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Sample records for brassica napus oilseed

  1. Inheritance of oilseed rape (Brassica napus) RAPD markers in a backcross progeny with Brassica campestris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, T.R.; Jensen, J.; Bagger Jørgensen, Rikke

    1996-01-01

    Different cultivars/transgenic lines of oilseed rape (Brassica napus) were crossed (as females) with different cultivars/populations of Brassica campestris. All cross combinations produced seed, with an average seed set per pollination of 9.8. Backcrossing of selected interspecific hybrids (as...... markers could be assigned to six linkage groups, most probably reflecting six B. napus C-chromosomes. The presence of backcross plants with recombinant genotypes suggests that complex genetic processes can take place during the interspecific hybridisation and backcrossing in these Brassica species....... The implications of our results for the possible choice nf integration sites of transgenes in oilseed rape are discussed....

  2. NMR metabolomics of ripened and developing oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and turnip rape (Brassica rapa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortesniemi, Maaria; Vuorinen, Anssi L; Sinkkonen, Jari; Yang, Baoru; Rajala, Ari; Kallio, Heikki

    2015-04-01

    The oilseeds of the commercially important oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and turnip rape (Brassica rapa) were investigated with (1)H NMR metabolomics. The compositions of ripened (cultivated in field trials) and developing seeds (cultivated in controlled conditions) were compared in multivariate models using principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), and orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). Differences in the major lipids and the minor metabolites between the two species were found. A higher content of polyunsaturated fatty acids and sucrose were observed in turnip rape, while the overall oil content and sinapine levels were higher in oilseed rape. The genotype traits were negligible compared to the effect of the growing site and concomitant conditions on the oilseed metabolome. This study demonstrates the applicability of NMR-based analysis in determining the species, geographical origin, developmental stage, and quality of oilseed Brassicas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hormones and Pod Development in Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus) 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bouille, Pierre; Sotta, Bruno; Miginiac, Emile; Merrien, André

    1989-01-01

    The endogenous levels of several plant growth substances (indole acetic acid, IAA; abscisic acid, ABA; zeatin, Z; zeatin riboside, [9R]Z; isopentenyladenine, iP; and isopentenyladenosine, [9R]iP were measured during pod development of field grown oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L. var oleifera cv Bienvenu) with high performance liquid chromatography and immunoenzymic (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, ELISA) techniques. Results show that pod development is characterized by high levels of Z and [9R]Z in 3 day old fruits and of IAA on the fourth day. During pod maturation, initially a significant increase of IAA and cytokinins was observed, followed by a progressive rise of ABA levels and a concomitant decline of IAA and cytokinin (except iP) levels. The relationship between hormone levels and development, especially pod number, seed number per pod, and seed weight determination, will be discussed. PMID:16666891

  4. Unexpected diversity of feral genetically modified oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) despite a cultivation and import ban in Switzerland

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schulze, Juerg; Frauenknecht, Tina; Brodmann, Peter; Bagutti, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Despite cultivation and seed import bans of genetically modified (GM) oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.), feral GM plants were found growing along railway lines and in port areas at four sites in Switzerland in 2011 and 2012...

  5. Effects of plant densities on yield, yield components and some morphological characters of two cultivators of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Barzinjy, M.; Stölen, O.; Christiansen, Jørgen Lindskrog

    2003-01-01

    Effects of Plant Densities on Yield, Yield Components and some Morphological Characters of two Cultivators of Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L.)......Effects of Plant Densities on Yield, Yield Components and some Morphological Characters of two Cultivators of Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L.)...

  6. Indications of Selenium Protection against Cadmium and Lead Toxicity in Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhilin; Yin, Xuebin; Bañuelos, Gary S.; Lin, Zhi-Qing; Liu, Ying; Li, Miao; Yuan, Linxi

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the beneficial role of selenium (Se) in protecting oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) plants from cadmium (Cd+2) and lead (Pb+2) toxicity. Exogenous Se markedly reduced Cd and Pb concentration in both roots and shoots. Supplementation of the medium with Se (5, 10, and 15 mg kg-1) alleviated the negative effect of Cd and Pb on growth and led to a decrease in oxidative damages caused by Cd and Pb. Furthermore, Se-enhanced superoxide free radicals (O2•¯), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and lipid peroxidation, as indicated by malondialdehyde accumulation, but decreased superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities. Meanwhile, the presence of Cd and Pb in the medium affected Se speciation in shoots. The results suggest that Se could alleviate Cd and Pb toxicity by preventing oxidative stress in oilseed rape plant. PMID:28018407

  7. Indications of selenium protection against cadmium and lead toxicity in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhilin Wu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the beneficial role of selenium (Se in protecting oilseed rape (Brassica napus L. plants from cadmium (Cd+2 and lead (Pb+2 toxicity. Exogenous Se markedly reduced Cd and Pb concentration in both roots and shoots. Supplementation of the medium with Se (5, 10 and 15 mg kg-1 alleviated the negative effect of Cd and Pb on growth and led to a decrease in oxidative damages caused by Cd and Pb. Furthermore, Se enhanced superoxide free radicals (O2-, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and lipid peroxidation, as indicated by malondialdehyde (MDA accumulation, but decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx activities. Meanwhile, the presence of Cd and Pb in the medium affected Se speciation in shoots. The results suggest that Se could alleviate Cd and Pb toxicity by preventing oxidative stress in oilseed rape plant.

  8. Significant reductions in oil quality and lipid content of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) under climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Namazkar, Shahla; Egsgaard, Helge; Frenck, Georg

    Despite of the potential importance to food and bioenergy purposes effects from climate change on plant oil quality have hardly been characterized. Worldwide Brassica napus, rapeseed or oilseed rape, is the second largest source of vegetable oil and the predominant oil crop in Europe. We found...... significant changes in oil quality and quantity of cultivars of oilseed rape grown in five future climate scenarios with elevated [CO2], [O3], temperature and combinations hereof (~RCP8.5, IPCC 2013)....

  9. Consequences of gene flow between oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and its relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongbo; Wei, Wei; Ma, Keping; Li, Junsheng; Liang, Yuyong; Darmency, Henri

    2013-10-01

    Numerous studies have focused on the probability of occurrence of gene flow between transgenic crops and their wild relatives and the likelihood of transgene escape, which should be assessed before the commercial release of transgenic crops. This review paper focuses on this issue for oilseed rape, Brassica napus L., a species that produces huge numbers of pollen grains and seeds. We analyze separately the distinct steps of gene flow: (1) pollen and seeds as vectors of gene flow; (2) spontaneous hybridization; (3) hybrid behavior, fitness cost due to hybridization and mechanisms of introgression; (4) and fitness benefit due to transgenes (e.g. herbicide resistance and Bt toxin). Some physical, biological and molecular means of transgene containment are also described. Although hybrids and first generation progeny are difficult to identify in fields and non-crop habitats, the literature shows that transgenes could readily introgress into Brassica rapa, Brassica juncea and Brassica oleracea, while introgression is expected to be rare with Brassica nigra, Hirschfeldia incana and Raphanus raphanistrum. The hybrids grow well but produce less seed than their wild parent. The difference declines with increasing generations. However, there is large uncertainty about the evolution of chromosome numbers and recombination, and many parameters of life history traits of hybrids and progeny are not determined with satisfactory confidence to build generic models capable to really cover the wide diversity of situations. We show that more studies are needed to strengthen and organize biological knowledge, which is a necessary prerequisite for model simulations to assess the practical and evolutionary outputs of introgression, and to provide guidelines for gene flow management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Preferential exclusion of hybrids in mixed pollinations between oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and weedy B. campestris (Brassicaceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauser, T.P.; Bagger Jørgensen, Rikke; Østergård, Hanne

    1997-01-01

    In most experimental hybridizations between oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and weedy B. campestris, either intra- or interspecific pollen has been applied to individual flowers. Under field conditions, however, stigmas will often receive a mixture of the two types of pollen, thereby allowing...... for competition between male gametophytes and/or seeds within pods. To test whether competition influences the success of hybridization, pollen from the two species was mixed in different proportions and applied to stigmas of both species. The resulting seeds were scored for paternity by isozyme and randomly...... survival of hybrid zygotes in B. napus pods. This is in contrast to the higher survival of hybrid seeds in B. napus than in B. campestris pods when pollinations are made with pure pollen. Altogether, the likelihood of a foreign pollen grain producing a seed was much lower on B. napus than on B. campestris...

  11. Development of new restorer lines for CMS ogura system with the use of resynthesized oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szała, Laurencja; Sosnowska, Katarzyna; Popławska, Wiesława; Liersch, Alina; Olejnik, Anna; Kozłowska, Katarzyna; Bocianowski, Jan; Cegielska-Taras, Teresa

    2016-09-01

    Resynthesized (RS) oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) is potentially of great interest for hybrid breeding. However, a major problem with the direct use of RS B. napus is the quality of seed oil (high level of erucic acid) and seed meal (high glucosinolate content), which does not comply with double-low quality oilseed rape. Thus, additional developments are needed before RS B. napus can be introduced into breeding practice. In this study, RS oilseed rape was obtained through crosses between B. rapa ssp. chinensis var. chinensis and B. oleracea ssp. acephala var. sabellica. RS plant was then crossed with double-low (00) winter oilseed rape lines containing the Rfo gene for Ogura cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS ogu) system. Populations of doubled haploids (DH) were developed from these F1 hybrids using the microspore in vitro culture method. The seeds of semi-RS DH lines were analyzed for erucic acid and glucosinolate content. Among the populations of semi-RS DHs four 00-quality lines with the Rfo gene were selected. Using 344 AFLP markers to estimate genetic relatedness, we showed that the RS lines and semi-RS lines formed clusters that were clearly distinct from 96 winter oilseed rape parental lines of F1 hybrids.

  12. Mapping the mosaic of ancestral genotypes in a cultivar of oilseed rape (Brassica napus) selected via pedigree breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, A G; Lydiate, D J

    2003-06-01

    Recent oilseed rape breeding has produced low glucosinolate cultivars that yield proteinaceous meal suitable for animal feed. The low glucosinolate character was introduced into modern cultivars from Brassica napus 'Bronowski', a cultivar that is agronomically inferior in most other respects. Residual segments of 'Bronowski' genotype in modern cultivars probably cause reduced yield, poorer winter hardiness, and lower oil content. The quantity and distribution of the 'Bronowski' genotype in the modern oilseed rape cultivar Brassica napus 'Tapidor' was investigated using a segregating population derived from a cross between 'Tapidor' and its high glucosinolate progenitor. This population was analyzed with 65 informative Brassica RFLP probes and a genetic linkage map, based on the segregation at 77 polymorphic loci, was constructed. The mapping identified 15 residual segments of donor genotype in 'Tapidor', which together occupy approximately 29% of the B. napus genome. Mapping the loci that control variation for the accumulation of total seed glucosinolates in the segregating population has identified three loci that together explain >90% of the variation for this character. All of these loci are in donor segments of the 'Tapidor' genome. This result shows the extent to which conventional breeding programmes have difficulty in eliminating residual segments of donor genotype from elite material.

  13. Low level impurities in imported wheat are a likely source of feral transgenic oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Juerg; Brodmann, Peter; Oehen, Bernadette; Bagutti, Claudia

    2015-11-01

    In Switzerland, the cultivation of genetically modified (GM) oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) and the use of its seeds for food and feed are not permitted. Nevertheless, the GM oilseed rape events GT73, MS8×RF3, MS8 and RF3 have recently been found in the Rhine port of Basel, Switzerland. The sources of GM oilseed rape seeds have been unknown. The main agricultural good being imported at the Rhine port of Basel is wheat and from 2010 to 2013, 19% of all Swiss wheat imports originated from Canada. As over 90% of all oilseed rape grown in Canada is GM, we hypothesised that imports of Canadian wheat may contain low level impurities of GM oilseed rape. Therefore, waste fraction samples gathered during the mechanical cleaning of Canadian wheat from two Swiss grain mills were analysed by separating oilseed rape seeds from waste fraction samples and testing DNA of pooled seeds for the presence of transgenes by real-time PCR. Furthermore, oilseed rape seeds from each grain mill were sown in a germination experiment, and seedling DNA was tested for the presence of transgenes by real-time PCR. GT73, MS8×RF3, MS8 and RF3 oilseed rape was detected among seed samples and seedlings of both grain mills. Based on this data, we projected a mean proportion of 0.005% of oilseed rape in wheat imported from Canada. Besides Canadian wheat, the Rhine port of Basel does not import any other significant amounts of agricultural products from GM oilseed rape producing countries. We therefore conclude that Canadian wheat is the major source of unintended introduction of GM oilseed rape seeds into Switzerland.

  14. Brassica napus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-12-16

    Dec 16, 2011 ... Abstract. Experiments were conducted on rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) using a diallel design with nine parents: Youcai 601, Double 20-. 4, Huashuang 3, Gaoyou 605, Zhongyou 821, Eyouchangjia, Zhong R-888, Tower and Zheshuang 72. The seed developmental process was divided into five stages, ...

  15. Unexpected diversity of feral genetically modified oilseed rape (Brassica napus L. despite a cultivation and import ban in Switzerland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juerg Schulze

    Full Text Available Despite cultivation and seed import bans of genetically modified (GM oilseed rape (Brassica napus L., feral GM plants were found growing along railway lines and in port areas at four sites in Switzerland in 2011 and 2012. All GM plants were identified as glyphosate-resistant GM event GT73 (Roundup Ready, Monsanto. The most affected sites were the Rhine port of Basel and the St. Johann freight railway station in Basel. To assess the distribution and intra- and interspecific outcrossing of GM oilseed rape in more detail, we monitored these two sites in 2013. Leaves and seed pods of feral oilseed rape plants, their possible hybridization partners and putative hybrid plants were sampled in monthly intervals and analysed for the presence of transgenes by real-time PCR. Using flow cytometry, we measured DNA contents of cell nuclei to confirm putative hybrids. In total, 2787 plants were sampled. The presence of GT73 oilseed rape could be confirmed at all previously documented sampling locations and was additionally detected at one new sampling location within the Rhine port. Furthermore, we found the glufosinate-resistant GM events MS8xRF3, MS8 and RF3 (all traded as InVigor, Bayer at five sampling locations in the Rhine port. To our knowledge, this is the first time that feral MS8xRF3, MS8 or RF3 plants were detected in Europe. Real-time PCR analyses of seeds showed outcrossing of GT73 into two non-GM oilseed rape plants, but no outcrossing of transgenes into related wild species was observed. We found no hybrids between oilseed rape and related species. GM plants most frequently occurred at unloading sites for ships, indicating that ship cargo traffic is the main entry pathway for GM oilseed rape. In the future, it will be of major interest to determine the source of GM oilseed rape seeds.

  16. Introduction of beet cyst nematode resistance from Sinapis alba L. and Raphanus sativus L. into Brassica napus L. (oil-seed rape) through sexual and somatic hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelivelt, C.L.C.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments were performed to select for beet cyst nematode (Heterodera schachtii Schm., abbrev. BCN) resistant genotypes of Brassica napus L. (oilseed rape), and to introduce BCN-resistance from the related species Raphanus

  17. Genome-wide analysis and expression profiling of the GRF gene family in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jin-Qi; Jian, Hong-Ju; Yang, Bo; Lu, Kun; Zhang, Ao-Xiang; Liu, Pu; Li, Jia-Na

    2017-07-15

    Growth regulating-factors (GRFs) are plant-specific transcription factors that help regulate plant growth and development. Genome-wide identification and evolutionary analyses of GRF gene families have been performed in Arabidopsis thaliana, Zea mays, Oryza sativa, and Brassica rapa, but a comprehensive analysis of the GRF gene family in oilseed rape (Brassica napus) has not yet been reported. In the current study, we identified 35 members of the BnGRF family in B. napus. We analyzed the chromosomal distribution, phylogenetic relationships (Bayesian Inference and Neighbor Joining method), gene structures, and motifs of the BnGRF family members, as well as the cis-acting regulatory elements in their promoters. We also analyzed the expression patterns of 15 randomly selected BnGRF genes in various tissues and in plant varieties with different harvest indices and gibberellic acid (GA) responses. The expression levels of BnGRFs under GA treatment suggested the presence of possible negative feedback regulation. The evolutionary patterns and expression profiles of BnGRFs uncovered in this study increase our understanding of the important roles played by these genes in oilseed rape. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. A high-density genetic map identifies a novel major QTL for boron efficiency in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Didi; Hua, Yingpeng; Wang, Xiaohua; Zhao, Hua; Shi, Lei; Xu, Fangsen

    2014-01-01

    Low boron (B) seriously limits the growth of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.), a high B demand species that is sensitive to low B conditions. Significant genotypic variations in response to B deficiency have been observed among B. napus cultivars. To reveal the genetic basis for B efficiency in B. napus, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for the plant growth traits, B uptake traits and the B efficiency coefficient (BEC) were analyzed using a doubled haploid (DH) population derived from a cross between a B-efficient parent, Qingyou 10, and a B-inefficient parent, Westar 10. A high-density genetic map was constructed based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) assayed using Brassica 60 K Infinium BeadChip Array, simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). The linkage map covered a total length of 2139.5 cM, with 19 linkage groups (LGs) and an average distance of 1.6 cM between adjacent markers. Based on hydroponic evaluation of six B efficiency traits measured in three separate repeated trials, a total of 52 QTLs were identified, accounting for 6.14-46.27% of the phenotypic variation. A major QTL for BEC, qBEC-A3a, was co-located on A3 with other QTLs for plant growth and B uptake traits under low B stress. Using a subset of substitution lines, qBEC-A3a was validated and narrowed down to the interval between CNU384 and BnGMS436. The results of this study provide a novel major locus located on A3 for B efficiency in B. napus that will be suitable for fine mapping and marker-assisted selection breeding for B efficiency in B. napus.

  19. A high-density genetic map identifies a novel major QTL for boron efficiency in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didi Zhang

    Full Text Available Low boron (B seriously limits the growth of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L., a high B demand species that is sensitive to low B conditions. Significant genotypic variations in response to B deficiency have been observed among B. napus cultivars. To reveal the genetic basis for B efficiency in B. napus, quantitative trait loci (QTLs for the plant growth traits, B uptake traits and the B efficiency coefficient (BEC were analyzed using a doubled haploid (DH population derived from a cross between a B-efficient parent, Qingyou 10, and a B-inefficient parent, Westar 10. A high-density genetic map was constructed based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs assayed using Brassica 60 K Infinium BeadChip Array, simple sequence repeats (SSRs and amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs. The linkage map covered a total length of 2139.5 cM, with 19 linkage groups (LGs and an average distance of 1.6 cM between adjacent markers. Based on hydroponic evaluation of six B efficiency traits measured in three separate repeated trials, a total of 52 QTLs were identified, accounting for 6.14-46.27% of the phenotypic variation. A major QTL for BEC, qBEC-A3a, was co-located on A3 with other QTLs for plant growth and B uptake traits under low B stress. Using a subset of substitution lines, qBEC-A3a was validated and narrowed down to the interval between CNU384 and BnGMS436. The results of this study provide a novel major locus located on A3 for B efficiency in B. napus that will be suitable for fine mapping and marker-assisted selection breeding for B efficiency in B. napus.

  20. Intergeneric hybrids between Brassica napus and Orychophragmus violaceus containing traits of agronomic importance for oilseed rape breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q.; Hansen, N.; Laursen, J.; Dixelius, C.; Andersen, B.

    2002-11-01

    Protoplast fusions between Brassica napus and Orychophragmus violaceus for transfer of valuable traits to oilseed rape resulted in 257 somatic hybrid plants. Hybridity was confirmed by morphological, cytological and molecular means. Symmetric fusions gave rise to 131 plants. Fifty eight of these plants had an intermediate morphology and contained nuclear DNA corresponding to the sum of the parental species. All 131 plants were sterile with no pollen grains observed upon flowering. Another 126 plants were derived from asymmetric fusions in which protoplasts of the donor parent O. violaceus were irradiated by 100 or 200-Gy X-rays prior to fusion. Morphologically these plants showed a larger variation compared to the plants regenerated from symmetric fusion experiments. In contrast to plants obtained from symmetric fusions, fertile hybrids were recovered among regenerants from the asymmetric fusions. Twenty four of these plants released viable pollen grains and 14 of the determined 17 plants set seeds after either selfing or backcrossing to B. napus. Fourteen male-sterile plants were identified with female fertility. This observed male sterility most-likely originated from alloplasmic recombination and would be of great potential for the development of a new cytoplasmic male sterility system. The fatty acid composition of the fertile hybrids and their progenies showed a biased distribution towards the B. napus parent, which has a high erucic acid-content type. However, increased levels of palmitic and linoleic acids compared to B. napus were found in subsequent generations, as well as a reduced level of erucic acid.

  1. Divergent patterns of allelic diversity from similar origins: the case of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) in China and Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S; Nelson, M N; Ghamkhar, K; Fu, T; Cowling, W A

    2008-01-01

    Oilseed rape (Brassica napus) in Australia and China have similar origins, with introductions from Europe, Canada, and Japan in the mid 20th century, and there has been some interchange of germplasm between China and Australia since that time. Allelic diversity of 72 B. napus genotypes representing contemporary germplasm in Australia and China, including samples from India, Europe, and Canada, was characterized by 55 polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers spanning the entire B. napus genome. Hierarchical clustering and two-dimensional multidimensional scaling identified a Chinese group (China-1) that was separated from "mixed group" of Australian, Chinese (China-2), European, and Canadian lines. A small group from India was distinctly separated from all other B. napus genotypes. Chinese genotypes, especially in the China-1 group, have inherited unique alleles from interspecific crossing, primarily with B. rapa, and the China-2 group has many alleles in common with Australian genotypes. The concept of "private alleles" is introduced to describe both the greater genetic diversity and the genetic distinctiveness of Chinese germplasm, compared with Australian germplasm, after 50 years of breeding from similar origins.

  2. FEASIBILITY OF HYGROMYCIN AS A SELECTION AGENT IN AGROBACTERIUM-MEDIATED TRANSFORMATION OF OILSEED RAPE (BRASSICA NAPUS L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tímea Kuťka Hlozáková

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work the feasibility of the antibiotic hygromycin as a selection agent in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L. was evaluated. For this, two economically important commercial varieties Haydn and Hunter and tobacco as a model plant were subjected to Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The 5-6 days-old oilseed rape hypocotyls and 4-6 weeks-old tobacco leaf segments were transformed with the binary vector pCambia1304. The T-DNA contained the reporter gfp:gus and the selectable marker htp genes. Regeneration of transformed cells was conducted under selection of 10 mg.l-1 (oilseed rape and 30 mg.l-1 (tobacco hygromycin. Putative transgenic plantlets were analysed by the mean of the histochemical GUS and PCR analyses. Transformation efficiency ranged from 1.0% (cv. Haydn to 40.4% (tobacco. No transgenic shoots were detected for the cv. Hunter. It points out the oilseed rape cultivar specificity plays significant role in choice of suitable selection agent.

  3. Plant regeneration from hypocotyl protoplasts of winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wacław Orczyk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Protoplasts were isolated from hypocotyls of six breeding lines and two cultivars of winter oilseed rape (B. napus L.. Under presented culture conditions almost all of the protoplasts regenerated cell walls. Division frequency depended on the genotype and was from 50% to 64%. Shoot regeneration (also depended on the genotype was induced with the frequency of 3.6% (for cv Bolko on the medium containing IAA (0.1 mg•dm-3, zeatin (0.5 mg•dm-3 and BAP (0.5 mg•dm-3 . All shoots were rooted on MS basal medium supplemented with sucrose 30 g•dm-3.

  4. Metabolic network reconstruction and flux variability analysis of storage synthesis in developing oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, J.; Schwender, J.

    2011-08-01

    Computational simulation of large-scale biochemical networks can be used to analyze and predict the metabolic behavior of an organism, such as a developing seed. Based on the biochemical literature, pathways databases and decision rules defining reaction directionality we reconstructed bna572, a stoichiometric metabolic network model representing Brassica napus seed storage metabolism. In the highly compartmentalized network about 25% of the 572 reactions are transport reactions interconnecting nine subcellular compartments and the environment. According to known physiological capabilities of developing B. napus embryos, four nutritional conditions were defined to simulate heterotrophy or photoheterotrophy, each in combination with the availability of inorganic nitrogen (ammonia, nitrate) or amino acids as nitrogen sources. Based on mathematical linear optimization the optimal solution space was comprehensively explored by flux variability analysis, thereby identifying for each reaction the range of flux values allowable under optimality. The range and variability of flux values was then categorized into flux variability types. Across the four nutritional conditions, approximately 13% of the reactions have variable flux values and 10-11% are substitutable (can be inactive), both indicating metabolic redundancy given, for example, by isoenzymes, subcellular compartmentalization or the presence of alternative pathways. About one-third of the reactions are never used and are associated with pathways that are suboptimal for storage synthesis. Fifty-seven reactions change flux variability type among the different nutritional conditions, indicating their function in metabolic adjustments. This predictive modeling framework allows analysis and quantitative exploration of storage metabolism of a developing B. napus oilseed.

  5. Do competitive conditions affect introgression of transgenes from oilseed rape (Brassica napus) to weedy Brassica rapa? AS case study with special reference to transplastomic oilseed rape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Marina

    In species where chloroplast inheritance is exclusively or predominantly maternal, pollen-mediated flow of transgenes is reduced if transgenes are inserted in chloroplast DNA instead of nuclear DNA. However, transmission of chloroplast-encoded transgeneswill still occur if transgenic individuals......) significantly. As to the proportion between the species, B. rapa was a stronger competitor than B. napus. Theproportion seemed to be a more powerful factor than the density. In conclusion, hybridisation on B. napus seems to be most likely at current field densities of B. napus and when B. rapa is an abundant...... affected the thousand-kernel weight significantly. It was concluded that further introgression of transgenes from transplastomic oilseed rape to B. rapa is mostlikely at current field densities of B. napus and when B. rapa is an abundant weed....

  6. Significant reductions in oil quality and lipid content of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) under climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Namazkar, Shahla; Egsgaard, Helge; Frenck, Georg

    2015-01-01

    stearic acid, C 18:0. For example we found that in the two factor treatment, where elevated [CO2] and temperature were combined, the essential fatty acid omega-3, C18:3, decreased by 45% and oil content declined 10%.Total losses in fatty acid and oil yields would be even larger, when also considering...... fatty acids was changed for the worse. Facing this outlook, breeding for climate tolerant cultivars seems essential for oil yield and quality. (C) 2015 Published by Elsevier B.V......Despite of the potential importance to food and bioenergy purposes, effects from climate change on plant oil quality have hardly been characterized.On a global basis Brassica napus L., rapeseed or oilseed rape, is the second largest source of vegetable oil after soybean and the predominant oil crop...

  7. Significant reductions in oil quality and lipid content of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) under climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Namazkar, Shahla; Egsgaard, Helge; Frenck, Georg

    2015-01-01

    found that in the two- factor treatment, where elevated [CO2] and temperature were combined, the essential fatty acid omega-3, C18:3, decreased by 45% and oil content declined 10%.Total losses in fatty acid and oil yields would be even larger, when also considering reported reductions in seed biomass....... Facing this outlook, breeding for climate tolerant cultivars seems essential for oil yield and quality.......Despite of the potential importance to food and bioenergy purposes, effects from climate change on plant oil quality have hardly been characterized.On a global basis Brassica napus L., rapeseed or oilseed rape, is the second largest source of vegetable oil after soybean and the predominant oil crop...

  8. Differences between winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) cultivars in nitrogen starvation-induced leaf senescence are governed by leaf-inherent rather than root-derived signals

    OpenAIRE

    Koeslin-Findeklee, Fabian; Martin A. Becker; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas; Horst, Walter J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) efficiency of winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) line-cultivars (cvs.), defined as high grain yield under N limitation, has been primarily attributed to maintained N uptake during reproductive growth (N uptake efficiency) in combination with delayed senescence of the older leaves accompanied with maintained photosynthetic capacity (functional stay-green). However, it is not clear whether genotypic variation in N starvation-induced leaf senescence is due to leaf-inherent fact...

  9. Protocol: optimisation of a grafting protocol for oilseed rape (Brassica napus) for studying long-distance signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostendorp, Anna; Pahlow, Steffen; Deke, Jennifer; Thieß, Melanie; Kehr, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Grafting is a well-established technique for studying long-distance transport and signalling processes in higher plants. While oilseed rape has been the subject of comprehensive analyses of xylem and phloem sap to identify macromolecules potentially involved in long-distance information transfer, there is currently no standardised grafting method for this species published. We developed a straightforward collar-free grafting protocol for Brassica napus plants with high reproducibility and success rates. Micrografting of seedlings was done on filter paper. Grafting success on different types of regeneration media was measured short-term after grafting and as the long-term survival rate (>14 days) of grafts after the transfer to hydroponic culture or soil. We compared different methods for grafting B. napus seedlings. Grafting on filter paper with removed cotyledons, a truncated hypocotyl and the addition of low levels of sucrose under long day conditions allowed the highest grafting success. A subsequent long-term hydroponic cultivation of merged grafts showed highest survival rates and best reproducibility.

  10. Frequency-dependent fitness of hybrids between oilseed rape (¤Brassica napus¤) and weedy ¤B. rapa¤ (Brassicaceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauser, T.P.; Damgaard, C.; Bagger Jørgensen, Rikke

    2003-01-01

    Fitness of interspecific hybrids is sometimes high relative to their parents, despite the conventional belief that they are mostly unfit. F-1 hybrids between oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and weedy B. rapa can be significantly more fit than their weedy parents under some conditions; however, under...... other conditions they are less fit. To understand the reasons, we measured the seed production of B. napus, B. rapa, and different generations of hybrid plants at three different densities and in mixtures of different frequencies (including pure stands). Brassica napus, B. rapa, and backcross plants (F...... and reproductive interactions may be responsible for these effects. Our results show that the fitness of both parents and hybrids is strongly frequency-dependent and that the likelihood of introgression of genes between the species thus may depend on the numbers and densities of parents and their various hybrid...

  11. Genetic diversity and relationship analysis of the Brassica napus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) is an important oilseed crop worldwide. The objective of this research was to study the genetic diversity and relationships of B. napus accessions using simple sequence repeat (SSR). A set of 217 genotypes was characterized using 37 SSR markers of mapping on the B. napus genome.

  12. Temporal Polarimetric Behavior of Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L. at C-Band for Early Season Sowing Date Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Yang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Spatial monitoring of the sowing date plays an important role in crop yield estimation at the regional scale. The feasibility of using polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR data for early season monitoring of the sowing dates of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L. fields is explored in this paper. Polarimetric SAR responses of six parameters, relying on polarization decomposition methods, were investigated as a function of days after sowing (DAS during the entire growing season, by means of five consecutive Radarsat-2 images. A near-continuous temporal evolution of these parameters was observed, based on 88 oilseed rape fields. It provided a solid basis for determining the suitable temporal window and the best polarimetric parameters for sowing date monitoring. A high sensitivity of all polarimetric parameters to the DAS at different growing stages was shown. Simple linear models could be calibrated to estimate sowing dates at early growth stages and were validated on an independent data set. Although Volume and Span parameters provided the highest sowing date estimation accuracy at the earlier growth stages, the other four parameters (Volume/Total, Odd/Total, Entropy and Alpha were more accurate for a wider temporal window. These results demonstrate the capability and high potential of polarimetric SAR data for monitoring the sowing date of crops in the early season.

  13. Hydroponics versus field lysimeter studies of urea, ammonium and nitrate uptake by oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkoun, Mustapha; Sarda, Xavier; Jannin, Laëtitia; Laîné, Philippe; Etienne, Philippe; Garcia-Mina, José-Maria; Yvin, Jean-Claude; Ourry, Alain

    2012-09-01

    N-fertilizer use efficiencies are affected by their chemical composition and suffer from potential N-losses by volatilization. In a field lysimeter experiment, (15)N-labelled fertilizers were used to follow N uptake by Brassica napus L. and assess N-losses by volatilization. Use of urea with NBPT (urease inhibitor) showed the best efficiency with the lowest N losses (8% of N applied compared with 25% with urea alone). Plants receiving ammonium sulphate, had similar yield achieved through a better N mobilization from vegetative tissues to the seeds, despite a lower N uptake resulting from a higher volatilization (43% of applied N). Amounts of (15)N in the plant were also higher when plants were fertilized with ammonium nitrate but N-losses reached 23% of applied N. In parallel, hydroponic experiments showed a deleterious effect of ammonium and urea on the growth of oilseed rape. This was alleviated by the nitrate supply, which was preferentially taken up. B. napus was also characterized by a very low potential for urea uptake. BnDUR3 and BnAMT1, encoding urea and ammonium transporters, were up-regulated by urea, suggesting that urea-grown plants suffered from nitrogen deficiency. The results also suggested a role for nitrate as a signal for the expression of BnDUR3, in addition to its role as a major nutrient. Overall, the results of the hydroponic study showed that urea itself does not contribute significantly to the N nutrition of oilseed rape. Moreover, it may contribute indirectly since a better use efficiency for urea fertilizer, which was further increased by the application of a urease inhibitor, was observed in the lysimeter study.

  14. Hyperspectral and thermal imaging of oilseed rape (Brassica napus) response to fungal species of the genus Alternaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, Piotr; Jedryczka, Malgorzata; Mazurek, Wojciech; Babula-Skowronska, Danuta; Siedliska, Anna; Kaczmarek, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, thermal (8-13 µm) and hyperspectral imaging in visible and near infrared (VNIR) and short wavelength infrared (SWIR) ranges were used to elaborate a method of early detection of biotic stresses caused by fungal species belonging to the genus Alternaria that were host (Alternaria alternata, Alternaria brassicae, and Alternaria brassicicola) and non-host (Alternaria dauci) pathogens to oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.). The measurements of disease severity for chosen dates after inoculation were compared to temperature distributions on infected leaves and to averaged reflectance characteristics. Statistical analysis revealed that leaf temperature distributions on particular days after inoculation and respective spectral characteristics, especially in the SWIR range (1000-2500 nm), significantly differed for the leaves inoculated with A. dauci from the other species of Alternaria as well as from leaves of non-treated plants. The significant differences in leaf temperature of the studied Alternaria species were observed in various stages of infection development. The classification experiments were performed on the hyperspectral data of the leaf surfaces to distinguish days after inoculation and Alternaria species. The second-derivative transformation of the spectral data together with back-propagation neural networks (BNNs) appeared to be the best combination for classification of days after inoculation (prediction accuracy 90.5%) and Alternaria species (prediction accuracy 80.5%).

  15. Genetic variants associated with the root system architecture of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) under contrasting phosphate supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohua; Chen, Yanling; Thomas, Catherine L; Ding, Guangda; Xu, Ping; Shi, Dexu; Grandke, Fabian; Jin, Kemo; Cai, Hongmei; Xu, Fangsen; Yi, Bin; Broadley, Martin R; Shi, Lei

    2017-08-01

    Breeding crops with ideal root system architecture for efficient absorption of phosphorus is an important strategy to reduce the use of phosphate fertilizers. To investigate genetic variants leading to changes in root system architecture, 405 oilseed rape cultivars were genotyped with a 60K Brassica Infinium SNP array in low and high P environments. A total of 285 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were associated with root system architecture traits at varying phosphorus levels. Nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms corroborate a previous linkage analysis of root system architecture quantitative trait loci in the BnaTNDH population. One peak single-nucleotide polymorphism region on A3 was associated with all root system architecture traits and co-localized with a quantitative trait locus for primary root length at low phosphorus. Two more single-nucleotide polymorphism peaks on A5 for root dry weight at low phosphorus were detected in both growth systems and co-localized with a quantitative trait locus for the same trait. The candidate genes identified on A3 form a haplotype 'BnA3Hap', that will be important for understanding the phosphorus/root system interaction and for the incorporation into Brassica napus breeding programs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  16. Epidemiology of light leaf spot (Pyrenopeziza brassicae) on winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus) = De epidemiologie van 'light leaf spot' (Pyrenopeziza brassicae) in winterkoolzaad (Brassica napus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilles, T.

    2000-01-01

    Forecasts of the severity of light leaf spot of winter oilseed rape are needed to help growers with their decisions on fungicide applications at times when sprays are needed to control light leaf spot, but the disease is difficult to diagnose. A thorough understanding of stages in

  17. Landscape-scale distribution and persistence of genetically modified oilseed rape (Brassica napus) in Manitoba, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knispel, Alexis L; McLachlan, Stéphane M

    2010-01-01

    Genetically modified herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) oilseed rape (OSR; Brassica napus L.) was approved for commercial cultivation in Canada in 1995 and currently represents over 95% of the OSR grown in western Canada. After a decade of widespread cultivation, GMHT volunteers represent an increasing management problem in cultivated fields and are ubiquitous in adjacent ruderal habitats, where they contribute to the spread of transgenes. However, few studies have considered escaped GMHT OSR populations in North America, and even fewer have been conducted at large spatial scales (i.e. landscape scales). In particular, the contribution of landscape structure and large-scale anthropogenic dispersal processes to the persistence and spread of escaped GMHT OSR remains poorly understood. We conducted a multi-year survey of the landscape-scale distribution of escaped OSR plants adjacent to roads and cultivated fields. Our objective was to examine the long-term dynamics of escaped OSR at large spatial scales and to assess the relative importance of landscape and localised factors to the persistence and spread of these plants outside of cultivation. From 2005 to 2007, we surveyed escaped OSR plants along roadsides and field edges at 12 locations in three agricultural landscapes in southern Manitoba where GMHT OSR is widely grown. Data were analysed to examine temporal changes at large spatial scales and to determine factors affecting the distribution of escaped OSR plants in roadside and field edge habitats within agricultural landscapes. Additionally, we assessed the potential for seed dispersal between escaped populations by comparing the relative spatial distribution of roadside and field edge OSR. Densities of escaped OSR fluctuated over space and time in both roadside and field edge habitats, though the proportion of GMHT plants was high (93-100%). Escaped OSR was positively affected by agricultural landscape (indicative of cropping intensity) and by the presence of an

  18. Response of oilseed Brassica cultivars to ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hucl, P.; Beversdorf, W.D

    1993-10-01

    Research was conducted to determine the sensitivity of four Brassica oilseed crops to ozone under controlled environmental conditions. Cultivars of four Brassica oilseed species were exposed to acute levels of ozone (0.31 or 0.47 [mu]l/l) at the seedling stage. Brassica hirta BHL-926 was the most sensitive to ozone, followed by B. juncea (Newton) and B. rapa (Torch). Injury symptoms ranged from a slight stippling in insensitive species to large bifacial necrotic patches in the most sensitive species. Brassica napus (canola) seedlings exhibited very little foliar injury (0-4% after 24 h exposure to 0.31 [mu]l/l ozone). In Ontario, where a vast majority of canola acreage is seeded to B. napus cultivars, it is unlikely that canola yields are being affected by exposure to ozone. 6 refs., 1 tab.

  19. Coordinate changes in gene expression and triacylglycerol composition in the developing seeds of oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and turnip rape (Brassica rapa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorinen, Anssi L; Kalpio, Marika; Linderborg, Kaisa M; Kortesniemi, Maaria; Lehto, Kirsi; Niemi, Jarmo; Yang, Baoru; Kallio, Heikki P

    2014-02-15

    Crop production for vegetable oil in the northern latitudes utilises oilseed rape (Brassica napus subsp. oleifera) and turnip rape (B. rapa subsp. oleifera), having similar oil compositions. The oil consists mostly of triacylglycerols, which are synthesised during seed development. In this study, we characterised the oil composition and the expression levels of genes involved in triacylglycerol biosynthesis in the developing seeds in optimal, low temperature (15 °C) and short day (12-h day length) conditions. Gene expression levels of several genes were altered during seed development. Low temperature and short day treatments increased the level of 9,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid (18:3n-3) in turnip rape and short day treatment decreased the total oil content in both species. This study gives a novel view on seed oil biosynthesis under different growth conditions, bringing together gene expression levels of the triacylglycerol biosynthesis pathway and oil composition over a time series in two related oilseed species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification and characterization of microRNAs in oilseed rape (Brassica napus) responsive to infection with the pathogenic fungus Verticillium longisporum using Brassica AA (Brassica rapa) and CC (Brassica oleracea) as reference genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Dan; Suhrkamp, Ina; Wang, Yu; Liu, Shenyi; Menkhaus, Jan; Verreet, Joseph-Alexander; Fan, Longjiang; Cai, Daguang

    2014-11-01

    Verticillium longisporum, a soil-borne pathogenic fungus, causes vascular disease in oilseed rape (Brassica napus). We proposed that plant microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in the plant-V. longisporum interaction. To identify oilseed rape miRNAs, we deep-sequenced two small RNA libraries made from V. longisporum infected/noninfected roots and employed Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea genomes as references for miRNA prediction and characterization. We identified 893 B. napus miRNAs representing 360 conserved and 533 novel miRNAs, and mapped 429 and 464 miRNAs to the AA and CC genomes, respectively. Microsynteny analysis with the conserved miRNAs and their flanking protein coding sequences revealed 137 AA-CC genome syntenic miRNA pairs and 61 AA and 42 CC genome-unique miRNAs. Sixty-two miRNAs were responsive to the V. longisporum infection. We present data for specific interactions and simultaneously reciprocal changes in the expression levels of the miRNAs and their targets in the infected roots. We demonstrate that miRNAs are involved in the plant-fungus interaction and that miRNA168-Argonaute 1 (AGO1) expression modulation might act as a key regulatory module in a compatible plant-V. longisporum interaction. Our results suggest that V. longisporum may have evolved a virulence mechanism by interference with plant miRNAs to reprogram plant gene expression and achieve infection. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Genetic load and transgenic mitigating genes in transgenic Brassica rapa (field mustard × Brassica napus (oilseed rape hybrid populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warwick Suzanne I

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One theoretical explanation for the relatively poor performance of Brassica rapa (weed × Brassica napus (crop transgenic hybrids suggests that hybridization imparts a negative genetic load. Consequently, in hybrids genetic load could overshadow any benefits of fitness enhancing transgenes and become the limiting factor in transgenic hybrid persistence. Two types of genetic load were analyzed in this study: random/linkage-derived genetic load, and directly incorporated genetic load using a transgenic mitigation (TM strategy. In order to measure the effects of random genetic load, hybrid productivity (seed yield and biomass was correlated with crop- and weed-specific AFLP genomic markers. This portion of the study was designed to answer whether or not weed × transgenic crop hybrids possessing more crop genes were less competitive than hybrids containing fewer crop genes. The effects of directly incorporated genetic load (TM were analyzed through transgene persistence data. TM strategies are proposed to decrease transgene persistence if gene flow and subsequent transgene introgression to a wild host were to occur. Results In the absence of interspecific competition, transgenic weed × crop hybrids benefited from having more crop-specific alleles. There was a positive correlation between performance and number of B. napus crop-specific AFLP markers [seed yield vs. marker number (r = 0.54, P = 0.0003 and vegetative dry biomass vs. marker number (r = 0.44, P = 0.005]. However under interspecific competition with wheat or more weed-like conditions (i.e. representing a situation where hybrid plants emerge as volunteer weeds in subsequent cropping systems, there was a positive correlation between the number of B. rapa weed-specific AFLP markers and seed yield (r = 0.70, P = 0.0001, although no such correlation was detected for vegetative biomass. When genetic load was directly incorporated into the hybrid genome, by inserting a

  2. Uptake, transport and distribution of molybdenum in two oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) cultivars under different nitrate/ammonium ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shi-Yu; Sun, Xue-Cheng; Hu, Cheng-Xiao; Tan, Qi-Ling; Zhao, Xiao-Hu

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the effects of different nitrate sources on the uptake, transport, and distribution of molybdenum (Mo) between two oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) cultivars, L0917 and ZS11. A hydroponic culture experiment was conducted with four nitrate/ammonium (NO3-:NH4+) ratios (14:1, 9:6, 7.5:7.5, and 1:14) at a constant nitrogen concentration of 15 mmol/L. We examined Mo concentrations in roots, shoots, xylem and phloem sap, and subcellular fractions of leaves to contrast Mo uptake, transport, and subcellular distribution between ZS11 and L0917. Both the cultivars showed maximum biomass and Mo accumulation at the 7.5:7.5 ratio of NO3-:NH4+ while those were decreased by the 14:1 and 1:14 treatments. However, the percentages of root Mo (14.8% and 15.0% for L0917 and ZS11, respectively) were low under the 7.5:7.5 treatment, suggesting that the equal NO3-:NH4+ ratio promoted Mo transportation from root to shoot. The xylem sap Mo concentration and phloem sap Mo accumulation of L0917 were lower than those of ZS11 under the 1:14 treatment, which suggests that higher NO3-:NH4+ ratio was more beneficial for L0917. On the contrary, a lower NO3-:NH4+ ratio was more beneficial for ZS11 to transport and remobilize Mo. Furthermore, the Mo concentrations of both the cultivars' leaf organelles were increased but the Mo accumulations of the cell wall and soluble fraction were reduced significantly under the 14:1 treatment, meaning that more Mo was accumulated in organelles under the highest NO3-:NH4+ ratio. This investigation demonstrated that the capacities of Mo absorption, transportation and subcellular distribution play an important role in genotype-dependent differences in Mo accumulation under low or high NO3-:NH4+ ratio conditions.

  3. Oilseed rape (Brassica napus) as a resource for farmland insect pollinators: quantifying floral traits in conventional varieties and breeding systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Jonathan M; Cook, Samantha M; Wright, Geraldine A; Osborne, Juliet L; Clark, Suzanne J; Swain, Jennifer L; Haughton, Alison J

    2017-08-01

    Oilseed rape (OSR; Brassica napus L.) is a major crop in temperate regions and provides an important source of nutrition to many of the yield-enhancing insect flower visitors that consume floral nectar. The manipulation of mechanisms that control various crop plant traits for the benefit of pollinators has been suggested in the bid to increase food security, but little is known about inherent floral trait expression in contemporary OSR varieties or the breeding systems used in OSR breeding programmes. We studied a range of floral traits in glasshouse-grown, certified conventional varieties of winter OSR to test for variation among and within breeding systems. We measured 24-h nectar secretion rate, amount, concentration and ratio of nectar sugars per flower, and sizes and number of flowers produced per plant from 24 varieties of OSR representing open-pollinated (OP), genic male sterility (GMS) hybrid and cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) hybrid breeding systems. Sugar concentration was consistent among and within the breeding systems; however, GMS hybrids produced more nectar and more sugar per flower than CMS hybrid or OP varieties. With the exception of ratio of fructose/glucose in OP varieties, we found that nectar traits were consistent within all the breeding systems. When scaled, GMS hybrids produced 1.73 times more nectar resource per plant than OP varieties. Nectar production and amount of nectar sugar in OSR plants were independent of number and size of flowers. Our data show that floral traits of glasshouse-grown OSR differed among breeding systems, suggesting that manipulation and enhancement of nectar rewards for insect flower visitors, including pollinators, could be included in future OSR breeding programmes.

  4. Analysis of yield and plant traits of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L. cultivated in temperate region in light of the possibilities of sowing in arid areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Zając

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work is a review of selected literature on the species of Brassica with the greatest economic significance. Oilseed rape (Brassica napus ssp. oleifera currently ranks third worldwide among oilseed crops used for oil production and is the most important in the temperate zone. The manifold uses of rape include not only human consumption of oil, but also the use of post-extraction meal to feed livestock as well as industrial applications as a source of bioenergy or cellulose. The improvement in the economic position of rape among crop plants is also due to the doubling of its yield between 1970 and 2009; the average annual increase in seed yield worldwide was 27 kg ha−1 yr−1. The yield level in Europe exceeds the average yields achieved in the world, particularly in Asia. Recently, the cultivation of oilseed rape was started on a relatively large acreage in Iran where the yield amounted 2.1 t ha−1, exceeding the yields of China and India. In Poland, the acreage of oilseed rape cultivation between 1965 and 2013 increased 3–4 times, and during this period the annual increase in seed yield was 29 kg ha−1 yr−1. Under the field conditions of the temperate climate zone, winter oilseed rape yield is mainly determined by agro-climatic conditions during the growing period, the level of nitrogen fertilization, and the production potential of varieties, which is currently highest in hybrids. There is a noticeable tendency of hybrids towards formation of more siliques by individual oilseed plants. Different production categories of plants appear in a rape crop. Semi-dwarf varieties of winter rapeseed are distinguished by greater silique density, particularly on the main shoot. Moreover, these hybrids are characterized by faster growth of the root system, which enables them to take up nitrogen from the soil more efficiently.

  5. Genotypic Variation in Nitrogen Utilization Efficiency of Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus) Under Contrasting N Supply in Pot and Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Huiying; Yang, Rui; Li, Yajun; Ma, Aisheng; Cao, Lanqin; Wu, Xiaoming; Chen, Biyun; Tian, Hui; Gao, Yajun

    2017-01-01

    Oilseed rape (Brassica napus) characteristically has high N uptake efficiency and low N utilization efficiency (NUtE, seed yield/shoot N accumulation). Determining the NUtE phenotype of various genotypes in different growth conditions is a way of finding target traits to improve oilseed rape NUtE. The aim of this study was to compare oilseed rape genotypes grown on contrasting N supply rates in pot and field experiments to investigate the genotypic variations of NUtE and to identify indicators of N efficient genotypes. For 50 oilseed rape genotypes, NUtE, dry matter and N partitioning, morphological characteristics, and the yield components were investigated under high and low N supplies in a greenhouse pot experiment and a field trial. Although the genotype rankings of NUtE were different between the pot experiment and the field trial, some genotypes performed consistently in both two environments. N-responder, N-nonresponder, N-efficient and N-inefficient genotypes were identified from these genotypes with consistent NUtE. The correlations between the pot experiment and the field trial in NUtE were only 0.34 at high N supplies and no significant correlations were found at low N supplies. However, Pearson coefficient correlation (r) and principal component analysis showed NUtE had similar genetic correlations with other traits across the pot and field experiment. Among the yield components, only seeds per silique showed strong and positive correlations with NUtE under varying N supply in both experiments (r = 0.47**; 0.49**; 0.47**; 0.54**). At high and low N supply, NUtE was positively correlated with seed yield (r = 0.45**; 0.53**; 0.39**; 0.87**), nitrogen harvest index (NHI, r = 0.68**; 0.82**; 0.99**; 0.89**), and harvest index (HI, r = 0.79**; 0.83**; 0.90**; 0.78**) and negatively correlated with biomass distribution to stem and leaf (r = −0.34**; −0.45**; −0.37**; 0.62**), all aboveground plant section N concentration (r from −0.30* to −0

  6. Genotypic Variation in Nitrogen Utilization Efficiency of Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus Under Contrasting N Supply in Pot and Field Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiying He

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Oilseed rape (Brassica napus characteristically has high N uptake efficiency and low N utilization efficiency (NUtE, seed yield/shoot N accumulation. Determining the NUtE phenotype of various genotypes in different growth conditions is a way of finding target traits to improve oilseed rape NUtE. The aim of this study was to compare oilseed rape genotypes grown on contrasting N supply rates in pot and field experiments to investigate the genotypic variations of NUtE and to identify indicators of N efficient genotypes. For 50 oilseed rape genotypes, NUtE, dry matter and N partitioning, morphological characteristics, and the yield components were investigated under high and low N supplies in a greenhouse pot experiment and a field trial. Although the genotype rankings of NUtE were different between the pot experiment and the field trial, some genotypes performed consistently in both two environments. N-responder, N-nonresponder, N-efficient and N-inefficient genotypes were identified from these genotypes with consistent NUtE. The correlations between the pot experiment and the field trial in NUtE were only 0.34 at high N supplies and no significant correlations were found at low N supplies. However, Pearson coefficient correlation (r and principal component analysis showed NUtE had similar genetic correlations with other traits across the pot and field experiment. Among the yield components, only seeds per silique showed strong and positive correlations with NUtE under varying N supply in both experiments (r = 0.47**; 0.49**; 0.47**; 0.54**. At high and low N supply, NUtE was positively correlated with seed yield (r = 0.45**; 0.53**; 0.39**; 0.87**, nitrogen harvest index (NHI, r = 0.68**; 0.82**; 0.99**; 0.89**, and harvest index (HI, r = 0.79**; 0.83**; 0.90**; 0.78** and negatively correlated with biomass distribution to stem and leaf (r = −0.34**; −0.45**; −0.37**; 0.62**, all aboveground plant section N concentration (r from −0.30* to

  7. Introgression between oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) and its weedy relative B. rapa L. in a natural population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L.B.; Siegismund, Hans Redlef; Jørgensen, R.B.

    2001-01-01

    .napus-specific markers. We compared thenumber of markers in the plants from the weedy population with thenumbers in controlled backcross generations (BC1 andBC2). The marker distribution in the weedy populationresembled the distribution in the second backcross generation mostclosely. Together with the cultivation......We investigated introgression in a mixed weedy population ofoilseed rape (Brassica napus) and itsrelative B. rapa usingspecies-specific AFLP-markers. The population wassituated in a field relayed from conventional to organic cultivation11 years ago. One-hundred-and-twoB. napus orB. rapa......-like plantswere collected in a 3 m2 plot. Of these, onewas a first generation hybrid (F1) and nearlyhalf (44 plants) were introgressed, having bothB. napus andB. rapa specific markers.The remaining plants apparently corresponded to pure species, with 50having only B. rapa-and seven having only B...

  8. Enhanced Cd extraction of oilseed rape (Brassica napus) by plant growth-promoting bacteria isolated from Cd hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Fengshan; Meng, Qian; Luo, Sha; Shen, Jing; Chen, Bao; Khan, Kiran Yasmin; Japenga, Jan; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Yang, Xiaoe; Feng, Ying

    2017-03-04

    Four plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) were used as study materials, among them two heavy metal-tolerant rhizosphere strains SrN1 (Arthrobacter sp.) and SrN9 (Bacillus altitudinis) were isolated from rhizosphere soil, while two endophytic strains SaN1 (Bacillus megaterium) and SaMR12 (Sphingomonas) were identified from roots of the cadmium (Cd)/zinc (Zn) hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance. A pot experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of these PGPB on plant growth and Cd accumulation of oilseed rape (Brassica napus) plants grown on aged Cd-spiked soil. The results showed that the four PGPB significantly boosted oilseed rape shoot biomass production, improved soil and plant analyzer development (SPAD) value, enhanced Cd uptake of plant and Cd translocation to the leaves. By fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and green fluorescent protein (GFP), we demonstrated the studied S. alfredii endophytic bacterium SaMR12 were able to colonize successfully in the B. napus roots. However, all four PGPB could increase seed Cd accumulation. Due to its potential to enhance Cd uptake by the plant and to restrict Cd accumulation in the seeds, SaMR12 was selected as the most promising microbial partner of B. napus when setting up a plant-microbe fortified remediation system.

  9. Haplotype hitchhiking promotes trait coselection in Brassica napus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Qian, Lunwen; Qian, Wei; Snowdon, Rod J

    2016-01-01

    .... We performed genome‐wide analysis of haplotypes associated with the important physiological and agronomic traits leaf chlorophyll and seed glucosinolate content, respectively, in the major oilseed crop species Brassica napus...

  10. Coat protein of Turnip mosaic virus in oilseed rape (Brassica napus)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mohammad

    Three host species, Chenopodium quinoa, Chenopodium amaranticolor and Brassica rapa were used in the inoculations, the first two hosts for biological purification and the last one for virus preservation. One of the infected sample from Govareshk of. Mashhad (IRN GSK) was ground in 100 mM potassium phosphate buffer ...

  11. Seed Vigor and Field Performance of Winter Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L.) Cultivars

    OpenAIRE

    GHASSEMI-GOLEZANI, Kazem; Javad BAKHSHY; Yaeghoob RAEY; Ayda HOSSAINZADEH-MAHOOTCHY

    2010-01-01

    The effect of seed vigor on field performance of two oilseed rape cultivars (Licord and Okapi) was investigated in 2008 at the Research Farm of the University Tabriz, Iran. The experiment was arranged as factorial based on RCB design with three replications. A sub-sample of seeds of each cultivar was kept as control. The other two sub-samples of each cultivar with about 15% moisture content were artificially deteriorated at 40C for 9 and 12 days (Licord) and 7 and 10 days (Okapi). Cons...

  12. Genetic and Epigenetic Changes in Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L.) Extracted from Intergeneric Allopolyploid and Additions with Orychophragmus

    OpenAIRE

    Gautam, Mayank; Dang, Yanwei; Ge, Xianhong; Shao, Yujiao; Li, Zaiyun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Allopolyploidization with the merger of the genomes from different species has been shown to be associated with genetic and epigenetic changes. But the maintenance of such alterations related to one parental species after the genome is extracted from the allopolyploid remains to be detected. In this study, the genome of Brassica napus L. (2n=38, genomes AACC) was extracted from its intergeneric allohexaploid (2n=62, genomes AACCOO) with another crucifer Orychophragmus violaceus (2n=2...

  13. Evaluation of nine genotypes of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) for larval infestation and performance of rape stem weevil (Ceutorhynchus napi Gyll.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Heike L; Brandes, Haiko; Ulber, Bernd; Becker, Heiko C; Vidal, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The rape stem weevil, Ceutorhynchus napi Gyll., is a serious pest of winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) crops in Europe causing severe yield loss. In currently used oilseed rape cultivars no resistance to C. napi has been identified. Resynthesized lines of B. napus have potential to broaden the genetic variability and may improve resistance to insect pests. In this study, the susceptibility to C. napi of three cultivars, one breeding line and five resynthesized lines of oilseed rape was compared in a semi-field plot experiment under multi-choice conditions. Plant acceptance for oviposition was estimated by counting the number of C. napi larvae in stems. The larval instar index and the dry body mass were assessed as indicators of larval performance. The extent of larval feeding within stems was determined by the stem injury coefficient. Morphological stem traits and stem contents of glucosinolates were assessed as potential mediators of resistance. The resynthesized line S30 had significantly fewer larvae than the cultivars Express617 and Visby and the resynthesized lines L122 and L16. The low level of larval infestation in S30 was associated with a low larval instar and stem injury index. Low numbers of larvae were not correlated with the length or diameter of stems, and the level of stem glucosinolates. As indicated by the low larval infestation and slow larval development the resistance of S30 to C. napi is based on both antixenotic and antibiotic properties of the genotypes. The resynthesized line S30 should therefore be introduced into B. napus breeding programs to enhance resistance against C. napi.

  14. Evaluation of nine genotypes of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L. for larval infestation and performance of rape stem weevil (Ceutorhynchus napi Gyll..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike L Schaefer

    Full Text Available The rape stem weevil, Ceutorhynchus napi Gyll., is a serious pest of winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L. crops in Europe causing severe yield loss. In currently used oilseed rape cultivars no resistance to C. napi has been identified. Resynthesized lines of B. napus have potential to broaden the genetic variability and may improve resistance to insect pests. In this study, the susceptibility to C. napi of three cultivars, one breeding line and five resynthesized lines of oilseed rape was compared in a semi-field plot experiment under multi-choice conditions. Plant acceptance for oviposition was estimated by counting the number of C. napi larvae in stems. The larval instar index and the dry body mass were assessed as indicators of larval performance. The extent of larval feeding within stems was determined by the stem injury coefficient. Morphological stem traits and stem contents of glucosinolates were assessed as potential mediators of resistance. The resynthesized line S30 had significantly fewer larvae than the cultivars Express617 and Visby and the resynthesized lines L122 and L16. The low level of larval infestation in S30 was associated with a low larval instar and stem injury index. Low numbers of larvae were not correlated with the length or diameter of stems, and the level of stem glucosinolates. As indicated by the low larval infestation and slow larval development the resistance of S30 to C. napi is based on both antixenotic and antibiotic properties of the genotypes. The resynthesized line S30 should therefore be introduced into B. napus breeding programs to enhance resistance against C. napi.

  15. Crop Establishment Practices Are a Driver of the Plant Microbiota in Winter Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Ridhdhi; Dowling, David N.; Forristal, Patrick D.; Spink, John; Cotter, Paul D.; Bulgarelli, Davide; Germaine, Kieran J.

    2017-01-01

    Gaining a greater understanding of the plant microbiota and its interactions with its host plant heralds a new era of scientific discovery in agriculture. Different agricultural management practices influence soil microbial populations by changing a soil’s physical, chemical and biological properties. However, the impact of these practices on the microbiota associated with economically important crops such as oilseed rape, are still understudied. In this work we investigated the impact of two contrasting crop establishment practices, conventional (plow based) and conservation (strip–tillage) systems, on the microbiota inhabiting different plant microhabitats, namely rhizosphere, root and shoot, of winter oilseed rape under Irish agronomic conditions. Illumina 16S rRNA gene sequence profiling showed that the plant associated microhabitats (root and shoot), are dominated by members of the bacterial phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The root and shoot associated bacterial communities displayed markedly distinct profiles as a result of tillage practices. We observed a very limited ‘rhizosphere effect’ in the root zone of WOSR, i.e., there was little or no increase in bacterial community richness and abundance in the WOSR rhizosphere compared to the bulk soil. The two tillage systems investigated did not appear to lead to any major long term differences on the bulk soil or rhizosphere bacterial communities. Our data suggests that the WOSR root and shoot microbiota can be impacted by management practices and is an important mechanism that could allow us to understand how plants respond to different management practices and environments. PMID:28848510

  16. Crop Establishment Practices Are a Driver of the Plant Microbiota in Winter Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridhdhi Rathore

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Gaining a greater understanding of the plant microbiota and its interactions with its host plant heralds a new era of scientific discovery in agriculture. Different agricultural management practices influence soil microbial populations by changing a soil’s physical, chemical and biological properties. However, the impact of these practices on the microbiota associated with economically important crops such as oilseed rape, are still understudied. In this work we investigated the impact of two contrasting crop establishment practices, conventional (plow based and conservation (strip–tillage systems, on the microbiota inhabiting different plant microhabitats, namely rhizosphere, root and shoot, of winter oilseed rape under Irish agronomic conditions. Illumina 16S rRNA gene sequence profiling showed that the plant associated microhabitats (root and shoot, are dominated by members of the bacterial phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The root and shoot associated bacterial communities displayed markedly distinct profiles as a result of tillage practices. We observed a very limited ‘rhizosphere effect’ in the root zone of WOSR, i.e., there was little or no increase in bacterial community richness and abundance in the WOSR rhizosphere compared to the bulk soil. The two tillage systems investigated did not appear to lead to any major long term differences on the bulk soil or rhizosphere bacterial communities. Our data suggests that the WOSR root and shoot microbiota can be impacted by management practices and is an important mechanism that could allow us to understand how plants respond to different management practices and environments.

  17. The presence of turnip yellows virus in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L. in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloševic Dragana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 86 oilseed rape samples from six crops in different localities were collected during 2014 and analyzed for the presence of Turnip yellows virus (TuYV, Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV and Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV using commercial double-antibody sandwich (DAS-ELISA kits. TuYV was serologically detected in 60 collected samples (69.77%, and none of the samples tested were positive for CaMV and TuMV. Six selected TuYV isolates were successfully transmitted by Myzus persicae to three test plants, confirming the infectious nature of the disease. In the selected ELISA-positive samples, the presence of TuYV was further confirmed by RT-PCR and sequencing. A comparison of the obtained sequence with those available in GenBank confirmed the presence of TuYV in oilseed rape samples. An analysis of P0 gene sequence data for a subset of these isolates showed they clustered with the known TuYV and were distinct from Beet western yellows virus (BWYV isolates.

  18. Genetic variants associated with the root system architecture of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) under contrasting phosphate supply

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaohua; Chen, Yanling; Thomas, Catherine L.; Ding, Guangda; Xu, Ping; Shi, Dexu; Grandke, Fabian; Jin, Kemo; Cai, Hongmei; Xu, Fangsen; Yi, Bin; Broadley, Martin R.; Shi, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Breeding crops with ideal root system architecture for efficient absorption of phosphorus is an important strategy to reduce the use of phosphate fertilizers. To investigate genetic variants leading to changes in root system architecture, 405 oilseed rape cultivars were genotyped with a 60K Brassica Infinium SNP array in low and high P environments. A total of 285 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were associated with root system architecture traits at varying phosphorus levels. Nine single-nuc...

  19. Genetic and Epigenetic Changes in Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L.) Extracted from Intergeneric Allopolyploid and Additions with Orychophragmus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Mayank; Dang, Yanwei; Ge, Xianhong; Shao, Yujiao; Li, Zaiyun

    2016-01-01

    Allopolyploidization with the merger of the genomes from different species has been shown to be associated with genetic and epigenetic changes. But the maintenance of such alterations related to one parental species after the genome is extracted from the allopolyploid remains to be detected. In this study, the genome of Brassica napus L. (2n = 38, genomes AACC) was extracted from its intergeneric allohexaploid (2n = 62, genomes AACCOO) with another crucifer Orychophragmus violaceus (2n = 24, genome OO), by backcrossing and development of alien addition lines. B. napus-type plants identified in the self-pollinated progenies of nine monosomic additions were analyzed by the methods of amplified fragment length polymorphism, sequence-specific amplified polymorphism, and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism. They showed modifications to certain extents in genomic components (loss and gain of DNA segments and transposons, introgression of alien DNA segments) and DNA methylation, compared with B. napus donor. The significant differences in the changes between the B. napus types extracted from these additions likely resulted from the different effects of individual alien chromosomes. Particularly, the additions which harbored the O. violaceus chromosome carrying dominant rRNA genes over those of B. napus tended to result in the development of plants which showed fewer changes, suggesting a role of the expression levels of alien rRNA genes in genomic stability. These results provided new cues for the genetic alterations in one parental genome that are maintained even after the genome becomes independent.

  20. Genetic and epigenetic changes in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L. extracted from intergeneric allopolyploid and additions with Orychophragmus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank eGautam

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Allopolyploidization with the merger of the genomes from different species has been shown to be associated with genetic and epigenetic changes. But the maintenance of such alterations related to one parental species after the genome is extracted from the allopolyploid remains to be detected. In this study, the genome of Brassica napus L. (2n=38, genomes AACC was extracted from its intergeneric allohexaploid (2n=62, genomes AACCOO with another crucifer Orychophragmus violaceus (2n=24, genome OO, by backcrossing and development of alien addition lines. B. napus-type plants identified in the self-pollinated progenies of nine monosomic additions were analyzed by the methods of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP, sequence-specific amplified polymorphism (SSAP, and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP. They showed modifications to certain extents in genomic components (loss and gain of DNA segments and transposons, introgression of alien DNA segments and DNA methylation, compared with B. napus donor. The significant differences in the changes between the B. napus types extracted from these additions likely resulted from the different effects of individual alien chromosomes. Particularly, the additions which harbored the O. violaceus chromosome carrying dominant rRNA genes over those of B. napus tended to result in the development of plants which showed fewer changes, suggesting a role of the expression levels of alien rRNA genes in genomic stability. These results provided new cues for the genetic alterations in one parental genome that are maintained even after the genome becomes independent.

  1. Evaluating agroclimatic constraints and yield gaps for winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) - A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi; Lu, Jianwei; Cong, Rihuan; Ren, Tao; Li, Xiaokun

    2017-08-10

    Evaluating the effects of agroclimatic constraints on winter oilseed rape (WOSR) yield can facilitate the development of agricultural mitigation and adaptation strategies. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the WOSR yield and agroclimatic factors using the yield data collected from Agricultural Yearbook and field experimental sites, and the climate dataset from the meteorological stations in Hubei province, China. Five agroclimatic indicators during WOSR growth, such as ≥0 °C accumulated temperature (AT-0), overwintering days (OWD), precipitation (P), precipitation at an earlier stage (EP) and sunshine hours (S), were extracted from twelve agroclimatic indices. The attainable yield for the five yield-limiting factors ranged from 2638 kg ha(-1) (EP) to 3089 kg ha(-1) (AT-0). Farmers (Y farm ) and local agronomists (Y exp ) have achieved 63% and 86% of the attainable yield (Y att ), respectively. The contribution of optimum fertilization to narrow the yield gap (NY exp ) was 52% for the factor P, which was remarkably lower than the mean value (63%). Overall, the precipitation was the crucial yield-limiting agroclimatic factor, and restricted the effect of optimizing fertilization. The integrated data suggest that agricultural strategies of mitigation and adaptation to climatic variability based on different agroclimatic factors are essential for improving the crop yield.

  2. Does pea lectin expressed transgenically in oilseed rape (Brassica napus) influence honey bee (Apis mellifera) larvae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrman, Anna

    2007-01-01

    The European honey bee (Apis mellifera) is important both for pollination and for honey production. Pollen is the major protein source for bees, which exposes them directly to changes in pollen quality e.g. through genetic engineering. In order to create a worst case scenario regarding pea lectin (PSL) expressed transgenically in oilseed rape anthers and pollen, the maximum amount of dried pollen that could be mixed in an artificial diet without negatively affecting larval performance (1.5% w/w) was fed to bee larvae. Pollen from two transgenic plant lines expressing PSL up to 1.2% of total soluble protein and pollen from one non-transgenic line was added to the same diet and used as a pollen control. When these three pollen diets and the control diet (without added pollen) were compared, no negative effect from the pollen of the transgenic plants could be detected on larval mortality, weight, or development time. An increased weight and a reduced developmental time were recorded for larvae on all diets containing pollen when compared to the diet without pollen.

  3. Senescence-specific alteration of hydrogen peroxide levels in Arabidopsis thaliana and oilseed rape spring variety Brassica napus L. cv. Mozart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieker, Stefan; Riester, Lena; Stahl, Mark; Franzaring, Jürgen; Zentgraf, Ulrike

    2012-08-01

    In order to analyze the signaling function of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) production in senescence in more detail, we manipulated intracellular H(2)O(2) levels in Arabidopsis thaliala (L.) Heynh by using the hydrogen-peroxide-sensitive part of the Escherichia coli transcription regulator OxyR, which was directed to the cytoplasm as well as into the peroxisomes. H(2)O(2) levels were lowered and senescence was delayed in both transgenic lines, but OxyR was found to be more effective in the cytoplasm. To transfer this knowledge to crop plants, we analyzed oilseed rape plants Brassica napus L. cv. Mozart for H(2)O(2) and its scavenging enzymes catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) during leaf and plant development. H(2)O(2) levels were found to increase during bolting and flowering time, but no increase could be observed in the very late stages of senescence. With increasing H(2)O(2) levels, CAT and APX activities declined, so it is likely that similar mechanisms are used in oilseed rape and Arabidopsis to control H(2)O(2) levels. Under elevated CO(2) conditions, oilseed rape senescence was accelerated and coincided with an earlier increase in H(2)O(2) levels, indicating that H(2)O(2) may be one of the signals to inducing senescence in a broader range of Brassicaceae. © 2012 Institute of Botany, the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  4. Genome-wide analysis and expression profiling of the SUC and SWEET gene families of sucrose transporters in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIAN Hongju

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sucrose is the principal transported product of photosynthesis from source leaves to sink organs. SUTs/SUCs (sucrose transporters or sucrose carriers and SWEETs (Sugars Will Eventually be Exported Transporters play significant central roles in phloem loading and unloading. SUTs/SUCs and SWEETs are key players in sucrose translocation and are associated with crop yields. The SUT/SUC and SWEET genes have been characterized in several plant species, but a comprehensive analysis of these two gene families in oilseed rape has not yet been reported. In our study, 22 and 68 members of the SUT/SUCs and SWEET gene families, respectively, were identified in the oilseed rape (Brassica napus genome through homology searches. An analysis of the chromosomal distribution, phylogenetic relationships, gene structures, motifs and the cis-acting regulatory elements in the promoters of BnSUC and BnSWEET genes were analysed. Furthermore, we examined the expression of the 18 BnSUC and 16 BnSWEET genes in different tissues of ‘ZS11’ and the expression of 9 BnSUC and 7 BnSWEET genes in ‘ZS11’ under various conditions, including biotic stress (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, abiotic stresses (drought, salt and heat, and hormone treatments (abscisic acid, auxin, cytokinin, brassinolide, gibberellin and salicylic acid. In conclusion, our study provides the first comprehensive analysis of the oilseed rape SUC and SWEET gene families. Information regarding the phylogenetic relationships, gene structure and expression profiles of the SUC and SWEET genes in the different tissues of oilseed rape helps to identify candidates with potential roles in specific developmental processes. Our study advances our understanding of the important roles of sucrose transport in oilseed rape.

  5. Colocalization of a partially dominant gene for yellow seed colour with a major QTL influencing acid detergent fibre (ADF) content in different crosses of oilseed rape (Brassica napus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badani, Ana Gloria; Snowdon, Rod J; Wittkop, Benjamin; Lipsa, Florin D; Baetzel, Roland; Horn, Renate; De Haro, Antonio; Font, Rafael; Lühs, Wilfred; Friedt, Wolfgang

    2006-12-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to yellow seed colour and acid detergent fibre (ADF) were localized and compared in 3 mapping populations developed from 2 crosses (designated 'YE1' and 'YE2') between 2 distinct sources of true-breeding yellow-seeded oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and 2 different black-seeded genotypes. A clear correlation was observed between seed colour and ADF content in both crosses. In all 3 populations, a major QTL, with a large effect on both seed colour and ADF in multiple environments, was detected at the same position on chromosome N18. In YE1, a second minor QTL, with a small effect on seed colour but not on ADF content, was localized on chromosome N1. In YE2, no QTL was observed on N1; however, 2 minor seed-colour loci were localized to N15 and N5. A second major QTL for ADF was localized in YE1 on N13; in YE2, no other QTLs for ADF were detected. Combined QTL and segregation data for seed colour and ADF content in the different populations suggest that a partially dominant B. napus gene for seed colour on N18 contributes to a reduction in fibre content in different yellow-seeded B. napus genotypes. The other QTLs that were identified appear to represent different genes in the 2 yellow-seeded rapeseed sources, which, in each case, affect only fibre content or seed colour, respectively. Potential candidate genes and implications for marker-assisted breeding of oilseed rape with reduced seed dietary fibre content are discussed.

  6. Identification and characterization of microRNAs in oilseed rape (Brassica napus) responsive to infection with the pathogenic fungus Verticillium longisporum using Brassica AA (Brassica rapa) and CC (Brassica oleracea) as reference genomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shen, Dan; Suhrkamp, Ina; Wang, Yu; Liu, Shenyi; Menkhaus, Jan; Verreet, Joseph‐Alexander; Fan, Longjiang; Cai, Daguang

    2014-01-01

    .... To identify oilseed rape mi RNA s, we deep‐sequenced two small RNA libraries made from V. longisporum infected/noninfected roots and employed Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea genomes as references for mi RNA prediction and characterization...

  7. Transcriptomic analysis of nitrogen starvation- and cultivar-specific leaf senescence in winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeslin-Findeklee, Fabian; Rizi, Vajiheh Safavi; Becker, Martin A; Parra-Londono, Sebastian; Arif, Muhammad; Balazadeh, Salma; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Kunze, Reinhard; Horst, Walter J

    2015-04-01

    High nitrogen (N) efficiency, characterized by high grain yield under N limitation, is an important agricultural trait in Brassica napus L. cultivars related to delayed senescence of older leaves during reproductive growth (a syndrome called stay-green). The aim of this study was thus to identify genes whose expression is specifically altered during N starvation-induced leaf senescence and that can be used as markers to distinguish cultivars at early stages of senescence prior to chlorophyll loss. To this end, the transcriptomes of leaves of two B. napus cultivars differing in stay-green characteristics and N efficiency were analyzed 4 days after the induction of senescence by either N starvation, leaf shading or detaching. In addition to N metabolism genes, N starvation mostly (and specifically) repressed genes related to photosynthesis, photorespiration and cell-wall structure, while genes related to mitochondrial electron transport and flavonoid biosynthesis were predominately up-regulated. A kinetic study over a period of 12 days with four B. napus cultivars differing in their stay-green characteristics confirmed the cultivar-specific regulation of six genes in agreement with their senescence behavior: the senescence regulator ANAC029, the anthocyanin synthesis-related genes ANS and DFR-like1, the ammonium transporter AMT1;4, the ureide transporter UPS5, and SPS1 involved in sucrose biosynthesis. The identified genes represent markers for the detection of cultivar-specific differences in N starvation-induced leaf senescence and can thus be employed as valuable tools in B. napus breeding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Redox regulation of a guard cell SNF1-related protein kinase in Brassica napus, an oilseed crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mengmeng; Zhang, Tong; Ji, Wei; Silva-Sanchez, Cecilia; Song, Wen-Yuan; Assmann, Sarah M; Harmon, Alice C; Chen, Sixue

    2017-07-17

    Kinase-mediated phosphorylation is a pivotal regulatory process in stomatal responses to stresses. Through a redox proteomics study, a sucrose non-fermenting 1-related protein kinase (SnRK2.4) was identified to be redox-regulated in Brassica napus guard cells upon abscisic acid treatment. There are six genes encoding SnRK2.4 paralogs in B. napus Here, we show that recombinant BnSnRK2.4-1C exhibited autophosphorylation activity and preferentially phosphorylated the N-terminal region of B. napus slow anion channel (BnSLAC1-NT) over generic substrates. The in vitro activity of BnSnRK2.4-1C requires the presence of manganese (Mn2+). Phosphorylation sites of autophosphorylated BnSnRK2.4-1C were mapped, including serine and threonine residues in the activation loop. In vitro BnSnRK2.4-1C autophosphorylation activity was inhibited by oxidants such as H2O2 and recovered by active thioredoxin isoforms, indicating redox regulation of BnSnRK2.4-1C. Thiol-specific isotope tagging followed by mass spectrometry analysis revealed specific cysteine residues responsive to oxidant treatments. The in vivo activity of BnSnRK2.4-1C is inhibited by 15 min of H2O2 treatment. Taken together, these data indicate that BnSnRK2.4-1C, an SnRK preferentially expressed in guard cells, is redox-regulated with potential roles in guard cell signal transduction. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  9. [Effects of simulated acid rain on oilseed rape (Brassica napus) physiological characteristics at flowering stage and yield].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chun-Xin; Zhou, Qin; Han, Liang-Liang; Zhang, Pei; Jiang, Hai-Dong

    2010-08-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of different acidity simulated acid rain on the physiological characteristics at flowering stage and yield of oilseed rape (B. napus cv. Qinyou 9). Comparing with the control (pH 6.0), weak acidity (pH = 4.0-5.0) simulated acid rain stimulated the rape growth to some extent, but had less effects on the plant biomass, leaf chlorophyll content, photosynthetic characteristics, and yield. With the further increase of acid rain acidity, the plant biomass, leaf chlorophyll content, photosynthetic rate, antioxidative enzyme activities, and non-enzyme antioxidant contents all decreased gradually, while the leaf malonyldialdehyde (MDA) content and relative conductivity increased significantly. As the results, the pod number per plant, seed number per pod, seed weight, and actual yield decreased. However, different yield components showed different sensitivity to simulated acid rain. With the increasing acidity of simulated acid rain, the pod number per plant and the seed number per pod decreased significantly, while the seed weight was less affected.

  10. Assessing quantitative resistance against Leptosphaeria maculans (phoma stem canker in Brassica napus (oilseed rape in young plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Ju Huang

    Full Text Available Quantitative resistance against Leptosphaeria maculans in Brassica napus is difficult to assess in young plants due to the long period of symptomless growth of the pathogen from the appearance of leaf lesions to the appearance of canker symptoms on the stem. By using doubled haploid (DH lines A30 (susceptible and C119 (with quantitative resistance, quantitative resistance against L. maculans was assessed in young plants in controlled environments at two stages: stage 1, growth of the pathogen along leaf veins/petioles towards the stem by leaf lamina inoculation; stage 2, growth in stem tissues to produce stem canker symptoms by leaf petiole inoculation. Two types of inoculum (ascospores; conidia and three assessment methods (extent of visible necrosis; symptomless pathogen growth visualised using the GFP reporter gene; amount of pathogen DNA quantified by PCR were used. In stage 1 assessments, significant differences were observed between lines A30 and C119 in area of leaf lesions, distance grown along veins/petioles assessed by visible necrosis or by viewing GFP and amount of L. maculans DNA in leaf petioles. In stage 2 assessments, significant differences were observed between lines A30 and C119 in severity of stem canker and amount of L. maculans DNA in stem tissues. GFP-labelled L. maculans spread more quickly from the stem cortex to the stem pith in A30 than in C119. Stem canker symptoms were produced more rapidly by using ascospore inoculum than by using conidial inoculum. These results suggest that quantitative resistance against L. maculans in B. napus can be assessed in young plants in controlled conditions. Development of methods to phenotype quantitative resistance against plant pathogens in young plants in controlled environments will help identification of stable quantitative resistance for control of crop diseases.

  11. Assessing quantitative resistance against Leptosphaeria maculans (phoma stem canker) in Brassica napus (oilseed rape) in young plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong-Ju; Qi, Aiming; King, Graham J; Fitt, Bruce D L

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative resistance against Leptosphaeria maculans in Brassica napus is difficult to assess in young plants due to the long period of symptomless growth of the pathogen from the appearance of leaf lesions to the appearance of canker symptoms on the stem. By using doubled haploid (DH) lines A30 (susceptible) and C119 (with quantitative resistance), quantitative resistance against L. maculans was assessed in young plants in controlled environments at two stages: stage 1, growth of the pathogen along leaf veins/petioles towards the stem by leaf lamina inoculation; stage 2, growth in stem tissues to produce stem canker symptoms by leaf petiole inoculation. Two types of inoculum (ascospores; conidia) and three assessment methods (extent of visible necrosis; symptomless pathogen growth visualised using the GFP reporter gene; amount of pathogen DNA quantified by PCR) were used. In stage 1 assessments, significant differences were observed between lines A30 and C119 in area of leaf lesions, distance grown along veins/petioles assessed by visible necrosis or by viewing GFP and amount of L. maculans DNA in leaf petioles. In stage 2 assessments, significant differences were observed between lines A30 and C119 in severity of stem canker and amount of L. maculans DNA in stem tissues. GFP-labelled L. maculans spread more quickly from the stem cortex to the stem pith in A30 than in C119. Stem canker symptoms were produced more rapidly by using ascospore inoculum than by using conidial inoculum. These results suggest that quantitative resistance against L. maculans in B. napus can be assessed in young plants in controlled conditions. Development of methods to phenotype quantitative resistance against plant pathogens in young plants in controlled environments will help identification of stable quantitative resistance for control of crop diseases.

  12. Removing the mustard oil bomb from seeds: transgenic ablation of myrosin cells in oilseed rape (Brassica napus) produces MINELESS seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgen, Birgit Hafeld; Thangstad, Ole Petter; Ahuja, Ishita; Rossiter, John Trevor; Bones, Atle Magnar

    2010-06-01

    Many plant phytochemicals constitute binary enzyme-glucoside systems and function in plant defence. In brassicas, the enzyme myrosinase is confined to specific myrosin cells that separate the enzyme from its substrate; the glucosinolates. The myrosinase-catalysed release of toxic and bioactive compounds such as isothiocyanates, upon activation or tissue damage, has been termed 'the mustard oil bomb' and characterized as a 'toxic mine' in plant defence. The removal of myrosin cells and the enzyme that triggers the release of phytochemicals have been investigated by genetically modifying Brassica napus plants to remove myrosinase-storing idioblasts. A construct with the seed myrosin cell-specific Myr1.Bn1 promoter was used to express a ribonuclease, barnase. Transgenic plants ectopically expressing barnase were embryo lethal. Co-expressing barnase under the control of the Myr1.Bn1 promoter with the barnase inhibitor, barstar, under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter enabled a selective and controlled death of myrosin cells without affecting plant viability. Ablation of myrosin cells was confirmed with light and electron microscopy, with immunohistological analysis and immunogold-electron microscopy analysis showing empty holes where myrosin cells normally are localized. Further evidence for a successful myrosin cell ablation comes from immunoblots showing absence of myrosinase and negligible myrosinase activity, and autolysis experiments showing negligible production of glucosinolate hydrolysis products. The plants where the myrosin defence cells have been ablated and named 'MINELESS plants'. The epithiospecifier protein profile and glucosinolate levels were changed in MINELESS plants, pointing to localization of myrosinases and a 35 kDa epithiospecifier protein in myrosin cells and a reduced turnover of glucosinolates in MINELESS plants.

  13. Small RNA changes in synthetic Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ying; Xiao, Meili; Yu, Huasheng; Mason, Annaliese S; Yin, Jiaming; Li, Jiana; Zhang, Dongqing; Fu, Donghui

    2016-09-01

    Small RNAs and microRNAs were found to vary extensively in synthetic Brassica napus and subsequent generations, accompanied by the activation of transposable elements in response to hybridization and polyploidization. Resynthesizing B. napus by hybridization and chromosome doubling provides an approach to create novel polyploids and increases the usable genetic variability in oilseed rape. Although many studies have shown that small RNAs (sRNAs) act as important factor during hybridization and polyploidization in plants, much less is known on how sRNAs change in synthetic B. napus, particularly in subsequent generations after formation. We performed high-throughput sequencing of sRNAs in S1-S4 generations of synthetic B. napus and in the homozygous B. oleracea and B. rapa parent lines. We found that the number of small RNAs (sRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) doubled in synthetic B. napus relative to the parents. The proportions of common sRNAs detected varied from the S1 to S4 generations, suggesting sRNAs are unstable in synthetic B. napus. The majority of miRNAs (67.2 %) were non-additively expressed in the synthesized Brassica allotetraploid, and 33.3 % of miRNAs were novel in the resynthesized B. napus. The percentage of miRNAs derived from transposable elements (TEs) also increased, indicating transposon activation and increased transposon-associated miRNA production in response to hybridization and polyploidization. The number of target genes for each miRNA in the synthesized Brassica allotetraploid was doubled relative to the parents, enhancing the complexity of gene expression regulation. The potential roles of miRNAs and their targets are discussed. Our data demonstrate generational changes in sRNAs and miRNAs in synthesized B. napus.

  14. Male fitness of oilseed rape (¤Brassica napus¤), weedy ¤B-rapa¤ and their F1 hybrids when pollinating ¤B-rapa¤ seeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pertl, M.; Hauser, T.P.; Damgaard, C.

    2002-01-01

    ) and their F(1) hybrids at different frequencies and densities. Paternity was determined by the presence of a transgene, morphology, and AFLP markers. In addition, observations of flower and pollen production, and published data on pollen fertilisation success, zygote survival, and seed germination, allowed us......The likelihood that two species hybridise and backcross may depend strongly on environmental conditions, and possibly on competitive interactions between parents and hybrids. We studied the paternity of seeds produced by weedy Brassica rapa growing in mixtures with oilseed rape (B. napus...... to estimate an expected paternity. The frequency and density of B. napus, B. rapa, and F(1) plants had a strong influence on flower, pollen, and seed production, and on the paternity of B. rapa seeds. Hybridisation and backcrossing mostly occurred at low densities and at high frequencies of B. napus and F(1...

  15. CRISPR-Cas9 Targeted Mutagenesis Leads to Simultaneous Modification of Different Homoeologous Gene Copies in Polyploid Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braatz, Janina; Harloff, Hans-Joachim; Mascher, Martin; Stein, Nils; Himmelbach, Axel; Jung, Christian

    2017-06-01

    In polyploid species, altering a trait by random mutagenesis is highly inefficient due to gene redundancy. We have stably transformed tetraploid oilseed rape (Brassica napus) with a CRISPR-Cas9 construct targeting two ALCATRAZ (ALC) homoeologs. ALC is involved in valve margin development and, thus, contributes to seed shattering from mature fruits. Knocking out ALC would increase shatter resistance to avoid seed loss during mechanical harvest. We obtained a transgenic T1 plant with four alc mutant alleles by the use of a single target sequence. All mutations were stably inherited to the T2 progeny. The T2 generation was devoid of any wild-type alleles, proving that the underlying T1 was a nonchimeric double heterozygote. T-DNA and ALC loci were not linked, as indicated by random segregation in the T2 generation. Hence, we could select double mutants lacking the T-DNA already in the first offspring generation. However, whole-genome sequencing data revealed at least five independent insertions of vector backbone sequences. We did not detect any off-target effects in two genome regions homologous to the target sequence. The simultaneous alteration of multiple homoeologs by CRISPR-Cas9 mutagenesis without any background mutations will offer new opportunities for using mutant genotypes in rapeseed breeding. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Study of Drought and Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR on Radiation Use Efficiency and Dry Matter Partitioning Into Pod in Different Cultivars of Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooya Arvin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Oilseed rape (Brassica napus L. is one of the valuable oilseed crops which has been attracting attention in recent years (Arvin et al., 2011. Several factors such as water shortage, low relative humidity, heat and salinity can make drought stress. Radiation use efficiency and yield components are the effective factors of yield formation in oilseed rape. Drought tolerance in oilseed rape depends on other factors except radiation use efficiency. Studies have indicated that plant growth promoting rhizobacterias (PGPRs has a direct effect on growth and they can cause resistance to the abiotic stress as well. Hence, considering the drought climate in Iran and the effects of PGPRs on increasing resistance to abiotic stress and relief of drought effects and the importance of the cultivation of oilseed rape in Iran, the present research was done with the goal of study of drought and some plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR on radiation use efficiency and dry matter partitioning into pod in different cultivars of oilseed rape. Materials and methods The current study was done on the basis of two simultaneous experiments (under stress and non-stress experiments during 2010- 2011 growing season at Agriculture and Natural Resources Research Station of Torogh, Mashhad is in East-North of Iran (36° N, 59° E, 1003 as.Two research sites (under stress and non-stress fields were beside each other. This region has a semi-arid climate (annual rainfall 286 mm. The experimental design was factorial based on randomized compeletly block design with three replications in each experiment. The first treatment was plant growth promoting rizobactria, including B0: no inoculation (control, B1:co-inoculation (Pseudomonas flourescens 169+P. putida 108, B2: inoculation with P. flourescens 169 and B3: inoculation with P. putida 108. Second treatment was cultivar, including Hayola401 and Hayola330 cultivars belong to Brassica napus, Parkland and Goldrush

  17. Differences between winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) cultivars in nitrogen starvation-induced leaf senescence are governed by leaf-inherent rather than root-derived signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeslin-Findeklee, Fabian; Becker, Martin A.; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas; Horst, Walter J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) efficiency of winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) line-cultivars (cvs.), defined as high grain yield under N limitation, has been primarily attributed to maintained N uptake during reproductive growth (N uptake efficiency) in combination with delayed senescence of the older leaves accompanied with maintained photosynthetic capacity (functional stay-green). However, it is not clear whether genotypic variation in N starvation-induced leaf senescence is due to leaf-inherent factors and/or governed by root-mediated signals. Therefore, the N-efficient and stay-green cvs. NPZ-1 and Apex were reciprocally grafted with the N-inefficient and early-senescing cvs. NPZ-2 and Capitol, respectively and grown in hydroponics. The senescence status of older leaves after 12 days of N starvation assessed by SPAD, photosynthesis and the expression of the senescence-specific cysteine protease gene SAG12-1 revealed that the stay-green phenotype of the cvs. NPZ-1 and Apex under N starvation was primarily under the control of leaf-inherent factors. The same four cultivars were submitted to N starvation for up to 12 days in a time-course experiment. The specific leaf contents of biologically active and inactive cytokinins (CKs) and the expression of genes involved in CK homeostasis revealed that under N starvation leaves of early-senescing cultivars were characterized by inactivation of biologically active CKs, whereas in stay-green cultivars synthesis, activation, binding of and response to biologically active CKs were favoured. These results suggest that the homeostasis of biologically active CKs was the predominant leaf-inherent factor for cultivar differences in N starvation-induced leaf senescence and thus N efficiency. PMID:25944925

  18. Differences between winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) cultivars in nitrogen starvation-induced leaf senescence are governed by leaf-inherent rather than root-derived signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeslin-Findeklee, Fabian; Becker, Martin A; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas; Horst, Walter J

    2015-07-01

    Nitrogen (N) efficiency of winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) line-cultivars (cvs.), defined as high grain yield under N limitation, has been primarily attributed to maintained N uptake during reproductive growth (N uptake efficiency) in combination with delayed senescence of the older leaves accompanied with maintained photosynthetic capacity (functional stay-green). However, it is not clear whether genotypic variation in N starvation-induced leaf senescence is due to leaf-inherent factors and/or governed by root-mediated signals. Therefore, the N-efficient and stay-green cvs. NPZ-1 and Apex were reciprocally grafted with the N-inefficient and early-senescing cvs. NPZ-2 and Capitol, respectively and grown in hydroponics. The senescence status of older leaves after 12 days of N starvation assessed by SPAD, photosynthesis and the expression of the senescence-specific cysteine protease gene SAG12-1 revealed that the stay-green phenotype of the cvs. NPZ-1 and Apex under N starvation was primarily under the control of leaf-inherent factors. The same four cultivars were submitted to N starvation for up to 12 days in a time-course experiment. The specific leaf contents of biologically active and inactive cytokinins (CKs) and the expression of genes involved in CK homeostasis revealed that under N starvation leaves of early-senescing cultivars were characterized by inactivation of biologically active CKs, whereas in stay-green cultivars synthesis, activation, binding of and response to biologically active CKs were favoured. These results suggest that the homeostasis of biologically active CKs was the predominant leaf-inherent factor for cultivar differences in N starvation-induced leaf senescence and thus N efficiency. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  19. Progressive introgression between ¤Brassica napus¤ (oilseed rape) and ¤B-rapa¤

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L.B.; Siegismund, H.R.; Bagger Jørgensen, Rikke

    2003-01-01

    that introgression can lead to both (1) exchange of chloroplast DNA between species producing B. rapa-like plants with B. napus chloroplasts and (2) incorporation of B. napus C-genome DNA into the B. rapa genome. Therefore, we question whether it can be regarded as containment to position transgenes...... population with the same AFLP-markers; AFLP data were supported by chromosome counting. We also analysed the offspring with a species-specific chloroplast marker and finally evaluated the reproductive system in selected maternal plants. Our results indicated a high outcrossing rate of the introgressed...

  20. Regulation of erucic acid accumulation in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) : effects of temperature and abscisic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilmer, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    Vegetable oils are an important commodity world-wide with an annual production of about 70 million tonnes. Oilseed rape is one of the four major crops, providing about 10% of the total production. Quality of vegetable oils is determined by the fatty acid composition of the triacylglycerols

  1. Adventitious presence of other varieties in oilseed rape (¤Brassica napus¤) from seed banks and certified seed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, T.; Hauser, Thure Pavlo; Bagger Jørgensen, Rikke

    2007-01-01

    in the soil seed-bank. This information was acquired through DNA analysis of volunteers collected in the field and seedlings derived from the soil seed-bank. DNA profiles of the volunteers and seedlings were obtained using Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) markers, and the profiles were compared with ISSR...... profiles from an assortment of 14 of the most commonly cultivated oilseed rape varieties from 1985 to 2004. This comparison was performed using the assignment program, AFLPOP. The age of the seed bank germinating to become volunteers was assumed from information on previously cultivated oilseed rape...... analysed and, from soil cores, their soil seed-bank was estimated to be 50-100 seeds m(-2). The ISSR analysis of the 14 reference varieties showed that three of the certified seed lots contained other varieties above the allowed threshold. Our findings are discussed in the context of the coexistence...

  2. Mid-infrared spectroscopy combined with chemometrics to detect Sclerotinia stem rot on oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chu; Feng, Xuping; Wang, Jian; Liu, Fei; He, Yong; Zhou, Weijun

    2017-01-01

    Detection of plant diseases in a fast and simple way is crucial for timely disease control. Conventionally, plant diseases are accurately identified by DNA, RNA or serology based methods which are time consuming, complex and expensive. Mid-infrared spectroscopy is a promising technique that simplifies the detection procedure for the disease. Mid-infrared spectroscopy was used to identify the spectral differences between healthy and infected oilseed rape leaves. Two different sample sets from two experiments were used to explore and validate the feasibility of using mid-infrared spectroscopy in detecting Sclerotinia stem rot (SSR) on oilseed rape leaves. The average mid-infrared spectra showed differences between healthy and infected leaves, and the differences varied among different sample sets. Optimal wavenumbers for the 2 sample sets selected by the second derivative spectra were similar, indicating the efficacy of selecting optimal wavenumbers. Chemometric methods were further used to quantitatively detect the oilseed rape leaves infected by SSR, including the partial least squares-discriminant analysis, support vector machine and extreme learning machine. The discriminant models using the full spectra and the optimal wavenumbers of the 2 sample sets were effective for classification accuracies over 80%. The discriminant results for the 2 sample sets varied due to variations in the samples. The use of two sample sets proved and validated the feasibility of using mid-infrared spectroscopy and chemometric methods for detecting SSR on oilseed rape leaves. The similarities among the selected optimal wavenumbers in different sample sets made it feasible to simplify the models and build practical models. Mid-infrared spectroscopy is a reliable and promising technique for SSR control. This study helps in developing practical application of using mid-infrared spectroscopy combined with chemometrics to detect plant disease.

  3. High-throughput phenotyping (HTP) identifies seedling root traits linked to variation in seed yield and nutrient capture in field-grown oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C L; Graham, N S; Hayden, R; Meacham, M C; Neugebauer, K; Nightingale, M; Dupuy, L X; Hammond, J P; White, P J; Broadley, M R

    2016-04-06

    Root traits can be selected for crop improvement. Techniques such as soil excavations can be used to screen root traits in the field, but are limited to genotypes that are well-adapted to field conditions. The aim of this study was to compare a low-cost, high-throughput root phenotyping (HTP) technique in a controlled environment with field performance, using oilseed rape (OSR;Brassica napus) varieties. Primary root length (PRL), lateral root length and lateral root density (LRD) were measured on 14-d-old seedlings of elite OSR varieties (n = 32) using a 'pouch and wick' HTP system (∼40 replicates). Six field experiments were conducted using the same varieties at two UK sites each year for 3 years. Plants were excavated at the 6- to 8-leaf stage for general vigour assessments of roots and shoots in all six experiments, and final seed yield was determined. Leaves were sampled for mineral composition from one of the field experiments. Seedling PRL in the HTP system correlated with seed yield in four out of six (r = 0·50, 0·50, 0·33, 0·49;P < 0·05) and with emergence in three out of five (r = 0·59, 0·22, 0·49;P < 0·05) field experiments. Seedling LRD correlated positively with leaf concentrations of some minerals, e.g. calcium (r = 0·46;P < 0·01) and zinc (r = 0·58;P < 0·001), but did not correlate with emergence, general early vigour or yield in the field. Associations between PRL and field performance are generally related to early vigour. These root traits might therefore be of limited additional selection value, given that vigour can be measured easily on shoots/canopies. In contrast, LRD cannot be assessed easily in the field and, if LRD can improve nutrient uptake, then it may be possible to use HTP systems to screen this trait in both elite and more genetically diverse, non-field-adapted OSR. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  4. Different myrosinase and idioblast distribution in Arabidopsis and Brassica napus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasson, Erik; Jørgensen, Lise Bolt; Höglund, Anna-Stina

    2001-01-01

    Arabidopsis, Brassica napus, Myrosinase, Myrosinase Binding Protein, Glucosinolates, Myrosin Cell, Immunocytochemistry......Arabidopsis, Brassica napus, Myrosinase, Myrosinase Binding Protein, Glucosinolates, Myrosin Cell, Immunocytochemistry...

  5. Hybridisation and introgression between Brassica napus and B. rapa in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijten, S.H.; Shidlo, N.S.; Meirmans, P.G.; de Jong, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    We used flow cytometry, chromosome counting and AFLP markers to investigate gene flow from the crop plant oilseed rape, Brassica napus (AACC) to wild B. rapa (AA) in the Netherlands. From 89 B. napus source populations investigated, all near cropping fields or at transhipment sites, only 19

  6. Characterization of Brassica napus Flavonol Synthase Involved in Flavonol Biosynthesis in Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Tien Thanh; Jeong, Chan Young; Nguyen, Hoai Nguyen; Lee, Dongho; Lee, Sang A; Kim, Ji Hye; Hong, Suk-Whan; Lee, Hojoung

    2015-09-09

    Recently, Brassica napus has become a very important crop for plant oil production. Flavonols, an uncolored flavonoid subclass, have a high antioxidative effect and are known to have antiproliferative, antiangiogenic, and neuropharmacological properties. In B. napus, some flavonoid structural genes have been identified, such as, BnF3H-1, BnCHS, and BnC4H-1. However, no studies on FLS genes in B. napus have been conducted. Thus, in this study, we cloned and characterized the function of BnFLS gene B. napus. By overexpression of the BnFLS gene, flavonol (kaempferol and quercetin) levels were recovered in the Arabidopsis atfls1-ko mutant. In addition, we found that the higher endogenous flavonol levels of BnFLS-ox in vitro shoots correlated with slightly higher ROS scavenging activities. Thus, our results indicate that the BnFLS gene encodes for a BnFLS enzyme that can be manipulated to specifically increase flavonol accumulation in oilseed plants and other species such as Arabidopsis.

  7. Brassica oleracea and B. napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Penny A C Hundleby Née; Irwin, Judith A

    2015-01-01

    With the accelerating advances in genetics and genomics research in Arabidopsis and Brassica, transformation technologies are now routinely being exploited to elucidate gene function as well as contributing to the development of novel enhanced crops. When a researcher's desired goal is simply to modify or introduce candidate genes into a Brassica, the availability of easy-to-follow protocols and knowledge of readily transformable genotypes becomes a valuable resource. In this chapter we outline a basic A. tumefaciens-mediated transformation method, using 4-day-old cotyledonary explants, that has been successfully applied to a range of different B. oleracea and B. napus genotypes. For demonstration purposes, we focus primarily on the diploid species B. oleracea using a model doubled haploid genotype, AG DH1012. After only 3-4 weeks on kanamycin selection the first transgenic shoots can be isolated. Transformation efficiencies are typically in the region of 15-25 % (based on 15-25 PCR-positive independent shoots from 100 inoculated explants). Most explants will produce multiple shoots (1-3+ per explant) and so the total number of transgenic shoots produced will exceed 15-25 per 100 explant experiment. The protocol is also applicable to B. napus and modifications specific to this species are highlighted accordingly. For researchers wishing to use their own plant genotype, tissue culture phenotypes that are conducive to efficient transformation are also highlighted within this chapter.

  8. Structural and functional comparative mapping between the Brassica A genomes in allotetraploid Brassica napus and diploid Brassica rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Congcong; Ramchiary, Nirala; Ma, Yongbiao; Jin, Mina; Feng, Ji; Li, Ruiyuan; Wang, Hao; Long, Yan; Choi, Su Ryun; Zhang, Chunyu; Cowling, Wallace A; Park, Beom Seok; Lim, Yong Pyo; Meng, Jinling

    2011-10-01

    Brassica napus (AACC genome) is an important oilseed crop that was formed by the fusion of the diploids B. rapa (AA) and B. oleracea (CC). The complete genomic sequence of the Brassica A genome will be available soon from the B. rapa genome sequencing project, but it is not clear how informative the A genome sequence in B. rapa (A(r)) will be for predicting the structure and function of the A subgenome in the allotetraploid Brassica species B. napus (A(n)). In this paper, we report the results of structural and functional comparative mapping between the A subgenomes of B. napus and B. rapa based on genetic maps that were anchored with bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs)-sequence of B. rapa. We identified segmental conservation that represented by syntenic blocks in over one third of the A genome; meanwhile, comparative mapping of quantitative trait loci for seed quality traits identified a dozen homologous regions with conserved function in the A genome of the two species. However, several genomic rearrangement events, such as inversions, intra- and inter-chromosomal translocations, were also observed, covering totally at least 5% of the A genome, between allotetraploid B. napus and diploid B. rapa. Based on these results, the A genomes of B. rapa and B. napus are mostly functionally conserved, but caution will be necessary in applying the full sequence data from B. rapa to the B. napus as a result of genomic rearrangements in the A genome between the two species.

  9. Computational analysis of storage synthesis in developing Brassica napus L. (oilseed rape) embryos: Flux variability analysis in relation to 13C-metabolic flux analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, J.; Schwender, J.

    2011-08-01

    Plant oils are an important renewable resource, and seed oil content is a key agronomical trait that is in part controlled by the metabolic processes within developing seeds. A large-scale model of cellular metabolism in developing embryos of Brassica napus (bna572) was used to predict biomass formation and to analyze metabolic steady states by flux variability analysis under different physiological conditions. Predicted flux patterns are highly correlated with results from prior 13C metabolic flux analysis of B. napus developing embryos. Minor differences from the experimental results arose because bna572 always selected only one sugar and one nitrogen source from the available alternatives, and failed to predict the use of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. Flux variability, indicative of alternative optimal solutions, revealed alternative pathways that can provide pyruvate and NADPH to plastidic fatty acid synthesis. The nutritional values of different medium substrates were compared based on the overall carbon conversion efficiency (CCE) for the biosynthesis of biomass. Although bna572 has a functional nitrogen assimilation pathway via glutamate synthase, the simulations predict an unexpected role of glycine decarboxylase operating in the direction of NH4+ assimilation. Analysis of the light-dependent improvement of carbon economy predicted two metabolic phases. At very low light levels small reductions in CO2 efflux can be attributed to enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase) and glycine decarboxylase. At higher light levels relevant to the 13C flux studies, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity is predicted to account fully for the light-dependent changes in carbon balance.

  10. Dynamic metabolic changes in seeds and seedlings of Brassica napus (oilseed rape) suppressing UGT84A9 reveal plasticity and molecular regulation of the phenylpropanoid pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettwer, Karina; Böttcher, Christoph; Frolov, Andrej; Mittasch, Juliane; Albert, Andreas; von Roepenack-Lahaye, Edda; Strack, Dieter; Milkowski, Carsten

    2016-04-01

    In Brassica napus, suppression of the key biosynthetic enzyme UDP-glucose:sinapic acid glucosyltransferase (UGT84A9) inhibits the biosynthesis of sinapine (sinapoylcholine), the major phenolic component of seeds. Based on the accumulation kinetics of a total of 158 compounds (110 secondary and 48 primary metabolites), we investigated how suppression of the major sink pathway of sinapic acid impacts the metabolome of developing seeds and seedlings. In UGT84A9-suppressing (UGT84A9i) lines massive alterations became evident in late stages of seed development affecting the accumulation levels of 58 secondary and 7 primary metabolites. UGT84A9i seeds were characterized by decreased amounts of various hydroxycinnamic acid (HCA) esters, and increased formation of sinapic and syringic acid glycosides. This indicates glycosylation and β-oxidation as metabolic detoxification strategies to bypass intracellular accumulation of sinapic acid. In addition, a net loss of sinapic acid upon UGT84A9 suppression may point to a feedback regulation of HCA biosynthesis. Surprisingly, suppression of UGT84A9 under control of the seed-specific NAPINC promoter was maintained in cotyledons during the first two weeks of seedling development and associated with a reduced and delayed transformation of sinapine into sinapoylmalate. The lack of sinapoylmalate did not interfere with plant fitness under UV-B stress. Increased UV-B radiation triggered the accumulation of quercetin conjugates whereas the sinapoylmalate level was not affected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Induction and purification of chitinase in Brassica napus L. ssp. oleifera infected with Phoma lingam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, U.; Giese, H.; Dalgaard Mikkelsen, J.

    1992-01-01

    A pathogen-induced chitinase (EC 3.2.1.14) was isolated from cotyledons of oilseed rape (Brassica napus cv. Bienvenu) 8 d after inoculation with Phoma lingam. The purified chitinase has a molecular weight of 30 kDa, and an isoelectric point of approx. 9.1. A partial amino-acid sequence obtained a...

  12. Comparison of a diurnal vs steady-state ozone exposure profile on growth and yield of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) in open-top chambers in the Yangtze Delta, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xiaoke [State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shuangqinglu 18, Beijing 100085 (China)], E-mail: wangxk@rcees.ac.cn; Zheng Qiwei; Feng Zhaozhong [State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shuangqinglu 18, Beijing 100085 (China); Xie Juqing [Northwestern Sci-Tech University of Agriculture and Forestry, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Feng Zongwei; Ouyang Zhiyun [State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shuangqinglu 18, Beijing 100085 (China); Manning, William J. [Department of Plant, Soil and Insect Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-9320 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Most available exposure-response relationships for assessing crop loss due to elevated ozone (O{sub 3}) have been established using data from chamber and open-top chamber experiments, using a simulated constant O{sub 3} concentration exposure (square wave), which is not consistent with the diurnal variation of O{sub 3} concentration that occurs in nature. We investigated the response of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) to O{sub 3} as affected by two exposure regimes: one with a diurnal variation (CF100D) and another with a constant concentration (CF100). Although the two exposure regimes have the same mean O{sub 3} concentration and accumulated O{sub 3} concentration above 40 ppb (AOT40), our results show that O{sub 3} at CF100D reduced biomass and number of pods/plant more than O{sub 3} at CF100. Both O{sub 3} exposures resulted in larger seed weights/100 pods compared to CF. Numbers of seeds/100 pods were reduced by CF100, while numbers of seeds/100 pods in the CF100D chambers were comparable to those in CF. Our results suggest that chamber experiments that use a constant O{sub 3} exposure may underestimate O{sub 3} effects on biomass and yields. - Diurnal variation of O{sub 3} concentration should be considered when designing O{sub 3} exposure experiment.

  13. Biology and harmfulness of Brassica pod midge (Dasineura brassicae Winn. in winter oilseed rape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Draga Graora

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Brassica pod midge (Dasineura brassicae Winn. is an important pest in oilseed rape (Brasica napus L.. It develops two generations per year and overwinters in the larval stage in cocoons in soil. Immigration of the first generation adults lasted from the beginning of April until the end of May. Larvae developed in pods from mid-April to mid-June, causing pod deformation and cracking, which resulted in premature falling out of seeds and yield reduction. Pod damage amounted to 11.6%. The emergence of the second generation adults was detected at the end of May and in the first ten days of June. D. brassicae was found to lay eggs in healthy pods and no correlation was found with the cabbage seed weevil, Ceutorhynchus assimilis Paykull.

  14. Identification, evolution, and expression partitioning of miRNAs in allopolyploid Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Enhui; Zou, Jun; Hubertus Behrens, Falk; Chen, Li; Ye, Chuyu; Dai, Shutao; Li, Ruiyan; Ni, Meng; Jiang, Xiaoxue; Qiu, Jie; Liu, Yang; Wang, Weidi; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Chalhoub, Boulos; Bancroft, Ian; Meng, Jinling; Cai, Daguang; Fan, Longjiang

    2015-12-01

    The recently published genome of Brassica napus offers for the first time the opportunity to gain insights into the genomic organization and the evolution of miRNAs in oilseed rape. In this study, 12 small RNA libraries from two B. napus cultivars (Tapidor and Ningyou7) and their four double-haploid lines were sequenced, employing the newly sequenced B. napus genome, together with genomes of its progenitors Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea. A total of 645 miRNAs including 280 conserved and 365 novel miRNAs were identified. Comparative analysis revealed a high level of genomic conservation of MIRNAs (75.9%) between the subgenomes of B. napus and its two progenitors' genomes, and MIRNA lost/gain events (133) occurred in B. napus after its speciation. Furthermore, significant partitioning of miRNA expressions between the two subgenomes in B. napus was detected. The data of degradome sequencing, miRNA-mediated cleavage, and expression analyses support specific interactions between miRNAs and their targets in the modulation of diverse physiological processes in roots and leaves, as well as in biosynthesis of, for example, glucosinolates and lipids in oilseed rape. These data provide a first genome-wide view on the origin, evolution, and genomic organization of B. napus MIRNAs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  15. The progress of intersubgenomic heterosis studies in Brassica napus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The new nomenclature of Brassica has been suggested in a previous study by same authours where the symbols of Ar, Aj and An represented the A genome in the Brassica rapa, Brassica juncea and Brassica napus, Bb, Bj and Bc for the B genome of Brassica nigra (black mustard), B. juncea and Brassica carinata, Co, Cn ...

  16. Contribution of nitrogen uptake and retranslocation during reproductive growth to the nitrogen efficiency of winter oilseed-rape cultivars (Brassica napus L.) differing in leaf senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Fabian Koeslin-Findeklee; Horst, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    Genotypic variation in N efficiency defined as high grain yield under limited nitrogen (N) supply of winter oilseed-rape line-cultivars has been predominantly attributed to N uptake efficiency (NUPT) through maintained N uptake during reproductive growth related to functional stay-green. For investigating the role of stay-green, N retranslocation and N uptake during the reproductive phase for grain yield formation, two line cultivars differing in N starvation-induced leaf senescence were grow...

  17. A new time-saving transformation system for Brassica napus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    mediated transformation system for Brassica napus was developed. A series of combinations of optical densities, infection durations, concentrations of acetosyringone and silwet L77 were evaluated. Maximum transformation.

  18. Genome-wide association mapping unravels the genetic control of seed germination and vigor in Brassica napus

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah Vanessa Hatzig; Matthias eFrisch; Frank eBreuer; Nathalie eNesi; Sylvie eDucournau; Marie-Hélène eWagner; Gunhild eLeckband; Amine eAbbadi; Snowdon, Rod J.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and uniform seed germination is a crucial prerequisite for crop establishment and high yield levels in crop production. A disclosure of genetic factors contributing to adequate seed vigour would help to further increase yield potential and stability. Here we carried out a genome-wide association study in order to define genomic regions influencing seed germination and early seedling growth in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.). A population of 248 genetically diverse winter-type B. napus ...

  19. Chemical variation for leaf cuticular waxes and their levels revealed in a diverse panel of Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassica napus L. is one of the most important oilseed crops in the world, providing oil and protein used for food, fuel, and industrial purposes. Despite high oil yields and desirable agronomic traits, its geographical range is mainly limited to temperate climates, and oil yields and quality are ne...

  20. Comparison of Flowering Time Genes in Brassica Rapa, B. Napus and Arabidopsis Thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, T. C.; Kole, C.; Parkin, IAP.; Sharpe, A. G.; Kuiper, M.; Lydiate, D. J.; Trick, M.

    1997-01-01

    The major difference between annual and biennial cultivars of oilseed Brassica napus and B. rapa is conferred by genes controlling vernalization-responsive flowering time. These genes were compared between the species by aligning the map positions of flowering time quantitative trait loci (QTLs) detected in a segregating population of each species. The results suggest that two major QTLs identified in B. rapa correspond to two major QTLs identified in B. napus. Since B. rapa is one of the hypothesized diploid parents of the amphidiploid B. napus, the vernalization requirement of B. napus probably originated from B. rapa. Brassica genes also were compared to flowering time genes in Arabidopsis thaliana by mapping RFLP loci with the same probes in both B. napus and Arabidopsis. The region containing one pair of Brassica QTLs was collinear with the top of chromosome 5 in A. thaliana where flowering time genes FLC, FY and CO are located. The region containing the second pair of QTLs showed fractured collinearity with several regions of the Arabidopsis genome, including the top of chromosome 4 where FRI is located. Thus, these Brassica genes may correspond to two genes (FLC and FRI) that regulate flowering time in the latest flowering ecotypes of Arabidopsis. PMID:9215913

  1. EFFECTS OF PLANT NUTRITION ON CANOLA (Brassica napus L. GROWTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Süzer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Canola (Brassica napus L. is an important edible oilseed crop in the World and in Turkey. It has a healthy vegetable oil because of its balance with omega 3-6-9 essential fatty acids, making canola oil a healthy vegetable oil throughout the World for cooking and processed food industry. Canola production of high yield and good quality usually depends on well-balanced plant nutrition and growing conditions. A well-balanced soil condition also affects canola plants responses to stress factors such as disease and bad weather conditions. Nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK are some of the major nutrients required to significantly increase canola yield. Fertilizer application dosages in canola production vary because of the variable occurrence of NPK in the soil. A high yielding canola production needs a well-balanced fertilization program.

  2. Transgene expression and fitness of hybrids between GM oilseed rape and Brassica rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammitzbøll, Henriette; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Jørgensen, Rikke Bagger

    2005-01-01

    Oilseed rape (Brassica napus) is sexually compatible with its wild and weedy relative B. rapa, and introgression of genes from B. napus has been found to occur over a few generations. We simulated the early stages of transgene escape by producing F1 hybrids and the first backcross generation between two lines of transgenic B. napus and two populations of weedy B. rapa. Transgene expression and the fitness of the hybrids were examined under different environmental conditions. Expression of the transgenes was analyzed at the mRNA level by quantitative PCR and found to be stable in the hybrids, regardless of the genetic background and the environment, and equal to the level of transcription in the parental B. napus lines. Vigor of the hybrids was measured as the photosynthetic capability; pollen viability and seed set per silique. Photosynthetic capability of first generation hybrids was found to be at the same level, or higher, than that of the parental species, whereas the reproductive fitness was significantly lower. The first backcross generation had a significantly lower photosynthetic capability and reproductive fitness compared to the parental species. This is the first study that examines transgene expression at the mRNA level in transgenic hybrids of B. napus of different genetic background exposed to different environmental conditions. The data presented clarify important details of the overall risk assessment of growing transgenic oilseed rape.

  3. Contribution of Nitrogen Uptake and Retranslocation during Reproductive Growth to the Nitrogen Efficiency of Winter Oilseed-Rape Cultivars (Brassica napus L. Differing in Leaf Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Koeslin-Findeklee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Genotypic variation in N efficiency defined as high grain yield under limited nitrogen (N supply of winter oilseed-rape line-cultivars has been predominantly attributed to N uptake efficiency (NUPT through maintained N uptake during reproductive growth related to functional stay-green. For investigating the role of stay-green, N retranslocation and N uptake during the reproductive phase for grain yield formation, two line cultivars differing in N starvation-induced leaf senescence were grown in a field experiment without mineral N (N0 and with 160 kg N·ha−1 (N160. Through frequent harvests from full flowering until maturity N uptake, N utilization and apparent N remobilization from vegetative plant parts to the pods could be calculated. NUPT proved being more important than N utilization efficiency (NUE for grain yield formation under N-limiting (N0 conditions. For cultivar differences in N efficiency, particularly N uptake during flowering (NUPT and biomass allocation efficiency (HI to the grains, were decisive. Both crop traits were related to delayed senescence of the older leaves. Remobilization of N particularly from stems and leaves was more important for pod N accumulation than N uptake after full flowering. Pod walls (high N concentrations and stems (high biomass mainly contributed to the crop-residue N at maturity. Decreasing the crop-inherent high N budget surplus of winter oilseed-rape requires increasing the low N remobilization efficiency particularly of pod-wall N to the grains. Addressing this conclusion, multi-year and -location field experiments with an extended range of cultivars including hybrids are desirable.

  4. Genomic Changes in Resynthesized Brassica napus and Their Effect on Gene Expression and Phenotype

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robert T. Gaeta; J. Chris Pires; Federico Iniguez-Luy; Enrique Leon; Thomas C. Osborn

    2007-01-01

    .... We analyzed genetic, epigenetic, gene expression, and phenotypic changes in ∼50 resynthesized Brassica napus lines independently derived by hybridizing double haploids of Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa...

  5. Isolation of an ascorbate peroxidase in Brassica napus and analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Brassica napus, ATP6 is related to Pol cytoplasmic male sterility. To understand the mechanism of Pol CMS, proteins which interact with ATP6 were screened in a yeast two-hybrid system. A partial sequence of a putative and ascorbate peroxidase (Bn-APX) was isolated from Brassica napus. By use of rapid amplification ...

  6. Distribution and metabolism of D/L-, L- and D-glufosinate in transgenic, glufosinate-tolerant crops of maize (Zea mays L ssp mays) and oilseed rape (Brassica napus L var napus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhland, Monika; Engelhardt, Gabriele; Pawlizki, Karlheinz

    2004-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether post-emergence application of glufosinate to transgenic crops could lead to an increase in residues or to the formation of new, hitherto unknown metabolites. Transgenic oilseed rape and maize plants were treated separately with L-glufosinate, D-glufosinate or the racemic mixture. Whereas about 90% of the applied D-glufosinate was washed off by rain and only 5-6% was metabolised, 13-35% of the applied L-glufosinate remained in the form of metabolites and unchanged herbicide in both transgenic maize and oilseed rape. The main metabolite was N-acetyl-L-glufosinate with total residues of 91% in oilseed rape and 67% in maize, together with small amounts, of 5% in oilseed rape and 28% in maize, of different methylphosphinyl fatty acids. These metabolites were probably formed from L-glufosinate by deamination and subsequent decarboxylation. The residues were distributed in all fractions of the plants, with the highest contents in treated leaves and the lowest in the grains (0.07-0.3% in maize and 0.4-0.6% in oilseed rape). There was no indication of an accumulation of total residues or of residue levels above the official tolerances for glufosinate.

  7. Heat stress during seed filling interferes with sulfur restriction on grain composition and seed germination in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie eBrunel-Muguet

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In coming decades, increasing temperatures are expected to impact crop yield and seed quality. To develop low input systems, the effects of temperature and sulfur (S nutrition in oilseed rape, a high S demanding crop, need to be jointly considered. In this study, we investigated the effects of temperatures (High Temperature (HT, 33 °C/day, 19 °C/night vs. Control Temperature (Ctrl T, 20°C/day, 15°C/day and S supply (High S (HS, 500 µm SO42- vs. Low S (LS, 8.7 µM SO42- during seed filling on (i yield components (seed number, seed dry weight (SDW and seed yield, (ii grain composition (nitrogen (N and S contents and quality (fatty acid (FA composition and seed storage protein (SSP accumulation and (iii germination characteristics (pre-harvest sprouting, germination rates and abnormal seedlings. Abscisic acid (ABA, soluble sugar contents and seed conductivity were also measured. HT and LS decreased the number of seeds per plant. SDW was less affected due to compensatory effects since the number of seeds decreased under stress conditions. While LS had negative effects on seed composition by reducing the FA contents and increasing the ratio S-poor SSPs (12S globulins/S-rich SSPs (2S albumins ratio, HT had positive effects by increasing S and FA contents and decreasing the C18:2/C18:3 ratio and the 12S/2S protein ratio. Seeds produced under HT showed high pre-harvest sprouting rates along with decreased ABA contents and high rates of abnormal seedlings. HT and LS restriction significantly accelerated germination times. High conductivity, which indicates poor seed storage capacity, was higher in HT seeds. Consistently, the lower ratio of (raffinose +stachyose/sucrose in HT seeds indicated low seed storage capacity. We demonstrated the effects of HT and LS on grain and on germination characteristics. These results suggest that hormonal changes might control several seed characteristics simultaneously.

  8. Origins of the amphiploid species Brassica napus L. investigated by chloroplast and nuclear molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allender Charlotte J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amphiploid species Brassica napus (oilseed rape, Canola is a globally important oil crop yielding food, biofuels and industrial compounds such as lubricants and surfactants. Identification of the likely ancestors of each of the two genomes (designated A and C found in B. napus would facilitate incorporation of novel alleles from the wider Brassica genepool in oilseed rape crop genetic improvement programmes. Knowledge of the closest extant relatives of the genotypes involved in the initial formation of B. napus would also allow further investigation of the genetic factors required for the formation of a stable amphiploid and permit the more efficient creation of fully fertile re-synthesised B. napus. We have used a combination of chloroplast and nuclear genetic markers to investigate the closest extant relatives of the original maternal progenitors of B. napus. This was based on a comprehensive sampling of the relevant genepools, including 83 accessions of A genome B. rapa L. (both wild and cultivated types, 94 accessions of B. napus and 181 accessions of C genome wild and cultivated B. oleracea L. and related species. Results Three chloroplast haplotypes occurred in B. napus. The most prevalent haplotype (found in 79% of accessions was not present within the C genome accessions but was found at low frequencies in B. rapa. Chloroplast haplotypes characteristic of B. napus were found in a small number of wild and weedy B. rapa populations, and also in two accessions of cultivated B. rapa 'brocoletto'. Whilst introgression of the B. napus chloroplast type in the wild and weedy B. rapa populations has been proposed by other studies, the presence of this haplotype within the two brocoletto accessions is unexplained. Conclusions The distribution of chloroplast haplotypes eliminate any of the C genome species as being the maternal ancestor of the majority of the B. napus accessions. The presence of multiple chloroplast

  9. A high-throughput SNP array in the amphidiploid species Brassica napus shows diversity in resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton-Morgan, Jessica; Hayward, Alice; Alamery, Salman; Tollenaere, Reece; Mason, Annaliese S; Campbell, Emma; Patel, Dhwani; Lorenc, Michał T; Yi, Bin; Long, Yan; Meng, Jinling; Raman, Rosy; Raman, Harsh; Lawley, Cindy; Edwards, David; Batley, Jacqueline

    2014-12-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)are molecular markers based on nucleotide variation and can be used for genotyping assays across populations and to track genomic inheritance. SNPs offer a comprehensive genotyping alternative to whole-genome sequencing for both agricultural and research purposes including molecular breeding and diagnostics, genome evolution and genetic diversity analyses, genetic mapping, and trait association studies. Here genomic SNPs were discovered between four cultivars of the important amphidiploid oilseed species Brassica napus and used to develop a B. napus Infinium™ array containing 5,306 SNPs randomly dispersed across the genome. Assay success was high, with >94 % of these producing a reproducible, polymorphic genotype in the 1,070 samples screened. Although the assay was designed to B. napus, successful SNP amplification was achieved in the B. napus progenitor species, Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea, and to a lesser extent in the related species Brassica nigra. Phylogenetic analysis was consistent with the expected relationships between B. napus individuals. This study presents an efficient custom SNP assay development pipeline in the complex polyploid Brassica genome and demonstrates the utility of the array for high-throughput genotyping in a number of related Brassica species. It also demonstrates the utility of this assay in genotyping resistance genes on chromosome A7, which segregate amongst the 1,070 samples.

  10. Patterns of molecular variation in a species-wide germplasm set of Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, Anja; Körber, Niklas; Snowdon, Rod J; Stich, Benjamin

    2011-12-01

    Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) is the leading European oilseed crop serving as source for edible oil and renewable energy. The objectives of our study were to (i) examine the population structure of a large and diverse set of B. napus inbred lines, (ii) investigate patterns of genetic diversity within and among different germplasm types, (iii) compare the two genomes of B. napus with regard to genetic diversity, and (iv) assess the extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Our study was based on 509 B. napus inbred lines genotyped with 89 genome-specific SSR primer combinations. Both a principal coordinate analysis and software STRUCTURE revealed that winter types, spring types, and swedes were assigned to three major clusters. The genetic diversity of winter oilseed rape was lower than the diversity found in other germplasm types. Within winter oilseed rape types, a decay of genetic diversity with more recent release dates and reduced levels of erucic acid and glucosinolates was observed. The percentage of linked SSR loci pairs in significant (r (2) > Q (95 unlinked loci pairs)) LD was 6.29% for the entire germplasm set. Furthermore, LD decayed rapidly with distance, which will allow a relatively high mapping resolution in genome-wide association studies using our germplasm set, but, on the other hand, will require a high number of markers.

  11. Comparing the effects of excess copper in the leaves of Brassica juncea (L. Czern) and Brassica napus (L.) seedlings: Growth inhibition, oxidative stress and photosynthetic damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigl, Gábor; Kumar, Devanand; Lehotai, Nóra; Pető, Andrea; Molnár, Árpád; Rácz, Éva; Ördög, Attila; Erdei, László; Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Laskay, Gábor

    2015-06-01

    Hydroponic experiments were conducted to compare the effects of excess copper (Cu) on growth and photosynthesis in young Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) and oilseed rape (Brassica napus). We compared the effects of excess Cu on the two Brassica species at different physiological levels from antioxidant levels to photosynthetic activity. Nine-day-old plants were treated with Cu (10, 25 and 50 μM CuSO4) for 7 and 14 days. Both species took up Cu from the external solution to a similar degree but showed slight root-to-shoot translocation. Furthermore, after seven days of treatment, excess Cu significantly decreased other microelement content, such as iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn), especially in the shoots of B. napus. As a consequence, the leaves of young Brassica napus plants showed decreased concentrations of photosynthetic pigments and more intense growth inhibition; however, accumulation of highly reactive oxygen species (hROS) were not detected. After 14 days of Cu exposure the reduction of Fe and Mn contents and shoot growth proved to be comparable in the two species. Moreover, a significant Cu-induced hROS accumulation was observed in both Brassica species. The diminution in pigment contents and photosynthetic efficiency were more pronounced in B. napus during prolonged Cu exposure. Based on all the parameters, B. juncea appears to be more resistant to excess Cu than B. napus, rendering it a species with higher potential for phytoremediation.

  12. Deletion of a Stay-Green Gene Associates with Adaptive Selection in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Lunwen; Voss-Fels, Kai; Cui, Yixin; Jan, Habib U; Samans, Birgit; Obermeier, Christian; Qian, Wei; Snowdon, Rod J

    2016-12-05

    Chlorophyll levels provide important information about plant growth and physiological plasticity in response to changing environments. The stay-green gene NON-YELLOWING 1 (NYE1) is believed to regulate chlorophyll degradation during senescence, concomitantly affecting the disassembly of the light-harvesting complex and hence indirectly influencing photosynthesis. We identified Brassica napus accessions carrying an NYE1 deletion associated with increased chlorophyll content, and with upregulated expression of light-harvesting complex and photosynthetic reaction center (PSI and PSII) genes. Comparative analysis of the seed oil content of accessions with related genetic backgrounds revealed that the B. napus NYE1 gene deletion (bnnye1) affected oil accumulation, and linkage disequilibrium signatures suggested that the locus has been subject to artificial selection by breeding in oilseed B. napus forms. Comparative analysis of haplotype diversity groups (haplogroups) between three different ecotypes of the allopolyploid B. napus and its A-subgenome diploid progenitor, Brassica rapa, indicated that introgression of the bnnye1 deletion from Asian B. rapa into winter-type B. napus may have simultaneously improved its adaptation to cooler environments experienced by autumn-sown rapeseed. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Differential expression of miRNAs in Brassica napus root following infection with Plasmodiophora brassicae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiv S Verma

    Full Text Available Canola (oilseed rape, Brassica napus L. is susceptible to infection by the biotrophic protist Plasmodiophora brassicae, the causal agent of clubroot. To understand the roles of microRNAs (miRNAs during the post-transcriptional regulation of disease initiation and progression, we have characterized the changes in miRNA expression profiles in canola roots during clubroot disease development and have compared these to uninfected roots. Two different stages of clubroot development were targeted in this miRNA profiling study: an early time of 10-dpi for disease initiation and a later 20-dpi, by which time the pathogen had colonized the roots (as evident by visible gall formation and histological observations. P. brassicae responsive miRNAs were identified and validated by qRT-PCR of miRNAs and the subsequent validation of the target mRNAs through starBase degradome analysis, and through 5' RLM-RACE. This study identifies putative miRNA-regulated genes with roles during clubroot disease initiation and development. Putative target genes identified in this study included: transcription factors (TFs, hormone-related genes, as well as genes associated with plant stress response regulation such as cytokinin, auxin/ethylene response elements. The results of our study may assist in elucidating the role of miRNAs in post-transcriptional regulation of target genes during disease development and may contribute to the development of strategies to engineer durable resistance to this important phytopathogen.

  14. new time-saving transformation system for Brassica napus | Kong ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mediated transformation system for Brassica napus was developed. A series of combinations of optical densities, infection durations, concentrations of acetosyringone and silwet L77 were evaluated. Maximum transformation efficiency reached ...

  15. Immunopurification and characterization of a rape (Brassica napus L.)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BEN HAMIDA

    Brassica napus L.) seedling lipase. Belguith H.1*, Fattouch S.2, Jridi T.1 and Ben Hamida J. 1. 1Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Bizerte, Tunisia. 2Biological Engineering Laboratory, INSAT, Tunis, Tunisia. Accepted 30 March, 2009.

  16. The progress of intersubgenomic heterosis studies in Brassica napus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-03-15

    Mar 15, 2010 ... Numerous efforts have focused on exploring novel B. napus (AnAnCnCn) breeding stocks by the hybridization ... Thereafter, most interspecific hybrids in Brassicas could be considered .... Observation of the embryo sac development and the pollen tube elongation in new-typed B. napus. a−d represents the.

  17. Meligethes aeneus pollen-feeding suppresses, and oviposition induces, Brassica napus volatiles: beetle attraction/repellence to lilac aldehydes and veratrole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insect pollination and pollen-feeding can reduce plant volatile emissions and future insect floral attraction, with oviposition having different effects. Meligethes aeneus F. (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae), is a pollen-feeding pest beetle of oilseed rape, Brassica napus L. (Brassicaceae). We measured pla...

  18. Anatomy and transcript profiling of gynoecium development in female sterile Brassica napus mediated by one alien chromosome from Orychophragmus violaceus

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Wen-qin; Zhao, Zhi-gang; Ge, Xian-hong; Ding, Li; Li, Zai-yun

    2014-01-01

    Background The gynoecium is one of the most complex organs of angiosperms specialized for seed production and dispersal, but only several genes important for ovule or embryo sac development were identified by using female sterile mutants. The female sterility in oilseed rape (Brassica napus) was before found to be related with one alien chromosome from another crucifer Orychophragmus violaceus. Herein, the developmental anatomy and comparative transcript profiling (RNA-seq) for the female ste...

  19. Genomic identification, characterization and differential expression analysis of SBP-box gene family in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hongtao; Hao, Mengyu; Wang, Wenxiang; Mei, Desheng; Tong, Chaobo; Wang, Hui; Liu, Jia; Fu, Li; Hu, Qiong

    2016-09-08

    SBP-box genes belong to one of the largest families of transcription factors. Though members of this family have been characterized to be important regulators of diverse biological processes, information of SBP-box genes in the third most important oilseed crop Brassica napus is largely undefined. In the present study, by whole genome bioinformatics analysis and transcriptional profiling, 58 putative members of SBP-box gene family in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) were identified and their expression pattern in different tissues as well as possible interaction with miRNAs were analyzed. In addition, B. napus lines with contrasting branch angle were used for investigating the involvement of SBP-box genes in plant architecture regulation. Detailed gene information, including genomic organization, structural feature, conserved domain and phylogenetic relationship of the genes were systematically characterized. By phylogenetic analysis, BnaSBP proteins were classified into eight distinct groups representing the clear orthologous relationships to their family members in Arabidopsis and rice. Expression analysis in twelve tissues including vegetative and reproductive organs showed different expression patterns among the SBP-box genes and a number of the genes exhibit tissue specific expression, indicating their diverse functions involved in the developmental process. Forty-four SBP-box genes were ascertained to contain the putative miR156 binding site, with 30 and 14 of the genes targeted by miR156 at the coding and 3'UTR region, respectively. Relative expression level of miR156 is varied across tissues. Different expression pattern of some BnaSBP genes and the negative correlation of transcription levels between miR156 and its target BnaSBP gene were observed in lines with different branch angle. Taken together, this study represents the first systematic analysis of the SBP-box gene family in Brassica napus. The data presented here provides base foundation for

  20. Field tolerance to fungal pathogens of Brassica napus constitutively expressing a chimeric chitinase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grison, R.; Grezes-Besset, B.; Lucante, N. [Rustica Prograin Genetique, Mondonville (France)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Constitutive overexpression of a protein involved in plant defense mechanisms to disease is one of the strategies proposed to increase plant tolerance to fungal pathogens. A hybrid endochitinase gene under a constitutive promoter was introduced by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation into a winter-type oilseed rape (Brassica napus var. oleifera) inbred line. Progeny from transformed plants was challenged using three different fungal pathogens (Cylindrosporium concentricum, Phoma lingam, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum) in field trials at two different geographical locations. These plants exhibited an increased tolerance to disease as compared with the nontransgenic parental plants. 31 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Cytokinins in shoot apices of Brassica napus plants during vernalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkowská, Danuše; Filek, Maria; Biesaga-Kościelniak, Jolanta; Marcińska, Izabela; Macháčková, Ivana; Krekule, Jan; Strnad, Miroslav

    2012-05-01

    The putative role of cytokinins in processes leading to reproductive development of plants was investigated by analysing the shoot apical parts of a winter cultivar of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L. var. oleifera, cv. Górczański). The endogenous cytokinin levels were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS) in the shoot apices of vegetative plants (grown at 20/17°C with a 16/8h day/night regime) and vernalized plants (56 days at 5/2°C with a 16/8h photoperiod) at different times during floral transition. During vernalization, the content of all isoprenoid cytokinins increased significantly, coinciding well with the onset of the early stages of reproductive development. Cytokinin levels reached their maxima when most of the plants became irreversibly reproductive (after 42 days of cold treatment). cis-Zeatin riboside (unequivocally identified by quadrupole-time-of-flight MS) accounted for ca. 87-89% of the total isoprenoid cytokinin content in control and vernalized plants, whilst N(6)-isopentenyladenosine ( approximately 6% in control and approximately 8% in vernalized plants) and cis-zeatin (approxiamtely 2% in control and approximately 1% in vernalized plants) were the next most abundant cytokinins. In the post-vernalization period, endogenous cytokinin levels decreased, but remained significantly higher in the reproductive plants than in the vegetative controls. These results suggest that cytokinins, especially those of the cis-zeatin type, are involved in vernalization-induced reproductive development of B. napus. © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A High-Density SNP Map for Accurate Mapping of Seed Fibre QTL in Brassica napus L

    OpenAIRE

    Liezhao Liu; Cunmin Qu; Benjamin Wittkop; Bin Yi; Yang Xiao; Yajun He; Snowdon, Rod J.; Jiana Li

    2013-01-01

    A high density genetic linkage map for the complex allotetraploid crop species Brassica napus (oilseed rape) was constructed in a late-generation recombinant inbred line (RIL) population, using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers assayed by the Brassica 60 K Infinium BeadChip Array. The linkage map contains 9164 SNP markers covering 1832.9 cM. 1232 bins account for 7648 of the markers. A subset of 2795 SNP markers, with an average distance of 0.66 cM between adjacent mark...

  3. SNP discovery by amplicon sequencing and multiplex SNP genotyping in the allopolyploid species Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durstewitz, G; Polley, A; Plieske, J; Luerssen, H; Graner, E M; Wieseke, R; Ganal, M W

    2010-11-01

    Oilseed rape (Brassica napus) is an allotetraploid species consisting of two genomes, derived from B. rapa (A genome) and B. oleracea (C genome). The presence of these two genomes makes single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker identification and SNP analysis more challenging than in diploid species, as for a given locus usually two versions of a DNA sequence (based on the two ancestral genomes) have to be analyzed simultaneously during SNP identification and analysis. One hundred amplicons derived from expressed sequence tag (ESTs) were analyzed to identify SNPs in a panel of oilseed rape varieties and within two sister species representing the ancestral genomes. A total of 604 SNPs were identified, averaging one SNP in every 42 bp. It was possible to clearly discriminate SNPs that are polymorphic between different plant varieties from SNPs differentiating the two ancestral genomes. To validate the identified SNPs for their use in genetic analysis, we have developed Illumina GoldenGate assays for some of the identified SNPs. Through the analysis of a number of oilseed rape varieties and mapping populations with GoldenGate assays, we were able to identify a number of different segregation patterns in allotetraploid oilseed rape. The majority of the identified SNP markers can be readily used for genetic mapping, showing that amplicon sequencing and Illumina GoldenGate assays can be used to reliably identify SNP markers in tetraploid oilseed rape and to convert them into successful SNP assays that can be used for genetic analysis.

  4. High-throughput multiplex cpDNA resequencing clarifies the genetic diversity and genetic relationships among Brassica napus, Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jiangwei; Cai, Mengxian; Yan, Guixin; Wang, Nian; Li, Feng; Chen, Binyun; Gao, Guizhen; Xu, Kun; Li, Jun; Wu, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Brassica napus (rapeseed) is a recent allotetraploid plant and the second most important oilseed crop worldwide. The origin of B. napus and the genetic relationships with its diploid ancestor species remain largely unresolved. Here, chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) from 488 B. napus accessions of global origin, 139 B. rapa accessions and 49 B. oleracea accessions were populationally resequenced using Illumina Solexa sequencing technologies. The intraspecific cpDNA variants and their allelic frequencies were called genomewide and further validated via EcoTILLING analyses of the rpo region. The cpDNA of the current global B. napus population comprises more than 400 variants (SNPs and short InDels) and maintains one predominant haplotype (Bncp1). Whole-genome resequencing of the cpDNA of Bncp1 haplotype eliminated its direct inheritance from any accession of the B. rapa or B. oleracea species. The distribution of the polymorphism information content (PIC) values for each variant demonstrated that B. napus has much lower cpDNA diversity than B. rapa; however, a vast majority of the wild and cultivated B. oleracea specimens appeared to share one same distinct cpDNA haplotype, in contrast to its wild C-genome relatives. This finding suggests that the cpDNA of the three Brassica species is well differentiated. The predominant B. napus cpDNA haplotype may have originated from uninvestigated relatives or from interactions between cpDNA mutations and natural/artificial selection during speciation and evolution. These exhaustive data on variation in cpDNA would provide fundamental data for research on cpDNA and chloroplasts. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Chalazal seed coat development in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Jenna L; Khan, Deirdre; Becker, Michael G; Chan, Ainsley; Dufresne, André; Sumner, Michael; Belmonte, Mark F

    2015-12-01

    The chalazal seed coat (CZSC) is a maternal subregion adjacent to the funiculus which serves as the first point of entry into the developing seed. This subregion is of particular interest in Brassica napus (canola) because of its location within the seed and its putative contribution to seed filling processes. In this study, the CZSC of canola was characterized at an anatomical and molecular level to (i) describe the cellular and subcellular features of the CZSC throughout seed development, (ii) reveal cellular features of the CZSC that relate to transport processes, (iii) study gene activity of transporters and transcriptional regulators in the CZSC subregion over developmental time, and (iv) briefly investigate the contribution of the A and C constituent genomes to B. napus CZSC gene activity. We found that the CZSC contains terminating ends of xylem and phloem as well as a mosaic of endomembrane and plasmodesmatal connections, suggesting that this subregion is likely involved in the transport of material and information from the maternal tissues of the plant to other regions of the seed. Laser microdissection coupled with quantitative RT-PCR identified the relative abundance of sugar, water, auxin and amino acid transporter homologs inherited from the constituent genomes of this complex polyploid. We also studied the expression of three transcription factors that were shown to co-express with these biological processes providing a preliminary framework for the regulatory networks responsible for seed filling in canola and discuss the relationship of the CZSC to other regions and subregions of the seed and its role in seed development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Functional analysis of the Brassica napus L. phytoene synthase (PSY) gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Emparán, Ada; Quezada-Martinez, Daniela; Zúñiga-Bustos, Matías; Cifuentes, Víctor; Iñiguez-Luy, Federico; Federico, María Laura

    2014-01-01

    Phytoene synthase (PSY) has been shown to catalyze the first committed and rate-limiting step of carotenogenesis in several crop species, including Brassica napus L. Due to its pivotal role, PSY has been a prime target for breeding and metabolic engineering the carotenoid content of seeds, tubers, fruits and flowers. In Arabidopsis thaliana, PSY is encoded by a single copy gene but small PSY gene families have been described in monocot and dicotyledonous species. We have recently shown that PSY genes have been retained in a triplicated state in the A- and C-Brassica genomes, with each paralogue mapping to syntenic locations in each of the three "Arabidopsis-like" subgenomes. Most importantly, we have shown that in B. napus all six members are expressed, exhibiting overlapping redundancy and signs of subfunctionalization among photosynthetic and non photosynthetic tissues. The question of whether this large PSY family actually encodes six functional enzymes remained to be answered. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to: (i) isolate, characterize and compare the complete protein coding sequences (CDS) of the six B. napus PSY genes; (ii) model their predicted tridimensional enzyme structures; (iii) test their phytoene synthase activity in a heterologous complementation system and (iv) evaluate their individual expression patterns during seed development. This study further confirmed that the six B. napus PSY genes encode proteins with high sequence identity, which have evolved under functional constraint. Structural modeling demonstrated that they share similar tridimensional protein structures with a putative PSY active site. Significantly, all six B. napus PSY enzymes were found to be functional. Taking into account the specific patterns of expression exhibited by these PSY genes during seed development and recent knowledge of PSY suborganellar localization, the selection of transgene candidates for metabolic engineering the carotenoid content of oilseeds

  7. Identification of Candidate Genes for Seed Glucosinolate Content Using Association Mapping in Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Cun-Min; Li, Shi-Meng; Duan, Xiu-Jian; Fan, Jin-Hua; Jia, Le-Dong; Zhao, Hui-Yan; Lu, Kun; Li, Jia-Na; Xu, Xin-Fu; Wang, Rui

    2015-11-18

    Rapeseed contains glucosinolates, a toxic group of sulfur-containing glucosides, which play critical roles in defense against herbivores and microbes. However, the presence of glucosinolates in rapeseed reduces the value of the meal as feed for livestock. We performed association mapping of seed glucosinolate (GS) content using the 60K Brassica Infinium single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array in 520 oilseed rape accessions. A total of 11 peak SNPs significantly associated with GS content were detected in growing seasons of 2013 and 2014 and were located on B. napus chromosomes A08, A09, C03, and C09, respectively. Two associated regions of GS content covered by these markers were further verified, and three B. napus homologous genes involved in the biosynthesis and accumulation of GS were identified. These genes were multigene family members and were distributed on different chromosomes. Moreover, two genes (BnGRT2 and BnMYB28) associated with GS content were validated by the qRT-PCR analysis of their expression profiles. The further identification and functionalization of these genes will provide useful insight into the mechanism underlying GS biosynthesis and allocation in B. napus, and the associated SNPs markers could be helpful for molecular maker-assisted breeding for low seed GS in B. napus.

  8. Identification of Candidate Genes for Seed Glucosinolate Content Using Association Mapping in Brassica napus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cun-Min Qu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapeseed contains glucosinolates, a toxic group of sulfur-containing glucosides, which play critical roles in defense against herbivores and microbes. However, the presence of glucosinolates in rapeseed reduces the value of the meal as feed for livestock. We performed association mapping of seed glucosinolate (GS content using the 60K Brassica Infinium single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array in 520 oilseed rape accessions. A total of 11 peak SNPs significantly associated with GS content were detected in growing seasons of 2013 and 2014 and were located on B. napus chromosomes A08, A09, C03, and C09, respectively. Two associated regions of GS content covered by these markers were further verified, and three B. napus homologous genes involved in the biosynthesis and accumulation of GS were identified. These genes were multigene family members and were distributed on different chromosomes. Moreover, two genes (BnGRT2 and BnMYB28 associated with GS content were validated by the qRT-PCR analysis of their expression profiles. The further identification and functionalization of these genes will provide useful insight into the mechanism underlying GS biosynthesis and allocation in B. napus, and the associated SNPs markers could be helpful for molecular maker-assisted breeding for low seed GS in B. napus.

  9. Haplotype hitchhiking promotes trait coselection in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Lunwen; Qian, Wei; Snowdon, Rod J

    2016-07-01

    Local haplotype patterns surrounding densely spaced DNA markers with significant trait associations can reveal information on selective sweeps and genome diversity associated with important crop traits. Relationships between haplotype and phenotype diversity, coupled with analysis of gene content in conserved haplotype blocks, can provide insight into coselection for nonrelated traits. We performed genome-wide analysis of haplotypes associated with the important physiological and agronomic traits leaf chlorophyll and seed glucosinolate content, respectively, in the major oilseed crop species Brassica napus. A locus on chromosome A01 showed opposite effects on leaf chlorophyll content and seed glucosinolate content, attributed to strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) between orthologues of the chlorophyll biosynthesis genes EARLY LIGHT-INDUCED PROTEIN and CHLOROPHYLL SYNTHASE, and the glucosinolate synthesis gene ATP SULFURYLASE 1. Another conserved haplotype block, on chromosome A02, contained a number of chlorophyll-related genes in LD with orthologues of the key glucosinolate biosynthesis genes METHYLTHIOALKYMALATE SYNTHASE-LIKE 1 and 3. Multigene haplogroups were found to have a significantly greater contribution to variation for chlorophyll content than haplotypes for any single gene, suggesting positive effects of additive locus accumulation. Detailed reanalysis of population substructure revealed a clade of ten related accessions exhibiting high leaf chlorophyll and low seed glucosinolate content. These accessions each carried one of the above-mentioned haplotypes from A01 or A02, generally in combination with further chlorophyll-associated haplotypes from chromosomes A05 and/or C05. The phenotypic rather than pleiotropic correlations between leaf chlorophyll content index and seed GSL suggest that LD may have led to inadvertent coselection for these two traits. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and

  10. Optimization of Brassica napus (canola) explant regeneration for genetic transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Priti; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2011-12-15

    Brassica napus (canola) is the second largest oilseed crop in the world. It is among the first crops to be genetically transformed, and genetically modified cultivars are in commercial production at very significant levels. Despite the early lead with respect to transgenesis, there remain cultivars that are recalcitrant to transformation. To address this, we have conducted an elaborate investigation of the conditions for regenerating shoots from hypocotyl explants from four genetic lines: Invigor 5020, Westar and Topas as well as a microspore culture derived line of Topas (Line 4079). We analyzed the effect of hormonal combinations in regeneration medium, donor plant age and explant type on the regeneration capacity of these plants. The analysis showed that hypocotyls of eight-day-old seedlings grown on media supplemented with 1mg/L dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-D) produced the most shoots. Globular somatic embryos emerged following two weeks of 2,4-D treatment. When transferred to the medium containing 5mg/L benzyladenine (BA), approximately 82% of embryos produced shoots within six weeks. Invigor plants were shown to regenerate more efficiently than Topas; the number of plantlets regenerated from Invigor was approximately 40-50% more as compared to Topas or Line 4079. When hypocotyl explants were co-cultivated with the Agrobacterium strain GV3101 harboring a binary vector carrying a firefly luciferase reporter gene (LUC), significant numbers of plantlets were LUC-positive in a luciferase assay. Frequency of such plants were: Invigor 5020 (54.2 ± 2.5%), Westar (53.7 ± 5.3), Topas (16.0 ± 0.24) and Line 4079 (13.4 ± 4). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Proteomic Analysis of Pollen and Blossom Honey from Rape Seed Brassica Napus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borutinskaitė Veronika

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the study, honey from oilseed rape Brassica napus L., and both hand-collected (winter rape Visby and Cult and bee-collected pollen of oilseed rape were analyzed for their proteome content, in order to see if any plant proteins were present to allow the proteo-typing of the oilseed rape honey. Proteins were fractionated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE, stained by Coomassie blue and then analyzed by mass spectrometry. All identified proteins were divided into few groups due to their biological function. In 2DE gels with separated proteins from blossom honey, only bee (Apis mellifera main proteins (Major royal jelly protein 1-5 and Glucosidase were found. So we analyzed all proteins using gel-free based analysis with the SYNAPT G2 high definition mass spectrometry. We identified proteins that were present in both oilseed rape pollen and honey (Bna, Polygalacturonase, Non-specific lipid-transfer protein, GAPDH and others. We believe that these proteins are important for the nutritional value of plant pollen-enriched honey and further research is required on honey and honeybee pollen protein.

  12. Ascorbate peroxidase gene from Brassica napus enhances salt and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A full-length cDNA clone, BnAPX (GenBank: FJ965556.1) encoding ascorbate peroxidase and isolated from Brassica napus, was successfully introduced into Arabidopsis thaliana. Investigation into the function of BnAPX demonstrated that BnAPX transgenic plants grew better than wild type under NaCl stress, and also had ...

  13. Molecular phylogenetic implications in Brassica napus based on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Brassica napus L. (canola, rapeseed) is one of the most important oil crops in many countries (Abdelmigid 2012;. Fayyaz et al. 2014), and thought to have originated from a cross where the maternal donor was closely related to two diploid species, B. oleracea (CC, 2n = 18) and B. rapa (AA, 2n = 20). Here, molecular ...

  14. Factors affecting the density of Brassica napus seeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, L.; Jalink, H.; Denkert, R.; Reaney, M.

    2006-01-01

    Brassica napus seed is composed of low density oil (0.92 g.cm(-3)) and higher density solids (1.3-1.45 g.cm(-3)). Seed buoyant density may potentially be used to determine seed oil content and to separate seeds with different oil contents, however, we have found that seeds with the lowest buoyant

  15. Immunopurification and characterization of a rape ( Brassica napus L.)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lipase or triacylglycerol acylhydrolase (E.C.3.1.1.3) was purified to homogeneity from rapeseed-germinated cotyledons (Brassica napus L.). The purification scheme involved homogenization, centrifugation, ultracentrifugation and affinity chromatography using polyclonal antibodies raised against porcine pancreatic lipase.

  16. Expression of human interferon gamma in Brassica napus seeds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we used seed specific promoter (Napin) and C-terminal KDEL sequence to express human therapeutic protein, interferon gamma (IFN_y) in Brassica napus seeds. Kozak sequence was linked to the 5' end of the IFN_y gene to increase the level of expression. The constructed cassette was transformed into ...

  17. A new time-saving transformation system for Brassica napus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    Jun 3, 2009 ... transformation and rooting efficiencies in canola (Brassica napus L.) from hypocotyl segment explants. Plant Cell Rep. 21: 599-604. Ce´sar Petri, SL, Nuria A, Jose E, Lorenzo B (2008). An antibiotic- based selection strategy to regenerate transformed plants from apricot leaves with high efficiency. Plant Sci.

  18. The progress of intersubgenomic heterosis studies in Brassica napus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-03-15

    Mar 15, 2010 ... Cloning, chromosome mapping and expression analysis of an R2R3-. MYB gene under-expressed in maize hybrid. Mol. Biol. Rep. 33: 103-. 110. Li M, Chen X, Meng J (2006). Intersubgenomic heterosis in rapeseed production with a partial new-typed Brassica napus containing subgenome Ar from B. rapa ...

  19. Gene transformation potential of commercial canola (Brassica napus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-17

    Dec 17, 2008 ... Daneshian J (2005). Efficient regeneration of Brassica napus L. hypocotyls and genetic transformation by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Biologia Plantarum 49(2): 175-180. Keara GS, Mathias RJ (1992). The interaction of genotype, explants and media on the regeneration of shoots from complex explants of.

  20. Hybridisation and introgression between Brassica napus and B. rapa in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luijten, S H; Schidlo, N S; Meirmans, P G; de Jong, T J

    2015-01-01

    We used flow cytometry, chromosome counting and AFLP markers to investigate gene flow from the crop plant oilseed rape, Brassica napus (AACC) to wild B. rapa (AA) in the Netherlands. From 89 B. napus source populations investigated, all near cropping fields or at transhipment sites, only 19 contained a B. rapa population within a 2.5-km radius. During our survey we found only three populations with F1 hybrids (AAC), as recognized by their nine extra chromosomes and by flow cytometry. These hybrids were all collected in mixed populations where the two species grew in close proximity. Populations with F1 hybrids were not close to crops, but instead were located on road verges with highly disturbed soils, in which both species were probably recruited from the soil seed bank. Many plants in the F2, BC1 or higher backcrosses are expected to carry one to eight C chromosomes. However, these plants were not observed among the hybrids. We further investigated introgression with molecular markers (AFLP) and compared sympatric B. rapa populations (near populations of B. napus) with control populations of B. rapa (no B. napus within at least 7 km). We found no difference between sympatric and control populations in the number of C markers in B. rapa, nor did we find that these sympatric populations closely resembled B. napus. Our data show that hybrids occur but also suggest no recent introgression of alleles from the crop plant B. napus into wild B. rapa in the Dutch populations studied. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  1. Effect of water stress on the agressiveness of oilsseed rape (Brassica napus L.) and two mustards (Sinapis alba L. and S. arvensis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maataoui, A; Talouizte, A; Benbella, M; Bouhache, M

    2003-01-01

    Oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.), a winter sown crop, may compete for water especially with Brassicaceae weeds. Investigating plant competition under water stress conditions is necessary for achieving a good yield in a Mediterranean climate characterized by a scarse water availability. This experiment was carried out to study the competiveness of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) with two brassicaceae weeds (Sinapis alba L. and S. arvensis L.). Species were grown at a density of two plants per bucket either in monoculture or as a binary mixture under water stress conditions in a greenhouse. Results of monoculture showed that B. napus had the highest shoot dry matter. Shoot dry matter of B. napus was more reduced by intraspecific competition than by interspecific competition due to S. arvensis. Shoot dry matter of S. alba in monoculture was higher than in mixture with S. arvensis, but more reduced in mixture with B. napus. In case of S. arvensis, shoot dry matter was more reduced by interspecific competition than by intraspecific competition. Agressivity based on grain yield showed, that B. napus was the most agressive species followed by S. alba. This agressivity did not change by the imposed water stress.

  2. Identification and characterization of improved nitrogen efficiency in interspecific hybridized new-type Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gaili; Ding, Guangda; Li, Ling; Cai, Hongmei; Ye, Xiangsheng; Zou, Jun; Xu, Fangsen

    2014-09-01

    Oilseed rape (Brassica napus) is an important oil crop worldwide. The aim of this study was to identify the variation in nitrogen (N) efficiency of new-type B. napus (genome A(r)A(r)C(c)C(c)) genotypes, and to characterize some critical physiological and molecular mechanisms in response to N limitation. Two genotypes with contrasting N efficiency (D4-15 and D1-1) were identified from 150 new-type B. napus lines, and hydroponic and pot experiments were conducted. Root morphology, plant biomass, N uptake parameters and seed yield of D4-15 and D1-1 were investigated. Two traditional B. napus (genome A(n)A(n)C(n)C(n)) genotypes, QY10 and NY7, were also cultivated. Introgression of exotic genomic components in D4-15 and D1-1 was evaluated with molecular markers. Large genetic variation existed among traits contributing to the N efficiency of new-type B. napus. Under low N levels at the seedling stage, the N-efficient new-type D4-15 showed higher values than the N-inefficient D1-1 line and the traditional B. napus QY10 and NY7 genotypes with respect to several traits, including root and shoot biomass, root morphology, N accumulation, N utilization efficiency (NutE), N uptake efficiency (NupE), activities of nitrate reductase (NR) and glutamine synthetase (GS), and expression levels of N transporter genes and genes that are involved in N assimilation. Higher yield was produced by the N-efficient D4-15 line compared with the N-inefficient D1-1 at maturity. More exotic genome components were introgressed into the genome of D4-15 (64·97 %) compared with D1-1 (32·23 %). The N-efficient new-type B. napus identified in this research had higher N efficiency (and tolerance to low-N stress) than traditional B. napus cultivars, and thus could have important potential for use in breeding N-efficient B. napus cultivars in the field. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email

  3. Extraction of the Constituent Subgenomes of the Natural Allopolyploid Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bin; Tu, Yuqin; Zeng, Pan; Ge, Xianhong; Li, Zaiyun

    2016-11-01

    As the dynamic nature of progenitor genomes accompanies the speciation by interspecific hybridization, the extraction of the constituent subgenome(s) from a natural allopolyploid species of long history and then restitution of the progenitor(s) provides the unique opportunity to study the genome evolution and interplay. Herein, the A subgenome from the allotetraploid oilseed rape (Brassica napus L., AACC) was extracted through inducing the preferential elimination of C-subgenome chromosomes in intertribal crosses and the progenitor B. rapa was restituted (RBR). Then by crossing and backcrossing RBR with B. napus donor, the C subgenome was in situ dissected by adding each of its nine chromosomes to the extracted A subgenome and establishing the whole set of monosonic alien addition lines (MAALs). RBR from spring-type B. napus genotype "Oro" expressed a phenotype resembling some type of B. rapa never observed before, but showed a winter-type flowering habit. This RBR had weaker growth vigor and suffered more seriously from biotic and abiotic stresses compared with Oro. The phenotypes specific for these MAALs showed the location of the related genes on the particular C-subgenome chromosomes. These MAALs exhibited obviously different frequencies in homeologous pairing and transmission of additional C-subgenome chromosomes, which were associated with the distinct degrees of their relatedness, and even with the possible genetic regulation for meiotic pairing evolved in B. napus Finally, large scaffolds undetermined for sequence assembly of B. napus were anchored to specific C-subgenome chromosomes using MAALs. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  4. Gene Introgression in Weeds Depends on Initial Gene Location in the Crop: Brassica napus-Raphanus raphanistrum Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk-Chauvat, Katarzyna; Delaunay, Sabrina; Vannier, Anne; François, Caroline; Thomas, Gwenaëlle; Eber, Frédérique; Lodé, Maryse; Gilet, Marie; Huteau, Virginie; Morice, Jérôme; Nègre, Sylvie; Falentin, Cyril; Coriton, Olivier; Darmency, Henri; Alrustom, Bachar; Jenczewski, Eric; Rousseau-Gueutin, Mathieu; Chèvre, Anne-Marie

    2017-07-01

    The effect of gene location within a crop genome on its transfer to a weed genome remains an open question for gene flow assessment. To elucidate this question, we analyzed advanced generations of intergeneric hybrids, derived from an initial pollination of known oilseed rape varieties (Brassica napus, AACC, 2n = 38) by a local population of wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum, RrRr, 2n = 18). After five generations of recurrent pollination, 307 G5 plants with a chromosome number similar to wild radish were genotyped using 105 B. napus specific markers well distributed along the chromosomes. They revealed that 49.8% of G5 plants carried at least one B. napus genomic region. According to the frequency of B. napus markers (0-28%), four classes were defined: Class 1 (near zero frequency), with 75 markers covering ∼70% of oilseed rape genome; Class 2 (low frequency), with 20 markers located on 11 genomic regions; Class 3 (high frequency), with eight markers on three genomic regions; and Class 4 (higher frequency), with two adjacent markers detected on A10. Therefore, some regions of the oilseed rape genome are more prone than others to be introgressed into wild radish. Inheritance and growth of plant progeny revealed that genomic regions of oilseed rape could be stably introduced into wild radish and variably impact the plant fitness (plant height and seed number). Our results pinpoint that novel technologies enabling the targeted insertion of transgenes should select genomic regions that are less likely to be introgressed into the weed genome, thereby reducing gene flow. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  5. Increased [CO2] does not compensate for negative effects on yield caused by higher temperature and [O3] in Brassica napus L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frenck, Georg; van der Linden, Leon Gareth; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard

    2011-01-01

    in existing genotypes is vital. In this study, the responses in yield and biomass production of four different cultivars of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) were tested under five different combinations of increased [CO2] (700 ppm), temperature (+5 °C) and [O3] (+40 ppb). Especially the multifactor treatments....... Our results suggest that future breeding of B. napus should be based on old cultivars, since more modern varieties seem to have lower potentials to respond to CO2 and thus counteract the detrimental effects of yield reducing environmental factors such as temperature and O3....

  6. Long-Term Monitoring of Field Trial Sites with Genetically Modified Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L.) in Saxony-Anhalt, Germany. Fifteen Years Persistence to Date but No Spatial Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belter, Anke

    2016-01-01

    Oilseed rape is known to persist in arable fields because of its ability to develop secondary seed dormancy in certain agronomic and environmental conditions. If conditions change, rapeseeds are able to germinate up to 10 years later to build volunteers in ensuing crops. Extrapolations of experimental data acted on the assumption of persistence periods for more than 20 years after last harvest of rapeseed. Genetically-modified oilseed rape—cultivated widely in Northern America since 1996—is assumed not to differ from its conventional form in this property. Here, experimental data are reported from official monitoring activities that verify these assumptions. At two former field trial sites in Saxony-Anhalt genetically-modified herbicide-resistant oilseed rape volunteers are found up to fifteen years after harvest. Nevertheless, spatial dispersion or establishment of GM plants outside of the field sites was not observed within this period. PMID:26784233

  7. Long-Term Monitoring of Field Trial Sites with Genetically Modified Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L.) in Saxony-Anhalt, Germany. Fifteen Years Persistence to Date but No Spatial Dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belter, Anke

    2016-01-16

    Oilseed rape is known to persist in arable fields because of its ability to develop secondary seed dormancy in certain agronomic and environmental conditions. If conditions change, rapeseeds are able to germinate up to 10 years later to build volunteers in ensuing crops. Extrapolations of experimental data acted on the assumption of persistence periods for more than 20 years after last harvest of rapeseed. Genetically-modified oilseed rape-cultivated widely in Northern America since 1996-is assumed not to differ from its conventional form in this property. Here, experimental data are reported from official monitoring activities that verify these assumptions. At two former field trial sites in Saxony-Anhalt genetically-modified herbicide-resistant oilseed rape volunteers are found up to fifteen years after harvest. Nevertheless, spatial dispersion or establishment of GM plants outside of the field sites was not observed within this period.

  8. Genome-wide association mapping unravels the genetic control of seed germination and vigor in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzig, Sarah V; Frisch, Matthias; Breuer, Frank; Nesi, Nathalie; Ducournau, Sylvie; Wagner, Marie-Helene; Leckband, Gunhild; Abbadi, Amine; Snowdon, Rod J

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and uniform seed germination is a crucial prerequisite for crop establishment and high yield levels in crop production. A disclosure of genetic factors contributing to adequate seed vigor would help to further increase yield potential and stability. Here we carried out a genome-wide association study in order to define genomic regions influencing seed germination and early seedling growth in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.). A population of 248 genetically diverse winter-type B. napus accessions was genotyped with the Brassica 60k SNP Illumina genotyping array. Automated high-throughput in vitro phenotyping provided extensive data for multiple traits related to germination and early vigor, such as germination speed, absolute germination rate and radicle elongation. The data obtained indicate that seed germination and radicle growth are strongly environmentally dependent, but could nevertheless be substantially improved by genomic-based breeding. Conditions during seed production and storage were shown to have a profound effect on seed vigor, and a variable manifestation of seed dormancy appears to contribute to differences in germination performance in B. napus. Several promising positional and functional candidate genes could be identified within the genomic regions associated with germination speed, absolute germination rate, radicle growth and thousand seed weight. These include B. napus orthologs of the Arabidopsis thaliana genes SNOWY COTYLEDON 1 (SCO1), ARABIDOPSIS TWO-COMPONENT RESPONSE REGULATOR (ARR4), and ARGINYL-t-RNA PROTEIN TRANSFERASE 1 (ATE1), which have been shown previously to play a role in seed germination and seedling growth in A. thaliana.

  9. [Phosphinothricin-resistant somatic hybrids Brassica napus + Orychophragmus violaceus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhno, L O; Komarnyts'kyĭ, I K; Cherep, M N; Kuchuk, M V

    2007-01-01

    Phosphinothricin (PPT) resistant hybrid plants between Brassica napus L. cv. Kalinovsky and Orychophragmus violaceus (L.) O.E. Shulz. were obtained as a result of somatic hybridization experiments. The hybrids inherited PPT resistance from O. violaceus plants which were previously transformed by the vector containing Spm/dSpm Zea mays transposon system with bar gene located within the nonautonomous transposon. The obtained plants had intermediate morphology. Their hybrid nature has been confirmed by isozyme (esterase and amilase activity) and PCR (bar, gus, Spm/dSpm integration) analyses. The hybrids combined B. napus plastom and O. violaceus mithochondrion that was revealed by PCR-RFLP. The hybrid plants might be included to rapeseed breeding programme after examination of their oil quality as well as to chloroplast transformation experiments that is still urgent for B. napus.

  10. Genome-wide association mapping and Identification of candidate genes for fatty acid composition in Brassica napus L. using SNP markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Cunmin; Jia, Ledong; Fu, Fuyou; Zhao, Huiyan; Lu, Kun; Wei, Lijuan; Xu, Xinfu; Liang, Ying; Li, Shimeng; Wang, Rui; Li, Jiana

    2017-03-14

    B. napus (oilseed) is an important source of edible vegetable oil, and its nutritional and economic value is determined by its fatty acid composition and content. Using the Brassica 60 K SNP array, we performed a genome-wide association study of fatty acid composition in a population of 520 genetically diverse oilseed accessions. Using the PCA + K model in TASSEL 5.2.1, we identified 62 genomic regions that were significantly associated with the composition of seven fatty acids, and five consensus regions that mapped to the A2, A8, A9, C1, and C3 chromosomes, respectively, of the Brassica napus Darmor-bzh genome. We then identified 24 orthologs of the functional candidate genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis, excluding BnaA.FAE1 and BnaC.FAE1 on the A8 and C3 homologous genome blocks, which are known to have critical roles in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway, and potential orthologs of these genes (e.g., LACS9, KCR1, FAB1, LPAT4, KCS17, CER4, TT16, and ACBP5). Our results demonstrate the power of association mapping in identifying genes of interest in B. napus and provide insight into the genetic basis of fatty acid biosynthesis in B. napus. Furthermore, our findings may facilitate marker-based breeding efforts aimed at improving fatty acid composition and quality in B. napus.

  11. Capturing sequence variation among flowering-time regulatory gene homologues in the allopolyploid crop species Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eSchiessl

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Flowering, the transition from the vegetative to the generative phase, is a decisive time point in the lifecycle of a plant. Flowering is controlled by a complex network of transcription factors, photoreceptors, enzymes and miRNAs. In recent years, several studies gave rise to the hypothesis that this network is also strongly involved in the regulation of other important lifecycle processes ranging from germination and seed development through to fundamental developmental and yield-related traits. In the allopolyploid crop species Brassica napus, (genome AACC, homoeologous copies of flowering time regulatory genes are implicated in major phenological variation within the species, however the extent and control of intraspecific and intergenomic variation among flowering-time regulators is still unclear. To investigate differences among B. napus morphotypes in relation to flowering-time gene variation, we performed targeted deep sequencing of 29 regulatory flowering-time genes in four genetically and phenologically diverse B. napus accessions. The genotype panel included a winter-type oilseed rape, a winter fodder rape, a spring-type oilseed rape (all B. napus ssp. napus and a swede (B. napus ssp. napobrassica, which show extreme differences in winter-hardiness, vernalization requirement and flowering behaviour. A broad range of genetic variation was detected in the targeted genes for the different morphotypes, including non-synonymous SNPs, copy number variation and presence-absence variation. The results suggest that this broad variation in vernalisation, clock and signaling genes could be a key driver of morphological differentiation for flowering-related traits in this recent allopolyploid crop species.

  12. Gene conversion events and variable degree of homogenization of rDNA loci in cultivars of Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochorová, Jana; Coriton, Olivier; Kuderová, Alena; Lunerová, Jana; Chèvre, Anne-Marie; Kovařík, Aleš

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Brassica napus (AACC, 2n = 38, oilseed rape) is a relatively recent allotetraploid species derived from the putative progenitor diploid species Brassica rapa (AA, 2n = 20) and Brassica oleracea (CC, 2n = 18). To determine the influence of intensive breeding conditions on the evolution of its genome, we analysed structure and copy number of rDNA in 21 cultivars of B. napus, representative of genetic diversity. Methods We used next-generation sequencing genomic approaches, Southern blot hybridization, expression analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Subgenome-specific sequences derived from rDNA intergenic spacers (IGS) were used as probes for identification of loci composition on chromosomes. Key Results Most B. napus cultivars (18/21, 86 %) had more A-genome than C-genome rDNA copies. Three cultivars analysed by FISH (‘Darmor’, ‘Yudal’ and ‘Asparagus kale’) harboured the same number (12 per diploid set) of loci. In B. napus ‘Darmor’, the A-genome-specific rDNA probe hybridized to all 12 rDNA loci (eight on the A-genome and four on the C-genome) while the C-genome-specific probe showed weak signals on the C-genome loci only. Deep sequencing revealed high homogeneity of arrays suggesting that the C-genome genes were largely overwritten by the A-genome variants in B. napus ‘Darmor’. In contrast, B. napus ‘Yudal’ showed a lack of gene conversion evidenced by additive inheritance of progenitor rDNA variants and highly localized hybridization signals of subgenome-specific probes on chromosomes. Brassica napus ‘Asparagus kale’ showed an intermediate pattern to ‘Darmor’ and ‘Yudal’. At the expression level, most cultivars (95 %) exhibited stable A-genome nucleolar dominance while one cultivar (‘Norin 9’) showed co-dominance. Conclusions The B. napus cultivars differ in the degree and direction of rDNA homogenization. The prevalent direction of gene conversion (towards the A-genome) correlates

  13. Gene conversion events and variable degree of homogenization of rDNA loci in cultivars of Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochorová, Jana; Coriton, Olivier; Kuderová, Alena; Lunerová, Jana; Chèvre, Anne-Marie; Kovařík, Aleš

    2017-01-01

    Brassica napus (AACC, 2n = 38, oilseed rape) is a relatively recent allotetraploid species derived from the putative progenitor diploid species Brassica rapa (AA, 2n = 20) and Brassica oleracea (CC, 2n = 18). To determine the influence of intensive breeding conditions on the evolution of its genome, we analysed structure and copy number of rDNA in 21 cultivars of B. napus, representative of genetic diversity. We used next-generation sequencing genomic approaches, Southern blot hybridization, expression analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Subgenome-specific sequences derived from rDNA intergenic spacers (IGS) were used as probes for identification of loci composition on chromosomes. Most B. napus cultivars (18/21, 86 %) had more A-genome than C-genome rDNA copies. Three cultivars analysed by FISH ('Darmor', 'Yudal' and 'Asparagus kale') harboured the same number (12 per diploid set) of loci. In B. napus 'Darmor', the A-genome-specific rDNA probe hybridized to all 12 rDNA loci (eight on the A-genome and four on the C-genome) while the C-genome-specific probe showed weak signals on the C-genome loci only. Deep sequencing revealed high homogeneity of arrays suggesting that the C-genome genes were largely overwritten by the A-genome variants in B. napus 'Darmor'. In contrast, B. napus 'Yudal' showed a lack of gene conversion evidenced by additive inheritance of progenitor rDNA variants and highly localized hybridization signals of subgenome-specific probes on chromosomes. Brassica napus 'Asparagus kale' showed an intermediate pattern to 'Darmor' and 'Yudal'. At the expression level, most cultivars (95 %) exhibited stable A-genome nucleolar dominance while one cultivar ('Norin 9') showed co-dominance. The B. napus cultivars differ in the degree and direction of rDNA homogenization. The prevalent direction of gene conversion (towards the A-genome) correlates with the direction of expression dominance indicating that gene activity may be needed for

  14. Construction of an integrated genetic linkage map for the A genome of Brassica napus using SSR markers derived from sequenced BACs in B. rapa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Graham J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Multinational Brassica rapa Genome Sequencing Project (BrGSP has developed valuable genomic resources, including BAC libraries, BAC-end sequences, genetic and physical maps, and seed BAC sequences for Brassica rapa. An integrated linkage map between the amphidiploid B. napus and diploid B. rapa will facilitate the rapid transfer of these valuable resources from B. rapa to B. napus (Oilseed rape, Canola. Results In this study, we identified over 23,000 simple sequence repeats (SSRs from 536 sequenced BACs. 890 SSR markers (designated as BrGMS were developed and used for the construction of an integrated linkage map for the A genome in B. rapa and B. napus. Two hundred and nineteen BrGMS markers were integrated to an existing B. napus linkage map (BnaNZDH. Among these mapped BrGMS markers, 168 were only distributed on the A genome linkage groups (LGs, 18 distrubuted both on the A and C genome LGs, and 33 only distributed on the C genome LGs. Most of the A genome LGs in B. napus were collinear with the homoeologous LGs in B. rapa, although minor inversions or rearrangements occurred on A2 and A9. The mapping of these BAC-specific SSR markers enabled assignment of 161 sequenced B. rapa BACs, as well as the associated BAC contigs to the A genome LGs of B. napus. Conclusion The genetic mapping of SSR markers derived from sequenced BACs in B. rapa enabled direct links to be established between the B. napus linkage map and a B. rapa physical map, and thus the assignment of B. rapa BACs and the associated BAC contigs to the B. napus linkage map. This integrated genetic linkage map will facilitate exploitation of the B. rapa annotated genomic resources for gene tagging and map-based cloning in B. napus, and for comparative analysis of the A genome within Brassica species.

  15. Construction of an integrated genetic linkage map for the A genome of Brassica napus using SSR markers derived from sequenced BACs in B. rapa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The Multinational Brassica rapa Genome Sequencing Project (BrGSP) has developed valuable genomic resources, including BAC libraries, BAC-end sequences, genetic and physical maps, and seed BAC sequences for Brassica rapa. An integrated linkage map between the amphidiploid B. napus and diploid B. rapa will facilitate the rapid transfer of these valuable resources from B. rapa to B. napus (Oilseed rape, Canola). Results In this study, we identified over 23,000 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) from 536 sequenced BACs. 890 SSR markers (designated as BrGMS) were developed and used for the construction of an integrated linkage map for the A genome in B. rapa and B. napus. Two hundred and nineteen BrGMS markers were integrated to an existing B. napus linkage map (BnaNZDH). Among these mapped BrGMS markers, 168 were only distributed on the A genome linkage groups (LGs), 18 distrubuted both on the A and C genome LGs, and 33 only distributed on the C genome LGs. Most of the A genome LGs in B. napus were collinear with the homoeologous LGs in B. rapa, although minor inversions or rearrangements occurred on A2 and A9. The mapping of these BAC-specific SSR markers enabled assignment of 161 sequenced B. rapa BACs, as well as the associated BAC contigs to the A genome LGs of B. napus. Conclusion The genetic mapping of SSR markers derived from sequenced BACs in B. rapa enabled direct links to be established between the B. napus linkage map and a B. rapa physical map, and thus the assignment of B. rapa BACs and the associated BAC contigs to the B. napus linkage map. This integrated genetic linkage map will facilitate exploitation of the B. rapa annotated genomic resources for gene tagging and map-based cloning in B. napus, and for comparative analysis of the A genome within Brassica species. PMID:20969760

  16. Long-term monitoring of feral genetically modified herbicide-tolerant Brassica napus populations around unloading Japanese ports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuta, Kensuke; Matsuo, Kazuhito; Yoshimura, Yasuyuki; Ohsawa, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified, herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) Brassica napus plants originating from seed spill have recently been found along roadsides leading from Japanese ports that unload oilseed rape. Such introductions have potential biodiversity effects (as defined by the Cartagena Protocol): these include replacement of native elements in the biota through competitive suppression or hybridization. We conducted surveys in the period 2006–2011 to assess such threats. We examined shifts in the population distribution and occurrence of GMHT plants in 1,029 volunteer introduced assemblages of B. napus, 1,169 of B. juncea, and 184 of B. rapa around 12 ports. GMHT B. napus was found around 10 of 12 ports, but its proportion in the populations varied greatly by year and location. Over the survey period, the distributions of a pure non-GMHT population around Tobata and a pure GMHT population around Hakata increased significantly. However, there was no common trend of population expansion or contraction around the 12 ports. Furthermore, we found no herbicide tolerant B. juncea and B. rapa plants derived from crosses with GMHT B. napus. Therefore, GMHT B. napus is not invading native vegetation surrounding its populations and not likely to cross with congeners in Japanese environment. PMID:26175624

  17. Citric acid assisted phytoremediation of copper by Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaheer, Ihsan Elahi; Ali, Shafaqat; Rizwan, Muhammad; Farid, Mujahid; Shakoor, Muhammad Bilal; Gill, Rafaqa Ali; Najeeb, Ullah; Iqbal, Naeem; Ahmad, Rehan

    2015-10-01

    Use of organic acids for promoting heavy metals phytoextraction is gaining worldwide attention. The present study investigated the influence of citric acid (CA) in enhancing copper (Cu) uptake by Brassica napus L. seedlings. 6 Weeks old B. napus seedlings were exposed to different levels of copper (Cu, 0, 50 and 100µM) alone or with CA (2.5mM) in a nutrient medium for 40 days. Exposure to elevated Cu levels (50 and 100µM) significantly reduced the growth, biomass production, chlorophyll content, gas exchange attributes and soluble proteins of B. napus seedlings. In addition, Cu toxicity increased the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), malondialdehyde (MDA) and electrolyte leakage (EL) in leaf and root tissues of B. napus. Activities of antioxidant enzymes such as guaiacol peroxidase (POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalases (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) in root and shoot tissues of B. napus were increased in response to lower Cu concentration (50µM) but increased under higher Cu concentration (100µM). Addition of CA into nutrient medium significantly alleviated Cu toxicity effects on B. napus seedlings by improving photosynthetic capacity and ultimately plant growth. Increased activities of antioxidant enzymes in CA-treated plants seems to play a role in capturing of stress-induced reactive oxygen species as was evident from lower level of H2O2, MDA and EL in CA-treated plants. Increasing Cu concentration in the nutrient medium significantly increased Cu concentration in in B. napus tissues. Cu uptake was further increased by CA application. These results suggested that CA might be a useful strategy for increasing phytoextraction of Cu from contaminated soils. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hydrogen sulfide alleviates cadmium-induced morpho-physiological and ultrastructural changes in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Basharat; Gill, Rafaqat A; Yang, Su; Gill, Muhammad B; Ali, Shafaqat; Rafiq, Muhammad T; Zhou, Weijun

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, role of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in alleviating cadmium (Cd) induced stress in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) was studied under greenhouse conditions. Plants were grown hydroponically under three levels (0, 100, and 500µM) of Cd and three levels (0, 100 and 200µM) of H2S donor, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS). Results showed that application of H2S significantly improved the plant growth, root morphology, chlorophyll contents, elements uptake and photosynthetic activity in B. napus plants under Cd stress. Moreover, addition of H2S reduced the Cd concentration in the leaves and roots of B. napus plants under Cd-toxicity. Exogenously applied H2S decreased the production of malondialdehyde and reactive oxygen species in the leaves and roots by improving the enzymatic antioxidant activities under Cd stress conditions. The microscopic examination indicated that application of exogenous H2S improved the cell structures and enabled a clean mesophyll cell having a well developed chloroplast with thylakoid membranes, and a number of mitochondria could be observed in the micrographs. A number of modifications could be found in root tip cell i.e. mature mitochondria, long endoplasmic reticulum and golgibodies under combined application of H2S and Cd. On the basis of these findings, it can be concluded that application of exogenous H2S has a protective role on plant growth, photosynthetic parameters, elements uptake, antioxidants enzyme activities and ultrastructural changes in B. napus under high Cd stress conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Diverse regulatory factors associate with flowering time and yield responses in winter-type Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiessl, Sarah; Iniguez-Luy, Federico; Qian, Wei; Snowdon, Rod J

    2015-09-29

    Flowering time, plant height and seed yield are strongly influenced by climatic and day-length adaptation in crop plants. To investigate these traits under highly diverse field conditions in the important oilseed crop Brassica napus, we performed a genome-wide association study using data from diverse agroecological environments spanning three continents. A total of 158 European winter-type B.napus inbred lines were genotyped with 21,623 unique, single-locus single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers using the Brassica 60 K-SNP Illumina® Infinium consortium array. Phenotypic associations were calculated in the panel over the years 2010-2012 for flowering time, plant height and seed yield in 5 highly diverse locations in Germany, China and Chile, adding up to 11 diverse environments in total. We identified 101 genome regions associating with the onset of flowering, 69 with plant height, 36 with seed yield and 68 cross-trait regions with potential adaptive value. Within these regions, B.napus orthologs for a number of candidate adaptation genes were detected, including central circadian clock components like CIRCADIAN CLOCK- ASSOCIATED 1 (Bna.CCA1) and the important flowering-time regulators FLOWERING LOCUS T (Bna.FT) and FRUITFUL (Bna.FUL). Gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis of candidate regions suggested that selection of genes involved in post-transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of flowering time may play a potential role in adaptation of B. napus to highly divergent environments. The classical flowering time regulators Bna.FLC and Bna.CO were not found among the candidate regions, although both show functional variation. Allelic effects were additive for plant height and yield, but not for flowering time. The scarcity of positive minor alleles for yield in this breeding pool points to a lack of diversity for adaptation that could restrict yield gain in the face of environmental change. Our study provides a valuable framework to further improve the

  20. Genetics and molecular mapping of resistance to Plasmodiophora brassicae pathotypes 2, 3, 5, 6, and 8 in rutabaga (Brassica napus var. napobrassica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Muhammad Jakir; Rahman, Habibur

    2016-10-01

    Clubroot disease, caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae, is a threat to the production of Brassica crops including oilseed B. napus. In Canada, several pathotypes of this pathogen, such as pathotypes 2, 3, 5, 6, and 8, were identified, and resistance to these pathotypes was found in a rutabaga (B. napus var. napobrassica) genotype. In this paper, we report the genetic basis and molecular mapping of this resistance by use of F2, backcross (BC1), and doubled haploid (DH) populations generated from crossing of this rutabaga line to a susceptible spring B. napus canola line. The F1, F2, and BC1 populations were evaluated for resistance to pathotype 3, and the DH population was evaluated for resistance to pathotypes 2, 3, 5, 6, and 8. A 3:1 segregation in F2 and a 1:1 segregation in BC1 were found for resistance to pathotype 3, and a 1:1 segregation was found in the DH population for resistance to all pathotypes. Molecular mapping by using the DH population identified a genomic region on chromosome A8 carrying resistance to all five pathotypes. This suggests that a single gene or a cluster of genes, located in this genomic region, is involved in the control of resistance to these pathotypes.

  1. Disruption of germination and seedling development in Brassica napus by mutations causing severe seed hormonal imbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung eNguyen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Brassica napus (oilseed rape accession 1012-98 shows a disturbed germination phenotype that was thought to be associated with its lack of testa pigmentation and thin seed coat. Here we demonstrate that the disturbed germination and seedling development are actually due to independent mutations that disrupt the balance of hormone metabolites and their regulators in the seeds. High-throughput UPLC-MS/MS hormone profiling of seeds and seedlings before and after germination revealed that 1012-98 has a severely disturbed hormone balance with extremely atypical, excessive quantities of auxin and ABA metabolites. The resulting hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA and a corresponding increase in dormancy often results in death of the embryo after imbibition or high frequencies of disturbed, often lethal developmental phenotypes, resembling Arabidopsis mutants for the auxin regulatory factor gene ARF10 or the auxin-overproducing transgenic line iaaM-OX. Molecular cloning of Brassica ARF10 orthologues revealed four loci in normal B. napus, two derived from the Brassica A genome and two from the C genome. On the other hand, the phenotypic mutant 1012-98 exhibited amplification of C-genome BnaC.ARF10 copy number along with a chimeric allele originating from recombination between homoeologous A and C genome loci which lead to minor increase of Bna.ARF10 transcription on the critical timepoint for seed germination, the indirect regulator of ABI3, the germinative inhibitor. Bna.GH3.5 expression was upregulated to conjugate free auxin to IAA-asp between 2-6 DAS. Functional amino acid changes were also found in important DNA binding domains of one BnaC.ARF10 locus, suggesting that regulatory changes in Bna.ARF10 are collectively responsible for the observed phenotpyes in 1012-98. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report disruption of germination and seedling development in Brassica napus caused by the crosstalk of auxin-ABA and the

  2. Disruption of Germination and Seedling Development in Brassica napus by Mutations Causing Severe Seed Hormonal Imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tung C T; Obermeier, Christian; Friedt, Wolfgang; Abrams, Suzanne R; Snowdon, Rod J

    2016-01-01

    The Brassica napus (oilseed rape) accession 1012-98 shows a disturbed germination phenotype that was thought to be associated with its lack of testa pigmentation and thin seed coat. Here, we demonstrate that the disturbed germination and seedling development are actually due to independent mutations that disrupt the balance of hormone metabolites and their regulators in the seeds. High-throughput UPLC-MS/MS hormone profiling of seeds and seedlings before and after germination revealed that 1012-98 has a severely disturbed hormone balance with extremely atypical, excessive quantities of auxin and ABA metabolites. The resulting hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) and a corresponding increase in dormancy often results in death of the embryo after imbibition or high frequencies of disturbed, often lethal developmental phenotypes, resembling Arabidopsis mutants for the auxin regulatory factor gene ARF10 or the auxin-overproducing transgenic line iaaM-OX. Molecular cloning of Brassica ARF10 orthologs revealed four loci in normal B. napus, two derived from the Brassica A genome and two from the C genome. On the other hand, the phenotypic mutant 1012-98 exhibited amplification of C-genome BnaC.ARF10 copy number along with a chimeric allele originating from recombination between homeologous A and C genome loci which lead to minor increase of Bna.ARF10 transcription on the critical timepoint for seed germination, the indirect regulator of ABI3, the germinative inhibitor. Bna.GH3.5 expression was upregulated to conjugate free auxin to IAA-asp between 2 and 6 DAS. Functional amino acid changes were also found in important DNA binding domains of one BnaC.ARF10 locus, suggesting that regulatory changes in Bna.ARF10 are collectively responsible for the observed phenotpyes in 1012-98. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report disruption of germination and seedling development in Brassica napus caused by the crosstalk of auxin-ABA and the corresponding regulators Bna

  3. Assembly and comparison of two closely related Brassica napus genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Philipp E; Hurgobin, Bhavna; Golicz, Agnieszka A; Chan, Chon-Kit Kenneth; Yuan, Yuxuan; Lee, HueyTyng; Renton, Michael; Meng, Jinling; Li, Ruiyuan; Long, Yan; Zou, Jun; Bancroft, Ian; Chalhoub, Boulos; King, Graham J; Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, David

    2017-12-01

    As an increasing number of plant genome sequences become available, it is clear that gene content varies between individuals, and the challenge arises to predict the gene content of a species. However, genome comparison is often confounded by variation in assembly and annotation. Differentiating between true gene absence and variation in assembly or annotation is essential for the accurate identification of conserved and variable genes in a species. Here, we present the de novo assembly of the B. napus cultivar Tapidor and comparison with an improved assembly of the Brassica napus cultivar Darmor-bzh. Both cultivars were annotated using the same method to allow comparison of gene content. We identified genes unique to each cultivar and differentiate these from artefacts due to variation in the assembly and annotation. We demonstrate that using a common annotation pipeline can result in different gene predictions, even for closely related cultivars, and repeat regions which collapse during assembly impact whole genome comparison. After accounting for differences in assembly and annotation, we demonstrate that the genome of Darmor-bzh contains a greater number of genes than the genome of Tapidor. Our results are the first step towards comparison of the true differences between B. napus genomes and highlight the potential sources of error in future production of a B. napus pangenome. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Piriformospora indica promotes growth, seed yield and quality of Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhen-Zhu; Wang, Ting; Shrivastava, Neeraj; Chen, You-Yuan; Liu, Xiaoxi; Sun, Chao; Yin, Yufeng; Gao, Qi-Kang; Lou, Bing-Gan

    2017-06-01

    In current scenario, crop productivity is being challenged by decreasing soil fertility. To cope up with this problem, different beneficial microbes are explored to increase the crop productivity with value additions. In this study, Brassica napus L., an important agricultural economic oilseed crop with rich source of nutritive qualities, was interacted with Piriformospora indica, a unique root colonizing fungus with wide host range and multifunctional aspects. The fungus-treated plants showed a significant increase in agronomic parameters with plant biomass, lodging-resistance, early bolting and flowering, oil yield and quality. Nutritional analysis revealed that plants treated by P. indica had reduced erucic acid and glucosinolates contents, and increased the accumulation of N, Ca, Mg, P, K, S, B, Fe and Zn elements. Low erucic acid and glucosinolates contents are important parameters for high quality oil, because oils high in erucic acid and glucosinolates are considered undesirable for human nutrition. Furthermore, the expression profiles of two encoding enzyme genes, Bn-FAE1 and BnECR, which are responsible for regulating erucic acid biosynthesis, were down-regulated at mid- and late- life stages during seeds development in colonized plants. These results demonstrated that P. indica played an important role in enhancing plant growth, rapeseed yield and quality improvement of B. napus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Anatomy and transcript profiling of gynoecium development in female sterile Brassica napus mediated by one alien chromosome from Orychophragmus violaceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wen-qin; Zhao, Zhi-gang; Ge, Xian-hong; Ding, Li; Li, Zai-yun

    2014-01-23

    The gynoecium is one of the most complex organs of angiosperms specialized for seed production and dispersal, but only several genes important for ovule or embryo sac development were identified by using female sterile mutants. The female sterility in oilseed rape (Brassica napus) was before found to be related with one alien chromosome from another crucifer Orychophragmus violaceus. Herein, the developmental anatomy and comparative transcript profiling (RNA-seq) for the female sterility were performed to reveal the genes and possible metabolic pathways behind the formation of the damaged gynoecium. The ovules in the female sterile Brassica napus with two copies of the alien chromosomes (S1) initiated only one short integument primordium which underwent no further development and the female gametophyte development was blocked after the tetrad stage but before megagametogenesis initiation. Using Brassica_ 95k_ unigene as the reference genome, a total of 28,065 and 27,653 unigenes were identified to be transcribed in S1 and donor B. napus (H3), respectively. Further comparison of the transcript abundance between S1 and H3 revealed that 4540 unigenes showed more than two fold expression differences. Gene ontology and pathway enrichment analysis of the Differentially Expressed Genes (DEGs) showed that a number of important genes and metabolism pathways were involved in the development of gynoecium, embryo sac, ovule, integuments as well as the interactions between pollen and pistil. DEGs for the ovule development were detected to function in the metabolism pathways regulating brassinosteroid (BR) biosynthesis, adaxial/abaxial axis specification, auxin transport and signaling. A model was proposed to show the possible roles and interactions of these pathways for the sterile gynoecium development. The results provided new information for the molecular mechanisms behind the gynoecium development at early stage in B. napus.

  6. Digestibility and intestinal fermentability of canola meal from Brassica juncea and Brassica napus fed to ileal-cannulated grower pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le, M.H.A.; Buchet, A.D.G.; Beltranena, E.; Gerrits, W.J.J.; Zijlstra, R.T.

    2017-01-01

    Yellow-seeded Brassica (B.) juncea is a novel canola species. Therefore, its meal co-product requires feed quality evaluation and comparison to conventional, dark-seeded B. napus canola meal for pigs. The B. juncea canola meal contains less fibre than B. napus canola meal (190 vs. 260 g NDF/kg, as

  7. Molekularne i fizjologiczne podstawy osmokondycjonowania nasion rzepaku (Brassica napus L)

    OpenAIRE

    Kubala, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    Wydział Biologii: Instytut Biologii Eksperymentalnej Prezentowana rozprawa doktorska poświęcona jest zagadnieniu kondycjonowania nasion, w szczególności osmokondycjonowania nasion rzepaku (Brassica napus L.). Celem pracy doktorskiej było poznanie molekularnych i fizjologicznych mechanizmów kondycjonowania odpowiedzialnych za polepszenie parametrów kiełkowania nasion oraz zwiększoną tolerancję na zasolenie. Osmokondycjonowanie znacząco zwiększyło wigor nasion rzepaku. Wyniki analizy transkr...

  8. Separation and identification of candidate protein elicitors from the cultivation medium of Leptosphaeria maculans inducing resistance in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nováková, Miroslava; Kim, Phuong Dinh; Šašek, Vladimír; Burketová, Lenka; Jindřichová, Barbora; Šantrůček, Jiří; Valentová, Olga

    2016-07-08

    The Dothideomycete Leptosphaeria maculans, a worldwide fungal pathogen of oilseed rape (Brassica napus), secretes a broad spectrum of molecules into the cultivation medium during growth in vitro. Here, candidate elicitor molecules, which induce resistance in B. napus to L. maculans, were identified in the cultivation medium. The elicitation activity was indicated by increased transcription of pathogenesis-related gene 1 (PR1) and enhanced resistance of B. napus plants to the invasion of L. maculans. The elicitation activity was significantly lowered when the cultivation medium was heated to 80°C. Active components were further characterized by specific cleavage with the proteolytic enzymes trypsin and proteinase K and with glycosidases α-amylase and β-glucanase. The elicitor activity was eliminated by proteolytic digestion while glycosidases had no effect. The filtered medium was fractionated by either ion-exchange chromatography or isoelectric focusing. Mass spectrometry analysis of the most active fractions obtained by both separation procedures revealed predominantly enzymes that can be involved in the degradation of plant cell wall polysaccharides. This is the first study searching for L. maculans-specific secreted elicitors with a potential to be used as defense-activating agents in the protection of B. napus against L. maculans in agriculture. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:918-928, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  9. A comparative investigation of the metabolism of the herbicide glufosinate in cell cultures of transgenic glufosinate-resistant and non-transgenic oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and corn (Zea mays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhland, Monika; Engelhardt, Gabriele; Pawlizki, Karlheinz

    2002-10-01

    To obtain information on differences between the metabolic pathways of the herbicide glufosinate (trade names: BASTA, LIBERTY) in non-transgenic, glufosinate-sensitive plants and in transgenic, glufosinate-resistant plants, the metabolism of 14C-labeled glufosinate and its enantiomers L- and D-glufosinate was studied using cell cultures of oilseed rape and corn. Transformation of glufosinate in both sensitive and transgenic rape cells remained at a low rate of about 3-10% in contrast to corn cells, where 20% was transformed in sensitive and 43% in transgenic cells after 14 days of incubation, the rest remaining as unchanged glufosinate. In sensitive rape and corn cells the main metabolite was 4-methylphosphinico-2-oxo-butanoic acid (PPO) with 7.3 and 16.4%, respectively, together with low amounts of 3-methylphosphinicopropionic acid (MPP), 4-methylphosphinico-2-hydroxybutanoic acid (MHB), 4-methylphosphinicobutanoic acid (MPB) and 2-methylphosphinicoacetic acid (MPA). An additional metabolite formed in transgenic cell cultures was 2-acetamido-4-methylbutanoic acid (N-acetyl-L-glufosinate, NGA), which was formed at rates of 3.2% in rape and 16.1% in corn. A further minor metabolite, not yet identified, was detected in both cell types. The liberation of 0.2% 14CO2 indicates further metabolic steps prior to a limited mineralization in plant cell cultures. L-glufosinate was transformed into the same metabolites as the glufosinate racemate. D-glufosinate was not metabolized.

  10. Climate change and genetically modified insecticidal plants. Plant-herbivore interactions and secondary chemistry of Bt Cry1Ac-toxin producing oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) under elevated CO{sub 2} or O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himanen, S.

    2008-07-01

    Transgenic insect-resistant plants producing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crystalline endotoxins are the first commercial applications of genetically modified crops and their use has steadily expanded over the last ten years. Together with the expanding agricultural use of transgenic crops, climate change is predicted to be among the major factors affecting agriculture in the coming years. Plants, herbivores and insects of higher trophic levels are all predicted to be affected by the current atmospheric climate change. However, only very few studies to date have addressed the sustained use and herbivore interactions of Bt-producing plants under the influence of these abiotic factors. The main objective of this study was to comparatively assess the performance of a Bt Cry1Ac toxin-producing oilseed rape line and its non-transgenic parent line in terms of vegetative growth and allocation to secondary defence compounds (glucosinolates and volatile terpenoids), and the performance of Bt-target and nontarget insect herbivores as well as tritrophic interaction functioning on these lines. For this, several growth chamber experiments with vegetative stage non-Bt and Bt plants facing exposures to doubled atmospheric CO{sub 2} level alone or together with increased temperature and different regimes of elevated O{sub 3} were conducted. The main hypothesis of this work was that Bt-transgenic plants have reduced performance or allocation to secondary compounds due to the cost of producing Bt toxin under changed abiotic environments. The Bt-transgenic oilseed rape line exhibited slightly delayed vegetative growth and had increased nitrogen and reduced carbon content compared to the non-transgenic parent line, but the physiological responses (i.e. biomass gain and photosynthesis) of the plant lines to CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} enhancements were equal. Two aphid species, non-susceptible to Bt Cry1Ac, showed equal performance and reproduction on both plant lines under elevated CO{sub 2

  11. Spatial and Temporal Mapping of Key Lipid Species in Brassica napus Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfield, Helen K; Sturtevant, Drew; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Munz, Eberhard; Guschina, Irina A; Chapman, Kent; Harwood, John L

    2017-04-01

    The regulation of lipid synthesis in oil seeds is still not fully understood. Oilseed rape (Brassica napus) is the third most productive vegetable oil crop on the global market; therefore, increasing our understanding of lipid accumulation in oilseed rape seeds is of great economic, as well as intellectual, importance. Matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) is a technique that allows the mapping of metabolites directly onto intact biological tissues, giving a spatial context to metabolism. We have used MALDI-MSI to study the spatial distribution of two major lipid species, triacylglycerols and phosphatidylcholines. A dramatic, heterogenous landscape of molecular species was revealed, demonstrating significantly different lipid compositions between the various tissue types within the seed. The embryonic axis was found to be particularly enriched in palmitic acid, while the seed coat/aleurone layer accumulated vaccenic, linoleic, and α-linoleic acids. Furthermore, the lipid composition of the inner and outer cotyledons differed from each other, a remarkable discovery given the supposed identical functionality of these two tissues. Triacylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine molecular species distribution was analyzed through a developmental time series covering early seed lipid accumulation to seed maturity. The spatial patterning of lipid molecular species did not vary significantly during seed development. Data gathered using MALDI-MSI was verified through gas chromatography analysis of dissected seeds. The distinct lipid distribution profiles observed imply differential regulation of lipid metabolism between the different tissue types of the seed. Further understanding of this differential regulation will enhance efforts to improve oilseed rape productivity and quality. © 2017 The author(s). All Rights Reserved.

  12. High accumulation of anthocyanins via the ectopic expression of AtDFR confers significant salt stress tolerance in Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihye; Lee, Won Je; Vu, Tien Thanh; Jeong, Chan Young; Hong, Suk-Whan; Lee, Hojoung

    2017-08-01

    The ectopic expression of AtDFR results in increased accumulation of anthocyanins leading to enhanced salinity and drought stress tolerance in B. napus plants. Flavonoids with antioxidant effects confer many additional benefits to plants. Evidence indicates that flavonoids, including anthocyanins, protect tissues against oxidative stress from various abiotic stressors. We determined whether increases in anthocyanins increased abiotic stress tolerance in Brassica napus, because the values of B. napus L. and its cultivation area are increasing worldwide. We overexpressed Arabidopsis dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR) in B. napus. Increased DFR transcript levels for AtDFR-OX B. shoots correlated with higher anthocyanin accumulation. AtDFR-OX Brassica shoots exhibited lower reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation than wild-type (WT) shoots under high NaCl and mannitol concentrations. This was corroborated by 3,3-diaminobenzidine staining for ROS scavenging activity in 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl assays. Shoots of the AtDFR-OX B. napus lines grown in a high salt medium exhibited enhanced salt tolerance and higher chlorophyll content than similarly grown WT plants. Our observations suggested that the AtDFR gene can be effectively manipulated to modulate salinity and drought stress tolerance by directing to high accumulation of anthocyanins in oilseed plants.

  13. GM risk assessment: Pollen carriage from Brassica napus to B. rapa varies widely between pollinators

    OpenAIRE

    Ronca, S; Allainguillaume, J.; Ford, C.; Warren, J; Wilkinson, M.

    2017-01-01

    Characterizing insect pollen carriage between closely related plant species is especially challenging where source species possess morphologically identical pollen and share many pollinators in common. Here, we use an SNP-based assay using the plant DNA barcoding locus matK to characterize pollen carriage between cultivated Brassica napus and wild Brassica rapa in three sites across southern England. The assay differentiated B. napus and B. rapa pollen carried by honey bees (Apis melifera), b...

  14. Genetic differentiation among sexually compatible relatives of Brassica napus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pipan Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of gene flow between Brassica napus L. and its sexually compatible relatives that could be found in the wild in Slovenia was performed by microsatellite analysis using fifteen selected primer pairs. Genotypes included in the study were obtained from the field survey of sexually compatible relatives of B. napus in natural habitats around Slovenia and from reference collections. Two different wild species of all the presented sexually compatible relatives of B. napus were found in Slovenia, B. rapa and Sinapis arvensis. The reference genotypes included varieties and wild forms from internal collections as marketable seeds or from gene banks. Reference genotypes were represented by the following species and subspecies: B. napus ssp. napobrassica, B. napus ssp. napus, B. nigra, B. oleracea, B. rapa ssp. oleifera, Diplotaxis muralis; D. tenuifolia, Raphanus raphanistrum, R. sativus, R. sativus var. oleiformis, Rapistrum rugosum, S. alba and S. arvensis. Estimation of gene flow described by average number of migrants was 0.72 followed by 0.20 migrants. Due to the observed gene migrations, genetic drift and selection, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was not met. The mean number of alleles over all loci was 16.9, the average polymorphic information content was 0.43. We found four highly divergent and polymorphic loci (Na12-C08, Na10-A08, Ni3-G04b and BRMS-050 at statistically significant level (p<0.05 of gene flow detected. Over all gene diversity intra-individual among populations (0.55 was lower than inter-individual among population (0.77. The results of genetic linkages based standard genetic distance and unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean clustering method, generally divided the genotypes in three divergent groups. Similar results were obtained by principal coordinate analysis where three main groups were constructed according to three factors. A real number of genetic clusters demonstrated a clear separation between populations

  15. Phytoextraction with Brassica napus L.: A tool for sustainable management of heavy metal contaminated soils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grispen, V.M.J.; Nelissen, H.J.M.; Verkleij, J.A.C.

    2006-01-01

    Phytoextraction is a promising tool to extract metals from contaminated soils and Brassica napus L. seems to be a possible candidate species for this purpose. To select accessions with the ability to accumulate cadmium, hydroponically grown 21 day old seedlings of 77 B. napus L. accessions were

  16. Genome-wide association mapping unravels the genetic control of seed germination and vigour in Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Vanessa Hatzig

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Rapid and uniform seed germination is a crucial prerequisite for crop establishment and high yield levels in crop production. A disclosure of genetic factors contributing to adequate seed vigour would help to further increase yield potential and stability. Here we carried out a genome-wide association study in order to define genomic regions influencing seed germination and early seedling growth in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.. A population of 248 genetically diverse winter-type B. napus accessions was genotyped with the Brassica 60kSNP Illumina genotyping array. Automated high-throughput in vitro phenotyping provided extensive data for multiple traits related to germination and early vigour, such as germination speed, absolute germination rate and radicle elongation. The data obtained indicate that seed germination and radicle growth are strongly environmentally dependent, but could nevertheless be substantially improved by genomic-based breeding,. Conditions during seed production and storage were shown to have a profound effect on seed vigour, and a variable manifestation of seed dormancy appears to contribute to differences in germination performance in B. napus. Several promising positional and functional candidate genes could be identified within the genomic regions associated with germination speed, absolute germination rate, radicle growth and thousand seed weight. These include B. napus orthologues of the Arabidopsis thaliana genes SNOWY COTYLEDON 1 (SCO1, ARABIDOPSIS TWO-COMPONENT RESPONSE REGULATOR (ARR4 and ARGINYL-t-RNA PROTEIN TRANSFERASE 1 (ATE1, which have been shown previously to play a role in seed germination and seedling growth in A. thaliana.

  17. Brassica napus DS-3, encoding a DELLA protein, negatively regulates stem elongation through gibberellin signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Li, Haitao; Li, Juanjuan; Wang, Bo; Dai, Cheng; Wang, Jing; Liu, Kede

    2017-04-01

    Identification and characterization of a semi-dwarfing gene ds-3 encoding a mutant DELLA protein regulating plant height through gibberellin signaling pathway. Lodging is one of the most important factors causing severe yield loss in oilseed rape. Utilization of semi-dwarf varieties has been proved the most effective way to increase lodging resistance and yield in many crops. To develop semi-dwarf germplasm in oilseed rape, we identified a semi-dwarf mutant ds-3 which showed a reduced response to phytohormones gibberellins (GAs). Genetic analysis indicated the dwarfism was controlled by a single semi-dominant gene, ds-3. The DS-3 gene was mapped to a genomic region on chromosome C07, which is syntenic to the region of a previously identified semi-dwarf gene ds-1 (BnaA06.RGA). In this region, DS-3 (BnaC07.RGA) gene was identified to encode a DELLA protein that functions as a repressor in GA signaling pathway. A substitution of proline to leucine was identified in ds-3 in the conserved VHYNP motif, which is essential for GA-dependent interaction between gibberellin receptor GID1 and DELLA proteins. Segregation analysis in the F2 population derived from the cross between ds-1 and ds-3 demonstrated that BnaA06.RGA displayed a stronger effect on plant height than BnaC07.RGA, indicating that different RGA genes may play different roles in stem elongation. In addition to BnaA06.RGA and BnaC07.RGA, two more RGA genes (BnaA09.RGA and BnaC09.RGA) were identified in the Brassica napus (B. napus) genome. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) assays suggest that both BnaA09.RGA and BnaC09.RGA are transcribed in leaves and stems and can mediate GA signaling in vivo. These genes represent potential targets for screening ideal semi-dwarfing alleles for oilseed rape breeding.

  18. A high-density SNP map for accurate mapping of seed fibre QTL in Brassica napus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liezhao Liu

    Full Text Available A high density genetic linkage map for the complex allotetraploid crop species Brassica napus (oilseed rape was constructed in a late-generation recombinant inbred line (RIL population, using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers assayed by the Brassica 60 K Infinium BeadChip Array. The linkage map contains 9164 SNP markers covering 1832.9 cM. 1232 bins account for 7648 of the markers. A subset of 2795 SNP markers, with an average distance of 0.66 cM between adjacent markers, was applied for QTL mapping of seed colour and the cell wall fiber components acid detergent lignin (ADL, cellulose and hemicellulose. After phenotypic analyses across four different environments a total of 11 QTL were detected for seed colour and fiber traits. The high-density map considerably improved QTL resolution compared to the previous low-density maps. A previously identified major QTL with very high effects on seed colour and ADL was pinpointed to a narrow genome interval on chromosome A09, while a minor QTL explaining 8.1% to 14.1% of variation for ADL was detected on chromosome C05. Five and three QTL accounting for 4.7% to 21.9% and 7.3% to 16.9% of the phenotypic variation for cellulose and hemicellulose, respectively, were also detected. To our knowledge this is the first description of QTL for seed cellulose and hemicellulose in B. napus, representing interesting new targets for improving oil content. The high density SNP genetic map enables navigation from interesting B. napus QTL to Brassica genome sequences, giving useful new information for understanding the genetics of key seed quality traits in rapeseed.

  19. A high-density SNP map for accurate mapping of seed fibre QTL in Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liezhao; Qu, Cunmin; Wittkop, Benjamin; Yi, Bin; Xiao, Yang; He, Yajun; Snowdon, Rod J; Li, Jiana

    2013-01-01

    A high density genetic linkage map for the complex allotetraploid crop species Brassica napus (oilseed rape) was constructed in a late-generation recombinant inbred line (RIL) population, using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers assayed by the Brassica 60 K Infinium BeadChip Array. The linkage map contains 9164 SNP markers covering 1832.9 cM. 1232 bins account for 7648 of the markers. A subset of 2795 SNP markers, with an average distance of 0.66 cM between adjacent markers, was applied for QTL mapping of seed colour and the cell wall fiber components acid detergent lignin (ADL), cellulose and hemicellulose. After phenotypic analyses across four different environments a total of 11 QTL were detected for seed colour and fiber traits. The high-density map considerably improved QTL resolution compared to the previous low-density maps. A previously identified major QTL with very high effects on seed colour and ADL was pinpointed to a narrow genome interval on chromosome A09, while a minor QTL explaining 8.1% to 14.1% of variation for ADL was detected on chromosome C05. Five and three QTL accounting for 4.7% to 21.9% and 7.3% to 16.9% of the phenotypic variation for cellulose and hemicellulose, respectively, were also detected. To our knowledge this is the first description of QTL for seed cellulose and hemicellulose in B. napus, representing interesting new targets for improving oil content. The high density SNP genetic map enables navigation from interesting B. napus QTL to Brassica genome sequences, giving useful new information for understanding the genetics of key seed quality traits in rapeseed.

  20. Integration of a constraint-based metabolic model of Brassica napus developing seeds with 13C-Metabolic Flux Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan eHay

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of large-scale or genome-scale metabolic reconstructions for modeling and simulation of plant metabolism and integration of those models with large-scale omics and experimental flux data is becoming increasingly important in plant metabolic research. Here we report an updated version of bna572, a bottom-up reconstruction of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.; Brassicaceae developing seeds with emphasis on representation of biomass-component biosynthesis. New features include additional seed-relevant pathways for isoprenoid, sterol, phenylpropanoid, flavonoid, and choline biosynthesis. Being now based on standardized data formats and procedures for model reconstruction, bna572+ is available as a COBRA-compliant Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML model and conforms to the Minimum Information Requested in the Annotation of Biochemical Models (MIRIAM standards for annotation of external data resources. Bna572+ contains 966 genes, 671 reactions, and 666 metabolites distributed among 11 subcellular compartments. It is referenced to the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, with gene-protein-reaction associations resolving subcellular localization. Detailed mass and charge balancing and confidence scoring were applied to all reactions. Using Brassica napus seed specific transcriptome data, expression was verified for 78% of bna572+ genes and 97% of reactions. Alongside bna572+ we also present a revised carbon centric model for 13C-Metabolic Flux Analysis (13C-MFA with all its reactions being referenced to bna572+ based on linear projections. By integration of flux ratio constraints obtained from 13C-MFA and by elimination of infinite flux bounds around thermodynamically infeasible loops based on COBRA loopless methods, we demonstrate improvements in predictive power of Flux Variability Analysis (FVA. Using this combined approach we characterize the difference in metabolic flux of developing seeds of two Brassica napus genotypes contrasting in starch and

  1. Reduction of antinutritional glucosinolates in Brassica oilseeds by mutation of genes encoding transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Madsen, Svend Roesen; Engelen, Steven; Jørgensen, Morten Egevang; Olsen, Carl Erik; Andersen, Jonathan Sonne; Seynnaeve, David; Verhoye, Thalia; Fulawka, Rudy; Denolf, Peter; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2017-04-01

    The nutritional value of Brassica seed meals is reduced by the presence of glucosinolates, which are toxic compounds involved in plant defense. Mutation of the genes encoding two glucosinolate transporters (GTRs) eliminated glucosinolates from Arabidopsis thaliana seeds, but translation of loss-of-function phenotypes into Brassica crops is challenging because Brassica is polyploid. We mutated one of seven and four of 12 GTR orthologs and reduced glucosinolate levels in seeds by 60-70% in two different Brassica species (Brassica rapa and Brassica juncea). Reduction in seed glucosinolates was stably inherited over multiple generations and maintained in field trials of two mutant populations at three locations. Successful translation of the gtr loss-of-function phenotype from model plant to two Brassica crops suggests that our transport engineering approach could be broadly applied to reduce seed glucosinolate content in other oilseed crops, such as Camelina sativa or Crambe abyssinica.

  2. Valor nutricional e potencial nutracêutico de inflorescências de couve-nabo (Brassica napus var napus) e couve-tronchuda (Brassica oleraceae var costata).

    OpenAIRE

    Barros, Lillian; Batista, Cátia Emanuela Oliveira; Carvalho, Ana Maria; Ferreira, Isabel C.F.R.

    2012-01-01

    Na Península Ibérica as verduras (silvestres ou tradicionalmente cultivadas) têm sido alimentos importantes na dieta humana. O valor nutricional de verduras e os seus benefícios para a saúde têm sido reconhecidos como importantes alvos de investigação. Os grelos, inflorescências da couve-nabo (Brassica napus L. var. napus) e os espigos, inflorescências da couve-tronchuda (Brassica oleracea L. var. costata DC.) são exemplos de espécies tradicionalmente cultivadas e amplamente consumidas nas re...

  3. Hydrogen sulfide alleviates the aluminum-induced changes in Brassica napus as revealed by physiochemical and ultrastructural study of plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Basharat; Qian, Ping; Sun, Rui; Farooq, Muhammad A; Gill, Rafaqat A; Wang, Jian; Azam, Muhammad; Zhou, Weijun

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, ameliorating role of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) was studied with or without application of H2S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) (0.3 mM) in hydroponic conditions under three levels (0, 0.1 and 0.3 mM) of aluminum (Al). Results showed that addition of H2S significantly improved the plant growth, photosynthetic gas exchange, and nutrients concentration in the leaves and roots of B. napus plants under Al stress. Exogenously applied H2S significantly lowered the Al concentration in different plant parts, and reduced the production of malondialdehyde and reactive oxygen species by improving antioxidant enzyme activities in the leaves and roots under Al stress. Moreover, the present study indicated that exogenously applied H2S improved the cell structure and displayed clean mesophyll and root tip cells. The chloroplast with well-developed thylakoid membranes could be observed in the micrographs. Under the combined application of H2S and Al, a number of modifications could be observed in root tip cell, such as mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and golgi bodies. Thus, it can be concluded that exogenous application of H2S under Al stress improved the plant growth, photosynthetic parameters, elements concentration, and biochemical and ultrastructural changes in leaves and roots of B. napus.

  4. Effect of plant density on competitiveness of Brassica napus, Sinapis alba and S. arvensis under water stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maataoui, A; Talouizte, A; Benbella, M; Bouhache, M

    2005-01-01

    Under Mediterranean climate, oilseed rape is subjected especially to the competition of weeds with respect to water. Herbicides registered for this crop do not effectively control species of the same family, in particular Sinapis alba and Sinapis arvensis. Moreover, there are no results of the effect of plant density on the competitiveness of these species. The purpose of this experiment was to determine if the competitiveness of the species varies according to the total density. The experiment was carried out in pots under greenhouse conditions, according to a replacement series method. Plant densities tested were 2, 4 and 8 plants per pot. The results of the replacement series diagram and those of relative crowding coefficients showed that Brassica napus was the most competitive, whatever the density is. This classification is explained primarily by leaf area. Indeed, the intraspecific competition due to B. napus has affected more its leaf area than the interspecific competition. Conversely, the intraspecific competition due to S. arvensis has less affected its leaf area than the interspecific competition. Regarding S. alba, the intraspecific competition effect was less severe than the interspecific competition effect due to B. napus and more severe than the interspecific competition effect due to S. arvensis on S. alba

  5. Cadmium uptake potential of Brassica napus cocropped with Brassica parachinensis and Zea mays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvam, Ammaiyappan [Sino-Forest Applied Research Centre for Pearl River Delta Environment, Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong, (Hong Kong); Wong, Jonathan Woon-Chung, E-mail: jwcwong@hkbu.edu.hk [Sino-Forest Applied Research Centre for Pearl River Delta Environment, Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2009-08-15

    Cadmium uptake potential of Brassica napus cocropped with B. parachinensis or Zea mays plants in split pot (allow the solutes to pass but prevent the interaction of roots between compartments) experiments was evaluated. Plants were grown in split pots filled with soil spiked at 0, 3, 6, 12, 25 and 50 mg Cd/kg soil. Biomass and Cd uptake were detemined after 6 weeks, and rhizospheric soil solutions, extracted using soil probes, were analyzed for pH and water soluble Cd at weekly intervals. Cadmium treatments affected the biomass. Cadmium concentration in the shoots of B. napus was higher when cocropped with B. parachinensis and significantly higher with Z. mays; however, the biomass was negatively affected implying the higher nutrient apportionment to the crop plants than B. napus. Concentration of Cd in B. napus was higher in shoots than in roots as revealed by shoot/root Cd quotient and was always >1; the quotient for B. parachinensis was {approx}1 and that of Z. mays was <1, indicating the potential of Brassicaceae members to translocate the Cd to aboveground tissue. Results indicate the feasibility of cocropping method to clean the Cd contaminated soils.

  6. MicroRNAs and their putative targets in Brassica napus seed maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 20–21 nucleotide RNA molecules that suppress the transcription of target genes and may also inhibit translation. Despite the thousands of miRNAs identified and validated in numerous plant species, only small numbers have been identified from the oilseed crop plant Brassica napus (canola) – especially in seeds. Results Using next-generation sequencing technologies, we performed a comprehensive analysis of miRNAs during seed maturation at 9 time points from 10 days after flowering (DAF) to 50 DAF using whole seeds and included separate analyses of radicle, hypocotyl, cotyledon, embryo, endosperm and seed coat tissues at 4 selected time points. We identified more than 500 conserved miRNA or variant unique sequences with >300 sequence reads and also found 10 novel miRNAs. Only 27 of the conserved miRNA sequences had been previously identified in B. napus (miRBase Release 18). More than 180 MIRNA loci were identified/annotated using the B. rapa genome as a surrogate for the B.napus A genome. Numerous miRNAs were expressed in a stage- or tissue-specific manner suggesting that they have specific functions related to the fine tuning of transcript abundance during seed development. miRNA targets in B. napus were predicted and their expression patterns profiled using microarray analyses. Global correlation analysis of the expression patterns of miRNAs and their targets revealed complex miRNA-target gene regulatory networks during seed development. The miR156 family was the most abundant and the majority of the family members were primarily expressed in the embryo. Conclusions Large numbers of miRNAs with diverse expression patterns, multiple-targeting and co-targeting of many miRNAs, and complex relationships between expression of miRNAs and targets were identified in this study. Several key miRNA-target expression patterns were identified and new roles of miRNAs in regulating seed development are suggested. miR156, miR159, miR172, mi

  7. The bioaccumulation of heavy metals in Brassica napus L. in the area around Turów Power Station, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niedźwiecka Alicja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Brassica napus L. is a known bioaccumulator of copper, zinc, cadmium, lead, chromium, nickel and arsenic from soils. The metal ions are accumulated in the roots, stems, leaves and seeds of the oilseed rape. The samples of soils and plants were collected in the area around the Turów power station (Bogatynia city, Lower Silesia. The soil samples were collected from the surface layer of 0-25 cm. Roots, stems and pods of the oilseed rape were used in the study. The environmental samples were digested in HNO3, 60%, using the Microwave Digestion System. Metal concentrations have been dermined through the FAAS method. Three heavy metals - zinc, copper and lead – have been analyzed. The content of zinc was higher than the content of copper in all samples (plants and soils. In the roots of the oilseed rape higher concentration of metals compared to other parts of the plant was observed. In the soil samples, there was no correlation between the concentration of pollution and the distance from the power plant. Permissible concentrations of heavy metals relative to the standard according to the Polish Ministry of Environment Regulation from September 1st, 2016, have not been exceeded. The permissible pollution indexes (Wn in soils were exceeded compared to the geochemical background in uncontaminated soils of Poland. The bioaccumulation coefficients of heavy metals indicate lower metal concentrations in plants than in soils

  8. Identification and characterization of orthologs of AtNHX5 and AtNHX6 in Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Andrew Ford

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Improving crop species by breeding for salt tolerance or introducing salt tolerant traits is one method of increasing crop yields in saline affected areas. The model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana has been extensively studied and there is substantial information available about the function and importance of many genes and proteins involved in salt tolerance. The identification and characterization of A. thaliana orthologs in species such as Brassica napus (oilseed rape can prove difficult due to the significant genomic changes that have occurred since their divergence approximately 20 million years ago. The recently released B. rapa genome provides an excellent resource for comparative studies of Arabidopsis and the cultivated Brassica species, and facilitates the identification of Brassica species orthologs which may be of agronomic importance. Sodium hydrogen antiporter (NHX proteins transport a sodium or potassium ion in exchange for a hydrogen ion in the other direction across a membrane. In A. thaliana there are eight members of the NHX family designated AtNHX1-8 that can be sub-divided into three clades (plasma membrane (PM, intracellular class I (IC-I and intracellular class II (IC-II based on their subcellular localization. In plants, many NHX proteins are primary determinants of salt tolerance and act by transporting Na+ out of the cytosol where it would otherwise accumulate to toxic levels. Significant work has been done analyzing both PM and IC-I clade members role in salt tolerance in a variety of plant species but relatively little analysis has been described for the IC-II clade. Here we describe the identification of B. napus orthologs of AtNHX5 and AtNHX6, using the Brassica rapa genome sequence, macro- and micro-synteny analysis, comparative expression and promoter motif analysis, and highlight the value of these multiple approaches for identifying true orthologs in closely related species with multiple paralogs.

  9. Large scale purification of rapeseed proteins (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérot, S; Compoint, J P; Larré, C; Malabat, C; Guéguen, J

    2005-04-15

    Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) cruciferin (12S globulin), napin (2S albumin) and lipid transfer proteins (LTP) were purified at a multi-g scale. The procedure developed was simple, rather fast and resolutive; it permitted the recovery of these proteins with a good yield, such as 40% for cruciferin and 18% for napin. Nanofiltration eliminated the major phenolic compounds. The remaining protein fraction was fractionated by cation exchange chromatography (CEC) on a streamline SP-XL column in alkaline conditions. The unbound neutral cruciferin was polished by size exclusion chromatography. The alkaline napin isoforms and LTP, adsorbed on the beads, were eluted as a whole fraction and further separated by an other CEC step at acidic pH. Napins were polished by hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC). The fractions were characterized by reverse phase HPLC, electrophoresis, N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry. All the fractions contained less than 5% of impurities.

  10. Genetic diversity and pathogenicity differentiation of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum on rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) in Anhui Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, D F; Li, X L; Pan, Y M; Dai, Y L; Li, P; Chen, F X; Zhang, H J; Guo, M; Gao, Z M

    2014-12-18

    The pathogenicity of 47 isolates of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum from oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) in Anhui, China, was tested by detached leaf inoculation using the susceptible rape cultivar Wanyou-14. All isolates were pathogenic to the cultivar and could be grouped into 3 categories based on the lesion length on the leaves tested: weak pathogenicity type, intermediate pathogenicity type, and strong pathogenicity type. This suggested that there was differentiation in the pathogenicity among the strains tested of S. sclerotiorum. Additionally, the intraspecific DNA polymorphisms among 47 strains of S. sclerotiorum were investigated by screening 40 pairs of inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) primers. Unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average cluster analysis of these ISSR data distinguished all strains from each other and revealed considerable genetic variability among them. These strains were classified into 7 clusters according to their branching in the dendrogram, and partial correlation was observed between the genetic polymorphisms and the pathogenicity of S. sclerotiorum strains.

  11. Physiological and proteomic analyses on artificially aged Brassica napus seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingfang eYang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant seeds lose their viability when they are exposed to long term storage or controlled deterioration treatments, by a process known as seed ageing. Based on previous studies, artificially ageing treatments have been developed to accelerate the process of seed ageing in order to understand its underlying mechanisms. In this study, we used Brassica napus seeds to investigate the mechanisms of ageing initiation. B. napus seeds were exposed to artificially ageing treatment (40 oC and 90% relative humidity and their physio-biochemical characteristics were analyzed. Although the treatment delayed germination, it did not increase the concentration of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS. Comparative proteomic analysis was conducted among the control and treated seeds at different stages of germination. The proteins responded to the treatment were mainly involved in metabolism, protein modification and destination, stress response, development and miscellaneous enzymes. Except for peroxiredoxin, no changes were observed in the accumulation of other antioxidant enzymes in the artificially aged seeds. Increased content of ABA was observed in the artificially treated seeds which might be involved in the inhibition of germination. Taken together, our results highlight the involvement of ABA in the initiation of seed ageing in addition to the ROS which was previously reported to mediate the seed ageing process.

  12. Molecular regulation and genetic improvement of seed oil content in Brassica napus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei HUA,Jing LIU,Hanzhong WANG

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available As an important oil crop and a potential bioenergy crop, Brassica napus L. is becoming a model plant for basic research on seed lipid biosynthesis as well as seed oil content, which has always been the key breeding objective. In this review, we present current progress in understanding of the regulation of oil content in B. napus, including genetics, biosynthesis pathway, transcriptional regulation, maternal effects and QTL analysis. Furthermore, the history of breeding for high oil content in B. napus is summarized and the progress in breeding ultra-high oil content lines is described. Finally, prospects for breeding high oil content B. napus cultivars are outlined.

  13. Current Status and Challenges in Identifying Disease Resistance Genes in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neik, Ting Xiang; Barbetti, Martin J; Batley, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    Brassica napus is an economically important crop across different continents including temperate and subtropical regions in Europe, Canada, South Asia, China and Australia. Its widespread cultivation also brings setbacks as it plays host to fungal, oomycete and chytrid pathogens that can lead to serious yield loss. For sustainable crop production, identification of resistance (R) genes in B. napus has become of critical importance. In this review, we discuss four key pathogens affecting Brassica crops: Clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae), Blackleg (Leptosphaeria maculans and L. biglobosa), Sclerotinia Stem Rot (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum), and Downy Mildew (Hyaloperonospora parasitica). We first review current studies covering prevalence of these pathogens on Brassica crops and highlight the R genes and QTL that have been identified from Brassica species against these pathogens. Insights into the relationships between the pathogen and its Brassica host, the unique host resistance mechanisms and how these affect resistance outcomes is also presented. We discuss challenges in identification and deployment of R genes in B. napus in relation to highly specific genetic interactions between host subpopulations and pathogen pathotypes and emphasize the need for common or shared techniques and research materials or tighter collaboration between researchers to reconcile the inconsistencies in the research outcomes. Using current genomics tools, we provide examples of how characterization and cloning of R genes in B. napus can be carried out more effectively. Lastly, we put forward strategies to breed resistant cultivars through introgressions supported by genomic approaches and suggest prospects that can be implemented in the future for a better, pathogen-resistant B. napus.

  14. Altered seed oil and glucosinolate levels in transgenic plants overexpressing the Brassica napus SHOOTMERISTEMLESS gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhiti, Mohamed; Yang, Cunchun; Chan, Ainsley; Durnin, Douglas C; Belmonte, Mark F; Ayele, Belay T; Tahir, Muhammad; Stasolla, Claudio

    2012-07-01

    SHOOTMERISTEMLESS (STM) is a homeobox gene conserved among plant species which is required for the formation and maintenance of the shoot meristem by suppressing differentiation and maintaining an undetermined cell fate within the apical pole. To assess further the role of this gene during seed storage accumulation, transgenic Brassica napus (Bn) plants overexpressing or down-regulating BnSTM under the control of the 35S promoter were generated. Overexpression of BnSTM increased seed oil content without affecting the protein and sucrose level. These changes were accompanied by the induction of genes encoding several transcription factors promoting fatty acid (FA) synthesis: LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (BnLEC1), BnLEC2, and WRINKLE1 (BnWRI1). In addition, expression of key representative enzymes involved in sucrose metabolism, glycolysis, and FA biosynthesis was up-regulated in developing seeds ectopically expressing BnSTM. These distinctive expression patterns support the view of an increased carbon flux to the FA biosynthetic pathway in developing transformed seeds. The overexpression of BnSTM also resulted in a desirable reduction of seed glucosinolate (GLS) levels ascribed to a transcriptional repression of key enzymes participating in the GLS biosynthetic pathway, and possibly to the differential utilization of common precursors for GLS and indole-3-acetic acid synthesis. No changes in oil and GLS levels were observed in lines down-regulating BnSTM. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for a novel function for BnSTM in promoting desirable changes in seed oil and GLS levels when overexpressed in B. napus plants, and demonstrate that this gene can be used as a target for genetic improvement of oilseed species.

  15. Unraveling the genetic basis of seed tocopherol content and composition in rapeseed (Brassica napus L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingxing Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tocopherols are important antioxidants in vegetable oils; when present as vitamin E, tocopherols are an essential nutrient for humans and livestock. Rapeseed (Brassica napus L, AACC, 2 n = 38 is one of the most important oil crops and a major source of tocopherols. Although the tocopherol biosynthetic pathway has been well elucidated in the model photosynthetic organisms Arabidopsis thaliana and Synechocystis sp. PCC6803, knowledge about the genetic basis of tocopherol biosynthesis in seeds of rapeseed is scant. This project was carried out to dissect the genetic basis of seed tocopherol content and composition in rapeseed through quantitative trait loci (QTL detection, genome-wide association analysis, and homologous gene mapping. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a segregating Tapidor × Ningyou7 doubled haploid (TNDH population, its reconstructed F(2 (RC-F(2 population, and a panel of 142 rapeseed accessions (association panel. Genetic effects mainly contributed to phenotypic variations in tocopherol content and composition; environmental effects were also identified. Thirty-three unique QTL were detected for tocopherol content and composition in TNDH and RC-F(2 populations. Of these, seven QTL co-localized with candidate sequences associated with tocopherol biosynthesis through in silico and linkage mapping. Several near-isogenic lines carrying introgressions from the parent with higher tocopherol content showed highly increased tocopherol content compared with the recurrent parent. Genome-wide association analysis was performed with 142 B. napus accessions. Sixty-one loci were significantly associated with tocopherol content and composition, 11 of which were localized within the confidence intervals of tocopherol QTL. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This joint QTL, candidate gene, and association mapping study sheds light on the genetic basis of seed tocopherol biosynthesis in rapeseed. The sequences presented here may be used

  16. Genome-Wide Survey and Characterization of Fatty Acid Desaturase Gene Family in Brassica napus and Its Parental Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yufei; Chen, Baojun; Wang, Rui; Win, Aung Naing; Li, Jiana; Chai, Yourong

    2018-02-01

    Rapeseed (Brassica napus) is an important oilseed crop worldwide, and fatty acid (FA) compositions determine the nutritional and economic value of its seed oil. Fatty acid desaturases (FADs) play a pivotal role in regulating FA compositions, but to date, no comprehensive genome-wide analysis of FAD gene family in rapeseed and its parent species has been reported. In this study, using homology searches, 84, 45, and 44 FAD genes were identified in rapeseed, Brassica rapa, and Brassica oleracea genomes, respectively. These FAD genes were unevenly located in 17 chromosomes and 2 scaffolds of rapeseed, 9 chromosomes and 1 scaffold of B. rapa, and all the chromosomes of B. oleracea. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the soluble and membrane-bound FADs in the three Brassica species were divided into four and six subfamilies, respectively. Generally, the soluble FADs contained two conserved histidine boxes, while three highly conserved histidine boxes were harbored in membrane-bound FADs. Exon-intron structure, intron phase, and motif composition and position were highly conserved in each FAD subfamily. Putative subcellular locations of FAD proteins in three Brassica species were consistent with those of corresponding known FADs. In total, 25 of simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci were found in FAD genes of the three Brassica species. Transcripts of selected FAD genes in the three species were examined in various organs/tissues or stress treatments from NCBI expressed sequence tag (EST) database. This study provides a critical molecular basis for quality improvement of rapeseed oil and facilitates our understanding of key roles of FAD genes in plant growth and development and stress response.

  17. Tight regulation of the interaction between Brassica napus and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum at the microRNA level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jia-Yi; Xu, You-Ping; Zhao, Li; Li, Shuang-Sheng; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2016-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are multifunctional non-coding short nucleotide molecules. Nevertheless, the role of miRNAs in the interactions between plants and necrotrophic pathogens is largely unknown. Here, we report the identification of the miRNA repertoire of the economically important oil crop oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and those involved in interacting with its most devastating necrotrophic pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. We identified 280 B. napus miRNA candidates, including 53 novel candidates and 227 canonical members or variants of known miRNA families, by high-throughput deep sequencing of small RNAs from both normal and S. sclerotiorum-inoculated leaves. Target genes of 15 novel candidates and 222 known miRNAs were further identified by sequencing of degradomes from the two types of samples. MiRNA microarray analysis revealed that 68 miRNAs were differentially expressed between S. sclerotiorum-inoculated and uninoculated leaves. A set of these miRNAs target genes involved in plant defense to S. sclerotiorum and/or other pathogens such as nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) R genes and nitric oxygen and reactive oxygen species related genes. Additionally, three miRNAs target AGO1 and AGO2, key components of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Expression of several viral PTGS suppressors reduced resistance to S. sclerotiorum. Arabidopsis mutants of AGO1 and AGO2 exhibited reduced resistance while transgenic lines over-expressing AGO1 displayed increased resistance to S. sclerotiorum in an AGO1 expression level-dependent manner. Moreover, transient over-expression of miRNAs targeting AGO1 and AGO2 decreased resistance to S. sclerotiorum in oilseed rape. Our results demonstrate that the interactions between B. napus and S. sclerotiorum are tightly regulated at miRNA level and probably involve PTGS.

  18. A novel procedure for the quantitative analysis of metabolites, storage products and transcripts of laser microdissected seed tissues of Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radchuk Ruslana

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biology of the seed is complicated by the extensive non-homogeneity (spatial gradients in gene expression, metabolic conversions and storage product accumulation. The detailed understanding of the mechanisms underlying seed growth and storage therefore requires the development of means to obtain tissue-specific analyses. This approach also represents an important priority in the context of seed biotechnology. Results We provide a guideline and detailed procedures towards the quantitative analysis of laser micro-dissected (LM tissues in oilseed rape (Brassica napus. This includes protocols for laser microdissection of the seed, and the subsequent extraction and quantitative analysis of lipids, starch and metabolites (sugars, sugar phosphates, nucleotides, amino acids, intermediates of glycolysis and citric acid cycle. We have also developed a protocol allowing the parallel analysis of the transcriptome using Brassica-specific microarrays. Some data are presented regarding the compartmentation of metabolites within the oilseed rape embryo. Conclusion The described methodology allows for the rapid, combined analysis of metabolic intermediates, major storage products and transcripts in a tissue-specific manner. The protocols are robust for oilseed rape, and should be readily adjustable for other crop species. The suite of methods applied to LM tissues represents an important step in the context of both the systems biology and the biotechnology of oilseeds.

  19. Reduction of antinutritional glucosinolates in Brassica oilseeds by mutation of genes encoding transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Madsen, Svend Roesen; Engelen, Steven

    2017-01-01

    The nutritional value of Brassica seed meals is reduced by the presence of glucosinolates, which are toxic compounds involved in plant defense. Mutation of the genes encoding two glucosinolate transporters (GTRs) eliminated glucosinolates from Arabidopsis thaliana seeds, but translation of loss-o...... glucosinolate content in other oilseed crops, such as Camelina sativa or Crambe abyssinica....

  20. Effects of NaCl treatment on the antioxidant enzymes of oilseed rape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of NaCl treatment on the activity of antioxidant enzymes in leaves of oilseed rape seedlings (Brassica napus L.) were studied. The results showed that the relative water content from leaves of oilseed rape seedlings was gradually decreased and the electronic conductivity was increased during 0 - 24 h under 200 ...

  1. Effects of NaCl treatment on the antioxidant enzymes of oilseed rape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... The effects of NaCl treatment on the activity of antioxidant enzymes in leaves of oilseed rape seedlings. (Brassica napus L.) were studied. The results showed that the relative water content from leaves of oilseed rape seedlings was gradually decreased and the electronic conductivity was increased during 0.

  2. Resynthesis of Brassica napus through hybridization between B. juncea and B. carinata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Debamalya; Banga, Shashi; Gupta, Mehak; Bharti, Sakshi; Salisbury, Phillip Anthony; Banga, Surinder Singh

    2016-05-01

    First report for the resynthesis of Brassica napus by recombining A and C genome from B. juncea and B. carinata , respectively. Also documents B genome introgressions in resynthesized B. napus. Resynthesis of Brassica napus (AACC) was achieved by hybridizing Brassica juncea (AABB) with Brassica carinata (BBCC). This was facilitated by spontaneous chromosome doubling in the F1 hybrid (ABBC) to yield octaploid (AABBBBCC), elimination of extra B genome chromosomes in the resulting octaploid and in subsequent selfed generations, aided with directed selection for fertile plants having B. napus morphology. Twenty-five plants with varying degrees of resemblance to natural B. napus were identified from 17 A5 progenies and assayed for cytogenetic stability and genetic diversity. Majority of these plants, except six (2n = 38) were hyperploids (2n = 40-56). The six plants with 2n = 38 were designated as derived B. napus types. These showed an expected meiotic configuration of 19II at metaphase-I, with 19-19 distribution at anaphase-I. Genotyping based on A and C genome specific primers confirmed genetic identity of six derived (2n = 38) B. napus plants with natural types whereas genotyping with B genome specific primers indicated introgression of B genome segments. This was also confirmed by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). Strong signals of B genome probe were detected, proving hitherto unreported genetic exchanges between B and A/C chromosomes. These introgressions possibly occurred en route five generations of selfing. Derived plants yielded fertile hybrids in crosses with natural B. napus var. GSC 6. The selfed derived plants as evaluated in A6 plant to progeny rows were morphologically similar to natural B. napus, and meiotically stable. Agronomic assessment of these progenies revealed variation for key morpho-physiological traits. Of special interest were the progenies with plants having oil content exceeding 47% as against about 39-41% in existing cultivars.

  3. Gene expression profiling via LongSAGE in a non-model plant species: a case study in seeds of Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedt Wolfgang

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serial analysis of gene expression (LongSAGE was applied for gene expression profiling in seeds of oilseed rape (Brassica napus ssp. napus. The usefulness of this technique for detailed expression profiling in a non-model organism was demonstrated for the highly complex, neither fully sequenced nor annotated genome of B. napus by applying a tag-to-gene matching strategy based on Brassica ESTs and the annotated proteome of the closely related model crucifer A. thaliana. Results Transcripts from 3,094 genes were detected at two time-points of seed development, 23 days and 35 days after pollination (DAP. Differential expression showed a shift from gene expression involved in diverse developmental processes including cell proliferation and seed coat formation at 23 DAP to more focussed metabolic processes including storage protein accumulation and lipid deposition at 35 DAP. The most abundant transcripts at 23 DAP were coding for diverse protease inhibitor proteins and proteases, including cysteine proteases involved in seed coat formation and a number of lipid transfer proteins involved in embryo pattern formation. At 35 DAP, transcripts encoding napin, cruciferin and oleosin storage proteins were most abundant. Over both time-points, 18.6% of the detected genes were matched by Brassica ESTs identified by LongSAGE tags in antisense orientation. This suggests a strong involvement of antisense transcript expression in regulatory processes during B. napus seed development. Conclusion This study underlines the potential of transcript tagging approaches for gene expression profiling in Brassica crop species via EST matching to annotated A. thaliana genes. Limits of tag detection for low-abundance transcripts can today be overcome by ultra-high throughput sequencing approaches, so that tag-based gene expression profiling may soon become the method of choice for global expression profiling in non-model species.

  4. Cytological and morphological analysis of hybrids between Brassicoraphanus, and Brassica napus for introgression of clubroot resistant trait into Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Zongxiang; Nwafor, Chinedu Charles; Hou, Zhaoke; Gong, Jianfang; Zhu, Bin; Jiang, Yingfen; Zhou, Yongming; Wu, Jiangsheng; Piao, Zhongyun; Tong, Yue; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Chunyu

    2017-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization is a powerful tool for improvement of crop species, it has the potential to broaden the genetic base and create new plant forms for breeding programs. Synthetic allopolyploid is a widely-used model for the study of genetic recombination and fixed heterosis in Brassica. In Brassica napus breeding, identification and introgression of new sources of clubroot resistance trait from wild or related species into it by hybridization is a long-term crop management strategy for clubroot disease. Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) is a close relative of the Brassica and most radish accessions are immune to the clubroot disease. A synthesized allotetraploid Brassicoraphanus (RRCC, 2n = 36) between R. sativus cv. HQ-04 (2n = 18, RR) and Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra (L.H Bailey) (2n = 18, CC) proved resistant of multiple clubroot disease pathogen P. brassicae. To predict the possibility to transfer the clubroot resistance trait from the RR subgenome of allotetraploid Brassicoraphanus (RRCC, 2n = 36) into Brassica napus (AACC, 2n = 38), we analyzed the frequency of chromosome pairings in the F1 hybrids produced from a cross between B. napus cv. HS5 and the allotetraploid, characterize the genomic composition of some backcrossed progeny (BC1) using GISH, BAC-FISH and AFLP techniques. The level of intergenomic pairing between A and R genomes in the F1 hybrid was high, allosyndetic bivalents formed in 73.53% PMCs indicative of significant level of homeologous recombination between two genomes and high probability of incorporating chromosomal segments/genes from R-genome into A/C-genomes. The BC1 plants inherited variant extra R chromosomes or fragments from allotetraploid as revealed by GISH and AFLP analysis. 13.51% BC2 individuals were resistant to clubroot disease, and several resistance lines had high pollen fertility, Overall, the genetic material presented in this work represents a potential new genetic resource for practical use in breeding B. napus

  5. Proteomic Dissection of Seed Germination and Seedling Establishment in Brassica napus

    OpenAIRE

    Jianwei Gu (顾建伟); Hongbo Chao; Lu Gan; Liangxing Guo; Kai Zhang; Yonghong Li; Nadia Raboanatahiry; Hao Wang; Maoteng Li

    2016-01-01

    The success of seed germination and establishment of a normal seedling are key determinants of plant species propagation. At present, only a few studies have focused on the genetic control of seed germination by using a proteomic approach in Brassica napus. In the present study, the protein expression pattern of seed germination was investigated using differential fluorescence two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in B. napus. One hundred and thirteen differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) th...

  6. Molecular mechanism of manipulating seed coat coloration in oilseed Brassica species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Cheng-Yu

    2013-05-01

    Yellow seed is a desirable characteristic for the breeding of oilseed Brassica crops, but the manifestation of seed coat color is very intricate due to the involvement of various pigments, the main components of which are flavonols, proanthocyanidin (condensed tannin), and maybe some other phenolic relatives, like lignin and melanin. The focus of this review is to examine the genetics mechanism regarding the biosynthesis and regulation of these pigments in the seed coat of oilseed Brassica. This knowledge came largely from recent researches on the molecular mechanism of TRANSPARENT TESTA (tt) and similar mutations in the ancestry model plant of Brassica, Arabidopsis. Some key enzymes in the flavonoid (flavonols and proanthocyanidin) biosynthetic pathway have been characterized in tt mutants. Some orthologs to these TRANSPARENT TESTA genes have also been cloned in Brassica species. However, it is suggested that some alterative metabolism pathways, including lignin and melanin, might also be involved in seed color manifestation. Polyphenol oxidases, such as laccase, tyrosinase, or even peroxidase, participate in the oxidation step in proanthocyanidin, lignin, and melanin biosynthesis. Moreover, some researches also suggested that melanic pigment in black-seeded Brassica was several fold higher than in yellow-seeded Brassica. Although more experiments are required to evaluate the importance of lignin and melanin in seed coat browning, the current results suggest that the flavonols and proanthocyanidin are not the only roles affecting seed color.

  7. Production and cytogenetics of intergeneric hybrids between Brassica napus and Orychophragmus violaceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Liu, H L; Luo, P

    1995-07-01

    The intergeneric hybrid between Brassica napus and Orychophragmus violaceus was obtained by means of embryo culture technique with the latter as the pollen parent. The hybrid was morphologically intermediate between its parents, but could produce a lot of seeds when selfed. Somatic separation of the genomes from the two parental species was observed during the mitotic divisions of some of the hybrid cells. Thus, the hybrid became the mixoploid in nature, consisting of haploid and diploid cells of B. napus, and a nuclear - cytoplasmic hybrid, with the cytoplasm of B. napus and the nuclei of O. violaceus, and the hybrid cells. Pollen mother cells with 19, 12 and 6 bivalents, respectively, were produced by the hybrid. From the selfed progeny of the hybrid, mainly two kinds of plants, B. napus and the hybrid, were found. The hybrid plants of the selfed progeny again produced two kinds of plants, B. napus and the hybrid.

  8. Protein pattern of canola (Brassica napus L. changes in response to salt and salicylic acid in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razavizadeh Roya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of salicylic acid (SA on the salt (NaCl tolerance mechanism was studied in canola plants (oilseed rape, Brassica napus L. by molecular and physiological experiments in plant tissue culture. Seeds of B. napus ‘Ocapy’ were germinated at 0, 50, and 100 mM NaCl on Murashige and Skoog (MS medium containing different levels (0, 2, and 5 μM of SA for 4 weeks. Total chlorophyll, carotenoid, and flavonoid content increased in response to interactive effects of SA and NaCl treatments at some concentrations. Proline content was increased under salt and SA treatments in shoot and root tissues. Salt alone and in combination with SA increased the total soluble protein content of shoots only, while the different concentrations of SA in the culture media affected variously the total soluble protein content. Protein patterns of shoots and roots showed some remarkable differences, based on gel electrophoresis and the consequent analysis of bands by ImageJ program. The relative expression of 15 and 12 protein bands in shoots and roots, respectively, differed under the applied treatments. In addition, the protein profile indicated that salinity and SA regulate the expression of salt-stress-inducible proteins as well as induced de novo synthesis of specific polypeptides. The findings may help to explain the salt tolerance mechanisms and to produce salt-tolerant canola plants.

  9. Transcriptome analysis of the Brassica napus-Leptosphaeria maculans pathosystem identifies receptor, signaling and structural genes underlying plant resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Michael G; Zhang, Xuehua; Walker, Philip L; Wan, Joey C; Millar, Jenna L; Khan, Deirdre; Granger, Matthew J; Cavers, Jacob D; Chan, Ainsley C; Fernando, Dilantha W G; Belmonte, Mark F

    2017-05-01

    The hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans is the causal agent of blackleg disease in Brassica napus (canola, oilseed rape) and causes significant loss of yield worldwide. While genetic resistance has been used to mitigate the disease by means of traditional breeding strategies, there is little knowledge about the genes that contribute to blackleg resistance. RNA sequencing and a streamlined bioinformatics pipeline identified unique genes and plant defense pathways specific to plant resistance in the B. napus-L. maculans LepR1-AvrLepR1 interaction over time. We complemented our temporal analyses by monitoring gene activity directly at the infection site using laser microdissection coupled to quantitative PCR. Finally, we characterized genes involved in plant resistance to blackleg in the Arabidopsis-L. maculans model pathosystem. Data reveal an accelerated activation of the plant transcriptome in resistant host cotyledons associated with transcripts coding for extracellular receptors and phytohormone signaling molecules. Functional characterization provides direct support for transcriptome data and positively identifies resistance regulators in the Brassicaceae. Spatial gradients of gene activity were identified in response to L. maculans proximal to the site of infection. This dataset provides unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution of the genes required for blackleg resistance and serves as a valuable resource for those interested in host-pathogen interactions. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Storage oil breakdown during embryo development of Brassica napus (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Tansy Y P; Pike, Marilyn J; Rawsthorne, Stephen

    2005-05-01

    In this study it is shown that at least 10% of the major storage product of developing embryos of Brassica napus (L.), triacylglycerol, is lost during the desiccation phase of seed development. The metabolism of this lipid was studied by measurements of the fate of label from [1-(14)C]decanoate supplied to isolated embryos, and by measurements of the activities of enzymes of fatty acid catabolism. Measurements on desiccating embryos have been compared with those made on embryos during lipid accumulation and on germinating seedlings. Enzymes of beta-oxidation and the glyoxylate cycle, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase were present in embryos during oil accumulation, and increased in activity and abundance as the seeds matured and became desiccated. Although the activities were less than those measured during germination, they were at least comparable to the in vivo rate of fatty acid synthesis in the embryo during development. The pattern of labelling, following metabolism of decanoate by isolated embryos, indicated a much greater involvement of the glyoxylate cycle during desiccation than earlier in oil accumulation, and showed that much of the (14)C-label from decanoate was released as CO(2) at both stages. Sucrose was not a product of decanoate metabolism during embryo development, and therefore lipid degradation was not associated with net gluconeogenic activity. These observations are discussed in the context of seed development, oil yield, and the synthesis of novel fatty acids in plants.

  11. Transcriptomic basis for drought-resistance in Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Yang, Cuiling; Chen, Hao; Song, Chunpeng; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Daojie

    2017-01-01

    Based on transcriptomic data from four experimental settings with drought-resistant and drought-sensitive cultivars under drought and well-watered conditions, statistical analysis revealed three categories encompassing 169 highly differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in response to drought in Brassica napus L., including 37 drought-resistant cultivar-related genes, 35 drought-sensitive cultivar-related genes and 97 cultivar non-specific ones. We provide evidence that the identified DEGs were fairly uniformly distributed on different chromosomes and their expression patterns are variety specific. Except commonly enriched in response to various stimuli or stresses, different categories of DEGs show specific enrichment in certain biological processes or pathways, which indicated the possibility of functional differences among the three categories. Network analysis revealed relationships among the 169 DEGs, annotated biological processes and pathways. The 169 DEGs can be classified into different functional categories via preferred pathways or biological processes. Some pathways might simultaneously involve a large number of shared DEGs, and these pathways are likely to cross-talk and have overlapping biological functions. Several members of the identified DEGs fit to drought stress signal transduction pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana. Finally, quantitative real-time PCR validations confirmed the reproducibility of the RNA-seq data. These investigations are profitable for the improvement of crop varieties through transgenic engineering.

  12. A proteomic analysis of seeds from Bt-transgenic Brassica napus and hybrids with wild B. juncea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongbo; Zhang, Ying-Xue; Song, Song-Quan; Li, Junsheng; Neal Stewart, C; Wei, Wei; Zhao, Yujie; Wang, Wei-Qing

    2015-10-21

    Transgene insertions might have unintended side effects on the transgenic host, both crop and hybrids with wild relatives that harbor transgenes. We employed proteomic approaches to assess protein abundance changes in seeds from Bt-transgenic oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and its hybrids with wild mustard (B. juncea). A total of 24, 15 and 34 protein spots matching to 23, 13 and 31 unique genes were identified that changed at least 1.5 fold (p transgenic (tBN) and non-transgenic (BN) oilseed rape, between hybrids of B. juncea (BJ) × tBN (BJtBN) and BJ × BN (BJBN) and between BJBN and BJ, respectively. Eight proteins had higher abundance in tBN than in BN. None of these proteins was toxic or nutritionally harmful to human health, which is not surprising since the seeds are not known to produce toxic proteins. Protein spots varying in abundance between BJtBN and BJBN seeds were the same or homologous to those in the respective parents. None of the differentially-accumulated proteins between BJtBN and BJBN were identical to those between tBN and BN. Results indicated that unintended effects resulted from transgene flow fell within the range of natural variability of hybridization and those found in the native host proteomes.

  13. Stimulation of the ionic transport system in Brassica napus by a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (Achromobacter sp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, H; Plassard, C; Pinochet, X; Touraine, B; Normand, P; Cleyet-Marel, J C

    2000-03-01

    A plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium belonging to the genus Achromobacter was isolated from the oil-seed-rape (Brassica napus) root. Growth promotion bioassays were performed with oilseed rape seedlings in a growth chamber in test tubes containing attapulgite and mineral nutrient solution, containing NO3- as N source. The presence of this Achromobacter strain increased shoot and root dry weight by 22-33% and 6-21%, respectively. Inoculation of young seedlings with the Achromobacter bacteria induced a 100% improvement in NO3- uptake by the whole root system. Observations on the seminal root of seedlings 20 h after inoculation showed that there was an enhancement of both the number and the length of root hairs, compared to non-inoculated seedlings. Electrophysiological measurements of NO3- net flux with ion-selective microelectrodes showed that inoculation resulted in a specific increase of net nitrate flux in a root zone morphologically similar in inoculated and non-inoculated plants. The root area increased due to root hair stimulation by the Achromobacter bacteria, which might have contributed to the improvement of NO3- uptake by the whole root system, together with the enhancement of specific NO3- uptake rate. Moreover, inoculated plants showed increased potassium net influx and proton net efflux. Overall, the data presented suggest that the inoculation of oilseed-rape with the bacteria Achromobacter affects the mineral uptake.

  14. Plasmodiophora brassicae: a review of an emerging pathogen of the Canadian canola (Brassica napus) crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sheau-Fang; Strelkov, Stephen E; Feng, Jie; Gossen, Bruce D; Howard, Ron J

    2012-02-01

    Plasmodiophora brassicae causes clubroot disease in cruciferous plants, and is an emerging threat to Canadian canola (Brassica napus) production. This review focuses on recent studies into the pathogenic diversity of P. brassicae populations, mechanisms of pathogenesis and resistance, and the development of diagnostic tests for pathogen detection and quantification. Plasmodiophora brassicae is a soil-borne, obligate parasite within the class Phytomyxea (plasmodiophorids) of the protist supergroup Rhizaria. Clubroot development is characterized by the formation of club-shaped galls on the roots of affected plants. Above-ground symptoms include wilting, stunting, yellowing and premature senescence. DISEASE CYCLE: Plasmodiophora brassicae first infects the root hairs, producing motile zoospores that invade the cortical tissue. Secondary plasmodia form within the root cortex and, by triggering the expression of genes involved in the production of auxins, cytokinins and other plant growth regulators, divert a substantial proportion of plant resources into hypertrophic growth of the root tissues, resulting in the formation of galls. The secondary plasmodia are cleaved into millions of resting spores and the root galls quickly disintegrate, releasing long-lived resting spores into the soil. A serine protease, PRO1, has been shown to trigger resting spore germination. PHYSIOLOGICAL SPECIALIZATION: Physiological specialization occurs in populations of P. brassicae, and various host differential sets, consisting of different collections of Brassica genotypes, are used to distinguish among pathotypes of the parasite. DETECTION AND QUANTIFICATION: As P. brassicae cannot be cultured, bioassays with bait plants were traditionally used to detect the pathogen in the soil. More recent innovations for the detection and quantification of P. brassicae include the use of antibodies, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and qPCR in conjunction with signature fatty acid analysis

  15. Current Status and Challenges in Identifying Disease Resistance Genes in Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Xiang Neik

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Brassica napus is an economically important crop across different continents including temperate and subtropical regions in Europe, Canada, South Asia, China and Australia. Its widespread cultivation also brings setbacks as it plays host to fungal, oomycete and chytrid pathogens that can lead to serious yield loss. For sustainable crop production, identification of resistance (R genes in B. napus has become of critical importance. In this review, we discuss four key pathogens affecting Brassica crops: Clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae, Blackleg (Leptosphaeria maculans and L. biglobosa, Sclerotinia Stem Rot (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, and Downy Mildew (Hyaloperonospora parasitica. We first review current studies covering prevalence of these pathogens on Brassica crops and highlight the R genes and QTL that have been identified from Brassica species against these pathogens. Insights into the relationships between the pathogen and its Brassica host, the unique host resistance mechanisms and how these affect resistance outcomes is also presented. We discuss challenges in identification and deployment of R genes in B. napus in relation to highly specific genetic interactions between host subpopulations and pathogen pathotypes and emphasize the need for common or shared techniques and research materials or tighter collaboration between researchers to reconcile the inconsistencies in the research outcomes. Using current genomics tools, we provide examples of how characterization and cloning of R genes in B. napus can be carried out more effectively. Lastly, we put forward strategies to breed resistant cultivars through introgressions supported by genomic approaches and suggest prospects that can be implemented in the future for a better, pathogen-resistant B. napus.

  16. Current Status and Challenges in Identifying Disease Resistance Genes in Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neik, Ting Xiang; Barbetti, Martin J.; Batley, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    Brassica napus is an economically important crop across different continents including temperate and subtropical regions in Europe, Canada, South Asia, China and Australia. Its widespread cultivation also brings setbacks as it plays host to fungal, oomycete and chytrid pathogens that can lead to serious yield loss. For sustainable crop production, identification of resistance (R) genes in B. napus has become of critical importance. In this review, we discuss four key pathogens affecting Brassica crops: Clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae), Blackleg (Leptosphaeria maculans and L. biglobosa), Sclerotinia Stem Rot (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum), and Downy Mildew (Hyaloperonospora parasitica). We first review current studies covering prevalence of these pathogens on Brassica crops and highlight the R genes and QTL that have been identified from Brassica species against these pathogens. Insights into the relationships between the pathogen and its Brassica host, the unique host resistance mechanisms and how these affect resistance outcomes is also presented. We discuss challenges in identification and deployment of R genes in B. napus in relation to highly specific genetic interactions between host subpopulations and pathogen pathotypes and emphasize the need for common or shared techniques and research materials or tighter collaboration between researchers to reconcile the inconsistencies in the research outcomes. Using current genomics tools, we provide examples of how characterization and cloning of R genes in B. napus can be carried out more effectively. Lastly, we put forward strategies to breed resistant cultivars through introgressions supported by genomic approaches and suggest prospects that can be implemented in the future for a better, pathogen-resistant B. napus. PMID:29163558

  17. Fatty Acid and Transcript Profiling in Developing Seeds of Three Brassica napus Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petkova Mariana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid levels and gene expression profiles for selected genes associated with the synthesis of fatty acids (FA, triacylglycerol, and oil body proteins were examined in three oilseed rape (Brassica napus cultivars that have utility for cultivar development in our spring canola breeding program. The seed oil content of Bronowski, Q2, and Westar was 39.0, 40.1, and 40.6%, respectively at 40 days after flowering (DAF. During the 20 to 40 day period of seed development, cultivars had varying levels of palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic, α-linolenic, eicosenoic, and erucic acid. In general, the percentage of each FA was similar among the cultivars during seed development. However, the level of oleic acid was lower and the levels of eicosenoic acid and erucic acid were higher in Bronowski than in Q2 and Westar seeds; linoleic acid also tended to be lower in Bronowski. Gene expression among the cultivars was similar from 10 to 40 DAF. The few exceptions were that expression of KAS1 and SAD were higher in Westar and Q2 than in Bronowski at 25 DAF, SAD was highest in Q2, intermediate in Westar, and lowest in Bronowski at 35 DAF, FAD2 was higher in Q2 than in Bronowski at 35 DAF, FAD3 was higher in Q2 than in Bronowski at 15 DAF and Q2 and Westar at 25 and 30 DAF, and FAE1 was higher in Westar and Q2 than in Bronowski at 30 DAF. Correlation analysis for gene expression against DAF for each genotype supported a common trend in gene expression among the three cultivars with gene expression tending to decrease over time; except for LPAAT, which tended to increase. The correlation between the level of FAs and expression of genes by genotype indicated no general trend; rather correlations seem to depend on the genotype.

  18. Identification of candidate genes of QTLs for seed weight in Brassica napus through comparative mapping among Arabidopsis and Brassica species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Map-based cloning of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in polyploidy crop species remains a challenge due to the complexity of their genome structures. QTLs for seed weight in B. napus have been identified, but information on candidate genes for identified QTLs of this important trait is still rare. Results In this study, a whole genome genetic linkage map for B. napus was constructed using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers that covered a genetic distance of 2,126.4 cM with an average distance of 5.36 cM between markers. A procedure was developed to establish colinearity of SSR loci on B. napus with its two progenitor diploid species B. rapa and B. oleracea through extensive bioinformatics analysis. With the aid of B. rapa and B. oleracea genome sequences, the 421 homologous colinear loci deduced from the SSR loci of B. napus were shown to correspond to 398 homologous loci in Arabidopsis thaliana. Through comparative mapping of Arabidopsis and the three Brassica species, 227 homologous genes for seed size/weight were mapped on the B. napus genetic map, establishing the genetic bases for the important agronomic trait in this amphidiploid species. Furthermore, 12 candidate genes underlying 8 QTLs for seed weight were identified, and a gene-specific marker for BnAP2 was developed through molecular cloning using the seed weight/size gene distribution map in B. napus. Conclusions Our study showed that it is feasible to identify candidate genes of QTLs using a SSR-based B. napus genetic map through comparative mapping among Arabidopsis and B. napus and its two progenitor species B. rapa and B. oleracea. Identification of candidate genes for seed weight in amphidiploid B. napus will accelerate the process of isolating the mapped QTLs for this important trait, and this approach may be useful for QTL identification of other traits of agronomic significance. PMID:23216693

  19. The infection processes of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in cotyledon tissue of a resistant and a susceptible genotype of Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Harsh; Li, Hua; Sivasithamparam, Krishnapillai; Kuo, John; Barbetti, Martin J.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Sclerotinia sclerotiorum can attack >400 plant species worldwide. Very few studies have investigated host–pathogen interactions at the plant surface and cellular level in resistant genotypes of oilseed rape/canola (Brassica napus). Methods Infection processes of S. sclerotiorum were examined on two B. napus genotypes, one resistant cultivar ‘Charlton’ and one susceptible ‘RQ001-02M2’ by light and scanning electron microscopy from 2 h to 8 d post-inoculation (dpi). Key Results The resistant ‘Charlton’ impeded fungal growth at 1, 2 and 3 dpi, suppressed formation of appresoria and infection cushions, caused extrusion of protoplast from hyphal cells and produced a hypersensitive reaction. At 8 dpi, whilst in ‘Charlton’ pathogen invasion was mainly confined to the upper epidermis, in the susceptible ‘RQ001-02M2’, colonization up to the spongy mesophyll cells was evident. Calcium oxalate crystals were found in the upper epidermis and in palisade cells in susceptible ‘RQ001-02M2’ at 6 dpi, and throughout leaf tissues at 8 dpi. In resistant ‘Charlton’, crystals were not observed at 6 dpi, whereas at 8 dpi they were mainly confined to the upper epidermis. Starch deposits were also more prevalent in ‘RQ001-02M2’. Conclusions This study demonstrates for the first time at the cellular level that resistance to S. sclerotiorum in B. napus is a result of retardation of pathogen development, both on the plant surface and within host tissues. The resistance mechanisms identified in this study will be useful for engineering disease-resistant genotypes and for developing markers for screening for resistance against this pathogen. PMID:20929899

  20. Comparative genomic analysis of duplicated homoeologous regions involved in the resistance of Brassica napus to stem canker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berline eFopa Fomeju

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available All crop species are current or ancient polyploids. Following whole genome duplication, structural and functional modifications result in differential gene content or regulation in the duplicated regions, which can play a fundamental role in the diversification of genes underlying complex traits. We have investigated this issue in Brassica napus, a species with a highly duplicated genome, with the aim of studying the structural and functional organization of duplicated regions involved in quantitative resistance to stem canker, a disease caused by the fungal pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans. Genome-wide association analysis on two oilseed rape panels confirmed that duplicated regions of ancestral blocks E, J, R, U and W were involved in resistance to stem canker. The structural analysis of the duplicated genomic regions showed a higher gene density on the A genome than on the C genome and a better collinearity between homoeologous regions than paralogous regions, as overall in the whole B. napus genome. The three ancestral sub-genomes were involved in the resistance to stem canker and the fractionation profile of the duplicated regions corresponded to what was expected from results on the B. napus progenitors. About 60% of the genes identified in these duplicated regions were single-copy genes while less than 5% were retained in all the duplicated copies of a given ancestral block. Genes retained in several copies were mainly involved in response to stress, signaling or transcription regulation. Genes with resistance-associated markers were mainly retained in more than two copies. These results suggested that some genes underlying quantitative resistance to stem canker might be duplicated genes. Genes with a hydrolase activity that were retained in one copy or R-like genes might also account for resistance in some regions. Further analyses need to be conducted to indicate to what extent duplicated genes contribute to the expression of the

  1. Comparative genomic analysis of duplicated homoeologous regions involved in the resistance of Brassica napus to stem canker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fopa Fomeju, Berline; Falentin, Cyril; Lassalle, Gilles; Manzanares-Dauleux, Maria J.; Delourme, Régine

    2015-01-01

    All crop species are current or ancient polyploids. Following whole genome duplication, structural and functional modifications result in differential gene content or regulation in the duplicated regions, which can play a fundamental role in the diversification of genes underlying complex traits. We have investigated this issue in Brassica napus, a species with a highly duplicated genome, with the aim of studying the structural and functional organization of duplicated regions involved in quantitative resistance to stem canker, a disease caused by the fungal pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans. Genome-wide association analysis on two oilseed rape panels confirmed that duplicated regions of ancestral blocks E, J, R, U, and W were involved in resistance to stem canker. The structural analysis of the duplicated genomic regions showed a higher gene density on the A genome than on the C genome and a better collinearity between homoeologous regions than paralogous regions, as overall in the whole B. napus genome. The three ancestral sub-genomes were involved in the resistance to stem canker and the fractionation profile of the duplicated regions corresponded to what was expected from results on the B. napus progenitors. About 60% of the genes identified in these duplicated regions were single-copy genes while less than 5% were retained in all the duplicated copies of a given ancestral block. Genes retained in several copies were mainly involved in response to stress, signaling, or transcription regulation. Genes with resistance-associated markers were mainly retained in more than two copies. These results suggested that some genes underlying quantitative resistance to stem canker might be duplicated genes. Genes with a hydrolase activity that were retained in one copy or R-like genes might also account for resistance in some regions. Further analyses need to be conducted to indicate to what extent duplicated genes contribute to the expression of the resistance phenotype

  2. Integration of a constraint-based metabolic model of Brassica napus developing seeds with 13C-metabolic flux analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Jordan O.; Shi, Hai; Heinzel, Nicolas; Hebbelmann, Inga; Rolletschek, Hardy; Schwender, Jorg

    2014-01-01

    The use of large-scale or genome-scale metabolic reconstructions for modeling and simulation of plant metabolism and integration of those models with large-scale omics and experimental flux data is becoming increasingly important in plant metabolic research. Here we report an updated version of bna572, a bottom-up reconstruction of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.; Brassicaceae) developing seeds with emphasis on representation of biomass-component biosynthesis. New features include additional seed-relevant pathways for isoprenoid, sterol, phenylpropanoid, flavonoid, and choline biosynthesis. Being now based on standardized data formats and procedures for model reconstruction, bna572+ is available as a COBRA-compliant Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) model and conforms to the Minimum Information Requested in the Annotation of Biochemical Models (MIRIAM) standards for annotation of external data resources. Bna572+ contains 966 genes, 671 reactions, and 666 metabolites distributed among 11 subcellular compartments. It is referenced to the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, with gene-protein-reaction (GPR) associations resolving subcellular localization. Detailed mass and charge balancing and confidence scoring were applied to all reactions. Using B. napus seed specific transcriptome data, expression was verified for 78% of bna572+ genes and 97% of reactions. Alongside bna572+ we also present a revised carbon centric model for 13C-Metabolic Flux Analysis (13C-MFA) with all its reactions being referenced to bna572+ based on linear projections. By integration of flux ratio constraints obtained from 13C-MFA and by elimination of infinite flux bounds around thermodynamically infeasible loops based on COBRA loopless methods, we demonstrate improvements in predictive power of Flux Variability Analysis (FVA). Using this combined approach we characterize the difference in metabolic flux of developing seeds of two B. napus genotypes contrasting in starch and oil content. PMID

  3. Integration of a constraint-based metabolic model of Brassica napus developing seeds with (13)C-metabolic flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Jordan O; Shi, Hai; Heinzel, Nicolas; Hebbelmann, Inga; Rolletschek, Hardy; Schwender, Jorg

    2014-01-01

    The use of large-scale or genome-scale metabolic reconstructions for modeling and simulation of plant metabolism and integration of those models with large-scale omics and experimental flux data is becoming increasingly important in plant metabolic research. Here we report an updated version of bna572, a bottom-up reconstruction of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.; Brassicaceae) developing seeds with emphasis on representation of biomass-component biosynthesis. New features include additional seed-relevant pathways for isoprenoid, sterol, phenylpropanoid, flavonoid, and choline biosynthesis. Being now based on standardized data formats and procedures for model reconstruction, bna572+ is available as a COBRA-compliant Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) model and conforms to the Minimum Information Requested in the Annotation of Biochemical Models (MIRIAM) standards for annotation of external data resources. Bna572+ contains 966 genes, 671 reactions, and 666 metabolites distributed among 11 subcellular compartments. It is referenced to the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, with gene-protein-reaction (GPR) associations resolving subcellular localization. Detailed mass and charge balancing and confidence scoring were applied to all reactions. Using B. napus seed specific transcriptome data, expression was verified for 78% of bna572+ genes and 97% of reactions. Alongside bna572+ we also present a revised carbon centric model for (13)C-Metabolic Flux Analysis ((13)C-MFA) with all its reactions being referenced to bna572+ based on linear projections. By integration of flux ratio constraints obtained from (13)C-MFA and by elimination of infinite flux bounds around thermodynamically infeasible loops based on COBRA loopless methods, we demonstrate improvements in predictive power of Flux Variability Analysis (FVA). Using this combined approach we characterize the difference in metabolic flux of developing seeds of two B. napus genotypes contrasting in starch and oil content.

  4. Physical Localization and Genetic Mapping of Fertility Restoration Gene Rfo in Canola (Brassica napus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Ogu cytoplasm for male fertility and its fertility restorer gene Rfo in canola (Brassica napus L.) were originally introgressed from radish (Raphanus sativus L.) and have been widely used for canola hybrid production and breeding. The objective of this study was to determine the physical locati...

  5. Cloning and characterization of a pathogen-induced chitinase in Brassica napus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, U.; Bojsen, K.; Collinge, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    A chitinase cDNA clone from rapeseed (Brassica napus L. ssp. oleifera) was isolated. The cDNA clone, ChB4, represents a previously purified and characterized basic chitinase isozyme. The longest open reading frame in ChB4 encodes a polypeptide of 268 amino acids. This polypeptide consists of a 24...

  6. Homoeologous shuffling and chromosome compensation maintain genome balance in resynthesized allopolyploid Brassica napus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhiyong Xiong; Robert T. Gaeta; J. Chris Pires; Susan R. Wessler

    2011-01-01

    .... By using new cytogenetic tools to identify all of the homoeologous chromosomes, we conducted a cytologica I investigation of 50 resynthesized Brassica napus allopolyploids across generations S0:1 to S5:6 and in the S10:11 generation...

  7. Effect of phosphorus, potassium, and chloride nutrition on cold tolerance of winter canola (Brassica napus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A field experiment was conducted to determine whether fertility treatments improve cold hardiness of canola (Brassica napus L.). Measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence and overwinter survival of field-grown canola were used to evaluate the effect of chloride (Cl), potassium (K), and phosphorus (P)...

  8. Effects of Fe deficiency on the protein profile of Brassica napus phloem sap

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of Fe deficiency on the protein profile of phloem sap exudates from Brassica napus using 2-DE (IEF-SDS PAGE). The experiment was repeated thrice and two technical replicates per treatment were done. Two hundred sixty-three spots were consistently detected...

  9. Amplification of the active site of BnLIP3 gene of Brassica napus L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lipases are useful enzymes that are responsible for the hydrolysis of triacylglycerides and play an important role in plant growth. In this study, we report a rapid molecular method to amplify a partial sequence of the lipase class 3 family designated BnLIP3 gene of Brassica napus L. in order to follow its expression and ...

  10. Monitoring of nuclear activity during pollen development and androgenesis in Brassica napus L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straatman, K.R.

    1999-01-01

    To study transcription and maturation of RNA, pollen development and androgenesis of Brassica napus was chosen as a test system as explained in Chapter 1. Culturing microspores and young bicellular pollen at 32 °C allows to change the developmental pathway from pollen

  11. Plant defence responses in oilseed rape MINELESS plants after attack by the cabbage moth Mamestra brassicae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Ishita; van Dam, Nicole Marie; Winge, Per; Trælnes, Marianne; Heydarova, Aysel; Rohloff, Jens; Langaas, Mette; Bones, Atle Magnar

    2015-02-01

    The Brassicaceae family is characterized by a unique defence mechanism known as the 'glucosinolate-myrosinase' system. When insect herbivores attack plant tissues, glucosinolates are hydrolysed by the enzyme myrosinase (EC 3.2.1.147) into a variety of degradation products, which can deter further herbivory. This process has been described as 'the mustard oil bomb'. Additionally, insect damage induces the production of glucosinolates, myrosinase, and other defences. Brassica napus seeds have been genetically modified to remove myrosinase-containing myrosin cells. These plants are termed MINELESS because they lack myrosin cells, the so-called toxic mustard oil mines. Here, we examined the interaction between B. napus wild-type and MINELESS plants and the larvae of the cabbage moth Mamestra brassicae. No-choice feeding experiments showed that M. brassicae larvae gained less weight and showed stunted growth when feeding on MINELESS plants compared to feeding on wild-type plants. M. brassicae feeding didn't affect myrosinase activity in MINELESS plants, but did reduce it in wild-type seedlings. M. brassicae feeding increased the levels of indol-3-yl-methyl, 1-methoxy-indol-3-yl-methyl, and total glucosinolates in both wild-type and MINELESS seedlings. M. brassicae feeding affected the levels of glucosinolate hydrolysis products in both wild-type and MINELESS plants. Transcriptional analysis showed that 494 and 159 genes were differentially regulated after M. brassicae feeding on wild-type and MINELESS seedlings, respectively. Taken together, the outcomes are very interesting in terms of analysing the role of myrosin cells and the glucosinolate-myrosinase defence system in response to a generalist cabbage moth, suggesting that similar studies with other generalist or specialist insect herbivores, including above- and below-ground herbivores, would be useful. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  12. Citric acid assisted phytoremediation of cadmium by Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsan, Sana; Ali, Shafaqat; Noureen, Shamaila; Mahmood, Khalid; Farid, Mujahid; Ishaque, Wajid; Shakoor, Muhammad Bilal; Rizwan, Muhammad

    2014-08-01

    Phytoextraction is an eco-friendly and cost-effective technique for removal of toxins, especially heavy metals and metalloids from contaminated soils by the roots of high biomass producing plant species with subsequent transport to aerial parts. Lower metal bioavailability often limits the phytoextraction. Organic chelators can help to improve this biological technique by increasing metal solubility. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possibility of improving the phytoextraction of Cd by the application of citric acid. For this purpose, plants were grown in hydroponics under controlled conditions. Results indicated that Cd supply significantly decreased the plant growth, biomass, pigments, photosynthetic characteristics and protein contents which were accompanied by a significant increase in Cd concentration, hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂), electrolyte leakage, malondialdehyde (MDA) accumulation and decrease in antioxidant capacity. The effects were dose dependent with obvious effects at higher Cd concentration. Application of CA significantly enhanced Cd uptake and its accumulation in plant roots, stems and leaves. Citric acid alleviated Cd toxicity by increasing plant biomass and photosynthetic and growth parameters alone and in combination with Cd and by reducing oxidative stress as observed by reduction in MDA and H₂O₂ production and decreased electrolyte leakage induced by Cd stress. Application of CA also enhanced the antioxidant enzymes activity alone and under Cd stress. Thus, the data indicate that exogenous CA application can increase Cd uptake and minimize Cd stress in plants and may be beneficial in accelerating the phytoextraction of Cd through hyper-accumulating plants such as Brassica napus L. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Vascular Pathogen Verticillium longisporum Does Not Affect Water Relations and Plant Responses to Drought Stress of Its Host, Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopisso, Daniel Teshome; Knüfer, Jessica; Koopmann, Birger; von Tiedemann, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Verticillium longisporum is a host-specific vascular pathogen of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) that causes economic crop losses by impairing plant growth and inducing premature senescence. This study investigates whether plant damage through Verticillium stem striping is due to impaired plant water relations, whether V. longisporum affects responses of a susceptible B. napus variety to drought stress, and whether drought stress, in turn, affects plant responses to V. longisporum. Two-factorial experiments on a susceptible cultivar of B. napus infected or noninfected with V. longisporum and exposed to three watering levels (30, 60, and 100% field capacity) revealed that drought stress and V. longisporum impaired plant growth by entirely different mechanisms. Although both stresses similarly affected plant growth parameters (plant height, hypocotyl diameter, and shoot and root dry matter), infection of B. napus with V. longisporum did not affect any drought-related physiological or molecular genetic plant parameters, including transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, photosynthesis rate, water use efficiency, relative leaf water content, leaf proline content, or the expression of drought-responsive genes. Thus, this study provides comprehensive physiological and molecular genetic evidence explaining the lack of wilt symptoms in B. napus infected with V. longisporum. Likewise, drought tolerance of B. napus was unaffected by V. longisporum, as was the level of disease by drought conditions, thus excluding a concerted action of both stresses in the field. Although it is evident that drought and vascular infection with V. longisporum impair plant growth by different mechanisms, it remains to be determined by which other factors V. longisporum causes crop loss.

  14. Impact of biogenic terpene emissions from Brassica napus on tropospheric ozone over Saxony (Germany): numerical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Eberhard; Münzenberg, Annette

    2003-01-01

    The role of biogenic emissions in tropospheric ozone production is currently under discussion and major aspects are not well understood yet. This study aims towards the estimation of the influence of biogenic emissions on tropospheric ozone concentrations over Saxony in general and of biogenic emissions from brassica napus in special. MODELLING TOOLS: The studies are performed by utilizing a coupled numerical modelling system consisting of the meteorological model METRAS and the chemistry transport model MUSCAT. For the chemical part, the Euro-RADM algorithm is used. EMISSIONS: Anthropogenic and biogenic emissions are taken into account. The anthropogenic emissions are introduced by an emission inventory. Biogenic emissions, VOC and NO, are calculated within the chemical transport model MUSCAT at each time step and in each grid cell depending on land use type and on the temperature. The emissions of hydrocarbons from forest areas as well as biogenic NO especially from agricultural grounds are considered. Also terpene emissions from brassica napus fields are estimated. SIMULATION SETUP AND METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS: The simulations were performed over an area with an extension of 160 x 140 km2 which covers the main parts of Saxony and neighboring areas of Brandenburg, Sachsen-Anhalt and Thuringia. Summer smog with high ozone concentrations can be expected during high pressure conditions on hot summer days. Typical meteorological conditions for such cases were introduced in an conceptual way. It is estimated that biogenic emissions change tropospheric ozone concentrations in a noticeable way (up to 15% to 20%) and, therefore, should not be neglected in studies about tropospheric ozone. Emissions from brassica napus do have a moderate potential to enhance tropospheric ozone concentrations, but emissions are still under consideration and, therefore, results vary to a high degree. Summing up, the effect of brassica napus terpene emissions on ozone concentrations is

  15. ANTIBACTERIAL EFFECT OF COMPOUNDS OF PEPTIDE NATURE CONTAINED IN AQUEOUS EXTRACT OF BRASSICA NAPUS SOLANUM LYCOPERSICUM AND TETRAGONIA TETRAGONIOIDES LEAVES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tereza Neubauerová; Ivana Dolezílková; Marta Králová; Irina Schevchenko; Anna Macurková; Miloslav Sanda; Petra Lovecká; Martina Macková; Tomás Macek

    2015-01-01

    .... Lot of them have been isolated from bacteria, plants, insects and mammals as well. Our project was aimed on finding such peptides in plant extracts, respectively in leaves of Brassica napus (canola...

  16. Attack modes and defence reactions in pathosystems involving Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Brassica carinata, B. juncea and B. napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uloth, Margaret B; Clode, Peta L; You, Ming Pei; Barbetti, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Sclerotinia stem rot (SSR, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum) is a damaging disease of oilseed brassicas world-wide. Host resistance is urgently needed to achieve control, yet the factors that contribute to stem resistance are not well understood. This study investigated the mechanisms of resistance to SSR. Stems of 5-week-old Brassica carinata, B. juncea and B. napus of known resistance were infected via filter paper discs impregnated with S. sclerotiorum mycelium under controlled conditions. Transverse sections of the stem and portions of the stem surface were examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy. The association of anatomical features with the severity of disease (measured by mean lesion length) was determined. Several distinct resistance mechanisms were recorded for the first time in these Brassica-pathogen interactions, including hypersensitive reactions and lignification within the stem cortex, endodermis and in tissues surrounding the lesions. Genotypes showing a strong lignification response 72 h post-infection (hpi) tended to have smaller lesions. Extensive vascular invasion by S. sclerotiorum was observed only in susceptible genotypes, especially in the vascular fibres and xylem. Mean lesion length was negatively correlated with the number of cell layers in the cortex, suggesting progress of S. sclerotiorum is impeded by more cell layers. Hyphae in the centre of lesions became highly vacuolate 72 hpi, reflecting an ageing process in S. sclerotiorum hyphal networks that was independent of host resistance. The infection process of S. sclerotiorum was analogous in B. carinata and B. napus. Infection cushions of the highly virulent isolate of S. sclerotiorum MBRS-1 were grouped together in dense parallel bundles, while hyphae in the infection cushions of a less aggressive isolate WW-3 were more diffuse, and this was unaffected by host genotype. A variety of mechanisms contribute to host resistance against S. sclerotiorum across the three

  17. Characteristics Analysis of F1 Hybrids between Genetically Modified Brassica napus and B. rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Soo-In; Oh, Young-Ju; Lee, Kyeong-Ryeol; Ko, Ho-Cheol; Cho, Hyun-Suk; Lee, Yeon-Hee; Chang, Ancheol

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have been conducted on hybridization between transgenic Brassica napus and B. rapa or backcross of F1 hybrid to their parents. However, trait changes must be analyzed to evaluate hybrid sustainability in nature. In the present study, B. rapa and transgenic (BrAGL20) B. napus were hybridized to verify the early flowering phenomenon of F1 hybrids, and F1 hybrid traits were analyzed to predict their impact on sustainability. Flowering of F1 hybrid has been induced slightly later than that of the transgenic B. napus, but flowering was available in the greenhouse without low temperature treatment to young plant, similar to the transgenic B. napus. It is because the BrAGL20 gene has been transferred from transgenic B. napus to F1 hybrid. The size of F1 hybrid seeds was intermediate between those of B. rapa and transgenic B. napus, and ~40% of F1 pollen exhibited abnormal size and morphology. The form of the F1 stomata was also intermediate between that of B. rapa and transgenic B. napus, and the number of stomata was close to the parental mean. Among various fatty acids, the content of erucic acid exhibited the greatest change, owing to the polymorphism of parental FATTY ACID ELONGASE 1 alleles. Furthermore, F2 hybrids could not be obtained. However, BC1 progeny were obtained by hand pollination of B. rapa with F1 hybrid pollen, with an outcrossing rate of 50%.

  18. Synthetic Brassica napus L.: Development and Studies on Morphological Characters, Yield Attributes, and Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Malek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brassica napus was synthesized by hybridization between its diploid progenitor species B. rapa and B. oleracea followed by chromosome doubling. Cross with B. rapa as a female parent was only successful. Among three colchicine treatments (0.10, 0.15, and 0.20%, 0.15% gave the highest success (86% of chromosome doubling in the hybrids (AC; 2=19. Synthetic B. napus (AACC, 2=38 was identified with bigger petals, fertile pollens and seed setting. Synthetic B. napus had increased growth over parents and exhibited wider ranges with higher coefficients of variations than parents for morphological and yield contributing characters, and yield per plant. Siliqua length as well as beak length in synthetic B. napus was longer than those of the parents. Number of seeds per siliqua, 1000-seed weight and seed yield per plant in synthetic B. napus were higher than those of the parents. Although flowering time in synthetic B. napus was earlier than both parents, however the days to maturity was little higher over early maturing B. rapa parent. The synthesized B. napus has great potential to produce higher seed yield. Further screening and evaluation is needed for selection of desirable genotypes having improved yield contributing characters and higher seed yield.

  19. Quantification of Plasmodiophora brassicae Using a DNA-Based Soil Test Facilitates Sustainable Oilseed Rape Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Charlotte Wallenhammar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of clubroot disease caused by the soil-borne obligate parasite Plasmodiophora brassicae are common in oilseed rape (OSR in Sweden. A DNA-based soil testing service that identifies fields where P. brassicae poses a significant risk of clubroot infection is now commercially available. It was applied here in field surveys to monitor the prevalence of P. brassicae DNA in field soils intended for winter OSR production and winter OSR field experiments. In 2013 in Scania, prior to planting, P. brassicae DNA was detected in 60% of 45 fields on 10 of 18 farms. In 2014, P. brassicae DNA was detected in 44% of 59 fields in 14 of 36 farms, in the main winter OSR producing region in southern Sweden. P. brassicae was present indicative of a risk for >10% yield loss with susceptible cultivars (>1300 DNA copies g soil−1 in 47% and 44% of fields in 2013 and 2014 respectively. Furthermore, P. brassicae DNA was indicative of sites at risk of complete crop failure if susceptible cultivars were grown (>50 000 copies g−1 soil in 14% and 8% of fields in 2013 and 2014, respectively. A survey of all fields at Lanna research station in western Sweden showed that P. brassicae was spread throughout the farm, as only three of the fields (20% showed infection levels below the detection limit for P.brassicae DNA, while the level was >50,000 DNA copies g−1 soil in 20% of the fields. Soil-borne spread is of critical importance and soil scraped off footwear showed levels of up to 682 million spores g−1 soil. Soil testing is an important tool for determining the presence of P. brassicae and providing an indication of potential yield loss, e.g., in advisory work on planning for a sustainable OSR crop rotation. This soil test is gaining acceptance as a tool that increases the likelihood of success in precision agriculture and in applied research conducted in commercial oilseed fields and at research stations. The present application highlights the importance of

  20. Population genomic analysis reveals differential evolutionary histories and patterns of diversity across subgenomes and subpopulations of Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassica napus (L.) is a crop of major economic importance that produces canola oil (seed), vegetables, fodder and animal meal. Characterizing the genetic diversity present in the extant germplasm pool of B. napus is fundamental to better conserve, manage and utilize the genetic resources of this s...

  1. A- or C-chromosomes, does it matter for the transfer of transgenes from ¤Brassica napus¤

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomiuk, J.; Hauser, T.P.; Bagger Jørgensen, Rikke

    2000-01-01

    Introgression of genes from allotetraploid Brassica napus into its diploid wild relative B. mpa is generally considered to be inevitable. As a means to minimize a potential ecological risk in environments where B. ml,a is growing, the insertion of transgenes into chromosome regions of B. napus...

  2. Effect of microwave treatment on the efficacy of expeller pressing of Brassica napus rapeseed and Brassica juncea mustard seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yanxing; Rogiewicz, Anna; Wan, Chuyun; Guo, Mian; Huang, Fenghong; Slominski, Bogdan A

    2015-04-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of microwave heating on the efficacy of expeller pressing of rapeseed and mustard seed and the composition of expeller meals in two types of Brassica napus rapeseed (intermediate- and low-glucosinolate) and in Brassica juncea mustard (high-glucosinolate). Following microwave treatment, the microstructure of rapeseed using transmission electron microscopy showed a significant disappearance of oil bodies and myrosin cells. After 6 min of microwave heating (400 g, 800 W), the oil content of rapeseed expeller meal decreased from 44.9 to 13.5% for intermediate-glucosinolate B. napus rapeseed, from 42.6 to 11.3% for low-glucosinolate B. napus rapeseed, and from 44.4 to 14.1% for B. juncea mustard. The latter values were much lower than the oil contents of the corresponding expeller meals derived from the unheated seeds (i.e., 26.6, 22.6, and 29.8%, respectively). Neutral detergent fiber (NDF) contents showed no differences except for the expeller meal from the intermediate-glucosinolate B. napus rapeseed, which increased from 22.7 to 29.2% after 6 min of microwave heating. Microwave treatment for 4 and 5 min effectively inactivated myrosinase enzyme of intermediate-glucosinolate B. napus rapeseed and B. juncea mustard seed, respectively. In low-glucosinolate B. napus rapeseed the enzyme appeared to be more heat stable, with some activity being present after 6 min of microwave heating. Myrosinase enzyme inactivation had a profound effect on the glucosinolate content of expeller meals and prevented their hydrolysis to toxic breakdown products during the expelling process. It appeared evident from this study that microwave heating for 6 min was an effective method of producing expeller meal without toxic glucosinolate breakdown products while at the same time facilitating high yield of oil during the expelling process.

  3. Brassica napus Genome Possesses Extraordinary High Number of CAMTA Genes and CAMTA3 Contributes to PAMP Triggered Immunity and Resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Hafizur; Xu, You-Ping; Zhang, Xuan-Rui; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin-binding transcription activators (CAMTAs) play important roles in various plant biological processes including disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance. Oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) is one of the most important oil-producing crops worldwide. To date, compositon of CAMTAs in genomes of Brassica species and role of CAMTAs in resistance to the devastating necrotrophic fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum are still unknown. In this study, 18 CAMTA genes were identified in oilseed rape genome through bioinformatics analyses, which were inherited from the nine copies each in its progenitors Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea and represented the highest number of CAMTAs in a given plant species identified so far. Gene structure, protein domain organization and phylogentic analyses showed that the oilseed rape CAMTAs were structurally similar and clustered into three major groups as other plant CAMTAs, but had expanded subgroups CAMTA3 and CAMTA4 genes uniquely in rosids species occurring before formation of oilseed rape. A large number of stress response-related cis-elements existed in the 1.5 kb promoter regions of the BnCAMTA genes. BnCAMTA genes were expressed differentially in various organs and in response to treatments with plant hormones and the toxin oxalic acid (OA) secreted by S. sclerotiorum as well as the pathogen inoculation. Remarkably, the expression of BnCAMTA3A1 and BnCAMTA3C1 was drastically induced in early phase of S. sclerotiorum infection, indicating their potential role in the interactions between oilseed rape and S. sclerotiorum. Furthermore, inoculation analyses using Arabidopsis camta mutants demonstrated that Atcamta3 mutant plants exhibited significantly smaller disease lesions than wild-type and other Atcamta mutant plants. In addition, compared with wild-type plants, Atcamta3 plants accumulated obviously more hydrogen peroxide in response to the PAMP chitin and exhibited much higher expression of the CGCG

  4. Genome-Wide Delineation of Natural Variation for Pod Shatter Resistance in Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Harsh; Raman, Rosy; Kilian, Andrzej; Detering, Frank; Carling, Jason; Coombes, Neil; Diffey, Simon; Kadkol, Gururaj; Edwards, David; McCully, Margaret; Ruperao, Pradeep; Parkin, Isobel A. P.; Batley, Jacqueline; Luckett, David J.; Wratten, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to pod shattering (shatter resistance) is a target trait for global rapeseed (canola, Brassica napus L.), improvement programs to minimise grain loss in the mature standing crop, and during windrowing and mechanical harvest. We describe the genetic basis of natural variation for shatter resistance in B. napus and show that several quantitative trait loci (QTL) control this trait. To identify loci underlying shatter resistance, we used a novel genotyping-by-sequencing approach DArT-Seq. QTL analysis detected a total of 12 significant QTL on chromosomes A03, A07, A09, C03, C04, C06, and C08; which jointly account for approximately 57% of the genotypic variation in shatter resistance. Through Genome-Wide Association Studies, we show that a large number of loci, including those that are involved in shattering in Arabidopsis, account for variation in shatter resistance in diverse B. napus germplasm. Our results indicate that genetic diversity for shatter resistance genes in B. napus is limited; many of the genes that might control this trait were not included during the natural creation of this species, or were not retained during the domestication and selection process. We speculate that valuable diversity for this trait was lost during the natural creation of B. napus. To improve shatter resistance, breeders will need to target the introduction of useful alleles especially from genotypes of other related species of Brassica, such as those that we have identified. PMID:25006804

  5. Determination of the net energy content of canola meal from Brassica napus yellow and Brassica juncea yellow fed to growing pigs using indirect calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jung Min; Adewole, Deborah; Nyachoti, Martin

    2014-07-01

    The net energy (NE) content of canola meals (CM; i.e. Brassica napus yellow and Brassica juncea yellow) in growing pigs was determined using an indirect calorimetry chamber or published prediction equations. The study was conducted as a completely randomized design (n=6), with (i) a basal diet and (ii) 2 diets containing 700 g/kg of the basal diet and 300 g/kg of either of the two varieties of CM. A total of 18 growing barrows were housed in metabolism crates for the determination of digestible (DE) and metabolizable (ME) energy. Thereafter, pigs were transferred to the indirect calorimetry chamber to determine heat production (HP). The NE contents of diets containing Brassica napus yellow and Brassica juncea yellow determined with the direct determination technique and prediction equations were 9.8 versus 10.3 MJ/kg dry matter (DM) and 10.2 versus 10.4 MJ/kg DM, respectively. Retained energy (RE) and fasting heat production (FHP) of diets containing Brassica napus yellow and Brassica juncea yellow were 5.5 versus 5.7 MJ/kg and 4.3 versus 4.5 MJ/kg, respectively, when measured with the direct determination technique and prediction equations. The NE contents of Brassica napus yellow and Brassica juncea yellow were determined to be 8.8 and 9.8 MJ/kg DM, respectively, using the direct determination technique. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  6. Functional analysis and tissue-differential expression of four FAD2 genes in amphidiploid Brassica napus derived from Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeong-Ryeol; In Sohn, Soo; Jung, Jin Hee; Kim, Sun Hee; Roh, Kyung Hee; Kim, Jong-Bum; Suh, Mi Chung; Kim, Hyun Uk

    2013-12-01

    Fatty acid desaturase 2 (FAD2), which resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), plays a crucial role in producing linoleic acid (18:2) through catalyzing the desaturation of oleic acid (18:1) by double bond formation at the delta 12 position. FAD2 catalyzes the first step needed for the production of polyunsaturated fatty acids found in the glycerolipids of cell membranes and the triacylglycerols in seeds. In this study, four FAD2 genes from amphidiploid Brassica napus genome were isolated by PCR amplification, with their enzymatic functions predicted by sequence analysis of the cDNAs. Fatty acid analysis of budding yeast transformed with each of the FAD2 genes showed that whereas BnFAD2-1, BnFAD2-2, and BnFAD2-4 are functional enzymes, and BnFAD2-3 is nonfunctional. The four FAD2 genes of B. napus originated from synthetic hybridization of its diploid progenitors Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea, each of which has two FAD2 genes identical to those of B. napus. The BnFAD2-3 gene of B. napus, a nonfunctional pseudogene mutated by multiple nucleotide deletions and insertions, was inherited from B. rapa. All BnFAD2 isozymes except BnFAD2-3 localized to the ER. Nonfunctional BnFAD2-3 localized to the nucleus and chloroplasts. Four BnFAD2 genes can be classified on the basis of their expression patterns. © 2013.

  7. BraLTP1, a lipid transfer protein gene involved in epicuticular wax deposition, cell proliferation and flower development in Brassica napus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Liu

    Full Text Available Plant non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs constitute large multigene families that possess complex physiological functions, many of which remain unclear. This study isolated and characterized the function of a lipid transfer protein gene, BraLTP1 from Brassica rapa, in the important oilseed crops Brassica napus. BraLTP1 encodes a predicted secretory protein, in the little known VI Class of nsLTP families. Overexpression of BnaLTP1 in B. napus caused abnormal green coloration and reduced wax deposition on leaves and detailed wax analysis revealed 17-80% reduction in various major wax components, which resulted in significant water-loss relative to wild type. BnaLTP1 overexpressing leaves exhibited morphological disfiguration and abaxially curled leaf edges, and leaf cross-sections revealed cell overproliferation that was correlated to increased cytokinin levels (tZ, tZR, iP, and iPR in leaves and high expression of the cytokinin biosynthsis gene IPT3. BnaLTP1-overexpressing plants also displayed morphological disfiguration of flowers, with early-onset and elongated carpel development and outwardly curled stamen. This was consistent with altered expression of a a number of ABC model genes related to flower development. Together, these results suggest that BraLTP1 is a new nsLTP gene involved in wax production or deposition, with additional direct or indirect effects on cell division and flower development.

  8. Rising CO2 from historical concentrations enhances the physiological performance of Brassica napus seedlings under optimal water supply but not under reduced water availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faralli, Michele; Grove, Ivan G; Hare, Martin C; Kettlewell, Peter S; Fiorani, Fabio

    2017-02-01

    The productivity of many important crops is significantly threatened by water shortage, and the elevated atmospheric CO2 can significantly interact with physiological processes and crop responses to drought. We examined the effects of three different CO2 concentrations (historical ~300 ppm, ambient ~400 ppm and elevated ~700 ppm) on physiological traits of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) seedlings subjected to well-watered and reduced water availability. Our data show (1) that, as expected, increasing CO2 level positively modulates leaf photosynthetic traits, leaf water-use efficiency and growth under non-stressed conditions, although a pronounced acclimation of photosynthesis to elevated CO2 occurred; (2) that the predicted elevated CO2 concentration does not reduce total evapotranspiration under drought when compared with present (400 ppm) and historical (300 ppm) concentrations because of a larger leaf area that does not buffer transpiration; and (3) that accordingly, the physiological traits analysed decreased similarly under stress for all CO2 concentrations. Our data support the hypothesis that increasing CO2 concentrations may not significantly counteract the negative effect of increasing drought intensity on Brassica napus performance. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptide from Pinus monticola (PmAMP1) confers resistance to multiple fungal pathogens in canola (Brassica napus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Shiv S; Yajima, William R; Rahman, Muhammad H; Shah, Saleh; Liu, Jun-Jun; Ekramoddoullah, Abul K M; Kav, Nat N V

    2012-05-01

    Canola (Brassica napus), an agriculturally important oilseed crop, can be significantly affected by diseases such as sclerotinia stem rot, blackleg, and alternaria black spot resulting in significant loss of crop productivity and quality. Cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptides isolated from plants have emerged as a potential resource for protection of plants against phytopathogens. Here we report the significance of an antimicrobial peptide, PmAMP1, isolated from western white pine (Pinus monticola), in providing canola with resistance against multiple phytopathogenic fungi. The cDNA encoding PmAMP1 was successfully incorporated into the genome of B. napus, and it's in planta expression conferred greater protection against Alternaria brassicae, Leptosphaeria maculans and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. In vitro experiments with proteins extracted from transgenic canola expressing Pm-AMP1 demonstrated its inhibitory activity by reducing growth of fungal hyphae. In addition, the in vitro synthesized peptide also inhibited the growth of the fungi. These results demonstrate that generating transgenic crops expressing PmAMP1 may be an effective and versatile method to protect susceptible crops against multiple phytopathogens.

  10. Differentially expressed proteins and associated histological and disease progression changes in cotyledon tissue of a resistant and susceptible genotype of brassica napus infected with Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Harsh; Li, Hua; Sivasithamparam, Krishnapillai; Barbetti, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    Sclerotinia rot caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is one of the most serious diseases of oilseed rape. To understand the resistance mechanisms in the Brassica napus to S. sclerotiorum, comparative disease progression, histological and proteomic studies were conducted of two B. napus genotypes (resistant cv. Charlton, susceptible cv. RQ001-02M2). At 72 and 96 h post inoculation (hpi), lesion size on cotyledons was significantly (P≤0.001) smaller in the resistant Charlton. Anatomical investigations revealed impeded fungal growth (at 24 hpi and onwards) and hyphal disintegration only on resistant Charlton. Temporal changes (12, 24, 48 and 72 hpi) in protein profile showed certain enzymes up-regulated only in resistant Charlton, such as those related to primary metabolic pathways, antioxidant defence, ethylene biosynthesis, pathogenesis related proteins, protein synthesis and protein folding, play a role in mediating defence responses against S. sclerotiorum. Similarly a eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A enzyme with increased abundance in susceptible RQ001-02M2 and decreased levels in resistant Charlton has a role in increased susceptibility to this pathogen. This is the first time that the expression of these enzymes has been shown to be associated with mediating the defence response against S. sclerotinia in cotyledon tissue of a resistant cultivar of B. napus at a proteomics level. This study not only provides important new insights into the resistance mechanisms within B. napus against S. sclerotiorum, but opens the way for novel engineering of new B. napus varieties that over-express these key enzymes as a strategy to enhance resistance and better manage this devastating pathogen.

  11. The receptor-like kinase SOBIR1 interacts with Brassica napus LepR3 and is required for Leptosphaeria maculans AvrLm1-triggered immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisong eMa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe fungus Leptosphaeria maculans (L. maculans is the causal agent of blackleg disease of canola/oilseed rape (Brassica napus worldwide. We previously reported cloning of the B. napus blackleg resistance gene, LepR3, which encodes a receptor-like protein. LepR3 triggers localised cell death upon recognition of its cognate Avr protein, AvrLm1. Here, we exploited the Nicotiana benthamiana model plant to investigate the recognition mechanism of AvrLm1 by LepR3. Co-expression of the LepR3/AvrLm1 gene pair in N. benthamiana resulted in development of a hypersensitive response (HR. However, a truncated AvrLm1 lacking its indigenous signal peptide was compromised in its ability to induce LepR3-mediated HR, indicating that AvrLm1 is perceived by LepR3 extracellularly. Structure-function analysis of the AvrLm1 protein revealed that the C-terminal region of AvrLm1 was required for LepR3-mediated HR in N. benthamiana and for resistance to L. maculans in B. napus. LepR3 was shown to be physically interacting with the B. napus receptor like kinase, SOBIR1 (BnSOBIR1. Silencing of NbSOBIR1 or NbSERK3 (BAK1 compromised LepR3-AvrLm1-dependent HR in N. benthamiana, suggesting that LepR3-mediated resistance to L. maculans in B. napus requires SOBIR1 and BAK1/SERK3. Using this model system, we determined that BnSOBIR1 and SERK3/BAK1 are essential partners in the LepR3 signalling complex and were able to define the AvrLm1 effector domain.

  12. Mapping a major QTL responsible for dwarf architecture in Brassica napus using a single-nucleotide polymorphism marker approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yankun; Chen, Wenjing; Chu, Pu; Wan, Shubei; Yang, Mao; Wang, Mingming; Guan, Rongzhan

    2016-08-18

    Key genes related to plant type traits have played very important roles in the "green revolution" by increasing lodging resistance and elevating the harvest indices of crop cultivars. Although there have been numerous achievements in the development of dwarfism and plant type in Brassica napus breeding, exploring new materials conferring oilseed rape with efficient plant types that provide higher yields is still of significance in breeding, as well as in elucidating the mechanisms underlying plant development. Here, we report a new dwarf architecture with down-curved leaf mutant (Bndwf/dcl1) isolated from an ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS)-mutagenized B. napus line, together with its inheritance and gene mapping, and pleiotropic effects of the mapped locus on plant-type traits. We constructed a high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) map using a backcross population derived from the Bndwf/dcl1 mutant and the canola cultivar 'zhongshuang11' ('ZS11') and mapped the dwarf architecture with the down-curved leaf dominant locus, BnDWF/DCL1, in a 6.58-cM interval between SNP marker bins M46180 and M49962 on the linkage group (LG) C05 of B. napus. Further mapping with other materials derived from Bndwf/dcl1 narrowed the interval harbouring BnDWF/DCL1 to 175 kb in length and this interval contained 16 annotated genes. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mappings with the backcross population for plant type traits, including plant height, branching height, main raceme length and average branching interval, indicated that the mapped QTLs for plant type traits were located at the same position as the BnDWF/DCL1 locus. This study suggests that the BnDWF/DCL1 locus is a major pleiotropic locus/QTL in B. napus, which may reduce plant height, alter plant type traits and change leaf shape, and thus may lead to compact plant architecture. Accordingly, this locus may have substantial breeding potential for increasing planting density.

  13. Present state and prospects of breeding rapeseed (Brassica napus) with a maximum erucic acid content for industrial applications. Stand und Perspektiven der Zuechtung von Raps (Brassica napus L. ) mit hohem Erucasaeure-Gehalt im Oel fuer industrielle Nutzungszwecke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luhs, W. (Inst. fuer Pflanzenbau und Pflanzenzuechtung 1, Giessen (Germany)); Friedt, W. (Inst. fuer Pflanzenbau und Pflanzenzuechtung 1, Giessen (Germany))

    1994-01-01

    Rapeseed oil with proportions of erucic acid (C22:1) substantially higher than the level found in traditional cultivars (ca. 50% C22:1) are sought by breeders and chemists for use in wellknown industrial processes and products. In a first step available rapeseed and Brassica germplasm was screened for high erucic acid content. Following conventional breeding procedures (e.g. pedigree selection) promising rapeseed genotypes were crossed and the progeny were selected due to genetic variation of oil content and quality. Since rapeseed (B. napus L.) is amenable to improvement through biotechnology as well, further breeding progress was achieved by application of cell and tissue culture techniques, e.g., microspore culture for the production of doubled-haploid lines. Furthermore, an impressive strategy to increase genetic variation is the resynthesis of rapeseed, i.e., by crossing the original ancestors, B. rapa and B. oleracea, accomplished by embryo rescue technique circumventing existing incompatibility barriers. Following this way we have carried out crosses between b. rapa ssp. trilocularis ('Yellow sarson') and several selected cauliflowers in order to create new oilseed rape germplasm with high erucic acid content. The offspring display desirable variation in the content of major fatty acids. Through introgression of resynthesized germplasm into conventional high-erucic acid rapeseed material it should be possible to produce recombinant breeding lines with an erucic acid content of 60% or even more. (orig.)

  14. Integration of linkage maps for the Amphidiploid Brassica napus and comparative mapping with Arabidopsis and Brassica rapa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The large number of genetic linkage maps representing Brassica chromosomes constitute a potential platform for studying crop traits and genome evolution within Brassicaceae. However, the alignment of existing maps remains a major challenge. The integration of these genetic maps will enhance genetic resolution, and provide a means to navigate between sequence-tagged loci, and with contiguous genome sequences as these become available. Results We report the first genome-wide integration of Brassica maps based on an automated pipeline which involved collation of genome-wide genotype data for sequence-tagged markers scored on three extensively used amphidiploid Brassica napus (2n = 38) populations. Representative markers were selected from consolidated maps for each population, and skeleton bin maps were generated. The skeleton maps for the three populations were then combined to generate an integrated map for each LG, comparing two different approaches, one encapsulated in JoinMap and the other in MergeMap. The BnaWAIT_01_2010a integrated genetic map was generated using JoinMap, and includes 5,162 genetic markers mapped onto 2,196 loci, with a total genetic length of 1,792 cM. The map density of one locus every 0.82 cM, corresponding to 515 Kbp, increases by at least three-fold the locus and marker density within the original maps. Within the B. napus integrated map we identified 103 conserved collinearity blocks relative to Arabidopsis, including five previously unreported blocks. The BnaWAIT_01_2010a map was used to investigate the integrity and conservation of order proposed for genome sequence scaffolds generated from the constituent A genome of Brassica rapa. Conclusions Our results provide a comprehensive genetic integration of the B. napus genome from a range of sources, which we anticipate will provide valuable information for rapeseed and Canola research. PMID:21306613

  15. Integration of linkage maps for the Amphidiploid Brassica napus and comparative mapping with Arabidopsis and Brassica rapa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delourme Régine

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The large number of genetic linkage maps representing Brassica chromosomes constitute a potential platform for studying crop traits and genome evolution within Brassicaceae. However, the alignment of existing maps remains a major challenge. The integration of these genetic maps will enhance genetic resolution, and provide a means to navigate between sequence-tagged loci, and with contiguous genome sequences as these become available. Results We report the first genome-wide integration of Brassica maps based on an automated pipeline which involved collation of genome-wide genotype data for sequence-tagged markers scored on three extensively used amphidiploid Brassica napus (2n = 38 populations. Representative markers were selected from consolidated maps for each population, and skeleton bin maps were generated. The skeleton maps for the three populations were then combined to generate an integrated map for each LG, comparing two different approaches, one encapsulated in JoinMap and the other in MergeMap. The BnaWAIT_01_2010a integrated genetic map was generated using JoinMap, and includes 5,162 genetic markers mapped onto 2,196 loci, with a total genetic length of 1,792 cM. The map density of one locus every 0.82 cM, corresponding to 515 Kbp, increases by at least three-fold the locus and marker density within the original maps. Within the B. napus integrated map we identified 103 conserved collinearity blocks relative to Arabidopsis, including five previously unreported blocks. The BnaWAIT_01_2010a map was used to investigate the integrity and conservation of order proposed for genome sequence scaffolds generated from the constituent A genome of Brassica rapa. Conclusions Our results provide a comprehensive genetic integration of the B. napus genome from a range of sources, which we anticipate will provide valuable information for rapeseed and Canola research.

  16. Proteomic and comparative genomic analysis reveals adaptability of Brassica napus to phosphorus-deficient stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuisen; Ding, Guangda; Wang, Zhenhua; Cai, Hongmei; Xu, Fangsen

    2015-03-18

    Given low solubility and immobility in many soils of the world, phosphorus (P) may be the most widely studied macronutrient for plants. In an attempt to gain an insight into the adaptability of Brassica napus to P deficiency, proteome alterations of roots and leaves in two B. napus contrasting genotypes, P-efficient 'Eyou Changjia' and P-inefficient 'B104-2', under long-term low P stress and short-term P-free starvation conditions were investigated, and proteomic combined with comparative genomic analyses were conducted to interpret the interrelation of differential abundance protein species (DAPs) responding to P deficiency with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for P deficiency tolerance. P-efficient 'Eyou Changjia' had higher dry weight and P content, and showed high tolerance to low P stress compared with P-inefficient 'B104-2'. A total of 146 DAPs were successfully identified by MALDI TOF/TOF MS, which were categorized into several groups including defense and stress response, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, signaling and regulation, amino acid and fatty acid metabolism, protein process, biogenesis and cellular component, and function unknown. 94 of 146 DAPs were mapped to a linkage map constructed by a B. napus population derived from a cross between the two genotypes, and 72 DAPs were located in the confidence intervals of QTLs for P efficiency related traits. We conclude that the identification of these DAPs and the co-location of DAPs with QTLs in the B. napus linkage genetic map provide us novel information in understanding the adaptability of B. napus to P deficiency, and helpful to isolate P-efficient genes in B. napus. Low P seriously limits the production and quality of B. napus. Proteomics and genetic linkage map were widely used to study the adaptive strategies of B. napus response to P deficiency, proteomic combined with comparative genetic analysis to investigate the correlations between DAPs and QTLs are scarce. Thus, we herein investigated

  17. A Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals New Loci for Resistance to Clubroot Disease in Brassica napus

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Lixia; Luo, Yujie; Chen, Biyun; Xu, Kun; Zhang, Fugui; Li, Hao; Huang, Qian; Xiao, Xin; Zhang, Tianyao; Hu, Jihong; Li, Feng; Wu, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) is one of the most important oil crops in the world. However, the yield and quality of rapeseed were largely decreased by clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae Woronin). Therefore, it is of great importance for screening more resistant germplasms or genes and improving the resistance to P. brassicae in rapeseed breeding. In this study, a massive resistant identification for a natural global population was conducted in two environments with race/pathotype 4 of P. bras...

  18. Rapid Identification of Candidate Genes for Seed Weight Using the SLAF-Seq Method in Brassica napus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Geng

    Full Text Available Seed weight is a critical and direct trait for oilseed crop seed yield. Understanding its genetic mechanism is of great importance for yield improvement in Brassica napus breeding. Two hundred and fifty doubled haploid lines derived by microspore culture were developed from a cross between a large-seed line G-42 and a small-seed line 7-9. According to the 1000-seed weight (TSW data, the individual DNA of the heaviest 46 lines and the lightest 47 lines were respectively selected to establish two bulked DNA pools. A new high-throughput sequencing technology, Specific Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing (SLAF-seq, was used to identify candidate genes of TSW in association analysis combined with bulked segregant analysis (BSA. A total of 1,933 high quality polymorphic SLAF markers were developed and 4 associated markers of TSW were procured. A hot region of ~0.58 Mb at nucleotides 25,401,885-25,985,931 on ChrA09 containing 91 candidate genes was identified as tightly associated with the TSW trait. From annotation information, four genes (GSBRNA2T00037136001, GSBRNA2T00037157001, GSBRNA2T00037129001 and GSBRNA2T00069389001 might be interesting candidate genes that are highly related to seed weight.

  19. Radio-sensitivity analysis and selection of useful mutants of rape (Brassica napus L.) by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goh, Eun Jeong; Kim, Wook Jin; Kim, Jin Baek; Kim, Dong Sub; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kang, Si Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    Rape (Brassica napus L.) plants are one of the major oilseed crops. The main components of rapeseed are oil (35 to 47%) and protein (15 to 32%). For the biodiesel production, the development of a new variety of rape plant with high biomass and/or oleic acid contents is required. In order to determine the optimum dose of gamma-ray irradiation, the rape seeds of cvs. Hanra (Hr), Youngsan (Ys), Tammi (Tm), and Tamra (Tr) were irradiated with a 100 {approx} 4,000 Gy dose range of gamma-rays. Considering the growth factors, the optimum doses were determined to be within the range of 600 {approx} 1,000 Gy for the selection of useful mutant lines. Six-hundred and eighty eight (688) M{sub 2} mutant lines were obtained from 600 {approx} 1,000 Gy gamma-ray-irradiated M{sub 1} plants through selfing. The growth characteristics, leaf shape, early flowering, and flower color were all investigated. The selected mutant numbers of early flowering, leaf shape, and flower color were 34, 52, and 3 from the four cultivars, respectively. These mutant lines will be used for the development of a new variety of rape plant with high biomass and oleic acid contents.

  20. Molecular mapping of qualitative and quantitative loci for resistance to Leptosphaeria maculans causing blackleg disease in canola (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Rosy; Taylor, Belinda; Marcroft, Steve; Stiller, Jiri; Eckermann, Paul; Coombes, Neil; Rehman, Ata; Lindbeck, Kurt; Luckett, David; Wratten, Neil; Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, David; Wang, Xiaowu; Raman, Harsh

    2012-07-01

    Blackleg, caused by Leptosphaeria maculans, is one of the most important diseases of oilseed and vegetable crucifiers worldwide. The present study describes (1) the construction of a genetic linkage map, comprising 255 markers, based upon simple sequence repeats (SSR), sequence-related amplified polymorphism, sequence tagged sites, and EST-SSRs and (2) the localization of qualitative (race-specific) and quantitative (race non-specific) trait loci controlling blackleg resistance in a doubled-haploid population derived from the Australian canola (Brassica napus L.) cultivars Skipton and Ag-Spectrum using the whole-genome average interval mapping approach. Marker regression analyses revealed that at least 14 genomic regions with LOD ≥ 2.0 were associated with qualitative and quantitative blackleg resistance, explaining 4.6-88.9 % of genotypic variation. A major qualitative locus, designated RlmSkipton (Rlm4), was mapped on chromosome A7, within 0.8 cM of the SSR marker Xbrms075. Alignment of the molecular markers underlying this QTL region with the genome sequence data of B. rapa L. suggests that RlmSkipton is located approximately 80 kb from the Xbrms075 locus. Molecular marker-RlmSkipton linkage was further validated in an F(2) population from Skipton/Ag-Spectrum. Our results show that SSR markers linked to consistent genomic regions are suitable for enrichment of favourable alleles for blackleg resistance in canola breeding programs.

  1. Sequential light programs shape kale (Brassica napus) sprout appearance and alter metabolic and nutrient content

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Sofia D; Folta, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    Different light wavelengths have specific effects on plant growth and development. Narrow-bandwidth light-emitting diode (LED) lighting may be used to directionally manipulate size, color and metabolites in high-value fruits and vegetables. In this report, Red Russian kale (Brassica napus) seedlings were grown under specific light conditions and analyzed for photomorphogenic responses, pigment accumulation and nutraceutical content. The results showed that this genotype responds predictably t...

  2. Screening of a Brassica napus bacterial artificial chromosome library using highly parallel single nucleotide polymorphism assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Efficient screening of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based markers is feasible provided that a multidimensional pooling strategy is implemented. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can be screened in multiplexed format, therefore this marker type lends itself particularly well for medium- to high-throughput applications. Combining the power of multiplex-PCR assays with a multidimensional pooling system may prove to be especially challenging in a polyploid genome. In polyploid genomes two classes of SNPs need to be distinguished, polymorphisms between accessions (intragenomic SNPs) and those differentiating between homoeologous genomes (intergenomic SNPs). We have assessed whether the highly parallel Illumina GoldenGate® Genotyping Assay is suitable for the screening of a BAC library of the polyploid Brassica napus genome. Results A multidimensional screening platform was developed for a Brassica napus BAC library which is composed of almost 83,000 clones. Intragenomic and intergenomic SNPs were included in Illumina’s GoldenGate® Genotyping Assay and both SNP classes were used successfully for screening of the multidimensional BAC pools of the Brassica napus library. An optimized scoring method is proposed which is especially valuable for SNP calling of intergenomic SNPs. Validation of the genotyping results by independent methods revealed a success of approximately 80% for the multiplex PCR-based screening regardless of whether intra- or intergenomic SNPs were evaluated. Conclusions Illumina’s GoldenGate® Genotyping Assay can be efficiently used for screening of multidimensional Brassica napus BAC pools. SNP calling was specifically tailored for the evaluation of BAC pool screening data. The developed scoring method can be implemented independently of plant reference samples. It is demonstrated that intergenomic SNPs represent a powerful tool for BAC library screening of a polyploid genome

  3. Sugar accumulation and its Regulation by jasmonic acid in Brassica napus L. under salt stress

    OpenAIRE

    Harpreet Kaur; Poonam Sharma; Geetika Sirhindi

    2013-01-01

    The effects of Jasmonic acid (JA) on sugar accumulation and protein content in 12-days old Brassica napus L. seedlings were studied. The seeds pre-treated with different concentrations of jasmonic acid were germinated in Petriplates supplied with various concentrations of salt stress (NaCl). The contents of total chlorophyll, total sugars, reducing sugars, non-reducing sugars, total carbohydrates and total protein content of 12-days old seedlings were analysed. It was observed that JA reduce...

  4. Studies of the floral biology and reproductive system of Brassica napus L.(Cruciferae)

    OpenAIRE

    Rosilda Mara Mussury; Wedson Desidério Fernandes

    2000-01-01

    Studies of the floral biology of canola were accomplished with the objective of enlarging the system and reproductive strategies knowledge of its CTC-4 cultivar in Dourados, Centerwest, Brazil. Brassica napus is self pollinated, presenting however, many resources for the allogamy accomplishment, e.g., abundant pollen, nectar and scent production. The smaller anther were responsible for the production of fruit with smaller and less growth seeds, when compared to the autogamy, autopollination a...

  5. GISH and AFLP analyses of novel Brassica napus lines derived from one hybrid between B. napus and Orychophragmus violaceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ni; Li, Zai-Yun; Cartagena, J A; Fukui, K

    2006-10-01

    New Brassica napus inbred lines with different petal colors and with canola quality and increased levels of oleic (approximately 70%, 10% higher than that of B. napus parent) and linoleic (28%) acids have been developed in the progenies of one B. napus cv. Oro x Orychophragmus violaceus F5 hybrid plant (2n = 31). Their genetic constituents were analyzed by using the methods of genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) and amplified fragments length polymorphism (AFLP). No intact chromosomes of O. violaceus origin were detected by GISH in their somatic cells of ovaries and root tips (2n = 38) and pollen mother cells (PMCs) with normal chromosome pairing (19 bivalents) and segregation (19:19), though signals of variable sizes and intensities were located mainly at terminal and centromeric parts of some mitotic chromosomes and meiotic bivalents at diakinesis or chromosomes in anaphase I groups and one large patch of chromatin was intensively labeled and separated spatially in some telophase I nuclei and metaphase II PMCs. AFLP analysis revealed that substantial genomic changes have occurred in these lines and O. violaceus-specific bands, deleted bands in 'Oro' and novel bands for two parents were detected. The possible mechanisms for these results were discussed.

  6. Computational Prediction of acyl-coA Binding Proteins Structure in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboanatahiry, Nadia Haingotiana; Lu, Guangyuan; Li, Maoteng

    2015-01-01

    Acyl-coA binding proteins could transport acyl-coA esters from plastid to endoplasmic reticulum, prior to fatty acid biosynthesis, leading to the formation of triacylglycerol. The structure and the subcellular localization of acyl-coA binding proteins (ACBP) in Brassica napus were computationally predicted in this study. Earlier, the structure analysis of ACBPs was limited to the small ACBPs, the current study focused on all four classes of ACBPs. Physicochemical parameters including the size and the length, the intron-exon structure, the isoelectric point, the hydrophobicity, and the amino acid composition were studied. Furthermore, identification of conserved residues and conserved domains were carried out. Secondary structure and tertiary structure of ACBPs were also studied. Finally, subcellular localization of ACBPs was predicted. The findings indicated that the physicochemical parameters and subcellular localizations of ACBPs in Brassica napus were identical to Arabidopsis thaliana. Conserved domain analysis indicated that ACBPs contain two or three kelch domains that belong to different families. Identical residues in acyl-coA binding domains corresponded to eight amino acid residues in all ACBPs of B. napus. However, conserved residues of common ACBPs in all species of animal, plant, bacteria and fungi were only inclusive in small ACBPs. Alpha-helixes were displayed and conserved in all the acyl-coA binding domains, representing almost the half of the protein structure. The findings confirm high similarities in ACBPs between A. thaliana and B. napus, they might share the same functions but loss or gain might be possible.

  7. Identification of putative candidate genes for water stress tolerance in canola (Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing eZhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Drought stress can directly inhibit seedling establishment in canola (Brassica napus, resulting in lower plant densities and reduced yields. To dissect this complex trait, 140 B. napus accessions were phenotyped under normal (0.0 MPa, S0 and water-stressed conditions simulated by polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000 (–0.5 MPa, S5 in a hydroponic system. Phenotypic variation and heritability indicated that the root to shoot length ratio was a reliable indicator for water stress tolerance. Thereafter, 66 accessions (16 water stress tolerant, 34 moderate and 16 sensitive lines were genotyped using 25,495 Brassica single nucleotide polymorphisms. Genome-wide association studies identified 16 loci significantly associated with water stress response. Two B. napus accessions were used for RNA-seq, with differentially-expressed genes under normal and water-stressed conditions examined. By combining differentially-expressed genes detected by RNA-seq with significantly associated loci from genome-wide association studies, 79 candidate genes were identified, of which eight were putatively associated with drought tolerance based on gene ontology of Arabidopsis. Functional validation of these genes may confirm key drought-related genes for selection and breeding in B. napus. Our results provide insight into the genetic basis of water stress tolerance in canola.

  8. Identification and analysis of MKK and MPK gene families in canola (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wanwan; Yang, Bo; Yu, Bao-Jun; Zhou, Zili; Li, Cui; Jia, Ming; Sun, Yun; Zhang, Yue; Wu, Feifei; Zhang, Hanfeng; Wang, Boya; Deyholos, Michael K; Jiang, Yuan-Qing

    2013-06-11

    Eukaryotic mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/MPK) signaling cascades transduce and amplify environmental signals via three types of reversibly phosphorylated kinases to activate defense gene expression. Canola (oilseed rape, Brassica napus) is a major crop in temperate regions. Identification and characterization of MAPK and MAPK kinases (MAPKK/MKK) of canola will help to elucidate their role in responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. We describe the identification and analysis of seven MKK (BnaMKK) and 12 MPK (BnaMPK) members from canola. Sequence alignments and phylogenetic analyses of the predicted amino acid sequences of BnaMKKs and BnaMPKs classified them into four different groups. We also examined the subcellular localization of four and two members of BnaMKK and BnaMPK gene families, respectively, using green fluorescent protein (GFP) and, found GFP signals in both nuclei and cytoplasm. Furthermore, we identified several interesting interaction pairs through yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) analysis of interactions between BnaMKKs and BnaMPKs, as well as BnaMPK and BnaWRKYs. We defined contiguous signaling modules including BnaMKK9-BnaMPK1/2-BnaWRKY53, BnaMKK2/4/5-BnaMPK3/6-BnaWRKY20/26 and BnaMKK9-BnaMPK5/9/19/20. Of these, several interactions had not been previously described in any species. Selected interactions were validated in vivo by a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay. Transcriptional responses of a subset of canola MKK and MPK genes to stimuli including fungal pathogens, hormones and abiotic stress treatments were analyzed through real-time RT-PCR and we identified a few of BnaMKKs and BnaMPKs responding to salicylic acid (SA), oxalic acid (OA), Sclerotinia sclerotiorum or other stress conditions. Comparisons of expression patterns of putative orthologs in canola and Arabidopsis showed that transcript expression patterns were generally conserved, with some differences suggestive of sub-functionalization. We identified seven MKK

  9. High-throughput polymorphism detection and genotyping in Brassica napus using next-generation RAD sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bus Anja

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complex genome of rapeseed (Brassica napus is not well understood despite the economic importance of the species. Good knowledge of sequence variation is needed for genetics approaches and breeding purposes. We used a diversity set of B. napus representing eight different germplasm types to sequence genome-wide distributed restriction-site associated DNA (RAD fragments for polymorphism detection and genotyping. Results More than 113,000 RAD clusters with more than 20,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and 125 insertions/deletions were detected and characterized. About one third of the RAD clusters and polymorphisms mapped to the Brassica rapa reference sequence. An even distribution of RAD clusters and polymorphisms was observed across the B. rapa chromosomes, which suggests that there might be an equal distribution over the Brassica oleracea chromosomes, too. The representation of Gene Ontology (GO terms for unigenes with RAD clusters and polymorphisms revealed no signature of selection with respect to the distribution of polymorphisms within genes belonging to a specific GO category. Conclusions Considering the decreasing costs for next-generation sequencing, the results of our study suggest that RAD sequencing is not only a simple and cost-effective method for high-density polymorphism detection but also an alternative to SNP genotyping from transcriptome sequencing or SNP arrays, even for species with complex genomes such as B. napus.

  10. Proteomic analysis of residual proteins in blades and petioles of fallen leaves of Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desclos-Théveniau, M; Coquet, L; Jouenne, T; Etienne, P

    2015-03-01

    Brassica napus L. is an important crop plant, characterised by high nitrogen (N) levels in fallen leaves, leading to a significant restitution of this element to the soil, with important consequences at the economic and environmental levels. It is now well established that the N in fallen leaves is due to weak N remobilisation that is especially related to incomplete degradation of foliar proteins during leaf senescence. Identification of residual proteins in a fallen leaf (i.e. incompletely degraded in the last step of the N remobilisation process) constitutes important information for improving nutrient use efficiency. Proteome analysis of the vascular system (petioles) and blades from fallen leaves of Brassica napus was performed, and the 30 most abundant residual proteins in each tissue were identified. Among them, several proteins involved in N recycling remain in the leaf after abscission. Moreover, this study reveals that some residual proteins are associated with energy metabolism, protection against oxidative stress, and more surprisingly, photosynthesis. Finally, comparison of blade and petiole proteomes show that, despite their different physiological roles in the non-senescing leaf, both organs redirect their metabolism in order to ensure catabolic reactions. Taken together, the results suggest that a better degradation of these leaf proteins during the senescence process could enable improvements in the N use efficiency of Brassica napus. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  11. Phytotoxicity evaluation of some commonly used shampoos using Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Faiqa; Ahmed, Faiza; Kanwal, Memoona; Murad, Waheed; Azizullah, Azizullah

    2015-10-01

    Hair shampoos are among the most commonly used chemicals in everyday life. Since shampoos are a major component of domestic and municipal wastewater, they may affect plants when irrigated with wastewater. However, their effects on plants have never been investigated in detail. The present study was aimed to evaluate the effect of some commonly used hair shampoos on seed germination and seedling vigor of Brassica napus. Seeds of Brassica napus were exposed to different concentrations of hair shampoos, i.e., 0 (control), 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, and 10 %. The obtained results revealed that germination was not very sensitive to shampoo stress and was significantly inhibited only at the highest tested concentration (10 %) of shampoo except in the case of one shampoo where it was inhibited at concentration of 1 % or above. The other tested parameters of Brassica napus were comparatively more sensitive than germination to shampoo stress. However, at lower concentrations of shampoos, stimulatory effects were also observed in some cases. Although no exact data is available on shampoo concentration in wastewater used for irrigation, it is unlikely that shampoo concentration in irrigation water reach so high and pose adversity to plants.

  12. Cytogenetic and molecular characterization of intergeneric hybrids between Brassica napus and Orychophragmus violaceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, B F; Séguin-Swartz, G; Somers, D J

    2002-02-01

    Twenty-two intergeneric hybrids from a cross between Brassica napus (AACC, 2n = 38) cultivar Oro and the ornamental crucifer Orychophragmus violaceus (OO, 2n = 24) were produced without embryo rescue. The plants were classified into three groups based on morphological and cytological observations and RAPD banding patterns. Plants of Group I had morphological traits of both parents and 2n = 29 chromosomes. In these plants, 62.1% of the pollen mother cells (PMCs) had the pairing configuration 1 III + 9 II + 8 I; the remaining PMCs had 10 II + 9 I. The plants possessed 97.6-98.8% B. napus specific and 9.2-11.7% O. violaceus specific RAPD fragments. Plants of Group II exhibited novel morphological traits and possessed 2n = 35, 36, or 37 chromosomes. Plants of Group III were morphologically similar to B. napus and possessed 2n = 19, 37, 38, or 39 chromosomes. Plants of Group II and Group III had 94.1-99.4% B. napus specific RAPD fragments and no O. violaceus specific RAPD fragments. Chromosome fragments were observed in PMCs of most of the F1 plants in all groups. Based on the cytological results and RAPD analysis, it is suggested that genome doubling and chromosome elimination occurred in the intergeneric hybrids of B. napus x O. violaceus.

  13. Ascorbate peroxidase gene from Brassica napus enhances salt and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-12

    Dec 12, 2011 ... A cytosolic APX from tomato could enhance its tolerance to chilling and ... In our previous researches, B. napus APX gene. (BnAPX) was cloned and sequenced. The amino acid sequence of the BnAPX had 77% homology to thylakoidal ... cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S) promoter (Figure 1a). The.

  14. Application of Endophytic Pseudomonas fluorescens and a Bacterial Consortium to Brassica napus Can Increase Plant Height and Biomass under Greenhouse and Field Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard D. Lally

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant associated bacteria with plant growth promotion (PGP properties have been proposed for use as environmentally friendly biofertilizers for sustainable agriculture; however, analysis of their efficacy in the field is often limited. In this study, greenhouse and field trials were carried out using individual endophytic Pseudomonas fluorescens strains, the well characterized rhizospheric P. fluorescens F113 and an endophytic microbial consortium of 10 different strains. These bacteria had been previously characterized with respect to their PGP properties in vitro and had been shown to harbor a range of traits associated with PGP including siderophore production, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC deaminase activity, and inorganic phosphate solubilization. In greenhouse experiments individual strains tagged with gfp and Kmr were applied to Brassica napus as a seed coat and were shown to effectively colonize the rhizosphere and root of B. napus and in addition they demonstrated a significant increase in plant biomass compared with the non-inoculated control. In the field experiment, the bacteria (individual and consortium were spray inoculated to winter oilseed rape B. napus var. Compass which was grown under standard North Western European agronomic conditions. Analysis of the data provides evidence that the application of the live bacterial biofertilizers can enhance aspects of crop development in B. napus at field scale. The field data demonstrated statistically significant increases in crop height, stem/leaf, and pod biomass, particularly, in the case of the consortium inoculated treatment. However, although seed and oil yield were increased in the field in response to inoculation, these data were not statistically significant under the experimental conditions tested. Future field trials will investigate the effectiveness of the inoculants under different agronomic conditions.

  15. Leptosphaeria maculans effector AvrLm4-7 affects salicylic acid (SA) and ethylene (ET) signalling and hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) accumulation in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nováková, Miroslava; Šašek, Vladimír; Trdá, Lucie; Krutinová, Hana; Mongin, Thomas; Valentová, Olga; Balesdent, Marie-HelEne; Rouxel, Thierry; Burketová, Lenka

    2016-08-01

    To achieve host colonization, successful pathogens need to overcome plant basal defences. For this, (hemi)biotrophic pathogens secrete effectors that interfere with a range of physiological processes of the host plant. AvrLm4-7 is one of the cloned effectors from the hemibiotrophic fungus Leptosphaeria maculans 'brassicaceae' infecting mainly oilseed rape (Brassica napus). Although its mode of action is still unknown, AvrLm4-7 is strongly involved in L. maculans virulence. Here, we investigated the effect of AvrLm4-7 on plant defence responses in a susceptible cultivar of B. napus. Using two isogenic L. maculans isolates differing in the presence of a functional AvrLm4-7 allele [absence ('a4a7') and presence ('A4A7') of the allele], the plant hormone concentrations, defence-related gene transcription and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation were analysed in infected B. napus cotyledons. Various components of the plant immune system were affected. Infection with the 'A4A7' isolate caused suppression of salicylic acid- and ethylene-dependent signalling, the pathways regulating an effective defence against L. maculans infection. Furthermore, ROS accumulation was decreased in cotyledons infected with the 'A4A7' isolate. Treatment with an antioxidant agent, ascorbic acid, increased the aggressiveness of the 'a4a7' L. maculans isolate, but not that of the 'A4A7' isolate. Together, our results suggest that the increased aggressiveness of the 'A4A7' L. maculans isolate could be caused by defects in ROS-dependent defence and/or linked to suppressed SA and ET signalling. This is the first study to provide insights into the manipulation of B. napus defence responses by an effector of L. maculans. © 2015 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  16. Application of EndophyticPseudomonas fluorescensand a Bacterial Consortium toBrassica napusCan Increase Plant Height and Biomass under Greenhouse and Field Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lally, Richard D; Galbally, Paul; Moreira, António S; Spink, John; Ryan, David; Germaine, Kieran J; Dowling, David N

    2017-01-01

    Plant associated bacteria with plant growth promotion (PGP) properties have been proposed for use as environmentally friendly biofertilizers for sustainable agriculture; however, analysis of their efficacy in the field is often limited. In this study, greenhouse and field trials were carried out using individual endophytic Pseudomonas fluorescens strains, the well characterized rhizospheric P. fluorescens F113 and an endophytic microbial consortium of 10 different strains. These bacteria had been previously characterized with respect to their PGP properties in vitro and had been shown to harbor a range of traits associated with PGP including siderophore production, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase activity, and inorganic phosphate solubilization. In greenhouse experiments individual strains tagged with gfp and Km r were applied to Brassica napus as a seed coat and were shown to effectively colonize the rhizosphere and root of B. napus and in addition they demonstrated a significant increase in plant biomass compared with the non-inoculated control. In the field experiment, the bacteria (individual and consortium) were spray inoculated to winter oilseed rape B. napus var. Compass which was grown under standard North Western European agronomic conditions. Analysis of the data provides evidence that the application of the live bacterial biofertilizers can enhance aspects of crop development in B. napus at field scale. The field data demonstrated statistically significant increases in crop height, stem/leaf, and pod biomass, particularly, in the case of the consortium inoculated treatment. However, although seed and oil yield were increased in the field in response to inoculation, these data were not statistically significant under the experimental conditions tested. Future field trials will investigate the effectiveness of the inoculants under different agronomic conditions.

  17. SNP markers-based map construction and genome-wide linkage analysis in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Harsh; Dalton-Morgan, Jessica; Diffey, Simon; Raman, Rosy; Alamery, Salman; Edwards, David; Batley, Jacqueline

    2014-09-01

    An Illumina Infinium array comprising 5306 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers was used to genotype 175 individuals of a doubled haploid population derived from a cross between Skipton and Ag-Spectrum, two Australian cultivars of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.). A genetic linkage map based on 613 SNP and 228 non-SNP (DArT, SSR, SRAP and candidate gene markers) covering 2514.8 cM was constructed and further utilized to identify loci associated with flowering time and resistance to blackleg, a disease caused by the fungus Leptosphaeria maculans. Comparison between genetic map positions of SNP markers and the sequenced Brassica rapa (A) and Brassica oleracea (C) genome scaffolds showed several genomic rearrangements in the B. napus genome. A major locus controlling resistance to L. maculans was identified at both seedling and adult plant stages on chromosome A07. QTL analyses revealed that up to 40.2% of genetic variation for flowering time was accounted for by loci having quantitative effects. Comparative mapping showed Arabidopsis and Brassica flowering genes such as Phytochrome A/D, Flowering Locus C and agamous-Like MADS box gene AGL1 map within marker intervals associated with flowering time in a DH population from Skipton/Ag-Spectrum. Genomic regions associated with flowering time and resistance to L. maculans had several SNP markers mapped within 10 cM. Our results suggest that SNP markers will be suitable for various applications such as trait introgression, comparative mapping and high-resolution mapping of loci in B. napus. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Distance from forest edge affects bee pollinators in oilseed rape fields

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey, S.; Requier, F.; Nusillard, B.; Roberts, Stuart; Potts, Simon; Bouget, C.

    2014-01-01

    Wild pollinators have been shown to enhance the pollination of Brassica napus(oilseed rape) and thus increase its market value. Several studies have previously shown that pollination services are greater in crops adjoining forest patches or other seminatural habitats than in crops completely surrounded by other crops.\\ud In this study, we investigated the specific importance of forest edges in providing potential pollinators in B. napus fields in two areas in France. Bees were caught with yel...

  19. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals the Genetic Architecture Underlying Salt Tolerance-Related Traits in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Heping; Chen, Lunlin; Guo, Jianbin; Li, Qun; Wen, Jing; Yi, Bin; Ma, Chaozhi; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong; Shen, Jinxiong

    2017-01-01

    Soil salinity is a serious threat to agriculture sustainability worldwide. Salt tolerance at the seedling stage is crucial for plant establishment and high yield in saline soils; however, little information is available on rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) salt tolerance. We evaluated salt tolerance in different rapeseed accessions and conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify salt tolerance-related quantitative trait loci (QTL). A natural population comprising 368 B. napus cult...

  20. Agronomic and seed quality traits dissected by genome-wide association mapping in Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas eKörber

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In Brassica napus breeding, traits related to commercial success are of highest importance for plant breeders. However, such traits can only be assessed in an advanced developmental stage. % as well as require high experimental effort due to their quantitative inheritance and the importance of genotype*environment interaction. Molecular markers genetically linked to such traits have the potential to accelerate the breeding process of B. napus by marker-assisted selection. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to identify (i genome regions associated with the examined agronomic and seed quality traits, (ii the interrelationship of population structure and the detected associations, and (iii candidate genes for the revealed associations. The diversity set used in this study consisted of 405 Brassica napus inbred lines which were genotyped using a 6K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array and phenotyped for agronomic and seed quality traits in field trials. In a genome-wide association study, we detected a total of 112 associations between SNPs and the seed quality traits as well as 46 SNP-trait associations for the agronomic traits with a P-value 100 and a sequence identity of > 70 % to A. thaliana or B. rapa could be found for the agronomic SNP-trait associations and 187 hits of potential candidate genes for the seed quality SNP-trait associations.

  1. Changes in the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum transcriptome during infection of Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifbarghi, Shirin; Borhan, M Hossein; Wei, Yangdou; Coutu, Cathy; Robinson, Stephen J; Hegedus, Dwayne D

    2017-03-29

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum causes stem rot in Brassica napus, which leads to lodging and severe yield losses. Although recent studies have explored significant progress in the characterization of individual S. sclerotiorum pathogenicity factors, a gap exists in profiling gene expression throughout the course of S. sclerotiorum infection on a host plant. In this study, RNA-Seq analysis was performed with focus on the events occurring through the early (1 h) to the middle (48 h) stages of infection. Transcript analysis revealed the temporal pattern and amplitude of the deployment of genes associated with aspects of pathogenicity or virulence during the course of S. sclerotiorum infection on Brassica napus. These genes were categorized into eight functional groups: hydrolytic enzymes, secondary metabolites, detoxification, signaling, development, secreted effectors, oxalic acid and reactive oxygen species production. The induction patterns of nearly all of these genes agreed with their predicted functions. Principal component analysis delineated gene expression patterns that signified transitions between pathogenic phases, namely host penetration, ramification and necrotic stages, and provided evidence for the occurrence of a brief biotrophic phase soon after host penetration. The current observations support the notion that S. sclerotiorum deploys an array of factors and complex strategies to facilitate host colonization and mitigate host defenses. This investigation provides a broad overview of the sequential expression of virulence/pathogenicity-associated genes during infection of B. napus by S. sclerotiorum and provides information for further characterization of genes involved in the S. sclerotiorum-host plant interactions.

  2. Comparative Analysis of the Brassica napus Root and Leaf Transcript Profiling in Response to Drought Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunqing; Zhang, Xuekun; Zhang, Ka; An, Hong; Hu, Kaining; Wen, Jing; Shen, Jinxiong; Ma, Chaozhi; Yi, Bin; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong

    2015-08-11

    Drought stress is one of the major abiotic factors affecting Brassica napus (B. napus) productivity. In order to identify genes of potential importance to drought stress and obtain a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms regarding the responses of B. napus to dehydration stress, we performed large-scale transcriptome sequencing of B. napus plants under dehydration stress using the Illumina sequencing technology. In this work, a relatively drought tolerant B. napus line, Q2, identified in our previous study, was used. Four cDNA libraries constructed from mRNAs of control and dehydration-treated root and leaf were sequenced by Illumina technology. A total of 6018 and 5377 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in root and leaf. In addition, 1745 genes exhibited a coordinated expression profile between the two tissues under drought stress, 1289 (approximately 74%) of which showed an inverse relationship, demonstrating different regulation patterns between the root and leaf. The gene ontology (GO) enrichment test indicated that up-regulated genes in root were mostly involved in "stimulus" "stress" biological process, and activated genes in leaf mainly functioned in "cell" "cell part" components. Furthermore, a comparative network related to plant hormone signal transduction and AREB/ABF, AP2/EREBP, NAC, WRKY and MYC/MYB transcription factors (TFs) provided a view of different stress tolerance mechanisms between root and leaf. Some of the DEGs identified may be candidates for future research aimed at detecting drought-responsive genes and will be useful for understanding the molecular mechanisms of drought tolerance in root and leaf of B. napus.

  3. Multiple evolutionary events involved in maintaining homologs of Resistance to Powdery Mildew 8 in Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Resistance to Powdery Mildew 8 (RPW8 locus confers broad-spectrum resistance to powdery mildew in Arabidopsis thaliana. There are four Homologous to RPW8s (BrHRs in Brassica rapa and three in B. oleracea (BoHRs. B. napus (Bn is derived from diploidization of a hybrid between B. rapa and B. oleracea, thus should have seven homologs of RPW8 (BnHRs. It is unclear whether these genes are still maintained or lost in B. napus after diploidization and how they might have been evolved. Here we reported the identification and sequence polymorphisms of BnHRs from a set of B. napus accessions. Our data indicated that while the BoHR copy from B. oleracea is highly conserved, the BrHR copy from B. rapa is relatively variable in the B. napus genome owing to multiple evolutionary events, such as gene loss, point mutation, insertion, deletion and intragenic recombination. Given the overall high sequence homology of BnHR genes, it is not surprising that both intragenic recombination between two orthologs and two paralogs were detected in B. napus, which may explain the loss of BoHR genes in some B. napus accessions. When ectopically expressed in Arabidopsis, a C-terminally truncated version of BnHRa and BnHRb, as well as the full length BnHRd fused with YFP at their C-termini could trigger cell death in the absence of pathogens and enhanced resistance to powdery mildew disease. Moreover, subcellular localization analysis showed that both BnHRa-YFP and BnHRb-YFP were mainly localized to the extra-haustorial membrane (EHM encasing the haustorium of powdery mildew. Taken together, our data suggest that the duplicated BnHR genes might have been subjected to differential selection and at least some may play a role in defense and could serve as resistance resource in engineering disease-resistant plants.

  4. Comparative Analysis of the Brassica napus Root and Leaf Transcript Profiling in Response to Drought Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunqing Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Drought stress is one of the major abiotic factors affecting Brassica napus (B. napus productivity. In order to identify genes of potential importance to drought stress and obtain a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms regarding the responses of B. napus to dehydration stress, we performed large-scale transcriptome sequencing of B. napus plants under dehydration stress using the Illumina sequencing technology. In this work, a relatively drought tolerant B. napus line, Q2, identified in our previous study, was used. Four cDNA libraries constructed from mRNAs of control and dehydration-treated root and leaf were sequenced by Illumina technology. A total of 6018 and 5377 differentially expressed genes (DEGs were identified in root and leaf. In addition, 1745 genes exhibited a coordinated expression profile between the two tissues under drought stress, 1289 (approximately 74% of which showed an inverse relationship, demonstrating different regulation patterns between the root and leaf. The gene ontology (GO enrichment test indicated that up-regulated genes in root were mostly involved in “stimulus” “stress” biological process, and activated genes in leaf mainly functioned in “cell” “cell part” components. Furthermore, a comparative network related to plant hormone signal transduction and AREB/ABF, AP2/EREBP, NAC, WRKY and MYC/MYB transcription factors (TFs provided a view of different stress tolerance mechanisms between root and leaf. Some of the DEGs identified may be candidates for future research aimed at detecting drought-responsive genes and will be useful for understanding the molecular mechanisms of drought tolerance in root and leaf of B. napus.

  5. Potential bioetanol and biogas production using lignocellulosic biomass from winter rye, oilseed rape and faba bean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersson, Anneli; Thomsen, Mette Hedegaard; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    To meet the increasing need for bioenergy several raw materials have to be considered for the production of e.g. bioethanol and biogas. In this study, three lignocellulosic raw materials were studied, i.e. (1) winter rye straw (Secale cereale L), (2) oilseed rape straw (Brassica napus L.) and (3)...

  6. Possibilities of direct introgression from Brassica napus to B. juncea and indirect introgression from B. napus to related Brassicaceae through B. juncea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Mai; Ohsawa, Ryo; Tabei, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    The impact of genetically modified canola (Brassica napus) on biodiversity has been examined since its initial stage of commercialization. Various research groups have extensively investigated crossability and introgression among species of Brassicaceae. B. rapa and B. juncea are ranked first and second as the recipients of cross-pollination and introgression from B. napus, respectively. Crossability between B. napus and B. rapa has been examined, specifically in terms of introgression from B. napus to B. rapa, which is mainly considered a weed in America and European countries. On the other hand, knowledge on introgression from B. napus to B. juncea is insufficient, although B. juncea is recognized as the main Brassicaceae weed species in Asia. It is therefore essential to gather information regarding the direct introgression of B. napus into B. juncea and indirect introgression of B. napus into other species of Brassicaceae through B. juncea to evaluate the influence of genetically modified canola on biodiversity. We review information on crossability and introgression between B. juncea and other related Brassicaseae in this report. PMID:24987292

  7. Comparative transcriptomic analysis uncovers the complex genetic network for resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Zhao, Qing; Yang, Qingyong; Liu, Han; Li, Qingyuan; Yi, Xinqi; Cheng, Yan; Guo, Liang; Fan, Chuchuan; Zhou, Yongming

    2016-01-08

    Sclerotinia stem rot caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is one of the most devastating diseases in many important crops including Brassica napus worldwide. Quantitative resistance is the only source for genetic improvement of Sclerotinia-resistance in B. napus, but the molecular basis for such a resistance is largely unknown. Here, we performed dynamic transcriptomic analyses to understand the differential defense response to S. sclerotiorum in a resistant line (R-line) and a susceptible line (S-line) of B. napus at 24, 48 and 96 h post-inoculation. Both the numbers of and fold changes in differentially expressed genes in the R-line were larger than those in the S-line. We identified 9001 relative differentially expressed genes in the R-line compared with the S-line. The differences between susceptibility and resistance were associated with the magnitude of expression changes in a set of genes involved in pathogen recognition, MAPK signaling cascade, WRKY transcription regulation, jasmonic acid/ethylene signaling pathways, and biosynthesis of defense-related protein and indolic glucosinolate. The results were supported by quantitation of defense-related enzyme activity and glucosinolate contents. Our results provide insights into the complex molecular mechanism of the defense response to S. sclerotiorum in B. napus and for development of effective strategies in Sclerotinia-resistance breeding.

  8. Genome-Wide Association Mapping of Seed Coat Color in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Xian, Xiaohua; Xu, Xinfu; Qu, Cunmin; Lu, Kun; Li, Jiana; Liu, Liezhao

    2017-07-05

    Seed coat color is an extremely important breeding characteristic of Brassica napus. To elucidate the factors affecting the genetic architecture of seed coat color, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of seed coat color was conducted with a diversity panel comprising 520 B. napus cultivars and inbred lines. In total, 22 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed on 7 chromosomes were found to be associated with seed coat color. The most significant SNPs were found in 2014 near Bn-scaff_15763_1-p233999, only 43.42 kb away from BnaC06g17050D, which is orthologous to Arabidopsis thaliana TRANSPARENT TESTA 12 (TT12), an important gene involved in the transportation of proanthocyanidin precursors into the vacuole. Two of eight repeatedly detected SNPs can be identified and digested by restriction enzymes. Candidate gene mining revealed that the relevant regions of significant SNP loci on the A09 and C08 chromosomes are highly homologous. Moreover, a comparison of the GWAS results to those of previous quantitative trait locus (QTL) studies showed that 11 SNPs were located in the confidence intervals of the QTLs identified in previous studies based on linkage analyses or association mapping. Our results provide insights into the genetic basis of seed coat color in B. napus, and the beneficial allele, SNP information, and candidate genes should be useful for selecting yellow seeds in B. napus breeding.

  9. Proteomic dissection of seed germination and seedling establishment in Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwei Gu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The success of seed germination and the establishment of a normal seedling are key determinants of plant species propagation. At present, only few studies have focused on the genetic control of the seed germination by proteomic approach in Brassica napus. In the present study, the protein expression pattern of seed germination was investigated using differential fluorescence two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE in B. napus. One hundred thirteen differentially expressed proteins (DEPs, which were mainly involved in storage proteins (23.4%, energy metabolism (18.9%, protein metabolism (16.2%, defense/disease (12.6%, seed maturation (11.7%, carbohydrate metabolism (4.5%, lipid metabolism (4.5%, amino acids metabolism (3.6%, cell growth/division (3.6%, and some unclear proteins (2.7% were observed by proteomic analysis. Seventeen genes corresponding to 11 DEPs were identified within or near the associated linkage disequilibrium regions related to seed germination and vigor quantitative traits reported in B. napus in previous studies. The expression pattern of proteins showed the heterotrophic metabolism could be activated in the process of seed germination and the onset of defense system might start during seed germination. These findings will help us more in-depth understanding of the mobilization of seed storage reserves and regulation mechanisms of germination process in B. napus.

  10. Proteomic Dissection of Seed Germination and Seedling Establishment in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jianwei; Chao, Hongbo; Gan, Lu; Guo, Liangxing; Zhang, Kai; Li, Yonghong; Wang, Hao; Raboanatahiry, Nadia; Li, Maoteng

    2016-01-01

    The success of seed germination and establishment of a normal seedling are key determinants of plant species propagation. At present, only a few studies have focused on the genetic control of seed germination by using a proteomic approach in Brassica napus. In the present study, the protein expression pattern of seed germination was investigated using differential fluorescence two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in B. napus. One hundred and thirteen differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) that were mainly involved in storage (23.4%), energy metabolism (18.9%), protein metabolism (16.2%), defense/disease (12.6%), seed maturation (11.7%), carbohydrate metabolism (4.5%), lipid metabolism (4.5%), amino acids metabolism (3.6%), cell growth/division (3.6%), and some unclear functions (2.7%) were observed by proteomic analysis. Seventeen genes corresponding to 11 DEPs were identified within or near the associated linkage disequilibrium regions related to seed germination and vigor quantitative traits reported in B. napus in previous studies. The expression pattern of proteins showed that heterotrophic metabolism could be activated in the process of seed germination and that the onset of defense mechanisms might start during seed germination. These findings will help generate a more in-depth understanding of the mobilization of seed storage reserves and regulation mechanisms of the germination process in B. napus.

  11. Glyphosate-drift but not herbivory alters the rate of transgene flow from single and stacked trait transgenic canola (Brassica napus) to nontransgenic B. napus and B. rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londo, Jason P; Bollman, Michael A; Sagers, Cynthia L; Lee, E Henry; Watrud, Lidia S

    2011-08-01

    • Transgenic plants can offer agricultural benefits, but the escape of transgenes is an environmental concern. In this study we tested the hypothesis that glyphosate drift and herbivory selective pressures can change the rate of transgene flow between the crop Brassica napus (canola), and weedy species and contribute to the potential for increased transgene escape risk and persistence outside of cultivation. • We constructed plant communities containing single transgenic B. napus genotypes expressing glyphosate herbicide resistance (CP4 EPSPS), lepidopteran insect resistance (Cry1Ac), or both traits ('stacked'), plus nontransgenic B. napus, Brassica rapa and Brassica nigra. Two different selective pressures, a sublethal glyphosate dose and lepidopteran herbivores (Plutella xylostella), were applied and rates of transgene flow and transgenic seed production were measured. • Selective treatments differed in the degree in which they affected gene flow and production of transgenic hybrid seed. Most notably, glyphosate-drift increased the incidence of transgenic seeds on nontransgenic B. napus by altering flowering phenology and reproductive function. • The findings of this study indicate that transgenic traits may be transmitted to wild populations and may increase in frequency in weedy populations through the direct and indirect effects of selection pressures on gene flow. No claim to original US government works. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  12. Occurrence of Plasmodiophora brassicae in Finnish turnip rape and oilseed rape fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marika Rastas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Clubroot, caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae Woronin, is a serious plant disease of cruciferous plants. A field survey of occurrence of clubroot in oilseed fields was conducted in Finland in 2007−2009 and in 1984−1989. At present, the disease is distributed throughout the oilseed cultivation area. Clubroot was found on average from 30% of fields, but its severity was low; fields with high numbers of infected plants and plants with severe symptoms were rare. According to the survey, cultivation frequency of cruciferous plants is the most important factor affecting clubroot occurrence and severity. Clubroot was found in soils with a wide range of pH-values (pH 5-7.6, but symptoms were most severe at low pH. According to the survey, and greenhouse and field trials, high temperature and moisture during the early growth period seem to favour disease development and can cause significant yield losses. In a survival trial, clubroot declined to close to zero after four years in the absence of host plants, but traces of the pathogen were still detectable after a 19-year trial period, making eradication of the pathogen very difficult.

  13. BnNAC485 is involved in abiotic stress responses and flowering time in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Lu; Chen, Haiying; Cai, Weiming

    2014-06-01

    NAC domain proteins are plant-specific transcription factors that play important roles in plant growth and development. In this present study, we isolated BnNAC485 from Brassica napus L. (cv. HuYou15) and found that it showed high homology (84% at the amino acid level) with a NAC protein called AtRD26/ANAC072. BnNAC485 was specifically expressed in cotyledons and leaves of young seedlings, and expression was induced by abiotic stress and abscisic acid (ABA) treatment. The BnNAC485 protein localized to the nucleus. Over-expression of BnNAC485 enhanced tolerance to abiotic stress compared with wild-type plants in both B. napus and Arabidopsis thaliana. Furthermore, under exogenous ABA stress, BnNAC485 over-expression lines showed hypersensitivity to this treatment compared with wild-type B. napus and A. thaliana plants. Moreover, exogenous ABA treatment enhanced stomatal closing in B. napus plants over-expressing BnNAC485. Real-time RT-PCR assays showed that some abiotic- or ABA-responsive genes were up-regulated in A. thaliana plants over-expressing BnNAC485. Additionally, the transgenic lines flowered earlier than the wild-type B. napus and A. thaliana plants and the expression patterns of certain circadian clock genes were found to have changed. These results suggest that BnNAC485 acts in response to abiotic stress in plants via an ABA-mediated pathway and this gene can also alter plant flowering time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Glyphostate-drift but not herbivory alters the rate of transgene flow from single and stacked trait transgenic canola (Brassica napus L.) to non-transgenic B. napus and B. rapa

    Science.gov (United States)

    While transgenic plants can offer agricultural benefits, the escape of transgenes out of crop fields is a major environmental concern. Escape of transgenic herbicide resistance has occurred between transgenic Brassica napus (canola) and weedy species in numerous locations. In t...

  15. Dynamic transcriptome analysis reveals AP2/ERF transcription factors responsible for cold stress in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chunfang; Hu, Kaining; Xian, Shuanshi; Liu, Chunqing; Fan, Jianchun; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong

    2016-06-01

    The APETALA2/ethylene response factor (AP2/ERF) transcription factor (TF) superfamily plays an important regulatory role in signal transduction of the plant responses to various stresses including low temperature. Significant progress has been made in understanding the mechanism of cold resistance in Brassica napus, an important oilseed crop. However, comprehensive studies on the induction and activity of these TFs under low temperature have been lacking. In this study, 132 AP2/ERF genes were identified by transcriptome sequencing of rapeseed leaves exposed to 0, 2, 6, 12, and 24 h of low (4 °C) temperature stress. The genes were classified into 4 subfamilies (AP2, DREB, ERF, and RAV) and 13 subgroups, among which the DREB subfamily and ERF subfamily contained 114 genes, no genes were assigned to soloist or DREB A3 subgroups. One hundred and eighteen genes were located on chromosomes A1 to C9. GO functional analysis and promoter sequence analysis revealed that these genes are involved in many molecular pathways that may enhance cold resistance in plants, such as the low-temperature responsiveness, methyl jasmonate, abscisic acid, and ethylene-responsiveness pathways. Their expression patterns revealed dynamic control at different times following initiation of cold stress; the RAV and DREB subfamilies were expressed at the early stage of cold stress, whereas the AP2 subfamily was expressed later. Quantitative PCR analyses of 13 cold-induced AP2/ERF TFs confirmed the accuracy of above results. This study is the first dynamic analysis of the AP2/ERF TFs responsible for cold stress in rapeseed. These findings will serve as a reference for future functional research on transcription in rapeseed.

  16. Strigolactones Improve Plant Growth, Photosynthesis, and Alleviate Oxidative Stress under Salinity in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L. by Regulating Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Ma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapeseed (Brassica napus L. is a very important edible oil crop in the world, and the production is inhibited by abiotic stresses, such as salinity. Plant hormones can alleviate the stress by regulating the physiological processes and gene expression. To study the plant responses to salinity in combination with GR24, a synthesized strigolactone, the oilseed rape variety (Zhongshuang 11 replications were grown in the pots in a controlled growth chamber under three levels of salinity (0, 100, and 200 mM NaCl and 0.18 μM GR24 treatments at the seedling stage for 7 days. The results showed that salinity depressed the shoots and roots growth, whereas GR24 improved the growth under salt stress. Leaf chlorophyll contents and gas exchange parameters (net photosynthetic rates, stomatal conductance, intercellular CO2 concentration, and transpiration rate were also reduced significantly with increasing salinity, and these effects could be partially reversed by GR24 application. Additionally, GR24 treatment significantly increased and decreased the photosystem II quantum yield and non-photochemical quenching, respectively, under salinity stress conditions. The activities of peroxidase and superoxide dismutase increased, and lipid peroxidation measured by the level of malondialdehyde reduced due to GR24 application. The transcriptome analysis of root and shoot was conducted. Three hundred and forty-two common differentially expressed genes (DEGs after GR24 treatment and 166 special DEGs after GR24 treatment under salinity stress were identified in root and shoot. The DEGs in root were significantly more than that in shoot. Quantitative PCR validated that the stress alleviation was mainly related to the gene expression of tryptophan metabolism, plant hormone signal transduction, and photosynthesis.

  17. Copper-deficiency in Brassica napus induces copper remobilization, molybdenum accumulation and modification of the expression of chloroplastic proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Billard

    Full Text Available During the last 40 years, crop breeding has strongly increased yields but has had adverse effects on the content of micronutrients, such as Fe, Mg, Zn and Cu, in edible products despite their sufficient supply in most soils. This suggests that micronutrient remobilization to edible tissues has been negatively selected. As a consequence, the aim of this work was to quantify the remobilization of Cu in leaves of Brassica napus L. during Cu deficiency and to identify the main metabolic processes that were affected so that improvements can be achieved in the future. While Cu deficiency reduced oilseed rape growth by less than 19% compared to control plants, Cu content in old leaves decreased by 61.4%, thus demonstrating a remobilization process between leaves. Cu deficiency also triggered an increase in Cu transporter expression in roots (COPT2 and leaves (HMA1, and more surprisingly, the induction of the MOT1 gene encoding a molybdenum transporter associated with a strong increase in molybdenum (Mo uptake. Proteomic analysis of leaves revealed 33 proteins differentially regulated by Cu deficiency, among which more than half were located in chloroplasts. Eleven differentially expressed proteins are known to require Cu for their synthesis and/or activity. Enzymes that were located directly upstream or downstream of Cu-dependent enzymes were also differentially expressed. The overall results are then discussed in relation to remobilization of Cu, the interaction between Mo and Cu that occurs through the synthesis pathway of Mo cofactor, and finally their putative regulation within the Calvin cycle and the chloroplastic electron transport chain.

  18. The Impact of Region, Nitrogen Use Efficiency, and Grower Incentives on Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Canola (Brassica napus) Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammac, W. A.; Pan, W.; Koenig, R. T.; McCracken, V.

    2012-12-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has mandated through the second renewable fuel standard (RFS2) that biodiesel meet a minimum threshold requirement (50% reduction) for greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction compared to fossil diesel. This designation is determined by life cycle assessment (LCA) and carries with it potential for monetary incentives for biodiesel feedstock growers (Biomass Crop Assistance Program) and biodiesel processors (Renewable Identification Numbers). A national LCA was carried out for canola (Brassica napus) biodiesel feedstock by the EPA and it did meet the minimum threshold requirement. However, EPA's national LCA does not provide insight into regional variation in GHG mitigation. The authors propose for full GHG reduction potential of biofuels to be realized, LCA results must have regional specificity and should inform incentives for growers and processors on a regional basis. The objectives of this work were to determine (1) variation in biofuel feedstock production related GHG emissions between three agroecological zones (AEZs) in eastern Washington State (2) the impact of nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) on GHG mitigation potential for each AEZ and (3) the impact of incentives on adoption of oilseed production. Results from objective (1) revealed there is wide variability in range for GHG estimates both across and within AEZs based on variation in farming practices and environment. It is expected that results for objective (2) will show further GHG mitigation potential due to minimizing N use and therefore fertilizer transport and soil related GHG emission while potentially increasing biodiesel production per hectare. Regional based incentives may allow more timely achievement of goals for bio-based fuels production. Additionally, incentives may further increase GHG offsetting by promoting nitrogen conserving best management practices implementation. This research highlights the need for regional assessment/incentive based

  19. Identification and functional analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) genes in canola (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yun; Wang, Chen; Yang, Bo; Wu, Feifei; Hao, Xueyu; Liang, Wanwan; Niu, Fangfang; Yan, Jingli; Zhang, Hanfeng; Wang, Boya; Deyholos, Michael K; Jiang, Yuan-Qing

    2014-05-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling cascades, consisting of three types of reversibly phosphorylated kinases (MAPKKK, MAPKK, and MAPK), are involved in important processes including plant immunity and hormone responses. The MAPKKKs comprise the largest family in the MAPK cascades, yet only a few of these genes have been associated with physiological functions, even in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Canola (Brassica napus L.) is one of the most important oilseed crops in China and worldwide. To explore MAPKKK functions in biotic and abiotic stress responses in canola, 66 MAPKKK genes were identified and 28 of them were cloned. Phylogenetic analysis of these canola MAPKKKs with homologous genes from representative species classified them into three groups (A-C), comprising four MAPKKKs, seven ZIKs, and 17 Raf genes. A further 15 interaction pairs between these MAPKKKs and the downstream BnaMKKs were identified through a yeast two-hybrid assay. The interactions were further validated through bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis. In addition, by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR, it was further observed that some of these BnaMAPKKK genes were regulated by different hormone stimuli, abiotic stresses, or fungal pathogen treatments. Interestingly, two novel BnaMAPKKK genes, BnaMAPKKK18 and BnaMAPKKK19, which could elicit hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death when transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, were successfully identified. Moreover, it was found that BnaMAPKKK19 probably mediated cell death through BnaMKK9. Overall, the present work has laid the foundation for further characterization of this important MAPKKK gene family in canola.

  20. Overexpression of phyA and appA Genes Improves Soil Organic Phosphorus Utilisation and Seed Phytase Activity in Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Ye, Xiangsheng; Ding, Guangda; Xu, Fangsen

    2013-01-01

    Phytate is the major storage form of organic phosphorus in soils and plant seeds, and phosphorus (P) in this form is unavailable to plants or monogastric animals. In the present study, the phytase genes phyA and appA were introduced into Brassica napus cv Westar with a signal peptide sequence and CaMV 35S promoter, respectively. Three independent transgenic lines, P3 and P11 from phyA and a18 from appA, were selected. The three transgenic lines exhibited significantly higher exuded phytase activity when compared to wild-type (WT) controls. A quartz sand culture experiment demonstrated that transgenic Brassica napus had significantly improved P uptake and plant biomass. A soil culture experiment revealed that seed yields of transgenic lines P11 and a18 increased by 20.9% and 59.9%, respectively, when compared to WT. When phytate was used as the sole P source, P accumulation in seeds increased by 20.6% and 46.9% with respect to WT in P11 and a18, respectively. The P3 line accumulated markedly more P in seeds than WT, while no significant difference was observed in seed yields when phytate was used as the sole P source. Phytase activities in transgenic canola seeds ranged from 1,138 to 1,605 U kg–1 seeds, while no phytase activity was detected in WT seeds. Moreover, phytic acid content in P11 and a18 seeds was significantly lower than in WT. These results introduce an opportunity for improvement of soil and seed phytate-P bioavailability through genetic manipulation of oilseed rape, thereby increasing plant production and P nutrition for monogastric animals. PMID:23573285

  1. Transcriptomic basis of functional difference and coordination between seeds and the silique wall of Brassica napus during the seed-filling stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han; Yang, Qingyong; Fan, Chuchuan; Zhao, Xiaoqin; Wang, Xuemin; Zhou, Yongming

    2015-04-01

    The silique of oilseed rape (Brassica napus) is a composite organ including seeds and the silique wall (SW) that possesses distinctly physiological, biochemical and functional differentiations. Yet, the molecular events controlling such differences between the SW and seeds, as well as their coordination during silique development at transcriptional level are largely unknown. Here, we identified large sets of differentially expressed genes in the SW and seeds of siliques at 21-22 days after flowering with a Brassica 95K EST microarray. At this particular stage, there were 3278 SW preferentially expressed genes and 2425 seed preferentially expressed genes. Using the MapMan visualization software, genes differentially regulated in various metabolic pathways and sub-pathways between the SW and seeds were revealed. Photosynthesis and transport-related genes were more actively transcripted in the SW, while those involved in lipid metabolism were more active in seeds during the seed filling stage. On the other hand, genes involved in secondary metabolisms were selectively regulated in the SW and seeds. Large numbers of transcription factors were identified to be differentially expressed between the SW and seeds, suggesting a complex pattern of transcriptional control in these two organs. Furthermore, most genes discussed in categories or pathways showed a similar expression pattern through 21 DAF to 42 DAF. Our results thus provide insights into the coordination of seeds and the SW in the developing silique at the transcriptional levels, which will facilitate the functional studies of important genes for improving B. napus seed productivity and quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Overexpression of phyA and appA genes improves soil organic phosphorus utilisation and seed phytase activity in Brassica napus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Wang

    Full Text Available Phytate is the major storage form of organic phosphorus in soils and plant seeds, and phosphorus (P in this form is unavailable to plants or monogastric animals. In the present study, the phytase genes phyA and appA were introduced into Brassica napus cv Westar with a signal peptide sequence and CaMV 35S promoter, respectively. Three independent transgenic lines, P3 and P11 from phyA and a18 from appA, were selected. The three transgenic lines exhibited significantly higher exuded phytase activity when compared to wild-type (WT controls. A quartz sand culture experiment demonstrated that transgenic Brassica napus had significantly improved P uptake and plant biomass. A soil culture experiment revealed that seed yields of transgenic lines P11 and a18 increased by 20.9% and 59.9%, respectively, when compared to WT. When phytate was used as the sole P source, P accumulation in seeds increased by 20.6% and 46.9% with respect to WT in P11 and a18, respectively. The P3 line accumulated markedly more P in seeds than WT, while no significant difference was observed in seed yields when phytate was used as the sole P source. Phytase activities in transgenic canola seeds ranged from 1,138 to 1,605 U kg(-1 seeds, while no phytase activity was detected in WT seeds. Moreover, phytic acid content in P11 and a18 seeds was significantly lower than in WT. These results introduce an opportunity for improvement of soil and seed phytate-P bioavailability through genetic manipulation of oilseed rape, thereby increasing plant production and P nutrition for monogastric animals.

  3. Variations in fatty acid composition, glucosinolate profile and some phyto chemical contents in selected oil seed rape (Brassica napus L.) cultivars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Din Saad El-Beltag, H.; Mohamed, A. A.

    2010-07-01

    Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) is now the third most important source of edible oil in the world after soybean and palm oil. In this study seeds of five different rapeseed cultivars namely; pactol, silvo, topas, serw 4 and serw 6 were evaluated for their fatty acid composition, glucosinolate profile, amino acids, total tocopherols and phenolic content. Among all cultivars significant variability in fatty acids were observed. The oleic acid (C18:1) ranged from 56.31% to 58.67%, linoleic acid (C18:2) from 10.52% to 13.74%, {alpha}-linolenic acid (C18:3) from 8.83% to 10.32% and erucic acid (22:1) from 0.15% to 0.91%. The glucosinolate profile of rapeseed was also separated and identified using high-performance liquid chromatography. Small variations in the glucosinolate profile were observed among all tested cultivars; however, progoitrin and gluconapin were the major glucosinolate found. Additionally, silvo cultivar showed the highest total glucosinolate contents (5.97 {mu}mol/g dw). Generally, the contents of aspartic, glutamic, arginine and leucine were high, while the contents of tyrosine and isoleucine were low among all cultivars. For total tocopherols, the results indicated that both serw 6 and pactol cultivars had the highest total tocopherol contents (138.3 and 102.8 mg/100 g oil, respectively). Total phenolic contents varied from 28.0 to 35.4 mg/g dw. The highest total phenolic content was found in topas while the lowest value was detected in serw 6. These parameters; fatty acid contents, glucosinolate profile and amino acids together with total tocopherols and phenolic contents, could be taken into consideration by oilseed rape breeders as selection criteria for developing genotypes with modified seed quality traits in Brassica napus L. (Author)

  4. Multi-environment QTL studies suggest a role for cysteine-rich protein kinase genes in quantitative resistance to blackleg disease in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkan, Nicholas J; Raman, Harsh; Lydiate, Derek J; Robinson, Stephen J; Yu, Fengqun; Barbulescu, Denise M; Raman, Rosy; Luckett, David J; Burton, Wayne; Wratten, Neil; Salisbury, Philip A; Rimmer, S Roger; Borhan, M Hossein

    2016-08-24

    Resistance to the blackleg disease of Brassica napus (canola/oilseed rape), caused by the hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans, is determined by both race-specific resistance (R) genes and quantitative resistance loci (QTL), or adult-plant resistance (APR). While the introgression of R genes into breeding material is relatively simple, QTL are often detected sporadically, making them harder to capture in breeding programs. For the effective deployment of APR in crop varieties, resistance QTL need to have a reliable influence on phenotype in multiple environments and be well defined genetically to enable marker-assisted selection (MAS). Doubled-haploid populations produced from the susceptible B. napus variety Topas and APR varieties AG-Castle and AV-Sapphire were analysed for resistance to blackleg in two locations over 3 and 4 years, respectively. Three stable QTL were detected in each population, with two loci appearing to be common to both APR varieties. Physical delineation of three QTL regions was sufficient to identify candidate defense-related genes, including a cluster of cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases contained within a 49 gene QTL interval on chromosome A01. Individual L. maculans isolates were used to define the physical intervals for the race-specific R genes Rlm3 and Rlm4 and to identify QTL common to both field studies and the cotyledon resistance response. Through multi-environment QTL analysis we have identified and delineated four significant and stable QTL suitable for MAS of quantitative blackleg resistance in B. napus, and identified candidate genes which potentially play a role in quantitative defense responses to L. maculans.

  5. Microtubule configurations and nuclear DNA synthesis during initiation of suspensor-bearing embryos from Brassica napus cv. Topas microspores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubas, E.; Custers, J.B.M.; Kieft, H.; Wedzony, M.; Lammeren, van A.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    In the new Brassica napus microspore culture system, wherein embryos with suspensors are formed, ab initio mimics zygotic embryogenesis. The system provides a powerful in vitro tool for studying the diverse developmental processes that take place during early stages of plant embryogenesis. Here, we

  6. Solubilization and characterization of diacylglycerol acyltransferase from microspore-derived cultures of oilseed rape.

    OpenAIRE

    Little, D.; Weselake, R; Pomeroy, K; Furukawa-Stoffer, T; Bagu, J

    1994-01-01

    Particulate fractions prepared from microspore-derived (MD) embryos of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L. cv. Reston) and an embryogenic MD cell suspension culture of oilseed rape (B. napus L. cv. Jet Neuf) were used as a source of diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT, EC 2.3.1.20) for enzyme characterization and development of a solubilization procedure. DGAT activity in the 1500-100,000 g fraction from MD embryos was stimulated 4-5-fold by 3 to 4 mg of BSA/ml of reaction mixture. DGAT activity...

  7. Resynthesized Brassica juncea lines with novel organellar genome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. Brassica juncea, a natural allotetraploid derived from B. rapa and B. nigra, is a major oilseed crop of the Indian sub- continent. Efforts to extend its cultivation to Australia and. Canada as a replacement for B. napus are being made be- cause of its desirable features such as high-temperature tol- erance, disease ...

  8. Inheritance of rapeseed (Brassica napus)-specific RAPD markers and a transgene in the cross B.juncea x (B.juncea x B.napus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frello, S.; Hansen, K.R.; Jensen, J.

    1995-01-01

    We have examined the inheritance of 20 rapeseed (Brassica napus)-specific RAPD (randomly amplified polymorphic DNA) markers from transgenic, herbicide-tolerant rapeseed in 54 plants of the BC1 generation from the cross B. juncea x (B. juncea x B. napus). Hybridization between B. juncea and B. napus......, with B. juncea as the female parent, was successful both in controlled crosses and spontaneously in the field. The controlled backcrossing of selected hybrids to B. juncea, again with B. juncea as the female parent, also resulted in many seeds. The BC1 plants contained from 0 to 20 of the rapeseed RAPD...... markers, and the frequency of inheritance of individual RAPD markers ranged from 19% to 93%. The transgene was found in 52% of the plants analyzed. Five synteny groups of RAPD markers were identified. In the hybrids pollen fertility was 0-28%. The hybrids with the highest pollen fertility were selected...

  9. Transcriptome analysis of canola (Brassica napus under salt stress at the germination stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Long

    Full Text Available Canola (Brassica napus is one of the most important oil crops in the world. However, its yield has been constrained by salt stress. In this study, transcriptome profiles were explored using Digital Gene Expression (DGE at 0, 3, 12 and 24 hours after H2O (control and NaCl treatments on B. napus roots at the germination stage. Comparisons of gene-expression between the control and the treatment were conducted after tag-mapping to the sequenced Brassica rapa genome. The differentially expressed genes during the time course of salt stress were focused on, and 163 genes were identified to be differentially expressed at all the time points. Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes enrichment analyses revealed that some of the genes were involved in proline metabolism, inositol metabolism, carbohydrate metabolic processes and oxidation-reduction processes and may play vital roles in the salt-stress response at the germination stage. Thus, this study provides new candidate salt stress responding genes, which may function in novel putative nodes in the molecular pathways of salt stress resistance.

  10. Effects of Salinity on Yield and Component Characters in Canola (Brassica napus L. Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad BYBORDI

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cultivars �Okapi�, �SLM046�, �Elite�, �Fornax� and �Licord� Brassica napus were tested for yield and component characters under different levels of salinity. The variations due to salinity levels, cultivars and cultivarxsalinity (interaction were significant for different characters. The variable degrees of increase and decrease of regression coefficient estimate mates (curve estimation showed the performance as influenced by different salinity levels. The performance of Brassica napus variety in plant height and days to first flowering was the best for �SLM046�, �Okapi� �SLM046� and �Okapi� cultivars. �SLM046� showed the best performance in days to maturity, followed by �Licord� and �Elite�. �Okapi� performed better than others regarding the increased number of seeds per plant and seed yield per plant, followed by �Fornax�. Considering all characters, the most tolerance ability was found in �SLM046� and �Okapi�, against different levels of salinity.

  11. Purification and protein composition of oil bodies from Brassica napus seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolivet Pascale

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Seed oil bodies are intracellular particles to store lipids as food reserves in oleaginous plants. Description of oil body-associated proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana has been recently reported whereas only few data are available in the case of rapeseed. Oil bodies have been prepared from two double-low varieties of Brassica napus seeds, a standard variety (Explus and an oleic variety (Cabriolet. Oil bodies have been purified using floatation technique in the successive presence of high salt concentration, detergent or urea in order to remove non-specifically trapped proteins. The integrity of the oil bodies has been verified and their size estimated. Their protein and fatty acid contents have been determined. The proteins composing these organelles were extracted, separated by denaturing gel electrophoresis, digested by trypsin and their peptides were subsequently analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Protein identification was performed using Arabidopsis thaliana protein sequence database and a collection of Expressed Sequence Tag (EST of Brassica napus generated from the framework of the French plant genomics programme “Genoplante”. This led to the identification of a limited number of proteins: eight oleosins showing a high similarity each other and representing up to 75% of oil body proteins, a 11 β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-like protein highly homologous to the same protein from A. thaliana, and only few contaminating proteins associated with myrosinase activity.

  12. Genome-wide investigation of genetic changes during modern breeding of Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nian; Li, Feng; Chen, Biyun; Xu, Kun; Yan, Guixin; Qiao, Jiangwei; Li, Jun; Gao, Guizhen; Bancroft, Ian; Meng, Jingling; King, Graham J; Wu, Xiaoming

    2014-08-01

    Considerable genome variation had been incorporated within rapeseed breeding programs over past decades. In past decades, there have been substantial changes in phenotypic properties of rapeseed as a result of extensive breeding effort. Uncovering the underlying patterns of allelic variation in the context of genome organisation would provide knowledge to guide future genetic improvement. We assessed genome-wide genetic changes, including population structure, genetic relatedness, the extent of linkage disequilibrium, nucleotide diversity and genetic differentiation based on F ST outlier detection, for a panel of 472 Brassica napus inbred accessions using a 60 k Brassica Infinium® SNP array. We found genetic diversity varied in different sub-groups. Moreover, the genetic diversity increased from 1950 to 1980 and then remained at a similar level in China and Europe. We also found ~6-10 % genomic regions revealed high F ST values. Some QTLs previously associated with important agronomic traits overlapped with these regions. Overall, the B. napus C genome was found to have more high F ST signals than the A genome, and we concluded that the C genome may contribute more valuable alleles to generate elite traits. The results of this study indicate that considerable genome variation had been incorporated within rapeseed breeding programs over past decades. These results also contribute to understanding the impact of rapeseed improvement on available genome variation and the potential for dissecting complex agronomic traits.

  13. Transcriptome analysis of canola (Brassica napus) under salt stress at the germination stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Weihua; Zou, Xiling; Zhang, Xuekun

    2015-01-01

    Canola (Brassica napus) is one of the most important oil crops in the world. However, its yield has been constrained by salt stress. In this study, transcriptome profiles were explored using Digital Gene Expression (DGE) at 0, 3, 12 and 24 hours after H2O (control) and NaCl treatments on B. napus roots at the germination stage. Comparisons of gene-expression between the control and the treatment were conducted after tag-mapping to the sequenced Brassica rapa genome. The differentially expressed genes during the time course of salt stress were focused on, and 163 genes were identified to be differentially expressed at all the time points. Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes enrichment analyses revealed that some of the genes were involved in proline metabolism, inositol metabolism, carbohydrate metabolic processes and oxidation-reduction processes and may play vital roles in the salt-stress response at the germination stage. Thus, this study provides new candidate salt stress responding genes, which may function in novel putative nodes in the molecular pathways of salt stress resistance.

  14. Heme oxygenase 1 defects lead to reduced chlorophyll in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lixia; Yang, Zonghui; Zeng, Xinhua; Gao, Jie; Liu, Jie; Yi, Bin; Ma, Chaozhi; Shen, Jinxiong; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong; Wen, Jing

    2017-04-01

    We previously described a Brassica napus chlorophyll-deficient mutant (ygl) with yellow-green seedling leaves and mapped the related gene, BnaC.YGL, to a 0.35 cM region. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in this chlorophyll defect are still unknown. In this study, the BnaC07.HO1 gene (equivalent to BnaC.YGL) was isolated by the candidate gene approach, and its function was confirmed by genetic complementation. Comparative sequencing analysis suggested that BnaC07.HO1 was lost in the mutant, while a long noncoding-RNA was inserted into the promoter of the homologous gene BnaA07.HO1. This insert was widely present in B. napus cultivars and down-regulated BnaA07.HO1 expression. BnaC07.HO1 was highly expressed in the seedling leaves and encoded heme oxygenase 1, which was localized in the chloroplast. Biochemical analysis showed that BnaC07.HO1 can catalyze heme conversion to form biliverdin IXα. RNA-seq analysis revealed that the loss of BnaC07.HO1 impaired tetrapyrrole metabolism, especially chlorophyll biosynthesis. According, the levels of chlorophyll intermediates were reduced in the ygl mutant. In addition, gene expression in multiple pathways was affected in ygl. These findings provide molecular evidences for the basis of the yellow-green leaf phenotype and further insights into the crucial role of HO1 in B. napus.

  15. Chelate-assisted phytoextraction: effect of EDTA and EDDS on copper uptake by Brassica napus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TIJANA M. ZEREMSKI-ŠKORIĆ

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Chelate-assisted phytoextraction is proposed as an effective approach for the removal of heavy metals from contaminated soil through the use of high biomass plants. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficiency of the two chelators: EDTA and biodegradable EDDS in enhancing Cu uptake and translocation by Brassica napus L. grown on moderately contaminated soil and treated with increasing concentrations of EDTA or EDDS. Increasing amounts of EDDS caused serious growth suppression of B. napus and an increase in shoot metal concentrations. Growth suppression limited the actual amount of phytoextracted Cu at high concentrations of EDDS. The maximum amount of extracted Cu was achieved by the application of 8.0 and 4.0+4.0 mmol kg-1 EDDS. The shoot Cu concentrations after EDTA application were much lower than with EDDS at the same doses. According to these experiments, EDTA does not appear to be an efficient amendment if Cu phytoextraction with B. napus is considered but EDDS is.

  16. LMI1-like genes involved in leaf margin development of Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Xiyuan; Liu, Han; Huang, Jixiang; Zhao, Jianyi

    2017-06-01

    In rapeseed (Brassica napus L.), leaf margins are variable and can be entire, serrate, or lobed. In our previous study, the lobed-leaf gene (LOBED-LEAF 1, BnLL1) was mapped to a 32.1 kb section of B. napus A10. Two LMI1-like genes, BnaA10g26320D and BnaA10g26330D, were considered the potential genes that controlled the lobed-leaf trait in rapeseed. In the present study, these two genes and another homologous gene (BnaC04g00850D) were transformed into Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. plants to identify their functions. All three LMI1-like genes of B. napus produced serrate leaf margins. The expression analysis indicated that the expression level of BnaA10g26320D determined the difference between lobed- and entire-leaved lines in rapeseed. Therefore, it is likely that BnaA10g26320D corresponds to BnLL1.

  17. Complete sequence of heterogenous-composition mitochondrial genome (Brassica napus and its exogenous source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Juan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unlike maternal inheritance of mitochondria in sexual reproduction, somatic hybrids follow no obvious pattern. The introgressed segment orf138 from the mitochondrial genome of radish (Raphanus sativus to its counterpart in rapeseed (Brassica napus demonstrates that this inheritance mode derives from the cytoplasm of both parents. Sequencing of the complete mitochondrial genome of five species from Brassica family allowed the prediction of other extraneous sources of the cybrids from the radish parent, and the determination of their mitochondrial rearrangement. Results We obtained the complete mitochondrial genome of Ogura-cms-cybrid (oguC rapeseed. To date, this is the first time that a heterogeneously composed mitochondrial genome was sequenced. The 258,473 bp master circle constituted of 33 protein-coding genes, 3 rRNA sequences, and 23 tRNA sequences. This mitotype noticeably holds two copies of atp9 and is devoid of cox2-2. Relative to nap mitochondrial genome, 40 point mutations were scattered in the 23 protein-coding genes. atp6 even has an abnormal start locus whereas tatC has an abnormal end locus. The rearrangement of the 22 syntenic regions that comprised 80.11% of the genome was influenced by short repeats. A pair of large repeats (9731 bp was responsible for the multipartite structure. Nine unique regions were detected when compared with other published Brassica mitochondrial genome sequences. We also found six homologous chloroplast segments (Brassica napus. Conclusions The mitochondrial genome of oguC is quite divergent from nap and pol, which are more similar with each other. We analyzed the unique regions of every genome of the Brassica family, and found that very few segments were specific for these six mitotypes, especially cam, jun, and ole, which have no specific segments at all. Therefore, we conclude that the most specific regions of oguC possibly came from radish. Compared with the chloroplast genome

  18. Scale up of 2,4-dichlorophenol removal from aqueous solutions using Brassica napus hairy roots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelini, Vanina A. [Departamento de Biologia Molecular, FCEFQN, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto, 5800 Rio Cuarto, Cordoba (Argentina); Orejas, Joaquin [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto, 5800 Rio Cuarto, Cordoba (Argentina); Medina, Maria I. [Departamento de Biologia Molecular, FCEFQN, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto, 5800 Rio Cuarto, Cordoba (Argentina); Agostini, Elizabeth, E-mail: eagostini@exa.unrc.edu.ar [Departamento de Biologia Molecular, FCEFQN, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto, 5800 Rio Cuarto, Cordoba (Argentina)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: {yields}B. napus hairy roots were effectively used for a large scale removal of 2,4-DCP. {yields} High removal efficiencies were obtained (98%) in a short time (30 min). {yields} Roots were re-used for six consecutive cycles with high efficiency. {yields} Post removal solutions showed no toxicity. {yields} This method could be used for continuous and safe treatment of phenolic effluents. - Abstract: Chlorophenols are harmful pollutants, frequently found in the effluents of several industries. For this reason, many environmental friendly technologies are being explored for their removal from industrial wastewaters. The aim of the present work was to study the scale up of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) removal from synthetic wastewater, using Brassica napus hairy roots and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in a discontinuous stirred tank reactor. We have analyzed some operational conditions, because the scale up of such process was poorly studied. High removal efficiencies were obtained (98%) in a short time (30 min). When roots were re-used for six consecutive cycles, 2,4-DCP removal efficiency decreased from 98 to 86%, in the last cycle. After the removal process, the solutions obtained from the reactor were assessed for their toxicity using an acute test with Lactuca sativa L. seeds. Results suggested that the treated solution was less toxic than the parent solution, because neither inhibition of lettuce germination nor effects in root and hypocotyl lengths were observed. Therefore, we provide evidence that Brassica napus hairy roots could be effectively used to detoxify solutions containing 2,4-DCP and they have considerable potential for a large scale removal of this pollutant. Thus, this study could help to design a method for continuous and safe treatment of effluents containing chlorophenols.

  19. Clubroot resistance QTL are modulated by nitrogen input in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laperche, A; Aigu, Y; Jubault, M; Ollier, M; Guichard, S; Glory, P; Strelkov, S E; Gravot, A; Manzanares-Dauleux, M J

    2017-04-01

    Nitrogen levels can modulate the effectiveness of clubroot resistance in an isolate- and host-specific manner. While the same QTL were detected under high and low nitrogen, their effects were altered. Clubroot, caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae, is one of the most damaging diseases of oilseed rape and is known to be affected by nitrogen fertilization. However, the genetic factors involved in clubroot resistance have not been characterized under nitrogen-limiting conditions. This study aimed to assess the variability of clubroot resistance under different nitrogen levels and to characterize the impact of nitrogen supply on genetic resistance factors. Linkage analyses and a genome-wide association study were conducted to detect QTL for clubroot resistance and evaluate their sensitivity to nitrogen. The clubroot response of a set of 92 diverse oilseed rape accessions and 108 lines derived from a cross between 'Darmor-bzh' (resistant) and 'Yudal' (susceptible) was studied in the greenhouse under high- and low-nitrogen conditions, following inoculation with the P. brassicae isolates eH and K92-16. Resistance to each isolate was controlled by a major QTL and a few small-effects QTL. While the same QTL were detected under both high and low nitrogen, their effects were altered. Clubroot resistance to isolate eH, but not K92-16, was greater under a low-N supply versus a high-N supply. New sources of resistance were found among the oilseed rape accessions under both low and high-N conditions. The results are discussed relative to the literature and from a crop improvement perspective.

  20. EDTA enhanced plant growth, antioxidant defense system, and phytoextraction of copper by Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habiba, Ume; Ali, Shafaqat; Farid, Mujahid; Shakoor, Muhammad Bilal; Rizwan, Muhammad; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Abbasi, Ghulam Hasan; Hayat, Tahir; Ali, Basharat

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential micronutrient for normal plant growth and development, but in excess, it is also toxic to plants. The present study investigated the influence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in enhancing Cu uptake and tolerance as well as the morphological and physiological responses of Brassica napus L. seedlings under Cu stress. Four-week-old seedlings were transferred to hydroponics containing Hoagland's nutrient solution. After 2 weeks of transplanting, three levels (0, 50, and 100 μM) of Cu were applied with or without application of 2.5 mM EDTA and plants were further grown for 8 weeks in culture media. Results showed that Cu alone significantly decreased plant growth, biomass, photosynthetic pigments, and gas exchange characteristics. Cu stress also reduced the activities of antioxidants, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and catalase (CAT) along with protein contents. Cu toxicity increased the concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as indicated by the increased production of malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in both leaves and roots. The application of EDTA significantly alleviated Cu-induced toxic effects in B. napus, showing remarkable improvement in all these parameters. EDTA amendment increased the activity of antioxidant enzymes by decreasing the concentrations of MDA and H2O2 both in leaves and roots of B. napus. Although, EDTA amendment with Cu significantly increased Cu uptake in roots, stems, and leaves in decreasing order of concentration but increased the growth, photosynthetic parameters, and antioxidant enzymes. These results showed that the application of EDTA can be a useful strategy for phytoextraction of Cu by B. napus from contaminated soils.

  1. Dissecting Quantitative Trait Loci for Boron Efficiency across Multiple Environments in Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zunkang; Wu, Likun; Nian, Fuzhao; Ding, Guangda; Shi, Taoxiong; Zhang, Didi; Shi, Lei; Xu, Fangsen; Meng, Jinling

    2012-01-01

    High yield is the most important goal in crop breeding, and boron (B) is an essential micronutrient for plants. However, B deficiency, leading to yield decreases, is an agricultural problem worldwide. Brassica napus is one of the most sensitive crops to B deficiency, and considerable genotypic variation exists among different cultivars in response to B deficiency. To dissect the genetic basis of tolerance to B deficiency in B. napus, we carried out QTL analysis for seed yield and yield-related traits under low and normal B conditions using the double haploid population (TNDH) by two-year and the BQDH population by three-year field trials. In total, 80 putative QTLs and 42 epistatic interactions for seed yield, plant height, branch number, pod number, seed number, seed weight and B efficiency coefficient (BEC) were identified under low and normal B conditions, singly explaining 4.15–23.16% and 0.53–14.38% of the phenotypic variation. An additive effect of putative QTLs was a more important controlling factor than the additive-additive effect of epistatic interactions. Four QTL-by-environment interactions and 7 interactions between epistatic interactions and the environment contributed to 1.27–4.95% and 1.17–3.68% of the phenotypic variation, respectively. The chromosome region on A2 of SYLB-A2 for seed yield under low B condition and BEC-A2 for BEC in the two populations was equivalent to the region of a reported major QTL, BE1. The B. napus homologous genes of Bra020592 and Bra020595 mapped to the A2 region and were speculated to be candidate genes for B efficiency. These findings reveal the complex genetic basis of B efficiency in B. napus. They provide a basis for the fine mapping and cloning of the B efficiency genes and for breeding B-efficient cultivars by marker-assisted selection (MAS). PMID:23028855

  2. Dissecting quantitative trait loci for boron efficiency across multiple environments in Brassica napus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zunkang Zhao

    Full Text Available High yield is the most important goal in crop breeding, and boron (B is an essential micronutrient for plants. However, B deficiency, leading to yield decreases, is an agricultural problem worldwide. Brassica napus is one of the most sensitive crops to B deficiency, and considerable genotypic variation exists among different cultivars in response to B deficiency. To dissect the genetic basis of tolerance to B deficiency in B. napus, we carried out QTL analysis for seed yield and yield-related traits under low and normal B conditions using the double haploid population (TNDH by two-year and the BQDH population by three-year field trials. In total, 80 putative QTLs and 42 epistatic interactions for seed yield, plant height, branch number, pod number, seed number, seed weight and B efficiency coefficient (BEC were identified under low and normal B conditions, singly explaining 4.15-23.16% and 0.53-14.38% of the phenotypic variation. An additive effect of putative QTLs was a more important controlling factor than the additive-additive effect of epistatic interactions. Four QTL-by-environment interactions and 7 interactions between epistatic interactions and the environment contributed to 1.27-4.95% and 1.17-3.68% of the phenotypic variation, respectively. The chromosome region on A2 of SYLB-A2 for seed yield under low B condition and BEC-A2 for BEC in the two populations was equivalent to the region of a reported major QTL, BE1. The B. napus homologous genes of Bra020592 and Bra020595 mapped to the A2 region and were speculated to be candidate genes for B efficiency. These findings reveal the complex genetic basis of B efficiency in B. napus. They provide a basis for the fine mapping and cloning of the B efficiency genes and for breeding B-efficient cultivars by marker-assisted selection (MAS.

  3. miR395 is involved in detoxification of cadmium in Brassica napus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liu Wei; Song, Jian Bo; Shu, Xia Xia; Zhang, Yun [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Life Science, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Yang, Zhi Min, E-mail: zmyang@njau.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Life Science, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Involvement of miR395 in sulfate uptake and assimilation in B. napus. ► miR395 regulation of Cd accumulation and distribution in B. napus. ► Depression of Cd-induced oxidative stress by miR395. -- Abstract: The toxic metal cadmium (Cd) constitutes one of the major inorganic contaminants in environments. microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous non-coding small RNAs. miR395 is conserved and regulates sulfate assimilation and distribution in higher plants, but whether it is involved in detoxification of Cd in plants has not been described. In this study, transgenic rapeseed (Brassica napus) over-expressing miR395 was identified under Cd stress. miR395-over-expressing plants showed a lower degree of Cd-induced oxidative stress than wild type. By contrast, chlorophyll, glutathione and non-protein thiols contents were higher in the transformants than wild type. Determination of growth response showed that 35S::MIR395 plants accumulated higher levels of biomass and sulfur than wild type under Cd exposure. miR395 transgenic plants had higher levels of Cd in plants, particularly at the high supply of Cd in the medium, but they tended to repress Cd translocation from roots to shoots. Simultaneously, expression of metal-tolerance genes such as BnPCS1, BnHO1 and Sultr1;1 was up-regulated under Cd stress, and the expression of the genes was more pronounced in 35S::MIR395 plants than in wild type. These results suggest that miR395 would be involved in detoxification of Cd in B. napus.

  4. The lipid polyester composition of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Isabel; Bonaventure, Gustavo; Ohlrogge, John; Pollard, Mike

    2006-12-01

    Mature seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus contain a complex mixture of aliphatic monomers derived from the non-extractable lipid polyesters deposited by various seed tissues. Methods of polyester depolymerization of solvent-extracted seeds and analysis of aliphatic monomers were compared. Sodium methoxide-catalyzed depolymerization, followed by GC analysis of the acetylated monomers, was developed for routine quantitative analysis suitable for 0.5g seed samples. In Arabidopsis seeds, the major C16 and C18 monomers identified included omega-hydroxy fatty acids and alpha,omega-dicarboxylic acids derived from palmitate, oleate and linoleate, and 9,10,18-trihydroxyoctadecenoic acid. Among monomers which can collectively be considered likely to be derived from suberin, docosan-1-ol, docosane-1,22-diol, 22-hydroxydocosanoic acid, 24-hydroxytetracosanoic acid, tetracosane-1,24-dioic acid and ferulic acid were the major species. Compared to Arabidopsis, Brassica seeds showed a roughly similar proportion of monomer classes, with the exception that alkan-1ols were 3-fold higher. Also, there were much less C24 aliphatic species and significant amounts of C14-C16 alkan-1ols, including iso- and anteiso-methyl branched compounds. Dissection and analysis of mature Brassica seeds showed that the trihydroxy C18:1 fatty acid was found mainly in the embryo, while ferulate, fatty alcohols and C22 and C24 species were specific to the seed coat plus endosperm.

  5. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies New Loci for Resistance to Sclerotinia Stem Rot in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Zhao, Qing; Liu, Sheng; Shahid, Muhammad; Lan, Lei; Cai, Guangqin; Zhang, Chunyu; Fan, Chuchuan; Wang, Youping; Zhou, Yongming

    2016-01-01

    Sclerotinia stem rot (SSR) caused by the necrotrophic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a major disease in rapeseed (Brassica napus) worldwide. Breeding for SSR resistance in B. napus, as in other crops, relies only on germplasms with quantitative resistance genes. A better understanding of the genetic basis for SSR resistance in B. napus thus holds promise for the genetic improvement of disease resistance. In the present study, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for SSR resistance in B. napus were performed using an association panel of 448 accessions genotyped with the Brassica 60K Infinium® single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. A total of 26 SNPs corresponding to three loci, DSRC4, DSRC6, and DSRC8 were associated with SSR resistance. Haplotype analysis showed that the three favorable alleles for SSR resistance exhibited cumulative effects. After aligning SSR resistance quantitative trait loci (QTL) identified in the present and previous studies to the B. napus reference genome, one locus (DSRC6) was found to be located within the confidence interval of a QTL identified in previous QTL mapping studies and another two loci (DSRC4 and DSRC8) were considered novel loci for SSR resistance. A total of 39 candidate genes were predicted for the three loci based on the GWAS combining with the differentially expressed genes identified in previous transcriptomics analyses.

  6. Genome-wide association study identifies new loci for resistance to Sclerotinia stem rot in Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sclerotinia stem rot (SSR caused by the necrotrophic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a major disease in rapeseed (Brassica napus worldwide. Breeding for SSR resistance in B. napus, as in other crops, relies only on germplasms with quantitative resistance genes. A better understanding of the genetic basis for SSR resistance in B. napus thus holds promise for the genetic improvement of disease resistance. In the present study, a genome-wide association study (GWAS for SSR resistance in B. napus were performed using an association panel of 448 accessions genotyped with the Brassica 60K Infinium® single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array. A total of 26 SNPs corresponding to 3 loci, DSRC4, DSRC6 and DSRC8 were associated with SSR resistance. Haplotype analysis showed that the 3 favourable alleles for SSR resistance exhibited cumulative effects. After aligning SSR resistance quantitative trait loci (QTL identified in the present and previous studies to the B. napus reference genome, one locus (DSRC6 was found to be located within the confidence interval of a QTL identified in previous QTL mapping studies and another two loci (DSRC4 and DSRC8 were considered novel loci for SSR resistance. A total of 39 candidate genes were predicted for the 3 loci based on the GWAS combining with the differentially expressed genes identified in previous transcriptomics analyses.

  7. Genomes and transcriptomes of partners in plant-fungal-interactions between canola (Brassica napus and two Leptosphaeria species.

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    Rohan G T Lowe

    Full Text Available Leptosphaeria maculans 'brassicae' is a damaging fungal pathogen of canola (Brassica napus, causing lesions on cotyledons and leaves, and cankers on the lower stem. A related species, L. biglobosa 'canadensis', colonises cotyledons but causes few stem cankers. We describe the complement of genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZys and peptidases of these fungi, as well as of four related plant pathogens. We also report dual-organism RNA-seq transcriptomes of these two Leptosphaeria species and B. napus during disease. During the first seven days of infection L. biglobosa 'canadensis', a necrotroph, expressed more cell wall degrading genes than L. maculans 'brassicae', a hemi-biotroph. L. maculans 'brassicae' expressed many genes in the Carbohydrate Binding Module class of CAZy, particularly CBM50 genes, with potential roles in the evasion of basal innate immunity in the host plant. At this time, three avirulence genes were amongst the top 20 most highly upregulated L. maculans 'brassicae' genes in planta. The two fungi had a similar number of peptidase genes, and trypsin was transcribed at high levels by both fungi early in infection. L. biglobosa 'canadensis' infection activated the jasmonic acid and salicylic acid defence pathways in B. napus, consistent with defence against necrotrophs. L. maculans 'brassicae' triggered a high level of expression of isochorismate synthase 1, a reporter for salicylic acid signalling. L. biglobosa 'canadensis' infection triggered coordinated shutdown of photosynthesis genes, and a concomitant increase in transcription of cell wall remodelling genes of the host plant. Expression of particular classes of CAZy genes and the triggering of host defence and particular metabolic pathways are consistent with the necrotrophic lifestyle of L. biglobosa 'canadensis', and the hemibiotrophic life style of L. maculans 'brassicae'.

  8. Genomes and transcriptomes of partners in plant-fungal-interactions between canola (Brassica napus) and two Leptosphaeria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Rohan G T; Cassin, Andrew; Grandaubert, Jonathan; Clark, Bethany L; Van de Wouw, Angela P; Rouxel, Thierry; Howlett, Barbara J

    2014-01-01

    Leptosphaeria maculans 'brassicae' is a damaging fungal pathogen of canola (Brassica napus), causing lesions on cotyledons and leaves, and cankers on the lower stem. A related species, L. biglobosa 'canadensis', colonises cotyledons but causes few stem cankers. We describe the complement of genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZys) and peptidases of these fungi, as well as of four related plant pathogens. We also report dual-organism RNA-seq transcriptomes of these two Leptosphaeria species and B. napus during disease. During the first seven days of infection L. biglobosa 'canadensis', a necrotroph, expressed more cell wall degrading genes than L. maculans 'brassicae', a hemi-biotroph. L. maculans 'brassicae' expressed many genes in the Carbohydrate Binding Module class of CAZy, particularly CBM50 genes, with potential roles in the evasion of basal innate immunity in the host plant. At this time, three avirulence genes were amongst the top 20 most highly upregulated L. maculans 'brassicae' genes in planta. The two fungi had a similar number of peptidase genes, and trypsin was transcribed at high levels by both fungi early in infection. L. biglobosa 'canadensis' infection activated the jasmonic acid and salicylic acid defence pathways in B. napus, consistent with defence against necrotrophs. L. maculans 'brassicae' triggered a high level of expression of isochorismate synthase 1, a reporter for salicylic acid signalling. L. biglobosa 'canadensis' infection triggered coordinated shutdown of photosynthesis genes, and a concomitant increase in transcription of cell wall remodelling genes of the host plant. Expression of particular classes of CAZy genes and the triggering of host defence and particular metabolic pathways are consistent with the necrotrophic lifestyle of L. biglobosa 'canadensis', and the hemibiotrophic life style of L. maculans 'brassicae'.

  9. Growth performance and preference studies to evaluate solvent-extracted Brassica napus or Brassica juncea canola meal fed to weaned pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landero, J L; Beltranena, E; Zijlstra, R T

    2012-12-01

    Inclusion of conventional dark-seeded (Brassica napus) and novel yellow-seeded (Brassica juncea) canola meal (CM) can potentially replace soybean (Glycine max) meal (SBM) in pig diets. Our objective was to examine the preference of weaned pigs fed diets containing SBM or B. napus or B. juncea CM and to compare it against previously reported growth performance data (Exp. 1 and 2). In Exp. 1 and 2, growth performance was evaluated using 220 and 240 weaned pigs, respectively, by replacing dietary SBM with up to 20% B. napus (Exp. 1) or 24% B. juncea CM (Exp. 2). Feeding up to 20% B. napus CM to pigs did not affect growth performance, but increasing inclusion of B. juncea CM linearly reduced (P < 0.001) ADFI, ADG, and G:F most likely due to the higher content of glucosinolates, particularly gluconapin in B. juncea CM as confirmed by principle component analysis. In Exp. 3 and 4, SBM and B. napus and B. juncea CM fed at 20% dietary inclusion were evaluated in 2 preference studies using 216 and 144 pigs of 35 d of age, respectively. Pens equipped with 2 feeders housed 8 or 4 pigs per pen, in Exp. 3 and 4, respectively. Diets formulated to equal NE and standardized ileal digestible AA were offered in a paired choice as mash (Exp. 3) or pellets (Exp. 4) for 3 consecutive 7-d periods (3 d nontest and 4 d preference test). The 3 treatments offered were (i) SBM vs. B. napus CM, (ii) SBM vs. B. juncea CM, and (iii) B. napus vs. B. juncea CM. Pigs preferred SBM (P < 0.001) over B. napus and B. juncea CM diets, and pigs preferred B. napus (P < 0.001) over B. juncea CM diet. High content of the glucosinolate gluconapin likely reduced feed preference in B. juncea more than in B. napus CM. In conclusion, the contrast between preference and performance studies feeding CM to pigs indicates that preference studies should be interpreted cautiously until validated by growth performance data.

  10. A Complex Recombination Pattern in the Genome of Allotetraploid Brassica napus as Revealed by a High-Density Genetic Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Bin; Fan, Chuchuan; Edwards, David; Batley, Jacqueline; Zhou, Yongming

    2014-01-01

    Polyploidy plays a crucial role in plant evolution. Brassica napus (2n = 38, AACC), the most important oil crop in the Brassica genus, is an allotetraploid that originated through natural doubling of chromosomes after the hybridization of its progenitor species, B. rapa (2n = 20, AA) and B. oleracea (2n = 18, CC). A better understanding of the evolutionary relationship between B. napus and B. rapa, B. oleracea, as well as Arabidopsis, which has a common ancestor with these three species, will provide valuable information about the generation and evolution of allopolyploidy. Based on a high-density genetic map with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, we performed a comparative genomic analysis of B. napus with Arabidopsis and its progenitor species B. rapa and B. oleracea. Based on the collinear relationship of B. rapa and B. oleracea in the B. napus genetic map, the B. napus genome was found to consist of 70.1% of the skeleton components of the chromosomes of B. rapa and B. oleracea, with 17.7% of sequences derived from reciprocal translocation between homoeologous chromosomes between the A- and C-genome and 3.6% of sequences derived from reciprocal translocation between non-homologous chromosomes at both intra- and inter-genomic levels. The current study thus provides insights into the formation and evolution of the allotetraploid B. napus genome, which will allow for more accurate transfer of genomic information from B. rapa, B. oleracea and Arabidopsis to B. napus. PMID:25356735

  11. Comparative transcriptome profiling of two Brassica napus cultivars under chromium toxicity and its alleviation by reduced glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Rafaqat A; Ali, Basharat; Cui, Peng; Shen, Enhui; Farooq, Muhammad A; Islam, Faisal; Ali, Shafaqat; Mao, Bizeng; Zhou, Weijun

    2016-11-07

    Chromium (Cr) being multifarious industrial used element, is considered a potential environmental threat. Cr found to be a prospective water and soil pollutant, and thus it is a current area of concern. Oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) is well known as a major source of edible oil around the globe. Due to its higher growth, larger biomass and capability to uptake toxic materials B. napus is considered a potential candidate plant against unfavorable conditions. To date, no study has been done that described the Cr and GSH mechanism at RNA-Seq level. Both digital gene expression (DGE) and transcriptome profile analysis (TPA) approaches had opened new insights to uncover the several number of genes related to Cr stress and GSH alleviating mechanism in two leading cultivars (ZS 758 and Zheda 622) of B. napus plants. Data showed that Cr inhibited KEGG pathways i.e. stilbenoid, diarlyheptanoid and gingerol biosynthesis; limonene and pentose degradation and glutathione metabolism in ZS 758; and ribosome and glucosinolate biosynthesis in Zheda-622. On the other hand, vitamin B6, tryptophan, sulfur, nitrogen and fructose and manose metabolisms were induced in ZS 758, and zeatin biosynthesis, linoleic acid metabolism, arginine and proline metabolism, and alanine, asparate and glutamate metabolism pathways in Zheda 622. Cr increased the TFs that were related to hydralase activity, antioxidant activity, catalytic activity phosphatase and pyrophosphatase activity in ZS 758, and vitamin binding and oxidoreductase activity in Zheda 622. Cr also up-regulated the promising proteins related to intracellular membrane bounded organelles, nitrile hyrdatase activity, cytoskeleton protein binding and stress response. It also uncovered, a novel Cr-responsive protein (CL2535.Contig1_All) that was statistically increased as compared to control and GSH treated plants. Exogenously applied GSH successfully not only recovered the changes in metabolic pathways but also induced cysteine and

  12. Mapping and Identifying a Candidate Gene (Bnmfs for Female-Male Sterility through Whole-Genome Resequencing and RNA-Seq in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changcai Teng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In oilseed crops, carpel and stamen development play vital roles in pollination and rapeseed yield, but the genetic mechanisms underlying carpel and stamen development remain unclear. Herein, a male- and female-sterile mutant was obtained in offspring of a (Brassica napus cv. Qingyou 14 × (Qingyou 14 × B. rapa landrace Dahuang cross. Subsequently, F2–F9 populations were generated through selfing of the heterozygote plants among the progeny of each generation. The male- and female-sterility exhibited stable inheritance in successive generations and was controlled by a recessive gene. The mutant kept the same chromosome number (2n = 38 as B. napus parent but showed abnormal meiosis for male and female. One candidate gene for the sterility was identified by simple sequence repeat (SSR and insertion deletion length polymorphism (InDel markers in F7–F9 plants, and whole-genome resequencing with F8 pools and RNA sequencing with F9 pools. Whole-genome resequencing found three candidate intervals (35.40–35.68, 35.74–35.75, and 45.34–46.45 Mb on chromosome C3 in B. napus and candidate region for Bnmfs was narrowed to approximately 1.11-Mb (45.34–46.45 M by combining SSR and InDel marker analyses with whole-genome resequencing. From transcriptome profiling in 0–2 mm buds, all of the genes in the candidate interval were detected, and only two genes with significant differences (BnaC03g56670D and BnaC03g56870D were revealed. BnaC03g56870D was a candidate gene that shared homology with the CYP86C4 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana. Quantitative reverse transcription (qRT-PCR analysis showed that Bnmfs primarily functioned in flower buds. Thus, sequencing and expression analyses provided evidence that BnaC03g56870D was the candidate gene for male and female sterility in the B. napus mutant.

  13. Tissue-specific distribution of secondary metabolites in rapeseed (Brassica napus L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Fang

    Full Text Available Four different parts, hypocotyl and radicle (HR, inner cotyledon (IC, outer cotyledon (OC, seed coat and endosperm (SE, were sampled from mature rapeseed (Brassica napus L. by laser microdissection. Subsequently, major secondary metabolites, glucosinolates and sinapine, as well as three minor ones, a cyclic spermidine conjugate and two flavonoids, representing different compound categories, were qualified and quantified in dissected samples by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection and mass spectrometry. No qualitative and quantitative difference of glucosinolates and sinapine was detected in embryo tissues (HR, IC and OC. On the other hand, the three minor compounds were observed to be distributed unevenly in different rapeseed tissues. The hypothetic biological functions of the distribution patterns of different secondary metabolites in rapeseed are discussed.

  14. Maghemite Nanoparticles Acts as Nanozymes, Improving Growth and Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmqvist, N. G. Martin; Seisenbaeva, Gulaim A.; Svedlindh, Peter; Kessler, Vadim G.

    2017-12-01

    Yttrium doping-stabilized γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were studied for its potential to serve as a plant fertilizer and, through enzymatic activity, support drought stress management. Levels of both hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxidation, after drought, were reduced when γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were delivered by irrigation in a nutrient solution to Brassica napus plants grown in soil. Hydrogen peroxide was reduced from 151 to 83 μM g-1 compared to control, and the malondialdehyde formation was reduced from 36 to 26 mM g-1. Growth rate of leaves was enhanced from 33 to 50% growth compared to fully fertilized plants and SPAD-measurements of chlorophyll increased from 47 to 52 suggesting improved agronomic properties by use of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles as fertilizer as compared to chelated iron.

  15. [Obtaining and analysis of intergeneric somatic hybrids between Brassica napus and "albino" line of Orychophragmus violaceus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilenko, M Iu; Komarnitskiĭ, I K; Sakhno, L A; Gleba, Iu Iu; Kuchuk, N V

    2003-01-01

    The Orychophragmus violaceus chlorophylldefective line of "albino" type has been obtained by spectinomycin treatment. Somatic hybridization between Orychophragmus violaceus and Brassica napus was performed by fusion of green mesophyll protoplasts of rape and callus protoplasts of the O. violaceus "albino" line. Near two hundred of regenerant plants were selected according to the regeneration type and ability to become green, and were determined as hybrids. Chloroplast DNA in selected hybrids was identical to rape chlDNA, which was confirmed by the PCR-RFLP analysis of plastid DNA fragments. Fragments of hybrid mitochondrial DNA analyzed by the PCR-RFLP analysis were identical to fragments of O. violaceus. The nuclear genome of the majority of hybrids was represented by the O. violaceus genome, which was demonstrated by analyses of isoenzymes, DNA telomeric sequences, ribosomal and satellite DNAs, and the RAPD analysis. The cytogenetic analysis of a number of lines has shown variability in the number of chromosomes in the obtained lines.

  16. Phytoextraction of heavy metals by canola (Brassica napus) and radish (Raphanus sativus) grown on multicontaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchiol, L.; Assolari, S.; Sacco, P.; Zerbi, G

    2004-11-01

    Phytoextraction can provide an effective in situ technique for removing heavy metals from polluted soils. The experiment reported in this paper was undertaken to study the basic potential of phytoextraction of Brassica napus (canola) and Raphanus sativus (radish) grown on a multi-metal contaminated soil in the framework of a pot-experiment. Chlorophyll contents and gas exchanges were measured during the experiment; the heavy metal phytoextraction efficiency of canola and radish were also determined and the phytoextraction coefficient for each metal calculated. Data indicated that both species are moderately tolerant to heavy metals and that radish is more so than canola. These species showed relatively low phytoremediation potential of multicontaminated soils. They could possibly be used with success in marginally polluted soils where their growth would not be impaired and the extraction of heavy metals could be maintained at satisfying levels.

  17. The use of protein patterns in genetic diversity analysis in some Brassica napus cultivars

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    Roya Razavizadeh

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, protein variations of seeds and five-day old cotyledonal leaves of four selected Brassica napus cultivars including Elite, Ocapy, Tasilo and Zarfam were analyzed by SDS-PAGE to identify protein markers. The amount of total soluble protein of seed storage proteins did not show significant differences in all cultivars whereas it was different in cotyledonal leaves. Protein patterns of seeds and cotyledonal leaves showed significant differences using SDS-PAGE and consequence analysis of bands by ImageJ program. Relative expression of six protein bands in seeds and five-day old cotyledonal leaves were significantly different. Three protein markers were identified by protein patterns of seed and cotyledonal leaves. The results of relationship analysis based on presence and absence of the specific protein bands in protein pattern of seed storage proteins showed that Tasilo and Elite cultivars had the highest similarities.

  18. Sugar Accumulation and its Regulation by Jasmonic Acid in Brassica napus L. under Salt Stress

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    Harpreet Kaur

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The effects of Jasmonic acid (JA on sugar accumulation and protein content in 12-days old Brassica napus L. seedlings were studied. The seeds pre-treated with different concentrations of jasmonic acid were germinated in Petriplates supplied with various concentrations of salt stress (NaCl. The contents of total chlorophyll, total sugars, reducing sugars, non-reducing sugars, total carbohydrates and total protein content of 12-days old seedlings were analysed. It was observed that JA reduced the toxicity of salt stress on seedling growth by influencing the chlorophyll content and protein content. Pre-treatment of jasmonic acid was found to be significantly effective in increasing the contents of sugars.

  19. A candidate gene-based association study of tocopherol content and composition in rapeseed (Brassica napus

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    Steffi eFritsche

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Rapeseed (Brassica napus L. is the most important oil crop of temperate climates. Rapeseed oil contains tocopherols, also known as vitamin E, which is an indispensable nutrient for humans and animals due to its antioxidant and radical scavenging abilities. Moreover, tocopherols are also important for the oxidative stability of vegetable oils. Therefore, seed oil with increased tocopherol content or altered tocopherol composition is a target for breeding. We investigated the role of nucleotide variations within candidate genes from the tocopherol biosynthesis pathway. Field trials were carried out with 229 accessions from a worldwide B. napus collection which was divided into two panels of 96 and 133 accessions. Seed tocopherol content and composition were measured by HPLC. High heritabilities were found for both traits, ranging from 0.62 to 0.94. We identified polymorphisms by sequencing selected regions of the tocopherol genes from the 96 accession panel. Subsequently, we determined the population structure (Q and relative kinship (K as detected by genotyping with genome-wide distributed SSR markers. Association studies were performed using two models, the structure-based GLM+Q and the PK mixed model. Between 26 and 12 polymorphisms within two genes (BnaX.VTE3.a, BnaA.PDS1.c were significantly associated with tocopherol traits. The SNPs explained up to 16.93 % of the genetic variance for tocopherol composition and up to 10.48 % for total tocopherol content. Based on the sequence information we designed CAPS markers for genotyping the 133 accessions from the 2nd panel. Significant associations with various tocopherol traits confirmed the results from the first experiment. We demonstrate that the polymorphisms within the tocopherol genes clearly impact tocopherol content and composition in B. napus seeds. We suggest that these nucleotide variations may be used as selectable markers for breeding rapeseed with enhanced tocopherol quality.

  20. Substoichiometrically different mitotypes coexist in mitochondrial genomes of Brassica napus L.

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    Jianmei Chen

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS has been identified in numerous plant species. Brassica napus CMS plants, such as Polima (pol, MI, and Shaan 2A, have been identified independently by different researchers with different materials in conventional breeding processes. How this kind of CMS emerges is unclear. Here, we report the mitochondrial genome sequence of the prevalent mitotype in the most widely used pol-CMS line, which has a length of 223,412 bp and encodes 34 proteins, 3 ribosomal RNAs, and 18 tRNAs, including two near identical copies of trnH. Of these 55 genes, 48 were found to be identical to their equivalents in the "nap" cytoplasm. The nap mitotype carries only one copy of trnH, and the sequences of five of the six remaining genes are highly similar to their equivalents in the pol mitotype. Forty-four open reading frames (ORFs with unknown function were detected, including two unique to the pol mitotype (orf122 and orf132. At least five rearrangement events are required to account for the structural differences between the pol and nap sequences. The CMS-related orf224 neighboring region (∼5 kb rearranged twice. PCR profiling based on mitotype-specific primer pairs showed that both mitotypes are present in B. napus cultivars. Quantitative PCR showed that the pol cytoplasm consists mainly of the pol mitotype, and the nap mitotype is the main genome of nap cytoplasm. Large variation in the copy number ratio of mitotypes was found, even among cultivars sharing the same cytoplasm. The coexistence of mitochondrial mitotypes and substoichiometric shifting can explain the emergence of CMS in B. napus.

  1. Glyphosate drift promotes changes in fitness and transgene gene flow in canola (Brassica napus) and hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londo, Jason P.; Bautista, Nonnatus S.; Sagers, Cynthia L.; Lee, E. Henry; Watrud, Lidia S.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims With the advent of transgenic crops, genetically modified, herbicide-resistant Brassica napus has become a model system for examining the risks and potential ecological consequences of escape of transgenes from cultivation into wild compatible species. Escaped transgenic feral B. napus and hybrids with compatible weedy species have been identified outside of agriculture and without the apparent selection for herbicide resistance. However, herbicide (glyphosate) exposure can extend beyond crop field boundaries, and a drift-level of herbicide could function as a selective agent contributing to increased persistence of transgenes in the environment. Methods The effects of a drift level (0·1 × the field application rate) of glyphosate herbicide and varied levels of plant competition were examined on plant fitness-associated traits and gene flow in a simulated field plot, common garden experiment. Plants included transgenic, glyphosate-resistant B. napus, its weedy ancestor B. rapa, and hybrid and advanced generations derived from them. Key Results The results of this experiment demonstrate reductions in reproductive fitness for non-transgenic genotypes and a contrasting increase in plant fitness for transgenic genotypes as a result of glyphosate-drift treatments. Results also suggest that a drift level of glyphosate spray may influence the movement of transgenes among transgenic crops and weeds and alter the processes of hybridization and introgression in non-agronomic habitats by impacting flowering phenology and pollen availability within the community. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate the potential for persistence of glyphosate resistance transgenes in weedy plant communities due to the effect of glyphosate spray drift on plant fitness. Additionally, glyphosate drift has the potential to change the gene-flow dynamics between compatible transgenic crops and weeds, simultaneously reducing direct introgression into weedy species

  2. Transformation of LTP gene into Brassica napus to enhance its resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Y; Du, K; Gao, Y; Kong, Y; Chu, C; Sokolov, V; Wang, Y

    2013-04-01

    Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) is one of the most important economic crops worldwide, and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is the most dangerous disease that affects its yield greatly. Lipid transfer protein (LTP) has broad-spectrum anti-bacterial and fungal activities. In this study, B. napus was transformed using Agrobacterium tumefaciens harboring the plasmid-containing LTP gene to study its possible capability of increasing plant's resistance. First, we optimized the petiole genetic transformation system by adjusting the days of explants, bacterial concentrations, ratio of hormones, and cultivating condition. Second, we obtained 8 positive plants by PCR analysis of T0 generation. The PCR results of T1 generation were positive, indicating that the LTP gene had been integrated into B. napus. Third, T1 transgenic plants inoculated by detached leaves with mycelia of S. sclerotiorum showed better disease resistance than non-transformants. Oxalic acid belongs to secondary metabolites of S. sclerotiorum, and several studies have demonstrated that the resistance of rapeseed to oxalic acid is significantly consistent with its resistance to S. sclerotiorum. The result from the seed germination assay showed that when T1 seeds were exposed to oxalic acid stress, their germination rate was evidently higher than that of non-transformant seeds. In addition, we measured some physiological changes in T1 plants and control plants under oxalic acid stress. The results showed that T1 transgenic plants had lower malondialdehyde (MDA) content, higher super oxide dismutase (SOD), and peroxidase (POD) activities than non-transformants, whereas disease resistance was related to low MDA content and high SOD and POD activities.

  3. Decreased seed oil production in FUSCA3 Brassica napus mutant plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, Nosheen; Duncan, Robert W; Stasolla, Claudio

    2015-11-01

    Canola (Brassica napus L.) oil is extensively utilized for human consumption and industrial applications. Among the genes regulating seed development and participating in oil accumulation is FUSCA3 (FUS3), a member of the plant-specific B3-domain family of transcription factors. To evaluate the role of this gene during seed storage deposition, three BnFUSCA3 (BnFUS3) TILLING mutants were generated. Mutations occurring downstream of the B3 domain reduced silique number and repressed seed oil level resulting in increased protein content in developing seeds. BnFUS3 mutant seeds also had increased levels of linoleic acid, possibly due to the reduced expression of ω-3 FA DESATURASE (FAD3). These observed phenotypic alterations were accompanied by the decreased expression of genes encoding transcription factors stimulating fatty acid (FA) synthesis: LEAFY COTYLEDON1 and 2 (LEC1 and 2) ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE 3 (BnABI3) and WRINKLED1 (WRI1). Additionally, expression of genes encoding enzymes involved in sucrose metabolism, glycolysis, and FA modifications were down-regulated in developing seeds of the mutant plants. Collectively, these transcriptional changes support altered sucrose metabolism and reduced glycolytic activity, diminishing the carbon pool available for the synthesis of FA and ultimately seed oil production. Based on these observations, it is suggested that targeted manipulations of BnFUS3 can be used as a tool to influence oil accumulation in the economically important species B. napus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic Diversity in Commercial Rapeseed (Brassica napus L. Varieties from Turkey as Revealed by RAPD

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    Özlem ÖZBEK

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In cultivated commercial crop species, genetic diversity tends to decrease because of the extensive breeding processes. Therefore, germplasm of commercial crop species, such as Brassica napus L. should be evaluated and the genotypes, which have higher genetic diversity index, should be addressed as potential parental cross materials in breeding programs. In this study, the genetic diversity was analysed by using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis (RAPD technique in nine Turkish commercial rapeseed varieties. The RAPD primers (10-mer oligonucleotides produced 51 scorable loci, 31 loci of which were polymorphic (60.78% and 20 loci (39.22% were monomorphic The RAPD bands were scored as binary matrix data and were analysed using POPGENE version 1.32. At locus level, the values of genetic diversity within population (Hs and total (HT were 0.15 and 0.19 respectively. The genetic differentiation (GST and the gene flow (Nm values between the populations were 0.20 and 2.05 respectively. The mean number of alleles (na, the mean number of effective alleles (nae, and the mean value of genetic diversity (He were 2.00, 1.26, and 0.19 respectively. According to Pearson’s correlation, multiple regression and principal component analyses, eco-geographical conditions in combination had significant effect on genetic indices of commercial B. napus L. varieties were discussed.

  5. Studies of the floral biology and reproductive system of Brassica napus L.(Cruciferae

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    Rosilda Mara Mussury

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of the floral biology of canola were accomplished with the objective of enlarging the system and reproductive strategies knowledge of its CTC-4 cultivar in Dourados, Centerwest, Brazil. Brassica napus is self pollinated, presenting however, many resources for the allogamy accomplishment, e.g., abundant pollen, nectar and scent production. The smaller anther were responsible for the production of fruit with smaller and less growth seeds, when compared to the autogamy, autopollination and cross pollination tests.Os estudos da biologia floral da Canola (cultivar CTC-4, objetivando o conhecimento do sistema reprodutivo e de suas estratégias reprodutivas foram realizados em Dourados-MS. B. napus é autopolinizada, apresentando no entanto, muitos recursos para realização de alogamia, como por exemplo pólen abundante, néctar e odor. As anteras menores foram responsáveis pela produção de frutos com sementes de vigor inferior, quando comparadas aos testes de autogamia, polinização natural e cruzada.

  6. Root morphology and seed and leaf ionomic traits in a Brassica napus L. diversity panel show wide phenotypic variation and are characteristic of crop habit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C L; Alcock, T D; Graham, N S; Hayden, R; Matterson, S; Wilson, L; Young, S D; Dupuy, L X; White, P J; Hammond, J P; Danku, J M C; Salt, D E; Sweeney, A; Bancroft, I; Broadley, M R

    2016-10-04

    Mineral nutrient uptake and utilisation by plants are controlled by many traits relating to root morphology, ion transport, sequestration and translocation. The aims of this study were to determine the phenotypic diversity in root morphology and leaf and seed mineral composition of a polyploid crop species, Brassica napus L., and how these traits relate to crop habit. Traits were quantified in a diversity panel of up to 387 genotypes: 163 winter, 127 spring, and seven semiwinter oilseed rape (OSR) habits, 35 swede, 15 winter fodder, and 40 exotic/unspecified habits. Root traits of 14 d old seedlings were measured in a 'pouch and wick' system (n = ~24 replicates per genotype). The mineral composition of 3-6 rosette-stage leaves, and mature seeds, was determined on compost-grown plants from a designed experiment (n = 5) by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Seed size explained a large proportion of the variation in root length. Winter OSR and fodder habits had longer primary and lateral roots than spring OSR habits, with generally lower mineral concentrations. A comparison of the ratios of elements in leaf and seed parts revealed differences in translocation processes between crop habits, including those likely to be associated with crop-selection for OSR seeds with lower sulphur-containing glucosinolates. Combining root, leaf and seed traits in a discriminant analysis provided the most accurate characterisation of crop habit, illustrating the interdependence of plant tissues. High-throughput morphological and composition phenotyping reveals complex interrelationships between mineral acquisition and accumulation linked to genetic control within and between crop types (habits) in B. napus. Despite its recent genetic ancestry (morphology, and leaf and seed composition traits could potentially be used in crop improvement, if suitable markers can be identified and if these correspond with suitable agronomy and quality traits.

  7. Enhanced Seed Oil Production in Canola by Conditional Expression of Brassica napus LEAFY COTYLEDON1 and LEC1-LIKE in Developing Seeds1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Helin; Yang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Fengxia; Zheng, Xiu; Qu, Cunmin; Mu, Jinye; Fu, Fuyou; Li, Jiana; Guan, Rongzhan; Zhang, Hongsheng; Wang, Guodong; Zuo, Jianru

    2011-01-01

    The seed oil content in oilseed crops is a major selection trait to breeders. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1) and LEC1-LIKE (L1L) are key regulators of fatty acid biosynthesis. Overexpression of AtLEC1 and its orthologs in canola (Brassica napus), BnLEC1 and BnL1L, causes an increased fatty acid level in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, which, however, also show severe developmental abnormalities. Here, we use truncated napin A promoters, which retain the seed-specific expression pattern but with a reduced expression level, to drive the expression of BnLEC1 and BnL1L in transgenic canola. Conditional expression of BnLEC1 and BnL1L increases the seed oil content by 2% to 20% and has no detrimental effects on major agronomic traits. In the transgenic canola, expression of a subset of genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and glycolysis is up-regulated in developing seeds. Moreover, the BnLEC1 transgene enhances the expression of several genes involved in Suc synthesis and transport in developing seeds and the silique wall. Consistently, the accumulation of Suc and Fru is increased in developing seeds of the transgenic rapeseed, suggesting the increased carbon flux to fatty acid biosynthesis. These results demonstrate that BnLEC1 and BnL1L are reliable targets for genetic improvement of rapeseed in seed oil production. PMID:21562329

  8. Enhanced seed oil production in canola by conditional expression of Brassica napus LEAFY COTYLEDON1 and LEC1-LIKE in developing seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Helin; Yang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Fengxia; Zheng, Xiu; Qu, Cunmin; Mu, Jinye; Fu, Fuyou; Li, Jiana; Guan, Rongzhan; Zhang, Hongsheng; Wang, Guodong; Zuo, Jianru

    2011-07-01

    The seed oil content in oilseed crops is a major selection trait to breeders. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1) and LEC1-LIKE (L1L) are key regulators of fatty acid biosynthesis. Overexpression of AtLEC1 and its orthologs in canola (Brassica napus), BnLEC1 and BnL1L, causes an increased fatty acid level in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, which, however, also show severe developmental abnormalities. Here, we use truncated napin A promoters, which retain the seed-specific expression pattern but with a reduced expression level, to drive the expression of BnLEC1 and BnL1L in transgenic canola. Conditional expression of BnLEC1 and BnL1L increases the seed oil content by 2% to 20% and has no detrimental effects on major agronomic traits. In the transgenic canola, expression of a subset of genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and glycolysis is up-regulated in developing seeds. Moreover, the BnLEC1 transgene enhances the expression of several genes involved in Suc synthesis and transport in developing seeds and the silique wall. Consistently, the accumulation of Suc and Fru is increased in developing seeds of the transgenic rapeseed, suggesting the increased carbon flux to fatty acid biosynthesis. These results demonstrate that BnLEC1 and BnL1L are reliable targets for genetic improvement of rapeseed in seed oil production.

  9. Identification and characterization of plant-specific NAC gene family in canola (Brassica napus L.) reveal novel members involved in cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Boya; Guo, Xiaohua; Wang, Chen; Ma, Jieyu; Niu, Fangfang; Zhang, Hanfeng; Yang, Bo; Liang, Wanwan; Han, Feng; Jiang, Yuan-Qing

    2015-03-01

    NAC transcription factors are plant-specific and play important roles in plant development processes, response to biotic and abiotic cues and hormone signaling. However, to date, little is known about the NAC genes in canola (or oilseed rape, Brassica napus L.). In this study, a total of 60 NAC genes were identified from canola through a systematical analysis and mining of expressed sequence tags. Among these, the cDNA sequences of 41 NAC genes were successfully cloned. The translated protein sequences of canola NAC genes with the NAC genes from representative species were phylogenetically clustered into three major groups and multiple subgroups. The transcriptional activities of these BnaNAC proteins were assayed in yeast. In addition, by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, we further observed that some of these BnaNACs were regulated by different hormone stimuli or abiotic stresses. Interestingly, we successfully identified two novel BnaNACs, BnaNAC19 and BnaNAC82, which could elicit hypersensitive response-like cell death when expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, which was mediated by accumulation of reactive oxygen species. Overall, our work has laid a solid foundation for further characterization of this important NAC gene family in canola.

  10. Whole-Genome Identification and Expression Pattern of the Vicinal Oxygen Chelate Family in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu; Wan, Neng; Cheng, Zao; Mo, Yufeng; Liu, Baolin; Liu, Hui; Raboanatahiry, Nadia; Yin, Yongtai; Li, Maoteng

    2017-01-01

    Vicinal oxygen chelate proteins (VOC) are members of the metalloenzyme superfamily, which plays roles in many biological reactions. Some members of the VOC superfamily have been systematically characterized but not in Brassica napus. In this study, 38 VOC genes were identified based on their conserved domains. The present results revealed that most of the BnaVOC genes have few introns, and all contained the typical VOC structure of βαβββ modules. The BnaVOC genes are distributed unevenly across 15 chromosomes in B. napus and occur as gene clusters on chromosomes C5 and A6. The synteny and phylogenetic analyses revealed that the VOC gene family is a consequence of mesopolyploidy events that occurred in Brassica evolution, and whole-genome duplication and segmental duplication played a major role in the expansion of the BnaVOC gene family. The expression profile analysis indicated that the expression of most BnaVOCs was increased in the leaves and late stage seeds. Further results indicated that seeds of B. napus with a high oil content show higher expression levels under drought stress conditions, suggesting that BnaVOCs not only respond to abiotic stress but may also affect lipid metabolism in drought stress. This present study provides a comprehensive overview of the VOC gene family and provides new insights into their biological function in B. napus evolution. PMID:28536594

  11. Genome-wide association study reveals the genetic architecture of flowering time in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liping; Hu, Kaining; Zhang, Zhenqian; Guan, Chunyun; Chen, Song; Hua, Wei; Li, Jiana; Wen, Jing; Yi, Bin; Shen, Jinxiong; Ma, Chaozhi; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong

    2016-02-01

    Flowering time adaptation is a major breeding goal in the allopolyploid species Brassica napus. To investigate the genetic architecture of flowering time, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of flowering time was conducted with a diversity panel comprising 523 B. napus cultivars and inbred lines grown in eight different environments. Genotyping was performed with a Brassica 60K Illumina Infinium SNP array. A total of 41 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed on 14 chromosomes were found to be associated with flowering time, and 12 SNPs located in the confidence intervals of quantitative trait loci (QTL) identified in previous researches based on linkage analyses. Twenty-five candidate genes were orthologous to Arabidopsis thaliana flowering genes. To further our understanding of the genetic factors influencing flowering time in different environments, GWAS was performed on two derived traits, environment sensitivity and temperature sensitivity. The most significant SNPs were found near Bn-scaff_16362_1-p380982, just 13 kb away from BnaC09g41990D, which is orthologous to A. thaliana CONSTANS (CO), an important gene in the photoperiod flowering pathway. These results provide new insights into the genetic control of flowering time in B. napus and indicate that GWAS is an effective method by which to reveal natural variations of complex traits in B. napus. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  12. TRANSGENIC PLANTS OF RAPE (BRASSICA NAPUS L. WITH GENE OSMYB4 HAVE INCREASED RESISTANCE TO SALTS OF HEAVY METALS

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    Raldugina G.N.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to study the response of the transgenic spring rape plants (Brassica napus L. var. ‘Westar’ with the rice transfactor-encoding gene Osmyb4 to treatment with salts of heavy metals (HM CuSO4 or ZnSO4 and accumulation in the leaves of biomass, metals, photosynthetic pigments, lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant compounds: total phenols, anthocyanins, and antioxidant enzyme activity superoxide dismutase (SOD and guaiacol peroxidase (POX were determined. Vegetatively propagated transgenic plants and wild-type plants were grown on Hoagland-Snyder medium at 24°C, then at the 5-6th leaves-stage, CuSO4 (in concentration 25-150 mM or ZnSO4 (500 - 5000 mM were added to the growth medium, and plants were exposed to the salts for 15 days. Under the action of small concentrations of salts, the results obtained for the transgenic and untransformed plants did not differ, but at high concentrations strong differences between transgenic and untransformed plants were observed. In transgenic plants, accumulation of biomass was greater. Carotene and xanthophyll were destroyed in transgenic plants less than in the untransformed plants. They have accumulated in their leaves more metal, especially Zn, reaching almost to the accumulation of 7 mg per g of dry biomass, bringing these plants to the hyperaccumulation of Zn. In the tissues of transgenic plants exposed to high concentrations of salts, the content of total phenols, anthocyanins, and low molecular weight compounds, that are responsible for protection against ROS, increased significantly. All these results indicate a greater stability of the transgenic plants to the action of heavy metals, as evidenced also by less activity of lipid peroxidases in their tissue: at high salt concentrations, malondialdehyde (MDA accumulated significantly less in transgenic plants than in non-transformed plant tissues. The greater stability of transgenic plants to stressful effect of HM is also evidenced by the

  13. GWAS, QTL mapping and gene expression analyses in Brassica napus reveal genetic control of branching morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yajun; Wu, Daoming; Wei, Dayong; Fu, Ying; Cui, Yixin; Dong, Hongli; Tan, Chuandong; Qian, Wei

    2017-11-21

    Branch number is an important trait in plant architecture that can influence crop yield and quality in Brassica napus. Here, we detected the QTLs responsible for branch number in a DH population and its reconstructed F2 population over two years. Further, a GWAS research on branch number was performed using a panel of 327 accessions with 33186 genomic SNPs from the 60 K Brassica Illumina® Infinium SNP array. Through combining linkage analysis and association mapping, a new QTL was fine mapped onto C03. Subsequently, we tested the correlations between the SNP polymorphisms and mRNA expression levels of genes in the target interval to identify potential loci or genes that control branch number through expression. The results show that 4 SNP loci are associated with the corresponding gene expression levels, and one locus (BnaC03g63480D) exhibited a significant correlation between the phenotype variation and gene expression levels. Our results provide insights into the genetic basis for branching morphogenesis and may be valuable for optimizing architecture in rapeseed breeding.

  14. DNA Methylation Alterations at 5'-CCGG Sites in the Interspecific and Intraspecific Hybridizations Derived from Brassica rapa and B. napus.

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    Wanshan Xiong

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is an important regulatory mechanism for gene expression that involved in the biological processes of development and differentiation in plants. To investigate the association of DNA methylation with heterosis in Brassica, a set of intraspecific hybrids in Brassica rapa and B. napus and interspecific hybrids between B. rapa and B. napus, together with parental lines, were used to monitor alterations in cytosine methylation at 5'-CCGG sites in seedlings and buds by methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism analysis. The methylation status of approximately a quarter of the methylation sites changed between seedlings and buds. These alterations were related closely to the genomic structure and heterozygous status among accessions. The methylation status in the majority of DNA methylation sites detected in hybrids was the same as that in at least one of the parental lines in both seedlings and buds. However, the association between patterns of cytosine methylation and heterosis varied among different traits and between tissues in hybrids of Brassica, although a few methylation loci were associated with heterosis. Our data suggest that changes in DNA methylation at 5'-CCGG sites are not associated simply with heterosis in the interspecific and intraspecific hybridizations derived from B. rapa and B. napus.

  15. SeqEnrich: A tool to predict transcription factor networks from co-expressed Arabidopsis and Brassica napus gene sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Michael G; Walker, Philip L; Pulgar-Vidal, Nadège C; Belmonte, Mark F

    2017-01-01

    Transcription factors and their associated DNA binding sites are key regulatory elements of cellular differentiation, development, and environmental response. New tools that predict transcriptional regulation of biological processes are valuable to researchers studying both model and emerging-model plant systems. SeqEnrich predicts transcription factor networks from co-expressed Arabidopsis or Brassica napus gene sets. The networks produced by SeqEnrich are supported by existing literature and predicted transcription factor-DNA interactions that can be functionally validated at the laboratory bench. The program functions with gene sets of varying sizes and derived from diverse tissues and environmental treatments. SeqEnrich presents as a powerful predictive framework for the analysis of Arabidopsis and Brassica napus co-expression data, and is designed so that researchers at all levels can easily access and interpret predicted transcriptional circuits. The program outperformed its ancestral program ChipEnrich, and produced detailed transcription factor networks from Arabidopsis and Brassica napus gene expression data. The SeqEnrich program is ideal for generating new hypotheses and distilling biological information from large-scale expression data.

  16. Different timing and spatial separation of parental chromosomes in intergeneric somatic hybrids between Brassica napus and Orychophragmus violaceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, L; Zhao, Z G; Ge, X H; Li, Z Y

    2014-04-08

    Experimental and newly formed hybrids and polyploids generated by wide crosses usually show varying degrees of cytological instability. The spatial separation of parental genomes and uniparental chromosome elimination in hybrid cells has been reported in many hybrids from plants and animals. Herein, the behavior of parental genomes in intergeneric somatic hybrids between Brassica napus and Orychophragmus violaceus was analyzed using genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). In mitotic and meiotic cells, the chromosomes from O. violaceus were distinguished from B. napus by their larger size and staining patterns. In interphase nuclei of the hybrid, O. violaceus-labeled chromatin appeared as large heterochromatic blocks that were nonrandomly distributed at prophase, typically distributed toward one side of the nucleus. In pollen mother cells at prophase I of meiosis, O. violaceus chromosomes appeared as one or two deeply stained chromatin blocks that resolved into bivalents at a late stage, after bivalents from B. napus were visible. Thereafter, bivalents of O. violaceus congressed to the equatorial plate and segregated at anaphase I after those from B. napus. The different behavior of O. violaceus chromosomes in the hybrids indicates that they have differential condensation states at interphase and progress later through the cell cycle and meiosis than B. napus chromosomes. This difference in behavior may restrict or prevent the formation of bivalents of mixed genome origin. Differential gene expression of parental alleles including rDNA loci may contribute to their distinct cytological behavior and to the phenotype of hybrids.

  17. Genome-Wide Association and Transcriptome Analyses Reveal Candidate Genes Underlying Yield-determining Traits in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kun; Peng, Liu; Zhang, Chao; Lu, Junhua; Yang, Bo; Xiao, Zhongchun; Liang, Ying; Xu, Xingfu; Qu, Cunmin; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Liezhao; Zhu, Qinlong; Fu, Minglian; Yuan, Xiaoyan; Li, Jiana

    2017-01-01

    Yield is one of the most important yet complex crop traits. To improve our understanding of the genetic basis of yield establishment, and to identify candidate genes responsible for yield improvement in Brassica napus, we performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for seven yield-determining traits [main inflorescence pod number (MIPN), branch pod number (BPN), pod number per plant (PNP), seed number per pod (SPP), thousand seed weight, main inflorescence yield (MIY), and branch yield], using data from 520 diverse B. napus accessions from two different yield environments. In total, we detected 128 significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 93 of which were revealed as novel by integrative analysis. A combination of GWAS and transcriptome sequencing on 21 haplotype blocks from samples pooled by four extremely high-yielding or low-yielding accessions revealed the differential expression of 14 crucial candiate genes (such as Bna.MYB83, Bna.SPL5, and Bna.ROP3) associated with multiple traits or containing multiple SNPs associated with the same trait. Functional annotation and expression pattern analyses further demonstrated that these 14 candiate genes might be important in developmental processes and biomass accumulation, thus affecting the yield establishment of B. napus. These results provide valuable information for understanding the genetic mechanisms underlying the establishment of high yield in B. napus, and lay the foundation for developing high-yielding B. napus varieties.

  18. Population genomic analysis reveals differential evolutionary histories and patterns of diversity across subgenomes and subpopulations of Brassica napus L.

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    Elodie eGazave

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The allotetraploid species Brassica napus L. is a global crop of major economic importance, providing canola oil (seed and vegetables for human consumption and fodder and meal for livestock feed. Characterizing the genetic diversity present in the extant germplasm pool of B. napus is fundamental to better conserve, manage and utilize the genetic resources of this species. We used sequence-based genotyping to identify and genotype 30,881 SNPs in a diversity panel of 782 B. napus accessions, representing samples of winter and spring growth habits originating from 33 countries across Europe, Asia and America. We detected strong population structure broadly concordant with growth habit and geography, and identified three major genetic groups: spring (SP, winter Europe (WE, and winter Asia (WA. Subpopulation-specific polymorphism patterns suggest enriched genetic diversity within the WA group and a smaller effective breeding population for the SP group compared to WE. Interestingly, the two subgenomes of B. napus appear to have different geographic origins, with phylogenetic analysis placing WE and WA as basal clades for the other subpopulations in the C and A subgenomes, respectively. Finally, we identified 16 genomic regions where the patterns of diversity differed markedly from the genome-wide average, several of which are suggestive of genomic inversions. The results obtained in this study constitute a valuable resource for worldwide breeding efforts and the genetic dissection and prediction of complex B. napus traits.

  19. Genome-wide analysis of the auxin/indoleacetic acid (Aux/IAA) gene family in allotetraploid rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

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    Li, Haitao; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Qinghua; Wang, Jing; King, Graham J; Liu, Kede

    2017-11-16

    Auxin/Indoleacetic acid (Aux/IAA) genes participate in the auxin signaling pathway and play key roles in plant growth and development. Although the Aux/IAA gene family has been identified in many plants, within allotetraploid Brassica napus little is known. In this study, a total of 119 Aux/IAA genes were found in the genome of B. napus. They were distributed non-randomly across all 19 chromosomes and other non-anchored random scaffolds, with a symmetric distribution in the A and C subgenomes. Evolutionary and comparative analysis revealed that 111 (94.1%) B. napus Aux/IAA genes were multiplied due to ancestral Brassica genome triplication and recent allotetraploidy from B. rapa and B. oleracea. Phylogenetic analysis indicated seven subgroups containing 29 orthologous gene sets and two Brassica-specific gene sets. Structures of genes and proteins varied across different genes but were conserved among homologous genes in B. napus. Furthermore, analysis of transcriptional profiles revealed that the expression patterns of Aux/IAA genes in B. napus were tissue dependent. Auxin-responsive elements tend to be distributed in the proximal region of promoters, and are significantly associated with early exogenous auxin up-regulation. Members of the Aux/IAA gene family were identified and analyzed comprehensively in the allotetraploid B. napus genome. This analysis provides a deeper understanding of diversification of the Aux/IAA gene family and will facilitate further dissection of Aux/IAA gene function in B. napus.

  20. Identification of QTLs for Resistance to Sclerotinia Stem Rot and BnaC.IGMT5.a as a Candidate Gene of the Major Resistant QTL SRC6 in Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Cai, Guangqin; Tu, Jiangying; Li, Lixia; Liu, Sheng; Luo, Xinping; Zhou, Lipeng; Fan, Chuchuan; Zhou, Yongming

    2013-01-01

    Stem rot caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in many important dicotyledonous crops, including oilseed rape (Brassica napus), is one of the most devastating fungal diseases and imposes huge yield loss each year worldwide. Currently, breeding for Sclerotinia resistance in B. napus, as in other crops, can only rely on germplasms with quantitative resistance genes. Thus, the identification of quantitative trait locus (QTL) for S. sclerotiorum resistance/tolerance in this crop holds immediate promise for the genetic improvement of the disease resistance. In this study, ten QTLs for stem resistance (SR) at the mature plant stage and three QTLs for leaf resistance (LR) at the seedling stage in multiple environments were mapped on nine linkage groups (LGs) of a whole genome map for B. napus constructed with SSR markers. Two major QTLs, LRA9 on LG A9 and SRC6 on LG C6, were repeatedly detected across all environments and explained 8.54–15.86% and 29.01%–32.61% of the phenotypic variations, respectively. Genotypes containing resistant SRC6 or LRA9 allele showed a significant reduction in disease lesion after pathogen infection. Comparative mapping with Arabidopsis and data mining from previous gene profiling experiments identified that the Arabidopsis homologous gene of IGMT5 (At1g76790) was related to the SRC6 locus. Four copies of the IGMT5 gene in B. napus were isolated through homologous cloning, among which, only BnaC.IGMT5.a showed a polymorphism between parental lines and can be associated with the SRC6. Furthermore, two parental lines exhibited a differential expression pattern of the BnaC.IGMT5.a gene in responding to pathogen inoculation. Thus, our data suggested that BnaC.IGMT5.a was very likely a candidate gene of this major resistance QTL. PMID:23844081

  1. Identification of QTLs for resistance to sclerotinia stem rot and BnaC.IGMT5.a as a candidate gene of the major resistant QTL SRC6 in Brassica napus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wu

    Full Text Available Stem rot caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in many important dicotyledonous crops, including oilseed rape (Brassica napus, is one of the most devastating fungal diseases and imposes huge yield loss each year worldwide. Currently, breeding for Sclerotinia resistance in B. napus, as in other crops, can only rely on germplasms with quantitative resistance genes. Thus, the identification of quantitative trait locus (QTL for S. sclerotiorum resistance/tolerance in this crop holds immediate promise for the genetic improvement of the disease resistance. In this study, ten QTLs for stem resistance (SR at the mature plant stage and three QTLs for leaf resistance (LR at the seedling stage in multiple environments were mapped on nine linkage groups (LGs of a whole genome map for B. napus constructed with SSR markers. Two major QTLs, LRA9 on LG A9 and SRC6 on LG C6, were repeatedly detected across all environments and explained 8.54-15.86% and 29.01%-32.61% of the phenotypic variations, respectively. Genotypes containing resistant SRC6 or LRA9 allele showed a significant reduction in disease lesion after pathogen infection. Comparative mapping with Arabidopsis and data mining from previous gene profiling experiments identified that the Arabidopsis homologous gene of IGMT5 (At1g76790 was related to the SRC6 locus. Four copies of the IGMT5 gene in B. napus were isolated through homologous cloning, among which, only BnaC.IGMT5.a showed a polymorphism between parental lines and can be associated with the SRC6. Furthermore, two parental lines exhibited a differential expression pattern of the BnaC.IGMT5.a gene in responding to pathogen inoculation. Thus, our data suggested that BnaC.IGMT5.a was very likely a candidate gene of this major resistance QTL.

  2. Inheritance and expression patterns of BN28, a low temperature induced gene in Brassica napus, throughout the Brassicaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, G P; Nykiforuk, C L; Johnson-Flanagan, A M; Boothe, J G

    1996-08-01

    Molecular genetics is becoming an important tool in the breeding and selection of agronomically important traits. BN28 is a low temperature induced gene in Brassicaceae species. PCR and Southern blot analysis indicate that BN28 is polymorphic in the three diploid genomes: Brassica rapa (AA), Brassica nigra (BB), and Brassica oleracea (CC). Of the allotetraploids, Brassica napus (AACC) is the only species to have inherited homologous genes from both parental genomes. Brassica juncea (AABB) and Brassica carinata (BBCC) have inherited homologues from the AA and CC genomes, respectively, while Sinapsis arvensis (SS) contains a single homologue from the BB genome and Sinapsis alba (dd) appears to be different from all the diploid parents. All species show message induction when exposed to low temperature. However, differences in expression were noticed at the protein level, with silencing occurring in the BB genome at the level of translation. Results suggest that silencing is occurring in diploid species where duplication may not have occurred. Molecular characterization and inheritance of BN28 homologues in the Brassicaceae may play an important role in determining their quantitative function during exposure to low temperature. Key words : Brassicaceae, BN28, inheritance, polymorphism.

  3. Genome-Wide Survey of Flavonoid Biosynthesis Genes and Gene Expression Analysis between Black- and Yellow-Seeded Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Cunmin; Zhao, Huiyan; Fu, Fuyou; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Kai; Zhou, Yan; Wang, Xin; Wang, Rui; Xu, Xinfu; Tang, Zhanglin; Lu, Kun; Li, Jia-Na

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids, the compounds that impart color to fruits, flowers, and seeds, are the most widespread secondary metabolites in plants. However, a systematic analysis of these loci has not been performed in Brassicaceae. In this study, we isolated 649 nucleotide sequences related to flavonoid biosynthesis, i.e., the Transparent Testa (TT) genes, and their associated amino acid sequences in 17 Brassicaceae species, grouped into Arabidopsis or Brassicaceae subgroups. Moreover, 36 copies of 21 genes of the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway were identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, 53 were identified in Brassica rapa, 50 in Brassica oleracea, and 95 in B. napus, followed the genomic distribution, collinearity analysis and genes triplication of them among Brassicaceae species. The results showed that the extensive gene loss, whole genome triplication, and diploidization that occurred after divergence from the common ancestor. Using qRT-PCR methods, we analyzed the expression of 18 flavonoid biosynthesis genes in 6 yellow- and black-seeded B. napus inbred lines with different genetic background, found that 12 of which were preferentially expressed during seed development, whereas the remaining genes were expressed in all B. napus tissues examined. Moreover, 14 of these genes showed significant differences in expression level during seed development, and all but four of these (i.e., BnTT5, BnTT7, BnTT10, and BnTTG1) had similar expression patterns among the yellow- and black-seeded B. napus. Results showed that the structural genes (BnTT3, BnTT18, and BnBAN), regulatory genes (BnTTG2 and BnTT16) and three encoding transfer proteins (BnTT12, BnTT19, and BnAHA10) might play an crucial roles in the formation of different seed coat colors in B. napus. These data will be helpful for illustrating the molecular mechanisms of flavonoid biosynthesis in Brassicaceae species. PMID:27999578

  4. Nitrogen Use Efficiency Is Mediated by Vacuolar Nitrate Sequestration Capacity in Roots of Brassica napus.

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    Han, Yong-Liang; Song, Hai-Xing; Liao, Qiong; Yu, Yin; Jian, Shao-Fen; Lepo, Joe Eugene; Liu, Qiang; Rong, Xiang-Min; Tian, Chang; Zeng, Jing; Guan, Chun-Yun; Ismail, Abdelbagi M; Zhang, Zhen-Hua

    2016-03-01

    Enhancing nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) in crop plants is an important breeding target to reduce excessive use of chemical fertilizers, with substantial benefits to farmers and the environment. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), allocation of more NO3 (-) to shoots was associated with higher NUE; however, the commonality of this process across plant species have not been sufficiently studied. Two Brassica napus genotypes were identified with high and low NUE. We found that activities of V-ATPase and V-PPase, the two tonoplast proton-pumps, were significantly lower in roots of the high-NUE genotype (Xiangyou15) than in the low-NUE genotype (814); and consequently, less vacuolar NO3 (-) was retained in roots of Xiangyou15. Moreover, NO3 (-) concentration in xylem sap, [(15)N] shoot:root (S:R) and [NO3 (-)] S:R ratios were significantly higher in Xiangyou15. BnNRT1.5 expression was higher in roots of Xiangyou15 compared with 814, while BnNRT1.8 expression was lower. In both B. napus treated with proton pump inhibitors or Arabidopsis mutants impaired in proton pump activity, vacuolar sequestration capacity (VSC) of NO3 (-) in roots substantially decreased. Expression of NRT1.5 was up-regulated, but NRT1.8 was down-regulated, driving greater NO3 (-) long-distance transport from roots to shoots. NUE in Arabidopsis mutants impaired in proton pumps was also significantly higher than in the wild type col-0. Taken together, these data suggest that decrease in VSC of NO3 (-) in roots will enhance transport to shoot and essentially contribute to higher NUE by promoting NO3 (-) allocation to aerial parts, likely through coordinated regulation of NRT1.5 and NRT1.8. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Time and substrate dependent exudation of carboxylates by Lupinus albus L. and Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimmo, Tanja; Hann, Stephan; Jaitz, Leonhard; Cesco, Stefano; Gessa, Carlo Emanuele; Puschenreiter, Markus

    2011-11-01

    Root exudates influence significantly physical, chemical and biological characteristics of rhizosphere soil. Their qualitative and quantitative composition is affected by environmental factors such as pH, soil type, oxygen status, light intensity, soil temperature, plant growth, nutrient availability and microorganisms. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of growth substrate and plant age on the release of carboxylates from Lupinus albus L. and Brassica napus L. Both plant species were studied in continuously percolated microcosms filled with either sand, soil or sand + soil (1:1) mixture. Soil solution was collected every week at 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 days after planting (DAP). Carboxylate concentrations were determined by reversed-phase liquid chromatography - electrospray ionization - time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-TOFMS). Oxalate, citrate, succinate, malate and maleate were detected in soil solutions of both plant species. Their concentrations were correlated with the physiological status of the plant and the growth substrate. Oxalate was the predominant carboxylate detected within the soil solution of B. napus plants while oxalate and citrate were the predominant ones found in the soil solutions of L. albus plants. The sampling determination of carboxylates released by plant roots with continuous percolation systems seems to be promising as it is a non-destructive method and allows sampling and determination of soluble low molecular weight organic compounds derived from root exudation as well as the concentration of soluble nutrients, which both might reflect the nutritional status of plants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Specificity and Photomorphogenic Nature of Ultraviolet-B-Induced Cotyledon Curling in Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M. I.; Greenberg, B. M.

    1993-06-01

    Three general classes of photomorphogenic photoreceptors have been characterized in higher plants: phytochrome, a blue light/ultraviolet (UV)-A photoreceptor(s), and a UV-B sensory system(s). Although a great deal is known about phytochrome and the blue light/UV-A photoreceptor(s), little is known about UV-B detection processes. One reason for this is the lack of readily quantifiable morphogenic responses that are specifically induced by UV-B radiation. We have discovered a response to UV-B, upward curling of Brassica napus L. cotyledons, that may be useful for probing the mechanism of UV-B photoreception. The process was initially observed when B. napus seeds were germinated under visible light plus UV-B radiation, but did not occur under visible light alone or visible light plus UV-A. When 5-d-old seedlings grown in visible light were given relatively short exposures of UV-B (100 min of 5.5 [mu]mol m-2 s-1), the curling response was also observed. Development of curling was separated from the application of this UV-B pulse by a 14-h latent period. Pulses of red light, blue light, farred light, and UV-A (100 min of 5.5 [mu]mol m-2 s-1) did not induce curling, indicating UV-B specificity Additionally, these other spectral regions did not reverse or enhance the UV-B-triggered response. The degree of curling showed a log-linear dependence on UV-B fluence (6-40 mmol m-2) and reciprocity with respect to length of exposure and fluence rate. The data indicate that curling is photomorphogenic in nature and may be triggered by a single photoreceptor species.

  7. SSR marker variations in Brassica species provide insight into the origin and evolution of Brassica amphidiploids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Ajay Kumar; Singh, Kunwar Harendra; Singh, Lal; Nanjundan, Joghee; Khan, Yasin Jeshima; Singh, Dhiraj

    2018-01-01

    Oilseed Brassica represents an important group of oilseed crops with a long history of evolution and cultivation. To understand the origin and evolution of Brassica amphidiploids, simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to unravel genetic variations in three diploids and three amphidiploid Brassica species of U's triangle along with Eruca sativa as an outlier. Of 124 Brassica-derived SSR loci assayed, 100% cross-transferability was obtained for B. juncea and three subspecies of B. rapa, while lowest cross-transferability (91.93%) was obtained for Eruca sativa. The average % age of cross-transferability across all the seven species was 98.15%. The number of alleles detected at each locus ranged from one to six with an average of 3.41 alleles per primer pair. Neighbor-Joining-based dendrogram divided all the 40 accessions into two main groups composed of B. juncea/B. nigra/B. rapa and B. carinata/B. napus/B. oleracea. C-genome of oilseed Brassica species remained relatively more conserved than A- and B-genome. A- genome present in B. juncea and B. napus seems distinct from each other and hence provides great opportunity for generating diversity through synthesizing amphidiploids from different sources of A- genome. B. juncea had least intra-specific distance indicating narrow genetic base. B. rapa appears to be more primitive species from which other two diploid species might have evolved. The SSR marker set developed in this study will assist in DNA fingerprinting of various Brassica species cultivars, evaluating the genetic diversity in Brassica germplasm, genome mapping and construction of linkage maps, gene tagging and various other genomics-related studies in Brassica species. Further, the evolutionary relationship established among various Brassica species would assist in formulating suitable breeding strategies for widening the genetic base of Brassica amphidiploids by exploiting the genetic diversity present in diploid progenitor gene pools.

  8. Analysis of gene expression in resynthesized Brassica napus Allopolyploids using arabidopsis 70mer oligo microarrays.

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    Robert T Gaeta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies in resynthesized Brassica napus allopolyploids indicate that homoeologous chromosome exchanges in advanced generations (S(5ratio6 alter gene expression through the loss and doubling of homoeologous genes within the rearrangements. Rearrangements may also indirectly affect global gene expression if homoeologous copies of gene regulators within rearrangements have differential affects on the transcription of genes in networks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We utilized Arabidopsis 70mer oligonucleotide microarrays for exploring gene expression in three resynthesized B. napus lineages at the S(0ratio1 and S(5ratio6 generations as well as their diploid progenitors B. rapa and B. oleracea. Differential gene expression between the progenitors and additive (midparent expression in the allopolyploids were tested. The S(5ratio6 lines differed in the number of genetic rearrangements, allowing us to test if the number of genes displaying nonadditive expression was related to the number of rearrangements. Estimates using per-gene and common variance ANOVA models indicated that 6-15% of 26,107 genes were differentially expressed between the progenitors. Individual allopolyploids showed nonadditive expression for 1.6-32% of all genes. Less than 0.3% of genes displayed nonadditive expression in all S(0ratio1 lines and 0.1-0.2% were nonadditive among all S(5ratio6 lines. Differentially expressed genes in the polyploids were over-represented by genes differential between the progenitors. The total number of differentially expressed genes was correlated with the number of genetic changes in S(5ratio6 lines under the common variance model; however, there was no relationship using a per-gene variance model, and many genes showed nonadditive expression in S(0ratio1 lines. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Few genes reproducibly demonstrated nonadditive expression among lineages, suggesting few changes resulted from a general response to polyploidization

  9. High Density Linkage Map Construction and QTL Detection for Three Silique-Related Traits in Orychophragmus violaceus Derived Brassica napus Population

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    Yang, Yi; Shen, Yusen; Li, Shunda; Ge, Xianhong; Li, Zaiyun

    2017-01-01

    Seeds per silique (SS), seed weight (SW), and silique length (SL) are important determinant traits of seed yield potential in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.), and are controlled by naturally occurring quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Mapping QTLs to narrow chromosomal regions provides an effective means of characterizing the genetic basis of these complex traits. Orychophragmus violaceus is a crucifer with long siliques, many SS, and heavy seeds. A novel B. napus introgression line with many SS w...

  10. Identification and functional prediction of stress responsive AP2/ERF transcription factors in Brassica napus by genome-wide analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owji, Hajar; Hajiebrahimi, Ali; Seradj, Hassan; Hemmati, Shiva

    2017-12-01

    Using homology and domain authentication, 321 putative AP2/ERF transcription factors were identified in Brassica napus, called BnAP2/ERF TFs. BnAP2/ERF TFs were classified into five major subfamilies, including DREB, ERF, AP2, RAV, and BnSoloist. This classification is based on phylogenetic analysis, motif identification, gene structure analysis, and physiochemical characterization. These TFs were annotated based on phylogenetic relationship with Brassica rapa. BnAP2/ERF TFs were located on 19 chromosomes of B. napus. Orthologs and paralogs were identified using synteny-based methods Ks calculation within B. napus genome and between B. napus with other species such as B. rapa, Brassica oleracea, and Arabidopsis thaliana indicated that BnAP2/ERF TFs were formed through duplication events occurred before B. napus formation. Kn/Ks values were between 0 and 1, suggesting the purifying selection among BnAP2/ERF TFs. Gene ontology annotation, cis-regulatory elements and functional interaction networks suggested that BnAP2/ERF TFs participate in response to stressors, including drought, high salinity, heat and cold as well as developmental processes particularly organ specification and embryogenesis. The identified cis-regulatory elements in the upstream of BnAP2/ERF TFs were responsive to abscisic acid. Analysis of the expression data derived from Illumina Hiseq 2000 RNA sequencing revealed that BnAP2/ERF genes were highly expressed in the roots comparing to flower buds, leaves, and stems. Also, the ERF subfamily was over-expressed under salt and fungal treatments. BnERF039 and BnERF245 are candidates for salt-tolerant B. napus. BnERF253-256 and BnERF260-277 are potential cytokinin response factors. BnERF227, BnERF228, BnERF234, BnERF134, BnERF132, BnERF176, and BnERF235 were suggested for resistance against Leptosphaeria maculan and Leptosphaeria biglobosa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. TMT-based quantitative proteomics analyses reveal novel defense mechanisms of Brassica napus against the devastating necrotrophic pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jia-Yi; Xu, You-Ping; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2016-06-30

    The white mould disease, caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, is one of the most important diseases in the vital oil crop Brassica napus. Nevertheless, the defense mechanisms of B. napus against S. sclerotiorum are poorly understood. In this study, we performed comparative quantitative proteomics analyses to reveal B. napus defense mechanisms against S. sclerotiorum. The proteomes of B. napus leaves inoculated with S. sclerotiorum wild-type strain 1980 and nonpathogenic mutant strain Ep-1PB as well as empty agar plug as the control were analyzed using TMT label-based quantitative analysis technique. A total of 79, 299 and 173 proteins consistently differentially expressed between Ep-1PB- and mock-inoculated leaves, 1980- and mock-inoculated leaves, as well as 1980- and Ep-1PB-inoculated leaves, respectively, were identified. The differential expression of 12 selected proteins was confirmed by qRT-PCR analyses. The Gene Ontology (GO), Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and protein-protein interaction prediction analyses revealed that redox homeostasis, lipid signaling, calcium signaling, histone and DNA methylation-mediated transcription regulation and defense-related proteins such as defensin and defensin-like proteins and cyanate lyase, contribute to defense against S. sclerotiorum. Our results provide new insights into molecular mechanisms that may be involved in defense responses of B. napus to S. sclerotiorum. The Sclerotinia white mould disease is one of the most important diseases in the significant oil crop Brassica napus. Nevertheless, the defense mechanisms of B. napus against S. sclerotiorum are still largely unknown to date. In this study, we addressed this issue by performing TMT label-based comparative quantitative analyses of the proteomes of B. napus leaves inoculated with S. sclerotiorum wild-type strain 1980 and nonpathogenic mutant strain Ep-1PB as well as empty agar plug as the control. Through comparative analyses on 79, 299, and 173

  12. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals the Genetic Architecture Underlying Salt Tolerance-Related Traits in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.

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    Jinxiong Shen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity is a serious threat to agriculture sustainability worldwide. Salt tolerance at the seedling stage is crucial for plant establishment and high yield in saline soils; however, little information is available on rapeseed (Brassica napus L. salt tolerance. We evaluated salt tolerance in different rapeseed accessions and conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS to identify salt tolerance-related quantitative trait loci (QTL. A natural population comprising 368 B. napus cultivars and inbred lines was genotyped with a Brassica 60K Illumina Infinium SNP array. The results revealed that 75 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs distributed across 14 chromosomes were associated with four salt tolerance-related traits. These SNPs integrated into 25 QTLs that explained 4.21–9.23% of the phenotypic variation in the cultivars. Additionally, 38 possible candidate genes were identified in genomic regions associated with salt tolerance indices. These genes fell into several functional groups that are associated with plant salt tolerance, including transcription factors, aquaporins, transporters, and enzymes. Thus, salt tolerance in rapeseed involves complex molecular mechanisms. Our results provide valuable information for studying the genetic control of salt tolerance in B. napus seedlings and may facilitate marker-based breeding for rapeseed salt tolerance.

  13. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals the Genetic Architecture Underlying Salt Tolerance-Related Traits in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Heping; Chen, Lunlin; Guo, Jianbin; Li, Qun; Wen, Jing; Yi, Bin; Ma, Chaozhi; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong; Shen, Jinxiong

    2017-01-01

    Soil salinity is a serious threat to agriculture sustainability worldwide. Salt tolerance at the seedling stage is crucial for plant establishment and high yield in saline soils; however, little information is available on rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) salt tolerance. We evaluated salt tolerance in different rapeseed accessions and conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify salt tolerance-related quantitative trait loci (QTL). A natural population comprising 368 B. napus cultivars and inbred lines was genotyped with a Brassica 60K Illumina Infinium SNP array. The results revealed that 75 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed across 14 chromosomes were associated with four salt tolerance-related traits. These SNPs integrated into 25 QTLs that explained 4.21-9.23% of the phenotypic variation in the cultivars. Additionally, 38 possible candidate genes were identified in genomic regions associated with salt tolerance indices. These genes fell into several functional groups that are associated with plant salt tolerance, including transcription factors, aquaporins, transporters, and enzymes. Thus, salt tolerance in rapeseed involves complex molecular mechanisms. Our results provide valuable information for studying the genetic control of salt tolerance in B. napus seedlings and may facilitate marker-based breeding for rapeseed salt tolerance.

  14. Identification of different cytoplasms based on newly developed mitotype-specific markers for marker-assisted selection breeding in Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Shuangping; Chen, Fengyi; Wei, Chao; Hu, Kaining; Yang, Zonghui; Wen, Jing; Yi, Bin; Ma, Chaozhi; Tu, Jinxing; Si, Ping; Fu, Tingdong; Shen, Jinxiong

    2017-06-01

    Different mitotype-specific markers were developed to distinguish different cytoplasms in Brassica napus L. Mitotype-specific markers have been developed to distinguish different mitotypes in plant. And use of molecular markers to identify different mitotypes in Brassica napus would enhance breeding efficiency. Here, we comparatively analyzed six sequenced mitochondrial genomes in Brassica napus and identified collinear block sequences and mitotype-specific sequences (MSSs) of these mitochondrial genomes. The collinear block sequences between mitochondrial genomes of nap, cam, and pol cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) lines were higher than those of other lines. After comparative analysis of the six sequenced mitochondrial genomes (cam, nap, ole, pol CMS, ogu CMS, and hau CMS), 90 MSSs with sizes ranging from 101 to 9981 bp and a total length of 103,756 bp (accounting for 6.77% of the mitochondrial genome sequences) were identified. Additionally, 12 mitotype-specific markers were developed based on the mitochondrial genome-specific sequences in order to distinguish among these different mitotypes. Cytoplasms of 570 different inbred lines collected across scientific research institutes in China were identified using the MSS markers developed in our study. In addition to confirming the accuracy of the cytoplasmic identification, we also identified mitotypes that have not been reported in Brassica napus. Our study may provide guidance for the classification of different mitotypes in B. napus breeding.

  15. Growth and Yield Stimulation of Winter Oilseed Rape (Brasssica Napus L. by Mg-Titanit Fertiliser

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    Kováčik Peter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The effort to achieve higher yields at the required qualitative level has led to the intensive studying the problems of the rational usage of the titanium containing fertilisers by the agricultural research in the course the previous thirty years. Therefore, the objective of the experiment was to evaluate the impact of two doses of Mg-Titanit (0.2 l/ha and 0.4 l/ha on the formation of the aboveground and underground phytomass, also on the total chlorophyll in leaves, on the titanium and nitrogen content in the seeds and straw, on the quantity and quality of winter rape yield. The doses were applied two or three times on the leaves of winter rape (BBCH 50-52, BBCH 59, BBCH 66-67. The experiment was realized on the Haplic Chernozem (48°42´ N, 17°70´ E - Western Slovakia during two farming years (2009/2010 and 2010/2011. The results showed that all three applications of Mg-Titanit in both doses stimulated the formation of aboveground and underground phytomass of winter rape. The highest growth of phytomass was detected after the second application. The application of Mg-Titanit in the growth phases BBCH 50-52 and BBCH 59 increased the contents of both chlorophylls (a and b, where the growth of chlorophyll b content was more considerable than the growth of chlorophyll a content. The third spraying by Mg-Titanit decreased the content of the total chlorophyll. The application of Mg-Titanit had the positive impact on the yield of seeds, straw and fat content in the winter oilseed rape seeds.

  16. Analysis of Brassica napus ESTs: gene discovery and expression patterns of AP2/ERF-family transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jing; Zhu, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Starting from expressed sequence tag sequences and using the conserved amino acid sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana AP2/ERF domain as a probe, we used in silico cloning to identify 87 genes that encode putative AP2/ERF transcription factors (TFs) from the Brassica napus. Almost all of the putative AP2/ERF factors from B. napus were similar to genes previously defined as AP2/ERF genes from A. thaliana. Based on the number of AP2-domains and the function of the genes, the AP2/ERF TFs from B. napus were classified into four subfamilies, named the AP2, DREB, ERF, and RAV subfamilies. We then predicted and analyzed cDNA sequences and amino acid sequences, amino acid compositions, physical and chemical characteristics, phylogenetic trees, conserved domain sequences, functional domains, molecular models, and folding states of the proteins they are predicted to encode. Expression analysis showed that four factors, which belonged to the ERF and DREB subfamilies, were induced by abiotic stresses, as well as by hormone treatment. This suggests that those AP2/ERF factors may be involved in signaling pathways responsive to abiotic and biotic stresses. The results from this study, reported herein, form a basis for future functional analyses of B. napus TFs that belong to the AP2/ERF family.

  17. Genome-Wide Identification and Structural Analysis of bZIP Transcription Factor Genes in Brassica napus

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    Yan Zhou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The basic region/leucine zipper motif (bZIP transcription factor family is one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in plants. bZIP genes have been systematically characterized in some plants, but not in rapeseed (Brassica napus. In this study, we identified 247 BnbZIP genes in the rapeseed genome, which we classified into 10 subfamilies based on phylogenetic analysis of their deduced protein sequences. The BnbZIP genes were grouped into functional clades with Arabidopsis genes with similar putative functions, indicating functional conservation. Genome mapping analysis revealed that the BnbZIPs are distributed unevenly across all 19 chromosomes, and that some of these genes arose through whole-genome duplication and dispersed duplication events. All expression profiles of 247 bZIP genes were extracted from RNA-sequencing data obtained from 17 different B. napus ZS11 tissues with 42 various developmental stages. These genes exhibited different expression patterns in various tissues, revealing that these genes are differentially regulated. Our results provide a valuable foundation for functional dissection of the different BnbZIP homologs in B. napus and its parental lines and for molecular breeding studies of bZIP genes in B. napus.

  18. Citric acid improves lead (pb) phytoextraction in brassica napus L. by mitigating pb-induced morphological and biochemical damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakoor, Muhammad Bilal; Ali, Shafaqat; Hameed, Amjad; Farid, Mujahid; Hussain, Sabir; Yasmeen, Tahira; Najeeb, Ullah; Bharwana, Saima Aslam; Abbasi, Ghulam Hasan

    2014-11-01

    Phytoextraction is an environmentally friendly and a cost-effective strategy for remediation of heavy metal contaminated soils. However, lower bioavailability of some of the metals in polluted environments e.g. lead (Pb) is a major constraint of phytoextraction process that could be overcome by applying organic chelators. We conducted a glasshouse experiment to evaluate the role of citric acid (CA) in enhancing Pb phytoextraction. Brassica napus L. seedlings were grown in hydroponic media and exposed to various treatments of Pb (50 and 100 μM) as alone or in combination with CA (2.5mM) for six weeks. Pb-induced damage in B. napus toxicity was evident from elevated levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and H2O2 that significantly inhibited plant growth, biomass accumulation, leaf chlorophyll contents and gas exchange parameters. Alternatively, CA application to Pb-stressed B. napus plants arrested lipid membrane damage by limiting MDA and H2O2 production and by improving antioxidant enzyme activities. In addition, CA significantly increased the Pb accumulation in B. napus plants. The study concludes that CA has a potential to improve Pb phytoextraction without damaging plant growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Genome-Wide Identification and Structural Analysis of bZIP Transcription Factor Genes in Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Xu, Daixiang; Jia, Ledong; Huang, Xiaohu; Ma, Guoqiang; Wang, Shuxian; Zhu, Meichen; Zhang, Aoxiang; Guan, Mingwei; Xu, Xinfu; Wang, Rui; Li, Jiana

    2017-01-01

    The basic region/leucine zipper motif (bZIP) transcription factor family is one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in plants. bZIP genes have been systematically characterized in some plants, but not in rapeseed (Brassica napus). In this study, we identified 247 BnbZIP genes in the rapeseed genome, which we classified into 10 subfamilies based on phylogenetic analysis of their deduced protein sequences. The BnbZIP genes were grouped into functional clades with Arabidopsis genes with similar putative functions, indicating functional conservation. Genome mapping analysis revealed that the BnbZIPs are distributed unevenly across all 19 chromosomes, and that some of these genes arose through whole-genome duplication and dispersed duplication events. All expression profiles of 247 bZIP genes were extracted from RNA-sequencing data obtained from 17 different B. napus ZS11 tissues with 42 various developmental stages. These genes exhibited different expression patterns in various tissues, revealing that these genes are differentially regulated. Our results provide a valuable foundation for functional dissection of the different BnbZIP homologs in B. napus and its parental lines and for molecular breeding studies of bZIP genes in B. napus. PMID:29064393

  20. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 4 is essential for the normal development of reproductive organs and the embryo in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue; Chen, Guanqun; Truksa, Martin; Snyder, Crystal L; Shah, Saleh; Weselake, Randall J

    2014-08-01

    The enzyme sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 4 (GPAT4) is involved in the biosynthesis of plant lipid poly-esters. The present study further characterizes the enzymatic activities of three endoplasmic reticulum-bound GPAT4 isoforms of Brassica napus and examines their roles in the development of reproductive organs and the embryo. All three BnGPAT4 isoforms exhibited sn-2 acyltransferase and phosphatase activities with dicarboxylic acid-CoA as acyl donor. When non-substituted acyl-CoA was used as acyl donor, the rate of acylation was considerably lower and phosphatase activity was not manifested. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated down-regulation of all GPAT4 homologues in B. napus under the control of the napin promoter caused abnormal development of several reproductive organs and reduced seed set. Microscopic examination and reciprocal crosses revealed that both pollen grains and developing embryo sacs of the B. napus gpat4 lines were affected. The gpat4 mature embryos showed decreased cutin content and altered monomer composition. The defective embryo development further affected the oil body morphology, oil content, and fatty acid composition in gpat4 seeds. These results suggest that GPAT4 has a critical role in the development of reproductive organs and the seed of B. napus. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  1. Metabolome classification of Brassica napus L. organs via UPLC-QTOF-PDA-MS and their anti-oxidant potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Mohamed A; Sharaf Eldin, Mohamed G; Kassem, Hanaa; Abou el Fetouh, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Brassica napus L. is a crop widely grown for its oil production and other nutritional components in the seed. In addition to the seed, other organs contain a wide range of phenolic metabolites although they have not been investigated to the same extent as in seeds. To define and compare the phytochemical composition of B. napus L. organs, namely the root, stem, leaf, inflorescence and seeds. Non-targeted metabolomic analysis via UPLC-QTOF-MS was utilised in order to localise compounds belonging to various chemical classes (i.e. oxygenated fatty acids, flavonols, phenolic acids and sinapoyl choline derivatives). The vast majority of identified metabolites were flavonol glycosides that accumulated in most of the plant organs. Whereas other classes were detected predominantly in specific organs, i.e. sinapoyl cholines were present uniquely in seeds. Furthermore, variation in the accumulation pattern of metabolites from the same class was observed, particularly in the case of quercetin, kaempferol and isorhamnetin flavonols. Anti-oxidant activity, based on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhdrazyl analysis was observed for all extracts, and correlated to some extent with total flavonoid content. This study provides the most complete map for polyphenol composition in B. napus L. organs. By describing the metabolites profile in B. napus L., this study provides the basis for future investigations of seeds for potential health and/or medicinal use. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Metabolomics and Proteomics of Brassica napus Guard Cells in Response to Low CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Sisi; Yu, Bing; Zhu, Ning; Dufresne, Craig; Chen, Sixue

    2017-01-01

    Stomatal guard cell response to various stimuli is an important process that balances plant carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake and water transpiration. Elevated CO2 induces stomatal closure, while low CO2 promotes stomatal opening. The signaling process of elevated CO2 induced stomatal closure has been extensively studied in recent years. However, the mechanism of low CO2 induced stomatal opening is not fully understood. Here we report metabolomic and proteomic responses of Brassica napus guard cells to low CO2 using hyphenated mass spectrometry technologies. A total of 411 metabolites and 1397 proteins were quantified in a time-course study of low CO2 effects. Metabolites and proteins that exhibited significant changes are overrepresented in fatty acid metabolism, starch and sucrose metabolism, glycolysis and redox regulation. Concomitantly, multiple hormones that promote stomatal opening increased in response to low CO2. Interestingly, jasmonic acid precursors were diverted to a branch pathway of traumatic acid biosynthesis. These results indicate that the low CO2 response is mediated by a complex crosstalk between different phytohormones.

  3. Sequential light programs shape kale (Brassica napus) sprout appearance and alter metabolic and nutrient content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Sofia D; Folta, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    Different light wavelengths have specific effects on plant growth and development. Narrow-bandwidth light-emitting diode (LED) lighting may be used to directionally manipulate size, color and metabolites in high-value fruits and vegetables. In this report, Red Russian kale (Brassica napus) seedlings were grown under specific light conditions and analyzed for photomorphogenic responses, pigment accumulation and nutraceutical content. The results showed that this genotype responds predictably to darkness, blue and red light, with suppression of hypocotyl elongation, development of pigments and changes in specific metabolites. However, these seedlings were relatively hypersensitive to far-red light, leading to uncharacteristically short hypocotyls and high pigment accumulation, even after growth under very low fluence rates (<1 μmol m(-2) s(-1)). General antioxidant levels and aliphatic glucosinolates are elevated by far-red light treatments. Sequential treatments of darkness, blue light, red light and far-red light were applied throughout sprout development to alter final product quality. These results indicate that sequential treatment with narrow-bandwidth light may be used to affect key economically important traits in high-value crops.

  4. Detection of Fungus Infection on Petals of Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) Using NIR Hyperspectral Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan-Ru; Yu, Ke-Qiang; Li, Xiaoli; He, Yong

    2016-12-01

    Infected petals are often regarded as the source for the spread of fungi Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in all growing process of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) plants. This research aimed to detect fungal infection of rapeseed petals by applying hyperspectral imaging in the spectral region of 874-1734 nm coupled with chemometrics. Reflectance was extracted from regions of interest (ROIs) in the hyperspectral image of each sample. Firstly, principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to conduct a cluster analysis with the first several principal components (PCs). Then, two methods including X-loadings of PCA and random frog (RF) algorithm were used and compared for optimizing wavebands selection. Least squares-support vector machine (LS-SVM) methodology was employed to establish discriminative models based on the optimal and full wavebands. Finally, area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) was utilized to evaluate classification performance of these LS-SVM models. It was found that LS-SVM based on the combination of all optimal wavebands had the best performance with AUC of 0.929. These results were promising and demonstrated the potential of applying hyperspectral imaging in fungus infection detection on rapeseed petals.

  5. Variations in chromium tolerance and accumulation among canola (Brassica napus L.) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzi, Hakan; Yıldız, Mustafa

    2014-07-01

    Phytoremediation is a green technology for the remediation of contaminated ecosystems by using plants. In the present study, a hydroponic experiment was conducted to investigate the phytoremediation potential of eight canola (Brassica napus L.) cultivars for hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)]. Chromium significantly affected dry weight, lipid peroxidation, chlorophylls, non-protein thiol and antioxidant enzymes. Based on the dry weight, the tolerance index was found maximum in cultivar (cv.) NK Petrol and minimum in cv. Sary. The cv. Sary accumulated the maximum amount of Cr (705.8 μg g(-1) DW), which was correlated with the lowest levels of chlorophyll content and highest levels of lipid peroxidation. However, Cr accumulation was lowest (255.0 μg g(-1) DW) in NK Petrol. Although cv. NK Petrol may be a Cr(VI) excluder relative to cv. Sary, it may have the potential for the phytoremediation of Cr-contaminated sites as it possesses higher resistance to Cr(VI) by producing higher biomasses.

  6. Fatty acid composition of canola (Brassica napus L.), as affected by agronomical, genotypic and environmental parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidi, Heshmat; Tahmasebi, Zeinaldin; Naghdi Badi, Hassan Ali; Torabi, Hossein; Miransari, Mohammad

    2010-03-01

    Vegetable oils with a high relative amount of unsaturated fatty acids are of great significance for human health. There is not any data on the effects of tillage practices on fatty acid composition of canola (Brassica napus L.). Hence, in a 2-year split plot experiment, the effects of different tillage systems (no (NT), minimum (MT) and conventional tillage (CT)), canola genotypes (Hyola 401 (V1) and PF (V2)) and sowing dates (including Sep. 8, 23 and Oct. 7) on the fatty acid composition of canola were evaluated. Tillage practices and the combination of canola genotypes and sowing dates were randomized to the main and sub-plots, respectively. The highest oleic acid content was the result of combining NT, V1 and Sep. 23, and the lowest was related to the combination of CT, V2 and Oct. 7. While the combination of NT, V1 and D1 resulted in the highest amount of unsaturated fatty acids, this amount was the lowest for the combination of CT, V2 and Sep. 23. For the selection of an appropriate canola producing strategy, all these parameters must be taken into account. The combination of NT, V1 and Sep. 23 may be the most favorable cropping strategy for canola production under a Mediterranean climate. Copyright 2009 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Early biochemical responses of Brassica napus var Exagone seed germination at salt treatment

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    Lacramioara Oprica

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapeseed is the third most important edible oil source in the world, after soybean and palm. This plant is very sensitive to salt stress throughout the growth and development cycle. Salt stress reduces plant growth and productivity and can affected several physiological and biochemical process. For this reason, this study was carried out to determine early the effects of NaCl treatment on the protein content, amylase (EC 3.2.1.1, acide phosphatase (E.C. 3.1.3.2, peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7 and catalase (EC 1.11.1.6 in young rape plant (Brassica napus L. var Exagone. The rape seed were treated four hour with three NaCl solutions (50mM, 100mM, 150mM comparatively with a control who wasn’t exposed at treatment. Amylase activity was inhibited by all used salts concentrations at both time intervals studied. Salinity stimulated the acid phosphatase activity, more intense at 4 days and moderately at 7 days after treatment. The activity of the two assayed antioxidant enzymes (except peroxidase in the second period increase in salinity conditions with increasing salt concentration. Soluble protein content is reduced compared to the control at both studied intervals.

  8. A Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals New Loci for Resistance to Clubroot Disease in Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lixia; Luo, Yujie; Chen, Biyun; Xu, Kun; Zhang, Fugui; Li, Hao; Huang, Qian; Xiao, Xin; Zhang, Tianyao; Hu, Jihong; Li, Feng; Wu, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) is one of the most important oil crops in the world. However, the yield and quality of rapeseed were largely decreased by clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae Woronin). Therefore, it is of great importance for screening more resistant germplasms or genes and improving the resistance to P. brassicae in rapeseed breeding. In this study, a massive resistant identification for a natural global population was conducted in two environments with race/pathotype 4 of P. brassicae which was the most predominant in China, and a wide range of phenotypic variation was found in the population. In addition, a genome-wide association study of 472 accessions for clubroot resistance (CR) was performed with 60K Brassica Infinium SNP arrays for the first time. In total, nine QTLs were detected, seven of which were novel through integrative analysis. Furthermore, additive effects in genetic control of CR in rapeseed among the above loci were found. By bioinformatic analyses, the candidate genes of these loci were predicted, which indicated that TIR-NBS gene family might play an important role in CR. It is believable that the results presented in our study could provide valuable information for understanding the genetic mechanism and molecular regulation of CR. PMID:27746804

  9. A Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals New Loci for Resistance to Clubroot Disease in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lixia; Luo, Yujie; Chen, Biyun; Xu, Kun; Zhang, Fugui; Li, Hao; Huang, Qian; Xiao, Xin; Zhang, Tianyao; Hu, Jihong; Li, Feng; Wu, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) is one of the most important oil crops in the world. However, the yield and quality of rapeseed were largely decreased by clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae Woronin). Therefore, it is of great importance for screening more resistant germplasms or genes and improving the resistance to P. brassicae in rapeseed breeding. In this study, a massive resistant identification for a natural global population was conducted in two environments with race/pathotype 4 of P. brassicae which was the most predominant in China, and a wide range of phenotypic variation was found in the population. In addition, a genome-wide association study of 472 accessions for clubroot resistance (CR) was performed with 60K Brassica Infinium SNP arrays for the first time. In total, nine QTLs were detected, seven of which were novel through integrative analysis. Furthermore, additive effects in genetic control of CR in rapeseed among the above loci were found. By bioinformatic analyses, the candidate genes of these loci were predicted, which indicated that TIR-NBS gene family might play an important role in CR. It is believable that the results presented in our study could provide valuable information for understanding the genetic mechanism and molecular regulation of CR.

  10. A genome-wide association study reveals new loci for resistance to clubroot disease in Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixia Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapeseed (Brassica napus L. is one of the most important oil crops in the world. However, the yield and quality of rapeseed were largely decreased by clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae Woronin. Therefore, it is of great importance for screening more resistant germplasms or genes and improving the resistance to P. brassicae in rapeseed breeding. In this study, a massive resistant identification for a natural global population was conducted in two environments with race/pathotype 4 of P. brassicae which was the most predominant in China, and a wide range of phenotypic variation was found in the population. In addition, a genome-wide association study of 472 accessions for clubroot resistance (CR was performed with 60K Brassica Infinium SNP arrays for the first time. In total, 9 QTLs were detected, 7 of which were novel through integrative analysis. Furthermore, additive effects in genetic control of CR in rapeseed among the above loci were found. By bioinformatic analyses, the candidate genes of these loci were predicted, which indicated that TIR-NBS gene family might play an important role in CR. It is believable that the results presented in our study could provide valuable information for understanding the genetic mechanism and molecular regulation of CR.

  11. Data for iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics analysis of Brassica napus leaves in response to chlorophyll deficiency

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    Pu Chu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The essential pigment chlorophyll (Chl plays important roles in light harvesting and energy transfer during photosynthesis. Here we present the data from a comparative proteomic analysis of chlorophyll-deficient Brassica napus mutant cde1 and its corresponding wild-type using the iTRAQ approach (Pu Chu et al., 2014 [1]. The distribution of length and number of peptides, mass and sequence coverage of proteins identified was calculated, and the repeatability of the replicates was analyzed. A total of 443 differentially expressed proteins were identified in B. napus leaves, including 228 down-accumulated proteins mainly involved in photosynthesis, porphyrin and chlorophyll metabolism, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, carbon fixation and 215 up-accumulated proteins that enriched in the spliceosome, mRNA surveillance and RNA degradation.

  12. Indications of selenium protection against cadmium and lead toxicity in oilseed rape (Brassica napus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) pollution from industrial, agricultural, energy and municipal sources may have a toxic impact on food chain quality in China. In plants, Cd is readily taken up, while Pb is slowly absorbed. The uptake of both metals interferes with many cellular functions in the ...

  13. A high-density SNP genotyping array for Brassica napus and its ancestral diploid species based on optimised selection of single-locus markers in the allotetraploid genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Wayne E; Higgins, Erin E; Plieske, Joerg; Wieseke, Ralf; Sidebottom, Christine; Khedikar, Yogendra; Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, Dave; Meng, Jinling; Li, Ruiyuan; Lawley, Cynthia Taylor; Pauquet, Jérôme; Laga, Benjamin; Cheung, Wing; Iniguez-Luy, Federico; Dyrszka, Emmanuelle; Rae, Stephen; Stich, Benjamin; Snowdon, Rod J; Sharpe, Andrew G; Ganal, Martin W; Parkin, Isobel A P

    2016-10-01

    The Brassica napus Illumina array provides genome-wide markers linked to the available genome sequence, a significant tool for genetic analyses of the allotetraploid B. napus and its progenitor diploid genomes. A high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) Illumina Infinium array, containing 52,157 markers, was developed for the allotetraploid Brassica napus. A stringent selection process employing the short probe sequence for each SNP assay was used to limit the majority of the selected markers to those represented a minimum number of times across the highly replicated genome. As a result approximately 60 % of the SNP assays display genome-specificity, resolving as three clearly separated clusters (AA, AB, and BB) when tested with a diverse range of B. napus material. This genome specificity was supported by the analysis of the diploid ancestors of B. napus, whereby 26,504 and 29,720 markers were scorable in B. oleracea and B. rapa, respectively. Forty-four percent of the assayed loci on the array were genetically mapped in a single doubled-haploid B. napus population allowing alignment of their physical and genetic coordinates. Although strong conservation of the two positions was shown, at least 3 % of the loci were genetically mapped to a homoeologous position compared to their presumed physical position in the respective genome, underlying the importance of genetic corroboration of locus identity. In addition, the alignments identified multiple rearrangements between the diploid and tetraploid Brassica genomes. Although mostly attributed to genome assembly errors, some are likely evidence of rearrangements that occurred since the hybridisation of the progenitor genomes in the B. napus nucleus. Based on estimates for linkage disequilibrium decay, the array is a valuable tool for genetic fine mapping and genome-wide association studies in B. napus and its progenitor genomes.

  14. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of WRKY Transcription Factors under Multiple Stresses in Brassica napus.

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    Yajun He

    Full Text Available WRKY transcription factors play important roles in responses to environmental stress stimuli. Using a genome-wide domain analysis, we identified 287 WRKY genes with 343 WRKY domains in the sequenced genome of Brassica napus, 139 in the A sub-genome and 148 in the C sub-genome. These genes were classified into eight groups based on phylogenetic analysis. In the 343 WRKY domains, a total of 26 members showed divergence in the WRKY domain, and 21 belonged to group I. This finding suggested that WRKY genes in group I are more active and variable compared with genes in other groups. Using genome-wide identification and analysis of the WRKY gene family in Brassica napus, we observed genome duplication, chromosomal/segmental duplications and tandem duplication. All of these duplications contributed to the expansion of the WRKY gene family. The duplicate segments that were detected indicated that genome duplication events occurred in the two diploid progenitors B. rapa and B. olearecea before they combined to form B. napus. Analysis of the public microarray database and EST database for B. napus indicated that 74 WRKY genes were induced or preferentially expressed under stress conditions. According to the public QTL data, we identified 77 WRKY genes in 31 QTL regions related to various stress tolerance. We further evaluated the expression of 26 BnaWRKY genes under multiple stresses by qRT-PCR. Most of the genes were induced by low temperature, salinity and drought stress, indicating that the WRKYs play important roles in B. napus stress responses. Further, three BnaWRKY genes were strongly responsive to the three multiple stresses simultaneously, which suggests that these 3 WRKY may have multi-functional roles in stress tolerance and can potentially be used in breeding new rapeseed cultivars. We also found six tandem repeat pairs exhibiting similar expression profiles under the various stress conditions, and three pairs were mapped in the stress related

  15. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of WRKY Transcription Factors under Multiple Stresses in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yajun; Mao, Shaoshuai; Gao, Yulong; Zhu, Liying; Wu, Daoming; Cui, Yixin; Li, Jiana; Qian, Wei

    2016-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors play important roles in responses to environmental stress stimuli. Using a genome-wide domain analysis, we identified 287 WRKY genes with 343 WRKY domains in the sequenced genome of Brassica napus, 139 in the A sub-genome and 148 in the C sub-genome. These genes were classified into eight groups based on phylogenetic analysis. In the 343 WRKY domains, a total of 26 members showed divergence in the WRKY domain, and 21 belonged to group I. This finding suggested that WRKY genes in group I are more active and variable compared with genes in other groups. Using genome-wide identification and analysis of the WRKY gene family in Brassica napus, we observed genome duplication, chromosomal/segmental duplications and tandem duplication. All of these duplications contributed to the expansion of the WRKY gene family. The duplicate segments that were detected indicated that genome duplication events occurred in the two diploid progenitors B. rapa and B. olearecea before they combined to form B. napus. Analysis of the public microarray database and EST database for B. napus indicated that 74 WRKY genes were induced or preferentially expressed under stress conditions. According to the public QTL data, we identified 77 WRKY genes in 31 QTL regions related to various stress tolerance. We further evaluated the expression of 26 BnaWRKY genes under multiple stresses by qRT-PCR. Most of the genes were induced by low temperature, salinity and drought stress, indicating that the WRKYs play important roles in B. napus stress responses. Further, three BnaWRKY genes were strongly responsive to the three multiple stresses simultaneously, which suggests that these 3 WRKY may have multi-functional roles in stress tolerance and can potentially be used in breeding new rapeseed cultivars. We also found six tandem repeat pairs exhibiting similar expression profiles under the various stress conditions, and three pairs were mapped in the stress related QTL regions

  16. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of WRKY Transcription Factors under Multiple Stresses in Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yajun; Mao, Shaoshuai; Gao, Yulong; Zhu, Liying; Wu, Daoming; Cui, Yixin; Li, Jiana; Qian, Wei

    2016-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors play important roles in responses to environmental stress stimuli. Using a genome-wide domain analysis, we identified 287 WRKY genes with 343 WRKY domains in the sequenced genome of Brassica napus, 139 in the A sub-genome and 148 in the C sub-genome. These genes were classified into eight groups based on phylogenetic analysis. In the 343 WRKY domains, a total of 26 members showed divergence in the WRKY domain, and 21 belonged to group I. This finding suggested that WRKY genes in group I are more active and variable compared with genes in other groups. Using genome-wide identification and analysis of the WRKY gene family in Brassica napus, we observed genome duplication, chromosomal/segmental duplications and tandem duplication. All of these duplications contributed to the expansion of the WRKY gene family. The duplicate segments that were detected indicated that genome duplication events occurred in the two diploid progenitors B. rapa and B. olearecea before they combined to form B. napus. Analysis of the public microarray database and EST database for B. napus indicated that 74 WRKY genes were induced or preferentially expressed under stress conditions. According to the public QTL data, we identified 77 WRKY genes in 31 QTL regions related to various stress tolerance. We further evaluated the expression of 26 BnaWRKY genes under multiple stresses by qRT-PCR. Most of the genes were induced by low temperature, salinity and drought stress, indicating that the WRKYs play important roles in B. napus stress responses. Further, three BnaWRKY genes were strongly responsive to the three multiple stresses simultaneously, which suggests that these 3 WRKY may have multi-functional roles in stress tolerance and can potentially be used in breeding new rapeseed cultivars. We also found six tandem repeat pairs exhibiting similar expression profiles under the various stress conditions, and three pairs were mapped in the stress related QTL regions

  17. Microarray analysis reveals altered expression of a large number of nuclear genes in developing cytoplasmic male sterile Brassica napus flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Jenny; Lagercrantz, Ulf; Sundström, Jens; Teixeira, Rita; Wellmer, Frank; Meyerowitz, Elliot M; Glimelius, Kristina

    2007-02-01

    To gain new insights into the mechanism underlying cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS), we compared the nuclear gene expression profiles of flowers of a Brassica napus CMS line with that of the fertile B. napus maintainer line using Arabidopsis thaliana flower-specific cDNA microarrays. The CMS line used has a B. napus nuclear genome, but has a rearranged mitochondrial (mt) genome consisting of both B. napus and A. thaliana DNA. Gene expression profiling revealed that a large number of genes differed in expression between the two lines. For example, nuclear genes coding for proteins that are involved in protein import into organelles, genes expressed in stamens and pollen, as well as genes implicated in either cell-wall remodeling or architecture, were repressed in the CMS line compared with B. napus. These results show that the mt genome of the CMS line strongly influences nuclear gene expression, and thus reveal the importance of retrograde signalling between the mitochondria and the nucleus. Furthermore, flowers of the CMS line are characterized by a replacement of stamens with carpelloid organs, and thus partially resemble the APETALA3 (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI) mutants. In accordance with this phenotype, AP3 expression was downregulated in the stamens, shortly before these organs developed carpelloid characteristics, even though it was initiated correctly. Repression of PI succeeded that of AP3 and might be a consequence of a loss of AP3 activity. These results suggest that AP3 expression in stamens depends on proper mt function and a correct nuclear-mt interaction, and that mt alterations cause the male sterility phenotype of the CMS line.

  18. Production and characterization of intergeneric somatic hybrids between Brassica napus and Orychophragmus violaceus and their backcrossing progenies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-gang; Hu, Ting-ting; Ge, Xian-Hong; Du, Xue-zhu; Ding, Li; Li, Zai-yun

    2008-10-01

    Alien chromosome addition lines have been widely used for identifying gene linkage groups, assigning species-specific characters to a particular chromosome and comparing gene synteny between related species. In plant breeding, their utilization lies in introgressing characters of agronomic value. The present investigation reports the production of intergeneric somatic hybrids Brassica napus (2n = 38) + Orychophragmus violaceus (2n = 24) through asymmetric fusions of mesophyll protoplasts and subsequent development of B. napus-O. violaceous chromosome addition lines. Somatic hybrids showed variations in morphology and fertility and were mixoploids (2n = 51-67) with a range of 19-28 O. violaceus chromosomes identified by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). After pollinated with B. napus parent and following embryo rescue, 20 BC(1) plants were obtained from one hybrid. These exhibited typical serrated leaves of O. violaceus or B. napus-type leaves. All BC(1) plants were partially male fertile but female sterile because of abnormal ovules. These were mixoploids (2n = 41-54) with 9-16 chromosomes from O. violaceus. BC(2) plants showed segregations for female fertility, leaf shape and still some chromosome variation (2n = 39-43) with 2-5 O. violaceus chromosomes, but mainly containing the whole complement from B. napus. Among the selfed progenies of BC(2) plants, monosomic addition lines (2n = 39, AACC + 1O) with or without the serrated leaves of O. violaceus or female sterility were established. The complete set of additions is expected from this investigation. In addition, O. violaceus plants at diploid and tetraploid levels with some variations in morphology and chromosome numbers were regenerated from the pretreated protoplasts by iodoacetate and UV-irradiation.

  19. Modification of oil and glucosinolate content in canola seeds with altered expression of Brassica napus LEAFY COTYLEDON1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, Nosheen; Duncan, Robert W; Stasolla, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    Over the last few decades, research focusing on canola (Brassica napus L.) seed oil content and composition has expanded. Oil production and accumulation are influenced by genes participating in embryo and seed development. The Arabidopsis LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1) is a well characterized regulator of embryo development that also enhances the expression of genes involved in fatty acid (FA) synthesis. B. napus lines over-expressing or down-regulating BnLEC1 were successfully generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The constitutive expression of BnLEC1 in B. napus var. Polo, increased seed oil content by 7-16%, while the down-regulation of BnLEC1 in B. napus var. Topas reduced oil content by 9-12%. Experimental manipulation of BnLEC1 caused transcriptional changes in enzymes participating in sucrose metabolism, glycolysis, and FA biosynthesis, suggesting an enhanced carbon flux towards FA biosynthesis in tissues over-expressing BnLEC1. The increase in oil content induced by BnLEC1 was not accompanied by alterations in FA composition, oil nutritional value or glucosinolate (GLS) levels. Suppression of BnLEC1 reduced seed oil accumulation and elevated the level of GLS possibly through the transcriptional regulation of BnST5a (Sulphotransferase5a), the last GLS biosynthetic enzyme. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that experimental alterations of BnLEC1 expression can be used to influence oil production and quality in B. napus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Genome-wide identification, functional prediction, and evolutionary analysis of the R2R3-MYB superfamily in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiebrahimi, Ali; Owji, Hajar; Hemmati, Shiva

    2017-10-01

    R2R3-MYB transcription factors (TFs) have been shown to play important roles in plants, including in development and in various stress conditions. Phylogenetic analysis showed the presence of 249 R2R3-MYB TFs in Brassica napus, called BnaR2R3-MYB TFs, clustered into 38 clades. BnaR2R3-MYB TFs were distributed on 19 chromosomes of B. napus. Sixteen gene clusters were identified. BnaR2R3-MYB TFs were characterized by motif prediction, gene structure analysis, and gene ontology. Evolutionary analysis revealed that BnaR2R3-MYB TFs are mainly formed as a result of whole-genome duplication. Orthologs and paralogs of BnaR2R3-MYB TFs were identified in B. napus, B. rapa, B. oleracea, and Arabidopsis thaliana using synteny-based methods. Purifying selection was pervasive within R2R3-MYB TFs. Kn/Ks values lower than 0.3 indicated that BnaR2R3-MYB TFs are being functionally converged. The role of gene conversion in the formation of BnaR2R3-MYB TFs was significant. Cis-regulatory elements in the upstream regions of BnaR2R3-MYB genes, miRNA targeting BnaR2R3MYB TFs, and post translational modifications were identified. Digital expression data revealed that BnaR2R3-MYB genes were highly expressed in the roots and under high salinity treatment after 24 h. BnaMYB21, BnaMYB141, and BnaMYB148 have been suggested for improving salt-tolerant B. napus. BnaR2R3-MYB genes were mostly up regulated on the 14th day post inoculation with Leptosphaeria biglobosa and L. maculan. BnaMYB150 is a candidate for increased tolerance to Leptospheria in B. napus.

  1. Molecular Mapping and QTL for Expression Profiles of Flavonoid Genes in Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Cunmin; Zhao, Huiyan; Fu, Fuyou; Zhang, Kai; Yuan, Jianglian; Liu, Liezhao; Wang, Rui; Xu, Xinfu; Lu, Kun; Li, Jia-Na

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids are secondary metabolites that are extensively distributed in the plant kingdom and contribute to seed coat color formation in rapeseed. To decipher the genetic networks underlying flavonoid biosynthesis in rapeseed, we constructed a high-density genetic linkage map with 1089 polymorphic loci (including 464 SSR loci, 97 RAPD loci, 451 SRAP loci, and 75 IBP loci) using recombinant inbred lines (RILs). The map consists of 19 linkage groups and covers 2775 cM of the B. napus genome with an average distance of 2.54 cM between adjacent markers. We then performed expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis to detect transcript-level variation of 18 flavonoid biosynthesis pathway genes in the seeds of the 94 RILs. In total, 72 eQTLs were detected and found to be distributed among 15 different linkage groups that account for 4.11% to 52.70% of the phenotypic variance atrributed to each eQTL. Using a genetical genomics approach, four eQTL hotspots together harboring 28 eQTLs associated with 18 genes were found on chromosomes A03, A09, and C08 and had high levels of synteny with genome sequences of A. thaliana and Brassica species. Associated with the trans-eQTL hotspots on chromosomes A03, A09, and C08 were 5, 17, and 1 genes encoding transcription factors, suggesting that these genes have essential roles in the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway. Importantly, bZIP25, which is expressed specifically in seeds, MYC1, which controls flavonoid biosynthesis, and the R2R3-type gene MYB51, which is involved in the synthesis of secondary metabolites, were associated with the eQTL hotspots, and these genes might thus be involved in different flavonoid biosynthesis pathways in rapeseed. Hence, further studies of the functions of these genes will provide insight into the regulatory mechanism underlying flavonoid biosynthesis, and lay the foundation for elaborating the molecular mechanism of seed coat color formation in B. napus. PMID:27881992

  2. Digestibility energy and amino acids of canola meal from two species (Brassica juncea and Brassica napus) fed to distal ileum cannulated grower pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, M H A; Buchet, A D G; Beltranena, E; Gerrits, W J J; Zijlstra, R T

    2012-12-01

    Yellow-seeded Brassica juncea is a novel canola species targeted to grow in the southern Canadian prairies where thermotolerance, disease resistance, and adaptation to dry agronomic conditions are required. The support of its cultivation needs nutritional evaluation of its coproduct. The B. juncea canola meal (CM) contains less fiber than conventional, dark-seeded Brassica napus CM but also slightly less Lys. In a 6 × 6 Latin square, 6 distal ileum cannulated pigs (47 kg BW) were fed 6 diets to determine the apparent ileal digestibility (AID) and standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of CP and AA, AID and apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of energy, and VFA content in digesta and feces. Pigs were fed 6 diets: basal [46% wheat (Triticum aestivum) and corn (Zea mays) starch], 4 diets with 46% wheat and either B. juncea or B. napus CM at 25 or 50%, and a N-free diet based on corn starch. The B. juncea CM had higher (P canola species grown in Canadian prairie land, will increase flexibility in swine feed formulation.

  3. Determination of Flowering Phenology, Number of Flowers, Nectar and Pollen Potential of Oil Rape (Brassica napus L., Plant in Black Sea Coastal Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necda Çankaya

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried out in 2011 and 2012 in order to determine the flowering phenology, number of flowers, nectar and pollen potential in the Samsun province of the oilseed rape (Brassica napus L., which is widely used in agriculture in our country. In the first year of the study (2011, it was determined that the rapeseed plant was in flower for 44 days, there were 2.694 flowers per plant, 1.89 kg/da nectar per day and 1330 kg/da pollen production. In the second year of the research (2012, it was revealed that the rapeseed plant was in flower for 39 days, there were 701 plants/flower in the plant, 0.38 kg/da nectar secreted daily and 331.57 kg/da pollen. According to the results of two years, the yield of rapeseed was found to be 41.5 days, the daily nectar production was 0.23 mg/flower/day, the nectar dry matter level was 20.25% and the pollen production was 0.48 mg/flower/day. In Samsun province, it was determined that rapeseed plants flowered before the flowering of many plants in the vicinity in the early spring, and provided honey bees, Apis mellifera L., and many other honey bees, nectar and pollen. It has been demonstrated that the cultivation of rapeseed is cultivated in the early spring, and it can be a convenient source of food for honey bees and other dusty insects.

  4. Comparative mapping reveals similar linkage of functional genes to QTL of yield-related traits between Brassica napus and Oryza sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fupeng; Ma, Chaozhi; Chen, Qingfang; Liu, Touming; Shen, Jinxiong; Tu, Jinxing; Xing, Yongzhong; Fu, Tingdong

    2012-08-01

    Oryza sativa and Brassica napus-two important crops for food and oil, respectively-share high seed yield as a common breeding goal. As a model plant, O. sativa genomics have been intensively investigated and its agronomic traits have been advanced. In the present study, we used the available information on O. sativa to conduct comparative mapping between O. sativa and B. napus, with the aim of advancing research on seed-yield and yield-related traits in B. napus. Firstly, functional markers (from 55 differentially expressed genes between a hybrid and its parents) were used to detect B. napus genes that co-localized with yield-related traits in an F(2:3) population. Referring to publicly available sequences of 55 B. napus genes, 53 homologous O. sativa genes were subsequently detected by screening, and their chromosomal locations were determined using silico mapping. Comparative location of yield-related QTL between the two species showed that a total of 37 O. sativa and B. napus homologues were located in similar yield-related QTL between species. Our results indicate that homologous genes between O. sativa and B. napus may have consistent function and control similar traits, which may be helpful for agronomic gene characterization in B. napus based on what is known in O. sativa.

  5. Multiple NUCLEAR FACTOR Y transcription factors respond to abiotic stress in Brassica napus L.

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    Li Xu

    Full Text Available Members of the plant NUCLEAR FACTOR Y (NF-Y family are composed of the NF-YA, NF-YB, and NF-YC subunits. In Brassica napus (canola, each of these subunits forms a multimember subfamily. Plant NF-Ys were reported to be involved in several abiotic stresses. In this study, we demonstrated that multiple members of thirty three BnNF-Ys responded rapidly to salinity, drought, or ABA treatments. Transcripts of five BnNF-YAs, seven BnNF-YBs, and two BnNF-YCs were up-regulated by salinity stress, whereas the expression of thirteen BnNF-YAs, ten BnNF-YBs, and four BnNF-YCs were induced by drought stress. Under NaCl treatments, the expression of one BnNF-YA10 and four NF-YBs (BnNF-YB3, BnNF-YB7, BnNF-YB10, and BnNF-YB14 were greatly increased. Under PEG treatments, the expression levels of four NF-YAs (BnNF-YA9, BnNF-YA10, BnNF-YA11, and BnNF-YA12 and five NF-YBs (BnNF-YB1, BnNF-YB8, BnNF-YB10, BnNF-YB13, and BnNF-YB14 were greatly induced. The expression profiles of 20 of the 27 salinity- or drought-induced BnNF-Ys were also affected by ABA treatment. The expression levels of six NF-YAs (BnNF-YA1, BnNF-YA7, BnNF-YA8, BnNF-YA9, BnNF-YA10, and BnNF-YA12 and seven BnNF-YB members (BnNF-YB2, BnNF-YB3, BnNF-YB7, BnNF-YB10, BnNF-YB11, BnNF-YB13, and BnNF-YB14 and two NF-YC members (BnNF-YC2 and BnNF-YC3 were greatly up-regulated by ABA treatments. Only a few BnNF-Ys were inhibited by the above three treatments. Several NF-Y subfamily members exhibited collinear expression patterns. The promoters of all stress-responsive BnNF-Ys harbored at least two types of stress-related cis-elements, such as ABRE, DRE, MYB, or MYC. The cis-element organization of BnNF-Ys was similar to that of Arabidopsis thaliana, and the promoter regions exhibited higher levels of nucleotide sequence identity with Brassica rapa than with Brassica oleracea. This work represents an entry point for investigating the roles of canola NF-Y proteins during abiotic stress responses and provides

  6. Seeding date affects fall growth of winter canola (Brassica napus L. ‘Baldur’) and its performance as a winter cover crop in central Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, interest has increased in finding non-grass cover crop species that could be planted after soybean (Glycine max (L) Merr.) and before corn (Zea mays L.) in Iowa crop rotations. In this study, we investigate the use of winter canola (Brassica napus L.) as an alternative cover crop fo...

  7. Effect of planting methods on spring canola (Brassica napus L.) establishment and yield in the low-rainfall region of the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Growers are becoming interested in producing canola (Brassica napus or rapa) in the dryland, wheat-fallow region of the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Currently, agronomic research for spring canola in this region has not been initiated. This study evaluated the effect of no-till planting methods on stand...

  8. The X-ray structure of Brassica napus ß-keto acyl carrier protein reductase and its implications for substrate binding and catalysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fisher, M.; Kroon, J.T.M.; Martindale, W.; Stuitje, A.R.; Slabas, A.R.; Rafferty, J.B.

    2000-01-01

    Background: β-Keto acyl carrier protein reductase (BKR) catalyzes the pyridine-nucleotide-dependent reduction of a 3-oxoacyl form of acyl carrier protein (ACP), the first reductive step in de novo fatty acid biosynthesis and a reaction often performed in polyketide biosynthesis. The Brassica napus

  9. Influence of a Vertical Cutting Device on Brassica Napus Seed Loss in Direct Combining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pari, L.; Fedrizzi, M.; Assirelli, A. (Consiglio per la Ricerca e la Sperimentazione in Agricoltura, Unita di Ricerca per l' Ingegneria Agraria, Monterotondo, RM (Italy))

    2008-10-15

    EU requires that by 2010 5.65% of diesel fuel must be of vegetable origin. To reduce Italian dependence from imported palm oil, it is necessary to increase national production of vegetable oils: together with sunflower and soybean, canola (Brassica napus or Brassica napus oleifera) is an interesting possibility to satisfy vegetable oil demand, that is rapidly increasing for its use in biodiesel production. In Italy potential areas are available for the cultivation in relation to adequate rainfall and mild winters, that are very promising factors for canola production. However, the long period of seed maturity, non uniform growth, natural dehiscent process and variable weather conditions, such as wind and rain, are some of the factors which can lead to large seed losses: this is the main problem limiting this specie diffusion. Amongst available harvesting techniques, direct harvest of canola is an hazardous practice because there are several important questions related to it. The success of canola may depend on research initiatives to reduce some of the obstacles associated with its growing. The objective of this study is to determine if different cropping heads in direct combining can reduce seed losses. In Northern Italy (Piedmont) the trials were conducted in a 16 ha canola cultivation, in which was seeded the -Lion variety of canola. In order to realize direct harvest, the combine cylinder speed was regulated as slow as possible (500 rpm), the concave was opened at 3/4 of the way (about 25 mm clearance) and the fan speed was set at 2/3 of small grain settings (800 rpm). Only one combine was used for the trials, a New Holland CX 9080, in order to avoid any influence on seed losses. The combine was equipped with two different cutting heads: a common wheat type (type 1) and another, similar to the first, but equipped with vertical cutting devices on both ends of the head (type 2), because the plants are very dense and entangled. The losses of seeds were measured

  10. The biocontrol agent Pseudomonas chlororaphis PA23 primes Brassica napus defenses through distinct gene networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Kelly A; Becker, Michael G; Girard, Ian J; Millar, Jenna L; Dilantha Fernando, W G; Belmonte, Mark F; de Kievit, Teresa R

    2017-06-19

    The biological control agent Pseudomonas chlororaphis PA23 is capable of protecting Brassica napus (canola) from the necrotrophic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum via direct antagonism. While we have elucidated bacterial genes and gene products responsible biocontrol, little is known about how the host plant responds to bacterial priming on the leaf surface, including global changes in gene activity in the presence and absence of S. sclerotiorum. Application of PA23 to the aerial surfaces of canola plants reduced the number of S. sclerotiorum lesion-forming petals by 91.1%. RNA sequencing of the host pathogen interface showed that pretreatment with PA23 reduced the number of genes upregulated in response to S. sclerotiorum by 16-fold. By itself, PA23 activated unique defense networks indicative of defense priming. Genes encoding MAMP-triggered immunity receptors detecting flagellin and peptidoglycan were downregulated in PA23 only-treated plants, consistent with post-stimulus desensitization. Downstream, we observed reactive oxygen species (ROS) production involving low levels of H 2 O 2 and overexpression of genes associated with glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P)-mediated systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Leaf chloroplasts exhibited increased thylakoid membrane structures and chlorophyll content, while lipid metabolic processes were upregulated. In addition to directly antagonizing S. sclerotiorum, PA23 primes the plant defense response through induction of unique local and systemic defense networks. This study provides novel insight into the effects of biocontrol agents applied to the plant phyllosphere. Understanding these interactions will aid in the development of biocontrol systems as an alternative to chemical pesticides for protection of important crop systems.

  11. Global Dynamic Transcriptome Programming of Rapeseed (Brassica napus L. Anther at Different Development Stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanjie Li

    Full Text Available Rapeseed (Brassica napus L. is an important oil crop worldwide and exhibits significant heterosis. Effective pollination control systems, which are closely linked to anther development, are a prerequisite for utilizing heterosis. The anther, which is the male organ in flowering plants, undergoes many metabolic processes during development. Although the gene expression patterns underlying pollen development are well studied in model plant Arabidopsis, the regulatory networks of genome-wide gene expression during rapeseed anther development is poorly understood, especially regarding metabolic regulations. In this study, we systematically analyzed metabolic processes occurring during anther development in rapeseed using ultrastructural observation and global transcriptome analysis. Anther ultrastructure exhibited that numerous cellular organelles abundant with metabolic materials, such as elaioplast, tapetosomes, plastids (containing starch deposits etc. appeared, accompanied with anther structural alterations during anther development, suggesting many metabolic processes occurring. Global transcriptome analysis revealed dynamic changes in gene expression during anther development that corresponded to dynamic functional alterations between early and late anther developmental stages. The early stage anthers preferentially expressed genes involved in lipid metabolism that are related to pollen extine formation as well as elaioplast and tapetosome biosynthesis, whereas the late stage anthers expressed genes associated with carbohydrate metabolism to form pollen intine and to accumulate starch in mature pollen grains. Finally, a predictive gene regulatory module responsible for early pollen extine formation was generated. Taken together, this analysis provides a comprehensive understanding of dynamic gene expression programming of metabolic processes in the rapeseed anther, especially with respect to lipid and carbohydrate metabolism during pollen

  12. Methyl jasmonate regulates antioxidant defense and suppresses arsenic uptake in Brassica napus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad A Farooq

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Methyl jasmonate (MJ is an important plant growth regulator, involved in plant defense against abiotic stresses, however its possible function in response to metal stress is poorly understood. In the present study, the effect of MJ on physiological and biochemical changes of the plants exposed to arsenic (As stress were investigated in two Brassica napus L. cultivars (ZS 758 – a black seed type, and Zheda 622 – a yellow seed type. The As treatment at 200 µM was more phytotoxic, however its combined application with MJ resulted in significant increase in leaf chlorophyll fluorescence, biomass production and reduced malondialdehyde content compared with As stressed plants. The application of MJ minimized the oxidative stress, as revealed via a lower level of reactive oxygen species (ROS synthesis (H2O2 and OH- in leaves and the maintenance of high redox states of glutathione and ascorbate. Enhanced enzymatic activities and gene expression of important antioxidants (SOD, APX, CAT, POD, secondary metabolites (PAL, PPO, CAD and induction of lypoxygenase gene suggest that MJ plays an effective role in the regulation of multiple transcriptional pathways which were involved in oxidative stress responses. The content of As was higher in yellow seeded plants (cv. Zheda 622 as compared to black seeded plants (ZS 758. The application of MJ significantly reduced the As content in leaves and roots of both cultivars. Findings of the present study reveal that MJ improves ROS scavenging through enhanced antioxidant defense system, secondary metabolite and reduced As contents in both the cultivars.

  13. Response of Brassica napus L grains to the interactive effect of salinity and salicylic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salarizdah Mohammadreza

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity is a serious environmental problem that has negative effect on plant growth, production and photosynthesis. Fresh and dry plant weights decreases with salinity treatments. The very important role of salicylic acid (SA in response to different stress and modification and decline damages due to stresses has established in different studies. In this research, effect of grain soaking presowing in (0, 1, 1.5, 2 and 5 mM of salicylic acid (SA and NaCl (0, 4, 8 and 12 dsm-1 on canola (Brassica napus L was studied. Increasing of NaCl level reduced the germination percentage(GP, Average velocity of germination (AVG and growth parameters of 15-day old seedlings in compared to control plants. pretreated of SA in content 1mM significantly increased the germination percentage, and in contents more than of 1mM reduced the germination percentage in seeds under salinity stress. SA in content 1mM increased RWC, root and shoot of fresh weight in the stressed seedlings. Increasing of NaCl level increased Electrolyte leakage and MDA content in the stress seedling. electrolyte leakage and MDA content were markedly reduced under salt stress with SA 1mM than without. It was concluded that SA could be used as a potential growth regulator to improve salt tolerance in canola. Our observations indicate that, although SA is not essential for germination under normal growth conditions, it plays a promotive role in seed germination under high salinity by reducing oxidative damage.

  14. Influence of lead on growth and nutrient accumulation in canola (Brassica napus L.) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Muhammad Yasin; Azhar, Nazila; Ashraf, Muhammad; Hussain, Mumtaz; Arshad, Muhammad

    2011-09-01

    Canola (Brassica napus L.) is commonly used as a hyper-accumulator for phytoextraction of heavy metals from soil and water. Like many other heavy metals, lead (Pb) contaminates soil, water and air and thus it is a great problem. This study was conducted to investigate toxic effects of Pb on growth and nutrient uptake in four canola cultivars. Each of four cultivars of canola (Con-II, Con-III, Legend and Shiralee) was subjected to four levels of Pb (0, 30, 60 and 90 mg Pb kg(-1) of soil) from lead chloride [PbCl2]. Due to Pb toxicity, plant growth was adversely affected and relatively a severe reduction in root biomass (45.7%) was recorded. The Pb accumulation increased both in shoot and root, the highest being in root. The uptake of different nutrients, i.e., N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Cu and Mn was reduced (38.4, 32.8, 33.1, 49.6, 7.78, 52.0, 42.6 and 45.9%, respectively) in the shoots and that of N, Fe, Zn, and Cu in the roots (48.5, 33.2, 24.3 and 44.8%, respectively) of all canola cultivars. The root K, P, Zn and Mn and shoot P, Mg and Fe contents were less affected, the concentration of Pb, Ca and Mg in roots of all cultivars. Among canola cultivars Con-II and Con-III performed better than Legend and Shiralee in terms of growth (26.03%) and nutrient accumulation. Overall, plant growth and nutrient accumulation in the canola cultivars was hampered due to the presence of Pb.

  15. A study of proline metabolism in canola (Brassica napus L.) seedlings under salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadia, Mubshara; Jamil, Amer; Akram, Nudrat Aisha; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2012-05-16

    Expression analysis of crop plants has improved our knowledge about the veiled underlying mechanisms for salt tolerance. In order to observe the time course effects of salinity stress on gene expression for enzymes regulating proline metabolism, we comparatively analyzed the expression of specific genes for proline metabolism in root and shoot tissues of salt-tolerant (cv. Dunkled) and salt-sensitive (cv. Cyclone) canola (Brassica napus L.) cultivars through reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR); following the NaCl treatment for various durations. Both lines showed an increase in ∆¹-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase1 (P5CS1) gene expression after induction of salt stress with enhanced expression in the root tissue of the tolerant line, while maximum expression was noted in the shoot tissues of the sensitive line. We observed a much reduced proline dehydrogenase (PDH) expression in both the root and shoot tissues of both canola lines, with more marked reduction of PDH expression in the shoot tissues than that in the root ones. To confirm the increase in P5CS1 gene expression, total proline content was also measured in the root and shoot tissues of both the canola lines. The root tissues of canola sensitive line showed a gradually increasing proline concentration pattern with regular increase in salinity treatment, while an increase in proline concentration in the tolerant line was noted at 24 h post salinity treatment after a sudden decrease at 6 h and 12 h of salt treatment. A gradually increasing concentration of free proline content was found in shoot tissues of the tolerant canola line though a remarkable increase in proline concentration was noted in the sensitive canola line at 24 h post salinity treatment, indicating the initiation of proline biosynthesis process in that tissue of sensitive canola.

  16. Identification and characterization of NF-Y transcription factor families in Canola (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Mingxiang; Yin, Xiangzhen; Lin, Zhongyuan; Zheng, Qingsong; Liu, Guohong; Zhao, Gengmao

    2014-01-01

    NF-Y (NUCLEAR FACTOR-Y), a heterotrimeric transcription factor, is composed of NF-YA, NF-YB, and NF-YC proteins in yeast, animal, and plant systems. In plants, each of the NF-YA/B/C subunit forms a multi-member family. NF-Ys are key regulators with important roles in many physiological processes, such as drought tolerance, flowering time, and seed development. In this study, we identified, annotated, and further characterized 14 NF-YA, 14 NF-YB, and 5 NF-YC proteins in Brassica napus (canola). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the NF-YA/B/C subunits were more closely clustered with the Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) homologs than with rice OsHAP2/3/5 subunits. Analyses of the conserved domain indicated that the BnNF-YA/B/C subfamilies, respectively, shared the same conserved domains with those in other organisms, including Homo sapiens, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis, and Oryza sativa (rice). An examination of exon/intron structures revealed that most gene structures of BnNF-Y were similar to their homologs in Arabidopsis, a model dicot plant, but different from those in the model monocot plant rice, suggesting that plant NF-Ys diverged before monocot and dicot plants differentiated. Spatial-tempo expression patterns, as determined by qRT-PCR, showed that most BnNF-Ys were widely expressed in different tissues throughout the canola life cycle and that several closely related BnNF-Y subunits had similar expression profiles. Based on these findings, we predict that BnNF-Y proteins have functions that are conserved in the homologous proteins in other plants. This study provides the first extensive evaluation of the BnNF-Y family, and provides a useful foundation for dissecting the functions of BnNF-Y.

  17. Study on salt tolerance with YHem1 transgenic canola (Brassica napus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin-E; Feng, Xin-Xin; Li, Cui; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Wang, Liang-Ju

    2015-06-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) has been suggested for improving plant salt tolerance via exogenous application. In this study, we used a transgenic canola (Brassica napus), which contained a constituted gene YHem1 and biosynthesized more 5-ALA, to study salt stress responses. In a long-term pot experiment, the transgenic plants produced higher yield under 200 mmol L(-1) NaCl treatment than the wild type (WT). In a short-term experiment, the YHem1 transformation accelerated endogenous 5-ALA metabolism, leading to more chlorophyll accumulation, higher diurnal photosynthetic rates and upregulated expression of the gene encoding Rubisco small subunit. Furthermore, the activities of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase, guaiacol peroxidase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase, were significantly higher in the transgenic plants than the WT, while the levels of O2 ·(-) and malondialdehyde were lower than the latter. Additionally, the Na(+) content was higher in the transgenic leaves than that in the WT under salinity, but K(+) and Cl(-) were significantly lower. The levels of N, P, Cu, and S in the transgenic plants were also significantly lower than those in the WT, but the Fe content was significantly improved. As the leaf Fe content was decreased by salinity, it was suggested that the stronger salt tolerance of the transgenic plants was related to the higher Fe acquisition. Lastly, YHem1 transformation improved the leaf proline content, but salinity decreased rather than increased it. The content of free amino acids and soluble sugars was similarly decreased as salinity increased, but it was higher in the transgenic plants than that in the WT. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  18. [Establishment of Genic Male Sterile Lines of Brassica napus by Wide Cross and Their Cytology and Morphology.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xing-Wu; Wu, Jian-Guo; Shi, Chun-Hai

    2005-05-01

    One and three male sterile plants were found in the progenies of the intergeneric hybrids by crossing Brassica napus and Brassica juncea to Orychophragmus violaceus, respectively. After interspecific cross and full-sib crosses, four genic male sterile lines were obtained. The results of cytological observations indicated that somatic chromosome number was 38 in all types of sterile lines, which were considered as the type of B. napus. Most of pollen mother cells (PMC) in all sterile plants were observed normally for chromosome behaviour. But abnormal phenomena of chromosome, which present for chromosome lagging and bridge, were still found at each stage of meiosis in these sterile lines. These lines belonged to complete sterile type. There were distinct differences between sterile plants and normal plants in the flower morphology. Bud death at different degrees was found on anthotaxies in sterile plants. Studies on the flower growth showed that the growths of the pistils in sterile plants were gradually accelerated along with pollen sterility. At the same time there were two slowly growth stages of the pistils growth in normal plants. The prospects of these sterile lines were discussed in this paper.

  19. QTL analysis of root morphology, flowering time, and yield reveals trade-offs in response to drought in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Richard S; Mullen, Jack L; Heiliger, Annie; McKay, John K

    2015-01-01

    Drought escape and dehydration avoidance represent alternative strategies for drought adaptation in annual crops. The mechanisms underlying these two strategies are reported to have a negative correlation, suggesting a trade-off. We conducted a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of flowering time and root mass, traits representing each strategy, in Brassica napus to understand if a trade-off exists and what the genetic basis might be. Our field experiment used a genotyped population of doubled haploid lines and included both irrigated and rainfed treatments, allowing analysis of plasticity in each trait. We found strong genetic correlations among all traits, suggesting a trade-off among traits may exist. Summing across traits and treatments we found 20 QTLs, but many of these co-localized to two major QTLs, providing evidence that the trade-off is genetically constrained. To understand the mechanistic relationship between root mass, flowering time, and QTLs, we analysed the data by conditioning upon correlated traits. Our results suggest a causal model where such QTLs affect root mass directly as well as through their impacts on flowering time. Additionally, we used draft Brassica genomes to identify orthologues of well characterized Arabidopsis thaliana flowering time genes as candidate genes. This research provides valuable clues to breeding for drought adaptation as it is the first to analyse the inheritance of the root system in B. napus in relation to drought. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  20. Sensitization to turnip rape and oilseed rape in children with atopic dermatitis: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poikonen, Sanna; Puumalainen, Tuija J; Kautiainen, Hannu; Palosuo, Timo; Reunala, Timo; Turjanmaa, Kristiina

    2008-08-01

    Turnip rape and oilseed rape 2S albumins are new allergens in children with atopic dermatitis suspected for food allergy. We recently found that 11% (206/1887) of these children had a positive skin prick test to seeds of oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and/or turnip rape (Brassica rapa). In the present case-control study we examined how the children with atopic dermatitis sensitized to turnip rape and oilseed rape had been breast-fed and whether they had some common sensitization pattern to certain foods or pollens. A total of 64 children with atopic dermatitis and a positive skin prick test to turnip rape and/or oilseed rape (>or=5 mm) were examined. Sixty-four age- and sex-matched children with atopic dermatitis but negative skin prick tests to turnip rape and oilseed rape served as case controls. The turnip rape and/or oilseed rape sensitized children with atopic dermatitis had significantly more often positive skin prick tests reactions and IgE antibodies to various foods (cow's milk, egg, wheat, mustard; p children. They had been exclusively breast-fed for a longer period (median 4 months; p Children with atopic dermatitis sensitized to oilseed rape and turnip rape had high frequency of associated sensitizations to all foods and pollens tested showing that oilseed plant sensitization affects especially atopic children who have been sensitized to multiple allergens.

  1. A mutant Brassica napus (canola population for the identification of new genetic diversity via TILLING and next generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin J Gilchrist

    Full Text Available We have generated a Brassica napus (canola population of 3,158 EMS-mutagenised lines and used TILLING to demonstrate that the population has a high enough mutation density that it will be useful for identification of mutations in genes of interest in this important crop species. TILLING is a reverse genetics technique that has been successfully used in many plant and animal species. Classical TILLING involves the generation of a mutagenised population, followed by screening of DNA samples using a mismatch-specific endonuclease that cleaves only those PCR products that carry a mutation. Polyacrylamide gel detection is then used to visualise the mutations in any gene of interest. We have used this TILLING technique to identify 432 unique mutations in 26 different genes in B. napus (canola cv. DH12075. This reflects a mutation density ranging from 1/56 kb to 1/308 kb (depending on the locus with an average of 1/109 kb. We have also successfully verified the utility of next generation sequencing technology as a powerful approach for the identification of rare mutations in a population of plants, even in polyploid species such as B. napus. Most of the mutants we have identified are publically available.

  2. The functional role of the photosynthetic apparatus in the recovery of Brassica napus plants from pre-emergent metazachlor exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercampt, H; Koleva, L; Vassilev, A; Horemans, N; Biermans, G; Vangronsveld, J; Cuypers, A

    2016-06-01

    Metazachlor is a chloroacetamide herbicide, frequently used in Brassica napus cultivations around the world. Its primary target is the inhibition of very long chain fatty acid biosynthesis. This study included a morphological and physiological screening of hydroponically grown B. napus, exposed to a concentration range of 0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.0kg metazachlor per hectare. The results indicate that within a month after application, growth and development of B. napus are severely affected by low metazachlor doses. At intermediate metazachlor concentrations, loss of phosphorous and potassium from the plant tissues suggests destabilisation of cellular membranes, which may be a direct consequence of metazachlor application. This membrane instability could be indirectly linked with alterations of electron transport and a reduction of carbon assimilation. At increased metazachlor doses of 0.75kga.i.ha(-1), pigment concentrations are strongly reduced. However, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters seem to remain unaffected at metazachlor doses up to 0.75kga.i.ha(-1). At a metazachlor concentration of 1.0kga.i.ha(-1), negative effects are observed on all tested parameters, resulting in limited survival. The results indicate photosynthesis is assured at intermediate metazachlor concentrations for the cost of growth and development. It is clear that photosynthesis plays a key role in the survival strategy of young plants to overcome initially induced chemical stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. A mutant Brassica napus (canola) population for the identification of new genetic diversity via TILLING and next generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Erin J; Sidebottom, Christine H D; Koh, Chu Shin; Macinnes, Tanya; Sharpe, Andrew G; Haughn, George W

    2013-01-01

    We have generated a Brassica napus (canola) population of 3,158 EMS-mutagenised lines and used TILLING to demonstrate that the population has a high enough mutation density that it will be useful for identification of mutations in genes of interest in this important crop species. TILLING is a reverse genetics technique that has been successfully used in many plant and animal species. Classical TILLING involves the generation of a mutagenised population, followed by screening of DNA samples using a mismatch-specific endonuclease that cleaves only those PCR products that carry a mutation. Polyacrylamide gel detection is then used to visualise the mutations in any gene of interest. We have used this TILLING technique to identify 432 unique mutations in 26 different genes in B. napus (canola cv. DH12075). This reflects a mutation density ranging from 1/56 kb to 1/308 kb (depending on the locus) with an average of 1/109 kb. We have also successfully verified the utility of next generation sequencing technology as a powerful approach for the identification of rare mutations in a population of plants, even in polyploid species such as B. napus. Most of the mutants we have identified are publically available.

  4. Characterization of interploid hybrids from crosses between Brassica juncea and B. oleracea and the production of yellow-seeded B. napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Zhu, Lixia; Qi, Liping; Ke, Hongmei; Yi, Bin; Shen, Jinxiong; Tu, Jinxing; Ma, Chaozhi; Fu, Tingdong

    2012-06-01

    Yellow-seeded Brassica napus was for the first time developed from interspecific crosses using yellow-seeded B. juncea (AABB), yellow-seeded B. oleracea (CC), and black-seeded artificial B. napus (AACC). Three different mating approaches were undertaken to eliminate B-genome chromosomes after trigenomic hexaploids (AABBCC) were generated. Hybrids (AABCC, ABCC) from crosses AABBCC × AACC, AABBCC × CC and ABCC × AACC were advanced by continuous selfing in approach 1, 2 and 3, respectively. To provide more insight into Brassica genome evolution and the cytological basis for B. napus resynthesis in each approach, B-genome chromosome pairing and segregation were intensively analyzed in AABCC and ABCC plants using genomic in situ hybridization methods. The frequencies at which B-genome chromosomes underwent autosyndesis and allosyndesis were generally higher in ABCC than in AABCC plants. The difference was statistically significant for allosyndesis but not autosyndesis. Abnormal distributions of B-genome chromosomes were encountered at anaphase I, including chromosome lagging and precocious sister centromere separation of univalents. These abnormalities were observed at a significantly higher frequency in AABCC than in ABCC plants, which resulted in more rapid B-genome chromosome elimination in the AABCC derivatives. Yellow or yellow-brown seeds were obtained in all approaches, although true-breeding yellow-seeded B. napus was developed only in approaches 2 and 3. The efficiency of the B. napus construction approaches was in the order 1 > 3 > 2 whereas this order was 3 > 2 > 1 with respect to the construction of yellow-seeded B. napus. The results are discussed in relation to Brassica genome evolution and the development and utilization of the yellow-seeded B. napus obtained here.

  5. High-Density SNP Map Construction and QTL Identification for the Apetalous Character in Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Yu, Kunjiang; Li, Hongge; Peng, Qi; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Song; Hu, Maolong; Zhang, Jiefu

    2015-01-01

    The apetalous genotype is a morphological ideotype for increasing seed yield and should be of considerable agricultural use; however, only a few studies have focused on the genetic control of this trait in Brassica napus. In the present study, a recombinant inbred line, the AH population, containing 189 individuals was derived from a cross between an apetalous line ‘APL01’ and a normally petalled variety ‘Holly’. The Brassica 60 K Infinium BeadChip Array harboring 52,157 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers was used to genotype the AH individuals. A high-density genetic linkage map was constructed based on 2,755 bins involving 11,458 SNPs and 57 simple sequence repeats, and was used to identify loci associated with petalous degree (PDgr). The linkage map covered 2,027.53 cM, with an average marker interval of 0.72 cM. The AH map had good collinearity with the B. napus reference genome, indicating its high quality and accuracy. After phenotypic analyses across five different experiments, a total of 19 identified quantitative trait loci (QTLs) distributed across chromosomes A3, A5, A6, A9 and C8 were obtained, and these QTLs were further integrated into nine consensus QTLs by a meta-analysis. Interestingly, the major QTL qPD.C8-2 was consistently detected in all five experiments, and qPD.A9-2 and qPD.C8-3 were stably expressed in four experiments. Comparative mapping between the AH map and the B. napus reference genome suggested that there were 328 genes underlying the confidence intervals of the three steady QTLs. Based on the Gene Ontology assignments of 52 genes to the regulation of floral development in published studies, 146 genes were considered as potential candidate genes for PDgr. The current study carried out a QTL analysis for PDgr using a high-density SNP map in B. napus, providing novel targets for improving seed yield. These results advanced our understanding of the genetic control of PDgr regulation in B. napus. PMID:26779193

  6. High-density SNP map construction and QTL identification for the apetalous character in Brassica napus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong eWang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The apetalous genotype is a morphological ideotype for increasing seed yield and should be of considerable agricultural use; however, only a few studies have focused on the genetic control of this trait in Brassica napus. In the present study, a recombinant inbred line, the AH population, containing 189 individuals was derived from a cross between an apetalous line ‘APL01’ and a normally petalled variety ‘Holly’. The Brassica 60 K Infinium BeadChip Array harboring 52,157 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers was used to genotype the AH individuals. A high-density genetic linkage map was constructed based on 2,755 bins involving 11,458 SNPs and 57 simple sequence repeats, and was used to identify loci associated with petalous degree (PDgr. The linkage map covered 2,027.53 cM, with an average marker interval of 0.72 cM. The AH map had good collinearity with the B. napus reference genome, indicating its high quality and accuracy. After phenotypic analyses across five different experiments, a total of 19 identified quantitative trait loci (QTLs distributed across chromosomes A3, A5, A6, A9 and C8 were obtained, and these QTLs were further integrated into nine consensus QTLs by a meta-analysis. Interestingly, the major QTL qPD.C8-2 was consistently detected in all five experiments, and qPD.A9-2 and qPD.C8-3 were stably expressed in four experiments. Comparative mapping between the AH map and the B. napus reference genome suggested that there were 328 genes underlying the confidence intervals of the three steady QTLs. Based on the Gene Ontology assignments of 52 genes to the regulation of floral development in published studies, 146 genes were considered as potential candidate genes for PDgr. The current study carried out a QTL analysis for PDgr using a high-density SNP map in B. napus, providing novel targets for improving seed yield. These results advanced our understanding of the genetic control of PDgr regulation in B. napus.

  7. High-Density SNP Map Construction and QTL Identification for the Apetalous Character in Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Yu, Kunjiang; Li, Hongge; Peng, Qi; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Song; Hu, Maolong; Zhang, Jiefu

    2015-01-01

    The apetalous genotype is a morphological ideotype for increasing seed yield and should be of considerable agricultural use; however, only a few studies have focused on the genetic control of this trait in Brassica napus. In the present study, a recombinant inbred line, the AH population, containing 189 individuals was derived from a cross between an apetalous line 'APL01' and a normally petalled variety 'Holly'. The Brassica 60 K Infinium BeadChip Array harboring 52,157 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers was used to genotype the AH individuals. A high-density genetic linkage map was constructed based on 2,755 bins involving 11,458 SNPs and 57 simple sequence repeats, and was used to identify loci associated with petalous degree (PDgr). The linkage map covered 2,027.53 cM, with an average marker interval of 0.72 cM. The AH map had good collinearity with the B. napus reference genome, indicating its high quality and accuracy. After phenotypic analyses across five different experiments, a total of 19 identified quantitative trait loci (QTLs) distributed across chromosomes A3, A5, A6, A9 and C8 were obtained, and these QTLs were further integrated into nine consensus QTLs by a meta-analysis. Interestingly, the major QTL qPD.C8-2 was consistently detected in all five experiments, and qPD.A9-2 and qPD.C8-3 were stably expressed in four experiments. Comparative mapping between the AH map and the B. napus reference genome suggested that there were 328 genes underlying the confidence intervals of the three steady QTLs. Based on the Gene Ontology assignments of 52 genes to the regulation of floral development in published studies, 146 genes were considered as potential candidate genes for PDgr. The current study carried out a QTL analysis for PDgr using a high-density SNP map in B. napus, providing novel targets for improving seed yield. These results advanced our understanding of the genetic control of PDgr regulation in B. napus.

  8. Overexpression of Three Glucosinolate Biosynthesis Genes in Brassica napus Identifies Enhanced Resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Huai, Dongxin; Yang, Qingyong; Cheng, Yan; Ma, Ming; Kliebenstein, Daniel J; Zhou, Yongming

    2015-01-01

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea are notorious plant pathogenic fungi with an extensive host range including Brassica crops. Glucosinolates (GSLs) are an important group of secondary metabolites characteristic of the Brassicales order, whose degradation products are proving to be increasingly important in plant protection. Enhancing the defense effect of GSL and their associated degradation products is an attractive strategy to strengthen the resistance of plants by transgenic approaches. We generated the lines of Brassica napus with three biosynthesis genes involved in GSL metabolic pathway (BnMAM1, BnCYP83A1 and BnUGT74B1), respectively. We then measured the foliar GSLs of each transgenic lines and inoculated them with S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea. Compared with the wild type control, over-expressing BnUGT74B1 in B. napus increased the aliphatic and indolic GSL levels by 1.7 and 1.5 folds in leaves respectively; while over-expressing BnMAM1 or BnCYP83A1 resulted in an approximate 1.5-fold higher only in the aliphatic GSL level in leaves. The results of plant inoculation demonstrated that BnUGT74B1-overexpressing lines showed less severe disease symptoms and tissue damage compared with the wild type control, but BnMAM1 or BnCYP83A1-overexpressing lines showed no significant difference in comparison to the controls. These results suggest that the resistance to S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea in B. napus could be enhanced through tailoring the GSL profiles by transgenic approaches or molecular breeding, which provides useful information to assist plant breeders to design improved breeding strategies.

  9. Overexpression of Three Glucosinolate Biosynthesis Genes in Brassica napus Identifies Enhanced Resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Zhang

    Full Text Available Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea are notorious plant pathogenic fungi with an extensive host range including Brassica crops. Glucosinolates (GSLs are an important group of secondary metabolites characteristic of the Brassicales order, whose degradation products are proving to be increasingly important in plant protection. Enhancing the defense effect of GSL and their associated degradation products is an attractive strategy to strengthen the resistance of plants by transgenic approaches. We generated the lines of Brassica napus with three biosynthesis genes involved in GSL metabolic pathway (BnMAM1, BnCYP83A1 and BnUGT74B1, respectively. We then measured the foliar GSLs of each transgenic lines and inoculated them with S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea. Compared with the wild type control, over-expressing BnUGT74B1 in B. napus increased the aliphatic and indolic GSL levels by 1.7 and 1.5 folds in leaves respectively; while over-expressing BnMAM1 or BnCYP83A1 resulted in an approximate 1.5-fold higher only in the aliphatic GSL level in leaves. The results of plant inoculation demonstrated that BnUGT74B1-overexpressing lines showed less severe disease symptoms and tissue damage compared with the wild type control, but BnMAM1 or BnCYP83A1-overexpressing lines showed no significant difference in comparison to the controls. These results suggest that the resistance to S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea in B. napus could be enhanced through tailoring the GSL profiles by transgenic approaches or molecular breeding, which provides useful information to assist plant breeders to design improved breeding strategies.

  10. A Novel Cytoplasmic Male Sterility in Brassica napus (inap CMS) with Carpelloid Stamens via Protoplast Fusion with Chinese Woad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Lei; Li, Pengfei; Wang, Aifan; Ge, Xianhong; Li, Zaiyun

    2017-01-01

    A novel cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in Brassica napus (inap CMS) was selected from the somatic hybrid with Isatis indigotica (Chinese woad) by recurrent backcrossing. The male sterility was caused by the conversion of tetradynamous stamens into carpelloid structures with stigmatoid tissues at their tips and ovule-like tissues in the margins, and the two shorter stamens into filaments without anthers. The feminized development of the stamens resulted in the complete lack of pollen grains, which was stable in different years and environments. The pistils of inap CMS displayed normal morphology and good seed-set after pollinated by B. napus. Histological sections showed that the developmental alteration of the stamens initiated at the stage of stamen primordium differentiation. AFLP analysis of the nuclear genomic composition with 23 pairs of selective primers detected no woad DNA bands in inap CMS. Twenty out of 25 mitochondrial genes originated from I. indigotica, except for cox2-2 which was the recombinant between cox2 from woad and cox2-2 from rapeseed. The novel cox2-2 was transcribed in flower buds of inap CMS weakly and comparatively with the fertile B. napus addition line Me harboring one particular woad chromosome. The restorers of other autoplasmic and alloplasmic CMS systems in rapeseed failed to restore the fertility of inap CMS and the screening of B. napus wide resources found no fertility restoration variety, showing its distinct origin and the related mechanism of sterility. The reasons for the mitochondrial rearrangements and the breeding of the restorer for the novel CMS system were discussed. PMID:28428799

  11. Fine mapping of a major locus controlling plant height using a high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism map in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yankun; He, Jianbo; Yang, Li; Wang, Yu; Chen, Wenjing; Wan, Shubei; Chu, Pu; Guan, Rongzhan

    2016-08-01

    A saturated map was constructed using SNP markers to fine-map a Brassica napus dominant locus for dwarf mutant onto a 152-kb interval of chromosome A09 containing 14 genes. Major dwarf loci in crops may play important roles in crop improvement and developmental genetics. The present study investigated and fine-mapped a Brassica napus dwarf-dominant locus BnDWF1. Plants carrying the BnDWF1 locus in populations derived from 'zhongshuang11' and Bndwf1 have deep-green leaves and dwarf architecture that differ sharply from tall plants with normal green leaves. BnDWF1, as a major locus controlling plant height, showed a very high heritability (0.91-0.95). To map this locus, a high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism map was constructed, and the BnDWF1 locus was mapped at an interval between single-nucleotide polymorphism markers, M19704 and M19695, on linkage group A09 of B. napus, with five co-segregating single-nucleotide polymorphism markers. Furthermore, fine mapping narrowed the interval harboring BnDWF1 to 152 kb in length in B. napus. This interval contains 14 annotated or predicted genes, seven of which are candidates responsible for the dwarf trait. This study provides an effective foundation for the study of plant height regulation and plant type breeding in B. napus.

  12. Molecular cytogenetic identification of B genome chromosomes linked to blackleg disease resistance in Brassica napus × B. carinata interspecific hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredua-Agyeman, Rudolph; Coriton, Olivier; Huteau, Virginie; Parkin, Isobel A P; Chèvre, Anne-Marie; Rahman, Habibur

    2014-06-01

    Provide evidence that the Brassica B genome chromosome B3 carries blackleg resistance gene, and also the B genome chromosomes were inherited several generations along with B. napus chromosomes. Blackleg disease caused by fungus Leptosphaeria maculans causes significant yield losses in Brassica napus. Brassica carinata possesses excellent resistance to this disease. To introgress blackleg resistance, crosses between B. napus cv. Westar and B. carinata were done. The interspecific-hybrids were backcrossed twice to Westar and self-pollinated three times to produce BC2S3 families. Doubled haploid lines (DH1) were produced from one blackleg resistant family. SSR markers were used to study the association between B genome chromosome(s) and blackleg resistance. The entire B3 chromosome of B. carinata was associated with blackleg resistance in DH1. A second DH population (DH2) was produced from F1s of resistant DH1 lines crossed to blackleg susceptible B. napus cv. Polo where resistance was found to be associated with SSR markers from the middle to bottom of the B3 and top of the B8 chromosomes. The results demonstrated that the B3 chromosome carried gene(s) for blackleg resistance. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) and GISH-like analysis of the DH2 lines revealed that susceptible lines, in addition to B. napus chromosomes, possessed one pair of B genome chromosomes (2n = 40), while resistant lines had either one (2n = 40) or two pairs (2n = 42) of B chromosomes. The molecular and GISH data suggested that the B chromosome in the susceptible lines was B7, while it was difficult to confirm the identity of the B chromosomes in the resistant lines. Also, B chromosomes were found to be inherited over several generations along with B. napus chromosomes.

  13. Transcriptome Analysis Comparison of Lipid Biosynthesis in the Leaves and Developing Seeds of Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Tan, Ren-Ke; Guo, Xiao-Juan; Fu, Zheng-Li; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Zhi-Yan; Tan, Xiao-Li

    2015-01-01

    Brassica napus seed is a lipid storage organ containing approximately 40% oil, while its leaves contain many kinds of lipids for many biological roles, but the overall amounts are less than in seeds. Thus, lipid biosynthesis in the developing seeds and the leaves is strictly regulated which results the final difference of lipids. However, there are few reports about the molecular mechanism controlling the difference in lipid biosynthesis between developing seeds and leaves. In this study, we tried to uncover this mechanism by analyzing the transcriptome data for lipid biosynthesis. The transcriptome data were de novo assembled and a total of 47,216 unigenes were obtained, which had an N50 length and median of 1271 and 755 bp, respectively. Among these unigenes, 36,368 (about 77.02%) were annotated and there were 109 up-regulated unigenes and 72 down-regulated unigenes in the developing seeds lipid synthetic pathway after comparing with leaves. In the oleic acid pathway, 23 unigenes were up-regulated and four unigenes were down-regulated. During triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis, the key unigenes were all up-regulated, such as phosphatidate phosphatase and diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. During palmitic acid, palmitoleic acid, stearic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid synthesis in leaves, the unigenes were nearly all up-regulated, which indicated that the biosynthesis of these particular fatty acids were more important in leaves. In the developing seeds, almost all the unigenes in the ABI3VP1, RKD, CPP, E2F-DP, GRF, JUMONJI, MYB-related, PHD and REM transcript factor families were up-regulated, which helped us to discern the regulation mechanism underlying lipid biosynthesis. The differential up/down-regulation of the genes and TFs involved in lipid biosynthesis in developing seeds and leaves provided direct evidence that allowed us to map the network that regulates lipid biosynthesis, and the identification of new TFs that are up-regulated in developing seeds

  14. Identification and characterization of CBL and CIPK gene families in canola (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanfeng; Yang, Bo; Liu, Wu-Zhen; Li, Hongwei; Wang, Lei; Wang, Boya; Deng, Min; Liang, Wanwan; Deyholos, Michael K; Jiang, Yuan-Qing

    2014-01-07

    Canola (Brassica napus L.) is one of the most important oil-producing crops in China and worldwide. The yield and quality of canola is frequently threatened by environmental stresses including drought, cold and high salinity. Calcium is a ubiquitous intracellular secondary messenger in plants. Calcineurin B-like proteins (CBLs) are Ca2+ sensors and regulate a group of Ser/Thr protein kinases called CBL-interacting protein kinases (CIPKs). Although the CBL-CIPK network has been demonstrated to play crucial roles in plant development and responses to various environmental stresses in Arabidopsis, little is known about their function in canola. In the present study, we identified seven CBL and 23 CIPK genes from canola by database mining and cloning of cDNA sequences of six CBLs and 17 CIPKs. Phylogenetic analysis of CBL and CIPK gene families across a variety of species suggested genome duplication and diversification. The subcellular localization of three BnaCBLs and two BnaCIPKs were determined using green fluorescence protein (GFP) as the reporter. We also demonstrated interactions between six BnaCBLs and 17 BnaCIPKs using yeast two-hybrid assay, and a subset of interactions were further confirmed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). Furthermore, the expression levels of six selected BnaCBL and 12 BnaCIPK genes in response to salt, drought, cold, heat, ABA, methyl viologen (MV) and low potassium were examined by quantitative RT-PCR and these CBL or CIPK genes were found to respond to multiple stimuli, suggesting that the canola CBL-CIPK network may be a point of convergence for several different signaling pathways. We also performed a comparison of interaction patterns and expression profiles of CBL and CIPK in Arabidospsis, canola and rice, to examine the differences between orthologs, highlighting the importance of studying CBL-CIPK in canola as a prerequisite for improvement of this crop. Our findings indicate that CBL and CIPK family members may

  15. Members of the germin-like protein family in Brassica napus are candidates for the initiation of an oxidative burst that impedes pathogenesis of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Daguang

    2012-01-01

    Germin-like proteins (GLPs) are defined by their sequence homology to germins from barley and are present ubiquitously in plants. Analyses of corresponding genes have revealed diverse functions of GLPs in plant development and biotic and abiotic stresses. This study describes the identification of a family of 14 germin-like genes from Brassica napus (BnGLP) designated BnGLP1–BnGLP14 and investigated potential functions of BnGLPs in plant defense against the necrotrophic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses classify the 14 BnGLPs into four groups, which were clearly distinguished from known germin oxalic acid oxidases. Transcriptional responses of the BnGLP genes to S. sclerotiorum infection was determined by comparing cultivars of susceptible B. napus ‘Falcon’ and partially resistant B. napus ‘Zhongshuang 9’. Of the 14 BnGLP genes tested, BnGLP3 was transcriptionally upregulated in both B. napus cultivars at 6h after S. sclerotiorum infection, while upregulation of BnGLP12 was restricted to resistant B. napus ‘Zhongshuang 9’. Biochemical analysis of five representative BnGLP members identified a H2O2-generating superoxide dismutase activity only for higher molecular weight complexes of BnGLP3 and BnGLP12. By analogy, H2O2 formation at infected leaf sites increased after 6h, with even higher H2O2 production in B. napus ‘Zhongshuang 9’ compared with B. napus ‘Falcon’. Conversely, exogenous application of H2O2 significantly reduced the susceptibility of B. napus ‘Falcon’. These data suggest that early induction of BnGLP3 and BnGLP12 participates in an oxidative burst that may play a pivotal role in defence of B. napus against S. sclerotiorum. PMID:22888126

  16. Genetic changes in a novel breeding population of Brassica napus synthesized from hundreds of crosses between B. rapa and B. carinata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jun; Hu, Dandan; Mason, Annaliese S; Shen, Xueqi; Wang, Xiaohua; Wang, Nian; Grandke, Fabian; Wang, Meng; Chang, Shihao; Snowdon, Rod J; Meng, Jinling

    2017-07-13

    Introgression of genomic variation between and within related crop species is a significant evolutionary approach for population differentiation, genome reorganization and trait improvement. Using the Illumina Infinium Brassica 60K SNP array, we investigated genomic changes in a panel of advanced generation new-type Brassica napus breeding lines developed from hundreds of interspecific crosses between 122 Brassica rapa and 74 Brassica carinata accessions, and compared them with representative accessions of their three parental species. The new-type B. napus population presented rich genetic diversity and abundant novel genomic alterations, consisting of introgressions from B. rapa and B. carinata, novel allelic combinations, reconstructed linkage disequilibrium patterns and haplotype blocks, and frequent deletions and duplications (nonrandomly distributed), particularly in the C subgenome. After a much shorter, but very intensive, selection history compared to traditional B. napus, a total of 15 genomic regions with strong selective sweeps and 112 genomic regions with putative signals of selective sweeps were identified. Some of these regions were associated with important agronomic traits that were selected for during the breeding process, while others were potentially associated with restoration of genome stability and fertility after interspecific hybridization. Our results demonstrate how a novel method for population-based crop genetic improvement can lead to rapid adaptation, restoration of genome stability and positive responses to artificial selection. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Gene Silencing of BnTT10 Family Genes Causes Retarded Pigmentation and Lignin Reduction in the Seed Coat of Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Lu, Kun; Qu, Cunmin; Liang, Ying; Wang, Rui; Chai, Yourong; Li, Jiana

    2013-01-01

    Yellow-seed (i.e., yellow seed coat) is one of the most important agronomic traits of Brassica plants, which is correlated with seed oil and meal qualities. Previous studies on the Brassicaceae, including Arabidopsis and Brassica species, proposed that the seed-color trait is correlative to flavonoid and lignin biosynthesis, at the molecular level. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the oxidative polymerization of flavonoid and biosynthesis of lignin has been demonstrated to be catalyzed by laccase 15, a functional enzyme encoded by the AtTT10 gene. In this study, eight Brassica TT10 genes (three from B. napus, three from B. rapa and two from B. oleracea) were isolated and their roles in flavonoid oxidation/polymerization and lignin biosynthesis were investigated. Based on our phylogenetic analysis, these genes could be divided into two groups with obvious structural and functional differentiation. Expression studies showed that Brassica TT10 genes are active in developing seeds, but with differential expression patterns in yellow- and black-seeded near-isogenic lines. For functional analyses, three black-seeded B. napus cultivars were chosen for transgenic studies. Transgenic B. napus plants expressing antisense TT10 constructs exhibited retarded pigmentation in the seed coat. Chemical composition analysis revealed increased levels of soluble proanthocyanidins, and decreased extractable lignin in the seed coats of these transgenic plants compared with that of the controls. These findings indicate a role for the Brassica TT10 genes in proanthocyanidin polymerization and lignin biosynthesis, as well as seed coat pigmentation in B. napus. PMID:23613820

  18. Selection and evaluation of novel reference genes for quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) based on genome and transcriptome data in Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongli; Liu, Jing; Huang, Shunmou; Guo, Tingting; Deng, Linbin; Hua, Wei

    2014-03-15

    Selection of reference genes in Brassica napus, a tetraploid (4×) species, is a very difficult task without information on genome and transcriptome. By now, only several traditional reference genes which show significant expression differentiation under different conditions are used in B. napus. In the present study, based on genome and transcriptome data of the rapeseed Zhongshuang-11 cultivar, 14 candidate reference genes were screened for investigation in different tissues, cultivars, and treated conditions of B. napus. These genes were as follows: ELF5, ENTH, F-BOX7, F-BOX2, FYPP1, GDI1, GYF, MCP2d, OTP80, PPR, SPOC, Unknown1, Unknown2 and UBA. Among them, excluding GYF and FYPP1, another 12 genes, were identified to perform better than traditional reference genes ACTIN7 and GAPDH. To further validate the accuracy of the newly developed reference genes in normalization, expression levels of BnCAT1 (B. napus catalase 1) in different rapeseed tissues and seedlings under stress conditions were normalized by the three most stable reference genes PPR, GDI1, and ENTH and little difference existed in normalization results. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time B. napus reference genes have been provided with the help of complete genome and transcriptome information. The new reference genes provided in this study are more accurate than previously reported reference genes in quantifying expression levels of B. napus genes. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of 24-epibrassinolide on Brassica napus alternative respiratory pathway, guard cells movements and phospholipid signaling under salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derevyanchuk, Michael; Kretynin, Sergii; Iakovenko, Oksana; Litvinovskaya, Raisa; Zhabinskii, Vladimir; Martinec, Jan; Blume, Yaroslav; Khripach, Vladimir; Kravets, Volodymyr

    2017-01-01

    Using Brassica napus roots we observed statistically significant increase in alternative respiratory pathway in response to exogenous 24-epibrassinolide (EBL) under optimal conditions and salinity. Also we observed activation of phospholipid signaling under the same conditions in response to EBL by measuring levels of lipid second messengers - diacylglycerol (DAG) and phosphatidic acid (PA). We found that brassinosteroids cause closure of stomata in isolated leaf disks while inhibitors of alternative oxidase cancelled these effects. This study demonstrates that BRs activate total respiration rate, alternative respiratory pathway, production of PA and DAG, stimulate stomata closure and growth under optimal conditions and salinity. Also, specific inhibitor of brassinosteroids biosynthesis decreased alternative respiratory pathway and production of lipid messengers in rape plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Genome-wide association analysis and differential expression analysis of resistance to Sclerotinia stem rot in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lijuan; Jian, Hongju; Lu, Kun; Filardo, Fiona; Yin, Nengwen; Liu, Liezhao; Qu, Cunmin; Li, Wei; Du, Hai; Li, Jiana

    2016-06-01

    Brassica napus is one of the most important oil crops in the world, and stem rot caused by the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum results in major losses in yield and quality. To elucidate resistance genes and pathogenesis-related genes, genome-wide association analysis of 347 accessions was performed using the Illumina 60K Brassica SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) array. In addition, the detached stem inoculation assay was used to select five highly resistant (R) and susceptible (S) B. napus lines, 48 h postinoculation with S. sclerotiorum for transcriptome sequencing. We identified 17 significant associations for stem resistance on chromosomes A8 and C6, five of which were on A8 and 12 on C6. The SNPs identified on A8 were located in a 409-kb haplotype block, and those on C6 were consistent with previous QTL mapping efforts. Transcriptome analysis suggested that S. sclerotiorum infection activates the immune system, sulphur metabolism, especially glutathione (GSH) and glucosinolates in both R and S genotypes. Genes found to be specific to the R genotype related to the jasmonic acid pathway, lignin biosynthesis, defence response, signal transduction and encoding transcription factors. Twenty-four genes were identified in both the SNP-trait association and transcriptome sequencing analyses, including a tau class glutathione S-transferase (GSTU) gene cluster. This study provides useful insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the plant's response to S. sclerotiorum. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Altered Fruit and Seed Development of Transgenic Rapeseed (Brassica napus) Over-Expressing MicroRNA394

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jian Bo; Shu, Xia Xia; Shen, Qi; Li, Bo Wen; Song, Jun; Yang, Zhi Min

    2015-01-01

    Fruit and seed development in plants is a complex biological process mainly involved in input and biosynthesis of many storage compounds such as proteins and oils. Although the basic biochemical pathways for production of the storage metabolites in plants are well characterized, their regulatory mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we functionally identified rapeseed (Brassica napus) miR394 with its target gene Brassica napus LEAF CURLING RESPONSIVENESS (BnLCR) to dissect a role of miR394 during the fruit and seed development. Transgenic rapeseed plants over-expressing miR394 under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter were generated. miR394 over-expression plants exhibited a delayed flowering time and enlarged size of plants, leaf blade, pods and seed body, but developed seeds with higher contents of protein and glucosinolates (GLS) and lower levels of oil accumulation as compared to wild-type. Over-expression of miR394 altered the fatty acid (FA) composition by increasing several FA species such as C16:0 and C18:0 and unsaturated species of C20:1 and C22:1 but lowering C18:3. This change was accompanied by induction of genes coding for transcription factors of FA synthesis including LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (BnLEC1), BnLEC2, and FUSCA3 (FUS3). Because the phytohormone auxin plays a crucial role in fruit development and seed patterning, the DR5-GUS reporter was used for monitoring the auxin response in Arabidopsis siliques and demonstrated that the DR5 gene was strongly expressed. These results suggest that BnmiR394 is involved in rapeseed fruit and seed development. PMID:25978066

  2. Transcriptomic Analysis of Seed Coats in Yellow-Seeded Brassica napus Reveals Novel Genes That Influence Proanthocyanidin Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Meiyan; Hu, Kaining; Tian, Tiantian; Li, Xia; Chen, Li; Zhang, Yan; Yi, Bin; Wen, Jing; Ma, Chaozhi; Shen, Jinxiong; Fu, Tingdong; Tu, Jinxing

    2017-01-01

    Yellow seeds are a favorable trait for Brassica crops breeding due to better quality than their black-seeded counterparts. Here, we compared the Brassica napus seed coat transcriptomes between yellow- and brown-seeded near-isogenic lines (Y-NIL and B-NIL) that were developed from the resynthesized yellow-seeded line No. 2127-17. A total of 4,974 differentially expressed genes (DEG) were identified during seed development, involving 3,128 up-regulated and 1,835 down-regulated genes in yellow seed coats. Phenylpropanoid and flavonoid biosynthesis pathways were enriched in down-regulated genes, whereas the top two pathways for up-regulated genes were plant-pathogen interaction and plant hormone signal transduction. Twelve biosynthetic genes and three regulatory genes involved in the flavonoid pathway exhibited similar expression patterns in seed coats during seed development, of which the down-regulation mainly contributed to the reduction of proanthocyanidins (PAs) in yellow seed coats, indicating that these genes associated with PA biosynthesis may be regulated by an unreported common regulator, possibly corresponding to the candidate for the dominant black-seeded gene D in the NILs. Three transcription factor (TF) genes, including one bHLH gene and two MYB-related genes that are located within the previous seed coat color quantitative trait locus (QTL) region on chromosome A09, also showed similar developmental expression patterns to the key PA biosynthetic genes and they might thus potentially involved participate in flavonoid biosynthesis regulation. Our study identified novel potential TFs involved in PAs accumulation and will provide pivotal information for identifying the candidate genes for seed coat color in B. napus.

  3. Altered Fruit and Seed Development of Transgenic Rapeseed (Brassica napus Over-Expressing MicroRNA394.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Bo Song

    Full Text Available Fruit and seed development in plants is a complex biological process mainly involved in input and biosynthesis of many storage compounds such as proteins and oils. Although the basic biochemical pathways for production of the storage metabolites in plants are well characterized, their regulatory mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we functionally identified rapeseed (Brassica napus miR394 with its target gene Brassica napus leaf curling responsiveness (BnLCR to dissect a role of miR394 during the fruit and seed development. Transgenic rapeseed plants over-expressing miR394 under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter were generated. miR394 over-expression plants exhibited a delayed flowering time and enlarged size of plants, leaf blade, pods and seed body, but developed seeds with higher contents of protein and glucosinolates (GLS and lower levels of oil accumulation as compared to wild-type. Over-expression of miR394 altered the fatty acid (FA composition by increasing several FA species such as C16:0 and C18:0 and unsaturated species of C20:1 and C22:1 but lowering C18:3. This change was accompanied by induction of genes coding for transcription factors of FA synthesis including leafy cotyledon1 (BnLEC1, BnLEC2, and FUSCA3 (FUS3. Because the phytohormone auxin plays a crucial role in fruit development and seed patterning, the DR5-GUS reporter was used for monitoring the auxin response in Arabidopsis siliques and demonstrated that the DR5 gene was strongly expressed. These results suggest that BnmiR394 is involved in rapeseed fruit and seed development.

  4. Quantitative trait loci for thermal time to flowering and photoperiod responsiveness discovered in summer annual-type Brassica napus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew N Nelson

    Full Text Available Time of flowering is a key adaptive trait in plants and is conditioned by the interaction of genes and environmental cues including length of photoperiod, ambient temperature and vernalisation. Here we investigated the photoperiod responsiveness of summer annual-types of Brassica napus (rapeseed, canola. A population of 131 doubled haploid lines derived from a cross between European and Australian parents was evaluated for days to flowering, thermal time to flowering (measured in degree-days and the number of leaf nodes at flowering in a compact and efficient glasshouse-based experiment with replicated short and long day treatments. All three traits were under strong genetic control with heritability estimates ranging from 0.85-0.93. There was a very strong photoperiod effect with flowering in the population accelerated by 765 degree-days in the long day versus short day treatments. However, there was a strong genetic correlation of line effects (0.91 between the long and short day treatments and relatively low genotype x treatment interaction indicating that photoperiod had a similar effect across the population. Bivariate analysis of thermal time to flowering in short and long days revealed three main effect quantitative trait loci (QTLs that accounted for 57.7% of the variation in the population and no significant interaction QTLs. These results provided insight into the contrasting adaptations of Australian and European varieties. Both parents responded to photoperiod and their alleles shifted the population to earlier flowering under long days. In addition, segregation of QTLs in the population caused wide transgressive segregation in thermal time to flowering. Potential candidate flowering time homologues located near QTLs were identified with the aid of the Brassica rapa reference genome sequence. We discuss how these results will help to guide the breeding of summer annual types of B. napus adapted to new and changing environments.

  5. Citric acid enhances the phytoextraction of chromium, plant growth, and photosynthesis by alleviating the oxidative damages in Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshan, Sehar; Ali, Shafaqat; Bharwana, Saima Aslam; Rizwan, Muhammad; Farid, Mujahid; Abbas, Farhat; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Mehmood, Muhammad Aamer; Abbasi, Ghulam Hasan

    2015-08-01

    Chromium (Cr) toxicity is widespread in crops grown on Cr-contaminated soils and has become a serious environmental issue which requires affordable strategies for the remediation of such soils. This study was performed to assess the performance of citric acid (CA) through growing Brassica napus in the phytoextraction of Cr from contaminated soil. Different Cr (0, 100, and 500 μM) and citric acid (0, 2.5, and 5.0 mM) treatments were applied alone and in combinations to 4-week-old seedlings of B. napus plants in soil under wire house condition. Plants were harvested after 12 weeks of sowing, and the data was recorded regarding growth characteristics, biomass, photosynthetic pigments, malondialdehyde (MDA), electrolytic leakage (EL), antioxidant enzymes, and Cr uptake and accumulation. The results showed that the plant growth, biomass, chlorophyll contents, and carotenoid as well as soluble protein concentrations significantly decreased under Cr stress alone while these adverse effects were alleviated by application of CA. Cr concentration in roots, stem, and leaves of CA-supplied plant was significantly reduced while total uptake of Cr increased in all plant parts with CA application. Furthermore, in comparison with Cr treatments alone, CA supply reduced the MDA and EL values in both shoots and roots. Moreover, the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacol peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) in shoots and roots markedly increased by 100 μM Cr exposure, while decreased at 500 μM Cr stress. CA application enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes compared to the same Cr treatment alone. Thus, the data indicate that exogenous CA application can increase Cr uptake and can minimize Cr stress in plants and may be beneficial in accelerating the phytoextraction of Cr through hyper-accumulating plants such as B. napus.

  6. Alteration of chromosome behavior and synchronization of parental chromosomes after successive generations in Brassica napus x Orychophragmus violaceus hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhigang; Ma, Ni; Li, Zaiyun

    2007-02-01

    In an earlier study, the progenies of intergeneric hybrids Brassica napus (2n = 38) x Orychophragmus violaceus (2n = 24) were investigated in successive generations (F1-F4) for the cytological phenomenon of parental genome separation during mitotic and meiotic division. In the present study, inbred lines (F5-F8) derived from 1 such hybrid were characterized for morphology, chromosome pairing behaviour, and genome composition. One F5 plant (2n = 31) with slightly yellow petals and 12:19 and 15:16 segregation ratios in its pollen mother cells (PMCs) produced F6 plants with distinct morphological characteristics and wide variations in fertility and chromosome numbers (2n = 25-38). F7 and F8 lines with distinctive morphology and wide ranges in chromsome numbers were established. In PMCs of F7 plants from 4 F6 plants, 0-12 labelled chromosomes from O. violaceus, which predominantly appeared as bivalents, were identified by genomic in situ hybridization. They behaved synchronously with B. napus chromosomes during meiotic division. The results provide molecular cytogenetic evidence of the inclusion of O. violaceus chromosomes in the original hybrids and the cytology in the hybrids documented earlier. They also show that chromosome behaviour was altered and the parental chromosomes became synchronized after successive generations.

  7. Brassica napus polygalacturonase inhibitor proteins inhibit Sclerotinia sclerotiorum polygalacturonase enzymatic and necrotizing activities and delay symptoms in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashi, Zafer Dallal; Rimmer, S Roger; Khachatourians, George G; Hegedus, Dwayne D

    2013-02-01

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum releases a battery of polygalacturonases (PGs) during infection, which the host plant may cope with through production of polygalacturonase inhibitor proteins (PGIPs). To study the interaction between S. sclerotiorum PGs and Brassica napus PGIPs, 5 S. sclerotiorum PGs and 4 B. napus PGIPs were expressed in Pichia pastoris. SsPG3, SsPG6, and BnPGIP1 were successfully produced in the yeast system, and BnPGIP1 inhibited SsPG6 enzymatic activity in vitro. SsPG3 and SsPG6 both induced light-dependent necrosis when infiltrated into leaves, which was reduced in an Arabidopsis thaliana line expressing BnPGIP2 and to a lesser extent in a line expressing BnPGIP1. The line expressing BnPGIP2 also exhibited a delay in the onset of symptoms upon S. sclerotiorum inoculation, but no long-term effect on S. sclerotiorum disease progression was observed. The P. pastoris system was found to be suitable for expressing high levels of some S. sclerotiorum PGs, but PGIP interaction studies were best performed in planta. Arabidopsis thaliana forms necrotic lesions upon infiltration of PGs, is susceptible to S. sclerotiorum, and is easily transformed, and thus, is well-suited for the qualitative study of PG-PGIP interactions.

  8. Exogenous 3,3'-diindolylmethane increases Brassica napus L. seedling shoot growth through modulation of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokul, Arun; Roode, Enrico; Klein, Ashwil; Keyster, Marshall

    2016-06-01

    Brassica napus L. (cv. AV Garnet) seeds were pre-treated with 15μM 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM) to investigate whether DIM could enhance seed germination. Further treatment of seedlings with 15μM DIM for 14days explored the effects on seedling shoot growth. Exogenous DIM led to improved germination percentage, increased seedling shoot lengths, and increased fresh and dry weights. Furthermore, DIM triggered induction of superoxide radical (O2(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) content however, no change in malondialdehyde (MDA) content and cell death (assesse