOF) and that phosphorylated MOF colocalizes with γ-H2AX, ATM, and 53BP1 foci. Mutation of the phosphorylation site (MOF-T392A) impedes DNA repair in S and G2 phase but not G1 phase cells. Expression of MOF-T392A also blocks the reduction in DSB-associated 53BP1 seen in wild-type S/G2 phase cells, resulting in enhanced 53BP1 and reduced BRCA1 association. Decreased BRCA1 levels at DSB sites correlates with defective repairosome formation, reduced HR repair, and decreased cell survival following irradiation. These data support a model whereby ATM-mediated MOF-T392 phosphorylation modulates 53BP1 function to facilitate the subsequent recruitment of HR repair proteins, uncovering a regulatory role for MOF in DSB repair pathway choice during S/G2 phase. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. AUNIP/C1orf135 directs DNA double-strand breaks towards the homologous recombination repair pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jiangman; Chen, Hongxia; Han, Jinhua; He, Hanqing; Huen, Michael S Y; Feng, Xin-Hua; Liu, Ting; Huang, Jun

    2017-10-17

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are mainly repaired by either homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Here, we identify AUNIP/C1orf135, a largely uncharacterized protein, as a key determinant of DSB repair pathway choice. AUNIP physically interacts with CtIP and is required for efficient CtIP accumulation at DSBs. AUNIP possesses intrinsic DNA-binding ability with a strong preference for DNA substrates that mimic structures generated at stalled replication forks. This ability to bind DNA is necessary for the recruitment of AUNIP and its binding partner CtIP to DSBs, which in turn drives CtIP-dependent DNA-end resection and HR repair. Accordingly, loss of AUNIP or ablation of its ability to bind to DNA results in cell hypersensitivity toward a variety of DSB-inducing agents, particularly those that induce replication-associated DSBs. Our findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanism by which DSBs are recognized and channeled to the HR repair pathway.DNA double strand breaks can be repaired by homology-independent or homology-directed mechanisms. The choice between these pathways is a key event for genomic stability maintenance. Here the authors identify and characterize AUNIP, as a factor involved in tilting the balance towards homology repair.

  8. An alternative pathway for Alu retrotransposition suggests a role in DNA double-strand break repair.

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    Srikanta, Deepa; Sen, Shurjo K; Huang, Charles T; Conlin, Erin M; Rhodes, Ryan M; Batzer, Mark A

    2009-03-01

    The Alu family is a highly successful group of non-LTR retrotransposons ubiquitously found in primate genomes. Similar to the L1 retrotransposon family, Alu elements integrate primarily through an endonuclease-dependent mechanism termed target site-primed reverse transcription (TPRT). Recent studies have suggested that, in addition to TPRT, L1 elements occasionally utilize an alternative endonuclease-independent pathway for genomic integration. To determine whether an analogous mechanism exists for Alu elements, we have analyzed three publicly available primate genomes (human, chimpanzee and rhesus macaque) for endonuclease-independent recently integrated or lineage specific Alu insertions. We recovered twenty-three examples of such insertions and show that these insertions are recognizably different from classical TPRT-mediated Alu element integration. We suggest a role for this process in DNA double-strand break repair and present evidence to suggest its association with intra-chromosomal translocations, in-vitro RNA recombination (IVRR), and synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA).

  9. Crosstalk of DNA double-strand break repair pathways in PARP inhibitor treatment of BRCA1/2-mutated Cancer.

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    Sunada, Shigeaki; Nakanishi, Akira; Miki, Yoshio

    2018-02-10

    Germ-line mutations in breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 or 2 (BRCA1 or BRCA2) significantly increase cancer risk in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC). Both genes function in the homologous recombination (HR) pathway of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair process. Therefore, the DNA-repair defect characteristic in cancer cells brings therapeutic advantage for Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor-induced synthetic lethality. The PARP inhibitor-based therapeutics initially causes cancer lethality but acquired resistance mechanisms have been found and need to be elucidated. In particular, it is essential to understand the mechanism of DNA damage and repair to PARP inhibitor treatment in detail. Further investigations have shown the roles of BRCA1/2 and its associations to other molecules in the DSB repair system. Notably, the repair pathway chosen in BRCA1-deficient cells could be entirely different from that in BRCA2-deficient cells after PARP inhibitor treatment. This review describes synthetic lethality and acquired resistance mechanisms to PARP inhibitor via the DSB repair pathway and subsequent repair process. In addition, recent knowledge of resistance mechanisms is discussed. Our model should contribute to the development of novel therapeutic strategies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Chlamydomonas chloroplasts can use short dispersed repeats and multiple pathways to repair a double-strand break in the genome.

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    Odom, Obed W; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Dani, Radhika N; Herrin, David L

    2008-03-01

    Certain group I introns insert into intronless DNA via an endonuclease that creates a double-strand break (DSB). There are two models for intron homing in phage: synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) and double-strand break repair (DSBR). The Cr.psbA4 intron homes efficiently from a plasmid into the chloroplast psbA gene in Chlamydomonas, but little is known about the mechanism. Analysis of co-transformants selected using a spectinomycin-resistant 16S gene (16S(spec)) provided evidence for both pathways. We also examined the consequences of the donor DNA having only one-sided or no homology with the psbA gene. When there was no homology with the donor DNA, deletions of up to 5 kb involving direct repeats that flank the psbA gene were obtained. Remarkably, repeats as short as 15 bp were used for this repair, which is consistent with the single-strand annealing (SSA) pathway. When the donor had one-sided homology, the DSB in most co-transformants was repaired using two DNAs, the donor and the 16S(spec) plasmid, which, coincidentally, contained a region that is repeated upstream of psbA. DSB repair using two separate DNAs provides further evidence for the SDSA pathway. These data show that the chloroplast can repair a DSB using short dispersed repeats located proximally, distally, or even on separate molecules relative to the DSB. They also provide a rationale for the extensive repertoire of repeated sequences in this genome.

  11. A robust network of double-strand break repair pathways governs genome integrity during C. elegans development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pontier, D.B.; Tijsterman, M.

    2009-01-01

    To preserve genomic integrity, various mechanisms have evolved to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Depending on cell type or cell cycle phase, DSBs can be repaired error-free, by homologous recombination, or with concomitant loss of sequence information, via nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ)

  12. A Role for BLM in Double-Strand Break Repair Pathway Choice: Prevention of CtIP/Mre11-Mediated Alternative Nonhomologous End-Joining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grabarz, Anastazja; Guirouilh-Barbat, Josée; Barascu, Aurelia

    2013-01-01

    The choice of the appropriate double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway is essential for the maintenance of genomic stability. Here, we show that the Bloom syndrome gene product, BLM, counteracts CtIP/MRE11-dependent long-range deletions (>200 bp) generated by alternative end-joining (A-EJ). BLM...

  13. Meiotic versus mitotic recombination: two different routes for double-strand break repair: the different functions of meiotic versus mitotic DSB repair are reflected in different pathway usage and different outcomes.

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    Andersen, Sabrina L; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2010-12-01

    Studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have validated the major features of the double-strand break repair (DSBR) model as an accurate representation of the pathway through which meiotic crossovers (COs) are produced. This success has led to this model being invoked to explain double-strand break (DSB) repair in other contexts. However, most non-crossover (NCO) recombinants generated during S. cerevisiae meiosis do not arise via a DSBR pathway. Furthermore, it is becoming increasingly clear that DSBR is a minor pathway for recombinational repair of DSBs that occur in mitotically-proliferating cells and that the synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) model appears to describe mitotic DSB repair more accurately. Fundamental dissimilarities between meiotic and mitotic recombination are not unexpected, since meiotic recombination serves a very different purpose (accurate chromosome segregation, which requires COs) than mitotic recombination (repair of DNA damage, which typically generates NCOs). Copyright © 2010 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks: I. A mathematical model.

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    Taleei, Reza; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2013-05-01

    This article presents a biochemical kinetic model for the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway. The model is part of a theoretical framework to encompass all cellular DSB repair pathways. The NHEJ model was developed by taking into consideration the biological characteristics of the repair processes in the absence of homologous recombination (HR), the major alternative pathway for DSB repair. The model considers fast and slow components of the repair kinetics resulting in a set of differential equations that were solved numerically. In the absence of available published data for reaction rate constants for the repair proteins involved in NHEJ, we propose reaction rate constants for the solution of the equations. We assume as a first approximation that the reaction rate constants are applicable to mammalian cells under same conditions. The model was tested by comparing measured and simulated DSB repair kinetics obtained with HR-deficient cell lines irradiated by X rays in the dose range of 20-80 Gy. Measured data for initial protein recruitment to a DSB were used to independently estimate rate constants for Ku70/Ku80 and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). We show here based on the model of DSB repair described in this article, application of the model in the accompanying article (Taleei et al., Radiat. Res. 179, 540-548, 2013) and by simulation of repair times for each individual DSB produced by individual tracks of electrons, that the complexity of damage may explain the slow kinetics of DNA DSB repair.

  15. Phosphorylation: The Molecular Switch of Double-Strand Break Repair

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    K. C. Summers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Repair of double-stranded breaks (DSBs is vital to maintaining genomic stability. In mammalian cells, DSBs are resolved in one of the following complex repair pathways: nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ, homologous recombination (HR, or the inclusive DNA damage response (DDR. These repair pathways rely on factors that utilize reversible phosphorylation of proteins as molecular switches to regulate DNA repair. Many of these molecular switches overlap and play key roles in multiple pathways. For example, the NHEJ pathway and the DDR both utilize DNA-PK phosphorylation, whereas the HR pathway mediates repair with phosphorylation of RPA2, BRCA1, and BRCA2. Also, the DDR pathway utilizes the kinases ATM and ATR, as well as the phosphorylation of H2AX and MDC1. Together, these molecular switches regulate repair of DSBs by aiding in DSB recognition, pathway initiation, recruitment of repair factors, and the maintenance of repair mechanisms.

  16. A novel protein, Rsf1/Pxd1, is critical for the single-strand annealing pathway of double-strand break repair in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

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    Wang, Hanqian; Zhang, Zhanlu; Zhang, Lan; Zhang, Qiuxue; Zhang, Liang; Zhao, Yangmin; Wang, Weibu; Fan, Yunliu; Wang, Lei

    2015-06-01

    The process of single-strand annealing (SSA) repairs DNA double-strand breaks that are flanked by direct repeat sequences through the coordinated actions of a series of proteins implicated in recombination, mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair (NER). Many of the molecular and mechanistic insights gained in SSA repair have principally come from studies in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, there is little molecular understanding of the SSA pathway in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. To further our understanding of this important process, we established a new chromosome-based SSA assay in fission yeast. Our genetic analyses showed that, although many homologous components participate in SSA repair in these species indicating that some evolutionary conservation, Saw1 and Slx4 are not principal agents in the SSA repair pathway in fission yeast. This is in marked contrast to the function of Saw1 and Slx4 in budding yeast. Additionally, a novel genus-specific protein, Rsf1/Pxd1, physically interacts with Rad16, Swi10 and Saw1 in vitro and in vivo. We find that Rsf1/Pxd1 is not required for NER and demonstrate that, in fission yeast, Rsf1/Pxd1, but not Saw1, plays a critical role in SSA recombination. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. MCM8 is required for a pathway of meiotic double-strand break repair independent of DMC1 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Crismani, Wayne; Portemer, Virginie; Froger, Nicole; Chelysheva, Liudmila; Horlow, Christine; Vrielynck, Nathalie; Mercier, Raphaël

    2013-01-01

    Mini-chromosome maintenance (MCM) 2-9 proteins are related helicases. The first six, MCM2-7, are essential for DNA replication in all eukaryotes. In contrast, MCM8 is not always conserved in eukaryotes but is present in Arabidopsis thaliana. MCM8 is required for 95% of meiotic crossovers (COs) in Drosophila and is essential for meiosis completion in mouse, prompting us to study this gene in Arabidopsis meiosis. Three allelic Atmcm8 mutants showed a limited level of chromosome fragmentation at meiosis. This defect was dependent on programmed meiotic double-strand break (DSB) formation, revealing a role for AtMCM8 in meiotic DSB repair. In contrast, CO formation was not affected, as shown both genetically and cytologically. The Atmcm8 DSB repair defect was greatly amplified in the absence of the DMC1 recombinase or in mutants affected in DMC1 dynamics (sds, asy1). The Atmcm8 fragmentation defect was also amplified in plants heterozygous for a mutation in either recombinase, DMC1 or RAD51. Finally, in the context of absence of homologous chromosomes (i.e. haploid), mutation of AtMCM8 also provoked a low level of chromosome fragmentation. This fragmentation was amplified by the absence of DMC1 showing that both MCM8 and DMC1 can promote repair on the sister chromatid in Arabidopsis haploids. Altogether, this establishes a role for AtMCM8 in meiotic DSB repair, in parallel to DMC1. We propose that MCM8 is involved with RAD51 in a backup pathway that repairs meiotic DSB without giving CO when the major pathway, which relies on DMC1, fails.

  18. MCM8 is required for a pathway of meiotic double-strand break repair independent of DMC1 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Crismani

    Full Text Available Mini-chromosome maintenance (MCM 2-9 proteins are related helicases. The first six, MCM2-7, are essential for DNA replication in all eukaryotes. In contrast, MCM8 is not always conserved in eukaryotes but is present in Arabidopsis thaliana. MCM8 is required for 95% of meiotic crossovers (COs in Drosophila and is essential for meiosis completion in mouse, prompting us to study this gene in Arabidopsis meiosis. Three allelic Atmcm8 mutants showed a limited level of chromosome fragmentation at meiosis. This defect was dependent on programmed meiotic double-strand break (DSB formation, revealing a role for AtMCM8 in meiotic DSB repair. In contrast, CO formation was not affected, as shown both genetically and cytologically. The Atmcm8 DSB repair defect was greatly amplified in the absence of the DMC1 recombinase or in mutants affected in DMC1 dynamics (sds, asy1. The Atmcm8 fragmentation defect was also amplified in plants heterozygous for a mutation in either recombinase, DMC1 or RAD51. Finally, in the context of absence of homologous chromosomes (i.e. haploid, mutation of AtMCM8 also provoked a low level of chromosome fragmentation. This fragmentation was amplified by the absence of DMC1 showing that both MCM8 and DMC1 can promote repair on the sister chromatid in Arabidopsis haploids. Altogether, this establishes a role for AtMCM8 in meiotic DSB repair, in parallel to DMC1. We propose that MCM8 is involved with RAD51 in a backup pathway that repairs meiotic DSB without giving CO when the major pathway, which relies on DMC1, fails.

  19. Non-homologous end joining is the responsible pathway for the repair of fludarabine-induced DNA double strand breaks in mammalian cells

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    Campos-Nebel, Marcelo de [Departamento de Genetica, Instituto de Investigaciones Hematologicas Mariano R. Castex, Academia Nacional de Medicina, Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: mnebel@hematologia.anm.edu.ar; Larripa, Irene; Gonzalez-Cid, Marcela [Departamento de Genetica, Instituto de Investigaciones Hematologicas Mariano R. Castex, Academia Nacional de Medicina, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2008-11-10

    Fludarabine (FLU), an analogue of adenosine, interferes with DNA synthesis and inhibits the chain elongation leading to replication arrest and DNA double strand break (DSB) formation. Mammalian cells use two main pathways of DSB repair to maintain genomic stability: homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). The aim of the present work was to evaluate the repair pathways employed in the restoration of DSB formed following replication arrest induced by FLU in mammalian cells. Replication inhibition was induced in human lymphocytes and fibroblasts by FLU. DSB occurred in a dose-dependent manner on early/middle S-phase cells, as detected by {gamma}H2AX foci formation. To test whether conservative HR participates in FLU-induced DSB repair, we measured the kinetics of Rad51 nuclear foci formation in human fibroblasts. There was no significant induction of Rad51 foci after FLU treatment. To further confirm these results, we analyzed the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in both human cells. We did not find increased frequencies of SCE after FLU treatment. To assess the participation of NHEJ pathway in the repair of FLU-induced damage, we used two chemical inhibitors of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), vanillin and wortmannin. Human fibroblasts pretreated with DNA-PKcs inhibitors showed increased levels of chromosome breakages and became more sensitive to cell death. An active role of NHEJ pathway was also suggested from the analysis of Chinese hamster cell lines. XR-C1 (DNA-PKcs-deficient) and XR-V15B (Ku80-deficient) cells showed hypersensitivity to FLU as evidenced by the increased frequency of chromosome aberrations, decreased mitotic index and impaired survival rates. In contrast, CL-V4B (Rad51C-deficient) and V-C8 (Brca2-deficient) cell lines displayed a FLU-resistant phenotype. Together, our results suggest a major role for NHEJ repair in the preservation of genome integrity against FLU

  20. A major role of the RecFOR pathway in DNA double-strand-break repair through ESDSA in Deinococcus radiodurans.

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    Esma Bentchikou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In Deinococcus radiodurans, the extreme resistance to DNA-shattering treatments such as ionizing radiation or desiccation is correlated with its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of chromosomal fragments. The rapid reconstitution of an intact genome is thought to occur through an extended synthesis-dependent strand annealing process (ESDSA followed by DNA recombination. Here, we investigated the role of key components of the RecF pathway in ESDSA in this organism naturally devoid of RecB and RecC proteins. We demonstrate that inactivation of RecJ exonuclease results in cell lethality, indicating that this protein plays a key role in genome maintenance. Cells devoid of RecF, RecO, or RecR proteins also display greatly impaired growth and an important lethal sectoring as bacteria devoid of RecA protein. Other aspects of the phenotype of recFOR knock-out mutants paralleled that of a DeltarecA mutant: DeltarecFOR mutants are extremely radiosensitive and show a slow assembly of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments, not accompanied by DNA synthesis, and reduced DNA degradation. Cells devoid of RecQ, the major helicase implicated in repair through the RecF pathway in E. coli, are resistant to gamma-irradiation and have a wild-type DNA repair capacity as also shown for cells devoid of the RecD helicase; in contrast, DeltauvrD mutants show a markedly decreased radioresistance, an increased latent period in the kinetics of DNA double-strand-break repair, and a slow rate of fragment assembly correlated with a slow rate of DNA synthesis. Combining RecQ or RecD deficiency with UvrD deficiency did not significantly accentuate the phenotype of DeltauvrD mutants. In conclusion, RecFOR proteins are essential for DNA double-strand-break repair through ESDSA whereas RecJ protein is essential for cell viability and UvrD helicase might be involved in the processing of double stranded DNA ends and/or in the DNA synthesis step of ESDSA.

  1. A Major Role of the RecFOR Pathway in DNA Double-Strand-Break Repair through ESDSA in Deinococcus radiodurans

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    Bentchikou, Esma; Servant, Pascale; Coste, Geneviève; Sommer, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    In Deinococcus radiodurans, the extreme resistance to DNA–shattering treatments such as ionizing radiation or desiccation is correlated with its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of chromosomal fragments. The rapid reconstitution of an intact genome is thought to occur through an extended synthesis-dependent strand annealing process (ESDSA) followed by DNA recombination. Here, we investigated the role of key components of the RecF pathway in ESDSA in this organism naturally devoid of RecB and RecC proteins. We demonstrate that inactivation of RecJ exonuclease results in cell lethality, indicating that this protein plays a key role in genome maintenance. Cells devoid of RecF, RecO, or RecR proteins also display greatly impaired growth and an important lethal sectoring as bacteria devoid of RecA protein. Other aspects of the phenotype of recFOR knock-out mutants paralleled that of a ΔrecA mutant: ΔrecFOR mutants are extremely radiosensitive and show a slow assembly of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments, not accompanied by DNA synthesis, and reduced DNA degradation. Cells devoid of RecQ, the major helicase implicated in repair through the RecF pathway in E. coli, are resistant to γ-irradiation and have a wild-type DNA repair capacity as also shown for cells devoid of the RecD helicase; in contrast, ΔuvrD mutants show a markedly decreased radioresistance, an increased latent period in the kinetics of DNA double-strand-break repair, and a slow rate of fragment assembly correlated with a slow rate of DNA synthesis. Combining RecQ or RecD deficiency with UvrD deficiency did not significantly accentuate the phenotype of ΔuvrD mutants. In conclusion, RecFOR proteins are essential for DNA double-strand-break repair through ESDSA whereas RecJ protein is essential for cell viability and UvrD helicase might be involved in the processing of double stranded DNA ends and/or in the DNA synthesis step of ESDSA. PMID:20090937

  2. RNA-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

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    Yang, Yun-Gui; Qi, Yijun

    2015-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most deleterious DNA lesions, which if unrepaired or repaired incorrectly can cause cell death or genome instability that may lead to cancer. To counteract these adverse consequences, eukaryotes have evolved a highly orchestrated mechanism to repair DSBs, namely DNA-damage-response (DDR). DDR, as defined specifically in relation to DSBs, consists of multi-layered regulatory modes including DNA damage sensors, transducers and effectors, through which DSBs are sensed and then repaired via DNAprotein interactions. Unexpectedly, recent studies have revealed a direct role of RNA in the repair of DSBs, including DSB-induced small RNA (diRNA)-directed and RNA-templated DNA repair. Here, we summarize the recent discoveries of RNA-mediated regulation of DSB repair and discuss the potential impact of these novel RNA components of the DSB repair pathway on genomic stability and plasticity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The requirement for recombination factors differs considerably between different pathways of homologous double-strand break repair in somatic plant cells.

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    Roth, Nadine; Klimesch, Jacqueline; Dukowic-Schulze, Stefanie; Pacher, Michael; Mannuss, Anja; Puchta, Holger

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, multiple factors involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair have been characterised in Arabidopsis thaliana. Using homologous sequences in somatic cells, DSBs are mainly repaired by two different pathways: synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) and single-strand annealing (SSA). By applying recombination substrates in which recombination is initiated by the induction of a site-specific DSB by the homing endonuclease I-SceI, we were able to characterise the involvement of different factors in both pathways. The nucleases MRE11 and COM1, both involved in DSB end processing, were not required for either SDSA or SSA in our assay system. Both SDSA and SSA were even more efficient without MRE11, in accordance with the fact that a loss of MRE11 might negatively affect the efficiency of non-homologous end joining. Loss of the classical recombinase RAD51 or its two paralogues RAD51C and XRCC3, as well as the SWI2/SNF2 remodelling factor RAD54, resulted in a drastic deficiency in SDSA but had hardly any influence on SSA, confirming that a strand exchange reaction is only required for SDSA. The helicase FANCM, which is postulated to be involved in the stabilisation of recombination intermediates, is surprisingly not only needed for SDSA but to a lesser extent also for SSA. Both SSA and SDSA were affected only weakly when the SMC6B protein, implicated in sister chromatid recombination, was absent, indicating that SSA and SDSA are in most cases intrachromatid recombination reactions. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Double strand break repair functions of histone H2AX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scully, Ralph, E-mail: rscully@bidmc.harvard.edu; Xie, Anyong

    2013-10-15

    Chromosomal double strand breaks provoke an extensive reaction in neighboring chromatin, characterized by phosphorylation of histone H2AX on serine 139 of its C-terminal tail (to form “γH2AX”). The γH2AX response contributes to the repair of double strand breaks encountered in a variety of different contexts, including those induced by ionizing radiation, physiologically programmed breaks that characterize normal immune cell development and the pathological exposure of DNA ends triggered by telomere dysfunction. γH2AX also participates in the evolutionarily conserved process of sister chromatid recombination, a homologous recombination pathway involved in the suppression of genomic instability during DNA replication and directly implicated in tumor suppression. At a biochemical level, the γH2AX response provides a compelling example of how the “histone code” is adapted to the regulation of double strand break repair. Here, we review progress in research aimed at understanding how γH2AX contributes to double strand break repair in mammalian cells.

  5. Genetics of x-ray induced double strand break repair in saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budd, M.E.

    1982-07-01

    The possible fates of x-ray-induced double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were examined. One possible pathway which breaks can follow, the repair pathway, was studied by assaying strains with mutations in the RAD51, RAD54, and RAD57 loci for double-strand break repair. In order of increasing radiation sensitivity one finds: rad57-1(23/sup 0/)> rad51-1(30/sup 0/)> rad54-3(36/sup 0/). At 36/sup 0/, rad54-3 cells cannot repair double-strand breaks, while 23/sup 0/, they can. Strains with the rad57-1 mutation can rejoin broken chromosomes at both temperatures. However, the low survival at 36/sup 0/ shows that the assay is not distinguishing large DNA fragments which allow cell survival from those which cause cell death. A rad51-1 strain could also rejoin broken chromosomes, and was thus capable of incomplete repair. The data can be explained with the hypothesis that rad54-3 cells are blocked in an early step of repair, while rad51-1 and rad57-1 strains are blocked in a later step of repair. The fate of double-strand breaks when they are left unrepaired was investigated with the rad54-3 mutation. If breaks are prevented from entering the RAD54 repair pathway they become uncommitted lesions. These lesions are repaired slower than the original breaks. One possible fate for an uncommitted lesion is conversion into a fixed lesion, which is likely to be an unrepairable or misrepaired double-strand break. The presence of protein synthesis after irradiation increases the probability that a break will enter the repair pathway. Evidence shows that increased probability of repair results from enhanced synthesis of repair proteins shortly after radiation. (ERB)

  6. Repair of DNA strand breaks in a minichromosome in vivo: kinetics, modeling, and effects of inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slawomir Kumala

    Full Text Available To obtain an overall picture of the repair of DNA single and double strand breaks in a defined region of chromatin in vivo, we studied their repair in a ~170 kb circular minichromosome whose length and topology are analogous to those of the closed loops in genomic chromatin. The rate of repair of single strand breaks in cells irradiated with γ photons was quantitated by determining the sensitivity of the minichromosome DNA to nuclease S1, and that of double strand breaks by assaying the reformation of supercoiled DNA using pulsed field electrophoresis. Reformation of supercoiled DNA, which requires that all single strand breaks have been repaired, was not slowed detectably by the inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 NU1025 or 1,5-IQD. Repair of double strand breaks was slowed by 20-30% when homologous recombination was supressed by KU55933, caffeine, or siRNA-mediated depletion of Rad51 but was completely arrested by the inhibitors of nonhomologous end-joining wortmannin or NU7441, responses interpreted as reflecting competition between these repair pathways similar to that seen in genomic DNA. The reformation of supercoiled DNA was unaffected when topoisomerases I or II, whose participation in repair of strand breaks has been controversial, were inhibited by the catalytic inhibitors ICRF-193 or F11782. Modeling of the kinetics of repair provided rate constants and showed that repair of single strand breaks in minichromosome DNA proceeded independently of repair of double strand breaks. The simplicity of quantitating strand breaks in this minichromosome provides a usefull system for testing the efficiency of new inhibitors of their repair, and since the sequence and structural features of its DNA and its transcription pattern have been studied extensively it offers a good model for examining other aspects of DNA breakage and repair.

  7. Mouse RAD54 affects DNA double-strand break repair and sister chromatid exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.B. Beverloo (Berna); R.D. Johnson (Roger); M. Jasin (Maria); R. Kanaar (Roland); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); M.L.G. Dronkert (Mies)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractCells can achieve error-free repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination through gene conversion with or without crossover. In contrast, an alternative homology-dependent DSB repair pathway, single-strand annealing (SSA), results in deletions. In this study, we

  8. Meiotic versus Mitotic Recombination: Two Different Routes for Double-Strand Break Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Sabrina L.; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Summary Studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have validated the major features of the double-strand break repair (DSBR) model as an accurate representation of the pathway through which meiotic crossovers are produced. This success has led to this model being invoked to explain double-strand break (DSB) repair in other contexts. However, most non-crossover recombinants generated during S. cerevisiae meiosis do not arise via a DSBR pathway. Furthermore, and it is becoming increasing clear that DSBR is a minor pathway for recombinational repair of DSBs that occur in mitotically proliferating cells; rather, the synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) model appears to describe mitotic DSB repair more accurately. Fundamental dissimilarities between meiotic and mitotic recombination are not unexpected, since meiotic recombination serves a very different purpose (accurate chromosome segregation, which requires crossovers) than mitotic recombination (repair of DNA damage, which typically generates non-crossovers). PMID:20967781

  9. The transcription fidelity factor GreA impedes DNA break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Priya; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A; Halliday, Jennifer A; Liu, Jingjing; Núñez, María Angélica Bravo; Golding, Ido; Rosenberg, Susan M; Herman, Christophe

    2017-10-12

    Homologous recombination repairs DNA double-strand breaks and must function even on actively transcribed DNA. Because break repair prevents chromosome loss, the completion of repair is expected to outweigh the transcription of broken templates. However, the interplay between DNA break repair and transcription processivity is unclear. Here we show that the transcription factor GreA inhibits break repair in Escherichia coli. GreA restarts backtracked RNA polymerase and hence promotes transcription fidelity. We report that removal of GreA results in markedly enhanced break repair via the classic RecBCD-RecA pathway. Using a deep-sequencing method to measure chromosomal exonucleolytic degradation, we demonstrate that the absence of GreA limits RecBCD-mediated resection. Our findings suggest that increased RNA polymerase backtracking promotes break repair by instigating RecA loading by RecBCD, without the influence of canonical Chi signals. The idea that backtracked RNA polymerase can stimulate recombination presents a DNA transaction conundrum: a transcription fidelity factor that compromises genomic integrity.

  10. Genetic and environmental influence on DNA strand break repair: a twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, Christian; Moreno-Villanueva, Maria; Bürkle, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of DNA damage deriving from exogenous and endogenous sources has significant consequences for cellular survival, and is implicated in aging, cancer, and neurological diseases. Different DNA repair pathways have evolved in order to maintain genomic stability. Genetic and environmental......-strand breaks), and some of the most hazardous lesions (DNA double-strand breaks). DNA damage signaling response (Gamma-H2AX signaling), relative amount of endogenous damage, and DNA-strand break repair capacities were studied in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 198 twins (94 monozygotic and 104...

  11. Cell cycle-regulated centers of DNA double-strand break repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, Michael; Antúnez de Mayolo, Adriana; Mortensen, Uffe H

    2003-01-01

    In eukaryotes, homologous recombination is an important pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. We have studied this process in living cells in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using Rad52 as a cell biological marker. In response to DNA damage, Rad52 redistributes itself and forms...... foci specifically during S phase. We have shown previously that Rad52 foci are centers of DNA repair where multiple DNA double-strand breaks colocalize. Here we report a correlation between the timing of Rad52 focus formation and modification of the Rad52 protein. In addition, we show that the two ends...... of a double-strand break are held tightly together in the majority of cells. Interestingly, in a small but significant fraction of the S phase cells, the two ends of a break separate suggesting that mechanisms exist to reassociate and align these ends for proper DNA repair....

  12. DEK is required for homologous recombination repair of DNA breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Eric A; Gole, Boris; Willis, Nicholas A

    2017-01-01

    DEK is a highly conserved chromatin-bound protein whose upregulation across cancer types correlates with genotoxic therapy resistance. Loss of DEK induces genome instability and sensitizes cells to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), suggesting defects in DNA repair. While these DEK-deficiency pheno......DEK is a highly conserved chromatin-bound protein whose upregulation across cancer types correlates with genotoxic therapy resistance. Loss of DEK induces genome instability and sensitizes cells to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), suggesting defects in DNA repair. While these DEK......-deficiency phenotypes were thought to arise from a moderate attenuation of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair, the role of DEK in DNA repair remains incompletely understood. We present new evidence demonstrating the observed decrease in NHEJ is insufficient to impact immunoglobulin class switching in DEK knockout...

  13. The Heterochromatic Barrier to DNA Double Strand Break Repair: How to Get the Entry Visa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron A. Goodarzi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Over recent decades, a deep understanding of pathways that repair DNA double strand breaks (DSB has been gained from biochemical, structural, biophysical and cellular studies. DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ and homologous recombination (HR represent the two major DSB repair pathways, and both processes are now well understood. Recent work has demonstrated that the chromatin environment at a DSB significantly impacts upon DSB repair and that, moreover, dramatic modifications arise in the chromatin surrounding a DSB. Chromatin is broadly divided into open, transcriptionally active, euchromatin (EC and highly compacted, transcriptionally inert, heterochromatin (HC, although these represent extremes of a spectrum. The HC superstructure restricts both DSB repair and damage response signaling. Moreover, DSBs within HC (HC-DSBs are rapidly relocalized to the EC-HC interface. The damage response protein kinase, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM, is required for HC-DSB repair but is dispensable for the relocalization of HC-DSBs. It has been proposed that ATM signaling enhances HC relaxation in the DSB vicinity and that this is a prerequisite for HC-DSB repair. Hence, ATM is essential for repair of HC-DSBs. Here, we discuss how HC impacts upon the response to DSBs and how ATM overcomes the barrier that HC poses to repair.

  14. The Role of Long Non Coding RNAs in the Repair of DNA Double Strand Breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianatpour, Ali; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh

    2017-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are abrasions caused in both strands of the DNA duplex following exposure to both exogenous and endogenous conditions. Such abrasions have deleterious effect in cells leading to genome rearrangements and cell death. A number of repair systems including homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) have been evolved to minimize the fatal effects of these lesions in cell. The role of protein coding genes in regulation of these pathways has been assessed previously. However, a number of recent studies have focused on evaluation of non-coding RNAs participation in DNA repair. We performed a computerized search of the Medline/ Pubmed databases with key words: DNA repair, homologous recombination, non-homologues end joining and long non-coding RNA (LncRNA). The existing data highlight the role of long non-coding RNAs in DSB repair as well as dysregulation in their expression which would lead to pathological conditions such as cancer. The specific mechanism of their contribution in DNA repair pathways has been elucidated for a few of them. LncRNAs participate in several steps of DNA repair pathways and regulate the expression of key components of these pathways including p53 tumor suppressor gene.

  15. Zebularine induces replication-dependent double-strand breaks which are preferentially repaired by homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orta, Manuel Luis; Pastor, Nuria; Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Domínguez, Inmaculada; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Huertas Castaño, Carlos; López-Lázaro, Miguel; Helleday, Thomas; Mateos, Santiago

    2017-09-01

    Zebularine is a second-generation, highly stable hydrophilic inhibitor of DNA methylation with oral bioavailability that preferentially target cancer cells. It acts primarily as a trap for DNA methyl transferases (DNMTs) protein by forming covalent complexes between DNMT protein and zebularine-substrate DNA. It's well documented that replication-blocking DNA lesions can cause replication fork collapse and thereby to the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). DSB are dangerous lesions that can lead to potentially oncogenic genomic rearrangements or cell death. The two major pathways for repair of DSB are non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). Recently, multiple functions for the HR machinery have been identified at arrested forks. Here we investigate in more detail the importance of the lesions induced by zebularine in terms of DNA damage and cytotoxicity as well as the role of HR in the repair of these lesions. When we examined the contribution of NHEJ and HR in the repair of DSB induced by zebularine we found that these breaks were preferentially repaired by HR. Also we show that the production of DSB is dependent on active replication. To test this, we determined chromosome damage by zebularine while transiently inhibiting DNA synthesis. Here we report that cells deficient in single-strand break (SSB) repair are hypersensitive to zebularine. We have observed more DSB induced by zebularine in XRCC1 deficient cells, likely to be the result of conversion of SSB into toxic DSB when encountered by a replication fork. Furthermore we demonstrate that HR is required for the repair of these breaks. Overall, our data suggest that zebularine induces replication-dependent DSB which are preferentially repaired by HR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Parp1-XRCC1 and the repair of DNA double strand breaks in mouse round spermatids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Emad A. [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Boer, Peter de [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Philippens, Marielle E.P.; Kal, Henk B. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Rooij, Dirk G. de, E-mail: d.g.derooij@uu.nl [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Center for Reproductive Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-01-05

    The repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in male germ cells is slower and differently regulated compared to that in somatic cells. Round spermatids show DSB repair and are radioresistant to apoptosis induction. Mutation induction studies using ionizing irradiation, indicated a high frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) in the next generation. Since they are in a G1 comparable stage of the cell cycle, haploid spermatids are expected to repair DSBs by the non-homologous end-joining pathway (NHEJ). However, immunohistochemical evidence indicates that not all components of the classical NHEJ pathway are available since the presence of DNA-PKcs cannot be shown. Here, we demonstrate that round spermatids, as well as most other types of male germ cells express both Parp1 and XRCC1. Therefore, we have determined whether the alternative Parp1/XRCC1 dependent NHEJ pathway is active in these nuclei and also have tested for classical NHEJ activity by a genetic method. To evaluate DSB repair in SCID mice, deficient for DNA-PKcs, and to study the involvement of the Parp1/XRCC1 dependent NHEJ pathway in round spermatids, the loss of {gamma}-H2AX foci after irradiation has been determined in nucleus spreads of round spermatids of SCID mice and in nucleus spreads and histological sections of Parp1-inhibited mice and their respective controls. Results show that around half of the breaks in randomly selected round spermatids are repaired between 1 and 8 h after irradiation. The repair of 16% of the induced DSBs requires DNA-PKcs and 21% Parp1. Foci numbers in the Parp1-inhibited testes tend to be higher in spermatids of all epithelial stages reaching significance in stages I-III which indicates an active Parp1/XRCC1 pathway in round spermatids and a decreased repair capacity in later round spermatid stages. In Parp1-inhibited SCID mice only 14.5% of the breaks were repaired 8 h after irradiation indicating additivity of the two NHEJ pathways in round spermatids.

  17. Mammalian RAD52 Functions in Break-Induced Replication Repair of Collapsed DNA Replication Forks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sotiriou, Sotirios K; Kamileri, Irene; Lugli, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    RNA or knockout of the gene by CRISPR/Cas9 compromised restart of collapsed forks and led to DNA damage in cells experiencing DRS. Furthermore, in cancer-prone, heterozygous APC mutant mice, homozygous deletion of the Rad52 gene suppressed tumor growth and prolonged lifespan. We therefore propose that mammalian......Human cancers are characterized by the presence of oncogene-induced DNA replication stress (DRS), making them dependent on repair pathways such as break-induced replication (BIR) for damaged DNA replication forks. To better understand BIR, we performed a targeted siRNA screen for genes whose...... RAD52 facilitates repair of collapsed DNA replication forks in cancer cells....

  18. Regulation of hetDNA Length during Mitotic Double-Strand Break Repair in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoge; Hum, Yee Fang; Lehner, Kevin; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2017-08-17

    Heteroduplex DNA (hetDNA) is a key molecular intermediate during the repair of mitotic double-strand breaks by homologous recombination, but its relationship to 5' end resection and/or 3' end extension is poorly understood. In the current study, we examined how perturbations in these processes affect the hetDNA profile associated with repair of a defined double-strand break (DSB) by the synthesis-dependent strand-annealing (SDSA) pathway. Loss of either the Exo1 or Sgs1 long-range resection pathway significantly shortened hetDNA, suggesting that these pathways normally collaborate during DSB repair. In addition, altering the processivity or proofreading activity of DNA polymerase δ shortened hetDNA length or reduced break-adjacent mismatch removal, respectively, demonstrating that this is the primary polymerase that extends both 3' ends. Data are most consistent with the extent of DNA synthesis from the invading end being the primary determinant of hetDNA length during SDSA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Double-strand break repair-adox: Restoration of suppressed double-strand break repair during mitosis induces genomic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, Masahiro; Shinohara, Akira; Shinohara, Miki

    2014-12-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the severest types of DNA damage. Unrepaired DSBs easily induce cell death and chromosome aberrations. To maintain genomic stability, cells have checkpoint and DSB repair systems to respond to DNA damage throughout most of the cell cycle. The failure of this process often results in apoptosis or genomic instability, such as aneuploidy, deletion, or translocation. Therefore, DSB repair is essential for maintenance of genomic stability. During mitosis, however, cells seem to suppress the DNA damage response and proceed to the next G1 phase, even if there are unrepaired DSBs. The biological significance of this suppression is not known. In this review, we summarize recent studies of mitotic DSB repair and discuss the mechanisms of suppression of DSB repair during mitosis. DSB repair, which maintains genomic integrity in other phases of the cell cycle, is rather toxic to cells during mitosis, often resulting in chromosome missegregation and aberration. Cells have multiple safeguards to prevent genomic instability during mitosis: inhibition of 53BP1 or BRCA1 localization to DSB sites, which is important to promote non-homologous end joining or homologous recombination, respectively, and also modulation of the non-homologous end joining core complex to inhibit DSB repair. We discuss how DSBs during mitosis are toxic and the multiple safeguard systems that suppress genomic instability. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  20. End-joining repair of double-strand breaks in Drosophila melanogaster is largely DNA ligase IV independent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVey, Mitch; Radut, Dora; Sekelsky, Jeff J

    2004-12-01

    Repair of DNA double-strand breaks can occur by either nonhomologous end joining or homologous recombination. Most nonhomologous end joining requires a specialized ligase, DNA ligase IV (Lig4). In Drosophila melanogaster, double-strand breaks created by excision of a P element are usually repaired by a homologous recombination pathway called synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA). SDSA requires strand invasion mediated by DmRad51, the product of the spn-A gene. In spn-A mutants, repair proceeds through a nonconservative pathway involving the annealing of microhomologies found within the 17-nt overhangs produced by P excision. We report here that end joining of P-element breaks in the absence of DmRad51 does not require Drosophila LIG4. In wild-type flies, SDSA is sometimes incomplete, and repair is finished by an end-joining pathway that also appears to be independent of LIG4. Loss of LIG4 does not increase sensitivity to ionizing radiation in late-stage larvae, but lig4 spn-A double mutants do show heightened sensitivity relative to spn-A single mutants. Together, our results suggest that a LIG4-independent end-joining pathway is responsible for the majority of double-strand break repair in the absence of homologous recombination in flies.

  1. Development of a novel method to create double-strand break repair fingerprints using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, Chen-Pang; Breuer, Gregory A; Hannon, Ryan A; Kim, Savina D; Salem, Ahmed F; Wang, Guilin; Yu, Ruoxi; Carriero, Nicholas J; Bjornson, Robert; Sundaram, Ranjini K; Bindra, Ranjit S

    2015-02-01

    Efficient DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is a critical determinant of cell survival in response to DNA damaging agents, and it plays a key role in the maintenance of genomic integrity. Homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) represent the two major pathways by which DSBs are repaired in mammalian cells. We now understand that HR and NHEJ repair are composed of multiple sub-pathways, some of which still remain poorly understood. As such, there is great interest in the development of novel assays to interrogate these key pathways, which could lead to the development of novel therapeutics, and a better understanding of how DSBs are repaired. Furthermore, assays which can measure repair specifically at endogenous chromosomal loci are of particular interest, because of an emerging understanding that chromatin interactions heavily influence DSB repair pathway choice. Here, we present the design and validation of a novel, next-generation sequencing-based approach to study DSB repair at chromosomal loci in cells. We demonstrate that NHEJ repair "fingerprints" can be identified using our assay, which are dependent on the status of key DSB repair proteins. In addition, we have validated that our system can be used to detect dynamic shifts in DSB repair activity in response to specific perturbations. This approach represents a unique alternative to many currently available DSB repair assays, which typical rely on the expression of reporter genes as an indirect read-out for repair. As such, we believe this tool will be useful for DNA repair researchers to study NHEJ repair in a high-throughput and sensitive manner, with the capacity to detect subtle changes in DSB repair patterns that was not possible previously. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The involvement of human RECQL4 in DNA double-strand break repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Karmakar, Parimal; Aamann, Maria Diget

    2010-01-01

    Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS) is an autosomal recessive hereditary disorder associated with mutation in RECQL4 gene, a member of the human RecQ helicases. The disease is characterized by genomic instability, skeletal abnormalities and predisposition to malignant tumors, especially osteosarcomas....... The precise role of RECQL4 in cellular pathways is largely unknown; however, recent evidence suggests its involvement in multiple DNA metabolic pathways. This study investigates the roles of RECQL4 in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. The results show that RECQL4-deficient fibroblasts are moderately......-induced DSBs and remains for a shorter duration than WRN and BLM, indicating its distinct role in repair of DSBs. Endogenous RECQL4 also colocalizes with gammaH2AX at the site of DSBs. The RECQL4 domain responsible for its DNA damage localization has been mapped to the unique N-terminus domain between amino...

  3. Visualization of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair at the Single-Molecule Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dynan, William S.; Li, Shuyi; Mernaugh, Raymond; Wragg, Stephanie; Takeda, Yoshihiko

    2003-03-27

    Exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation is universal. The signature injury from ionizing radiation exposure is induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The first line of defense against DSBs is direct ligation of broken DNA ends via the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. Because even a relatively high environmental exposure induces only a few DSBs per cell, our current understanding of the response to this exposure is limited by the ability to measure DSB repair events reliably in situ at a single-molecule level. To address this need, we have taken advantage of biological amplification, measuring relocalization of proteins and detection of protein phosphorylation as a surrogate for detection of broken ends themselves. We describe the use of specific antibodies to investigate the kinetics and mechanism of repair of very small numbers of DSBs in human cells by the nonhomologous end-joining pathway.

  4. Human Cell Assays for Synthesis-Dependent Strand Annealing and Crossing over During Double-Strand Break Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Grzegorz Zapotoczny; Jeff Sekelsky

    2017-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most deleterious types of lesions to the genome. Synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) is thought to be a major pathway of DSB repair, but direct tests of this model have only been conducted in budding yeast and Drosophila. To better understand this pathway, we developed an SDSA assay for use in human cells. Our results support the hypothesis that SDSA is an important DSB repair mechanism in human cells. We used siRNA knockdown to assess th...

  5. Breaking bad: The mutagenic effect of DNA repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Species survival depends on the faithful replication of genetic information, which is continually monitored and maintained by DNA repair pathways thatcorrect replication errors and the thousands of lesions that arise daily from the inherent chemical lability of DNA and the effects of genotoxic agents. Nonetheless,neutrally evolving DNA (not under purifying selection) accumulates base substitutions with time (the neutral mutation rate). Thus, repair processes are not 100% efficient. The neutral mutation rate varies both between and within chromosomes. For example it is 10 – 50 fold higher at CpGsthan at non-CpG positions. Interestingly, the neutral mutation rate at non-CpG sites is positively correlated with CpG content. Althoughthe basis of this correlation was not immediately apparent,some bioinformatic results were consistent with the induction of non-CpGmutations byDNA repairat flanking CpG sites. Recent studies with a model system showed that in vivo repair of preformed lesions (mismatches, abasic sites, single stranded nicks) can in factinduce mutations in flanking DNA. Mismatch repair (MMR) is an essential component for repair-induced mutations, which can occur as distant as 5 kb from the introduced lesions. Most, but not all, mutations involved the C of TpCpN (G of NpGpA) which is the target sequence of the C-preferringsingle-stranded DNA specific APOBEC deaminases. APOBEC-mediated mutations are not limited to our model system: Recent studies by others showed that some tumors harbor mutations with the same signature, as can intermediates in RNA-guided endonuclease-mediated genome editing. APOBEC deaminases participate in normal physiological functions such as generating mutations that inactivate viruses or endogenous retrotransposons, or that enhance immunoglobulin diversity in B cells. The recruitment of normally physiological errorprone processes during DNA repairwould have important implications for disease, aging and evolution. This perspective briefly

  6. Rad52 and Ku bind to different DNA structures produced early in double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristic, Dejan; Modesti, Mauro; Kanaar, Roland; Wyman, Claire

    2003-09-15

    DNA double-strand breaks are repaired by one of two main pathways, non-homologous end joining or homologous recombination. A competition for binding to DNA ends by Ku and Rad52, proteins required for non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination, respectively, has been proposed to determine the choice of repair pathway. In order to test this idea directly, we compared Ku and human Rad52 binding to different DNA substrates. How ever, we found no evidence that these proteins would compete for binding to the same broken DNA ends. Ku bound preferentially to DNA with free ends. Under the same conditions, Rad52 did not bind preferentially to DNA ends. Using a series of defined substrates we showed that it is single-stranded DNA and not DNA ends that were preferentially bound by Rad52. In addition, Rad52 aggregated DNA, bringing different single-stranded DNAs in close proximity. This activity was independent of the presence of DNA ends and of the ability of the single-stranded sequences to form extensive base pairs. Based on these DNA binding characteristics it is unlikely that Rad52 and Ku compete as 'gatekeepers' of different DNA double-strand break repair pathways. Rather, they interact with different DNA substrates produced early in DNA double-strand break repair.

  7. Impact of a stress-inducible switch to mutagenic repair of DNA breaks on mutation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shee, Chandan; Gibson, Janet L; Darrow, Michele C; Gonzalez, Caleb; Rosenberg, Susan M

    2011-08-16

    Basic ideas about the constancy and randomness of mutagenesis that drives evolution were challenged by the discovery of mutation pathways activated by stress responses. These pathways could promote evolution specifically when cells are maladapted to their environment (i.e., are stressed). However, the clearest example--a general stress-response-controlled switch to error-prone DNA break (double-strand break, DSB) repair--was suggested to be peculiar to an Escherichia coli F' conjugative plasmid, not generally significant, and to occur by an alternative stress-independent mechanism. Moreover, mechanisms of spontaneous mutation in E. coli remain obscure. First, we demonstrate that this same mechanism occurs in chromosomes of starving F(-) E. coli. I-SceI endonuclease-induced chromosomal DSBs increase mutation 50-fold, dependent upon general/starvation- and DNA-damage-stress responses, DinB error-prone DNA polymerase, and DSB-repair proteins. Second, DSB repair is also mutagenic if the RpoS general-stress-response activator is expressed in unstressed cells, illustrating a stress-response-controlled switch to mutagenic repair. Third, DSB survival is not improved by RpoS or DinB, indicating that mutagenesis is not an inescapable byproduct of repair. Importantly, fourth, fully half of spontaneous frame-shift and base-substitution mutation during starvation also requires the same stress-response, DSB-repair, and DinB proteins. These data indicate that DSB-repair-dependent stress-induced mutation, driven by spontaneous DNA breaks, is a pathway that cells usually use and a major source of spontaneous mutation. These data also rule out major alternative models for the mechanism. Mechanisms that couple mutagenesis to stress responses can allow cells to evolve rapidly and responsively to their environment.

  8. DNA ligase 1 deficient plants display severe growth defects and delayed repair of both DNA single and double strand breaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bray Clifford M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA ligase enzymes catalyse the joining of adjacent polynucleotides and as such play important roles in DNA replication and repair pathways. Eukaryotes possess multiple DNA ligases with distinct roles in DNA metabolism, with clear differences in the functions of DNA ligase orthologues between animals, yeast and plants. DNA ligase 1, present in all eukaryotes, plays critical roles in both DNA repair and replication and is indispensable for cell viability. Results Knockout mutants of atlig1 are lethal. Therefore, RNAi lines with reduced levels of AtLIG1 were generated to allow the roles and importance of Arabidopsis DNA ligase 1 in DNA metabolism to be elucidated. Viable plants were fertile but displayed a severely stunted and stressed growth phenotype. Cell size was reduced in the silenced lines, whilst flow cytometry analysis revealed an increase of cells in S-phase in atlig1-RNAi lines relative to wild type plants. Comet assay analysis of isolated nuclei showed atlig1-RNAi lines displayed slower repair of single strand breaks (SSBs and also double strand breaks (DSBs, implicating AtLIG1 in repair of both these lesions. Conclusion Reduced levels of Arabidopsis DNA ligase 1 in the silenced lines are sufficient to support plant development but result in retarded growth and reduced cell size, which may reflect roles for AtLIG1 in both replication and repair. The finding that DNA ligase 1 plays an important role in DSB repair in addition to its known function in SSB repair, demonstrates the existence of a previously uncharacterised novel pathway, independent of the conserved NHEJ. These results indicate that DNA ligase 1 functions in both DNA replication and in repair of both ss and dsDNA strand breaks in higher plants.

  9. Apn1 and Apn2 endonucleases prevent accumulation of repair-associated DNA breaks in budding yeast as revealed by direct chromosomal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wenjian; Resnick, Michael A; Gordenin, Dmitry A

    2008-04-01

    Base excision repair (BER) provides relief from many DNA lesions. While BER enzymes have been characterized biochemically, BER functions within cells are much less understood, in part because replication bypass and double-strand break (DSB) repair can also impact resistance to base damage. To investigate BER in vivo, we examined the repair of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) induced DNA damage in haploid G1 yeast cells, so that replication bypass and recombinational DSB repair cannot occur. Based on the heat-lability of MMS-induced base damage, an assay was developed that monitors secondary breaks in full-length yeast chromosomes where closely spaced breaks yield DSBs that are observed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The assay detects damaged bases and abasic (AP) sites as heat-dependent breaks as well as intermediate heat-independent breaks that arise during BER. Using a circular chromosome, lesion frequency and repair kinetics could be easily determined. Monitoring BER in single and multiple glycosylase and AP-endonuclease mutants confirmed that Mag1 is the major enzyme that removes MMS-damaged bases. This approach provided direct physical evidence that Apn1 and Apn2 not only repair cellular base damage but also prevent break accumulation that can result from AP sites being channeled into other BER pathway(s).

  10. Adriamycin does not affect the repair of X-ray induced DNA single strand breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantoni, O.; Sestili, P.; Cattabeni, F.

    1985-06-01

    The ability of the antitumor antibiotic adriamycin (Ad) to inhibit the rejoining of DNA single strand breaks produced by X-rays was investigated in cultured cells. Chinese hamster ovary cells were given 400 rad and were allowed to repair in the presence or absence of Ad for 60 min at 37degC. The drug did not affect the ability of cells to repair DNA breaks and residual breaks found after the repair period were attributed to those induced by Ad alone. (author). 16 refs.

  11. Human Cell Assays for Synthesis-Dependent Strand Annealing and Crossing over During Double-Strand Break Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapotoczny, Grzegorz; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2017-04-03

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most deleterious types of lesions to the genome. Synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) is thought to be a major pathway of DSB repair, but direct tests of this model have only been conducted in budding yeast and Drosophila To better understand this pathway, we developed an SDSA assay for use in human cells. Our results support the hypothesis that SDSA is an important DSB repair mechanism in human cells. We used siRNA knockdown to assess the roles of a number of helicases suggested to promote SDSA. None of the helicase knockdowns reduced SDSA, but knocking down BLM or RTEL1 increased SDSA. Molecular analysis of repair products suggests that these helicases may prevent long-tract repair synthesis. Since the major alternative to SDSA (repair involving a double-Holliday junction intermediate) can lead to crossovers, we also developed a fluorescent assay that detects crossovers generated during DSB repair. Together, these assays will be useful in investigating features and mechanisms of SDSA and crossover pathways in human cells. Copyright © 2017 Zapotoczny and Sekelsky.

  12. Human Cell Assays for Synthesis-Dependent Strand Annealing and Crossing over During Double-Strand Break Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Zapotoczny

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are one of the most deleterious types of lesions to the genome. Synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA is thought to be a major pathway of DSB repair, but direct tests of this model have only been conducted in budding yeast and Drosophila. To better understand this pathway, we developed an SDSA assay for use in human cells. Our results support the hypothesis that SDSA is an important DSB repair mechanism in human cells. We used siRNA knockdown to assess the roles of a number of helicases suggested to promote SDSA. None of the helicase knockdowns reduced SDSA, but knocking down BLM or RTEL1 increased SDSA. Molecular analysis of repair products suggests that these helicases may prevent long-tract repair synthesis. Since the major alternative to SDSA (repair involving a double-Holliday junction intermediate can lead to crossovers, we also developed a fluorescent assay that detects crossovers generated during DSB repair. Together, these assays will be useful in investigating features and mechanisms of SDSA and crossover pathways in human cells.

  13. JNK Phosphorylates SIRT6 to Stimulate DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Response to Oxidative Stress by Recruiting PARP1 to DNA Breaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Van Meter

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of damage caused by oxidative stress has been linked to aging and to the etiology of numerous age-related diseases. The longevity gene, sirtuin 6 (SIRT6, promotes genome stability by facilitating DNA repair, especially under oxidative stress conditions. Here we uncover the mechanism by which SIRT6 is activated by oxidative stress to promote DNA double-strand break (DSB repair. We show that the stress-activated protein kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, phosphorylates SIRT6 on serine 10 in response to oxidative stress. This post-translational modification facilitates the mobilization of SIRT6 to DNA damage sites and is required for efficient recruitment of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1 to DNA break sites and for efficient repair of DSBs. Our results demonstrate a post-translational mechanism regulating SIRT6, and they provide the link between oxidative stress signaling and DNA repair pathways that may be critical for hormetic response and longevity assurance.

  14. CRISPR/Cas9-Induced Double-Strand Break Repair in Arabidopsis Nonhomologous End-Joining Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hexi; Strunks, Gary D.; Klemann, Bart J. P. M.; Hooykaas, Paul J. J.; de Pater, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most harmful DNA lesions. Cells utilize two main pathways for DSB repair: homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). NHEJ can be subdivided into the KU-dependent classical NHEJ (c-NHEJ) and the more error-prone KU-independent backup-NHEJ (b-NHEJ) pathways, involving the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). However, in the absence of these factors, cells still seem able to adequately maintain genome integrity, suggesting the presence of other b-NHEJ repair factors or pathways independent from KU and PARPs. The outcome of DSB repair by NHEJ pathways can be investigated by using artificial sequence-specific nucleases such as CRISPR/Cas9 to induce DSBs at a target of interest. Here, we used CRISPR/Cas9 for DSB induction at the Arabidopsis cruciferin 3 (CRU3) and protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO) genes. DSB repair outcomes via NHEJ were analyzed using footprint analysis in wild-type plants and plants deficient in key factors of c-NHEJ (ku80), b-NHEJ (parp1 parp2), or both (ku80 parp1 parp2). We found that larger deletions of >20 bp predominated after DSB repair in ku80 and ku80 parp1 parp2 mutants, corroborating with a role of KU in preventing DSB end resection. Deletion lengths did not significantly differ between ku80 and ku80 parp1 parp2 mutants, suggesting that a KU- and PARP-independent b-NHEJ mechanism becomes active in these mutants. Furthermore, microhomologies and templated insertions were observed at the repair junctions in the wild type and all mutants. Since these characteristics are hallmarks of polymerase θ-mediated DSB repair, we suggest a possible role for this recently discovered polymerase in DSB repair in plants. PMID:27866150

  15. CRISPR/Cas9-Induced Double-Strand Break Repair in Arabidopsis Nonhomologous End-Joining Mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hexi Shen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Double-strand breaks (DSBs are one of the most harmful DNA lesions. Cells utilize two main pathways for DSB repair: homologous recombination (HR and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ. NHEJ can be subdivided into the KU-dependent classical NHEJ (c-NHEJ and the more error-prone KU-independent backup-NHEJ (b-NHEJ pathways, involving the poly (ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs. However, in the absence of these factors, cells still seem able to adequately maintain genome integrity, suggesting the presence of other b-NHEJ repair factors or pathways independent from KU and PARPs. The outcome of DSB repair by NHEJ pathways can be investigated by using artificial sequence-specific nucleases such as CRISPR/Cas9 to induce DSBs at a target of interest. Here, we used CRISPR/Cas9 for DSB induction at the Arabidopsis cruciferin 3 (CRU3 and protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO genes. DSB repair outcomes via NHEJ were analyzed using footprint analysis in wild-type plants and plants deficient in key factors of c-NHEJ (ku80, b-NHEJ (parp1 parp2, or both (ku80 parp1 parp2. We found that larger deletions of >20 bp predominated after DSB repair in ku80 and ku80 parp1 parp2 mutants, corroborating with a role of KU in preventing DSB end resection. Deletion lengths did not significantly differ between ku80 and ku80 parp1 parp2 mutants, suggesting that a KU- and PARP-independent b-NHEJ mechanism becomes active in these mutants. Furthermore, microhomologies and templated insertions were observed at the repair junctions in the wild type and all mutants. Since these characteristics are hallmarks of polymerase θ-mediated DSB repair, we suggest a possible role for this recently discovered polymerase in DSB repair in plants.

  16. DNA-PKcs structure suggests an allosteric mechanism modulating DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibanda, Bancinyane L; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y; Ascher, David B; Blundell, Tom L

    2017-02-03

    DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is a central component of nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), repairing DNA double-strand breaks that would otherwise lead to apoptosis or cancer. We have solved its structure in complex with the C-terminal peptide of Ku80 at 4.3 angstrom resolution using x-ray crystallography. We show that the 4128-amino acid structure comprises three large structural units: the N-terminal unit, the Circular Cradle, and the Head. Conformational differences between the two molecules in the asymmetric unit are correlated with changes in accessibility of the kinase active site, which are consistent with an allosteric mechanism to bring about kinase activation. The location of KU80ct194 in the vicinity of the breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) binding site suggests competition with BRCA1, leading to pathway selection between NHEJ and homologous recombination. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. MTE1 Functions with MPH1 in Double-Strand Break Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimit, Askar; Kim, TaeHyung; Anand, Ranjith P; Meister, Sarah; Ou, Jiongwen; Haber, James E; Zhang, Zhaolei; Brown, Grant W

    2016-05-01

    Double-strand DNA breaks occur upon exposure of cells to ionizing radiation and certain chemical agents or indirectly through replication fork collapse at DNA damage sites. If left unrepaired, double-strand breaks can cause genome instability and cell death, and their repair can result in loss of heterozygosity. In response to DNA damage, proteins involved in double-strand break repair by homologous recombination relocalize into discrete nuclear foci. We identified 29 proteins that colocalize with recombination repair protein Rad52 in response to DNA damage. Of particular interest, Ygr042w/Mte1, a protein of unknown function, showed robust colocalization with Rad52. Mte1 foci fail to form when the DNA helicase gene MPH1 is absent. Mte1 and Mph1 form a complex and are recruited to double-strand breaks in vivo in a mutually dependent manner. MTE1 is important for resolution of Rad52 foci during double-strand break repair and for suppressing break-induced replication. Together our data indicate that Mte1 functions with Mph1 in double-strand break repair. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  18. Colocalization of multiple DNA double-strand breaks at a single Rad52 repair centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, M.; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro; Rothstein, R.

    2003-01-01

    DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) is an essential process for preserving genomic integrity in all organisms. To investigate this process at the cellular level, we engineered a system of fluorescently marked DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to visualize in ...

  19. Parp1-XRCC1 and the repair of DNA double strand breaks in mouse round spermatids.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, E.A.; Boer, P. de; Philippens, M.E.P.; Kal, H.B.; Rooij, D.G. de

    2010-01-01

    The repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in male germ cells is slower and differently regulated compared to that in somatic cells. Round spermatids show DSB repair and are radioresistant to apoptosis induction. Mutation induction studies using ionizing irradiation, indicated a high frequency of

  20. The DNA-dependent protein kinase: a multifunctional protein kinase with roles in DNA double strand break repair and mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and the Ku70/80 heterodimer. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in elucidating the role of DNA-PK in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells and recently, additional roles for DNA-PK have been reported. In this review, we will describe the biochemistry, structure and function of DNA-PK, its roles in DNA double strand break repair and its newly described roles in mitosis and other cellular processes. PMID:25550082

  1. Numt-mediated double-strand break repair mitigates deletions during primate genome evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einat Hazkani-Covo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ is the major mechanism of double-strand break repair (DSBR in mammalian cells. NHEJ has traditionally been inferred from experimental systems involving induced double strand breaks (DSBs. Whether or not the spectrum of repair events observed in experimental NHEJ reflects the repair of natural breaks by NHEJ during chromosomal evolution is an unresolved issue. In primate phylogeny, nuclear DNA sequences of mitochondrial origin, numts, are inserted into naturally occurring chromosomal breaks via NHEJ. Thus, numt integration sites harbor evidence for the mechanisms that act on the genome over evolutionary timescales. We have identified 35 and 55 lineage-specific numts in the human and chimpanzee genomes, respectively, using the rhesus monkey genome as an outgroup. One hundred and fifty two numt-chromosome fusion points were classified based on their repair patterns. Repair involving microhomology and repair leading to nucleotide additions were detected. These repair patterns are within the experimentally determined spectrum of classical NHEJ, suggesting that information from experimental systems is representative of broader genetic loci and end configurations. However, in incompatible DSBR events, small deletions always occur, whereas in 54% of numt integration events examined, no deletions were detected. Numts show a statistically significant reduction in deletion frequency, even in comparison to DSBR involving filler DNA. Therefore, numts show a unique mechanism of integration via NHEJ. Since the deletion frequency during numt insertion is low, native overhangs of chromosome breaks are preserved, allowing us to determine that 24% of the analyzed breaks are cohesive with overhangs of up to 11 bases. These data represent, to the best of our knowledge, the most comprehensive description of the structure of naturally occurring DSBs. We suggest a model in which the sealing of DSBs by numts, and probably by other filler

  2. Age and gender effects on DNA strand break repair in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, Christian; Moreno-Villanueva, Maria; Bürkle, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Exogenous and endogenous damage to DNA is constantly challenging the stability of our genome. This DNA damage increase the frequency of errors in DNA replication, thus causing point mutations or chromosomal rearrangements and has been implicated in aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases....... Therefore, efficient DNA repair is vital for the maintenance of genome stability. The general notion has been that DNA repair capacity decreases with age although there are conflicting results. Here, we focused on potential age-associated changes in DNA damage response and the capacities of repairing DNA...... single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs) in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Of these lesions, DSBs are the least frequent but the most dangerous for cells. We have measured the level of endogenous SSBs, SSB repair capacity, γ-H2AX response, and DSB repair capacity...

  3. Deletion-bias in DNA double-strand break repair differentially contributes to plant genome shrinkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Giang T H; Cao, Hieu X; Reiss, Bernd; Schubert, Ingo

    2017-06-01

    In order to prevent genome instability, cells need to be protected by a number of repair mechanisms, including DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. The extent to which DSB repair, biased towards deletions or insertions, contributes to evolutionary diversification of genome size is still under debate. We analyzed mutation spectra in Arabidopsis thaliana and in barley (Hordeum vulgare) by PacBio sequencing of three DSB-targeted loci each, uncovering repair via gene conversion, single strand annealing (SSA) or nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). Furthermore, phylogenomic comparisons between A. thaliana and two related species were used to detect naturally occurring deletions during Arabidopsis evolution. Arabidopsis thaliana revealed significantly more and larger deletions after DSB repair than barley, and barley displayed more and larger insertions. Arabidopsis displayed a clear net loss of DNA after DSB repair, mainly via SSA and NHEJ. Barley revealed a very weak net loss of DNA, apparently due to less active break-end resection and easier copying of template sequences into breaks. Comparative phylogenomics revealed several footprints of SSA in the A. thaliana genome. Quantitative assessment of DNA gain and loss through DSB repair processes suggests deletion-biased DSB repair causing ongoing genome shrinking in A. thaliana, whereas genome size in barley remains nearly constant. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Mammalian RAD52 Functions in Break-Induced Replication Repair of Collapsed DNA Replication Forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiriou, Sotirios K; Kamileri, Irene; Lugli, Natalia; Evangelou, Konstantinos; Da-Ré, Caterina; Huber, Florian; Padayachy, Laura; Tardy, Sebastien; Nicati, Noemie L; Barriot, Samia; Ochs, Fena; Lukas, Claudia; Lukas, Jiri; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G; Scapozza, Leonardo; Halazonetis, Thanos D

    2016-12-15

    Human cancers are characterized by the presence of oncogene-induced DNA replication stress (DRS), making them dependent on repair pathways such as break-induced replication (BIR) for damaged DNA replication forks. To better understand BIR, we performed a targeted siRNA screen for genes whose depletion inhibited G1 to S phase progression when oncogenic cyclin E was overexpressed. RAD52, a gene dispensable for normal development in mice, was among the top hits. In cells in which fork collapse was induced by oncogenes or chemicals, the Rad52 protein localized to DRS foci. Depletion of Rad52 by siRNA or knockout of the gene by CRISPR/Cas9 compromised restart of collapsed forks and led to DNA damage in cells experiencing DRS. Furthermore, in cancer-prone, heterozygous APC mutant mice, homozygous deletion of the Rad52 gene suppressed tumor growth and prolonged lifespan. We therefore propose that mammalian RAD52 facilitates repair of collapsed DNA replication forks in cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ubiquitin-specific protease 5 is required for the efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Nakajima

    Full Text Available During the DNA damage response (DDR, ubiquitination plays an important role in the recruitment and regulation of repair proteins. However, little is known about elimination of the ubiquitination signal after repair is completed. Here we show that the ubiquitin-specific protease 5 (USP5, a deubiquitinating enzyme, is involved in the elimination of the ubiquitin signal from damaged sites and is required for efficient DNA double-strand break (DSB repair. Depletion of USP5 sensitizes cells to DNA damaging agents, produces DSBs, causes delayed disappearance of γH2AX foci after Bleocin treatment, and influences DSB repair efficiency in the homologous recombination pathway but not in the non-homologous end joining pathway. USP5 co-localizes to DSBs induced by laser micro-irradiation in a RAD18-dependent manner. Importantly, polyubiquitin chains at sites of DNA damage remained for longer periods in USP5-depleted cells. Our results show that disassembly of polyubiquitin chains by USP5 at sites of damage is important for efficient DSB repair.

  6. The democratization of gene editing: Insights from site-specific cleavage and double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasin, Maria; Haber, James E

    2016-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are dangerous lesions that if not properly repaired can lead to genomic change or cell death. Organisms have developed several pathways and have many factors devoted to repairing DSBs, which broadly occurs by homologous recombination, which relies on an identical or homologous sequence to template repair, or nonhomologous end-joining. Much of our understanding of these repair mechanisms has come from the study of induced DNA cleavage by site-specific endonucleases. In addition to their biological role, these cellular pathways can be co-opted for gene editing to study gene function or for gene therapy or other applications. While the first gene editing experiments were done more than 20 years ago, the recent discovery of RNA-guided endonucleases has simplified approaches developed over the years to make gene editing an approach that is available to the entire biomedical research community. Here, we review DSB repair mechanisms and site-specific cleavage systems that have provided insight into these mechanisms and led to the current gene editing revolution. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. The Democratization of Gene Editing: Insights from site-specific cleavage and double-strand break repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasin, Maria; Haber, James E.

    2017-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are dangerous lesions that if not properly repaired can lead to genomic change or cell death. Organisms have developed several pathways and have many factors devoted to repairing DSBs, which broadly occur by homologous recombination that relies on an identical or homologous sequence to template repair, or nonhomologous end-joining. Much of our understanding of these repair mechanisms has come from the study of induced DNA cleavage by site-specific endonucleases. In addition to their biological role, these cellular pathways can be co-opted for gene editing to study gene function or for gene therapy or other applications. While the first gene editing experiments were done more than 20 years ago, the recent discovery of RNA-guided endonucleases has simplified approaches developed over the years to make gene editing an approach that is available to the entire biomedical research community. Here, we review DSB repair mechanisms and site-specific cleavage systems that have provided insight into these mechanisms and led to the current gene editing revolution. PMID:27261202

  8. Differential requirement for SUB1 in chromosomal and plasmid double-strand DNA break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijian Yu

    Full Text Available Non homologous end joining (NHEJ is an important process that repairs double strand DNA breaks (DSBs in eukaryotic cells. Cells defective in NHEJ are unable to join chromosomal breaks. Two different NHEJ assays are typically used to determine the efficiency of NHEJ. One requires NHEJ of linearized plasmid DNA transformed into the test organism; the other requires NHEJ of a single chromosomal break induced either by HO endonuclease or the I-SceI restriction enzyme. These two assays are generally considered equivalent and rely on the same set of NHEJ genes. PC4 is an abundant DNA binding protein that has been suggested to stimulate NHEJ. Here we tested the role of PC4's yeast homolog SUB1 in repair of DNA double strand breaks using different assays. We found SUB1 is required for NHEJ repair of DSBs in plasmid DNA, but not in chromosomal DNA. Our results suggest that these two assays, while similar are not equivalent and that repair of plasmid DNA requires additional factor(s that are not required for NHEJ repair of chromosomal double-strand DNA breaks. Possible roles for Sub1 proteins in NHEJ of plasmid DNA are discussed.

  9. Homology Requirements and Competition between Gene Conversion and Break-Induced Replication during Double-Strand Break Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Anuja; Beach, Annette; Haber, James E

    2017-02-02

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating-type switching is initiated by a double-strand break (DSB) at MATa, leaving one cut end perfectly homologous to the HMLα donor, while the second end must be processed to remove a non-homologous tail before completing repair by gene conversion (GC). When homology at the matched end is ≤150 bp, efficient repair depends on the recombination enhancer, which tethers HMLα near the DSB. Thus, homology shorter than an apparent minimum efficient processing segment can be rescued by tethering the donor near the break. When homology at the second end is ≤150 bp, second-end capture becomes inefficient and repair shifts from GC to break-induced replication (BIR). But when pol32 or pif1 mutants block BIR, GC increases 3-fold, indicating that the steps blocked by these mutations are reversible. With short second-end homology, absence of the RecQ helicase Sgs1 promotes gene conversion, whereas deletion of the FANCM-related Mph1 helicase promotes BIR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. An inverse switch in DNA base excision and strand break repair contributes to melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirta M L Sousa

    Full Text Available Alterations in checkpoint and DNA repair pathways may provide adaptive mechanisms contributing to acquired drug resistance. Here, we investigated the levels of proteins mediating DNA damage signaling and -repair in RPMI8226 multiple myeloma cells and its Melphalan-resistant derivative 8226-LR5. We observed markedly reduced steady-state levels of DNA glycosylases UNG2, NEIL1 and MPG in the resistant cells and cross-resistance to agents inducing their respective DNA base lesions. Conversely, repair of alkali-labile sites was apparently enhanced in the resistant cells, as substantiated by alkaline comet assay, autoribosylation of PARP-1, and increased sensitivity to PARP-1 inhibition by 4-AN or KU58684. Reduced base-excision and enhanced single-strand break repair would both contribute to the observed reduction in genomic alkali-labile sites, which could jeopardize productive processing of the more cytotoxic Melphalan-induced interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs. Furthermore, we found a marked upregulation of proteins in the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ pathway of double-strand break (DSB repair, likely contributing to the observed increase in DSB repair kinetics in the resistant cells. Finally, we observed apparent upregulation of ATR-signaling and downregulation of ATM-signaling in the resistant cells. This was accompanied by markedly increased sensitivity towards Melphalan in the presence of ATR-, DNA-PK, or CHK1/2 inhibitors whereas no sensitizing effect was observed subsequent to ATM inhibition, suggesting that replication blocking lesions are primary triggers of the DNA damage response in the Melphalan resistant cells. In conclusion, Melphalan resistance is apparently contributed by modulation of the DNA damage response at multiple levels, including downregulation of specific repair pathways to avoid repair intermediates that could impair efficient processing of cytotoxic ICLs and ICL-induced DSBs. This study has revealed several novel

  11. Expansions and contractions in a tandem repeat induced by double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pâques, F; Leung, W Y; Haber, J E

    1998-04-01

    Repair of a double-strand break (DSB) in yeast can induce very frequent expansions and contractions in a tandem array of 375-bp repeats. These results strongly suggest that DSB repair can be a major source of amplification of tandemly repeated sequences. Most of the DSB repair events are not associated with crossover. Rearrangements appear in 50% of these repaired recipient molecules. In contrast, the donor template nearly always remains unchanged. Among the rare crossover events, similar rearrangements are found. These results cannot readily be explained by the gap repair model of Szostak et al. (J. W. Szostak, T. L. Orr-Weaver, R. J. Rothstein, and F. W. Stahl, Cell 33:25-35, 1983) but can be explained by synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) models that allow for crossover. Support for SDSA models is provided by a demonstration that a single DSB repair event can use two donor templates located on two different chromosomes.

  12. DEK is required for homologous recombination repair of DNA breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Eric A; Gole, Boris; Willis, Nicholas A

    2017-01-01

    mice. Furthermore, DEK knockout cells were sensitive to apoptosis with NHEJ inhibition. Thus, we hypothesized DEK plays additional roles in homologous recombination (HR). Using episomal and integrated reporters, we demonstrate that HR repair of conventional DSBs is severely compromised in DEK...

  13. The Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of Gen1/Yen1 resolvases links DNA damage signaling to DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Aymeric P; Freeman, Alasdair; Hall, Julie; Déclais, Anne-Cécile; Alpi, Arno; Lilley, David M J; Ahmed, Shawn; Gartner, Anton

    2010-07-15

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can be repaired by homologous recombination (HR), which can involve Holliday junction (HJ) intermediates that are ultimately resolved by nucleolytic enzymes. An N-terminal fragment of human GEN1 has recently been shown to act as a Holliday junction resolvase, but little is known about the role of GEN-1 in vivo. Holliday junction resolution signifies the completion of DNA repair, a step that may be coupled to signaling proteins that regulate cell cycle progression in response to DNA damage. Using forward genetic approaches, we identified a Caenorhabditis elegans dual function DNA double-strand break repair and DNA damage signaling protein orthologous to the human GEN1 Holliday junction resolving enzyme. GEN-1 has biochemical activities related to the human enzyme and facilitates repair of DNA double-strand breaks, but is not essential for DNA double-strand break repair during meiotic recombination. Mutational analysis reveals that the DNA damage-signaling function of GEN-1 is separable from its role in DNA repair. GEN-1 promotes germ cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via a pathway that acts in parallel to the canonical DNA damage response pathway mediated by RPA loading, CHK1 activation, and CEP-1/p53-mediated apoptosis induction. Furthermore, GEN-1 acts redundantly with the 9-1-1 complex to ensure genome stability. Our study suggests that GEN-1 might act as a dual function Holliday junction resolvase that may coordinate DNA damage signaling with a late step in DNA double-strand break repair.

  14. The Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of Gen1/Yen1 resolvases links DNA damage signaling to DNA double-strand break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymeric P Bailly

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs can be repaired by homologous recombination (HR, which can involve Holliday junction (HJ intermediates that are ultimately resolved by nucleolytic enzymes. An N-terminal fragment of human GEN1 has recently been shown to act as a Holliday junction resolvase, but little is known about the role of GEN-1 in vivo. Holliday junction resolution signifies the completion of DNA repair, a step that may be coupled to signaling proteins that regulate cell cycle progression in response to DNA damage. Using forward genetic approaches, we identified a Caenorhabditis elegans dual function DNA double-strand break repair and DNA damage signaling protein orthologous to the human GEN1 Holliday junction resolving enzyme. GEN-1 has biochemical activities related to the human enzyme and facilitates repair of DNA double-strand breaks, but is not essential for DNA double-strand break repair during meiotic recombination. Mutational analysis reveals that the DNA damage-signaling function of GEN-1 is separable from its role in DNA repair. GEN-1 promotes germ cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via a pathway that acts in parallel to the canonical DNA damage response pathway mediated by RPA loading, CHK1 activation, and CEP-1/p53-mediated apoptosis induction. Furthermore, GEN-1 acts redundantly with the 9-1-1 complex to ensure genome stability. Our study suggests that GEN-1 might act as a dual function Holliday junction resolvase that may coordinate DNA damage signaling with a late step in DNA double-strand break repair.

  15. TRF2 is required for repair of nontelomeric DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Zhiyong; Seluanov, Andrei; Jiang, Ying; Gorbunova, Vera

    2007-01-01

    TRF2 (telomeric repeat binding factor 2) is an essential component of the telomeric cap, where it forms and stabilizes the T-loop junctions. TRF2 forms the T-loops by stimulating strand invasion of the 3′ overhang into duplex DNA. TRF2 also has been shown to localize to nontelomeric DNA double-strand breaks, but its functional role in DNA repair has not been examined. Here, we present evidence that TRF2 is involved in homologous recombination (HR) repair of nontelomeric double-strand breaks. ...

  16. The Caenorhabditis elegans WRN helicase promotes double-strand DNA break repair by mediating end resection and checkpoint activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jin-Sun; Koo, Hyeon-Sook

    2017-07-01

    The protein associated with Werner syndrome (WRN), is involved in DNA repair, checkpoint activation, and telomere maintenance. To better understand the involvement of WRN in double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair, we analyzed the combinatorial role of WRN-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans WRN helicase, in conjunction with EXO-1 and DNA-2 nucleases. We found that WRN-1 cooperates with DNA-2 to resect DSB ends in a pathway acting in parallel to EXO-1. The wrn-1 mutants show an aberrant accumulation of replication protein A (RPA) and RAD-51, and the same pattern of accumulation is also observed in checkpoint-defective strains. We conclude that WRN-1 plays a conserved role in the resection of DSB ends and mediates checkpoint signaling, thereby influencing levels of RPA and RAD-51. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  17. Regulation of DNA double-strand break repair by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwertman, Petra; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions. The swift recognition and faithful repair of such damage is crucial for the maintenance of genomic stability, as well as for cell and organismal fitness. Signalling by ubiquitin, SUMO and other ubiquitin-like modifiers (UBLs...

  18. Repair and genetic consequences of DNA double strand breaks during animal development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmens, Bennie Benjamin Lodewijk Gerardus

    2014-01-01

    The genetic code of life is stored in DNA molecules that consist of two parallel strands of coupled nucleotides that form a DNA double helix. One of the most deleterious forms of DNA damage is a DNA double-strand break (DSB) in which both strands of the helix are broken. When not repaired adequately

  19. Cockayne syndrome group B protein regulates DNA double-strand break repair and checkpoint activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batenburg, Nicole L; Thompson, Elizabeth L; Hendrickson, Eric A; Zhu, Xu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of CSB account for the majority of Cockayne syndrome (CS), a devastating hereditary disorder characterized by physical impairment, neurological degeneration and segmental premature aging. Here we report the generation of a human CSB-knockout cell line. We find that CSB facilitates HR and represses NHEJ. Loss of CSB or a CS-associated CSB mutation abrogating its ATPase activity impairs the recruitment of BRCA1, RPA and Rad51 proteins to damaged chromatin but promotes the formation of 53BP1-Rif1 damage foci in S and G2 cells. Depletion of 53BP1 rescues the formation of BRCA1 damage foci in CSB-knockout cells. In addition, knockout of CSB impairs the ATM- and Chk2-mediated DNA damage responses, promoting a premature entry into mitosis. Furthermore, we show that CSB accumulates at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in a transcription-dependent manner. The kinetics of DSB-induced chromatin association of CSB is distinct from that of its UV-induced chromatin association. These results reveal novel, important functions of CSB in regulating the DNA DSB repair pathway choice as well as G2/M checkpoint activation. PMID:25820262

  20. Cockayne syndrome group B protein regulates DNA double-strand break repair and checkpoint activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batenburg, Nicole L; Thompson, Elizabeth L; Hendrickson, Eric A; Zhu, Xu-Dong

    2015-05-12

    Mutations of CSB account for the majority of Cockayne syndrome (CS), a devastating hereditary disorder characterized by physical impairment, neurological degeneration and segmental premature aging. Here we report the generation of a human CSB-knockout cell line. We find that CSB facilitates HR and represses NHEJ. Loss of CSB or a CS-associated CSB mutation abrogating its ATPase activity impairs the recruitment of BRCA1, RPA and Rad51 proteins to damaged chromatin but promotes the formation of 53BP1-Rif1 damage foci in S and G2 cells. Depletion of 53BP1 rescues the formation of BRCA1 damage foci in CSB-knockout cells. In addition, knockout of CSB impairs the ATM- and Chk2-mediated DNA damage responses, promoting a premature entry into mitosis. Furthermore, we show that CSB accumulates at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in a transcription-dependent manner. The kinetics of DSB-induced chromatin association of CSB is distinct from that of its UV-induced chromatin association. These results reveal novel, important functions of CSB in regulating the DNA DSB repair pathway choice as well as G2/M checkpoint activation. © 2015 The Authors.

  1. ASPM influences DNA double-strand break repair and represents a potential target for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Takamitsu A; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Jeggo, Penny A; Fujimori, Akira

    2011-12-01

    In a previous study using HiCEP (High coverage expression profiling), we demonstrated that ASPM (abnormal spindle-like microcephaly-associated) or the most common-type microcephaly (MCPH5) gene was selectively down-regulated by IR (ionizing radiation). The roles of ASPM on radiosensitivity, however, have never been studied. Using glioblastoma cell lines and normal human fibroblasts, we investigated how IR sensitivity (survived fraction, DNA repair and chromosome aberration) was affected by the reduction of ASPM by specific siRNA (small interfering RNA). Down-regulation of ASPM by siRNA enhanced radiosensitivity in three human cell lines examined. Constant-field gel electrophoreses and γ-H2AX (phosphorylated form of Histone H2A variant H2AX) foci analysis showed that ASPM-specific siRNA impaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in irradiated cells. Elevated levels of abnormal chromosomes were also observed following ASPM siRNA. In addition IR-sensitization by ASPM knockdown was not enhanced in DNA-PK (DNA-dependent protein kinase) deficient glioblastoma cells suggesting that ASPM impacts upon a DNA-PK-dependent pathway. Our results show for the first time that ASPM is required for efficient non-homologous end-joining in mammalian cells. In clinical applications, ASPM could be a novel target for combination therapy with radiation as well as a useful biomarker for tumor prognosis as ever described.

  2. Mechanisms and biological impact of DNA repair pathways for UV and {gamma}-ray-induced damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeijmakers, J.H.J. [MGC, Department of Cell Biology et Genetics, Erasmus Universtiy, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    1997-03-01

    Nature has equipped all living systems with an intricate network of DNA repair pathways, to cope with damage induced by genotoxic agents (such as UV light, {gamma}-rays and numerous chemicals). These pathways ensure genome stability and prevent carcinogenesis. Examples of multi-step damage repair processes are: nucleotide excision repair (NER, for removal of a wide variety of lesions, including UV) and recombination repair (for elimination of the very genotoxic radiation-induced double strand breaks). The NER pathway is understood in great detail and is associated with three human syndromes characterized by marked sun sensitivity: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), cockayne syndrome (CS) and tricho-thio-dystrophy (TTD), XP patients show an over 1000 x increased risk of skin cancer, in contrast to CS and TTD. At least 25 proteins re involved some are also implicated in other cellular processes, explaining puzzling features associated with defects in these genes. NER-deficient mouse mutants have been generated, that permit evaluation of the biological impact of this process. Recombination repair is much less understood. However, recently a number of genes has been cloned based on sequence homology with yeast genes and mouse mutants are being generated. These will be invaluable to investigate e.g. radioresistance and radiation-induced tumorigenesis and for radiotherapy. (author)

  3. DNA repair goes hip-hop: SMARCA and CHD chromatin remodellers join the break dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rother, Magdalena B; van Attikum, Haico

    2017-10-05

    Proper signalling and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) is critical to prevent genome instability and diseases such as cancer. The packaging of DNA into chromatin, however, has evolved as a mere obstacle to these DSB responses. Posttranslational modifications and ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling help to overcome this barrier by modulating nucleosome structures and allow signalling and repair machineries access to DSBs in chromatin. Here we recap our current knowledge on how ATP-dependent SMARCA- and CHD-type chromatin remodellers alter chromatin structure during the signalling and repair of DSBs and discuss how their dysfunction impacts genome stability and human disease.This article is part of the themed issue 'Chromatin modifiers and remodellers in DNA repair and signalling'. © 2017 The Authors.

  4. Granulocytes affect double-strand break repair assays in primary human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, Sandrine; Bhatia, Ravi; Bhatia, Smita; O'Connor, Timothy R

    2014-01-01

    Patients who develop therapy-related myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia after autologous-hematopoietic stem cell (aHCT) transplant show lower expression levels of DNA repair genes in their pre-aHCT CD34+ cells. To investigate whether this leads to functional differences in DNA repair abilities measurable in patients, we adapted two plasmid-based host-cell reactivation assays for use in primary lymphocytes. Prior to applying these assays to patients who underwent aHCT, we wanted first to verify whether sample preparation affected repair measurements, as patient samples were simply depleted of erythrocytes (with hetastarch) prior to freezing, which is not the classical way to prepare lymphocytes prior to DNA repair experiments (with a density gradient). We show here that lymphocytes from healthy donors freshly prepared with hetastarch show systematically a higher level of double-strand break repair as compared to when prepared with a density gradient, but that most of this difference disappears after samples were frozen. Several observations points to granulocytes as the source for this effect of sample preparation on repair: 1) removal of granulocytes makes the effect disappear, 2) DSB repair measurements for the same individual correlate to the percentage of granulocytes in the sample and 3) nucleofection in presence of granulocytes increases the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in neighboring lymphocytes in a dose-dependent manner (R2 of 0.95). These results indicate that co-purified granulocytes, possibly through the release of ROS at time of transfection, can lead to an enhanced repair in lymphocytes that obfuscates any evaluation of inter individual differences in repair as measured by host-cell reactivation. As a result, hetastarch-prepared samples are likely unsuitable for the assessment of DSB repair in primary cells with that type of assay. Granulocyte contamination that exists after a density gradient preparation, although much more limited, could

  5. A role for small RNAs in DNA double-strand break repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, W.; Ba, Z.; Wu, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved complex mechanisms to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) through coordinated actions of protein sensors, transducers, and effectors. Here we show that ∼21-nucleotide small RNAs are produced from the sequences in the vicinity of DSB sites in Arabidopsis and in human cells....... We refer to these as diRNAs for DSB-induced small RNAs. In Arabidopsis, the biogenesis of diRNAs requires the PI3 kinase ATR, RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), and Dicer-like proteins. Mutations in these proteins as well as in Pol V cause significant reduction in DSB repair efficiency. In Arabidopsis, di...

  6. Ago2 facilitates Rad51 recruitment and DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Min; Wei, Wei; Li, Ming Hua

    2014-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic lesions and pose a major threat to genome stability if not properly repaired. We and others have previously shown that a class of DSB-induced small RNAs (diRNAs) is produced from sequences around DSB sites. DiRNAs are associated with Argonaute...... cells. Interestingly, we show that Ago2 forms a complex with Rad51 and that the interaction is enhanced in cells treated with ionizing radiation. We demonstrate that Rad51 accumulation at DSB sites and HR repair depend on catalytic activity and small RNA-binding capability of Ago2. In contrast, DSB...

  7. SAW1 is Required for SDSA Double-Strand Break Repair in S. cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Diamante, Graciel; Phan, Claire; Celis, Angie S.; Krueger, Jonas; Kelson, Eric P.; Fischhaber, Paula L.

    2014-01-01

    SAW1 , coding for Saw1, is required for single-strand annealing (SSA) DNA Double-strand Break (DSB) Repair in S. cerevisiae. Saw1 physically associates with Rad1 and Rad52 and recruits the Rad1-Rad10 endonuclease. Herein we show by fluorescence microscopy that SAW1 is similarly required for recruitment of Rad10 to sites of Synthesis-Dependent Strand Annealing (SDSA) and associates with sites of SDSA repair in a manner temporally overlapped with Rad10. The magnitude of induction of colocalized...

  8. Quantitation of intracellular NAD(P)H can monitor an imbalance of DNA single strand break repair in base excision repair deficient cells in real time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Jun; Asakura, Shoji; Hester, Susan D.; de Murcia, Gilbert; Caldecott, Keith W.; Swenberg, James A.

    2003-01-01

    DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) are one of the most frequent DNA lesions in genomic DNA generated either by oxidative stress or during the base excision repair pathways. Here we established a new real-time assay to assess an imbalance of DNA SSB repair by indirectly measuring PARP-1 activation through the depletion of intracellular NAD(P)H. A water-soluble tetrazolium salt is used to monitor the amount of NAD(P)H in living cells through its reduction to a yellow colored water-soluble formazan dye. While this assay is not a direct method, it does not require DNA extraction or alkaline treatment, both of which could potentially cause an artifactual induction of SSBs. In addition, it takes only 4 h and requires less than a half million cells to perform this measurement. Using this assay, we demonstrated that the dose- and time-dependent depletion of NAD(P)H in XRCC1-deficient CHO cells exposed to methyl methanesulfonate. This decrease was almost completely blocked by a PARP inhibitor. Furthermore, methyl methanesulfonate reduced NAD(P)H in PARP-1+/+cells, whereas PARP-1–/– cells were more resistant to the decrease in NAD(P)H. These results indicate that the analysis of intracellular NAD(P)H level using water-soluble tetrazolium salt can assess an imbalance of SSB repair in living cells in real time. PMID:12930978

  9. Writers, Readers, and Erasers of Histone Ubiquitylation in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smeenk, Godelieve; Mailand, Niels

    2016-01-01

    for a range of genome caretaker proteins and their associated factors. These DNA damage-induced chromatin ubiquitylation marks provide an essential component of a histone code for DSB repair that is controlled by multifaceted regulatory circuits, underscoring its importance for genome stability maintenance...... accurate lesion repair and restoration of genome integrity. In vertebrate cells, ubiquitin-dependent modifications of histones adjacent to DSBs by RNF8, RNF168, and other ubiquitin ligases have a key role in promoting the assembly of repair protein complexes, serving as direct recruitment platforms....... In this review, we provide a comprehensive account of how DSB-induced histone ubiquitylation is sensed, decoded and modulated by an elaborate array of repair factors and regulators. We discuss how these mechanisms impact DSB repair pathway choice and functionality for optimal protection of genome integrity...

  10. Atypical Role for PhoU in Mutagenic Break Repair under Stress in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet L Gibson

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of mutagenesis activated by stress responses drive pathogen/host adaptation, antibiotic and anti-fungal-drug resistance, and perhaps much of evolution generally. In Escherichia coli, repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs by homologous recombination is high fidelity in unstressed cells, but switches to a mutagenic mode using error-prone DNA polymerases when the both the SOS and general (σS stress responses are activated. Additionally, the σE response promotes spontaneous DNA breakage that leads to mutagenic break repair (MBR. We identified the regulatory protein PhoU in a genetic screen for functions required for MBR. PhoU negatively regulates the phosphate-transport and utilization (Pho regulon when phosphate is in excess, including the PstB and PstC subunits of the phosphate-specific ABC transporter PstSCAB. Here, we characterize the PhoU mutation-promoting role. First, some mutations that affect phosphate transport and Pho transcriptional regulation decrease mutagenesis. Second, the mutagenesis and regulon-expression phenotypes do not correspond, revealing an apparent new function(s for PhoU. Third, the PhoU mutagenic role is not via activation of the σS, SOS or σE responses, because mutations (or DSBs that restore mutagenesis to cells defective in these stress responses do not restore mutagenesis to phoU cells. Fourth, the mutagenesis defect in phoU-mutant cells is partially restored by deletion of arcA, a gene normally repressed by PhoU, implying that a gene(s repressed by ArcA promotes mutagenic break repair. The data show a new role for PhoU in regulation, and a new regulatory branch of the stress-response signaling web that activates mutagenic break repair in E. coli.

  11. Balancing Pathways in DNA Double Strand Break Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Brandsma (Inger)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractAll information a cell needs to live and survive is stored in the genomic DNA. Maintenance of an intact and uncompromised genome is of vital importance for cell survival. Damaged DNA can block transcription and replication, processes essential for cell viability. Persistent DNA

  12. TALEN-Induced Double-Strand Break Repair of CTG Trinucleotide Repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentine Mosbach

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Trinucleotide repeat expansions involving CTG/CAG triplets are responsible for several neurodegenerative disorders, including myotonic dystrophy and Huntington’s disease. Because expansions trigger the disease, contracting repeat length could be a possible approach to gene therapy for these disorders. Here, we show that a TALEN-induced double-strand break was very efficient at contracting expanded CTG repeats in yeast. We show that RAD51, POL32, and DNL4 are dispensable for double-strand break repair within CTG repeats, the only required genes being RAD50, SAE2, and RAD52. Resection was totally abolished in the absence of RAD50 on both sides of the break, whereas it was reduced in a sae2Δ mutant on the side of the break containing the longest repeat tract, suggesting that secondary structures at double-strand break ends must be removed by the Mre11-Rad50 complex and Sae2. Following the TALEN double-strand break, single-strand annealing occurred between both sides of the repeat tract, leading to repeat contraction.

  13. Wwox-Brca1 interaction: role in DNA repair pathway choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrock, M S; Batar, B; Lee, J; Druck, T; Ferguson, B; Cho, J H; Akakpo, K; Hagrass, H; Heerema, N A; Xia, F; Parvin, J D; Aldaz, C M; Huebner, K

    2017-04-20

    In this study, loss of expression of the fragile site-encoded Wwox protein was found to contribute to radiation and cisplatin resistance of cells, responses that could be associated with cancer recurrence and poor outcome. WWOX gene deletions occur in a variety of human cancer types, and reduced Wwox protein expression can be detected early during cancer development. We found that Wwox loss is followed by mild chromosome instability in genomes of mouse embryo fibroblast cells from Wwox-knockout mice. Human and mouse cells deficient for Wwox also exhibit significantly enhanced survival of ionizing radiation and bleomycin treatment, agents that induce double-strand breaks (DSBs). Cancer cells that survive radiation recur more rapidly in a xenograft model of irradiated breast cancer cells; Wwox-deficient cells exhibited significantly shorter tumor latencies vs Wwox-expressing cells. This Wwox effect has important consequences in human disease: in a cohort of cancer patients treated with radiation, Wwox deficiency significantly correlated with shorter overall survival times. In examining mechanisms underlying Wwox-dependent survival differences, we found that Wwox-deficient cells exhibit enhanced homology directed repair (HDR) and decreased non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair, suggesting that Wwox contributes to DNA DSB repair pathway choice. Upon silencing of Rad51, a protein critical for HDR, Wwox-deficient cells were resensitized to radiation. We also demonstrated interaction of Wwox with Brca1, a driver of HDR, and show via immunofluorescent detection of repair proteins at ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage foci that Wwox expression suppresses DSB repair at the end-resection step of HDR. We propose a genome caretaker function for WWOX, in which Brca1-Wwox interaction supports NHEJ as the dominant DSB repair pathway in Wwox-sufficient cells. Taken together, the experimental results suggest that reduced Wwox expression, a common occurrence in cancers

  14. Wwox–Brca1 interaction: role in DNA repair pathway choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrock, M S; Batar, B; Lee, J; Druck, T; Ferguson, B; Cho, J H; Akakpo, K; Hagrass, H; Heerema, N A; Xia, F; Parvin, J D; Aldaz, C M; Huebner, K

    2017-01-01

    In this study, loss of expression of the fragile site-encoded Wwox protein was found to contribute to radiation and cisplatin resistance of cells, responses that could be associated with cancer recurrence and poor outcome. WWOX gene deletions occur in a variety of human cancer types, and reduced Wwox protein expression can be detected early during cancer development. We found that Wwox loss is followed by mild chromosome instability in genomes of mouse embryo fibroblast cells from Wwox-knockout mice. Human and mouse cells deficient for Wwox also exhibit significantly enhanced survival of ionizing radiation and bleomycin treatment, agents that induce double-strand breaks (DSBs). Cancer cells that survive radiation recur more rapidly in a xenograft model of irradiated breast cancer cells; Wwox-deficient cells exhibited significantly shorter tumor latencies vs Wwox-expressing cells. This Wwox effect has important consequences in human disease: in a cohort of cancer patients treated with radiation, Wwox deficiency significantly correlated with shorter overall survival times. In examining mechanisms underlying Wwox-dependent survival differences, we found that Wwox-deficient cells exhibit enhanced homology directed repair (HDR) and decreased non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair, suggesting that Wwox contributes to DNA DSB repair pathway choice. Upon silencing of Rad51, a protein critical for HDR, Wwox-deficient cells were resensitized to radiation. We also demonstrated interaction of Wwox with Brca1, a driver of HDR, and show via immunofluorescent detection of repair proteins at ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage foci that Wwox expression suppresses DSB repair at the end-resection step of HDR. We propose a genome caretaker function for WWOX, in which Brca1–Wwox interaction supports NHEJ as the dominant DSB repair pathway in Wwox-sufficient cells. Taken together, the experimental results suggest that reduced Wwox expression, a common occurrence in cancers

  15. RNF4 is required for DNA double-strand break repair in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vyas, R; Kumar, R; Clermont, F

    2013-01-01

    , and that Rnf4-deficient cells and mice exhibit increased sensitivity to genotoxic stress. Mechanistically, we show that Rnf4 targets SUMOylated MDC1 and SUMOylated BRCA1, and is required for the loading of Rad51, an enzyme required for HR repair, onto sites of DNA damage. Similarly to inactivating mutations......Unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) cause genetic instability that leads to malignant transformation or cell death. Cells respond to DSBs with the ordered recruitment of signaling and repair proteins to the sites of DNA lesions. Coordinated protein SUMOylation and ubiquitylation have crucial...... for both homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining repair. To establish a link between Rnf4 and the DNA damage response (DDR) in vivo, we generated an Rnf4 allelic series in mice. We show that Rnf4-deficiency causes persistent ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and signaling...

  16. Lingering single-strand breaks trigger Rad51-independent homology-directed repair of collapsed replication forks in the polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase mutant of fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arancha Sanchez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The DNA repair enzyme polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (PNKP protects genome integrity by restoring ligatable 5'-phosphate and 3'-hydroxyl termini at single-strand breaks (SSBs. In humans, PNKP mutations underlie the neurological disease known as MCSZ, but these individuals are not predisposed for cancer, implying effective alternative repair pathways in dividing cells. Homology-directed repair (HDR of collapsed replication forks was proposed to repair SSBs in PNKP-deficient cells, but the critical HDR protein Rad51 is not required in PNKP-null (pnk1Δ cells of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here, we report that pnk1Δ cells have enhanced requirements for Rad3 (ATR/Mec1 and Chk1 checkpoint kinases, and the multi-BRCT domain protein Brc1 that binds phospho-histone H2A (γH2A at damaged replication forks. The viability of pnk1Δ cells depends on Mre11 and Ctp1 (CtIP/Sae2 double-strand break (DSB resection proteins, Rad52 DNA strand annealing protein, Mus81-Eme1 Holliday junction resolvase, and Rqh1 (BLM/WRN/Sgs1 DNA helicase. Coupled with increased sister chromatid recombination and Rad52 repair foci in pnk1Δ cells, these findings indicate that lingering SSBs in pnk1Δ cells trigger Rad51-independent homology-directed repair of collapsed replication forks. From these data, we propose models for HDR-mediated tolerance of persistent SSBs with 3' phosphate in pnk1Δ cells.

  17. DNA double-strand break repair: a theoretical framework and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Philip J; Cornelissen, Bart; Vallis, Katherine A; Chapman, S Jon

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are formed as a result of genotoxic insults, such as exogenous ionizing radiation, and are among the most serious types of DNA damage. One of the earliest molecular responses following DSB formation is the phosphorylation of the histone H2AX, giving rise to γH2AX. Many copies of γH2AX are generated at DSBs and can be detected in vitro as foci using well-established immuno-histochemical methods. It has previously been shown that anti-γH2AX antibodies, modified by the addition of the cell-penetrating peptide TAT and a fluorescent or radionuclide label, can be used to visualize and quantify DSBs in vivo. Moreover, when labelled with a high amount of the short-range, Auger electron-emitting radioisotope, (111)In, the amount of DNA damage within a cell can be increased, leading to cell death. In this report, we develop a mathematical model that describes how molecular processes at individual sites of DNA damage give rise to quantifiable foci. Equations that describe stochastic mean behaviours at individual DSB sites are derived and parametrized using population-scale, time-series measurements from two different cancer cell lines. The model is used to examine two case studies in which the introduction of an antibody (anti-γH2AX-TAT) that targets a key component in the DSB repair pathway influences system behaviour. We investigate: (i) how the interaction between anti-γH2AX-TAT and γH2AX effects the kinetics of H2AX phosphorylation and DSB repair and (ii) model behaviour when the anti-γH2AX antibody is labelled with Auger electron-emitting (111)In and can thus instigate additional DNA damage. This work supports the conclusion that DSB kinetics are largely unaffected by the introduction of the anti-γH2AX antibody, a result that has been validated experimentally, and hence the hypothesis that the use of anti-γH2AX antibody to quantify DSBs does not violate the image tracer principle. Moreover, it provides a novel model of DNA damage

  18. Repair of DNA strand breaks by the overlapping functions of lesion-specific and non-lesion-specific DNA 3' phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, J R; Wilson, T E

    2001-11-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases Apn1 and Apn2 act as alternative pathways for the removal of various 3'-terminal blocking lesions from DNA strand breaks and in the repair of abasic sites, which both result from oxidative DNA damage. Here we demonstrate that Tpp1, a homologue of the 3' phosphatase domain of polynucleotide kinase, is a third member of this group of redundant 3' processing enzymes. Unlike Apn1 and Apn2, Tpp1 is specific for the removal of 3' phosphates at strand breaks and does not possess more general 3' phosphodiesterase, exonuclease, or AP endonuclease activities. Deletion of TPP1 in an apn1 apn2 mutant background dramatically increased the sensitivity of the double mutant to DNA damage caused by H2O2 and bleomycin but not to damage caused by methyl methanesulfonate. The triple mutant was also deficient in the repair of 3' phosphate lesions left by Tdp1-mediated cleavage of camptothecin-stabilized Top1-DNA covalent complexes. Finally, the tpp1 apn1 apn2 triple mutation displayed synthetic lethality in combination with rad52, possibly implicating postreplication repair in the removal of unrepaired 3'-terminal lesions resulting from endogenous damage. Taken together, these results demonstrate a clear role for the lesion-specific enzyme, Tpp1, in the repair of a subset of DNA strand breaks.

  19. Repair of DNA Strand Breaks by the Overlapping Functions of Lesion-Specific and Non-Lesion-Specific DNA 3′ Phosphatases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, John R.; Wilson, Thomas E.

    2001-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases Apn1 and Apn2 act as alternative pathways for the removal of various 3′-terminal blocking lesions from DNA strand breaks and in the repair of abasic sites, which both result from oxidative DNA damage. Here we demonstrate that Tpp1, a homologue of the 3′ phosphatase domain of polynucleotide kinase, is a third member of this group of redundant 3′ processing enzymes. Unlike Apn1 and Apn2, Tpp1 is specific for the removal of 3′ phosphates at strand breaks and does not possess more general 3′ phosphodiesterase, exonuclease, or AP endonuclease activities. Deletion of TPP1 in an apn1 apn2 mutant background dramatically increased the sensitivity of the double mutant to DNA damage caused by H2O2 and bleomycin but not to damage caused by methyl methanesulfonate. The triple mutant was also deficient in the repair of 3′ phosphate lesions left by Tdp1-mediated cleavage of camptothecin-stabilized Top1-DNA covalent complexes. Finally, the tpp1 apn1 apn2 triple mutation displayed synthetic lethality in combination with rad52, possibly implicating postreplication repair in the removal of unrepaired 3′-terminal lesions resulting from endogenous damage. Taken together, these results demonstrate a clear role for the lesion-specific enzyme, Tpp1, in the repair of a subset of DNA strand breaks. PMID:11585902

  20. Alkyltransferase-like proteins: Molecular switches between DNA repair pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, Julie L.; Tainer, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Alkyltransferase-like proteins (ATLs) play a role in the protection of cells from the biological effects of DNA alkylation damage. Although ATLs share functional motifs with the DNA repair protein and cancer chemotherapy target O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase, they lack the reactive cysteine residue required for alkyltransferase activity, so its mechanism for cell protection was previously unknown. Here, we review recent advances in unravelling the enigmatic cellular protection provided by ATLs against the deleterious effects of DNA alkylation damage. We discuss exciting new evidence that ATLs aid in the repair of DNA O6-alkylguanine lesions through a novel repair cross-talk between DNA-alkylation base damage responses and the DNA nucleotide excision repair pathway. PMID:20502938

  1. Electronic Pathways in Photoactivated Repair of UV Mutated DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohr, Henrik; Jalkanen, K. J.; Bary Malik, F.

    An investigation of the physics, underlying the damage caused to DNA by UV radiation and its subsequent repair via a photoreactivation mechanism, is presented in this study. Electronic pathways, starting from the initial damage to the final repair process, are presented. UV radiation is absorbed to create a hole-excited thymine or other pyrimidine that subsequently is responsible for the formation of a dimer. The negative-ion of the cofactor riboflavin, FADH-, formed by the exposure of the photolyase protein to visible light, interacts with the hole-excited electronic orbital of the thymine dimer inducing a photon-less Auger transition, which restores the two thymines to the ground state, thereby detaching the lesion and repairing the DNA. Density functional theoretical calculations supporting the theory are presented. The mechanism involves the least amount of energy dissipation and is charge neutral. It also avoids radiation damage in the repair process. Recent experimental data are compatible with this theory.

  2. In vitro model for DNA double-strand break repair analysis in breast cancer reveals cell type-specific associations with age and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Miriam; Kaufmann, Julia; Stahl, Andreea; Gundelach, Theresa; Janni, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Isabell; Keimling, Marlen; Hampp, Stephanie; Ihle, Michaela; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2016-11-01

    Dysfunction of homologous recombination is a common denominator of changes associated with breast cancer-predisposing mutations. In our previous work, we identified a functional signature in peripheral blood lymphocytes from women who were predisposed that indicated a shift from homologous recombination to alternative, error-prone DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways. To capture both hereditary and nonhereditary factors, we newly established a protocol for isolation and ex vivo analysis of epithelial cells, epithelial-mesenchymal transition cells (EMTs), and fibroblasts from breast cancer specimens (147 patients). By applying a fluorescence-based test system, we analyzed the error-prone DSB repair pathway microhomology-mediated end joining in these tumor-derived cell types and peripheral blood lymphocytes. In parallel, we investigated DNA lesion processing by quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy of histone H2AX phosphorylated on Ser139 focus after radiomimetic treatment. Our study reveals elevated histone H2AX phosphorylated on Ser139 damage removal in epithelial cells, not EMTs, and poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase inhibitor sensitivities, which suggested a DSB repair pathway shift with increasing patient age. Of interest, we found elevated microhomology-mediated end joining in EMTs, not epithelial cells, from patients who received a treatment recommendation of adjuvant chemotherapy, that is, those with high-risk tumors. Our discoveries of altered DSB repair activities in cells may serve as a method to further classify breast cancer to predict responsiveness to adjuvant chemotherapy and/or therapeutics that target DSB repair-dysfunctional tumors.-Deniz, M., Kaufmann, J., Stahl, A., Gundelach, T., Janni, W., Hoffmann, I., Keimling, M., Hampp, S., Ihle, M., Wiesmüller, L. In vitro model for DNA double-strand break repair analysis in breast cancer reveals cell type-specific associations with age and prognosis. © FASEB.

  3. The DNA translocase RAD5A acts independently of the other main DNA repair pathways, and requires both its ATPase and RING domain for activity in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, Tobias; Mannuß, Anja; Kobbe, Daniela; Knoll, Alexander; Trapp, Oliver; Dorn, Annika; Puchta, Holger

    2017-08-01

    Multiple pathways exist to repair DNA damage induced by methylating and crosslinking agents in Arabidopsis thaliana. The SWI2/SNF2 translocase RAD5A, the functional homolog of budding yeast Rad5 that is required for the error-free branch of post-replicative repair, plays a surprisingly prominent role in the repair of both kinds of lesions in Arabidopsis. Here we show that both the ATPase domain and the ubiquitination function of the RING domain of the Arabidopsis protein are essential for the cellular response to different forms of DNA damage. To define the exact role of RAD5A within the complex network of DNA repair pathways, we crossed the rad5a mutant line with mutants of different known repair factors of Arabidopsis. We had previously shown that RAD5A acts independently of two main pathways of replication-associated DNA repair defined by the helicase RECQ4A and the endonuclease MUS81. The enhanced sensitivity of all double mutants tested in this study indicates that the repair of damaged DNA by RAD5A also occurs independently of nucleotide excision repair (AtRAD1), single-strand break repair (AtPARP1), as well as microhomology-mediated double-strand break repair (AtTEB). Moreover, RAD5A can partially complement for a deficient AtATM-mediated DNA damage response in plants, as the double mutant shows phenotypic growth defects. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Depletion of the bloom syndrome helicase stimulates homology-dependent repair at double-strand breaks in human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yibin; Smith, Krissy; Waldman, Barbara Criscuolo; Waldman, Alan S

    2011-04-03

    Mutation of BLM helicase causes Blooms syndrome, a disorder associated with genome instability, high levels of sister chromatid exchanges, and cancer predisposition. To study the influence of BLM on double-strand break (DSB) repair in human chromosomes, we stably transfected a normal human cell line with a DNA substrate that contained a thymidine kinase (tk)-neo fusion gene disrupted by the recognition site for endonuclease I-SceI. The substrate also contained a closely linked functional tk gene to serve as a recombination partner for the tk-neo fusion gene. We derived two cell lines each containing a single integrated copy of the DNA substrate. In these cell lines, a DSB was introduced within the tk-neo fusion gene by expression of I-SceI. DSB repair events that occurred via homologous recombination (HR) or nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) were recovered by selection for G418-resistant clones. DSB repair was examined under conditions of either normal BLM expression or reduced BLM expression brought about by RNA interference. We report that BLM knockdown in both cell lines specifically increased the frequency of HR events that produced deletions by crossovers or single-strand annealing while leaving the frequency of gene conversions unchanged or reduced. We observed no change in the accuracy of individual HR events and no substantial alteration of the nature of individual NHEJ events when BLM expression was reduced. Our work provides the first direct evidence that BLM influences DSB repair pathway choice in human chromosomes and suggests that BLM deficiency can engender genomic instability by provoking an increased frequency of HR events of a potentially deleterious nature. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Assembly and function of DNA double-strand break repair foci in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2010-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most cytotoxic types of DNA damage, which if left unrepaired can lead to mutations or gross chromosomal aberrations, and promote the onset of diseases associated with genomic instability such as cancer. One of the most discernible hallmarks...... of the cellular response to DSBs is the accumulation and local concentration of a plethora of DNA damage signaling and repair proteins in the vicinity of the lesion, initiated by ATM-mediated phosphorylation of H2AX (¿-H2AX) and culminating in the generation of distinct nuclear compartments, so-called Ionizing...... of such DNA repair foci still remains limited. In this review, we focus on recent discoveries on the mechanisms that govern the formation of IRIF, and discuss the implications of such findings in light of our understanding of the physiological importance of these structures....

  6. Epigenetic modifications in double-strand break DNA damage signaling and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Dorine; Truman, Andrew W; Kron, Stephen J; Côté, Jacques

    2010-09-15

    Factors involved in the cellular response to double-strand break (DSB) DNA damage have been identified as potential therapeutic targets that would greatly sensitize cancer cells to radiotherapy and genotoxic chemotherapy. These targets could disable the repair machinery and/or reinstate normal cell-cycle checkpoint leading to growth arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. It is now clear that a major aspect of the DNA damage response occurs through specific interactions with chromatin structure and its modulation. It implicates highly dynamic posttranslational modifications of histones that are critical for DNA damage recognition and/or signaling, repair of the lesion, and release of cell-cycle arrest. Therefore, drugs that target the enzymes responsible for these modifications, or the protein modules reading them, have very high therapeutic potential. This review presents the current state of knowledge on the different chromatin modifications and their roles in each step of eukaryotic DSB DNA damage response. ©2010 AACR.

  7. SCAI promotes DNA double-strand break repair in distinct chromosomal contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rebecca Kring; Mund, Andreas; Poulsen, Sara Lund

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions, whose accurate repair by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) is crucial for genome integrity and is strongly influenced by the local chromatin environment. Here, we identify SCAI (suppressor of cancer...... in repressive chromatin environments. Moreover, we establish an important role of SCAI in meiotic recombination, as SCAI deficiency in mice leads to germ cell loss and subfertility associated with impaired retention of the DMC1 recombinase on meiotic chromosomes. Collectively, our findings uncover SCAI...

  8. Transient RNA-DNA Hybrids Are Required for Efficient Double-Strand Break Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohle, Corina; Tesorero, Rafael; Schermann, Géza; Dobrev, Nikolay; Sinning, Irmgard; Fischer, Tamás

    2016-11-03

    RNA-DNA hybrids are a major internal cause of DNA damage within cells, and their degradation by RNase H enzymes is important for maintaining genomic stability. Here, we identified an unexpected role for RNA-DNA hybrids and RNase H enzymes in DNA repair. Using a site-specific DNA double-strand break (DSB) system in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we showed that RNA-DNA hybrids form as part of the homologous-recombination (HR)-mediated DSB repair process and that RNase H enzymes are essential for their degradation and efficient completion of DNA repair. Deleting RNase H stabilizes RNA-DNA hybrids around DSB sites and strongly impairs recruitment of the ssDNA-binding RPA complex. In contrast, overexpressing RNase H1 destabilizes these hybrids, leading to excessive strand resection and RPA recruitment and to severe loss of repeat regions around DSBs. Our study challenges the existing model of HR-mediated DSB repair and reveals a surprising role for RNA-DNA hybrids in maintaining genomic stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. SAW1 is required for SDSA double-strand break repair in S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamante, Graciel; Phan, Claire; Celis, Angie S; Krueger, Jonas; Kelson, Eric P; Fischhaber, Paula L

    2014-03-14

    SAW1, coding for Saw1, is required for single-strand annealing (SSA) DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in Saccharomycescerevisiae. Saw1 physically associates with Rad1 and Rad52 and recruits the Rad1-Rad10 endonuclease. Herein we show by fluorescence microscopy that SAW1 is similarly required for recruitment of Rad10 to sites of Synthesis-Dependent Strand Annealing (SDSA) and associates with sites of SDSA repair in a manner temporally overlapped with Rad10. The magnitude of induction of colocalized Saw1-CFP/Rad10-YFP/DSB-RFP foci in SDSA is more dramatic in S and G2 phase cells than in M phase, consistent with the known mechanism of SDSA. We observed a substantial fraction of foci in which Rad10 was localized to the repair site without Saw1, but few DSB sites that contained Saw1 without Rad10. Together these data are consistent with a model in which Saw1 recruits Rad1-Rad10 to SDSA sites, possibly even binding as a protein-protein complex, but departs the repair site in advance of Rad1-Rad10. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Double-strand break repair mechanisms in Escherichia coli: recent insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đermić D

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Damir Ðermić Ruđer Bošković Institute, Division of Molecular Biology, Zagreb, Croatia Abstract: In order to survive, all organisms must repair the continuous appearance of double-strand breaks (DSBs in their DNA. Escherichia coli does this by RecA-dependent homologous recombination (HR, during which the RecA protein is assembled on a 3´-terminated overhang that is created by a process called DNA end resection. The RecA nucleoprotein filament searches for and invades an intact homologous DNA sequence, creating a central HR intermediate. This review describes recent insights into HR and DSB repair in E. coli, especially the processes that precede the formation of a RecA nucleoprotein filament, with an emphasis on the regulation of 3´-tail metabolism. Since HR is a highly conserved process, the parallels to DSB repair in eukaryotic systems are discussed, bearing in mind that the lessons learned from studies in simpler bacterial models may be useful for studying DSB repair and the maintenance of genome stability in eukaryotes. Keywords: RecA nucleoprotein filament, homologous recombination, exonucleases, genome stability, 3´-overhang metabolism

  11. Non Random Distribution of DMD Deletion Breakpoints and Implication of Double Strand Breaks Repair and Replication Error Repair Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marey, Isabelle; Ben Yaou, Rabah; Deburgrave, Nathalie; Vasson, Aurélie; Nectoux, Juliette; Leturcq, France; Eymard, Bruno; Laforet, Pascal; Behin, Anthony; Stojkovic, Tanya; Mayer, Michèle; Tiffreau, Vincent; Desguerre, Isabelle; Boyer, François Constant; Nadaj-Pakleza, Aleksandra; Ferrer, Xavier; Wahbi, Karim; Becane, Henri-Marc; Claustres, Mireille; Chelly, Jamel; Cossee, Mireille

    2016-05-27

    Dystrophinopathies are mostly caused by copy number variations, especially deletions, in the dystrophin gene (DMD). Despite the large size of the gene, deletions do not occur randomly but mainly in two hot spots, the main one involving exons 45 to 55. The underlying mechanisms are complex and implicate two main mechanisms: Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and micro-homology mediated replication-dependent recombination (MMRDR). Our goals were to assess the distribution of intronic breakpoints (BPs) in the genomic sequence of the main hot spot of deletions within DMD gene and to search for specific sequences at or near to BPs that might promote BP occurrence or be associated with DNA break repair. Using comparative genomic hybridization microarray, 57 deletions within the intron 44 to 55 region were mapped. Moreover, 21 junction fragments were sequenced to search for specific sequences. Non-randomly distributed BPs were found in introns 44, 47, 48, 49 and 53 and 50% of BPs clustered within genomic regions of less than 700bp. Repeated elements (REs), known to promote gene rearrangement via several mechanisms, were present in the vicinity of 90% of clustered BPs and less frequently (72%) close to scattered BPs, illustrating the important role of such elements in the occurrence of DMD deletions. Palindromic and TTTAAA sequences, which also promote DNA instability, were identified at fragment junctions in 20% and 5% of cases, respectively. Micro-homologies (76%) and insertions or deletions of small sequences were frequently found at BP junctions. Our results illustrate, in a large series of patients, the important role of RE and other genomic features in DNA breaks, and the involvement of different mechanisms in DMD gene deletions: Mainly replication error repair mechanisms, but also NHEJ and potentially aberrant firing of replication origins. A combination of these mechanisms may also be possible.

  12. Repair on the go: E. coli maintains a high proliferation rate while repairing a chronic DNA double-strand break.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Darmon

    Full Text Available DNA damage checkpoints exist to promote cell survival and the faithful inheritance of genetic information. It is thought that one function of such checkpoints is to ensure that cell division does not occur before DNA damage is repaired. However, in unicellular organisms, rapid cell multiplication confers a powerful selective advantage, leading to a dilemma. Is the activation of a DNA damage checkpoint compatible with rapid cell multiplication? By uncoupling the initiation of DNA replication from cell division, the Escherichia coli cell cycle offers a solution to this dilemma. Here, we show that a DNA double-strand break, which occurs once per replication cycle, induces the SOS response. This SOS induction is needed for cell survival due to a requirement for an elevated level of expression of the RecA protein. Cell division is delayed, leading to an increase in average cell length but with no detectable consequence on mutagenesis and little effect on growth rate and viability. The increase in cell length caused by chronic DNA double-strand break repair comprises three components: two types of increase in the unit cell size, one independent of SfiA and SlmA, the other dependent of the presence of SfiA and the absence of SlmA, and a filamentation component that is dependent on the presence of either SfiA or SlmA. These results imply that chronic checkpoint induction in E. coli is compatible with rapid cell multiplication. Therefore, under conditions of chronic low-level DNA damage, the SOS checkpoint operates seamlessly in a cell cycle where the initiation of DNA replication is uncoupled from cell division.

  13. Role for the mammalian Swi5-Sfr1 complex in DNA strand break repair through homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufuko Akamatsu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In fission yeast, the Swi5-Sfr1 complex plays an important role in homologous recombination (HR, a pathway crucial for the maintenance of genomic integrity. Here we identify and characterize mammalian Swi5 and Sfr1 homologues. Mouse Swi5 and Sfr1 are nuclear proteins that form a complex in vivo and in vitro. Swi5 interacts in vitro with Rad51, the DNA strand-exchange protein which functions during HR. By generating Swi5(-/- and Sfr1(-/- embryonic stem cell lines, we found that both proteins are mutually interdependent for their stability. Importantly, the Swi5-Sfr1 complex plays a role in HR when Rad51 function is perturbed in vivo by expression of a BRC peptide from BRCA2. Swi5(-/- and Sfr1(-/- cells are selectively sensitive to agents that cause DNA strand breaks, in particular ionizing radiation, camptothecin, and the Parp inhibitor olaparib. Consistent with a role in HR, sister chromatid exchange induced by Parp inhibition is attenuated in Swi5(-/- and Sfr1(-/- cells, and chromosome aberrations are increased. Thus, Swi5-Sfr1 is a newly identified complex required for genomic integrity in mammalian cells with a specific role in the repair of DNA strand breaks.

  14. Persistent damaged bases in DNA allow mutagenic break repair in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M Moore

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria, yeast and human cancer cells possess mechanisms of mutagenesis upregulated by stress responses. Stress-inducible mutagenesis potentially accelerates adaptation, and may provide important models for mutagenesis that drives cancers, host pathogen interactions, antibiotic resistance and possibly much of evolution generally. In Escherichia coli repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs becomes mutagenic, using low-fidelity DNA polymerases under the control of the SOS DNA-damage response and RpoS general stress response, which upregulate and allow the action of error-prone DNA polymerases IV (DinB, II and V to make mutations during repair. Pol IV is implied to compete with and replace high-fidelity DNA polymerases at the DSB-repair replisome, causing mutagenesis. We report that up-regulated Pol IV is not sufficient for mutagenic break repair (MBR; damaged bases in the DNA are also required, and that in starvation-stressed cells, these are caused by reactive-oxygen species (ROS. First, MBR is reduced by either ROS-scavenging agents or constitutive activation of oxidative-damage responses, both of which reduce cellular ROS levels. The ROS promote MBR other than by causing DSBs, saturating mismatch repair, oxidizing proteins, or inducing the SOS response or the general stress response. We find that ROS drive MBR through oxidized guanines (8-oxo-dG in DNA, in that overproduction of a glycosylase that removes 8-oxo-dG from DNA prevents MBR. Further, other damaged DNA bases can substitute for 8-oxo-dG because ROS-scavenged cells resume MBR if either DNA pyrimidine dimers or alkylated bases are induced. We hypothesize that damaged bases in DNA pause the replisome and allow the critical switch from high fidelity to error-prone DNA polymerases in the DSB-repair replisome, thus allowing MBR. The data imply that in addition to the indirect stress-response controlled switch to MBR, a direct cis-acting switch to MBR occurs independently of DNA breakage

  15. Persistent damaged bases in DNA allow mutagenic break repair in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jessica M; Correa, Raul; Rosenberg, Susan M; Hastings, P J

    2017-07-01

    Bacteria, yeast and human cancer cells possess mechanisms of mutagenesis upregulated by stress responses. Stress-inducible mutagenesis potentially accelerates adaptation, and may provide important models for mutagenesis that drives cancers, host pathogen interactions, antibiotic resistance and possibly much of evolution generally. In Escherichia coli repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) becomes mutagenic, using low-fidelity DNA polymerases under the control of the SOS DNA-damage response and RpoS general stress response, which upregulate and allow the action of error-prone DNA polymerases IV (DinB), II and V to make mutations during repair. Pol IV is implied to compete with and replace high-fidelity DNA polymerases at the DSB-repair replisome, causing mutagenesis. We report that up-regulated Pol IV is not sufficient for mutagenic break repair (MBR); damaged bases in the DNA are also required, and that in starvation-stressed cells, these are caused by reactive-oxygen species (ROS). First, MBR is reduced by either ROS-scavenging agents or constitutive activation of oxidative-damage responses, both of which reduce cellular ROS levels. The ROS promote MBR other than by causing DSBs, saturating mismatch repair, oxidizing proteins, or inducing the SOS response or the general stress response. We find that ROS drive MBR through oxidized guanines (8-oxo-dG) in DNA, in that overproduction of a glycosylase that removes 8-oxo-dG from DNA prevents MBR. Further, other damaged DNA bases can substitute for 8-oxo-dG because ROS-scavenged cells resume MBR if either DNA pyrimidine dimers or alkylated bases are induced. We hypothesize that damaged bases in DNA pause the replisome and allow the critical switch from high fidelity to error-prone DNA polymerases in the DSB-repair replisome, thus allowing MBR. The data imply that in addition to the indirect stress-response controlled switch to MBR, a direct cis-acting switch to MBR occurs independently of DNA breakage, caused by ROS

  16. Phenotypic Analysis of ATM Protein Kinase in DNA Double-Strand Break Formation and Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mian, Elisabeth; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) encodes a serine/threonine protein kinase, which is involved in various regulatory processes in mammalian cells. Its best-known role is apical activation of the DNA damage response following generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). When DSBs appear, sensor and mediator proteins are recruited, activating transducers such as ATM, which in turn relay a widespread signal to a multitude of downstream effectors. ATM mutation causes Ataxia telangiectasia (AT), whereby the disease phenotype shows differing characteristics depending on the underlying ATM mutation. However, all phenotypes share progressive neurodegeneration and marked predisposition to malignancies at the organismal level and sensitivity to ionizing radiation and chromosome aberrations at the cellular level. Expression and localization of the ATM protein can be determined via western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy; however, detection of subtle alterations such as resulting from amino acid exchanges rather than truncating mutations requires functional testing. Previous studies on the role of ATM in DSB repair, which connects with radiosensitivity and chromosomal stability, gave at first sight contradictory results. To systematically explore the effects of clinically relevant ATM mutations on DSB repair, we engaged a series of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from AT patients and controls. To examine DSB repair both in a quantitative and qualitative manners, we used an EGFP-based assay comprising different substrates for distinct DSB repair mechanisms. In this way, we demonstrated that particular signaling defects caused by individual ATM mutations led to specific DSB repair phenotypes. To explore the impact of ATM on carcinogenic chromosomal aberrations, we monitored chromosomal breakage at a breakpoint cluster region hotspot within the MLL gene that has been associated with therapy-related leukemia. PCR-based MLL-breakage analysis of HeLa cells

  17. The extreme radiosensitivity of the squamous cell carcinoma SKX is due to a defect in double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasten-Pisula, Ulla; Menegakis, Apostolos; Brammer, Ingo; Borgmann, Kerstin; Mansour, Wael Y; Degenhardt, Sarah; Krause, Mechthild; Schreiber, Andreas; Dahm-Daphi, Jochen; Petersen, Cordula; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Baumann, Michael

    2009-02-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) are characterized by moderate radiosensitivity. We have established the human head & neck SCC cell line SKX, which shows an exceptionally high radiosensitivity. It was the aim of this study to understand the underlying mechanisms. Experiments were performed with SKX and FaDu, the latter taken as a control of moderate radiosensitivity. Cell lines were grown as xenografts as well as cell cultures. For xenografts, radiosensitivity was determined via local tumour control assay, and for cell cultures using colony assay. For cell cultures, apoptosis was determined by Annexin V staining and G1-arrest by BrdU labelling. Double-strand breaks (DSBs) were detected by both constant-field gel electrophoresis (CFGE) and gammaH2AX-foci technique; DSB rejoining was also assessed by in vitro rejoining assay; chromosomal damage was determined by G01-assay. Compared to FaDu, SKX cells are extremely radiosensitive as found for both xenografts (TCD(50) for 10 fractions 46.0Gy [95% C.I.: 39; 54 Gy] vs. 18.9 Gy [95% C.I.: 13; 25Gy]) and cell cultures (D(0.01); 7.1 vs. 3.5Gy). Both cell lines showed neither radiation-induced apoptosis nor radiation-induced permanent G1-arrest. For DSBs, there was no difference in the induction but for repair with SKX cells showing a higher level of both, slowly repaired DSBs and residual DSBs. The in vitro DSB repair assay revealed that SKX cells are defective in nonhomologous endjoining (NHEJ), and that more than 40% of DSBs are rejoined by single-strand annealing (SSA). SKX cells also depicted a two-fold higher number of lethal chromosomal aberrations when compared to FaDu cells. The extreme radiosensitivity of the SCC SKX seen both in vivo and in vitro can be ascribed to a reduced DNA double-strand break repair, resulting from a defect in NHEJ. This defect might be due to preferred usage of other pathways, such as SSA, which prevents efficient endjoining.

  18. Structure of the Rad50 DNA double-strand break repair protein in complex with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojowska, Anna; Lammens, Katja; Seifert, Florian U; Direnberger, Carolin; Feldmann, Heidi; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2014-12-01

    The Mre11-Rad50 nuclease-ATPase is an evolutionarily conserved multifunctional DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair factor. Mre11-Rad50's mechanism in the processing, tethering, and signaling of DSBs is unclear, in part because we lack a structural framework for its interaction with DNA in different functional states. We determined the crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima Rad50(NBD) (nucleotide-binding domain) in complex with Mre11(HLH) (helix-loop-helix domain), AMPPNP, and double-stranded DNA. DNA binds between both coiled-coil domains of the Rad50 dimer with main interactions to a strand-loop-helix motif on the NBD. Our analysis suggests that this motif on Rad50 does not directly recognize DNA ends and binds internal sites on DNA. Functional studies reveal that DNA binding to Rad50 is not critical for DNA double-strand break repair but is important for telomere maintenance. In summary, we provide a structural framework for DNA binding to Rad50 in the ATP-bound state. © 2014 The Authors.

  19. TRF2 is required for repair of nontelomeric DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhiyong; Seluanov, Andrei; Jiang, Ying; Gorbunova, Vera

    2007-08-07

    TRF2 (telomeric repeat binding factor 2) is an essential component of the telomeric cap, where it forms and stabilizes the T-loop junctions. TRF2 forms the T-loops by stimulating strand invasion of the 3' overhang into duplex DNA. TRF2 also has been shown to localize to nontelomeric DNA double-strand breaks, but its functional role in DNA repair has not been examined. Here, we present evidence that TRF2 is involved in homologous recombination (HR) repair of nontelomeric double-strand breaks. Depletion of TRF2 strongly inhibited HR and delayed the formation of Rad51 foci after gamma-irradiation, whereas overexpression of TRF2 stimulated HR. Depletion of TRF2 had no effect on nonhomologous end-joining, and overexpression of TRF2 inhibited nonhomologous end-joining. We propose, based on our results and on the ability of TRF2 to mediate strand invasion, that TRF2 plays an essential role in HR by facilitating the formation of early recombination intermediates.

  20. Arabidopsis DNA ligase IV is induced by gamma-irradiation and interacts with an Arabidopsis homologue of the double strand break repair protein XRCC4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, C E; Waterworth, W M; Jiang, Q; Bray, C M

    2000-10-01

    Rejoining of single- and double-strand breaks (DSBs) introduced in DNA during replication, recombination, and DNA damage is catalysed by DNA ligase enzymes. Eukaryotes possess multiple DNA ligase enzymes, each having distinct roles in cellular metabolism. Double-strand breaks in DNA, which can occur spontaneously in the cell or be induced experimentally by gamma-irradiation, represent one of the most serious threats to genomic integrity. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) rather than homologous recombination is the major pathway for repair of DSBs in organisms with complex genomes, including humans and plants. DNA ligase IV in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and humans catalyses the final step in the NHEJ pathway of DSB repair. In this study we identify an Arabidopsis thaliana homologue (AtLIG4) of human and S. cerevisiae DNA ligase IV which is shown to encode an ATP-dependent DNA ligase with a theoretical molecular mass of 138 kDa and 48% similarity in amino-acid sequence to the human DNA ligase IV. Yeast two-hybrid analysis demonstrated a strong interaction between A. thaliana DNA ligase IV and the A. thaliana homologue of the human DNA ligase IV-binding protein XRCC4. This interaction is shown to be mediated via the tandem BRCA C-terminal domains of A. thaliana DNA ligase IV protein. Expression of AtLIG4 is induced by gamma-irradiation but not by UVB irradiation, consistent with an in vivo role for the A. thaliana DNA ligase IV in DSB repair.

  1. E4 ligase-specific ubiquitination hubs coordinate DNA double-strand-break repair and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Leena; Schell, Michael; Pokrzywa, Wojciech; Kevei, Éva; Gartner, Anton; Schumacher, Björn; Hoppe, Thorsten

    2016-11-01

    Multiple protein ubiquitination events at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) regulate damage recognition, signaling and repair. It has remained poorly understood how the repair process of DSBs is coordinated with the apoptotic response. Here, we identified the E4 ubiquitin ligase UFD-2 as a mediator of DNA-damage-induced apoptosis in a genetic screen in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that, after initiation of homologous recombination by RAD-51, UFD-2 forms foci that contain substrate-processivity factors including the ubiquitin-selective segregase CDC-48 (p97), the deubiquitination enzyme ATX-3 (Ataxin-3) and the proteasome. In the absence of UFD-2, RAD-51 foci persist, and DNA damage-induced apoptosis is prevented. In contrast, UFD-2 foci are retained until recombination intermediates are removed by the Holliday-junction-processing enzymes GEN-1, MUS-81 or XPF-1. Formation of UFD-2 foci also requires proapoptotic CEP-1 (p53) signaling. Our findings establish a central role of UFD-2 in the coordination between the DNA-repair process and the apoptotic response.

  2. Toll pathway is required for wound-induced expression of barrier repair genes in the Drosophila epidermis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capilla, Amalia; Karachentsev, Dmitry; Patterson, Rachel A.; Hermann, Anita; Juarez, Michelle T.; McGinnis, William

    2017-01-01

    The epidermis serves as a protective barrier in animals. After epidermal injury, barrier repair requires activation of many wound response genes in epidermal cells surrounding wound sites. Two such genes in Drosophila encode the enzymes dopa decarboxylase (Ddc) and tyrosine hydroxylase (ple). In this paper we explore the involvement of the Toll/NF-κB pathway in the localized activation of wound repair genes around epidermal breaks. Robust activation of wound-induced transcription from ple and Ddc requires Toll pathway components ranging from the extracellular ligand Spätzle to the Dif transcription factor. Epistasis experiments indicate a requirement for Spätzle ligand downstream of hydrogen peroxide and protease function, both of which are known activators of wound-induced transcription. The localized activation of Toll a few cell diameters from wound edges is reminiscent of local activation of Toll in early embryonic ventral hypoderm, consistent with the hypothesis that the dorsal–ventral patterning function of Toll arose from the evolutionary cooption of a morphogen-responsive function in wound repair. Furthermore, the combinatorial activity of Toll and other signaling pathways in activating epidermal barrier repair genes can help explain why developmental activation of the Toll, ERK, or JNK pathways alone fail to activate wound repair loci. PMID:28289197

  3. RecA bundles mediate homology pairing between distant sisters during DNA break repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesterlin, Christian; Ball, Graeme; Schermelleh, Lothar; Sherratt, David J.

    2014-02-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination has evolved to maintain genetic integrity in all organisms. Although many reactions that occur during homologous recombination are known, it is unclear where, when and how they occur in cells. Here, by using conventional and super-resolution microscopy, we describe the progression of DSB repair in live Escherichia coli. Specifically, we investigate whether homologous recombination can occur efficiently between distant sister loci that have segregated to opposite halves of an E. coli cell. We show that a site-specific DSB in one sister can be repaired efficiently using distant sister homology. After RecBCD processing of the DSB, RecA is recruited to the cut locus, where it nucleates into a bundle that contains many more RecA molecules than can associate with the two single-stranded DNA regions that form at the DSB. Mature bundles extend along the long axis of the cell, in the space between the bulk nucleoid and the inner membrane. Bundle formation is followed by pairing, in which the two ends of the cut locus relocate at the periphery of the nucleoid and together move rapidly towards the homology of the uncut sister. After sister locus pairing, RecA bundles disassemble and proteins that act late in homologous recombination are recruited to give viable recombinants 1-2-generation-time equivalents after formation of the initial DSB. Mutated RecA proteins that do not form bundles are defective in sister pairing and in DSB-induced repair. This work reveals an unanticipated role of RecA bundles in channelling the movement of the DNA DSB ends, thereby facilitating the long-range homology search that occurs before the strand invasion and transfer reactions.

  4. ATP binding and hydrolysis by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Msh2-Msh3 are differentially modulated by mismatch and double-strand break repair DNA substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Charanya; Eichmiller, Robin; Wang, Bangchen; Williams, Gregory M; Bianco, Piero R; Surtees, Jennifer A

    2014-06-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Msh2-Msh3-mediated mismatch repair (MMR) recognizes and targets insertion/deletion loops for repair. Msh2-Msh3 is also required for 3' non-homologous tail removal (3'NHTR) in double-strand break repair. In both pathways, Msh2-Msh3 binds double-strand/single-strand junctions and initiates repair in an ATP-dependent manner. However, we recently demonstrated that the two pathways have distinct requirements with respect to Msh2-Msh3 activities. We identified a set of aromatic residues in the nucleotide binding pocket (FLY motif) of Msh3 that, when mutated, disrupted MMR, but left 3'NHTR largely intact. One of these mutations, msh3Y942A, was predicted to disrupt the nucleotide sandwich and allow altered positioning of ATP within the pocket. To develop a mechanistic understanding of the differential requirements for ATP binding and/or hydrolysis in the two pathways, we characterized Msh2-Msh3 and Msh2-msh3Y942A ATP binding and hydrolysis activities in the presence of MMR and 3'NHTR DNA substrates. We observed distinct, substrate-dependent ATP hydrolysis and nucleotide turnover by Msh2-Msh3, indicating that the MMR and 3'NHTR DNA substrates differentially modify the ATP binding/hydrolysis activities of Msh2-Msh3. Msh2-msh3Y942A retained the ability to bind DNA and ATP but exhibited altered ATP hydrolysis and nucleotide turnover. We propose that both ATP and structure-specific repair substrates cooperate to direct Msh2-Msh3-mediated repair and suggest an explanation for the msh3Y942A separation-of-function phenotype. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. ATP binding and hydrolysis by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Msh2-Msh3 are differentially modulated by Mismatch and Double-strand Break Repair DNA substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Charanya; Eichmiller, Robin; Wang, Bangchen; Williams, Gregory M.; Bianco, Piero R.; Surtees, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Msh2-Msh3-mediated mismatch repair (MMR) recognizes and targets insertion/deletion loops for repair. Msh2-Msh3 is also required for 3′ non-homologous tail removal (3′NHTR) in double-strand break repair. In both pathways, Msh2-Msh3 binds double-strand/single-strand junctions and initiates repair in an ATP-dependent manner. However, we recently demonstrated that the two pathways have distinct requirements with respect to Msh2-Msh3 activities. We identified a set of aromatic residues in the nucleotide binding pocket (FLY motif) of Msh3 that, when mutated, disrupted MMR, but left 3′ NHTR largely intact. One of these mutations, msh3Y942A, was predicted to disrupt the nucleotide sandwich and allow altered positioning of ATP within the pocket. To develop a mechanistic understanding of the differential requirements for ATP binding and/or hydrolysis in the two pathways, we characterized Msh2-Msh3 and Msh2-msh3Y942A ATP binding and hydrolysis activities in the presence of MMR and 3′ NHTR DNA substrates. We observed distinct, substrate-dependent ATP hydrolysis and nucleotide turnover by Msh2-Msh3, indicating that the MMR and 3′ NHTR DNA substrates differentially modify the ATP binding/hydrolysis activities of Msh2-Msh3. Msh2-msh3Y942A retained the ability to bind DNA and ATP but exhibited altered ATP hydrolysis and nucleotide turnover. We propose that both ATP and structure-specific repair substrates cooperate to direct Msh2-Msh3-mediated repair and suggest an explanation for the msh3Y942A separation-of-function phenotype. PMID:24746922

  6. Repair of DNA Strand Breaks by the Overlapping Functions of Lesion-Specific and Non-Lesion-Specific DNA 3′ Phosphatases

    OpenAIRE

    Vance, John R.; Wilson, Thomas E.

    2001-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases Apn1 and Apn2 act as alternative pathways for the removal of various 3′-terminal blocking lesions from DNA strand breaks and in the repair of abasic sites, which both result from oxidative DNA damage. Here we demonstrate that Tpp1, a homologue of the 3′ phosphatase domain of polynucleotide kinase, is a third member of this group of redundant 3′ processing enzymes. Unlike Apn1 and Apn2, Tpp1 is specific for the removal o...

  7. DNA breaks and repair in interstitial telomere sequences: Influence of chromatin structure; Etude des cassures de l'ADN et des mecanismes de reparation dans les sequences telomeriques interstitielles: Influence de la structure chromatinienne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revaud, D.

    2009-06-15

    Interstitial Telomeric Sequences (ITS) are over-involved in spontaneous and radiationinduced chromosome aberrations in chinese hamster cells. We have performed a study to investigate the origin of their instability, spontaneously or after low doses irradiation. Our results demonstrate that ITS have a particular chromatin structure: short nucleotide repeat length, less compaction of the 30 nm chromatin fiber, presence of G-quadruplex structures. These features would modulate breaks production and would favour the recruitment of alternative DNA repair mechanisms, which are prone to produce chromosome aberrations. These pathways could be at the origin of chromosome aberrations in ITS whereas NHEJ and HR Double Strand Break repair pathways are rather required for a correct repair in these regions. (author)

  8. Annealing of Complementary DNA Sequences During Double-Strand Break Repair in Drosophila Is Mediated by the Ortholog of SMARCAL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsclaw, Julie Korda; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2017-05-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) pose a serious threat to genomic integrity. If unrepaired, they can lead to chromosome fragmentation and cell death. If repaired incorrectly, they can cause mutations and chromosome rearrangements. DSBs are repaired using end-joining or homology-directed repair strategies, with the predominant form of homology-directed repair being synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA). SDSA is the first defense against genomic rearrangements and information loss during DSB repair, making it a vital component of cell health and an attractive target for chemotherapeutic development. SDSA has also been proposed to be the primary mechanism for integration of large insertions during genome editing with CRISPR/Cas9. Despite the central role for SDSA in genome stability, little is known about the defining step: annealing. We hypothesized that annealing during SDSA is performed by the annealing helicase SMARCAL1, which can anneal RPA-coated single DNA strands during replication-associated DNA damage repair. We used unique genetic tools in Drosophila melanogaster to test whether the fly ortholog of SMARCAL1, Marcal1, mediates annealing during SDSA. Repair that requires annealing is significantly reduced in Marcal1 null mutants in both synthesis-dependent and synthesis-independent (single-strand annealing) assays. Elimination of the ATP-binding activity of Marcal1 also reduced annealing-dependent repair, suggesting that the annealing activity requires translocation along DNA. Unlike the null mutant, however, the ATP-binding defect mutant showed reduced end joining, shedding light on the interaction between SDSA and end-joining pathways. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  9. APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases in double-strand DNA break repair and cancer promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowarski, Roni; Kotler, Moshe

    2013-06-15

    High frequency of cytidine to thymidine conversions was identified in the genome of several types of cancer cells. In breast cancer cells, these mutations are clustered in long DNA regions associated with single-strand DNA (ssDNA), double-strand DNA breaks (DSB), and genomic rearrangements. The observed mutational pattern resembles the deamination signature of cytidine to uridine carried out by members of the APOBEC3 family of cellular deaminases. Consistently, APOBEC3B (A3B) was recently identified as the mutational source in breast cancer cells. A3G is another member of the cytidine deaminases family predominantly expressed in lymphoma cells, where it is involved in mutational DSB repair following ionizing radiation treatments. This activity provides us with a new paradigm for cancer cell survival and tumor promotion and a mechanistic link between ssDNA, DSBs, and clustered mutations. Cancer Res; 73(12); 3494-8. ©2013 AACR. ©2013 AACR.

  10. RECQL4 Promotes DNA End Resection in Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Huiming; Shamanna, Raghavendra A; Keijzers, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The RecQ helicase RECQL4, mutated in Rothmund-Thomson syndrome, regulates genome stability, aging, and cancer. Here, we identify a crucial role for RECQL4 in DNA end resection, which is the initial and an essential step of homologous recombination (HR)-dependent DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR...... interacts with CtIP via its N-terminal domain and promotes CtIP recruitment to the MRN complex at DSBs. Moreover, inactivation of RECQL4's helicase activity impairs DNA end processing and HR-dependent DSBR without affecting its interaction with MRE11 and CtIP, suggesting an important role for RECQL4's......). Depletion of RECQL4 severely reduces HR-mediated repair and 5' end resection in vivo. RECQL4 physically interacts with MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN), which senses DSBs and initiates DNA end resection with CtIP. The MRE11 exonuclease regulates the retention of RECQL4 at laser-induced DSBs. RECQL4 also directly...

  11. DNA double-strand break repair is impaired in presenescent Syrian hamster fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovjeva, Ljudmila; Firsanov, Denis; Vasilishina, Anastasia; Chagin, Vadim; Pleskach, Nadezhda; Kropotov, Andrey; Svetlova, Maria

    2015-10-12

    Studies of DNA damage response are critical for the comprehensive understanding of age-related changes in cells, tissues and organisms. Syrian hamster cells halt proliferation and become presenescent after several passages in standard conditions of cultivation due to what is known as "culture stress". Using proliferating young and non-dividing presenescent cells in primary cultures of Syrian hamster fibroblasts, we defined their response to the action of radiomimetic drug bleomycin (BL) that induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The effect of the drug was estimated by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence microscopy using the antibody to phosphorylated histone H2AX (gH2AX), which is generally accepted as a DSB marker. At all stages of the cell cycle, both presenescent and young cells demonstrated variability of the number of gH2AX foci per nucleus. gH2AX focus induction was found to be independent from BL-hydrolase expression. Some differences in DSB repair process between BL-treated young and presenescent Syrian hamster cells were observed: (1) the kinetics of gH2AX focus loss in G0 fibroblasts of young culture was faster than in cells that prematurely stopped dividing; (2) presenescent cells were characterized by a slower recruitment of DSB repair proteins 53BP1, phospho-DNA-PK and phospho-ATM to gH2AX focal sites, while the rate of phosphorylated ATM/ATR substrate accumulation was the same as that in young cells. Our results demonstrate an impairment of DSB repair in prematurely aged Syrian hamster fibroblasts in comparison with young fibroblasts, suggesting age-related differences in response to BL therapy.

  12. mus309 mutation, defective in DNA double-strand break repair, affects intergenic but not intragenic meiotic recombination in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portin, Petter

    2005-12-01

    The effect was investigated of the hypomorphic DNA double-strand break repair, notably synthesis-dependent strand annealing, deficient mutation mus309 on the third chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster on intergenic and intragenic meiotic recombination in the X chromosome. The results showed that the mutation significantly increases the frequency of intergenic crossing over in two of three gene intervals of the X chromosome studied. Interestingly the increase was most prevalent in the tip of the X chromosome where crossovers normally are least frequent per physical map unit length. In particular crossing over interference was also affected, indicating that the effect of the mus309 mutation involves preconditions of crossing over but not the event of crossing over itself. On the other hand, the results also show that most probably the mutation does not have any effect on intragenic recombination, i.e. gene conversion. These results are fully consistent with the present molecular models of meiotic crossing over initiated by double-strand breaks of DNA followed by formation of a single-end-invasion intermediate, or D-loop, which is subsequently processed to generate either crossover or non-crossover products involving formation of a double Holliday junction. In particular the results suggest that the mus309 gene is involved in resolution of the D-loop, thereby affecting the choice between double-strand-break repair (DSBR) and synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) pathways of meiotic recombination.

  13. Sequence conservation of the rad21 Schizosaccharomyces pombe DNA double-strand break repair gene in human and mouse.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. McKay (Michael); C. Troelstra (Christine); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); R. Kanaar (Roland); B. Smit (Bep); A. Hagemeijer (Anne); D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe rad21 gene of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is involved in the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. The isolation of mouse and human putative homologs of rad21 is reported here. Alignment of the predicted amino acid sequence of Rad21 with the mammalian proteins

  14. Molecular Process Producing Oncogene Fusion in Lung Cancer Cells by Illegitimate Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Seki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Constitutive activation of oncogenes by fusion to partner genes, caused by chromosome translocation and inversion, is a critical genetic event driving lung carcinogenesis. Fusions of the tyrosine kinase genes ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase, ROS1 (c-ros oncogene 1, or RET (rearranged during transfection occur in 1%–5% of lung adenocarcinomas (LADCs and their products constitute therapeutic targets for kinase inhibitory drugs. Interestingly, ALK, RET, and ROS1 fusions occur preferentially in LADCs of never- and light-smokers, suggesting that the molecular mechanisms that cause these rearrangements are smoking-independent. In this study, using previously reported next generation LADC genome sequencing data of the breakpoint junction structures of chromosome rearrangements that cause oncogenic fusions in human cancer cells, we employed the structures of breakpoint junctions of ALK, RET, and ROS1 fusions in 41 LADC cases as “traces” to deduce the molecular processes of chromosome rearrangements caused by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs and illegitimate joining. We found that gene fusion was produced by illegitimate repair of DSBs at unspecified sites in genomic regions of a few kb through DNA synthesis-dependent or -independent end-joining pathways, according to DSB type. This information will assist in the understanding of how oncogene fusions are generated and which etiological factors trigger them.

  15. BRCA1 requirement for the fidelity of plasmid DNA double-strand break repair in cultured breast epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Eric G; Fares, Hanna; Dixon, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    The tumor suppressor breast cancer susceptibility protein 1 (BRCA1) protects our cells from genomic instability in part by facilitating the efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). BRCA1 promotes the error-free repair of DSBs through homologous recombination and is also implicated in the regulation of nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) repair fidelity. Here, we investigate the role of BRCA1 in NHEJ repair mutagenesis following a DSB. We examined the frequency of microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) and the fidelity of DSB repair relative to BRCA1 protein levels in both control and tumorigenic breast epithelial cells. In addition to altered BRCA1 protein levels, we tested the effects of cellular exposure to mirin, an inhibitor of meiotic recombination enzyme 11 (Mre11) 3'-5'-exonuclease activity. Knockdown or loss of BRCA1 protein resulted in an increased frequency of overall plasmid DNA mutagenesis and MMEJ following a DSB. Inhibition of Mre11-exonuclease activity with mirin significantly decreased the occurrence of MMEJ, but did not considerably affect the overall mutagenic frequency of plasmid DSB repair. The results suggest that BRCA1 protects DNA from mutagenesis during nonhomologous DSB repair in plasmid-based assays. The increased frequency of DSB mutagenesis and MMEJ repair in the absence of BRCA1 suggests a potential mechanism for carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Regulation of 53BP1 protein stability by RNF8 and RNF168 is important for efficient DNA double-strand break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiheng Hu

    Full Text Available 53BP1 regulates DNA double-strand break (DSB repair. In functional assays for specific DSB repair pathways, we found that 53BP1 was important in the conservative non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ pathway, and this activity was dependent upon RNF8 and RNF168. We observed that 53BP1 protein was diffusely abundant in nuclei, and upon ionizing radiation, 53BP1 was everywhere degraded except at DNA damage sites. Depletion of RNF8 or RNF168 blocked the degradation of the diffusely localized nuclear 53BP1, and ionizing radiation induced foci (IRIF did not form. Furthermore, when 53BP1 degradation was inhibited, a subset of 53BP1 was bound to DNA damage sites but bulk, unbound 53BP1 remained in the nucleoplasm, and localization of its downstream effector RIF1 at DSBs was abolished. Our data suggest a novel mechanism for responding to DSB that upon ionizing radiation, 53BP1 was divided into two populations, ensuring functional DSB repair: damage site-bound 53BP1 whose binding signal is known to be generated by RNF8 and RNF168; and unbound bulk 53BP1 whose ensuing degradation is regulated by RNF8 and RNF168.

  17. IDN2 Interacts with RPA and Facilitates DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Homologous Recombination in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingming; Ba, Zhaoqing; Costa-Nunes, Pedro; Wei, Wei; Li, Lanxia; Kong, Fansi; Li, Yan; Chai, Jijie; Pontes, Olga; Qi, Yijun

    2017-03-01

    Repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is critical for the maintenance of genome integrity. We previously showed that DSB-induced small RNAs (diRNAs) facilitate homologous recombination-mediated DSB repair in Arabidopsis thaliana Here, we show that INVOLVED IN DE NOVO2 (IDN2), a double-stranded RNA binding protein involved in small RNA-directed DNA methylation, is required for DSB repair in Arabidopsis. We find that IDN2 interacts with the heterotrimeric replication protein A (RPA) complex. Depletion of IDN2 or the diRNA binding ARGONAUTE2 leads to increased accumulation of RPA at DSB sites and mislocalization of the recombination factor RAD51. These findings support a model in which IDN2 interacts with RPA and facilitates the release of RPA from single-stranded DNA tails and subsequent recruitment of RAD51 at DSB sites to promote DSB repair. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  18. Repair pathways independent of the Fanconi anemia nuclear core complex play a predominant role in mitigating formaldehyde-induced DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Taichi [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Takahashi, Akihisa [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Kondo, Natsuko [Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Mori, Eiichiro [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Okamoto, Noritomo [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Nakagawa, Yosuke [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Ohnishi, Ken [Department of Biology, Ibaraki Prefectual University of Health Sciences, 4669-2 Ami, Ami-mati, Inasiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Zdzienicka, Malgorzata Z. [Department of Molecular Cell Genetics, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus-Copernicus-University in Torun, ul. Sklodowskiej-Curie 9, 85-094 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Thompson, Larry H. [Biosciences and Biotechnology Division, L452, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551-0808 (United States); Helleday, Thomas [Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Off Roosevelt Drive, Oxford, OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Asada, Hideo [Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); and others

    2011-01-07

    The role of the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway for DNA damage induced by formaldehyde was examined in the work described here. The following cell types were used: mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines FANCA{sup -/-}, FANCC{sup -/-}, FANCA{sup -/-}C{sup -/-}, FANCD2{sup -/-} and their parental cells, the Chinese hamster cell lines FANCD1 mutant (mt), FANCGmt, their revertant cells, and the corresponding wild-type (wt) cells. Cell survival rates were determined with colony formation assays after formaldehyde treatment. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were detected with an immunocytochemical {gamma}H2AX-staining assay. Although the sensitivity of FANCA{sup -/-}, FANCC{sup -/-} and FANCA{sup -/-}C{sup -/-} cells to formaldehyde was comparable to that of proficient cells, FANCD1mt, FANCGmt and FANCD2{sup -/-} cells were more sensitive to formaldehyde than the corresponding proficient cells. It was found that homologous recombination (HR) repair was induced by formaldehyde. In addition, {gamma}H2AX foci in FANCD1mt cells persisted for longer times than in FANCD1wt cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde-induced DSBs are repaired by HR through the FA repair pathway which is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. -- Research highlights: {yields} We examined to clarify the repair pathways of formaldehyde-induced DNA damage. Formaldehyde induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). {yields} DSBs are repaired through the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway. {yields} This pathway is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. {yields} We also found that homologous recombination repair was induced by formaldehyde.

  19. The processing of double-stranded DNA breaks for recombinational repair by helicase-nuclease complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeeles, Joseph T P; Dillingham, Mark S

    2010-03-02

    Double-stranded DNA breaks are prepared for recombinational repair by nucleolytic digestion to form single-stranded DNA overhangs that are substrates for RecA/Rad51-mediated strand exchange. This processing can be achieved through the activities of multiple helicases and nucleases. In bacteria, the function is mainly provided by a stable multi-protein complex of which there are two structural classes; AddAB- and RecBCD-type enzymes. These helicase-nucleases are of special interest with respect to DNA helicase mechanism because they are exceptionally powerful DNA translocation motors, and because they serve as model systems for both single molecule studies and for understanding how DNA helicases can be coupled to other protein machinery. This review discusses recent developments in our understanding of the AddAB and RecBCD complexes, focussing on their distinctive strategies for processing DNA ends. We also discuss the extent to which bacterial DNA end resection mechanisms may parallel those used in eukaryotic cells. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. DNA Double Strand Break Repair and its Association with Inherited Predispositions to Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Rodney J

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mutations in BRCA1 account for the majority of familial aggregations of early onset breast and ovarian cancer (~70% and about 1/5 of all early onset breast cancer families; in contrast, mutations in BRCA2 account for a smaller proportion of breast/ovarian cancer families and a similar proportion of early onset breast cancer families. BRCA2 has also been shown to be associated with a much more pleiotropic disease spectrum compared to BRCA1. Since the identification of both BRCA1 and BRCA2 investigations into the functions of these genes have revealed that both are associated with the maintenance of genomic integrity via their apparent roles in cellular response to DNA damage, especially their involvement in the process of double strand DNA break repair. This review will focus on the specific roles of both genes and how functional differences may account for the diverse clinical findings observed between families that harbour BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

  1. OsRAD51C Is Essential for Double Strand Break Repair in Rice Meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding eTang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available RAD51C is one of the RAD51 paralogs that plays an important role in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination. Here, we identified and characterized OsRAD51C, the rice homolog of human RAD51C. The Osrad51c mutant plant is normal in vegetative growth but exhibits complete male and female sterility. Cytological investigation revealed that homologous pairing and synapsis were severely disrupted. Massive chromosome fragmentation occurred during metaphase I in Osrad51c meiocytes, and was fully suppressed by the CRC1 mutation. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that OsRAD51C localized onto the chromosomes from leptotene to early pachytene during prophase I, and that normal loading of OsRAD51C was dependent on OsREC8, PAIR2, and PAIR3. Additionally, ZEP1 did not localize properly in Osrad51c, indicating that OsRAD51C is required for synaptonemal complex assembly. Our study also provided evidence in support of a functional divergence in RAD51C among organisms.

  2. Analysis of gene repair tracts from Cas9/gRNA double-stranded breaks in the human CFTR gene

    OpenAIRE

    Hollywood, Jennifer A.; Lee, Ciaran M.; Scallan, Martina F.; Harrison, Patrick T.

    2016-01-01

    To maximise the efficiency of template-dependent gene editing, most studies describe programmable and/or RNA-guided endonucleases that make a double-stranded break at, or close to, the target sequence to be modified. The rationale for this design strategy is that most gene repair tracts will be very short. Here, we describe a CRISPR Cas9/gRNA selection-free strategy which uses deep sequencing to characterise repair tracts from a donor plasmid containing seven nucleotide differences across a 2...

  3. Targeting the DNA Repair Pathway in Ewing Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Stewart

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ewing sarcoma (EWS is a tumor of the bone and soft tissue that primarily affects adolescents and young adults. With current therapies, 70% of patients with localized disease survive, but patients with metastatic or recurrent disease have a poor outcome. We found that EWS cell lines are defective in DNA break repair and are sensitive to PARP inhibitors (PARPis. PARPi-induced cytotoxicity in EWS cells was 10- to 1,000-fold higher after administration of the DNA-damaging agents irinotecan or temozolomide. We developed an orthotopic EWS mouse model and performed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies using three different PARPis that are in clinical development for pediatric cancer. Irinotecan administered on a low-dose, protracted schedule previously optimized for pediatric patients was an effective DNA-damaging agent when combined with PARPis; it was also better tolerated than combinations with temozolomide. Combining PARPis with irinotecan and temozolomide gave complete and durable responses in more than 80% of the mice.

  4. Homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining repair pathways in bovine embryos with different developmental competence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henrique Barreta, Marcos [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitario de Curitibanos, Curitibanos, SC (Brazil); Laboratorio de Biotecnologia e Reproducao Animal-BioRep, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Garziera Gasperin, Bernardo; Braga Rissi, Vitor; Cesaro, Matheus Pedrotti de [Laboratorio de Biotecnologia e Reproducao Animal-BioRep, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Ferreira, Rogerio [Centro de Educacao Superior do Oeste-Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, Chapeco, SC (Brazil); Oliveira, Joao Francisco de; Goncalves, Paulo Bayard Dias [Laboratorio de Biotecnologia e Reproducao Animal-BioRep, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Bordignon, Vilceu, E-mail: vilceu.bordignon@mcgill.ca [Department of Animal Science, McGill University, Ste-Anne-De-Bellevue, QC (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the expression of genes controlling homologous recombination (HR), and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA-repair pathways in bovine embryos of different developmental potential. It also evaluated whether bovine embryos can respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced with ultraviolet irradiation by regulating expression of genes involved in HR and NHEJ repair pathways. Embryos with high, intermediate or low developmental competence were selected based on the cleavage time after in vitro insemination and were removed from in vitro culture before (36 h), during (72 h) and after (96 h) the expected period of embryonic genome activation. All studied genes were expressed before, during and after the genome activation period regardless the developmental competence of the embryos. Higher mRNA expression of 53BP1 and RAD52 was found before genome activation in embryos with low developmental competence. Expression of 53BP1, RAD51 and KU70 was downregulated at 72 h and upregulated at 168 h post-insemination in response to DSBs induced by ultraviolet irradiation. In conclusion, important genes controlling HR and NHEJ DNA-repair pathways are expressed in bovine embryos, however genes participating in these pathways are only regulated after the period of embryo genome activation in response to ultraviolet-induced DSBs.

  5. DNA repair pathways involved in repair of lesions induced by 5-fluorouracil and its active metabolite FdUMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuo, Renata; Sousa, Fabrício Garmus; Escargueil, Alexandre E; Soares, Daniele G; Grivicich, Ivana; Saffi, Jenifer; Larsen, Annette K; Henriques, João Antonio Pêgas

    2010-01-15

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is an antitumor antimetabolite that can be converted into fluoronucleotides and FdUMP. Fluoronucleotides are incorporated into DNA and RNA, while FdUMP results in nucleotide pool imbalance. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unable to convert 5-FU into FdUMP, making yeast a unique model system to study the cellular effects of 5-FU and FdUMP independently. A panel of repair-deficient yeast strains was used to identify the DNA repair pathways needed for repair of lesions generated by 5-FU or FdUMP. This included yeast deficient in base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), translesion synthesis (TLS), mismatch repair (MMR), post-replication repair (PRR), homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The results revealed an important role of BER, since BER-mutants (ntg1, ntg2, apn1, apn2) showed pronounced sensitivity to both 5-FU and FdUMP. MMR mutants also showed high sensitivity to both compounds. In contrast, deficiencies in NER, NHEJ and TLS repair had only minor influence on the sensitivity to FU and FdUMP. Interestingly, deficiencies in HR (rad52) and PPR (rad6, rad18) were associated with increased sensitivity to 5-FU, but not to FdUMP. Taken together, our study reveals an important contribution of DNA repair pathways on the sensitivity to 5-FU and its active metabolite FdUMP. Importantly, the repair mechanisms differed for the 2 antimetabolites since lesions induced by 5-FU were repaired by BER, MMR, HR and PRR, while only BER and MMR were required for repair of FdUMP-induced lesions.

  6. Either non-homologous ends joining or homologous recombination is required to repair double-strand breaks in the genome of macrophage-internalized Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Brzostek

    Full Text Available The intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is constantly exposed to a multitude of hostile conditions and is confronted by a variety of potentially DNA-damaging assaults in vivo, primarily from host-generated antimicrobial toxic radicals. Exposure to reactive nitrogen species and/or reactive oxygen species causes different types of DNA damage, including oxidation, depurination, methylation and deamination, that can result in single- or double-strand breaks (DSBs. These breaks affect the integrity of the whole genome and, when left unrepaired, can lead to cell death. Here, we investigated the role of the DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR and non-homologous ends joining (NHEJ, in the survival of Mtb inside macrophages. To this end, we constructed Mtb strains defective for HR (ΔrecA, NHEJ [Δ(ku,ligD], or both DSB repair systems [Δ(ku,ligD,recA]. Experiments using these strains revealed that either HR or NHEJ is sufficient for the survival and propagation of tubercle bacilli inside macrophages. Inhibition of nitric oxide or superoxide anion production with L-NIL or apocynin, respectively, enabled the Δ(ku,ligD,recA mutant strain lacking both systems to survive intracellularly. Complementation of the Δ(ku,ligD,recA mutant with an intact recA or ku-ligD rescued the ability of Mtb to propagate inside macrophages.

  7. Genomic Approaches to DNA repair and Mutagenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wyrick, John J.; Roberts, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage is a constant threat to cells, causing cytotoxicity as well as inducing genetic alterations. The steady-state abundance of DNA lesions in a cell is minimized by a variety of DNA repair mechanisms, including DNA strand break repair, mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, and ribonucleotide excision repair. The efficiencies and mechanisms by which these pathways remove damage from chromosomes have been primarily characterized by investigating the processin...

  8. Characterization of mammalian RAD51 double strand break repair using non-lethal dominant-negative forms

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Sarah; Lopez, Bernard S.

    2000-01-01

    In contrast to yeast RAD51, mammalian mRAD51 is an essential gene. Its role in double strand break (DSB) repair and its consequences on cell viability remain to be characterized precisely. Here, we used a hamster cell line carrying tandem repeat sequences with an I-SceI cleavage site. We characterized conservative recombination after I-SceI cleavage as gene conversion or intrachromatid crossing over associated with random reintegration of the excised reciprocal product. We identified two domi...

  9. More efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks in skeletal muscle stem cells compared to their committed progeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla Vahidi Ferdousi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The loss of genome integrity in adult stem cells results in accelerated tissue aging and is possibly cancerogenic. Adult stem cells in different tissues appear to react robustly to DNA damage. We report that adult skeletal stem (satellite cells do not primarily respond to radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs via differentiation and exhibit less apoptosis compared to other myogenic cells. Satellite cells repair these DNA lesions more efficiently than their committed progeny. Importantly, non-proliferating satellite cells and post-mitotic nuclei in the fiber exhibit dramatically distinct repair efficiencies. Altogether, reduction of the repair capacity appears to be more a function of differentiation than of the proliferation status of the muscle cell. Notably, satellite cells retain a high efficiency of DSB repair also when isolated from the natural niche. Finally, we show that repair of DSB substrates is not only very efficient but, surprisingly, also very accurate in satellite cells and that accurate repair depends on the key non-homologous end-joining factor DNA-PKcs.

  10. Dynamic dependence on ATR and ATM for double-strand break repair in human embryonic stem cells and neural descendants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bret R Adams

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The DNA double-strand break (DSB is the most toxic form of DNA damage. Studies aimed at characterizing DNA repair during development suggest that homologous recombination repair (HRR is more critical in pluripotent cells compared to differentiated somatic cells in which nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ is dominant. We have characterized the DNA damage response (DDR and quality of DNA double-strand break (DSB repair in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs, and in vitro-derived neural cells. Resolution of ionizing radiation-induced foci (IRIF was used as a surrogate for DSB repair. The resolution of gamma-H2AX foci occurred at a slower rate in hESCs compared to neural progenitors (NPs and astrocytes perhaps reflective of more complex DSB repair in hESCs. In addition, the resolution of RAD51 foci, indicative of active homologous recombination repair (HRR, showed that hESCs as well as NPs have high capacity for HRR, whereas astrocytes do not. Importantly, the ATM kinase was shown to be critical for foci formation in astrocytes, but not in hESCs, suggesting that the DDR is different in these cells. Blocking the ATM kinase in astrocytes not only prevented the formation but also completely disassembled preformed repair foci. The ability of hESCs to form IRIF was abrogated with caffeine and siRNAs targeted against ATR, implicating that hESCs rely on ATR, rather than ATM for regulating DSB repair. This relationship dynamically changed as cells differentiated. Interestingly, while the inhibition of the DNA-PKcs kinase (and presumably non-homologous endjoining [NHEJ] in astrocytes slowed IRIF resolution it did not in hESCs, suggesting that repair in hESCs does not utilize DNA-PKcs. Altogether, our results show that hESCs have efficient DSB repair that is largely ATR-dependent HRR, whereas astrocytes critically depend on ATM for NHEJ, which, in part, is DNA-PKcs-independent.

  11. A Novel Histone Crosstalk Pathway Important for Regulation of UV-Induced DNA Damage Repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudoures, Anna L; Pfeil, Jacob J; Steenkiste, Elizabeth M; Hoffman, Rachel A; Bailey, Elizabeth A; Wilkes, Sara E; Higdon, Sarah K; Thompson, Jeffrey S

    2017-07-01

    Histone post-translational modifications play vital roles in a variety of nuclear processes, including DNA repair. It has been previously shown that histone H3K79 methylation is important for the cellular response to DNA damage caused by ultraviolet (UV) radiation, with evidence that specific methylation states play distinct roles in UV repair. Here, we report that H3K79 methylation is reduced in response to UV exposure in Saccharomyces cerevisiae This reduction is specific to the dimethylated state, as trimethylation levels are minimally altered by UV exposure. Inhibition of this reduction has a deleterious effect on UV-induced sister chromatid exchange, suggesting that H3K79 dimethylation levels play a regulatory role in UV repair. Further evidence implicates an additional role for H3K79 dimethylation levels in error-free translesion synthesis, but not in UV-induced G1/S checkpoint activation or double-stranded break repair. Additionally, we find that H3K79 dimethylation levels are influenced by acetylatable lysines on the histone H4 N-terminal tail, which are hyperacetylated in response to UV exposure. Preclusion of H4 acetylation prevents UV-induced reduction of H3K79 dimethylation, and similarly has a negative effect on UV-induced sister chromatid exchange. These results point to the existence of a novel histone crosstalk pathway that is important for the regulation of UV-induced DNA damage repair. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  12. Contribution of DNA double-strand break repair gene XRCC3 genotypes to oral cancer susceptibility in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chang, Wen-Shin; Liu, Juhn-Cherng; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Bau, Da-Tian

    2014-06-01

    The DNA repair gene X-ray repair cross complementing protein 3 (XRCC3) is thought to play a major role in double-strand break repair and in maintaining genomic stability. Very possibly, defective double-strand break repair of cells can lead to carcinogenesis. Therefore, a case-control study was performed to reveal the contribution of XRCC3 genotypes to individual oral cancer susceptibility. In this hospital-based research, the association of XRCC3 rs1799794, rs45603942, rs861530, rs3212057, rs1799796, rs861539, rs28903081 genotypes with oral cancer risk in a Taiwanese population was investigated. In total, 788 patients with oral cancer and 956 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were genotyped. The results showed that there was significant differential distribution among oral cancer and controls in the genotypic (p=0.001428) and allelic (p=0.0013) frequencies of XRCC3 rs861539. As for the other polymorphisms, there was no difference between case and control groups. In gene-lifestyle interaction analysis, we have provided the first evidence showing that there is an obvious joint effect of XRCC3 rs861539 genotype with individual areca chewing habits on oral cancer risk. In conclusion, the T allele of XRCC3 rs861539, which has an interaction with areca chewing habit in oral carcinogenesis, may be an early marker for oral cancer in Taiwanese. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanism of elimination of phosphorylated histone H2AX from chromatin after repair of DNA double-strand breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svetlova, M.P., E-mail: svetlma@mail.ru [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 4 Tikhoretsky ave., 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Solovjeva, L.V.; Tomilin, N.V. [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 4 Tikhoretsky ave., 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2010-03-01

    Covalent modifications of histones in chromatin play an important role in regulation of eukaryotic gene expression and DNA repair. Formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in DNA is followed by the rapid local phosphorylation of the C-terminal serine in the replacement histone H2AX in megabase chromatin domains around DSBs and formation of discrete nuclear foci called {gamma}H2AX foci. This epigenetic modification of chromatin represents the 'histone code' for DNA damage signaling and repair and has been extensively studied during last decade. It is known that after DSB rejoining {gamma}H2AX foci are eliminated from the nucleus, but molecular mechanism of this elimination remains to be established. However, {gamma}H2AX elimination can serve as a useful marker of DSB repair in normal cells and tissues. In this paper the available data on kinetics and possible mechanisms of {gamma}H2AX elimination are reviewed.

  14. LncRNA lnc-RI regulates homologous recombination repair of DNA double-strand breaks by stabilizing RAD51 mRNA as a competitive endogenous RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Liping; Wang, Qi; Liu, Ruixue; Chen, Zhongmin; Zhang, Xueqing; Zhou, Pingkun; Wang, Zhidong

    2017-12-04

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is critical for the maintenance of genome stability. The current models of the mechanism of DSB repair are based on studies of DNA repair proteins. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have recently emerged as new regulatory molecules, with diverse functions in biological processes. In the present study, we found that expression of the ionizing radiation-inducible lncRNA, lnc-RI, was correlate negatively with micronucleus frequencies in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Knockdown of lnc-RI significantly increased spontaneous DSBs levels, which was confirmed to be associated with the decreased efficiency of homologous recombination (HR) repair of DSBs. The expression of RAD51, a key recombinase in the HR pathway, decreased sharply in lnc-RI-depressed cells. In a further investigation, we demonstrated that miR-193a-3p could bind with both lnc-RI and RAD51 mRNA and depressed the expression of lnc-RI and RAD51 mRNA. Lnc-RI acted as a competitive endogenous RNA (ceRNA) to stabilize RAD51 mRNA via competitive binding with miR-193a-3p and release of its inhibition of RAD51 expression. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate the role of lnc-RI in regulating HR repair of DSBs. The feedback loop established in the current study suggests that lnc-RI is critical for the maintenance of genomic stability. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Genetic variants in DNA double-strand break repair genes and risk of salivary gland carcinoma: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xu

    Full Text Available DNA double strand break (DSB repair is the primary defense mechanism against ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage. Ionizing radiation is the only established risk factor for salivary gland carcinoma (SGC. We hypothesized that genetic variants in DSB repair genes contribute to individual variation in susceptibility to SGC. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a case-control study in which we analyzed 415 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 45 DSB repair genes in 352 SGC cases and 598 controls. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Rs3748522 in RAD52 and rs13180356 in XRCC4 were significantly associated with SGC after Bonferroni adjustment; ORs (95% CIs for the variant alleles of these SNPs were 1.71 (1.40-2.09, P = 1.70 × 10(-7 and 0.58 (0.45-0.74, P = 2.00 × 10(-5 respectively. The genetic effects were modulated by histological subtype. The association of RAD52-rs3748522 with SGC was strongest for mucoepidermoid carcinoma (OR = 2.21, 95% CI: 1.55-3.15, P = 1.25 × 10(-5, n = 74, and the association of XRCC4-rs13180356 with SGC was strongest for adenoid cystic carcinoma (OR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.42-0.87, P = 6.91 × 10(-3, n = 123. Gene-level association analysis revealed one gene, PRKDC, with a marginally significant association with SGC risk in non-Hispanic whites. To our knowledge, this study is the first to comprehensively evaluate the genetic effect of DSB repair genes on SGC risk. Our results indicate that genetic variants in the DSB repair pathways contribute to inter-individual differences in susceptibility to SGC and show that the impact of genetic variants differs by histological subtype. Independent studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

  16. ZTF-8 interacts with the 9-1-1 complex and is required for DNA damage response and double-strand break repair in the C. elegans germline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Min Kim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in DNA repair genes are linked to tumor progression. Furthermore, failure in either activating a DNA damage checkpoint or repairing programmed meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs can impair chromosome segregation. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis for DNA damage response (DDR and DSB repair (DSBR within the germline is highly important. Here we define ZTF-8, a previously uncharacterized protein conserved from worms to humans, as a novel factor involved in the repair of both mitotic and meiotic DSBs as well as in meiotic DNA damage checkpoint activation in the C. elegans germline. ztf-8 mutants exhibit specific sensitivity to γ-irradiation and hydroxyurea, mitotic nuclear arrest at S-phase accompanied by activation of the ATL-1 and CHK-1 DNA damage checkpoint kinases, as well as accumulation of both mitotic and meiotic recombination intermediates, indicating that ZTF-8 functions in DSBR. However, impaired meiotic DSBR progression partially fails to trigger the CEP-1/p53-dependent DNA damage checkpoint in late pachytene, also supporting a role for ZTF-8 in meiotic DDR. ZTF-8 partially co-localizes with the 9-1-1 DDR complex and interacts with MRT-2/Rad1, a component of this complex. The human RHINO protein rescues the phenotypes observed in ztf-8 mutants, suggesting functional conservation across species. We propose that ZTF-8 is involved in promoting repair at stalled replication forks and meiotic DSBs by transducing DNA damage checkpoint signaling via the 9-1-1 pathway. Our findings define a conserved function for ZTF-8/RHINO in promoting genomic stability in the germline.

  17. Endogenous sequence patterns predispose the repair modes of CRISPR/Cas9-induced DNA double-stranded breaks in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Giang T H; Cao, Hieu X; Fauser, Friedrich; Reiss, Bernd; Puchta, Holger; Schubert, Ingo

    2017-10-01

    The possibility to predict the outcome of targeted DNA double-stranded break (DSB) repair would be desirable for genome editing. Furthermore the consequences of mis-repair of potentially cell-lethal DSBs and the underlying pathways are not yet fully understood. Here we study the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9-induced mutation spectra at three selected endogenous loci in Arabidopsis thaliana by deep sequencing of long amplicon libraries. Notably, we found sequence-dependent genomic features that affected the DNA repair outcome. Deletions of 1-bp to 1 kbp (all due to NHEJ) and deletions combined with insertions between 5-bp to >100 bp [caused by a synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA)-like mechanism] occurred most frequently at all three loci. The appearance of single-stranded annealing events depends on the presence and distance between repeats flanking the DSB. The frequency and size of insertions is increased if a sequence with high similarity to the target site was available in cis. Most deletions were linked to pre-existing microhomology. Deletion and/or insertion mutations were blunt-end ligated or via de novo generated microhomology. While most mutation types and, to some degree, their predictability are comparable with animal systems, the broad range of deletion mutations seems to be a peculiar feature of the plant A. thaliana. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Cascade of chromosomal rearrangements caused by a heterogeneous T-DNA integration supports the double-stranded break repair model for T-DNA integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yufei; Chen, Zhiyu; Zhuang, Chuxiong; Huang, Jilei

    2017-06-01

    Transferred DNA (T-DNA) from Agrobacterium tumefaciens can be integrated into the plant genome. The double-stranded break repair (DSBR) pathway is a major model for T-DNA integration. From this model, we expect that two ends of a T-DNA molecule would invade into a single DNA double-stranded break (DSB) or independent DSBs in the plant genome. We call the later phenomenon a heterogeneous T-DNA integration, which has never been observed. In this work, we demonstrated it in an Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant seb19. To resolve the chromosomal structural changes caused by T-DNA integration at both the nucleotide and chromosome levels, we performed inverse PCR, genome resequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization and linkage analysis. We found, in seb19, a single T-DNA connected two different chromosomal loci and caused complex chromosomal rearrangements. The specific break-junction pattern in seb19 is consistent with the result of heterogeneous T-DNA integration but not of recombination between two T-DNA insertions. We demonstrated that, in seb19, heterogeneous T-DNA integration evoked a cascade of incorrect repair of seven DSBs on chromosomes 4 and 5, and then produced translocation, inversion, duplication and deletion. Heterogeneous T-DNA integration supports the DSBR model and suggests that two ends of a T-DNA molecule could be integrated into the plant genome independently. Our results also show a new origin of chromosomal abnormalities. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Impact of charged particle exposure on homologous DNA double-strand break repair in human blood-derived cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie eRall

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation generates DNA double-strand breaks (DSB which, unless faithfully repaired, can generate chromosomal rearrangements in hematopoietic stem and/or progenitor cells (HSPC, potentially priming the cells towards a leukemic phenotype. Using an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP-based reporter system, we recently identified differences in the removal of enzyme-mediated DSB in human HSPC versus mature peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL, particularly regarding homologous DSB repair (HR. Assessment of chromosomal breaks via premature chromosome condensation or γH2AX foci indicated similar efficiency and kinetics of radiation-induced DSB formation and rejoining in PBL and HSPC. Prolonged persistence of chromosomal breaks was observed for higher LET charged particles which are known to induce more complex DNA damage compared to X rays. Consistent with HR deficiency in HSPC observed in our previous study, we noticed here pronounced focal accumulation of 53BP1 after X-ray and carbon ion exposure (intermediate LET in HSPC versus PBL. For higher LET, 53BP1 foci kinetics were similarly delayed in PBL and HSPC suggesting similar failure to repair complex DNA damage. Data obtained with plasmid reporter systems revealed a dose- and LET-dependent HR increase after X-ray, carbon ion and higher LET exposure, particularly in HR-proficient immortalized and primary lymphocytes, confirming preferential use of conservative HR in PBL for intermediate LET damage repair. HR measured adjacent to the leukemia-associated MLL breakpoint cluster sequence in reporter lines revealed dose-dependency of potentially leukemogenic rearrangements underscoring the risk of leukemia-induction by radiation treatment.

  20. Approach to the classical radiation biology. Ionizing radiation effects and repair mechanism of DNA double strand breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utsumi, Hiroshi [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst

    2000-09-01

    Split-dose recovery has been observed under a variety of experimental conditions in many cell systems and believed to be the recovery of sublethal damage (SLD). It is considered to be one of the most widespread and important cellular responses in clinical radiotherapy. To study the molecular mechanism of this recovery, we analyzed the knockout mutants KU70{sup -/-}, RAD54{sup -/-}, and KU70{sup -/-}/ RAD54{sup -/-} of the chicken B-cell line, DT40. Rad54 participates in the homologous recombinational (HR) repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), while Ku proteins are involved in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Split-dose recovery was observed in the parent DT40 and KU70{sup -/-} cells. Moreover the split-dose survival enhancement had all of the characteristics of SLD recovery that had been demonstrated earlier: e.g., the reappearance of the shoulder of the survival curve with dose fractionation; repair at 25degC; and inhibition by the antibiotic actinomycin D. These results strongly suggest that SLD recovery is due to DSB repair via or mediated by HR, and that these breaks constitute SLD. The tonicity-sensitive potentially lethal damage (PLD) recovery was also found only in DT40 and KU70 {sup -/-} cells. Delayed-plating PLD recovery may be controlled by NHEJ repair that works through the cell cycle. These results lead to the conclusion that the repair of DSBs could explain the classical operational recovery phenomena. We have also investigated RBE/LET using those mutants. (author)

  1. DNA repair pathway choice is influenced by the health of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Alethea D; Agrawal, Aneil F

    2012-10-01

    In nature, individuals vary tremendously in condition and this may be an important source of variation in mutation rate. Condition is likely to affect cell state and thereby impact the amount of DNA damage sustained and/or the way it is repaired. Here, we focus on DNA repair. If low-condition individuals are less capable of devoting the same level of resources to accurate repair, they may suffer higher mutation rates. However, repair decisions are also governed by various aspects of cell physiology, which may render the prediction that "higher-condition individuals use better repair mechanisms" too simplistic. We use a larval diet manipulation in Drosophila melanogaster to create high- and low-condition individuals and then contrast their relative usage of three repair pathways [homologous recombination (HR), single-strand annealing (SSA), and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ)] that differ in their mechanistic requirements and their mutational consequences. We find that low-condition flies are more likely than high-condition flies to use the most conservative of these three repair pathways, suggesting that physiological constraints on repair pathway usage may be more important than energetic costs. We also show that the repair differences between high- and low-condition flies resemble those between young and old flies, suggesting the underlying mechanisms may be similar. Finally, we observe that the effect of larval diet on adult repair increases as flies age, indicating that developmental differences early in life can have long-lasting consequences.

  2. Highly mutagenic exocyclic DNA adducts are substrates for the human nucleotide incision repair pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Prorok

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oxygen free radicals induce lipid peroxidation (LPO that damages and breaks polyunsaturated fatty acids in cell membranes. LPO-derived aldehydes and hydroxyalkenals react with DNA leading to the formation of etheno(ε-bases including 1,N(6-ethenoadenine (εA and 3,N(4-ethenocytosine (εC. The εA and εC residues are highly mutagenic in mammalian cells and eliminated in the base excision repair (BER pathway and/or by AlkB family proteins in the direct damage reversal process. BER initiated by DNA glycosylases is thought to be the major pathway for the removal of non-bulky endogenous base damage. Alternatively, in the nucleotide incision repair (NIR pathway, the apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP endonucleases can directly incise DNA duplex 5' to a damaged base in a DNA glycosylase-independent manner. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we have characterized the substrate specificity of human major AP endonuclease 1, APE1, towards εA, εC, thymine glycol (Tg and 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8oxoG residues when present in duplex DNA. APE1 cleaves oligonucleotide duplexes containing εA, εC and Tg, but not those containing 8oxoG. Activity depends strongly on sequence context. The apparent kinetic parameters of the reactions suggest that APE1 has a high affinity for DNA containing ε-bases but cleaves DNA duplexes at an extremely slow rate. Consistent with this observation, oligonucleotide duplexes containing an ε-base strongly inhibit AP site nicking activity of APE1 with IC(50 values in the range of 5-10 nM. MALDI-TOF MS analysis of the reaction products demonstrated that APE1-catalyzed cleavage of εA•T and εC•G duplexes generates, as expected, DNA fragments containing 5'-terminal ε-base residue. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The fact that ε-bases and Tg in duplex DNA are recognized and cleaved by APE1 in vitro, suggests that NIR may act as a backup pathway to BER to remove a large variety of genotoxic base lesions in human cells.

  3. SIRT6 stabilizes DNA-dependent protein kinase at chromatin for DNA double-strand break repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCord, Ronald A; Michishita, Eriko; Hong, Tao

    2009-01-01

    The Sir2 chromatin regulatory factor links maintenance of genomic stability to life span extension in yeast. The mammalian Sir2 family member SIRT6 has been proposed to have analogous functions, because SIRT6-deficiency leads to shortened life span and an aging-like degenerative phenotype in mice......, and SIRT6 knockout cells exhibit genomic instability and DNA damage hypersensitivity. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these defects are not fully understood. Here, we show that SIRT6 forms a macromolecular complex with the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair factor DNA-PK (DNA......-PKcs) to chromatin in response to DNA damage and stabilizes DNA-PKcs at chromatin adjacent to an induced site-specific DSB. Abrogation of these SIRT6 activities leads to impaired resolution of DSBs. Together, these findings elucidate a mechanism whereby regulation of dynamic interaction of a DNA repair factor...

  4. Structure and Stability of ERCC1-XPF DNA Repair Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faridounnia, M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding DNA repair pathways such as Nucleotide Excision Repair, Double Strand Break repair and Interstrand Cross-Link repair is of basic interest for understanding fundamental cellular processes. It also forms the basis for understanding molecular details of diseases when defects occur in

  5. BRCA2 and the DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Machinery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Phang-Lang

    2000-01-01

    The overall goal of my grant proposal is to test the model, BRCA2 modulates the early steps of repair mediated by the Rad5O nuclease complex, and the later stages catalyzed by the Rad51 recombinase...

  6. Evidence based on studies of the mus309 mutant, deficient in DNA double-strand break repair, that meiotic crossing over in Drosophila melanogaster is a two-phase process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portin, Petter

    2010-10-01

    The mus309 gene in Drosophila melanogaster encodes a RecQ helicase which is involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair and specifically in the choice between the different pathways of the repair. In a brood pattern analysis of mus309 and wild type females which either had or had not experienced a temperature shock, different parameters of meiotic crossing over including map distances and crossover interference in the X chromosome were measured. The results suggest that, like in other eukaryotes studied, the control of meiotic crossover formation also in D. melanogaster is a two-phase process. The first phase seems to be temperature shock sensitive, independent of the mus309 gene and coincidental with the premeiotic DNA synthesis, thus most likely representing the formation of DSBs. The second phase seems to be temperature shock tolerant, dependent on the mus309 gene, occurring during the meiotic prophase and most likely representing the choice made by the oocyte between the different pathways of the DSB repair. A hypothesis of the localization of chiasmata is also presented, combining the mechanisms of interference and the so-called centromere effect, and based on the balance between the SDSA and DSBR pathways of DSB repair.

  7. Stripped-down DNA repair in a highly reduced parasite

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    Fast Naomi M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Encephalitozoon cuniculi is a member of a distinctive group of single-celled parasitic eukaryotes called microsporidia, which are closely related to fungi. Some of these organisms, including E. cuniculi, also have uniquely small genomes that are within the prokaryotic range. Thus, E. cuniculi has undergone a massive genome reduction which has resulted in a loss of genes from diverse biological pathways, including those that act in DNA repair. DNA repair is essential to any living cell. A loss of these mechanisms invariably results in accumulation of mutations and/or cell death. Six major pathways of DNA repair in eukaryotes include: non-homologous end joining (NHEJ, homologous recombination repair (HRR, mismatch repair (MMR, nucleotide excision repair (NER, base excision repair (BER and methyltransferase repair. DNA polymerases are also critical players in DNA repair processes. Given the close relationship between microsporidia and fungi, the repair mechanisms present in E. cuniculi were compared to those of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ascertain how the process of genome reduction has affected the DNA repair pathways. Results E. cuniculi lacks 16 (plus another 6 potential absences of the 56 DNA repair genes sought via BLASTP and PSI-BLAST searches. Six of 14 DNA polymerases or polymerase subunits are also absent in E. cuniculi. All of these genes are relatively well conserved within eukaryotes. The absence of genes is not distributed equally among the different repair pathways; some pathways lack only one protein, while there is a striking absence of many proteins that are components of both double strand break repair pathways. All specialized repair polymerases are also absent. Conclusion Given the large number of DNA repair genes that are absent from the double strand break repair pathways, E. cuniculi is a prime candidate for the study of double strand break repair with minimal machinery. Strikingly, all of the

  8. Altered Hematopoiesis in Mice Lacking DNA Polymerase μ Is Due to Inefficient Double-Strand Break Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Daniel; Escudero, Beatriz; Ligos, José Manuel; Segovia, Jose Carlos; Estrada, Juan Camilo; Terrados, Gloria; Blanco, Luis; Samper, Enrique; Bernad, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Polymerase mu (Polμ) is an error-prone, DNA-directed DNA polymerase that participates in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair. In vivo, Polμ deficiency results in impaired Vκ-Jκ recombination and altered somatic hypermutation and centroblast development. In Polμ−/− mice, hematopoietic development was defective in several peripheral and bone marrow (BM) cell populations, with about a 40% decrease in BM cell number that affected several hematopoietic lineages. Hematopoietic progenitors were reduced both in number and in expansion potential. The observed phenotype correlates with a reduced efficiency in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in hematopoietic tissue. Whole-body γ-irradiation revealed that Polμ also plays a role in DSB repair in non-hematopoietic tissues. Our results show that Polμ function is required for physiological hematopoietic development with an important role in maintaining early progenitor cell homeostasis and genetic stability in hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic tissues. PMID:19229323

  9. PTH1–34 Blocks Radiation-induced Osteoblast Apoptosis by Enhancing DNA Repair through Canonical Wnt Pathway*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Abhishek; Lin, Tiao; Zhu, Ji; Tong, Wei; Huo, Yanying; Jia, Haoruo; Zhang, Yejia; Liu, X. Sherry; Cengel, Keith; Xia, Bing; Qin, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Focal radiotherapy for cancer patients has detrimental effects on bones within the radiation field and the primary clinical signs of bone damage include the loss of functional osteoblasts. We reported previously that daily injection of parathyroid hormone (PTH, 1–34) alleviates radiation-induced osteopenia in a preclinical radiotherapy model by improving osteoblast survival. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms, we irradiated osteoblastic UMR 106-01 cells and calvarial organ culture and demonstrated an anti-apoptosis effect of PTH1–34 on these cultures. Inhibitor assay indicated that PTH exerts its radioprotective action mainly through protein kinase A/β-catenin pathway. γ-H2AX foci staining and comet assay revealed that PTH efficiently promotes the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in irradiated osteoblasts via activating the β-catenin pathway. Interestingly, Wnt3a alone also blocked cell death and accelerated DNA repair in primary osteoprogenitors, osteoblastic and osteocytic cells after radiation through the canonical signaling. Further investigations revealed that both Wnt3a and PTH increase the amount of Ku70, a core protein for initiating the assembly of DSB repair machinery, in osteoblasts after radiation. Moreover, down-regulation of Ku70 by siRNA abrogated the prosurvival effect of PTH and Wnt3a on irradiated osteoblasts. In summary, our results identify a novel role of PTH and canonical Wnt signaling in regulating DSB repair machinery and apoptosis in osteoblasts and shed light on using PTH1–34 or Wnt agonist as possible therapy for radiation-induced osteoporosis. PMID:25336648

  10. Identification of Ku70 and Ku80 homologues in Arabidopsis thaliana: evidence for a role in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Katsunori; Adachi, Yugo; Chiba, Keiko; Oguchi, Keiko; Takahashi, Hideo

    2002-03-01

    In higher organisms such as mammals and plants, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired preferentially by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) rather than by homologous recombination. The NHEJ pathway is mediated by Ku, a heterodimer of approximately 70 and 80 kDa subunits, which contributes to various aspects of the metabolism of DNA ends in eukaryotic cells. On the basis of their predicted sequence similarity to human Ku70 and Ku80, cDNAs encoding the first plant homologues of these proteins (AtKu70 and AtKu80, respectively) have now been isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. AtKu70 and AtKu80 share 28.6 and 22.5% amino acid sequence identity with human Ku70 and Ku80, respectively. Yeast two-hybrid analysis demonstrated that AtKu70 and AtKu80 form a heterodimer, and electrophoretic mobility-shift assays revealed that this heterodimer binds to double-stranded telomeric and non-telomeric DNA sequences, but not to single-stranded DNA. The AtKu heterodimer also possesses single-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase and ATP-dependent DNA helicase activities. Reverse transcription and the polymerase chain reaction revealed that AtKu70 and AtKu80 genes are expressed widely but at low levels in plant tissues. The expression of these two genes in cultured cells was markedly increased in response to the generation of DSBs by bleomycin or methylmethane sulfonate. These results suggest that the evolutionarily conserved Ku70-Ku80 heterodimer functions in DSB repair by the NHEJ pathway in A. thaliana.

  11. Microhomology-mediated end joining is the principal mediator of double-strand break repair during mitochondrial DNA lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadi, Satish Kumar; Sebastian, Robin; Dahal, Sumedha; Babu, Ravi K; Choudhary, Bibha; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2016-01-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions are associated with various mitochondrial disorders. The deletions identified in humans are flanked by short, directly repeated mitochondrial DNA sequences; however, the mechanism of such DNA rearrangements has yet to be elucidated. In contrast to nuclear DNA (nDNA), mtDNA is more exposed to oxidative damage, which may result in double-strand breaks (DSBs). Although DSB repair in nDNA is well studied, repair mechanisms in mitochondria are not characterized. In the present study, we investigate the mechanisms of DSB repair in mitochondria using in vitro and ex vivo assays. Whereas classical NHEJ (C-NHEJ) is undetectable, microhomology-mediated alternative NHEJ efficiently repairs DSBs in mitochondria. Of interest, robust microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) was observed with DNA substrates bearing 5-, 8-, 10-, 13-, 16-, 19-, and 22-nt microhomology. Furthermore, MMEJ efficiency was enhanced with an increase in the length of homology. Western blotting, immunoprecipitation, and protein inhibition assays suggest the involvement of CtIP, FEN1, MRE11, and PARP1 in mitochondrial MMEJ. Knockdown studies, in conjunction with other experiments, demonstrated that DNA ligase III, but not ligase IV or ligase I, is primarily responsible for the final sealing of DSBs during mitochondrial MMEJ. These observations highlight the central role of MMEJ in maintenance of mammalian mitochondrial genome integrity and is likely relevant for deletions observed in many human mitochondrial disorders. © 2016 Tadi et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  12. Homologous recombination contributes to the repair of DNA double-strand breaks induced by high-energy iron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zafar, Faria; Seidler, Sara B.; Kronenberg, Amy; Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2010-06-29

    To test the contribution of homologous recombinational repair (HRR) in repairing DNA damaged sites induced by high-energy iron ions, we used: (1) HRR-deficient rodent cells carrying a deletion in the RAD51D gene and (2) syngeneic human cells impaired for HRR by RAD51D or RAD51 knockdown using RNA interference. We show that in response to iron ions, HRR contributes to cell survival in rodent cells, and that HRR-deficiency abrogates RAD51 foci formation. Complementation of the HRR defect by human RAD51D rescues both enhanced cytotoxicity and RAD51 foci formation. For human cells irradiated with iron ions, cell survival is decreased, and, in p53 mutant cells, the levels of mutagenesis are increased when HRR is impaired. Human cells synchronized in S phase exhibit more pronounced resistance to iron ions as compared with cells in G1 phase, and this increase in radioresistance is diminished by RAD51 knockdown. These results implicate a role for RAD51-mediated DNA repair (i.e. HRR) in removing a fraction of clustered lesions induced by charged particle irradiation. Our results are the first to directly show the requirement for an intact HRR pathway in human cells in ensuring DNA repair and cell survival in response to high-energy high LET radiation.

  13. Double-strand break repair: are Rad51/RecA--DNA joints barriers to DNA replication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, A

    2001-06-01

    The central step of homologous recombination is the DNA strand exchange reaction catalyzed by bacterial RecA or eukaryotic Rad51. Besides Rad51-mediated synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA), DNA ends can promote replication in Escherichia coli (recombination-dependent replication, RDR) and yeast (break-induced replication, BIR). However, what causes a DNA end to be repaired via SDSA or via BIR/RDR? I propose that Rad51/RecA--DNA plectonemic joints act as barriers to DNA replication and that BIR/RDR is only possible when the DNA polymerase that synthesizes DNA from the invading 3' end does not encounter RecA/Rad51--DNA joints in its path.

  14. Genome-wide analysis of heteroduplex DNA in mismatch repair-deficient yeast cells reveals novel properties of meiotic recombination pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Martini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs initiate crossover (CO recombination, which is necessary for accurate chromosome segregation, but DSBs may also repair as non-crossovers (NCOs. Multiple recombination pathways with specific intermediates are expected to lead to COs and NCOs. We revisited the mechanisms of meiotic DSB repair and the regulation of CO formation, by conducting a genome-wide analysis of strand-transfer intermediates associated with recombination events. We performed this analysis in a SK1 × S288C Saccharomyces cerevisiae hybrid lacking the mismatch repair (MMR protein Msh2, to allow efficient detection of heteroduplex DNAs (hDNAs. First, we observed that the anti-recombinogenic activity of MMR is responsible for a 20% drop in CO number, suggesting that in MMR-proficient cells some DSBs are repaired using the sister chromatid as a template when polymorphisms are present. Second, we observed that a large fraction of NCOs were associated with trans-hDNA tracts constrained to a single chromatid. This unexpected finding is compatible with dissolution of double Holliday junctions (dHJs during repair, and it suggests the existence of a novel control point for CO formation at the level of the dHJ intermediate, in addition to the previously described control point before the dHJ formation step. Finally, we observed that COs are associated with complex hDNA patterns, confirming that the canonical double-strand break repair model is not sufficient to explain the formation of most COs. We propose that multiple factors contribute to the complexity of recombination intermediates. These factors include repair of nicks and double-stranded gaps, template switches between non-sister and sister chromatids, and HJ branch migration. Finally, the good correlation between the strand transfer properties observed in the absence of and in the presence of Msh2 suggests that the intermediates detected in the absence of Msh2 reflect normal intermediates.

  15. Srs2 and Sgs1-Top3 suppress crossovers during double-strand break repair in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ira, Grzegorz; Malkova, Anna; Liberi, Giordano; Foiani, Marco; Haber, James E

    2003-11-14

    Very few gene conversions in mitotic cells are associated with crossovers, suggesting that these events are regulated. This may be important for the maintenance of genetic stability. We have analyzed the relationship between homologous recombination and crossing-over in haploid budding yeast and identified factors involved in the regulation of crossover outcomes. Gene conversions unaccompanied by a crossover appear 30 min before conversions accompanied by exchange, indicating that there are two different repair mechanisms in mitotic cells. Crossovers are rare (5%), but deleting the BLM/WRN homolog, SGS1, or the SRS2 helicase increases crossovers 2- to 3-fold. Overexpressing SRS2 nearly eliminates crossovers, whereas overexpression of RAD51 in srs2Delta cells almost completely eliminates the noncrossover recombination pathway. We suggest Sgs1 and its associated topoisomerase Top3 remove double Holliday junction intermediates from a crossover-producing repair pathway, thereby reducing crossovers. Srs2 promotes the noncrossover synthesis-dependent strand-annealing (SDSA) pathway, apparently by regulating Rad51 binding during strand exchange.

  16. Srs2 and Sgs1–Top3 Suppress Crossovers during Double-Strand Break Repair in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ira, Grzegorz; Malkova, Anna; Liberi, Giordano; Foiani, Marco; Haber, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Very few gene conversions in mitotic cells are associated with crossovers, suggesting that these events are regulated. This may be important for the maintenance of genetic stability. We have analyzed the relationship between homologous recombination and crossing-over in haploid budding yeast and identified factors involved in the regulation of crossover outcomes. Gene conversions unaccompanied by a crossover appear 30 min before conversions accompanied by exchange, indicating that there are two different repair mechanisms in mitotic cells. Crossovers are rare (5%), but deleting the BLM/WRN homolog, SGS1, or the SRS2 helicase increases crossovers 2- to 3-fold. Overexpressing SRS2 nearly eliminates crossovers, whereas overexpression of RAD51 in srs2Δ cells almost completely eliminates the noncrossover recombination pathway. We suggest Sgs1 and its associated topoisomerase Top3 remove double Holliday junction intermediates from a crossover-producing repair pathway, thereby reducing crossovers. Srs2 promotes the noncrossover synthesis-dependent strand-annealing (SDSA) pathway, apparently by regulating Rad51 binding during strand exchange. PMID:14622595

  17. SETD2 is required for DNA double-strand break repair and activation of the p53-mediated checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Sílvia; Vítor, Alexandra C; Sridhara, Sreerama C; Martins, Filipa B; Raposo, Ana C; Desterro, Joana M P; Ferreira, João; de Almeida, Sérgio F

    2014-05-06

    Histone modifications establish the chromatin states that coordinate the DNA damage response. In this study, we show that SETD2, the enzyme that trimethylates histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36me3), is required for ATM activation upon DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Moreover, we find that SETD2 is necessary for homologous recombination repair of DSBs by promoting the formation of RAD51 presynaptic filaments. In agreement, SETD2-mutant clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) cells displayed impaired DNA damage signaling. However, despite the persistence of DNA lesions, SETD2-deficient cells failed to activate p53, a master guardian of the genome rarely mutated in ccRCC and showed decreased cell survival after DNA damage. We propose that this novel SETD2-dependent role provides a chromatin bookmarking instrument that facilitates signaling and repair of DSBs. In ccRCC, loss of SETD2 may afford an alternative mechanism for the inactivation of the p53-mediated checkpoint without the need for additional genetic mutations in TP53.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02482.001. Copyright © 2014, Carvalho et al.

  18. Tandem repeat modification during double-strand break repair induced by an engineered TAL effector nuclease in zebrafish genome.

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    Wanxu Huang

    Full Text Available Tandem repeats (TRs are abundant and widely distributed in eukaryotic genomes. TRs are thought to have various functions in gene transcription, DNA methylation, nucleosome position and chromatin organization. Variation of repeat units in the genome is observed in association with a number of diseases, such as Fragile X Syndrome, Huntington's disease and Friedreich's ataxia. However, the underlying mechanisms involved are poorly understood, largely owing to the technical limitations in modification of TRs at definite sites in the genome in vivo. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs are widely used in recent years in gene targeting for their specific binding to target sequences when engineered in vitro. Here, we show that the repair of a double-strand break (DSB induced by TALENs adjacent to a TR can produce serial types of mutations in the TR region. Sequencing analysis revealed that there are three types of mutations induced by the DSB repair, including indels only within the TR region or within the flanking TALEN target region or simutaneously within both regions. Therefore, desired TR mutant types can be conveniently obtained by using engineered TALENs. These results demonstrate that TALENs can serve as a convenient tool for modifying TRs in the genome in studying the functions of TRs.

  19. RAD50 is required for efficient initiation of resection and recombinational repair at random, gamma-induced double-strand break ends.

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    Jim Westmoreland

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Resection of DNA double-strand break (DSB ends is generally considered a critical determinant in pathways of DSB repair and genome stability. Unlike for enzymatically induced site-specific DSBs, little is known about processing of random "dirty-ended" DSBs created by DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation. Here we present a novel system for monitoring early events in the repair of random DSBs, based on our finding that single-strand tails generated by resection at the ends of large molecules in budding yeast decreases mobility during pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. We utilized this "PFGE-shift" to follow the fate of both ends of linear molecules generated by a single random DSB in circular chromosomes. Within 10 min after gamma-irradiation of G2/M arrested WT cells, there is a near-synchronous PFGE-shift of the linearized circular molecules, corresponding to resection of a few hundred bases. Resection at the radiation-induced DSBs continues so that by the time of significant repair of DSBs at 1 hr there is about 1-2 kb resection per DSB end. The PFGE-shift is comparable in WT and recombination-defective rad52 and rad51 strains but somewhat delayed in exo1 mutants. However, in rad50 and mre11 null mutants the initiation and generation of resected ends at radiation-induced DSB ends is greatly reduced in G2/M. Thus, the Rad50/Mre11/Xrs2 complex is responsible for rapid processing of most damaged ends into substrates that subsequently undergo recombinational repair. A similar requirement was found for RAD50 in asynchronously growing cells. Among the few molecules exhibiting shift in the rad50 mutant, the residual resection is consistent with resection at only one of the DSB ends. Surprisingly, within 1 hr after irradiation, double-length linear molecules are detected in the WT and rad50, but not in rad52, strains that are likely due to crossovers that are largely resection- and RAD50-independent.

  20. Melatonin: A pleiotropic molecule that modulates DNA damage response and repair pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidinia, Maryam; Sadeghpour, Alireza; Mehrzadi, Saeed; Reiter, Russel J; Khatami, Nasrin; Yousefi, Bahman

    2017-08-01

    DNA repair is responsible for maintaining the integrity of the genome. Perturbations in the DNA repair pathways have been identified in several human cancers. Thus, compounds targeting DNA damage response (DDR) hold great promise in cancer therapy. A great deal of effort, in pursuit of new anticancer drugs, has been devoted to understanding the basic mechanisms and functions of the cellular DNA repair machinery. Melatonin, a widely produced indoleamine in all organisms, is associated with a reduced risk of cancer and has multiple regulatory roles on the different aspects of the DDR and DNA repair. Herein, we have mainly discussed how defective components in different DNA repair machineries, including homologous recombination (HR), nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), and finally DNA mismatch repair (MMR), can contribute to the risk of cancer. Melatonin biosynthesis, mode of action, and antioxidant effects are reviewed along with the means by which the indoleamine regulates DDR at the transduction, mediation, and functional levels. Finally, we summarize recent studies that illustrate how melatonin can be combined with DNA-damaging agents to improve their efficacy in cancer therapy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Genome engineering with TALENs and ZFNs: repair pathways and donor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Dana; Beumer, Kelly J

    2014-09-01

    Genome engineering with targetable nucleases depends on cellular pathways of DNA repair after target cleavage. Knowledge of how those pathways work, their requirements and their active factors, can guide experimental design and improve outcomes. While many aspects of both homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) are shared by a broad range of cells and organisms, some features are specific to individual situations. This article reviews the influence of repair mechanisms on the results of gene targeting experiments, with an emphasis on lessons learned from experiments with Drosophila. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Feasibility of measuring radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks and their repair by pulsed field gel electrophoresis in freshly isolated cells from the mouse RIF-1 tumor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanWaarde, MAWH; vanAssen, AJ; Konings, AWT; Kampinga, HH

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the technical feasibility of pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) as a predictive assay for the radioresponsiveness of tumors. Induction and repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in a freshly prepared cell suspension from a RIF-1 tumor (irradiated ex vivo) was compared

  3. [Defect of preferential repair of gamma-ray-induced single-strand breaks in transcribed and non-transcribed DNA in Cockayne syndrome cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igusheva, O A; Mikhel'son, V M; Pleskach, N M; Bil'din, V N; Zhestianikov, V D

    1998-01-01

    The repair of gamma-ray-induced DNA single-strand breaks in transcribed (protooncogene c-myc) and non-transcribed (human satellite III) DNA of normal human fibroblasts and fibroblasts obtained from a patient with Cockayne's syndrome (CS) has been investigated. A method of alkaline sucrose sedimentation was applied besides the Southern hybridization of 32P-DNA, containing sequences analysed with total 3H-DNA distributed through sucrose gradient fractions. No increase in the induction of DNA single-strand breaks was found in gamma-irradiated CS fibroblasts, compared to normal human fibroblasts. At the same time, an evident defect in the preferential repair of single-strand breaks in c-myc gene was observed.

  4. Fission yeast Uve1 and Apn2 function in distinct oxidative damage repair pathways in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, J Lee A; Neill, Erin; Davey, Scott

    2003-11-21

    In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the endonuclease Uve1 functions as the first step in an alternate UV photo-product repair pathway that is distinct from nucleotide excision repair (NER). Based upon the broad substrate specificity of Uve1 in vitro, and the observation that Uve1 mutants accumulate spontaneous mutations at an elevated rate in vivo, we and others have hypothesized that this protein might have a function in a mutation avoidance pathway other than UV photo-product repair. We show here that fission yeast Uve1 also functions in oxidative damage repair in vivo. We have determined the spectrum of spontaneous mutations that arise in uve1 null (uve1 degrees ) cells and have observed that both G-->T(C-->A) and T-->G(A-->C) transversions occur at an increased rate relative to wildtype cells. These mutations are indicative of unrepaired oxidative DNA damage and are very similar to the mutation spectrum observed in 8-oxoguanine glycosylase (OGG1) mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have generated an apn2 null (apn2 degrees ) strain and shown that it is mildly sensitive to H(2)O(2). Furthermore we have also shown that apn2 degrees cells have an elevated rate of spontaneous mutation that is similar to uve1 degrees. The phenotype of apn2 degrees uve1 degrees double mutants indicates that these genes define distinct spontaneous mutation avoidance pathways. While uve1 degrees cells show only a modest sensitivity to the oxidizing agent hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), both uve1 degrees and apn2 degrees cells also display a marked increased in mutation rate following exposure to H(2)O(2) doses. Collectively these data demonstrate that Uve1 is a component of multiple alternate repair pathways in fission yeast and suggest a possible role for Uve1 in a general alternate incision repair pathway in eukaryotes.

  5. DNA damage response and cancer therapeutics through the lens of the Fanconi Anemia DNA repair pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Sonali; Nandi, Saikat

    2017-10-10

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare, inherited genomic instability disorder, caused by mutations in genes involved in the repair of interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs). The FA signaling network contains a unique nuclear protein complex that mediates the monoubiquitylation of the FANCD2 and FANCI heterodimer, and coordinates activities of the downstream DNA repair pathway including nucleotide excision repair, translesion synthesis, and homologous recombination. FA proteins act at different steps of ICL repair in sensing, recognition and processing of DNA lesions. The multi-protein network is tightly regulated by complex mechanisms, such as ubiquitination, phosphorylation, and degradation signals that are critical for the maintenance of genome integrity and suppressing tumorigenesis. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how the FA proteins participate in ICL repair and regulation of the FA signaling network that assures the safeguard of the genome. We further discuss the potential application of designing small molecule inhibitors that inhibit the FA pathway and are synthetic lethal with DNA repair enzymes that can be used for cancer therapeutics.

  6. Frequent and efficient use of the sister chromatid for DNA double-strand break repair during budding yeast meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Goldfarb

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Recombination between homologous chromosomes of different parental origin (homologs is necessary for their accurate segregation during meiosis. It has been suggested that meiotic inter-homolog recombination is promoted by a barrier to inter-sister-chromatid recombination, imposed by meiosis-specific components of the chromosome axis. Consistent with this, measures of Holliday junction-containing recombination intermediates (joint molecules [JMs] show a strong bias towards inter-homolog and against inter-sister JMs. However, recombination between sister chromatids also has an important role in meiosis. The genomes of diploid organisms in natural populations are highly polymorphic for insertions and deletions, and meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs that form within such polymorphic regions must be repaired by inter-sister recombination. Efforts to study inter-sister recombination during meiosis, in particular to determine recombination frequencies and mechanisms, have been constrained by the inability to monitor the products of inter-sister recombination. We present here molecular-level studies of inter-sister recombination during budding yeast meiosis. We examined events initiated by DSBs in regions that lack corresponding sequences on the homolog, and show that these DSBs are efficiently repaired by inter-sister recombination. This occurs with the same timing as inter-homolog recombination, but with reduced (2- to 3-fold yields of JMs. Loss of the meiotic-chromosome-axis-associated kinase Mek1 accelerates inter-sister DSB repair and markedly increases inter-sister JM frequencies. Furthermore, inter-sister JMs formed in mek1Δ mutants are preferentially lost, while inter-homolog JMs are maintained. These findings indicate that inter-sister recombination occurs frequently during budding yeast meiosis, with the possibility that up to one-third of all recombination events occur between sister chromatids. We suggest that a Mek1-dependent reduction in

  7. Distinct pathways for repairing mutagenic lesions induced by methylating and ethylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Kentaro; Kaneto, Satomi; Nakano, Kota; Watanabe, Shinji; Takahashi, Eizo; Arimoto, Sakae; Okamoto, Keinosuke; Schaaper, Roel M; Negishi, Kazuo; Negishi, Tomoe

    2013-05-01

    DNA alkylation damage can be repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair (BER) or by direct removal of alkyl groups from modified bases by O(6)-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase (AGT; E.C. 2.1.1.63). DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is also likely involved in this repair. We have investigated alkylation-induced mutagenesis in a series of NER- or AGT-deficient Escherichia coli strains, alone or in combination with defects in the MutS, MutL or MutH components of MMR. All strains used contained the F'prolac from strain CC102 (F'CC102) episome capable of detecting specifically lac GC to AT reverse mutations resulting from O(6)-alkylguanine. The results showed the repair of O(6)-methylguanine to be performed by AGT ≫ MMR > NER in order of importance, whereas the repair of O(6)-ethylguanine followed the order NER > AGT > MMR. Studies with double mutants showed that in the absence of AGT or NER repair pathways, the lack of MutS protein generally increased mutant frequencies for both methylating and ethylating agents, suggesting a repair or mutation avoidance role for this protein. However, lack of MutL or MutH protein did not increase alkylation-induced mutagenesis under these conditions and, in fact, reduced mutagenesis by the N-alkyl-N-nitrosoureas MNU and ENU. The combined results suggest that little or no alkylation damage is actually corrected by the mutHLS MMR system; instead, an as yet unspecified interaction of MutS protein with alkylated DNA may promote the involvement of a repair system other than MMR to avoid a mutagenic outcome. Furthermore, both mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of MMR were detected, revealing a dual function of the MMR system in alkylation-exposed cells.

  8. How Trypanosoma cruzi deals with oxidative stress: Antioxidant defence and DNA repair pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Silva, Alice; Cerqueira, Paula Gonçalves; Grazielle-Silva, Viviane; Gadelha, Fernanda Ramos; Peloso, Eduardo de Figueiredo; Teixeira, Santuza Maria Ribeiro; Machado, Carlos Renato

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is an obligatory intracellular parasite with a digenetic life cycle. Due to the variety of host environments, it faces several sources of oxidative stress. In addition to reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by its own metabolism, T. cruzi must deal with high ROS levels generated as part of the host's immune responses. Hence, the conclusion that T. cruzi has limited ability to deal with ROS (based on the lack of a few enzymes involved with oxidative stress responses) seems somewhat paradoxical. Actually, to withstand such variable sources of oxidative stress, T. cruzi has developed complex defence mechanisms. This includes ROS detoxification pathways that are distinct from the ones in the mammalian host, DNA repair pathways and specialized polymerases, which not only protect its genome from the resulting oxidative damage but also contribute to the generation of genetic diversity within the parasite population. Recent studies on T. cruzi's DNA repair pathways as mismatch repair (MMR) and GO system suggested that, besides a role associated with DNA repair, some proteins of these pathways may also be involved in signalling oxidative damage. Recent data also suggested that an oxidative environment might be beneficial for parasite survival within the host cell as it contributes to iron mobilization from the host's intracellular storages. Besides contributing to the understanding of basic aspects of T. cruzi biology, these studies are highly relevant since oxidative stress pathways are part of the poorly understood mechanisms behind the mode of action of drugs currently used against this parasite. By unveiling new peculiar aspects of T. cruzi biology, emerging data on DNA repair pathways and other antioxidant defences from this parasite have revealed potential new targets for a much needed boost in drug development efforts towards a better treatment for Chagas disease. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Nrf2 facilitates repair of radiation induced DNA damage through homologous recombination repair pathway in a ROS independent manner in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Pal, Debojyoti; Sandur, Santosh K., E-mail: sskumar@barc.gov.in

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Nrf2 inhibition in A549 cells led to attenuated DNA repair and radiosensitization. • Influence of Nrf2 on DNA repair is not linked to its antioxidant function. • Nrf2 influences DNA repair through homologous recombination (HR) repair pathway. • Many genes involved in HR pathway show ARE sequences in their upstream region. - Abstract: Nrf2 is a redox sensitive transcription factor that is involved in the co-ordinated transcription of genes involved in redox homeostasis. But the role of Nrf2 in DNA repair is not investigated in detail. We have employed A549 and MCF7 cells to study the role of Nrf2 on DNA repair by inhibiting Nrf2 using all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) or by knock down approach prior to radiation exposure (4 Gy). DNA damage and repair analysis was studied by γH2AX foci formation and comet assay. Results suggested that the inhibition of Nrf2 in A549 or MCF7 cells led to significant slowdown in DNA repair as compared to respective radiation controls. The persistence of residual DNA damage even in the presence of free radical scavenger N-acetyl cysteine, suggested that the influence of Nrf2 on DNA repair was not linked to its antioxidant functions. Further, its influence on non-homologous end joining repair pathway was studied by inhibiting both Nrf2 and DNA-PK together. This led to synergistic reduction of survival fraction, indicating that Nrf2 may not be influencing the NHEJ pathway. To investigate the role of homologous recombination repair (HR) pathway, RAD51 foci formation was monitored. There was a significant reduction in the foci formation in cells treated with ATRA or shRNA against Nrf2 as compared to their respective radiation controls. Further, Nrf2 inhibition led to significant reduction in mRNA levels of RAD51. BLAST analysis was also performed on upstream regions of DNA repair genes to identify antioxidant response element and found that many repair genes that are involved in HR pathway may be regulated by Nrf2

  10. Biochemical characterization and DNA repair pathway interactions of Mag1-mediated base excision repair in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alseth, Ingrun; Osman, Fikret; Korvald, Hanne; Tsaneva, Irina; Whitby, Matthew C; Seeberg, Erling; Bjørås, Magnar

    2005-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe mag1 gene encodes a DNA repair enzyme with sequence similarity to the AlkA family of DNA glycosylases, which are essential for the removal of cytotoxic alkylation products, the premutagenic deamination product hypoxanthine and certain cyclic ethenoadducts such as ethenoadenine. In this paper, we have purified the Mag1 protein and characterized its substrate specificity. It appears that the substrate range of Mag1 is limited to the major alkylation products, such as 3-mA, 3-mG and 7-mG, whereas no significant activity was found towards deamination products, ethenoadducts or oxidation products. The efficiency of 3-mA and 3-mG removal was 5-10 times slower for Mag1 than for Escherichia coli AlkA whereas the rate of 7-mG removal was similar to the two enzymes. The relatively low efficiency for the removal of cytotoxic 3-methylpurines is consistent with the moderate sensitivity of the mag1 mutant to methylating agents. Furthermore, we studied the initial steps of Mag1-dependent base excision repair (BER) and genetic interactions with other repair pathways by mutant analysis. The double mutants mag1 nth1, mag1 apn2 and mag1 rad2 displayed increased resistance to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) compared with the single mutants nth1, apn2 and rad2, respectively, indicating that Mag1 initiates both short-patch (Nth1-dependent) and long-patch (Rad2-dependent) BER of MMS-induced damage. Spontaneous intrachromosomal recombination frequencies increased 3-fold in the mag1 mutant suggesting that Mag1 and recombinational repair (RR) are both involved in repair of alkylated bases. Finally, we show that the deletion of mag1 in the background of rad16, nth1 and rad2 single mutants reduced the total recombination frequencies of all three double mutants, indicating that abasic sites formed as a result of Mag1 removal of spontaneous base lesions are substrates for nucleotide excision repair, long- and short-patch BER and RR.

  11. Inhibition of proteasomal degradation of rpn4 impairs nonhomologous end-joining repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghong Ju

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The proteasome homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by a negative feedback circuit in which the transcription factor Rpn4 induces the proteasome genes and is rapidly degraded by the assembled proteasome. The integrity of the Rpn4-proteasome feedback loop is critical for cell viability under stressed conditions. We have demonstrated that inhibition of Rpn4 degradation sensitizes cells to DNA damage, particularly in response to high doses of DNA damaging agents. The underlying mechanism, however, remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using yeast genetics and biochemical approach we show that inhibition of Rpn4 degradation displays a synthetic growth defect with deletion of the MEC1 checkpoint gene and sensitizes several checkpoint mutants to DNA damage. In addition, inhibition of Rpn4 degradation leads to a defect in repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ. The expression levels of several key NHEJ genes are downregulated and the recruitment of Yku70 to a DSB is reduced by inhibition of Rpn4 degradation. We find that Rpn4 and the proteasome are recruited to a DSB, suggesting their direct participation in NHEJ. Inhibition of Rpn4 degradation may result in a concomitant delay of release of Rpn4 and the proteasome from a DSB. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides the first evidence for the role of proteasomal degradation of Rpn4 in NHEJ.

  12. The complexity of DNA double strand break is a crucial factor for activating ATR signaling pathway for G2/M checkpoint regulation regardless of ATM function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Lian; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Miura, Masahiko; Cui, Xing; Liu, Cuihua; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Yajima, Hirohiko; Yu, Dong

    2015-01-01

    DNA double strand break (DSB) repair pathway choice following ionizing radiation (IR) is currently an appealing research topic, which is still largely unclear. Our recent paper indicated that the complexity of DSBs is a critical factor that enhances DNA end resection. It has been well accepted that the RPA-coated single strand DNA produced by resection is a signaling structure for ATR activation. Therefore, taking advantage of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation to effectively produce complex DSBs, we investigated how the complexity of DSB influences the function of ATR pathway on the G2/M checkpoint regulation. Human skin fibroblast cells with or without ATM were irradiated with X rays or heavy ion particles, and dual-parameter flow cytometry was used to quantitatively assess the mitotic entry at early period post radiation by detecting the cells positive for phosphor histone H3. In ATM-deficient cells, ATR pathway played a pivotal role and functioned in a dose- and LET-dependent way to regulate the early G2/M arrest even as low as 0.2Gy for heavy ion radiation, which indicated that ATR pathway could be rapidly activated and functioned in an ATM-independent, but DSB complexity-dependent manner following exposure to IR. Furthermore, ATR pathway also functioned more efficiently in ATM-proficient cells to block G2 to M transition at early period of particle radiation exposure. Accordingly, in contrast to ATM inhibitor, ATR inhibitor had a more effective radiosensitizing effect on survival fraction following heavy ion beams as compared with X ray radiation. Taken together, our results reveal that the complexity of DSBs is a crucial factor for the activation of ATR pathway for G2/M checkpoint regulation, and ATM-dependent end resection is not essential for the activation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Alkylation base damage is converted into repairable double-strand breaks and complex intermediates in G2 cells lacking AP endonuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjian Ma

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are potent sources of genome instability. While there is considerable genetic and molecular information about the disposition of direct DSBs and breaks that arise during replication, relatively little is known about DSBs derived during processing of single-strand lesions, especially for the case of single-strand breaks (SSBs with 3'-blocked termini generated in vivo. Using our recently developed assay for detecting end-processing at random DSBs in budding yeast, we show that single-strand lesions produced by the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS can generate DSBs in G2-arrested cells, i.e., S-phase independent. These derived DSBs were observed in apn1/2 endonuclease mutants and resulted from aborted base excision repair leading to 3' blocked single-strand breaks following the creation of abasic (AP sites. DSB formation was reduced by additional mutations that affect processing of AP sites including ntg1, ntg2, and, unexpectedly, ogg1, or by a lack of AP sites due to deletion of the MAG1 glycosylase gene. Similar to direct DSBs, the derived DSBs were subject to MRX (Mre11, Rad50, Xrs2-determined resection and relied upon the recombinational repair genes RAD51, RAD52, as well as on the MCD1 cohesin gene, for repair. In addition, we identified a novel DNA intermediate, detected as slow-moving chromosomal DNA (SMD in pulsed field electrophoresis gels shortly after MMS exposure in apn1/2 cells. The SMD requires nicked AP sites, but is independent of resection/recombination processes, suggesting that it is a novel structure generated during processing of 3'-blocked SSBs. Collectively, this study provides new insights into the potential consequences of alkylation base damage in vivo, including creation of novel structures as well as generation and repair of DSBs in nonreplicating cells.

  14. Developmental pathways from childhood aggression-disruptiveness, chronic peer rejection, and deviant friendships to early-adolescent rule breaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettekal, Idean; Ladd, Gary W

    2015-01-01

    Childhood aggression-disruptiveness (AD), chronic peer rejection, and deviant friendships were examined as predictors of early-adolescent rule-breaking behaviors. Using a sample of 383 children (193 girls and 190 boys) who were followed from ages 6 to 14, peer rejection trajectories were identified and incorporated into a series of alternative models to assess how chronic peer rejection and deviant friendships mediate the association between stable childhood AD and early-adolescent rule breaking. There were multiple mediated pathways to rule breaking that included both behavioral and relational risk factors, and findings were consistent for boys and girls. Results have implications for better understanding the influence of multiple social processes in the continuity of antisocial behaviors from middle childhood to early adolescence. © 2014 The Authors. Child Development © 2014 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  15. Trace metals alter DNA repair and histone modification pathways concurrently in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadhia, Sanket R; Calabro, Anthony R; Barile, Frank A

    2012-07-20

    Exposure to metals alters gene expression, changes transcription rates or interferes with DNA repair mechanisms. We tested a hypothesis to determine whether in vitro acute metal exposure, with or without recovery, alters epigenetic pathways in mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells. We measured cell viability, total and histone protein production, changes in gene expression for differentiation and DNA repair, and histone lysine mono-methylation (H3K27me1), in differentiated cells. Confluent differentiated cultures of mES cells were exposed to arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), lithium (Li), mercury (Hg), and nickel (Ni), for 1-h and 24-h, followed by a recovery period. The data demonstrate that maximum cell death occurred during the first few hours of exposure at 24-h IC₅₀ concentrations for all metals. Prolonged in vitro exposure to metals at low concentrations also inhibited protein production and cell proliferation. Subsequently, we determined that metals alter cell differentiation (Oct-4 and egfr) and DNA repair mechanisms (Rad-18, Top-3a and Ogg-1). Interestingly, As, Cd, Hg, and Ni decreased cell proliferation to a greater extent than total histone protein production. Yet, at equivalent concentrations, As and Hg significantly decreased total histone protein production per cell compared to respective controls, suggesting suppression of repair or compensatory mechanisms involving histone pathways. And, acute exposure to As, Cd, Hg and Ni decreased H3K27me1 residue, when compared to control cells. Because activation of cellular differentiation, histone modification, and DNA repair are linked by common transcriptional pathways, and the data propose that metals alter these conduits, then it is reasonable to conclude that trace quantities of metals are capable of suppressing regulation of chromatin structure, cellular differentiation, and controlled cell proliferation in mES cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Non-homologous end-joining protein expression screen from radiosensitive cancer patients yields a novel DNA double strand break repair phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Michael J; Goh, Su Kak; McKay, Jeremy N; Chao, Michael; McKay, Timothy M

    2017-03-01

    Clinical radiosensitivity is a significant impediment to tumour control and cure, in that it restricts the total doses which can safely be delivered to the whole radiotherapy population, within the tissue tolerance of potentially radiosensitive (RS) individuals. Understanding its causes could lead to personalization of radiotherapy. We screened tissues from a unique bank of RS cancer patients for expression defects in major DNA double-strand break repair proteins, using Western blot analysis and subsequently reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. We hypothesized that abnormalities in expression of these proteins may explain the radiosensitivity of some of our cancer patients. The cells from one patient showed a reproducibly consistent expression reduction in two complex-forming DNA double-strand break repair protein components (DNA Ligase IV and XRCC4). We also showed a corresponding reduction in both gene products at the mRNA level. Additionally, the mRNA inducibility by ionizing radiation was increased for one of the proteins in the patient's cells. We confirmed the likely functional significance of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) expression abnormalities with a DNA double strand break (DNA DSB) repair assay. We have identified a novel biological phenotype linked to clinical radiosensitivity. This is important in that very few molecular defects are known in human radiotherapy subjects. Such knowledge may contribute to the understanding of radiation response mechanisms in cancer patients and to personalization of radiotherapy.

  17. Electron Tunneling Pathway and Role of Adenine in Repair of Damaged DNA by Photolyase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheyun; Tan, Chuang; Guo, Xunmin; Kao, Ya-Ting; Li, Jiang; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2012-06-01

    Through electron tunneling, photolyase, a photoenzyme, restores damaged DNA into normal bases. Here, we report our systematic characterization and analyses of three electron transfer processes in thymine dimer restoration by following the entire dynamical evolution during enzymatic repair with femtosecond resolution. We observed the complete dynamics of the reactants, all intermediates and final products, and determined their reaction time scales. Using (deoxy)uracil and thymine as dimer substrates, we unambiguously determined the electron tunneling pathways for the forward electron transfer to initiate repairing and for the final electron return to restore the active cofactor and complete the repair photocycle. Significantly, we found that the adenine moiety of the unusual bent cofactor is essential to mediating all electron transfer dynamics through a super-exchange mechanism, leading to a delicate balance of time scales. The active-site structural integrity, unique electron tunneling pathways and the critical role of adenine assure these elementary dynamics in synergy in this complex photorepair machinery to achieve the maximum repair efficiency close to unity. Z. Liu, C. Tan, X. Guo, Y.-T. Kao, J. Li, L. Wang, A. Sancar, and D. Zhong, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108, 14831 (2011) J. Li, Z. Liu, C. Tan, X. Guo, L. Wang, A. Sancar, and D. Zhong, Nature 466, 887 (2010)

  18. Dynamics and pathway of electron tunneling in repair of damaged DNA by photolyase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheyun; Guo, Xunmin; Tan, Chuang; Li, Jiang; Kao, Ya-Ting; Wang, Lijuan; Sancar, Aziz; Zhong, Dongping

    2013-03-01

    Through electron tunneling, photolyase, a photoenzyme, restores damaged DNA into normal bases. Here, we report our systematic characterization and analyses of three electron transfer processes in thymine dimer restoration by following the entire dynamical evolution during enzymatic repair with femtosecond resolution. Using (deoxy)uracil and thymine as dimer substrates, we unambiguously determined the electron tunneling pathways for the forward electron transfer to initiate repairing and for the final electron return to restore the active cofactor and complete the repair photocycle. Significantly, we found that the adenine moiety of the unusual bent cofactor is essential to mediating all electron-transfer dynamics through a super-exchange mechanism, leading to a delicate balance of time scales. The active-site structural integrity, unique electron tunneling pathways and the critical role of adenine assure these elementary dynamics in synergy in this complex photorepair machinery to achieve the maximum repair efficiency close to unity. The authors thank Drs. Chaitanya Sexana, Yi Yang, and Chen Zang for the initial help with experiment, and Prof. Sherwin Singer and Dr. Ali Hassanali for discussion.

  19. Hsp90α regulates ATM and NBN functions in sensing and repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennisi, Rosa; Antoccia, Antonio; Leone, Stefano; Ascenzi, Paolo; di Masi, Alessandra

    2017-08-01

    The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90α) regulates cell proteostasis and mitigates the harmful effects of endogenous and exogenous stressors on the proteome. Indeed, the inhibition of Hsp90α ATPase activity affects the cellular response to ionizing radiation (IR). Although the interplay between Hsp90α and several DNA damage response (DDR) proteins has been reported, its role in the DDR is still unclear. Here, we show that ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated kinase (ATM) and nibrin (NBN), but not 53BP1, RAD50, and MRE11, are Hsp90α clients as the Hsp90α inhibitor 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) induces ATM and NBN polyubiquitination and proteosomal degradation in normal fibroblasts and lymphoblastoid cell lines. Hsp90α-ATM and Hsp90α-NBN complexes are present in unstressed and irradiated cells, allowing the maintenance of ATM and NBN stability that is required for the MRE11/RAD50/NBN complex-dependent ATM activation and the ATM-dependent phosphorylation of both NBN and Hsp90α in response to IR-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Hsp90α forms a complex also with ph-Ser1981-ATM following IR. Upon phosphorylation, NBN dissociates from Hsp90α and translocates at the DSBs, while phThr5/7-Hsp90α is not recruited at the damaged sites. The inhibition of Hsp90α affects nuclear localization of MRE11 and RAD50, impairs DDR signaling (e.g., BRCA1 and CHK2 phosphorylation), and slows down DSBs repair. Hsp90α inhibition does not affect DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity, which possibly phosphorylates Hsp90α and H2AX after IR. Notably, Hsp90α inhibition causes H2AX phosphorylation in proliferating cells, this possibly indicating replication stress events. Overall, present data shed light on the regulatory role of Hsp90α on the DDR, controlling ATM and NBN stability and influencing the DSBs signaling and repair. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  20. The Association of Low-Penetrance Variants in DNA Repair Genes with Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Aggarwal, Nikhil; Donald, Neil D; Malik, Salim; Selvendran, Subothini S; McPhail, Mark JW.; Monahan, Kevin J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Approximately 35% of colorectal cancer (CRC) risk is attributable to heritable factors known hereditary syndromes, accounting for 6%. The remainder may be due to lower penetrance polymorphisms particularly of DNA repair genes. DNA repair pathways, including base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), mismatch repair (MMR), direct reversal repair (DRR), and double-strand break repair are complex, evolutionarily conserved, and critical in carcinogenesis. Germline m...

  1. MOF phosphorylation by ATM regulates 53BP1-mediated DSB repair pathway choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arun; Hunt, Clayton R.; Hegdec, Muralidhar L.; Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Udayakumar, Durga; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Singh1, Mayank; Ramnarain, Deepti B.; Hittelman, Walter N.; Namjoshi, Sarita; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Hazra, Tapas K.; Ludwig, Thomas; Pandita, Raj K.; Tyler, Jessica K.; Pandita, Tej K.

    2014-01-01

    Cell cycle phase is a critical determinant of the choice between DNA damage repair by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). Here we report that DSBs induce ATM-dependent MOF (a histone H4 acetyl-transferase) phosphorylation (p-T392-MOF) and that phosphorylated MOF co-localizes with γ-H2AX, ATM, and 53BP1 foci. Mutation of the phosphorylation site (MOF-T392A) impedes DNA repair in S- and G2-phase but not G1-phase cells. Expression of MOF-T392A also reverses the reduction in DSB associated 53BP1 seen in wild type S/G2-phase cells, resulting in enhanced 53BP1 and reduced BRCA1 association. Decreased BRCA1 levels at DSB sites correlates with defective repairosome formation, reduced HR repair and decreased cell survival following irradiation. These data support a model whereby ATM mediated MOF-T392 phosphorylation modulates 53BP1 function to facilitate the subsequent recruitment of HR repair proteins, uncovering a regulatory role for MOF in DSB repair pathway choice during S/G2-phase. PMID:24953651

  2. Exposure of Human Lung Cells to Tobacco Smoke Condensate Inhibits the Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel Holcomb

    Full Text Available Exposure to tobacco smoke is the number one risk factor for lung cancer. Although the DNA damaging properties of tobacco smoke have been well documented, relatively few studies have examined its effect on DNA repair pathways. This is especially true for the nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway which recognizes and removes many structurally diverse DNA lesions, including those introduced by chemical carcinogens present in tobacco smoke. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of tobacco smoke on NER in human lung cells. We studied the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC, a surrogate for tobacco smoke, on the NER pathway in two different human lung cell lines; IMR-90 lung fibroblasts and BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells. To measure NER, we employed a slot-blot assay to quantify the introduction and removal of UV light-induced 6-4 photoproducts and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. We find a dose-dependent inhibition of 6-4 photoproduct repair in both cell lines treated with CSC. Additionally, the impact of CSC on the abundance of various NER proteins and their respective RNAs was investigated. The abundance of XPC protein, which is required for functional NER, is significantly reduced by treatment with CSC while the abundance of XPA protein, also required for NER, is unaffected. Both XPC and XPA RNA levels are modestly reduced by CSC treatment. Finally, treatment of cells with MG-132 abrogates the reduction in the abundance of XPC protein produced by treatment with CSC, suggesting that CSC enhances proteasome-dependent turnover of the protein that is mediated by ubiquitination. Together, these findings indicate that tobacco smoke can inhibit the same DNA repair pathway that is also essential for the removal of some of the carcinogenic DNA damage introduced by smoke itself, increasing the DNA damage burden of cells exposed to tobacco smoke.

  3. In what extent classic radiation biology can be understand at the molecular level? Biological effects of ionizing radiation and repair mechanism of double strand breaks of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utsumi, Hiroshi [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    2000-09-01

    This review revealed that classic radiation biology phenomena not based on substantial concept, such as lethal damage, sublethal damage, potentially lethal damage, recoveries from them, variation of radiation sensitivity due to cell cycle, RBE/LET relationships and mathematical expression of survival curve, can be described only at the levels of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) and its repair mechanism. Authors investigated chicken cells with DSB repair-defect, analyzed the molecular mechanisms of 'Elkind recovery' where cell survival rates are higher after fractionated irradiation than after single irradiation at a fixed dose, and showed that the phenomenon was derived from the cell revival resulting from homologous recombination repair of DSB yielded on homologous chromosome DNA. Investigations using HIMAC also revealed the molecular mechanisms of RBE/LET in those cells. Findings indicate that biological effects of ionizing radiation can be described at the molecular level.(K.H.)

  4. Influence of Double-Strand Break Repair on Radiation Therapy-Induced Acute Skin Reactions in Breast Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mumbrekar, Kamalesh Dattaram [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, School of Life Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Fernandes, Donald Jerard [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Shirdi Sai Baba Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Goutham, Hassan Venkatesh [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, School of Life Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Sharan, Krishna [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Shirdi Sai Baba Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Vadhiraja, Bejadi Manjunath [Manipal Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu [Division of Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Bola Sadashiva, Satish Rao, E-mail: satishraomlsc@gmail.com [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, School of Life Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Curative radiation therapy (RT)-induced toxicity poses strong limitations for efficient RT and worsens the quality of life. The parameter that explains when and to what extent normal tissue toxicity in RT evolves would be of clinical relevance because of its predictive value and may provide an opportunity for personalized treatment approach. Methods and Materials: DNA double-strand breaks and repair were analyzed by microscopic γ-H2AX foci analysis in peripheral lymphocytes from 38 healthy donors and 80 breast cancer patients before RT, a 2 Gy challenge dose of x-ray exposed in vitro. Results: The actual damage (AD) at 0.25, 3, and 6 hours and percentage residual damage (PRD) at 3 and 6 hours were used as parameters to measure cellular radiosensitivity and correlated with RT-induced acute skin reactions in patients stratified as non-overresponders (NOR) (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] grade <2) and overresponders (OR) (RTOG grade ≥2). The results indicated that the basal and induced (at 0.25 and 3 hours) γ-H2AX foci numbers were nonsignificant (P>.05) between healthy control donors and the NOR and OR groups, whereas it was significant between ORs and healthy donors at 6 hours (P<.001). There was a significantly higher PRD in OR versus NOR (P<.05), OR versus healthy donors (P<.001) and NOR versus healthy donors (P<.01), supported further by the trend analysis (r=.2392; P=.0326 at 6 hours). Conclusions: Our findings strongly suggest that the measurement of PRD by performing γ-H2AX foci analysis has the potential to be developed into a clinically useful predictive assay.

  5. RAD5A, RECQ4A, and MUS81 Have Specific Functions in Homologous Recombination and Define Different Pathways of DNA Repair in Arabidopsis thaliana[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannuss, Anja; Dukowic-Schulze, Stefanie; Suer, Stefanie; Hartung, Frank; Pacher, Michael; Puchta, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Complex DNA structures, such as double Holliday junctions and stalled replication forks, arise during DNA replication and DNA repair. Factors processing these intermediates include the endonuclease MUS81, helicases of the RecQ family, and the yeast SNF2 ATPase RAD5 and its Arabidopsis thaliana homolog RAD5A. By testing sensitivity of mutant plants to DNA-damaging agents, we defined the roles of these factors in Arabidopsis. rad5A recq4A and rad5A mus81 double mutants are more sensitive to cross-linking and methylating agents, showing that RAD5A is required for damage-induced DNA repair, independent of MUS81 and RECQ4A. The lethality of the recq4A mus81 double mutant indicates that MUS81 and RECQ4A also define parallel DNA repair pathways. The recq4A/mus81 lethality is suppressed by blocking homologous recombination (HR) through disruption of RAD51C, showing that RECQ4A and MUS81 are required for processing recombination-induced aberrant intermediates during replication. Thus, plants possess at least three different pathways to process DNA repair intermediates. We also examined HR-mediated double-strand break (DSB) repair using recombination substrates with inducible site-specific DSBs: MUS81 and RECQ4A are required for efficient synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) but only to a small extent for single-strand annealing (SSA). Interestingly, RAD5A plays a significant role in SDSA but not in SSA. PMID:20971895

  6. RAD5A, RECQ4A, and MUS81 have specific functions in homologous recombination and define different pathways of DNA repair in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannuss, Anja; Dukowic-Schulze, Stefanie; Suer, Stefanie; Hartung, Frank; Pacher, Michael; Puchta, Holger

    2010-10-01

    Complex DNA structures, such as double Holliday junctions and stalled replication forks, arise during DNA replication and DNA repair. Factors processing these intermediates include the endonuclease MUS81, helicases of the RecQ family, and the yeast SNF2 ATPase RAD5 and its Arabidopsis thaliana homolog RAD5A. By testing sensitivity of mutant plants to DNA-damaging agents, we defined the roles of these factors in Arabidopsis. rad5A recq4A and rad5A mus81 double mutants are more sensitive to cross-linking and methylating agents, showing that RAD5A is required for damage-induced DNA repair, independent of MUS81 and RECQ4A. The lethality of the recq4A mus81 double mutant indicates that MUS81 and RECQ4A also define parallel DNA repair pathways. The recq4A/mus81 lethality is suppressed by blocking homologous recombination (HR) through disruption of RAD51C, showing that RECQ4A and MUS81 are required for processing recombination-induced aberrant intermediates during replication. Thus, plants possess at least three different pathways to process DNA repair intermediates. We also examined HR-mediated double-strand break (DSB) repair using recombination substrates with inducible site-specific DSBs: MUS81 and RECQ4A are required for efficient synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) but only to a small extent for single-strand annealing (SSA). Interestingly, RAD5A plays a significant role in SDSA but not in SSA.

  7. Multispectral imaging flow cytometry reveals distinct frequencies of γ-H2AX foci induction in DNA double strand break repair defective human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourton, Emma C; Plowman, Piers N; Zahir, Sheba Adam; Senguloglu, Gonul Ulus; Serrai, Hiba; Bottley, Graham; Parris, Christopher N

    2012-02-01

    The measurement of γ-H2AX foci induction in cells provides a sensitive and reliable method for the quantitation of DNA damage responses in a variety of cell types. Accurate and rapid methods to conduct such observations are desirable. In this study, we have employed the novel technique of multispectral imaging flow cytometry to compare the induction and repair of γ-H2AX foci in three human cell types with different capacities for the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB). A repair normal fibroblast cell line MRC5-SV1, a DSB repair defective ataxia telangiectasia (AT5BIVA) cell line, and a DNA-PKcs deficient cell line XP14BRneo17 were exposed to 2 Gy gamma radiation from a (60)Cobalt source. Thirty minutes following exposure, we observed a dramatic induction of foci in the nuclei of these cells. After 24 hrs, there was a predictable reduction on the number of foci in the MRC5-SV1 cells, consistent with the repair of DNA DSB. In the AT5BIVA cells, persistence of the foci over a 24-hr period was due to the failure in the repair of DNA DSB. However, in the DNA-PKcs defective cells (XP14BRneo17), we observed an intermediate retention of foci in the nuclei indicative of partial repair of DNA DSB. In summary, the application of imaging flow cytometry has permitted an evaluation of foci in a large number of cells (20,000) for each cell line at each time point. This provides a novel method to determine differences in repair kinetics between different cell types. We propose that imaging flow cytometry provides an alternative platform for accurate automated high through-put analysis of foci induction in a variety of cell types. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  8. Caffeine impairs resection during DNA break repair by reducing the levels of nucleases Sae2 and Dna2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsabar, Michael; Eapen, Vinay V; Mason, Jennifer M; Memisoglu, Gonen; Waterman, David P; Long, Marcus J; Bishop, Douglas K; Haber, James E

    2015-08-18

    In response to chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs), eukaryotic cells activate the DNA damage checkpoint, which is orchestrated by the PI3 kinase-like protein kinases ATR and ATM (Mec1 and Tel1 in budding yeast). Following DSB formation, Mec1 and Tel1 phosphorylate histone H2A on serine 129 (known as γ-H2AX). We used caffeine to inhibit the checkpoint kinases after DSB induction. We show that prolonged phosphorylation of H2A-S129 does not require continuous Mec1 and Tel1 activity. Unexpectedly, caffeine treatment impaired homologous recombination by inhibiting 5' to 3' end resection, independent of Mec1 and Tel1 inhibition. Caffeine treatment led to the rapid loss, by proteasomal degradation, of both Sae2, a nuclease that plays a role in early steps of resection, and Dna2, a nuclease that facilitates one of two extensive resection pathways. Sae2's instability is evident in the absence of DNA damage. A similar loss is seen when protein synthesis is inhibited by cycloheximide. Caffeine treatment had similar effects on irradiated HeLa cells, blocking the formation of RPA and Rad51 foci that depend on 5' to 3' resection of broken chromosome ends. Our findings provide insight toward the use of caffeine as a DNA damage-sensitizing agent in cancer cells. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Caffeine impairs resection during DNA break repair by reducing the levels of nucleases Sae2 and Dna2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsabar, Michael; Eapen, Vinay V.; Mason, Jennifer M.; Memisoglu, Gonen; Waterman, David P.; Long, Marcus J.; Bishop, Douglas K.; Haber, James E.

    2015-01-01

    In response to chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs), eukaryotic cells activate the DNA damage checkpoint, which is orchestrated by the PI3 kinase-like protein kinases ATR and ATM (Mec1 and Tel1 in budding yeast). Following DSB formation, Mec1 and Tel1 phosphorylate histone H2A on serine 129 (known as γ-H2AX). We used caffeine to inhibit the checkpoint kinases after DSB induction. We show that prolonged phosphorylation of H2A-S129 does not require continuous Mec1 and Tel1 activity. Unexpectedly, caffeine treatment impaired homologous recombination by inhibiting 5′ to 3′ end resection, independent of Mec1 and Tel1 inhibition. Caffeine treatment led to the rapid loss, by proteasomal degradation, of both Sae2, a nuclease that plays a role in early steps of resection, and Dna2, a nuclease that facilitates one of two extensive resection pathways. Sae2's instability is evident in the absence of DNA damage. A similar loss is seen when protein synthesis is inhibited by cycloheximide. Caffeine treatment had similar effects on irradiated HeLa cells, blocking the formation of RPA and Rad51 foci that depend on 5′ to 3′ resection of broken chromosome ends. Our findings provide insight toward the use of caffeine as a DNA damage-sensitizing agent in cancer cells. PMID:26019182

  10. In Vitro Expansion of Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Alters DNA Double Strand Break Repair of Etoposide Induced DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Hare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are of interest for use in diverse cellular therapies. Ex vivo expansion of MSCs intended for transplantation must result in generation of cells that maintain fidelity of critical functions. Previous investigations have identified genetic and phenotypic alterations of MSCs with in vitro passage, but little is known regarding how culturing influences the ability of MSCs to repair double strand DNA breaks (DSBs, the most severe of DNA lesions. To investigate the response to DSB stress with passage in vitro, primary human MSCs were exposed to etoposide (VP16 at various passages with subsequent evaluation of cellular damage responses and DNA repair. Passage number did not affect susceptibility to VP16 or the incidence and repair kinetics of DSBs. Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ transcripts showed little alteration with VP16 exposure or passage; however, homologous recombination (HR transcripts were reduced following VP16 exposure with this decrease amplified as MSCs were passaged in vitro. Functional evaluations of NHEJ and HR showed that MSCs were unable to activate NHEJ repair following VP16 stress in cells after successive passage. These results indicate that ex vivo expansion of MSCs alters their ability to perform DSB repair, a necessary function for cells intended for transplantation.

  11. Mitosis, double strand break repair, and telomeres: a view from the end: how telomeres and the DNA damage response cooperate during mitosis to maintain genome stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesare, Anthony J

    2014-11-01

    Double strand break (DSB) repair is suppressed during mitosis because RNF8 and downstream DNA damage response (DDR) factors, including 53BP1, do not localize to mitotic chromatin. Discovery of the mitotic kinase-dependent mechanism that inhibits DSB repair during cell division was recently reported. It was shown that restoring mitotic DSB repair was detrimental, resulting in repair dependent genome instability and covalent telomere fusions. The telomere DDR that occurs naturally during cellular aging and in cancer is known to be refractory to G2/M checkpoint activation. Such DDR-positive telomeres, and those that occur as part of the telomere-dependent prolonged mitotic arrest checkpoint, normally pass through mitosis without covalent ligation, but result in cell growth arrest in G1 phase. The discovery that suppressing DSB repair during mitosis may function primarily to protect DDR-positive telomeres from fusing during cell division reinforces the unique cooperation between telomeres and the DDR to mediate tumor suppression. © 2014 The Author. Bioessays published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Anti-tumour compounds illudin S and Irofulven induce DNA lesions ignored by global repair and exclusively processed by transcription- and replication-coupled repair pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Raams, Anja; Kelner, Michael J; Ng, Jessica M Y; Yamashita, Yukiko M; Takeda, Shiunichi; McMorris, Trevor C; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J

    2002-12-05

    Illudin S is a natural sesquiterpene drug with strong anti-tumour activity. Inside cells, unstable active metabolites of illudin cause the formation of as yet poorly characterised DNA lesions. In order to identify factors involved in their repair, we have performed a detailed genetic survey of repair-defective mutants for responses to the drug. We show that 90% of illudin's lethal effects in human fibroblasts can be prevented by an active nucleotide excision repair (NER) system. Core NER enzymes XPA, XPF, XPG, and TFIIH are essential for recovery. However, the presence of global NER initiators XPC, HR23A/HR23B and XPE is not required, whereas survival, repair and recovery from transcription inhibition critically depend on CSA, CSB and UVS, the factors specific for transcription-coupled NER. Base excision repair and non-homologous end-joining of DNA breaks do not play a major role in the processing of illudin lesions. However, active RAD18 is required for optimal cell survival, indicating that the lesions also block replication forks, eliciting post-replication-repair-like responses. However, the translesion-polymerase DNA pol eta is not involved. We conclude that illudin-induced lesions are exceptional in that they appear to be ignored by all of the known global repair systems, and can only be repaired when trapped in stalled replication or transcription complexes. We show that the semisynthetic illudin derivative hydroxymethylacylfulvene (HMAF, Irofulven), currently under clinical trial for anti-tumour therapy, acts via the same mechanism. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  13. Red meat and poultry intake, polymorphisms in the nucleotide excision repair and mismatch repair pathways and colorectal cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Amit D.; Corral, Román; Siegmund, Kimberly D.; Haile, Robert W.; Le Marchand, Loïc; Martínez, Maria Elena; Ahnen, Dennis J.; Sandler, Robert S.; Lance, Peter; Stern, Mariana C.

    2009-01-01

    Diets high in red meat have been consistently associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk and may result in exposure to carcinogens that cause DNA damage [i.e polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and N-nitroso compounds]. Using a family-based study, we investigated whether polymorphisms in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) (ERCC1 3′ untranslated region (UTR) G/T, XPD Asp312Asn and Lys751Gln, XPC intron 11 C/A, XPA 5′ UTR C/T, XPF Arg415Gln and XPG Asp1104His) and mismatch repair (MLH1 Ile219Val and MSH2 Gly322Asp) pathways modified the association with red meat and poultry intake. We tested for gene–environment interactions using case-only analyses (n = 577) and compared the results using case-unaffected sibling comparisons (n = 307 sibships). Increased risk of CRC was observed for intake of more than or equal to three servings per week of red meat [odds ratio (OR) = 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.3–2.5)] or high-temperature cooked red meat (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.1–2.2). Intake of red meat heavily brown on the outside or inside increased CRC risk only among subjects who carried the XPD codon 751 Lys/Lys genotype (case-only interaction P = 0.006 and P = 0.001, respectively, for doneness outside or inside) or the XPD codon 312 Asp/Asp genotype (case-only interaction P = 0.090 and P < 0.001, respectively). These interactions were stronger for rectal cancer cases (heterogeneity test P = 0.002 for XPD Asp312Asn and P = 0.03 for XPD Lys751Gln) and remained statistically significant after accounting for multiple testing. Case-unaffected sibling analyses were generally supportive of the case-only results. These findings highlight the possible contribution of diets high in red meat to the formation of lesions that elicit the NER pathway, such as carcinogen-induced bulky adducts. PMID:19029193

  14. Identification of Pathways in Liver Repair Potentially Targeted by Secretory Proteins from Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Winkler

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The beneficial impact of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC on both acute and chronic liver diseases has been confirmed, although the molecular mechanisms behind it remain elusive. We aim to identify factors secreted by undifferentiated and hepatocytic differentiated MSC in vitro in order to delineate liver repair pathways potentially targeted by MSC. Methods: Secreted factors were determined by protein arrays and related pathways identified by biomathematical analyses. Results: MSC from adipose tissue and bone marrow expressed a similar pattern of surface markers. After hepatocytic differentiation, CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1, ICAM-1 increased and CD166 (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule, ALCAM decreased. MSC secreted different factors before and after differentiation. These comprised cytokines involved in innate immunity and growth factors regulating liver regeneration. Pathway analysis revealed cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions, chemokine signalling pathways, the complement and coagulation cascades as well as the Januskinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NOD-like receptor signalling pathways as relevant networks. Relationships to transforming growth factor β (TGF-β and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF1-α signalling seemed also relevant. Conclusion: MSC secreted proteins, which differed depending on cell source and degree of differentiation. The factors might address inflammatory and growth factor pathways as well as chemo-attraction and innate immunity. Since these are prone to dysregulation in most liver diseases, MSC release hepatotropic factors, potentially supporting liver regeneration.

  15. Distinct genetic control of homologous recombination repair of Cas9-induced double-strand breaks, nicks and paired nicks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriend, Lianne E. M.; Prakash, Rohit; Chen, Chun-Chin; Vanoli, Fabio; Cavallo, Francesca; Zhang, Yu; Jasin, Maria; Krawczyk, Przemek M.

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are known to be powerful inducers of homologous recombination (HR), but single-strand breaks (nicks) have also been shown to trigger HR. Both DSB- and nick-induced HR ((nick)HR) are exploited in advanced genome-engineering approaches based on the bacterial RNA-guided

  16. Significant accumulation of persistent organic pollutants and dysregulation in multiple DNA damage repair pathways in the electronic-waste-exposed populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Xiaobo; Jing, Yaqing; Wang, Jianhai; Li, Keqiu [Basic Medical College, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Yang, Qiaoyun [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Zhao, Yuxia [Basic Medical College, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Li, Ran [State Key Joint Laboratory for Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering and Center for Environment and Health, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ge, Jie [Department of Breast Surgery, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin 300060 (China); Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin 300060 (China); Qiu, Xinghua, E-mail: xhqiu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Joint Laboratory for Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering and Center for Environment and Health, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Guang, E-mail: lig@tijmu.edu.cn [Basic Medical College, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Electronic waste (e-waste) has created a worldwide environmental and health problem, by generating a diverse group of hazardous compounds such as persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Our previous studies demonstrated that populations from e-waste exposed region have a significantly higher level of chromosomal aberrancy and incidence of DNA damage. In this study, we further demonstrated that various POPs persisted at a significantly higher concentration in the exposed group than those in the unexposed group. The level of reactive oxygen species and micronucleus rate were also significantly elevated in the exposed group. RNA sequencing analysis revealed 31 genes in DNA damage responses and repair pathways that were differentially expressed between the two groups (Log 2 ratio >1 or <−1). Our data demonstrated that both females and males of the exposed group have activated a series of DNA damage response genes; however many important DNA repair pathways have been dysregulated. Expressions of NEIL1/3 and RPA3, which are critical in initiating base pair and nucleotide excision repairs respectively, have been downregulated in both females and males of the exposed group. In contrast, expression of RNF8, an E3 ligase involved in an error prone non-homologous end joining repair for DNA double strand break, was upregulated in both genders of the exposed group. The other genes appeared to be differentially expressed only when the males or females of the two groups were compared respectively. Importantly, the expression of cell cycle regulatory gene CDC25A that has been implicated in multiple kinds of malignant transformation was significantly upregulated among the exposed males while downregulated among the exposed females. In conclusion, our studies have demonstrated significant correlations between e-waste disposing and POPs accumulation, DNA lesions and dysregulation of multiple DNA damage repair mechanisms in the residents of the e-waste exposed region. - Highlights:

  17. Bi-directional routing of DNA mismatch repair protein human exonuclease 1 to replication foci and DNA double strand breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liberti, Sascha E; Andersen, Sofie Dabros; Wang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Human exonuclease 1 (hEXO1) is implicated in DNA metabolism, including replication, recombination and repair, substantiated by its interactions with PCNA, DNA helicases BLM and WRN, and several DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. We investigated the sub-nuclear localization of hEXO1 during S-phas...

  18. DNA Repair Deficiency in Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Stevnsner, Tinna

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative base lesions is base excision repair, and such repair is crucial for neurons given their high rates of oxygen metabolism. Mismatch repair corrects base mispairs generated during replication and evidence indicates that oxidative DNA damage can cause this pathway to expand trinucleotide repeats, thereby causing Huntington’s disease. Single-strand breaks are common DNA lesions and are associated with the neurodegenerative diseases, ataxia-oculomotor apraxia-1 and spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy-1. DNA double-strand breaks are toxic lesions and two main pathways exist for their repair: homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining. Ataxia telangiectasia and related disorders with defects in these pathways illustrate that such defects can lead to early childhood neurodegeneration. Aging is a risk factor for neurodegeneration and accumulation of oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage may be linked with the age-associated neurodegenerative disorders Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Mutation in the WRN protein leads to the premature aging disease Werner syndrome, a disorder that features neurodegeneration. In this article we review the evidence linking deficiencies in the DNA repair pathways with neurodegeneration. PMID:21550379

  19. Inter-individual variation in DNA double-strand break repair in human fibroblasts before and after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Paul F.; Nham, Peter B.; Urbin, Salustra S.; Hinz, John M.; Jones, Irene M. [Biosciences and Biotechnology Division, PO Box 808, L-452, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, 94551-0808 (United States); Thompson, Larry H., E-mail: thompson14@llnl.gov [Biosciences and Biotechnology Division, PO Box 808, L-452, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, 94551-0808 (United States)

    2010-01-05

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) are generally considered the most critical lesion induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and may initiate carcinogenesis and other disease. Using an immunofluorescence assay to simultaneously detect nuclear foci of the phosphorylated forms of histone H2AX and ATM kinase at sites of DSBs, we examined the response of 25 apparently normal and 10 DNA repair-deficient (ATM, ATR, NBN, LIG1, LIG4, and FANCG) primary fibroblast strains irradiated with low doses of {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays. Quiescent G{sub 0}/G{sub 1}-phase cultures were exposed to 5, 10, and 25 cGy and allowed to repair for 24 h. The maximum level of IR-induced foci (0.15 foci per cGy, at 10 or 30 min) in the normal strains showed much less inter-individual variation (CV {approx} 0.2) than the level of spontaneous foci, which ranged from 0.2-2.6 foci/cell (CV {approx} 0.6; mean {+-} SD of 1.00 {+-} 0.57). Significantly slower focus formation post-irradiation was observed in seven normal strains, similar to most mutant strains examined. There was variation in repair efficiency measured by the fraction of IR-induced foci remaining 24 h post-irradiation, curiously with the strains having slower focus formation showing more efficient repair after 25 cGy. Interestingly, the ranges of spontaneous and residual induced foci levels at 24 h in the normal strains were as least as large as those observed for the repair-defective mutant strains. The inter-individual variation in DSB foci parameters observed in cells exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in this small survey of apparently normal people suggests that hypomorphic genetic variants in genomic maintenance and/or DNA damage signaling and repair genes may contribute to differential susceptibility to cancer induced by environmental mutagens.

  20. Involvement of recQ in the ultraviolet damage repair pathway in Deinococcus radiodurans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua Xiaoting [Key Laboratory of Chinese Ministry of Agriculture for Nuclear-Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Nuclear-Agricultural Sciences, Zhejiang University, Kaixuan RD 268, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310029 (China); Huang Lifen [Key Laboratory of Chinese Ministry of Agriculture for Nuclear-Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Nuclear-Agricultural Sciences, Zhejiang University, Kaixuan RD 268, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310029 (China)]|[Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Physiology of Jiangsu Province, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Tian Bing [Key Laboratory of Chinese Ministry of Agriculture for Nuclear-Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Nuclear-Agricultural Sciences, Zhejiang University, Kaixuan RD 268, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310029 (China); Hua Yuejin [Key Laboratory of Chinese Ministry of Agriculture for Nuclear-Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Nuclear-Agricultural Sciences, Zhejiang University, Kaixuan RD 268, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310029 (China)], E-mail: yjhua@zju.edu.cn

    2008-05-10

    Deinococcus radiodurans is a bacterium which can survive extremely DNA damage. To investigate the relationship between recQ and the ultraviolet radiation (UV) damage repair pathway, we created a four mutant strain by constructing recQ knockout mutants in uvrA1, uvrA2, and uvsE backgrounds. Using the rpoB/Rif{sup r} system, we measured the mutation frequencies and rates in wild type, recQ (MQ), uvsE uvrA1 uvrA2 (TNK006), and uvsE uvrA1 uvrA2 recQ (TQ). We then isolated Rif{sup r} mutants of these strains and sequenced the rpoB gene. The mutation frequency of TQ was 6.4, 10.1, and 2.43 times that of wild type, MQ, and TNK006, respectively, and resulted in rates of 4.7, 6.71, and 2.15 folds higher than that of wild type, MQ, and TNK006, respectively. All the strains demonstrated specific mutational hotspots. Furthermore, the TQ strain showed a transversion bias that was different from the other three strains. The results indicate that recQ is involved in the ultraviolet damage repair pathway via the interaction between recQ and uvrA1, uvrA2, and uvsE in D. radiodurans.

  1. Identification of Proteins Required for Repair of Double-Strand Chromosome Breaks, a Predisposing Factor in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marshall-Batty, Kimberly

    2001-01-01

    ... when replication forks become arrested. This project bas focused on developing a bacterial model for DSB repair by characterizing the enzymatic apparatus needed to initiate DNA replication on recombination intermediates...

  2. Identification of Proteins Required for Repair of Double-Strand Chromosome Breaks, a Predisposing Factor in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Jessica

    2000-01-01

    ... when replication forks become arrested. This project has focused on developing a bacterial model for DSB repair by characterizing the enzymatic apparatus needed to initiate DNA replication on recombination intermediates...

  3. The Fanconi anemia pathway: Repairing the link between DNA damage and squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romick-Rosendale, Lindsey E. [Division of Oncology, Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States); Lui, Vivian W.Y.; Grandis, Jennifer R. [Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Wells, Susanne I., E-mail: Susanne.Wells@cchmc.org [Division of Oncology, Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare inherited recessive disease caused by mutations in one of fifteen genes known to encode FA pathway components. In response to DNA damage, nuclear FA proteins associate into high molecular weight complexes through a cascade of post-translational modifications and physical interactions, followed by the repair of damaged DNA. Hematopoietic cells are particularly sensitive to the loss of these interactions, and bone marrow failure occurs almost universally in FA patients. FA as a disease is further characterized by cancer susceptibility, which highlights the importance of the FA pathway in tumor suppression, and will be the focus of this review. Acute myeloid leukemia is the most common cancer type, often subsequent to bone marrow failure. However, FA patients are also at an extreme risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck and gynecological tract, with an even greater incidence in those individuals who have received a bone marrow transplant and recovered from hematopoietic disease. FA tumor suppression in hematopoietic versus epithelial compartments could be mechanistically similar or distinct. Definition of compartment specific FA activities is now critical to assess the effects of today's bone marrow failure treatments on tomorrow's solid tumor development. It is our hope that current therapies can then be optimized to decrease the risk of malignant transformation in both hematopoietic and epithelial cells. Here we review our current understanding of the mechanisms of action of the Fanconi anemia pathway as it contributes to stress responses, DNA repair and squamous cell carcinoma susceptibility.

  4. Mouse BAZ1A (ACF1 is dispensable for double-strand break repair but is essential for averting improper gene expression during spermatogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Dowdle

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers control DNA access for transcription, recombination, and other processes. Acf1 (also known as BAZ1A in mammals is a defining subunit of the conserved ISWI-family chromatin remodelers ACF and CHRAC, first purified over 15 years ago from Drosophila melanogaster embryos. Much is known about biochemical properties of ACF and CHRAC, which move nucleosomes in vitro and in vivo to establish ordered chromatin arrays. Genetic studies in yeast, flies and cultured human cells clearly implicate these complexes in transcriptional repression via control of chromatin structures. RNAi experiments in transformed mammalian cells in culture also implicate ACF and CHRAC in DNA damage checkpoints and double-strand break repair. However, their essential in vivo roles in mammals are unknown. Here, we show that Baz1a-knockout mice are viable and able to repair developmentally programmed DNA double-strand breaks in the immune system and germ line, I-SceI endonuclease-induced breaks in primary fibroblasts via homologous recombination, and DNA damage from mitomycin C exposure in vivo. However, Baz1a deficiency causes male-specific sterility in accord with its high expression in male germ cells, where it displays dynamic, stage-specific patterns of chromosomal localization. Sterility is caused by pronounced defects in sperm development, most likely a consequence of massively perturbed gene expression in spermatocytes and round spermatids in the absence of BAZ1A: the normal spermiogenic transcription program is largely intact but more than 900 other genes are mis-regulated, primarily reflecting inappropriate up-regulation. We propose that large-scale changes in chromatin composition that occur during spermatogenesis create a window of vulnerability to promiscuous transcription changes, with an essential function of ACF and/or CHRAC chromatin remodeling activities being to safeguard against these alterations.

  5. DNA repair deficiency in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2011-01-01

    causing Huntington's disease. Single-strand breaks are common DNA lesions and are associated with the neurodegenerative diseases, ataxia-oculomotor apraxia-1 and spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy-1. DNA double-strand breaks are toxic lesions and two main pathways exist for their repair......: homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining. Ataxia telangiectasia and related disorders with defects in these pathways illustrate that such defects can lead to early childhood neurodegeneration. Aging is a risk factor for neurodegeneration and accumulation of oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage...

  6. Structural Insights Into DNA Repair by RNase T—An Exonuclease Processing 3′ End of Structured DNA in Repair Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yu-Yuan; Fang, Woei-Horng; Lee, Chia-Chia; Chen, Yi-Ping; Yuan, Hanna S.

    2014-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms are essential for preservation of genome integrity. However, it is not clear how DNA are selected and processed at broken ends by exonucleases during repair pathways. Here we show that the DnaQ-like exonuclease RNase T is critical for Escherichia coli resistance to various DNA-damaging agents and UV radiation. RNase T specifically trims the 3′ end of structured DNA, including bulge, bubble, and Y-structured DNA, and it can work with Endonuclease V to restore the deaminated base in an inosine-containing heteroduplex DNA. Crystal structure analyses further reveal how RNase T recognizes the bulge DNA by inserting a phenylalanine into the bulge, and as a result the 3′ end of blunt-end bulge DNA can be digested by RNase T. In contrast, the homodimeric RNase T interacts with the Y-structured DNA by a different binding mode via a single protomer so that the 3′ overhang of the Y-structured DNA can be trimmed closely to the duplex region. Our data suggest that RNase T likely processes bulge and bubble DNA in the Endonuclease V–dependent DNA repair, whereas it processes Y-structured DNA in UV-induced and various other DNA repair pathways. This study thus provides mechanistic insights for RNase T and thousands of DnaQ-like exonucleases in DNA 3′-end processing. PMID:24594808

  7. Polymorphisms within base and nucleotide excision repair pathways and risk of differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipollini, Monica; Figlioli, Gisella; Maccari, Giuseppe; Garritano, Sonia; De Santi, Chiara; Melaiu, Ombretta; Barone, Elisa; Bambi, Franco; Ermini, Stefano; Pellegrini, Giovanni; Cristaudo, Alfonso; Foddis, Rudy; Bonotti, Alessandra; Romei, Cristina; Vivaldi, Agnese; Agate, Laura; Molinari, Eleonora; Barale, Roberto; Forsti, Asta; Hemminki, Kari; Elisei, Rossella; Gemignani, Federica; Landi, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    The thyrocytes are exposed to high levels of oxidative stress which could induce DNA damages. Base excision repair (BER) is one of the principal mechanisms of defense against oxidative DNA damage, however recent evidences suggest that also nucleotide excision repair (NER) could be involved. The aim of present work was to identify novel differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) risk variants in BER and NER genes. For this purpose, the most strongly associated SNPs within NER and BER genes found in our previous GWAS on DTC were selected and replicated in an independent series of samples for a new case-control study. Although a positive signal was detected at the nominal level of 0.05 for rs7689099 (encoding for an aminoacid change proline to arginine at codon 117 within NEIL3), none of the considered SNPs (i.e. rs7990340 and rs690860 within RFC3, rs3744767 and rs1131636 within RPA1, rs16962916 and rs3136166 in ERCC4, and rs17739370 and rs7689099 in NEIL3) was associated with the risk of DTC when the correction of multiple testing was applied. In conclusion, a role of NER and BER pathways was evoked in the susceptibility to DTC. However, this seemed to be limited to few polymorphic genes and the overall effect size appeared weak. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Structure of the FANCI-FANCD2 Complex: Insights into the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Woo; Xu, Guozhou; Persky, Nicole S.; Smogorzewska, Agata; Rudge, Derek G.; Buzovetsky, Olga; Elledge, Stephen J.; Pavletich, Nikola P. (Harvard-Med); (Cornell); (MSKCC)

    2011-08-29

    Fanconi anemia is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by defects in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Central to this pathway is the Fanconi anemia I-Fanconi anemia D2 (FANCI-FANCD2) (ID) complex, which is activated by DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and monoubiquitination. The 3.4 angstrom crystal structure of the {approx}300 kilodalton ID complex reveals that monoubiquitination and regulatory phosphorylation sites map to the I-D interface, suggesting that they occur on monomeric proteins or an opened-up complex and that they may serve to stabilize I-D heterodimerization. The 7.8 angstrom electron-density map of FANCI-DNA crystals and in vitro data show that each protein has binding sites for both single- and double-stranded DNA, suggesting that the ID complex recognizes DNA structures that result from the encounter of replication forks with an ICL.

  9. Structure of the FANCI-FANCD2 Complex: Insights into the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W Joo; G Xu; n Persky; A Smogorzewska; D Rudge; O Buzovetsky; S Elledge; N Pavletich

    2011-12-31

    Fanconi anemia is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by defects in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Central to this pathway is the Fanconi anemia I-Fanconi anemia D2 (FANCI-FANCD2) (ID) complex, which is activated by DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and monoubiquitination. The 3.4 angstrom crystal structure of the {approx}300 kilodalton ID complex reveals that monoubiquitination and regulatory phosphorylation sites map to the I-D interface, suggesting that they occur on monomeric proteins or an opened-up complex and that they may serve to stabilize I-D heterodimerization. The 7.8 angstrom electron-density map of FANCI-DNA crystals and in vitro data show that each protein has binding sites for both single- and double-stranded DNA, suggesting that the ID complex recognizes DNA structures that result from the encounter of replication forks with an ICL.

  10. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in lymphoma patients is associated with a decrease in the double strand break repair capacity of peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Lacoste

    Full Text Available Patients who undergo autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHCT for treatment of a relapsed or refractory lymphoma are at risk of developing therapy related- myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia (t-MDS/AML. Part of the risk likely resides in inherent interindividual differences in their DNA repair capacity (DRC, which is thought to influence the effect chemotherapeutic treatments have on the patient's stem cells prior to aHCT. Measuring DRC involves identifying small differences in repair proficiency among individuals. Initially, we investigated the cell model in healthy individuals (primary lymphocytes and/or lymphoblastoid cell lines that would be appropriate to measure genetically determined DRC using host-cell reactivation assays. We present evidence that interindividual differences in DRC double-strand break repair (by non-homologous end-joining [NHEJ] or single-strand annealing [SSA] are better preserved in non-induced primary lymphocytes. In contrast, lymphocytes induced to proliferate are required to assay base excision (BER or nucleotide excision repair (NER. We established that both NHEJ and SSA DRCs in lymphocytes of healthy individuals were inversely correlated with the age of the donor, indicating that DSB repair in lymphocytes is likely not a constant feature but rather something that decreases with age (~0.37% NHEJ DRC/year. To investigate the predictive value of pre-aHCT DRC on outcome in patients, we then applied the optimized assays to the analysis of primary lymphocytes from lymphoma patients and found that individuals who later developed t-MDS/AML (cases were indistinguishable in their DRC from controls who never developed t-MDS/AML. However, when DRC was investigated shortly after aHCT in the same individuals (21.6 months later on average, aHCT patients (both cases and controls showed a significant decrease in DSB repair measurements. The average decrease of 6.9% in NHEJ DRC observed among aHCT patients was

  11. Genetic variations in the homologous recombination repair pathway genes modify risk of glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haishi; Liu, Yanhong; Zhou, Keke; Zhou, Chengcheng; Zhou, Renke; Cheng, Chunxia; Wei, Qingyi; Lu, Daru; Zhou, Liangfu

    2016-01-01

    Accumulative epidemiological evidence suggests that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair pathway play an important role in glioma susceptibility. However, the effects of such SNPs on glioma risk remain unclear. We used a used a candidate pathway-based approach to elucidate the relationship between glioma risk and 12 putative functional SNPs in genes involved in the HR pathway. Genotyping was conducted on 771 histologically-confirmed glioma patients and 752 cancer-free controls from the Chinese Han population. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated both for each SNP individually and for grouped analyses, examining the effects of the numbers of adverse alleles on glioma risk, and evaluated their potential gene-gene interactions using the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR). In the single-locus analysis, two variants, the NBS1 rs1805794 (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.15-1.76, P = 0.001), and RAD54L rs1048771 (OR 1.61, 95% CI 1.17-2.22, P = 0.002) were significantly associated with glioma risk. When we examined the joint effects of the risk-conferring alleles of these three SNPs, we found a significant trend indicating that the risk increases as the number of adverse alleles increase (P = 0.005). Moreover, the MDR analysis suggested a significant three-locus interaction model involving NBS1 rs1805794, MRE11 rs10831234, and ATM rs227062. These results suggested that these variants of the genes involved in the HR pathway may contribute to glioma susceptibility.

  12. DNA excision repair and double-strand break repair gene polymorphisms and the level of chromosome aberration in children with long-term exposure to radon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larionov, Aleksey V; Sinitsky, Maxim Y; Druzhinin, Vladimir G; Volobaev, Valentin P; Minina, Varvara I; Asanov, Maxim A; Meyer, Alina V; Tolochko, Tatiana A; Kalyuzhnaya, Ekaterina E

    2016-08-01

    To study polymorphic variants of repair genes in people affected by long-term exposure to radon. The chromosome aberration frequency in peripheral blood lymphocytes was used as the biological marker of genotoxicity. Genotyping of 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms in DNA repair genes (APE, XRCC1, OGG1, ADPRT, XpC, XpD, XpG, Lig4 and NBS1) was performed in children with long-term resident exposure to radon. Quantification of the aberrations was performed using light microscopy. The total frequency of aberrations was increased in carriers of the G/G genotype for the XpD gene (rs13181) polymorphism in recessive model confirmed by the results of ROC-analysis ('satisfactory predictor', AUC = 0.609). Single chromosome fragments frequency was increased in carriers of the G/G genotype in comparison with the T/T genotype. In respect to the total frequency of aberrations, the G/G genotype for the XpG gene (rs17655) polymorphism was also identified as a 'satisfactory predictor' (AUC = 0.605). Carriers of the T/C genotype for the ADPRT gene (rs1136410) polymorphism were characterized by an increased level of single fragments relative to the T/T genotype. The relationships with several types of cytogenetic damage suggest these three SNP (rs13181, rs17655 and rs1136410) may be considered radiosensitivity markers.

  13. Elevated presence of retrotransposons at sites of DNA double strand break repair in mouse models of metabolic oxidative stress and MYC-induced lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockwood, Lynne D.; Felix, Klaus; Janz, Siegfried

    2004-04-14

    The chromosomally integrated shuttle vector pUR288 contains a lacZ reporter gene to study mutagenesis in vivo. We used pUR288 to compare patterns of genomic instability in two mouse models, lymphoma resulting from deregulated c-MYC expression ({lambda}-MYC), and endogenous oxidative stress caused by partial glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. We found previously that spontaneous mutations in both models were predominantly genomic rearrangements of lacZ with mouse sequences, while most mutations in controls were point mutations. Here, we characterized the fine structure of 68 lacZ/mouse rearrangements from {lambda}-MYC lymphomas and G6PD deficient mice by sequencing breakpoint junctions and determining the origin of recombining mouse sequences. Fifty-eight of 68 (85%) recombination partners were identified. The structure of rearrangements from both {lambda}-MYC and G6PD deficient mice were remarkably alike. Intra-chromosomal deletions and inversions were common, occurring in 41% (24/58) of rearrangements, while 59% (34/58) were random translocations between lacZ and other chromosomes. Signatures of double strand break repair by nonhomologous end joining were observed at breakpoint junctions; 37% (25/68) contained 1-4 bp microhomologies, while the remaining breakpoints had no sequence homology. Long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) retrotransposons, which constitute {approx}10% of the mouse genome, were present at 25% (17/68) of breakpoints, suggesting their participation in rearrangements. The similarity in the structure of rearrangements is consistent with the hypothesis that genetic rearrangements in {lambda}-MYC lymphomas and G6PD deficient mice result from the same mechanism, mutagenic repair of DNA double strand breaks arising from oxidative damage.

  14. Nucleotide excision repair pathway assessment in DNA exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, A S; Campos, V M A; Magalhães, L A G; Paoli, F

    2015-10-01

    Low-intensity lasers are used for prevention and management of oral mucositis induced by anticancer therapy, but the effectiveness of treatment depends on the genetic characteristics of affected cells. This study evaluated the survival and induction of filamentation of Escherichia coli cells deficient in the nucleotide excision repair pathway, and the action of T4endonuclease V on plasmid DNA exposed to low-intensity red and near-infrared laser light. Cultures of wild-type (strain AB1157) E. coli and strain AB1886 (deficient in uvrA protein) were exposed to red (660 nm) and infrared (808 nm) lasers at various fluences, powers and emission modes to study bacterial survival and filamentation. Also, plasmid DNA was exposed to laser light to study DNA lesions produced in vitro by T4endonuclease V. Low-intensity lasers:i) had no effect on survival of wild-type E. coli but decreased the survival of uvrA protein-deficient cells,ii) induced bacterial filamentation, iii) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids in agarose gels, andiv) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with T4 endonuclease V. These results increase our understanding of the effects of laser light on cells with various genetic characteristics, such as xeroderma pigmentosum cells deficient in nucleotide excision pathway activity in patients with mucositis treated by low-intensity lasers.

  15. Conservation of the nucleotide excision repair pathway: characterization of hydra Xeroderma Pigmentosum group F homolog.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apurva Barve

    Full Text Available Hydra, one of the earliest metazoans with tissue grade organization and nervous system, is an animal with a remarkable regeneration capacity and shows no signs of organismal aging. We have for the first time identified genes of the nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway from hydra. Here we report cloning and characterization of hydra homolog of xeroderma pigmentosum group F (XPF gene that encodes a structure-specific 5' endonuclease which is a crucial component of NER. In silico analysis shows that hydra XPF amino acid sequence is very similar to its counterparts from other animals, especially vertebrates, and shows all features essential for its function. By in situ hybridization, we show that hydra XPF is expressed prominently in the multipotent stem cell niche in the central region of the body column. Ectoderm of the diploblastic hydra was shown to express higher levels of XPF as compared to the endoderm by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis also demonstrated that interstitial cells, a multipotent and rapidly cycling stem cell lineage of hydra, express higher levels of XPF mRNA than other cell types. Our data show that XPF and by extension, the NER pathway is highly conserved during evolution. The prominent expression of an NER gene in interstitial cells may have implications for the lack of senescence in hydra.

  16. Conservation of the nucleotide excision repair pathway: characterization of hydra Xeroderma Pigmentosum group F homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barve, Apurva; Ghaskadbi, Saroj; Ghaskadbi, Surendra

    2013-01-01

    Hydra, one of the earliest metazoans with tissue grade organization and nervous system, is an animal with a remarkable regeneration capacity and shows no signs of organismal aging. We have for the first time identified genes of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway from hydra. Here we report cloning and characterization of hydra homolog of xeroderma pigmentosum group F (XPF) gene that encodes a structure-specific 5' endonuclease which is a crucial component of NER. In silico analysis shows that hydra XPF amino acid sequence is very similar to its counterparts from other animals, especially vertebrates, and shows all features essential for its function. By in situ hybridization, we show that hydra XPF is expressed prominently in the multipotent stem cell niche in the central region of the body column. Ectoderm of the diploblastic hydra was shown to express higher levels of XPF as compared to the endoderm by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis also demonstrated that interstitial cells, a multipotent and rapidly cycling stem cell lineage of hydra, express higher levels of XPF mRNA than other cell types. Our data show that XPF and by extension, the NER pathway is highly conserved during evolution. The prominent expression of an NER gene in interstitial cells may have implications for the lack of senescence in hydra.

  17. Nucleotide excision repair pathway assessment in DNA exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, A.S.; Campos, V.M.A.; Magalhaes, L.A.G., E-mail: adnfonseca@ig.com.br [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria. Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas; Paoli, F. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas. Departamento de Morfologia

    2015-10-15

    Low-intensity lasers are used for prevention and management of oral mucositis induced by anticancer therapy, but the effectiveness of treatment depends on the genetic characteristics of affected cells. This study evaluated the survival and induction of filamentation of Escherichia coli cells deficient in the nucleotide excision repair pathway, and the action of T{sub 4} endonuclease V on plasmid DNA exposed to low-intensity red and near-infrared laser light. Cultures of wild-type (strain AB1157) E. coli and strain AB1886 (deficient in uvrA protein) were exposed to red (660 nm) and infrared (808 nm) lasers at various fluences, powers and emission modes to study bacterial survival and filamentation. Also, plasmid DNA was exposed to laser light to study DNA lesions produced in vitro by T{sub 4} endonuclease V. Low-intensity lasers: i) had no effect on survival of wild-type E. coli but decreased the survival of uvrA protein-deficient cells, ii) induced bacterial filamentation, iii) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids in agarose gels, and iv) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with T{sub 4} endonuclease V. These results increase our understanding of the effects of laser light on cells with various genetic characteristics, such as xeroderma pigmentosum cells deficient in nucleotide excision pathway activity in patients with mucositis treated by low-intensity lasers. (author)

  18. Variation in Base Excision Repair Capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, David M.; Kim, Daemyung; Berquist, Brian R.; Sigurdson, Alice J.

    2010-01-01

    The major DNA repair pathway for coping with spontaneous forms of DNA damage, such as natural hydrolytic products or oxidative lesions, is base excision repair (BER). In particular, BER processes mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA lesions such as non-bulky base modifications, abasic sites, and a range of chemically distinct single-strand breaks. Defects in BER have been linked to cancer predisposition, neurodegenerative disorders, and immunodeficiency. Recent data indicate a large degree of sequence...

  19. The Over-expression of the β2 Catalytic Subunit of the Proteasome Decreases Homologous Recombination and Impairs DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Collavoli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available By a human cDNA library screening, we have previously identified two sequences coding two different catalytic subunits of the proteasome which increase homologous recombination (HR when overexpressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we investigated the effect of proteasome on spontaneous HR and DNA repair in human cells. To determine if the proteasome has a role in the occurrence of spontaneous HR in human cells, we overexpressed the β2 subunit of the proteasome in HeLa cells and determined the effect on intrachromosomal HR. Results showed that the overexpression of β2 subunit decreased HR in human cells without altering the cell proteasome activity and the Rad51p level. Moreover, exposure to MG132 that inhibits the proteasome activity reduced HR in human cells. We also found that the expression of the β2 subunit increases the sensitivity to the camptothecin that induces DNA double-strand break (DSB. This suggests that the β2 subunit has an active role in HR and DSB repair but does not alter the intracellular level of the Rad51p.

  20. BLM–DNA2–RPA–MRN and EXO1–BLM–RPA–MRN constitute two DNA end resection machineries for human DNA break repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimonkar, Amitabh V.; Genschel, Jochen; Kinoshita, Eri; Polaczek, Piotr; Campbell, Judith L.; Wyman, Claire; Modrich, Paul; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    2011-01-01

    Repair of dsDNA breaks requires processing to produce 3′-terminated ssDNA. We biochemically reconstituted DNA end resection using purified human proteins: Bloom helicase (BLM); DNA2 helicase/nuclease; Exonuclease 1 (EXO1); the complex comprising MRE11, RAD50, and NBS1 (MRN); and Replication protein A (RPA). Resection occurs via two routes. In one, BLM and DNA2 physically and specifically interact to resect DNA in a process that is ATP-dependent and requires BLM helicase and DNA2 nuclease functions. RPA is essential for both DNA unwinding by BLM and enforcing 5′ → 3′ resection polarity by DNA2. MRN accelerates processing by recruiting BLM to the end. In the other, EXO1 resects the DNA and is stimulated by BLM, MRN, and RPA. BLM increases the affinity of EXO1 for ends, and MRN recruits and enhances the processivity of EXO1. Our results establish two of the core machineries that initiate recombinational DNA repair in human cells. PMID:21325134

  1. Genomic approaches to DNA repair and mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrick, John J; Roberts, Steven A

    2015-12-01

    DNA damage is a constant threat to cells, causing cytotoxicity as well as inducing genetic alterations. The steady-state abundance of DNA lesions in a cell is minimized by a variety of DNA repair mechanisms, including DNA strand break repair, mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, and ribonucleotide excision repair. The efficiencies and mechanisms by which these pathways remove damage from chromosomes have been primarily characterized by investigating the processing of lesions at defined genomic loci, among bulk genomic DNA, on episomal DNA constructs, or using in vitro substrates. However, the structure of a chromosome is heterogeneous, consisting of heavily protein-bound heterochromatic regions, open regulatory regions, actively transcribed genes, and even areas of transient single stranded DNA. Consequently, DNA repair pathways function in a much more diverse set of chromosomal contexts than can be readily assessed using previous methods. Recent efforts to develop whole genome maps of DNA damage, repair processes, and even mutations promise to greatly expand our understanding of DNA repair and mutagenesis. Here we review the current efforts to utilize whole genome maps of DNA damage and mutation to understand how different chromosomal contexts affect DNA excision repair pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Bypass of a 5',8-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleoside by DNA polymerase β during DNA replication and base excision repair leads to nucleotide misinsertions and DNA strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhongliang; Xu, Meng; Lai, Yanhao; Laverde, Eduardo E; Terzidis, Michael A; Masi, Annalisa; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Liu, Yuan

    2015-09-01

    5',8-Cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleosides including 5',8-cyclo-dA (cdA) and 5',8-cyclo-dG (cdG) are induced by hydroxyl radicals resulting from oxidative stress such as ionizing radiation. 5',8-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleoside lesions are repaired by nucleotide excision repair with low efficiency, thereby leading to their accumulation in the human genome and lesion bypass by DNA polymerases during DNA replication and base excision repair (BER). In this study, for the first time, we discovered that DNA polymerase β (pol β) efficiently bypassed a 5'R-cdA, but inefficiently bypassed a 5'S-cdA during DNA replication and BER. We found that cell extracts from pol β wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibited significant DNA synthesis activity in bypassing a cdA lesion located in replication and BER intermediates. However, pol β knock-out cell extracts exhibited little DNA synthesis to bypass the lesion. This indicates that pol β plays an important role in bypassing a cdA lesion during DNA replication and BER. Furthermore, we demonstrated that pol β inserted both a correct and incorrect nucleotide to bypass a cdA at a low concentration. Nucleotide misinsertion was significantly stimulated by a high concentration of pol β, indicating a mutagenic effect induced by pol β lesion bypass synthesis of a 5',8-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleoside. Moreover, we found that bypass of a 5'S-cdA by pol β generated an intermediate that failed to be extended by pol β, resulting in accumulation of single-strand DNA breaks. Our study provides the first evidence that pol β plays an important role in bypassing a 5',8-cyclo-dA during DNA replication and repair, as well as new insight into mutagenic effects and genome instability resulting from pol β bypassing of a cdA lesion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Cross-Cancer Genetic Association Analysis of the DNA Repair and DNA Damage Signaling Pathways for Lung, Ovary, Prostate, Breast, and Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarbrough, Peter M; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Iversen, Edwin S; Brhane, Yonathan; Amos, Christopher I; Kraft, Peter; Hung, Rayjean J; Sellers, Thomas A; Witte, John S; Pharoah, Paul; Henderson, Brian E; Gruber, Stephen B; Hunter, David J; Garber, Judy E; Joshi, Amit D; McDonnell, Kevin; Easton, Doug F; Eeles, Ros; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Muir, Kenneth; Doherty, Jennifer A; Schildkraut, Joellen M

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage is an established mediator of carcinogenesis, although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified few significant loci. This cross-cancer site, pooled analysis was performed to increase the power to detect common variants of DNA repair genes associated with cancer susceptibility. We conducted a cross-cancer analysis of 60,297 single nucleotide polymorphisms, at 229 DNA repair gene regions, using data from the NCI Genetic Associations and Mechanisms in Oncology (GAME-ON) Network. Our analysis included data from 32 GWAS and 48,734 controls and 51,537 cases across five cancer sites (breast, colon, lung, ovary, and prostate). Because of the unavailability of individual data, data were analyzed at the aggregate level. Meta-analysis was performed using the Association analysis for SubSETs (ASSET) software. To test for genetic associations that might escape individual variant testing due to small effect sizes, pathway analysis of eight DNA repair pathways was performed using hierarchical modeling. We identified three susceptibility DNA repair genes, RAD51B (P associations with cancer risk in the base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, and homologous recombination pathways. Only three susceptibility loci were identified, which had all been previously reported. In contrast, hierarchical modeling identified several pleiotropic cancer risk associations in key DNA repair pathways. Results suggest that many common variants in DNA repair genes are likely associated with cancer susceptibility through small effect sizes that do not meet stringent significance testing criteria. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. The Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Pathway, Prolyl Hydroxylase Domain Protein Inhibitors, and Their Roles in Bone Repair and Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihong Fan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs are oxygen-dependent transcriptional activators that play crucial roles in angiogenesis, erythropoiesis, energy metabolism, and cell fate decisions. The group of enzymes that can catalyse the hydroxylation reaction of HIF-1 is prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHDs. PHD inhibitors (PHIs activate the HIF pathway by preventing degradation of HIF-α via inhibiting PHDs. Osteogenesis and angiogenesis are tightly coupled during bone repair and regeneration. Numerous studies suggest that HIFs and their target gene, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, are critical regulators of angiogenic-osteogenic coupling. In this brief perspective, we review current studies about the HIF pathway and its role in bone repair and regeneration, as well as the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved. Additionally, we briefly discuss the therapeutic manipulation of HIFs and VEGF in bone repair and bone tumours. This review will expand our knowledge of biology of HIFs, PHDs, PHD inhibitors, and bone regeneration, and it may also aid the design of novel therapies for accelerating bone repair and regeneration or inhibiting bone tumours.

  5. Functional Analysis of BARD1 Missense Variants in Homology-Directed Repair of DNA Double Strand Breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cindy; Banerjee, Tapahsama; Gillespie, Jessica; Ceravolo, Amanda; Parvinsmith, Matthew R; Starita, Lea M; Fields, Stanley; Toland, Amanda E; Parvin, Jeffrey D

    2015-12-01

    Genes associated with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) are often sequenced in search of mutations that are predictive of susceptibility to these cancer types, but the sequence results are frequently ambiguous because of the detection of missense substitutions for which the clinical impact is unknown. The BARD1 protein is the heterodimeric partner of BRCA1 and is included on clinical gene panels for testing for susceptibility to HBOC. Like BRCA1, it is required for homology-directed DNA repair (HDR). We measured the HDR function of 29 BARD1 missense variants, 27 culled from clinical test results and two synthetic variants. Twenty-three of the assayed variants were functional for HDR; of these, four are known neutral variants. Three variants showed intermediate function, and three others were defective in HDR. When mapped to BARD1 domains, residues crucial for HDR were located in the N- and C- termini of BARD1. In the BARD1 RING domain, critical residues mapped to the zinc-coordinating amino acids and to the BRCA1-BARD1 binding interface, highlighting the importance of interaction between BRCA1 and BARD1 for HDR activity. Based on these results, we propose that the HDR assay is a useful complement to genetic analyses to classify BARD1 variants of unknown clinical significance. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  6. Analysis of Repair Mechanisms following an Induced Double-Strand Break Uncovers Recessive Deleterious Alleles in the Candida albicans Diploid Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feri, Adeline; Loll-Krippleber, Raphaël; Commere, Pierre-Henri; Maufrais, Corinne; Sertour, Natacha; Schwartz, Katja; Sherlock, Gavin; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; d'Enfert, Christophe; Legrand, Mélanie

    2016-10-11

    The diploid genome of the yeast Candida albicans is highly plastic, exhibiting frequent loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) events. To provide a deeper understanding of the mechanisms leading to LOH, we investigated the repair of a unique DNA double-strand break (DSB) in the laboratory C. albicans SC5314 strain using the I-SceI meganuclease. Upon I-SceI induction, we detected a strong increase in the frequency of LOH events at an I-SceI target locus positioned on chromosome 4 (Chr4), including events spreading from this locus to the proximal telomere. Characterization of the repair events by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing and whole-genome sequencing revealed a predominance of gene conversions, but we also observed mitotic crossover or break-induced replication events, as well as combinations of independent events. Importantly, progeny that had undergone homozygosis of part or all of Chr4 haplotype B (Chr4B) were inviable. Mining of genome sequencing data for 155 C. albicans isolates allowed the identification of a recessive lethal allele in the GPI16 gene on Chr4B unique to C. albicans strain SC5314 which is responsible for this inviability. Additional recessive lethal or deleterious alleles were identified in the genomes of strain SC5314 and two clinical isolates. Our results demonstrate that recessive lethal alleles in the genomes of C. albicans isolates prevent the occurrence of specific extended LOH events. While these and other recessive lethal and deleterious alleles are likely to accumulate in C. albicans due to clonal reproduction, their occurrence may in turn promote the maintenance of corresponding nondeleterious alleles and, consequently, heterozygosity in the C. albicans species. Recessive lethal alleles impose significant constraints on the biology of diploid organisms. Using a combination of an I-SceI meganuclease-mediated DNA DSB, a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS)-optimized reporter of LOH, and a compendium of 155 genome

  7. DNA-Protein Crosslink Proteolysis Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Bruno; Popovic, Marta; Ramadan, Kristijan

    2017-06-01

    Proteins that are covalently bound to DNA constitute a specific type of DNA lesion known as DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs). DPCs represent physical obstacles to the progression of DNA replication. If not repaired, DPCs cause stalling of DNA replication forks that consequently leads to DNA double-strand breaks, the most cytotoxic DNA lesion. Although DPCs are common DNA lesions, the mechanism of DPC repair was unclear until now. Recent work unveiled that DPC repair is orchestrated by proteolysis performed by two distinct metalloproteases, SPARTAN in metazoans and Wss1 in yeast. This review summarizes recent discoveries on two proteases in DNA replication-coupled DPC repair and establishes DPC proteolysis repair as a separate DNA repair pathway for genome stability and protection from accelerated aging and cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mitochondrial base excision repair assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    The main source of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage is reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during normal cellular metabolism. The main mtDNA lesions generated by ROS are base modifications, such as the ubiquitous 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) lesion; however, base loss and strand breaks may also occur....... Many human diseases are associated with mtDNA mutations and thus maintaining mtDNA integrity is critical. All of these lesions are repaired primarily by the base excision repair (BER) pathway. It is now known that mammalian mitochondria have BER, which, similarly to nuclear BER, is catalyzed by DNA...

  9. U. V. induces long-lived DNA breaks in Cockayne's syndrome and cells from an immunodeficient individual (46BR): defects and disturbance in post incision steps of excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squires, S.; Johnson, R.T.

    1983-01-01

    In normal cells exposed to low U.V. doses the several enzymic steps of the excision repair process are closely coupled with the result that DNA gaps are transient and present at such low frequency that it is very difficult to detect them. Cells from a U.V.-sensitive human genetic disorder, Cockayne's Syndrome (CS) and from an immunodeficient individual 46BR, have been examined with respect to their incision capacity after U.V. in the presence and absence of inhibitors of DNA synthesis. We have measured the initial rates of DNA break accumulation in the presence of hydroxyurea and 1-beta-D arabinofuranosylcytosine and find that in both these groups the rate is only slightly lower than in normal cells. However, there is a marked difference between U.V. sensitive cells and normal in the accumulation of long-lived DNA breaks in the absence of inhibitors. While in normal cells practically no breaks could be detected, the U.V. sensitive cells accumulated significant numbers of DNA breaks within 15 min of incubation; 46BR cells showed almost the same level of DNA breaks without the inhibitors as with them. In CS break accumulation can be detected in the absence of inhibitors for only a short time after irradiation (approximately 30 min), but less so when deoxyribonucleosides are provided. The spontaneous break accumulation is related to the time elapsed since proteolytic detachment of the cells from monolayer; 24 h after replating CS breaks no longer accumulate in response to U.V. 46BR cells, on the other hand, accumulate breaks even 1 day after replating and express unligated gaps 2 h after irradiation with a relatively low U.V. dose such as 4 Jm-2. Provision of DNA precursors does not greatly reduce break accumulation. The extremely slow rate of gap sealing in 46BR cells is consistent with the hypothesis that a ligase defect is expressed in these cells.

  10. Contributions of DNA repair and damage response pathways to the non-linear genotoxic responses of alkylating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapacz, Joanna; Pottenger, Lynn H.; Engelward, Bevin P.; Heinen, Christopher D.; Johnson, George E.; Clewell, Rebecca A.; Carmichael, Paul L.; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2016-01-01

    From a risk assessment perspective, DNA-reactive agents are conventionally assumed to have genotoxic risks at all exposure levels, thus applying a linear extrapolation for low-dose responses. New approaches discussed here, including more diverse and sensitive methods for assessing DNA damage and DNA repair, strongly support the existence of measurable regions where genotoxic responses with increasing doses are insignificant relative to control. Model monofunctional alkylating agents have in vitro and in vivo datasets amenable to determination of points of departure (PoDs) for genotoxic effects. A session at the 2013 Society of Toxicology meeting provided an opportunity to survey the progress in understanding the biological basis of empirically-observed PoDs for DNA alkylating agents. Together with the literature published since, this review discusses cellular pathways activated by endogenous and exogenous alkylation DNA damage. Cells have evolved conserved processes that monitor and counteract a spontaneous steady-state level of DNA damage. The ubiquitous network of DNA repair pathways serves as the first line of defense for clearing of the DNA damage and preventing mutation. Other biological pathways discussed here that are activated by genotoxic stress include post-translational activation of cell cycle networks and transcriptional networks for apoptosis/cell death. The interactions of various DNA repair and DNA damage response pathways provide biological bases for the observed PoD behaviors seen with genotoxic compounds. Thus, after formation of DNA adducts, the activation of cellular pathways can lead to the avoidance a mutagenic outcome. The understanding of the cellular mechanisms acting within the low-dose region will serve to better characterize risks from exposures to DNA-reactive agents at environmentally-relevant concentrations. PMID:27036068

  11. MRE11–RAD50–NBS1 is a critical regulator of FANCD2 stability and function during DNA double-strand break repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roques, Céline; Coulombe, Yan; Delannoy, Mathieu; Vignard, Julien; Grossi, Simona; Brodeur, Isabelle; Rodrigue, Amélie; Gautier, Jean; Stasiak, Alicja Z; Stasiak, Andrzej; Constantinou, Angelos; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2009-01-01

    Monoubiquitination of the Fanconi anaemia protein FANCD2 is a key event leading to repair of interstrand cross-links. It was reported earlier that FANCD2 co-localizes with NBS1. However, the functional connection between FANCD2 and MRE11 is poorly understood. In this study, we show that inhibition of MRE11, NBS1 or RAD50 leads to a destabilization of FANCD2. FANCD2 accumulated from mid-S to G2 phase within sites containing single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) intermediates, or at sites of DNA damage, such as those created by restriction endonucleases and laser irradiation. Purified FANCD2, a ring-like particle by electron microscopy, preferentially bound ssDNA over various DNA substrates. Inhibition of MRE11 nuclease activity by Mirin decreased the number of FANCD2 foci formed in vivo. We propose that FANCD2 binds to ssDNA arising from MRE11-processed DNA double-strand breaks. Our data establish MRN as a crucial regulator of FANCD2 stability and function in the DNA damage response. PMID:19609304

  12. Mutagenicity of 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline in colon and liver of Big Blue rats: role of DNA adducts, strand breaks, DNA repair and oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, P.; Wallin, H.; Vogel, U.

    2002-01-01

    weeks. There were dose-response relationships of DNA adducts (P-32-postlabeling) and DNA strand breaks (comet assay) in colon and liver tissues, with the highest levels of DNA adducts and strand breaks in the colon. There was dose-dependent induction of mutations in both the colon and the liver...... and colon. A lower frequency of mutations in the colon than in the liver could be related to higher expression of DNA repair enzymes in the former.......The contribution of oxidative stress, different types of DNA damage and expression of DNA repair enzymes in colon and liver mutagenesis induced by 2-amino-3-methylimidazo [4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) was investigated in four groups of six Big Blue rats fed diets with 0, 20, 70, and 200 mg IQ/kg for 3...

  13. GENETIC AND MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND TOLERANCE PATHWAYS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2001-07-26

    Radiation can damage cellular components, including DNA. Organisms have developed a panoply of means of dealing with DNA damage. Some repair paths have rather narrow substrate specificity (e.g. photolyases), which act on specific pyrimidine photoproducts in a specific type (e.g., DNA) and conformation (double-stranded B conformation) of nucleic acid. Others, for example, nucleotide excision repair, deal with larger classes of damages, in this case bulky adducts in DNA. A detailed discussion of DNA repair mechanisms is beyond the scope of this article, but one can be found in the excellent book of Friedberg et al. [1] for further detail. However, some DNA damages and paths for repair of those damages important for photobiology will be outlined below as a basis for the specific examples of genetic and molecular analysis that will be presented below.

  14. Gefitinib Radiosensitizes Stem-Like Glioma Cells: Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Akt-DNA-PK Signaling, Accompanied by Inhibition of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Khong Bee, E-mail: dmskkb@nccs.com.sg [Brain Tumour Research Laboratory, Division of Medical Sciences, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Zhu Congju; Wong Yinling; Gao Qiuhan; Ty, Albert; Wong, Meng Cheong [Brain Tumour Research Laboratory, Division of Medical Sciences, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: We compared radiosensitivity of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) with matched nonstem glioma cells, and determined whether gefitinib enhanced BTSC radiosensitivity by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Akt-DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) signaling, followed by enhanced DNA double-stand breaks (DSBs) and inhibition of DSB repair. Methods and Materials: Radiosensitivity of stem-like gliomaspheres and nonstem glioma cells (obtained at patient neurosurgical resection) were evaluated by clonogenic assays, {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX immunostaining and cell cycle distribution. Survival of irradiated and nonirradiated NOD-SCID mice intracranially implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres were monitored. Glioma cells treated with gefitinib, irradiation, or both were assayed for clonogenic survival, {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX immunostaining, DNA-PKcs expression, and phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt. Results: Stem-like gliomaspheres displayed BTSC characteristics of self-renewal; differentiation into lineages of neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes; and initiation of glioma growth in NOD-SCID mice. Irradiation dose-dependently reduced clonogenic survival, induced G{sub 2}/M arrest and increased {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX immunostaining of nonstem glioma cells, but not stem-like gliomaspheres. There was no difference in survival of irradiated and nonirradiated mice implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres. The addition of gefitinib significantly inhibited clonogenic survival, increased {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX immunostaining, and reduced DNA-PKcs expression of irradiated stem-like gliomaspheres, without affecting irradiated-nonstem glioma cells. Gefitinib alone, and when combined with irradiation, inhibited phosphorylation of EGFR (Y1068 and Y1045) and Akt (S473) in stem-like gliomaspheres. In nonstem glioma cells, gefitinib alone inhibited EGFR Y1068 phosphorylation, with further inhibition by combined gefitinib and irradiation. Conclusions: Stem-like gliomaspheres are

  15. Activation of the Hh pathway in periosteum-derived mesenchymal stem cells induces bone formation in vivo: implication for postnatal bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qun; Huang, Chunlan; Zeng, Fanjie; Xue, Ming; Zhang, Xinping

    2010-12-01

    While the essential role of periosteum in cortical bone repair and regeneration is well established, the molecular pathways that control the early osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of periosteal stem/progenitor cells during repair processes are unclear. Using a murine segmental bone graft transplantation model, we isolated a population of early periosteum-callus-derived mesenchymal stem cells (PCDSCs) from the healing autograft periosteum. These cells express typical mesenchymal stem cell markers and are capable of differentiating into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Characterization of these cells demonstrated that activation of the hedgehog (Hh) pathway effectively promoted osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of PCDSCs in vitro and induced bone formation in vivo. To determine the role of the Hh pathway in adult bone repair, we deleted Smoothened (Smo), the receptor that transduces all Hh signals at the onset of bone autograft repair via a tamoxifen-inducible RosaCreER mouse model. We found that deletion of Smo markedly reduced osteogenic differentiation of isolated PCDSCs and further resulted in a near 50% reduction in periosteal bone callus formation at the cortical bone junction as determined by MicroCT and histomorphometric analyses. These data strongly suggest that the Hh pathway plays an important role in adult bone repair via enhancing differentiation of periosteal progenitors and that activation of the Hh pathway at the onset of healing could be beneficial for repair and regeneration.

  16. Expression of a Human Cytochrome P450 in Yeast Permits Analysis of Pathways for Response to and Repair of Aflatoxin-Induced DNA Damage†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yingying; Breeden, Linda L.; Zarbl, Helmut; Preston, Bradley D.; Eaton, David L.

    2005-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a human hepatotoxin and hepatocarcinogen produced by the mold Aspergillus flavus. In humans, AFB1 is primarily bioactivated by cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) and 3A4 to a genotoxic epoxide that forms N7-guanine DNA adducts. A series of yeast haploid mutants defective in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints were transformed with human CYP1A2 to investigate how these DNA adducts are repaired. Cell survival and mutagenesis following aflatoxin B1 treatment was assayed in strains defective in nucleotide excision repair (NER) (rad14), postreplication repair (PRR) (rad6, rad18, mms2, and rad5), homologous recombinational repair (HRR) (rad51 and rad54), base excision repair (BER) (apn1 apn2), nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) (yku70), mismatch repair (MMR) (pms1), translesion synthesis (TLS) (rev3), and checkpoints (mec1-1, mec1-1 rad53, rad9, and rad17). Together our data suggest the involvement of homologous recombination and nucleotide excision repair, postreplication repair, and checkpoints in the repair and/or tolerance of AFB1-induced DNA damage in the yeast model. Rev3 appears to mediate AFB1-induced mutagenesis when error-free pathways are compromised. The results further suggest unique roles for Rad5 and abasic endonuclease-dependent DNA intermediates in regulating AFB1-induced mutagenicity. PMID:15988000

  17. Expression of a human cytochrome p450 in yeast permits analysis of pathways for response to and repair of aflatoxin-induced DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yingying; Breeden, Linda L; Zarbl, Helmut; Preston, Bradley D; Eaton, David L

    2005-07-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a human hepatotoxin and hepatocarcinogen produced by the mold Aspergillus flavus. In humans, AFB1 is primarily bioactivated by cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) and 3A4 to a genotoxic epoxide that forms N7-guanine DNA adducts. A series of yeast haploid mutants defective in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints were transformed with human CYP1A2 to investigate how these DNA adducts are repaired. Cell survival and mutagenesis following aflatoxin B1 treatment was assayed in strains defective in nucleotide excision repair (NER) (rad14), postreplication repair (PRR) (rad6, rad18, mms2, and rad5), homologous recombinational repair (HRR) (rad51 and rad54), base excision repair (BER) (apn1 apn2), nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) (yku70), mismatch repair (MMR) (pms1), translesion synthesis (TLS) (rev3), and checkpoints (mec1-1, mec1-1 rad53, rad9, and rad17). Together our data suggest the involvement of homologous recombination and nucleotide excision repair, postreplication repair, and checkpoints in the repair and/or tolerance of AFB1-induced DNA damage in the yeast model. Rev3 appears to mediate AFB1-induced mutagenesis when error-free pathways are compromised. The results further suggest unique roles for Rad5 and abasic endonuclease-dependent DNA intermediates in regulating AFB1-induced mutagenicity.

  18. Systematic analysis of DNA crosslink repair pathways during development and aging in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David M; Rieckher, Matthias; Williams, Ashley B; Schumacher, Björn

    2017-09-19

    DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) are generated by endogenous sources and chemotherapeutics, and pose a threat to genome stability and cell survival. Using Caenorhabditis elegans mutants, we identify DNA repair factors that protect against the genotoxicity of ICLs generated by trioxsalen/ultraviolet A (TMP/UVA) during development and aging. Mutations in nucleotide excision repair (NER) components (e.g. XPA-1 and XPF-1) imparted extreme sensitivity to TMP/UVA relative to wild-type animals, manifested as developmental arrest, defects in adult tissue morphology and functionality, and shortened lifespan. Compensatory roles for global-genome (XPC-1) and transcription-coupled (CSB-1) NER in ICL sensing were exposed. The analysis also revealed contributions of homologous recombination (BRC-1/BRCA1), the MUS-81, EXO-1, SLX-1 and FAN-1 nucleases, and the DOG-1 (FANCJ) helicase in ICL resolution, influenced by the replicative-status of the cell/tissue. No obvious or critical role in ICL repair was seen for non-homologous end-joining (cku-80) or base excision repair (nth-1, exo-3), the Fanconi-related proteins BRC-2 (BRCA2/FANCD1) and FCD-2 (FANCD2), the WRN-1 or HIM-6 (BLM) helicases, or the GEN-1 or MRT-1 (SNM1) nucleases. Our efforts uncover replication-dependent and -independent ICL repair networks, and establish nematodes as a model for investigating the repair and consequences of DNA crosslinks in metazoan development and in adult post-mitotic and proliferative germ cells. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2017.

  19. Effects of hyperthermia on DNA repair pathways: one treatment to inhibit them all

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oei, Arlene L.; Vriend, Lianne E. M.; Crezee, Johannes; Franken, Nicolaas A. P.; Krawczyk, Przemek M.

    2015-01-01

    The currently available arsenal of anticancer modalities includes many DNA damaging agents that can kill malignant cells. However, efficient DNA repair mechanisms protect both healthy and cancer cells against the effects of treatment and contribute to the development of drug resistance. Therefore,

  20. Proteomics-based network analysis characterizes biological processes and pathways activated by preconditioned mesenchymal stem cells in cardiac repair mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Silvestre, Dario; Brambilla, Francesca; Scardoni, Giovanni; Brunetti, Pietro; Motta, Sara; Matteucci, Marco; Laudanna, Carlo; Recchia, Fabio A; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Mauri, Pierluigi

    2017-05-01

    We have demonstrated that intramyocardial delivery of human mesenchymal stem cells preconditioned with a hyaluronan mixed ester of butyric and retinoic acid (MSCp+) is more effective in preventing the decay of regional myocardial contractility in a swine model of myocardial infarction (MI). However, the understanding of the role of MSCp+ in proteomic remodeling of cardiac infarcted tissue is not complete. We therefore sought to perform a comprehensive analysis of the proteome of infarct remote (RZ) and border zone (BZ) of pigs treated with MSCp+ or unconditioned stem cells. Heart tissues were analyzed by MudPIT and differentially expressed proteins were selected by a label-free approach based on spectral counting. Protein profiles were evaluated by using PPI networks and their topological analysis. The proteomic remodeling was largely prevented in MSCp+ group. Extracellular proteins involved in fibrosis were down-regulated, while energetic pathways were globally up-regulated. Cardioprotectant pathways involved in the production of keto acid metabolites were also activated. Additionally, we found that new hub proteins support the cardioprotective phenotype characterizing the left ventricular BZ treated with MSCp+. In fact, the up-regulation of angiogenic proteins NCL and RAC1 can be explained by the increase of capillary density induced by MSCp+. Our results show that angiogenic pathways appear to be uniquely positioned to integrate signaling with energetic pathways involving cardiac repair. Our findings prompt the use of proteomics-based network analysis to optimize new approaches preventing the post-ischemic proteomic remodeling that may underlie the limited self-repair ability of adult heart. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The Rate and Spectrum of Spontaneous Mutations in Mycobacterium smegmatis, a Bacterium Naturally Devoid of the Postreplicative Mismatch Repair Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Kucukyildirim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium smegmatis is a bacterium that is naturally devoid of known postreplicative DNA mismatch repair (MMR homologs, mutS and mutL, providing an opportunity to investigate how the mutation rate and spectrum has evolved in the absence of a highly conserved primary repair pathway. Mutation accumulation experiments of M. smegmatis yielded a base-substitution mutation rate of 5.27 × 10−10 per site per generation, or 0.0036 per genome per generation, which is surprisingly similar to the mutation rate in MMR-functional unicellular organisms. Transitions were found more frequently than transversions, with the A:T→G:C transition rate significantly higher than the G:C→A:T transition rate, opposite to what is observed in most studied bacteria. We also found that the transition-mutation rate of M. smegmatis is significantly lower than that of other naturally MMR-devoid or MMR-knockout organisms. Two possible candidates that could be responsible for maintaining high DNA fidelity in this MMR-deficient organism are the ancestral-like DNA polymerase DnaE1, which contains a highly efficient DNA proofreading histidinol phosphatase (PHP domain, and/or the existence of a uracil-DNA glycosylase B (UdgB homolog that might protect the GC-rich M. smegmatis genome against DNA damage arising from oxidation or deamination. Our results suggest that M. smegmatis has a noncanonical Dam (DNA adenine methylase methylation system, with target motifs differing from those previously reported. The mutation features of M. smegmatis provide further evidence that genomes harbor alternative routes for improving replication fidelity, even in the absence of major repair pathways.

  2. Interference in DNA replication can cause mitotic chromosomal breakage unassociated with double-strand breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Fujita

    Full Text Available Morphological analysis of mitotic chromosomes is used to detect mutagenic chemical compounds and to estimate the dose of ionizing radiation to be administered. It has long been believed that chromosomal breaks are always associated with double-strand breaks (DSBs. We here provide compelling evidence against this canonical theory. We employed a genetic approach using two cell lines, chicken DT40 and human Nalm-6. We measured the number of chromosomal breaks induced by three replication-blocking agents (aphidicolin, 5-fluorouracil, and hydroxyurea in DSB-repair-proficient wild-type cells and cells deficient in both homologous recombination and nonhomologous end-joining (the two major DSB-repair pathways. Exposure of cells to the three replication-blocking agents for at least two cell cycles resulted in comparable numbers of chromosomal breaks for RAD54(-/-/KU70(-/- DT40 clones and wild-type cells. Likewise, the numbers of chromosomal breaks induced in RAD54(-/-/LIG4(-/- Nalm-6 clones and wild-type cells were also comparable. These data indicate that the replication-blocking agents can cause chromosomal breaks unassociated with DSBs. In contrast with DSB-repair-deficient cells, chicken DT40 cells deficient in PIF1 or ATRIP, which molecules contribute to the completion of DNA replication, displayed higher numbers of mitotic chromosomal breaks induced by aphidicolin than did wild-type cells, suggesting that single-strand gaps left unreplicated may result in mitotic chromosomal breaks.

  3. The radical cationic repair pathway of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer: the effect of sugar-phosphate backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Habibi-Khorassani, Mostafa; Shahraki, Asiyeh

    2013-01-01

    Radical cationic repair process of cis-syn thymine dimer has been investigated when (1) sugar-phosphate backbones were substituted by hydrogen atoms, (2) phosphate group was substituted by two hydrogen atoms each on a sugar ring and (3) sugar-phosphate backbone was taken into account. The effect of the interactions between N1 and N1' lone pairs and the C6-C6' antibonding orbital are the most important evidences for the cleavage of the C6-C6' bond in the first step of radical cationic repair mechanism in the absence of the sugar-phosphate backbone. The impact of the N1 and N1' lone pairs on the C6-C6' bond cleavage decreases and the energy barrier of the cleavage of that bond significantly increases in the presence of the deoxynucleoside sugars and the sugar-phosphate backbone. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2012 The American Society of Photobiology.

  4. Role of Double-Strand Break End-Tethering during Gene Conversion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Correct repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is critical for maintaining genome stability. Whereas gene conversion (GC)-mediated repair is mostly error-free, repair by break-induced replication (BIR) is associated with non-reciprocal translocations and loss of heterozygosity. We have previously shown that a Recombination Execution Checkpoint (REC) mediates this competition by preventing the BIR pathway from acting on DSBs that can be repaired by GC. Here, we asked if the REC can also determine whether the ends that are engaged in a GC-compatible configuration belong to the same break, since repair involving ends from different breaks will produce potentially deleterious translocations. We report that the kinetics of repair are markedly delayed when the two DSB ends that participate in GC belong to different DSBs (termed Trans) compared to the case when both DSB ends come from the same break (Cis). However, repair in Trans still occurs by GC rather than BIR, and the overall efficiency of repair is comparable. Hence, the REC is not sensitive to the “origin” of the DSB ends. When the homologous ends for GC are in Trans, the delay in repair appears to reflect their tethering to sequences on the other side of the DSB that themselves recombine with other genomic locations with which they share sequence homology. These data support previous observations that the two ends of a DSB are usually tethered to each other and that this tethering facilitates both ends encountering the same donor sequence. We also found that the presence of homeologous/repetitive sequences in the vicinity of a DSB can distract the DSB end from finding its bona fide homologous donor, and that inhibition of GC by such homeologous sequences is markedly increased upon deleting Sgs1 but not Msh6. PMID:27074148

  5. Role of Double-Strand Break End-Tethering during Gene Conversion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi Jain

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Correct repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs is critical for maintaining genome stability. Whereas gene conversion (GC-mediated repair is mostly error-free, repair by break-induced replication (BIR is associated with non-reciprocal translocations and loss of heterozygosity. We have previously shown that a Recombination Execution Checkpoint (REC mediates this competition by preventing the BIR pathway from acting on DSBs that can be repaired by GC. Here, we asked if the REC can also determine whether the ends that are engaged in a GC-compatible configuration belong to the same break, since repair involving ends from different breaks will produce potentially deleterious translocations. We report that the kinetics of repair are markedly delayed when the two DSB ends that participate in GC belong to different DSBs (termed Trans compared to the case when both DSB ends come from the same break (Cis. However, repair in Trans still occurs by GC rather than BIR, and the overall efficiency of repair is comparable. Hence, the REC is not sensitive to the "origin" of the DSB ends. When the homologous ends for GC are in Trans, the delay in repair appears to reflect their tethering to sequences on the other side of the DSB that themselves recombine with other genomic locations with which they share sequence homology. These data support previous observations that the two ends of a DSB are usually tethered to each other and that this tethering facilitates both ends encountering the same donor sequence. We also found that the presence of homeologous/repetitive sequences in the vicinity of a DSB can distract the DSB end from finding its bona fide homologous donor, and that inhibition of GC by such homeologous sequences is markedly increased upon deleting Sgs1 but not Msh6.

  6. Break-induced ATR and Ddb1-Cul4(Cdt)² ubiquitin ligase-dependent nucleotide synthesis promotes homologous recombination repair in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moss, Jennifer; Tinline-Purvis, Helen; Walker, Carol A

    2010-01-01

    Nucleotide synthesis is a universal response to DNA damage, but how this response facilitates DNA repair and cell survival is unclear. Here we establish a role for DNA damage-induced nucleotide synthesis in homologous recombination (HR) repair in fission yeast. Using a genetic screen, we found...

  7. D-ribose inhibits DNA repair synthesis in human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zunica, G.; Marini, M.; Brunelli, M.A.; Chiricolo, M.; Franceschi, C.

    1986-07-31

    D-ribose is cytotoxic for quiescent human lymphocytes and severely inhibits their PHA-induced proliferation at concentrations (25-50 mM) at which other simple sugars are ineffective. In order to explain these effects, DNA repair synthesis was evaluated in PHA-stimulated human lymphocytes treated with hydroxyurea and irradiated. D-ribose, in contrast to other reducing sugars, did not induce repair synthesis and therefore did not apparently damage DNA in a direct way, although it markedly inhibited gamma ray-induced repair. Taking into account that lymphocytes must rejoin physiologically-formed DNA strand breaks in order to enter the cell cycle, we suggest that D-ribose exerts its cytotoxic activity by interfering with metabolic pathways critical for the repair of DNA breaks.

  8. Anti-tumour compounds illudin S and Irofulven induce DNA lesions ignored by global repair and exclusively processed by transcription- and replication-coupled repair pathways.

    OpenAIRE

    Raams, Anja; Kelner, Michael; Ng, Jessica; Yamashita, Yukiko; Takeda, Shiunichi; McMorris, Trevor; Hoeijmakers, Jan; Jaspers, Nicolaas

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIlludin S is a natural sesquiterpene drug with strong anti-tumour activity. Inside cells, unstable active metabolites of illudin cause the formation of as yet poorly characterised DNA lesions. In order to identify factors involved in their repair, we have performed a detailed genetic survey of repair-defective mutants for responses to the drug. We show that 90% of illudin's lethal effects in human fibroblasts can be prevented by an active nucleotide excision repair (NER) system. C...

  9. Oversized AAV transductifon is mediated via a DNA-PKcs-independent, Rad51C-dependent repair pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Matthew L; Li, Chengwen; Bellon, Isabella; Yin, Chaoying; Chavala, Sai; Pryadkina, Marina; Richard, Isabelle; Samulski, Richard Jude

    2013-12-01

    A drawback of gene therapy using adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the DNA packaging restriction of the viral capsid (AAV genome transduction through an unknown mechanism. Herein, AAV production using an oversized reporter (6.2 kb) resulted in chloroform and DNase-resistant particles harboring distinct "fragment" AAV (fAAV) genomes (5.0, 2.4, and 1.6 kb). Fractionation experiments determined that only the larger "fragments" mediated transduction in vitro, and relatively efficient transduction was also demonstrated in the muscle, the eye, and the liver. In contrast with concatemerization-dependent large-gene delivery by split AAV, fAAV transduction is independent of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) in vitro and in vivo while disproportionately reliant on the DNA strand-annealing protein Rad51C. Importantly, fAAV's unique dependence on DNA repair proteins, compared with intact AAV, strongly suggests that the majority of oversized AAV transduction is mediated by fragmented genomes. Although fAAV transduction is less efficient than intact AAV, it is enhanced fourfold in muscle and sevenfold in the retina compared with split AAV transduction. Furthermore, fAAV carrying codon-optimized therapeutic dysferlin cDNA in a 7.5 kb expression cassette restored dysferlin levels in a dystrophic model. Collectively, oversized AAV genome transduction requires unique DNA repair pathways and offers an alternative, more efficient strategy for large-gene therapy.

  10. RIP4 is a target of multiple signal transduction pathways in keratinocytes: Implications for epidermal differentiation and cutaneous wound repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Stephanie [Charite, University Medicine Berlin, Institute of Physiology, Arnimallee 22, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Munz, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.munz@charite.de [Charite, University Medicine Berlin, Institute of Physiology, Arnimallee 22, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-01-01

    Receptor interacting protein 4 (RIP4) is an important regulator of epidermal morphogenesis during embryonic development. We could previously show that expression of the rip4 gene is strongly downregulated in cutaneous wound repair, which might be initiated by a broad variety of growth factors and cytokines. Here, we demonstrate that in keratinocytes, rip4 expression is controlled by a multitude of different signal transduction pathways, such as the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) cascade, in a unique and specific manner. Furthermore, we show that the steroid dexamethasone abolishes the physiological rip4 downregulation after injury and might thus contribute to the phenotype of reduced and delayed wound reepithelialization seen in glucocorticoid-treated patients. As a whole, our data indicate that rip4 expression is regulated in a complex manner, which might have therapeutic implications.

  11. Metformin enhances radiosensitivity via inhibition of DNA repair pathway in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Youn Kyoung; Kim, Mi Sook; Lee, Ji Young; Song, Kyung Hee; Choi, Kyul; Kim, Eun Ho; Ha, Hun Joo [Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    In this study, we provide a scientific rationale for the clinical application of metformin as a radiosensitizer in colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Currently, it is one of the commonest chemoradiotherapy worked better than the radiotherapy or chemotherapy in colorectal cancer. To enhance radiosensitivity of tumor cells for chemoradiotherapy, it is to use potential anticancer agents that act as radiosensitizers. Metformin, one of the most widely used antidiabetic drugs, has recently been associated with potential antitumorigenic effects. Our data shows that metformin combined with radiation enhances the efficacy of radiotherapy and down-regulates DNA repair proteins. Therefore, we provides a scientific rationale for the clinical application of metformin as a radiosensitizer in colorectal cancer.

  12. SELECTIVE-INHIBITION OF REPAIR OF ACTIVE GENES BY HYPERTHERMIA IS DUE TO INHIBITION OF GLOBAL AND TRANSCRIPTION COUPLED REPAIR PATHWAYS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SAKKERS, RJ; FILON, AR; BRUNSTING, JF; KAMPINGA, HH; KONINGS, AWT; MULLENDERS, LHF

    Hyperthermia specifically inhibits the repair of UV-induced DNA photolesions in transcriptionally active genes, To define more precisely which mechanisms underlie the heat-induced inhibition of repair of active genes, removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) was studied in human fibroblasts

  13. Assembly of checkpoint and repair machineries at DNA damage sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huen, Michael S.Y.; Chen, Junjie

    2009-01-01

    The remarkably coordinated nature of the DNA damage response pathway relies on numerous mechanisms that facilitate the assembly of checkpoint and repair factors at DNA breaks. Post-translational modifications on and around chromatin play critical roles in allowing the timely and sequential assembly of DNA damage responsive elements at the vicinity of DNA breaks. Notably, recent advances in forward genetics and proteomics-based approaches have enabled the identification of novel components within the DNA damage response pathway, providing a more comprehensive picture of the molecular network that assists in the detection and propagation of DNA damage signals. PMID:19875294

  14. Disruption of Maternal DNA Repair Increases Sperm-DerivedChromosomal Aberrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Essers, Jeroun; Kanaar, Roland; Wyrobek,Andrew J.

    2007-02-07

    The final weeks of male germ cell differentiation occur in aDNA repair-deficient environment and normal development depends on theability of the egg to repair DNA damage in the fertilizing sperm. Geneticdisruption of maternal DNA double-strand break repair pathways in micesignificantly increased the frequency of zygotes with chromosomalstructural aberrations after paternal exposure to ionizing radiation.These findings demonstrate that radiation-induced DNA sperm lesions arerepaired after fertilization by maternal factors and suggest that geneticvariation in maternal DNA repair can modulate the risk of early pregnancylosses and of children with chromosomal aberrations of paternalorigin.

  15. Cleavage/Repair and Signal Transduction Pathways in Irradiated Breast Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-01

    influence of p53 function on Radiation Research, 135, 75-80. radiosensitivity of human glioblastoma cells . Cancer SuMŽ•,txRAN,• V. N., EALOVEGA, N’I. WV...after drug exposure while Leung et ted mitotic arrest and giant cell formation in irradiated al. [75] reported that continuous exposure for 24 h to MCF-7...Signal Transduction Pathways in Irradiated Breast Tumor Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David A. Gewirtz, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Virginia

  16. Evidence of perturbations of cell cycle and DNA repair pathways as a consequence of human and murine NF1-haploinsufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Douglas R

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 is a common monogenic tumor-predisposition disorder that arises secondary to mutations in the tumor suppressor gene NF1. Haploinsufficiency of NF1 fosters a permissive tumorigenic environment through changes in signalling between cells, however the intracellular mechanisms for this tumor-promoting effect are less clear. Most primary human NF1+/- cells are a challenge to obtain, however lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs have been collected from large NF1 kindreds. We hypothesized that the genetic effects of NF1-haploinsufficiency may be discerned by comparison of genome-wide transcriptional profiling in somatic, non-tumor cells (LCLs from NF1-affected and -unaffected individuals. As a cross-species filter for heterogeneity, we compared the results from two human kindreds to whole-genome transcriptional profiling in spleen-derived B lymphocytes from age- and gender-matched Nf1+/- and wild-type mice, and used gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA, Onto-Express, Pathway-Express and MetaCore tools to identify genes perturbed in NF1-haploinsufficiency. Results We observed moderate expression of NF1 in human LCLs and of Nf1 in CD19+ mouse B lymphocytes. Using the t test to evaluate individual transcripts, we observed modest expression differences in the transcriptome in NF1-haploinsufficient LCLs and Nf1-haploinsuffiicient mouse B lymphocytes. However, GSEA, Onto-Express, Pathway-Express and MetaCore analyses identified genes that control cell cycle, DNA replication and repair, transcription and translation, and immune response as the most perturbed in NF1-haploinsufficient conditions in both human and mouse. Conclusions Haploinsufficiency arises when loss of one allele of a gene is sufficient to give rise to disease. Haploinsufficiency has traditionally been viewed as a passive state. Our observations of perturbed, up-regulated cell cycle and DNA repair pathways may functionally contribute to NF1

  17. JMJD1C demethylates MDC1 to regulate the RNF8 and BRCA1-mediated chromatin response to DNA breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watanabe, Sugiko; Watanabe, Kenji; Akimov, Vyacheslav

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin ubiquitylation flanking DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), mediated by RNF8 and RNF168 ubiquitin ligases, orchestrates a two-branch pathway, recruiting repair factors 53BP1 or the RAP80-BRCA1 complex. We report that human demethylase JMJD1C regulates the RAP80-BRCA1 branch of this DNA...

  18. Modulation of radiation-induced base excision repair pathway gene expression by melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Rezapoor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Approximately 70% of all cancer patients receive radiotherapy. Although radiotherapy is effective in killing cancer cells, it has adverse effects on normal cells as well. Melatonin (MLT as a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent has been proposed to stimulate DNA repair capacity. We investigated the capability of MLT in the modification of radiation-induced DNA damage in rat peripheral blood cells. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, male rats (n = 162 were divided into 27 groups (n = 6 in each group including: irradiation only, vehicle only, vehicle with irradiation, 100 mg/kg MLT alone, 100 mg/kg MLT plus irradiation in 3 different time points, and control. Subsequently, they were irradiated with a single whole-body X-ray radiation dose of 2 and 8 Gy at a dose rate of 200 MU/min. Rats were given an intraperitoneal injection of MLT or the same volume of vehicle alone 1 h prior to irradiation. Blood samples were also taken 8, 24, and 48 h postirradiation, in order to measure the 8-oxoguanine glycosylase1 (Ogg1, Apex1, and Xrcc1 expression using quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction. Results: Exposing to the ionizing radiation resulted in downregulation of Ogg1, Apex1, and Xrcc1 gene expression. The most obvious suppression was observed in 8 h after exposure. Pretreatments with MLT were able to upregulate these genes when compared to the irradiation-only and vehicle plus irradiation groups (P < 0.05 in all time points. Conclusion: Our results suggested that MLT in mentioned dose may result in modulation of Ogg1, Apex1, and Xrcc1 gene expression in peripheral blood cells to reduce X-ray irradiation-induced DNA damage. Therefore, administration of MLT may increase the normal tissue tolerance to radiation through enhancing the cell DNA repair capacity. We believed that MLT could play a radiation toxicity reduction role in patients who have undergone radiation treatment as a part of cancer radiotherapy.

  19. Association of nucleotide excision repair pathway gene polymorphisms with gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingwei; Sun, Liping; Xu, Qian; Tu, Huakang; He, Caiyun; Xing, Chengzhong; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-02-09

    Polymorphisms of NER genes could change NER ability, thereby altering individual susceptibility to GC. We systematically analyzed 39 SNPs of 8 key genes of NER pathway in 2686 subjects including 898 gastric cancer (GC), 851 atrophic gastritis (AG) and 937 controls (CON) in northern Chinese. SNP genotyping were performed using Sequenom MassARRAY platform. The results demonstrated that DDB2 rs830083 GG genotype was significantly associated with increased GC risk compared with wild-type CC (OR=2.32, P= 6.62 × 10-9); XPC rs2607775 CG genotype conferred a 1.73 increased odds of GC risk than non-cancer subjects compared with wild-type CC (OR=1.73, P= 3.04 × 10-4). The combined detection of these two polymorphisms demonstrated even higher GC risk (OR=3.05). Haplotype analysis suggested that DDB2 rs2029298-rs326222-rs3781619-rs830083 GTAG haplotype was significantly associated with disease risk in each step of CON→AG→GC development (AG vs. CON: OR=2.88, P= 7.51 × 10-7; GC vs. AG: OR=2.90, P=5.68 × 10-15; GC vs. CON: OR=8.42, P=2.22 × 10-15); DDB2 GTAC haplotype was associated with reduced risk of GC compared with CON (OR=0.63, P= 8.31 × 10-12). XPC rs1870134-rs2228000-rs2228001-rs2470352-rs2607775 GCAAG haplotype conferred increased risk of GC compared with AG (OR=1.88, P= 6.98 × 10-4). XPA rs2808668 and drinking, DDB2 rs326222, rs3781619, rs830083 and smoking demonstrated significant interactions in AG; XPC rs2607775 had significant interaction with smoking in GC. In conclusion, NER pathway polymorphisms especially in "damage incision" step were significantly associated with GC risk and had interactions with environment factors. The detection of NER pathway polymorphisms such as DDB2 and XPC might be applied in the prediction of GC risk and personalized prevention in the future. NER pathway polymorphisms especially in "damage incision" step were significantly associated with GC risk and had interactions with environment factors, which might be applied in the

  20. Femur fracture repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000166.htm Femur fracture repair - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had a fracture (break) in the femur in your leg. It ...

  1. Breaking Bat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Isaac-Cesar; Kagan, David

    2013-01-01

    The sight of a broken bat in Major League Baseball can produce anything from a humorous dribbler in the infield to a frightening pointed projectile headed for the stands. Bats usually break at the weakest point, typically in the handle. Breaking happens because the wood gets bent beyond the breaking point due to the wave sent down the bat created…

  2. Comparison of repair of DNA double-strand breaks in identical sequences in primary human fibroblast and immortal hamster-human hybrid cells harboring a single copy of human chromosome 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouladi, B.; Waldren, C. A.; Rydberg, B.; Cooper, P. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    We have optimized a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis assay that measures induction and repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in specific regions of the genome (Lobrich et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 12050-12054, 1995). The increased sensitivity resulting from these improvements makes it possible to analyze the size distribution of broken DNA molecules immediately after the introduction of DSBs and after repair incubation. This analysis shows that the distribution of broken DNA pieces after exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation is consistent with the distribution expected from randomly induced DSBs. It is apparent from the distribution of rejoined DNA pieces after repair incubation that DNA ends continue to rejoin between 3 and 24 h postirradiation and that some of these rejoining events are in fact misrejoining events, since novel restriction fragments both larger and smaller than the original fragment are generated after repair. This improved assay was also used to study the kinetics of DSB rejoining and the extent of misrejoining in identical DNA sequences in human GM38 cells and human-hamster hybrid A(L) cells containing a single human chromosome 11. Despite the numerous differences between these cells, which include species and tissue of origin, levels of TP53, expression of telomerase, and the presence or absence of a homologous chromosome for the restriction fragments examined, the kinetics of rejoining of radiation-induced DSBs and the extent of misrejoining were similar in the two cell lines when studied in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, DSBs were removed from the single-copy human chromosome in the hamster A(L) cells with similar kinetics and misrejoining frequency as at a locus on this hybrid's CHO chromosomes.

  3. Efficacy of DNA double-strand breaks repair in breast cancer is decreased in carriers of the variant allele of the UBC9 gene c.73G>A polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synowiec, Ewelina; Krupa, Renata; Morawiec, Zbigniew; Wasylecka, Maja; Dziki, Lukasz; Morawiec, Jan; Blasiak, Janusz; Wozniak, Katarzyna

    2010-12-10

    UBC9 (E2) SUMO conjugating enzyme plays an important role in the maintenance of genome stability and integrity. In the present work we examined the association between the c.73G>A (Val25Met) polymorphism of the UBC9 gene (rs11553473) and efficacy of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) repair (DRE) in breast cancer patients. We determined the level of endogenous (basal) and exogenous (induced by γ-irradiation) DSBs and efficacy of their repair in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 57 breast cancer patients and 70 healthy individuals. DNA damage and repair were studied by neutral comet assay. Genotypes were determined in DNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes by allele-specific PCR (ASO-PCR). We also correlated genotypes with the clinical characteristics of breast cancer patients. We observed a strong association between breast cancer occurrence and the variant allele carried genotypes in patients with elevated level of basal as well as induced DNA damage (OR 6.74, 95% CI 2.27-20.0 and OR 5.33, 95% CI 1.81-15.7, respectively). We also found statistically significant (pA polymorphism of the UBC9 gene in breast cancer patients. Carriers of variant allele have decreased DNA DRE as compared to wild type genotype carriers. We did not find any association with the UBC9 gene polymorphism and estrogen and progesterone receptor status. The variant allele of the UBC9 gene polymorphism was strongly inversely related to HER negative breast cancer patients (OR 0.03, 95% CI 0.00-0.23). Our results suggest that the c.73G>A polymorphism of the UBC9 gene may affect DNA DSBs repair efficacy in breast cancer patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Efficacy of DNA double-strand breaks repair in breast cancer is decreased in carriers of the variant allele of the UBC9 gene c.73G>A polymorphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Synowiec, Ewelina [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Krupa, Renata [Laboratory of DNA Repair, Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Lodz (Poland); Morawiec, Zbigniew; Wasylecka, Maja [Department of Surgical Oncology, N. Copernicus Hospital, Lodz (Poland); Dziki, Lukasz; Morawiec, Jan [Department of General and Colorectal Surgery, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Blasiak, Janusz [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Wozniak, Katarzyna, E-mail: wozniak@biol.uni.lodz.pl [Laboratory of DNA Repair, Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Lodz (Poland)

    2010-12-10

    UBC9 (E2) SUMO conjugating enzyme plays an important role in the maintenance of genome stability and integrity. In the present work we examined the association between the c.73G>A (Val25Met) polymorphism of the UBC9 gene (rs11553473) and efficacy of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) repair (DRE) in breast cancer patients. We determined the level of endogenous (basal) and exogenous (induced by {gamma}-irradiation) DSBs and efficacy of their repair in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 57 breast cancer patients and 70 healthy individuals. DNA damage and repair were studied by neutral comet assay. Genotypes were determined in DNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes by allele-specific PCR (ASO-PCR). We also correlated genotypes with the clinical characteristics of breast cancer patients. We observed a strong association between breast cancer occurrence and the variant allele carried genotypes in patients with elevated level of basal as well as induced DNA damage (OR 6.74, 95% CI 2.27-20.0 and OR 5.33, 95% CI 1.81-15.7, respectively). We also found statistically significant (p < 0.05) difference in DRE related to the c.73G>A polymorphism of the UBC9 gene in breast cancer patients. Carriers of variant allele have decreased DNA DRE as compared to wild type genotype carriers. We did not find any association with the UBC9 gene polymorphism and estrogen and progesterone receptor status. The variant allele of the UBC9 gene polymorphism was strongly inversely related to HER negative breast cancer patients (OR 0.03, 95% CI 0.00-0.23). Our results suggest that the c.73G>A polymorphism of the UBC9 gene may affect DNA DSBs repair efficacy in breast cancer patients.

  5. Calmodulin Mediates DNA Repair Pathways Involving H2AX in Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure of RAW 264.7 Macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smallwood, Heather S.; Lopez Ferrer, Daniel; Eberlein, P. Elis; Watson, David J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2009-02-05

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms that modulate macrophage radioresistance is necessary for the development of effective radiation therapies, as tumor-associated macrophages promote both angiogenesis and matrix remodeling that, in turn, enhance metastasis. In this respect, we have identified a dose-dependent increase in the abundance of the calcium regulatory protein calmodulin (CaM) in RAW 264.7 macrophages upon irradiation. CaM overexpression results in increased macrophage survival following radiation exposure, acting to diminish the sensitivity to low-dose exposures. Increases in CaM abundance also result in an increase in the number of phosphorylated histone H2AX protein complexes associated with DNA repair following macrophage irradiation, with no change in the extent of double-stranded DNA damage. In comparison, when NFκB-dependent pathways are inhibited, through the expression of a dominant-negative IκB construct, there is no significant increase in phosphorylated H2AX upon irradiation. These results indicate that the molecular basis for the up-regulation of histone H2AX mediated DNA-repair pathways is not the result of nonspecific NFκB-dependent pathways or a specific threshold of DNA damage. Rather, increases in CaM abundance act to minimize the low-dose hypersensitivity to radiation to enhance macrophage radioresistance through processes that include the upregulation of DNA repair pathways involving histone protein H2AX phosphorylation.

  6. Unsuitability of lymphoblastoid cell lines as surrogate of cryopreserved isolated lymphocytes for the analysis of DNA double-strand break repair activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zijno, Andrea [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Porcedda, Paola [Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin (Italy); Saini, Francesca [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Allione, Alessandra [Institute for Scientific Interchange (ISI) Foundation, Villa Gualino, Turin (Italy); Garofalo, Bruno; Marcon, Francesca [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Guarrera, Simonetta [Institute for Scientific Interchange (ISI) Foundation, Villa Gualino, Turin (Italy); Turinetto, Valentina; Minieri, Valentina [Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin (Italy); Funaro, Ada [Department of Genetics, Biology and Biochemistry, University of Turin (Italy); Crebelli, Riccardo [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Giachino, Claudia [Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin (Italy); Matullo, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.matullo@unito.it [Institute for Scientific Interchange (ISI) Foundation, Villa Gualino, Turin (Italy); Department of Genetics, Biology and Biochemistry, University of Turin (Italy)

    2010-02-03

    As first task of a comprehensive investigation on DNA repair genotype-phenotype correlations, the suitability of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) as surrogate of cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in DNA repair phenotypic assays was evaluated. To this aim the amount of DNA damage induced by {gamma}-rays and DNA repair capacity were evaluated in unstimulated (G{sub 0}) and mitogen-simulated (G{sub 2}) PBMC from 20 healthy subjects and in EBV-transformed LCL obtained from the same individuals. Phosphorylation of histone H2AX, micronuclei and chromosomal aberrations were the end-points investigated. The results obtained show higher basal frequencies of binucleated cells bearing micronuclei and nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) in LCL with respect to PBMC, suggesting that EBV transformation may be associated with chromosomal instability. After irradiation, higher levels of micronuclei were induced in G{sub 0}-treated PBMC compared to cycling LCL; conversely, NPB were more frequent in LCL than in PBMC. Moreover, higher levels of chromosomal aberrations were observed in G{sub 2}-treated PBMC compared to LCL. Concerning {gamma}-H2AX measurements, phosphorylation levels 1 h after treatment and dephosphorylation kinetics were basically similar in LCL and in PBMC. However, while Spearman's test showed a strong correlation between the results obtained in replicated experiments with PBMC, high inter-experimental variability and poor reproducibility was observed in the experiments performed with LCL, possibly due to the intrinsic instability of LCL. In summary, both the analysis of {gamma}-H2AX and the evaluation of chromosome damage highlighted a larger inter-experimental variability in the results obtained with LCL compared to PBMC. Noteworthy, the two set of results proved to lack any significant correlation at the individual level. These results indicate that LCL may be unsuitable for investigating genotype

  7. Defective resection at DNA double-strand breaks leads to de novo telomere formation and enhances gene targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo-Hyun Chung

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The formation of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA at double-strand break (DSB ends is essential in repair by homologous recombination and is mediated by DNA helicases and nucleases. Here we estimated the length of ssDNA generated during DSB repair and analyzed the consequences of elimination of processive resection pathways mediated by Sgs1 helicase and Exo1 nuclease on DSB repair fidelity. In wild-type cells during allelic gene conversion, an average of 2-4 kb of ssDNA accumulates at each side of the break. Longer ssDNA is formed during ectopic recombination or break-induced replication (BIR, reflecting much slower repair kinetics. This relatively extensive resection may help determine sequences involved in homology search and prevent recombination within short DNA repeats next to the break. In sgs1Delta exo1Delta mutants that form only very short ssDNA, allelic gene conversion decreases 5-fold and DSBs are repaired by BIR or de novo telomere formation resulting in loss of heterozygosity. The absence of the telomerase inhibitor, PIF1, increases de novo telomere pathway usage to about 50%. Accumulation of Cdc13, a protein recruiting telomerase, at the break site increases in sgs1Delta exo1Delta, and the requirement of the Ku complex for new telomere formation is partially bypassed. In contrast to this decreased and alternative DSB repair, the efficiency and accuracy of gene targeting increases dramatically in sgs1Delta exo1Delta cells, suggesting that transformed DNA is very stable in these mutants. Altogether these data establish a new role for processive resection in the fidelity of DSB repair.

  8. Anti-tumour compounds illudin S and Irofulven induce DNA lesions ignored by global repair and exclusively processed by transcription- and replication-coupled repair pathways.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Raams (Anja); M.J. Kelner (Michael); J.M.Y. Ng (Jessica); Y.M. Yamashita (Yukiko); S. Takeda (Shiunichi); T.C. McMorris (Trevor); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIlludin S is a natural sesquiterpene drug with strong anti-tumour activity. Inside cells, unstable active metabolites of illudin cause the formation of as yet poorly characterised DNA lesions. In order to identify factors involved in their repair, we have performed a detailed genetic

  9. Characterization of 26 deletion CNVs reveals the frequent occurrence of micro-mutations within the breakpoint-flanking regions and frequent repair of double-strand breaks by templated insertions derived from remote genomic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; Su, Peiqiang; Hu, Bin; Zhu, Wenjuan; Li, Qibin; Yuan, Ping; Li, Jiangchao; Guan, Xinyuan; Li, Fucheng; Jing, Xiangyi; Li, Ru; Zhang, Yongling; Férec, Claude; Cooper, David N; Wang, Jun; Huang, Dongsheng; Chen, Jian-Min; Wang, Yiming

    2015-06-01

    Copy number variations (CNVs) have increasingly been reported to cause, or predispose to, human disease. However, a large fraction of these CNVs have not been accurately characterized at the single-base-pair level, thereby hampering a better understanding of the mutational mechanisms underlying CNV formation. Here, employing a composite pipeline method derived from various inference-based programs, we have characterized 26 deletion CNVs [including three novel pathogenic CNVs involving an autosomal gene (EXT2) causing hereditary osteochondromas and an X-linked gene (CLCN5) causing Dent disease, as well as 23 CNVs previously identified by inference from a cohort of Canadian autism spectrum disorder families] to the single-base-pair level of accuracy from whole-genome sequencing data. We found that breakpoint-flanking micro-mutations (within 22 bp of the breakpoint) are present in a significant fraction (5/26; 19%) of the deletion CNVs. This analysis also provided evidence that a recently described error-prone form of DNA repair (i.e., repair of DNA double-strand breaks by templated nucleotide sequence insertions derived from distant regions of the genome) not only causes human genetic disease but also impacts on human genome evolution. Our findings illustrate the importance of precise CNV breakpoint delineation for understanding the underlying mutational mechanisms and have implications for primer design in relation to the detection of deletion CNVs in clinical diagnosis.

  10. Chromosome End Repair and Genome Stability in Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susannah F. Calhoun

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum replicates within circulating red blood cells, where it is subjected to conditions that frequently cause DNA damage. The repair of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs is thought to rely almost exclusively on homologous recombination (HR, due to a lack of efficient nonhomologous end joining. However, given that the parasite is haploid during this stage of its life cycle, the mechanisms involved in maintaining genome stability are poorly understood. Of particular interest are the subtelomeric regions of the chromosomes, which contain the majority of the multicopy variant antigen-encoding genes responsible for virulence and disease severity. Here, we show that parasites utilize a competitive balance between de novo telomere addition, also called “telomere healing,” and HR to stabilize chromosome ends. Products of both repair pathways were observed in response to DSBs that occurred spontaneously during routine in vitro culture or resulted from experimentally induced DSBs, demonstrating that both pathways are active in repairing DSBs within subtelomeric regions and that the pathway utilized was determined by the DNA sequences immediately surrounding the break. In combination, these two repair pathways enable parasites to efficiently maintain chromosome stability while also contributing to the generation of genetic diversity.

  11. KAP1 Deacetylation by SIRT1 Promotes Non-Homologous End-Joining Repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hui Lin

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining are two major DNA double-strand-break repair pathways. While HR-mediated repair requires a homologous sequence as the guiding template to restore the damage site precisely, NHEJ-mediated repair ligates the DNA lesion directly and increases the risk of losing nucleotides. Therefore, how a cell regulates the balance between HR and NHEJ has become an important issue for maintaining genomic integrity over time. Here we report that SIRT1-dependent KAP1 deacetylation positively regulates NHEJ. We show that up-regulation of KAP1 attenuates HR efficiency while promoting NHEJ repair. Moreover, SIRT1-mediated KAP1 deacetylation further enhances the effect of NHEJ by stabilizing its interaction with 53BP1, which leads to increased 53BP1 focus formation in response to DNA damage. Taken together, our study suggests a SIRT1-KAP1 regulatory mechanism for HR-NHEJ repair pathway choice.

  12. Oxidative stress alters base excision repair pathway and increases apoptotic response in apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 haploinsufficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, Archana; Raffoul, Julian J; Patel, Hiral V; Prychitko, Thomas M; Anyangwe, Njwen; Meira, Lisiane B; Friedberg, Errol C; Cabelof, Diane C; Heydari, Ahmad R

    2009-06-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is the redox regulator of multiple stress-inducible transcription factors, such as NF-kappaB, and the major 5'-endonuclease in base excision repair (BER). We utilized mice containing a heterozygous gene-targeted deletion of APE1/Ref-1 (Apex(+/-)) to determine the impact of APE1/Ref-1 haploinsufficiency on the processing of oxidative DNA damage induced by 2-nitropropane (2-NP) in the liver tissue of mice. APE1/Ref-1 haploinsufficiency results in a significant decline in NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity in response to oxidative stress in liver. In addition, loss of APE1/Ref-1 increases the apoptotic response to oxidative stress, in which significant increases in GADD45g expression, p53 protein stability, and caspase activity are observed. Oxidative stress displays a differential impact on monofunctional (UNG) and bifunctional (OGG1) DNA glycosylase-initiated BER in the liver of Apex(+/-) mice. APE1/Ref-1 haploinsufficiency results in a significant decline in the repair of oxidized bases (e.g., 8-OHdG), whereas removal of uracil is increased in liver nuclear extracts of mice using an in vitro BER assay. Apex(+/-) mice exposed to 2-NP displayed a significant decline in 3'-OH-containing single-strand breaks and an increase in aldehydic lesions in their liver DNA, suggesting an accumulation of repair intermediates of failed bifunctional DNA glycosylase-initiated BER.

  13. Human Xip1 (C2orf13) is a novel regulator of cellular responses to DNA strand breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Fugger, Kasper; Danielsen, Jannie Rendtlew

    2007-01-01

    DNA strand breaks arise continuously as the result of intracellular metabolism and in response to a multitude of genotoxic agents. To overcome such challenges to genomic stability, cells have evolved genome surveillance pathways that detect and repair damaged DNA in a coordinated fashion. Here we...... underscoring the potential importance of Xip1 in the DNA damage response. Finally, depletion of Xip1 significantly decreased the clonogenic survival of cells exposed to DNA SSB- or double strand break-inducing agents. Collectively, these findings implicate Xip1 as a new regulator of genome maintenance pathways...

  14. Extracts of proliferating and non-proliferating human cells display different base excision pathways and repair fidelity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akbari, Mansour; Pena Diaz, Javier; Andersen, Sonja

    2009-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) of damaged or inappropriate bases in DNA has been reported to take place by single nucleotide insertion or through incorporation of several nucleotides, termed short-patch and long-patch repair, respectively. We found that extracts from proliferating and non-proliferati...

  15. DNA repair in neurons: So if they don't divide what's to repair?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishel, Melissa L. [Department of Pediatrics (Section of Hematology/Oncology), Herman B Wells Center for Pediatric Research, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1044 W. Walnut, Room 302C, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Vasko, Michael R. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1044 W. Walnut St., Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Kelley, Mark R. [Department of Pediatrics (Section of Hematology/Oncology), Herman B Wells Center for Pediatric Research, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1044 W. Walnut, Room 302C, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States) and Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1044 W. Walnut St., Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States) and Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1044 W. Walnut, Room 302C, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)]. E-mail: mkelley@iupui.edu

    2007-01-03

    Neuronal DNA repair remains one of the most exciting areas for investigation, particularly as a means to compare the DNA repair response in mitotic (cancer) vs. post-mitotic (neuronal) cells. In addition, the role of DNA repair in neuronal cell survival and response to aging and environmental insults is of particular interest. DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as generated by mitochondrial respiration includes altered bases, abasic sites, and single- and double-strand breaks which can be prevented by the DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway. Oxidative stress accumulates in the DNA of the human brain over time especially in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and is proposed to play a critical role in aging and in the pathogenesis of several neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease, ALS, and Alzheimer's diseases. Because DNA damage accumulates in the mtDNA more than nuclear DNA, there is increased interest in DNA repair pathways and the consequence of DNA damage in the mitochondria of neurons. The type of damage that is most likely to occur in neuronal cells is oxidative DNA damage which is primarily removed by the BER pathway. Following the notion that the bulk of neuronal DNA damage is acquired by oxidative DNA damage and ROS, the BER pathway is a likely area of focus for neuronal studies of DNA repair. BER variations in brain aging and pathology in various brain regions and tissues are presented. Therefore, the BER pathway is discussed in greater detail in this review than other repair pathways. Other repair pathways including direct reversal, nucleotide excision repair (NER), mismatch repair (MMR), homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining are also discussed. Finally, there is a growing interest in the role that DNA repair pathways play in the clinical arena as they relate to the neurotoxicity and neuropathy associated with cancer treatments. Among the numerous side effects of cancer treatments, major

  16. Assessing SNP-SNP interactions among DNA repair, modification and metabolism related pathway genes in breast cancer susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Sapkota

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWASs have identified low-penetrance common variants (i.e., single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs associated with breast cancer susceptibility. Although GWASs are primarily focused on single-locus effects, gene-gene interactions (i.e., epistasis are also assumed to contribute to the genetic risks for complex diseases including breast cancer. While it has been hypothesized that moderately ranked (P value based weak single-locus effects in GWASs could potentially harbor valuable information for evaluating epistasis, we lack systematic efforts to investigate SNPs showing consistent associations with weak statistical significance across independent discovery and replication stages. The objectives of this study were i to select SNPs showing single-locus effects with weak statistical significance for breast cancer in a GWAS and/or candidate-gene studies; ii to replicate these SNPs in an independent set of breast cancer cases and controls; and iii to explore their potential SNP-SNP interactions contributing to breast cancer susceptibility. A total of 17 SNPs related to DNA repair, modification and metabolism pathway genes were selected since these pathways offer a priori knowledge for potential epistatic interactions and an overall role in breast carcinogenesis. The study design included predominantly Caucasian women (2,795 cases and 4,505 controls from Alberta, Canada. We observed two two-way SNP-SNP interactions (APEX1-rs1130409 and RPAP1-rs2297381; MLH1-rs1799977 and MDM2-rs769412 in logistic regression that conferred elevated risks for breast cancer (P(interaction<7.3 × 10(-3. Logic regression identified an interaction involving four SNPs (MBD2-rs4041245, MLH1-rs1799977, MDM2-rs769412, BRCA2-rs1799943 (P(permutation = 2.4 × 10(-3. SNPs involved in SNP-SNP interactions also showed single-locus effects with weak statistical significance, while BRCA2-rs1799943 showed stronger statistical significance (P

  17. Crosstalk between Translesion Synthesis, Fanconi Anemia Network, and Homologous Recombination Repair Pathways in Interstrand DNA Crosslink Repair and Development of Chemoresistance

    OpenAIRE

    Haynes, Brittany; Saadat, Nadia; Myung, Brian; Shekhar, Malathy PV

    2014-01-01

    Bifunctional alkylating and platinum based drugs are chemotherapeutic agents used to treat cancer. These agents induce DNA adducts via formation of intrastrand or interstrand (ICL) DNA crosslinks, and DNA lesions of the ICL type are particularly toxic as they block DNA replication and/or DNA transcription. However, the therapeutic efficacies of these drugs are frequently limited due to the cancer cell’s enhanced ability to repair and tolerate these toxic DNA lesions. This ability to tolerate ...

  18. The current state of eukaryotic DNA base damage and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Nicholas C; Corbett, Anita H; Doetsch, Paul W

    2015-12-02

    DNA damage is a natural hazard of life. The most common DNA lesions are base, sugar, and single-strand break damage resulting from oxidation, alkylation, deamination, and spontaneous hydrolysis. If left unrepaired, such lesions can become fixed in the genome as permanent mutations. Thus, evolution has led to the creation of several highly conserved, partially redundant pathways to repair or mitigate the effects of DNA base damage. The biochemical mechanisms of these pathways have been well characterized and the impact of this work was recently highlighted by the selection of Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar and Paul Modrich as the recipients of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their seminal work in defining DNA repair pathways. However, how these repair pathways are regulated and interconnected is still being elucidated. This review focuses on the classical base excision repair and strand incision pathways in eukaryotes, considering both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and humans, and extends to some important questions and challenges facing the field of DNA base damage repair. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Mechanism-based drug combinations with the DNA-strand-breaking nucleoside analog, CNDAC

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiaojun; Jiang, Yingjun; Nowak, Billie; Hargis, Sarah; Plunkett, William

    2016-01-01

    CNDAC (2?-C-cyano-2?-deoxy-1-?-D-arabino-pentofuranosyl-cytosine, DFP10917) and its orally bioavailable prodrug, sapacitabine, are undergoing clinical trials for hematological malignancies and solid tumors. The unique action mechanism of inducing DNA strand breaks distinguishes CNDAC from other deoxycytidine analogs. To optimize the clinical potentials of CNDAC, we explored multiple strategies combining CNDAC with chemotherapeutic agents targeting distinct DNA damage repair pathways that are ...

  20. BCR-ABL promotes the frequency of mutagenic single-strand annealing DNA repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Margret S.; Reddy, Mamatha M.; Gonneville, Jeffrey R.; DeRoo, Scott C.; Podar, Klaus; Griffin, James D.; Weinstock, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Intracellular oxidative stress in cells transformed by the BCR-ABL oncogene is associated with increased DNA double-strand breaks. Imprecise repair of these breaks can result in the accumulation of mutations, leading to therapy-related drug resistance and disease progression. Using several BCR-ABL model systems, we found that BCR-ABL specifically promotes the repair of double-strand breaks through single-strand annealing (SSA), a mutagenic pathway that involves sequence repeats. Moreover, our results suggest that mutagenic SSA repair can be regulated through the interplay between BCR-ABL and extrinsic growth factors. Increased SSA activity required Y177 in BCR-ABL, as well as a functional PI3K and Ras pathway downstream of this site. Furthermore, our data hint at a common pathway for DSB repair whereby BCR-ABL, Tel-ABL, Tel-PDGFR, FLT3-ITD, and Jak2V617F all increase mutagenic repair. This increase in SSA may not be sufficiently suppressed by tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the stromal microenvironment. Therefore, drugs that target growth factor receptor signaling represent potential therapeutic agents to combat tyrosine kinase-induced genomic instability. PMID:19571320

  1. Bypass of a 5′,8-cyclopurine-2′-deoxynucleoside by DNA polymerase β during DNA replication and base excision repair leads to nucleotide misinsertions and DNA strand breaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhongliang; Xu, Meng; Lai, Yanhao; Laverde, Eduardo E.; Terzidis, Michael A.; Masi, Annalisa; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Liu, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    5′,8-cyclopurine-2′-deoxynucleosides including 5′,8-cyclo-dA (cdA) and 5′,8-cyclo-dG (cdG) are induced by hydroxyl radicals resulting from oxidative stress such as ionizing radiation. 5′,8-cyclopurine-2′-deoxynucleoside lesions are repaired by nucleotide excision repair with low efficiency, thereby leading to their accumulation in the human genome and lesion bypass by DNA polymerases during DNA replication and base excision repair (BER). In this study, for the first time, we discovered that DNA polymerase β (pol β) efficiently bypassed a 5′R-cdA, but inefficiently bypassed a 5′S-cdA during DNA replication and BER. We found that cell extracts from pol β wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibited significant DNA synthesis activity in bypassing a cdA lesion located in replication and BER intermediates. However, pol β knock-out cell extracts exhibited little DNA synthesis to bypass the lesion. This indicates that pol β plays an important role in bypassing a cdA lesion during DNA replication and BER. Furthermore, we demonstrated that pol β inserted both a correct and incorrect nucleotide to bypass a cdA at a low concentration. Nucleotide misinsertion was significantly stimulated by a high concentration of pol β, indicating a mutagenic effect induced by pol β lesion bypass synthesis of a 5′,8-cyclopurine-2′-deoxynucleoside. Moreover, we found that bypass of a 5′S-cdA by pol β generated an intermediate that failed to be extended by pol β, resulting in accumulation of single-strand DNA breaks. Our study provides the first evidence that pol β plays an important role in bypassing a 5′,8-cyclo-dA during DNA replication and repair, as well as new insight into mutagenic effects and genome instability resulting from pol β bypassing of a cdA lesion. PMID:26123757

  2. Rad52 forms DMA repair and recombination centers during S phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, M.; Rothstein, R.; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2001-01-01

    Maintenance of genomic integrity and stable transmission of genetic information depend on a number of DNA repair processes. Failure to faithfully perform these processes can result in genetic alterations and subsequent development of cancer and other genetic diseases. In the eukaryote Saccharomyces...... cerevisiae, homologous recombination is the major pathway for repairing DNA double-strand breaks. The key role played by Rad52 in this pathway has been attributed to its ability to seek out and mediate annealing of homologous DNA strands. In this study, we find that S. cerevisiae Rad52 fused to green...... fluorescent protein (GFP) is fully functional in DNA repair and recombination. After induction of DNA double-strand breaks by gamma -irradiation, meiosis, or the HO endonuclease, Rad52-GFP relocalizes from a diffuse nuclear distribution to distinct foci. Interestingly, Rad52 foci are formed almost exclusively...

  3. Individual repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks in lymphocytes. Implications for radiation-induced dermatitis in breast cancer; Die individuelle Reparatur von strahleninduzierten DNA-Doppelstrangbruechen in Lymphozyten. Implikationen fuer die radiogene Dermatitis beim Mammakarzinom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melchior, Patrick Wilhelm

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant 'whole breast radiotherapy' (WBRT) is the standard of care after breast conserving surgery in women with breast cancer. Throughout different cancer stages the addition of WBRT leads to significantly improved rates of freedom from local failure and overall survival. WBRT is generally well tolerated. A 5-10%-rate of severe acute or long-term side effects is commonly observed. For both radiation-mediated tumor-cell-elimination and induction of side effects, DNA-double-strand-breaks (DSB) presumably play the decisive role. The intensity of normal tissue reactions in radiotherapy can, in part, be attributed to the intrinsic DSB repair-capacity. In this study in vivo and in vitro experiments are carried through in order to assess DSB repair-kinetics in blood lymphocytes of women with breast cancer. These findings are to be correlated with the degree of radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity. Patients and Methods: Eighteen patients with breast cancer, in whom WBRT was indicated, were examined. A total WBRT dose of 50 Gy (single dose 2 Gy) with an additional boost-radiotherapy to the initial tumor-region to a total dose of 60-66 Gy was administered. DSB repair was determined by means of counting γ-H2AX foci in blood lymphocytes at predefined points in time, i.e. before and 0.5 h; 2.5 h; 5 h and 24 h after in vivo irradiation (1st fraction of WBRT) and before and 0.5 h; 2.5 h and 5 h after in vitro irradiation with increasing radiation doses in the range of 10 - 500 mGy. Acute normal tissue toxicity was scored on the basis of a modified RTOG-classification (main aspects were erythema and dry or moist skin desquamation). Results: DSB repair-halflife-times did not differ between patients with a higher or lower than average incidence of acute side effects. In patients with 'above average' side effects larger irradiation volumes were treated (volume surrounded by the 50%-isodose). Adjusted for these, no single patients showed elevated

  4. Signalling of double strand breaks and deprotected telomeres in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon eAmiard

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Failure to repair DNA double strand breaks (DSB can lead to chromosomal rearrangements and eventually to cancer or cell death. Radiation and environmental pollutants induce DSB and this is of particular relevance to plants due to their sessile life style. DSB also occur naturally in cells during DNA replication and programmed induction of DSB initiates the meiotic recombination essential for gametogenesis in most eukaryotes. The linear nature of most eukaryotic chromosomes means that each chromosome has two "broken" ends. Chromosome ends, or telomeres, are protected by nucleoprotein caps which avoid their recognition as DSB by the cellular DNA repair machinery. Deprotected telomeres are recognized as DSB and become substrates for recombination leading to chromosome fusions, the "bridge-breakage-fusion" cycle, genome rearrangements and cell death. The importance of repair of DSB and the severity of the consequences of their misrepair have led to the presence of multiple, robust mechanisms for their detection and repair. After a brief overview of DSB repair pathways to set the context, we present here an update of current understanding of the detection and signalling of DSB in the plant, Arabidopsis thaliana.

  5. Signalization and repair of the DNA double-strand breaks of in the cerebral tumors: modulation of the radiation response with the chemotherapy treatments; Signalization et reparation des cassures double-brin de l'ADN dans les gliomes: modulation de la reponse aux traitements chimio-radiotherapeutiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcinkova-Bencokova, Z

    2007-07-15

    There are about 6000 new cases of nervous system tumours each year in France. However, the current radio chemotherapeutic approaches against brain tumours remain still insufficient to produce a satisfactory therapeutic index. In parallel, the knowledge of the early radiobiological events has considerably progressed in the last few years. This thesis aims to provide new insights in the molecular and cellular response of brain tumours to radio chemotherapy. This thesis was divided into four stages. Stage 1: a novel DNA double-strand breaks repair pathway depending on the MRE11 protein but independent of the phosphorylation of H2AX emerged from the study of artefacts of the immunofluorescence technique and a systematic analysis of the radiosensitivity of human cells. Stage 2: the radiobiological features of 3 rodent models of glioma among the most used in preclinical trials and of 7 human glioma cell lines were investigated. Functional impairments of the BRCA1 protein in response to radiation and/or cisplatin were observed in the majority of the models tested, raising the question of the role of this protein in the anti-glioma treatments and in glioma genesis. Stage 3: in order to extend our approach to genetic syndromes associated with cerebral tumours predisposition, the radiobiological characteristics of the fibroblasts resulting from patients suffering from neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a pathology associated with a strong incidence of peripheral nervous system tumours, were investigated. NF1 appeared to be a syndrome with moderated radiosensitivity, associated with a weak deficiency of DNA end-joining repair but with a strong activity of MRE11. These results enabled us to propose a preliminary model involving both proteins BRCA1 and NF1. Stage 4: considering the role of BRCA1 in the inhibition of some tyrosine kinase activity and in the response to cisplatin, we tested the radiobiological effects of treatments combining radiation, cisplatin and tyrosine kinase

  6. Radiation induced base excision repair (BER): a mechanistic mathematical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmanian, Shirin; Taleei, Reza; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a mechanistic model of base excision repair (BER) pathway for the repair of single-stand breaks (SSBs) and oxidized base lesions produced by ionizing radiation (IR). The model is based on law of mass action kinetics to translate the biochemical processes involved, step-by-step, in the BER pathway to translate into mathematical equations. The BER is divided into two subpathways, short-patch repair (SPR) and long-patch repair (LPR). SPR involves in replacement of single nucleotide via Pol β and ligation of the ends via XRCC1 and Ligase III, while LPR involves in replacement of multiple nucleotides via PCNA, Pol δ/ɛ and FEN 1, and ligation via Ligase I. A hallmark of IR is the production of closely spaced lesions within a turn of DNA helix (named complex lesions), which have been attributed to a slower repair process. The model presented considers fast and slow component of BER kinetics by assigning SPR for simple lesions and LPR for complex lesions. In the absence of in vivo reaction rate constants for the BER proteins, we have deduced a set of rate constants based on different published experimental measurements including accumulation kinetics obtained from UVA irradiation, overall SSB repair kinetic experiments, and overall BER kinetics from live-cell imaging experiments. The model was further used to calculate the repair kinetics of complex base lesions via the LPR subpathway and compared to foci kinetic experiments for cells irradiated with γ rays, Si, and Fe ions. The model calculation show good agreement with experimental measurements for both overall repair and repair of complex lesions. Furthermore, using the model we explored different mechanisms responsible for inhibition of repair when higher LET and HZE particles are used and concluded that increasing the damage complexity can inhibit initiation of LPR after the AP site removal step in BER. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Evidence for multiple cycles of strand invasion during repair of double-strand gaps in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVey, Mitch; Adams, Melissa; Staeva-Vieira, Eric; Sekelsky, Jeff J

    2004-06-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), a major source of genome instability, are often repaired through homologous recombination pathways. Models for these pathways have been proposed, but the precise mechanisms and the rules governing their use remain unclear. In Drosophila, the synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) model can explain most DSB repair. To investigate SDSA, we induced DSBs by excision of a P element from the male X chromosome, which produces a 14-kb gap relative to the sister chromatid. In wild-type males, repair synthesis tracts are usually long, resulting in frequent restoration of the P element. However, repair synthesis is often incomplete, resulting in internally deleted P elements. We examined the effects of mutations in spn-A, which encodes the Drosophila Rad51 ortholog. As expected, there is little or no repair synthesis in homozygous spn-A mutants after P excision. However, heterozygosity for spn-A mutations also resulted in dramatic reductions in the lengths of repair synthesis tracts. These findings support a model in which repair DNA synthesis is not highly processive. We discuss a model wherein repair of a double-strand gap requires multiple cycles of strand invasion, synthesis, and dissociation of the nascent strand. After dissociation, the nascent strand may anneal to a complementary single strand, reinvade a template to be extended by additional synthesis, or undergo end joining. This model can explain aborted SDSA repair events and the prevalence of internally deleted transposable elements in genomes.

  8. The Break

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Anete Mikkala Camille

    2018-01-01

    The chapter elaborates on how to deal with one of the major challenges facing organizations worldwide; Stress. The Break enacts a quantum approach to meet the challenges by proposing a combination of three different quantum storytelling technologies; protreptic mentoring, walking and material...... storytelling to enact fruitful breakings of patterns unbecoming. The claim being, that the hamster wheel of Work-life anno 2016 needs reconfiguration and the simple yet fruitful manner by which this is done is through acknowledging the benefits of bodies, spaces and artifacts – and the benefits of actually...... taking a break, discontinuing for a moment in order to continue better, wiser and more at ease. Both within and as part of the daily routines, and – now and then – outside these routines in the majesty of nature with time to explore and redirect the course of life in companionships with fellow man...

  9. Genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair and oxidative stress pathways may modify the association between body size and postmenopausal breast cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    McCullough, L. E.; Eng, S. M.; Bradshaw, P. T.; Cleveland, R. J.; Steck, S. E.; Terry, M. B.; Shen, J.; Crew, K.D.; Rössner ml., Pavel; Ahn, J.; Ambrosone, Ch.B.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Neugut, A. I.; Santella, R. M.; Gammon, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 4 (2015), s. 263-269 ISSN 1047-2797 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : breast cancer * body mass index * oxidative stress * DNA repair * Epidemiology Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.335, year: 2015

  10. Esc2 and Sgs1 act in functionally distinct branches of the homologous recombination repair pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mankouri, Hocine W; Ngo, Hien-Ping; Hickson, Ian D

    2009-01-01

    homologous recombination repair (HRR) intermediates. These roles are qualitatively similar to those of Sgs1, the yeast ortholog of the human Bloom's syndrome protein, BLM. However, whereas mutation of either ESC2 or SGS1 leads to the accumulation of unprocessed HRR intermediates in the presence of MMS...

  11. Resisting the Resistance in Cancer: Cheminformatics Studies on Short- Path Base Excision Repair Pathway Antagonists Using Supervised Learning Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ritu; Jamal, Salma; Goyal, Sukriti; Wahi, Divya; Singh, Aditi; Grover, Abhinav

    2015-01-01

    Survival of cells and maintenance of genome depend on detection and repair of damaged DNA through intricate mechanisms. Cancer treatment relies on chemotherapy or radiation therapy that kills neoplastic cells by causing immense damage to the DNA. In many cases, escalated DNA repair mechanism leads to resistance against these therapies and therefore, there is a need to expand the interest in developing drugs that can sensitize the cells to such therapies by interfering with the DNA repair mechanism. Several studies have suggested a link between over expression of the primary mammalian enzyme, Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease (APE1), responsible for abasic (or AP) site removal in the DNA and resistance of these cells to cancer therapy, whereas APE1 down-regulation sensitizes the cells to DNA damaging agents. Thus, the current treatment efficacy can be improved by aiding to selective sensitization of cancer cells and protection of normal cells. In the present study, we have used machine learning based approach by selecting assorted compounds with known activity for APE1 and constructed a range of in silico predictive classification models to discriminate between the inhibitors and non-inhibitors. These models can be applied to numerous other unscreened compounds to select the ones which are more likely to be the inhibitors for APE1. We have further found the common molecular substructures which were associated with the molecular activity of the compounds using a substructure search approach.

  12. Dynamics and mechanisms of DNA repair by photolyase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheyun; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2015-01-01

    Photolyase, a class of flavoproteins, uses blue light to repair two types of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) and pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6–4) photoproduct (6–4PP). In this perspective, we review the recent progress on the repair dynamics and mechanisms of both types of DNA restoration by photolyases. We first report the spectroscopic characterization of flavin in various redox states and the active-site solvation dynamics in photolyases. We then systematically summarize the detailed repair dynamics of damaged DNA by photolyases and a biomimetic system through resolving all elementary steps on the ultrafast timescales, including multiple intermolecular electron- and proton-transfer reactions and bond-breaking and -making processes. We determined the unique electron tunneling pathways, identified the key functional residues and revealed the molecular origin of high repair efficiency, and thus elucidate the molecular mechanisms and repair photocycles at the most fundamental level. We finally conclude that the active sites of photolyases, unlike aqueous solution for the biomimetic system, provide a unique electrostatic environment and local flexibility and thus a dedicated synergy for all elementary dynamics to maximize the repair efficiency. This repair photomachine is the first enzyme that the entire functional evolution is completely mapped out in real time. PMID:25870862

  13. Electroweak breaking and supersymmetry breaking

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We discuss the clash between the absence of fine tuning in the Higgs potential and a sufficient suppression of flavour changing neutral current transitions in supersymmetric extensions of the standard model. It is pointed out that horizontal U ( 1 ) symmetry combined with the D -term supersymmetry breaking provides a ...

  14. Roscovitine modulates DNA repair and senescence: implications for combination chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzi, Elvira; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Brady, Hugh J M

    2005-11-15

    Treatment of tumor cells by chemotherapy activates a series of responses ranging from apoptosis to premature senescence and repair. Survival responses are characterized by inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases. Because inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases represents a distinctive feature of DNA damage-induced prosurvival responses, we investigated the possibility that the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor roscovitine modulates drug-induced responses in human adenocarcinoma cells, favoring cell survival. Sublethal concentrations of doxorubicin were used to induce premature senescence in human adenocarcinoma cells. The effect of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor roscovitine on the doxorubicin-dependent cell cycle checkpoint activation and DNA repair pathways was evaluated. Roscovitine reinforces doxorubicin-dependent G(1) checkpoint in A549 and HEC1B cells leading to decreased frequency of double-strand breaks and to the preferential induction of senescence and enhanced clonogenic survival. However, in other tumor cell lines, such as HCT116 and H1299, combined treatment with doxorubicin and roscovitine increases the frequency of double-strand breaks and dramatically sensitizes to doxorubicin. This unexpected effect of roscovitine depends on a novel ability to inhibit DNA double-strand break repair processes and requires inactivation of the pRb pathway. Roscovitine, by hindering DNA repair processes, has the potential to inhibit recovery of mildly damaged tumor cells after doxorubicin treatment and to increase the susceptibility of tumor cells to chemotherapy. However, in some tumor cells, the cell cycle inhibitory function of roscovitine prevails over the DNA repair inhibitory activity, favoring premature senescence and clonogenic growth. These data indicate a novel mechanism underlying combined chemotherapy, which may have wide application in treatment of carcinomas.

  15. The Break

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Anete Mikkala Camille; Larsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    that language and the social has been granted too much power on the dispense of the bodily, physical and biological – or in short, in dispense of the material. The break To be or not to be poses the theoretical notion of dis-/continuity (Barad, 2007, 2010) from the quantum approach to storytelling (Strand 2012...... and euro each year. The paper tries to explore new ways to deal with these challenges through a quantum approach to storytelling where the enactment of core values, bodies, spaces and artifacts positions managers and CEO’s from major Scandinavian organizations in sites where they can re-evaluate their life...... stones on a table in an office of a municipality in Denmark. Silence….. Rebuilding rooms for taking breaks with the inclusion of different activities such as a game of soccer or a hike seems to provide the tools to rework these imbalances or enslaving patterns. Break……. The attempt at meeting...

  16. DNA repair: Dynamic defenders against cancer and aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuss, Jill O.; Cooper, Priscilla K.

    2006-04-01

    You probably weren't thinking about your body's cellular DNA repair systems the last time you sat on the beach in the bright sunshine. Fortunately, however, while you were subjecting your DNA to the harmful effects of ultraviolet light, your cells were busy repairing the damage. The idea that our genetic material could be damaged by the sun was not appreciated in the early days of molecular biology. When Watson and Crick discovered the structure of DNA in 1953 [1], it was assumed that DNA is fundamentally stable since it carries the blueprint of life. However, over 50 years of research have revealed that our DNA is under constant assault by sunlight, oxygen, radiation, various chemicals, and even our own cellular processes. Cleverly, evolution has provided our cells with a diverse set of tools to repair the damage that Mother Nature causes. DNA repair processes restore the normal nucleotide sequence and DNA structure of the genome after damage [2]. These responses are highly varied and exquisitely regulated. DNA repair mechanisms are traditionally characterized by the type of damage repaired. A large variety of chemical modifications can alter normal DNA bases and either lead to mutations or block transcription if not repaired, and three distinct pathways exist to remove base damage. Base excision repair (BER) corrects DNA base alterations that do not distort the overall structure of the DNA helix such as bases damaged by oxidation resulting from normal cellular metabolism. While BER removes single damaged bases, nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes short segments of nucleotides (called oligonucleotides) containing damaged bases. NER responds to any alteration that distorts the DNA helix and is the mechanism responsible for repairing bulky base damage caused by carcinogenic chemicals such as benzo [a]pyrene (found in cigarette smoke and automobile exhaust) as well as covalent linkages between adjacent pyrimidine bases resulting from the ultraviolet

  17. Histone Variant Regulates DNA Repair via Chromatin Condensation | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Activating the appropriate DNA repair pathway is essential for maintaining the stability of the genome after a break in both strands of DNA. How a pathway is selected, however, is not well understood. Since these double strand breaks (DSBs) occur while DNA is packaged as chromatin, changes in its organization are necessary for repair to take place. Numerous alterations have been associated with DSBs, including modifications of histone tails and exchange of histone variants, some increasing chromatin accessibility, others reducing it. In fact, distinct domains flanking a single DSB have been observed that are bound by opposing repair pathway proteins 53BP1and BRCA1, which promote non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR), respectively. To investigate whether DSB-proximal chromatin reorganization affects repair pathway selection, Philipp Oberdoerffer, Ph.D., of CCR’s Laboratory of Receptor Biology and Gene Expression, and his colleagues performed a high-throughput RNA interference (RNAi) screen for chromatin-related genes that modulate HR.

  18. Dominant mutations in S. cerevisiae PMS1 identify the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease active site and an exonuclease 1-independent mismatch repair pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Smith

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolypsis colorectal cancer or HNPCC is a common cancer predisposition syndrome. Predisposition to cancer in this syndrome results from increased accumulation of mutations due to defective mismatch repair (MMR caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2/scPMS1. To better understand the function of Mlh1-Pms1 in MMR, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify six pms1 mutations (pms1-G683E, pms1-C817R, pms1-C848S, pms1-H850R, pms1-H703A and pms1-E707A that were weakly dominant in wild-type cells, which surprisingly caused a strong MMR defect when present on low copy plasmids in an exo1Δ mutant. Molecular modeling showed these mutations caused amino acid substitutions in the metal coordination pocket of the Pms1 endonuclease active site and biochemical studies showed that they inactivated the endonuclease activity. This model of Mlh1-Pms1 suggested that the Mlh1-FERC motif contributes to the endonuclease active site. Consistent with this, the mlh1-E767stp mutation caused both MMR and endonuclease defects similar to those caused by the dominant pms1 mutations whereas mutations affecting the predicted metal coordinating residue Mlh1-C769 had no effect. These studies establish that the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease is required for MMR in a previously uncharacterized Exo1-independent MMR pathway.

  19. Chapter 10 the primary cilium coordinates signaling pathways in cell cycle control and migration during development and tissue repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren T; Pedersen, Stine F; Satir, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Cell cycle control and migration are critical processes during development and maintenance of tissue functions. Recently, primary cilia were shown to take part in coordination of the signaling pathways that control these cellular processes in human health and disease. In this review, we present...... an overview of the function of primary cilia and the centrosome in the signaling pathways that regulate cell cycle control and migration with focus on ciliary signaling via platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRalpha). We also consider how the primary cilium and the centrosome interact...... with the extracellular matrix, coordinate Wnt signaling, and modulate cytoskeletal changes that impinge on both cell cycle control and cell migration....

  20. Competitive repair by naturally dispersed repetitive DNA during non-allelic homologous recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, Margaret L.; Tan, Frederick J.; Lai, David C.; Celniker, Sue E.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Dunham, Maitreya J.; Zheng, Yixian; Koshland, Douglas

    2010-08-27

    Genome rearrangements often result from non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between repetitive DNA elements dispersed throughout the genome. Here we systematically analyze NAHR between Ty retrotransposons using a genome-wide approach that exploits unique features of Saccharomyces cerevisiae purebred and Saccharomyces cerevisiae/Saccharomyces bayanus hybrid diploids. We find that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induce NAHR-dependent rearrangements using Ty elements located 12 to 48 kilobases distal to the break site. This break-distal recombination (BDR) occurs frequently, even when allelic recombination can repair the break using the homolog. Robust BDR-dependent NAHR demonstrates that sequences very distal to DSBs can effectively compete with proximal sequences for repair of the break. In addition, our analysis of NAHR partner choice between Ty repeats shows that intrachromosomal Ty partners are preferred despite the abundance of potential interchromosomal Ty partners that share higher sequence identity. This competitive advantage of intrachromosomal Tys results from the relative efficiencies of different NAHR repair pathways. Finally, NAHR generates deleterious rearrangements more frequently when DSBs occur outside rather than within a Ty repeat. These findings yield insights into mechanisms of repeat-mediated genome rearrangements associated with evolution and cancer.

  1. Graphene oxide nanosheets induce DNA damage and activate the base excision repair (BER) signaling pathway both in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chun-Jiao; Jiang, Xue-Feng; Junaid, Muhammad; Ma, Yan-Bo; Jia, Pan-Pan; Wang, Hua-Bin; Pei, De-Sheng

    2017-10-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has widespread concerns in the fields of biological sciences and medical applications. Currently, studies have reported that excessive GO exposure can cause cellular DNA damage through reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. However, DNA damage mediated response of the base excision repair (BER) pathway due to GO exposure is not elucidated yet. Therefore, we exposed HEK293T cells and zebrafish embryos to different concentrations of GO for 24 h, and transcriptional profiles of BER pathway genes, DNA damage, and cell viability were analyzed both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the deformation of HEK293T cells before and after GO exposure was also investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to identify the physical changes occurred in the cells' structure. CCK-8 and Comet assay revealed the significant decrease in cell viability and increase in DNA damage in HEK293T cells at higher GO doses (25 and 50 μg/mL). Among the investigated genetic markers in HEK293T cells, BER pathway genes (APEX1, OGG1, CREB1, UNG) were significantly up-regulated upon exposure to higher GO dose (50 μg/mL), however, low exposure concentration (5, 25 μg/mL) failed to induce significant genetic induction except for CREB1 at 25 μg/mL. Additionally, the viscosity of HEK293T cells decreased upon GO exposure. In zebrafish, the results of up-regulated gene expressions (apex1, ogg1, polb, creb1) were consistent with those in the HEK293T cells. Taken all together, the exposure to elevated GO concentration could cause DNA damage to HEK293T cells and zebrafish embryos; BER pathway could be proposed as the possible inner response mechanism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Crystallization of a member of the recFOR DNA repair pathway, RecO, with and without bound oligonucleotide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aono, Shelly; Hartsch, Thomas; Schulze-Gahmen, Ursula

    2003-01-22

    RecFOR proteins are important for DNA repair by homologous recombination in bacteria. The RecO protein from Thermus thermophilus was cloned, purified and characterized for its binding to oligonucleotides. The protein was crystallized alone and in complex with a 14-mer oligonucleotide. Both crystal forms grow under different crystallization conditions in the same space group, P3121 or P3221, with almost identical unit cell parameters. Complete data sets were collected to 2.8 Angstrom and 2.5 Angstrom for RecO alone and the RecO-oligonucleotide complex, respectively. Visual comparison of the diffraction patterns between the two crystal forms and calculation of an Rmerge of 33.9 percent on F indicate that one of the crystal forms is indeed a complex of RecO with bound oligonucleotide.

  3. Mechanisms of Post-Replication DNA Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanzhe Gao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Accurate DNA replication is crucial for cell survival and the maintenance of genome stability. Cells have developed mechanisms to cope with the frequent genotoxic injuries that arise from both endogenous and environmental sources. Lesions encountered during DNA replication are often tolerated by post-replication repair mechanisms that prevent replication fork collapse and avert the formation of DNA double strand breaks. There are two predominant post-replication repair pathways, trans-lesion synthesis (TLS and template switching (TS. TLS is a DNA damage-tolerant and low-fidelity mode of DNA synthesis that utilizes specialized ‘Y-family’ DNA polymerases to replicate damaged templates. TS, however, is an error-free ‘DNA damage avoidance’ mode of DNA synthesis that uses a newly synthesized sister chromatid as a template in lieu of the damaged parent strand. Both TLS and TS pathways are tightly controlled signaling cascades that integrate DNA synthesis with the overall DNA damage response and are thus crucial for genome stability. This review will cover the current knowledge of the primary mediators of post-replication repair and how they are regulated in the cell.

  4. The journey of DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Natalie

    2015-12-01

    21 years ago, the DNA Repair Enzyme was declared "Molecule of the Year". Today, we are celebrating another "year of repair", with the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry being awarded to Aziz Sancar, Tomas Lindahl and Paul Modrich for their collective work on the different DNA repair pathways.

  5. Replication-independent endogenous DNA double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongsroy, Jirapan; Matangkasombut, Oranart; Thongnak, Araya; Rattanatanyong, Prakasit; Jirawatnotai, Siwanon; Mutirangura, Apiwat

    2013-01-01

    Without exposure to any DNA-damaging agents, non-dividing eukaryotic cells carry endogenous DNA double-strand breaks (EDSBs), or Replication-Independent (RIND)-EDSBs. In human cells, RIND-EDSBs are enriched in the methylated heterochromatic areas of the genome and are repaired by an ATM-dependent non-homologous end-joining pathway (NHEJ). Here, we showed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae similarly possess RIND-EDSBs. Various levels of EDSBs were detected during different phases of the cell cycle, including G0. Using a collection of mutant yeast strains, we investigated various DNA metabolic and DNA repair pathways that might be involved in the maintenance of RIND-EDSB levels. We found that the RIND-EDSB levels increased significantly in yeast strains lacking proteins involved in NHEJ DNA repair and in suppression of heterochromatin formation. RIND-EDSB levels were also upregulated when genes encoding histone deacetylase, endonucleases, topoisomerase, and DNA repair regulators were deleted. In contrast, RIND-EDSB levels were downregulated in the mutants that lack chromatin-condensing proteins, such as the high-mobility group box proteins, and Sir2. Likewise, RIND-EDSB levels were also decreased in human cells lacking HMGB1. Therefore, we conclude that the genomic levels of RIND-EDSBs are evolutionally conserved, dynamically regulated, and may be influenced by genome topology, chromatin structure, and the efficiency of DNA repair systems.

  6. Influence of XRCC1 Genetic Polymorphisms on Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Sterpone

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that ionizing radiation (IR can damage DNA through a direct action, producing single- and double-strand breaks on DNA double helix, as well as an indirect effect by generating oxygen reactive species in the cells. Mammals have evolved several and distinct DNA repair pathways in order to maintain genomic stability and avoid tumour cell transformation. This review reports important data showing a huge interindividual variability on sensitivity to IR and in susceptibility to developing cancer; this variability is principally represented by genetic polymorphisms, that is, DNA repair gene polymorphisms. In particular we have focussed on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of XRCC1, a gene that encodes for a scaffold protein involved basically in Base Excision Repair (BER. In this paper we have reported and presented recent studies that show an influence of XRCC1 variants on DNA repair capacity and susceptibility to breast cancer.

  7. Cell cycle control, DNA damage repair, and apoptosis-related pathways control pre-ameloblasts differentiation during tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengcheng; Niu, Yulong; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Xin; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Liwei

    2015-08-12

    Ameloblast differentiation is the most critical stepwise process in amelogenesis, and it is controlled by precise molecular events. To better understand the mechanism controlling pre-ameloblasts (PABs) differentiation into secretory ameloblasts (SABs), a more precise identification of molecules and signaling networks will elucidate the mechanisms governing enamel formation and lay a foundation for enamel regeneration. We analyzed transcriptional profiles of human PABs and SABs. From a total of 28,869 analyzed transcripts, we identified 923 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) with p  2. Among the DEGs, 647 genes showed elevated expression in PABs compared to SABs. Notably, 38 DEGs displayed greater than eight-fold changes. Comparative analysis revealed that highly expressed genes in PABs were involved in cell cycle control, DNA damage repair and apoptosis, while highly expressed genes in SABs were related to cell adhesion and extracellular matrix. Moreover, coexpression network analysis uncovered two highly conserved sub-networks contributing to differentiation, containing transcription regulators (RUNX2, ETV1 and ETV5), solute carrier family members (SLC15A1 and SLC7A11), enamel matrix protein (MMP20), and a polymodal excitatory ion channel (TRPA1). By combining comparative analysis and coexpression networks, this study provides novel biomarkers and research targets for ameloblast differentiation and the potential for their application in enamel regeneration.

  8. Rad54 and Mus81 cooperation promotes DNA damage repair and restrains chromosome missegregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghamrasni, S El; Cardoso, R; Li, L

    2016-01-01

    Rad54 and Mus81 mammalian proteins physically interact and are important for the homologous recombination DNA repair pathway; however, their functional interactions in vivo are poorly defined. Here, we show that combinatorial loss of Rad54 and Mus81 results in hypersensitivity to DNA......-damaging agents, defects on both the homologous recombination and non-homologous DNA end joining repair pathways and reduced fertility. We also observed that while Mus81 deficiency diminished the cleavage of common fragile sites, very strikingly, Rad54 loss impaired this cleavage to even a greater extent....... The inefficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in Rad54(-/-)Mus81(-/-) cells was accompanied by elevated levels of chromosome missegregation and cell death. Perhaps as a consequence, tumor incidence in Rad54(-/-)Mus81(-/-) mice remained comparable to that in Mus81(-/-) mice. Our study highlights...

  9. Interactions of Human Mismatch Repair Proteins MutSα and MutLα with Proteins of the ATR-Chk1 Pathway*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiyong; Fang, Yanan; Shao, Hongbing; Lindsey-Boltz, Laura; Sancar, Aziz; Modrich, Paul

    2010-01-01

    At clinically relevant doses, chemotherapeutic SN1 DNA methylating agents induce an ATR-mediated checkpoint response in human cells that is dependent on functional MutSα and MutLα. Deficiency of either mismatch repair activity renders cells highly resistant to this class of drug, but the mechanisms linking mismatch repair to checkpoint activation have remained elusive. In this study we have systematically examined the interactions of human MutSα and MutLα with proteins of the ATR-Chk1 pathway using both nuclear extracts and purified proteins. Using nuclear co-immunoprecipitation, we have detected interaction of MutSα with ATR, TopBP1, Claspin, and Chk1 and interaction of MutLα with TopBP1 and Claspin. We were unable to detect interaction of MutSα or MutLα with Rad17, Rad9, or replication protein A in the extract system. Use of purified proteins confirmed direct interaction of MutSα with ATR, TopBP1, and Chk1 and of MutLα with TopBP1. MutSα-Claspin and MutLα-Claspin interactions were not demonstrable with purified proteins, suggesting that extract interactions are indirect or depend on post-translational modification. Use of a modified chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that proliferating cell nuclear antigen, ATR, TopBP1, and Chk1 are recruited to chromatin in a MutLα- and MutSα-dependent fashion after N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine treatment. However, chromatin enrichment of replication protein A, Claspin, Rad17-RFC, and Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 was not detected in these experiments. Although our failure to observe enrichment of the latter activities could be due to sensitivity limitations, these observations may indicate a novel mechanism for ATR activation. PMID:20029092

  10. BRD4 Promotes DNA Repair and Mediates the Formation of TMPRSS2-ERG Gene Rearrangements in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyi Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BRD4 belongs to the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET family of chromatin reader proteins that bind acetylated histones and regulate gene expression. Pharmacological inhibition of BRD4 by BET inhibitors (BETi has indicated antitumor activity against multiple cancer types. We show that BRD4 is essential for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs and mediates the formation of oncogenic gene rearrangements by engaging the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ pathway. Mechanistically, genome-wide DNA breaks are associated with enhanced acetylation of histone H4, leading to BRD4 recruitment, and stable establishment of the DNA repair complex. In support of this, we also show that, in clinical tumor samples, BRD4 protein levels are negatively associated with outcome after prostate cancer (PCa radiation therapy. Thus, in addition to regulating gene expression, BRD4 is also a central player in the repair of DNA DSBs, with significant implications for cancer therapy.

  11. Molecular Basis for DNA Double-Strand Break Annealing and Primer Extension by an NHEJ DNA Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel C. Brissett

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ is one of the major DNA double-strand break (DSB repair pathways. The mechanisms by which breaks are competently brought together and extended during NHEJ is poorly understood. As polymerases extend DNA in a 5′-3′ direction by nucleotide addition to a primer, it is unclear how NHEJ polymerases fill in break termini containing 3′ overhangs that lack a primer strand. Here, we describe, at the molecular level, how prokaryotic NHEJ polymerases configure a primer-template substrate by annealing the 3′ overhanging strands from opposing breaks, forming a gapped intermediate that can be extended in trans. We identify structural elements that facilitate docking of the 3′ ends in the active sites of adjacent polymerases and reveal how the termini act as primers for extension of the annealed break, thus explaining how such DSBs are extended in trans. This study clarifies how polymerases couple break-synapsis to catalysis, providing a molecular mechanism to explain how primer extension is achieved on DNA breaks.

  12. Break induced replication in eukaryotes: mechanisms, functions, and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakofsky, Cynthia J; Malkova, Anna

    2017-08-01

    Break-induced replication (BIR) is an important pathway specializing in repair of one-ended double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). This type of DSB break typically arises at collapsed replication forks or at eroded telomeres. BIR initiates by invasion of a broken DNA end into a homologous template followed by initiation of DNA synthesis that can proceed for hundreds of kilobases. This synthesis is drastically different from S-phase replication in that instead of a replication fork, BIR proceeds via a migrating bubble and is associated with conservative inheritance of newly synthesized DNA. This unusual mode of DNA replication is responsible for frequent genetic instabilities associated with BIR, including hyper-mutagenesis, which can lead to the formation of mutation clusters, extensive loss of heterozygosity, chromosomal translocations, copy-number variations and complex genomic rearrangements. In addition to budding yeast experimental systems that were initially employed to investigate eukaryotic BIR, recent studies in different organisms including humans, have provided multiple examples of BIR initiated within different cellular contexts, including collapsed replication fork and telomere maintenance in the absence of telomerase. In addition, significant progress has been made towards understanding microhomology-mediated BIR (MMBIR) that can promote complex chromosomal rearrangements, including those associated with cancer and those leading to a number of neurological disorders in humans.

  13. Myelin repair by Schwann cells in the regenerating goldfish visual pathway: regional patterns revealed by X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nona, S.N.; Stafford, C.A.; Cronly-Dillon, J.R. (Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. of Science and Technology); Duncan, A. (Guy' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Anatomy); Scholes, J. (University Coll., London (United Kingdom))

    1994-07-01

    In the regenerating goldfish optic nerves, Schwann cells of unknown origin reliably infiltrate the lesion site forming a band of peripheral-type myelinating tissue by 1-2 months, sharply demarcated form the adjacent new CNS myelin. To investigate this effect, we have interfered with cell proliferation by locally X-irradiating the fish visual pathway 24 h after the lesion. As assayed by immunohistochemistry and EM, irradiation retards until 6 months formation of new myelin by Schwann cells at the lesion site, and virtually abolishes oligodendrocyte myelination distally, but has little or no effect on nerve fibre regrowth. Optic nerve astrocyte processes normally fail to re-infiltrate the lesion, but re-occupy it after irradiation, suggesting that they are normally excluded by early cell proliferation at this site. Moreover, scattered myelinating Schwann cells also appear in the oligodendrocyte-depleted distal optic nerve after irradiation, although only as far as the optic tract. (Author).

  14. The RecQ helicase RECQL5 participates in psoralen-induced interstrand cross-link repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2013-01-01

    Interstrand cross-links (ICLs) are very severe lesions as they are absolute blocks of replication and transcription. This property of interstrand cross-linking agents has been exploited clinically for the treatment of cancers and other diseases. ICLs are repaired in human cells by specialized DNA repair pathways including components of the nucleotide excision repair pathway, double-strand break repair pathway and the Fanconi anemia pathway. In this report, we identify the role of RECQL5, a member of the RecQ family of helicases, in the repair of ICLs. Using laser-directed confocal microscopy, we demonstrate that RECQL5 is recruited to ICLs formed by trioxalen (a psoralen-derived compound) and ultraviolet irradiation A. Using single-cell gel electrophoresis and proliferation assays, we identify the role of RECQL5 in the repair of ICL lesions. The domain of RECQL5 that recruits to the site of ICL was mapped to the KIX region between amino acids 500 and 650. Inhibition of transcription and of topoisomerases did not affect recruitment, which was inhibited by DNA-intercalating agents, suggesting that the DNA structure itself may be responsible for the recruitment of RECQL5 to the sites of ICLs. PMID:23715498

  15. Mechanism-Based Drug Combinations with the DNA Strand-Breaking Nucleoside Analog CNDAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojun; Jiang, Yingjun; Nowak, Billie; Hargis, Sarah; Plunkett, William

    2016-10-01

    CNDAC (2'-C-cyano-2'-deoxy-1-β-d-arabino-pentofuranosyl-cytosine, DFP10917) and its orally bioavailable prodrug, sapacitabine, are undergoing clinical trials for hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. The unique action mechanism of inducing DNA strand breaks distinguishes CNDAC from other deoxycytidine analogs. To optimize the clinical potentials of CNDAC, we explored multiple strategies combining CNDAC with chemotherapeutic agents targeting distinct DNA damage repair pathways that are currently in clinical use. The ability of each agent to decrease proliferative potential, determined by clonogenic assays, was determined in paired cell lines proficient and deficient in certain DNA repair proteins. Subsequently, each agent was used in combination with CNDAC at fixed concentration ratios. The clonogenicity was quantitated by median effect analysis, and a combination index was calculated. The c-Abl kinase inhibitor imatinib had synergy with CNDAC in HCT116 cells, regardless of p53 status. Inhibitors of PARP1 that interfere with homologous recombination (HR) repair or base excision repair (BER) and agents such as temozolomide that cause DNA damage repaired by the BER pathway were also synergistic with CNDAC. The toxicity of the nitrogen mustards bendamustine and cytoxan, or of platinum compounds, which generate DNA adducts repaired by nucleotide excision repair and HR, was additive with CNDAC. An additive cell killing was also achieved by the combination of CNDAC with taxane mitotic inhibitors (paclitaxel and docetaxel). At concentrations that allow survival of the majority of wild-type cells, the synergistic or additive combination effects were selective in HR-deficient cells. This study provides mechanistic rationales for combining CNDAC with other active drugs. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(10); 2302-13. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Pms2 and uracil-DNA glycosylases act jointly in the mismatch repair pathway to generate Ig gene mutations at A-T base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girelli Zubani, Giulia; Zivojnovic, Marija; De Smet, Annie; Albagli-Curiel, Olivier; Huetz, François; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Storck, Sébastien

    2017-04-03

    During somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin genes, uracils introduced by activation-induced cytidine deaminase are processed by uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG) and mismatch repair (MMR) pathways to generate mutations at G-C and A-T base pairs, respectively. Paradoxically, the MMR-nicking complex Pms2/Mlh1 is apparently dispensable for A-T mutagenesis. Thus, how detection of U:G mismatches is translated into the single-strand nick required for error-prone synthesis is an open question. One model proposed that UNG could cooperate with MMR by excising a second uracil in the vicinity of the U:G mismatch, but it failed to explain the low impact of UNG inactivation on A-T mutagenesis. In this study, we show that uracils generated in the G1 phase in B cells can generate equal proportions of A-T and G-C mutations, which suggests that UNG and MMR can operate within the same time frame during SHM. Furthermore, we show that Ung-/-Pms2-/- mice display a 50% reduction in mutations at A-T base pairs and that most remaining mutations at A-T bases depend on two additional uracil glycosylases, thymine-DNA glycosylase and SMUG1. These results demonstrate that Pms2/Mlh1 and multiple uracil glycosylases act jointly, each one with a distinct strand bias, to enlarge the immunoglobulin gene mutation spectrum from G-C to A-T bases. © 2017 Girelli Zubani et al.

  17. Thrombin induced by the extrinsic pathway and PAR-1 regulated inflammation at the site of fracture repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Nobutaka; Ichikawa, Jiro; Wako, Masanori; Ohba, Tetsuro; Saito, Masanori; Sato, Hironao; Koyama, Kensuke; Hagino, Tetsuo; Schoenecker, Jonathan G; Ando, Takashi; Haro, Hirotaka

    2016-02-01

    Thrombin (coagulation factor IIa) is a serine protease encoded by the F2 gene. Pro-thrombin (coagulation factor II) is cut to generate thrombin in the coagulation cascade that results in a reduction of blood loss. Procoagulant states that lead to activation of thrombin are common in bone fracture sites. However, its physiological roles and relationship with osteoblasts in bone fractures are largely unknown. We herein report various effects of thrombin on mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. MC3T3-E1 cells expressed proteinase-activated receptor 1 (PAR1), also known as the coagulation factor II receptor. They also produced monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), tissue factor (TF), MCSF and IL-6 upon thrombin stimulation through the PI3K-Akt and MEK-Erk1/2 pathways. Furthermore, MCP-1 obtained from thrombin-stimulated MC3T3-E1 cells induced migration by macrophage RAW264 cells. All these effects of thrombin on MC3T3-E1 cells were abolished by the selective non-peptide thrombin receptor inhibitor SCH79797. We also found that thrombin, PAR-1, MCP-1, TF as well as phosphorylated AKT and p42/44 were significantly expressed at the fracture site of mouse femoral bone. Collectively, thrombin/PAR-1 interaction regulated MCP-1, TF, MCSF and IL-6 production by MC3T3-E1 cells. Furthermore, MCP-1 induced RAW264 cell migration. Thrombin may thus be a novel cytokine that regulates several aspects of osteoblast function and fracture healing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Drugging the Cancers Addicted to DNA Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickoloff, Jac A; Jones, Dennie; Lee, Suk-Hee; Williamson, Elizabeth A; Hromas, Robert

    2017-11-01

    Defects in DNA repair can result in oncogenic genomic instability. Cancers occurring from DNA repair defects were once thought to be limited to rare inherited mutations (such as BRCA1 or 2). It now appears that a clinically significant fraction of cancers have acquired DNA repair defects. DNA repair pathways operate in related networks, and cancers arising from loss of one DNA repair component typically become addicted to other repair pathways to survive and proliferate. Drug inhibition of the rescue repair pathway prevents the repair-deficient cancer cell from replicating, causing apoptosis (termed synthetic lethality). However, the selective pressure of inhibiting the rescue repair pathway can generate further mutations that confer resistance to the synthetic lethal drugs. Many such drugs currently in clinical use inhibit PARP1, a repair component to which cancers arising from inherited BRCA1 or 2 mutations become addicted. It is now clear that drugs inducing synthetic lethality may also be therapeutic in cancers with acquired DNA repair defects, which would markedly broaden their applicability beyond treatment of cancers with inherited DNA repair defects. Here we review how each DNA repair pathway can be attacked therapeutically and evaluate DNA repair components as potential drug targets to induce synthetic lethality. Clinical use of drugs targeting DNA repair will markedly increase when functional and genetic loss of repair components are consistently identified. In addition, future therapies will exploit artificial synthetic lethality, where complementary DNA repair pathways are targeted simultaneously in cancers without DNA repair defects. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. Recombinational DNA repair and human disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Larry H.; Schild, David

    2002-11-30

    We review the genes and proteins related to the homologous recombinational repair (HRR) pathway that are implicated in cancer through either genetic disorders that predispose to cancer through chromosome instability or the occurrence of somatic mutations that contribute to carcinogenesis. Ataxia telangiectasia (AT), Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS), and an ataxia-like disorder (ATLD), are chromosome instability disorders that are defective in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), NBS, and Mre11 genes, respectively. These genes are critical in maintaining cellular resistance to ionizing radiation (IR), which kills largely by the production of double-strand breaks (DSBs). Bloom syndrome involves a defect in the BLM helicase, which seems to play a role in restarting DNA replication forks that are blocked at lesions, thereby promoting chromosome stability. The Werner syndrome gene (WRN) helicase, another member of the RecQ family like BLM, has very recently been found to help mediate homologous recombination. Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically complex chromosomal instability disorder involving seven or more genes, one of which is BRCA2. FA may be at least partially caused by the aberrant production of reactive oxidative species. The breast cancer-associated BRCA1 and BRCA2 proteins are strongly implicated in HRR; BRCA2 associates with Rad51 and appears to regulate its activity. We discuss in detail the phenotypes of the various mutant cell lines and the signaling pathways mediated by the ATM kinase. ATM's phosphorylation targets can be grouped into oxidative stress-mediated transcriptional changes, cell cycle checkpoints, and recombinational repair. We present the DNA damage response pathways by using the DSB as the prototype lesion, whose incorrect repair can initiate and augment karyotypic abnormalities.

  20. Replication independent DNA double-strand break retention may prevent genomic instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornthanakasem Wichai

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global hypomethylation and genomic instability are cardinal features of cancers. Recently, we established a method for the detection of DNA methylation levels at sites close to endogenous DNA double strand breaks (EDSBs, and found that those sites have a higher level of methylation than the rest of the genome. Interestingly, the most significant differences between EDSBs and genomes were observed when cells were cultured in the absence of serum. DNA methylation levels on each genomic location are different. Therefore, there are more replication-independent EDSBs (RIND-EDSBs located in methylated genomic regions. Moreover, methylated and unmethylated RIND-EDSBs are differentially processed. Euchromatins respond rapidly to DSBs induced by irradiation with the phosphorylation of H2AX, γ-H2AX, and these initiate the DSB repair process. During G0, most DSBs are repaired by non-homologous end-joining repair (NHEJ, mediated by at least two distinct pathways; the Ku-mediated and the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM-mediated. The ATM-mediated pathway is more precise. Here we explored how cells process methylated RIND-EDSBs and if RIND-EDSBs play a role in global hypomethylation-induced genomic instability. Results We observed a significant number of methylated RIND-EDSBs that are retained within deacetylated chromatin and free from an immediate cellular response to DSBs, the γ-H2AX. When cells were treated with tricostatin A (TSA and the histones became hyperacetylated, the amount of γ-H2AX-bound DNA increased and the retained RIND-EDSBs were rapidly repaired. When NHEJ was simultaneously inhibited in TSA-treated cells, more EDSBs were detected. Without TSA, a sporadic increase in unmethylated RIND-EDSBs could be observed when Ku-mediated NHEJ was inhibited. Finally, a remarkable increase in RIND-EDSB methylation levels was observed when cells were depleted of ATM, but not of Ku86 and RAD51. Conclusions Methylated RIND-EDSBs are

  1. Lys98 substitution in human AP endonuclease 1 affects the kinetic mechanism of enzyme action in base excision and nucleotide incision repair pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhda A Timofeyeva

    Full Text Available Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1 is a key enzyme in the base excision repair (BER and nucleotide incision repair (NIR pathways. We recently analyzed the conformational dynamics and kinetic mechanism of wild-type (wt protein, in a stopped-flow fluorescence study. In this study, we investigated the mutant enzyme APE1K98A using the same approach. Lys98 was known to hydrogen bond to the carboxyl group of Asp70, a residue implicated in binding the divalent metal ion. Our data suggested that the conformational selection and induced fit occur during the enzyme action. We expanded upon the evidence that APE1 can pre-exist in two conformations. The isomerization of an enzyme-product complex in the BER process and the additional isomerization stage of enzyme-substrate complex in the NIR process were established for APE1K98A. These stages had not been registered for the wtAPE1. We found that the K98A substitution resulted in a 12-fold reduction of catalytic constant of 5'-phosphodiester bond hydrolysis in (3-hydroxytetrahydrofuran-2-ylmethyl phosphate (F, tetrahydrofuran containing substrate, and in 200-fold reduction in 5,6-dihydrouridine (DHU containing substrate. Thus, the K98A substitution influenced NIR more than BER. We demonstrated that the K98A mutation influenced the formation of primary unspecific enzyme-substrate complex in a complicated manner, depending on the Mg(2+ concentration and pH. This mutation obstructed the induced fit of enzyme in the complex with undamaged DNA and F-containing DNA and appreciably decreased the stability of primary complex upon interaction of enzyme with DNA, containing the natural apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP site. Furthermore, it significantly delayed the activation of the less active form of enzyme during NIR and slowed down the conformational conversion of the complex of enzyme with the cleavage product of DHU-substrate. Our data revealed that APE1 uses the same active site to catalyze the cleavage

  2. Deciphering the Role of Alternative Non-Homologous End Joining (Alt-NHEJ) DNA Repair in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    P. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ku70 potentiates illegitimate DNA double-strand break repair and serves as a barrier to error-prone DNA repair pathways...the ATP-dependent DNA end-resection machinery from Saccharomyces cerevisiae . Nature 467, 108-111, doi:10.1038/nature09318 (2010). 48 Chen, H... medium (Gibco) containing 15%FBS.U2OS-DSBreporter cellswere grown inDMEMsupplemented with 10%BCS.HumanHeLa cells were grown inDMEMsupplementedwith 10% FBS

  3. DNA repair and cytokines: TGF-beta, IL-6, and thrombopoietin as different biomarkers of radioresistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Bianca Aiello

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Double strand breaks (DSBs induced by radiotherapy are highly cytotoxic lesions, leading to chromosomal aberrations and cell death. ATM-dependent DNA-damage response, non-homologous end joining, and homologous recombination pathways coordinately contribute to repairing DSBs in higher eukaryotes. It is known that the expression of DSB repair genes is increased in tumors which is one of the main reasons for radioresistance. The inhibition of DSB repair pathways may be useful to increase tumor cell radiosensitivity and may target stem cell-like cancer cells, known to be the most radioresistant tumor components. Commonly overexpressed in neoplastic cells, cytokines confer radioresistance by promoting proliferation, survival, invasion, and angiogenesis. Unfortunately, tumor irradiation increases the expression of various cytokines displaying these effects, including transforming growth factor-beta and interlukin-6. Recently the capabilities of these cytokines to support DNA repair pathways and the ATM-dependent DNA response have been demonstrated. Thrombopoietin, essential for megakaryopoiesis and very important for hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis, has also been found to promote DNA repair in a highly selective manner. These findings reveal a novel mechanism underlying cytokine-related radioresistance, which may be clinically relevant. Therapies targeting specific cytokines may be used to improve radiosensitivity. Specific inhibitors may be chosen in consideration of different tumor microenvironments. Thrombopoietin may be useful in fending off irradiation-induced loss of hematopoietic stem cells.

  4. Metabolism, Genomics, and DNA Repair in the Mouse Aging Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Lebel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver plays a pivotal role in the metabolism of nutrients, drugs, hormones, and metabolic waste products, thereby maintaining body homeostasis. The liver undergoes substantial changes in structure and function within old age. Such changes are associated with significant impairment of many hepatic metabolic and detoxification activities, with implications for systemic aging and age-related disease. It has become clear, using rodent models as biological tools, that genetic instability in the form of gross DNA rearrangements or point mutations accumulate in the liver with age. DNA lesions, such as oxidized bases or persistent breaks, increase with age and correlate well with the presence of senescent hepatocytes. The level of DNA damage and/or mutation can be affected by changes in carcinogen activation, decreased ability to repair DNA, or a combination of these factors. This paper covers some of the DNA repair pathways affecting liver homeostasis with age using rodents as model systems.

  5. Ion channel functional protein kinase TRPM7 regulates Mg ions to promote the osteoinduction of human osteoblast via PI3K pathway: In vitro simulation of the bone-repairing effect of Mg-based alloy implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiuzhi; Zu, Haiyue; Zhao, Dewei; Yang, Ke; Tian, Simiao; Yu, Xiaoming; Lu, Faqiang; Liu, Baoyi; Yu, Xiaobing; Wang, Benjie; Wang, Wei; Huang, Shibo; Wang, Yongxuan; Wang, Zihua; Zhang, Zhaodong

    2017-11-01

    Mg-based alloys, as the potential orthopaedic implant, can self-degrade to avoid second operation for its remove, and enable to promote bone repair; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we examined the effect of Mg ions on osteogenesis, chemotaxis and anti-alkaline stress in hFOB1.19 human osteoblast cells to simulate bone-repairing effect of a biodegradable Mg-based alloy implant in vitro, and explored the regulatory role of the transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7)/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signalling pathway in the process of Mg ion-induced bone repair by knockdown of TRPM7 and antagonizing PI3K activity. Results indicate that Mg ions up-regulated the expression of Runx2 and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) through TRPM7/PI3K signalling pathway, which could significantly enhance the osteogenic activity of human osteoblasts. Furthermore, the expression levels of MMP2, MMP9 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were increased by TRPM7/PI3K signalling pathway, which recruits osteoblasts from low- to high-Mg ion environments by inducing cell migration. Although an alkaline environment has antibacterial effects, alkaline stress can cause cytotoxicity and induce cell death. Finally, we found that Mg ions could activate PI3K phosphorylation to promote cell growth and survival, protecting cells against the alkaline-stress-induced cytotoxicity caused by the degradation of Mg-based alloy implants. Our study not only revealed the molecular mechanism of Mg in promoting bone repair but also explained the protective effects of Mg ions on osteoblasts in an alkaline environment, which provides a theoretical basis and new directions for the application of Mg-based alloy implant material in orthopaedics fixations and osteosarcoma treatment. As a potential biomaterial for orthopaedic implant, biodegradable magnesium has several advantages including self-degradation and bone repair promotion; however, the underlying

  6. Homologous Recombination DNA Repair Pathway Disruption and Retinoblastoma Protein Loss Are Associated with Exceptional Survival in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garsed, Dale W; Alsop, Kathryn; Fereday, Sian; Emmanuel, Catherine; Kennedy, Catherine J; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Gao, Bo; Gebski, Val; Garès, Valérie; Christie, Elizabeth L; Wouters, Maartje C A; Milne, Katy; George, Joshy; Patch, Ann-Marie; Li, Jason; Arnau, Gisela Mir; Semple, Timothy; Gadipally, Sreeja R; Chiew, Yoke-Eng; Hendley, Joy; Mikeska, Thomas; Zapparoli, Giada V; Amarasinghe, Kaushalya; Grimmond, Sean M; Pearson, John V; Waddell, Nicola; Hung, Jillian; Stewart, Colin J R; Sharma, Raghwa; Allan, Prue E; Rambau, Peter F; Traficante, Nadia; McNally, Orla; Mileshkin, Linda; Hamilton, Anne; Ananda, Sumitra; Grossi, Marisa; Cohen, Paul A; Leung, Yee C; Rome, Robert M; Beale, Philip; Blomfield, Penny; Friedlander, Michael; Brand, Alison; Dobrovic, Alexander; Köbel, Martin; Harnett, Paul; Nelson, Brad H; Bowtell, David D L; deFazio, Anna

    2017-10-23

    Purpose: Women with epithelial ovarian cancer generally have a poor prognosis; however, a subset of patients has an unexpected dramatic and durable response to treatment. We sought to identify clinical, pathological, and molecular determinants of exceptional survival in women with high-grade serous cancer (HGSC), a disease associated with the majority of ovarian cancer deaths.Experimental Design: We evaluated the histories of 2,283 ovarian cancer patients and, after applying stringent clinical and pathological selection criteria, identified 96 with HGSC that represented significant outliers in terms of treatment response and overall survival. Patient samples were characterized immunohistochemically and by genome sequencing.Results: Different patterns of clinical response were seen: long progression-free survival (Long-PFS), multiple objective responses to chemotherapy (Multiple Responder), and/or greater than 10-year overall survival (Long-Term Survivors). Pathogenic germline and somatic mutations in genes involved in homologous recombination (HR) repair were enriched in all three groups relative to a population-based series. However, 29% of 10-year survivors lacked an identifiable HR pathway alteration, and tumors from these patients had increased Ki-67 staining. CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes were more commonly present in Long-Term Survivors. RB1 loss was associated with long progression-free and overall survival. HR deficiency and RB1 loss were correlated, and co-occurrence was significantly associated with prolonged survival.Conclusions: There was diversity in the clinical trajectory of exceptional survivors associated with multiple molecular determinants of exceptional outcome in HGSC patients. Concurrent HR deficiency and RB1 loss were associated with favorable outcomes, suggesting that co-occurrence of specific mutations might mediate durable responses in such patients. Clin Cancer Res; 1-12. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Involvement of two endonuclease III homologs in the base excision repair pathway for the processing of DNA alkylation damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Michelle; Chow, Barbara L; Morey, Natalie J; Jinks-Robertson, Sue; Doetsch, Paul W; Xiao, Wei

    2004-01-05

    DNA base excision repair (BER) is initiated by DNA glycosylases that recognize and remove damaged bases. The phosphate backbone adjacent to the resulting apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site is then cleaved by an AP endonuclease or glycosylase-associated AP lyase to invoke subsequent BER steps. We have used a genetic approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to determine whether or not AP sites are blocks to DNA replication and the biological consequences if AP sites persist in the genome. We previously reported that yeast cells deficient in the two AP endonucleases (apn1 apn2 double mutant) are extremely sensitive to killing by a model DNA alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and that this sensitivity can be reduced by deleting the MAG1 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase gene. Here we report that in the absence of the AP endonucleases, deletion of two Escherichia coli endonuclease III homologs, NTG1 and NTG2, partially suppresses MMS-induced killing, which indicates that the AP lyase products are deleterious unless they are further processed by an AP endonuclease. The severe MMS sensitivity seen in AP endonuclease deficient strains can also be rescued by treatment of cells with the AP lyase inhibitor methoxyamine, which suggests that the product of AP lyase action on an AP site is indeed an extremely toxic lesion. In addition to the AP endonuclease interactions, deletion of NTG1 and NTG2 enhances the mag1 mutant sensitivity to MMS, whereas overexpression of MAG1 in either the ntg1 or ntg2 mutant severely affects cell growth. These results help to delineate alkylation base lesion flow within the BER pathway.

  8. Mechanism of cluster DNA damage repair in response to high-atomic number and energy particles radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asaithamby, Aroumougame, E-mail: Aroumougame.Asaithamy@UTsouthwestern.edu [Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States); Chen, David J., E-mail: David.Chen@UTsouthwestern.edu [Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    Low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (i.e., {gamma}- and X-rays) induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that are rapidly repaired (rejoined). In contrast, DNA damage induced by the dense ionizing track of high-atomic number and energy (HZE) particles is slowly repaired or is irreparable. These unrepaired and/or misrepaired DNA lesions may contribute to the observed higher relative biological effectiveness for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in HZE particle irradiated cells compared to those treated with low-LET radiation. The types of DNA lesions induced by HZE particles have been characterized in vitro and usually consist of two or more closely spaced strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases on opposing strands. It is unclear why these lesions are difficult to repair. In this review, we highlight the potential of a new technology allowing direct visualization of different types of DNA lesions in human cells and document the emerging significance of live-cell imaging for elucidation of the spatio-temporal characterization of complex DNA damage. We focus on the recent insights into the molecular pathways that participate in the repair of HZE particle-induced DSBs. We also discuss recent advances in our understanding of how different end-processing nucleases aid in repair of DSBs with complicated ends generated by HZE particles. Understanding the mechanism underlying the repair of DNA damage induced by HZE particles will have important implications for estimating the risks to human health associated with HZE particle exposure.

  9. Ku80-deleted cells are defective at base excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Han [The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, The Institute of Biotechnology, The Department of Molecular Medicine, 15355 Lambda Drive, San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Tumor Suppression Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid 28029 (Spain); Marple, Teresa [The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, The Institute of Biotechnology, The Department of Molecular Medicine, 15355 Lambda Drive, San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Hasty, Paul, E-mail: hastye@uthscsa.edu [The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, The Institute of Biotechnology, The Department of Molecular Medicine, 15355 Lambda Drive, San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Tumor Suppression Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid 28029 (Spain)

    2013-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ku80-deleted cells are hypersensitive to ROS and alkylating agents. • Cells deleted for Ku80, but not Ku70 or Lig4, have reduced BER capacity. • OGG1 rescues hypersensitivity to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and paraquat in Ku80-mutant cells. • Cells deleted for Ku80, but not Lig4, are defective at repairing AP sites. • Cells deleted for Ku80, but not Lig4 or Brca2 exon 27, exhibit increased PAR. - Abstract: Ku80 forms a heterodimer with Ku70, called Ku, that repairs DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. As a consequence of deleting NHEJ, Ku80-mutant cells are hypersensitive to agents that cause DNA DSBs like ionizing radiation. Here we show that Ku80 deletion also decreased resistance to ROS and alkylating agents that typically cause base lesions and single-strand breaks (SSBs). This is unusual since base excision repair (BER), not NHEJ, typically repairs these types of lesions. However, we show that deletion of another NHEJ protein, DNA ligase IV (Lig4), did not cause hypersensitivity to these agents. In addition, the ROS and alkylating agents did not induce γ-H2AX foci that are diagnostic of DSBs. Furthermore, deletion of Ku80, but not Lig4 or Ku70, reduced BER capacity. Ku80 deletion also impaired BER at the initial lesion recognition/strand scission step; thus, involvement of a DSB is unlikely. Therefore, our data suggests that Ku80 deletion impairs BER via a mechanism that does not repair DSBs.

  10. Cytogenetic Response to Ionizing Radiation Exposure in Human Fibroblasts with Suppressed Expression of Non-DSB Repair Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Hammond, Dianne; Mehta, Satish K.; Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Pierson, Duane L.; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in double-strand break (DSB) repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been well studied. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of IR inducible genes in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations and micronuclei formation. In the study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN) formation and chromosome aberrations were measured to determine the efficiency of cytogenetic repair, and the fraction of bi-nucleated cells in the MN analysis was used as a marker for cell cycle progression. In response to gamma radiation, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of five genes: Ku70 (DSB repair pathway), XPA (nucleotide excision repair pathway), RPA1 (mismatch repair pathway), RAD17 and RBBP8 (cell cycle control). Knocked-down expression of four genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Moreover, decreased XPA, p21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Nine of these eleven genes, whose knock-down expression affected cytogenetic repair, were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate IR

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of the Whole DNA Repair System: A Comparison of Bacterial and Eukaryotic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rihito Morita

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA is subjected to many endogenous and exogenous damages. All organisms have developed a complex network of DNA repair mechanisms. A variety of different DNA repair pathways have been reported: direct reversal, base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, and recombination repair pathways. Recent studies of the fundamental mechanisms for DNA repair processes have revealed a complexity beyond that initially expected, with inter- and intrapathway complementation as well as functional interactions between proteins involved in repair pathways. In this paper we give a broad overview of the whole DNA repair system and focus on the molecular basis of the repair machineries, particularly in Thermus thermophilus HB8.

  12. Oxidative Genome Damage and Its Repair in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Function of Transition Metals as a Double-Edged Sword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Muralidhar L.; Hegde, Pavana M.; Rao, K.S.J.; Mitra, Sankar

    2013-01-01

    The neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) with high O2 consumption and prolonged life span are chronically exposed to high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Accumulation of ROS-induced genome damage in the form of oxidized bases and single-strand breaks (SSBs) as well as their defective or reduced repair in the brain has been implicated in the etiology of various neurological disorders including Alzheimer’s/Parkinson’s diseases (AD/PD). Although inactivating mutations in some DNA repair genes have been linked to hereditary neurodegenerative diseases, the underlying mechanisms of repair deficiencies for the sporadic diseases is not understood. The ROS-induced DNA damages are predominantly repaired via highly conserved and regulated base excision/SSB repair (BER/SSBR) pathway. We recently made an interesting discovery that transition metals iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) which accumulate excessively in the brains of AD, PD and other neurodegenerative diseases, act as a ‘double-edged sword’ by inducing genotoxic ROS and inhibiting DNA damage repair at the same time. These metals inhibit the base excision activity of NEIL family DNA glycosylases by oxidizing them, changing their structure, and inhibiting their binding to downstream repair proteins. Metal chelators and reducing agents partially reverse the inhibition, while curcumin with both chelating and reducing activities reverses the inhibition nearly completely. In this review, we have discussed the possible etiological linkage of BER/SSBR defects to neurodegenerative diseases and therapeutic potential of metal chelators in restoring DNA repair capacity. PMID:21441656

  13. DNA damage response and repair data with pharmacological modulators of Tousled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Srinivasan Timiri Shanmugam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human Tousled kinase 1 (TLK1 plays an important role in chromatin remodeling, replication, and DNA damage response and repair. TLK1 activity is immediately, but transiently, downregulated after genotoxic insult, and its recovery is important for exit from checkpoint arrest and cell survival after radiation. The data in this article compliments research presented in the paper titled, “Tousled kinase activator, gallic acid, promotes DNA repair and suppresses radiation cytotoxicity in salivary gland cells” [1]. The identification of small molecule activators and inhibitors of TLK1 provided an opportunity to pharmacologically alter the protein׳s activity to elucidate its role in DNA damage response pathways. TLK1 effectors, gallic acid (GA and thioridazine (THD activate and inhibit the kinase, respectively, and the data report on the impact of these compounds and the significance of TLK1 to DNA break repair and the survival of human salivary acinar cells.

  14. Mechanisms of DNA repair and radio-induced mutagenesis in higher eukaryotes; Mecanismes de reparation et mutagenese radio-induite chez les eucaryotes superieurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D. [Centre Universitaire d' Orsay, Institut Curie, Section de Recherche, Lab. Raymond-Latarjet, UMR 2027 CNRS, 91 (France)

    2000-10-01

    Cells of higher eukaryotes possess several very efficient systems for the repair of radiation-induced lesions in DNA. Different strategies have been adopted at the cellular level to remove or even tolerate various types of lesions in order to assure survival and limit the mutagenic consequences. In mammalian cells, the main DNA repair systems comprise direct reversion of damage, excision of damage and exchange mechanisms with intact DNA. Among these, the direct ligation of single strand breaks (SSB) by a DNA ligase and the multi-enzymatic repair systems of mismatch repair, base and nucleotide excision repair as well as the repair of double strand breaks (DSB) by homologous recombination or non homologous end-joining are the most important systems. Most of these processes are error-free except the non homologous end-joining pathway used for the repair of DSB. Moreover, certain lesions can be tolerated by more or less accurately acting polymerases capable of performing trans-lesion DNA syntheses. The DNA repair systems are intimately integrated in the network of cellular regulation. Some of their components are DNA damage inducible. Radiation-induced mutagenesis is largely due to unrepaired DNA damage but also involves error-prone repair processes like the repair of DSB by non-homologous end-joining. Generally, mammalian cells are well prepared to repair radiation-induced lesions. However, some questions remain to be asked about mechanistic details and efficiencies of the systems for removing certain types of radiation-damage and about their order and timing of action. The answers to these questions would be important for radioprotection as well as radiotherapy. (author)

  15. DNA Damage Response Pathway and Replication Fork Stress During Oligonucleotide Directed Gene Editing

    OpenAIRE

    Bonner, Melissa; Strouse,Bryan; Applegate, Mindy; Livingston, Paula; Kmiec, Eric B.

    2012-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ODNs) can be used to direct the exchange of nucleotides in the genome of mammalian cells in a process known as gene editing. Once refined, gene editing should become a viable option for gene therapy and molecular medicine. Gene editing is regulated by a number of DNA recombination and repair pathways whose natural activities often lead to single- and double-stranded DNA breaks. It has been previously shown that introduction of a phosphorotioated ODN, desi...

  16. Nucleotide excision repair in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, Patrick van

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) is a conserved DNA repair pathway capable of removing a broad spectrum of DNA damage. In human cells a defect in NER leads to the disorder Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model organism to study the mechanism of NER. The

  17. A data mining approach for classifying DNA repair genes into ageing-related or non-ageing-related.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Alex A; Vasieva, Olga; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2011-01-12

    The ageing of the worldwide population means there is a growing need for research on the biology of ageing. DNA damage is likely a key contributor to the ageing process and elucidating the role of different DNA repair systems in ageing is of great interest. In this paper we propose a data mining approach, based on classification methods (decision trees and Naive Bayes), for analysing data about human DNA repair genes. The goal is to build classification models that allow us to discriminate between ageing-related and non-ageing-related DNA repair genes, in order to better understand their different properties. The main patterns discovered by the classification methods are as follows: (a) the number of protein-protein interactions was a predictor of DNA repair proteins being ageing-related; (b) the use of predictor attributes based on protein-protein interactions considerably increased predictive accuracy of attributes based on Gene Ontology (GO) annotations; (c) GO terms related to "response to stimulus" seem reasonably good predictors of ageing-relatedness for DNA repair genes; (d) interaction with the XRCC5 (Ku80) protein is a strong predictor of ageing-relatedness for DNA repair genes; and (e) DNA repair genes with a high expression in T lymphocytes are more likely to be ageing-related. The above patterns are broadly integrated in an analysis discussing relations between Ku, the non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathway, ageing and lymphocyte development. These patterns and their analysis support non-homologous end joining double strand break repair as central to the ageing-relatedness of DNA repair genes. Our work also showcases the use of protein interaction partners to improve accuracy in data mining methods and our approach could be applied to other ageing-related pathways.

  18. A data mining approach for classifying DNA repair genes into ageing-related or non-ageing-related

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasieva Olga

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ageing of the worldwide population means there is a growing need for research on the biology of ageing. DNA damage is likely a key contributor to the ageing process and elucidating the role of different DNA repair systems in ageing is of great interest. In this paper we propose a data mining approach, based on classification methods (decision trees and Naive Bayes, for analysing data about human DNA repair genes. The goal is to build classification models that allow us to discriminate between ageing-related and non-ageing-related DNA repair genes, in order to better understand their different properties. Results The main patterns discovered by the classification methods are as follows: (a the number of protein-protein interactions was a predictor of DNA repair proteins being ageing-related; (b the use of predictor attributes based on protein-protein interactions considerably increased predictive accuracy of attributes based on Gene Ontology (GO annotations; (c GO terms related to "response to stimulus" seem reasonably good predictors of ageing-relatedness for DNA repair genes; (d interaction with the XRCC5 (Ku80 protein is a strong predictor of ageing-relatedness for DNA repair genes; and (e DNA repair genes with a high expression in T lymphocytes are more likely to be ageing-related. Conclusions The above patterns are broadly integrated in an analysis discussing relations between Ku, the non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathway, ageing and lymphocyte development. These patterns and their analysis support non-homologous end joining double strand break repair as central to the ageing-relatedness of DNA repair genes. Our work also showcases the use of protein interaction partners to improve accuracy in data mining methods and our approach could be applied to other ageing-related pathways.

  19. To Break or Not To Break: Sex Chromosome Hemizygosity During Meiosis in Caenorhabditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Mike V; Larson, Braden J; Engebrecht, JoAnne

    2016-11-01

    Meiotic recombination establishes connections between homologous chromosomes to promote segregation. Hemizygous regions of sex chromosomes have no homologous chromosome to recombine with, yet must be transmitted through meiosis. An extreme case of hemizygosity exists in the genus Caenorhabditis, where males have a single X chromosome that completely lacks a homologous partner. To determine whether similar strategies have evolved to accommodate hemizygosity of the X during male meiosis in Caenorhabditis with distinct modes of sexual reproduction, we examined induction and processing of meiotic double strand breaks (DSBs) in androdioecious (hermaphrodite/male) Caenorhabditis elegans and C. briggsae, and gonochoristic (female/male) C. remanei and C. brenneri Analysis of the recombinase RAD-51 suggests more meiotic DSBs are induced in gonochoristic vs. androdioecious species. However, in late prophase in all species, chromosome pairs are restructured into bivalents around a single axis, suggesting that the holocentric nature of Caenorhabditis chromosomes dictates a single crossover per bivalent regardless of the number of DSBs induced. Interestingly, RAD-51 foci were readily observed on the X chromosome of androdioecious male germ cells, while very few were detected in gonochoristic male germ cells. As in C. elegans, the X chromosome in C. briggsae male germ cells undergoes transient pseudosynapsis and flexibility in DSB repair pathway choice. In contrast, in C. remanei and C. brenneri male germ cells, the X chromosome does not undergo pseudosynapsis and appears refractory to SPO-11-induced breaks. Together our results suggest that distinct strategies have evolved to accommodate sex chromosome hemizygosity during meiosis in closely related Caenorhabditis species. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  20. 46 CFR 196.30-20 - Breaking of safety valve seal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breaking of safety valve seal. 196.30-20 Section 196.30... OPERATIONS Reports of Accidents, Repairs, and Unsafe Equipment § 196.30-20 Breaking of safety valve seal. (a) If at any time it is necessary to break the seal on a safety valve for any purpose, the Chief...

  1. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chen, D.S. [Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    1993-02-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  2. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Chen, D.S. (Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology)

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  3. Hypospadias repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003000.htm Hypospadias repair To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hypospadias repair is surgery to correct a defect in ...

  4. The PCNA-associated protein PARI negatively regulates homologous recombination via the inhibition of DNA repair synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burkovics, Peter; Dome, Lili; Juhasz, Szilvia

    2016-01-01

    Successful and accurate completion of the replication of damage-containing DNA requires mainly recombination and RAD18-dependent DNA damage tolerance pathways. RAD18 governs at least two distinct mechanisms: translesion synthesis (TLS) and template switching (TS)-dependent pathways. Whereas TS...... is mainly error-free, TLS can work in an error-prone manner and, as such, the regulation of these pathways requires tight control to prevent DNA errors and potentially oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis. In humans, the PCNA-associated recombination inhibitor (PARI) protein has recently been shown...... to inhibit homologous recombination (HR) events. Here, we describe a biochemical mechanism in which PARI functions as an HR regulator after replication fork stalling and during double-strand break repair. In our reconstituted biochemical system, we show that PARI inhibits DNA repair synthesis during...

  5. Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP-1 is not involved in DNA double-strand break recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernet Marie

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cytotoxicity and the rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks induced by γ-rays, H2O2 and neocarzinostatin, were investigated in normal and PARP-1 knockout mouse 3T3 fibroblasts to determine the role of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP-1 in DNA double-strand break repair. Results PARP-1-/- were considerably more sensitive than PARP-1+/+ 3T3s to induced cell kill by γ-rays and H2O2. However, the two cell lines did not show any significant difference in the susceptibility to neocarzinostatin below 1.5 nM drug. Restoration of PARP-1 expression in PARP-1-/- 3T3s by retroviral transfection of the full PARP-1 cDNA did not induce any change in neocarzinostatin response. Moreover the incidence and the rejoining kinetics of neocarzinostatin-induced DNA double-strand breaks were identical in PARP-1+/+ and PARP-1-/- 3T3s. Poly(ADP-ribose synthesis following γ-rays and H2O2 was observed in PARP-1-proficient cells only. In contrast neocarzinostatin, even at supra-lethal concentration, was unable to initiate PARP-1 activation yet it induced H2AX histone phosphorylation in both PARP1+/+ and PARP-1-/- 3T3s as efficiently as γ-rays and H2O2. Conclusions The results show that PARP-1 is not a major determinant of DNA double-strand break recovery with either strand break rejoining or cell survival as an endpoint. Even though both PARP-1 and ATM activation are major determinants of the cell response to γ-rays and H2O2, data suggest that PARP-1-dependent poly(ADP-ribose synthesis and ATM-dependent H2AX phosphorylation, are not inter-related in the repair pathway of neocarzinostatin-induced DNA double-strand breaks.

  6. Polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase, Pnk1, is involved in base excision repair in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashkina, Ekaterina; Qi, Tao; Weinfeld, Michael; Young, Dallan

    2012-08-01

    We previously reported that Schizosaccharomyces pombe pnk1 cells are more sensitive than wild-type cells to γ-radiation and camptothecin, indicating that Pnk1 is required for DNA repair. Here, we report that pnk1pku70 and pnk1rhp51 double mutants are more sensitive to γ-radiation than single mutants, from which we infer that Pnk1's primary role is independent of either homologous recombination or non-homologous end joining mechanisms. We also report that pnk1 cells are more sensitive than wild-type cells to oxidizing and alkylating agents, suggesting that Pnk1 is involved in base excision repair. Mutational analysis of Pnk1 revealed that the DNA 3'-phosphatase activity is necessary for repair of DNA damage, whereas the 5'-kinase activity is dispensable. A role for Pnk1 in base excision repair is supported by genetic analyses which revealed that pnk1apn2 is synthetically lethal, suggesting that Pnk1 and Apn2 may function in parallel pathways essential for the repair of endogenous DNA damage. Furthermore, the nth1pnk1apn2 and tdp1pnk1apn2 triple mutants are viable, implying that single-strand breaks with 3'-blocked termini produced by Nth1 and Tdp1 contribute to synthetic lethality. We also examined the sensitivity to methyl methanesulfonate of all single and double mutant combinations of nth1, apn2, tdp1 and pnk1. Together, our results support a model where Tdp1 and Pnk1 act in concert in an Apn2-independent base excision repair pathway to repair 3'-blocked termini produced by Nth1; and they also provide evidence that Pnk1 has additional roles in base excision repair. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Homology directed repair is unaffected by the absence of siRNAs in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidts, Ines; Böttcher, Romy; Mirkovic-Hösle, Milijana; Förstemann, Klaus

    2016-09-30

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) defend the organism against harmful transcripts from exogenous (e.g. viral) or endogenous (e.g. transposons) sources. Recent publications describe the production of siRNAs induced by DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in Neurospora crassa, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster and human cells, which suggests a conserved function. A current hypothesis is that break-induced small RNAs ensure efficient homologous recombination (HR). However, biogenesis of siRNAs is often intertwined with other small RNA species, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), which complicates interpretation of experimental results. In Drosophila, siRNAs are produced by Dcr-2 while miRNAs are processed by Dcr-1. Thus, it is possible to probe siRNA function without miRNA deregulation. We therefore examined DNA double-strand break repair after perturbation of siRNA biogenesis in cultured Drosophila cells as well as mutant flies. Our assays comprised reporters for the single-strand annealing pathway, homologous recombination and sensitivity to the DSB-inducing drug camptothecin. We could not detect any repair defects caused by the lack of siRNAs derived from the broken DNA locus. Since production of these siRNAs depends on local transcription, they may thus participate in RNA metabolism-an established function of siRNAs-rather than DNA repair. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Both genetic and dietary factors underlie individual differences in DNA damage levels and DNA repair capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slyskova, Jana; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Karlsen, Anette; Carlsen, Monica H; Novosadova, Vendula; Blomhoff, Rune; Vodicka, Pavel; Collins, Andrew R

    2014-04-01

    The interplay between dietary habits and individual genetic make-up is assumed to influence risk of cancer, via modulation of DNA integrity. Our aim was to characterize internal and external factors that underlie inter-individual variability in DNA damage and repair and to identify dietary habits beneficial for maintaining DNA integrity. Habitual diet was estimated in 340 healthy individuals using a food frequency questionnaire and biomarkers of antioxidant status were quantified in fasting blood samples. Markers of DNA integrity were represented by DNA strand breaks, oxidized purines, oxidized pyrimidines and a sum of all three as total DNA damage. DNA repair was characterized by genetic variants and functional activities of base and nucleotide excision repair pathways. Sex, fruit-based food consumption and XPG genotype were factors significantly associated with the level of DNA damage. DNA damage was higher in women (p=0.035). Fruit consumption was negatively associated with the number of all measured DNA lesions, and this effect was mediated mostly by β-cryptoxanthin and β-tocopherol (pindividual antioxidants were also associated with DNA repair capacity; both the base and nucleotide excision repairs were lower in women and the latter increased with higher plasma levels of ascorbic acid and α-carotene (pgenetic and dietary factors that modulate DNA integrity. We propose that the positive health effect of fruit intake is partially mediated via DNA damage suppression and a simultaneous increase in DNA repair capacity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Association of Low-Penetrance Variants in DNA Repair Genes with Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Nikhil; Donald, Neil D; Malik, Salim; Selvendran, Subothini S; McPhail, Mark Jw; Monahan, Kevin J

    2017-07-27

    Approximately 35% of colorectal cancer (CRC) risk is attributable to heritable factors known hereditary syndromes, accounting for 6%. The remainder may be due to lower penetrance polymorphisms particularly of DNA repair genes. DNA repair pathways, including base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), mismatch repair (MMR), direct reversal repair (DRR), and double-strand break repair are complex, evolutionarily conserved, and critical in carcinogenesis. Germline mutations in these genes are associated with high-penetrance CRC syndromes such as Lynch syndrome. However, the association of low-penetrance polymorphisms of DNA repair genes with CRC risk remains unclear. A systematic literature review of PubMed, Embase, and HuGENet databases was conducted. Pre-specified criteria determined study inclusion/exclusion. Per-allele, pooled odds ratios disclosed the risk attributed to each variant. Heterogeneity was investigated by subgroup analyses for ethnicity and tumor location; funnel plots and Egger's test assessed publication bias. Sixty-one polymorphisms in 26 different DNA repair genes were identified. Meta-analyses for 22 polymorphisms in 17 genes revealed that six polymorphisms were significantly associated with CRC risk within BER (APE1, PARP1), NER (ERCC5, XPC), double-strand break (RAD18), and DRR (MGMT), but none within MMR. Subgroup analyses revealed significant association of OGG1 rs1052133 with rectal cancer risk. Egger's test revealed no publication bias. Low-penetrance polymorphisms in DNA repair genes alter susceptibility to CRC. Future studies should therefore analyze whole-genome polymorphisms and any synergistic effects on CRC risk.Translational impact:This knowledge may enhance CRC risk assessment and facilitate a more personalized approach to cancer prevention.

  10. Expression signatures of DNA repair genes correlate with survival prognosis of astrocytoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Juliana Ferreira; Torrieri, Raul; Serafim, Rodolfo Bortolozo; Di Cristofaro, Luis Fernando Macedo; Escanfella, Fábio Dalbon; Ribeiro, Rodrigo; Zanette, Dalila Lucíola; Paçó-Larson, Maria Luisa; da Silva, Wilson Araujo; Tirapelli, Daniela Pretti da Cunha; Neder, Luciano; Carlotti, Carlos Gilberto; Valente, Valeria

    2017-04-01

    Astrocytomas are the most common primary brain tumors. They are very resistant to therapies and usually progress rapidly to high-grade lesions. Here, we investigated the potential role of DNA repair genes in astrocytoma progression and resistance. To this aim, we performed a polymerase chain reaction array-based analysis focused on DNA repair genes and searched for correlations between expression patters and survival prognoses. We found 19 genes significantly altered. Combining these genes in all possible arrangements, we found 421 expression signatures strongly associated with poor survival. Importantly, five genes (DDB2, EXO1, NEIL3, BRCA2, and BRIP1) were independently correlated with worse prognoses, revealing single-gene signatures. Moreover, silencing of EXO1, which is remarkably overexpressed, promoted faster restoration of double-strand breaks, while NEIL3 knockdown, also highly overexpressed, caused an increment in DNA damage and cell death after irradiation of glioblastoma cells. These results disclose the importance of DNA repair pathways for the maintenance of genomic stability of high-grade astrocytomas and suggest that EXO1 and NEIL3 overexpression confers more efficiency for double-strand break repair and resistance to reactive oxygen species, respectively. Thereby, we highlight these two genes as potentially related with tumor aggressiveness and promising candidates as novel therapeutic targets.

  11. Tribute to dr louis keith: twin and physician extraordinaire/twin research reports: influences on asthma severity; chimerism revisited; DNA strand break repair/media reports: twins born apart; elevated twin frequencies; celebrity father of twins; conjoined twinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Nancy L

    2014-10-01

    The International Society for Twin Studies has lost a valued friend and colleague. Dr Louis Keith, Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Northwestern University, in Chicago, passed away on Sunday, July 6, 2014. His life and work with twins will be acknowledged at the November 2014 International Twin Congress in Budapest, Hungary. Next, twin research reports on the severity of asthma symptoms, a case of chimerism, and factors affecting DNA breakage and repair mechanisms are reviewed. Media reports cover twins born apart, elevated twin frequencies, a celebrity father of twins, and a family's decision to keep conjoined twins together.

  12. A new role for Rrm3 in repair of replication-born DNA breakage by sister chromatid recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Muñoz-Galván

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Replication forks stall at different DNA obstacles such as those originated by transcription. Fork stalling can lead to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs that will be preferentially repaired by homologous recombination when the sister chromatid is available. The Rrm3 helicase is a replisome component that promotes replication upon fork stalling, accumulates at highly transcribed regions and prevents not only transcription-induced replication fork stalling but also transcription-associated hyper-recombination. This led us to explore the possible role of Rrm3 in the repair of DSBs when originating at the passage of the replication fork. Using a mini-HO system that induces mainly single-stranded DNA breaks, we show that rrm3Δ cells are defective in DSB repair. The defect is clearly seen in sister chromatid recombination, the major repair pathway of replication-born DSBs. Our results indicate that Rrm3 recruitment to replication-born DSBs is crucial for viability, uncovering a new role for Rrm3 in the repair of broken replication forks.

  13. A genome-scale DNA repair RNAi screen identifies SPG48 as a novel gene associated with hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikołaj Słabicki

    Full Text Available DNA repair is essential to maintain genome integrity, and genes with roles in DNA repair are frequently mutated in a variety of human diseases. Repair via homologous recombination typically restores the original DNA sequence without introducing mutations, and a number of genes that are required for homologous recombination DNA double-strand break repair (HR-DSBR have been identified. However, a systematic analysis of this important DNA repair pathway in mammalian cells has not been reported. Here, we describe a genome-scale endoribonuclease-prepared short interfering RNA (esiRNA screen for genes involved in DNA double strand break repair. We report 61 genes that influenced the frequency of HR-DSBR and characterize in detail one of the genes that decreased the frequency of HR-DSBR. We show that the gene KIAA0415 encodes a putative helicase that interacts with SPG11 and SPG15, two proteins mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP. We identify mutations in HSP patients, discovering KIAA0415/SPG48 as a novel HSP-associated gene, and show that a KIAA0415/SPG48 mutant cell line is more sensitive to DNA damaging drugs. We present the first genome-scale survey of HR-DSBR in mammalian cells providing a dataset that should accelerate the discovery of novel genes with roles in DNA repair and associated medical conditions. The discovery that proteins forming a novel protein complex are required for efficient HR-DSBR and are mutated in patients suffering from HSP suggests a link between HSP and DNA repair.

  14. Bladder exstrophy repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladder birth defect repair; Everted bladder repair; Exposed bladder repair; Repair of bladder exstrophy ... Bladder exstrophy repair involves two surgeries. The first surgery is to repair the bladder. The second one ...

  15. The key residue for SSB-RecO interaction is dispensable for Deinococcus radiodurans DNA repair in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kaiying; Xu, Xin; Zhao, Ye; Wang, Liangyan; Xu, Guangzhi; Hua, Yuejin

    2014-05-01

    The RecFOR DNA repair pathway is one of the major RecA-dependent recombinatorial repair pathways in bacteria and plays an important role in double-strand breaks repair. RecO, one of the major recombination mediator proteins in the RecFOR pathway, has been shown to assist RecA loading onto single-stranded binding protein (SSB) coated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). However, it has not been characterized whether the protein-protein interaction between RecO and SSB contributes to that process in vivo. Here, we identified the residue arginine-121 of Deinococcus radiodurans RecO (drRecO-R121) as the key residue for RecO-SSB interaction. The substitution of drRecO-R121 with alanine greatly abolished the binding of RecO to SSB but not the binding to RecR. Meanwhile, SSB-coated ssDNA annealing activity was also compromised by the mutation of the residue of drRecO. However, the drRecO-R121A strain showed only modest sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Taking these data together, arginine-121 of drRecO is the key residue for SSB-RecO interaction, which may not play a vital role in the SSB displacement and RecA loading process of RecFOR DNA repair pathway in vivo.

  16. Clubfoot repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clubfoot release; Talipes equinovarus - repair; Tibialis anterior tendon transfer Patient ... of the foot. In: Herring JA, ed. Tachdjian's Pediatric Orthopaedics . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014: ...

  17. Germline stem cell gene PIWIL2 mediates DNA repair through relaxation of chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Tao Yin

    Full Text Available DNA damage response (DDR is an intrinsic barrier of cell to tumorigenesis initiated by genotoxic agents. However, the mechanisms underlying the DDR are not completely understood despite of extensive investigation. Recently, we have reported that ectopic expression of germline stem cell gene PIWIL2 is associated with tumor stem cell development, although the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here we show that PIWIL2 is required for the repair of DNA-damage induced by various types of genotoxic agents. Upon ultraviolet (UV irradiation, silenced PIWIL2 gene in normal human fibroblasts was transiently activated after treatment with UV light. This activation was associated with DNA repair, because Piwil2-deficienct mouse embryonic fibroblasts (mili(-/- MEFs were defective in cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD repair after UV treatment. As a result, the UV-treated mili(-/- MEFs were more susceptible to apoptosis, as characterized by increased levels of DNA damage-associated apoptotic proteins, such as active caspase-3, cleaved Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP and Bik. The impaired DNA repair in the mili(-/- MEFs was associated with the reductions of histone H3 acetylation and chromatin relaxation, although the DDR pathway downstream chromatin relaxation appeared not to be directly affected by Piwil2. Moreover, guanine-guanine (Pt-[GG] and double strand break (DSB repair were also defective in the mili(-/- MEFs treated by genotoxic chemicals Cisplatin and ionizing radiation (IR, respectively. The results indicate that Piwil2 can mediate DNA repair through an axis of Piwil2 → histone acetylation → chromatin relaxation upstream DDR pathways. The findings reveal a new role for Piwil2 in DNA repair and suggest that Piwil2 may act as a gatekeeper against DNA damage-mediated tumorigenesis.

  18. BLM has early and late functions in homologous recombination repair in mouse embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chu, W K; Hanada, K; Kanaar, R

    2010-01-01

    BLM is a RecQ family helicase that is defective in individuals with the cancer predisposition disorder, Bloom's syndrome (BS). At the cellular level, BS is characterized by hyper-recombination manifested as excessive sister chromatid exchange and loss of heterozygosity. However, the precise...... function of BLM remains unclear. Multiple roles have been proposed for BLM in the homologous recombination (HR) repair pathway, including 'early' functions, such as the stimulation of resection of DNA double-strand break ends or displacement of the invading strand of DNA displacement loops, and 'late...

  19. Alternative Okazaki Fragment Ligation Pathway by DNA Ligase III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Arakawa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Higher eukaryotes have three types of DNA ligases: DNA ligase 1 (Lig1, DNA ligase 3 (Lig3 and DNA ligase 4 (Lig4. While Lig1 and Lig4 are present in all eukaryotes from yeast to human, Lig3 appears sporadically in evolution and is uniformly present only in vertebrates. In the classical, textbook view, Lig1 catalyzes Okazaki-fragment ligation at the DNA replication fork and the ligation steps of long-patch base-excision repair (BER, homologous recombination repair (HRR and nucleotide excision repair (NER. Lig4 is responsible for DNA ligation at DNA double strand breaks (DSBs by the classical, DNA-PKcs-dependent pathway of non-homologous end joining (C-NHEJ. Lig3 is implicated in a short-patch base excision repair (BER pathway, in single strand break repair in the nucleus, and in all ligation requirements of the DNA metabolism in mitochondria. In this scenario, Lig1 and Lig4 feature as the major DNA ligases serving the most essential ligation needs of the cell, while Lig3 serves in the cell nucleus only minor repair roles. Notably, recent systematic studies in the chicken B cell line, DT40, involving constitutive and conditional knockouts of all three DNA ligases individually, as well as of combinations thereof, demonstrate that the current view must be revised. Results demonstrate that Lig1 deficient cells proliferate efficiently. Even Lig1/Lig4 double knockout cells show long-term viability and proliferate actively, demonstrating that, at least in DT40, Lig3 can perform all ligation reactions of the cellular DNA metabolism as sole DNA ligase. Indeed, in the absence of Lig1, Lig3 can efficiently support semi-conservative DNA replication via an alternative Okazaki-fragment ligation pathway. In addition, Lig3 can back up NHEJ in the absence of Lig4, and can support NER and HRR in the absence of Lig1. Supporting observations are available in less elaborate genetic models in mouse cells. Collectively, these observations raise Lig3 from a niche

  20. Initial steps of the base excision repair pathway within the nuclear architecture; Les etapes initiales du mecanisme de reparation par excision de bases au sein de l'architecture nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amouroux, R

    2009-09-15

    Oxidative stress induced lesions threaten aerobic organisms by representing a major cause of genomic instability. A common product of guanine oxidation, 8-oxo-guanine (8- oxoG) is particularly mutagenic by provoking G to T transversions. Removal of oxidised bases from DNA is initiated by the recognition and excision of the damaged base by a DNA glycosylase, initiating the base excision repair (BER) pathway. In mammals, 8-oxoG is processed by the 8-oxoG-DNA-glycosylase I (OGG1), which biochemical mechanisms has been well characterised in vitro. However how and where this enzyme finds the modified base within the complex chromatin architecture is not yet understood. We show that upon induction of 8-oxoG, OGG1, together with at least two other proteins involved in BER, is recruited from a soluble fraction to chromatin. Formation kinetics of this patches correlates with 8-oxoG excision, suggesting a direct link between presence of this chromatin-associated complexes and 8-oxoG repair. More precisely, these repair patches are specifically directed to euchromatin regions, and completely excluded from heterochromatin regions. Inducing of artificial chromatin compaction results in a complete inhibition of the in vivo repair of 8-oxoG, probably by impeding the access of OGG1 to the lesion. Using OGG1 mutants, we show that OGG1 direct recognition of 8-oxoG did not trigger its re-localisation to the chromatin. We conclude that in response to the induction of oxidative DNA damage, the DNA glycosylase is actively recruited to regions of open chromatin allowing the access of the BER machinery to the lesions. (author)

  1. Nucleotide Excision Repair Lesion-Recognition Protein Rad4 Captures a Pre-Flipped Partner Base in a Benzo[a]pyrene-Derived DNA Lesion: How Structure Impacts the Binding Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Hong; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Min, Jung-Hyun; Zhang, Yingkai; Broyde, Suse

    2017-06-19

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C protein complex (XPC) recognizes a variety of environmentally induced DNA lesions and is the key in initiating their repair by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. When bound to a lesion, XPC flips two nucleotide pairs that include the lesion out of the DNA duplex, yielding a productively bound complex that can lead to successful lesion excision. Interestingly, the efficiencies of NER vary greatly among different lesions, influencing their toxicity and mutagenicity in cells. Though differences in XPC binding may influence NER efficiency, it is not understood whether XPC utilizes different mechanisms to achieve productive binding with different lesions. Here, we investigated the well-repaired 10R-(+)-cis-anti-benzo[a]pyrene-N 2 -dG (cis-B[a]P-dG) DNA adduct in a duplex containing normal partner C opposite the lesion. This adduct is derived from the environmental pro-carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene and is likely to be encountered by NER in the cell. We have extensively investigated its binding to the yeast XPC orthologue, Rad4, using umbrella sampling with restrained molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations. The NMR solution structure of this lesion in duplex DNA has shown that the dC complementary to the adducted dG is flipped out of the DNA duplex in the absence of XPC. However, it is not known whether the "pre-flipped" base would play a role in its recognition by XPC. Our results show that Rad4 first captures the displaced dC, which is followed by a tightly coupled lesion-extruding pathway for productive binding. This binding path differs significantly from the one deduced for the small cis-syn cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer lesion opposite mismatched thymines [ Mu , H. , ( 2015 ) Biochemistry , 54 ( 34 ), 5263 - 7 ]. The possibility of multiple paths that lead to productive binding to XPC is consistent with the versatile lesion recognition by XPC that is required for successful NER.

  2. The recombination protein RAD52 cooperates with the excision repair protein OGG1 for the repair of oxidative lesions in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Maynard, Scott; Hashiguchi, Kazunari

    2009-01-01

    Oxidized bases are common types of DNA modifications. Their accumulation in the genome is linked to aging and degenerative diseases. These modifications are commonly repaired by the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) initiates BER of oxidized purine bases. A small...... activities and RAD52 stimulates OGG1 incision activity, likely increasing its turnover rate. RAD52 colocalizes with OGG1 after oxidative stress to cultured cells, but not after the direct induction of double-strand breaks by ionizing radiation. Human cells depleted of RAD52 via small interfering RNA...... knockdown, and mouse cells lacking the protein via gene knockout showed increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. Moreover, cells depleted of RAD52 show higher accumulation of oxidized bases in their genome than cells with normal levels of RAD52. Our results indicate that RAD52 cooperates with OGG1...

  3. DNA repair in the trinucleotide repeat disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lesley; Houlden, Henry; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2017-01-01

    Inherited diseases caused by unstable repeated DNA sequences are rare, but together represent a substantial cause of morbidity. Trinucleotide repeat disorders are severe, usually life-shortening, neurological disorders caused by nucleotide expansions, and most have no disease-modifying treatments. Longer repeat expansions are associated with genetic anticipation (ie, earlier disease onset in successive generations), although the differences in age at onset are not entirely accounted for by repeat length. Such phenotypic variation within disorders implies the existence of additional modifying factors in pathways that can potentially be modulated to treat disease. A genome-wide association study detected genetic modifiers of age at onset in Huntington's disease. Similar findings were seen in the spinocerebellar ataxias, indicating an association between DNA damage-response and repair pathways and the age at onset of disease. These studies also suggest that a common genetic mechanism modulates age at onset across polyglutamine diseases and could extend to other repeat expansion disorders. Genetic defects in DNA repair underlie other neurodegenerative disorders (eg, ataxia-telangiectasia), and DNA double-strand breaks are crucial to the modulation of early gene expression, which provides a mechanistic link between DNA repair and neurodegeneration. Mismatch and base-excision repair are important in the somatic expansion of repeated sequences in mouse models of trinucleotide repeat disorders, and somatic expansion of the expanded CAG tract in HTT correlates with age at onset of Huntington's disease and other trinucleotide repeat disorders. WHERE NEXT?: To understand the common genetic architecture of trinucleotide repeat disorders and any further genetic susceptibilities in individual disorders, genetic analysis with increased numbers of variants and sample sizes is needed, followed by sequencing approaches to define the phenotype-modifying variants. The findings must

  4. Optimal Treatment of Malignant Long Bone Fracture: Influence of Method of Repair and External Beam Irradiation on the Pathway and Efficacy of Fracture Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    healing, bone healing, endochondral ossification , intramembranous ossification , irradiation, radiotherapy, pathologic fractures, bony metastasis...pathways, endochondral or intramembranous ossification , and clinically the pathway followed is determined by the nature of fracture stabilization...Endochondral ossification (EO), “secondary bone healing”, is characterized by a cartilaginous callus intermediary induced by interfragmentary motion

  5. Human longevity and variation in GH/IGF-1/insulin signaling, DNA damage signaling and repair and pro/antioxidant pathway genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soerensen, Mette; Dato, Serena; Tan, Qihua

    2012-01-01

    oldest-old (age 92-93) and 736 middle-aged Danes we found 1 pro/antioxidant SNP (rs1002149 (GSR)), 5 GH/IGF-1/INS SNPs (rs1207362 (KL), rs2267723 (GHRHR), rs3842755 (INS), rs572169 (GHSR), rs9456497 (IGF2R)) and 5 DNA repair SNPs (rs11571461 (RAD52), rs13251813 (WRN), rs1805329 (RAD23B), rs2953983 (POLB...

  6. Adrenergic Receptor Stimulation Prevents Radiation-Induced DNA Strand Breaks, Apoptosis and Gene Expression in Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Villanueva, Maria; Krieger, Stephanie; Feiveson, Alan; Kovach, Annie Marie; Buerkle, Alexander; Wu, Honglu

    2017-01-01

    Under Earth gravity conditions cellular damage can be counteracted by activation of the physiological defense mechanisms or through medical interventions. The mode of action of both, physiological response and medical interventions can be affected by microgravity leading to failure in repairing the damage. There are many studies reporting the effects of microgravity and/or radiation on cellular functions. However, little is known about the synergistic effects on cellular response to radiation when other endogenous cellular stress-response pathways are previously activated. Here, we investigated whether previous stimulation of the adrenergic receptor, which modulates immune response, affects radiation-induced apoptosis in immune cells under simulated microgravity conditions. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with isoproterenol (a sympathomimetic drug) and exposed to 0.8 or 2Gy gamma-radiation in simulated microgravity versus Earth gravity. Expression of genes involved in adrenergic receptor pathways, DNA repair and apoptosis as well as the number of apoptotic cells and DNA strand breaks were determined. Our results showed that, under simulated microgravity conditions, previous treatment with isoproterenol prevented radiation-induced i) gene down regulation, ii) DNA strand breaks formation and iii) apoptosis induction. Interestedly, we found a radiation-induced increase of adrenergic receptor gene expression, which was also abolished in simulated microgravity. Understanding the mechanisms of isoproterenol-mediated radioprotection in simulated microgravity can help to develop countermeasures for space-associated health risks as well as radio-sensitizers for cancer therapy.

  7. Post-translational Regulation of Cas9 during G1 Enhances Homology-Directed Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Gutschner

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available CRISPR/Cas9 induces DNA double-strand breaks that are repaired by cell-autonomous repair pathways, namely, non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ, or homology-directed repair (HDR. While HDR is absent in G1, NHEJ is active throughout the cell cycle and, thus, is largely favored over HDR. We devised a strategy to increase HDR by directly synchronizing the expression of Cas9 with cell-cycle progression. Fusion of Cas9 to the N-terminal region of human Geminin converted this gene-editing protein into a substrate for the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex APC/Cdh1, resulting in a cell-cycle-tailored expression with low levels in G1 but high expression in S/G2/M. Importantly, Cas9-hGem(1/110 increased the rate of HDR by up to 87% compared to wild-type Cas9. Future developments may enable high-resolution expression of genome engineering proteins, which might increase HDR rates further, and may contribute to a better understanding of DNA repair pathways due to spatiotemporal control of DNA damage induction.

  8. Salidroside stimulates DNA repair enzyme Parp-1 activity in mouse HSC maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Sipple, Jared; Pang, Qishen; Du, Wei

    2012-05-03

    Salidroside is a phenylpropanoid glycoside isolated from the medicinal plant Rhodiola rosea, which has potent antioxidant properties. Here we show that salidroside prevented the loss of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in mice under oxidative stress. Quiescent HSCs were recruited into cell cycling on in vivo challenge with oxidative stress, which was blocked by salidroside. Surprisingly, salidroside does not prevent the production of reactive oxygen species but reduces hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA-strand breaks in bone marrow cells enriched for HSCs. We tested whether salidroside enhances oxidative DNA damage repair in mice deficient for 5 DNA repair pathways known to be involved in oxidative DNA damage repair; we found that salidroside activated poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a component of the base excision repair pathway, in mouse bone marrow HSCs as well as primary fibroblasts and human lymphoblasts. PARP-1 activation by salidroside protects quiescent HSCs from oxidative stress-induced cycling in native animals and self-renewal defect in transplanted recipients, which was abrogated by genetic ablation or pharmacologic inhibition of PARP-1. Together, these findings suggest that activation of PARP-1 by salidroside could affect the homeostasis and function of HSCs and contribute to the antioxidant effects of salidroside.

  9. Drosophila DNA polymerase theta utilizes both helicase-like and polymerase domains during microhomology-mediated end joining and interstrand crosslink repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Beagan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Double strand breaks (DSBs and interstrand crosslinks (ICLs are toxic DNA lesions that can be repaired through multiple pathways, some of which involve shared proteins. One of these proteins, DNA Polymerase θ (Pol θ, coordinates a mutagenic DSB repair pathway named microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ and is also a critical component for bypass or repair of ICLs in several organisms. Pol θ contains both polymerase and helicase-like domains that are tethered by an unstructured central region. While the role of the polymerase domain in promoting MMEJ has been studied extensively both in vitro and in vivo, a function for the helicase-like domain, which possesses DNA-dependent ATPase activity, remains unclear. Here, we utilize genetic and biochemical analyses to examine the roles of the helicase-like and polymerase domains of Drosophila Pol θ. We demonstrate an absolute requirement for both polymerase and ATPase activities during ICL repair in vivo. However, similar to mammalian systems, polymerase activity, but not ATPase activity, is required for ionizing radiation-induced DSB repair. Using a site-specific break repair assay, we show that overall end-joining efficiency is not affected in ATPase-dead mutants, but there is a significant decrease in templated insertion events. In vitro, Pol θ can efficiently bypass a model unhooked nitrogen mustard crosslink and promote DNA synthesis following microhomology annealing, although ATPase activity is not required for these functions. Together, our data illustrate the functional importance of the helicase-like domain of Pol θ and suggest that its tethering to the polymerase domain is important for its multiple functions in DNA repair and damage tolerance.

  10. Human DNA polymerase θ grasps the primer terminus to mediate DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, Karl E; Averill, April M; Aller, Pierre; Wood, Richard D; Doublié, Sylvie

    2015-04-01

    DNA polymerase θ protects against genomic instability via an alternative end-joining repair pathway for DNA double-strand breaks. Polymerase θ is overexpressed in breast, lung and oral cancers, and reduction of its activity in mammalian cells increases sensitivity to double-strand break-inducing agents, including ionizing radiation. Reported here are crystal structures of the C-terminal polymerase domain from human polymerase θ, illustrating two potential modes of dimerization. One structure depicts insertion of ddATP opposite an abasic-site analog during translesion DNA synthesis. The second structure describes a cognate ddGTP complex. Polymerase θ uses a specialized thumb subdomain to establish unique upstream contacts to the primer DNA strand, including an interaction with the 3'-terminal phosphate from one of five distinctive insertion loops. These observations demonstrate how polymerase θ grasps the primer to bypass DNA lesions or extend poorly annealed DNA termini to mediate end-joining.

  11. Consistency of Trend Break Point Estimator with Underspecified Break Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the consistency of trend break point estimators when the number of breaks is underspecified. The consistency of break point estimators in a simple location model with level shifts has been well documented by researchers under various settings, including extensions such as allowing a time trend in the model. Despite the consistency of break point estimators of level shifts, there are few papers on the consistency of trend shift break point estimators in the presence of an underspecified break number. The simulation study and asymptotic analysis in this paper show that the trend shift break point estimator does not converge to the true break points when the break number is underspecified. In the case of two trend shifts, the inconsistency problem worsens if the magnitudes of the breaks are similar and the breaks are either both positive or both negative. The limiting distribution for the trend break point estimator is developed and closely approximates the finite sample performance.

  12. The multiple nuclear functions of BRCA1: transcription, ubiquitination and DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starita, Lea M; Parvin, Jeffrey D

    2003-06-01

    Interest in BRCA1 stems from its role as a tumour suppressor in breast and ovarian cancer. Intensive research in BRCA1 has revealed little about its specific role in cancer; rather, this protein has been implicated in a multitude of important cellular processes. The diverse biochemical activities of BRCA1 combine to protect the genome from damage. New data reveal that BRCA1 transcriptionally regulates some DNA-repair genes, and, in addition, new roles for BRCA1 have been identified in heterochromatin formation on the X chromosome, double-strand-break repair, and ubiquitination. These diverse activities of BRCA1 may be linked in a single pathway, or BRCA1 might function in multiple nuclear processes.

  13. Break-induced replication is highly inaccurate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Deem

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA must be synthesized for purposes of genome duplication and DNA repair. While the former is a highly accurate process, short-patch synthesis associated with repair of DNA damage is often error-prone. Break-induced replication (BIR is a unique cellular process that mimics normal DNA replication in its processivity, rate, and capacity to duplicate hundreds of kilobases, but is initiated at double-strand breaks (DSBs rather than at replication origins. Here we employed a series of frameshift reporters to measure mutagenesis associated with BIR in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate that BIR DNA synthesis is intrinsically inaccurate over the entire path of the replication fork, as the rate of frameshift mutagenesis during BIR is up to 2,800-fold higher than during normal replication. Importantly, this high rate of mutagenesis was observed not only close to the DSB where BIR is less stable, but also far from the DSB where the BIR replication fork is fast and stabilized. We established that polymerase proofreading and mismatch repair correct BIR errors. Also, dNTP levels were elevated during BIR, and this contributed to BIR-related mutagenesis. We propose that a high level of DNA polymerase errors that is not fully compensated by error-correction mechanisms is largely responsible for mutagenesis during BIR, with Pol δ generating many of the mutagenic errors. We further postulate that activation of BIR in eukaryotic cells may significantly contribute to accumulation of mutations that fuel cancer and evolution.

  14. The nucleosome: orchestrating DNA damage signaling and repair within chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Poonam; Miller, Kyle M

    2016-10-01

    DNA damage occurs within the chromatin environment, which ultimately participates in regulating DNA damage response (DDR) pathways and repair of the lesion. DNA damage activates a cascade of signaling events that extensively modulates chromatin structure and organization to coordinate DDR factor recruitment to the break and repair, whilst also promoting the maintenance of normal chromatin functions within the damaged region. For example, DDR pathways must avoid conflicts between other DNA-based processes that function within the context of chromatin, including transcription and replication. The molecular mechanisms governing the recognition, target specificity, and recruitment of DDR factors and enzymes to the fundamental repeating unit of chromatin, i.e., the nucleosome, are poorly understood. Here we present our current view of how chromatin recognition by DDR factors is achieved at the level of the nucleosome. Emerging evidence suggests that the nucleosome surface, including the nucleosome acidic patch, promotes the binding and activity of several DNA damage factors on chromatin. Thus, in addition to interactions with damaged DNA and histone modifications, nucleosome recognition by DDR factors plays a key role in orchestrating the requisite chromatin response to maintain both genome and epigenome integrity.

  15. Prolonged particulate chromate exposure does not inhibit homologous recombination repair in North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Cynthia L; Wise, Catherine F; Wise, John Pierce

    2017-09-15

    Chromosome instability is a common feature of cancers that forms due to the misrepair of DNA double strand breaks. Homologous recombination (HR) repair is a high fidelity DNA repair pathway that utilizes a homologous DNA sequence to accurately repair such damage and protect the genome. Prolonged exposure (>72h) to the human lung carcinogen, particulate hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), inhibits HR repair, resulting in increased chromosome instability in human cells. Comparative studies have shown acute Cr(VI) exposure induces less chromosome damage in whale cells than human cells, suggesting investigating the effect of this carcinogen in other species may inform efforts to prevent Cr(VI)-induced chromosome instability. Thus, the goal of this study was to determine the effect of prolonged Cr(VI) exposure on HR repair and clastogenesis in North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) lung cells. We show particulate Cr(VI) induces HR repair activity after both acute (24h) and prolonged (120h) exposure in North Atlantic right whale cells. Although the RAD51 response was lower following prolonged Cr(VI) exposure compared to acute exposure, the response was sufficient for HR repair to occur. In accordance with active HR repair, no increase in Cr(VI)-induced clastogenesis was observed with increased exposure time. These results suggest prolonged Cr(VI) exposure affects HR repair and genomic stability differently in whale and human lung cells. Future investigation of the differences in how human and whale cells respond to chemical carcinogens may provide valuable insight into mechanisms of preventing chemical carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Aberrant recombination and repair during immunoglobulin class switching in BRCA1-deficient human B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björkman, Andrea; Qvist, Per; Du, Likun

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein (BRCA1) has a multitude of functions that contribute to genome integrity and tumor suppression. Its participation in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during homologous recombination (HR) is well recognized, whereas its involvement in the se......Breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein (BRCA1) has a multitude of functions that contribute to genome integrity and tumor suppression. Its participation in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during homologous recombination (HR) is well recognized, whereas its involvement...... of long microhomologies was found at recombination junctions derived from E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase RNF168-deficient, Fanconi anemia group J protein (FACJ, BRIP1)-deficient, or DNA endonuclease RBBP8 (CtIP)-compromised cells, whereas an increased frequency of S-region inversions was observed in breast...... cancer type 2 susceptibility protein (BRCA2)-deficient cells. Thus, BRCA1, together with its interaction partners, seems to play an important role in repairing DSBs generated during class switch recombination by promoting the classical NHEJ pathway. This may not only provide a general mechanism...

  17. High-Risk Alphapapillomavirus Oncogenes Impair the Homologous Recombination Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Nicholas A; Khanal, Sujita; Robinson, Kristin L; Wendel, Sebastian O; Messer, Joshua J; Galloway, Denise A

    2017-10-15

    Persistent high-risk genus human Alphapapillomavirus (HPV) infections cause nearly every cervical carcinoma and a subset of tumors in the oropharyngeal tract. During the decades required for HPV-associated tumorigenesis, the cellular genome becomes significantly destabilized. Our analysis of cervical tumors from four separate data sets found a significant upregulation of the homologous-recombination (HR) pathway genes. The increased abundance of HR proteins can be replicated in primary cells by expression of the two HPV oncogenes (E6 and E7) required for HPV-associated transformation. HPV E6 and E7 also enhanced the ability of HR proteins to form repair foci, and yet both E6 and E7 reduce the ability of the HR pathway to complete double-strand break (DSB) repair by about 50%. The HPV oncogenes hinder HR by allowing the process to begin at points in the cell cycle when the lack of a sister chromatid to serve as a homologous template prevents completion of the repair. Further, HPV E6 attenuates repair by causing RAD51 to be mislocalized away from both transient and persistent DSBs, whereas HPV E7 is only capable of impairing RAD51 localization to transient lesions. Finally, we show that the inability to robustly repair DSBs causes some of these lesions to be more persistent, a phenotype that correlates with increased integration of episomal DNA. Together, these data support our hypothesis that HPV oncogenes contribute to the genomic instability observed in HPV-associated malignancies by attenuating the repair of damaged DNA.IMPORTANCE This study expands the understanding of HPV biology, establishing a direct role for both HPV E6 and E7 in the destabilization of the host genome by blocking the homologous repair of DSBs. To our knowledge, this is the first time that both viral oncogenes were shown to disrupt this DSB repair pathway. We show that HPV E6 and E7 allow HR to initiate at an inappropriate part of the cell cycle. The mislocalization of RAD51 away from DSBs in

  18. Excision repair in mammalian cells. [uv radiation, N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, F.E.; Setlow, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Excision repair after combined treatments of uv and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene (AAAF) was studied by three different techniques in cells proficient in uv excision repair and in cells deficient in uv repair. Two patterns of repair were observed: in repair proficient cells total repair was additive, and in repair deficient cells total repair was much less than additive--usually less than observed for separate treatments--and AAAF inhibited dimer excision. We conclude that in the 1st class of cells pathways for repair of uv and AAAF lesions are not identical, and in the 2nd class the residual excision enzymes are different from those in repair proficient cells.

  19. New applications of the Comet assay: Comet-FISH and transcription-coupled DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, Graciela; Cox, Rachel A; Hanawalt, Philip C

    2009-01-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is a pathway dedicated to the removal of damage from the template strands of actively transcribed genes. Although the detailed mechanism of TCR is not yet understood, it is believed to be triggered when a translocating RNA polymerase is arrested at a lesion or unusual structure in the DNA. Conventional assays for TCR require high doses of DNA damage for the statistical analysis of repair in the individual strands of DNA sequences ranging in size from a few hundred bases to 30kb. The single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay allows detection of single- or double-strand breaks at a 10-100-fold higher level of resolution. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) combined with the Comet assay (Comet-FISH) affords a heightened level of sensitivity for the assessment of repair in defined DNA sequences of cells treated with physiologically relevant doses of genotoxins. This approach also reveals localized susceptibility to chromosomal breakage in cells from individuals with hypersensitivity to radiation or chemotherapy. Several groups have reported preferential repair in transcriptionally active genes or chromosomal domains using Comet-FISH. The prevailing interpretation of the behavior of DNA in the Comet assay assumes that the DNA is arranged in loops and matrix-attachment sites; that supercoiled, undamaged loops are contained within the nuclear matrix and appear in Comet "heads", and that Comet "tails" consist of relaxed DNA loops containing one or more breaks. According to this model, localization of FISH probes in Comet heads signifies that loops containing the targeted sequences are free of damage. This implies that preferential repair as detected by Comet-FISH might encompass large chromosomal domains containing both transcribed and non-transcribed sequences. We review the existing evidence and discuss the implications in relation to current models for the molecular mechanism of TCR.

  20. New Applications of the Comet Assay: Comet-FISH and Transcription-Coupled DNA Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Rachel A.; Hanawalt, Philip C.

    2009-01-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is a pathway dedicated to the removal of damage from the template strands of actively transcribed genes. Although the detailed mechanism of TCR is not yet understood, it is believed to be triggered when a translocating RNA polymerase is arrested at a lesion or unusual structure in the DNA. Conventional assays for TCR require high doses of DNA damage for the statistical analysis of repair in the individual strands of DNA sequences ranging in size from a few hundred bases to 30 kb. The single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay allows detection of single-or double-strand breaks at a 10 to 100-fold higher level of resolution. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) combined with the Comet assay (Comet-FISH) affords a heightened level of sensitivity for the assessment of repair in defined DNA sequences of cells treated with physiologically relevant doses of genotoxins. This approach also reveals localized susceptibility to chromosomal breakage in cells from individuals with hypersensitivity to radiation or chemotherapy. Several groups have reported preferential repair in transcriptionally active genes or chromosomal domains using Comet-FISH. The prevailing interpretation of the behavior of DNA in the Comet assay assumes that the DNA is arranged in loops and matrix-attachment sites; that supercoiled, undamaged loops are contained within the nuclear matrix and appear in Comet “heads”, and that Comet “tails” consist of relaxed DNA loops containing one or more breaks. According to this model, localization of FISH probes in Comet heads signifies that loops containing the targeted sequences are free of damage. This implies that preferential repair as detected by Comet-FISH might encompass large chromosomal domains containing both transcribed and non-transcribed sequences. We review the existing evidence and discuss the implications in relation to current models for the molecular mechanism of TCR. PMID:18291710

  1. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuy, Aurélie [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Oncogenesis UMR8200CNRS, Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Sarasin, Alain, E-mail: alain.sarasin@gustaveroussy.fr [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Oncogenesis UMR8200CNRS, Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Service de Génétique, Institut Gustave Roussy (France)

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Full correction of mutation in the XPC gene by engineered nucleases. • Meganucleases and TALENs are inhibited by 5-MeC for inducing double strand breaks. • Gene therapy of XP cells is possible using homologous recombination for DSB repair. - Abstract: Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients.

  2. Exonuclease 1 and its versatile roles in DNA repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keijzers, Guido; Liu, Dekang; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2016-01-01

    Exonuclease 1 (EXO1) is a multifunctional 5' → 3' exonuclease and a DNA structure-specific DNA endonuclease. EXO1 plays roles in DNA replication, DNA mismatch repair (MMR) and DNA double-stranded break repair (DSBR) in lower and higher eukaryotes and contributes to meiosis, immunoglobulin...

  3. Base excision repair dysfunction in a subgroup of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, A M; Gondek, L P; Szpurka, H; Nearman, Z P; Tiu, R V; Maciejewski, J P

    2008-03-01

    In myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) increased chromosomal breaks point toward defects in DNA repair machinery including base excision repair (BER) pathway involved in handling of oxidative DNA damage. We investigated whether defects in this pathway can be found in MDS. Elevated levels of 8-oxoguanine (8-OG) were found in a significant proportion of MDS patients, indicating increased oxidative DNA damage or defective handling of oxidative load. In a distinct subgroup of patients, increased 8-OG content was associated with increased hOGG1 mRNA expression and activity. In some patients, increased numbers of abasic sites (AP sites) correlated with low levels of POLbeta. To further investigate the nature of this defect, we examined genetic lesions potentially explaining accumulation of 8-OG and AP sites. We genotyped a large cohort of MDS patients and found a correlation between increased oxidative damage and the presence of the hOGG1-Cys326 allele suggesting inadequate compensatory feedback. Overall, this hOGG1 variant was more frequent in MDS, particularly in advanced forms, as compared to controls. In summary, we demonstrated that BER dysfunction in some MDS patients may be responsible for the increased 8-OG incorporation and explains one aspect of the propensity to chromosomal breaks in MDS but other mechanisms may also be involved.

  4. Mechanism of cluster DNA damage repair in response to high-atomic number and energy particles radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Chen, David J

    2011-06-03

    Low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (i.e., γ- and X-rays) induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that are rapidly repaired (rejoined). In contrast, DNA damage induced by the dense ionizing track of high-atomic number and energy (HZE) particles is slowly repaired or is irreparable. These unrepaired and/or misrepaired DNA lesions may contribute to the observed higher relative biological effectiveness for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in HZE particle irradiated cells compared to those treated with low-LET radiation. The types of DNA lesions induced by HZE particles have been characterized in vitro and usually consist of two or more closely spaced strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases on opposing strands. It is unclear why these lesions are difficult to repair. In this review, we highlight the potential of a new technology allowing direct visualization of different types of DNA lesions in human cells and document the emerging significance of live-cell imaging for elucidation of the spatio-temporal characterization of complex DNA damage. We focus on the recent insights into the molecular pathways that participate in the repair of HZE particle-induced DSBs. We also discuss recent advances in our understanding of how different end-processing nucleases aid in repair of DSBs with complicated ends generated by HZE particles. Understanding the mechanism underlying the repair of DNA damage induced by HZE particles will have important implications for estimating the risks to human health associated with HZE particle exposure. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of oxidative guanine damage and repair in mammalian telomeres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhilong Wang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyG are among the most common oxidative DNA lesions and are substrates for 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1-initiated DNA base excision repair (BER. Mammalian telomeres consist of triple guanine repeats and are subject to oxidative guanine damage. Here, we investigated the impact of oxidative guanine damage and its repair by OGG1 on telomere integrity in mice. The mouse cells were analyzed for telomere integrity by telomere quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (telomere-FISH, by chromosome orientation-FISH (CO-FISH, and by indirect immunofluorescence in combination with telomere-FISH and for oxidative base lesions by Fpg-incision/Southern blot assay. In comparison to the wild type, telomere lengthening was observed in Ogg1 null (Ogg1(-/- mouse tissues and primary embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs cultivated in hypoxia condition (3% oxygen, whereas telomere shortening was detected in Ogg1(-/- mouse hematopoietic cells and primary MEFs cultivated in normoxia condition (20% oxygen or in the presence of an oxidant. In addition, telomere length abnormalities were accompanied by altered telomere sister chromatid exchanges, increased telomere single- and double-strand breaks, and preferential telomere lagging- or G-strand losses in Ogg1(-/- mouse cells. Oxidative guanine lesions were increased in telomeres in Ogg1(-/- mice with aging and primary MEFs cultivated in 20% oxygen. Furthermore, oxidative guanine lesions persisted at high level in Ogg1(-/- MEFs after acute exposure to hydrogen peroxide, while they rapidly returned to basal level in wild-type MEFs. These findings indicate that oxidative guanine damage can arise in telomeres where it affects length homeostasis, recombination, DNA replication, and DNA breakage repair. Our studies demonstrate that BER pathway is required in repairing oxidative guanine damage in telomeres and maintaining telomere integrity

  6. WHERE MULTIFUNCTIONAL DNA REPAIR PROTEINS MEET: MAPPING THE INTERACTION DOMAINS BETWEEN XPG AND WRN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangaraj, K.; Cooper, P.K.; Trego, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    The rapid recognition and repair of DNA damage is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity and cellular survival. Multiple complex and interconnected DNA damage responses exist within cells to preserve the human genome, and these repair pathways are carried out by a specifi c interplay of protein-protein interactions. Thus a failure in the coordination of these processes, perhaps brought about by a breakdown in any one multifunctional repair protein, can lead to genomic instability, developmental and immunological abnormalities, cancer and premature aging. This study demonstrates a novel interaction between two such repair proteins, Xeroderma pigmentosum group G protein (XPG) and Werner syndrome helicase (WRN), that are both highly pleiotropic and associated with inherited genetic disorders when mutated. XPG is a structure-specifi c endonuclease required for the repair of UV-damaged DNA by nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mutations in XPG result in the diseases Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS). A loss of XPG incision activity results in XP, whereas a loss of non-enzymatic function(s) of XPG causes CS. WRN is a multifunctional protein involved in double-strand break repair (DSBR), and consists of 3’–5’ DNA-dependent helicase, 3’–5’ exonuclease, and single-strand DNA annealing activities. Nonfunctional WRN protein leads to Werner syndrome, a premature aging disorder with increased cancer incidence. Far Western analysis was used to map the interacting domains between XPG and WRN by denaturing gel electrophoresis, which separated purifi ed full length and recombinant XPG and WRN deletion constructs, based primarily upon the length of each polypeptide. Specifi c interacting domains were visualized when probed with the secondary protein of interest which was then detected by traditional Western analysis using the antibody of the secondary protein. The interaction between XPG and WRN was mapped to the C-terminal region of

  7. Repair process and a repaired component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, III, Herbert Chidsey; Simpson, Stanley F.

    2018-02-20

    Matrix composite component repair processes are disclosed. The matrix composite repair process includes applying a repair material to a matrix composite component, securing the repair material to the matrix composite component with an external securing mechanism and curing the repair material to bond the repair material to the matrix composite component during the securing by the external securing mechanism. The matrix composite component is selected from the group consisting of a ceramic matrix composite, a polymer matrix composite, and a metal matrix composite. In another embodiment, the repair process includes applying a partially-cured repair material to a matrix composite component, and curing the repair material to bond the repair material to the matrix composite component, an external securing mechanism securing the repair material throughout a curing period, In another embodiment, the external securing mechanism is consumed or decomposed during the repair process.

  8. Selenium added unripe carica papaya pulp extracts enhance wound repair through TGF-β1 and VEGF-a signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafiu, Abdulrazaq Bidemi; Rahman, Mohammad Tariqur

    2015-10-15

    Increased wound healing efficiency by Se(2+) added Carica papaya L. (Caricaceae) fruit extract was linked to increased antioxidant and anti-inflammatory responses during healing. We investigated the impact of Se(2+) or Zn(2+) added papaya water (WE) and phosphate-buffered saline (PE) extracts on cells recruitment and bio-molecular alterations on days 4 and 10 post wounding in an in vivo excision wound. Excision wounds were created on the dorsum of Sprague Dawley rats and treated topically twice/day with 20 μL of PE and WE (5 mg extract/mL), 0.5 μgSe(2+) added PE and WE (PES and WES), or 100 μMZn(2+) added PE and WE (PEZ and WEZ). Deionised water (negative) and Solcoseryl (positive) were applied on the control groups. Histochemical and biochemical assays were used to evaluate cellular and bio-molecular changes in the wound. PES (PE + 0.5 μg Se(2+)) only increased significantly (p Papaya extract improved wound repair by increasing fibroblasts recruitment and reducing polymorphonuclear leukocytes infiltration through early transient expressions of TGF-β1 and VEGFA at the wound area. The processes were amplified with Se(2+) addition.

  9. Energy and Technology Review: Unlocking the mysteries of DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirk, W.A.

    1993-04-01

    DNA, the genetic blueprint, has the remarkable property of encoding its own repair following diverse types of structural damage induced by external agents or normal metabolism. We are studying the interplay of DNA damaging agents, repair genes, and their protein products to decipher the complex biochemical pathways that mediate such repair. Our research focuses on repair processes that correct DNA damage produced by chemical mutagens and radiation, both ionizing and ultraviolet. The most important type of DNA repair in human cells is called excision repair. This multistep process removes damaged or inappropriate pieces of DNA -- often as a string of 29 nucleotides containing the damage -- and replaces them with intact ones. We have isolated, cloned, and mapped several human repair genes associated with the nucleotide excision repair pathway and involved in the repair of DNA damage after exposure to ultraviolet light or mutagens in cooked food. We have shown that a defect in one of these repair genes, ERCC2, is responsible for the repair deficiency in one of the groups of patients with the recessive genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP group D). We are exploring ways to purify sufficient quantities (milligrams) of the protein products of these and other repair genes so that we can understand their functions. Our long-term goals are to link defective repair proteins to human DNA repair disorders that predispose to cancer, and to produce DNA-repair-deficient mice that can serve as models for the human disorders.

  10. Motorcycle Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Jim; Bundy, Mike

    This motorcycle repair curriculum guide contains the following ten areas of study: brake systems, clutches, constant mesh transmissions, final drives, suspension, mechanical starting mechanisms, electrical systems, fuel systems, lubrication systems, and overhead camshafts. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction. Each instructional…

  11. Omphalocele repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your child to visit a very ill sibling Surgical wound care - open Images Omphalocele repair - series References Chung DH. Pediatric surgery. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, ... Modern Surgical Practice . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap ...

  12. Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent or Embryonic Stem Cells Decreases the DNA Damage Repair by Homologous Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Mujoo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The nitric oxide (NO-cyclic GMP pathway contributes to human stem cell differentiation, but NO free radical production can also damage DNA, necessitating a robust DNA damage response (DDR to ensure cell survival. How the DDR is affected by differentiation is unclear. Differentiation of stem cells, either inducible pluripotent or embryonic derived, increased residual DNA damage as determined by γ-H2AX and 53BP1 foci, with increased S-phase-specific chromosomal aberration after exposure to DNA-damaging agents, suggesting reduced homologous recombination (HR repair as supported by the observation of decreased HR-related repair factor foci formation (RAD51 and BRCA1. Differentiated cells also had relatively increased fork stalling and R-loop formation after DNA replication stress. Treatment with NO donor (NOC-18, which causes stem cell differentiation has no effect on double-strand break (DSB repair by non-homologous end-joining but reduced DSB repair by HR. Present studies suggest that DNA repair by HR is impaired in differentiated cells.

  13. Turbine repair process, repaired coating, and repaired turbine component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rupak; Delvaux, John McConnell; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-11-03

    A turbine repair process, a repaired coating, and a repaired turbine component are disclosed. The turbine repair process includes providing a turbine component having a higher-pressure region and a lower-pressure region, introducing particles into the higher-pressure region, and at least partially repairing an opening between the higher-pressure region and the lower-pressure region with at least one of the particles to form a repaired turbine component. The repaired coating includes a silicon material, a ceramic matrix composite material, and a repaired region having the silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material. The repaired turbine component a ceramic matrix composite layer and a repaired region having silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material.

  14. Model Breaking Points Conceptualized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vig, Rozy; Murray, Eileen; Star, Jon R.

    2014-01-01

    Current curriculum initiatives (e.g., National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers 2010) advocate that models be used in the mathematics classroom. However, despite their apparent promise, there comes a point when models break, a point in the mathematical problem space where the model cannot,…

  15. NPRL2 sensitizes human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells to cisplatin treatment by regulating key components in the DNA repair pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitanjali Jayachandran

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available NPRL2, one of the tumor suppressor genes residing in a 120-kb homozygous deletion region of human chromosome band 3p21.3, has a high degree of amino acid sequence homology with the nitrogen permease regulator 2 (NPR2 yeast gene, and mutations of NPRL2 in yeast cells are associated with resistance to cisplatin-mediated cell killing. Previously, we showed that restoration of NPRL2 in NPRL2-negative and cisplatin-resistant cells resensitize lung cancer cells to cisplatin treatment in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we show that sensitization of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells to cisplatin by NPRL2 is accomplished through the regulation of key components in the DNA-damage checkpoint pathway. NPRL2 can phosphorylate ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM kinase activated by cisplatin and promote downstream gamma-H2AX formation in vitro and in vivo, which occurs during apoptosis concurrently with the initial appearance of high-molecular-weight DNA fragments. Moreover, this combination treatment results in higher Chk1 and Chk2 kinase activity than does treatment with cisplatin alone and can activate Chk2 in pleural metastases tumor xenograft in mice. Activated Chk1 and Chk2 increase the expression of cell cycle checkpoint proteins, including Cdc25A and Cdc25C, leading to higher levels of G2/M arrest in tumor cells treated with NPRL2 and cisplatin than in tumor cells treated with cisplatin only. Our results therefore suggest that ectopic expression of NPRL2 activates the DNA damage checkpoint pathway in cisplatin-resistant and NPRL2-negative cells; hence, the combination of NPRL2 and cisplatin can resensitize cisplatin nonresponders to cisplatin treatment through the activation of the DNA damage checkpoint pathway, leading to cell arrest in the G2/M phase and induction of apoptosis. The direct implication of this study is that combination treatment with NPRL2 and cisplatin may overcome cisplatin resistance and enhance therapeutic efficacy.

  16. NPRL2 Sensitizes Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Cells to Cisplatin Treatment by Regulating Key Components in the DNA Repair Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingbing; Roth, Jack A.; Ji, Lin

    2010-01-01

    NPRL2, one of the tumor suppressor genes residing in a 120-kb homozygous deletion region of human chromosome band 3p21.3, has a high degree of amino acid sequence homology with the nitrogen permease regulator 2 (NPR2) yeast gene, and mutations of NPRL2 in yeast cells are associated with resistance to cisplatin-mediated cell killing. Previously, we showed that restoration of NPRL2 in NPRL2-negative and cisplatin-resistant cells resensitize lung cancer cells to cisplatin treatment in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we show that sensitization of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells to cisplatin by NPRL2 is accomplished through the regulation of key components in the DNA-damage checkpoint pathway. NPRL2 can phosphorylate ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase activated by cisplatin and promote downstream γ-H2AX formation in vitro and in vivo, which occurs during apoptosis concurrently with the initial appearance of high-molecular-weight DNA fragments. Moreover, this combination treatment results in higher Chk1 and Chk2 kinase activity than does treatment with cisplatin alone and can activate Chk2 in pleural metastases tumor xenograft in mice. Activated Chk1 and Chk2 increase the expression of cell cycle checkpoint proteins, including Cdc25A and Cdc25C, leading to higher levels of G2/M arrest in tumor cells treated with NPRL2 and cisplatin than in tumor cells treated with cisplatin only. Our results therefore suggest that ectopic expression of NPRL2 activates the DNA damage checkpoint pathway in cisplatin-resistant and NPRL2-negative cells; hence, the combination of NPRL2 and cisplatin can resensitize cisplatin nonresponders to cisplatin treatment through the activation of the DNA damage checkpoint pathway, leading to cell arrest in the G2/M phase and induction of apoptosis. The direct implication of this study is that combination treatment with NPRL2 and cisplatin may overcome cisplatin resistance and enhance therapeutic efficacy. PMID:20700484

  17. A miR-590/Acvr2a/Rad51b Axis Regulates DNA Damage Repair during mESC Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qidong Liu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells (ESCs enable rapid proliferation that also causes DNA damage. To maintain genomic stabilization during rapid proliferation, ESCs must have an efficient system to repress genotoxic stress. Here, we show that withdrawal of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF, which maintains the self-renewal capability of mouse ESCs (mESCs, significantly inhibits the cell proliferation and DNA damage of mESCs and upregulates the expression of miR-590. miR-590 promotes single-strand break (SSB and double-strand break (DSB damage repair, thus slowing proliferation of mESCs without influencing stemness. miR-590 directly targets Activin receptor type 2a (Acvr2a to mediate Activin signaling. We identified the homologous recombination-mediated repair (HRR gene, Rad51b, as a downstream molecule of the miR-590/Acvr2a pathway regulating the SSB and DSB damage repair and cell cycle. Our study shows that a miR-590/Acvr2a/Rad51b signaling axis ensures the stabilization of mESCs by balancing DNA damage repair and rapid proliferation during self-renewal.

  18. [Neural repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitada, Masaaki; Dezawa, Mari

    2008-05-01

    Recent progress of stem cell biology gives us the hope for neural repair. We have established methods to specifically induce functional Schwann cells and neurons from bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs). The effectiveness of these induced cells was evaluated by grafting them either into peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord injury, or Parkinson' s disease animal models. MSCs-derived Schwann cells supported axonal regeneration and re-constructed myelin to facilitate the functional recovery in peripheral and spinal cord injury. MSCs-derived dopaminergic neurons integrated into host striatum and contributed to behavioral repair. In this review, we introduce the differentiation potential of MSCs and finally discuss about their benefits and drawbacks of these induction systems for cell-based therapy in neuro-traumatic and neuro-degenerative diseases.

  19. A kinetic framework for tRNA ligase and enforcement of a 2'-phosphate requirement for ligation highlights the design logic of an RNA repair machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remus, Barbara S; Shuman, Stewart

    2013-05-01

    tRNA ligases are essential components of informational and stress-response pathways entailing repair of RNA breaks with 2',3'-cyclic phosphate and 5'-OH ends. Plant and fungal tRNA ligases comprise three catalytic domains. Phosphodiesterase and kinase modules heal the broken ends to generate the 3'-OH, 2'-PO₄, and 5'-PO₄ required for sealing by the ligase. We exploit RNA substrates with different termini to define rates of individual steps or subsets of steps along the repair pathway of plant ligase AtRNL. The results highlight rate-limiting transactions, how repair is affected by active-site mutations, and how mutations are bypassed by RNA alterations. We gain insights to 2'-PO₄ specificity by showing that AtRNL is deficient in transferring AMP to pRNAOH to form AppRNAOH but proficient at sealing pre-adenylylated AppRNAOH. This strategy for discriminating 2'-PO₄ versus 2'-OH ends provides a quality-control checkpoint to ensure that only purposeful RNA breaks are sealed and to avoid nonspecific "capping" of 5'-PO₄ ends.

  20. Assaying Break and Nick-Induced Homologous Recombination in Mammalian Cells Using the DR-GFP Reporter and Cas9 Nucleases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriend, Lianne E. M.; Jasin, Maria; Krawczyk, Przemek M.

    2014-01-01

    Thousands of DNA breaks occur daily in mammalian cells, including potentially tumorigenic double-strand breaks (DSBs) and less dangerous but vastly more abundant single-strand breaks (SSBs). The majority of SSBs are quickly repaired, but some can be converted to DSBs, posing a threat to the

  1. Protein expression of DNA damage repair proteins dictates response to topoisomerase and PARP inhibitors in triple-negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie L Boerner

    Full Text Available Patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC have a poor prognosis. New approaches for the treatment of TNBC are needed to improve patient survival. The concept of synthetic lethality, brought about by inactivating complementary DNA repair pathways, has been proposed as a promising therapeutic option for these tumors. The TNBC tumor type has been associated with BRCA mutations, and inhibitors of Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, a family of proteins that facilitates DNA repair, have been shown to effectively kill BRCA defective tumors by preventing cells from repairing DNA damage, leading to a loss of cell viability and clonogenic survival. Here we present preclinical efficacy results of combining the PARP inhibitor, ABT-888, with CPT-11, a topoisomerase I inhibitor. CPT-11 binds to topoisomerase I at the replication fork, creating a bulky adduct that is recognized as damaged DNA. When DNA damage was stimulated with CPT-11, protein expression of the nucleotide excision repair enzyme ERCC1 inversely correlated with cell viability, but not clonogenic survival. However, 4 out of the 6 TNBC cells were synergistically responsive by cell viability and 5 out of the 6 TNBC cells were synergistically responsive by clonogenic survival to the combination of ABT-888 and CPT-11. In vivo, the BRCA mutant cell line MX-1 treated with CPT-11 alone demonstrated significant decreased tumor growth; this decrease was enhanced further with the addition of ABT-888. Decrease in tumor growth correlated with an increase in double strand DNA breaks as measured by γ-H2AX phosphorylation. In summary, inhibiting two arms of the DNA repair pathway simultaneously in TNBC cell lines, independent of BRCA mutation status, resulted in un-repairable DNA damage and subsequent cell death.

  2. Break-induced telomere synthesis underlies alternative telomere maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilley, Robert L; Verma, Priyanka; Cho, Nam Woo; Winters, Harrison D; Wondisford, Anne R; Greenberg, Roger A

    2016-11-03

    Homology-directed DNA repair is essential for genome maintenance through templated DNA synthesis. Alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) necessitates homology-directed DNA repair to maintain telomeres in about 10-15% of human cancers. How DNA damage induces assembly and execution of a DNA replication complex (break-induced replisome) at telomeres or elsewhere in the mammalian genome is poorly understood. Here we define break-induced telomere synthesis and demonstrate that it utilizes a specialized replisome, which underlies ALT telomere maintenance. DNA double-strand breaks enact nascent telomere synthesis by long-tract unidirectional replication. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) loading by replication factor C (RFC) acts as the initial sensor of telomere damage to establish predominance of DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ) through its POLD3 subunit. Break-induced telomere synthesis requires the RFC-PCNA-Pol δ axis, but is independent of other canonical replisome components, ATM and ATR, or the homologous recombination protein Rad51. Thus, the inception of telomere damage recognition by the break-induced replisome orchestrates homology-directed telomere maintenance.

  3. Determination of genotoxic potential by comparison of structurally related azo dyes using DNA repair-deficient DT40 mutant panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooka, Masato; Kobayashi, Koji; Abe, Takuya; Akiyama, Kazuhiko; Hada, Masahiko; Takeda, Shunichi; Hirota, Kouji

    2016-12-01

    Azo dyes, including Sudan I, Orange II and Orange G, are industrial dyes that are assumed to have genotoxic potential. However, neither the type of DNA damage induced nor the structural features responsible for toxicity have been determined. We used a panel of DNA-repair-pathway-deficient mutants generated from chicken DT40 cells to evaluate the ability of these azo dyes to induce DNA damage and to identify the type of DNA damage induced. We compared the structurally related azo dyes Sudan I, Orange II and Orange G to identify the structural features responsible for genotoxicity. Compared with wild type cells, the double-strand break repair defective RAD54-/-/KU70-/- cells were significantly more sensitive to Sudan I, but not to Orange II or Orange G. The quantum-chemical calculations revealed that Sudan I, but not Orange II or Orange G, has a complete planar aromatic ring structure. These suggest that the planar feature of Sudan I is critical to the inducing of double-strand breaks. In summary, we used a DNA-repair mutant panel in combination with quantum-chemical calculations to provide a clue to the chemical structure responsible for genotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Knockout targeting of the Drosophila nap1 gene and examination of DNA repair tracts in the recombination products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankenau, Susanne; Barnickel, Thorsten; Marhold, Joachim; Lyko, Frank; Mechler, Bernard M; Lankenau, Dirk-Henner

    2003-02-01

    We used ends-in gene targeting to generate knockout mutations of the nucleosome assembly protein 1 (Nap1) gene in Drosophila melanogaster. Three independent targeted null-knockout mutations were produced. No wild-type NAP1 protein could be detected in protein extracts. Homozygous Nap1(KO) knockout flies were either embryonic lethal or poorly viable adult escapers. Three additional targeted recombination products were viable. To gain insight into the underlying molecular processes we examined conversion tracts in the recombination products. In nearly all cases the I-SceI endonuclease site of the donor vector was replaced by the wild-type Nap1 sequence. This indicated exonuclease processing at the site of the double-strand break (DSB), followed by replicative repair at donor-target junctions. The targeting products are best interpreted either by the classical DSB repair model or by the break-induced recombination (BIR) model. Synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA), which is another important recombinational repair pathway in the germline, does not explain ends-in targeting products. We conclude that this example of gene targeting at the Nap1 locus provides added support for the efficiency of this method and its usefulness in targeting any arbitrary locus in the Drosophila genome.

  5. DNA Repair Dysfunction and Neurodegeneration: Lessons From Rare Pediatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabbir, Syed H

    2016-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair disorders display a wide range of clinical syndromes and presentations, all associated at the molecular level by dysfunction of genes participating in the nucleotide excision repair pathway. Genotype-phenotype relationships are remarkably complex and not well understood. This article outlines neurodegenerative symptoms seen in nucleotide excision repair disorders and explores the role that nucleotide excision repair dysfunction can play in the pathogenesis of chronic neurodegenerative diseases. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Non-redundant Functions of ATM and DNA-PKcs in Response to DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Caron

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs elicit the so-called DNA damage response (DDR, largely relying on ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs, two members of the PI3K-like kinase family, whose respective functions during the sequential steps of the DDR remains controversial. Using the DIvA system (DSB inducible via AsiSI combined with high-resolution mapping and advanced microscopy, we uncovered that both ATM and DNA-PKcs spread in cis on a confined region surrounding DSBs, independently of the pathway used for repair. However, once recruited, these kinases exhibit non-overlapping functions on end joining and γH2AX domain establishment. More specifically, we found that ATM is required to ensure the association of multiple DSBs within “repair foci.” Our results suggest that ATM acts not only on chromatin marks but also on higher-order chromatin organization to ensure repair accuracy and survival.

  7. Neuroendocrine Merkel cell carcinoma is associated with mutations in key DNA repair, epigenetic and apoptosis pathways: a case-based study using targeted massively parallel sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Christian A; Jones, Ashley; Reynolds, Justin; Stuart, Jeremy; Pirisi, Lucia; Botrous, Peter; Wells, James

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare neuroendocrine carcinoma with a poorly understood molecular etiology. We implemented a comprehensive deep sequencing approach to identify mutations in the tumor DNA from a cohort of patients treated at our institution over the past 15 years. Our results indicate mutations that may constitute therapeutic targets in MCC. Five patients were treated for MCC within the study interval. Patients with adequate tissue (n = 4), positive neuroendocrine differentiation (chromogranin, synaptophysin, and cytokeratin 20), and histopathological confirmation of MCC were included in the study. DNA was extracted from archival tumor tissue samples and analyzed by massively parallel sequencing using a targeted, multiplex PCR approach followed by semiconductor sequencing. We demonstrate high-penetrance nonsense mutations in PDE4DIP (n = 4) as well as various missense mutations in the DNA damage response (PRKDC, AURKB, ERCC5, ATR, and ATRX) and epigenetic modulating enzymes (MLL3). We describe several mutations in potential disease-relevant genes and pathways. These targets should be evaluated in a larger cohort to determine their role in the molecular pathogenesis of MCC. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Breaking News as Radicalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartley, Jannie Møller

    The aim of the paper is to make explicit how the different categories are applied in the online newsroom and thus how new categories can be seen as positioning strategies in the form of radicalisations of already existing categories. Thus field theory provides us with tools to analyse how online...... journalists are using the categorisations to create hierarchies within the journalistic field in order to position themselves as specialists in what Tuchman has called developing news, aiming and striving for what today is know as breaking news and the “exclusive scoop,” as the trademark of online journalism...... in a media environment where immediacy rules (Domingo 2008a). Following this research the primary focus of this paper is the category breaking news and Tuchmans developing news, but as they are all connected the analysis will also draw upon the other categories in Tuchmans typology. The theoretical framework...

  9. DNA Repair in Drosophila: Mutagens, Models, and Missing Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekelsky, Jeff

    2017-02-01

    The numerous processes that damage DNA are counterbalanced by a complex network of repair pathways that, collectively, can mend diverse types of damage. Insights into these pathways have come from studies in many different organisms, including Drosophila melanogaster Indeed, the first ideas about chromosome and gene repair grew out of Drosophila research on the properties of mutations produced by ionizing radiation and mustard gas. Numerous methods have been developed to take advantage of Drosophila genetic tools to elucidate repair processes in whole animals, organs, tissues, and cells. These studies have led to the discovery of key DNA repair pathways, including synthesis-dependent strand annealing, and DNA polymerase theta-mediated end joining. Drosophila appear to utilize other major repair pathways as well, such as base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, and interstrand crosslink repair. In a surprising number of cases, however, DNA repair genes whose products play important roles in these pathways in other organisms are missing from the Drosophila genome, raising interesting questions for continued investigations. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  10. Routinizing Breaking News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartley, Jannie Møller

    2011-01-01

    This chapter revisits seminal theoretical categorizations of news proposed three decades earlier by US sociologist Gaye Tuchman. By exploring the definition of ”breaking news” in the contemporary online newsrooms of three Danish news organisations, the author offers us a long overdue re......-theorization of journalistic practice in the online context and helpfully explores well-evidenced limitations to online news production, such as the relationship between original reporting and the use of ”shovelware.”...

  11. EEPD1 Rescues Stressed Replication Forks and Maintains Genome Stability by Promoting End Resection and Homologous Recombination Repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuehan Wu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Replication fork stalling and collapse is a major source of genome instability leading to neoplastic transformation or cell death. Such stressed replication forks can be conservatively repaired and restarted using homologous recombination (HR or non-conservatively repaired using micro-homology mediated end joining (MMEJ. HR repair of stressed forks is initiated by 5' end resection near the fork junction, which permits 3' single strand invasion of a homologous template for fork restart. This 5' end resection also prevents classical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ, a competing pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB repair. Unopposed NHEJ can cause genome instability during replication stress by abnormally fusing free double strand ends that occur as unstable replication fork repair intermediates. We show here that the previously uncharacterized Exonuclease/Endonuclease/Phosphatase Domain-1 (EEPD1 protein is required for initiating repair and restart of stalled forks. EEPD1 is recruited to stalled forks, enhances 5' DNA end resection, and promotes restart of stalled forks. Interestingly, EEPD1 directs DSB repair away from cNHEJ, and also away from MMEJ, which requires limited end resection for initiation. EEPD1 is also required for proper ATR and CHK1 phosphorylation, and formation of gamma-H2AX, RAD51 and phospho-RPA32 foci. Consistent with a direct role in stalled replication fork cleavage, EEPD1 is a 5' overhang nuclease in an obligate complex with the end resection nuclease Exo1 and BLM. EEPD1 depletion causes nuclear and cytogenetic defects, which are made worse by replication stress. Depleting 53BP1, which slows cNHEJ, fully rescues the nuclear and cytogenetic abnormalities seen with EEPD1 depletion. These data demonstrate that genome stability during replication stress is maintained by EEPD1, which initiates HR and inhibits cNHEJ and MMEJ.

  12. Structure-based insights into the repair of UV-damaged DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenbroek, Elisabeth Maria

    2012-01-01

    Repair of damage in the DNA is essential for an organism. Therefore, several repair mechanisms have evolved. In this thesis, the mechanism of Transcription-Coupled Nucleotide Excision Repair (TC-NER) and the UV Damage Endonuclease repair pathway (UVDE) have been studied. Central to TC-NER is the

  13. Double-strand breaks and the concept of short- and long-term epigenetic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlowski, Christian; Mah, Li-Jeen; Vasireddy, Raja S; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2011-04-01

    Double-strand breaks represent an extremely cytolethal form of DNA damage and thus pose a serious threat to the preservation of genetic and epigenetic information. Though it is well-known that double-strand breaks such as those generated by ionising radiation are among the principal causative factors behind mutations, chromosomal aberrations, genetic instability and carcinogenesis, significantly less is known about the epigenetic consequences of double-strand break formation and repair for carcinogenesis. Double-strand break repair is a highly coordinated process that requires the unravelling of the compacted chromatin structure to facilitate repair machinery access and then restoration of the original undamaged chromatin state. Recent experimental findings have pointed to a potential mechanism for double-strand break-induced epigenetic silencing. This review will discuss some of the key epigenetic regulatory processes involved in double-strand break (DSB) repair and how incomplete or incorrect restoration of chromatin structure can leave a DSB-induced epigenetic memory of damage with potentially pathological repercussions.

  14. Nbs1 ChIP-Seq Identifies Off-Target DNA Double-Strand Breaks Induced by AID in Activated Splenic B Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyne Khair

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID is required for initiation of Ig class switch recombination (CSR and somatic hypermutation (SHM of antibody genes during immune responses. AID has also been shown to induce chromosomal translocations, mutations, and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs involving non-Ig genes in activated B cells. To determine what makes a DNA site a target for AID-induced DSBs, we identify off-target DSBs induced by AID by performing chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP for Nbs1, a protein that binds DSBs, followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-Seq. We detect and characterize hundreds of off-target AID-dependent DSBs. Two types of tandem repeats are highly enriched within the Nbs1-binding sites: long CA repeats, which can form Z-DNA, and tandem pentamers containing the AID target hotspot WGCW. These tandem repeats are not nearly as enriched at AID-independent DSBs, which we also identified. Msh2, a component of the mismatch repair pathway and important for genome stability, increases off-target DSBs, similar to its effect on Ig switch region DSBs, which are required intermediates during CSR. Most of the off-target DSBs are two-ended, consistent with generation during G1 phase, similar to DSBs in Ig switch regions. However, a minority are one-ended, presumably due to conversion of single-strand breaks to DSBs during replication. One-ended DSBs are repaired by processes involving homologous recombination, including break-induced replication repair, which can lead to genome instability. Off-target DSBs, especially those present during S phase, can lead to chromosomal translocations, deletions and gene amplifications, resulting in the high frequency of B cell lymphomas derived from cells that express or have expressed AID.

  15. Recombinational DNA repair is regulated by compartmentalization of DNA lesions at the nuclear pore complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Géli, Vincent; Lisby, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is emerging as a center for recruitment of a class of "difficult to repair" lesions such as double-strand breaks without a repair template and eroded telomeres in telomerase-deficient cells. In addition to such pathological situations, a recent study by Su and colle......The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is emerging as a center for recruitment of a class of "difficult to repair" lesions such as double-strand breaks without a repair template and eroded telomeres in telomerase-deficient cells. In addition to such pathological situations, a recent study by Su...

  16. DNA damage and radical reactions: Mechanistic aspects, formation in cells and repair studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadet, J.; Ravanat, J.L. [CEA Grenoble, Inst Nanosci and Cryogenie, SCIB-UMR-E 3, Lab Les Acides Nucl, UJF, F-38054 Grenoble 9 (France); Carell, T. [Univ Munich, Dept Chem and Biochem, Ctr Integrat Prot Sci, D-81377 Munich (Germany); Cellai, L. [CNR, Ist Cristalog, Monterotondo Stn, I-00016 Rome (Italy); Chatgilialoglu, Ch. [CNR, ISOF, I-40129 Bologna, (Italy); Gimisis, Th. [Univ Athens, Dept Chem, Organ Chem Lab, Athens 15784, (Greece); Miranda, M. [Univ Politecn Valencia, Inst Technol Quim, Dept Quim, Valencia 46022 (Spain); O' Neill, P. [Univ Oxford, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Robert, M. [Univ Paris 07, CNRS, UMR 7591, Electrochim Mol Lab, F-75251 Paris 05 (France)

    2008-07-01

    Several examples of oxidative and reductive reactions of DNA components that lead to single and tandem modifications are discussed in this review. These include nucleophilic addition reactions of the one-electron oxidation-mediated guanine radical cation and the one-electron reduced intermediate of 8-bromo-purine 2'-de-oxy-ribo-nucleosides that give rise to either an oxidizing guanine radical or related 5',8-cyclo-purine nucleosides. In addition, mechanistic insights into the reductive pathways involved in the photolyase induced reversal of cyclo-buta-cli-pyrimidine and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts are provided. Evidence for the occurrence and validation in cellular DNA of (OH){sup {center_dot}} radical degradation pathways of guanine that have been established in model systems has been gained from the accurate measurement of degradation products. Relevant information on biochemical aspects of the repair of single and clustered oxidatively generated damage to DNA has been gained from detailed investigations that rely on the synthesis of suitable modified probes. Thus the preparation of stable carbocyclic derivatives of purine nucleoside containing defined sequence oligonucleotides has allowed detailed crystallographic studies of the recognition step of the base damage by enzymes implicated in the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Detailed insights are provided on the BER processing of non-double strand break bi-stranded clustered damage that may consist of base lesions, a single strand break or abasic sites and represent one of the main deleterious classes of radiation-induced DNA damage. (authors)

  17. DNA repair, damage signaling and carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Christophe; Salles, Bernard; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2008-04-02

    The First joint meeting of the German DGDR (German Society for Research on DNA Repair) and the French SFTG (French Society of Genotoxicology) on DNA Repair was held in Toulouse, France, from September 15 to 19, 2007. It was organized by Lisa Wiesmüller and Bernard Salles together with the scientific committee consisting of Gilbert de Murcia, Jean-Marc Egly, Frank Grosse, Karl-Peter Hopfner, Georges Iliakis, Bernd Kaina, Markus Löbrich, Bernard Lopez, Daniel Marzin and Alain Sarasin. This report summarizes information presented by the speakers (invited lectures and oral communications) during the seven plenary sessions, which include (1) excision repair, (2) DNA repair and carcinogenesis, (3) double-strand break repair, (4) replication in repair and lesion bypass, (5) cellular responses to genotoxic stress, (6) DNA repair machinery within the chromatin context and (7) genotoxicology and testing. A total of 23 plenary lectures, 32 oral communications and 66 posters were presented in this rather intense 4 days meeting, which stimulated extensive discussions and highly interdisciplinary scientific exchanges among the approximately 250 participants.

  18. Break the Pattern!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasse, Cathrine; Trentemøller, Stine

    Break the Pattern! A critical enquiry into three scientific workplace cultures: Hercules, Caretakers and Worker Bees is the third publication of the international three year long project "Understanding Puzzles in the Gendered European Map" (UPGEM). By contrasting empirical findings from academic ...... (physics in culture) and discuss how physics as and in culture influence the perception of science, of work and family life, of the interplay between religion and science as well as how physics as culture can either hinder or promote the career of female scientists....

  19. Brain aneurysm repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  20. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  1. Inguinal hernia repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007406.htm Inguinal hernia repair To use the sharing features on this ... Inguinal hernia repair is surgery to repair a hernia in your groin. A hernia is tissue that bulges out of ...

  2. Femoral hernia repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007399.htm Femoral hernia repair To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Femoral hernia repair is surgery to repair a hernia near ...

  3. Tax impairs DNA replication forks and increases DNA breaks in specific oncogenic genome regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaib-Mezrag, Hassiba; Lemaçon, Delphine; Fontaine, Hélène; Bellon, Marcia; Bai, Xue Tao; Drac, Marjorie; Coquelle, Arnaud; Nicot, Christophe

    2014-09-04

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-I) is a human retrovirus associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), an aggressive CD4 T-cell proliferative disease with dismal prognosis. The long latency preceding the development of the disease and the low incidence suggests that the virus itself is not sufficient for transformation and that genetic defects are required to create a permissive environment for leukemia. In fact, ATL cells are characterized by profound genetic modifications including structural and numerical chromosome alterations. In this study we used molecular combing techniques to study the effect of the oncoprotein Tax on DNA replication. We found that replication forks have difficulties replicating complex DNA, fork progression is slower, and they pause or stall more frequently in the presence of Tax expression. Our results also show that Tax-associated replication defects are partially compensated by an increase in the firing of back-up origins. Consistent with these effects of Tax on DNA replication, an increase in double strand DNA breaks (DDSB) was seen in Tax expressing cells. Tax-mediated increases in DDSBs were associated with the ability of Tax to activate NF-kB and to stimulate intracellular nitric oxide production. We also demonstrated a reduced expression of human translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases Pol-H and Pol-K in HTLV-I-transformed T cells and ATL cells. This was associated with an increase in DNA breaks induced by Tax at specific genome regions, such as the c-Myc and the Bcl-2 major breakpoints. Consistent with the notion that the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway is hyperactive in HTLV-I-transformed cells, we found that inhibition of the NHEJ pathway induces significant killing of HTLV-I transformed cells and patient-derived leukemic ATL cells. Our results suggest that, replication problems increase genetic instability in HTLV-I-transformed cells. As a result, abuse of NHEJ and a defective homologous repair (HR) DNA

  4. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters in Pediatric Patients: To Repair or Not Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnannt, Ralph, E-mail: ralph.gnannt@usz.ch; Patel, Premal; Temple, Michael; Al Brashdi, Yahya; Amaral, Joao; Parra, Dimitri; Rea, Vanessa [University of Toronto, Image Guided Therapy, Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children (Canada); Stephens, Derek [University of Toronto, Child Health Evaluative Sciences (Canada); Connolly, Bairbre [University of Toronto, Image Guided Therapy, Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children (Canada)

    2017-06-15

    IntroductionPreservation of venous access in children is a major concern in pediatric interventional radiology. If a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) breaks, there are two options: repair the line with a repair kit or exchange the line over a wire in the interventional suite. The purpose of this study is to assess the outcome of PICC repairs in children and to compare these with the outcomes of PICC exchange.Materials and MethodsThis is a single-center, retrospective study of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) following management of externally broken PICCs (2010–2014). The occurrence of CLABSI within 30 days after repair (Group A) or exchange (Group B) of a line was analyzed, as well as PICCs exchanged following an initial and failed repair.ResultsA total of 235 PICC breaks were included in the study, of which 161 were repaired, and 116 of whom were successful (68%, Group A). No repair was performed in 74 PICCs—55/74 of these were exchanged over a wire (74%, Group B), and 19/74 lines were removed. The 30 days post-repair CLABSI rate (Group A) was 2.0 infections per 1000 catheter days, and the calculated risk was 4.3%. In comparison the 30 days post-exchange CLABSI rate (Group B) was 4.0 per 1000 catheter days and the calculated risk 10.9%. This difference was significant when adjusted for antibiotic use (OR 3.87; 95% CI 1.07–14.0, p = 0.039).ConclusionThe results of this study support repairing a broken PICC instead of removing or replacing the line.

  5. Exploration of methods to identify polymorphisms associated with variation in DNA repair capacity phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, I M; Thomas, C B; Xi, T; Mohrenweiser, H W; Nelson, D O

    2006-07-03

    Elucidating the relationship between polymorphic sequences and risk of common disease is a challenge. For example, although it is clear that variation in DNA repair genes is associated with familial cancer, aging and neurological disease, progress toward identifying polymorphisms associated with elevated risk of sporadic disease has been slow. This is partly due to the complexity of the genetic variation, the existence of large numbers of mostly low frequency variants and the contribution of many genes to variation in susceptibility. There has been limited development of methods to find associations between genotypes having many polymorphisms and pathway function or health outcome. We have explored several statistical methods for identifying polymorphisms associated with variation in DNA repair phenotypes. The model system used was 80 cell lines that had been resequenced to identify variation; 191 single nucleotide substitution polymorphisms (SNPs) are included, of which 172 are in 31 base excision repair pathway genes, 19 in 5 anti-oxidation genes, and DNA repair phenotypes based on single strand breaks measured by the alkaline Comet assay. Univariate analyses were of limited value in identifying SNPs associated with phenotype variation. Of the multivariable model selection methods tested: the easiest that provided reduced error of prediction of phenotype was simple counting of the variant alleles predicted to encode proteins with reduced activity, which led to a genotype including 52 SNPs; the best and most parsimonious model was achieved using a two-step analysis without regard to potential functional relevance: first SNPs were ranked by importance determined by Random Forests Regression (RFR), followed by cross-validation in a second round of RFR modeling that included ever more SNPs in declining order of importance. With this approach 6 SNPs were found to minimize prediction error. The results should encourage research into utilization of multivariate

  6. Bootstrap Dynamical Symmetry Breaking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Shu Hou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the emergence of a 125 GeV Higgs-like particle at the LHC, we explore the possibility of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking by strong Yukawa coupling of very heavy new chiral quarks Q . Taking the 125 GeV object to be a dilaton with suppressed couplings, we note that the Goldstone bosons G exist as longitudinal modes V L of the weak bosons and would couple to Q with Yukawa coupling λ Q . With m Q ≳ 700  GeV from LHC, the strong λ Q ≳ 4 could lead to deeply bound Q Q ¯ states. We postulate that the leading “collapsed state,” the color-singlet (heavy isotriplet, pseudoscalar Q Q ¯ meson π 1 , is G itself, and a gap equation without Higgs is constructed. Dynamical symmetry breaking is affected via strong λ Q , generating m Q while self-consistently justifying treating G as massless in the loop, hence, “bootstrap,” Solving such a gap equation, we find that m Q should be several TeV, or λ Q ≳ 4 π , and would become much heavier if there is a light Higgs boson. For such heavy chiral quarks, we find analogy with the π − N system, by which we conjecture the possible annihilation phenomena of Q Q ¯ → n V L with high multiplicity, the search of which might be aided by Yukawa-bound Q Q ¯ resonances.

  7. Modulated Tool-Path (MTP) Chip Breaking System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, K. B.

    2010-04-01

    The Modulated Tool-Path (MTP) Chip Breaking System produces user-selectable chip lengths and workpiece finishes and is compatible with any material, workpiece shape, and depth of cut. The MTP chip breaking system consistently creates the desired size of chips regardless of workpiece size, shape, or material, and the machine operator does not need to make any adjustments during the machining operation. The system's programmer configures the part program that commands the machine tool to move in a specific fashion to deliver the desired part size, shape, chip length, and workpiece surface finish. The MTP chip breaking system helps manufacturers avoid the detrimental effects of continuous chips, including expensive repair costs, delivery delays, and hazards to personnel.

  8. Mismatch repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishel, Richard

    2015-10-30

    Highly conserved MutS homologs (MSH) and MutL homologs (MLH/PMS) are the fundamental components of mismatch repair (MMR). After decades of debate, it appears clear that the MSH proteins initiate MMR by recognizing a mismatch and forming multiple extremely stable ATP-bound sliding clamps that diffuse without hydrolysis along the adjacent DNA. The function(s) of MLH/PMS proteins is less clear, although they too bind ATP and are targeted to MMR by MSH sliding clamps. Structural analysis combined with recent real-time single molecule and cellular imaging technologies are providing new and detailed insight into the thermal-driven motions that animate the complete MMR mechanism. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Mismatch Repair*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishel, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Highly conserved MutS homologs (MSH) and MutL homologs (MLH/PMS) are the fundamental components of mismatch repair (MMR). After decades of debate, it appears clear that the MSH proteins initiate MMR by recognizing a mismatch and forming multiple extremely stable ATP-bound sliding clamps that diffuse without hydrolysis along the adjacent DNA. The function(s) of MLH/PMS proteins is less clear, although they too bind ATP and are targeted to MMR by MSH sliding clamps. Structural analysis combined with recent real-time single molecule and cellular imaging technologies are providing new and detailed insight into the thermal-driven motions that animate the complete MMR mechanism. PMID:26354434

  10. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria protects cells against oxidative stress and improves mitochondrial DNA base excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Mansour; Keijzers, Guido; Maynard, Scott; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Desler, Claus; Hickson, Ian D; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2014-04-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is the most prominent DNA repair pathway in human mitochondria. BER also results in a temporary generation of AP-sites, single-strand breaks and nucleotide gaps. Thus, incomplete BER can result in the generation of DNA repair intermediates that can disrupt mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription and generate mutations. We carried out BER analysis in highly purified mitochondrial extracts from human cell lines U2OS and HeLa, and mouse brain using a circular DNA substrate containing a lesion at a specific position. We found that DNA ligation is significantly slower than the preceding mitochondrial BER steps. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria improved the rate of overall BER, increased cell survival after menadione induced oxidative stress and reduced autophagy following the inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I by rotenone. Our results suggest that the amount of DNA ligase III in mitochondria may be critical for cell survival following prolonged oxidative stress, and demonstrate a functional link between mitochondrial DNA damage and repair, cell survival upon oxidative stress, and removal of dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagy. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Does a role for selenium in DNA damage repair explain apparent controversies in its use in chemoprevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    The trace element selenium is an essential micronutrient that has received considerable attention for its potential use in the prevention of cancer. In spite of this interest, the mechanism(s) by which selenium might function as a chemopreventive remain to be determined. Considerable experimental evidence indicates that one possible mechanism by which selenium supplementation may exert its benefits is by enhancing the DNA damage repair response, and this includes data obtained using cultured cells, animal models as well as in human clinical studies. In these studies, selenium supplementation has been shown to be beneficial in reducing the frequency of DNA adducts and chromosome breaks, consequentially reducing the likelihood of detrimental mutations that ultimately contribute to carcinogenesis. The benefits of selenium can be envisioned as being due, at least in part, to it being a critical constituent of selenoproteins such as glutathione peroxidases and thioredoxin reductases, proteins that play important roles in antioxidant defence and maintaining the cellular reducing environment. Selenium, therefore, may be protective by preventing DNA damage from occurring as well as by increasing the activity of repair enzymes such as DNA glycosylases and DNA damage repair pathways that involve p53, BRCA1 and Gadd45. An improved understanding of the mechanism of selenium’s impact on DNA repair processes may help to resolve the apparently contradicting data obtained from decades of animal work, human epidemiology and more recently, clinical supplementation studies. PMID:23204505

  12. Repair of DNA damaged by ionizing radiation and other oxidative agents in yeast and human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louisek Prakash

    2000-01-15

    the carboxyl-terminus of yeast Apn2 protein does not affect the AP endonuclease activity of the protein, but this protein is defective in the removal of AP sites in vivo. The carboxyl-terminus may enable Apn2 to complex with other proteins, and such a multiprotein assembly may be necessary for the efficient recognition and cleavage of AP sites in vivo. We also carried out further biochemical characterization of the yeast Apn2 protein. As mentioned above, oxidative DNA damaging agents, such as hydrogen peroxide, produce DNA strand breaks which contain 3'-phosphate or 3'-phosphoglycolate termini. Such 3' termini are inhibitory to synthesis by DNA polymerases. We found that purified yeast Apn2 protein contains 3'-phosphodiesterase and 3'5' exonuclease activities, and mutation of the active site residue Glu59 to Ala in Apn2 inactivates both these activities. Consistent with these biochemical observations, our genetic studies indicate the involvement of APN2 in the repair of hydrogen peroxide induced DNA damage in a pathway alternate to APN1, and the Ala59 mutation inactivates this function of Apn2. From these results, we have concluded that the ability of Apn2 to remove 3'-end groups from DNA is paramount for the repair of strand breaks arising from the reaction of DNA with reactive oxygen species. Other studies from our laboratory indicate that the yeast APN1 and APN2 genes provide alternate pathways for the repair of abasic sites and for the repair of single strand breaks with 3'-blocked termini. The apn1 deletion apn2 deletion mutant is highly sensitive to both the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate and to the oxidizing agent hydrogen peroxide. While the apn1 deletion and apn2 deletion single mutants are proficient in repairing single strand breaks arising in DNA following treatment with hydrogen peroxide, the repair of abasic sites as well as of single strand DNA breaks with 3'-blocked termini is greatly reduced in

  13. Repair of DNA damaged by ionizing radiation and other oxidative agents in yeast and human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louise Prakash

    2000-01-15

    carboxyl-terminus of yeast Apn2 protein does not affect the AP endonuclease activity of the protein, but this protein is defective in the removal of AP sites in vivo. The carboxyl-terminus may enable Apn2 to complex with other proteins, and such a multiprotein assembly may be necessary for the efficient recognition and cleavage of AP sites in vivo. We also carried out further biochemical characterization of the yeast Apn2 protein. As mentioned above, oxidative DNA damaging agents, such as hydrogen peroxide, produce DNA strand breaks which contain 3'-phosphate or 3'-phosphoglycolate termini. Such 3' termini are inhibitory to synthesis by DNA polymerases. We found that purified yeast Apn2 protein contains 3'-phosphodiesterase and 3'5' exonuclease activities, and mutation of the active site residue Glu59 to Ala in Apn2 inactivates both these activities. Consistent with these biochemical observations, our genetic studies indicate the involvement of APN2 in the repair of hydrogen peroxide induced DNA damage in a pathway alternate to APN1, and the Ala59 mutation inactivates this function of Apn2. From these results, we have concluded that the ability of Apn2 to remove 3'-end groups from DNA is paramount for the repair of strand breaks arising from the reaction of DNA with reactive oxygen species. Other studies from our laboratory indicate that the yeast APN1 and APN2 genes provide alternate pathways for the repair of abasic sites and for the repair of single strand breaks with 3'-blocked termini. The apn1 deletion apn2 deletion mutant is highly sensitive to both the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate and to the oxidizing agent hydrogen peroxide. While the apn1 deletion and apn2 deletion single mutants are proficient in repairing single strand breaks arising in DNA following treatment with hydrogen peroxide, the repair of abasic sites as well as of single strand DNA breaks with 3'-blocked termini is greatly reduced in the apn1

  14. DNA Repair and Genome Maintenance in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, Justin S.; Schroeder, Jeremy W.; Walsh, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: From microbes to multicellular eukaryotic organisms, all cells contain pathways responsible for genome maintenance. DNA replication allows for the faithful duplication of the genome, whereas DNA repair pathways preserve DNA integrity in response to damage originating from endogenous and exogenous sources. The basic pathways important for DNA replication and repair are often conserved throughout biology. In bacteria, high-fidelity repair is balanced with low-fidelity repair and mutagenesis. Such a balance is important for maintaining viability while providing an opportunity for the advantageous selection of mutations when faced with a changing environment. Over the last decade, studies of DNA repair pathways in bacteria have demonstrated considerable differences between Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. Here we review and discuss the DNA repair, genome maintenance, and DNA damage checkpoint pathways of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We present their molecular mechanisms and compare the functions and regulation of several pathways with known information on other organisms. We also discuss DNA repair during different growth phases and the developmental program of sporulation. In summary, we present a review of the function, regulation, and molecular mechanisms of DNA repair and mutagenesis in Gram-positive bacteria, with a strong emphasis on B. subtilis. PMID:22933559

  15. The role of polymorphisms of genes repair pathway to the radiotoxicity in patients with cancer of the cervix; O papel dos polimorfismos de genes da via de reparo com a radiotoxidade em pacientes com cancer de colo uterino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Ana Terra Silva

    2012-07-01

    Background: In Brazil, cervical cancer is the second most common among women. Radiation therapy is part of its interdisciplinary management, playing an important role in their loco regional control. The major challenge of modern medicine in radiotherapy is to develop predictive methods that can determine the level of radiosensitivity of the patient and the healthy surrounding tissue in order to individualize the prescribed radiation dose, to prevent severe side effects and promoting better local tumor control. This study evaluated the acute and chronic adverse effects on the skin, lower gastrointestinal tract and urinary tract of radiotherapy in 47 cervical cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Biological material was collected and DNA from peripheral blood was extracted of ali patients studied. The fragments of TP53 and ATM were amplified to be sequenced, to verify if there are any polymorphisms witch could be responsible to the radiosensitivity of the patients. Results and Discussion: In a univariate analysis, the variable age was strongly associated with a risk of acute toxicity skin (p=O,023). Patients that received a high dose of external beam radiation and patients who have undergone brachytherapy, showed a significantly higher incidence of chronic urinary tract toxicity (p=O,031) and (p=O,019), respectively. The exchange G>A in the position 5557 of the A TM gene was significantly associated with the risk of acute lower gastrointestinal tract (p=O,008). There wasn't association between the other TP53 polymorphisms analyzed and the frequency of side effects (p>O,05). Our data revealed that patients who evolved significant association presented death (p=O,019) with the increase of chronic skin radiossensitivity. Conclusions: These observations corroborate the importance of investigating the genetic profile to predict adverse side effects in cervical cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. These genes have an important role in DNA repair pathways and

  16. Genetic variations in DNA repair genes, radiosensitivity to cancer and susceptibility to acute tissue reactions in radiotherapy-treated cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A. (Dept. of Pathology, Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh (US)); Voronova, Natalia V. (Dept. of Molecular Diagnostics, National Research Center GosNIIgenetika, Moscow (RU)); Chistiakov, Pavel A. (Dept. of Radiology, Cancer Research Center, Moscow (RU))

    2008-06-15

    Ionizing radiation is a well established carcinogen for human cells. At low doses, radiation exposure mainly results in generation of double strand breaks (DSBs). Radiation-related DSBs could be directly linked to the formation of chromosomal rearrangements as has been proven for radiation-induced thyroid tumors. Repair of DSBs presumably involves two main pathways, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). A number of known inherited syndromes, such as ataxia telangiectasia, ataxia-telangiectasia like-disorder, radiosensitive severe combined immunodeficiency, Nijmegen breakage syndrome, and LIG4 deficiency are associated with increased radiosensitivity and/or cancer risk. Many of them are caused by mutations in DNA repair genes. Recent studies also suggest that variations in the DNA repair capacity in the general population may influence cancer susceptibility. In this paper, we summarize the current status of DNA repair proteins as potential targets for radiation-induced cancer risk. We will focus on genetic alterations in genes involved in HR- and NHEJ-mediated repair of DSBs, which could influence predisposition to radiation-related cancer and thereby explain interindividual differences in radiosensitivity or radioresistance in a general population

  17. The Nuclear Oncogene SET Controls DNA Repair by KAP1 and HP1 Retention to Chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkmini Kalousi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cells experience damage from exogenous and endogenous sources that endanger genome stability. Several cellular pathways have evolved to detect DNA damage and mediate its repair. Although many proteins have been implicated in these processes, only recent studies have revealed how they operate in the context of high-ordered chromatin structure. Here, we identify the nuclear oncogene SET (I2PP2A as a modulator of DNA damage response (DDR and repair in chromatin surrounding double-strand breaks (DSBs. We demonstrate that depletion of SET increases DDR and survival in the presence of radiomimetic drugs, while overexpression of SET impairs DDR and homologous recombination (HR-mediated DNA repair. SET interacts with the Kruppel-associated box (KRAB-associated co-repressor KAP1, and its overexpression results in the sustained retention of KAP1 and Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1 on chromatin. Our results are consistent with a model in which SET-mediated chromatin compaction triggers an inhibition of DNA end resection and HR.

  18. Abasic sites in DNA: repair and biological consequences in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiteux, Serge; Guillet, Marie

    2004-01-05

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are one of the most frequent spontaneous lesions in DNA. They are potentially mutagenic and lethal lesions that can block DNA replication and transcription. In addition, cleavage of AP sites by AP endonucleases or AP lyases generates DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) with 5'- or 3'-blocked ends, respectively. Therefore, we suggest that AP sites and 3'- or 5'-blocked SSBs, we name "honorary AP sites", constitute a single class of lesions. In this review, we describe the different mechanisms used by the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to remove or tolerate AP sites and related SSBs. In wild-type cells, AP sites are primarily repaired by the base excision repair (BER) pathway, with the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway as a back up activity. BER is initiated by one of the two AP endonucleases, Apn1 or Apn2. Three DNA N-glycosylases/AP lyases, Ntg1, Ntg2 and Ogg1, can also incise AP sites in DNA. Rad27, a structure specific endonuclease, is involved in the repair of 5'-blocked ends, whereas Apn1, Apn2 and Rad1-Rad10 are involved in the removal of 3'-blocked ends using their 3'-phosphodiesterase and 3'-flap endonuclease activities, respectively. AP sites can stall DNA replication forks, as well as they block in vitro DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase delta. Restart of stalled forks can occur through a recombination-associated pathway initiated by the Mus81-Mms4 endonuclease or mutagenic translesion DNA synthesis (TLS). The mutagenic bypass of AP sites is a two-polymerases affair with an inserter DNA polymerase (Poldelta, Poleta or Rev1) and an extender DNA polymerase (Polzeta). Under normal growth conditions, inactivation of Apn1, Apn2 and Rad1-Rad10 causes cell death. Therefore, the burden of spontaneous AP sites is not compatible with life, in the absence of excision repair pathways. These results in yeast demonstrate that AP sites are critical endogenous DNA damages that cause genetic instability and by analogy could be

  19. The impact of homologous recombination repair deficiency on depleted uranium clastogenicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells: XRCC3 protects cells from chromosome aberrations, but increases chromosome fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Amie L. [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth Street, P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Joyce, Kellie [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Xie, Hong [Wise Laboratory of