WorldWideScience

Sample records for braze welding technique

  1. Welding and Brazing Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    Hot isostatic pressing and conventional furnace brazing effective under right conditions. Study performed showed feasibility of welding SiC using several welding and brazing techniques. Use of SiC improves engine efficiency by allowing increase in operating temperature. SiC successfully hot-pressure-welded at 3,550 degrees F (1,950 degrees C) in argon. Refinements of solid-state welding and brazing procedures used sufficient for some specific industrial applications.

  2. Joining of beryllium by braze welding technique: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banaim, P.; Abramov, E. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel); Zalkind, S.; Eden, S.

    1998-01-01

    Within the framework of some applications, there is a need to join beryllium parts to each other. Gas Tungsten Arc Braze Welds were made in beryllium using 0.3 mm commercially Aluminum (1100) shim preplaced at the joint. The welds exhibited a tendency to form microcracks in the Fusion Zone and Heat Affected Zone. All the microcracks were backfilled with Aluminum. (author)

  3. Brazing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harast, Donald G.

    1986-01-01

    A method of brazing comprises sand blasting the surfaces of the components to be brazed with particles of a brazing material to clean the surfaces and to embed brazing material in the surfaces, applying the brazing material to the surfaces, and heating the brazing material to form a brazement between the components.

  4. Weld-brazing of titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A joining process, designated weld-brazing, which combines resistance spotwelding and brazing has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Resistance spot-welding is employed to position and align the parts and to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing; it contributes to the integrity of the joint. Brazing enhances the properties of the joint and reduces the stress concentrations normally associated with spotwelds. Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints have been fabricated using 3003 aluminum braze both in a vacuum furnace and in a retort containing an inert gas environment.

  5. Weld-brazing - a new joining process. [combination resistance spot welding and brazing of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A joining process designated weld brazing which combines resistance spot welding and brazing has been developed. Resistance spot welding is used to position and align the parts as well as to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing. Fabrication is then completed by capillary flow of the braze alloy into the joint. The process has been used successfully to fabricate Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints using 3003 aluminum braze alloy. Test results obtained on single overlap and hat-stiffened structural specimens show that weld brazed joints are superior in tensile shear, stress rupture, fatigue, and buckling than joint fabricated by spotwelding or brazing. Another attractive feature of the process is that the brazed joints is hermetically sealed by the braze material.

  6. Cleaning Effect of Interlayer Metal on the Joining Surface during Braze Pressure Welding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    INAGAKI, Yohei; SUZUMURA, Akio; IKESHOJI, Toshi-Taka; YAMAZAKI, Takahisa

    2005-01-01

    Braze Pressure Welding (BPW) with high frequency induction heating is a newly developed pressure welding technique using interlayer metals for welding the general steel pipes for pipe arrangement in buildings...

  7. Weld-brazing of titanium. [resistance spot welding combined with brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A joining process, designated weld-brazing, which combines resistance spot-welding and brazing has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Resistance spot-welding is employed to position and aline the parts and to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing and contributes to the integrity of the joint. Brazing enhances the properties of the joint and reduces the stress concentrations normally associated with spotwelds. Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints have been fabricated using 3003 aluminum braze both in a vaccum furnace and in a retort containing an inert gas environment.

  8. Braze welding of cobalt with a silver–copper filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everett M. Criss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of joining cobalt by braze-welding it with a silver–copper filler was developed in order to better understand the residual stresses in beryllium–aluminum/silicon weldments which are problematic to investigate because of the high toxicity of Be. The base and filler metals of this new welding system were selected to replicate the physical properties, crystal structures, and chemical behavior of the Be–AlSi welds. Welding parameters of this surrogate Co–AgCu system were determined by experimentation combining 4-point bending tests and microscopy. Final welds are 5 pass manual TIG (tungsten inert gas, with He top gas and Ar back gas. Control of the welding process produces welds with full penetration melting of the cobalt base. Microscopy indicates that cracking is minimal, and not through thickness, whereas 4-point bending shows failure is not by base-filler delamination. These welds improve upon the original Be–AlSi welds, which do not possess full penetration, and have considerable porosity. We propose that utilization of our welding methods will increase the strength of the Be–AlSi weldments. The specialized welding techniques developed for this study may be applicable not only for the parent Be–AlSi welds, but to braze welds and welds utilizing brittle materials in general. This concept of surrogacy may prove useful in the study of many different types of exotic welds.

  9. Refractory metals welded or brazed with tungsten inert gas equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisner, J. P.

    1965-01-01

    Appropriate brazing metals and temperatures facilitate the welding or brazing of base metals with tungsten inert gas equipment. The highest quality bond is obtained when TIG welding is performed in an inert atmosphere.

  10. Welding/brazing for Space Station repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, David W.; Babel, H. W.; Conaway, H. R.; Hooper, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on welding/brazing for space station repair are presented. Topics covered include: fabrication and repair candidates; debris penetration of module panel; welded repair patch; mechanical assembly of utility fluid line; space station utility systems; Soviet aerospace fabrication - an overview; and processes under consideration.

  11. Gas Shielding Technology for Welding and Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur J.; Gradl, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Welding is a common method that allows two metallic materials to be joined together with high structural integrity. When joints need to be leak-tight, light-weight, or free of contaminant-trapping seams or surface asperities, welding tends to be specified. There are many welding techniques, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Some of these techniques include Forge Welding, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, Friction Stir Welding, and Laser Beam Welding to name a few. Whichever technique is used, the objective is a structural joint that meets the requirements of a particular component or assembly. A key practice in producing quality welds is the use of shielding gas. This article discusses various weld techniques, quality of the welds, and importance of shielding gas in each of those techniques. Metallic bonds, or joints, are produced when metals are put into intimate contact. In the solid-state "blacksmith welding" process, now called Forge Welding (FOW), the site to be joined is pounded into intimate contact. The surfaces to be joined usually need to be heated to make it easier to deform the metal. The surfaces are sprinkled with a flux to melt surface oxides and given a concave shape so that surface contamination can be squeezed out of the joint as the surfaces are pounded together; otherwise the surface contamination would be trapped in the joint and would weaken the weld. In solid-state welding processes surface oxides or other contamination are typically squeezed out of the joint in "flash."

  12. Improved Assembly for Gas Shielding During Welding or Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradl, Paul; Baker, Kevin; Weeks, Jack

    2009-01-01

    An improved assembly for inert-gas shielding of a metallic joint is designed to be useable during any of a variety of both laser-based and traditional welding and brazing processes. The basic purpose of this assembly or of a typical prior related assembly is to channel the flow of a chemically inert gas to a joint to prevent environmental contamination of the joint during the welding or brazing process and, if required, to accelerate cooling upon completion of the process.

  13. Cleaning Effect of Interlayer Metal on the Joining Surface during Braze Pressure Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Yohei; Suzumura, Akio; Ikeshoji, Toshi-Taka; Yamazaki, Takahisa

    Braze Pressure Welding (BPW) with high frequency induction heating is a newly developed pressure welding technique using interlayer metals for welding the general steel pipes for pipe arrangement in buildings. BPW enables to make joints by solid-state welding in air with relatively small deformation. In this method, the interlayer metal is expected to play the primary role in making high performance joints. It removes contaminations from the joining surface of the base metal and forms fillets at the gaps around the joint. It had been revealed by some experiments and/or numerical analyses in previous research that the BPW joint had higher tensile strength than the brazed joint, and that the fillet can improve the joint strength. In this study, in order to investigate the cleaning effect of interlayer metal more closely, a low carbon steel plate specimen was brazed mainly by Ni-based brazing filler using a tungsten spacer. The microscopy and EPMA analysis on the joints made by various brazing temperatures and durations confirmed that the oxide films on the joining surfaces were removed and discharged from the joining region by the interlayer metal.

  14. More About Brazing Or Welding NiAl Without Filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas J.; Kalinowski, Joseph M.

    1996-01-01

    Two reports present additional information about two processes for joining, brazing, or welding workpieces made of nickel aluminide alloys, without use of filler metal. Joining processes involve uniform heating in vacuum-controlled furnace. Eliminates internal thermal gradients in workpieces joined and greatly reduces tendency toward cracking.

  15. 49 CFR 178.55 - Specification 4B240ET welded or brazed cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... repairs to longitudinal joints is permitted. (3) Welding procedures and operators must be qualified in... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specification 4B240ET welded or brazed cylinders... SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.55 Specification 4B240ET welded or brazed...

  16. Effects of different brazing and welding methods on the fracture load of various orthodontic joining configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Jens J; Bailly, Jacqueline; Fuhrmann, Robert A

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the fracture load of different joints made by conventional brazing, tungston inert gas (TIG) and laser welding. Six standardized joining configurations of spring hard quality orthodontic wire were investigated: end-to-end, round, cross, 3 mm length, 9 mm length and 6.5 mm to orthodontic band. The joints were made by five different methods: brazing with universal silver solder, two TIG and two laser welding devices. The fracture loads were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005). Data were analysed with the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests. The significance level was set at PTIG or laser welding (Pwelding (826 N). No differences between the various TIG or laser welding devices were demonstrated, although it was not possible to join an orthodontic wire to an orthodontic band using TIG welding. For orthodontic purposes laser and TIG welding are solder free alternatives. TIG welding and laser welding showed similar results. The laser technique is an expensive, but sophisticated and simple method.

  17. Influence of different brazing and welding methods on tensile strength and microhardness of orthodontic stainless steel wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Jens Johannes; Fraenzel, Wolfgang; Bailly, Jacqueline; Gernhardt, Christian Ralf; Fuhrmann, Robert Andreas Werner

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical strength and microhardness of joints made by conventional brazing and tungsten inert gas (TIG) and laser welding. A standardized end-to-end joint configuration of the orthodontic wire material in spring hard quality was used. The joints were made using five different methods: brazing (soldering > 450 degrees C) with universal silver solder, two TIG, and two laser welders. Laser parameters and welding conditions were used according to the manufacturers' guidance. The tensile strengths were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005). The microhardness measurements were carried out with a hardness tester (Zwick 3202). Data were analysed using one-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni's post hoc correction (P TIG or laser welding were found. The highest means were observed for TIG welding (699-754 MPa). Laser welding showed a significantly lower mean tensile strength (369-520 MPa) compared with TIG welding. Significant differences (P welded area. The mean microhardness differed significantly between brazing (1.99 GPa), TIG (2.22-2.39 GPa) and laser welding (2.21-2.68 GPa). For orthodontic purposes, laser and TIG welding are solder-free alternatives to joining metal. TIG welding with a lower investment cost is comparable with laser welding. However, while expensive, the laser technique is a sophisticated and simple method.

  18. Brazing, high temperature brazing and diffusion welding. Lectures and posters; Hart- und Hochtemperaturloeten und Diffusionsschweissen. Vortraege und Posterbeitraege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This paper contains lectures and poster with the following main topics: Fundamentals and industrial application of brazing; Joining of cemented carbides, hard metals, cermets; Diffusion bonding, micro- and nanotechnologies, corrosion and corrosion protection, integration of brazing into the production process; Joining of glass, ceramics, metals; Joining techniques in fuel cells; Joining with Fe-based filler metals; Joining of high performance materials; Arc brazing and beam brazing; Designing suitable for brazing / Corrosion and corrosion protection / Inspection; Joining of light weight metals; Functional surfaces / Modeling an simulation.

  19. Training Materials Sourcebook. Welding, Brazing, and Flame-Cutting. Voc./Tec. Resources Series Number 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian Commission of Employment and Immigration, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Second in a resource series (see note), this annotated bibliography provides detailed information on training curriculum and instructional materials for welding, brazing, and flame-cutting. The materials are divided into thirty-fie sections by topic and type. Specific topic areas include gas and arc welding; arc welding; oxyacetylene welding and…

  20. 75 FR 52037 - Welding, Cutting and Brazing Standard; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Welding, Cutting and Brazing Standard; Extension of the Office of... the information collection requirements contained in the Welding, Cutting and Brazing Standard (29 CFR..., cutting and brazing are performed. The purpose of the information is to ensure that employers evaluate...

  1. 78 FR 53159 - Standard for Welding, Cutting, and Brazing; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Standard for Welding, Cutting, and Brazing; Extension of the..., Cutting, and Brazing (29 CFR Part 1910, Subpart Q). The information collected is used by employers and workers whenever welding, cutting, and brazing are performed. The purpose of the information is to ensure...

  2. Braze Welding TIG of Titanium and Aluminium Alloy Type Al – Mg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winiowski A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the course and the results of technological tests related to TIG-based arc braze welding of titanium and AW-5754 (AlMg3 aluminium alloy. The tests involved the use of an aluminium filler metal (Al99.5 and two filler metals based on Al-Si alloys (AlSi5 and AlSi12. Braze welded joints underwent tensile tests, metallographic examinations using a light microscope as well as structural examinations involving the use of a scanning electron microscope and an X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS. The highest strength and quality of welds was obtained when the Al99.5 filler metal was used in a braze welding process. The tests enabled the development of the most convenient braze welding conditions and parameters.

  3. 49 CFR 178.50 - Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... cylinders over 18 inches long must be protected by footrings. Welding procedures and operators must be... may be used with proper welding procedure. (f) Wall thickness. The wall thickness of the cylinder must... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders...

  4. Combined Laser Beam Braze-Welding Process for Fluxless Al-Cu Connections

    OpenAIRE

    Solchenbach, Tobias; Plapper, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A combined laser beam welding and brazing process for Al-Cu connections in overlap configuration is investigated. Aluminium and copper for electric and electronic application is used for experiments without surface treatment or activation, e.g. by flux. Although Al and Cu have been considered as “not weldable”, the possibility of a thermal joining process, i.e., the weld-brazing, was proved. The inevitable formation of intermetallic compounds at the inter...

  5. Brazing

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Mel M

    2003-01-01

    Text provides information needed to braze materials that will be used in the 21st century. Revised to include lessons learned on tooling, design, materials, atmospheres, processing, and equipment. For brazing technologists and engineers.

  6. Brazing handbook

    CERN Document Server

    American Welding Society

    2007-01-01

    By agreement between the American Welding Society C3 Committee on Brazing and Soldering and the ASM Handbook Committee, the AWS Brazing Handbook has been formally adopted as part of the ASM Handbook Series. Through this agreement, the brazing content in the ASM Handbook is significantly updated and expanded. The AWS Brazing Handbook, 5th Edition provides a comprehensive, organized survey of the basics of brazing, processes, and applications. Addresses the fundamentals of brazing, brazement design, brazing filler metals and fluxes, safety and health, and many other topics. Includes new chapters on induction brazing and diamond brazing.

  7. Simulation model of Al-Ti dissimilar laser welding-brazing and its experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behúlová, M.; Babalová, E.; Nagy, M.

    2017-02-01

    Formation of dissimilar weld joints of light metals and alloys including Al-Ti joints is interesting mainly due to demands on the weight reduction and corrosion resistance of components and structures in automotive, aircraft, aeronautic and other industries. Joining of Al-Ti alloys represents quite difficult problem. Generally, the fusion welding of these materials can lead to the development of different metastable phases and formation of brittle intermetallic compounds. The paper deals with numerical simulation of the laser welding-brazing process of titanium Grade 2 and EN AW 5083 aluminum alloy sheets using the 5087 aluminum filler wire. Simulation model for welding-brazing of testing samples with the dimensions of 50 × 100 × 2 mm was developed in order to perform numerical experiments applying variable welding parameters and to design proper combination of these parameters for formation of sound Al-Ti welded-brazed joints. Thermal properties of welded materials in the dependence on temperature were computed using JMatPro software. The conical model of the heat source was exploited for description of the heat input to the weld due to the moving laser beam source. The sample cooling by convection and radiation to the surrounding air and shielding argon gas was taken into account. Developed simulation model was verified by comparison of obtained results of numerical simulation with the temperatures measured during real experiments of laser welding-brazing by the TruDisk 4002 disk laser.

  8. Welding, Cutting and Brazing Safety. Module SH-28. Safety and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on welding, cutting and brazing safety is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module addresses safety precautions for oxyacetylene welding and gives information about handling compressed gases. Following the introduction, 17 objectives (each keyed to a page in the text) the student is expected to…

  9. Corrosion Behavior of MIG Brazed and MIG Welded Joints of Automotive DP600-GI Steel Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Sushovan; Das, Hrishikesh; Pal, Tapan Kumar; Shome, Mahadev

    2016-12-01

    Galvanized dual-phase steel sheets are extensively used by the auto industry for their corrosion resistance property. Welding by the metal inert gas (MIG) process causes degradation of the steel in the vicinity of the joint due to excessive zinc evaporation. In order to minimize Zn loss, the MIG brazing process has been tried out in lap joint configuration over a heat input range of 136-204 J mm-1. The amount of zinc loss, intermetallic formation and corrosion properties in the joint area has been evaluated for both MIG brazing and MIG welding. Corrosion rate of 21 mm year-1 has been reduced to 2 mm year-1 by adopting MIGB in place MIGW. Impedance study has shown that the corrosion mechanism in base metal, MIG brazed and MIG welded joints is dominated by charge transfer, diffusion and mixed mode control processes, respectively.

  10. Braze Welding TIG of Titanium and Aluminium Alloy Type Al – Mg

    OpenAIRE

    Winiowski A.; Majewski D.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the course and the results of technological tests related to TIG-based arc braze welding of titanium and AW-5754 (AlMg3) aluminium alloy. The tests involved the use of an aluminium filler metal (Al99.5) and two filler metals based on Al-Si alloys (AlSi5 and AlSi12). Braze welded joints underwent tensile tests, metallographic examinations using a light microscope as well as structural examinations involving the use of a scanning electron microscope and an X-ray energy disp...

  11. Tensile strength and corrosion resistance of brazed and laser-welded cobalt-chromium alloy joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupancic, Rok; Legat, Andraz; Funduk, Nenad

    2006-10-01

    The longevity of prosthodontic restorations is often limited due to the mechanical or corrosive failure occurring at the sites where segments of a metal framework are joined together. The purpose of this study was to determine which joining method offers the best properties to cobalt-chromium alloy frameworks. Brazed and 2 types of laser-welded joints were compared for their mechanical and corrosion characteristics. Sixty-eight cylindrical cobalt-chromium dental alloy specimens, 35 mm long and 2 mm in diameter, were cast. Sixteen specimens were selected for electrochemical measurements in an artificial saliva solution and divided into 4 groups (n=4). In the intact group, the specimens were left as cast. The specimens of the remaining 3 groups were sectioned at the center, perpendicular to the long-axis, and were subsequently rejoined by brazing (brazing group) or laser welding using an X- or I-shaped joint design (X laser and I laser groups, respectively). Another 16 specimens were selected for electrochemical measurements in a more acidic artificial saliva solution. These specimens were also divided into 4 groups (n=4) as described above. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization were used to assess corrosion potentials, breakdown potentials, corrosion current densities, total impedances at lowest frequency, and polarization charge-transfer resistances. The remaining 36 specimens were used for tensile testing. They were divided into 3 groups in which specimen pairs (n=6) were joined by brazing or laser welding to form 70-mm-long cylindrical rods. The tensile strength (MPa) was measured using a universal testing machine. Differences between groups were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance (alpha=.05). The fracture surfaces and corrosion defects were examined with a scanning electron microscope. The average tensile strength of brazed joints was 792 MPa and was significantly greater (Pcobalt-chromium alloy joints, but strength is

  12. Reversible brazing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Jim D.; Stephens, John J.; Walker, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    A method of reversibly brazing surfaces together. An interface is affixed to each surface. The interfaces can be affixed by processes such as mechanical joining, welding, or brazing. The two interfaces are then brazed together using a brazing process that does not defeat the surface to interface joint. Interfaces of materials such as Ni-200 can be affixed to metallic surfaces by welding or by brazing with a first braze alloy. The Ni-200 interfaces can then be brazed together using a second braze alloy. The second braze alloy can be chosen so that it minimally alters the properties of the interfaces to allow multiple braze, heat and disassemble, rebraze cycles.

  13. Disk Laser Weld Brazing of AW5083 Aluminum Alloy with Titanium Grade 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahul, Miroslav; Sahul, Martin; Vyskoč, Maroš; Čaplovič, Ľubomír; Pašák, Matej

    2017-03-01

    Disk laser weld brazing of dissimilar metals was carried out. Aluminum alloy 5083 and commercially pure titanium Grade 2 with the thickness of 2.0 mm were used as experimental materials. Butt weld brazed joints were produced under different welding parameters. The 5087 aluminum alloy filler wire with a diameter of 1.2 mm was used for joining dissimilar metals. The elimination of weld metal cracking was attained by offsetting the laser beam. When the offset was 0 mm, the intermixing of both metals was too high, thus producing higher amount of intermetallic compounds (IMCs). Higher amount of IMCs resulted in poorer mechanical properties of produced joints. Grain refinement in the fusion zone occurred especially due to the high cooling rates during laser beam joining. Reactions at the interface varied in the dependence of its location. Continuous thin IMC layer was observed directly at the titanium-weld metal interface. Microhardness of an IMC island in the weld metal reached up to 452.2 HV0.1. The XRD analysis confirmed the presence of tetragonal Al3Ti intermetallic compound. The highest tensile strength was recorded in the case when the laser beam offset of 300 μm from the joint centerline toward aluminum alloy was utilized.

  14. Laser Brazing metallic embedding technique for fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandal, Tania; Fraga, Sergio; Castro, Gemma; Vazquez, Esteban; Zornoza, Ander

    2017-04-01

    In this paper a fiber optic metallic embedding technique is presented based on laser Brazing manufacturing process. The embedding strategy to follow by the laser Brazing, which consists in three steps, minimizes the thermal stress of the embedded fiber, relaxes microbending strains and reduces damage on the fiber. The minimum embedded fiber optic Ni coating total diameter is 237 μm for a successful process with negligible optical loss on the fiber. Fiber Bragg Gratings were successfully embedded in metallic specimens and their strain response was in accordance with their specifications.

  15. Phase analysis of fume during arc weld brazing of steel sheets with protective coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Matusiak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of research of the phase identification and of the quantitative phase analysis of fume generated during Cold Metal Transfer (CMT, ColdArc and Metal Inert Gas / Metal Active Gas (MIG / MAG weld brazing. Investigations were conducted for hot - dip coated steel sheets with zinc (Zn and zinc-iron (Zn - Fe alloy coatings. Arc shielding gases applied during the research-related tests were Ar + O2, Ar + CO2, Ar + H2 and Ar + CO2 + H2 gas mixtures. The analysis of the results covers the influence of the chemical composition of shielding gas on the chemical composition of welding fume.

  16. Multiple-unit implant frames: one-piece casting vs. laser welding and brazing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Elza Maria Valadares da; Neisser, Maximiliano Piero; Bottino, Marco Antônio

    2004-09-01

    The linear distortion of prostheses over implants, one-piece casting and cast in sections followed by laser welding by laser and brazing was evaluated in an edentulous mandibular model with five parallel abutments, with a distance of 10mm from center to center. Seventy five gold cylinders were tightened with screws on the abutments with 10Ncm torque. The cylinder/analogue assemblies were measured by microscopic examination (0.001mm accuracy) and the obtained results were compared with the GC (control group). Fifteen metal frames were waxed and cast in a gold alloy (Stabilor, Degussa Hulls, Brazil) and divided into three groups with five elements each, as followed: GM (one-piece casting), GB (section and brazing) and GL (section and laser welding). In all groups, measurements were taken at the right, left, buccal and lingual sides of the cylinder/analogue interface and the results were submitted to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and to the Tukey test (5%). The smallest amount of distortion was seen in the laser group (GL with a mean value of 13.58), followed by the brazing group (GB with a mean value of 24.33) and one-piece (GM with a mean value of 40.00). The greatest distortion was found in the one-piece group (GM).

  17. Effect of dual laser beam on dissimilar welding-brazing of aluminum to galvanized steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour, Masoud; Yazdian, Nima; Yang, Guang; Wang, Hui-Ping; Carlson, Blair; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2018-01-01

    In this investigation, the joining of two types of galvanized steel and Al6022 aluminum alloy in a coach peel configuration was carried out using a laser welding-brazing process in dual-beam mode. The feasibility of this method to obtain a sound and uniform brazed bead with high surface quality at a high welding speed was investigated by employing AlSi12 as a consumable material. The effects of alloying elements on the thickness of intermetallic compound (IMC) produced at the interface of steel and aluminum, surface roughness, edge straightness and the tensile strength of the resultant joint were studied. The comprehensive study was conducted on the microstructure of joints by means of a scanning electron microscopy and EDS. Results showed that a dual-beam laser shape and high scanning speed could control the thickness of IMC as thin as 3 μm and alter the failure location from the steel-brazed interface toward the Al-brazed interface. The numerical simulation of thermal regime was conducted by the Finite Element Method (FEM), and simulation results were validated through comparative experimental data. FEM thermal modeling evidenced that the peak temperatures at the Al-steel interface were around the critical temperature range of 700-900 °C that is required for the highest growth rate of IMC. However, the time duration that the molten pool was placed inside this temperature range was less than 1 s, and this duration was too short for diffusion-control based IMC growth.

  18. Effect of welding speed on microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of laser welded-brazed Al/brass dissimilar joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L.; Luo, L. Y.; Tan, C. W.; Li, Z. Y.; Song, X. G.; Zhao, H. Y.; Huang, Y. X.; Feng, J. C.

    2018-01-01

    Laser welding-brazing process was developed for joining 5052 aluminum alloy and H62 brass in butt configuration with Zn-15%Al filler. Effect of welding speed on microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties of joints were investigated. Acceptable joints without obvious defect were obtained with the welding speed of 0.5-0.6 m/min, while lower and higher welding speed caused excessive back reinforcement and cracking, respectively. Three reaction layers were observed at welding speed of 0.3 m/min, which were Al4.2Cu3.2Zn0.7 (τ‧)/Al4Cu9/CuZn from weld seam side to brass side; while at welding speed of 0.4-0.6 m/min, two layers Al4.2Cu3.2Zn0.7 and CuZn formed. The thickness of interfacial reaction layers increased with the decrease of welding speed, but varied little at different interfacial positions from top to bottom in one joint. Tensile test results indicated that the maximum joint tensile strength of 128 MPa was obtained at 0.5 m/min, which was 55.7% of that of Al base metal. All the joints fractured along the weld seam/brass interface. Some differences were found regarding fracture locations with three and two reaction layers. The joint fractured between Al4Cu9 and τ‧ IMC layer when the interface had three layers, while the crack occurred between CuZn and τ‧ phase in the case of two layers.

  19. SHADOW: a new welding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Thorsten; Olowinsky, Alexander M.; Durand, Friedrich

    2002-06-01

    The new welding technique 'SHADOW ' is introduced. SHADOW means the use of a single pulse to generate a quasi continuous weld of several millimeters in length. HET processing time is defined by the pulse duration of the pulsed laser. At present, a state-of-the-art laser is capable of a maximum pulse duration of 20 ms. The variation of the laser power depend on time is a vital capability of the pulsed laser to adapt the energy deposition into the workpiece. Laser beam welds of several watch components were successfully performed. Similar metals like crowns and axes made out of stainless steel have been welded using pulsed laser radiation. Applying a series of about 130 single pulses for the crown-axis combination the total energy accumulates to 19.5 J. The use of the SHADOW welding technique reduces the energy to 2.5 J. While welding dissimilar metals like stainless steel and bras, the SHADOW welding reduces drastically the contamination as well as the distortion. Laser beam welding of copper has a low process reliability due to the high reflection and the high thermal conductivity. SHADOW welds of 3.6 mm length were performed on 250 micrometers thick copper plates with very high reproducibility. As a result, a pilot plant for laser beam welding of copper plates has been set up. The work to be presented has partly been funded by the European Commission in a project under the contract BRPR-CT-0634.

  20. Fatigue properties of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy butt joints processed by vacuum brazing and tungsten inert gas welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei Lin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten inert gas welding and vacuum brazing butt joints of Al–Mg–Si alloy 6061 in the artificially aged condition T6 were studied. Constant amplitude and variable amplitude fatigue loading tests were performed. The experimental S-N curves were compared with the fatigue design curves recommended by the International Institute of Welding, British Standard, and Eurocode 9. Two mean stress correction methods, Goodman and Gerber, were evaluated. In terms of the size effect on the fatigue life, this article proposed an innovational thickness correction method based on the ratio of the ultimate tensile strengths of specimens with different thickness. For vacuum brazing components, the tensile strength–based thickness correction method was better than the thickness correction methods recommended by the International Institute of Welding and Eurocode 9.

  1. Corrosion in artificial saliva of a Ni-Cr-based dental alloy joined by TIG welding and conventional brazing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Irma C; Bastos, Ivan N; Diniz, Marília G; de Miranda, Mauro S

    2015-08-01

    Fixed prosthesis and partial dental prosthesis frameworks are usually made from welded Ni-Cr-based alloys. These structures can corrode in saliva and have to be investigated to establish their safety. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the corrosion behavior of joints joined by tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding and conventional brazing in specimens made of commercial Ni-Cr alloy in Fusayama artificial saliva at 37°C (pH 2.5 and 5.5). Eighteen Ni-Cr base metal specimens were cast and welded by brazing or tungsten inert gas methods. The specimens were divided into 3 groups (base metal, 2 welded specimens), and the composition and microstructure were qualitatively evaluated. The results of potential corrosion and corrosion current density were analyzed with a 1-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test for pairwise comparisons (α=.05). Base metal and tungsten inert gas welded material showed equivalent results in electrochemical corrosion tests, while the air-torched specimens exhibited low corrosion resistance. The performance was worst at pH 2.5. These results suggest that tungsten inert gas is a suitable welding process for use in dentistry, because the final microstructure does not reduce the corrosion resistance in artificial saliva at 37°C, even in a corrosion-testing medium that facilitates galvanic corrosion processes. Moreover, the corrosion current density of brazed Ni-Cr alloy joints was significantly higher (Pwelded joints. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Interfacial Reaction Characteristics and Mechanical Properties of Welding-brazing Bonding Between AZ31B Magnesium Alloy and PRO500 Ultra-high Strength Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Jian-hua

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were carried out with TIG welding-brazing of AZ31B magnesium alloy to PRO500 steel using TIG arc as heat source. The interfacial reaction characteristics and mechanical properties of the welding-brazing bonding were investigated. The results show that an effective bonding is achieved between AZ31B magnesium alloy and PRO500 steel by using TIG welding-brazing method. Some spontaneous oxidation reactions result in the formation of a transition zone containing AlFe3 phase with rich oxide. The micro-hardness value of the interfacial transition zone is between that of the AZ31B and the PRO500. Temper softening zone appears due to the welding thermal cycle nearby the bonding position in the interface. A higher heat input makes an increase of the brittle phases and leads to an obvious decrease of the bonding strength.

  3. Multiphysics Simulation and Experimental Investigation of Aluminum Wettability on a Titanium Substrate for Laser Welding-Brazing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Dal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The control of metal wettability is a key-factor in the field of brazing or welding-brazing. The present paper deals with the numerical simulation of the whole phenomena occurring during the assembly of dissimilar alloys. The study is realized in the frame of potential applications for the aircraft industry, considering the case of the welding-brazing of aluminum Al5754 and quasi-pure titanium Ti40. The assembly configuration, presented here, is a simplification of the real experiment. We have reduced the three-dimensional overlap configuration to a bi-dimensional case. In the present case, an aluminum cylinder is fused onto a titanium substrate. The main physical phenomena which are considered here are: the heat transfers, the fluid flows with free boundaries and the mass transfer in terms of chemical species diffusion. The numerical problem is implemented with the commercial software Comsol Multiphysics™, by coupling heat equation, Navier-Stokes and continuity equations and the free boundary motion. The latter is treated with the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian method, with a particular focus on the contact angle implementation. The comparison between numerical and experimental results shows a very satisfactory agreement in terms of droplet shape, thermal field and intermetallic layer thickness. The model validates our numerical approach.

  4. Relationship between welding fume concentration and systemic inflammation after controlled exposure of human subjects with welding fumes from metal inert gas brazing of zinc-coated materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Peter; Bauer, Marcus; Gube, Monika; Lenz, Klaus; Reisgen, Uwe; Spiegel-Ciobanu, Vilia Elena; Kraus, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that exposure of subjects to emissions from a metal inert gas (MIG) brazing process of zinc-coated material led to an increase of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in the blood. In this study, the no-observed-effect level (NOEL) for such emissions was assessed. Twelve healthy subjects were exposed for 6 hours to different concentrations of MIG brazing fumes under controlled conditions. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein was measured in the blood. For welding fumes containing 1.20 and 1.50 mg m zinc, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein was increased the day after exposure. For 0.90 mg m zinc, no increase was detected. These data indicate that the no-observed-effect level for emissions from a MIG brazing process of zinc-coated material in respect to systemic inflammation is found for welding fumes with zinc concentrations between 0.90 and 1.20 mg m.

  5. Intermediate layer, microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum alloy/stainless steel butt joint using laser-MIG hybrid welding-brazing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zongtao; Wan, Zhandong; Li, Yuanxing; Xue, Junyu; Hui, Chen

    2017-07-01

    Butt joining of AA6061 aluminum (Al) alloy and 304 stainless steel of 2-mm thickness was conducted using laser-MIG hybrid welding-brazing method with ER4043 filler metal. To promote the mechanical properties of the welding-brazing joints, two kinds of intermediate layers (Al-Si-Mg alloy and Ag-based alloy) are used to adjust the microstructures of the joints. The brazing interface and the tensile strength of the joints were characterized. The results showed that the brazing interface between Al alloy and stainless steel consisted of double layers of Fe2Al5 (near stainless steel) and Fe4Al13 intermetallic compounds (IMCs) with a total thickness of 3.7 μm, when using Al-Si-Mg alloy as the intermediate layer. The brazing interface of the joints using Ag-based alloy as intermediate layer also consists of double IMC layers, but the first layer near stainless steel was FeAl2 and the total thickness of these two IMC layers decreased to 3.1 μm. The tensile strength of the joints using Al-Si-Mg alloy as the intermediate layer was promoted to 149 MPa, which was 63 MPa higher than that of the joints using Al-Si-Mg alloy as the intermediate layer. The fractures occurred in the brazing interface between Al alloy and stainless steel.

  6. Thermal Analysis of Brazing Seal and Sterilizing Technique to Break Contamination Chain for Mars Sample Return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2015-01-01

    The potential to return Martian samples to Earth for extensive analysis is in great interest of the planetary science community. It is important to make sure the mission would securely contain any microbes that may possibly exist on Mars so that they would not be able to cause any adverse effects on Earth's environment. A brazing sealing and sterilizing technique has been proposed to break the Mars-to-Earth contamination chain. Thermal analysis of the brazing process was conducted for several conceptual designs that apply the technique. Control of the increase of the temperature of the Martian samples is a challenge. The temperature profiles of the Martian samples being sealed in the container were predicted by finite element thermal models. The results show that the sealing and sterilization process can be controlled such that the samples' temperature is maintained below the potentially required level, and that the brazing technique is a feasible approach to break the contamination chain.

  7. Thermal analysis of brazing seal and sterilizing technique to break contamination chain for Mars sample return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2015-03-01

    The potential to return Martian samples to Earth for extensive analysis is in great interest of the planetary science community. It is important to make sure the mission would securely contain any microbes that may possibly exist on Mars so that they would not be able to cause any adverse effects on Earth's environment. A brazing sealing and sterilizing technique has been proposed to break the Mars-to-Earth contamination chain. Thermal analysis of the brazing process was conducted for several conceptual designs that apply the technique. Control of the increase of the temperature of the Martian samples is a challenge. The temperature profiles of the Martian samples being sealed in the container were predicted by finite element thermal models. The results show that the sealing and sterilization process can be controlled such that the samples' temperature is maintained below the potentially required level, and that the brazing technique is a feasible approach to break the contamination chain.

  8. Quality assurance of brazed copper plates through advanced ultrasonic NDE

    OpenAIRE

    Segreto, T.; Caggiano, A.; Teti, R.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic non-destructive methods have demonstrated great potential for the detection of flaws in a material under examination. In particular, discontinuities produced by welding, brazing, and soldering are regularly inspected through ultrasonic techniques. In this paper, an advanced ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation technique is applied for the quality control of brazed copper cells in order to realize an accelerometer prototype for cancer proton therapy. The cells are composed of two h...

  9. THE INFLUENCE OF BRAZING TEMPERATURE ON THE METALLOGRAPHIC MICROSTRUCTURE OF THE BONDED WELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei DIMITRESCU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Since it was determined that as a result of fatigue on the brazed joints, the breakage occurs in thefiller material or in its immediate vicinity (Z.I.T.M., it is necessary to study the phenomenon in themicrostructure. The experiments have been made on alloys 3L59 samples, using as filler material the aluminumalloy L103. The brazing was made by gluing, overlapping nonstandard samples

  10. Crack repair welding by CMT brazing using low melting point filler wire for long-term used steam turbine cases of Cr-Mo-V cast steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadoi, Kota, E-mail: kadoi@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Murakami, Aoi; Shinozaki, Kenji; Yamamoto, Motomichi [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Matsumura, Hideo [Chugoku Electric Power Co., 3-9-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan)

    2016-06-01

    Surface melting by gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding and overlaying by cold metal transfer (CMT) brazing using low melting point filler wire were investigated to develop a repair process for cracks in worn cast steel of steam turbine cases. Cr-Mo-V cast steel, operated for 188,500 h at 566 °C, was used as the base material. Silver and gold brazing filler wires were used as overlaying materials to decrease the heat input into the base metal and the peak temperature during the welding thermal cycle. Microstructural analysis revealed that the worn cast steel test samples contained ferrite phases with intragranular precipitates of Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3}, Mo{sub 2}C, and CrSi{sub 2} and grain boundary precipitates of Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6} and Mo{sub 2}C. CMT brazing using low melting point filler wire was found to decrease the heat input and peak temperature during the thermal cycle of the process compared with those during GTA surface melting. Thus, the process helped to inhibit the formation of hardened phases such as intermetallics and martensite in the heat affected zone (HAZ). Additionally, in the case of CMT brazing using BAg-8, the change in the hardness of the HAZ was negligible even though other processes such as GTA surface melting cause significant changes. The creep-fatigue properties of weldments produced by CMT brazing with BAg-8 were the highest, and nearly the same as those of the base metal owing to the prevention of hardened phase formation. The number of fracture cycles using GTA surface melting and CMT brazing with BAu-4 was also quite small. Therefore, CMT brazing using low melting point filler wire such as BAg-8 is a promising candidate method for repairing steam turbine cases. However, it is necessary to take alloy segregation during turbine operation into account to design a suitable filler wire for practical use.

  11. Secondary ledeburite formation during various welding techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonkovič M.P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence and formation sequence of secondary ledeburite in the heat affected zone of chromium ledeburitic tool steel W.Nr. 1.2379 (OCR12 VM after welding with SAW, TIG, microplasma and laser welding techniques is presented in this paper. Special attention was paid on the behaviour of carbides. The occurrence of secondary ledeburite is a result of local enrichment of the austenite matrix with alloying elements, due to partial or complete dissolution of primary/eutectic carbides. The results show that the largest amount of secondary ledeburite is formed during submerged arc welding, followed by TIG and microplasma welding technique. Welding by laser technique, with appropriate technological parameters, could prevent secondary ledeburite formation.

  12. [Dental welding titanium and its clinical usage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Xiao, M; Zhao, Y

    1998-09-01

    Due to its excellent biocompatibility, desirable chemical and mechanical properties, Titanium has been used for implant denture, RPD and FPD, where welding techniques were indispensable. This paper introduces 5 useful modern ways to weld Titanium and their clinical usage. They are: laser, plasma welding, TIG, infraned brazing and Hruska electrowelding.

  13. Heating and thermal control of brazing technique to break contamination path for potential Mars sample return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Campos, Sergio

    2017-04-01

    The potential return of Mars sample material is of great interest to the planetary science community, as it would enable extensive analysis of samples with highly sensitive laboratory instruments. It is important to make sure such a mission concept would not bring any living microbes, which may possibly exist on Mars, back to Earth's environment. In order to ensure the isolation of Mars microbes from Earth's Atmosphere, a brazing sealing and sterilizing technique was proposed to break the Mars-to-Earth contamination path. Effectively, heating the brazing zone in high vacuum space and controlling the sample temperature for integrity are key challenges to the implementation of this technique. The break-thechain procedures for container configurations, which are being considered, were simulated by multi-physics finite element models. Different heating methods including induction and resistive/radiation were evaluated. The temperature profiles of Martian samples in a proposed container structure were predicted. The results show that the sealing and sterilizing process can be controlled such that the samples temperature is maintained below the level that may cause damage, and that the brazing technique is a feasible approach to breaking the contamination path.

  14. Influence of laser power on microstructure and mechanical properties of laser welded-brazed Mg to Ni coated Ti alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Caiwang; Lu, Qingshuang; Chen, Bo; Song, Xiaoguo; Li, Liqun; Feng, Jicai; Wang, Yang

    2017-03-01

    AZ31B Magnesium (Mg) and Ti-6Al-4V titanium (Ti) alloys with Ni coating were joined by laser welding-brazing process using AZ92 Mg based filler. The influence of laser power on microstructure and mechanical properties were investigated. Ni coating was found to significantly promote good wetting-spreading ability of molten filler on the Ti sheet. Acceptable joints without obvious defects were obtained within a relatively wide processing window. In the process metallurgical bonding was achieved by the formation of Ti3Al phase at direct irradiation zone and Al-Ni phase followed by a layer of Mg-Al-Ni ternary compound adjacent to the fusion zone at the intermediate zone. The thickness of reaction layers increased slowly with the increasing laser power. The tensile-shear test indicated that joints produced at the laser power of 1300 W reached 2387 N fracture load, representing 88.5% joint efficiency with respect to the Mg base metal. The corresponding failure occurred in the fusion zone of the Mg base metal, while joints fractured at the interface at lower/higher laser power due to the crack or excessive intermetallic compound (IMC) formation along the interface.

  15. Characterization of inhalable, thoracic, and respirable fractions and ultrafine particle exposure during grinding, brazing, and welding activities in a mechanical engineering factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Leso, Veruscka; Fontana, Luca; Cottica, Danilo; Bergamaschi, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the emission sources of fine and ultrafine particles (UFPs) during brazing, welding, and grinding in a mechanical engineering factory and to characterize UFP exposure by measuring size distributions, number, and surface area concentrations. Samplings lasted 4 hours and were conducted during 5 days using the Grimm 1.109 portable aerosol spectrometer, the Grimm portable NanoCheck™ 1.320, the electrical low pressure impactor, and the nanoparticle aerosol monitor AeroTrak™ 9000. Higher concentrations of fine particles were observed in welding and grinding activities. The highest values of UFP number and alveolar surface area concentrations were detected in the welding booth. Potential emission sources of fine particles and UFPs can be identified by the multifaceted approach outlined in this study. This sampling strategy provides important data on key UFP metrics.

  16. Welding of Aluminum Alloys to Steels: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    UNCLASSIFIED 7 UNCLASSIFIED 2.1. Fusion welding methods 2.1.1. Gas metal arc (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas ( TIG ) welding techniques...UNCLASSIFIED 8 UNCLASSIFIED Fig.3. (a) Schematic of the butt TIG welding for joining the aluminum to steel and (b) formation of the cracks at the...dissimilar metals TIG welding -brazing of aluminum alloy to stainless steel, Materials Science and Engineering A 509 (2009) 31-40. [28] S.B. Lin, J.L. Song

  17. Furnace brazing under partial vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckown, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Brazing furnace utilizing partial-vacuum technique reduces tooling requirements and produces better bond. Benefit in that partial vacuum helps to dissociate metal oxides that inhibit metal flow and eliminates heavy tooling required to hold parts together during brazing.

  18. Experimental study of W-Eurofer laser brazing for divertor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munez, C.J., E-mail: claudio.munez@urjc.es [Dept. de Tecnologia Mecanica, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, Mostoles 28933, Madrid (Spain); Garrido, M.A. [Dept. de Tecnologia Mecanica, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, Mostoles 28933, Madrid (Spain); Rams, J.; Urena, A. [Dept. de Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, Mostoles 28933, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > Laser brazing system as a suitable technique to joint W and Eurofer alloys. > High residual stresses at the bonding were produced. > Laser brazing of powder metallurgy W alloys added porosity in the solidified pool. > The CSM methodology as a suitable technique to discriminate zones of welding joints. - Abstract: This work can be considered as a preliminary evaluation of the potential of laser brazing for joining tungsten based alloys to reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels (Eurofer). Brazing of tungsten and EUROFER alloys using a 55Ni-45Ti alloy as a brazer and a high power diode laser (HPDL) as a power source has been investigated. The brazed joints showed solidified pools with good superficial aspect and a high degree of wettability with the both parent sheets, presumably because of the active effect of titanium. Metallurgical brazeability was investigated and nanoindentation measurements were done to evaluate local hardening and stiffness effects associated to dilution phenomena.

  19. Combination Effects of Nocolok Flux with Ni Powder on Properties and Microstructures of Aluminum-Stainless Steel TIG Welding-Brazing Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Huan; Lin, Sanbao; Yang, Chunli; Fan, Chenglei; Chen, Zhe

    2013-11-01

    A flux consisting of Nocolok and nickel powder was first applied for TIG welding-brazing of aluminum-stainless steel. Results of tensile and impact tests illustrated that a significant improvement in mechanical properties of the butt joint was obtained with the flux, tensile strength increased from 116 to 158 MPa, and impact energy increased from 3.2 to 6.7 J. Investigation results on microstructures of interfaces and seams suggested that Ni addition significantly decreased the thickness of intermetallic compound (IMC) layer on the interfaces, but did not change the phase structure of Al13Fe4. Furthermore, precipitate phase in the welded seams changed from Al6Fe to Al9FeNi, and the quantity of precipitate phases decreased from 12 to 9% approximately. Finally, effect of Ni powder's addition on the joint was analyzed and discussed. The reduction in the thickness of IMC and quantity of precipitate phases are beneficial to joint properties.

  20. Brazing Dissimilar Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krotz, Phillip D.; Davis, William M.; Wisner, Daniel L.

    1996-01-01

    Brazing effective technique for joining ordinary structural metals to brittle, low-thermal-expansion refractory metals. Specifically, brazing process established for joining copper or nickel flanges to ends of vacuum-plasma-sprayed tungsten tubes and for joining stainless-steel flanges to ends of tubes made of alloy of molybdenum with 40 percent of rhenium.

  1. Advances in brazing science, technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Brazing processes offer enhanced control, adaptability and cost-efficiency in the joining of materials. Unsurprisingly, this has lead to great interest and investment in the area. Drawing on important research in the field, Advances in brazing provides a clear guide to the principles, materials, methods and key applications of brazing. Part one introduces the fundamentals of brazing, including molten metal wetting processes, strength and margins of safety of brazed joints, and modeling of associated physical phenomena. Part two goes on to consider specific materials, such as super alloys, filler metals for high temperature brazing, diamonds and cubic boron nitride, and varied ceramics and intermetallics. The brazing of carbon-carbon (C/C) composites to metals is also explored before applications of brazing and brazed materials are discussed in part three. Brazing of cutting materials, use of coating techniques, and metal-nonmetal brazing for electrical, packaging and structural applications are reviewed, alon...

  2. Residual stress characterization of welds and post-weld processes using x-ray diffraction techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauss, Michael E.; Pineault, James A.; Eckersley, John S.

    1998-03-01

    This paper illustrates the importance of residual stress characterization in welds and post weld processes. The failure to characterize residual stresses created during welding and/or post weld processes can lead to unexpected occurrences of stress corrosion cracking, distortion, fatigue cracking as well as instances of over design or over processing. The development of automated residual stress mapping and the availability of portable and fast equipment have now made the characterization of residual stresses using x-ray diffraction practical for process control and optimization. The paper presents examples where x-ray diffraction residual stress characterization techniques were applied on various kinds of welds including arc welds, TIG welds, resistance welds, laser welds and electron beam welds. The nondestructive nature of the x-ray diffraction technique has made the residual stress characterization of welds a useful tool for process optimization and failure analysis, particularly since components can be measured before and after welding and post welding processes. Some examples presented show the residual stresses before and after the application of post weld processes such as shot peening, grinding and heat treatment.

  3. Brazing in Space: The Next Frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flom, Yury

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the challenges facing mechanically joining objects in space, as well as past, present, and future techniques for brazing. The sections of the presentation include: 1) Why do we need to join components in space; 2) Why brazing? 3) History of brazing in space; 4) Electron beam vacuum brazing; 5) Current effort at GSFC; 6) Future work.

  4. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  5. The use of welding techniques in protection of welding structures against corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.St. Kowalski

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents possibilities of using welding techniques as a means of protection from corrosion of materials for welding structuresoperating in power engineering industry, chemical industry and shipbuilding. Based on the example of an LNG installation, the potentials of weld overlaying in anti-corrosive protection of parts operating in LNG installations have been described. The weld overlaying technique enables building up of protective coatings, which not only protect material from corrosion resulting from the flow of more or less aggressive medium (e.g. water, exhaust gas but also increase the performance life of thus “coated” elements due to the improved abrasion wear resistance of weld overlays. The weld overlaying process is equally well suitable in building of new structures as in the repair of damaged or worn out elements of water or power feeding installations.

  6. Method for brazing together planar and nonplanar metal members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammersand, Fred G.; Witkowski, Anthony J.

    1985-01-01

    The invention relates to a method and apparatus for brazing two metal members together, at least one of which is nonplanar, in a brazing furnace using a substantially pure brazing material. The method comprises the steps of utilizing a brazing fixture to hold the two metal members in tangential relation to one another along a portion of each member so that a cavity is formed adjacent to the contacting portions. A braze material is then positioned within the cavity. The braze fixture, the metal members, and the braze material are then placed in a brazing furnace. A heat shield is then placed over the braze fixture, the metal members, and the braze material to shield the braze material from direct furnace radiation. The furnace temperature is linearly increased at a rate of about 180.degree. C. per hour until a temperature of 350.degree. C. is achieved. Heat is transferred by conduction from the metal members to the braze material to cause the braze material to melt. Some material from the metal members slowly diffuses into the braze material forming a braze joint. The furnace is rapidly cooled to room temperature using nitrogen gas. The brazed assemblies made according to this method are superior to assemblies formed by heliarc welding.

  7. Preparation of W/CuCrZr mono-block test mock-up using vacuum brazing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premjit Singh, K.; Khirwadkar, S.; Bhope, Kedar; Patel, Nikunj; Mokaria, Prakash

    2017-04-01

    Development of the joining for W/CuCrZr mono-block PFC test mock-up is an interesting area in Fusion R&D. W/Cu bimetallic material has been prepared using OFHC Copper casting approach on the radial surface of W mono-block tile surface. The W/Cu bimetallic material has been joined with CuCrZr tube (heat sink) material with the vacuum brazing route. Vacuum brazing of W/Cu-CuCrZr has been performed @ 970°C for 10 min using NiCuMn-37 filler material under deep vacuum environment (10-6 mbar). Graphite fixture was used for OFHC Copper casting and vacuum brazing experiments. The joint integrity of W/Cu-CuCrZr mono-block mock-up of W/Cu and Cu-CuCrZr interface has been checked using ultrasonic immersion technique. The result of the experimental work is presented in the paper.

  8. BRAZING ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1962-02-20

    A brazing alloy is described which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability and is capable of forming a corrosion-resistant brazed joint. At least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion-resistant refractory metal. The brazing alloy consists essentially of 40 to 90 wt % of gold, 5 to 35 wt% of nickel, and 1 to 45 wt% of tantalum. (AEC)

  9. Improved electron-beam welding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, B.

    1970-01-01

    Electron-beam generator produces high quality welds without vaporization by relying on the mobility and hydrodynamic properties of the material in its liquid phase. The power density of the beam is relative to the speed of the workpiece, producing an inclined weld-front.

  10. Brazing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, James T.; Ferry, Paul B.; Hall, John C.

    1981-10-06

    There is disclosed a positive cathode electrode structure formed by brazing a thin porous membrane to a backing material by preselecting a predetermined area of the thin porous membrane and thereafter providing a braze flow barrier throughout the remainder of the membrane and electrolessly plating a nickel-phosphide alloy on the backing material, or in this case the honeycomb structure. The preselected area of the thin porous membrane is placed in intimate contact with the electrolessly plated portion of the backing material and heated to elevated temperatures in the absence of oxygen to form a brazed joint limited to a preselected area. If the braze flow barrier is provided by application of a liquid organic solvent, then the organic solvent is driven off by maintaining the thin porous membrane at elevated temperatures for an extended period of time prior to the brazing operation.

  11. Titanium Brazing for Structures and Survivability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    first method ( Weld +HIP) was a tungsten inert gas ( TIG ) weld around the exterior of the Ti- 6Al-4V blocks followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) at...structural material is much less mature than both steel and aluminum alloys, especially in the area of joining. While welding is the typical joining...method for titanium, vacuum brazing is an option in areas that are difficult to access for welding as well as areas near other nonmetallic

  12. RFQ Vacuum brazing at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Mathot, S

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the vacuum brazing procedure used at CERN for the brazing of Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). The RFQ is made of high precision machined OFE copper pieces assembled together. Vacuum brazing is one of the most promising techniques used to join the individual components leading to vacuum tightness and high precision alignment. The RFQ modules brazed at CERN are made of four 100 or 120 cm long vanes (two major and two minor vanes). Our brazing procedure consists of two steps. The first step involves the brazing of the four vanes in a horizontal position. The second step consists of brazing the vacuum stainless steel flanges to the copper structure in a vertical position. The paper describes the problems encountered with the alignment and the vacuum tightness. The difficulties related to the stress relaxation of the machined copper pieces during the brazing heat treatment are discussed. In addition, the solutions developed to improve the alignment of the brazed RFQ’s are...

  13. Finding Brazing Voids by Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluccio, R.

    1986-01-01

    Vibration-induced interference fringes reveal locations of defects. Holographic apparatus used to view object while vibrated ultrasonically. Interference fringes in hologram reveal brazing defects. Holographic technique locates small voids in large brazed joints. Identifies unbrazed regions 1 in. to second power (6 cm to the second power) or less in area.

  14. Fabrication of divertor mock-up with ODS-Cu and W by the improved brazing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokitani, M.; Hamaji, Y.; Hiraoka, Y.; Masuzaki, S.; Tamura, H.; Noto, H.; Tanaka, T.; Muroga, T.; Sagara, A.; FFHR Design Group

    2017-07-01

    Copper alloy has been considered as a divertor cooling tube or heat sink not only in the helical reactor FFHR-d1 but also in the tokamak DEMO reactor, because it has a high thermal conductivity. This work focused on applying an oxide dispersion strengthened copper alloy (ODS-Cu), GlidCop® (Cu-0.3 wt%Al2O3) as the divertor heat sink material of FFHR-d1. This alloy has superior high temperature yield strength exceeding 300 MPa at room temperature even after annealing up to ~1000 °C. The change in material properties of Pure-Cu, GlidCop® and CuCrZr by neutron irradiation are summarized in this paper. A primary dose limit is the radiation-induced hardening/softening (~0.2 dpa/1-2 dpa) which has a temperature dependence. According to such an evaluation, the GlidCop® can be selected as the current best candidate material in the commercial base of the divertor heat sink, and its temperature should be maintained as close as possible to 300 °C during operation. Bonding between the W armour and the GlidCop® heat sink was successfully performed by using an improved brazing technique with BNi-6 (Ni-11%P) filler material. The bonding strength was measured by a three-point bending test and reached up to approximately 200 MPa. Surprisingly, several specimens showed an obvious yield point. This means that the BNi-6 brazing (bonding) layer caused relaxation of the applied stress. The small-scale divertor mock-up of the W/BNi-6/GlidCop® was successfully fabricated by using the improved brazing technique. The heat loading test was carried out by the electron beam device ACT2 in NIFS. The mock-up showed an excellent heat removal capability for use in the FFHR-d1 divertor.

  15. Laser Brazing of High Temperature Braze Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y. P.; Seaman, R. F.; McQuillan, T. J.; Martiens, R. F.

    2000-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) consists of 1080 conical tubes, which are furnace brazed themselves, manifolds, and surrounding structural jacket making almost four miles of braze joints. Subsequent furnace braze cycles are performed due to localized braze voids between the coolant tubes. SSME nozzle experiences extremely high heat flux (180 mW/sq m) during hot fire. Braze voids between coolant tubes may result in hot combustion gas escape causing jacket bulges. The nozzle can be disqualified for flight or result in mission failure if the braze voids exceed the limits. Localized braze processes were considered to eliminate braze voids, however, damage to the parent materials often prohibited use of such process. Being the only manned flight reusable rocket engine, it has stringent requirement on the braze process. Poor braze quality or damage to the parent materials limits the nozzle service life. The objective of this study was to develop a laser brazing process to provide quality, localized braze joints without adverse affect on the parent materials. Gold (Au-Cu-Ni-Pd-Mn) based high temperature braze alloys were used in both powder and wire form. Thin section iron base superalloy A286 tube was used as substrate materials. Different Laser Systems including CO2 (10.6 micrometers, 1kW), ND:YAG (1.06 micrometers, 4kW). and direct diode laser (808nm. 150W) were investigated for brazing process. The laser process variables including wavelength. laser power, travel speed and angle of inclination were optimized according to bead geometry and braze alloy wetting at minimum heat input level, The properties of laser brazing were compared to that of furnace brazing. Microhardness profiles were used for braze joint property comparison between laser and furnace brazing. The cooling rate of laser brazing was compared to furnace brazing based on secondary dendritic arm spacing, Both optical and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) were used to evaluate the microstructures of

  16. Influence of Laser Power on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of a Laser Welded-Brazed Mg Alloy/Ni-Coated Steel Dissimilar Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Caiwang; Xiao, Liyuan; Liu, Fuyun; Chen, Bo; Song, Xiaoguo; Li, Liqun; Feng, Jicai

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we describe a method to improve the bonding of an immiscible Mg/steel system using Ni as an interlayer by coating it on the steel surface. Laser welding-brazing of AZ31B Mg alloy to Ni-coated Q235 steel using Mg-based filler was performed in a lap configuration. The influence of laser power on the weld characteristics, including joint appearance, formation of interfacial reaction layers and mechanical properties was investigated. The results indicated that the presence of the Ni-coating promoted the wetting of the liquid filler metal on the steel surface. A thermal gradient along the interface led to the formation of heterogeneous interfacial reaction layers. When using a low laser power of 1600 W, the reaction products were an FeAl phase in the direct laser irradiation zone, an AlNi phase close to the intermediate zone and mixtures of AlNi phase and an (α-Mg + Mg2Ni) eutectic structure near the interface at the seam head zone. For high powers of more than 2000 W, the FeAl phase grew thicker in the direct laser irradiation zone and a new Fe(Ni) transition layer formed at the interface of the intermediate zone and the seam head zone. However, the AlNi phase and (α-Mg + Mg2Ni) eutectic structure were scattered at the Mg seam. All the joints fractured at the fusion zone, indicating that the improved interface was not the weakest joint region. The maximum tensile-shear strength of the Mg/Ni-coated steel joint reached 190 N/mm, and the joint efficiency was 70% with respect to the Mg alloy base metal.

  17. Lasers in car body construction - substitution of conventional welding techniques or supplement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhoff, R.; Behler, K.; Beyer, E.

    1988-09-01

    In car body construction, laser beam welding competes with resistance spot welding and with projection welding. There are problems concerning the short bridging distance of the laser beam welding, but there are also some advantages, i.e.: lower weight; higher strength and stiffness of the car body; high welding speed (5 to 10 m/min); triple-pass welding; welding at a present depth for attaching reinforcing elements on the inside of visible car parts for the purpose of vibration and noise damping; good process control characteristics. In the long run, laser beam welding is expected to replace conventional welding techniques in car body construction.

  18. Induction Brazing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul

    Induction brazing is a fast and appropriate method for industrial joining of complex geometries and metal combinations. In all types of brazing processes it is important to heat the joint interface of the two materials to the same, high temperature. If one of the specimens is warmer than the other...... materials has large influence on the heating time and temperature distribution in induction heating. In order to ensure high and uniform temperature distribution near the interface of a joint between dissimilar materials the precise coil geometry and position is of great importance. The present report...... presents a combined numerical and experimental method for determination of appropriate/optimiged coil geometry and position in induction brazing tube-to-plate joints of different ratios between tube and plate thickness and different combinations of the materials stainless steel, brass and copper...

  19. Laser welding and syncristallization techniques comparison: in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaini, C; Merigo, E; Vescovi, P; Meleti, M; Nammour, S

    2012-01-01

    Background. Laser welding was first reported in 1967 and for many years it has been used in dental laboratories with several advantages versus the conventional technique. Authors described, in previous works, the possibility of using also chair-side Nd : YAG laser device (Fotona Fidelis III, λ = 1064 nm) for welding metallic parts of prosthetic appliances directly in the dental office, extra- and also intra-orally. Syncristallisation is a soldering technique based on the creation of an electric arc between two electrodes and used to connect implants to bars intra-orally. Aim. The aim of this study was to compare two different laser welding devices with a soldering machine, all of these used in prosthetic dentistry. Material and Methods. In-lab Nd : YAG laser welding (group A = 12 samples), chair-side Nd : YAG laser welding (group B = 12 samples), and electrowelder (group C = 12 samples) were used. The tests were performed on 36 CrCoMo plates and the analysis consisted in evaluation, by microscopic observation, of the number of fissures in welded areas of groups A and B and in measurement of the welding strength in all the groups. The results were statistically analysed by means of one-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison tests. Results. The means and standard deviations for the number of fissures in welded areas were 8.12 ± 2.59 for group A and 5.20 ± 1.38 for group B. The difference was statistical significant (P = 0.0023 at the level 95%). On the other hand, the means and standard deviations for the traction tests were 1185.50 ± 288.56 N for group A, 896.41 ± 120.84 N for group B, and 283.58 ± 84.98 N for group C. The difference was statistical significant (P = 0.01 at the level 95%). Conclusion. The joint obtained by welding devices had a significant higher strength compared with that obtained by the electrowelder, and the comparison between the two laser devices used demonstrated that the chair-side Nd : YAG, even giving

  20. Laser Welding and Syncristallization Techniques Comparison: In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Fornaini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Laser welding was first reported in 1967 and for many years it has been used in dental laboratories with several advantages versus the conventional technique. Authors described, in previous works, the possibility of using also chair-side Nd : YAG laser device (Fotona Fidelis III, =1064 nm for welding metallic parts of prosthetic appliances directly in the dental office, extra- and also intra-orally. Syncristallisation is a soldering technique based on the creation of an electric arc between two electrodes and used to connect implants to bars intra-orally. Aim. The aim of this study was to compare two different laser welding devices with a soldering machine, all of these used in prosthetic dentistry. Material and Methods. In-lab Nd : YAG laser welding (group A = 12 samples, chair-side Nd : YAG laser welding (group B = 12 samples, and electrowelder (group C = 12 samples were used. The tests were performed on 36 CrCoMo plates and the analysis consisted in evaluation, by microscopic observation, of the number of fissures in welded areas of groups A and B and in measurement of the welding strength in all the groups. The results were statistically analysed by means of one-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison tests. Results. The means and standard deviations for the number of fissures in welded areas were 8.12±2.59 for group A and 5.20±1.38 for group B. The difference was statistical significant (=0.0023 at the level 95%. On the other hand, the means and standard deviations for the traction tests were 1185.50±288.56 N for group A, 896.41±120.84 N for group B, and 283.58±84.98 N for group C. The difference was statistical significant (=0.01 at the level 95%. Conclusion. The joint obtained by welding devices had a significant higher strength compared with that obtained by the electrowelder, and the comparison between the two laser devices used demonstrated that the chair-side Nd : YAG, even giving a

  1. The influence of the weld toe grinding and wig remelting weld toe rehabilitation techniques, on variable stresses, in case of cross fillet welds, reinforced with additional welding rows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babis Claudiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Variable stresses where the load value varies between a maximum and a minimum value, or varies the position in time, cause after accumulating a large number of load cycles in those structures, the emergence of drug fatigue. Fatigue is characterized by failure on values of the applied stress from the load cycles, below the material flow, values which in case of static stress would not have caused problems. Knowing that the variable stressed structures are sensitive to stress concentrators, the paper aims to highlight the influence of two techniques to reduce stress concentrator weld toe grinding and WIG remelting weld toe, on the behavior of variable tensile test of cross corner welded specimens, reinforced with additional welding rows.

  2. Characterisation of submerged arc welding process using infrared imaging technique

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Zondi, MC

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Infrared (IR) thermography is a technique used to measure temperature distribution of heat generation in manufacturing processes such as welding. IR thermography is a non-destructive and non-contact method, which makes it favoured for the arc...

  3. Numerical simulation of electron beam welding and instrumental technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carin, M.; Rogeon, P.; Carron, D.; Le Masson, P.; Couedel, D. [Universite de Bretagne Sud, Centre de Recherche, Lab. d' Etudes Thermiques Energetique et Environnement, 56 - Lorient (France)

    2004-07-01

    In the present work, thermal cycles measured with thermocouples embedded in specimens are employed to validate a numerical thermo-metallurgical model of an Electron Beam welding process. The implemented instrumentation techniques aim at reducing the perturbations induced by the sensors in place. The numerical model is based on the definition of a heat source term linked to the keyhole geometry predicted by a model of pressure balance using the FEMLAB code. The heat source term is used by the thermo-metallurgical simulation carried out with the finite element code SYSWELD. Kinetics parameters are extracted from dilatometric experiments achieved in welding austenitization conditions at constant cooling rates. (authors)

  4. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  5. Tailored Welding Technique for High Strength Al-Cu Alloy for Higher Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biradar, N. S.; Raman, R.

    AA2014 aluminum alloy, with 4.5% Cu as major alloying element, offers highest strength and hardness values in T6 temper and finds extensive use in aircraft primary structures. However, this alloy is difficult to weld by fusion welding because the dendritic structure formed can affect weld properties seriously. Among the welding processes, AC-TIG technique is largely used for welding. As welded yield strength was in the range of 190-195 MPa, using conventional TIG technique. Welding metallurgy of AA2014 was critically reviewed and factors responsible for lower properties were identified. Square-wave AC TIG with Transverse mechanical arc oscillation (TMAO) was postulated to improve the weld strength. A systematic experimentation using 4 mm thick plates produced YS in the range of 230-240 MPa, has been achieved. Through characterization including optical and SEM/EDX was conducted to validate the metallurgical phenomena attributable to improvement in weld properties.

  6. 78 FR 75947 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Welding...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    ...; Welding, Cutting, and Brazing Standard ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor (DOL) is... (ICR) titled, ``Welding, Cutting, and Brazing Standard,'' to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB... the Welding, Cutting, and Brazing Standard, regulations 29 CFR part 1910, subpart Q. More specifically...

  7. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  8. Review of techniques for on-line monitoring and inspection of laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, J.; Yan, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Laser welding has been applied to various industries, in particular, automotive, aerospace and microelectronics. However, traditional off-line testing of the welds is costly and inefficient. Therefore, on-line inspection systems with low cost have being developed to increase productivity and maintain high welding quality. This paper presents the applications of acoustic, optical, visual, thermal and ultrasonic techniques and latest development of laser welding monitoring. The advantages and limitations of these techniques are also discussed.

  9. Research Activities at IPT, DTU on Resistance Projection Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels

    2000-01-01

    Resistance welding processes and among these especially the resistance projection welding is considered an industrially strategic process with increasing applications as alternative to other welding processes, soldering, brazing and mechanical assembling. This is due to increasing requirements...

  10. Optimization of process parameters during vibratory welding technique using Taguchi's analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Kumar Singh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available With an aim to improve the mechanical properties of a weld joint, a new concept of vibratory setup has been designed which is capable to stir the molten weld pool before it solidifies during shielded metal arc welding (SMAW operation. Mechanical vibration having resonance frequency of 300 Hz and amplitude of 0.5 mm was transferred to the molten weld pool of 6 mm thick mild steel butt-welded joints during the welding operation. The experimental work was conducted at various ranges of frequencies, welding current and welding speed. Taguchi's analysis technique has been applied to optimize the process parameters; the response values for analysis are yield strength and micro-hardness. The test results showed that with the application of the vibratory treatment the values of hardness and tensile properties increased. The auxiliary vibrations induced into the weld pool resulted in increased micro-hardness of the weld metal which indicates the orientation of the crystal and refinement of grains took place. This study shows that vibration applied into the weld pool can be successfully improved the mechanical properties of welded joints. Thus this research attempt provided an alternative welding technique for grain refinement of weldments.

  11. Development of Underwater Laser Cladding and Underwater Laser Seal Welding Techniques for Reactor Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Takehisa; Tamura, Masataka; Tanaka, Yoshimi; Kouno, Wataru; Makino, Yoshinobu; Kawano, Shohei; Matsunaga, Keiji

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been reported at the aged components in many nuclear power plants. Toshiba has been developing the underwater laser welding. This welding technique can be conducted without draining the water in the reactor vessel. It is beneficial for workers not to exposure the radiation. The welding speed can be attaining twice as fast as that of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW). The susceptibility of SCC can also be lower than the Alloy 600 base metal.

  12. Development of reactive-air-brazing as a joining technology for material combinations of the high temperature solid oxide fuel cell; Weiterentwicklung des Reactive-Air-Brazing (Reaktionsloeten an Luft) als Fuegetechnik fuer Werkstoffkombinationen der Hochtemperaturbrennstoffzelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koppitz, T.; Federmann, D.; Reichle, S.; Reisgen, U.; Remmel, J.; Zerfass, H.R. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    REactive air brazing is a promising joining technology. A silver braze is used for brazing of the basic materials, i.e. ferritic Cr steel (Crofer22ALPU) and 8YSZ electrolyte resp. a ceramic Al2O3/MgO insulating layer. The silver braze contains additives to ensure wettability, to improve the solidification morphology, and to suppress weld porosity. The contribution presents current results of investigations in this field and outlines the potential of the technology. (orig.)

  13. Influence of Exposure to Multiple Brazing Cycles on the Integrity of OFE Copper Brazed Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, P.; Sandha, R. S.; Choudhary, R. S.; Nagpure, D. C.; Goswami, S. G.; Dwivedi, Jishnu; Kaul, R.; Singh, B.

    2017-11-01

    A 10 MeV, 5 kW S-band travelling wave electron linear accelerator has been developed at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology for industrial applications. The electron accelerating structure is made of oxygen-free electronic (OFE) copper and comprises of fifty-six brazed joints and is fabricated in multiple stages, as per the process and testing requirements. The accelerating structure is often required to be repaired through an additional brazing cycle with the same filler. The present study evaluates possible microstructural and mechanical property degradation of OFE copper brazed joints, as a result of its exposure to multiple brazing cycles. The study was performed on an OFE copper cavity stack brazed assembly, made through a four-stage brazing using BVAg-8 as braze filler. The resultant brazed assembly did not exhibit any leak at a sensitivity of 1 × 10-10 mbar.L/s. The results of the study demonstrate that OFE copper brazements can be safely subjected to an additional brazing cycle without causing significant degradation in its microstructure and strength. However, brazed joint's exposure to any additional brazing cycles results in the formation of voids and cracks due to intergranular penetration of silver, with associated drop in tensile strength from about 210 MPa to about 150-180 MPa. Based on the results of study, it is recommended to qualify the accelerating structure, fabricated through multiple brazing cycles, by a suitable non-destructive technique. The results of the study are important for design, fabrication and maintenance of electron linear accelerator components.

  14. Influence of Exposure to Multiple Brazing Cycles on the Integrity of OFE Copper Brazed Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, P.; Sandha, R. S.; Choudhary, R. S.; Nagpure, D. C.; Goswami, S. G.; Dwivedi, Jishnu; Kaul, R.; Singh, B.

    2017-10-01

    A 10 MeV, 5 kW S-band travelling wave electron linear accelerator has been developed at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology for industrial applications. The electron accelerating structure is made of oxygen-free electronic (OFE) copper and comprises of fifty-six brazed joints and is fabricated in multiple stages, as per the process and testing requirements. The accelerating structure is often required to be repaired through an additional brazing cycle with the same filler. The present study evaluates possible microstructural and mechanical property degradation of OFE copper brazed joints, as a result of its exposure to multiple brazing cycles. The study was performed on an OFE copper cavity stack brazed assembly, made through a four-stage brazing using BVAg-8 as braze filler. The resultant brazed assembly did not exhibit any leak at a sensitivity of 1 × 10-10 mbar.L/s. The results of the study demonstrate that OFE copper brazements can be safely subjected to an additional brazing cycle without causing significant degradation in its microstructure and strength. However, brazed joint's exposure to any additional brazing cycles results in the formation of voids and cracks due to intergranular penetration of silver, with associated drop in tensile strength from about 210 MPa to about 150-180 MPa. Based on the results of study, it is recommended to qualify the accelerating structure, fabricated through multiple brazing cycles, by a suitable non-destructive technique. The results of the study are important for design, fabrication and maintenance of electron linear accelerator components.

  15. Development of End Plug Welding Technique for SFR Fuel Rod Fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Won Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Korea, R&D on a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR was begun in 1997, as one of the national long-term nuclear R&D programs. As one fuel option for a prototype SFR, a metallic fuel, U-Zr alloy fuel, was selected and is currently being developed. For the fabrication of SFR metallic fuel rods, the end plug welding is a crucial process. The sealing of the end plug to the cladding tube should be hermetically perfect to prevent a leakage of fission gases and to maintain a good reactor performance. In this study, the welding technique, welding equipment, welding conditions, and parameters were developed for the end plug welding of SFR metallic fuel rods. A gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW technique was adopted and the welding joint design was developed. In addition, the optimal welding conditions and parameters were established. Based on the establishment of the welding conditions, the GTAW technique was qualified for the end plug welding of SFR metallic fuel rods.

  16. An Intelligent System for Analyzing Welding Defects using Image Retrieval Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Pein, Raoul Pascal; Lu, Joan; Stav, John Birger; Xu, Qiang; Uran, Miro; Mráz, Luboš

    2009-01-01

    The development of new approaches in image processing and retrieval provides several opportunities in supporting in different\\ud domains. The group of welding engineers frequently needs to conduct visual inspections to assess the quality of welding products.\\ud It is investigated, if this process can be supported by different kinds of software. Techniques from a generic CBIR system have\\ud been successfully used to cluster welding photographs according to the severeness of visual faults. Simi...

  17. Development of laser welding techniques for vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strain, R.V.; Leong, K.H.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Laser welding is potentially advantageous because of its flexibility and the reduced amount of material affected by the weld. Bead-on-plate and butt welds were previously performed to depths of about 4 mm with a 6-kW CO{sub 2} laser on V-4%Cr-4%Ti and V-5%Cr-5%Ti alloys. These welds were made at a speed of 0.042 m/s using argon purging at a flow rate of 2.8 m{sup 3}/s. The purge was distributed with a diffuser nozzle aimed just behind the laser beam during the welding operation. The fusion zones of welds made under these conditions consisted of very fine, needle-shaped grains and were also harder than the bulk metal (230-270 dph, compared to {approx}180 dph for the bulk metal). A limited number of impact tests showed that the as-welded ductile-brittle transition temperatures (DBTT) was above room temperature, but heat treatment at 1000{degrees}C for 1 h in vacuum reduced the DBTT to <{minus}25{degrees}C. Activities during this reporting period focused on improvements in the purging system and determination of the effect of welding speed on welds. A 2-kW continuous YAG laser at Lumonics Corp. in Livonia, MI, was used to make 34 test welds for this study.

  18. A Review of Dissimilar Welding Techniques for Magnesium Alloys to Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Liu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Welding of dissimilar magnesium alloys and aluminum alloys is an important issue because of their increasing applications in industries. In this document, the research and progress of a variety of welding techniques for joining dissimilar Mg alloys and Al alloys are reviewed from different perspectives. Welding of dissimilar Mg and Al is challenging due to the formation of brittle intermetallic compound (IMC such as Mg17Al12 and Mg2Al3. In order to increase the joint strength, three main research approaches were used to eliminate or reduce the Mg-Al intermetallic reaction layer. First, solid state welding techniques which have a low welding temperature were used to reduce the IMCs. Second, IMC variety and distribution were controlled to avoid the degradation of the joining strength in fusion welding. Third, techniques which have relatively controllable reaction time and energy were used to eliminate the IMCs. Some important processing parameters and their effects on weld quality are discussed, and the microstructure and metallurgical reaction are described. Mechanical properties of welds such as hardness, tensile, shear and fatigue strength are discussed. The aim of the report is to review the recent progress in the welding of dissimilar Mg and Al to provide a basis for follow-up research.

  19. A Review of Dissimilar Welding Techniques for Magnesium Alloys to Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liming; Ren, Daxin; Liu, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Welding of dissimilar magnesium alloys and aluminum alloys is an important issue because of their increasing applications in industries. In this document, the research and progress of a variety of welding techniques for joining dissimilar Mg alloys and Al alloys are reviewed from different perspectives. Welding of dissimilar Mg and Al is challenging due to the formation of brittle intermetallic compound (IMC) such as Mg17Al12 and Mg2Al3. In order to increase the joint strength, three main research approaches were used to eliminate or reduce the Mg-Al intermetallic reaction layer. First, solid state welding techniques which have a low welding temperature were used to reduce the IMCs. Second, IMC variety and distribution were controlled to avoid the degradation of the joining strength in fusion welding. Third, techniques which have relatively controllable reaction time and energy were used to eliminate the IMCs. Some important processing parameters and their effects on weld quality are discussed, and the microstructure and metallurgical reaction are described. Mechanical properties of welds such as hardness, tensile, shear and fatigue strength are discussed. The aim of the report is to review the recent progress in the welding of dissimilar Mg and Al to provide a basis for follow-up research. PMID:28788646

  20. Corrosion Behavior of Brazed Zinc-Coated Structured Sheet Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nikitin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arc brazing has, in comparison to arc welding, the advantage of less heat input while joining galvanized sheet metals. The evaporation of zinc is reduced in the areas adjacent to the joint and improved corrosion protection is achieved. In the automotive industry, lightweight design is a key technology against the background of the weight and environment protection. Structured sheet metals have higher stiffness compared to typical automobile sheet metals and therefore they can play an important role in lightweight structures. In the present paper, three arc brazing variants of galvanized structured sheet metals were validated in terms of the corrosion behavior. The standard gas metal arc brazing, the pulsed arc brazing, and the cold metal transfer (CMT® in combination with a pulsed cycle were investigated. In experimental climate change tests, the influence of the brazing processes on the corrosion behavior of galvanized structured sheet metals was investigated. After that, the corrosion behavior of brazed structured and flat sheet metals was compared. Because of the selected lap joint, the valuation of damage between sheet metals was conducted. The pulsed CMT brazing has been derived from the results as the best brazing method for the joining process of galvanized structured sheet metals.

  1. Advanced examination techniques applied to the qualification of critical welds for the ITER correction coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sgobba, Stefano, E-mail: Stefano.Sgobba@cern.ch [CERN, CH-1211 Genève (Switzerland); Langeslag, Stefanie Agnes Elisabeth [CERN, CH-1211 Genève (Switzerland); Libeyre, Paul [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Marcinek, Dawid Jaroslaw [Tadeusz Kościuszko Cracow University of Technology, 31-155 Kraków (Poland); Piguiet, Aline [CERN, CH-1211 Genève (Switzerland); Cécillon, Alexandre [RX Solutions, ZAC Altaïs, Chavanod (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • X-ray computed tomography (CT) was successfully applied to inspect the full weld volume of critical qualification welds for the ITER correction coils. • These welds featuring a complex geometry are virtually uninspectable with sufficient resolution by conventional Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) techniques. • The applied advanced examinations allowed an exhaustive identification of weld imperfections and a thorough understanding of their nature, position and size. • A substantial progress in weld quality could be achieved during the weld qualification phases. - Abstract: The ITER correction coils (CCs) consist of three sets of six coils located in between the toroidal (TF) and poloidal field (PF) magnets. The CCs rely on a Cable-in-Conduit Conductor (CICC), whose supercritical cooling at 4.5 K is provided by helium inlets and outlets. The assembly of the nozzles to the stainless steel conductor conduit includes fillet welds requiring full penetration through the thickness of the nozzle. Static and cyclic stresses have to be sustained by the inlet welds during operation. The entire volume of helium inlet and outlet welds, that are submitted to the most stringent quality levels of imperfections according to standards in force, is virtually uninspectable with sufficient resolution by conventional or computed radiography or by Ultrasonic Testing. On the other hand, X-ray computed tomography (CT) was successfully applied to inspect the full weld volume of several dozens of helium inlet qualification samples. The extensive use of CT techniques allowed a significant progress in the weld quality of the CC inlets. CT is also a promising technique for inspection of qualification welds of helium inlets of the TF magnets, by far more complex to examine due to their larger dimensions.

  2. 29 CFR 1910.255 - Resistance welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resistance welding. 1910.255 Section 1910.255 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Welding, Cutting and Brazing § 1910.255 Resistance welding. (a.... Ignitron tubes used in resistance welding equipment shall be equipped with a thermal protection switch. (3...

  3. Development of laser welding techniques for vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strain, R.V.; Leong, K.H.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    Laser welding is potentially advantageous because of its flexibility and the reduced amount of material affected by the weld. Lasers do not require a vacuum (as do electron beam welders) and the welds they produce high depth-to-width ratios. Scoping with a small pulsed 50 J YAG laser indicated that lasers could produce successful welds in vanadium alloy (V-5%Cr-5%Ti) sheet (1 mm thick) when the fusion zone was isolated from air. The pulsed laser required an isolating chamber filled with inert gas to produce welds that did not contain cracks and showed only minor hardness increases. Following the initial scoping tests, a series of tests were preformed with a 6 kW continuous CO{sub 2} laser. Successful bead-on-plate welds were made on V-4%Cr-4%Ti and V-5%Cr-5%Ti alloys to depths of about 4 mm with this laser.

  4. Laser penetration spike welding : A microlaser welding technique enabling novel product designs and constructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijken, D.K; Hoving, W.; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    A novel method for laser penetration microspot welding of sheet metal is presented. With this so called "laser spike-welding," large gap tolerances are allowed. Depending on the ratio of laser spot radius to top plate thickness, gaps of 100% of the top layer thickness and more can be bridged. With

  5. Alumina barrier for vacuum brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuyukian, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    Heating platens of vacuum-brazing press will not stick to workpiece if aluminum oxide "paper" is interposed. Paper does not disintegrate in press, will not contaminate braze alloy, and helps form smoothly contoured, regular fillet at brazed edges.

  6. Multiple-unit implant frames: one-piece casting vs. laser welding and brazing Sobre estruturas de implantes múltiplos: fundição em monobloco versus soldagem a laser e brasagem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Maria Valadares da Costa

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The linear distortion of prostheses over implants, one-piece casting and cast in sections followed by laser welding by laser and brazing was evaluated in an edentulous mandibular model with five parallel abutments, with a distance of 10mm from center to center. Seventy five gold cylinders were tightened with screws on the abutments with 10Ncm torque. The cylinder/analogue assemblies were measured by microscopic examination (0.001mm accuracy and the obtained results were compared with the GC (control group. Fifteen metal frames were waxed and cast in a gold alloy (Stabilor, Degussa Hulls, Brazil and divided into three groups with five elements each, as followed: GM (one-piece casting, GB (section and brazing and GL (section and laser welding. In all groups, measurements were taken at the right, left, buccal and lingual sides of the cylinder/analogue interface and the results were submitted to analysis of variance (ANOVA and to the Tukey test (5%. The smallest amount of distortion was seen in the laser group (GL with a mean value of 13.58, followed by the brazing group (GB with a mean value of 24.33 and one-piece (GM with a mean value of 40.00. The greatest distortion was found in the one-piece group (GM.A distorção linear das próteses sobre implantes, fundidas em monobloco e fundidas em secções e soldadas a laser e por brasagem foi avaliada em um modelo de uma mandíbula edêntula com cinco análogos de pilares de implantes, paralelos entre si com distância de 10mm medidos de centro a centro. Sobre estes foram parafusados novos cilindros de ouro, com torque de 10N/cm. Então foram executadas 15 sobre-estruturas metálicas que foram divididas: GC - Adaptação passiva dos cilindros de ouro; GM - monobloco, GB - segmentos soldados por brasagem e, GL - segmentos soldados a laser. Observaram-se as estruturas fixadas com parafusos novos sob microscópio de mensuração. A medição foi realizada na vestibular direita e esquerda e da mesma forma

  7. Welding of Mo-Based Alloy Using Electron Beam and Laser-GTAW Hybrid Welding Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Anjan; Kumar, Santosh; Tewari, Raghvendra; Dey, Gautam Kumar

    2016-03-01

    In the current study, welding of TZM (molybdenum-based alloy) plates in square-butt configuration was carried out using electron beam and laser-GTAW hybrid power sources. Microstructures of weld joint containing three zones—parent metal, heat-affected zone, and fusion zone—were clearly identified when examined through optical and scanning electron microscopy. The weld joints were found to be sound with very wide fusion and heat-affected zones. The microstructure of the fusion zone was coarse-grained. as-solidified microstructure, while the microstructure of heat-affected zone was the recrystallized microstructure with reduction in grain size as distance from the fusion line increased. Microhardness profile using Vickers hardness tester was obtained across the weld region, and the tensile properties of the weld joints were evaluated by performing room temperature tensile test and fracture was examined using scanning electron microscope. Joint coefficient of the weld joints were ~40 to 45 pct of that of the parent metals with nonmeasurable tensile ductility with predominantly transgranular mode of fracture indicating weakness along the grain boundary. Detailed orientation imaging and transmission electron microscopy were carried out to understand the most dominating factor in introducing weld joint brittleness.

  8. New technique of skin embedded wire double-sided laser beam welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Tao, Wang; Chen, Yanbin

    2017-06-01

    In the aircraft industry, double-sided laser beam welding is an approved method for producing skin-stringer T-joints on aircraft fuselage panels. As for the welding of new generation aluminum-lithium alloys, however, this technique is limited because of high hot cracking susceptibility and strengthening elements' uneven distributions within weld. In the present study, a new technique of skin embedded wire double-sided laser beam welding (LBW) has been developed to fabricate T-joints consisting of 2.0 mm thick 2060-T8/2099-T83 aluminum-lithium alloys using eutectic alloy AA4047 filler wire. Necessary dimension parameters of the novel groove were reasonably designed for achieving crack-free welds. Comparisons were made between the new technique welded T-joint and conventional T-joint mainly on microstructure, hot crack, elements distribution features and mechanical properties within weld. Excellent crack-free microstructure, uniform distribution of silicon and superior tensile properties within weld were found in the new skin embedded wire double-sided LBW T-joints.

  9. Corrosion Mechanisms in Brazed Al-Base Alloy Sandwich Structures as a Function of Braze Alloy and Process Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Welding , Brazing, and Soldering (ASM International: Materials Park, Ohio, 1993) p. 937. 3. A.K. Bhattamishra and K. Lai, "Microstructural studies on the...TCT6) condition, c) UNS A96061 T6 + UNS A94047 foil wedge. 47 ^ mtsst k\\ ’J%jry~z & ■^ KC t ^\\T iH ^^ >*^ .CH\\ WBSSS^SK ;s * iW >flLr4w...at an International Conference for Braze or Weld Sandwich work One A.B. Campbell Award for best paper for an author under 35 years of age iv

  10. Characterization of 2.25Cr1Mo welded ferritic steel plate by using diffractometric and ultrasonic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernuschi, F.; Ghia, S. [Ente Nazionale per l`Energia Elettrica, Milan (Italy); Albertini, G.; Ceretti, M.; Rustichelli, F. [Ancona Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Medica; Castelnuovo, A.; Depero, L. [Univ. degli studi, Brescia.Fac. di ingegneria, dip. di ingegneria meccanica (Italy); Giamboni, S.; Gori, M. [Centro Elettrotecnico Sperimentale Italiano (CESI), Milan (Italy)

    1995-12-01

    Four different techniques (X-ray and neutron diffraction, ultrasonic birefringence and incremental hole drilling method) were applied for evaluating residual stress in a butt-welded ferritic steel palte. Measurements were carried out both before and after welding. Effects of post-welding heat treatment is also considered. A comparison between results obtained by using four different techniques is done.

  11. INVESTIGATION OF SINGLE-PASS/DOUBLE-PASS TECHNIQUES ON FRICTION STIR WELDING OF ALUMINIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A.A. Sathari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to study the effects of single-pass/ double-pass techniques on friction stir welding of aluminium. Two pieces of AA1100 with a thickness of 6.0 mm were friction stir welded using a CNC milling machine at rotational speeds of 1400 rpm, 1600 rpm and 1800 rpm respectively for single-pass and double-pass. Microstructure observations of the welded area were studied using an optical microscope. The specimens were tested by using a tensile test and Vickers hardness test to evaluate their mechanical properties. The results indicated that, at low rotational speed, defects such as ‘surface lack of fill’ and tunnels in the welded area contributed to a decrease in mechanical properties. Welded specimens using double-pass techniques show increasing values of tensile strength and hardness. From this investigation it is found that the best parameters of FSW welded aluminium AA1100 plate were those using double-pass techniques that produce mechanically sound joints with a hardness of 56.38 HV and 108 MPa strength at 1800 rpm compared to the single-pass technique. Friction stir welding, single-pass/ double-pass techniques, AA1100, microstructure, mechanical properties.

  12. Laser welding and syncristallization techniques comparison: "Ex vivo" study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Meleti, Marco; Vescovi, Paolo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Rocca, Jean-Paul

    2013-12-30

    Stabilization of implant abutments through electric impulses at high voltage for a very short time (electrowelding) was developed in the Eighties. In 2009, the same procedure was performed through the use of laser (laser welding) The aim of this study is to compare electrowelding and laser welding for intra-oral implant abutments stabilization on "ex vivo models" (pig jaws). Six bars were welded with two different devices (Nd:YAG laser and Electrowelder) to eighteen titanium implant abutment inserted in three pig jaws. During the welding process, thermal increase was recorded, through the use of k-thermocouples, in the bone close to the implants. The strength of the welded joints was evaluated by a traction test after the removal of the implants. For temperature measurements a descriptive analysis and for traction test "values unpaired t test with Welch's correction" were performed: the significance level was set at Pwelding gives a lower thermal increase than Electrowelding at the bone close to implants (Mean: 1.97 and 5.27); the strength of laser welded joints was higher than that of Electrowelding even if nor statistically significant. (Mean: 184.75 and 168.29) CONCLUSION: Electrowelding seems to have no advantages, in term of thermal elevation and strength, while laser welding may be employed to connect titanium implants for immediate load without risks of thermal damage at surrounding tissues.

  13. Mechanical Behaviour Investigation Of Aluminium Alloy Tailor Welded Blank Developed By Using Friction Stir Welding Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwi Anggono, Agus; Sugito, Bibit; Hariyanto, Agus; Subroto; Sarjito

    2017-10-01

    The objective on the research was to investigate the mechanical properties and microstructure of tailor welded blank (TWB) made from AA6061-T6 and AA1100 using friction stir welding (FSW) process. Due to the dissimilar mechanical properties of the two aluminium alloys, microhardness test was conducted to measure the hardness distribution across the weld nugget. The mixing of two distinct materials was influenced by tool rotation speed. Therefore, microstructure analysis was carried out to investigate the grain size and shape. The grain size of AA6061-T6 has increased in the heat affected zone (HAZ) while for AA1100 has decreased. In the weld nugget, it has found a hook defects in the dissimilar aluminium joining. By using monotonic tensile load, the different weld line direction was observed with the expansion in tool rotation. The joints failure were consistently on the area of AA1100 series. Furthermore, two specimens were investigated, one through the dissimilar aluminium and the other through similiar material. Inspection of the weld nugget hardness was shown that nonhomogen material intermixing during the stiring process as confirmed by microhardness measurement.

  14. Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis brazing for emergency repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Luo, Zhen; Fan, Naifeng; Ao, Sansan

    2011-05-01

    It is of great significance to fast weld and repair damaged parts in electroless and gasless field. So, based on Selfpropagating High-temperature Synthesis (SHS), this paper investigates the SHS brazing of thermit reaction. It is found that the heat obtained by SHS thermit reaction can not melt the base metal, however the silver solder with the melting temperature of 595°C to 605°C can all just melt in the middle of the base metal to achieve SHS brazing. In the experiment, as the surface tension, the molten solder is more likely to wet the slag which is with a larger surface tension, resulting in the poor wettability between solder and base metal. By adding a certain amount of silver brazing flux into the powder can solve the problem of base metal wetting. When the silver brazing flux and the powder are in a ratio of 10:1, solder melt completely, and can be separated with slag, there is a good weld surface. With the increase of silver brazing flux, the slag is more loose and easy to removal. The solder and base metal coating is better. However, with further increase in silver brazing flux, the heat from the reaction reduces, solder can not melt. And with the increase of the powder, the slag and the solder can not be separated. SHS brazing combines the thermit reaction heat with the brazing technology to achieve the low carbon steel welding. Using the heat of thermit reaction to melt the solder then weld the steel can overcome the defects of poor quality of traditional welding which use the reaction products. And the operation is simple. SHS brazing achieve the emergency equipment welding under the condition of no electricity, no gas and equipment.

  15. Brazing Alloys Indicate Turbomachinery Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaff, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Foils serve as consumable thermometers. Stainless-steel tab with circular window holds brazing-foil sample in place. Tab tacked to object to be tested with capacitive-discharge spot welder operating in range 10 + 1 joules. After measurements, tabs and samples chiseled off, leaving tested object fairly well intact. Technique used on objects made of alloys with iron, nickel, or cobalt as principal ingredients.

  16. 75 FR 74083 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Welding...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ...; Welding, Cutting and Brazing ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor (DOL) hereby announces the... request (ICR) titled, ``Welding, Cutting and Brazing,'' to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for... inspection of resistance welding equipment be made by qualified maintenance personnel and that a...

  17. A non-conventional technique for evaluating welded joints based on the electrical conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, T.G.; Sorger, G., E-mail: telmo.santos@fct.unl.pt, E-mail: lgs18243@campus.fct.unl.pt [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, UNIDEMI, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica e Industrial, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Caparica (Portugal); Vilaca, P., E-mail: pedro.vilaca@aalto.fi [Aalto Univ., Dept. of Engineering Design and Production, School of Engineering, Aalto (Finland); Miranda, R., E-mail: rmiranda@fct.unl.pt [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, UNIDEMI, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica e Industrial, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Caparica (Portugal)

    2015-01-15

    Recent studies showed that electrical conductivity is a valuable technique to identify the different zones of solid-state welded joints with a good correlation with the microstructure and hardness. This is a relevant result since this technique is fast and, in some cases, non destructive, The concept was applied to other welding processes such as the ones involving fusion to a wide range of materials, For this, a comprehensive study was performed using friction stir welding, tungsten inert gas (TlG) and gas metal arc (MAG) welding processes in either bead on plate or butt joints in: carbon steel, magnesium and titanium, Eddy current nondestructive testing (NDT) was used to measure the electrical conductivity at different depths in transverse sections of the processed materials. The profiles were compared to the hardness profiles in the same sections. As a result, a correlation was observed in most materials welded by solid state and by fusion processes. The variation of the electrical conductivity closely follows that measured in the hardness. Another interesting conclusion is that, even for fusion welding of carbon steels, the technique has potential to complement the hardness measurements and microstructural observations, allowing the identification of the distinct zones of welds in materials commonly used in industry. (author)

  18. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  19. Ultrapulse welding: A new joining technique. [for automotive industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. G.

    1972-01-01

    The ultrapulse process is a resistance welding process that utilizes unidirectional current of high magnitude for a very short time with a precisely controlled dynamic force pulse. Peak currents of up to 220,000 amperes for two to ten milliseconds are used with synchronized force pulses of up to nine thousand pounds. The welding current passing through the relatively high resistance of the interface between the parts that are being joined results in highly localized heating. Described is the UPW process as it applies to the automotive industry.

  20. Brazing dissimilar aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalalian, H.

    1979-01-01

    Dip-brazing process joins aluminum castings to aluminum sheet made from different aluminum alloy. Process includes careful cleaning, surface preparation, and temperature control. It causes minimum distortion of parts.

  1. Joining Ceramics By Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Sudsina, Michael W.

    1992-01-01

    Certain ceramic materials tightly bond together by brazing with suitable alloys. Enables fabrication of parts of wide variety of shapes from smaller initial pieces of ceramics produced directly in only limited variety of shapes.

  2. 29 CFR 1910.254 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arc welding and cutting. 1910.254 Section 1910.254 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Welding, Cutting and Brazing § 1910.254 Arc welding and cutting. (a... following limits shall not be exceeded: (i) Alternating-current machines (A) Manual arc welding and cutting...

  3. Orthodontic silver brazing alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockhurst, P J; Pham, H L

    1989-10-01

    Orthodontic silver brazing alloys suffer from the presence of cadmium, excessive flow temperatures, and crevice corrosion on stainless steel. Seven alloys were examined. Two alloys contained cadmium. The lowest flow temperature observed was 629 degrees C for a cadmium alloy and 651 degrees C for two cadmium free alloys. Three alloys had corrosion resistance superior to the other solders. Addition of low melting temperature elements gallium and indium reduced flow temperature in some cases but produced brittleness in the brazing alloy.

  4. An Evaluation of Welding Processes to Reduce Hexavalent Chromium Exposures and Reduce Costs by Using Better Welding Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Keane, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    A group of stainless steel arc welding processes was compared for emission rates of fume and hexavalent chromium, and costs per meter length of weld. The objective was to identify those with minimal emissions and also compare relative labor and consumables costs. The selection included flux-cored arc welding (FCAW), shielded-metal arc welding (SMAW), and multiple gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes. Using a conical chamber, fumes were collected, and fume generation rates and hexavalent chr...

  5. Immediate loading of zygomatic implants using the intraoral welding technique: a 12-month case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degidi, Marco; Nardi, Diego; Piattelli, Adriano; Malevez, Chantal

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the concept of intraoral welding as a suitable technique for fabricating a fixed restoration for the edentulous maxilla the day of surgery using standard and zygomatic implants. Ten consecutive patients (four men, six women; mean age, 62.3 ± 11.6 years) were involved in this study, each of whom had an edentulous atrophic maxilla and received two standard and two zygomatic implants. All implants were loaded immediately with a fixed prosthesis supported by an intraorally welded titanium framework. Definitive abutments were connected to the implants, and a titanium bar was welded to them using an intraoral welding unit. This framework was used to support the definitive prosthesis, which was fitted the day of implant placement. Patients were checked for swelling, pain, and framework stability at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. A total of 20 immediately loaded standard and 20 zygomatic implants were used. The cases included in this study achieved a 100% prosthetic success rate at the 12-month follow-up. No fracture or radiographically detectable alteration of the welded frameworks was noticed. It is possible to successfully rehabilitate the edentulous atrophic maxilla with a permanently fixed prosthesis supported by an intraorally welded titanium framework attached to standard and zygomatic implants the day of surgery.

  6. Impact of different welding techniques on biological effect markers in exhaled breath condensate of 58 mild steel welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmeyer, Frank; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Lehnert, Martin; Kendzia, Benjamin; Bernard, Sabine; Berresheim, Hans; Düser, Maria; Henry, Jana; Weiss, Tobias; Koch, Holger M; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Total mass and composition of welding fumes are predominantly dependent on the welding technique and welding wire applied. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of welding techniques on biological effect markers in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) of 58 healthy welders. The welding techniques applied were gas metal arc welding with solid wire (GMAW) (n=29) or flux cored wire (FCAW) (n=29). Welding fume particles were collected with personal samplers in the breathing zone inside the helmets. Levels of leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)), prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), and 8-isoprostane (8-iso-PGF(2α)) were measured with immunoassay kits and the EBC pH was measured after deaeration. Significantly higher 8-iso-PGF(2α) concentrations and a less acid pH were detected in EBC of welders using the FCAW than in EBC of welders using the GMAW technique. The lowest LTB(4) concentrations were measured in nonsmoking welders applying a solid wire. No significant influences were found in EBC concentrations of PGE(2) based upon smoking status or type of welding technique. This study suggests an enhanced irritative effect in the lower airways of mild steel welders due to the application of FCAW compared to GMAW, most likely associated with a higher emission of welding fumes.

  7. Optimization of Thermal Aspects of Friction Stir Welding – Initial Studies Using a Space Mapping Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Astrup; Bendsøe, Martin P.; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimize a thermal model of a friction stir welding process. The optimization is performed using a space mapping technique in which an analytical model is used along with the FEM model to be optimized. The results are compared to traditional gradient based optimization...

  8. The Use of CDM Analysis Techniques in High Temperature Creep Failure of Welded Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayhurst, David R.; Wong, Man Tak; Vakili-Tahami, Farid

    Techniques are reviewed for the calibration of constitutive relationships for the different phases of the weld. It is shown how the calibration is carried out using property ratios, and a knowledge of the constitutive equations of the parent material. The results of CDM analyses, obtained using the two-dimensional solver Damage XX, are reviewed for: a butt-welded pipe at 565°C and, a welded cylinder-sphere pipe intersection at 590°C. Results are then presented of a three-dimensional CDM solution for a three-degree slice of the welded cylinder-sphere pipe intersection, and shown to be in close agreement with the two-dimensional, Damage XX, solution. Then the paper examines damage growth at a constant temperature of 590°C in a ferritic steel butt-welded pipe subjected to a combined constant internal pressure of 4MPa and a constant global bending moment of 49kNm. The CDM results for a three-dimensional analysis are compared with qualitative experimental results, and good correlation is indicated.

  9. Instant loading with intraoral welding technique and PRAMA implants: a new prosthetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celletti, R; Fanali, S; Laici, C U; Santori, C; Pignatelli, P; Sinjari, B

    2017-01-01

    When splinting multiple implants passive fit of the framework should be achieved to avoid excessive force distribution on the implants. Recently, a protocol was suggested for immediate loading of multiple implants by welding a titanium bar to implant abutments directly in the oral cavity so as to create a customized, precise and passive metal-reinforced provisional restoration. The intraoral welding technique subsequently proves to be a successful option in the full-arch immediate restorations of the mandible and maxilla. The aim of this article is to present a case report in which a new prosthetic approach, using trans-mucosal implants, is described. Dental implants are instantly loaded with a provisional prosthesis supported by an intraoral welded titanium framework to obtain a precise passive fit of the immediate loaded prosthesis.

  10. Ultrasonic Phased Array Technique for Accurate Flaw Sizing in Dissimilar Metal Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonathan D Buttram

    2005-03-11

    Described is a manual,portable non-destructive technique to determine the through wall height of cracks present in dissimilar metal welds used in the primary coolling systems of pressure water and boiler light water reactors. Current manual methods found in industry have proven not to exhibit the sizing accuracy required by ASME inspection requirement. The technique described demonstrated an accuracy approximately three times that required to ASME Section XI, Appendix 8 qualification.

  11. Analysis on High Temperature Aging Property of Self-brazing Aluminum Honeycomb Core at Middle Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Huan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tension-shear test was carried out on middle temperature self-brazing aluminum honeycomb cores after high temperature aging by micro mechanical test system, and the microstructure and component of the joints were observed and analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy to study the relationship between brazing seam microstructure, component and high temperature aging properties. Results show that the tensile-shear strength of aluminum honeycomb core joints brazed by 1060 aluminum foil and aluminum composite brazing plate after high temperature aging(200℃/12h, 200℃/24h, 200℃/36h is similar to that of as-welded joints, and the weak part of the joint is the base metal which is near the brazing joint. The observation and analysis of the aluminum honeycomb core microstructure and component show that the component of Zn, Sn at brazing seam is not much affected and no compound phase formed after high temperature aging; therefore, the main reason for good high temperature aging performance of self-brazing aluminum honeycomb core is that no obvious change of brazing seam microstructure and component occurs.

  12. METHOD OF BRAZING BERYLLIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, G.S.; Keil, R.W.

    1963-05-21

    A process is described for brazing beryllium metal parts by coating the beryllium with silver (65- 75 wt%)-aluminum alloy using a lithium fluoride (50 wt%)-lithium chloride flux, and heating the coated joint to a temperature of about 700 un. Concent 85% C for about 10 minutes. (AEC)

  13. Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique for the Ultrasonic Evaluation of Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévesque, D.; Dubourg, L.; Mandache, C.; Kruger, S. E.; Lord, M.; Merati, A.; Jahazi, M.; Monchalin, J.-P.

    2008-02-01

    An ultrasonic technique using numerical focusing and processing is presented in this paper for the detection of different types of flaws in friction stir welds (FSW). The data is acquired using immersion ultrasonic technique or laser ultrasonics, while the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) is used for numerical focusing. Measurements on the top and far sides of the weld for both lap and butt joints of thin aluminum sheets are investigated. Discontinuities such as wormholes, hooking, lack of penetration and voids are found to be easily detected. The limit of detectability and a comparison with mechanical properties are discussed. Also, the detection of joint line remnants or kissing bonds due to entrapped oxide layers seems possible in lap joint structures using high frequency laser-ultrasonics.

  14. Advanced examination techniques applied to the qualification of critical welds for the ITER correction coils

    CERN Document Server

    Sgobba, Stefano; Libeyre, Paul; Marcinek, Dawid Jaroslaw; Piguiet, Aline; Cécillon, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    The ITER correction coils (CCs) consist of three sets of six coils located in between the toroidal (TF) and poloidal field (PF) magnets. The CCs rely on a Cable-in-Conduit Conductor (CICC), whose supercritical cooling at 4.5 K is provided by helium inlets and outlets. The assembly of the nozzles to the stainless steel conductor conduit includes fillet welds requiring full penetration through the thickness of the nozzle. Static and cyclic stresses have to be sustained by the inlet welds during operation. The entire volume of helium inlet and outlet welds, that are submitted to the most stringent quality levels of imperfections according to standards in force, is virtually uninspectable with sufficient resolution by conventional or computed radiography or by Ultrasonic Testing. On the other hand, X-ray computed tomography (CT) was successfully applied to inspect the full weld volume of several dozens of helium inlet qualification samples. The extensive use of CT techniques allowed a significant progress in the ...

  15. 49 CFR 192.225 - Welding procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... qualified under section 5 of API 1104 (incorporated by reference, see § 192.7) or section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code “ Welding and Brazing Qualifications” (incorporated by reference, see... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding procedures. 192.225 Section 192.225...

  16. Dissimilar Brazed Joints Between Steel and Tungsten Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voiculescu, I.; Geanta, V.; Binchiciu, H.; Iovanas, D.; Stefanoiu, R.

    2017-06-01

    Brazing is a joining process used to obtain heterogeneous assemblies between different materials, such as steels, irons, non-ferrous metals, ceramics etc. Some application, like asphalt cutters, require quick solutions to obtain dissimilar joints at acceptable costs, given the very short period of operation of these parts. This paper presents some results obtained during the brazing of dissimilar joints between steel and tungsten carbide by using different types of Ag-Cu system filler materials alloyed with P and Sn. The brazing techniques used were oxygen-gas flame and induction joining. The brazing behaviour was analysed in cross sections by optical and electron microscopy. The metallographic analysis enhanced the adhesion features and the length of penetration in the joining gap. The melting range of the filler materials was measured using thermal analysis.

  17. Failure Assessment of Stainless Steel and Titanium Brazed Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flom, Yury A.

    2012-01-01

    Following successful application of Coulomb-Mohr and interaction equations for evaluation of safety margins in Albemet 162 brazed joints, two additional base metal/filler metal systems were investigated. Specimens consisting of stainless steel brazed with silver-base filler metal and titanium brazed with 1100 Al alloy were tested to failure under combined action of tensile, shear, bending and torsion loads. Finite Element Analysis (FEA), hand calculations and digital image comparison (DIC) techniques were used to estimate failure stresses and construct Failure Assessment Diagrams (FAD). This study confirms that interaction equation R(sub sigma) + R(sub tau) = 1, where R(sub sigma) and R(sub t u) are normal and shear stress ratios, can be used as conservative lower bound estimate of the failure criterion in stainless steel and titanium brazed joints.

  18. Comparison of the Thermal Welding Technique and Cold Dissection for Pediatric Tonsillectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Yaşar, Hüsamettin; Özkul, Haluk; Verim, Ayşegül

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the thermal welding technique (TWT) with cold dissection (CD) for pediatric tonsillectomy. Patients and Methods: Fifty consecutive children with chronic tonsillitis and/or upper airway obstruction were alternately assigned to the TWT or CD group. Age, gender, operation time, intraoperative hemostasis method, early postoperative pain, time to regain normal diet, and extent of healing of the tonsillar fossa on the tenth postoperative day were evaluated. Re...

  19. Strength properties of preceramic brazed joints of a gold-palladium alloy with a microwave-assisted oven and gas/oxygen torch technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeongil; Prasad, Soni; Dunford, Robert; Monaco, Edward A

    2014-09-01

    The effect of microwave brazing on the strength properties of dental casting alloys is not yet known. The purpose of this study was to compare the strength properties of preceramic brazed joints obtained by using a microwave oven and a conventional torch flame for a high noble alloy (Au-Pd). A total of 18 tensile bars made of an Au-Pd ceramic alloy were fabricated. Six specimens were cut and joined with a high-fusing preceramic solder in a specially designed microwave oven, and 6 specimens were joined with a conventional natural gas/oxygen torch. The remaining 6 uncut specimens were tested as a control. All the specimens were subjected to testing with a universal testing machine. A 1-way ANOVA was performed for each strength property tested. The tensile strength of the uncut group was the highest (745 ±19 MPa), followed by the microwave group (420 ±68 MPa) and the conventional torch group (348 ±103 MPa) (Pmicrowave group and gas torch group. The tensile strength of the microwave group exceeded ANSI/ADA Standard No. 88, Dental Brazing Alloys (a joint standard of the American National Standards Institute and the American Dental Association). The microwave heating preceramic solder method demonstrated the excellent tensile strength of an Au-Pd alloy and may be an alternative way of joining alloys when a torch flame is contraindicated. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Method for controlling brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosking, F Michael [Albuquerque, NM; Hall, Aaron C [Albuquerque, NM; Givler, Richard C [Albuquerque, NM; Walker, Charles A [Albuquerque, NM

    2006-08-01

    A method for making a braze joint across a discontinuity in a work piece using alternating current. A filler metal is pre-placed at a location sufficiently close to the discontinuity such that, when an alternating current is applied across a work piece to heat the work piece and melt the filler metal, the filler metal is drawn into the discontinuity. The alternating current is maintained for a set residence time, generally less than 10 seconds and more particularly less than 3 seconds. The alternating current is then altered, generally by reducing the current and/or voltage such that the filler metal can solidify to form a braze joint of desired quality and thickness.

  1. An evaluation of welding processes to reduce hexavalent chromium exposures and reduce costs by using better welding techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    A group of stainless steel arc welding processes was compared for emission rates of fume and hexavalent chromium, and costs per meter length of weld. The objective was to identify those with minimal emissions and also compare relative labor and consumables costs. The selection included flux-cored arc welding (FCAW), shielded-metal arc welding (SMAW), and multiple gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes. Using a conical chamber, fumes were collected, and fume generation rates and hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)) were measured. GMAW processes used were short-circuit (SC) and pulsed-spray modes. Flux-cored welding used gas shielding. Costs were estimated per meter of a 6.3-mm thick horizontal butt weld. Emission rates of Cr(6+) were lowest for GMAW processes and highest for SMAW; several GMAW processes had less than 2% of the SMAW generation rate. Labor and consumable costs for the processes studied were again highest for SMAW, with those of several GMAW types about half that cost. The results show that use of any of the GMAW processes (and flux-cored welding) could substantially reduce fume and Cr(6+) emissions, and greatly reduce costs relative to SMAW.

  2. Multi Objective Optimization of Flux Cored Arc Weld Parameters Using Hybrid Grey - Fuzzy Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Satheesh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, an attempt has been made to use the grey-based fuzzy logic method to solve correlated multiple response optimization problems in the field of flux cored arc welding. This approach converts the complex multiple objectives into a single grey-fuzzy reasoning grade. Based on the grey-fuzzy reasoning grade, optimum parameters are identified. The significant contributions of parameters are estimated using analysis of variance (ANOVA. This evaluation procedure can be used in intelligent decision making for a welding operator. The proposed and developed method has good accuracy and competency. The proposed technique provides manufacturers who develop intelligent manufacturing systems a method to facilitate the achievement of the highest level of automation.

  3. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jian; Qi, Junlei; Song, Xiaoguo; Feng, Jicai

    2014-01-01

    Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing–microstructure–property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials. PMID:28788113

  4. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jian; Qi, Junlei; Song, Xiaoguo; Feng, Jicai

    2014-06-25

    Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing-microstructure-property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials.

  5. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Cao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing–microstructure–property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials.

  6. Brazing of titanium-vapor-coated silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, M.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1988-09-01

    A technique for brazing Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with metallic alloys was evaluated. The process involved vapor coating the ceramic with a 1.0-{mu}-thick layer of titanium before the brazing operation. The coating improved wetting of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} surfaces to the extent that strong bonding between the solidified braze filler metal and the ceramic occurred. Braze joints of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were made with Ag-Cu, Au-Ni, and Au-Ni-Pd alloys at temperatures of 790{degree}, 970{degree}, and 1,130{degree}C. Silicon nitride specimens were also brazed with a Ag-Cu alloy to the molybdenum alloy TZM, titanium, and A286 steel at 790{degree}C. Residual stresses resulting from mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients between the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and the metals caused all of the ceramic-to-metal joints to spontaneously crack in the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} upon cooling from the brazing temperature.

  7. Time-sharing switch for vacuum brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Switching unit changes power and cooling-water connections between two vacuum-brazing machines. It allows both units to be powered by single radio-frequency (RF) generator. One machine can be used for brazing while bell jar of other is being evacuated (20 minute process) in preparation for brazing or is being cooled after brazing (10 minute process).

  8. The effect of reconditioning techniques by welding on the quality of deposits on crankshafts, case study SMAW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivu, O. R.; Cicic, D. T.; Rontescu, C.; Vasile, I. M.; Petriceanu, C.

    2015-11-01

    Currently, we are searching for a range of solutions for repairing the crankshafts that had snapped during operation. The paper deals with the extension of the two methods for reconditioning by welding in the energy industry in the field of repairing the crankshafts in the automotive industry. The results obtained through the application of methods for reconditioning Weld Toe Tempering Technique and filling layers of sidings, which was used as a welding procedure SMAW. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons between the results of the two methods based on the criterion of rigidity are carried out.

  9. The role of welding techniques in the biomechanical behavior of implant-supported prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Sabrina Alessandra; Presotto, Anna Gabriella Camacho; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio Arruda; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz

    2017-09-01

    This in vitro study investigated the role of welding techniques of implant-supported prostheses in the 2D and 3D marginal misfits of prosthetic frameworks, strain induced on the mini abutment, and detorque of prosthetic screws. The correlations between the analyzed variables were also investigated. Frameworks were cast in commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti). A marginal misfit of 200μm was simulated in the working models (control group) (n=20). The 2D marginal misfit was analyzed according to the single-screw test protocol using a precision optical microscope. The 3D marginal misfit was performed by X-ray microtomography. Strain gauge analysis was performed to investigate the strain induced on the mini abutment. A digital torque meter was used for analysis of the detorque and the mean value was calculated for each framework. Afterwards, the frameworks were divided into two experimental groups (n=10): Laser (L) and TIG (T). The welding techniques were performed according to the following parameters: L (390V/9ms); T (36A/60ms). The L and T groups were reevaluated according to the marginal misfit, strain, and detorque. The results were submitted to one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's HSD test and Person correlation analysis (α=0.05). Welding techniques statistically reduced the 2D and 3D marginal misfits of prosthetic frameworks (p0.05). Positive correlations were observed between 2D and 3D marginal misfit reading methods (r=0.943, pwelding techniques improved the biomechanical behavior of the implant-supported system. TIG can be an acceptable and affordable technique to reduce the misfit of 3-unit Ti frameworks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Structural Performance of Inconel 625 Superalloy Brazed Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianqiang; Demers, Vincent; Cadotte, Eve-Line; Turner, Daniel; Bocher, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate tensile and fatigue behaviors of Inconel 625 superalloy brazed joints after transient liquid-phase bonding process. Brazing was performed in a vacuum furnace using a nickel-based filler metal in a form of paste to join wrought Inconel 625 plates. Mechanical tests were carried out on single-lap joints under various lap distance-to-thickness ratios. The fatigue crack initiation and crack growth modes were examined via metallographic analysis, and the effect of local stress on fatigue life was assessed by finite element simulations. The fatigue results show that fatigue strength and endurance limit increase with overlap distance, leading to a relatively large scatter of results. Fatigue cracks nucleated in the high-stressed region of the weld fillets from brittle eutectic phases or from internal brazing cavities. The present work proposes to rationalize the results by using the local stress at the brazing fillet. When using this local stress, all fatigue-obtained results find themselves on a single S- N curve, providing a design curve for any joint configuration in fatigue solicitation.

  11. Optimization of Welding Parameters of Submerged Arc Welding Using Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) Based on Taguchi Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, A.; Roy, J.; Majumder, A.; Saha, S. C.

    2014-04-01

    The present paper reports a new procedure using an analytic hierarchy process (AHP) based Taguchi method for the selection of the best welding parameters to fabricate submerged arc welding of plain carbon steel. Selection of best welding parameters is an unstructured decision problem involving process parameters for multiple weldments. In the present investigation, three process parameter variables i.e. wire feed rate (Wf), stick out (So) and traverse speed (Ts) and the three response parameters i.e. penetration, bead width and bead reinforcement have been considered. The objective of the present work is thus to improve the quality of the welded elements by using AHP analysis based Taguchi method. Taguchi L16 orthogonal array is used to perform with less number of experimental runs. Taguchi approach is insufficient to solve a multi response optimization problem. In order to overcome this limitation, a multi criteria decision making method, AHP is applied in the present study. The optimal condition to have a quality weld (i.e. bead geometry) is found at 210 mm/min of wire feed rate, 15 mm of stick out and 0.75 m/min of traverse speed and also observed that the effect of wire feed rate on the overall bead geometry properties is more significant than other welding parameters. Finally, a confirmatory test has been carried out to verify the optimal setting so obtained.

  12. Multiple exposure to metals in eight types of welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostoli, P; Porru, S; Brunelli, E; Alessio, L

    1997-01-01

    This article evaluates multiple exposures to metals in different types of metal welding such as manual metal arc for mild and stainless steel, continuous wire, submerged arc, laser and brazing. Environmental monitoring was carried out in eight different occupational situations and the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry technique was adopted in order to characterize exposure to several elements simultaneously and with high accuracy. The results showed that up to 23 elements could be measured. The highest concentrations were found for Al, Mn, Fr, Ni, Cr, Cu and Zn. For some elements such as In, Nd, I, Rb the concentrations were very low. A qualitative and quantitative variation in fume composition was observed at a certain distance from the welding point, which should be to taken into account when evaluating indirect exposures. It would also be possible, with this technique, to identify specific elements in the mixture which could also be measured in biological fluids.

  13. Plasma spectroscopy analysis technique based on optimization algorithms and spectral synthesis for arc-welding quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirapeix, J; Cobo, A; González, D A; López-Higuera, J M

    2007-02-19

    A new plasma spectroscopy analysis technique based on the generation of synthetic spectra by means of optimization processes is presented in this paper. The technique has been developed for its application in arc-welding quality assurance. The new approach has been checked through several experimental tests, yielding results in reasonably good agreement with the ones offered by the traditional spectroscopic analysis technique.

  14. Brazing graphite to graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, George R.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite is joined to graphite by employing both fine molybdenum powder as the brazing material and an annealing step that together produce a virtually metal-free joint exhibiting properties similar to those found in the parent graphite. Molybdenum powder is placed between the faying surfaces of two graphite parts and melted to form molybdenum carbide. The joint area is thereafter subjected to an annealing operation which diffuses the carbide away from the joint and into the graphite parts. Graphite dissolved by the dispersed molybdenum carbide precipitates into the joint area, replacing the molybdenum carbide to provide a joint of virtually graphite.

  15. Fiber laser welding of dual-phase galvanized sheet steel (DP590): traditional analysis and new quality assessment techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Stephanie; Pfeif, Erik; Kazakov, Andrei; Baumann, Esther; Dowell, Marla

    2016-03-01

    Laser welding has many advantages over traditional joining methods, yet remains underutilized. NIST has undertaken an ambitious initiative to improve predictions of weldability, reliability, and performance of laser welds. This study investigates butt welding of galvanized and ungalvanized dual-phase automotive sheet steels (DP 590) using a 10 kW commercial fiber laser system. Parameter development work, hardness profiles, microstructural characterization, and optical profilometry results are presented. Sound welding was accomplished in a laser power range of 2.0 kW to 4.5 kW and travel speed of 2000 mm/min to 5000 mm/min. Vickers hardness ranged from approximately 2 GPa to 4 GPa across the welds, with limited evidence of heat affected zone softening. Decreased hardness across the heat affected zone directly correlated to the appearance of ferrite. A technique was developed to non-destructively evaluate weld quality based on geometrical criteria. Weld face profilometry data were compared between light optical, metallographic sample, and frequency-modulated continuous-wave laser detection and ranging (FMCW LADAR) methods.

  16. effect of post-weld heat treatment on the microstructure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    among others are shielded metal arc welding, submerge arc welding, gas metal arc welding, plasma arc welding, gas ... welding (SMAW) technique is preferable to the other techniques ..... studies''International Journal of Innovative Research.

  17. Peculiarities and future development of space welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulym, V. F.; Lapchinskii, V. F.; Nikitskii, V. P.; Demidov, D. L.; Neznamova, L. O.

    The paper deals with the peculiar features of space as a medium in which welding operations are performed. Studies of different methods of welding carried out both in the plane-laboratory and in space are briefly described, and the comparative characteristics of the most promising methods of welding for space conditions are given. The selection of electron beam as a basic method for space is supported. The paper considers the main welding processes performed in space with the help of an electron beam, such as heating, brazing, welding, cutting and coating.

  18. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2011-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the range of available welding technologies. This title includes chapters on individual techniques that cover principles, equipment, consumables and key quality issues. It includes material on such topics as the basics of electricity in welding, arc physics, and distortion, and the weldability of particular metals.$bThe first edition of Welding processes handbook established itself as a standard introduction and guide to the main welding technologies and their applications. This new edition has been substantially revised and extended to reflect the latest developments. After an initial introduction, the book first reviews gas welding before discussing the fundamentals of arc welding, including arc physics and power sources. It then discusses the range of arc welding techniques including TIG, plasma, MIG/MAG, MMA and submerged arc welding. Further chapters cover a range of other important welding technologies such as resistance and laser welding, as well as the use of welding techniqu...

  19. Brazing vacuum ceramic tubes for magnets applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagnato, O.R.; Francisco, R.F. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), SP (Brazil); Gobbi, A.L. [Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecbologia (LNNano), SP (Brazil); Falvo, T. [Engecer Ltda, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Full text: The Sirius Project is an initiative of the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory - LNLS (CNPEM - MCTI ), for the design, construction and operation of a new synchrotron radiation source 3rd generation, with high brightness and energy of the electrons of 3. 0 GeV. Among many other components, will be built 80 ceramic cameras embedded in specials magnets, whose function is to act to correct the orbit of the electron beam in the storage ring. The ceramic chamber is crucial for this application because this material is transparent to the magnetic field generated in the electro magnet and thus acts directly on the electron beam. The difficulty of these constructive components lies in the fact that, the ceramic components must be attached to metal components will join vacuum chambers that make up the ring, and then must present excellent mechanical and vacuum tight. The process of chemical bonding between the ceramic and metal components is performed by brazing in high vacuum. After brazing, is deposited a film of copper with 7 micrometers thickness. The objective of this paper is to describe the process of film deposition and brazing of copper and the excellent results obtained in the production, mechanical characterization, microstructural and tightness. The results obtained with the process indicate an homogeneous film with high adhesion and electrical resistance near the estimated values??. Tests are being carried out by XPS and SEM techniques for chemical and structural characterization. (author)

  20. Fatigue limits of titanium-bar joints made with the laser and the electric resistance welding techniques: microstructural characterization and hardness properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degidi, Marco; Nardi, Diego; Morri, Alessandro; Sighinolfi, Gianluca; Tebbel, Florian; Marchetti, Claudio

    2017-09-01

    Fatigue behavior of the titanium bars is of utmost importance for the safe and reliable operation of dental implants and prosthetic constructions based on these implants. To date, however, only few data are available on the fatigue strength of dental prostheses made with electric resistance welding and laser welding techniques. This in-vitro study highlighted that although the joints made with the laser welding approach are credited of a superior tensile strength, joints made with electric resistance welding exhibited double the minimum fatigue strength with respect to the joints made with laser welding (120 vs 60 N).

  1. Optimization of process parameters during vibratory welding technique using Taguchi's analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Pravin Kumar; Patel, D.; Prasad,S.B.

    2016-01-01

    With an aim to improve the mechanical properties of a weld joint, a new concept of vibratory setup has been designed which is capable to stir the molten weld pool before it solidifies during shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) operation. Mechanical vibration having resonance frequency of 300 Hz and amplitude of 0.5 mm was transferred to the molten weld pool of 6 mm thick mild steel butt-welded joints during the welding operation. The experimental work was conducted at various ranges of frequenc...

  2. Brazing titanium to stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, R. I.

    1980-01-01

    Titanium and stainless-steel members are usually joined mechanically for lack of any other effective method. New approach using different brazing alloy and plating steel member with nickel resolves problem. Process must be carried out in inert atmosphere.

  3. High quality joining techniques: in-process assurance (IPA) welding system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaihara, Shoichiro [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    On July 1, 1995, the Product Liability Law was enforced, and in industrial world, further reliability has been demanded. Recently, accompanying the progress of electronics, the proportion taken by automatic welders and robots increased in welding. By memorizing proper welding conditions, the welding from initial to final passes can be done fully automatically. Also feedback mechanism was equipped to mechanized welders, and the in-process control has become to be feasible. The way of thinking on confirming in process welding quality in arc welding is explained. IPA welding system utilizes the multi-media collecting images and sound, samples the change of welding conditions and the state of arc on a same screen, and monitors the deviation from the range of proper welding conditions. At the time of abnormality, inspector or a computer carries out image diagnosis and welding control, and the system indicates the soundness of welded parts. The basic concept and the flow chart of this system are shown. The experiment of applying the system to arc welding is reported. The correlation of welding phenomena and welding conditions is examined. (K.I.)

  4. Uniform-Dead-Weight Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaw, William D.

    1991-01-01

    Method of deadweight loading for vacuum-furnace brazing improves quality of joint, increases yield, and reduces costs. In improved method, plates weighted with heavy stainless-steel blocks. Blocks act independently and are immune to distortion. Besides being uniformly distributed, force applied to plates larger and repeatable from one brazing operation to next. Larger blocks used on edges of plates, where more thermal mass needed to reduce differences between temperatures of interior and edge as temperature of furnace varied.

  5. Time-shaped RF brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, J. A.; Vannasse, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    One RF generator is controlled from two independent work stations with aid of RF switch and simple control boxes. Brazing may be stopped manually or automatically by external brazing-temperature controller or timer in RF switch housing. Switch is air-operated with water-cooled contacts. If switch loses air pressure, generator stops transmitting power. Time-shared outlet increases utilization and productivity of costly RF generator.

  6. Advanced Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  7. Thermally stable diamond brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Robert P [Kingwood, TX

    2009-02-10

    A cutting element and a method for forming a cutting element is described and shown. The cutting element includes a substrate, a TSP diamond layer, a metal interlayer between the substrate and the diamond layer, and a braze joint securing the diamond layer to the substrate. The thickness of the metal interlayer is determined according to a formula. The formula takes into account the thickness and modulus of elasticity of the metal interlayer and the thickness of the TSP diamond. This prevents the use of a too thin or too thick metal interlayer. A metal interlayer that is too thin is not capable of absorbing enough energy to prevent the TSP diamond from fracturing. A metal interlayer that is too thick may allow the TSP diamond to fracture by reason of bending stress. A coating may be provided between the TSP diamond layer and the metal interlayer. This coating serves as a thermal barrier and to control residual thermal stress.

  8. Applying a nonlinear, pitch-catch, ultrasonic technique for the detection of kissing bonds in friction stir welds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrue, Steven; Tabatabaeipour, Morteza; Hettler, Jan; Van Den Abeele, Koen

    2016-05-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a promising technology for the joining of aluminum alloys and other metallic admixtures that are hard to weld by conventional fusion welding. Although FSW generally provides better fatigue properties than traditional fusion welding methods, fatigue properties are still significantly lower than for the base material. Apart from voids, kissing bonds for instance, in the form of closed cracks propagating along the interface of the stirred and heat affected zone, are inherent features of the weld and can be considered as one of the main causes of a reduced fatigue life of FSW in comparison to the base material. The main problem with kissing bond defects in FSW, is that they currently are very difficult to detect using existing NDT methods. Besides, in most cases, the defects are not directly accessible from the exposed surface. Therefore, new techniques capable of detecting small kissing bond flaws need to be introduced. In the present paper, a novel and practical approach is introduced based on a nonlinear, single-sided, ultrasonic technique. The proposed inspection technique uses two single element transducers, with the first transducer transmitting an ultrasonic signal that focuses the ultrasonic waves at the bottom side of the sample where cracks are most likely to occur. The large amount of energy at the focus activates the kissing bond, resulting in the generation of nonlinear features in the wave propagation. These nonlinear features are then captured by the second transducer operating in pitch-catch mode, and are analyzed, using pulse inversion, to reveal the presence of a defect. The performance of the proposed nonlinear, pitch-catch technique, is first illustrated using a numerical study of an aluminum sample containing simple, vertically oriented, incipient cracks. Later, the proposed technique is also applied experimentally on a real-life friction stir welded butt joint containing a kissing bond flaw. Copyright © 2016

  9. Carbide braze cladding for titanium components; Auftragloeten von Karbiden fuer Verschleissschutz von Titanbauteilen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobzin, K.; Ernst, F.; Roesing, J.; Rojas, Y. [RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The abrasion resistance of pure titanium and titanium alloys is not always sufficient for applications where wear resistance demands play an important roll, especially for systems which involve relative sliding tribosystems such as valves, piping connections, etc. Because of this and due to the increasing interest on light materials for structural purposes, the necessity to develop innovative coating techniques in order to increase lifetime and performance of tools keeps on arising. Surface coatings produced by combining braze filler metal with carbide particles increase surface hardness and wear resistance of pure titanium and titanium alloys, which result to be of considerable interest for many engineering applications. This study shows different composite systems based on silver braze and titanium braze alloys, which were especially designed for commercial titanium alloys. The produced carbide/brazing mixtures were brazed and characterised by means of microscopy and ball-on-disc tests, showing an improvement on the wear resistant properties when compared to titanium. (orig.)

  10. Strength of vacuum brazed joints for repair; Haallfasthet hos reparationer utfoerda med vakuumloedning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berglin, Leif [Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB, Finspaang (Sweden)

    2005-04-01

    Strength data are missing for braze joints. Repaired components cannot fully make use of the strength of the braze, and lifetime will be underestimated. The goal of the project was to generate material data to be able to prolong the lifetime of the components. Two different material combinations were tested, 12% Chromium steel brazed with BNi-2, and a nickel base alloy, IN792 brazed with BNi-5. Tensile testing at room temperature and elevated temperature was performed in the project. Target group is purchasers and suppliers of repaired components. A tensile test specimen with butt joint was developed in the project. The used test specimen worked well for the 12% Chromium steel. The results from testing show that proof stress and tensile strength are strongly depending on the joint gap, particularly at room temperature. High strength, close to base material strength, was achieved with joint gaps smaller than 50{mu}m. For wider joint gaps, strength was lower. Strength was approximately 25% of base material strength for joint gaps over 100{mu}m. The results can be explained by changes in microstructure. Joint gaps wider than 50{mu}m showed evidence of two-phase structure. At 500 deg C, the results also showed a connection between joint gap, microstructure and strength. The generated strength data can be used for calculations of lifetime for repaired components. Two different process errors were discovered in the manufacturing process of the brazed IN792 test specimens. The generated material data are therefor erroneous. The reason for this was two manufacturing errors. The tack welding was done with too high heat input. The surfaces of the joint gap became oxidised and the oxide hindered wetting of the braze. The second reason was that the brazing was done without the prescribed hold time at maximum temperature. The melting of the braze was therefor not completed when cooling started. As a result, the strength of the IN792 specimens was low at both temperatures.

  11. Advanced characterization techniques in understanding the roles of nickel in enhancing strength and toughness of submerged arc welding high strength low alloy steel multiple pass welds in the as-welded condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sham, Kin-Ling

    Striving for higher strength along with higher toughness is a constant goal in material properties. Even though nickel is known as an effective alloying element in improving the resistance of a steel to impact fracture, it is not fully understood how nickel enhances toughness. It was the goal of this work to assist and further the understanding of how nickel enhanced toughness and maintained strength in particular for high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel submerged arc welding multiple pass welds in the as-welded condition. Using advanced analytical techniques such as electron backscatter diffraction, x-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermodynamic modeling software, the effect of nickel was studied with nickel varying from one to five wt. pct. in increments of one wt. pct. in a specific HSLA steel submerged arc welding multiple pass weldment. The test matrix of five different nickel compositions in the as-welded and stress-relieved condition was to meet the targeted mechanical properties with a yield strength greater than or equal to 85 ksi, a ultimate tensile strength greater than or equal to 105 ksi, and a nil ductility temperature less than or equal to -140 degrees F. Mechanical testing demonstrated that nickel content of three wt. pct and greater in the as-welded condition fulfilled the targeted mechanical properties. Therefore, one, three, and five wt. pct. nickel in the as-welded condition was further studied to determine the effect of nickel on primary solidification mode, nickel solute segregation, dendrite thickness, phase transformation temperatures, effective ferrite grain size, dislocation density and strain, grain misorientation distribution, and precipitates. From one to five wt. pct nickel content in the as-welded condition, the primary solidification was shown to change from primary delta-ferrite to primary austenite. The nickel partitioning coefficient increased and dendrite/cellular thickness was

  12. Friction stir scribe welding technique for dissimilar joining of aluminium and galvanised steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tianhao [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; Sidhar, Harpreet [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; Mishra, Rajiv S. [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; Hovanski, Yuri [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Energy Materials and Manufacturing, Richland, WA, USA; Upadhyay, Piyush [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Energy Materials and Manufacturing, Richland, WA, USA; Carlson, Blair [General Motors Technical Center, Warren, MI, USA

    2017-10-04

    Friction stir scribe technology, a derivative of friction stir welding, was applied for the dissimilar lap welding of an aluminum alloy and galvanized mild steel sheets. During the process, the rotating tool with a cobalt steel scribe first penetrated the top material — aluminum — and then the scribe cut the bottom material — steel. The steel was displaced into the upper material to produce a characteristic hook feature. Lap welds were shear tested, and their fracture paths were studied. Welding parameters affected the welding features including hook height, which turned out to be highly related to fracture position. Therefore, in this paper, the relationships among welding parameters, hook height, joint strength and fracture position are presented. In addition, influence of zinc coating on joint strength was also studied. Keywords: friction stir scribe technology; dissimilar material welding; zinc coating; hook height; joint strength; fracture position

  13. Induction brazing at the Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    A description of the joint design, materials, equipment, qualification testing, inspection methods, and applications involved in performing induction brazing on hyperbolic propellants tubing at Kennedy Space Center. Induction brazing is a form of brazing in which the energy is transmitted to the workpiece by electrical induction; the eddy currents generated in the metal produce heat by resistance losses. Since induction heating is fast and highly localized, undesirable heat effects are minimized and the resulting braze is of high quality.

  14. Low-Gold-Content Brazing Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, A.; Mckown, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    Two new alloys for brazing at 1,760 degrees to 1,850 degrees F are stronger and have better gap-filling capability. Alloys have lower gold content than other gold brazes for their temperature range and therefore are far less expensive. They are produced in wire, foil, and powder and are excellent for brazing at temperatures where no suitable alloys existed--especially for step brazing copper.

  15. Robust Optimization of Thermal Aspects of Friction Stir Welding Using Manifold Mapping Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Astrup; Lahaye, Domenico; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimize a friction stir welding process taking robustness into account. The optimization problems are formulated with the goal of obtaining desired mean responses while reducing the variance of the response. We restrict ourselves to a thermal model of the process...... and use the manifold mapping technique to solve the optimization problems using a fast analytical coarse and an expensive accurate fine model. The statistics of the response are calculated using Taylor expansions and are compared to Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that the use of manifold...... mapping reduces the number of fine model evaluations required and that the Taylor expansion approach gives good results when compared to Monte Carlo simulations....

  16. Microstructure Characterization and Hardness Evaluation of Alloy 52 Welded Stainless Steel 316 Subjected to Ultrasonic Nanocyrtal Surface Modification Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. D.; Amanov, A.; Pyun, Y. S. [Sun Moon Univ., Asan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y. S.; Choi, Y. S. [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, an ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification (UNSM) technique was applied to dissimilar weld point between STS316L and Alloy 52. This UNSM technique is a patented technology, which can be described as a type of ultrasonic cold-forging technology. It has been demonstrated that the UNSM technique is a simple method to produce a nanocrystalline surface layer at the top surface of metallic materials. Microstructure and hardness of STS316L and Alloy 52 are investigated before and after UNSM treatment. It is expected according to the previous study that the UNSM technique is able to release the residual stress which delays PWSCC. In this study, microstructural characterization and hardness evaluation of STS316L and welded Alloy 52 subjected to UNSM technique were investigated.

  17. Development of Zn50 Brazing Alloy for Joining Mild Steel to Mild Steel (SAE1018

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.C. Nwigbo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This work has developed new brazing alloys for joining mild steel to mild steel (SAE1018 at a lower temperature. The alloys blends and error analysis were done by experimental design software (Design Expert 8.0.7.1. Design of experiments was done by Scheffe quadratic mixture method. The liquidus temperatures were predicted by calculation of phase diagrams of the alloying metals. The brazing alloys were produced by gravity technique and melted using silicon carbide graphite crucible. The quality of the brazing alloys was analyzed by optical microscopy (OM, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR. Brazed joints were produced by torch method with a commercial flux. Brazing temperatures (liquidus were tracked by a digital infrared/laser pyrometer. Some mechanical properties studied were tensile strength and hardness. Finally, brazed joints produced from the developed brazing alloys were compared to that produced from muntz brass. Six (6 brazing alloys were successfully developed. Zinc and manganese were the main components, to which were added; 3 to 4 %wt silver and 11 to15 %wt modifying element. The microstructure showed a typical eutectic structure with zinc-rich phase distributed uniformly in the matrix with a combination of different sizes of dendrite, rounded blocks of compounds and hypoeutectic structures. AAS results indicated minimal out-gassing of zinc and FT-IR results indicated very low presence of atmospheric gas. The range of brazing temperature for best results was recorded from 690.90 to 735.10 0C. The joints produced from the developed brazing alloys had acceptable strengths with improved stress-strain behaviour compared to muntz brass.

  18. Residual stress in a laser welded EUROFER blanket module assembly using non-destructive neutron diffraction techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, D.J., E-mail: d.hughes@warwick.ac.uk [WMG, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Koukovini-Platia, E. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Heeley, E.L. [Department of Physical Sciences, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Residual stresses were determined in a welded EUROFER blanket assembly with integrated cooling channels. • Good agreement was seen between experimentally determined and predicted stresses. • We show that microstructure changes that occur in EUROFER steels during welding must be considered for residual stress determination. • An experimental route is proposed for validation of predicted stresses in reactor components using non-destructive diffraction techniques. - Abstract: Whilst the structural integrity and lifetime considerations in welded joints for blanket modules can be predicted using finite element software, it is essential to prove the validity of these simulations. This paper provides detailed analysis for the first time, of the residual stress state in a laser-welded sample with integral cooling channels. State-of-the-art non-destructive neutron diffraction was employed to determine the triaxial stress state and to understand microstructural changes around the heat affected zone. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to probe the variation of strain-free lattice reference parameter around the weld zone allowing correction of the neutron measurements. This paper details an important experimental route to validation of predicted stresses in complex safety-critical reactor components for future applications.

  19. WELDING METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  20. Induction brazing of complex joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2003-01-01

    Induction brazing is a fast and appropriate method for industrial joining of complex geometries and metal combinations. In all types of brazing processes it is important to heat the joint interface of the two materials to the same, high temperature. If one of the specimens is warmer than the other...... materials has large influence on the heating time and temperature distribution in induction heating. In order to ensure high and uniform temperature distribution near the interface of a joint between dissimilar materials the precise coil geometry and position is of great importance. The present paper...... presents a combined numerical and experimental method for fast determination of appropriate coil geometry and position in induction brazing tube-to-plate joints of different ratios between tube and plate thickness and different combinations of the materials stainless steel, brass and copper. The method has...

  1. Silver-hafnium braze alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Jr., John J.; Hosking, F. Michael; Yost, Frederick G.

    2003-12-16

    A binary allow braze composition has been prepared and used in a bonded article of ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal materials. The braze composition comprises greater than approximately 95 wt % silver, greater than approximately 2 wt % hafnium and less than approximately 4.1 wt % hafnium, and less than approximately 0.2 wt % trace elements. The binary braze alloy is used to join a ceramic material to another ceramic material or a ceramic material, such as alumina, quartz, aluminum nitride, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, and mullite, to a metal material, such as iron-based metals, cobalt-based metals, nickel-based metals, molybdenum-based metals, tungsten-based metals, niobium-based metals, and tantalum-based metals. A hermetic bonded article is obtained with a strength greater than 10,000 psi.

  2. Computer-assisted surgery and intraoral welding technique for immediate implant-supported rehabilitation of the edentulous maxilla: case report and technical description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albiero, Alberto Maria; Benato, Renato

    2016-09-01

    Complications are frequently reported when combining computer assisted flapless surgery with an immediate loaded prefabricated prosthesis. The authors have combined computer-assisted surgery with the intraoral welding technique to obtain a precise passive fit of the immediate loading prosthesis. An edentulous maxilla was rehabilitated with four computer assisted implants welded together intraorally and immediately loaded with a provisional restoration. A perfect passive fit of the metal framework was obtained that enabled proper osseointegration of implants. Computer assisted preoperative planning has been shown to be effective in reducing the intraoperative time of the intraoral welding technique. No complications were observed at 1 year follow-up. This guided-welded approach is useful to achieve a passive fit of the provisional prosthesis on the inserted implants the same day as the surgery, reducing intraoperative time with respect to the traditional intraoral welding technique. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Brazed multilayer material compounds for operation in stationary Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC); Geloetete Multilayerwerkstoffverbunde fuer den Einsatz in stationaeren Hochtemperatur-Brennstoffzellen (SOFC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuprin, C.; Meyer, L.W. [Technische Univ. Chemnitz (Germany); Mueller, J.U. [Saxobraze GmbH, Chemnitz (Germany); Krueger, L. [Technische Univ. Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofftechnik; Reichel, I.; Dautert, T.; Posdziech, O. [EBZ Entwicklungs- und Vertriebsgesellschaft Brennstoffzelle mbH, Dresden (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Using the example of a modular power supply system on the basis of SOFC high-temperature fuel cells for decentral, stationary or quasistationary applications, vacuum-brazed components are discussed here, i.e. heat transfer units, evaporators, gas distribution systems and adapter plates. The particular requirements of high-temperature components and the function in operating conditions of the 3D composites constructed and brazed by the multilayer principle are discussed. For applications in high-temperature fuel cell systems, brazed multilayer structures make it possible to construct components that cannot be constructed by conventional welding processes. (orig.)

  4. Wear behavior of the surface alloyed AISI 1020 steel with Fe-Nb-B by TIG welding technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilinc, B., E-mail: bkilinc@sakarya.edu.tr; Durmaz, M.; Abakay, E. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Institute of Arts and Sciences, SakaryaUniversity, Esentepe Campus, 54187Sakarya (Turkey); Sen, U.; Sen, S. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Sakarya University, Esentepe Campus, 54187 Sakarya (Turkey)

    2015-03-30

    Weld overlay coatings also known as hardfacing is a method which involves melting of the alloys and solidification for applied coatings. Recently hardfacing by welding has become a commonly used technique for improvement of material performance in extreme (high temperature, impact/abrasion, erosion, etc.) conditions.In the present study, the coatings were produced from a mixture of ferrous niobium, ferrous boron and iron powders in the ranges of -45µm particle size with different ratio. Fe{sub 12}Nb{sub 5}B{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}NbBalloys were coated on the AISI 1020 steel surface by TIG welding. The phases formed in the coated layer are Fe{sub 2}B, NbB{sub 2}, NbFeB and Fe0,2 Nb{sub 0,8} phases. The hardness of the presence phases are changing between 1689±85 HV{sub 0.01}, and 181±7 HV{sub 0.1}. Microstructural examinations were realized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The wear and friction behaviors of Fe{sub 12}Nb{sub 5}B{sub 3} and Fe2NbB realized on the AISI 1020 steel were investigated by the technique of TIG welding by using ball-on-disk arrangement against alumina ball.

  5. Wear behavior of the surface alloyed AISI 1020 steel with Fe-Nb-B by TIG welding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinc, B.; Durmaz, M.; Abakay, E.; Sen, U.; Sen, S.

    2015-03-01

    Weld overlay coatings also known as hardfacing is a method which involves melting of the alloys and solidification for applied coatings. Recently hardfacing by welding has become a commonly used technique for improvement of material performance in extreme (high temperature, impact/abrasion, erosion, etc.) conditions.In the present study, the coatings were produced from a mixture of ferrous niobium, ferrous boron and iron powders in the ranges of -45µm particle size with different ratio. Fe12Nb5B3 and Fe2NbBalloys were coated on the AISI 1020 steel surface by TIG welding. The phases formed in the coated layer are Fe2B, NbB2, NbFeB and Fe0,2 Nb0,8 phases. The hardness of the presence phases are changing between 1689±85 HV0.01, and 181±7 HV0.1. Microstructural examinations were realized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The wear and friction behaviors of Fe12Nb5B3 and Fe2NbB realized on the AISI 1020 steel were investigated by the technique of TIG welding by using ball-on-disk arrangement against alumina ball.

  6. Influence of the brazing parameters on microstructure and mechanical properties of brazed joints of Hastelloy B2 nickel base alloy; Influencia de los parametros de soldeo fuerte en la microestructura y propiedades mecanicas de la union de la aleacion base niquel Hastelloy B2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotelo, J. C.; Gonzalez, M.; Porto, E.

    2014-07-01

    A study of the high vacuum brazing process of solid solution strengthened Hastelloy B2 nickel alloy has been done. A first stage of research has focused on the selection of the most appropriate brazing filler metal to the base material and vacuum furnace brazing process. The influence of welding parameters on joint microstructure constituents, relating the microstructure of the joint to its mechanical properties, has been evaluated. Two gaps of 50 and 200 micrometers, and two dwell times at brazing temperature of 10 and 90 minutes were studied. The braze joint mainly consists of the nickel rich matrix, nickel silicide and ternary compounds. Finally, the results of this study have shown the high bond strength for small gaps and increased dwell times of 90 minutes. (Author)

  7. Laser welding and syncristallization techniques comparison: “Ex vivo” study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleti, Marco; Vescovi, Paolo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Rocca, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims: Stabilization of implant abutments through electric impulses at high voltage for a very short time (electrowelding) was developed in the Eighties. In 2009, the same procedure was performed through the use of laser (laser welding) The aim of this study is to compare electrowelding and laser welding for intra-oral implant abutments stabilization on “ex vivo models” (pig jaws). Materials and methods: Six bars were welded with two different devices (Nd:YAG laser and Electrowelder) to eighteen titanium implant abutment inserted in three pig jaws. During the welding process, thermal increase was recorded, through the use of k-thermocouples, in the bone close to the implants. The strength of the welded joints was evaluated by a traction test after the removal of the implants. For temperature measurements a descriptive analysis and for traction test “values unpaired t test with Welch's correction” were performed: the significance level was set at Pwelding gives a lower thermal increase than Electrowelding at the bone close to implants (Mean: 1.97 and 5.27); the strength of laser welded joints was higher than that of Electrowelding even if nor statistically significant. (Mean: 184.75 and 168.29) Conclusion: Electrowelding seems to have no advantages, in term of thermal elevation and strength, while laser welding may be employed to connect titanium implants for immediate load without risks of thermal damage at surrounding tissues. PMID:24511205

  8. Nondestructive Online Detection of Welding Defects in Track Crane Boom Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Tao

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nondestructive detection of structural component of track crane is a difficult and costly problem. In the present study, acoustic emission (AE was used to detect two kinds of typical welding defects, that is, welding porosity and incomplete penetration, in the truck crane boom. Firstly, a subsidiary test specimen with special preset welding defect was designed and added on the boom surface with the aid of steel plates to get the synchronous deformation of the main boom. Then, the AE feature information of the welding defect could be got without influencing normal operation of equipment. As a result, the rudimentary location analysis can be attained using the linear location method and the two kinds of welding defects can be distinguished clearly using AE characteristic parameters such as amplitude and centroid frequency. Also, through the comparison of two loading processes, we concluded that the signal produced during the first loading process was mainly caused by plastic deformation damage and during the second loading process the stress release and structure friction between sections in welding area are the main acoustic emission sources. Thus, the AE is an available tool for nondestructive online detection of latent welding defects of structural component of track crane.

  9. Titanium brazing with mechanically alloyed Ti-Zr-Cu-Ni braze powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.W. [Materials Resources International, Landsdale (United States); Shapiro, A. [Titanium Brazing, Inc., Upper Arlington (United States); Ivanov, E. [Tosoh, SMD, Inc., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2004-07-01

    The paper reviews the results of braze trials with Ti-Zr-Cu-Ni braze alloy powders. The work presented is based on the braze assembly of titanium alloys being considered for lightweight heat exchangers for aircraft applications. The report reviews the braze coupon tests, showing joint structures, braze filler metal structures as well as reports on local and overall composition of the braze powders and the joints. Various braze cycles are evaluated and selected comparisons are made between mechanically alloyed powders and prealloyed (gas atomized) braze filler metals. SEM, EDAX, and microprobe are reported for joints made from C.P. titanium (ASTM Grade 1 and Ti-6Al-4V) and Timet {sup registered} Alloy 21S. (orig.)

  10. SCIP - Self-Cleaning Inert-Gas Brazing - a new process for brazing corrosion-resistant metals; SCIB - Self-Cleaning Inert-Gas Brazing - Ein neues Verfahren zum flussmittelfreien Hartloeten korrosionsbestaendiger Konstruktionswerkstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, F.W.; Moehwald, K. [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde; Hollaender, U.; Roxlau, C. [Leipzig Univ. Hannover, Garbsen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    In flux-free inert gas furnace welding of corrosion-resistant metals, even very small water or oxygen impurities will dramatically reduce the quality of the brazed joint. A high-quality process atmosphere is ensured on the one hand by intelligent furnace design and on the other hand by the use of high-purity inert or reducing gases. The high quality demands on the process gases are an important cost factor especially in once-through furnaces. Further, gas purity with less than 1 ppm residual oxygen or water cannot be ensured so that inert gas welding of extremely oxidation-sensitive materials is not possible in principle. The contribution presents the new process of self-cleaning inert gas brazing (SCIB), in which conventional inert gases are doped with gaseous hydrides which cause direct and quantitative removal of all oxidizing impurities in the process gas already at room temperature. The concentration of residual oxygen and water in the inert gas is thus reduced to below the theoretical detection limit. The contribution describes the physical and chemical effective mechanism of the non-corrosive additives and presents experimental results with SCIB in flux-free brazing of sensitive construction materials in a conventional once-through inert gas furnace. (orig.)

  11. Controlling Angular Distortion in Manual Metal Arc Welding of Austenitic Stainless Steels Using Back-step Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Sameea Jasim Abdul Zehra Jilabi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, austenitic stainless steels (A.S.S. have many industrial applications in the fields of chemical and petrochemical processing, marine, medicine, water treatment, petroleum refining, food and drinks processing, nuclear power generation etc. The secret behind this wide range of applications is the fact that A.S.S. have great corrosion resistance, high strength and scale resistance at elevated temperatures, good ductility at low temperatures approached to absolute zero in addition to notable weldability. On the other hand, manual metal arc (MMA is probably the most common process used for the welding of A.S.S. Unfortunately, MMA welding of A.S.S. could be associated with considerable distortion. Uncontrolled or excessive distortion usually increases the cost of the production process due to the high expense of rectification or replacing the weldment by a non-distorted one. MMA welding of A.S.S. was carried out using the back-step technique with various bead lengths, and without using this technique for comparison. Results have showed that the angular distortion was a function of the bead length in the back-step welding of A.S.S. The angular distortion decreased by (14.32% when the back-step technique was used with a (60 mm length for each bead, and by (41.08% when the bead length was (40 mm. On the other hand, it increased by (25% when the back-step technique was done with a (30 mm length for each bead.

  12. A six-year follow-up of full-arch immediate restorations fabricated with an intraoral welding technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degidi, Marco; Nardi, Diego; Piattelli, Adriano

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the 6-year effectiveness of maxillary and mandibular full-arch immediately loaded prostheses fabricated using an intraoral welding technique. All patients received the same day of surgery a fixed, full-arch prosthesis supported by an intraorally welded titanium framework created directly in the patient's mouth using a titanium bar. Life table analysis of implant survival, complications, and any other adverse events were recorded at yearly follow-up for a period of 6 years. One hundred twenty-four (86.11%) of 144 implants placed in maxillary cases and 87 (77.68%) of 112 implants placed in mandible cases completed the planned 6-year follow-up. At the 72-month follow-up, the accumulated mean marginal bone loss was, respectively, 1.39 mm (SD = 0.67) for the implants placed in the maxilla (n = 124) and 1.29 mm (SD = 0.71) for the implants placed in the mandible (n = 87). Fracturing of the composite resin superstructure was the most common adverse event. After a 6-year follow-up period, the intraoral welding technique proved to be a predictable technique for successfully rehabilitating the fully edentulous patient with a fixed and immediate prosthesis.

  13. Fluxless Brazing of Large Structural Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuyukian, C. S.

    1982-01-01

    Fluxless brazing is used in fabricating aluminum structural panels that withstand high internal pressure. Aluminum sheet of structural thickness with 4045 aluminum/silicon-braze-alloy cladding is brazed to corrugated "fin stock" having channels 0.001 inch (0.03mm) high by same width. Process is carried out in an inert (argon) atmosphere in a retort furnace. Filler bars are used in some channels to prevent fin stock from collapsing as pressure is applied.

  14. Fluxless Brazing and Heat Treatment of a Plate-Fin Sandwich Actively Cooled Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuyukian, C. S.

    1978-01-01

    The processes and techniques used to fabricate plate-fin sandwich actively cooled panels are presented. The materials were 6061 aluminum alloy and brazing sheet having clad brazing alloy. The panels consisted of small scale specimens, fatigue specimens, and a large 0.61 m by 1.22 m test panel. All panels were fluxless brazed in retorts in heated platen presses while exerting external pressure to assure intimate contact of details. Distortion and damage normally associated with that heat treatment were minimized by heat treating without fixtures and solution quenching in an organic polymer solution. The test panel is the largest fluxless brazed and heat treated panel of its configuration known to exist.

  15. Susceptor heating device for electron beam brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antieau, Susan M.; Johnson, Robert G. R.

    1999-01-01

    A brazing device and method are provided which locally apply a controlled amount of heat to a selected area, within a vacuum. The device brazes two components together with a brazing metal. A susceptor plate is placed in thermal contact with one of the components. A serrated pedestal supports the susceptor plate. When the pedestal and susceptor plate are in place, an electron gun irradiates an electron beam at the susceptor plate such that the susceptor plate is sufficiently heated to transfer heat through the one component and melt the brazing metal.

  16. Welding Course Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  17. Cadmium hazard in silver brazing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, S L; Tan, S H; Pinnagoda, J; Tan, K T

    1995-03-01

    This study evaluates the usage of cadmium-containing silver brazing alloys in Singapore and the potential cadmium hazard from its use. Of the 137 factories which responded to the survey questionnaire, only 28 (20.4%) carried out brazing. Of these, only 7 factories used cadmium-containing filler alloys. One hundred and six out of 123 workers from one of these factories had cadmium-in-blood concentrations exceeding 10 mcg/l. Thirty-one (29.2%) of the workers with excessive cadmium absorption had urinary beta-2 microglobulin levels exceeding 28 mcg/g creat. Workers in the other factories who were intermittently exposed had cadmium-in-blood concentrations of 10 mcg/l and below.

  18. Standard practice for examination of welds using the alternating current field measurement technique

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes procedures to be followed during alternating current field measurement examination of welds for baseline and service-induced surface breaking discontinuities. 1.2 This practice is intended for use on welds in any metallic material. 1.3 This practice does not establish weld acceptance criteria. 1.4 The values stated in either inch-pound units or SI units are to be regarded separately as standard. The values stated in each system might not be exact equivalents; therefore, each system shall be used independently of the other. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  19. Optimization and Characterization of the Friction Stir Welded Sheets of AA 5754-H111: Monitoring of the Quality of Joints with Thermographic Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Luigi Alberto Ciro; Serio, Livia Maria; Palumbo, Davide; De Finis, Rosa; Galietti, Umberto

    2017-10-11

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state welding process, based on frictional and stirring phenomena, that offers many advantages with respect to the traditional welding methods. However, several parameters can affect the quality of the produced joints. In this work, an experimental approach has been used for studying and optimizing the FSW process, applied on 5754-H111 aluminum plates. In particular, the thermal behavior of the material during the process has been investigated and two thermal indexes, the maximum temperature and the heating rate of the material, correlated to the frictional power input, were investigated for different process parameters (the travel and rotation tool speeds) configurations. Moreover, other techniques (micrographs, macrographs and destructive tensile tests) were carried out for supporting in a quantitative way the analysis of the quality of welded joints. The potential of thermographic technique has been demonstrated both for monitoring the FSW process and for predicting the quality of joints in terms of tensile strength.

  20. Protecting brazing furnaces from air leaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenoff, C. T.; Mckown, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Inexpensive inert-atmosphere shielding protects vacuum brazing-furnace components that are likely to spring leak. Pipefittings, gages, and valves are encased in transparent plastic shroud inflated with argon. If leak develops, harmless argon will enter vacuum chamber, making it possible to finish ongoing brazing or heat treatment before shutting down for repair.

  1. Hand-Controlled Brazing-Paste Dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.

    1994-01-01

    Hand control proven superior to foot control. Hand-operated switch added to hand-held brazing-alloy-paste dispenser yields improved, more consistent brazing-alloy beads. Dispenser used to apply paste between adjacent tubes in heat exchanger. Switch reliable and safe, and removed and reattached easily.

  2. 46 CFR 56.30-30 - Brazed joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Brazed joints. 56.30-30 Section 56.30-30 Shipping COAST... Selection and Limitations of Piping Joints § 56.30-30 Brazed joints. (a) General (refer also to subpart 56.75). Brazed socket-type joints shall be made with suitable brazing alloys. The minimum socket depth...

  3. Automatic-Control System for Safer Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, J. A.; Vanasse, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    Automatic-control system for radio-frequency (RF) induction brazing of metal tubing reduces probability of operator errors, increases safety, and ensures high-quality brazed joints. Unit combines functions of gas control and electric-power control. Minimizes unnecessary flow of argon gas into work area and prevents electrical shocks from RF terminals. Controller will not allow power to flow from RF generator to brazing head unless work has been firmly attached to head and has actuated micro-switch. Potential shock hazard eliminated. Flow of argon for purging and cooling must be turned on and adjusted before brazing power applied. Provision ensures power not applied prematurely, causing damaged work or poor-quality joints. Controller automatically turns off argon flow at conclusion of brazing so potentially suffocating gas does not accumulate in confined areas.

  4. Brazing of Titanium with Aluminium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winiowski A.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents results of vacuum diffusion brazing of Grade 2 titanium with 6082 (AlMg1Si0.6Cu0.3 aluminium alloy using B-Ag72Cu-780 (Ag72Cu28 grade silver brazing metal as an interlayer. Brazed joints underwent shear tests, light-microscopy-based metallographic examinations and structural examinations using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS. The highest quality and shear strength of 20 MPa was characteristic of joints brazed at 530°C with a 30-minute hold. The structural examinations revealed that in diffusion zone near the boundary with titanium the braze contained solid solutions based on hard and brittle Ti-Al type intermetallic phases determining the strength of the joints.

  5. Combined scale effects for effective brazing at low temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartout D.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In modern joining technology, the focus is on effective brazing and soldering of temperature sensitive materials. Here, as well as in diffusion welding processes the needed thermal energy is externally realized in the joint zone. This produces a heating of the whole joining parts, since in laminar joining the thermal energy is transported in interior by thermal conduction. An excess of critical temperatures or tolerable impact periods in wide parts of materials and respectively components is often not avoidable. This leads to thermal damages. In this point of view nanotechnology shows promising possibilities as scale effects and their resulting thermophysical effects such as melting temperature reduction and high diffusion rates can be used for providing a self-propagating high-temperature synthesis at room temperature. After ignition by an external energy source a self-propagating exothermic reaction is started. By producing a multilayer system with alternately arranged nanoscaled layers of e.g. Al and Ni the resulting thin foil can be used as heat source for melting the braze or solder material within the joining zone without any external preheating. Due to the high process velocities up to 30 m/s and the local heat input significant thermal influences on the joined parts are not detectable.

  6. Development of the manufacture and process for DUPIC fuel elements; development of the quality evaluation techniques for end cap welds of DUPIC fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Tae; Choi, Myong Seon; Yang, Hyun Tae; Kim, Dong Gyun; Park, Jin Seok; Kim, Jin Ho [Yeungnam University, Kyongsan (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this research is to set up the quality evaluation techniques for end cap welds of DUPIC fuel element. High temperature corrosion test and the SCC test for Zircaloy-4 were performed, and also the possibility of the ultrasonic test technique was verified for the quality evaluation and control of the laser welds in the DUPIC fuel rod end cap. From the evaluation of corrosion properties with measuring the weight gain and observing oxide film of the specimen that had been in the circumstance of steam(400 .deg. C, 1,500 psi) by max. 70 days later, the weight gain of the welded specimens was larger than original tube and the weight increasing rate increased with the exposed days. For the Development of techniques for ultrasonic test, semi-auto ultrasonic test system has been made based on immersion pulse-echo technique using spherically concentrated ultrasonic beam. Subsequently, developed ultrasonic test technique is quite sensible to shape of welds in the inside and outside of tube as well as crack, undercut and expulsion, and also this ultrasonic test, together with metallurgical fracture test, has good reliance as enough to be used for control method of welding process. 43 refs., 47 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  7. Braze alloy spreading on steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewert, T. A.; Heine, R. W.; Lagally, M. G.

    1978-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron microscopy (AEM) were employed to observe elemental surface decomposition resulting from the brazing of a copper-treated steel. Two types of steel were used for the study, stainless steel (treated with a eutectic silver-copper alloy), and low-carbon steel (treated with pure copper). Attention is given to oxygen partial pressure during the processes; a low enough pressure (8 x 10 to the -5th torr) was found to totally inhibit the spreading of the filler material at a fixed heating cycle. With both types of steel, copper treatment enhanced even spreading at a decreased temperature.

  8. Tensometry technique for X-ray diffraction in applied analysis of welding; Tensometria por tecnica de difracao de raios X aplicada na analise de soldagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turibus, S.N.; Caldas, F.C.M.; Miranda, D.M.; Monine, V.I.; Assis, J.T., E-mail: snturibus@iprj.uerj.b [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (IPRJ/UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Inst. Politecnico

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents the analysis of residual stress introduced in welding process. As the stress in a material can induce damages, it is necessary to have a method to identify this residual stress state. For this it was used the non-destructive X-ray diffraction technique to analyze two plates from A36 steel jointed by metal inert gas (MIG) welding. The stress measurements were made by the sin{sup 2{psi}} method in weld region of steel plates including analysis of longitudinal and transverse residual stresses in fusion zone, heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal. To determine the stress distribution along the depth of the welded material it was used removing of superficial layers made by electropolishing. (author)

  9. Aluminum alloy weldability. Identification of weld solidification cracking mechanisms through novel experimental technique and model development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coniglio, Nicolas

    2008-07-01

    The objective of the present thesis is to make advancements in understanding solidification crack formation in aluminum welds, by investigating in particular the aluminum 6060/4043 system. Alloy 6060 is typical of a family of Al-Mg-Si extrusion alloys, which are considered weldable only when using an appropriate filler alloy such as 4043 (Al-5Si). The effect of 4043 filler dilution (i.e. weld metal silicon content) on cracking sensitivity and solidification path of Alloy 6060 welds are investigated. Afterwards, cracking models are developed to propose mechanisms for solidification crack initiation and growth. Cracking Sensitivity. Building upon the concept that silicon improves weldability and that weldability can be defined by a critical strain rate, strain rate-composition combinations required for solidification crack formation in the Al- 6060/4043 system were determined using the newly developed Controlled Tensile Weldability (CTW) test utilizing local strain extensometer measurements. Results, presented in a critical strain rate - dilution map, show a crack - no crack boundary which reveals that higher local strain rates require higher 4043 filler dilution to avoid solidification cracking when arc welding Alloy 6060. Using the established crack - no crack boundary as a line of reference, additional parameters were examined and their influence on cracking characterized. These parameter influences have included studies of weld travel speed, weld pool contaminants (Fe, O, and H), and grain refiner additions (TiAl{sub 3} + Boron). Each parameter has been independently varied and its effect on cracking susceptibility quantified in terms of strain rate - composition combinations. Solidification Path. Solidification path of the Al-6060/4043 system was characterized using thermal analysis and phase identification. Increasing 4043 filler dilution from 0 to 16% in Alloy 6060 arc welds resulted in little effect on thermal arrests and microstructure, no effect on

  10. Theory and modeling of active brazing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Swol, Frank B.; Miller, James Edward; Lechman, Jeremy B.; Givler, Richard C.

    2013-09-01

    Active brazes have been used for many years to produce bonds between metal and ceramic objects. By including a relatively small of a reactive additive to the braze one seeks to improve the wetting and spreading behavior of the braze. The additive modifies the substrate, either by a chemical surface reaction or possibly by alloying. By its nature, the joining process with active brazes is a complex nonequilibrium non-steady state process that couples chemical reaction, reactant and product diffusion to the rheology and wetting behavior of the braze. Most of the these subprocesses are taking place in the interfacial region, most are difficult to access by experiment. To improve the control over the brazing process, one requires a better understanding of the melting of the active braze, rate of the chemical reaction, reactant and product diffusion rates, nonequilibrium composition-dependent surface tension as well as the viscosity. This report identifies ways in which modeling and theory can assist in improving our understanding.

  11. Detached Melt Nucleation during Diffusion Brazing of a Technical Ni-based Superalloy: A Phase-Field Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, B.; Apel, M.; Laux, B.; Piegert, S.

    2015-06-01

    Advanced solidification processes like welding, soldering, and brazing are often characterized by their specific solidification conditions. But they also may include different types of melting processes which themselves are strongly influenced by the initial microstructures and compositions of the applied materials and therefore are decisive for the final quality and mechanical properties of the joint. Such melting processes are often not well- understood because - compared to other fields of solidification science - relatively little research has been done on melting by now. Also, regarding microstructure simulation, melting has been strongly neglected in the past, although this process is substantially different from solidification due to the reversed diffusivities of the involved phases. In this paper we present phase-field simulations showing melting, solidification and precipitation of intermetallic phases during diffusion brazing of directionally solidified and heat-treated high-alloyed Ni- based gas turbine blade material using different boron containing braze alloys. Contrary to the common belief, melting of the base material is not always planar and can be further accompanied by detached nucleation and growth of a second liquid phase inside the base material leading to polycrystalline morphologies of the joint after solidification. These findings are consistent with results from brazed laboratory samples, which were characterized by EDX and optical microscopy, and can be explained in terms of specific alloy thermodynamics and inter-diffusion kinetics. Consequences of the gained new understanding for brazing of high- alloyed materials are discussed.

  12. Development of rapidly quenched nickel-based non-boron filler metals for brazing corrosion resistant steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivannikov, A.; Kalin, B.; Suchkov, A.; Penyaz, M.; Yurlova, M.

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion-resistant steels are stably applied in modern rocket and nuclear technology. Creating of permanent joints of these steels is a difficult task that can be solved by means of welding or brazing. Recently, the use rapidly quenched boron-containing filler metals is perspective. However, the use of such alloys leads to the formation of brittle borides in brazing zone, which degrades the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of the compounds. Therefore, the development of non-boron alloys for brazing stainless steels is important task. The study of binary systems Ni-Be and Ni-Si revealed the perspective of replacing boron in Ni-based filler metals by beryllium, so there was the objective of studying of phase equilibrium in the system Ni-Be-Si. The alloys of the Ni-Si-Be with different contents of Si and Be are considered in this paper. The presence of two low-melting components is revealed during of their studying by methods of metallography analysis and DTA. Microhardness is measured and X-ray diffraction analysis is conducted for a number of alloys of Ni-Si-Be. The compositions are developed on the basis of these data. Rapidly quenched brazing alloys can be prepared from these compositions, and they are suitable for high temperature brazing of steels.

  13. Fuzzy Logic-Based Techniques for Modeling the Correlation between the Weld Bead Dimension and the Process Parameters in MIG Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Surender

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuzzy logic-based techniques have been developed to model input-output relationships of metal inert gas (MIG welding process. Both conventional and hierarchical fuzzy logic controllers (FLCs of Mamdani type have been developed, and their performances are compared. The conventional FLC suffers from the curse of dimensionality for handling a large number of variables, and a hierarchical FLC was proposed earlier to tackle this problem. However, in that study, both the structure and knowledge base of the FLC were not optimized simultaneously, which has been attempted here. Simultaneous optimization of the structure and knowledge base is a difficult task, and to solve it, a genetic algorithm (GA will have to deal with the strings having varied lengths. A new scheme has been proposed here to tackle the problem related to crossover of two parents with unequal lengths. It is interesting to observe that the conventional FLC yields the best accuracy in predictions, whereas the hierarchical FLC can be computationally faster than others but at the cost of accuracy. Moreover, there is no improvement of interpretability by introducing a hierarchical fuzzy system. Thus, there exists a trade-off between the accuracy obtained in predictions and computational complexity of various FLCs.

  14. Testing of the wettability during brazing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alin Asavei

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to present the process of brazing using laser, with the goal of determining the wettability resulted from the brazing process. For the experimental work there was applied only one type of brasing alloy on two different zinc plated sheets. The results of the experiments carried out revealed that the quality of the zinc layer may lead to different behyaviour of the sample surface during the brazing process. Moreover, there was observed that the obtained contact angle is inversely proportional to the advancing speed of the table from the laser device.

  15. Direct metal brazing to cermet feedthroughs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not Available

    1982-07-29

    An improved method for brazing metallic components to a cermet surface in an alumina substrate eliminates the prior art metallized layer over the cermet via and adjoining alumina surfaces. Instead, a nickel layer is applied over the cermet surface only and metallic components are brazed directly to this nickel coated cermet surface. As a result, heretofore unachievable tensile strength joints are produced. In addition, cermet vias with their brazed metal components can be spaced more closely in the alumina substrate because of the elimination of the prior art metallized alumina surfaces.

  16. Failure Assessment Diagram for Titanium Brazed Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flom, Yury; Jones, Justin S.; Powell, Mollie M.; Puckett, David F.

    2011-01-01

    The interaction equation was used to predict failure in Ti-4V-6Al joints brazed with Al 1100 filler metal. The joints used in this study were geometrically similar to the joints in the brazed beryllium metering structure considered for the ATLAS telescope. This study confirmed that the interaction equation R(sub sigma) + R(sub Tau) = 1, where R(sub sigma) and R(sub Tau)are normal and shear stress ratios, can be used as conservative lower bound estimate of the failure criterion in ATLAS brazed joints as well as for construction of the Failure Assessment Diagram (FAD).

  17. Technique for the residual life assessment of high temperature components based on creep-rupture testing on welded miniature specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzillo, A.; Guardamagna, C.; Moscotti, L.; Ranzani, L. [Ente Nazionale per l`Energia Elettrica, Milan (Italy)

    1995-06-01

    Following the present trend in the development of advanced methodologies for residual life assessment of high temperature components operating in power plants, particularly in non destructive methods, a testing technique has been set up at ENEL-CRAM based on creep-rupture testa in an argon on welded miniature specimens. Five experimental systems for creep-rupture tests in an argon atmosphere have been set up which include high accuracy systems, vacuum chambers and exrwnsometer devices. With the aim of establishing and validating the suitability of the experimental methodology, creep-rupture and interrupted creep testing programmes have been performed on miniature specimens (2 mm diameter and 10 mm gauge lenght). On the basis of experience gathered by various European research laboratories, a miniature specimen construction procedure has been developed using a laser welding technique for joining threaded heads to sample material. Low alloy ferritic steels, such as virgin 2.25CrlMo, 0.5Cr 0.5Mo 0.25V, and IN 738 superalloy miniature specimens have been investigated and the results, compared with those from standard specimens, show a regular trend in deformation vs time. Additional efforts to provide guidelines for material sampling from each plant component will be required in order to reduce uncertainties in residual life prediction.

  18. An accurate method for determining residual stresses with magnetic non-destructive techniques in welded ferromagnetic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vourna, P.

    2016-03-01

    The scope of the present research work was to investigate the proper selection criteria for developing a suitable methodology for the accurate determination of residual stresses existing in welded parts. Magnetic non-destructive testing took place by the use of two magnetic non-destructive techniques: by the measurement of the magnetic Barkhausen noise and by the evaluation of the magnetic hysteresis loop parameters. The spatial distribution of residual stresses in welded metal parts by both non-destructive magnetic methods and two diffraction methods was determined. The conduction of magnetic measurements required an initial calibration of ferromagnetic steels. Based on the examined volume of the sample, all methods used were divided into two large categories: the first one was related to the determination of surface residual stress, whereas the second one was related to bulk residual stress determination. The first category included the magnetic Barkhausen noise and the X-ray diffraction measurements, while the second one included the magnetic permeability and the neutron diffraction data. The residual stresses determined by the magnetic techniques were in a good agreement with the diffraction ones.

  19. Feasibility study of fluxless brazing cemented carbides to steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, W.; Sievers, N.

    2017-03-01

    One of the most important brazing processes is the joints between cemented carbides and steel for the tool industry such as in rotary drill hammers or saw blades. Even though this technique has already been used for several decades, defects in the joint can still occur and lead to quality loss. Mostly, the joining process is facilitated by induction heating and the use of a flux to enhance the wetting of the filler alloy on the surface of the steel and cemented carbide in an ambient atmosphere. However, although the use of flux enables successful joining, it also generates voids within the joint, which reduces the strength of the connection while the chemicals within the flux are toxic and polluting. In this feasibility study, a fluxless brazing process is used to examine the joint between cemented carbides and steel for the first time. For this, ultrasound is applied during induction heating to enable the wetting between the liquid filler metal and the surfaces of the cemented carbide and steel. The ultrasound generates cavitations within the liquid filler metal, which remove the oxides from the surface. Several filler metals such as a silver based alloy Ag449, pure Zn, and an AlSi-alloy were used to reduce the brazing temperature and to lower the thermal residual stresses within the joint. As a result, every filler metal successfully wetted both materials and led to a dense connection. The ultrasound has to be applied carefully to prevent a damage of the cemented carbide. In this regard, it was observed that single grains of the cemented carbide broke out and remained in the joint. This positive result of brazing cemented carbides to steel without a flux but using ultrasound, allows future studies to focus on the shear strength of these joints as well as the behavior of the thermally induced residual stresses.

  20. Deposition of thin film of titanium on ceramic substrate using the discharge for hollow cathode for Al2O3/Al2O3 indirect brazing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Roberta Meira Marinho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of titanium were deposited onto Al2O3 substrate by hollow cathode discharge method for the formation of a ceramic-ceramic joint using indirect brazing method. An advantage of using this technique is that a relatively small amount of titanium is required for the metallization of the ceramic surface when compared with other conventional methods. Rapidly solidified brazing filler of Cu49Ag45Ce6 in the form of ribbons was used. The thickness of deposited titanium layer and the brazing temperature/time were varied. The quality of the brazed joint was evaluated through the three point bending flexural tests. The brazed joints presented high flexural resistance values up to 176 MPa showing the efficiency of the technique.

  1. X-Ray diffraction technique applied to study of residual stresses after welding of duplex stainless steel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monin, Vladimir Ivanovitch; Assis, Joaquim Teixeira de [Instituto Politecnico do Rio e Janeiro (IPRJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil); Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Turibus, Sergio Noleto; Payao Filho, Joao C., E-mail: sturibus@nuclear.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Duplex stainless steel is an example of composite material with approximately equal amounts of austenite and ferrite phases. Difference of physical and mechanical properties of component is additional factor that contributes appearance of residual stresses after welding of duplex steel plates. Measurements of stress distributions in weld region were made by X-ray diffraction method both in ferrite and austenite phases. Duplex Steel plates were joined by GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) technology. There were studied longitudinal and transverse stress components in welded butt joint, in heat affected zone (HAZ) and in points of base metal 10 mm from the weld. Residual stresses measured in duplex steel plates jointed by welding are caused by temperature gradients between weld zone and base metal and by difference of thermal expansion coefficients of ferrite and austenite phases. Proposed analytical model allows evaluating of residual stress distribution over the cross section in the weld region. (author)

  2. Application of Induction Heating for Brazing Parts of Solar Collectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristína Demianová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the application of induction heating for brazing parts of solar collectors made of Al alloys. The tube-flange joint is a part of the collecting pipe of a solar collector. The main task was to design an induction coil for this type of joint, and to select the optimum brazing parameters. Brazing was performed with AlSi12 brazing alloy, and corrosive and non-corrosive flux types were also applied. The optimum brazing parameters were determined on the basis of testing the fabricated brazed joints by visual inspection, by leakage tests, and by macro- and micro-analysis of the joint boundary. The following conditions can be considered to be the best for brazing Al materials: power 2.69 kW,brazing time 24 s, flux BrazeTec F32/80.

  3. Wetting and spreading behavior of Ti-based brazing filler on Ti64 substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komolafe, Bolarinwa; Mostafa, Ahmad

    2017-06-01

    In this work, wetting behavior of Ti-20Zr-20Cu-20Ni brazing filler on Ti-6Al-4V substrate was studied using sessile drop technique. Effects of the substrate surface roughness, R a of ~0.40 and 0.08 µm, and heating scheme on wetting and spreading of the filler metal were evaluated. The wetting mechanism was investigated by the combination of cooling technique, thermal, compositional, and microstructural analysis. This was performed using a heat-flux DSC and an SEM equipped with EDS. The degree of wetting was evaluated by measuring the apparent dynamic contact angle between the filler drop and substrate surface and by calculating the drop spread ratio. The surface roughness of the substrate was found to have little or no effect on the final apparent contact angle. The wetting behavior of this system showed a reactive nature, because it involves dissolution of the substrate and formation of interfacial layers. Three heating schemes were used in the current study. While the high heating rate of 6.8 °C s-1 was found to limit the metallurgical reaction between the substrate and the brazing filler, in the low heating rate scheme of 1.7 °C s-1, more intense metallurgical reaction occurred between the brazing filler and the substrate. The high heating rate with soaking scheme is recommended for brazing, because it entails extensive spreading and limited metallurgical reaction between the brazing filler and the substrate.

  4. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of an Ultrasonic Spot Welded Aluminum Alloy: The Effect of Welding Energy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    He Peng; Daolun Chen; Xianquan Jiang

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the microstructures, tensile lap shear strength, and fatigue resistance of 6022-T43 aluminum alloy joints welded via a solid-state welding technique-ultrasonic spot welding (USW...

  5. Improved corrosion resistance of aluminum brazing sheet by a post-brazing heat treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norouzi Afshar, F.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Glenn, A. M.; Taheri, P.; Sababi, M.; Terryn, H.A.; Mol, J.M.C.

    2017-01-01

    This work studies the influence of the microstructure on the corrosion mechanism and susceptibility of as-brazed aluminum sheet. Various microstructures are obtained using postbrazing heat treatments developed to enhance the corrosion resistance of an AA4xxx/AA3xxx brazing sheet. The heat

  6. Fracture strength of different soldered and welded orthodontic joining configurations with and without filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Jens Johannes; Bailly, Jacqueline; Gernhardt, Christian Ralf; Fuhrmann, Robert Andreas Werner

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical strength of different joints made by conventional brazing, TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. Five standardized joining configurations of orthodontic wire in spring hard quality were used: round, cross, 3 mm length, 9 mm length and 7 mm to orthodontic band. The joints were made by five different methods: brazing, tungsten inert gas (TIG) and laser welding with and without filling material. For the original orthodontic wire and for each kind of joint configuration or connecting method 10 specimens were carefully produced, totalizing 240. The fracture strengths were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005). Data were analyzed by ANOVA (p=0.05) and Bonferroni post hoc test (p=0.05). In all cases, brazing joints were ruptured on a low level of fracture strength (186-407 N). Significant differences between brazing and TIG or laser welding (pwelding with filling material and 3 mm joint length (998 N). Using filling materials, there was a clear tendency to higher mean values of fracture strength in TIG and laser welding. However, statistically significant differences were found only in the 9-mm long joints (pwelded joints was positively influenced by the additional use of filling material. TIG welding was comparable to laser welding except for the impossibility of joining orthodontic wire with orthodontic band.

  7. Brazing of Stainless Steels to Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) Using Silver -Base Brazes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Asthana, Rajiv

    2005-01-01

    Three silver-base brazes containing either noble metal palladium (Palcusil-10 and Palcusil-15) or active metal titanium (Ticusil) were evaluated for high-temperature oxidation resistance, and their effectiveness in joining yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to a corrosion-resistant ferritic stainless steel. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and optical- and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) were used to evaluate the braze oxidation behavior and the structure and chemistry of the YSZ/braze/steel joints. The effect of the braze type and processing conditions on the interfacial microstructure and composition of the joint regions is discussed with reference to the chemical changes that occur at the interface. It was found that chemical interdiffusion of the constituents of YSZ, steel and the brazes led to compositional changes and/or interface reconstruction, and metallurgically sound joints.

  8. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Donald W.; Johnson, John A.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1987-01-01

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

  9. Design of a braze alloy for fast epitaxial brazing of superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piegert, S.; Laux, B.; Rösier, J.

    2012-07-01

    For the repair of directionally solidified turbine components made of nickel-based superalloys, a new high-temperature brazing method has been developed. Utilising heterogeneous nucleation on the crack surface, the microstructure of the base material can be reproduced, i.e. single crystallinity can be maintained. In contrast to commonly used eutectic braze alloys, such as nickel-boron or nickel-silicon systems, the process is not diffusion controlled but works with a consolute binary base system. The currently applied epitaxial brazing methods rely on isothermal solidification diffusing the melting point depressants into the base material until their concentration is reduced so that the liquid braze solidifies. Contrary, the identified Ni-Mn consolute system enables a temperature driven epitaxial solidification resulting in substantially reduced process duration. The development of the braze alloys was assisted using the CALPHAD software Thermo-Calc. The solidification behaviour was estimated by kinetic calculations with realistic boundary conditions. Finally, the complete system, including braze alloy as well as substrate material, was modelled by means of DICTRA. Subsequently, the thermodynamic properties of the braze alloys were experimentally analysed by DSC measurements. For brazing experiments 300 μm wide parallel gaps were used. Complete epitaxial solidification, i.e. the absence of high-angle grain boundaries, could be achieved within brazing times being up to two orders of magnitude shorter compared to diffusion brazing processes. Theoretically and experimentally evaluated process windows reveal similar shapes. However, a distinct shift has to be stated which can be ascribed to the limited accuracy of the underlying thermodynamic databases.

  10. Experimental study of cyclic creep and high-cycle fatigue of welded joints of St3 steel by the DIC technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kibitkin, Vladimir V., E-mail: vvk@ispms.tsc.ru; Solodushkin, Andrey I., E-mail: s.ai@sibmail.com; Pleshanov, Vasily S., E-mail: vsp@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    In the paper the mechanisms of plastic deformation and fracture of welded joints of steel St3 were investigated at high-cycle fatigue and cyclic creep by the digital image correlation (DIC) technique. The evolution of strain rate is studied for the following regions: base metal, HAZ, and fusion zone. This strain rate evolution can be considered as a mechanical response of material. Three stages of deformation evolution are shown: deformation hardening (I), fatigue crack initiation (II), and the last stage is related to main crack (III). Two criteria are offered to evaluate the current mechanical state of welded joints.

  11. Improving Casing Integrity by Induction Brazing of Casing Connections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ernens, Dennis; Hariharan, Hari; van Haaften, Willem Maarten; Pasaribu, Rihard; Jabs, Matthew; McKim, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Brazing technology allows metallurgical joining of dissimilar materials using a filler material. In this paper brazing technology applied to casing connections is presented. The initial application was triggered by challenges with mechanical and pressure integrity after expansion of casing

  12. Preliminary results on the development of vacuum brazed joints for cryogenic wind tunnel aerofoil models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigley, D. A.; Sandefur, P. G., Jr.; Lawing, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    The results of initial experiments show that high-strength void-free bonds can be formed by vacuum brazing of stainless steels using copper and nickel-based filler metals. In Nitronic 40, brazed joints have been formed with strengths in excess of the yield strength of the parent metal, and even at liquid nitrogen temperatures the excellent mechanical properties of the parent metal are only slightly degraded. The poor toughness of 15-5 P.H. stainless steel at cryogenic temperatures is lowered even further by the presence of the brazed bonds investigated. It is highly unlikely that the technique would be used for any critical areas of aerofoil models intended for low-temperature service. Nevertheless, the potential advantages of this simplified method of construction still have attractions for use at ambient temperatures.

  13. Nondestructive test of brazed cooling tubes of prototype bolometer camera housing using active infrared thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahiliani, Kumudni; Pandya, Santosh P; Pandya, Shwetang; Jha, Ratneshwar; Govindarajan, J

    2011-01-01

    The active infrared thermography technique is used for assessing the brazing quality of an actively cooled bolometer camera housing developed for steady state superconducting tokamak. The housing is a circular pipe, which has circular tubes vacuum brazed on the periphery. A unique method was adopted to monitor the temperature distribution on the internal surface of the pipe. A stainless steel mirror was placed inside the pipe and the reflected IR radiations were viewed using an IR camera. The heat stimulus was given by passing hot water through the tubes and the temperature distribution was monitored during the transient phase. The thermographs showed a significant nonuniformity in the brazing with a contact area of around 51%. The thermography results were compared with the x-ray radiographs and a good match between the two was observed. Benefits of thermography over x-ray radiography testing are emphasized.

  14. Welding arc plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  15. Challenges to Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng

    This report originates from the compulsory defense during my Ph.D. study at the Technical University of Denmark. Resistance welding is an old and well-proven technology. Yet the emergence of more and more new materials, new designs, invention off new joining techniques, and more stringent...... requirement in quality have imposed challenges to the resistance welding. More some research and development have to be done to adapt the old technology to the manufacturing industry of the 21st century. In the 1st part of the report, the challenging factors to the resistance welding are reviewed. Numerical...... simulation of resistance welding has been under development for many years. Yet it is no easy to make simulation results reliable and accurate because of the complexity of resistance welding process. In the 2nd part of the report numerical modeling of resistance welding is reviewed, some critical factors...

  16. Inert Welding/Brazing Gas Filters and Dryers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudy, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    The use of hybridized carbon/silicon carbide (C/SiC) fabric to reinforce ceramic matrix composite face sheets and the integration of such face sheets with a foam core creates a sandwich structure capable of withstanding high-heat-flux environments (150 W/sq cm) in which the core provides a temperature drop of 1,000 C between the surface and the back face without cracking or delamination of the structure. The composite face sheet exhibits a bilinear response, which results from the SiC matrix not being cracked on fabrication. In addition, the structure exhibits damage tolerance under impact with projectiles, showing no penetration to the back face sheet. These attributes make the composite ideal for leading-edge structures and control surfaces in aerospace vehicles, as well as for acreage thermal protection systems and in high-temperature, lightweight stiffened structures. By tailoring the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of a carbon fiber containing ceramic matrix composite (CMC) face sheet to match that of a ceramic foam core, the face sheet and the core can be integrally fabricated without any delamination. Carbon and SiC are woven together in the reinforcing fabric. Integral densification of the CMC and the foam core is accomplished with chemical vapor deposition, eliminating the need for bond-line adhesive. This means there is no need to separately fabricate the core and the face sheet, or to bond the two elements together, risking edge delamination during use. Fibers of two or more types are woven together on a loom. The carbon and ceramic fibers are pulled into the same "pick" location during the weaving process. Tow spacing may be varied to accommodate the increased volume of the combined fiber tows while maintaining a target fiber volume fraction in the composite. Foam pore size, strut thickness, and ratio of face sheet to core thickness can be used to tailor thermal and mechanical properties. The anticipated CTE for the hybridized composite is managed by the choice of constituents, varying fiber tow sizes and constituent part ratios. This structural concept provides high strength and stiffness at low density 1.06 g/cu cm in panels tested. Varieties of face sheet constructions are possible, including variations in fiber type and weave geometry. The integrated structures possible with this composite could eliminate the need for non-load-bearing thermal protection systems on top of a structural component. The back sheet can readily be integrated to substructures through the incorporation of ribs. This would eliminate weight and cost for aerospace missions.

  17. Diffusion Brazing and Welding of the Accelerating Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Avagyan, Vardan

    2005-01-01

    This work presents technologies of copper accelarating structure diffusion joints. The formation conditions of copper diffusion joint with minimal residual plastic strain are determined experimentally.

  18. Studies of welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Krupa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies of a welded joint were described. The joint was made as a result of the reconstruction of a truss and one of the possible means to make a repair. The studies were of a simulation character and were targeted at the detection of welding defects and imperfections thatshould be eliminated in a real structure. A model was designed and on this model the tests and examinations were carried out. The modelwas made under the same conditions as the conditions adopted for repair. It corresponded to the real object in shape and dimensions, and in the proposed technique of welding and welding parameters. The model was composed of five plates joined together with twelve beads.The destructive and non-destructive tests were carried out; the whole structure and the respective welds were also examined visually. Thedefects and imperfections in welds were detected by surface methods of inspection, penetration tests and magnetic particle flaw detection.The model of the welded joint was prepared by destructive methods, a technique that would never be permitted in the case of a realstructure. For the investigations it was necessary to cut out the specimens from the welded joint in direction transverse to the weld run. The specimens were subjected to metallographic examinations and hardness measurements. Additionally, the joint cross-section was examined by destructive testing methods to enable precise determination of the internal defects and imperfections. The surface methods were applied again, this time to determine the severity of welding defects. The analysis has proved that, fabricated under proper conditions and with parameters of the welding process duly observed, the welded joint has good properties and repairs of this type are possible in practice.

  19. Comparative testing of radiographic testing, ultrasonic testing and phased array advanced ultrasonic testing non destructive testing techniques in accordance with the AWS D1.5 bridge welding code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    A comprehensive body of non-destructive testing data was collected from steel bridge welds under real-world conditions in a fabricators shop. Three different non-destructive testing (NDT) techniques were used on each weld inspection, these being R...

  20. The Brazing Behavior of Aluminum-Steel Cladding Strip with Pre-Cladded Brazing Layer Used in Air Cooling System of Power Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Sun Chang; Zhang Xiao-jun; Li Long; Zhou De-jing

    2016-01-01

    The brazing behavior of 3003 fin assemble with 4343(filler layer)/4A60(transition layer)/08Al(steel layer) brazing sheet (the ratio of filler layer thickness to transition thickness were constant 1:2) were investigated. This study elucidates the brazing results vary with the layer thickness and brazing temperatures. Results showed that keeping the holding time at brazing temperature constant (the holding time of this study was 10 minutes in all brazing progress), under the condition of brazin...

  1. Optimization and Characterization of the Friction Stir Welded Sheets of AA 5754-H111: Monitoring of the Quality of Joints with Thermographic Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Alberto Ciro De Filippis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Welding (FSW is a solid-state welding process, based on frictional and stirring phenomena, that offers many advantages with respect to the traditional welding methods. However, several parameters can affect the quality of the produced joints. In this work, an experimental approach has been used for studying and optimizing the FSW process, applied on 5754-H111 aluminum plates. In particular, the thermal behavior of the material during the process has been investigated and two thermal indexes, the maximum temperature and the heating rate of the material, correlated to the frictional power input, were investigated for different process parameters (the travel and rotation tool speeds configurations. Moreover, other techniques (micrographs, macrographs and destructive tensile tests were carried out for supporting in a quantitative way the analysis of the quality of welded joints. The potential of thermographic technique has been demonstrated both for monitoring the FSW process and for predicting the quality of joints in terms of tensile strength.

  2. Dual atmosphere tolerance of Ag-CuO based air braze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Yong Y.; Hardy, John S.; Weil, K. Scott

    2007-11-01

    Recently, a new braze filler metal based on the silver-copper oxide system was developed for use in sealing high-temperature, solid-state electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells. One of the concerns regarding the viability of this joining technique is the long-term stability of silver-based alloys under a high-temperature, dual oxidizing/reducing gas environment. This paper reports on an initial series of exposure experiments that were conducted to characterize the effects of (1) filler metal composition, (2) brazing temperature, and (3) exposure time on the microstructural stability of Ag-CuO brazed Al2O3/Al2O3 joints under a prototypic operating environment for an intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell stack. In general joints exposed simultaneously to air on one side and hydrogen on the other for short periods of time at 800°C (100 hrs) showed no signs of degradation with respect to hermeticity or joint microstructure. Samples exposed for longer periods of time (1000 hrs) displayed some internal porosity, which extends approximately halfway across the joint and is not interconnected. Little effect of the filler metal’s composition on its tolerance to dual atmosphere exposure was observed. However brazing temperature was found to have a measurable effect. Higher brazing temperature leads to a more extensive formation of an interfacial reaction phase, copper aluminate, which tends to tie up some of the free CuO in the filler metal and minimize the formation of porosity in the air brazed joints during long-term, dual-atmosphere exposure. The effect is due to the greater chemical stability of the copper aluminate relative to copper oxide.

  3. Dual-atmosphere tolerance of Ag-CuO-based air braze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Yong; Hardy, John S.; Weil, Scott [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2007-11-15

    Recently, a new braze filler metal based on the silver-copper oxide system was developed for use in sealing high-temperature, solid-state electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells. One of the concerns regarding the viability of this joining technique is the long-term stability of silver-based alloys under a high-temperature, dual oxidizing/reducing gas environment. This paper reports on an initial series of exposure experiments that were conducted to characterize the effects of (1) filler metal composition, (2) brazing temperature, and (3) exposure time on the microstructural stability of Ag-CuO-brazed Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} joints under a prototypic operating environment for an intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell stack. In general joints exposed simultaneously to air on one side and hydrogen on the other for short periods of time at 800 {sup circle} C (100 h) showed no signs of degradation with respect to hermeticity or joint microstructure. Samples exposed for longer periods of time (1000 h) displayed some internal porosity, which extends approximately halfway across the joint and is not interconnected. Little effect of the filler metal's composition on its tolerance to dual-atmosphere exposure was observed. However, brazing temperature was found to have a measurable effect. Higher brazing temperature leads to a more extensive formation of an interfacial reaction phase, copper aluminate, which tends to tie up some of the free CuO in the filler metal and minimize the formation of porosity in the air-brazed joints during long-term, dual-atmosphere exposure. The effect is due to the greater chemical stability of the copper aluminate relative to copper oxide. (author)

  4. ZIRCONIUM-TITANIUM-BERYLLIUM BRAZING ALLOY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, R.G.; Patriarca, P.; Slaughter, G.M.; Williams, L.C.

    1962-06-12

    A new and improved ternary alloy is described which is of particular utility in braze-bonding parts made of a refractory metal selected from Group IV, V, and VI of the periodic table and alloys containing said metal as a predominating alloying ingredient. The brazing alloy contains, by weight, 40 to 50 per cent zirconium, 40 to 50 per cent titanium, and the balance beryllium in amounts ranging from 1 to 20 per cent, said alloy having a melting point in the range 950 to 1400 deg C. (AEC)

  5. Experimental fatigue curves for aluminium brazed areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitescu, A.; Babiş, C.; Niţoi, D. F.; Radu, C.

    2017-08-01

    An important factor for the quality of joints is the brazed area. The fatigue check occupies a major position among many test procedures and methods, especially by the joining technologies. The results of processing the fatigue data experiments for aluminium brazed samples are used to find the regression function and the response surface methodology. The fatigue process of mechanical components under service loading is stochastic in nature. The prediction of time-dependent fatigue reliability is critical for the design and maintenance planning of many structural components.

  6. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Weld Strength for Aluminum Ultrasonic Spot Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Bita; Hetrick, Elizabeth T.; Mozurkewich, George; Reatherford, Larry V.

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this work is to determine the feasibility of using an ultrasonic, non-destructive technique for post-process evaluation of aluminum ultrasonic spot welds. A focused immersion transducer was utilized to obtain a C-scan of the weld interface, from which a weighted ultrasonic contact area was estimated. Weldments were subsequently tested destructively to determine the weld strength. The square root of the weld contact area displayed a relatively good correlation with weld strength, r2=0.85.

  7. Braze Development of Graphite Fiber for Use in Phase Change Material Heat Sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gregory; Beringer, Woody; Gleason, Brian; Stephan, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Hamilton Sundstrand (HS), together with NASA Johnson Space Center, developed methods to metallurgically join graphite fiber to aluminum. The goal of the effort was to demonstrate improved thermal conductance, tensile strength and manufacturability compared to existing epoxy bonded techniques. These improvements have the potential to increase the performance and robustness of phase change material heat sinks that use graphite fibers as an interstitial material. Initial work focused on evaluating joining techniques from four suppliers, each consisting of a metallization step followed by brazing or soldering of one inch square blocks of Fibercore graphite fiber material to aluminum end sheets. Results matched the strength and thermal conductance of the epoxy bonded control samples, so two suppliers were down-selected for a second round of braze development. The second round of braze samples had up to a 300% increase in strength and up to a 132% increase in thermal conductance over the bonded samples. However, scalability and repeatability proved to be significant hurdles with the metallization approach. An alternative approach was pursued which used a nickel braze allow to prepare the carbon fibers for joining with aluminum. Initial results on sample blocks indicate that this approach should be repeatable and scalable with good strength and thermal conductance when compared with epoxy bonding.

  8. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  9. Investigation of the effect of rapidly solidified braze ribbons on the microstructure of brazed joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Wiesner, S.; Rochala, P.; Mayer, J.; Aretz, A.; Iskandar, R.; Schwedt, A.

    2017-03-01

    Shrinkage and warpage due to melting and solidification are crucial for the geometric precision of related components. In order to assure a high geometric precision, the formation of the microstructure in the joint during brazing must be taken into consideration. An extensive interaction can occur between liquid melt and base material, resulting in the formation of distinctive phases. This interaction depends on the parameters of the brazing process. However, the consequences of the interaction between phase formation and process parameters in terms of geometric precision cannot be estimated yet. Insufficient quality of the joint can be a result. In this study, investigations focus on the process of solidification in terms of time dependent diffusion behavior of elements. Therefore, microcrystalline and amorphous braze ribbons based on Ti are produced by rapid solidification and are used for joining. The microstructure of the braze ribbons as well as the melting behavior and phase formation during brazing are considered to be of particular importance for the mechanical properties of the brazed components.

  10. Active Metal Brazing and Characterization of Brazed Joints in Titanium to Carbon-Carbon Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, T. P.; Morscher, G. N.; Asthana, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Ti-metal/C-C composite joints were formed by reactive brazing with three commercial brazes, namely, Cu-ABA, TiCuNi, and TiCuSiI. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The results of the microstructure analysis indicate solute redistribution across the joint and possible metallurgical bond formation via interdiffusion, which led to good wetting and spreading. A tube-on-plate tensile test was used to evaluate joint strength of Ti-tube/ C-C composite joints. The load-carrying ability was greatest for the Cu-ABA braze joint structures. This system appeared to have the best braze spreading which resulted in a larger braze/C-C composite bonded area compared to the other two braze materials. Also, joint loadcarrying ability was found to be higher for joint structures where the fiber tows in the outer ply of the C-C composite were aligned perpendicular to the tube axis when compared to the case where fiber tows were aligned parallel to the tube axis.

  11. A Combined Brazing and Aluminizing Process for Repairing Turbine Blades by Thermal Spraying Using the Coating System NiCrSi/NiCoCrAlY/Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaus, M.; Möhwald, K.; Maier, H. J.

    2017-10-01

    The repair and maintenance of components in the aerospace industry play an increasingly important role due to rising manufacturing costs. Besides welding, vacuum brazing is a well-established repair process for turbine blades made of nickel-based alloys. After the coating of the worn turbine blade has been removed, the manual application of the nickel-based filler metal follows. Subsequently, the hot gas corrosion-protective coating is applied by thermal spraying. The brazed turbine blade is aluminized to increase the hot gas corrosion resistance. The thermal spray technology is used to develop a two-stage hybrid technology that allows shortening the process chain for repair brazing turbine blades and is described in the present paper. In the first step, the coating is applied on the base material. Specifically, the coating system employed here is a layer system consisting of nickel filler metal, NiCoCrAlY and aluminum. The second step represents the combination of brazing and aluminizing of the coating system which is subjected to a heat treatment. The microstructure, which results from the combined brazing and aluminizing process, is characterized and the relevant diffusion processes in the coating system are illustrated. The properties of the coating and the ramifications with respect to actual applications will be discussed.

  12. WOOD WELDING

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Theodoro Muller; Rafael Rodolfo de Melo; Diego Martins Stangerlin

    2010-01-01

    The term "wood welding" designates what can be defined as "welding of wood surfaces". This new process, that it provides the joint of wood pieces without the use of adhesives or any other additional material, provokes growing interest in the academic environment, although it is still in laboratorial state. Linear friction welding induced bymechanical vibration yields welded joints of flat wood surfaces. The phenomenon of the welding occurs in less time than 10 seconds, with the temperature in...

  13. Binary alloys for refractory-metal brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Data on binary-metal eutectics and melting-point minimums have been assembled for use in selecting brazing filler compositions for refractory metals. Data are presented in four tables for ready reference. Brief discussion of problems and potentials of metallides is included in appendix.

  14. Gold-nickel-titanium brazing alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuhara, Howard

    1990-07-03

    A brazing alloy in accordance with this invention has the following composition, by weight: 91 to 99% gold, 0.5 to 7% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium. Alternatively, with palladium present, the composition is as follows, by weight: 83 to 96% gold; 3 to 10% palladium; 0.5 to 5% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium.

  15. Holding Tubes in Place for Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrisco, D.; Arbino, P.

    1983-01-01

    Simple method prevents loosening due to thermal mismatch. Four segment die pushed outward against tubing wall by tapered ram. Boss on each segment of die produces dimple in wall. Ram driven by commercial pneumatic cylinder powered by air at 250 psi. Method applicable to brazing of heat exchanges, thrust chambers, and other assemblies in which thermal expansion coefficients of materials differ significantly.

  16. Diffusion brazing nickel-plated stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Mitchell, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    To bond parts, sandwich assembly is made up of aluminum core, aluminum face sheet with brazing alloy interface, and nickel plated stainless steel part. Sandwich is placed between bottom and top glide sheet that is placed in stainless steel retort where assembly is bonded at 580 C.

  17. Brazed bipolar plates for PEM fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutzler, Jay Kevin

    1998-01-01

    A liquid-cooled, bipolar plate separating adjacent cells of a PEM fuel cell comprising corrosion-resistant metal sheets brazed together so as to provide a passage between the sheets through which a dielectric coolant flows. The brazement comprises a metal which is substantially insoluble in the coolant.

  18. Weld procedure produces quality welds for thick sections of Hastelloy-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flens, F. J.; Fletcher, C. W.; Glasier, L. F., Jr.

    1967-01-01

    Welding program produces premium quality, multipass welds in heavy tube sections of Hastelloy-X. It develops semiautomatic tungsten/inert gas procedures, weld wire procurement specifications material weld properties, welder-operator training, and nondestructive testing inspection techniques and procedures.

  19. Assessment of the Biological Effects of Welding Fumes Emitted From Metal Active Gas and Manual Metal Arc Welding in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewald, Eva; Gube, Monika; Baumann, Ralf; Bertram, Jens; Kossack, Veronika; Lenz, Klaus; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas; Brand, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Emissions from a particular welding process, metal inert gas brazing of zinc-coated steel, induce an increase in C-reactive protein. In this study, it was investigated whether inflammatory effects could also be observed for other welding procedures. Twelve male subjects were separately exposed to (1) manual metal arc welding fumes, (2) filtered air, and (3) metal active gas welding fumes for 6 hours. Inflammatory markers were measured in serum before, and directly, 1 and 7 days after exposure. Although C-reactive protein concentrations remained unchanged, neutrophil concentrations increased directly after exposure to manual metal arc welding fumes, and endothelin-1 concentrations increased directly and 24 hours after exposure. After exposure to metal active gas and filtered air, endothelin-1 concentrations decreased. The increase in the concentrations of neutrophils and endothelin-1 may characterize a subclinical inflammatory reaction, whereas the decrease of endothelin-1 may indicate stress reduction.

  20. Fracture strength of different soldered and welded orthodontic joining configurations with and without filling material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Johannes Bock

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical strength of different joints made by conventional brazing, TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. Five standardized joining configurations of orthodontic wire in spring hard quality were used: round, cross, 3 mm length, 9 mm length and 7 mm to orthodontic band. The joints were made by five different methods: brazing, tungsten inert gas (TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. For the original orthodontic wire and for each kind of joint configuration or connecting method 10 specimens were carefully produced, totalizing 240. The fracture strengths were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005. Data were analyzed by ANOVA (p=0.05 and Bonferroni post hoc test (p=0.05. In all cases, brazing joints were ruptured on a low level of fracture strength (186-407 N. Significant differences between brazing and TIG or laser welding (p<0.05, Bonferroni post hoc test were found in each joint configuration. The highest fracture strength means were observed for laser welding with filling material and 3 mm joint length (998 N. Using filling materials, there was a clear tendency to higher mean values of fracture strength in TIG and laser welding. However, statistically significant differences were found only in the 9-mm long joints (p<0.05, Bonferroni post hoc test. In conclusion, the fracture strength of welded joints was positively influenced by the additional use of filling material. TIG welding was comparable to laser welding except for the impossibility of joining orthodontic wire with orthodontic band.

  1. First industrial application of the auto-adaptative MAG STT welding technique with laser joint tracking; Premiere application industrielle du soudage MAG STT avec suivi de joint auto-adaptatif au laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran Tien, Th. [Institut de Soudure, 93 - Villepinte (France)

    2007-05-15

    The Welding Institute has participated to the plan of construction of the Large Hadron Collider. The hoops of the dipolar magnets are composed of two half cylinders 15 m in length in 10 mm 316LN austenitic stainless steel and are assembled around the magnet in a horizontal-vertical position. The Welding Institute has developed a software for carrying out the auto-adaptative welding technique with laser joint tracking, in using the MAG STT (Surface Tension Transfer) process. The modelling of the welding laws and the strategy of filling the joints in multi-paths absorb the physical tolerances of the preparation (clearance, poor alignment, root..) in dynamic welding condition too. (O.M.)

  2. Automatic welding of stainless steel tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of automatic welding for making girth welds in stainless steel tubing was investigated as well as the reduction in fabrication costs resulting from the elimination of radiographic inspection. Test methodology, materials, and techniques are discussed, and data sheets for individual tests are included. Process variables studied include welding amperes, revolutions per minute, and shielding gas flow. Strip chart recordings, as a definitive method of insuring weld quality, are studied. Test results, determined by both radiographic and visual inspection, are presented and indicate that once optimum welding procedures for specific sizes of tubing are established, and the welding machine operations are certified, then the automatic tube welding process produces good quality welds repeatedly, with a high degree of reliability. Revised specifications for welding tubing using the automatic process and weld visual inspection requirements at the Kennedy Space Center are enumerated.

  3. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...

  4. Evaluation of Brazed Joints Using Failure Assessment Diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flom, Yury

    2012-01-01

    Fitness-for service approach was used to perform structural analysis of the brazed joints consisting of several base metal / filler metal combinations. Failure Assessment Diagrams (FADs) based on tensile and shear stress ratios were constructed and experimentally validated. It was shown that such FADs can provide a conservative estimate of safe combinations of stresses in the brazed joints. Based on this approach, Margins of Safety (MS) of the brazed joints subjected to multi-axial loading conditions can be evaluated..

  5. PROSES BRAZING Cu-Ag BERBAHAN BAKAR BIOGAS TERMURNIKAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Kusrijadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pemanfaatan biogas sebagai salah satu alternatif bahan bakar  pada proses brazing merupakan langkah diversifikasi biogas, yang diharapkan dapat meningkatkan tingkat efisiensi dan keramahan teknologi. Permasalahan yang bersifat teknis dan menjadi kendala dalam pemanfaatan biogas ini adalah rendahnya konsentrasi CH4 dikarenakan adanya pengotor utama berupa air, karbondioksida dan asam disulfida. Penelitian dilakukan melalui dua tahap yaitu  tahap  pressureized storage process meliputi pemisahan komponen pengotor yang terdapat dalam biogas melalui teknik absorbsi sehingga dihasilkan biogas yang berkualitas gas alam terbarukan dan proses injeksi ke dalam suatu tangki penyimpanan, dan tahap selanjutnya adalah menggunakan biogas tersebut pada proses brazing logam Cu (tembaga dengan bahan tambah Ag (silver. Analisis hasil brazing dilakukan melalui analisis struktur mikro (metalografi untuk melihat kualitas tampak dari hasil brazing, serta analisis kekerasan mikro dan analisis parameter fisik standar terhadap hasil proses brazing. Penelitian ini telah menghasilkan perangkat alat pemurnian biogas yang dapat memurnikan biogas menjadi metana mendekati 100% dan sistem pengemasan (storage system  biogas bertekanan hingga 2 bar. Dari hasil analisis struktur mikro dan uji kekerasan mikro diketahui bahwa hasil proses brazing dengan biogas menghasilkan kualitas yang sama dengan hasil proses brazing dengan gas acetylene sehingga disimpulkan bahwa biogas dapat menjadi bahan bakar alternatif untuk proses brazing, khususnya untuk logam Cu dengan bahan tambah Ag.  Kata kunci : Biogas, Pressureized Storage, Brazing

  6. Laser welding of titanium in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, G; Andersson, M; Bergman, M

    1988-08-01

    Unalloyed titanium of the quality used for osseointegrated implants by the method of Brånemark is also sometimes used for the metallic part of the prosthetic superstructure placed on the fixtures and for crowns and bridges of conventional type. Forty bars of titanium, 8 of ASTM B 348 grade-1 quality and 32 of ASTM B 348 grade-2 quality, were laser-welded, using dissimilar laser joint variables. Tensile strength, 0.2% proof stress, and percentage elongation of the welded bars were measured and compared with the corresponding values for the titanium bars as delivered and with those of brazed type-3 gold alloy bars of similar dimensions. The type of fracture was evaluated from fractographs. The results showed that the use of certain defined laser joint variables during welding produced values for the mechanical properties studied which were more favorable than those obtained from the brazed gold bars. The fracture of the titanium specimens was ductile, with dimples occurring at the fracture surfaces.

  7. TECHNOLOGICAL ISSUES IN MECHANISED FEED WIG/TIG WELDING SURFACING OF WELDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BURCA Mircea

    2016-09-01

    manual welding tests in the light of using the process for welding surfacing being known that in such applications mechanised operations are recommended whenever possible given the latter strengths i.e. increased productivity and quality deposits. The research also aims at achieving a comparative a study between wire mechanised feed based WIG manual welding and the manual rod entry based manual welding in terms of geometry deposits, deposits aesthetics, operating technique, productivity, etc . In this regard deposits were made by means of two welding procedures, and subsequently welding surfacing was made with the optimum values of the welding parameters in this case.

  8. New measurement technique of ductility curve for ductility-dip cracking susceptibility in Alloy 690 welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadoi, Kota, E-mail: kadoi@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Uegaki, Takanori; Shinozaki, Kenji; Yamamoto, Motomichi [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan)

    2016-08-30

    The coupling of a hot tensile test with a novel in situ observation technique using a high-speed camera was investigated as a high-accuracy quantitative evaluation method for ductility-dip cracking (DDC) susceptibility. Several types of Alloy 690 filler wire were tested in this study owing to its susceptibility to DDC. The developed test method was used to directly measure the critical strain for DDC and high temperature ductility curves with a gauge length of 0.5 mm. Minimum critical strains of 1.3%, 4.0%, and 3.9% were obtained for ERNiCrFe-7, ERNiCrFe-13, and ERNiCrFe-15, respectively. The DDC susceptibilities of ERNiCrFe-13 and ERNiCrFe-15 were nearly the same and quite low compared with that of ERNiCrFe-7. This was likely caused by the tortuosity of the grain boundaries arising from the niobium content of around 2.5% in the former samples. Besides, ERNiCrFe-13 and ERNiCrFe-15 indicated higher minimum critical strains even though these specimens include higher content of sulfur and phosphorus than ERNiCrFe-7. Thus, containing niobium must be more effective to improve the susceptibility compared to sulfur and phosphorous in the alloy system.

  9. Residual stress in a laser welded EUROFER blanket module assembly using non-destructive neutron diffraction techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, D J; Heeley, E L

    2014-01-01

    Whilst the structural integrity and lifetime considerations in welded joints for blanket modules can be predicted using finite element software, it is essential to prove the validity of these simulations. This paper provides detailed analysis for the first time, of the residual stress state in a laser-welded sample with integral cooling channels. State-of-the-art non-destructive neutron diffraction was employed to determine the triaxial stress state and to understand microstructural changes around the heat affected zone. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to probe the variation of strain-free lattice reference parameter around the weld zone allowing correction of the neutron measurements. This paper details an important experimental route to validation of predicted stresses in complex safety-critical reactor components for future applications.

  10. Microstructures and Properties of FGH96/DD6 Joints Brazed at Vacuum Pressure State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZOU Wenjiang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Ni-Cr-B brazing filler was used to braze FGH96 and DD6 at 1120℃/10 min and 1120℃/10 min/2 MPa. The tensile strength of the joints was tested, the microstructures and fractures were observed by OM and SEM, and the reaction products were analyzed by EPMA. The results show that the joints brazed at vacuum pressure process offer the average tensile strength of 1187 MPa, outclass the joints brazed without pressure which has average tensile strength of 621 MPa. Compared with vacuum brazing, the grains of FGH96/DD6 joints brazed by vacuum pressure state penetrate the brazing seam without grain boundary and ductile fracture occurred in the parent metal surface. The Ni3B exists in the joints brazed by vacuum brazing, but it is (Ni, Cr solid solution in the joints brazed by vacuum pressure brazing instead of Ni3B.

  11. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  12. In Situ Synthesis of Al-Si-Cu Alloy During Brazing Process and Mechanical Property of Brazing Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LONG Wei-min

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Al-Si-Cu alloy system is considered to be a promising choice of filler metal for aluminium alloys brazing due to its high strength and low melting point. The greatest obstacle is its lack of plastic forming ability and being difficult to be processed by conventional methods. This disadvantage is ascribed to the considerable amount of brittle CuAl2 intermetallic compound which forms when alloy composition is around the ternary eutectic point. In order to overcome this deficiency, authors of this article proposed to synthesize Al-Si-Cu filler metal by using in situ synthesis method, and the structure and properties of brazing joints were studied. The results show that AlSi alloy is used as the wrap layer, and CuAl alloy is used as the powder core in the composite brazing wire, the two alloys have similar melting points. The machinability of the composite brazing wire is much superior to the traditional Al-Si-Cu filler metal. During the induction brazing of 3A21 alloy, when using AlSi-CuAl composite filler wire, AlSi and CuAl alloys melt almost simultaneously, then after short time holding, Al-Si-Cu braze filler is obtained, the brazing seam has uniform composition and good bonding interface, also, the shearing strength of the brazing joints is higher than the joint brazed by conventional Al-Si-Cu filler metal.

  13. Effect of ultrasonic transmission rate on microstructure and properties of the ultrasonic-assisted brazing of Cu to alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hongjun; Chen, Hao; Li, Mingyu

    2017-01-01

    Fluxless brazing of bare alumina with Cu was conducted with an ultrasonic-assisted brazing technique by a Zn-14wt.%Al filler. The shear strength of Cu/alumina joints (84MPa) exhibited 27% larger than the alumina/Cu joints (66MPa) due to different intermetallic phases and their morphologies formed in the seam under the same parameters, which are probably attributed to the transmission rate of ultrasonic energy varying with density of the ultrasonic horn-contacted materials. Overgrowth of stalactite-like CuZn5 contributes to better thermal dissipation of the ultrasonic-assisted brazed Cu/alumina joints. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Joining of aluminum and stainless steel using AlSi10 brazing filler: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Vasilii; Uhlig, Thomas; Wagner, Guntram

    2017-07-01

    Joining of dissimilar materials like stainless steel and aluminum is of special interest for automotive applications. Due to the different properties of these materials, suitable joining techniques are required. Brazing offers the possibilities to manufacture high performance joints in one step and at low joining temperatures. However, these joints often need to withstand a high number of high cyclic loads during application. Therefore, in addition to the monotonic properties, the fatigue behavior of the produced joints must be considered and evaluated. In the present work, specimens are manufactured by induction brazing using an AlSi10 filler and a non-corrosive flux. The mechanical properties are determined by tensile shear tests as well as in fatigue tests at ambient and elevated temperatures. The microstructure of the brazed joints and the fracture surfaces of the tested samples are investigated by SEM.

  15. Modified protocol of the intraoral welding technique for immediate implant-supported rehabilitation of the edentulous maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, Marcello; Ferrari, Carla; Superbi, Simone; Jimbo, Ryo; Galli, Silvia

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to report the outcomes of a treatment option of immediate loading with intraoral welding on only 4 implants for the restoration of patients with maxillary edentulism. Seventeen consecutive patients were rehabilitated with 2 parallel and 2 tilted implants in the maxilla. Immediately after implant placement, angulated abutments were screwed on the implants to create better parallelism among the implants; thereafter, a titanium bar was intraorally welded to the welding pins to create a superstructure that rigidly splinted the implants. A fixed full-arch durable prosthesis was delivered on the same day of the surgery. The patients were followed for 26.5 months on average. During the follow-up time, 2 implants were lost giving an implant survival rate of 97%. Nonetheless, all the prostheses remained in function and the prosthetic success was 100%. The rehabilitation of the edentulous maxilla with an immediately loaded full-arch prosthesis, obtained through intraoral welding on only 4 implants, is a functionally and esthetically successful treatment.

  16. Laser weld process monitoring and control using chromatic filtering of thermal radiation from a weld pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Kim, Min Suk; Baik, Sung Hoon; Chung, Chin Man

    2000-06-01

    The application of high power Nd: YAG lasers for precision welding in industry has been growing quite fast these days in diverse areas such as the automobile, the electronics and the aerospace industries. These diverse applications also require the new developments for the precise control and the reliable process monitoring. Due to the hostile environment in laser welding, a remote monitoring is required. The present development relates in general to weld process monitoring techniques, and more particularly to improved methods and apparatus for real-time monitoring of thermal radiation of a weld pool to monitor a size variation and a focus shift of the weld pool for weld process control, utilizing the chromatic aberration of focusing lens or lenses. The monitoring technique of the size variation and the focus shift of a weld pool is developed by using the chromatic filtering of the thermal radiation from a weld pool. The monitoring of weld pool size variation can also be used to monitor the weld depth in a laser welding. Furthermore, the monitoring of the size variation of a weld pool is independent of the focus shift of a weld pool and the monitoring of the focus shift of a weld pool is independent of the size variation of a weld pool.

  17. Failure Assessment Diagram for Brazed 304 Stainless Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flom, Yory

    2011-01-01

    Interaction equations were proposed earlier to predict failure in Albemet 162 brazed joints. Present study demonstrates that the same interaction equations can be used for lower bound estimate of the failure criterion in 304 stainless steel joints brazed with silver-based filler metals as well as for construction of the Failure Assessment Diagrams (FAD).

  18. 46 CFR 56.75-20 - Brazing qualification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... brazing operators shall be in accordance with the requirements of part C, Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) and part 57 of this... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Brazing qualification. 56.75-20 Section 56.75-20...

  19. Microwave-assisted brazing of alumina ceramics for electron tube ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The brazed joints were characterizedby X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, Vickers microhardness evaluation, brazing strength measurement and helium leak test. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the formationof Ti-based compounds at the substrate-filler alloy interfaces of ...

  20. Liquid Film Migration in Warm Formed Aluminum Brazing Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, M. J.; Whitney, M. A.; Wells, M. A.; Jin, H.; Winkler, S.

    2017-10-01

    Warm forming has previously proven to be a promising manufacturing route to improve formability of Al brazing sheets used in automotive heat exchanger production; however, the impact of warm forming on subsequent brazing has not previously been studied. In particular, the interaction between liquid clad and solid core alloys during brazing through the process of liquid film migration (LFM) requires further understanding. Al brazing sheet comprised of an AA3003 core and AA4045 clad alloy, supplied in O and H24 tempers, was stretched between 0 and 12 pct strain, at room temperature and 523K (250 °C), to simulate warm forming. Brazeability was predicted through thermal and microstructure analysis. The rate of solid-liquid interactions was quantified using thermal analysis, while microstructure analysis was used to investigate the opposing processes of LFM and core alloy recrystallization during brazing. In general, liquid clad was consumed relatively rapidly and LFM occurred in forming conditions where the core alloy did not recrystallize during brazing. The results showed that warm forming could potentially impair brazeability of O temper sheet by extending the regime over which LFM occurs during brazing. No change in microstructure or thermal data was found for H24 sheet when the forming temperature was increased, and thus warm forming was not predicted to adversely affect the brazing performance of H24 sheet.

  1. Factors affecting weld root morphology in laser keyhole welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frostevarg, Jan

    2018-02-01

    Welding production efficiency is usually optimised if full penetration can be achieved in a single pass. Techniques such as electron and laser beam welding offer deep high speed keyhole welding, especially since multi-kilowatt lasers became available. However, there are limitations for these techniques when considering weld imperfections such as weld cap undercuts, interior porosity or humps at the root. The thickness of sheets during full penetration welding is practically limited by these root humps. The mechanisms behind root morphology formation are not yet satisfactory understood. In this paper root humping is studied by reviewing previous studies and findings and also by sample examination and process observation by high speed imaging. Different process regimes governing root quality are presented, categorized and explained. Even though this study mainly covers laser beam and laser arc hybrid welding, the presented findings can generally be applied full penetration welding in medium to thick sheets, especially the discussion of surface tension effects. As a final result of this analysis, a map of methods to optimise weld root topology is presented.

  2. Two-beam Laser Brazing of Thin Sheet Steel for Automotive Industry Using Cu-base Filler Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelstädt, C.; Seefeld, T.; Reitemeyer, D.; Vollertsen, F.

    This work shows the potential of two-beam laser brazing for joining both Zn-coated steel and 22MnB5. Brazing of Zn-coated steel sheets using Cu-Si filler wire is already state of the art in car manufacturing. New press-hardened steels like 22MnB5 are more and more used in automotive industry, offering high potential to save costs and improve structural properties (reduced weight / higher stiffness). However, for joining of these ultra-high strength steels investigations are mandatory. In this paper, a novel approach using a two-beam laser brazing process and Cu-base filler material is presented. The use of Cu-base filler material leads to a reduced heat input, compared to currently applied welding processes, which may result in benefits concerning distortion, post processing and tensile strength of the joint. Reliable processing at desired high speeds is attained by means of laser-preheating. High feed rates prevent significant diffusion of copper into the base material.

  3. Composition and method for brazing graphite to graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A.J.; Dykes, N.L.

    1982-08-10

    A brazing material is described for joining graphite structures that can be used up to 2800/sup 0/C. The brazing material is formed of a paste-like composition of hafnium carbide and uranium oxide with a thermosetting resin. The uranium oxide is converted to uranium dicarbide during the brazing operation and then the hafnium carbide and uranium dicarbide form a liquid phase at a temperature about 2600/sup 0/C with the uranium diffusing and vaporizing from the joint area as the temperature is increased to about 2800/sup 0/C so as to provide a brazed joint consisting essentially of hafnium carbide. The resulting brazed joint is chemically and thermally compatible with the graphite structures.

  4. Thermochemistry of brazing ceramics and metals in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobzin, Kirsten; Schlaefer, Thomas; Kopp, Nils [RWTH Aachen (DE). Surface Engineering Inst. (IOT)

    2011-08-15

    Reactive air brazing offers economically and technologically advantageous joining of ceramics to metals. Solid oxide fuel cells and membranes for oxyfuel combustion are recent fields of application. However, it remains a problem that strong metallurgical reactions between brazes and base materials occur. These reactions were analysed by differential scanning calorimetry tests to get a better understanding. Therefore, three braze alloys (Ag8Cu, Ag8Cu0.5Ti and Ag4Cu4Ni) and five base materials (alumina, 3YSZ partially stabilised zirconia, BSCF perovskite ceramic, X1CrTi-La22 and X15CrNiSi25-20) were investigated. The reaction peaks correlate with the formation of reaction layers, which were observed in metallographic analysis of brazed specimens. The results help to explain the reaction mechanisms and allow optimised selection of filler metals and brazing temperature. (orig.)

  5. Metal substrate effects on the thermochemistry of active brazing interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arroyave, Raymundo; Eagar, Thomas W

    2003-09-15

    This work investigates the effects of the metal substrate on the thermochemistry of active brazing alloys during ceramic/metal joining applications. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the interactions between the metal substrate and the braze alloy are examined. Numerical simulations are used to rationalize experimental observations reported elsewhere. It is shown that using Ni metal substrates at temperatures much higher than the liquidus of the brazing alloys can dramatically decrease the chemical activity of Ti in Cu-based brazing alloys. This effect is much less intense when Fe-metal substrates are in contact with the same active brazing alloy systems. It is additionally proven that the time scales necessary to observe such detrimental decrease in chemical activity are on the order of minutes.

  6. Survey of welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    The current KYTC SPECIAL PROVISION NO. 4 WELDING STEEL BRIDGES prohibits the use of welding processes other than shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and submerged arc welding (SAW). Nationally, bridge welding is codified under ANSI/AASHTO/AWS D1....

  7. A study of processes for welding pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, J. (ed.)

    1991-07-01

    A review was made of exisiting and potential processes for welding pipelines: fusion welding (arc, electron beam, laser, thermit) and forge welding (friction, flash, magnetically impelled arc butt, upset butt, explosive, shielded active gas, gas pressure). Consideration of J-lay operations gave indications that were reflections of the status of the processes in terms of normal land and offshore S-lay operation: forge welding processes, although having promise require considerable development; fusion welding processes offer several possibilities (mechanized GMA welding likely to be used in 1991-2); laser welding requires development in all pipeline areas: a production machine for electron beam welding will involve high costs. Nondestructive testing techniques are also reviewed. Demand for faster quality assessment is being addressed by speeding radiographic film processing and through the development of real time radiography and automatic ultrasonic testing. Conclusions on most likely future process developments are: SMAW with cellulosic electrodes is best for tie-ins, short pip runs; SMAW continues to be important for small-diameter lines, although mechanized GMA could be used, along with mechanical joining, MIAB, radial fraction, and flash butt; mechanized GMA welding is likely to predominate for large diameter lines and probably will be used for the first J-lay line (other techniques could be used too); and welding of piping for station facilities involves both shop welding of sub-assemblies and on-site welding of pipe and sub-assemblies to each other (site welding uses both SMAW and GMAW). Figs, tabs.

  8. EFFECT OF POST-WELD HEAT TREATMENT ON THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of post- weld heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of arc welded medium carbon steel was investigated. Medium carbon steel samples were butt- welded by using the shielded metal arc welding technique and, thereafter, heat treated by annealing, normalising and quench hardening in ...

  9. Technical specifications on the welding in fuel reprocessing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karino, Motonobu; Uryu, Mitsuru; Matsui, N.; Nakazawa, Fumio; Imanishi, Makoto; Koizumi; Kazuhiko; Sugawara, Junichi; Tanaka, Hideo

    1999-04-01

    The past specifications SGN of the welding in JNC was reexamined for the reprocessing plants in order to further promote the quality control. The specification first concerns the quality of raw materials, items of the quality tests, material management, and qualification standards of the welders. It extends over details of the welding techniques, welding design, welding testings, inspection and the judgment standards. (H. Baba)

  10. Joining titanium materials with tungsten inert gas welding, laser welding, and infrared brazing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R R; Welsch, G E

    1995-11-01

    Titanium has a number of desirable properties for dental applications that include low density, excellent biocompatibility, and corrosion resistance. However, joining titanium is one of the practical problems with the use of titanium prostheses. Dissolved oxygen and hydrogen may cause severe embrittlement in titanium materials. Therefore the conventional dental soldering methods that use oxygen flame or air torch are not indicated for joining titanium materials. This study compared laser, tungsten inert gas, and infrared radiation heating methods for joining both pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Original rods that were not subjected to joining procedures were used as a control method. Mechanical tests and microstructure analysis were used to evaluate joined samples. Mechanical tests included Vickers microhardness and uniaxial tensile testing of the strength of the joints and percentage elongation. Two-way analysis of variance and Duncan's multiple range test were used to compare mean values of tensile strength and elongation for significant differences (p < or = 0.05). Tensile rupture occurred in the joint region of all specimens by cohesive failure. Ti-6Al-4V samples exhibited significantly greater tensile strength than pure titanium samples. Samples prepared by the three joining methods had markedly lower tensile elongation than the control titanium and Ti-6Al-4V rods. The changes in microstructure and microhardness were studied in the heat-affected and unaffected zones. Microhardness values increased in the heat-affected zone for all the specimens tested.

  11. Control of Vacuum Induction Brazing System for Sealing of Instrumentation Feedthrough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sung Ho; Hong, Jintae; Joung, Chang Young; Heo, Sung Ho

    2017-04-01

    The integrity of instrumentation cables is an important performance parameter in the brazing process, along with the sealing performance. In this paper, an accurate control scheme for brazing of the instrumentation feedthrough in a vacuum induction brazing system was developed. The experimental results show that the accurate brazing temperature control performance is achieved by the developed control scheme. It is demonstrated that the sealing performances of the instrumentation feedthrough and the integrity of the instrumentation cables are to be acceptable after brazing.

  12. The dissimilar brazing of Kovar alloy to SiCp/Al composites using silver-based filler metal foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Xu, Dongxia; Zhai, Yahong; Niu, Jitai

    2017-09-01

    Aluminum metal matrix composites with high SiC content (60 vol.% SiCp/Al MMCs) were surface metallized with a Ni-P alloy coating, and vacuum brazing between the composites and Kovar alloy were performed using rapidly cooled Ag-22.0Cu-15.9In-10.86Sn-1.84Ti (wt%) foil. The effects of Ni-P alloy coating and brazing parameters on the joint microstructures and properties were researched by SEM, EDS, and single lap shear test, respectively. Results show that Ag-Al intermetallic strips were formed in the 6063Al matrix and filler metal layer because of diffusion, and they were arranged regularly and accumulated gradually as the brazing temperature was increased ( T/°C = 550-600) or the soaking time was prolonged ( t/min = 10-50). However, excessive strips would destroy the uniformity of seams and lead to a reduced bonding strength (at most 70 MPa). Using a Ni-P alloy coating, void free joints without those strips were obtained at 560 °C after 20 min soaking time, and a higher shear strength of 90 MPa was achieved. The appropriate interface reaction ( 2 μm transition layer) that occurred along the Ni-P alloy coating/filler metal/Kovar alloy interfaces resulted in better metallurgical bonding. In this research, the developed Ag-based filler metal was suitable for brazing the dissimilar materials of Ni-P alloy-coated SiCp/Al MMCs and Kovar alloy, and capable welding parameters were also broadened.

  13. [New welding processes and health effects of welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vecchia, G Marina; Maestrelli, Piero

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes some of the recent developments in the control technology to enhance capability of Pulse Gas Metal Arc Welding. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) processing has been also considered. FSW is a new solid-state joining technique. Heat generated by friction at the rotating tool softens the material being welded. FSW can be considered a green and energy-efficient technique without deleterious fumes, gas, radiation, and noise. Application of new welding processes is limited and studies on health effects in exposed workers are lacking. Acute and chronic health effects of conventional welding have been described. Metal fume fever and cross-shift decline of lung function are the main acute respiratory effects. Skin and eyes may be affected by heat, electricity and UV radiations. Chronic effects on respiratory system include chronic bronchitis, a benign pneumoconiosis (siderosis), asthma, and a possible increase in the incidence of lung cancer. Pulmonary infections are increased in terms of severity, duration, and frequency among welders.

  14. WELDING TORCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  15. TIG-dressing of High Strength Steel Butt Welded Connections. Part 1 : Weld Toe Geometry and Local Hardness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Es, S.H.J.; Kolstein, M.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of extensive measurements on weld toe geometry of as-welded and TIG-dressed butt welded connections in high strength steels S460, S690 and very high strength steels S890 and S1100. Descriptions of the measurement techniques and data analysis are presented. Four weld

  16. TIG-dressing of high strength steel butt welded connections - Part 1: weld toe geometry and local hardness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es, S.H.J. van; Kolstein, M.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of extensive measurements on weld toe geometry of as-welded and TIG-dressed butt welded connections in high strength steels S460, S690 and very high strength steels S890 and S1100. Descriptions of the measurement techniques and data analysis are presented. Four weld

  17. Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracks in Nickel Alloy Dissimilar Metal Welds: Detection and Sizing Using Established and Emerging Nondestructive Examination Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braatz, Brett G.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Prokofiev, Iouri

    2012-12-31

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established the Program to Assess the Reliability of Emerging Nondestructive Techniques (PARENT) as a follow-on to the international cooperative Program for the Inspection of Nickel Alloy Components (PINC). The goal of PINC was to evaluate the capabilities of various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to detect and characterize surface-breaking primary water stress corrosion cracks in dissimilar-metal welds (DMW) in bottom-mounted instrumentation (BMI) penetrations and small-bore (≈400-mm diameter) piping components. A series of international blind round-robin tests were conducted by commercial and university inspection teams. Results from these tests showed that a combination of conventional and phased-array ultrasound techniques provided the highest performance for flaw detection and depth sizing in dissimilar metal piping welds. The effective detection of flaws in BMIs by eddy current and ultrasound shows that it may be possible to reliably inspect these components in the field. The goal of PARENT is to continue the work begun in PINC and apply the lessons learned to a series of open and blind international round-robin tests that will be conducted on a new set of piping components including large-bore (≈900-mm diameter) DMWs, small-bore DMWs, and BMIs. Open round-robin testing will engage universities and industry worldwide to investigate the reliability of emerging NDE techniques to detect and accurately size flaws having a wide range of lengths, depths, orientations, and locations. Blind round-robin testing will invite testing organizations worldwide, whose inspectors and procedures are certified by the standards for the nuclear industry in their respective countries, to investigate the ability of established NDE techniques to detect and size flaws whose characteristics range from easy to very difficult to detect and size. This paper presents highlights of PINC and reports on the plans and progress for

  18. Local zone wise elastic and plastic properties of electron beam welded Ti-6Al-4V alloy using digital image correlation technique: A comparative study between uniform stress and virtual fields method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranath, K. M.; Ramji, M.

    2015-05-01

    Joining of materials using welding results in the formation of material zones with varying microstructure across the weld. Extraction of the mechanical properties of those individual heterogeneous zones are important in designing components and structures comprised of welds. In this study, the zone wise local extraction of the elastic and plastic properties of an electron beam welded Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy has been carried out using both the uniform stress method (USM) and the virtual fields method (VFM) involving digital image correlation (DIC) technique. The surface strain field obtained using DIC technique from a transverse weld specimen tensile testing is used for extracting the zone wise strain evolution. Initially, using uniform stress assumption, zone wise full range stress-strain curves are extracted. In USM methodology, the elastic and plastic material models are fitted to the zone wise stress-strain curves and required parameters are extracted from it. But inherent disadvantage is lot of images need to be processed for the parameter extraction. Recently, VFM is gaining lot of popularity in characterization domain as it is robust, accurate and faster. VFM is based on the principle of virtual work where, the weak form of local equilibrium equations and kinematically admissible virtual displacement fields are utilized for parameter extraction. Hollomon's power law is used here as the hardening rule. Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, yield stress, strength coefficient and strain hardening exponent are the parameters extracted zone wise using both USM and VFM. A Vicker's microhardness measurement is also conducted across the weld zone towards mapping the strength behavior. Fusion zone has reported higher yield strength, strength coefficient and Poisson's ratio. Young's modulus value is found decreasing from base metal towards the fusion zone. The trend observed in parameter variation across the weld zone obtained by both USM and VFM compares very well. Due

  19. Plasma arc welding weld imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has a transparent shield cup disposed about the constricting nozzle, the cup including a small outwardly extending polished lip. A guide tube extends externally of the torch and has a free end adjacent to the lip. First and second optical fiber bundle assemblies are supported within the guide tube. Light from a strobe light is transmitted along one of the assemblies to the free end and through the lip onto the weld site. A lens is positioned in the guide tube adjacent to the second assembly and focuses images of the weld site onto the end of the fiber bundle of the second assembly and these images are transmitted along the second assembly to a video camera so that the weld site may be viewed continuously for monitoring the welding process.

  20. Brazing of zirconia to titanium using Ag-Cu and Au-Ni filler alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean S. Pimenta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Advanced ceramic is usually joined to metal by the well-known direct brazing process, where costly active filler alloys can be considered a limitation. Brazing using active-metal-free filler alloy as insert between the joint components is an attempt to overcome it. The active metal diffusion from the titanium member through the bulk of molten filler to the ceramic was responsible to produce an active filler alloy in loco and promote reduction of the zirconium oxide to improve wetting on the ceramic surface. Unalloyed titanium was joined in a high-vacuum furnace (<3x10-5 mbar to yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycristals (Y-TZP and zirconia partially stabilized with magnesia (Mg-PSZ, where commercial fillers Ag-28Cu and Au-18Ni with respective thermal cycles were evaluated. Helium gas leak detection test was performed at the ceramic/metal interface at room temperature; samples from reliable vacuum tight joints were examined by microstructural analysis techniques and energy dispersive X-ray analysis at the joint cross-section. Tight joints were produced with eutectic Ag-Cu filler, revealing an intermetallic layer and a dark reaction layer near the ceramic surface; titanium diffusion was efficient for superficial chemical interactions between individual components. Brazing joints were also tested using three-point flexure testing.

  1. Mechanical Design, Brazing and Assembly Procedures of the LINAC4 RFQ

    CERN Document Server

    Mathot, S; Briswalter, A; Callamand, Th; Carosone, J; Favre, N; Geisser, J M; Lombardi, A; Maire, V; Malabaila, M; Pugnat, D; Richerot, Ph; Riffaut, B; Rossi, C; Timmins, M; Vacca, A; Vandoni, G; Vretenar, M

    2010-01-01

    The Linac4 RFQ will accelerate the H- beam from the ion source to the energy of 3 MeV. The RFQ is composed of three sections of one meter each, assembled by means of ultra high vacuum flanges and adjustable centring rings. The complete 3-m long RFQ will be supported isostatically over 3 points like a simple beam in order to minimise the maximum deflection. The ridge line, used to feed the RF power into the RFQ, will be supported via springs and its position adjusted in such way that no strain is introduced into the RFQ at the moment of its connection. The mechanical design has been done at CERN where the modules are completely manufactured, heat treated and brazed also. In that way, all of the processes are carefully controlled and the influence, notably of the heat treatments, has been understood in a better way. Since 2002 several four vanes RFQ modules have been brazed at CERN for the TRASCO and IPHI projects. A two-step brazing procedure has been tested. This technique is actually used for the assembly of...

  2. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Wide-gap Brazed Joints of K465 Alloy Using Cobalt-base Brazing Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAN Hui

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vacuum brazing of K465 superalloy was carried out by using Co45NiCrWB cobalt-base filler metal at 1220 ℃ for different holding time, and the joint clearance was 0.5 mm pre-filled with FGH95 nickel-base superalloy powder. The effect of the structural constitution of brazed different holding time of temperature on the brazed joint microstructure and properties. The results show that the brazing seam is composed of alloy powder particles and borides among them. It is two-phase structure of γ and γ' with a few small blocks of borides in the powder particles, and there exists phases rich in Cr, W and Nb elements. The powder particles are growing along the holding time during the brazing process, while their combination is expanded. It is good for stress rapture properties of joints that borides was fine in brazing seam with more superalloy powder and proper holding time. And the joints brazed for 30-60 min show higher stress rapture properties.

  3. TIG-dressing of high strength butt welded connection - Part 2: physical testing and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es, S.H.J. van; Kolstein, M.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2013-01-01

    Weld improvement techniques are aimed at reducing the notch effects of welds and generally focus on two aspects: a change of geometry of the weld toe and a change of the weld residual stresses. In this paper, fatigue tests are discussed, performed on butt welded specimens in steel grades ranging

  4. TIG-dressing of High Strength Butt Welded Connection. Part 2 : Physical Testing and Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Es, S.H.J.; Kolstein, M.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2014-01-01

    Weld improvement techniques are aimed at reducing the notch effects of welds and generally focus on two aspects: a change of geometry of the weld toe and a change of the weld residual stresses. In this paper, fatigue tests are discussed, performed on butt welded specimens in steel grades ranging

  5. Study of the mechanical properties of welded joints by wet sub sea welding technique with tubular electrode; Estudo das propriedades mecanicas de juntas soldadas pela tecnica de soldagem subaquatica molhada com eletrodo tubular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teichmann, Erwin Werner; Baixo, Carlos Eduardo Iconomos; Dutra, Jair Carlos [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Lab. de Soldagem e Mecatronica - LABSOLDA]. E-mail: erwin@labsolda.ufsc.br; Santos, Valter Rocha dos [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica (CEFET), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Teixeira, Jose Claudio [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    1997-07-01

    Some experiments conducted at LABSOLDA/UFSC - a welding laboratory of Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, Brazil - in order to identify mechanical properties, weld bead geometry and the quantity and dimensions of pores in weld beads produced by sub sea wet FCAW are described. Welding in shallow water with power source adjusted to operate in constant current characteristic mode and a set of parameters to establish an open arc transfer mode it was obtained weld beads with regular geometry and an acceptable profile, with low level of defects incidence, no pores and crack free. The tenacity measured by Charpy tests (0C) was 34 J and hardness of 119 HV-10 measured by Vickers tests. The methodology used in the experiments and the results obtained are discussed in the paper. (author)

  6. Heat-affected zone and phase composition of 0.09 C-2 Mn-1 Si-Fe steel depending on welding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Natalya; Ozhiganov, Eugeniy; Nikonenko, Elena; Ababkov, Nikolay; Smirnov, Aleksander; Koneva, Nina

    2017-11-01

    The paper presents the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations of the structure and phase composition of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) in welded joint modified by four types of welding, namely: electrode welding and electropercussive welding both with and without the introduction of artificial flaws. Artificial flows are aluminum pieces. TEM investigations are carried out within HAZ between the deposited and base metal at 1 mm distance to the latter. The type 0.09C-2Mn-1Si-Fe steel is used as weld material. It is shown that the welding process has an effect on the material morphology, phase composition, faulted structure and its parameters. Long-range stresses are divided into plastic and elastic components. It is demonstrated that the type of welding does not change the structural quality of welded joint represented by perlite and ferrite as contrasted with their volume fraction. According to observations, any type of welding with the introduction of artificial flaws results in the destruction of perlite. Polarization of the dislocation structure occurs. The amplitude of mean internal stresses does not practically depend on the welding type. It is shown that the introduction of artificial flaws both during electrode and electropercussive welding reduce the quantitative parameters of the faulted structure.

  7. [Spectra and thermal analysis of the arc in activating flux plasma arc welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Guo-Ming; Zhu, Yi-Feng

    2010-04-01

    In activating flux plasma arc welding the welding arc was analyzed by spectra analysis technique, and the welding arc temperature field was measured by the infrared sensing and computer image technique. The distribution models of welding arc heat flow density of activating flux PAW welding were developed. The composition of welding arc affected by activated flux was studied, and the welding arc temperature field was studied. The results show that the spectral lines of argon atom and ionized argon atom of primary ionization are the main spectra lines of the conventional plasma welding arc. The spectra lines of weld metal are inappreciable in the spectra lines of the conventional plasma welding arc. The gas particle is the main in the conventional plasma welding arc. The conventional plasma welding arc is gas welding arc. The spectra lines of argon atom and ionized argon atom of primary ionization are intensified in the activating flux plasma welding arc, and the spectra lines of Ti, Cr and Fe elements are found in the activating flux plasma welding arc. The welding arc temperature distribution in activating flux plasma arc welding is compact, the outline of the welding arc temperature field is narrow, the range of the welding arc temperature distribution is concentrated, the welding arc radial temperature gradient is large, and the welding arc radial temperature gradient shows normal Gauss distribution.

  8. Laser Beam Submerged Arc Hybrid Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisgen, Uwe; Olschok, Simon; Jakobs, Stefan; Schleser, Markus; Mokrov, Oleg; Rossiter, Eduardo

    The laser beam-submerged arc hybrid welding method originates from the knowledge that, with increasing penetration depth, the laser beam process has a tendency to pore formation in the lower weld regions. The coupling with the energy-efficient submerged-arc process improves degassing and reduces the tendency to pore formation. The high deposition rate of the SA process in combination with the laser beam process offers, providing the appropriate choice of weld preparation, the possibility of welding plates with a thickness larger than 20° mm in a single pass, and also of welding thicker plates with the double-sided single pass technique.

  9. COMPARATION BETWEEN NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING METHODS FOR THE ALUMINIUM BRAZED PIECES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan NIŢOI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Presented paper refers to different control methods used in aluminium brazed joining because of possible defects. Low joining complexity permits exact damages position in relation with materials geometry.

  10. Reactive Brazing of Carbon-Carbon Composites to Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpargel, Tarah; Singh, M.; Morscher, Gregory; Asthana, Rajiv

    2004-01-01

    The Ti-metal/C-C composite joints were formed by reactive brazing with three commercial brazes, namely, Cu-ABA, TiCuNi, and TiCuSil. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The results of the microstructure analysis indicate solute redistribution across the joint and possible metallurgical bond formation via interdiffusion, which led to good wetting and spreading.

  11. Comparison of brazed joints made with BNi-1 and BNi-7 nickel-base brazing alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorc, Borut

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Kinetics of the processes are different with different types of brazing alloys. Precipitation processes in the parent metal close to the brazing gap are of great importance. They control the mechanical properties of the joint area when the brittle eutectic has disappeared from the gap. A comparative study of brazed joints on austenitic stainless alloys made with BNi-7 (Ni-P type and BNi-1 (Ni-Si-B type brazing alloys was made. Brazing alloys containing phosphorus behave in a different manner to those containing boron.

    Las aleaciones de níquel se producen mediante tres sistemas de aleación: Ni-P, Ni-Si y Ni-B. Durante las reacciones metalúrgicas con el metal de base, la eutéctica frágil en la separación soldada puede transformarse en la solución dúctil-sólida con todas aleaciones. La cinética del proceso varía según el tipo de aleación. Los procesos de precipitación en el metal de base cerca de la separación soldada son de mucha importancia, ya que controlan las propiedades mecánicas de la área de unión después de desaparecer la eutéctica frágil de la separación. Se ha hecho un análisis comparativo de uniones soldadas en aleaciones austeníticas inoxidables realizadas con aleaciones BNi-7 (tipo Ni-P y BNi-1 (tipo Ni-Si-B. Las aleaciones que contienen fósforo se comportan de una manera diferente, tanto con el cambio de la eutéctica a la solución sólida, como con los procesos de precipitación en el metal de base cerca de la unión soldada.

  12. Self-brazing Mechanism of Aluminum Alloy at Medium Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHENG Fang-jie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ZnCl2 and SnCl2 were added to the AlF3-CsF eutectic flux, which can be used for connecting aluminum alloy sheet by self-brazing at medium temperature. The influence of the amount of ZnCl2 and SnCl2 and the size of the T-joint area on the interface microstructure and the self-brazing joint mechanical properties was investigated. The interface microstructure, chemical compositions, defects and tensile fractography of the self-brazing joints were analyzed by metallographic microscope, scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results show that the joints are soundly bonded when both the mass fractions of ZnCl2 and SnCl2 are about 4%; the replacement reactions between Zn2+, Sn2+ of flux and Al atoms of base metal occur during brazing, then the liquid metals of Sn and Zn appear, a great degree of Zn which has high solid solution with Al spreads rapidly to the base metal; Sn is distributed along the interface forming a low melting point metal layer with Zn and Al; the brazing of joints with small area can be realized easily; there are a lot of dimples on the fracture surface and the tensile strength of the brazing joint reaches (58±5MPa.

  13. Microstructural and Mechanical Characterization of Actively Brazed Alumina Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosking, F.M.; Cadden, C.H.; Stephens, J.J.; Glass, S.J.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Vianco, P.V.; Walker, C.A.

    1999-08-26

    Alumina (94 and 99.8% grade compositions) was brazed directly to itself with gold-based active brazing alloys (ABA's) containing vanadium additions of 1,2 and 3 weight percent. The effects of brazing conditions on the joint properties were investigated. Wetting behavior, interfacial reactions, microstructure, hermeticity and tensile strength were determined. Wetting was fair to good for the ABA and base material combinations. Microanalysis identified a discontinuous Al-V-O spinel reaction product at the alumina-braze interface. Tensile strength results for 94% alumina were uniformly good and generally not sensitive to the vanadium concentration, with tensile values of 85-105 MPa. There was more variability in the 99.8% alumina strength results, with values ranging from 25-95 MPa. The highest vanadium concentration (3 wt. %) yielded the highest joint strength for the brazed 99.8% alumina. Failures in the 99.8% alumina samples occurred at the braze-alumina interface, while the 94% alumina specimens exhibited fracture of the ceramic substrate.

  14. Method For Brazing And Thermal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, John O.; Dave, Vivek R.; Christensen, Dane; Carpenter, II, Robert W.

    2005-07-12

    The present invention includes a method for brazing of two objects or heat treatment of one object. First, object or objects to be treated are selected and initial conditions establishing a relative geometry and material characteristics are determined. Then, a first design of an optical system for directing heat energy onto the object or objects is determined. The initial conditions and first design of the optical system are then input into a optical ray-tracing computer program. The program is then run to produce a representative output of the heat energy input distribution to the object or objects. The geometry of the object or objects, material characteristics, and optical system design are then adjusted until an desired heat input is determined.

  15. Brazing open cell reticulated copper foam to stainless steel tubing with vacuum furnace brazed gold/indium alloy plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Stanley R [Windsor, SC; Korinko, Paul S [Aiken, SC

    2008-05-27

    A method of fabricating a heat exchanger includes brush electroplating plated layers for a brazing alloy onto a stainless steel tube in thin layers, over a nickel strike having a 1.3 .mu.m thickness. The resultant Au-18 In composition may be applied as a first layer of indium, 1.47 .mu.m thick, and a second layer of gold, 2.54 .mu.m thick. The order of plating helps control brazing erosion. Excessive amounts of brazing material are avoided by controlling the electroplating process. The reticulated copper foam rings are interference fit to the stainless steel tube, and in contact with the plated layers. The copper foam rings, the plated layers for brazing alloy, and the stainless steel tube are heated and cooled in a vacuum furnace at controlled rates, forming a bond of the copper foam rings to the stainless steel tube that improves heat transfer between the tube and the copper foam.

  16. Brazing of Stainless Steel to Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Using Gold-Based Brazes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, T. P.; Asthana, R.

    2007-01-01

    Two gold-base active metal brazes (gold-ABA and gold-ABA-V) were evaluated for oxidation resistance to 850 C, and used to join yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to a corrosion-resistant ferritic stainless steel for possible use in solid oxide fuel cells. Thermogravimetric analysis and optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive spectroscopy were used to evaluate the braze oxidation behavior, and microstructure and composition of the YSZ/braze/steel joints. Both gold-ABA and gold-ABA-V exhibited nearly linear oxidation kinetics at 850 C, with gold-ABA-V showing faster oxidation than gold-ABA. Both brazes produced metallurgically sound YSZ/steel joints due to chemical interactions of Ti and V with the YSZ and steel substrates.

  17. Performance Improvement of Friction Stir Welds by Better Surface Finish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Sam; Nettles, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    The as-welded friction stir weld has a cross section that may act as a stress concentrator. The geometry associated with the stress concentration may reduce the weld strength and it makes the weld challenging to inspect with ultrasound. In some cases, the geometry leads to false positive nondestructive evaluation (NDE) indications and, in many cases, it requires manual blending to facilitate the inspection. This study will measure the stress concentration effect and develop an improved phased array ultrasound testing (PAUT) technique for friction stir welding. Post-welding, the friction stir weld (FSW) tool would be fitted with an end mill that would machine the weld smooth, trimmed shaved. This would eliminate the need for manual weld preparation for ultrasonic inspections. Manual surface preparation is a hand operation that varies widely depending on the person preparing the welds. Shaving is a process that can be automated and tightly controlled.

  18. Process Parameters Optimization for Friction Stir Welding of Pure Aluminium to Brass (CuZn30 using Taguchi Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elfar O. M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the friction stir welding of dissimilar commercial pure aluminium and brass (CuZn30 plates was investigated and the process parameters were optimized using Taguchi L9 orthogonal array. The considered process parameters were the rotational speed, traverse speed and pin offset. The optimum setting was determined with reference to ultimate tensile strength of the joint. The predicted optimum value of ultimate tensile strength was confirmed by experimental run using optimum parameters. Analysis of variance revealed that traverse speed is the most significant factor in controlling the joint tensile strength and pin offset also plays a significant role. In this investigation, the optimum tensile strength is 50% of aluminium base metal. Metallographic examination revealed that intermetallic compounds were formed in the interface of the optimum joint where the tensile failure was observed to take place.

  19. Qualification of electron-beam welded joints between copper and stainless steel for cryogenic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusch, C.; Borsch, M.; Heidt, C.; Magginetti, N.; Sas, J.; Weiss, K.-P.; Grohmann, S.

    2015-12-01

    Joints between copper and stainless steel are commonly applied in cryogenic systems. A relatively new and increasingly important method to combine these materials is electron-beam (EB) welding. Typically, welds in cryogenic applications need to withstand a temperature range from 300K down to 4K, and pressures of several MPa. However, few data are available for classifying EB welds between OFHC copper and 316L stainless steel. A broad test program was conducted in order to qualify this kind of weld. The experiments started with the measurement of the hardness in the weld area. To verify the leak-tightness of the joints, integral helium leak tests at operating pressures of 16 MPa were carried out at room- and at liquid nitrogen temperature. The tests were followed by destructive tensile tests at room temperature, at liquid nitrogen and at liquid helium temperatures, yielding information on the yield strength and the ultimate tensile strength of the welds at these temperatures. Moreover, nondestructive tensile tests up to the yield strength, i.e. the range in which the weld can be stressed during operation, were performed. Also, the behavior of the weld upon temperature fluctuations between room- and liquid nitrogen temperature was tested. The results of the qualification indicate that EB welded joints between OFHC copper and 316L stainless steel are reliable and present an interesting alternative to other technologies such as vacuum brazing or friction welding.

  20. Study of Mechanical Properties and Characterization of Pipe Steel welded by Hybrid (Friction Stir Weld + Root Arc Weld) Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Yong Chae [ORNL; Sanderson, Samuel [MegaStir Technologies LLC; Mahoney, Murray [Consultant; Wasson, Andrew J [ExxonMobil, Upstream Research Company (URC); Fairchild, Doug P [ExxonMobil, Upstream Research Company (URC); Wang, Yanli [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has recently attracted attention as an alternative construction process for gas/oil transportation applications due to advantages compared to fusion welding techniques. A significant advantage is the ability of FSW to weld the entire or nearly the entire wall thickness in a single pass, while fusion welding requires multiple passes. However, when FSW is applied to a pipe or tube geometry, an internal back support anvil is required to resist the plunging forces exerted during FSW. Unfortunately, it may not be convenient or economical to use internal backing support due to limited access for some applications. To overcome this issue, ExxonMobil recently developed a new concept, combining root arc welding and FSW. That is, a root arc weld is made prior to FSW that supports the normal loads associated with FSW. In the present work, mechanical properties of a FSW + root arc welded pipe steel are reported including microstructure and microhardness.

  1. Investigate The Effect Of Welding Parameters On Mechanical Properties During The Welding Of Al-6061 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Prasad

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Friction welding is a solid state welding technique which is being used in recent times to weld similar as well as dissimilar metals for getting defect free weld. Many combinations like low carbon to stainless steel austenitic to ferrite stainless steel aluminium to copper and titanium to aluminium or steel have been tried out by various solid state welding processes with quite good results. In the present work the 3 level full factorial design has been employed to investigate the effect of welding parameters on tensile strength toughness and heat generation during the welding of Al-6061 alloy. Mathematical relationships between friction welding parameters and mechanical properties like heat generation tensile strength and toughness have also been developed. An attempt has also been made to examine the fracture surfaces of test specimens using SEM. It has been found that welding speed is the most significant parameter thats affect the heat generation tensile strength and toughness. it has been found that tensile strength and toughness during welding increases with increased in welding speed while tensile strength and toughness initially increased as the welding time increases after that it decreased with increase in welding time. The difference in weight of alloying elements can be clearly seen by analyzing spectrum of elements.

  2. Brazed joint properties and microstructure of SCS-6/{beta}21S titanium matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, E.K.; Bird, R.K.; Dicus, D.L. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center

    1995-11-01

    The properties and microstructure of brazed joints of SCS-6 SiC fiber reinforced {beta}21S (Ti-15Mo-2.7Nb-3Al-0.2Si, wt-%) titanium matrix composite (TMC) were investigated. Brazed joint specimens were fabricated from TMC using two different forms of commercially available Ti-15Cu-15Ni braze filler metal. The brazed joint specimens were tested in air at room temperature and 1,500 F (815 C) using overlap tensile shear (OLTS) tests. Metallurgical and fractographic analyses were used to characterize the microstructure, brazing filler metal/TMC interactions, and joint failure modes. The fractographic results indicated that TMC delamination is a dominant failure mode for this type of joint. At room temperature, the TMC brazed joint specimens failed by TMC delamination and TMC tensile failure, with the brazed joint remaining intact. Therefore, the performance of the brazed joint specimens at room temperature is limited by the interlaminar strength of the TMC and not by the braze strength. At 1,500 F, the TMC brazed joint specimens exhibited a combination of delamination and braze shear failure. Thus, the high-temperature performance of the brazed joint specimens may be limited by both the TMC interlaminar properties and the strength of the braze.

  3. Effects of Thermal Cycling and Thermal Aging on the Hermeticity and Strength of Silver-Copper Oxide Air-Brazed Seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weil, K. Scott; Coyle, Christopher A.; Darsell, Jens T.; Xia, Gordon; Hardy, John S.

    2005-12-01

    Thermal cycle and exposure tests were conducted on ceramic-to-metal joints prepared by a new sealing technique. Known as reactive air brazing, this joining method is currently being considered for use in sealing various high-temperature solid-state electrochemical devices, including planar solid oxide fuel cells (pSOFC). In order to simulate a typical pSOFC application, test specimens were prepared by joining ceramic anode/electrolyte bilayers to washers, of the same composition as the common frame materials employed in pSOFC stacks, using a filler metal composed of 4mol% CuO in silver. The brazed samples were exposure tested at 750°C for 200, 400, and 800hrs in both simulated fuel and air environments and thermally cycled at rapid rate (75°C/min) between room temperature and 750°C for as many as fifty cycles. Subsequent joint strength testing and microstructural analysis indicated that the samples exposure tested in air displayed little degradation with respect to strength, hermeticity, or microstructure out to 800hrs of exposure. Those tested in fuel showed no change in rupture strength or loss in hermeticity after 800hrs of high-temperature exposure, but did undergo microstructural change due to the dissolution of hydrogen into the silver-based braze material. Air brazed specimens subjected to rapid thermal cycling exhibited no loss in joint strength or hermeticity, but displayed initial signs of seal delamination along the braze/electrolyte interface after 50 cycles.

  4. Braze Alloy Development for Fast Epitaxial High-Temperature Brazing of Single-Crystalline Nickel-Based Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, B.; Piegert, S.; Rösler, J.

    2009-01-01

    For the repair of single-crystalline turbine components, fabricated from nickel-based superalloys, a new high-temperature brazing technology has been developed. Cracks in single-crystalline parts can be repaired by reproducing the single-crystalline microstructure over the complete gap width within very short brazing times. Nickel-manganese-based alloys were identified as systems that provide very high, epitaxial solidification rates. In contrast to commonly used braze alloys, such as nickel-boron or nickel-silicon systems, the process is not completely diffusion controlled but works with consolute systems. For brazing experiments 300- μm-wide parallel gaps as well as V-shaped gaps with a maximum width of 250 μm were used. A complete epitaxial solidification, that is, the absence of large-angle grain boundaries, could be achieved within brazing times, being up to 100 times shorter compared to commonly used transient-liquid-phase bonding technologies. To quantify the misorientation relative to the base material and the composition within and near the filled gaps, the results of the brazing experiments were visualized by means of light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analyses were conducted.

  5. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  6. A new technique for the strengthening of aluminum tungsten inert gas weld metals: using carbon nanotube/aluminum composite as a filler metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, M; Nabhani, N; Rashidkhani, E; Fattahi, Y; Akhavan, S; Arabian, N

    2013-01-01

    The effect of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) on the mechanical properties of aluminum multipass weld metal prepared by the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process was investigated. High energy ball milling was used to disperse MWCNT in the aluminum powder. Carbon nanotube/aluminum composite filler metal was fabricated for the first time by hot extrusion of ball-milled powders. After welding, the tensile strength, microhardness and MWCNT distribution in the weld metal were investigated. The test results showed that the tensile strength and microhardness of weld metal was greatly increased when using the filler metal containing 1.5 wt.% MWCNT. Therefore, according to the results presented in this paper, it can be concluded that the filler metal containing MWCNT can serve as a super filler metal to improve the mechanical properties of TIG welds of Al and its alloys. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. ITER lip seal welding and cutting developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesy, B.; Cordier, J.J.; Jokinen, T. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Kujanpää, V.; Karhu, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland); Le Barbier, R. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Määttä, T. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland); Martins, J.P.; Utin, Y. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Different TIG and Laser welding techniques are tested. • Twin spot laser welding techniques is the best. • Limited heat input gives a stable weld pool in all positions. • Penetrations is achieved. • Lip seal welding and cutting with a robotic arm is successfully performed on a representative mock-up. - Abstract: The welded lip seals form part of the torus primary vacuum boundary in between the port plugs and the vacuum vessel, and are classified as Protection Important Component. In order to refurbish the port plugs or the in-vessel components, port plugs have to be removed from the machine. The lip seal design must enable up to ten opening of the vacuum vessel during the life time operation of the ITER machine. Therefore proven, remote reliable cutting and re-welding are essential, as these operations need to be performed in the port cells in a nuclear environment, where human presence will be restricted. Moreover, the combination of size of the components to be welded (∼10 m long vacuum compatible thin welds) and the congested environment close to the core of the machine constraint the type and size of tools to be used. This paper describes the lip seal cutting and welding development programme performed at the VTT Technical Research Centre, Finland. Potential cutting and welding techniques are analyzed and compared. The development of the cutting, TIG and laser welding techniques on samples are presented. Effects of lip seal misalignments and optimization of the 2 welding processes are discussed. Finally, the manufacturing and test of the two 1.2 m × 1 m representative mock-ups are presented. The set-up and use of a robotic arm for the mock-up cutting and welding operations are also described.

  8. In-Situ Nondestructive Examination of Weld Penetration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chin, Bryan

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop infrared sensing techniques to monitor and control welding penetration in gas tungsten arc and submerged arc welding processes used by the US Navy in the construction of ships...

  9. Study on local vacuum electron beam welding of flange rim

    CERN Document Server

    He Cheng Dan; Ying Lei; Xu Qi Jin

    2002-01-01

    Local vacuum electron beam welding and its application prospect in military and civil industry are introduced. A home made local vacuum electron beam welding is completed. Its main technical parameters and key techniques are also presented

  10. In-process oxidation protection in fluxless brazing or diffusion bonding of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okelly, K. P.; Featherston, A. B.

    1974-01-01

    Aluminum is cleaned of its oxide coating and is sealed immediately with polymeric material which makes it suitable for fluxless brazing or diffusion bonding. Time involved between cleaning and brazing is no longer critical factor.

  11. Laser welding of micro plastic parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberstroh, E.; Hoffmann, W.-M.

    2007-02-01

    Most welding processes for plastics do not meet the demands of micro technology and thus cannot be applied in this innovative industrial sector. One of the few techniques which are applicable in this sector is the laser transmission welding, which has distinctive advantages like low mechanical and thermal load of the joining parts. This makes the laser particularly suitable for the welding of micro plastics parts. Thereby, contour welding is a process variant of laser transmission welding enabling the welding of complex and even three-dimensional weld contours. But so far it has not yet been applied for welding plastics parts of micro scale in the industrial practice. Recent research at the Institute of Plastics Processing (IKV) at the RWTH Aachen University shows the feasibility of this process to weld small and complex micro parts. Good mechanical properties can be achieved. However, it is necessary to apply measures to reduce the formation of flash. Moreover, it can be shown that there is a strong influence of some material parameters on the laser welding process so that some plastics are more suitable than others for the contour welding in micro technology.

  12. Static and dynamic crack toughness of brazed joints of Inconel 718 nickel-base alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, B.Z. (Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa); Steffens, H.D.; Englehart, A.H.; Wielage, B.

    1979-10-01

    The crack toughness of brazed joints of Inconel 718 nickel-base alloy was investigated at different strain rates. The brazing filler metal used was BNi5. The results were compared with those obtained on specimens made of the base material. The brazed joints were heat-treated after the brazing process in order to achieve a desirable distribution of the brittle phases in the joint.

  13. THE INFLUENCE OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE BRAZING UPON INDICATORS OF MATERIAL BRAZEABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Koleňák

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of both common and extreme parameters of AISI 321stainless steel high-temperature brazing using the NI 102 brazing alloy upon material brazeability indicators. The ascertainment of the wetting angle, the area over which Ni brazing alloy spreads, the width of AISI 321 steel's dissolubility band, and the width of Ni brazing alloy’s diffusion band into the basic material.

  14. Laser Droplet Brazing for the Electrical Contacting of Composite Materials with Integrated Active Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Carolin; Quentin, Ulf; Heberle, Johannes; Gürtler, Franz-Josef; Weigl, Markus; Schmidt, Michael

    This paper describes a laser droplet brazing method for electrical contacting of sensitive piezoceramic actuator modules. In order to increase the reproducibility of the contacting process, the mass, the energy and the flight path of the braze droplets have to be controlled. For this reason, braze preforms are used which are molten by a single laser pulse. The system technology and first results will be presented, as well as a mechanical and metallurgical analysis of the brazed connections.

  15. Effects of conventional welding and laser welding on the tensile strength, ultimate tensile strength and surface characteristics of two cobalt-chromium alloys: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhan Kumar, Seenivasan; Sethumadhava, Jayesh Raghavendra; Anand Kumar, Vaidyanathan; Manita, Grover

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of laser welding and conventional welding on the tensile strength and ultimate tensile strength of the cobalt-chromium alloy. Samples were prepared with two commercially available cobalt-chromium alloys (Wironium plus and Diadur alloy). The samples were sectioned and the broken fragments were joined using Conventional and Laser welding techniques. The welded joints were subjected to tensile and ultimate tensile strength testing; and scanning electron microscope to evaluate the surface characteristics at the welded site. Both on laser welding as well as on conventional welding technique, Diadur alloy samples showed lesser values when tested for tensile and ultimate tensile strength when compared to Wironium alloy samples. Under the scanning electron microscope, the laser welded joints show uniform welding and continuous molt pool all over the surface with less porosity than the conventionally welded joints. Laser welding is an advantageous method of connecting or repairing cast metal prosthetic frameworks.

  16. Microstructural Changes in Brazing Sheet due to Solid-Liquid Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittebrood, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Aluminium brazing sheet is the material of choice to produce automotive heat exchangers. Although in Dutch the official translation of aluminium brazing sheet is “aluminium hardsoldeerplaat” the English name is used in the industry. Aluminium brazing sheet is basically a sandwich material and

  17. Silver-Copper Oxide Based Reactive Air Braze (RAB) for Joining Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Yong Y.; Hardy, John S.; Weil, K. Scott

    2005-03-01

    We are investigating a new method of ceramic-to-metal joining, referred to as reactive air brazing (RAB), as a potential method of sealing ceramic components in high-temperature electrochemical devices. Sessile drop wetting experiments and joint strength testing were conducted using yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates and CuO-Ag based air brazes. Results from our studies indicate that the wettability of the braze improves substantially with increasing CuO content, over a compositional range of 1 - 8 mol% CuO, which is accompanied by an increase in the bend strength of the corresponding brazed YSZ joint. The addition of a small amount of TiO2 (0.5 mol%) to the CuO-Ag braze further improves wettability due to the formation of a titanium zirconate reaction product along the braze/substrate interface. However, with one notable exception, the bend strength of these ternary braze joints remained nearly identical to those measured in comparable binary braze joints. SEM analysis conducted on the corresponding fracture surfaces indicated that in the binary braze joints the failure occurs primarily at the braze/YSZ interface. Similarly in the case of the the ternary, TiO2-doped brazes joint failure occurs predominantly along the interface between the braze filler metal and the underlying titanium zirconate reaction layer.

  18. Substrate Effects on the High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of a Gold-Based Braze Filler Metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weil, K. Scott; Rice, Joseph P.

    2005-06-30

    Oxidation testing was conducted on a commercial gold-based braze alloy, Gold ABA, and on zirconia and stainless steel joining couples prepared using this braze filler metal. Preliminary results reveal that both substrates play a significant role in determining the overall oxidation resistance of the brazed joint.

  19. Heating coil welding technique for connection of large-diameter PE pipes using universally applicable, flexible taped joints; Heizwendelschweissverfahren fuer die Verbindung von PE-Grossrohren mittels universal anwendbarer, flexibler Wickelmuffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudrit, Benjamin; Kraus, Eduard; Heidemeyer, Peter; Bastian, Martin [Sueddeutsche Kunststoff-Zentrum, Wuerzburg (Germany); Kern, Juergen; Neufeld, Wjatscheslaw [Frank und Krah Wickelrohr GmbH, Woelfersheim (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    This research project (Heating coil welding technique for connection of large-diameter PE pipes using universally applicable, flexible taped joints) was carried out by SKZ (Sueddeutsches Kunststoff-Zentrum) in close coopearation with Messrs. Frank and Krah Wickelrohr GmbH with the intention to develop a high-quality, economically efficient joining process for large-diameter pipes. The technique is based on the new technology of heating coil joints which permits the use of any desired joint geometries at acceptable cost. The new technique was validated for joints up to a diameter of 1,000 mm. With the welding parameters calculated in the project, even larger diameter joints are possible in theory.

  20. Study of the effect of low-power pulse laser on arc plasma and magnesium alloy target in hybrid welding by spectral diagnosis technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liming; Hao, Xinfeng

    2008-10-01

    In order to study the effect of laser pulses on arc plasma and target metal in the hybrid welding process, the spectra of the plasmas in the welding process of magnesium alloys are analysed in this paper. The acquisition system of plasma spectra is set up and the spectral lines of welding plasma are acquired. Compared with tungsten-inert gas (TIG) welding, the intensities of the spectral lines of magnesium increase sharply while those of Ar decrease for strong evaporation and ionization of magnesium alloys in low-power laser/arc hybrid welding. The electron temperature and density are estimated by the Boltzmann plot method and the Stark broadening effect. The result shows that the electron temperature of arc plasma in the hybrid welding process is much lower than that in TIG welding, especially in the laser beam-affected zone. In contrast, the electron density of the plasma is enhanced. The influences of laser parameters on electron temperature are also studied. The changes in electron temperature and density indicate that the effect of laser pulse on the target metal is the dominant factor influencing the electron temperature and density in low-power laser/arc hybrid welding.

  1. Evaluation of the Low Heat Input Process for Weld Repair of Nickel-Base Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durocher, J.; Richards, N. L.

    2011-10-01

    The repair of turbine blades and vanes commonly involves gas tungsten arc welding or an equivalent process, but unfortunately these components are often susceptible to heat-affected zone (HAZ) cracking during the weld repair process. This is a major problem especially in cast alloys due to their coarse-grain size and where the (Al + Ti) contents is in excess of 3-4%; vacuum brazing is also used but mainly on low stress non-rotating components such as vanes. Micro-welding has the potential to deposit small amounts of filler at low heat input levels with minimum HAZ and thus is an attractive process for depositing a quality weld. As with conventional fusion processes, the filler alloy is deposited by the generation of a low power arc between a consumable electrode and the substrate. The low heat input of this process offers unique advantages over more common welding processes such as gas tungsten arc, plasma arc, laser, and electron beam welding. In this study, the low heat input characteristic of micro-welding has been used to simulate weld repair using Inconel (IN) (Inconel and IN are trademarks of INCO Alloys International) 625, Rene (Rene is a trademark of General Electric Company) 41, Nimonic (Nimonic is a trademark of INCO Alloys International) 105 and Inconel 738LC filler alloys, to a cast Inconel 738LC substrate. The effect of micro-welding process parameters on the deposition rate, coating quality, and substrate has been investigated.

  2. Direct use geothermal applications for brazed plate heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafferty, K.

    1993-02-01

    Brazed plate heat exchanger were placed in three geothermal fluids (Klamath Falls, OR; Boise, ID; and Pagosa Springs, CO) in order to determine the effect of H[sub 2]S on braze material. Based on subsequent analysis, it appears that the rate of corrosion of the braze material is much slower than corrosion of copper tube materials in the same fluids. Minimum expected life of the heat exchangers based on these corrosion rates is reported to be 12 years in fluids of less than 1 ppm H[sub 2]S and 10 years in fluids of less than 5 ppm. Based on these expected lives, and using a 3% inflation rate and 8% discount rate, brazed plate heat exchangers are a clear economic choice in which the capital cost is 50% or less of the cost of a plate and frame heat exchanger for the same duty. Due to their single pass design, brazed plate heat exchangers are generally limited to approach temperatures of 10[degree] or greater. Size limitations restrict applications to 100 gpm and/or 200 ft[sup 2] heat transfer surface area.

  3. Direct use geothermal applications for brazed plate heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafferty, K.

    1992-01-01

    Brazed plate heat exchanger were placed in three geothermal fluids (Klamath Falls, OR; Boise, ID; and Pagosa Springs, CO) to determine the effect of H[sub 2]S on braze material. Based on subsequent analysis, it appears that the rate of corrosion of the braze material is much slower than corrosion of copper tube materials in the same fluids. Minimum expected life of the heat exchangers based on these corrosion rates is reported to be 12 years in fluids of less than 1 ppm H[sub 2]S and 10 years in fluids of less than 5 ppm. Based on these expected lives, and using a 3% inflation rate and 8% discount rate, brazed plate heat exchangers are a clear economic choice in which the capital cost is 50% or less of the cost of a plate and frame heat exchanger for the same duty. Due to their single pass design, brazed plate heat exchangers are generally limited to approach temperatures of 10[degrees] or greater. Size limitations restrict applications to 100 gpm and/or 200 ft[sup 2] heat transfer surface area.

  4. Direct use geothermal applications for brazed plate heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafferty, K.

    1993-02-01

    Brazed plate heat exchanger were placed in three geothermal fluids (Klamath Falls, OR; Boise, ID; and Pagosa Springs, CO) in order to determine the effect of H{sub 2}S on braze material. Based on subsequent analysis, it appears that the rate of corrosion of the braze material is much slower than corrosion of copper tube materials in the same fluids. Minimum expected life of the heat exchangers based on these corrosion rates is reported to be 12 years in fluids of less than 1 ppm H{sub 2}S and 10 years in fluids of less than 5 ppm. Based on these expected lives, and using a 3% inflation rate and 8% discount rate, brazed plate heat exchangers are a clear economic choice in which the capital cost is 50% or less of the cost of a plate and frame heat exchanger for the same duty. Due to their single pass design, brazed plate heat exchangers are generally limited to approach temperatures of 10{degree} or greater. Size limitations restrict applications to 100 gpm and/or 200 ft{sup 2} heat transfer surface area.

  5. Direct use geothermal applications for brazed plate heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafferty, K.

    1992-12-31

    Brazed plate heat exchanger were placed in three geothermal fluids (Klamath Falls, OR; Boise, ID; and Pagosa Springs, CO) to determine the effect of H{sub 2}S on braze material. Based on subsequent analysis, it appears that the rate of corrosion of the braze material is much slower than corrosion of copper tube materials in the same fluids. Minimum expected life of the heat exchangers based on these corrosion rates is reported to be 12 years in fluids of less than 1 ppm H{sub 2}S and 10 years in fluids of less than 5 ppm. Based on these expected lives, and using a 3% inflation rate and 8% discount rate, brazed plate heat exchangers are a clear economic choice in which the capital cost is 50% or less of the cost of a plate and frame heat exchanger for the same duty. Due to their single pass design, brazed plate heat exchangers are generally limited to approach temperatures of 10{degrees} or greater. Size limitations restrict applications to 100 gpm and/or 200 ft{sup 2} heat transfer surface area.

  6. Brazing composite intermetallic TiAl with structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevryukov, O.N.; Fedotov, V.T.; Kalin, B.A.; Golikov, M.Y. [MIFI-AMENTO, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01

    The intermetallic alloys based on a titanium aluminide have a high strength, a low specific weight, and a chemical and thermal stability. Owing to a similar combination of physical and chemical properties, the given type of materials can be considered as an alternative to the traditional materials used for the manufacture of units of the thermonuclear reactor first wall. The technology to manufacture samples of composite alloys based on a titanium aluminide intermetallide has been improved in the present work with subsequent tests of brazed joints by thermo cycling tests. To estimate the possibility of using this intermetallic alloy as a structural material, brazed joints of Ti-48at.%Al with bronze and titanium were produced. Brazing was carried out by the STEMET 1202 registered filler metal of the Ti-Cu-Zr-Ni-V-Be system. The distribution of chemical elements in the brazed seam was investigated by X-ray spectrum analysis. It has been found that the distribution of the main and doping elements is sufficiently uniform in the contact zone of the filler metal with brazed materials; inclusions, cracks, and delamination are absent. (orig.)

  7. Linear friction welding for constructing and repairing rail for high speed and intercity passenger service rail : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This project developed a solid-state welding process based on linear friction welding (LFW) technology. While resistance flash welding or : thermite techniques are tried and true methods for joining rails and performing partial rail replacement repai...

  8. Pulsed Magnetic Welding for Advanced Core and Cladding Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Guoping [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Yang, Yong [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2013-12-19

    To investigate a solid-state joining method, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW), for welding the advanced core and cladding steels to be used in Generation IV systems, with a specific application for fuel pin end-plug welding. As another alternative solid state welding technique, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW) has not been extensively explored on the advanced steels. The resultant weld can be free from microstructure defects (pores, non-metallic inclusions, segregation of alloying elements). More specifically, the following objectives are to be achieved: 1. To design a suitable welding apparatus fixture, and optimize welding parameters for repeatable and acceptable joining of the fuel pin end-plug. The welding will be evaluated using tensile tests for lap joint weldments and helium leak tests for the fuel pin end-plug; 2 Investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties changes in PMW weldments of proposed advanced core and cladding alloys; 3. Simulate the irradiation effects on the PWM weldments using ion irradiation.

  9. Microstructures of beta-titanium orthodontic wires joined by infrared brazing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masahiro; Brantley, William A; Kawashima, Isao; Baba, Naoki; Alapati, Satish B; Yuasa, Toshihiro; Ohno, Hiroki; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2006-10-01

    The microstructures and interdiffusion in brazed beta-titanium orthodontic wires were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis, respectively. Beta-titanium wire (Ti-11Mo-6Zr-4Sn) with cross-section dimensions of 0.032 in. x 0.032 in., titanium-based braze alloy (Ti-30Ni-20Cu), and silver-based braze alloy (Ag-22Cu-17Zn-5Sn) were selected for the study. Brazing was performed using infrared radiation (RS-1) under an argon atmosphere. Specimens were etched with two solutions (2.5% HF + 2.5% HNO(3) + 95% H(2)O; 25% HN(4)OH + 30% H(2)O(2) + 45%H(2)O). It was found that the silver-based braze alloy has a eutectic structure. In the diffusion layer between the beta-titanium wire and this silver-based braze alloy, Cu and Ti were enriched on the wire side, and Sn and Ti were enriched on the braze alloy side. The titanium-based braze alloy has a dendritic structure. Beta-titanium wire specimens brazed with the titanium-based braze alloy had a thicker intermediate area compared to the silver alloy; Ti in the diffusion layer had an irregular concentration gradient, and the braze alloy side had higher Ti concentration. The original microstructure of the beta-titanium wire was not altered with the use of either braze alloy. Infrared brazing of beta-titanium orthodontic wire is acceptable for clinical use, since the wire microstructure did not deteriorate with either the titanium-based or silver-based braze alloy. The differing microstructures of the joint regions for the two braze alloys suggest that the joint strengths may also differ.

  10. Study of a fiber laser assisted friction stir welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalino, G.; Campanelli, S.; Ludovico, A. D.; Contuzzi, N.; Angelastro, A.

    2012-03-01

    Friction stir welding is a relatively new joining technique. This technique, which is considered a derivative of the more common friction welding method, was developed mainly for aluminum and its alloys. In recent years, this method has been used to join various other alloys. FSW has many advantages, including the following: the welding procedure is relatively simple with no consumables or filler metal; joint edge preparation is not needed; oxide removal prior to welding is unnecessary; high joint strength has been achieved in aluminum and magnesium alloys; FSW can be used with alloys that cannot be fusion welded due to crack sensitivity. The drawbacks of FSW include the need for powerful fixtures to clamp the workpiece to the welding table, the high force needed to move the welding tool forward, the relatively high wear rate of the welding tool, and weld speeds in FSW are slower, which can lead to longer process times. To overcome these drawbacks, a fiber laser-assisted friction stir welding system was designed (FLAFSW). The system combined a conventional commercial friction machine and a fiber pumped laser system. The scope is to investigate the influence of the laser assistance on the weld quality. A number of different aluminum plates, which are still mentioned to be difficult to be joint as intermetallic phases appear during melting welding techniques, were used. The evaluation of quality was performed through analysis of appearance, mechanical and microstructure characterization of the weld.

  11. Friction Pull Plug Welding in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Shane A.; Bradford, Vann

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has recently invested much time and effort into the process development of Friction Pull Plug Welding (FPPW). FPPW, is a welding process similar to Friction Push Plug Welding in that, there is a small rotating part (plug) being spun and simultaneously pulled (forged) into a larger part. These two processes differ, in that push plug welding requires an internal reaction support, while pull plug welding reacts to the load externally. FPPW was originally conceived as a post proof repair technique for the Space Shuttle fs External Tank. FPPW was easily selected as the primary weld process used to close out the termination hole on the Constellation Program's ARES I Upper Stage circumferential Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds (SR-FSW). The versatility of FPPW allows it to also be used as a repair technique for both SR-FSW and Conventional Friction Stir Welds. To date, all MSFC led development has been concentrated on aluminum alloys (2195, 2219, and 2014). Much work has been done to fully understand and characterize the process's limitations. A heavy emphasis has been spent on plug design, to match the various weldland thicknesses and alloy combinations. This presentation will summarize these development efforts including weld parameter development, process control, parameter sensitivity studies, plug repair techniques, material properties including tensile, fracture and failure analysis.

  12. Evaluation of Residual Stress Measurements Before and After Post-Weld Heat Treatment in the Weld Repairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardowska, Anna M.; Price, John W. H.; Finlayson, Trevor R.; Ibrahim, R.

    2010-11-01

    Welding repairs are increasingly a structural integrity concern for aging pressure vessel and piping components. It has been demonstrated that the residual stress distribution near repair welds can be drastically different from that of the original weld. Residual stresses have a significant effect on the lifetime performance of a weld, and a reduction of these stresses is normally desirable. The aim of this paper is to investigate residual stresses in various weld repair arrangements using the non-destructive neutron diffraction technique. This research is focused on characterization of the residual stress distribution: (i) in the original weld; (ii) in a shallow toe weld repair; and (iii) after conventional post-weld heat treatment. The focus of the measurements is on the values of the subsurface strain/stress variations across the weld.

  13. Formation of Brittle Phases During Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Titanium to Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shouzheng; Li, Yajiang; Wang, Juan; Liu, Kun

    2014-04-01

    Welding of titanium alloy TA15 to aluminum alloy Al 2024 was conducted by pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding using AlSi12 filler metal. Formation process of phases near the Ti/Al interface was discussed. Titanium and aluminum were partially fusion welded in the upper part while brazed together in the middle and bottom parts of the joint. In the upper part of the joint, intermetallics Ti3Al + Ti5Si3, TiAl + Ti5Si3, and TiAl3 were formed as three layers orderly from the titanium side to the weld metal. In the middle and bottom parts of the joint, intermetallics Ti5Si3 and TiAl3 were formed as two layers near the Ti/Al interface.

  14. Improvement of stable technique and welding efficiency of digital controlled pulse MAG welder; Digital seigyo pulse MAG yosetsuki ni okeru anteika gijutsu to yosetsu seino no kojo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamata, T.; Uezono, T. [Daihen Corporation, Osaka (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    This paper describes the digital control technology of pulse MAG welders for stable operation and performance improvement. Pulse welding forms a droplet at a wire tip during pulse period, and separates the droplet by pinching it by pulse electromagnetic pinch force. This technology automatically optimizes and stabilizes welding current waveform by digital control to obtain such smooth one pulse- one droplet transfer under various welding conditions, and also controls external characteristics of welding power sources to obtain a constant arc length regardless of the distance between the tip and matrix. The technology offers superior welding stability in a small current range below 100A, and superior high-speed weldability, arc startability and transient responsibility. The newly developed pulse MAG welder mounts the control function of penetration for the first time as pulse welder, and allows stable penetration regardless of torch height. In addition, the welder allows reduction of noise level, superior weldability of galvanized steel sheets, superior basic welding performance, and automatic setting of welding conditions. 2 refs., 19 figs.

  15. Optimization of vibratory welding process parameters using response surface methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Pravin Kumar; Kumar, S. Deepak; Patel, D.; Prasad, S. B. [National Institute of Technology Jamshedpur, Jharkhand (India)

    2017-05-15

    The current investigation was carried out to study the effect of vibratory welding technique on mechanical properties of 6 mm thick butt welded mild steel plates. A new concept of vibratory welding technique has been designed and developed which is capable to transfer vibrations, having resonance frequency of 300 Hz, into the molten weld pool before it solidifies during the Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process. The important process parameters of vibratory welding technique namely welding current, welding speed and frequency of the vibrations induced in molten weld pool were optimized using Taguchi’s analysis and Response surface methodology (RSM). The effect of process parameters on tensile strength and hardness were evaluated using optimization techniques. Applying RSM, the effect of vibratory welding parameters on tensile strength and hardness were obtained through two separate regression equations. Results showed that, the most influencing factor for the desired tensile strength and hardness is frequency at its resonance value, i.e. 300 Hz. The micro-hardness and microstructures of the vibratory welded joints were studied in detail and compared with those of conventional SMAW joints. Comparatively, uniform and fine grain structure has been found in vibratory welded joints.

  16. Brazing diamond grits onto a steel substrate using copper alloys as the filler metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S.-M.; Lin, S.-T.

    1996-12-01

    Surface-set diamond tools were fabricated by an active metal brazing process, using bronze (Cu-8.9Sn) powder and 316L stainless steel powder mixed to various ratios as the braze filler metals. The diamond grits were brazed onto a steel substrate at 1050 °C for 30 min in a dry hydrogen atmosphere. After brazing practice, an intermediate layer rich in chromium formed between the braze filler metal and diamond. A braze filler metal composed of 70 wt % bronze powder and 30 wt % stainless steel powder was found to be optimum in that the diamond grits were strongly impregnated in the filler metal by both mechanical and chemical types of holding. The diamond tools thus fabricated performed better than conventional nickel-plated diamond tools. In service, the braze filler metal wore at almost the same rate as the diamond grits, and no pullout of diamond grits or peeling of the filler metal layer took place.

  17. Development of a Cu-Sn based brazing system with a low brazing and a high remelting temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieding, M.; Holländer, U.; Möhwald, K.

    2017-03-01

    Objective of the project presented is the development of a joining process for hot working steel components at low brazing temperatures leading to a bond with a much higher remelting temperature. This basically is achieved by the use of a Cu-Sn melt spinning foil combined with a pure Cu foil. During brazing, the Sn content of the foil is decreased by diffusion of Sn into the additional Cu resulting in a homogenious joint with a increased remelting temperature of the filler metal. Within this project specimens were brazed and diffusion annealed in a vacuum furnace at 850 °C varying the processing times (0 - 10 h). The samples prepared were studied metallographically and diffusion profiles of Sn were recorded using EDX line scans. The results are discussed in view of further investigations and envisaged applications.

  18. Laser Peening Effects on Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatamleh, Omar

    2011-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a welding technique that uses frictional heating combined with forging pressure to produce high strength bonds. It is attractive for aerospace applications. Although residual stresses in FSW are generally lower when compared to conventional fusion welds, recent work has shown that significant tensile residual stresses can be present in the weld after fabrication. Therefore, laser shock peening was investigated as a means of moderating the tensile residual stresses produced during welding. This slide presentation reviews the effect of Laser Peening on the weld, in tensile strength, strain, surface roughness, microhardness, surface wear/friction, and fatigue crack growth rates. The study concluded that the laser peening process can result in considerable improvement to crack initiaion, propagation and mechanical properties in FSW.

  19. Structural degradation of heterogeneous welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Schmidová

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Developing the techniques of welding materials with higher dynamic strength onto the rolling surfaces of rails is one of the options for increasing their operational endurance. The subject of this paper is an analyses of heterogeneous weld interfaces experimentally manufactured by welding medium-carbon austenitic steels onto high-carbon unalloyed pearlitic steels. The analyses focus on examinations of the marginal mixing of the materials at the weld interface and the circumstances under which intercrystalline cracks form in the weld deposit layers. Structural analyses, chemical microanalyses and a hardness assessment were performed in order to identify the corresponding structural changes. The proportion of zonal vs. interdendritic segregation of the alloying elements in the degradation of the welded joint was distinguished. We described the nature of the structural heterogeneities produced, locally connected with the martensitic transformation. The chemical heterogeneity leading to the formation of martensite at grain boundaries was identified as the limiting effect.

  20. Femtosecond fiber laser welding of dissimilar metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei; Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, welding of dissimilar metals was demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, by using a high-energy high-repetition-rate femtosecond fiber laser. Metallurgical and mechanical properties were investigated and analyzed under various processing parameters (pulse energy, repetition rate, and welding speed). Results showed that the formation of intermetallic brittle phases and welding defects could be effectively reduced. Strong welding quality with more than 210 MPa tensile strength for stainless steel-aluminum and 175 MPa tensile strength for stainless steel-magnesium has been demonstrated. A minimal heat affected zone and uniform and homogenous phase transformation in the welding region have been demonstrated. This laser-welding technique can be extended for various applications in semiconductor, automobile, aerospace, and biomedical industries.

  1. Friction Stir Welding of Steel Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The friction stir welding process has been developed primarily for the welding of aluminum alloys. Other higher melting allows such, as steels are much more difficult to join. Special attention must be given to pin tool material selection and welding techniques. This paper addresses the joining of steels and other high melting point materials using the friction stir welding process. Pin tool material and welding parameters will be presented. Mechanical properties of weldments will also be presented. Significance: There are many applications for the friction stir welding process other than low melting aluminum alloys. The FSW process can be expanded for use with high melting alloys in the pressure vessel, railroad and ship building industries.

  2. Improving fatigue performance of rail thermite welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winiar L.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Rail transport development offers economic and ecological interests. Nevertheless, it requires heavy investments in rolling material and infrastructure. To be competitive, this transportation means must rely on safe and reliable infrastructure, which requires optimization of all implemented techniques and structure. Rail thermite (or aluminothermic welding is widely used within the railway industry for in-track welding during re-rail and defect replacement. The process provides numerous advantages against other welding technology commonly used. Obviously, future demands on train traffic are heavier axle loads, higher train speeds and increased traffic density. Thus, a new enhanced weld should be developed to prevent accidents due to fracture of welds and to lower maintenance costs. In order to improve such assembly process, a detailed metallurgical study coupled to a thermomechanical modelling of the phenomena involved in the thermite welding process is carried out. Obtained data enables us to develop a new improved thermite weld (type A. This joint is made by modifying the routinely specified procedure (type B used in a railway rail by a standard gap alumino-thermic weld. Joints of type A and B are tested and compared. Based on experimental temperature measurements, a finite element analysis is used to calculate the thermal residual stresses induced. In the vicinity of the weld, the residual stress patterns depend on the thermal conditions during welding as it also shown by litterature [1, 2]. In parallel, X-Ray diffraction has been used to map the residual stress field that is generated in welded rail of types A and B. Their effect on fatigue crack growth in rail welds is studied. An experimental study based on fatigue tests of rails welded by conventional and improved processes adjudicates on the new advances and results will be shown.

  3. Improving Fatigue Performance of AHSS Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Yu, Xinghua [ORNL; ERDMAN III, DONALD L [ORNL; Wang, Yanli [ORNL; Kelly, Steve [ArcelorMittal USA; Hou, Wenkao [ArcelorMittal USA; Yan, Benda [ArcelorMittal USA; Wang, Zhifeng [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Yu, Zhenzhen [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Liu, Stephen [Colorado School of Mines, Golden

    2015-03-01

    Reported herein is technical progress on a U.S. Department of Energy CRADA project with industry cost-share aimed at developing the technical basis and demonstrate the viability of innovative in-situ weld residual stresses mitigation technology that can substantially improve the weld fatigue performance and durability of auto-body structures. The developed technology would be costeffective and practical in high-volume vehicle production environment. Enhancing weld fatigue performance would address a critical technology gap that impedes the widespread use of advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) and other lightweight materials for auto body structure light-weighting. This means that the automotive industry can take full advantage of the AHSS in strength, durability and crashworthiness without the concern of the relatively weak weld fatigue performance. The project comprises both technological innovations in weld residual stress mitigation and due-diligence residual stress measurement and fatigue performance evaluation. Two approaches were investigated. The first one was the use of low temperature phase transformation (LTPT) weld filler wire, and the second focused on novel thermo-mechanical stress management technique. Both technical approaches have resulted in considerable improvement in fatigue lives of welded joints made of high-strength steels. Synchrotron diffraction measurement confirmed the reduction of high tensile weld residual stresses by the two weld residual stress mitigation techniques.

  4. Comparative analysis of different joining techniques to improve the passive fit of cobalt-chromium superstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbi, Francisco C L; Camarini, Edevaldo T; Silva, Rafael S; Endo, Eliana H; Pereira, Jefferson R

    2012-12-01

    The influence of different joining techniques on passive fit at the interface structure/abutment of cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) superstructures has not yet been clearly established. The purpose of this study was to compare 3 different techniques of joining Co-Cr superstructures by measuring the resulting marginal misfit in a simulated prosthetic assembly. A specially designed metal model was used for casting, sectioning, joining, and measuring marginal misfit. Forty-five cast bar-type superstructures were fabricated in a Co-Cr alloy and randomly assigned by drawing lots to 3 groups (n=15) according to the joining method used: conventional gas-torch brazing (G-TB), laser welding (LW), and tungsten inert gas welding (TIG). Joined specimens were assembled onto abutment analogs in the metal model with the 1-screw method. The resulting marginal misfit was measured with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at 3 different points: distal (D), central (C), and mesial (M) along the buccal aspect of both abutments: A (tightened) and B (without screw). The Levene test was used to evaluate variance homogeneity and then the Welsch ANOVA for heteroscedastic data (α=.05). Significant differences were found on abutment A between groups G-TB and LW (P=.013) measured mesially and between groups G-TB and TIG (P=.037) measured centrally. On abutment B, significant differences were found between groups G-TB and LW (PTIG (PTIG (P=.007) measured distally; and groups G-TB and TIG (P=.001) and LW and TIG (P=.007) measured centrally. The method used for joining Co-Cr prosthetic structures had an influence on the level of resulting passive fit. Structures joined by the tungsten inert gas method produced better mean results than did the brazing or laser method. Copyright © 2012 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of the Corrosion Behavior of an A-TIG Welded SS 409 Weld Fusion Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyarthy, R. S.; Dwivedi, D. K.

    2017-11-01

    AISI 409 (SS 409) ferritic stainless steel is generally used as the thick gauge section in freight train wagons, in ocean containers, and in sugar refinery equipment. Activating the flux tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) welding process can reduce the welding cost during fabrication of thick sections. However, corrosion behavior of the A-TIG weld fusion zone is a prime concern for this type of steel. In the present work, the effect of the A-TIG welding process parameters on the corrosion behavior of a weld fusion zone made of 8-mm-thick AISI 409 ferritic stainless-steel plate has been analyzed. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed to evaluate the corrosion behavior. The maximum corrosion potential ( E corr) was shown by the weld made using a welding current of 215 A, a welding speed of 95 mm/min, and a flux coating density of 0.81 mg/cm2. The minimum E corr was observed in the weld made using a welding current of 190 A, a welding speed of 120 mm/min, and a flux coating density of 1.40 mg/cm2. The current study also presents the inclusive microstructure-corrosion property relationships using the collective techniques of scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction.

  6. Vacuum brazing of TiAl48Cr2Nb2 casting alloys based on TiAl (γ intermetallic compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Mirski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A growing interest in modern engineering materials characterised by increasingly better operational parameters combined with a necessity to obtain joints of such materials representing good operation properties create important research and technological problems of today. These issues include also titanium joints or joints of titanium alloys based on intermetallic compounds. Brazing is one of the basic and sometimes even the only available welding method used for joining the aforesaid materials in production of various systems, heat exchangers and, in case of titanium alloys based on intermetallic compounds, turbine elements and space shuttle plating etc. This article presents the basic physical and chemical properties as well as the brazability of alloys based on intermetallic compounds. The work also describes the principle and mechanisms of diffusion-brazed joint formation as well as reveals the results of metallographic and strength tests involving diffusion-welded joints of TiAl48Cr3Nb2 casting alloy based on TiAl (γ phase with the use of sandwich-type layers of silver-based parent metal (grade B- Ag72Cu-780 (AG 401 and copper (grade CF032A. Structural examination was performed by means of light microscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM and energy dispersion spectrometer (EDS. Furthermore, the article reveals the results of shear strength tests involving the aforementioned joints.

  7. Characterization of duplex stainless steel weld metals obtained by hybrid plasma-gas metal arc welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koray Yurtisik

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite its high efficiency, autogenous keyhole welding is not well-accepted for duplex stainless steels because it causes excessive ferrite in as-welded duplex microstructure, which leads to a degradation in toughness and corrosion properties of the material. Combining the deep penetration characteristics of plasma arc welding in keyhole mode and metal deposition capability of gas metal arc welding, hybrid plasma - gas metal arc welding process has considered for providing a proper duplex microstructure without compromising the welding efficiency. 11.1 mm-thick standard duplex stainless steel plates were joined in a single-pass using this novel technique. Same plates were also subjected to conventional gas metal arc and plasma arc welding processes, providing benchmarks for the investigation of the weldability of the material. In the first place, the hybrid welding process enabled us to achieve less heat input compared to gas metal arc welding. Consequently, the precipitation of secondary phases, which are known to be detrimental to the toughness and corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels, was significantly suppressed in both fusion and heat affected zones. Secondly, contrary to other keyhole techniques, proper cooling time and weld metal chemistry were achieved during the process, facilitating sufficient reconstructive transformation of austenite in the ferrite phase.

  8. Distortion Control during Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ methods to control welding distortion. In these methods local heating and/or cooling strategies are applied during welding. Additional heating and/or cooling sources can be implemented either stationa...

  9. Microwave-assisted brazing of alumina ceramics for electron tube ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microwave-assisted brazing of alumina ceramics for electron tube applications. MAYUR SHUKLA1,2, SUMANA GHOSH2,∗, NANDADULAL DANDAPAT2, ASHIS K MANDAL2 and VAMSI K BALLA2. 1Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), CSIR—-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute,.

  10. Enhanced corrosion protection by microstructural control of aluminium brazing sheet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norouzi Afshar, F.

    2013-01-01

    Aluminium brazing sheet is a sandwich material made out of two aluminium alloys (AA4xxx/AA3xxx) and is widely used in automotive heat exchangers. One of the main performance criteria for heat exchanger units is the lifetime of the product. The lifetime of the heat exchanger units is determined by

  11. Interfacial microstructure and strength of diffusion brazed joint ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    Abstract. Joining of composite, Al2O3–TiC, with heat-resistant 9Cr1MoV steel, was carried out by diffusion brazing technology, using a combination of Ti, Cu and Ti as multi-interlayer. The interfacial strength was measured by shear testing and the result was explained by the fracture morphology. Microstructural charac-.

  12. Contamination and solid state welds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Bernice E.

    2007-05-01

    Since sensitivity to contamination is one of the verities of solid state joining, there is a need for assessing contamination of the part(s) to be joined, preferably nondestructively while it can be remedied. As the surfaces that are joined in pinch welds are inaccessible and thus provide a greater challenge, most of the discussion is of the search for the origin and effect of contamination on pinch welding and ways to detect and mitigate it. An example of contamination and the investigation and remediation of such a system is presented. Suggestions are made for techniques for nondestructive evaluation of contamination of surfaces for other solid state welds as well as for pinch welds. Surfaces that have good visual access are amenable to inspection by diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy. Although other techniques are useful for specific classes of contaminants (such as hydrocarbons), DRIFT can be used most classes of contaminants. Surfaces such as the interior of open tubes or stems that are to be pinch welded can be inspected using infrared reflection spectroscopy. It must be demonstrated whether or not this tool can detect graphite based contamination, which has been seen in stems. For tubes with one closed end, the technique that should be investigated is emission infrared spectroscopy.

  13. WELDING PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  14. Microgalvanic Corrosion Behavior of Cu-Ag Active Braze Alloys Investigated with SKPFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen Kvryan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The nature of microgalvanic couple driven corrosion of brazed joints was investigated. 316L stainless steel samples were joined using Cu-Ag-Ti and Cu-Ag-In-Ti braze alloys. Phase and elemental composition across each braze and parent metal interface was characterized and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM was used to map the Volta potential differences. Co-localization of SKPFM with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS measurements enabled spatially resolved correlation of potential differences with composition and subsequent galvanic corrosion behavior. Following exposure to the aggressive solution, corrosion damage morphology was characterized to determine the mode of attack and likely initiation areas. When exposed to 0.6 M NaCl, corrosion occurred at the braze-316L interface preceded by preferential dissolution of the Cu-rich phase within the braze alloy. Braze corrosion was driven by galvanic couples between the braze alloys and stainless steel as well as between different phases within the braze microstructure. Microgalvanic corrosion between phases of the braze alloys was investigated via SKPFM to determine how corrosion of the brazed joints developed.

  15. Brazing of Ti to stainless steel under Ar-gas atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazawa, Y.; Sano, Y.; Minoda, Y.; Ariga, T. [Tokai Univ., Kanagawa (Japan); Chang, C.S. [Engineered Materials Solutions, Attleboro (United States); Kanda, K. [Kanto YakinKogyo Co., Kanagawa (Japan); Takahashi, S. [Osaka Univ. (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Joining technology of CP-Titanium and Titanium alloy is very important for manufacturing field. In that case of titanium brazing, chemical compositions of brazing filler metal and brazing atmosphere are very important. In this study, Ti alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) / Stainless Steel (SUS630, PH stainless steel) were brazed with Ag-based brazing filler metal foil (Ag-Cu eutectic composition) and Ti-based laminated brazing filler metal foil by using continuous type furnace under Ar gas atmosphere containing extremely low oxygen. Laminated filler was fabricated by roll bonding technology. Whole chemical compositions of laminated filler metal used in this study were Ti-15Cu-15Ni and Ti-20Zr-20Cu-20Ni. Brazing condition employed in this study in that case of laminated brazing filler metal was 950 C and 30 min. and brazing conditions employed in this study in that case of Ag-based brazing filler metal were 830C 3min, 830C 30min, 860C 5min and 900C 5min. Joint characteristics were estimated by micro-structural observation at the joint and mechanical properties measurement. Sound joint was obtained in this study according to outside appearance of the specimen and cross-sectional microstructure. (orig.)

  16. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  17. Issues of low activation brazing of SiC{sub f}/SiC composites by using alloys without free silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riccardi, B. E-mail: riccardi@frascati.enea.it; Nannetti, C.A.; Petrisor, T.; Woltersdorf, J.; Pippel, E.; Libera, S.; Pilloni, L

    2004-08-01

    The paper presents a novel low activation brazing technique for SiC{sub f}/SiC composites. The brazing alloy does not contain free silicon and is based on the use of a Si-44Cr at.% eutectic and the intermetallic CrSi{sub 2} (melting temperatures 1390 and 1490 deg. C, respectively). These are advantageous because the melting point is low enough to avoid degradation of the advanced fibres and of the interphases in the composite, and the Si-Cr intermetallics are chemically compatible with silicon carbide. Both the eutectic and the intermetallic were prepared before brazing operations by melting a Si-Cr mixture. The joining was performed under vacuum (about 10{sup -4} Pa). Systematic investigations of the microstructure and of the nanochemistry (TEM, EELS, ELNES) of the Si-Cr joints reveal that direct chemical Si-Si, Cr-C and Si-Cr bonds across the interface are responsible for the adhesion: the interfaces were proved to be nearly atomically sharp and adhesive. Altogether, this brazing procedure enables joints with sufficient strength and with a microstructure comparable with that of the starting powders to be obtained.

  18. Design, fabrication, and performance of brazed, graphite electrode, multistage depressed collectors with 500-W, continuous wave, 4.8- to 9.6-GHz traveling-wave tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramins, Peter; Ebihara, Ben

    1989-03-01

    A small, isotropic graphite electrode, multistage depressed collector (MDC) was designed, fabricated, and evaluated in conjunction with a 500-W, continuous wave (CW), 4.8- to 9.6-GHz traveling-wave tube (TWT). The carbon electrode surfaces were used to improve the TWT overall efficiency by minimizing the secondary electron emission losses in the MDC. The design and fabrication of the brazed graphite MDC assembly are described. The brazing technique, which used copper braze filler metal, is compatible with both vacuum and the more commonly available hydrogen atmosphere brazing furnaces. The TWT and graphite electrode MCC bakeout, processing, and outgassing characteristics were evaluated and found to be comparable to TWT's equipped with copper electrode MDC's. The TWT and MDC performance was optimized for broadband CW operation at saturation. The average radiofrequency (RF), overall, and MDC efficiencies were 14.9, 46.4, and 83.6 percent, respectively, across the octave operating band. A 1500-hr CW test, conducted without the use of an appendage ion pump, showed no gas buildup and excellent stability of the electrode surfaces.

  19. A Study to Increase Weld Penetration in P91 Steel During TIG Welding by using Activating Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Kumar, Mayank; Dey, Vidyut; Naresh Rai, Ram

    2017-08-01

    Activated Flux TIG (ATIG) welding is a unique joining process, invented at Paton Institute of electric welding in 1960. ATIG welding process is also known as flux zoned TIG (FZTIG). In this process, a thin layer of activating flux is applied along the line on the surface of the material where the welding is to be carries out. The ATIG process aids to increase the weld penetration in thick materials. Activating fluxes used in the literature show the use of oxides like TiO2, SiO2, Cr2O3, ZnO, CaO, Fe2O3, and MnO2 during welding of steels. In the present study, ATIG was carried out on P-91 steel. Though, Tungsten Inert Gas welding gives excellent quality welds, but the penetration obtained in such welding is still demanding. P91 steel which is ferritic steel is used in high temperature applications. As this steel is, generally, used in thick sections, fabrication of such structures with TIG welding is limited, due to its low depth of penetration. To increase the depth of penetration in P91while welding with ATIG, the role of various oxides were investigated. Apart from the oxides mentioned above, in the present study the role of B2O3, V2O5 and MgO, during ATIG welding of P91 was investigated. It was seen that, compared to TIG welding, there was phenomenal increase in weld penetration during ATIG welding. Amongst all the oxides used in this study, maximum penetration was achieved in case of B2O3. The measurements of weld penetration, bead width and heat affected zone of the weldings were carried out using an image analysis technique.

  20. The influence of metallic brazing materials on the strain formation of internally water-cooled X-ray optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberta, P; Kittler, M; Áč, V; Hrdý, J; Iragashi, N; Scheinost, A C; Uchida, Y

    2015-03-01

    A study of metallic brazing material for internally cooled optics is presented. The study shows the influence of the different material properties on the final quality of the bond in terms of diffracted wavefront distortion, i.e. enlargement of the rocking curve. By choosing the proper brazing material and applying the proper brazing conditions, the influence of the brazing material can be fully eliminated. Furthermore the degradation of some brazing material due to the extreme working conditions of the optics is presented. Measurement results from ESRF and KEK confirm the importance of the proper brazing material choice.

  1. Monte Carlo Simulation of Alloy Design Techniques: Fracture and Welding Studied Using the BFS Method for Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Good, Brian; Noebe, Ronald D.; Honecy, Frank; Abel, Phillip

    1999-01-01

    Large-scale simulations of dynamic processes at the atomic level have developed into one of the main areas of work in computational materials science. Until recently, severe computational restrictions, as well as the lack of accurate methods for calculating the energetics, resulted in slower growth in the area than that required by current alloy design programs. The Computational Materials Group at the NASA Lewis Research Center is devoted to the development of powerful, accurate, economical tools to aid in alloy design. These include the BFS (Bozzolo, Ferrante, and Smith) method for alloys (ref. 1) and the development of dedicated software for large-scale simulations based on Monte Carlo- Metropolis numerical techniques, as well as state-of-the-art visualization methods. Our previous effort linking theoretical and computational modeling resulted in the successful prediction of the microstructure of a five-element intermetallic alloy, in excellent agreement with experimental results (refs. 2 and 3). This effort also produced a complete description of the role of alloying additions in intermetallic binary, ternary, and higher order alloys (ref. 4).

  2. Introduction to Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  3. Distortion Control during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ

  4. Study on a novel Sn-electroplated silver brazing filler metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingxing; Peng, Jin; Cui, Datian

    2017-08-01

    Novel Sn-electroplated Ag brazing filler metal with a high tin content was prepared by combining the plating and thermal diffusion method. The BAg45CuZn alloy was used as a base filler metal, and a Sn layer was electroplated on it. Then the H62 brass was brazed with the Sn-plated brazing filler metal containing 6.2 wt% of Sn. The results showed that the microstructure of the brazed joints with the Sn-plated filler mainly consisted of the Ag phase, Cu phase, CuZn phase and Cu5Zn8 phase. The tensile strength of the joints brazed with the Sn-plated filler metal was 326 MPa, which was higher than that of the joints with the base filler metal. Fracture analysis showed that the fractures of the joints brazed by the Sn-plated filler metal was mainly ductile fracture mixed with a small quantity of brittle fracture.

  5. Brazing of titanium at temperatures below 800 C: review and prospective applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, A.E. [Titanum Brazing, Inc., Columbus (United States); Flom, Y.A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Brazing temperature of conventional Ti-Cu-Ni and Ti-Zr-Cu-Ni filler metals is usually above the {beta}-transus temperature of titanium base metals that hurts mechanical properties of the base metal. Brazing titanium below the {beta}-transus temperature using the Ag-based and Al-based filler metals of various compositions has been evaluated in the review. Some new Al-based filler metals were tested experimentally for joining thin-wall titanium structures. The effect of alloying elements on the aluminum braze alloys, especially for the intermetallic formation in the brazed titanium joints, was examined. Prospective applications of low-temperature brazing of titanium in Aerospace, Aviation, and Electronics are discussed, as well as potential technical solutions to improve mechanical properties of brazed joints. (orig.)

  6. An Approach to Maximize Weld Penetration During TIG Welding of P91 Steel Plates by Utilizing Image Processing and Taguchi Orthogonal Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Debnath, Tapas; Dey, Vidyut; Rai, Ram Naresh

    2017-10-01

    P-91 is modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. Fabricated structures and components of P-91 has a lot of application in power and chemical industry owing to its excellent properties like high temperature stress corrosion resistance, less susceptibility to thermal fatigue at high operating temperatures. The weld quality and surface finish of fabricated structure of P91 is very good when welded by Tungsten Inert Gas welding (TIG). However, the process has its limitation regarding weld penetration. The success of a welding process lies in fabricating with such a combination of parameters that gives maximum weld penetration and minimum weld width. To carry out an investigation on the effect of the autogenous TIG welding parameters on weld penetration and weld width, bead-on-plate welds were carried on P91 plates of thickness 6 mm in accordance to a Taguchi L9 design. Welding current, welding speed and gas flow rate were the three control variables in the investigation. After autogenous (TIG) welding, the dimension of the weld width, weld penetration and weld area were successfully measured by an image analysis technique developed for the study. The maximum error for the measured dimensions of the weld width, penetration and area with the developed image analysis technique was only 2 % compared to the measurements of Leica-Q-Win-V3 software installed in optical microscope. The measurements with the developed software, unlike the measurements under a microscope, required least human intervention. An Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) confirms the significance of the selected parameters. Thereafter, Taguchi's method was successfully used to trade-off between maximum penetration and minimum weld width while keeping the weld area at a minimum.

  7. Role of heat equation in lap joint for welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.; Rohit, Sooraj

    2017-07-01

    Welding is predominantly used in industrial purposes and growth in their industry, which gives exact welding and more efficient. The major advantage of using this welding technique at initial stage it takes very low heat to weld the portion and gives a good result of low distortion in modules. In this context, two dissimilar metals copper and nickel are chosen for analysis in tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) in which length is 300 mm and breadth is 100 mm thickness 15 mm welded at room temperature a welded portion zone is formed simulation analysis has done on CATIA® and ANSYS®and MATLAB® code is generated for calculating temperatures at each node to calculate temperature at each node a new technique is used tri-diagonal matrix algorithm is used (TDMA) Steady state one dimension heat is calculated results compared between simulation analysis and analytical analysis temperature at each node is calculated both the temperatures are equal with error.

  8. Experimental and simulation study on the microstructure of TA15 titanium alloy laser beam welded joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiaohong; Peng, Qingyu; Wei, Yanhong; Ou, Wenmin

    2017-09-01

    Laser beam welding technique offers obvious advantages over other fusion welding processes in terms of joining titanium alloy. The microstructure of welded seam and heat affected zone resulted from diverse welding speeds and laser powers were investigated after simulating welding heat treatment. The analysis of the thermal transport properties successfully explained the morphology. Optimal process parameters were obtained. The simulation results were consistent with the corresponding experimental observations.

  9. Monitoring and Control of the Hybrid Laser-Gas Metal-Arc Welding Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunerth, D. C.; McJunkin, T. R.; Nichol, C. I.; Clark, D.; Todorov, E.; Couch, R. D.; Yu, F.

    2013-07-01

    Methods are currently being developed towards a more robust system real time feedback in the high throughput process combining laser welding with gas metal arc welding. A combination of ultrasonic, eddy current, electronic monitoring, and visual techniques are being applied to the welding process. Initial simulation and bench top evaluation of proposed real time techniques on weld samples are presented along with the concepts to apply the techniques concurrently to the weld process. Consideration for the eventual code acceptance of the methods and system are also being researched as a component of this project. The goal is to detect defects or precursors to defects and correct when possible during the weld process.

  10. Manganese in occupational arc welding fumes--aspects on physiochemical properties, with focus on solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taube, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    Physicochemical properties, such as particle sizes, composition, and solubility of welding fumes are decisive for the bioaccessibility of manganese and thereby for the manganese cytotoxic and neurotoxic effects arising from various welding fumes. Because of the diverse results within the research on welding fume solubility, this article aims to review and discuss recent literature on physicochemical properties of gas metal arc welding, shielded metal arc welding, and flux-cored arc welding fumes, with focus on solubility properties. This article also presents a short introduction to the literature on arc welding techniques, health effects from manganese, and occupational exposure to manganese among welders.

  11. Structural and mechanical properties of welded joints of reduced activation martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filacchioni, G. E-mail: gianni.filacchioni@casaccia.enea.it; Montanari, R.; Tata, M.E.; Pilloni, L

    2002-12-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding and electron beam welding methods were used to realise welding pools on plates of reduced activation martensitic steels. Structural and mechanical features of these simulated joints have been investigated in as-welded and post-welding heat-treated conditions. The research allowed to assess how each welding technique affects the original mechanical properties of materials and to find suitable post-welding heat treatments. This paper reports results from experimental activities on BATMAN II and F82H mod. steels carried out in the frame of the European Blanket Project - Structural Materials Program.

  12. Modal testing and finite element model updating of laser spot welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Husain, N.; Haddad Khodaparast, H.; Snaylam, A.; James, S.; Sharp, M.; Dearden, G.; Ouyang, H.

    2009-08-01

    Spot welds are used extensively in automotive engineering. One of the latest manufacturing techniques for producing spot welds is Laser Welding. Finite element (FE) modelling of laser welds for dynamic analysis is a research issue because of the complexity and uncertainty of the welds and thus formed structures. In this work, FE model of the welds is developed by employing CWELD element in NASTRAN and its feasibility for representing laser spot welds is investigated. The FE model is updated based on the measured modal data of hat-plate structures and cast as a structural minimisation problem by the application of NASTRAN codes.

  13. Large Area Active Brazing of Multi-tile Ceramic-Metal Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Large Area Active Brazing of Multi-tile Ceramic-Metal Structures by Kevin J. Doherty ARL-RP-366 May 2012 A...reprint from the Proceedings From the 5th International Brazing and Soldering Conference, Las Vegas, NV, 22–25 April 2012...Army Research Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 ARL-RP-366 May 2012 Large Area Active Brazing of Multi-tile

  14. The constitutive response of brazing alloys and the residual stresses in ceramic-metal joints

    OpenAIRE

    Galli, Matteo

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays the joining of dissimilar materials is often the only solution to fulfill the complex requirements of high technology applications. One of the fields in which the research activity is more intense and promising is that of the brazing of ceramics with metals. The performance of brazed ceramic-metal joints is limited by residual stresses which develop in the bonded assembly as it cools down after brazing. The magnitude and influence of these stresses can be particularly high because of...

  15. Characterization of the Micro-Welding Process for Repair of Nickel Base Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durocher, J.; Richards, N. L.

    2007-12-01

    Micro-welding is a low-heat input process whereby a metal or cermet, is deposited by the generation of a low-power arc between a consumable electrode and a substrate. The low-heat input of this process offers unique advantages over more common welding processes such as gas tungsten arc, plasma arc, laser, and electron beam welding. At present, the repair of turbine blades and vanes commonly involves gas tungsten arc welding and these components are susceptible to heat affected zone cracking during the weld repair process; vacuum brazing is also used but mainly on low-stress components such as stators. In this study, the low-heat input characteristic of micro-welding has been utilized to simulate repair of Inconel (Trade Mark of Special Metals) 625, Inconel 718, and Inconel 722 filler alloys to a cast Inconel 738 substrate. The effect of micro-welding process parameters on the deposition rate, coating quality, and substrate has been investigated.

  16. Non-destructive Magnetic Evaluation of Laser Weld Quality in Hot Rolled Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, J. N.; Chakradhar, I.; Rao, K. R. C.; Rao, V. V. L.; Kaza, Marutiram

    2015-06-01

    Weld quality evaluation was conducted on laser welded thin sectsions (2 mm) of hot-rolled (HR) low-carbon steel coils during cold rolling process. The analysis revealed that the poor welds consisting of the weld defects like incomplete fusion, cluster of porosity, and large difference in hardness between the weld zone and base metal were responsible for the weld failures. Experiments were conducted by varying the welding parameters; laser power and welding speed to optimize the parameters for minimizing the weld defects. The optimized weld process parameters have helped elimination of weld defects and the results are verified with microscopy and microhardness measurements. As destructive evaluation techniques are time consuming and not always permitted in industrial applications, attempts have been made in the present investigation for the utilization of suitable non-destructive techniques for the evaluation of weld quality. Non-destructive magnetic techniques of magnetic hysteresis loop and magnetic Barkhausen emissions were used in the present investigation to establish possible correlations of magnetic properties across the weld seam with the mechanical property (microhardness) for evaluation of weld quality. It is inferred that the magnetic properties of coercivity and inverse of root mean square voltage can be effectively utilized to determine weld quality in HR steel coils.

  17. Welding of Prosthetic Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciechowska M.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the techniques of joining metal denture elements, used in prosthetic dentistry: the traditional soldering technique with a gas burner and a new technique of welding with a laser beam; the aim of the study was to make a comparative assessment of the quality of the joints in view of the possibility of applying them in prosthetic structures. Fractographic examinations were conducted along with tensile strength and impact strength tests, and the quality of the joints was assessed compared to the solid metal. The experiments have shown that the metal elements used to make dentures, joined by the technique which employs a laser beam, have better strength properties than those achieved with a gas burner.

  18. Effects of thermal cycling and thermal aging on the hermeticity and strength of silver-copper oxide air-brazed seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Weil, K.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Hardy, John S. [Energy Science and Technology Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Darsell, Jens T. [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Xia, Gordon G. [Environmental Technology Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Thermal cycle and exposure tests were conducted on ceramic-to-metal joints prepared by a new sealing technique. Known as reactive air brazing, this joining method is currently being considered for use in sealing various high-temperature solid-state electrochemical devices, including planar solid oxide fuel cells (pSOFC). In order to simulate a typical pSOFC application, test specimens were prepared by joining ceramic anode/electrolyte bilayers to metal washers, of the same composition as the common frame materials employed in pSOFC stacks, using a filler metal composed of 4mol% CuO in silver. The brazed samples were exposure tested at 750{sup o}C for 200, 400, and 800h in both simulated fuel and air environments and thermally cycled at rapid rate (75{sup o}Cmin{sup -1}) between room temperature and 750{sup o}C for as many as 50 cycles. Subsequent joint strength testing and microstructural analysis indicated that the samples exposure tested in air displayed little degradation with respect to strength, hermeticity, or microstructure out to 800h of exposure. Those tested in fuel showed no change in rupture strength or loss in hermeticity after 800h of high-temperature exposure, but did undergo microstructural change due to the dissolution of hydrogen into the silver-based braze material. Air-brazed specimens subjected to rapid thermal cycling exhibited no loss in joint strength or hermeticity, but displayed initial signs of seal delamination along the braze-electrolyte interface after 50 cycles. (author)

  19. Passive Visual Sensing in Automatic Arc Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jinchao

    For decades much work has been devoted to the research and development of automatic arc welding systems. However, it has remained a challenging problem. Besides the very complex arc welding process itself, the lack of ability to precisely sense the welding process, including the seam geometry...... and the weld pool, has also prevented the realization of a closed-loop control system for many years, even though a variety of sensors have been developed. Among all the sensor systems, visual sensors have the advantage of receiving visual information and have been drawn more and more attentions. Typical...... industrial solutions for seam detection such as using laser scanners suer from several limitations. For instance, it must be positioned some distance ahead to the molten pool and may cause problem when dealing with shiny surfaces. Existing techniques for weld pool sensing mostly rely on auxiliary light...

  20. STRUCTURAL DEGRADATION OF HETEROGENEOUS WELDED JOINTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Schmidová

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Developing the techniques of welding materials with higher dynamic strength onto the rolling surfaces of rails is one of the options for increasing their operational endurance. The subject of this paper is an analysis of heterogeneous weld joints experimentally manufactured by welding medium-carbon austenitic steels onto high-carbon unalloyed pearlitic steels. The analyses focus on examinations of the marginal mixing of the materials at the fusion line and the circumstances under which intercrystalline cracks form in the weld deposit layers. Structural analyses, chemical microanalyses and a hardness assessment were performed in order to identify the corresponding structural changes. The proportion of zonal vs. interdendritic segregation of the alloying elements in the degradation of the welded joint was distinguished. We described the nature of the structural heterogeneities produced, locally connected with the martensitic transformation. The chemical heterogeneity leading to the formation of martensite at grain boundaries was identified as the limiting effect.

  1. Online resistance spot weld NDE using infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Feng, Zhili

    2017-04-01

    A new online resistance spot weld non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique based on infrared (IR) thermography has been developed. It is capable of both real-time online (during welding) and post-weld online/offline (after welding) inspections. The system mainly consists of an IR camera and a computer program with proprietary thermal imaging analysis algorithms integrated into existing production lines. For real-time inspection, the heat flow generated from the welding process (with temperature exceeding 1000°C) is monitored by the IR camera. For post-weld inspection, a novel auxiliary heating device is applied to locally heat the weld region, resulting in temperature changes on the order of 10°C, and the transmitted heat flow is monitored. Unlike the conventional IR NDE method that requires surface coating to reduce the influence of unknown emissivity, the new method can be applied on as-is bare metal surface thanks to the unique "thermal signatures" extracted from infrared thermal images, which positively correlates to weld quality with a high degree of confidence. The new method can be used to reliably detect weld size, surface indents and defects such as cold weld with sufficient accuracy for welds made from various combinations of materials, thickness, stack-up configuration, surface coating conditions and welding conditions.

  2. Controlling phase formation during aluminium/steel Nd:YAG laser brazing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez, L.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of fuel consumption of internal combustion motors, imposed by the new anti-pollution and energy saving laws may be attained by reducing the weight of vehicles, introducing, for example, aluminium sections into the main steel car-body. Laser brazing is a process which can be used to perform such a junction. The main problem of welding this kind of materials combination with conventional processes is the potential formation of inter-metallic phases, which reduces the good performance of the joint. Laser brazing allows a very good control of the thermal development of the joint, with a limited precipitation of these brittle phases. This paper presents the results of a feasibility study made with ZnAl-30 as filler metal. The study shows that the type of configuration used for the assembly has a particular influence on the formation of brittle phases and consequently on the mechanical performance of the joint.

    La reducción en el consumo de combustibles fósiles y las emergentes leyes mundiales anti-contaminación, obligan a prever una reducción en el peso de los vehículos de transporte. Esta condición se puede cumplir por ejemplo, introduciendo componentes de Aluminio en el cuerpo de la carrocería principal de acero de los mencionados vehículos. El principal problema que se presenta al realizar este tipo de ensamblaje es la formación de fases íntermetálicas frágiles que pueden comprometer el buen desenvolvimiento de la unión. La soldadura con rayo láser permite un buen control de calor aportado y una formación muy limitada de este tipo de fases. Este trabajo presenta los resultados preliminares de los estudios realizados en uniones soldadas con ZnAl-30 como material de aportación. El estudio muestra que el tipo de configuración utilizada para realizar la soldadura tiene una influencia importante sobre la posibilidad de formación de estas fases ínter-metálicas.

  3. Friction Stir Spot Welding of 6061 Aluminum-to-Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heideman, Robert J.

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) between 1.5mm thick 6061 Al on top and 1.5mm thick Cu at bottom was conducted. First, weld parameters and the weld macrostructure that were necessary to form good quality welds, as determined using lap shear weld strength, were identified. Tool rotation speed and tool pin length are key variables that control weld strength. To obtain high quality strong welds, a Cu ring extruded upward from the lower Cu sheet into the upper 6061 Al-sheet, which promoted bonding and interlocking between the sheets, and an Al-rich stir zone between Cu ring and weld keyhole were both necessary. Second, a technique where the tool remained in the sample after FSSW helped determine the material flow that takes place during high quality weld formation and the functions of the welding tool features. The tool threads cause 6061 Al from the upper sheet to move downward into the region near the threads. The tool shoulder causes a counter flow movement of 6061 Al that results in the formation of the Al-rich stir zone and also causes the upward extrusion of the lower Cu sheet. This technique also identified that a Cu-rich material forms on the tool tip, that this material sheds and rebuilds during subsequent welds, and that this material can form large Cu-rich particles that can completely fill the tool threads, impede proper material flow and lead to a low strength, poor quality weld. Third, to further understand welding parameters, weld temperatures, torque, and vertical forces were measured. Temperature data was collected using a tool holder that permitted wireless thermocouple data collection. Through these measurements, rotational plunge weld energy was recognized as important in determining if a quality weld formed, and weld plunge rate was identified as the welding parameter that significantly impacted rotational weld plunge energy. The final phase of research was to improve weld quality consistency. Through repetitive trials with a single tool

  4. An unconventional set-up for fluxless brazing of aluminium

    CERN Document Server

    Loos, Robert

    1999-01-01

    In order to successfully braze aluminium alloy assemblies without the use of oxide-removing fluxes, an evironment with very low contaminant level is mandatory. This is mostly achieved by using a vacuum furnace. Brazing under inert gas of sufficient purity is also possible. The method reported upon here makes use of a stainless steel bag which can enter a traditional air furnace. The bag is evacuated, giving a well distributed mechanical pressure on the parts to join. The intrinsic handicap of poor vacuum is compensated by regular inert gas flushing, even at high temperatures. The set-up works rather well, and the idea is believed to yield a valuable strategic and economic option, for the realization of special equipment as well as for prototyping work. We intend to use the principle for the CMS Preshower cooling screens.

  5. Analysis of Laser-Brazed Diamond Particle Microstructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibo YANG

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Brazing diamond particles to a steel substrate using Ni-based filler alloy was carried out via laser in an argon atmosphere. The brazed diamond particles were detected by scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. The formation mechanism of carbide layers was discussed. All the results indicated that a high-strength bond between the diamond particles and the steel substrate was successfully realized. The chromium in the Ni-based alloy segregated preferentially to the surfaces of the diamonds to form a chromium-rich reaction product, and the bond between the alloy and the steel substrate was established through a cross-diffusion of iron and Ni-based alloy.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9626

  6. Separation and Sealing of a Sample Container Using Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Rivellini, Tommaso P.; Wincentsen, James E.; Gershman, Robert

    2007-01-01

    A special double-wall container and a process for utilizing the container are being developed to enable (1) acquisition of a sample of material in a dirty environment that may include a biological and/or chemical hazard; (2) sealing a lid onto the inner part of the container to hermetically enclose the sample; (3) separating the resulting hermetic container from the dirty environment; and (4) bringing that hermetic container, without any biological or chemical contamination of its outer surface, into a clean environment. The process is denoted S(exp 3)B (separation, seaming, and sealing using brazing) because sealing of the sample into the hermetic container, separating the container from the dirty environment, and bringing the container with a clean outer surface into the clean environment are all accomplished simultaneously with a brazing operation.

  7. Brazing SiC/SiC Composites to Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffier, Wayne S.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments have shown that active brazing alloys (ABAs) can be used to join SiC/SiC composite materials to metals, with bond strengths sufficient for some structural applications. The SiC/SiC composite coupons used in the experiments were made from polymerbased SiC fiber preforms that were chemical-vapor-infiltrated with SiC to form SiC matrices. Some of the metal coupons used in the experiments were made from 304 stainless steel; others were made from oxygen-free, high-conductivity copper. Three ABAs were chosen for the experiments: two were chosen randomly from among a number of ABAs that were on hand at the time; the third ABA was chosen because its titanium content (1.25 percent) is less than those of the other two ABAs (1.75 and 4.5 percent, respectively) and it was desired to evaluate the effect of reducing the titanium content, as described below. The characteristics of ABAs that are considered to be beneficial for the purpose of joining SiC/SiC to metal include wettability, reactivity, and adhesion to SiC-based ceramics. Prior to further development, it was verified that the three chosen ABAs have these characteristics. For each ABA, suitable vacuum brazing process conditions were established empirically by producing a series of (SiC/SiC)/ABA wetting samples. These samples were then sectioned and subjected to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDS) for analysis of their microstructures and compositions. Specimens for destructive mechanical tests were fabricated by brazing of lap joints between SiC/SiC coupons 1/8-in. (.3.2- mm) thick and, variously, stainless steel or copper tabs. The results of destructive mechanical tests and the SEM/EDS analysis were used to guide the development of a viable method of brazing the affected materials.

  8. Analysis and Comparison of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanelli, Sabina Luisa; Casalino, Giuseppe; Casavola, Caterina; Moramarco, Vincenzo

    2013-12-18

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process; i.e. , no melting occurs. The welding process is promoted by the rotation and translation of an axis-symmetric non-consumable tool along the weld centerline. Thus, the FSW process is performed at much lower temperatures than conventional fusion welding, nevertheless it has some disadvantages. Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding (LAFSW) is a combination in which the FSW is the dominant welding process and the laser pre-heats the weld. In this work FSW and LAFSW tests were conducted on 6 mm thick 5754H111 aluminum alloy plates in butt joint configuration. LAFSW is studied firstly to demonstrate the weldability of aluminum alloy using that technique. Secondly, process parameters, such as laser power and temperature gradient are investigated in order to evaluate changes in microstructure, micro-hardness, residual stress, and tensile properties. Once the possibility to achieve sound weld using LAFSW is demonstrated, it will be possible to explore the benefits for tool wear, higher welding speeds, and lower clamping force.

  9. Critical Assessment of Temperature Distribution in Submerged Arc Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet Negi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature distribution during any welding process holds the key for understanding and predicting several important welding attributes like heat affected zone, microstructure of the weld, residual stress, and distortion during welding. The accuracy of the analytical approaches for modeling temperature distribution during welding has been constrained by oversimplified assumptions regarding boundary conditions and material properties. In this paper, an attempt has been made to model the temperature distribution during submerged arc welding process using finite element modeling technique implemented in ANSYS v12. In the present analysis, heat source is assumed to be double-ellipsoidal with Gaussian volumetric heat generation. Furthermore, variation of material properties with temperature and both convective and radiant heat loss boundary condition have been considered. The predicted temperature distribution is then validated against the experimental results obtained by thermal imaging of the welded plate, and they are found to be in a good agreement.

  10. Low temperature friction stir welding of P91 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Rao Kalvala

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bead-on-plate friction stir welds were made on P91 alloy with low and high rotational speeds (100 and 1000 RPM to study their effects on weld microstructural changes and impression creep behavior. Temperatures experienced by the stir zone were recorded at the weld tool tip. Different zones of welds were characterized for their microstructural changes, hardness and creep behavior (by impression creep tests. The results were compared with submerged arc fusion weld. Studies revealed that the stir zone temperature with 100 RPM was well below Ac1 temperature of P91 steel while it was above Ac3 with 1000 RPM. The results suggest that the microstructural degradation in P91 welds can be controlled by low temperature friction stir welding technique.

  11. New welding information system on the internet (Prediction of the properties of weld heat-affected zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Fujita

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available To promote continuous transfer and development of welding technology, a new system for predicting the microstructures and mechanical properties of welded joins has been built on the Internet. It combines a database system containing continuous cooling transformation diagrams (CCT diagrams for welding and an expert system for computing weld thermal histories. In addition, this system employs a technique which was invented during the development of another distributed database system called "Data-Free-Way" , which was designed to contain information advanced nuclear materials and materials obtained from other programs of welding research at NIMS in the past. This paper describes the current state of our new system for computing weld thermal histories to predict the properties of welded joints using the CCT diagrams database, which is now available on the Internet. Some problems encountered with the database used in such a system are also referred to.

  12. Microstructure characterization of Friction Stir Spot Welded TRIP steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Trine Colding; Adachi, Yoshitaka; Peterson, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels have not yet been successfully joined by any welding technique. It is desirable to search for a suitable welding technique that opens up for full usability of TRIP steels. In this study, the potential of joining TRIP steel with Friction Stir Spot...

  13. Reprocessing weld and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killian, M.L.; Lewis, H.E.

    1993-08-03

    A process is described for improving the fatigue resistance of a small primary structural weld at a joint between structural members of a weldment, the weld having been made with the welding energy input of E[sub 1], the process comprising: applying a reprocessing weld on at least a portion of either one or both toes of the primary structural weld, thereby covering said toe portion, the reprocessing weld containing a filler metal and having a cross-sectional area which is less than the corresponding cross-sectional area of the primary structural weld, the reprocessing weld extending onto the face of the primary structural weld at one side of the toe portion covered and onto the structural member at the other side of the toe portion covered, and the total welding energy input, E[sub 2], used in said reprocessing the primary structural weld being less than the welding energy input E[sub 1] of the primary structural weld.

  14. THE DISTRIBUTION OF FILLER MATERIAL ON BASE METALS DURING BRAZING OF ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei DIMITRESCU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Since aluminum brazing technology is relatively new compared to other permanent joiningtechnologies, this technological process needs a scientific approach.One of the specific parameters of this type of technological processes is the distribution of fillermaterial on base material. This parameter affects directly the quality of the brazed assembly

  15. Substrate Effects on the High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of a Gold-Based Braze Filler Metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weil, K. Scott; Rice, Joseph P.

    2005-06-01

    Oxidation testing was conducted on a commercial gold-based braze alloy, Gold ABA®, and on zirconia/stainless steel couples joined using this filler metal. Preliminary results reveal that both substrates play a significant role in determining the overall oxidation behavior of the brazed joint.

  16. Ag-Al based air braze for high temperature electrochemical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Yong Y.; Hardy, John S.; Weil, K. Scott

    2007-11-01

    Silver-aluminum based air brazing was attempted using an in-situ alloying and brazing process. In this process, layers of foils of aluminum and silver were laid up between alumina plates in alternating fashion to achieve three target compositions representing Ag, Ag3Al, and Ag2Al phases. Each alloy composition revealed different microstructure, mechanical properties and fracture mechanisms. Joints brazed with foils containing 9.8 at% Al formed a long continuous layer parallel to the direction of the original aluminum foil. The fracture occurred through the interface between this long alumina layer and the braze filler, resulting in low bend strength (6 ~ 12 MPa). Joints containing 26.5 at% Al in the braze filler metal experienced the series of phase transformations, leading to cracks in as-brazed specimens. The fracture initiated through these pre-existing cracks, thus the joint strength observed in these specimens was extremely low. The joints prepared using foils with 35.1 at% Al exhibited a good interface even though interfacial alumina particles formed during air brazing. Crack propagation occurred through the interface between the alumina substrate and in-situ formed interfacial alumina particles or directly through these particles and the best bend strength (46 ~ 52 MPa) among Al-added braze compositions was achieved.

  17. Economic solar-panel production by infrared brazing; Wirtschaftliche Herstellung von Solarabsorbern durch Infrarotloeten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuessel, U.; Frenz, C.A.; Six, S. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Infrared brazing is a new technology for solar absorber construction which reduces the joining time and improves the heat transfer from the absorber sheet to the pipe register. The solar-selective layer remains undamaged, heat transfer into the absorber sheets is reduced, and production of full-surface absorbers becomes possible. In all, infrared brazing will improve the efficiency of the absorber. (orig.)

  18. Plasma brazing of magnesium- and aluminium-alloys; Plasmaloeten von Magnesium- und Aluminiumlegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobzin, K.; Ernst, F.; Roesing, J. [RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The increasing demand for light metals in all fields of industry necessitates the further development of economically efficient and ecologically acceptable brazed joints. Plasma brazing is an interesting alternative to established technologies as it offers the possibility of joining Mg and Al alloys with a thick oxide layer without fluxes and with comparatively low thermal stress of the base material. (orig.)

  19. SLAM examination of solar cells and solar cell welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, P. M.; Vorres, C. L.; Yuhas, D. E.

    The scanning laser acoustic microscope (SLAM) has been evaluated for non-destructive examination of solar cells and interconnector bonds. Using this technique, it is possible to view through materials in order to reveal regions of discontinuity such as microcracks and voids. Of particular interest is the ability to evaluate, in a unique manner, the bonds produced by parallel gap welding. It is possible to not only determine the area and geometry of the bond between the tab and cell, but also to reveal any microcracks incurred during the welding. By correlating the SLAM results with conventional techniques of weld evaluation a more confident weld parameter optimization can be obtained.

  20. Heat Sink Welding for Preventing Hot Cracking in Alloy 2195 Intersection Welds: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Ping; Dong, Pingsha; Rogers, Patrick

    2000-01-01

    Two concepts, stationary cooling and trailing cooling, were proposed to prevent weld intersection cracking. Finite element analysis was used to demonstrate the potential effectiveness of those two concepts. Both stationary and trailing heat sink setups were proposed for preventing intersection cracking. The cooling media could be liquid nitrogen, or pressured air knife. Welding experiments on the small test panel with the localized heat sink confirmed the feasibility of using such a stationary cooling technique. The required cooling was achieved in this test panel. Systematic welding experiments should be conducted in the future to validate and refine the heat sink technique for preventing intersection cracking.

  1. Experimental and thermodynamic assessment of beryllium-replacement materials for CANDU brazed joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, K.N.; Ferrier, G.A.; Corcoran, E.C., E-mail: Kieran.Potter@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston ON, (Canada); Dimayuga, F.C. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Currently, appendages are joined to CANDU fuel elements via a brazing process, with beryllium as the filler material. A potential reduction in the occupational limit on airborne beryllium particulates has motivated research into alternative brazing materials. To this end, the Canadian nuclear industry has funded an initiative to identify and evaluate the suitability of several candidate brazing materials. This work describes contributions toward the assessment of alternative brazing materials from the Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC). An impact testing method was developed to evaluate the mechanical strength of candidate braze joints.Thermodynamic modelling was performed to predict the aqueous behaviour of each candidate material in CANDU coolant conditions characteristic of reactor shutdown, and corrosion experiments are underway to support modelling predictions.The results of these activities will assist in selecting a suitable replacement material for beryllium. (author)

  2. Reduction of liquid metal embrittlement in copper-brazed stainless steel joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlig, T.; Fedorov, V.; Elßner, M.; Wagner, G.; Weis, S.

    2017-03-01

    Due to its very good formability and the low raw material cost, pure copper in form of foils is commonly used to braze plate heat exchangers made of stainless steel. The difference in the electrochemical potentials of brazing filler and base material leads to corrosion effects in contact with electrolytes. This may lead to leakages, which decrease the reliability of the heat exchanger during service in potable water. The dissolution of the emerging corrosion products of brazing filler and base material induces the migration of heavy metal ions, such as Cu2+ and Ni2+, into the potable water. The so-called liquid metal embrittlement, which takes place during the brazing process, may intensify the corrosion. The brazing filler infiltrates the stainless steel along the grain boundaries and causes an embrittlement. This paper deals with the determination of the grain boundary erosion dependent on the degree of deformation and heat treatment of the stainless steel AISI 316L.

  3. Comparative Investigation on Brazing Behavior, Compressive Strength, and Wear Properties of Multicrystalline CBN Abrasive Grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Feng Ding

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to fabricate the abrasive wheels with good grain self-sharpening capacity, two types of multicrystalline CBN grains, that is, polycrystalline CBN (PCBN and binderless CBN (BCBN, were brazed using Cu-Sn-Ti alloy, respectively. Comparative investigation on the brazing interface, compressive strength, and wear properties of the different grains was carried out. Results obtained show that the PCBN grains have more intricate reaction, more complicated resultants, and thicker reaction layer than the BCBN counterparts under the identical brazing conditions. Though the average compressive strength of the PCBN grains is similar to that of BCBN ones, stronger self-sharpening action by virtue of the microfracture behavior takes place with BCBN grains during grinding. As a consequence, compared to the brazed PCBN wheels and the conventional monocrystalline CBN (MCBN ones, longer service life is obtained for the brazed BCBN wheels.

  4. Handbook of Plastic Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the information about the laser welding of plastic. Laser welding is a matured process nevertheless laser welding of micro dimensional plastic parts is still a big challenge. This report collects the latest information about the laser welding of plastic...... materials and provides an extensive knowhow on the industrial plastic welding process. The objectives of the report include: - Provide the general knowhow of laser welding for the beginners - Summarize the state-of-the-art information on the laser welding of plastics - Find the technological limits in terms...... of design, materials and process - Find the best technology, process and machines adaptive to Sonion’s components - Provide the skills to Sonion’s Design Engineers for successful design of the of the plastic components suitable for the laser welding The ultimate goal of this report is to serve...

  5. Identification of the Quality Spot Welding used Non Destructive Test-Ultrasonic Testing: (Effect of Welding Time)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifa, A.; Endramawan, T.; Badruzzaman

    2017-03-01

    Resistance Spot Welding (RSW) is frequently used as one way of welding is used in the manufacturing process, especially in the automotive industry [4][5][6][7]. Several parameters influence the process of welding points. To determine the quality of a welding job needs to be tested, either by damaging or testing without damage, in this study conducted experimental testing the quality of welding or identify quality of the nugget by using Non-Destructive Test (NDT) -Ultrasonic Testing (UT), in which the identification of the quality of the welding is done with parameter thickness of worksheet after welding using NDT-UT with use same material worksheet and have more thickness of worksheet, the thickness of the worksheet single plate 1mm, with the capability of propagation Ultrasonic Testing (UT) standard limited> 3 mm [1], welding process parameters such as the time difference between 1-10s and the welding current of 8 KV, visually Heat Affected Zone ( HAZ ) have different results due to the length of time of welding. UT uses a probe that is used with a frequency of 4 MHz, diameter 10 mm, range 100 and the couplant used is oil. Identification techniques using drop 6dB, with sound velocity 2267 m / s of Fe, with the result that the effect of the Welding time affect the size of the HAZ, identification with the lowest time 1s show results capable identified joined through NDT - UT.

  6. Development of technology for brazing and diffusion welding of copper accelerating structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardan Avagyan

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available This work presents technologies of copper accelerating structure diffusion joints. The formation conditions of copper diffusion joint with the minimal residual plastic strain are determined experimentally.

  7. 49 CFR 178.51 - Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... be of a length not less than that specified for American Standard taper pipe threads. (iii) Straight... not exceed 1/8 inch per minute during yield strength determination. (k) Elongation. Physical test specimens must show at least a 40 percent elongation for a 2-inch gauge length or at least 20 percent in...

  8. Friction stir welding of Aluminium matrix composites – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanya Prabhu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is established as one of the prominent welding techniques to join aluminium matrix composites (AMCs. It is a solid state welding process, takes place well below the melting temperature of the material, eliminates the detrimental effects of conventional fusion welding process. Although the process is capable to join AMCs, challenges are still open that need to be fulfill to widen its applications. This paper gives the outline of the friction stir welding technique used to join AMCs. Effect of process variables on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints, behavior of reinforcing materials during welding, effect of tool profiles on the joint strength are discussed in detail. Few improvements and direction for future research are also proposed.

  9. Ultrasonic assessment of tension shear strength in resistance spot welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghanizadeh, Abbas

    2015-05-01

    Resistance spot welding is extensively used to join sheet steel in the automotive industry. Ultrasonic non-destructive techniques for evaluation of the mechanical properties of resistance spot welding are presented. The aim of this study is to develop the capability of the ultrasonic techniques as an efficient tool in the assessment of the welding characterization. Previous researches have indicated that the measurements of ultrasonic attenuation are sensitive to grain- size variations in an extensive range of metallic alloys. Other researchers have frequently described grain sizes which are able to have significant effects on the physical characteristics of the material. This research provides a novel method to estimate the tension-shear strengths of the resistance spot welding directly from the ultrasonic attenuation measurements. The effects of spot welding parameters on the ultrasonic waves are further investigated. The results confirm that it is possible to determine the spot welding parameters for individual quality by using ultrasonic test.

  10. Effect of plasma welding parameters on the flexural strength of Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyra e Silva, João Paulo; Fernandes Neto, Alfredo Júlio; Raposo, Luís Henrique Araújo; Novais, Veridiana Resende; de Araujo, Cleudmar Amaral; Cavalcante, Luisa de Andrade Lima; Simamoto Júnior, Paulo Cezar

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of different plasma arc welding parameters on the flexural strength of titanium alloy beams (Ti-6Al-4V). Forty Ti-6Al-4V and 10 NiCr alloy beam specimens (40 mm long and 3.18 mm diameter) were prepared and divided into 5 groups (n=10). The titanium alloy beams for the control group were not sectioned or subjected to welding. Groups PL10, PL12, and PL14 contained titanium beams sectioned and welded at current 3 A for 10, 12 or 14 ms, respectively. Group NCB consisted of NiCr alloy beams welded using conventional torch brazing. After, the beams were subjected to a three-point bending test and the values obtained were analyzed to assess the flexural strength (MPa). Statistical analysis was carried out by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test at 0.05 confidence level. Significant difference was verified among the evaluated groups (pplasma welded groups (p>0.05). The NCB group showed the lowest flexural strength, although it was statistically similar to the PL 14 group (p>0.05). The weld depth penetration was not significantly different among the plasma welded groups (p=0.05). Three representative specimens were randomly selected to be evaluated under scanning electron microcopy. The composition of the welded regions was analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. This study provides an initial set of parameters supporting the use of plasma welding during fabrication of titanium alloy dental frameworks.

  11. Residual Stress and Bonding Strength in the ElectricalSialon Ceramics Joint Made by Using the Brazing Metal Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, Mitsuhiko; Asari, Koichi; Goto, Shoji; Aso, Setsuo

    2002-01-01

    Electrical Sialons which have some TiN contents were joined with Ag-Cu-Ti active brazing metal layer having a thickness from 30μm to 400μm at a temperature from 1113 K to 1213 K in a vacuum. Residual stress in the brazed joint specimens was not observed when the thickness of brazing metal layer was 30 μ m. However, the residual stress of 80 MPa was detected when the thickness of brazing metal layer increased up to 400μm. When the brazing temperature was 1113 K, four-point bending strengths of...

  12. Fast brazing development for the joining of the beryllium armour layer for the ITER first wall panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudot, C. [AREVA NP Technical centre, Porte Magenta, 71200 Le Creusot (France)], E-mail: cecile.boudot@areva.com; Boireau, B. [AREVA NP Technical centre, Porte Magenta, 71200 Le Creusot (France); Lorenzetto, P. [EFDA, Close Support Unit, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Macel, D. [Institut de soudure, 4, boulevard Henri-Becquerel, 57970 Yutz (France)

    2007-10-15

    This paper describes the development of a flat pancake inductor for brazing beryllium tiles on a primary first wall (PFW) panel heat sink as well as the development of the brazing parameters. Two main variables were tested: brazing filler metal on one hand and PVD coating material on beryllium tiles on the other hand. The nickel coating and silver base brazing filler metal was the best couple and obtained shear values higher than 100 MPa. The inductor design and the choice of materials were applied to the brazing of a mock-up for high heat flux testing. Some tiles sustained 1000 cycles at 1.5 MW.

  13. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  14. Determination of the sensitization of two coatings by steel welding 308l by the EPR-Dl and Astm A-262 practice A techniques; Determinacion de la sensibilizacion de dos revestimientos por soldadura de acero 308L por las tecnicas EPR-DL y ASTM A-262 practica A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arganis J, C. R.; Zenteno S, J. C.; Robles F, J. L.; Rodriguez M, E.; Vazquez P, A., E-mail: carlos.arganis@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    A stainless steel 308l coating was deposited by the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) on steel A36 with a thickness of 4.726 mm in three layers. The sensitization was measured with the technique of Electrochemical Potentiodynamic Reactivation of Double-loop (EPR-Dl), using a portable cell and other of conventional window. The standard Astm A-262, practice A was used to verify the sensitization values. Two samples were used, a welding on a plate of 323 x 172 x 76.2 mm and the second welding on the end of a plate of 12.7 mm of thickness and 280 mm of longitude, with a post-welding process with gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) with electrode ERNiCr{sub 3} and a process SMAW with electrode ENICRFe{sub 3}. The coating on the plate showed low values of sensitization grade (DOS) in all the points, indicating a very quick heat extraction and an inter dendritic structure type step. The second sample presented DOS values that are related with a structure of low sensitization and the influence of the heat of the post-welding process and a structure of recrystallized grains. (Author)

  15. The Joint Strength and Fracture Mechanisms of TC4/TC4 and TA0/TA0 Brazed with Ti-25Cu-15Ni Braze Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhihuan; Zeng, Fanhao; Wu, Haobo; Liu, Jian; Li, Yi; Gu, Yi; Yuan, Tiechui; Zhang, Fuqin

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, Ti-25Cu-15Ni (mass ratio) braze alloys were prepared by vacuum arc melting. Additionally, the TA0 pure titanium and TC4 titanium alloy were brazed with the Ti-25Cu-15Ni braze alloy at 960, 980, 1000, 1020, and 1040 °C. The effects of the braze temperature on the tensile strength of the TA0 and TC4 joints and their fracture mechanisms were studied. The maximum tensile strength of the TA0 joints of 219.9 ± 0.1 MPa was achieved at a brazing temperature of 980 °C, and the maximum tensile strength of the TC4 joints of 832.9 ± 0.1 MPa was achieved at the same brazing temperature. These results indicate that their ideal joint strength is comparable. According to the fractography results of the TA0 joints, a mixed fracture morphology is indicated. The TA0 fracture surface is dominated by cleavage fracture with a small contribution from ductile fracture. The TC4 joint fracture arises from cleavage.

  16. Development of Alternative Technology to PWHT in Site Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, B. S.; Jang, J. S.; Kim, K. H.; Park, S. D.; Yoon, J. H.; Kim, M. C.; Kim, K. B.; Sung, K. W

    2007-04-15

    ASME Section IX added requirements for qualification when using temper bead welding in the 2004 edition. The temper bead welding techniques which can satisfy the requirements of the Code are needed to use them in the site repair welding. The optimized welding parameters can be obtained when controlling the process to supercritically-reheat and to subcritically-reheat the coarse grain region sequently. The microstructures of SCFGCG obtained from the Gleegle simulated specimens and those of post weld heat treated coarse grain region are compared. The obtained both microstructures showed almost similar patterns. mid bead deposition technique Suggested in this study has a technical concept that the mid beads are deposited between the deposited initial beads repeatedly in a bead layer, which gives a lot of reheating effects on brittle microstructure in HAZ. This newly suggested technique is considered to have more effective tempering effect than the conventional temper bead technique which has concept to deposit one type of beads in a bead layer. The suggested modeling in this study can simulate well the SMAW process. Hence this modeling was used in analyzing the more complicated welding process of multi-layer welding. The modeling was used to analyze the tempering effect on the microstructures of HAZ by considering the patterns of overlapping of the reheating regions under the consequently deposited beads. When considering the crack path in the ever-matched weld metal condition, the interface may have a resistance against the crack propagation. A182 filler and A625 filler were used to make the weld specimens which have different weld metal conditions. The crack directed toward the under-matched weld metal may propagate across the fusion line easier than that of the even-matched weld metal condition.

  17. Performance of repair welds on aged Cr-Mo piping girth welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, R.; Gandy, D. W.

    1999-10-01

    This article documents the results of an industry survey of weld repair practices and describes the results of experimental evaluations performed on service-aged 21/4 Cr-1Mo steel piping using SMAW with both conventional postweld heat treatments and temper bead repair techniques. The overall results of this program provide substantial evidence that service-aged piping systems can be successfully weld repaired with and without postweld heat treatments and that life extension by several decades is achievable under the right design and repair conditions. Weld repairs performed on degraded exservice welds resulted in restoration or improvement of tensile and creep properties. Microhardness test results within the heat-affected zone of each weldment indicated that the temper bead weld repairs produced only slightly higher peak hardness values than those measured for the fully postweld heat treated repairs. Finally, in terms of toughness, temper bead weld repairs consistently produced higher impact properties than those measured for the postweld heat treated weldments. Gas tungsten arc weld repairs with postweld heat treatment resulted in the best combination of tensile strength, uniform microhardness distribution across the weld, Charpy toughness, and creep rupture life.

  18. Report Summarizing the Effort Required to Initiate Welding of Irradiated Materials within the Welding Cubicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick, Greg [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Sutton, Benjamin J. [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Tatman, Jonathan K. [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Vance, Mark Christopher [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Allen W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Clark, Scarlett R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Feng, Zhili [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, Roger G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chen, Jian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tang, Wei [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hu, Xunxiang [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gibson, Brian T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The advanced welding facility within a hot cell at the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which has been jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and the Electric Power Research Institute, Long Term Operations Program and the Welding and Repair Technology Center, is in the final phase of development. Research and development activities in this facility will involve direct testing of advanced welding technologies on irradiated materials in order to address the primary technical challenge of helium induced cracking that can arise when conventional fusion welding techniques are utilized on neutron irradiated stainless steels and nickel-base alloys. This report details the effort that has been required since the beginning of fiscal year 2017 to initiate welding research and development activities on irradiated materials within the hot cell cubicle, which houses welding sub-systems that include laser beam welding (LBW) and friction stir welding (FSW) and provides material containment within the hot cell.

  19. PENETRATION AND DEFECT FORMATION IN HIGH CURRENT ARC WELDING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MENDEZ,P.F.; EAGAR, T.W.

    2003-01-01

    The work performed during the three previous years can be roughly divided into two main categories: (1) development of advanced modeling techniques; and (2) modeling of arc welding process. The work in the first category comprised the development of the Order of Magnitude Scaling (OMS) technique, which is complementary to numerical modeling techniques such as finite elements, but it provides approximate formulas instead of just numerical results. Borrowing concepts from OMS, another modeling technique based on empirical data was also developed. During this stage special software was also developed. The second category comprised the application of OMS to the three main subsystems of arc welding: the weld pool, the arc, and the electrode. For each of these subsystems they found scaling laws and regimes. With this knowledge, they analyzed the generation of weld pool defects during high current arc welding, proposed a mechanistic description of the process, and possible solutions.

  20. A study of gas flow pattern, undercutting and torch modification in variable polarity plasma arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcclure, John C.; Hou, Haihui Ron

    1994-01-01

    A study on the plasma and shield gas flow patterns in variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding was undertaken by shadowgraph techniques. Visualization of gas flow under different welding conditions was obtained. Undercutting is often present with aluminum welds. The effects of torch alignment, shield gas flow rate and gas contamination on undercutting were investigated and suggestions made to minimize the defect. A modified shield cup for the welding torch was fabricated which consumes much less shield gas while maintaining the weld quality. The current torch was modified with a trailer flow for Al-Li welding, in which hot cracking is a critical problem. The modification shows improved weldablility on these alloys.

  1. Assessing mechanical properties of the dissimilar metal welding between P92 steels and alloy 617 at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H.; Hwang, J. H.; Park, Y. S.; Kim, T. M.; Bae, D. H. [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seo, W. B. [Institute of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Han, J. W. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Hoseo University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this study, a new welding technology of dissimilar materials, Cr-based P92 steels and Ni-based Alloy 617 is introduced and demonstrated to investigate its reliability. Firstly, multi-pass dissimilar metal welding between P92 steel and Alloy 617 was performed using DCEN TIG welding technology, buttering welding technique and a narrow gap groove. After welding, in order to understand characteristics of the dissimilar metal welds, metallurgical micro-structures analysis by optical observation and static tensile strength assessment of the dissimilar welded joints were conducted at 700°C.

  2. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards During Electron Beam Welding in the Space Shuttle Bay at LEO for the International Space Welding Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.

    1996-01-01

    In 1997, the United States [NASA] and the Paton Electric Welding Institute are scheduled to cooperate in a flight demonstration on the U.S. Space Shuttle to demonstrate the feasibility of welding in space for a possible repair option for the International Space Station Alpha. This endeavor, known as the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE), will involve astronauts performing various welding exercises such as brazing, cutting, welding, and coating using an electron beam space welding system that was developed by the E.O. Paton Electric Welding Institute (PWI), Kiev Ukraine. This electron beam welding system known as the "Universal Weld System" consists of hand tools capable of brazing, cutting, autogeneous welding, and coating using an 8 kV (8000 volts) electron beam. The electron beam hand tools have also been developed by the Paton Welding Institute with greater capabilities than the original hand tool, including filler wire feeding, to be used with the Universal Weld System on the U.S. Space Shuttle Bay as part of ISWE. The hand tool(s) known as the Ukrainian Universal Hand [Electron Beam Welding] Tool (UHT) will be utilized for the ISWE Space Shuttle flight welding exercises to perform welding on various metal alloy samples. A total of 61 metal alloy samples, which include 304 stainless steel, Ti-6AI-4V, 2219 aluminum, and 5456 aluminum alloys, have been provided by NASA for the ISWE electron beam welding exercises using the UHT. These samples were chosen to replicate both the U.S. and Russian module materials. The ISWE requires extravehicular activity (EVA) of two astronauts to perform the space shuttle electron beam welding operations of the 61 alloy samples. This study was undertaken to determine if a hazard could exist with ISWE during the electron beam welding exercises in the Space Shuttle Bay using the Ukrainian Universal Weld System with the UHT. The safety issue has been raised with regard to molten metal detachments as a result of several

  3. Physics of arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, T. W.

    1982-05-01

    A discussion of the factors controlling the size and shape of the weld fusion zone is presented along with a description of current theories of heat and fluid flow phenomena in the plasma and the molten metal weld pool. Although experimental results confirm that surface tension, plasma jets, and weld pool convection all strongly influence the fusion zone shape; no comprehensive model is available from which to predict welding behavior. It is proposed that the lack of such an understanding is a major impediment to development of automated welding processes. In addition, sensors for weld torch positioning are reviewed in terms of the mechnical and electromagnetic energy spectra which have been used. New developments in this area are also needed in order to advance the technology of automated welding.

  4. Research on the microstructure and properties of laser-MIG hybrid welded joint of Invar alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiaohong; Zhang, Dan; Wei, Yanhong; Wang, Yuhua

    2017-12-01

    In order to solve the problem of large deformation, low production efficiency and high tendency of hot cracking in welding 19.05 mm thick plates of Fe36Ni Invar alloy, laser-MIG hybrid multi-layer welding technique (LMHMW) has been developed. To investigate the influence of different welding parameters on the joint properties, optical microscope observation, SEM, EDS and microhardness measurement were conducted. Experimental results illustrated that different matching of welding parameters significantly affected the depth-to-width ratio, formation of defects and HAZ width. Besides, weld zone were consisted of two regions according to the different grain shape. The region near center of weld seam (region 1) was columnar dendrite induced by laser, while the region far away from weld seam center (region 2) was cellular dendrite which was mainly caused by MIG arc. The peak value of microhardness appeared at the center of weld seam since the grains in region 1 were relatively fine, and the lowest hardness value was obtained in HAZ. In addition, results showed that the sheets can be welded at optimum process parameters, with few defects such as, surface oxidation, porosity, cracks and lack of penetration in the welding seam: laser power of backing weld P = 5500 W, welding current I = 240 A, welding speed v = 1 m/min. laser power of filling weld P = 2000 W, welding current I = 220 A, welding speed v = 0.35 m/min. laser power of cosmetic weld P = 2000 W, welding current I = 300 A, welding speed v = 0.35 m/min.

  5. Numerical aspects for efficient welding computational mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aburuga Tarek Kh.S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the residual stresses and strains is one of the most important parameter in the structure integrity assessment. A finite element model is constructed in order to simulate the multi passes mismatched submerged arc welding SAW which used in the welded tensile test specimen. Sequentially coupled thermal mechanical analysis is done by using ABAQUS software for calculating the residual stresses and distortion due to welding. In this work, three main issues were studied in order to reduce the time consuming during welding simulation which is the major problem in the computational welding mechanics (CWM. The first issue is dimensionality of the problem. Both two- and three-dimensional models are constructed for the same analysis type, shell element for two dimension simulation shows good performance comparing with brick element. The conventional method to calculate residual stress is by using implicit scheme that because of the welding and cooling time is relatively high. In this work, the author shows that it could use the explicit scheme with the mass scaling technique, and time consuming during the analysis will be reduced very efficiently. By using this new technique, it will be possible to simulate relatively large three dimensional structures.

  6. The Microstructural Evolution of Vacuum Brazed 1Cr18Ni9Ti Using Various Filler Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunxia Chen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The microstructures and weldability of a brazed joint of 1Cr18Ni9Ti austenitic stainless steel with BNi-2, BNi82CrSiBFe and BMn50NiCuCrCo filler metals in vacuum were investigated. It can be observed that an interdiffusion region existed between the filler metal and the base metal for the brazed joint of Ni-based filler metals. The width of the interdiffusion region was about 10 μm, and the microstructure of the brazed joint of BNi-2 filler metal was dense and free of obvious defects. In the case of the brazed joint of BMn50NiCuCrCo filler metal, there were pits, pores and crack defects in the brazing joint due to insufficient wettability of the filler metal. Crack defects can also be observed in the brazed joint of BNi82CrSiBFe filler metal. Compared with BMn50NiCuCrCo and BNi82CrSiBFe filler metals, BNi-2 filler metal is the best material for 1Cr18Ni9Ti austenitic stainless steel vacuum brazing because of its distinct weldability.

  7. Brazed Diamond Micropowder Bur Fabricated by Supersonic Frequency Induction Heating for Precision Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bojiang; Lou, Jianpeng; Pang, Qian

    2014-04-01

    The common brazed diamond micropowder bur fabricated in a vacuum furnace produces an even brazing alloy surface. The small brazed diamond grits show low outcropping from the brazing alloy surface, and the chip space between them is small. The bur shows a low grinding efficiency and poor heat dissipation. In this study, a brazed diamond micropowder bur was fabricated by supersonic frequency induction heating. The method afforded a fluctuant surface on the brazing alloy. The brazed diamond grits with an outcropping height distributed uniformly on the fluctuant surface. The fluctuant surface showed a certain chip space. These characteristics of the tool increased the grinding efficiency and decreased the temperature of the grinding arc area. The roughness R a of the ceramic tile surface trimmed by the tool cylinder was between 0.09 and 0.12 μm. In the first 90 min, the decrease in the weight of the ceramic tile ground by the tool cylinder was higher than that ground by the tool fabricated in a vacuum furnace. When the ceramic tile was cylindrically ground, the temperature of the grinding arc area measured using a thermocouple remained below 70 °C.

  8. Remote Welding, NDE and Repair of DOE Standardized Canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Larsen; Art Watkins; Timothy R. McJunkin; Dave Pace; Rodney Bitsoi

    2006-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) created the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) to manage DOE’s spent nuclear fuel (SNF). One of the NSNFP’s tasks is to prepare spent nuclear fuel for storage, transportation, and disposal at the national repository. As part of this effort, the NSNFP developed a standardized canister for interim storage and transportation of SNF. These canisters will be built and sealed to American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section III, Division 3 requirements. Packaging SNF usually is a three-step process: canister loading, closure welding, and closure weld verification. After loading SNF into the canisters, the canisters must be seal welded and the welds verified using a combination of visual, surface eddy current, and ultrasonic inspection or examination techniques. If unacceptable defects in the weld are detected, the defective sections of weld must be removed, re-welded, and re-inspected. Due to the high contamination and/or radiation fields involved with this process, all of these functions must be performed remotely in a hot cell. The prototype apparatus to perform these functions is a floor-mounted carousel that encircles the loaded canister; three stations perform the functions of welding, inspecting, and repairing the seal welds. A welding operator monitors and controls these functions remotely via a workstation located outside the hot cell. The discussion describes the hardware and software that have been developed and the results of testing that has been done to date.

  9. Laser welding of Zn-coated sheet steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Marianne P.; Kerr, Hugh W.; Weckman, David C.

    1996-04-01

    Compared to other welding processes, laser welding of sheet steels coated with various zinc- rich layers (galvanized, electrogalvanized, galvannealed, etc.) can permit weight reduction of automobiles plus increase in productivity. Some instances of laser welding of such coated steels have been reported. However, wider applications of lasers for this purpose are hampered by the low boiling temperature of zinc compared to the melting temperature of steel. During laser welding in the lap-joint configuration, the presence of vaporized zinc between the steel sheets often leads to expulsion of the weld metal or considerably weld porosity. Attempts to overcome this problem using Nd:YAG laser welding are reviewed. For the lap-joint configuration, techniques examined include provision of a gap between the sheets, use of geometrical solutions such as concave or convex surfaces, and pulsing or modulating the laser waveform. The effects on weld quality of power density, pulse time and pulse shaping (for pulsed welding), the coating type and weight, the location of the beam axis and beam focus with respect to the sheet surface(s) and the joint geometry (lap and edge) have been examined. The results provide insight into the weldability of coated sheet steels by the laser welding process as well as better assessment of viable approaches to this problem.

  10. Dual wire weld feed proportioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, R. E.

    1968-01-01

    Dual feed mechanism enables proportioning of two different weld feed wires during automated TIG welding to produce a weld alloy deposit of the desired composition. The wires are fed into the weld simultaneously. The relative feed rates of the wires and the wire diameters determine the weld deposit composition.

  11. Joining and fabrication techniques for high temperature structures including the first wall in fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, B. S.; Kim, K. B

    2003-09-01

    The materials for PFC's (Plasma Facing Components) in a fusion reactor are severely irradiated with fusion products in facing the high temperature plasma during the operation. The refractory materials can be maintained their excellent properties in severe operating condition by lowering surface temperature by bonding them to the high thermal conducting materials of heat sink. Hence, the joining and bonding techniques between dissimilar materials is considered to be important in case of the fusion reactor or nuclear reactor which is operated at high temperature. The first wall in the fusion reactor is heated to approximately 1000 .deg. C and irradiated severely by the plasma. In ITER, beryllium is expected as the primary armour candidate for the PFC's; other candidates including W, Mo, SiC, B4C, C/C and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. Since the heat affected zones in the PFC's processed by conventional welding are reported to have embrittlement and degradation in the sever operation condition, both brazing and diffusion bonding are being considered as prime candidates for the joining technique. In this report, both the materials including ceramics and the fabrication techniques including joining technique between dissimilar materials for PFC's are described. The described joining technique between the refractory materials and the dissimilar materials may be applicable for the fusion reactor and Generation-4 future nuclear reactor which are operated at high temperature and high irradiation.

  12. Strength testing of Ti-vapor-coated silicon nitride braze joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, M.L.

    1994-09-01

    Sintered silicon nitride was vacuum brazed to itself at 1130{degree}C with a Au-25Ni-25Pd wt % filler metal. Wetting was obtained by coating the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} surfaces with titanium prior to brazing by electron beam evaporation. The brazed joints were virtually free of porosity. Metallographic analysis showed that Ti reacted with the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, to form a TiN reaction layer during brazing. Small amounts of Si and Ti dissolved in the filler metal layers but they did not appear to influence the mechanical properties of the braze layer. Flexure bars were made from the brazed coupons and tested at room temperature, 600C, 700C, and 800C in air. At 700C and below, fracture of the test bars occurred in the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, either near the brazed surfaces or at some distance into the monolithic material. The measured strength of joint specimens decreased slightly with increasing test temperature, and generally exceeded the intrinsic braze filler metal strength in this temperature range. It was also found that lapping the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, prior to Ti coating reduced the number of near-surface flaws and produced joints with higher average strength and lower scatter than those left in a ground condition. Specimens tested at 800C had very low strengths, and this behavior was related to the microstructure at the brazed Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} surfaces.

  13. Influence of the welding parameters on the heat affected zone for aluminium welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meseguer-Valdenebro José L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work analyzes the Heat Affected Zone in an aluminum alloy welded assembly using the Metal Inert Gas welding technique. Making use of numerical simulations of the involved thermal processes, the aluminum alloy cooling curve is calculated and the extension of the Heat Affected Zone is evaluated. The connection between this last parameter, the cooling rate, and the maximum obtained temperature is assessed. Additionally, the response surface method is exploited to fit the dependence of the Heat Affected Zone with the welding parameters and to optimize these parameters in order to minimize that region.

  14. Measurement of Laser Weld Temperatures for 3D Model Input

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagel, Daryl [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grossetete, Grant [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maccallum, Danny O. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Laser welding is a key joining process used extensively in the manufacture and assembly of critical components for several weapons systems. Sandia National Laboratories advances the understanding of the laser welding process through coupled experimentation and modeling. This report summarizes the experimental portion of the research program, which focused on measuring temperatures and thermal history of laser welds on steel plates. To increase confidence in measurement accuracy, researchers utilized multiple complementary techniques to acquire temperatures during laser welding. This data serves as input to and validation of 3D laser welding models aimed at predicting microstructure and the formation of defects and their impact on weld-joint reliability, a crucial step in rapid prototyping of weapons components.

  15. A Neural Network Approach for GMA Butt Joint Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim Hardam; Sørensen, Torben

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the neural network technology for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) control. A system has been developed for modeling and online adjustment of welding parameters, appropriate to guarantee a certain degree of quality in the field of butt joint welding with full...... penetration, when the gap width is varying during the welding process. The process modeling to facilitate the mapping from joint geometry and reference weld quality to significant welding parameters has been based on a multi-layer feed-forward network. The Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for non-linear least...... squares has been used with the back-propagation algorithm for training the network, while a Bayesian regularization technique has been successfully applied for minimizing the risk of inexpedient over-training. Finally, a predictive closed-loop control strategy based on a so-called single-neuron self...

  16. Development of Pd-Ni Brazing Filler Metals for SUS316L Stainless Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroshi, IZUI; Yoshifumi, SUEZAWA; College of Science and Technology, Nihon Univ.

    1993-01-01

    Several braze alloys containing palladium have been newly developed for use in high temperature brazing of stainless steel SUS 316 L. Palladium filler metals have excellent high-temperature strength, corrosion and oxidation resistance, ductility, and relatively high melting points and are of lower cost than gold-based filler metals. In this research, two types of palladium-containing brazing filler metals were considered, 40 Pd-50 Ni-10 Co and 30 Pd-50 Ni-10 Cu-10 Co (all in wt-%). Commercial...

  17. Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper for linear collider accelerator structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Elmer

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper were investigated to develop procedures for joining precision machined copper components for the Next Linear Collider (NLC. Diffusion bonds were made over a range of temperatures from 400 °C to 1000 °C, under two different loading conditions [3.45 kPa (0.5 psi and 3.45 MPa (500 psi], and on two different diamond machined surface finishes. Brazes were made using pure silver, pure gold, and gold-nickel alloys, and different heating rates produced by both radiation and induction heating. Braze materials were applied by both physical vapor deposition (PVD and conventional braze alloy shims. Results of the diffusion bonding experiments showed that bond strengths very near that of the copper base metal could be made at bonding temperatures of 700 °C or higher at 3.45 MPa bonding pressure. At lower temperatures, only partial strength diffusion bonds could be made. At low bonding pressures (3.45 kPa, full strength bonds were made at temperatures of 800 °C and higher, while no bonding (zero strength was observed at temperatures of 700 °C and lower. Observations of the fracture surfaces of the diffusion bonded samples showed the effects of surface finish on the bonding mechanism. These observations clearly indicate that bonding began by point asperity contact, and flatter surfaces resulted in a higher percentage of bonded area under similar bonding conditions. Results of the brazing experiments indicated that pure silver worked very well for brazing under both conventional and high heating rate scenarios. Similarly, pure silver brazed well for both the PVD layers and the braze alloy shims. The gold and gold-containing brazes had problems, mainly due to the high diffusivity of gold in copper. These problems led to the necessity of overdriving the temperature to ensure melting, the presence of porosity in the joint, and very wide braze joints. Based on the overall findings of this study, a two

  18. Effect of post weld heat treatment on the microstructure and tensile properties of activated flux TIG welds of Inconel X750

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramkumar, K. Devendranath, E-mail: ramdevendranath@gmail.com; Ramanand, R.; Ameer, Ajmal; Simon, K. Aghil; Arivazhagan, N.

    2016-03-21

    This study addresses the effect of post weld heat treatment on the fusion zone microstructure and the mechanical properties of activated flux tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) weldments of Inconel X750. In this study, a compound flux of 50% SiO{sub 2}+50% MoO{sub 3} was used for A-TIG welding of the samples. Comparative studies on the microstructure and mechanical properties have been made on the weldments both in the as-welded and post weld heat treated conditions. Direct ageing post weld heat treatment (PWHT) was carried out at 705 °C for 22 h on the A-TIG weldment to assess the structure–property relationships. It was inferred that direct ageing post weld heat treatment resulted in better tensile strength (1142 MPa) compared to the as-welded coupons (736 MPa). The joint efficiencies of the as-welded and post weld heat treated conditions were found to be 60.7% and 94.07% respectively. The impact toughness of the as-welded coupons were found to be greater than the post weld heat treated samples; however the impact toughness of the welds are greater than the parent metal employed in both the cases. This study also attested the detailed structure–property relationships of A-TIG weldments using the combined techniques of optical and scanning electron microscopy, Electron Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDAX) techniques.

  19. Complete Report on the Development of Welding Parameters for Irradiated Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick, Greg [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Knoxville, TN (United States); Sutton, Benjamin J. [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Knoxville, TN (United States); Tatman, Jonathan K. [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Knoxville, TN (United States); Vance, Mark Christopher [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Clark, Scarlett R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Feng, Zhili [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, Roger G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chen, Jian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tang, Wei [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gibson, Brian T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-11-01

    The advanced welding facility at the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which was conceived to enable research and development of weld repair techniques for nuclear power plant life extension, is now operational. The development of the facility and its advanced welding capabilities, along with the model materials for initial welding trials, were funded jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, the Electric Power Research Institute, Long Term Operations Program and the Welding and Repair Technology Center, with additional support from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Welding of irradiated materials was initiated on November 17, 2017, which marked a significant step in the development of the facility and the beginning of extensive welding research and development campaigns on irradiated materials that will eventually produce validated techniques and guidelines for weld repair activities carried out to extend the operational lifetimes of nuclear power plants beyond 60 years. This report summarizes the final steps that were required to complete weld process development, initial irradiated materials welding activities, near-term plans for irradiated materials welding, and plans for post-weld analyses that will be carried out to assess the ability of the advanced welding processes to make repairs on irradiated materials.

  20. Non Destructive Analysis of Fsw Welds using Ultrasonic Signal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan Kumar, T.; Prabhakar Reddy, P.

    2017-08-01

    Friction Stir Welding is an evolving metal joining technique and is mostly used in joining materials which cannot be easily joined by other available welding techniques. It is a technique which can be used for welding dissimilar materials also. The strength of the weld joint is determined by the way in which these material are mixing with each other, since we are not using any filler material for the welding process the intermixing has a significant importance. The complication with the friction stir welding process is that there are many process parameters which effect this intermixing process such as tool geometry, rotating speed of the tool, transverse speed etc., In this study an attempt is made to compare the material flow and weld quality of various weldments by changing the parameters. Ultrasonic signal Analysis is used to characterize the microstructure of the weldments. use of ultrasonic waves is a non destructive, accurate and fast way of characterization of microstructure. In this method the relationship between the ultrasonic measured parameters and microstructures are evaluated using background echo and backscattered signal process techniques. The ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements are dependent on the elastic modulus and any change in the microstructure is reflected in the ultrasonic velocity. An insight into material flow is essential to determine the quality of the weld. Hence an attempt is made in this study to know the relationship between tool geometry and the pattern of material flow and resulting weld quality the experiments are conducted to weld dissimilar aluminum alloys and the weldments are characterized using and ultra Sonic signal processing. Characterization is also done using Scanning Electron Microscopy. It is observed that there is a good correlation between the ultrasonic signal processing results and Scanning Electron Microscopy on the observed precipitates. Tensile tests and hardness tests are conducted on the

  1. Finite element simulation of laser transmission welding of dissimilar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Now-a-days, metal to plastic micro-welding is of great interest in the field of biomedical and electronics applications. Laser transmission welding (LTW) has emerged as the most suitable technique for such applications. In this paper, a three-dimensional finite element (FE) thermal model is developed to simulate the laser ...

  2. Low temperature friction stir welding of P91 steel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalvala, Prasad Rao; Akram, Javed; Misra, Mano; Ramachandran, Damodaram; Gabbita, Janaki Ram

    2016-01-01

    ... RPM was well below Ac1 temperature of P91 steel while it was above Ac3 with 1000 RPM. The results suggest that the microstructural degradation in P91 welds can be controlled by low temperature friction stir welding technique.

  3. Does pattern-welding make Anglo-Saxon swords stronger?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of pattern-welding, used for the construction of some Anglo-Saxon swords, has yet to be fully resolved. One suggestion is that the technique enhanced the mechanical properties of a blade. Another explanation is that pattern-welding created a desired aesthetic appearance. In order to a...

  4. Modelling of damage development and ductile failure in welded joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau

    conducted ([P1], [P2], [P7]-[P9]). The focus in the thesis is on FS-welded 2xxx and 6xxx series of aluminum alloys, which are attractive, for example, to the aerospace industry, since the 2024 aluminum in particular, is typically classified as un-weldable by conventional fusion welding techniques. Secondly...

  5. Research data supporting "Surface residual stresses in multipass welds produced using low transformation temperature filler alloys"

    OpenAIRE

    Ramjaun, TI; Stone, HJ; Karlsson, L.; Gharghouri, M; Dalaei, K; Moat, R.; Bhadeshia, HKDH

    2017-01-01

    Tensile residual stresses at the surface of welded components are known to compromise fatigue resistance through the accelerated initiation of microcracks, especially at the weld toe. Inducement of compression in these regions is a common technique employed to enhance fatigue performance. Transformation plasticity has been established as a viable method to generate such compressive residual stresses in steel welds and exploits the phase transformation in welding filler alloys, that transform ...

  6. The analysis of spot welding joints of steel sheets with closed profile by ultrasonic method

    OpenAIRE

    Dariusz Ulbrich; Jakub Kowalczyk; Marian Jósko; Jarosław Selech

    2015-01-01

    Resistance spot welding is widely used in the fabrication of vehicle bodies and parts of their equipment. The article presents the methodology and the results of non-destructive ultrasonic testing of resistance spot welded joints of thin steel sheet with closed profile. Non-destructive test results were verified on the basis of welded joint area after destructive testing. The obtained results were used to develop an assessment technique for spot welded joints of closed profile with steel shee...

  7. Welding skate with computerized controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    New welding skate concept for automatic TIG welding of contoured or double-contoured parts combines lightweight welding apparatus with electrical circuitry which computes the desired torch angle and positions a torch and cold-wire guide angle manipulator.

  8. Microstructure and Tensile Behavior of Laser Arc Hybrid Welded Dissimilar Al and Ti Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Gao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fiber laser-cold metal transfer arc hybrid welding was developed to welding-braze dissimilar Al and Ti alloys in butt configuration. Microstructure, interface properties, tensile behavior, and their relationships were investigated in detail. The results show the cross-weld tensile strength of the joints is up to 213 MPa, 95.5% of same Al weld. The optimal range of heat input for accepted joints was obtained as 83–98 J·mm−1. Within this range, the joint is stronger than 200 MPa and fractures in weld metal, or else, it becomes weaker and fractures at the intermetallic compounds (IMCs layer. The IMCs layer of an accepted joint is usually thin and continuous, which is about 1μm-thick and only consists of TiAl2 due to fast solidification rate. However, the IMCs layer at the top corner of fusion zone/Ti substrate is easily thickened with increasing heat input. This thickened IMCs layer consists of a wide TiAl3 layer close to FZ and a thin TiAl2 layer close to Ti substrate. Furthermore, both bead shape formation and interface growth were discussed by laser-arc interaction and melt flow. Tensile behavior was summarized by interface properties.

  9. Computerized adaptive control weld skate with CCTV weld guidance project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes progress of the automatic computerized weld skate development portion of the Computerized Weld Skate with Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Arc Guidance Project. The main goal of the project is to develop an automatic welding skate demonstration model equipped with CCTV weld guidance. The three main goals of the overall project are to: (1) develop a demonstration model computerized weld skate system, (2) develop a demonstration model automatic CCTV guidance system, and (3) integrate the two systems into a demonstration model of computerized weld skate with CCTV weld guidance for welding contoured parts.

  10. Compatibility between Co-Metallized PbTe Thermoelectric Legs and an Ag-Cu-In Brazing Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ayoun, Dana; Sadia, Yatir; Gelbstein, Yaniv

    2018-01-10

    In thermoelectric (TE) generators, maximizing the efficiency of conversion of direct heat to electricity requires the reduction of any thermal and electrical contact resistances between the TE legs and the metallic contacts. This requirement is especially challenging in the development of intermediate to high-temperature TE generators. PbTe-based TE materials are known to be highly efficient up to temperatures of around 500 °C; however, only a few practical TE generators based on these materials are currently commercially available. One reason for that is the insufficient bonding techniques between the TE legs and the hot-side metallic contacts. The current research is focused on the interaction between cobalt-metallized n-type 9.104 × 10-3 mol % PbI₂-doped PbTe TE legs and the Ag0.32Cu0.43In0.25 brazing alloy, which is free of volatile species. Clear and fine interfaces without any noticeable formation of adverse brittle intermetallic compounds were observed following prolonged thermal treatment testing. Moreover, a reasonable electrical contact resistance of ~2.25 mΩmm² was observed upon brazing at 600 °C, highlighting the potential of such contacts while developing practical PbTe-based TE generators.

  11. Modern Methods of Rail Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, Nikolay A.; Kozyreva, Olga A.; Usoltsev, Aleksander A.; Kryukov, Roman E.; Shevchenko, Roman A.

    2017-10-01

    Existing methods of rail welding, which are enable to get continuous welded rail track, are observed in this article. Analysis of existing welding methods allows considering an issue of continuous rail track in detail. Metallurgical and welding technologies of rail welding and also process technologies reducing aftereffects of temperature exposure are important factors determining the quality and reliability of the continuous rail track. Analysis of the existing methods of rail welding enable to find the research line for solving this problem.

  12. [Study of the effect of heat source separation distance on plasma physical properties in laser-pulsed GMAW hybrid welding based on spectral diagnosis technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei; Hua, Xue-Ming; Zhang, Wang; Li, Fang

    2014-05-01

    In the present paper, the authors calculated the plasma's peak electron temperatures under different heat source separation distance in laser- pulse GMAW hybrid welding based on Boltzmann spectrometry. Plasma's peak electron densities under the corresponding conditions were also calculated by using the Stark width of the plasma spectrum. Combined with high-speed photography, the effect of heat source separation distance on electron temperature and electron density was studied. The results show that with the increase in heat source separation distance, the electron temperatures and electron densities of laser plasma did not changed significantly. However, the electron temperatures of are plasma decreased, and the electron densities of are plasma first increased and then decreased.

  13. Active Metal Brazing and Characterization of Brazed Joints in C-C and C-SiC Composites to Copper-Clad-Molybdenum System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Asthana, R.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon/carbon composites with CVI and resin-derived matrices, and C/SiC composites reinforced with T-300 carbon fibers in a CVI SiC matrix were joined to Cu-clad Mo using two Ag-Cu braze alloys, Cusil-ABA (1.75% Ti) and Ticusil (4.5% Ti). The brazed joints revealed good interfacial bonding, preferential precipitation of Ti at the composite/braze interface, and a tendency toward delamination in resin-derived C/C composite. Extensive braze penetration of the inter-fiber channels in the CVI C/C composites was observed. The Knoop microhardness (HK) distribution across the C/C joints indicated sharp gradients at the interface, and a higher hardness in Ticusil than in Cusil-ABA. For the C/SiC composite to Cu-clad-Mo joints, the effect of composite surface preparation revealed that ground samples did not crack whereas unground samples cracked. Calculated strain energy in brazed joints in both systems is comparable to the strain energy in a number of other ceramic/metal systems. Theoretical predictions of the effective thermal resistance suggest that such joined systems may be promising for thermal management applications.

  14. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  15. Dual wire welding torch and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  16. Characterization through nano indentation technique of mechanical properties of an aluminium alloy welded zone for hydrogen storage; Apport de la nanoindentation pour la caracterisation d'un cordon de soudure par faisceau d'electrons d'un reservoir d'hydrogene sous pression en alliage d'aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delobelle, P.; Perreux, D.; Russo, C. [Universite de Franche-Comte, Institut FEMTO-ST, UMR 6174, Depart. LMARC, 25 - Besancon (France); Meunier, E. [CEA Valduc (DRMN/SMCM/LCSi), 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France); Decamps, B. [Laboratoire de Chimie Metallurgique des Terres Rares, UPR 209, 94 - Vitry-Thiais, (France)

    2008-07-01

    In this study we use the nano indentation technique which is a powerful tool to characterise the mechanical properties of a welded bond. The Berkovich indentation has the advantage to test small material volumes compared to the conventional tensile tests. The welded process with electrons beam of hydrogen vessels induces different regions and the aim of this study is to characterize the differences of the mechanical properties of the different zones of the weld. To identify the stress-strain curves of the tested material, F.E. inverse method has been used. After treatment, for one pass, the hardness of the melted zone is greater than those of the base material and for the two passes, the hardness is still lower than those of the base material. The interface zones present a hardness which is always higher than those of the weld. A relation of the Hall-Petch type which correlates the evolution of the hardness with the zinc concentration and the grain size has been proposed. Moreover a relation between the normalized hardness and the hydrogen concentration CH has been found. The parameters of the stress-strain curves of the four regions; base material, interface, one and two passes melted zones, have been deduced. The identified laws are used in a F.E. model of a welded sphere to model its radial deformation under internal pressure loading. (authors)

  17. Appropriate welding conditions of temper bead weld repair for SQV2A pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, R.; Matsuda, F. [NDE Center, Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corp. (Japan); Brziak, P. [Welding Research Inst. - Industrial Inst. of Slovak Republic (Slovakia); Lomozik, M. [Inst. of Welding (Poland)

    2004-07-01

    Temper bead welding technique is one of the most important repair welding methods for large structures for which it is difficult to perform the specified post weld heat treatment. In this study, appropriate temper bead welding conditions to improve the characteristics of heat affected zone (HAZ) are studied using pressure vessel steel SQV2A corresponding to ASTM A533 Type B Class 1. Thermal/mechanical simulator is employed to give specimens welding thermal cycles from single to quadruple cycle. Charpy absorbed energy and hardness of simulated CGHAZ by first cycle were degraded as compared with base metal. Improvability of these degradations by subsequent cycles is discussed and appropriate temper bead thermal cycles are clarified. When the peak temperature lower than Ac1 and near Ac1 in the second thermal cycle is applied to CGAHZ by first thermal cycle, the characteristics of CGHAZ improve enough. When the other peak temperatures (that is, higher than Ac1) in the second thermal cycle are applied to the CGHAZ, third or more thermal cycle temper bead process should be applied to improve the properties. Appropriate weld condition ranges are selected based on the above results. The validity of the selected ranges is verified by the temper bead welding test. (orig.)

  18. Nano-Phase Powder Based Exothermic Braze Repair Technology For RCC Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase II project will advance innovative, cost effective and reliable nano-phase exothermic RCC joining processes (ExoBrazeTM) in order to be able to reinforce...

  19. Nano-Phase Powder Based Exothermic Braze Repair Technology For RCC Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MRi is proposing, with its partner, Exotherm Corp (Camden, NJ) to demonstrate the feasibility of using exothermic brazing to join RCC (or C:SiC) composites to itself...

  20. Evaluation of the adhesion strength of diamond films brazed on K-10 type hard metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Ivan dos Santos

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The coating of cutting tools with diamond films considerably increases the tool performance due to the combination of the unique tribological properties of diamond with the bulk properties of the substrate (toughness. The tool performance, however, is strongly related to the adhesion strength between the film and the substrate. In this work our main goal was to propose and to test a procedure, based on a tensile strength test, to evaluate the adhesion strength of a diamond wafer brazed on a hard metal substrate, taking into account the effect of the brazing temperature and time. The temperature range studied was from 800 to 980 °C and the brazing time ranged from 3 to 40 min. The obtained results could be used to optimize the costs and time required to the production of high performance cutting tools with brazed diamond wafers.

  1. An Investigation on Corrosion Behavior of a Multi-layer Modified Aluminum Brazing Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of a multi-layer modified aluminum brazing sheet (AA4045/3003Mod./AA7072/AA4045 was investigated. The results shows that, the existence of BDP, which forms at the interface between clad and core layer during brazing, changes the corrosion form of the air side of the material from inter-granular corrosion to local exfoliation corrosion. The addition of anti-corrosion layer makes the corrosion form of the water side from inter-granular corrosion into uniform exfoliation corrosion. Compared to the normal triple-layer brazing sheet at the same thickness, the time to perforation of the modified four-layer brazing sheet is increased by more than 200%.

  2. Researches and studies regarding brazed aluminium alloys microstructure used in aeronautic industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dimitrescu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Brazing is applied to the merge of the pieces which are most required, tensile strength of the solder can reach high values. By brazing there can be assembled pieces of most metals and ferrous and nonferrous alloys, with high melting temperature. This paper presents an analysis of the microstructure of materials from a brazed merge of aluminum alloy L103 which is often used to produce pieces of aeronautical industry. Brazing material was performed using several technologies, and after examination of the microstructure of materials from the merge area it was established as optimal technology the technology which consist of pickling in Aloclene 100 solution with the deposition of filler material on both sides of the base material and the use of spectral acetylene and neutral flame.

  3. Robot welding process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1991-01-01

    This final report documents the development and installation of software and hardware for Robotic Welding Process Control. Primary emphasis is on serial communications between the CYRO 750 robotic welder, Heurikon minicomputer running Hunter & Ready VRTX, and an IBM PC/AT, for offline programming and control and closed-loop welding control. The requirements for completion of the implementation of the Rocketdyne weld tracking control are discussed. The procedure for downloading programs from the Intergraph, over the network, is discussed. Conclusions are made on the results of this task, and recommendations are made for efficient implementation of communications, weld process control development, and advanced process control procedures using the Heurikon.

  4. Explosive Welding of Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennov, Oleg; Drennov, Andrey; Burtseva, Olga

    2013-06-01

    For connection by welding it is suggested to use the explosive welding method. This method is rather new. Nevertheless, it has become commonly used among the technological developments. This method can be advantageous (saving material and physical resources) comparing to its statical analogs (electron-beam welding, argon-arc welding, plasma welding, gas welding, etc.), in particular, in hard-to-reach areas due to their geographic and climatic conditions. Explosive welding of cylindrical surfaces is performed by launching of welded layer along longitudinal axis of construction. During this procedure, it is required to provide reliable resistance against radial convergent strains. The traditional method is application of fillers of pipe cavity, which are dense cylindrical objects having special designs. However, when connecting pipes consecutively in pipelines by explosive welding, removal of the fillers becomes difficult and sometimes impossible. The suggestion is to use water as filler. The principle of non-compressibility of liquid under quasi-dynamic loading is used. In one-dimensional gasdynamic and elastic-plastic calculations we determined non-deformed mass of water (perturbations, which are moving in the axial direction with sound velocity, should not reach the layer end boundaries for 5-7 circulations of shock waves in the radial direction). Linear dimension of the water layer from the zone of pipe coupling along axis in each direction is >= 2R, where R is the internal radius of pipe.

  5. Cognitive symptoms and welding fume exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, John A S; Macdiarmid, Jennifer I; Semple, Sean; Watt, Stephen J; Moir, Gill; Henderson, George

    2013-01-01

    Prevalence of moderate to severe cognitive symptoms is markedly higher in UK professional divers who have also worked as a welder (28%) than in either divers who have not welded (18%) or offshore workers who have worked neither as a diver nor as a welder (6%). To determine whether cognitive symptoms are related to welding fume exposure or diving. Three age-matched groups of male workers were studied using postal questionnaire: professional divers who had worked as a welder (PDW, n = 361), professional welders who had not dived (NDW, n = 352), and offshore oil field workers who had neither dived nor welded (NDNW, n =503). Health-related quality of life was assessed by the Short Form 12 questionnaire (SF12). Cognitive symptomatology was assessed using the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ). A single variable for welding fume exposure (mg m(-3) days) was calculated, incorporating welding experience in different environments and using different welding techniques and respiratory protective equipment. The level of fume exposure during hyperbaric welding operations was measured during such work as ambient PM(10) (particles of 10 µm or less). Diving exposure was assessed as the number of dives performed plus the number of days spent working during saturation diving. Questionnaires were returned by 153 PDW, 108 NDW, and 252 NDNW. SF12 scores were the same in all groups and fell within normative values. Mean (95% CI) CFQ scores were higher in PDW [40.3 (37.7-42.9)] than in both NDW [34.6 (31.6-37.7)] and NDNW [32.1 (30.4-33.9)], but the scores in no groups fell outside the normative range. The mean PM(10) exposure during hyperbaric welding operations was 2.58 mg m(-3). The geometric mean mg m(-3) days (95% CI) for welding fume exposure in NDW [33 128 (24 625-44 567) n = 85] was higher than for that in PDW [10 904 (8103-14 673) n = 112]. For PDW the geometric mean (95% CI) diving exposure was 1491 [(1192-1866) n = 94] dives and days in saturation. In the general linear

  6. Development and Evaluation of Wide Clearance Braze Joints in Gamma Prime Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    improve their resistance to the hot corrosive gases of the engine. When such parts suffer service damage, it is necessary to clean them prior to braze...sinter metal is mixed with the braze filler metal and that mixture is placed in and on the cra (ck to be repaired. The repair then takes place in a sinele...joints ire likely to be advantageous on surfaces of three types. The; are: newly cast and buffed, surfaces havinc Sttmospheric corrosion product, and

  7. Flight/ground sample comparison relating to flight experiment M552, exothermic brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, R. W.; Adams, C. M.; Siewert, T. A.

    1973-01-01

    Comparisons were made between Skylab and ground-based specimens of nickel and stainless steel which were vacuum brazed using silver-copper-lithium alloy with various joint configurations. It was established that the absence of gravity greatly extends the scope of brazing since capillary flow can proceed without gravity interference. There was also evidence of enhanced transport, primarily in that liquid silver copper alloy dissolves nickel to a much greater extent in the zero gravity environment.

  8. Some possible filler alloys with low vapor pressures for refractory-metal brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    A compilation of eutectics and melting-point minima for binary combinations of metals having vapor pressures below 10 to the minus 10th power torr at 1500 degrees K and .00005 torr at 2000 degree K is presented. These compositions and others near them on their phase diagrams are potential special brazing fillers for refractory metals. Some possible problems and advantages for fusion bonds of such mixtures are indicated. Evaluations of brazing fillers containing refractory metals are reported.

  9. An evaluation of brazes for plasma facing component applications from a waste disposal perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parish, T.A. (Texas A M Univ., College Station (USA)); Koski, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma facing components in fusion devices such as tokamaks must often sustain heat fluxes in the 2 to 40 MW/m{sup 2} range. In this environment, it is essential that armor tiles be affixed to an actively cooled substrate with a minimum of thermal contact resistance. For divertor plates, limiters, beam dumps, and other high-heat-flux components used in fusion devices, low Z armor tiles, such as graphite, or high Z armor tiles, such as tungsten, are often brazed to cooled, highly conductive substrates, such as copper. The brazes that are typically 2 to 3 mils thick are chosen for certain characteristics, including (a) the ability to wet the materials to be joined, (b) braze time and temperature and consequent effects on material properties, and (c) metallurgical considerations, such as the potential formation of intermetallic alloys. The effect, or lack of effect, that the braze filler metal has on the granular structure of the metal substrate (copper) is also a consideration. Brazes will be needed in experimental fusion reactors in order to fasten armor tiles to substrates with minimal thermal contact resistance. Calculations of the activation products formed when candidate brazes are irradiated rule out the use of those containing significant amounts of silver or palladium according to current low-level-waste disposal limits. Some of the brazes that are most promising from a waste-disposal perspective have rather small engineering data bases on which to predicate their performance and may have less advantageous metallurgical characteristics. Investigations are continuing to identify promising armor tile-braze-substrate combinations. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  10. Heat sink welding of austenitic stainless steel pipes to control distortion and residual stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, H.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K. [Materials Technology Div., Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2007-07-01

    Construction of India's Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) involves extensive welding of austenitic stainless steels pipes of different dimensions. Due to high thermal expansion coefficient and poor thermal conductivity of this class of steels, welding can result in significant distortion of these pipes. Attempts to arrest this distortion can lead to high levels of residual stresses in the welded parts. Heat sink welding is one of the techniques often employed to minimize distortion and residual stress in austenitic stainless steel pipe welding. This technique has also been employed to repair welding of the piping of the Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) subjected to radiation induced intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). In the present study, a comparison of the distortion in two pipe welds, one made with heat sink welding and another a normal welds. Pipes of dimensions 350{phi} x 250(L) x 8(t) mm was fabricated from 316LN plates of dimensions 1100 x 250 x 8 mm by bending and long seam (L-seam) welding by SMAW process. Two fit ups with a root gap of 2 mm, land height of 1mm and a groove angle of 70 were prepared using these pipes for circumferential seam (C-seam) welding. Dimensions at predetermined points in the fit up were made before and after welding to check the variation in radius, circumference and and ovality of the pipes. Root pass for both the pipe fit up were carried out using conventional GTAW process with 1.6 mm AWS ER 16-8-2 as consumables. Welding of one of the pipe fit ups were completed using conventions GTAW process while the other was completed using heat sink welding. For second and subsequent layers of welding using this process, water was sprayed at the root side of the joint while welding was in progress. Flow rate of the water was {proportional_to}6 1/minute. Welding parameters employed were same as those used for the other pipe weld. Results of the dimensional measurements showed that there is no circumferential shrinkage in

  11. Plasma arc welding repair of space flight hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, David S.

    1993-01-01

    Repair and refurbishment of flight and test hardware can extend the useful life of very expensive components. A technique to weld repair the main combustion chamber of space shuttle main engines has been developed. The technique uses the plasma arc welding process and active cooling to seal cracks and pinholes in the hot-gas wall of the main combustion chamber liner. The liner hot-gas wall is made of NARloyZ, a copper alloy previously thought to be unweldable using conventional arc welding processes. The process must provide extensive heat input to melt the high conductivity NARloyZ while protecting the delicate structure of the surrounding material. The higher energy density of the plasma arc process provides the necessary heat input while active water cooling protects the surrounding structure. The welding process is precisely controlled using a computerized robotic welding system.

  12. Mechanical properties of Inconel 718 and Nickel 201 alloys after thermal histories simulating brazing and high temperature service

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, W. F.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made to evaluate two nickel base alloys (Nickel-201 and Inconel-718) in three heat treated conditions. These conditions were: (1) annealed; (2) after thermal exposure simulating a braze cycle; and (3) after a thermal exposure simulating a braze cycle plus one operational lifetime of high temperature service. For the Nickel-201, two different braze cycle temperatures were evaluated. A braze cycle utilizing a lower braze temperature resulted in less grain growth for Nickel-201 than the standard braze cycle used for joining Nickel-201 to Inconel-718. It was determined, however, that Nickel-201, was marginal for temperatures investigated due to large grain growth. After the thermal exposures described above, the mechanical properties of Nickel-201 were degraded, whereas similar exposure on Inconel-718 actually strengthened the material compared with the annealed condition. The investigation included tensile tests at both room temperature and elevated temperatures, stress-rupture tests, and metallographic examination.

  13. Improving contour accuracy and strength of reactive air brazed (RAB) ceramic/metal joints by controlling interface microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chichi; Kuhn, Bernd; Brandenberg, Joerg; Beck, Tilmann; Singheiser, Lorenz [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institute for Energy and Climate Research (IEK), Microstructure and Properties of Materials (IEK-2), 52425 Juelich (Germany); Bobzin, Kirsten; Bagcivan, Nazlim; Kopp, Nils [Surface Engineering Institute (IOT), RWTH Aachen University, Kackertstr. 15, 52072 Aachen (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    The development of high-temperature electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells, oxygen, and hydrogen separators and gas reformers poses a great challenge in brazing technology of metal/ceramic joints. To maintain the integrity of such equipment, the resulting seals have to be stable and hermetic during continuous and cyclic high temperature operation. As a solution for joining metal and ceramic materials, reactive air brazing has gained increasing interest in recent years. This paper compares joints brazed by different filler alloys: pure Ag, AgCu, and AgAl in three different aspects: contour accuracy, room temperature delamination resistance, and corresponding microstructures of the as-brazed and fractured brazed joints. Discussion focuses on fracture mechanism and associated delamination resistance. AgAl brazed joints exhibit the most promising mechanical properties and contour accuracy. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Investigation of the corrosion performance of different braze fillers fused onto stainless steel type 1.4401 (UNS S31600)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, C.; Eklund, T.; Persson, O. [Alfa Laval Corporate AB, Tumba (Sweden)

    2004-07-01

    Corrosion measurements were performed on a new iron based braze filler, AlfaNova{sup 1} developed by Alfa Laval. The braze filler was fused onto stainless steel type EN 1.4401 (UNS S31600). The susceptibility to general corrosion, intergranular corrosion and pitting corrosion was evaluated by gravimetrical and electrochemical methods as well as metallographical examination of the samples. Different sample configurations were utilised, which simulate the geometry of a braze joint in a plate heat exchange. The results were compared with a selection of commercial nickel-based braze fillers. It was shown that the newly developed iron-based braze filler had similar corrosion resistance as the commercially available nickel-based fillers. It was seen that the precipitation of intermetallic phases due to melting point depressants had a governing effect on the corrosion resistance of the braze joint. (orig.)

  15. Number size distribution of fine and ultrafine fume particles from various welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Peter; Lenz, Klaus; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Studies in the field of environmental epidemiology indicate that for the adverse effect of inhaled particles not only particle mass is crucial but also particle size is. Ultrafine particles with diameters below 100 nm are of special interest since these particles have high surface area to mass ratio and have properties which differ from those of larger particles. In this paper, particle size distributions of various welding and joining techniques were measured close to the welding process using a fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS). It turned out that welding processes with high mass emission rates (manual metal arc welding, metal active gas welding, metal inert gas welding, metal inert gas soldering, and laser welding) show mainly agglomerated particles with diameters above 100 nm and only few particles in the size range below 50 nm (10 to 15%). Welding processes with low mass emission rates (tungsten inert gas welding and resistance spot welding) emit predominantly ultrafine particles with diameters well below 100 nm. This finding can be explained by considerably faster agglomeration processes in welding processes with high mass emission rates. Although mass emission is low for tungsten inert gas welding and resistance spot welding, due to the low particle size of the fume, these processes cannot be labeled as toxicologically irrelevant and should be further investigated.

  16. Efficient Simulation of Welding Distortion in Large Structures and Its Reduction by Jig Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ninshu; Huang, Hui

    2017-10-01

    Two large construction machinery structures were welded separately with and without jig constraints. The welding distortion of the entire structure was measured by a 3D coordinate measuring system and simulated by elastic FEM using the inherent deformation method. To obtain an accurate inherent deformation, a thermal elastoplastic FE analysis of simple one-side fillet joints with and without jig constraints was performed. Efficient simulation of welding distortion in large structures was accomplished by applying inherent deformation in a localized region, and the effect of jig constraint on the reduction of welding distortion was clarified. The computation of inherent deformation, the weld zone definition and the conversion of inherent deformation into inherent strain were automated. Measured and computed welding distortions in large structures had a good correspondence with respect to both tendency and magnitude. Further investigation of jig configuration was performed for enhanced reduction of welding distortion. Alternative controlling techniques for common welded structures were also addressed.

  17. Studies on corrosion protection of laser hybrid welded AISI 316 by laser remelting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove; Ambat, Rajan; Rasmussen, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    Unlike in autogenous laser welding, hybrid laser welding of stainless steel could introduce grain boundary carbides due to low cooling rates. Formation of grain boundary carbides leads to reduced corrosion properties. Studies have initially been carried out on hybrid laser welding and subsequent...... laser surface melting on microstructure and corrosion behaviour of AISI 316L welds. Welding and laser treatment parameters were varied. General corrosion behaviour of the weld and laser treated surface was characterised using a gel visualization test. The local electrochemistry of the weld and laser...... treated surface was investigated using a novel micro electrochemical technique with a tip resolution of ~1 mm. Results show that hybrid laser welding of 316L has increased corrosion susceptibility probably as a result of grain boundary carbide formation. However a suitable post laser treatment could...

  18. Comparative study of TIG and SMAW root welding passes on ductile iron cast weldability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cárcel-Carrasco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work compares the weldability of ductile iron when: (I a root weld is applied with a tungsten inert gas (TIG process using an Inconel 625 source rod and filler welds are subsequently applied using coated electrodes with 97,6%Ni; and (II welds on ductile iron exclusively made using the manual shielded metal arc welding technique (SMAW. Both types of welds are performed on ductile iron specimen test plates that are subjected to preheat and post-weld annealing treatments. Samples with TIG root-welding pass shown higher hardness but slightly lower ductility and strength. Both types of welding achieved better ductile and strength properties than ones found in literature.

  19. A density-adaptive SPH method with kernel gradient correction for modeling explosive welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, M. B.; Zhang, Z. L.; Feng, D. L.

    2017-09-01

    Explosive welding involves processes like the detonation of explosive, impact of metal structures and strong fluid-structure interaction, while the whole process of explosive welding has not been well modeled before. In this paper, a novel smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model is developed to simulate explosive welding. In the SPH model, a kernel gradient correction algorithm is used to achieve better computational accuracy. A density adapting technique which can effectively treat large density ratio is also proposed. The developed SPH model is firstly validated by simulating a benchmark problem of one-dimensional TNT detonation and an impact welding problem. The SPH model is then successfully applied to simulate the whole process of explosive welding. It is demonstrated that the presented SPH method can capture typical physics in explosive welding including explosion wave, welding surface morphology, jet flow and acceleration of the flyer plate. The welding angle obtained from the SPH simulation agrees well with that from a kinematic analysis.

  20. Efficient Simulation of Welding Distortion in Large Structures and Its Reduction by Jig Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ninshu; Huang, Hui

    2017-11-01

    Two large construction machinery structures were welded separately with and without jig constraints. The welding distortion of the entire structure was measured by a 3D coordinate measuring system and simulated by elastic FEM using the inherent deformation method. To obtain an accurate inherent deformation, a thermal elastoplastic FE analysis of simple one-side fillet joints with and without jig constraints was performed. Efficient simulation of welding distortion in large structures was accomplished by applying inherent deformation in a localized region, and the effect of jig constraint on the reduction of welding distortion was clarified. The computation of inherent deformation, the weld zone definition and the conversion of inherent deformation into inherent strain were automated. Measured and computed welding distortions in large structures had a good correspondence with respect to both tendency and magnitude. Further investigation of jig configuration was performed for enhanced reduction of welding distortion. Alternative controlling techniques for common welded structures were also addressed.