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Sample records for branchial cleft cyst

  1. Branchial Cleft Cyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahata, Vaishali

    2016-01-01

    Branchial cleft cyst, sinuses, and fistulae are among the most commonly encountered congenital anomalies in pediatric otolaryngic practice. They can present difficulty in diagnosis and surgical management. Here, I report a case of 14-year-old boy who presented with asymptomatic, congenital swelling located just below the jawline in the lateral part of the neck. The lesion was excised surgically. Histopathology showed the cyst lined by squamous as well as columnar ciliated epithelium, which was a characteristic finding of branchial cleft cyst. The aim of presenting this case is its rarity. PMID:27904209

  2. Branchial cleft cyst

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    Vaishali Nahata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Branchial cleft cyst, sinuses, and fistulae are among the most commonly encountered congenital anomalies in pediatric otolaryngic practice. They can present difficulty in diagnosis and surgical management. Here, I report a case of 14-year-old boy who presented with asymptomatic, congenital swelling located just below the jawline in the lateral part of the neck. The lesion was excised surgically. Histopathology showed the cyst lined by squamous as well as columnar ciliated epithelium, which was a characteristic finding of branchial cleft cyst. The aim of presenting this case is its rarity.

  3. Branchial Cleft Cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahata, Vaishali

    2016-01-01

    Branchial cleft cyst, sinuses, and fistulae are among the most commonly encountered congenital anomalies in pediatric otolaryngic practice. They can present difficulty in diagnosis and surgical management. Here, I report a case of 14-year-old boy who presented with asymptomatic, congenital swelling located just below the jawline in the lateral part of the neck. The lesion was excised surgically. Histopathology showed the cyst lined by squamous as well as columnar ciliated epithelium, which was a characteristic finding of branchial cleft cyst. The aim of presenting this case is its rarity.

  4. Branchial Cleft Cyst

    OpenAIRE

    Nahata, Vaishali

    2016-01-01

    Branchial cleft cyst, sinuses, and fistulae are among the most commonly encountered congenital anomalies in pediatric otolaryngic practice. They can present difficulty in diagnosis and surgical management. Here, I report a case of 14-year-old boy who presented with asymptomatic, congenital swelling located just below the jawline in the lateral part of the neck. The lesion was excised surgically. Histopathology showed the cyst lined by squamous as well as columnar ciliated epithelium, which wa...

  5. Branchial cleft cyst encircling the hypoglossal nerve

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    Long, Kristin L.; Spears, Carol; Kenady, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Branchial cleft anomalies are a common cause of lateral neck masses and may present with infection, cyst enlargement or fistulas. They may affect any of the nearby neck structures, causing compressive symptoms or vessel thrombosis. We present a case of a branchial cleft cyst in a 10-year-old boy who had been present for 1year. At the time of operation, the cyst was found to completely envelop the hypoglossal nerve. While reports of hypoglossal nerve palsies due to external compression from cysts are known, we believe this to be the first report of direct nerve involvement by a branchial cleft cyst. PMID:24963902

  6. Second branchial cleft cyst of the oropharynx

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    Paik, Sang Hyun; Kim, Hyun Sook; Moon Seung Il; Choi, Yun Sun; Cho, Jae Min; Cho, Sung Bum; Yoon, Sook Ja; Kim, Dai Hong; Yoon, Yong Kyu

    2001-01-01

    We report a very rare type of second branchial cleft cyst located at the oropharynx, and include a review of the literature. CT scans of the neck revealed a homogeneous non-enhancing low-density mass in the right posterolateral mucosal wall of the oropharynx. Only the peripheral capsule of the mass was enhanced. The cyst was resected perorally and proved to be a type-IV second branchial cleft cyst

  7. Second branchial cleft cyst of the oropharynx

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    Paik, Sang Hyun; Kim, Hyun Sook; Moon Seung Il; Choi, Yun Sun; Cho, Jae Min; Cho, Sung Bum; Yoon, Sook Ja; Kim, Dai Hong; Yoon, Yong Kyu [Eulji Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-01

    We report a very rare type of second branchial cleft cyst located at the oropharynx, and include a review of the literature. CT scans of the neck revealed a homogeneous non-enhancing low-density mass in the right posterolateral mucosal wall of the oropharynx. Only the peripheral capsule of the mass was enhanced. The cyst was resected perorally and proved to be a type-IV second branchial cleft cyst.

  8. Thymic cyst: a fourth branchial cleft anomaly.

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    Nayan, Smriti; MacLean, Jonathan; Sommer, Doron

    2010-01-01

    We report a unique case of a fourth branchial cleft cyst found within the thymus of an adult patient. In the literature to date, there have been no reports of such a finding in the adult population. These anomalies can often cause recurrent acute suppurative thyroiditis or recurrent deep neck abscesses. Delay in recognizing the underlying etiology can lead to significant complications.

  9. Sonographic detection of intrathyroidal branchial cleft cyst: a case report

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    Lee, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Hong, Soon-Won [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    We report here on an extremely rare case of an intrathyroidal branchial cleft cyst. Intrathyroidal branchial cleft cyst is rare disease entity and it nonspecific findings on sonography, so the diagnosis of the lesion is very difficult. However, during aspiration, if pus-like materials are aspirated from a thyroid cyst, we should consider the possibility of intrathyroidal branchial cleft cyst in the differential diagnosis.

  10. Sonographic detection of intrathyroidal branchial cleft cyst: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Hong, Soon-Won

    2006-01-01

    We report here on an extremely rare case of an intrathyroidal branchial cleft cyst. Intrathyroidal branchial cleft cyst is rare disease entity and it nonspecific findings on sonography, so the diagnosis of the lesion is very difficult. However, during aspiration, if pus-like materials are aspirated from a thyroid cyst, we should consider the possibility of intrathyroidal branchial cleft cyst in the differential diagnosis

  11. THIRD BRANCHIAL CLEFT CYST PRESENTATION IN ADULTHOOD: A CASE REPORT

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    Srinjeeta Garg; Yuvraj Patil; Karan Vayangankar; Adip Shetty; Haritosh Kamalakar Velankar

    2014-01-01

    Third branchial cleft cysts (BCCs) are rare entities that represent abnormal persistence of the branchial apparatus. Most cases of third branchial cleft cysts (BCCs) are diagnosed in childhood and show a marked preference for the left side. However, here we present this rare anomaly in a 40 year old female which presented as a fast growing swelling in adulthood.

  12. Possible Estrogen Dependency in the Pathogenesis of Branchial Cleft Cysts

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    Jan D. Raguse

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Even though branchial cleft cysts are currently accepted as a congenital anomaly, there is often a long delay until clinical presentation; branchial cleft cysts classically appear in the second to fourth decade of life. Our observation of their occurrence in three pregnant women encouraged us to contemplate a possible hormonal influence. Methods. Immunohistological analysis was performed for the evaluation of the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα in paraffin-embedded tissue specimens of 16 patients with a diagnosis of branchial cleft cyst, with three of them being pregnant. Results. Expression of ERα was detected within epithelial cells only in branchial cleft cysts in pregnant females; moreover, higher growth fractions (Ki-67/Mib1 were found. Conclusion. The fact that the estrogen receptor was expressed only in pregnant women, in contrast to 13 investigated cases, may suggest that the high level of estrogen in pregnancy is a possible explanation for the spontaneous growth of branchial cleft cysts.

  13. Possible Estrogen Dependency in the Pathogenesis of Branchial Cleft Cysts.

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    Raguse, Jan D; Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis; Doll, Christian; Heiland, Max; Jöhrens, Korinna

    2017-01-01

    Even though branchial cleft cysts are currently accepted as a congenital anomaly, there is often a long delay until clinical presentation; branchial cleft cysts classically appear in the second to fourth decade of life. Our observation of their occurrence in three pregnant women encouraged us to contemplate a possible hormonal influence. Immunohistological analysis was performed for the evaluation of the estrogen receptor alpha (ER α ) in paraffin-embedded tissue specimens of 16 patients with a diagnosis of branchial cleft cyst, with three of them being pregnant. Expression of ER α was detected within epithelial cells only in branchial cleft cysts in pregnant females; moreover, higher growth fractions (Ki-67/Mib1) were found. The fact that the estrogen receptor was expressed only in pregnant women, in contrast to 13 investigated cases, may suggest that the high level of estrogen in pregnancy is a possible explanation for the spontaneous growth of branchial cleft cysts.

  14. The occurrence of a branchial cleft cyst in the anterior mediastinum: a case report

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    Park, Seong Hoon; Kim, Seong Hoon; Shin, Hyun Woong; Jo, Hyun Chul; Son, Mi Yung; Gong, Joon Hyuk

    2008-01-01

    Branchial cleft cysts and branchial anomalies develop from the branchial cleft apparatus that persists after fetal development. The most common anatomical site for the occurrence of branchial cleft cysts is in the cervical area, generally anterior to the sternomastoid muscle in the upper or middle portion of the neck. A mediastinal branchial cleft cyst is extremely rare and few cases have been reported. We report the case of branchial cleft cyst found in the anterior mediastinum with literature review

  15. The occurrence of a branchial cleft cyst in the anterior mediastinum: a case report

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    Park, Seong Hoon; Kim, Seong Hoon; Shin, Hyun Woong; Jo, Hyun Chul; Son, Mi Yung; Gong, Joon Hyuk [Daegu Fatima Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    Branchial cleft cysts and branchial anomalies develop from the branchial cleft apparatus that persists after fetal development. The most common anatomical site for the occurrence of branchial cleft cysts is in the cervical area, generally anterior to the sternomastoid muscle in the upper or middle portion of the neck. A mediastinal branchial cleft cyst is extremely rare and few cases have been reported. We report the case of branchial cleft cyst found in the anterior mediastinum with literature review.

  16. An unusual presentation of presentation of a branchial cleft cyst.

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    Vemula, Rahul; Greco, Gregory

    2012-05-01

    Branchial cleft cysts are congenital anomalies that arise from the aberrant embryological development of the branchial apparatus. The location of a branchial cleft cyst is determined by which branchial cleft failed to obliterate during embryological development, with the second branchial cleft cyst being the most commonly recognized lesion. Although the most common location for branchial cleft cysts is between the external auditory canal and the level of the clavicle, the literature does describe unusual locations. We present a case a 15-year-old boy who had an enlarging lesion on his back that had been present since birth. A presumptive radiologic diagnosis of lymphangioma circumscriptum was made. Upon excision of the lesion and pathologic examination, it was determined to be a branchial cleft cyst. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course, and no recurrence was noted after a 2-year follow-up. Our clinical report demonstrates a lesion on the posterior thorax that proved to be a branchial cleft cyst and should always be part of the differential diagnosis for soft tissue masses of the thorax.

  17. [First branchial cleft cyst in nasopharynx: a case report].

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    2017-09-20

    We report a rare case of first branchial cleft cyst arising from the nasopharynx. A 47-year old woman with a six-month-history of right ear stuffy and hearing loss was studied. Electronic nasopharyngeal examination revealed a mass in the nasopharynx of this case. The tumor was removed endoscopically with endonasal approach. Postoperative pathological examination indicated that it was branchial cleft cyst. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Clinical Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery.

  18. Duplicated facial nerve trunk with a first branchial cleft cyst.

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    Hinson, Drew; Poteet, Perry; Bower, Charles

    2014-03-01

    First branchial cleft anomalies are rare and their various anatomical relationships to the facial nerve have been described. We encountered a 15-year-old female with a type II first branchial cleft cyst presenting as a right neck mass that we found during surgical excision to transverse two main facial nerve trunks. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a first branchial cleft anomaly in conjunction with a duplicated facial nerve trunk. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  19. Branchial cleft or cervical lymphoepithelial cysts: etiology and management.

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    Glosser, Jeffrey W; Pires, Carlos Alberto S; Feinberg, Stephen E

    2003-01-01

    The cervical lymphoepithelial or branchial cleft cyst is a developmental cyst that has a disputed pathogenesis. The objective of this article is to provide a brief review of the literature and to define diagnostic terms related to this anomaly, as well as to describe its etiology, clinical presentation and treatment. The cervical lymphoepithelial or branchial cleft cyst usually presents as a unilateral, soft-tissue fluctuant swelling that typically appears in the lateral aspect of the neck, anterior to the sternocleidomastoid muscle, and becomes clinically evident late in childhood or in early adulthood. Clinicians can diagnose the cyst with appropriate imaging to assess the extent of the lesion before definitive surgical treatment. The authors describe a patient who underwent excision of a well-encapsulated cystic structure that was diagnosed as a branchial cleft cyst. The cervical lymphoepithelial or branchial cleft cyst can be easily misdiagnosed as a parotid swelling or odontogenic infection. It is imperative that clinicians make an accurate diagnosis so that appropriate treatment (that is, surgical excision) can be performed. If the cysts are treated properly, recurrences are rare.

  20. Efficacy and Safety of Ethanol Ablation for Branchial Cleft Cysts.

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    Ha, E J; Baek, S M; Baek, J H; Shin, S Y; Han, M; Kim, C-H

    2017-12-01

    Branchial cleft cyst is a common congenital lesion of the neck. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of ethanol ablation as an alternative treatment to surgery for branchial cleft cyst. Between September 2006 and October 2016, ethanol ablation was performed in 22 patients who refused an operation for a second branchial cleft cyst. After the exclusion of 2 patients who were lost to follow-up, the data of 20 patients were retrospectively evaluated. All index masses were confirmed as benign before treatment. Sonography-guided aspiration of the cystic fluid was followed by injection of absolute ethanol (99%) into the lesion. The injected volume of ethanol was 50%-80% of the volume of fluid aspirated. Therapeutic outcome, including the volume reduction ratio, therapeutic success rate (volume reduction ratio of >50% and/or no palpable mass), and complications, was evaluated. The mean index volume of the cysts was 26.4 ± 15.7 mL (range, 3.8-49.9 mL). After ablation, the mean volume of the cysts decreased to 1.2 ± 1.1 mL (range, 0.0-3.5 mL). The mean volume reduction ratio at last follow-up was 93.9% ± 7.9% (range, 75.5%-100.0%; P branchial cleft cysts who refuse, or are ineligible for, an operation. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  1. Endoscope-assisted approach to excision of branchial cleft cysts.

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    Teng, Stephanie E; Paul, Benjamin C; Brumm, John D; Fritz, Mark; Fang, Yixin; Myssiorek, David

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe an endoscope-assisted surgical technique for the excision of branchial cleft cysts and compare it to the standard approach. Retrospective case series review. Twenty-seven cases described as branchial cleft excisions performed by a single surgeon at one academic medical center were identified between 2007 and 2014. Twenty-five cases (8 endoscopic, 17 standard approach) were included in the study. Cases were excluded if final pathology was malignant. Patient charts were reviewed, and two techniques were compared through analysis of incision size, operative time, and surgical outcomes. This study showed that the length of incision required for the endoscopic approach (mean = 2.13 ± 0.23) was significantly less than that of the standard approach (mean = 4.10 ± 1.46, P = 0.008) despite the fact that there was no significant difference in cyst size between the two groups (P = 0.09). The other variables examined, including operative time and surgical outcomes, were not significantly different between the two groups. This transcervical endoscope-assisted approach to branchial cleft cyst excision is a viable option for uncomplicated cases. It provides better cosmetic results than the standard approach and does not negatively affect outcomes, increase operative time, or result in recurrence. 4. Laryngoscope, 126:1339-1342, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. Rare localization of a branchial cleft cyst in a child - case report

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    Chodorowska, A.; Haran, T.

    2006-01-01

    Branchial cleft cysts are the most common neck masses in children. USG and MRI allow precise diagnosis and preoperative assessment of these changes. A 20-month-old girl was admitted to the hospital with a palpable mass in the submandibular region. In the USG and MRI examinations, a cystic mass was found. The cyst was removed. Histopathological examination revealed the presence of an endodermal cleft cyst. The main cause of neck tumors in children are congenital changes. The most common are branchial cleft cysts and thyreoglossal cysts. Branchial cleft cysts arise during the first six weeks of fetal life when the branchial arches are developing. Among them the most common are second branchial cleft cysts, which occur in the neck, anterior to the sternocleidomastoid. (author)

  3. Fine needle aspiration cytology versus frozen section in branchial cleft cysts.

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    Begbie, F; Visvanathan, V; Clark, L J

    2015-02-01

    Branchial cleft cysts occur because of a failure of involution of the second branchial cleft. However, as well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma can mimic branchial cleft cysts, there is a lack of consensus on the appropriate management of cystic neck lumps. To report our experience of fine needle aspiration cytology and frozen section examination in the management of cystic neck lumps. Retrospective case note review of patients managed in the Southern General Hospital, Scotland, UK. The sensitivity of fine needle aspiration cytology and frozen section for detecting branchial cleft cysts was 75 per cent and 100 per cent respectively. Two patients who did not undergo intra-operative frozen section examination were either over- or under-treated, which is discussed. Adult patients subjected to surgical excision of a suspected branchial cyst should undergo intra-operative frozen section analysis regardless of clinical suspicion for malignancy. This part of management is critical to ensure patients are offered appropriate treatment.

  4. Branchial cleft cyst: A case report and review of literature.

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    Chavan, Surekha; Deshmukh, Revati; Karande, Prasad; Ingale, Yeshwant

    2014-01-01

    First branchial cleft anomaly is a rare disease of the head and neck. Because of its rarity, first branchial cleft anomaly is often misdiagnosed and results in inappropriate management. In this article, we present a case of type II first branchial cleft anomaly. A middle-aged woman who had suffered from swelling on lower jaw visited our department with the chief complaint of a swelling. She underwent complete excision of the lesion with preservation of the facial nerve. The patient recovered well and had no recurrence at 1-year of follow up.

  5. A Type I first branchial cleft cyst masquerading as a parotid tumor

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    Krishnamurthy, Arvind; Ramshanker, Vijayalakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Branchial cleft anomalies are caused by incomplete regression of the cervical sinus of “His” during the 6th and 7th weeks of embryologic development. Although congenital in origin, first branchial cleft cysts (FBCCs) can present later in life. FBCCs are rare causes of parotid swellings, accounting for branchial cleft abnormalities. The diagnosis of FBCCs is a clinical challenge; the condition is often overlooked and mismanaged. We report a case of Type 1 FBCC in a 22-year-old female with an asymptomatic 3.5 cm × 2.5 cm sized cystic mass. It was removed completely under the impression of a cystic tumor of the parotid. On histopathology, the cyst had a squamous epithelium-lined wall with lymphoid aggregation which was characteristic of a branchial cleft cyst. A good understanding of the regional anatomy and embryology can lead to an early diagnosis and thereby effective management of FBCC. PMID:25298726

  6. A Type I first branchial cleft cyst masquerading as a parotid tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Arvind; Ramshanker, Vijayalakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Branchial cleft anomalies are caused by incomplete regression of the cervical sinus of "His" during the 6(th) and 7(th) weeks of embryologic development. Although congenital in origin, first branchial cleft cysts (FBCCs) can present later in life. FBCCs are rare causes of parotid swellings, accounting for branchial cleft abnormalities. The diagnosis of FBCCs is a clinical challenge; the condition is often overlooked and mismanaged. We report a case of Type 1 FBCC in a 22-year-old female with an asymptomatic 3.5 cm × 2.5 cm sized cystic mass. It was removed completely under the impression of a cystic tumor of the parotid. On histopathology, the cyst had a squamous epithelium-lined wall with lymphoid aggregation which was characteristic of a branchial cleft cyst. A good understanding of the regional anatomy and embryology can lead to an early diagnosis and thereby effective management of FBCC.

  7. Current management of congenital branchial cleft cysts, sinuses, and fistulae.

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    Goff, Christopher J; Allred, Carly; Glade, Robert S

    2012-12-01

    Branchial anomalies comprise approximately 20% of pediatric congenital head and neck lesions. This study reviews current literature detailing the diagnosis and management of first, second, third and fourth branchial cysts, sinuses and fistulae. Branchial anomalies remain classified as first, second, third and fourth cysts, sinuses and fistulae. Management varies on the basis of classification. The imaging study of choice remains controversial. Computed tomography fistulography likely best demonstrates the complete course of the tract if a cutaneous opening is present. Treatment of all lesions has historically been by complete surgical excision of the entire tract. Studies of less invasive procedures for several anomalies are promising including sclerotherapy and endoscopic excision of second branchial cysts, and endoscopic cauterization or sclerotherapy at the piriform opening for third and fourth branchial sinuses. An increased risk of complications in children less than 8 years is reported in children undergoing open excision of third and fourth branchial anomalies. Branchial anomalies are common congenital pediatric head and neck lesions but are comprised by several diverse anomalies. Treatment must be tailored depending on which branchial arch is involved and whether a cyst mass or sinus/fistula tract is present.

  8. Branchial cleft anomalies: CT evaluation

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    Seok, Eul Hye; Park, Chan Sup [College of Medicine, Inha University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the CT findings of a variety of branchial cleft anomalies in the head and neck area. We reviewed the CT findings of 16 patients with neck lesion pathologically proved as branchial cleft anomalies. There were two first and 12 second branchial cleft cysts, one first and one second branchial cleft sinuses. Two cases of first branchial cleft cysts were manifested as thin-walled, cystic masses at auricular area. One first branchial cleft sinus was an external opening type and manifested as an ill-defined, enhancing solid lesion at posterior auricular area. All 12 cases of second branchial cleft cysts demonstrated a typical location, displacing the sternocleidomastoid muscle posteriorly, the carotid artery and internal jugular vein complex medially and the submandibular gland anteriorly. Eight cases of second branchial cleft cysts were seen as fluid-filled, round or ovoid-shaped cysts, and 3 cases of them were seen as irregular-shaped cysts. In one case, suppurative adenopathy with loss of soft tissue planes around the cyst was observed. One case of second branchial cleft sinus was manifested as a tubular-shaped, enhancing lesion at submental area and containing external opening site draining into the anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. We conclude that CT provides important diagnostic and therapeutic information in patients with a neck mass believed to be a branchial cleft anomaly, as it can differentiate various forms of the branchial anomalies by their characteristic location and shape.

  9. Branchial cleft anomalies: CT evaluation

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    Seok, Eul Hye; Park, Chan Sup

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the CT findings of a variety of branchial cleft anomalies in the head and neck area. We reviewed the CT findings of 16 patients with neck lesion pathologically proved as branchial cleft anomalies. There were two first and 12 second branchial cleft cysts, one first and one second branchial cleft sinuses. Two cases of first branchial cleft cysts were manifested as thin-walled, cystic masses at auricular area. One first branchial cleft sinus was an external opening type and manifested as an ill-defined, enhancing solid lesion at posterior auricular area. All 12 cases of second branchial cleft cysts demonstrated a typical location, displacing the sternocleidomastoid muscle posteriorly, the carotid artery and internal jugular vein complex medially and the submandibular gland anteriorly. Eight cases of second branchial cleft cysts were seen as fluid-filled, round or ovoid-shaped cysts, and 3 cases of them were seen as irregular-shaped cysts. In one case, suppurative adenopathy with loss of soft tissue planes around the cyst was observed. One case of second branchial cleft sinus was manifested as a tubular-shaped, enhancing lesion at submental area and containing external opening site draining into the anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. We conclude that CT provides important diagnostic and therapeutic information in patients with a neck mass believed to be a branchial cleft anomaly, as it can differentiate various forms of the branchial anomalies by their characteristic location and shape

  10. A Rare Case Report of a Child Coexistence Thyroglossal Cyst and Second Branchial Cleft Fistulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdoufi, Rachid; Barhmi, Ismail; Tazi, Nabil; Rouadi, Sami; Abada, Reda; Roubal, Mohamed; Mahtar, Mohamed

    2017-06-01

    Thyroglossal duct cysts followed by branchial cleft anomalies are the most common congenital neck masses encountered in practice, second branchial cleft cysts and sinuses are the most common type (LaRiviere and Waldhausen in Surg Clin North Am 92(3):583-597, 2012). Although both abnormalities are common individually, but rarely seen associated in same patient as described in our case. Congenitalcervical anomalies are important to consider in the differential of head and neck masses in children and adults. These lesions can present as palpable cystic masses, infected masses, draining sinuses, or fistulae. Thyroglossal duct cysts are most common, followed by branchial cleft anomalies. A synchronous presentation of both type of cyst and fistula in a same child patient is very rare with no such cases reported in literature till date.

  11. Squamous cell carcinoma arising from second branchial cleft cyst: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Heung Cheol; Hwang, Im Kyung; Kim, Bong Soo; Namkung Sook; Hwang, Woo Cheol

    2003-01-01

    Primary branchiogenic carcinoma is a rare malignant tumor resulting from the malignant transformation of a branchial cleft cyst. In the case we describe, CT scanning and ultrasonography demonstrated the characteristic findings of a second branchial cleft cyst located in the anterior triangle of the neck, along the anterior margin of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. This lesion presented as a well-defined cystic mass with a thick irregular inner wall and central septa, and associated multiple neighboring necrotic lymph nodes. Microscopic examination revealed a transition zone from squamous epithelium to squamous cell carcinoma

  12. CT of second branchial cleft cysts and fistula: comparison with MRI in three cases

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    Schepper, A.M.A. de; Monheim, P.; Degryse, H.R.; Van de Heyning, P.

    1988-01-01

    Second branchial cleft cyst (SBCC) is a relatively common disease. Over a period of 18 months we have evaluated 11 patients with SBCC. Based on CT-findings all SBCC were correctly diagnosed as well in their uncomplicated as in their complicated (infected) presentation. A second branchial cleft fistula evaluated both by fistulography and CT-fistulography illustrates the anatomy of the cervical sinus and the potential topography of SBCC. Three cases were also evaluated by MRI and in two cases T1 calculation of aspirated cyst fluid was performed; preliminary results are reported.

  13. Squamous cell carcinoma arising from second branchial cleft cyst: case report

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    Kim, Heung Cheol; Hwang, Im Kyung; Kim, Bong Soo; Namkung Sook; Hwang, Woo Cheol [Hallym University College of Medicine, Chunchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-01

    Primary branchiogenic carcinoma is a rare malignant tumor resulting from the malignant transformation of a branchial cleft cyst. In the case we describe, CT scanning and ultrasonography demonstrated the characteristic findings of a second branchial cleft cyst located in the anterior triangle of the neck, along the anterior margin of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. This lesion presented as a well-defined cystic mass with a thick irregular inner wall and central septa, and associated multiple neighboring necrotic lymph nodes. Microscopic examination revealed a transition zone from squamous epithelium to squamous cell carcinoma.

  14. Branchial cleft-like cysts in Hashimoto's thyroiditis: A case report and literature review.

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    Miyazaki, Masaya; Kiuchi, Shizuka; Fujioka, Yasunori

    2016-05-01

    We report an extremely rare case of branchial cleft-like cysts in Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The patient was a 77-year-old man with a growing mass in the anterior neck. Ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed a cystic lesion with septum in the left thyroid and multiple small cystic lesions in the right thyroid. Lymph node swelling of the cervical region, supraclavicular fossa and submandibular region was also observed. Left thyroidectomy and lymph node dissection were performed. Histologically, cysts were lined by stratified squamous epithelium and dense lymphoid tissue having conspicuous follicle formation surrounded the epithelial lining. Solid cell nest (SCN)-like aggregations were seen in the thyroid parenchyma adjacent to the cyst walls and a small number of thyroid follicles were observed in the fibrous wall. Immunohistochemically, it is suggested that both the cyst lining and SCN-like aggregations are originally from thyroid follicles. Although, the exact histogenesis of branchial cleft-like cysts remains unclear, there are probably two different processes for its development, one is of branchial cleft origin and the other is mere squamous metaplasia, while in our case the latter is suggested. Herein, we report our new case and update information about branchial cleft-like cysts that appears in the literature. © 2016 Japanese Society of Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. The non-typical MRI findings of the branchial cleft cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Chunhong; Wu Qingde; Yao Xuanjun; Chen Jie; Zhu Wei; Chen Jianhua; Xing Jianming; Ding Yi; Ge Zili

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the non-typical MRI findings of the branchial cleft cysts in order to improve their diagnoses. Methods: 10 cases with branchial cleft cysts proven by surgery and pathology were collected and their MRI features were analyzed. There were 6 male and 4 female, aged 15 to 70, with an averaged age of 37. All patients underwent plain MR scan, 6 patients underwent enhanced scan, and 4 patients underwent magnetic resonance angiography. Results: All 10 cases were second branchial cleft cysts, including 4 of Bailey type I and 6 of type II. The non-typical MRI findings were composed of haematocele (2 cases), extraordinarily thick cyst wall (4 cases), solidified cystic fluid (2 cases), and concomitant canceration (2 cases), which made the diagnoses more difficult. Conclusion: The diagnoses of the branchial cleft cysts with non-typical MRI features should combined with its characteristic of position that located at the lateral portion of the neck adjacent to the anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle at the mandibular angle. The findings, such as thickened wall, ill-defined margin, and vascular involvement or jugular lymphadenectasis, strongly suggest cancerous tendency. (authors)

  16. Case report of a p16INK4A-positive branchial cleft cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, T; Iseli, C; Amott, D; Taylor, M

    2015-06-01

    To report the occurrence of a concurrent oropharyngeal papilloma and branchial cleft cyst linked by p16(INK4A) and human papillomavirus immunohistochemistry. A 42-year-old woman presented with a 1-month history of a left lateral neck mass. Contrast enhanced computed tomography showed a hypodense lesion 20 mm in diameter anteromedial to the left sternocleidomastoid muscle. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration suggested a branchial cleft cyst. Panendoscopy was performed at the time of neck mass removal, and a papillomatous lesion was removed from the left hypopharynx. Histopathological analysis showed the neck lesion to be a branchial cyst containing lymphoid tissue, and the oral lesion to be a squamous papilloma. Immunohistochemical analysis showed both the branchial cleft cyst and papilloma to be positive for p16(INK4A) expression and human papillomavirus DNA. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses support the cystic transformation of lymph nodes, or the 'Inclusion Theory', as the aetiology of branchial apparatus anomalies, and raise the possibility that human papillomavirus infection may play a much larger role in disease of the head and neck than previously supposed.

  17. Branchial cleft cyst: An unusual site for the cervical metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yu-Chang; Adel, Mohamad; Lee, Li-Yu; Chang, Kai-Ping

    2018-04-01

    Cancers found in the resected branchial cleft cyst are rare clinically but usually impose substantive diagnostic and treatment challenges for clinicians. A 31-year-old man presented with a lateral neck mass that was suspected to be an inflammatory branchial cleft cyst. After excision, the pathologic specimen revealed a benign cystic appearance with a focus of undifferentiated carcinoma. Serologic tests for Epstein-Barr virus were negative. A positron emission tomography scan and upper aerodigestive tract endoscopies were negative for any other suspicious lesion. The patient underwent random biopsies of the nasopharynx, tongue base, and hypopharynx and bil tonsillectomy. Pathologic examination of the nasopharyngeal biopsies showed the presence of undifferentiated carcinoma. The cancerous part of the branchial cleft cyst and this nasopharyngeal specimen were positive for the latent membrane protein-1 and EBV-encoded RNAs of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and confirmed our diagnosis. This is the first report of a NPC metastasizing to a branchial cleft cyst. Molecular diagnostic techniques facilitate the definite diagnosis that enabled us to refine treatment plans and offered the patient a favorable outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Complete second branchial cleft anomaly presenting as a fistula and a tonsillar cyst: an interesting congenital anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thottam, Prasad John; Bathula, Samba S; Poulik, Janet M; Madgy, David N

    2014-01-01

    Branchial cleft anomalies make up 30% of all pediatric neck masses, but complete second branchial cleft anomalies are extremely rare. We report an unusual case of a complete second branchial cleft anomaly that presented as a draining neck fistula and a tonsillar cyst in an otherwise healthy 3-month-old girl. At the age of 7 months, the patient had been experiencing feeding difficulties, and there was increasing concern about the risk of persistent infections. At that point, the anomaly was excised in its entirety. Our suspicion that the patient had a complete second branchial cleft anomaly was confirmed by imaging, surgical excision, and histopathologic analysis.

  19. Branchial Cleft Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail, Neil; Mustard, Robert A.

    1966-01-01

    The embryology, anatomy and pathology of branchial cleft anomalies are discussed and 87 cases reviewed. The most frequent anomaly was branchial cleft cyst, of which there were 77 cases. Treatment in all cases consisted of complete excision. There were five cases of external branchial sinus and five cases of complete branchial fistula. Sinograms were helpful in demonstrating these lesions. Excision presented little difficulty. No proved case of branchiogenic carcinoma has been found in the Toronto General Hospital. Five cases are described in which the original diagnosis was branchiogenic carcinoma—in four of these a primary tumour has already been found. The authors believe that the diagnosis of branchiogenic carcinoma should never be accepted until repeated examinations over a period of at least five years have failed to reveal a primary tumour. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:5901161

  20. CT features of second branchial cleft cysts: emphasis on the locations of lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Deok Sub; Kim, Byong Geun; Park, Byung Ran; Kim, Se Jong; Ko, Kang Seok; Oh, Jong Sub [Kwangju Christian Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Jeong Jin [Chonnam Univ. Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the CT features of second branchial cleft cysts. We retrospectively analyzed the computed tomographic images in nine cases of second branchial cleft cyst which was confirmed pathologically. Emphasis was on localization of the masses to fascial spaces as defined by the deep cervical fasica. In all nine cases, the lesions were located in the submandibular and carotid spaces. Among these cases, six(67%) had simultaneous involvement of the other contiguous spaces, such as anterior and posterior cervical spaces. All cases had round or oval, unilocular, cystic masses with partial or complete rim enhancement. In eight cases(89%), smooth and thin walls were observed. In one case, thick wall and septations were noted. No definite calcifications were noted in all cases. The internal contents of cystic masses showed relatively homogeneous appearance, and CT number ranged from 20 to 35.2 Hounsfield unit(HU)(mean, 28.4HU). CT diagnosis of second branchial cleft cyst would be easily obtained from recognition of frequent simultaneous involvement of the other contiguous spaces, along with a typical location and characteristic morphology.

  1. CT features of second branchial cleft cysts: emphasis on the locations of lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Deok Sub; Kim, Byong Geun; Park, Byung Ran; Kim, Se Jong; Ko, Kang Seok; Oh, Jong Sub; Seo, Jeong Jin

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the CT features of second branchial cleft cysts. We retrospectively analyzed the computed tomographic images in nine cases of second branchial cleft cyst which was confirmed pathologically. Emphasis was on localization of the masses to fascial spaces as defined by the deep cervical fasica. In all nine cases, the lesions were located in the submandibular and carotid spaces. Among these cases, six(67%) had simultaneous involvement of the other contiguous spaces, such as anterior and posterior cervical spaces. All cases had round or oval, unilocular, cystic masses with partial or complete rim enhancement. In eight cases(89%), smooth and thin walls were observed. In one case, thick wall and septations were noted. No definite calcifications were noted in all cases. The internal contents of cystic masses showed relatively homogeneous appearance, and CT number ranged from 20 to 35.2 Hounsfield unit(HU)(mean, 28.4HU). CT diagnosis of second branchial cleft cyst would be easily obtained from recognition of frequent simultaneous involvement of the other contiguous spaces, along with a typical location and characteristic morphology

  2. A type II first branchial cleft cyst masquerading as an infected parotid Warthin's tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meng-Feng; Ueng, Shir-Hwa; Jung, Shih-Ming; Chen, Yao-Liang; Chang, Kai-Ping

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of a parotid mass usually depends on thorough history taking and physical examination. Diagnostic modalities, including ultrasonographic examinations, computed tomography and magnetic resonance images, may also provide substantial information but their accuracy for diagnosis is sometimes questionable, especially in differentiating some rare neoplasms. First branchial cleft cysts (FBCCs) are rare causes of parotid swelling and comprise less than 1% of all branchial anomalies. They are frequently misdiagnosed due to their rarity and unfamiliar clinical signs and symptoms. We present a case of type II FBCC masquerading as an infected parotid Warthin's tumor. We also review the clinical signs and symptoms of FBCCs in order to remind clinicians that this rare branchial anomaly can mimic an infected Warthin's tumor and may be seated in the deep lobe of the parotid gland. By making an accurate pre-operative diagnosis of type II FBCC, we can minimize surgical morbidity and avoid incomplete resection and possible recurrence.

  3. First branchial cleft anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fallouji, M. A.; Butler, M. F.

    1983-01-01

    A 15-year-old girl presented with a cystic swelling since birth behind the ramus of the right mandible and diagnosed clinically as a dermoid cyst. Surgical exploration, however, showed that it was closely related to the external auditory canal, with an extension running medially behind the parotid gland and ending in the bony middle ear. The facial nerve was closely related to the deep part of the cyst. Such an anatomical position indicates that this was a first branchial cleft anomaly. Surgical excision of the cyst was performed. PMID:6622327

  4. Clinical Study of Second Branchial Cleft Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Yoon, Tae Mi; Lee, Joon Kyoo; Lim, Sang Chul

    2018-03-30

    The objective of this study was to review the clinical characteristics and surgical treatment outcomes of second branchial cleft anomalies, and to evaluate the usefulness and accuracy of preoperative fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) in the diagnosis of branchial cleft cysts. A retrospective chart review was performed at Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital from January 2010 to December 2016. Among 25 patients with second branchial cleft anomalies, in 23 patients (92.0%), these anomalies presented as cysts, and in the remaining 2 patients (8.0%), these anomalies presented as fistulas. Fine-needle aspiration cytology had a diagnostic sensitivity of 100%, a positive-predictive value of 100%, and accuracy of 100% for diagnosing second branchial cleft cyst. All patients of second branchial cleft anomalies were treated surgically under general anesthesia. No recurrence of second branchial cleft anomalies was observed. Branchial cleft cysts were the most common type of second branchial cleft anomalies. Preoperative FNAC is a useful and accurate method for preoperative evaluation of branchial cleft cysts. Surgical excision of second branchial cleft anomalies is the treatment of choice without any complications and with no recurrence.

  5. Branchial cleft cyst at an unusual location: a rare case with a brief review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchbhai, A S; Choudhary, M S

    2012-01-01

    A branchial cleft cyst (BCC) commonly presents as a solitary, painless mass in the neck of a child or young adult. They are most commonly located along the anterior border and the upper third of the sternocleidomastoid muscle in the anterior triangle of the neck. It is very rare for a BCC to manifest in other locations, especially in the posterior triangle of the neck. BCCs are believed to be derived from the branchial apparatus, mostly from the second branchial arch, although many theories have been proposed to explain the aetiology of BCCs. It is possible for BCCs to be easily misdiagnosed as other swellings of oral or paraoral origin owing to their location. Intraoral lymphoepithelial cysts have also been reported in the literature. It is imperative that clinicians make an accurate diagnosis so that appropriate treatment can be performed. If the cysts are excised properly, recurrence is rare. A rare case report of BCC arising in the neck from an unusual location with components in the posterior triangle is presented here. PMID:22116133

  6. [Double second branchial cleft anomaly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Fernández, Noelia; Mallea-Cañizares, Ismael; Fernández-Julián, Enrique; De La Fuente-Arjona, Luís; Marco-Algarra, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    Second branchial cleft anomalies are the most common of this type of neck masses. They can be classified in four types (Bailey/Proctor classification) according to their location. Type II is the most common, and related to vital neck structures such as the carotid artery and jugular vein. Cysts are the most frequent among them. Management consists of surgical excision of the cyst and tract by cervicotomy to avoid recurrence. We present an extremely rare case of a 32-year-old male who presented a sudden appearance of a right lateral neck mass that was identified by an image study as a double branchial cleft cyst. A review of simultaneous branchial cleft cyst in the literature is also made. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma with Cystic Cervical Metastasis Masquerading as Branchial Cleft Cyst: A Potential Pitfall in Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai-Guan, Lum; Min-Han, Kong; Kah-Wai, Ngan; Mohamad-Yunus, Mohd-Razif

    2017-03-01

    Most metastatic lymph nodes from head and neck malignancy are solid. Cystic nodes are found in 33% - 61% of carcinomas arise from Waldeyer's ring, of which only 1.8% - 8% originate are from the nasopharynx. Some cystic cervical metastases were initially presumed to be branchial cleft cyst. This case report aims to highlight the unusual presentation of cystic cervical metastasis secondary to nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a young adult. The histopathology, radiological features and management strategy were discussed. A 36-year-old man presented with a solitary cystic cervical swelling, initially diagnosed as branchial cleft cyst. Fine needle aspiration yielded 18 ml of straw-coloured fluid. During cytological examination no atypical cells were observed. Computed tomography of the neck showed a heterogeneous mass with multiseptation medial to the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Histopathological examination of the mass, post excision, revealed a metastatic lymph node. A suspicious mucosal lesion at the nasopharynx was detected after repeated thorough head and neck examinations and the biopsy result confirmed undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Cystic cervical metastasis may occur in young patients under 40 years. The primary tumour may not be obvious during initial presentation because it mimicks benign branchial cleft cyst clinically. Retrospective review of the computed tomography images revealed features that were not characteristic of simple branchial cleft cyst. The inadequacy of assessment and interpretation had lead to the error in diagnosis and subsequent management. Metastatic head and neck lesion must be considered in a young adult with a cystic neck mass.

  8. Cytologic separation of branchial cleft cyst from metastatic cystic squamous cell carcinoma: A multivariate analysis of nineteen cytomorphologic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layfield, Lester J; Esebua, Magda; Schmidt, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    The separation of branchial cleft cysts from metastatic cystic squamous cell carcinomas in adults can be clinically and cytologically challenging. Diagnostic accuracy for separation is reported to be as low as 75% prompting some authors to recommend frozen section evaluation of suspected branchial cleft cysts before resection. We evaluated 19 cytologic features to determine which were useful in this distinction. Thirty-three cases (21 squamous carcinoma and 12 branchial cysts) of histologically confirmed cystic lesions of the lateral neck were graded for the presence or absence of 19 cytologic features by two cytopathologists. The cytologic features were analyzed for agreement between observers and underwent multivariate analysis for correlation with the diagnosis of carcinoma. Interobserver agreement was greatest for increased nuclear/cytoplasmic (N/C) ratio, pyknotic nuclei, and irregular nuclear membranes. Recursive partitioning analysis showed increased N/C ratio, small clusters of cells, and irregular nuclear membranes were the best discriminators. The distinction of branchial cleft cysts from cystic squamous cell carcinoma is cytologically difficult. Both digital image analysis and p16 testing have been suggested as aids in this separation, but analysis of cytologic features remains the main method for diagnosis. In an analysis of 19 cytologic features, we found that high nuclear cytoplasmic ratio, irregular nuclear membranes, and small cell clusters were most helpful in their distinction. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:561-567. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Work type II first branchial cleft cyst: a rare anomaly with a classical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    such cases. The branchial apparatus starts to appear between the fourth and the fifth weeks of fetal develop- ment. The apparatus consists of five arches consisting of the mesoderm, four clefts that consist of the ectoderm and four pouches that consist of the endoderm. The first branchial pouch forms the Eustachian tube and ...

  10. Third branchial cleft anomaly presenting as a retropharyngeal abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, R Y; Damrose, E J; Alavi, S; Maceri, D R; Shapiro, N L

    2000-08-31

    Branchial cleft anomalies are congenital developmental defects that typically present as a soft fluctuant mass or fistulous tract along the anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. However, branchial anomalies can manifest atypically, presenting diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Error or delay in diagnosis can lead to complications, recurrences, and even life-threatening emergencies. We describe a case of an infected branchial cleft cyst that progressed to a retropharyngeal abscess in a 5-week-old female patient. The clinical, radiographic, and histologic findings of this rare presentation of branchial cleft cyst are discussed.

  11. Branchial cleft anomalies and their mimics: computed tomographic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harnsberger, H.R.; Mancuso, A.A.; Muraki, A.S.; Byrd, S.E.; Dillon, W.P.; Johnson, L.P.; Hanafee, W.N.

    1984-01-01

    A review was made of the clinical records and radiographic examinations of 38 patients with neck lesions clinically suspected of being branchial cleft anomalies. The impact of computed tomography in this sometimes confusing clinical picture was assessed and CT criteria for diagnosing branchial cleft anomalies (BCAs) and differentiating them from their mimics were identified. Seventeen branchial cleft anomalies and 21 BCA mimics were evaluated. A definitive CT diagnosis of second branchial cleft cysts based on characteristic morphology, location, and displacement of surrounding structures was possible in 80% of cases. CT was found to be the best radiographic examination in making a definitive diagnosis of BCA if a neck mass was present

  12. A Third Branchial Pouch Cyst Presenting as Stridor in a Child

    OpenAIRE

    Wasson, Joseph; Blaney, Sean; Simo, Ricard

    2007-01-01

    We present a rare case of a third branchial pouch cyst in an 18-month-old child, presenting with stridor and a lateral cervical cystic mass. Differences in the anatomical course of third and fourth branchial cysts, and histological differences between branchial pouch and branchial cleft cysts are discussed.

  13. A Third Branchial Pouch Cyst Presenting as Stridor in a Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, Joseph; Blaney, Sean; Simo, Ricard

    2007-01-01

    We present a rare case of a third branchial pouch cyst in an 18-month-old child, presenting with stridor and a lateral cervical cystic mass. Differences in the anatomical course of third and fourth branchial cysts, and histological differences between branchial pouch and branchial cleft cysts are discussed. PMID:17316513

  14. Branchial cleft and pouch anomalies in childhood: a report of 50 surgical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, C; Rossi, L; Strambi, S; Piscioneri, J; Natale, G; Bertocchini, A; Messineo, A

    2016-05-01

    Branchial abnormalities occur when there is disturbance in the maturation of the branchial apparatus during fetal development. Branchial anomalies are congenital lesions usually present in childhood, even if they can be diagnosed later for enlargement or infection. A correct diagnosis will lead to proper management: complete surgical excision is the treatment of choice. The purpose of this article is to present clinical features, diagnostic methods and surgical treatment of branchial anomalies in childhood, based on a series of 50 patients. We conducted a retrospective analysis of a total of 50 pediatric patients operated from June 2005 to June 2014 for the presence of branchial cleft anomalies. 27 cases (54 %) presented a second branchial cleft fistula and 11 cases (22 %) a second branchial cleft cyst and one case (2 %) presented both cyst and sinus of the second branchial cleft; four cases (8 %) presented first branchial cleft cyst whereas four cases (8 %) a first branchial cleft sinus and two cases (4 %) a first branchial cleft fistula; one case (2 %) presented a piriform sinus fistula (third branchial cleft). None of our patients presented anomalies of the fourth branchial cleft. All patients underwent surgical treatment and lesions have been removed by excision or fistulectomy. No post-surgical complication occurred. The rate of recurrence was 4 %. Pre-operative diagnosis supplies important information to the surgeon for a proper therapy: a complete excision of the lesion without inflammatory signs is essential to avoid re-intervention and to achieve a good outcome.

  15. [Surgical treatment of first branchial cleft anomaly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hongjun; Kong, Weijia; Gong, Shusheng; Wang, Jibao; Liu, Shiying; Shi, Hong

    2005-10-01

    To identify the clinical and anatomical presentations and to discuss the guidelines for surgical management of anomalies of the first branchial cleft. Twenty-one patients with first branchial cleft anomalies were treated in our department between January 1994 and December 2004, their clinical data were retrospectively analysed. Surgery was performed on all patients. Among them 13 were males and 8 females, ranging in age from 1.5 to 33 years with an average of 15 years. Anatomically, 3 types of first branchial cleft anomalies were identified: fistulas (n = 17), cysts (n = 2), and fistula combined with cyst (n = 2). Before definitive surgery, soma patients (n = 4) underwent incision and drainage for infection owing to the difficulties in diagnosing this anomaly. Methylthioninium Chloride was used in almost all cases for tracking the fistulous during operation. Wide exposure is necessary in many cases,and a standard parotidectomy incision allows adequate exposure of the anomaly and preservation of the facial nerve. Complete removal without complications depends on a good understanding of regional embryogenesis, an awareness of the different anatomical presentations, and a readiness to identify and protect the facial nerve during resection.

  16. The second branchial cleft fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddalozzo, John; Rastatter, Jeffrey C; Dreyfuss, Heath F; Jaffar, Reema; Bhushan, Bharat

    2012-07-01

    To review the surgical anatomy and histopathology of second branchial cleft fistulae. Retrospective study of patients treated for second branchial cleft fistulae at a tertiary care pediatric hospital. The senior author noted anatomic and histologic features of second branchial cleft fistulae, not previously described. Tertiary care children's hospital. Retrospective examination of 28 patients was conducted who were operated upon for second branchial cleft fistula. Data collected included age at surgery, initial presentation, imaging characteristics prior to surgery, laterality of the fistula tract, pathology results and follow-up data. Twenty-eight patients met the criteria for inclusion. Three patients (11%) had bilateral fistulae. 11 (39%) were male and 17 (61%) were female. 23 (74.2%) tracts were lined with ciliated columnar epithelium, 3 (9.7%) had cuboidal epithelium, and 5 (16.7%) had squamous epithelium. Nineteen (61.3%) tracts contained salivary tissue. Of the unilateral fistula tracts, 25 (100%) were on the right side. Of the 3 patients with bilateral lesions, 2 (66%) had associated branchio-oto-renal syndrome (BORS). Second branchial cleft fistulae are rare. They are usually right-sided. If bilateral fistulae are present, one should consider an underlying genetic disorder. The histology of the fistulae mostly demonstrates ciliated columnar epithelium with the majority of specimens showing salivary tissue. There is a clear association with the internal jugular vein (IJV). Dissection should continue until superior to the hyoid bone, ensuring near complete surgical dissection and less risk of recurrence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An undescribed first branchial cleft anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockey, Jason Gabriel; John, D Gareth; Herbetko, John

    2003-06-01

    A variant of a type 2 first branchial cleft anomaly, in which accessory ossicles were found, is described. There follows a discussion of the classification of first branchial cleft abnormalities and how this particular case falls outside the standard classification. CT scanning is mentioned as the investigation that is most useful for defining these abnormalities.

  18. First branchial cleft anomalies: avoiding the misdiagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Sikka, Kapil; Sagar, Prem; Kakkar, Aanchal; Thakar, Alok

    2013-07-01

    First branchial cleft anomalies are a very rare entities accounting for less than 1 % of all branchial cleft malformations. They are often misdiagnosed for other cystic lesions occurring in parotid gland and inadequately treated (incision and drainage or incomplete excision) leading to multiple recurrences. We report a series of four patients who were previously operated (incision and drainage) for misdiagnosed first branchial cleft anomalies with subsequent recurrences. All patients underwent superficial parotidectomy with complete tract excision using facial nerve monitoring to prevent iatrogenic injury because of extensive fibrosis. We discuss the literature pertaining to first branchial cleft anomalies, their varied presentations and their relationship to facial nerve in parotid gland and importance of facial nerve monitoring in revision surgery.

  19. Second branchial cleft anomaly with an ectopic tooth: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyono, Jennifer C; Hong, Paul; Page, Nathan C; Malicki, Denise; Bothwell, Marcella R

    2014-09-01

    Branchial cleft cysts, sinuses, and fistulas are the most common congenital lateral neck lesions in children. They arise as a result of an abnormal development of the branchial arches and their corresponding ectoderm-lined branchial clefts. Of these diverse anomalies, second branchial cleft lesions are the most common, accounting for approximately 95% of all branchial arch pathologies. We describe what is to the best of our knowledge the first reported case of an ectopic tooth in a branchial cleft anomaly. The patient was a young girl who had other congenital abnormalities and syndromic features and who was eventually diagnosed with Townes-Brocks syndrome. We describe the clinical presentation, management, pathologic analysis, and postoperative outcomes of this case, and we present a brief review of Townes-Brocks syndrome.

  20. Oropharyngeal trauma mimicking a first branchial cleft anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larem, Aisha; Sheikh, Rashid; Al Qahtani, Abdulsalam; Khais, Frat; Ganesan, Shanmugam; Haidar, Hassan

    2016-06-01

    We present a unique and challenging case of a remnant foreign body that presented to us in a child disguised as a strongly suspected congenital branchial cleft anomaly. This case entailed oropharyngeal trauma, with a delayed presentation as a retroauricular cyst accompanied by otorrhea that mimicked the classic presentation of an infected first branchial cleft anomaly. During surgical excision of the presumed branchial anomaly, a large wooden stick was found in the tract. The diagnostic and therapeutic obstacles in the management of such cases are highlighted. In addition to exploring the existing literature, we retrospectively analyzed a plausible explanation of the findings of this case. Laryngoscope, 126:E224-E226, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Type II first branchial cleft anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mahdi, Akmam H; Al-Khurri, Luay E; Atto, Ghada Z; Dhaher, Ameer

    2013-01-01

    First branchial cleft anomaly is a rare disease of the head and neck. It accounts for less than 8% of all branchial abnormalities. It is classified into type I, which is thought to arise from the duplication of the membranous external ear canal and are composed of ectoderm only, and type II that have ectoderm and mesoderm. Because of its rarity, first branchial cleft anomaly is often misdiagnosed and results in inappropriate management. A 9-year-old girl presented to us with fistula in the submandibular region and discharge in the external ear. Under general anesthesia, complete surgical excision of the fistula tract was done through step-ladder approach, and the histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of type II first branchial cleft anomaly.

  2. Unusual extension of the first branchial cleft anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ada, Mehmet; Korkut, Nazim; Güvenç, M Güven; Acioğlu, Engin; Yilmaz, Süleyman; Cevikbaş, Uğur

    2006-03-01

    First branchial cleft is the only branchial structure that persists as the external ear canal, while all other clefts are resorbed. Incomplete obliteration and the degree of closure cause the varied types of first branchial cleft anomalies. They were classified based on the anatomical and histological features. We present an unusual type of first branchial cleft anomaly involving the external auditory canal, the middle ear and the nasopharynx through the eustachian tube.

  3. Branchial cysts in two Amazon parrots (Amazona species).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufrère, Hugues; Castillo-Alcala, Fernanda; Holmberg, David L; Boston, Sarah; Smith, Dale A; Taylor, W Michael

    2010-03-01

    A 37-year-old yellow-crowned Amazon parrot (Amazona ochrocephala) and a 20-year-old red-lored Amazon parrot (Amazona autumnalis) each presented with a large mass localized on the lateral neck. With the first bird, there was no evidence of signs of pain or discomfort, and the bird prehended and swallowed food normally. The second bird showed signs of mild upper-gastrointestinal discomfort. Results of an ultrasound examination and aspiration of the mass on each bird revealed a cystic structure. A computed tomography performed on the second bird revealed a large polycystic mass connected to the pharynx by a lateral tract. During surgical resection, both masses were found to originate from the subpharyngeal area. Based on topography and the histopathologic and immunohistochemical results, the masses were determined to be a second branchial cleft cyst for the first case and a second branchial pouch cyst for the second case. In addition, a carcinoma was present in situ within the epithelium of case 1, and the cyst in case 2 was secondarily infected. Branchial cysts are uncommonly diagnosed in veterinary and human medicine. These 2 cases are the first documented in parrots and appear similar to second branchial cysts reported in adult humans.

  4. An unusual otoscopic finding associated with a type II first branchial cleft anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebelhar, A J; Potts, K

    2012-03-01

    We report an interesting case involving a child with a branchial cleft anomaly with two fistulous tracts, one of which was associated with an unusual otoscopic finding. A seven-year-old girl presented with an apparent type II first branchial cleft cyst after an acute infection. Parotidectomy and excision of the tract were performed, with subsequent development of pre-auricular swelling three months later. Further surgery was performed to remove a second duplication anomaly of the external auditory canal. Otomicroscopy showed a fibrous band arising from the wall of the canal and attached to the tympanic membrane at the umbo. Otoscopic findings on physical examination can be important diagnostic clues in the early recognition of branchial cleft anomalies. The classification system proposed by Work may fail to describe some branchial cleft lesions.

  5. Branchial cleft anomalies: a pictorial review of embryological development and spectrum of imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Ashok; Mankad, Kshitij; Offiah, Curtis; Childs, Lucy

    2016-02-01

    The branchial arches are the embryological precursors of the face, neck and pharynx. Anomalies of the branchial arches are the second most common congenital lesions of the head and neck in children, with second branchial arch anomalies by far the most common. Clinically, these congenital anomalies may present as cysts, sinus tracts, fistulae or cartilaginous remnants with typical clinical and radiological findings. We review the normal embryological development of the branchial arches and the anatomical structures of the head and neck that derive from each arch. The typical clinical and radiological appearances of both common and uncommon branchial arch abnormalities are discussed with an emphasis on branchial cleft anomalies. • Anomalies of the branchial arches usually present as cysts, sinuses or fistulae. • Second branchial arch anomalies account for approximately 95 % of cases. • There are no pathognomonic imaging features so diagnosis depends on a high index of suspicion and knowledge of typical locations. • Persistent cysts, fistulae or recurrent localised infection may be due to branchial arch anomalies. • Surgical excision of the cyst or tract is the most common curative option.

  6. First branchial cleft anomaly presenting as a recurrent post-auricular abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiq, M A

    2003-01-01

    Embryological anomalies of the first branchial cleft are uncommonly encountered. They usually present as cysts, swellings, or fistulas in the pre-auricular or post-auricular area or high in the neck, which may become infected. Failure to recognise these unusual cases may result in misdiagnosis, inadequate treatment, and subsequent recurrence. Further definitive surgery may thus be complicated. A case is reported of a patient who attended accident and emergency on three occasions with an infected post-auricular cyst, which was treated by incision and drainage. It was subsequently found to be a first branchial cleft anomaly.

  7. [Management and classification of first branchial cleft anomalies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhen; Zhao, Enmin; Liu, Yuhe; Liu, Ping; Wang, Quangui; Xiao, Shuifang

    2013-07-01

    We aimed to identify the different courses of first branchial cleft anomalies and to discuss the management and classification of these anomalies. Twenty-four patients with first branchial cleft anomalies were reviewed. The courses of first branchial cleft anomalies and their corresponding managements were analyzed. Each case was classified according to Olsen's criteria and Works criteria. According to Olsen's criteria, 3 types of first branchial cleft anomalies are identified: cysts (n = 4), sinuses (n = 13), and fistulas (n = 7). The internal opening was in the external auditory meatus in 16 cases. Two fistulas were parallel to the external auditory canal and the Eustachian tube, with the internal openings on the Eustachian tube. Fourteen cases had close relations to the parotid gland and dissection of the facial nerve had to be done in the operation. Temporary weakness of the mandibular branch of facial nerve occurred in 2 cases. Salivary fistula of the parotid gland occurred in one patient, which was managed by pressure dressing for two weeks. Canal stenosis occurred in one patient, who underwent canalplasty after three months. The presence of squamous epithelium was reported in all cases, adnexal skin structures in 6 cases, and cartilage in 14 cases. The specimens of the fistula which extended to the nasopharynx were reported as tracts lined with squamous epithelium (the external part) and ciliated columnar epithelium (the internal part). According to Work's criteria, 9 cases were classified as Type I lesions, 13 cases were classified as Type II lesions, and two special cases could not be classified. The average follow-up was 83 months (ranging from 12 to 152 months). No recurrence was found. First branchial cleft anomalies have high variability in the courses. If a patient is suspected to have first branchial anomalies, the external auditory canal must be examined for the internal opening. CT should be done to understand the extension of the lesion. For cases

  8. A lymphoepithelial cyst (branchial cyst) in the floor of the mouth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumara, G R; Gillgrass, T J; Bridgman, J B

    1995-03-01

    Lymphoepithelial cysts are developmental, but their pathogenesis is unknown. The classical explanation is that they are derived from remnants of the branchial arches or clefts. This has been disputed, and it is likely that most arise from epithelium, possibly of tonsillar or salivary origin, that becomes entrapped by lymphoid tissue. This report describes a lymphoepithelial cyst in a 29-year-old man. The cyst was situated on the right side of the floor of the mouth adjacent to the lingual frenum. Its appearance supports both branchiogenic and the entrapment theories.

  9. Pharyngeal branchial cyst: magnetic resonance findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerezal, L.; Canga, A. [Department of Radiology of the ' Santa Cruz' Hospital Liencres, Cantabria (Spain); Morales, C. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology of the ' Sierrallana' Hospital Torrelavega, Cantabria (Spain); Abascal, F.; Usamentiaga, E.; Bustamante, M. [Department of Radiology of the University Hospital ' Marques de Valdecilla' , Av. de Valdecilla s/n Santander 39008 (Spain); Olcinas, O. [Department of Pathology of the University Hospital ' Marques de Valdecilla' , Av. de Valdecilla s/n Santander 39008 (Spain)

    1998-11-01

    An unusual case of pharyngeal cyst in a 25-year-old man studied by Magnetic Resonance (MR) is described. Anatomic location and pathological findings indicated the second branchial pouch origin. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  10. CT diagnostic criteria of branchial cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jend, H.H.; Jend-Rossmann, I.; Techentin, E.C.

    1984-01-01

    Although well known, the morphology of branchial cysts has not been sufficiently presented in CT literature. In the present case report, diagnostic criteria are given, such as typical site of occurrence, ductal extension towards the supratonsillar fossa, and cystic, but occasionally soft tissue density. Differential diagnosis is given for cases which cannot be classified according to these criteria. (orig.) [de

  11. Pharyngeal branchial cyst: magnetic resonance findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerezal, L.; Canga, A.; Morales, C.; Abascal, F.; Usamentiaga, E.; Bustamante, M.; Olcinas, O.

    1998-01-01

    An unusual case of pharyngeal cyst in a 25-year-old man studied by Magnetic Resonance (MR) is described. Anatomic location and pathological findings indicated the second branchial pouch origin. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  12. CT diagnostic criteria of branchial cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jend, H.H.; Jend-Rossmann, I.; Techentin, E.C.

    1984-09-01

    Although well known, the morphology of branchial cysts has not been sufficiently presented in CT literature. In the present case report, diagnostic criteria are given, such as typical site of occurrence, ductal extension towards the supratonsillar fossa, and cystic, but occasionally soft tissue density. Differential diagnosis is given for cases which cannot be classified according to these criteria.

  13. First branchial cleft anomaly presenting as a recurrent post-auricular abscess

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiq, M

    2003-01-01

    Failure to recognise these unusual cases may result in misdiagnosis, inadequate treatment, and subsequent recurrence. Further definitive surgery may thus be complicated. A case is reported of a patient who attended accident and emergency on three occasions with an infected post-auricular cyst, which was treated by incision and drainage. It was subsequently found to be a first branchial cleft anomaly.

  14. A case report of brachial cleft cyst in the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Mi; Choi, Soon Chul; Park, Tae Won; You, Dong Soo

    1993-01-01

    Branchial cleft cyst is the most common lateral neck cyst ; the vast majority are of the second branchial cleft origin. This presumably reflects the greater depth and longer persistence of the second cleft, compared with the first, third, and fourth clefts. We experienced a 49-year-old male whose chief complaint was a abnormal mass of the cleft parotid gland area and neck. As a result of careful analysis of clinical, radiological, and histopathological findings. We diagnosed it as a second branchial cleft cyst in the neck and obtained results as follows: 1. In clinical examination, there was a 10 X 15 cm sized, fluctuant painful mass in the left neck and parotid area. 2. In radiographic examination, a low echogenic mass with internal cystic change in the inferior parotid gland area was noted sonographically. Computed tomograph showed a 3 X 4 cm sized, well-defined cystic mass with heterogenous solid component in the anterior border of sternocleidomastoid muscle. MRI revealed 5 X 6 cm sized, well-marginated multiseparated mass in the same area. 3. In histopathological examination, lining of cyst was stratified squamous epithelium with typical lymph node pattern and inflammatory cell infiltration.

  15. A case report of brachial cleft cyst in the neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Mi; Choi, Soon Chul; Park, Tae Won; You, Dong Soo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-08-15

    Branchial cleft cyst is the most common lateral neck cyst ; the vast majority are of the second branchial cleft origin. This presumably reflects the greater depth and longer persistence of the second cleft, compared with the first, third, and fourth clefts. We experienced a 49-year-old male whose chief complaint was a abnormal mass of the cleft parotid gland area and neck. As a result of careful analysis of clinical, radiological, and histopathological findings. We diagnosed it as a second branchial cleft cyst in the neck and obtained results as follows: 1. In clinical examination, there was a 10 X 15 cm sized, fluctuant painful mass in the left neck and parotid area. 2. In radiographic examination, a low echogenic mass with internal cystic change in the inferior parotid gland area was noted sonographically. Computed tomograph showed a 3 X 4 cm sized, well-defined cystic mass with heterogenous solid component in the anterior border of sternocleidomastoid muscle. MRI revealed 5 X 6 cm sized, well-marginated multiseparated mass in the same area. 3. In histopathological examination, lining of cyst was stratified squamous epithelium with typical lymph node pattern and inflammatory cell infiltration.

  16. Diagnosis and treatment of branchial cleft anomalies in UKMMC: a 10-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaifullah, Syed; Yunus, Mohd Razif Mohamad; See, Goh Bee

    2013-03-01

    Branchial cleft anomalies result from abnormal persistence of branchial apparatus, which is located at the lateral part of the neck. These occur due to failure of obliteration of the branchial apparatus during embryonic development. Differential diagnoses of lateral neck mass are salivary gland or neurogenic neoplasms, paragangliomas, adenopathies, cystic hygroma or cystic metastasis from squamous cell carcinoma or thyroid papillary carcinoma. Clinically, a branchial cyst is smooth, round, fluctuant and non-tender, and usually occurs over the upper part of the neck, anterior to the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Sometimes, it may present as infected cyst (or abscess), a sinus or fistula. Surgical excision is the definitive treatment for branchial anomalies. The objective of the work was to study the demographic data, clinical presentation, definite diagnostic workup and treatment of patients diagnosed with branchial anomalies. This is a retrospective study of 26 patients who were diagnosed with branchial anomalies (branchial cyst and fistula), of which only 12 patients had data available between July 1999 and June 2009 at the Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre. Twelve cases of branchial anomalies were seen, in which 10 patients had second branchial cyst anomalies, 1 had third branchial fistula and 1 had bilateral branchial lesion. There were seven females and five males. The age of the patients varied over a wide range (4-44 years), but the majority of the patients were in their second and third decade of life. All branchial anomalies occurred at the classical site; eight patients had left-sided neck lesion. Correct clinical diagnosis was made only in five patients (41.6 %). All patients underwent surgical excision with no reported recurrence. Branchial anomalies are frequently forgotten in the differential diagnosis of lateral neck swelling. Diagnosis is usually delayed, leading to improper treatment. The

  17. Simultaneous branchial cleft and thyroid disorders may present a management challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Jane L; Veivers, David; Sidhu, Stan B; Sywak, Mark S; Shun, Albert; Delbridge, Leigh W

    2005-09-01

    Cysts, sinuses or abscesses arising from second, third or fourth branchial cleft remnants may lie either within the body of, or in close proximity to the thyroid gland. Given their infrequent nature they may pose both diagnostic and management challenges for the treating surgeon when they occur in association with thyroid disorders. This is a case series. All patients with concomitant thyroid disorders and a branchial cleft anomaly treated in the University of Sydney Endocrine Surgical Unit in the 10-year period 1994-2003 comprised the study group. Patient demographics, clinical presentation, imaging, surgical management, definitive histology and outcomes were documented. Six patients were identified with an age range of 3-76 years and a male : female ratio of 1:5. Five branchial cleft anomalies were left sided, one was right sided. Two patients had second cleft anomalies, both of which were initially thought to represent metastatic lymph nodes in association with thyroid cancer. A further two patients had third cleft abnormalities presenting as suppurative thyroiditis. The final two patients had fourth cleft abnormalities causing intraoperative management problems. Branchial cleft remnants and anomalies are rare but may occur in association with thyroid disease. They may pose a diagnostic and management dilemma either preoperatively, when mistaken for metastatic thyroid cancer, or intraoperatively when mistaken for a thyroid nodule.

  18. Case report: a branchial cleft anomaly presenting as an oropharyngeal mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, David; Merz, Meredith

    2011-12-01

    Branchial anomalies are common cervical pathologic entities encountered in the field of otolaryngology and are typical in the pediatric and young adult populations. In most cases, these anomalies present as a cyst, sinus, or fistula in a rather stereotypical fashion. When a branchial anomaly deviates from the classic presentation, an improper diagnosis and inadequate management are more likely to occur, leading to an increased recurrence rate. We present a case of a 6-year-old girl with an incidental finding of a right posterior oropharyngeal wall mass, distinctly separate from the tonsillar fossa, which was found on pathologic analysis to be a branchial cleft anomaly. The theories regarding the pathogenesis of branchial anomalies are presented, along with other cases of atypical branchial anomalies.

  19. Anatomical variations of the facial nerve in first branchial cleft anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solares, C Arturo; Chan, James; Koltai, Peter J

    2003-03-01

    To review our experience with branchial cleft anomalies, with special attention to their subtypes and anatomical relationship to the facial nerve. Case series. Tertiary care center. Ten patients who underwent resection for anomalies of the first branchial cleft, with at least 1 year of follow-up, were included in the study. The data from all cases were collected in a prospective fashion, including immediate postoperative diagrams. Complete resection of the branchial cleft anomaly was performed in all cases. Wide exposure of the facial nerve was achieved using a modified Blair incision and superficial parotidectomy. Facial nerve monitoring was used in every case. The primary outcome measurements were facial nerve function and incidence of recurrence after resection of the branchial cleft anomaly. Ten patients, 6 females and 4 males,with a mean age of 9 years at presentation, were treated by the senior author (P.J.K.) between 1989 and 2001. The lesions were characterized as sinus tracts (n = 5), fistulous tracts (n = 3), and cysts (n = 2). Seven lesions were medial to the facial nerve, 2 were lateral to the facial nerve, and 1 was between branches of the facial nerve. There were no complications related to facial nerve paresis or paralysis, and none of the patients has had a recurrence. The successful treatment of branchial cleft anomalies requires a complete resection. A safe complete resection requires a full exposure of the facial nerve, as the lesions can be variably associated with the nerve.

  20. [Recurrent neck abscess due to a branchial cleft remnant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijff, Schelto; Mastboom, Walter J; Vriens, Menno R; Sidhu, Stan B; Delbridge, Leigh W

    2013-01-01

    Abscesses arising from a third or fourth branchial cleft remnant are uncommon clinical entities and are often not recognised in a timely manner. In a 33-year-old female patient with a recurrent abscess in the left side of her neck, the cause turned out to be a fistula in the third branchial cleft remnant. She was treated initially with antibiotics and prednisone without adequate results. When the abscess was finally surgically drained, she became very ill and was admitted to the ICU with sepsis and multiple organ failure. She was discharged from hospital after six weeks. Four months later, a third-branchial cleft remnant was found during pharyngoscopy, immediately after which the cleft remnant fistula was excised and an ipsilateral hemi-thyroidectomy was performed. In young patients with recurring peri-thyroidal abscesses, a branchial cleft remnant should be considered a causative factor; this could avoid high morbidity and a delay in the appropriate treatment.

  1. First branchial cleft anomalies: otologic manifestations and treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Justin R; Purcell, Patricia L; Horn, David L; Sie, Kathleen C Y; Manning, Scott C

    2015-03-01

    This study describes the presentation of first branchial cleft anomalies and compares outcomes of first branchial cleft with other branchial cleft anomalies with attention to otologic findings. Case series with chart review. Pediatric tertiary care facility. Surgical databases were queried to identify children with branchial cleft anomalies. Descriptive analysis defined sample characteristics. Risk estimates were calculated using Fisher's exact test. Queries identified 126 subjects: 27 (21.4%) had first branchial cleft anomalies, 80 (63.4%) had second, and 19 (15.1%) had third or fourth. Children with first anomalies often presented with otologic complications, including otorrhea (22.2%), otitis media (25.9%), and cholesteatoma (14.8%). Of 80 children with second branchial cleft anomalies, only 3 (3.8%) had otitis. Compared with children with second anomalies, children with first anomalies had a greater risk of requiring primary incision and drainage: 16 (59.3%) vs 2 (2.5%) (relative risk [RR], 3.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.4-5; Pbranchial cleft anomalies often present with otologic complaints. They are at increased risk of persistent disease, particularly if anomalies lie medial to the facial nerve. They may require ear-specific surgery such as tympanoplasty. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  2. First Branchial Cleft Malformation with Duplication of External Auditory Canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, Pradipta Kumar; Raja, Kalairasi; Surianarayanan, Gopalakrishnan; Ganeshan, Sivaraman

    2013-01-01

    First branchial cleft anomalies are uncommon, accounting for less than 10% of all branchial abnormalities. Their rare occurrence and varied presentation have frequently led to misdiagnosis and inadequate and inappropriate treatment of these conditions leading to repeated recurrences and secondary infection. In this paper, a case of 11-year girl with type 2 first branchial cleft defect is described. She first presented with a nonhealing ulcer of upper neck from childhood. Diagnosis had previously been missed and treated as tubercular ulcer. We confirmed the correct diagnosis by history and computerized tomography fistulogram. The lesion was completely excised with no further recurrence. PMID:24312740

  3. First Branchial Cleft Malformation with Duplication of External Auditory Canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradipta Kumar Parida

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available First branchial cleft anomalies are uncommon, accounting for less than 10% of all branchial abnormalities. Their rare occurrence and varied presentation have frequently led to misdiagnosis and inadequate and inappropriate treatment of these conditions leading to repeated recurrences and secondary infection. In this paper, a case of 11-year girl with type 2 first branchial cleft defect is described. She first presented with a nonhealing ulcer of upper neck from childhood. Diagnosis had previously been missed and treated as tubercular ulcer. We confirmed the correct diagnosis by history and computerized tomography fistulogram. The lesion was completely excised with no further recurrence.

  4. Branchial cysts within the parotid salivary gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Cystic lesions within the parotid gland are uncommon and clinically they are frequently misdiagnosed as tumours. Many theories have been proposed as to their embryological origin. A 20-year retrospective review was undertaken of all pathological codes (SNOMED) of all of patients presenting with any parotid lesions requiring surgery. After analysis seven subjects were found to have histopathologically proven parotid branchial cysts in the absence of HIV infection and those patients are the aim of this review. Four of the most common embryological theories are also discussed with regard to these cases, as are their management. PMID:22607735

  5. Branchial cleft anomalies: accuracy of pre-operative diagnosis, clinical presentation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guldfred, L-A; Philipsen, B B; Siim, C

    2012-06-01

    To examine the accuracy of the pre-operative diagnosis of branchial cleft anomalies, and also to describe their occurrence, clinical presentation and management. Retrospective review of the records of patients diagnosed with a branchial cleft anomaly between 1997 and 2006. One hundred and twenty-six patients were included. Pre-operative diagnosis had a positive predictive value of 0.856 (95 per cent confidence interval, 0.771-0.918) and a sensitivity of 0.944 (95 per cent confidence interval, 0.869-0.979). These patients' demographic data, investigations, findings and management are presented, along with a possible strategy for dealing with solitary cystic masses in the neck. As pre-operative diagnosis has a positive predictive value of 86 per cent, cystic lesions in the neck should be presumed to be carcinomatous until proven otherwise. Branchial fistulae and sinuses seem to be a disease of childhood, while branchial cysts occur mainly in adults. Branchial cleft anomalies are equally frequent in men and women, and equally distributed on the left and right side of the neck.

  6. First branchial cleft anomaly, a case for misdiagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanisnik, Bostjan; Didanovic, Vojko; Cizmarevic, Bogdan

    2004-01-01

    First branchial cleft anomaly is a rare condition that is often misdiagnosed and falsely mistreated before complete and definitive surgical treatment. Its origin is uncertain and the presence of ectodermal and sometimes also mesodermal elements has led some authors to the conclusion that it represents buried nests of cells forming the first branchial cleft and the underlying mesoderm. First branchial cleft anomaly can be presented as a cystic lesion, fistula or sinus extending towards the membranous external ear canal. The sinus tract runs through the parotid gland in close association with the facial nerve. There is no imaging method capable of identifying a first branchial cleft anomaly with certainty. The danger of facial nerve injury during surgery and the failure to identify the sinus tract running to the external ear canal are the main reasons for incomplete excision. The facial nerve must be identified and preserved and the lesion completely excised. Facial nerve injury is more common in attempts to remove recurrent branchial cleft lesions.

  7. A rare variant of first branchial cleft fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnani, S; Mungutwar, V; Goyal, N K; Bansal, A

    2009-12-01

    We report an extremely rare variant of first branchial cleft anomaly. A 15-year-old girl presented with a history of recurrent mucopurulent discharge from an opening in the left infra-auricular region, since birth. Computed tomography fistulography showed a tortuous tract measuring approximately 4.61 cm, extending anteroinferiorly and medially from the external inframeatal opening to the lateral nasopharyngeal wall (anterior to the fossa of Rosenmuller). The tract was connected to the deep lobe of the parotid gland and lay 0.67 cm anterior to the carotid artery and posterior to the medial pterygoid muscle. This was an extremely rare variant of first branchial cleft fistula. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of its type to be reported. Computed tomography fistulography is the imaging modality of choice for the diagnosis of branchial cleft fistula, and will also assist surgical planning.

  8. [Diagnosis and surgical operation for fourth branchial cleft anomalies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ting; Hua, Qingquan

    2011-11-01

    To explore diagnosis and surgical operation through analyzing clinical features of the fourth branchial cleft anomalies. Clinical materials of 10 patients with the fourth branchial cleft anomalies were retrospectively analyzed, and literatures were studied to explore the diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment methods of surgical operation; lesions of 10 patients were completely removed by surgical operation, and internal sinus was properly handled. All 10 cases were cured, no recurrence were observed during a follow-up of 1-3 years. 1 patient appeared low voice, and drinking cough, back to normality after 2 weeks; 1 patient appeared paralysis of left hypoglossal nerves, back to normality after 3 months. Recurrent deep neck abscess and chronic sinus infections of anterior area in the lower part of neck should be considered with the diagnosis of the fourth branchial cleft anomalies. Enhanced neck CT scan and barium sulfate meal examination aid to diagnosis, pathological examination can be confirmed. Complete surgical removal of lesions is an effective treatment of fourth branchial cleft anomalies, knowing of the courses of internal sinus and spread of infection, and use of principle of selective neck dissection is the key to ensure complete removal of lesions.

  9. Classification of first branchial cleft anomalies: is it clinically relevant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There are three classification systems for first branchial cleft anomalies currently in use. The Arnot, Work and Olsen classifications describe these lesions on the basis of morphology, tissue of origin and clinical appearance. However, the clinical relevance of these classifications is debated, as they may not be ...

  10. Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the gingiva appearing as a solitary branchial cyst carcinoma: diagnostic role of PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiong-Xin; Zhao, Kui; Zhou, Shui-Hong; Wang, Qin-Ying; Liu, Jian-Hua; Lu, Zhong-Jie

    2014-01-01

    We herein present a case of a left cervical cystic mass, for which the initial pathological diagnosis was branchial cleft cyst carcinoma (following complete mass excision). Thorough postoperative examinations, including with FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), revealed a primary tumor in the retromolar region of the left mandible. A 52-year-old female presented with a 2-month history of a painless, progressively enlarged left-sided neck mass. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy suggested a branchial cleft cyst. Physical examination revealed a 3 × 3-cm smooth, tender mass in the upper-left neck and anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Examination using nasendoscopy and a strobolaryngoscope revealed no abnormalities of the nasal cavity, nasopharynx, oropharynx, hypopharynx or larynx. MRI of the neck revealed a solitary, round, cystic mass under the left parotid gland. The mass was excised completely. Pathologic results indicated a branchial cleft cyst carcinoma. According to the diagnostic criteria for a branchial cleft cystic carcinoma, PET/CT was performed to detect the occult primary site. PET/CT revealed high FDG uptake in the tooth root of the left mandible. Frozen sections of the mass were indicative of moderate, differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. The carcinoma in the retromolar region of the left mandible was locally excised under general anesthesia. A partial left maxillectomy, partial mandibulectomy, and left radical neck dissection were performed. The patient received postoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy, and was disease-free at the 8-month follow-up. True branchial cleft cyst carcinoma is rare: once diagnosed, it should be distinguished from metastatic cystic cervical lymph and occult primary carcinoma. FDG PET/CT is useful in the identification of occult primary tumor.

  11. Microbiology of third and fourth branchial pouch cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlavan, Shane; Haque, Waqar; Pereira, Kevin; Larrier, Deidre; Valdez, Tulio A

    2010-03-01

    To identify the most common pathogens involved in infections of third and fourth branchial pouch cysts. Third and fourth branchial pouch cyst infections are an uncommon cause of anterior neck abscesses often confused with other entities, such as thyroglossal duct cysts and thyroid abscesses leading to misdiagnosis, recurrence, and increased morbidity related to a delay in diagnosis and appropriate treatment. Retrospective chart and literature review. Retrospective chart review case series of patients presenting to the Bobby R. Alford Department of Otolaryngology at Texas Children's Hospital from July 2004 to July 2008 with third and fourth branchial pouch cysts. A total of 11 patients were identified. All patients had left-sided lesions. Eikenella corrodens was found in 60% of cultures and was the most common organism identified in our patient group. Furthermore, 56% of the organisms isolated were anaerobic. All organisms with the exception of Staphylococcus aureus were identified as oral cavity flora. Third and fourth branchial pouch cysts provide a communication between the neck and the oral cavity through pyriform sinus tracts. The presence of oral cavity flora in a left anterior neck abscess should raise the suspicion of a branchial pouch anomaly, and subsequently alter therapeutic management.

  12. First branchial cleft anomalies have relevance in otology and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tham, Y S; Low, W K

    2005-05-01

    First branchial cleft anomalies account for less than 8% of all branchial abnormalities. Their rarity and diverse presentations have frequently led to misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment. In a trend towards specialisation/subspecialisation, first branchial cleft duplication anomalies, with their varied clinical manifestations, may possibly present to an Otology, Head and Neck Surgery, Paediatric Otolaryngology, Maxillofacial or even a General Paediatric and General Surgery practice. There is a need to highlight the clinical features which can aid in accurate diagnosis. A case of an adult with Work Type 2 first branchial cleft duplication anomaly presenting as a collaural fistula is described. It first presented as a recurrent upper neck abscess in childhood. The diagnosis had previously been missed although the patient was able to clearly establish a correlation between digging of the ipsilateral ear and precipitation of the abscess. Instead of an epidermal web, a myringeal lesion in the form of a fibrous band-like was present. The lesion was completely excised with no further recurrence. This case highlights useful diagnostic features both from the history and physical examination. The specialist/subspecialist must be aware of this condition and be mindful of its possible cross specialty/subspecialty symptoms and signs. Together with a good understanding of the regional embryology and anatomy, the lesion can be diagnosed early at initial presentation with the potential for best treatment outcomes.

  13. Bilateral branchial cleft anomaly type two and type three seen together

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Okan Gürsel; Yusuf Eren; Vefa Kınış; Cüneyt Kucur

    2012-01-01

    Branchial apparatus begins to develop at about secondweek of gestation and each complex will transform intodifferent structures in the head and neck. Branchial cleftanomalies develop due to defect in the closure of thesestructures by time. Branchial cleft anomalies may be diagnosedat any age but most of them are seen in pediatricpopulation. Although, branchial cleft anomalies are frequentlyseen, bilateral cases, which have been reportedare very rare. We present a 14 years old boy who wasdiagn...

  14. Combined approach branchial sinusectomy: a new technique for excision of second branchial cleft sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olusesi, A D

    2009-10-01

    Branchial cleft anomalies are well described, with the second arch anomaly being the commonest. Following surgical excision, recurrence occurs in 2 to 22 per cent of cases, and is believed to be due largely to incomplete resection. This report aims to describe a simple surgical technique for treatment of second branchial cleft sinus in the older paediatric age group and adults. An 11-year-old girl underwent surgical excision of a second branchial sinus. Prior to surgery, she was assessed by means of an imaging sonogram, and by direct methylene blue dye injection into the sinus on the operating table, followed by insertion of a metallic probe. Dissection was of the 'step ladder' incision type, but the incision was completed via an oropharyngeal approach. Histological examination of the lesion after excision established the diagnosis. No recurrence had been observed at the time of writing. Although they are congenital lesions, second branchial cleft abnormalities usually present in the older paediatric age group or even in adulthood. In the case reported, a simple combined approach ensured completeness of resection.

  15. First branchial cleft anomalies: presentation, variability and safe surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdy, Emad A; Ashram, Yasmine A

    2013-05-01

    First branchial cleft (FBC) anomalies are uncommon. The aim of this retrospective clinical study is to describe our experience in dealing with these sporadically reported lesions. Eighteen cases presenting with various FBC anomalies managed surgically during an 8-year period at a tertiary referral medical institution were included. Ten were males (56 %) and eight females (44 %) with age range 3-18 years. Anomaly was right-sided in 12 cases (67 %). None were bilateral. Nine patients (50 %) had prior abscess incision and drainage procedures ranging from 1 to 9 times. Two also had previous unsuccessful surgical excisions. Clinical presentations included discharging tract openings in external auditory canal/conchal bowl (n = 9), periauricular (n = 6), or upper neck (n = 4); cystic postauricular, parotid or upper neck swellings (n = 5); and eczematous scars (n = 9). Three distinct anatomical types were encountered: sinuses (n = 7), fistulas (n = 6), and cysts (n = 5). Complete surgical excision required superficial parotidectomy in 11 patients (61 %). Anomaly was deep to facial nerve (FN) in three cases (17 %), in-between its branches in two (11 %) and superficial (but sometimes adherent to the nerve) in remaining cases (72 %). Continuous intraoperative electrophysiological FN monitoring was used in all cases. Two cases had postoperative temporary lower FN paresis that recovered within 2 months. No further anomaly manifestation was observed after 49.8 months' mean postoperative follow-up (range 10-107 months). This study has shown that awareness of different presentations and readiness to identify and protect FN during surgery is essential for successful management of FBC anomalies. Intraoperative electrophysiological FN monitoring can help in that respect.

  16. Second branchial cleft fistulae: patient characteristics and surgical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajosaari, Lauri; Mäkitie, Antti; Salminen, Päivi; Klockars, Tuomas

    2014-09-01

    Second branchial cleft anomalies predispose to recurrent infections, and surgical resection is recommended as the treatment of choice. There is no clear consensus regarding the timing or surgical technique in the operative treatment of these anomalies. Our aim was to compare the effect of age and operative techniques to patient characteristics and treatment outcome. A retrospective study of pediatric patients treated for second branchial sinuses or fistulae during 1998-2012 at two departments in our academic tertiary care referral center. Comparison of patient characteristics, preoperative investigations, surgical techniques and postoperative sequelae. Our data is based on 68 patients, the largest series in the literature. One-fourth (24%) of patients had any infectious symptoms prior to operative treatment. Patient demographics, preoperative investigations, use of methylene blue, or tonsillectomy had no effect on the surgical outcome. There were no re-operations due to residual disease. Three complications were observed postoperatively. Our patient series of second branchial cleft sinuses/fistulae is the largest so far and enables analyses of patient characteristics and surgical outcomes more reliably than previously. Preoperative symptoms are infrequent and mild. There was no difference in clinical outcome between the observed departments. Performing ipsilateral tonsillectomy gave no outcome benefits. The operation may be delayed to an age of approximately three years when anesthesiological risks are and possible harms are best avoided. Considering postoperative pain and risk of postoperative hemorrhage a routine tonsillectomy should not be included to the operative treatment of second branchial cleft fistulae. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Bilateral branchial cleft anomaly type two and type three seen together

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    Ali Okan Gürsel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Branchial apparatus begins to develop at about secondweek of gestation and each complex will transform intodifferent structures in the head and neck. Branchial cleftanomalies develop due to defect in the closure of thesestructures by time. Branchial cleft anomalies may be diagnosedat any age but most of them are seen in pediatricpopulation. Although, branchial cleft anomalies are frequentlyseen, bilateral cases, which have been reportedare very rare. We present a 14 years old boy who wasdiagnosed and operated due to bilateral branchial cleftanomaly. J Clin Exp Invest 2012; 3(1: 99-101

  18. Intraoperative use of fibrin glue dyed with methylene blue in surgery for branchial cleft anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccioni, Michela; Bottazzoli, Marco; Nassif, Nader; Stefini, Stefania; Nicolai, Piero

    2016-09-01

    We present a new method of optimizing the results of surgery for branchial cleft anomalies based on the intraoperative injection of fibrin glue combined with methylene blue dye. Retrospective single-center cohort study. The method was applied in 17 patients suffering from branchial anomalies. Six (35.29%) had a preauricular lesion; three (17.65%) had lesions derived from the first arch/pouch/groove (type I), four (23.53%) had lesions derived from the first (type II), one (5.88%) had lesions derived from the second, one (5.88%) had lesions derived from the third, and two (11.76%) had lesions derived from the fourth. The median and mean age at surgery were 10 and 10.6 years, respectively. All patients were followed by periodic clinical and ultrasonographic examination. The combination of fibrin glue with methylene blue facilitated the correct assessment of the extension of the lesions and their intraoperative manipulation. After a mean follow-up of 47.8 months, all patients were free of disease. Intraoperative injection of branchial fistulae and cysts by a mixture of fibrin glue and methylene blue is an effective, easy, and safe tool to track lesions and achieve radical resection. The technique requires a definitive validation on a large cohort with adequate stratification of patients. 4 Laryngoscope, 126:2147-2150, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  19. Parapharyngeal branchial cleft cyst: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcele Oliveira dos Santos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A 30-year-old woman presented with a 2-year history of right-sided pharyngeal foreign body sensation. There were no signs of dysarthria, dysphagia, odynophagia, or dyspnea. On physical examination, we observed a fluctuant, painless mass in the oropharynx, pressing against the right lateral pharyngeal wall, covered with normal mucosa. Full examination of the head and neck, including cranial nerve evaluation, detected no further abnormalities.

  20. First Branchial Cleft Fistula Associated with External Auditory Canal Stenosis and Middle Ear Cholesteatoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi fakhim, Shahin; Naderpoor, Masoud; Mousaviagdas, Mehrnoosh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: First branchial cleft anomalies manifest with duplication of the external auditory canal. Case Report: This report features a rare case of microtia and congenital middle ear and canal cholesteatoma with first branchial fistula. External auditory canal stenosis was complicated by middle ear and external canal cholesteatoma, but branchial fistula, opening in the zygomatic root and a sinus in the helical root, may explain this feature. A canal wall down mastoidectomy with canaloplasty and wide meatoplasty was performed. The branchial cleft was excised through parotidectomy and facial nerve dissection. Conclusion: It should be considered that canal stenosis in such cases can induce cholesteatoma formation in the auditory canal and middle ear. PMID:25320705

  1. First branchial cleft fistula associated with external auditory canal stenosis and middle ear cholesteatoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi Fakhim, Shahin; Naderpoor, Masoud; Mousaviagdas, Mehrnoosh

    2014-10-01

    First branchial cleft anomalies manifest with duplication of the external auditory canal. This report features a rare case of microtia and congenital middle ear and canal cholesteatoma with first branchial fistula. External auditory canal stenosis was complicated by middle ear and external canal cholesteatoma, but branchial fistula, opening in the zygomatic root and a sinus in the helical root, may explain this feature. A canal wall down mastoidectomy with canaloplasty and wide meatoplasty was performed. The branchial cleft was excised through parotidectomy and facial nerve dissection. It should be considered that canal stenosis in such cases can induce cholesteatoma formation in the auditory canal and middle ear.

  2. Fourth branchial cleft anomaly: management strategy in acute presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, Filippo; Sionis, Sara; Mascia, Luigi; Puxeddu, Roberto

    2014-09-01

    Branchial malformations are common congenital head and neck lesions usually diagnosed in childhood during the first decade of life. Acute presentation is usually managed with conservative protocols before a definitive surgical procedure although the risk of life-treating septic complications may influence the physician's decision. Surgery is the treatment of choice with the removal of the lesion alone, nevertheless more aggressive approaches must be considered in complicated cases. Selective neck dissection including the removal of part of the thyroid lobe with the congenital lesion should be considered as the "ultima ratio" treatment to avoid recurrence. We reviewed literature and report our experience concerning two patients with fourth branchial cleft sinus. A three-year-old child with a clinical history of recurrent neck abscess was referred to our department after several drainages performed in another centre. A three-year-old child referred to our department for a left side lower primary neck abscess. In both cases the diagnosis of a complicated fourth cleft remnant was confirmed by rigid endoscopic visualization of the mucosal orifice of the sinus in the pyriform fossa. Surgical management during acute presentation was challenging; in one patient the early fasciitis required an emergency procedure to remove the infected sinus that were strictly adherent to the deep vascular-nervous axis. Surgery was the definitive treatment in both cases and at 12 and 25 months follow-up respectively no recurrences were observed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. First branchial cleft sinus presenting with cholesteatoma and external auditory canal atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalçin, Sinasi; Karlidağ, Turgut; Kaygusuz, Irfan; Demirbağ, Erhan

    2003-07-01

    First branchial cleft abnormalities are rare. They may involve the external auditory canal and middle ear. We describe a 6-year-old girl with congenital external auditory canal atresia, microtia, and cholesteatoma of mastoid and middle ear in addition to the first branchial cleft abnormalities. Clinical features of the patient are briefly described and the embryological relationship between first branchial cleft anomaly and external auditory canal atresia is discussed. The surgical management of these lesions may be performed, both the complete excision of the sinus and reconstructive otologic surgery.

  4. Surgical management of first branchial cleft anomaly presenting as infected retroauricular mass using a microscopic dissection technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kai-Chieh; Chao, Wei-Chieh; Wu, Che-Ming

    2012-01-01

    This is a detailed description of the clinical and anatomical presentation of the first branchial cleft anomaly presenting as retroauricular infected mass. Our experience with a microscopic dissection with control of the sinus lumen from within the cyst is also described. Between 2001 and 2008, patients with the final histologic diagnosis of first branchial cleft anomaly in the retroauricular area were managed with a microscopic dissection technique with control of the sinus lumen from within the cyst. Classifications were done in accordance with Work, Olsen, and Chilla. Outcomes measured intervention as a function of disease recurrence and complications including facial nerve function was used. Eight patients with a mean age of 14.2 years were enrolled, and this included 4 females and 4 males. Four type 1 and 4 type 2 lesions as per the Work's and Chilla's classification were found, and there were 5 sinuses, 2 fistulae, and 1 cyst according to Olsen's classification. All patients presented to the department with acute infection at the time of diagnosis. Five of the 8 patients had previous surgical treatment, 2 of those had up to 3 previous operations. None of the patients were complicated by disease recurrence or had surgical related complications (facial nerve paresis or paralysis, infection, canal stenosis) requiring reoperation with more than 1 year of follow-up. First branchial cleft anomaly presenting as retroauricular infected mass can be effectively treated by adopting a microscopic dissection technique with control of the sinus lumen from within the cyst. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A case with unilateral hypoglossal nerve injury in branchial cyst surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Sudipta

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An 11 years old boy came, with complain of mild dysarthria. Examination revealed marked hemiatrophy of left side of the tongue. Five months back he underwent ipsilateral branchial cyst operation. To our knowledge, no case was reported. After branchial cyst operation if there is any residual remnant chance of recurrence is very high.

  6. Role of fine needle aspiration cytology in the preoperative investigation of branchial cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Jacqueline; Serpell, Jonathan W; Woodruff, Stacey; Grodski, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Successful preoperative diagnosis of a branchial cyst requires a systematic approach. The aim of this study was to evaluate methods of investigation of a lateral neck swelling suspicious for a branchial cyst, and to highlight cases where a less benign cause for the swelling should be suspected and therefore management altered appropriately. A retrospective case study of 24 patients with presumed branchial cysts managed operatively was undertaken. Demographic, clinical, imaging, cytology and histopathological data were analysed to formulate an approach to the work-up of a lateral neck swelling suspected to be a branchial cyst. All 24 patients presented with a lateral neck mass thought to be a branchial cyst preoperatively underwent preoperative fine-needle aspiration cytology. The overall accuracy of cytology in predicting a benign branchial cyst histopathologically was 83.3% (20 out of 24). Successful preoperative diagnosis of a branchial cyst requires a combination of imaging and cytology. If there is concern that a lateral neck swelling is not a branchial cyst on clinical, imaging or cytological features, then a full preoperative work-up, including computed tomography scan of the neck and upper aero-digestive tract endoscopy should be performed, prior to an excisional biopsy. © 2011 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2011 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  7. Lateral cervical cleft: a previously unreported anomaly resulting from incomplete disappearance of the second pharyngeal (branchial) cleft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürsoy, M H; Gedikoğlu, G; Tanyel, F C

    1999-03-01

    The authors present a 2-year-old boy with a skin defect located in the right lateral side of the neck. They suggest the defect is a partial failure of disappearance of the second pharyngeal (branchial) cleft and propose a name of lateral cervical cleft.

  8. Bilateral first branchial cleft anomaly with evidence of a genetic aetiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Perez, L M; Prats-Golczer, V E; Montes Carmona, J F; Heurtebise Saavedra, J M

    2014-03-01

    Anomalies of the first branchial cleft (FBC) are uncommon, and recognizing them can be difficult. Although present at birth, many cases do not become evident until later in childhood or adolescence, with an initial clinical presentation in adulthood being encountered only rarely. Typically, FBC anomalies present as a unilateral cyst, sinus, or fistula associated with the external auditory canal, or with swelling or an inflammatory opening in the peri-auricular/parotid area. They are commonly misdiagnosed and are often treated inadequately before being excised completely. A 40-year-old woman presented to the maxillofacial outpatient clinic with an episode of bilateral pre-auricular tumefaction, initially diagnosed as temporomandibular dysfunction syndrome. This was associated with bilateral pre-auricular pain that increased with mandibular movements. In relation to the patient's history, and given the bilateral presence of a pre-auricular pit, a diagnosis of FBC anomaly was made. Further investigation showed a related asymptomatic history in five other cases across four generations of the same family. The authors describe here the case, the diagnostic methodology, and the wide local excision technique used for removal of the branchial sinus. Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. First branchial cleft anomalies in children: Experience with 30 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wanpeng; Zhao, Liming; Xu, Hongming; Li, Xiaoyan

    2017-07-01

    First branchial cleft anomalies (FBCA) are rare in the clinical setting, as they account for 1 to 8% of all branchial abnormalities. The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between the fistula tract and facial nerve and the surgical method of FBCA. This retrospective study included 30 cases of FBCA in children managed from 2009 to 2016. All patients underwent surgery to remove the tract of the FBCA. We reviewed the clinical data of the patients to obtain their demographics and management. Thirty patients (11 male and 19 female) with anomalies of FBCA were diagnosed. The ages ranged from 1 to 13 years (median, 3 years). Twenty cases had a close relationship with the parotid gland. The facial nerve was identified in 20 of the 30 patients. The tract ran deep to the facial nerve in 3 cases, superficial to it in 21 cases, and passed between the branches of the nerve in 6 cases. The facial nerve was not identified in ten patients, as the tract was superficial to it. There were 2 cases of postoperative temporary facial paralysis (2/30, 6.7%). The symptoms gradually improved after one month, 1 case had permanent facial paralysis (1/30, 3.3%), and 1 case had postoperative recurrence. Complete excision of the tract is the only way to manage FBCA, and the course of the tracts vary and have different relationships with the facial nerve. There are 3 types: Superficial, deep to the facial nerve, and between the branches of the nerve. Therefore, surgical approaches differ among the various types, and careful preoperative planning and protecting the facial nerve during resection of the tract are essential.

  10. Branchial cysts: an unusual cause of a mediastinal mass: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotecha, Vihar; Muturi, Alex; Ruturi, Josiah

    2015-09-29

    Complex embryological processes form the head and neck of humans. It is not flawless; remnants lead to sinuses or cysts, commonly in the head and neck region. We present the a case of an 8-year-old boy, a primary school pupil, from rural Kenya with chronic cough, wheezing, difficulty in breathing and dyspnea on exertion. He was treated with antibiotics and antitubercular drugs without improvement prior to referral to our hospital. A computed tomography scan of his chest revealed a superior mediastinal mass extending into his neck. A diagnosis of a brachial cleft cyst was made and our patient underwent a successful excision of the mass through a median strenotomy and neck dissection. Branchial cysts of the neck are common, accounting for 20% of pediatric neck masses. Usually they present as a neck mass but in our case it presented as a mediastinal mass, which is a very rare clinical presentation. Surgical excision is the mainstay of treatment. To the surgeon, the embryology and anatomy should be absolutely clear as dissection may be challenging due to the close proximity and variable course of the cystic stalk to major neck vessels and nerves.

  11. Intrasellar abscess simultaning a Rathke's cleft cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Toshihiko; Murakawa, Takatsugu; Iwai, Tomohiko; Hirata, Toshifumi; Sakai, Noboru

    1983-01-01

    Both symptomatic Rathke's cleft cyst and intrasellar abscess are exceedingly rare. We present a case of intrasellar abscess developed in a Rathke's cleft cyst. A 60-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with complaints of polyuria, polydipsia, headache, and remittent fever. On admission, his neurological and ophthalmological examination was normal. Panhypopituitarism was revealed by endocrine testing. Plain-skull X-ray films showed no abnormalities, but a CT scan showed a small cystic lesion with a ring-like enhancement in the sella turcica and paranasal sinusitis. Further sagittal reconstruction of the CT scan demonstrated that the diaphragma sellae protruded upwards and that the pituitary stalk was markedly enhanced and enlarged. After the sinusitis improved, transsphenoidal surgery was carried out. Approximately 1 ml of the purulent contents were aspirated from the intrasellar region. The postoperative course was uneventful. A histological examination of the abscess wall revealed a ciliated columnar epithelium and inflammatory-cell infiltration beneath the epithelium. (author)

  12. First Branchial Cleft Fistula Associated with External Auditory Canal Stenosis and Middle Ear Cholesteatoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    shahin abdollahi fakhim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: First branchial cleft anomalies manifest with duplication of the external auditory canal.   Case Report: This report features a rare case of microtia and congenital middle ear and canal cholesteatoma with first branchial fistula. External auditory canal stenosis was complicated by middle ear and external canal cholesteatoma, but branchial fistula, opening in the zygomatic root and a sinus in the helical root, may explain this feature. A canal wall down mastoidectomy with canaloplasty and wide meatoplasty was performed. The branchial cleft was excised through parotidectomy and facial nerve dissection.   Conclusion:  It should be considered that canal stenosis in such cases can induce cholesteatoma formation in the auditory canal and middle ear.

  13. A branchial cyst of the pyriform fossa transoral laser resection: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelfattah, Hesham Mostafa; Ahmed, Mohammed Elrabie; Ahmed, Mona El-Rabie; Ahmed, Mohamed Abd El-Kader; Moussa, Abd-Elmateen

    2016-02-01

    Pyriform sinus malformations represent rare third and fourth branchial anomalies. Fistulae at the latter site were initially described and make up less than 1 % of all brachial anomalies. They may be discovered incidentally, or may present as a neck mass with recurrent infection, dysphagia, or airway compromise, and can be an unusual cause of dysphonia in infant and children. Here, we present a case of third branchial cyst located in pharyngeal wall of the left pyriform sinus which presented with dysphonia since birth in a 6-year-old girl. Transoral CO2 laser excision was carried out successfully with no communicating tract. The patient's dysphonia showed progressive regression at 1-year follow-up. Third branchial cyst in the left pyriform sinus (Bailey's type IV) is an unusual cause of dysphonia in pediatric. Our present case report is the first brachial cyst to be reported in the pyriform fossa and the second branchial anomalies to be excised transorally with CO2 laser.

  14. Updating concepts of first branchial cleft defects: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Alwyn R; Uppal, Harpreet S; De, Ranit; Zeitoun, Hisham

    2002-02-01

    The Sinuses and fistulae of first branchial cleft origin have been widely reported in the literature and their variable relationship to the facial nerve has been described. Most published series however are too small to allow a detailed analysis of the relative frequency of various relationships of these lesions to the facial nerve and therefore enabling the determination of risks to the nerve at surgery. The aim of this study was to perform a comprehensive review of literature in an attempt to identify those patients with a deep tract (lying deep to the main trunk of the facial nerve and/or its branches, and/or between the branches) and to recognize the incidence of the complications of surgical management. Available English, French and German literature between 1923 and 2000 was reviewed and variables including patient's age, sex, side and type of anomaly, opening of the lesion and the relationship of the tract are analyzed in relation to the position of the facial nerve. The complications due to their surgical excision are also reported. Of the total number of cases with fistulae and sinuses identified (n=158) fistulous tracts were more likely to lie deep to the facial nerve compared with sinus tracts (P=0.01). Lesions with openings in the external auditory meatus are associated with a tract superficial to the facial nerve (P=0.05). Patients presenting at a younger age were more likely to have a deep tract with consequent increased risk of facial nerve damage. Identification of the facial nerve trunk at an early stage of dissection is critical. Extra care and caution should be exercised in younger patients (<6 months), those with fistulous tracts and in patients with a tract opening elsewhere other than the external auditory canal.

  15. Computed tomography of Rathke's cleft cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Teramoto, Akira; Mayanagi, Yoshiaki; Hanamura, Tetsu; Noguchi, Makoto; Takakura, Kintomo.

    1986-01-01

    The computed tomography (CT) findings in six cases of Rathke's cleft cyst (RCC) were presented. According to the location of the RCC, we divided these cases into two types - the suprasellar type and the intrasellar type. The characteristic CT findings are as follows: SUPRASELLAR type 1. smooth, round mass, 2. various densities, 3. no enhancement, INTRASELLAR type 1. low-density area in the posterior sella turcica, 2. no enhancement, 3. suprasellar high-density mass; enhanced pituitary gland pushed up by the intrasellar RCC. As RCC are more common than was formerly suspected, this disease should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient showing a non-enhancing, non-calcified sellar/suprasellar cyst on CT scans. (author)

  16. Computed tomography of Rathke's cleft cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Teramoto, Akira; Mayanagi, Yoshiaki; Hanamura, Tetsu; Noguchi, Makoto; Takakura, Kintomo

    1986-02-01

    The computed tomography (CT) findings in six cases of Rathke's cleft cyst (RCC) were presented. According to the location of the RCC, we divided these cases into two types - the suprasellar type and the intrasellar type. The characteristic CT findings are as follows: SUPRASELLAR type 1. smooth, round mass, 2. various densities, 3. no enhancement, INTRASELLAR type 1. low-density area in the posterior sella turcica, 2. no enhancement, 3. suprasellar high-density mass; enhanced pituitary gland pushed up by the intrasellar RCC. As RCC are more common than was formerly suspected, this disease should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient showing a non-enhancing, non-calcified sellar/suprasellar cyst on CT scans.

  17. Surgical Approaches to First Branchial Cleft Anomaly Excision: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintanilla-Dieck, Lourdes; Virgin, Frank; Wootten, Chistopher; Goudy, Steven; Penn, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. First branchial cleft anomalies (BCAs) constitute a rare entity with variable clinical presentations and anatomic findings. Given the high rate of recurrence with incomplete excision, identification of the entire tract during surgical treatment is of paramount importance. The objectives of this paper were to present five anatomic variations of first BCAs and describe the presentation, evaluation, and surgical approach to each one. Methods. A retrospective case review and literature review were performed. We describe patient characteristics, presentation, evaluation, and surgical approach of five patients with first BCAs. Results. Age at definitive surgical treatment ranged from 8 months to 7 years. Various clinical presentations were encountered, some of which were atypical for first BCAs. All had preoperative imaging demonstrating the tract. Four surgical approaches required a superficial parotidectomy with identification of the facial nerve, one of which revealed an aberrant facial nerve. In one case the tract was found to travel into the angle of the mandible, terminating as a mandibular cyst. This required en bloc excision that included the lateral cortex of the mandible. Conclusions. First BCAs have variable presentations. Complete surgical excision can be challenging. Therefore, careful preoperative planning and the recognition of atypical variants during surgery are essential.

  18. Surgical Approaches to First Branchial Cleft Anomaly Excision: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Quintanilla-Dieck

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. First branchial cleft anomalies (BCAs constitute a rare entity with variable clinical presentations and anatomic findings. Given the high rate of recurrence with incomplete excision, identification of the entire tract during surgical treatment is of paramount importance. The objectives of this paper were to present five anatomic variations of first BCAs and describe the presentation, evaluation, and surgical approach to each one. Methods. A retrospective case review and literature review were performed. We describe patient characteristics, presentation, evaluation, and surgical approach of five patients with first BCAs. Results. Age at definitive surgical treatment ranged from 8 months to 7 years. Various clinical presentations were encountered, some of which were atypical for first BCAs. All had preoperative imaging demonstrating the tract. Four surgical approaches required a superficial parotidectomy with identification of the facial nerve, one of which revealed an aberrant facial nerve. In one case the tract was found to travel into the angle of the mandible, terminating as a mandibular cyst. This required en bloc excision that included the lateral cortex of the mandible. Conclusions. First BCAs have variable presentations. Complete surgical excision can be challenging. Therefore, careful preoperative planning and the recognition of atypical variants during surgery are essential.

  19. Midline nasal dermoid cyst with Tessier's 0 cleft

    OpenAIRE

    Guruprasad, Yadavalli; Chauhan, Dinesh Singh

    2014-01-01

    This is a rare anomaly of midline nasal dermoid cyst (NDC) along with Tessier's 0 cleft. Midline NDCs present most commonly result from aberrant embryological development, and most commonly give rise to bifid nasal deformity resulting in midline cleft of the nose. Craniofacial clefts are among the most disfiguring of all facial anomalies. They exist in a multitude of patterns and with varying degrees of severity. The bifid nose deformity is generally an indicator of Tessier number 0 cleft. We...

  20. The double auditory meatus--a rare first branchial cleft anomaly: clinical presentation and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokroos, R J; Manni, J J

    2000-11-01

    To discuss the embryology, classification, clinical experience with, and management of first branchial cleft anomalies. Retrospective case review. Tertiary referral center. Patients with a first branchial cleft anomaly. Surgery or revision surgery. Classifications according to Work, Olsen, Chilla; previous diagnostic and therapeutic pitfalls; outcome of intervention (including facial nerve function). Between 1984 and 1999, first branchial cleft anomalies were diagnosed in 18 patients. Surgical treatment was the treatment of choice. The authors' approach in Work type I and type 2 lesions is described, and surgical aspects of revision surgery are discussed. The importance of early establishment of the relationship of the anomaly to the facial nerve is stressed. In 8 patients, previous surgical attempts had been undertaken without establishment of the diagnosis first. After intervention, the outcome was favorable. First branchial cleft anomalies occur sporadically in ordinary clinical practice. They may go unrecognized or may be mistaken for tumors or other inflammatory lesions of in the periauricular region. However, the distinct clinical features, which can be derived from embryologic development, usually lead to the correct diagnosis. This avoids both treatment delay and eventual failure.

  1. Novel presentation of a fourth branchial cleft anomaly in a male infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Seth H; Marinello, Mark; Dodson, Kelley M

    2010-01-01

    Fourth branchial cleft anomalies are rare congenital disorders of the neck. We describe a case involving a unique presentation of this entity as well as a review of the literature concerning its management. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Type-II First Branchial Cleft Anomaly Presenting as a Post ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    [2]. Here, we report an extremely rare variant of first branchial cleft anomaly of type‑2 presenting as a salivary fistula near mastoid tip in a young female patient. To the best of our knowledge, this is probably the first case of this type to be reported. Case Report. A 12-year-old female presented to Otolaryngology Department.

  3. Bilateral pharyngoceles (branchial cleft anomalies?) and endoscopic surgical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Christopher Y; Furdyna, Julia A

    2005-07-01

    A case report of bilateral pharyngoceles without a history of elevated intrapharyngeal pressures is used to support the hypothesis that pharyngoceles may be an adult manifestation of an internal branchial sinus anomaly. The development of a pharyngocele from a branchial sinus origin would suggest a predictable relationship to the hypoglossal, glossopharyngeal, and superior laryngeal nerves, which may influence the choice of surgical approach (open versus endoscopic) and the counseling of patients who are considering surgical correction.

  4. Multidetector computerized tomographic fistulography in the evaluation of congenital branchial cleft fistulae and sinuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhipeng; Fu, Kaiyuan; Zhang, Zuyan; Zhao, Yanping; Ma, Xuchen

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to primarily investigate the usefulness of computerized tomographic (CT) fistulography in the diagnosis and management of branchial cleft fistulae and sinuses. Fifteen patients with confirmed branchial fistulae or sinuses who had undergone CT fistulography were included. The diagnoses were confirmed by clinical, radiologic, or histopathologic examinations. The internal openings, distribution, and neighboring relationship of the lesions presented by CT fistulography were analyzed to evaluate the usefulness in comparison with x-ray fistulography. Nine patients were diagnosed with first branchial fistulae or sinuses, 2 with second branchial fistulae, and 4 with third or fourth branchial fistulae. The presence and location of the lesions could be seen on x-ray fistulography. The distribution of the lesions, internal openings, and neighboring relationship with parotid gland, carotid sheath, and submandibular gland could be clearly demonstrated on CT cross-sectional or volume-rendering images. CT fistulography could provide valuable information and benefit surgical planning by demonstrating the courses of branchial anomalies in detail. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A fatal case of severe neck abscess due to a third branchial cleft fistula: morphologic and immunohistochemical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Fang; Liang, Yue; Khan, Muhammad Fasahat; Zhang, Lin; Li, Wenhe; Mahmoodurrahman, Mohammed; Zhou, Yiwu

    2016-09-15

    Branchial cleft anomalies constitute a frequently encountered and commonly non-lethal disease in otolaryngology, and result from aberrant embryonic development. The third branchial cleft fistula is one of the four known specific types of branchial cleft anomalies, and always presents as recurrent neck abscess and suppurative thyroiditis. Here, we report an unexpected death due to severe neck infection following a third branchial cleft fistula. A 19-year-old man was sent to the hospital with a 1-week history of recurrent left-sided neck abscess, and was scheduled for incision and drainage of the abscess. However, before the surgery was performed, the man's condition deteriorated and he died. A review of his medical history showed that he had undergone a previous incision and drainage for a neck abscess 2 years ago. Postmortem examination revealed that the fatal neck abscess was induced by a third branchial cleft fistula. We conclude that a histopathological examination of neck tissue combined with a detailed review of medical history and examination of ultrasonographic and CT images can provide a rapid and accurate diagnosis of third branchial cleft fistula. This common, non-lethal disease can potentially lead to death if the neck infection is not properly diagnosed and treated. In medico-legal practice, medical examiners should be aware of this condition, as this knowledge would be important in the diagnosis of the cause of death.

  6. First branchial cleft fistula presenting with internal opening on the Eustachian tube: Illustrated cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuhe; Li, Tiancheng; Xue, Junfang; Jia, Jun; Xiao, Shuifang; Zhao, Enmin

    2012-05-01

    Two cases of first branchial cleft fistula with internal opening on the Eustachian tube are reported and the diagnosis, management and embryological hypothesis are discussed. Retrospective study and review of the literature. Both patients were young boys with first branchial cleft anomaly clearly identified by computed tomography fistulography scan and direct Methylene Blue dye injection. In both cases, surgical removal revealed a fistula with internal opening located on the Eustachian tube near the nasopharynx. The main embryological theories and classification are reviewed. A connection between the theories of first branchial apparatus development and the classification by Work might explain the reported clinical association. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Management of First Branchial Cleft Anomalies via a Cartilage-Splitting Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Richard; Conrad, David; Field, Erin; O'Reilly, Robert

    2015-06-01

    First branchial cleft anomalies are uncommon lesions that often present as periauricular infections. They have high recurrence rates, due in part to scarring secondary to prior infections and their management. These lesions have a close relationship with the facial nerve, and most authors recommend its identification and dissection because of this relationship. Nonetheless, facial nerve palsy has been reported in up to 15% of cases. We describe a novel technique for the management of first branchial cleft anomalies. Such lesions that presented in an infra- or postauricular location were approached via an incision through the cartilage of the pinna, between the tragus and antitragus. This technique affords direct access to the lesion without the need for facial nerve dissection. Six patients were treated. Five had prior surgery, including 3 with previous attempts at excision. There were no complications. The median follow-up was 35 months. One patient developed a recurrence. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  8. Unusual association of congenital middle ear cholesteatoma and first branchial cleft anomaly: management and embryological concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicollas, R; Tardivet, L; Bourlière-Najean, B; Sudre-Levillain, I; Triglia, J M

    2005-02-01

    To report two cases of an undescribed association of first branchial cleft fistula and middle ear congenital cholesteatoma and to discuss management and embryological hypothesis. Retrospective study and review of the literature Both patients were young girls free of past medical or surgical history. Surgical removal of the first cleft anomaly found in the two cases a fistula routing underneath the facial nerve. Both cholesteatomas were located in the hypotympanum, mesotympanum. In one case, an anatomical link between the two malformations was clearly identified with CT scan. The main embryological theories and classification are reviewed. A connection between Aimi's and Michaels' theories (congenital cholesteatoma) and Work classification might explain the reported clinical association.

  9. The use of preoperative fistulography in patients with a second branchial cleft anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celis, I.; Bijnens, E.; Peene, P.; Cleeren, P.

    1998-01-01

    The preoperative fistulography used in cases of second branchial cleft anomalies is an effective method of showing the exact anatomy and topography of these fistulas in the neck. This visualisation is very important because the only therapeutic solution is complete surgical resection. This method is easy to perform and is painless. We report two patients with branchiogenic anomalies. The diagnosis was established by fistulography and histological examination. (orig.)

  10. Relation between a first branchial cleft anomaly and the facial nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu-Xing; Guo, Chuan-Bin

    2012-04-01

    Relations between first branchial cleft anomalies and the facial nerve vary. We reviewed 41 patients' medical records and pathological sections to clarify the relation, and found that those on the right side in young patients, which were Work type II and situated low down, were likely to be deep to the facial nerve. Copyright © 2011 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The use of preoperative fistulography in patients with a second branchial cleft anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celis, I.; Bijnens, E.; Peene, P.; Cleeren, P. [Service of Radiology, Virga Jesse Ziekenhuis, Hasselt (Belgium)

    1998-09-01

    The preoperative fistulography used in cases of second branchial cleft anomalies is an effective method of showing the exact anatomy and topography of these fistulas in the neck. This visualisation is very important because the only therapeutic solution is complete surgical resection. This method is easy to perform and is painless. We report two patients with branchiogenic anomalies. The diagnosis was established by fistulography and histological examination. (orig.) With 3 figs., 7 refs.

  12. Resection of recurrent branchial cleft deformity using selective neck dissection technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qian; Pan, Yong; Xu, Yaodong; Liang, Faya; Huang, Xiaoming; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Han, Ping

    2014-07-01

    This study explores application of selective neck dissection technique in recurrent second, third, and fourth branchial cleft deformities. A total of 19 cases of recurrent second, third, and fourth branchial cleft deformities were treated using the selective neck dissection technique, during which the sternocleidomastoid muscle, cervical anterior muscle, and carotid sheath were contoured. The lesion above the prevertebral fascia was then resected en bloc. Finally, the opening of the internal fistula was ligated and sutured using the purse-string approach. Patients in this study had no injures to their internal carotid artery, jugular vein, vagus nerve, accessory nerve, hypoglossal nerve, or recurrent laryngeal nerve. There were also no complications such as poor wound healing. The patients were monitored for 7-73 months and showed no recurrences. Using selective neck dissection to treat second, third, and fourth branchial cleft deformities resulted in en bloc lesion resections and reduced the chance of recurrence. Contouring the sternocleidomastoid muscle, strap muscle, and carotid sheath is key to the surgical procedure, as it leads to en bloc lesion resection while retaining the recurrent laryngeal nerve and carotid sheath. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Report of a complete second branchial fistula.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khan, Mohammad Habibullah

    2010-08-01

    We report a case of complete congenital branchial fistula with an internal opening near the tonsillar fossa. Cysts, fistulas, and sinuses of the second branchial cleft are the most common developmental anomalies arising from the branchial apparatus. In our case, a 43-year-old man presented with a several-year history of a discharging sinus from the right side of his neck, consistent with a branchial fistula. He underwent various investigations and finally was treated with a one-stage complete surgical excision of the fistula tract. We describe the general clinical presentation, investigations, and surgical outcome of this case.

  14. Congenital agenesis of unilateral parotid gland with ipsilateral type I first branchial cleft anomaly: A rare presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Tripti Maithani; Apoorva Pandey; Seema Acharya

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To report a rare case of unilateral parotid agenesis with ipsilateral type I first branchial cleft anomaly. Material and methods: A case study with special emphasis on the embryology, outlining the complex developmental process of parotid and branchial arches and highlighting the probable reason for development of such anomalies. Results: The literature states that unilateral parotid agenesis is a rare entity with few reported cases occurring solely or in conjunction with other hea...

  15. Branchial cleft cyst - A case report with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamatha Boringi

    2014-01-01

    A solitary, 1 month old swelling on the right submandibular region, in a 13-year-old girl, caused diagnostic dilemma with clinical presentation. Diagnosis was done after all the investigations and treated accordingly.

  16. [Relationship between Work Ⅱ type of congenital first branchial cleft anomaly and facial nerve and surgical strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B; Chen, L S; Huang, S L; Liang, L; Gong, X X; Wu, P N; Zhang, S Y; Luo, X N; Zhan, J D; Sheng, X L; Lu, Z M

    2017-10-07

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between Work Ⅱ type of congenital first branchial cleft anomaly (CFBCA) and facial nerve and discuss surgical strategies. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 37 patients with CFBCA who were treated from May 2005 to September 2016. Among 37 cases with CFBCA, 12 males and 25 females; 24 in the left and 13 in the right; the age at diagnosis was from 1 to 76 ( years, with a median age of 20, 24 cases with age of 18 years or less and 13 with age more than 18 years; duration of disease ranged from 1 to 10 years (median of 6 years); 4 cases were recurren after fistula resection. According to the classification of Olsen, all 37 cases were non-cyst (sinus or fistula). External fistula located over the mandibular angle in 28 (75.7%) cases and below the angle in 9 (24.3%) cases. Results: Surgeries were performed successfully in all the 37 cases. It was found that lesions located at anterior of the facial nerve in 13 (35.1%) cases, coursed between the branches in 3 cases (8.1%), and lied in the deep of the facial nerve in 21 (56.8%) cases. CFBCA in female with external fistula below mandibular angle and membranous band was more likely to lie deep of the facial nerve than in male with external fistula over the mandibular angle but without myringeal web. Conclusions: CFBCA in female patients with a external fistula located below the mandibular angle, non-cyst of Olsen or a myringeal web is more likely to lie deep of the facial nerve. Surgeons should particularly take care of the protection of facial nerve in these patients, if necessary, facial nerve monitoring technology can be used during surgery to complete resection of lesions.

  17. MRI of symptomatic Rathke`s cleft cyst. MR intensity of cyst contents and clinical manifestations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeichi, Yasuhiro [Soseikai General Hospital, Kyoto (Japan); Nakasu, Yoko; Handa, Jyoji

    1997-07-01

    We have not known surgical indications for incidental Rathke`s cleft cysts, because of our lack of knowledge about their natural history. In this study, we investigated whether symptomatic Rathke`s cleft cysts have any characteristic features in magnetic resonance (MR) signal intensities, and analyzed their relation to clinical manifestations and to patterns of suprasellar expansion. MR signal intensities on T1-weighted (T1W) and T2-weighted (T2W) images were categorized into 3 types in 78 cases including our 9 cases; type I, low signal intensity on T1W images and hyperintensity on T2W images in 25 cases; type II, hyperintensity on both T1W and T2W images in 20; and type III, low intensity on T2W images, in other 33. Patients of type I signal intensities presented with significantly high percentage of large cysts compressing the third ventricle than patients with other types. The patients of type I signal intensities also frequently had visual disturbance. Patients in type II showed significantly less percentage of large cysts. Anterior pituitary dysfunction was observed more often in patients of type II and III than patients of type I. We conclude that Rathke`s cleft cysts with MR signal intensity like cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are slowly growing, and are frequently diagnosed as large cysts associated with visual disturbance. The patients with other types of MR signal intensities may suffer pituitary dysfunction or other symptoms before the cysts compress the hypothalamic region. The assessment of MR signal intensities may contribute in predicting clinical progression in patients with Rathke`s cleft cysts. (author)

  18. A Case of First Branchial Cleft Fistula Presenting with an External Opening on the Root of the Helical Crus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Background First branchial cleft anomalies (FBCA) are rare clinical entities of the head and neck. Typically, the tract of the FBCA begins in the external auditory canal and ends in the postauricular or submandibular region. Case Presentation We present a case of a 23-year-old man who had a first branchial cleft fistula with atypical opening on the root of the helical crus. Complete excision of the tract, including the cuff of surrounding cartilage, was performed. Histopathology revealed a fistular tract lined with squamous epithelium. To our knowledge, this is the first case to be reported of type I FBCA with an opening on the root of the helical crus. The low incidence and varied presentation often result in misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment. Conclusions In the patients with FBCA, careful recognition of atypical variants is essential for complete excision. PMID:29560006

  19. Transoral robotic surgery-assisted excision of a congenital cervical salivary duct fistula presenting as a branchial cleft fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassekh, Christopher H; Kazahaya, Ken; Livolsi, Virginia A; Loevner, Laurie A; Cowan, Andy T; Weinstein, Gregory S

    2016-02-01

    Congenital cervical salivary duct fistulae are rare entities and can mimic branchial cleft fistulae. Ectopic salivary tissue associated with these pharyngocervical tracts may have malignant potential. We present a case report of a novel surgical approach and review of the literature. A 27-year-old man presented with complaint of drainage from the right side of his neck since early childhood. A tract was found from the posterior tonsillar pillar into the neck and ectopic salivary tissue was found along the tract. A congenital hearing loss was also present. Transoral robotic (TORS)-assisted surgery was used in the management of this patient and allowed excellent visualization of the pharyngeal component of the lesion and a minimally invasive approach. The patient did well with no recurrence. TORS was helpful for management of a congenital salivary fistula and may be helpful for branchial cleft fistulae. These lesions may be associated with the branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Congenital cutaneous fistula at the sternoclavicular joint - Not a dermoid fistula but the remnant of the fourth branchial (pharyngeal) cleft ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Michinobu; Kanamori, Yutaka; Tomonaga, Kotaro; Yamashita, Tatsuya; Migita, Misato; Takezoe, Toshiko; Watanabe, Toshihiko; Fuchimoto, Yasushi; Matsuoka, Kentaro

    2015-12-01

    A fourth branchial pouch remnant is well known as a pyriform sinus fistula. However, there has been no report of a fistula composed of the complete remnant of the fourth branchial apparatus. We experienced patients with a congenital lower neck cutaneous fistula which was thought to be the skin-side remnant of the fourth branchial cleft. Seven children were referred to our hospital from 2009 to 2015 for the treatment of a cutaneous fistula situated near the sternoclavicular joint. All of them were surgically resected and their pathological characteristics were examined. Clinical charts were retrospectively reviewed. In six cases, the left side was affected. All cutaneous fistulas had a small skin orifice near the sternoclavicular joint and they were situated at the anterior edge of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Abscess formation was seen in four cases. Surgical resection was performed at the age of 6 months to 9 years. These fistulas ran deep into the subcutaneous tissue and had a blind end. Pathological examination showed that the epithelial layer was mainly composed of a stratified squamous epithelium. In two cases the epithelium was composed of ciliated columnar epithelium. Recurrence has not been observed in any of the cases. The seven cases had a common clinical feature and were a definite clinical entity. Judging from the characteristics of our cases and the previous literature, we concluded that this lower neck cutaneous fistula was most likely a congenital skin-side remnant of the fourth branchial cleft. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Branchial anomalies in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Y; Ifeacho, S; Tweedie, D; Jephson, C G; Albert, D M; Cochrane, L A; Wyatt, M E; Jonas, N; Hartley, B E J

    2011-08-01

    Branchial cleft anomalies are the second most common head and neck congenital lesions seen in children. Amongst the branchial cleft malformations, second cleft lesions account for 95% of the branchial anomalies. This article analyzes all the cases of branchial cleft anomalies operated on at Great Ormond Street Hospital over the past 10 years. All children who underwent surgery for branchial cleft sinus or fistula from January 2000 to December 2010 were included in this study. In this series, we had 80 patients (38 female and 42 male). The age at the time of operation varied from 1 year to 14 years. Amongst this group, 15 patients had first branchial cleft anomaly, 62 had second branchial cleft anomaly and 3 had fourth branchial pouch anomaly. All the first cleft cases were operated on by a superficial parotidectomy approach with facial nerve identification. Complete excision was achieved in all these first cleft cases. In this series of first cleft anomalies, we had one complication (temporary marginal mandibular nerve weakness. In the 62 children with second branchial cleft anomalies, 50 were unilateral and 12 were bilateral. In the vast majority, the tract extended through the carotid bifurcation and extended up to pharyngeal constrictor muscles. Majority of these cases were operated on through an elliptical incision around the external opening. Complete excision was achieved in all second cleft cases except one who required a repeat excision. In this subgroup, we had two complications one patient developed a seroma and one had incomplete excision. The three patients with fourth pouch anomaly were treated with endoscopic assisted monopolar diathermy to the sinus opening with good outcome. Branchial anomalies are relatively common in children. There are three distinct types, first cleft, second cleft and fourth pouch anomaly. Correct diagnosis is essential to avoid inadequate surgery and multiple procedures. The surgical approach needs to be tailored to the type

  2. First branchial cleft anomaly: clinical insight into its relevance in otolaryngology with pediatric considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maithani, Tripti; Pandey, Apporva; Dey, Debraj; Bhardwaj, Aparna; Singh, V P

    2014-01-01

    First branchial cleft anomalies (FBCA) represent a small subset of congenital malformations in neck. Prime objective of this study is to share our experience with FBCA, emphasize its relevance in otolaryngology and deal with its pediatric perspective. Embryology, pathologic anatomy and varied spectra of clinical presentations of FBCA are discussed. Along with this we have illustrated three different cases; all of them were of pediatric age group and were misdiagnosed by their treating specialists elsewhere. In this article we have also laid special emphasis on its pediatric considerations. FBCA are mostly misdiagnosed due to their unfamiliar clinical signs and symptoms. Swellings may masquerade as other neck masses. Majority of patients give a history of previous incision and drainage. While dealing with pediatric patients the important factors to be kept in mind are the age of child, superficial course of facial nerve, any associated agenesis of parotid gland. Alteration in surgical technique may be required in children. A thorough medical examination with high index of clinical suspicion should be kept in mind while dealing with such anomalies. Owing to their complex presentation and close relation with facial nerve they are challenging lesions for surgeons.

  3. Spontaneous alteration from Rathke's cleft cyst to craniopharyngioma--possible involvement of transformation between these pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yoshikazu; Watanabe, Mika; Tominaga, Teiji

    2014-12-01

    Both Rathke's cleft cyst and craniopharyngioma are considered to arise from the remnants of Rathke's diverticulum despite the quite different histological characteristics. These two lesions may consist of a disease spectrum extending from Rathke's cleft cyst to craniopharyngioma. However, in spite of increasing evidence of these intermediate histologies, very few cases of the actual transformation from Rathke's cleft cyst to craniopharyngioma have been reported in the same patient. A 47-year-old man suffered from recurrent visual dysfunction. Aspiration and partial cystectomy was performed to a suprasellar massive cystic lesion. The histological diagnosis was Rathke's cleft cyst with a small component of squamous metaplasia. Seven months later, the cyst was re-expanded. The cyst wall was irregularly thickened. Re-operation was performed, and the thickened anterior wall was widely removed. Postoperative histological examination showed multiplication of stratified squamous epithelia forming a papillary arrangement. Ki-67 staining showed positive cells randomly distributed not only in the basal layer but also in various epithelial layers, with a labeling index of more than 20 %. The histological diagnosis was squamous papillary type of craniopharyngioma with high potential of proliferation. Subsequent immunohistochemical examinations showed positive reaction to cytokeratin 8 only in the initial epithelium and negative in the latter epithelium. The present case was thought as an actual evidence of the proposed link between Rathke's cleft cyst and craniopharyngioma. Cytokeratin 8 could be the important examination to differentiate Rathke's cleft cyst from craniopharyngioma.

  4. Case Report: CT diagnosis of thymic remnant cyst/thymopharyngeal duct cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daga, Bipin V; Chaudhary, VA; Dhamangaokar, VB

    2009-01-01

    A 4-year-old boy presented with history of left anterolateral neck swelling since birth. He was clinically diagnosed to have a branchial cleft cyst. A CT scan revealed findings suggestive of a thymic remnant cyst. The lesion was excised and the diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology

  5. [Fourth branchial cleft deformity with skin orifice: a series of 10 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S L; Zhang, B; Chen, L S; Liang, L; Luo, X N; Lu, Z M; Zhang, S Y

    2016-10-07

    Objective: To report rare cases of congenital neck cutaneous sinus with an orifice near the sternoclavicular joint and to investigate their origins and managements. Methods: A total of ten patients with congenital neck cutaneous sinus having an orifice near the sternoclavicular joint treated in the Guangdong General Hospital from January 2010 to June 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Results: There four boys and six girls, aging from 11 months to 96 months with an average of 33.4 months, and they had a common feature showing a congenital cutaneous sinus with an orifice near sternoclavicular joint. Discharge of pus from the orifice or abscess formation was commonly seen soon after infection. With bacteriological study, staphylococcus aureus was positive in five cases and klebsiella pneumonia in a case. Another orifice of fistula/sinus was not depicted in pyriform with barium swallow X-ray in five cases Ultrasound studies of three cases demonstrated anechoic (i.e., nearly black) and solid-cystic lesion near sternoclavicular joint with posterior acoustic enhancement. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed isointensity of the lesion on T1 and T2 weighted images with heterogeneous enhancement and a close relationship with sternoclavicular joint. All patients underwent laryngoscopic examination, which showed no orifice of sinus in pyriform at same side. Surgical resection of fistula/sinus was performed in all cases. The lengths of the fistula varied from 5 mm to 22 mm with an average of 11 mm. Postoperative pathological examination showed all specimens were accordance with fistula. No complications were noticed. Recurrence was not observed in the cases by following-up of 6 months to 70 months (median: 33 months). Conclusion: Congenital neck cutaneous sinus with orifice near the sternoclavicular joint maybe a special clinical phenotype of the fourth branchial cleft sinus with skin orifice in cervicothoracic junction. Differential diagnoses between low cervical diseases

  6. A Type-II First Branchial Cleft Anomaly Presenting as a Post-Auricular Salivary Fistula: A Rare Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, S; Deshmukh, Pt; Gupta, M; Shukla, S

    2014-01-01

    First branchial cleft anomalies are rare with the average age of presentation as 19 years. There is an average delay of 3.5 years between initial presentation and adequate treatment due to diagnostic dilemma. A very rare variant of first branchial cleft anomaly presenting as a post-auricular salivary fistula is reported. A 12-year-old girl presented with a history of intermittent watery discharge, more so at the time of meals from a right post-auricular opening for last 3 years. Computed tomography sialography revealed a fistulous tract connecting the sub segmental duct of the parotid gland extending along the pre-tragus region in subcutaneous plane up to mastoid tip after passing inferior to external auditory canal. Superficial parotidectomy with identification of facial nerve branches was carried out for excision of the tract. Histopathology revealed sinus tract comprising of ectodermal components and acini of the parotid gland. We classified our case into work's type-2 based on anatomical location at an angle of mandible, its relationship to parotid gland and facial nerve and previous history of ear discharge. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of its type to be reported.

  7. A Type-II First Branchial Cleft Anomaly Presenting as a Post-Auricular Salivary Fistula: A Rare Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, S; Deshmukh, PT; Gupta, M; Shukla, S

    2014-01-01

    First branchial cleft anomalies are rare with the average age of presentation as 19 years. There is an average delay of 3.5 years between initial presentation and adequate treatment due to diagnostic dilemma. A very rare variant of first branchial cleft anomaly presenting as a post-auricular salivary fistula is reported. A 12-year-old girl presented with a history of intermittent watery discharge, more so at the time of meals from a right post-auricular opening for last 3 years. Computed tomography sialography revealed a fistulous tract connecting the sub segmental duct of the parotid gland extending along the pre-tragus region in subcutaneous plane up to mastoid tip after passing inferior to external auditory canal. Superficial parotidectomy with identification of facial nerve branches was carried out for excision of the tract. Histopathology revealed sinus tract comprising of ectodermal components and acini of the parotid gland. We classified our case into work's type-2 based on anatomical location at an angle of mandible, its relationship to parotid gland and facial nerve and previous history of ear discharge. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of its type to be reported. PMID:24669347

  8. Endoscopic Endonasal Approach in the Management of Rathke's Cleft Cysts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Solari

    Full Text Available Rathke's cleft cysts (RCCs are quite uncommon sellar lesions that can extend or even arise in the suprasellar area. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of both standard and extended endoscopic endonasal approaches in the management of different located RCCs.We retrospectively analyzed a series of 29 patients (9 males, 20 females complaining of a RCC, who underwent a standard or an extended endoscopic transsphenoidal approach at the Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosciences and Reproductive and Odontostomatological Sciences, of the Università degli Studi di Napoli "Federico II". Data regarding patients' demographics, clinical evaluation, cyst characteristics, surgical treatments, complications and outcomes were extracted from our electronic database (Filemaker Pro 11, File Maker Inc., Santa Clara, California, USA.A standard transsphenoidal approach was used in 19 cases, while the extended variation of the approach in 10 cases (5 purely suprasellar and 5 intra-suprasellar RCC. Cysts contents was fully drained in all the 29 cases, whilst a gross total removal, that accounts on the complete cyst wall removal, was achieved in an overall 55,1% of patients (16/29, specifically 36,8% (7/19 that received standard approach and 90% (9/10 of those that underwent to extended approach. We reported a 56.2% of recovery from headache, 38.5% of complete recovery and 53.8% of improvement from visual field defect and an overall 46.7% of improvement of the endocrine functions. Postoperative permanent DI rate was 10.3%, overall post-operative CSF leak rate 6.9%; recurrence/regrowth occurred in 4 patients (4/29, 13.8%, but only one required a second surgery.The endoscopic transsphenoidal approach for the removal of a symptomatic RCC offers several advantages in terms of visualization of the surgical field during both the exposure and removal of the lesion. The "extended" variation of the endoscopic approach provides a direct access

  9. Craniopharyngioma arising in a Rathke's cleft cyst: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alomari, Ahmed K; Kelley, Brian J; Damisah, Eyiyemisi; Marks, Asher; Hui, Pei; DiLuna, Michael; Vortmeyer, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    Craniopharyngioma is one of the most common non-glial intracranial tumors of childhood. Its relation to Rathke's cleft cyst (RCC) is controversial, and both lesions have been hypothesized to lie on a continuum of cystic ectodermal lesions of the sellar region. The authors report on a 7-year-old boy who presented with decreased visual acuity, presumably of at least 2 years' duration, and was found to have a 5.2-cm sellar lesion with rim enhancement. Histological examination of the resected lesion showed a mixture of areas with simple RCC morphology with focal squamous metaplasia and areas with typical craniopharyngioma morphology. Immunohistochemical staining with CK20 and Ki 67 differentially highlighted the 2 morphological components. Testing for beta-catenin and BRAF mutations was negative in the craniopharyngioma component, precluding definitive molecular classification. Follow-up imaging showed minimal residual enhancement and the patient will be closely followed up with serial MRI. Given the clinical and histological findings in the case, a progressive transformation of the RCC to craniopharyngioma seems to be the most plausible explanation for the co-occurrence of the 2 lesion types in this patient. An extensive review of previously proposed theories of the relationship between craniopharyngioma and RCC is also presented.

  10. Rathke's Cleft Cyst as Origin of a Pediatric Papillary Craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaffer, Sven-Martin; Buchfelder, Michael; Stoehr, Robert; Buslei, Rolf; Hölsken, Annett

    2018-01-01

    A 6-year old patient presented with an intra and suprasellar cystic lesion accompanied with impairment of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis and partial hypopituitarism. The most likely cause of sellar lesions in this age group are adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma (adaCP) or Rathke´s cleft cysts (RCCs). AdaCP are characterized by CTNNB1 mutations accompanied with aberrant nuclear beta-catenin expression. RCC show neither nuclear beta-catenin expression nor BRAF mutation. The latter is a hallmark of papillary craniopharyngiomas (papCP) that exhibit remarkable histological similarity with metaplasia of RCC. Diagnosis of the patient was elucidated by CTNNB1 and BRAF mutation screening, utilizing different approaches, as well as histological examination of markers, e.g., beta-catenin, claudin-1, EpCAM and the mutated BRAFV600E protein, which are known to be differentially expressed in sellar lesions. The case presented reveals extraordinary aspects for two reasons. Firstly, the lesion appeared clinically, on MRI, intraoperatively and histologically as RCC with prominent squamous metaplasia, but showing an expression pattern of markers also found in papCP, whilst exhibiting a hitherto undescribed BRAF V 600 E mutation. This important result documents a supposable transition of RCC metaplasia into a papillary craniopharyngioma (papCP). Secondly, this intriguing case shows unexpectedly that although papCP usually occurs almost exclusively in adults, it can also arise in childhood.

  11. Rathke's Cleft Cyst as Origin of a Pediatric Papillary Craniopharyngioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven-Martin Schlaffer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A 6-year old patient presented with an intra and suprasellar cystic lesion accompanied with impairment of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis and partial hypopituitarism. The most likely cause of sellar lesions in this age group are adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma (adaCP or Rathke´s cleft cysts (RCCs. AdaCP are characterized by CTNNB1 mutations accompanied with aberrant nuclear beta-catenin expression. RCC show neither nuclear beta-catenin expression nor BRAF mutation. The latter is a hallmark of papillary craniopharyngiomas (papCP that exhibit remarkable histological similarity with metaplasia of RCC. Diagnosis of the patient was elucidated by CTNNB1 and BRAF mutation screening, utilizing different approaches, as well as histological examination of markers, e.g., beta-catenin, claudin-1, EpCAM and the mutated BRAFV600E protein, which are known to be differentially expressed in sellar lesions. The case presented reveals extraordinary aspects for two reasons. Firstly, the lesion appeared clinically, on MRI, intraoperatively and histologically as RCC with prominent squamous metaplasia, but showing an expression pattern of markers also found in papCP, whilst exhibiting a hitherto undescribed BRAFV600E mutation. This important result documents a supposable transition of RCC metaplasia into a papillary craniopharyngioma (papCP. Secondly, this intriguing case shows unexpectedly that although papCP usually occurs almost exclusively in adults, it can also arise in childhood.

  12. Pediatric symptomatic Rathke cleft cyst compared with cystic craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Kita, Daisuke; Fukui, Issei; Sasagawa, Yasuo; Oishi, Masahiro; Okajima, Michiko; Tachibana, Osamu; Nakada, Mitsutoshi

    2016-09-01

    Symptomatic Rathke cleft cysts (RCCs) are rarely detected in neuroradiological screening and are less commonly found in children than in adults. However, when RCCs are observed in children, it is important to carefully distinguish a RCC from a cystic craniopharyngioma (CP) even if surgically treated or conservatively followed up. We conducted a retrospective review of clinical data from 11 patients with symptomatic RCCs whose ages were under 18 years and compared the data with data from 15 age- and sex-matched patients with cystic CP who were treated at our institute. The mean age of the patients with RCCs was 12.2 years (range, 6-18). There were six males and five females. As initial symptoms, nine patients presented with headache, while two each had impaired visual function, diabetes insipidus, and activity loss. The 14 patients with CP suffered from impaired visual function. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) mainly showed hyperintensity on T1-weighted images (WIs) and hypointensity on T2-WI in patients with RCC. However, patients with CP had characteristic hyperintensity on T2-WI. The average maximum diameter of the RCCs was 19.0 mm on average (range, 8-33 mm). The RCCs were thus significantly smaller than CPs (34.9 mm; range, 21-54 mm). The RCCs were usually oval or dumbbell-shaped and regular in appearance, while the larger CPs were lobular and irregular. A preoperative endocrinological evaluation revealed insufficiencies in four axes in five patients with RCC. Postoperative endocrinological status improved in three patients, remained unchanged in three, and worsened in one. The gonadotropin axis was damaged in a majority (nine) of the patients with CP preoperatively. Postoperative evaluation revealed deficits in five axes in 14 patients with CP, which is a significantly different trend than observed in patients with RCC. Eight patients underwent surgical procedures (transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) in four, craniotomy in four). Two of these patients

  13. Pituitary adenoma, craniopharyngioma, and Rathke cleft cyst involving both intrasellar and suprasellar regions: differentiation using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, S.H.; Kwon, B.J.; Na, D.G.; Kim, J.-H.; Han, M.H.; Chang, K.-H.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To determine the differential magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of pituitary adenoma, craniopharyngioma, and Rathke cleft cyst involving both intrasellar and suprasellar regions. Materials and methods: The MRI images of 64 patients with pituitary adenoma (n = 38), craniopharyngioma (n = 13), or Rathke cleft cyst (n = 13) were retrospectively reviewed by three neuroradiologists. The following characteristics were evaluated: shape, volume, extent, component characteristics, signal intensities of solid portions on T2-weighted images, signal intensities of cystic portions on T1-weighted images, and enhancement patterns of solid portions and cyst walls of tumours. Fisher's exact test applied with Bonferroni correction was used for multiple comparison. A flowchart for differential diagnosis was constructed based on statistical analysis of the results. Results: A snowman shape, solid characteristics, and homogeneous enhancement of the solid portion were more common in pituitary adenomas (p < 0.017). A superiorly lobulated shape, third ventricle compression by superior tumour extension, mixed solid and cystic characteristics, and reticular enhancement of the solid portion were more common in craniopharyngiomas (p < 0.017). Finally, an ovoid shape, a small tumour volume, cystic characteristics, and no or thin cyst wall enhancement were more common in Rathke cleft cysts (p < 0.017). The flowchart yielded diagnostic accuracies as follows: 92.1% in pituitary adenoma; 92.3% in craniopharyngioma; 92.3% in Rathke cleft cyst; and 92.2% overall. Conclusion: A combination of MRI findings is helpful in the differential diagnosis of the three tumours involving both intrasellar and suprasellar regions

  14. Branchial cleft anomaly, congenital heart disease, and biliary atresia: Goldenhar complex or Lambert syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J; Schanen, N C

    2000-01-01

    The features of Goldenhar complex have been well-described and classically include branchial arch abnormalities, epibulbar dermoid and vertebral abnormalities. We have identified an infant with these features in association with complex congenital heart disease and intrahepatic biliary atresia. Although Lambert described an autosomal recessive disorder with an association of biliary atresia and branchial arch abnormalities, none of those cases had epibulbar dermoid. Diagnostic considerations in this case include inclusion of biliary atresia as a new feature in the expanding spectrum of the Goldenhar complex, versus Lambert syndrome with epibulbar dermoid.

  15. From headache to Rathke’s cleft cyst followed by diabetes insipidus with panhypopituitarism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valea Ana

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Rathke cyst represents an unusual benign tumour derived from Rathke’s cleft remnants. The diagnosis is potential seen at any age. The most frequent signs are mostly mass effects as headache, visual field defects and hypopituitarism.

  16. Clinicopathological findings in symptomatic Rathke's cleft cyst. Correlation between enhancement effects on MRI and histopathology of the cyst wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Jun; Tanabe, Sumiyoshi; Ibayashi, Yukihiro; Hashi, Kazuo; Satoh, Masaaki

    1996-01-01

    We have studied MR images and the histopathology of eight patients with symptomatic Rathke's cleft cysts. Six cases showed visual disturbance and two showed galactorrhea. In five, the cyst fluid had low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high intensity on T2-weighted images; in 2, the cyst fluid had high intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images; in 1, the cyst fluid had high intensity on T1-weighted images and low intensity on T2-weighted images. Enhancement of the cyst wall by Gd-DTPA was able to be distinguished in 6 patients: 2 showed no enhancement, 2 showed thin enhancement and the remaining 2, thick enhancement. Fluid aspiration and total resection of the cyst wall was performed in all patients (3 by the transcranial approach and 5 by the transsphenoidal approach). Normal pituitary glands were found in all cases during the operations. Histopathologically, ciliated epithelium with goblet cells was recognized in 3. Non-ciliated epithelium was recognized in the other 5. Stratified squamous component was recognized in 1 and secondary inflammation, in another. Normal pituitary tissue was recognized in 5. Immunohistochemically, ciliated and non-ciliated epithelium was successfully stained for detecting antibody against epithelial membrane antigen and/or carcinoembryonic antigen. Two cases with no enhancement of the cyst wall by Gd-DTPA showed only ciliated epithelium. Two patients with thin enhancement of the cyst wall had single layer epithelium with normal pituitary tissue. Two patients with thick enhancement of the cyst wall showed single layer epithelium with its stratified squamous component or with secondary inflammation. A close relationship was suggested between the enhancement effect on MRI and histopathology of the cyst wall. (author)

  17. Pituitary adenoma, craniopharyngioma, and Rathke cleft cyst involving both intrasellar and suprasellar regions: differentiation using MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, S.H. [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, B.J. [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: bjkwon@radiol.snu.ac.kr; Na, D.G. [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.-H. [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Han, M.H. [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, K.-H. [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-05-15

    Aims: To determine the differential magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of pituitary adenoma, craniopharyngioma, and Rathke cleft cyst involving both intrasellar and suprasellar regions. Materials and methods: The MRI images of 64 patients with pituitary adenoma (n = 38), craniopharyngioma (n = 13), or Rathke cleft cyst (n = 13) were retrospectively reviewed by three neuroradiologists. The following characteristics were evaluated: shape, volume, extent, component characteristics, signal intensities of solid portions on T2-weighted images, signal intensities of cystic portions on T1-weighted images, and enhancement patterns of solid portions and cyst walls of tumours. Fisher's exact test applied with Bonferroni correction was used for multiple comparison. A flowchart for differential diagnosis was constructed based on statistical analysis of the results. Results: A snowman shape, solid characteristics, and homogeneous enhancement of the solid portion were more common in pituitary adenomas (p < 0.017). A superiorly lobulated shape, third ventricle compression by superior tumour extension, mixed solid and cystic characteristics, and reticular enhancement of the solid portion were more common in craniopharyngiomas (p < 0.017). Finally, an ovoid shape, a small tumour volume, cystic characteristics, and no or thin cyst wall enhancement were more common in Rathke cleft cysts (p < 0.017). The flowchart yielded diagnostic accuracies as follows: 92.1% in pituitary adenoma; 92.3% in craniopharyngioma; 92.3% in Rathke cleft cyst; and 92.2% overall. Conclusion: A combination of MRI findings is helpful in the differential diagnosis of the three tumours involving both intrasellar and suprasellar regions.

  18. Combined pituitary hormone deficiency in a girl with 48, XXXX and Rathke's cleft cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Surabhi; Jee, Youn Hee; Lightbourne, Marissa; Han, Joan C; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2017-01-01

    Tetrasomy X is a rare chromosomal aneuploidy seen in girls, associated with facial dysmorphism, premature ovarian insufficiency and intellectual disability. A Rathke's cleft cyst (RCC) is a remnant of Rathke's pouch which may cause multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies by exerting pressure on the pituitary gland in the sella. The patient was diagnosed with tetrasomy X by karyotyping during infancy. Brain MRI and multiple endocrine stimulation tests revealed RCC and combined pituitary hormone deficiency (growth hormone deficiency, secondary adrenal insufficiency and central hypothyroidism) likely due to RCC. We report the first case in the literature of a girl with 48, XXXX and combined pituitary hormone deficiency due to Rathke's cyst.

  19. Deflation of a Rathke cleft cyst triggered rupture of a superior hypophyseal artery aneurysm: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitai, Ryuheki; Yamauchi, Takahiro; Arai, Yoshikazu; Hosoda, Tetsuya; Hashimoto, Norichika; Tsunetoshi, Kenzo; Higashino, Yoshifumi; Kikuta, Ken-Ichiro

    2017-04-19

    A 57-year-old woman was diagnosed as a Rathke cleft cyst (RCC). Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) was performed uneventfully. She developed subarachnoid haemorrhage on postoperative day 3. The vessels adhered the cyst had been pulled into the pituitary fossa, causing an aneurysm.

  20. Distinct patterns of primary and motile cilia in Rathke's cleft cysts and craniopharyngioma subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, Shannon; Du, Ziming; Sheu, Shu-Hsien; Woo, Terri; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Kieran, Mark W; Santagata, Sandro

    2016-12-01

    Cilia are highly conserved organelles, which serve critical roles in development and physiology. Motile cilia are expressed in a limited range of tissues, where they principally regulate local extracellular fluid dynamics. In contrast, primary cilia are expressed by many vertebrate cell types during interphase, and are intimately involved in the cell cycle and signal transduction. Notably, primary cilia are essential for vertebrate hedgehog pathway activity. Improved detection of motile cilia may assist in the diagnosis of some pathologic entities such as Rathke's cleft cysts, whereas characterizing primary cilia in neoplastic tissues may implicate cilia-dependent signaling pathways as critical for tumorigenesis. We show that immunohistochemistry for the nuclear transcription factor FOXJ1, a master regulator of motile ciliogenesis, robustly labels the motile ciliated epithelium of Rathke's cleft cysts. FOXJ1 expression discriminates Rathke's cleft cysts from entities in the sellar/suprasellar region with overlapping histologic features such as craniopharyngiomas. Co-immunohistochemistry for FOXJ1 and markers that highlight motile cilia such as acetylated tubulin (TUBA4A) and the small GTPase ARL13B further enhance the ability to identify diagnostic epithelial cells. In addition to highlighting motile cilia, ARL13B immunohistochemistry also robustly highlights primary cilia in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections. Primary cilia are present throughout the neoplastic epithelium of adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma, but are limited to basally oriented cells near the fibrovascular stroma in papillary craniopharyngioma. Consistent with this differing pattern of primary ciliation, adamantinomatous craniopharyngiomas express significantly higher levels of SHH, and downstream targets such as PTCH1 and GLI2, compared with papillary craniopharyngiomas. In conclusion, motile ciliated epithelium can be readily identified using immunohistochemistry for FOXJ1, TUBA4A, and

  1. Significant Improvement in Chronic Persistent Headaches Caused by Small Rathke Cleft Cysts After Transsphenoidal Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Fukui, Issei; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Kita, Daisuke; Sasagawa, Yasuo; Oishi, Masahiro; Tachibana, Osamu; Nakada, Mitsutoshi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Rathke cleft cysts (RCC) usually are asymptomatic and can be observed via the use of conservative methods. Some patients with RCCs, however, have severe headaches even if they are small enough to be confined to the sella, and these small RCCs seldom have been discussed. This study presents an investigation into clinical characteristics of small RCCs associated with severe headaches, demonstrating efficacy and safety of endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery (ETSS) to relieve headaches. Me...

  2. Bilateral acute visual loss from Rathke's cleft cyst apoplexy in a patient with dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cláudia De Franco Suzuki

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic complications of optic pathway diseases are extremely rare causes of acute visual loss associated with dengue fever. In this paper we report a patient presenting with dengue fever and bilateral acute visual loss caused by chiasmal compression due to Rathke's cleft cyst apoplexy. Considering the importance of early diagnosis and treatment to visual recovery, apoplexy of sellar and suprasellar tumors should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with acute visual loss and dengue fever.

  3. The relationship between the fistula tract and the facial nerve in type II first branchial cleft anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertas, Burak; Gunaydin, Rıza Onder; Unal, Omer Faruk

    2015-04-01

    To share our experience involving seven patients with type II first branchial cleft anomalies (hereafter, type II anomalies), to determine whether the location of the external fistula openings of the anomalies are associated with the location of the facial nerve tract, and elucidate the relationship between the location of the fistula opening and the facial nerve. The medical records of seven patients who underwent surgery from 2005 to 2013 for type II anomalies were retrospectively examined. The relationship between the fistula opening and the facial nerve was evaluated in each patient with respect to whether the fistula opening was superior or inferior to the mandibular angle. All patients underwent partial parotidectomy, facial nerve exposure, and total excision of the mass together with connection of a small cuff of the external auditory canal skin to the fistula tract. The fistula tracts were located medially to the facial nerve in two patients, and both fistulae had openings inferior to the mandibular angle. The fistula tracts were located laterally to the facial nerve in the remaining five patients: one patient had no external opening, one had an opening inferior to the mandibular angle, and the remaining three had openings superior to the mandibular angle. Because type II anomalies are rare, their diagnosis is difficult. Surgery of such lesions is challenging and associated with a high risk due to their proximity to the facial nerve. We believe that the location of the fistula opening may help to identify the relationship between the anomalous lesion and facial nerve. Studies involving larger series of cases are needed to confirm our hypothesis; however, because of the rarity of this specific anomaly, it will not be easy to compile a large number of cases. We believe that our study will encourage further investigation on this subject. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. Characteristics of Rathke's cleft cyst in MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tominaga, Jun-ya; Higano, Shuichi; Takahashi, Shoki [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was symptoms, macroscopic appearances and microscopic findings of Rathke's cleft cysts with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. We analyzed the data from 31 patients with pathologically confirmed Rathke's cleft cysts. MR appearances were evaluated on T{sub 1}WI, T{sub 2}WI and contrast T{sub 1}WI. Symptoms, macroscopic appearances and pathological findings were obtained from available medical records. We analyzed the images according to the following criteria: findings on the location and shape of the lesions and form of the lesional wall; the relationship between the maximum diameter of the lesions and symptoms; the relationship between MR and macroscopic appearance; the sites of adjacent contrast enhancement. The lesions were located mostly in both the intrasellar and suprasellar regions for a total of 87%. All lesions revealed either an oval or dumbbell shape with a smooth lesional wall. When correlated with physical symptoms, asymptomatic cases were associated with smaller lesions, while visual disturbances and dizziness were associated with relatively larger lesions. MR lesion signal intensity was related to the content of macroscopic appearance to some degree: the selected lesions showed shortening of T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} relaxation times in relation to the increase in protein concentration. This should have been macro-scopically reflected in the color and turbidity of the liquid within the cyst. Adjacent contrast enhancement around the lesion was found at various sites, but anterior enhancement was most frequent. Circumferential enhancement was revealed to be derived from inflammatory changes. Rathke's cleft cyst exhibits a varied MR signal. It may be difficult to differentiate from craniopharyngioma from the intensity alone. (author)

  5. [Branchiogen cyst at unusual age and in rare localization. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Dóra; Redl, Pál; Hegedűs, Csaba

    2015-12-01

    Branchiogen anomalies represent a heterogeneous group of developmental abnormalities, they arise from incomplete obliteration of branchial clefts and pouches during embriogenesis. Clinically they can present as a cyst, fistula or sinus. Second cleft lesions account for 95% of the branchial anomalies. Second branchial cleft cysts are usually located in the neck, along the anterior border of the stenocleidomastoid muscle, but they can be anywhere along the course of the second branchial fistula from the tonsillar fossa to the supraclavicular region. Their presence in the nasopharynx is extremely rare. Ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging is recommended for diagnosis. Definitive treatment is surgical excision, these lesions do not regress spontaneously and often result recurrent infections. A 7 month old infant applied to a pediatrician with gastrointestinal viral infection. During examination a cystic mass was discovered in the right lateral nasopharyngeal wall, the lesion extended to the oropharynx. Marsupialisation was performed via transoral approach. In case of cystic lesion in the lateral epipharynx, branchial cleft cyst should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  6. Rathke cleft cyst in seven-year-old girl presenting with central diabetes insipidus and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evliyaoglu, Olcay; Evliyaoglu, Cetin; Ayva, Sebnem

    2010-05-01

    Rathke cleft cysts (RCC) are benign cysts derived from remnants of Rathke cleft, and are rarely symptomatic in children. Symptoms due to RCC are associated with mass effect and pituitary hormone deficiencies. Slow growth rate of the cyst makes its incidence increase with aging. Here we report on a seven-year-old girl who presented with central diabetes insipidus (CDI). Her sella MRI revealed a lesion in the sellar region which grew rapidly in follow-up. She underwent microneurosurgical operation and the lesion was totally excised. Pathologic examination revealed RCC with degenerative changes. In her follow-up, growth hormone deficiency developed in addition to arginine vasopressin deficiency. Rapid growth of the cyst is not the usual course of RCC's. Mechanisms regarding the cyst growth are unclear as they are in this case. This is the youngest child to date presenting with central diabetes insipidus due to RCC. Rapid growth of RCC can cause CDI in young children.

  7. Branchial cysts: an unusual cause of a mediastinal mass: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kotecha, Vihar; Muturi, Alex; Ruturi, Josiah

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Complex embryological processes form the head and neck of humans. It is not flawless; remnants lead to sinuses or cysts, commonly in the head and neck region. Case presentation We present the a case of an 8-year-old boy, a primary school pupil, from rural Kenya with chronic cough, wheezing, difficulty in breathing and dyspnea on exertion. He was treated with antibiotics and antitubercular drugs without improvement prior to referral to our hospital. A computed tomography scan of h...

  8. Distinct Patterns of Primary and Motile Cilia in Rathke’s Cleft Cysts and Craniopharyngioma Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, Shannon; Du, Ziming; Sheu, Shu-Hsien; Woo, Terri; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Kieran, Mark W.; Santagata, Sandro

    2017-01-01

    Cilia are highly conserved organelles which serve critical roles in development and physiology. Motile cilia are expressed in a limited range of tissues, where they principally regulate local extracellular fluid dynamics. In contrast, primary cilia are expressed by many vertebrate cell types during interphase, and are intimately involved in the cell cycle and signal transduction. Notably, primary cilia are essential for vertebrate hedgehog pathway activity. Improved detection of motile cilia may assist in the diagnosis of some pathologic entities such as Rathke’s cleft cysts while characterizing primary cilia in neoplastic tissues may implicate cilia-dependent signaling pathways as critical for tumorigenesis. We show that immunohistochemistry for the nuclear transcription factor FOXJ1, a master regulator of motile ciliogenesis, robustly labels the motile ciliated epithelium of Rathke’s cleft cysts. FOXJ1 expression discriminates Rathke’s cleft cysts from entities in the sellar/suprasellar region with overlapping histologic features such as craniopharyngiomas. Co-immunohistochemistry for FOXJ1 and markers that highlight motile cilia such as acetylated tubulin (TUBA4A) and the small GTPase ARL13B further enhance the ability to identify diagnostic epithelial cells. In addition to highlighting motile cilia, ARL13B immunohistochemistry also robustly highlights primary cilia in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections. Primary cilia are present throughout the neoplastic epithelium of adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma, but are limited to basally oriented cells near the fibrovascular stroma in papillary craniopharyngioma. Consistent with this differing pattern of primary ciliation, adamantinomatous craniopharyngiomas express significantly higher levels of SHH, and downstream targets such as PTCH1 and GLI2, compared to papillary craniopharyngiomas. In conclusion, motile ciliated epithelium can be readily identified using immunohistochemistry for FOXJ1, TUBA4A and

  9. Diabetes insipidus as a presenting manifestation of Rathke′s cleft cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rathke′s cleft cysts (RCC are cystic sellar and suprasellar lesions derived from remnants of Rathke′s pouch, lined by cuboidal or columnar epithelium. RCC are usually asymptomatic but can present with headache, visual impairment, panhypopituitarism and hypothalamic dysfunction. Diabetes Insipidus as a presenting symptom of RCC is reported, but rare. We present a case of a 48-year-old male presenting with polyuria and on investigations found to have central diabetes insipidus due to a sellar RCC. Patient underwent transsphenoidal surgery with complete excision with resolution of his symptoms. His polyuria resolved post-surgery without vasopressin replacement, which has never been reported.

  10. Fourth Branchial Anomaly Presenting with a Lateral Neck Mass in a Neonate

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Tae-Kyung; Kim, Soo-Hong; Kim, Ha-Shin; Kim, Hyun-Young; Park, Kwi-Won

    2014-01-01

    Branchial cleft anomalies are an important differential diagnosis in congenital neck masses in infants. The third and fourth branchial anomalies are rare branchial cleft anomalies, which are hard to differentiate. We report here an uncommon case of the fourth branchial anomaly that was presented as an asymptomatic neck mass in a neonate.

  11. Fourth branchial anomaly presenting with a lateral neck mass in a neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Tae-Kyung; Kim, Soo-Hong; Kim, Ha-Shin; Kim, Hyun-Young; Park, Kwi-Won

    2014-01-01

    Branchial cleft anomalies are an important differential diagnosis in congenital neck masses in infants. The third and fourth branchial anomalies are rare branchial cleft anomalies, which are hard to differentiate. We report here an uncommon case of the fourth branchial anomaly that was presented as an asymptomatic neck mass in a neonate.

  12. First branchial groove anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M; Hickey, S; Joseph, G

    2000-06-01

    First branchial groove anomalies are very rare. We report a case of a first branchial groove anomaly presented as an infected cyst in an 11-month-old child. Management of such lesions is complicated because of their close association with the facial nerve. Surgical management must include identification and protection of the facial nerve. Embryology and facial nerve disposition in relation to the anomaly are reviewed.

  13. Congenital cervical cysts, sinuses, and fistulae in pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRiviere, Cabrini A; Waldhausen, John H T

    2012-06-01

    Congenital cervical anomalies are essential to consider in the clinical assessment of head and neck masses in children and adults. These lesions can present as palpable cystic masses, infected masses, draining sinuses, or fistulae. Thyroglossal duct cysts are most common, followed by branchial cleft anomalies and dermoid cysts. Other lesions reviewed include median ectopic thyroid, cervical teratomas, and midline cervical clefts. Appropriate diagnosis and management of these lesions requires a thorough understanding of their embryology and anatomy. Correct diagnosis, resolution of infectious issues before definitive therapy, and complete surgical excision are imperative in the prevention of recurrence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. First branchial complex anomalies: report of 3 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goten, A. van der; Hermans, R.; Hover, P. van; Crevits, I.; Baert, A.L.

    1997-01-01

    Three cases of first branchial cleft anomalies are presented. The embryology and pathology of first branchial complex anomalies, their imaging characteristics and differential diagnosis are discussed. (orig.). With 3 figs

  15. First branchial complex anomalies: report of 3 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goten, A. van der [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Catholic University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Hermans, R. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Catholic University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Hover, P. van [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Catholic University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Crevits, I. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Catholic University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Baert, A.L. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Catholic University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    1997-02-01

    Three cases of first branchial cleft anomalies are presented. The embryology and pathology of first branchial complex anomalies, their imaging characteristics and differential diagnosis are discussed. (orig.). With 3 figs.

  16. Significant Improvement in Chronic Persistent Headaches Caused by Small Rathke Cleft Cysts After Transsphenoidal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Issei; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Kita, Daisuke; Sasagawa, Yasuo; Oishi, Masahiro; Tachibana, Osamu; Nakada, Mitsutoshi

    2017-03-01

    Rathke cleft cysts (RCC) usually are asymptomatic and can be observed via the use of conservative methods. Some patients with RCCs, however, have severe headaches even if they are small enough to be confined to the sella, and these small RCCs seldom have been discussed. This study presents an investigation into clinical characteristics of small RCCs associated with severe headaches, demonstrating efficacy and safety of endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery (ETSS) to relieve headaches. In this study, 13 patients with small RCCs (maximum diameter HIT-6) score was calculated both pre- and postoperatively to evaluate headache severity. All patients complained of severe headaches, which disturbed their daily life. Most headaches were nonpulsating and localized in the frontal area. Characteristically, 6 patients (46%) experienced severe headaches with sudden onset that continued chronically. HIT-6 score was 64 on average, meaning headaches affected daily life severely. After surgical decompression of the cyst, headache in all of the patients improved dramatically and HIT-6 score decreased significantly to 37, suggesting that headaches were diminished. No newly developed deficiencies of the anterior pituitary lobe function were detected. Postoperative occurrence of diabetes insipidus was found in 2 patients, both of which were transient. No recurring cysts were found. Severe headaches can develop from small RCCs. In the present study, ETSS was performed on such patients effectively and safely to relieve their headaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Central Diabetes Insipidus Linked to Rathke's Cleft Cyst, Polyuria in a 17-year-old Girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ha Yeon; Lee, Seung Jin; Bae, Eun Hui; Ma, Seong Kwon; Kim, Soo Wan

    2017-09-01

    A 17-year-old girl presented with polyuria (7 L/day) and polydipsia for one year. Initial urine osmolality was 113mOsm/kg H 2 O. Following 6 h of fluid restriction, serum plasma osmolality reached 300mOsm/kg H 2 O, whereas urine osmolality was 108mOsm/kg H 2 O. Urine osmolality was increased by 427% from 108 to 557mOsm/kg after vasopressin challenge. The patient was diagnosed with central diabetes insipidus, possibly derived from the atypical occupation of a Rathke's cleft cyst at the pituitary stalk following magnetic resonance imaging with enhancement. She was discharged with desmopressin nasal spray (10 µg); urine output was maintained at 2-3 L/day, and urine osmolality was >300 mOsm/kg. Additional pituitary image studies and evaluation of hypopituitarism should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with central diabetes insipidus.

  18. A Case of Rathke’s Cleft Cyst Associated with Transient Central Adrenal Insufficiency and Masked Diabetes Insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Asakawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 73-year-old woman admitted to our hospital because of headache, poor appetite, malaise, weight loss, and vomiting was found to have central adrenal insufficiency and thyrotoxicosis due to silent thyroiditis. Polyuria developed after replacement with glucocorticoid (masked diabetes insipidus, which was controlled with nasal administration of desmopressin. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a large cystic pituitary mass (18 × 18 × 12 mm extending suprasellarly to the optic chiasm. Transsphenoidal surgery revealed that the pituitary tumor was Rathke’s cleft cyst. Following surgery, replacement with neither glucocorticoid nor desmopressin was needed any more. Therefore, it is suggested that Rathke’s cleft cyst is responsible for the masked diabetes insipidus and the central insufficiency. Furthermore, it is speculated that thyrotoxicosis with painless thyroiditis might induce changes from subclinical adrenal insufficiency to transiently overt insufficiency.

  19. [A case of malignant amygdaloid cyst].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdennour, S; Allag, S; Benhalima, H

    2014-12-01

    An amygdaloid cyst is a rare high laterocervical cystic tumor arising from the second branchial cleft. It accounts for 2% of laterocervical tumors and up to 85% of second branchial cleft abnormalities [1]. The incidence of intracystic squamous cell carcinoma ranges from 4 to 22% [2]. The diagnosis of primary carcinoma or intracystic metastasis is a controversial issue. We report a rare case of degenerate amygdaloid cyst meeting the diagnostic criteria for intracystic squamous cell carcinoma determined by Martin and Khafif. A 73-year-old female patient consulted for a left cervical swelling in 2010; the diagnosis was an amygdaloid cyst. She had a history of squamous cell carcinoma of the hard palate (T1NoMo) surgery and radiation therapy in 2009, without recurrence. Three years later, the swelling increased to a large size without any cervical node involvement. An exploratory cervicotomy with histological study revealed intracystic squamous cell degeneration. Primary squamous cell carcinoma location in the wall of an amygdaloid cyst is extremely rare and a highly controversial issue. The challenge is to be able to discriminate between a cystic metastasis of squamous cell carcinoma of the aerodigestive tract and a primary squamous cell carcinoma located in the wall of an amygdaloid cyst. Martin and Khafif defined specific criteria to confirm the diagnosis of primary branchiogenic carcinoma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Determinants of orofacial clefting I: Effects of 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine on cellular processes and gene expression during development of the first branchial arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Seelan, Ratnam S; Rezzoug, Francine; Warner, Dennis R; Smolenkova, Irina A; Brock, Guy; Pisano, M Michele; Greene, Robert M

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we identify gene targets and cellular events mediating the teratogenic action(s) of 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (AzaD), an inhibitor of DNA methylation, on secondary palate development. Exposure of pregnant mice (on gestation day (GD) 9.5) to AzaD for 12h resulted in the complete penetrance of cleft palate (CP) in fetuses. Analysis of cells of the embryonic first branchial arch (1-BA), in fetuses exposed to AzaD, revealed: 1) significant alteration in expression of genes encoding several morphogenetic factors, cell cycle inhibitors and regulators of apoptosis; 2) a decrease in cell proliferation; and, 3) an increase in apoptosis. Pyrosequencing of selected genes, displaying pronounced differential expression in AzaD-exposed 1-BAs, failed to reveal significant alterations in CpG methylation levels in their putative promoters or gene bodies. CpG methylation analysis suggested that the effects of AzaD on gene expression were likely indirect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Determinants of orofacial clefting II: Effects of 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine on gene methylation during development of the first branchial arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelan, Ratnam S; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Warner, Dennis R; Smolenkova, Irina A; Pisano, M Michele; Greene, Robert M

    2017-01-01

    Defects in development of the secondary palate, which arise from the embryonic first branchial arch (1-BA), can cause cleft palate (CP). Administration of 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (AzaD), a demethylating agent, to pregnant mice on gestational day 9.5 resulted in complete penetrance of CP in fetuses. Several genes critical for normal palatogenesis were found to be upregulated in 1-BA, 12h after AzaD exposure. MethylCap-Seq (MCS) analysis identified several differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in DNA extracted from AzaD-exposed 1-BAs. Hypomethylated DMRs did not correlate with the upregulation of genes in AzaD-exposed 1-BAs. However, most DMRs were associated with endogenous retroviral elements. Expression analyses suggested that interferon signaling was activated in AzaD-exposed 1-BAs. Our data, thus, suggest that a 12-h in utero AzaD exposure demethylates and activates endogenous retroviral elements in the 1-BA, thereby triggering an interferon-mediated response. This may result in the dysregulation of key signaling pathways during palatogenesis, causing CP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A rare case of complete second arch branchial fistula in a 7-year-old child

    OpenAIRE

    Shankar, Venkateswara Gomathi; Babu, Thirunavukkarasu Arun; Swami, Hartimath Basavanand

    2012-01-01

    Branchial fistulae are formed due to the abnormal persistence of the embryonic branchial clefts. Complete branchial fistula with internal and external opening is extremely rare. We report a rare case of complete second arch branchial fistulae in a 7-year-old boy, which was confirmed by a fistulogram. The tract was completely excised and the patient was successfully treated.

  3. A rare case of complete second arch branchial fistula in a 7-year-old child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Venkateswara Gomathi; Babu, Thirunavukkarasu Arun; Swami, Hartimath Basavanand

    2012-07-01

    Branchial fistulae are formed due to the abnormal persistence of the embryonic branchial clefts. Complete branchial fistula with internal and external opening is extremely rare. We report a rare case of complete second arch branchial fistulae in a 7-year-old boy, which was confirmed by a fistulogram. The tract was completely excised and the patient was successfully treated.

  4. Diagnostic Significance of Intracystic Nodules on MRI in Rathke’s Cleft Cyst

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    Shou-sen Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. To explore strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of Rathke’s cleft cyst (RCC. Methods. The medical records of 24 patients with sellar RCC were retrospectively reviewed. Two patients had concomitant pituitary adenoma, 2 underwent transcranial surgery, and 22 underwent transsphenoidal surgery. The clinical features, especially the findings of intracystic nodules on MRI, were evaluated and compared with the pathological findings. Results. Preoperatively, only 2 patients were diagnosed with RCC or suspected RCC. Pre- and postoperative MRI images revealed 10 intracystic nodules in 9 (37.5% patients. Two nodules had bull's eyelike changes. The signal intensity of the intracystic nodules varied on T1- and T2-weighted images. Not all nodules on T2-weighted images were visualized. Postoperative MRI revealed recurrence or residual lesion in 5 patients; none had new symptoms and a second surgery was not required. Conclusions. Identifying intracystic nodules is important in patients with sellar cystic lesions. Bull’s eyelike change in an intracystic nodule on MRI, which is reported here for the first time, potentially might have value for confirming the diagnosis.

  5. A Case of Apoplexy of Rathke’s Cleft Cyst Followed by Cerebral Infarction

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    Yu-ichiro Ohnishi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rathke’s cleft cyst (RCC apoplexy is a rare clinical entity. We report a case of apoplexy of an RCC followed by cerebral infarction. A 67-year-old woman was found lying on the street unconscious. She had fallen from her motorbike. On referral to our hospital she gradually regained consciousness and presented with no neurological deficits. CT showed a round and slightly hyperdense area in the suprasellar region. However, the attending physician did not find this abnormal finding on CT and the patient was discharged the same day. Thirteen days after the first emergency visit she developed left hemiparesis and dysarthria. CT showed a round hypodense area in the suprasellar region. The change of the density in the suprasellar region on CT suggested the pituitary apoplexy. CT also showed a low density area in the territory of the right middle cerebral artery, which indicated the cerebral infarction. MR angiography revealed poor visibility and stenotic changes of right middle cerebral arteries. Transsphenoidal surgery was performed. Histopathological findings confirmed a hemorrhagic RCC. Postoperative MR angiography showed that the visibility and stenosis of right middle cerebral arteries were recovered. This is the rare case of apoplexy of an RCC followed by cerebral infarction.

  6. Cervical Chondrocutaneous Branchial Remnants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockars, Tuomas; Kajosaari, Lauri

    2017-03-01

      Cervical chondrocutaneous branchial remnants are rare malformations usually found in the lower neck. As high as 76% of patients have been reported to have associated anomalies. We review the literature and report a case series of seven patients with cervical cartilaginous remnants.   A retrospective case series of seven patients identified from the electronic hospital records.   Seven patients with cervical chondrocutaneous branchial remnants were identified (six boys and one girl). Only one of the patients had associated anomalies.   A review of the literature revealed no evidence for sinuses or cysts related to cervical chondrocutaneous branchial remnants. Operative treatment can be postponed to a suitable and safe age. There is marked variation in the reported prevalence of associated anomalies, ranging from 11% to 76%.

  7. Differential diagnosis of pituitary adenomas and Rathke's cleft cysts by diffusion-weighted MRI using single-shot fast spin echo technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Takumi; Izumiyama, Hitoshi; Fukuda, Ataru; Tanioka, Daisuke; Kunii, Norihiko; Komatsu, Daisuke; Fujita, Shogo; Ukisu, Ryutaro; Moritani, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to prospectively evaluate the diagnostic ability of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) using single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) technique to discriminate pituitary adenomas from Rathke's cleft cysts. DWIs were obtained from 40 patients with pathologically proven pituitary macroadenomas and 15 patients with proven Rathke's cleft cysts. Pituitary adenomas were divided into 27 cases with solid components alone, five with non-hemorrhagic large cysts, and eight with intratumoral hemorrhage. On SSFSE DWI, solid components of pituitary adenomas revealed iso or slightly increased intensity and intratumoral hemorrhage showed higher intensity than normal brain parenchyma, whereas Rathke's cleft cysts and intratumoral cysts demonstrated very low intensity. SSFSE DWI did not display the susceptibility artifacts that are seen close to the skull base and sinonasal cavities on echo planar diffusion imaging. On the basis of our preliminary findings, DWI may enable us to differentiate pituitary adenomas with only solid components and hemorrhagic pituitary adenomas appearing hyperintense on T1-weighted images from Rathke's cleft cysts without administration of gadolinium-DTPA. SSFSE DWI appears to be a useful technique for characterizing pituitary diseases without the susceptibility artifacts. Our study is the first report to demonstrate the identification of pituitary disorders on SSFSE DWI. (author)

  8. Differential diagnosis of pituitary adenomas and Rathke's cleft cysts by diffusion-weighted MRI using single-shot fast spin echo technique

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    Abe, Takumi; Izumiyama, Hitoshi; Fukuda, Ataru; Tanioka, Daisuke; Kunii, Norihiko; Komatsu, Daisuke; Fujita, Shogo; Ukisu, Ryutaro; Moritani, Toshio [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to prospectively evaluate the diagnostic ability of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) using single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) technique to discriminate pituitary adenomas from Rathke's cleft cysts. DWIs were obtained from 40 patients with pathologically proven pituitary macroadenomas and 15 patients with proven Rathke's cleft cysts. Pituitary adenomas were divided into 27 cases with solid components alone, five with non-hemorrhagic large cysts, and eight with intratumoral hemorrhage. On SSFSE DWI, solid components of pituitary adenomas revealed iso or slightly increased intensity and intratumoral hemorrhage showed higher intensity than normal brain parenchyma, whereas Rathke's cleft cysts and intratumoral cysts demonstrated very low intensity. SSFSE DWI did not display the susceptibility artifacts that are seen close to the skull base and sinonasal cavities on echo planar diffusion imaging. On the basis of our preliminary findings, DWI may enable us to differentiate pituitary adenomas with only solid components and hemorrhagic pituitary adenomas appearing hyperintense on T1-weighted images from Rathke's cleft cysts without administration of gadolinium-DTPA. SSFSE DWI appears to be a useful technique for characterizing pituitary diseases without the susceptibility artifacts. Our study is the first report to demonstrate the identification of pituitary disorders on SSFSE DWI. (author)

  9. TREM-1 expression in craniopharyngioma and Rathke's cleft cyst: its possible implication for controversial pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Chao-Hu; Li, Dan-Ling; Zhang, Shi-Chao; Peng, Yu-Ping; Peng, Jun-Xiang; Song, Ye; Qi, Song-Tao; Pan, Jun

    2016-08-02

    Whether a mixed type of craniopharyngioma (CP) exists and whether papillary craniopharyngioma (pCP) is on a histopathological continuum with Rathke's cleft cyst (RCC) remain controversial. Herein, we examined the expression and localization of β-catenin, BRAF p.V600E (V600E), and triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) in 58 samples including 20 pCPs, 26 adamantinomatous craniopharyngiomas (aCP), and 12 RCCs. Five aCPs were diagnosed with mixed type CPs and the remaining 21 cases were pure aCPs. Four of the 12 RCCs presented with significant squamous epithelium (SE). V600E immunoreactivity was observed in all pCPs in the cytoplasm, but not in the nuclei. aCPs and RCCs, including mixed type CP, did not express V600E. Nuclear β-catenin translocation was detected exclusively in aCPs. TREM-1 was expressed in pCPs. Additionally, TREM-1 expression was detected in the SE of 5 "mixed type" CPs, while it was absent in pure aCPs. TREM-1 was expressed in 4 RCCs with SE, but not in the remaining 8 RCCs. TREM-1 mRNA levels were compared in cultured pCP and aCP cells. TREM-1 mRNA level was significantly (p < 0.001; up to 4.045 fold) higher in pCPs than in aCPs. Western blotting revealed a significantly (p < 0.001; up to 7.19 fold) lower level of TREM-1 expression in aCP cells compared to that in pCP cells. Our findings further supported that RCC and pCP may represent two ends of a morphological spectrum. A variant showing overlapping histological features of aCP and pCP should not be considered as a mixed type.

  10. Clinical and radiological findings of incidental Rathke's cleft cysts in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon Joung Oh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available PurposeIn the pediatric population, Rathke's cleft cysts (RCCs are known to be an infrequent cause of headaches, visual disturbances, and pituitary dysfunction. We investigated the clinical characteristics of children in whom RCCs were incidentally discovered and evaluated whether RCCs influence the treatment response of patients with proven endocrinopathy.MethodsA retrospective analysis was conducted in 34 patients with RCCs who were diagnosed between 2006 and 2013 at Hallym University Medical Center. Their clinical, hormonal, and imaging findings were reviewed. We evaluated the clinical outcomes of the patients with concomitant RCCs and endocrinopathy compared to matched controls.ResultsTwenty-six of 34 patients with radiologically proven RCCs had endocrine disorders. They were 9 boys and 17 girls, with ages ranging from 4.8 to 17.4 years at the time of the diagnosis. Of these, 7 (27% had idiopathic short stature, 7 (27% had growth hormone deficiency (GHD, and 12 (46% had central precocious puberty (CPP. Nineteen of 26 patients (73.1% showed low signal intensities on T1-weighted images (T1WI and high signal intensities on T2-weighted images. The incidence of hypointensity on T1WI was higher in the patients with RCCs accompanied by endocrinopathy than in those without endocrinopathy (P=0.033. The treatment outcomes of the patients with CPP and GHD with and without RCCs were similar.ConclusionCPP and GHD patients with a small RCC (less than 20 mm expressing cystic magnetic resonance intensity can be managed with medical treatment, although the RCCs need to be closely monitored in radiological studies to observe their growth.

  11. Recurrent branchial sinus tract with aberrant extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, J P

    2004-01-01

    Second branchial cysts are the commonest lesions among congenital lateral neck anomalies. Good knowledge of anatomy and embryology are necessary for proper treatment. Surgical treatment involves resection of all branchial remnants, which extend laterally in the neck, medial to the sternocleidomastoid muscle with cranial extension to the pharynx and ipsilateral tonsillar fosa. However, infections and previous surgery can distort anatomy, making the approach to branchial anomalies more difficult. We present a case of a 17-year-old patient who presented with a second branchial tract anomaly with an aberrant extension to the midline and part of the contralateral neck. Previous surgical interventions and chronic infections may have been the primary cause for this aberrant tract. All head and neck surgeons should bear in mind that aberrant presentations may exist when reoperating on chronic branchial cysts fistulas.

  12. Branchial anomalies in the pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, James W; Mohyuddin, Nadia; Maddalozzo, John

    2007-08-01

    We sought to review the presentation, evaluation, and treatment of branchial anomalies in the pediatric population and to relate these findings to recurrences and complications. We conducted a retrospective study at a tertiary care pediatric hospital. Ninety-seven pediatric patients who were treated for branchial anomalies over a 10-year period were reviewed. Patients were studied if they underwent surgical treatment for the branchial anomaly and had 1 year of postoperative follow-up; 67 children met criteria, and 74 anomalies were studied. Patients with cysts presented at a later age than did those with branchial anomaly fistulas or sinus branchial anomalies. 32% of branchial anomalies were previously infected. Of these, 71% had more than one preoperative infection. 18% of the BA were first arch derivatives, 69% were second arch derivatives and 7% were third arch derivatives. There were 22 branchial cysts, 31 branchial sinuses and 16 branchial fistulas. The preoperative and postoperative diagnoses differed in 17 cases. None of the excised specimens that contained a cystic lining recurred; all five recurrences had multiple preoperative infections. Recurrence rates are increased when there are multiple preoperative infections and when there is no epithelial lining identified in the specimen.

  13. RARE BRANCHIAL ARCH ANOMALIES

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    Jayanta Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM Amongst the branchial arch anomalies third arch anomaly occurs rarely and more so the fourth arch anomalies. We present our experience with cases of rare branchial arch anomalies. PATIENTS AND METHODS From June 2006 to January 2016, cases having their external opening in the lower third of sternocleidomastoid muscle with the tract going through thyroid gland and directing to pyriform sinus (PFS or cysts with internal opening in the PFS were studied. RESULTS No fourth arch anomaly was encountered. One cyst with internal opening which later on formed a fistula, three fistulae from beginning and two sinuses were encountered. The main stay of diagnosis was the fistula in the PFS and the tract lying posterior to the internal carotid artery. Simple excision technique with a small incision around the external opening was done. There was no recurrence. CONCLUSION Third arch fistula is not very rare as it was thought. Internal fistula is found in most of the cases. Though radiological investigations are helpful, fistulae can be diagnosed clinically and during operation. Extensive operation of the neck, mediastinum and pharynx is not required.

  14. A combined third and fourth branchial arch anomaly: clinical and embryological implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehrzad, H.; Georgalas, C.; Huins, C.; Tolley, N. S.

    2007-01-01

    Embryological abnormalities of the branchial apparatus present an interesting diagnostic and surgical challenge. Thymic cysts are a rare form of branchial apparatus anomaly, resulting from abnormal development of the third pharyngeal pouch. We present two cases of a thymic cyst coexisting with a non

  15. Imaging of nasopharyngeal cysts and bursae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Salem, D.; Ricolfi, Frederic; Duvillard, Christian; Ballester, Michel; Assous, Dorothee; Krause, Denis

    2006-01-01

    Cysts and bursae of the nasopharynx are uncommon and seldom symptomatic when compared with malignant tumors of this region. However, it is noteworthy that in the presence of symptoms, a good knowledge of their radiological appearance is useful to establish the correct diagnosis. Cysts of Rathke's pouch, pharyngeal bursa of Luschka, Tornwaldt's cysts, retentional cysts of the seromucinous glands, oncocytic cysts, intra-adenoid cysts, branchial cysts, prevertebral or retropharyngeal abscess and pseudocysts of the nasopharynx will be discussed in this paper. (orig.)

  16. Second Branchial Anomalies: A Study of 94 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Vijay Kumar; Rattan, Kamal Nain; Yadav, Samar Pal Singh; Bhukar, Sandeep; Dheeraj, S

    2017-12-01

    Ninety-four patients with second branchial anomalies were retrospectively analysed at a tertiary care centre from January 2006 to September 2016 to determine the demographical data and management. Branchial sinus and fistula presented earlier as compared to branchial cyst. The mean age at presentation in case of branchial sinuses, fistulae and cysts was 5.07, 5.79 and 7.31 years respectively. There was preponderance in males as compared to females, more so in bilateral cases. Male to female sex ratio was 2.91:1. The branchial fistulae were the most common type of lesions, followed by the branchial sinuses. The branchial anomalies were more on the right side (65.96%) probably due to right handedness of the population. Only eight patients (8.51%) had bilateral anomalies. Four patients had familial association, it was seen in bilateral cases and they presented earlier than unilateral cases. Early and complete surgical excision is the treatment of choice. Preoperative sinogram/fistulogram and intraoperative methylene blue dye injection is not mandatory for excision of a branchial sinus/fistula. Post-operative wound infection was the most common complication (4.25%).

  17. [Selective neck dissection for treating recurrent branchial anomalies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liangsi; Song, Xinhan; Zhang, Siyi; Han, Zhijuan; Luo, Xiaoning; Chen, Shaohua; Zhan, Jiandong

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the role of selective neck dissection in the treatment of recurrent branchial anomalies. The clinical data of 18 patients with recurrent branchial anomalies were retrospectively analyzed. In accordance with the embryologic and anatomic features of branchial anomalies, different types of selective neck dissection were applied. With dissection and protection of important vessels, nerves and other structures, enbloc resection principles were applied to extirpate branchial lesions, scarrings and inflammatory granuloma during the operation. Of all 18 patients, 16 cases were healed with primary healing, 2 cases with local incision infection were healed after dressing changes. A temporary facial nerve paralysis occurred in 1 case with recurrent first branchial cleft fistula postoperatively, and completely recovered 2 months after operation. A postoperative temporary vocal cord paralysis occurred in 1 case with recurrent fourth branchial cleft fistula, and totally recuperated 1 month after operation. No recurrences were found in all 18 cases with a follow-up period of 12-78 months (average 35 months). Selective neck dissection is a safe and effective surgical procedure for the radical treatment of recurrent branchial anomalies.

  18. Alterações visuais decorrentes do cisto da fenda de Rathke: relato de caso Visual alterations due to Rathke's cleft cyst: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Valandro Rech

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Os cistos da fenda de Rathke são lesões para-selares, geralmente assintomáticas, presentes em 12 a 33% das autópsias de pacientes com hipófise normal. Ocasionalmente, os cistos podem aumentar de volume a ponto de comprimir estruturas supra-selares e intra-selares, levando ao aparecimento dos sintomas. Clinicamente, os pacientes referem escurecimento visual, além de apresentarem defeitos campimétricos. M.A.S.R., 47 anos, sexo feminino, branca, natural de Pelotas/RS com queixa de embaçamento progressivo da visão do olho direito há 2 meses. Ao exame, constatou-se baixa visual e hemianopsia bitemporal. A tomografia computadorizada evidenciou imagem hipodensa arredondada, de bordos nítidos, em topografia selar, determinando remodelação e alargamento da sela túrcica. A ressonância magnética mostrou lesão expansiva cística localizada na sela túrcica com crescimento supra-selar. A referida lesão apresenta obliteração da cisterna supra-selar e importante compressão sobre o quiasma óptico. A abordagem cirúrgica confirmou a presença de lesão expansiva cística comprimindo o quiasma óptico e o exame de anatomia patológica do material diagnosticou cisto da fenda de Rathke. O exame oftalmológico, três meses após a cirurgia, mostrou melhora da acuidade visual e recuperação total dos defeitos do campo visual. O cisto da fenda de Rathke deve ser incluído no diagnóstico diferencial dos tumores para-selares passíveis de causar compressão da via óptica nervosa e ressalta-se a importância do diagnóstico e tratamento precoce no intuito de prevenir danos estruturais com perdas irreversíveis da função visual, bem como os distúrbios endócrinos.Rathke's cleft cysts are parasellar lesions, which are usually asymptomatic and found in 12 to 33% of autopsies done on patients with normal pituitary gland. Occasionally, the cysts can swell up to the point of putting pressure on the suprasellar and intrasellar structures, which

  19. A combined third and fourth branchial arch anomaly: clinical and embryological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrzad, H; Georgalas, C; Huins, C; Tolley, N S

    2007-08-01

    Embryological abnormalities of the branchial apparatus present an interesting diagnostic and surgical challenge. Thymic cysts are a rare form of branchial apparatus anomaly, resulting from abnormal development of the third pharyngeal pouch. We present two cases of a thymic cyst coexisting with a non recurrent inferior laryngeal nerve (NRILN), two anomalies that to our knowledge have not been associated previously. A possible embryological explication for this double abnormality is discussed, while the clinical implications of this association are presented.

  20. Silent internal sinus of the pyriform fossa: a rare adult manifestation of a branchial anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chao-Jung; Lin, Yaoh-Shiang; Kang, Bor-Hwang; Lee, Jin-Chin

    2003-03-01

    Branchial anomalies present with a wide range of pathologic characteristics, including cysts, fistulas, and sinuses of the head and neck region. Branchial cysts are most commonly diagnosed during the second through fourth decades of life, while branchial sinuses and fistulas are diagnosed almost exclusively in children with infection episodes. Only rarely has an internal sinus of a third or fourth branchial anomaly manifested in adults as a noninfectious swelling in the neck during swallowing. In this report, we describe our experience treating a 21-year-old man with a left-sided swallowing-induced neck protrusion of 10 years' duration. Findings of physical examination, videolaryngoscopy, and a pharyngoesophagogram confirmed the diagnosis of internal sinus of the pyriform fossa, with uncertain origin of a third or fourth branchial anomaly. The patient underwent regular follow-up as an outpatient and experienced no further infectious episodes.

  1. Branchial anomalies: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sampath Chandra; Azeez, Arun; Thada, Nikhil Dinaker; Rao, Pallavi; Bacciu, Andrea; Prasad, Kishore Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To find out the incidence of involvement of individual arches, anatomical types of lesions, the age and sex incidence, the site and side of predilection, the common clinical features, the common investigations, treatment, and complications of the different anomalies. Setting. Academic Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. Design. A 10 year retrospective study. Participants. 30 patients with clinically proven branchial anomalies including patients with bilateral disease totaling 34 lesions. Main Outcome Measures. The demographical data, clinical features, type of branchial anomalies, and the management details were recorded and analyzed. Results and Observations. The mean age of presentation was 18.67 years. Male to female sex ratio was 1.27 : 1 with a male preponderance. Of the 34 lesions, maximum incidence was of second arch anomalies (50%) followed by first arch. We had two cases each of third and fourth arch anomalies. Only 1 (3.3%) patients of the 30 presented with lesion at birth. The most common pathological type of lesions was fistula (58.82%) followed by cyst. 41.18% of the lesions occurred on the right side. All the patients underwent surgical excision. None of our patients had involvement of facial nerve in first branchial anomaly. All patients had tracts going superficial to the facial nerve. Conclusion. Confirming the extent of the tract is mandatory before any surgery as these lesions pass in relation to some of the most vital structures of the neck. Surgery should always be the treatment option. injection of dye, microscopic removal and inclusion of surrounding tissue while excising the tract leads to a decreased incidence of recurrence.

  2. Branchial Anomalies: Diagnosis and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeez, Arun; Thada, Nikhil Dinaker; Rao, Pallavi; Prasad, Kishore Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To find out the incidence of involvement of individual arches, anatomical types of lesions, the age and sex incidence, the site and side of predilection, the common clinical features, the common investigations, treatment, and complications of the different anomalies. Setting. Academic Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. Design. A 10 year retrospective study. Participants. 30 patients with clinically proven branchial anomalies including patients with bilateral disease totaling 34 lesions. Main Outcome Measures. The demographical data, clinical features, type of branchial anomalies, and the management details were recorded and analyzed. Results and Observations. The mean age of presentation was 18.67 years. Male to female sex ratio was 1.27 : 1 with a male preponderance. Of the 34 lesions, maximum incidence was of second arch anomalies (50%) followed by first arch. We had two cases each of third and fourth arch anomalies. Only 1 (3.3%) patients of the 30 presented with lesion at birth. The most common pathological type of lesions was fistula (58.82%) followed by cyst. 41.18% of the lesions occurred on the right side. All the patients underwent surgical excision. None of our patients had involvement of facial nerve in first branchial anomaly. All patients had tracts going superficial to the facial nerve. Conclusion. Confirming the extent of the tract is mandatory before any surgery as these lesions pass in relation to some of the most vital structures of the neck. Surgery should always be the treatment option. injection of dye, microscopic removal and inclusion of surrounding tissue while excising the tract leads to a decreased incidence of recurrence. PMID:24772172

  3. [Clinical characteristics and surgical management in patients with third and fourth branchial anomalies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y X; He, X G; Wang, Y; Yang, X

    2016-08-05

    Objective: To analysize the clinical characteristics as well as the effect and methods of the surgical treatment in patiets with the third and fourth branchial anomalies. Method: The clinical data of 25 patients diagnosed as third and fourth branchial cleft fistula by pathological method were analyzed retrospectively.Two of 25 patients had undergone fistulectomy simply.Based on the embryologicc and anatomic features of branchial anomalies,23 of 25 patients had received different types of selective neck dissection.All of lesions were confirmed as branchial cleft fistula by pathology.All patients were received the examinations of Esophagus myelography,MRI and CT preoperatively. Result: The features of the third and the fourth bianchial fistula were as following:most patients suffered from recurrent neck abscess and had undergone incision and drainage. Esophagus myelography and CT were important auxiliary examination for branchial anomalies.No recurrent and complications were found in all patients by using treatment of selective neck dissection (23/25 cases) and fistulectomy simply(2/25 cases) within 12 to 36 months following-up,postoperatively. Conclusion: Branchial anomalies is characterized by recurrent acute abscess,acute thyroiditis or fistula secretion inferior to neck.Complete removal of branchial lesions and inflammatory granuloma using selective neck dissection is a safty and effective treatment for recurrent branchial anomalies. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Clinical Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery.

  4. Coexisting first and bilateral second branchial fistulas in a child with nonfamilial branchio-otic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapeña, Jose F; Jimena, Genilou Liv M

    2013-07-01

    We describe what we believe is only the third reported case of coexisting first and bilateral second branchial fistulas associated with nonfamilial branchio-otic syndrome. The patient was a 6-year-old girl who presented with bilaterally draining anterior neck puncta, a preauricular sinus, and moderately severe bilateral hearing loss. She had no family history of branchial anomalies. Compared with branchial cysts and sinuses, branchial fistulas are rare. Even more rare are bilateral second branchial fistulas coexisting with first branchial anomalies, as only 10 cases have been previously reported in the English-language literature. Of these 10 cases, 5 were associated with either branchio-otic syndrome or branchio-oto-renal syndrome; 2 patients had familial branchio-otic syndrome, 2 had nonfamilial branchio-otic syndrome, and 1 had nonfamilial branchio-oto-renal syndrome.

  5. Imaging of nasopharyngeal cysts and bursae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Salem, D.; Ricolfi, Frederic [CHU DIJON, Service de Neuroradiologie et de Radiologie des Urgences, Dijon, Cedex (France); Duvillard, Christian; Ballester, Michel [CHU DIJON, Service d' ORL, Dijon, Cedex (France); Assous, Dorothee [CHU DIJON, Service d' Anatomie et de Cytologie Pathologiques Faculte de Medecine, Dijon, Cedex (France); Krause, Denis [CHU DIJON, Service d' Imagerie Diagnostique et Interventionnelle, Dijon, Cedex (France)

    2006-10-15

    Cysts and bursae of the nasopharynx are uncommon and seldom symptomatic when compared with malignant tumors of this region. However, it is noteworthy that in the presence of symptoms, a good knowledge of their radiological appearance is useful to establish the correct diagnosis. Cysts of Rathke's pouch, pharyngeal bursa of Luschka, Tornwaldt's cysts, retentional cysts of the seromucinous glands, oncocytic cysts, intra-adenoid cysts, branchial cysts, prevertebral or retropharyngeal abscess and pseudocysts of the nasopharynx will be discussed in this paper. (orig.)

  6. Fourth branchial complex anomalies: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrime, Mark; Kacker, Ashutosh; Bent, John; Ward, Robert F

    2003-11-01

    Anomalies of the fourth branchial arch complex are exceedingly rare, with approximately forty cases reported in the literature since 1972. The authors report experience with six fourth arch anomalies. Retrospective chart review of six consecutive patients presenting to the pediatric otolaryngology service at a tertiary care center with anomalies referable to the fourth branchial arch. All six patients presented within the first or second decade of life. All six had left-sided disease. Four patients presented with recurrent neck infection, one with asymptomatic cervical masses, and one with a neck mass and respiratory compromise. One patient had prior surgery presented with a recurrence. Diagnosis of fourth arch anomalies was suggested or confirmed by computed tomography and flexible laryngoscopy. Treatment was surgical in five patients; one patient is awaiting surgery. Surgical procedures included resection of the mass and endoscopic cauterization of the inner opening of the cyst. The presentation of a cervical mass, especially with recurrent infections and especially on the left side, in a child in the first or second decade of life heightens suspicion for an anomaly of the fourth branchial arch. Diagnosis can be difficult, but is aided by the use of flexible laryngoscopy, Computed tomography (CT) scanning and ultrasonography. Surgical resection of the cyst and cauterization of its pyriform sinus opening should be undertaken to minimize recurrence.

  7. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health conditions > Cleft lip and cleft palate Cleft lip and cleft palate E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... repair cleft lip and palate. What are cleft lip and cleft palate? Cleft lip is a birth defect in which ...

  8. Management of pediatric second branchial fistulae: is tonsillectomy necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jeffrey; Elden, Lisa

    2012-11-01

    To describe the surgical management of second branchial fistulae that extend to the pharynx, specifically to determine whether tonsillectomy, along with surgical excision of the tract affects the rate of recurrence. Retrospective chart review of pediatric patients (agebranchial anomalies at a tertiary-care children's hospital between January 1, 2006 and September 1, 2011. Sinus tracts that extended to the pharynx were considered to be fistulae. Seventy-four patients were identified who underwent surgical excision of 85 total second branchial anomalies - 20 cysts (23.5%), 29 sinuses (34.1%), and 36 fistulae (42.4%). The 36 fistulae were removed from 32 patients, 23 males and 9 females, with an average age of 43.3 months. There were 16 right, 11 left, and 5 bilateral lesions. In 14 (43.8%) of the fistulae cases, a tonsillectomy was performed. There was only one recurrence (2.8%), which occurred 41 months postoperatively. No statistically significant difference for recurrence (p=1.0) was found between the group of patients that underwent tonsillectomy and those that did not. Pediatric branchial anomalies can present as a cyst, sinus, or fistula. They are developmental failures in the involution of the branchial apparatus during the embryologic period. Management of second branchial anomalies is with surgical excision of the tract and ligation of the terminal attachment to the pharynx. Our results suggest that the recurrence rates are not affected by whether or not an ipsilateral tonsillectomy is performed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Spectrum of lesions derived from branchial arches occurring in the thyroid: from solid cell nests to tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srbecka, Kristyna; Michalova, Kvetoslava; Curcikova, Radmila; Michal, Michael; Dubova, Magdalena; Svajdler, Marian; Michal, Michal; Daum, Ondrej

    2017-09-01

    There is a group of lesions in the head and neck region derived from branchial arches and related structures which, when inflamed, are characterized by the formation of cysts lined by squamous or glandular epithelium and surrounded by a heavy inflammatory infiltrate rich in germinal centers. In the thyroid, the main source of various structures which may cause diagnostic dilemma is the ultimobranchial body. To investigate the spectrum of such thyroid lesions, the consultation files were reviewed for thyroid samples containing pathological structures regarded to arise from the ultimobranchial body. Positive reaction with antibodies against CK5/6, p63, galectin 3, and CEA, and negative reaction with antibodies against thyroglobulin, TTF-1, and calcitonin were used to confirm the diagnosis. The specific subtype of the ultimobranchial body-derived lesion was then determined based on histological examination of H&E-stained slides. Twenty-one cases of ultimobranchial body-derived lesions were retrieved from the consultation files, 20 of them along with clinical information (M/F = 6/14, mean age 55 years, range 36-68 years). Lesions derived from the ultimobranchial body were classified as follows: (hyperplastic) solid cell nests (nine cases), solid cell nests with focal cystic change (five cases), cystic solid cell nests (two cases), branchial cleft-like cyst (four cases), and finally a peculiar Warthin tumor-like lesion (one case). We suggest that the common denominator of these structures is that they all arise due to activation of inflammatory cells around the vestigial structures, which leads to cystic dilatation and proliferation of the epithelial component.

  10. First branchial arch fistula: diagnostic dilemma and improvised surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Vinod; Ingrams, Duncan

    2011-01-01

    First branchial cleft anomalies are uncommon, and only sporadic case reports are published in the literature. They account for 1% to 8% of all the branchial abnormalities. The often variable presentation and tract siting of first arch fistulae have led to misdiagnosis. The misdiagnosis results in inappropriate/ineffective treatment and recurrence of the sinus tract. We present a 19-year-old woman who presented to the ENT outpatient department with episodic discharge from a long-standing fistula anterior to the left sternomastoid muscle. This was associated with repeated episodes of ipsilateral tonsillitis. In relation to the history and because of the position of the fistula, a diagnosis of second branchial arch fistula was made. An attempt at excision was unfortunately followed by early recurrence of discharge. At review following the procedure, a defect of the left tympanic membrane in the form of a fibrous band was noted, and a revised diagnosis of first branchial arch sinus was made. Wide surgical excision of the tract with partial parotidectomy was performed. An uneventful postoperative course followed, with no recurrence of symptoms after 24 months of review. We discuss the case, the diagnostic pathway, and the wide local excision technique used for removal of branchial fistulae. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Thyroidal abscesses in third and fourth branchial anomalies: not only a paediatric diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijff, Schelto; Sywak, Mark S; Sidhu, Stan B; Shun, Albert; Novakovic, Daniel; Lee, James C; Delbridge, Leigh W

    2015-01-01

    Acute suppurative thyroiditis and recurrent abscess formation due to third and fourth branchial anomalies typically present in children. However, thyroid abscesses in branchial anomalies may occur in adulthood as well. Failure to recognize and delayed drainage of a neck abscess may lead to a fulminant life-threatening outcome. This is a retrospective case series. The study group comprised all patients presenting over a 12-month period from January to December 2012 with thyroid abscesses and a branchial cleft anomaly in two centres, one adult and the other paediatric. Patient demographics, clinical presentation, imaging, surgical management, definitive histology and outcomes were documented. Five patients were identified with a history of thyroid abscesses. Only one was a child (aged 9 years) with the other four being adults (aged 20, 34, 37 and 41 years). All patients had third or fourth left branchial cleft anomalies, presenting as suppurative thyroiditis with a left-sided thyroid abscess. Management options ranged from abscess drainage on initial presentation, primary thyroid lobectomy or delayed thyroid lobectomy following abscess drainage. Acute suppurative thyroidits and thyroid abscesses is not just a paediatric diagnosis but may present at any age. In both children and adults, a thyroid abscess almost always arises from branchial cleft anomalies. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  12. The complete branchial fistula: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, C; Kumar, R; Kumar, R; Mishra, S K; Roy, M; Bhavana, K

    2005-10-01

    The incomplete branchial fistula is not an uncommon congenital anomaly of branchial apparatus but a complete one is rare. Here we report a case of complete congenital branchial fistula with an internal opening near the tonsillar fossa.

  13. The complete branchial fistula: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Shekhar, C.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, R.; Mishra, S. K.; Roy, M.; Bhavana, K.

    2005-01-01

    The incomplete branchial fistula is not an uncommon congenital anomaly of branchial apparatus but a complete one is rare. Here we report a case of complete congenital branchial fistula with an internal opening near the tonsillar fossa.

  14. Ten years of experience with third and fourth branchial remnants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, Moishe; Kay, Saundra; Emil, Sherif; Flageole, Hélène; Nguyen, Luong T; Tewfik, Ted L; Oudjhane, Kamal; Laberge, Jean-Martin

    2002-05-01

    Third and fourth branchial remnants may result in cysts and abscesses that are in close contact with the thyroid gland. These anomalies are rare and often present diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The charts of patients diagnosed with a branchial anomaly between July 1991 and July 2001 at the Montreal Children's Hospital were reviewed. All cases of third and fourth branchial remnants or pyriform sinus fistulae were identified. Clinical presentation, imaging, treatment, and outcome were recorded. Eight patients with a third or fourth branchial anomaly were identified and ranged in age from birth to 13 years. All anomalies were left sided. Presenting symptoms consisted of an asymptomatic cervical mass (n = 1), an infected mass (n = 5), neonatal respiratory distress (n = 1), and 1 incidental cyst found on magnetic resonance imaging. Ultrasonography was useful in suggesting the diagnosis in 7 cases. Barium swallow was performed in 3 patients with 2 positive results. Pharyngoscopy results showed the internal opening in 2 of 7 patients. A portion of the thyroid gland was resected in 6 patients. One patient has not yet undergone a definitive procedure. There was 1 recurrence in a patient whose pathology did not confirm a branchial remnant. The diagnosis and management of pyriform sinus anomalies are challenging. Ultrasound scan, computed tomography scan, barium swallow, and pharyngoscopy are all useful. The portion of thyroid involved in the fistula must be excised en bloc with the inflammatory mass, and the tract should be ligated at the level of the pharynx to minimize recurrence. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  15. A Case Report: A Third/Fourth Branchial Pouch Anomaly Presented by Solid Thyroid and Lateral Cervical Neck Masses

    OpenAIRE

    Magda H. A. Nasreldin; Eman A. Ibrahim; Somaia A. Saad El-Din

    2016-01-01

    Branchial pouch-derived anomalies may arise from remnants of the first, second, or third/fourth branchial arches. Branchial pouch-related structures are found within the thyroid gland in the form of solid cell rests, epithelial lined cyst with or without an associated lymphoid component, thymic and/or parathyroid tissue, and less commonly in the form of heterotopic cartilage. We present a rare case of left solid thyroid swelling nearby two cervical nodules in a seven-year-old female with a cl...

  16. Rapidly enlarging neck mass in a neonate causing airway compromise

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Kyra; Leal, Andres; McGill, Thomas; Jacob, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Up to 20% of all congenital pediatric head and neck masses are branchial cleft cysts. Second branchial cleft cysts account for 95% of branchial anomalies, and fourth branchial cleft cysts are the rarest type. Their typical presentations include non–life-threatening symptoms, such as drainage, skin irritations, minor swelling, and tenderness. We describe a 5-week-old neonate with increasing stridor secondary to a rapidly growing neck mass. Imaging and surgical excision confirmed the mass to be...

  17. REPARTITION BRANCHIALE DES MONOGENES Gotocotyla ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AISA

    com. RESUME. La localisation branchiale de Gotocotyla acanthura (Parona et Perugia, 1891) et Pyragraphorus hollisae. (Euzet et Ktari, 1970) parasites de Trachinotus ovatus (L, 1758) de la côte atlantique marocaine de Mehdia dans le cas ...

  18. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refers to a cleft in the lip only accounting for 20 percent of all clefts. What causes ... malformation of the upper airway can affect the function of the Eustachian tube and increase the possibility ...

  19. Lymphoepithelial cyst of the submandibular gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Saneem Ahamed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoepithelial cysts are benign, slowly growing unilocular or multilocular lesions that appear in the head and neck. They are also called Branchial cyst. The head and neck sites are the salivary glands(more commonly parotid and rarely submandibular gland and the oral cavity (usually the floor of the mouth. there are various methods of investigation available today, of which Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC can be used to provide an immediate diagnosis of a lymphoepithelial cyst. The other investigations include, Ultrasonogram,and Computed tomography.It usually occurs due to the process of lymphocyte-induced cystic ductular dilatation and the confirmatory diagnosis is always made postoperatively by histopathological examination. The mainstay in the treatment of a lymphoepithelial cyst remains the surgical approach, which includes complete enucleation of the cyst along with total excision of the involved salivary gland. This is a report of a lymphoepithelial cyst involving the submandibular salivary gland and its management.

  20. A Case Report: A Third/Fourth Branchial Pouch Anomaly Presented by Solid Thyroid and Lateral Cervical Neck Masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasreldin, Magda H A; Ibrahim, Eman A; Saad El-Din, Somaia A

    2016-01-01

    Branchial pouch-derived anomalies may arise from remnants of the first, second, or third/fourth branchial arches. Branchial pouch-related structures are found within the thyroid gland in the form of solid cell rests, epithelial lined cyst with or without an associated lymphoid component, thymic and/or parathyroid tissue, and less commonly in the form of heterotopic cartilage. We present a rare case of left solid thyroid swelling nearby two cervical nodules in a seven-year-old female with a clinical diagnosis suggestive of malignant thyroid tumor with metastasis to the cervical lymph nodes. Histopathological examination revealed that it was compatible with third/fourth branchial pouch-derived anomaly composed of mature cartilage and thymic and parathyroid tissues for clinical and radiological correlations.

  1. A Case Report: A Third/Fourth Branchial Pouch Anomaly Presented by Solid Thyroid and Lateral Cervical Neck Masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda H. A. Nasreldin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Branchial pouch-derived anomalies may arise from remnants of the first, second, or third/fourth branchial arches. Branchial pouch-related structures are found within the thyroid gland in the form of solid cell rests, epithelial lined cyst with or without an associated lymphoid component, thymic and/or parathyroid tissue, and less commonly in the form of heterotopic cartilage. We present a rare case of left solid thyroid swelling nearby two cervical nodules in a seven-year-old female with a clinical diagnosis suggestive of malignant thyroid tumor with metastasis to the cervical lymph nodes. Histopathological examination revealed that it was compatible with third/fourth branchial pouch-derived anomaly composed of mature cartilage and thymic and parathyroid tissues for clinical and radiological correlations.

  2. Congenital branchial apparatus malformation in a Haflinger colt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Florent; Savard, Claudine; Drolet, Richard; Alexander, Kate; Pang, Daniel S J; Laverty, Sheila

    2008-01-01

    To report the diagnosis and treatment of a branchial apparatus anomaly (BAA) associated with a mandibular malformation in a foal. Clinical report. Haflinger foal. A 6-day-old foal had a fluctuating cystic mass in the pharyngeal (throatlatch) region, which changed in appearance after ingestion of milk. Upper airway endoscopy and diagnostic imaging (ultrasonography, radiography, computed tomography) permitted identification of the anatomic location of a communicating tract between the lumen of the cystic mass and the pharynx. The mass was surgically removed and communication with the pharynx ligated. Histologic appearance of this mass was consistent with a branchial cyst or sinus. The mandibular malformation was managed conservatively. Surgical resection of a third branchial sinus resulted in an excellent functional and cosmetic outcome. There was no evidence of any mandibular deformity 2 years later. BAA may induce secondary mandibular deformation in utero and may cause respiratory compromise postpartum. Careful surgical dissection and removal of BAA resulted in an excellent outcome. BAAs should be included in the differential diagnosis of a throatlatch region mass in equine neonates. Complete surgical excision is recommended and full recovery of any associated mandibular deformity may be anticipated without additional treatment in very young patients.

  3. Neonatal Presentation of an Air-Filled Neck Mass that Enlarges with Valsalva: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jasminkumar Bharatbhai; Kilbride, Howard; Paulson, Lorien

    2015-01-01

    Branchial cleft cysts are common causes of congenital neck masses in the pediatric population. However, neonatal presentation of branchial cleft cysts is uncommon, but recognizable secondary to acute respiratory distress from airway compression or complications secondary to infection. We report a 1-day-old infant presenting with an air-filled neck mass that enlarged with Valsalva and was not associated with respiratory distress. The infant was found to have a third branchial cleft cyst with an internal opening into the pyriform sinus. The cyst was conservatively managed with endoscopic surgical decompression and cauterization of the tract and opening. We review the embryology of branchial cleft cysts and current management. PMID:26495186

  4. Facts about Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts about Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... can make referrals to cleft/craniofacial treatment teams. Cleft Lip & Palate Foundation of Smiles Cleft Lip & Palate Foundation of ...

  5. First and second branchial arch syndromes: multimodality approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senggen, Elodie; Laswed, Tarek; Meuwly, Jean-Yves; Maestre, Leonor Alamo; Meuli, Reto; Gudinchet, Francois; Jaques, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    First and second branchial arch syndromes (BAS) manifest as combined tissue deficiencies and hypoplasias of the face, external ear, middle ear and maxillary and mandibular arches. They represent the second most common craniofacial malformation after cleft lip and palate. Extended knowledge of the embryology and anatomy of each branchial arch derivative is mandatory for the diagnosis and grading of different BAS lesions and in the follow-up of postoperative patients. In recent years, many new complex surgical approaches and procedures have been designed by maxillofacial surgeons to treat extensive maxillary, mandibular and external and internal ear deformations. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the role of different imaging modalities (orthopantomogram (OPG), lateral and posteroanterior cephalometric radiographs, CT and MRI) in the diagnosis of a wide spectrum of first and second BAS, including hemifacial microsomia, mandibulofacial dysostosis, branchio-oto-renal syndrome, Pierre Robin sequence and Nager acrofacial dysostosis. Additionally, we aim to emphasize the importance of the systematic use of a multimodality imaging approach to facilitate the precise grading of these syndromes, as well as the preoperative planning of different reconstructive surgical procedures and their follow-up during treatment. (orig.)

  6. First and second branchial arch syndromes: multimodality approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senggen, Elodie; Laswed, Tarek; Meuwly, Jean-Yves; Maestre, Leonor Alamo; Meuli, Reto; Gudinchet, Francois [University Hospital of Lausanne, Radiology Department, Lausanne (Switzerland); Jaques, Bertrand [University Hospital of Lausanne, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-05-15

    First and second branchial arch syndromes (BAS) manifest as combined tissue deficiencies and hypoplasias of the face, external ear, middle ear and maxillary and mandibular arches. They represent the second most common craniofacial malformation after cleft lip and palate. Extended knowledge of the embryology and anatomy of each branchial arch derivative is mandatory for the diagnosis and grading of different BAS lesions and in the follow-up of postoperative patients. In recent years, many new complex surgical approaches and procedures have been designed by maxillofacial surgeons to treat extensive maxillary, mandibular and external and internal ear deformations. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the role of different imaging modalities (orthopantomogram (OPG), lateral and posteroanterior cephalometric radiographs, CT and MRI) in the diagnosis of a wide spectrum of first and second BAS, including hemifacial microsomia, mandibulofacial dysostosis, branchio-oto-renal syndrome, Pierre Robin sequence and Nager acrofacial dysostosis. Additionally, we aim to emphasize the importance of the systematic use of a multimodality imaging approach to facilitate the precise grading of these syndromes, as well as the preoperative planning of different reconstructive surgical procedures and their follow-up during treatment. (orig.)

  7. Transverse facial cleft: A series of 17 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L K Makhija

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Transverse facial cleft (Tessier type 7 or congenital macrostomia is a rare congenital anomaly seldom occurring alone and is frequently associated with deformities of the structures developing from the first and second branchial arches. The reported incidence of No. 7 cleft varies from 1 in 60,000 to 1 in 300,000 live births. Material and Methods: Seventeen patients of transeverse facial cleft who presented to us in last 5 years were included in the study. Their history regarding familial and environmental predispositions was recorded. The cases were analysed on basis of sex, laterality, severity, associated anomalies and were graded according to severity. They were operated by z plasty technique and were followed up for 2 years to look for effectiveness of the technique and its complications. Result: Out of the seventeen patients of transverse cleft, none had familial predilection or any environmental etiology like antenatal radiological exposure or intake of drugs of teratogenic potential. Most of the patients (9/17 were associated with hemifacial microsomia and 1 patient was associated with Treacher Colin′s Syndrome. Out of the 6 cases of Grade I clefts, 4 were isolated transverse clefts and of the 10 patients of Grade II clefts, 7 were associated with hemifacial microsomia. We encountered only one case of Grade III Transverse Cleft which was not only associated with hemifacial microsomia but also had cardiac anomaly. Out of the17 cases, 15 were operated and in most of them the outcome was satisfactory.

  8. Submucous Clefts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find Local Cleft/Craniofacial Specialists Booklets & Factsheets College Scholarships School-Age Support Resources Connections Conference View More… ... for speech problems, middle ear disease, and swallowing difficulties. However, there are some individuals with a submucous ...

  9. A RARE CASE OF PAROTID CYST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rambabu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A 28 years old male presented with a case of painless soft fluctuant swelling of right parotid gland is reported to our hospital. The lesion was found to be a cystic lesion through the pre - operative examinations and investigations. The cyst was completely excised, taking care not to injure the lower division of the facial nerve. Po st recovery was uneventful with no defect of the facial nerve functions. The histologic picture confirmed that the cyst was lymphoepithelial cyst which is so called “branchial cyst”. Through the literature reviews of parotid lymphoepit h elial cyst the discu ssions on prevalence, origin, diagnosis, histological finding, investigation and the modes of treatment are made. The ultra sound was found to be valuable in the pre - operative evaluation of the parotid swelling furthermore it is non - invasive, harmless, pai nless and relatively quick

  10. Heterotopic salivary gland tissue: a case report demonstrating evolution and association with the branchial apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Yu; Lee, Ka-Wo; Tsai, Kun-Bow; Chen, Gwo-Shing

    2005-09-01

    Heterotopic salivary gland tissue (HSGT) in the lower neck is an unusual developmental anomaly with characteristic clinical and microscopic findings. The exact embryogenesis remains unclear. This rare entity must be considered in the differential diagnosis of neck mass with fistula. We present a typical HSGT totally removed using the stepladder excision technique and showing an internal fistula. Interpretation of this case from the anatomical and pathological points of view, we support the argument that the embryogenesis of HSGT is more probably related to ectodermal heteroplasia of the precervical sinus of His and further conclude that an association with branchial cleft sinus may exist and cannot be seen as an exclusion criteria for diagnosis of HSGT. Due to possible but infrequent neoplastic transformation, it is important to check HSGT in every encountered cervical anomaly related to any branchial apparatus derived lesion.

  11. [Diagnosis and treatment of congenital fourth branchial anomaly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang-si; Zhang, Si-yi; Luo, Xiao-ning; Song, Xin-han; Zhan, Jian-dong; Chen, Shao-hua; Lu, Zhong-ming

    2010-10-01

    To discuss the anatomic features, clinical presentations, diagnosis, differentiations and treatments of congenital fourth branchial anomaly(CFBA). The clinical data of 8 patients with CFBA were retrospectively analyzed. Of the 8 patients aging from 27 to 300 months (median age: 114 months), 4 male and 4 female; 3 untreated previously and 5 recurrent. All lesions, including 1 cyst, 3 sinus (with internal opening) and 4 fistula, located in the left necks. Three patients presented acute suppurative thyroiditis, 4 deep neck abscesses, and 1 neck lump. Preoperative examinations included barium esophagogram, direct laryngoscopy, ultrasonography, CT, MRI, and so on. The principles of managements were adequate drainage, infection control during acute period and radical surgery during quiescent period. Classic surgical approach consisted of complete excision of branchial lesions, dissection of recurrent laryngeal nerve and partial thyroidectomy. Selective neck dissection was applied in recurrent cases to extirpate branchial lesions, scarrings and inflammatory granuloma. Postoperatively, 1 case was with local incision infection which healed by wound care; 1 case was with temporary vocal cord paralysis which completely recovered 1 month after operation. No recurrence was found in all of 8 cases with follow-up of 13 to 42 months (median: 21 months). CFBA relates closely anatomically with recurrent laryngeal nerve and thyroid grand. The barium esophagogram and direct laryngoscopy are the most useful diagnostic tools. CT and MRI are all beneficial to the diagnosis of CFBA. The treatment key to CFBA is the complete excision of lesion during a quiescent period after inflammatory control, together with the dissection of recurrent laryngeal nerve, partial thyroidectomy and partial resection of lamina of thyroid cartilage (if necessary), which all can decrease the risk of complications and recurrence. For recurrent cases, selective neck dissection is a safe and effective surgical

  12. Distribution of branchial anomalies in a paediatric Asian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Neville Wei Yang; Ibrahim, Shahrul Izham; Tan, Kun Kiaang Henry

    2015-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to review the distribution and incidence of branchial anomalies in an Asian paediatric population and highlight the challenges involved in the diagnosis of branchial anomalies. This was a retrospective chart review of all paediatric patients who underwent surgery for branchial anomalies in a tertiary paediatric hospital from August 2007 to November 2012. The clinical notes were correlated with preoperative radiological investigations, intraoperative findings and histology results. Branchial anomalies were classified based on the results of the review. A total of 28 children underwent surgery for 30 branchial anomalies during the review period. Two children had bilateral branchial anomalies requiring excision. Of the 30 branchial anomalies, 7 (23.3%) were first branchial anomalies, 5 (16.7%) were second branchial anomalies, 3 (10.0%) were third branchial anomalies, and 4 (13.3%) were fourth branchial anomalies (one of the four patients with fourth branchial anomalies had bilateral branchial anomalies). In addition, seven children had 8 (26.7%) branchial anomalies that were thought to originate from the pyriform sinus; however, we were unable to determine if these anomalies were from the third or fourth branchial arches. There was inadequate information on the remaining 3 (10.0%) branchial anomalies for classification. The incidence of second branchial anomalies appears to be lower in our Asian paediatric population, while that of third and fourth branchial anomalies was higher. Knowledge of embryology and the related anatomy of the branchial apparatus is crucial in the identification of the type of branchial anomaly.

  13. Vaginal cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001509.htm Vaginal cysts To use the sharing features on this ... with air, fluid, pus, or other material. A vaginal cyst occurs on or under the lining of ...

  14. Cleft Lip and Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleft lip and cleft palate are birth defects that occur when a baby's lip or mouth do not form properly. They happen early during ... A baby can have a cleft lip, a cleft palate, or both. A cleft lip happens if the ...

  15. Epiphysical clefts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brent Harrison, R.; Keats, T.E.

    1980-01-01

    Defects or clefts may be seen in the growing epiphysis and are usually observed just before puberty. The basal epiphysis of the proximal phalanx of the great toe is the most common site but similar defects have been observed in a numer of other epiphyseso At least some of these defects develop within a single normal appearing epiphysis and are not associated with signs or symptoms suggestive of fracture. The mechanism of formation of these defects is not clear. The defects probably close spontaneously some-time around late puberty. (orig.) [de

  16. Fenda cervical mediana Midline cervical cleft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José V. Tagliarini

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A fenda mediana congênita do pescoço é anomalia rara da parte ventral do pescoço. Em torno de 100 casos foram relatados na literatura, sendo o primeiro caso descrito por Bailey em 1924. Este defeito é relatado em associação com fenda mediana do lábio inferior, fenda da mandíbula e da língua, e hipoplasia de outras estruturas cervicais medianas. Acredita-se que seja uma malformação originada dos dois primeiros arcos branquiais. O tratamento da lesão consiste na excisão vertical da lesão e reparação do defeito resultante. A maioria dos autores recomenda evitar a reparação simples da lesão, preferindo a fechamento com a utilização de zetaplastia múltiplas, com o intuito de evitar fibrose e retração local. Neste artigo relatamos dois casos dessa anomalia e realizamos revisão bibliográfica.The midline cervical cleft is an unusual congenital anomaly of the ventral neck and fewer than 100 cases have been reported overall and the first described by Bailey in 1924. This anomaly is report in association with median cleft of lower lip, cleft mandible and tongue, and hypoplasia of other midline neck structures. Its considered an anomaly originated from the two first branchial arches. The treatment of this cleft is a vertical complete excision and a closure with multiple Z-plasty. Many authors recommend avoid linear closure and prefer multiple Z-plasty for evicted fibrosis and local retraction. In this paper we report 2 case of this anomaly and the literature is reviewed.

  17. Branchial sinus of the piriform fossa: reappraisal of third and fourth branchial anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Adrian; Stewart, Craig; Warrick, Paul; Tzifa, Constance; Forte, Vito

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this study was to review clinical and embryologic aspects of third and fourth branchial anomalies. Retrospective study. We reviewed the institutional and departmental databases at our institution to identify all cases of third and fourth branchial anomalies encountered from 1992 to 2006. All patient records were examined with respect to demographics, clinical history, and radiologic and pathologic reports. We identified 17 cases of third and fourth branchial anomalies, the largest series of its kind reported to date. The lesions were predominantly left sided, all presenting with neck infection. Fistula formation was iatrogenic, secondary to incision and drainage. Preoperative direct laryngoscopy always revealed a pit within the apex of the piriform fossa. Surgical excision involved ipsilateral thyroidectomy as the lesion passed through the thyroid gland. No lesions following the classical course of a either a third or fourth branchial anomaly were identified. The clinical presentation of branchial sinuses arising from the piriform fossa is more in keeping with derivation from the thymopharyngeal duct (of the third pouch) than the hypothetical course of third and fourth branchial fistulae.

  18. Cleft Palate Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... craniofacial journeys. Read the press release here. American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association 1504 East Franklin Street, Suite 102 ... order bottles Order ACPA publications © Copyright 2017 American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association. Website by Mixer Creative Follow us ...

  19. Vermian agenesis without posterior fossa cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamsbaum, C.; Moreau, V.; Bulteau, C.; Burstyn, J.; Lair Milan, F.; Kalifa, G.

    1994-01-01

    We report 11 cases of vermian partial agenesis without posterior fossa cyst or hemispheric abnormalities. Characteristic MR signs were: absence of the posterior lobe, hypoplasia of the anterior lobe, a narrow sagittal cleft separating the hemispheres (''buttocks sign'') and fourth ventricle deformity. The main clinical signs were complex oculomotor dysfunction and developmental delay. None of the patients had respiratory symptoms. Consideration is given to the relationship between Joubert syndrome and this entity as well as to embroyological data. (orig.)

  20. Simple (unicameral) bone cyst of the calcaneus: a pathologic variant revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, L Brannon; Steffensen, Thora; Walling, Arthur K; Gilbert-Barness, Enid

    2008-01-01

    A 17-year-old girl was admitted to the hospital for surgery of an enlarging, painful mass of the left calcaneus. Preoperative imaging studies suggested either a simple (unicameral) or aneurysmal bone cyst. Intraoperative biopsy of the lesion revealed a simple bone cyst with extensive cholesterol clefts. Such cysts are not uncommon in the calcaneus. However, the pathology of this case is unusual and often overlooked. The typical presentation, treatment, and pathology of these lesions are reviewed.

  1. Clefting of the Alveolus: Emphasizing the Distinction from Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, Nicholas; Sidman, James; Block, William

    2016-05-01

    Oral clefting is one of the most common significant fetal abnormalities. Cleft lip and cleft palate have drastically different clinical ramifications and management from one another. A cleft of the alveolus (with or without cleft lip) can confuse the diagnostic picture and lead to a false assumption of cleft palate. The cleft alveolus should be viewed on the spectrum of cleft lip rather than be associated with cleft palate. This is made evident by understanding the embryological development of the midface and relevant terminology. Cleft alveolus carries significantly different clinical implications and treatment options than that of cleft palate. Accurately distinguishing cleft alveolus from cleft palate is crucial for appropriate discussions regarding the patient's care. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. [Manifestation of first branchial anomaly:56 cases reportrhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B; Chen, L S; Huang, S L; Liang, L; Wu, P N; Zhang, S Y; L, Z M; Liang, L

    2016-09-05

    Objective: To sum up and conclude manifestation of congenital first branchial anomaly(CFBCA). Method: The clinical data of 56 patients from 2005 to 2015 in our hospital were retrospective reviewed. Result: Manifestation:mass without pain(26.8%),repeated sore and discharge(71.4%),otological symptom(external auditory discharge、hearing loss,28.6%).Eleven cases bacterial sample showed positive result,and most of them show pseudomonas aeruginosa and staphylococcus aureus.Auricular endoscopy typically performed stricture of external auditory canal,cholesteatoma samples accumulated in ear canal,fistula at the conjunction of the bone and cartilage and tympanic membranous attachment.Typical performance of CT(MRI)was that there were cystic,lobulated or tubular abnormal shadow related with ear canal in Pochet's triangle area whose cyst wall or pipe wall could been enhanced in enhanced CT(MRI) scans,and part of that could be connected with skin.The statistical difference between type Oslen and Work and clinical characteristics( P <0.01),and the relationship between type Oslen and Work( P <0.01).Most of Work Ⅰ were cyst type,and these two type often had no infected symptom.Most of them were young patients.Most of Work Ⅱ were sinus and fistula type ,and these two type often had infected symptom.Most of them were teenagers.Part of patients of type Work Ⅱ showed tympanic membranous attachment. Conclusion: CFBCA was rare,and it is more common in young patients and often in left part.It always performed as mass without pain、repeated sore and discharge、external auditory discharge.Most of Work Ⅰ were cyst type,and these two type often had no infected symptom and most of them were young patients .Most of Work Ⅱ were sinus and fistula type,and these two type often had infected symptom and most of them were teenagers.Auricular endoscopy,CT,MRI could help make diagnose.Doctors clinical need to differentiate it with related diseases according to different manifestations

  3. Cleft Palate; A Multidiscipline Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Richard B., Ed.

    Nineteen articles present a multidisciplinary approach to the management of facial clefts. The following subjects are discussed: the history of cleft lip and cleft palate surgery; cogenital defects; classification; the operation of a cleft palate clinic; physical examination of newborns with cleft lip and/or palate; nursing care; anesthesia;…

  4. Ganglion Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Ganglion Cysts Email to a friend * required fields ...

  5. Unilateral Cleft Hand with Cleft Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Asif Nazir; Bhat, Yasmeen J.; Ahmed, Sheikh Mushtaq; Nazir, Abid

    2009-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the hand form an important class of congenital malformations. They have a huge functional importance because of the part played by the hand in the daily activities of a person. The deformities also have significant cosmetic significance and may also be associated with other anomalies. Amongst the congenital anomalies, central deficiency or cleft hand is relatively rare. The association of cleft foot with cleft hand is an even more rare occurance. We present a case report of a 6 year old child, born of a non-consanginous marriage, having congenital central deficiency of ipsilateral hand and foot. PMID:21475543

  6. Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst mimicking periapical cyst

    OpenAIRE

    Rajalakshmi, R; Sreeja, C; Vijayalakshmi, D; Leelarani, V

    2013-01-01

    Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst (OOC) denotes the odontogenic cyst that microscopically has an orthokeratinised epithelial lining. OOC is characterised by a less-aggressive behaviour and a low rate of recurrence. This report describes a case of OOC involving posterior part of the mandible that mimicked periapical cyst in a 14-year-old boy. The initial clinical diagnosis was given as periapical cyst based on the clinical and radiographical features. Enucleation of the cyst was performed and ...

  7. The Fourth Branchial Complex Anomaly: A Rare Clinical Entity

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Alpen B.; Hinni, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Fourth branchial pouch anomalies are rare congenital disorders of the neck and are a consequence of abnormal development of the branchial apparatus during embryogenesis. Failure to appropriately recognize these anomalies may result in misdiagnosis, insufficient treatment, and continued recurrence. Here, we present an unique presentation of two cases, describe their diagnosis, clinical course, and management, and review the literature regarding these interesting anomalies.

  8. The fourth branchial complex anomaly: a rare clinical entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Alpen B; Hinni, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    Fourth branchial pouch anomalies are rare congenital disorders of the neck and are a consequence of abnormal development of the branchial apparatus during embryogenesis. Failure to appropriately recognize these anomalies may result in misdiagnosis, insufficient treatment, and continued recurrence. Here, we present an unique presentation of two cases, describe their diagnosis, clinical course, and management, and review the literature regarding these interesting anomalies.

  9. Identification of Isthmin 1 as a Novel Clefting and Craniofacial Patterning Gene in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansdon, Lisa A; Darbro, Benjamin W; Petrin, Aline L; Hulstrand, Alissa M; Standley, Jennifer M; Brouillette, Rachel B; Long, Abby; Mansilla, M Adela; Cornell, Robert A; Murray, Jeffrey C; Houston, Douglas W; Manak, J Robert

    2018-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are one of the most common birth defects, affecting 1-2 per 1000 births, and have a complex etiology. High-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization has increased the ability to detect copy number variants (CNVs) that can be causative for complex diseases such as cleft lip and/or palate. Utilizing this technique on 97 nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate cases and 43 cases with cleft palate only, we identified a heterozygous deletion of Isthmin 1 in one affected case, as well as a deletion in a second case that removes putative 3' regulatory information. Isthmin 1 is a strong candidate for clefting, as it is expressed in orofacial structures derived from the first branchial arch and is also in the same "synexpression group" as fibroblast growth factor 8 and sprouty RTK signaling antagonist 1a and 2 , all of which have been associated with clefting. CNVs affecting Isthmin 1 are exceedingly rare in control populations, and Isthmin 1 scores as a likely haploinsufficiency locus. Confirming its role in craniofacial development, knockdown or clustered randomly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9-generated mutation of isthmin 1 in Xenopus laevis resulted in mild to severe craniofacial dysmorphologies, with several individuals presenting with median clefts. Moreover, knockdown of isthmin 1 produced decreased expression of LIM homeobox 8 , itself a gene associated with clefting, in regions of the face that pattern the maxilla. Our study demonstrates a successful pipeline from CNV identification of a candidate gene to functional validation in a vertebrate model system, and reveals Isthmin 1 as both a new human clefting locus as well as a key craniofacial patterning gene. Copyright © 2018 by the Genetics Society of America.

  10. Simple Kidney Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Solitary Kidney Your Kidneys & How They Work Simple Kidney Cysts What are simple kidney cysts? Simple kidney cysts are abnormal, fluid-filled ... that form in the kidneys. What are the kidneys and what do they do? The kidneys are ...

  11. Branchial cymothoids infesting the marine food fishes of Malabar coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panakkool-Thamban, Aneesh; Ameri Kottarathil, Helna; Kappalli, Sudha

    2016-12-01

    Occurrence of cymothoid isopods parasitizing the branchial chamber of marine food fishes along the Malabar coast was investigated. Live and fresh fishes collected from the Ayyikkara fish landing center (Lat. 11°51'N, Long. 75°22'E; Malabar coast, India) were subjected to the thorough observation for the presence of branchial cymothoids for 3 consecutive years (November 2009-November 2012). Among the recovered cymothoids, 11 species were branchial residents belonging to 6 genera; the species include Agarna malayi, Catoessa gruneri, C. boscii, Joryma hilsae, J. brachysoma, J. engraulidis, J. sawayah, Mothocya collettei, M. renardi, Norileca indica and Ryukyua circularis ; highest prevalence being exhibited by two species of Mothocya , ( M. renardi and M. collettei ) parasitizing the belonidaen fishes, Strongylura leiura (92.15 %) and Tylosurus crocodilus crocodilus (87.2 %) respectively. Except Mothocya species, which preferred the branchial floor for infestation, all recovered branchial cymothoids were found attached the inner wall of the operculum. In several instances, the parasites appeared in male-female pairs, one in each branchial cavity. Ovigerous female members of all species of branchial cymothoids except R. circularis showed remarkable bending either towards left or right depending on whether they are located in right or left branchial cavity of their respective host fishes. The deleterious effects of parasitization by all recovered branchial cymothoids include the formation of a pit like depression in the branchial chamber and atrophy of the gill filament; the damage was more pronounced in the gill cavity of parasitized host fishes where the ovigerous female member was accommodated.

  12. Inflammatory dentigerous cyst mimicking a periapical cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic cysts are the most common form of cystic lesions that affect the maxillofacial region. The low frequency of dentigerous cysts in children has been reported in dental literature. Dentigerous cysts arise as a result of cystic change in the remains of the enamel organ after the process of enamel formation is complete. They enclose the crown of an unerupted tooth and are attached to the cementoenamel junction. Although most dentigerous cysts are considered developmental cysts, some cases seem to have an inflammatory origin. The purpose of this report is to present a case of an 8-year-old male patient with a dentigerous cyst of inflammatory origin.

  13. Complex branchial fistula: a variant arch anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caluwé, D; Hayes, R; McDermott, M; Corbally, M T

    2001-07-01

    A 5-year-old boy presented with an infected left-sided branchial fistula. Despite antibiotic treatment and repeated excision of the fistula, purulent discharge from the wound persisted. Three-dimensional computed tomography (3D CT) reconstruction greatly facilitated the diagnosis and management of this case by showing the course of the fistulous tract. The complexity of the tract suggests that this represents a variant arch anomaly because it contains features of first, second, third, and fourth arch remnants. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company.

  14. Cleft Lip and Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cleft Lip or Cleft Palate Print en español Labio leporino y paladar hendido Tilt your head back a bit and look in the mirror. Do you see the way your nose connects to your upper lip? Now open your mouth. Do you see the ...

  15. Cleft lip and palate repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002979.htm Cleft lip and palate repair To use the sharing features on this ... Cheiloplasty; Cleft rhinoplasty; Palatoplasty; Tip rhinoplasty Patient Instructions Cleft lip and palate repair - discharge Images Cleft lip repair - series References ...

  16. Patterns of Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate in Northern Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Khan

    2012-04-01

    Results: A total of 159 patients of cleft lip and cleft palate deformities were included in the study, having a mean age of 3.5+6.59 years and containing 59.1% males and 40.9% females with a ratio of 1.4:1. A cleft lip with palate, cleft palate and cleft lip were found in 51.6%, 31.4% and 17% of cases, respectively. Left-sided clefts were most common in the cleft lip with palate and the isolated cleft lip deformity. A cleft lip with palate was a male dominant variety (62.8% of cases, while in the cleft palate variety, the dominant gender was female. In 61.6% of cases, the parent had a consanguineous relationship. In 21.4% of cases, family history was positive for the cleft lip/palate. Other congenital anomalies were associated in 10.7% of cases. Conclusion: Cleft deformities of the lip and palate affect the male population more than females with cleft lips, in association with a cleft palate being the most common anomaly. Females are mainly affected by an isolated cleft palate. The high prevalence of these deformities in consanguineous marriages emphasizes educating people. The lower number of patients from distant distracts of Northern Pakistan calls for the attention of the health department. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2012; 1(2.000: 63-70

  17. Distribution, Management Difficulty and Outcome of Branchial Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, M A; Sultana, M T; Ahmed, S

    2018-01-01

    Branchial arch anomalies are one of the most common congenital anomalies of the neck. Developmental anomalies of the branchial apparatus account for 17% of all pediatric cervical masses. This study aimed to focus on proper diagnosis of branchial anomaly and describe occurrence, presentation, management and outcome of usual and unusual types. This ten-year prospective observational study was conducted from November 2005 to November 2015 including 2-year postoperative follow-up of the patients in Department of ENT, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka, Bangladesh. Total 89 patients were enrolled for this study. Information was recorded on Clinical examination, relevant investigation, Per-operative findings and Histo-pathological findings. After receiving Histo-pathological findings 61 cases were proved as branchial arch anomalies. Ultrasonography and Histopathology was done for every patient. Fistulogram and sinogram was done for patient of fistula and sinus respectively. CT scan was needed for 9 patients, MRI for 3 patients and 12 patient undergone FNAC. Outcomes of those patients were described in terms of Hospital stay, Complications and Follow up studies. Data analysis was done by Standard Statistical Method.Presentation of a number of participant's mimics Branchial arch anomalies; 4.91% was syndromal. Second branchial arch anomalies were the highest. Management was exclusively surgical. Recurrence rate was about 6.56%. Surgery is the tool for diagnosis, treatment, preventing complications, avoiding carcinoma for branchial arch anomalies.

  18. Odontogenic Cysts and Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau, Elizabeth Ann; Collins, Bobby M

    2017-03-01

    This article reviews a myriad of common and uncommon odontogenic cysts and tumors. The clinical presentation, gross and microscopic features, differential diagnosis, prognosis, and diagnostic pitfalls are addressed for inflammatory cysts (periapical cyst, mandibular infected buccal cyst/paradental cyst), developmental cysts (dentigerous, lateral periodontal, glandular odontogenic, orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst), benign tumors (keratocystic odontogenic tumor, ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, ameloblastic fibroma and fibroodontoma, odontoma, squamous odontogenic tumor, calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor, primordial odontogenic tumor, central odontogenic fibroma, and odontogenic myxomas), and malignant tumors (clear cell odontogenic carcinoma, ameloblastic carcinoma, ameloblastic fibrosarcoma). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Coexistence of bilateral first and second branchial arch anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, J S; Shekar, Vidya; Saluja, Manika; Mohindroo, N K

    2013-01-01

    Branchial arch anomalies are one of the most common congenital anomalies that are usually unilateral and bilateral presentation is rare. The simultaneous presence of bilateral second branchial arch anomalies along with bilateral first arch anomalies is extremely rare, with only three such cases reported in the literature. We present two non-syndromic cases of coexisting bilateral first and second arch anomalies. Developmental anomalies of the branchial apparatus account for 17% of all paediatric cervical masses and are the most common type of congenital cervical mass. They usually present in the paediatric age group. About 96–97% of these anomalies are unilateral. Bilateral presentation is seen in 2–3% having a strong familial association. Congenital syndromes also have been associated with first and second branchial arch anomalies. Thorough clinical examination and investigations should be done to rule out these syndromes. PMID:23580675

  20. First Branchial Arch Fistula: A Rarity and a Surgical Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, J S; Ganesh, Deepa; Anirudh, J R; Akbar, S; Joshi, Niraj

    2016-06-01

    Although 2(nd) Branchial arch fistulae (from incomplete closure of Cervical sinus of His) are well known, 1(st) arch fistulae are much rarer (branchial arch fistula of the type II Arnot classification, which presented with two external openings of more than 20 years duration. Patient had a successful resection of all the concerned fistulous tract. Review of literature and the surgical challenges of the procedure are presented herewith.

  1. The Fourth Branchial Complex Anomaly: A Rare Clinical Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alpen B. Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fourth branchial pouch anomalies are rare congenital disorders of the neck and are a consequence of abnormal development of the branchial apparatus during embryogenesis. Failure to appropriately recognize these anomalies may result in misdiagnosis, insufficient treatment, and continued recurrence. Here, we present an unique presentation of two cases, describe their diagnosis, clinical course, and management, and review the literature regarding these interesting anomalies.

  2. Skull thickness in patients with clefts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arntsen, T; Kjaer, I; Sonnesen, L

    2010-01-01

    The purpose was to analyze skull thickness in incomplete cleft lip (CL), cleft palate (CP), and combined cleft lip and palate (UCLP).......The purpose was to analyze skull thickness in incomplete cleft lip (CL), cleft palate (CP), and combined cleft lip and palate (UCLP)....

  3. A novel surgical management of hypopharyngeal branchial anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givens, Daniel J; Buchmann, Luke O; Park, Albert H

    2015-04-01

    To review our experience treating hypopharyngeal branchial anomalies utilizing an open transcervical approach that: (1) includes recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) monitoring and identification if needed; (2) resection of tract if present; and (3) a superiorly based sternothyroid muscle flap for closure. A retrospective chart review was performed to identify all patients at a tertiary level children's hospital with branchial anomalies from 2005 to 2014. The clinical presentation, evaluation, treatment and outcome were analyzed for those patients with hypopharyngeal branchial anomalies. Forty-seven patients who underwent excision of branchial anomalies with a known origin were identified. Thirteen patients had hypopharyngeal branchial anomalies. Six of these patients were treated by the authors of this study and are the focus of this analysis. All six underwent an open transcervical procedure with a sternothyroid muscle flap closure of a piriform sinus opening over a nine year period. Definitive surgery included a microlaryngoscopy and an open transcervical approach to close a fistula between the piriform sinus and neck with recurrent laryngeal nerve monitoring or dissection. A superiorly based sternothyroid muscle flap was used to close the sinus opening. There were no recurrences, recurrent laryngeal nerve injuries or other complications from these procedures. This study supports complete surgical extirpation of the fistula tract using an open cervical approach, recurrent laryngeal nerve monitoring or identification, and rotational muscle flap closure to treat patients with hypopharyngeal branchial anomalies. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. Branchial placenta in the viviparous teleost Ilyodon whitei (Goodeidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Mari Carmen; De la Rosa-Cruz, Gabino; García-Alarcón, Adriana

    2014-12-01

    Intraluminal gestation, as it occurs in viviparous goodeids, allows a wide diversity of embryo-maternal metabolic exchanges. The branchial placenta occurs in embryos developing in intraluminal gestation when ovarian folds enter through the operculum, into the branchial chamber. The maternal ovarian folds may extend to the embryonic pharyngeal cavity. A branchial placenta has been observed in few viviparous teleosts, and there are not previous histological analyses. This study analysis the histological structure in the goodeid Ilyodon whitei. The moterno ovarian folds extend through the embryonic operculum and reach near the gills, occupying part of the branchial chamber. These folds extend also into the pharyngeal cavity. In some regions, the epithelia of the ovarian folds and embryo were in apposition, developing a placental structure in which, maternal and embryonic capillaries lie in close proximity. The maternal epithelium has desquamated cells which may enter through the branchial chamber to the pharyngeal cavity and the alimentary tract. The complex processes that occur in the ovaries of viviparous teleosts, and its diverse adaptations for viviparity, as the presence of branchial placenta, are relevant in the study of the evolution of vertebrate viviparity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Midline cervical cleft: a rare congenital anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renukaswamy, Gayathri Mandya; Soma, Marlene A; Hartley, Benjamin E J

    2009-11-01

    A midline cervical cleft (MCC) is a rare congenital anomaly due to failure of fusion of the first and second branchial arches during embryogenesis. It may present as a midline defect of the anterior neck skin with a skin projection or sinus, or as a subcutaneous fibrous cord. This report evaluates the clinical features and surgical management of an MCC. We analyzed a series of 4 patients with an MCC successfully treated at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London. Three male patients and 1 female patient between 4 and 11 months of age were found to have an MCC. Each patient presented with an erythematous, fibrous band of tissue extending between the chin and the suprasternal notch. Treatment comprised surgical excision of the lesion and Z-plasty repair. We present the embryology, common clinical presentation, investigations, differential diagnosis, and histology, along with a literature review, of this uncommon malformation of the anterior neck. An MCC is a differential diagnosis to consider when assessing a child with a midline cervical lesion. Early surgical excision with Z-plasty repair of the soft tissue defect is the treatment of choice to prevent long-term complications.

  6. Differentiating pneumocystis cysts from Candida Sp. yeasts in pulmonary specimens using methenamine silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantiziantoniou, N.

    1996-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii (PC) pneumonia in the immunocompromised patient requires therapeutic intervention; therefore, rapid identification of PC organisms in cytopathologic specimens is essential. Conclusive diagnoses of PC are achievable using Grocott's methenamine silver (GMS), the gold standard stain for PC cyst visualization. However, non-budding Candida sp. yeasts can stimulate PC cysts with GMS and thus pose significant diagnostic challenges. After qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis of 49 cytopulmonary cases, this study aimed to establish morphologic criteria that differentiate these organisms using GMS. The results showed that spherical/demilune PC cysts (4 to 7 microns in diameter) are monomorphic and mainly transparent, with intracyst densities being commonly evident. Demilune cysts typically display wall wrinkling with longitudinal clefts. Relative to cysts, Candida sp. yeasts reveal increased argyrophilia, range 4 to 10 microns in diameter, are mainly oval and budding, polymorphic and exhibit wall deformation with variable internal structure. Differentiating criteria are (a) budding; (b) cyst transparency, demilune shape; (c) longitudinal cyst clefts; (d) paired common-alike intracyst densities; (e) cyst monomprphism; (f) alveolar cast formations; (g) overall cystomorphologic presentation; and (h)relative argyrophilia. (author)

  7. Cerebral Arachnoid Cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Haciyakupoglu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Arachnoid cysts can occur through inflammatory, traumatic, chemical irritation, skin tumor and postoperative processes. It is diagnosed and differentiated by magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography from other lesions. Its differential diagnosis includes colloid cyst , craniopharyngioma, prosencephaly, holoprosencephaly , epidermoid cyst, hydatid cyst, low grade glial tumors, infarcts and subdural hygroma. Most of them are asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally. Treatment methods such as simple cyst aspiration , total excision of the cyst, basal cysternostomy, ventricular fenestration, cysto or ventriculoperitoneal shunt can be performed by various endoscopic surgery and craniotomy. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(3.000: 259-268

  8. Cleft Lip and Palate Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery. Cleft Lip / Palate and Craniofacial Surgery This type of surgery is ... the carefully orchestrated, multiple-stage correctional program for cleft lip and palate patients. The goal is to help restore the ...

  9. Hypertelorism and orofacial clefting revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinberg, Seth M.; Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Since the 1960s, multiple studies have reported a tendency toward hypertelorism in individuals with nonsyndromic orofacial clefts (OFCs). However, the association between specific cleft types and increased interorbital distance has been inconsistent. Using threedimensional (3D) surface...

  10. BRANCHIAL ELIMINATION OF SUPERHYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BY RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The branchial elimination of pentachloroethane and four congeneric polychlorinated bephenyls by rainbow trout was measured using a fish respirometer-metabolism chamber and an adsorption resin column. Branchial elimination was characterized by calculating a set of apparent in vivo...

  11. BRANCHIAL EFFLUX OF HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BY RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of PBTK models for fish has been impededd by a lack of data on the branchial elimination of hydrophobic compounds. The hypothesis is that branchial efflux of high log Kow compounds proceeds to an equilibrium between the afferent blood and expired water. Branchial effl...

  12. Keratinizing dentigerous cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishnavi Sivasankar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratinizing dentigerous cyst is a rare entity. This article reports a case of keratinizing dentigerous cyst associated with an impacted mandibular canine. Clinical and radiological features, cone-beam computed tomography findings and histological features of the case are reported along with a discussion on keratinizing odontogenic cysts and the need for follow-up.

  13. Keratinizing dentigerous cyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasankar, Vaishnavi; Ranganathan, Kannan; Praveen, B

    2014-01-01

    Keratinizing dentigerous cyst is a rare entity. This article reports a case of keratinizing dentigerous cyst associated with an impacted mandibular canine. Clinical and radiological features, cone-beam computed tomography findings and histological features of the case are reported along with a discussion on keratinizing odontogenic cysts and the need for follow-up. PMID:24808713

  14. Tail gut cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, G Mallikarjuna; Haricharan, P; Ramanujacharyulu, S; Reddy, K Lakshmi

    2002-01-01

    The tail gut is a blind extension of the hindgut into the tail fold just distal to the cloacal membrane. Remnants of this structure may form tail gut cyst. We report a 14-year-old girl with tail gut cyst that presented as acute abdomen. The patient recovered after cyst excision.

  15. Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst mimicking periapical cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalakshmi, R; Sreeja, C; Vijayalakshmi, D; Leelarani, V

    2013-10-07

    Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst (OOC) denotes the odontogenic cyst that microscopically has an orthokeratinised epithelial lining. OOC is characterised by a less-aggressive behaviour and a low rate of recurrence. This report describes a case of OOC involving posterior part of the mandible that mimicked periapical cyst in a 14-year-old boy. The initial clinical diagnosis was given as periapical cyst based on the clinical and radiographical features. Enucleation of the cyst was performed and the specimen was sent for histopathological examination. A definite diagnosis of OOC was made by histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen. This case emphases on including OOC in the differential diagnosis of radiolucencies occurring in the periapical region of non-vital tooth.

  16. Management of ovarian cysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Ulla Breth; Tabor, Ann; Mosgaard, Berit Jul

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The treatment of an ovarian cyst relies on its nature, and accurate preoperative discrimination of benign and malignant cysts is therefore of crucial importance. This study was undertaken to review the literature concerning the preoperative diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cysts....... METHODS: Articles concerning ovarian cysts from a medline literature search during the period 1985-2003 were included in addition to articles found as references in the initial publications. RESULTS: Different methods for discriminating between benign and malignant ovarian cysts are discussed....... The diagnosis and the treatment are assessed in relation to age, menopausal status, pregnancy, and whether the cyst is presumed to be benign or malignant. In general, expectant management is the choice in premenopausal and pregnant women with non-suspicious cysts and normal levels of CA-125. In postmenopausal...

  17. [Rare location of arachnoid cysts. Extratemporal cysts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Perez, Rafael; Hinojosa, José; Pascual, Beatriz; Panaderos, Teresa; Welter, Diego; Muñoz, María J

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic management of arachnoid cysts depends largely on its location. Almost 50% of arachnoid cysts are located in the temporal fossa-Sylvian fissure, whereas the other half is distributed in different locations, sometimes exceptional. Under the name of infrequent location arachnoid cysts, a description is presented of those composed of 2 sheets of arachnoid membrane, which are not located in the temporal fossa, and are primary or congenital. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Case report of bilateral cervical chondrocutaneous branchial remnants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Hannes; Hofmann, Thiemo; Wolfgruber, Herwig; Anderhuber, Wolfgang; Beham, Alfred; Stammberger, Heinz

    2003-01-01

    Cervical chondrocutaneous branchial remnants are rare and not well known lesions. Histologically the lesion per definition presents as a Choristoma. Choristoma is the pathohistological term for a developmental tumor-like anomaly consisting of tissues foreign to the site at which it is located. Treatment is complete surgical removal as promptly as possible in order to get an exact histopathological diagnosis. A case of a 4-month-old boy with cervical chondrocutaneous branchial remnants anterior to the sternocleidomastoid muscles on both sides is presented. According to literature search this appears to be the second case published on such a bilateral lesion.

  19. Cleft Lip and Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from surgery, coping with speech problems, or improving self-esteem. Some teens join support groups or online forums where they can talk to other people who were born with cleft lip or palate. Reviewed by: Rupal Christine Gupta, MD Date reviewed: ...

  20. [Observing effect of treatment of the second branchial fistula with endoscopic resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiping; Wang, Shuyun; Tong, Kang

    2014-03-01

    To explore synergic effect of treatment of the second branchial fistula with endoscopic resection. All patients of the second branchial fistula were scanned in neck with CT (computed tomography), we injected ioversol-320 from the entrance of the second branchial fistula in front of sternocleidomastiod into the second branchial fistula, then scanned the neck with CT (computed tomography), and rebuilding the picture of the second branchial fistula, to prepare for the operation. 9 patients of the second branchial fistula were operated under general anesthesia with endoscopic resection. All of 9 patients were cured. no one recurred after follow-up of 6 months. It is minimally invasive and complete to resect the second branchial with endoscopic resection, the operation is simply and easy to promote.

  1. Psychological issues in cleft lip and cleft palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousa Avinash

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Vocational and social issues affect rehabilitation and development of patients with cleft lip and cleft palate. However, psychological problems like lowered self esteem and difficulties in social interaction have also been noted in them. Not many pediatric reconstructive surgery teams have a psychiatrist on their panel. It is likely that psychological problems are higher in incidence than literature actually suggests. Hence it is very essential that such cases are identified by the surgical team to maximize positive outcome of surgery and rehabilitation. This study discusses psychological issues revolving around cleft lip and cleft palate along with lacunae in many psychological research studies.

  2. Isolated Cardiac Hydatid Cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakil, U.; Rehman, A. U.; Shahid, R.

    2015-01-01

    Hydatid cyst disease is common in our part of the world. Cardiac hydatid cyst is its rare manifestation. We report this case of 48-year male having isolated cardiac hydatid cyst, incidentally found on computed tomography. This patient presented in medical OPD of Combined Military Hospital, Lahore with one month history of mild retrosternal discomfort. His general physical and systemic examinations as well as ECG were unremarkable. Chest X-ray showed an enlarged cardiac shadow with mildly irregular left heart border. Contrast enhanced CT scan of the chest showed a large well defined multiloculated non-enhancing cystic lesion with multiple daughter cysts involving wall of left ventricle and overlying pericardium. Serology for echinococcus confirmed the diagnosis of hydatid cyst. Patient was offered the surgical treatment but he opted for medical treatment only. Albendezol was prescribed. His follow-up echocardiography after one month showed no significant decrease in size of the cyst. (author)

  3. Periorbital dermoid cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigwekar Shubhangi P, Gupte Chaitanya P, Chaudhari Sagar V, Kharche Prajakta S

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Dermoid cysts are a developmental benign choristomas, which are congenital lesions representing normal tissue/s in an abnormal location. These consist of ectodermal and mesodermal elements, lined with epithelium and contain hair with other skin structures. Periorbital dermoid cyst is commonly located at lateral one third of the eyebrow. It is asymptomatic however school going child suffers from social stigma. So its surgical excision for cosmetic purpose becomes necessary. Excision also prevents bony remoulding and recurrent inflammatory responses due to leakage of cyst contents. In this article we are presenting a six years old male child having periorbital dermoid in lateral right eyebrow. The intact dermoid cyst was excised surgically and sent for histopathological examination, which confirmed the diagnosis of dermoid cyst. We highlight the merits of early surgical intervention, even in an asymptomatic periorbital dermoid cyst.

  4. Hydatid cyst of mediastinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehgal S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of hydatid cyst of the mediastinum in a 32-year-old female patient who was admitted with chest pain. CT scan reported posterior mediastinal mass towards the right side. Surgical exploration revealed a loculated cyst in posterior mediastinum on the right side, adherent to the overlying lung and underlying bone. Posterolateral thoracotomy was performed for cyst aspiration and excision. The patient was discharged on albendazole.

  5. Regulation of the branchial ciliary activity in the mussel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dral, A.D.G.

    1977-01-01

    In mussels the movement of the cilia on the gill are basically autonomous and influenced by environmental factors. The branchial nerve has an inhibitory as well as a stimulating effect on the activity of the lateral cilia. The reactions of these cilia to changing temperature and chlorinity in

  6. Spatial variability in branchial basket meristics and morphology of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We examined spatial variability in meristic and morphological characteristics of the branchial basket of sardine Sardinops sagax collected from four geographical regions around the southern African coast, namely Namibia and the South African west, south and east coasts. Our analysis tested the hypothesis of three putative ...

  7. Calcified adrenal cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chung Kyu; Choi, Byung Sook [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1970-10-15

    Calcified hemorrhagic adrenal cysts are rather rare and unusual pathologic entity. Especially, the peripheral curvilinear calcification on roentgenogram is fairly characteristic picture of the cysts. Recently, we have experienced in Severance Hospital one of the classical cases of the benign calcified adrenal cyst in 35 year old white mail patient who has had vague abdominal pain and palpable mass in right abdomen. It has been reviewed several reports for adrenal cysts and hoped that this report may call additional attention of radiological diagnosis on this unusual disease.

  8. Schizencephaly/congenital cerebral clefts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, H.; Naidich, T.P.

    1987-01-01

    Schizencephaly (from the Greek meaning ''split brain''), is a term developed in the 1940s to explain symmetric clefts in the brain seen at autopsy in children with histories of severe neurologic defects. Use of the term has been expanded to include a variety of cerebral clefts. A review of the experience at Children's Memorial Hospital as well as case materials made available to the authors are presented, including CT, MR imaging, and US findings. Theories of etiology and pathogenesis of these congenital clefts, associated anomalies, and the spectrum of appearance of these clefts are discussed

  9. Cervical chondrocutaneous branchial remnants--report of 17 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begovic, Ninoslav; Simic, Radoje; Vlahovic, Aleksandar; Kravljanac, Djordje; Djuricic, Slavisa; Mijovic, Tanja

    2014-11-01

    Cervical chondrocutaneous branchial remnants are congenital, benign and rare neck masses. These anomalies are limited in the literature, reported mostly as case reports. Cervical chondrocutaneous branchial remnant is always present at birth, and the lesion is usually unilateral. Understanding and treatment of cervical chondrocutaneous branchial remnants requires knowledge of the related embryology. From January 2005 to December 2008, 17 patients with mean age of 32 months (range from 2 months to 15 years) with CCBRs were treated at the Division of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Burns at the Institute for Mother and Child Health Care, Belgrade, Serbia. The following objections were recorded: sex, lesion side, surgical data, associated malformations and pathohistology findings. There were 7 females and 10 males, 4 with bilateral presences. Five children had associated anomalies, as follows: vesicoureteral reflux, atrial and ventricular septal defect, ventricular septal defect, branchiootorenal syndrome and preauricular sinus. There was a positive family history in one patient. Fifteen patients (88%) were treated with complete surgical excision and no connections with deep underlying structures of the neck were found. There were no complications at surgery. No recurrence was found during follow-up. Histopathology analysis revealed both, hyaline and elastic cartilage. Cervical chondrocutaneous branchial remnants are rare anomalies arising from branchial arch, probably originally from remnants of first or second arch. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice. From our experience, we suggest surgical treatment early in childhood because of esthetic reason, simplicity of the intervention and low complication rate. Also, the abdominal ultrasound and cardiac examination is recommended because of associated anomalies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Case series: Endoscopic management of fourth branchial arch anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, G J; Nichani, J R; Rothera, M P; Bruce, I A

    2013-05-01

    Fourth branchial arch anomalies represent branchial anomalies and present as recurrent neck infections or suppurative thyroiditis. Traditionally, management has consisted of treatment of the acute infection followed by hemithyroidectomy, surgical excision of the tract and obliteration of the opening in the pyriform fossa. Recently, it has been suggested that endoscopic obliteration of the sinus tract alone using laser, chemo or electrocautery is a viable alternative to open surgery. To determine the results of endoscopic obliteration of fourth branchial arch fistulae in children in our institute. Retrospective case note review of all children undergoing endoscopic treatment of fourth branchial arch anomalies in the last 7 years at the Royal Manchester Children's Hospital. Patient demographics, presenting symptoms, investigations and surgical technique were analysed. The primary and secondary outcome measures were resolution of recurrent infections and incidence of surgical complications, respectively. In total 5 cases were identified (4 females and 1 male) aged between 3 and 12 years. All presented with recurrent left sided neck abscesses. All children underwent a diagnostic laryngo-tracheo-bronchoscopy which identified a sinus in the apex of the left pyriform fossa. This was obliterated using electrocautery in 1 patient, CO₂ laser/Silver Nitrate chemocautery in 2 patients and Silver Nitrate chemocautery in a further 2 patients. There were no complications and no recurrences over a mean follow-up period of 25 months (range 11-41 months). Endoscopic obliteration of pyriform fossa sinus is a safe method for treating fourth branchial arch anomalies with no recurrence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Physiological and molecular ontogeny of branchial and extra-branchial urea excretion in posthatch rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Alex M; Wood, Chris M

    2016-02-01

    All teleost fish produce ammonia as a metabolic waste product. In embryos, ammonia excretion is limited by the chorion, and fish must detoxify ammonia by synthesizing urea via the ornithine urea cycle (OUC). Although urea is produced by embryos and larvae, urea excretion (J(urea)) is typically low until yolk sac absorption, increasing thereafter. The aim of this study was to determine the physiological and molecular characteristics of J(urea) by posthatch rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Following hatch, whole body urea concentration decreased over time, while J(urea) increased following yolk sac absorption. From 12 to 40 days posthatch (dph), extra-branchial routes of excretion accounted for the majority of J(urea), while the gills became the dominant site for J(urea) only after 55 dph. This represents the most delayed branchial ontogeny of any process studied to date. Urea transporter (UT) gene expression in the gills and skin increased over development, consistent with increases in branchial and extra-branchial J(urea). Following exposure to 25 mmol/l urea, the accumulation and subsequent elimination of exogenous urea was much greater at 55 dph than 12 dph, consistent with increased UT expression. Notably, UT gene expression in the gills of 55 dph larvae increased in response to high urea. In summary, there is a clear increase in urea transport capacity over posthatch development, despite a decrease in OUC activity. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Clefting in pumpkin balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginski, F.; Schur, W.

    NASA's effort to develop a large payload, high altitude, long duration balloon, the Ultra Long Duration Balloon, focuses on a pumpkin shape super-pressure design. It has been observed that a pumpkin balloon may be unable to pressurize into the desired cyclically symmetric equilibrium configuration, settling into a distorted, undesired stable state instead. Hoop stress considerations in the pumpkin design leads to choosing the lowest possible bulge radius, while robust deployment is favored by a large bulge radius. Some qualitative understanding of design aspects on undesired equilibria in pumpkin balloons has been obtained via small-scale balloon testing. Poorly deploying balloons have clefts, but most gores away from the cleft deploy uniformly. In this paper, we present models for pumpkin balloons with clefts. Long term success of the pumpkin balloon for NASA requires a thorough understanding of the phenomenon of multiple stable equilibria and means for quantitative assessment of measures that prevent their occurrence. This paper attempts to determine numerical thresholds of design parameters that distinguish between properly deploying designs and improperly deploying designs by analytically investigating designs in the vicinity of criticality. Design elements which may trigger the onset undesired equilibria and remedial measures that ensure deployment are discussed.

  13. Epidermoid cyst post dermofasciectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Henry, Francis P

    2010-01-01

    We report the finding of an unusual presentation of an epidermoid cyst 3 years following dermofasciectomy for Dupuytren\\'s disease. Epidermoid cysts remain a rare entity in the palmoplanter distribution but also a very unusual finding within the confines of a full thickness skin graft.

  14. (unicameral) bone cysts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • September 2007. When encountering a radiologically benign lucent bone lesion in a child, a simple bone cyst is a reasonable diagnostic consideration. Simple or unicameral bone cysts are expansile, serous-fluid-containing defects, that are not true neoplasms. Peak age ranges between 3 ...

  15. Congenital Hepatic Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Recinos

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital hepatic cyst is a rare and nonsymptomatic condition in infants and children. Its incidence is 2.5% in the postnatal life with a much lower incidence in the prenatal period. Incidental finding on antenatal imaging is the most common presentation. We present a case of a newborn in whom fetal ultrasound detected a cyst within the fetal liver. Postnatal imaging revealed a liver cyst in the right lobe of the liver, with no other intrahepatic structure affected. Liver function tests were abnormal, but the patient was asymptomatic. Posterior follow-up imaging showed a minor decrease in size. Management of congenital hepatic cyst is usually conservative, done with periodic ultrasound monitoring. However, surgical treatment is the mainstay of treatment when hydrops, progressive enlargement, hemorrhage, torsion, or compression of adjacent structures occurs. Malignant transformation can occur, but it is extremely rare. Partial or total removal of the cyst is the preferred treatment in neonates with a large lesion.

  16. Splenic epithelial cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousuf, M.; Jalali, U.

    2011-01-01

    Cysts of spleen are rare entities. Congenital splenic cysts are even more uncommon comprising of only 10% of benign non-parasitic cysts. We report a case of 22 years old female who presented with history of 2 years abdominal pain and gradual distension. Ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) both were suggestive of splenic cyst. Laboratory tests show thrombocytopenia with platelets count of 97000 per cubic millimeter and anemia with hemoglobin 8.7 gram per deciliter. Serological tests were negative for parasitic infection. Splenectomy was done and the weight of the spleen was found to be 1.5 kilogram. Histopathological findings are consistent with splenic epithelial cyst. The aetiology, diagnostic modalities and treatment options are discussed in the case report. (author)

  17. Multiple cerebral hydatid cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banzo, J.; Pina, J.I.; Abos, M.D.; Rios, G.; Garcia, D.; Marin, F.; Diaz, F.J.

    1984-12-01

    A 39-year-old woman was admitted to hospital with headaches, vomiting, psychic impairment and diplopia. Three hydatid cysts of the lung had been previously removed. An avascular mass in the left hemisphere with left-to-right displacement of the anterior cerebral arteries was noted during a brain angioscintigraphy. A cerebralthrombosis (CT) brain scan showed two cystic lesions situated in the left-frontal and occipital regions. A CT abdominal scan showed multiple cysts in the liver, spleen and both kidneys. At operation, two brain cysts were totally extirpated without rupture. The definite pathological diagnosis was secondry hydatid cysts. The headaches, vomiting and diplopia were persistent in the post-operative period. Seven days after the operation, a CT brain scan showed an infratenrorial cyst. The patient rejected any surgical intervention.

  18. Asyndromic Bilateral Transverse Facial Cleft

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-04-23

    of this atypical cleft is unknown although the frequency ... on Tuesday, April 23, 2013, IP: 41.132.185.55] || Click here to download free Android application for this journal ... Facial cleft remains a source of social anxiety and in the past has lead ...

  19. Genetic determinants of facial clefting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jugessur, Astanand; Shi, Min; Gjessing, Håkon Kristian

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Facial clefts are common birth defects with a strong genetic component. To identify fetal genetic risk factors for clefting, 1536 SNPs in 357 candidate genes were genotyped in two population-based samples from Scandinavia (Norway: 562 case-parent and 592 control-parent triads; Denmark...

  20. CLEFT PALATE. FOUNDATIONS OF SPEECH PATHOLOGY SERIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RUTHERFORD, DAVID; WESTLAKE, HAROLD

    DESIGNED TO PROVIDE AN ESSENTIAL CORE OF INFORMATION, THIS BOOK TREATS NORMAL AND ABNORMAL DEVELOPMENT, STRUCTURE, AND FUNCTION OF THE LIPS AND PALATE AND THEIR RELATIONSHIPS TO CLEFT LIP AND CLEFT PALATE SPEECH. PROBLEMS OF PERSONAL AND SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT, HEARING, AND SPEECH IN CLEFT LIP OR CLEFT PALATE INDIVIDUALS ARE DISCUSSED. NASAL RESONANCE…

  1. The canonical Wnt signaling activator, R-spondin2, regulates craniofacial patterning and morphogenesis within the branchial arch through ectodermal-mesenchymal interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yong-Ri; Turcotte, Taryn J.; Crocker, Alison L.; Han, Xiang Hua; Yoon, Jeong Kyo

    2011-01-01

    R-spondins are a recently characterized family of secreted proteins that activate Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Herein, we determine R-spondin2 (Rspo2) function in craniofacial development in mice. Mice lacking a functional Rspo2 gene exhibit craniofacial abnormalities such as mandibular hypoplasia, maxillary and mandibular skeletal deformation, and cleft palate. We found that loss of the mouse Rspo2 gene significantly disrupted Wnt/β-catenin signaling and gene expression within the first branchial arch (BA1). Rspo2, which is normally expressed in BA1 mesenchymal cells, regulates gene expression through a unique ectoderm-mesenchyme interaction loop. The Rspo2 protein, potentially in combination with ectoderm-derived Wnt ligands, up-regulates Msx1 and Msx2 expression within mesenchymal cells. In contrast, Rspo2 regulates expression of the Dlx5, Dlx6, and Hand2 genes in mesenchymal cells via inducing expression of their upstream activator, Endothelin1 (Edn1), within ectodermal cells. Loss of Rspo2 also causes increased cell apoptosis, especially within the aboral (or caudal) domain of the BA1, resulting in hypoplasia of the BA1. Severely reduced expression of Fgf8, a survival factor for mesenchymal cells, in the ectoderm of Rspo2−/− embryos is likely responsible for increased cell apoptosis. Additionally, we found that cleft palate in Rspo2−/− mice is not associated with defects intrinsic to the palatal shelves. A possible cause of cleft palate is a delay of proper palatal shelf elevation that may result from the small mandible and a failure of lowering the tongue. Thus, our study identifies Rspo2 as a mesenchyme-derived factor that plays critical roles in regulating BA1 patterning and morphogenesis through ectodermal-mesenchymal interaction and a novel genetic factor for cleft palate. PMID:21237142

  2. Recurrent neck infection with branchial arch fistula in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madana, J; Yolmo, Deeke; Kalaiarasi, R; Gopalakrishnan, S; Saxena, S K; Krishnapriya, S

    2011-09-01

    Acute suppurative neck infections associated with third or fourth branchial arch fistulas are frequently recurrent. Third and fourth branchial arch anomalies are much less common than those of second arch and usually present with left thyroid lobe inflammation. The authors present their experience with 15 cases of pyriform sinus fistulae (PSF) of third branchial arch origin and 3 cases of fourth arch origin, all of which presented as recurrent neck infection mainly on the left side. A retrospective review of 18 cases of third and fourth arch fistulae treated at JIPMER from 2005 to 2010. This study includes 18 patients with PSF diagnosed by the existence of fistulous tract radiologically and intraoperatively with pathological correlation. Neck exploration with excision of tract and left hemithyroidectomy was performed in all cases. The patients consisted of 7 males and 11 females, and the ages ranged from 3 to 15 years. All of them presented with recurrent episodes of neck infection. Investigations performed include computed tomography (CT) fistulography, barium swallow and ultrasound which were useful in delineating pyriform sinus fistulous tract preoperatively. All cases were on the left side and the fistula was identified by barium swallow in 14 cases (80%), while intraoperative and pathologic confirmation of the tract was possible in all cases (100%). Neck exploration with an emphasis on complete exposure of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and exposure of the pyriform sinus opening to facilitate complete fistulous tract excision with left hemithyroidectomy was successful in all patients. A follow up period of 1-3 years showed no recurrence. Recurrent neck infection in a child should alert the physician to the possibility of an underlying pyriform sinus fistula of branchial origin and CT fistulography should be performed after the resolution of the neck infection to delineate the tract anatomically. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  3. Solitary (unicameral) bone cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struhl, S.; Edelson, C.; Pritzker, H.; Seimon, L.P.; Dorfman, H.D.; Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY

    1989-01-01

    The fallen fragment sign is a prominent radiologic feature in a minority of cases of unicameral bone cyst (20% in this series). This sign is always associated with pathologic fracture. Intramedullary fracture fragments may be single or multiple and may or may not be entirely dislodged from overlying periosteum. The finding appears limited to unicameral bone cysts in patients with open physes. When present, the fallen fragment is a pathognomonic finding as it defines the interior of the cyst as nonsolid. (orig./GDG)

  4. Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Seung Won; Seong, Han Yu; Roh, Sung Woo

    2013-01-01

    Spinal extradural arachnoid cyst (SEAC) is a rare disease and uncommon cause of compressive myelopathy. The etiology remains still unclear. We experienced 2 cases of SEACs and reviewed the cases and previous literatures. A 59-year-old man complained of both leg radiating pain and paresthesia for 4 years. His MRI showed an extradural cyst from T12 to L3 and we performed cyst fenestration and repaired the dural defect with tailored laminectomy. Another 51-year-old female patient visited our cli...

  5. Branchial Cilia and Sperm Flagella Recruit Distinct Axonemal Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Alu; Shiba, Kogiku; Cai, Chunhua; Inaba, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella have highly conserved 9 + 2 structures. They are functionally diverged to play cell-type-specific roles even in a multicellular organism. Although their structural components are therefore believed to be common, few studies have investigated the molecular diversity of the protein components of the cilia and flagella in a single organism. Here we carried out a proteomic analysis and compared protein components between branchial cilia and sperm flagella in a marine invertebrate chordate, Ciona intestinalis. Distinct feature of protein recruitment in branchial cilia and sperm flagella has been clarified; (1) Isoforms of α- and β-tubulins as well as those of actins are distinctly used in branchial cilia or sperm flagella. (2) Structural components, such as dynein docking complex, tektins and an outer dense fiber protein, are used differently by the cilia and flagella. (3) Sperm flagella are specialized for the cAMP- and Ca2+-dependent regulation of outer arm dynein and for energy metabolism by glycolytic enzymes. Our present study clearly demonstrates that flagellar or ciliary proteins are properly recruited according to their function and stability, despite their apparent structural resemblance and conservation. PMID:25962172

  6. Odontogenic Cysts - An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayyer, Namita V; Macluskey, Michaelina; Keys, William

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to discuss the clinical features, radiological assessment, histopathology and management of a variety of odontogenic cysts. It also highlights the reclassification of odontogenic keratocysts to keratocystic odontogenic tumours.

  7. Spinal extradural arachnoid cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Rahimizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Extradural arachnoid cysts (EACs are rare causes of spinal cord compression and cauda equina. These benign lesions appear in the literature mainly as single case reports. In this article, we present the largest series found in literature, with four new cases of spinal extradural arachnoid cysts. The characteristic imaging features, details of surgical steps and strategies to prevent postoperative kyphosis in this cystic pathology will be discussed.

  8. Multiple lymphatic cervical cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, J.; Piotrowski, S.; Zalewska-Rzezniczak, I.

    1994-01-01

    Authors described a case of 60 year-old woman with multiple lateral neck cysts. 4 cysts were located in the supraclavicular region of lateral neck triangle. During histopathological studies of postoperative specimens a cystic hygroma diagnosis was established. The fact, that cystic lymphangioma occurred in an adult woman, was interesting. The authors stress the necessity of preoperative evaluation of tumor size in view of the possibility of its penetration into the thorax. The CT examination may be useful in these cases. (author)

  9. Gingival Cyst of Newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moda, Aman

    2011-01-01

    Gingival cyst of newborn is an oral mucosal lesion of transient nature. Although it is very common lesion within 3 to 6 weeks of birth, it is very rare to visualize the lesion thereafter. Presented here is a case report of gingival cyst, which was visible just after 15 days of birth. Clinical diagnoses of these conditions are important in order to avoid unnecessary therapeutic procedure and provide suitable information to parents about the nature of the lesion.

  10. Psychological issues in cleft lip and cleft palate

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa Avinash; Devare Shibani; Ghanshani Jyoti

    2009-01-01

    Vocational and social issues affect rehabilitation and development of patients with cleft lip and cleft palate. However, psychological problems like lowered self esteem and difficulties in social interaction have also been noted in them. Not many pediatric reconstructive surgery teams have a psychiatrist on their panel. It is likely that psychological problems are higher in incidence than literature actually suggests. Hence it is very essential that such cases are identified by the surgical t...

  11. Oral Clefts and Academic Performance in Adolescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Nicola G; Pedersen, Dorthe A; Pedersen, Jacob K

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:   Early life exposure to anesthesia and surgery is suspected to associate with cognitive impairment later in life. We compared academic achievement among adolescents with cleft lip only (CL), cleft palate only (CP), and cleft lip and cleft palate (CLP) with a noncleft control group to ......:   Oral cleft type rather than number and timing of anesthesia and operations associate to poorer academic performance. Although a potential neurotoxic effect due to anesthetic agents is not reflected in the data, it cannot be completely excluded.......OBJECTIVE:   Early life exposure to anesthesia and surgery is suspected to associate with cognitive impairment later in life. We compared academic achievement among adolescents with cleft lip only (CL), cleft palate only (CP), and cleft lip and cleft palate (CLP) with a noncleft control group...

  12. Spinal dermoid cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Yoshihisa; Makita, Yasumasa; Nabeshima, Sachio; Tei, Taikyoku; Keyaki, Atsushi; Takahashi, Jun; Kawamura, Junichiro

    1987-01-01

    A 25-year-old male complained of intermittent, sharp pains about the left eye and in the left side of the chest. Neurological examination revealed paresthesia and impaired perception of touch and pin-pricks in the dermatomes of Th8 and Th9 on the left side. In all four extremities, the muscle stretch reflexes were equal and slightly hyperactive, without weakness or sensory deficits. Metrizamide myelography showed defective filling at the level between the upper 8th and 9th thoracic vertebrae. The lesion was also demonstrated by computed tomography (CT) scan performed 1 hour later, appearing as an oval, radiolucent mass in the left dorsal spinal canal, which compressed the spinal cord forward and toward the right. Serial sections of the spinal canal revealed the lesion to be partly filled with contrast medium. Repeat CT scan 24 hours after metrizamide myelography showed more contrast medium in the periphery of the lesion, giving it a doughnut-shaped appearance. At surgery a smooth-surfaced cyst containing sebum and white hair was totally removed from the intradural extramedullary space. The histological diagnosis was dermoid cyst. There have been a few reported cases of intracranial epidermoid cyst in which filling of the cyst was suggested on metrizamide CT myelography. These findings may complicate the differential diagnosis of arachnoid cyst and dermoid or epidermoid cyst when only CT is used. (author)

  13. Pancreas and cyst segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, Konstantin; Gutenko, Ievgeniia; Nadeem, Saad; Kaufman, Arie

    2016-03-01

    Accurate segmentation of abdominal organs from medical images is an essential part of surgical planning and computer-aided disease diagnosis. Many existing algorithms are specialized for the segmentation of healthy organs. Cystic pancreas segmentation is especially challenging due to its low contrast boundaries, variability in shape, location and the stage of the pancreatic cancer. We present a semi-automatic segmentation algorithm for pancreata with cysts. In contrast to existing automatic segmentation approaches for healthy pancreas segmentation which are amenable to atlas/statistical shape approaches, a pancreas with cysts can have even higher variability with respect to the shape of the pancreas due to the size and shape of the cyst(s). Hence, fine results are better attained with semi-automatic steerable approaches. We use a novel combination of random walker and region growing approaches to delineate the boundaries of the pancreas and cysts with respective best Dice coefficients of 85.1% and 86.7%, and respective best volumetric overlap errors of 26.0% and 23.5%. Results show that the proposed algorithm for pancreas and pancreatic cyst segmentation is accurate and stable.

  14. Simple bone cyst of mandible mimicking periapical cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hs, Charan Babu; Rai, Bhagawan Das; Nair, Manju A; Astekar, Madhusudan S

    2012-05-29

    Simple bone cysts (SBC) are pseudocysts occurring less commonly in the maxillofacial region. The uncertain and unclear etiopathogenesis led to numerous synonyms to refer this particular cyst. These cysts are devoid of an epithelial lining and are usually empty or contain blood or straw-colored fluid. In jaws initially it mimics a periapical cyst and later can lead to cortical bone expansion warranting for radical approach, which is seldom required. SBC is predominantly diagnosed in first two decades of life. Here we report a case of solitary bone cyst mimicking a periapical cyst of a mandibular molar in a 37-year-old patient.

  15. Simple bone cyst of mandible mimicking periapical cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charan Babu HS

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Simple bone cysts (SBC are pseudocysts occurring less commonly in the maxillofacial region. The uncertain and unclear etiopathogenesis led to numerous synonyms to refer this particular cyst. These cysts are devoid of an epithelial lining and are usually empty or contain blood or straw-colored fluid. In jaws initially it mimics a periapical cyst and later can lead to cortical bone expansion warranting for radical approach, which is seldom required. SBC is predominantly diagnosed in first two decades of life. Here we report a case of solitary bone cyst mimicking a periapical cyst of a mandibular molar in a 37-year-old patient.

  16. Submental epidermoid cysts in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Rafal; Zakrzewska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Epidermoid cysts are lesions, which form as a result of implantation of the epidermis in the layers of the dermis or the mucous membrane. The lesions are rare in adults with 7% occurring in the head and neck area and most often located in the submental region. In children population submental epidermoid cysts are extremely rare. The differential diagnosis of the lesions is necessary as it affects the choice of treatment methods. Among the pathological conditions occurring in that region, salivary retention cyst (ranula), thyroglossal duct cyst, vascular lymphatic malformation (cystic hygroma), median neck cyst, lymphadenopathy, thyroid gland tumor, laryngeal cyst, epidermoid and dermoid cysts, submental abscess, sialolithiasis and salivary gland inflammation should be considered. The authors of the present report demonstrate two cases of submental epidermoid cysts in children. Differential diagnosis in case of suspected submental epidermoid cyst in a child with proposed clinical practice and literature review is provided.

  17. Classification of spondylolytic clefts in patients with spondylolysis or isthmic spondylolisthesis using positional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niggemann, Pascal; Kuchta, Johannes; Hadizadeh, Dariusch; Pieper, Claus Christian; Schild, Hans Heinz

    2017-02-01

    Background Posterior instability is a pathologic movement occurring in the spondylolytic cleft. Purpose To present a new classification system for the evaluation of spondylolytic cleft by positional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and determine the prevalence of the different types. Material and Methods A total of 176 segments of the lumbar spine with spondylolysis or isthmic spondylolisthesis were examined using positional MRI. Scans were obtained in neutral sitting, flexion, and extension positions. No visible movement in the cleft was defined as type A, fluid displaced into the cleft as type BI, displacement of the flava ligaments at the level of the cleft as type BII, and intraspinal cysts arising from the spondylolytic cleft as type BIII. The movements were characterized by a radiologist and a neurosurgeon experienced in positional MRI. Clinical findings were correlated with the different types of instability. Results A high agreement was found between the two observers. In total, 131 segments were characterized as type A, six as type BI, 24 as type BII, and 10 as type BIII. In five segments, the type differed between the right and the left side. Two patients had a mixed type BI/II, another two patients had a mixed type BII/III, and one patient had a mixed type BI/III. Patients with type BII and BIII instabilities suffered more often from radicular symptoms compared to patients without any instability. Conclusion The presented classification might help to better understand and study changes encountered in the spondylolytic cleft in patients with spondylolysis and isthmic spondylolisthesis using positional MRI.

  18. Cleft deformities (lip and palate)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    hospital between February 2008 and February 2009, seventeen neonates presented with ..... are low necessitating very large sample sizes often limited by resources. ... Bianco-Davila F: Incidence of cleft lip and palate in northeast of Mexico.

  19. Primary Posterior Mediastinum Hydatid Cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.; Eid, A. F.; Sheikh, M. Y.; Yiannakou, N.

    2014-01-01

    Primary posterior mediastinal hydatid cyst is a serious health problem for the Mediterranean countries. We diagnosed a case of a 46-year-old female with a primary posterior mediastinum hydatid cyst on CT and MRI. It was provisionally identified as either a hydatid cyst or bronchogenic cyst or neuroenteric cyst. CT guided aspiration with 18 gauge needle confirmed as hydatid sand. This is very rare in this population but it should be kept in mind when one is looking at any cyst in the posterior mediastinum. (author)

  20. Ovarian chocolate cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimura, Kazuro; Ishida, Tetsuya; Takemori, Masayuki; Kitagaki, Hajime; Tanaka, Yutaka; Yamasaki, Katsuhito; Shimizu, Tadafumi; Kono, Michio.

    1988-01-01

    Accurate preoperative staging of ovarian chocolate cysts is very important because recent hormonal therapy has been effective in low stage patients. However, it has been difficult to assess the preoperative stage of ovarian chocolate cysts. We evaluated the diagnostic potential of MRI in preoperative staging of 15 overian chocolate cysts. It was well known that the older the ovarian chocolate cyst was the more iron content it had. We examined the iron contents effect on T1 and T2 relaxation times in surgically confirmed chocolate cysts (stage II: 3 cases, stage III: 3 cases and stage IV: 9 cases by AFS classification, 1985) employing the 0.15-T MR system and 200 MHz spectrometer. There was a positive linear relation between T1 of the lesion using the MR system (T1) and T1 of the resected contents using the spectrometer (sp-T1); r = 0.93. The same relation was revealed between T2 and sp-T2; r = 0.87. It was indicated that T1 and T2 using the MR system was accurate. There was a negative linear relation between T1 and the iron contents ( r = -0.81) but no relation between T2 and the iron contents. T1 was 412 ± 91 msec for stage II, 356 ± 126 msec for stage III and 208 ± 30 msec for stage IV. T1 for stage IV was shorter than that for stage II and III, statistically significant differences were noted (p < 0.05). Thus, T1 was useful in differentiating a fresh from an old ovarian chocolate cyst. We concluded that T1 relaxation time using the MR system was useful for the staging of an ovarian chocolate cyst without surgery. (author)

  1. Secondary bone grafting for alveolar cleft in children with cleft lip or cleft lip and palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, J.; Li, C.; Zhang, Q.; Wu, G.; Deacon, S.A.; Chen, J.; Hu, H.; Zou, S.; Ye, Q.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Secondary alveolar bone grafting has been widely used to reconstruct alveolar cleft. However, there is still some controversy. OBJECTIVES: To compare the effectiveness and safety of different secondary bone grafting methods. SEARCH STRATEGY: The final electronic and handsearches were

  2. Simple bone cyst of mandible mimicking periapical cyst

    OpenAIRE

    Charan Babu HS; Bhagawan Das Rai; Manju A. Nair; Madhusudan S. Astekar

    2012-01-01

    Simple bone cysts (SBC) are pseudocysts occurring less commonly in the maxillofacial region. The uncertain and unclear etiopathogenesis led to numerous synonyms to refer this particular cyst. These cysts are devoid of an epithelial lining and are usually empty or contain blood or straw-colored fluid. In jaws initially it mimics a periapical cyst and later can lead to cortical bone expansion warranting for radical approach, which is seldom required. SBC is predominantly diagnosed in first two ...

  3. The "Double" Tessier 7 Cleft: An Unusual Presentation of a Transverse Facial Cleft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveendran, Janani A; Chao, Jerry W; Rogers, Gary F; Boyajian, Michael J

    2018-07-01

    Congenital macrostomia, or Tessier number 7 cleft, is a rare craniofacial anomaly. We present a unique patient with bilateral macrostomia that consisted of a "double" transverse cleft on the left side and a single transverse cleft on the right side. A staged reconstructive approach was used to repair the "double" left-sided clefts. This staged technique produced a satisfactory aesthetic and functional outcome.

  4. Bright Promise for Your Child with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Eugene T.; Berlin, Asa J.

    Intended for parents of children with cleft lip and cleft palate, the booklet provides an overview of the condition. Addressed are the following topics (sample subtopics in parentheses): prenatal development and birth defects (facial development); possible causes of cleft lip/cleft palate (common misconceptions, genetic factors, environmental…

  5. Intrasellar abscess simultaning a Rathke's clef cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Toshihiko; Murakawa, Takatsugu; Iwai, Tomohiko; Hirata, Toshifumi; Sakai, Noboru

    1983-08-01

    Both symptomatic Rathke's cleft cyst and intrasellar abscess are exceedingly rare. We present a case of intrasellar abscess developed in a Rathke's cleft cyst. A 60-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with complaints of polyuria, polydipsia, headache, and remittent fever. On admission, his neurological and ophthalmological examination was normal. Panhypopituitarism was revealed by endocrine testing. Plain-skull X-ray films showed no abnormalities, but a CT scan showed a small cystic lesion with a ring-like enhancement in the sella turcica and paranasal sinusitis. Further sagittal reconstruction of the CT scan demonstrated that the diaphragma sellae protruded upwards and that the pituitary stalk was markedly enhanced and enlarged. After the sinusitis improved, transsphenoidal surgery was carried out. Approximately 1 ml of the purulent contents were aspirated from the intrasellar region. The postoperative course was uneventful. A histological examination of the abscess wall revealed a ciliated columnar epithelium and inflammatory-cell infiltration beneath the epithelium.

  6. Choledochal cyst - three case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, E.G.; Assamy, W.T.; Abbud, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    Three cases of choledochal cyst and a brief review of the pertinent literature are presented. Considerations regarding etiopathogenesis, difficulties in diagnosis, and treatment for the different types of cysts are made. (author)

  7. Recurrent thyroid abscess - Is it a fourth branchial archanomaly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, A A; Pandya, V K; Chougule, Sachin; Nair, Unnikrishnnan

    2006-04-01

    Branchial fistulae are of congenital origin(6) and consists of skin lined tract opening internally at junction of cartilaginous and bony meatus in case of 1(st) arch anomaly, tonsillar fossa in case of 2(nd) arch, while 3(rd) and 4(th) arch sinuses have internal opening at level of pyriform sinus or below. A complete tract of 3(rd) or 4(th) arch fistulae is yet to be described. Fourth arch fistulae(1) have a distinct clinical pattern of internal opening at pyriform apex, are left sided and associated with suppurative thyroiditis(3), they manifest at a younger age and treatment involves excision of tract with ipsilateral thyroid lobectomy.

  8. Unicameral (simple) bone cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Rafath; Eady, John L

    2006-09-01

    Since their original description by Virchow, simple bone cysts have been studied repeatedly. Although these defects are not true neoplasms, simple bone cysts may create major structural defects of the humerus, femur, and os calcis. They are commonly discovered incidentally when x-rays are taken for other reasons or on presentation due to a pathologic fracture. Various treatment strategies have been employed, but the only reliable predictor of success of any treatment strategy is the age of the patient; those being older than 10 years of age heal their cysts at a higher rate than those under age 10. The goal of management is the formation of a bone that can withstand the stresses of use by the patient without evidence of continued bone destruction as determined by serial radiographic follow-up. The goal is not a normal-appearing x-ray, but a functionally stable bone.

  9. Cleft Lip – A Comprehensive Review

    OpenAIRE

    Shkoukani, Mahdi A.; Chen, Michael; Vong, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Orofacial clefts comprise a range of congenital deformities and are the most common head and neck congenital malformation. Clefting has significant psychological and socio- economic effects on patient quality of life and require a multidisciplinary team approach for management. The complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors play a significant role in the incidence and cause of clefting. In this review, the embryology, classification, epidemiology, and etiology of cleft lip ar...

  10. Bone cysts: unicameral and aneurysmal bone cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascard, E; Gomez-Brouchet, A; Lambot, K

    2015-02-01

    Simple and aneurysmal bone cysts are benign lytic bone lesions, usually encountered in children and adolescents. Simple bone cyst is a cystic, fluid-filled lesion, which may be unicameral (UBC) or partially separated. UBC can involve all bones, but usually the long bone metaphysis and otherwise primarily the proximal humerus and proximal femur. The classic aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is an expansive and hemorrhagic tumor, usually showing characteristic translocation. About 30% of ABCs are secondary, without translocation; they occur in reaction to another, usually benign, bone lesion. ABCs are metaphyseal, excentric, bulging, fluid-filled and multicameral, and may develop in all bones of the skeleton. On MRI, the fluid level is evocative. It is mandatory to distinguish ABC from UBC, as prognosis and treatment are different. UBCs resolve spontaneously between adolescence and adulthood; the main concern is the risk of pathologic fracture. Treatment in non-threatening forms consists in intracystic injection of methylprednisolone. When there is a risk of fracture, especially of the femoral neck, surgery with curettage, filling with bone substitute or graft and osteosynthesis may be required. ABCs are potentially more aggressive, with a risk of bone destruction. Diagnosis must systematically be confirmed by biopsy, identifying soft-tissue parts, as telangiectatic sarcoma can mimic ABC. Intra-lesional sclerotherapy with alcohol is an effective treatment. In spinal ABC and in aggressive lesions with a risk of fracture, surgical treatment should be preferred, possibly after preoperative embolization. The risk of malignant transformation is very low, except in case of radiation therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Aspiration sclerotherapy of hepatic cysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnands, T.F.M.

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic cysts are fluid-filled lesions in the liver that generally arise as congenital anomalies. Prevalence is estimated between 3 and 18%. Overall, cysts are benign and asymptomatic. However, hepatic cysts can increase to a volume of several liters as a result of continuous fluid production by the

  12. Infected orbital cyst following exenteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, A; Hirsh, A; Rosner, M; Rosen, N

    1996-09-01

    An orbital cyst is a rare complication of orbital trauma and exenteration. Infections of such cysts have not been described, and are potentially dangerous unless treated immediately. The authors describe a case of delayed treatment of such an infected cyst, which resolved following surgical drainage. The potentially hazardous outcome makes knowledge of such cases important.

  13. SEBACEOUS CYSTS MINOR SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gusti Ayu Agung Laksemi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Minor surgery is small surgery or localized example cut ulcers and boils, cyst excision, and suturing. Somethings that need to be considered in the preparation of the surgery is minor tools, operating rooms and operating tables, lighting, maintenance of tools and equipment, sterilization and desinfection equipment, preparation of patients and anesthesia. In general cysts is walled chamber that consist of fluid, cells and the remaining cells. Cysts are formed not due to inflammation although then be inflamed. Lining of the cysts wall is composed of fibrous tissue and usually coated epithelial cells or endothelial. Cysts formed by dilated glands and closed channels, glands, blood vessels, lymph channels or layers of the epidermis. Contents of the cysts wall consists of the results is serum, lymph, sweat sebum, epithelial cells, the stratum corneum, and hair. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  14. Dissection and Flat-mounting of the Threespine Stickleback Branchial Skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Nicholas A; Miller, Craig T

    2016-05-07

    The posterior pharyngeal segments of the vertebrate head give rise to the branchial skeleton, the primary site of food processing in fish. The morphology of the fish branchial skeleton is matched to a species' diet. Threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus) have emerged as a model system to study the genetic and developmental basis of evolved differences in a variety of traits. Marine populations of sticklebacks have repeatedly colonized countless new freshwater lakes and creeks. Adaptation to the new diet in these freshwater environments likely underlies a series of craniofacial changes that have evolved repeatedly in independently derived freshwater populations. These include three major patterning changes to the branchial skeleton: reductions in the number and length of gill raker bones, increases in pharyngeal tooth number, and increased branchial bone lengths. Here we describe a detailed protocol to dissect and flat-mount the internal branchial skeleton in threespine stickleback fish. Dissection of the entire three-dimensional branchial skeleton and mounting it flat into a largely two-dimensional prep allows for the easy visualization and quantification of branchial skeleton morphology. This dissection method is inexpensive, fast, relatively easy, and applicable to a wide variety of fish species. In sticklebacks, this efficient method allows the quantification of skeletal morphology in genetic crosses to map genomic regions controlling craniofacial patterning.

  15. Unusual case of cleft hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahasrabudhe Parag

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a six-year-old male child with cleft hand deformity involving the dominant right hand. It was a rare case of atypical cleft hand with no missing tissue but cleft extending to metacarpal level and associated hypoplasia of thumb and index finger. As per Manske′s classification of cleft hand our patient belongs to the Class III variety. There was associated malposition of the index finger with absence of first web space and syndactly of thumb and index finger at the metacarpal level. A modified Snow-Littler procedure was planned. The surgical plan involved closure of cleft, release of thumb and index finger syndactly and reconstruction of the first web space. The functional outcome was good considering hypoplasia of the index finger and thumb. Depending upon the function of the thumb tendon transfers can be planned to augment thumb function at a later date along with correction of rotational deformities of the index and middle finger.

  16. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate Surgery: Malpractice Litigation Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin, Grant A; Brietzke, Scott E

    2017-01-01

      This study examined malpractice claims related to cleft lip and cleft palate surgery to identify common allegations and injuries and reviewed financial outcomes.   The WestlawNext legal database was analyzed for all malpractice lawsuits and settlements related to the surgical repair of cleft lip and palate.   Inclusion criteria included patients undergoing surgical repair of a primary cleft lip or palate or revision for complications of previous surgery. Data evaluated included patient demographics, type of operation performed, plaintiff allegation, nature of injury, and litigation outcomes.   A total of 36 cases were identified, with 12 unique cases from 1981 to 2006 meeting the inclusion criteria. Six cases (50%) were decided by a jury and six by settlement. Five cases involved complications related to the specific surgery, and the other seven were associated with any surgery and perioperative care of children and adults. Cleft palate repair (50%) was the most frequently litigated surgery. Postoperative negligent supervision was the most common allegation (42%) and resulted in a payout in each case (mean = $3,126,032). Death (42%) and brain injury (25%) were the most frequent injuries reported. Financial awards were made in nine cases (after adjusting for inflation, mean = $2,470,552, range = $0 to $7,704,585). The awards were significantly larger for brain injury than other outcomes ($4,675,395 versus $1,368,131 after adjusting for inflation, P = .0101).   Malpractice litigation regarding cleft lip and palate surgery is uncommon. However, significant financial awards involving perioperative brain injury have been reported.

  17. Epidermoid cyst in the kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Saral; Thakur, Sudeep; Menon, Santosh; Desai, Sangeeta B

    2011-09-01

    We report an extremely rare case of an epidermoid cyst in the kidney of a 74-year-old man who had presented with painless hematuria. Radiologic examination revealed a cyst in the kidney that was thought to be neoplastic. The patient underwent surgery to remove the cyst, and we received the nephrectomy specimen. A 6-cm cyst with no solid areas was seen. On histologic examination, this was an epidermoid cyst. We reviewed the published data and discuss the possible theories of origin of this rare condition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Congenital mucous retention cyst of the anterior hard palate! The first case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Satya Ranjan; Priyadarshini, Smita; Pati, Abhishek Ranjan; Bhuyan, Sanat Kumar; Panigrahi, Rajat G

    2014-10-01

    Children may be born with birth defects, the most common being oro-facial clefts and fissural cysts. A well circumscribed pedunculated soft tissue growth that occurs congenitally is known as congenital epulis of the newborn or 'Neuman's Tumour' as described in the literature. It is a rare lesion and the diagnosis has to be confirmed histologically. We present a rare case of a 7-year-old child with a congenital growth in the pre-maxillary region of the anterior hard palate clinically diagnosed as congenital epulis however, histologically confirmed as a mucous retention cyst. An elaborate clinical differential diagnosis is discussed. The anterior hard palate is devoid of salivary glands and the presence of a mucous retention cyst in the area is suggestive of ectopic salivary gland tissue and in a child manifesting at birth is probably the first case to be reported in the English literature.

  19. Protection against suspended sand: the function of the branchial membrane in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vooys, C. G. N.

    2006-09-01

    Blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis) living in estuaries have to cope with varying concentrations of suspended sand. Sand flowing through the inhalant siphons comes into the infrabranchial chamber. The inhalant siphon can be partially closed by the branchial membrane. As a result the inward flow decreases, and suspended sand sinks and can be eliminated. Experiments with mussels from three ecologically different locations showed about the same response of the branchial membrane on contact with suspended sand. The presence and function of the branchial membrane appears to be an adaptation of mussels to their estuarine environment.

  20. Odonto calcifying cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini Aswath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC is reported to be associated with odontoma in 24% of cases. Separation of the cases of calcifying odontogenic cyst associated with odontoma (COCaO may lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this lesion. The literature revealed 52 cases of COCaO. The male to female ratio was 1:1.9, with a mean age of 16 years. Most common location was the maxilla (61.5%. The radiographic appearance of most cases (80.5% was a well-defined, mixed radiolucent-radiopaque lesion. Histologically, the lesions consisted of a single large cyst with tooth-like structures as an integral part, giving the impression of a single lesion. In addition to the unique histologic features, differences in gender and distribution were found between the cases of COCaO and those of simple COC. COCaO may be regarded as a separate entity and classified as a benign, mixed odontogenic tumor. The term odontocalcifying odontogenic cyst is suggested.

  1. Odonto calcifying cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswath, Nalini; Mastan, Kader; Manikandan, Tirupathi; Samuel, Gigi

    2013-01-01

    The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) is reported to be associated with odontoma in 24% of cases. Separation of the cases of calcifying odontogenic cyst associated with odontoma (COCaO) may lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this lesion. The literature revealed 52 cases of COCaO. The male to female ratio was 1:1.9, with a mean age of 16 years. Most common location was the maxilla (61.5%). The radiographic appearance of most cases (80.5%) was a well-defined, mixed radiolucent-radiopaque lesion. Histologically, the lesions consisted of a single large cyst with tooth-like structures as an integral part, giving the impression of a single lesion. In addition to the unique histologic features, differences in gender and distribution were found between the cases of COCaO and those of simple COC. COCaO may be regarded as a separate entity and classified as a benign, mixed odontogenic tumor. The term odontocalcifying odontogenic cyst is suggested.

  2. Treated unicameral bone cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinman, J.; Servaes, S.; Anupindi, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Unicameral bone cysts (UBCs) are a common benign entity involving the metaphysis of growing bone, occurring within the first two decades of life. Assessment of these lesions, both before and after surgery, is performed routinely utilizing radiographs. We present a review of UBCs at various stages of treatment, including both successful and incomplete healing, and describe the imaging findings throughout their postoperative course

  3. Hydatid Cysts in Children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HussamHassan

    Hydatid Cysts in Children. Ismail M. Tantawy. Pediatric Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Zagazig University Hospital, Zgazig, Egypt. Background/Purpose: Hydatid disease is a parasitic infection caused by a parasite, echinococcus granulosus, characterized by cystic lesion in the liver, lungs and rarely in other parts of ...

  4. Nasal dermoid sinus cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchois, R; Laccourreye, O; Bremond, D; Testud, R; Küffer, R; Monteil, J P

    1994-08-01

    Nasal dermoid sinus cyst is one of the diagnoses of midline nasal masses in children. This retrospective study analyzes the various theories regarding the origin of this congenital abnormality, the differential diagnosis, and the value of magnetic resonance imaging, as well as the various surgical options available.

  5. [Surgical correction of cleft palate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, F T; Pavia Noble, A; Soriano Padilla, F; Soto Miranda, A; Medellín Rodríguez, A

    1990-04-01

    This study presents a statistical review of corrective surgery for cleft palate, based on cases treated at the maxillo-facial surgery units of the Pediatrics Hospital of the Centro Médico Nacional and at Centro Médico La Raza of the National Institute of Social Security of Mexico, over a five-year period. Interdisciplinary management as performed at the Cleft-Palate Clinic, in an integrated approach involving specialists in maxillo-facial surgery, maxillar orthopedics, genetics, social work and mental hygiene, pursuing to reestablish the stomatological and psychological functions of children afflicted by cleft palate, is amply described. The frequency and classification of the various techniques practiced in that service are described, as well as surgical statistics for 188 patients, which include a total of 256 palate surgeries performed from March 1984 to March 1989, applying three different techniques and proposing a combination of them in a single surgical time, in order to avoid complementary surgery.

  6. Surgical treatment of cleft lip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Domingues Miachon

    Full Text Available We performed a systematic review of the literature on the surgical treatment of cleft lip, emphasizing the prevalence, complications associated with the treatment and the points of disagreement between authors. We conducted a literature cross-sectional search that analyzed publications in books, articles and on the databases SciELO - Scientific Electronic Library Online, PubMed, of the National Center for Biotechnology Information. We conclude that: 1 the severity of the cleft will indicate the technique presenting more advantages; 2 the different approaches indicate that there is no consensus on the optimal technique; and 3 the surgeon experience contributes to choosing the best option.

  7. Primary unilateral cleft lip repair

    OpenAIRE

    Adenwalla, H. S.; Narayanan, P. V.

    2009-01-01

    The unilateral cleft lip is a complex deformity. Surgical correction has evolved from a straight repair through triangular and quadrilateral repairs to the Rotation Advancement Technique of Millard. The latter is the technique followed at our centre for all unilateral cleft lip patients. We operate on these at five to six months of age, do not use pre-surgical orthodontics, and follow a protocol to produce a notch-free vermillion. This is easy to follow even for trainees. We also perform clos...

  8. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia clefting syndrome (EEC syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Monika; Dwivedi, Rahul; Upadhyay, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia- clefting syndrome (also k/a. split hand- split foot malformation /split hand-split foot ectodermal dysplasia- cleft syndrome/ectodermal dysplasia cleft lip/cleft palate syndrome) a rare form of ectodermal dysplasia, is an autosomal dominant disorder inherited as a genetic trait and characterized by a triad of (i) ectrodactyly, (ii) ectodermal dysplasia and, (iii) & facial clefts.

  9. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia clefting syndrome (EEC syndrome)

    OpenAIRE

    Koul, Monika; Dwivedi, Rahul; Upadhyay, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia- clefting syndrome (also k/a. split hand- split foot malformation /split hand-split foot ectodermal dysplasia- cleft syndrome/ectodermal dysplasia cleft lip/cleft palate syndrome) a rare form of ectodermal dysplasia, is an autosomal dominant disorder inherited as a genetic trait and characterized by a triad of (i) ectrodactyly, (ii) ectodermal dysplasia and, (iii) & facial clefts.

  10. Incidence of Cleft Lip and Palate in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreise, Marieke; Galiwango, George; Hodges, Andrew

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to estimate the need for resources for cleft repairs in Uganda by determining the overall incidence of oral-facial clefts and the ratio of isolated cleft lip to isolated cleft palate to cleft lip and palate. Design: A 1-year prospective study was implemented

  11. A Novel Technique of Branchial Fistula Tract Delineation and Excision In Children Allergic To Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swagatam Banerjee

    2015-08-01

    Surgical excision of branchial fistulas in children with allergy to dyes can be challenging. Insertion of a polypropylene thread into the fistula tract makes its subsequent dissection easy with minimal disruption of adjacent structures.

  12. Surgery versus endoscopic cauterization in patients with third or fourth branchial pouch sinuses : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, Laura S M; Veenstra, Hidde J.; Oomen, Karin P Q; Speleman, Lucienne; Stegeman, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To systematically review the current literature on treatment of third and fourth branchial pouch sinuses with endoscopic cauterization, including chemocauterization and electrocauterization, in comparison to surgical treatment. Data Sources PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. Review

  13. Effects of the organophosphorous methyl parathion on the branchial epithelium of a freshwater fish Metynnis roosevelti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado Marcelo Rubens

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Gills are vital structures for fish, since they are the main site for gaseous exchange as well as partially responsible for osmorregulation, acid-basic balance, excretion of nitrogenous compounds and taste. Chemicals in the water may alter the morphology of branchial cells of fish that are, therefore, a useful model for environmental impact and ecotoxicology studies. In order to investigate the effects of an organophosphorous compound, methyl parathion, on the gills of the fish, samples of Metynnis roosevelti were exposed to lethal (7ppm and sublethal (1ppm doses of Mentox 600 CE. Through light and scanning electron microscopy, shrinking of the branchial epithelium, followed by detachment and hyperplasia were observed. Externally, the branchial filaments presented the gradual disappearance of microridges. Even in sublethal doses, the organophosphorous reduced the health and fitness of these fish, as consequence of secondary effects derived from changes in the branchial epithelium, impairing oxygenation and ionic balance of the organism.

  14. Validation study of HPV DNA detection from stained FNA smears by polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Channir, Hani Ibrahim; Larsen, Christian Grønhøj; Ahlborn, Lise Barlebo

    2016-01-01

    and corresponding surgical specimens were collected from 71 patients with known HPV-positive OPSCC, 12 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), 20 patients with branchial cleft cysts, and 20 patients with Warthin tumors. Thirty-eight patients with OPSCC and 7 patients with OSCC had FNA smears available...... was detected in 68 of the 71 FNA smears from OPSCC metastases. All corresponding surgical specimens from primary tumors (n = 71) and metastases (n = 38) were p16- and HPV DNA-positive. All the surgical specimens and corresponding FNA smears from OSCCs, Warthin tumors, and branchial cleft cysts were HPV DNA...

  15. Branchial fistula arising from pyriform fossa: CT diagnosis of a case and discussion of radiological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Narvir Singh; Sharma, Yash Paul; Bhagra, Tilak; Sud, Bindu

    2012-01-01

    Anomalies of third or fourth branchial apparatus origin are very uncommon and present as recurrent neck infections or thyroiditis with a predominant left-sided involvement. Radiological diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion and is critical for initiation of proper treatment. We describe a case of branchial sinus of pyriform fossa with external fistulization that presented in adulthood and was diagnosed on computed tomographic scan. The radiological features of this rare anomaly are revisited. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Orthognathic surgery in cleft patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, John H; Nish, Iain; Daskalogiannakis, John

    2012-03-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Identify the skeletal changes in the cleft patient that necessitate surgery. 2. Describe the orthodontic principles that precede surgical treatment. 3. Demonstrate the surgical principles involved in cleft orthognathic surgery and how to avoid common pitfalls particular to cleft orthognathic surgery. 4. Anticipate when dentoalveolar distraction can help in the treatment of problems not easily treated with conventional orthognathic techniques. This CME article covers the basic multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of patients requiring a combined orthodontic orthognathic approach to their skeletally based malocclusion. The dentoskeletal abnormalities are described for these patients, as are the fundamental orthodontic principles in the presurgical treatment of these patients. The basic surgical principles are discussed in general, and the reader is provided with advice on avoiding common pitfalls. Specific attention is given to the more recent advances in dentoalveolar distraction in cases of large defects that would have been difficult to treat using conventional orthognathic surgery. Videos are provided to illustrate the general principles in treating the cleft orthognathic patient and to illustrate the treatment of large defects using dentoalveolar distraction.

  17. Simulating clefts in pumpkin balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginski, Frank; Brakke, Kenneth

    2010-02-01

    The geometry of a large axisymmetric balloon with positive differential pressure, such as a sphere, leads to very high film stresses. These stresses can be significantly reduced by using a tendon re-enforced lobed pumpkin-like shape. A number of schemes have been proposed to achieve a cyclically symmetric pumpkin shape, including the constant bulge angle (CBA) design, the constant bulge radius (CBR) design, CBA/CBR hybrids, and NASA’s recent constant stress (CS) design. Utilizing a hybrid CBA/CBR pumpkin design, Flight 555-NT in June 2006 formed an S-cleft and was unable to fully deploy. In order to better understand the S-cleft phenomenon, a series of inflation tests involving four 27-m diameter 200-gore pumpkin balloons were conducted in 2007. One of the test vehicles was a 1/3-scale mockup of the Flight 555-NT balloon. Using an inflation procedure intended to mimic ascent, the 1/3-scale mockup developed an S-cleft feature strikingly similar to the one observed in Flight 555-NT. Our analysis of the 1/3-scale mockup found it to be unstable. We compute asymmetric equilibrium configurations of this balloon, including shapes with an S-cleft feature.

  18. Intradiploic epidermoid cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arana, E.; Latorre, F.F.; Revert, A.; Menor, F.; Riesgo, P.; Liano, F.; Diaz, C.

    1996-01-01

    We studied 37 intradiploic epidermoid cysts, reviewing typical and atypical radiological features and the differential diagnosis. The most common clinical feature was a long standing lump in the scalp, occurring in 25 patients (67.7 %). Plain films were the most cost-effective radiological technique in diagnosis. The typical finding was a well-defined lytic lesion with sclerotic border, seen in 29 cases (78 %). Atypical lesions were those larger than 5 cm and/or with an ill-defined edge, being observed in 8 cases (22 %). CT and MRI were the best methods for assessing atypical ones. In all cases with typical radiological findings a preoperative diagnosis of intradiploic epidermoid cyst was suggested. (orig.). With 8 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Batch variation between branchial cell cultures: An analysis of variance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Grosell, M.; Kristensen, L.

    2003-01-01

    We present in detail how a statistical analysis of variance (ANOVA) is used to sort out the effect of an unexpected batch-to-batch variation between cell cultures. Two separate cultures of rainbow trout branchial cells were grown on permeable filtersupports ("inserts"). They were supposed...... and introducing the observed difference between batches as one of the factors in an expanded three-dimensional ANOVA, we were able to overcome an otherwisecrucial lack of sufficiently reproducible duplicate values. We could thereby show that the effect of changing the apical medium was much more marked when...... the radioactive lipid precursors were added on the apical, rather than on the basolateral, side. Theinsert cell cultures were obviously polarized. We argue that it is not reasonable to reject troublesome experimental results, when we do not know a priori that something went wrong. The ANOVA is a very useful...

  20. Treated unicameral bone cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinman, J; Servaes, S; Anupindi, S A

    2013-06-01

    Unicameral bone cysts (UBCs) are a common benign entity involving the metaphysis of growing bone, occurring within the first two decades of life. Assessment of these lesions, both before and after surgery, is performed routinely utilizing radiographs. We present a review of UBCs at various stages of treatment, including both successful and incomplete healing, and describe the imaging findings throughout their postoperative course. Copyright © 2012 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Bilateral cleft lip nasal deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Arun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral cleft lip nose deformity is a multi-factorial and complex deformity which tends to aggravate with growth of the child, if not attended surgically. The goals of primary bilateral cleft lip nose surgery are, closure of the nasal floor and sill, lengthening of the columella, repositioning of the alar base, achieving nasal tip projection, repositioning of the lower lateral cartilages, and reorienting the nares from horizontal to oblique position. The multiplicity of procedures in the literature for correction of this deformity alludes to the fact that no single procedure is entirely effective. The timing for surgical intervention and its extent varies considerably. Early surgery on cartilage may adversely affect growth and development; at the same time, allowing the cartilage to grow in an abnormal position and contributing to aggravation of deformity. Some surgeons advocate correction of deformity at an early age. However, others like the cartilages to grow and mature before going in for surgery. With peer pressure also becoming an important consideration during the teens, the current trend is towards early intervention. There is no unanimity in the extent of nasal dissection to be done at the time of primary lip repair. While many perform limited nasal dissection for the fear of growth retardation, others opt for full cartilage correction at the time of primary surgery itself. The value of naso-alveolar moulding (NAM too is not universally accepted and has now more opponents than proponents. Also most centres in the developing world have neither the personnel nor the facilities for the same. The secondary cleft nasal deformity is variable and is affected by the extent of the original abnormality, any prior surgeries performed and alteration due to nasal growth. This article reviews the currently popular methods for correction of nasal deformity associated with bilateral cleft lip, it′s management both at the time of cleft lip repair

  2. [Arachnoid cysts: Embriology and pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Conde, Mario; Martín-Viota, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    There is still great controversy surrounding the origin of the arachnoid cyst. The most accepted theory in the case of congenital cysts explains how they are formed from an anomalous development of the arachnoid membrane, which is unfolded allowing the accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid inside and creating a cyst. This theory seems to explain the origin of convexity and sylvian cistern arachnoid cysts, whereas those in other locations might be due to other mechanisms. In the anatomopathological analysis, the arachnoid cyst wall can be seen as having few differences from normal, although thickened due to an increase quantity of collagenous material. A description of the embryological development of the arachnoid layer and cyst formation is presented, describing the main anatomopathological findings. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Isodense epidermoid cyst in the pineal region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanouchi, Yasuo; Takahara, Nobuhiko; Kawamura, Yasuo; Matsumura, Hiroshi

    1985-01-01

    A 69-year-old male was admitted complaining of gait disturbances and diplopia, 2.5 years after an episode of serous meningitis. Neurological examination on admission disclosed Parinaud's sign, unsteady gait and dysdiadochokinesis on the left side. A striking finding on the computerized tomography (CT) was the left to right shift of the posterior portion of the third ventricle without visualization of the quadrigeminal and ambient cisterns, which were almost completely occupied by an isodense mass accompanied by high dense flecks and a low dense part. Enhanced CT showed positive enhancement in the vicinity of the pineal calcification. By the suboccipital supracerebellar approach, an encapsulated mass containing brownish yellow fluid was subtotally removed and a histological examination of it revealed epidermoid tissue and hemosiderin deposits in the solid portion. Few reports of isodense epidermoid cysts have so far been found in the literature giving a full explanation for this unusual CT attenuation value. Based on the clinical course and histology of this case, the pathogenesis of the unusual density is discussed along the following lines: The mixture of the low dense factor due to cholesterin and the high dense factor due to prior bleeding is believed to result in the isodense attenuation value in the liquid portion. Also, in the solid part, a microscopically mixed texture of deposited hemosiderin and cholesterin clefts in the inflammatory granulomatous tissue could explain its density on the CT scan. (author)

  4. Dental Care for a Child with Cleft Lip and Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donor Spotlight Fundraising Ideas Vehicle Donation Volunteer Efforts Dental Care for a Child with Cleft Lip and ... submenu What We Do Cleft & Craniofacial Educational Materials Dental Care for a Child with Cleft Lip and ...

  5. Treatment for Adults (with Cleft Lip and Palate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here What treatment is available for adults with cleft lip and palate? Treatments currently available to infants and children with cleft lip and palate are also available to adults with clefts. Although ...

  6. Mammary and femoral hydatid cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, Muhammad

    2010-08-01

    Hydatid cyst disease most commonly affects liver and lungs, but it can affect all viscera and soft tissues of the body. Simultaneous mammary and femoral hydatid cysts, without any other visceral involvement, are extremely rare. This is a case report of 25-years-old female, presenting with lump in left breast mimicking fibroadenoma and lump in right thigh mimicking fibroma. Both turned out to be hydatid cysts.

  7. The Association study of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    2016-11-25

    Nov 25, 2016 ... These authors contributed equally to this work. .... individuals without a family history of orofacial clefts or other major congenital defects. ..... Wehby G. L., Cassell C. H. 2010 The impact of orofacial clefts on quality of life and.

  8. Maternal Risk Factors Associated with Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Barrera, Catalina; Mezarobba, Naiara

    2016-01-01

    Disruptions in the development of the nasal and oral structures lead to cleft palate and cleft lip. There are many different factors that can affect this development such as genetic, mechanical traumas or teratogeny. The oral clefts are one of the most common birth defects worldwide affecting approximately 1 in 700 to 1000 children. The development of oral clefts is multifactorial and affect a significant portion of the population. The study results showed that smoking is the risk factor most...

  9. FOXE1 Association with both Isolated Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate; and Isolated Cleft Palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreno, Lina M; Mansilla, Maria Adela; Bullard, Steve A

    2009-01-01

    Nonsyndromic orofacial clefts are a common complex birth defect caused by genetic and environmental factors and/or their interactions. A previous genome-wide linkage scan discovered a novel locus for cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) at 9q22-q33. To identify the etiologic gene, we......) and rs4460498 (p=6.51E-12) were located inside a 70Kb high LD block containing FOXE1. Association signals for Caucasians and Asians clustered 5' and 3' of FOXE1, respectively. Isolated cleft palate (CP) was also associated indicating that FOXE1 plays a role in two phenotypes thought to be genetically...

  10. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate--What to Know and Who Can Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Craniofacial defects such as cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common of all birth defects in the United States, with one in every 600 newborns affected. Cleft lip and/or palate can occur as an isolated condition or may be one component of an inherited disease or syndrome. Dealing with the condition is an extremely difficult and…

  11. Fetal genetic risk of isolated cleft lip only versus isolated cleft lip and palate: A subphenotype analysis using two population-based studies of orofacial clefts in scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jugessur, Astanand; Shi, Min; Gjessing, Håkon Kristian

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cleft lip only (CLO) and cleft lip and palate (CLP) are commonly regarded as variants of the same defect and are traditionally combined to form the single group of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) prior to analysis. However, recent data have suggested that at least a subg...

  12. Face facts: Genes, environment, and clefts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, J.C. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City IA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Cleft lip and/or palate provides an ideal, albeit complex, model for the study of human developmental anomalies. Clefting disorders show a mix of well-defined syndromic causes (many with single-gene or environmental etiologies) coupled with their more common presentation in the nonsyndromic form. This summary presents some insight into the genetic causes of, etiology of and animal models for cleft lip and/or palate. 79 refs.

  13. Improving Informed Consent for Cleft Palate Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-07

    Cleft Palate; Jaw Abnormalities; Maxillofacial Abnormalities; Mouth Abnormalities; Congenital Abnormalities; Jaw Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Craniofacial Abnormalities; Musculoskeletal Abnormalities; Stomatognathic Diseases; Stomatognathic System Abnormalities

  14. Evidence-Based Medicine: Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Albert S

    2017-01-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Describe the incidence of cleft palate and risk factors associated with development of an orofacial cleft. 2. Understand differences among several techniques to repair clefts of both the hard and soft palates. 3. Discuss risk factors for development of postoperative fistulas, velopharyngeal insufficiency, and facial growth problems. 4. Establish a treatment plan for individualized care of a cleft palate patient. Orofacial clefts are the most common congenital malformations of the head and neck region, and approximately three-quarters of these patients have some form of cleft palate deformity. Cleft palate repair is generally performed in children between 6 and 12 months of age. The goals of palate repair are to minimize the occurrence of fistulas, establish a normal velopharyngeal mechanism, and optimize facial growth. This Maintenance of Certification review discusses the incidence and epidemiology associated with cleft palate deformity and specifics associated with patient care, including analgesia, surgical repair techniques, and complications associated with repair of the cleft palate.

  15. Hoffa's recess: incidence, morphology and differential diagnosis of the globular-shaped cleft in the infrapatellar fat pad of the knee on MRI and cadaver dissections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahlensieck, M.; Linneborn, G.; Schild, H.H.; Schmidt, H.-M.

    2002-01-01

    We frequently observed a fluid-like indentation at the inferior posterior margin of Hoffa's fat pad of the knee and sought to establish the incidence and differential diagnostic criteria of this cleft. In total, 133 MRI studies and 35 cadaver specimens were analyzed for the location, size, and shape of clefts at the inferior posterior margin of Hoffa's fat pad. The incidence of a fluid-like ovoid cleft on MR images was 13.5% and in cadavers 14.3%. The cleft was located just below the insertion of the infrapatellar synovial fold (plica synovialis infrapatellaris, ligamentum mucosum). More linear-shaped indentations at the posterior margin were visible in all patients and cadavers due to the horizontal course of the alar folds. A fluid-filled indentation within the inferior posterior margin of Hoffa's fat pad has to be expected in more than 10% of knee studies and should not be confused with tumors like ganglion cysts. We term this cleft the infrahoffatic recess. One hypothesis of its origin concerns the embryological regression process of the infrapatellar membrane into the infrapatellar synovial fold. It should not be confused with linear clefts due to the alar folds. (orig.)

  16. Influence of lip closure on alveolar cleft width in patients with cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmelzle Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The influence of surgery on growth and stability after treatment in patients with cleft lip and palate are topics still under discussion. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of early lip closure on the width of the alveolar cleft using dental casts. Methods A total of 44 clefts were investigated using plaster casts, 30 unilateral and 7 bilateral clefts. All infants received a passive molding plate a few days after birth. The age at the time of closure of the lip was 2.1 month in average (range 1-6 months. Plaster casts were obtained at the following stages: shortly after birth, prior to lip closure, prior to soft palate closure. We determined the width of the alveolar cleft before lip closure and prior to soft palate closure measuring the alveolar cleft width from the most lateral point of the premaxilla/anterior segment to the most medial point of the smaller segment. Results After lip closure 15 clefts presented with a width of 0 mm, meaning that the mucosa of the segments was almost touching one another. 19 clefts showed a width of up to 2 mm and 10 clefts were still over 2 mm wide. This means a reduction of 0% in 5 clefts, of 1-50% in 6 clefts, of 51-99% in 19 clefts, and of 100% in 14 clefts. Conclusions Early lip closure reduces alveolar cleft width. In most cases our aim of a remaining cleft width of 2 mm or less can be achieved. These are promising conditions for primary alveolar bone grafting to restore the dental bony arch.

  17. Chondrogenesis of the branchial skeleton in embryonic sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, S L; Campbell, C K; Wright, G M

    2000-11-01

    This study provides concise temporal and spatial characteristics of branchial chondrogenesis in embryonic sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, using high resolution light microscopy, transmission electron, and immunoelectron microscopy. Prechondrogenic condensations representing the first branchial arch appeared first in the mid-region of the third pharyngeal arch at 13 days post-fertilization (pf). Cartilage differentiation, defined by the presence of the unique, fibrillar, non-collagenous matrix protein characteristic of branchial cartilage, was first observed at 14 days pf. Development of lamprey branchial cartilage appeared unusual compared to that in jawed fishes, in that precartilage condensations appear as a one-cell wide orderly stack of flattened cells that extend by the addition of one dorsal and one ventral condensation. Development of lamprey gill arches from three condensations that fuse to form a single skeletal element differs from the developing gill arches of jawed fishes, where more than one skeletal element forms from a single condensation. The initial orderly arrangement of cells in the lamprey branchial prechondrogenic condensations remains throughout development. Once chondrification of the condensations begins, the branchial arches start to grow. Initially, growth occurs as a result of matrix secretion and cell migration. Later in development, the arches grow mainly by cell proliferation and enlargement. This study defines the morphology and timing of lamprey branchial chondrogenesis. Studies of lamprey chondrogenesis provide not only insight into the developmental biology of a unique non-collagenous cartilage in a primitive vertebrate but also into the general evolution of the skeletal system in vertebrates. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Laryngo-tracheo-oesophageal clefts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leboulanger Nicolas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A laryngo-tracheo-esophageal cleft (LC is a congenital malformation characterized by an abnormal, posterior, sagittal communication between the larynx and the pharynx, possibly extending downward between the trachea and the esophagus. The estimated annual incidence of LC is 1/10,000 to 1/20,000 live births, accounting for 0.2% to 1.5% of congenital malformations of the larynx. These incidence rates may however be underestimated due to difficulty in diagnosing minor forms and a high mortality rate in severe forms. A slightly higher incidence has been reported in boys than in girls. No specific geographic distribution has been found. Depending on the severity of the malformation, patients may present with stridor, hoarse cry, swallowing difficulties, aspirations, cough, dyspnea and cyanosis through to early respiratory distress. Five types of laryngo-tracheo-esophageal cleft have been described based on the downward extension of the cleft, which typically correlates with the severity of symptoms: Type 0 laryngo-tracheo-esophageal cleft to Type 4 laryngo-tracheo-esophageal cleft. LC is often associated with other congenital abnormalities/anomalies (16% to 68%, mainly involving the gastro-intestinal tract, which include laryngomalacia, tracheo-bronchial dyskinesia, tracheo-bronchomalacia (mostly in types 3 and 4, and gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD. The syndromes most frequently associated with an LC are Opitz/BBB syndrome, Pallister Hall syndrome, VACTERL/VATER association, and CHARGE syndrome. Laryngeal clefts result from failure of fusion of the posterior cricoid lamina and abnormal development of the tracheo-esophageal septum. The causes of the embryological developmental anomalies leading to LC are not known but are thought to be multifactorial. LC appears to be mostly sporadic although some familial cases with suspected autosomal dominant transmission have been reported. The age of diagnosis depends mainly on the severity of

  19. Laryngo-tracheo-oesophageal clefts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    A laryngo-tracheo-esophageal cleft (LC) is a congenital malformation characterized by an abnormal, posterior, sagittal communication between the larynx and the pharynx, possibly extending downward between the trachea and the esophagus. The estimated annual incidence of LC is 1/10,000 to 1/20,000 live births, accounting for 0.2% to 1.5% of congenital malformations of the larynx. These incidence rates may however be underestimated due to difficulty in diagnosing minor forms and a high mortality rate in severe forms. A slightly higher incidence has been reported in boys than in girls. No specific geographic distribution has been found. Depending on the severity of the malformation, patients may present with stridor, hoarse cry, swallowing difficulties, aspirations, cough, dyspnea and cyanosis through to early respiratory distress. Five types of laryngo-tracheo-esophageal cleft have been described based on the downward extension of the cleft, which typically correlates with the severity of symptoms: Type 0 laryngo-tracheo-esophageal cleft to Type 4 laryngo-tracheo-esophageal cleft. LC is often associated with other congenital abnormalities/anomalies (16% to 68%), mainly involving the gastro-intestinal tract, which include laryngomalacia, tracheo-bronchial dyskinesia, tracheo-bronchomalacia (mostly in types 3 and 4), and gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). The syndromes most frequently associated with an LC are Opitz/BBB syndrome, Pallister Hall syndrome, VACTERL/VATER association, and CHARGE syndrome. Laryngeal clefts result from failure of fusion of the posterior cricoid lamina and abnormal development of the tracheo-esophageal septum. The causes of the embryological developmental anomalies leading to LC are not known but are thought to be multifactorial. LC appears to be mostly sporadic although some familial cases with suspected autosomal dominant transmission have been reported. The age of diagnosis depends mainly on the severity of the clinical symptoms and

  20. Primary unilateral cleft lip repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenwalla, H S; Narayanan, P V

    2009-10-01

    The unilateral cleft lip is a complex deformity. Surgical correction has evolved from a straight repair through triangular and quadrilateral repairs to the Rotation Advancement Technique of Millard. The latter is the technique followed at our centre for all unilateral cleft lip patients. We operate on these at five to six months of age, do not use pre-surgical orthodontics, and follow a protocol to produce a notch-free vermillion. This is easy to follow even for trainees. We also perform closed alar dissection and extensive primary septoplasty in all these patients. This has improved the overall result and has no long-term deleterious effect on the growth of the nose or of the maxilla. Other refinements have been used for prevention of a high-riding nostril, and correction of the vestibular web.

  1. Primary unilateral cleft lip repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adenwalla H

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The unilateral cleft lip is a complex deformity. Surgical correction has evolved from a straight repair through triangular and quadrilateral repairs to the Rotation Advancement Technique of Millard. The latter is the technique followed at our centre for all unilateral cleft lip patients. We operate on these at five to six months of age, do not use pre-surgical orthodontics, and follow a protocol to produce a notch-free vermillion. This is easy to follow even for trainees. We also perform closed alar dissection and extensive primary septoplasty in all these patients. This has improved the overall result and has no long-term deleterious effect on the growth of the nose or of the maxilla. Other refinements have been used for prevention of a high-riding nostril, and correction of the vestibular web.

  2. Tailgut cyst in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podberesky, Daniel J.; Emery, Kathleen H.; Care, Marguerite M.; Anton, Christopher G.; Falcone, Richard A.; Ryckman, Frederick C.; Miles, Lili

    2005-01-01

    Tailgut cyst, or retrorectal cystic hamartoma, is a rare congenital lesion found in the presacral space. The lesion has been infrequently reported in the literature. We report the MRI findings of a tailgut cyst in a 2-year-old girl who presented with a sacral dimple and skin discoloration. (orig.)

  3. [Suture simulator - Cleft palate surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devinck, F; Riot, S; Qassemyar, A; Belkhou, A; Wolber, A; Martinot Duquennoy, V; Guerreschi, P

    2017-04-01

    Cleft palate requires surgery in the first years of life, furthermore repairing anatomically the soft and hard palate is complex on a surgical level because of the fine tissues and the local intraoral configuration. It is valuable to train first on simulators before going to the operating room. However, there is no material dedicated to learning how to perform intraoral sutures in cleft palate surgery. We made one, in an artisanal manner, in order to practice before the real surgical gesture. The simulator was designed based on precise anatomical data. A steel pipe, fixed on a rigid base represented the oral cavity. An adapted split spoon represented the palate. All pieces could be removed in order to apply a hydrocellular dressing before training for sutures. Our simulator was tested by 3 senior surgeons in our department in close to real-life conditions in order to evaluate its anatomical accuracy. It is valuable to have a simulator to train on cleft palate sutures within teaching university hospitals that manage this pathology. Our simulator has a very low cost, it is easy to make and is anatomically accurate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Odontogenic Keratocyst Mimicking Paradental Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Enrico Borgonovo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this paper is to present an uncommon clinical and radiographic aspect of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC mimicking paradental cyst. Methods. A 32-year-old female patient showed a well-delimited radiolucent lesion connected with the root of the left third molar with close anatomical relationship with the mandibular canal. The clinical, radiographic, and anamnestic features lead us to diagnose a paradental cyst that was treated by enucleation after extraction of the partially impacted tooth. Results. Histological analysis showed typical histological features of PKC such as the presence of a lining of stratified squamous epithelium with a well-defined basal layer of palisading columnar of cuboidal cells. Conclusion. Initial X-ray analysis and the position of the lesion related to the third mandibular tooth caused us to mistakenly diagnose a paradental cyst. We were only able to identify the cyst as an PKC rather than a paradental cyst after histological analysis.

  5. Short mandible - a possible risk factor for cleft palate with/without a cleft lip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Nuno Vibe; Darvann, Tron Andre; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2014-01-01

    Structured Abstract Objectives To estimate the influence of a short mandible on the risk of developing a cleft palate with/without a cleft lip (CP). Setting and sample population The retrospective sample consisted of 115 2-month-old Danish infants with CP, and 70 control infants with unilateral...... the risk of having a cleft palate. Results The mean mandibular length in the group with CP was about 4mm shorter than in the control group. Odds ratio (OR) was calculated to be 0.58 (95% confidence interval 0.48-0.68), implying that an individual's risk of cleft palate with/without a cleft lip increases...... about 50% per mm decrease in mandibular length. Conclusions A special facial type including a short mandible is a possible risk factor for cleft palate, and it was found that the risk of cleft palate increases 58% per mm decreases in mandibular length....

  6. [Cysts in the posterior triangle of the neck in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea-Álvarez, Beatriz; Roldán-Hidalgo, Amaya

    2015-01-01

    Cystic lesions of the posterior triangle are a pathologic entity whose diagnosis is made in the first two years of life. Its presentation in adulthood is an incidental finding and the differential diagnosis includes cystic lymphangioma, lymphatic metastasis of thyroid cancer and branchial cyst. Often with the finding of a cervical lump, FNA is made before diagnostic imaging is performed, however, this procedure is not always advisable. We reviewed the cases of patients who came last year to our department with a cystic mass in this location and correlating the imaging findings with pathologic specimen. We show characteristic findings of these lesions in order to make an early diagnosis and thus to get the approach and treatment appropriate of adult patients with a cystic lesion in the posterior cervical triangle. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  7. Spinal Accessory Motor Neurons in the Mouse: A Special Type of Branchial Motor Neuron?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Charles; Tvrdik, Petr

    2018-04-16

    The spinal accessory nerve arises from motor neurons in the upper cervical spinal cord. The axons of these motor neurons exit dorsal to the ligamentum denticulatum and form the spinal accessory nerve. The nerve ascends in the spinal subarachnoid space to enter the posterior cranial fossa through the foramen magnum. The spinal accessory nerve then turns caudally to exit through the jugular foramen alongside the vagus and glossopharyngeal nerves, and then travels to supply the sternomastoid and trapezius muscles in the neck. The unusual course of the spinal accessory nerve has long prompted speculation that it is not a typical spinal motor nerve and that it might represent a caudal remnant of the branchial motor system. Our cell lineage tracing data, combined with images from public databases, show that the spinal accessory motor neurons in the mouse transiently express Phox2b, a transcription factor that is required for development of brain stem branchial motor nuclei. While this is strong prima facie evidence that the spinal accessory motor neurons should be classified as branchial motor, the evolutionary history of these motor neurons in anamniote vertebrates suggests that they may be considered to be an atypical branchial group that possesses both branchial and somatic characteristics. Anat Rec, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A true branchial fistula in the context of branchiootic syndrome: challenges of diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovic, Thomas H; Saldanha, Francesca; Kuo, Rachel; Ahmad, Tariq

    2014-09-01

    The presence of a branchial fistula with communication both internally and externally: a 'true' branchial fistula is rare, and may arise in the context of autosomal dominant conditions such as branchiootic syndrome and branchiootorenal syndrome. We discuss the case of a true branchial fistula, which recurred after initial surgical excision, in a patient with branchiootic syndrome. The residual tract was dissected in a second operation through stepladder neck incisions and removed in toto via an intraoral approach. No renal abnormalities were detected on investigation with ultrasound. Incomplete excision of a branchial sinus is likely to cause recurrence however intraoperative visualisation of the tract can can sometimes prove challenging. An combined intraoral and external approach aids delineation and tract definition when there is a true branchial fistula and can therefore facilitate a complete excision. Suspicion of an hereditary aetiology should be raised in patients with bilateral or preauricular features, or a positive family history, which may then prompt additional renal and genetic investigation. Copyright © 2014 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Risk of Oral Clefts in Twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosen, Dorthe; Bille, Camilla; Petersen, Inge

    2011-01-01

    and heritability. Twins (207 affected/130,710) and singletons (7766 affected/4,798,526) born from 1936 through 2004 in Denmark were ascertained by linkage among the Danish Facial Cleft Database, the Danish Twin Registry, and the Civil Registration System. We computed oral cleft prevalence and prevalence proportion...

  10. Maternal occupational risk factors for oral clefts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorente, C; Cordier, S; Bergeret, A; De Walle, HEK; Goujard, J; Ayme, S; Knill-Jones, R; Calzolari, E

    Objectives This study investigated the role of maternal exposures at work during pregnancy in the occurrence of oral clefts. Methods The occupational exposures of 851 women (100 mothers of babies with oral clefts and 751 mothers of healthy referents) who worked during the first trimester of

  11. Dating brittle tectonic movements with cleft monazite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Alfons; Gnos, E.; Janots, E.

    2013-01-01

    stress axis, which is characteristic for strike slip deformation. The inferred stress situation is consistent with observed kinematics and the opening of such clefts. Therefore, the investigated monazite-bearing cleft formed at the end of D2 and/or D3, and dextral movements along NNW dipping planes...

  12. Branchial arch anomalies: Recurrence, malignant degeneration and operative complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mufarrej, Faisal; Stoddard, David; Bite, Uldis

    2017-06-01

    Branchial arch anomalies (BAA) represent one of the commonest pediatric neck masses, but large case series are lacking with none specifically examining risk of recurrence, surgical complications, and malignancy. Retrospective study of patients with BAA at Mayo Clinic from 1/1/1976-7/29/2011. Features studied include age, gender, location, BAA type, symptoms, recurrence, preoperative management, extent of surgery, pathology as well as presence of tracts. Associations with tracts, operative complications, and recurrence were evaluated. 421 subjects underwent BAA excision during the study period at our institution. Subjects with tracts were symptomatic earlier. Four cases (mean age 60.3 years) of malignancy were identified. Among the 358 (non-remenant) BAA patients with no previous excision, 3.6% recurred at a mean of 47.1 months following surgery. Patients who underwent incision and drainage prior to BAA excision were 3.4 times more likely to recur. 2% experienced complications. Age, BAA type, preoperative imaging and extent of surgery did not affect recurrence or complication rates. Patients with history of preoperative incision and drainage should be followed closely for recurrence the first four years. Early BAA excision is not associated with higher complication rate. Extent of resection should be determined by gross margins of BAA. Malignant degeneration was not seen in children. Malignancies have been seen in older patients (over 45 years) diagnosed with BAA, and a thorough work-up is important for correct diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Branchial mitochondria-rich cells in the dogfish Squalus acanthias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jonathan M; Morgan, John D; Vogl, A Wayne; Randall, David J

    2002-06-01

    In marine teleost fishes, the gill mitochondria-rich cells (MRCs) are responsible for NaCl elimination; however, in elasmobranch fishes, the specialized rectal gland is considered to be the most important site for salt secretion. The role of the gills in elasmobranch ion regulation, although clearly shown to be secondary, is not well characterized. In the present study, we investigated some morphological properties of the branchial MRCs and the localization, and activity of the important ionoregulatory enzyme Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, under control conditions and following rectal gland removal (1 month) in the spiny dogfish, Squalus acanthias. A clear correlation can be made between MRC numbers and the levels of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity in crude gill homogenates (r(2)=-0.69). Strong Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase immunoreactivity is also clearly associated with the basolateral membrane of these MRCs. In addition, the dogfish were able to maintain ionic balance after rectal gland removal. These results all suggest a possible role of the dogfish gill in salt secretion. MRCs were, however, unresponsive to rectal gland removal in terms of changes in number, fine structure and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity, as might be expected if they were compensating for the loss of salt secretion by the rectal gland. Thus, the specific role that these MRCs play in ion regulation in the dogfish remains to be determined

  14. Cleft lip and palate surgery in children: Anaesthetic considerations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The Care of cleft patients is very challenging. Team cleft care is usually lacking in many developing countries due to shortage of qualified manpower. This study is aimed at highlighting anaesthetic challenges in the management of cleft in children. Patients and Methods: This was a study of cleft lip and palate ...

  15. X-linked genes and risk of orofacial clefts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jugessur, Astanand; Skare, Øivind; Lie, Rolv T

    2012-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are common birth defects of complex etiology, with an excess of males among babies with cleft lip and palate, and an excess of females among those with cleft palate only. Although genes on the X chromosome have been implicated in clefting, there has been no association analysis...

  16. Genome-wide meta-analyses of nonsyndromic orofacial clefts identify novel associations between FOXE1 and all orofacial clefts, and TP63 and cleft lip with or without cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Carlson, Jenna C.; Shaffer, John R.

    2017-01-01

    Nonsyndromic orofacial clefts (OFCs) are a heterogeneous group of common craniofacial birth defects with complex etiologies that include genetic and environmental risk factors. OFCs are commonly categorized as cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) and cleft palate alone (CP), which have h...

  17. A giant traumatic iris cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lott Pooi Wah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 52 year-old construction worker presented with progressive painful blurring of vision in the left eye associated with redness for past 1 month. There was a history of penetrating injury in the same eye 10 years ago and he underwent primary wound toilet and suturing, lens removal with intraocular lens implantation. Slit lamp examination revealed a corneal scar at 9’oclock, a large transilluminant iris cyst superotemporally and adherent to corneal endothelium. It was extended from angle of the pupil and obstructing the visual axis. The patient underwent excision of an iris cyst through superior limbal incision. Viscodissection was done to separate the cyst from the corneal endothelium and underlying iris stroma. Trypan blue ophthalmic solution was injected into the cyst to stain the cyst capsule. Post operatively 7 days, vision improved to 6/7.5 without complication. There was no recurrence up to 1 year postoperation. Histopathological finding revealed a benign cyst mass lined by simple cuboidal to nonkeratinized stratified squamous epithelium. We had achieved a good surgical outcome with no complication to date for our case study. We advocate this modified surgical method to completely remove iris cyst.

  18. A model to environmental monitoring based on glutathione-S-transferase activity and branchial lesions in catfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neta, Raimunda Nonata Fortes Carvalho; Torres, Audalio Rebelo

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we validate the glutathione-S-transferase and branchial lesions as biomarkers in catfish Sciades herzbergii to obtain a predictive model of the environmental impact effects in a harbor of Brazil. The catfish were sampled from a port known to be contaminated with heavy metals and organic compounds and from a natural reserve in São Marcos Bay, Maranhão. Two biomarkers, hepatic glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and branchial lesions were analyzed. The values for GST activity were modeled with the occurrence of branchial lesions by fitting a third order polynomial. Results from the mathematical model indicate that GST activity has a strong polynomial relationship with the occurrence of branchial lesions in both the wet and the dry seasons, but only at the polluted port site. Our mathematic model indicates that when the GST ceases to act, serious branchial lesions are observed in the catfish of the contaminated port area.

  19. MR imaging of pineal cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Yong Sik; Yu, Hyeon; Kim, Wan Tae; Bae, Jin Woo; Moon, Hee Jung; Shin, Hyun Ja

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence and characteristic findings of pineal cyst incidentally detected on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Brain MR images obtained in 2432 patients were retrospectively reviewed to determine the incidence and MR findings of pineal cysts, which were evaluated according to their size, shape, location, signal intensity, interval change, contrast enhancement and mass effect on adjacent structures. Cysts were encountered in 107(4.4 %) of 2432 patients evaluated. their size ranged from 1 X 1 X 1 to 15 X 8 X 9 (mean, 5.97 X 3.82 X 4.82)mm. All were spherical (n=53) or oval (n=54) in shape. Their margin was smooth and they were homogeneous in nature. On T1-weighted images, the cysts were seen to be hyperintense (n=57) or isointense (n=50) to cerebrospinal fluid, but less so than brain parenchyma. T2-weighted images showed them to be isointense (n=51)or hyperintense (n=56) to cerebrospinal fluid. The cysts were centrally located in 65 cases and eccentrically in 42. Compression of the superior colliculi of the tectum was demonstrated in 17 cases (15.9 %). NO patients presented clinical symptoms or signs related to either pineal or tectal lesions. Peripheral enhancement around the cyst after Gd-DTPA injection was demonstrated in 51 cases(100 %). Follow-up examinations in 19 cases demonstrated no interval change. The incidence of pineal cysts was 4.4 %. The MR characteristics of simple pineal cysts include: (1) an oval or spherical shape, (2) a smooth outer margin and homogeneous nature, (3) isosignal or slightly high signal intensity to cerebrospinal fluid on whole pulse sequences, (4) ring enhancement after contrast injection, (5) an absence of interval change, as seen during follow up MR study. These MR appearances of pineal cysts might be helpful for differentiating them from pineal tumors

  20. Ovarian cysts on prenatal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemec, Ursula; Nemec, Stefan F.; Bettelheim, Dieter; Brugger, Peter C.; Horcher, Ernst; Schöpf, Veronika; Graham, John M.; Rimoin, David L.; Weber, Michael; Prayer, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Ovarian cysts are the most frequently encountered intra-abdominal masses in females in utero. They may, at times, require perinatal intervention. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an adjunct to ultrasonography (US) in prenatal diagnosis, we sought to demonstrate the ability to visualize ovarian cysts on prenatal MRI. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 17 fetal MRI scans from 16 female fetuses (23–37 gestational weeks) with an MRI diagnosis of ovarian cysts after suspicious US findings. A multiplanar MRI protocol was applied to image and to characterize the cysts. The US and MRI findings were compared, and the prenatal findings were compared with postnatal imaging findings or histopathology. Results: Simple ovarian cysts were found in 10/16 cases and complex cysts in 7/16 cases, including one case with both. In 11/16 (69%) cases, US and MRI diagnoses were in agreement, and, in 5/16 (31%) cases, MRI specified or expanded the US diagnosis. In 6/16 cases, postnatal US showed that the cysts spontaneously resolved or decreased in size, and in 1/16 cases, postnatal imaging confirmed a hemorrhagic cyst. In 4/16 cases, the prenatal diagnoses were confirmed by surgery/histopathology, and for the rest, postnatal correlation was not available. Conclusion: Our results illustrate the MRI visualization of ovarian cysts in utero. In most cases, MRI will confirm the US diagnosis. In certain cases, MRI may provide further diagnostic information, additional to US, which is the standard technique for diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment planning.

  1. Ovarian cysts on prenatal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemec, Ursula [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Nemec, Stefan F., E-mail: stefan.nemec@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Medical Genetics Institute, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, PACT Suite 400, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Bettelheim, Dieter [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Division of Prenatal Diagnosis and Therapy, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Integrative Morphology Group, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 13, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Horcher, Ernst [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Schoepf, Veronika [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Graham, John M.; Rimoin, David L. [Medical Genetics Institute, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, PACT Suite 400, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Weber, Michael; Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-08-15

    Objective: Ovarian cysts are the most frequently encountered intra-abdominal masses in females in utero. They may, at times, require perinatal intervention. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an adjunct to ultrasonography (US) in prenatal diagnosis, we sought to demonstrate the ability to visualize ovarian cysts on prenatal MRI. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 17 fetal MRI scans from 16 female fetuses (23-37 gestational weeks) with an MRI diagnosis of ovarian cysts after suspicious US findings. A multiplanar MRI protocol was applied to image and to characterize the cysts. The US and MRI findings were compared, and the prenatal findings were compared with postnatal imaging findings or histopathology. Results: Simple ovarian cysts were found in 10/16 cases and complex cysts in 7/16 cases, including one case with both. In 11/16 (69%) cases, US and MRI diagnoses were in agreement, and, in 5/16 (31%) cases, MRI specified or expanded the US diagnosis. In 6/16 cases, postnatal US showed that the cysts spontaneously resolved or decreased in size, and in 1/16 cases, postnatal imaging confirmed a hemorrhagic cyst. In 4/16 cases, the prenatal diagnoses were confirmed by surgery/histopathology, and for the rest, postnatal correlation was not available. Conclusion: Our results illustrate the MRI visualization of ovarian cysts in utero. In most cases, MRI will confirm the US diagnosis. In certain cases, MRI may provide further diagnostic information, additional to US, which is the standard technique for diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment planning.

  2. Congenital Mucous Retention Cyst of the Anterior Hard Palate! the First Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, Satya Ranjan; Priyadarshini, Smita; Pati, Abhishek Ranjan; Bhuyan, Sanat Kumar; Panigrahi, Rajat G

    2014-01-01

    Children may be born with birth defects, the most common being oro-facial clefts and fissural cysts. A well circumscribed pedunculated soft tissue growth that occurs congenitally is known as congenital epulis of the newborn or ‘Neuman’s Tumour’ as described in the literature. It is a rare lesion and the diagnosis has to be confirmed histologically. We present a rare case of a 7-year-old child with a congenital growth in the pre-maxillary region of the anterior hard palate clinically diagnosed...

  3. Ambulatory cleft lip surgery: A value analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneja, Jugpal S; Mitton, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Socialized health systems face fiscal constraints due to a limited supply of resources and few reliable ways to control patient demand. Some form of prioritization must occur as to what services to offer and which programs to fund. A data-driven approach to decision making that incorporates outcomes, including safety and quality, in the setting of fiscal prudence is required. A value model championed by Michael Porter encompasses these parameters, in which value is defined as outcomes divided by cost. To assess ambulatory cleft lip surgery from a quality and safety perspective, and to assess the costs associated with ambulatory cleft lip surgery in North America. Conclusions will be drawn as to how the overall value of cleft lip surgery may be enhanced. A value analysis of published articles related to ambulatory cleft lip repair over the past 30 years was performed to determine what percentage of patients would be candidates for ambulatory cleft lip repair from a quality and safety perspective. An economic model was constructed based on costs associated with the inpatient stay related to cleft lip repair. On analysis of the published reports in the literature, a minority (28%) of patients are currently discharged in an ambulatory fashion following cleft lip repair. Further analysis suggests that 88.9% of patients would be safe candidates for same-day discharge. From an economic perspective, the mean cost per patient for the overnight admission component of ambulatory cleft surgery to the health care system in the United States was USD$2,390 and $1,800 in Canada. The present analysis reviewed germane publications over a 30-year period, ultimately suggesting that ambulatory cleft lip surgery results in preservation of quality and safety metrics for most patients. The financial model illustrates a potential cost saving through the adoption of such a practice change. For appropriately selected patients, ambulatory cleft surgery enhances overall health care value.

  4. [Giant intradiploic infratentorial epidermoid cyst].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberione, F; Caire, F; Fischer-Lokou, D; Gueye, M; Moreau, J J

    2007-10-01

    Epidermoid cysts are benign, uncommon lesions (1% of all intracranial tumors). Their localization is intradiploic in 25% of cases, and exceptionally subtentorial. We report here a rare case of giant intradiploic infratentorial epidermoid cyst. A 74-year old patient presented with recent diplopia and sindrome cerebellar. CT scan and MR imaging revealed a giant osteolytic extradural lesion of the posterior fossa (5.2 cm x 3.8 cm) with a small area of peripheral enhancement after contrast injection. Retrosigmoid suboccipital craniectomy allowed a satisfactory removal of the tumor, followed by an acrylic cranioplasty. The outcome was good. Neuropathological examination confirmed an epidermoid cyst. We review the literature and discuss our case.

  5. Dimensions of the cleft nasal airway in adults: a comparison with subjects without cleft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairfield, W M; Warren, D W

    1989-01-01

    The prevalence of mouthbreathing among individuals with cleft lip and palate is significantly higher than in the normal population. This has been attributed to nasal deformities that tend to reduce nasal airway size. The purpose of the present study was to determine how a heterogeneous adult group with cleft lip and palate differs in terms of nasal airway cross-sectional area from an adult group without cleft during the inspiratory and expiratory phases of breathing. The pressure-flow technique was used to estimate nasal airway size in 15 adults without cleft (15 years or older) and 37 adults with cleft lip, cleft palate, or both. Mean areas and standard deviations for subjects without cleft were 0.63 cm2 +/- 0.17 during inspiration and 0.56 cm2 +/- 0.14 during expiration. This difference is statistically significant (p less than 0.01). Mean areas and standard deviations for all subjects with cleft were 0.37 cm2 +/- 0.18 during inspiration and 0.40 cm2 +/- 0.20 during expiration. This difference is not statistically significant (p greater than 0.15). Twenty-two of the subjects with cleft had nasal areas considered to be impaired (below 0.40 cm2) as compared with only three of the subjects without cleft. A two factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated that area changes during respiration are different for subjects with and without cleft (p less than 0.005), and that cleft nasal areas are smaller than noncleft areas for both phases of breathing (p less than 0.001). Inspiratory-expiratory differences between subjects with and without cleft are probably the result of developmental defects, reparative surgery or both.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Neonate with VACTERL Association and a Branchial Arch Anomaly without Hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Danitza; Pereira, Elaine; Havranek, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    VACTERL (vertebral anomalies, anal atresia, cardiac defect, tracheoesophageal fistula, renal anomaly, limb anomalies) is an association of anomalies with a wide spectrum of phenotypic expression. While the majority of cases are sporadic, there is evidence of an inherited component in a small number of patients as well as the potential influence of nongenetic risk factors (maternal diabetes mellitus). Presence of hydrocephalus has been reported in VACTERL patients (VACTERL-H) in the past, with some displaying branchial arch anomalies. We report the unique case of an infant of diabetic mother with VACTERL association and a branchial arch anomaly-in the absence of hydrocephalus.

  7. Epidermoid cyst in Anterior, Middle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kankane Vivek Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Epidermoid cysts are benign slow growing more often extra-axial tumors that insinuate between brain structures, we present the clinical, imaging, and pathological findings in 35 years old female patients with atypical epidermoid cysts which was situated anterior, middle & posterior cranial fossa. NCCT head revealed hypodense lesion over right temporal and perisylvian region with extension in prepontine cistern with mass effect & midline shift and MRI findings revealed a non-enhancing heterogeneous signal intensity cystic lesion in right frontal & temporal region extending into prepontine cistern with restricted diffusion. Patient was detoriated in night of same day of admission, emergency Fronto-temporal craniotomy with anterior peterousectomy and subtotal resection was done. The histological examination confirms the epidermoid cyst. The timing of ectodermal tissue sequestration during fetal development may account for the occurrence of atypical epidermoid cysts.

  8. Hydatid cyst of the tibia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madiwale C

    1992-10-01

    Full Text Available A case of hydatid cyst of the tibia, which manifested as a pathologic fracture is being reported. Pain and swelling of left lower limb with inability to bear the weight were the main features. Tender swelling was also noted at the upper and middle third of tibia. Open biopsy revealed the hydatid cyst wall and scolices of Echinococcus granulosus. Albendazole treatment was followed by curettage and bone grafting.

  9. Aspiration pneumonia in patients with cleft palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hun; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Uhm, Ki Il [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-01

    To assess the incidence of aspiration pneumonia in infants with cleft palate and to compare the incidence between complete and incomplete types of cleft palate. A review of medical records revealed 100 infants who had undergone initial surgery to repair cleft palate in our hospital during a recent three-year period. Aspiration pneumonia was defined as the coexistence of pneumonia at chest radiography with a history of frequent choking during feeding. The anatomic distribution of aspiration pneumonia was analyzed, and the incidences of aspiration pneumonia in infants with complete and incomplete cleft palate were compared. Among 100 children, aspiration pneumonia was found in 35 (35%). Those with complete and incomplete cleft palate showed similar incidences of the condition (27 of 70 [39%] vs 8 of 30 [27%], p=0.36). Pneumonia was most commonly seen in the left lower lobe (11 of 35), followed by the right upper and lower lobes. Aspiration pneumonia is frequently associated with infants with cleft palate. There is no statistical difference in the incidence of aspiration pneumonia between the complete and the incomplete cleft palate group.

  10. Aspiration pneumonia in patients with cleft palate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Hun; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Uhm, Ki Il

    2003-01-01

    To assess the incidence of aspiration pneumonia in infants with cleft palate and to compare the incidence between complete and incomplete types of cleft palate. A review of medical records revealed 100 infants who had undergone initial surgery to repair cleft palate in our hospital during a recent three-year period. Aspiration pneumonia was defined as the coexistence of pneumonia at chest radiography with a history of frequent choking during feeding. The anatomic distribution of aspiration pneumonia was analyzed, and the incidences of aspiration pneumonia in infants with complete and incomplete cleft palate were compared. Among 100 children, aspiration pneumonia was found in 35 (35%). Those with complete and incomplete cleft palate showed similar incidences of the condition (27 of 70 [39%] vs 8 of 30 [27%], p=0.36). Pneumonia was most commonly seen in the left lower lobe (11 of 35), followed by the right upper and lower lobes. Aspiration pneumonia is frequently associated with infants with cleft palate. There is no statistical difference in the incidence of aspiration pneumonia between the complete and the incomplete cleft palate group

  11. Implementing the Brazilian Database on Orofacial Clefts

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    Isabella Lopes Monlleó

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. High-quality clinical and genetic descriptions are crucial to improve knowledge of orofacial clefts and support specific healthcare polices. The objective of this study is to discuss the potential and perspectives of the Brazilian Database on Orofacial Clefts. Methods. From 2008 to 2010, clinical and familial information on 370 subjects was collected by geneticists in eight different services. Data was centrally processed using an international system for case classification and coding. Results. Cleft lip with cleft palate amounted to 198 (53.5%, cleft palate to 99 (26.8%, and cleft lip to 73 (19.7% cases. Parental consanguinity was present in 5.7% and familial history of cleft was present in 26.3% subjects. Rate of associated major plus minor defects was 48% and syndromic cases amounted to 25% of the samples. Conclusions. Overall results corroborate the literature. Adopted tools are user friendly and could be incorporated into routine patient care. The BDOC exemplifies a network for clinical and genetic research. The data may be useful to develop and improve personalized treatment, family planning, and healthcare policies. This experience should be of interest for geneticists, laboratory-based researchers, and clinicians entrusted with OC worldwide.

  12. Surgical repair of large cyclodialysis clefts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jacob B; Davis, Garvin H; Bell, Nicholas P; Feldman, Robert M; Blieden, Lauren S

    2017-05-11

    To describe a new surgical technique to effectively close large (>180 degrees) cyclodialysis clefts. Our method involves the use of procedures commonly associated with repair of retinal detachment and complex cataract extraction: phacoemulsification with placement of a capsular tension ring followed by pars plana vitrectomy and gas tamponade with light cryotherapy. We also used anterior segment optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a noninvasive mechanism to determine the extent of the clefts and compared those results with ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) and gonioscopy. This technique was used to repair large cyclodialysis clefts in 4 eyes. All 4 eyes had resolution of hypotony and improvement of visual acuity. One patient had an intraocular pressure spike requiring further surgical intervention. Anterior segment OCT imaging in all 4 patients showed a more extensive cleft than UBM or gonioscopy. This technique is effective in repairing large cyclodialysis clefts. Anterior segment OCT more accurately predicted the extent of each cleft, while UBM and gonioscopy both underestimated the size of the cleft.

  13. Molecular aspects of cyst nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, Catherine J; Atkinson, Howard J; Urwin, Peter E

    2005-11-01

    SUMMARY Taxonomy: Superkingdom Eukaryota; kingdom Metazoa; phylum Nematoda; class Chromadorea; order Tylenchida; suborder Tylenchina; superfamily Tylenchoidea; family Heteroderidae; subfamily Heteroderinae; main genera Heterodera and Globodera. Cyst nematodes comprise approximately 100 known species in six genera. They are pathogens of temperate, subtropical and tropical plant species and the host range of many species is narrow. The most economically important species are within the Globodera and Heterodera genera. Globodera pallida and G. rostochiensis are important pathogens of potato crops. There are many economic species in the Heterodera genus, including Heterodera glycines (soybean cyst nematode), H. avenae (cereal cyst nematode) and H. schachtii (sugar beet cyst nematode), the last of which attacks a range of Chenopodiaceae and Cruciferae, including Arabidopsis thaliana. Disease symptoms: Field symptoms of severe cyst nematode infection are often stunting, wilting and chlorosis, but considerable yield loss can occur without obvious symptoms. The only unique indicator of cyst nematode infection is the presence of adult female nematodes attached to host roots after several weeks of parasitism. Disease control: This is usually achieved by using integrated pest management involving cultural practices such as crop rotation, resistant cultivars if available and chemical control when economically justified.

  14. Branchial anomalies in children: A report of 105 surgical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wanpeng; Xu, Hongming; Zhao, Liming; Li, Xiaoyan

    2018-01-01

    Branchial anomalies (BAs) account for 20% of all congenital masses in children. We sought to review the incidence of involvement of individual anomalies, diagnostic methods, surgical treatment, and complications of BAs in children. In addition, we also classified our study and analyzed a congenital lower neck cutaneous fistula near the sternoclavicular joint that was thought to be the skin-side remnant of the fourth BAs. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 105 children who were referred to our hospital from June 2009 to December 2016 for the treatment of BAs. In this series, there were 51 males and 54 females. The age at the time of operation varied from 19 days to 13 years, and the mean age was 4.5 years. A total of 33 (31.4%) cases presented with first BAs, 13 (12.4%) presented with second BAs, and 59 (56.2%) presented with third and fourth BAs, including 6 cases of congenital lower neck cutaneous fistula. Fistulectomy under general anesthesia was performed on all of them. For postoperative complications, 2 cases had temporary facial paralysis, 1 case had permanent facial paralysis, 4 cases had temporary recurrent laryngeal nerve injury. Recurrence occurred in 2 patients with first BAs after medium follow-up time of 3.6 years (6 months-8 years). BAs are common congenital head and neck lesions in children, and there are four distinct types (first, second, third and fourth anomalies). The incidence of third and fourth BAs in Asia maybe higher when compared with literature reports, second BAs seem rare in this population, but more research is needed to confirm this perspective. Diagnosis is not difficult with a proper knowledge of the anatomy of the BAs. The surgical procedures should be tailored depending on the various types, and complete excision of the fistula is the key to prevent recurrence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hydatid Cyst of Ovary: A Case Report

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    Mohsen Khosravi Maharlooei

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcus granulosus is considered the major cause of humanhydatid cysts. Usually the duration of cyst formation is 10-20 years. This period shortens significantly upon rupture of aprimary cyst. The literature describes low incidence of primaryinvolvement of ovary as a site of hydatid cyst formation. Ourcase is the first report on ovarian hydatid cyst in Iran. A 60-year-old woman was presented with abdominal pain in the leftlower quadrant area. Paraclinical data were suggestive of neoplasiaand preoperative diagnosis was ovarian tumor. Duringlaparotomy, multiple cysts resembling hydatid cysts were observedin the left ovary. Pathological examination confirmed thediagnosis of hydatid cyst. Although there is a small possibilityof secondary ovarian echinococcal disease, it is more probablefor this case to be primary infection, as the patient had developedovarian hydatid cysts 15 years after hepatic involvementand recurrence after 30 months is very uncommon.

  16. Cyclin d1 expression in odontogenic cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi, Nasim; Modabbernia, Shirin; Akbarzadeh, Alireza; Sajjadi, Samad

    2013-01-01

    In the present study expression of cyclin D1 in the epithelial lining of odontogenic keratocyst, radicular cyst, dentigerous cyst and glandular odontogenic cyst was investigated to compare proliferative activity in these lesions. Immunohistochemical staining of cyclin D1 on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections of odontogenic keratocysts (n=23), dentigerous cysts (n=20), radicular cysts (n=20) and glandular odontogenic cysts (n=5) was performed by standard EnVision method. Then, slides were studied to evaluate the following parameters in epithelial lining of cysts: expression, expression pattern, staining intensity and localization of expression. The data analysis showed statistically significant difference in cyclin D1 expression in studied groups (p keratocysts, but difference was not statistically significant among groups respectively (p=0.204, 0.469). Considering expression localization, cyclin D1 positive cells in odontogenic keratocysts and dentigerous cysts were frequently confined in parabasal layer, different from radicular cysts and glandular odontogenic cysts. The difference was statistically significant (p keratocyst and the entire cystic epithelium of glandular odontogenic cysts comparing to dentigerous cysts and radicular cysts, implying the possible role of G1-S cell cycle phase disturbances in the aggressiveness of odontogenic keratocyst and glandular odontogenic cyst.

  17. Clinicopathological analysis of 232 radicular cysts of the jawbone in a population of southern Taiwanese patients

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    Jeng-Huey Chen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the clinicopathological features of 232 cases of radicular cyst (January 2001–December 2016 submitted for histopathological examination to Department of Oral Pathology by endodontists in our institution. Demographic data including age, gender, affected site, involved tooth, and histopathological features, were reviewed. The study population comprised 133 females (57.3% and 99 males (42.7%, with a mean age of 40.5 years and an age range of 13–78 years. Two-hundred and one cysts occurred in the maxilla (86.7% and 31 in the mandible (13.3%. Most cases involved the anterior teeth of the maxilla (67.2%. The most frequently-involved tooth was the maxillary lateral incisor (50.5%. In most cases (228 cases; 98.3%, the cyst was lined with nonkeratinized stratified squamous epithelium, with two cases containing epithelial lining of the mucoepidermoid epithelium (0.9% and respiratory epithelium (0.9%, respectively. One case (0.4% revealed epithelial dysplasia of the epithelial lining. Hyaline body was seen in two cases (0.9%, and Rushton body was noted in seven cases (3.0%. Odontogenic epithelial rest was noted in one case (0.4%. Cholesterol clefts (54 cases; 23.3%, foamy histiocytes (72 cases; 31.0%, hemosiderins (57 cases; 24.6%, dystrophic calcifications (94 cases; 40.5%, foreign bodies (44 cases; 19.0%, and bacterial colonies (22 cases; 9.5% were also observed. Fifty-three cases (22.8% showed a mixed acute and chronic inflammatory infiltrate, whereas chronic inflammatory infiltrate only was noted in 179 cases (77.2%. In summary, the current findings provide a valuable source for clinicopathological reference concerning radicular cysts of the jawbone. Keywords: Periapical cyst, Radicular cyst, Taiwan

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of cleft palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, Yasushi; Tasaka, Yasuyuki; Honjo, Iwao; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nakano, Yoshihisa

    1987-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the nasopharynx and the eustachian tube was performed in five patients with cleft palate and compared with the results of those without this anomaly. Various degrees of deformity of the eustachian tube cartilage were found in cleft palate patients. The levator veli palatini muscles were situated more laterally in cleft palate patients than in normal subjects. Also, changes in the position of these muscles after palatoplasty were clearly depicted by MRI. Besides several autopsy reports, this is the first demonstration of the characteristic anomaly around the eustachian tube by a non-invasive method.

  19. Preoperative Cleft Lip Measurements and Maxillary Growth in Patients With Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonarakis, Gregory S; Tompson, Bryan D; Fisher, David M

    2016-11-01

    Maxillary growth in patients with cleft lip and palate is highly variable. The authors' aim was to investigate associations between preoperative cleft lip measurements and maxillary growth determined cephalometrically in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (cUCLP). Retrospective cross-sectional study. Children with cUCLP. Preoperative cleft lip measurements were made at the time of primary cheiloplasty and available for each patient. Maxillary growth was evaluated on lateral cephalometric radiographs taken prior to any orthodontic treatment and alveolar bone grafting (8.5 ± 0.7 years). The presence of associations between preoperative cleft lip measurements and cephalometric measures of maxillary growth was determined using regression analyses. In the 58 patients included in the study, the cleft lateral lip element was deficient in height in 90% and in transverse width in 81% of patients. There was an inverse correlation between cleft lateral lip height and transverse width with a β coefficient of -0.382 (P = .003). Patients with a more deficient cleft lateral lip height displayed a shorter maxillary length (β coefficient = 0.336; P = .010), a less protruded maxilla (β coefficient = .334; P = .008), and a shorter anterior maxillary height (β coefficient = 0.306; P = .020) than those with a less deficient cleft lateral lip height. Patients with cUCLP present with varying degrees of lateral lip hypoplasia. Preoperative measures of lateral lip deficiency are related to later observed deficiencies of maxillary length, protrusion, and height.

  20. Prevalence of cleft lip and cleft palate in rural north-central guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matute, Jorge; Lydick, Elaine A; Torres, Olga R; Owen, Karen K; Jacobsen, Kathryn H

    2015-05-01

    To estimate the number of new cases of cleft lip and cleft palate in the department (state) of Alta Verapaz, Guatemala, in 2012. Cross-sectional survey of midwives from communities identified through a two-stage cluster-sampling process. Midwives were asked how many babies they had delivered in the past year and how many of those newborns had various types of birth defects, as illustrated in pictures. Indigenous Mayan communities in rural north-central Guatemala. Midwives (n = 129) who had delivered babies in the previous year. Reports of babies born with cleft lip and cleft palate. A 1-year prevalence rate of 18.9 per 10,000 for cleft lip and 4.7 per 10,000 for cleft palate was estimated for Alta Verapaz. None of the cases of cleft lip also had cleft palate. The indigenous communities in north-central Guatemala might have a relatively high cleft lip prevalence rate compared with the global average.

  1. Risk of oral clefts in children born to mothers taking Topamax (topiramate)Risk of Oral Clefts (Cleft Lip and/or ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drug Safety and Availability FDA Drug Safety Communication: Risk of oral clefts in children born to mothers ... data that show that there is an increased risk for the development of cleft lip and/or ...

  2. The clinical and morphological aspects of aetiology and pathogenesis of sacrococcygeal pilonidal cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. V. Tsema

    2013-12-01

    follicles. - In the pilonidal cyst’s tissues immunopathological cell reactions of foreign body rejection are evident. Disorganization and lysis of hair shafts, vessel hyalinosis, fibrinoid degeneration and lymphoid cells infiltration are critical components of pilonidal cysts morphogenesis. - The important role in the consistent development of pathogenetic mechanisms of sinus ducts formation in sacrococcygeal pilonidal disease is played by common pathological mechanisms of tubular sinus ducts formation with hypertrophic skin epithelium growth in the external sinus tract area and on the fundus of enlarged hair follicle with ‘epithelial polyp’ formation. Conclusion: 1. Pilonidal disease has an acquired origin and develops when the loose hair shafts penetrate into skin through the destroyed hair follicles in the intergluteal cleft. 2. Pilonidal cyst formation is associated with hyperergic cell immunopathological delayed-type reaction that develops in soft tissues of sacrococcygeal area. 3. The application of special methods of immunohistochemistry and morphology is necessary for more comprehensive evaluation of histogenetic mechanisms of sacrococcygeal pilonidal cyst formation.

  3. Management of ovarian cysts in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue-Qiang, Yan; Nan-Nan, Zheng; Lei, Yu; Wei, Lu; Hong-Qiang, Bian; Jun, Yang; Xu-Fei, Duan; Xin-Ke, Qin

    2015-12-01

    To discuss the experience of diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cyst in infants. A retrospective review was conducted on 20 infants who suffered from ovarian cyst. There were no dysplasia ovarian was found in children which were preoperatively diagnosed simplex cyst. Within thirteen children preoperatively detected mixed cystic-solid lesion, six cases ovarian cysts disappeared and two cases underwent poor blood supply in the following time. Adverse effects for ovarian cyst in infants can be prevented by agressive surgical intervention. Harmful effects of ovarian cyst can be prevented by positive surgical intervention despite the diagnostic difficulties in children with clinical symptoms of this condition.

  4. Spontaneous hygroma in intracranial arachnoid cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnoli, A L

    1984-06-01

    Anamnesis and treatment of two cases of arachnoid cysts extending into the subarachnoid space are described. No traumatic incident was discovered in the previous history of these two patients. The causal genesis of neurological signs of deficiency in patients with arachnoid and acquired cysts is discussed. However, the cause of the development of a subdural hygroma in arachnoid cysts remains unclarified. CT findings of arachnoid cysts with a hypodense zone between brain surface and the vault of the cranium always require an investigation into the possibility of a spontaneous emptying of the cyst or of a congenital and not only localised extension of the cyst itself.

  5. Nasopalatine duct cyst: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikrishna Pasupuleti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nasopalatine duct cyst (NPDC is the most common non-odontogenic cyst of oral cavity. Clinically, Nasopalatine duct cyst manifests as an asymptomatic swelling of the palate or the upper lip. Radiographically, it is seen as a heart-shaped radiolucency and can be confused with periapical pathology. The aim of this article is to report a case of a nasopalatine duct cyst in a 36-year-old patient which was misinterpreted for a periapical cyst. Diagnosis of a Nasopalatine duct cyst can be given through clinical, radiographical, and histopathological examination.

  6. Percutaneous transcatheter sclerotherapy of oophoritic cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Youhua; Xu Qiang; Sun Jun; Shen Tao; Shi Hongjian; Tang Qingfang; Chen Qiying; Zhou Mingxia; Li Hongyao

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of percutaneous transcatheter sclerotherapy in oophoritic cysts. Methods: Seventy six oophoritic cysts incluoling 48 simple and 28 chocolate cysts of 64 patients were treated with percutaneous transcatheter sclerotherapy under CT guidance. 4F multisideholes pigtail catheter was introduced into cyst using absolute alcohol as sclerosing agents. Results: The successful rate of percutaneous oophoritc cyst puncture was 100% in all 64 patients. Among them 58 were cured (90.6%), 6 improved significantly (9.4%). The total effective rate reached 100% with no serious complications. Conclusions: Catheterization sclerotherapy for oophoritic cyst is a simple, complete, safe and effective method. (authors)

  7. Dental anomalies inside the cleft region in individuals with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Jamile; Araújo, Luana; Guimarães, Laís; Maranhão, Samário; Lopes, Gabriela; Medrado, Alena; Coletta, Ricardo; Reis, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL±P) present high frequency of dental anomalies, which may represent complicating factors for dental treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies inside cleft area in a group of Brazilians with NSCL±P. Retrospective analysis of 178 panoramic radiographs of patients aged from 12 to 45 years old and without history of tooth extraction or orthodontic treatment was performed. Association between cleft type and the prevalence of dental anomalies was assessed by chi-square test with a significance level set at p≤ 0.05. Dental anomalies were found in 88.2% (n=157) of the patients. Tooth agenesis (47.1%), giroversion (20%) and microdontia (15.5%) were the most common anomalies. Individuals with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (CLP, pdental anomalies inside cleft region in NSCL±P patients, and further demonstrated that patients with unilateral complete CLP and bilateral incomplete CLP were frequently more affected by dental anomalies. Moreover, our results demonstrate that dental anomalies should be considered during dental treatment planning of individuals affected by NSCL±P.

  8. Differential distribution of the Ca (2+) regulator Pcp4 in the branchial arches is regulated by Hoxa2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Megan; Amin, Shilu; Luise, Fabiana; Zeef, Leo; Bobola, Nicoletta

    2013-01-01

    Branchial arches are externally visible tissue bands in the head region of all vertebrate embryos. Although initially formed from similar components, each arch will give rise to different head and neck structures. In a screen designed to characterize the molecular control of branchial arch identity in mouse, we identified Pcp4 as a second branchial arch-specific molecular signature. We further show that the transcription factor Hoxa2 binds to Pcp4 chromatin and regulates Pcp4 expression in the second arch. Hoxa2 is also sufficient to induce Pcp4 expression in anterior first arch cells, which are Pcp4-negative.

  9. Evidence-based medicine: cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepla, Kyle J; Gosain, Arun K

    2013-12-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Describe recent changes in treatment of cleft palate. 2. Compare the efficacy of different surgical treatments. 3. Assess their own knowledge of cleft palate repair. 4. Determine where further individual in-depth study and development are warranted. The Maintenance of Certification in Plastic Surgery series is designed to ensure professional development and measure continued competency within a specialty or subspecialty. The present article provides an evaluation of the interval studies regarding the management of cleft palate with a specific focus on craniofacial growth, speech outcomes, and obstructive sleep apnea since the last Maintenance of Certification in Plastic Surgery article on the subject published in 2010. This purpose of this article is to update plastic and craniomaxillofacial surgeons on recent changes in treatment of cleft palate, provide a means for accurate self-assessment, and guide further individual in-depth study and development.

  10. Cleft Lip and Palate (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Things That Help Feelings Expert Answers Q&A Movies & More for Teens Teens site Sitio para adolescentes ... spite of these and other social, psychological, and educational challenges, kids with clefts just want to be ...

  11. [Peritoneal cyst. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervone, P; Boso Caretta, F; Painvain, E; Marchiani, E; Montanino, G

    1999-11-01

    Cystic mesothelioma is a rare benign tumor of the abdominal and pelvic peritoneum, consisting of solitary or multiple cysts. No more than 130 cases are reported. Several risk factors such as chronic peritoneal irritation, caused by foreign bodies, infection or endometriosis, were hypothesized but the pathogenesis is still unknown. A 51-year menopausal woman was submitted to ultrasonography because of abnormal uterine bleeding. The scan revealed a right ovarian cyst (size 81 x 64 mm) with the feature of serous cyst. In the anamnesis a cystectomy of the right ovary and appendectomy were reported. At laparoscopy, then converted in laparotomy, a cyst arising from peritoneum of the posterior surface of the uterus was found. The right ovary was normal. The histopathological finding was: serous simple cyst of peritoneum. Ultrasonographic diagnosis was not confirmed by surgery; in fact, sometimes, it may be difficult to establish the origin of pelvic cystic mass, from ovary or peritoneum, by ultrasonography. It is mandatory to suggest a laparoscopy and/or laparotomy in case of pelvic cystic mass that does not regress in the time even after administration of oral contraceptives.

  12. Percutaneous aspiration of hydatid cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, G.; Serrano, R.

    1996-01-01

    A perspective study was carried out to assess the efficacy of a combination of percutaneous aspiration plus oral albendazole to assess its efficacy as an alternative to surgery in the treatment of hydatid cyst. We performed percutaneous aspiration followed by injection of 20% hypertonic saline solution into 16 hydatid cysts in 13 patients. All the patients received oral albendazole (400 mg/12 hours) starting 2 days before and lasting until there weeks after the procedure. There were no anaphylactic reactions during or after the procedure. Follow-up included monthly ultrasound over a period ranging between 10 and 36 months. Three cysts disappeared completely; in 10 cases, the cysts cavity was replaced by a complex ultrasonographic findings, with strong signals similar to those of a pseudotumor. In another case, the aspirate was sterile and its morphology remained unchanged. In two cases, infection of the cyst ensued, requiring surgical treatment. We consider that percutaneous aspiration in combination with albendazole may prove to be a good alternative to surgery for the management of hepatic hydatid disease. (Author) 15 refs

  13. Comparison of the structure and composition of the branchial filters in suspension feeding elasmobranchs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misty Paig-Tran, E W; Summers, A P

    2014-04-01

    The four, evolutionarily independent, lineages of suspension feeding elasmobranchs have two types of branchial filters. The first is a robust, flattened filter pad akin to a colander (e.g., whale sharks, mantas and devil rays) while the second more closely resembles the comb-like gill raker structure found in bony fishes (e.g., basking and megamouth sharks). The structure and the presence of mucus on the filter elements will determine the mechanical function of the filter and subsequent particle transport. Using histology and scanning electron microscopy, we investigated the anatomy of the branchial filters in 12 of the 14 species of Chondrichthyian filter-feeding fishes. We hypothesized that mucus producing cells would be abundant along the filter epithelium and perform as a sticky mechanism to retain and transport particles; however, we found that only three species had mucus producing goblet cells. Two of these (Mobula kuhlii and Mobula tarapacana) also had branchial cilia, indicating sticky retention and transport. The remaining filter-feeding elasmobranchs did not have a sticky surface along the filter for particles to collect and instead must employ alternative mechanisms of filtration (e.g., direct sieving, inertial impaction or cross-flow). With the exception of basking sharks, the branchial filter is composed of a hyaline cartilage skeleton surrounded by a layer of highly organized connective tissue that may function as a support. Megamouth sharks and most of the mobulid rays have denticles along the surface of the filter, presumably to protect against damage from large particle impactions. Basking sharks have branchial filters that lack a cartilaginous core; instead they are composed entirely of smooth keratin. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Prevalence of dental anomalies in children with cleft lip and unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullo, R; Festa, V M; Rullo, R; Addabbo, F; Chiodini, P; Vitale, M; Perillo, L

    2015-09-01

    To examine the prevalence of different types of dental anomalies in children with nonsyndromic cleft lip, unilateral cleft lip-palate, and bilateral cleft lip-palate. A sample of 90 patients (aged 4-20 years) affected by isolated cleft lip, unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate was examined. Cleft patients were classified into one of three groups according to cleft type: (1) Unilateral Cleft Lip-Palate, (2) Bilateral Cleft Lip-Palate, and (3) Cleft Lip. Intraoral exams, panoramic radiographs and dental casts, were used to analyse the prevalence of the various dental anomalies included in this study. There were no statistically significant differences between patients with cleft lip, unilateral cleft lip and palate and bilateral cleft lip and palate. The congenital absence of the cleft-side lateral incisor was observed in 40% of the sample, and a total of 30% patients showed supernumerary teeth at the incisors region. Second premolar agenesis was found in 4.4% of patients, whereas in 18.9% of the sample there was an ectopic dental eruption. Lateral or central incisors rotation was noted in 31.1% of the sample, while shape anomaly, lateral incisor microdontia, and enamel hypoplasia were detected respectively in 25.6%, 5.6% and 18.9% of cleft patients. High prevalence of different dental anomalies in children with cleft lip and unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate has been confirmed. This study, in particular, shows the presence of ectopic and rotated teeth in the cleft area.

  15. Dental Anomalies in a Brazilian Cleft Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Jamile; Mariano, Lorena C; Canguçu, Daiane; Coutinho, Thaynara S L; Hoshi, Ryuichi; Medrado, Alena Peixoto; Martelli-Junior, Hercílio; Coletta, Ricardo D; Reis, Silvia R A

    2016-11-01

      The aim of this study was to radiographically investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies outside the cleft area in a group of Brazilian patients with nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or palate (NSCL/P).   A retrospective analysis of 207 panoramic radiographs of patients with NSCL/P aged 12 to 45 years without history of tooth extraction and orthodontic treatment was performed.   Dental anomalies were found in 75.4% of the patients, and tooth agenesis (29.2%) and supernumerary tooth (2.6%) were the most common anomalies. The risk of agenesis was higher among the individuals with cleft palate (CP) compared with individuals with cleft lip (CL) and cleft lip and palate (CLP) (agenesis: CP versus CL: odds ratio 6.27, 95% confidence interval 2.21-17.8, P = .0003; CP versus CLP: odds ratio 2.94; 95% confidence interval 1.27-6.81, P = .01). The frequency of dental agenesis was higher in patients with unilateral complete CLP (agenesis: P dental agenesis (P dental anomalies in patients with NSCL/P was higher than that reported in overall population. This study found preferential associations between dental anomalies and specific extensions of NSCL/P, suggesting that dental agenesis and ectopic tooth may be part of oral cleft subphenotypes.

  16. Mucous retention cyst of the maxillary sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruprecht, A; Batniji, S; el-Neweihi, E

    1986-12-01

    The mucous retention cyst is not a rare phenomenon. The incidence of dental patients was determined. Of 1685 patient radiographs reviewed, 44 (2.6%) had one or more mucous retention cysts in the maxillary sinuses.

  17. Multiple intracranial hydatid cysts: MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pumar, J.; Alvarez, M.; Leira, R.; Prieto, J.M.; Arrojo, L.; Pereira, J.; Vidal, J.

    1992-01-01

    Multiple intracranial hydatid cysts are uncommon and usually localized in the supratentorial compartment. We report a case studied by CT and MR of multiple intracranial hydatid cysts scattered in various anatomic sites: supratentorial, infratentorial and also intraventricular. (orig.)

  18. Cleft sidedness and congenitally missing teeth in patients with cleft lip and palate patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolreza Jamilian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of cleft sidedness, and the number of congenitally missing teeth in regard to cleft type and gender. Methods The charts, models, radiographs, and intraoral photographs of 201 cleft patients including 131 males with the mean age of 12.3 ± 4 years and 70 females with the mean age of 12.6 ± 3.9 years were used for the study. T test, Chi-square, and binomial tests were used for assessment of the data. Results and conclusions One hundred forty-eight of the subjects suffered from cleft lip and palate followed by 41 subjects who suffered from cleft lip and alveolus. Chi-square test did not show any significant difference between the genders. Binomial test showed that left-sided cleft was more predominant in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients (P < 0.001. This study also showed that the upper lateral incisors were the most commonly missing teeth in the cleft area.

  19. Dental fear in children with a cleft lip and/or cleft Palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogels, W.E.J.C.; Aartman, I.H.A.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the level of dental fear in children with a cleft lip and/or palate, to compare this level with that of a normative group testing the hypothesis that children with a cleft lip and/or palate have a higher level of dental anxiety than children from the general population, and to

  20. Lower incidence of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... In India, as in other parts of the world, nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL±P) is a highly prevalent birth defect, its incidence in males being twice that in females. A case–control association study has been carried out with respect to homocysteine level and MTHFR C677T, A1298C and ...

  1. Biliary tract duplication cyst with gastric heterotopia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grumbach, K.; Baker, D.H.; Weigert, J.; Altman, R.P.

    1988-05-01

    Cystic duplications of the biliary tract are rare anomalies, easily mistaken for choledochal cysts. Surgical drainage is the preferred therapy for choledochal cyst, but cystic duplication necessitates surgical excision as duplications may contain heterotopic gastric mucosa leading to peptic ulceration of the biliary tract. We report a case of biliary tract duplication cyst containing heterotopic alimentary mucosa which had initially been diagnosed and surgically treated as a choledochal cyst.

  2. Biliary tract duplication cyst with gastric heterotopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grumbach, K.; Baker, D.H.; Weigert, J.; Altman, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    Cystic duplications of the biliary tract are rare anomalies, easily mistaken for choledochal cysts. Surgical drainage is the preferred therapy for choledochal cyst, but cystic duplication necessitates surgical excision as duplications may contain heterotopic gastric mucosa leading to peptic ulceration of the biliary tract. We report a case of biliary tract duplication cyst containing heterotopic alimentary mucosa which had initially been diagnosed and surgically treated as a choledochal cyst. (orig.)

  3. Primary pelvic hydatic cyst mimicking ovarian carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Faruk Abike; Ilkkan Dunder; Omer Lutfi Tapisiz; Osman Temizkan; Banu Bingol; Ahmet Payasli; Lale Kutluay

    2011-01-01

    Hydatic cyst is an illness that appears in consequence of the cystic form of small strap-shaped worm Echinococcus granulosis. Frequently, cysts exist in the lungs and liver. Peritoneal involvement is rare, and generally occurs as a result of second inoculation from rupture of a liver-located hydatic cyst. Primary ovarian hydatic cyst is very rare. A 56-year-old female patient was admitted to Emergency Service with the complaint of stomachache and swollen abdomen. From ultrasonographic examina...

  4. Asymptomatic vallecular cyst: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuce, Yucel; Uzun, Sennur; Aypar, Ulku

    2013-01-01

    A 56-year-old man presented himself for an intracranial glioblastoma multiforme excision. After being routinely monitored, he was preoxygenated. We induced anesthesia and paralysis with 200 mg propofol, 50 μg fentanyl and 9 mg vecuronium. Direct laryngoscopy with a Macintosh 3 blade revealed a 2x2 cm cyst, pedunculated, arising from the right side of the vallecula preventing the endotracheal intubation. While the patient remained anesthetized, we urgently consulted an otolaryngologist and aspirated the cyst with a 22-gauge needle and syringe under direct laryngoscopy. We aspirated 10 cc of liquid content. This was followed by an uneventful tracheal intubation with a 9.0 enforced spiral cuffed tube. An alternative to fiberoptic intubation may be careful cyst aspiration to facilitate the intubation.

  5. Giant Occipital Intradiploic Epidermoid Cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oommen, Arun; Govindan, Jayasree; Peroor, Devan Surendran; Azeez, C Roshan; Rashmi, R; Abdul Jalal, Muhammed Jasim

    2018-01-01

    Intraparenchymal or intradiploic epidermoid cysts are very rare. Most of these cysts, when present, tend to involve the frontal and temporal lobes, and occasionally, the pineal gland or the brain stem. Here, we report a 45-year-old female, who presented with localized occipital headache and a tender occipital swelling, gradually increasing in size. She was hemodynamically and neurologically stable and did not have any focal neurological deficits. Whole skull and brain imaging revealed a well-demarcated expansile lytic lesion in the right occipital bone, which was hypointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on both T2-weighted imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging without any contrast enhancement. The patient underwent a right occipital craniotomy and total excision of the intradiploic space occupying lesion. Histopathological examination confirmed the lytic bone lesion over occipital bone as intradiploic epidermoid cyst.

  6. Prenatal diagnosis of arachnoid cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korkut Daglar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Arachnoid cysts are rare, usually benign, space-occupying central nervous system lesion. They are the results of an accumulation of cerebrospinal-like fluid between the cerebral meninges and diagnosed prenatally as a unilocular, simple, echolucent area within the fetal head. They may be primary (congenital (maldevelopment of the meninges or secondary (acquired (result of infection trauma, or hemorrhage. The primary ones typically dont communicate with the subarachnoid space whereas acquired forms usually communicate. In recent years, with the development of radiological techniques, the clinical detectability of arachnoid cysts seems to have increased. We report a case of primary arachnoid cyst that were diagnosed prenatally by using ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging . [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(4.000: 792-795

  7. MR findings in thyroglossal duct cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blandino, A.; Salvi, L.; Chirico, G.; Scribano, E.; Longo, M.; Pandolfo, I.

    1990-01-01

    Two patients with thyroglossal duct cysts have been studied with CT and MR. The typical CT feature of these cystic upper-neck lesions are depicted in literature, conversely MR findings are not well known. The homogeneous high intensity on T1-weighted images, higher than simple cyst or fluid, is the most typical feature of the thyroglossal cyst. (author). 12 refs.; 5 figs

  8. Sclerotherapy for hydrocoele and epididymal cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, J R

    1979-04-01

    A prospective study was carried out on the efficacy of sclerotherapy for the treatment of hydrocoeles and epididymal cysts. Thirty-six hydrocoeles and 13 epididymal cysts were treated and followed up for between 1 and 2 years. Thirty-four hydrocoeles were cured, 1 failed to respond to treatment and 1 recurred after treatment. All 13 epididymal cysts were cured.

  9. Primary hydatid cysts of the pancreas

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kurt

    Hydatid cysts of the pancreas are rare. The reported incidence varies from 0.1% to 2% of patients with hydatid disease.4-7. Management may be diffi- cult as a hydatid cyst in the head of the pancreas may closely simulate a cystic tumour. In this study we report 4 cases of primary hydatid cysts involving the head of the ...

  10. Primary Peritoneal Hydatid Cyst Presenting as Ovarian Cyst Torsion: A Rare Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Gandhiraman, Kavitha; Balakrishnan, Renukadevi; Ramamoorthy, Rathna; Rajeshwari, Raja

    2015-01-01

    Hydatid cyst disease is a zoonotic disease caused by Echinococcus granulosus, E.multilocularis or E.Vogli. The most common primary site is liver (75%) followed by lungs (5-15%) and other organs constitute 10-20%. Peritoneal hydatid cysts are very rare especially primary peritoneal hydatid. Secondary peritoneal hydatid cysts are relatively common, which usually occurs due to rupture of primary hepatic hydatid cyst. We present a rare case of large primary peritoneal hydatid cyst misdiagnosed as...

  11. An analysis of the energetic cost of the branchial and cardiac pumps during sustained swimming in trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    FARRELL, AP; STEFFENSEN, JF

    1987-01-01

    Experimental data are available for the oxygen cost of the branchial and cardiac pumps in fish. These data were used to theoretically analyze the relative oxygen cost of these pumps during rest and swimming in rainbow troutSalmo gairdneri. Efficiency of the heart increases with activity and so...... the relative oxygen cost of the cardiac pumps decreased from 4.6% at rest to 1.9% at the critical swimming speed. The relative oxygen cost of the branchial pump is significant in the resting and slowly swimming fish, being 10 to 15% of total oxygen uptake. However, when swimming trout switch to a ram mode...... of ventilation, a considerable saving in oxygen cost is accrued by switching the cost of ventilation from the branchial to the tail musculature. Thus, the relative oxygen cost of the branchial and cardiac pumps actually decreases at critical swimming speed compared to rest and therefore is unlikely to be a major...

  12. Characterization of complex renal cysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graumann, Ole; Osther, Susanne Sloth; Osther, Palle Jörn Sloth

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Complex renal cysts represent a major clinical problem, since it is often difficult to exclude malignancy. The Bosniak classification system, based on computed tomography (CT), is widely used to categorize cystic renal lesions. The aim of this study was to evaluate critically...... available data on the Bosniak classification. Material and methods. All publications from an Entrez Pubmed search were reviewed, focusing on clinical applicability and the use of imaging modalities other than CT to categorize complex renal cysts. Results. Fifteen retrospective studies were found. Most...

  13. Ecchinococcal cyst of the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yun Ju; Kim, Sun Hee [Maryknoll Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-15

    Hydatid disease is a parasitic infestation with the larval stage of echinococcus which is found most frequently in Mediterranean area, Australia, and south America, and rarely in Korea. The case presented herein was a 43-year-old man who had been to the middle East Asia for three years. His initial ultrasonogram showed a well-defined cystic mass in the right hepatic lobe. It was surrounded by three layers of capsule and contained multiple small daughter cysts with echogenic debris. Computed tomograms and magnetic resonance images showed similar findings. Ultrasonography was the most accurate among the three imaging modalities in demonstrating the internal architecture of the echinococal cyst

  14. Ecchinococcal cyst of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yun Ju; Kim, Sun Hee

    1994-01-01

    Hydatid disease is a parasitic infestation with the larval stage of echinococcus which is found most frequently in Mediterranean area, Australia, and south America, and rarely in Korea. The case presented herein was a 43-year-old man who had been to the middle East Asia for three years. His initial ultrasonogram showed a well-defined cystic mass in the right hepatic lobe. It was surrounded by three layers of capsule and contained multiple small daughter cysts with echogenic debris. Computed tomograms and magnetic resonance images showed similar findings. Ultrasonography was the most accurate among the three imaging modalities in demonstrating the internal architecture of the echinococal cyst

  15. The diagnosis of choledochal cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duering, A.; Roedl, W.; Koch, B.; Riemann, J.

    1985-01-01

    For 10 case in which we detected cysts in the choledochus ourselves comparing traditional radiological methods (infusion-cholegram, ERC, scintigraphy, barium meal examination, angiography) with recent imaging procedures (ultrasound, CT, NMR) the following sequence of procedures proved to be favorable: Screening methods are ultrasound and infusion-cholegram. CT and NMR furnish good presentations of the intra- and extrahepatic dilatations of the bile duct. ERC still represents the best methods for demonstration of an extrahepatic cyst of the choledochus. Hepato-biliary functional scintigraphy is performed as a supplement. Barium meal examination and coeliacography furnish a small diagnostic contribution only. (orig.) [de

  16. Arthroscopic excision of ganglion cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontempo, Nicholas A; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C

    2014-02-01

    Arthroscopy is an advancing field in orthopedics, the applications of which have been expanding over time. Traditionally, excision of ganglion cysts has been done in an open fashion. However, more recently, studies show outcomes following arthroscopic excision to be as good as open excision. Cosmetically, the incisions are smaller and heal faster following arthroscopy. In addition, there is the suggested benefit that patients will regain function and return to work faster following arthroscopic excision. More prospective studies comparing open and arthroscopic excision of ganglion cysts need to be done in order to delineate if there is a true functional benefit. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Not All Clefts Are Created Equal: Patterns of Hospital-Based Care Use among Children with Cleft Lip and Palate within 4 Years of Initial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligh, Cassandra A; Fox, Justin P; Swanson, Jordan; Yu, Jason W; Taylor, Jesse A

    2016-06-01

    This study compares hospital-based care and associated charges among children with cleft lip, cleft palate, or both, and identifies subgroups generating the greatest cumulative hospital charges. The authors conducted a retrospective cohort study of cleft lip, cleft palate, or cleft lip and palate who underwent initial surgery from 2006 to 2008 in four U.S. states. Primary outcome was hospital-based care-emergency, outpatient, inpatient-within 4 years of surgery. Regression models compared outcomes and classification tree analysis identified patients at risk for being in the highest quartile of cumulative hospital charges. The authors identified 4571 children with cleft lip (18.2 percent), cleft palate (39.2 percent), or cleft lip and palate (42.6 percent). Medical comorbidity was frequent across all groups, with feeding difficulty (cleft lip, 2.4 percent; cleft palate, 13.4 percent; cleft lip and palate, 6.0 percent; p cleft lip, 1.8 percent; cleft palate, 9.4 percent; cleft lip and palate, 3.6 percent; p cleft palate were most likely to return to the hospital (p cleft lip group, yet comparable among those with cleft palate and cleft lip and palate (p cleft palate cohort (cleft lip, $56,966; cleft palate, $106,090; cleft lip and palate, $91,263; p cleft lip versus cleft palate with or without cleft lip), and age at initial surgery were the most important factors associated with the highest quartile of cumulative hospital charges. Cleft lip and palate children experience a high rate of hospital-based care early in life, with degree of medical comorbidity being a significant burden. Understanding this relationship and associated needs may help deliver more efficient, patient-centered care.

  18. The Primary Care Pediatrician and the Care of Children With Cleft Lip and/or Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Charlotte W; Jacob, Lisa S; Lehmann, Christoph U

    2017-05-01

    Orofacial clefts, specifically cleft lip and/or cleft palate (CL/P), are among the most common congenital anomalies. CL/P vary in their location and severity and comprise 3 overarching groups: cleft lip (CL), cleft lip with cleft palate (CLP), and cleft palate alone (CP). CL/P may be associated with one of many syndromes that could further complicate a child's needs. Care of patients with CL/P spans prenatal diagnosis into adulthood. The appropriate timing and order of specific cleft-related care are important factors for optimizing outcomes; however, care should be individualized to meet the specific needs of each patient and family. Children with CL/P should receive their specialty cleft-related care from a multidisciplinary cleft or craniofacial team with sufficient patient and surgical volume to promote successful outcomes. The primary care pediatrician at the child's medical home has an essential role in making a timely diagnosis and referral; providing ongoing health care maintenance, anticipatory guidance, and acute care; and functioning as an advocate for the patient and a liaison between the family and the craniofacial/cleft team. This document provides background on CL/P and multidisciplinary team care, information about typical timing and order of cleft-related care, and recommendations for cleft/craniofacial teams and primary care pediatricians in the care of children with CL/P. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in WNT genes with the risk of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafighdoost, Houshang; Hashemi, Mohammad; Asadi, Hossein; Bahari, Gholamreza

    2018-01-22

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate is a common congenital deformity worldwide with multifaceted etiology. Interaction of genes and environmental factors has been indicated to be related with susceptibility to nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate. Some WNT genes which are involved in craniofacial embryogenesis may play a key role in the pathogenesis of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate. In the present study, we aimed to inspect the relationship between WNT3 (rs3809857 and rs9890413), WNT3A (rs752107 and rs3121310), and WNT10a rs201002930 (c.392 C>T) polymorphisms and nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in an Iranian population. The present case-control study was carried out on 120 unrelated nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate patients and 112 healthy subjects. The variants were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The findings suggest that the rs3809857 polymorphism significantly decreased the risk of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in codominant (odds ratio = 0.16, 95% confidence interval = 0.03-0.75, P = 0.020, TT vs GG), recessive (odds ratio = 0.16, 95% confidence interval = 0.03-0.72, P = 0.009, TT vs GG + GT) inheritance models. The rs9890413 variant marginally decreased the risk of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in codominant (odds ratio = 0.41, 95% confidence interval = 0.17-0.99, P = 0.047, AG vs AA) model. Regarding C392T variant, the findings revealed that this variant significantly decreased the risk of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in codominant (odds ratio = 0.24, 95% confidence interval = 0.10-0.58, P = 0.002, CT vs CC) and allele (odds ratio = 0.26, 95% confidence interval = 0.11-0.62, P = 0.002, T vs C) models. No significant association was observed between the rs752107 and rs3121310 variants

  20. Prevalence of orofacial clefts and risks for nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in newborns at a university hospital from West Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona-Rivera, Jorge Román; Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo; Peña-Padilla, Christian; Olvera-Molina, Sandra; Orozco-Martín, Miriam A; García-Cruz, Diana; Ríos-Flores, Izabel M; Gómez-Rodríguez, Brian Gabriel; Rivas-Soto, Gemma; Pérez-Molina, J Jesús

    2018-02-19

    We determined the overall prevalence of typical orofacial clefts and the potential risks for nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in a university hospital from West México. For the prevalence, 227 liveborn infants with typical orofacial clefts were included from a total of 81,193 births occurred during the period 2009-2016 at the "Dr. Juan I. Menchaca" Civil Hospital of Guadalajara (Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico). To evaluate potential risks, a case-control study was conducted among 420 newborns, including only those 105 patients with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (cases), and 315 infants without birth defects (controls). Data were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression analysis expressed as adjusted odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals . The overall prevalence for typical orofacial clefts was 28 per 10,000 (95% confidence interval: 24.3-31.6), or 1 per 358 live births. The mean values for the prepregnancy weight, antepartum weight, and pre-pregnancy body mass index were statistically higher among the mothers of cases. Infants with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate had a significantly higher risk for previous history of any type of congenital anomaly (adjusted odds ratio: 2.7; 95% confidence interval: 1.4-5.1), history of a relative with cleft lip with or without cleft palate (adjusted odds ratio: 19.6; 95% confidence interval: 8.2-47.1), and first-trimester exposures to progestogens (adjusted odds ratio: 6.8; 95% CI 1.8-25.3), hyperthermia (adjusted odds ratio: 3.4; 95% confidence interval: 1.1-10.6), and common cold (adjusted odds ratio: 3.6; 95% confidence interval: 1.1-11.9). These risks could have contributed to explain the high prevalence of orofacial clefts in our region of Mexico, emphasizing that except for history of relatives with cleft lip with or without cleft palate, most are susceptible of modification. © 2018 Japanese Teratology Society.

  1. Role of Dlx6 in regulation of an endothelin-1-dependent, dHAND branchial arch enhancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charité, Jeroen; McFadden, David G.; Merlo, Giorgio; Levi, Giovanni; Clouthier, David E.; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Richardson, James A.; Olson, Eric N.

    2001-01-01

    Neural crest cells play a key role in craniofacial development. The endothelin family of secreted polypeptides regulates development of several neural crest sublineages, including the branchial arch neural crest. The basic helix–loop–helix transcription factor dHAND is also required for craniofacial development, and in endothelin-1 (ET-1) mutant embryos, dHAND expression in the branchial arches is down-regulated, implicating it as a transcriptional effector of ET-1 action. To determine the mechanism that links ET-1 signaling to dHAND transcription, we analyzed the dHAND gene for cis-regulatory elements that control transcription in the branchial arches. We describe an evolutionarily conserved dHAND enhancer that requires ET-1 signaling for activity. This enhancer contains four homeodomain binding sites that are required for branchial arch expression. By comparing protein binding to these sites in branchial arch extracts from endothelin receptor A (EdnrA) mutant and wild-type mouse embryos, we identified Dlx6, a member of the Distal-less family of homeodomain proteins, as an ET-1-dependent binding factor. Consistent with this conclusion, Dlx6 was down-regulated in branchial arches from EdnrA mutant mice. These results suggest that Dlx6 acts as an intermediary between ET-1 signaling and dHAND transcription during craniofacial morphogenesis. PMID:11711438

  2. Chronic hematic cyst of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orhan, K.; Delilbasi, C.; Nishiyama, H.; Furukawa, S.; Mitsunobu, K.

    2005-01-01

    Hematic cyst refers to accumulation of blood or blood breakdown products in a non epithelium-lined fibrous tissue capsule. Hepatic cyst is a term often used for deeply placed, incompletely resorbed hematoma hemorrhagic cyst, which may remain unchanged and unidentified for long periods of time. Trauma is the major causative factor, although it is often vague or totally uncalled by the patient. Chronic hematic cysts are uncommon lesions those can present diagnostic challenge. In this article we report a first case of a chronic hematic cyst of the temporomandibular joint TMJ. (author)

  3. Mothers' experiences when their infants were diagnosed with cleft ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traditionally the diagnosis of cleft lip and palate was made at birth or soon thereafter, but modern technology has led to the identification of cleft lip prenatally. The aim of this study was to describe 16 mothers' experiences of pre- and postnatal diagnosis of their infants' cleft lip and palate, and to develop clinical guidelines for ...

  4. Assessment of scar quality after cleft lip closure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frans, Franceline A.; van Zuijlen, Paul P. M.; Griot, J. P. W. Don; van der Horst, Chantal M. A. M.

    2012-01-01

    To assess scar quality after cleft lip repair. The linear scars of patients with cleft lip with or without cleft palate were evaluated in a prospective study using the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale. Linear regression was performed to identify which scar characteristics were important

  5. Evaluation of Teeth Development in Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-23

    Feb 23, 2018 ... in patients with cleft lip and palate using medical software ... to be used in routine dental treatment and in particular the need to do more study. ... cleft palate/lip surgery were examined. ... segment from the “evaluate” tab of the program. Teeth .... cases of cleft palate or lip. ..... of maxillary canines: A CT study.

  6. New insights about suprapatellar cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Crnkovic

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available bursa is located between the quadriceps tendon and femur, and it develops before the birth as a separate synovial compartment proximal to the knee joint. By the fifth month of fetal life there is a suprapatellar septum between the knee joint cavity and suprapatellar bursa which later perforates and involutes in a way that a normal communication between the cavity of bursa and knee is established. A small portion of the embrionic septum can later lag as more or less expressed suprapatellar plica. In case when suprapatellar plica has a small communication with valve mechanism or in case of complete septum, bursa becomes a separate compartment and potential location for the suprapatellar cyst development. Magnetic resonance imaging is recognised as the gold standard in diagnosis of knee cysts because of its ability to show cystic nature of the lesion, its relationship with other anatomic structures, as well as to establish whether other knee pathologies are present. Considering treatment possibilities, majority of cysts around the knee resolve spontaneously and should be treated by aspiration and application of corticosteroids. Suprapatellar cyst is a very rare knee pathology and it can in some occasions be treated using open or arthroscopic surgery.

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of cysts of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al'perovich, B.I.; Mitasov, V.Ya.

    1989-01-01

    Is is shown that ultrasonography, computer tomography, laparoscopy provide for liver cyst detection. Parasitic cyst of Echinococcus and opisthhordeiasis nature are subject to surgical treatment. Selective procedures under echinococcosis include echinococcotomy and liver resection, and under opisthorchiasis - liver resection. Under nonparasitic liver cysts of minor size dynamic observation is advisable, under medium, hard and multiple complication cysts - sergical treatment is advisable. Selective procedures under non-complicated cysts include cyst resection with tamponage using omentum, and under complicated multiple cysts - liver resection

  8. Reinke Edema: Watch For Vocal Fold Cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüzüner, Arzu; Demirci, Sule; Yavanoglu, Ahmet; Kurkcuoglu, Melih; Arslan, Necmi

    2015-06-01

    Reinke edema is one of the common cause of dysphonia middle-aged population, and severe thickening of vocal folds require surgical treatment. Smoking plays a major role on etiology. Vocal fold cysts are also benign lesions and vocal trauma blamed for acquired cysts. We would like to present 3 cases with vocal fold cyst related with Reinke edema. First case had a subepidermal epidermoid cyst with Reinke edema, which could be easily observed before surgery during laryngostroboscopy. Second case had a mucous retention cyst into the edematous Reinke tissue, which was detected during surgical intervention, and third case had a epidermoid cyst that occurred 2 months after before microlaryngeal operation regarding Reinke edema reduction. These 3 cases revealed that surgical management of Reinke edema needs a careful dissection and close follow-up after surgery for presence of vocal fold cysts.

  9. Chrysophyte cysts as potential environmental indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, David P.; Mahood, Albert D.

    1981-01-01

    Many Chrysophyte algae produce morphologically distinctive, siliceous, microscopic cysts during a resting stage of their life cycles; these cysts are often preserved in sediments. Scanning electron microscopy and Nomarski optics permit much more detailed observation of these cysts than was heretofore possible. We have used an ecologic and biogeographic approach to study the distribution of cyst forms in sediments and have established that many cyst types are found only in specific habitats, such as montane lakes, wet meadows, ephemeral ponds, and Sphagnum bogs. In the samples we have studied, cysts seem to be most common in fluctuating fresh-water habitats of low to moderate pH and some winter freezing. Numerous taxonomic problems have yet to be resolved. We believe that chrysophyte cysts have the potential to become a useful tool for both modern environmental assessments and paleoecological studies of Cenozoic fresh-water lacustrine deposits.

  10. Management strategy for unicameral bone cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuo, Chin-Yi; Fu, Yin-Chih; Chien, Song-Hsiung; Lin, Gau-Tyan; Wang, Gwo-Jaw

    2003-06-01

    The management of a unicameral bone cyst varies from percutaneous needle biopsy, aspiration, and local injection of steroid, autogenous bone marrow, or demineralized bone matrix to the more invasive surgical procedures of conventional curettage and grafting (with autogenous or allogenous bone) or subtotal resection with bone grafting. The best treatment for a unicameral bone cyst is yet to be identified. Better understanding of the pathology will change the concept of management. The aim of treatment is to prevent pathologic fracture, to promote cyst healing, and to avoid cyst recurrence and re-fracture. We retrospectively reviewed 17 cases of unicameral bone cysts (12 in the humerus, 3 in the femur, 2 in the fibula) managed by conservative observation, curettage and bone grafting with open reduction and internal fixation, or continuous decompression and drainage with a cannulated screw. We suggest percutaneous cannulated screw insertion to promote cyst healing and prevent pathologic fracture. We devised a protocol for the management of unicameral bone cysts.

  11. Diseases of the branquial apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Candela, V.; Wiehoff, A.; Avial, R.

    2000-01-01

    To correlate ht embryologic and radiologic findings in the branchial apparatus or system with the anomalies that can occur. We reviewed the cases of branchial anomalies examined over the past 6 years, finding periparotid cysts at the first branchial cleft (n=2), cysts (n=13) and fistulas (n=4) at the second, and cysts (n=2) and thymopharyngeal cysts (n=3) at the third. The studies included ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and fistulography. All the patients underwent surgery, with histological confirmation. Knowledge of the embryology of the branchial apparatus or system helps in the understanding of anomalies, which appear as cervical cystic masses, mainly located along the anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle, or as fistulas running from the exterior to the pharyngeal lumen at the level of the tonsillar fossa, sometimes forming sinuses, that is fistulas that are blind at either the external or internal end. The most common anomalies arise from the second branchial cleft and are easily diagnosed in the presence of a cystic mass located to one side of the SCM muscle, behind the submandibular gland and occupying the carotid space. (Author) 14 refs

  12. Diseases of the branquial apparatus; Pataologia del aparato branquial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perz-Candela, V.; Wiehoff, A.; Avial, R. [Hospital Universitario Maternoinfantil de Canarias. Las Palmas de Gran Canarias (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    To correlate ht embryologic and radiologic findings in the branchial apparatus or system with the anomalies that can occur. We reviewed the cases of branchial anomalies examined over the past 6 years, finding periparotid cysts at the first branchial cleft (n=2), cysts (n=13) and fistulas (n=4) at the second, and cysts (n=2) and thymopharyngeal cysts (n=3) at the third. The studies included ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and fistulography. All the patients underwent surgery, with histological confirmation. Knowledge of the embryology of the branchial apparatus or system helps in the understanding of anomalies, which appear as cervical cystic masses, mainly located along the anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle, or as fistulas running from the exterior to the pharyngeal lumen at the level of the tonsillar fossa, sometimes forming sinuses, that is fistulas that are blind at either the external or internal end. The most common anomalies arise from the second branchial cleft and are easily diagnosed in the presence of a cystic mass located to one side of the SCM muscle, behind the submandibular gland and occupying the carotid space. (Author) 14 refs.

  13. Feeding interventions for growth and development in infants with cleft lip, cleft palate or cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessell, Alyson; Hooper, Lee; Shaw, William C; Reilly, Sheena; Reid, Julie; Glenny, Anne-Marie

    2011-02-16

    Cleft lip and cleft palate are common birth defects, affecting about one baby of every 700 born. Feeding these babies is an immediate concern and there is evidence of delay in growth of children with a cleft as compared to those without clefting. In an effort to combat reduced weight for height, a variety of advice and devices are recommended to aid feeding of babies with clefts. This review aims to assess the effects of these feeding interventions in babies with cleft lip and/or palate on growth, development and parental satisfaction. The following electronic databases were searched: the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 27 October 2010), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 4), MEDLINE via OVID (1950 to 27 October 2010), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 27 October 2010), PsycINFO via OVID (1950 to 27 October 2010) and CINAHL via EBSCO (1980 to 27 October 2010). Attempts were made to identify both unpublished and ongoing studies. There was no restriction with regard to language of publication. Studies were included if they were randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of feeding interventions for babies born with cleft lip, cleft palate or cleft lip and palate up to the age of 6 months (from term). Studies were assessed for relevance independently and in duplicate. All studies meeting the inclusion criteria were data extracted and assessed for validity independently by each member of the review team. Authors were contacted for clarification or missing information whenever possible. Five RCTs with a total of 292 babies, were included in the review. Comparisons made within the RCTs were squeezable versus rigid feeding bottles (two studies), breastfeeding versus spoon-feeding (one study) and maxillary plate versus no plate (two studies). No statistically significant differences were shown for any of the primary outcomes when comparing bottle types, although squeezable bottles were less likely to require

  14. Cleft palate caused by congenital teratoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyssière, Alexis; Streit, Libor; Traoré, Hamady; Bénateau, Hervé

    2017-02-01

    A cleft palate results from incomplete fusion of the lateral palatine processes, the median nasal septum and the median palatine process. This case report describes a rare case of congenital teratoma originating from the nasal septum that may have interfered with the fusion of the palatal shelves during embryonic development, resulting in a cleft palate. An infant girl was born at 40 weeks of gestation weighing 3020 g with a complete cleft palate associated with a large central nasopharyngeal tumour. Computed tomography (CT) of the head showed a well defined mass of mixed density. The tumour was attached to the nasal septum in direct contact with the cleft palate. A biopsy confirmed the teratoma. Tumour resection was performed at 5 months, soft palate reconstruction at 7 months and hard palate closure at 14 months. There was no sign of local recurrence 1 year later. Most teratomas are benign and the prognosis is usually good. However, recurrence is not rare if germ cell carcinomatous foci are present within the teratoma. For these reasons, we advocate the use of a two-stage procedure in which closure of the cleft palate is postponed until histological examination confirms complete excision of the teratoma.

  15. Occlusal Classification in Relation to Original Cleft Width in Patients With Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Andrew H; Patel, Kamlesh B; Maschhoff, Clayton W; Huebener, Donald V; Skolnick, Gary B; Naidoo, Sybill D; Woo, Albert S

    2015-09-01

    To determine a correlation between the width of the cleft palate measured at the time of lip adhesion, definitive lip repair, and palatoplasty and the subsequent occlusal classification of patients born with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Retrospective, observational study. Referral, urban, children's hospital Participants : Dental models and records of 270 patients were analyzed. None. Angle occlusion classification. The mean age at which occlusal classification was determined was 11 ± 0.3 years. Of the children studies, 84 were diagnosed with Class I or II occlusion, 67 were diagnosed with Class III occlusion, and 119 were lost to follow up or transferred care. Mean cleft widths were significantly larger in subjects with Class III occlusion for all measures at time of lip adhesion and definitive lip repair (P cleft widths were significantly greater at the alveolus (P = .025) but not at the midportion of the hard palate (P = .35) or posterior hard palate (P = .10). Cleft widths from the lip through to the posterior hard palate are generally greater in children who are diagnosed with Class III occlusion later in life. Notably, the alveolar cleft width is significantly greater at each time point for patients who went on to develop Class III occlusion. There were no significant differences in cleft widths between patients diagnosed later with Class I and Class II occlusions.

  16. The Fetal Cleft palate: V. Elucidation of the Mechanism of Palatal Clefting in the Congenital Caprine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maternal ingestion of Nicotiana glauca from gestation days 32 through 41 results in a high incidence of cleft palate in Spanish goats. This caprine cleft palate model was used to evaluate the temporal sequence of palatal shelf fusion throughout the period of cleft induction with the poisonous plant...

  17. A study on the dental anomalities and site of cleft associated with cleft lip and/or palate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Hyung Kyu

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate possible correlation between the dental anomalies and site of cleft in cleft lip and palate. In this study, 142 patients who had cleft lip and/or cleft palate were examined. The results are as follows. 1. The incidence of missing tooth was high in the permanent dentition as compared to the incidence in the deciduous dentition. 2. There was not much difference of incidence of supernumerary tooth between deciduous and permanent dentition in the group of patients who had cleft lip and jaw with or without cleft palate. 3. In the group of patients who had cleft lip and jaw with or without cleft palate, the frequency of incidence of cleft sides was higher in unilateral than bilateral cases. And, incidence of left sides was higher than right sides. 4. The type of cleft between central incisor and canine with missing lateral incisor was most frequent in permanent dentition and the type of cleft between central and lateral incisor was most frequent in deciduous dentition. 5. The type of cleft associated with tooth position in deciduous dentition was not almost the same in the succeeding permanent dentition.

  18. A study on the dental anomalities and site of cleft associated with cleft lip and/or palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Hyung Kyu [Department of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to investigate possible correlation between the dental anomalies and site of cleft in cleft lip and palate. In this study, 142 patients who had cleft lip and/or cleft palate were examined. The results are as follows. 1. The incidence of missing tooth was high in the permanent dentition as compared to the incidence in the deciduous dentition. 2. There was not much difference of incidence of supernumerary tooth between deciduous and permanent dentition in the group of patients who had cleft lip and jaw with or without cleft palate. 3. In the group of patients who had cleft lip and jaw with or without cleft palate, the frequency of incidence of cleft sides was higher in unilateral than bilateral cases. And, incidence of left sides was higher than right sides. 4. The type of cleft between central incisor and canine with missing lateral incisor was most frequent in permanent dentition and the type of cleft between central and lateral incisor was most frequent in deciduous dentition. 5. The type of cleft associated with tooth position in deciduous dentition was not almost the same in the succeeding permanent dentition.

  19. Association studies of low-frequency coding variants in nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, Elizabeth J; Carlson, Jenna C; Shaffer, John R

    2017-01-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P) is a group of common human birth defects with complex etiology. Although genome-wide association studies have successfully identified a number of risk loci, these loci only account for about 20% of the heritability of orofacial clefts. ...

  20. Energetic cost of active branchial ventilation in the sharksucker, Echeneis naucrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, J F; Lomholt, J P

    1983-01-01

    active to ram gill ventilation were from 10-50 cm s-1, depending on the size of the fish. 3. Oxygen consumption increased between 3.7 and 5.7% when the fish shifted from ram gill ventilation to active branchial pumping. 4. When water velocity was increased beyond the threshold for ram gill ventilation......1. Sharksuckers use active branchial ventilation when swimming or at rest in stationary water. When attached to a moving object or when placed in a water current, they shift to ram gill ventilation as water velocity exceeds a certain threshold. 2. Water velocities required for the transition from......, no further increase in oxygen consumption was observed. 5. It is concluded that the energetic cost of active ventilation in sharksuckers is lower than has previously been reported for fish in general....

  1. Bilateral optic disc pit with maculopathy in a patient with cleft lip and cleft palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisha Seth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic disc pit (ODP is small, gray-white, oval depression found at the optic nerve head. It is a congenital defect that occurs due to imperfect closure of superior edge of the embryonic fissure. Cleft lip and palate are also congenital midline abnormalities occurring due to defect in the fusion of frontonasal prominence, maxillary prominence and mandibular prominence. There is only one case report describing the occurrence of ODP in a young patient with cleft lip and palate who also had basal encephalocele. We describe a 52-year-old patient with congenital cleft lip and palate with bilateral ODP with maculopathy but without any other midline abnormality.

  2. Acetic acid sclerotheraphy of renal cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Hoon Pyo; Oh, Joo Hyeong; Yoon, Yup; Kong, Keun Young; Kim, Eui Jong; Goo, Jang Sung

    1998-01-01

    Sclerotherapy for renal cysts was performed, using 50% acetic acid as new sclerosing agent. We report the methods and results of this procedure. Fifteen patients underwent sclerotherapy for renal cyst, using 50% acetic acid. Because four patients were lost to follow-up, only 11 of the 15 were included in this study. The renal cysts, including one infected case, were diagnosed by ultrasonograpy (n=3D10) ormagnetic resonance imaging (n=3D1). The patient group consisted of four men and seven women(mean age, 59 years; range, 23-77). At first, the cyst was completely aspirated, and 25 volume% of aspirated volume was replaced with 50% sterile acetic acid through the drainage catheter. During the follwing 20 minutes, the patient changed position, and the acetic acid was then removed from the cyst. Finally, the drainage catheter was removed, after cleaning the cyst with saline. After treatment of infection by antibiotics and catheter drainage for 7 days, sclerotherapy in the infected case followed the same procedure. In order to observe changes in the size of renal cysts and recurrence, all patients were followed up by ultrasound between 2 and 8 months. We defined response to therapy as follows:complete regression as under 5 volume%, partial regression as 5-50 volume% and no response as more than 50 volume% of initial cyst volume. No clinically significant complication occured during the procedures or follow-up periods. All cysts regressed completely during follow-up of 8 months. Complete regression occurred as follows: two cysts at 2 months, seven cysts at 4 months, two cysts at 6 months. Two cysts showed residues at the last follow-up, at 4 and 6 months, respectively. The volume of residual cysts decreased to under 5 volume% of initial volume, however. Completely regressed cysts did not recurr during follow-up. Acetic acid sclerotherapy for renal cysts showed good results, regardless of the dilution of sclerosing agent with residual cyst fluid, and no significant

  3. Nasal Airway Dysfunction in Children with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate: Results of a Cross-Sectional Population-Based Study, with Anatomical and Surgical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, Danielle L; Allori, Alexander C; Carlson, Anna R; Pien, Irene J; Watkins, Stephanie E; Aylsworth, Arthur S; Meyer, Robert E; Pimenta, Luiz A; Strauss, Ronald P; Ramsey, Barry L; Raynor, Eileen; Marcus, Jeffrey R

    2016-12-01

    The aesthetic aspects of the cleft lip nasal deformity have been appreciated for over a century, but the functional implications have remained largely underappreciated or misunderstood. This study describes the frequency and severity of nasal obstructive symptoms among children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate, addressing the hypotheses that age, cleft type, and severity are associated with the development of nasal obstructive symptoms. Children with nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or cleft palate and a comparison group of unaffected children born from 1997 to 2003 were identified through the North Carolina Birth Defects Monitoring Program and birth certificates. Nasal airway obstruction was measured using the validated Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation scale. The survey was completed by parental proxy for 176 children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate and 333 unaffected children. Nasal obstructive symptoms were more frequently reported in cleft lip with cleft palate compared with unaffected children (p cleft lip with or without alveolus and isolated cleft palate were not statistically different from unaffected children. Patients with unilateral cleft lip with cleft palate were found to be more severely affected than bilateral cases. Nasal obstruction was observed in early childhood, although severity worsened in adolescence. This population-based study reports a high prevalence of nasal obstructive symptoms in children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate based on type and severity of the cleft. The authors encourage cleft teams to consider using this or similar screening methods to identify which children may benefit from functional rhinoplasty. Risk, I.

  4. Open and Endoscopic Management of Fourth Branchial Pouch Sinus – Our Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunachalam, Pavai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Acute suppurative neck infections associated with third or fourth branchial arch fistulas are frequently recurrent. Third and fourth branchial arch anomalies are much less common and usually present with recurrent left thyroid lobe abscesses. Objectives The authors present their experience in treating such cases that were observed exclusively in children. Methods The study involved performing a retrospective review of five cases in PSG Institute of Medical Sciences & Research. All cases were evaluated radiologically and with Direct Rigid hypopharyngoscopy. Definitive surgery was performed, including hemithyroidectomy. Results The patients consisted of five children, two boys and three girls. All of them presented with recurrent episodes of neck infection. Investigations performed included computed tomography (CT fistulography, rigid hypopharyngoscopy and ultrasound, which were useful in preoperatively delineating pyriform sinus fistulous tract. All patients underwent neck exploration with excision of the fistulous tract and hemithyroidectomy. Upon follow-up, all patients are asymptomatic. Conclusions Recurrent neck abscesses in a child should alert the clinician to the possibility of a fourth branchial arch anomaly; therefore, children with this condition require a complete evaluation so the anomaly can be ruled out.

  5. Open and Endoscopic Management of Fourth Branchial Pouch Sinus – Our Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, Pavai; Vaidyanathan, Venkatraman; Sengottan, Palaninathan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute suppurative neck infections associated with third or fourth branchial arch fistulas are frequently recurrent. Third and fourth branchial arch anomalies are much less common and usually present with recurrent left thyroid lobe abscesses. Objectives The authors present their experience in treating such cases that were observed exclusively in children. Methods The study involved performing a retrospective review of five cases in PSG Institute of Medical Sciences & Research. All cases were evaluated radiologically and with Direct Rigid hypopharyngoscopy. Definitive surgery was performed, including hemithyroidectomy. Results The patients consisted of five children, two boys and three girls. All of them presented with recurrent episodes of neck infection. Investigations performed included computed tomography (CT) fistulography, rigid hypopharyngoscopy and ultrasound, which were useful in preoperatively delineating pyriform sinus fistulous tract. All patients underwent neck exploration with excision of the fistulous tract and hemithyroidectomy. Upon follow-up, all patients are asymptomatic. Conclusions Recurrent neck abscesses in a child should alert the clinician to the possibility of a fourth branchial arch anomaly; therefore, children with this condition require a complete evaluation so the anomaly can be ruled out. PMID:26491476

  6. Open and Endoscopic Management of Fourth Branchial Pouch Sinus - Our Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, Pavai; Vaidyanathan, Venkatraman; Sengottan, Palaninathan

    2015-10-01

    Introduction Acute suppurative neck infections associated with third or fourth branchial arch fistulas are frequently recurrent. Third and fourth branchial arch anomalies are much less common and usually present with recurrent left thyroid lobe abscesses. Objectives The authors present their experience in treating such cases that were observed exclusively in children. Methods The study involved performing a retrospective review of five cases in PSG Institute of Medical Sciences & Research. All cases were evaluated radiologically and with Direct Rigid hypopharyngoscopy. Definitive surgery was performed, including hemithyroidectomy. Results The patients consisted of five children, two boys and three girls. All of them presented with recurrent episodes of neck infection. Investigations performed included computed tomography (CT) fistulography, rigid hypopharyngoscopy and ultrasound, which were useful in preoperatively delineating pyriform sinus fistulous tract. All patients underwent neck exploration with excision of the fistulous tract and hemithyroidectomy. Upon follow-up, all patients are asymptomatic. Conclusions Recurrent neck abscesses in a child should alert the clinician to the possibility of a fourth branchial arch anomaly; therefore, children with this condition require a complete evaluation so the anomaly can be ruled out.

  7. [Use of Airwayscope with pediatric intlock in a patient with first and second branchial arch syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Aiko; Takeda, Akiko; Arai, Toshimi; Murozono, Michihiro

    2013-12-01

    First and second branchial arch syndrome is a congenital anomaly of craniofacial dysplasia involving organs derived from the second branchial arch. The main characteristics are microtia and mandibular hypoplasia. A 6-year-old boy was scheduled for adenoidectomy and bilateral myringotomy and tube placement. Slow induction was performed with oxygen, nitrous oxide, and sevoflurane. No difficulties were encountered during mask ventilation, and rocuronium was administered intravenously. His epiglottis was not visible during laryngoscopy. Therefore, we used the Airwayscope (AWS). His glottis was visible after application of cricold pressure from the left side. However, we could not closely conform his epiglottis to the mark on the AWS. Therefore, we passed a fiberoptic bronchoscope through a tracheal tube and placed it in the AWS. We attempted to intubate the trachea, but could not guide the bronchoscope to his glottis. We then attempted to pull the tracheal tube to improve the mobility of the bronchoscope. Control of the bronchoscope consequently became easy We successfully guided it to his glottis and performed tracheal intubation. His condition was stable during the procedure. In conclusion, we safely performed tracheal intubation in a patient with first and second branchial arch syndrome using the AWS and a fiberoptic bronchoscope.

  8. Two developmentally temporal quantitative trait loci underlie convergent evolution of increased branchial bone length in sticklebacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Priscilla A.; Glazer, Andrew M.; Cleves, Phillip A.; Smith, Alyson S.; Miller, Craig T.

    2014-01-01

    In convergent evolution, similar phenotypes evolve repeatedly in independent populations, often reflecting adaptation to similar environments. Understanding whether convergent evolution proceeds via similar or different genetic and developmental mechanisms offers insight towards the repeatability and predictability of evolution. Oceanic populations of threespine stickleback fish, Gasterosteus aculeatus, have repeatedly colonized countless freshwater lakes and streams, where new diets lead to morphological adaptations related to feeding. Here, we show that heritable increases in branchial bone length have convergently evolved in two independently derived freshwater stickleback populations. In both populations, an increased bone growth rate in juveniles underlies the convergent adult phenotype, and one population also has a longer cartilage template. Using F2 crosses from these two freshwater populations, we show that two quantitative trait loci (QTL) control branchial bone length at distinct points in development. In both populations, a QTL on chromosome 21 controls bone length throughout juvenile development, and a QTL on chromosome 4 controls bone length only in adults. In addition to these similar developmental profiles, these QTL show similar chromosomal locations in both populations. Our results suggest that sticklebacks have convergently evolved longer branchial bones using similar genetic and developmental programmes in two independently derived populations. PMID:24966315

  9. [Resection of the recurrent third branchial fistula under gastroscope with assistance of yellow zebra guidewire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X; Huang, Z C; Tao, F; Ou, X L

    2016-02-01

    To investigate clinical aspects and a new operative method for resecting third branchial fistula. The clinical aspects of 4 patients with third branchial fistula were retrospectively analyzed. It is difficult to locate the inner orifice of fistula through neck path due to tiny diameter of inner orifice. The inner orifice could be found and closed effectively by inserting yellow zebra guidewire from sinus piriformis with gastroscope. The mucous membrane of sinus piriformis could not be damaged due to the soft pointed end of yellow zebra guidewire. 4 cases were treated successfully without pharyngeal fistula or recurrent laryngeal nerve injury. No recurrent infections were found in all cases with follows-up of 6-66 months. Ineffectiveness of radiography with meglumine diatrizoate or oral administration of methylene blue before operation indicates tiny fistula. In this case, resection of third branchial fistula with the assistance of gastroscope and yellow zebra guidewire under general anesthesia can be performed. This innovative method of diagnosis and treatment is worth of application clinically.

  10. Branchial lesions associated with abundant apoptotic cells in oysters Ostrea edulis of Galicia (NW Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirella da Silva, P; Villalba, Antonio; Sunila, Inke

    2006-06-12

    An experiment to evaluate differences in growth, mortality and disease susceptibility among Ostrea edulis stocks was performed. Five families were produced from each of 4 oyster populations (Irish, Greek and 2 Galician). The spat were transferred to a raft in the Ria de Arousa (Galicia, Spain) for grow-out. Monthly samples of each family were histologically processed from 2001 to 2003. One of the pathological conditions discovered by this study was the occurrence of extensive branchial lesions characterized by haemocytic infiltration and loss of branchial architecture. Furthermore, abundant atypical cells occurred among the haemocytes in the lesions in the branchial connective and epithelial tissues, but rarely in the mantle. These cells were contracted in size with nuclei showing chromatin condensation and fragmentation. Some nuclear chromatin aggregated under the nuclear membranes into crescent shapes, whereas others were uniformly dense. Those characteristics suggested that the cells were apoptotic haemocytes, which was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) assay using the Apoptag Kit on paraffin sections. A low prevalence of gill lesions was detected in some, but not all, families of every origin peaking in July 2002 and April 2003. No etiologic agent was identified by either histology or TEM; thus, the cause of the abundance of apoptotic cells remains unclear.

  11. Epidermoid Cyst of Mandible Ramus: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loxha, Mergime Prekazi; Salihu, Sami; Kryeziu, Kaltrina; Loxha, Sadushe; Agani, Zana; Hamiti, Vjosa; Rexhepi, Aida

    2016-06-01

    An epidermoid cyst is a benign cyst usually found on the skin. Bone cysts are very rare and if they appear in bone they usually appear in the distal phalanges of the fingers. Epidermoid cysts of the jaws are uncommon. We present a case, of a 41 year-old female patient admitted to our department because of pain and swelling in the parotid and masseteric region-left side. There was no trismus, pathological findings in skin, high body temperature level, infra-alveolar nerves anesthesia or lymphadenopathy present. The orthopantomography revealed a cystic lesion and a unilocular lesion that included mandibular ramus on the left side with 3 cm in diameter. Under total anesthesia, a cyst had been reached and was enucleated. Histopathologic findings showed that the pathologic lesion was an epidermoid cyst. Epidermoid and dermoid cysts are rare, benign lesions found throughout the body. Only a few cases in literature describe an intraossesus epidermoid cyst. Our case is an epidermoid cyst with a rare location in the region of the mandibular ramus. It is not associated with any trauma in this region except medical history reveals there was an operative removal of a wisdom tooth 12 years ago in the same side. These cysts are interesting from the etiological point of view. They should be considered in the differential diagnosis of other radiolucent lesions of the jaws. Surgically they have a very good prognosis, and are non-aggressive lesions.

  12. Macrophage polarization differs between apical granulomas, radicular cysts, and dentigerous cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Manuel; Schlittenbauer, Tilo; Moebius, Patrick; Büttner-Herold, Maike; Ries, Jutta; Preidl, Raimund; Geppert, Carol-Immanuel; Neukam, Friedrich W; Wehrhan, Falk

    2018-01-01

    Apical periodontitis can appear clinically as apical granulomas or radicular cysts. There is evidence that immunologic factors are involved in the pathogenesis of both pathologies. In contrast to radicular cysts, the dentigerous cysts have a developmental origin. Macrophage polarization (M1 vs M2) is a main regulator of tissue homeostasis and differentiation. There are no studies comparing macrophage polarization in apical granulomas, radicular cysts, and dentigerous cysts. Forty-one apical granulomas, 23 radicular cysts, and 23 dentigerous cysts were analyzed in this study. A tissue microarray (TMA) of the 87 consecutive specimens was created, and CD68-, CD11c-, CD163-, and MRC1-positive macrophages were detected by immunohistochemical methods. TMAs were digitized, and the expression of macrophage markers was quantitatively assessed. Radicular cysts are characterized by M1 polarization of macrophages while apical granulomas show a significantly higher degree of M2 polarization. Dentigerous cysts have a significantly lower M1 polarization than both analyzed periapical lesions (apical granulomas and radicular cysts) and accordingly, a significantly higher M2 polarization than radicular cysts. Macrophage cell density in dentigerous cysts is significantly lower than in the periapical lesions. The development of apical periodontitis towards apical granulomas or radicular cysts might be directed by macrophage polarization. Radicular cyst formation is associated with an increased M1 polarization of infiltrating macrophages. In contrast to radicular cysts, dentigerous cysts are characterized by a low macrophage infiltration and a high degree of M2 polarization, possibly reflecting their developmental rather than inflammatory origin. As M1 polarization of macrophages is triggered by bacterial antigens, these results underline the need for sufficient bacterial clearance during endodontic treatment to prevent a possible M1 macrophage-derived stimulus for radicular cyst

  13. Congenital cervical bronchogenic cyst: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiralj Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bronchogenic cysts are rare congenital anomalies of the embryonic foregut. They are caused by abnormal budding of diverticulum of the embryonic foregut between the 26th and 40th day of gestation. Bronchogenic cysts can appear in the mediastinum and pulmonary parenchyma, or at ectopic sites (neck, subcutaneous tissue or abdomen. So far, 70 cases of cervical localization of bronchogenic cysts have been reported. Majority of bronchogenic cysts have been diagnosed in the pediatric population. Bronchogenic cysts of the cervical area are generally asymptomatic and symptoms may occur if cysts become large or in case of infection of the cyst. The diagnosis is made based on clinical findings, radiological examination, but histopathologic findings are essential for establishing the final diagnosis. Treatment of cervical bronchogenic cyst involves surgical excision. Case Outline. Authors present a case of a 6-year-old female patient sent by a pediatrician to a maxillofacial surgeon due to asymptomatic lump on the left side of the neck. The patient had frequent respiratory infections and respiratory obstructions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the neck was performed and a well-circumscribed cystic formation on the left side of the neck was observed, with paratracheal location. The complete excision of the cyst was made transcervically. Histopathological findings pointed to bronchogenic cyst. Conclusion. Cervical bronchogenic cysts are rare congenital malformations. Considering the location, clinical findings and the radiological features, these cysts resemble other cervical lesions. Surgical treatment is important because it is both therapeutic and diagnostic. Reliable diagnosis of bronchogenic cysts is based on histopathological examination.

  14. Intrathoracic Paraspinal Mesothelial Cyst: A Report of Two Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Se Won; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Heo, Jeong Nam; Park, Choong Ki; Paik, Seung Sam; Chung, Won Sang; Chon, Soon Ho

    2010-01-01

    Intrathoracic mesothelial cysts are congenital developmental cysts usually located in the anterior cardiophrenic angle region (so called, pericardial cysts). We report two rare cases of an intrathoracic paraspinal mesothelial cyst which was purely cystic and had no perceptible cyst wall on CT or MRI with histopathologic findings

  15. Parents' age and the risk of oral clefts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, C.; Skytthe, A.; Vach, W.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some malformations are clearly associated with older maternal age, but the effect of older age of the father is less certain. The aim of this study is to determine the degree to which maternal age and paternal age independently influence the risk of having a child with oral clefts....... In a joint analysis, both maternal and paternal ages were associated with the risk of cleft lip with or without cleft palate, but the contribution of each was dependent on the age of the other parent. In the analysis of cleft palate only, the effect of maternal age disappeared, leaving only paternal age...... as a risk factor. CONCLUSION: Both high maternal age and high paternal age were associated with cleft lip with or without cleft palate. Higher paternal age but not maternal age increased the risk of cleft palate only....

  16. Genetic survey of a group of children with clefting: implications for genetic counseling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstee, Y.; Kors, N.; Hennekam, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    A cleft lip, cleft palate, or both are associated with a high frequency of other anomalies. This study gives an inventory of associated anomalies in a consecutive group of children (n = 36) with clefts, referred to a local multidisciplinary cleft team in the Netherlands. In 47.2% of cleft patients

  17. Hearing outcomes in patients with cleft lip/palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skuladottir, Hildur; Sivertsen, Ase; Assmus, Jorg; Remme, Asa Rommetveit; Dahlen, Marianne; Vindenes, Hallvard

    2015-03-01

    Objective : Children with cleft lip and palate or cleft palate only have a high incidence of conductive hearing loss from otitis media with effusion. Studies demonstrating longitudinal results are lacking. This study was undertaken to investigate long-term longitudinal hearing outcomes of children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate and cleft palate only. Design : Retrospective chart review. Setting : Clinical charts of patients born with cleft lip and palate or cleft palate only in 1985 to 1994 who were referred to the cleft team in Bergen, Norway. Study findings include 15 years of follow-up. Participants : The study population consisted of 317 children of whom 159 had nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate and 158 had nonsyndromic cleft palate. Main Outcome Measures : Pure tone average calculated from pure tone audiometry at ages 4, 6, and 15 years. Results : The median pure tone average significantly improved with increasing age. For the cleft lip and palate group, the median pure tone average at ages 4, 6, and 15 years was 16 dB hearing level (HL), 13 dB HL, and 9 dB HL, respectively (P ≤ .001). In the cleft palate group the median pure tone average at ages 4, 6, and 15 years was 15 dB HL, 12 dB HL, and 9 dB HL, respectively (P ≤ .001). There was no significant difference in the hearing levels between the two groups. Patients who had surgical closure of the palate at age 18 months had a significantly better pure tone average outcome at age 15 compared with patients who had surgery at 12 months. Conclusions : Hearing improves significantly from childhood to adolescence in patients with cleft lip and palate and cleft palate only.

  18. Cleft palate with/without cleft lip in French children: radiographic evaluation of prevalence, location and coexistence of dental anomalies inside and outside cleft region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangione, Francesca; Nguyen, Laure; Foumou, Nathalie; Bocquet, Emmanuelle; Dursun, Elisabeth

    2018-03-01

    Prevalence of dental anomalies in cleft patients is higher than that in general population. The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of dental anomalies and their coexistence in French children with cleft and, then, to investigate the relation between the dental anomalies and the cleft type. Seventy-four non-syndromic cleft patients (6-16 years old) from Lille Regional University and Mondor-Chenevier Hospitals (France) were included. Clefts were classified as right/left unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP), bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP) and cleft palate (CP). Dental anomalies were investigated on panoramic radiographs and categorized as agenesis, supernumerary teeth, incisor rotations, impacted canines and shape anomalies. Prevalence and gender distribution of dental anomalies, mean number of affected teeth per patient, agenesis occurrence and location, and coexistence of dental anomalies were analysed by cleft type. 96.0% of patients presented at least one dental anomaly (agenesis 83.8%, incisor rotations 25.7%, shape anomalies 21.6%, impacted canines 18.9%, supernumerary teeth 8.1%). BCLP patients had a higher number of affected teeth, and left UCLP patients had a higher one compared to right UCLP patients. Distribution of inside (45.3%) and outside (54.7%) cleft region agenesis was similar. Adjacent (31.8%) and not adjacent (33.3%) combined dental anomalies were often encountered. Dental anomalies were localized inside as well as outside cleft region and were often associated with each other. BCLP patients were more affected. Early radiographic evaluation allows a comprehensive diagnosis of inside and outside cleft region anomalies, required for the multidisciplinary dental treatment.

  19. Soft tissue aneurysmal bone cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.L.; Gielen, J.L.; Delrue, F.; De Schepper, A.M.A. [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen (University of Antwerp), Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650, Edegem (Belgium); Salgado, R. [Department of Pathology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen (University of Antwerp), Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650, Edegem (Belgium)

    2004-08-01

    A soft tissue aneurysmal bone cyst located in the right gluteus medius of a 21-year-old man is reported. On conventional radiography, the lesion demonstrated a spherically trabeculated mass with a calcific rim. On CT scan, it showed a well-organized peripheral calcification resembling a myositis ossificans. On MRI, it presented as a multilocular, cystic lesion with fluid-fluid levels. The lesion had no solid components except for intralesional septa. Although findings on imaging and histology were identical to those described in classical aneurysmal bone cyst, diagnosis was delayed because of lack of knowledge of this entity and its resemblance to the more familiar post-traumatic heterotopic ossification (myositis ossificans). (orig.)

  20. Soft tissue aneurysmal bone cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.L.; Gielen, J.L.; Delrue, F.; De Schepper, A.M.A.; Salgado, R.

    2004-01-01

    A soft tissue aneurysmal bone cyst located in the right gluteus medius of a 21-year-old man is reported. On conventional radiography, the lesion demonstrated a spherically trabeculated mass with a calcific rim. On CT scan, it showed a well-organized peripheral calcification resembling a myositis ossificans. On MRI, it presented as a multilocular, cystic lesion with fluid-fluid levels. The lesion had no solid components except for intralesional septa. Although findings on imaging and histology were identical to those described in classical aneurysmal bone cyst, diagnosis was delayed because of lack of knowledge of this entity and its resemblance to the more familiar post-traumatic heterotopic ossification (myositis ossificans). (orig.)