WorldWideScience

Sample records for brain visualisation conditions

  1. Visualising Deteriorating Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Andrews, RN, B.Sc. (Hons, M.Sc., Ph.D.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The research aims were to investigate the difficulties ward staff experienced in detecting deterioration and how these were resolved. The emphasis within the literature tends to be on identifying premonitory signs that may be useful in predicting deterioration. Changes in respiratory rate is the most consistent of these (Fieselmann et al. 1993; Sax and Charlson 1987; Schein et al. 1990; Smith and Wood 1998 but in common with other signs, it lacks sensitivity and specificity. The sample consisted of 44 nurses, doctors (Interns and health care support workers from a general medical and surgical ward. Data were collected by means of nonparticipant observations and interviews, using grounded theory as originated by (Glaser and Strauss 1967 and (Glaser 1978. As data were collected, the constant comparative method and theoretical sensitivity were used as outlined in grounded theory. A core category of “visualising deteriorating conditions” emerged, together with its sub-core categories of “intuitive knowing”, “baselining” and “grabbing attention”.The main concern in visualising deteriorating conditions is to ensure that patients suspected of deterioration are successfully referred to medical staff. The aim is to convince those who can treat or prevent further deterioration to intervene. Through intuitive knowing they pick up that patients have changed in a way that requires a medical assessment. To make the referral more credible, nurses attempt to contextualise any changes in patients by baselining (establishing baselines. Finally with the backup of colleagues, nurses refer patients by providing as much persuasive information as possible in a way that grabs attention. The whole process is facilitated by knowledge and experience, together with mutual trust and respect.

  2. Segmentation and Visualisation of Human Brain Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hult, Roger

    2003-10-01

    In this thesis the focus is mainly on the development of segmentation techniques for human brain structures and of the visualisation of such structures. The images of the brain are both anatomical images (magnet resonance imaging (MRI) and autoradiography) and functional images that show blood flow (functional magnetic imaging (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and single photon emission tomography (SPECT)). When working with anatomical images, the structures segmented are visible as different parts of the brain, e.g. the brain cortex, the hippocampus, or the amygdala. In functional images, the activity or the blood flow that be seen. Grey-level morphology methods are used in the segmentations to make tissue types in the images more homogenous and minimise difficulties with connections to outside tissue. A method for automatic histogram thresholding is also used. Furthermore, there are binary operations such as logic operation between masks and binary morphology operations. The visualisation of the segmented structures uses either surface rendering or volume rendering. For the visualisation of thin structures, surface rendering is the better choice since otherwise some voxels might be missed. It is possible to display activation from a functional image on the surface of a segmented cortex. A new method for autoradiographic images has been developed, which integrates registration, background compensation, and automatic thresholding to get faster and more reliable results than the standard techniques give.

  3. Segmentation and Visualisation of Human Brain Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hult, Roger

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis the focus is mainly on the development of segmentation techniques for human brain structures and of the visualisation of such structures. The images of the brain are both anatomical images (magnet resonance imaging (MRI) and autoradiography) and functional images that show blood flow (functional magnetic imaging (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and single photon emission tomography (SPECT)). When working with anatomical images, the structures segmented are visible as different parts of the brain, e.g. the brain cortex, the hippocampus, or the amygdala. In functional images, the activity or the blood flow that be seen. Grey-level morphology methods are used in the segmentations to make tissue types in the images more homogenous and minimise difficulties with connections to outside tissue. A method for automatic histogram thresholding is also used. Furthermore, there are binary operations such as logic operation between masks and binary morphology operations. The visualisation of the segmented structures uses either surface rendering or volume rendering. For the visualisation of thin structures, surface rendering is the better choice since otherwise some voxels might be missed. It is possible to display activation from a functional image on the surface of a segmented cortex. A new method for autoradiographic images has been developed, which integrates registration, background compensation, and automatic thresholding to get faster and more reliable results than the standard techniques give

  4. Patient specific 3D visualisation of human brain | Baichoo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    University of Mauritius Research Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 15, No 1 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Patient specific 3D visualisation of human brain.

  5. Fluid flow in panel radiator under various conditions - thermographic visualisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bašta Jiří

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Thermographic investigation of a heating panel radiator under various conditions, especially with various heating water volume flow rate is described in this article. For a radiator type 10-500x1000 TBOE and for two levels of inlet water temperature (75 and 55 °C a set of thermal images of surface temperature patterns for various values of heating water volume flow rate was taken. The initial value of flow rate was derived from nominal heating output and recalculated to real conditions. An increase of volume flow rate higher than 15 % over the nominal recalculated value is for the studied cases easily detectable on the resulting thermal images.

  6. One decade of functional imaging in schizophrenia research. From visualisation of basic information processing steps to molecular brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tost, H.; Meyer-Lindenberg, A.; Ruf, M.; Demirakca, T.; Grimm, O.; Henn, F.A.; Ende, G.

    2005-01-01

    Modern neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have contributed tremendously to our current understanding of psychiatric disorders in the context of functional, biochemical and microstructural alterations of the brain. Since the mid-nineties, functional MRI has provided major insights into the neurobiological correlates of signs and symptoms in schizophrenia. The current paper reviews important fMRI studies of the past decade in the domains of motor, visual, auditory, attentional and working memory function. Special emphasis is given to new methodological approaches, such as the visualisation of medication effects and the functional characterisation of risk genes. (orig.) [de

  7. Intraoperative visualisation of functional structures facilitates safe frameless stereotactic biopsy in the motor eloquent regions of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia-Shu; Qu, Ling; Wang, Qun; Jin, Wei; Hou, Yuan-Zheng; Sun, Guo-Chen; Li, Fang-Ye; Yu, Xin-Guang; Xu, Ban-Nan; Chen, Xiao-Lei

    2017-12-20

    For stereotactic brain biopsy involving motor eloquent regions, the surgical objective is to enhance diagnostic yield and preserve neurological function. To achieve this aim, we implemented functional neuro-navigation and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) into the biopsy procedure. The impact of this integrated technique on the surgical outcome and postoperative neurological function was investigated and evaluated. Thirty nine patients with lesions involving motor eloquent structures underwent frameless stereotactic biopsy assisted by functional neuro-navigation and iMRI. Intraoperative visualisation was realised by integrating anatomical and functional information into a navigation framework to improve biopsy trajectories and preserve eloquent structures. iMRI was conducted to guarantee the biopsy accuracy and detect intraoperative complications. The perioperative change of motor function and biopsy error before and after iMRI were recorded, and the role of functional information in trajectory selection and the relationship between the distance from sampling site to nearby eloquent structures and the neurological deterioration were further analyzed. Functional neuro-navigation helped modify the original trajectories and sampling sites in 35.90% (16/39) of cases to avoid the damage of eloquent structures. Even though all the lesions were high-risk of causing neurological deficits, no significant difference was found between preoperative and postoperative muscle strength. After data analysis, 3mm was supposed to be the safe distance for avoiding transient neurological deterioration. During surgery, the use of iMRI significantly reduced the biopsy errors (p = 0.042) and potentially increased the diagnostic yield from 84.62% (33/39) to 94.87% (37/39). Moreover, iMRI detected intraoperative haemorrhage in 5.13% (2/39) of patients, all of them benefited from the intraoperative strategies based on iMRI findings. Intraoperative visualisation of

  8. Visualising reacting single atoms under controlled conditions: Advances in atomic resolution in situ Environmental (Scanning) Transmission Electron Microscopy (E(S)TEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyes, Edward D.; Gai, Pratibha L.

    2014-02-01

    Advances in atomic resolution Environmental (Scanning) Transmission Electron Microscopy (E(S)TEM) for probing gas-solid catalyst reactions in situ at the atomic level under controlled reaction conditions of gas environment and temperature are described. The recent development of the ESTEM extends the capability of the ETEM by providing the direct visualisation of single atoms and the atomic structure of selected solid state heterogeneous catalysts in their working states in real-time. Atomic resolution E(S)TEM provides a deeper understanding of the dynamic atomic processes at the surface of solids and their mechanisms of operation. The benefits of atomic resolution-E(S)TEM to science and technology include new knowledge leading to improved technological processes with substantial economic benefits, improved healthcare, reductions in energy needs and the management of environmental waste generation. xml:lang="fr"

  9. Visualisation of dental images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Md Saion Salikin; Azuhar Ripin; Wan Hazlinda Ismail; Asmaliza Hashim; Norriza Mohd Isa; Suriany Sarmid

    2005-01-01

    Since the invention and the discovery of x-rays, physicians, surgeons and life scientists have been using images to diagnose and subsequently treat diseases. X-ray is also widely used in many imaging techniques to better understand basics anatomy, physiology and biology as well as testing and analytical work in physical science. In dentistry, x-ray technique has been employed to get a panoramic view of the whole teeth of a particular patient. A panoramic dental radiograph is very useful in dentistry for diagnostic purpose, denture preparation, as well as for orthodontic. Image visualisation is an important aspect especially for the dentists to analyse and proceed with a particulate dental treatment. In this project panoramic dental image obtained by using a standard phantom is visualised by using Interactive Data Language (IDL) software. A panoramic dental x-ray machine, Cranex3, is used to get a panoramic radiograph, which is subsequently digitized, by using Vidar digitizer (Sierra Plus). The 2D digitized image is enhance and apply other visualising techniques such as surface rendering and volume rendering technique using Interactive Data Language (IDL) software as a first step in 3D visualisation. In this paper, visualising of panoramic dental radiograph by using IDL is discussed in brief. (Author)

  10. CMS Tracker Visualisation

    CERN Document Server

    Mennea, Maria Santa; Zito, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    To provide improvements in the performance of existing tracker data visualization tools in IGUANA, a 2D visualisation software has been developed, using the object oriented paradigm and software engineering techniques. We have designed 2D graphics objects and some of them have been implemented. The access to the new objects is made in ORCA plugin of IGUANA CMS. A new tracker object oriented model has been designed for developing these 2D graphics objects. The model consists of new classes which represent all its components (layers, modules, rings, petals, rods).The new classes are described here. The last part of this document contains a user manual of the software and will be updated with new releases.

  11. Visualising large hierarchies with Flextree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongzhi; Curran, Edwin P.; Sterritt, Roy

    2003-05-01

    One of the main tasks in Information Visualisation research is creating visual tools to facilitate human understanding of large and complex information spaces. Hierarchies, being a good mechanism in organising such information, are ubiquitous. Although much research effort has been spent on finding useful representations for hierarchies, visualising large hierarchies is still a difficult topic. One of the difficulties is how to show both tructure and node content information in one view. Another is how to achieve multiple foci in a focus+context visualisation. This paper describes a novel hierarchy visualisation technique called FlexTree to address these problems. It contains some important features that have not been exploited so far. In this visualisation, a profile or contour unique to the hierarchy being visualised can be gained in a histogram-like layout. A normalised view of a common attribute of all nodes can be acquired, and selection of this attribute is controllable by the user. Multiple foci are consistently accessible within a global context through interaction. Furthermore it can handle a large hierarchy that contains several thousand nodes in a PC environment. In addition results from an informal evaluation are also presented.

  12. Landscape Visualisation on the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, M. P.; Cox, M. T.; Harvey, D. W.; Heemskerk, G. E.; Pettit, C. J.

    2012-07-01

    The Victorian Resources Online (VRO) website (http://www.dpi.vic.gov.au/vro) is the principal means for accessing landscapebased information in Victoria. In this paper we introduce a range of online landscape visualisations that have been developed to enhance existing static web content around the nature and distribution of Victoria's landforms and soils as well as associated processes. Flash is used to develop online visualisations that include interactive landscape panoramas, animations of soil and landscape processes and videos of experts explaining features in the field as well as landscape "flyovers". The use of interactive visualisations adds rich information multimedia content to otherwise static pages and offers the potential to improve user's appreciation and understanding of soil and landscapes. Visualisation is becoming a key component of knowledge management activities associated with VRO - proving useful for both "knowledge capture" (from subject matter specialists) and "knowledge transfer" to a diverse user base. A range of useful visualisation products have been made available online, with varying degrees of interactivity and suited to a variety of users. The use of video files, animation and interactive visualisations is adding rich information content to otherwise static web pages. These information products offer new possibilities to enhance learning of landscapes and the effectiveness of these will be tested as the next phase of development.

  13. One decade of functional imaging in schizophrenia research. From visualisation of basic information processing steps to molecular brain imaging; Zehn Jahre funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie in der Schizophrenieforschung. Von der Abbildung einfacher Informationsverarbeitungsprozesse zur molekulargenetisch orientierten Bildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tost, H. [Zentralinstitut fuer Seelische Gesundheit, NMR-Forschung in der Psychiatrie (Germany); Zentralinstitut fuer Seelische Gesundheit, NMR-Forschung in der Psychiatrie, Mannheim (Germany); Meyer-Lindenberg, A. [Genes, Neuroimaging Core Facility and Unit on Integrative Neuroimaging, Cognition and Psychosis Program, National Institute of Mental Health (United States); Ruf, M.; Demirakca, T.; Grimm, O.; Henn, F.A.; Ende, G. [Zentralinstitut fuer Seelische Gesundheit, NMR-Forschung in der Psychiatrie (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    Modern neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have contributed tremendously to our current understanding of psychiatric disorders in the context of functional, biochemical and microstructural alterations of the brain. Since the mid-nineties, functional MRI has provided major insights into the neurobiological correlates of signs and symptoms in schizophrenia. The current paper reviews important fMRI studies of the past decade in the domains of motor, visual, auditory, attentional and working memory function. Special emphasis is given to new methodological approaches, such as the visualisation of medication effects and the functional characterisation of risk genes. (orig.) [German] Bildgebende Verfahren wie die Magnetresonanz- und Positronenemissionstomographie haben entscheidend dazu beigetragen, dass psychiatrische Erkrankungen heutzutage im Kontext funktioneller, biochemischer und feinstruktureller Veraenderungen des Gehirns verstanden werden. Im Bereich der Schizophrenieforschung gibt insbesondere die funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie seit Mitte der 90er-Jahre wichtige Einblicke in die neurobiologischen Grundlagen schizophrener Defizitbereiche. Die vorliegende Arbeit stellt die wichtigsten fMRT-Befunde der letzten Dekade in den Bereichen Psychomotorik, visuelle bzw. akustische Informationsverarbeitung, Aufmerksamkeit und Arbeitsgedaechtnis vor. Die Betrachtung erfolgt dabei unter der besonderen Beruecksichtigung aktueller methodischer Ansaetze wie der Darstellung von Therapieeffekten und der funktionellen Charakterisierung psychiatrischer Risikogene. (orig.)

  14. In vitro and in vivo characterisation of nor-{beta}-CIT: a potential radioligand for visualisation of the serotonin transporter in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, K.A. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden)]|[Kuopio University Hospital, Clinical Physiology, FIN-70210 Kuopio (Finland); Halldin, C. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Hall, H. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Lundkvist, C. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Ginovart, N. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Swahn, C.G. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Farde, L. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-06-10

    Radiolabelled 2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane ({beta}-CIT) has been used in clinical studies for the imaging of dopamine and serotonin transporters with single-photon emission tomography (SPET). 2{beta}-Carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane (nor-{beta}-CIT) is a des-methyl analogue of {beta}-CIT, which in vitro has tenfold higher affinity (IC{sub 50}=0.36 nM) to the serotonin transporter than {beta}-CIT (IC{sub 50}=4.2 nM). Nor-{beta}-CIT may thus be a useful radioligand for imaging of the serotonin transporter. In the present study iodine-125 and carbon-11 labelled nor-{beta}-CIT were prepared for in vitro autoradiographic studies on post-mortem human brain cryosections and for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) studies in Cynomolgus monkeys. Whole hemisphere autoradiography with [{sup 125}I]nor-{beta}-CIT demonstrated high binding in the striatum, the thalamus and cortical regions of the human brain. Addition of a high concentration (1 {mu}M) of citalopram inhibited binding in the thalamus and the neocortex, but not in the striatum. In PET studies with [{sup 11}C]nor-{beta}-CIT there was rapid uptake of radioactivity in the monkey brain (6% of injected dose at 15 min) and high accumulation of radioactivity in the striatum, thalamus and neocortex. Thalamus to cerebellum and cortex to cerebellum ratios were 2.5 and 1.8 at 60 min, respectively. The ratios obtained with [{sup 11}C]nor-{beta}-CIT were 20%-40% higher than those previously obtained with [{sup 11}C]{beta}-CIT. Radioactivity in the thalamus and the neocortex but not in the striatum was displaceable with citalopram (5 mg/kg). In conclusion, nor-{beta}-CIT binds to the serotonin transporter in the primate brain in vitro and in vivo and has potential for PET and SPET imaging of the serotonin transporter in human brain. (orig.). With 4 figs.

  15. In vitro and in vivo characterisation of nor-β-CIT: a potential radioligand for visualisation of the serotonin transporter in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, K.A.; Halldin, C.; Hall, H.; Lundkvist, C.; Ginovart, N.; Swahn, C.G.; Farde, L.

    1997-01-01

    Radiolabelled 2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropane (β-CIT) has been used in clinical studies for the imaging of dopamine and serotonin transporters with single-photon emission tomography (SPET). 2β-Carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane (nor-β-CIT) is a des-methyl analogue of β-CIT, which in vitro has tenfold higher affinity (IC 50 =0.36 nM) to the serotonin transporter than β-CIT (IC 50 =4.2 nM). Nor-β-CIT may thus be a useful radioligand for imaging of the serotonin transporter. In the present study iodine-125 and carbon-11 labelled nor-β-CIT were prepared for in vitro autoradiographic studies on post-mortem human brain cryosections and for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) studies in Cynomolgus monkeys. Whole hemisphere autoradiography with [ 125 I[nor-β-CIT demonstrated high binding in the striatum, the thalamus and cortical regions of the human brain. Addition of a high concentration (1 μM) of citalopram inhibited binding in the thalamus and the neocortex, but not in the striatum. In PET studies with [ 11 C[nor-β-CIT there was rapid uptake of radioactivity in the monkey brain (6% of injected dose at 15 min) and high accumulation of radioactivity in the striatum, thalamus and neocortex. Thalamus to cerebellum and cortex to cerebellum ratios were 2.5 and 1.8 at 60 min, respectively. The ratios obtained with [ 11 C[nor-β-CIT were 20%-40% higher than those previously obtained with [ 11 C[β-CIT. Radioactivity in the thalamus and the neocortex but not in the striatum was displaceable with citalopram (5 mg/kg). In conclusion, nor-β-CIT binds to the serotonin transporter in the primate brain in vitro and in vivo and has potential for PET and SPET imaging of the serotonin transporter in human brain. (orig.). With 4 figs

  16. The posthuman condition consciousness beyond the brain

    CERN Document Server

    Pepperell, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic creativity, organic computers, genetic modification, intelligent machines &endash; such ideas are deeply challenging to many of our traditional assumptions about human uniqueness and superiority. But, ironically, it is our very capacity for technological invention that has secured us so dominant a position in the world which may lead ultimately to (as some have put it) 'The End of Man'. If we are really capable of creating entities that exceed our own skills and intellect then the consequences for humanity are almost inconceivable. Nevertheless, we must now face up to the possibility that attributes like intelligence and consciousness may be synthesised in non-human entities &endash; perhaps within our lifetime. Would such entities have human-like emotions; would they have a sense of their own being? The Posthuman Condition argues that such questions are difficult to tackle given the concepts of human existence that we have inherited from humanism, many of which can no longer be sustained. N...

  17. Graph Creation, Visualisation and Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maribel Fernández

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a tool to create, edit, visualise and compute with interaction nets - a form of graph rewriting systems. The editor, called GraphPaper, allows users to create and edit graphs and their transformation rules using an intuitive user interface. The editor uses the functionalities of the TULIP system, which gives us access to a wealth of visualisation algorithms. Interaction nets are not only a formalism for the specification of graphs, but also a rewrite-based computation model. We discuss graph rewriting strategies and a language to express them in order to perform strategic interaction net rewriting.

  18. Visualisations and Calculations of Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harty, Chris; Tryggestad, Kjell; Holm Jacobsen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    There is a complex relationship between the use of visualisations, and the production of both designs and physical spaces. In the case of hospitals, technical, aesthetic and practice-based requirements are incorporated into negotiations around facilities, layout and operation, and a plethora...

  19. Ambient intelligence : visualising the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, E.H.L.

    2005-01-01

    Ambient Intelligence systems are aimed at making user-system interaction and content consumption a truly positive experience. The endless search for nifty information visualisation mechanism to squeeze yet one more piece of information onto a visual display is surpassed by the challenge to embed

  20. Three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence for visualisation of subthalamic nucleus for deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Young Jin [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Inje University, Department of Radiology, Busan Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Joon; Kim, Ho Sung; Choi, Choong Gon; Jung, Seung Chai [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Kyo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chong Sik; Chung, Sun J. [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, So Hyun [Department of Radiology, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gyoung Ro [Philips HealthCare Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an accepted treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). However, targeting the STN is difficult due to its relatively small size and variable location. The purpose of this study was to assess which of the following sequences obtained with the 3.0 T MR system can accurately delineate the STN: coronal 3D fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), 2D T2*-weighted fast-field echo (T2*-FFE) and 2D T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences. We included 20 consecutive patients with PD who underwent 3.0 T MR for DBS targeting. 3D FLAIR, 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images were obtained for all study patients. Image quality and demarcation of the STN were analysed using 4-point scales, and contrast ratio (CR) of the STN and normal white matter was calculated. The Friedman test was used to compare the three sequences. In qualitative analysis, the 2D T2*-FFE image showed more artefacts than 3D FLAIR or 2D T2-TSE, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. 3D FLAIR images showed significantly superior demarcation of the STN compared with 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images (P < 0.001, respectively). The CR of 3D FLAIR was significantly higher than that of 2D T2*-FFE or T2-TSE images in multiple comparison correction (P < 0.001), but there was no significant difference in the CR between 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images. Coronal 3D FLAIR images showed the most accurate demarcation of the STN for DBS targeting among coronal 3D FLAIR, 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images. (orig.)

  1. Three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence for visualisation of subthalamic nucleus for deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Young Jin; Kim, Sang Joon; Kim, Ho Sung; Choi, Choong Gon; Jung, Seung Chai; Lee, Jung Kyo; Lee, Chong Sik; Chung, Sun J.; Cho, So Hyun; Lee, Gyoung Ro

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an accepted treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). However, targeting the STN is difficult due to its relatively small size and variable location. The purpose of this study was to assess which of the following sequences obtained with the 3.0 T MR system can accurately delineate the STN: coronal 3D fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), 2D T2*-weighted fast-field echo (T2*-FFE) and 2D T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences. We included 20 consecutive patients with PD who underwent 3.0 T MR for DBS targeting. 3D FLAIR, 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images were obtained for all study patients. Image quality and demarcation of the STN were analysed using 4-point scales, and contrast ratio (CR) of the STN and normal white matter was calculated. The Friedman test was used to compare the three sequences. In qualitative analysis, the 2D T2*-FFE image showed more artefacts than 3D FLAIR or 2D T2-TSE, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. 3D FLAIR images showed significantly superior demarcation of the STN compared with 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images (P < 0.001, respectively). The CR of 3D FLAIR was significantly higher than that of 2D T2*-FFE or T2-TSE images in multiple comparison correction (P < 0.001), but there was no significant difference in the CR between 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images. Coronal 3D FLAIR images showed the most accurate demarcation of the STN for DBS targeting among coronal 3D FLAIR, 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images. (orig.)

  2. Visualising a Postfeminist Africa in Ama Ata Aidoo's Changes: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Visualising a Postfeminist Africa in Ama Ata Aidoo's Changes: A Love Story. ... of thinking and looking at the world. In effect, those of us who look into literature for the „shapes‟ of our world will be amazed at how much the condition of women is still a decisive issue in the production of literature and its associated discourses.

  3. A genetically encoded biosensor for visualising hypoxia responses in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tvisha Misra

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cells experience different oxygen concentrations depending on location, organismal developmental stage, and physiological or pathological conditions. Responses to reduced oxygen levels (hypoxia rely on the conserved hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1. Understanding the developmental and tissue-specific responses to changing oxygen levels has been limited by the lack of adequate tools for monitoring HIF-1 in vivo. To visualise and analyse HIF-1 dynamics in Drosophila, we used a hypoxia biosensor consisting of GFP fused to the oxygen-dependent degradation domain (ODD of the HIF-1 homologue Sima. GFP-ODD responds to changing oxygen levels and to genetic manipulations of the hypoxia pathway, reflecting oxygen-dependent regulation of HIF-1 at the single-cell level. Ratiometric imaging of GFP-ODD and a red-fluorescent reference protein reveals tissue-specific differences in the cellular hypoxic status at ambient normoxia. Strikingly, cells in the larval brain show distinct hypoxic states that correlate with the distribution and relative densities of respiratory tubes. We present a set of genetic and image analysis tools that enable new approaches to map hypoxic microenvironments, to probe effects of perturbations on hypoxic signalling, and to identify new regulators of the hypoxia response.

  4. Reconfiguration de visualisations du CRDI

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    Dans chaque reconfiguration, j'ai essayé de demeu- rer raisonnablement fidèle à l'original. Par exemple, la taille globale des éléments sta- tiques n'a pas changé. Dans trois des quatre cas, j'ai conservé la typographie et la palette de couleurs de l'original. En outre, j'ai supposé que la visualisation (l'image) était destinée à.

  5. Quality criteria for landscape visualisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldi, H.-P.; Witt, U. de

    1996-01-01

    The rapid expansion of wind energy utilisation in Western Europe can strain the limits of social acceptance with citizens living in wind development areas. One of the problems wind farm engineers and local authorities face is the visual impact of wind turbines. To determine the influence on the landscape visualisations of wind farms photorealistic compositions are used. In many cases it is part of the planning procedure. The quality of this visualization can strongly influence the success of the permission procedure. We will give criteria which can give help to reduce the possibility of unwanted manipulations. (author)

  6. Visualiseer!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.M. Bierens

    2010-01-01

    Een eigen Library Dashboard met grafisch schitterend vormgegeven interactieve kerncijfers over de bibliotheek. Het kán een sterk marketinginstrument zijn waarmee je tot in detail de sterke punten kunt etaleren. Dus… verzamel de statistieken en ga aan de slag!

  7. Visuals and Visualisation of Human Body Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, Sindhu; Ramadas, Jayashree

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the role of diagrams and text in middle school students' understanding and visualisation of human body systems. We develop a common framework based on structure and function to assess students' responses across diagram and verbal modes. Visualisation is defined in terms of understanding transformations on structure and relating…

  8. Uncertainties in segmentation and their visualisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucieer, Arko

    2004-01-01

    This thesis focuses on uncertainties in remotely sensed image segmentation and their visualisation. The first part describes a visualisation tool, allowing interaction with the parameters of a fuzzy classification algorithm by visually adjusting fuzzy membership functions of classes in a 3D feature

  9. Data visualisations as motivational technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunæs, Dorthe; Wied, Kia

    This paper aims to contribute with an (affirmative) critique of current tendencies to govern and educate students’ motivation through visualisations. The paper explores how educational policy with a focus on motivating improved learning for ‘all’ children is brought into the lived life of schooling...... students. The hope immanent (in the technologies) is that engagement with these technologies will enable students to move their energy and engagement, and thus themselves in the direction of learning. (ved vi fra lærere-stemmerne i begyndelsen af filmen og diverse dokumenter). The assumption...... to energize and move students towards better performance. It is not our aim to test, evaluate or judge whether these technologies are efficient or not. Rather our curiosity is directed at exploring the interchange between different techniques making learning visible (such as poster, graphs, pictures, computer...

  10. Visualising the Process of Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pia

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the process of transformation that is part of the ISOTYPE (International System Of TYpographic Picture Education) system, using the correspondence between Austrian sociologist Otto Neurath /his wife Marie Neurath and Town Clerk A. V. Williams of the town of Bilston in the UK....... The letters were written around 1946 and are part of the preparations for creating an exhibition—containing 12 charts—on a possible housing development project in Bilston, a poor neighbourhood in Staffordshire, England. According to the ISOTYPE system, the transformer, the link between expert and artist (M....... Neurath, 1960: 113-115), works across disciplines on organizing, analysing and configuring data into visual form (Kinross, 2009:6). It is my intention to use the correspondence from this transformation process to build on earlier identification and visualisation of the essential principles...

  11. Bowel wall visualisation at CT colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, M.H.; Hellstroem, M.; Svensson, E.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the quality of bowel wall visualisation at CT colonography and the impact of examination in the supine and prone positions. Material and Methods: After bowel preparation, 111 patients underwent CT colonography. Air distension, degree of fluid redistribution with change in body position (supine and prone), influence of residual stool on bowel wall assessability, and quality of overall colon visualisation were evaluated using scales. Results: Thirty of 110 patients (27%) had complete overall visualisation of the colon wall and 52 (47%) had subtotal visualisation of a limited part of the colon. The entire colon was more often air-filled in the prone position (46%) than in the supine position (18%). Joint review of supine and prone data showed that for all colon segments, except the sigmoid (86%), 95% of the patients had complete air filling. All patients had residual fluid. In 75% to 99%, depending on segment, fluid did not interfere with the bowel wall visualisation in the combined evaluation of supine and prone data sets. Thirty-one patients had residual stool with potential negative influence on polyp detection. Conclusions: The colon wall was completely, or almost completely, visualised in 75% of the patients, and examination in the supine and prone positions was necessary for complete visualisation

  12. Brain Mapping of drug addiction in witdrawal condition based P300 Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnip, Arjon; Esti Kusumandari, Dwi; Hidayat, Teddy

    2018-04-01

    Drug abuse for a long time will slowly cause changes in brain structure and performance. These changes tend to occur in the front of the brain which is directly interfere the concentration and the decision-making process. In this study an experiment involving 10 drug users was performed. The process of recording data with EEG system is conducted during craving condition and 1 hour after taking methadone. From brain mapping results obtained that brain activity tend to occur in the upper layer of the brain during craving conditions and tend to be in the midle layer of the brain after one hour of taking methadone.

  13. Science Plan Visualisation for Rosetta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A.; Grieger, B.; Völk, S.

    2013-12-01

    Rosetta is a mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) to rendez-vous with comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko in mid-2014. The trajectories and their corresponding operations are flexible and particularly complex. To make informed decisions among the many free parameters novel ways to communicate operations to the community have been explored. To support science planning by communicating operational ideas and disseminating operational scenarios, the science ground segment makes use of Web-based visualisation technologies. To keep the threshold to analysing operations proposals as low as possible, various implementation techniques have been investigated. An important goal was to use the Web to make the content as accessible as possible. By adopting the recent standard WebGL and generating static pages of time-dependent three-dimensional views of the spacecraft as well as the corresponding field-of-views of instruments, directly from the operational and for-study files, users are given the opportunity to explore interactively in their Web browsers what is being proposed in addition to using the traditional file products and analysing them in detail. The scenes and animations can be viewed in any modern Web browser and be combined with other analyses. This is to facilitate verification and cross-validation of complex products, often done by comparing different independent analyses and studies. By providing different timesteps in animations, it is possible to focus on long-term planning or short-term planning without distracting the user from the essentials. This is particularly important since the information that can be displayed in a Web browser is somewhat related to data volume that can be transferred across the wire. In Web browsers, it is more challenging to do numerical calculations on demand. Since requests for additional data have to be passed through a Web server, they are more complex and also require a more complex infrastructure. The volume of data that can be

  14. Human creativity in the data visualisation pipeline

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Featherstone, Coral

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available project that will be exploring the development of a non-interactive computational algorithm that enhances the process of computer produced visualisations by introducing criteria and techniques from the theories of computational creativity, which is sub...

  15. Streamlets for visualisation and data exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liptrot, Matthew George

    Streamlets for visualisation and data exploration Matthew Liptrot, Image Group, Department of Computer Science, University of Copenhagen, Denmark Target Audience Anyone using streamlines for interpreting tractography from diffusion-weighted MRI Purpose The purpose of streamline tractography...

  16. Uncertainty visualisation in the Model Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerharz, L. E.; Autermann, C.; Hopmann, H.; Stasch, C.; Pebesma, E.

    2012-04-01

    Visualisation of geospatial data as maps is a common way to communicate spatially distributed information. If temporal and furthermore uncertainty information are included in the data, efficient visualisation methods are required. For uncertain spatial and spatio-temporal data, numerous visualisation methods have been developed and proposed, but only few tools for visualisation of data in a standardised way exist. Furthermore, usually they are realised as thick clients, and lack functionality of handling data coming from web services as it is envisaged in the Model Web. We present an interactive web tool for visualisation of uncertain spatio-temporal data developed in the UncertWeb project. The client is based on the OpenLayers JavaScript library. OpenLayers provides standard map windows and navigation tools, i.e. pan, zoom in/out, to allow interactive control for the user. Further interactive methods are implemented using jStat, a JavaScript library for statistics plots developed in UncertWeb, and flot. To integrate the uncertainty information into existing standards for geospatial data, the Uncertainty Markup Language (UncertML) was applied in combination with OGC Observations&Measurements 2.0 and JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) encodings for vector and NetCDF for raster data. The client offers methods to visualise uncertain vector and raster data with temporal information. Uncertainty information considered for the tool are probabilistic and quantified attribute uncertainties which can be provided as realisations or samples, full probability distributions functions and statistics. Visualisation is supported for uncertain continuous and categorical data. In the client, the visualisation is realised using a combination of different methods. Based on previously conducted usability studies, a differentiation between expert (in statistics or mapping) and non-expert users has been indicated as useful. Therefore, two different modes are realised together in the tool

  17. Using a Visualiser in Primary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Danny

    2011-01-01

    Picture the scene--a child in a class has brought in a fabulous example of a snake skin, a snail, a seed, a fossil or rock and the whole class wants to see it. How does a teacher allow them all to observe it without destroying it or jostling each other? One way to get around this issue is to use a visualiser. A visualiser is essentially a small…

  18. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor enhances conditioned taste aversion retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Diana V; Figueroa-Guzmán, Yazmín; Escobar, Martha L

    2006-01-05

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has recently emerged as one of the most potent molecular mediators of not only central synaptic plasticity, but also behavioral interactions between an organism and its environment. Our previous studies on the insular cortex (IC), a region of the temporal cortex implicated in the acquisition and storage of conditioned taste aversion (CTA), have demonstrated that induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the projection from the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (Bla) to the IC, previous to CTA training, enhances the retention of this task. Recently, we found that intracortical microinfusion of BDNF induces a lasting potentiation of synaptic efficacy in the Bla-IC projection of adult rats in vivo. In this work, we present experimental data showing that intracortical microinfusion of BDNF previous to CTA training enhances the retention of this task. These findings support the concept that BDNF may contribute to memory-related functions performed by a neocortical area, playing a critical role in long-term synaptic plasticity.

  19. Brain Region-Specific Activity Patterns after Recent or Remote Memory Retrieval of Auditory Conditioned Fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jeong-Tae; Jhang, Jinho; Kim, Hyung-Su; Lee, Sujin; Han, Jin-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Memory is thought to be sparsely encoded throughout multiple brain regions forming unique memory trace. Although evidence has established that the amygdala is a key brain site for memory storage and retrieval of auditory conditioned fear memory, it remains elusive whether the auditory brain regions may be involved in fear memory storage or…

  20. Multivariate and Spatial Visualisation of Archaeological Assemblages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Sterry

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Multivariate analyses, in particular correspondence analysis (CA, have become a standard exploratory tool for analysing and interpreting variance in archaeological assemblages. While they have greatly helped analysts, they unfortunately remain abstract to the viewer, all the more so if the viewer has little or no experience with multivariate statistics. A second issue with these analyses can arise from the detachment of archaeological material from its geo-referenced location and typically considered only in terms of arbitrary classifications (e.g. North Europe, Central Europe, South Europe instead of the full range of local conditions (e.g. proximity to other assemblages, relationships with other spatial phenomena. This article addresses these issues by presenting a novel method for spatially visualising CA so that these analyses can be interpreted intuitively. The method works by transforming the resultant bi-plots of the CA into colour maps using the HSV colour model, in which the similarity and difference between assemblages directly corresponds to the similarity and difference of the colours used to display them. Utilising two datasets – ceramics from the excavations of the Roman fortress of Vetera I, and terra sigillata forms collected as part of 'The Samian Project' – the article demonstrates how the method is applied and how it can be used to draw out spatial and temporal trends.

  1. Map as a Service: A Framework for Visualising and Maximising Information Return from Multi-ModalWireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hammoudeh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a distributed information extraction and visualisation service, called the mapping service, for maximising information return from large-scale wireless sensor networks. Such a service would greatly simplify the production of higher-level, information-rich, representations suitable for informing other network services and the delivery of field information visualisations. The mapping service utilises a blend of inductive and deductive models to map sense data accurately using externally available knowledge. It utilises the special characteristics of the application domain to render visualisations in a map format that are a precise reflection of the concrete reality. This service is suitable for visualising an arbitrary number of sense modalities. It is capable of visualising from multiple independent types of the sense data to overcome the limitations of generating visualisations from a single type of sense modality. Furthermore, the mapping service responds dynamically to changes in the environmental conditions, which may affect the visualisation performance by continuously updating the application domain model in a distributed manner. Finally, a distributed self-adaptation function is proposed with the goal of saving more power and generating more accurate data visualisation. We conduct comprehensive experimentation to evaluate the performance of our mapping service and show that it achieves low communication overhead, produces maps of high fidelity, and further minimises the mapping predictive error dynamically through integrating the application domain model in the mapping service.

  2. Brain mineralocorticoid receptors as resilience factor under adverse life conditions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanatsou, S.

    2016-01-01

    Studies in human cohorts have underlined the importance of gene-environment interactions for brain structure and function during development and in adulthood. Such interactions can make the difference between staying healthy or succumbing to disease, e.g. depression or posttraumatic stress disorder.

  3. [Visualisation methods for etheric formative forces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhard, B; Kittel, R

    2009-09-01

    Rudolf Steiner, the founder of anthroposophy, suggested the development of visualisation methods for "etheric formative forces". The essential methods, their "spiritual scientific" basis and indications are described and their claims critically tested. The methods are not validated, the key criteria for diagnostic tests (reproducibility, sensitivity, specifity) are not given.

  4. Learning, Learning Analytics, Activity Visualisation and Open learner Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, Susan; Kickmeier-Rust, Michael; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    This paper draws on visualisation approaches in learning analytics, considering how classroom visualisations can come together in practice. We suggest an open learner model in situations where many tools and activity visualisations produce more visual information than can be readily interpreted....

  5. Deep brain stimulation affects conditioned and unconditioned anxiety in different brain areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, A.; Klanker, M.; van Oorschot, N.; Post, R.; Hamelink, R.; Feenstra, M. G. P.; Denys, D.

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) has proven to be an effective treatment for therapy refractory obsessive compulsive disorder. Clinical observations show that anxiety symptoms decrease rapidly following DBS. As in clinical studies different regions are targeted, it is of

  6. Colour in visualisation for computational fluid dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Kinnear, D; Atherton, MA; Collins, MW; Dokhan, J; Karayiannis, TG

    2006-01-01

    Colour is used in computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations in two key ways. First it is used to visualise the geometry and allow the engineers to be confident that the model constructed is a good representation of the engineering situation. Once an analysis has been completed, colour is used in post-processing the data from the simulations to illustrate the complex fluid mechanic phenomena under investigation. This paper describes these two uses of colour and provides some examples to il...

  7. Lossy compression for Animated Web Visualisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudden, R.; Tomlinson, J.; Robinson, N.; Arribas, A.

    2017-12-01

    This talk will discuss an technique for lossy data compression specialised for web animation. We set ourselves the challenge of visualising a full forecast weather field as an animated 3D web page visualisation. This data is richly spatiotemporal, however it is routinely communicated to the public as a 2D map, and scientists are largely limited to visualising data via static 2D maps or 1D scatter plots. We wanted to present Met Office weather forecasts in a way that represents all the generated data. Our approach was to repurpose the technology used to stream high definition videos. This enabled us to achieve high rates of compression, while being compatible with both web browsers and GPU processing. Since lossy compression necessarily involves discarding information, evaluating the results is an important and difficult problem. This is essentially a problem of forecast verification. The difficulty lies in deciding what it means for two weather fields to be "similar", as simple definitions such as mean squared error often lead to undesirable results. In the second part of the talk, I will briefly discuss some ideas for alternative measures of similarity.

  8. Name conditioning in event-related brain potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotchoubey, Boris; Pavlov, Yuri G

    2017-11-01

    Four experiments are reported in which two harmonic tones (CS+ and CS-) were paired with a participant's own name (SON) and different names (DN), respectively. A third tone was not paired with any other stimulus and served as a standard (frequent stimulus) in a three-stimuli oddball paradigm. The larger posterior positivity (P3) to SON than DN, found in previous studies, was replicated in all experiments. Conditioning of the P3 response was albeit observed in two similar experiments (1 and 3), but the obtained effects were weak and not identical in the two experiments. Only Experiment 4, where the number of CS/UCS pairings and the Stimulus-Onset Asynchrony between CS and UCS were increased, showed clear CS+/CS- differences both in time and time-frequency domains. Surprisingly, differential responses to CS+ and CS- were also obtained in Experiment 2, although SON and DN in that experiment were masked and never consciously recognized as meaningful words (recognition rate 0/63 participants). The results are discussed in the context of other ERP conditioning experiments and, particularly, the studies of non-conscious effect on ERP. Several further experiments are suggested to replicate and extend the present findings and to remove the remaining methodological limitations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Game-theoretic View on Behavioural Visualisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Michael

    2007-01-01

    To bridge the gap between domain experts and formal methods experts, visualisations of the behaviour of formal models are used to let the domain expert understand and experiment with the formal model. In this paper we provide a definition of visualisations, founded in game-theory, which regards v...... visualisations as transition systems synchronised with formal models. We show example visualisations, use them to show winning strategies of games, and demonstrate how an industrial application of formal models benefited from this approach.......To bridge the gap between domain experts and formal methods experts, visualisations of the behaviour of formal models are used to let the domain expert understand and experiment with the formal model. In this paper we provide a definition of visualisations, founded in game-theory, which regards...

  10. Visualising very large phylogenetic trees in three dimensional hyperbolic space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liberles David A

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common existing phylogenetic tree visualisation tools are not able to display readable trees with more than a few thousand nodes. These existing methodologies are based in two dimensional space. Results We introduce the idea of visualising phylogenetic trees in three dimensional hyperbolic space with the Walrus graph visualisation tool and have developed a conversion tool that enables the conversion of standard phylogenetic tree formats to Walrus' format. With Walrus, it becomes possible to visualise and navigate phylogenetic trees with more than 100,000 nodes. Conclusion Walrus enables desktop visualisation of very large phylogenetic trees in 3 dimensional hyperbolic space. This application is potentially useful for visualisation of the tree of life and for functional genomics derivatives, like The Adaptive Evolution Database (TAED.

  11. Architectural visualisation toolkit for 3D Studio Max users

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper , Neil

    2012-01-01

    Architectural Visualisation has become a vital part of the design process for architects and engineers. The process of modelling and rendering an architectural visualisation can be complex and time consuming with only a few tools available to assist novice modellers. This paper looks at available solutions for visualisation specialists including AutoCAD, 3D Studio Max and Google SketchUp as well as available solutions which attempt to automate the process including Batzal Roof ...

  12. Technical Evaluation Report (Workshop on Visualising Network Information)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rasmussen, Lisbeth M

    2006-01-01

    The workshop brought together operational users, developers and researchers to explore the connection between visualisation technologies and network analysis for military and civil protection applications...

  13. Approaches to integrating indicators into 3D landscape visualisations and their benefits for participative planning situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissen, Ulrike; Schroth, Olaf; Lange, Eckart; Schmid, Willy A

    2008-11-01

    In discussing issues of landscape change, the complex relationships in the landscape have to be assessed. In participative planning processes, 3D visualisations have a high potential as an aid in understanding and communicating characteristics of landscape conditions by integrating visual and non-visual landscape information. Unclear is, which design and how much interactivity is required for an indicator visualisation that would suit stakeholders best in workshop situations. This paper describes the preparation and application of three different types of integrated 3D visualisations in workshops conducted in the Entlebuch UNESCO Biosphere Reserve (CH). The results reveal that simple representations of a complex issue created by draping thematic maps on the 3D model can make problematic developments visible at a glance; that diagrams linked to the spatial context can help draw attention to problematic relationships not considered beforehand; and that the size of species as indicators of conditions of the landscape's production and biotope function seems to provide a common language for stakeholders with different perspectives. Overall, the of the indicators the functions required to assist in information processing. Further research should focus on testing the effectiveness of the integrated visualisation tools in participative processes for the general public.

  14. A study of the application of Brain Atlas with and without +Gz acceleration conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yifeng; Zhang, Lihui; Zhang, Tao; Li, Baohui

    2017-07-20

    The purposes of this study were to utilize Brain Atlas to investigate the fluctuations in the characteristics of human EEG, with and without +Gz acceleration produced by human centrifuge, and also to examine the G load endurance of human body. The Brain Atlas of the EEG signal with and without +Gz acceleration in a static state were compared in order to reveal the correlation and differences. When compared with those in a static state, it was found that for the EEG readings of the subjects undergoing +Gz acceleration conditions, the energy and gray scale values of the low-frequency component-delta rhythm showed significant increases, while the energy and gray scale values of the high-frequency component-beta rhythm showed significant decreases. Among these, the beta2 rhythm was determined to be significantly inhibited. These fluctuations suggested that the ischemia conditions of brain had been improved. Also, the recoveries in the energy and gray-scale values were determined to be faster, which suggested that the G load endurance of human body had been enhanced. The Brain Atlas was found to show observable changes in color. The experimental results indicated that the Brain Atlas was able to provide assistance during the exploration of the fluctuations in the characteristics of EEG, and provided a criterion to assist in the observations of the function state fluctuations of human brain with +Gz acceleration. It also assisted in the evaluations of the G load endurance of human body.

  15. Biomarkers for Musculoskeletal Pain Conditions: Use of Brain Imaging and Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissoneault, Jeff; Sevel, Landrew; Letzen, Janelle; Robinson, Michael; Staud, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain condition often shows poor correlations between tissue abnormalities and clinical pain. Therefore, classification of pain conditions like chronic low back pain, osteoarthritis, and fibromyalgia depends mostly on self report and less on objective findings like X-ray or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes. However, recent advances in structural and functional brain imaging have identified brain abnormalities in chronic pain conditions that can be used for illness classification. Because the analysis of complex and multivariate brain imaging data is challenging, machine learning techniques have been increasingly utilized for this purpose. The goal of machine learning is to train specific classifiers to best identify variables of interest on brain MRIs (i.e., biomarkers). This report describes classification techniques capable of separating MRI-based brain biomarkers of chronic pain patients from healthy controls with high accuracy (70-92%) using machine learning, as well as critical scientific, practical, and ethical considerations related to their potential clinical application. Although self-report remains the gold standard for pain assessment, machine learning may aid in the classification of chronic pain disorders like chronic back pain and fibromyalgia as well as provide mechanistic information regarding their neural correlates.

  16. Self organising maps for visualising and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the motivation of SOMs (Self Organising Maps) and how they are generally more accessible due to the wider available modern, more powerful, cost-effective computers. Their advantages compared to Principal Components Analysis and Partial Least Squares are discussed. These allow application to non-linear data, are not so dependent on least squares solutions, normality of errors and less influenced by outliers. In addition there are a wide variety of intuitive methods for visualisation that allow full use of the map space. Modern problems in analytical chemistry include applications to cultural heritage studies, environmental, metabolomic and biological problems result in complex datasets. Methods for visualising maps are described including best matching units, hit histograms, unified distance matrices and component planes. Supervised SOMs for classification including multifactor data and variable selection are discussed as is their use in Quality Control. The paper is illustrated using four case studies, namely the Near Infrared of food, the thermal analysis of polymers, metabolomic analysis of saliva using NMR, and on-line HPLC for pharmaceutical process monitoring. PMID:22594434

  17. Self organising maps for visualising and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brereton, Richard G

    2012-05-02

    The paper describes the motivation of SOMs (Self Organising Maps) and how they are generally more accessible due to the wider available modern, more powerful, cost-effective computers. Their advantages compared to Principal Components Analysis and Partial Least Squares are discussed. These allow application to non-linear data, are not so dependent on least squares solutions, normality of errors and less influenced by outliers. In addition there are a wide variety of intuitive methods for visualisation that allow full use of the map space. Modern problems in analytical chemistry include applications to cultural heritage studies, environmental, metabolomic and biological problems result in complex datasets. Methods for visualising maps are described including best matching units, hit histograms, unified distance matrices and component planes. Supervised SOMs for classification including multifactor data and variable selection are discussed as is their use in Quality Control. The paper is illustrated using four case studies, namely the Near Infrared of food, the thermal analysis of polymers, metabolomic analysis of saliva using NMR, and on-line HPLC for pharmaceutical process monitoring.

  18. Fingermark visualisation on uncirculated £5 (Bank of England) polymer notes: Initial process comparison studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downham, Rory P; Brewer, Eleigh R; King, Roberto S P; Luscombe, Aoife M; Sears, Vaughn G

    2017-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the effectiveness of a range of fingermark visualisation processes on brand new, uncirculated, £5 polymer banknotes (and their test note predecessors), as produced by the Bank of England (BoE). In the main study of this paper, a total of 14 individual processes were investigated on BoE £5 polymer banknotes, which included both 'Category A' processes (as recommended in the Home Office Fingermark Visualisation Manual) as well as recently developed processes, including fpNatural ® 2 powder (cuprorivaite) from Foster+Freeman and a vacuum metal deposition sequence that evaporates silver followed by zinc. Results from this preliminary investigation indicate that fpNatural ® 2, multimetal deposition, Wet Powder ™ Black, iron oxide powder suspension and black magnetic powder are the most effective processes on these uncirculated £5 BoE polymer banknotes, when viewed under "primary viewing" conditions (white light or fluorescence). Additional fingermarks were visualised on the polymer banknotes following the subsequent use of reflected infrared imaging and lifting techniques, and with the benefit of these techniques taken into consideration, the aforementioned processes remained amongst the most effective overall. This work provides initial insight into fingermark visualisation strategies for BoE £5 polymer banknotes, and the need for further studies in order to generate mature operational guidance is emphasised. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Drawing, Visualisation and Young Children's Exploration of "Big Ideas"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    It is in the visualisation of ideas, and the expression or representation of our ideas, that we can bring something more clearly into consciousness. A drawing might be seen as an externalisation of a concept or idea. Drawing has the potential to play a mediating role in the visualisation of ideas and concepts in relation to young children…

  20. The Extreme Male Brain Theory and Gender Role Behaviour in Persons with an Autism Spectrum Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauder, J. E. A.; Cornet, L. J. M.; Ponds, R. W. H. M.

    2011-01-01

    According to the Extreme Male Brain theory persons with autism possess masculinised cognitive traits. In this study masculinisation of gender role behaviour is evaluated in 25 persons with an autism spectrum condition (ASC) and matched controls with gender role behaviour as part of a shortened version of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality…

  1. Exposures to Conditioned Flavours with Different Hedonic Values Induce Contrasted Behavioural and Brain Responses in Pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Clouard, Caroline; Jouhanneau, Mélanie; Meunier-Salaün, Marie-Christine; Malbert, Charles-Henri; Val-Laillet, David

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the behavioural and brain responses towards conditioned flavours with different hedonic values in juvenile pigs. Twelve 30-kg pigs were given four three-day conditioning sessions: they received three different flavoured meals paired with intraduodenal (i.d.) infusions of 15% glucose (F(Glu)), lithium chloride (F(LiCl)), or saline (control treatment, F(NaCl)). One and five weeks later, the animals were subjected to three two-choice feeding tests without reinforcement to...

  2. Molecular Mechanisms Responsible for Neuron-Derived Conditioned Medium (NCM-Mediated Protection of Ischemic Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hsin Lin

    Full Text Available The protective value of neuron-derived conditioned medium (NCM in cerebral ischemia and the underlying mechanism(s responsible for NCM-mediated brain protection against cerebral ischemia were investigated in the study. NCM was first collected from the neuronal culture growing under the in vitro ischemic condition (glucose-, oxygen- and serum-deprivation or GOSD for 2, 4 or 6 h. Through the focal cerebral ischemia (bilateral CCAO/unilateral MCAO animal model, we discovered that ischemia/reperfusion (I/R-induced brain infarction was significantly reduced by NCM, given directly into the cistern magna at the end of 90 min of CCAO/MCAO. Immunoblocking and chemical blocking strategies were applied in the in vitro ischemic studies to show that NCM supplement could protect microglia, astrocytes and neurons from GOSD-induced cell death, in a growth factor (TGFβ1, NT-3 and GDNF and p-ERK dependent manner. Brain injection with TGFβ1, NT3, GDNF and ERK agonist (DADS alone or in combination, therefore also significantly decreased the infarct volume of ischemic brain. Moreover, NCM could inhibit ROS but stimulate IL-1β release from GOSD-treated microglia and limit the infiltration of IL-β-positive microglia into the core area of ischemic brain, revealing the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of NCM. In overall, NCM-mediated brain protection against cerebral ischemia has been demonstrated for the first time in S.D. rats, due to its anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant and potentially anti-glutamate activities (NCM-induced IL-1β can inhibit the glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity and restriction upon the infiltration of inflammatory microglia into the core area of ischemic brain. The therapeutic potentials of NCM, TGFβ1, GDNF, NT-3 and DADS in the control of cerebral ischemia in human therefore have been suggested and require further investigation.

  3. Design Creativity: Future Directions for Integrated Visualisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Steven Goulding

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC sectors are facing unprecedented challenges, not just with increased complexity of projects per se, but design-related integration. This requires stakeholders to radically re-think their existing business models (and thinking that underpins them, but also the technological challenges and skills required to deliver these projects. Whilst opponents will no doubt cite that this is nothing new as the sector as a whole has always had to respond to change; the counter to this is that design ‘creativity’ is now much more dependent on integration from day one. Given this, collaborative processes embedded in Building Information Modelling (BIM models have been proffered as a panacea solution to embrace this change and deliver streamlined integration. The veracity of design teams’ “project data” is increasingly becoming paramount - not only for the coordination of design, processes, engineering services, fabrication, construction, and maintenance; but more importantly, facilitate ‘true’ project integration and interchange – the actualisation of which will require firm consensus and commitment. This Special Issue envisions some of these issues, challenges and opportunities (from a future landscape perspective, by highlighting a raft of concomitant factors, which include: technological challenges, design visualisation and integration, future digital tools, new and anticipated operating environments, and training requirements needed to deliver these aspirations. A fundamental part of this Special Issue’s ‘call’ was to capture best practice in order to demonstrate how design, visualisation and delivery processes (and technologies affect the finished product viz: design outcome, design procedures, production methodologies and construction implementation. In this respect, the use of virtual environments are now particularly effective at supporting the design and delivery processes. In

  4. Associative learning in humans--conditioning of sensory-evoked brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrandies, W; Jedynak, A

    2000-01-01

    A classical conditioning paradigm was employed in two experiments performed on 35 human volunteers. In nine subjects, the presentation of Landolt rings (conditioned stimuli, CS + ) was paired with an electric stimulus (unconditioned stimuli, UCS) applied to the left median nerve. Neutral visual control stimuli were full circles (CS -) that were not paired with the UCS. The skin conductance response (SCR) was determined in a time interval of 5 s after onset of the visual stimuli, and it was measured in the acquisition and test phase. Associative learning was reflected by a SCR occurring selectively with CS +. The same experiment was repeated with another group of 26 adults while electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded from 30 electrodes. For each subject, mean evoked potentials were computed. In 13 of the subjects, a conditioning paradigm was followed while the other subjects served as the control group (non-contingent stimulation). There were somatosensory and visual brain activity evoked by the stimuli. Conditioned components were identified by computing cross-correlation between evoked somatosensory components and the averaged EEG. In the visual evoked brain activity, three components with mean latencies of 105.4, 183.2, and 360.3 ms were analyzed. Somatosensory stimuli were followed by major components that occurred at mean latencies of 48.8, 132.5, 219.7, 294.8, and 374.2 ms latency after the shock. All components were analyzed in terms of latency, field strength, and topographic characteristics, and were compared between groups and experimental conditions. Both visual and somatosensory brain activity was significantly affected by classical conditioning. Our data illustrate how associative learning affects the topography of brain electrical activity elicited by presentation of conditioned visual stimuli.

  5. Visualising the environmental appearance of audio products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stilma, M. [Univ. of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Stevels, A. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)]|[Philips Consumer Electronics, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Christiaans, H.; Kandachar, P. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2004-07-01

    Can environmental friendliness be communicated by the design style and appearance of products? (such as form, colour, style or material)? Consumers are interested in buying environmental products and design styles might be used as communicative tools. However, current 'green' products show something else. Environmental aspects are chiefly promoted by marketing programs based on technical items like the use of materials, hazardous substances, energy consumption, etc. By a qualitative and exploratory research the environmental design styles according to consumers' opinions were analysed with larger audio products as case study. Visible distinctive differences can be identified between the most and the least environmental rated products. A 'Green flagship', which claims to be environmentally orientated, wasn't recognised as such by consumers. And women and men perceive environmental friendliness in another way. From this research can be concluded that more attention is needed to visualise the good technical environmental performance of products. (orig.)

  6. Digital visualisering i udbygning af Roskilde Universitetscenter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Nils Lykke

    Rapporten beskriver tre forsøg med 3D-visualisering i forbindelse med konkurrencer vedrørende udbygning af Roskilde Universitetscenter. Første forsøg var en metode til hurtigt at skabe en række digitale modeller i højt abstraktionsniveau. Forsøget resulterede i 15 små animationer, der blev benyttet...... af dommerkomiteen til volumenstudier af bygningskonkurrencens indsendte forslag. Andet forsøg var afprøvning af et modelleringsarbejde i lavere abstraktionsniveau, som resulterede i en animation af vinderprojektet. I sidste forsøg blev de praktiske erfaringer fra de to første forsøg implementeret hos...

  7. A new way of visualising quantum fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Helmut

    2018-05-01

    Quantum field theory (QFT) is the basis of some of the most fundamental theories in modern physics, but it is not an easy subject to learn. In the present article we intend to pave the way from quantum mechanics to QFT for students at early graduate or advanced undergraduate level. More specifically, we propose a new way of visualising the wave function Ψ of a linear chain of interacting quantum harmonic oscillators, which can be seen as a model for a simple one-dimensional bosonic quantum field. The main idea is to draw randomly chosen classical states of the chain superimposed upon each other and use a grey scale to represent the value of Ψ at the corresponding coordinates of the quantised system. Our goal is to establish a better intuitive understanding of the mathematical objects underlying quantum field theories and solid state physics.

  8. Exposures to Conditioned Flavours with Different Hedonic Values Induce Contrasted Behavioural and Brain Responses in Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouard, Caroline; Jouhanneau, Mélanie; Meunier-Salaün, Marie-Christine; Malbert, Charles-Henri; Val-Laillet, David

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the behavioural and brain responses towards conditioned flavours with different hedonic values in juvenile pigs. Twelve 30-kg pigs were given four three-day conditioning sessions: they received three different flavoured meals paired with intraduodenal (i.d.) infusions of 15% glucose (FGlu), lithium chloride (FLiCl), or saline (control treatment, FNaCl). One and five weeks later, the animals were subjected to three two-choice feeding tests without reinforcement to check the acquisition of a conditioned flavour preference or aversion. In between, the anaesthetised pigs were subjected to three 18FDG PET brain imaging coupled with an olfactogustatory stimulation with the conditioned flavours. During conditioning, the pigs spent more time lying inactive, and investigated their environment less after the FLiCl than the FNaCl or FGlu meals. During the two-choice tests performed one and five weeks later, the FNaCl and FGlu foods were significantly preferred over the FLICl food even in the absence of i.d. infusions. Surprisingly, the FNaCl food was also preferred over the FGlu food during the first test only, suggesting that, while LiCl i.d. infusions led to a strong flavour aversion, glucose infusions failed to induce flavour preference. As for brain imaging results, exposure to aversive or less preferred flavours triggered global deactivation of the prefrontal cortex, specific activation of the posterior cingulate cortex, as well as asymmetric brain responses in the basal nuclei and the temporal gyrus. In conclusion, postingestive visceral stimuli can modulate the flavour/food hedonism and further feeding choices. Exposure to flavours with different hedonic values induced metabolism differences in neural circuits known to be involved in humans in the characterization of food palatability, feeding motivation, reward expectation, and more generally in the regulation of food intake. PMID:22685528

  9. Exposures to conditioned flavours with different hedonic values induce contrasted behavioural and brain responses in pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Clouard

    Full Text Available This study investigated the behavioural and brain responses towards conditioned flavours with different hedonic values in juvenile pigs. Twelve 30-kg pigs were given four three-day conditioning sessions: they received three different flavoured meals paired with intraduodenal (i.d. infusions of 15% glucose (F(Glu, lithium chloride (F(LiCl, or saline (control treatment, F(NaCl. One and five weeks later, the animals were subjected to three two-choice feeding tests without reinforcement to check the acquisition of a conditioned flavour preference or aversion. In between, the anaesthetised pigs were subjected to three (18FDG PET brain imaging coupled with an olfactogustatory stimulation with the conditioned flavours. During conditioning, the pigs spent more time lying inactive, and investigated their environment less after the F(LiCl than the F(NaCl or F(Glu meals. During the two-choice tests performed one and five weeks later, the F(NaCl and F(Glu foods were significantly preferred over the F(LICl food even in the absence of i.d. infusions. Surprisingly, the F(NaCl food was also preferred over the F(Glu food during the first test only, suggesting that, while LiCl i.d. infusions led to a strong flavour aversion, glucose infusions failed to induce flavour preference. As for brain imaging results, exposure to aversive or less preferred flavours triggered global deactivation of the prefrontal cortex, specific activation of the posterior cingulate cortex, as well as asymmetric brain responses in the basal nuclei and the temporal gyrus. In conclusion, postingestive visceral stimuli can modulate the flavour/food hedonism and further feeding choices. Exposure to flavours with different hedonic values induced metabolism differences in neural circuits known to be involved in humans in the characterization of food palatability, feeding motivation, reward expectation, and more generally in the regulation of food intake.

  10. Exposures to conditioned flavours with different hedonic values induce contrasted behavioural and brain responses in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouard, Caroline; Jouhanneau, Mélanie; Meunier-Salaün, Marie-Christine; Malbert, Charles-Henri; Val-Laillet, David

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the behavioural and brain responses towards conditioned flavours with different hedonic values in juvenile pigs. Twelve 30-kg pigs were given four three-day conditioning sessions: they received three different flavoured meals paired with intraduodenal (i.d.) infusions of 15% glucose (F(Glu)), lithium chloride (F(LiCl)), or saline (control treatment, F(NaCl)). One and five weeks later, the animals were subjected to three two-choice feeding tests without reinforcement to check the acquisition of a conditioned flavour preference or aversion. In between, the anaesthetised pigs were subjected to three (18)FDG PET brain imaging coupled with an olfactogustatory stimulation with the conditioned flavours. During conditioning, the pigs spent more time lying inactive, and investigated their environment less after the F(LiCl) than the F(NaCl) or F(Glu) meals. During the two-choice tests performed one and five weeks later, the F(NaCl) and F(Glu) foods were significantly preferred over the F(LICl) food even in the absence of i.d. infusions. Surprisingly, the F(NaCl) food was also preferred over the F(Glu) food during the first test only, suggesting that, while LiCl i.d. infusions led to a strong flavour aversion, glucose infusions failed to induce flavour preference. As for brain imaging results, exposure to aversive or less preferred flavours triggered global deactivation of the prefrontal cortex, specific activation of the posterior cingulate cortex, as well as asymmetric brain responses in the basal nuclei and the temporal gyrus. In conclusion, postingestive visceral stimuli can modulate the flavour/food hedonism and further feeding choices. Exposure to flavours with different hedonic values induced metabolism differences in neural circuits known to be involved in humans in the characterization of food palatability, feeding motivation, reward expectation, and more generally in the regulation of food intake.

  11. Patient specific 3D visualisation of human brain | Baichoo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed (for example, a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader). If you would like more information about how to print, save, and work with PDFs, Highwire Press provides a helpful Frequently Asked Questions about PDFs.

  12. Patient specific 3D visualisation of human brain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nafiisah

    development of powerful new 3D image analysis and visualization algorithms that ... The tool is aimed to provide facility to reconstruct patient-specific 3D ... In this paper we present a review of the ... medical diagnosis, procedures training, pre-operative planning, ..... Body: Handbook of Numerical Analysis, Elsevier, 2004.

  13. Housing conditions influence motor functions and exploratory behavior following focal damage of the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornicka-Pawlak, Elzbieta; Jabłońska, Anna; Chyliński, Andrzej; Domańska-Janik, Krystyna

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated influence of housing conditions on motor functions recovery and exploratory behavior following ouabain focal brain lesion in the rat. During 30 days post-surgery period rats were housed individually in standard cages (IS) or in groups in enriched environment (EE) and behaviorally tested. The EE lesioned rats showed enhanced recovery from motor impairments in walking beam task, comparing with IS animals. Contrarily, in the open field IS rats (both lesioned and control) traveled a longer distance, showed less habituation and spent less time resting at the home base than the EE animals. Unlike the EE lesioned animals, the lesioned IS rats, presented a tendency to hyperactivity in postinjury period. Turning tendency was significantly affected by unilateral brain lesion only in the EE rats. We can conclude that housing conditions distinctly affected the rat's behavior in classical laboratory tests.

  14. Involvement of brain catalase activity in the acquisition of ethanol-induced conditioned place preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, Laura; Miquel, Marta; Aragon, Carlos M G

    2008-03-18

    It has been suggested that some of the behavioral effects produced by ethanol are mediated by its first metabolite, acetaldehyde. The present research addressed the hypothesis that catalase-dependent metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde in the brain is an important step in the production of ethanol-related affective properties. Firstly, we investigated the contribution of brain catalase in the acquisition of ethanol-induced conditioned place preference (CPP). Secondly, the specificity of the catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (AT) was evaluated with morphine- and cocaine-induced CPP. Finally, to investigate the role of catalase in the process of relapse to ethanol seeking caused by re-exposure to ethanol, after an initial conditioning and extinction, mice were primed with saline and ethanol or AT and ethanol and tested for reinstatement of CPP. Conditioned place preference was blocked in animals treated with AT and ethanol. Morphine and cocaine CPP were unaffected by AT treatment. However, the reinstatement of place preference was not modified by catalase inhibition. Taken together, the results of the present study indicate that the brain catalase-H(2)O(2) system contributes to the acquisition of affective-dependent learning induced by ethanol, and support the involvement of centrally-formed acetaldehyde in the formation of positive affective memories produced by ethanol.

  15. [The anatomy of a reduced skull model--visualisation of Leonardo da Vinci's anthropology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahner, E

    2008-04-02

    The article focuses on a rare example of a miniature skull of unknown origin. The profoundness of the anatomical details, conjoint with outstanding virtuosity, reminds of Leonardo da Vinci's anatomical skull studies and asks for additional interpretation beside the emblematic "memento mori"-character. Following the miscellaneous topics of his skull studies an anatomical-anthropological interpretation is proposed. For such a project the mergence of anthropology, history of medicine and history of art was mandatory. Concerning some discrepancies within the anatomical realism, the depiction of a pathology is discussed and beyond the visualisation of a historic concept of brain function.

  16. Brain activation associated to olfactory conditioned same-sex partner preference in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coria-Avila, Genaro A; Cibrian-Llanderal, Tamara; Díaz-Estrada, Victor X; García, Luis I; Toledo-Cárdenas, Rebeca; Pfaus, James G; Manzo, Jorge

    2018-03-01

    Sexual preferences can be strongly modified by Pavlovian learning. For instance, olfactory conditioned same-sex partner preference can occur when a sexually naïve male cohabits with an scented male during repeated periods under the effects of enhanced D2-type activity. Preference is observed days later via social and sexual behaviors. Herein we explored brain activity related to learned same-sex preference (Fos-Immunoreactivity, IR) following exposure to a conditioned odor paired with same-sex preference. During conditioning trials males received either saline or the D2-type receptor agonist quinpirole (QNP) and cohabitated during 24 h with a stimulus male that bore almond scent on the back as conditioned stimulus. This was repeated every 4 days, for a total of three trials. In a drug-free final test we assessed socio/sexual partner preference between the scented male and a receptive female. The results indicated that QNP-conditioned males developed a same-sex preference observed via contact, time spent, olfactory investigations, and non-contact erections. By contrast, saline-conditioned and intact (non-exposed to conditioning) males expressed an unconditioned preference for the female. Four days later the males were exposed to almond scent and their brains were processed for Fos-IR. Results indicated that the QNP-conditioned group expressed more Fos-IR in the nucleus accumbens (AcbSh), medial preoptic area (MPA), piriform cortex (Pir) and ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) as compared to saline-conditioned. Intact males expressed the lowest Fos-IR in AcbSh and VMH, but the highest in MPA and Pir. We discuss the role of these areas in the learning process of same-sex partner preferences and olfactory discrimination. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. EEG Oscillatory States: Universality, Uniqueness and Specificity across Healthy-Normal, Altered and Pathological Brain Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingelkurts, Alexander A.; Fingelkurts, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    For the first time the dynamic repertoires and oscillatory types of local EEG states in 13 diverse conditions (examined over 9 studies) that covered healthy-normal, altered and pathological brain states were quantified within the same methodological and conceptual framework. EEG oscillatory states were assessed by the probability-classification analysis of short-term EEG spectral patterns. The results demonstrated that brain activity consists of a limited repertoire of local EEG states in any of the examined conditions. The size of the state repertoires was associated with changes in cognition and vigilance or neuropsychopathologic conditions. Additionally universal, optional and unique EEG states across 13 diverse conditions were observed. It was demonstrated also that EEG oscillations which constituted EEG states were characteristic for different groups of conditions in accordance to oscillations’ functional significance. The results suggested that (a) there is a limit in the number of local states available to the cortex and many ways in which these local states can rearrange themselves and still produce the same global state and (b) EEG individuality is determined by varying proportions of universal, optional and unique oscillatory states. The results enriched our understanding about dynamic microstructure of EEG-signal. PMID:24505292

  18. General anesthetics inhibit erythropoietin induction under hypoxic conditions in the mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoharu Tanaka

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin (EPO, originally identified as a hematopoietic growth factor produced in the kidney and fetal liver, is also endogenously expressed in the central nervous system (CNS. EPO in the CNS, mainly produced in astrocytes, is induced under hypoxic conditions in a hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-dependent manner and plays a dominant role in neuroprotection and neurogenesis. We investigated the effect of general anesthetics on EPO expression in the mouse brain and primary cultured astrocytes.BALB/c mice were exposed to 10% oxygen with isoflurane at various concentrations (0.10-1.0%. Expression of EPO mRNA in the brain was studied, and the effects of sevoflurane, halothane, nitrous oxide, pentobarbital, ketamine, and propofol were investigated. In addition, expression of HIF-2α protein was studied by immunoblotting. Hypoxia-induced EPO mRNA expression in the brain was significantly suppressed by isoflurane in a concentration-dependent manner. A similar effect was confirmed for all other general anesthetics. Hypoxia-inducible expression of HIF-2α protein was also significantly suppressed with isoflurane. In the experiments using primary cultured astrocytes, isoflurane, pentobarbital, and ketamine suppressed hypoxia-inducible expression of HIF-2α protein and EPO mRNA.Taken together, our results indicate that general anesthetics suppress activation of HIF-2 and inhibit hypoxia-induced EPO upregulation in the mouse brain through a direct effect on astrocytes.

  19. Inspection, visualisation and analysis of quantitative proteomics data

    OpenAIRE

    Gatto, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Material Quantitative Proteomics and Data Analysis Course. 4 - 5 April 2016, Queen Hotel, Chester, UK Table D - Inspection, visualisation and analysis of quantitative proteomics data, Laurent Gatto (University of Cambridge)

  20. Scenario visualisation for participatory landscape planning - a study from Denmark

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tress, B.; Tress, G.

    2003-01-01

    Increasingly, different functions must be integrated simultaneously in the Danish countryside, demanding a common effort of planners, decision-makers, researchers, and stakeholders. The study proposes a transdisciplinary method that combines scenario technique, photorealistic visualisation, and

  1. Targeting myeloid cells to the brain using non-myeloablative conditioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chotima Böttcher

    Full Text Available Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs are able to colonize the central nervous system (CNS at sites of damage. This ability makes BMDCs an ideal cellular vehicle for transferring therapeutic genes/molecules to the CNS. However, conditioning is required for bone marrow-derived myeloid cells to engraft in the brain, which so far has been achieved by total body irradiation (TBI and by chemotherapy (e.g. busulfan treatment. Unfortunately, both regimens massively disturb the host's hematopoietic compartment. Here, we established a conditioning protocol to target myeloid cells to sites of brain damage in mice using non-myeloablative focal head irradiation (HI. This treatment was associated with comparatively low inflammatory responses in the CNS despite cranial radiation doses which are identical to TBI, as revealed by gene expression analysis of cytokines/chemokines such as CCL2, CXCL10, TNF-α and CCL5. HI prior to bone marrow transplantation resulted in much lower levels of blood chimerism defined as the percentage of donor-derived cells in peripheral blood ( 95% or busulfan treatment (> 50%. Nevertheless, HI effectively recruited myeloid cells to the area of motoneuron degeneration in the brainstem within 7 days after facial nerve axotomy. In contrast, no donor-derived cells were detected in the lesioned facial nucleus of busulfan-treated animals up to 2 weeks after transplantation. Our findings suggest that myeloid cells can be targeted to sites of brain damage even in the presence of very low levels of peripheral blood chimerism. We established a novel non-myeloablative conditioning protocol with minimal disturbance of the host's hematopoietic system for targeting BMDCs specifically to areas of pathology in the brain.

  2. Small-scale visualisation in the manufacturing environment

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Sc. The domain of computer graphics has undergone phenomenal changes and improvements over the past decade, to the extent that photorealistic renderings have now become possible. Evidence of the vast potential of such renderings is all too clear in movies such as The Titanic. In the manufacturing arena, however, it is rarely required to produce visualisations of this quality. The rendered image is, in fact, required merely to visualise the required data set effectively and unambiguously,...

  3. Visualising Chord Progressions in Music Collections: A Big Data Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kachkaev, A.; Wolff, D.; Barthet, M.; Tidhar, D.; Plumbley, M. D.; Dykes, J.; Weyde, T.

    2014-01-01

    In the Digital Music Lab project we work on the automatic analysis of large audio databases that results in rich annotations for large corpora of music. The musicological interpretation of this data from thousands of pieces is a challenging task that can benefit greatly from specifically designed interactive visualisation. Most existing big music data visualisation focuses on cultural attributes, mood, or listener behaviour.\\ud \\ud In this ongoing work we explore chord sequence patterns extract...

  4. Technology Corner: Visualising Forensic Data: Evidence Guidelines (Part 2)

    OpenAIRE

    Damian Schofield; Ken Fowle

    2013-01-01

    Visualisation is becoming increasingly important for understanding information, such as investigative data (for example: computing, medical and crime scene evidence) and analysis (for example, network capability assessment, data file reconstruction and planning scenarios). Investigative data visualisation is used to reconstruct a scene or item and is used to assist the viewer (who may well be a member of the general public with little or no understanding of the subject matter) to understand w...

  5. Multimedia Visualisation of Massive Military Datasets (Visualisation multimedia des jeux de donnees militaires massifs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    the Los Angeles Area A-16 Figure A-5 Illustration of the Life Cycle of the Japanese Beetle A-17 Figure B-1 Knowledge Wall B-8 Figure B-2...Structure of World Trade in 1992 C-15 Figure D-1 3D Panorama Cinema at CAVI in Use D-2 Figure D-2 Holobench at CAVI D-2 Figure D-3 Virtual Studio...Illustration of the Life Cycle of the Japanese Beetle. A.6 STEPS IN ESTABLISHING A THEORY OF EFFECTIVE VISUALISATION An established theory generally

  6. Ischemic conditioning-induced endogenous brain protection: Applications pre-, per- or post-stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuechun; Reis, Cesar; Applegate, Richard; Stier, Gary; Martin, Robert; Zhang, John H

    2015-10-01

    In the area of brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases, a plethora of experimental and clinical evidence strongly indicates the promise of therapeutically exploiting the endogenous adaptive system at various levels like triggers, mediators and the end-effectors to stimulate and mobilize intrinsic protective capacities against brain injuries. It is believed that ischemic pre-conditioning and post-conditioning are actually the strongest known interventions to stimulate the innate neuroprotective mechanism to prevent or reverse neurodegenerative diseases including stroke and traumatic brain injury. Recently, studies showed the effectiveness of ischemic per-conditioning in some organs. Therefore the term ischemic conditioning, including all interventions applied pre-, per- and post-ischemia, which spans therapeutic windows in 3 time periods, has recently been broadly accepted by scientific communities. In addition, it is extensively acknowledged that ischemia-mediated protection not only affects the neurons but also all the components of the neurovascular network (consisting of neurons, glial cells, vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, smooth muscle cells, and venule/veins). The concept of cerebroprotection has been widely used in place of neuroprotection. Intensive studies on the cellular signaling pathways involved in ischemic conditioning have improved the mechanistic understanding of tolerance to cerebral ischemia. This has added impetus to exploration for potential pharmacologic mimetics, which could possibly induce and maximize inherent protective capacities. However, most of these studies were performed in rodents, and the efficacy of these mimetics remains to be evaluated in human patients. Several classical signaling pathways involving apoptosis, inflammation, or oxidation have been elaborated in the past decades. Newly characterized mechanisms are emerging with the advances in biotechnology and conceptual renewal. In this review we are going to focus on

  7. Brain regions associated with the acquisition of conditioned place preference for cocaine vs. social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Rawas, Rana; Klement, Sabine; Kummer, Kai K; Fritz, Michael; Dechant, Georg; Saria, Alois; Zernig, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    Positive social interaction could play an essential role in switching the preference of the substance dependent individual away from drug related activities. We have previously shown that conditioned place preference (CPP) for cocaine at the dose of 15 mg/kg and CPP for four 15-min episodes of social interaction were equally strong when rats were concurrently conditioned for place preference by pairing cocaine with one compartment and social interaction with the other. The aim of the present study was to investigate the differential activation of brain regions related to the reward circuitry after acquisition/expression of cocaine CPP or social interaction CPP. Our findings indicate that cocaine CPP and social interaction CPP activated almost the same brain regions. However, the granular insular cortex and the dorsal part of the agranular insular cortex were more activated after cocaine CPP, whereas the prelimbic cortex and the core subregion of the nucleus accumbens were more activated after social interaction CPP. These results suggest that the insular cortex appears to be potently activated after drug conditioning learning while activation of the prelimbic cortex-nucleus accumbens core projection seems to be preferentially involved in the conditioning to non-drug stimuli such as social interaction.

  8. Prenatal and Postnatal Medical Conditions and the Risk of Brain Tumors in Children and Adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tettamanti, Giorgio; Shu, Xiaochen; Adel Fahmideh, Maral

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have evaluated the effect of medical diagnostic radiation on brain tumors. Recent cohort studies have reported an increased risk associated with exposure to head CT scans. METHODS: Information regarding medical conditions, including prenatal and postnatal exposure...... to medical diagnostic radiation, was obtained from CEFALO, a multicenter case-control study performed in Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and Switzerland through face-to-face interview. Eligible cases of childhood and adolescent brain tumors (CABT) were ages 7 to 19 years, diagnosed between January 1, 2004...... and August 31, 2008, and living in the participating countries (n = 352). The cases were matched by age, sex, and region to 646 population-based controls. RESULTS: Prenatal exposure to medical diagnostic radiation and postnatal exposure to X-rays were not associated with CABTs. A higher risk estimate...

  9. Real-time construction and visualisation of drift-free video mosaics from unconstrained camera motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Brzeszcz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes a novel approach for real-time video mosaicking facilitating drift-free mosaic construction and visualisation, with integrated frame blending and redundancy management, that is shown to be flexible to a range of varying mosaic scenarios. The approach supports unconstrained camera motion with in-sequence loop closing, variation in camera focal distance (zoom and recovery from video sequence breaks. Real-time performance, over extended duration sequences, is realised via novel aspects of frame management within the mosaic representation and thus avoiding the high data redundancy associated with temporally dense, spatially overlapping video frame inputs. This managed set of image frames is visualised in real time using a dynamic mosaic representation of overlapping textured graphics primitives in place of the traditional globally constructed, and hence frequently reconstructed, mosaic image. Within this formulation, subsequent optimisation occurring during online construction can thus efficiency adjust relative frame positions via simple primitive position transforms. Effective visualisation is similarly facilitated by online inter-frame blending to overcome the illumination and colour variance associated with modern camera hardware. The evaluation illustrates overall robustness in video mosaic construction under a diverse range of conditions including indoor and outdoor environments, varying illumination and presence of in-scene motion on varying computational platforms.

  10. Establishment of minimal positive-control conditions to ensure brain safety during rapid development of emergency vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Hyekyung; Kim, Kwang Ho; Park, Min Young; Kim, Kyeongryun; Ko, Bokyeong; Seo, Hyung Seok; Kim, Byoung Soo; Hahn, Tae-Wook; Yi, Sun Shin

    2017-08-31

    With the increase in international human and material exchanges, contagious and infectious epidemics are occurring. One of the effective methods of epidemic inhibition is the rapid development and supply of vaccines. Considering the safety of the brain during vaccine development is very important. However, manuals for brain safety assays for new vaccines are not uniform or effective globally. Therefore, the aim of this study is to establish a positive-control protocol for an effective brain safety test to enhance rapid vaccine development. The blood-brain barrier's tight junctions provide selective defense of the brain; however, it is possible to destroy these important microstructures by administering lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), thereby artificially increasing the permeability of brain parenchyma. In this study, test conditions are established so that the degree of brain penetration or brain destruction of newly developed vaccines can be quantitatively identified. The most effective conditions were suggested by measuring time-dependent expressions of tight junction biomarkers (zonula occludens-1 [ZO-1] and occludin) in two types of mice (C57BL/6 and ICR) following exposure to two types of LPS ( Salmonella and Escherichia ). In the future, we hope that use of the developed positive-control protocol will help speed up the determination of brain safety of novel vaccines.

  11. Brain oxytocin in social fear conditioning and its extinction: involvement of the lateral septum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoicas, Iulia; Slattery, David A; Neumann, Inga D

    2014-12-01

    Central oxytocin (OXT) has anxiolytic and pro-social properties both in humans and rodents, and has been proposed as a therapeutic option for anxiety and social dysfunctions. Here, we utilized a mouse model of social fear conditioning (SFC) to study the effects of OXT on social fear, and to determine whether SFC causes alterations in central OXT receptor (OXTR) binding and local OXT release. Central infusion of OXT, but not arginine vasopressin, prior to social fear extinction training completely abolished social fear expression in an OXTR-mediated fashion without affecting general anxiety or locomotion. SFC caused increased OXTR binding in the dorso-lateral septum (DLS), central amygdala, dentate gyrus, and cornu ammunis 1, which normalized after social fear extinction, suggesting that these areas form part of a brain network involved in the development and neural support of social fear. Microdialysis revealed that the increase in OXT release observed in unconditioned mice within the DLS during social fear extinction training was attenuated in conditioned mice. Consequently, increasing the availability of local OXT by infusion of OXT into the DLS reversed social fear. Thus, alterations in the brain OXT system, including altered OXTR binding and OXT release within the DLS, play an important role in SFC and social fear extinction. Thus, we suggest that the OXT system is adversely affected in disorders associated with social fear, such as social anxiety disorder and reinstalling an appropriate balance of the OXT system may alleviate some of the symptoms.

  12. Valence of physical stimuli, not housing conditions, affects behaviour and frontal cortical brain activity in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vögeli, Sabine; Lutz, Janika; Wolf, Martin; Wechsler, Beat; Gygax, Lorenz

    2014-07-01

    Modulation of short-term emotions by long-term mood is little understood but relevant to understand the affective system and of importance in respect to animal welfare: a negative mood might taint experiences, whilst a positive mood might alleviate single negative events. To induce different mood states in sheep housing conditions were varied. Fourteen ewes were group-housed in an unpredictable, stimulus-poor and 15 ewes in a predictable, stimulus-rich environment. Sheep were tested individually for mood in a behavioural cognitive bias paradigm. Also, their reactions to three physical stimuli thought to differ in their perceived valence were observed (negative: pricking, intermediate: slight pressure, positive: kneading). General behaviour, activity, ear movements and positions, and haemodynamic changes in the cortical brain were recorded during stimulations. Generalised mixed-effects models and model probabilities based on the BIC (Bayesian information criterion) were used. Only weak evidence for mood difference was found. Sheep from the unpredictable, stimulus-poor housing condition had a somewhat more negative cognitive bias, showed slightly more aversive behaviour, were slightly more active and moved their ears somewhat more. Sheep most clearly differentiated the negative from the intermediate and positive stimulus in that they exhibited more aversive behaviour, less nibbling, were more active, showed more ear movements, more forward ear postures, fewer backward ear postures, and a stronger decrease in deoxyhaemoglobin when subjected to the negative stimulus. In conclusion, sheep reacted towards stimuli according to their presumed valence but their mood was not strongly influenced by housing conditions. Therefore, behavioural reactions and cortical brain activity towards the stimuli were hardly modulated by housing conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Visualisation and Immersion Dome Experience for Inspired Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna P. Gawlikowska

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Public protests, which lead to increased administrative and permission procedures, are amongst the most important obstacles in development of wind energy projects. The community’s fears of visual and acoustic impacts of new power plants are commonly recognized as the weakest aspects of public acceptance. To address these issues Visualisation Dome has been designed to better communicate the economic, political, spatial, ecological and social benefits of wind power plants and the associated risks to local communities. The approach combines the experimental and simulation method. The integrated analysis software tool, which allows assessing the impacts of planed wind power plants underpins their 360-degree video and audio simulations. The Visualisation Dome demonstration resulted in 57% of the interviewed participants improving their opinion of wind power following the experience. Visualisation Dome’s novel approach for improving procedural justice of wind energy projects development forms innovative, interactive and streamlined processes, and enables constructive participation of audiences.

  14. Technology Corner: Visualising Forensic Data: Evidence Guidelines (Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Schofield

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Visualisation is becoming increasingly important for understanding information, such as investigative data (for example: computing, medical and crime scene evidence and analysis (for example, network capability assessment, data file reconstruction and planning scenarios. Investigative data visualisation is used to reconstruct a scene or item and is used to assist the viewer (who may well be a member of the general public with little or no understanding of the subject matter to understand what is being presented. Analysis visualisations, on the other hand, are usually developed to review data, information and assess competing scenario hypotheses for those who usually have an understanding of the subject matter.Courtroom environments are morphing into cinematic display environments, the media consumed by an audience who are increasingly visually literate and media savvy (Heintz, 2002. There are a number of fundamental implications inherent in the shift from oral to visual mediation and a number of facets of this modern evidence presentation technology needs to be investigated and analysed. One of the primary issues of visualisation is that no matter how coherent the data, there will always be conjecture and debate as to how the information is/has-been visualised and, is it presented in an acceptable and meaningful way.This paper presents a range of examples of where forensic data has been visualised using various techniques and technology, the paper then examines aspects of the visual courtroom evidence presented and discusses some of the benefits and potential problems of implementing this technology. This paper is part two of a two-part series that aims to describe the use of, and provide guidelines for, the use of graphical displays in courtrooms.

  15. Histone deacetylases exert class specific roles in conditioning the brain and heart against acute ischemic injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sverre Erik Aune

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury comprises a significant portion of morbidity and mortality from heart and brain diseases worldwide. This enduring clinical problem has inspired myriad reports in the scientific literature of experimental interventions seeking to elucidate the pathology of IR injury. Elective cardiac surgery presents perhaps the most viable scenario for protecting the heart and brain from IR injury, due to the opportunity to condition the organs prior to insult. The physiological parameters for the preconditioning of vital organs prior to insult through mechanical and pharmacologic maneuvers have been heavily examined. These investigations have revealed new insights into how preconditioning alters cellular responses to IR injury. However, the promise of preconditioning remains unfulfilled at the clinical level, and research seeking to implicate cell signals essential to this protection continues. Recent discoveries in molecular biology have revealed that gene expression can be controlled through posttranslational modifications, without altering the chemical structure of the genetic code. In this scenario, gene expression is repressed by enzymes that cause chromatin compaction through catalytic removal of acetyl moieties from lysine residues on histones. These enzymes, called histone deacetylases (HDACs, can be inhibited pharmacologically, leading to the de-repression of protective genes. The discovery that HDACs can also alter the function of non-histone proteins through posttranslational deacetylation has expanded the potential impact of HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of human disease. HDAC inhibitors have been applied in a very small number of experimental models of IR. However, the scientific literature contains an increasing number of reports demonstrating that HDACs converge on preconditioning signals in the cell. This review will describe the influence of HDACs on major preconditioning signaling pathways in the heart and

  16. Using Cesium for 3D Thematic Visualisations on the Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gede, Mátyás

    2018-05-01

    Cesium (http://cesiumjs.org) is an open source, WebGL-based JavaScript library for virtual globes and 3D maps. It is an excellent tool for 3D thematic visualisations, but to use its full functionality it has to be feed with its own file format, CZML. Unfortunately, this format is not yet supported by any major GIS software. This paper intro- duces a plugin for QGIS, developed by the author, which facilitates the creation of CZML file for various types of visualisations. The usability of Cesium is also examined in various hardware/software environments.

  17. Purpose compliant visual simulation: towards effective and selective methods and techniques of visualisation and simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daru, R.; Venemans, P.

    1998-01-01

    Visualisation, simulation and communication were always intimately interconnected. Visualisations and simulations impersonate existing or virtual realities. Without those tools it is arduous to communicate mental depictions about virtual objects and events. A communication model is presented to

  18. Ensemble of Neural Network Conditional Random Fields for Self-Paced Brain Computer Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Bashashati

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Classification of EEG signals in self-paced Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI is an extremely challenging task. The main difficulty stems from the fact that start time of a control task is not defined. Therefore it is imperative to exploit the characteristics of the EEG data to the extent possible. In sensory motor self-paced BCIs, while performing the mental task, the user’s brain goes through several well-defined internal state changes. Applying appropriate classifiers that can capture these state changes and exploit the temporal correlation in EEG data can enhance the performance of the BCI. In this paper, we propose an ensemble learning approach for self-paced BCIs. We use Bayesian optimization to train several different classifiers on different parts of the BCI hyper- parameter space. We call each of these classifiers Neural Network Conditional Random Field (NNCRF. NNCRF is a combination of a neural network and conditional random field (CRF. As in the standard CRF, NNCRF is able to model the correlation between adjacent EEG samples. However, NNCRF can also model the nonlinear dependencies between the input and the output, which makes it more powerful than the standard CRF. We compare the performance of our algorithm to those of three popular sequence labeling algorithms (Hidden Markov Models, Hidden Markov Support Vector Machines and CRF, and to two classical classifiers (Logistic Regression and Support Vector Machines. The classifiers are compared for the two cases: when the ensemble learning approach is not used and when it is. The data used in our studies are those from the BCI competition IV and the SM2 dataset. We show that our algorithm is considerably superior to the other approaches in terms of the Area Under the Curve (AUC of the BCI system.

  19. Functional and Topological Conditions for Explosive Synchronization Develop in Human Brain Networks with the Onset of Anesthetic-Induced Unconsciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minkyung; Mashour, George A; Moraes, Stefanie-Blain; Vanini, Giancarlo; Tarnal, Vijay; Janke, Ellen; Hudetz, Anthony G; Lee, Uncheol

    2016-01-01

    Sleep, anesthesia, and coma share a number of neural features but the recovery profiles are radically different. To understand the mechanisms of reversibility of unconsciousness at the network level, we studied the conditions for gradual and abrupt transitions in conscious and anesthetized states. We hypothesized that the conditions for explosive synchronization (ES) in human brain networks would be present in the anesthetized brain just over the threshold of unconsciousness. To test this hypothesis, functional brain networks were constructed from multi-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings in seven healthy subjects across conscious, unconscious, and recovery states. We analyzed four variables that are involved in facilitating ES in generic, non-biological networks: (1) correlation between node degree and frequency, (2) disassortativity (i.e., the tendency of highly-connected nodes to link with less-connected nodes, or vice versa), (3) frequency difference of coupled nodes, and (4) an inequality relationship between local and global network properties, which is referred to as the suppressive rule. We observed that the four network conditions for ES were satisfied in the unconscious state. Conditions for ES in the human brain suggest a potential mechanism for rapid recovery from the lightly-anesthetized state. This study demonstrates for the first time that the network conditions for ES, formerly shown in generic networks only, are present in empirically-derived functional brain networks. Further investigations with deep anesthesia, sleep, and coma could provide insight into the underlying causes of variability in recovery profiles of these unconscious states.

  20. Techniques and software architectures for medical visualisation and image processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botha, C.P.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents a flexible software platform for medical visualisation and image processing, a technique for the segmentation of the shoulder skeleton from CT data and three techniques that make contributions to the field of direct volume rendering. Our primary goal was to investigate the use

  1. Tangible air: An interactive installation for visualising audience engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Röggla (Tom); C. Wang (Chen); L. Pérez Romero (Lilia); A.J. Jansen (Jack); P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThis article presents an end-to-end system for capturing physiological sensor data and visualising it on a real-time graphic dashboard and as part of an art installation. More specifically, it describes an event where the level of engagement of the audience was measured by means of

  2. Tangible air : An Interactive Installation for Visualising Audience Engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Röggla, Thomas; Wang, Chen; Perez Romero, Lilia; Jansen, Jack; Cesar Garcia, P.S.

    2017-01-01

    This article presents an end-to-end system for capturing physiological sensor data and visualising it on a real-time graphic dashboard and as part of an art installation. More specifically, it describes an event where the level of engagement of the audience was measured by means of Galvanic Skin

  3. The role of visualisation in developing critical thinking in mathematics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research has been conducted on the role and importance of visualisation in many fields, including psychology, but very little has been done to extend its role to mathematics education in particular. Furthermore, much research has been done on the importance of critical thinking. However, to date not much has been done ...

  4. Visualisation of animal anatomy using MRI and CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik; Hansen, Kasper; Pedersen, Michael

    imaging (MRI) and CT. Various species (tarantula, horseshoe crab, carp, haddock, lungfish, axolotl) were subjected to multi-slice MRI and CT protocols to produce 2D images of body slices, followed by volume rendering producing 3D digital models of animal anatomy with applications for visualising specific...

  5. Visualisation for Stochastic Process Algebras: The Graphic Truth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Michael James Andrew; Gilmore, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    and stochastic activity networks provide an automaton-based view of the model, which may be easier to visualise, at the expense of portability. In this paper, we argue that we can achieve the benefits of both approaches by generating a graphical view of a stochastic process algebra model, which is synchronised...

  6. A cognitive-relaxation-visualisation intervention for anxiety in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cognitive-relaxation-visualisation intervention for anxiety in women with breast cancer. ... A Solomon four group design was used for the pre-diagnosis group and a pre-test - post-test control group design was utilised for the post-diagnosis group. The IPAT Anxiety Scale was used to measure the variables of overt and ...

  7. Visualising the Roots of Quadratic Equations with Complex Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardell, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a natural extension of the root visualisation techniques first presented by Bardell (2012) for quadratic equations with real coefficients. Consideration is now given to the familiar quadratic equation "y = ax[superscript 2] + bx + c" in which the coefficients "a," "b," "c" are generally…

  8. Analysis and visualisation of movement: an interdisciplinary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demšar, Urška; Buchin, Kevin; Cagnacci, Francesca; Safi, Kamran; Speckmann, Bettina; Van de Weghe, Nico; Weiskopf, Daniel; Weibel, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The processes that cause and influence movement are one of the main points of enquiry in movement ecology. However, ecology is not the only discipline interested in movement: a number of information sciences are specialising in analysis and visualisation of movement data. The recent explosion in availability and complexity of movement data has resulted in a call in ecology for new appropriate methods that would be able to take full advantage of the increasingly complex and growing data volume. One way in which this could be done is to form interdisciplinary collaborations between ecologists and experts from information sciences that analyse movement. In this paper we present an overview of new movement analysis and visualisation methodologies resulting from such an interdisciplinary research network: the European COST Action "MOVE - Knowledge Discovery from Moving Objects" (http://www.move-cost.info). This international network evolved over four years and brought together some 140 researchers from different disciplines: those that collect movement data (out of which the movement ecology was the largest represented group) and those that specialise in developing methods for analysis and visualisation of such data (represented in MOVE by computational geometry, geographic information science, visualisation and visual analytics). We present MOVE achievements and at the same time put them in ecological context by exploring relevant ecological themes to which MOVE studies do or potentially could contribute.

  9. Critical Role of Peripheral Vasoconstriction in Fatal Brain Hyperthermia Induced by MDMA (Ecstasy) under Conditions That Mimic Human Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Albert H.; Wakabayashi, Ken T.; Baumann, Michael H.; Shaham, Yavin

    2014-01-01

    MDMA (Ecstasy) is an illicit drug used by young adults at hot, crowed “rave” parties, yet the data on potential health hazards of its abuse remain controversial. Here, we examined the effect of MDMA on temperature homeostasis in male rats under standard laboratory conditions and under conditions that simulate drug use in humans. We chronically implanted thermocouple microsensors in the nucleus accumbens (a brain reward area), temporal muscle, and facial skin to measure temperature continuously from freely moving rats. While focusing on brain hyperthermia, temperature monitoring from the two peripheral locations allowed us to evaluate the physiological mechanisms (i.e., intracerebral heat production and heat loss via skin surfaces) that underlie MDMA-induced brain temperature responses. Our data confirm previous reports on high individual variability and relatively weak brain hyperthermic effects of MDMA under standard control conditions (quiet rest, 22−23°C), but demonstrate dramatic enhancements of drug-induced brain hyperthermia during social interaction (exposure to male conspecific) and in warm environments (29°C). Importantly, we identified peripheral vasoconstriction as a critical mechanism underlying the activity- and state-dependent potentiation of MDMA-induced brain hyperthermia. Through this mechanism, which prevents proper heat dissipation to the external environment, MDMA at a moderate nontoxic dose (9 mg/kg or ∼1/5 of LD50 in rats) can cause fatal hyperthermia under environmental conditions commonly encountered by humans. Our results demonstrate that doses of MDMA that are nontoxic under cool, quiet conditions can become highly dangerous under conditions that mimic recreational use of MDMA at rave parties or other hot, crowded venues. PMID:24899699

  10. Diffany: an ontology-driven framework to infer, visualise and analyse differential molecular networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Landeghem, Sofie; Van Parys, Thomas; Dubois, Marieke; Inzé, Dirk; Van de Peer, Yves

    2016-01-05

    Differential networks have recently been introduced as a powerful way to study the dynamic rewiring capabilities of an interactome in response to changing environmental conditions or stimuli. Currently, such differential networks are generated and visualised using ad hoc methods, and are often limited to the analysis of only one condition-specific response or one interaction type at a time. In this work, we present a generic, ontology-driven framework to infer, visualise and analyse an arbitrary set of condition-specific responses against one reference network. To this end, we have implemented novel ontology-based algorithms that can process highly heterogeneous networks, accounting for both physical interactions and regulatory associations, symmetric and directed edges, edge weights and negation. We propose this integrative framework as a standardised methodology that allows a unified view on differential networks and promotes comparability between differential network studies. As an illustrative application, we demonstrate its usefulness on a plant abiotic stress study and we experimentally confirmed a predicted regulator. Diffany is freely available as open-source java library and Cytoscape plugin from http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/supplementary_data/solan/diffany/.

  11. The effect of conditional probability of chord progression on brain response: an MEG study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Goo Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent electrophysiological and neuroimaging studies have explored how and where musical syntax in Western music is processed in the human brain. An inappropriate chord progression elicits an event-related potential (ERP component called an early right anterior negativity (ERAN or simply an early anterior negativity (EAN in an early stage of processing the musical syntax. Though the possible underlying mechanism of the EAN is assumed to be probabilistic learning, the effect of the probability of chord progressions on the EAN response has not been previously explored explicitly. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, the empirical conditional probabilities in a Western music corpus were employed as an approximation of the frequencies in previous exposure of participants. Three types of chord progression were presented to musicians and non-musicians in order to examine the correlation between the probability of chord progression and the neuromagnetic response using magnetoencephalography (MEG. Chord progressions were found to elicit early responses in a negatively correlating fashion with the conditional probability. Observed EANm (as a magnetic counterpart of the EAN component responses were consistent with the previously reported EAN responses in terms of latency and location. The effect of conditional probability interacted with the effect of musical training. In addition, the neural response also correlated with the behavioral measures in the non-musicians. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study is the first to reveal the correlation between the probability of chord progression and the corresponding neuromagnetic response. The current results suggest that the physiological response is a reflection of the probabilistic representations of the musical syntax. Moreover, the results indicate that the probabilistic representation is related to the musical training as well as the sensitivity of an individual.

  12. Using game engine for 3D terrain visualisation of GIS data: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mat, Ruzinoor Che; Zulkifli, Abdul Nasir; Mahayudin, Mohd Hafiz; Shariff, Abdul Rashid Mohammed; Rahim, Mohd Shafry Mohd

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews on the 3D terrain visualisation of GIS data using game engines that are available in the market as well as open source. 3D terrain visualisation is a technique used to visualise terrain information from GIS data such as a digital elevation model (DEM), triangular irregular network (TIN) and contour. Much research has been conducted to transform the 2D view of map to 3D. There are several terrain visualisation softwares that are available for free, which include Cesium, Hftool and Landserf. This review paper will help interested users to better understand the current state of art in 3D terrain visualisation of GIS data using game engines

  13. Using game engine for 3D terrain visualisation of GIS data: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che Mat, Ruzinoor; Shariff, Abdul Rashid Mohammed; Nasir Zulkifli, Abdul; Shafry Mohd Rahim, Mohd; Hafiz Mahayudin, Mohd

    2014-06-01

    This paper reviews on the 3D terrain visualisation of GIS data using game engines that are available in the market as well as open source. 3D terrain visualisation is a technique used to visualise terrain information from GIS data such as a digital elevation model (DEM), triangular irregular network (TIN) and contour. Much research has been conducted to transform the 2D view of map to 3D. There are several terrain visualisation softwares that are available for free, which include Cesium, Hftool and Landserf. This review paper will help interested users to better understand the current state of art in 3D terrain visualisation of GIS data using game engines.

  14. Gaia Data Release 1. The archive visualisation service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moitinho, A.; Krone-Martins, A.; Savietto, H.; Barros, M.; Barata, C.; Falcão, A. J.; Fernandes, T.; Alves, J.; Silva, A. F.; Gomes, M.; Bakker, J.; Brown, A. G. A.; González-Núñez, J.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Hernández, J.; Jordan, S.; Luri, X.; Merin, B.; Mignard, F.; Mora, A.; Navarro, V.; O'Mullane, W.; Sagristà Sellés, T.; Salgado, J.; Segovia, J. C.; Utrilla, E.; Arenou, F.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Jansen, F.; McCaughrean, M.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Taylor, M. B.; Vallenari, A.

    2017-09-01

    Context. The first Gaia data release (DR1) delivered a catalogue of astrometry and photometry for over a billion astronomical sources. Within the panoplyof methods used for data exploration, visualisation is often the starting point and even the guiding reference for scientific thought. However, this is a volume of data that cannot be efficiently explored using traditional tools, techniques, and habits. Aims: We aim to provide a global visual exploration service for the Gaia archive, something that is not possible out of the box for most people. The service has two main goals. The first is to provide a software platform for interactive visual exploration of the archive contents, using common personal computers and mobile devices available to most users. The second aim is to produce intelligible and appealing visual representations of the enormous information content of the archive. Methods: The interactive exploration service follows a client-server design. The server runs close to the data, at the archive, and is responsible for hiding as far as possible the complexity and volume of the Gaia data from the client. This is achieved by serving visual detail on demand. Levels of detail are pre-computed using data aggregation and subsampling techniques. For DR1, the client is a web application that provides an interactive multi-panel visualisation workspace as well as a graphical user interface. Results: The Gaia archive Visualisation Service offers a web-based multi-panel interactive visualisation desktop in a browser tab. It currently provides highly configurable 1D histograms and 2D scatter plots of Gaia DR1 and the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS) with linked views. An innovative feature is the creation of ADQL queries from visually defined regions in plots. These visual queries are ready for use in the Gaia Archive Search/data retrieval service. In addition, regions around user-selected objects can be further examined with automatically generated SIMBAD

  15. Visualisation of serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptors in the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passchier, J.; Waarde, A. van

    2001-01-01

    The 5-HT 1A subtype of receptors for the neurotransmitter serotonin is predominantly located in the limbic forebrain and is involved in the modulation of emotion and the function of the hypothalamus. Since 5-HT 1A receptors are implicated in the pathogenesis of anxiety, depression, hallucinogenic behaviour, motion sickness and eating disorders, they are an important target for drug therapy. Here, we review the radioligands which are available for visualisation and quantification of this important neuroreceptor in the human brain, using positron emission tomography (PET) or single-photon emission tomography (SPET). More than 20 compounds have been labelled with carbon-11 (half-life 20 min), fluorine-18 (half-life 109.8 min) or iodine-123 (half-life 13.2 h): structural analogues of the agonist, 8-OH-DPAT, structural analogues of the antagonist, WAY 100635, and apomorphines. The most successful radioligands thus far are [carbonyl- 11 C] WAY-100635 (WAY), [carbonyl- 11 C]desmethyl-WAY-100635 (DWAY), p-[ 18 F]MPPF and [ 11 C]robalzotan (NAD-299). The high-affinity ligands WAY and DWAY produce excellent images of 5-HT 1A receptor distribution in the brain (even the raphe nuclei are visualised), but they cannot be distributed to remote facilities and they probably cannot be used to measure changes in endogenous serotonin. Binding of the moderate-affinity ligands MPPF and NAD-299 may be more sensitive to serotonin competition and MPPF can be distributed to PET centres within a flying distance of a few hours. Future research should be directed towards: (a) improvement of the metabolic stability in primates; (b) development of a fluorinated radioligand which can be produced in large quantities and (c) production of a radioiodinated or technetium-labelled ligand for SPET. (orig.)

  16. Circadian Rhythms in Fear Conditioning: An Overview of Behavioral, Brain System, and Molecular Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Albrecht

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of fear memories is a powerful and highly evolutionary conserved mechanism that serves the behavioral adaptation to environmental threats. Accordingly, classical fear conditioning paradigms have been employed to investigate fundamental molecular processes of memory formation. Evidence suggests that a circadian regulation mechanism allows for a timestamping of such fear memories and controlling memory salience during both their acquisition and their modification after retrieval. These mechanisms include an expression of molecular clocks in neurons of the amygdala, hippocampus, and medial prefrontal cortex and their tight interaction with the intracellular signaling pathways that mediate neural plasticity and information storage. The cellular activities are coordinated across different brain regions and neural circuits through the release of glucocorticoids and neuromodulators such as acetylcholine, which integrate circadian and memory-related activation. Disturbance of this interplay by circadian phase shifts or traumatic experience appears to be an important factor in the development of stress-related psychopathology, considering these circadian components are of critical importance for optimizing therapeutic approaches to these disorders.

  17. Dynamics of brain activity underlying working memory for music in a naturalistic condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burunat, Iballa; Alluri, Vinoo; Toiviainen, Petri; Numminen, Jussi; Brattico, Elvira

    2014-08-01

    We aimed at determining the functional neuroanatomy of working memory (WM) recognition of musical motifs that occurs while listening to music by adopting a non-standard procedure. Western tonal music provides naturally occurring repetition and variation of motifs. These serve as WM triggers, thus allowing us to study the phenomenon of motif tracking within real music. Adopting a modern tango as stimulus, a behavioural test helped to identify the stimulus motifs and build a time-course regressor of WM neural responses. This regressor was then correlated with the participants' (musicians') functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal obtained during a continuous listening condition. In order to fine-tune the identification of WM processes in the brain, the variance accounted for by the sensory processing of a set of the stimulus' acoustic features was pruned from participants' neurovascular responses to music. Motivic repetitions activated prefrontal and motor cortical areas, basal ganglia, medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures, and cerebellum. The findings suggest that WM processing of motifs while listening to music emerges from the integration of neural activity distributed over cognitive, motor and limbic subsystems. The recruitment of the hippocampus stands as a novel finding in auditory WM. Effective connectivity and agglomerative hierarchical clustering analyses indicate that the hippocampal connectivity is modulated by motif repetitions, showing strong connections with WM-relevant areas (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex - dlPFC, supplementary motor area - SMA, and cerebellum), which supports the role of the hippocampus in the encoding of the musical motifs in WM, and may evidence long-term memory (LTM) formation, enabled by the use of a realistic listening condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Impact of Active Visualisation of High School Students on the Ability to Memorise Verbal Definitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamarija Šmajdek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The era of visual communication influences the cognitive strategies of the individual. Education, too, must adjust to these changes, which raises questions regarding the use of visualisation in teaching. In the present study, we examine the impact of visualisation on the ability of high school students to memorise text. In the theoretical part of the research, we first clarify the concept of visualisation. We define the concept of active visualisation and visualisation as a means of acquiring and conveying knowledge, and we describe the different kinds of visualisation (appearance-based analogies and form-based analogies, specifically defining appearance-based schemata visualisations (where imagery is articulated in a typical culturally trained manner. In the empirical part of the research, we perform an experiment in which we evaluate the effects of visualisation on students’ ability to memorise a difficult written definition. According to the theoretical findings, we establish two hypotheses. In the first, we assume that the majority of the visualisations that students form will be appearance-based schemata visualisations. This hypothesis is based on the assumption that, in visualisation, people spontaneously use analogies based on imagery and schemas that are typical of their society. In the second hypothesis, we assume that active visualisation will contribute to the students’ ability to memorise text in a statistically significant way. This hypothesis is based on the assumption that the combination of verbal and visual experiences enhances cognitive learning. Both hypotheses were confirmed in the research. As our study only dealt with the impact of the most spontaneous type of appearance based schemata visualisations, we see further possibilities in researching the influence of visualisations that are more complex formally.

  19. Volitional enhancement of firing synchrony and oscillation by neuronal operant conditioning: interaction with neurorehabilitation and brain-machine interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Yoshio; Song, Kichan; Tachibana, Shota; Takahashi, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we focus on neuronal operant conditioning in which increments in neuronal activities are directly rewarded without behaviors. We discuss the potential of this approach to elucidate neuronal plasticity for enhancing specific brain functions and its interaction with the progress in neurorehabilitation and brain-machine interfaces. The key to-be-conditioned activities that this paper emphasizes are synchronous and oscillatory firings of multiple neurons that reflect activities of cell assemblies. First, we introduce certain well-known studies on neuronal operant conditioning in which conditioned enhancements of neuronal firing were reported in animals and humans. These studies demonstrated the feasibility of volitional control over neuronal activity. Second, we refer to the recent studies on operant conditioning of synchrony and oscillation of neuronal activities. In particular, we introduce a recent study showing volitional enhancement of oscillatory activity in monkey motor cortex and our study showing selective enhancement of firing synchrony of neighboring neurons in rat hippocampus. Third, we discuss the reasons for emphasizing firing synchrony and oscillation in neuronal operant conditioning, the main reason being that they reflect the activities of cell assemblies, which have been suggested to be basic neuronal codes representing information in the brain. Finally, we discuss the interaction of neuronal operant conditioning with neurorehabilitation and brain-machine interface (BMI). We argue that synchrony and oscillation of neuronal firing are the key activities required for developing both reliable neurorehabilitation and high-performance BMI. Further, we conclude that research of neuronal operant conditioning, neurorehabilitation, BMI, and system neuroscience will produce findings applicable to these interrelated fields, and neuronal synchrony and oscillation can be a common important bridge among all of them.

  20. miR-98 and let-7g* protect the blood-brain barrier under neuroinflammatory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, Slava; Dykstra, Holly; Zuluaga-Ramirez, Viviana; Reichenbach, Nancy L; Persidsky, Yuri

    2015-12-01

    Pathologic conditions in the central nervous system, regardless of the underlying injury mechanism, show a certain level of blood-brain barrier (BBB) impairment. Endothelial dysfunction is the earliest event in the initiation of vascular damage caused by inflammation due to stroke, atherosclerosis, trauma, or brain infections. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as a class of gene expression regulators. The relationship between neuroinflammation and miRNA expression in brain endothelium remains unexplored. Previously, we showed the BBB-protective and anti-inflammatory effects of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) 3β inhibition in brain endothelium in in vitro and in vivo models of neuroinflammation. Using microarray screening, we identified miRNAs induced in primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells after exposure to the pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α, with/out GSK3β inhibition. Among the highly modified miRNAs, let-7 and miR-98 were predicted to target the inflammatory molecules, CCL2 and CCL5. Overexpression of let-7 and miR-98 in vitro and in vivo resulted in reduced leukocyte adhesion to and migration across endothelium, diminished expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and increased BBB tightness, attenuating barrier 'leakiness' in neuroinflammation conditions. For the first time, we showed that miRNAs could be used as a therapeutic tool to prevent the BBB dysfunction in neuroinflammation.

  1. Elucidation of polymer induced DNA condensation. Visualisation at the single molecular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Alison Laura

    2002-01-01

    DNA condensation is a phenomenon that has stimulated interest from biologists, physicists, and polymer chemists for decades. At the cellular level, this process is key to the packing of DNA within the nuclear envelope, and the exposure of the appropriate nucleic acid sequences in order for transcription to occur, and proteins to be produced. The advent of gene therapy has led to an invigoration of this subject area. In order to successfully deliver to, and transfect target cells, many delivery vectors condense the therapeutic DNA into small compact particles. The nature of these particles have a considerable influence on the ultimate expression of the administered nucleic acid material. In addition, at its most fundamental, DNA itself is a classical polyelectrolyte polymer, the behaviour of which has applicability to other charged polymeric systems. There are two core interwound themes to this investigation; the visualisation of DNA condensate morphology at ultra-resolution, and the elucidation of the mechanisms of formation of these structures. The technique of atomic force microscopy is central to these investigations. Methodologies have been devised allowing the visualisation of the tertiary structure and conformational behaviour of individual DNA condensates in near in situ conditions. Condensation of the nucleic acid material has been induced by two classes of cation; small molecular cations, like those found within eukaryotic cells, and a range of cationic polymers. The cationic polymers investigated all have considerable potential as gene delivery vectors. The resultant DNA condensates have been assessed and contrasted in terms of their tertiary morphology, lateral dimensions, and structural volume. Assessments have also been made regarding the influence of the molecular architecture of the cationic moiety and the nature of the input nucleic acid material on the resultant DNA condensates. With regard to the elucidation of the mechanisms of DNA condensate

  2. Visualising the scene: computer graphics and evidence presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Noond, Jez; Schofield, Damian; March, Jack; Evison, Martin

    2002-01-01

    In the UK forensic animations are becoming an increasingly important visual aid in courtroom situations, where complex data relating to a sequence of events is being visualised before a general public who may have little or no understanding of established forensic procedure or methodology. This paper will introduce and discuss a spectrum of new technologies that utilise new developments in Computer Graphics (CG) and Virtual Reality (VR) for a range of incident investigation and presentation s...

  3. Visualisation, imagery, and the development of geometrical reasoning

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Keith; Bills, Chris

    1998-01-01

    This report focuses on some aspects of the nature and role of visualisation and imagery in the teaching and learning of mathematics, particularly as a component in the development of geometrical reasoning. Issues briefly addressed include the relationship between imagery and perception, imagery and memory, the nature of dynamic images, and the interaction between imagery and concept development. The report concludes with a series of questions that may provide a suitable programme for research...

  4. Competency mapping and visualisation techniques in change management

    OpenAIRE

    Schöpfel , Joachim; Creusot , Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The article describes techniques that may facilitate change management in the library. Approach: The paper is based on practical experience and evidence from the INIST library department in France. Findings: Based on standard inventories of LIS professions and competencies, we present techniques for the mapping and visualisation of individual or team-centred job functions and skills. These techniques can help and facilitate communication, information and participation and are useful ...

  5. Fingermark Development on Leathers: Visualisation and Species Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Nichols-Drew, L.; Hillman, R.; Coulston, J.

    2017-01-01

    The Society for Wildlife Forensic Sciences - 2017 Conference Edinburgh The uniqueness of fingermarks provides identification of an individual. In practice, most such marks are latent: selection of the optimum reagent to render them visible depends on the nature of the surface and the object’s history. Despite availability of many processes, some “difficult” surfaces with low fingermark recovery rates remain: leather is a prime example. The generic goal of this work is visualisation of late...

  6. Immediate Realities: an anthropology of computer visualisation in archaeology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Bateman

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of computer visualisation techniques is an increasing part of archaeology's illustrative repertoire - but how do these images relate to the wider visual language that archaeologists use? This article assesses computer visualisations in the light of a range of anthropological, art historical, and cultural critiques to place them and their production squarely within the broader spectrum of the discipline's output. Moving from identifying the shortcomings in the methods and scope of existing critiques of archaeological illustrations, a comprehensive approach to understanding the visual culture of archaeology is outlined. This approach is specifically applied to computer visualisations, and identifies both the sociology of their production, and the technological nature of their creation and reproduction as key elements influencing their readings as communicators of archaeological ideas. In order to develop useful understandings of how the visual languages we employ act within the discourse of the discipline, we must be inclusive in our critiques of those languages. Until we consider the cultural products of our discipline with the same sophistication with which we examine the products of other cultures (past and present, we will struggle to use them to their full potential.

  7. Visualisation of cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns in albino Xenopus larvae in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogi Kazue

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has long been known that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, its composition and flow, play an important part in normal brain development, and ependymal cell ciliary beating as a possible driver of CSF flow has previously been studied in mammalian fetuses in vitro. Lower vertebrate animals are potential models for analysis of CSF flow during development because they are oviparous. Albino Xenopus laevis larvae are nearly transparent and have a straight, translucent brain that facilitates the observation of fluid flow within the ventricles. The aim of these experiments was to study CSF flow and circulation in vivo in the developing brain of living embryos, larvae and tadpoles of Xenopus laevis using a microinjection technique. Methods The development of Xenopus larval brain ventricles and the patterns of CSF flow were visualised after injection of quantum dot nanocrystals and polystyrene beads (3.1 or 5.8 μm in diameter into the fourth cerebral ventricle at embryonic/larval stages 30-53. Results The fluorescent nanocrystals showed the normal development of the cerebral ventricles from embryonic/larval stages 38 to 53. The polystyrene beads injected into stage 47-49 larvae revealed three CSF flow patterns, left-handed, right-handed and non-biased, in movement of the beads into the third ventricle from the cerebral aqueduct (aqueduct of Sylvius. In the lateral ventricles, anterior to the third ventricle, CSF flow moved anteriorly along the outer wall of the ventricle to the inner wall and then posteriorly, creating a semicircle. In the cerebral aqueduct, connecting the third and fourth cerebral ventricles, CSF flow moved rostrally in the dorsal region and caudally in the ventral region. Also in the fourth ventricle, clear dorso-ventral differences in fluid flow pattern were observed. Conclusions This is the first visualisation of the orchestrated CSF flow pattern in developing vertebrates using a live animal imaging approach. CSF flow

  8. The in vitro blood-brain barrier model under OGD condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornabene, Erica; Helms, Hans Christian Cederberg; Berndt, Philipp

    Introduction - The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a physical, transport and metabolic barrier which plays a key role in preventing uncontrolled exchanges between blood and brain, ensuring an optimal environment for neurons activity. This extent interface is created by the endothelial cells forming...... the wall of brain capillaries. The restrictive nature of the BBB is due to the presence of tight junctions, which seal the paracellular space, a low number of endocytotic vesicles and the presence of efflux transporters, resulting in a very tight layer. Ischemic insult and the subsequent reperfusion...... of therapies to treat this devastating disease. Materials and Methods - Primary cultures of endothelial cells from bovine brain microvessels were cocultured with rat astrocytes in transwell inserts. At day 11, cells were treated with 4h of OGD by changing the culture medium with glucose-free medium...

  9. Visualisation of diesel injector with neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, E.; Grünzweig, C.; Jollet, S.; Kaiser, M.; Hansen, H.; Dinkelacker, F.

    2015-12-01

    The injection process of diesel engines influences the pollutant emissions. The spray formation is significantly influenced by the internal flow of the injector. One of the key parameters here is the generation of cavitation caused by the geometry and the needle lift. In modern diesel engines the injection pressure is established up to 3000 bar. The details of the flow and phase change processes inside the injector are of increasing importance for such injectors. With these experimental measurements the validation of multiphase and cavitation models is possible for the high pressure range. Here, for instance, cavitation effects can occur. Cavitation effects in the injection port area destabilize the emergent fuel jet and improve the jet break-up. The design of the injection system in direct-injection diesel engines is an important challenge, as the jet breakup, the atomization and the mixture formation in the combustion chamber are closely linked. These factors have a direct impact on emissions, fuel consumption and performance of an engine. The shape of the spray at the outlet is determined by the internal flow of the nozzle. Here, geometrical parameters, the injection pressure, the injection duration and the cavitation phenomena play a major role. In this work, the flow dependency in the nozzles are analysed with the Neutron-Imaging. The great advantage of this method is the penetrability of the steel structure while a high contrast to the fuel is given due to the interaction of the neutrons with the hydrogen amount. Compared to other methods (optical with glass structures) we can apply real components under highest pressure conditions. During the steady state phase of the injection various cavitation phenomena are visible in the injector, being influenced by the nozzle geometry and the fuel pressure. Different characteristics of cavitation in the sac and spray hole can be detected, and the spray formation in the primary breakup zone is influenced.

  10. Clinical course of brain stroke in the persons exposed to ionizing radiation under the production conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchmanov, A.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose was to study the risk factors and clinical course of brain strokes in professionally exposed workers being employed in plutonium production in comparison with a control group. The method and materials of study -clinical supervision and clinical database creation on 162 cases of brain stroke (128 males and 34 females) developed among professionally exposed workers. Age of patient varied from 21 to 68 years (in average -51.6 y.). The control group consisted of patients with the same diagnosis, worked on the same enterprise, but non-exposed to radiation. Data on the totally accumulated dose of external gamma radiation were received on the base of the individual dosimeters (from 0.1 cSv to 52 cSv, in average about 13 cSv); the plutonium-239 body content was estimated accordingly to the level of urine radionuclide excretion (from 0.4 kBq to 1.6 kBq, in average about 0.33 kBq). Muscle's hypertinsion and pathological great-toe reflexes in paretic legs and hands, hemianopsia, impressive and ataxic aphasia prevailed in the patients with ischemic brain strokes in system of internal carotid artery, exposed to radiation. The changes of muscle's tension, ataxia and nystagmus were marked more often in the professionals with ischemic brain strokes in system of vertebrobasilar artery. The illness proceeded more easy and with smaller frequency of frustration of consciousness and algesthesia, irrespective of a type ischemic brain strokes in the people exposed to ionizing radiation, than in patients of non-irradiated group. It was found that the arterial hypertension appeared to be the main risk factor for the brain stroke in both groups of patients (in 81.48% and 91.15% of cases). There was no marked differences in significance of risk factors and in main clinical parameters of various types of ischemic brain strokes among the patients professionally exposed to radiation in comparison with a control group. (author)

  11. Changes in Lecithin Concentration in the Human Brain Tissue in Some Neurodegenerative Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajanovic, A.; Mihaljevic, M.; Hasanbasic, D.; Rukavina, D.; Sofic, E.

    2011-01-01

    As a consequence of a possible increase in oxidative stress or deterioration of nerve cells during aging, in some states neurodegeneration was demonstrated by multiple biochemical deficiency, especially deficiency of cholesterol and lecithin in brain regions. The aim of this study was to determine the changes in the concentration of lecithin in different regions of brain tissue (MC - motor cortex, NC - nucleus caudates, GT - temporal gyrus) dissected postmortem from people with senile dementia of Alzheimer's type (SDAT), and persons with Parkinson's disease (PD) as compared to people who died without these diseases (C). Spectrophotometric determination of lecithin in 18 postmortem brain tissue regions collected from of 12 persons with SDAT, in 11 postmortem brain tissue regions of 8 persons with PD and in 18 postmortem brain tissue regions of 8 control persons, was performed by enzymatic method. The content of lecithin in MC: 14.4 mg/g fresh tissue (f.t.) and GT: 13.1 mg/g (f.t.) for SDAT was significantly reduced (p < 0.01) by about 30 %, compared to control where there was: 21.6 mg/g (f.t.) in MC and 18.3 mg/g (f.t.) in the GT estimated. In all regions of the brain of PD patients, the content of lecithin was decreased by about 12 % compared to control, but without statistical significance. These results suggest that changes in the content of lecithin in these regions of brain tissue might affect the changes in the membrane potential and cell degeneration. (author)

  12. Towards the Development of a Taxonomy for Visualisation of Streamed Geospatial Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibolla, B. H.; Van Zyl, T.; Coetzee, S.

    2016-06-01

    Geospatial data has very specific characteristics that need to be carefully captured in its visualisation, in order for the user and the viewer to gain knowledge from it. The science of visualisation has gained much traction over the last decade as a response to various visualisation challenges. During the development of an open source based, dynamic two-dimensional visualisation library, that caters for geospatial streaming data, it was found necessary to conduct a review of existing geospatial visualisation taxonomies. The review was done in order to inform the design phase of the library development, such that either an existing taxonomy can be adopted or extended to fit the needs at hand. The major challenge in this case is to develop dynamic two dimensional visualisations that enable human interaction in order to assist the user to understand the data streams that are continuously being updated. This paper reviews the existing geospatial data visualisation taxonomies that have been developed over the years. Based on the review, an adopted taxonomy for visualisation of geospatial streaming data is presented. Example applications of this taxonomy are also provided. The adopted taxonomy will then be used to develop the information model for the visualisation library in a further study.

  13. LIME: 3D visualisation and interpretation of virtual geoscience models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Simon; Ringdal, Kari; Dolva, Benjamin; Naumann, Nicole; Kurz, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    Three-dimensional and photorealistic acquisition of surface topography, using methods such as laser scanning and photogrammetry, has become widespread across the geosciences over the last decade. With recent innovations in photogrammetric processing software, robust and automated data capture hardware, and novel sensor platforms, including unmanned aerial vehicles, obtaining 3D representations of exposed topography has never been easier. In addition to 3D datasets, fusion of surface geometry with imaging sensors, such as multi/hyperspectral, thermal and ground-based InSAR, and geophysical methods, create novel and highly visual datasets that provide a fundamental spatial framework to address open geoscience research questions. Although data capture and processing routines are becoming well-established and widely reported in the scientific literature, challenges remain related to the analysis, co-visualisation and presentation of 3D photorealistic models, especially for new users (e.g. students and scientists new to geomatics methods). Interpretation and measurement is essential for quantitative analysis of 3D datasets, and qualitative methods are valuable for presentation purposes, for planning and in education. Motivated by this background, the current contribution presents LIME, a lightweight and high performance 3D software for interpreting and co-visualising 3D models and related image data in geoscience applications. The software focuses on novel data integration and visualisation of 3D topography with image sources such as hyperspectral imagery, logs and interpretation panels, geophysical datasets and georeferenced maps and images. High quality visual output can be generated for dissemination purposes, to aid researchers with communication of their research results. The background of the software is described and case studies from outcrop geology, in hyperspectral mineral mapping and geophysical-geospatial data integration are used to showcase the novel

  14. Visualising elastic anisotropy: theoretical background and computational implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmann, J.; Aßmus, M.; Altenbach, H.

    2018-02-01

    In this article, we present the technical realisation for visualisations of characteristic parameters of the fourth-order elasticity tensor, which is classified by three-dimensional symmetry groups. Hereby, expressions for spatial representations of uc(Young)'s modulus and bulk modulus as well as plane representations of shear modulus and uc(Poisson)'s ratio are derived and transferred into a comprehensible form to computer algebra systems. Additionally, we present approaches for spatial representations of both latter parameters. These three- and two-dimensional representations are implemented into the software MATrix LABoratory. Exemplary representations of characteristic materials complete the present treatise.

  15. Using Ferumoxytol-Enhanced MRI to Measure Inflammation in Patients With Brain Tumors or Other Conditions of the CNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-30

    Brain Injury; Central Nervous System Degenerative Disorder; Central Nervous System Infectious Disorder; Central Nervous System Vascular Malformation; Hemorrhagic Cerebrovascular Accident; Ischemic Cerebrovascular Accident; Primary Brain Neoplasm; Brain Cancer; Brain Tumors

  16. Clinical course of brain stroke in the persons exposed to ionizing radiation under the production conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchmanov, A. [State Research Center of Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Biophysics

    2000-05-01

    The purpose was to study the risk factors and clinical course of brain strokes in professionally exposed workers being employed in plutonium production in comparison with a control group. The method and materials of study -clinical supervision and clinical database creation on 162 cases of brain stroke (128 males and 34 females) developed among professionally exposed workers. Age of patient varied from 21 to 68 years (in average -51.6 y.). The control group consisted of patients with the same diagnosis, worked on the same enterprise, but non-exposed to radiation. Data on the totally accumulated dose of external gamma radiation were received on the base of the individual dosimeters (from 0.1 cSv to 52 cSv, in average about 13 cSv); the plutonium-239 body content was estimated accordingly to the level of urine radionuclide excretion (from 0.4 kBq to 1.6 kBq, in average about 0.33 kBq). Muscle's hypertinsion and pathological great-toe reflexes in paretic legs and hands, hemianopsia, impressive and ataxic aphasia prevailed in the patients with ischemic brain strokes in system of internal carotid artery, exposed to radiation. The changes of muscle's tension, ataxia and nystagmus were marked more often in the professionals with ischemic brain strokes in system of vertebrobasilar artery. The illness proceeded more easy and with smaller frequency of frustration of consciousness and algesthesia, irrespective of a type ischemic brain strokes in the people exposed to ionizing radiation, than in patients of non-irradiated group. It was found that the arterial hypertension appeared to be the main risk factor for the brain stroke in both groups of patients (in 81.48% and 91.15% of cases). There was no marked differences in significance of risk factors and in main clinical parameters of various types of ischemic brain strokes among the patients professionally exposed to radiation in comparison with a control group. (author)

  17. Extracellular Membrane Vesicles as Vehicles for Brain Cell-to-Cell Interactions in Physiological as well as Pathological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Schiera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are involved in a great variety of physiological events occurring in the nervous system, such as cross talk among neurons and glial cells in synapse development and function, integrated neuronal plasticity, neuronal-glial metabolic exchanges, and synthesis and dynamic renewal of myelin. Many of these EV-mediated processes depend on the exchange of proteins, mRNAs, and noncoding RNAs, including miRNAs, which occurs among glial and neuronal cells. In addition, production and exchange of EVs can be modified under pathological conditions, such as brain cancer and neurodegeneration. Like other cancer cells, brain tumours can use EVs to secrete factors, which allow escaping from immune surveillance, and to transfer molecules into the surrounding cells, thus transforming their phenotype. Moreover, EVs can function as a way to discard material dangerous to cancer cells, such as differentiation-inducing proteins, and even drugs. Intriguingly, EVs seem to be also involved in spreading through the brain of aggregated proteins, such as prions and aggregated tau protein. Finally, EVs can carry useful biomarkers for the early diagnosis of diseases. Herein we summarize possible roles of EVs in brain physiological functions and discuss their involvement in the horizontal spreading, from cell to cell, of both cancer and neurodegenerative pathologies.

  18. The effect of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction on the assessment of diagnostic image quality and visualisation of anatomical structures in paediatric cerebral CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, Joel; Baath, Magnus; Thilander-Klang, Anne; Ledenius, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) on the visualisation of anatomical structures and diagnostic image quality in paediatric cerebral computed tomography (CT) examinations. Forty paediatric patients undergoing routine cerebral CT were included in the study. The raw data from CT scans were reconstructed into stacks of 5 mm thick axial images at various levels of ASiR. Three paediatric radiologists rated six questions related to the visualisation of anatomical structures and one question on diagnostic image quality, in a blinded randomised visual grading study. The evaluated anatomical structures demonstrated enhanced visibility with increasing level of ASiR, apart from the cerebrospinal fluid space around the brain. In this study, 60 % ASiR was found to be the optimal level of ASiR for paediatric cerebral CT examinations. This shows that the commonly used 30 % ASiR may not always be the optimal level. (authors)

  19. Differential changes of metabolic brain activity and interregional functional coupling in prefronto-limbic pathways during different stress conditions: Functional imaging in freely behaving rodent pups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg eBock

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The trumpet-tailed rat or degu (Octodon degus is an established model to investigate the consequences of early stress on the development of emotional brain circuits and behaviour. The aim of this study was to identify brain circuits, that respond to different stress conditions and to test if acute stress alters functional coupling of brain activity among prefrontal and limbic regions. Using functional imaging (2-Fluoro-deoxyglucose method in 8 day old male degu pups the following stress conditions were compared: (A pups together with parents and siblings (control, (B separation of the litter from the parents, (C individual separation from parents and siblings, (D individual separation and presentation of maternal calls. Condition (B significantly downregulated brain activity in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, nucleus accumbens and sensory areas compared to controls. Activity decrease was even more pronounced during condition (C, where, in contrast to all other regions, activity in the PAG was increased. Interestingly, brain activity in stress-associated brain regions such as the amygdala and habenula was not affected. In condition (D maternal vocalizations reactivated brain activity in the cingulate and precentral medial cortex, nucleus accumbens and striatum and in sensory areas. In contrast, reduced activity was measured in the prelimbic and infralimbic cortex and in the hippocampus and amygdala. Correlation analysis revealed complex, region- and situation-specific changes of interregional functional coupling among prefrontal and limbic brain regions during stress exposure. We show here for the first time that early life stress results in a widespread reduction of brain activity in the infant brain and changes interregional functional coupling. Moreover, maternal vocalizations can partly buffer stress-induced decrease in brain activity in some regions and evoked very different functional coupling patterns compared to the three other

  20. Measurement of serum melatonin in intensive care unit patients: changes in traumatic brain injury, trauma and medical conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A Seifman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is an endogenous hormone mainly produced by the pineal gland whose dysfunction leads to abnormal sleeping patterns. Changes in melatonin have been reported in acute traumatic brain injury (TBI, however the impact of environmental conditions typical of the intensive care unit (ICU has not been assessed. The aim of this study was to compare daily melatonin production in three patient populations treated at the ICU to differentiate the role of TBI versus ICU conditions. Forty-five patients were recruited and divided into severe TBI, trauma without TBI, medical conditions without trauma and compared to healthy volunteers. Serum melatonin levels were measured at four daily intervals at 0400h, 1000h, 1600h and 2200h for 7 days post-ICU admission by commercial ELISA. The geometric mean concentrations (95% confidence intervals of melatonin in these groups showed no difference being 8.3 (6.3-11.0, 9.3 (7.0-12.3 and 8.9 (6.6-11.9 pg/mL, respectively in TBI, trauma and intensive care cohorts. All of these patient groups demonstrated decreased melatonin concentrations when compared to control patients.This study suggests that TBI as well as ICU conditions, may have a role in the dysfunction of melatonin. Monitoring and possibly substituting melatonin acutely in these settings may assist in ameliorating longterm sleep dysfunction in all of these groups, and possibly contribute to reducing secondary brain injury in severe TBI.

  1. Sex-based differences in brain alterations across chronic pain conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arpana; Mayer, Emeran A; Fling, Connor; Labus, Jennifer S; Naliboff, Bruce D; Hong, Jui-Yang; Kilpatrick, Lisa A

    2017-01-02

    Common brain mechanisms are thought to play a significant role across a multitude of chronic pain syndromes. In addition, there is strong evidence for the existence of sex differences in the prevalence of chronic pain and in the neurobiology of pain. Thus, it is important to consider sex when developing general principals of pain neurobiology. The goal of the current Mini-Review is to evaluate what is known about sex-specific brain alterations across multiple chronic pain populations. A total of 15 sex difference and 143 single-sex articles were identified from among 412 chronic pain neuroimaging articles. Results from sex difference studies indicate more prominent primary sensorimotor structural and functional alterations in female chronic pain patients compared with male chronic pain patients: differences in the nature and degree of insula alterations, with greater insula reactivity in male patients; differences in the degree of anterior cingulate structural alterations; and differences in emotional-arousal reactivity. Qualitative comparisons of male-specific and female-specific studies appear to be consistent with the results from sex difference studies. Given these differences, mixed-sex studies of chronic pain risk creating biased data or missing important information and single-sex studies have limited generalizability. The advent of large-scale neuroimaging databases will likely aid in building a more comprehensive understanding of sex differences and commonalities in brain mechanisms underlying chronic pain. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Identification of brain nuclei implicated in cocaine-primed reinstatement of conditioned place preference: a behaviour dissociable from sensitization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn Mary Brown

    Full Text Available Relapse prevention represents the primary therapeutic challenge in the treatment of drug addiction. As with humans, drug-seeking behaviour can be precipitated in laboratory animals by exposure to a small dose of the drug (prime. The aim of this study was to identify brain nuclei implicated in the cocaine-primed reinstatement of a conditioned place preference (CPP. Thus, a group of mice were conditioned to cocaine, had this place preference extinguished and were then tested for primed reinstatement of the original place preference. There was no correlation between the extent of drug-seeking upon reinstatement and the extent of behavioural sensitization, the extent of original CPP or the extinction profile of mice, suggesting a dissociation of these components of addictive behaviour with a drug-primed reinstatement. Expression of the protein product of the neuronal activity marker c-fos was assessed in a number of brain regions of mice that exhibited reinstatement (R mice versus those which did not (NR mice. Reinstatement generally conferred greater Fos expression in cortical and limbic structures previously implicated in drug-seeking behaviour, though a number of regions not typically associated with drug-seeking were also activated. In addition, positive correlations were found between neural activation of a number of brain regions and reinstatement behaviour. The most significant result was the activation of the lateral habenula and its positive correlation with reinstatement behaviour. The findings of this study question the relationship between primed reinstatement of a previously extinguished place preference for cocaine and behavioural sensitization. They also implicate activation patterns of discrete brain nuclei as differentiators between reinstating and non-reinstating mice.

  3. Identification of Brain Nuclei Implicated in Cocaine-Primed Reinstatement of Conditioned Place Preference: A Behaviour Dissociable from Sensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robyn Mary; Short, Jennifer Lynn; Lawrence, Andrew John

    2010-01-01

    Relapse prevention represents the primary therapeutic challenge in the treatment of drug addiction. As with humans, drug-seeking behaviour can be precipitated in laboratory animals by exposure to a small dose of the drug (prime). The aim of this study was to identify brain nuclei implicated in the cocaine-primed reinstatement of a conditioned place preference (CPP). Thus, a group of mice were conditioned to cocaine, had this place preference extinguished and were then tested for primed reinstatement of the original place preference. There was no correlation between the extent of drug-seeking upon reinstatement and the extent of behavioural sensitization, the extent of original CPP or the extinction profile of mice, suggesting a dissociation of these components of addictive behaviour with a drug-primed reinstatement. Expression of the protein product of the neuronal activity marker c-fos was assessed in a number of brain regions of mice that exhibited reinstatement (R mice) versus those which did not (NR mice). Reinstatement generally conferred greater Fos expression in cortical and limbic structures previously implicated in drug-seeking behaviour, though a number of regions not typically associated with drug-seeking were also activated. In addition, positive correlations were found between neural activation of a number of brain regions and reinstatement behaviour. The most significant result was the activation of the lateral habenula and its positive correlation with reinstatement behaviour. The findings of this study question the relationship between primed reinstatement of a previously extinguished place preference for cocaine and behavioural sensitization. They also implicate activation patterns of discrete brain nuclei as differentiators between reinstating and non-reinstating mice. PMID:21209913

  4. Evidence for Effective Uses of Dynamic Visualisations in Science Curriculum Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhaney, Kevin W.; Chang, Hsin-Yi; Chiu, Jennifer L.; Linn, Marcia C.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic visualisations capture aspects of scientific phenomena that are difficult to communicate in static materials and benefit from well-designed scaffolds to succeed in classrooms. We review research to clarify the impacts of dynamic visualisations and to identify instructional scaffolds that mediate their success. We use meta-analysis to…

  5. The Impact of Active Visualisation of High School Students on the Ability to Memorise Verbal Definitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmajdek, Anamarija; Selan, Jurij

    2016-01-01

    The era of visual communication influences the cognitive strategies of the individual. Education, too, must adjust to these changes, which raises questions regarding the use of visualisation in teaching. In the present study, we examine the impact of visualisation on the ability of high school students to memorise text. In the theoretical part of…

  6. Data visualisation in surveillance for injury prevention and control: conceptual bases and case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Ramon; Ordunez, Pedro; Soliz, Patricia N; Ballesteros, Michael F

    2016-04-01

    The complexity of current injury-related health issues demands the usage of diverse and massive data sets for comprehensive analyses, and application of novel methods to communicate data effectively to the public health community, decision-makers and the public. Recent advances in information visualisation, availability of new visual analytic methods and tools, and progress on information technology provide an opportunity for shaping the next generation of injury surveillance. To introduce data visualisation conceptual bases, and propose a visual analytic and visualisation platform in public health surveillance for injury prevention and control. The paper introduces data visualisation conceptual bases, describes a visual analytic and visualisation platform, and presents two real-world case studies illustrating their application in public health surveillance for injury prevention and control. Application of visual analytic and visualisation platform is presented as solution for improved access to heterogeneous data sources, enhance data exploration and analysis, communicate data effectively, and support decision-making. Applications of data visualisation concepts and visual analytic platform could play a key role to shape the next generation of injury surveillance. Visual analytic and visualisation platform could improve data use, the analytic capacity, and ability to effectively communicate findings and key messages. The public health surveillance community is encouraged to identify opportunities to develop and expand its use in injury prevention and control. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Towards a multi-agent system for visualising simulated behaviour within the built environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, J.; Timmermans, H.J.P.; Vries, de B.; Timmermans, H.J.P.; Vries, de B.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the outline of a multi-agent system approach for visualising simulated user behaviour within a building. This system can be used to support the assessment of design performance. Visualisation is of critical importance in improving the readability of design representations.

  8. Information visualisation for science and policy: engaging users and avoiding bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerny, Greg J; Chen, Min; Freeman, Robin; Gavaghan, David; Meyer, Miriah; Rowland, Francis; Spiegelhalter, David J; Stefaner, Moritz; Tessarolo, Geizi; Hortal, Joaquin

    2014-03-01

    Visualisations and graphics are fundamental to studying complex subject matter. However, beyond acknowledging this value, scientists and science-policy programmes rarely consider how visualisations can enable discovery, create engaging and robust reporting, or support online resources. Producing accessible and unbiased visualisations from complicated, uncertain data requires expertise and knowledge from science, policy, computing, and design. However, visualisation is rarely found in our scientific training, organisations, or collaborations. As new policy programmes develop [e.g., the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES)], we need information visualisation to permeate increasingly both the work of scientists and science policy. The alternative is increased potential for missed discoveries, miscommunications, and, at worst, creating a bias towards the research that is easiest to display. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Antioxidant and oxidative stress parameters in brain of Heteropneustes fossilis under air exposure condition; role of mitochondrial electron transport chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paital, Biswaranjan

    2013-09-01

    Many fishes are exposed to air in their natural habitat or during their commercial handling. In natural habitat or during commercial handling, the cat fish Heteropneustes fossilis is exposed to air for >24h. Data on its oxidative metabolism in the above condition are not available. Oxidative stress (OS) indices (lipid and protein oxidation), toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS: H2O2) generation, antioxidative status (levels of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and reductase, ascorbic acid and non-protein sulfhydryl) and activities of electron transport chain (ETC) enzymes (complex I-IV) were investigated in brain tissue of H. fossilis under air exposure condition (0, 3, 6, 12 and 18 h at 25°C). Decreased activities of antioxidant (except catalase) and ETC enzymes (except complex II) with increased H2O2 and OS levels were observed in the tissue under water deprivation condition. Positive correlation was observed for complex II activity and non-protein thiol groups with time period of air exposure. The critical time period to induce OS and to reduce most of the studied antioxidant level in brain was found to be 3-6h air exposure. The data can be useful to minimize the stress generated during commercial handling of the live fishes those exposed to air in general and H. fossilis in particular. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Redox competition mode of scanning electrochemical microscopy (RC-SECM) for visualisation of local catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhard, Kathrin; Chen, Xingxing; Turcu, Florin; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2006-12-07

    In order to locally analyse catalytic activity on modified surfaces a transient redox competition mode of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) has been developed. In a bi-potentiostatic experiment the SECM tip competes with the sample for the very same analyte. This leads to a current decrease at the SECM tip, if it is positioned in close proximity to an active catalyst site on the surface. Specifically, local catalytic activity of a Pt-catalyst modified sample with respect to the catalytic reduction of molecular oxygen was investigated. At higher local catalytic activity the local 02 partial pressure within the gap between accurately positioned SECM tip and sample is depleted, leading to a noticeable tip current decrease over active sites. A flexible software module has been implemented into the SECM to adapt the competition conditions by proper definition of tip and sample potentials. A potential pulse profile enables the localised electrochemically induced generation of molecular oxygen prior to the competition detection. The current decay curves are recorded over the entire duration of the applied reduction pulse. Hence, a time resolved processing of the acquired current values provides movies of the local oxygen concentration against x,y-position. The SECM redox competition mode was verified with a macroscopic Pt-disk electrode as a test sample to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach. Moreover, highly dispersed electro-deposited spots of gold and platinum on glassy carbon were visualised using the redox competition mode of SECM. Catalyst spots of different nature as well as activity inhomogeneities within one spot caused by local variations in Pt-loading were visualised successfully.

  11. Representational uncertainty in the brain during threat conditioning and the link with psychopathic traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brazil, I.A.; Mathys, C.D.; Popma, A.; Hoppenbrouwers, S.S.; Cohn, M.D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Psychopathy has repeatedly been linked to disturbed associative learning from aversive events (i.e., threat conditioning). Optimal threat conditioning requires the generation of internal representations of stimulus-outcome contingencies and the rate with which these may change. Because

  12. Visualisation of collagen fibrils in joint cartilage using STIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinert, T.; Reibetanz, U.; Vogt, J.; Butz, T.; Werner, A.; Gruender, W.

    2001-01-01

    The scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) method was used to investigate the collagen network structure of the articular cartilage from a pig's knee in comparison with high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (microscopic NMR-tomography) and polarised light microscopy (PLM). Single collagen fibrils down to 200 nm in diameter were visualised. It was proved that the cartilage collagen network consists partly of zones of oriented fibrils as suggested by NMR measurements. Radially oriented fibrils were found in the zone near the calcified zone (hypertrophic zone) of both tibia and femur, and in the tibial radial zone. Tangentially oriented fibrils were found in the femoral and tibial superficial zone and in a second zone of the femoral cartilage. Polarisation light microscopy reveals broader zones of orientation than it was found with STIM

  13. Modelling and visualising modular product architectures for mass customisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Henrik; Pedersen, Rasmus; Kvist, Morten

    2008-01-01

    that the companies are striving for variety from a commercial- and simplicity from a manufacturing one. A conscious structuring of product architectures and/or the use of product platforms can help overcome this challenge. This paper presents a new method for the synthesis and visualisation of product architecture...... concepts that puts emphasis on variety in markets while also treating the consequences in the manufacturing set-up. The work is based on the assumption that a graphical overview of a given solution space and relations between market demands, product architecture and manufacturing layout can support......Companies following a mass customisation strategy have to observe two prerequisites for success: they have to fulfil a wide variety of customer needs and demands, and to harvest the benefits from economies of scale within their organisation and supply chain. This leads to the situation...

  14. Innovative taught MSc in Medical Visualisation and Human Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clunie, Lauren; Livingstone, Daniel; Rea, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    A relatively new, fully accredited MSc in Medical Visualisation and Human Anatomy, is now offered through a joint collaboration with the Laboratory of Human Anatomy, University of Glasgow and the Digital Design Studio, Glasgow School of Art. This degree combines training in digital technologies and intensive human anatomy training as a result of a long-standing successful partnership between these two esteemed institutes. The student also has to complete a research dissertation which encompasses both the digital perspective and a related medical, dental, surgical, veterinary (comparative anatomy) or life science specialty to enhance development in the digital field for a variety of specialties. This article discusses the background in development of this degree, the course structure and the career prospects and destinations for graduates of this unique degree programme.

  15. Visualisation and characterisation of heterogeneous bimodal PDMS networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahrt, Frederikke; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Fleury, Clemence

    2014-01-01

    The existence of short-chain domains in heterogeneous bimodal PDMS networks has been confirmed visually, for the first time, through confocal fluorescence microscopy. The networks were prepared using a controlled reaction scheme where short PDMS chains were reacted below the gelation point...... bimodal networks with short-chain domains within a long-chain network. The average sizes of the short-chain domains were found to vary from 2.1 to 5.7 mm depending on the short-chain content. The visualised network structure could be correlated thereafter to the elastic properties, which were determined...... by rheology. All heterogeneous bimodal networks displayed significantly lower moduli than mono-modal PDMS elastomers prepared from the long polymer chains. Low-loss moduli as well as low-sol fractions indicate that low-elastic moduli can be obtained without compromising the network's structure...

  16. Maltreatment Exposure, Brain Structure, and Fear Conditioning in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Katie A; Sheridan, Margaret A; Gold, Andrea L; Duys, Andrea; Lambert, Hilary K; Peverill, Matthew; Heleniak, Charlotte; Shechner, Tomer; Wojcieszak, Zuzanna; Pine, Daniel S

    2016-07-01

    Alterations in learning processes and the neural circuitry that supports fear conditioning and extinction represent mechanisms through which trauma exposure might influence risk for psychopathology. Few studies examine how trauma or neural structure relates to fear conditioning in children. Children (n=94) aged 6-18 years, 40.4% (n=38) with exposure to maltreatment (physical abuse, sexual abuse, or domestic violence), completed a fear conditioning paradigm utilizing blue and yellow bells as conditioned stimuli (CS+/CS-) and an aversive alarm noise as the unconditioned stimulus. Skin conductance responses (SCR) and self-reported fear were acquired. Magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired from 60 children. Children without maltreatment exposure exhibited strong differential conditioning to the CS+ vs CS-, based on SCR and self-reported fear. In contrast, maltreated children exhibited blunted SCR to the CS+ and failed to exhibit differential SCR to the CS+ vs CS- during early conditioning. Amygdala and hippocampal volume were reduced among children with maltreatment exposure and were negatively associated with SCR to the CS+ during early conditioning in the total sample, although these associations were negative only among non-maltreated children and were positive among maltreated children. The association of maltreatment with externalizing psychopathology was mediated by this perturbed pattern of fear conditioning. Child maltreatment is associated with failure to discriminate between threat and safety cues during fear conditioning in children. Poor threat-safety discrimination might reflect either enhanced fear generalization or a deficit in associative learning, which may in turn represent a central mechanism underlying the development of maltreatment-related externalizing psychopathology in children.

  17. Classifying and Visualising Roman Pottery using Computer-scanned Typologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Christmas

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available For many archaeological assemblages and type-series, accurate drawings of standardised pottery vessels have been recorded in consistent styles. This provides the opportunity to extract individual pot drawings and derive from them data that can be used for analysis and visualisation. Starting from PDF scans of the original pages of pot drawings, we have automated much of the process for locating, defining the boundaries, extracting and orientating each individual pot drawing. From these processed images, basic features such as width and height, the volume of the interior, the edges, and the shape of the cross-section outline are extracted and are then used to construct more complex features such as a measure of a pot's 'circularity'. Capturing these traits opens up new possibilities for (a classifying vessel form in a way that is sensitive to the physical characteristics of pots relative to other vessels in an assemblage, and (b visualising the results of quantifying assemblages using standard typologies. A frequently encountered problem when trying to compare pottery from different archaeological sites is that the pottery is classified into forms and labels using different standards. With a set of data from early Roman urban centres and related sites that has been labelled both with forms (e.g. 'platter' and 'bowl' and shape identifiers (based on the Camulodunum type-series, we use the extracted features from images to look both at how the pottery forms cluster for a given set of features, and at how the features may be used to compare finds from different sites.

  18. Content of NCAM in the brain and pancreas of rats in response to endointoxication under conditions of experimental chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Makarchuk

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The study was undertaken to examine the influence of chronic pancreatitis on the distribution of neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM in the pancreas and various brain regions of rats under the conditions of endogenous intoxication. The study was conducted using 36 white nonlinear male rats (6 months old, 190–220 g. To develop the state of chronic pancreatitis, animals were subjected tolaparotomy under general anesthesia and prolonged occlusion of the pancreatic duct. The morphological examination of pancreatic tissue hasbeen performed to confirm the chronic pancreatitis development in animals. Biochemical evaluation of the pancreatic fibrosis has been performed by measuring plasma levels of hyaluronic acid, hydroxyproline and protein-free hydroxyproline. The intensity of free radical oxidation has been assessed by the change in the concentration of TBA-active products in plasma. The level of endotoxemia has been determinedby the content of average weight molecules in plasma. Protein fractions were extracted from the pancreas and various parts of the rat brain and the levels of soluble (sNCAM and membrane (mNCAM proteins were studied with the use of the competitive ELISA. Total protein in the obtained fractions was measured by the Bradford assay. Occlusion of the pancreatic duct resultedin significant atrophy of acinar tissue, fibrosis and disfunction of the pancreas along with the decreasing in the antioxidant defense of animals. The present study shows developing of endointoxication in experimentalrats, signified by considerable increase of molecules with average weight in plasma due to the activation of lipid peroxidation. It was established that, as a result of the experimental pancreas dysfunction, significant redistribution of soluble and membrane forms of NCAM took place, more especially in the cerebellum and thalamus of rats; it caused changing of cell-cell adhesion in these brain regions. Multidirectional NCAM distribution in the

  19. Near-death-like experiences without life-threatening conditions or brain disorders: a hypothesis from a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico eFacco

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Near-death experiences (NDEs are profound psychic experiences commonly occurring in life-threatening conditions. They include feeling a sense of peace, of seeing a bright light, encountering deceased relatives or religious figures, and of transcending space and time. To explain them, it has been suggested that they stem from brain disorders and/or psychological reactions to approaching death, a sort of wishful thinking in response to the perceived threat.This is a report on a case with most of the features typical of NDEs except that it occurred entirely without any life-threatening conditions. This evidence is theoretically incompatible with either of the above hypotheses, suggesting that a broader interpretation of the phenomenon is needed.

  20. Functional brain networks involved in decision-making under certain and uncertain conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, Danielle C.; Moss, Mark B.; Killiany, Ronald J. [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston, MA (United States); Mian, Asim Z. [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Budson, Andrew E. [VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA (United States)

    2018-01-15

    The aim of this study was to describe imaging markers of decision-making under uncertain conditions in normal individuals, in order to provide baseline activity to compare to impaired decision-making in pathological states. In this cross-sectional study, 19 healthy subjects ages 18-35 completed a novel decision-making card-matching task using a Phillips T3 Scanner and a 32-channel head coil. Functional data were collected in six functional runs. In one condition of the task, the participant was certain of the rule to apply to match the cards; in the other condition, the participant was uncertain. We performed cluster-based comparison of the two conditions using FSL fMRI Expert Analysis Tool and network-based analysis using MATLAB. The uncertain > certain comparison yielded three clusters - a midline cluster that extended through the midbrain, the thalamus, bilateral prefrontal cortex, the striatum, and bilateral parietal/occipital clusters. The certain > uncertain comparison yielded bilateral clusters in the insula, parietal and temporal lobe, as well as a medial frontal cluster. A larger, more connected functional network was found in the uncertain condition. The involvement of the insula, parietal cortex, temporal cortex, ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and orbitofrontal cortex of the certain condition reinforces the notion that certainty is inherently rewarding. For the uncertain condition, the involvement of the prefrontal cortex, parietal cortex, striatum, thalamus, amygdala, and hippocampal involvement was expected, as these are areas involved in resolving uncertainty and rule updating. The involvement of occipital cortical involvement and midbrain involvement may be attributed to increased visual attention and increased motor control. (orig.)

  1. Functional brain networks involved in decision-making under certain and uncertain conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, Danielle C.; Moss, Mark B.; Killiany, Ronald J.; Mian, Asim Z.; Budson, Andrew E.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe imaging markers of decision-making under uncertain conditions in normal individuals, in order to provide baseline activity to compare to impaired decision-making in pathological states. In this cross-sectional study, 19 healthy subjects ages 18-35 completed a novel decision-making card-matching task using a Phillips T3 Scanner and a 32-channel head coil. Functional data were collected in six functional runs. In one condition of the task, the participant was certain of the rule to apply to match the cards; in the other condition, the participant was uncertain. We performed cluster-based comparison of the two conditions using FSL fMRI Expert Analysis Tool and network-based analysis using MATLAB. The uncertain > certain comparison yielded three clusters - a midline cluster that extended through the midbrain, the thalamus, bilateral prefrontal cortex, the striatum, and bilateral parietal/occipital clusters. The certain > uncertain comparison yielded bilateral clusters in the insula, parietal and temporal lobe, as well as a medial frontal cluster. A larger, more connected functional network was found in the uncertain condition. The involvement of the insula, parietal cortex, temporal cortex, ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and orbitofrontal cortex of the certain condition reinforces the notion that certainty is inherently rewarding. For the uncertain condition, the involvement of the prefrontal cortex, parietal cortex, striatum, thalamus, amygdala, and hippocampal involvement was expected, as these are areas involved in resolving uncertainty and rule updating. The involvement of occipital cortical involvement and midbrain involvement may be attributed to increased visual attention and increased motor control. (orig.)

  2. Generation of a Tph2 Conditional Knockout Mouse Line for Time- and Tissue-Specific Depletion of Brain Serotonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliarini, Sara; Pacini, Giulia; Pasqualetti, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin has been gaining increasing attention during the last two decades due to the dual function of this monoamine as key regulator during critical developmental events and as neurotransmitter. Importantly, unbalanced serotonergic levels during critical temporal phases might contribute to the onset of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and autism. Despite increasing evidences from both animal models and human genetic studies have underpinned the importance of serotonin homeostasis maintenance during central nervous system development and adulthood, the precise role of this molecule in time-specific activities is only beginning to be elucidated. Serotonin synthesis is a 2-step process, the first step of which is mediated by the rate-limiting activity of Tph enzymes, belonging to the family of aromatic amino acid hydroxylases and existing in two isoforms, Tph1 and Tph2, responsible for the production of peripheral and brain serotonin, respectively. In the present study, we generated and validated a conditional knockout mouse line, Tph2 flox/flox, in which brain serotonin can be effectively ablated with time specificity. We demonstrated that the Cre-mediated excision of the third exon of Tph2 gene results in the production of a Tph2 null allele in which we observed the near-complete loss of brain serotonin, as well as the growth defects and perinatal lethality observed in serotonin conventional knockouts. We also revealed that in mice harbouring the Tph2 null allele, but not in wild-types, two distinct Tph2 mRNA isoforms are present, namely Tph2Δ3 and Tph2Δ3Δ4, with the latter showing an in-frame deletion of amino acids 84–178 and coding a protein that could potentially retain non-negligible enzymatic activity. As we could not detect Tph1 expression in the raphe, we made the hypothesis that the Tph2Δ3Δ4 isoform can be at the origin of the residual, sub-threshold amount of serotonin detected in the brain of Tph2 null/null mice. Finally, we set

  3. Omission of expected reward sensitizes the brain dopaminergic system of classically conditioned Atlantic salmon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vindas, M.A.; Höglund, Erik; Folkedal, O.

    in fishes. Here we show that the omission of expected reward (OER) leads to increased aggression towards conspecifics in classically conditioned Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Furthermore, in response to an acute stressor, OER fish displayed increased dopaminergic (DA) neurotransmission compared to controls....... There was also a general downregulation of dopamine receptor D1 gene expression in the telencephalon of OER groups, which suggests a coping mechanism in response to unbalanced DA metabolism. These results indicate that animals subjected to unpredictable reward conditions develop a senzitation of the DA...

  4. Classification of Error Related Brain Activity in an Auditory Identification Task with Conditions of Varying Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkos, I.; Gkiatis, K.; Bromis, K.; Asvestas, P. A.; Karanasiou, I. S.; Ventouras, E. M.; Matsopoulos, G. K.

    2017-11-01

    The detection of an error is the cognitive evaluation of an action outcome that is considered undesired or mismatches an expected response. Brain activity during monitoring of correct and incorrect responses elicits Event Related Potentials (ERPs) revealing complex cerebral responses to deviant sensory stimuli. Development of accurate error detection systems is of great importance both concerning practical applications and in investigating the complex neural mechanisms of decision making. In this study, data are used from an audio identification experiment that was implemented with two levels of complexity in order to investigate neurophysiological error processing mechanisms in actors and observers. To examine and analyse the variations of the processing of erroneous sensory information for each level of complexity we employ Support Vector Machines (SVM) classifiers with various learning methods and kernels using characteristic ERP time-windowed features. For dimensionality reduction and to remove redundant features we implement a feature selection framework based on Sequential Forward Selection (SFS). The proposed method provided high accuracy in identifying correct and incorrect responses both for actors and for observers with mean accuracy of 93% and 91% respectively. Additionally, computational time was reduced and the effects of the nesting problem usually occurring in SFS of large feature sets were alleviated.

  5. Visualisation of serotonin-1A (5-HT{sub 1A}) receptors in the central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passchier, J.; Waarde, A. van [PET Center, University Hospital Groningen (Netherlands)

    2001-01-01

    The 5-HT{sub 1A} subtype of receptors for the neurotransmitter serotonin is predominantly located in the limbic forebrain and is involved in the modulation of emotion and the function of the hypothalamus. Since 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors are implicated in the pathogenesis of anxiety, depression, hallucinogenic behaviour, motion sickness and eating disorders, they are an important target for drug therapy. Here, we review the radioligands which are available for visualisation and quantification of this important neuroreceptor in the human brain, using positron emission tomography (PET) or single-photon emission tomography (SPET). More than 20 compounds have been labelled with carbon-11 (half-life 20 min), fluorine-18 (half-life 109.8 min) or iodine-123 (half-life 13.2 h): structural analogues of the agonist, 8-OH-DPAT, structural analogues of the antagonist, WAY 100635, and apomorphines. The most successful radioligands thus far are [carbonyl-{sup 11}C] WAY-100635 (WAY), [carbonyl-{sup 11}C]desmethyl-WAY-100635 (DWAY), p-[{sup 18}F]MPPF and [{sup 11}C]robalzotan (NAD-299). The high-affinity ligands WAY and DWAY produce excellent images of 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor distribution in the brain (even the raphe nuclei are visualised), but they cannot be distributed to remote facilities and they probably cannot be used to measure changes in endogenous serotonin. Binding of the moderate-affinity ligands MPPF and NAD-299 may be more sensitive to serotonin competition and MPPF can be distributed to PET centres within a flying distance of a few hours. Future research should be directed towards: (a) improvement of the metabolic stability in primates; (b) development of a fluorinated radioligand which can be produced in large quantities and (c) production of a radioiodinated or technetium-labelled ligand for SPET. (orig.)

  6. Brain drain: Do economic conditions "push" doctors out of developing countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeke, Edward N

    2013-12-01

    Health worker migration is an issue of first order concern in global health policy circles and continues to be the subject of much policy debate. In this paper, we contribute to the discussion by studying the impact of economic conditions on the migration of physicians from developing countries. To our knowledge, this is one of the first papers to do so. A major contribution of this paper is the introduction of a new panel dataset on migration to the US and the UK from 31 sub-Saharan Africa countries. The data spans the period 1975-2004. Using this data, we estimate the impact of changes in economic conditions on physician migration. In our preferred specification that allows for country-specific time trends, we find that a temporary one percentage point decline in GDP per capita increases physician migration in the next period by approximately. 3 percent. In our IV models a one percentage point decline in GDP per capita increases physician migration in the next period by between 3.4 and 3.6 percent. Overall, our results suggest a significant effect of developing country economic conditions on physician migration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [One decade of functional imaging in schizophrenia research. From visualisation of basic information processing steps to molecular-genetic oriented imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tost, H; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Ruf, M; Demirakça, T; Grimm, O; Henn, F A; Ende, G

    2005-02-01

    Modern neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have contributed tremendously to our current understanding of psychiatric disorders in the context of functional, biochemical and microstructural alterations of the brain. Since the mid-nineties, functional MRI has provided major insights into the neurobiological correlates of signs and symptoms in schizophrenia. The current paper reviews important fMRI studies of the past decade in the domains of motor, visual, auditory, attentional and working memory function. Special emphasis is given to new methodological approaches, such as the visualisation of medication effects and the functional characterisation of risk genes.

  8. Fingolimod (FTY720-P Does Not Stabilize the Blood–Brain Barrier under Inflammatory Conditions in an in Vitro Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael K. Schuhmann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB is an early hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS, a progressive inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. Cell adhesion in the BBB is modulated by sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, a signaling protein, via S1P receptors (S1P1. Fingolimod phosphate (FTY720-P a functional S1P1 antagonist has been shown to improve the relapse rate in relapsing-remitting MS by preventing the egress of lymphocytes from lymph nodes. However, its role in modulating BBB permeability—in particular, on the tight junction proteins occludin, claudin 5 and ZO-1—has not been well elucidated to date. In the present study, FTY720-P did not change the transendothelial electrical resistance in a rat brain microvascular endothelial cell (RBMEC culture exposed to inflammatory conditions and thus did not decrease endothelial barrier permeability. In contrast, occludin was reduced in RBMEC culture after adding FTY720-P. Additionally, FTY720-P did not alter the amount of endothelial matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9 and MMP-2 in RBMEC cultures. Taken together, our observations support the assumption that S1P1 plays a dual role in vascular permeability, depending on its ligand. Thus, S1P1 provides a mechanistic basis for FTY720-P-associated disruption of endothelial barriers—such as the blood-retinal barrier—which might result in macular edema.

  9. Visualisation during ablation of atrial fibrillation - stimulating the patient's own resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Marianne W; Pedersen, Preben U; Bjerrum, Merete

    2014-01-01

    management. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate patients' experiences with visualisation in relation to pain and anxiety during an intervention consisting of visualisation, when undergoing ablation of atrial fibrillation. METHODS: Qualitative interviews were conducted with 14 patients from...... a study population of a clinical controlled study with 147 patients. The transcribed interviews were analysed according to qualitative methodology of inductive content analysis. FINDINGS: Four categories emerged from the interviews: 'approach to visualisation'; 'strategies of managing pain'; 'strategies...... in managing pain and anxiety. Our findings indicate that visualisation for acute pain during ablation of atrial fibrillation was associated not only with a decrease in experience of pain but also with high levels of treatment satisfaction and other non-pain-related benefits....

  10. Audio interfaces should be designed based on data visualisation first principles

    OpenAIRE

    Dewey, Christopher; Wakefield, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Audio mixing interfaces (AMIs) commonly conform to a small number of paradigms. These paradigms have\\ud significant shortcomings. Data visualisation first principles should be employed to consider alternatives. Existing AMI\\ud paradigms are discussed and concepts of image theory and elementary perceptual elements outlined. AMIs should be evaluated by usability experiments however performing these properly is time-consuming. There are many data visualisation options and combinations. Collabora...

  11. PDB2CD visualises dynamics within protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, Robert W

    2017-10-01

    Proteins tend to have defined conformations, a key factor in enabling their function. Atomic resolution structures of proteins are predominantly obtained by either solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or crystal structure methods. However, when considering a protein whose structure has been determined by both these approaches, on many occasions, the resultant conformations are subtly different, as illustrated by the examples in this study. The solution NMR approach invariably results in a cluster of structures whose conformations satisfy the distance boundaries imposed by the data collected; it might be argued that this is evidence of the dynamics of proteins when in solution. In crystal structures, the proteins are often in an energy minimum state which can result in an increase in the extent of regular secondary structure present relative to the solution state depicted by NMR, because the more dynamic ends of alpha helices and beta strands can become ordered at the lower temperatures. This study examines a novel way to display the differences in conformations within an NMR ensemble and between these and a crystal structure of a protein. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy can be used to characterise protein structures in solution. Using the new bioinformatics tool, PDB2CD, which generates CD spectra from atomic resolution protein structures, the differences between, and possible dynamic range of, conformations adopted by a protein can be visualised.

  12. VISPA. New applications for intuitive data visualisation and analysis creation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Benjamin; Fischer, Robert; Glaser, Christian; Heidemann, Fabian; Mueller, Gero; Quast, Thorben; Rieger, Marcel; Urban, Martin; Asseldonk, Daniel van; Cube, Ralf Florian von; Welling, Christoph [Physics Institute IIIa, RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The Visual Physics Analysis software is a framework developed at RWTH Aachen providing intuitive access and usage of experiment-specific resources via common web browsers. Through its extension mechanism, VISPA allows for interfacing a wide range of applications to meet the demands for diverse use cases. After a quick review of the internal architecture and basic functionalities, most recent updates to the system are highlighted and various newly released extensions are presented: Our data browsers facilitate the inspection of information in Pierre Auger Observatory and HEP data samples. The JSROOT project has been embedded and enables the visualisation of ROOT files. Modular analysis chains based on our HEP software library (PXL) can be interactively created and modified using the Analysis Designer. VISPA is tested both through its integration in undergraduate and elementary particle physics courses at RWTH and through its use in analysis work for CMS and Auger. Finally, instructions on how to access our cluster or to set up an own server are given.

  13. Microscopic transport model animation visualisation on KML base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatskiv, I.; Savrasovs, M.

    2012-10-01

    By reading classical literature devoted to the simulation theory it could be found that one of the greatest possibilities of simulation is the ability to present processes inside the system by animation. This gives to the simulation model additional value during presentation of simulation results for the public and authorities who are not familiar enough with simulation. That is why most of universal and specialised simulation tools have the ability to construct 2D and 3D representation of the model. Usually the development of such representation could take much time and there must be put a lot forces into creating an adequate 3D representation of the model. For long years such well-known microscopic traffic flow simulation software tools as VISSIM, AIMSUN and PARAMICS have had a possibility to produce 2D and 3D animation. But creation of realistic 3D model of the place where traffic flows are simulated, even in these professional software tools it is a hard and time consuming action. The goal of this paper is to describe the concepts of use the existing on-line geographical information systems for visualisation of animation produced by simulation software. For demonstration purposes the following technologies and tools have been used: PTV VISION VISSIM, KML and Google Earth.

  14. Visualising the demographic factors which shape population age structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Wilson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The population pyramid is one of the most popular tools for visualising population age structure. However, it is difficult to discern from the diagram the relative effects of different demographic components on the size of age-specific populations, making it hard to understand exactly how a population's age structure is formed. Objective: The aim of this paper is to introduce a type of population pyramid which shows how births, deaths, and migration have shaped a population's age structure. Methods: Births, deaths, and population data were obtained from the Human Mortality Database and the Australian Bureau of Statistics. A variation on the conventional population pyramid, termed here a components-of-change pyramid, was created. Based on cohort population accounts, it illustrates how births, deaths, and net migration have created the population of each age group. A simple measure which summarises the impact of net migration on age structure is also suggested. Results: Example components-of-change pyramids for several countries and subnational regions are presented, which illustrate how births, deaths, and net migration have fashioned current population age structures. The influence of migration is shown to vary greatly between populations. Conclusions: The new type of pyramid aids interpretation of a population's age structure and helps to understand its demographic history over the last century.

  15. Improving student success using predictive models and data visualisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan Ayad

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The need to educate a competitive workforce is a global problem. In the US, for example, despite billions of dollars spent to improve the educational system, approximately 35% of students never finish high school. The drop rate among some demographic groups is as high as 50–60%. At the college level in the US only 30% of students graduate from 2-year colleges in 3 years or less and approximately 50% graduate from 4-year colleges in 5 years or less. A basic challenge in delivering global education, therefore, is improving student success. By student success we mean improving retention, completion and graduation rates. In this paper we describe a Student Success System (S3 that provides a holistic, analytical view of student academic progress.1 The core of S3 is a flexible predictive modelling engine that uses machine intelligence and statistical techniques to identify at-risk students pre-emptively. S3 also provides a set of advanced data visualisations for reaching diagnostic insights and a case management tool for managing interventions. S3's open modular architecture will also allow integration and plug-ins with both open and proprietary software. Powered by learning analytics, S3 is intended as an end-to-end solution for identifying at-risk students, understanding why they are at risk, designing interventions to mitigate that risk and finally closing the feedback look by tracking the efficacy of the applied intervention.

  16. VariVis: a visualisation toolkit for variation databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Timothy D

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the completion of the Human Genome Project and recent advancements in mutation detection technologies, the volume of data available on genetic variations has risen considerably. These data are stored in online variation databases and provide important clues to the cause of diseases and potential side effects or resistance to drugs. However, the data presentation techniques employed by most of these databases make them difficult to use and understand. Results Here we present a visualisation toolkit that can be employed by online variation databases to generate graphical models of gene sequence with corresponding variations and their consequences. The VariVis software package can run on any web server capable of executing Perl CGI scripts and can interface with numerous Database Management Systems and "flat-file" data files. VariVis produces two easily understandable graphical depictions of any gene sequence and matches these with variant data. While developed with the goal of improving the utility of human variation databases, the VariVis package can be used in any variation database to enhance utilisation of, and access to, critical information.

  17. Abdominal tumours in children: 3-D visualisation and surgical planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, P; Schenk, J P; Wunsch, R; Tröger, J; Waag, K L

    2004-10-01

    Solid abdominal tumours are of special importance in the field of paediatric surgery. Because of the dangers of cumulative irradiation and improved delineation of soft parts MRI is usually employed in children for diagnostic assessment. Compiling the radiologic information for surgical planning is often difficult by conventional methods. Newly improved and efficient 3-D volume rendering software is now available for visual reconstruction of tumour anatomy utilising segmentation and other special techniques. Because the intraoperative complication rate is close to 20 % as described in the literature, optimal preoperative visualisation and planning would seem imperative. All children with solid abdominal tumours at Heidelberg University in the year 2002 were included in this study. MR examinations were performed with a 0.5 Tesla magnet using a standard protocol. All MR data were processed with VG Studio Max 1.1, converting the two-dimensional data into three-dimensional data. This report presents 15 cases using this special technique: 7 with abdominal neuroblastoma, 6 with nephroblastoma, 1 ganglioneuroma, and 1 ovarian teratoma. Our experience shows that a better understanding of the surgical anatomy, particularly regarding the surrounding organs and vasculature, can be helpful in decreasing the incidence of inadvertent intraoperative injuries to these structures.

  18. Invited Article: Visualisation of extreme value events in optical communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derevyanko, Stanislav; Redyuk, Alexey; Vergeles, Sergey; Turitsyn, Sergei

    2018-06-01

    Fluctuations of a temporal signal propagating along long-haul transoceanic scale fiber links can be visualised in the spatio-temporal domain drawing visual analogy with ocean waves. Substantial overlapping of information symbols or use of multi-frequency signals leads to strong statistical deviations of local peak power from an average signal power level. We consider long-haul optical communication systems from this unusual angle, treating them as physical systems with a huge number of random statistical events, including extreme value fluctuations that potentially might affect the quality of data transmission. We apply the well-established concepts of adaptive wavefront shaping used in imaging through turbid medium to detect the detrimental phase modulated sequences in optical communications that can cause extreme power outages (rare optical waves of ultra-high amplitude) during propagation down the ultra-long fiber line. We illustrate the concept by a theoretical analysis of rare events of high-intensity fluctuations—optical freak waves, taking as an example an increasingly popular optical frequency division multiplexing data format where the problem of high peak to average power ratio is the most acute. We also show how such short living extreme value spikes in the optical data streams are affected by nonlinearity and demonstrate the negative impact of such events on the system performance.

  19. Volunteered Geographic Information: Interpretation, Visualisation and Social Computing (VGIscience)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghardt, Dirk; Nejdl, Wolfgang; Schiewe, Jochen; Sester, Monika

    2018-05-01

    In the past years Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) has emerged as a novel form of user-generated content, which involves active generation of geo-data for example in citizen science projects or during crisis mapping as well as the passive collection of data via the user's location-enabled mobile devices. In addition there are more and more sensors available that detect our environment with ever greater detail and dynamics. These data can be used for a variety of applications, not only for the solution of societal tasks such as in environment, health or transport fields, but also for the development of commercial products and services. The interpretation, visualisation and usage of such multi-source data is challenging because of the large heterogeneity, the differences in quality, the high update frequencies, the varying spatial-temporal resolution, subjective characteristics and low semantic structuring. Therefore the German Research Foundation has launched a priority programme for the next 3-6 years which will support interdisciplinary research projects. This priority programme aims to provide a scientific basis for raising the potential of VGI- and sensor data. Research questions described more in detail in this short paper span from the extraction of spatial information, to the visual analysis and knowledge presentation, taking into account the social context while collecting and using VGI.

  20. Providing visualisation support for the analysis of anatomy ontology data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burger Albert

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improvements in technology have been accompanied by the generation of large amounts of complex data. This same technology must be harnessed effectively if the knowledge stored within the data is to be retrieved. Storing data in ontologies aids its management; ontologies serve as controlled vocabularies that promote data exchange and re-use, improving analysis. The Edinburgh Mouse Atlas Project stores the developmental stages of the mouse embryo in anatomy ontologies. This project is looking at the use of visual data overviews for intuitive analysis of the ontology data. Results A prototype has been developed that visualises the ontologies using directed acyclic graphs in two dimensions, with the ability to study detail in regions of interest in isolation or within the context of the overview. This is followed by the development of a technique that layers individual anatomy ontologies in three-dimensional space, so that relationships across multiple data sets may be mapped using physical links drawn along the third axis. Conclusion Usability evaluations of the applications confirmed advantages in visual analysis of complex data. This project will look next at data input from multiple sources, and continue to develop the techniques presented to provide intuitive identification of relationships that span multiple ontologies.

  1. Evaluation of solar thermal storages with quantitative flow visualisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logie, W.; Frank, E.; Luzzi, A.

    2008-07-15

    The non-intrusive Quantitative Flow Visualisation (QFV) Techniques of Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) and Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) have been evaluated in the context of experimental investigations on solar Thermal Energy Storages (TES). Much competence and experience has been gained in the integration of these powerful yet complex and time consuming flow analysis methods into the realm of laboratory experimentation. In addition to gathering experience in the application of QFV techniques, a number of charging and discharging variations were considered in light of exergetic evaluation for the influence they have on the ability of a TES to stratify. The contemporary awareness that poorly chosen pitch to diameter ratios by the design of immersed coil heat exchangers leads to a reduction in heat exchange and an increase in mixing phenomenon has been confirmed. The observation of two combitank (combined domestic hot water and space heating) configurations has shown that free convective heat transfer forces in the form of mixing energy play a significant role in the stratification efficiency of thermal energy storages. (author)

  2. The brain dynamics of rapid perceptual adaptation to adverse listening conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Julia; Henry, Molly J; Eisner, Frank; Obleser, Jonas

    2013-06-26

    Listeners show a remarkable ability to quickly adjust to degraded speech input. Here, we aimed to identify the neural mechanisms of such short-term perceptual adaptation. In a sparse-sampling, cardiac-gated functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) acquisition, human listeners heard and repeated back 4-band-vocoded sentences (in which the temporal envelope of the acoustic signal is preserved, while spectral information is highly degraded). Clear-speech trials were included as baseline. An additional fMRI experiment on amplitude modulation rate discrimination quantified the convergence of neural mechanisms that subserve coping with challenging listening conditions for speech and non-speech. First, the degraded speech task revealed an "executive" network (comprising the anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortex), parts of which were also activated in the non-speech discrimination task. Second, trial-by-trial fluctuations in successful comprehension of degraded speech drove hemodynamic signal change in classic "language" areas (bilateral temporal cortices). Third, as listeners perceptually adapted to degraded speech, downregulation in a cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuit was observable. The present data highlight differential upregulation and downregulation in auditory-language and executive networks, respectively, with important subcortical contributions when successfully adapting to a challenging listening situation.

  3. Operant conditioning of a multiple degree-of-freedom brain-machine interface in a primate model of amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Karthikeyan; Southerland, Joshua; Vaidya, Mukta; Qian, Kai; Eleryan, Ahmed; Fagg, Andrew H; Sluzky, Marc; Oweiss, Karim; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Operant conditioning with biofeedback has been shown to be an effective method to modify neural activity to generate goal-directed actions in a brain-machine interface. It is particularly useful when neural activity cannot be mathematically mapped to motor actions of the actual body such as in the case of amputation. Here, we implement an operant conditioning approach with visual feedback in which an amputated monkey is trained to control a multiple degree-of-freedom robot to perform a reach-to-grasp behavior. A key innovation is that each controlled dimension represents a behaviorally relevant synergy among a set of joint degrees-of-freedom. We present a number of behavioral metrics by which to assess improvements in BMI control with exposure to the system. The use of non-human primates with chronic amputation is arguably the most clinically-relevant model of human amputation that could have direct implications for developing a neural prosthesis to treat humans with missing upper limbs.

  4. Conditional associative learning examined in a paralyzed patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using brain-computer interface technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birbaumer N

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain-computer interface methodology based on self-regulation of slow-cortical potentials (SCPs of the EEG (electroencephalogram was used to assess conditional associative learning in one severely paralyzed, late-stage ALS patient. After having been taught arbitrary stimulus relations, he was evaluated for formation of equivalence classes among the trained stimuli. Methods A monitor presented visual information in two targets. The method of teaching was matching to sample. Three types of stimuli were presented: signs (A, colored disks (B, and geometrical shapes (C. The sample was one type, and the choice was between two stimuli from another type. The patient used his SCP to steer a cursor to one of the targets. A smiley was presented as a reward when he hit the correct target. The patient was taught A-B and B-C (sample – comparison matching with three stimuli of each type. Tests for stimulus equivalence involved the untaught B-A, C-B, A-C, and C-A relations. An additional test was discrimination between all three stimuli of one equivalence class presented together versus three unrelated stimuli. The patient also had sessions with identity matching using the same stimuli. Results The patient showed high accuracy, close to 100%, on identity matching and could therefore discriminate the stimuli and control the cursor correctly. Acquisition of A-B matching took 11 sessions (of 70 trials each and had to be broken into simpler units before he could learn it. Acquisition of B-C matching took two sessions. The patient passed all equivalence class tests at 90% or higher. Conclusion The patient may have had a deficit in acquisition of the first conditional association of signs and colored disks. In contrast, the patient showed clear evidence that A-B and B-C training had resulted in formation of equivalence classes. The brain-computer interface technology combined with the matching to sample method is a useful way to assess various

  5. Conditional associative learning examined in a paralyzed patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using brain-computer interface technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Ih; Ghanayim, N; Kübler, A; Neumann, N; Birbaumer, N; Kaiser, J

    2008-11-24

    Brain-computer interface methodology based on self-regulation of slow-cortical potentials (SCPs) of the EEG (electroencephalogram) was used to assess conditional associative learning in one severely paralyzed, late-stage ALS patient. After having been taught arbitrary stimulus relations, he was evaluated for formation of equivalence classes among the trained stimuli. A monitor presented visual information in two targets. The method of teaching was matching to sample. Three types of stimuli were presented: signs (A), colored disks (B), and geometrical shapes (C). The sample was one type, and the choice was between two stimuli from another type. The patient used his SCP to steer a cursor to one of the targets. A smiley was presented as a reward when he hit the correct target. The patient was taught A-B and B-C (sample - comparison) matching with three stimuli of each type. Tests for stimulus equivalence involved the untaught B-A, C-B, A-C, and C-A relations. An additional test was discrimination between all three stimuli of one equivalence class presented together versus three unrelated stimuli. The patient also had sessions with identity matching using the same stimuli. The patient showed high accuracy, close to 100%, on identity matching and could therefore discriminate the stimuli and control the cursor correctly. Acquisition of A-B matching took 11 sessions (of 70 trials each) and had to be broken into simpler units before he could learn it. Acquisition of B-C matching took two sessions. The patient passed all equivalence class tests at 90% or higher. The patient may have had a deficit in acquisition of the first conditional association of signs and colored disks. In contrast, the patient showed clear evidence that A-B and B-C training had resulted in formation of equivalence classes. The brain-computer interface technology combined with the matching to sample method is a useful way to assess various cognitive abilities of severely paralyzed patients, who are

  6. The Multi-modal Australian ScienceS Imaging and Visualisation Environment (MASSIVE high performance computing infrastructure: applications in neuroscience and neuroinformatics research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojtek James eGoscinski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Multi-modal Australian ScienceS Imaging and Visualisation Environment (MASSIVE is a national imaging and visualisation facility established by Monash University, the Australian Synchrotron, the Commonwealth Scientific Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO, and the Victorian Partnership for Advanced Computing (VPAC, with funding from the National Computational Infrastructure and the Victorian Government. The MASSIVE facility provides hardware, software and expertise to drive research in the biomedical sciences, particularly advanced brain imaging research using synchrotron x-ray and infrared imaging, functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, x-ray computer tomography (CT, electron microscopy and optical microscopy. The development of MASSIVE has been based on best practice in system integration methodologies, frameworks, and architectures. The facility has: (i integrated multiple different neuroimaging analysis software components, (ii enabled cross-platform and cross-modality integration of neuroinformatics tools, and (iii brought together neuroimaging databases and analysis workflows. MASSIVE is now operational as a nationally distributed and integrated facility for neuroinfomatics and brain imaging research.

  7. Evaluation of the impact of a system for real-time visualisation of occupational radiation dose rate during fluoroscopically guided procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandblom, V; Almén, A; Cederblad, A.; Båth, M; Lundh, C; Mai, T; Rystedt, H

    2013-01-01

    Optimisation of radiological protection for operators working with fluoroscopically guided procedures has to be performed during the procedure, under varying and difficult conditions. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of a system for real-time visualisation of radiation dose rate on optimisation of occupational radiological protection in fluoroscopically guided procedures. Individual radiation dose measurements, using a system for real-time visualisation, were performed in a cardiology laboratory for three cardiologists and ten assisting nurses. Radiation doses collected when the radiation dose rates were not displayed to the staff were compared to radiation doses collected when the radiation dose rates were displayed. When the radiation dose rates were displayed to the staff, one cardiologist and the assisting nurses (as a group) significantly reduced their personal radiation doses. The median radiation dose (H p (10)) per procedure decreased from 68 to 28 μSv (p = 0.003) for this cardiologist and from 4.3 to 2.5 μSv (p = 0.001) for the assisting nurses. The results of the present study indicate that a system for real-time visualisation of radiation dose rate may have a positive impact on optimisation of occupational radiological protection. In particular, this may affect the behaviour of staff members practising inadequate personal radiological protection. (paper)

  8. Organisation and functional role of the brain angiotensin system

    OpenAIRE

    Catherine Llorens-Cortes; Frederic AO Mendelsohn

    2002-01-01

    The discovery that all components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are present in the brain led investigators to postulate the existence of a local brain RAS. Supporting this, angiotensin immunoreactive neurones have been visualised in the brain. Two major pathways were described: a forebrain pathway which connects circumventricular organs to the median preoptic nucleus, paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei, and a second pathway connecting the hypothalamus to the medulla oblongata. Bloo...

  9. Determining Optimal Microwave Antigen Retrieval Conditions for Microtubule-Associated Protein 2 Immunohistochemistry in the Guinea Pig Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-01

    sections of formalin-fixed guinea pig brains using different MAP-2 monoclonal antibodies. Brain sections were boiled in sodium citrate, citric acid...citric acid solution at pH 6.0 is the optimal microwave-assisted AR method for immunolabeling MAP-2 in formalin-fixed, paraffin-processed guinea pig brain...studies on archival guinea pig brain paraffin blocks, ultimately relaxing the use of additional animals to evaluate changes in MAP-2 expression between chemical warfare nerve agent-treated and control samples.

  10. Effects of resting state condition on reliability, trait specificity, and network connectivity of brain function measured with arterial spin labeled perfusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengjun; Vidorreta, Marta; Katchmar, Natalie; Alsop, David C; Wolf, Daniel H; Detre, John A

    2018-06-01

    Resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) provides imaging biomarkers of task-independent brain function that can be associated with clinical variables or modulated by interventions such as behavioral training or pharmacological manipulations. These biomarkers include time-averaged regional brain function as manifested by regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured using arterial spin labeled (ASL) perfusion MRI and correlated temporal fluctuations of function across brain networks with either ASL or blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI. Resting-state studies are typically carried out using just one of several prescribed state conditions such as eyes closed (EC), eyes open (EO), or visual fixation on a cross-hair (FIX), which may affect the reliability and specificity of rs-fMRI. In this study, we collected test-retest ASL MRI data during 4 resting-state task conditions: EC, EO, FIX and PVT (low-frequency psychomotor vigilance task), and examined the effects of these task conditions on reliability and reproducibility as well as trait specificity of regional brain function. We also acquired resting-state BOLD fMRI under FIX and compared the network connectivity reliabilities between the four ASL conditions and the BOLD FIX condition. For resting-state ASL data, EC provided the highest CBF reliability, reproducibility, trait specificity, and network connectivity reliability, followed by EO, while FIX was lowest on all of these measures. PVT demonstrated lower CBF reliability, reproducibility and trait specificity than EO and EC. Overall network connectivity reliability was comparable between ASL and BOLD. Our findings confirm ASL CBF as a reliable, stable, and consistent measure of resting-state regional brain function and support the use of EC or EO over FIX and PVT as the resting-state condition. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Acute infusion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the insular cortex promotes conditioned taste aversion extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Serrano, Luis M; Ramírez-León, Betsabee; Rodríguez-Durán, Luis F; Escobar, Martha L

    2014-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has emerged as one of the most potent molecular mediators not only for synaptic plasticity, but also for the behavioral organism-environment interactions. Our previous studies in the insular cortex (IC), a neocortical region that has been related with acquisition and retention of conditioned taste aversion (CTA), have demonstrated that intracortical microinfusion of BDNF induces a lasting potentiation of synaptic efficacy in the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus (Bla)-IC projection and enhances the retention of CTA memory of adult rats in vivo. The aim of the present study was to analyze whether acute BDNF-infusion in the IC modifies the extinction of CTA. Accordingly, animals were trained in the CTA task and received bilateral IC microinfusions of BDNF before extinction training. Our results showed that taste aversion was significantly reduced in BDNF rats from the first extinction trial. Additionally, we found that the effect of BDNF on taste aversion did not require extinction training. Finally we showed that the BDNF effect does not degrade the original taste aversion memory trace. These results emphasize that BDNF activity underlies memory extinction in neocortical areas and support the idea that BDNF is a key regulator and mediator of long-term synaptic modifications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cell cycle analysis of brain cells as a growth index in larval cod at different feeding conditions and temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael González-Quirós

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The percentage of cells dividing in a specific tissue of individual larvae can be estimated by analyzing DNA per cell by flow cytometry. An experimental test was carried out with cod (Gadus morhua larvae, with brain as the target tissue, to validate this technique as an appropriate growth index for larval fish. Standard length (SL, myotome height, and %S-phase (% of cells in the S-phase of the cell-division cycle variability were analyzed, with temperature (6 and 10°C, food level (high- and no-food and larval developmental stage (first feeding, pre-metamorphosis and post-metamorphosis as independent factors. Cod larvae grew faster (in SL and presented a higher %S-phase under high-food conditions. Larval SL increased with temperature in rearing and experimental tanks. However, there was a significant interaction between temperature and food in the %S-phase. There were no significant differences in the %S-phase between 6 and 10°C at high-food levels. We suggest that this result is a consequence of temperature-dependency of the duration of the cell cycle. In the absence of food, larvae at 10ºC had a lower %S-phase than larvae at 6°C, which may be related to increased metabolic costs with increasing temperature. Considering the effect of temperature, the mean % S-phase explained 74% of the variability in the estimated standard growth rate.

  13. From brain synapses to systems for learning and memory: Object recognition, spatial navigation, timed conditioning, and movement control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossberg, Stephen

    2015-09-24

    This article provides an overview of neural models of synaptic learning and memory whose expression in adaptive behavior depends critically on the circuits and systems in which the synapses are embedded. It reviews Adaptive Resonance Theory, or ART, models that use excitatory matching and match-based learning to achieve fast category learning and whose learned memories are dynamically stabilized by top-down expectations, attentional focusing, and memory search. ART clarifies mechanistic relationships between consciousness, learning, expectation, attention, resonance, and synchrony. ART models are embedded in ARTSCAN architectures that unify processes of invariant object category learning, recognition, spatial and object attention, predictive remapping, and eye movement search, and that clarify how conscious object vision and recognition may fail during perceptual crowding and parietal neglect. The generality of learned categories depends upon a vigilance process that is regulated by acetylcholine via the nucleus basalis. Vigilance can get stuck at too high or too low values, thereby causing learning problems in autism and medial temporal amnesia. Similar synaptic learning laws support qualitatively different behaviors: Invariant object category learning in the inferotemporal cortex; learning of grid cells and place cells in the entorhinal and hippocampal cortices during spatial navigation; and learning of time cells in the entorhinal-hippocampal system during adaptively timed conditioning, including trace conditioning. Spatial and temporal processes through the medial and lateral entorhinal-hippocampal system seem to be carried out with homologous circuit designs. Variations of a shared laminar neocortical circuit design have modeled 3D vision, speech perception, and cognitive working memory and learning. A complementary kind of inhibitory matching and mismatch learning controls movement. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Brain and Memory

  14. High Brain Ammonia Tolerance and Down-Regulation of Na+:K+:2Cl- Cotransporter 1b mRNA and Protein Expression in the Brain of the Swamp Eel, Monopterus albus, Exposed to Environmental Ammonia or Terrestrial Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Yuen K.; Hou, Zhisheng; Chen, Xiu L.; Ong, Jasmine L. Y.; Chng, You R.; Ching, Biyun; Hiong, Kum C.; Chew, Shit F.

    2013-01-01

    Na+:K+:2Cl- cotransporter 1 (NKCC1) has been implicated in mediating ischemia-, trauma- or ammonia-induced astrocyte swelling/brain edema in mammals. This study aimed to determine the effects of ammonia or terrestrial exposure on ammonia concentrations in the plasma and brain, and the mRNA expression and protein abundance of nkcc/Nkcc in the brain, of the swamp eel Monopterus albus . Ammonia exposure led to a greater increase in the ammonia concentration in the brain of M. albus than terrestrial exposure. The brain ammonia concentration of M. albus reached 4.5 µmol g-1 and 2.7 µmol g-1 after 6 days of exposure to 50 mmol l-1 NH4Cl and terrestrial conditions, respectively. The full cDNA coding sequence of nkcc1b from M. albus brain comprised 3276 bp and coded for 1092 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 119.6 kDa. A molecular characterization indicated that it could be activated through phosphorylation and/or glycosylation by osmotic and/or oxidative stresses. Ammonia exposure for 1 day or 6 days led to significant decreases in the nkcc1b mRNA expression and Nkcc1b protein abundance in the brain of M. albus. In comparison, a significant decrease in nkcc1b mRNA expression was observed in the brain of M. albus only after 6 days of terrestrial exposure, but both 1 day and 6 days of terrestrial exposure resulted in significant decreases in the protein abundance of Nkcc1b. These results are novel because it has been established in mammals that ammonia up-regulates NKCC1 expression in astrocytes and NKCC1 plays an important role in ammonia-induced astrocyte swelling and brain edema. By contrast, our results indicate for the first time that M. albus is able to down-regulate the mRNA and protein expression of nkcc1b/Nkcc1b in the brain when confronted with ammonia toxicity, which could be one of the contributing factors to its extraordinarily high brain ammonia tolerance. PMID:24069137

  15. DataView: a computational visualisation system for multidisciplinary design and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengen

    2016-01-01

    Rapidly processing raw data and effectively extracting underlining information from huge volumes of multivariate data become essential to all decision-making processes in sectors like finance, government, medical care, climate analysis, industries, science, etc. Remarkably, visualisation is recognised as a fundamental technology that props up human comprehension, cognition and utilisation of burgeoning amounts of heterogeneous data. This paper presents a computational visualisation system, named DataView, which has been developed for graphically displaying and capturing outcomes of multiphysics problem-solvers widely used in engineering fields. The DataView is functionally composed of techniques for table/diagram representation, and graphical illustration of scalar, vector and tensor fields. The field visualisation techniques are implemented on the basis of a range of linear and non-linear meshes, which flexibly adapts to disparate data representation schemas adopted by a variety of disciplinary problem-solvers. The visualisation system has been successfully applied to a number of engineering problems, of which some illustrations are presented to demonstrate effectiveness of the visualisation techniques.

  16. Brain aging and Aβ₁₋₄₂ neurotoxicity converge via deterioration in autophagy-lysosomal system: a conditional Drosophila model linking Alzheimer's neurodegeneration with aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Daijun; Salvaterra, Paul M

    2011-02-01

    Aging is known to be the most prominent risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD); however, the underlying mechanism linking brain aging with AD pathogenesis remains unknown. The expression of human amyloid beta 42 peptide (Aβ₁₋₄₂), but not Aβ₁₋₄₀ in Drosophila brain induces an early onset and progressive autophagy-lysosomal neuropathology. Here we show that the natural process of brain aging also accompanies a chronic and late-onset deterioration of neuronal autophagy-lysosomal system. This process is characterized by accumulation of dysfunctional autophagy-lysosomal vesicles, a compromise of these vesicles leading to damage of intracellular membranes and organelles, necrotic-like intraneuronal destruction and neurodegeneration. In addition, conditional activation of neuronal autophagy in young animals is protective while late activation is deleterious for survival. Intriguingly, conditional Aβ₁₋₄₂ expression limited to young animals exacerbates the aging process to a greater extent than Aβ₁₋₄₂ expression in old animals. These data suggest that the neuronal autophagy-lysosomal system may shift from a functional and protective state to a pathological and deleterious state either during brain aging or via Aβ₁₋₄₂ neurotoxicity. A chronic deterioration of the neuronal autophagy-lysosomal system is likely to be a key event in transitioning from normal brain aging to pathological aging leading to Alzheimer's neurodegeneration.

  17. miR-Let7A Controls the Cell Death and Tight Junction Density of Brain Endothelial Cells under High Glucose Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juhyun; Yoon, So Ra; Kim, Oh Yoen

    2017-01-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced stress in the brain of patients with diabetes triggers the disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB), leading to diverse neurological diseases including stroke and dementia. Recently, the role of microRNA becomes an interest in the research for deciphering the mechanism of brain endothelial cell damage under hyperglycemia. Therefore, we investigated whether mircoRNA Let7A (miR-Let7A) controls the damage of brain endothelial (bEnd.3) cells against high glucose condition. Cell viability, cell death marker expressions (p-53, Bax, and cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase), the loss of tight junction proteins (ZO-1 and claudin-5), proinflammatory response (interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor- α ), inducible nitric oxide synthase, and nitrite production were confirmed using MTT, reverse transcription-PCR, quantitative-PCR, Western blotting, immunofluorescence, and Griess reagent assay. miR-Let7A overexpression significantly prevented cell death and loss of tight junction proteins and attenuated proinflammatory response and nitrite production in the bEnd.3 cells under high glucose condition. Taken together, we suggest that miR-Let7A may attenuate brain endothelial cell damage by controlling cell death signaling, loss of tight junction proteins, and proinflammatory response against high glucose stress. In the future, the manipulation of miR-Let7A may be a novel solution in controlling BBB disruption which leads to the central nervous system diseases.

  18. Visual privacy by context: proposal and evaluation of a level-based visualisation scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-López, José Ramón; Chaaraoui, Alexandros Andre; Gu, Feng; Flórez-Revuelta, Francisco

    2015-06-04

    Privacy in image and video data has become an important subject since cameras are being installed in an increasing number of public and private spaces. Specifically, in assisted living, intelligent monitoring based on computer vision can allow one to provide risk detection and support services that increase people's autonomy at home. In the present work, a level-based visualisation scheme is proposed to provide visual privacy when human intervention is necessary, such as at telerehabilitation and safety assessment applications. Visualisation levels are dynamically selected based on the previously modelled context. In this way, different levels of protection can be provided, maintaining the necessary intelligibility required for the applications. Furthermore, a case study of a living room, where a top-view camera is installed, is presented. Finally, the performed survey-based evaluation indicates the degree of protection provided by the different visualisation models, as well as the personal privacy preferences and valuations of the users.

  19. Analysis of the flow in stenosed carotid artery bifurcation models--hydrogen-bubble visualisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmen, D E; van de Vosse, F N; Janssen, J D; van Dongen, M E

    1994-05-01

    This paper deals with the effect of geometric changes of mild stenoses on large-scale flow disturbances in the carotid artery bifurcation. Hydrogen-bubble visualisation experiments have been performed in Plexiglas models of a non-stenosed and a 25% stenosed carotid artery bifurcation. The flow conditions approximate physiological flow. The experiments show that shortly after the onset of the diastolic phase vortex formation occurs in the plane of symmetry. This vortex formation is found in a shear layer, which is formed in the carotid sinus. The shear layer is located between a region with low shear rates at the non-divider wall and a region with high shear rates at the divider wall. In order to gain insight into the parameters that are important with respect to the stability of the shear layer, experiments have been performed in which the influence of the shape of the flow pulse, the Reynolds number (Re), the Womersley parameter (alpha) and the flow division ratio (gamma) on the flow phenomena is studied. From these experiments it appears that the flow phenomena in the carotid artery bifurcation are significantly influenced by Re, alpha the systolic acceleration (sa) and deceleration (sd) and the duration of the peak-systolic flow (Tmax). With these results a simplified flow pulse is chosen, with which the experiments in the non-stenosed and the 25% stenosed bifurcation are performed. Comparison of the hydrogen-bubble profiles in the 0 and 25% stenosed models with similar flow conditions shows that the geometric change of the 25% stenosis only slightly influences the flow phenomena. The most striking influences are found in the stability of the shear layer. Quantitative experiments by means of laser Doppler anemometry measurements and numerical computations are needed to analyse the influence of the stenosis of the flow field more accurately.

  20. A review of techniques for visualising soft tissue microstructure deformation and quantifying strain Ex Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disney, C M; Lee, P D; Hoyland, J A; Sherratt, M J; Bay, B K

    2018-04-14

    Many biological tissues have a complex hierarchical structure allowing them to function under demanding physiological loading conditions. Structural changes caused by ageing or disease can lead to loss of mechanical function. Therefore, it is necessary to characterise tissue structure to understand normal tissue function and the progression of disease. Ideally intact native tissues should be imaged in 3D and under physiological loading conditions. The current published in situ imaging methodologies demonstrate a compromise between imaging limitations and maintaining the samples native mechanical function. This review gives an overview of in situ imaging techniques used to visualise microstructural deformation of soft tissue, including three case studies of different tissues (tendon, intervertebral disc and artery). Some of the imaging techniques restricted analysis to observational mechanics or discrete strain measurement from invasive markers. Full-field local surface strain measurement has been achieved using digital image correlation. Volumetric strain fields have successfully been quantified from in situ X-ray microtomography (micro-CT) studies of bone using digital volume correlation but not in soft tissue due to low X-ray transmission contrast. With the latest developments in micro-CT showing in-line phase contrast capability to resolve native soft tissue microstructure, there is potential for future soft tissue mechanics research where 3D local strain can be quantified. These methods will provide information on the local 3D micromechanical environment experienced by cells in healthy, aged and diseased tissues. It is hoped that future applications of in situ imaging techniques will impact positively on the design and testing of potential tissue replacements or regenerative therapies. © 2018 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2018 Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. The role of visualisation in data handling in Grade 9 within a problem-centred context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Makina

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the recent past, data handling has been neglected at secondary school level, perhaps partially due to the strong emphasis on developing arithmetic, algebra and geometry. For the first time, the South African curriculum includes substantial amounts of data handling at all grade levels. The introduction of more data handling in the secondary school curriculum in South Africa and the prevalence of many problems in the teaching of probability and statistics argues for a serious reconsideration of the way it is taught to the pupils. Currently this concern has been the focus of a call for reform in mathematics education by a body like the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM at all levels of schooling (NCTM, 1989; 2000. The importance of visualisation in mathematics, at all levels of mathematical problem solving is well documented in the literature (Bishop, 1989; Maher & Alston, 1989; Moses, 1982; Wheatley, 1991 but almost nothing was done to appreciate visualisation in the learning of data handling. The paper therefore provides a qualitative examination from a Masters dissertation (Makina, 2005 of the role of visualisation in the learning of data handling. This is done through examining the thought processes involved by Grade 9 learners during visualisation while solving data handling tasks. Several roles of visualisation were identified and most were found to improve the critical and creative thinking of pupils during their learning of data handling. The results show that learners are likely to improve their performance in data handling if the awareness of the need to use visualisation creatively as a tool for understanding are highlighted.

  2. Mapping patient safety: a large-scale literature review using bibliometric visualisation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, S P; van Eck, N J; Waltman, L; Jansen, F W

    2014-03-13

    The amount of scientific literature available is often overwhelming, making it difficult for researchers to have a good overview of the literature and to see relations between different developments. Visualisation techniques based on bibliometric data are helpful in obtaining an overview of the literature on complex research topics, and have been applied here to the topic of patient safety (PS). On the basis of title words and citation relations, publications in the period 2000-2010 related to PS were identified in the Scopus bibliographic database. A visualisation of the most frequently cited PS publications was produced based on direct and indirect citation relations between publications. Terms were extracted from titles and abstracts of the publications, and a visualisation of the most important terms was created. The main PS-related topics studied in the literature were identified using a technique for clustering publications and terms. A total of 8480 publications were identified, of which the 1462 most frequently cited ones were included in the visualisation. The publications were clustered into 19 clusters, which were grouped into three categories: (1) magnitude of PS problems (42% of all included publications); (2) PS risk factors (31%) and (3) implementation of solutions (19%). In the visualisation of PS-related terms, five clusters were identified: (1) medication; (2) measuring harm; (3) PS culture; (4) physician; (5) training, education and communication. Both analysis at publication and term level indicate an increasing focus on risk factors. A bibliometric visualisation approach makes it possible to analyse large amounts of literature. This approach is very useful for improving one's understanding of a complex research topic such as PS and for suggesting new research directions or alternative research priorities. For PS research, the approach suggests that more research on implementing PS improvement initiatives might be needed.

  3. Mapping patient safety: a large-scale literature review using bibliometric visualisation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, S P; van Eck, N J; Waltman, L; Jansen, F W

    2014-01-01

    Background The amount of scientific literature available is often overwhelming, making it difficult for researchers to have a good overview of the literature and to see relations between different developments. Visualisation techniques based on bibliometric data are helpful in obtaining an overview of the literature on complex research topics, and have been applied here to the topic of patient safety (PS). Methods On the basis of title words and citation relations, publications in the period 2000–2010 related to PS were identified in the Scopus bibliographic database. A visualisation of the most frequently cited PS publications was produced based on direct and indirect citation relations between publications. Terms were extracted from titles and abstracts of the publications, and a visualisation of the most important terms was created. The main PS-related topics studied in the literature were identified using a technique for clustering publications and terms. Results A total of 8480 publications were identified, of which the 1462 most frequently cited ones were included in the visualisation. The publications were clustered into 19 clusters, which were grouped into three categories: (1) magnitude of PS problems (42% of all included publications); (2) PS risk factors (31%) and (3) implementation of solutions (19%). In the visualisation of PS-related terms, five clusters were identified: (1) medication; (2) measuring harm; (3) PS culture; (4) physician; (5) training, education and communication. Both analysis at publication and term level indicate an increasing focus on risk factors. Conclusions A bibliometric visualisation approach makes it possible to analyse large amounts of literature. This approach is very useful for improving one's understanding of a complex research topic such as PS and for suggesting new research directions or alternative research priorities. For PS research, the approach suggests that more research on implementing PS improvement initiatives

  4. The use of metrizamide (amipaque) to visualise the gastrointestinal tract in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.; Smith, W.L.; Smith, J.A.; Gresham, E.L.; Schreiner, R.; Lemons, J.

    1980-01-01

    Metrizamide (amipaque) has not been used previously as a diagnostic contrast agent in the gastrointestinal tract. Metrizamide is a water-soluble isotonic contrast material having many advantages over barium and existing hypertonic water-soluble agents. There are many clinical situations in children in which metrizamide should be the contrast agent of choice for investigating the gastrointestinal tract. Four neonates are presented in whom barium or gastrografin were absolutely contraindicated. In each case metrizamide gave excellent visualisation of the gastrointestinal tract. It could be followed through the bowel giving excellent visualisation even up to 120h after ingestion. No harmful effects were noted in the four cases studied. (author)

  5. Integration of functional and morphological MR data for preoperative 3D visualisation of tumours. Cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evers, H.; Meinzer, H.P.; Hawighorst, H.; Kaick, G. van; Knapstein, P.G.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this exemplary study was to integrate morphological and functional MRI to establish computer-based, preoperative therapy planning for tumors, instancing cervical carcinoma. Results: Segmentation of organs and vessels as well as tissue differentiation yielded a morphological visualisation of anatomical structures that were overlaid with pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic MRI, subsequently. Thereby, three-dimensional, arbitrary views on the functional data were displayed. Conclusions: Image analysis and visualisation of the acquired MR data establishes both a morphologic and functional evaluation of suspect lesions and adjacent organs. By integrating morphologic and functional MRI additional information can be gathered that possibly impinge on preoperative planning. (orig./AJ) [de

  6. The Effects of Computer-Aided Design Software on Engineering Students' Spatial Visualisation Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kösa, Temel; Karakus, Fatih

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of computer-aided design (CAD) software-based instruction on the spatial visualisation skills of freshman engineering students in a computer-aided engineering drawing course. A quasi-experimental design was applied, using the Purdue Spatial Visualization Test-Visualization of Rotations…

  7. An anthropomorphic phantom study of visualisation of surgical clips for partial breast irradiation (PBI) setup verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Carys W.; Nichol, Alan M.; Park, Julie E.; Hui, Jason F.; Giddings, Alison A.; Grahame, Sheri; Otto, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Surgical clips were investigated for partial breast image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Small titanium clips were insufficiently well visualised. Medium tantalum clips were best for megavoltage IGRT and small tantalum clips were best for floor mounted kilovoltage IGRT (ExacTrac TM ). Both small tantalum and medium titanium clips were suitable for isocentric kilovoltage IGRT

  8. Does Teaching Sequence Matter When Teaching High School Chemistry with Scientific Visualisations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Ian; Geelan, David; Mukherjee, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Five Canadian high school Chemistry classes in one school, taught by three different teachers, studied the concepts of dynamic chemical equilibria and Le Chatelier's Principle. Some students received traditional teacher-led explanations of the concept first and used an interactive scientific visualisation second, while others worked with the…

  9. Open source libraries and frameworks for biological data visualisation: a guide for developers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Hermjakob, Henning; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput experimental techniques have led to an exponential increase in both the size and the complexity of the data sets commonly studied in biology. Data visualisation is increasingly used as the key to unlock this data, going from hypothesis generation to model evaluation and tool implementation. It is becoming more and more the heart of bioinformatics workflows, enabling scientists to reason and communicate more effectively. In parallel, there has been a corresponding trend towards the development of related software, which has triggered the maturation of different visualisation libraries and frameworks. For bioinformaticians, scientific programmers and software developers, the main challenge is to pick out the most fitting one(s) to create clear, meaningful and integrated data visualisation for their particular use cases. In this review, we introduce a collection of open source or free to use libraries and frameworks for creating data visualisation, covering the generation of a wide variety of charts and graphs. We will focus on software written in Java, JavaScript or Python. We truly believe this software offers the potential to turn tedious data into exciting visual stories. © 2014 The Authors. PROTEOMICS published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. A Visualisation-Based Semiotic Analysis of Learners' Conceptual Understanding of Graphical Functional Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudaly, Vimolan

    2014-01-01

    Within the South African school curriculum, the section on graphical functional relationships consists of signs which include symbols, notation and imagery. In a previous article we explored the role visualisation played in the way learners understood mathematical concepts. That paper reported on the learners' fixation with the physical features…

  11. IGUANA: a high-performance 2D and 3D visualisation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alverson, G. [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Eulisse, G. [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Muzaffar, S. [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Osborne, I. [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Taylor, L. [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)]. E-mail: lucas.taylor@cern.ch; Tuura, L.A. [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2004-11-21

    The IGUANA project has developed visualisation tools for multiple high-energy experiments. At the core of IGUANA is a generic, high-performance visualisation system based on OpenInventor and OpenGL. This paper describes the back-end and a feature-rich 3D visualisation system built on it, as well as a new 2D visualisation system that can automatically generate 2D views from 3D data, for example to produce R/Z or X/Y detector displays from existing 3D display with little effort. IGUANA has collaborated with the open-source gl2ps project to create a high-quality vector postscript output that can produce true vector graphics output from any OpenGL 2D or 3D display, complete with surface shading and culling of invisible surfaces. We describe how it works. We also describe how one can measure the memory and performance costs of various OpenInventor constructs and how to test scene graphs. We present good patterns to follow and bad patterns to avoid. We have added more advanced tools such as per-object clipping, slicing, lighting or animation, as well as multiple linked views with OpenInventor, and describe them in this paper. We give details on how to edit object appearance efficiently and easily, and even dynamically as a function of object properties, with instant visual feedback to the user.

  12. Event visualisation in ALICE - current status and strategy for Run 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedziela, Jeremi; von Haller, Barthélémy

    2017-10-01

    A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) is one of the four big experiments running at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which focuses on the study of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) being produced in heavy-ion collisions. The ALICE Event Visualisation Environment (AliEve) is a tool providing an interactive 3D model of the detector’s geometry and a graphical representation of the data. Together with the online reconstruction module, it provides important quality monitoring of the recorded data. As a consequence it has been used in the ALICE Run Control Centre during all stages of Run 2. Static screenshots from the online visualisation are published on the public website - ALICE LIVE. Dedicated converters have been developed to provide geometry and data for external projects. An example of such project is the Total Event Display (TEV) - a visualisation tool recently developed by the CERN Media Lab based on the Unity game engine. It can be easily deployed on any platform, including web and mobile platforms. Another external project is More Than ALICE - an augmented reality application for visitors, overlaying detector descriptions and event visualisations on the camera’s picture. For the future Run 3 both AliEve and TEV will be adapted to fit the ALICE O2 project. Several changes are required due to the new data formats, especially so-called Compressed Time Frames.

  13. Mapping patient safety : A large-scale literature review using bibliometric visualisation techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, S.P.; Van Eck, N.J.; Waltman, L.; Jansen, F.W.

    2014-01-01

    Background The amount of scientific literature available is often overwhelming, making it difficult for researchers to have a good overview of the literature and to see relations between different developments. Visualisation techniques based on bibliometric data are helpful in obtaining an overview

  14. IGUANA A high-performance 2D and 3D visualisation system

    CERN Document Server

    Alverson, G; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Taylor, L; Tuura, L A

    2004-01-01

    The IGUANA project has developed visualisation tools for multiple high-energy experiments. At the core of IGUANA is a generic, high- performance visualisation system based on OpenInventor and OpenGL. This paper describes the back-end and a feature-rich 3D visualisation system built on it, as well as a new 2D visualisation system that can automatically generate 2D views from 3D data, for example to produce R/Z or X/Y detector displays from existing 3D display with little effort. IGUANA has collaborated with the open-source gl2ps project to create a high-quality vector postscript output that can produce true vector graphics output from any OpenGL 2D or 3D display, complete with surface shading and culling of invisible surfaces. We describe how it works. We also describe how one can measure the memory and performance costs of various OpenInventor constructs and how to test scene graphs. We present good patterns to follow and bad patterns to avoid. We have added more advanced tools such as per-object clipping, sl...

  15. IGUANA: a high-performance 2D and 3D visualisation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alverson, G.; Eulisse, G.; Muzaffar, S.; Osborne, I.; Taylor, L.; Tuura, L.A.

    2004-01-01

    The IGUANA project has developed visualisation tools for multiple high-energy experiments. At the core of IGUANA is a generic, high-performance visualisation system based on OpenInventor and OpenGL. This paper describes the back-end and a feature-rich 3D visualisation system built on it, as well as a new 2D visualisation system that can automatically generate 2D views from 3D data, for example to produce R/Z or X/Y detector displays from existing 3D display with little effort. IGUANA has collaborated with the open-source gl2ps project to create a high-quality vector postscript output that can produce true vector graphics output from any OpenGL 2D or 3D display, complete with surface shading and culling of invisible surfaces. We describe how it works. We also describe how one can measure the memory and performance costs of various OpenInventor constructs and how to test scene graphs. We present good patterns to follow and bad patterns to avoid. We have added more advanced tools such as per-object clipping, slicing, lighting or animation, as well as multiple linked views with OpenInventor, and describe them in this paper. We give details on how to edit object appearance efficiently and easily, and even dynamically as a function of object properties, with instant visual feedback to the user

  16. SQuAVisiT : A Software Quality Assessment and Visualisation Toolset

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roubtsov, Serguei; Telea, Alexandru; Holten, Danny

    2007-01-01

    Software quality assessment of large COBOL industrial legacy systems, both for maintenance or migration purposes, mounts a serious challenge. We present the Software Quality Assessment and Visualisation Toolset (SQuAVisiT), which assists users in performing the above task. First, it allows a fully

  17. SQuAVisiT: a software quality assessment and visualisation toolset

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roubtsov, S.; Telea, A.C.; Holten, D.H.R.

    2007-01-01

    Software quality assessment of large COBOL industrial legacy systems, both for maintenance or migration purposes, mounts a serious challenge. We present the software quality assessment and visualisation toolset (SQuAVisiT), which assists users in performing the above task. First, it allows a fully

  18. An anthropomorphic phantom study of visualisation of surgical clips for partial breast irradiation (PBI) setup verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Carys W; Nichol, Alan M; Park, Julie E; Hui, Jason F; Giddings, Alison A; Grahame, Sheri; Otto, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Surgical clips were investigated for partial breast image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Small titanium clips were insufficiently well visualised. Medium tantalum clips were best for megavoltage IGRT and small tantalum clips were best for floor mounted kilovoltage IGRT (ExacTrac). Both small tantalum and medium titanium clips were suitable for isocentric kilovoltage IGRT.

  19. Visualisation Ability of Senior High School Students with Using GeoGebra and Transparent Mica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thohirudin, M; Maryati, TK; Dwirahayu, G

    2017-01-01

    Visualisation ability is an ability to process, inform, and transform object which suitable for geometry topic in math. This research aims to describe the influence of using software GeoGebra and transparent mica for student’s visualisation ability. GeoGebra is shortness of geometry and algebra. GeoGebra is an open source program that is created for math. Transparent mica is a tool that is created by the author to transform a geometry object. This research is a quantitative experiment model. The subject of this research were students in grade XII of science program in Annajah Senior High School Rumpin with two classes which one as an experiment class (science one) and another one as a control class (science two). Experiment class use GeoGebra and transparent mica in the study, and control class use powerpoint in the study. Data of student’s visualisation ability is collected from posttest with visual questions which are gifted at the end of the research to both classes with topic “transformation geometry”. This research resulted that studying with GeoGebra and transparent mica had a better influence than studying with powerpoint to student’s visualisation ability. The time of study in class and the habit of the students to use software and tool affected the result of research. Although, GeoGebra and transparent mica can give help to students in transformation geometry topic. (paper)

  20. Visualisation of Massive Military Datasets: Human Factors, Applications, and Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    we have been confronted with data of new kinds at a rate faster than our human brains can manage to turn into information. “Visualisation” means the...because variation of these kinds do not have the qaulities of textons. Figure 2.5 A trivial Icon Map in which there is a data attribute, shown as...information management is to ensure that the right information is available to the right person, at the right time, and shown in such a way that the person

  1. Directionality of large-scale resting-state brain networks during eyes open and eyes closed conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Delong; Liang, Bishan; Wu, Xia; Wang, Zengjian; Xu, Pengfei; Chang, Song; Liu, Bo; Liu, Ming; Huang, Ruiwang

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined directional connections in the brain among resting-state networks (RSNs) when the participant had their eyes open (E0) or had their eyes closed (EC). The resting state fMRI data were collected from 20 healthy participants (9 males, 20.17 +/- 2.74 years) under the EO and EC

  2. Effects of environmental enrichment on growth, aggressive behaviour and brain monoamines of gilthead seabream Sparus aurata reared under different social conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batzina, Alkisti; Dalla, Christina; Papadopoulou-Daifoti, Zeta; Karakatsouli, Nafsika

    2014-03-01

    The presence of blue or red-brown substrate on the tank bottom has been previously reported as an efficient means of environmental enrichment for gilthead seabream. The present study aimed to investigate whether this enrichment is still beneficial when gilthead seabream is reared under different social conditions (i.e. a lower 4.9 kg m(-3) and a higher 9.7 kg m(-3) density). Water exchange was adjusted according to fish biomass to exclude density effects on water quality. In the enriched tanks single-colour glass gravel was used as substrate (blue and red-brown substrate, or BS and RBS respectively), while control tanks had no gravel. Growth, aggressive behaviour and size distribution results indicated that the lower density created a less favourable social environment. In both densities studied, BS enhanced growth, suppressed aggression and reduced brain serotonergic activity. In the condition of intense social interactions (i.e. the lower density) BS also reduced brain dopaminergic activity. These results along with the negative correlations observed between brain monoamines and fish body mass, indicated that substrate and density effects are socially-induced. However, there may be several biotic and/or abiotic factors interfering with substrate effects that should be investigated before the practical use of a substrate in land-based intensive aquaculture. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [NO and H2S brain systems of the Japanese shore crab Hemigrapsus sanguineus under conditions of anoxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsiuba, E P

    2012-01-01

    The topography and dynamics of the activity of the enzymes of the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the brain of the Japanese shore crab Hemigrapsus sanguineus after 1, 6, and 12 h ofanoxia was studied histochemically and immunocytochemically. Changes in the activity and number of NO- and CBS-immune-positive cells that take place due to anoxia and the intensity of which depends on the duration of the influence were revealed. The fact that the balance between the nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide systems in the brain of the crabs H. sanguineus is preserved indicates the joint participation of those systems in the central regulation of adaptive mechanisms under the influence of anoxia and, apparently, plays an important role in the adaptation of these hydrobionts to oxygen deficit.

  4. Trib3 is developmentally and nutritionally regulated in the brain but is dispensable for spatial memory, fear conditioning and sensing of amino acid-imbalanced diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiit Örd

    Full Text Available Tribbles homolog 3 (TRIB3 is a mammalian pseudokinase that is induced in neuronal cell cultures in response to cell death-inducing stresses, including neurotrophic factor deprivation. TRIB3 is an inhibitor of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4, the central transcriptional regulator in the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α phosphorylation pathway that is involved in the cellular stress response and behavioral processes. In this article, we study the expression of Trib3 in the mouse brain, characterize the brain morphology of mice with a genetic ablation of Trib3 and investigate whether Trib3 deficiency alters eIF2α-dependent cognitive abilities. Our data show that the consumption of a leucine-deficient diet induces Trib3 expression in the anterior piriform cortex, the brain region responsible for detecting essential amino acid intake imbalance. However, the aversive response to leucine-devoid diet does not differ in Trib3 knockout and wild type mice. Trib3 deletion also does not affect long-term spatial memory and reversal learning in the Morris water maze and auditory or contextual fear conditioning. During embryonic development, Trib3 expression increases in the brain and persists in the early postnatal stadium. Neuroanatomical characterization of mice lacking Trib3 revealed enlarged lateral ventricles. Thus, although the absence of Trib3 does not alter the eIF2α pathway-dependent cognitive functions of several areas of the brain, including the hippocampus, amygdala and anterior piriform cortex, Trib3 may serve a role in other central nervous system processes and molecular pathways.

  5. Trib3 is developmentally and nutritionally regulated in the brain but is dispensable for spatial memory, fear conditioning and sensing of amino acid-imbalanced diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örd, Tiit; Innos, Jürgen; Lilleväli, Kersti; Tekko, Triin; Sütt, Silva; Örd, Daima; Kõks, Sulev; Vasar, Eero; Örd, Tõnis

    2014-01-01

    Tribbles homolog 3 (TRIB3) is a mammalian pseudokinase that is induced in neuronal cell cultures in response to cell death-inducing stresses, including neurotrophic factor deprivation. TRIB3 is an inhibitor of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), the central transcriptional regulator in the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) phosphorylation pathway that is involved in the cellular stress response and behavioral processes. In this article, we study the expression of Trib3 in the mouse brain, characterize the brain morphology of mice with a genetic ablation of Trib3 and investigate whether Trib3 deficiency alters eIF2α-dependent cognitive abilities. Our data show that the consumption of a leucine-deficient diet induces Trib3 expression in the anterior piriform cortex, the brain region responsible for detecting essential amino acid intake imbalance. However, the aversive response to leucine-devoid diet does not differ in Trib3 knockout and wild type mice. Trib3 deletion also does not affect long-term spatial memory and reversal learning in the Morris water maze and auditory or contextual fear conditioning. During embryonic development, Trib3 expression increases in the brain and persists in the early postnatal stadium. Neuroanatomical characterization of mice lacking Trib3 revealed enlarged lateral ventricles. Thus, although the absence of Trib3 does not alter the eIF2α pathway-dependent cognitive functions of several areas of the brain, including the hippocampus, amygdala and anterior piriform cortex, Trib3 may serve a role in other central nervous system processes and molecular pathways.

  6. Neuroprotective effects of a brain permeant 6-aminoquinoxaline derivative in cell culture conditions that model the loss of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Douaron, Gael; Schmidt, Fanny; Amar, Majid; Kadar, Hanane; Debortoli, Lucila; Latini, Alexandra; Séon-Méniel, Blandine; Ferrié, Laurent; Michel, Patrick Pierre; Touboul, David; Brunelle, Alain; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Figadère, Bruno

    2015-01-07

    Parkinson disease is a neurodegenerative disorder of aging, characterized by disabling motor symptoms resulting from the loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons and the decrease of dopamine in the striatum. Current therapies are directed at treating the symptoms but there is presently no cure for the disease. In order to discover neuroprotective compounds with a therapeutical potential, our research team has established original and highly regioselective methods for the synthesis of 2,3-disubstituted 6-aminoquinoxalines. To evaluate the neuroprotective activity of these molecules, we used midbrain cultures and various experimental conditions that promote dopaminergic cell loss. Among a series of 11 molecules, only compound MPAQ (2-methyl-3-phenyl-6-aminoquinoxaline) afforded substantial protection in a paradigm where dopaminergic neurons die spontaneously and progressively as they mature. Prediction of blood-brain barrier permeation by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship studies (QSARs) suggested that MPAQ was able to reach the brain parenchyma with sufficient efficacy. HPLC-MS/MS quantification in brain homogenates and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry imaging on brain tissue sections performed in MPAQ-treated mice allowed us to confirm this prediction and to demonstrate, by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry imaging, that MPAQ was localized in areas containing vulnerable neurons and/or their terminals. Of interest, MPAQ also rescued dopaminergic neurons, which (i) acquired dependency on the trophic peptide GDNF for their survival or (ii) underwent oxidative stress-mediated insults mediated by catalytically active iron. In summary, MPAQ possesses an interesting pharmacological profile as it penetrates the brain parenchyma and counteracts mechanisms possibly contributive to dopaminergic cell death in Parkinson disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Three-dimensional culture conditions differentially affect astrocyte modulation of brain endothelial barrier function in response to transforming growth factor β1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Brian T; Grego, Sonia; Sellgren, Katelyn L

    2015-05-22

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) function is regulated by dynamic interactions among cell types within the neurovascular unit, including astrocytes and endothelial cells. Co-culture models of the BBB typically involve astrocytes seeded on two-dimensional (2D) surfaces, which recent studies indicate cause astrocytes to express a phenotype similar to that of reactive astrocytes in situ. We hypothesized that the culture conditions of astrocytes would differentially affect their ability to modulate BBB function in vitro. Brain endothelial cells were grown alone or in co-culture with astrocytes. Astrocytes were grown either as conventional (2D) monolayers, or in a collagen-based gel which allows them to grow in a three-dimensional (3D) construct. Astrocytes were viable in 3D conditions, and displayed a marked reduction in their expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), suggesting reduced activation. Stimulation of astrocytes with transforming growth factor (TGF)β1 decreased transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and reduced expression of claudin-5 in co-cultures, whereas treatment of endothelial cells in the absence of astrocytes was without effect. The effect of TGFβ1 on TEER was significantly more pronounced in endothelial cells cultured with 3D astrocytes compared to 2D astrocytes. These results demonstrate that astrocyte culture conditions differentially affect their ability to modulate brain endothelial barrier function, and suggest a direct relationship between reactive gliosis and BBB permeability. Moreover, these studies demonstrate the potential importance of physiologically relevant culture conditions to in vitro modeling of disease processes that affect the neurovascular unit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The ethics of Google Earth: crossing thresholds from spatial data to landscape visualisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Stephen R J; Cizek, Petr

    2009-05-01

    'Virtual globe' software systems such as Google Earth are growing rapidly in popularity as a way to visualise and share 3D environmental data. Scientists and environmental professionals, many of whom are new to 3D modeling and visual communications, are beginning routinely to use such techniques in their work. While the appeal of these techniques is evident, with unprecedented opportunities for public access to data and collaborative engagement over the web, are there nonetheless risks in their widespread usage when applied in areas of the public interest such as planning and policy-making? This paper argues that the Google Earth phenomenon, which features realistic imagery of places, cannot be dealt with only as a question of spatial data and geographic information science. The virtual globe type of visualisation crosses several key thresholds in communicating scientific and environmental information, taking it well beyond the realm of conventional spatial data and geographic information science, and engaging more complex dimensions of human perception and aesthetic preference. The realism, perspective views, and social meanings of the landscape visualisations embedded in virtual globes invoke not only cognition but also emotional and intuitive responses, with associated issues of uncertainty, credibility, and bias in interpreting the imagery. This paper considers the types of risks as well as benefits that may exist with participatory uses of virtual globes by experts and lay-people. It is illustrated with early examples from practice and relevant themes from the literature in landscape visualisation and related disciplines such as environmental psychology and landscape planning. Existing frameworks and principles for the appropriate use of environmental visualisation methods are applied to the special case of widely accessible, realistic 3D and 4D visualisation systems such as Google Earth, in the context of public awareness-building and agency decision

  9. Pharmacological imaging as a tool to visualise dopaminergic neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrantee, A; Reneman, L

    2014-09-01

    Dopamine abnormalities underlie a wide variety of psychopathologies, including ADHD and schizophrenia. A new imaging technique, pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI), is a promising non-invasive technique to visualize the dopaminergic system in the brain. In this review we explore the clinical potential of phMRI in detecting dopamine dysfunction or neurotoxicity, assess its strengths and weaknesses and identify directions for future research. Preclinically, phMRI is able to detect severe dopaminergic abnormalities quite similar to conventional techniques such as PET and SPECT. phMRI benefits from its high spatial resolution and the possibility to visualize both local and downstream effects of dopaminergic neurotransmission. In addition, it allows for repeated measurements and assessments in vulnerable populations. The major challenge is the complex interpretation of phMRI results. Future studies in patients with dopaminergic abnormalities need to confirm the currently reviewed preclinical findings to validate the technique in a clinical setting. Eventually, based on the current review we expect that phMRI can be of use in a clinical setting involving vulnerable populations (such as children and adolescents) for diagnosis and monitoring treatment efficacy. This article is part of the Special Issue Section entitled 'Neuroimaging in Neuropharmacology'. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of the molecular level visualisation approach for teaching and learning chemistry in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phenglengdi, Butsari

    This research evaluates the use of a molecular level visualisation approach in Thai secondary schools. The goal is to obtain insights about the usefulness of this approach, and to examine possible improvements in how the approach might be applied in the future. The methodology used for this research used both qualitative and quantitative approaches. Data were collected in the form of pre- and post-intervention multiple choice questions, open-ended-questions, drawing exercises, one-to-one interviews and video recordings of class activity. The research was conducted in two phases, involving a total of 261 students from the 11th Grade in Thailand. The use of VisChem animations in three studies was evaluated in Phase I. Study 1 was a pilot study exploring the benefits of incorporating VisChem animations to portray the molecular level. Study 2 compared test results between students exposed to these animations of molecular level events, and those not. Finally, in Study 3, test results were gathered from different types of schools (a rural school, a city school, and a university school). The results showed that students (and teachers) had misconceptions at the molecular level, and VisChem animations could help students understand chemistry concepts at the molecular level across all three types of schools. While the animation treatment group had a better score on the topic of states of water, the non-animation treatment group had a better score on the topic of dissolving sodium chloride in water than the animation group. The molecular level visualisation approach as a learning design was evaluated in Phase II. This approach involved a combination of VisChem animations, pictures, and diagrams together with the seven-step VisChem learning design. The study involved three classes of students, each with a different treatment, described as Class A - Traditional approach; Class B - VisChem animations with traditional approach; and Class C - Molecular level visualisation approach

  11. Beyond marks: new tools to visualise student engagement via social networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne L. Badge

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Evidence shows that engaged students perform better academically than disinterested students. Measurement of engagement with education is difficult and imprecise, especially in large student cohorts. Traditional measurements such as summary statistics derived from assessment are crude secondary measures of engagement at best and do not provide much support for educators to work with students and curate engagement during teaching periods. We have used academic-related student contributions to a public social network as a proxy for engagement. Statistical summaries and novel data visualisation tools provide subtle and powerful insights into online student peer networks. Analysis of data collected shows that network visualisation can be an important curation tool for educators interested in cultivating student engagement.

  12. Colouring in the "black-box": Alternative renderings of scientific visualisations in two comic book cosmologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Two somewhat contrasting views of public uses of scientific visualisations argue that they are "black-boxed" with meaning given by the scientific community or they are "polysemic" with meaning given by the context of presentation. This paper argues that whether they are treated as black-boxed or not and in what manner this is done is itself part of the meaning given by context. Thus, "black-boxing" is done not only by scientists but also by members of the public. The argument is illustrated by reference to two recent comic books, Dave Sim's Cerebus and Alan Moore's Promethea, in which the authors present cosmological visions of the universe using scientific visualisations to create a sense of realism. From analysis of their use of images of planet Earth and the human foetus it is argued that, although the images are black-boxed, the authors re-work them aesthetically to suit their specific moral and cosmological views.

  13. Czech Registry of Monoclonal Gammopathies - Technical Solution, Data Collection and Visualisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozova, L; Schwarz, D; Snabl, I; Kalina, J; Pavlickova, B; Komenda, M; Jarkovský, J; Němec, P; Horinek, D; Stefanikova, Z; Pour, L; Hájek, R; Maisnar, V

    2017-01-01

    The Registry of Monoclonal Gammopathies (RMG) was established by the Czech Myeloma Group in 2007. RMG is a registry designed for the collection of clinical data concerning diagnosis, treatment, treatment results and survival of patients with monoclonal gammopathies. Data on patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), Waldenström macroglobulinaemia (WM), multiple myeloma (MM) or primary AL ("amyloid light-chain") amyloidosis are collected in the registry. Nineteen Czech centres and four Slovak centres currently contribute to the registry. The registry currently contains records on more than 5,000 patients with MM, almost 3,000 patients with MGUS, 170 patients with WM and 26 patients with primary AL amyloidosis, i.e. more than 8,000 records on patients with monoclonal gammopathies altogether. This paper describes technology employed for the collection, storage and subsequent online visualisation of data. The CLADE-IS platform is introduced as a new system for the collection and storage of data from the registry. The form structure and functions of the new system are described for all diagnoses in general; these functions facilitate data entry to the registry and minimise the error rate in data. Publicly available online visualisations of data on patients with MGUS, WM, MM or primary AL amyloidosis from all Czech or Slovak centres are introduced, together with authenticated visualisations of data on patients with MM from selected centres. The RMG represents a data basis that makes it possible to monitor the disease course in patients with monoclonal gammopathies on the population level.Key words: Registry of Monoclonal Gammopathies - RMG - registries - monoclonal gammopathies - CLADE-IS - data visualisation - database.

  14. A deviation display method for visualising data in mobile gamma-ray spectrometry.

    OpenAIRE

    Kock, Peder; Finck, Robert R; Nilsson, Jonas M C; Östlund, Karl; Samuelsson, Christer

    2010-01-01

    A real time visualisation method, to be used in mobile gamma-spectrometric search operations using standard detector systems is presented. The new method, called deviation display, uses a modified waterfall display to present relative changes in spectral data over energy and time. Using unshielded (137)Cs and (241)Am point sources and different natural background environments, the behaviour of the deviation displays is demonstrated and analysed for two standard detector types (NaI(Tl) and HPG...

  15. Temporal contrast enhancement and parametric imaging for the visualisation of time patterns in dynamic scintigraphic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deconinck, F.; Bossuyt, A.; Lepoudre, R.

    1982-01-01

    Image contrast, photon noise and sampling frequency limit the visual extraction of relevant temporal information in scintigraphic image series. When the Unitation is mainly due to low temporal contrast, temporal contrast enhancement will strongly improve the perceptibility of time patterns in the series. When the limitation is due to photon noise and limited temporal sampling, parametric imaging by means of the Hadamard transform can visualise temporal patterns. (WU)

  16. Integration of biotechnology, visualisation technology and robot technology for automated mass propagation af elite trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Find, Jens

    for the production of Christmas trees and Sitka spruce has gained renewed interest as a fast growing species for the production biofuels. These species are used as model systems for the development of automated plant production based on robot and visualisation technology. The commercial aspect of the project aims at......: 1) the market for cloned elite plants in the forestry sector and 2) the market for robot technology in the production of plants for the forestry sector....

  17. Tranquillity, Guided Visualisation and Personal Discovery \\ud for Disengaged ‘Dispirited’ Pupils

    OpenAIRE

    Bigger, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Swindon Youth Empowerment Project (SYEP) is currently working in six schools in urban disadvantaged areas in Swindon. The project encourages young people with disaffected and challenging behaviour to reflect on their own behaviour, relationships and potential. The particular innovation of SYEP includes guided personal reflection using visualisation, words and music in an ambient environment without distractions (called “the Tranquillity Zone”), followed by focused activities to stimulate pers...

  18. Change in the properties of the opiate receptors of the brain under conditions of habituation of rats to morphine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaitsev, S.V.; Sergeeva, M.G.; Chichenkov, O.N.; Petrov, V.E.; Varfolomeev, S.D.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of prolonged administration of morphine on the properties of the opiate receptors of the rat brain was investigated. For this purpose they conducted an analysis of the isotherms of binding of labeled μ-, σ-, and chi-ligands: morphine, D-Ala 2 , D-Leu 5 -enkephalin, and ethylketocyclazocin, with membrane preparations of the brains of rats tolerant to morphine, as well as the control animals. For a quantitative determination of the dissociation constants of the ligand-receptor complexes (K) and the concentration of the reagents ([Q]), they used differential method and the method of simulation modeling. It was shown that the values of K and [Q] for individual animals are subjected to substantial dispersion, whereas the ratios [Q]/K undergo minor individual fluctuations, both in the control group and in the group of rats tolerant to morphine. This permits the ratio [Q]/K to be singled out as one of the main parameters for comparing the properties of opiate receptors of various groups of animals. Using this criterion, as well as the method of simulated modeling, it was shown that the development of tolerance is accompanied by a change in the properties of the δ-receptors (the ratio [Q]/K decreases by a factor of more than two). In contrast to the δ-receptors, no significant influence of the tolerance on the properties of the μ- and chi-receptors, as well as the ultrahigh-affinity ligand binding sites, was detected

  19. Change in the properties of the opiate receptors of the brain under conditions of habituation of rats to morphine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaitsev, S.V.; Sergeeva, M.G.; Chichenkov, O.N.; Petrov, V.E.; Varfolomeev, S.D.

    1987-02-20

    The influence of prolonged administration of morphine on the properties of the opiate receptors of the rat brain was investigated. For this purpose they conducted an analysis of the isotherms of binding of labeled ..mu..-, sigma-, and chi-ligands: morphine, D-Ala/sup 2/, D-Leu/sup 5/-enkephalin, and ethylketocyclazocin, with membrane preparations of the brains of rats tolerant to morphine, as well as the control animals. For a quantitative determination of the dissociation constants of the ligand-receptor complexes (K) and the concentration of the reagents ((Q)), they used differential method and the method of simulation modeling. It was shown that the values of K and (Q) for individual animals are subjected to substantial dispersion, whereas the ratios (Q)/K undergo minor individual fluctuations, both in the control group and in the group of rats tolerant to morphine. This permits the ratio (Q)/K to be singled out as one of the main parameters for comparing the properties of opiate receptors of various groups of animals. Using this criterion, as well as the method of simulated modeling, it was shown that the development of tolerance is accompanied by a change in the properties of the delta-receptors (the ratio (Q)/K decreases by a factor of more than two). In contrast to the delta-receptors, no significant influence of the tolerance on the properties of the ..mu..- and chi-receptors, as well as the ultrahigh-affinity ligand binding sites, was detected.

  20. Visualisation of flow patterns in straight and C-shape thermosyphons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, K. S.; Tshai, K. H.; Firwana, A.

    2017-04-01

    A heat pipe is a passive heat transfer device capable of transferring a large quantity of heat effectively and efficiently over a long distance and with a small temperature difference between the heat source and heat sink. A heat pipe consists of a metal pipe initially vacuumed and then filled with a small quantity of fluid inside. The pipe is separated into a heating (evaporator) section and a cooling (condenser) section by an adiabatic section. In a run-around-coil heating, ventilation and air conditioning system, a wrap-around heat pipe heat exchanger could be employed to increase dehumidification and to reduce cooling costs. The thermal performance of a thermosyphon is dependent upon type of fill liquid, fill ratio, power input, pipe inclination and pipe dimensions. The boiling and condensation processes that occur inside a thermosyphon are quite complex. During operation, dry-out, burn-out or boiling limit, entrainment or flooding limit and geysering occur. These phenomena would lead to non-uniform axial wall temperature distribution in the pipe, or worse still, ineffective operation. In order to have a better understanding of the internal heat transfer phenomena, a visual study using transparent glass tubes and high speed camera recording of the internal flow patterns would be most helpful. This paper reports on an experimental investigation conducted to visualise the flow patterns in straight and C-shape thermosyphons. The pictures recorded enabled the internal flow boiling and condensation pattern occurring inside a straight and a C-shape thermosyphon to be observed. The thermosyphons were fabricated from 10 mm O/D × 8 mm I/D × 300 mm long glass tubes and filled with water with fill ratios from 0.5 - 1.5. The evaporator sections of the thermosyphons were immersed into a hot water tank that was electrically heated from cold at ambient temperature till boiling. Cooling of the condenser section was achieved using a fan. Preliminary results showed that dry

  1. Investigation of multiple visualisation techniques and dynamic queries in conjunction with direct sonification to support the browsing of audio resources

    OpenAIRE

    Brazil, Eoin

    2003-01-01

    non-peer-reviewed In this thesis, a prototype system for the browsing of audio resources was developed and an initial evaluation of this system was performed. The main contributions of this thesis are dynamic queries and multiple visualisation techniques in conjunction with direct sonification. Dynamic queries are queries that provide immediate feedback while maintaining consistency between the queries themselves and the graphical/auditory display. The multiple visualisation techniques are...

  2. The effects of computer-aided design software on engineering students' spatial visualisation skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kösa, Temel; Karakuş, Fatih

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of computer-aided design (CAD) software-based instruction on the spatial visualisation skills of freshman engineering students in a computer-aided engineering drawing course. A quasi-experimental design was applied, using the Purdue Spatial Visualization Test-Visualization of Rotations (PSVT:R) for both the pre- and the post-test. The participants were 116 freshman students in the first year of their undergraduate programme in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at a university in Turkey. A total of 72 students comprised the experimental group; they were instructed with CAD-based activities in an engineering drawing course. The control group consisted of 44 students who did not attend this course. The results of the study showed that a CAD-based engineering drawing course had a positive effect on developing engineering students' spatial visualisation skills. Additionally, the results of the study showed that spatial visualisation skills can be a predictor for success in a computer-aided engineering drawing course.

  3. Visualisation of uric acid renal calculi (UARC) using computed radiography (CR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dom, Sulaiman M.; Yusoff, Nadzri M.; Amin, Zulkifli M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the capability of CR to visualise UARC through inverse image post-processing technique. Methods. A patient-equivalent phantom (PEP) consisting of six 2.5-cm thick Perspex layers and one 1-mm thick aluminium layer was used to represent human tissues and bones respectively. A total of eight exposures were made on PEP to radiograph 1 mm, 2 mm and 3 mm UARC located between three layers of 2-cm thick cattle muscle, positioned inside the PEP. After each exposure, a layer of Perspex was removed, and another exposure was made until only one Perspex layer and one layer of muscle (containing the three UARC) remained. For each exposure, two images (a positive and an inverse image) were produced for comparison using Fuji XG1 computed radiography system with IP0 type C-ST-VI Fuji imaging plate (equivalent to 400 speed radiographic screen-film systems). Results: In positive image, UARC of all three sizes (1 mm, 2 mm and 3 mm) located in the cattle muscle, cannot be visualised when the PEP consists of more than one layer of Perspex. In inverse image, the 3-mm UARC can be seen even when the PEP consists of five layers of Perspex. Conclusion: This study revealed the post-processing capability of CR to increase the visualisation of UARC which has been categorised as radiolucent. A further study of clinical image quality should be performed using blinded observers to test diagnostic accuracy, which was not included in this study.

  4. Quantitatively Plotting the Human Face for Multivariate Data Visualisation Illustrated by Health Assessments Using Laboratory Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hongwei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to describe a new data visualisation system by plotting the human face to observe the comprehensive effects of multivariate data. Methods. The Graphics Device Interface (GDI+ in the Visual Studio.NET development platform was used to write a program that enables facial image parameters to be recorded, such as cropping and rotation, and can generate a new facial image according to Z values from sets of normal data (Z>3 was still counted as 3. The measured clinical laboratory parameters related to health status were obtained from senile people, glaucoma patients, and fatty liver patients to illustrate the facial data visualisation system. Results. When the eyes, nose, and mouth were rotated around their own axes at the same angle, the deformation effects were similar. The deformation effects for any abnormality of the eyes, nose, or mouth should be slightly higher than those for simultaneous abnormalities. The facial changes in the populations with different health statuses were significant compared with a control population. Conclusions. The comprehensive effects of multivariate may not equal the sum of each variable. The 3Z facial data visualisation system can effectively distinguish people with poor health status from healthy people.

  5. Effect of SkQ1 Antioxidant on Structural and Functional Conditions of The Brain in PostResuscitation Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Lovat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to assess the efficacy of mitochondriatargeted antioxidant SkQ1 in prevention of structural and functional abnormalities of brain postresuscitation after cardiac arrest.Materials and methods. Adult male Wistar rats (n=19 underwent cardiac arrest for 7 minutes followed by resuscitation. Nine rats were administered with 500 nmol/kg SkQ1 per os with water for 2 weeks (1 week before and 1 week after resuscitation. A control group consisted of shamoperated animals (n=10. At days 4—6 post operation locomotor activity and anxiety («elevated plus maze» test and sensorimotor function of limbs («beam walking» test were examined. Total numbers of neurons per 1 mm of their layer length in vulnerable neuronal populations (cerebellar Purkinje cells and piramidal neurons of hippocampus fields CA1 and CA4 were estimated by histological analysis of the specimens stained with cresyl violet on day 7 postresuscitation. To identify possible mechanisms of SkQ1 action, the immunohistochemical study of a glialderived neurotrophic factor (GDNF expression in piramidal neurons of hippocampus was performed by indirect peroxidaseantiperoxidase method and antiGDNF primary polyclonal antibodies.Results. Ischemiareperfusion resulted in neuronal loss in all studied brain areas followed by reduction in locomotor activity and development of sensorimotor deficit. SkQ1 prevented development of postresuscitative locomotor and sensorimotor irregularities, significantly reduced Purkinje cells loss, prevented death of piramidal neurons in hippocampal field CA4, but not in CA1. Data demonstrated, that iIn Purkinje cells from resuscitated rats treated with SkQ1 there was a significant increase in number of GDNFpositive neurons, which were more resistant to ischemia (transition of GDNFnegative cells toward the category of cells actively expressing this factor that promoted their survival postresuscitation.Conclusion. Data confirm the positive effects of SkQ1

  6. Processing of visual semantic information to concrete words: temporal dynamics and neural mechanisms indicated by event-related brain potentials( ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schie, Hein T; Wijers, Albertus A; Mars, Rogier B; Benjamins, Jeroen S; Stowe, Laurie A

    2005-05-01

    Event-related brain potentials were used to study the retrieval of visual semantic information to concrete words, and to investigate possible structural overlap between visual object working memory and concreteness effects in word processing. Subjects performed an object working memory task that involved 5 s retention of simple 4-angled polygons (load 1), complex 10-angled polygons (load 2), and a no-load baseline condition. During the polygon retention interval subjects were presented with a lexical decision task to auditory presented concrete (imageable) and abstract (nonimageable) words, and pseudowords. ERP results are consistent with the use of object working memory for the visualisation of concrete words. Our data indicate a two-step processing model of visual semantics in which visual descriptive information of concrete words is first encoded in semantic memory (indicated by an anterior N400 and posterior occipital positivity), and is subsequently visualised via the network for object working memory (reflected by a left frontal positive slow wave and a bilateral occipital slow wave negativity). Results are discussed in the light of contemporary models of semantic memory.

  7. Brain stem slice conditioned medium contains endogenous BDNF and GDNF that affect neural crest boundary cap cells in co-culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Kale, Ajay; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Siratirakun, Piyaporn; Aquino, Jorge B; Thonabulsombat, Charoensri; Ernfors, Patrik; Olivius, Petri

    2014-05-30

    Conditioned medium (CM), made by collecting medium after a few days in cell culture and then re-using it to further stimulate other cells, is a known experimental concept since the 1950s. Our group has explored this technique to stimulate the performance of cells in culture in general, and to evaluate stem- and progenitor cell aptitude for auditory nerve repair enhancement in particular. As compared to other mediums, all primary endpoints in our published experimental settings have weighed in favor of conditioned culture medium, where we have shown that conditioned culture medium has a stimulatory effect on cell survival. In order to explore the reasons for this improved survival we set out to analyze the conditioned culture medium. We utilized ELISA kits to investigate whether brain stem (BS) slice CM contains any significant amounts of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). We further looked for a donor cell with progenitor characteristics that would be receptive to BDNF and GDNF. We chose the well-documented boundary cap (BC) progenitor cells to be tested in our in vitro co-culture setting together with cochlear nucleus (CN) of the BS. The results show that BS CM contains BDNF and GDNF and that survival of BC cells, as well as BC cell differentiation into neurons, were enhanced when BS CM were used. Altogether, we conclude that BC cells transplanted into a BDNF and GDNF rich environment could be suitable for treatment of a traumatized or degenerated auditory nerve. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Deep brain stimulation of the amygdala alleviates fear conditioning-induced alterations in synaptic plasticity in the cortical-amygdala pathway and fear memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Li; Huang, SiJia; Peng, BinBin; Ren, Jie; Tian, FuYing; Wang, Yan

    2014-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the amygdala has been demonstrated to modulate hyperactivity of the amygdala, which is responsible for the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and thus might be used for the treatment of PTSD. However, the underlying mechanism of DBS of the amygdala in the modulation of the amygdala is unclear. The present study investigated the effects of DBS of the amygdala on synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity at cortical inputs to the amygdala, which is critical for the formation and storage of auditory fear memories, and fear memories. The results demonstrated that auditory fear conditioning increased single-pulse-evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials in the cortical-amygdala pathway. Furthermore, auditory fear conditioning decreased the induction of paired-pulse facilitation and long-term potentiation, two neurophysiological models for studying short-term and long-term synaptic plasticity, respectively, in the cortical-amygdala pathway. In addition, all these auditory fear conditioning-induced changes could be reversed by DBS of the amygdala. DBS of the amygdala also rescued auditory fear conditioning-induced enhancement of long-term retention of fear memory. These findings suggested that DBS of the amygdala alleviating fear conditioning-induced alterations in synaptic plasticity in the cortical-amygdala pathway and fear memory may underlie the neuromodulatory role of DBS of the amygdala in activities of the amygdala.

  9. Evaluation of resting brain conditions measured by two different methods (i.v. and oral administration) with 18F-FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masud, M.; Yamaguchi, Keiichiro; Rikimaru, Hisashi; Tashiro, Manabu; Ozaki, Kaoru; Watanuki, Shoichi; Miyake, Masayasu; Ido, Tatsuo; Itoh, Masatoshi

    2001-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate regional differences between brain activity in two resting control conditions measured by 3D PET after administration of FDG through either the intravenous (i.v.) or the oral route. Ten healthy male volunteers engaged in the study as the i.v. group (mean age, 26±9.3 years, ±S.D.) who received FDG intravenously and another 10 volunteers as the oral group (mean age, 27.9±11.3 years, ±S.D.) who received FDG per os. A set of 3D-PET scans (emission and transmission scans) were performed in both groups. To explore possible functional differences between the brains of the two groups, the SPM-96 software was used for statistical analysis. The results revealed that glucose metabolism was significantly higher in the superior frontal gyrus, superior parietal lobule, lingual gyrus and left cerebellar hemisphere in the i.v. group than in the oral group. Metabolically active areas were found in the superior, middle and inferior temporal gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, amygdaloid nucleus, pons and cerebellum in the oral group when compared with the i.v. group. These differences were presumably induced by differences between FDG kinetics and/or time-weighted behavioral effects in the two studies. This study suggests the need for extreme caution when selecting a pooled control population for designated activation studies. (author)

  10. A Numerical Handling of the Boundary Conditions Imposed by the Skull on an Inhomogeneous Diffusion-Reaction Model of Glioblastoma Invasion Into the Brain: Clinical Validation Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios S Stamatakos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel explicit triscale reaction-diffusion numerical model of glioblastoma multiforme tumor growth is presented. The model incorporates the handling of Neumann boundary conditions imposed by the cranium and takes into account both the inhomogeneous nature of human brain and the complexity of the skull geometry. The finite-difference time-domain method is adopted. To demonstrate the workflow of a possible clinical validation procedure, a clinical case/scenario is addressed. A good agreement of the in silico calculated value of the doubling time (ie, the time for tumor volume to double with the value of the same quantity based on tomographic imaging data has been observed. A theoretical exploration suggests that a rough but still quite informative value of the doubling time may be calculated based on a homogeneous brain model. The model could serve as the main component of a continuous mathematics-based glioblastoma oncosimulator aiming at supporting the clinician in the optimal patient-individualized design of treatment using the patient’s multiscale data and experimenting in silico (ie, on the computer.

  11. Evaluation of resting brain conditions measured by two different methods (i.v. and oral administration) with {sup 18}F-FDG-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masud, M.; Yamaguchi, Keiichiro; Rikimaru, Hisashi; Tashiro, Manabu; Ozaki, Kaoru; Watanuki, Shoichi; Miyake, Masayasu; Ido, Tatsuo; Itoh, Masatoshi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center

    2001-02-01

    Our aim was to evaluate regional differences between brain activity in two resting control conditions measured by 3D PET after administration of FDG through either the intravenous (i.v.) or the oral route. Ten healthy male volunteers engaged in the study as the i.v. group (mean age, 26{+-}9.3 years, {+-}S.D.) who received FDG intravenously and another 10 volunteers as the oral group (mean age, 27.9{+-}11.3 years, {+-}S.D.) who received FDG per os. A set of 3D-PET scans (emission and transmission scans) were performed in both groups. To explore possible functional differences between the brains of the two groups, the SPM-96 software was used for statistical analysis. The results revealed that glucose metabolism was significantly higher in the superior frontal gyrus, superior parietal lobule, lingual gyrus and left cerebellar hemisphere in the i.v. group than in the oral group. Metabolically active areas were found in the superior, middle and inferior temporal gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, amygdaloid nucleus, pons and cerebellum in the oral group when compared with the i.v. group. These differences were presumably induced by differences between FDG kinetics and/or time-weighted behavioral effects in the two studies. This study suggests the need for extreme caution when selecting a pooled control population for designated activation studies. (author)

  12. Generation of a new bioluminescent model for visualisation of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zagozdzon, Agnieszka M

    2012-05-30

    AbstractBackgroundNumerous transgenic models have been generated to study breast cancer. However, despite many advantages, traditional transgenic models for breast cancer are also burdened with difficulties in early detection and longitudinal observation of transgene-induced tumours, which in most cases are randomly located and occur at various time points. Methods such as palpation followed by mechanical measurement of the tumours are of limited value in transgenic models. There is a crucial need for making these previously generated models suitable for modern methods of tumour visualisation and monitoring, e.g. by bioluminescence-based techniques. This approach was successfully used in the current study.ResultsA new mouse strain (MMTV-Luc2 mice) expressing Luc2 luciferase primarily in mammary tissue in females, with low-level background expression in internal organs, was generated and bred to homozygosity. After these mice were intercrossed with MMTV-PyVT mice, all double transgenic females developed mammary tumours by the age of 10 weeks, the localisation and progression of which could be effectively monitored using the luminescence-based in vivo imaging. Luminescence-based readout allowed for early visualisation of the locally overgrown mammary tissue and for longitudinal evaluation of local progression of the tumours. When sampled ex vivo at the age of 10 weeks, all tumours derived from MMTV-Luc2PyVT females displayed robust bioluminescent signal.ConclusionsWe have created a novel transgenic strain for visualisation and longitudinal monitoring of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice as an addition and\\/or a new and more advanced alternative to manual methods. Generation of this mouse strain is vital for making many of the existing mammary tumour transgenic models applicable for in vivo imaging techniques.

  13. A direct method to visualise the aryl acylamidase activity on cholinesterases in polyacrylamide gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boopathy Rathanam

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vertebrates, two types of cholinesterases exist, acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase. The function of acetylcholinesterase is to hydrolyse acetylcholine, thereby terminating the neurotransmission at cholinergic synapse, while the precise physiological function of butyrylcholinesterase has not been identified. The presence of cholinesterases in tissues that are not cholinergically innervated indicate that cholinesterases may have functions unrelated to neurotransmission. Furthermore, cholinesterases display a genuine aryl acylamidase activity apart from their predominant acylcholine hydrolase activity. The physiological significance of this aryl acylamidase activity is also not known. The study on the aryl acylamidase has been, in part hampered by the lack of a specific method to visualise this activity. We have developed a method to visualise the aryl acylamidase activity on cholinesterase in polyacrylamide gels. Results The o-nitroaniline liberated from o-nitroacetanilide by the action of aryl acylamidase activity on cholinesterases, in the presence of nitrous acid formed a diazonium compound. This compound gave an azo dye complex with N-(1-napthyl-ethylenediamine, which appeared as purple bands in polyacrylamide gels. Treating the stained gels with trichloroacetic acid followed by Tris-HCl buffer helped in fixation of the stain in the gels. By using specific inhibitors for acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase, respectively, differential staining for the aryl acylamidase activities on butyrylcholinesterase and acetylcholinesterase in a sample containing both these enzymes has been demonstrated. A linear relationship between the intensity of colour developed and activity of the enzyme was obtained. Conclusions A novel method to visualise the aryl acylamidase activity on cholinesterases in polyacrylamide gels has been developed.

  14. Generation of a new bioluminescent model for visualisation of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zagozdzon Agnieszka M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous transgenic models have been generated to study breast cancer. However, despite many advantages, traditional transgenic models for breast cancer are also burdened with difficulties in early detection and longitudinal observation of transgene-induced tumours, which in most cases are randomly located and occur at various time points. Methods such as palpation followed by mechanical measurement of the tumours are of limited value in transgenic models. There is a crucial need for making these previously generated models suitable for modern methods of tumour visualisation and monitoring, e.g. by bioluminescence-based techniques. This approach was successfully used in the current study. Results A new mouse strain (MMTV-Luc2 mice expressing Luc2 luciferase primarily in mammary tissue in females, with low-level background expression in internal organs, was generated and bred to homozygosity. After these mice were intercrossed with MMTV-PyVT mice, all double transgenic females developed mammary tumours by the age of 10 weeks, the localisation and progression of which could be effectively monitored using the luminescence-based in vivo imaging. Luminescence-based readout allowed for early visualisation of the locally overgrown mammary tissue and for longitudinal evaluation of local progression of the tumours. When sampled ex vivo at the age of 10 weeks, all tumours derived from MMTV-Luc2PyVT females displayed robust bioluminescent signal. Conclusions We have created a novel transgenic strain for visualisation and longitudinal monitoring of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice as an addition and/or a new and more advanced alternative to manual methods. Generation of this mouse strain is vital for making many of the existing mammary tumour transgenic models applicable for in vivo imaging techniques.

  15. Marketing health education: advertising margarine and visualising health in Britain from 1964–c.2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Abstract During the post-war period, margarine was re-conceptualised as a value-added product with distinct health benefits. This article contextualises the advertising of margarine as a healthy food, focusing on Unilever’s Flora brand as an important case study in legitimising the emergent role of disease prevention as a marketing tool. It uses the methodology of visual culture to examine how advertising employed chronic disease prevention as a selling tool. This article assesses how the post-war environment gave rise to new ways of visually advertising food, and how these promoted innovative visualisations of food, the body and their interactions with health. PMID:29348778

  16. Marketing health education: advertising margarine and visualising health in Britain from 1964-c.2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Jane

    2017-01-01

    During the post-war period, margarine was re-conceptualised as a value-added product with distinct health benefits. This article contextualises the advertising of margarine as a healthy food, focusing on Unilever's Flora brand as an important case study in legitimising the emergent role of disease prevention as a marketing tool. It uses the methodology of visual culture to examine how advertising employed chronic disease prevention as a selling tool. This article assesses how the post-war environment gave rise to new ways of visually advertising food, and how these promoted innovative visualisations of food, the body and their interactions with health.

  17. Novel Designs for the Audio Mixing Interface Based on Data Visualisation First Principles

    OpenAIRE

    Dewey, Christopher; Wakefield, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Given the shortcomings of current audio mixing interfaces (AMIs) this study focuses on the development of alternative AMIs based on data visualisation first principles. The elementary perceptual tasks defined by Cleveland informed the design process. Two design ideas were considered for pan: using the elementary perceptual tasks ‘scale’ to display pan on either a single or multiple horizontal lines. Four design ideas were considered for level:\\ud using ‘length’, ‘area’, ‘saturation’ or ‘scala...

  18. Automatically visualise and analyse data on pathways using PathVisioRPC from any programming environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohler, Anwesha; Eijssen, Lars M T; van Iersel, Martijn P; Leemans, Christ; Willighagen, Egon L; Kutmon, Martina; Jaillard, Magali; Evelo, Chris T

    2015-08-23

    Biological pathways are descriptive diagrams of biological processes widely used for functional analysis of differentially expressed genes or proteins. Primary data analysis, such as quality control, normalisation, and statistical analysis, is often performed in scripting languages like R, Perl, and Python. Subsequent pathway analysis is usually performed using dedicated external applications. Workflows involving manual use of multiple environments are time consuming and error prone. Therefore, tools are needed that enable pathway analysis directly within the same scripting languages used for primary data analyses. Existing tools have limited capability in terms of available pathway content, pathway editing and visualisation options, and export file formats. Consequently, making the full-fledged pathway analysis tool PathVisio available from various scripting languages will benefit researchers. We developed PathVisioRPC, an XMLRPC interface for the pathway analysis software PathVisio. PathVisioRPC enables creating and editing biological pathways, visualising data on pathways, performing pathway statistics, and exporting results in several image formats in multiple programming environments. We demonstrate PathVisioRPC functionalities using examples in Python. Subsequently, we analyse a publicly available NCBI GEO gene expression dataset studying tumour bearing mice treated with cyclophosphamide in R. The R scripts demonstrate how calls to existing R packages for data processing and calls to PathVisioRPC can directly work together. To further support R users, we have created RPathVisio simplifying the use of PathVisioRPC in this environment. We have also created a pathway module for the microarray data analysis portal ArrayAnalysis.org that calls the PathVisioRPC interface to perform pathway analysis. This module allows users to use PathVisio functionality online without having to download and install the software and exemplifies how the PathVisioRPC interface can be

  19. A cognitive-relaxation-visualisation intervention for anxiety in women with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colinda D Linde

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was twofold. Firstly, to design a cognitive-relaxation-visualisation intervention with the aim of reducing both overt and covert anxiety associated with the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. Opsomming Die doel van hierdie studie was tweeledig. Eerstens is daar gepoog om ‘n kognitiewe ontspanningsvisualiserings-intervensie te ontwerp wat die vermindering van overte en koverte angs geassosieer met die diagnose en behandeling van borskanker ten doel het. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

  20. Experimental studies of the visualisation of spongious bone by high resolution computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henschel, M.G.; Freyschmidt, J.; Holland, B.R.

    1995-01-01

    18 native human lumbar vertebrae were placed in a water phantom and examined by HR-CT. The scans were compared with contact radiographs of correlating thin bone sections by morphologic criteria. The measured lower limit of visualisation of cancellous bone structures is celarly worse than expected from the measurements of spatial resolution with standard phantoms used for HR-CT (0.6 versus 0.4 mm). True and exact imaging of normal cancellous bone cannot be achieved even by modern HR-CT. Noise creates structures mimicking cancellous bone. (orig./MG) [de

  1. Applying internet based 3D visualisation and priority games in public consultation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henning Sten; Kristensen, Peter Nordskov

    2006-01-01

    the new Limfjorden connection was very sensitive. Many people have already taken their decision without detailed knowledge about the alternatives. All descriptions and assessments of the project we published on the Internet. The aim was to give all the citizens the best possible background for being...... of the respondents had tried the 3D visualisation (flight simulator) of the various alternatives. One characteristic of interactive participatory planning is feedback and learning, and therefore the County decided to develop a priority game to support the learning process. However, according to the survey...

  2. Flow visualisation study of spiral flow in the aorta-renal bifurcation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulker, David; Javadzadegan, Ashkan; Li, Zuming; Barber, Tracie

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the flow dynamics in an idealised model of the aorta-renal bifurcation using flow visualisation, with a particular focus on the effect of aorta-to-renal flow ratio and flow spirality. The recirculation length was longest when there was low flow in the renal artery and smaller in the presence of spiral flow. The results also indicate that patients without spiral flow or who have low flow in the renal artery due to the presence of stenosis may be susceptible to heightened development of atherosclerotic lesions.

  3. Visualising linked health data to explore health events around preventable hospitalisations in NSW Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falster, Michael O; Jorm, Louisa R; Leyland, Alastair H

    2016-09-07

    To explore patterns of health service use in the lead-up to, and following, admission for a 'preventable' hospitalisation. 266 950 participants in the 45 and Up Study, New South Wales (NSW) Australia Linked data on hospital admissions, general practitioner (GP) visits and other health events were used to create visual representations of health service use. For each participant, health events were plotted against time, with different events juxtaposed using different markers and panels of data. Various visualisations were explored by patient characteristics, and compared with a cohort of non-admitted participants matched on sociodemographic and health characteristics. Health events were displayed over calendar year and in the 90 days surrounding first preventable hospitalisation. The visualisations revealed patterns of clustering of GP consultations in the lead-up to, and following, preventable hospitalisation, with 14% of patients having a consultation on the day of admission and 27% in the prior week. There was a clustering of deaths and other hospitalisations following discharge, particularly for patients with a long length of stay, suggesting patients may have been in a state of health deterioration. Specialist consultations were primarily clustered during the period of hospitalisation. Rates of all health events were higher in patients admitted for a preventable hospitalisation than the matched non-admitted cohort. We did not find evidence of limited use of primary care services in the lead-up to a preventable hospitalisation, rather people with preventable hospitalisations tended to have high levels of engagement with multiple elements of the healthcare system. As such, preventable hospitalisations might be better used as a tool for identifying sicker patients for managed care programmes. Visualising longitudinal health data was found to be a powerful strategy for uncovering patterns of health service use, and such visualisations have potential to be more

  4. Conditioned same-sex partner preference in male rats is facilitated by oxytocin and dopamine: effect on sexually dimorphic brain nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triana-Del Rio, Rodrigo; Tecamachaltzi-Silvarán, Miriam B; Díaz-Estrada, Victor X; Herrera-Covarrubias, Deissy; Corona-Morales, Aleph A; Pfaus, James G; Coria-Avila, Genaro A

    2015-04-15

    Conditioned same-sex partner preference can develop in male rats that undergo cohabitation under the effects of quinpirole (QNP, D2 agonist). Herein, we assessed the development of conditioned same-sex social/sexual preference in males that received either nothing, saline, QNP, oxytocin (OT), or QNP+OT during cohabitation with another male (+) or single-caged (-). This resulted in the following groups: (1) Intact-, (2) Saline+, (3) QNP-, (4) OT-, (5) QNP+, (6) OT+ and (7) QNP/OT+. Cohabitation occurred during 24h in a clean cage with a male partner that bore almond scent on the back as conditioned stimulus. This was repeated every 4 days for a total of three trials. Social and sexual preference were assessed four days after the last conditioning trial in a drug-free test in which experimental males chose between the scented familiar male and a novel sexually receptive female. Results showed that males from groups Intact-, Saline+, QNP- and OT- displayed a clear preference for the female (opposite-sex), whereas groups QNP+, OT+ and QNP/OT+ displayed socio/sexual preference for the male partner (same-sex). In Experiment 2, the brains were processed for Nissl dye and the area size of two sexually dimorphic nuclei (SDN-POA and SON) was compared between groups. Males from groups OT-, OT+ and QNP/OT+ expressed a smaller SDN-POA and groups QNP+ and QNP/OT+ expressed a larger SON. Accordingly, conditioned same-sex social/sexual partner preference can develop during cohabitation under enhanced D2 or OT activity but such preference does not depend on the area size of those sexually dimorphic nuclei. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Sound Visualisation

    OpenAIRE

    Dolenc, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This thesis contains a description of a construction of subwoofer case that has an extra functionality of being able to produce special visual effects and display visualizations that match the currently playing sound. For this reason, multiple lighting elements made out of LED (Light Emitting Diode) diodes were installed onto the subwoofer case. The lighting elements are controlled by dedicated software that was also developed. The software runs on STM32F4-Discovery evaluation board inside a ...

  6. ALPIDE Visualiser

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2268073

    2017-01-01

    In 2020, the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS) will be upgraded with Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) particle detectors. The ALPIDE chip is a custom-made MAPS, made specifically for instrumenting the ALICE detector. This report details the process of creating a system for making the ALPIDE technology accessible to a broader audience by interfacing it to the Arduino hobbyist electronic platform along with a supporting GUI application. The system, along with a stack of ALPIDE sensors, can be used to introduce students to this technology and bridge the gap between the technical and visual world.

  7. Computational and mathematical methods in brain atlasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L

    2017-12-01

    Brain atlases have a wide range of use from education to research to clinical applications. Mathematical methods as well as computational methods and tools play a major role in the process of brain atlas building and developing atlas-based applications. Computational methods and tools cover three areas: dedicated editors for brain model creation, brain navigators supporting multiple platforms, and atlas-assisted specific applications. Mathematical methods in atlas building and developing atlas-aided applications deal with problems in image segmentation, geometric body modelling, physical modelling, atlas-to-scan registration, visualisation, interaction and virtual reality. Here I overview computational and mathematical methods in atlas building and developing atlas-assisted applications, and share my contribution to and experience in this field.

  8. Exploring Visualisation of Channel Activity, Levels and EQ for User Interfaces Implementing the Stage Metaphor for Music Mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelineck, Steven; Uhrenholt, Anders Kirk

    2016-01-01

    This short précis outlines a collection of different strategies for visualising simple audio features for a GUI- based audio mixing interface that uses the stage metaphor control scheme. Audio features such as activity, loudness and spectral centroid are extracted in real-time and mapped...... to different visual cues that can be adapted to the circular widgets most often found in implementations of the stage metaphor. An initial evaluation suggests that while the visualisations are generally intuitive and provide information about activity of audio channels, they are not used directly. When...... implementing these kinds of dynamic graphical visualisations it is thus important to consider how intrusive they are compared to their usefulness in a real mixing context....

  9. PhyTB: Phylogenetic tree visualisation and sample positioning for M. tuberculosis

    KAUST Repository

    Benavente, Ernest D

    2015-05-13

    Background Phylogenetic-based classification of M. tuberculosis and other bacterial genomes is a core analysis for studying evolutionary hypotheses, disease outbreaks and transmission events. Whole genome sequencing is providing new insights into the genomic variation underlying intra- and inter-strain diversity, thereby assisting with the classification and molecular barcoding of the bacteria. One roadblock to strain investigation is the lack of user-interactive solutions to interrogate and visualise variation within a phylogenetic tree setting. Results We have developed a web-based tool called PhyTB (http://pathogenseq.lshtm.ac.uk/phytblive/index.php webcite) to assist phylogenetic tree visualisation and identification of M. tuberculosis clade-informative polymorphism. Variant Call Format files can be uploaded to determine a sample position within the tree. A map view summarises the geographical distribution of alleles and strain-types. The utility of the PhyTB is demonstrated on sequence data from 1,601 M. tuberculosis isolates. Conclusion PhyTB contextualises M. tuberculosis genomic variation within epidemiological, geographical and phylogenic settings. Further tool utility is possible by incorporating large variants and phenotypic data (e.g. drug-resistance profiles), and an assessment of genotype-phenotype associations. Source code is available to develop similar websites for other organisms (http://sourceforge.net/projects/phylotrack webcite).

  10. The interaction of fingermark deposits on metal surfaces and potential ways for visualisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wightman, G; Emery, F; Austin, C; Andersson, I; Harcus, L; Arju, G; Steven, C

    2015-04-01

    The interaction of fingermark deposits on metals has been examined by a variety of techniques. Visualisation by film growth has been the main area of investigation through: thermal oxidation, anodising, peroxide solution, and the interaction with vapour of iodine and ammonium sulphide. Corrosion of the underlying metal has also been examined as an alternative means of visualisation. Confocal microscopy was used to look at the film thickness and corrosion products around the prints. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion of X-rays (SEM-EDX) examined a number of metal samples to investigate film growth and the elemental distribution. The observations suggest that differential oxidation was occurring as well as corrosion into the metal. Fingermark deposits on metals can corrode into the metal depending on the reactivity of the metal and leave a recoverable mark. However, fingermark deposits can also alter the rate of chemical reaction of the substrate metal by oxidation. In some cases organic matter can inhibit reaction, both when forming an oxide layer and when corroding the metal. However, signs of third level detail from pore contact may also be visible and the monovalent ions from salts could also influence film growth. Whilst further work would need to be carried out to decide whether any of these techniques may have application in fingermark recovery, this study does suggest that fingermarks on metals may be recoverable after incidents such as fires or immersion in water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Catheter visualisation in MR tomography: first animal experimental experiences with field inhomogeneity catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, G.; Glowinski, A.; Neuerburg, J.; Buecker, A.; Vaals, J.J. van; Hurtak, W.; Guenther, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of a new developed field inhomogeneity catheter for interventional MR imaging in vivo. Materials and methods: Three different prototypes of a field inhomogeneity catheter were investigated in 6 pigs. The catheters were introduced in Seldinger technique via the femoral vessels over a guide wire on an interventional MR system (Philips Gyroscan NT combined with a C-arm fluoroscopy unit [Philips BV 212[). Catheters were placed in veins and arteries. The catheter position was controlled by a fast gradient echo sequence (Turbo Field Echo [TEF[). Results: Catheters were introduced over a guide wire without complications in all cases. Using the field inhomogeneity concept, catheters were easily visualised in the inferior vena cava and the aorta by the fast gradient echo technique on MR in all cases. Although aortic branches were successfully cannulated, the catheters were not displayed by the TFE technique due to the complex and tortuous anatomy. All animals survived the experiments without complications. Conclusion: MR guided visualisation of a field inhomogeneity catheter is a simple concept which can be realised on each MR scanner and may allow intravascular MR guided interventions in future. (orig.) [de

  12. Meteor Observational Data Visualisation in the Equatorial Coordinate System Using Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovashchenko, V. A.; Kolomiyets, S. V.

    As a result of dynamic evolution of IT industry and astronomical research in the XXI century, which have resulted in obtaining large and complex data sets known as Big Data (e.g. data from the European Space Agency missions, such as GAIA mission, etc.), as well as due to rapid development of computer technologies, astronomy and computer science have become closely linked to each other. In the XXI century, Information technology has become an essential part of understanding the world around. This paper presents a solution to the problem of meteor data representation in the second equatorial coordinate (RA-Dec) system using Information Technology. Such a visualisation solution is needed to analyse the results of experiments based on the radar observations conducted in 1972-1978 (stage 1 - the data obtained in 1972 comprise 10,247 meteor orbits), which have been accumulated and stored in the Meteor Database of the Kharkiv National University of Radio Electronics (KNURE). A sample set of data with their characteristics and details about their delivery has been presented by (Kashcheyev & Tkachuk, 1980). An electronic calculator application was developed by employing the model of data visualisation in the form of celestial hemispheres using the object-oriented programming language C#.

  13. 3D Digitisation and Visualisation of the Vače Situla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Vidmar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available EXTENDED ABSTRACT:The project of 3D digitisation and visualisation of the Vače situla was implemented at the beginning of 2011 in cooperation with the National Museum of Slovenia where the situla is kept and the company MFC.2 which, among other services, develops and implements 3 D digitisation and visualisation projects. The purpose of the project was to digitise and visualise a famous and precious piece of cultural heritage and to  1. show what modern 3D shape and texture scanning technologies allow us to do,  2. show how to ensure safety and reach high quality in digitising cultural heritage objects.  3. measure the added value of the 3 D visualisation of cultural heritage as a powerful tool for preservation, conservation, research, education, knowledge sharing and promotion of cultural heritage objects. Furthermore, the aims of the project were:  1. 3D capture of the shape and texture of the situla using the 3D scanning method.  2. 3D image of the situla and its details with expert descriptions.  3. 3D stereoscopic projection of the situla viewed with 3D glasses and with the possibility of controlling it remotely.  4. 3D animation giving professional interpretation of certain facts about the situla.  5. Public presentation of the project results on Slovenian cultural holiday, 8th February 2011, at the National Museum of Slovenia. The 3D capture of the shape and texture of the situla was carried out using the white light 3D scanning method followed by 3D flesh animation to show the object and its details. A touch screen was used to provide user access to the content. Reality based model enabled vertical rotation of the situla as well as the interactive display of individual engravings. By clicking a situla detail a photo with an extensive professional explanation of the scene was displayed in a new browser window. For attractive public presentation of the exhibition a 3D stereoscopic animation of the situla rotating and seemingly

  14. Increased Cortical Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Precedes Incomplete Extinction of Conditioned Fear and Increased Hippocampal Excitatory Tone in a Mouse Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Brandy L; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Charlton, Jennifer L; Kohler, Robert J; Galloway, Matthew P; Perrine, Shane A; Conti, Alana C

    2016-09-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) contributes to development of affective disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Psychiatric symptoms typically emerge in a tardive fashion post-TBI, with negative effects on recovery. Patients with PTSD, as well as rodent models of PTSD, demonstrate structural and functional changes in brain regions mediating fear learning, including prefrontal cortex (PFC), amygdala (AMYG), and hippocampus (HC). These changes may reflect loss of top-down control by which PFC normally exhibits inhibitory influence over AMYG reactivity to fearful stimuli, with HC contribution. Considering the susceptibility of these regions to injury, we examined fear conditioning (FC) in the delayed post-injury period, using a mouse model of mTBI. Mice with mTBI displayed enhanced acquisition and delayed extinction of FC. Using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ex vivo, we examined PFC, AMYG, and HC levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate as surrogate measures of inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission, respectively. Eight days post-injury, GABA was increased in PFC, with no significant changes in AMYG. In animals receiving FC and mTBI, glutamate trended toward an increase and the GABA/glutamate ratio decreased in ventral HC at 25 days post-injury, whereas GABA decreased and GABA/glutamate decreased in dorsal HC. These neurochemical changes are consistent with early TBI-induced PFC hypoactivation facilitating the fear learning circuit and exacerbating behavioral fear responses. The latent emergence of overall increased excitatory tone in the HC, despite distinct plasticity in dorsal and ventral HC fields, may be associated with disordered memory function, manifested as incomplete extinction and enhanced FC recall.

  15. Postulated vasoactive neuropeptide immunopathology affecting the blood–brain/blood–spinal barrier in certain neuropsychiatric fatigue-related conditions: A role for phosphodiesterase inhibitors in treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya Marshall-Gradisnik

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Donald R Staines1,2, Ekua W Brenu2, Sonya Marshall-Gradisnik21Queensland Health, Gold Coast Population Health Unit, Southport, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia; 2Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Population Health and Neuroimmunology Unit, Bond University, Robina, Queensland, AustraliaAbstract: Neuropsychiatric symptoms occur in a number of neurological fatigue-related conditions including multiple sclerosis (MS, Parkinson’s disease (PD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. These conditions have been attributed variably to neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative processes. While autoimmune pathology, at least in part, has long been suspected in these conditions proof has been elusive. Autoimmune pathomechanisms affecting the blood–brain barrier (BBB or blood–spinal barrier (BSB may predispose the BBB/BSB to ‘leakiness’ and be a precursor to additional autoimmune events resulting in neuroinflammatory or neurodegenerative processes. The aim of the paper is to postulate immunopathology of the cerebrospinal perivascular compartment involving certain vasoactive neuropeptides, specifically pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP, in the etiology of certain neuropsychiatric fatigue-related conditions such as MS, ALS, PD, and CFS. Vasoactive neuropeptides (VNs such as PACAP and VIP have critical roles as neurotransmitters, vasodilators including perfusion and hypoxia regulators, and immune and nociception modulators. PACAP and VIP are widely distributed in the central nervous system (CNS and have key roles in CNS blood vessels including maintaining functional integrity of the BBB and BSB. Autoimmunity affecting these VNs would likely have a detrimental effect on BBB and BSB functioning arguably predisposing to further pathological processes. Virchow–Robin spaces (VRS are perivascular compartments surrounding small vessels within the CNS which

  16. A low-cost experiment to visualise the Fourier series: video analysis of a real plucked coiled spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, V. L. B.; Haubrichs, C.; de Oliveira, A. L.; Sasaki, D. G. G.

    2018-03-01

    In the present work, we develop a low-cost and simple experiment to visualise Fourier’s synthesis using a short, soft, and light plastic coiled spring oscillating in a horizontal plane, and a basic camera (120 fps). It is shown that the spring obeys a linear wave differential equation, as gravitational influence is neglected. A nonlinear criterion is evaluated to determine if magnitudes of the parameters in the initial conditions satisfy the linear wave equation. Our setup promotes some desirable characteristics that make Fourier’s synthesis experiments feasible, visual, and enlightening: (i) it requires few, common, and cheap resources, and the experiment can be carried out even in a high-school laboratory; (ii) since the spring’s tension is small (∼1 N, on average), the frequencies of normal modes are low (close to 2 Hz), and therefore, it is possible to record the oscillations just with the camera and extract a considerable number of position and time data in just one cycle; (iii) when the video is loaded in the Tracker free software, it can be reproduced in slow motion. Since the frequencies involved are low, an interesting and instructive temporal sequence of images of the spring displaying the typical trapezoidal shape appears clearly; (iv) the tools associated with the Tracker software tools can yield the relevant oscillation parameters, such as the damping constant, amplitudes, frequencies, and phases; and (v) it is possible to carry out superposition of a snapshot of the spring in Tracker at any time, and to draw the related Fourier synthesis graphs. The visual match between the shape of the spring and the theoretical graph is remarkable, and can be enhanced by adding the damping term.

  17. Predictive gene lists for breast cancer prognosis: A topographic visualisation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lowe David

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The controversy surrounding the non-uniqueness of predictive gene lists (PGL of small selected subsets of genes from very large potential candidates as available in DNA microarray experiments is now widely acknowledged 1. Many of these studies have focused on constructing discriminative semi-parametric models and as such are also subject to the issue of random correlations of sparse model selection in high dimensional spaces. In this work we outline a different approach based around an unsupervised patient-specific nonlinear topographic projection in predictive gene lists. Methods We construct nonlinear topographic projection maps based on inter-patient gene-list relative dissimilarities. The Neuroscale, the Stochastic Neighbor Embedding(SNE and the Locally Linear Embedding(LLE techniques have been used to construct two-dimensional projective visualisation plots of 70 dimensional PGLs per patient, classifiers are also constructed to identify the prognosis indicator of each patient using the resulting projections from those visualisation techniques and investigate whether a-posteriori two prognosis groups are separable on the evidence of the gene lists. A literature-proposed predictive gene list for breast cancer is benchmarked against a separate gene list using the above methods. Generalisation ability is investigated by using the mapping capability of Neuroscale to visualise the follow-up study, but based on the projections derived from the original dataset. Results The results indicate that small subsets of patient-specific PGLs have insufficient prognostic dissimilarity to permit a distinction between two prognosis patients. Uncertainty and diversity across multiple gene expressions prevents unambiguous or even confident patient grouping. Comparative projections across different PGLs provide similar results. Conclusion The random correlation effect to an arbitrary outcome induced by small subset selection from very high

  18. Visualisation of bladder cancer using 11C-choline PET: first clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jong, Igle J.; Pruim, Jan; Elsinga, Philip H.; Jongen, Maud M.G.J.; Vaalburg, Willem; Mensink, Han J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), the most widely used radiopharmaceutical in positron emission tomography (PET) for oncological purposes, is unsuitable for imaging of bladder cancer owing to high excretion into the urine. More specific PET radiopharmaceuticals which are not excreted into urine would be welcome. Carbon-11 labelled choline (CHOL) is a new radiopharmaceutical potentially useful for tumour imaging and is not excreted into the urine. We prospectively studied the visualisation of bladder cancer using CHOL PET. Eighteen patients with bladder cancer and five healthy volunteers were included. Bladder cancer was first diagnosed by transurethral resection or by biopsy of the tumour. Next, PET images were performed before surgical treatment by cystectomy. The histopathological findings after cystectomy were used as the gold standard. PET images were performed on either an ECAT 951/31 or an ECAT Exact HR+ system. Attenuation-corrected PET images were obtained after injection of 400 MBq CHOL. PET images were analysed by two independent physicians using visual analysis and calculation of the standardised uptake value (SUV). In the normal bladder wall, the uptake of CHOL was low, and the bladder margin was only outlined by minimal urinary radioactivity, if present. In ten patients the tumour was detected correctly by CHOL PET, with an SUV of 4.7±3.6 (mean±SD). One false positive CHOL PET scan was seen in a patient with an indwelling catheter for 2 weeks prior to the PET scan. In two patients, lymph node metastases were detected by CHOL PET. A micrometastasis <5 mm was not visualised with CHOL PET. In seven patients, no residual tumour was found after surgery. In six of seven patients CHOL PET imaging was negative. In situ carcinoma, dysplasia and a non-invasive urothelial tumour (pTa) remained undetected in three of these six patients. Minimal to no urinary tract radioactivity was seen in 22/23 subjects. Non-specific uptake of CHOL was observed in the small

  19. Visualisation of microtubules and actin filaments in fixed BY-2 suspension cells using an optimised whole mount immunolabelling protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szechynska-Hebda, M.; Wedzony, M.; Dubas, E.; Kieft, H.; Lammeren, van A.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Excellent visualisation of microtubules and actin filaments was obtained in fixed tobacco BY-2 suspension cells after optimising a protocol for whole mount immunolabelling. The procedure is based on modification of fixation, cell wall digestion, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) treatment, post fixation,

  20. Requirements for future control room and visualisation features in the Web-of-Cells framework defined in the ELECTRA project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornelli, Carlo; Zuelli, Roberto; Marinell, Mattia

    2017-01-01

    project, that proposes a new Web-of-Cell (WoC) power system control architecture. Dedicated visualisation features are proposed, aimed to support the control room operators activities in a WoC-oriented approach. Furthermore, the work takes into account the point of view of network operators about future...

  1. VMStools: Open-source software for the processing, analysis and visualisation of fisheries logbook and VMS data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hintzen, N.T.; Bastardie, F.; Beare, D.J.; Piet, G.J.; Ulrich, C.; Deporte, N.; Egekvist, J.; Degel, H.

    2012-01-01

    VMStools is a package of open-source software, build using the freeware environment R, specifically developed for the processing, analysis and visualisation of landings (logbooks) and vessel location data (VMS) from commercial fisheries. Analyses start with standardized data formats for logbook

  2. Postulated Role of Vasoactive Neuropeptide-Related Immunopathology of the Blood Brain Barrier and Virchow-Robin Spaces in the Aetiology of Neurological-Related Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Staines

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Vasoactive neuropeptides (VNs such as pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP have critical roles as neurotransmitters, vasodilators including perfusion and hypoxia regulators, as well as immune and nociception modulators. They have key roles in blood vessels in the central nervous system (CNS including maintaining functional integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB and blood spinal barrier (BSB. VNs are potent activators of adenylate cyclase and thus also have a key role in cyclic AMP production affecting regulatory T cell and other immune functions. Virchow-Robin spaces (VRSs are perivascular compartments surrounding small vessels within the CNS and contain VNs. Autoimmunity of VNs or VN receptors may affect BBB and VRS function and, therefore, may contribute to the aetiology of neurological-related conditions including multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. VN autoimmunity will likely affect CNS and immunological homeostasis. Various pharmacological and immunological treatments including phosphodiesterase inhibitors and plasmapheresis may be indicated.

  3. Acquisition and retrieval of conditioned taste aversion is impaired by brain damage caused by two hours of pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroubek, J; Hort, J; Komárek, V; Langmeier, M; Brozek, G

    2001-01-01

    The effect of Cavalheiro's pilocarpine model of epileptogenesis upon conditioned taste aversion (CTA), an important example of nondeclarative memory, was studied in adult Long Evans rats. Deterioration of CTA was studied during the silent period between pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) and delayed spontaneous recurrent seizures. SE was elicited by i.p. injection of pilocarpine (320 mg/kg ) and interrupted after 2 hours by clonazepame (1 mg/kg i.p.). Peripheral cholinergic symptoms were suppressed by methylscopolamine (1 mg/kg i.p.), administered together with pilocarpine. CTA was formed against the salty taste of isotonic LiCl. In the experiment of CTA acquisition, the CTA was formed and tested during the silent period after SE. In the experiment of CTA retrieval, the CTA was acquired before SE and the retrieval itself was tested during the silent period. Retrieval of CTA acquired before SE was impaired more than the retrieval of CTA formed during the silent period. Our findings indicate that epileptic seizures can disrupt even non-declarative memory but that CTA formed by the damaged brain can use its better preserved parts for memory trace formation. Ketamine (50 mg/kg i.p.) applied 2 min after the onset of pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus protected memory deterioration.

  4. Eye closure helps memory by reducing cognitive load and enhancing visualisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vredeveldt, Annelies; Hitch, Graham J; Baddeley, Alan D

    2011-10-01

    Closing the eyes helps memory. We investigated the mechanisms underlying the eyeclosure effect by exposing 80 eyewitnesses to different types of distraction during the witness interview: blank screen (control), eyes closed, visual distraction, and auditory distraction. We examined the cognitive load hypothesis by comparing any type of distraction (visual or auditory) with minimal distraction (blank screen or eyes closed). We found recall to be significantly better when distraction was minimal, providing evidence that eyeclosure reduces cognitive load. We examined the modality-specific interference hypothesis by comparing the effects of visual and auditory distraction on recall of visual and auditory information. Visual and auditory distraction selectively impaired memory for information presented in the same modality, supporting the role of visualisation in the eyeclosure effect. Analysis of recall in terms of grain size revealed that recall of basic information about the event was robust, whereas recall of specific details was prone to both general and modality-specific disruptions.

  5. A deviation display method for visualising data in mobile gamma-ray spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kock, Peder, E-mail: Peder.Kock@med.lu.s [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund (Sweden); Finck, Robert R. [Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, SE-171 16 Stockholm (Sweden); Nilsson, Jonas M.C.; Ostlund, Karl; Samuelsson, Christer [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund (Sweden)

    2010-09-15

    A real time visualisation method, to be used in mobile gamma-spectrometric search operations using standard detector systems is presented. The new method, called deviation display, uses a modified waterfall display to present relative changes in spectral data over energy and time. Using unshielded {sup 137}Cs and {sup 241}Am point sources and different natural background environments, the behaviour of the deviation displays is demonstrated and analysed for two standard detector types (NaI(Tl) and HPGe). The deviation display enhances positive significant changes while suppressing the natural background fluctuations. After an initialisation time of about 10 min this technique leads to a homogeneous display dominated by the background colour, where even small changes in spectral data are easy to discover. As this paper shows, the deviation display method works well for all tested gamma energies and natural background radiation levels and with both tested detector systems.

  6. A deviation display method for visualising data in mobile gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kock, Peder; Finck, Robert R.; Nilsson, Jonas M.C.; Ostlund, Karl; Samuelsson, Christer

    2010-01-01

    A real time visualisation method, to be used in mobile gamma-spectrometric search operations using standard detector systems is presented. The new method, called deviation display, uses a modified waterfall display to present relative changes in spectral data over energy and time. Using unshielded 137 Cs and 241 Am point sources and different natural background environments, the behaviour of the deviation displays is demonstrated and analysed for two standard detector types (NaI(Tl) and HPGe). The deviation display enhances positive significant changes while suppressing the natural background fluctuations. After an initialisation time of about 10 min this technique leads to a homogeneous display dominated by the background colour, where even small changes in spectral data are easy to discover. As this paper shows, the deviation display method works well for all tested gamma energies and natural background radiation levels and with both tested detector systems.

  7. Visualisation of Radioactivity in Real-Time on a Tablet Measured by a Hybrid Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)749233; Bantel, Michael; Grünhaupt, Ulrich

    This work explores a method to visualise and interact with radioactivity over time and space by means of augmented reality on a screen. A prototype, iPadPix, was built to demonstrate use as an intuitive new tool for educative and training purposes. Measured by a hybrid pixel detector, Timepix, traces of radioactive decays are displayed in real- time on a mobile device. Its detection principle and properties are detailed as well as the calibration of the sensor. An embedded board is used to process and forward the sensor data to a tablet over a wireless network connection. Software was developed to processes and overlay signatures of ionising radiation and particles on a live camera feed. It is described here and published as open source.

  8. Visualisation and measurement of high-speed pulsating and continuous water jets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zeleňák, Michal; Foldyna, Josef; Ščučka, Jiří; Hloch, Sergej; Říha, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 72, August 2015 (2015), s. 1-8 ISSN 0263-2241 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : pulsating water jet * visualisation * shadowgraph technique * PIV * velocity fields Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 1.742, year: 2015 http://ac.els-cdn.com/S0263224115002353/1-s2.0-S0263224115002353-main.pdf?_tid=9dc7546a-038d-11e5-aa7e-00000aacb35f&acdnat=1432634427_ac85457bc49d2f3e26fb280e7d21f687

  9. MyChemise: A 2D drawing program that uses morphing for visualisation purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    MyChemise (My Chemical Structure Editor) is a new 2D structure editor. It is designed as a Java applet that enables the direct creation of structures in the Internet using a web browser. MyChemise saves files in a digital format (.cse) and the import and export of .mol files using the appropriate connection tables is also possible. MyChemise is available as a free online version in English and German. The MyChemise GUI is designed to be user friendly and can be used intuitively. There is also an English and German program description available as a PDF file. In addition to the known ways of drawing chemical structure formulas, there are also parts implemented in the program that allow the creation of different types of presentation. The morphing module uses this technology as a component for dynamic visualisation. For example, it enables a clear and simple illustration of molecule vibrations and reaction sequences. PMID:22152022

  10. Visualisation methods for large provenance collections in data-intensive collaborative platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinuso, Alessandro; Fligueira, Rosa; Atkinson, Malcolm; Gemuend, Andre

    2016-04-01

    This work investigates improving the methods of visually representing provenance information in the context of modern data-driven scientific research. It explores scenarios where data-intensive workflows systems are serving communities of researchers within collaborative environments, supporting the sharing of data and methods, and offering a variety of computation facilities, including HPC, HTC and Cloud. It focuses on the exploration of big-data visualization techniques aiming at producing comprehensive and interactive views on top of large and heterogeneous provenance data. The same approach is applicable to control-flow and data-flow workflows or to combinations of the two. This flexibility is achieved using the W3C-PROV recommendation as a reference model, especially its workflow oriented profiles such as D-PROV (Messier et al. 2013). Our implementation is based on the provenance records produced by the dispel4py data-intensive processing library (Filgueira et al. 2015). dispel4py is an open-source Python framework for describing abstract stream-based workflows for distributed data-intensive applications, developed during the VERCE project. dispel4py enables scientists to develop their scientific methods and applications on their laptop and then run them at scale on a wide range of e-Infrastructures (Cloud, Cluster, etc.) without making changes. Users can therefore focus on designing their workflows at an abstract level, describing actions, input and output streams, and how they are connected. The dispel4py system then maps these descriptions to the enactment platforms, such as MPI, Storm, multiprocessing. It provides a mechanism which allows users to determine the provenance information to be collected and to analyze it at runtime. For this work we consider alternative visualisation methods for provenance data, from infinite lists and localised interactive graphs, to radial-views. The latter technique has been positively explored in many fields, from text

  11. Visualisation of Proficiency Test Exercise by Means of Kiri Plots. Informatics Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasco, C.; Trinidad, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the visualisation procedure of the proficiency tests by means of Kiri Plots, based on three tests: z-score, zeta-score and the relative uncertainty outlier. The results assessment of the intercomparison exercises and proficiency tests among Spanish environmental radioactivity laboratories and Spanish Nuclear Power Plants Laboratories is performed by Environmental Radioactivity and Radiological Surveillance Unit following the ISO-43 e ISO/ IUPAC standards and applying the z-score test. The application of new graphics methods and tests to a better evaluation of uncertainties reported by Labs is described in this paper. An informatics programme has been developed in Visual Basic for applications that allows the graphic representation of Tables and Figures automatically in an excel-sheet and later statistical simulations changing the ratios between the reference value uncertainties and the concentration activities values from the participants laboratories. (Author) 26 refs.

  12. Computer Supported Argument Visualisation: Modelling in Consultative Democracy Around Wicked Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Ricky

    In this case study, computer supported argument visualisation has been applied to the analysis and representation of the draft South East Queensland Regional Plan Consultation discourse, demonstrating how argument mapping can help deliver the transparency and accountability required in participatory democracy. Consultative democracy for regional planning falls into a category of problems known as “wicked problems”. Inherent in this environment is heterogeneous viewpoints, agendas and voices, built on disparate and often contradictory logic. An argument ontology and notation that was designed specifically to deal with consultative urban planning around wicked problems is the Issue Based Information System (IBIS) and IBIS notation (Rittel & Webber, 1984). The software used for argument visualisation in this case was Compendium, a derivative of IBIS. The high volume of stakeholders and discourse heterogeneity in this environment calls for a unique approach to argument mapping. The map design model developed from this research has been titled a “Consultation Map”. The design incorporates the IBIS ontology within a hybrid of mapping approaches, amalgamating elements from concept, dialogue, argument, debate, thematic and tree-mapping. The consultation maps developed from the draft South East Queensland Regional Plan Consultation provide a transparent visual record to give evidence of the themes of citizen issues within the consultation discourse. The consultation maps also link the elicited discourse themes to related policies from the SEQ Regional Plan providing explicit evidence of SEQ Regional Plan policy-decisions matching citizen concerns. The final consultation map in the series provides explicit links between SEQ Regional Plan policy items and monitoring activities reporting on the ongoing implementation of the SEQ Regional Plan. This map provides updatable evidence of and accountability for SEQ Regional Plan policy implementation and developments.

  13. Computed 3D visualisation of an extinct cephalopod using computer tomographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukeneder, Alexander

    2012-08-01

    The first 3D visualisation of a heteromorph cephalopod species from the Southern Alps (Dolomites, northern Italy) is presented. Computed tomography, palaeontological data and 3D reconstructions were included in the production of a movie, which shows a life reconstruction of the extinct organism. This detailed reconstruction is according to the current knowledge of the shape and mode of life as well as habitat of this animal. The results are based on the most complete shell known thus far of the genus Dissimilites . Object-based combined analyses from computed tomography and various computed 3D facility programmes help to understand morphological details as well as their ontogentical changes in fossil material. In this study, an additional goal was to show changes in locomotion during different ontogenetic phases of such fossil, marine shell-bearing animals (ammonoids). Hence, the presented models and tools can serve as starting points for discussions on morphology and locomotion of extinct cephalopods in general, and of the genus Dissimilites in particular. The heteromorph ammonoid genus Dissimilites is interpreted here as an active swimmer of the Tethyan Ocean. This study portrays non-destructive methods of 3D visualisation applied on palaeontological material, starting with computed tomography resulting in animated, high-quality video clips. The here presented 3D geometrical models and animation, which are based on palaeontological material, demonstrate the wide range of applications, analytical techniques and also outline possible limitations of 3D models in earth sciences and palaeontology. The realistic 3D models and motion pictures can easily be shared amongst palaeontologists. Data, images and short clips can be discussed online and, if necessary, adapted in morphological details and motion-style to better represent the cephalopod animal.

  14. Computed 3D visualisation of an extinct cephalopod using computer tomographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukeneder, Alexander

    2012-08-01

    The first 3D visualisation of a heteromorph cephalopod species from the Southern Alps (Dolomites, northern Italy) is presented. Computed tomography, palaeontological data and 3D reconstructions were included in the production of a movie, which shows a life reconstruction of the extinct organism. This detailed reconstruction is according to the current knowledge of the shape and mode of life as well as habitat of this animal. The results are based on the most complete shell known thus far of the genus Dissimilites. Object-based combined analyses from computed tomography and various computed 3D facility programmes help to understand morphological details as well as their ontogentical changes in fossil material. In this study, an additional goal was to show changes in locomotion during different ontogenetic phases of such fossil, marine shell-bearing animals (ammonoids). Hence, the presented models and tools can serve as starting points for discussions on morphology and locomotion of extinct cephalopods in general, and of the genus Dissimilites in particular. The heteromorph ammonoid genus Dissimilites is interpreted here as an active swimmer of the Tethyan Ocean. This study portrays non-destructive methods of 3D visualisation applied on palaeontological material, starting with computed tomography resulting in animated, high-quality video clips. The here presented 3D geometrical models and animation, which are based on palaeontological material, demonstrate the wide range of applications, analytical techniques and also outline possible limitations of 3D models in earth sciences and palaeontology. The realistic 3D models and motion pictures can easily be shared amongst palaeontologists. Data, images and short clips can be discussed online and, if necessary, adapted in morphological details and motion-style to better represent the cephalopod animal.

  15. JHelioviewer. Time-dependent 3D visualisation of solar and heliospheric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, D.; Nicula, B.; Felix, S.; Verstringe, F.; Bourgoignie, B.; Csillaghy, A.; Berghmans, D.; Jiggens, P.; García-Ortiz, J. P.; Ireland, J.; Zahniy, S.; Fleck, B.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Solar observatories are providing the world-wide community with a wealth of data, covering wide time ranges (e.g. Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, SOHO), multiple viewpoints (Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory, STEREO), and returning large amounts of data (Solar Dynamics Observatory, SDO). In particular, the large volume of SDO data presents challenges; the data are available only from a few repositories, and full-disk, full-cadence data for reasonable durations of scientific interest are difficult to download, due to their size and the download rates available to most users. From a scientist's perspective this poses three problems: accessing, browsing, and finding interesting data as efficiently as possible. Aims: To address these challenges, we have developed JHelioviewer, a visualisation tool for solar data based on the JPEG 2000 compression standard and part of the open source ESA/NASA Helioviewer Project. Since the first release of JHelioviewer in 2009, the scientific functionality of the software has been extended significantly, and the objective of this paper is to highlight these improvements. Methods: The JPEG 2000 standard offers useful new features that facilitate the dissemination and analysis of high-resolution image data and offers a solution to the challenge of efficiently browsing petabyte-scale image archives. The JHelioviewer software is open source, platform independent, and extendable via a plug-in architecture. Results: With JHelioviewer, users can visualise the Sun for any time period between September 1991 and today; they can perform basic image processing in real time, track features on the Sun, and interactively overlay magnetic field extrapolations. The software integrates solar event data and a timeline display. Once an interesting event has been identified, science quality data can be accessed for in-depth analysis. As a first step towards supporting science planning of the upcoming Solar Orbiter mission, JHelioviewer

  16. THE POTENTIAL AND LIMITATIONS OF VISUALISATION AS A METHOD IN LEARNING SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana T. Sidelnikova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the paper is concerned with potential and barriers of application of visualisation as a method in learning social sciences and humanities. Using and employing visual aids becomes the most important resource in modern pedagogical theory and learning process due to the improvement of traditional pedagogical tools and new interpretation of well-known methods. Materials and Methods: the methods of observation, analysis of test results, results of examination session, data of questionnaires were used during the elaboration of the paper. Results: a good visual aid in teaching political science is the smiley as a simplified graphical representation expressing the emotions of a speaker or a writer. Observation, survey and results of examinations indicate that the above visual solutions not only improve students’ knowledge of subjects, but also improve the intellectual activity, contribute to the formation of the methodical approach to learning, associative thinking and creativity. Discussion and Conclusion: visualisation is a sign presentation of the content, functions, structures, stages of a process, a phenomenon through schematisation and associative and illustrative arrays. At the same time it is a way of transforming knowledge into real visual product with the author’s personal touch. Initially, students learn to reflect by drawing the essence of rather abstract concepts such as “parity”, “power” “freedom” etc. Assignments of higher levels involve the use of associative arrays, free images. By doing this, students do not just paint, but on their own initiative work with colours, seek to schematise information, sometimes dressing comments in lyrics.

  17. Visualisations en bibliothèques: comment rendre visible l’invisible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coleta Vaisman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1518-2924.2014v19n39p183 La bibliothèque est une sphère d'informations multidimensionnelle, à la fois abstraite et invisible et dotée de deux caractéristiques fondamentales sémantique et spatiale. Les relations sémantiques entre les données/informations constituent la structure de l'espace, autour d’attributs intrinsèques comme les mots-clés/sujets, les classifications, les hyperliens ou des structures connexes comme les thésaurus et vedettes-matière. Du point de vue des utilisateurs, le système d'informations en bibliothèque est un projet invisible et non transparent, alors que du point de vue du système, l'organisation taxinomique est indispensable voire vitale. La visualisation dans ce contexte se réfère à un processus qui transforme les données structurées invisibles et leurs relations sémantiques en un affichage lisible. Ainsi, le processus s’appuie sur le dessein classificatoire et cartographie les structures conceptuelles du système documentaire afin que d’une part l’utilisateur grâce à ses compétences puisse en extraire un sens que la machine n'aurait pu découvrir (recherche d’information et que d’autre part le professionnel de bibliothèque puisse engager des actions méta-cognitives sur le traitement de l’information. Les différentes approches (diagramme, arbres, circulaires, cartographiques, en 3D… sont des tentatives répondant aux problématiques imbriquées de visualisation et de repérage selon le principe de visualisation du focus (vue locale sur contexte (vue globale issu de la Gestalt théorie qui démontre que la perception humaine d’une scène est d’abord globale avant de porter son attention aux détails [CAR 99]. Deux dispositifs de médiation documentaire instrumentée initiés de façon concomitante des deux côtés de l’Atlantique illustrent efficacement cette démarche. Aux Etats Unis, la bibliothèque de Seattle a mis ainsi en place un projet d

  18. Thyroid Hormone-Dependent Formation of a Subcortical Band Heterotopia (SBH) in the Neonatal Brain is not Exacerbated Under Conditions of Low Dietary Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are critical for brain development. Modest TH insufficiency in pregnant rats induced by propylthiouracil (PTU) results in formation of a structural abnormality, a subcortical band heterotopia (SBH), in brains of offspring. PTU reduces TH by inhibiting the s...

  19. Brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feistel, H.

    1991-01-01

    Brain SPECT investigations have gained broad acceptance since the introduction of the lipophilic tracer Tc-99m-HMPAO. Depending on equipment and objectives in different departments, the examinations can be divided into three groups: 1. Under normal conditions and standardised patient preparation the 'rest' SPECT can be performed in every department with a tomographic camera. In cerebrovascular disease there is a demand for determination of either the perfusion reserve in reversible ischemia or prognostic values in completed stroke. In cases of dementia, SPECT may yield useful results according to differential diagnosis. Central cerebral system involvement in immunologic disease may be estimated with higher sensitivity than in conventional brain imaging procedures. In psychiatric diseases there is only a relative indication for brain SPECT, since results during recent years have been contradictory and may be derived only in interventional manner. In brain tumor diagnostics SPECT with Tl-201 possibly permits grading. In inflammatory disease, especially in viral encephalitis, SPECT may be used to obtain early diagnosis. Normal pressure hydrocephalus can be distinguished from other forms of dementia and, consequently, the necessity for shunting surgery can be recognised. 2. In departments equipped for emergency cases an 'acute' SPECT can be performed in illnesses with rapid changing symptoms such as different forms of migraine, transient global amnesia, epileptic seizures (so-called 'ictal SPECT') or urgent forms like trauma. 3. In cooperation with several departments brain SPECT can be practised as an interventional procedure in clinical and in scientific studies. (orig./MG) [de

  20. Insulin Like Growth Factor 2 Expression in the Rat Brain Both in Basal Condition and following Learning Predominantly Derives from the Maternal Allele.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Ye

    Full Text Available Insulin like growth factor 2 (Igf2 is known as a maternally imprinted gene involved in growth and development. Recently, Igf2 was found to also be regulated and required in the adult rat hippocampus for long-term memory formation, raising the question of its allelic regulation in adult brain regions following experience and in cognitive processes. We show that, in adult rats, Igf2 is abundantly expressed in brain regions involved in cognitive functions, like hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, compared to the peripheral tissues. In contrast to its maternal imprinting in peripheral tissues, Igf2 is mainly expressed from the maternal allele in these brain regions. The training-dependent increase in Igf2 expression derives proportionally from both parental alleles, and, hence, is mostly maternal. Thus, Igf2 parental expression in the adult rat brain does not follow the imprinting rules found in peripheral tissues, suggesting differential expression regulation and functions of imprinted genes in the brain.

  1. Brain herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  2. Thyroid Hormone-Dependent Formation of a Subcortical Band Heterotopia (SBH) in the Neonatal Brain is not Exacerbated Under Conditions of Low Dietary Iron (FeD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although the critical role of thyroid hormone (TH) in brain development is well established - severe deficiency producing significant neurological dysfunction - there is a paucity of data on neurological impairments that accompany modest degrees of TH disruption. Quantitative m...

  3. Visualisation of variable binding pockets on protein surfaces by probabilistic analysis of related structure sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashford Paul

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein structures provide a valuable resource for rational drug design. For a protein with no known ligand, computational tools can predict surface pockets that are of suitable size and shape to accommodate a complementary small-molecule drug. However, pocket prediction against single static structures may miss features of pockets that arise from proteins' dynamic behaviour. In particular, ligand-binding conformations can be observed as transiently populated states of the apo protein, so it is possible to gain insight into ligand-bound forms by considering conformational variation in apo proteins. This variation can be explored by considering sets of related structures: computationally generated conformers, solution NMR ensembles, multiple crystal structures, homologues or homology models. It is non-trivial to compare pockets, either from different programs or across sets of structures. For a single structure, difficulties arise in defining particular pocket's boundaries. For a set of conformationally distinct structures the challenge is how to make reasonable comparisons between them given that a perfect structural alignment is not possible. Results We have developed a computational method, Provar, that provides a consistent representation of predicted binding pockets across sets of related protein structures. The outputs are probabilities that each atom or residue of the protein borders a predicted pocket. These probabilities can be readily visualised on a protein using existing molecular graphics software. We show how Provar simplifies comparison of the outputs of different pocket prediction algorithms, of pockets across multiple simulated conformations and between homologous structures. We demonstrate the benefits of use of multiple structures for protein-ligand and protein-protein interface analysis on a set of complexes and consider three case studies in detail: i analysis of a kinase superfamily highlights the

  4. Visualisation of variable binding pockets on protein surfaces by probabilistic analysis of related structure sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashford, Paul; Moss, David S; Alex, Alexander; Yeap, Siew K; Povia, Alice; Nobeli, Irene; Williams, Mark A

    2012-03-14

    Protein structures provide a valuable resource for rational drug design. For a protein with no known ligand, computational tools can predict surface pockets that are of suitable size and shape to accommodate a complementary small-molecule drug. However, pocket prediction against single static structures may miss features of pockets that arise from proteins' dynamic behaviour. In particular, ligand-binding conformations can be observed as transiently populated states of the apo protein, so it is possible to gain insight into ligand-bound forms by considering conformational variation in apo proteins. This variation can be explored by considering sets of related structures: computationally generated conformers, solution NMR ensembles, multiple crystal structures, homologues or homology models. It is non-trivial to compare pockets, either from different programs or across sets of structures. For a single structure, difficulties arise in defining particular pocket's boundaries. For a set of conformationally distinct structures the challenge is how to make reasonable comparisons between them given that a perfect structural alignment is not possible. We have developed a computational method, Provar, that provides a consistent representation of predicted binding pockets across sets of related protein structures. The outputs are probabilities that each atom or residue of the protein borders a predicted pocket. These probabilities can be readily visualised on a protein using existing molecular graphics software. We show how Provar simplifies comparison of the outputs of different pocket prediction algorithms, of pockets across multiple simulated conformations and between homologous structures. We demonstrate the benefits of use of multiple structures for protein-ligand and protein-protein interface analysis on a set of complexes and consider three case studies in detail: i) analysis of a kinase superfamily highlights the conserved occurrence of surface pockets at the active

  5. Efficient visibility-driven medical image visualisation via adaptive binned visibility histogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Younhyun; Kim, Jinman; Kumar, Ashnil; Feng, David Dagan; Fulham, Michael

    2016-07-01

    'Visibility' is a fundamental optical property that represents the observable, by users, proportion of the voxels in a volume during interactive volume rendering. The manipulation of this 'visibility' improves the volume rendering processes; for instance by ensuring the visibility of regions of interest (ROIs) or by guiding the identification of an optimal rendering view-point. The construction of visibility histograms (VHs), which represent the distribution of all the visibility of all voxels in the rendered volume, enables users to explore the volume with real-time feedback about occlusion patterns among spatially related structures during volume rendering manipulations. Volume rendered medical images have been a primary beneficiary of VH given the need to ensure that specific ROIs are visible relative to the surrounding structures, e.g. the visualisation of tumours that may otherwise be occluded by neighbouring structures. VH construction and its subsequent manipulations, however, are computationally expensive due to the histogram binning of the visibilities. This limits the real-time application of VH to medical images that have large intensity ranges and volume dimensions and require a large number of histogram bins. In this study, we introduce an efficient adaptive binned visibility histogram (AB-VH) in which a smaller number of histogram bins are used to represent the visibility distribution of the full VH. We adaptively bin medical images by using a cluster analysis algorithm that groups the voxels according to their intensity similarities into a smaller subset of bins while preserving the distribution of the intensity range of the original images. We increase efficiency by exploiting the parallel computation and multiple render targets (MRT) extension of the modern graphical processing units (GPUs) and this enables efficient computation of the histogram. We show the application of our method to single-modality computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance

  6. Visualisation of details of a complicated inner structure of model objects by the method of diffusion optical tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tret'yakov, Evgeniy V; Shuvalov, Vladimir V; Shutov, I V

    2002-01-01

    An approximate algorithm is tested for solving the problem of diffusion optical tomography in experiments on the visualisation of details of the inner structure of strongly scattering model objects containing scattering and semitransparent inclusions, as well as absorbing inclusions located inside other optical inhomogeneities. The stability of the algorithm to errors is demonstrated, which allows its use for a rapid (2 - 3 min) image reconstruction of the details of objects with a complicated inner structure. (laser biology and medicine)

  7. Visualising electricity demand: use and users of a 3D chart from the 1950s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Cliff

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Showing electricity demand by the hour, day, month and year, this 3D chart offers a rich visualisation of energy data in the UK from the years 1951–54. Acquired by the Museum of Science & Industry, Manchester, the object is significant as a tangible record of past practice, both of the electricity supply industry and its consumers. In this paper, we offer a close inspection of the object, and following its clues, we generate ideas about the chart’s use and users. In addition to commenting on the rhythmic patterning of daily and seasonal loads, we reflect on the role of the object at the time of its construction, in terms of forecasting, price-setting and load-shifting, and lobbying and demonstration. The object literally materialises electricity demand, providing a distinctive 3D representation, and in so doing prompting questions about how demand changes over time, and in time, and how our practices of everyday life constitute this demand. We conclude by offering a new interpretation of the object as a tool, as well as historical data.

  8. Three-Dimensional Visualisation as an Innovation Approach to Forecasting the City Budget Income

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markuts Yuliya I.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Forecasting city budget income is a very important instrument of the budget management through which it is possible to assume the future financial influence of the current budget policy and economic tendencies for achievement of long-term plans and identify alternative ways of solution of existing problems. The goal of the article is development of a model for complex system analysis, economic assessment of execution and forecasting income of the budget of the city of Donetsk with the aim to make high quality, timely and efficient managerial decisions with respect to the budget on the basis of an innovation approach, which is a combination of methods of interpolation, imitation and three-dimensional visualisation. The result of the study is diagnostics of narrow places in execution of the city budget for the studied period of 2008 – 2012, detection of interconnected budget income items, identification of existing tendencies of execution of the budget income and forecasting the income part of the city budget for the period of 2013 – 2017.

  9. Evaluation of intra-aortic CT angiography performances for the visualisation of spinal vascular malformations' angioarchitecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarencon, Frederic; Gabrieli, Joseph; Chiras, Jacques; Di Maria, Federico; Sourour, Nader-Antoine; Shotar, Eimad; Cormier, Evelyne; Fahed, Robert; Nouet, Aurelien; Cornu, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the performances of the CT-angiography by direct intra-aortic contrast media injection (IA-CTA) for spinal vascular malformations (SVMs)' imaging. Thirteen patients (8 males, 5 females, mean age: 56 y) with suspected SVM underwent IA-CTAs by direct intra-aortic iodinated contrast media injection (5 cc/s; 100 cc) via an arterial femoral or humeral access. Two independent observers evaluated the angioarchitecture of the SVMs and the visualisation of both the Adamkiewicz artery and the anterior spinal artery. Then a consensus was obtained between the 2 reviewers; the results of the IA-CTA were finally compared with those of the full spinal DSA evaluated in consensus. The IA-CTA was feasible in all cases and depicted the SVM in all except one case (92 %). Interrater agreement was good for the location of the SVMs' level. Intermodality (IA-CTA/DSA) agreement was excellent for the level and side of the shunt point, as well as for the SVM subtype evaluation. In 77 % of the cases, the Adamkiewicz artery was satisfactorily seen at the same time on IA-CTA. IA-CTA is a new technique that seems helpful to reach a better understanding of SMVs and may help to tailor more precisely their treatment. (orig.)

  10. Optical visualisation of thermogenesis in stimulated single-cell brown adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriszt, Rókus; Arai, Satoshi; Itoh, Hideki; Lee, Michelle H; Goralczyk, Anna G; Ang, Xiu Min; Cypess, Aaron M; White, Andrew P; Shamsi, Farnaz; Xue, Ruidan; Lee, Jung Yeol; Lee, Sung-Chan; Hou, Yanyan; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Sudhaharan, Thankiah; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Lane, E Birgitte; Chang, Young-Tae; Tseng, Yu-Hua; Suzuki, Madoka; Raghunath, Michael

    2017-05-03

    The identification of brown adipose deposits in adults has led to significant interest in targeting this metabolically active tissue for treatment of obesity and diabetes. Improved methods for the direct measurement of heat production as the signature function of brown adipocytes (BAs), particularly at the single cell level, would be of substantial benefit to these ongoing efforts. Here, we report the first application of a small molecule-type thermosensitive fluorescent dye, ERthermAC, to monitor thermogenesis in BAs derived from murine brown fat precursors and in human brown fat cells differentiated from human neck brown preadipocytes. ERthermAC accumulated in the endoplasmic reticulum of BAs and displayed a marked change in fluorescence intensity in response to adrenergic stimulation of cells, which corresponded to temperature change. ERthermAC fluorescence intensity profiles were congruent with mitochondrial depolarisation events visualised by the JC-1 probe. Moreover, the averaged fluorescence intensity changes across a population of cells correlated well with dynamic changes such as thermal power, oxygen consumption, and extracellular acidification rates. These findings suggest ERthermAC as a promising new tool for studying thermogenic function in brown adipocytes of both murine and human origins.

  11. A novel method for visualising and quantifying through-plane skin layer deformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, L-C; Schmidt, J; Sanz-Herrera, J A; Baaijens, F P T; Ansari, T; Peters, G W M; Oomens, C W J

    2012-10-01

    Skin is a multilayer composite and exhibits highly non-linear, viscoelastic, anisotropic material properties. In many consumer product and medical applications (e.g. during shaving, needle insertion, patient re-positioning), large tissue displacements and deformations are involved; consequently large local strains in the skin tissue can occur. Here, we present a novel imaging-based method to study skin deformations and the mechanics of interacting skin layers of full-thickness skin. Shear experiments and real-time video recording were combined with digital image correlation and strain field analysis to visualise and quantify skin layer deformations during dynamic mechanical testing. A global shear strain of 10% was applied to airbrush-patterned porcine skin (thickness: 1.2-1.6mm) using a rotational rheometer. The recordings were analysed with ARAMIS image correlation software, and local skin displacement, strain and stiffness profiles through the skin layers determined. The results of this pilot study revealed inhomogeneous skin deformation, characterised by a gradual transition from a low (2.0-5.0%; epidermis) to high (10-22%; dermis) shear strain regime. Shear moduli ranged from 20 to 130kPa. The herein presented method will be used for more extended studies on viable human skin, and is considered a valuable foundation for further development of constitutive models which can be used in advanced finite element analyses of skin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. ZODET: software for the identification, analysis and visualisation of outlier genes in microarray expression data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Roden

    Full Text Available Complex human diseases can show significant heterogeneity between patients with the same phenotypic disorder. An outlier detection strategy was developed to identify variants at the level of gene transcription that are of potential biological and phenotypic importance. Here we describe a graphical software package (z-score outlier detection (ZODET that enables identification and visualisation of gross abnormalities in gene expression (outliers in individuals, using whole genome microarray data. Mean and standard deviation of expression in a healthy control cohort is used to detect both over and under-expressed probes in individual test subjects. We compared the potential of ZODET to detect outlier genes in gene expression datasets with a previously described statistical method, gene tissue index (GTI, using a simulated expression dataset and a publicly available monocyte-derived macrophage microarray dataset. Taken together, these results support ZODET as a novel approach to identify outlier genes of potential pathogenic relevance in complex human diseases. The algorithm is implemented using R packages and Java.The software is freely available from http://www.ucl.ac.uk/medicine/molecular-medicine/publications/microarray-outlier-analysis.

  13. Reconstruction and 3D visualisation based on objective real 3D based documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolliger, Michael J; Buck, Ursula; Thali, Michael J; Bolliger, Stephan A

    2012-09-01

    Reconstructions based directly upon forensic evidence alone are called primary information. Historically this consists of documentation of findings by verbal protocols, photographs and other visual means. Currently modern imaging techniques such as 3D surface scanning and radiological methods (computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) are also applied. Secondary interpretation is based on facts and the examiner's experience. Usually such reconstructive expertises are given in written form, and are often enhanced by sketches. However, narrative interpretations can, especially in complex courses of action, be difficult to present and can be misunderstood. In this report we demonstrate the use of graphic reconstruction of secondary interpretation with supporting pictorial evidence, applying digital visualisation (using 'Poser') or scientific animation (using '3D Studio Max', 'Maya') and present methods of clearly distinguishing between factual documentation and examiners' interpretation based on three cases. The first case involved a pedestrian who was initially struck by a car on a motorway and was then run over by a second car. The second case involved a suicidal gunshot to the head with a rifle, in which the trigger was pushed with a rod. The third case dealt with a collision between two motorcycles. Pictorial reconstruction of the secondary interpretation of these cases has several advantages. The images enable an immediate overview, give rise to enhanced clarity, and compel the examiner to look at all details if he or she is to create a complete image.

  14. Theorising 3D Visualisation Systems in Archaeology: Towards more effective design, evaluations and life cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Galeazzi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available 3D visualisation in archaeology has become a suitable solution and effective instrument for the analysis, interpretation and communication of archaeological information. However, so far only a few attempts have been made to understand and evaluate the real impact that 3D imaging has on the discipline under its different forms (off-line immersive and not immersive, and on-line platform. There is a need in archaeology and cultural heritage for a detailed analysis of the different infrastructural options that are available and a precise evaluation of the differing impact that they can have in reshaping the discipline. To achieve this, it is important to develop new methodologies that consider the evaluation process as a fundamental and central part for assessing digital infrastructures. These new methods should include flexible evaluation approaches that can be adapted to the infrastructure that needs to be assessed. This article aims to provide some examples of 3D applications in archaeology and cultural heritage and describe how the selection of the infrastructure is related to specific needs of the project. This work will describe the different applications and propose guidelines and protocols for evaluating their impact within academia and the general public.

  15. Advanced correlation grid: Analysis and visualisation of functional connectivity among multiple spike trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masud, Mohammad Shahed; Borisyuk, Roman; Stuart, Liz

    2017-07-15

    This study analyses multiple spike trains (MST) data, defines its functional connectivity and subsequently visualises an accurate diagram of connections. This is a challenging problem. For example, it is difficult to distinguish the common input and the direct functional connection of two spike trains. The new method presented in this paper is based on the traditional pairwise cross-correlation function (CCF) and a new combination of statistical techniques. First, the CCF is used to create the Advanced Correlation Grid (ACG) correlation where both the significant peak of the CCF and the corresponding time delay are used for detailed analysis of connectivity. Second, these two features of functional connectivity are used to classify connections. Finally, the visualization technique is used to represent the topology of functional connections. Examples are presented in the paper to demonstrate the new Advanced Correlation Grid method and to show how it enables discrimination between (i) influence from one spike train to another through an intermediate spike train and (ii) influence from one common spike train to another pair of analysed spike trains. The ACG method enables scientists to automatically distinguish between direct connections from spurious connections such as common source connection and indirect connection whereas existing methods require in-depth analysis to identify such connections. The ACG is a new and effective method for studying functional connectivity of multiple spike trains. This method can identify accurately all the direct connections and can distinguish common source and indirect connections automatically. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Training astronauts using three-dimensional visualisations of the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycroft, M; Houston, A; Barker, A; Dahlstron, E; Lewis, N; Maris, N; Nelles, D; Bagaoutdinov, R; Bodrikov, G; Borodin, Y; Cheburkov, M; Ivanov, D; Karpunin, P; Katargin, R; Kiselyev, A; Kotlayarevsky, Y; Schetinnikov, A; Tylerov, F

    1999-03-01

    Recent advances in personal computer technology have led to the development of relatively low-cost software to generate high-resolution three-dimensional images. The capability both to rotate and zoom in on these images superposed on appropriate background images enables high-quality movies to be created. These developments have been used to produce realistic simulations of the International Space Station on CD-ROM. This product is described and its potentialities demonstrated. With successive launches, the ISS is gradually built up, and visualised over a rotating Earth against the star background. It is anticipated that this product's capability will be useful when training astronauts to carry out EVAs around the ISS. Simulations inside the ISS are also very realistic. These should prove invaluable when familiarising the ISS crew with their future workplace and home. Operating procedures can be taught and perfected. "What if" scenario models can be explored and this facility should be useful when training the crew to deal with emergency situations which might arise. This CD-ROM product will also be used to make the general public more aware of, and hence enthusiastic about, the International Space Station programme.

  17. Visualisation of plastid outgrowths in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers by carboxyfluorescein diacetate staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borucki, Wojciech; Bederska, Magdalena; Sujkowska-Rybkowska, Marzena

    2015-05-01

    We describe two types of plastid outgrowths visualised in potato tubers after carboxyfluorescein diacetate staining. Probable esterase activity of the outgrowths has been demonstrated for the first time ever. Plastid outgrowths were observed in the phelloderm and storage parenchyma cells of red potato (S. tuberosum L. cv. Rosalinde) tubers after administration of carboxyfluorescein diacetate stain. Endogenous esterases cleaved off acetic groups to release membrane-unpermeable green fluorescing carboxyfluorescein which accumulated differentially in particular cell compartments. The intensive green fluorescence of carboxyfluorescein exhibited highly branched stromules (stroma-filled plastid tubular projections of the plastid envelope) and allowed distinguishing them within cytoplasmic strands of the phelloderm cells. Stromules (1) were directed towards the nucleus or (2) penetrated the whole cells through the cytoplasmic bands of highly vacuolated phelloderm cells. Those directed towards the nucleus were flattened and adhered to the nuclear envelope. Stromule-like interconnections between two parts of the same plastids (isthmuses) were also observed. We also documented the formation of another type of the stroma-filled plastid outgrowths, referred to here as protrusions, which differed from previously defined stromules in both morphology and esterase activity. Unlike stromules, the protrusions were found to be associated with developmental processes leading to starch accumulation in the storage parenchyma cells. These results strongly suggest that stromules and protrusions exhibit esterase activity. This has been demonstrated for the first time. Morphological and biochemical features as well as possible functions of stromules and protrusions are discussed below.

  18. Tobacco Control: Visualisation of Research Activity Using Density-Equalizing Mapping and Scientometric Benchmarking Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrix Groneberg-Kloft

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tobacco smoking continues to be a major preventable cause of death and disease and therefore tobacco control research is extremely important. However, research in this area is often hampered by a lack in funding and there is a need for scientometric techniques to display research efforts. Methods: The present study combines classical bibliometric tools with novel scientometric and visualizing techniques in order to analyse and categorise research in the field of tobacco control. Results: All studies related to tobacco control and listed in the ISI database since 1900 were identified by the use of defined search terms.Using bibliometric approaches, a continuous increase in qualitative markers such as collaboration numbers or citations were found for tobacco control research. The combination with density equalizing mapping revealed a distinct global pattern of research productivity and citation activity. Radar chart techniques were used to visualize bi- and multilateral research cooperation and institutional cooperation. Conclusions: The present study supplies a first scientometricapproach that visualises research activity in the field of tobacco control. It provides data that can be used for funding policy and the identification of research clusters.

  19. Rainwater Harvesting and Social Networks: Visualising Interactions for Niche Governance, Resilience and Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Ward

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Visualising interactions across urban water systems to explore transition and change processes requires the development of methods and models at different scales. This paper contributes a model representing the network interactions of rainwater harvesting (RWH infrastructure innovators and other organisations in the UK RWH niche to identify how resilience and sustainability feature within niche governance in practice. The RWH network interaction model was constructed using a modified participatory social network analysis (SNA. The SNA was further analysed through the application of a two-part analytical framework based on niche management and the safe, resilient and sustainable (‘Safe and SuRe’ framework. Weak interactions between some RWH infrastructure innovators and other organisations highlighted reliance on a limited number of persuaders to influence the regime and landscape, which were underrepresented. Features from niche creation and management were exhibited by the RWH network interaction model, though some observed characteristics were not represented. Additional Safe and SuRe features were identified covering diverse innovation, responsivity, no protection, unconverged expectations, primary influencers, polycentric or adaptive governance and multiple learning-types. These features enable RWH infrastructure innovators and other organisations to reflect on improving resilience and sustainability, though further research in other sectors would be useful to verify and validate observation of the seven features.

  20. Analysis and visualisation of lake disappearance process in Iława Lakeland Landscape Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marynowska Weronika Cecylia

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lake disappearance as a natural stage of evolution of lakes is an extremely important issue in the landscape and ecosystem research context. Studies of the changes that occur in the lake landscape, characteristic in the northern part of Poland, are aimed at defining the cause and forecasting the results. The possibilities of the Geographic Information Systems (GIS were used in this paper to analyse and visualise the process of lake disappearance in the Iława Lakeland Landscape Park. GIS technologies which primarily are used for gathering, storing, processing and presenting spatial data have been used to interpret changes in lakes coverage over a period of 100 years. The analysis were based on data bases and cartographic former maps such as hydrographic maps, attribute data and bathymetric plans. The data was gathered by transfer from different geoportals, next vectorised, and then preprocessed. Former maps were rectified. The lake disappearance process was presented in several forms: lake cards, animations and interactive map. Basing on the GIS analysis about lake disappearance in Iława Lakeland Landscape Park it was possible to state that lakes are disappearing in rate of 3.99 ha a−1.

  1. Intracoronary imaging using attenuation-compensated optical coherence tomography allows better visualisation of coronary artery diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foin, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.foin@gmail.com [International Centre for Circulatory Health, Imperial College London, W2 1LA London (United Kingdom); Mari, Jean Martial [University College London, London (United Kingdom); Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Sen, Sayan; Petraco, Ricardo [International Centre for Circulatory Health, Imperial College London, W2 1LA London (United Kingdom); Ghione, Matteo; Di Mario, Carlo [Biomedical Research Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Davies, Justin E. [International Centre for Circulatory Health, Imperial College London, W2 1LA London (United Kingdom); Girard, Michaël J.A. [Department of Bioengineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Singapore Eye Research Institute (Singapore)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: To allow an accurate diagnosis of coronary artery diseases by enhancing optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of atheromatous plaques using a novel automated attenuation compensation technique. Background: One of the major drawbacks of coronary OCT imaging is the rapid attenuation of the OCT signal, limiting penetration in tissue to only few millimetres. Visualisation of deeper anatomy is however critical for accurate assessment of plaque burden in-vivo. Methods: A compensation algorithm, previously developed to correct for light attenuation in soft tissues and to enhance contrast in ophthalmic OCT images, was applied to intracoronary plaque imaging using spectral-domain OCT. Results: Application of the compensation algorithm significantly increased tissue contrast in the vessel wall and atherosclerotic plaque boundaries. Contrast enhancement allows a better differentiation of plaque morphology, which is particularly important for the identification of lipid rich fibro atheromatous plaques and to guide decision on treatment strategy. Conclusion: The analysis of arterial vessel structure clinically captured with OCT is improved when used in conjunction with automated attenuation compensation. This approach may improve the OCT-based interpretation of coronary plaque morphology in clinical practice.

  2. Cartographic Visualisation and the Image of the Other in the Example of Multiple Borderlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snježana Gregurović

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the communication possibilities of early modern maps as historical sources within the methodological frame of imagology and constructionist theory. A comparative analysis reveals numerous visualisations or images of the Other, which depend not only on the author’s cartographic skills, the selection of the offered information and applied cartographic code, but also on the Habsburg, the Venetian or the Ottoman imperial strategic and cartographic policies on the multiple borderlands of early modern Croatia. Due to their highly suggestive nature, maps were easily used for interpretation and even manipulation with geographic, ideological, confessional, cultural and even linguistic images and denotations. The Other was not always illuminated as being different on the other side of the border, but also as diversity “among us”. Through the whole panoply of complex images of the Other, some of them imposed by a certain imperial power, European as well as Croatian cartographers have created a structured and hierarchical approach to cartography and mapping of the Other. Contemporary rereading of these sources requires a good understanding of the circumstances in which an individual map was made, but also a critical approach not only to sources but to interpretative patterns as well. In the end, it is necessary to compare the map in question with a a complementary source from the “Other side” in order to bridge the gap and remake the existing mental maps, adding intercultural competence aimed at getting to know better the Other.

  3. Visualisation of regional motility disorders in the left ventricular wall using radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, H.

    1985-01-01

    During this study ECG-triggered intramyocardial scintiscans were obtained following in-vivo labelling of erythrocytes (99mTc) from 74 patients showing coronary heart disease and analysed with the aim to assess the suitability of this method for the detection of mural motility disorders and for visualisation of the accurate size of the left ventricle. The results of the intramyocardial scintiscans were evaluated against those of levocardiograms recorded for reasons of comparison and found to demonstrate mural motility disorders with a specifity of 0.70 and a sensitivity of 0.75. Relatively reliable data to diagnose those myocardial motility disorders were obtained by combined analysis of the individual scintiphotographic displays of amplitudes, phases, ejection fractions and positive gradients. The investigation of further parameters like the recorded stroke volumes and negative gradients provided no additional information. The phase recording proved to be the most suitable parameter to assess the size of the left ventricle. All other recordings gave a distorted picture of the left ventricle in terms of a reduction in size. (TRV) [de

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Visualisation of Coastal Flows in Tidal Channels Supporting Ocean Energy Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enayatollah Zangiabadi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Flow characteristics in coastal regions are strongly influenced by the topography of the seabed and understanding the fluid dynamics is necessary before installation of tidal stream turbines (TST. In this paper, the bathymetry of a potential TST deployment site is used in the development of the a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics model. The steady state k-ϵ and transient Large Eddy Simulation (LES turbulence methods are employed and compared. The simulations are conducted with a fixed representation of the ocean surface, i.e., a rigid lid representation. In the vicinity of Horse Rock a study of the pressure difference shows that the small change in height of the water column is negligible, providing confidence in the simulation results. The stream surface method employed to visualise the results has important inherent characteristics that can enhance the visual perception of complex flow structures. The results of all cases are compared with the flow data transect gathered by an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP. It has been understood that the k-ϵ method can predict the flow pattern relatively well near the main features of the domain and the LES model has the ability to simulate some important flow patterns caused by the bathymetry.

  5. A novel role for ecdysone in Drosophila conditioned behavior: linking GPCR-mediated non-canonical steroid action to cAMP signaling in the adult brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Wang, Zhe; Rao, Yi; Wu, Chun-Fang; Kitamoto, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    The biological actions of steroid hormones are mediated primarily by their cognate nuclear receptors, which serve as steroid-dependent transcription factors. However, steroids can also execute their functions by modulating intracellular signaling cascades rapidly and independently of transcriptional regulation. Despite the potential significance of such "non-genomic" steroid actions, their biological roles and the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood, particularly with regard to their effects on behavioral regulation. The major steroid hormone in the fruit fly Drosophila is 20-hydroxy-ecdysone (20E), which plays a variety of pivotal roles during development via the nuclear ecdysone receptors. Here we report that DopEcR, a G-protein coupled receptor for ecdysteroids, is involved in activity- and experience-dependent plasticity of the adult central nervous system. Remarkably, a courtship memory defect in rutabaga (Ca²⁺/calmodulin-responsive adenylate cyclase) mutants was rescued by DopEcR overexpression or acute 20E feeding, whereas a memory defect in dunce (cAMP-specific phosphodiestrase) mutants was counteracted when a loss-of-function DopEcR mutation was introduced. A memory defect caused by suppressing dopamine synthesis was also restored through enhanced DopEcR-mediated ecdysone signaling, and rescue and phenocopy experiments revealed that the mushroom body (MB)--a brain region central to learning and memory in Drosophila--is critical for the DopEcR-dependent processing of courtship memory. Consistent with this finding, acute 20E feeding induced a rapid, DopEcR-dependent increase in cAMP levels in the MB. Our multidisciplinary approach demonstrates that DopEcR mediates the non-canonical actions of 20E and rapidly modulates adult conditioned behavior through cAMP signaling, which is universally important for neural plasticity. This study provides novel insights into non-genomic actions of steroids, and opens a new avenue for genetic

  6. A novel role for ecdysone in Drosophila conditioned behavior: linking GPCR-mediated non-canonical steroid action to cAMP signaling in the adult brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Ishimoto

    Full Text Available The biological actions of steroid hormones are mediated primarily by their cognate nuclear receptors, which serve as steroid-dependent transcription factors. However, steroids can also execute their functions by modulating intracellular signaling cascades rapidly and independently of transcriptional regulation. Despite the potential significance of such "non-genomic" steroid actions, their biological roles and the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood, particularly with regard to their effects on behavioral regulation. The major steroid hormone in the fruit fly Drosophila is 20-hydroxy-ecdysone (20E, which plays a variety of pivotal roles during development via the nuclear ecdysone receptors. Here we report that DopEcR, a G-protein coupled receptor for ecdysteroids, is involved in activity- and experience-dependent plasticity of the adult central nervous system. Remarkably, a courtship memory defect in rutabaga (Ca²⁺/calmodulin-responsive adenylate cyclase mutants was rescued by DopEcR overexpression or acute 20E feeding, whereas a memory defect in dunce (cAMP-specific phosphodiestrase mutants was counteracted when a loss-of-function DopEcR mutation was introduced. A memory defect caused by suppressing dopamine synthesis was also restored through enhanced DopEcR-mediated ecdysone signaling, and rescue and phenocopy experiments revealed that the mushroom body (MB--a brain region central to learning and memory in Drosophila--is critical for the DopEcR-dependent processing of courtship memory. Consistent with this finding, acute 20E feeding induced a rapid, DopEcR-dependent increase in cAMP levels in the MB. Our multidisciplinary approach demonstrates that DopEcR mediates the non-canonical actions of 20E and rapidly modulates adult conditioned behavior through cAMP signaling, which is universally important for neural plasticity. This study provides novel insights into non-genomic actions of steroids, and opens a new avenue for

  7. First experiments on visualisation of two-phase high pressure and temperature flows using an ultrasonic mesh sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnikov, V.I.; Khokhlov, V.N.; Ivanov, V.V.; Kontelev, V.V.; Zoi, V.R.; Zavinov, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    A novel device for fast visualisation of gas-liquid two-phase flows was developed and tested during loss-off-coolant accident simulations at the thermal hydraulic test facility PSB-VVER, a 1:300 integral model of the VVER-1000. The device is an ultrasonic mesh sensor. It consists of a metallic frame where transmitter and receiver wave-guides are fixed, that form two grids inside the measurement cross section. Ultrasonic pulses are transmitted into the fluid by the 8 wave-guides of the first plane. A second plane of another 8 wave-guides, that cross the ones of the first plane under an angle of 90 deg, serves as receives. The measurement is based on the acoustic conductivity of the two-phase mixture at the locations where the wave-guides cross. The sampling frequency is 250 frames per second. This allows both void fraction measurements and a fast flow visualisation. The sensor is applicable to high pressures and temperatures. All parts and surfaces that are in contact with the fluid are manufactured from stainless steel. During the tests at PSB-VVER the flow pattern in the hot leg of the primary circuit model was visualised for the first time. (orig.)

  8. Automation strategies in five domains - A comparison of levels of automation, function allocation and visualisation of automatic functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, J.

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted as a field study where control room operators and engineers from the refinery, heat and power, aviation, shipping and nuclear domain were interviewed regarding use of automation and the visualisation of automatic functions. The purpose of the study was to collect experiences and best practices from the five studied domains on levels of automation, function allocation and visualisation of automatic functions. In total, nine different control room settings were visited. The studied settings were compared using a systemic approach based on a human-machine systems model. The results show that the 'left over principle' is still the most common applied approach for function allocation but in high risk settings the decision whether to automate or not is more carefully considered. Regarding the visualisation of automatic functions, it was found that as long as each display type (process based, functional oriented, situation oriented and task based) are applied so that they correspond to the same level of abstraction as the technical system the operators mental model will be supported. No single display type can however readily match all levels of abstraction at the same time - all display types are still needed and serve different purposes. (Author)

  9. Three-dimensional visualisation of developmental stages of an apicomplexan fish blood parasite in its invertebrate host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayes Polly M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although widely used in medicine, the application of three-dimensional (3D imaging to parasitology appears limited to date. In this study, developmental stages of a marine fish haemogregarine, Haemogregarina curvata (Apicomplexa: Adeleorina, were investigated in their leech vector, Zeylanicobdella arugamensis; this involved 3D visualisation of brightfield and confocal microscopy images of histological sections through infected leech salivary gland cells. Findings 3D assessment demonstrated the morphology of the haemogregarine stages, their spatial layout, and their relationship with enlarged host cells showing reduced cellular content. Haemogregarine meronts, located marginally within leech salivary gland cells, had small tail-like connections to the host cell limiting membrane; this parasite-host cell interface was not visible in two-dimensional (2D light micrographs and no records of a similar connection in apicomplexan development have been traced. Conclusions This is likely the first account of the use of 3D visualisation to study developmental stages of an apicomplexan parasite in its invertebrate vector. Elucidation of the extent of development of the haemogregarine within the leech salivary cells, together with the unusual connections between meronts and the host cell membrane, illustrates the future potential of 3D visualisation in parasite-vector biology.

  10. Automation strategies in five domains - A comparison of levels of automation, function allocation and visualisation of automatic functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, J. (Chalmers Univ. of Technology. Division Design and Human factors. Dept. of Product and Production Development, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2011-01-15

    This study was conducted as a field study where control room operators and engineers from the refinery, heat and power, aviation, shipping and nuclear domain were interviewed regarding use of automation and the visualisation of automatic functions. The purpose of the study was to collect experiences and best practices from the five studied domains on levels of automation, function allocation and visualisation of automatic functions. In total, nine different control room settings were visited. The studied settings were compared using a systemic approach based on a human-machine systems model. The results show that the 'left over principle' is still the most common applied approach for function allocation but in high risk settings the decision whether to automate or not is more carefully considered. Regarding the visualisation of automatic functions, it was found that as long as each display type (process based, functional oriented, situation oriented and task based) are applied so that they correspond to the same level of abstraction as the technical system the operator's mental model will be supported. No single display type can however readily match all levels of abstraction at the same time - all display types are still needed and serve different purposes. (Author)

  11. Increase in seizure susceptibility in sepsis like condition explained by spiking cytokines and altered adhesion molecules level with impaired blood brain barrier integrity in experimental model of rats treated with lipopolysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewal, Rakesh K; Modi, Manish; Saikia, Uma Nahar; Chakrabarti, Amitava; Medhi, Bikash

    2017-09-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. Sepsis is a condition which initiates a cascade of a surge of inflammatory mediators. Interplay between seizures and inflammation other than of brain origin is yet to be explored. The present study was designed to evaluate the seizure susceptibility in experimental models of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced sepsis. Experimental sepsis was induced using lipopolysaccharides in Wistar rats. Valproic acid, dexametasone were given to two different groups of animals along with LPS. Two groups of animals were subjected to administration of vehicle and LPS respectively with no other treatment. 24h later, animals were subjected to seizures by using either maximal electro shock or pentylenetetrazole. Seizures related parameters, oxidative stress and TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, ICAM-1, ICAM-2, VCAM-1, MMP-9 level in serum and brain samples were evaluated. Histopathological and blood brain barrier permeability studies were conducted. Seizures were decreased in valproic acid treated animals. Reduced oxidative stress was seen in dexamethasone plus valproic acid treated groups as compared to LPS alone treated group. TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, MMP-9 levels were found increased in LPS treated animals whereas a reverse observation was noted for ICAM-2 level in brain and serum. Histopathological findings confirmed the successful establishment of sepsis like state in animals. Blood brain barrier permeability was found increased in LPS treated groups of animals. Seizure susceptibility may escalate during the sepsis like inflammatory conditions and curbing the inflammatory state might reverse the phenomenon. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. The effect of tryptophan supplemented diets on brain serotonergic activity and plasma cortisol under undisturbed and stressed conditions in grouped-housed Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, C.I.M.; Silva, P.I.M.; Costas, B.

    2013-01-01

    -term supplementation with TRP supplemented diets changes brain serotonergic activity and the stress response associated with slaughter handling in grouped-housed Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus. Adult fish (n. =. 108, 490.6. ±. 4.0. g, 12 individuals per tank) were exposed to one of the three treatments...

  13. EarthServer: Visualisation and use of uncertainty as a data exploration tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Peter; Clements, Oliver; Grant, Mike

    2013-04-01

    software from the EarthServer project we can produce a novel data offering that allows the use of traditional exploration and access mechanisms such as WMS and WCS. However the real benefits can be seen when utilising WCPS to explore the data . We will show two major benefits to this infrastructure. Firstly we will show that the visualisation of the combined chlorophyll and uncertainty datasets through a web based GIS portal gives users the ability to instantaneously assess the quality of the data they are exploring using traditional web based plotting techniques as well as through novel web based 3 dimensional visualisation. Secondly we will showcase the benefits available when combining these data with the WCPS standard. The uncertainty data can be utilised in queries using the standard WCPS query language. This allows selection of data either for download or use within the query, based on the respective uncertainty values as well as the possibility of incorporating both the chlorophyll data and uncertainty data into complex queries to produce additional novel data products. By filtering with uncertainty at the data source rather than the client we can minimise traffic over the network allowing huge datasets to be worked on with a minimal time penalty.

  14. The multilingual brain

    OpenAIRE

    Engel de Abreu, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    The multilingual brain. Is a multilingual education beneficial for children? What are the optimal conditions under which a child can become perfectly multilingual? The given lecture will focus on the "cognitive advantages" of multilingualism and illustrate the impact that being multilingual has on the cognitive organisation of the brain. Practical questions regarding multilingual education will also be discussed.

  15. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  16. Segeberg 1600 - Reconstructing a Historic Town for Virtual Reality Visualisation as AN Immersive Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deggim, S.; Kersten, T. P.; Tschirschwitz, F.; Hinrichsen, N.

    2017-11-01

    The 3D reconstruction of historic buildings and cities offers an opportunity to experience the history of relevant objects and their development over the centuries. Digital visualisations of such historic objects allow for a more natural view of history as well as showing information that is not possible in a real world setting. New presentation forms, such as the virtual reality (VR) system HTC Vive, can be used to disseminate information in another dimension and simplify the access by changing the user's viewpoint from a listener and viewer into being an integrated part of an interactive situation. In general, this approach is a combination of education and entertainment, also known as "edutainment" or "gamification", a term used in the education sector as describing where motivation to learn is encouraged through adding a competitive element. It is thus a step away from simple consumption of information towards experiencing information and a more literal interpretation of "living history". In this contribution, we present the development of a 3D reconstruction of the two towns Segeberg and Gieschenhagen (today: Bad Segeberg) in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany in the Early Modern Age around 1600. The historic landscape and its conversion from a reconstructed virtual town model into an interactive VR application is also described. The reconstruction is based on a recent digital terrain model as well as survey data of surviving buildings, historic visual information based on historic drawings and written accounts from that era. All datasets are combined to a single walkable virtual world that spans approximately 3 km2.

  17. Low-cost motility tracking system (LOCOMOTIS for time-lapse microscopy applications and cell visualisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam E Lynch

    Full Text Available Direct visualisation of cells for the purpose of studying their motility has typically required expensive microscopy equipment. However, recent advances in digital sensors mean that it is now possible to image cells for a fraction of the price of a standard microscope. Along with low-cost imaging there has also been a large increase in the availability of high quality, open-source analysis programs. In this study we describe the development and performance of an expandable cell motility system employing inexpensive, commercially available digital USB microscopes to image various cell types using time-lapse and perform tracking assays in proof-of-concept experiments. With this system we were able to measure and record three separate assays simultaneously on one personal computer using identical microscopes, and obtained tracking results comparable in quality to those from other studies that used standard, more expensive, equipment. The microscopes used in our system were capable of a maximum magnification of 413.6×. Although resolution was lower than that of a standard inverted microscope we found this difference to be indistinguishable at the magnification chosen for cell tracking experiments (206.8×. In preliminary cell culture experiments using our system, velocities (mean µm/min ± SE of 0.81 ± 0.01 (Biomphalaria glabrata hemocytes on uncoated plates, 1.17 ± 0.004 (MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, 1.24 ± 0.006 (SC5 mouse Sertoli cells and 2.21 ± 0.01 (B. glabrata hemocytes on Poly-L-Lysine coated plates, were measured and are consistent with previous reports. We believe that this system, coupled with open-source analysis software, demonstrates that higher throughput time-lapse imaging of cells for the purpose of studying motility can be an affordable option for all researchers.

  18. Low-cost motility tracking system (LOCOMOTIS) for time-lapse microscopy applications and cell visualisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Adam E; Triajianto, Junian; Routledge, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Direct visualisation of cells for the purpose of studying their motility has typically required expensive microscopy equipment. However, recent advances in digital sensors mean that it is now possible to image cells for a fraction of the price of a standard microscope. Along with low-cost imaging there has also been a large increase in the availability of high quality, open-source analysis programs. In this study we describe the development and performance of an expandable cell motility system employing inexpensive, commercially available digital USB microscopes to image various cell types using time-lapse and perform tracking assays in proof-of-concept experiments. With this system we were able to measure and record three separate assays simultaneously on one personal computer using identical microscopes, and obtained tracking results comparable in quality to those from other studies that used standard, more expensive, equipment. The microscopes used in our system were capable of a maximum magnification of 413.6×. Although resolution was lower than that of a standard inverted microscope we found this difference to be indistinguishable at the magnification chosen for cell tracking experiments (206.8×). In preliminary cell culture experiments using our system, velocities (mean µm/min ± SE) of 0.81 ± 0.01 (Biomphalaria glabrata hemocytes on uncoated plates), 1.17 ± 0.004 (MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells), 1.24 ± 0.006 (SC5 mouse Sertoli cells) and 2.21 ± 0.01 (B. glabrata hemocytes on Poly-L-Lysine coated plates), were measured and are consistent with previous reports. We believe that this system, coupled with open-source analysis software, demonstrates that higher throughput time-lapse imaging of cells for the purpose of studying motility can be an affordable option for all researchers.

  19. Low-Cost Motility Tracking System (LOCOMOTIS) for Time-Lapse Microscopy Applications and Cell Visualisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Adam E.; Triajianto, Junian; Routledge, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Direct visualisation of cells for the purpose of studying their motility has typically required expensive microscopy equipment. However, recent advances in digital sensors mean that it is now possible to image cells for a fraction of the price of a standard microscope. Along with low-cost imaging there has also been a large increase in the availability of high quality, open-source analysis programs. In this study we describe the development and performance of an expandable cell motility system employing inexpensive, commercially available digital USB microscopes to image various cell types using time-lapse and perform tracking assays in proof-of-concept experiments. With this system we were able to measure and record three separate assays simultaneously on one personal computer using identical microscopes, and obtained tracking results comparable in quality to those from other studies that used standard, more expensive, equipment. The microscopes used in our system were capable of a maximum magnification of 413.6×. Although resolution was lower than that of a standard inverted microscope we found this difference to be indistinguishable at the magnification chosen for cell tracking experiments (206.8×). In preliminary cell culture experiments using our system, velocities (mean µm/min ± SE) of 0.81±0.01 (Biomphalaria glabrata hemocytes on uncoated plates), 1.17±0.004 (MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells), 1.24±0.006 (SC5 mouse Sertoli cells) and 2.21±0.01 (B. glabrata hemocytes on Poly-L-Lysine coated plates), were measured and are consistent with previous reports. We believe that this system, coupled with open-source analysis software, demonstrates that higher throughput time-lapse imaging of cells for the purpose of studying motility can be an affordable option for all researchers. PMID:25121722

  20. Web-GIS visualisation of permafrost-related Remote Sensing products for ESA GlobPermafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, A.; Heim, B.; Schaefer-Neth, C.; Laboor, S.; Nitze, I.; Grosse, G.; Bartsch, A.; Kaab, A.; Strozzi, T.; Wiesmann, A.; Seifert, F. M.

    2016-12-01

    The ESA GlobPermafrost (www.globpermafrost.info) provides a remote sensing service for permafrost research and applications. The service comprises of data product generation for various sites and regions as well as specific infrastructure allowing overview and access to datasets. Based on an online user survey conducted within the project, the user community extensively applies GIS software to handle remote sensing-derived datasets and requires preview functionalities before accessing them. In response, we develop the Permafrost Information System PerSys which is conceptualized as an open access geospatial data dissemination and visualization portal. PerSys will allow visualisation of GlobPermafrost raster and vector products such as land cover classifications, Landsat multispectral index trend datasets, lake and wetland extents, InSAR-based land surface deformation maps, rock glacier velocity fields, spatially distributed permafrost model outputs, and land surface temperature datasets. The datasets will be published as WebGIS services relying on OGC-standardized Web Mapping Service (WMS) and Web Feature Service (WFS) technologies for data display and visualization. The WebGIS environment will be hosted at the AWI computing centre where a geodata infrastructure has been implemented comprising of ArcGIS for Server 10.4, PostgreSQL 9.2 and a browser-driven data viewer based on Leaflet (http://leafletjs.com). Independently, we will provide an `Access - Restricted Data Dissemination Service', which will be available to registered users for testing frequently updated versions of project datasets. PerSys will become a core project of the Arctic Permafrost Geospatial Centre (APGC) within the ERC-funded PETA-CARB project (www.awi.de/petacarb). The APGC Data Catalogue will contain all final products of GlobPermafrost, allow in-depth dataset search via keywords, spatial and temporal coverage, data type, etc., and will provide DOI-based links to the datasets archived in the

  1. Cellular internalisation of an inositol phosphate visualised by using fluorescent InsP5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Andrew M; Windhorst, Sabine; Lin, Hong-Yin; Potter, Barry V L

    2014-01-03

    When applied extracellularly, myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6 ) and myo-inositol pentakisphosphate (InsP5 ) can inhibit the growth and proliferation of tumour cells. There is debate about whether these effects result from interactions of InsP6 and InsP5 with intracellular or extracellular targets. We synthesised FAM-InsP5 , a fluorescent conjugate of InsP5 that allows direct visualisation of its interaction with cells. FAM-InsP5 was internalised by H1229 tumour cells, a finding that supports earlier reports that externally applied inositol phosphates can-perhaps surprisingly-enter into cells. Close examination of the process of FAM-InsP5 uptake suggests a mechanism of non-receptor-mediated endocytosis, which is blocked at 4 °C and probably involves interaction of the ligand with the glycocalyx. However, our results are difficult to reconcile with antiproliferative mechanisms that require direct interactions of externally applied InsP5 or InsP6 with cytosolic proteins, because internalised FAM-InsP5 appears in lysosomes and apparently does not enter the cytoplasm. Studies using FAM-InsP5 are less difficult and time-consuming than experiments using InsP5 or InsP6 , a factor that allowed us to analyse cellular uptake across a range of human cell types, identifying strong cell-specific differences. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. SEGEBERG 1600 – RECONSTRUCTING A HISTORIC TOWN FOR VIRTUAL REALITY VISUALISATION AS AN IMMERSIVE EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Deggim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The 3D reconstruction of historic buildings and cities offers an opportunity to experience the history of relevant objects and their development over the centuries. Digital visualisations of such historic objects allow for a more natural view of history as well as showing information that is not possible in a real world setting. New presentation forms, such as the virtual reality (VR system HTC Vive, can be used to disseminate information in another dimension and simplify the access by changing the user’s viewpoint from a listener and viewer into being an integrated part of an interactive situation. In general, this approach is a combination of education and entertainment, also known as “edutainment” or “gamification”, a term used in the education sector as describing where motivation to learn is encouraged through adding a competitive element. It is thus a step away from simple consumption of information towards experiencing information and a more literal interpretation of “living history”. In this contribution, we present the development of a 3D reconstruction of the two towns Segeberg and Gieschenhagen (today: Bad Segeberg in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany in the Early Modern Age around 1600. The historic landscape and its conversion from a reconstructed virtual town model into an interactive VR application is also described. The reconstruction is based on a recent digital terrain model as well as survey data of surviving buildings, historic visual information based on historic drawings and written accounts from that era. All datasets are combined to a single walkable virtual world that spans approximately 3 km².

  3. Visualisation of Leishmania donovani fluorescent hybrids during early stage development in the sand fly vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadlova, Jovana; Yeo, Matthew; Seblova, Veronika; Lewis, Michael D; Mauricio, Isabel; Volf, Petr; Miles, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    The Leishmania protozoan parasites cause devastating human diseases. Leishmania have been considered to replicate clonally, without genetic exchange. However, an accumulation of evidence indicates that there are inter-specific and intra-specific hybrids among natural populations. The first and so far only experimental proof of genetic exchange was obtained in 2009 when double drug resistant Leishmania major hybrids were produced by co-infecting sand flies with two strains carrying different drug resistance markers. However, the location and timing of hybridisation events in sand flies has not been described. Here we have co-infected Phlebotomus perniciosus and Lutzomyia longipalpis with transgenic promastigotes of Leishmania donovani strains carrying hygromycin or neomycin resistance genes and red or green fluorescent markers. Fed females were dissected at different times post bloodmeal (PBM) and examined by fluorescent microscopy or fluorescent activated cell sorting (FACS) followed by confocal microscopy. In mixed infections strains LEM3804 and Gebre-1 reached the cardia and stomodeal valves more rapidly than strains LEM4265 and LV9. Hybrids unequivocally expressing both red and green fluorescence were seen in single flies of both vectors tested, co-infected with LEM4265 and Gebre-1. The hybrids were present as short (procyclic) promastigotes 2 days PBM in the semi-digested blood in the endoperitrophic space. Recovery of a clearly co-expressing hybrid was also achieved by FACS. However, hybrids could not sustain growth in vitro. For the first time, we observed L. donovani hybrids in the sand fly vector, 2 days PBM and described the morphological stages involved. Fluorescence microscopy in combination with FACS allows visualisation and recovery of the progeny of experimental crosses but on this occasion the hybrids were not viable in vitro. Nevertheless, genetic exchange in L. donovani has profound epidemiological significance, because it facilitates the emergence

  4. Towards a Decision Support Tool for 3d Visualisation: Application to Selectivity Purpose of Single Object in a 3d City Scene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuville, R.; Pouliot, J.; Poux, F.; Hallot, P.; De Rudder, L.; Billen, R.

    2017-10-01

    This paper deals with the establishment of a comprehensive methodological framework that defines 3D visualisation rules and its application in a decision support tool. Whilst the use of 3D models grows in many application fields, their visualisation remains challenging from the point of view of mapping and rendering aspects to be applied to suitability support the decision making process. Indeed, there exists a great number of 3D visualisation techniques but as far as we know, a decision support tool that facilitates the production of an efficient 3D visualisation is still missing. This is why a comprehensive methodological framework is proposed in order to build decision tables for specific data, tasks and contexts. Based on the second-order logic formalism, we define a set of functions and propositions among and between two collections of entities: on one hand static retinal variables (hue, size, shape…) and 3D environment parameters (directional lighting, shadow, haze…) and on the other hand their effect(s) regarding specific visual tasks. It enables to define 3D visualisation rules according to four categories: consequence, compatibility, potential incompatibility and incompatibility. In this paper, the application of the methodological framework is demonstrated for an urban visualisation at high density considering a specific set of entities. On the basis of our analysis and the results of many studies conducted in the 3D semiotics, which refers to the study of symbols and how they relay information, the truth values of propositions are determined. 3D visualisation rules are then extracted for the considered context and set of entities and are presented into a decision table with a colour coding. Finally, the decision table is implemented into a plugin developed with three.js, a cross-browser JavaScript library. The plugin consists of a sidebar and warning windows that help the designer in the use of a set of static retinal variables and 3D environment

  5. Dosimetry comparison of irradiation with conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, conformal radiotherapy in stereotactic conditions and robotic stereotactic radiotherapy for benign brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spasic, E.; Noel, A.; Buchheit, I.; Bernier, V.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. - To compare several techniques in order to determine the best treatment for benign brain tumours. Methods and patients. - A retrospective study was performed for five patients who received 3D-conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy or CyberKnife R . These patients had a meningioma, a pituitary tumour, a cranio-pharyngioma or a neurinoma. In each case, these treatment plans were optimised and compared with the three other dosimetries. Radiobiological or positioning parameters were evaluated, as well as dosimetric parameters, in order to compare treatments with different characteristics. Results. - The dosimetric parameters showed that the choice of treatment seemed to be determined mostly by tumour size, shape and proximity with organs at risk (not tumour localisation). Whereas the results showed no significant deviations with regards to the radiobiological parameters. Therefore, with these parameters, it was difficult to give priority to a treatment. Conclusions. - With regards to benign brain tumours of medium or large size, intensity modulated radiotherapy seemed the recommended treatment. It enabled to obtain a good ratio between efficacy and toxicity for tumours that are really close to organs at risk. Concerning small benign brain tumours, the CyberKnife R was probably the best treatment. (authors)

  6. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  7. Brain Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  8. Visualisation of axolotl blastema cells and pig endothelial progenitor cells using very small super paramagnetic iron oxide particles in MRI: A technique with applications for non invasive visualisation of regenerative processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik; Kjær, N.B.; Bek, Maria

    oxide particles (VSOP) in animal cells enable non invasive cell tracking using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and can prove useful, when visualising regenerative processes. This study examines the possibility of labelling limited numbers of axolotl blastema cells (aBC) and pig endothelial progenitor...... implanted in live axolotl tail and dead porcine heart, respectively. Cellular iron uptake was determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Results: T2*-weighted 2D gradient-echo sequences on samples of 10˄5 cells yielded at significant linear correlations between...

  9. Computed tomography in cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy: Visualisation of structures, myelographic comparison, cord measurements and clinical utility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Y.L.; Du Boulay, G.H.; Stevens, J.M.; Kendall, B.E.

    1986-01-01

    Sixty-nine patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), radiculopathy (CSR), or both (CSMR) were studied with computed tomography (CT). Computer-assisted myelography (CAM) accurately determines the site and nature of spondylotic protrusions and provides good visualisation of the subarachnoid space and cord deformities even in areas with dilute metrizamide. However, excessive vertebral movement and bulging ligamenta flava with their effects on cord deformity, so easily visualised in myelograms, are completely or partially missed. In the assessment of CSM, metrizamide myelography (MM) followed by CAM should be performed, particularly when the myelographic images are unsatisfactory due to contrast dilution or blockage, when cord compression cannot be ascertained with MM and when cord atrophy is suspected. In CSR, the diagnostic information from MM and CAM is comparable. The diagnostic criteria in CAM are, however, less direct and since MM is adequate in uncomplicated cases, CAM is generally not necessary. The APD, APD/TD ratio, area and circularity are sensitive indices of cord deformity and the first two should be used more often to assist visual assessment of cord deformity. The relation between cord parameters and treatment response is better reflected in CSM cases managed conservatively and the results suggest that the degree of cord deformity is helpful in determining the outcome and hence the choice between surgical and conservative treatment. In plain CT, the osteophytes and calcified discs are adequately visualised and canal dimensions measured with accuracy, but the cervical cord and roots cannot be properly assessed and the diagnosis of CSM or CSR cannot be ascertained. At present, its role in cervical spondylosis is therefore limited. (orig.)

  10. Calculation and visualisation of future glacier extent in the Swiss Alps by means of hypsographic modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, F.; Maisch, M.; Rothenbühler, C.; Hoelzle, M.; Haeberli, W.

    2007-02-01

    The observed rapid glacier wastage in the European Alps during the past 20 years already has strong impacts on the natural environment (rock fall, lake formation) as well as on human activities (tourism, hydro-power production, etc.) and poses several new challenges also for glacier monitoring. With a further increase of global mean temperature in the future, it is likely that Alpine glaciers and the high-mountain environment as an entire system will further develop into a state of imbalance. Hence, the assessment of future glacier geometries is a valuable prerequisite for various impact studies. In order to calculate and visualize in a consistent manner future glacier extent for a large number of individual glaciers (> 100) according to a given climate change scenario, we have developed an automated and simple but robust approach that is based on an empirical relationship between glacier size and the steady-state accumulation area ratio (AAR 0) in the Alps. The model requires digital glacier outlines and a digital elevation model (DEM) only and calculates new glacier geometries from a given shift of the steady-state equilibrium line altitude (ELA 0) by means of hypsographic modelling. We have calculated changes in number, area and volume for 3062 individual glacier units in Switzerland and applied six step changes in ELA 0 (from + 100 to + 600 m) combined with four different values of the AAR 0 (0.5, 0.6, 0.67, 0.75). For an AAR 0 of 0.6 and an ELA 0 rise of 200 m (400 m) we calculate a total area loss of - 54% (- 80%) and a corresponding volume loss of - 50% (- 78%) compared to the 1973 glacier extent. In combination with a geocoded satellite image, the future glacier outlines are also used for automated rendering of perspective visualisations. This is a very attractive tool for communicating research results to the general public. Our study is illustrated for a test site in the Upper Engadine (Switzerland), where landscape changes above timberline play an

  11. Geomorphological map as a tool for visualisation of geodiversity - example from Cave Park Grabovaca (Croatia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzjak, Nenad; Bocic, Neven; Pahernik, Mladen

    2014-05-01

    Cave Park Grabovaca is located near Perusic in Lika region (central Croatia). It was established in 2006 at the area of 5.95 km2 (protection category: significant landscape). The main task is management and protection of Samograd, Medina and Amidzina caves that were declared as geomorphological monuments, and 6 other caves located close to each other. Owing to the central geographic location in Croatian Dinaric karst area, good traffic connections between central Europe and tourist centres of the Adriatic coast, preserved nature and easy accessible karst features typical for the Dinaric Karst, it has good potential to develop as an research, educational and tourist centre. In 2013. Cave Park management and the Department of Geography (University of Zagreb, Faculty of Science) established a core team that started to develop the project of Geoeducational centre (GEC) with following goals: exploration-evaluation-presentation-education. According to the accepted strategy, the first step in the project process is to enlarge the area and change the protection category. During the consultation process team members take into account protection, environmental, local economy, tourism and local population issues and proposed that protected area should be increased to 52,2 km2. This enlargement provides more efficient protection, greater geodiversity and biodiversity by occupying geotope, biotope, and landscape units typical for the whole Lika karst region. The next step was inventorying, evaluation, analysis and visualisation of geological, geomorphological and speleological phenomena. This 2 year task was made in cooperation between Croatian Geomorphological Society, Department of Geography, Speleological Society Karlovac and Caving Club Samobor. The inventory was made using field-work mapping and geotagged photographs, cave mapping and DEM analysis. It resulted in GIS oriented geodatabase consisting of geomorphological forms, processes and cave inventory. From those data

  12. Airborne electromagnetics data interactive visualisation and exploratory data analysis using Cloud technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golodoniuc, P.; Davis, A. C.; Klump, J. F.

    2017-12-01

    Electromagnetic exploration techniques are extensively used for remote detection and measurement of subsurface electrical conductivity structures for a variety of geophysical applications such as mineral exploration and groundwater detection. The Electromagnetic Applications group in the Mineral Resources business unit of CSIRO heavily relies upon the use of airborne electromagnetic (AEM) data for the development of new exploration methods. AEM data, which are often originally acquired for green- or brown-fields exploration for minerals, can be re-used for groundwater resource detection in the near-surface. This makes AEM data potentially useful beyond their initial purpose for decades into the future. Increasingly, AEM data are also used as a primary mapping tool for groundwater resources. With surveys ranging from under 1000 km to tens of thousands of km in total length, AEM data are spatially and temporally dense. Sounding stations are often sampled every 0.2 seconds, with about 30-50 measurements taken at each site, resulting in a spacing of measurements along the flight lines of approximately 20­-50 metres. This means that typical AEM surveys can easily have on the order of millions of individual stations, with tens of millions of measurements. AEM data needs to be examined for data quality before it can be inverted into conductivity-depth information. Data, which is gathered in survey transects or lines, is examined both along the line, in a plan view and for the transient decay of the electromagnetic signal of individual stations before noise artefacts can be removed. The complexity of the data, its size and dimensionality require efficient tools that support interactive visual data analysis and allows easy navigation through the dataset. A suite of numerical algorithms for data quality assurance facilitates this process through efficient visualisations and data quality metrics. The extensible architecture of the toolkit allows application of custom

  13. Visualisation of Gasoline and Exhaust Gases Distribution in a 4-Valve Si Engine; Effects of Stratification on Combustion and Pollutants Visualisation de la répartition du carburant et des gaz brûlés dans un moteur à 4 soupapes à allumage commandé ; effet de la stratification sur la combustion et les polluants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deschamps B.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available sAn indirect method to map the burned gases in SI engine has been developed. It is based on visualisation by Laser Induced Fluorescence of the unburned mixture seeded with biacetyl. Both internally and externally recirculated burned gases are monitored. This diagnostic is complementary to the LIF technique applied to measure the gasoline distribution. These LIF gasoline and burned gases measurements are applied in a 4-valve optical access SI engine for a large range of operating conditions. These include variations of both fuel injection and burned gas recirculation modes causing different types of stratification leading to very distinct heat release and exhaust emissions characteristics. Tumble level and spark location are also modified. The observation of the actual stratification in the engine forms a sound basis explanation of the engine performance. Parameters allowing an optimisation of NOx and HC levels can be inferred, and in particular the effectiveness of recirculation and fuel injection strategies. The conclusions are confirmed by measurements in a single engine cylinder conventional head with the same geometry. Une méthode indirecte pour cartographier les gaz brûlés dans un moteur à allumage commandé a été développée. Elle est fondée sur une visualisation à partir de la fluorescence induite par laser (LIF du mélange air-carburant non brûlé et ensemencé avec du biacétyl. Les gaz brûlés provenant à la fois des recirculations internes et externes sont observés. Ce type de diagnostic est complémentaire des techniques de LIF utilisées pour observer la distribution du carburant. Ces mesures de concentration sont réalisées dans un moteur à 4 soupapes avec accès optiques, pour une gamme étendue de conditions opératoires. Celles-ci comprennent des variations des modes d'injection du carburant et des modes de recirculation des gaz brûlés, provoquant ainsi différents types de stratifications qui correspondent

  14. Plasma and brain angiotensin concentrations associated with water response behavior in the desert anuran, Scaphiopus couchii under natural conditions in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William E; Hillyard, Stanley D; Propper, Catherine R

    2010-12-01

    Terrestrial amphibians obtain water by absorption across a specialized region of the ventral skin and exhibit a behavior, the water absorption response (WR) to place that region in contact with moist surfaces. Spadefoot toads (Scaphiopus couchii) spend dry months of the year in burrows, then emerge during brief periods of summer rainfall and seek water sources for rehydration and reproduction. We tested the hypothesis that these toads have changes in plasma and/or central angiotensin concentrations that are associated with seasonal emergence and WR behavior. Immunoreactive concentrations of combined angiotensin II and III (ir-ANG) were measured in plasma samples and microdissected regions of brain tissue taken from toads moving across the road or toads showing WR behavior in shallow puddles on the road. Plasma ir-ANG concentrations were not significantly different between these groups, but were significantly higher in the periventricular region of the hypothalamus in toads showing WR behavior. Concentrations in other brain regions, while highly variable among individuals, were not different between groups. Within the context of the natural history of a specialized desert toad, these results support the hypothesis that ir-ANG is associated with WR behavior in spadefoot toads in a manner analogous to oral drinking exhibited by other vertebrate clades. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pre-surgical planning and MR-tractography utility in brain tumour resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, A.; Fantozzi, L.M.; Bozzao, A. [University Sapienza, Department of Neuroradiology, S. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); D' Andrea, G.; Mastronardi, L.; Ferrante, L. [University Sapienza, Department of Neurosurgery, S. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Minniti, G. [University Sapienza, Department of Radiotherapy, S. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    The purposes of this study were (1) to evaluate the possible identification of trajectories of fibre tracts, (2) to examine the useful of a neuronavigation system for pre-surgical planning, (3) to assess pre- and post-surgery patients' clinical condition and (4) to evaluate the impact of this information on surgical planning and procedure. Twenty-eight right-handed patients were prospectively and consecutively studied. All the patients were clinically assessed by a neurologist in both pre- and post-surgical phases. Separately the pyramidal tract, optic radiation and arcuate fasciculus were reconstructed. The trajectories were considered suitable for surgical planning if there were no interruptions of any of the layers at the level of the lesion. Dedicated software 'merged' the acquired images with the tractographic processing, and the whole dataset was sent to the neuronavigation system. The assessment of the 37 visualised trajectories close to the tumour resulted in a modification of the surgical approach to corticotomy in six patients (21%); the impact on the definition of the resection margins during surgery was 64% (18 cases). The overall impact percentage on the surgical procedure was 82%. In 27 cases, the symptoms had not changed. MR-tractography provides the neurosurgeon with a new anatomical view that has an impact on the surgical resection planning for brain neoplasms. (orig.)

  16. Pre-surgical planning and MR-tractography utility in brain tumour resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, A.; Fantozzi, L.M.; Bozzao, A.; D'Andrea, G.; Mastronardi, L.; Ferrante, L.; Minniti, G.

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to evaluate the possible identification of trajectories of fibre tracts, (2) to examine the useful of a neuronavigation system for pre-surgical planning, (3) to assess pre- and post-surgery patients' clinical condition and (4) to evaluate the impact of this information on surgical planning and procedure. Twenty-eight right-handed patients were prospectively and consecutively studied. All the patients were clinically assessed by a neurologist in both pre- and post-surgical phases. Separately the pyramidal tract, optic radiation and arcuate fasciculus were reconstructed. The trajectories were considered suitable for surgical planning if there were no interruptions of any of the layers at the level of the lesion. Dedicated software 'merged' the acquired images with the tractographic processing, and the whole dataset was sent to the neuronavigation system. The assessment of the 37 visualised trajectories close to the tumour resulted in a modification of the surgical approach to corticotomy in six patients (21%); the impact on the definition of the resection margins during surgery was 64% (18 cases). The overall impact percentage on the surgical procedure was 82%. In 27 cases, the symptoms had not changed. MR-tractography provides the neurosurgeon with a new anatomical view that has an impact on the surgical resection planning for brain neoplasms. (orig.)

  17. The Cerebellum in Maintenance of a Motor Skill: A Hierarchy of Brain and Spinal Cord Plasticity Underlies H-Reflex Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolpaw, Jonathan R.; Chen, Xiang Yang

    2006-01-01

    Operant conditioning of the H-reflex, the electrical analog of the spinal stretch reflex, is a simple model of skill acquisition and involves plasticity in the spinal cord. Previous work showed that the cerebellum is essential for down-conditioning the H-reflex. This study asks whether the cerebellum is also essential for maintaining…

  18. Three-dimensional visualisation of the large bowel: a potential tool for assessing targeted drug delivery and colonic pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, A.C.; Mann, C.; Wilson, C.G.

    1995-01-01

    A study has been undertaken to assess the feasibility of three-dimensional imaging of the dispersion of a non-absorbable tracer released into the colon of normal subjects. Six healthy volunteers were selected who were participating in a scintigraphic study designed to assess the spreading of 1 MBq indium-111 Amberlite resin delivered from a delayed capsule system targeted to release in the ascending colon. In each case subjects were imaged using a rotating gamma camera over a data collection period of approximately 20 min. Three-dimensional volume rendered images demonstrated good visualisation of the dispersion of the tracer throughout the ascending, transverse and descending colon and provided good anatomical visualisation of the shape of the colon, not previously apparent from the planar views. The present study demonstrates for the first time, the successful three-dimensional imaging of a radiolabelled tracer dispersed throughout the colon and opens up the prospects for more detailed study of quantification of the volume and distribution of tracers contained within the colon. (orig.). With 1 fig

  19. Revealing the ecological content of long-duration audio-recordings of the environment through clustering and visualisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Yvonne F; Towsey, Michael; Roe, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Audio recordings of the environment are an increasingly important technique to monitor biodiversity and ecosystem function. While the acquisition of long-duration recordings is becoming easier and cheaper, the analysis and interpretation of that audio remains a significant research area. The issue addressed in this paper is the automated reduction of environmental audio data to facilitate ecological investigations. We describe a method that first reduces environmental audio to vectors of acoustic indices, which are then clustered. This can reduce the audio data by six to eight orders of magnitude yet retain useful ecological information. We describe techniques to visualise sequences of cluster occurrence (using for example, diel plots, rose plots) that assist interpretation of environmental audio. Colour coding acoustic clusters allows months and years of audio data to be visualised in a single image. These techniques are useful in identifying and indexing the contents of long-duration audio recordings. They could also play an important role in monitoring long-term changes in species abundance brought about by habitat degradation and/or restoration.

  20. Le plan du métro comme métaphore spatiale et cognitive dans la visualisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coleta Vaisman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Le point de départ de notre article est la carte du métro comme interface de médiation entre le territoire et l’utilisateur du réseau de transport. Cette carte est une représentation topographique qui, avec le diagramme de Beck, a évolué vers un modèle topologique. Notre démarche méthodologique s’articule en quatre points : le plan du métro vu comme un dialogue entre topographie et topologie ; la carte employée comme un système de visualisation ; la carte interactive comme métaphore spatiale et la carte comme modèle de représentation des connaissances. Sur cette base, nous voulons montrer que cette carte, hors contexte géographique, constitue une forme de métaphore visuelle. Notre travail montre l’importance de la visualisation de l’information et de ses représentations spatiales avec la métaphore du métro. Notre objectif va donc être d’établir les ponts conceptuels entre la métaphore spatiale et la métaphore cognitive pour passer des cartes interactives vers l’usage de la carte du métro comme une représentation visuelle universelle des connaissances.

  1. Organisation and functional role of the brain angiotensin system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Llorens-Cortes

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The discovery that all components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS are present in the brain led investigators to postulate the existence of a local brain RAS. Supporting this, angiotensin immunoreactive neurones have been visualised in the brain. Two major pathways were described: a forebrain pathway which connects circumventricular organs to the median preoptic nucleus, paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei, and a second pathway connecting the hypothalamus to the medulla oblongata. Blood-brain-barrier deficient circumventricular organs are rich in angiotensin II (Ang II receptors. By activating these receptors, circulating Ang II may act on central cardiovascular centres via angiotensinergic neurones, providing a link between peripheral and central Ang II systems. Among the effector peptides of the brain RAS, Ang II and angiotensin III (Ang III have the same affinity for type 1 and type 2 Ang II receptors. When injected into the brain, both peptides increase blood pressure (BP, water intake and pituitary hormone release and may modify learning and memory. Since Ang II is converted in vivo to Ang III, the nature of the true effector is unknown. This review summarises new insights into the predominant role of brain Ang III in the control of BP and underlines the fact that brain aminopeptidase A, the enzyme forming central Ang III, could constitute a putative central therapeutic target for the treatment of hypertension.

  2. Gene cloning and mRNA expression of glutamate dehydrogenase in the liver, brain and intestine of the swamp eel, Monopterus albus, exposed to freshwater, terrestrial conditions, environmental ammonia or salinity stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Y Toh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The swamp eel, Monopterus albus, is an obligatory air-breathing teleost which can survive long period of emersion, has high environmental and tissue ammonia tolerance, and acclimate from fresh to brackish water. This study was undertaken to clone and sequence gdh expressed in the liver, intestine and brain of M. albus, to verify whether more than one form of gdh were expressed, and to examine the gdh mRNA expressions in these three organs in fish exposed to various adverse conditions using quantitative real-time PCR. Only one gdh gene sequence, consisted of a 133 bp 5’ UTR, a CDS region spanning 1629 bp and a 3’ UTR of approximately 717 bp, was obtained from the liver, intestine and brain of M. albus. The translated Gdh amino acid sequence from the liver of M. albus had 542 residues and was confirmed to be Gdh1a. It had sequence identity of >90% with Oncorhynchus mykiss Gdh1a, Salmo salar Gdh1a1, Bostrychus sinensis Gdh1a and Tribolodon hakonensis Gdh1a, and formed a monophyletic clade with B. sinensis Gdh1a, Tetraodon nigroviridis Gdh1a, Chaenocephalus aceratus Gdh1a, Salmo salar Gdh1a1 and Gdh1a2 and O. mykiss Gdh1a. An increase in mRNA expression of gdh1a could be essential for increased glutamate production in support of increases in glutamine synthesis under certain environmental condition. Indeed, exposure of M. albus to 1 day of terrestrial conditions or 75 mmol l-1 NH4Cl, but not brackish water, resulted in a significant increase in gdh1a mRNA expression in the liver. However, exposure to brackish water, but not terrestrial conditions or 75 mmol l-1 NH4Cl, lead to a significant increase in the intestinal mRNA expression of gdh1a. By contrast, all the three experimental conditions had no significant effects on the mRNA expression of gdh1a in the brain of M. albus. Our results indicate for the first time that gdh mRNA expression was differentially up-regulated in the liver and intestine of M. albus, in responses to ammonia toxicity and

  3. Conditioning the Supply Chain in a Fast Moving Consumer Goods Business : Using value stream mapping to visualise, condition, manage information and product flow in Oriflame

    OpenAIRE

    Ehsan, Ghaffari

    2010-01-01

    Oriflame, since it was founded in Sweden in 1967 has become a major player in the cosmetics industry. The impressive annual growth of 17% that Oriflame has had in the last 17 years requires evidently a lot from the supply processes. It has been shown that the current set‐up and the countermeasures at hand do not provide a sustainable business model i.e. having a balance between service level and inventory level. The purpose of this thesis is to propose to Oriflame actions that need to be take...

  4. Some technological aspects of an evaluation and visualisation component for the safeguards integrated information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belenki, A.; Nishiwaki, Y.; Matsuoka, H.; Fedoseeva, I.

    2001-01-01

    According to Safeguards strengthening measures which include both Measures under Comprehensive Safeguards Agreements and Measures under Model Additional Protocol, the Agency receives much more information than some years before. It seems reasonable to develop an integrated information system (IIS) because information evaluation and review are important parts of Safeguards assessments. An integrated information system can include the following components: information search, primary messages selection, evaluation of received information, data storage, visualisation and evaluation of State's nuclear programme (SNP) and elaboration of management decisions. Hereby, IIS is a human-computer system where all components listed above are implemented. Within the framework of SNP a human factor plays an important role. SNP has a number of special properties such as uniqueness, multi-dimensions, subjectivity of its state evaluation, time variation, incompleteness of its description and the mentioned above human factor. For realistic simulation of SNP development it is necessary to reduce usage of quantitative methods and apply methods which are closer to perception of the outward things by a human being. This task requires to convert all available information, both qualitative and quantitative, into a special format. The format requires methods which are being developed on the basis of pragmatic, visual and Zadeh's linguistic variables which define corresponding scales. A pragmatic scale is defined on a basic metric scale taking into account a particular pragmatic cut of SNP. In other words pragmatic scale maps a pragmatic cut of the problem which is important from the point of view of IIS goal. By using pragmatic scales it is possible, for example, to estimate the speed of development of processes existing within the framework of SNP. The visual variable allows to solve the following engineering tasks: input of the expert's evaluations in the system and interpretations of its

  5. Technological evolution of axillary lymph nodes: Radiological visualisation in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eglitis, J.; Krumins, V.; Stengrevics, A.; Berzins, A.; Vevere, I.; Storozenko, G.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In patients with breast cancer, detection of axillary lymph node spread has a great prognostic significance. Visualisation of lymphatic glands is attracting attention of radiologists since long. Lymphogram usually shows 4-9 lymph glands as compared to 8 to 50 identified during surgical intervention. Lymphography is a laborious and complicated process requiring specific skills. Likewise, the evaluation and interpretation of results depends upon the experience of the specialist. We evaluated 234 breast cancer patients and found that lymphograms of these patients initially detected 1-2 central axillary lymph nodes followed by others. During surgical intervention, the total number of lymphatic glands removed from these patients was 3,241 of which only 2,693 (83.1%) were seen on lymphography. On further evaluation it was found that the largest groups of lymphatic nodes were seen in the following pattern (i) central axillary (ii) subclavicular (iii) lateral, with central axillary lymph nodes being the biggest (1.5 - 2 cm) and subclavicular the smallest (0.2 - 0.5 cm). Sternal lymph nodes receive lymph from medial quadrants of the breast and / or if the axillary lymph nodes are obstructed by metastases. The results of lymphography and post-operative examination matched in 71.7-75 % of cases. False positivity was seen in 19.2 % and false negative 9.1 % instances. As this method was not sufficiently selective and specific, its relative upsurge receded backwards and was forgotten. The last decade of the twentieth century saw a sentinel node (SN) concept. In advanced countries, the possibility to detect breast cancer of up to 1 cm diameter corresponding to T1A category, when the axillary lymph nodes still are not involved in malignant growth, accounts about 50%. Hence the search of lymphatic spread vis-a-vis sentinel node detection has gained more importance. Earlier, SN detection involved colour contrast methods, which was reasonably sensitive and specific in

  6. Frontal brain activity and behavioral indicators of affective states are weakly affected by thermal stimuli in sheep living in different housing conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine eVögeli

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Many stimuli evoke short-term emotional reactions. These reactions may play an important role in assessing how a subject perceives a stimulus. Additionally, long-term mood may modulate the emotional reactions but it is still unclear in what way. The question seems to be important in terms of animal welfare, as a negative mood may taint emotional reactions. In the present study with sheep, we investigated the effects of thermal stimuli on emotional reactions and the potential modulating effect of mood induced by manipulations of the housing conditions. We assume that unpredictable, stimulus-poor conditions lead to a negative and predictable, stimulus-rich conditions to a positive mood state. The thermal stimuli were applied to the upper breast during warm ambient temperatures: hot (as presumably negative, intermediate, and cold (as presumably positive. We recorded cortical activity by functional near-infrared spectroscopy, restlessness behavior (e.g. locomotor activity, aversive behaviors and ear postures as indicators of emotional reactions. The strongest hemodynamic reaction was found during a stimulus of intermediate valence independent of the animal’s housing conditions, whereas locomotor activity, ear movements and aversive behaviors were seen most in sheep from the unpredictable, stimulus-poor housing conditions, independent of stimulus valence. We conclude that, sheep perceived the thermal stimuli and differentiated between some of them. An adequate interpretation of the neuronal activity pattern remains difficult, though. The effects of housing conditions were small indicating that the induction of mood was only modestly efficacious. Therefore, a modulating effect of mood on the emotional reaction was not found.

  7. Dietary 2'-Fucosyllactose Enhances Operant Conditioning and Long-Term Potentiation via Gut-Brain Communication through the Vagus Nerve in Rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Vazquez

    Full Text Available 2´-fucosyllactose (2´-FL is an abundant human milk oligosaccharide (HMO in human milk with diverse biological effects. We recently reported ingested 2´-FL stimulates central nervous system (CNS function, such as hippocampal long term potentiation (LTP and learning and memory in rats. Conceivably the effect of 2´-FL on CNS function may be via the gut-brain axis (GBA, specifically the vagus nerve, and L-fucose (Fuc may play a role. This study had two aims: (1 determine if the effect of ingested 2´-FL on the modulation of CNS function is dependent on the integrity of the molecule; and (2 confirm if oral 2´-FL modified hippocampal LTP and associative learning related skills in rats submitted to bilateral subdiaphragmatic vagotomy. Results showed that 2´-FL but not Fuc enhanced LTP, and vagotomy inhibited the effects of oral 2´-FL on LTP and associative learning related paradigms. Taken together, the data show that dietary 2´-FL but not its Fuc moiety affects cognitive domains and improves learning and memory in rats. This effect is dependent on vagus nerve integrity, suggesting GBA plays a role in 2´-FL-mediated cognitive benefits.

  8. Outcome of secondary high-grade glioma in children previously treated for a malignant condition: A study of the Canadian Pediatric Brain Tumour Consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carret, Anne-Sophie; Tabori, Uri; Crooks, Bruce; Hukin, Juliette; Odame, Isaac; Johnston, Donna L.; Keene, Daniel L.; Freeman, Carolyn; Bouffet, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Reports of secondary high-grade glioma (HGG) in survivors of childhood cancer are scarce. The aim of this study was to review the pattern of diagnosis, the treatment, and outcome of secondary pediatric HGG. Patients and methods: We performed a multi-center retrospective study among the 17 paediatric institutions participating in the Canadian Pediatric Brain Tumour Consortium (CPBTC). Results: We report on 18 patients (14 males, 4 females) treated in childhood for a primary cancer, who subsequently developed a HGG as a second malignancy. All patients had previously received radiation therapy +/- chemotherapy for either acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (n = 9) or solid tumour (n = 9). All HGG occurred within the previous radiation fields. At the last follow-up, 17 patients have died and the median survival time is 9.75 months. Conclusion: Although aggressive treatment seems to provide sustained remissions in some patients, the optimal management is still to be defined. Further documentation of such cases is necessary in order to better understand the pathogenesis, the natural history and the prevention of these tumours

  9. Visualisation to enhance biomechanical tuning of ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs in stroke: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carse Bruce

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are a number of gaps in the evidence base for the use of ankle-foot orthoses for stroke patients. Three dimensional motion analysis offers an ideal method for objectively obtaining biomechanical gait data from stroke patients, however there are a number of major barriers to its use in routine clinical practice. One significant problem is the way in which the biomechanical data generated by these systems is presented. Through the careful design of bespoke biomechanical visualisation software it may be possible to present such data in novel ways to improve clinical decision making, track progress and increase patient understanding in the context of ankle-foot orthosis tuning. Methods A single-blind randomised controlled trial will be used to compare the use of biomechanical visualisation software in ankle-foot orthosis tuning against standard care (tuning using observation alone. Participants (n = 70 will have experienced a recent hemiplegia (1-12 months and will be identified by their care team as being suitable candidates for a rigid ankle-foot orthosis. The primary outcome measure will be walking velocity. Secondary outcome measures include; lower limb joint kinematics (thigh and shank global orientations & kinetics (knee and hip flexion/extension moments, ground reaction force FZ2 peak magnitude, step length, symmetry ratio based on step length, Modified Ashworth Scale, Modified Rivermead Mobility Index and EuroQol (EQ-5D. Additional qualitative measures will also be taken from participants (patients and clinicians at the beginning and end of their participation in the study. The main aim of the study is to determine whether or not the visualisation of biomechanical data can be used to improve the outcomes of tuning ankle-foot orthoses for stroke patients. Discussion In addition to answering the primary research question the broad range of measures that will be taken during this study are likely to contribute to a

  10. The multilingual brain

    OpenAIRE

    Engel de Abreu, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    The multilingual brain. Is a multilingual education beneficial for children? What are the optimal conditions under which a child can become perfectly multilingual? The given lecture will focus on the "cognitive advantages" of multilingualism and illustrate the impact that being multilingual has on the cognitive organisation of the brain. Practical questions regarding multilingual education will also be discussed. Ass et gutt e Kand méisproocheg ze erzéien? Wat sinn déi optimal Konditio...

  11. Insulin and brain aging

    OpenAIRE

    Baranowska-Bik, Agnieszka; Bik, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    The world’s population is living much longer than in the past. It is crucial to find as many pathological factors that deteriorate the health condition and well-being of elderly people as possible. Loss of activity and functions over time is typical for elderly people. Aging affects brain function, metabolism and structure in different ways, and these effects have multiple etiologies. Cognitive impairment, impaired neurotransmitter activity and reduction of brain volume are observed in th...

  12. Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  13. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  14. Brain Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Become a Member Home Early Development & Well-Being Brain Development A child’s brain undergoes an amazing period of development from birth ... neural connections each second. The development of the brain is influenced by many factors, including a child’s ...

  15. Visualisation of abscisic acid and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid in immature Phaseolus vulgaris L. seeds using desorption electrospray ionisation-imaging mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Hirofumi; Sensu, Takuya; Sato, Kei; Sato, Futoshi; Paxton, Thanai; Yumoto, Emi; Miyamoto, Koji; Asahina, Masashi; Yokota, Takao; Yamane, Hisakazu

    2017-02-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and the jasmonic acid related-compound 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) play crucial roles in seed development, dormancy, and germination. However, a lack of suitable techniques for visualising plant hormones has restricted the investigation of their biological mechanisms. In the present study, desorption electrospray ionisation-imaging mass spectrometry (DESI-IMS), a powerful tool for visualising metabolites in biological tissues, was used to visualise ABA and OPDA in immature Phaseolus vulgaris L. seed sections. The mass spectra, peak values and chemical formulae obtained from the analysis of seed sections were consistent with those determined for ABA and OPDA standards, as were the precursor and major fragment ions observed in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) imaging. Furthermore, the precursor and fragment ion images showed similar distribution patterns. In addition, the localisation of ABA and OPDA using DESI-IMS was confirmed using liquid chromatography-MS/MS (LC-MS/MS). The results indicated that ABA was mainly distributed in the radical and cotyledon of the embryo, whereas OPDA was distributed exclusively in external structures, such as the hilum and seed coat. The present study is the first to report the visualisation of plant hormones using IMS, and demonstrates that DESI-IMS is a promising technique for future plant hormone research.

  16. What Do Cells Really Look Like? An Inquiry into Students' Difficulties in Visualising a 3-D Biological Cell and Lessons for Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijapurkar, Jyotsna; Kawalkar, Aisha; Nambiar, Priya

    2014-01-01

    In our explorations of students' concepts in an inquiry science classroom with grade 6 students from urban schools in India, we uncovered a variety of problems in their understanding of biological cells as structural and functional units of living organisms. In particular, we found not only that they visualised the cell as a two-dimensional (2-D)…

  17. Left Brain. Right Brain. Whole Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    2004-01-01

    As the United States student population is becoming more diverse, library media specialists need to find ways to address these distinctive needs. However, some of these differences transcend culture, touching on variations in the brain itself. Most people have a dominant side of the brain, which can affect their personality and learning style.…

  18. iPadPix—A novel educational tool to visualise radioactivity measured by a hybrid pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, O; Müller, A; Benoit, M

    2016-01-01

    With the ability to attribute signatures of ionising radiation to certain particle types, pixel detectors offer a unique advantage over the traditional use of Geiger-Müller tubes also in educational settings. We demonstrate in this work how a Timepix readout chip combined with a standard 300 μ m pixelated silicon sensor can be used to visualise radioactivity in real-time and by means of augmented reality. The chip family is the result of technology transfer from High Energy Physics at CERN and facilitated by the Medipix Collaboration. This article summarises the development of a prototype based on an iPad mini and open source software detailed in ref. [1]. Appropriate experimental activities that explore natural radioactivity and everyday objects are given to demonstrate the use of this new tool in educational settings.

  19. Identification and visualisation of possible ancient ocean shoreline on Mars using submeter-resolution Digital Terrain Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świąder, Andrzej

    2014-12-01

    Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) produced from stereoscopic, submeter-resolution High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) imagery provide a solid basis for all morphometric analyses of the surface of Mars. In view of the fact that a more effective use of DTMs is hindered by complicated and time-consuming manual handling, the automated process provided by specialists of the Ames Intelligent Robotics Group (NASA), Ames Stereo Pipeline, constitutes a good alternative. Four DTMs, covering the global dichotomy boundary between the southern highlands and northern lowlands along the line of the presumable Arabia shoreline, were produced and analysed. One of them included forms that are likely to be indicative of an oceanic basin that extended across the lowland northern hemisphere of Mars in the geological past. The high resolution DTMs obtained were used in the process of landscape visualisation.

  20. iPadPix—A novel educational tool to visualise radioactivity measured by a hybrid pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, O.; Schmeling, S.; Müller, A.; Benoit, M.

    2016-01-01

    With the ability to attribute signatures of ionising radiation to certain particle types, pixel detectors offer a unique advantage over the traditional use of Geiger-Müller tubes also in educational settings. We demonstrate in this work how a Timepix readout chip combined with a standard 300μm pixelated silicon sensor can be used to visualise radioactivity in real-time and by means of augmented reality. The chip family is the result of technology transfer from High Energy Physics at CERN and facilitated by the Medipix Collaboration. This article summarises the development of a prototype based on an iPad mini and open source software detailed in ref. [1]. Appropriate experimental activities that explore natural radioactivity and everyday objects are given to demonstrate the use of this new tool in educational settings.

  1. Use of DMACA to visualise flavan-3-ols in grape berry skins (Vitis vinifera L., CV Cabernet Franc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Chevalier

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds are of great importance in Enology. They play a major role in the elaboration of red wines and during wine preservation, and contribute greatly to their organoleptic properties. Among them, flavonoïds constitute the major group present in berry skins. Their histological study is based classically on the use of Toluidine blue O as a staining agent, which is not specific of any type of phenolics. The use of DMACA (p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde, which is specific of tannins (flavan-3-ols, permitted to precise the localisation of these compounds without any risk of error ; it allowed also for the visualisation of tannins, stuck to the tonoplast, which had not been identified with Toluidine blue O.

  2. Steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy imaging under evanescent excitation for visualisation of FRET at the plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Devauges

    Full Text Available We present a novel imaging system combining total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy with measurement of steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy in order to perform live cell Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET imaging at the plasma membrane. We compare directly the imaging performance of fluorescence anisotropy resolved TIRF with epifluorescence illumination. The use of high numerical aperture objective for TIRF required correction for induced depolarization factors. This arrangement enabled visualisation of conformational changes of a Raichu-Cdc42 FRET biosensor by measurement of intramolecular FRET between eGFP and mRFP1. Higher activity of the probe was found at the cell plasma membrane compared to intracellularly. Imaging fluorescence anisotropy in TIRF allowed clear differentiation of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor from negative control mutants. Finally, inhibition of Cdc42 was imaged dynamically in live cells, where we show temporal changes of the activity of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor.

  3. Brain Basics: Know Your Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... however, the brain is beginning to relinquish its secrets. Scientists have learned more about the brain in ... through the activity of these lobes. At the top of each temporal lobe is an area responsible ...

  4. C2x: A tool for visualisation and input preparation for CASTEP and other electronic structure codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, M. J.

    2018-04-01

    The c2x code fills two distinct roles. Its first role is in acting as a converter between the binary format .check files from the widely-used CASTEP [1] electronic structure code and various visualisation programs. Its second role is to manipulate and analyse the input and output files from a variety of electronic structure codes, including CASTEP, ONETEP and VASP, as well as the widely-used 'Gaussian cube' file format. Analysis includes symmetry analysis, and manipulation arbitrary cell transformations. It continues to be under development, with growing functionality, and is written in a form which would make it easy to extend it to working directly with files from other electronic structure codes. Data which c2x is capable of extracting from CASTEP's binary checkpoint files include charge densities, spin densities, wavefunctions, relaxed atomic positions, forces, the Fermi level, the total energy, and symmetry operations. It can recreate .cell input files from checkpoint files. Volumetric data can be output in formats useable by many common visualisation programs, and c2x will itself calculate integrals, expand data into supercells, and interpolate data via combinations of Fourier and trilinear interpolation. It can extract data along arbitrary lines (such as lines between atoms) as 1D output. C2x is able to convert between several common formats for describing molecules and crystals, including the .cell format of CASTEP. It can construct supercells, reduce cells to their primitive form, and add specified k-point meshes. It uses the spglib library [2] to report symmetry information, which it can add to .cell files. C2x is a command-line utility, so is readily included in scripts. It is available under the GPL and can be obtained from http://www.c2x.org.uk. It is believed to be the only open-source code which can read CASTEP's .check files, so it will have utility in other projects.

  5. 3D visualisation and artistic imagery to enhance interest in `hidden environments' - new approaches to soil science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilford, J.; Falconer, R. E.; Wade, R.; Scott-Brown, K. C.

    2014-09-01

    Interactive Virtual Environments (VEs) have the potential to increase student interest in soil science. Accordingly a bespoke 'soil atlas' was created using Java3D as an interactive 3D VE, to show soil information in the context of (and as affected by) the over-lying landscape. To display the below-ground soil characteristics, four sets of artistic illustrations were produced, each set showing the effects of soil organic-matter density and water content on fungal density, to determine potential for visualisations and interactivity in stimulating interest in soil and soil illustrations, interest being an important factor in facilitating learning. The illustrations were created using 3D modelling packages, and a wide range of styles were produced. This allowed a preliminary study of the relative merits of different artistic styles, scientific-credibility, scale, abstraction and 'realism' (e.g. photo-realism or realism of forms), and any relationship between these and the level of interest indicated by the study participants in the soil visualisations and VE. The study found significant differences in mean interest ratings for different soil illustration styles, as well as in the perception of scientific-credibility of these styles, albeit for both measures there was considerable difference of attitude between participants about particular styles. There was also found to be a highly significant positive correlation between participants rating styles highly for interest and highly for scientific-credibility. There was furthermore a particularly high interest rating among participants for seeing temporal soil processes illustrated/animated, suggesting this as a particularly promising method for further stimulating interest in soil illustrations and soil itself.

  6. Quantitative myocardial perfusion PET combined with coronary anatomy derived from CT angiography. Validation of a new fusion and visualisation software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, Harald; Weise, Reiner; Burchert, Wolfgang; Fricke, Eva; Elsner, Andreas; Bolte, Matthias; Domik, Gitta; Hoff, Joerg van den

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Dynamic perfusion PET offers a clinical relevant advantage over myocardial perfusion scintigraphy due to its ability to measure myocardial blood flow quantitatively. This leads to an improved detection of multivessel disease and the possibility to assess not only the culprit lesion but lower grade stenoses as well. For appropriate revascularization, perfusion defects must be matched to coronary lesions. It has been shown that image fusion of morphological and functional images is superior to side-by-side analysis. Still, software for quantitative perfusion PET combined with CT angiography is rare. In this paper we present a new software tool for image fusion and visualization of quantitative perfusion PET and coronary morphology derived from CT angiography. Methods: In our software, a PET uptake image is used for manual co-registration. Co-registration results are then applied to the functional data derived from compartment modelling. To evaluate the reproducibility of the manual co-registration, we calculated the deviation between a series of manual co-registrations performed on nine pairs of unregistered PET and CT datasets by five trained participants. Two dimensional transfer functions were used to highlight the coronary arteries from the CT study in the combined data sets. Results: The average Euclidian distances for three references points were between 3.7 and 4.1 mm. The maximum distance was 10.6 mm. By the use of the two dimensional transfer functions, coronary anatomy could be easily visualised either by user-interaction or automatically by use of neuronal networks. Conclusions: With this approach it is possible to combine quantitative perfusion PET with coronary anatomy derived from CT angiography. Our first experiences indicate that manual image fusion with our tool is reproducible and that visualisation of the combined datasets is achieved within short time. (orig.)

  7. COMPUTER GRAPHICS MEETS IMAGE FUSION: THE POWER OF TEXTURE BAKING TO SIMULTANEOUSLY VISUALISE 3D SURFACE FEATURES AND COLOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Verhoeven

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Since a few years, structure-from-motion and multi-view stereo pipelines have become omnipresent in the cultural heritage domain. The fact that such Image-Based Modelling (IBM approaches are capable of providing a photo-realistic texture along the threedimensional (3D digital surface geometry is often considered a unique selling point, certainly for those cases that aim for a visually pleasing result. However, this texture can very often also obscure the underlying geometrical details of the surface, making it very hard to assess the morphological features of the digitised artefact or scene. Instead of constantly switching between the textured and untextured version of the 3D surface model, this paper presents a new method to generate a morphology-enhanced colour texture for the 3D polymesh. The presented approach tries to overcome this switching between objects visualisations by fusing the original colour texture data with a specific depiction of the surface normals. Whether applied to the original 3D surface model or a lowresolution derivative, this newly generated texture does not solely convey the colours in a proper way but also enhances the smalland large-scale spatial and morphological features that are hard or impossible to perceive in the original textured model. In addition, the technique is very useful for low-end 3D viewers, since no additional memory and computing capacity are needed to convey relief details properly. Apart from simple visualisation purposes, the textured 3D models are now also better suited for on-surface interpretative mapping and the generation of line drawings.

  8. Computer Graphics Meets Image Fusion: the Power of Texture Baking to Simultaneously Visualise 3d Surface Features and Colour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, G. J.

    2017-08-01

    Since a few years, structure-from-motion and multi-view stereo pipelines have become omnipresent in the cultural heritage domain. The fact that such Image-Based Modelling (IBM) approaches are capable of providing a photo-realistic texture along the threedimensional (3D) digital surface geometry is often considered a unique selling point, certainly for those cases that aim for a visually pleasing result. However, this texture can very often also obscure the underlying geometrical details of the surface, making it very hard to assess the morphological features of the digitised artefact or scene. Instead of constantly switching between the textured and untextured version of the 3D surface model, this paper presents a new method to generate a morphology-enhanced colour texture for the 3D polymesh. The presented approach tries to overcome this switching between objects visualisations by fusing the original colour texture data with a specific depiction of the surface normals. Whether applied to the original 3D surface model or a lowresolution derivative, this newly generated texture does not solely convey the colours in a proper way but also enhances the smalland large-scale spatial and morphological features that are hard or impossible to perceive in the original textured model. In addition, the technique is very useful for low-end 3D viewers, since no additional memory and computing capacity are needed to convey relief details properly. Apart from simple visualisation purposes, the textured 3D models are now also better suited for on-surface interpretative mapping and the generation of line drawings.

  9. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): Condition Information What is TBI? TBI ... external force that affects the functioning of the brain. It can be caused by a bump or ...

  10. Effect of a change in housing conditions on body weight, behavior and brain neurotransmitters in male C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquarelli, Noemi; Voehringer, Patrizia; Henke, Julia; Ferger, Boris

    2017-08-30

    The development of modern housing regimes such as individually ventilated cage (IVC) systems has become very popular and attractive in order to reduce spreading of pathogenic organisms and to lower the risk to develop a laboratory animal allergy for staff members. Additionally, optimal housing of laboratory animals contributes to improve animal health status and ensures high and comparable experimental and animal welfare standards. However, it has not been clearly elucidated whether 1) a change to IVC systems have an impact on various physiological phenotypic parameters of mice when compared to conventional, standard cages and 2) if this is further affected by changing from social to single housing. Therefore, we investigated the influence of a change in housing conditions (standard cages with social housing changed to standard or IVC cages combined with social or single housing) on body weight, behavior and a neurochemical fingerprint of male C57BL/6J mice. Body weight progression was significantly reduced when changing mice to single or social IVC cages as well as in single standard cages when compared to social standard housing. Automated motor activity measurement in the open field showed that mice maintained in social husbandry with standard cages displayed the lowest exploratory behavior but the highest activity difference upon amphetamine treatment. Elevated plus maze test revealed that a change to IVC single and social housing as well as single standard housing produced anxiety-related behavior when compared to maintenance in social standard housing. Additionally, postmortem neurochemical analysis of the striatum using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrochemical detection showed significant differences in striatal dopamine and serotonin turnover levels. In summary, our data indicate a crucial influence of a change in housing conditions on several mouse phenotype parameters. We propose that the maintenance of well-defined housing

  11. Clinically significant changes in the emotional condition of relatives of patients with severe traumatic brain injury during sub-acute rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, Anne; Kristensen, Karin Spangsberg; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    .2% and 58.1% of relatives had scores above cut-off values on the anxiety and depression scales, respectively. On the anxiety scale 69.7% of these experienced a reliable improvement according to the Reliable Change Index (RCI) and 45.5% also obtained CSC, as their end-point was below the cut-off value...... the Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R) when the patients were admitted to sub-acute rehabilitation and at discharge. Improvement in emotional condition was investigated using the following criteria: (i) statistically reliable improvement; and (ii) clinically significant change (CSC). Results: At admission, 53...... in the patients. Conclusion: Of the relatives who reported scores above cut-off values on the anxiety and depression scales at patient's admission, approximately 40% experienced CSC in anxiety and depression during the patient's rehabilitation. Relatives of patients experiencing improvement during inpatient...

  12. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging of the brain: technical considerations and normal brain development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huisman, Thierry A.G.M.; Kubik-Huch, Rahel; Marincek, Borut [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Martin, Ernst [Department of Neuroradiology and Magnetic Resonance, University Children' s Hospital, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-08-01

    Fetal MRI examines non-invasively the unborn fetus. Ultrafast MRI sequences effectively suppress fetal motion. Multiple case reports and studies have shown that fetal MRI is particularly helpful in the evaluation of the central nervous system. The high contrast-to-noise ratio, the high spatial resolution, the multiplanar capabilities, the large field of view and the simultaneous visualisation of fetal and maternal structures have proven to be advantageous. Fetal MRI is particularly helpful in the evaluation of the normal and pathological development of the brain. Despite the fact that no side effects have been reported or are to be expected, the use of MRI during pregnancy is still limited to the second and third trimester of pregnancy. Magnetic resonance imaging contrast media are not to be used as it passes the placenta. Ultrasound remains the primary screening modality for fetal pathology; fetal MRI can serve as an adjunct or second-line imaging modality. (orig.)

  13. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging of the brain: technical considerations and normal brain development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huisman, Thierry A.G.M.; Kubik-Huch, Rahel; Marincek, Borut; Martin, Ernst

    2002-01-01

    Fetal MRI examines non-invasively the unborn fetus. Ultrafast MRI sequences effectively suppress fetal motion. Multiple case reports and studies have shown that fetal MRI is particularly helpful in the evaluation of the central nervous system. The high contrast-to-noise ratio, the high spatial resolution, the multiplanar capabilities, the large field of view and the simultaneous visualisation of fetal and maternal structures have proven to be advantageous. Fetal MRI is particularly helpful in the evaluation of the normal and pathological development of the brain. Despite the fact that no side effects have been reported or are to be expected, the use of MRI during pregnancy is still limited to the second and third trimester of pregnancy. Magnetic resonance imaging contrast media are not to be used as it passes the placenta. Ultrasound remains the primary screening modality for fetal pathology; fetal MRI can serve as an adjunct or second-line imaging modality. (orig.)

  14. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging of the brain: technical considerations and normal brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Thierry A G M; Martin, Ernst; Kubik-Huch, Rahel; Marincek, Borut

    2002-08-01

    Fetal MRI examines non-invasively the unborn fetus. Ultrafast MRI sequences effectively suppress fetal motion. Multiple case reports and studies have shown that fetal MRI is particularly helpful in the evaluation of the central nervous system. The high contrast-to-noise ratio, the high spatial resolution, the multiplanar capabilities, the large field of view and the simultaneous visualisation of fetal and maternal structures have proven to be advantageous. Fetal MRI is particularly helpful in the evaluation of the normal and pathological development of the brain. Despite the fact that no side effects have been reported or are to be expected, the use of MRI during pregnancy is still limited to the second and third trimester of pregnancy. Magnetic resonance imaging contrast media are not to be used as it passes the placenta. Ultrasound remains the primary screening modality for fetal pathology; fetal MRI can serve as an adjunct or second-line imaging modality.

  15. The neonatal brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flodmark, O.

    1987-01-01

    The clinical examination of the CNS in the neonate is often difficult in cases of complex pathology. Diagnostic imaging of the neonatal brain has become extremely useful and in the last decade has developed in two main directions: CT and US. MR imaging has been used recently with varying success in the diagnosis of pathology in the neonatal brain. Despite technical difficulties, this imaging method is likely to become increasingly important in the neonate. The paper examines the normal neonatal brain anatomy as seen with the different modalities, followed by pathologic conditions. Attention is directed to the common pathology, in asphyxiated newborns, the patholphysiology of intraventicular hemorrhage and periventricular leukomalacia in the preterm neonate, and hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in the term neonate. Pitfalls, artifacts, and problems in image interpretation are illustrated. Finally, the subsequent appearance of neonatal pathology later in infancy and childhood is discussed

  16. Evaluating the clinical utility of the Validity-10 for detecting amplified symptom reporting for patients with mild traumatic brain injury and comorbid psychological health conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dretsch, Michael N; Williams, Kathy; Staver, Tara; Grammer, Geoffrey; Bleiberg, Joseph; DeGraba, Thomas; Lange, Rael T

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the Validity-10 scale with the PAI Negative Impression Management Scale (PAI-NIM) for detecting exaggerated symptom reporting in active-duty military service members (SMs) admitted with unremitting mild TBI symptoms and comorbid psychological health conditions (mTBI/PH). Data were analyzed from 254 SMs who completed the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI) and Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) as a part of a larger battery of self-report symptom scales upon admission to the intensive-outpatient TBI treatment program at a military medical center. Symptom exaggeration was operationalized using the PAI Negative Impression Management Scale (PAI-NIM). A PAI-NIM score of ≥73 was categorized as positive for symptom exaggeration (SVTpos), while a lower score was categorized as negative for symptom exaggeration (SVTneg). SMs in the SVTpos group (n = 34) had significantly higher scores (p ≤ .004) on the PAI clinical scales as well as on the NSI total score (range: d = 0.59-1.91) compared to those who were SVTneg (n = 220). The optimal cut-score for the NSI Val-10 scale to identify possible symptom exaggeration was ≥26 (sensitivity = .29, specificity = .95, PPP = .74, NPP = .71). In patients suffering from mTBI/PH, the Validity-10 requires a higher cut-score than previously reported to be useful as a metric of exaggerated symptom reporting.

  17. Brain glycogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Linea Lykke Frimodt; Müller, Margit S; Walls, Anne B

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g., liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia....... In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies-it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e., synaptic...... activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms...

  18. Brain Research: Implications for Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Louise M.; Soares, Anthony T.

    Brain research has illuminated several areas of the learning process: (1) learning as association; (2) learning as reinforcement; (3) learning as perception; (4) learning as imitation; (5) learning as organization; (6) learning as individual style; and (7) learning as brain activity. The classic conditioning model developed by Pavlov advanced…

  19. Visualisation of the velocity field in a scaled water model for validation of numerical calculations for a powder fuelled boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumortier, Laurent [Luleaa Univ. of Technology (Sweden)

    2001-01-01

    Validation of numerical predictions of the flow field in a powder fired industry boiler by flow visualisation in a water model has been studied. The bark powder fired boiler at AssiDomaen Kraftliner in Piteaa has been used as a case study. A literature study covering modelling of combusting flows by water models and different flow visualisation techniques has been carried out. The main conclusion as regards the use of water models is that only qualitative information can be expected. As far as turbulent flow is assured in the model as well as the real furnace, the same Reynolds number is not required. Geometrical similarity is important but modelling of burner jets requires adaptation of the jet diameters in the model. Guidelines for this are available and are presented in the report. The review of visualisation techniques shows that a number of methods have been used successfully for validation of flow field predictions. The conclusion is that the Particle Image Velocimetry and Particle Tracking Velocimetry methods could be very suitable for validation purposes provided that optical access is possible. The numerical predictions include flow fields in a 1130 scale model of the AssiDomaen furnace with water flow as well as flow and temperature fields in the actual furnace. Two burner arrangements were considered both for the model and the actual furnace, namely the present configuration with four front burners and a proposed modification where an additional burner is positioned at a side wall below the other burners. There are many similarities between the predicted flow fields in the model and the full scale furnace but there are also some differences, in particular in the region above the burners and the effects of the low region re-circulation on the lower burner jets. The experiments with the water model have only included the arrangement with four front burners. There were problems determining the velocities in the jets and the comparisons with predictions are

  20. A novel visualisation tool for climate services: a case study of temperature extremes and human mortality in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, R.; Ballester, J.; Robine, J.; Herrmann, F. R.; Jupp, T. E.; Stephenson, D.; Rodó, X.

    2013-12-01

    Users of climate information often require probabilistic information on which to base their decisions. However, communicating information contained within a probabilistic forecast presents a challenge. In this paper we demonstrate a novel visualisation technique to display ternary probabilistic forecasts on a map in order to inform decision making. In this method, ternary probabilistic forecasts, which assign probabilities to a set of three outcomes (e.g. low, medium, and high risk), are considered as a point in a triangle of barycentric coordinates. This allows a unique colour to be assigned to each forecast from a continuum of colours defined on the triangle. Colour saturation increases with information gain relative to the reference forecast (i.e. the long term average). This provides additional information to decision makers compared with conventional methods used in seasonal climate forecasting, where one colour is used to represent one forecast category on a forecast map (e.g. red = ';dry'). We use the tool to present climate-related mortality projections across Europe. Temperature and humidity are related to human mortality via location-specific transfer functions, calculated using historical data. Daily mortality data at the NUTS2 level for 16 countries in Europe were obtain from 1998-2005. Transfer functions were calculated for 54 aggregations in Europe, defined using criteria related to population and climatological similarities. Aggregations are restricted to fall within political boundaries to avoid problems related to varying adaptation policies between countries. A statistical model is fit to cold and warm tails to estimate future mortality using forecast temperatures, in a Bayesian probabilistic framework. Using predefined categories of temperature-related mortality risk, we present maps of probabilistic projections for human mortality at seasonal to decadal time scales. We demonstrate the information gained from using this technique compared to more

  1. Assessment and visualisation of uncertainty in remote sensing land cover classifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wel, F.J.M. van der

    2000-01-01

    The ability of space- and airborne instruments to measure the amount of electromagnetic radiation reflected and emitted by the Earth’s surface has proved to be valuable for the understanding of our environment, as it provides for an overwhelming flow of data on the appearance and condition of our

  2. Brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishkin, F.S.

    1978-01-01

    The techniques of brain imaging and results in perfusion studies and delayed images are outlined. An analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of the brain scan in a variety of common problems is discussed, especially as compared with other available procedures. Both nonneoplastic and neoplastic lesions are considered. (Auth/C.F.)

  3. Brain Abscess after Esophageal Dilatation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaïni, S; Grand, M; Michelsen, J

    2007-01-01

    Brain abscess formation is a serious disease often seen as a complication to other diseases and to procedures. A rare predisposing condition is dilatation therapy of esophageal strictures. A case of brain abscess formation after esophageal dilatations is presented. A 59-year-old woman was admitted...... with malaise, progressive lethargy, fever, aphasia and hemiparesis. Six days before she had been treated with esophageal dilatation for a stricture caused by accidental ingestion of caustic soda. The brain abscess was treated with surgery and antibiotics. She recovered completely. This clinical case...... illustrates the possible association between therapeutic esophageal dilatation and the risk of brain abscess formation....

  4. Spatial Montage and Multimedia Ethnography: Using Computers to Visualise Aspects of Migration and Social Division Among a Displaced Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Aston

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses how computer-based techniques of spatial montage can be used to visualise aspects of migration and social division among a displaced community. It is based on an ongoing collaboration between the author and the anthropologist, Wendy JAMES. The work is based on a substantial archive of ethnographic photographs, audio, cine and video recordings collected by JAMES in the Sudan/Ethiopian borderlands over four decades. Initially recording the way of life of several minority peoples, she was later able to follow their fortunes during the repeated war displacements and separations they suffered from the 1980s onwards. The recordings document work rhythms, dance, song and storytelling, music and other sensory rich performances alongside spoken memories of past events. The research is developing spatial montage techniques to draw comparisons across time, between multiple points of view, and between recordings of events and spoken memories of these events. It is argued that these techniques can be used to facilitate direct engagement with ethnographic recordings, creating multimedia experiences which can flexibly integrate fieldwork data into academic discourse. In so doing it is proposed that these techniques offer new tools to enhance the analysis and understanding of issues relating to migration and social division. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1002361

  5. Visualisation and orbital-free parametrisation of the large-Z scaling of the kinetic energy density of atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancio, Antonio C.; Redd, Jeremy J.

    2017-03-01

    The scaling of neutral atoms to large Z, combining periodicity with a gradual trend to homogeneity, is a fundamental probe of density functional theory, one that has driven recent advances in understanding both the kinetic and exchange-correlation energies. Although research focus is normally upon the scaling of integrated energies, insights can also be gained from energy densities. We visualise the scaling of the positive-definite kinetic energy density (KED) in closed-shell atoms, in comparison to invariant quantities based upon the gradient and Laplacian of the density. We notice a striking fit of the KED within the core of any atom to a gradient expansion using both the gradient and the Laplacian, appearing as an asymptotic limit around which the KED oscillates. The gradient expansion is qualitatively different from that derived from first principles for a slowly varying electron gas and is correlated with a nonzero Pauli contribution to the KED near the nucleus. We propose and explore orbital-free meta-GGA models for the kinetic energy to describe these features, with some success, but the effects of quantum oscillations in the inner shells of atoms make a complete parametrisation difficult. We discuss implications for improved orbital-free description of molecular properties.

  6. Visualising variation in mortality rates across the life course and by sex, USA and comparator states, 1933-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbloemen, Laura; Dorling, Danny; Minton, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Previous research showed that younger adult males in the USA have, since the 1950s, died at a faster rate than females of the same age. In this paper, we quantify this difference, and explore possible explanations for the differences at different ages and in different years. Using data from the Human Mortality Database (HMD), the number of additional male deaths per 10 000 female deaths was calculated for each year from 1933 to 2010, and for each year of age from 0 to 60 years, for the USA, and a number of other countries for comparison. The data were explored visually using shaded contour plots. Gender differences in excess mortality have increased. Coming of age (between the ages of 15 and 25 years of age) is especially perilous for men relative to women now compared with the past in the USA; the visualisations highlight this change as important. Sex differences in mortality risks at various ages are not static. While women may today have an advantage when it comes to life expectancy, in the USA, this has greatly increased since the 1930s. Just as young adulthood for women has been made safer through safer antenatal and childbirth practices, changes in public policy can make the social environment safer for men. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Computer-assisted orthognathic surgery: waferless maxillary positioning, versatility, and accuracy of an image-guided visualisation display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinser, Max J; Mischkowski, Robert A; Dreiseidler, Timo; Thamm, Oliver C; Rothamel, Daniel; Zöller, Joachim E

    2013-12-01

    There may well be a shift towards 3-dimensional orthognathic surgery when virtual surgical planning can be applied clinically. We present a computer-assisted protocol that uses surgical navigation supplemented by an interactive image-guided visualisation display (IGVD) to transfer virtual maxillary planning precisely. The aim of this study was to analyse its accuracy and versatility in vivo. The protocol consists of maxillofacial imaging, diagnosis, planning of virtual treatment, and intraoperative surgical transfer using an IGV display. The advantage of the interactive IGV display is that the virtually planned maxilla and its real position can be completely superimposed during operation through a video graphics array (VGA) camera, thereby augmenting the surgeon's 3-dimensional perception. Sixteen adult class III patients were treated with by bimaxillary osteotomy. Seven hard tissue variables were chosen to compare (ΔT1-T0) the virtual maxillary planning (T0) with the postoperative result (T1) using 3-dimensional cephalometry. Clinically acceptable precision for the surgical planning transfer of the maxilla (orthognathic planning. Copyright © 2013 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cervical spine imaging in trauma: Does the use of grid and filter combination improve visualisation of the cervicothoracic junction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, Nimit; Rachapalli, Vamsidhar; Burns, Helen; Lloyd, David C.F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of filter and anti-scatter grid combination in demonstrating the cervicothoracic junction in lateral cervical spine radiographs performed for trauma patients. Methods: Following a change in departmental protocol in our hospital, anti-scatter grid and filter are routinely used for lateral cervical spine radiograph in all trauma patients with immobilised cervical spine. A retrospective study was done to compare the efficacy of lateral cervical spine radiographs in demonstrating the cervicothoracic junction for a period of three months before and after the implementation of the change. All images were independently evaluated by two observers. Results: 253 trauma patients had a lateral cervical spine radiograph done in January to March 2003 without using the anti-scatter grid and filter while 309 patients in January to March 2007, using filter and grid. Inter-observer variability between the two observers was calculated using Cohen's Kappa which showed good and very good agreement for 2003 and 2007 respectively. 126 (49.8%) images adequately demonstrated the cervicothoracic junction without using filter and grid while 189 (61.1%) were adequate following their use. This was statistically significant (Fischer exact test, p value = 0.0081). Conclusion: The use of filter and anti-scatter grids improves the visualisation of cervicothoracic junction in lateral cervical spine imaging and reduces the need to repeat exposure.

  9. Three-dimensional fracture visualisation of multidetector CT of the skull base in trauma patients: comparison of three reconstruction algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringl, Helmut; Schernthaner, Ruediger; Philipp, Marcel O.; Metz-Schimmerl, Sylvia; Czerny, Christian; Weber, Michael; Steiner-Ringl, Andrea; Peloschek, Philipp; Herold, Christian J.; Schima, Wolfgang; Gaebler, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively assess the detection rate of skull-base fractures for three different three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction methods of cranial CT examinations in trauma patients. A total of 130 cranial CT examinations of patients with previous head trauma were subjected to 3D reconstruction of the skull base, using solid (SVR) and transparent (TVR) volume-rendering technique and maximum intensity projection (MIP). Three radiologists independently evaluated all reconstructions as well as standard high-resolution multiplanar reformations (HR-MPRs). Mean fracture detection rates for all readers reading rotating reconstructions were 39, 36, 61 and 64% for SVR, TVR, MIP and HR-MPR respectively. Although not significantly different from HR-MPR with respect to sensitivity (P = 0.9), MIP visualised 18% of fractures that were not reported in HR-MPR. Because of the relatively low detection rate using HR-MPRs alone, we recommend reading MIP reconstructions in addition to the obligatory HR-MPRs to improve fracture detection. (orig.)

  10. IDENTIFYING CONCERNS OF POSTGRADUATES IN COMMUNITY MEDICINE USING A QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHOD- VISUALISATION IN PARTICIPATORY PROGRAMMES (VIPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Babu Koganti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Postgraduation in Community Medicine finds few takers and those who do take it up as a career option have many concerns regarding the course. To understand the issues involved, a qualitative method called VIPP was used, which is a people centered approach to identify issues from the perspectives of those involved. This study is set to identify the problems faced by postgraduate students in Community Medicine regarding their course of study. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was conducted during a regional postgraduate CME of the NTR University of Health Sciences, Andhra Pradesh. Postgraduates and junior faculty from 5 medical colleges in the region were involved in the exercise after taking their informed consent. Visualisation in Participatory Programmes (VIPP, a qualitative method was used as a means of obtaining information followed by a discussion with visual display of all the mentioned items. RESULTS The themes that emerged are problems faced due to the student’s felt inadequacies, faculty shortcomings, issues regarding the department/college management and lacunae in the course structure and implementation. CONCLUSION In VIPP, sensitive issues are visually displayed for all to see and contemplate. Many of the student’s issues were actually brought on by poor curriculum planning and implementation. This was also undermining students’ self-esteem and causing anxiety about future career prospects.

  11. Evaluation of intra-aortic CT angiography performances for the visualisation of spinal vascular malformations' angioarchitecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarencon, Frederic; Gabrieli, Joseph; Chiras, Jacques [Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Paris (France); Paris VI University, Pierre et Marie Curie University, Paris (France); Di Maria, Federico; Sourour, Nader-Antoine; Shotar, Eimad; Cormier, Evelyne; Fahed, Robert [Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Paris (France); Nouet, Aurelien [Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Paris (France); Cornu, Philippe [Paris VI University, Pierre et Marie Curie University, Paris (France); Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Paris (France)

    2016-10-15

    To evaluate the performances of the CT-angiography by direct intra-aortic contrast media injection (IA-CTA) for spinal vascular malformations (SVMs)' imaging. Thirteen patients (8 males, 5 females, mean age: 56 y) with suspected SVM underwent IA-CTAs by direct intra-aortic iodinated contrast media injection (5 cc/s; 100 cc) via an arterial femoral or humeral access. Two independent observers evaluated the angioarchitecture of the SVMs and the visualisation of both the Adamkiewicz artery and the anterior spinal artery. Then a consensus was obtained between the 2 reviewers; the results of the IA-CTA were finally compared with those of the full spinal DSA evaluated in consensus. The IA-CTA was feasible in all cases and depicted the SVM in all except one case (92 %). Interrater agreement was good for the location of the SVMs' level. Intermodality (IA-CTA/DSA) agreement was excellent for the level and side of the shunt point, as well as for the SVM subtype evaluation. In 77 % of the cases, the Adamkiewicz artery was satisfactorily seen at the same time on IA-CTA. IA-CTA is a new technique that seems helpful to reach a better understanding of SMVs and may help to tailor more precisely their treatment. (orig.)

  12. Visualisation of chicken macrophages using transgenic reporter genes: insights into the development of the avian macrophage lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balic, Adam; Garcia-Morales, Carla; Vervelde, Lonneke; Gilhooley, Hazel; Sherman, Adrian; Garceau, Valerie; Gutowska, Maria W; Burt, David W; Kaiser, Pete; Hume, David A; Sang, Helen M

    2014-08-01

    We have generated the first transgenic chickens in which reporter genes are expressed in a specific immune cell lineage, based upon control elements of the colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) locus. The Fms intronic regulatory element (FIRE) within CSF1R is shown to be highly conserved in amniotes and absolutely required for myeloid-restricted expression of fluorescent reporter genes. As in mammals, CSF1R-reporter genes were specifically expressed at high levels in cells of the macrophage lineage and at a much lower level in granulocytes. The cell lineage specificity of reporter gene expression was confirmed by demonstration of coincident expression with the endogenous CSF1R protein. In transgenic birds, expression of the reporter gene provided a defined marker for macrophage-lineage cells, identifying the earliest stages in the yolk sac, throughout embryonic development and in all adult tissues. The reporter genes permit detailed and dynamic visualisation of embryonic chicken macrophages. Chicken embryonic macrophages are not recruited to incisional wounds, but are able to recognise and phagocytose microbial antigens. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Energy data visualisation requires additional approaches to continue to be relevant in a world with greater low-carbon generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Grant Wilson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis described in this article proposes that energy visualisation diagrams commonly used need additional changes to continue to be relevant in a world with greater low-carbon generation. The diagrams that display national energy data are influenced by the properties of the type of energy being displayed, which in most cases has historically meant fossil fuels, nuclear fuels or hydro. As many energy systems throughout the world increase their use of electricity from wind or solar based renewables, a more granular display of energy data in the time domain is required. This article also introduces the shared axes energy diagram that provides a simple and powerful way in which to compare the scale and seasonality of the demands and supplies of an energy system. This aims to complement rather than replace existing diagrams, and has an additional benefit of promoting a whole systems approach to energy systems, as differing energy vectors such as natural gas, transport fuels, and electricity can all be displayed together. This in particular, is useful to both policy makers and to industry, to build a visual foundation for a whole systems narrative, which provides a basis for discussion of the synergies and opportunities across and between different energy vectors and demands. The diagram’s ability to wrap a sense of scale around a whole energy system in a simple way is thought to explain its growing popularity.

  14. Cervical spine imaging in trauma: Does the use of grid and filter combination improve visualisation of the cervicothoracic junction?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, Nimit, E-mail: nimitgoyal@doctors.org.u [University Hospital of Wales, Heath Park, Cardiff, CF14 4XW (United Kingdom); Rachapalli, Vamsidhar; Burns, Helen; Lloyd, David C.F. [University Hospital of Wales, Heath Park, Cardiff, CF14 4XW (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of filter and anti-scatter grid combination in demonstrating the cervicothoracic junction in lateral cervical spine radiographs performed for trauma patients. Methods: Following a change in departmental protocol in our hospital, anti-scatter grid and filter are routinely used for lateral cervical spine radiograph in all trauma patients with immobilised cervical spine. A retrospective study was done to compare the efficacy of lateral cervical spine radiographs in demonstrating the cervicothoracic junction for a period of three months before and after the implementation of the change. All images were independently evaluated by two observers. Results: 253 trauma patients had a lateral cervical spine radiograph done in January to March 2003 without using the anti-scatter grid and filter while 309 patients in January to March 2007, using filter and grid. Inter-observer variability between the two observers was calculated using Cohen's Kappa which showed good and very good agreement for 2003 and 2007 respectively. 126 (49.8%) images adequately demonstrated the cervicothoracic junction without using filter and grid while 189 (61.1%) were adequate following their use. This was statistically significant (Fischer exact test, p value = 0.0081). Conclusion: The use of filter and anti-scatter grids improves the visualisation of cervicothoracic junction in lateral cervical spine imaging and reduces the need to repeat exposure.

  15. CyanoEXpress: A web database for exploration and visualisation of the integrated transcriptome of cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Prieto, Miguel A; Futschik, Matthias E

    2012-01-01

    Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 is one of the best studied cyanobacteria and an important model organism for our understanding of photosynthesis. The early availability of its complete genome sequence initiated numerous transcriptome studies, which have generated a wealth of expression data. Analysis of the accumulated data can be a powerful tool to study transcription in a comprehensive manner and to reveal underlying regulatory mechanisms, as well as to annotate genes whose functions are yet unknown. However, use of divergent microarray platforms, as well as distributed data storage make meta-analyses of Synechocystis expression data highly challenging, especially for researchers with limited bioinformatic expertise and resources. To facilitate utilisation of the accumulated expression data for a wider research community, we have developed CyanoEXpress, a web database for interactive exploration and visualisation of transcriptional response patterns in Synechocystis. CyanoEXpress currently comprises expression data for 3073 genes and 178 environmental and genetic perturbations obtained in 31 independent studies. At present, CyanoEXpress constitutes the most comprehensive collection of expression data available for Synechocystis and can be freely accessed. The database is available for free at http://cyanoexpress.sysbiolab.eu.

  16. Visualisation of BioPAX Networks using BioLayout Express3D [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4j1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek W. Wright

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available BioLayout Express3D is a network analysis tool designed for the visualisation and analysis of graphs derived from biological data. It has proved to be powerful in the analysis of gene expression data, biological pathways and in a range of other applications. In version 3.2 of the tool we have introduced the ability to import, merge and display pathways and protein interaction networks available in the BioPAX Level 3 standard exchange format. A graphical interface allows users to search for pathways or interaction data stored in the Pathway Commons database. Queries using either gene/protein or pathway names are made via the cPath2 client and users can also define the source and/or species of information that they wish to examine. Data matching a query are listed and individual records may be viewed in isolation or merged using an ‘Advanced’ query tab. A visualisation scheme has been defined by mapping BioPAX entity types to a range of glyphs. Graphs of these data can be viewed and explored within BioLayout as 2D or 3D graph layouts, where they can be edited and/or exported for visualisation and editing within other tools.

  17. D Recording, Modelling and Visualisation of the Fortification Kristiansten in Trondheim (norway) by Photogrammetric Methods and Terrestrial Laser Scanning in the Framework of Erasmus Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, T.; Lindstaedt, M.; Maziull, L.; Schreyer, K.; Tschirschwitz, F.; Holm, K.

    2015-02-01

    In this contribution the 3D recording, 3D modelling and 3D visualisation of the fortification Kristiansten in Trondheim (Norway) by digital photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning are presented. The fortification Kristiansten was built after the large city fire in the year 1681 above the city and has been a museum since 1997. The recording of the fortress took place in each case at the end of August/at the beginning of September 2010 and 2011 during two two-week summer schools with the topic "Digital Photogrammetry & Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Cultural Heritage Documentation" at NTNU Trondheim with international students in the context of ERASMUS teaching programs. For data acquisition, a terrestrial laser scanner and digital SLR cameras were used. The establishment of a geodetic 3D network, which was later transformed into the Norwegian UTM coordinate system using control points, ensured a consistent registration of the scans and an orientation of the photogrammetric images. The fortress buildings were constructed in detail from photogrammetric photographs and point clouds using AutoCAD, while the fortress area and walls were modelled by triangle meshing in Geomagic. The visualisation of the fortress was carried out 2013 with the software Cinema 4D in the context of a lecture in the Master study programme Geomatics. The 3D model was textured and afterwards presented in a video. This 3D model was finally transferred into the game engine Unity for an interactive 3D visualisation on 3D monitors.

  18. Online 3D terrain visualisation using Unity 3D game engine: A comparison of different contour intervals terrain data draped with UAV images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz Mahayudin, Mohd; Che Mat, Ruzinoor

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of this paper is to discuss on the effectiveness of visualising terrain draped with Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) images generated from different contour intervals using Unity 3D game engine in online environment. The study area that was tested in this project was oil palm plantation at Sintok, Kedah. The contour data used for this study are divided into three different intervals which are 1m, 3m and 5m. ArcGIS software were used to clip the contour data and also UAV images data to be similar size for the overlaying process. The Unity 3D game engine was used as the main platform for developing the system due to its capabilities which can be launch in different platform. The clipped contour data and UAV images data were process and exported into the web format using Unity 3D. Then process continue by publishing it into the web server for comparing the effectiveness of different 3D terrain data (contour data) draped with UAV images. The effectiveness is compared based on the data size, loading time (office and out-of-office hours), response time, visualisation quality, and frame per second (fps). The results were suggest which contour interval is better for developing an effective online 3D terrain visualisation draped with UAV images using Unity 3D game engine. It therefore benefits decision maker and planner related to this field decide on which contour is applicable for their task.

  19. MLPAinter for MLPA interpretation: an integrated approach for the analysis, visualisation and data management of Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morreau Hans

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA is an application that can be used for the detection of multiple chromosomal aberrations in a single experiment. In one reaction, up to 50 different genomic sequences can be analysed. For a reliable work-flow, tools are needed for administrative support, data management, normalisation, visualisation, reporting and interpretation. Results Here, we developed a data management system, MLPAInter for MLPA interpretation, that is windows executable and has a stand-alone database for monitoring and interpreting the MLPA data stream that is generated from the experimental setup to analysis, quality control and visualisation. A statistical approach is applied for the normalisation and analysis of large series of MLPA traces, making use of multiple control samples and internal controls. Conclusions MLPAinter visualises MLPA data in plots with information about sample replicates, normalisation settings, and sample characteristics. This integrated approach helps in the automated handling of large series of MLPA data and guarantees a quick and streamlined dataflow from the beginning of an experiment to an authorised report.

  20. Aluminium in brain tissue in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Ambreen; King, Andrew; Troakes, Claire; Exley, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    The genetic predispositions which describe a diagnosis of familial Alzheimer's disease can be considered as cornerstones of the amyloid cascade hypothesis. Essentially they place the expression and metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein as the main tenet of disease aetiology. However, we do not know the cause of Alzheimer's disease and environmental factors may yet be shown to contribute towards its onset and progression. One such environmental factor is human exposure to aluminium and aluminium has been shown to be present in brain tissue in sporadic Alzheimer's disease. We have made the first ever measurements of aluminium in brain tissue from 12 donors diagnosed with familial Alzheimer's disease. The concentrations of aluminium were extremely high, for example, there were values in excess of 10μg/g tissue dry wt. in 5 of the 12 individuals. Overall, the concentrations were higher than all previous measurements of brain aluminium except cases of known aluminium-induced encephalopathy. We have supported our quantitative analyses using a novel method of aluminium-selective fluorescence microscopy to visualise aluminium in all lobes of every brain investigated. The unique quantitative data and the stunning images of aluminium in familial Alzheimer's disease brain tissue raise the spectre of aluminium's role in this devastating disease. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  1. 3D visualisation of a Jurassic oolitic system with GPR data, Isle of Portland (UK)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Hansen, Trine Lykke; Nielsen, Lars

    architecture to be the result of mixed hydrodynamic conditions associated with wave activity and tidal currents. The Isle shows a island barrier complex which migrates basinwards but also expands laterally, filling up the available space and cannibalising itself. More proximal facies are effectively observed...... in the north of the Isle towards the former continent or lagoon. However, the survey clearly shows that the shore zone progrades broadly towards the SW, partially away from the Channel, with an obtuse angle compared to former reconstructions. This result suggests that the oolitic shore zone system forms...

  2. Brain-Reactive Antibodies and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Diamond, B.; Honig, G.; Mader, S.; Brimberg, L.; Volpe, B.T.

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases currently affect 5–7% of the world's population; in most diseases there are circulating autoantibodies. Brain-reactive antibodies are present in approximately 2–3% of the general population but do not usually contribute to brain pathology. These antibodies penetrate brain tissue only early in development or under pathologic conditions. This restriction on their pathogenicity and the lack of correlation between serum titers and brain pathology have, no doubt, contributed to...

  3. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  4. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  5. Brain radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation - brain - discharge; Cancer - brain radiation; Lymphoma - brain radiation; Leukemia - brain radiation ... Decadron) while you are getting radiation to the brain. It may make you hungrier, cause leg swelling ...

  6. Brain abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... found. However, the most common source is a lung infection. Less often, a heart infection is the cause. The following raise your chance of developing a brain abscess: A weakened immune system (such as in people ...

  7. MRI of the brain stem using fluid attenuated inversion recivery pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Coene, B.; Hajnal, J.V.; Pennock, J.M.; Bydder, G.M.

    1993-01-01

    Heavily T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences with inversion times of 2000-2500 ms and echo times of 130-200 ms were used to image the brain stem of a normal adult and five patients. These sequences produce high signal from many white matter tracts and display high lesion contrast. The corticospinal and parietopontine tracts, lateral and medial lemnisci, superior and inferior cerebellar peduncles, medial longitudinal fasciculi, thalamo-olivary tracts the cuneate and gracile fasiculi gave high signal and were directly visualised. The oculomotor and trigeminal nerves were demonstrated within the brain stem. Lesions not seen with conventional T2-weighted spin echo sequences were seen with high contrast in patients with infarction, multiple sclerosis, sarcoidosis, chunt obstruction and metastatic tumour. The anatomical detail and high lesion contrast given by the FLAIR pulse sequence appear likely to be of value in diagnosis of disease in the brain stem. (orig.)

  8. Brain imaging and brain function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokoloff, L.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a survey of the applications of imaging studies of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism to the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Contributors review imaging techniques and strategies for measuring regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism, for mapping functional neural systems, and for imaging normal brain functions. They then examine the applications of brain imaging techniques to the study of such neurological and psychiatric disorders as: cerebral ischemia; convulsive disorders; cerebral tumors; Huntington's disease; Alzheimer's disease; depression and other mood disorders. A state-of-the-art report on magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and central nervous system rounds out the book's coverage

  9. Visualising phase change in a brushite-based calcium phosphate ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerman, A.; Williams, R. L.; Cox, S. C.; Grover, L. M.

    2016-09-01

    The resorption of brushite-based bone cements has been shown to be highly unpredictable, with strong dependence on a number of conditions. One of the major factors is phase transformation, with change to more stable phases such as hydroxyapatite affecting the rate of resorption. Despite its importance, the analysis of phase transformation has been largely undertaken using methods that only detect crystalline composition and give no information on the spatial distribution of the phases. In this study confocal Raman microscopy was used to map cross-sections of brushite cylinders aged in Phosphate Buffered Saline, Foetal Bovine Serum, Dulbecco’s - Minimum Essential Medium (with and without serum). Image maps showed the importance of ageing medium on the phase composition throughout the ceramic structure. When aged without serum, there was dissolution of the brushite phase concomitant to the deposition of octacalcium phosphate (OCP) around the periphery of the sample. The deposition of OCP was detectable within five days and reduced the rate of brushite dissolution from the material. The use of serum, even at a concentration of 10vol% prevented phase transformation. This paper demonstrates the value of confocal Raman microscopy in monitoring phase change in biocements; it also demonstrates the problems with assessing material degradation in non-serum containing media.

  10. Using mobile monitoring to visualise diurnal variation of traffic pollutants across two near-highway neighbourhoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattinson, Woodrow; Longley, Ian; Kingham, Simon

    2014-09-01

    It is widely accepted that concentrations of primary traffic pollutants can vary substantially across relatively small urban areas. Fixed-site monitors have been shown to be largely inadequate for representing concentrations at nearby locations, resulting in the increasing use of spatial modelling or mobile sampling methods to achieve spatial saturation. In this study, we employ the use of a simple bicycle to sample concentrations of ultrafine particles (UFPs), carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter (PM10) at two small areas (arterials and quieter streets, at periods of contrasting meteorological and traffic conditions. A total of 20 sampling runs in each area (five at each of the four timings) were conducted. Meteorological data were logged continuously at background sites within each study area. Results show that the influence of highway traffic (UFPs, CO) was strongest during the mornings and late evenings when wind speeds were low, while for the midday and afternoon timings, concentrations were highest at the arterial and shopping zones. Concentrations of PM10 appeared to be strongest in the residential areas during mornings and late evenings, suggesting an influence of wood burning for home heating. For all timings combined, for all three pollutants, it appears the arterial roads featuring shops and numerous intersections with traffic lights, had a stronger influence on concentrations than the busier but more free-flowing highways. This study provides not only an insight into microspatial hotspot variation across suburbs, but also how this variation shifts diurnally.

  11. Visualisation of very high resolution Martian topographic data and its application on landing site selection and rover route navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Lin, S.; Hong, J.; Park, D.; Yoon, S.; Kim, Y.

    2010-12-01

    installed on the rover were used. Along with close range photogrammetric techniques, the rover location and also traverse navigation could be solved. A virtual reality (VR) system is useful to support decisions of landing site selection and rover traverse determination. Hence the topographic data were indigested into a powerful VR system which is provided by Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information (KISTI). As the VR system is established based on high speed parallel processors, high definition 3D display, control pointer and visualisation packages, a full-scale, seamless and real-time visualisation of Mars virtual environment is realised. In addition to the Mars rover applications described above, the VR scheme implemented in this research will also give great opportunities for scientific research in geology and geomorphology. Kim, J. R., and Muller, J-P., (2009). Multi-resolution topographic data extraction from Martian stereo imagery, Planetary and Space Science, 57 (15), 2095-2112.

  12. Visualisation and Quantification of Transport in Barrier Rocks with Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulenkampff, J.; Gajewski, C.; Gründig, M.; Lippmann-Pipke, J.; Mittmann, H.; Richter, M.; Wolf, M.

    2009-04-01

    In tight barrier rocks laboratory observation of radionuclide transport and determination of transport parameters is a demanding and interminable task, because of slow rates, small concentrations, and intricate chemical interactions. The validity of results from common laboratory methods, like flow- and diffusion experiments on small samples, is limited by the heterogeneity of the pathways and adherent upscaling issues, because homogeneous conditions have to be presumed for these input-output investigations. But nano-pores or micro-fractures could be present, which would provide pathways for heterogeneous transport processes. Transport properties of these pathways are most influential boundary conditions for reactions between fluid components and crystal surfaces. We propose Positron Emission Tomography (GEO-PET) as an appropriate method for direct observation of heterogeneous transport of radiotracers in tight material on the laboratory scale. With high-resolution PET scanners, which are common instruments of biomedical research ("small animal PET"), it is possible to determine the spatio-temporal distribution of the tracer activity with a resolution of almost 1 mm during about three periods of the tracer half-life (half-lives of some applicable PET tracers: 18F: 1.8 h, 124I: 4.2 days, 58Co: 70.8 days). The PET tracer is applied as ion in solution or as marker for compounds, like colloids. The most considerable difference between PET applications on geomaterial compared to biological tissue is the stronger attenuation and scattering of radiation because of the higher density of rock material. After travelling the positron attenuation length in dense material (about 1 mm), the positron annihilates in contact with an electron, transmitting two photons with 511 keV, propagating in antiparallel direction. The sample size of geomaterial is limited by the attenuation length of these photons. By applying an appropriate attenuation correction it is possible to investigate

  13. Visualising the equilibrium distribution and mobility of organic contaminants in soil using the chemical partitioning space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Fiona; Wania, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Assessing the behaviour of organic chemicals in soil is a complex task as it is governed by the physical chemical properties of the chemicals, the characteristics of the soil as well as the ambient conditions of the environment. The chemical partitioning space, defined by the air-water partition coefficient (K(AW)) and the soil organic carbon-water partition coefficient (K(OC)), was employed to visualize the equilibrium distribution of organic contaminants between the air-filled pores, the pore water and the solid phases of the bulk soil and the relative importance of the three transport processes removing contaminants from soil (evaporation, leaching and particle erosion). The partitioning properties of twenty neutral organic chemicals (i.e. herbicides, pharmaceuticals, polychlorinated biphenyls and volatile chemicals) were estimated using poly-parameter linear free energy relationships and superimposed onto these maps. This allows instantaneous estimation of the equilibrium phase distribution and mobility of neutral organic chemicals in soil. Although there is a link between the major phase and the dominant transport process, such that chemicals found in air-filled pore space are subject to evaporation, those in water-filled pore space undergo leaching and those in the sorbed phase are associated with particle erosion, the partitioning coefficient thresholds for distribution and mobility can often deviate by many orders of magnitude. In particular, even a small fraction of chemical in pore water or pore air allows for evaporation and leaching to dominate over solid phase transport. Multiple maps that represent soils that differ in the amount and type of soil organic matter, water saturation, temperature, depth of surface soil horizon, and mineral matters were evaluated.

  14. Introducing the fit-criteria assessment plot - A visualisation tool to assist class enumeration in group-based trajectory modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klijn, Sven L; Weijenberg, Matty P; Lemmens, Paul; van den Brandt, Piet A; Lima Passos, Valéria

    2017-10-01

    Background and objective Group-based trajectory modelling is a model-based clustering technique applied for the identification of latent patterns of temporal changes. Despite its manifold applications in clinical and health sciences, potential problems of the model selection procedure are often overlooked. The choice of the number of latent trajectories (class-enumeration), for instance, is to a large degree based on statistical criteria that are not fail-safe. Moreover, the process as a whole is not transparent. To facilitate class enumeration, we introduce a graphical summary display of several fit and model adequacy criteria, the fit-criteria assessment plot. Methods An R-code that accepts universal data input is presented. The programme condenses relevant group-based trajectory modelling output information of model fit indices in automated graphical displays. Examples based on real and simulated data are provided to illustrate, assess and validate fit-criteria assessment plot's utility. Results Fit-criteria assessment plot provides an overview of fit criteria on a single page, placing users in an informed position to make a decision. Fit-criteria assessment plot does not automatically select the most appropriate model but eases the model assessment procedure. Conclusions Fit-criteria assessment plot is an exploratory, visualisation tool that can be employed to assist decisions in the initial and decisive phase of group-based trajectory modelling analysis. Considering group-based trajectory modelling's widespread resonance in medical and epidemiological sciences, a more comprehensive, easily interpretable and transparent display of the iterative process of class enumeration may foster group-based trajectory modelling's adequate use.

  15. Visualising Pareto-optimal trade-offs helps move beyond monetary-only criteria for water management decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurford, Anthony; Harou, Julien

    2014-05-01

    Water related eco-system services are important to the livelihoods of the poorest sectors of society in developing countries. Degradation or loss of these services can increase the vulnerability of people decreasing their capacity to support themselves. New approaches to help guide water resources management decisions are needed which account for the non-market value of ecosystem goods and services. In case studies from Brazil and Kenya we demonstrate the capability of many objective Pareto-optimal trade-off analysis to help decision makers balance economic and non-market benefits from the management of existing multi-reservoir systems. A multi-criteria search algorithm is coupled to a water resources management simulator of each basin to generate a set of Pareto-approximate trade-offs representing the best case management decisions. In both cases, volume dependent reservoir release rules are the management decisions being optimised. In the Kenyan case we further assess the impacts of proposed irrigation investments, and how the possibility of new investments impacts the system's trade-offs. During the multi-criteria search (optimisation), performance of different sets of management decisions (policies) is assessed against case-specific objective functions representing provision of water supply and irrigation, hydropower generation and maintenance of ecosystem services. Results are visualised as trade-off surfaces to help decision makers understand the impacts of different policies on a broad range of stakeholders and to assist in decision-making. These case studies show how the approach can reveal unexpected opportunities for win-win solutions, and quantify the trade-offs between investing to increase agricultural revenue and negative impacts on protected ecosystems which support rural livelihoods.

  16. FoodMicrobionet: A database for the visualisation and exploration of food bacterial communities based on network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Eugenio; Cocolin, Luca; De Filippis, Francesca; Zotta, Teresa; Ferrocino, Ilario; O'Sullivan, Orla; Neviani, Erasmo; De Angelis, Maria; Cotter, Paul D; Ercolini, Danilo

    2016-02-16

    Amplicon targeted high-throughput sequencing has become a popular tool for the culture-independent analysis of microbial communities. Although the data obtained with this approach are portable and the number of sequences available in public databases is increasing, no tool has been developed yet for the analysis and presentation of data obtained in different studies. This work describes an approach for the development of a database for the rapid exploration and analysis of data on food microbial communities. Data from seventeen studies investigating the structure of bacterial communities in dairy, meat, sourdough and fermented vegetable products, obtained by 16S rRNA gene targeted high-throughput sequencing, were collated and analysed using Gephi, a network analysis software. The resulting database, which we named FoodMicrobionet, was used to analyse nodes and network properties and to build an interactive web-based visualisation. The latter allows the visual exploration of the relationships between Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) and samples and the identification of core- and sample-specific bacterial communities. It also provides additional search tools and hyperlinks for the rapid selection of food groups and OTUs and for rapid access to external resources (NCBI taxonomy, digital versions of the original articles). Microbial interaction network analysis was carried out using CoNet on datasets extracted from FoodMicrobionet: the complexity of interaction networks was much lower than that found for other bacterial communities (human microbiome, soil and other environments). This may reflect both a bias in the dataset (which was dominated by fermented foods and starter cultures) and the lower complexity of food bacterial communities. Although some technical challenges exist, and are discussed here, the net result is a valuable tool for the exploration of food bacterial communities by the scientific community and food industry. Copyright © 2015. Published by

  17. 3D virtual reconstruction and visualisation of the archaeological site Castellet de Bernabé (Llíria, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Portalés

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available 3D virtual reconstruction of cultural heritage is a useful tool to reach many goals: the accurate documentation of our tangible cultural legacy, the determination of mechanical alteration on the assets, or the mere shape acquisition prior to restoration and/or reconstruction works, etc. Among these goals, when planning and managing tourism enhancement of heritage sites, it demands setting up specific instruments and tools to guarantee both, the site conservation and the visitors’ satisfaction. Archaeological sites are physical witnesses of the past and an open window to research works and scientific discoveries, but usually, the major structures do no exist nowadays, and the general public takes long time and many efforts to elaborate a mental reconstruction of the volumetry and appearance from these remains. This mental reconstruction is essential to build up a storyline that communicates efficiently the archaeological and historic knowledge and awares the public about its conservation. To develop this process of awareness about conservation, heritage interpretation starts with the mental inmersion of the visitors in the archaeological site, what 3D reconstruction definitely helps to achieve. Different technologies exist nowadays for the3D reconstruction of assets, but when dealing with archaeological sites, the data acquisition requires alternative approaches to be used, as most part of the assets do not exist nowadays. In this work, we will deal with the virtual reconstruction and visualisation of the archaeological site Castellet de Bernabé by following a mixed approach (surveying techniques and archaeological research. We further give a methodology to process and merge the real and virtual data in order to create augmented views of the site.

  18. Whole-brain dynamic CT angiography and perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orrison, W.W. [CHW Nevada Imaging Company, Nevada Imaging Centers, Spring Valley, Las Vegas, NV (United States); College of Osteopathic Medicine, Touro University Nevada, Henderson, NV (United States); Department of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Department of Medical Education, University of Nevada School of Medicine, Reno, NV (United States); Snyder, K.V.; Hopkins, L.N. [Department of Neurosurgery, Millard Fillmore Gates Circle Hospital, Buffalo, NY (United States); Roach, C.J. [School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Advanced Medical Imaging and Genetics (Amigenics), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Ringdahl, E.N. [Department of Psychology, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Nazir, R. [Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad (Pakistan); Hanson, E.H., E-mail: eric.hanson@amigenics.co [College of Osteopathic Medicine, Touro University Nevada, Henderson, NV (United States); Department of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Advanced Medical Imaging and Genetics (Amigenics), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2011-06-15

    The availability of whole brain computed tomography (CT) perfusion has expanded the opportunities for analysing the haemodynamic parameters associated with varied neurological conditions. Examples demonstrating the clinical utility of whole-brain CT perfusion imaging in selected acute and chronic ischaemic arterial neurovascular conditions are presented. Whole-brain CT perfusion enables the detection and focused haemodynamic analyses of acute and chronic arterial conditions in the central nervous system without the limitation of partial anatomical coverage of the brain.

  19. Imaging cellular and subcellular structure of human brain tissue using micro computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khimchenko, Anna; Bikis, Christos; Schweighauser, Gabriel; Hench, Jürgen; Joita-Pacureanu, Alexandra-Teodora; Thalmann, Peter; Deyhle, Hans; Osmani, Bekim; Chicherova, Natalia; Hieber, Simone E.; Cloetens, Peter; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena; Schulz, Georg; Müller, Bert

    2017-09-01

    Brain tissues have been an attractive subject for investigations in neuropathology, neuroscience, and neurobiol- ogy. Nevertheless, existing imaging methodologies have intrinsic limitations in three-dimensional (3D) label-free visualisation of extended tissue samples down to (sub)cellular level. For a long time, these morphological features were visualised by electron or light microscopies. In addition to being time-consuming, microscopic investigation includes specimen fixation, embedding, sectioning, staining, and imaging with the associated artefacts. More- over, optical microscopy remains hampered by a fundamental limit in the spatial resolution that is imposed by the diffraction of visible light wavefront. In contrast, various tomography approaches do not require a complex specimen preparation and can now reach a true (sub)cellular resolution. Even laboratory-based micro computed tomography in the absorption-contrast mode of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human cerebellum yields an image contrast comparable to conventional histological sections. Data of a superior image quality was obtained by means of synchrotron radiation-based single-distance X-ray phase-contrast tomography enabling the visualisation of non-stained Purkinje cells down to the subcellular level and automated cell counting. The question arises, whether the data quality of the hard X-ray tomography can be superior to optical microscopy. Herein, we discuss the label-free investigation of the human brain ultramorphology be means of synchrotron radiation-based hard X-ray magnified phase-contrast in-line tomography at the nano-imaging beamline ID16A (ESRF, Grenoble, France). As an example, we present images of FFPE human cerebellum block. Hard X-ray tomography can provide detailed information on human tissues in health and disease with a spatial resolution below the optical limit, improving understanding of the neuro-degenerative diseases.

  20. The use of virtual reality and intelligent database systems for procedure planning, visualisation, and real-time component tracking in remote handling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, Edward; Sanders, Stephen; Williams, Adrian; Allan, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The organisation of remote handling (RH) operations in fusion environments is increasingly critical as the number of tasks, components and tooling that RH operations teams must deal with inexorably rises. During the recent JET EP1 RH shutdown the existing virtual reality (VR) and procedural database systems proved essential for visualisation and tracking of operations, particularly due to the increasing complexity of remote tasks. A new task planning system for RH operations is in development, and is expected to be ready for use during the next major shutdown, planned for 2009. The system will make use of information available from the remote operations procedures, the RH equipment human-machine interfaces, the on-line RH equipment control systems and also the virtual reality (VR) system to establish a complete database for the location of plant items and RH equipment as RH operations progress. It is intended that the system be used during both preparation and implementation of shutdowns. In the preparations phase the system can be used to validate procedures and overall logistics by allowing an operator to increment through each operation step and to use the VR system to visualise the location and status of all components, manipulators and RH tools. During task development the RH operations engineers can plan and visualise movement of components and tooling to examine handling concepts and establish storage requirements. In the implementation of operations the daily work schedules information will be integrated with the RH operations procedures tracking records to enable the VR system to provide a visual representation of the status of remote operations in real time. Monitoring of the usage history of items will allow estimates of radiation dosage and contaminant exposure to be made. This paper describes the overall aims, structure and use of the system, discusses its application to JET and also considers potential future developments.

  1. Sex and the Migraine Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsook, D; Erpelding, N; Lebel, A; Linnman, C; Veggeberg, R; Grant, PE; Buettner, C; Becerra, L; Burstein, R

    2014-01-01

    The brain responds differently to environmental and internal signals that relates to the stage of development of neural systems. While genetic and epigenetic factors contribute to a premorbid state, hormonal fluctuations in women may alter the set point of migraine. The cyclic surges of gonadal hormones may directly alter neuronal, glial and astrocyte function throughout the brain. Estrogen is mainly excitatory and progesterone inhibitory on brain neuronal systems. These changes contribute to the allostatic load of the migraine condition that most notably starts at puberty in girls. PMID:24662368

  2. Brain Fog

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... relationship with your doctor(s): • Always report changes in cognition/memory and mood (depression, anxiety). • Make sure your physician ... joint pain. • Exercise regularly. Adequate physical exercise enhances cognition/memory. • Train the Brain! “If you don’t use ...

  3. Robot brains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babuska, R.

    2011-01-01

    The brain hosts complex networks of neurons that are responsible for behavior in humans and animals that we generally call intelligent. I is not easy to give an exact definition of intelligence – for the purpose of this talk it will suffice to say that we refer to intelligence as a collection of

  4. Validation of brain tumour imaging with p-[123I]iodo-l-phenylalanine and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellwig, Dirk; Sell, Nadja; Schaefer, Andrea; Kirsch, Carl-Martin; Samnick, Samuel; Ketter, Ralf; Moringlane, Jean R.; Romeike, Bernd F.M.

    2005-01-01

    The aims of this prospective study were to validate single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with p-[ 123 I]iodo-l-phenylalanine (IPA) in brain tumours and to evaluate its potential for the characterisation of indeterminate brain lesions. In 45 patients with indeterminate brain lesions or suspected progression of glioma, amino acid uptake was studied using IPA-SPECT and compared with the final diagnosis established by biopsy or serial imaging. After image fusion of IPA-SPECT and magnetic resonance imaging, the presence of tumour was visually determined by two independent observers. IPA uptake was quantified as the ratio between maximum uptake in the suspicious lesion and mean uptake in unaffected brain. Primary brain tumours were present in 35 cases (12 low-grade and 23 high-grade gliomas). Non-neoplastic brain lesions were confirmed in seven cases (three dysplasias, three inflammatory lesions, one lesion after effective therapy). Visual analysis showed a high concordance between the two observers (kappa=0.90, p<0.001), with sensitivity and specificity of 86% and 100% for the discrimination of primary brain tumours and non-neoplastic lesions. At 30 min p.i., IPA uptake in primary brain tumours was higher than that in non-neoplastic lesions (1.70±0.36 vs 1.14±0.18, p<0.05). Brain metastases showed no increased uptake (1.13±0.22, n=3). The persistent retention of IPA in low-grade gliomas without disruption of the blood-brain barrier was visualised up to 24 h p.i. Low-grade and high-grade gliomas showed equivalent IPA uptake (1.72±0.37 vs 1.67±0.36 at 30 min, p=0.745). IPA shows long and specific retention in gliomas. IPA is a promising and safe radiopharmaceutical for the visualisation of gliomas and the characterisation of indeterminate brain lesions. (orig.)

  5. Antigen retrieval, blocking, detection and visualisation systems in immunohistochemistry: a review and practical evaluation of tyramide and rolling circle amplification systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warford, Anthony; Akbar, Hameed; Riberio, Deise

    2014-11-01

    To achieve specificity and sensitivity using immunohistochemistry it is necessary to combine the application of validated primary antibodies with optimised pre-treatment, detection and visualisation steps. The influence of these surrounding procedures is reviewed. A practical evaluation of tyramide signal amplification and rolling circle amplification detection methods is provided in which formalin fixed paraffin embedded sections of adenocarcinomas of breast, colon and lung together with squamous metaplasia of lung were immunostained with CD20 and CK19 primary antibodies. The results indicate that the detection systems are of comparable sensitivity and specificity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Visualisation and interpretation of the autumn 2006 mise-a-la-masse survey data at the Olkiluoto site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehtonen, T.

    2007-01-01

    This report concerns mise-a-la-masse surveys conducted autumn 2006 at the area of the underground characterisation facility (ONKALO) and surroundings. Field surveys were made in both drillholes and on the ground surface. Suomen Malmi Oy conducted the fieldwork. Astrock Oy supervised field surveys and processed, interpreted and reported acquired data for Astrock Oy. The purpose of the study was to collect data for geological modelling with following continuity of the conducting features in bedrock from drillhole to drillhole and to ground surface. These conducting features in bedrock are often linked with lithologic characters or weakness zones. The completed survey supplements previous mise-a-la-masse measurement and on the other hand widens investigations to the newest drillholes OL-KR40-OL-KR43. A basis for the current survey was the previous mise-a-la-masse measurements and their results. Current earthings were placed in 15 electrically conducting structures in three drillholes, two at an investigation trench and one in ONKALO. Current earthings were situated in drillholes OL-KR4, OL-KR27 and OL-KR33, at OL-TK13 and at chainage 899 in ONKALO. Electrical connections were probed in nine drillholes, in four pregrouting holes and at two ground survey area. The acquired survey data were collected to xyz-coordinate oriented databases for 3D processing, interpreting and visualization of the results. At first the data were transferred to Oasis Montaj, where the potential field profiles were drawn and studied drillhole-by-drillhole current earthing at a time to determine characteristics of the electrical connections. Next probable connections between drillholes were constructed and moved to Surpac (registered trademark) Vision 3D software for visualisation. They were delivered for Posiva Oy as Surpac (registered trademark) string and DTM files. With the mise-a-la-masse data, it was possible to determine low dipping electrically conducting structures, congruent with the

  7. Multimodal Imaging Brain Connectivity Analysis (MIBCA toolbox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Santos Ribeiro

    2015-07-01

    -hemispheric symmetry and an intra-hemispheric modularity associated with structural data, whilst functional data presented lower inter-hemispheric symmetry and a high inter-hemispheric modularity. Furthermore, when testing for differences between two subgroups (40 years old adults we observed a significant reduction in the volume and thickness, and an increase in the mean diffusivity of most of the subcortical/cortical regions.Conclusion. While bridging the gap between the high numbers of packages and tools widely available for the neuroimaging community in one toolbox, MIBCA also offers different possibilities for combining, analysing and visualising data in novel ways, enabling a better understanding of the human brain.

  8. Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  9. Brain tumor - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  10. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Brain Tumors KidsHealth / For Parents / Brain Tumors What's in ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  11. Brain and Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Brain and Nervous System KidsHealth / For Parents / Brain and ... healthy, and remove waste products. All About the Brain The brain is made up of three main ...

  12. The Creative Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Ned

    1982-01-01

    Outlines the differences between left-brain and right-brain functioning and between left-brain and right-brain dominant individuals, and concludes that creativity uses both halves of the brain. Discusses how both students and curriculum can become more "whole-brained." (Author/JM)

  13. Comparative study of four immortalized human brain capillary endothelial cell lines, hCMEC/D3, hBMEC, TY10, and BB19, and optimization of culture conditions, for an in vitro blood-brain barrier model for drug permeability studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigenmann, Daniela E; Xue, Gongda; Kim, Kwang S; Moses, Ashlee V; Hamburger, Matthias; Oufir, Mouhssin

    2013-11-22

    Reliable human in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) models suitable for high-throughput screening are urgently needed in early drug discovery and development for assessing the ability of promising bioactive compounds to overcome the BBB. To establish an improved human in vitro BBB model, we compared four currently available and well characterized immortalized human brain capillary endothelial cell lines, hCMEC/D3, hBMEC, TY10, and BB19, with respect to barrier tightness and paracellular permeability. Co-culture systems using immortalized human astrocytes (SVG-A cell line) and immortalized human pericytes (HBPCT cell line) were designed with the aim of positively influencing barrier tightness. Tight junction (TJ) formation was assessed by transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) measurements using a conventional epithelial voltohmmeter (EVOM) and an automated CellZscope system which records TEER and cell layer capacitance (CCL) in real-time.Paracellular permeability was assessed using two fluorescent marker compounds with low BBB penetration (sodium fluorescein (Na-F) and lucifer yellow (LY)). Conditions were optimized for each endothelial cell line by screening a series of 24-well tissue culture inserts from different providers. For hBMEC cells, further optimization was carried out by varying coating material, coating procedure, cell seeding density, and growth media composition. Biochemical characterization of cell type-specific transmembrane adherens junction protein VE-cadherin and of TJ proteins ZO-1 and claudin-5 were carried out for each endothelial cell line. In addition, immunostaining for ZO-1 in hBMEC cell line was performed. The four cell lines all expressed the endothelial cell type-specific adherens junction protein VE-cadherin. The TJ protein ZO-1 was expressed in hCMEC/D3 and in hBMEC cells. ZO-1 expression could be confirmed in hBMEC cells by immunocytochemical staining. Claudin-5 expression was detected in hCMEC/D3, TY10, and at a very low level

  14. A note on Boltzmann brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Yasunori, E-mail: ynomura@berkeley.edu

    2015-10-07

    Understanding the observed arrow of time is equivalent, under general assumptions, to explaining why Boltzmann brains do not overwhelm ordinary observers. It is usually thought that this provides a condition on the decay rate of every cosmologically accessible de Sitter vacuum, and that this condition is determined by the production rate of Boltzmann brains calculated using semiclassical theory built on each such vacuum. We argue, based on a recently developed picture of microscopic quantum gravitational degrees of freedom, that this thinking needs to be modified. In particular, depending on the structure of the fundamental theory, the decay rate of a de Sitter vacuum may not have to satisfy any condition except for the one imposed by the Poincaré recurrence. The framework discussed here also addresses the question of whether a Minkowski vacuum may produce Boltzmann brains.

  15. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Find a Study More Information Pharmacology Condition Information NICHD Research Information Find a Study ... the brain, bruised brain tissue, and other damage. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI uses magnets and radio waves to ...

  16. Brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenfield, L.D.; Bennett, L.R.

    1976-01-01

    Imaging with radionuclides should be used in a complementary fashion with other neuroradiologic techniques. It is useful in the early detection and evaluation of intracranial neoplasm, cerebrovascular accident and abscess, and in postsurgical follow-up. Cisternography yields useful information about the functional status of cerebrospinal fluid pathways. Computerized axial tomography is a new technique of great promise that produced a cross-sectional image of the brain

  17. Brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradshaw, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a survey of the various imaging tools with examples of the different diseases shown best with each modality. It includes 100 case presentations covering the gamut of brain diseases. These examples are grouped according to the clinical presentation of the patient: headache, acute headache, sudden unilateral weakness, unilateral weakness of gradual onset, speech disorders, seizures, pituitary and parasellar lesions, sensory disorders, posterior fossa and cranial nerve disorders, dementia, and congenital lesions

  18. Connectome analysis for pre-operative brain mapping in neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Michael G.; Price, Stephen J.; Suckling, John

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Object: Brain mapping has entered a new era focusing on complex network connectivity. Central to this is the search for the connectome or the brains ‘wiring diagram’. Graph theory analysis of the connectome allows understanding of the importance of regions to network function, and the consequences of their impairment or excision. Our goal was to apply connectome analysis in patients with brain tumours to characterise overall network topology and individual patterns of connectivity alterations. Methods: Resting-state functional MRI data were acquired using multi-echo, echo planar imaging pre-operatively from five participants each with a right temporal–parietal–occipital glioblastoma. Complex networks analysis was initiated by parcellating the brain into anatomically regions amongst which connections were identified by retaining the most significant correlations between the respective wavelet decomposed time-series. Results: Key characteristics of complex networks described in healthy controls were preserved in these patients, including ubiquitous small world organization. An exponentially truncated power law fit to the degree distribution predicted findings of general network robustness to injury but with a core of hubs exhibiting disproportionate vulnerability. Tumours produced a consistent reduction in local and long-range connectivity with distinct patterns of connection loss depending on lesion location. Conclusions: Connectome analysis is a feasible and novel approach to brain mapping in individual patients with brain tumours. Applications to pre-surgical planning include identifying regions critical to network function that should be preserved and visualising connections at risk from tumour resection. In the future one could use such data to model functional plasticity and recovery of cognitive deficits. PMID:27447756

  19. Connectome analysis for pre-operative brain mapping in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Michael G; Price, Stephen J; Suckling, John

    2016-10-01

    Brain mapping has entered a new era focusing on complex network connectivity. Central to this is the search for the connectome or the brains 'wiring diagram'. Graph theory analysis of the connectome allows understanding of the importance of regions to network function, and the consequences of their impairment or excision. Our goal was to apply connectome analysis in patients with brain tumours to characterise overall network topology and individual patterns of connectivity alterations. Resting-state functional MRI data were acquired using multi-echo, echo planar imaging pre-operatively from five participants each with a right temporal-parietal-occipital glioblastoma. Complex networks analysis was initiated by parcellating the brain into anatomically regions amongst which connections were identified by retaining the most significant correlations between the respective wavelet decomposed time-series. Key characteristics of complex networks described in healthy controls were preserved in these patients, including ubiquitous small world organization. An exponentially truncated power law fit to the degree distribution predicted findings of general network robustness to injury but with a core of hubs exhibiting disproportionate vulnerability. Tumours produced a consistent reduction in local and long-range connectivity with distinct patterns of connection loss depending on lesion location. Connectome analysis is a feasible and novel approach to brain mapping in individual patients with brain tumours. Applications to pre-surgical planning include identifying regions critical to network function that should be preserved and visualising connections at risk from tumour resection. In the future one could use such data to model functional plasticity and recovery of cognitive deficits.

  20. QueryArch3D: Querying and Visualising 3D Models of a Maya Archaeological Site in a Web-Based Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Agugiaro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Constant improvements in the field of surveying, computing and distribution of digital-content are reshaping the way Cultural Heritage can be digitised and virtually accessed, even remotely via web. A traditional 2D approach for data access, exploration, retrieval and exploration may generally suffice, however more complex analyses concerning spatial and temporal features require 3D tools, which, in some cases, have not yet been implemented or are not yet generally commercially available. Efficient organisation and integration strategies applicable to the wide array of heterogeneous data in the field of Cultural Heritage represent a hot research topic nowadays. This article presents a visualisation and query tool (QueryArch3D conceived to deal with multi-resolution 3D models. Geometric data are organised in successive levels of detail (LoD, provided with geometric and semantic hierarchies and enriched with attributes coming from external data sources. The visualisation and query front-end enables the 3D navigation of the models in a virtual environment, as well as the interaction with the objects by means of queries based on attributes or on geometries. The tool can be used as a standalone application, or served through the web. The characteristics of the research work, along with some implementation issues and the developed QueryArch3D tool will be discussed and presented.

  1. In vitro stent lumen visualisation of various common and newly developed femoral artery stents using MR angiography at 1.5 and 3 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syha, R; Ketelsen, D; Kaempf, M; Mangold, S; Sixt, S; Zeller, T; Springer, F; Schick, F; Claussen, C D; Brechtel, K

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate stent lumen assessment of various commonly used and newly developed stents for the superficial femoral artery (SFA) using MR angiography (MRA) at 1.5 and 3 T. Eleven nitinol stents and one cobalt-chromium stent were compared regarding stent lumen visualisation using a common three-dimensional MRA sequence. Maximum visible stent lumen width and contrast ratio were analysed in three representative slices for each stent type. A scoring system for lumen visualisation was applied. Nitinol stents showed significantly better performance than the cobalt chromium stent (P stent lumen ranged between 43.4 and 95.5 %, contrast ratio between 7.2 and 110.6 %. Regarding both field strengths, seven of the nitinol stents were classified as "suitable". Three nitinol stents were "limited", and one nitinol stent and the cobalt chromium stent were "not suitable". Intraluminal loss of signal and artefacts of most of the SFA stents do not markedly limit assessment of stent lumen by MRA at 1.5 and 3 T. MRA can thus be considered a valid technique for detection of relevant in-stent restenosis. Applied field strength does not strongly influence stent lumen assessment in general, but proper choice of field strength might be helpful.

  2. Technology review: prototyping platforms for monitoring ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afolaranmi, Samuel Olaiya; Ramis Ferrer, Borja; Martinez Lastra, Jose Luis

    2018-05-08

    The monitoring of ambient conditions in indoor spaces is very essential owing to the amount of time spent indoors. Specifically, the monitoring of air quality is significant because contaminated air affects the health, comfort and productivity of occupants. This research work presents a technology review of prototyping platforms for monitoring ambient conditions in indoor spaces. It involves the research on sensors (for CO 2 , air quality and ambient conditions), IoT platforms, and novel and commercial prototyping platforms. The ultimate objective of this review is to enable the easy identification, selection and utilisation of the technologies best suited for monitoring ambient conditions in indoor spaces. Following the review, it is recommended to use metal oxide sensors, optical sensors and electrochemical sensors for IAQ monitoring (including NDIR sensors for CO 2 monitoring), Raspberry Pi for data processing, ZigBee and Wi-Fi for data communication, and ThingSpeak IoT platform for data storage, analysis and visualisation.

  3. Functional magnetic resonance imaging-controlled neuronavigator-guided brain surgery: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, J; Nishizaki, T; Tokumaru, T; Uesugi, S; Yamashita, K; Ito, H; Suzuki, M

    2001-05-01

    The effectiveness of functional magnetic resonance imaging (f-MRI)-controlled and navigator-guided brain surgery for a patient with a recurrent astrocytoma is demonstrated. Preoperative f-MRI was performed in order to identify the motor area and ensure that the tumour was in the left prefrontal area. A more aggressive operation was planned for the recurrent tumour. The f-MRI data were input to the MKM navigation system and during the operation the contours of the tumour and motor area were visualised b y the microscope of the navigation system. The tumour and surrounding gliotic brain tissue were removed completely. The diagnosis was a grade III astrocytoma. The combination of the navigation system and f-MRI was useful for preoperative design of the surgical strategy, and tumour orientation during the operation, enabling aggressive surgery to be performed without functional deficits ensuing. Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  4. Comparative study of four immortalized human brain capillary endothelial cell lines, hCMEC/D3, hBMEC, TY10, and BB19, and optimization of culture conditions, for an in vitro blood–brain barrier model for drug permeability studies

    OpenAIRE

    Eigenmann, Daniela E; Xue, Gongda; Kim, Kwang S; Moses, Ashlee V; Hamburger, Matthias; Oufir, Mouhssin

    2013-01-01

    Background: Reliable human in vitro blood brain barrier (BBB) models suitable for high throughput screening are urgently needed in early drug discovery and development for assessing the ability of promising bioactive compounds to overcome the BBB. To establish an improved human in vitro BBB model we compared four currently available and well characterized immortalized human brain capillary endothelial cell lines hCMEC/D3 hBMEC TY10 and BB19 with respect to barrier tightness and paracellular p...

  5. Changes in 5-HT2A-mediated behavior and 5-HT2A- and 5-HT1A receptor binding and expression in conditional brain-derived neurotrophic factor knock-out mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, A B; Santini, M A; Aznar, S

    2010-01-01

    Changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression have been implicated in the etiology of psychiatric disorders. To investigate pathological mechanisms elicited by perturbed BDNF signaling, we examined mutant mice with central depletion of BDNF (BDNF(2L/2LCk-cre)). A severe impairmen...

  6. Subacute brain atrophy induced by radiation therapy to the malignant brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asai, Akio; Matsutani, Masao; Takakura, Kintomo.

    1987-01-01

    In order to analyze brain atrophy after radiation therapy to the brain tumors, we calculated a CSF-cranial volume ratio on CT scan as an index of brain atrophy, and estimated dementia-score by Hasegawa's method in 91 post-irradiated patients with malignant brain tumors. Radiation-induced brain atrophy was observed in 51 out of 91 patients (56 %) and dementia in 23 out of 47 patients (49 %). These two conditions were closely related, and observed significantly more often in aged and whole-brain-irradiated patients. As radiation-induced brain atrophy accompanied by dementia appeared 2 - 3 months after the completion of radiation therapy, it should be regarded as a subacute brain injury caused by radiation therapy. (author)

  7. Fetal brain disruption sequence versus fetal brain arrest: A distinct autosomal recessive developmental brain malformation phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S; El-Khayat, Hamed A; Eid, Ola M; Saba, Soliman; Farag, Mona K; Saleem, Sahar N; Gaber, Khaled R

    2015-05-01

    The term fetal brain disruption sequence (FBDS) was coined to describe a number of sporadic conditions caused by numerous external disruptive events presenting with variable imaging findings. However, rare familial occurrences have been reported. We describe five patients (two sib pairs and one sporadic) with congenital severe microcephaly, seizures, and profound intellectual disability. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed unique and uniform picture of underdeveloped cerebral hemispheres with increased extraxial CSF, abnormal gyral pattern (polymicrogyria-like lesions in two sibs and lissencephaly in the others), loss of white matter, dysplastic ventricles, hypogenesis of corpus callosum, and hypoplasia of the brainstem, but hypoplastic cerebellum in one. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) of two patients showed the same developmental brain malformations in utero. These imaging findings are in accordance with arrested brain development rather than disruption. Molecular analysis excluded mutations in potentially related genes such as NDE1, MKL2, OCLN, and JAM3. These unique clinical and imaging findings were described before among familial reports with FBDS. However, our patients represent a recognizable phenotype of developmental brain malformations, that is, apparently distinguishable from either familial microhydranencephaly or microlissencephaly that were collectively termed FBDS. Thus, the use of the umbrella term FBDS is no longer helpful. Accordingly, we propose the term fetal brain arrest to distinguish them from other familial patients diagnosed as FBDS. The presence of five affected patients from three unrelated consanguineous families suggests an autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance. The spectrum of fetal brain disruption sequence is reviewed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Brain injuries from blast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Cameron R; Panzer, Matthew B; Rafaels, Karen A; Wood, Garrett; Shridharani, Jay; Capehart, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) from blast produces a number of conundrums. This review focuses on five fundamental questions including: (1) What are the physical correlates for blast TBI in humans? (2) Why is there limited evidence of traditional pulmonary injury from blast in current military field epidemiology? (3) What are the primary blast brain injury mechanisms in humans? (4) If TBI can present with clinical symptoms similar to those of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), how do we clinically differentiate blast TBI from PTSD and other psychiatric conditions? (5) How do we scale experimental animal models to human response? The preponderance of the evidence from a combination of clinical practice and experimental models suggests that blast TBI from direct blast exposure occurs on the modern battlefield. Progress has been made in establishing injury risk functions in terms of blast overpressure time histories, and there is strong experimental evidence in animal models that mild brain injuries occur at blast intensities that are similar to the pulmonary injury threshold. Enhanced thoracic protection from ballistic protective body armor likely plays a role in the occurrence of blast TBI by preventing lung injuries at blast intensities that could cause TBI. Principal areas of uncertainty include the need for a more comprehensive injury assessment for mild blast injuries in humans, an improved understanding of blast TBI pathophysiology of blast TBI in animal models and humans, the relationship between clinical manifestations of PTSD and mild TBI from blunt or blast trauma including possible synergistic effects, and scaling between animals models and human exposure to blasts in wartime and terrorist attacks. Experimental methodologies, including location of the animal model relative to the shock or blast source, should be carefully designed to provide a realistic blast experiment with conditions comparable to blasts on humans. If traditional blast scaling is

  9. Changes in 5-HT2A-mediated behavior and 5-HT2A- and 5-HT1A receptor binding and expression in conditional brain-derived neurotrophic factor knock-out mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, A B; Santini, M A; Aznar, S

    2010-01-01

    Changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression have been implicated in the etiology of psychiatric disorders. To investigate pathological mechanisms elicited by perturbed BDNF signaling, we examined mutant mice with central depletion of BDNF (BDNF(2L/2LCk-cre)). A severe impairment...... specific for the serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT(2A)R) in prefrontal cortex was described previously in these mice. This is of much interest, as 5-HT(2A)Rs have been linked to neuropsychiatric disorders and anxiety-related behavior. Here we further characterized the serotonin receptor alterations triggered...... was decreased in hippocampus of BDNF mutants, but unchanged in frontal cortex. Molecular analysis indicated corresponding changes in 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(1A) mRNA expression but normal 5-HT(2C) content in these brain regions in BDNF(2L/2LCk-cre) mice. We investigated whether the reduction in frontal 5-HT(2A...

  10. Reporting of the air pollution situation in Norway according to EU's new air quality directives. Proposal of a GIS-based tool for reporting on visualisation of the air pollution situation in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larssen, Steinar; Thanh, The Nguyen; Hagen, Leif Otto; Endregard, Geir

    1999-12-01

    Norway shall, after 2001, annually report to the EU on the air quality situation in all zones. This report presents a proposal on a data (GIS)-based tool that will make this reporting more efficient. the concept is to visualise the AQ situation in the zones by means of values and isolines on maps, with zooming possibilities. (author)

  11. The significance of diagnostic MRI for visualisation of trauma-induced cervical nerve root avulsion. Case report; Die Bedeutung der MRT-Diagnostik zur Darstellung traumatisch bedingter zervikaler Wurzelausrisse. Kasuistik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muth, C P [Carl-Thiem-Klinikum, Cottbus (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Biemelt, F [Carl-Thiem-Klinikum, Cottbus (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Kamenz, M [Carl-Thiem-Klinikum, Cottbus (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    1996-11-01

    The article is intended to show the value of MRI for diagnostic visualisation and evaluation of posttraumatic nerve root avulsion as a brachial plexus injury. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Das Ziel der Arbeit besteht in der Darstellung des Wertes der MRT-Diagnostik bei der Abklaerung traumatischer Wurzelausrisse im Bereich des Plexus brachialis. (orig./MG)

  12. [Totally paralyzed or brain dead?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, G.W. van; Vos, P.E.; Eurelings, M.; Jansen, G.H.; Gijn, J. van

    2001-01-01

    In two patients, men aged 23 and 42 years, a condition that mimicked brain death was observed as a consequence of rapidly progressive complete peripheral paralyses, which included the intrinsic and extrinsic eye muscles. However, the EEG revealed a waking pattern. Maximal supportive therapy was

  13. Baby Brain Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Member Home Resources & Services Professional Resource Baby Brain Map Mar 17, 2016 The Brain Map was adapted in 2006 by ZERO TO ... supports Adobe Flash Player. To view the Baby Brain Map, please visit this page on a browser ...

  14. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... navigate their brain tumor diagnosis. WATCH AND SHARE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Central Nervous System Cancers Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  15. That's Using Your Brain!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Dana R.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses new adult learning theories, including those of Roger Sperry (left brain/right brain), Paul McLean (triune brain), and Howard Gardner (multiple intelligences). Relates adult learning theory to training. (JOW)

  16. Visualisation of distribution of gold nanoparticles in liver tissues ex vivo and in vitro using the method of optical coherence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genina, Elina A; Terentyuk, G S; Khlebtsov, B N; Bashkatov, A N; Tuchin, Valerii V

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of visualising the distribution of gold nanoparticles in liver by means of the method of optical coherence tomography is studied experimentally in model samples of beef liver in vitro and rat liver ex vivo. In the experiments we used the gold nanoparticles in the form of nanocages with resonance absorption in the near-IR spectral region. In the model studies the suspension of nanoparticles was applied to the surface of the sample, which then was treated with ultrasound. In the ex vivo studies the suspension of nanoparticles was injected to the laboratory rats intravenously. The image contrast and the optical depth of detection of blood vessels and liver structure components are calculated, as well as the depth of liver optical probing before and after the injection of nanoparticles. It was shown that the administration of the nanoparticle increases significantly the imaging contrast of liver blood vessels owing to the localisation of the nanoparticles therein.

  17. A Data-Driven Method for Selecting Optimal Models Based on Graphical Visualisation of Differences in Sequentially Fitted ROC Model Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K S Mwitondi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Differences in modelling techniques and model performance assessments typically impinge on the quality of knowledge extraction from data. We propose an algorithm for determining optimal patterns in data by separately training and testing three decision tree models in the Pima Indians Diabetes and the Bupa Liver Disorders datasets. Model performance is assessed using ROC curves and the Youden Index. Moving differences between sequential fitted parameters are then extracted, and their respective probability density estimations are used to track their variability using an iterative graphical data visualisation technique developed for this purpose. Our results show that the proposed strategy separates the groups more robustly than the plain ROC/Youden approach, eliminates obscurity, and minimizes over-fitting. Further, the algorithm can easily be understood by non-specialists and demonstrates multi-disciplinary compliance.

  18. A novel alternative method for 3D visualisation in Parasitology: the construction of a 3D model of a parasite from 2D illustrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, B G; Sarinder, K K S; Lim, L H S

    2010-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) models of the marginal hooks, dorsal and ventral anchors, bars and haptoral reservoirs of a parasite, Sundatrema langkawiense Lim & Gibson, 2009 (Monogenea) were developed using the polygonal modelling method in Autodesk 3ds Max (Version 9) based on two-dimensional (2D) illustrations. Maxscripts were written to rotate the modelled 3D structures. Appropriately orientated 3D haptoral hard-parts were then selected and positioned within the transparent 3D outline of the haptor and grouped together to form a complete 3D haptoral entity. This technique is an inexpensive tool for constructing 3D models from 2D illustrations for 3D visualisation of the spatial relationships between the different structural parts within organisms.

  19. The Environmental Virtual Observatory (EVO) local exemplar: A cloud based local landscape learning visualisation tool for communicating flood risk to catchment stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Mark; Beven, Keith; Brewer, Paul; El-khatib, Yehia; Gemmell, Alastair; Haygarth, Phil; Mackay, Ellie; Macklin, Mark; Marshall, Keith; Quinn, Paul; Stutter, Marc; Thomas, Nicola; Vitolo, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    Today's world is dominated by a wide range of informatics tools that are readily available to a wide range of stakeholders. There is growing recognition that the appropriate involvement of local communities in land and water management decisions can result in multiple environmental, economic and social benefits. Therefore, local stakeholder groups are increasingly being asked to participate in decision making alongside policy makers, government agencies and scientists. As such, addressing flooding issues requires new ways of engaging with the catchment and its inhabitants at a local level. To support this, new tools and approaches are required. The growth of cloud based technologies offers new novel ways to facilitate this process of exchange of information in earth sciences. The Environmental Virtual Observatory Pilot project (EVOp) is a new initiative from the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) designed to deliver proof of concept for new tools and approaches to support the challenges as outlined above (http://www.evo-uk.org/). The long term vision of the Environmental Virtual Observatory is to: • Make environmental data more visible and accessible to a wide range of potential users including public good applications; • Provide tools to facilitate the integrated analysis of data, greater access to added knowledge and expert analysis and visualisation of the results; • Develop new, added-value knowledge from public and private sector data assets to help tackle environmental challenges. As part of the EVO pilot, an interactive cloud based tool has been developed with local stakeholders. The Local Landscape Visualisation Tool attempts to communicate flood risk in local impacted communities. The tool has been developed iteratively to reflect the needs, interests and capabilities of a wide range of stakeholders. This tool (assessable via a web portal) combines numerous cloud based tools and services, local catchment datasets, hydrological models and

  20. Visualisation of distribution of gold nanoparticles in liver tissues ex vivo and in vitro using the method of optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genina, Elina A; Terentyuk, G S; Khlebtsov, B N; Bashkatov, A N; Tuchin, Valerii V

    2012-06-30

    The possibility of visualising the distribution of gold nanoparticles in liver by means of the method of optical coherence tomography is studied experimentally in model samples of beef liver in vitro and rat liver ex vivo. In the experiments we used the gold nanoparticles in the form of nanocages with resonance absorption in the near-IR spectral region. In the model studies the suspension of nanoparticles was applied to the surface of the sample, which then was treated with ultrasound. In the ex vivo studies the suspension of nanoparticles was injected to the laboratory rats intravenously. The image contrast and the optical depth of detection of blood vessels and liver structure components are calculated, as well as the depth of liver optical probing before and after the injection of nanoparticles. It was shown that the administration of the nanoparticle increases significantly the imaging contrast of liver blood vessels owing to the localisation of the nanoparticles therein.

  1. Brain death and related issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, M.; Mushtaq, S.; Jamil, K.; Ahmed, S.

    2003-01-01

    Concerns about the erroneous diagnosis of death and premature burial have been expressed from times immemorial. Patients with brain stem death have absolutely no chance of recovery. Brain death is considered at par with death in most of the countries. General public in most parts of the world shows reluctance to accept this concept due to different social, cultural and religious backgrounds and state of literacy and awareness. The criteria for the diagnosis of brain death have been established which include certain pre-conditions, exclusions and tests of the brain stem function. These criteria are universally accepted. The criteria in children are somewhat different from the adults. The subject is intimately related with organ transplantation. If the patients is registered as organ donor or the family consents, organs can be harvested from brain dead patients for transplantation. Pakistan is amongst the few countries where no legislation exists to accept brain death as being at par with death of an individual, and to facilitate and regulate, cadaveric organ donation and transplantation. (author)

  2. Brain SPECT in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guyot, M.; Baulieu, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Brain SPECT in child involves specific trends regarding the patient cooperation, irradiation, resolution and especially interpretation because of the rapid scintigraphic modifications related to the brain maturation. In a general nuclear medicine department, child brain SPECT represents about 2 % of the activity. The choice indications are the perfusion children: thallium and MIBI in brain tumours, pharmacological and neuropsychological interventions. In the future, brain dedicated detectors and new radiopharmaceuticals will promote the development of brain SPECT in children. (author)

  3. Prenatal Alcohol Exposure Damages Brain Signal Transduction Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Caldwell, Kevin

    2001-01-01

    .... One and twenty-four hours following fear conditioning this learning deficit is associated with altered brain signal transduction mechanisms that are dependent on an enzyme termed phosphatidylinositol...

  4. Childhood Brain Stem Glioma Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood brain stem glioma can be a benign (not cancer) or malignant (cancer) condition where abnormal cells form in the tissues of the brain stem. Get information about the symptoms, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of newly diagnosed and recurrent childhood brain stem glioma in this expert-reviewed summary.

  5. Revisiting Einstein's brain in Brain Awareness Week.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Chen, Su; Zeng, Lidan; Zhou, Lin; Hou, Shengtao

    2014-10-01

    Albert Einstein's brain has long been an object of fascination to both neuroscience specialists and the general public. However, without records of advanced neuro-imaging of his brain, conclusions regarding Einstein's extraordinary cognitive capabilities can only be drawn based on the unique external features of his brain and through comparison of the external features with those of other human brain samples. The recent discovery of 14 previously unpublished photographs of Einstein's brain taken at unconventional angles by Dr. Thomas Stoltz Harvey, the pathologist, ignited a renewed frenzy about clues to explain Einstein's genius. Dr. Dean Falk and her colleagues, in their landmark paper published in Brain (2013; 136:1304-1327), described in such details about the unusual features of Einstein's brain, which shed new light on Einstein's intelligence. In this article, we ask what are the unique structures of his brain? What can we learn from this new information? Can we really explain his extraordinary cognitive capabilities based on these unique brain structures? We conclude that studying the brain of a remarkable person like Albert Einstein indeed provides us a better example to comprehensively appreciate the relationship between brain structures and advanced cognitive functions. However, caution must be exercised so as not to over-interpret his intelligence solely based on the understanding of the surface structures of his brain.

  6. The Virtual Mouse Brain: A Computational Neuroinformatics Platform to Study Whole Mouse Brain Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melozzi, Francesca; Woodman, Marmaduke M; Jirsa, Viktor K; Bernard, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Connectome-based modeling of large-scale brain network dynamics enables causal in silico interrogation of the brain's structure-function relationship, necessitating the close integration of diverse neuroinformatics fields. Here we extend the open-source simulation software The Virtual Brain (TVB) to whole mouse brain network modeling based on individual diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI)-based or tracer-based detailed mouse connectomes. We provide practical examples on how to use The Virtual Mouse Brain (TVMB) to simulate brain activity, such as seizure propagation and the switching behavior of the resting state dynamics in health and disease. TVMB enables theoretically driven experimental planning and ways to test predictions in the numerous strains of mice available to study brain function in normal and pathological conditions.

  7. Electrical stunning and exsanguination decrease the extracellular volume in the broiler brain as studied with brain impedance recordings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savenije, B; Lambooij, E; Pieterse, C; Korf, J

    Electrical stunning in the process of slaughtering poultry is used to induce unconsciousness and immobilize the animal for easier processing. Unconsciousness is a function of brain damage. Brain damage has been studied with brain impedance recordings under ischemic conditions. This experiment

  8. Simulation of hydrocephalus condition in infant head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayanti, Erna; Arif, Idam

    2014-03-01

    Hydrocephalus is a condition of an excessive of cerebrospinal fluid in brain. In this paper, we try to simulate the behavior of hydrocephalus conditions in infant head by using a hydro-elastic model which is combined with orthotropic elastic skull and with the addition of suture that divide the skull into two lobes. The model then gives predictions for the case of stenosis aqueduct by varying the cerebral aqueduct diameter, time constant and brain elastic modulus. The hydrocephalus condition which is shown by the significant value of ventricle displacement, as the result shows, is occurred when the aqueduct is as resistant as brain parenchyma for the flow of cerebrospinal fluid. The decrement of brain elastic modulus causes brain parenchyma displacement value approach ventricle displacement value. The smaller of time constant value causes the smaller value of ventricle displacement.

  9. Left brain, right brain: facts and fantasies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corballis, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Handedness and brain asymmetry are widely regarded as unique to humans, and associated with complementary functions such as a left-brain specialization for language and logic and a right-brain specialization for creativity and intuition. In fact, asymmetries are widespread among animals, and support the gradual evolution of asymmetrical functions such as language and tool use. Handedness and brain asymmetry are inborn and under partial genetic control, although the gene or genes responsible are not well established. Cognitive and emotional difficulties are sometimes associated with departures from the "norm" of right-handedness and left-brain language dominance, more often with the absence of these asymmetries than their reversal.

  10. Exercise and plasticize the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mala, Hana; Wilms, Inge

    Neuroscientific studies continue to shed light on brain’s plasticity and its innate mechanisms to recover. The recovery process includes re-wiring of the existing circuitry, establishment of new connections, and recruitment of peri-lesional and homologous areas in the opposite hemisphere....... The plasticity of the brain can be stimulated and enhanced through training, which serves as a fundamental element of neurorehabilitative strategies. For instance, intensive cognitive and physical training promote the activation of processes that may help the brain to adapt to new conditions and needs. However...... neurorehabilitation is to understand and define how to stimulate the injured brain to elicit the desired adaptation. Research focuses on uncovering specific elements relevant for training planning and execution in order to create an environment that stimulates and maximizes the exploitation of the brain’s plastic...

  11. Chromosomal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and more. Stony Point, NY 10980 Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Chromosomal conditions Chromosomal conditions ... Disorders See also: Genetic counseling , Your family health history Last reviewed: February, 2013 ... labor & premature birth The newborn intensive care unit (NICU) Birth defects & ...

  12. Effects of diabetes on brain metabolism - is brain glycogen a significant player?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sickmann, Helle M; Waagepetersen, Helle S.

    2015-01-01

    Brain glycogen, being an intracellular glucose reservoir, contributes to maintain energy and neurotransmitter homeostasis under physiological as well as pathological conditions. Under conditions with a disturbance in systemic glucose metabolism such as in diabetes, the supply of glucose to the br......Brain glycogen, being an intracellular glucose reservoir, contributes to maintain energy and neurotransmitter homeostasis under physiological as well as pathological conditions. Under conditions with a disturbance in systemic glucose metabolism such as in diabetes, the supply of glucose...... to the brain may be affected and have important impacts on brain metabolism and neurotransmission. This also implies that brain glycogen may serve an essential role in the diabetic state to sustain appropriate brain function. There are two main types of diabetes; type 1 and type 2 diabetes and both types may...... understanding of how brain energy and neurotransmitter metabolism is affected in diabetes. There will be a particular focus on the role of brain glycogen to support glycolytic and TCA cycle activity as well as glutamate-glutamine cycle in type 1 and type 2 diabetes....

  13. Brain-in-Brain Artifact (BIBA) in a Patient with Hydranencepaly: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Sang Young; Kim, You Me; Lee, Seung Ha; Lee, Young Seok [College of Medicine Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    Hydranencephaly is a condition that is characterized by an absent brain mantle along with the subadjacent white matter, with replacement of the cerebral hemispheres by a thin-walled membranous sac containing CSF. During brain sonograpy in a neonate with hydranencephaly, we have found a brain-in-brain appearance as an unusual sonographic artifact. We report here on this interesting sonographic artifact in a neonate with hydranencephaly, and this artifact was due to multipath reflection artifact of the ultrasound beam/wave, and we explain the underlying physics

  14. Brain Cancer—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain cancer refers to growths of malignant cells in tissues of the brain. Tumors that start in the brain are called primary brain tumors. Tumors that spread to the brain are called metastatic brain tumors. Start here to find information on brain cancer treatment, research, and statistics.

  15. Neuroscience, brains, and computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorno Maria Innocenti

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the role of the neurosciences in establishing what the brain is and how states of the brain relate to states of the mind. The brain is viewed as a computational deviceperforming operations on symbols. However, the brain is a special purpose computational devicedesigned by evolution and development for survival and reproduction, in close interaction with theenvironment. The hardware of the brain (its structure is very different from that of man-made computers.The computational style of the brain is also very different from traditional computers: the computationalalgorithms, instead of being sets of external instructions, are embedded in brain structure. Concerningthe relationships between brain and mind a number of questions lie ahead. One of them is why andhow, only the human brain grasped the notion of God, probably only at the evolutionary stage attainedby Homo sapiens.

  16. FROM BRAIN DRAIN TO BRAIN NETWORKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina BONCEA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Scientific networking is the most accessible way a country can turn the brain drain into brain gain. Diaspora’s members offer valuable information, advice or financial support from the destination country, without being necessary to return. This article aims to investigate Romania’s potential of turning brain drain into brain networking, using evidence from the medical sector. The main factors influencing the collaboration with the country of origin are investigated. The conclusions suggest that Romania could benefit from the diaspora option, through an active implication at institutional level and the implementation of a strategy in this area.

  17. D-BRAIN : Anatomically accurate simulated diffusion MRI brain data

    OpenAIRE

    Perrone, Daniele; Jeurissen, Ben; Aelterman, Jan; Roine, Timo; Sijbers, Jan; Pizurica, Aleksandra; Leemans, Alexander; Philips, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion Weighted (DW) MRI allows for the non-invasive study of water diffusion inside living tissues. As such, it is useful for the investigation of human brain white matter (WM) connectivity in vivo through fiber tractography (FT) algorithms. Many DW-MRI tailored restoration techniques and FT algorithms have been developed. However, it is not clear how accurately these methods reproduce the WM bundle characteristics in real-world conditions, such as in the presence of noise, partial volume...

  18. Remodeling the blood–brain barrier microenvironment by natural products for brain tumor therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Zhao; Rujing Chen; Mei Liu; Jianfang Feng; Jun Chen; Kaili Hu

    2017-01-01

    Brain tumor incidence shows an upward trend in recent years; brain tumors account for 5% of adult tumors, while in children, this figure has increased to 70%. Moreover, 20%–30% of malignant tumors will eventually metastasize into the brain. Both benign and malignant tumors can cause an increase in intracranial pressure and brain tissue compression, leading to central nervous system(CNS) damage which endangers the patients’ lives. Despite the many approaches to treating brain tumors and the progress that has been made, only modest gains in survival time of brain tumor patients have been achieved. At present, chemotherapy is the treatment of choice for many cancers, but the special structure of the blood–brain barrier(BBB) limits most chemotherapeutic agents from passing through the BBB and penetrating into tumors in the brain. The BBB microenvironment contains numerous cell types, including endothelial cells, astrocytes, peripheral cells and microglia, and extracellular matrix(ECM). Many chemical components of natural products are reported to regulate the BBB microenvironment near brain tumors and assist in their treatment. This review focuses on the composition and function of the BBB microenvironment under both physiological and pathological conditions, and the current research progress in regulating the BBB microenvironment by natural products to promote the treatment of brain tumors.

  19. Brain-to-brain coupling during handholding is associated with pain reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Pavel; Weissman-Fogel, Irit; Dumas, Guillaume; Shamay-Tsoory, Simone G

    2018-03-13

    The mechanisms underlying analgesia related to social touch are not clear. While recent research highlights the role of the empathy of the observer to pain relief in the target, the contribution of social interaction to analgesia is unknown. The current study examines brain-to-brain coupling during pain with interpersonal touch and tests the involvement of interbrain synchrony in pain alleviation. Romantic partners were assigned the roles of target (pain receiver) and observer (pain observer) under pain-no-pain and touch-no-touch conditions concurrent with EEG recording. Brain-to-brain coupling in alpha-mu band (8-12 Hz) was estimated by a three-step multilevel analysis procedure based on running window circular correlation coefficient and post hoc power of the findings was calculated using simulations. Our findings indicate that hand-holding during pain administration increases brain-to-brain coupling in a network that mainly involves the central regions of the pain target and the right hemisphere of the pain observer. Moreover, brain-to-brain coupling in this network was found to correlate with analgesia magnitude and observer's empathic accuracy. These findings indicate that brain-to-brain coupling may be involved in touch-related analgesia.

  20. Matrix metalloproteinases in the brain and blood–brain barrier: Versatile breakers and makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempe, Ralf G; Hartz, Anika MS

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases are versatile endopeptidases with many different functions in the body in health and disease. In the brain, matrix metalloproteinases are critical for tissue formation, neuronal network remodeling, and blood–brain barrier integrity. Many reviews have been published on matrix metalloproteinases before, most of which focus on the two best studied matrix metalloproteinases, the gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9, and their role in one or two diseases. In this review, we provide a broad overview of the role various matrix metalloproteinases play in brain disorders. We summarize and review current knowledge and understanding of matrix metalloproteinases in the brain and at the blood–brain barrier in neuroinflammation, multiple sclerosis, cerebral aneurysms, stroke, epilepsy, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and brain cancer. We discuss the detrimental effects matrix metalloproteinases can have in these conditions, contributing to blood–brain barrier leakage, neuroinflammation, neurotoxicity, demyelination, tumor angiogenesis, and cancer metastasis. We also discuss the beneficial role matrix metalloproteinases can play in neuroprotection and anti-inflammation. Finally, we address matrix metalloproteinases as potential therapeutic targets. Together, in this comprehensive review, we summarize current understanding and knowledge of matrix metalloproteinases in the brain and at the blood–brain barrier in brain disorders. PMID:27323783