WorldWideScience

Sample records for brain visualisation conditions

  1. Fluid flow in panel radiator under various conditions - thermographic visualisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bašta Jiří

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Thermographic investigation of a heating panel radiator under various conditions, especially with various heating water volume flow rate is described in this article. For a radiator type 10-500x1000 TBOE and for two levels of inlet water temperature (75 and 55 °C a set of thermal images of surface temperature patterns for various values of heating water volume flow rate was taken. The initial value of flow rate was derived from nominal heating output and recalculated to real conditions. An increase of volume flow rate higher than 15 % over the nominal recalculated value is for the studied cases easily detectable on the resulting thermal images.

  2. Visualisation of multi-dimensional medical images with application to brain electrical impedance tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yan

    2007-01-01

    Medical imaging plays an important role in modem medicine. With the increasing complexity and information presented by medical images, visualisation is vital for medical research and clinical applications to interpret the information presented in these images. The aim of this research is to investigate improvements to medical image visualisation, particularly for multi-dimensional medical image datasets. A recently developed medical imaging technique known as Electrical Impedance Tomograp...

  3. One decade of functional imaging in schizophrenia research. From visualisation of basic information processing steps to molecular brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have contributed tremendously to our current understanding of psychiatric disorders in the context of functional, biochemical and microstructural alterations of the brain. Since the mid-nineties, functional MRI has provided major insights into the neurobiological correlates of signs and symptoms in schizophrenia. The current paper reviews important fMRI studies of the past decade in the domains of motor, visual, auditory, attentional and working memory function. Special emphasis is given to new methodological approaches, such as the visualisation of medication effects and the functional characterisation of risk genes. (orig.)

  4. Visualisation tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E. Dupont proposed that visualisation tools should be extended to Nuclear Data (ND) Information Systems in order to cover all data (and formats), all users and all needs. In particular, these ND Information Systems could both serve as an interface between data and users, as well as between data and codes (processing codes or nuclear reaction codes). It is expected that these systems will combine the advantages of processing codes and visualisation tools, as well as serving as a Tool Box to support various ND projects

  5. Visualising patient flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Andrew; Boyle, Justin; Khanna, Sankalp

    2012-01-01

    We describe the development of a method to distil routinely collected clinical data into patient flow information to aid hospital bed management. Using data from state-wide emergency department and inpatient clinical information systems, a user-friendly interface was developed to visualise patient flow conditions for a particular hospital. The historical snapshots employ a variable time scale, allowing flow to be visualised across a day, week, month or year. Flow information includes occupancy, arrival and departure rates, length-of-stay and access block observations, which can be filtered by age, departure status, diagnosis, elective status, triage category, and admission unit. The tool may be helpful in supporting hospital bed managers in their daily decision making. PMID:22797023

  6. Spatial thinking and visualisation

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Keith

    2001-01-01

    The provision of mathematics curriculum that encourages students to develop their powers of spatial thinking and visualisation, as important components of their geometrical reasoning, is seen as a key area for development in mathematics education. This short article reviews the nature of spatial thinking and visualisation, both in mathematics education more generally and in geometry in particular, illustrating how both forms of thinking are vital to mathematics.

  7. Brain death diagnosis in misleading conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tourtchaninoff, M; Hantson, P; Mahieu, P; Guérit, J M

    1999-07-01

    The necessity of defining brain death (BD) arose from technological development in medical science. The definition of this concept had practical consequences and opened the way to organ donation from BD patients. Nowadays, the imbalance between the number of organs available for transplantation and the size of the demand is becoming critical. In most laboratories, a BD diagnosis is made according to precise criteria and in a well-defined process. BD diagnosis should be improved, not only to assure the safety and to preserve the human dignity of the patient, but also in order to increase the rate of organ donation. By analysing some epidemiological parameters in BD diagnosis and organ donation, it appears that BD diagnoses can be made more often and more rapidly if one has a reliable, accurate, and safe confirmatory test, especially under misleading conditions (hypothermia, drugs, metabolic disturbances). In our experience, the use of multimodality evoked potentials (MEPs) to confirm a BD diagnosis has many advantages: MEPs can be rapidly performed at the patient's bedside, assess the brain stem as well as the cerebral cortex, and are innocuous for the patient. Moreover, their insensitivity to the aforementioned misleading factors is sufficient to distinguish BD from clinical and EEG states that mimic BD. They give an immediate diagnosis, and no delay is required in BD confirmation if there is sufficient cause to account for BD. MEPs are a safe, accurate, and reliable tool for confirming a BD diagnosis, and their use can improve the organ donation rate while preserving the safety of the patient. PMID:10627891

  8. Visualising roaming within eduroam

    OpenAIRE

    Chown, Tim; O'Leary, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The eduroam federated access service is a valuable tool for supporting collaboration and resource sharing worldwide, with its primary purpose being to facilitate seamless wireless roaming between users at participating institutions. There are over 100 participating sites in the UK that have joined the UK instance of eduroam known as the JANET Roaming Service (JRS). However, while the JRS is gaining traction in deployment, there is a lack of visualisation tools for users, site administrators o...

  9. Visualiser and SMACK Mediator

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Bohua

    2009-01-01

    With the stupendous rate of the development in network fields, more and more network based software comes into our eyesight. This thesis mainly focuses on how to build a data integration and synchronization system in order to support a distributed Web OS (Operation System) working properly with huge database on different servers. Jupiter Visualiser by Polystar OSIX is a process and analysis tool that generates customer and business intelligence information for telecom operators and puts it at...

  10. Embodied Design of Dance Visualisations

    OpenAIRE

    Brenton, Harry; Kleinsmith, Andrea; Gillies, Marco

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a software platform for creating interactive visualisations that respond to the free-form movements of a non-professional dancer. The visualisations can be trained to respond to the idiosyncratic movements of an individual dancer. This adaptive process is controlled by Interactive Machine Learning. Our approach is novel because the behaviour of the interactive visualisations is trained by a dancer dancing, rather than a computer scientist ...

  11. CMS Tracker Visualisation

    CERN Document Server

    Mennea, Maria Santa; Zito, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    To provide improvements in the performance of existing tracker data visualization tools in IGUANA, a 2D visualisation software has been developed, using the object oriented paradigm and software engineering techniques. We have designed 2D graphics objects and some of them have been implemented. The access to the new objects is made in ORCA plugin of IGUANA CMS. A new tracker object oriented model has been designed for developing these 2D graphics objects. The model consists of new classes which represent all its components (layers, modules, rings, petals, rods).The new classes are described here. The last part of this document contains a user manual of the software and will be updated with new releases.

  12. One decade of functional imaging in schizophrenia research. From visualisation of basic information processing steps to molecular brain imaging; Zehn Jahre funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie in der Schizophrenieforschung. Von der Abbildung einfacher Informationsverarbeitungsprozesse zur molekulargenetisch orientierten Bildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tost, H. [Zentralinstitut fuer Seelische Gesundheit, NMR-Forschung in der Psychiatrie (Germany); Zentralinstitut fuer Seelische Gesundheit, NMR-Forschung in der Psychiatrie, Mannheim (Germany); Meyer-Lindenberg, A. [Genes, Neuroimaging Core Facility and Unit on Integrative Neuroimaging, Cognition and Psychosis Program, National Institute of Mental Health (United States); Ruf, M.; Demirakca, T.; Grimm, O.; Henn, F.A.; Ende, G. [Zentralinstitut fuer Seelische Gesundheit, NMR-Forschung in der Psychiatrie (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    Modern neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have contributed tremendously to our current understanding of psychiatric disorders in the context of functional, biochemical and microstructural alterations of the brain. Since the mid-nineties, functional MRI has provided major insights into the neurobiological correlates of signs and symptoms in schizophrenia. The current paper reviews important fMRI studies of the past decade in the domains of motor, visual, auditory, attentional and working memory function. Special emphasis is given to new methodological approaches, such as the visualisation of medication effects and the functional characterisation of risk genes. (orig.) [German] Bildgebende Verfahren wie die Magnetresonanz- und Positronenemissionstomographie haben entscheidend dazu beigetragen, dass psychiatrische Erkrankungen heutzutage im Kontext funktioneller, biochemischer und feinstruktureller Veraenderungen des Gehirns verstanden werden. Im Bereich der Schizophrenieforschung gibt insbesondere die funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie seit Mitte der 90er-Jahre wichtige Einblicke in die neurobiologischen Grundlagen schizophrener Defizitbereiche. Die vorliegende Arbeit stellt die wichtigsten fMRT-Befunde der letzten Dekade in den Bereichen Psychomotorik, visuelle bzw. akustische Informationsverarbeitung, Aufmerksamkeit und Arbeitsgedaechtnis vor. Die Betrachtung erfolgt dabei unter der besonderen Beruecksichtigung aktueller methodischer Ansaetze wie der Darstellung von Therapieeffekten und der funktionellen Charakterisierung psychiatrischer Risikogene. (orig.)

  13. Autoencoding Time Series for Visualisation

    OpenAIRE

    Gianniotis, Nikolaos; Kügler, Dennis; Tino, Peter; Polsterer, Kai; Misra, Ranjeev

    2015-01-01

    We present an algorithm for the visualisation of time series. To that end we employ echo state networks to convert time series into a suitable vector representation which is capable of capturing the latent dynamics of the time series. Subsequently, the obtained vector representations are put through an autoencoder and the visualisation is constructed using the activations of the bottleneck. The crux of the work lies with defining an objective function that quantifies the reconstruction error ...

  14. In vitro and in vivo characterisation of nor-{beta}-CIT: a potential radioligand for visualisation of the serotonin transporter in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, K.A. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden)]|[Kuopio University Hospital, Clinical Physiology, FIN-70210 Kuopio (Finland); Halldin, C. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Hall, H. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Lundkvist, C. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Ginovart, N. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Swahn, C.G. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Farde, L. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-06-10

    Radiolabelled 2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane ({beta}-CIT) has been used in clinical studies for the imaging of dopamine and serotonin transporters with single-photon emission tomography (SPET). 2{beta}-Carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane (nor-{beta}-CIT) is a des-methyl analogue of {beta}-CIT, which in vitro has tenfold higher affinity (IC{sub 50}=0.36 nM) to the serotonin transporter than {beta}-CIT (IC{sub 50}=4.2 nM). Nor-{beta}-CIT may thus be a useful radioligand for imaging of the serotonin transporter. In the present study iodine-125 and carbon-11 labelled nor-{beta}-CIT were prepared for in vitro autoradiographic studies on post-mortem human brain cryosections and for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) studies in Cynomolgus monkeys. Whole hemisphere autoradiography with [{sup 125}I]nor-{beta}-CIT demonstrated high binding in the striatum, the thalamus and cortical regions of the human brain. Addition of a high concentration (1 {mu}M) of citalopram inhibited binding in the thalamus and the neocortex, but not in the striatum. In PET studies with [{sup 11}C]nor-{beta}-CIT there was rapid uptake of radioactivity in the monkey brain (6% of injected dose at 15 min) and high accumulation of radioactivity in the striatum, thalamus and neocortex. Thalamus to cerebellum and cortex to cerebellum ratios were 2.5 and 1.8 at 60 min, respectively. The ratios obtained with [{sup 11}C]nor-{beta}-CIT were 20%-40% higher than those previously obtained with [{sup 11}C]{beta}-CIT. Radioactivity in the thalamus and the neocortex but not in the striatum was displaceable with citalopram (5 mg/kg). In conclusion, nor-{beta}-CIT binds to the serotonin transporter in the primate brain in vitro and in vivo and has potential for PET and SPET imaging of the serotonin transporter in human brain. (orig.). With 4 figs.

  15. Autoencoding Time Series for Visualisation

    CERN Document Server

    Gianniotis, Nikolaos; Tino, Peter; Polsterer, Kai; Misra, Ranjeev

    2015-01-01

    We present an algorithm for the visualisation of time series. To that end we employ echo state networks to convert time series into a suitable vector representation which is capable of capturing the latent dynamics of the time series. Subsequently, the obtained vector representations are put through an autoencoder and the visualisation is constructed using the activations of the bottleneck. The crux of the work lies with defining an objective function that quantifies the reconstruction error of these representations in a principled manner. We demonstrate the method on synthetic and real data.

  16. Three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence for visualisation of subthalamic nucleus for deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Young Jin [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Inje University, Department of Radiology, Busan Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Joon; Kim, Ho Sung; Choi, Choong Gon; Jung, Seung Chai [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Kyo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chong Sik; Chung, Sun J. [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, So Hyun [Department of Radiology, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gyoung Ro [Philips HealthCare Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an accepted treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). However, targeting the STN is difficult due to its relatively small size and variable location. The purpose of this study was to assess which of the following sequences obtained with the 3.0 T MR system can accurately delineate the STN: coronal 3D fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), 2D T2*-weighted fast-field echo (T2*-FFE) and 2D T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences. We included 20 consecutive patients with PD who underwent 3.0 T MR for DBS targeting. 3D FLAIR, 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images were obtained for all study patients. Image quality and demarcation of the STN were analysed using 4-point scales, and contrast ratio (CR) of the STN and normal white matter was calculated. The Friedman test was used to compare the three sequences. In qualitative analysis, the 2D T2*-FFE image showed more artefacts than 3D FLAIR or 2D T2-TSE, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. 3D FLAIR images showed significantly superior demarcation of the STN compared with 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images (P < 0.001, respectively). The CR of 3D FLAIR was significantly higher than that of 2D T2*-FFE or T2-TSE images in multiple comparison correction (P < 0.001), but there was no significant difference in the CR between 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images. Coronal 3D FLAIR images showed the most accurate demarcation of the STN for DBS targeting among coronal 3D FLAIR, 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images. (orig.)

  17. Three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence for visualisation of subthalamic nucleus for deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an accepted treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). However, targeting the STN is difficult due to its relatively small size and variable location. The purpose of this study was to assess which of the following sequences obtained with the 3.0 T MR system can accurately delineate the STN: coronal 3D fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), 2D T2*-weighted fast-field echo (T2*-FFE) and 2D T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences. We included 20 consecutive patients with PD who underwent 3.0 T MR for DBS targeting. 3D FLAIR, 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images were obtained for all study patients. Image quality and demarcation of the STN were analysed using 4-point scales, and contrast ratio (CR) of the STN and normal white matter was calculated. The Friedman test was used to compare the three sequences. In qualitative analysis, the 2D T2*-FFE image showed more artefacts than 3D FLAIR or 2D T2-TSE, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. 3D FLAIR images showed significantly superior demarcation of the STN compared with 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images (P < 0.001, respectively). The CR of 3D FLAIR was significantly higher than that of 2D T2*-FFE or T2-TSE images in multiple comparison correction (P < 0.001), but there was no significant difference in the CR between 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images. Coronal 3D FLAIR images showed the most accurate demarcation of the STN for DBS targeting among coronal 3D FLAIR, 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images. (orig.)

  18. Visualisations and Calculations of Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harty, Chris; Tryggestad, Kjell; Holm Jacobsen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    of stakeholders are engaged in the process. This paper describes a case of the ‘on-boarding’ phase in the design of a new hospital in North Zealand, Denmark. It describes the use of various visualisations in the engagement of actors concerned with managing the budget and delivering the building programme as well...

  19. Do some neurological conditions induce brain plasticity processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Lilianne

    2008-09-01

    Paillard [Paillard J. Réflexions sur l'usage du concept de plasticité en Neurobiologie. J Psychol Norm Pathol 1976;1:33-47] defined adaptive plasticity as the capacity of the system to change its own structure and expand its behavioural repertoire. We review the literature on brain damage patients, in whom, adaptive plasticity was observed via neuropsychological and functional neuroimaging examinations. Attentional and memory system alterations and some resulting changes considered as compensatory mechanisms are commented. We have selected a single case presenting with developmental amnesia [Vargha-Khadem F, Gadian DG, Watkins KE, Connelly A, Van Paesschen W, Mishkin M. Differential effects of early hippocampal pathology on episodic and semantic memory. Science 1997;277(5324):376-80; Maguire EA, Vargha-Khadem F, Mishkin M. The effects of bilateral hippocampal damage on fMRI regional activations and interactions during memory retrieval. Brain 2001;124(Pt 6):1156-70] and several groups of multiple sclerosis patients studied recently [e.g. Mainero C, Pantano P, Caramia F, Pozzilli C. Brain reorganization during attention and memory tasks in multiple sclerosis: insights from functional MRI studies. J Neurol Sci 2006;245(1/2):93-8; Morgen K, Sammer G, Courtney SM, Wolters T, Melchior H, Blecker CR, et al. Distinct mechanisms of altered brain activation in patients with multiple sclerosis. Neuroimage 2007;37(3):937-46; Nebel K, Wiese H, Seyfarth J, Gizewski ER, Stude P, Diener HC, et al. Activity of attention related structures in multiple sclerosis patients. Brain Res 2007;1151:150-60]. Convergence evidence via the two approaches - neuropsychological and functional fMRI - was shown as functional and structural brain plasticity was demonstrated in the selected works. Some common characteristics of brain plasticity emerge from this review independently of the neurological conditions we reviewed. PMID:18479763

  20. Deep brain stimulation affects conditioned and unconditioned anxiety in different brain areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, A; Klanker, M; van Oorschot, N; Post, R; Hamelink, R; Feenstra, M G P; Denys, D

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) has proven to be an effective treatment for therapy refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder. Clinical observations show that anxiety symptoms decrease rapidly following DBS. As in clinical studies different regions are targeted, it is of principal interest to understand which brain area is responsible for the anxiolytic effect and whether high-frequency stimulation of different areas differentially affect unconditioned (innate) and conditioned (learned) anxiety. In this study, we examined the effect of stimulation in five brain areas in rats (NAc core and shell, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), internal capsule (IC) and the ventral medial caudate nucleus (CAU)). The elevated plus maze was used to test the effect of stimulation on unconditioned anxiety, the Vogel conflict test for conditioned anxiety, and an activity test for general locomotor behaviour. We found different anxiolytic effects of stimulation in the five target areas. Stimulation of the CAU decreased both conditioned and unconditioned anxiety, while stimulation of the IC uniquely reduced conditioned anxiety. Remarkably, neither the accumbens nor the BNST stimulation affected conditioned or unconditioned anxiety. Locomotor activity increased with NAc core stimulation but decreased with the BNST. These findings suggest that (1) DBS may have a differential effect on unconditioned and conditioned anxiety depending on the stimulation area, and that (2) stimulation of the IC exclusively reduces conditioned anxiety. This suggests that the anxiolytic effects of DBS seen in OCD patients may not be induced by stimulation of the NAc, but rather by the IC. PMID:23900312

  1. Subliminal Instrumental Conditioning Demonstrated in the Human Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Pessiglione, M.; Petrovic, P.; Daunizeau, J.; Palminteri, S; Dolan, R. J.; Frith, C D

    2008-01-01

    Summary How the brain uses success and failure to optimize future decisions is a long-standing question in neuroscience. One computational solution involves updating the values of context-action associations in proportion to a reward prediction error. Previous evidence suggests that such computations are expressed in the striatum and, as they are cognitively impenetrable, represent an unconscious learning mechanism. Here, we formally test this by studying instrumental conditioning in a situat...

  2. Condition-orientated maintenance with the aid of visualisation of wear data and change predictions; Zustandsorientierte Instandhaltung anhand Visualisierung von Verschleissdaten und Wechselprognosen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, Volker [RAG Deutsche Steinkohle AG, Marl (Germany). Bergwerk Auguste Victoria; Piejede, Peter [RAG Deutsche Steinkohle AG, Herne (Germany). Servicebereich Technik und Logistik

    2011-01-15

    Because of the greater concentration of underground workings in the German coal mining industry in a few high-output faces condition-orientated maintenance of conveying equipment is becoming increasingly important. The most diverse methods are used. For example, the abrasive parameters are of special importance for the armoured face conveyors with their high mechanical loads. The contribution explains the individual wear situations are as well as their evaluations on practical examples. (orig.)

  3. MRI of brain tissue oxygen tension under hyperbaric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Eric R; Cardenas, Damon P; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-06-01

    The brain depends on a continuous supply of oxygen to maintain its structural and functional integrity. This study measured T1 from MRI under normobaric air, normobaric oxygen, hyperbaric air, and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) conditions as a marker of tissue pO2 since dissolved molecular oxygen acts as an endogenous contrast agent. Brain tissue T1 decreased corresponding to increased pO2 with increasing inhaled oxygen concentrations, and tissue oxygenation was estimated from the T1 changes between different inhaled oxygen levels. Tissue pO2 difference maps between different oxygen conditions showed heterogeneous pO2 changes in the brain. MRI-derived tissue pO2 was markedly lower than the arterial pO2 but was slightly higher than venous pO2. Additionally, for comparison with published extracellular tissue pO2 data obtained using oxygen electrodes and other invasive techniques, a model was used to estimate extracellular and intracellular pO2 from the MRI-derived mean tissue pO2. This required multiple assumptions, and so the effects of the assumptions and parameters used in modeling brain pO2 were evaluated. MRI-derived pO2 values were strongly dependent on assumptions about the extra- and intracellular compartments but were relatively less sensitive to variations in the relaxivity constant of oxygen and contribution from oxygen in the cerebral blood compartment. This approach may prove useful in evaluating tissue oxygenation in disease states such as stroke. PMID:27033683

  4. Quality criteria for landscape visualisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rapid expansion of wind energy utilisation in Western Europe can strain the limits of social acceptance with citizens living in wind development areas. One of the problems wind farm engineers and local authorities face is the visual impact of wind turbines. To determine the influence on the landscape visualisations of wind farms photorealistic compositions are used. In many cases it is part of the planning procedure. The quality of this visualization can strongly influence the success of the permission procedure. We will give criteria which can give help to reduce the possibility of unwanted manipulations. (author)

  5. Effects of conditioned running on plasma, liver and brain tryptophan and on brain 5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism of the rat.

    OpenAIRE

    Chaouloff, F; Elghozi, J. L.; Guezennec, Y.; Laude, D.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was made into the effects of conditioned running (1 h and 2 h at 20 m min-1), which accelerates lipolysis, on the concentrations of tryptophan (Trp) in plasma, liver and brain and on 5-hydroxytrptamine (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels in brain. Running caused time-dependent increases in plasma free Trp and brain Trp of the rat, leading to increased brain 5-HT turnover as revealed by higher amounts of its metabolite, 5-HIAA. The ratio of brain Trp to plasm...

  6. A Multiview Visualisation Architecture for Open Distributed Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Oldengarm, P.; Halteren, van, Aart; Hughes, E.

    1998-01-01

    Program visualisation is an attractive way for understanding collaboration structures of complex distributed systems. By using the concepts of the open distributed processing-reference model (ODP-RM) as entities for visualisation, a multiview visualisation architecture is presented, which provides a large degree of flexibility in visualising the actions of an ODP system. The architecture has been implemented for visualising the CORBA system resulting in a visualisation tool called OBVlouS.

  7. Visualising DNA in Classrooms Using Nile Blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Christine; Roche, Scott; McKay, David

    2008-01-01

    Giving students the opportunity to extract, manipulate and visualise DNA molecules enhances a constructivist approach to learning about modern techniques in biology and biotechnology Visualisation usually requires agarose gel electrophoresis and staining. In this article, we report on an alternative DNA stain, Nile Blue A, that may be used in the…

  8. Visuals and Visualisation of Human Body Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, Sindhu; Ramadas, Jayashree

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the role of diagrams and text in middle school students' understanding and visualisation of human body systems. We develop a common framework based on structure and function to assess students' responses across diagram and verbal modes. Visualisation is defined in terms of understanding transformations on structure and relating…

  9. Exposure visualisation of ultrafine particle counts in a transport microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, S.; Clark, R. D. R.; Walsh, P. T.; Arnold, S. J.; Colvile, R. N.; Nieuwenhuijsen, M. J.

    An increasing number of studies indicate that short-term peak exposures, such as those seen in the transport microenvironment, pose particular health threats. Short-term exposure can only be sufficiently characterised using portable, fast-response monitoring instrumentation with detailed summaries of individual activity. In this paper, we present an exposure visualisation system that addresses this issue—it allows the simultaneous presentation of mobile video imagery synchronised with measured real-time ultrafine particle count exposure of an individual. The combined data can be examined in detail for the contribution of the surrounding environment and the individual's activities to their peak and overall exposure. The exposure visualisation system is demonstrated and evaluated around the DAPPLE study site in Central London using different modes of transport (walking, cycling, bus, car and taxi). The video images, synchronised with the exposure profile, highlight the extent to which ultrafine particle exposure is associated with traffic density and proximity to pollutant source. The extremely rapid decline in concentration with increasing distance away from the pollutant source, such as from the main street to the backstreets, is clearly evident. The visualisation technique allows these data to be presented to both technical audiences and laypersons thus making it an effective environmental risk communication tool. Some exposure peaks however are not obviously associated with any event recorded on video—in these cases it will be necessary to use advanced dispersion modelling techniques to investigate meteorological conditions and other variables influencing in-street conditions to identify their possible causes.

  10. Map as a Service: A Framework for Visualising and Maximising Information Return from Multi-ModalWireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hammoudeh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a distributed information extraction and visualisation service, called the mapping service, for maximising information return from large-scale wireless sensor networks. Such a service would greatly simplify the production of higher-level, information-rich, representations suitable for informing other network services and the delivery of field information visualisations. The mapping service utilises a blend of inductive and deductive models to map sense data accurately using externally available knowledge. It utilises the special characteristics of the application domain to render visualisations in a map format that are a precise reflection of the concrete reality. This service is suitable for visualising an arbitrary number of sense modalities. It is capable of visualising from multiple independent types of the sense data to overcome the limitations of generating visualisations from a single type of sense modality. Furthermore, the mapping service responds dynamically to changes in the environmental conditions, which may affect the visualisation performance by continuously updating the application domain model in a distributed manner. Finally, a distributed self-adaptation function is proposed with the goal of saving more power and generating more accurate data visualisation. We conduct comprehensive experimentation to evaluate the performance of our mapping service and show that it achieves low communication overhead, produces maps of high fidelity, and further minimises the mapping predictive error dynamically through integrating the application domain model in the mapping service.

  11. Brain mineralocorticoid receptors as resilience factor under adverse life conditions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanatsou, S.

    2016-01-01

    Studies in human cohorts have underlined the importance of gene-environment interactions for brain structure and function during development and in adulthood. Such interactions can make the difference between staying healthy or succumbing to disease, e.g. depression or posttraumatic stress disorder.

  12. 3D-visualisering i arkitektkonkurrencer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, N.H.

    Statens Forsknings- og Uddannelsesbygninger har på forskellige nybyggerier eksperimenteret med anvendelse af 3D-visualisering i tilknytning til bedømmelsen af arkitektkonkurrencer. Interview af dommerkomitéen på konkurrencerne på Muskikkens Hus i Nordjylland og nye bygninger til Roskilde...... Universitetscenter har givet input til forslag om den fremtidige udvikling. Forslagene retter sig både mod arkitekternes kompetence og udvalgte forretningsstrategier og mod den professionelle bygherres fremtidige krav til 3D-visualisering i arkitektkonkurrencer. Et indbudt seminar om rapportens anbefalinger samler...

  13. Learning, Learning Analytics, Activity Visualisation and Open learner Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, Susan; Kickmeier-Rust, Michael; Vatrapu, Ravi;

    2013-01-01

    This paper draws on visualisation approaches in learning analytics, considering how classroom visualisations can come together in practice. We suggest an open learner model in situations where many tools and activity visualisations produce more visual information than can be readily interpreted....

  14. Examining the contribution of critical visualisation to information security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, Peter A.; Heath, Claude P.; Coles-Kemp, Lizzie; Tanner, Axel

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the use of visualisations in the field of information security and in particular focuses on the practice of information security risk assessment. We examine the current roles of information security visualisations and place these roles in the wider information visualisation disco

  15. Alzheimer's disease: Is this a brain specific diabetic condition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Vanita; Deshmukh, Rahul; Jaswal, Priya; Kumar, Puneet; Bariwal, Jitender

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are the two major health issues affecting millions of elderly people worldwide, with major impacts in the patient's daily life. Numerous studies have demonstrated that patients with diabetes have an increased risk of developing AD compared with healthy individuals. The principal biological mechanisms that associate with the progression of diabetes and AD are not completely understood. Impaired insulin signaling, uncontrolled glucose metabolism, oxidative stress, abnormal protein processing, and the stimulation of inflammatory pathways are common features to both AD and T2DM. In recent years brain specific abnormalities in insulin and insulin like growth factor (IGF) signaling considered as a major trigger involved in the etiopathogenesis of AD, showing T2DM like milieu. This review summarizes the pathways that might link diabetes and AD and the effect of diminished insulin. PMID:27235734

  16. Neural Operant Conditioning as a Core Mechanism of Brain-Machine Interface Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Sakurai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The process of changing the neuronal activity of the brain to acquire rewards in a broad sense is essential for utilizing brain-machine interfaces (BMIs, which is essentially operant conditioning of neuronal activity. Currently, this is also known as neural biofeedback, and it is often referred to as neurofeedback when human brain activity is targeted. In this review, we first illustrate biofeedback and operant conditioning, which are methodological background elements in neural operant conditioning. Then, we introduce research models of neural operant conditioning in animal experiments and demonstrate that it is possible to change the firing frequency and synchronous firing of local neuronal populations in a short time period. We also debate the possibility of the application of neural operant conditioning and its contribution to BMIs.

  17. Comment visualiser l'invisible?

    CERN Multimedia

    Develay, Dominique

    2007-01-01

    In the big hadron collider, LHC, nearly finished, particle will be accelerated to make collisions, with the aim to re-create the conditions of the birth of Universe, some seconds after the Big Bang. (1 page)

  18. Effect of lighting conditions on brain network complexity associated with response learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidalgo, Camino; Conejo, Nélida M; González-Pardo, Héctor; Arias, Jorge L

    2013-10-25

    Several studies have reported the brain regions involved in response learning. However, there is discrepancy regarding the lighting conditions in the experimental setting (i.e. under dark or light conditions). In this regard, it would be relevant to know if the presence/absence of visual cues in the environment has any effect in the brain networks involved in a response learning task. Animals were trained in a water T-maze under two different lighting conditions (light versus dark). All subjects reached the learning criterion of 80% correct arm choices. Quantitative cytochrome oxidase (CO) histochemistry was used as a metabolic brain mapping technique. Our results show that the ventral hippocampus and the parietal cortex are associated with the acquisition of a response learning task regardless of lighting conditions. In addition, when the same task is run in the dark, widespread recruitment of structures involving cortical, limbic and striatal regions was found. PMID:24084195

  19. Bird brains and tool use: beyond instrumental conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striedter, Georg F

    2013-01-01

    Few displays of complex cognition are as intriguing as nonhuman tool use. Long thought to be unique to humans, evidence for tool use and manufacture has now been gathered in chimpanzees, dolphins, and elephants. Outside of mammals, tool use is most common in birds, especially in corvids and parrots. The present paper reviews the evidence for avian tool use, both in the wild and in laboratory settings. It also places this behavioral evidence in the context of longstanding debates about the kinds of mental processes nonhumans can perform. Descartes argued that animals are unable to think because they are soulless machines, incapable of flexible behavior. Later, as human machines became more sophisticated and psychologists discovered classical and instrumental conditioning, skepticism about animal thinking decreased. However, behaviors that involve more than simple conditioning continued to elicit skepticism, especially among behaviorists. Nonetheless, as reviewed here, strong behavioral data now indicate that tool use in some birds cannot be explained as resulting entirely from instrumental conditioning. The neural substrates of tool use in birds remain unclear, but the available data point mainly to the caudolateral nidopallium, which shares both functional and structural features with the mammalian prefrontal cortex. As more data on the neural mechanisms of complex cognition in birds accrue, skepticism about those mental capacities should continue to wane. PMID:23979456

  20. Different brain networks underlying the acquisition and expression of contextual fear conditioning: a metabolic mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pardo, H; Conejo, N M; Lana, G; Arias, J L

    2012-01-27

    The specific brain regions and circuits involved in the acquisition and expression of contextual fear conditioning are still a matter of debate. To address this issue, regional changes in brain metabolic capacity were mapped during the acquisition and expression of contextual fear conditioning using cytochrome oxidase (CO) quantitative histochemistry. In comparison with a group briefly exposed to a conditioning chamber, rats that received a series of randomly presented footshocks in the same conditioning chamber (fear acquisition group) showed increased CO activity in anxiety-related brain regions like the ventral periaqueductal gray, the ventral hippocampus, the lateral habenula, the mammillary bodies, and the laterodorsal thalamic nucleus. Another group received randomly presented footshocks, and it was re-exposed to the same conditioning chamber one week later (fear expression group). The conditioned group had significantly higher CO activity as compared with the matched control group in the following brain regions: the ventral periaqueductal gray, the central and lateral nuclei of the amygdala, and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. In addition, analysis of functional brain networks using interregional CO activity correlations revealed different patterns of functional connectivity between fear acquisition and fear expression groups. In particular, a network comprising the ventral hippocampus and amygdala nuclei was found in the fear acquisition group, whereas a closed reciprocal dorsal hippocampal network was detected in the fear expression group. These results suggest that contextual fear acquisition and expression differ as regards to the brain networks involved, although they share common brain regions involved in fear, anxiety, and defensive behavior. PMID:22173014

  1. Reinforcement learning, conditioning, and the brain: Successes and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Tiago V

    2009-12-01

    The field of reinforcement learning has greatly influenced the neuroscientific study of conditioning. This article provides an introduction to reinforcement learning followed by an examination of the successes and challenges using reinforcement learning to understand the neural bases of conditioning. Successes reviewed include (1) the mapping of positive and negative prediction errors to the firing of dopamine neurons and neurons in the lateral habenula, respectively; (2) the mapping of model-based and model-free reinforcement learning to associative and sensorimotor cortico-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuits, respectively; and (3) the mapping of actor and critic to the dorsal and ventral striatum, respectively. Challenges reviewed consist of several behavioral and neural findings that are at odds with standard reinforcement-learning models, including, among others, evidence for hyperbolic discounting and adaptive coding. The article suggests ways of reconciling reinforcement-learning models with many of the challenging findings, and highlights the need for further theoretical developments where necessary. Additional information related to this study may be downloaded from http://cabn.psychonomic-journals.org/content/supplemental. PMID:19897789

  2. Image digitization, preprocessing and visualisation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The system described in this paper has been designed to digitize and preprocess the images obtained at the ''Centre d'Etudes de Limeil'' (FRANCE) in the field of laser-fusion experiments. It mainly intends to set qualitative informations accessible to the physicist, and acts as an intermediary for the quantitative processing. We shall describe its organization and explain to role of its main functions (digitization of photographs, data storage, coding, preprocessing and visualisation, reconstruction). (author)

  3. Visualisation and Analysis Challenges for WALLABY

    OpenAIRE

    Fluke, Christopher J; Barnes, David G.; Hassan, Amr H.

    2010-01-01

    Visualisation and analysis of terabyte-scale datacubes, as will be produced with the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), will pose challenges for existing astronomy software and the work practices of astronomers. Focusing on the proposed outcomes of WALLABY (Widefield ASKAP L-Band Legacy All-Sky Blind Survey), and using lessons learnt from HIPASS (HI Parkes All Sky Survey), we identify issues that astronomers will face with WALLABY data cubes. We comment on potential researc...

  4. Visualisation Techniques for Learning and Teaching Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Kuljis, Jasna; Baldwin, Lynne P.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the programming knowledge and skills that learners need to develop, and concludes that this is an area of computer science education where those involved in the teaching of programming need to further consider the nature, structure and function of domain specific knowledge. Visualisation techniques may offer important insights into the learning and teaching of programming. It has been argued that conceptual models could serve to enhance learners' conceptual understanding ...

  5. Clinical and pathological significance of carotid siphon calcification observed on bone condition of brain CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On plain brain computed tomography (CT), it is difficult to evaluate stenosis of internal carotid artery (ICA) because ICA is surrounded by structures, even though we can observe calcification of carotid siphon in some patients by using bone condition. However the pathologic significance has not been well known. We studied the pathologic significance of carotid siphon calcification observed on bone condition of brain CT. A total of 112 patients who were diagnosed or suspected as cerebrovascular diseases were registered. We classified the calcification into four levels (none, mild, moderate, severe) based on the degree of calcification. Then we compared it with the degree of stenosis of carotid siphon seen on brain magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and with max intima-medial thickness (IMT) from common carotid artery (CCA) to ICA on carotid ultrasonography. The mean±standard deviation of max IMT to none, mild, moderate and severe in the degree of calcification were 1.03±0.64 (0.4-2.8), 1.65±0.83 (0.5-4.1), 2.03±0.83 (0.8-4.1) and 2.81±1.15 (0.7-6.5) mm, respectively. The calcification on brain CT significantly correlated with the degree of stenosis on brain MRA and with max IMT on carotid ultrasonography. The calcification of carotid siphon on bone condition of brain CT correlated with stenosis of the same portion and atherosclerosis of CCA bifurcation. Recently, on Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) viewer, clinicians can convert plain condition into bone condition on brain CT due to popularization of picture achieving and communication system (PACS). We should pay attention to calcification of carotid siphon in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular diseases because we can estimate the atherosclerosis of both carotid siphon and CCA bifurcation easily and immediately. (author)

  6. Conditioning of brain stimulation-induced presleep behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrwicka, W; Chase, M H

    1994-11-01

    Experiments were conducted on three chronic unanesthetized, undrugged cats. Electrical stimulation of the basal forebrain area (BFA) resulted in presleep behavior (i.e., the cats would sit or lie down, and EEG spindles would arise). After several sessions (conducted twice a week), two of these cats began to exhibit presleep behavior almost immediately after entering the experimental compartment, even before the application of BFA stimulation. The third cat often ate some food (which was always present in the compartment) before showing presleep behavior. When stimulation was withheld during an extinction procedure, the cats still exhibited presleep behavior in the absence of stimulation during several sessions. We conclude that repeated BFA stimulation led to conditioning of the stimulation effects, that is, the presleep behavior that was evoked by the environmental situation alone, without BFA stimulation or any other intermittent stimulus. PMID:7824587

  7. Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  8. Altered resting-state brain activity at functional MRI during automatic memory consolidation of fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tingyong; Feng, Pan; Chen, Zhencai

    2013-07-26

    Investigations of fear conditioning in rodents and humans have illuminated the neural mechanisms of fear acquisition and extinction. However, the neural mechanism of automatic memory consolidation of fear conditioning is still unclear. To address this question, we measured brain activity following fear acquisition using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI). In the current study, we used a marker of fMRI, amplitude of low-frequency (0.01-0.08Hz) fluctuation (ALFF) to quantify the spontaneous brain activity. Brain activity correlated to fear memory consolidation was observed in parahippocampus, insula, and thalamus in resting-state. Furthermore, after acquired fear conditioning, compared with control group some brain areas showed ALFF increased in ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in the experimental group, whereas some brain areas showed decreased ALFF in striatal regions (caudate, putamen). Moreover, the change of ALFF in vmPFC was positively correlated with the subjective fear ratings. These findings suggest that the parahippocampus, insula, and thalamus are the neural substrates of fear memory consolidation. The difference in activity could be attributed to a homeostatic process in which the vmPFC and ACC were involved in the fear recovery process, and change of ALFF in vmPFC predicts subjective fear ratings. PMID:23726994

  9. A Game-theoretic View on Behavioural Visualisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Michael

    2007-01-01

    To bridge the gap between domain experts and formal methods experts, visualisations of the behaviour of formal models are used to let the domain expert understand and experiment with the formal model. In this paper we provide a definition of visualisations, founded in game-theory, which regards v...... visualisations as transition systems synchronised with formal models. We show example visualisations, use them to show winning strategies of games, and demonstrate how an industrial application of formal models benefited from this approach.......To bridge the gap between domain experts and formal methods experts, visualisations of the behaviour of formal models are used to let the domain expert understand and experiment with the formal model. In this paper we provide a definition of visualisations, founded in game-theory, which regards...

  10. Visualising very large phylogenetic trees in three dimensional hyperbolic space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liberles David A

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common existing phylogenetic tree visualisation tools are not able to display readable trees with more than a few thousand nodes. These existing methodologies are based in two dimensional space. Results We introduce the idea of visualising phylogenetic trees in three dimensional hyperbolic space with the Walrus graph visualisation tool and have developed a conversion tool that enables the conversion of standard phylogenetic tree formats to Walrus' format. With Walrus, it becomes possible to visualise and navigate phylogenetic trees with more than 100,000 nodes. Conclusion Walrus enables desktop visualisation of very large phylogenetic trees in 3 dimensional hyperbolic space. This application is potentially useful for visualisation of the tree of life and for functional genomics derivatives, like The Adaptive Evolution Database (TAED.

  11. Exploratory visualisation of congestion evolutions on urban transport networks

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Tao; Tanaksaranond, Garavig; Brunsdon, Chris; Haworth, James

    2013-01-01

    Visualisation is an effective tool for studying traffic congestion using massive traffic datasets collected from traffic sensors. Existing techniques can reveal where/when congested areas are formed, developed, and moved on one or several highway roads, but it is still challenging to visualise the evolution of traffic congestion on the whole road network, especially on dense urban networks. To address this challenge, this paper proposes three 3D exploratory visualisation techniques: the isosu...

  12. The Extreme Male Brain Theory and Gender Role Behaviour in Persons with an Autism Spectrum Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauder, J. E. A.; Cornet, L. J. M.; Ponds, R. W. H. M.

    2011-01-01

    According to the Extreme Male Brain theory persons with autism possess masculinised cognitive traits. In this study masculinisation of gender role behaviour is evaluated in 25 persons with an autism spectrum condition (ASC) and matched controls with gender role behaviour as part of a shortened version of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality…

  13. Severe dopaminergic neuron loss in rhesus monkey brain impairs morphine-induced conditioned place preference

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Ting; Rizak, Joshua Dominic; Wang, Jianhong; Yang, Shangchuan; Ma, Yuanye; Hu, Xintian

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that dopamine (DA) is critical for reward, but the precise role of DA in reward remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to determine what percentage of dopaminergic neurons in the primate brain is required for the expression of conditioned reward by measuring the performance of DA-deficient rhesus monkeys in a morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. Animals with mild Parkinsonian symptoms successfully developed and retained a morphine preference tha...

  14. Severe dopaminergic neuron loss in rhesus monkey brain impairs morphine-induced conditioned place preference

    OpenAIRE

    Ting Yan; Yuanye Ma

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that dopamine is critical for reward, but the precise role of dopamine in reward remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to determine what percentage of dopaminergic neurons in the primate brain is required for the expression of conditioned reward by measuring the performance of dopamine-deficient rhesus monkeys in a morphine-induced conditioned place preference paradigm. Animals with mild Parkinsonian symptoms successfully developed and retained a morphine preference th...

  15. Resting cerebral metabolism correlates with skin conductance and functional brain activation during fear conditioning

    OpenAIRE

    Linnman, Clas; Zeidan, Mohamed A.; Pitman, Roger K.; Milad, Mohammed R.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether resting brain metabolism can be used to predict autonomic and neuronal responses during fear conditioning in 20 healthy humans. Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was measured via positron emission tomography at rest. During conditioning, autonomic responses were measured via skin conductance, and blood oxygen level dependent signal was measured via functional magnetic resonance imaging. Resting dorsal anterior cingulate metabolism positively predicted differ...

  16. ANAMICA: A Medical Data Visualisation and Characterisation .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sundar

    1993-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the design and implementation of ANAMICA, a three-dimensional (3-D medical data visualisation and characterisation system which provides a complete set of image processing options. Constructions of internal surfaces from total or partial volume of 3-D data and cut-out views are supported by means of 'volume rendering' as well as object space methods. Arbitrary planar and curved sections of 3-D data can be obtained and processed subsequently as standard 2-D images. Volumetrics and a preliminary characterisation of tissues based on histograms are also supported. A window based user-interface provides convenient access to all these options.

  17. Visualising Matter and Cosmologies: A Transhistorical Example

    CERN Document Server

    Ayala, Lucia

    2011-01-01

    We propose a connection between the visualisation of cosmic matter and structure formation in the Cartesian tradition and that used by contemporary astrophysics. More precisely, we identify cosmological simulations of large scale structure in the Universe with the system of vortices in Descartes physics. This connection operates at different levels of the images: their representational purpose; the theoretical systems behind their use; and, finally, their function and materiality as visual productions. A skilled use of image analysis is necessary to stress the continuities and peculiarities between different epochs and disciplines.

  18. Intraoperative visualisation of the trigeminal cistern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percutaneous retrogassarian glycerol rhizotomy has passed the test of time as an immediately effective and reliable method for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. X-ray-assisted puncture of the trigeminal cistern and contrast-enhanced intraoperative visualisation techniques are absolute requirements of this surgical measure and invariably precede any further steps taken by the surgeon. The use of state-of-the-art fluoroscopic methods ensures that ample information is even obtained from the images of the base-of-scull region. (orig.)

  19. MRI visualisation by digitally reconstructed radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrurier, Antoine; Bönsch, Andrea; Lau, Robert; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2015-03-01

    Visualising volumetric medical images such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) clients is often achieved by image browsing in sagittal, coronal or axial views or three-dimensional (3D) rendering. This latter technique requires fine thresholding for MRI. On the other hand, computing virtual radiograph images, also referred to as digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR), provides in a single two-dimensional (2D) image a complete overview of the 3D data. It appears therefore as a powerful alternative for MRI visualisation and preview in PACS. This study describes a method to compute DRR from T1-weighted MRI. After segmentation of the background, a histogram distribution analysis is performed and each foreground MRI voxel is labeled as one of three tissues: cortical bone, also known as principal absorber of the X-rays, muscle and fat. An intensity level is attributed to each voxel according to the Hounsfield scale, linearly related to the X-ray attenuation coefficient. Each DRR pixel is computed as the accumulation of the new intensities of the MRI dataset along the corresponding X-ray. The method has been tested on 16 T1-weighted MRI sets. Anterior-posterior and lateral DRR have been computed with reasonable qualities and avoiding any manual tissue segmentations. This proof-of-concept holds for research application for use in clinical PACS.

  20. Envisioning Possibilities: Visualising as Enquiry in Literacy Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Anna; Hall, Matthew; Sousanis, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Drawing from the research methods of three distinct literacy studies, in this piece, we highlight the visualisation approaches integral to our enquiry processes as researchers working to make sense of literacy and learning. We aim to encourage, provoke even, a conversation about visualisation processes in literacy research by sharing the…

  1. Globally conditioned Granger causality in brain-brain and brain-heart interactions: a combined heart rate variability/ultra-high-field (7 T) functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggento, Andrea; Bianciardi, Marta; Passamonti, Luca; Wald, Lawrence L; Guerrisi, Maria; Barbieri, Riccardo; Toschi, Nicola

    2016-05-13

    The causal, directed interactions between brain regions at rest (brain-brain networks) and between resting-state brain activity and autonomic nervous system (ANS) outflow (brain-heart links) have not been completely elucidated. We collected 7 T resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data with simultaneous respiration and heartbeat recordings in nine healthy volunteers to investigate (i) the causal interactions between cortical and subcortical brain regions at rest and (ii) the causal interactions between resting-state brain activity and the ANS as quantified through a probabilistic, point-process-based heartbeat model which generates dynamical estimates for sympathetic and parasympathetic activity as well as sympathovagal balance. Given the high amount of information shared between brain-derived signals, we compared the results of traditional bivariate Granger causality (GC) with a globally conditioned approach which evaluated the additional influence of each brain region on the causal target while factoring out effects concomitantly mediated by other brain regions. The bivariate approach resulted in a large number of possibly spurious causal brain-brain links, while, using the globally conditioned approach, we demonstrated the existence of significant selective causal links between cortical/subcortical brain regions and sympathetic and parasympathetic modulation as well as sympathovagal balance. In particular, we demonstrated a causal role of the amygdala, hypothalamus, brainstem and, among others, medial, middle and superior frontal gyri, superior temporal pole, paracentral lobule and cerebellar regions in modulating the so-called central autonomic network (CAN). In summary, we show that, provided proper conditioning is employed to eliminate spurious causalities, ultra-high-field functional imaging coupled with physiological signal acquisition and GC analysis is able to quantify directed brain-brain and brain-heart interactions reflecting

  2. Gliosis after traumatic brain injury in conditional ephrinB2-knockout mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ling; CHEN Xiao-lin; YANG Jian-kai; REN Ze-guang; WANG Shuo

    2012-01-01

    Background In response to the injury of the central nervous system (CNS),the astrocytes upregulate the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP),which largely contributes to the reactive gliosis after brain injury.The regulatory mechanism of this process is still not clear.In this study,we aimed to compare the ephrin-B2 deficient mice with the wild type ones with regard to gliosis after traumatic brain injury.Methods We generated ephrin-B2 knockout mice specifically in CNS astrocytes.Twelve mice from this gene-knockout strain were randomly selected along with twelve mice from the wild type littermates.In both groups,a modified controlled cortical impact injury model was applied to create a closed traumatic brain injury.Twenty-eight days after the injury,Nissl staining and GFAP immunofluorescence staining were used to compare the brain atrophy and GFAP immunoreactivity between the two groups.All the data were analyzed by t-test for between-group comparison.Results We successfully set up the conditional ephrin-B2 knockout mice strain,which was confirmed by genotyping and ephrin-B2/GFAP double staining.These mice developed normally without apparent abnormality in general appearance.Twenty-eight days following brain injury,histopathology revealed by immunohistochemistry showed different degrees of cerebral injuries in both groups.Compared with wild-type group,the ephrin-B2 knockout group exhibited less brain atrophy ratio for the injured hemispheres (P=0.005) and hippocampus (P=0.027).Also the wild-type group demonstrated greater GFAP immunoreactivity increment within hippocampal regions (P=0.008).Conclusions The establishment of conditional ephrin-B2 knockout mice provides us with a new way to explore the role of ephrin-B2 in astrocytes.Our findings revealed less atrophy and GFAP immunoreactivity in the knockout mice strain after traumatic brain injury,which implied ephrin-B2 could be one of the promoters to upregulate gliosis following brain injury.

  3. Changes in trace element composition of the brain under conditions of experimental myocardial dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Rodinskij, А. G.; Kozlova, Ju. V.

    2014-01-01

    Aim. Violation of the exchange of trace elements (TE) is an important link in the pathogenesis of cerebral pathology that occurs in people with heart diseases. In order to analyze the changes of the composition of TE, in 19 mature rats quantitative characteristics of TE in brain were identified by emission spectrography under conditions of doxorubicin-induced myocardial dysfunction (MD).Methods and results. We found that the concentration of magnesium and potassium increased, however, the con...

  4. Visualisation interactive de trajectoires de patients

    OpenAIRE

    Pinaire, Jessica; Alouane, Soumaya Ben; Azé, Jérôme; Bringay, Sandra; Landais, Paul; Sallaberry, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    La collecte des données hospitalières dans le cadre du PMSI (Programme de Médicalisation du Système d'Information) génère sur le plan national des bases de données de l'ordre de 25 millions d'enregistrements (séjours) par an. Ces données recueillies à des fins économiques, peuvent a posteriori, servir à des fins d'analyse et de recherche, pour examiner des questions médicales et épidémiologiques. L’objectif de cette démonstration est de présenter une visualisation interactive des trajectoires...

  5. Multimodal diagnosis and visualisation of oncologic pathologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakharov, V P; Bratchenko, I A; Myakinin, O O; Artemyev, D N; Kornilin, D V [S.P. Korolev Samara State Aerospace University, Samara (Russian Federation); Kozlov, S V; Moryatov, A A [Samara State Medical University, Samara (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-31

    The combined application of optical coherence tomography, Raman and autofluorescence spectroscopy of biotissues for the analysis of human malignant neoplasms is demonstrated. Rapid investigation of vast biotissue regions (at the scale of entire organs) is possible using the autofluorescence response. After selection of possible zones of pathologies one can visualise the neoplasm topology in the zone of interest with micron precision by using optical coherence tomography. In the case of suspecting the malignancy the analysis of the biotissue Raman spectrum is carried out that allows identification of the neoplasm type with the sensitivity and specificity ∼85%. An experimental scheme is proposed with the combined use of the abovementioned methods, which is a prototype of the medical system for complex analysis of neoplasms. (laser biophotonics)

  6. Brain c-Fos immunocytochemistry and cytochrome oxidase histochemistry after a fear conditioning task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conejo, Nélida M; González Pardo, Héctor; López, Matías; Cantora, Raúl; Arias, Jorge L

    2007-05-01

    The involvement of the basolateral and the medial amygdala in fear conditioning was evaluated using different markers of neuronal activation. The method described here is a combination of cytochrome oxidase (CO) histochemistry and c-Fos immunocytochemistry on fresh frozen brain sections. Freezing behavior was used as an index of auditory and contextual fear conditioning. As expected, freezing scores were significantly higher in rats exposed to tone-shock pairings in a distinctive environment (conditioned; COND), as compared to rats that did not receive any shocks (UNCD). CO labeling was increased in the basolateral and medial amygdala of the COND group. Conversely, c-Fos expression in the basolateral and medial amygdala was lower in the COND group as compared to the UNCD group. Furthermore, c-Fos expression was particularly high in the medial amygdala of the UNCD group. The data provided by both techniques indicate that these amygdalar nuclei could play different roles on auditory and contextual fear conditioning. PMID:17425902

  7. Resting cerebral metabolism correlates with skin conductance and functional brain activation during fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnman, Clas; Zeidan, Mohamed A; Pitman, Roger K; Milad, Mohammed R

    2012-02-01

    We investigated whether resting brain metabolism can be used to predict autonomic and neuronal responses during fear conditioning in 20 healthy humans. Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was measured via positron emission tomography at rest. During conditioning, autonomic responses were measured via skin conductance, and blood oxygen level dependent signal was measured via functional magnetic resonance imaging. Resting dorsal anterior cingulate metabolism positively predicted differentially conditioned skin conductance responses. Midbrain and insula resting metabolism negatively predicted midbrain and insula functional reactivity, while dorsal anterior cingulate resting metabolism positively predicted midbrain functional reactivity. We conclude that resting metabolism in limbic areas can predict some aspects of psychophysiological and neuronal reactivity during fear learning. PMID:22207247

  8. Scenario visualisation for participatory landscape planning - a study from Denmark

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tress, B.; Tress, G.

    2003-01-01

    Increasingly, different functions must be integrated simultaneously in the Danish countryside, demanding a common effort of planners, decision-makers, researchers, and stakeholders. The study proposes a transdisciplinary method that combines scenario technique, photorealistic visualisation, and stak

  9. Potentialities of geo-visualisation in landscape planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At planning in landscape space are imposed in the present time high requirements on knowledge and precision of all information about objective locality. New potentialities of geo-visualisation in landscape planning are discussed

  10. Three Tools to Aid Visualisation of FITS Files for Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Mohan, P; Klapaukh, R; Johnston-Hollitt, M

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly there is a need to develop astronomical visualisation and manipulations tools which allow viewers to interact with displayed data directly, in real time and across a range of platforms. In addition, increases in dynamic range available for astronomical images with next generation telescopes have led to a desire to develop enhanced visualisations capable of presenting information across a wide range of intensities. This paper describes three new tools for astronomical visualisation and image manipulation that are the result of a collaboration between software engineers and radio astronomers. The first tool, FITS3D, is a fast, interactive 3D data cube viewer designed to allow real-time interactive comparisons of multiple spectral line data cubes simultaneously. It features region specific selection manipulation including smoothing. The second tool, FITS2D, aids the visualisation and manipulation of 2D fits images. The tool supports the interactive creation of free-form masks which allow the user to...

  11. Tools for constraint visualisation: The VIFID/TRIFID tool

    OpenAIRE

    Carro Liñares, Manuel; Hermenegildo, Manuel V.

    2000-01-01

    Visualisation of program executions has been used in applications which include education and debugging. However, traditional visualisation techniques often fall short of expectations or are altogether inadequate for new programming paradigms, such as Constraint Logic Programming (CLP), whose declarative and operational semantics differ in some crucial ways from those of other paradigms. In particular, traditional ideas regarding the behaviour of data often cannot be lifted in a straightforwa...

  12. Integrated data visualisation: an approach to capture older adults’ wellness

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Thai; Wilamowska, Katarzyna; Demiris, George; Thompson, Hilaire

    2012-01-01

    Informatics tools can help support the health and independence of older adults. In this paper, we present an approach towards integrating health-monitoring data and describe several techniques for the assessment and visualisation of integrated health and well-being of older adults. We present three different visualisation techniques to provide distinct alternatives towards display of the same information, focusing on reducing the cognitive load of data interpretation. We demonstrate the feasi...

  13. Visualisation and quantitative analysis of flat continuous water jet structure

    OpenAIRE

    Ščučka, J. (Jiří); M. Zeleňák; Foldyna, J.; Lehocká, D.; Votavová, H.

    2015-01-01

    The results of an experiment focused on the visualisation and structural analysis of flat continuous high-speed water jet used in descaling process are presented in this paper. The aim of the work was to test the applicability of the shadowgraph technique, combined with image processing and analysis methods, to visualise the water jet structure and analyse its main quantitative parameters. Volume percentage of water and air in the water jet structure, size of droplets and water bunches ...

  14. Brain glycogen supercompensation after different conditions of induced hypoglycemia and sustained swimming in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, A M; Gómez-Boronat, M; Pérez-Maceira, J; Mancebo, M J; Aldegunde, M

    2015-09-01

    Brain glycogen is depleted when used as an emergency energy substrate. In mammals, brain glycogen levels rebound to higher than normal levels after a hypoglycemic episode and a few hours after refeeding or administration of glucose. This phenomenon is called glycogen supercompensation. However, this mechanism has not been investigated in lower vertebrates. The aim of this study was therefore to determine whether brain glycogen supercompensation occurs in the rainbow trout brain. For this purpose, short-term brain glucose and glycogen contents were determined in rainbow trout after being subjected to the following experimental conditions: i) a 5-day or 10-day fasting period and refeeding; ii) a single injection of insulin (4 mg kg(-1)) and refeeding; and iii) sustained swimming and injection of glucose (500 mg kg(-1)). Food deprivation during the fasting periods and insulin administration both induced a decrease in glucose and glycogen levels in the brain. However, only refeeding after 10 days of fasting significantly increased the brain glycogen content above control levels, in a clear short-term supercompensation response. Unlike in mammals, prolonged exercise did not alter brain glucose or glycogen levels. Furthermore, brain glycogen supercompensation was not observed after glucose administration in fish undergoing sustained swimming. To our knowledge, this is the first study providing direct experimental evidence for the existence of a short-term glycogen supercompensation response in a teleost brain, although the response was only detectable after prolonged fasting. PMID:25956213

  15. Insula and inferior frontal triangularis activations distinguish between conditioned brain responses using emotional sounds for basic BCI communication

    OpenAIRE

    van der Heiden, Linda; Liberati, Giulia; Sitaram, Ranganatha; Kim, Sunjung; Jaśkowski, Piotr; Raffone, Antonino; Olivetti Belardinelli, Marta; Birbaumer, Niels; Veit, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    In order to enable communication through a brain-computer interface (BCI), it is necessary to discriminate between distinct brain responses. As a first step, we probed the possibility to discriminate between affirmative (“yes”) and negative (“no”) responses using a semantic classical conditioning paradigm, within an fMRI setting. Subjects were presented with congruent and incongruent word-pairs as conditioned stimuli (CS), respectively eliciting affirmative and negative responses. Incongruent...

  16. Integrating 3D visualisation in landscape design and environmental planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, E.; Hehl-Lange, S.

    2006-07-01

    Information is a key element in environmental decision making. In landscape and environmental planning, information can be presented in a number of ways, ranging from texts and statistics to realistic representations such as 3D visualisations. We assume that 3D visualisations of scenarios for landscape changes are a key element for informed decision making. In order to assess the role of 3D visualisation in the planning and decision making process, we have examined three case studies related to generating energy (i.e., hydro power, reclamation of a brown coal surface mine, and wind turbines). In the early 1990s when 3D visualisation technology was just becoming more widely available, the application was typically limited to large infrastructure projects that were often subject to an environmental impact assessment. At that time 3D visualisation was only used to show the results of the planning and decision making process. There are indications that this is now changing towards integrating visualisation already in the earliest planning steps. Such integration allows both planning experts and the public to engage on equal footing in the entire planning and decision making process.

  17. Schlieren visualisation and measurement of axisymmetric disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. R. Sutherland

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic schlieren is a new technique that allows one easily and inexpensively to visualise density variations, such as those caused by internal waves propagating in a density stratified fluid. In the special case of two-dimensional internal waves (for example, those created by an oscillating cylinder, synthetic schlieren allows one to measure non-intrusively the wave amplitudes everywhere in space and time. The technique works by measuring the apparent displacement of points in a digitised image (such as a grid of horizontal lines, which is observed by a CCD camera through the experimental test section. Synthetic schlieren is sufficiently sensitive that it can measure sub-pixel-scale disturbances. In this work, we report on the first step toward measuring fully three-dimensional disturbances. We perform laboratory experiments in which internal waves are generated in a uniformly salt-stratified fluid by a vertically oscillating sphere. Theory predicts that the resulting wave-field is in the form of two cones emanating above and below the sphere. Using inverse tomographic techniques, we exploit the axisymmetry of the wave-field to relate the apparent displacement of pixels in an image to the wave amplitudes.

  18. Science visualisation within a planetarium setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, R.

    2008-06-01

    In less than a decade, a dramatic shift has taken place inside planetariums. Hundreds of theatres of various sizes have adopted immersive video technology, filling domes with computer-generatedvisuals that can depict current astronomical discoveries with unprecedented fidelity. Whereas planetarium programming once depended on informed artwork to tell science stories, the opportunity now exists to incorporate science visualisation into high-impact `narrative journeys' that immerse audiences inside the content. Observed data and computational simulations can provide a rich basis for such simulated excursions, giving people an experience of 21st century astronomy that approximates an alternate reality. Proper utilisation of the new technology requires the worldwide planetarium community to mature in certain ways. Broadened science topics require significant professional development on the part of educators, production teams need to devise ways of incorporating data into their work, and collectively, we must learn how to tell stories with an enriched palette of data-driven visuals. The international astronomy education community must consider how to support this emerging medium. Some ideas include the development of community standards (e.g. the Virtual Astronomy Metadata Project), specifically engineered content (e.g. HubbleSource's pre-rendered sequences), and increased visibility of the medium at conferences (e.g. the special session at the 2006 Astronomical Society of the Pacific meeting). As the chair of the Fulldome Video Committee of the International Planetarium Society - and the director of an immersive theatre under construction-the author is seeking ways to increase collaboration and cooperation across our varied subdisciplines.

  19. Integrated geoscience data visualisation and exploration - GeoVisionary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrington, Ricky; Napier, Bruce; Ramos, Luz

    2013-04-01

    The British Geological Survey (BGS) provides a wide variety of options for communicating and delivering geoscience data, information and knowledge to external partners and the public. These include the traditional reports, maps and GIS data products. However since the early 2000's, the BGS has invested significant resources into developing its 3D geosciences knowledge base which has lead to advancements in visualising geoscience data. This in turn has lead to the improvement in the communication of surface and subsurface data, which has, in turn, led to far larger volumes of data that challenged visualisation technology. The BGS has developed a number of applications and exports to feed into this 3D environment such as those commonly used which include 3D PDFs (Adobe Acrobat), 3D shapefiles (ESRI) and KML/KMZ (GoogleEarth files). Bespoke software such as GroundhogTM and the LithoFrame Viewer has also been developed to help the user analyse 3D geology through synthetic boreholes and cross-sections. All of the above mentioned have limitations when visualising this type of 3D data due to the integration of data, file sizes and the limitations of the software applications. The most advanced of all of these 3D applications that have been developed is GeoVisionary. Initially, the BGS commissioned UK Virtual Reality specialists, Virtalis Ltd., to create an immersive 3-dimensional visualisation and interpretation software environment to capture linework and descriptive information in a virtual 3D environment either on their desktop PC or in specialised 3D suites, replicating the work undertaken by field geologists. GeoVisionary has since developed into an environmental application for visualising all different types of subsurface and surface data while suffering none of the limitations of other applications due to its ability to stream terabytes of data seamlessly. GeoVisionary is able to integrate a wide variety of GIS and CAD based data with the highest resolution

  20. Analysis of Spectral Features of EEG signal in Brain Tumor Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvam V. Salai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The scalp electroencephalography (EEG signal is an important clinical tool for the diagnosis of several brain disorders. The objective of the presented work is to analyze the feasibility of the spectral features extracted from the scalp EEG signals in detecting brain tumors. A set of 16 candidate features from frequency domain is considered. The significance on the mean values of these features between 100 brain tumor patients and 102 normal subjects is statistically evaluated. Nine of the candidate features significantly discriminate the brain tumor case from the normal one. The results encourage the use of (quantitative scalp EEG for the diagnosis of brain tumors

  1. Severe dopaminergic neuron loss in rhesus monkey brain impairs morphine-induced conditioned place preference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Yan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that dopamine is critical for reward, but the precise role of dopamine in reward remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to determine what percentage of dopaminergic neurons in the primate brain is required for the expression of conditioned reward by measuring the performance of dopamine-deficient rhesus monkeys in a morphine-induced conditioned place preference paradigm. Animals with mild Parkinsonian symptoms successfully developed and retained a morphine preference that was equivalent to control monkeys. However, these monkeys could not maintain the preference as well as controls when they retained severe Parkinsonian symptoms. On the other hand, monkeys initially in a severe Parkinsonian state developed a preference for morphine, but this preference was weaker than that of the controls. Histological results showed that the loss of dopaminergic neurons in monkeys that had severe Parkinsonian symptoms was about 80% in comparison to the control monkeys. All these data suggest that a severely impaired dopamine system alters rewarding-seeking behavior in non-human primates.

  2. The effect of conditional probability of chord progression on brain response: an MEG study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Goo Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent electrophysiological and neuroimaging studies have explored how and where musical syntax in Western music is processed in the human brain. An inappropriate chord progression elicits an event-related potential (ERP component called an early right anterior negativity (ERAN or simply an early anterior negativity (EAN in an early stage of processing the musical syntax. Though the possible underlying mechanism of the EAN is assumed to be probabilistic learning, the effect of the probability of chord progressions on the EAN response has not been previously explored explicitly. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, the empirical conditional probabilities in a Western music corpus were employed as an approximation of the frequencies in previous exposure of participants. Three types of chord progression were presented to musicians and non-musicians in order to examine the correlation between the probability of chord progression and the neuromagnetic response using magnetoencephalography (MEG. Chord progressions were found to elicit early responses in a negatively correlating fashion with the conditional probability. Observed EANm (as a magnetic counterpart of the EAN component responses were consistent with the previously reported EAN responses in terms of latency and location. The effect of conditional probability interacted with the effect of musical training. In addition, the neural response also correlated with the behavioral measures in the non-musicians. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study is the first to reveal the correlation between the probability of chord progression and the corresponding neuromagnetic response. The current results suggest that the physiological response is a reflection of the probabilistic representations of the musical syntax. Moreover, the results indicate that the probabilistic representation is related to the musical training as well as the sensitivity of an individual.

  3. NIR-NIR fluorescence: A new genre of fingermark visualisation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Roberto S P; Hallett, Peter M; Foster, Doug

    2016-05-01

    A preliminary study reveals that finely divided cuprorivaite powder may be used to efficiently develop and subsequently image latent fingermarks across a range of highly patterned, coloured non-porous and semi-porous substrates using near infrared illumination and imaging. Problematic multi-coloured backgrounds provide very little interference under the illumination conditions used, and invoked fluorescence observed, when using this material. This is the first reported example of a NIR-NIR fluorophore for use within latent fingermark visualisation and offers the potential for application at the scene and in the laboratory. PMID:27040305

  4. Analysis of Spectral Features of EEG signal in Brain Tumor Condition

    OpenAIRE

    Selvam V. Salai; Devi S. Shenbaga

    2015-01-01

    The scalp electroencephalography (EEG) signal is an important clinical tool for the diagnosis of several brain disorders. The objective of the presented work is to analyze the feasibility of the spectral features extracted from the scalp EEG signals in detecting brain tumors. A set of 16 candidate features from frequency domain is considered. The significance on the mean values of these features between 100 brain tumor patients and 102 normal subjects is statistically evaluated. Nine of the c...

  5. Damage Identification in Composite Panels - Methodology and Visualisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loendersloot, R.; Buethe, I.; Michaelides, P.; Moix Bonet, M.; Lampeas, G.; Woelcken, P.C.; Papadopoulos, M.

    2015-01-01

    A methodology for the identification of an impact damage using guided waves on a composite structure is implemented. Both numerical and experimental results are used, and a graphical user interface is developed to visualise the potentially damaged area. The latter allows, on top of detection, an ass

  6. Visualising Knowledge Structures in Biology: Discipline, Curriculum and Student Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinchin, Ian M.

    2011-01-01

    Concept mapping is discussed as a tool for the visualisation of knowledge structures that can be exploited within biological education. Application of this tool makes it possible to relate the structure of the curriculum to the structure of the discipline, in order to support the development of robust student knowledge structures in ways that…

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... helps Sarah to better cope with her feelings. Brain Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists ... the treatment for a person's specific conditions. Such brain research help increase the understanding of how the brain ...

  8. Using game engine for 3D terrain visualisation of GIS data: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews on the 3D terrain visualisation of GIS data using game engines that are available in the market as well as open source. 3D terrain visualisation is a technique used to visualise terrain information from GIS data such as a digital elevation model (DEM), triangular irregular network (TIN) and contour. Much research has been conducted to transform the 2D view of map to 3D. There are several terrain visualisation softwares that are available for free, which include Cesium, Hftool and Landserf. This review paper will help interested users to better understand the current state of art in 3D terrain visualisation of GIS data using game engines

  9. Visualisation of serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptors in the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 5-HT1A subtype of receptors for the neurotransmitter serotonin is predominantly located in the limbic forebrain and is involved in the modulation of emotion and the function of the hypothalamus. Since 5-HT1A receptors are implicated in the pathogenesis of anxiety, depression, hallucinogenic behaviour, motion sickness and eating disorders, they are an important target for drug therapy. Here, we review the radioligands which are available for visualisation and quantification of this important neuroreceptor in the human brain, using positron emission tomography (PET) or single-photon emission tomography (SPET). More than 20 compounds have been labelled with carbon-11 (half-life 20 min), fluorine-18 (half-life 109.8 min) or iodine-123 (half-life 13.2 h): structural analogues of the agonist, 8-OH-DPAT, structural analogues of the antagonist, WAY 100635, and apomorphines. The most successful radioligands thus far are [carbonyl-11C] WAY-100635 (WAY), [carbonyl-11C]desmethyl-WAY-100635 (DWAY), p-[18F]MPPF and [11C]robalzotan (NAD-299). The high-affinity ligands WAY and DWAY produce excellent images of 5-HT1A receptor distribution in the brain (even the raphe nuclei are visualised), but they cannot be distributed to remote facilities and they probably cannot be used to measure changes in endogenous serotonin. Binding of the moderate-affinity ligands MPPF and NAD-299 may be more sensitive to serotonin competition and MPPF can be distributed to PET centres within a flying distance of a few hours. Future research should be directed towards: (a) improvement of the metabolic stability in primates; (b) development of a fluorinated radioligand which can be produced in large quantities and (c) production of a radioiodinated or technetium-labelled ligand for SPET. (orig.)

  10. Overlapping communities reveal rich structure in large-scale brain networks during rest and task conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Mahshid; McMenamin, Brenton W; Simon, Jonathan Z; Pessoa, Luiz

    2016-07-15

    Large-scale analysis of functional MRI data has revealed that brain regions can be grouped into stable "networks" or communities. In many instances, the communities are characterized as relatively disjoint. Although recent work indicates that brain regions may participate in multiple communities (for example, hub regions), the extent of community overlap is poorly understood. To address these issues, here we investigated large-scale brain networks based on "rest" and task human functional MRI data by employing a mixed-membership Bayesian model that allows each brain region to belong to all communities simultaneously with varying membership strengths. The approach allowed us to 1) compare the structure of disjoint and overlapping communities; 2) determine the relationship between functional diversity (how diverse is a region's functional activation repertoire) and membership diversity (how diverse is a region's affiliation to communities); 3) characterize overlapping community structure; 4) characterize the degree of non-modularity in brain networks; 5) study the distribution of "bridges", including bottleneck and hub bridges. Our findings revealed the existence of dense community overlap that was not limited to "special" hubs. Furthermore, the findings revealed important differences between community organization during rest and during specific task states. Overall, we suggest that dense overlapping communities are well suited to capture the flexible and task dependent mapping between brain regions and their functions. PMID:27129758

  11. Pharmacological reduction of adult hippocampal neurogenesis modifies functional brain circuits in mice exposed to a cocaine conditioned place preference paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Blanco, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Ladrón de Guevara-Miranda, David; Pedraz, María; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Santín, Luis J

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) behaviour and the functional brain circuitry involved. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis was pharmacologically reduced with temozolomide (TMZ), and mice were tested for cocaine-induced CPP to study c-Fos expression in the hippocampus and in extrahippocampal addiction-related areas. Correlational and multivariate analysis revealed that, under normal conditions, the hippocampus showed widespread functional connectivity with other brain areas and strongly contributed to the functional brain module associated with CPP expression. However, the neurogenesis-reduced mice showed normal CPP acquisition but engaged an alternate brain circuit where the functional connectivity of the dentate gyrus was notably reduced and other areas (the medial prefrontal cortex, accumbens and paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus) were recruited instead of the hippocampus. A second experiment unveiled that mice acquiring the cocaine-induced CPP under neurogenesis-reduced conditions were delayed in extinguishing their drug-seeking behaviour. But if the inhibited neurons were generated after CPP acquisition, extinction was not affected but an enhanced long-term CPP retention was found, suggesting that some roles of the adult-born neurons may differ depending on whether they are generated before or after drug-contextual associations are established. Importantly, cocaine-induced reinstatement of CPP behaviour was increased in the TMZ mice, regardless of the time of neurogenesis inhibition. The results show that adult hippocampal neurogenesis sculpts the addiction-related functional brain circuits, and reduction of the adult-born hippocampal neurons increases cocaine seeking in the CPP model. PMID:25870909

  12. Visualising inter-subject variability in fMRI using threshold-weighted overlap maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghier, Mohamed L; Price, Cathy J

    2016-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies are revealing the neural systems sustaining many sensory, motor and cognitive abilities. A proper understanding of these systems requires an appreciation of the degree to which they vary across subjects. Some sources of inter-subject variability might be easy to measure (demographics, behavioural scores, or experimental factors), while others are more difficult (cognitive strategies, learning effects, and other hidden sources). Here, we introduce a simple way of visualising whole-brain consistency and variability in brain responses across subjects using threshold-weighted voxel-based overlap maps. The output quantifies the proportion of subjects activating a particular voxel or region over a wide range of statistical thresholds. The sensitivity of our approach was assessed in 30 healthy adults performing a matching task with their dominant hand. We show how overlap maps revealed many effects that were only present in a subsample of our group; we discuss how overlap maps can provide information that may be missed or misrepresented by standard group analysis, and how this information can help users to understand their data. In particular, we emphasize that functional overlap maps can be particularly useful when it comes to explaining typical (or atypical) compensatory mechanisms used by patients following brain damage. PMID:26846561

  13. Model-Coupled Autoencoder for Time Series Visualisation

    CERN Document Server

    Gianniotis, Nikolaos; Tiňo, Peter; Polsterer, Kai L

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach for the visualisation of a set of time series that combines an echo state network with an autoencoder. For each time series in the dataset we train an echo state network, using a common and fixed reservoir of hidden neurons, and use the optimised readout weights as the new representation. Dimensionality reduction is then performed via an autoencoder on the readout weight representations. The crux of the work is to equip the autoencoder with a loss function that correctly interprets the reconstructed readout weights by associating them with a reconstruction error measured in the data space of sequences. This essentially amounts to measuring the predictive performance that the reconstructed readout weights exhibit on their corresponding sequences when plugged back into the echo state network with the same fixed reservoir. We demonstrate that the proposed visualisation framework can deal both with real valued sequences as well as binary sequences. We derive magnification factors in order t...

  14. Electronic Visualisation in Chemistry: From Alchemy to Art

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Karl; Bowen, Alice M

    2013-01-01

    Chemists now routinely use software as part of their work. For example, virtual chemistry allows chemical reactions to be simulated. In particular, a selection of software is available for the visualisation of complex 3-dimensional molecular structures. Many of these are very beautiful in their own right. As well as being included as illustrations in academic papers, such visualisations are often used on the covers of chemistry journals as artistically decorative and attractive motifs. Chemical images have also been used as the basis of artworks in exhibitions. This paper explores the development of the relationship of chemistry, art, and IT. It covers some of the increasingly sophisticated software used to generate these projections (e.g., UCSF Chimera) and their progressive use as a visual art form.

  15. Changes in Lecithin Concentration in the Human Brain Tissue in Some Neurodegenerative Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a consequence of a possible increase in oxidative stress or deterioration of nerve cells during aging, in some states neurodegeneration was demonstrated by multiple biochemical deficiency, especially deficiency of cholesterol and lecithin in brain regions. The aim of this study was to determine the changes in the concentration of lecithin in different regions of brain tissue (MC - motor cortex, NC - nucleus caudates, GT - temporal gyrus) dissected postmortem from people with senile dementia of Alzheimer's type (SDAT), and persons with Parkinson's disease (PD) as compared to people who died without these diseases (C). Spectrophotometric determination of lecithin in 18 postmortem brain tissue regions collected from of 12 persons with SDAT, in 11 postmortem brain tissue regions of 8 persons with PD and in 18 postmortem brain tissue regions of 8 control persons, was performed by enzymatic method. The content of lecithin in MC: 14.4 mg/g fresh tissue (f.t.) and GT: 13.1 mg/g (f.t.) for SDAT was significantly reduced (p < 0.01) by about 30 %, compared to control where there was: 21.6 mg/g (f.t.) in MC and 18.3 mg/g (f.t.) in the GT estimated. In all regions of the brain of PD patients, the content of lecithin was decreased by about 12 % compared to control, but without statistical significance. These results suggest that changes in the content of lecithin in these regions of brain tissue might affect the changes in the membrane potential and cell degeneration. (author)

  16. Implantation of Miniosmotic Pumps and Delivery of Tract Tracers to Study Brain Reorganization in Pathophysiological Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Mendoza, Eduardo H; Carballo, Jeismar; Longart, Marines; Hermann, Dirk M; Doeppner, Thorsten R

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment in animal models of cerebral disease imposes the problem of repeated injection protocols that may induce stress in animals and result in impermanent tissue levels of the drug. Additionally, drug delivery to the brain is delicate due to the blood brain barrier (BBB), thus significantly reducing intracerebral concentrations of selective drugs after systemic administration. Therefore, a system that allows both constant drug delivery without peak levels and circumvention of the BBB is in order to achieve sufficiently high intracerebral concentrations of drugs that are impermeable to the BBB. In this context, miniosmotic pumps represent an ideal system for constant drug delivery at a fixed known rate that eludes the problem of daily injection stress in animals and that may also be used for direct brain delivery of drugs. Here, we describe a method for miniosmotic pump implantation and post operatory care that should be given to animals in order to successfully apply this technique. We embed the aforementioned experimental paradigm in standard procedures that are used for studying neuroplasticity within the brain of C57BL6 mice. Thus, we exposed animals to 30 min brain infarct and implanted with miniosmotic pumps connected to the skull via a cannula in order to deliver a pro-plasticity drug. Behavioral testing was done during 30 days of treatment. After removal the animals received injections of anterograde tract tracers to analyze neuronal plasticity in the chronic phase of recovery. Results indicated that neuroprotection by the delivered drug was accompanied with increase in motor fibers crossing the midline of the brain at target structures. The results affirm the value of these techniques for drug administration and brain plasticity studies in modern neuroscience. PMID:26863287

  17. Visual Execution and Data Visualisation in Natural Language Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Rodgers, Peter; Gaizauskas, Robert; Humphreys, Kevin; Cunningham, Hamish

    1997-01-01

    We describe GGI, a visual system that allows the user to execute an automatically generated data flow graph containing code modules that perform natural language processing tasks. These code modules operate on text documents. GGI has a suite of text visualisation tools that allows the user useful views of the annotation data that is produced by the modules in the executable graph. GGI forms part of the GATE natural language engineering system.

  18. An Improved Chamber for Direct Visualisation of Chemotaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew J Muinonen-Martin; Douwe M Veltman; Gabriela Kalna; Insall, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    There has been a growing appreciation over the last decade that chemotaxis plays an important role in cancer migration, invasion and metastasis. Research into the field of cancer cell chemotaxis is still in its infancy and traditional investigative tools have been developed with other cell types and purposes in mind. Direct visualisation chambers are considered the gold standard for investigating the behaviour of cells migrating in a chemotactic gradient. We therefore drew up a list of key at...

  19. Visualisation of Oxygen Concentration Profiles in the Aqueous Boundary Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Falkenroth, Achim

    2007-01-01

    In environment studies as well as for technical application, the study of air-water gas exchange is crucial. For process studies, a novel visualisation technique of oxygen concentrations in water was realised with high spatial resolution. To resolve turbulent processes in water, also the temporal resolution was pushed to the limit of a imaging frame rate of 185 Hz. For this purpose, the well-established method of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) was extended introducing in this type of studie...

  20. Model-Coupled Autoencoder for Time Series Visualisation

    OpenAIRE

    Gianniotis, Nikolaos; Kügler, Sven D.; Tiňo, Peter; Polsterer, Kai L.

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach for the visualisation of a set of time series that combines an echo state network with an autoencoder. For each time series in the dataset we train an echo state network, using a common and fixed reservoir of hidden neurons, and use the optimised readout weights as the new representation. Dimensionality reduction is then performed via an autoencoder on the readout weight representations. The crux of the work is to equip the autoencoder with a loss function that correctl...

  1. Data Visualisation: A Motivational and Teaching Tool in Official Statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Forbes, Sharleen Denise

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the use, in 2011, of some recent data visualizations to both motivate students and assist them to understanding underlying official statistics concepts. Examples of visualisations used in a Masters course in public policy and an applied statistics honours course are presented. These visualizations are free, either on-line or open-source and easy to access. Although they are of aggregates of very large official data sets and so may mask some of the underlying variation th...

  2. User aspects in synchronous visualisation of multiple photo streams.

    OpenAIRE

    Zargham, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Photo sharing is becoming a common way of maintaining closeness and relationships with friends and family, and it can evoke pleasurable, enjoyable and exciting experiences. People have fun when sharing photos containing pleasant scenes or friends being caught doing something interesting. There has been a recent increase in studies that focus on the visualisation and sharing of photos using online services or sharing in the home environment using different digital technologies. Although pre...

  3. Visualisation of animal anatomy using MRI and CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik; Hansen, Kasper; Pedersen, Michael;

    Several traditional handbooks and web-based databases exist with descriptions of animal anatomy, providing dissection photographies or hand drawn images in explanatory figures. In recent years sophisticated databases have been developed providing unique 2D and 3D visualisations of the internal an...... digital models of animal soft and hard tissue anatomy in quality similar or superior to time consuming dissection, and we propose MRI and CT as valuable tools in future studies of animal anatomy in research and education.......Several traditional handbooks and web-based databases exist with descriptions of animal anatomy, providing dissection photographies or hand drawn images in explanatory figures. In recent years sophisticated databases have been developed providing unique 2D and 3D visualisations of the internal and...... imaging (MRI) and CT. Various species (tarantula, horseshoe crab, carp, haddock, lungfish, axolotl) were subjected to multi-slice MRI and CT protocols to produce 2D images of body slices, followed by volume rendering producing 3D digital models of animal anatomy with applications for visualising specific...

  4. Visualisation of cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns in albino Xenopus larvae in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogi Kazue

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has long been known that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, its composition and flow, play an important part in normal brain development, and ependymal cell ciliary beating as a possible driver of CSF flow has previously been studied in mammalian fetuses in vitro. Lower vertebrate animals are potential models for analysis of CSF flow during development because they are oviparous. Albino Xenopus laevis larvae are nearly transparent and have a straight, translucent brain that facilitates the observation of fluid flow within the ventricles. The aim of these experiments was to study CSF flow and circulation in vivo in the developing brain of living embryos, larvae and tadpoles of Xenopus laevis using a microinjection technique. Methods The development of Xenopus larval brain ventricles and the patterns of CSF flow were visualised after injection of quantum dot nanocrystals and polystyrene beads (3.1 or 5.8 μm in diameter into the fourth cerebral ventricle at embryonic/larval stages 30-53. Results The fluorescent nanocrystals showed the normal development of the cerebral ventricles from embryonic/larval stages 38 to 53. The polystyrene beads injected into stage 47-49 larvae revealed three CSF flow patterns, left-handed, right-handed and non-biased, in movement of the beads into the third ventricle from the cerebral aqueduct (aqueduct of Sylvius. In the lateral ventricles, anterior to the third ventricle, CSF flow moved anteriorly along the outer wall of the ventricle to the inner wall and then posteriorly, creating a semicircle. In the cerebral aqueduct, connecting the third and fourth cerebral ventricles, CSF flow moved rostrally in the dorsal region and caudally in the ventral region. Also in the fourth ventricle, clear dorso-ventral differences in fluid flow pattern were observed. Conclusions This is the first visualisation of the orchestrated CSF flow pattern in developing vertebrates using a live animal imaging approach. CSF flow

  5. Blood-brain barrier and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier in normal and pathological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Masaki; Chiba, Yoichi; Murakami, Ryuta; Matsumoto, Koichi; Kawauchi, Machi; Fujihara, Ryuji

    2016-04-01

    Blood-borne substances can invade into the extracellular spaces of the brain via endothelial cells in sites without the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and can travel through the interstitial fluid (ISF) of the brain parenchyma adjacent to non-BBB sites. It has been shown that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drains directly into the blood via the arachnoid villi and also into lymph nodes via the subarachnoid spaces of the brain, while ISF drains into the cervical lymph nodes through perivascular drainage pathways. In addition, the glymphatic pathway of fluids, characterized by para-arterial pathways, aquaporin4-dependent passage through astroglial cytoplasm, interstitial spaces, and paravenous routes, has been established. Meningeal lymphatic vessels along the superior sagittal sinus were very recently discovered. It is known that, in mice, blood-borne substances can be transferred to areas with intact BBB function, such as the medial regions of the hippocampus, presumably through leaky vessels in non-BBB sites. In the present paper, we review the clearance mechanisms of interstitial substances, such as amyloid-β peptides, as well as summarize models of BBB deterioration in response to different types of insults, including acute ischemia followed by reperfusion, hypertension, and chronic hypoperfusion. Lastly, we discuss the relationship between perivascular clearance and brain disorders. PMID:26920424

  6. The in vitro blood-brain barrier model under OGD condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornabene, Erica; Helms, Hans Christian Cederberg; Berndt, Philipp;

    Introduction - The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a physical, transport and metabolic barrier which plays a key role in preventing uncontrolled exchanges between blood and brain, ensuring an optimal environment for neurons activity. This extent interface is created by the endothelial cells forming...... decreasing the oxygen level to 1% in a hypoxia workbench. To mimic the reperfusion phase, the aglycemic medium was replaced by glucose-supplemented medium and cells were further transferred in a normoxia incubator for 48h. TEER was monitored with an EVOHM and expression levels of relevant proteins were...... therapies to treat this devastating disease. Materials and Methods - Primary cultures of endothelial cells from bovine brain microvessels were cocultured with rat astrocytes in transwell inserts. At day 11, cells were treated with 4h of OGD by changing the culture medium with glucose-free medium and...

  7. DEPENDENCE of the RESOURCE of FUNCTIONAL ASYMMETRY of the BRAIN ON EXTERNAL CONDITIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Kholmanskiy A.S.

    2009-01-01

    It is established, that the variable component of functional asymmetry of a brain (FАB) during the minimal activity of the Sun can sometimes reach high values and have different signs of dominantnace, that is shown in change of a direction of rotation of the person making running on the spot. This time dominant of a brain, is generated during a night dream, and speed of its deactivation depends on physical properties of the materials used at manufacturing of a floor in different places of a p...

  8. Simulated ischaemia-reperfusion conditions increase xanthine dehydrogenase and oxidase activities in rat brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battelli, M G; Buonamici, L; Virgili, M; Abbondanza, A; Contestabile, A

    1998-01-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase and oxidase activities increased by 87% in rat brain slices after 30 min in vitro ischaemia. A further 41% increase was induced by 30 min simulated reperfusion of ischaemic slices. No conversion from the dehydrogenase to the oxidase activity was observed. The increment of enzyme activity was not due to neosynthesis of the enzyme, since it was not affected by the addition of cycloheximide during the ischaemic incubation. The increased oxygen-dependent form of the enzyme could aggravate the ischaemic brain injury by free radicals production, in particular after reperfusion. PMID:9460697

  9. Using Ferumoxytol-Enhanced MRI to Measure Inflammation in Patients With Brain Tumors or Other Conditions of the CNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-08

    Brain Injury; Central Nervous System Degenerative Disorder; Central Nervous System Infectious Disorder; Central Nervous System Vascular Malformation; Hemorrhagic Cerebrovascular Accident; Ischemic Cerebrovascular Accident; Primary Brain Neoplasm; Brain Cancer; Brain Tumors

  10. Extracellular Membrane Vesicles as Vehicles for Brain Cell-to-Cell Interactions in Physiological as well as Pathological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Schiera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are involved in a great variety of physiological events occurring in the nervous system, such as cross talk among neurons and glial cells in synapse development and function, integrated neuronal plasticity, neuronal-glial metabolic exchanges, and synthesis and dynamic renewal of myelin. Many of these EV-mediated processes depend on the exchange of proteins, mRNAs, and noncoding RNAs, including miRNAs, which occurs among glial and neuronal cells. In addition, production and exchange of EVs can be modified under pathological conditions, such as brain cancer and neurodegeneration. Like other cancer cells, brain tumours can use EVs to secrete factors, which allow escaping from immune surveillance, and to transfer molecules into the surrounding cells, thus transforming their phenotype. Moreover, EVs can function as a way to discard material dangerous to cancer cells, such as differentiation-inducing proteins, and even drugs. Intriguingly, EVs seem to be also involved in spreading through the brain of aggregated proteins, such as prions and aggregated tau protein. Finally, EVs can carry useful biomarkers for the early diagnosis of diseases. Herein we summarize possible roles of EVs in brain physiological functions and discuss their involvement in the horizontal spreading, from cell to cell, of both cancer and neurodegenerative pathologies.

  11. NEUROREHABILITATION OF POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS AND DEPRESSIVE BEHAVIORS BY BRAIN STATE CONDITIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijendra K. SINGH

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain State Conditioning™ (BSC is an innovative technology that optimizes brainwaves in real-time to achieve balance and harmony of the human brain. Since the brain function is imbalanced in individuals with psychiatric disorders and neurological diseases, we explored the possibility of using this technology to help people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD and depression. We conducted a pilot study of 8 adult subjects who had symptoms of PTSD, depression and anxiety problems. The severity of symptoms was evaluated by Objective survey and Beck’s inventory for depression and anxiety. After the initial assessment of brain maps, individuals were administered with highly personalized training sessions, for example 4-5 sessions over 4-5 days. After the administration of BSC, we found a consistent decline in Beck’s inventory scores, which implied alleviation of depressive and anxiety tendencies. All subjects in the study responded to BSC technology and showed noticeable improvement in the quality of their lives. Thus we suggest that BSC is a viable approach to brainwave optimization to help people overcome health problems due to PTSD and depression.

  12. Differential changes of metabolic brain activity and interregional functional coupling in prefronto-limbic pathways during different stress conditions: Functional imaging in freely behaving rodent pups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg Bock

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The trumpet-tailed rat or degu (Octodon degus is an established model to investigate the consequences of early stress on the development of emotional brain circuits and behaviour. The aim of this study was to identify brain circuits, that respond to different stress conditions and to test if acute stress alters functional coupling of brain activity among prefrontal and limbic regions. Using functional imaging (2-Fluoro-deoxyglucose method in 8 day old male degu pups the following stress conditions were compared: (A pups together with parents and siblings (control, (B separation of the litter from the parents, (C individual separation from parents and siblings, (D individual separation and presentation of maternal calls. Condition (B significantly downregulated brain activity in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, nucleus accumbens and sensory areas compared to controls. Activity decrease was even more pronounced during condition (C, where, in contrast to all other regions, activity in the PAG was increased. Interestingly, brain activity in stress-associated brain regions such as the amygdala and habenula was not affected. In condition (D maternal vocalizations reactivated brain activity in the cingulate and precentral medial cortex, nucleus accumbens and striatum and in sensory areas. In contrast, reduced activity was measured in the prelimbic and infralimbic cortex and in the hippocampus and amygdala. Correlation analysis revealed complex, region- and situation-specific changes of interregional functional coupling among prefrontal and limbic brain regions during stress exposure. We show here for the first time that early life stress results in a widespread reduction of brain activity in the infant brain and changes interregional functional coupling. Moreover, maternal vocalizations can partly buffer stress-induced decrease in brain activity in some regions and evoked very different functional coupling patterns compared to the three other

  13. Visualisation of diesel injector with neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, E.; Grünzweig, C.; Jollet, S.; Kaiser, M.; Hansen, H.; Dinkelacker, F.

    2015-12-01

    The injection process of diesel engines influences the pollutant emissions. The spray formation is significantly influenced by the internal flow of the injector. One of the key parameters here is the generation of cavitation caused by the geometry and the needle lift. In modern diesel engines the injection pressure is established up to 3000 bar. The details of the flow and phase change processes inside the injector are of increasing importance for such injectors. With these experimental measurements the validation of multiphase and cavitation models is possible for the high pressure range. Here, for instance, cavitation effects can occur. Cavitation effects in the injection port area destabilize the emergent fuel jet and improve the jet break-up. The design of the injection system in direct-injection diesel engines is an important challenge, as the jet breakup, the atomization and the mixture formation in the combustion chamber are closely linked. These factors have a direct impact on emissions, fuel consumption and performance of an engine. The shape of the spray at the outlet is determined by the internal flow of the nozzle. Here, geometrical parameters, the injection pressure, the injection duration and the cavitation phenomena play a major role. In this work, the flow dependency in the nozzles are analysed with the Neutron-Imaging. The great advantage of this method is the penetrability of the steel structure while a high contrast to the fuel is given due to the interaction of the neutrons with the hydrogen amount. Compared to other methods (optical with glass structures) we can apply real components under highest pressure conditions. During the steady state phase of the injection various cavitation phenomena are visible in the injector, being influenced by the nozzle geometry and the fuel pressure. Different characteristics of cavitation in the sac and spray hole can be detected, and the spray formation in the primary breakup zone is influenced.

  14. Volitional enhancement of firing synchrony and oscillation by neuronal operant conditioning: interaction with neurorehabilitation and brain-machine interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio eSakurai

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we focus on neuronal operant conditioning in which increments in neuronal activities are directly rewarded without behaviors. We discuss the potential of this approach to elucidate neuronal plasticity for enhancing specific brain functions and its interaction with the progress in neurorehabilitation and brain–machine interfaces. The key to-be-conditioned activities that this paper emphasizes are synchronous and oscillatory firings of multiple neurons that reflect activities of cell assemblies. First, we introduce certain well-known studies on neuronal operant conditioning in which conditioned enhancements of neuronal firing were reported in animals and humans. These studies demonstrated the feasibility of volitional control over neuronal activity. Second, we refer to the recent studies on operant conditioning of synchrony and oscillation of neuronal activities. In particular, we introduce a recent study showing volitional enhancement of oscillatory activity in monkey motor cortex and our study showing selective enhancement of firing synchrony of neighboring neurons in rat hippocampus. Third, we discuss the reasons for emphasizing firing synchrony and oscillation in neuronal operant conditioning, the main reason being that they reflect the activities of cell assemblies, which have been suggested to be basic neuronal codes representing information in the brain. Finally, we discuss the interaction of neuronal operant conditioning with neurorehabilitation and brain–machine interface (BMI. We argue that synchrony and oscillation of neuronal firing are the key activities required for developing both reliable neurorehabilitation and high-performance BMI. Further, we conclude that research of neuronal operant conditioning, neurorehabilitation, BMI, and system neuroscience will produce findings applicable to these interrelated fields, and neuronal synchrony and oscillation can be a common important bridge among all of them.

  15. DEPENDENCE of the RESOURCE of FUNCTIONAL ASYMMETRY of the BRAIN ON EXTERNAL CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kholmanskiy A.S.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available It is established, that the variable component of functional asymmetry of a brain (FАB during the minimal activity of the Sun can sometimes reach high values and have different signs of dominantnace, that is shown in change of a direction of rotation of the person making running on the spot. This time dominant of a brain, is generated during a night dream, and speed of its deactivation depends on physical properties of the materials used at manufacturing of a floor in different places of a premise. It is shown, that the most probable reason of variable dominant FАB can be vortical indignations of a stream solar neutrino.

  16. Towards the Development of a Taxonomy for Visualisation of Streamed Geospatial Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibolla, B. H.; Van Zyl, T.; Coetzee, S.

    2016-06-01

    Geospatial data has very specific characteristics that need to be carefully captured in its visualisation, in order for the user and the viewer to gain knowledge from it. The science of visualisation has gained much traction over the last decade as a response to various visualisation challenges. During the development of an open source based, dynamic two-dimensional visualisation library, that caters for geospatial streaming data, it was found necessary to conduct a review of existing geospatial visualisation taxonomies. The review was done in order to inform the design phase of the library development, such that either an existing taxonomy can be adopted or extended to fit the needs at hand. The major challenge in this case is to develop dynamic two dimensional visualisations that enable human interaction in order to assist the user to understand the data streams that are continuously being updated. This paper reviews the existing geospatial data visualisation taxonomies that have been developed over the years. Based on the review, an adopted taxonomy for visualisation of geospatial streaming data is presented. Example applications of this taxonomy are also provided. The adopted taxonomy will then be used to develop the information model for the visualisation library in a further study.

  17. Identification of brain nuclei implicated in cocaine-primed reinstatement of conditioned place preference: a behaviour dissociable from sensitization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn Mary Brown

    Full Text Available Relapse prevention represents the primary therapeutic challenge in the treatment of drug addiction. As with humans, drug-seeking behaviour can be precipitated in laboratory animals by exposure to a small dose of the drug (prime. The aim of this study was to identify brain nuclei implicated in the cocaine-primed reinstatement of a conditioned place preference (CPP. Thus, a group of mice were conditioned to cocaine, had this place preference extinguished and were then tested for primed reinstatement of the original place preference. There was no correlation between the extent of drug-seeking upon reinstatement and the extent of behavioural sensitization, the extent of original CPP or the extinction profile of mice, suggesting a dissociation of these components of addictive behaviour with a drug-primed reinstatement. Expression of the protein product of the neuronal activity marker c-fos was assessed in a number of brain regions of mice that exhibited reinstatement (R mice versus those which did not (NR mice. Reinstatement generally conferred greater Fos expression in cortical and limbic structures previously implicated in drug-seeking behaviour, though a number of regions not typically associated with drug-seeking were also activated. In addition, positive correlations were found between neural activation of a number of brain regions and reinstatement behaviour. The most significant result was the activation of the lateral habenula and its positive correlation with reinstatement behaviour. The findings of this study question the relationship between primed reinstatement of a previously extinguished place preference for cocaine and behavioural sensitization. They also implicate activation patterns of discrete brain nuclei as differentiators between reinstating and non-reinstating mice.

  18. Integration of biotechnology, robot technoplogy and visualisation technology for development of methods for autamated mass production of elite trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Find, Jens; Krogstrup, Peter

    2009-01-01

    plants from sterile in vitro conditions to non sterile (ex vitro/in vivo) conditions in the nursery. To solve these problems, a Danish based project has been established to combine clonal propagation by somatic embryogenesis (SE) with biotechnological breeding tools, and with robot - and visualisation......  Clonal propagation of elite trees by somatic embryogenesis can shorten periods needed for breeding of trees, and can ensure a stable production of high quality plants for the forestry sector. It will furthermore allow for relative fast market oriented breeding and the production of trees ‘fit for...

  19. Visualisation and quantitative analysis of flat continuous water jet structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ščučka, Jiří; Zeleňák, Michal; Foldyna, Josef; Lehocká, D.; Votavová, H.

    Ostrava: Ústav geoniky AV ČR, v.v.i, 2015 - (Sitek, L.; Klichová, D.), s. 195-205 ISBN 978-80-86407-56-2. [Vodní paprsek 2015 - výzkum, vývoj, aplikace. Velké Losiny (CZ), 06.10.2015-08.10.2015] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : descaling * flat continuous water jet * visualisation * shadowgraph technique * image analysis Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools

  20. Intraoperative visualisation of the trigeminal cistern. Intraoperative Darstellung der Trigeminuszisterne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockermann, V.; Dieckmann, G. (Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. Funktionelle Neurochirurgie)

    1991-07-01

    Percutaneous retrogassarian glycerol rhizotomy has passed the test of time as an immediately effective and reliable method for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. X-ray-assisted puncture of the trigeminal cistern and contrast-enhanced intraoperative visualisation techniques are absolute requirements of this surgical measure and invariably precede any further steps taken by the surgeon. The use of state-of-the-art fluoroscopic methods ensures that ample information is even obtained from the images of the base-of-scull region. (orig.).

  1. Management Dashboard as an Effective Data Visualisation Tool in Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Ziuziański, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Management dashboard in a modern organization is an extremely useful tool to support decision. This article presents subject of management dashboard, especially connected with graphics elements providing data visualisation. Kokpit menedżerski w nowoczesnej organizacji jest niezwykle przydatnym narzędziem wspierającym podejmowanie decyzji. Niniejszy artykuł porusza tematykę kokpitów ze szczególnym uwzględnieniem elementów graficznych, umożliwiających wizualizację danych. Piotr Ziuziań...

  2. Modelling and visualising modular product architectures for mass customisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Henrik; Pedersen, Rasmus; Kvist, Morten;

    2008-01-01

    companies are striving for variety from a commercial- and simplicity from a manufacturing one. A conscious structuring of product architectures and/or the use of product platforms can help overcome this challenge. This paper presents a new method for the synthesis and visualisation of product architecture...... concepts that puts emphasis on variety in markets while also treating the consequences in the manufacturing set-up. The work is based on the assumption that a graphical overview of a given solution space and relations between market demands, product architecture and manufacturing layout can support...... decision making and constitute a very powerful interaction between stakeholders in product development departments striving for mass customisation....

  3. Insula and inferior frontal triangularis activations distinguish between conditioned brain responses using emotional sounds for basic BCI communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda van der Heiden

    2014-07-01

    Subjects were presented with congruent and incongruent word-pairs as conditioned stimuli (CS, respectively eliciting affirmative and negative responses. Incongruent word-pairs were associated to an unpleasant unconditioned stimulus (scream, US1 and congruent word-pairs were associated to a pleasant unconditioned stimulus (baby-laughter, US2, in order to elicit emotional conditioned responses (CR. The aim was to discriminate between affirmative and negative responses, enabled by their association with the positive and negative affective stimuli. In the late acquisition phase, when the US were not present anymore, there was a strong significant differential activation for incongruent and congruent word-pairs in a cluster comprising the left insula and the inferior frontal triangularis. This association was not found in the habituation phase. These results suggest that the difference in affirmative and negative brain responses was established as an effect of conditioning, allowing to further investigate the possibility of using this paradigm for a binary choice BCI.

  4. Pattern of CXCR7 Gene Expression in Mouse Brain Under Normal and Inflammatory Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banisadr, Ghazal; Podojil, Joseph R; Miller, Stephen D; Miller, Richard J

    2016-03-01

    The chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/CXCL12 acting via its G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) CXCR4 has been implicated in neurogenesis, neuromodulation, brain inflammation, HIV-1 encephalopathy and tumor growth. CXCR7 was identified as an alternate receptor for SDF-1/CXCL12. Characterization of CXCR7-deficient mice demonstrated a role for CXCR7 in fetal endothelial biology, cardiac development, and B-cell localization. Despite its ligand binding properties, CXCR7 does not seem to signal like a conventional GPCR. It has been suggested that CXCR7 may not function alone but in combination with CXCR4. Here, we investigated the regional localization of CXCR7 receptors in adult mouse brain using CXCR7-EGFP transgenic mice. We found that the receptors were expressed in various brain regions including olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, subventricular zone (SVZ), hypothalamus and cerebellum. Extensive CXCR7 expression was associated with cerebral blood vessels. Using cell type specific markers, CXCR7 expression was found in neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocyte progenitors. GAD-expressing neurons exhibited CXCR7 expression in the hippocampus. Expression of CXCR7 in the dentate gyrus included cells that expressed nestin, GFAP and cells that appeared to be immature granule cells. In mice with Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE), CXCR7 was expressed by migrating oligodendrocyte progenitors in the SVZ. We then compared the distribution of SDF-1/CXCL12 and CXCR7 using bitransgenic mice expressing both CXCR7-EGFP and SDF-1-mRFP. Enhanced expression of SDF-1/CXCL12 and CXCR7 was observed in the corpus callosum, SVZ and cerebellum. Overall, the expression of CXCR7 in normal and pathological nervous system suggests CXCR4-independent functions of SDF-1/CXCL12 mediated through its interaction with CXCR7. PMID:25997895

  5. An examination of co-occurring conditions and management of psychotropic medication use in soldiers with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinde, Abimbola

    2014-01-01

    There are approximately 1.4 million cases of traumatic brain injury (TBI) per year in the United States, with about 23 000 survivors requiring hospitalization. The incidence of TBI has increased in the patient population of the Department of Defense and Veterans Healthcare Administration as a result of injuries suffered during recent military and combat operations. Within the past few years, TBI has emerged as a common form of injury in service members with a subset of patients experiencing postinjury symptoms that greatly affect their quality of life. Traumatic brain injury can occur when sudden trauma (ie, penetration blast or blunt) causes damage to the brain. Traumatic brain injury produces a cascade of potentially injurious processes that include focal contusions and cytotoxic damage. The results of TBI can include impaired physical, cognitive, emotional, and behavioral functioning, which may or may not require the initiation of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions when deemed appropriate. Associated outcomes of TBI include alterations in mental state at the time of injury (confusion, disorientation, slowed thinking, and alteration of consciousness). Neurological deficits include loss of balance, praxis, aphasia, change in vision that may or may not be transient. Individuals who sustain a TBI are more likely to have or developed co-occurring conditions (ie, sleep problems, headaches, depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder) that may require the administration of multiple medications. It has been identified that veterans being discharged on central nervous system and muscular skeletal drug classes can develop addiction and experience medication misadventures. With the severity of TBI being highly variable but typically categorized as either mild, moderate, or severe, it can assist health care providers in determining which patients are more susceptible to medication misadventures compared with others. The unique development of

  6. Visualisation for Stochastic Process Algebras: The Graphic Truth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Michael James Andrew; Gilmore, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    There have historically been two approaches to performance modelling. On the one hand, textual language-based formalisms such as stochastic process algebras allow compositional modelling that is portable and easy to manage. In contrast, graphical formalisms such as stochastic Petri nets and stoch...... discuss some of the general features of the implementation that could be used by other tools. We illustrate the tool using an example based on a model of a financial web-service application....... with the textual representation, giving the user has two ways in which they can interact with the model. We present a tool, as part of the PEPA Eclipse Plug-in, that allows the components of models in the Performance Evaluation Process Algebra (PEPA) to be visualised in a graphical way. This also...... provides a natural interface for labelling states in the model, which integrates with our interface for specifying and model checking properties in the Continuous Stochastic Logic (CSL). We describe recent improvements to the tool in terms of usability and exploiting the visualisation framework, and...

  7. An improved chamber for direct visualisation of chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Muinonen-Martin

    Full Text Available There has been a growing appreciation over the last decade that chemotaxis plays an important role in cancer migration, invasion and metastasis. Research into the field of cancer cell chemotaxis is still in its infancy and traditional investigative tools have been developed with other cell types and purposes in mind. Direct visualisation chambers are considered the gold standard for investigating the behaviour of cells migrating in a chemotactic gradient. We therefore drew up a list of key attributes that a chemotaxis chamber should have for investigating cancer cell chemotaxis. These include (1 compatibility with thin cover slips for optimal optical properties and to allow use of high numerical aperture (NA oil immersion objectives; (2 gradients that are relatively stable for at least 24 hours due to the slow migration of cancer cells; (3 gradients of different steepnesses in a single experiment, with defined, consistent directions to avoid the need for complicated analysis; and (4 simple handling and disposability for use with medical samples. Here we describe and characterise the Insall chamber, a novel direct visualisation chamber. We use it to show GFP-lifeact transfected MV3 melanoma cells chemotaxing using a 60x high NA oil immersion objective, which cannot usually be done with other chemotaxis chambers. Linear gradients gave very efficient chemotaxis, contradicting earlier results suggesting that only polynomial gradients were effective. In conclusion, the chamber satisfies our design criteria, most importantly allowing high NA oil immersion microscopy to track chemotaxing cancer cells in detail over 24 hours.

  8. Global Visualisation Engines – issues for urban landscape planning participation processes

    OpenAIRE

    Podevyn, Martin; Horne, Margaret; Fisher, Peter; Thompson, Emine Mine

    2008-01-01

    Traditional planning processes use two-dimensional drawings, plans, sections, elevations and artists‟ impressions to communicate design intent to interested parties. Three-dimensional computer visualisation technologies that support the planning process raise institutional and organisational challenges as their perceived benefits are considered. Virtual Reality (VR) models add interactivity and immersiveness to landscape visualisations but require appropriate technical input and management. ...

  9. Use of Data Visualisation in the Teaching of Statistics: A New Zealand Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Sharleen; Chapman, Jeanette; Harraway, John; Stirling, Doug; Wild, Chris

    2014-01-01

    For many years, students have been taught to visualise data by drawing graphs. Recently, there has been a growing trend to teach statistics, particularly statistical concepts, using interactive and dynamic visualisation tools. Free down-loadable teaching and simulation software designed specifically for schools, and more general data visualisation…

  10. Teaching and Learning with a Visualiser in the Primary Classroom: Modelling Graph-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavers, Diane

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the technological affordances of the visualiser, and what teachers actually do with it in the primary (elementary) classroom, followed by an investigation into one example of teaching and learning with this whole-class technology. A visualiser is a digital display device. Connected to a data projector, whatever is in view of…

  11. Visualisation as a Model. Overview on Communication Techniques in Transport and Urban Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Rabino

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Information and Communication Technologies (ICT changed the way planners present and operate with their projects. New visualisation tools have changed the ways projects and plans are presented and disseminated. However, the opportunities given by visualisation are not completely exploited in the professional practice. This is due to several bottlenecks which occur in the daily carrying out of activities. The paper is organised in three sections. The first one explains how visualisation can be an added value to the planning practice if it is organised and designed as a framework of information; conceiving the visualisation as a model, data can be managed and represented in order to provide information at different levels of expertise, allowing city plans to be analysed and understood before their realisation. The second section resumes the changes caused by the introduction of ICT within the daily practice; a comparison between pre-digital and digital approaches highlights current opportunities for implementing the communication values of plans and projects. The third part illustrates some examples of innovative visualisations in the urban and transport planning practice, showing a number of uses of visualisation to fit different purposes. The paper concludes this insight formulating the necessity for integrating the studies on visualisation coming from different disciplines into a scientific method that can be proposed as a guideline in building the images of urban and transport plans. This would be particularly useful for obtaining a more scientific approach in the choices of representation and visualisation of urban aspects.

  12. La visualisation constructive : un paradigme de design de visualisation qui permet d'assembler des représentations visuel dynamique pour des personnes non expertes

    OpenAIRE

    Huron, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    During the past two decades, information visualisation (InfoVis) research has created new techniques and methods to support data- intensive analyses in science, industry and government. These have enabled a wide range of analyses tasks to be executed, with tasks varying in terms of the type and volume of data involved. However, the majority of this research has focused on static datasets, and the analysis and visualisation tasks tend to be carried out by trained expert users. In more recent y...

  13. Maltreatment Exposure, Brain Structure, and Fear Conditioning in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Katie A; Sheridan, Margaret A; Gold, Andrea L; Duys, Andrea; Lambert, Hilary K; Peverill, Matthew; Heleniak, Charlotte; Shechner, Tomer; Wojcieszak, Zuzanna; Pine, Daniel S

    2016-07-01

    Alterations in learning processes and the neural circuitry that supports fear conditioning and extinction represent mechanisms through which trauma exposure might influence risk for psychopathology. Few studies examine how trauma or neural structure relates to fear conditioning in children. Children (n=94) aged 6-18 years, 40.4% (n=38) with exposure to maltreatment (physical abuse, sexual abuse, or domestic violence), completed a fear conditioning paradigm utilizing blue and yellow bells as conditioned stimuli (CS+/CS-) and an aversive alarm noise as the unconditioned stimulus. Skin conductance responses (SCR) and self-reported fear were acquired. Magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired from 60 children. Children without maltreatment exposure exhibited strong differential conditioning to the CS+ vs CS-, based on SCR and self-reported fear. In contrast, maltreated children exhibited blunted SCR to the CS+ and failed to exhibit differential SCR to the CS+ vs CS- during early conditioning. Amygdala and hippocampal volume were reduced among children with maltreatment exposure and were negatively associated with SCR to the CS+ during early conditioning in the total sample, although these associations were negative only among non-maltreated children and were positive among maltreated children. The association of maltreatment with externalizing psychopathology was mediated by this perturbed pattern of fear conditioning. Child maltreatment is associated with failure to discriminate between threat and safety cues during fear conditioning in children. Poor threat-safety discrimination might reflect either enhanced fear generalization or a deficit in associative learning, which may in turn represent a central mechanism underlying the development of maltreatment-related externalizing psychopathology in children. PMID:26677946

  14. Simulation and Visualisation of Functional Landscapes: Effects of the Water Resource Competition Between Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincent Le Chevalier; Marc Jaeger; Xing Mei; Paul-Henry Cournède

    2007-01-01

    Vegetation ecosystem simulation and visualisation are challenging topics involving multidisciplinary aspects. In this paper, we present a new generic frame for the simulation of natural phenomena through manageable and interacting models. It focuses on the functional growth of large vegetal ecosystems, showing coherence for scales ranging from the individual plant to communities and with a particular attention to the effects of water resource competition between plants. The proposed approach is based on a model of plant growth in interaction with the environmental conditions. These are deduced from the climatic data (light, temperature, rainfall) and a model of soil hydrological budget. A set of layers is used to store the water resources and to build the interfaces between the environmental data and landscape components: temperature, rain, light, altitude, lakes, plant positions, biomass, cycles, etc. At the plant level, the simulation is performed for each individual by a structural-functional growth model, interacting with the plant's environment. Temperature is spatialised, changing according to altitude, and thus locally controls plant growth speed. The competition for water is based on a soil hydrological model taking into account rainfalls, water runoff, absorption, diffusion, percolation in soil. So far, the incoming light radiation is not studied in detail and is supposed constant. However, competition for light between plants is directly taken into account in the plant growth model. In our implementation, we propose a simple architecture for such a simulator and a simulation scheme to synchronise the water resource updating (on a temporal basis) and the plant growth cycles (determined by the sum of daily temperatures). The visualisation techniques are based on sets of layers, allowing both morphological and functional landscape views and providing interesting tools for ecosystem management. The implementation of the proposed frame leads to encouraging

  15. Project Ukko - Design of a climate service visualisation interface for seasonal wind forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemment, Drew; Stefaner, Moritz; Makri, Stephann; Buontempo, Carlo; Christel, Isadora; Torralba-Fernandez, Veronica; Gonzalez-Reviriego, Nube; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco; de Matos, Paula; Dykes, Jason

    2016-04-01

    Project Ukko is a prototype climate service to visually communicate probabilistic seasonal wind forecasts for the energy sector. In Project Ukko, an interactive visualisation enhances the accessibility and readability to the latests advances in seasonal wind speed predictions developed as part of the RESILIENCE prototype of the EUPORIAS (EC FP7) project. Climate services provide made-to-measure climate information, tailored to the specific requirements of different users and industries. In the wind energy sector, understanding of wind conditions in the next few months has high economic value, for instance, for the energy traders. Current energy practices use retrospective climatology, but access to reliable seasonal predictions based in the recent advances in global climate models has potential to improve their resilience to climate variability and change. Despite their potential benefits, a barrier to the development of commercially viable services is the complexity of the probabilistic forecast information, and the challenge of communicating complex and uncertain information to decision makers in industry. Project Ukko consists of an interactive climate service interface for wind energy users to explore probabilistic wind speed predictions for the coming season. This interface enables fast visual detection and exploration of interesting features and regions likely to experience unusual changes in wind speed in the coming months.The aim is not only to support users to better understand the future variability in wind power resources, but also to bridge the gap between practitioners' traditional approach and the advanced prediction systems developed by the climate science community. Project Ukko is presented as a case study of cross-disciplinary collaboration between climate science and design, for the development of climate services that are useful, usable and effective for industry users. The presentation will reflect on the challenge of developing a climate

  16. Visualisation and identification of the interaction between STIM1s in resting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun He

    Full Text Available Store-operated Ca(2+ channels are a major Ca(2+ entry pathway in nonexcitable cells, which drive various essential cellular functions. Recently, STIM1 and Orai proteins have been identified as the major molecular components of the Ca(2+ release-activated Ca(2+ (CRAC channel. As the key subunit of the CRAC channel, STIM1 is the ER Ca(2+ sensor and is essential for the recruitment and activation of Orai1. However, the mechanisms in transmission of information of STIM1 to Orai1 still need further investigation. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC is one of the most advanced and powerful tools for studying and visualising protein-protein interactions in living cells. We utilised BiFC and acceptor photobleaching fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET experiments to visualise and determine the state of STIM1 in the living cells in resting state. Our results demonstrate that STIM1 exists in an oligomeric form in resting cells and that rather than the SAM motif, it is the C-terminus (residues 233-474 of STIM1 that is the key domain for the interaction between STIM1s. The STIM1 oligomers (BiFC-STIM1 and wild-type STIM1 colocalised and had a fibrillar distribution in resting conditions. Depletion of ER Ca(2+ stores induced BiFC-STIM1 distribution to become punctate, an effect that could be prevented or reversed by 2-APB. After depletion of the Ca(2+ stores, BiFC-STIM1 has the ability to form puncta that colocalise with wild-type STIM1 or Orai1 near the plasma membrane. Our data also indicate that the function of BiFC-STIM1 was not altered compared with that of wild-type STIM1.

  17. Visualisation and characterisation of heterogeneous bimodal PDMS networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahrt, Frederikke; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Fleury, Clemence;

    2014-01-01

    The existence of short-chain domains in heterogeneous bimodal PDMS networks has been confirmed visually, for the first time, through confocal fluorescence microscopy. The networks were prepared using a controlled reaction scheme where short PDMS chains were reacted below the gelation point into...... bimodal networks with short-chain domains within a long-chain network. The average sizes of the short-chain domains were found to vary from 2.1 to 5.7 mm depending on the short-chain content. The visualised network structure could be correlated thereafter to the elastic properties, which were determined...... by rheology. All heterogeneous bimodal networks displayed significantly lower moduli than mono-modal PDMS elastomers prepared from the long polymer chains. Low-loss moduli as well as low-sol fractions indicate that low-elastic moduli can be obtained without compromising the network's structure...

  18. Data visualisations as motivational technologies. A child-centred perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunæs, Dorthe; Wied, Kia

    In contemporary educational policy and leadership motivation seems to be staged as the problem as well as the solution. In that sense motivation is not only a question for theories of learning, but a key problem for educational leadership. To motivate means to move and lead through the inner forces...... thereby make students themselves engage intensively in learning (Bjerg & Staunæs 2016). This paper explores how educational policy with a focus on improved learning outcomes for ‘all’ children is brought into the lived life of schooling through the invention and increased use of data visualisations...... the form of e.g. graphs of learning or ladders of motivation) are expected to energize and move students towards better performance. In this paper, our aim is not to test or judge whether these technologies work or not. Rather our curiosity is directed at exploring the interchange between different...

  19. Image Visualisation and Processing in DOOCS and EPICS

    CERN Document Server

    Perek, P; Makowski, D; Orlikowski, M; Napieralski, A

    2012-01-01

    The High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments, due to their large scale, required performance and precision, have to be controlled by complex, distributed control systems. The systems are responsible for processing thousands of signals from various sensors of different types. Very often, one of the data sources applied in such systems are visible light/infrared cameras or other imaging sensors. They can provide additional information about studied phenomena, which is not available on the basis of analysis data from other sensors. However, they require dedicated mechanisms for data collecting and processing. Moreover, often the images from cameras should be available to system operator. It needs the support from both operator panels interface and control application which should provide data in the dedicated format. The paper presents two different approaches to image distribution, processing and visualisation applied in distributed control systems. Discussed is the issue of support for cameras and image data impl...

  20. Architecture of collaborating frameworks: simulation, visualisation, user interface and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In modern high energy and astrophysics experiments the variety of user requirements and the complexity of the problem domain often involve the collaboration of several software frameworks, and different components are responsible for providing the functionalities related to each domain. For instance, a common use case consists in studying the physics effects and the detector performance, resulting from primary events, in a given detector configuration, to evaluate the physics reach of the experiment or optimise the detector design. Such a study typically involves various components: Simulation, Visualisation, Analysis and (interactive) User Interface. The authors focus on the design aspects of the collaboration of these frameworks and on the technologies that help to simplify the complex process of software design

  1. Fingolimod (FTY720-P Does Not Stabilize the Blood–Brain Barrier under Inflammatory Conditions in an in Vitro Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael K. Schuhmann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB is an early hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS, a progressive inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. Cell adhesion in the BBB is modulated by sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, a signaling protein, via S1P receptors (S1P1. Fingolimod phosphate (FTY720-P a functional S1P1 antagonist has been shown to improve the relapse rate in relapsing-remitting MS by preventing the egress of lymphocytes from lymph nodes. However, its role in modulating BBB permeability—in particular, on the tight junction proteins occludin, claudin 5 and ZO-1—has not been well elucidated to date. In the present study, FTY720-P did not change the transendothelial electrical resistance in a rat brain microvascular endothelial cell (RBMEC culture exposed to inflammatory conditions and thus did not decrease endothelial barrier permeability. In contrast, occludin was reduced in RBMEC culture after adding FTY720-P. Additionally, FTY720-P did not alter the amount of endothelial matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9 and MMP-2 in RBMEC cultures. Taken together, our observations support the assumption that S1P1 plays a dual role in vascular permeability, depending on its ligand. Thus, S1P1 provides a mechanistic basis for FTY720-P-associated disruption of endothelial barriers—such as the blood-retinal barrier—which might result in macular edema.

  2. Valence of physical stimuli, not housing conditions, affects behaviour and frontal cortical brain activity in sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Vögeli, Sabine; Lutz, Janika; Wolf, Martin; Wechsler, Beat; Gygax, Lorenz

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of short-term emotions by long-term mood is little understood but relevant to understand the affective system and of importance in respect to animal welfare: a negative mood might taint experiences, whilst a positive mood might alleviate single negative events. To induce different mood states in sheep housing conditions were varied. Fourteen ewes were group-housed in an unpredictable, stimulus-poor and 15 ewes in a predictable, stimulus-rich environment. Sheep were tested individua...

  3. Brain Oxytocin in Social Fear Conditioning and Its Extinction: Involvement of the Lateral Septum

    OpenAIRE

    Zoicas, Iulia; Slattery, David A.; Neumann, Inga D.

    2014-01-01

    Central oxytocin (OXT) has anxiolytic and pro-social properties both in humans and rodents, and has been proposed as a therapeutic option for anxiety and social dysfunctions. Here, we utilized a mouse model of social fear conditioning (SFC) to study the effects of OXT on social fear, and to determine whether SFC causes alterations in central OXT receptor (OXTR) binding and local OXT release. Central infusion of OXT, but not arginine vasopressin, prior to social fear extinction training comple...

  4. Glial-conditional deletion of aquaporin-4 (Aqp4) reduces blood–brain water uptake and confers barrier function on perivascular astrocyte endfeet

    OpenAIRE

    Haj-Yasein, Nadia Nabil; Vindedal, Gry Fluge; Eilert-Olsen, Martine; Gundersen, Georg Andreas; Skare, Øivind; Laake, Petter; Klungland, Arne; Thorén, Anna Elisabeth; Burkhardt, John Michael; Ottersen, Ole Petter; Nagelhus, Erlend Arnulf

    2011-01-01

    Tissue- and cell-specific deletion of the Aqp4 gene is required to differentiate between the numerous pools of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channels. A glial-conditional Aqp4 knockout mouse line was generated to resolve whether astroglial AQP4 controls water exchange across the blood–brain interface. The conditional knockout was driven by the glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter. Brains from conditional Aqp4 knockouts were devoid of AQP4 as assessed by Western blots, ruling out the presence o...

  5. The importance of the context in the hippocampus and brain related areas throughout the performance of a fear conditioning task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Natalia; Méndez, Marta; Arias, Jorge L

    2015-11-01

    The importance context has been broadly studied in the management of phobias and in the drug addiction literature. The way in which changes to a context influence behavior after the simple acquisition of a passive avoidance task remains unclear. The hippocampus has long been implicated in the contextual and spatial processing required for contextual fear, but its role in encoding the aversive component of a contextual fear memory is still inconclusive. Our work tries to elucidate whether a change in context, represented as differences in the load of the stimuli, is critical for learning about the context-shock association and whether this manipulation of the context could be linked to any change in metabolic brain activity requirements. For this purpose, we used an avoidance conditioning task. Animals were divided into three different experimental conditions. In one group, acquisition was performed in an enriched stimuli environment and retention was performed in a typically lit chamber (the PA-ACQ-CONTX group). In another group, acquisition was performed in the typically lit chamber and retention was undertaken in the highly enriched chamber (the PA-RET-CONTX group). Finally, for the control group, PA-CN-CONTX, acquisition, and retention were performed in the enriched stimuli environment. Our results showed that the PA-ACQ-CONTX group had longer escape latencies and poorer retention than the PA-RET-CONTX and PA-CN-CONTX groups after 24 h of acquisition under contextual changes. To study metabolic brain activity, histochemical labelling of cytochrome c-oxidase (CO) was performed. CO results suggested a neural circuit including the hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus, parahippocampal cortices, and mammillary nuclei that is involved in the learning and memory processes that enable context-dependent behavior. These results highlight how dysfunction in this network may be involved in the contextualization of fear associations that underlie several forms of psychopathology

  6. Omission of expected reward sensitizes the brain dopaminergic system of classically conditioned Atlantic salmon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vindas, M.A.; Höglund, Erik; Folkedal, O.;

    across treatments and generations is one particularly attractive feature of fish model systems. Both animal welfare considerations and fundamental scientific questions regarding the evolution of learning and memory have directed particular attention towards possible cognitive and emotional processes in....... There was also a general downregulation of dopamine receptor D1 gene expression in the telencephalon of OER groups, which suggests a coping mechanism in response to unbalanced DA metabolism. These results indicate that animals subjected to unpredictable reward conditions develop a senzitation of the DA...

  7. Visualisation of serotonin-1A (5-HT{sub 1A}) receptors in the central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passchier, J.; Waarde, A. van [PET Center, University Hospital Groningen (Netherlands)

    2001-01-01

    The 5-HT{sub 1A} subtype of receptors for the neurotransmitter serotonin is predominantly located in the limbic forebrain and is involved in the modulation of emotion and the function of the hypothalamus. Since 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors are implicated in the pathogenesis of anxiety, depression, hallucinogenic behaviour, motion sickness and eating disorders, they are an important target for drug therapy. Here, we review the radioligands which are available for visualisation and quantification of this important neuroreceptor in the human brain, using positron emission tomography (PET) or single-photon emission tomography (SPET). More than 20 compounds have been labelled with carbon-11 (half-life 20 min), fluorine-18 (half-life 109.8 min) or iodine-123 (half-life 13.2 h): structural analogues of the agonist, 8-OH-DPAT, structural analogues of the antagonist, WAY 100635, and apomorphines. The most successful radioligands thus far are [carbonyl-{sup 11}C] WAY-100635 (WAY), [carbonyl-{sup 11}C]desmethyl-WAY-100635 (DWAY), p-[{sup 18}F]MPPF and [{sup 11}C]robalzotan (NAD-299). The high-affinity ligands WAY and DWAY produce excellent images of 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor distribution in the brain (even the raphe nuclei are visualised), but they cannot be distributed to remote facilities and they probably cannot be used to measure changes in endogenous serotonin. Binding of the moderate-affinity ligands MPPF and NAD-299 may be more sensitive to serotonin competition and MPPF can be distributed to PET centres within a flying distance of a few hours. Future research should be directed towards: (a) improvement of the metabolic stability in primates; (b) development of a fluorinated radioligand which can be produced in large quantities and (c) production of a radioiodinated or technetium-labelled ligand for SPET. (orig.)

  8. 3D Digitisation and Visualisation of the Vače Situla

    OpenAIRE

    Gregor Vidmar

    2013-01-01

    EXTENDED ABSTRACT:The project of 3D digitisation and visualisation of the Vače situla was implemented at the beginning of 2011 in cooperation with the National Museum of Slovenia where the situla is kept and the company MFC.2 which, among other services, develops and implements 3 D digitisation and visualisation projects. The purpose of the project was to digitise and visualise a famous and precious piece of cultural heritage and to  1. show what modern 3D shape and texture scanning technolog...

  9. On the Role of Visualisation in Understanding Phraseologisms on the Example of Commercials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneli Baran

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Phraseologisms are linguistic units characterised by figurativeness or usage of metaphors. But what exactly is figurativeness? In the case of a linguistic unit, it is a quality instigating visual imagery. So, the direct meaning of a great part of phraseologisms is so figurative that we can easily visualise it. It is obvious that these individual visualisations help us understand an unfamiliar expression. The fact that while interpreting phraseologisms, language users may consciously proceed from mental images, is also confirmed by psycholinguistic experiments. This article dwells upon visualisation of metaphorical expressions as a means of conveying messages in advertisements and their reception or interpretation.

  10. The effect of heterotopic noxious conditioning stimulation on Aδ-, C- and Aβ-fibre brain responses in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torta, Diana M; Churyukanov, Maxim V; Plaghki, Leon; Mouraux, André

    2015-11-01

    Human studies have shown that heterotopic nociceptive conditioning stimulation (HNCS) applied to a given body location reduces the percept and brain responses elicited by noxious test stimuli delivered at a remote body location. It remains unclear to what extent this effect of HNCS relies on the spinal-bulbar-spinal loop mediating the effect of diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNICs) described in animals, and/or on top-down cortical mechanisms modulating nociception. Importantly, some studies have examined the effects of HNCS on the brain responses to nociceptive input conveyed by Aδ-fibres. In contrast, no studies have explored the effects of HNCS on the responses to selective nociceptive C-fibre input and non-nociceptive Aβ-fibre input. In this study, we measured the intensity of perception and event-related potentials (ERPs) to stimuli activating Aδ-, C- and Aβ-fibres, before, during and after HNCS, obtained by immersing one foot in painful cold water. We observed that (i) the perceived intensity of nociceptive Aδ- and C-stimuli was reduced during HNCS, and (ii) the ERPs elicited by Aδ- and Aβ- and C-stimuli were also reduced during HNCS. Importantly, because Aβ-ERPs are related to primary afferents that ascend directly through the dorsal columns without being relayed at spinal level, the modulation of these responses may not be explained by an influence of descending projections modulating the transmission of nociceptive input at spinal level. Therefore, our results indicate that, in humans, HNCS should be used with caution as a direct measure of DNIC-related mechanisms. PMID:26369522

  11. Directionality of large-scale resting-state brain networks during eyes open and eyes closed conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delong eZhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined directional connections in the brain among resting-state networks (RSNs when the participant had their eyes open (EO or had their eyes closed (EC. The resting-state fMRI data were collected from 20 healthy participants (11 males, 20.17 ± 2.74 years under the EO and EC states. Independent component analysis (ICA was applied to identify the separated RSNs (i.e., the primary/high-level visual, primary sensory-motor, ventral motor, salience/dorsal attention, and anterior/posterior default-mode networks, and the Gaussian Bayesian network (BN learning approach was then used to explore the conditional dependencies among these RSNs. The network-to-network directional connections related to EO and EC were depicted, and a support vector machine (SVM was further employed to identify the directional connection patterns that could effectively discriminate between the two states. The results indicated that the connections among RSNs are directionally connected within a BN during the EO and EC states. The directional connections from the salient attention network to the anterior/posterior default-mode networks and the high-level to primary-level visual network were the obvious characteristics of both the EO and EC resting-state BNs. Of the directional connections in BN, the attention (salient and dorsal-related directional connections were observed to be discriminative between the EO and EC states. In particular, we noted that the properties of the salient and dorsal attention networks were in opposite directions. Overall, the present study described the directional connections of RSNs using a BN learning approach during the EO and EC states, and the results suggested that the attention system (the salient and the dorsal attention network might have important roles in resting-state brain networks and the neural substrate underpinning of switching between the EO and EC states.

  12. Categorisation of visualisation methods to support the design of Human-Computer Interaction Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Katie; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Alcock, Jeffrey; Bermell-Garcia, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    During the design of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) systems, the creation of visual artefacts forms an important part of design. On one hand producing a visual artefact has a number of advantages: it helps designers to externalise their thought and acts as a common language between different stakeholders. On the other hand, if an inappropriate visualisation method is employed it could hinder the design process. To support the design of HCI systems, this paper reviews the categorisation of visualisation methods used in HCI. A keyword search is conducted to identify a) current HCI design methods, b) approaches of selecting these methods. The resulting design methods are filtered to create a list of just visualisation methods. These are then categorised using the approaches identified in (b). As a result 23 HCI visualisation methods are identified and categorised in 5 selection approaches (The Recipient, Primary Purpose, Visual Archetype, Interaction Type, and The Design Process). PMID:26995039

  13. Three-dimensional visualisation of tracks in OPERA nuclear emulsion films

    OpenAIRE

    Damet, Jerome; Pereiro Lopez, Eva; Sasov, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    The possibility of a three-dimensional visualisation/reconstruction of tracks in nuclear emulsion films using X-ray imaging is described in this paper. The feasibility of the technique is established with experimental results.

  14. Kara: A System for Visualising and Visual Editing of Interpretations for Answer-Set Programs

    CERN Document Server

    Kloimüllner, Christian; Pührer, Jörg; Tompits, Hans

    2011-01-01

    In answer-set programming (ASP), the solutions of a problem are encoded in dedicated models, called answer sets, of a logical theory. These answer sets are computed from the program that represents the theory by means of an ASP solver and returned to the user as sets of ground first-order literals. As this type of representation is often cumbersome for the user to interpret, tools like ASPVIZ and IDPDraw were developed that allow for visualising answer sets. The tool Kara, introduced in this paper, follows these approaches, using ASP itself as a language for defining visualisations of interpretations. Unlike existing tools that position graphic primitives according to static coordinates only, Kara allows for more high-level specifications, supporting graph structures, grids, and relative positioning of graphical elements. Moreover, generalising the functionality of previous tools, Kara provides modifiable visualisations such that interpretations can be manipulated by graphically editing their visualisations. ...

  15. Trading Consequences: A Case Study of Combining Text Mining & Visualisation to Facilitate Document Exploration

    OpenAIRE

    Hinrichs, Uta; Alex, Beatrice; Clifford, Jim; Quigley, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Trading Consequences is an interdisciplinary research project between historians, computational linguists and visualization specialists. We use text mining and visualisations to explore the growth of the global commodity trade in the nineteenth century. Feedback from a group of environmental historians during a workshop provided essential information to adapt advanced text mining and visualisation techniques to historical research. Expert feedback is an essential tool for effective interdisci...

  16. Producing place atmospheres digitally: architecture, digital visualisation practices and the experience economy

    OpenAIRE

    Degen, Monica; Melhuish, Clare; Rose, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    Computer-generated images have become the common means for architects and developers to visualise and market future urban developments. This article examines within the context of the experience economy how these digital images aim to evoke and manipulate specific place atmospheres to emphasise the experiential qualities of new buildings and urban environments. In particular, we argue that computer-generated images are far from ‘just’ glossy representations but are a new form of visualising t...

  17. Development of Multivariate Data Visualisation Software and Searches for Lepton Jets at CMS

    OpenAIRE

    Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in multivariate visualisations and computer graphics, allowing for effective implementations, most particle physics analyses still rely on conventional data visualisations. The currently available software implementing these techniques has been found to be inadequate for use with the large volume of multivariate data produced from modern particle physics experiments. After a design and development period, a novel piece of software, DataViewer, was produced.DataViewer was used...

  18. Using authentic 3D product visualisation for an electrical online retailer

    OpenAIRE

    Algharabat, R; Dennis, C.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of authentic three dimensional (3D) product visualisation versus 3D telepresence on consumers’ virtual experience. A hypothetical electrical retailer Web site presents a variety of laptops using 3D product visualisations for the within-subjects laboratory experiments. The first experiment uses two-way repeated measures ANOVA to determine the effects of the antecedents on 3D authenticity. In a second experiment, a one-way ANOVA compares telepresence and auth...

  19. Conditional associative learning examined in a paralyzed patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using brain-computer interface technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birbaumer N

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain-computer interface methodology based on self-regulation of slow-cortical potentials (SCPs of the EEG (electroencephalogram was used to assess conditional associative learning in one severely paralyzed, late-stage ALS patient. After having been taught arbitrary stimulus relations, he was evaluated for formation of equivalence classes among the trained stimuli. Methods A monitor presented visual information in two targets. The method of teaching was matching to sample. Three types of stimuli were presented: signs (A, colored disks (B, and geometrical shapes (C. The sample was one type, and the choice was between two stimuli from another type. The patient used his SCP to steer a cursor to one of the targets. A smiley was presented as a reward when he hit the correct target. The patient was taught A-B and B-C (sample – comparison matching with three stimuli of each type. Tests for stimulus equivalence involved the untaught B-A, C-B, A-C, and C-A relations. An additional test was discrimination between all three stimuli of one equivalence class presented together versus three unrelated stimuli. The patient also had sessions with identity matching using the same stimuli. Results The patient showed high accuracy, close to 100%, on identity matching and could therefore discriminate the stimuli and control the cursor correctly. Acquisition of A-B matching took 11 sessions (of 70 trials each and had to be broken into simpler units before he could learn it. Acquisition of B-C matching took two sessions. The patient passed all equivalence class tests at 90% or higher. Conclusion The patient may have had a deficit in acquisition of the first conditional association of signs and colored disks. In contrast, the patient showed clear evidence that A-B and B-C training had resulted in formation of equivalence classes. The brain-computer interface technology combined with the matching to sample method is a useful way to assess various

  20. Microscopic transport model animation visualisation on KML base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatskiv, I.; Savrasovs, M.

    2012-10-01

    By reading classical literature devoted to the simulation theory it could be found that one of the greatest possibilities of simulation is the ability to present processes inside the system by animation. This gives to the simulation model additional value during presentation of simulation results for the public and authorities who are not familiar enough with simulation. That is why most of universal and specialised simulation tools have the ability to construct 2D and 3D representation of the model. Usually the development of such representation could take much time and there must be put a lot forces into creating an adequate 3D representation of the model. For long years such well-known microscopic traffic flow simulation software tools as VISSIM, AIMSUN and PARAMICS have had a possibility to produce 2D and 3D animation. But creation of realistic 3D model of the place where traffic flows are simulated, even in these professional software tools it is a hard and time consuming action. The goal of this paper is to describe the concepts of use the existing on-line geographical information systems for visualisation of animation produced by simulation software. For demonstration purposes the following technologies and tools have been used: PTV VISION VISSIM, KML and Google Earth.

  1. Improving student success using predictive models and data visualisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan Ayad

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The need to educate a competitive workforce is a global problem. In the US, for example, despite billions of dollars spent to improve the educational system, approximately 35% of students never finish high school. The drop rate among some demographic groups is as high as 50–60%. At the college level in the US only 30% of students graduate from 2-year colleges in 3 years or less and approximately 50% graduate from 4-year colleges in 5 years or less. A basic challenge in delivering global education, therefore, is improving student success. By student success we mean improving retention, completion and graduation rates. In this paper we describe a Student Success System (S3 that provides a holistic, analytical view of student academic progress.1 The core of S3 is a flexible predictive modelling engine that uses machine intelligence and statistical techniques to identify at-risk students pre-emptively. S3 also provides a set of advanced data visualisations for reaching diagnostic insights and a case management tool for managing interventions. S3's open modular architecture will also allow integration and plug-ins with both open and proprietary software. Powered by learning analytics, S3 is intended as an end-to-end solution for identifying at-risk students, understanding why they are at risk, designing interventions to mitigate that risk and finally closing the feedback look by tracking the efficacy of the applied intervention.

  2. VariVis: a visualisation toolkit for variation databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Timothy D

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the completion of the Human Genome Project and recent advancements in mutation detection technologies, the volume of data available on genetic variations has risen considerably. These data are stored in online variation databases and provide important clues to the cause of diseases and potential side effects or resistance to drugs. However, the data presentation techniques employed by most of these databases make them difficult to use and understand. Results Here we present a visualisation toolkit that can be employed by online variation databases to generate graphical models of gene sequence with corresponding variations and their consequences. The VariVis software package can run on any web server capable of executing Perl CGI scripts and can interface with numerous Database Management Systems and "flat-file" data files. VariVis produces two easily understandable graphical depictions of any gene sequence and matches these with variant data. While developed with the goal of improving the utility of human variation databases, the VariVis package can be used in any variation database to enhance utilisation of, and access to, critical information.

  3. Evaluation of solar thermal storages with quantitative flow visualisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logie, W.; Frank, E.; Luzzi, A.

    2008-07-15

    The non-intrusive Quantitative Flow Visualisation (QFV) Techniques of Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) and Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) have been evaluated in the context of experimental investigations on solar Thermal Energy Storages (TES). Much competence and experience has been gained in the integration of these powerful yet complex and time consuming flow analysis methods into the realm of laboratory experimentation. In addition to gathering experience in the application of QFV techniques, a number of charging and discharging variations were considered in light of exergetic evaluation for the influence they have on the ability of a TES to stratify. The contemporary awareness that poorly chosen pitch to diameter ratios by the design of immersed coil heat exchangers leads to a reduction in heat exchange and an increase in mixing phenomenon has been confirmed. The observation of two combitank (combined domestic hot water and space heating) configurations has shown that free convective heat transfer forces in the form of mixing energy play a significant role in the stratification efficiency of thermal energy storages. (author)

  4. Detector description software for simulation, reconstruction and visualisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author describes a software that reads the detector description from tag-based ASCII files and builds an independent detector representation (its only dependency being the CLHEP library) in transient mode. A second package uses this transient representation to build automatically a GEANT4 representation of the detector geometry and materials. The software supports any kind of element and material, including material mixtures built by giving the weight fractions, the volume fractions or the number of atoms of each component. The common solid shapes (box, cube, cone, sphere, polycone, polyhedra, ..) can be used, as well as solids made from a boolean operation of another solids (addition, substraction and intersection). The geometry volumes can be placed through simple positioning or positioning several copies following a given formula, so that each copy can have different position and rotation. Also division of a volume along one of its axis is supported for the basic solid shapes. The Simulation, Reconstruction and Visualisation (ROOT based) software contain no detector data. Instead, this data is always accessed through a unique interface to the GEANT4 detector representation package, which manages the complicated parameterized positioning and divisions and returns GEANT4 independent objects. Both packages have been built following strict Software Engineering practices. The software has been used for the detector description of the PS214 (HARP) experiment at CERN, which is taking data since april 2001. With minor modifications it is also been used for the GEANT4 simulation of the CMS experiment

  5. Multimodal investigations of trans-endothelial cell trafficking under condition of disrupted blood-brain barrier integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Masaryk Thomas; Desai Nirav K; Franic Linda; Nguyen Minh T; Teng Qingshan; Marchi Nicola; Rasmussen Peter; Trasciatti Silvia; Janigro Damir

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Stem cells or immune cells targeting the central nervous system (CNS) bear significant promises for patients affected by CNS disorders. Brain or spinal cord delivery of therapeutic cells is limited by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) which remains one of the recognized rate-limiting steps. Osmotic BBB disruption (BBBD) has been shown to improve small molecule chemotherapy for brain tumors, but successful delivery of cells in conjunction with BBBD has never been reported. We h...

  6. Rotation is visualisation, 3D is 2D: using a novel measure to investigate the genetics of spatial ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeshaft, Nicholas G; Rimfeld, Kaili; Schofield, Kerry L; Selzam, Saskia; Malanchini, Margherita; Rodic, Maja; Kovas, Yulia; Plomin, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Spatial abilities-defined broadly as the capacity to manipulate mental representations of objects and the relations between them-have been studied widely, but with little agreement reached concerning their nature or structure. Two major putative spatial abilities are "mental rotation" (rotating mental models) and "visualisation" (complex manipulations, such as identifying objects from incomplete information), but inconsistent findings have been presented regarding their relationship to one another. Similarly inconsistent findings have been reported for the relationship between two- and three-dimensional stimuli. Behavioural genetic methods offer a largely untapped means to investigate such relationships. 1,265 twin pairs from the Twins Early Development Study completed the novel "Bricks" test battery, designed to tap these abilities in isolation. The results suggest substantial genetic influence unique to spatial ability as a whole, but indicate that dissociations between the more specific constructs (rotation and visualisation, in 2D and 3D) disappear when tested under identical conditions: they are highly correlated phenotypically, perfectly correlated genetically (indicating that the same genetic influences underpin performance), and are related similarly to other abilities. This has important implications for the structure of spatial ability, suggesting that the proliferation of apparent sub-domains may sometimes reflect idiosyncratic tasks rather than meaningful dissociations. PMID:27476554

  7. High brain ammonia tolerance and down-regulation of Na+:K+:2Cl(- Cotransporter 1b mRNA and protein expression in the brain of the Swamp Eel, Monopterus albus, exposed to environmental ammonia or terrestrial conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen K Ip

    Full Text Available Na(+:K(+:2Cl(- cotransporter 1 (NKCC1 has been implicated in mediating ischemia-, trauma- or ammonia-induced astrocyte swelling/brain edema in mammals. This study aimed to determine the effects of ammonia or terrestrial exposure on ammonia concentrations in the plasma and brain, and the mRNA expression and protein abundance of nkcc/Nkcc in the brain, of the swamp eel Monopterusalbus. Ammonia exposure led to a greater increase in the ammonia concentration in the brain of M. albus than terrestrial exposure. The brain ammonia concentration of M. albus reached 4.5 µmol g(-1 and 2.7 µmol g(-1 after 6 days of exposure to 50 mmol l(-1 NH4Cl and terrestrial conditions, respectively. The full cDNA coding sequence of nkcc1b from M. albus brain comprised 3276 bp and coded for 1092 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 119.6 kDa. A molecular characterization indicated that it could be activated through phosphorylation and/or glycosylation by osmotic and/or oxidative stresses. Ammonia exposure for 1 day or 6 days led to significant decreases in the nkcc1b mRNA expression and Nkcc1b protein abundance in the brain of M. albus. In comparison, a significant decrease in nkcc1b mRNA expression was observed in the brain of M. albus only after 6 days of terrestrial exposure, but both 1 day and 6 days of terrestrial exposure resulted in significant decreases in the protein abundance of Nkcc1b. These results are novel because it has been established in mammals that ammonia up-regulates NKCC1 expression in astrocytes and NKCC1 plays an important role in ammonia-induced astrocyte swelling and brain edema. By contrast, our results indicate for the first time that M. albus is able to down-regulate the mRNA and protein expression of nkcc1b/Nkcc1b in the brain when confronted with ammonia toxicity, which could be one of the contributing factors to its extraordinarily high brain ammonia tolerance.

  8. From brain synapses to systems for learning and memory: Object recognition, spatial navigation, timed conditioning, and movement control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossberg, Stephen

    2015-09-24

    This article provides an overview of neural models of synaptic learning and memory whose expression in adaptive behavior depends critically on the circuits and systems in which the synapses are embedded. It reviews Adaptive Resonance Theory, or ART, models that use excitatory matching and match-based learning to achieve fast category learning and whose learned memories are dynamically stabilized by top-down expectations, attentional focusing, and memory search. ART clarifies mechanistic relationships between consciousness, learning, expectation, attention, resonance, and synchrony. ART models are embedded in ARTSCAN architectures that unify processes of invariant object category learning, recognition, spatial and object attention, predictive remapping, and eye movement search, and that clarify how conscious object vision and recognition may fail during perceptual crowding and parietal neglect. The generality of learned categories depends upon a vigilance process that is regulated by acetylcholine via the nucleus basalis. Vigilance can get stuck at too high or too low values, thereby causing learning problems in autism and medial temporal amnesia. Similar synaptic learning laws support qualitatively different behaviors: Invariant object category learning in the inferotemporal cortex; learning of grid cells and place cells in the entorhinal and hippocampal cortices during spatial navigation; and learning of time cells in the entorhinal-hippocampal system during adaptively timed conditioning, including trace conditioning. Spatial and temporal processes through the medial and lateral entorhinal-hippocampal system seem to be carried out with homologous circuit designs. Variations of a shared laminar neocortical circuit design have modeled 3D vision, speech perception, and cognitive working memory and learning. A complementary kind of inhibitory matching and mismatch learning controls movement. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Brain and Memory. PMID

  9. Apparent target size of rat brain benzodiazepine receptor, acetylcholinesterase, and pyruvate kinase is highly influenced by experimental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation inactivation is a method to determine the apparent target size of molecules. In this report we examined whether radiation inactivation of various enzymes and brain receptors is influenced by the preparation of samples preceding irradiation. The apparent target sizes of endogenous acetylcholinesterase and pyruvate kinase from rat brain and from rabbit muscle and benzodiazepine receptor from rat brain were investigated in some detail. In addition the target sizes of alcohol dehydrogenase (from yeast and horse liver), beta-galactosidase (from Escherichia coli), lactate dehydrogenase (endogenous from rat brain), and 5-HT2 receptors, acetylcholine muscarine receptors, and [35S] butyl bicyclophosphorothionate tertiary binding sites from rat brain were determined. The results show that apparent target sizes are highly influenced by the procedure applied for sample preparation before irradiation. The data indicate that irradiation of frozen whole tissue as opposed to lyophilized tissue or frozen tissue homogenates will estimate the smallest and most relevant functional target size of a receptor or an enzyme

  10. Evaluation of the impact of a system for real-time visualisation of occupational radiation dose rate during fluoroscopically guided procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optimisation of radiological protection for operators working with fluoroscopically guided procedures has to be performed during the procedure, under varying and difficult conditions. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of a system for real-time visualisation of radiation dose rate on optimisation of occupational radiological protection in fluoroscopically guided procedures. Individual radiation dose measurements, using a system for real-time visualisation, were performed in a cardiology laboratory for three cardiologists and ten assisting nurses. Radiation doses collected when the radiation dose rates were not displayed to the staff were compared to radiation doses collected when the radiation dose rates were displayed. When the radiation dose rates were displayed to the staff, one cardiologist and the assisting nurses (as a group) significantly reduced their personal radiation doses. The median radiation dose (Hp(10)) per procedure decreased from 68 to 28 μSv (p = 0.003) for this cardiologist and from 4.3 to 2.5 μSv (p = 0.001) for the assisting nurses. The results of the present study indicate that a system for real-time visualisation of radiation dose rate may have a positive impact on optimisation of occupational radiological protection. In particular, this may affect the behaviour of staff members practising inadequate personal radiological protection. (paper)

  11. Detector Description Software for Simulation,Reconstruction and Visualisation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PedroArce

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a software that reads the detector description from tagbased ASCII files and builds an independent detector representation (its only dependency being the CLHEP library) in transient mode,A second package uses this transient representation to build automatically a GEANT4 representation of the detector geometry and materials.The software supports and kind of element and material,including material mixtures built by giving the weight fractions,the volume fractions of the number of atoms of each component.The common solid shapes(box,cube,cone,sphere,polycone,polyhedra,…)can be used,as well as solids made from a boolean operation of another solids(addition,substraction and intersection),The geometry volumes can be placed through simple positioning or positioning several copies following a given formula,so that each copy can have different position and rotation,Also divisioning of a volume along one of its axis is supported for the basic solid shpaes. The Simulation,Reconstruction and Visualisation(ROOT based)software contain no detector data.Instead,this data is always accesed through a unique interface to the GEANT4 detector representation package,which manages the complicated parameterised positionings and divisions and returns GEANT4 independent objects.Both packages have been built following strict Software Engineering practices,that we also describe in the paper.The software has been used for the detector description of the PS214(HARP) experiment at CERN,which is taking data since april 2001,With minor modifications it is also been used for the GEANT4 simulation of the CMS experiment.

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... her symptoms were not caused by a stroke, brain tumor, or similar conditions, Sarah's doctor referred her to a psychiatrist, a type of medical doctor who is an expert on mental ... of serotonin in the brain and help reduce symptoms of depression. Sarah also ...

  13. Topological Visualisation techniques for the understanding of Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (LQCD) simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Dean P; Hands, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The use of topology for visualisation applications has become increasingly popular due to its ability to summarise data at a high level. Criticalities in scalar field data are used by visualisation methods such as the Reeb graph and contour trees to present topological structure in simple graph based formats. These techniques can be used to segment the input field, recognising the boundaries between multiple objects, allowing whole contour meshes to be seeded as separate objects. In this paper we demonstrate the use of topology based techniques when applied to theoretical physics data generated from Quantum Chromodynamics simulations, which due to its structure complicates their use. We also discuss how the output of algorithms involved in topological visualisation can be used by physicists to further their understanding of Quantum Chromodynamics.

  14. Visual Privacy by Context: Proposal and Evaluation of a Level-Based Visualisation Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ramón Padilla-López

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Privacy in image and video data has become an important subject since cameras are being installed in an increasing number of public and private spaces. Specifically, in assisted living, intelligent monitoring based on computer vision can allow one to provide risk detection and support services that increase people’s autonomy at home. In the present work, a level-based visualisation scheme is proposed to provide visual privacy when human intervention is necessary, such as at telerehabilitation and safety assessment applications. Visualisation levels are dynamically selected based on the previously modelled context. In this way, different levels of protection can be provided, maintaining the necessary intelligibility required for the applications. Furthermore, a case study of a living room, where a top-view camera is installed, is presented. Finally, the performed survey-based evaluation indicates the degree of protection provided by the different visualisation models, as well as the personal privacy preferences and valuations of the users.

  15. The Royal Birth of 2013: Analysing and Visualising Public Sentiment in the UK Using Twitter

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Vu Dung; Barker, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of information retrieved from microblogging services such as Twitter can provide valuable insight into public sentiment in a geographic region. This insight can be enriched by visualising information in its geographic context. Two underlying approaches for sentiment analysis are dictionary-based and machine learning. The former is popular for public sentiment analysis, and the latter has found limited use for aggregating public sentiment from Twitter data. The research presented in this paper aims to extend the machine learning approach for aggregating public sentiment. To this end, a framework for analysing and visualising public sentiment from a Twitter corpus is developed. A dictionary-based approach and a machine learning approach are implemented within the framework and compared using one UK case study, namely the royal birth of 2013. The case study validates the feasibility of the framework for analysis and rapid visualisation. One observation is that there is good correlation between the resul...

  16. Optical monitoring of cardiac and respiratory rhythms in the skin perfusion near the brain under controlled conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Mandavilli M.; Blazek, Vladimir; Schmitt, Hans J.

    1998-06-01

    In this investigation an attempt is made to find the effects of controlled breathing on brain with the help of optical sensors mounted on the left and right temples of a subject. It has already been established that the brain activity can be monitored in terms of arterial blood volumetric changes to the left and right hemispheres of the brain recorded with the help of optical sensors. To investigate the influence of controlled breathing, an expert in controlled breathing (pranayama) is chosen as the subject. Pranayama is believed to be the controlled intake and outflow of breath in a firmly established posture. Some types of pranayama are believed to relive mental stress. While the subject is practicing one such type of breath control, arterial blood volume changes in the brain are recorded using optical sensors mounted on the left and right temples of the subject. From these measurements at the beginning and end of the pranayama exercise, it could be noticed that the subject could induce changes in the cardiac and respiratory rhythms by controlled breathing. Rhythmic phenomena in the skin perfusion in the vicinity of the brian are also studied when the subject is holding his breath. The arterial blood volume changes to the left and right hemispheres of the brain, as monitored by the optical sensors during this period, exhibit asymmetric reaction when the subject is holding his breath. An attempt is made to understand whether these changes induced by stoppage of breathing are 'chaotic' or 'adaptive' in nature.

  17. The role of visualisation in data handling in Grade 9 within a problem-centred context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Makina

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the recent past, data handling has been neglected at secondary school level, perhaps partially due to the strong emphasis on developing arithmetic, algebra and geometry. For the first time, the South African curriculum includes substantial amounts of data handling at all grade levels. The introduction of more data handling in the secondary school curriculum in South Africa and the prevalence of many problems in the teaching of probability and statistics argues for a serious reconsideration of the way it is taught to the pupils. Currently this concern has been the focus of a call for reform in mathematics education by a body like the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM at all levels of schooling (NCTM, 1989; 2000. The importance of visualisation in mathematics, at all levels of mathematical problem solving is well documented in the literature (Bishop, 1989; Maher & Alston, 1989; Moses, 1982; Wheatley, 1991 but almost nothing was done to appreciate visualisation in the learning of data handling. The paper therefore provides a qualitative examination from a Masters dissertation (Makina, 2005 of the role of visualisation in the learning of data handling. This is done through examining the thought processes involved by Grade 9 learners during visualisation while solving data handling tasks. Several roles of visualisation were identified and most were found to improve the critical and creative thinking of pupils during their learning of data handling. The results show that learners are likely to improve their performance in data handling if the awareness of the need to use visualisation creatively as a tool for understanding are highlighted.

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... he saw, Sarah's husband took her to the doctor, who ran some tests. After deciding her symptoms ... a stroke, brain tumor, or similar conditions, Sarah's doctor referred her to a psychiatrist, a type of ...

  19. Integration of functional and morphological MR data for preoperative 3D visualisation of tumours. Cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The goal of this exemplary study was to integrate morphological and functional MRI to establish computer-based, preoperative therapy planning for tumors, instancing cervical carcinoma. Results: Segmentation of organs and vessels as well as tissue differentiation yielded a morphological visualisation of anatomical structures that were overlaid with pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic MRI, subsequently. Thereby, three-dimensional, arbitrary views on the functional data were displayed. Conclusions: Image analysis and visualisation of the acquired MR data establishes both a morphologic and functional evaluation of suspect lesions and adjacent organs. By integrating morphologic and functional MRI additional information can be gathered that possibly impinge on preoperative planning. (orig./AJ)

  20. The use of metrizamide (amipaque) to visualise the gastrointestinal tract in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metrizamide (amipaque) has not been used previously as a diagnostic contrast agent in the gastrointestinal tract. Metrizamide is a water-soluble isotonic contrast material having many advantages over barium and existing hypertonic water-soluble agents. There are many clinical situations in children in which metrizamide should be the contrast agent of choice for investigating the gastrointestinal tract. Four neonates are presented in whom barium or gastrografin were absolutely contraindicated. In each case metrizamide gave excellent visualisation of the gastrointestinal tract. It could be followed through the bowel giving excellent visualisation even up to 120h after ingestion. No harmful effects were noted in the four cases studied. (author)

  1. Test-driving EvoSpaces: software visualisation in the real world

    OpenAIRE

    Marmier, Raphaël; Dugerdil, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    EvoSpaces is a prototype software visualisation tool that represents the source code of an application as a city in 3D. The size and shape of the buildings are mapped to software metrics. A special “night mode” allows visualising execution traces as rays of light between buildings. Our mission was to try EvoSpaces on an industrial-sized real world application. The first part of this work consisted in adapting EvoSpaces to a new database schema, generate metrics on the code of our target appli...

  2. Expression pattern of neural synaptic plasticity marker-Arc in different brain regions induced by conditioned drug withdrawal from acute morphine-dependent rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mu LI; Yuan-yuan HOU; Bin LU; Jie CHEN; Zhi-qiang CHI; Jing-gen LIU

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The immediate early gene Arc (activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein) mRNA and protein are induced by strong synaptic activation and rapidly transported into dendrites, where they localize at active synaptic sites. Thus, the Arc mRNA and protein are proposed as a marker of neuronal reactivity to map the neural substrates that are recruited by vari-ous stimuli. In the present study, we examined the expression of Arc protein induced by conditioned naloxone-precipitated drug withdrawal in different brain regions of acute morphine-dependent rats. The objective of the present study was to address the specific neural circuits involved in conditioned place aversion (CPA) that has not yet been well characterized. Methods: Place aversion was elicited by conditioned naloxone-precipitated drug withdrawal following exposure to a single dose of morphine. An immunohistochemical method was employed to detect the expression of Arc, which was used as a plasticity marker to trace the brain areas that contribute to the formation of the place aversion. Results: Marked increases in Arc protein levels were found in the medial and lateral prefrontal cortex, the sensory cortex, the lateral striatum and the amygdala. This effect was more pronounced in the basolateral arnygdala (BLA), the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), and the bed nucleus of the striatal terminals (BNST) when compared with the control group.Conclusion: Our results suggest that these brain regions may play key roles In mediating the negative motivational compo-nent of opiate withdrawal.

  3. Multimodal investigations of trans-endothelial cell trafficking under condition of disrupted blood-brain barrier integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaryk Thomas

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stem cells or immune cells targeting the central nervous system (CNS bear significant promises for patients affected by CNS disorders. Brain or spinal cord delivery of therapeutic cells is limited by the blood-brain barrier (BBB which remains one of the recognized rate-limiting steps. Osmotic BBB disruption (BBBD has been shown to improve small molecule chemotherapy for brain tumors, but successful delivery of cells in conjunction with BBBD has never been reported. We have used a clinically relevant model (pig of BBBD to attempt brain delivery of TALL-104, a human leukemic T cell line. TALL-104 cells are potent tumor killers and have demonstrated potential for systemic tumor therapy. The pig model used is analogous to the clinical BBBD procedure. Cells were injected in the carotid artery after labeling with the MRI T1 contrast agent GdHPDO3A. Contrast CT scans were used to quantify BBBD and MRI was used to detect Gd++-loaded cells in the brain. Transcranial Doppler was used to monitor cerebral blood flow. EEG recordings were used to detect seizures. Immunocytochemical detection (Cresyl Violet, anti-human CD8 for TALL-104, Evans Blue for BBB damage, GFAP and NEUN was performed. Results At the concentration used TALL-104 cells were tolerated. Incomplete BBBD did not allow cell entry into the brain. MRI scans at 24 and 48 hours post-injection allowed visualization of topographically segregated cells in the hemisphere that underwent successful BBBD. Perivascular location of TALL-104 was confirmed in the BBBD hemisphere by Cresyl violet and CD8 immunocytochemistry. No significant alteration in CBF or EEG activity was recorded during cell injections. Conclusions Our data show that targeted CNS cell therapy requires blood-brain barrier disruption. MRI-detectable cytotoxic anti-neoplastic cells can be forced to transverse the BBB and accumulate in the perivascular space. The virtual absence of toxicity, the high anti-tumor activity

  4. The Role and Potential Dangers of Visualisation when Learning about Sub-Microscopic Explanations in Chemistry Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo Eilks

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The core of theory-driven chemistry education consists of the constantshift between the different representational domains of chemical thinking: the macroscopic, the sub-microscopic, and the symbolic domains. Because the sub-microscopic domain can neither be seen nor directly visualised, it requires specific forms of visualisation, i.e. pictures and animations illustrating the model-based level of discrete particles, atoms, or molecular structures. This paper considers the central role visualisations play when learning about the model-based, sub-microscopic level, but it also reflects the dangers inherent in employing isufficiently examined, poorly considered, or even misleading visualisations. This is outlined using different examples taken from both textbooks for lower secondary chemistry education (for students aged 10 to 15 and from the internet. Implications for structuring and using sub-micro visualisations in chemistry education are also given.

  5. A comparative analysis of functional connectivity data in resting and task-related conditions of the brain for disease signature of OCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenas, Sona Khaneh; Halici, Ugur; Çiçek, Metehan

    2014-01-01

    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a frequent, chronic disorder producing intrusive thoughts which results in repetitive behaviors. It is thought that this psychological disorder occurs due to abnormal functional connectivity in certain regions of the brain called Default Mode Network (DMN) mainly. Recently, functional MRI (FMRI) studies were performed in order to compare the differences in brain activity between patients with OCD and healthy individuals through different conditions of the brain. Our previous study on extraction of disease signature for OCD that is determining the features for discrimination of OCD patients from healthy individuals based on their resting-sate functional connectivity (rs-FC) data had given encouraging results. In the present study, functional data extracted from FMRI images of subjects under imagination task (maintaining an image in mind, im-FC) is considered. The aim of this study is to compare classification results achieved from both resting and task-related (imagination) conditions. This research has shown quite interesting and promising results using the same classification (SVM) method. PMID:25570124

  6. Exploratory nuclear microprobe data visualisation using 3- and 4-dimensional biological volume rendering tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emergence of Confocal Microscopy (CM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) as everyday tools in cellular level biology has stimulated development of 3D data visualisation software. Conventional 2-dimensional images of cell (optical) sections obtained in a transmission electron or optical microscopes and more sophisticated multidimensional imaging methods require processing software capable of 3D rendering and mathematically transforming data in 3-, 4-, or more dimensions. The richness of data obtained from the different nuclear microscopy imaging techniques and often parallel information channels (X-ray, secondary electron, Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy) is often not obvious because subtleties and interrelations in the data could not be rendered in a human interpretable way. In this exploratory study we have applied the BioImageXD software, originally developed for rendering of multidimensional CM data, to some different nuclear microscopy data. Cells-on-Silicon STIM data from a human breast cancer cell line and elemental maps from lesions on rabbit aorta have been visualised. Mathematical filtering and averaging combined with hardware accelerated 3D rendering enabled dramatically clear visualisation of inter-cellular regions comprising extra cellular matrix proteins that were otherwise difficult to visualise, and also sub cellular structures. For elemental mapping, the use of filtered correlation surfaces and colour channels clearly revealed the interrelations in the data structures that are not easily discernible in the PIXE elemental maps

  7. Open source libraries and frameworks for biological data visualisation: a guide for developers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Hermjakob, Henning; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput experimental techniques have led to an exponential increase in both the size and the complexity of the data sets commonly studied in biology. Data visualisation is increasingly used as the key to unlock this data, going from hypothesis generation to model evaluation and tool implementation. It is becoming more and more the heart of bioinformatics workflows, enabling scientists to reason and communicate more effectively. In parallel, there has been a corresponding trend towards the development of related software, which has triggered the maturation of different visualisation libraries and frameworks. For bioinformaticians, scientific programmers and software developers, the main challenge is to pick out the most fitting one(s) to create clear, meaningful and integrated data visualisation for their particular use cases. In this review, we introduce a collection of open source or free to use libraries and frameworks for creating data visualisation, covering the generation of a wide variety of charts and graphs. We will focus on software written in Java, JavaScript or Python. We truly believe this software offers the potential to turn tedious data into exciting visual stories. PMID:25475079

  8. IGUANA A high-performance 2D and 3D visualisation system

    CERN Document Server

    Alverson, G; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Taylor, L; Tuura, L A

    2004-01-01

    The IGUANA project has developed visualisation tools for multiple high-energy experiments. At the core of IGUANA is a generic, high- performance visualisation system based on OpenInventor and OpenGL. This paper describes the back-end and a feature-rich 3D visualisation system built on it, as well as a new 2D visualisation system that can automatically generate 2D views from 3D data, for example to produce R/Z or X/Y detector displays from existing 3D display with little effort. IGUANA has collaborated with the open-source gl2ps project to create a high-quality vector postscript output that can produce true vector graphics output from any OpenGL 2D or 3D display, complete with surface shading and culling of invisible surfaces. We describe how it works. We also describe how one can measure the memory and performance costs of various OpenInventor constructs and how to test scene graphs. We present good patterns to follow and bad patterns to avoid. We have added more advanced tools such as per-object clipping, sl...

  9. Competence Visualisation: Making Sense of Data from 21st-Century Technologies in Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Susan; Wasson, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces an open learner model approach to learning analytics to combine the variety of data available from the range of applications and technologies in language learning, for visualisation of language learning competences to learners and teachers in the European language context. Specific examples are provided as illustrations…

  10. Overcoming Problems in Doctoral Writing through the Use of Visualisations: Telling Our Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Terry; Hussey, Jennie

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral students experience many challenges on the long journey towards completion. Common problems include: synthesising data, working at a conceptual level, clarifying the relationship of the parts of the thesis to the whole, finding a voice and completing a viva successfully. Few authors have addressed the use of visualisations to meet these…

  11. Exploratory nuclear microprobe data visualisation using 3- and 4-dimensional biological volume rendering tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitlow, Harry J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, PO Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 (Finland)]. E-mail: Harry_J.Whitlow@phys.jyu.fi; Ren, Minqin [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Kan, Jeroen A. van [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Watt, Frank [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, National University of Singapore (Singapore); White, Dan [Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences and the Nanoscience Centre, University of Jyvaeskylae, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2007-07-15

    The emergence of Confocal Microscopy (CM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) as everyday tools in cellular level biology has stimulated development of 3D data visualisation software. Conventional 2-dimensional images of cell (optical) sections obtained in a transmission electron or optical microscopes and more sophisticated multidimensional imaging methods require processing software capable of 3D rendering and mathematically transforming data in 3-, 4-, or more dimensions. The richness of data obtained from the different nuclear microscopy imaging techniques and often parallel information channels (X-ray, secondary electron, Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy) is often not obvious because subtleties and interrelations in the data could not be rendered in a human interpretable way. In this exploratory study we have applied the BioImageXD software, originally developed for rendering of multidimensional CM data, to some different nuclear microscopy data. Cells-on-Silicon STIM data from a human breast cancer cell line and elemental maps from lesions on rabbit aorta have been visualised. Mathematical filtering and averaging combined with hardware accelerated 3D rendering enabled dramatically clear visualisation of inter-cellular regions comprising extra cellular matrix proteins that were otherwise difficult to visualise, and also sub cellular structures. For elemental mapping, the use of filtered correlation surfaces and colour channels clearly revealed the interrelations in the data structures that are not easily discernible in the PIXE elemental maps.

  12. Developing students' functional thinking in algebra through different visualisations of a growing pattern's structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Karina J.; Clarke, Doug M.

    2016-06-01

    Spatial visualisation of geometric patterns and their generalisation have become a recognised pathway to developing students' functional thinking and understanding of variables in algebra. This design-based research project investigated upper primary students' development of explicit generalisation of functional relationships and their representation descriptively, graphically and symbolically. Ten teachers and their classes were involved in a sequence of tasks involving growing patterns and geometric structures over 1 year. This article focuses on two aspects of the study: visualising the structure of a geometric pattern in different ways and using this to generalise the functional relationship between two quantifiable aspects (variables). It was found that in an initial assessment task ( n = 222), students' initial visualisations could be categorised according to different types and some of these were more likely to lead either to recursive or explicit generalisation. In a later task, a small number of students demonstrated the ability to find more than one way to visualise the same geometric structure and thus represent their explicit generalisations as different but equivalent symbolic equations (using pronumerals). Implications for the teaching of functional thinking in middle-school algebra are discussed.

  13. Real-time Visualisation and Analysis of Tera-scale Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluke, Christopher J.

    2015-03-01

    As we move ever closer to the Square Kilometre Array era, support for real-time, interactive visualisation and analysis of tera-scale (and beyond) data cubes will be crucial for on-going knowledge discovery. However, the data-on-the-desktop approach to analysis and visualisation that most astronomers are comfortable with will no longer be feasible: tera-scale data volumes exceed the memory and processing capabilities of standard desktop computing environments. Instead, there will be an increasing need for astronomers to utilise remote high performance computing (HPC) resources. In recent years, the graphics processing unit (GPU) has emerged as a credible, low cost option for HPC. A growing number of supercomputing centres are now investing heavily in GPU technologies to provide O(100) Teraflop/s processing. I describe how a GPU-powered computing cluster allows us to overcome the analysis and visualisation challenges of tera-scale data. With a GPU-based architecture, we have moved the bottleneck from processing-limited to bandwidth-limited, achieving exceptional real-time performance for common visualisation and data analysis tasks.

  14. Three-dimensional visualisation of soft biological structures by X-ray computed micro-tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Tom; Bradley, Robert S; Hidalgo-Bastida, L Araida; Sherratt, Michael J; Cartmell, Sarah H

    2016-07-01

    Whereas the two-dimensional (2D) visualisation of biological samples is routine, three-dimensional (3D) imaging remains a time-consuming and relatively specialised pursuit. Current commonly adopted techniques for characterising the 3D structure of non-calcified tissues and biomaterials include optical and electron microscopy of serial sections and sectioned block faces, and the visualisation of intact samples by confocal microscopy or electron tomography. As an alternative to these approaches, X-ray computed micro-tomography (microCT) can both rapidly image the internal 3D structure of macroscopic volumes at sub-micron resolutions and visualise dynamic changes in living tissues at a microsecond scale. In this Commentary, we discuss the history and current capabilities of microCT. To that end, we present four case studies to illustrate the ability of microCT to visualise and quantify: (1) pressure-induced changes in the internal structure of unstained rat arteries, (2) the differential morphology of stained collagen fascicles in tendon and ligament, (3) the development of Vanessa cardui chrysalises, and (4) the distribution of cells within a tissue-engineering construct. Future developments in detector design and the use of synchrotron X-ray sources might enable real-time 3D imaging of dynamically remodelling biological samples. PMID:27278017

  15. Open source libraries and frameworks for biological data visualisation: A guide for developers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Hermjakob, Henning; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput experimental techniques have led to an exponential increase in both the size and the complexity of the data sets commonly studied in biology. Data visualisation is increasingly used as the key to unlock this data, going from hypothesis generation to model evaluation and tool implementation. It is becoming more and more the heart of bioinformatics workflows, enabling scientists to reason and communicate more effectively. In parallel, there has been a corresponding trend towards the development of related software, which has triggered the maturation of different visualisation libraries and frameworks. For bioinformaticians, scientific programmers and software developers, the main challenge is to pick out the most fitting one(s) to create clear, meaningful and integrated data visualisation for their particular use cases. In this review, we introduce a collection of open source or free to use libraries and frameworks for creating data visualisation, covering the generation of a wide variety of charts and graphs. We will focus on software written in Java, JavaScript or Python. We truly believe this software offers the potential to turn tedious data into exciting visual stories. PMID:25475079

  16. IGUANA: a high-performance 2D and 3D visualisation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IGUANA project has developed visualisation tools for multiple high-energy experiments. At the core of IGUANA is a generic, high-performance visualisation system based on OpenInventor and OpenGL. This paper describes the back-end and a feature-rich 3D visualisation system built on it, as well as a new 2D visualisation system that can automatically generate 2D views from 3D data, for example to produce R/Z or X/Y detector displays from existing 3D display with little effort. IGUANA has collaborated with the open-source gl2ps project to create a high-quality vector postscript output that can produce true vector graphics output from any OpenGL 2D or 3D display, complete with surface shading and culling of invisible surfaces. We describe how it works. We also describe how one can measure the memory and performance costs of various OpenInventor constructs and how to test scene graphs. We present good patterns to follow and bad patterns to avoid. We have added more advanced tools such as per-object clipping, slicing, lighting or animation, as well as multiple linked views with OpenInventor, and describe them in this paper. We give details on how to edit object appearance efficiently and easily, and even dynamically as a function of object properties, with instant visual feedback to the user

  17. IGUANA: a high-performance 2D and 3D visualisation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alverson, G. [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Eulisse, G. [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Muzaffar, S. [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Osborne, I. [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Taylor, L. [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)]. E-mail: lucas.taylor@cern.ch; Tuura, L.A. [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2004-11-21

    The IGUANA project has developed visualisation tools for multiple high-energy experiments. At the core of IGUANA is a generic, high-performance visualisation system based on OpenInventor and OpenGL. This paper describes the back-end and a feature-rich 3D visualisation system built on it, as well as a new 2D visualisation system that can automatically generate 2D views from 3D data, for example to produce R/Z or X/Y detector displays from existing 3D display with little effort. IGUANA has collaborated with the open-source gl2ps project to create a high-quality vector postscript output that can produce true vector graphics output from any OpenGL 2D or 3D display, complete with surface shading and culling of invisible surfaces. We describe how it works. We also describe how one can measure the memory and performance costs of various OpenInventor constructs and how to test scene graphs. We present good patterns to follow and bad patterns to avoid. We have added more advanced tools such as per-object clipping, slicing, lighting or animation, as well as multiple linked views with OpenInventor, and describe them in this paper. We give details on how to edit object appearance efficiently and easily, and even dynamically as a function of object properties, with instant visual feedback to the user.

  18. IGUANA: a high-performance 2D and 3D visualisation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alverson, G.; Eulisse, G.; Muzaffar, S.; Osborne, I.; Taylor, L.; Tuura, L. A.

    2004-11-01

    The IGUANA project has developed visualisation tools for multiple high-energy experiments. At the core of IGUANA is a generic, high-performance visualisation system based on OpenInventor and OpenGL. This paper describes the back-end and a feature-rich 3D visualisation system built on it, as well as a new 2D visualisation system that can automatically generate 2D views from 3D data, for example to produce R/Z or X/Y detector displays from existing 3D display with little effort. IGUANA has collaborated with the open-source gl2ps project to create a high-quality vector postscript output that can produce true vector graphics output from any OpenGL 2D or 3D display, complete with surface shading and culling of invisible surfaces. We describe how it works. We also describe how one can measure the memory and performance costs of various OpenInventor constructs and how to test scene graphs. We present good patterns to follow and bad patterns to avoid. We have added more advanced tools such as per-object clipping, slicing, lighting or animation, as well as multiple linked views with OpenInventor, and describe them in this paper. We give details on how to edit object appearance efficiently and easily, and even dynamically as a function of object properties, with instant visual feedback to the user.

  19. Does Teaching Sequence Matter When Teaching High School Chemistry with Scientific Visualisations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Ian; Geelan, David; Mukherjee, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Five Canadian high school Chemistry classes in one school, taught by three different teachers, studied the concepts of dynamic chemical equilibria and Le Chatelier's Principle. Some students received traditional teacher-led explanations of the concept first and used an interactive scientific visualisation second, while others worked with the…

  20. On Visualisation Problems by Using the "GeoGebra" and "Scientific WorkPlace" Packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaci, Djurdjica; Takaci, Arpad; Budinski, Natalija

    2010-01-01

    We analyse the role of computers in teaching and learning calculus, in particular at determining the integrals of functions. It is well known that the use of mathematical packages has proved itself as a powerful tool in mathematical education, especially in view of its excellent visualisations of mathematical concepts. Unfortunately, there are a…

  1. Trib3 is developmentally and nutritionally regulated in the brain but is dispensable for spatial memory, fear conditioning and sensing of amino acid-imbalanced diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiit Örd

    Full Text Available Tribbles homolog 3 (TRIB3 is a mammalian pseudokinase that is induced in neuronal cell cultures in response to cell death-inducing stresses, including neurotrophic factor deprivation. TRIB3 is an inhibitor of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4, the central transcriptional regulator in the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α phosphorylation pathway that is involved in the cellular stress response and behavioral processes. In this article, we study the expression of Trib3 in the mouse brain, characterize the brain morphology of mice with a genetic ablation of Trib3 and investigate whether Trib3 deficiency alters eIF2α-dependent cognitive abilities. Our data show that the consumption of a leucine-deficient diet induces Trib3 expression in the anterior piriform cortex, the brain region responsible for detecting essential amino acid intake imbalance. However, the aversive response to leucine-devoid diet does not differ in Trib3 knockout and wild type mice. Trib3 deletion also does not affect long-term spatial memory and reversal learning in the Morris water maze and auditory or contextual fear conditioning. During embryonic development, Trib3 expression increases in the brain and persists in the early postnatal stadium. Neuroanatomical characterization of mice lacking Trib3 revealed enlarged lateral ventricles. Thus, although the absence of Trib3 does not alter the eIF2α pathway-dependent cognitive functions of several areas of the brain, including the hippocampus, amygdala and anterior piriform cortex, Trib3 may serve a role in other central nervous system processes and molecular pathways.

  2. Relations between blood supply of brain of students and condition of autonomic nervous system and risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    L. D. Korovina; T. M. Zaporozhets

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our research was to estimate the brain blood supply level by rheoencephalography method in junior students of the Medical academy and to determine the blood supply links with the autonomic regulation state, behavioural and alimentary factors. Rheo-encephalographic study, research of the autonomic nervous system state, heart rate regulation and questioning of 17–29 year-old students have been conducted. Basic hemodynamic indices were normal in all surveyed students. Increase in ...

  3. Verbal memory in brain damaged patients under different conditions of retrieval aids: a study of frontal, temporal, and diencephalic damaged subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, C C; Markowitsch, H J; Hempel, U; Hackenberg, P

    1987-04-01

    The performance of 36 patients, divided into six groups, and 13 control subjects was investigated in paired-associate learning. The patients had right or left prefrontal, right or left anterior lateral temporopolar or medial temporal lobe damage, or lesions restricted to diencephalic areas. As tasks, two lists of paired words had to be learned, with the first list presenting only the word pairs, and the second one embedding the word pairs in sentences of a highly imaginable content. Recall consisted of immediate or delayed (48 hrs) free recall of the first list (condition I), of immediate or delayed recall of the second list (with visual imagery as a learning aid; condition II), and of cued recall (in which the sentence form was presented with a blank space where the word to be recalled had been previously; condition III). Control subjects clearly performed best under all conditions, manifesting a ceiling effect for the second and third ones under immediate recall. Among the brain-damaged groups the diencephalic subjects were poorest and gained only little from the aids given for learning and recall. Of the four patients with medial temporal lobe damage, those two with bilateral lesions were nearly as bad as the diencephalic lesioned subjects. The other patients were markedly inferior to the control subjects, but gained considerably under conditions II and III. These statements hold for immediate and delayed recall, though for the delayed recall conditions all groups showed a reduction in performance which amounted to roughly half of the values they had had under immediate recall. It is concluded that increasing the possibilities for depth of information processing assists brain damaged (as well as normal) subjects in verbal learning, but that the advantage of aiding them at the moment of encoding and retrieval is highest for patients with restricted lesions and/or with lesions not invading the two regions most regularly implicated in long-term information

  4. Conditional deletion of Ccm2 causes hemorrhage in the adult brain: a mouse model of human cerebral cavernous malformations

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, Kirk; Uchida, Yutaka; O'Donnell, Erin; Claudio, Estefania; Li, Wenling; Soneji, Kosha; Wang, Hongshan; Mukouyama, Yoh-suke; Siebenlist, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) are irregularly shaped and enlarged capillaries in the brain that are prone to hemorrhage, resulting in headaches, seizures, strokes and even death in patients. The disease affects up to 0.5% of the population and the inherited form has been linked to mutations in one of three genetic loci, CCM1, CCM2 and CCM3. To understand the pathophysiology underlying the vascular lesions in CCM, it is critical to develop a reproducible mouse genetic model of this di...

  5. Change in the properties of the opiate receptors of the brain under conditions of habituation of rats to morphine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaitsev, S.V.; Sergeeva, M.G.; Chichenkov, O.N.; Petrov, V.E.; Varfolomeev, S.D.

    1987-02-20

    The influence of prolonged administration of morphine on the properties of the opiate receptors of the rat brain was investigated. For this purpose they conducted an analysis of the isotherms of binding of labeled ..mu..-, sigma-, and chi-ligands: morphine, D-Ala/sup 2/, D-Leu/sup 5/-enkephalin, and ethylketocyclazocin, with membrane preparations of the brains of rats tolerant to morphine, as well as the control animals. For a quantitative determination of the dissociation constants of the ligand-receptor complexes (K) and the concentration of the reagents ((Q)), they used differential method and the method of simulation modeling. It was shown that the values of K and (Q) for individual animals are subjected to substantial dispersion, whereas the ratios (Q)/K undergo minor individual fluctuations, both in the control group and in the group of rats tolerant to morphine. This permits the ratio (Q)/K to be singled out as one of the main parameters for comparing the properties of opiate receptors of various groups of animals. Using this criterion, as well as the method of simulated modeling, it was shown that the development of tolerance is accompanied by a change in the properties of the delta-receptors (the ratio (Q)/K decreases by a factor of more than two). In contrast to the delta-receptors, no significant influence of the tolerance on the properties of the ..mu..- and chi-receptors, as well as the ultrahigh-affinity ligand binding sites, was detected.

  6. Change in the properties of the opiate receptors of the brain under conditions of habituation of rats to morphine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of prolonged administration of morphine on the properties of the opiate receptors of the rat brain was investigated. For this purpose they conducted an analysis of the isotherms of binding of labeled μ-, σ-, and chi-ligands: morphine, D-Ala2, D-Leu5-enkephalin, and ethylketocyclazocin, with membrane preparations of the brains of rats tolerant to morphine, as well as the control animals. For a quantitative determination of the dissociation constants of the ligand-receptor complexes (K) and the concentration of the reagents ([Q]), they used differential method and the method of simulation modeling. It was shown that the values of K and [Q] for individual animals are subjected to substantial dispersion, whereas the ratios [Q]/K undergo minor individual fluctuations, both in the control group and in the group of rats tolerant to morphine. This permits the ratio [Q]/K to be singled out as one of the main parameters for comparing the properties of opiate receptors of various groups of animals. Using this criterion, as well as the method of simulated modeling, it was shown that the development of tolerance is accompanied by a change in the properties of the δ-receptors (the ratio [Q]/K decreases by a factor of more than two). In contrast to the δ-receptors, no significant influence of the tolerance on the properties of the μ- and chi-receptors, as well as the ultrahigh-affinity ligand binding sites, was detected

  7. Web based hybrid volumetric visualisation of urban GIS data. Integration of 4D Temperature and Wind Fields with LoD-2 CityGML models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congote, J.; Moreno, A.; Kabongo, L.; Pérez, J.-L.; San-José, R.; Ruiz, O.

    2012-10-01

    City models visualisation, buildings, structures and volumetric information, is an important task in Computer Graphics and Urban Planning. The different formats and data sources involved in the visualisation make the development of applications a big challenge. We present a homogeneous web visualisation framework using X3DOM and MEDX3DOM for the visualisation of these urban objects. We present an integration of different declarative data sources, enabling the utilization of advanced visualisation algorithms to render the models. It has been tested with a city model composed of buildings from the Madrid University Campus, some volumetric datasets coming from Air Quality Models and 2D layers wind datasets. Results show that the visualisation of all the urban models can be performed in real time on the Web. An HTML5 web interface is presented to the users, enabling real time modifications of visualisation parameters.

  8. The detection of surfactant proteins A, B, C and D in the human brain and their regulation in cerebral infarction, autoimmune conditions and infections of the CNS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Schob

    Full Text Available Surfactant proteins (SP have been studied intensively in the respiratory system. Surfactant protein A and surfactant protein D are proteins belonging to the family of collectins each playing a major role in the innate immune system. The ability of surfactant protein A and surfactant protein D to bind various pathogens and facilitate their elimination has been described in a vast number of studies. Surfactant proteins are very important in modulating the host's inflammatory response and participate in the clearance of apoptotic cells. Surfactant protein B and surfactant protein C are proteins responsible for lowering the surface tension in the lungs. The aim of this study was an investigation of expression of surfactant proteins in the central nervous system to assess their specific distribution patterns. The second aim was to quantify surfactant proteins in cerebrospinal fluid of healthy subjects compared to patients suffering from different neuropathologies. The expression of mRNA for the surfactant proteins was analyzed with RT-PCR done with samples from different parts of the human brain. The production of the surfactant proteins in the brain was verified using immunohistochemistry and Western blot. The concentrations of the surfactant proteins in cerebrospinal fluid from healthy subjects and patients suffering from neuropathologic conditions were quantified using ELISA. Our results revealed that surfactant proteins are present in the central nervous system and that the concentrations of one or more surfactant proteins in healthy subjects differed significantly from those of patients affected by central autoimmune processes, CNS infections or cerebral infarction. Based on the localization of the surfactant proteins in the brain, their different levels in normal versus pathologic samples of cerebrospinal fluid and their well-known functions in the lungs, it appears that the surfactant proteins may play roles in host defense of the brain

  9. Pharmacological imaging as a tool to visualise dopaminergic neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrantee, A; Reneman, L

    2014-09-01

    Dopamine abnormalities underlie a wide variety of psychopathologies, including ADHD and schizophrenia. A new imaging technique, pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI), is a promising non-invasive technique to visualize the dopaminergic system in the brain. In this review we explore the clinical potential of phMRI in detecting dopamine dysfunction or neurotoxicity, assess its strengths and weaknesses and identify directions for future research. Preclinically, phMRI is able to detect severe dopaminergic abnormalities quite similar to conventional techniques such as PET and SPECT. phMRI benefits from its high spatial resolution and the possibility to visualize both local and downstream effects of dopaminergic neurotransmission. In addition, it allows for repeated measurements and assessments in vulnerable populations. The major challenge is the complex interpretation of phMRI results. Future studies in patients with dopaminergic abnormalities need to confirm the currently reviewed preclinical findings to validate the technique in a clinical setting. Eventually, based on the current review we expect that phMRI can be of use in a clinical setting involving vulnerable populations (such as children and adolescents) for diagnosis and monitoring treatment efficacy. This article is part of the Special Issue Section entitled 'Neuroimaging in Neuropharmacology'. PMID:23851258

  10. Power augmentation measurement and flow field visualisation for coupled Savonius rotors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujisawa, N.; Ogawa, Y.; Shirai, H.

    1988-01-01

    Power augmentation performance and its mechanism in coupled Savonius rotors running in parallel are studied by power measurement and by flow visualisation. It is found from the power measurement that the maximum power occurs with the counter-rotating rotors advancing at the center and the augmentation reaches 27% compared with the single rotor at the same tunnel blockage. The power augmentation mechanism suggested by the smoke-wire visualised results is considered to be due to the wind concentration effected by rotation and by the mutual flow-interaction effect between the rotors. Both effects are strong for counter-rotating rotors advancing at the center, but become weaker for other rotor combinations. This result agrees qualitatively with the measured power augmentation performance in the present experiment. (author).

  11. Beyond marks: new tools to visualise student engagement via social networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne L. Badge

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Evidence shows that engaged students perform better academically than disinterested students. Measurement of engagement with education is difficult and imprecise, especially in large student cohorts. Traditional measurements such as summary statistics derived from assessment are crude secondary measures of engagement at best and do not provide much support for educators to work with students and curate engagement during teaching periods. We have used academic-related student contributions to a public social network as a proxy for engagement. Statistical summaries and novel data visualisation tools provide subtle and powerful insights into online student peer networks. Analysis of data collected shows that network visualisation can be an important curation tool for educators interested in cultivating student engagement.

  12. A web-based 3D visualisation and assessment system for urban precinct scenario modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubka, Roman; Glackin, Stephen; Lade, Oliver; Pettit, Chris

    2016-07-01

    Recent years have seen an increasing number of spatial tools and technologies for enabling better decision-making in the urban environment. They have largely arisen because of the need for cities to be more efficiently planned to accommodate growing populations while mitigating urban sprawl, and also because of innovations in rendering data in 3D being well suited for visualising the urban built environment. In this paper we review a number of systems that are better known and more commonly used in the field of urban planning. We then introduce Envision Scenario Planner (ESP), a web-based 3D precinct geodesign, visualisation and assessment tool, developed using Agile and Co-design methods. We provide a comprehensive account of the tool, beginning with a discussion of its design and development process and concluding with an example use case and a discussion of the lessons learned in its development.

  13. Surface flow visualisation over forward facing steps with varying yaw angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many Australian wind farms are located near escarpments and cliffs where flow separation occurs. An absence of literature addressing the effect of wind direction over cliffs have motivated surface shear stress visualisations on forward facing steps at yaw angles between 0° and 50°. These visualisations have been conducted in the Monash University 450 kW wind tunnel. Mean reattachment lengths were measured and shown to vary as a function of the boundary layer thickness to step height ratio and the yaw angle. Vortices shed off the crest of the step induced surface shear stresses on the top surface of the step. The orientation of these shear stresses varied linearly with the yaw angle. Three-dimensional structures of different forms were also observed. At zero yaw angle the flow converged at points along the crest. At high yaw angles distinct sections of misaligned flow were observed downstream of the reattachment line, indicating a spatial periodicity in shedding

  14. In search of the AHA! - Creating a service experience visualisation tool for service design first-timers

    OpenAIRE

    Isosaari, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    The service design as an industry has developed a set of service process visualisation tools already from the 1980’s. The tools have had a strong aim on mapping all the factors that affect on the service process. The companies working among service design have often also created own versions of the tools. These issues together have created a situation in which the service designers provide complicated service visualisations in various styles and their new clients have problems understanding ...

  15. SCExV: a webtool for the analysis and visualisation of single cell qRT-PCR data.

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Stefan; Ugale, Amol; Erlandsson, Eva; Karlsson, Göran; Bryder, David; Soneji, Shamit

    2015-01-01

    Background Single cell gene expression assays have become a powerful tool with which to dissect heterogeneous populations. While methods and software exist to interrogate such data, what has been lacking is a unified solution combining analysis and visualisation which is also accessible and intuitive for use by non-bioinformaticians, as well as bioinformaticians. Results We present the Single cell expression visualiser (SCExV), a webtool developed to expedite the analysis of single cell qRT-P...

  16. Web-based visualisation and analysis of 3D electron-microscopy data from EMDB and PDB ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Lagerstedt, Ingvar; Moore, William J.; Patwardhan, Ardan; Sanz-García, Eduardo; Best, Christoph; Swedlow, Jason R.; Kleywegt, Gerard J

    2013-01-01

    The Protein Data Bank in Europe (PDBe) has developed web-based tools for the visualisation and analysis of 3D electron microscopy (3DEM) structures in the Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) and Protein Data Bank (PDB). The tools include: (1) a volume viewer for 3D visualisation of maps, tomograms and models, (2) a slice viewer for inspecting 2D slices of tomographic reconstructions, and (3) visual analysis pages to facilitate analysis and validation of maps, tomograms and models. These tool...

  17. The role and potential dangers of visualisation when learning about sub-microscopic explanations in chemistry education

    OpenAIRE

    Ingo Eilks; Torsten Witteck; Verena Pietzner

    2012-01-01

    The core of theory-driven chemistry education consists of the constant shift between the different representational domains of chemical thinking: the macroscopic, the sub-microscopic, and the symbolic domains. Because the sub-microscopic domain can neither be seen nor directly visualised, it requires specific forms of visualisation, i.e. pictures and animations illustrating the model-based level of discrete particles, atoms, or molecular structures. This paper considers the central role visua...

  18. THE POTENTIAL AND LIMITATIONS OF VISUALISATION AS A METHOD IN LEARNING SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES

    OpenAIRE

    Tatyana T. Sidelnikova

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: the paper is concerned with potential and barriers of application of visualisation as a method in learning social sciences and humanities. Using and employing visual aids becomes the most important resource in modern pedagogical theory and learning process due to the improvement of traditional pedagogical tools and new interpretation of well-known methods. Materials and Methods: the methods of observation, analysis of test results, results of examination session, data of que...

  19. Analysing and visualising areal crime data. A case study of residential burglary in San Francisco, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Bumpus, Susan Jane

    2012-01-01

    Methods to visualise and analyse areal social data are limited. A traditional approach is Choropleth mapping. However, the rates on which these maps are based can be unreliable in sparsely populated areas, and there may be visual bias when areas are irregularly sized. Another common method is to perform point interpolation at the centroids of the areas. This approach may only be valid when areas are regularly shaped and small. This thesis explores how Area-to-Area and Area-t...

  20. Processing flow visualisation records by correlation coefficient evaluation in sub-images

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tesař, Václav; Něnička, Václav

    Prague : Institute of Thermomechanics AS CR, v. v. i., 2010 - (Zolotarev, I.), s. 153-154 ISBN 978-80-87012-26-0. [ENGINEERING MECHANICS 2010. Svratka (CZ), 10.05.2010-13.05.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/07/1499; GA AV ČR IAA200760705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : flow visualisation * correlation coefficient * infrasound * image processing Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  1. Factors of importance for scintigraphic non-visualisation of sentinel nodes in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to analyse different factors of possible significance for non-visualisation of sentinel nodes (SNs) by preoperative lymphoscintigraphy, in order to enable improvement of the success rate of SN visualisation through modification or alteration of some of the factors. Between March 1998 and January 2003 we analysed a series of 442 women with unilateral stage T1 and clinical N0 breast cancer. Lymphoscintigraphy was performed after periareolar or peritumoural injection of 99mTc-albumin nanocolloid, with image acquisition after 2-6 h or 18-24 h. Until January 2001, all patients received around 20 MBq tracer, irrespective of time to operation. From January 2001, patients injected on the day before surgery received at least 100 MBq while patients injected on the day of surgery received around 50 MBq. An SN was visualised in 87% of the patients, and at surgery the SN was detected with the hand-held gamma probe in 42% of the remaining patients. By multiple logistic regression analysis, statistically significant independent variables that increased the risk for non-visualisation were increasing age (p=0.0007), increasing body weight (p=0.0189) and peritumoural injection (p<0.0001). Significant interaction was found for imaging time and injected activity (p=0.0017). This study conclusively shows that the risk of unsuccessful SN imaging increases with age and body weight. Our findings suggest that the scintigraphic success rate may be improved by periareolar (rather than peritumoural) injection. Early and late imaging procedures are equally efficient, but if a late imaging procedure is used, activity (adjusted for physical decay) in the patient on day 2 should be more than 10 MBq. (orig.)

  2. Mapping, sensing and visualising the digital co-presence in the public arena

    OpenAIRE

    Fatah gen Schieck, A.; Penn, A; O'Neill, E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on work carried out within the Cityware project using mobile technologies to map, visualise and project the digital co-presence in the city. This paper focuses on two pilot studies exploring the Bluetooth landscape in the city of Bath. Here we apply adapted and ‘digitally augmented’ methods for spatial observation and analysis based on established methods used extensively in the space syntax approach to urban design. We map the physical and digital flows at a macro level...

  3. Detection, Modelling and Visualisation of Georeferenced Emotions from User-Generated Content

    OpenAIRE

    Hauthal, Eva

    2015-01-01

    In recent years emotion-related applications like smartphone apps that document and analyse the emotions of the user, have become very popular. But research also can deal with human emotions in a very technology-driven approach. Thus space-related emotions are of interest as well which can be visualised cartographically and can be captured in different ways. The research project of this dissertation deals with the extraction of georeferenced emotions from the written language in the metad...

  4. Computed 3D visualisation of an extinct cephalopod using computer tomographs

    OpenAIRE

    Lukeneder, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The first 3D visualisation of a heteromorph cephalopod species from the Southern Alps (Dolomites, northern Italy) is presented. Computed tomography, palaeontological data and 3D reconstructions were included in the production of a movie, which shows a life reconstruction of the extinct organism. This detailed reconstruction is according to the current knowledge of the shape and mode of life as well as habitat of this animal. The results are based on the most complete shell known thus far of t...

  5. Implicit LOD for processing, visualisation and classification in Point Cloud Servers

    OpenAIRE

    Cura, Rémi; Perret, Julien; Paparoditis, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new paradigm to effortlessly get a portable geometric Level Of Details (LOD) for a point cloud inside a Point Cloud Server. The point cloud is divided into groups of points (patch), then each patch is reordered (MidOc ordering) so that reading points following this order provides more and more details on the patch. This LOD have then multiple applications: point cloud size reduction for visualisation (point cloud streaming) or speeding of slow algorithm, fast density peak detecti...

  6. Data visualisation in surveillance for injury prevention and control: conceptual bases and case studies

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Ramon; Ordunez, Pedro; Soliz, Patricia N; Ballesteros, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    Background The complexity of current injury-related health issues demands the usage of diverse and massive data sets for comprehensive analyses, and application of novel methods to communicate data effectively to the public health community, decision-makers and the public. Recent advances in information visualisation, availability of new visual analytic methods and tools, and progress on information technology provide an opportunity for shaping the next generation of injury surveillance. Obje...

  7. Categorisation of visualisation methods to support the design of Human-Computer Interaction systems

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Katie; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Alcock, Jeffrey R.; Bermell-Garcia, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    During the design of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) systems, the creation of visual artefacts forms an important part of design. On one hand producing a visual artefact has a number of advantages: it helps designers to externalise their thought and acts as a common language between different stakeholders. On the other hand, if an inappropriate visualisation method is employed it could hinder the design process. To support the design of HCI systems, this paper reviews the categorisation of v...

  8. Learning from a new learning landscape: Visualisation of location sensing data in the Augustine House Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, C.

    2013-01-01

    Funded by the UK JISC Institutional Innovation Programme, the Augustine House Experiment sets out to investigate how the location sensing data collected over students' uses of the iBorrow notebooks can be visualised to reveal aspects of the new learning landscape during a 1-week sensing period. Indoor real-time location sensing technologies are considered new tools for collecting quantitative evidence in search of emerging patterns of occupation and uses of the learning spaces. The experiment...

  9. VisAn MHD: a toolbox in Matlab for MHD computer model data visualisation and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Daum

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Among the many challenges facing modern space physics today is the need for a visualisation and analysis package which can examine the results from the diversity of numerical and empirical computer models as well as observational data. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD models represent the latest numerical models of the complex Earth's space environment and have the unique ability to span the enormous distances present in the magnetosphere from several hundred kilometres to several thousand kilometres above the Earth surface. This feature enables scientist to study complex structures of processes where otherwise only point measurements from satellites or ground-based instruments are available. Only by combining these observational data and the MHD simulations it is possible to enlarge the scope of the point-to-point observations and to fill the gaps left by measurements in order to get a full 3-D representation of the processes in our geospace environment. In this paper we introduce the VisAn MHD toolbox for Matlab as a tool for the visualisation and analysis of observational data and MHD simulations. We have created an easy to use tool which is capable of highly sophisticated visualisations and data analysis of the results from a diverse set of MHD models in combination with in situ measurements from satellites and ground-based instruments. The toolbox is being released under an open-source licensing agreement to facilitate and encourage community use and contribution.

  10. Quantitatively Plotting the Human Face for Multivariate Data Visualisation Illustrated by Health Assessments Using Laboratory Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hongwei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to describe a new data visualisation system by plotting the human face to observe the comprehensive effects of multivariate data. Methods. The Graphics Device Interface (GDI+ in the Visual Studio.NET development platform was used to write a program that enables facial image parameters to be recorded, such as cropping and rotation, and can generate a new facial image according to Z values from sets of normal data (Z>3 was still counted as 3. The measured clinical laboratory parameters related to health status were obtained from senile people, glaucoma patients, and fatty liver patients to illustrate the facial data visualisation system. Results. When the eyes, nose, and mouth were rotated around their own axes at the same angle, the deformation effects were similar. The deformation effects for any abnormality of the eyes, nose, or mouth should be slightly higher than those for simultaneous abnormalities. The facial changes in the populations with different health statuses were significant compared with a control population. Conclusions. The comprehensive effects of multivariate may not equal the sum of each variable. The 3Z facial data visualisation system can effectively distinguish people with poor health status from healthy people.

  11. KAGLVis - On-line 3D Visualisation of Earth-observing-satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szuba, Marek; Ameri, Parinaz; Grabowski, Udo; Maatouki, Ahmad; Meyer, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    One of the goals of the Large-Scale Data Management and Analysis project is to provide a high-performance framework facilitating management of data acquired by Earth-observing satellites such as Envisat. On the client-facing facet of this framework, we strive to provide visualisation and basic analysis tool which could be used by scientists with minimal to no knowledge of the underlying infrastructure. Our tool, KAGLVis, is a JavaScript client-server Web application which leverages modern Web technologies to provide three-dimensional visualisation of satellite observables on a wide range of client systems. It takes advantage of the WebGL API to employ locally available GPU power for 3D rendering; this approach has been demonstrated to perform well even on relatively weak hardware such as integrated graphics chipsets found in modern laptop computers and with some user-interface tuning could even be usable on embedded devices such as smartphones or tablets. Data is fetched from the database back-end using a ReST API and cached locally, both in memory and using HTML5 Web Storage, to minimise network use. Computations, calculation of cloud altitude from cloud-index measurements for instance, can depending on configuration be performed on either the client or the server side. Keywords: satellite data, Envisat, visualisation, 3D graphics, Web application, WebGL, MEAN stack.

  12. Visualisation of BioPAX Networks using BioLayout Express (3D).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Derek W; Angus, Tim; Enright, Anton J; Freeman, Tom C

    2014-01-01

    BioLayout Express (3D) is a network analysis tool designed for the visualisation and analysis of graphs derived from biological data. It has proved to be powerful in the analysis of gene expression data, biological pathways and in a range of other applications. In version 3.2 of the tool we have introduced the ability to import, merge and display pathways and protein interaction networks available in the BioPAX Level 3 standard exchange format. A graphical interface allows users to search for pathways or interaction data stored in the Pathway Commons database. Queries using either gene/protein or pathway names are made via the cPath2 client and users can also define the source and/or species of information that they wish to examine. Data matching a query are listed and individual records may be viewed in isolation or merged using an 'Advanced' query tab. A visualisation scheme has been defined by mapping BioPAX entity types to a range of glyphs. Graphs of these data can be viewed and explored within BioLayout as 2D or 3D graph layouts, where they can be edited and/or exported for visualisation and editing within other tools. PMID:25949802

  13. Visualisation of uric acid renal calculi (UARC) using computed radiography (CR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To investigate the capability of CR to visualise UARC through inverse image post-processing technique. Methods. A patient-equivalent phantom (PEP) consisting of six 2.5-cm thick Perspex layers and one 1-mm thick aluminium layer was used to represent human tissues and bones respectively. A total of eight exposures were made on PEP to radiograph 1 mm, 2 mm and 3 mm UARC located between three layers of 2-cm thick cattle muscle, positioned inside the PEP. After each exposure, a layer of Perspex was removed, and another exposure was made until only one Perspex layer and one layer of muscle (containing the three UARC) remained. For each exposure, two images (a positive and an inverse image) were produced for comparison using Fuji XG1 computed radiography system with IP0 type C-ST-VI Fuji imaging plate (equivalent to 400 speed radiographic screen-film systems). Results: In positive image, UARC of all three sizes (1 mm, 2 mm and 3 mm) located in the cattle muscle, cannot be visualised when the PEP consists of more than one layer of Perspex. In inverse image, the 3-mm UARC can be seen even when the PEP consists of five layers of Perspex. Conclusion: This study revealed the post-processing capability of CR to increase the visualisation of UARC which has been categorised as radiolucent. A further study of clinical image quality should be performed using blinded observers to test diagnostic accuracy, which was not included in this study.

  14. Preparation of brain perfusion imaging agent 99Tcm-ECD with EDTA exchange reaction. Study on the reaction conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to improve ECD kit formulation and select the best labelling condition, the radiochemical purity and lipophilic fraction of 99Tcm-ECD in different labelling conditions are observed. The results show that 99Tcm-ECD prepared by EDTA ligand exchange reaction is very stable, the radioactivity does not influence the radiochemical purity and lipophilic fraction, the best pH limits is ranged from 5 to 8, and 360 μg EDTA amounts with 2∼6 mL volume is suitable. 99Tcm-ECD can reserve stably in different pH buffer solutions

  15. Near-death-like experiences without life-threatening conditions or brain disorders: a hypothesis from a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ChristianAgrillo

    2012-11-01

    This is a report on a case with most of the features typical of NDEs except that it occurred entirely without any life-threatening conditions. This evidence is theoretically incompatible with either of the above hypotheses, suggesting that a broader interpretation of the phenomenon is needed.

  16. Visualization of cavitation bubbles; Visualisation de bulles de cavitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouvellon, M.; Fournel, Th.; Ducottet, Ch. [Universite Jean Monnet, 31 Saint-Etienne (France). Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation-UMR CNRS 5516

    1999-07-01

    A high frequency ultrasonic reactor allows the degradation of some organic compounds which are not or poorly biodegradable by usual methods in industrial flows. The propagation of an ultrasonic wave in a liquid induces cavitation phenomena. The implosion of cavitation bubble locally causes a temperature of about several thousand Kelvins and a pressure of about several hundred bars. Such conditions allow the creation of the hydroxyl radicals and then the oxidation of organic compounds. The aim of this paper is to describe the method used to visualize cavitation bubbles in an ultrasonic reactor at a frequency of 500 kHz. The experimental set-up and the measurement of both the bubble radius and the fringe separation are presented. (authors)

  17. CM156, a Sigma Receptor Ligand, Reverses Cocaine-Induced Place Conditioning and Transcriptional Responses in the Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yan-Tong; Robson, Matthew J.; Szeszel-Fedorowicz, Wioletta; Patel, Divyen; Rooney, Robert; Christopher R. McCurdy; Matsumoto, Rae R.

    2011-01-01

    Repeated exposure to cocaine induces neuroadaptations which contribute to the rewarding properties of cocaine. Using cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) as an animal model of reward, earlier studies have shown that sigma (σ) receptor ligands can attenuate the acquisition, expression and reactivation of CPP. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms that are associated with these changes are not yet understood. In the present study, CM156, a novel antagonist with high selecti...

  18. Data processing and visualisation in the Rosetta Science Ground Segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    Rosetta is the first space mission to rendezvous with a comet. The spacecraft encountered its target 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014 and currently escorts the comet through a complete activity cycle during perihelion passage. The Rosetta Science Ground Segment (RSGS) is in charge of planning and coordinating the observations carried out by the scientific instruments on board the Rosetta spacecraft. We describe the data processing system implemented at the RSGS in order to support data analysis and science operations planning. The system automatically retrieves and processes telemetry data in near real-time. The generated products include spacecraft and instrument housekeeping parameters, scientific data for some instruments, and derived quantities. Based on spacecraft and comet trajectory information a series of geometric variables are calculated in order to assess the conditions for scheduling the observations of the scientific instruments and analyse the respective measurements obtained. Images acquired by the Rosetta Navigation Camera are processed and distributed in near real-time to the instrument team community. A quicklook web-page displaying the images allows the RSGS team to monitor the state of the comet and the correct acquisition and downlink of the images. Consolidated datasets are later delivered to the long-term archive.

  19. Conditioned same-sex partner preference in male rats is facilitated by oxytocin and dopamine: effect on sexually dimorphic brain nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triana-Del Rio, Rodrigo; Tecamachaltzi-Silvarán, Miriam B; Díaz-Estrada, Victor X; Herrera-Covarrubias, Deissy; Corona-Morales, Aleph A; Pfaus, James G; Coria-Avila, Genaro A

    2015-04-15

    Conditioned same-sex partner preference can develop in male rats that undergo cohabitation under the effects of quinpirole (QNP, D2 agonist). Herein, we assessed the development of conditioned same-sex social/sexual preference in males that received either nothing, saline, QNP, oxytocin (OT), or QNP+OT during cohabitation with another male (+) or single-caged (-). This resulted in the following groups: (1) Intact-, (2) Saline+, (3) QNP-, (4) OT-, (5) QNP+, (6) OT+ and (7) QNP/OT+. Cohabitation occurred during 24h in a clean cage with a male partner that bore almond scent on the back as conditioned stimulus. This was repeated every 4 days for a total of three trials. Social and sexual preference were assessed four days after the last conditioning trial in a drug-free test in which experimental males chose between the scented familiar male and a novel sexually receptive female. Results showed that males from groups Intact-, Saline+, QNP- and OT- displayed a clear preference for the female (opposite-sex), whereas groups QNP+, OT+ and QNP/OT+ displayed socio/sexual preference for the male partner (same-sex). In Experiment 2, the brains were processed for Nissl dye and the area size of two sexually dimorphic nuclei (SDN-POA and SON) was compared between groups. Males from groups OT-, OT+ and QNP/OT+ expressed a smaller SDN-POA and groups QNP+ and QNP/OT+ expressed a larger SON. Accordingly, conditioned same-sex social/sexual partner preference can develop during cohabitation under enhanced D2 or OT activity but such preference does not depend on the area size of those sexually dimorphic nuclei. PMID:25601575

  20. Prenatal L-DOPA exposure produces lasting changes in brain dopamine content, cocaine-induced dopamine release and cocaine conditioned place preference

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Jia-Qian; Jiang, Yan; WANG, Zhihui; McCarthy, Deirdre; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M.; Tropea, Thomas F.; Kosofsky, Barry E.; Bhide, Pradeep G.

    2010-01-01

    Dopamine, its receptors and transporter are present in the brain beginning from early in the embryonic period. Dopamine receptor activation can influence developmental events including neurogenesis, neuronal migration and differentiation raising the possibility that dopamine imbalance in the fetal brain can alter development of the brain and behavior. We examined whether elevated dopamine levels during gestation can produce persisting changes in brain dopamine content and dopamine-mediated be...

  1. Groundwater Visualisation System (GVS): A software framework for integrated display and interrogation of conceptual hydrogeological models, data and time-series animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Malcolm E.; James, Allan; Hawke, Amy; Raiber, Matthias

    2013-05-01

    Valley, and the Surat Basin, a large sedimentary basin of confined artesian aquifers. This latter example required more detail in the hydrostratigraphy, correlation of formations with drillholes and visualisation of simulation piezometric surfaces. Both alluvial system GVS models were developed during drought conditions to support government strategies to implement groundwater management. The Surat Basin model was industry sponsored research, for coal seam gas groundwater management and community information and consultation. The "virtual" groundwater systems in these 3D GVS models can be interactively interrogated by standard functions, plus production of 2D cross-sections, data selection from the 3D scene, rear end database and plot displays. A unique feature is that GVS allows investigation of time-series data across different display modes, both 2D and 3D. GVS has been used successfully as a tool to enhance community/stakeholder understanding and knowledge of groundwater systems and is of value for training and educational purposes. Projects completed confirm that GVS provides a powerful support to management and decision making, and as a tool for interpretation of groundwater system hydrological processes. A highly effective visualisation output is the production of short videos (e.g. 2-5 min) based on sequences of camera 'fly-throughs' and screen images. Further work involves developing support for multi-screen displays and touch-screen technologies, distributed rendering, gestural interaction systems. To highlight the visualisation and animation capability of the GVS software, links to related multimedia hosted online sites are included in the references.

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  3. Brain Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

  5. A direct method to visualise the aryl acylamidase activity on cholinesterases in polyacrylamide gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boopathy Rathanam

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vertebrates, two types of cholinesterases exist, acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase. The function of acetylcholinesterase is to hydrolyse acetylcholine, thereby terminating the neurotransmission at cholinergic synapse, while the precise physiological function of butyrylcholinesterase has not been identified. The presence of cholinesterases in tissues that are not cholinergically innervated indicate that cholinesterases may have functions unrelated to neurotransmission. Furthermore, cholinesterases display a genuine aryl acylamidase activity apart from their predominant acylcholine hydrolase activity. The physiological significance of this aryl acylamidase activity is also not known. The study on the aryl acylamidase has been, in part hampered by the lack of a specific method to visualise this activity. We have developed a method to visualise the aryl acylamidase activity on cholinesterase in polyacrylamide gels. Results The o-nitroaniline liberated from o-nitroacetanilide by the action of aryl acylamidase activity on cholinesterases, in the presence of nitrous acid formed a diazonium compound. This compound gave an azo dye complex with N-(1-napthyl-ethylenediamine, which appeared as purple bands in polyacrylamide gels. Treating the stained gels with trichloroacetic acid followed by Tris-HCl buffer helped in fixation of the stain in the gels. By using specific inhibitors for acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase, respectively, differential staining for the aryl acylamidase activities on butyrylcholinesterase and acetylcholinesterase in a sample containing both these enzymes has been demonstrated. A linear relationship between the intensity of colour developed and activity of the enzyme was obtained. Conclusions A novel method to visualise the aryl acylamidase activity on cholinesterases in polyacrylamide gels has been developed.

  6. Generation of a new bioluminescent model for visualisation of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zagozdzon, Agnieszka M

    2012-05-30

    AbstractBackgroundNumerous transgenic models have been generated to study breast cancer. However, despite many advantages, traditional transgenic models for breast cancer are also burdened with difficulties in early detection and longitudinal observation of transgene-induced tumours, which in most cases are randomly located and occur at various time points. Methods such as palpation followed by mechanical measurement of the tumours are of limited value in transgenic models. There is a crucial need for making these previously generated models suitable for modern methods of tumour visualisation and monitoring, e.g. by bioluminescence-based techniques. This approach was successfully used in the current study.ResultsA new mouse strain (MMTV-Luc2 mice) expressing Luc2 luciferase primarily in mammary tissue in females, with low-level background expression in internal organs, was generated and bred to homozygosity. After these mice were intercrossed with MMTV-PyVT mice, all double transgenic females developed mammary tumours by the age of 10 weeks, the localisation and progression of which could be effectively monitored using the luminescence-based in vivo imaging. Luminescence-based readout allowed for early visualisation of the locally overgrown mammary tissue and for longitudinal evaluation of local progression of the tumours. When sampled ex vivo at the age of 10 weeks, all tumours derived from MMTV-Luc2PyVT females displayed robust bioluminescent signal.ConclusionsWe have created a novel transgenic strain for visualisation and longitudinal monitoring of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice as an addition and\\/or a new and more advanced alternative to manual methods. Generation of this mouse strain is vital for making many of the existing mammary tumour transgenic models applicable for in vivo imaging techniques.

  7. Generation of a new bioluminescent model for visualisation of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous transgenic models have been generated to study breast cancer. However, despite many advantages, traditional transgenic models for breast cancer are also burdened with difficulties in early detection and longitudinal observation of transgene-induced tumours, which in most cases are randomly located and occur at various time points. Methods such as palpation followed by mechanical measurement of the tumours are of limited value in transgenic models. There is a crucial need for making these previously generated models suitable for modern methods of tumour visualisation and monitoring, e.g. by bioluminescence-based techniques. This approach was successfully used in the current study. A new mouse strain (MMTV-Luc2 mice) expressing Luc2 luciferase primarily in mammary tissue in females, with low-level background expression in internal organs, was generated and bred to homozygosity. After these mice were intercrossed with MMTV-PyVT mice, all double transgenic females developed mammary tumours by the age of 10 weeks, the localisation and progression of which could be effectively monitored using the luminescence-based in vivo imaging. Luminescence-based readout allowed for early visualisation of the locally overgrown mammary tissue and for longitudinal evaluation of local progression of the tumours. When sampled ex vivo at the age of 10 weeks, all tumours derived from MMTV-Luc2PyVT females displayed robust bioluminescent signal. We have created a novel transgenic strain for visualisation and longitudinal monitoring of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice as an addition and/or a new and more advanced alternative to manual methods. Generation of this mouse strain is vital for making many of the existing mammary tumour transgenic models applicable for in vivo imaging techniques

  8. Generation of a new bioluminescent model for visualisation of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zagozdzon Agnieszka M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous transgenic models have been generated to study breast cancer. However, despite many advantages, traditional transgenic models for breast cancer are also burdened with difficulties in early detection and longitudinal observation of transgene-induced tumours, which in most cases are randomly located and occur at various time points. Methods such as palpation followed by mechanical measurement of the tumours are of limited value in transgenic models. There is a crucial need for making these previously generated models suitable for modern methods of tumour visualisation and monitoring, e.g. by bioluminescence-based techniques. This approach was successfully used in the current study. Results A new mouse strain (MMTV-Luc2 mice expressing Luc2 luciferase primarily in mammary tissue in females, with low-level background expression in internal organs, was generated and bred to homozygosity. After these mice were intercrossed with MMTV-PyVT mice, all double transgenic females developed mammary tumours by the age of 10 weeks, the localisation and progression of which could be effectively monitored using the luminescence-based in vivo imaging. Luminescence-based readout allowed for early visualisation of the locally overgrown mammary tissue and for longitudinal evaluation of local progression of the tumours. When sampled ex vivo at the age of 10 weeks, all tumours derived from MMTV-Luc2PyVT females displayed robust bioluminescent signal. Conclusions We have created a novel transgenic strain for visualisation and longitudinal monitoring of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice as an addition and/or a new and more advanced alternative to manual methods. Generation of this mouse strain is vital for making many of the existing mammary tumour transgenic models applicable for in vivo imaging techniques.

  9. Applying internet based 3D visualisation and priority games in public consultation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henning Sten; Kristensen, Peter Nordskov

    2006-01-01

    The County of Northern Jutland had just finalised a public consultation concerning a new connection across Limfjorden, which separates the northernmost part of Jutland, called Vendsyssel, from the mainland of Jutland. The County administration was quite aware of the fact the decision concerning the...... involved in the decision-making process. The current paper demonstrates how web-based interactive tools can support the participation of the citizens. The use of 3D geo-visualisation / VR makes it easier to represent spatial information in a way that is more similar to how people observe and perceive them...

  10. A Hierarchical Framework for Visualising and Simulating Supply Chains in Virtual Environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Yan Zhang; Zheng-Xu Zhao

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents research into applying virtual environment (VE) technology to supply chain management (SCM). Our research work has employed virtual manufacturing environments to represent supply chain nodes to simulate processes and activities in supply chain management. This will enable those who are involved in these processes and activities to gain an intuitive understanding of them, so as to design robust supply chains and make correct decisions at the right time.A framework system and its hierarchical structure for visualising and simulating supply chains in virtual environments are reported and detailed in this paper.

  11. Visualisation of BioPAX Networks using BioLayout Express3D

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Derek W.; Angus, Tim; Enright, Anton J.; Freeman, Tom C.

    2014-01-01

    BioLayout Express3D is a network analysis tool designed for the visualisation and analysis of graphs derived from biological data. It has proved to be powerful in the analysis of gene expression data, biological pathways and in a range of other applications. In version 3.2 of the tool we have introduced the ability to import, merge and display pathways and protein interaction networks available in the BioPAX Level 3 standard exchange format. A graphical interface allows users to search for pa...

  12. BIG DATA VISUALISATION IN IMMERSIVE VIRTUAL REALITY ENVIRONMENTS: EMBODIED PHENOMENOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES TO INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Teras

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ever-increasing human-computer interactions with various tracking technologies are creating unprecedented amounts of data. The amount and complexity of this ‘big data’ creates various challenges for its storage, analysis and presentation, but at the same time, big data is suggested to open up opportunities for those who can leverage it. This paper will discuss using immersive virtual reality environments for visualising, interacting and making sense of big data. It reveals that many of the developed applications do not justify their approaches to presentation or interaction. A phenomenological perspective of embodied perception and interaction is discussed to ground future developments.

  13. [31P-NMR analysis of high energy phosphorous compounds (ATP and phosphocreatine) in the living rat brain--effects of halothane anesthesia and a hypoxic condition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, T; Miyatake, T; Kuwabara, T; Umeda, M; Eguchi, K

    1983-11-01

    31phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) measurements have provided new and valuable insights for studying the metabolism of living systems. The aim of this paper is to introduce a technique of application of 31P-NMR measurements using a surface coil method, and to discuss the effects of halothane anesthesia and hypoxic hypoxia on the energetic metabolism of intact rat brains. All measurements were made using a JEOL FX 270 spectrometer with a super conducting magnet of 54-mm bore diameter. The magnetic field intensity of this machine is 6.3 tesla, and the resonance frequency used for 31P was 109.14 MHz. We remodelled an ordinary probe to take a live rat, and the animals were made to inhale anesthetic halothane or mixture of oxygen and nitrogen at various concentrations controlled by a flow regulator. The best conditions for measurements with our surface coil method were determined in this study as follows: (1) 90 degrees pulse width and selectivity, Fig. 1 shows signal selectivity in depthwise direction changed with 90 degrees pulse width, which was set to 20 microseconds. (2) Sensitivity and resolution; To obtain a spectrum of 31P-NMR from a rat brain 500 accumulations of free induction decays were considered suitable for both time and space resolution. Fig. 2 shows variations of signal intensity with pulse repetition time, which was set to 2 sec. It took about 17 min for averaging to get a spectrogram. (3) Quantitative accuracy and qualification; As shown in Fig. 3, a linear relationship was found between the signal intensity of beta-phosphate of ATP and the concentration of ATP solutions, thus proving the quantitative accuracy of our systems.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6661335

  14. Brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain SPECT investigations have gained broad acceptance since the introduction of the lipophilic tracer Tc-99m-HMPAO. Depending on equipment and objectives in different departments, the examinations can be divided into three groups: 1. Under normal conditions and standardised patient preparation the 'rest' SPECT can be performed in every department with a tomographic camera. In cerebrovascular disease there is a demand for determination of either the perfusion reserve in reversible ischemia or prognostic values in completed stroke. In cases of dementia, SPECT may yield useful results according to differential diagnosis. Central cerebral system involvement in immunologic disease may be estimated with higher sensitivity than in conventional brain imaging procedures. In psychiatric diseases there is only a relative indication for brain SPECT, since results during recent years have been contradictory and may be derived only in interventional manner. In brain tumor diagnostics SPECT with Tl-201 possibly permits grading. In inflammatory disease, especially in viral encephalitis, SPECT may be used to obtain early diagnosis. Normal pressure hydrocephalus can be distinguished from other forms of dementia and, consequently, the necessity for shunting surgery can be recognised. 2. In departments equipped for emergency cases an 'acute' SPECT can be performed in illnesses with rapid changing symptoms such as different forms of migraine, transient global amnesia, epileptic seizures (so-called 'ictal SPECT') or urgent forms like trauma. 3. In cooperation with several departments brain SPECT can be practised as an interventional procedure in clinical and in scientific studies. (orig./MG)

  15. Postulated vasoactive neuropeptide immunopathology affecting the blood–brain/blood–spinal barrier in certain neuropsychiatric fatigue-related conditions: A role for phosphodiesterase inhibitors in treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya Marshall-Gradisnik

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Donald R Staines1,2, Ekua W Brenu2, Sonya Marshall-Gradisnik21Queensland Health, Gold Coast Population Health Unit, Southport, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia; 2Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Population Health and Neuroimmunology Unit, Bond University, Robina, Queensland, AustraliaAbstract: Neuropsychiatric symptoms occur in a number of neurological fatigue-related conditions including multiple sclerosis (MS, Parkinson’s disease (PD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. These conditions have been attributed variably to neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative processes. While autoimmune pathology, at least in part, has long been suspected in these conditions proof has been elusive. Autoimmune pathomechanisms affecting the blood–brain barrier (BBB or blood–spinal barrier (BSB may predispose the BBB/BSB to ‘leakiness’ and be a precursor to additional autoimmune events resulting in neuroinflammatory or neurodegenerative processes. The aim of the paper is to postulate immunopathology of the cerebrospinal perivascular compartment involving certain vasoactive neuropeptides, specifically pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP, in the etiology of certain neuropsychiatric fatigue-related conditions such as MS, ALS, PD, and CFS. Vasoactive neuropeptides (VNs such as PACAP and VIP have critical roles as neurotransmitters, vasodilators including perfusion and hypoxia regulators, and immune and nociception modulators. PACAP and VIP are widely distributed in the central nervous system (CNS and have key roles in CNS blood vessels including maintaining functional integrity of the BBB and BSB. Autoimmunity affecting these VNs would likely have a detrimental effect on BBB and BSB functioning arguably predisposing to further pathological processes. Virchow–Robin spaces (VRS are perivascular compartments surrounding small vessels within the CNS which

  16. Modèles physiques pour la visualisation d'objets très déformables. Relations Mouvement-Forme-Image

    OpenAIRE

    Habibi, Arash

    1997-01-01

    Ce travail se situe dans le domaine de la synthèse d’images par ordinateur et de l’animation par modèles physiques. La modélisation et la visualisation d’un objet physique suppose un travail sur la forme, le mouvement et l’image. Plus cet objet de référence est déformable et plus la relation entre ces trois entités est complexe. Dans ce travail, nous étudions cette relation et nous déterminons dans quelles conditions le comportement (forme, mouvement, image) des objets peut être représenté pa...

  17. Real-time Interactive Steerable Scientific Visualisation of Free Surface Flow in the Context of Synthetic Vision (Review Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Lingaraju

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The existing techniques in the context of fluid modelling and simulation have been reviewed. Generic framework that enables an easy integration of various modules has been developed, extending the work to real-time simulation and visualisation, and developed user interaction during run-time using the concept of computational steering. Inthe generic framework developed, a new class of visualisation technique that simplifies the visualisation tasks of a scientist has been identified. Investigating these techniques is important as the tools such as visualisation tool kit (VTK and VTK designer are freely available (Open Source and easy to integrate. A technique for interactivevisualisation of the free surface flow, that introduces the concepts of geometrical steering and properties steering, has been developed. These techniques constitute computational steering. The concept of real-time interactive scientific visualisation using a surface flow application has been demonstrated. As a proof of concept, the behaviour of flow is simulated and visualised during training in a virtual environment on a desktop computer. It is expected that the generic framework, device, interface, and simulation engine, used in this work will not only have a significant impact in the area of free surface flow, but also in real-time applications such as synthetic vision in avionics. The underlying formulation/methodology involved in parametric approach is explained.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(4, pp.299-305, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.1115

  18. GrayStar: A Web application for pedagogical stellar atmosphere and spectral line modelling and visualisation

    CERN Document Server

    Short, C Ian

    2014-01-01

    GrayStar is a stellar atmospheric and spectral line modelling, post-processing, and visualisation code, suitable for classroom demonstrations and laboratory-style assignments, that has been developed in Java and deployed in JavaScript and HTML. The only software needed to compute models and post-processed observables, and to visualise the resulting atmospheric structure and observables, is a common Web browser. Therefore, the code will run on any common PC or related X86 (-64) computer of the type that typically serves classroom data projectors, is found in undergraduate computer laboratories, or that students themselves own, including those with highly portable form-factors such as net-books and tablets. The user requires no experience with compiling source code, reading data files, or using plotting packages. More advanced students can view the JavaScript source code using the developer tools provided by common Web browsers. The code is based on the approximate gray atmospheric solution and runs quickly eno...

  19. Online control and data visualisation system for the COSY-TOF experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TOF (Time Of Flight) experiment at the COSY accelerator in the FZ-Juelich has successfully performed a first measurement for the studies of the hyperon-nucleon interaction with a polarized beam at 2.95 GeV/c beam momentum. For these measurements a silicon quirl telescope and a straw tube tracker were recently installed in order to improve the mass reconstruction and increase the reconstruction efficiency. The increased complexity of the detector system required a user friendly software for diagnostics and visualize the proper functionality of detector components. This software includes data conversion, checking and visualisation routines, full detector geometry and GUI (graphical user interface). For visualisation of single events the event display, based on ROOT geometry classes, was developed. User friendly GUI provides convenient online monitoring of data, being acquired during the experiment, and selection of the event display parameters. The different parts of software are independent and run in parallel. For illustration, examples of data diagnostics and event display from the last experiment are presented.

  20. Complexity for artificial substrates (CASU: software for creating and visualising habitat complexity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynette H L Loke

    Full Text Available Physical habitat complexity regulates the structure and function of biological communities, although the mechanisms underlying this relationship remain unclear. Urbanisation, pollution, unsustainable resource exploitation and climate change have resulted in the widespread simplification (and loss of habitats worldwide. One way to restore physical complexity to anthropogenically simplified habitats is through the use of artificial substrates, which also offer excellent opportunities to explore the effects of different components (variables of complexity on biodiversity and community structure that would be difficult to separate in natural systems. Here, we describe a software program (CASU that enables users to visualise static, physical complexity. CASU also provides output files that can be used to create artificial substrates for experimental and/or restoration studies. It has two different operational modes: simple and advanced. In simple mode, users can adjust the five main variables of informational complexity (i.e. the number of object types, relative abundance of object types, density of objects, variability and range in the objects' dimensions, and their spatial arrangement and visualise the changes as they do so. The advanced mode allows users to design artificial substrates by fine-tuning the complexity variables as well as alter object-specific parameters. We illustrate how CASU can be used to create tiles of different designs for application in a marine environment. Such an ability to systematically influence physical complexity could greatly facilitate ecological restoration by allowing conservationists to rebuild complexity in degraded and simplified habitats.

  1. IVIS-3D: A tool for interactive 3D-visualisation of gravity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klesper, C.

    EDV-based interactive visualisation methods have become a very essential part in the modelling and analysing of three-dimensional models in geoscience. The value of enhanced 3D-visualization for the process of modelling and validation of complex models increases with the number of capabilities to change independently display parameters and to combine different data, like model and process information. But this value also falls with increasing information and methods which slow down user interaction and confuses the user with too much information and the complexity of user interfaces (Houlding, 1994). Especially for interactive 3D-visualization and validation of geometric models, existing modelling systems can meet the user requirements only inadequate. So lacks of functionality are often compensated by the user with a patchwork of different programs. Now the task was to find or create new visualisation methods, to combine the capabilities of interactive 3D-visualization with an intuitive environment and to adapt these features to the existing gravity and magnetic modelling program IGMAS (Götze et al., 1988); (Schmidt, 1996).

  2. GIS Visualisations of Mortuary Data from Holešov, Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Šmejda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a case-study demonstrating the potential of GIS visualisations for analyses of mortuary data, recorded half a century ago at the site of Holešov, Kroměříž district, in the Czech Republic. This cemetery consists of 10 Bell Beaker and 420 Early Bronze Age graves, giving the impression of continuous development over a considerable period of time. The temporality of the cemetery is examined in detail, via its chronological development, as well as the inseparable aspects of its social use and structuring through time. The original data were converted from the printed catalogue into a Geographical Information System (GIS consisting of digitised plans and a database. Exploratory analyses of the data were conducted, based on two complementary perspectives: the spatial reference of recorded features and objects, and the formal similarity of burial assemblages. The former approach includes spatial density and trend surface analyses, the latter applies multivariate factor analysis visualised in GIS, where the extracted factor scores define a new reference system. The methods employed are sometimes unorthodox, specifically because such plots describing formal space have been little employed in GIS-based studies of mortuary behaviour. This article strives to highlight the positive aspects of contemporary computer software in order to encourage researchers to pursue new ways of conceptualising their research ideas through the integration of concepts and methods, which traditionally have been applied to different research domains.

  3. Alignment of Hyperspectral Imagery and Full-Waveform LIDAR Data for Visualisation and Classification Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miltiadou, M.; Warren, M. A.; Grant, M.; Brown, M.

    2015-04-01

    The overarching aim of this paper is to enhance the visualisations and classifications of airborne remote sensing data for remote forest surveys. A new open source tool is presented for aligning hyperspectral and full-waveform LiDAR data. The tool produces coloured polygon representations of the scanned areas and aligned metrics from both datasets. Using data provided by NERC ARSF, tree coverage maps are generated and projected into the polygons. The 3D polygon meshes show well-separated structures and are suitable for direct rendering with commodity 3D-accelerated hardware allowing smooth visualisation. The intensity profile of each wave sample is accumulated into a 3D discrete density volume building a 3D representation of the scanned area. The 3D volume is then polygonised using the Marching Cubes algorithm. Further, three user-defined bands from the hyperspectral images are projected into the polygon mesh as RGB colours. Regarding the classifications of full-waveform LiDAR data, previous work used extraction of point clouds while this paper introduces a new approach of deriving information from the 3D volume representation and the hyperspectral data. We generate aligned metrics of multiple resolutions, including the standard deviation of the hyperspectral bands and width of the reflected waveform derived from the volume. Tree coverage maps are then generated using a Bayesian probabilistic model and due to the combination of the data, higher accuracy classification results are expected.

  4. Real-time Photorealistic Visualisation of Large-scaleMultiresolution Terrain Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Agrawal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Height field terrain rendering is an important aspect of GIS, outdoor virtual reality applicationssuch as flight simulation, 3-D games, etc. A polygonal model of very large terrain data requiresa large number of triangles. So, even most high-performance graphics workstations have greatdifficulty to display even moderately sized height fields at interactive frame rates. To bringphotorealism in visualisation, it is required to drape corresponding high-resolution satellite oraerial phototexture over 3-D digital terrain and also to place multiple collections of point-location-based static objects such as buildings, trees, etc and to overlay polyline vector objects suchas roads on top of the terrain surface. It further complicates the requirement of interactive framerates while navigation over the terrain. This paper describes a novel approach for objects andterrain visualisation by combination of two algorithms, one for terrain data and the other forobjects. The terrain rendering is accomplished by an efficient dynamic multiresolution view-dependent level-of-detail mesh simplification algorithm. It is augmented with out-of-corevisualisation of large-height geometry and phototexture terrain data populated with 3-D/2-Dstatic objects as well as vector overlays without extensive memory load. The proposedmethodology provides interactive frame rates on a general-purpose desktop PC with OpenGL-enabled graphics hardware. The software TREND has been successfully tested on different real-world height maps and satellite phototextures of sizes up to 16K*16K coupled with thousandsof static objects and polyline vector overlays.

  5. PhyTB: Phylogenetic tree visualisation and sample positioning for M. tuberculosis

    KAUST Repository

    Benavente, Ernest D

    2015-05-13

    Background Phylogenetic-based classification of M. tuberculosis and other bacterial genomes is a core analysis for studying evolutionary hypotheses, disease outbreaks and transmission events. Whole genome sequencing is providing new insights into the genomic variation underlying intra- and inter-strain diversity, thereby assisting with the classification and molecular barcoding of the bacteria. One roadblock to strain investigation is the lack of user-interactive solutions to interrogate and visualise variation within a phylogenetic tree setting. Results We have developed a web-based tool called PhyTB (http://pathogenseq.lshtm.ac.uk/phytblive/index.php webcite) to assist phylogenetic tree visualisation and identification of M. tuberculosis clade-informative polymorphism. Variant Call Format files can be uploaded to determine a sample position within the tree. A map view summarises the geographical distribution of alleles and strain-types. The utility of the PhyTB is demonstrated on sequence data from 1,601 M. tuberculosis isolates. Conclusion PhyTB contextualises M. tuberculosis genomic variation within epidemiological, geographical and phylogenic settings. Further tool utility is possible by incorporating large variants and phenotypic data (e.g. drug-resistance profiles), and an assessment of genotype-phenotype associations. Source code is available to develop similar websites for other organisms (http://sourceforge.net/projects/phylotrack webcite).

  6. Brain herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  7. 3D Digitisation and Visualisation of the Vače Situla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Vidmar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available EXTENDED ABSTRACT:The project of 3D digitisation and visualisation of the Vače situla was implemented at the beginning of 2011 in cooperation with the National Museum of Slovenia where the situla is kept and the company MFC.2 which, among other services, develops and implements 3 D digitisation and visualisation projects. The purpose of the project was to digitise and visualise a famous and precious piece of cultural heritage and to  1. show what modern 3D shape and texture scanning technologies allow us to do,  2. show how to ensure safety and reach high quality in digitising cultural heritage objects.  3. measure the added value of the 3 D visualisation of cultural heritage as a powerful tool for preservation, conservation, research, education, knowledge sharing and promotion of cultural heritage objects. Furthermore, the aims of the project were:  1. 3D capture of the shape and texture of the situla using the 3D scanning method.  2. 3D image of the situla and its details with expert descriptions.  3. 3D stereoscopic projection of the situla viewed with 3D glasses and with the possibility of controlling it remotely.  4. 3D animation giving professional interpretation of certain facts about the situla.  5. Public presentation of the project results on Slovenian cultural holiday, 8th February 2011, at the National Museum of Slovenia. The 3D capture of the shape and texture of the situla was carried out using the white light 3D scanning method followed by 3D flesh animation to show the object and its details. A touch screen was used to provide user access to the content. Reality based model enabled vertical rotation of the situla as well as the interactive display of individual engravings. By clicking a situla detail a photo with an extensive professional explanation of the scene was displayed in a new browser window. For attractive public presentation of the exhibition a 3D stereoscopic animation of the situla rotating and seemingly

  8. Wit & visualisation : visualising Jane Austen

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Jane Austen is famed for her pervasive use of irony. There are many other things one could praise in Jane Austen's writing: Her perfectly crafted plots, her deep understanding of human nature, her true-to-life depictions of everyday society, but it is her use of irony that makes her a really great writer, and which also contributes to making these other aspects of her writing so praiseworthy. It might be said that the characteristics that make her such a good writer also make her an attra...

  9. Postulated Role of Vasoactive Neuropeptide-Related Immunopathology of the Blood Brain Barrier and Virchow-Robin Spaces in the Aetiology of Neurological-Related Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Staines

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Vasoactive neuropeptides (VNs such as pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP have critical roles as neurotransmitters, vasodilators including perfusion and hypoxia regulators, as well as immune and nociception modulators. They have key roles in blood vessels in the central nervous system (CNS including maintaining functional integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB and blood spinal barrier (BSB. VNs are potent activators of adenylate cyclase and thus also have a key role in cyclic AMP production affecting regulatory T cell and other immune functions. Virchow-Robin spaces (VRSs are perivascular compartments surrounding small vessels within the CNS and contain VNs. Autoimmunity of VNs or VN receptors may affect BBB and VRS function and, therefore, may contribute to the aetiology of neurological-related conditions including multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. VN autoimmunity will likely affect CNS and immunological homeostasis. Various pharmacological and immunological treatments including phosphodiesterase inhibitors and plasmapheresis may be indicated.

  10. Comparison of molecular signatures in large scale protein interaction networks in normal and cancer conditions of brain, cervix, lung, ovary and prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat Suvra Banik

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Cancer, the disease of intricateness, has remained beyond our complete perception so far. Network systems biology (termed NSB is one of the most recent approaches to understand the unsolved problems of cancer development. From this perspective, differential protein networks (PINs have been developed based on the expression and interaction data of brain, cervix, lung, ovary and prostate for normal and cancer conditions. Methods Differential expression database GeneHub-GEPIS and interaction database STRING were applied for primary data retrieval. Cytoscape platform and related plugins named network analyzer; MCODE and ModuLand were used for visualization of complex networks and subsequent analysis. Results Significant differences were observedamong different common network parameters between normal and cancer states. Moreover, molecular complex numbers and overlapping modularization found to be varying significantly between normal and cancerous tissues. The number of the ranked molecular complex and the nodes involved in the overlapping modules were meaningfully higher in cancer condition.We identified79 commonly up regulated and 6 down regulated proteins in all five tissues. Number of nodes, edges; multi edge node pair, and average number of neighbor are found with significant fluctuations in case of cervix and ovarian tissues.Cluster analysis showed that the association of Myc and Cdk4 proteins is very close with other proteins within the network.Cervix and ovarian tissue showed higher increment of the molecular complex number and overlapping module network during cancer in comparison to normal state. Conclusions The differential molecular signatures identified from the work can be studied further to understand the cancer signaling process, and potential therapeutic and detection approach. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(4.000: 605-615

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism ...

  12. Endothelial cells derived from the blood-brain barrier and islets of Langerhans differ in their response to the effects of bilirubin on oxidative stress under hyperglycemic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JaimeKapitulnik

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Unconjugated bilirubin (UCB is a neurotoxic degradation product of heme. Its toxic effects include induction of apoptosis, and ultimately neuronal cell death. However, at low concentrations, UCB is a potent antioxidant that may protect cells and tissues against oxidative stress by neutralizing toxic metabolites such as reactive oxygen species (ROS. High glucose levels (hyperglycemia generate reactive metabolites. Endothelial cell dysfunction, an early vascular complication in diabetes, has been associated with hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. Both glucose and UCB are substrates for transport proteins in microvascular endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. In the current study we show that UCB (1-40 M induces apoptosis and reduces survival of bEnd3 cells, a mouse brain endothelial cell line which serves as an in vitro model of the BBB. These deleterious effects of UCB were enhanced in the presence of high glucose (25 mM levels. Interestingly, the bEnd3 cells exhibited an increased sensitivity to the apoptotic effects of UCB when compared to the MS1 microcapillary endothelial cell line. MS1 cells originate from murine pancreatic islets of Langherans, and are devoid of the barrier characteristics of BBB-derived endothelial cells. ROS production was increased in both bEnd3 and MS1 cells exposed to high glucose, as compared with cells exposed to normal (5.5 mM glucose levels. While UCB (0.1-40 M did not alter ROS production in cells exposed to normal glucose, relatively low ('physiological' UCB concentrations (0.1-5 M attenuated ROS generation in both cell lines exposed to high glucose levels. Most strikingly, higher UCB concentrations (20-40 M increased ROS generation in bEnd3 cells exposed to high glucose, but not in similarly treated MS1 cells. These results may be of critical importance for understanding the vulnerability of the BBB endothelium upon exposure to increasing UCB levels under hyperglycemic conditions.

  13. Predictive gene lists for breast cancer prognosis: A topographic visualisation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lowe David

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The controversy surrounding the non-uniqueness of predictive gene lists (PGL of small selected subsets of genes from very large potential candidates as available in DNA microarray experiments is now widely acknowledged 1. Many of these studies have focused on constructing discriminative semi-parametric models and as such are also subject to the issue of random correlations of sparse model selection in high dimensional spaces. In this work we outline a different approach based around an unsupervised patient-specific nonlinear topographic projection in predictive gene lists. Methods We construct nonlinear topographic projection maps based on inter-patient gene-list relative dissimilarities. The Neuroscale, the Stochastic Neighbor Embedding(SNE and the Locally Linear Embedding(LLE techniques have been used to construct two-dimensional projective visualisation plots of 70 dimensional PGLs per patient, classifiers are also constructed to identify the prognosis indicator of each patient using the resulting projections from those visualisation techniques and investigate whether a-posteriori two prognosis groups are separable on the evidence of the gene lists. A literature-proposed predictive gene list for breast cancer is benchmarked against a separate gene list using the above methods. Generalisation ability is investigated by using the mapping capability of Neuroscale to visualise the follow-up study, but based on the projections derived from the original dataset. Results The results indicate that small subsets of patient-specific PGLs have insufficient prognostic dissimilarity to permit a distinction between two prognosis patients. Uncertainty and diversity across multiple gene expressions prevents unambiguous or even confident patient grouping. Comparative projections across different PGLs provide similar results. Conclusion The random correlation effect to an arbitrary outcome induced by small subset selection from very high

  14. VMStools: Open-source software for the processing, analysis and visualisation of fisheries logbook and VMS data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hintzen, N.T.; Bastardie, F.; Beare, D.J.; Piet, G.J.; Ulrich, C.; Deporte, N.; Egekvist, J.; Degel, H.

    2012-01-01

    VMStools is a package of open-source software, build using the freeware environment R, specifically developed for the processing, analysis and visualisation of landings (logbooks) and vessel location data (VMS) from commercial fisheries. Analyses start with standardized data formats for logbook (EFL

  15. Designing Spatial Visualisation Tasks for Middle School Students with a 3D Modelling Software: An Instrumental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Melih; Uygan, Candas

    2015-01-01

    In this work, certain task designs to enhance middle school students' spatial visualisation ability, in the context of an instrumental approach, have been developed. 3D modelling software, SketchUp®, was used. In the design process, software tools were focused on and, thereafter, the aim was to interpret the instrumental genesis and spatial…

  16. A case-association cluster detection and visualisation tool with an application to Legionnaires’ disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansom, P; Copley, V R; Naik, F C; Leach, S; Hall, I M

    2013-01-01

    Statistical methods used in spatio-temporal surveillance of disease are able to identify abnormal clusters of cases but typically do not provide a measure of the degree of association between one case and another. Such a measure would facilitate the assignment of cases to common groups and be useful in outbreak investigations of diseases that potentially share the same source. This paper presents a model-based approach, which on the basis of available location data, provides a measure of the strength of association between cases in space and time and which is used to designate and visualise the most likely groupings of cases. The method was developed as a prospective surveillance tool to signal potential outbreaks, but it may also be used to explore groupings of cases in outbreak investigations. We demonstrate the method by using a historical case series of Legionnaires’ disease amongst residents of England and Wales. PMID:23483594

  17. A case-association cluster detection and visualisation tool with an application to Legionnaires' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansom, P; Copley, V R; Naik, F C; Leach, S; Hall, I M

    2013-09-10

    Statistical methods used in spatio-temporal surveillance of disease are able to identify abnormal clusters of cases but typically do not provide a measure of the degree of association between one case and another. Such a measure would facilitate the assignment of cases to common groups and be useful in outbreak investigations of diseases that potentially share the same source. This paper presents a model-based approach, which on the basis of available location data, provides a measure of the strength of association between cases in space and time and which is used to designate and visualise the most likely groupings of cases. The method was developed as a prospective surveillance tool to signal potential outbreaks, but it may also be used to explore groupings of cases in outbreak investigations. We demonstrate the method by using a historical case series of Legionnaires' disease amongst residents of England and Wales. PMID:23483594

  18. Visualisation of Radioactivity in Real-Time on a Tablet Measured by a Hybrid Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)749233; Bantel, Michael; Grünhaupt, Ulrich

    This work explores a method to visualise and interact with radioactivity over time and space by means of augmented reality on a screen. A prototype, iPadPix, was built to demonstrate use as an intuitive new tool for educative and training purposes. Measured by a hybrid pixel detector, Timepix, traces of radioactive decays are displayed in real- time on a mobile device. Its detection principle and properties are detailed as well as the calibration of the sensor. An embedded board is used to process and forward the sensor data to a tablet over a wireless network connection. Software was developed to processes and overlay signatures of ionising radiation and particles on a live camera feed. It is described here and published as open source.

  19. The Halden viewer: a tool for virtual walkthrough, annotation, radiation visualisation, and dose evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Halden Viewer is a software tool that can be used to interactively walk through and annotate 3D models of environments while visualising radiation dose-rate data. Paths can be defined through the environment and graphs can be plotted showing the dose-rate and accumulated dose of a human moving along the paths. Typical users include radiation protection staff, staff involved in maintenance and training activities, and managers. This report comprises of a foreword documenting the history of the Halden Viewer and the Halden Viewer User Manual. The user manual contains an overview of the tool, a tutorial, and reference information. The version of the Halden Viewer described in this report is release 2.0. (Author)

  20. Metal–biomass interactions: a comparison of visualisation techniques available in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Burgess

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of metals and biological materials is of interest for reasons such as metal recovery, toxicity and production of high-value products such as gold and platinum nanoparticles. Understanding the way in which metals interact with the biomass surface and intracellular components provides insights into the biosorption and bioaccumulation processes and increases the potential for process optimisation. Three technologies are available for the qualitative visualisation of metal–biomass interactions in South Africa, namely, micro-PIXE, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive analysis of X-rays. Each technique provides unique information and has specific shortcomings which should be taken into account when selecting the appropriate technology. This paper focuses on evaluating the various techniques.

  1. Visualisation methods for large provenance collections in data-intensive collaborative platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinuso, Alessandro; Fligueira, Rosa; Atkinson, Malcolm; Gemuend, Andre

    2016-04-01

    This work investigates improving the methods of visually representing provenance information in the context of modern data-driven scientific research. It explores scenarios where data-intensive workflows systems are serving communities of researchers within collaborative environments, supporting the sharing of data and methods, and offering a variety of computation facilities, including HPC, HTC and Cloud. It focuses on the exploration of big-data visualization techniques aiming at producing comprehensive and interactive views on top of large and heterogeneous provenance data. The same approach is applicable to control-flow and data-flow workflows or to combinations of the two. This flexibility is achieved using the W3C-PROV recommendation as a reference model, especially its workflow oriented profiles such as D-PROV (Messier et al. 2013). Our implementation is based on the provenance records produced by the dispel4py data-intensive processing library (Filgueira et al. 2015). dispel4py is an open-source Python framework for describing abstract stream-based workflows for distributed data-intensive applications, developed during the VERCE project. dispel4py enables scientists to develop their scientific methods and applications on their laptop and then run them at scale on a wide range of e-Infrastructures (Cloud, Cluster, etc.) without making changes. Users can therefore focus on designing their workflows at an abstract level, describing actions, input and output streams, and how they are connected. The dispel4py system then maps these descriptions to the enactment platforms, such as MPI, Storm, multiprocessing. It provides a mechanism which allows users to determine the provenance information to be collected and to analyze it at runtime. For this work we consider alternative visualisation methods for provenance data, from infinite lists and localised interactive graphs, to radial-views. The latter technique has been positively explored in many fields, from text

  2. MyChemise: A 2D drawing program that uses morphing for visualisation purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Jörg-Hubertus

    2011-01-01

    MyChemise (My Chemical Structure Editor) is a new 2D structure editor. It is designed as a Java applet that enables the direct creation of structures in the Internet using a web browser. MyChemise saves files in a digital format (.cse) and the import and export of .mol files using the appropriate connection tables is also possible.MyChemise is available as a free online version in English and German. The MyChemise GUI is designed to be user friendly and can be used intuitively. There is also an English and German program description available as a PDF file.In addition to the known ways of drawing chemical structure formulas, there are also parts implemented in the program that allow the creation of different types of presentation. The morphing module uses this technology as a component for dynamic visualisation. For example, it enables a clear and simple illustration of molecule vibrations and reaction sequences. PMID:22152022

  3. Volumetric ellipsoid zone mapping for enhanced visualisation of outer retinal integrity with optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yuji; Vasanji, Amit; Ehlers, Justis P

    2016-03-01

    Objective assessment of retinal layer integrity with optical coherence tomography (OCT) is currently limited. The ellipsoid zone (EZ) has been identified as an important feature on OCT that has critical prognostic value in macular disorders. In this report, we describe a novel assessment tool for EZ integrity that provides visual and quantitative assessment across an OCT data set. Using this algorithm, we describe the findings in multiple clinical examples, including normal controls, age-related macular degeneration, drug effects (eg, ocriplasmin, hydroxychloroquine) and effects of surgical manipulation (eg, following membrane peeling using intraoperative OCT). EZ mapping provides both en face visualisation of EZ integrity and EZ-retinal pigment epithelium height. Additionally, volumetric, area and linear measurements are feasible using this assessment tool. PMID:26201354

  4. The Starfish Diagram: Visualising Data Within the Context of Survey Samples

    CERN Document Server

    Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S

    2014-01-01

    As astronomy becomes increasingly invested in large surveys, the ample representation of an individual target becomes a significant challenge. Tabulations of basic properties can convey the message in an absolute sense, but not within the context of the sample from which the individual is drawn. We present a novel but simple plot that simultaneously visualises the properties of the sample and the individual. Numbers and characters are kept at an absolute minimum to enable the stacking of such plots without introducing too much verbal information. Once the user becomes accustomed to their appearance, a set of 'starfish diagrams' provide a direct representation of the individual within a sample, or between various samples. The utility and versatility of the plot is demonstrated through its application to astrophysical data and sports statistics. We provide a brief description of the concept and the source code, which is simple to adapt to any statistical dataset, be it descriptive of physics, demographics, fina...

  5. Visualisering på arkitektkontor, En effektivitetsjämförelse mellan fyra visualiseringsprogram

    OpenAIRE

    Hiltunen, Mattias; Olander, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Idag har det blivit allt vanligare att visualisering tillämpas inom byggsektorn. Det finns en mängd olika program där det kan vara stora skillnader på användarvänlighet samt kvalitet på de bilder programmen producerar. Några av de program som används på många arkitektkontor är Revit, ArchiCad, 3DS Max Design och Lumion. Ett stort problem idag är att för att få bra säljande bilder kostar det ofta mer än vad det är möjligt att ta betalt. Syftet med detta examensarbete är att ta reda på vilka vi...

  6. Visualisation in imaging mass spectrometry using the minimum noise fraction transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone Glenn

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Imaging Mass Spectrometry (IMS provides a means to measure the spatial distribution of biochemical features on the surface of a sectioned tissue sample. IMS datasets are typically huge and visualisation and subsequent analysis can be challenging. Principal component analysis (PCA is one popular data reduction technique that has been used and we propose another; the minimum noise fraction (MNF transform which is popular in remote sensing. Findings The MNF transform is able to extract spatially coherent information from IMS data. The MNF transform is implemented through an R-package which is available together with example data from http://staff.scm.uws.edu.au/∼glenn/∖#Software. Conclusions In our example, the MNF transform was able to find additional images of interest. The extracted information forms a useful basis for subsequent analyses.

  7. Visualisation of Proficiency Test Exercise by Means of Kiri Plots. Informatics Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the visualisation procedure of the proficiency tests by means of Kiri Plots, based on three tests: z-score, zeta-score and the relative uncertainty outlier. The results assessment of the intercomparison exercises and proficiency tests among Spanish environmental radioactivity laboratories and Spanish Nuclear Power Plants Laboratories is performed by Environmental Radioactivity and Radiological Surveillance Unit following the ISO-43 e ISO/ IUPAC standards and applying the z-score test. The application of new graphics methods and tests to a better evaluation of uncertainties reported by Labs is described in this paper. An informatics programme has been developed in Visual Basic for applications that allows the graphic representation of Tables and Figures automatically in an excel-sheet and later statistical simulations changing the ratios between the reference value uncertainties and the concentration activities values from the participants laboratories. (Author) 26 refs.

  8. Visualising the strain distribution in suspended two-dimensional materials under local deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elibol, Kenan; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Hummel, Stefan; Kotakoski, Jani; Argentero, Giacomo; Meyer, Jannik C.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate the use of combined simultaneous atomic force microscopy (AFM) and laterally resolved Raman spectroscopy to study the strain distribution around highly localised deformations in suspended two-dimensional materials. Using the AFM tip as a nanoindentation probe, we induce localised strain in suspended few-layer graphene, which we adopt as a two-dimensional membrane model system. Concurrently, we visualise the strain distribution under and around the AFM tip in situ using hyperspectral Raman mapping via the strain-dependent frequency shifts of the few-layer graphene’s G and 2D Raman bands. Thereby we show how the contact of the nm-sized scanning probe tip results in a two-dimensional strain field with μm dimensions in the suspended membrane. Our combined AFM/Raman approach thus adds to the critically required instrumental toolbox towards nanoscale strain engineering of two-dimensional materials.

  9. Visualisation and measurement of high-speed pulsating and continuous water jets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zeleňák, Michal; Foldyna, Josef; Ščučka, Jiří; Hloch, Sergej; Říha, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 72, August 2015 (2015), s. 1-8. ISSN 0263-2241 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : pulsating water jet * visualisation * shadowgraph technique * PIV * velocity fields Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 1.484, year: 2014 http://ac.els-cdn.com/S0263224115002353/1-s2.0-S0263224115002353-main.pdf?_tid=9dc7546a-038d-11e5-aa7e-00000aacb35f&acdnat=1432634427_ac85457bc49d2f3e26fb280e7d21f687

  10. THE POTENTIAL AND LIMITATIONS OF VISUALISATION AS A METHOD IN LEARNING SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana T. Sidelnikova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the paper is concerned with potential and barriers of application of visualisation as a method in learning social sciences and humanities. Using and employing visual aids becomes the most important resource in modern pedagogical theory and learning process due to the improvement of traditional pedagogical tools and new interpretation of well-known methods. Materials and Methods: the methods of observation, analysis of test results, results of examination session, data of questionnaires were used during the elaboration of the paper. Results: a good visual aid in teaching political science is the smiley as a simplified graphical representation expressing the emotions of a speaker or a writer. Observation, survey and results of examinations indicate that the above visual solutions not only improve students’ knowledge of subjects, but also improve the intellectual activity, contribute to the formation of the methodical approach to learning, associative thinking and creativity. Discussion and Conclusion: visualisation is a sign presentation of the content, functions, structures, stages of a process, a phenomenon through schematisation and associative and illustrative arrays. At the same time it is a way of transforming knowledge into real visual product with the author’s personal touch. Initially, students learn to reflect by drawing the essence of rather abstract concepts such as “parity”, “power” “freedom” etc. Assignments of higher levels involve the use of associative arrays, free images. By doing this, students do not just paint, but on their own initiative work with colours, seek to schematise information, sometimes dressing comments in lyrics.

  11. Visualising the past: potential applications of Geospatial tools to paleoclimate research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, A.; Turney, C. S.

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances in geospatial data acquisition, analysis and web-based data sharing offer new possibilities for understanding and visualising past modes of change. The availability, accessibility and cost-effectiveness of data is better than ever. Researchers can access remotely sensed data including terrain models; use secondary data from large consolidated repositories; make more accurate field measurements and combine data from disparate sources to form a single asset. An increase in the quantity and consistency of data is coupled with subtle yet significant improvements to the way in which geospatial systems manage data interoperability, topological and textual integrity, resulting in more stable analytical and modelling environments. Essentially, researchers now have greater control and more confidence in analytical tools and outputs. Web-based data sharing is growing rapidly, enabling researchers to publish and consume data directly into their spatial systems through OGC-compliant Web Map Services (WMS), Web Feature Services (WFS) and Web Coverage Services (WCS). This has been implemented at institutional, organisational and project scale around the globe. Some institutions have gone one step further and established Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDI) based on Federated Data Structures where the participating data owners retain control over who has access to what. It is important that advances in knowledge are transferred to audiences outside the scientific community in a way that is interesting and meaningful. The visualisation of paleodata through multi-media offers significant opportunities to highlight the parallels and distinctions between past climate dynamics and the challenges of today and tomorrow. Here we present an assessment of key innovations that demonstrate how Geospatial tools can be applied to palaeo-research and used to communicate the results to a diverse array of audiences in the digital age.

  12. Three-dimensional visualisation and articulating instrumentation: Impact on simulated laparoscopic tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bittner James

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopy requires the development of technical skills distinct from those used in open procedures. Several factors extending the learning curve of laparoscopy include ergonomic and technical difficulties, such as the fulcrum effect and limited degrees of freedom. This study aimed to establish the impact of four variables on performance of two simulated laparoscopic tasks. Methods: Six subjects including novice (n=2, intermediate (n=2 and expert surgeons completed two tasks: 1 four running sutures, 2 simple suture followed by surgeon′s knot plus four square knots. Task variables were suturing angle (left/right, needle holder type (standard/articulating and visualisation (2D/3D. Each task with a given set of variables was completed twice in random order. The endpoints included suturing task completion time, average and maximum distance from marks and knot tying task completion time. Results: Suturing task completion time was prolonged by 45-degree right angle suturing, articulating needle holder use and lower skill levels (all P < 0.0001. Accuracy also decreased with articulating needle holder use (both P < 0.0001. 3D vision affected only maximum distance ( P =0.0108. For the knot tying task, completion time was greater with 45-degree right angle suturing ( P =0.0015, articulating needle holder use ( P < 0.0001, 3D vision ( P =0.0014 and novice skill level ( P =0.0003. Participants felt that 3D visualisation offered subjective advantages during training. Conclusions: Results suggest construct validity. A 3D personal head display and articulating needle holder do not immediately improve task completion times or accuracy and may increase the training burden of laparoscopic suturing and knot tying.

  13. Computed 3D visualisation of an extinct cephalopod using computer tomographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukeneder, Alexander

    2012-08-01

    The first 3D visualisation of a heteromorph cephalopod species from the Southern Alps (Dolomites, northern Italy) is presented. Computed tomography, palaeontological data and 3D reconstructions were included in the production of a movie, which shows a life reconstruction of the extinct organism. This detailed reconstruction is according to the current knowledge of the shape and mode of life as well as habitat of this animal. The results are based on the most complete shell known thus far of the genus Dissimilites. Object-based combined analyses from computed tomography and various computed 3D facility programmes help to understand morphological details as well as their ontogentical changes in fossil material. In this study, an additional goal was to show changes in locomotion during different ontogenetic phases of such fossil, marine shell-bearing animals (ammonoids). Hence, the presented models and tools can serve as starting points for discussions on morphology and locomotion of extinct cephalopods in general, and of the genus Dissimilites in particular. The heteromorph ammonoid genus Dissimilites is interpreted here as an active swimmer of the Tethyan Ocean. This study portrays non-destructive methods of 3D visualisation applied on palaeontological material, starting with computed tomography resulting in animated, high-quality video clips. The here presented 3D geometrical models and animation, which are based on palaeontological material, demonstrate the wide range of applications, analytical techniques and also outline possible limitations of 3D models in earth sciences and palaeontology. The realistic 3D models and motion pictures can easily be shared amongst palaeontologists. Data, images and short clips can be discussed online and, if necessary, adapted in morphological details and motion-style to better represent the cephalopod animal. PMID:24850976

  14. The condition of hemato and liquor-encephalic barriers of the human brain in acute blood loss on the background of alcoholemia and drug intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Indiaminov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available By means of the histological methods, scanning and transmission electronic microscopy the cerebral cortex of the brain (field 6, the walls of III and IV ventricles of the brain of dead people, who had died of acute anemia on the background of alcohol intoxication and drug intoxication, have been studied. Examination has found thinning of the basal membrane of capillaries, development of fissures in the places of contact of neighboring endothelial cells, also between basal membrane and endothelial cells, and swelling of pericytes. In the wall of brain ventricles, a marked polymorphism of the ependymal cells and disturbance of the continuity of the layer are noted. Accumulation of blood cells, thickening of detritus, crystal structures are seen on ependymal surface. Reported symptoms reflect the disturbance of permeability of hematoencephalic and liquor-encephalic barriers of the brain with a combination of traumatic blood loss with alcohol and drug intoxication.

  15. Insulin Like Growth Factor 2 Expression in the Rat Brain Both in Basal Condition and following Learning Predominantly Derives from the Maternal Allele

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaojing Ye; Amy Kohtz; Gabriella Pollonini; Andrea Riccio; Alberini, Cristina M

    2015-01-01

    Insulin like growth factor 2 (Igf2) is known as a maternally imprinted gene involved in growth and development. Recently, Igf2 was found to also be regulated and required in the adult rat hippocampus for long-term memory formation, raising the question of its allelic regulation in adult brain regions following experience and in cognitive processes. We show that, in adult rats, Igf2 is abundantly expressed in brain regions involved in cognitive functions, like hippocampus and prefrontal cortex...

  16. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, or ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are metastatic, ...

  17. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain How different parts of the brain communicate and work with each other How changes in the brain ...

  18. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  19. Brain Fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ravi kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain Fingerprinting is a scientific technique to determine whether or not specific information is stored in an individual's brain by measuring a electrical brain wave response to Word, phrases, or picture that are presented on computer screen. Brain Fingerprinting is a controversial forensic science technique that uses electroencephalograph y (EEG to determine whether specific information is stored in a subject's brain

  20. 3D digitalizacija in vizualizacija situle z Vač: 3D digitisation and visualisation of the Vače situla:

    OpenAIRE

    Vidmar, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    The project of 3D digitisation and visualisation of the Vače situla was implemented at the beginning of 2011 in cooperation with the National Museum of Slovenia where the situla is kept and the company MFC.2 which, among other services, develops and implements 3D digitisation and visualisation projects. The purpose of the project was to digitise and visualise a famous and precious piece of cultural heritage and to 1. show what modern 3D shape and texture scanning technologies allow us to do, ...

  1. The multilingual brain

    OpenAIRE

    Engel de Abreu, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    The multilingual brain. Is a multilingual education beneficial for children? What are the optimal conditions under which a child can become perfectly multilingual? The given lecture will focus on the "cognitive advantages" of multilingualism and illustrate the impact that being multilingual has on the cognitive organisation of the brain. Practical questions regarding multilingual education will also be discussed.

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the ... distant nerve cells (via axons) to form brain circuits. These circuits control specific body functions such as ...

  3. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies ...

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... others live with symptoms of mental illness every day. They can be moderate, or serious and cause ...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain ... specialized for the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes ...

  7. Brain Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ... grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do ...

  9. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain How different parts of ...

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... understanding of the brain than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures ...

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

  12. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  13. Brain mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Blaž Koritnik

    2004-01-01

    Cartography of the brain ("brain mapping") aims to represent the complexities of the working brain in an understandable and usable way. There are four crucial steps in brain mapping: (1) acquiring data about brain structure and function, (2) transformation of data into a common reference, (3) visualization and interpretation of results, and (4) databasing and archiving. Electrophysiological and functional imaging methods provide information about function of the human brain. A prere...

  14. Spatial Thinking and Visualisation of Real-World Concepts using GeoMapApp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwillie, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Commonly, geoscience data is presented to students in the lab and classroom in the form of data tables, maps and graphs. Successful data interpretation requires learners to become proficient with spatial thinking skills, allowing them to gain insight and understanding of the underlying real-world 3-D processes and concepts. Yet, educators at both the school and university level often witness students having difficulty in performing that translation. As a result, tools and resources that help to bridge that spatial capability gap can have useful application in the educational realm. A free, map-based data discovery and visualisation tool developed with NSF funding at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory caters to students and teachers alike by providing a variety of data display and manipulation techniques that enhance geospatial awareness. Called GeoMapApp (http://www.geomapapp.org), the tool provides access to hundreds of built-in authentic geoscience data sets. Examples include earthquake and volcano data, geological maps, lithospheric plate boundary information, geochemical, oceanographic, and environmental data. Barriers to entry are lowered through easy installation, seamless integration of research-grade data sets, intuitive menus, and project-saving continuity. The default base map is a cutting-edge elevation model covering the oceans and land. Dynamic contouring, artificial illumination, 3-D visualisations, data point manipulations, cross-sectional profiles, and other display techniques help students grasp the content and geospatial context of data. Data sets can also be layered for easier comparison. Students may import their own data sets in Excel, ASCII, shapefile, and gridded format, and they can gain a sense of ownership by being able to tailor their data explorations and save their own projects. GeoMapApp is adaptable to a range of learning environments from lab sessions, group projects, and homework assignments to in-class pop-ups. A new Save Session

  15. Visualisation of variable binding pockets on protein surfaces by probabilistic analysis of related structure sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashford Paul

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein structures provide a valuable resource for rational drug design. For a protein with no known ligand, computational tools can predict surface pockets that are of suitable size and shape to accommodate a complementary small-molecule drug. However, pocket prediction against single static structures may miss features of pockets that arise from proteins' dynamic behaviour. In particular, ligand-binding conformations can be observed as transiently populated states of the apo protein, so it is possible to gain insight into ligand-bound forms by considering conformational variation in apo proteins. This variation can be explored by considering sets of related structures: computationally generated conformers, solution NMR ensembles, multiple crystal structures, homologues or homology models. It is non-trivial to compare pockets, either from different programs or across sets of structures. For a single structure, difficulties arise in defining particular pocket's boundaries. For a set of conformationally distinct structures the challenge is how to make reasonable comparisons between them given that a perfect structural alignment is not possible. Results We have developed a computational method, Provar, that provides a consistent representation of predicted binding pockets across sets of related protein structures. The outputs are probabilities that each atom or residue of the protein borders a predicted pocket. These probabilities can be readily visualised on a protein using existing molecular graphics software. We show how Provar simplifies comparison of the outputs of different pocket prediction algorithms, of pockets across multiple simulated conformations and between homologous structures. We demonstrate the benefits of use of multiple structures for protein-ligand and protein-protein interface analysis on a set of complexes and consider three case studies in detail: i analysis of a kinase superfamily highlights the

  16. Efficient visibility-driven medical image visualisation via adaptive binned visibility histogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Younhyun; Kim, Jinman; Kumar, Ashnil; Feng, David Dagan; Fulham, Michael

    2016-07-01

    'Visibility' is a fundamental optical property that represents the observable, by users, proportion of the voxels in a volume during interactive volume rendering. The manipulation of this 'visibility' improves the volume rendering processes; for instance by ensuring the visibility of regions of interest (ROIs) or by guiding the identification of an optimal rendering view-point. The construction of visibility histograms (VHs), which represent the distribution of all the visibility of all voxels in the rendered volume, enables users to explore the volume with real-time feedback about occlusion patterns among spatially related structures during volume rendering manipulations. Volume rendered medical images have been a primary beneficiary of VH given the need to ensure that specific ROIs are visible relative to the surrounding structures, e.g. the visualisation of tumours that may otherwise be occluded by neighbouring structures. VH construction and its subsequent manipulations, however, are computationally expensive due to the histogram binning of the visibilities. This limits the real-time application of VH to medical images that have large intensity ranges and volume dimensions and require a large number of histogram bins. In this study, we introduce an efficient adaptive binned visibility histogram (AB-VH) in which a smaller number of histogram bins are used to represent the visibility distribution of the full VH. We adaptively bin medical images by using a cluster analysis algorithm that groups the voxels according to their intensity similarities into a smaller subset of bins while preserving the distribution of the intensity range of the original images. We increase efficiency by exploiting the parallel computation and multiple render targets (MRT) extension of the modern graphical processing units (GPUs) and this enables efficient computation of the histogram. We show the application of our method to single-modality computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance

  17. Fluorescent in situ RT-PCR to visualise the expression of a phosphate transporter gene from an ectomycorrhizal fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aarle, Ingrid M; Viennois, Gaëlle; Amenc, Laurie K; Tatry, Marie-Violaine; Luu, Doan T; Plassard, Claude

    2007-09-01

    Expression of a mycorrhizal fungal-specific phosphate (P) transporter gene (HcPT1) was studied in mycelium of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Hebeloma cylindrosporum, by in situ reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction using amplification of complementary DNA sequences. The expression of HcPT1 was visualised under two different P treatments. Mycelium was transferred to liquid medium with or without P and incubated for 5 days. Under P starvation, mycelium growth and vitality was reduced and the expression of HcPT1 up regulated. Enzyme-labelled fluorescent substrate was used to detect gene expression in situ with epi-fluorescence microscopy and to visualise it at the level of the individual hyphae both in starved and non-starved hyphae. Up-regulation of HcPT1 was observed as a more intense fluorescent signal and from the larger proportion of hyphae that showed expression. PMID:17520293

  18. Web-based visualisation and analysis of 3D electron-microscopy data from EMDB and PDB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerstedt, Ingvar; Moore, William J; Patwardhan, Ardan; Sanz-García, Eduardo; Best, Christoph; Swedlow, Jason R; Kleywegt, Gerard J

    2013-11-01

    The Protein Data Bank in Europe (PDBe) has developed web-based tools for the visualisation and analysis of 3D electron microscopy (3DEM) structures in the Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) and Protein Data Bank (PDB). The tools include: (1) a volume viewer for 3D visualisation of maps, tomograms and models, (2) a slice viewer for inspecting 2D slices of tomographic reconstructions, and (3) visual analysis pages to facilitate analysis and validation of maps, tomograms and models. These tools were designed to help non-experts and experts alike to get some insight into the content and assess the quality of 3DEM structures in EMDB and PDB without the need to install specialised software or to download large amounts of data from these archives. The technical challenges encountered in developing these tools, as well as the more general considerations when making archived data available to the user community through a web interface, are discussed. PMID:24113529

  19. Non-overlapping, Time-coherent Visualisation of Action Commands in the AscoGraph Interactive Music User Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Burloiu, Grigore; Cont, Arshia

    2015-01-01

    International audience Integrated authoring and performing of mixed music scores, where musicians interact dynamically with computer controlled electronics, is enabled by the Antescofo state-of-the-art software package. Composers are able to plan computerised actions through a dedicated programming language, and performances are then synchronised in real time. AscoGraph is the dedicated graphical interface that allows users to configure Antescofo behaviours and vi-sualise their layout over...

  20. Visualisation of microtubules and actin filaments in fixed BY-2 suspension cells using an optimised whole mount immunolabelling protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Szechynska-Hebda, M.; Wedzony, M.; Dubas, E.; Kieft, H; Lammeren, van, ACAP Andre

    2006-01-01

    Excellent visualisation of microtubules and actin filaments was obtained in fixed tobacco BY-2 suspension cells after optimising a protocol for whole mount immunolabelling. The procedure is based on modification of fixation, cell wall digestion, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) treatment, post fixation, and blocking. The most critical aspects of successful preservation and visualization of cytoskeletal elements appeared to be: a two-step fixation with paraformaldehyde and glutaraldehyde before enzym...

  1. A collaborative approach for incorporating forensic case data into crime investigation using criminal intelligence analysis and visualisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossy, Quentin; Ribaux, Olivier

    2014-03-01

    There is an increasing awareness that the articulation of forensic science and criminal investigation is critical to the resolution of crimes. However, models and methods to support an effective collaboration between the partners are still poorly expressed or even lacking. Three propositions are borrowed from crime intelligence methods in order to bridge this gap: (a) the general intelligence process, (b) the analyses of investigative problems along principal perspectives: entities and their relationships, time and space, quantitative aspects and (c) visualisation methods as a mode of expression of a problem in these dimensions. Indeed, in a collaborative framework, different kinds of visualisations integrating forensic case data can play a central role for supporting decisions. Among them, link-charts are scrutinised for their abilities to structure and ease the analysis of a case by describing how relevant entities are connected. However, designing an informative chart that does not bias the reasoning process is not straightforward. Using visualisation as a catalyser for a collaborative approach integrating forensic data thus calls for better specifications. PMID:24630325

  2. Automation strategies in five domains - A comparison of levels of automation, function allocation and visualisation of automatic functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, J. (Chalmers Univ. of Technology. Division Design and Human factors. Dept. of Product and Production Development, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2011-01-15

    This study was conducted as a field study where control room operators and engineers from the refinery, heat and power, aviation, shipping and nuclear domain were interviewed regarding use of automation and the visualisation of automatic functions. The purpose of the study was to collect experiences and best practices from the five studied domains on levels of automation, function allocation and visualisation of automatic functions. In total, nine different control room settings were visited. The studied settings were compared using a systemic approach based on a human-machine systems model. The results show that the 'left over principle' is still the most common applied approach for function allocation but in high risk settings the decision whether to automate or not is more carefully considered. Regarding the visualisation of automatic functions, it was found that as long as each display type (process based, functional oriented, situation oriented and task based) are applied so that they correspond to the same level of abstraction as the technical system the operator's mental model will be supported. No single display type can however readily match all levels of abstraction at the same time - all display types are still needed and serve different purposes. (Author)

  3. Three-dimensional visualisation of developmental stages of an apicomplexan fish blood parasite in its invertebrate host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayes Polly M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although widely used in medicine, the application of three-dimensional (3D imaging to parasitology appears limited to date. In this study, developmental stages of a marine fish haemogregarine, Haemogregarina curvata (Apicomplexa: Adeleorina, were investigated in their leech vector, Zeylanicobdella arugamensis; this involved 3D visualisation of brightfield and confocal microscopy images of histological sections through infected leech salivary gland cells. Findings 3D assessment demonstrated the morphology of the haemogregarine stages, their spatial layout, and their relationship with enlarged host cells showing reduced cellular content. Haemogregarine meronts, located marginally within leech salivary gland cells, had small tail-like connections to the host cell limiting membrane; this parasite-host cell interface was not visible in two-dimensional (2D light micrographs and no records of a similar connection in apicomplexan development have been traced. Conclusions This is likely the first account of the use of 3D visualisation to study developmental stages of an apicomplexan parasite in its invertebrate vector. Elucidation of the extent of development of the haemogregarine within the leech salivary cells, together with the unusual connections between meronts and the host cell membrane, illustrates the future potential of 3D visualisation in parasite-vector biology.

  4. Automation strategies in five domains - A comparison of levels of automation, function allocation and visualisation of automatic functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted as a field study where control room operators and engineers from the refinery, heat and power, aviation, shipping and nuclear domain were interviewed regarding use of automation and the visualisation of automatic functions. The purpose of the study was to collect experiences and best practices from the five studied domains on levels of automation, function allocation and visualisation of automatic functions. In total, nine different control room settings were visited. The studied settings were compared using a systemic approach based on a human-machine systems model. The results show that the 'left over principle' is still the most common applied approach for function allocation but in high risk settings the decision whether to automate or not is more carefully considered. Regarding the visualisation of automatic functions, it was found that as long as each display type (process based, functional oriented, situation oriented and task based) are applied so that they correspond to the same level of abstraction as the technical system the operators mental model will be supported. No single display type can however readily match all levels of abstraction at the same time - all display types are still needed and serve different purposes. (Author)

  5. Investigation of feline brain anatomy for the detection of cortical spreading depression with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J M; James, M F; Bockhorst, K H; Smith, M I; Bradley, D P; Papadakis, N G; Carpenter, T A; Parsons, A A; Leslie, R A; Hall, L D; Huang, C L

    2001-05-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) and peri-infarct depolarisation (PID) are related phenomena that have been associated with the human clinical syndromes of migraine (CSD), head injury and stroke (PID). Nevertheless the existence of CSD in man remains controversial, despite the detection of this phenomenon in the brains of most, if not all, other animal species investigated. This failure to unambiguously detect CSD clinically may be at least partly due to the anatomically complex, gyrencephalic structure of the human brain. This study was designed to establish conditions for the study of CSD in the brain of a gyrencephalic species using the noninvasive technique of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The 3-dimensional (3D) gyrencephalic anatomy of the cat brain was examined to determine the imaging conditions necessary to detect CSD events. Orthogonal transverse, sagittal and horizontal T1-weighted image slices showed that the marginal and suprasylvian gyri were the most appropriate cortical structures to study CSD. This was in view of (1) their simple geometry: (2) their lengthy extent of grey matter orientated rostrocaudally in the cortex: (3) their separation by a sulcus across which CSD spread could be studied and (4) the discontinuity in the grey matter in these regions between the right and left hemispheres dorsal to the corpus callosum. The structure suggested by the T1-weighted images was corroborated by systematic diffusion tensor imaging to map the fractional anisotropy and diffusion trace. Thus a single horizontal image plane could visualise the neighbouring suprasylvian and marginal gyri of both cerebral hemispheres, whereas its complex shape and position ruled out the ectosylvian gyrus for CSD studies. With the horizontal imaging plane, CSD events were reproducibly detected by animating successive diffusion-weighted MR images following local KCl stimulation of the cortical surface. In single image frames, CSD detection and characterisation required

  6. Visualisation of morphological interaction of diamond and silver nanoparticles with Salmonella Enteritidis and Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawosz, Ewa; Chwalibog, André; Mitura, Katarzyna; Mitura, Stanisław; Szeliga, Jacek; Niemiec, Tomasz; Rupiewicz, Marlena; Grodzik, Marta; Sokołowska, Aleksandra

    2011-09-01

    Currently, medicine intensively searches for methods to transport drugs to a target (sick) point within the body. The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate morphological characteristics of the assembles of silver or diamond nanoparticles with Salmonella Enteritidis (G-) or Listeria monocytogenes (G+), to reveal possibilities of constructing nanoparticle-bacteria vehicles. Diamond nanoparticles (nano-D) were produced by the detonation method. Hydrocolloids of silver nanoparticles (nano-Ag) were produced by electric non-explosive patented method. Hydrocolloids of nanoparticles (200 microl) were added to bacteria suspension (200 microl) in the following order: nano-D + Salmonella E.; nano-D + Listeria monocytogenes; nano-Ag + Salmonella E; nano-Ag + Listeria monocytogenes. Samples were inspected by transmission electron microscopy. Visualisation of nanoparticles and bacteria interaction showed harmful effects of both nanoparticles on bacteria morphology. The most spectacular effect of nano-D were strong links between nano-D packages and the flagella of Salmonella E. Nano-Ag were closely attached to Listeria monocytogenes but not to Salmonella E. There was no evidence of entering nano-Ag inside Listeria monocytogenes but smaller particles were placed inside Salmonella E. The ability of nano-D to attach to the flagella and the ability of nano-Ag to penetrate inside bacteria cells can be utilized to design nano-bacteria vehicles, being carriers for active substances attached to nanoparticles. PMID:22097468

  7. Direct visualisation of gaze and hypometric saccades in cerebellar patients during visually guided stepping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marple-Horvat, D E; Crowdy, K A

    2005-01-01

    Four patients suffering from primary cerebellar degeneration and healthy matched controls undertook a test of functional mobility that demanded precise foot placement at each step. Vertical and horizontal eye movements were measured (using a head mounted eye tracking system) together with footfall patterns. Healthy subjects stepped accurately onto all targets and produced a clear pattern of saccadic eye movements, fixating each target in the sequence just prior to footlift. Still video frames, showing direction of gaze while walking, provide direct visual confirmation that these saccades serve to transfer gaze between successive targets in the walkway sequence. The planning of the saccade to the next target probably provides the locomotor control system with information useful for planning the corresponding (and shortly following) step. Cerebellar patients showed characteristic locomotor and oculomotor deficits. Dysmetric saccades to fixate footfall targets were seen in 39% of steps. Analysis confirms that these multi-saccadic eye movements include an initial hypometric saccade, which undershoots the target, followed by one or more additional saccades in the same direction. Direct visualisation of gaze at the end of a saccadic sequence confirms that these additional saccades are indeed corrective resulting in a foveal image of the footfall target. PMID:15536032

  8. Tobacco Control: Visualisation of Research Activity Using Density-Equalizing Mapping and Scientometric Benchmarking Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrix Groneberg-Kloft

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tobacco smoking continues to be a major preventable cause of death and disease and therefore tobacco control research is extremely important. However, research in this area is often hampered by a lack in funding and there is a need for scientometric techniques to display research efforts. Methods: The present study combines classical bibliometric tools with novel scientometric and visualizing techniques in order to analyse and categorise research in the field of tobacco control. Results: All studies related to tobacco control and listed in the ISI database since 1900 were identified by the use of defined search terms.Using bibliometric approaches, a continuous increase in qualitative markers such as collaboration numbers or citations were found for tobacco control research. The combination with density equalizing mapping revealed a distinct global pattern of research productivity and citation activity. Radar chart techniques were used to visualize bi- and multilateral research cooperation and institutional cooperation. Conclusions: The present study supplies a first scientometricapproach that visualises research activity in the field of tobacco control. It provides data that can be used for funding policy and the identification of research clusters.

  9. Visualisation of the interaction between Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and oil shale by atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milić Jelena S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study visually documents the mechanical contact and interaction between the bacterial cells of two biogeocenotically different strains of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (At. ferrooxidans and oil shale containing pyrite. Atomic force microscopy (AFM imaging was used to visualise initial interaction between the microorganisms and the surface minerals of an oil shale and to evaluate bacterial effects in the first hours of the bioleaching process. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was attached to the shale surface already after 2 h, and after 48 h, numerous cells covered the surface with a biofilm. After 5 day incubation with At. ferrooxidans, AFM imaging revealed ellipsoid etched pits that represent footprints left by detached cells. Combining AFM surface imaging and leaching analysis following bacterial colonisation of oil shale layers demonstrates that an initial attachment to the surface is necessary for the leaching and that later on, once a sufficient concentration of Fe2+ ions in the solution is achieved, cells detach to become free cells, and leaching occurs primarily by the Fe3+. This experiment confirmed that microorganisms isolated from sites in which a particular substrate is found will demonstrate stronger binding to that substrate.

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Visualisation of Coastal Flows in Tidal Channels Supporting Ocean Energy Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enayatollah Zangiabadi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Flow characteristics in coastal regions are strongly influenced by the topography of the seabed and understanding the fluid dynamics is necessary before installation of tidal stream turbines (TST. In this paper, the bathymetry of a potential TST deployment site is used in the development of the a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics model. The steady state k-ϵ and transient Large Eddy Simulation (LES turbulence methods are employed and compared. The simulations are conducted with a fixed representation of the ocean surface, i.e., a rigid lid representation. In the vicinity of Horse Rock a study of the pressure difference shows that the small change in height of the water column is negligible, providing confidence in the simulation results. The stream surface method employed to visualise the results has important inherent characteristics that can enhance the visual perception of complex flow structures. The results of all cases are compared with the flow data transect gathered by an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP. It has been understood that the k-ϵ method can predict the flow pattern relatively well near the main features of the domain and the LES model has the ability to simulate some important flow patterns caused by the bathymetry.

  11. MIDAS: software for analysis and visualisation of interallelic disequilibrium between multiallelic markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Day Ian NM

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various software tools are available for the display of pairwise linkage disequilibrium across multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms. The HapMap project also presents these graphics within their website. However, these approaches are limited in their use of data from multiallelic markers and provide limited information in a graphical form. Results We have developed a software package (MIDAS – Multiallelic Interallelic Disequilibrium Analysis Software for the estimation and graphical display of interallelic linkage disequilibrium. Linkage disequilibrium is analysed for each allelic combination (of one allele from each of two loci, between all pairwise combinations of any type of multiallelic loci in a contig (or any set of many loci (including single nucleotide polymorphisms, microsatellites, minisatellites and haplotypes. Data are presented graphically in a novel and informative way, and can also be exported in tabular form for other analyses. This approach facilitates visualisation of patterns of linkage disequilibrium across genomic regions, analysis of the relationships between different alleles of multiallelic markers and inferences about patterns of evolution and selection. Conclusion MIDAS is a linkage disequilibrium analysis program with a comprehensive graphical user interface providing novel views of patterns of linkage disequilibrium between all types of multiallelic and biallelic markers. Availability Available from http://www.genes.org.uk/software/midas and http://www.sgel.humgen.soton.ac.uk/midas

  12. Visualisation of lymphatic flow in a rabbit model using six 99Tcm- blue dyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Lymphoscintigraphy and the blue dye technique are currently used to identify the sentinel node and in lymphadenectomy. The radiopharmaceutical colloid used is injected more than two hours prior to surgery, and blue dye is injected at the time of the operation. The aims of this study were to prepare six 99Tcm-labelled blue dyes as single injections, and examine their usefulness in visualising lymphatic flow in a rabbit model as compared to 99Tcm-antimony sulphide colloid. Three dextran dyes, Cibacron Blue 3GA-dextran, Dextran Blue and Blue Dextran, were each successfully radiolabelled with 99Tcm, as were the naphthol-azo dyes Evans Blue, Trypan Blue and Chicago Sky Blue 6B. The migrating properties of these new 99Tcm-blue dyes were investigated, and although some popliteal lymph node uptake was seen after 40 minutes in the rabbit model, nodal uptake and retention were less than 99Tcm-antimony sulphide colloid. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  13. Three-Dimensional Visualisation as an Innovation Approach to Forecasting the City Budget Income

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markuts Yuliya I.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Forecasting city budget income is a very important instrument of the budget management through which it is possible to assume the future financial influence of the current budget policy and economic tendencies for achievement of long-term plans and identify alternative ways of solution of existing problems. The goal of the article is development of a model for complex system analysis, economic assessment of execution and forecasting income of the budget of the city of Donetsk with the aim to make high quality, timely and efficient managerial decisions with respect to the budget on the basis of an innovation approach, which is a combination of methods of interpolation, imitation and three-dimensional visualisation. The result of the study is diagnostics of narrow places in execution of the city budget for the studied period of 2008 – 2012, detection of interconnected budget income items, identification of existing tendencies of execution of the budget income and forecasting the income part of the city budget for the period of 2013 – 2017.

  14. MyChemise: A 2D drawing program that uses morphing for visualisation purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelm Jörg-Hubertus

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract MyChemise (My Chemical Structure Editor is a new 2D structure editor. It is designed as a Java applet that enables the direct creation of structures in the Internet using a web browser. MyChemise saves files in a digital format (.cse and the import and export of .mol files using the appropriate connection tables is also possible. MyChemise is available as a free online version in English and German. The MyChemise GUI is designed to be user friendly and can be used intuitively. There is also an English and German program description available as a PDF file. In addition to the known ways of drawing chemical structure formulas, there are also parts implemented in the program that allow the creation of different types of presentation. The morphing module uses this technology as a component for dynamic visualisation. For example, it enables a clear and simple illustration of molecule vibrations and reaction sequences.

  15. Intracoronary imaging using attenuation-compensated optical coherence tomography allows better visualisation of coronary artery diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foin, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.foin@gmail.com [International Centre for Circulatory Health, Imperial College London, W2 1LA London (United Kingdom); Mari, Jean Martial [University College London, London (United Kingdom); Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Sen, Sayan; Petraco, Ricardo [International Centre for Circulatory Health, Imperial College London, W2 1LA London (United Kingdom); Ghione, Matteo; Di Mario, Carlo [Biomedical Research Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Davies, Justin E. [International Centre for Circulatory Health, Imperial College London, W2 1LA London (United Kingdom); Girard, Michaël J.A. [Department of Bioengineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Singapore Eye Research Institute (Singapore)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: To allow an accurate diagnosis of coronary artery diseases by enhancing optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of atheromatous plaques using a novel automated attenuation compensation technique. Background: One of the major drawbacks of coronary OCT imaging is the rapid attenuation of the OCT signal, limiting penetration in tissue to only few millimetres. Visualisation of deeper anatomy is however critical for accurate assessment of plaque burden in-vivo. Methods: A compensation algorithm, previously developed to correct for light attenuation in soft tissues and to enhance contrast in ophthalmic OCT images, was applied to intracoronary plaque imaging using spectral-domain OCT. Results: Application of the compensation algorithm significantly increased tissue contrast in the vessel wall and atherosclerotic plaque boundaries. Contrast enhancement allows a better differentiation of plaque morphology, which is particularly important for the identification of lipid rich fibro atheromatous plaques and to guide decision on treatment strategy. Conclusion: The analysis of arterial vessel structure clinically captured with OCT is improved when used in conjunction with automated attenuation compensation. This approach may improve the OCT-based interpretation of coronary plaque morphology in clinical practice.

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. ... rise to disabilities or diseases. neural circuit —A network of neurons ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists a more detailed understanding of the brain than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ...

  20. Brain mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaž Koritnik

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Cartography of the brain ("brain mapping" aims to represent the complexities of the working brain in an understandable and usable way. There are four crucial steps in brain mapping: (1 acquiring data about brain structure and function, (2 transformation of data into a common reference, (3 visualization and interpretation of results, and (4 databasing and archiving. Electrophysiological and functional imaging methods provide information about function of the human brain. A prerequisite for multisubject, multidimensional and multimodal mapping is transformation of individual images to match a standard brain template. To produce brain maps, color, contours, and other visual cues are used to differentiate metabolic rates, electrical field potentials, receptor densities, and other attributes of structure or function. Databases are used to organize and archive data records. By relating the maps to cognitive functions and psychological models, brain mapping offers a prerequisite for the understanding of organizational principles of the human brain.

  1. Introduction to use of virtual reality visualisations in the exploitation and virtual testing of machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Foit

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Purpose of this paper: Due to quick evolution of virtual reality systems, this technology is more often used in processes of prototype’s design. On the other hand it could be also effective in others applications like virtual manuals, help systems, catalogues, education, visualisation, testing and virtual prototyping. The aim of this paper is to show some properties of the selected virtual reality systems, which could be used in the exploitation and virtual tests of machines.Design/methodology/approach: All software tests have been provided on Windows platform using selected ActiveX plugins for browsers.Findings: Creation of presentations, virtual manuals or catalogues is not a difficult task. It can be done using widely available software. However, virtual prototyping and testing are harder to manage and requires more knowledge about computer simulation. EON/EonX and Cortona software are rather presentation than simulation tools, but there is still possibility to create interaction with other application or external hardware.Research limitations/implications: In described tests only selected software have been used. All results and conclusions are related to EON/EonX and Cortona applications.Practical implications: The use of ActiveX technology gives a possibility to use a ActiveX control in almost any modern Windows application that supports it. Windows platform is also often used in handheld devices and industrial applications, so it is possible to create a virtual manual or a presentation, which could be displayed directly on machine interface.Originality/value: VR technology is worldwide used in many areas. EON software creates new possibilities in the field of virtual reality by handling special interfaces and display features. In the paper it is shown that the software can be used for more conventional purposes, like creation of virtual manuals or interactive 3D presentation

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions of cells in the body, the results can affect many ... unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of conducting ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells ... A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Trials — Participants Statistics Help for Mental Illnesses Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) . Glutamate —the ... mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain Regions Just as many neurons ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... medical professionals who can diagnose mental disorders are psychologists or clinical social workers. The psychiatrist asked Sarah ... important research tool in understanding how the brain functions. Another type of brain scan called magnetoencephalography, or ...

  8. Brain Basics

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  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... and epigenetic changes can be passed on to future generations. Further understanding of genes and epigenetics may ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  10. Brain Basics

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  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play a role in ... obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain Regions Just as many neurons working together form a ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... medications could reduce the amount of trial and error and frustration that many people with depression experience ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How ... cell, and responds to signals from the environment; this all helps the cell maintain its balance with ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... However, recent research points to a possible new class of antidepressants that can relieve symptoms of the ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ... depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies Advanced technologies are also making it faster, easier, and more ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... have been linked to many mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain ... studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... body, the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

  19. Brain Diseases

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    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of ... nerve cells (via axons) to form brain circuits. These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... mainly involved in controlling movement and aiding the flow of information to the front of the brain, ... the neuron will fire. This enhances the electrical flow among brain cells required for normal function and ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's early 20s. Knowing how the brain is wired ... in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability to move as they want to, resulting ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of brain scan called magnetoencephalography, or MEG, can capture split-second changes in the brain. Using MEG, ... The study of how environmental factors like diet, stress and post-natal care can change gene expression ( ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... neurons, the most highly specialized cells of all, conduct messages. Every cell in our bodies contains a ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... can be related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the ... healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of Science ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the ... inside contents of the cell from its surrounding environment and controls what enters and leaves the cell, ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, and ongoing research that helps us better understand and treat disorders. Mental disorders are common. You may have a ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain How different parts of the ... for the cell to work properly including small structures called cell organelles. Dendrites branch off from the ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... may help improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex ( ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

  14. BRAIN CANCER IMMUNOTHERAPY (REVIEW)

    OpenAIRE

    Yashin К.S.; Medyanik I.А.

    2014-01-01

    The review analyzes Russian and foreign reports concerned with a rapidly developing brain cancer treatment technique — immunotherapy. There has been presented a current view on the basic concept of antitumor immunity, on the problem of immune system interaction with a tumor in general and under the conditions of an immunologically privileged nervous system, shown the theoretical background of efficiency of immunotherapy used against brain cancer (the capability of tumor antigens and activated...

  15. The multilingual brain

    OpenAIRE

    Engel de Abreu, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    The multilingual brain. Is a multilingual education beneficial for children? What are the optimal conditions under which a child can become perfectly multilingual? The given lecture will focus on the "cognitive advantages" of multilingualism and illustrate the impact that being multilingual has on the cognitive organisation of the brain. Practical questions regarding multilingual education will also be discussed. Ass et gutt e Kand méisproocheg ze erzéien? Wat sinn déi optimal Konditio...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah ... having trouble coping with the stresses in her life. She began to think of suicide because she ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman ... new memories. hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis —A brain-body ... stress. impulse —An electrical communication signal sent between neurons ...

  18. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... other cells guide neurons in forming various brain structures. Neighboring neurons make connections with each other and with distant nerve cells (via axons) to form brain circuits. These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues ...

  20. Left Brain. Right Brain. Whole Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    2004-01-01

    As the United States student population is becoming more diverse, library media specialists need to find ways to address these distinctive needs. However, some of these differences transcend culture, touching on variations in the brain itself. Most people have a dominant side of the brain, which can affect their personality and learning style.…

  1. Exercise pre‑conditioning alleviates brain damage via excitatory amino acid transporter 2 and extracellular signal‑regulated kinase 1/2 following ischemic stroke in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Min; Feng, Rui; Li, Wen-Bin; Ren, Shi-Qing; Zhang, Feng

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have reported that physical exercise may exert a neuroprotective effect in humans as well as animals. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effect of exercise has remained to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to explore the possible signaling pathways involved in the protective effect of pre‑ischemic treadmill training for ischemic stroke in rats. A total of 36 male Sprague‑Dawley rats were divided at random into three groups as follows (n=12 for each): Sham surgery group; middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) group; and exercise with MCAO group. Following treadmill training for three weeks, the middle cerebral artery was occluded for 90 min in order to induce ischemic stroke, followed by reperfusion. Following 24 h post‑reperfusion, six rats from each group were assessed for neurological deficits and then sacrificed to calculate the infarct volume. The remaining rats (n=6 for each group) were sacrificed and the expression levels of excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT‑2) and extracellular signal‑regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) were detected using western blot analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that rats that underwent pre‑ischemic exercise intervention had a significantly decreased brain infarct volume and neurological deficits; in addition, the pre‑ischemic exercise group showed decreased overexpression of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and increased expression of EAAT‑2 following ischemic stroke. In conclusion, treadmill training exercise prior to ischemic stroke alleviated brain damage in rats via regulation of EAAT‑2 and ERK1/2. PMID:25370789

  2. Exteriör och interiör visualisering av ett bostadshus i 3ds max

    OpenAIRE

    Ekman, Viktor; Moen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Denna rapport beskriver och drar jämförelser mellan olika visualiseringstekniker i 3D Studio Max och Adobe Photoshop CS3. Syftet med studien är att undersöka olika visualiserings- och renderingstekniker för att se vilka tekniker som ger ett smidigast och mest verklighetstroget resultat utifrån olika förutsättningar. Studien grundar sig på en huvudfråga och två stycken underfrågor. Hur skapar man ett effektivt och verklighetstroget visualiseringsresultat av ett bostadskvarter för intressenter?...

  3. Optical vortex tracking studies of a horizontal axis wind turbine in yaw using laser-sheet, flow visualisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, I.; Parkin, P.; Wang, X.

    Experimental studies have been conducted on a 0.9 m diameter, horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) placed in the open jet of a closed return wind tunnel. The turbine was tested in a three blade and a two blade configuration. The power coefficient of the turbine was measured and wake flow studies conducted for a range of yawed flows by tilting the rotor plane at various angles up to 30° to the incident wind direction. The motion of the shed vorticity was followed using laser-sheet flow visualisation with the overall wake deflection being measured. The results were compared with theoretical predictions and with studies conducted elsewhere.

  4. Resting state brain activity and functional brain mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Xiaohu; Wang Peijun; Tang Xiaowei

    2007-01-01

    Functional brain imaging studies commonly use either resting or passive task states as their control conditions, and typically identify the activation brain region associated with a specific task by subtracting the resting from the active task conditions. Numerous studies now suggest, however, that the resting state may not reflect true mental "rest" conditions. The mental activity that occurs during"rest" might therefore greatly influence the functional neuroimaging observations that are collected through the usual subtracting analysis strategies. Exploring the ongoing mental processes that occur during resting conditions is thus of particular importance for deciphering functional brain mapping results and obtaining a more comprehensive understanding of human brain functions. In this review article, we will mainly focus on the discussion of the current research background of functional brain mapping at resting state and the physiological significance of the available neuroimaging data.

  5. Visualisation of Gasoline and Exhaust Gases Distribution in a 4-Valve Si Engine; Effects of Stratification on Combustion and Pollutants Visualisation de la répartition du carburant et des gaz brûlés dans un moteur à 4 soupapes à allumage commandé ; effet de la stratification sur la combustion et les polluants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deschamps B.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available sAn indirect method to map the burned gases in SI engine has been developed. It is based on visualisation by Laser Induced Fluorescence of the unburned mixture seeded with biacetyl. Both internally and externally recirculated burned gases are monitored. This diagnostic is complementary to the LIF technique applied to measure the gasoline distribution. These LIF gasoline and burned gases measurements are applied in a 4-valve optical access SI engine for a large range of operating conditions. These include variations of both fuel injection and burned gas recirculation modes causing different types of stratification leading to very distinct heat release and exhaust emissions characteristics. Tumble level and spark location are also modified. The observation of the actual stratification in the engine forms a sound basis explanation of the engine performance. Parameters allowing an optimisation of NOx and HC levels can be inferred, and in particular the effectiveness of recirculation and fuel injection strategies. The conclusions are confirmed by measurements in a single engine cylinder conventional head with the same geometry. Une méthode indirecte pour cartographier les gaz brûlés dans un moteur à allumage commandé a été développée. Elle est fondée sur une visualisation à partir de la fluorescence induite par laser (LIF du mélange air-carburant non brûlé et ensemencé avec du biacétyl. Les gaz brûlés provenant à la fois des recirculations internes et externes sont observés. Ce type de diagnostic est complémentaire des techniques de LIF utilisées pour observer la distribution du carburant. Ces mesures de concentration sont réalisées dans un moteur à 4 soupapes avec accès optiques, pour une gamme étendue de conditions opératoires. Celles-ci comprennent des variations des modes d'injection du carburant et des modes de recirculation des gaz brûlés, provoquant ainsi différents types de stratifications qui correspondent

  6. Visualising DEM-related flood-map uncertainties using a disparity-distance equation algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, S. Anders; Lim, Nancy J.

    2016-05-01

    The apparent absoluteness of information presented by crisp-delineated flood boundaries can lead to misconceptions among planners about the inherent uncertainties associated in generated flood maps. Even maps based on hydraulic modelling using the highest-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs), and calibrated with the most optimal Manning's roughness (n) coefficients, are susceptible to errors when compared to actual flood boundaries, specifically in flat areas. Therefore, the inaccuracies in inundation extents, brought about by the characteristics of the slope perpendicular to the flow direction of the river, have to be accounted for. Instead of using the typical Monte Carlo simulation and probabilistic methods for uncertainty quantification, an empirical-based disparity-distance equation that considers the effects of both the DEM resolution and slope was used to create prediction-uncertainty zones around the resulting inundation extents of a one-dimensional (1-D) hydraulic model. The equation was originally derived for the Eskilstuna River where flood maps, based on DEM data of different resolutions, were evaluated for the slope-disparity relationship. To assess whether the equation is applicable to another river with different characteristics, modelled inundation extents from the Testebo River were utilised and tested with the equation. By using the cross-sectional locations, water surface elevations, and DEM, uncertainty zones around the original inundation boundary line can be produced for different confidences. The results show that (1) the proposed method is useful both for estimating and directly visualising model inaccuracies caused by the combined effects of slope and DEM resolution, and (2) the DEM-related uncertainties alone do not account for the total inaccuracy of the derived flood map. Decision-makers can apply it to already existing flood maps, thereby recapitulating and re-analysing the inundation boundaries and the areas that are uncertain

  7. Geomorphological map as a tool for visualisation of geodiversity - example from Cave Park Grabovaca (Croatia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzjak, Nenad; Bocic, Neven; Pahernik, Mladen

    2014-05-01

    Cave Park Grabovaca is located near Perusic in Lika region (central Croatia). It was established in 2006 at the area of 5.95 km2 (protection category: significant landscape). The main task is management and protection of Samograd, Medina and Amidzina caves that were declared as geomorphological monuments, and 6 other caves located close to each other. Owing to the central geographic location in Croatian Dinaric karst area, good traffic connections between central Europe and tourist centres of the Adriatic coast, preserved nature and easy accessible karst features typical for the Dinaric Karst, it has good potential to develop as an research, educational and tourist centre. In 2013. Cave Park management and the Department of Geography (University of Zagreb, Faculty of Science) established a core team that started to develop the project of Geoeducational centre (GEC) with following goals: exploration-evaluation-presentation-education. According to the accepted strategy, the first step in the project process is to enlarge the area and change the protection category. During the consultation process team members take into account protection, environmental, local economy, tourism and local population issues and proposed that protected area should be increased to 52,2 km2. This enlargement provides more efficient protection, greater geodiversity and biodiversity by occupying geotope, biotope, and landscape units typical for the whole Lika karst region. The next step was inventorying, evaluation, analysis and visualisation of geological, geomorphological and speleological phenomena. This 2 year task was made in cooperation between Croatian Geomorphological Society, Department of Geography, Speleological Society Karlovac and Caving Club Samobor. The inventory was made using field-work mapping and geotagged photographs, cave mapping and DEM analysis. It resulted in GIS oriented geodatabase consisting of geomorphological forms, processes and cave inventory. From those data

  8. Visualising biological data: a semantic approach to tool and database integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsh James

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Motivation In the biological sciences, the need to analyse vast amounts of information has become commonplace. Such large-scale analyses often involve drawing together data from a variety of different databases, held remotely on the internet or locally on in-house servers. Supporting these tasks are ad hoc collections of data-manipulation tools, scripting languages and visualisation software, which are often combined in arcane ways to create cumbersome systems that have been customised for a particular purpose, and are consequently not readily adaptable to other uses. For many day-to-day bioinformatics tasks, the sizes of current databases, and the scale of the analyses necessary, now demand increasing levels of automation; nevertheless, the unique experience and intuition of human researchers is still required to interpret the end results in any meaningful biological way. Putting humans in the loop requires tools to support real-time interaction with these vast and complex data-sets. Numerous tools do exist for this purpose, but many do not have optimal interfaces, most are effectively isolated from other tools and databases owing to incompatible data formats, and many have limited real-time performance when applied to realistically large data-sets: much of the user's cognitive capacity is therefore focused on controlling the software and manipulating esoteric file formats rather than on performing the research. Methods To confront these issues, harnessing expertise in human-computer interaction (HCI, high-performance rendering and distributed systems, and guided by bioinformaticians and end-user biologists, we are building reusable software components that, together, create a toolkit that is both architecturally sound from a computing point of view, and addresses both user and developer requirements. Key to the system's usability is its direct exploitation of semantics, which, crucially, gives individual components knowledge of their

  9. Olfactory Associative Conditioning in Infant Rats with Brain Stimulation as Reward: II. Norepinephrine Mediates a Specific Component of the Bulb Response to Reward

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Donald A.; Sullivan, Regina M

    1991-01-01

    One of the circuits modified by early olfactory learning is in the olfactory bulb. Specifically, response patterns of mitral-tufted cells are modified by associative conditioning during the early postnatal period. In addition, previous work has demonstrated that mitral-tufted cell single units respond to both olfactory conditioned stimuli and rewarding stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle-lateral hypothalamus (MFB-LH). The present study suggests that norepinephrine β-receptor activation...

  10. Effect of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazon on the glutamate release from rat brain nerve terminals under altered gravity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, T.; Krisanova, N.

    L-glutamate acts within the mammalian central nervous system as the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter and as a potent neurotoxin The balance between these physiological and pathological actions of glutamate is thought to be kept in check by the rapid removal of the neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft The majority of uptake is mediated by the high-affinity Na -dependent glutamate transporters Depolarization leads to stimulation of glutamate efflux mediated by reversal of the high-affinity glutamate transporters The effects of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazon FCCP on the glutamate release from isolated nerve terminals rat brain synaptosomes were investigated in control and after centrifuge-induced hypergravity rats were rotated in a long-arm centrifuge at ten-G during one-hour period The treatment of synaptosomes with 1 mu M FCCP during 11 min resulted in the increase in L- 14 C glutamate release by 23 0 pm 2 3 of total accumulated synaptosomal label in control animals and 24 0 pm 2 3 animals subjected to hypergravity FCCP evoked release of L- 14 C glutamate from synaptosomes was not altered in animals exposed to hypergravity as compared to control Glutamate transport is of electrogenic nature and thus depends on the membrane potential The high-KCl stimulated L- 14 C glutamate release in Ca 2 -free media occurred due to reversal of the glutamate transporters Carrier --mediated release of L- 14 C glutamate 6 min slightly increased as a result of

  11. GrayStar: A Web application for pedagogical stellar atmosphere and spectral line modelling and visualisation II: Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Short, C Ian

    2014-01-01

    GrayStar is a stellar atmospheric and spectral line modelling, post-processing, and visualisation code, suitable for classroom demonstrations and laboratory-style assignments, that has been developed in Java and deployed in JavaScript and HTML. The only software needed to compute models and post-processed observables, and to visualise the resulting atmospheric structure and observables, is a common Web browser. Therefore, the code will run on any common PC or related X86 (-64) computer of the type that typically serves classroom data projectors, is found in undergraduate computer laboratories, or that students themselves own, including those with highly portable form-factors such as net-books and tablets. The user requires no experience with compiling source code, reading data files, or using plotting packages. More advanced students can view the JavaScript source code using the developer tools provided by common Web browsers. The code is based on the approximate gray atmospheric solution and runs quickly eno...

  12. Visualisation of metastatic oesophageal and gastric cancer and prediction of clinical response to palliative chemotherapy using {sup 18}FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzen, S.; Peschel, C.; Lordick, F. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Haematology/Medical Oncology, Technical Univ. Munich (Germany); Herrmann, K.; Wieder, H.; Schwaiger, M. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Technical Univ. Munich (Germany); Weber, W.A.; Hennig, M. [Inst. for Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Technical Univ. Munich (Germany); Ott, K. [Dept. of Surgery, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany); Bredenkamp, R. [Munich Centre for Clinical Studies, Munich (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Aim: This study assessed the value of {sup 18}F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for visualisation and early metabolic response assessment in metastatic gastro-oesophageal cancer. Patients, methods: Twenty-six patients who were treated for metastatic disease (20 adenocarcinomas, 6 squamous cell cancers) underwent FDG-PET before and two weeks after the onset of palliative chemotherapy with either oxaliplatin + 5-FU/LV or with docetaxel + capecitabine. PET results were validated according to clinical response based on RECIST criteria. Results: Twenty-four tumours (92%) could be visualised by FDG-PET and were also assessable by a second PET scan at 2 weeks. The 2 tumours that were not detectable by PET were both gastric cancers belonging to the non-intestinal subtype according to Lauren. Median time to progression and overall survival were not significantly different for metabolic responders and non-responders (6.3 vs 5.3 months and 14.1 vs 12.5 months, respectively). Conclusion: In this heterogeneous study population, FDG-PET had a limited accuracy in predicting clinical response. However, the metabolic response prediction was particularly good in the subgroup of patients with oesophageal squamous cell cancer. Therefore, FDG-PET and assessment of cancer therapy clearly merits further investigation in circumscribed patient populations with metastatic disease. (orig.)

  13. The Markyt visualisation, prediction and benchmark platform for chemical and gene entity recognition at BioCreative/CHEMDNER challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, Martin; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gael; Rabal, Obdulia; Vazquez, Miguel; Oyarzabal, Julen; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Valencia, Alfonso; Krallinger, Martin; Lourenço, Anália

    2016-01-01

    Biomedical text mining methods and technologies have improved significantly in the last decade. Considerable efforts have been invested in understanding the main challenges of biomedical literature retrieval and extraction and proposing solutions to problems of practical interest. Most notably, community-oriented initiatives such as the BioCreative challenge have enabled controlled environments for the comparison of automatic systems while pursuing practical biomedical tasks. Under this scenario, the present work describes the Markyt Web-based document curation platform, which has been implemented to support the visualisation, prediction and benchmark of chemical and gene mention annotations at BioCreative/CHEMDNER challenge. Creating this platform is an important step for the systematic and public evaluation of automatic prediction systems and the reusability of the knowledge compiled for the challenge. Markyt was not only critical to support the manual annotation and annotation revision process but also facilitated the comparative visualisation of automated results against the manually generated Gold Standard annotations and comparative assessment of generated results. We expect that future biomedical text mining challenges and the text mining community may benefit from the Markyt platform to better explore and interpret annotations and improve automatic system predictions.Database URL: http://www.markyt.org, https://github.com/sing-group/Markyt. PMID:27542845

  14. Frontal brain activity and behavioral indicators of affective states are weakly affected by thermal stimuli in sheep living in different housing conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine eVögeli

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Many stimuli evoke short-term emotional reactions. These reactions may play an important role in assessing how a subject perceives a stimulus. Additionally, long-term mood may modulate the emotional reactions but it is still unclear in what way. The question seems to be important in terms of animal welfare, as a negative mood may taint emotional reactions. In the present study with sheep, we investigated the effects of thermal stimuli on emotional reactions and the potential modulating effect of mood induced by manipulations of the housing conditions. We assume that unpredictable, stimulus-poor conditions lead to a negative and predictable, stimulus-rich conditions to a positive mood state. The thermal stimuli were applied to the upper breast during warm ambient temperatures: hot (as presumably negative, intermediate, and cold (as presumably positive. We recorded cortical activity by functional near-infrared spectroscopy, restlessness behavior (e.g. locomotor activity, aversive behaviors and ear postures as indicators of emotional reactions. The strongest hemodynamic reaction was found during a stimulus of intermediate valence independent of the animal’s housing conditions, whereas locomotor activity, ear movements and aversive behaviors were seen most in sheep from the unpredictable, stimulus-poor housing conditions, independent of stimulus valence. We conclude that, sheep perceived the thermal stimuli and differentiated between some of them. An adequate interpretation of the neuronal activity pattern remains difficult, though. The effects of housing conditions were small indicating that the induction of mood was only modestly efficacious. Therefore, a modulating effect of mood on the emotional reaction was not found.

  15. Quantum Brain States

    CERN Document Server

    Mould, R A

    2003-01-01

    If conscious observers are to be included in the quantum mechanical universe, we need to find the rules that engage observers with quantum mechanical systems. The author has proposed five rules that are discovered by insisting on empirical completeness; that is, by requiring the rules to draw empirical information from Schrodinger's solutions that is more complete than is currently possible with the (Born) probability interpretation. I discard Born's interpretation, introducing probability solely through probability current. These rules tell us something about brains. They require the existence of observer brain states that are neither conscious nor unconscious. I call them 'ready' brain states because they are on stand-by, ready to become conscious the moment they are stochastically chosen. Two of the rules are selection rules involving ready brain states. The place of these rules in a wider theoretical context is discussed. Key Words: boundary conditions, consciousness, decoherence, macroscopic superpositio...

  16. Post-conditioning exacerbates the MnSOD immune-reactivity after experimental cerebral global ischemia and reperfusion in the rat brain hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemethova, Miroslava; Danielisova, Viera; Gottlieb, Miroslav; Burda, Jozef

    2008-01-01

    This study monitored the effects of sub-lethal ischemia (post-conditioning) applied after a previous ischemic attack by way of the MnSOD immune-reactivity examined in CA1 and dentate gyrus of the rat hippocampus. The experimental 10 min transient cerebral ischemia was followed by 2 days of reperfusion, the rats then underwent a second ischemia (4 or 6 min post-conditioning). MnSOD immune-reactivity was evaluated after 5 h, 1 and 2 days. Results obtained by computer microdensitometric image analysis indicated that 4 min of ischemic post-conditioning caused higher MnSOD immune-reactivity than 6 min. However, higher viability of CA1 neurons after stronger (6 min) post-conditioning when production of MnSOD is lower, as well as differences between MnSOD in CA1 and dentate gyrus indicates another mechanism switching pro-apoptotic destination of CA1 neurons to anti-apoptotic. PMID:17936646

  17. Brain glycogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Linea Lykke Frimodt; Müller, Margit S; Walls, Anne B;

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g., liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia....... In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies-it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e., synaptic...... activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms...

  18. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging of the brain: technical considerations and normal brain development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetal MRI examines non-invasively the unborn fetus. Ultrafast MRI sequences effectively suppress fetal motion. Multiple case reports and studies have shown that fetal MRI is particularly helpful in the evaluation of the central nervous system. The high contrast-to-noise ratio, the high spatial resolution, the multiplanar capabilities, the large field of view and the simultaneous visualisation of fetal and maternal structures have proven to be advantageous. Fetal MRI is particularly helpful in the evaluation of the normal and pathological development of the brain. Despite the fact that no side effects have been reported or are to be expected, the use of MRI during pregnancy is still limited to the second and third trimester of pregnancy. Magnetic resonance imaging contrast media are not to be used as it passes the placenta. Ultrasound remains the primary screening modality for fetal pathology; fetal MRI can serve as an adjunct or second-line imaging modality. (orig.)

  19. Technological evolution of axillary lymph nodes: Radiological visualisation in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In patients with breast cancer, detection of axillary lymph node spread has a great prognostic significance. Visualisation of lymphatic glands is attracting attention of radiologists since long. Lymphogram usually shows 4-9 lymph glands as compared to 8 to 50 identified during surgical intervention. Lymphography is a laborious and complicated process requiring specific skills. Likewise, the evaluation and interpretation of results depends upon the experience of the specialist. We evaluated 234 breast cancer patients and found that lymphograms of these patients initially detected 1-2 central axillary lymph nodes followed by others. During surgical intervention, the total number of lymphatic glands removed from these patients was 3,241 of which only 2,693 (83.1%) were seen on lymphography. On further evaluation it was found that the largest groups of lymphatic nodes were seen in the following pattern (i) central axillary (ii) subclavicular (iii) lateral, with central axillary lymph nodes being the biggest (1.5 - 2 cm) and subclavicular the smallest (0.2 - 0.5 cm). Sternal lymph nodes receive lymph from medial quadrants of the breast and / or if the axillary lymph nodes are obstructed by metastases. The results of lymphography and post-operative examination matched in 71.7-75 % of cases. False positivity was seen in 19.2 % and false negative 9.1 % instances. As this method was not sufficiently selective and specific, its relative upsurge receded backwards and was forgotten. The last decade of the twentieth century saw a sentinel node (SN) concept. In advanced countries, the possibility to detect breast cancer of up to 1 cm diameter corresponding to T1A category, when the axillary lymph nodes still are not involved in malignant growth, accounts about 50%. Hence the search of lymphatic spread vis-a-vis sentinel node detection has gained more importance. Earlier, SN detection involved colour contrast methods, which was reasonably sensitive and specific in

  20. Some technological aspects of an evaluation and visualisation component for the safeguards integrated information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to Safeguards strengthening measures which include both Measures under Comprehensive Safeguards Agreements and Measures under Model Additional Protocol, the Agency receives much more information than some years before. It seems reasonable to develop an integrated information system (IIS) because information evaluation and review are important parts of Safeguards assessments. An integrated information system can include the following components: information search, primary messages selection, evaluation of received information, data storage, visualisation and evaluation of State's nuclear programme (SNP) and elaboration of management decisions. Hereby, IIS is a human-computer system where all components listed above are implemented. Within the framework of SNP a human factor plays an important role. SNP has a number of special properties such as uniqueness, multi-dimensions, subjectivity of its state evaluation, time variation, incompleteness of its description and the mentioned above human factor. For realistic simulation of SNP development it is necessary to reduce usage of quantitative methods and apply methods which are closer to perception of the outward things by a human being. This task requires to convert all available information, both qualitative and quantitative, into a special format. The format requires methods which are being developed on the basis of pragmatic, visual and Zadeh's linguistic variables which define corresponding scales. A pragmatic scale is defined on a basic metric scale taking into account a particular pragmatic cut of SNP. In other words pragmatic scale maps a pragmatic cut of the problem which is important from the point of view of IIS goal. By using pragmatic scales it is possible, for example, to estimate the speed of development of processes existing within the framework of SNP. The visual variable allows to solve the following engineering tasks: input of the expert's evaluations in the system and interpretations of its

  1. Conditioning the Supply Chain in a Fast Moving Consumer Goods Business : Using value stream mapping to visualise, condition, manage information and product flow in Oriflame

    OpenAIRE

    Ehsan, Ghaffari

    2010-01-01

    Oriflame, since it was founded in Sweden in 1967 has become a major player in the cosmetics industry. The impressive annual growth of 17% that Oriflame has had in the last 17 years requires evidently a lot from the supply processes. It has been shown that the current set‐up and the countermeasures at hand do not provide a sustainable business model i.e. having a balance between service level and inventory level. The purpose of this thesis is to propose to Oriflame actions that need to be take...

  2. Visualisation of axolotl blastema cells and pig endothelial progenitor cells using very small super paramagnetic iron oxide particles in MRI: A technique with applications for non invasive visualisation of regenerative processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik; Kjær, N.B.; Bek, Maria;

    oxide particles (VSOP) in animal cells enable non invasive cell tracking using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and can prove useful, when visualising regenerative processes. This study examines the possibility of labelling limited numbers of axolotl blastema cells (aBC) and pig endothelial progenitor...... cells (pEPC) with VSOP and detecting these in vitro and in vivo using a traditional clinical 1.5 T scanner. Methods: aBC and pEPG were incubated with VSOP C200 Vitro (Ferropharm) at different concentrations. T1- and T2*-weighted MRI was applied to labelled and control cells in vitro and to cells...... implanted in live axolotl tail and dead porcine heart, respectively. Cellular iron uptake was determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Results: T2*-weighted 2D gradient-echo sequences on samples of 10˄5 cells yielded at significant linear correlations between...

  3. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such children to those with normal brain development may help scientists to pinpoint when and where ...

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. ... brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, ...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in ...

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such children to those with normal brain development may help scientists to pinpoint when and where mental disorders begin and perhaps how to slow or stop ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct ... as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such ...

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in the brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability to move as they want to, resulting ...

  9. Brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The techniques of brain imaging and results in perfusion studies and delayed images are outlined. An analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of the brain scan in a variety of common problems is discussed, especially as compared with other available procedures. Both nonneoplastic and neoplastic lesions are considered. (Auth/C.F.)

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... will fire. This enhances the electrical flow among brain cells required for normal function and plays an important ... of neurons and their interconnections. neuron —A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. ...

  11. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... piece of tumor for a biopsy Remove abnormal brain tissue Drain blood or an infection Free a nerve The bone flap is usually replaced after surgery, using small metal ... or if the brain was swollen. (This is called a craniectomy.) The ...

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ... axis —A brain-body circuit which plays a critical role in the body's response to stress. impulse — ...

  13. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she lost interest ...

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in understanding ...

  15. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early-life experiences ... In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... her feelings. Brain Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists a more detailed understanding of the brain than ... a person responds to a certain medication. This information may someday ... is allowing scientists to make important discoveries that could change the ...

  17. Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know what causes some brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. The symptoms of brain diseases vary widely depending on the specific problem. In some cases, damage is permanent. In other cases, treatments such as surgery, medicines, or physical therapy can correct the source of the problem or ...

  18. Visualisation to enhance biomechanical tuning of ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs in stroke: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carse Bruce

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are a number of gaps in the evidence base for the use of ankle-foot orthoses for stroke patients. Three dimensional motion analysis offers an ideal method for objectively obtaining biomechanical gait data from stroke patients, however there are a number of major barriers to its use in routine clinical practice. One significant problem is the way in which the biomechanical data generated by these systems is presented. Through the careful design of bespoke biomechanical visualisation software it may be possible to present such data in novel ways to improve clinical decision making, track progress and increase patient understanding in the context of ankle-foot orthosis tuning. Methods A single-blind randomised controlled trial will be used to compare the use of biomechanical visualisation software in ankle-foot orthosis tuning against standard care (tuning using observation alone. Participants (n = 70 will have experienced a recent hemiplegia (1-12 months and will be identified by their care team as being suitable candidates for a rigid ankle-foot orthosis. The primary outcome measure will be walking velocity. Secondary outcome measures include; lower limb joint kinematics (thigh and shank global orientations & kinetics (knee and hip flexion/extension moments, ground reaction force FZ2 peak magnitude, step length, symmetry ratio based on step length, Modified Ashworth Scale, Modified Rivermead Mobility Index and EuroQol (EQ-5D. Additional qualitative measures will also be taken from participants (patients and clinicians at the beginning and end of their participation in the study. The main aim of the study is to determine whether or not the visualisation of biomechanical data can be used to improve the outcomes of tuning ankle-foot orthoses for stroke patients. Discussion In addition to answering the primary research question the broad range of measures that will be taken during this study are likely to contribute to a

  19. Visualisation and assessment of the protein synthesis rate of lung cancer using carbon-11 tyrosine and positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the potential role of L-(1-11C)-tyrosine positron emission tomography (TYR PET) for visualisation and quantification of protein metabolism in lung cancer. Dynamic TYR PET scans of the thorax were performed in 17 patients with lung cancer. Protein synthesis rate (PSR in μmol/min.l) and standardised uptake value (SUV, corrected for body measurements) of tumour tissue and contralateral normal tissue were calculated before and after chemotherapy or radiotherapy. All tumours [11 non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs), five small cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs), and one pleural mesothelioma] were visualised as a hot spot. The median PSR in tumour tissue was higher than that in corresponding contralateral normal lung tissue before [1.88 μmol/min.l (range 1.10-3.42) vs 0.40 μmol/min.l (range 0.12-0.86); P=0.003] and after treatment [1.33 μmol/min.l (range 0.45-2.21) vs 0.28 μmol/min.l (range 0.18-0.51); P<0.02]. In contrast to PSR of normal lung tissue, PSR of tumour tissue decreased significantly after therapy (P=0.03). Before therapy, no significant difference in PSR between NSCLCs and SCLCs was observed, but after therapy the PSR differed significantly between the subgroups [1.69 μmol/min.l (range 0.63-2.78) for NSCLC vs 0.67 μmol/min.l (range 0.45-0.92) for SCLC; P=0.03], irrespective of the treatment modality. The median SUV of tumour tissue was higher than that in corresponding contralateral normal lung both before and after therapy. Only a weak correlation between PSR and SUV was found when the latter was corrected for body surface area or lean body mass. Carbon-11 labelled tyrosine appears to be a good tracer for visualising lung cancer. PSR of tumour tissue can be used to quantify reduction in the metabolic rate of the tumour. Future studies need to be performed to determine whether TYR PET will supply additional clinical information with treatment implications in patients with lung cancer. (orig.)

  20. Brain Abscess after Esophageal Dilatation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaïni, S; Grand, M; Michelsen, J

    2007-01-01

    Brain abscess formation is a serious disease often seen as a complication to other diseases and to procedures. A rare predisposing condition is dilatation therapy of esophageal strictures. A case of brain abscess formation after esophageal dilatations is presented. A 59-year-old woman was admitted...... with malaise, progressive lethargy, fever, aphasia and hemiparesis. Six days before she had been treated with esophageal dilatation for a stricture caused by accidental ingestion of caustic soda. The brain abscess was treated with surgery and antibiotics. She recovered completely. This clinical case...... illustrates the possible association between therapeutic esophageal dilatation and the risk of brain abscess formation....

  1. The diagnosis of brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goila Ajay

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicians, health care workers, members of the clergy, and laypeople throughout the world have accepted fully that a person is dead when his or her brain is dead. Although the widespread use of mechanical ventilators and other advanced critical care services have transformed the course of terminal neurologic disorders. Vital functions can now be maintained artificially for a long period of time after the brain has ceased to function. There is a need to diagnose brain death with utmost accuracy and urgency because of an increased awareness amongst the masses for an early diagnosis of brain death and the requirements of organ retrieval for transplantation. Physicians need not be, or consult with, a neurologist or neurosurgeon in order to determine brain death. The purpose of this review article is to provide health care providers in India with requirements for determining brain death, increase knowledge amongst health care practitioners about the clinical evaluation of brain death, and reduce the potential for variations in brain death determination policies and practices amongst facilities and practitioners. Process for brain death certification has been discussed under the following: 1. Identification of history or physical examination findings that provide a clear etiology of brain dysfunction. 2. Exclusion of any condition that might confound the subsequent examination of cortical or brain stem function. 3. Performance of a complete neurological examination including the standard apnea test and 10 minute apnea test. 4. Assessment of brainstem reflexes. 5. Clinical observations compatible with the diagnosis of brain death. 6. Responsibilities of physicians. 7. Notify next of kin. 8. Interval observation period. 9. Repeat clinical assessment of brain stem reflexes. 10. Confirmatory testing as indicated. 11. Certification and brain death documentation.

  2. What Do Cells Really Look Like? An Inquiry into Students' Difficulties in Visualising a 3-D Biological Cell and Lessons for Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijapurkar, Jyotsna; Kawalkar, Aisha; Nambiar, Priya

    2014-01-01

    In our explorations of students' concepts in an inquiry science classroom with grade 6 students from urban schools in India, we uncovered a variety of problems in their understanding of biological cells as structural and functional units of living organisms. In particular, we found not only that they visualised the cell as a two-dimensional…

  3. Visualisation of the oscillation dynamics of cytoplasm in a living cell of Physarum mixomycete plasmodium by the method of optical coherence Doppler tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, A. V.; Priezzhev, A. V.; Lauri, J.; Myllylä, Risto

    2009-04-01

    The method of optical coherence Doppler tomography is used for the first time to visualise the oscillatory amoeboid mobility in strands of Physarum polycephalum mixomycete plasmodium and to record periodic radial contractions of the strands and spatiotemporal variations in the velocity of the cytoplasmic flow inside them.

  4. Visualisation of the oscillation dynamics of cytoplasm in a living cell of Physarum mixomycete plasmodium by the method of optical coherence Doppler tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of optical coherence Doppler tomography is used for the first time to visualise the oscillatory amoeboid mobility in strands of Physarum polycephalum mixomycete plasmodium and to record periodic radial contractions of the strands and spatiotemporal variations in the velocity of the cytoplasmic flow inside them. (laser biology)

  5. [Optimisation of the visualisation technique for optical paths through intraocular lenses for characterisation of multifocal imaging properties of Fresnel-zone plates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiß, S; Forbrig, J; Guthoff, R F; Terwee, T; Stolz, H; Siewert, S; El-Tamer, A; Hinze, U; Chichkov, B N; Stachs, O

    2014-12-01

    The utilisation of the diffractive properties of Fresnel zone plates offers the possibility of intraocular lens designs with multiple foci. Such intraocular lenses can be manufactured by two-photon polymerisation (2PP). This paper explains the underlying concept and shows the principles for visualisation of the focus properties of such implants. PMID:25519505

  6. The effect of tryptophan supplemented diets on brain serotonergic activity and plasma cortisol under undisturbed and stressed conditions in grouped-housed Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, C.I.M.; Silva, P.I.M.; Costas, B.;

    2013-01-01

    reduction in stress response, aggression and stress-induced anorexia. In land farmed animals, TRP supplemented diets have also been shown to improve meat quality as a result of reduced stress during slaughter while in fish no data is currently available. This study aims at investigating whether short.......76. ng/ml under undisturbed conditions to 80.34. ±. 7.16. ng/ml), however, it was not sufficient to cause a faster deterioration of flesh quality. TRP supplement diets had also no effect on muscle pH and rigor mortis during the 72. h observation period. In conclusion, this study showed that only the...... highest levels of supplementation (10. × the control diet) affect serotonergic activity. However, these levels did not result in reduced stress responsiveness or improved flesh quality when an acute stressor is applied before slaughter. Therefore, these results underline the fact that effects of TRP on...

  7. Brain function assessment in different conscious states

    OpenAIRE

    Ozgoren, Murat; Bayazit, Onur; Kocaaslan, Sibel; Gokmen, Necati; Oniz, Adile

    2010-01-01

    Background The study of brain functioning is a major challenge in neuroscience fields as human brain has a dynamic and ever changing information processing. Case is worsened with conditions where brain undergoes major changes in so-called different conscious states. Even though the exact definition of consciousness is a hard one, there are certain conditions where the descriptions have reached a consensus. The sleep and the anesthesia are different conditions which are separable from each oth...

  8. Visualisation of vascular changes in diffuse disorders of the liver parenchyma using computed tomography as imaging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes to the anatomy of vessels that occur in connection with diffuse disorders of the liver parenchyma may be visualised using computer tomography. An analysis of sectional images of hepatic vessels at a particular plane was carried out for 40 patients having no pathological liver changes, 30 patients showing sonographically detectable fatty degeneration and another 30 patients, in which the presence of cirrhosis had been confirmed by histological findings. Vessels normally having a minimum diameter of 8 mm and the branches of the portal vein were seen to be significantly narrower in patients suffering from cirrhosis of the liver. Even though the diagnosis of this disorder is generally established on the basis of clinical and sonographic examinations, a prudent interpretation of the CT findings described above may certainly be of some predictive value. (orig.)

  9. Steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy imaging under evanescent excitation for visualisation of FRET at the plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Devauges

    Full Text Available We present a novel imaging system combining total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy with measurement of steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy in order to perform live cell Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET imaging at the plasma membrane. We compare directly the imaging performance of fluorescence anisotropy resolved TIRF with epifluorescence illumination. The use of high numerical aperture objective for TIRF required correction for induced depolarization factors. This arrangement enabled visualisation of conformational changes of a Raichu-Cdc42 FRET biosensor by measurement of intramolecular FRET between eGFP and mRFP1. Higher activity of the probe was found at the cell plasma membrane compared to intracellularly. Imaging fluorescence anisotropy in TIRF allowed clear differentiation of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor from negative control mutants. Finally, inhibition of Cdc42 was imaged dynamically in live cells, where we show temporal changes of the activity of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor.

  10. Identification and visualisation of possible ancient ocean shoreline on Mars using submeter-resolution Digital Terrain Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świąder, Andrzej

    2014-12-01

    Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) produced from stereoscopic, submeter-resolution High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) imagery provide a solid basis for all morphometric analyses of the surface of Mars. In view of the fact that a more effective use of DTMs is hindered by complicated and time-consuming manual handling, the automated process provided by specialists of the Ames Intelligent Robotics Group (NASA), Ames Stereo Pipeline, constitutes a good alternative. Four DTMs, covering the global dichotomy boundary between the southern highlands and northern lowlands along the line of the presumable Arabia shoreline, were produced and analysed. One of them included forms that are likely to be indicative of an oceanic basin that extended across the lowland northern hemisphere of Mars in the geological past. The high resolution DTMs obtained were used in the process of landscape visualisation.

  11. Can inferred provenance and its visualisation be used to detect erroneous annotation? A case study using UniProtKB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Bell

    Full Text Available A constant influx of new data poses a challenge in keeping the annotation in biological databases current. Most biological databases contain significant quantities of textual annotation, which often contains the richest source of knowledge. Many databases reuse existing knowledge; during the curation process annotations are often propagated between entries. However, this is often not made explicit. Therefore, it can be hard, potentially impossible, for a reader to identify where an annotation originated from. Within this work we attempt to identify annotation provenance and track its subsequent propagation. Specifically, we exploit annotation reuse within the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB, at the level of individual sentences. We describe a visualisation approach for the provenance and propagation of sentences in UniProtKB which enables a large-scale statistical analysis. Initially levels of sentence reuse within UniProtKB were analysed, showing that reuse is heavily prevalent, which enables the tracking of provenance and propagation. By analysing sentences throughout UniProtKB, a number of interesting propagation patterns were identified, covering over [Formula: see text] sentences. Over [Formula: see text] sentences remain in the database after they have been removed from the entries where they originally occurred. Analysing a subset of these sentences suggest that approximately [Formula: see text] are erroneous, whilst [Formula: see text] appear to be inconsistent. These results suggest that being able to visualise sentence propagation and provenance can aid in the determination of the accuracy and quality of textual annotation. Source code and supplementary data are available from the authors website at http://homepages.cs.ncl.ac.uk/m.j.bell1/sentence_analysis/.

  12. 3D visualisation and artistic imagery to enhance interest in `hidden environments' - new approaches to soil science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilford, J.; Falconer, R. E.; Wade, R.; Scott-Brown, K. C.

    2014-09-01

    Interactive Virtual Environments (VEs) have the potential to increase student interest in soil science. Accordingly a bespoke 'soil atlas' was created using Java3D as an interactive 3D VE, to show soil information in the context of (and as affected by) the over-lying landscape. To display the below-ground soil characteristics, four sets of artistic illustrations were produced, each set showing the effects of soil organic-matter density and water content on fungal density, to determine potential for visualisations and interactivity in stimulating interest in soil and soil illustrations, interest being an important factor in facilitating learning. The illustrations were created using 3D modelling packages, and a wide range of styles were produced. This allowed a preliminary study of the relative merits of different artistic styles, scientific-credibility, scale, abstraction and 'realism' (e.g. photo-realism or realism of forms), and any relationship between these and the level of interest indicated by the study participants in the soil visualisations and VE. The study found significant differences in mean interest ratings for different soil illustration styles, as well as in the perception of scientific-credibility of these styles, albeit for both measures there was considerable difference of attitude between participants about particular styles. There was also found to be a highly significant positive correlation between participants rating styles highly for interest and highly for scientific-credibility. There was furthermore a particularly high interest rating among participants for seeing temporal soil processes illustrated/animated, suggesting this as a particularly promising method for further stimulating interest in soil illustrations and soil itself.

  13. Quantitative myocardial perfusion PET combined with coronary anatomy derived from CT angiography. Validation of a new fusion and visualisation software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Dynamic perfusion PET offers a clinical relevant advantage over myocardial perfusion scintigraphy due to its ability to measure myocardial blood flow quantitatively. This leads to an improved detection of multivessel disease and the possibility to assess not only the culprit lesion but lower grade stenoses as well. For appropriate revascularization, perfusion defects must be matched to coronary lesions. It has been shown that image fusion of morphological and functional images is superior to side-by-side analysis. Still, software for quantitative perfusion PET combined with CT angiography is rare. In this paper we present a new software tool for image fusion and visualization of quantitative perfusion PET and coronary morphology derived from CT angiography. Methods: In our software, a PET uptake image is used for manual co-registration. Co-registration results are then applied to the functional data derived from compartment modelling. To evaluate the reproducibility of the manual co-registration, we calculated the deviation between a series of manual co-registrations performed on nine pairs of unregistered PET and CT datasets by five trained participants. Two dimensional transfer functions were used to highlight the coronary arteries from the CT study in the combined data sets. Results: The average Euclidian distances for three references points were between 3.7 and 4.1 mm. The maximum distance was 10.6 mm. By the use of the two dimensional transfer functions, coronary anatomy could be easily visualised either by user-interaction or automatically by use of neuronal networks. Conclusions: With this approach it is possible to combine quantitative perfusion PET with coronary anatomy derived from CT angiography. Our first experiences indicate that manual image fusion with our tool is reproducible and that visualisation of the combined datasets is achieved within short time. (orig.)

  14. Brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BNCT in the past was not widely accepted because of poor usability of a nuclear reactor as a neutron source. Recently, technical advancements in the accelerator field have made accelerator-based BNCT feasible. Consequently, clinical trials of intractable brain tumors have started using it since 2012. In this review, our clinical results obtained from conventional reactor-based BNCT for treatment of brain tumors are introduced. It is strong hope that accelerator-based BNCT becomes a standard therapy for current intractable brain tumors. (author)

  15. Brain and Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teens / Drug Facts / Brain and Addiction Brain and Addiction Print Your Brain Your brain is who you ... is taken over and over. What Is Drug Addiction? Addiction is a chronic brain disease that causes ...

  16. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  17. [Imaging of brain changes in chronic pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Nuutti; Forss, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Modern methods of brain imaging have enabled objective measurements of functional and structural brain changes associated with chronic pain conditions. According to recent investigations, chronic pain is not only associated with abnormally strong or prolonged activity of regions processing acute pain, but also with activation of brain networks that are characteristic for each pain state, changes in cortical remodeling, as well as local reduction of grey matter in several regions of the brain. Brain changes associated with chronic pain facilitate the understanding of mechanisms of various chronic pain conditions. PMID:25211820

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Statistics Help for Mental Illnesses Outreach Outreach Home Public Involvement Outreach Partners Alliance for Research Progress Coalition ... also linked to reward systems in the brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, ...

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    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ... stay focused on a task, and managing proper emotional reactions. Reduced ACC activity or damage to this ...

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    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ... or-flight response and is also involved in emotions and memory. anterior cingulate cortex —Is involved in ...

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    Full Text Available ... producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability to move as they want ... the brain. The hippocampus may be involved in mood disorders through its control of a major mood circuit ...

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    Full Text Available ... of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. Different parts of the PFC ... a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, as well as emotional control ...

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  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... sends impulses and extends from cell bodies to meet and deliver impulses to another nerve cell. Axons ... in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who ...

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    Full Text Available ... each other How changes in the brain can lead to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing ... understanding of genes and epigenetics may one day lead to genetic testing for people at risk for ...

  19. Brain Health

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    ... Love Your Brain Stay Physically Active Adopt a Healthy Diet Stay Mentally and Socially Active We Can Help ... of any wellness plan. Learn More Adopt a Healthy Diet > Eat a heart-healthy diet that benefits both ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Offices and Divisions Careers@NIMH Advisory Boards and Groups Staff Directories Getting to NIMH National Institutes of ... electrical signals. The brain begins as a small group of cells in the outer layer of a ...

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    Full Text Available ... illnesses, such as depression, can occur when this process does not work correctly. Communication between neurons can also be electrical, such as in areas of the brain that control movement. When electrical signals are abnormal, they can ...

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    Full Text Available ... they can cause tremors or symptoms found in Parkinson's disease. Serotonin —helps control many functions, such as ... brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability ...

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure. mutation —A change in the code for a gene, which may be harmless or even helpful, but sometimes give rise to disabilities or diseases. neural ...

  4. Brain Basics

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  3. The biological significance of brain barrier mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Norman R; Habgood, Mark D; Møllgård, Kjeld;

    2016-01-01

    Barrier mechanisms in the brain are important for its normal functioning and development. Stability of the brain's internal environment, particularly with respect to its ionic composition, is a prerequisite for the fundamental basis of its function, namely transmission of nerve impulses. In addit...... addition, such studies, if applied to brain pathologies such as stroke, trauma, or multiple sclerosis, will aid in defining the contribution of brain barrier pathology to these conditions, either causative or secondary....

  4. Cysticercosis of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incidence and radiologic findings of neurocysticercosis were investigated in a series of 23 800 consecutive head examinations using computed tomography (CT). The condition was diagnosed in 168 case (0.7%). The parenchymatous form was the most common presentation (96.3%), while the meningeal form corresponded to only 11.9% of cases. These two forms coexisted in some cases. These findings reversed the knowledge on the condition based on conventional radiography. The different CT appearances in the brain are described and a new radiologic protocol for the CT evaluation of the condition is advocated, which includes a follow-up after a trial cure with Praziquantel in the presence of cysts not associated with suggestive brain calcifications. CT were more sensitive than conventional radiography in the differentiation between dead and living larvae, thus having an impact on the therapeutic management of the patients. (orig.)

  5. Brain imaging and brain function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is a survey of the applications of imaging studies of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism to the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Contributors review imaging techniques and strategies for measuring regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism, for mapping functional neural systems, and for imaging normal brain functions. They then examine the applications of brain imaging techniques to the study of such neurological and psychiatric disorders as: cerebral ischemia; convulsive disorders; cerebral tumors; Huntington's disease; Alzheimer's disease; depression and other mood disorders. A state-of-the-art report on magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and central nervous system rounds out the book's coverage

  6. Tbx1 regulates brain vascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, Sara; Martucciello, Stefania; Fulcoli, Filomena Gabriella; Bilio, Marchesa; Ferrentino, Rosa; Nusco, Edoardo; Illingworth, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor TBX1 is the major gene involved in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS). Using mouse models of these diseases, we have previously shown that TBX1 activates VEGFR3 in endothelial cells (EC), and that this interaction is critical for the development of the lymphatic vasculature. In this study, we show that TBX1 regulates brain angiogenesis. Using loss-of-function genetics and molecular approaches, we show that TBX1 regulates the VEGFR3 and DLL4 genes in brain ECs. In mice, loss of TBX1 causes global brain vascular defects, comprising brain vessel hyperplasia, enhanced angiogenic sprouting and vessel network disorganization. This phenotype is recapitulated in EC-specific Tbx1 conditional mutants and in an EC-only 3-dimensional cell culture system (matrigel), indicating that the brain vascular phenotype is cell autonomous. Furthermore, EC-specific conditional Tbx1 mutants have poorly perfused brain vessels and brain hypoxia, indicating that the expanded vascular network is functionally impaired. In EC-matrigel cultures, a Notch1 agonist is able to partially rescue microtubule hyperbranching induced by TBX1 knockdown. Thus, we have identified a novel transcriptional regulator of angiogenesis that exerts its effect in brain by negatively regulating angiogenesis through the DLL4/Notch1-VEGFR3 regulatory axis. Given the similarity of the phenotypic consequences of TBX1 mutation in humans and mice, this unexpected role of TBX1 in murine brain vascularization should stimulate clinicians to search for brain microvascular anomalies in 22q11.2DS patients and to evaluate whether some of the anatomical and functional brain anomalies in patients may have a microvascular origin. PMID:23945394

  7. Visualisation of the velocity field in a scaled water model for validation of numerical calculations for a powder fuelled boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumortier, Laurent [Luleaa Univ. of Technology (Sweden)

    2001-01-01

    Validation of numerical predictions of the flow field in a powder fired industry boiler by flow visualisation in a water model has been studied. The bark powder fired boiler at AssiDomaen Kraftliner in Piteaa has been used as a case study. A literature study covering modelling of combusting flows by water models and different flow visualisation techniques has been carried out. The main conclusion as regards the use of water models is that only qualitative information can be expected. As far as turbulent flow is assured in the model as well as the real furnace, the same Reynolds number is not required. Geometrical similarity is important but modelling of burner jets requires adaptation of the jet diameters in the model. Guidelines for this are available and are presented in the report. The review of visualisation techniques shows that a number of methods have been used successfully for validation of flow field predictions. The conclusion is that the Particle Image Velocimetry and Particle Tracking Velocimetry methods could be very suitable for validation purposes provided that optical access is possible. The numerical predictions include flow fields in a 1130 scale model of the AssiDomaen furnace with water flow as well as flow and temperature fields in the actual furnace. Two burner arrangements were considered both for the model and the actual furnace, namely the present configuration with four front burners and a proposed modification where an additional burner is positioned at a side wall below the other burners. There are many similarities between the predicted flow fields in the model and the full scale furnace but there are also some differences, in particular in the region above the burners and the effects of the low region re-circulation on the lower burner jets. The experiments with the water model have only included the arrangement with four front burners. There were problems determining the velocities in the jets and the comparisons with predictions are

  8. Visualising uncertainty: Examining women's views on the role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in late pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Kate; Kochetkova, Inna; Whitby, Elspeth

    2016-09-01

    Prenatal screening occupies a prominent role within sociological debates on medical uncertainty. A particular issue concerns the limitations of routine screening which tends to be based on risk prediction. Computer assisted visual technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are now starting to be applied to the prenatal realm to assist in the diagnosis of a range of fetal and maternal disorders (from problems with the fetal brain to the placenta). MRI is often perceived in popular and medical discourse as a technology of certainty and truth. However, little is known about the use of MRI as a tool to confirm or refute the diagnosis of a range of disorders in pregnancy. Drawing on qualitative research with pregnant women attending a fetal medicine clinic in the North of England this paper examines the potential role that MRI can play in mediating pregnancy uncertainty. The paper will argue that MRI can create and manage women's feelings of uncertainty during pregnancy. However, while MRI may not always provide women with unequivocal answers, the detailed information provided by MR images combined with the interpretation and communication skills of the radiologist in many ways enables women to navigate the issue. Our analysis of empirical data therefore highlights the value of this novel technological application for women and their partners. It also seeks to stress the merit of taking a productive approach to the study of diagnostic uncertainty, an approach which recognises the concepts dual nature. PMID:27451338

  9. Organic brain syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBS; Organic mental disorder (OMS); Chronic organic brain syndrome ... Listed below are disorders associated with OBS. Brain injury caused by ... the brain ( subarachnoid hemorrhage ) Blood clot inside the ...

  10. Whole-brain dynamic CT angiography and perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orrison, W.W. [CHW Nevada Imaging Company, Nevada Imaging Centers, Spring Valley, Las Vegas, NV (United States); College of Osteopathic Medicine, Touro University Nevada, Henderson, NV (United States); Department of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Department of Medical Education, University of Nevada School of Medicine, Reno, NV (United States); Snyder, K.V.; Hopkins, L.N. [Department of Neurosurgery, Millard Fillmore Gates Circle Hospital, Buffalo, NY (United States); Roach, C.J. [School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Advanced Medical Imaging and Genetics (Amigenics), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Ringdahl, E.N. [Department of Psychology, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Nazir, R. [Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad (Pakistan); Hanson, E.H., E-mail: eric.hanson@amigenics.co [College of Osteopathic Medicine, Touro University Nevada, Henderson, NV (United States); Department of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Advanced Medical Imaging and Genetics (Amigenics), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2011-06-15

    The availability of whole brain computed tomography (CT) perfusion has expanded the opportunities for analysing the haemodynamic parameters associated with varied neurological conditions. Examples demonstrating the clinical utility of whole-brain CT perfusion imaging in selected acute and chronic ischaemic arterial neurovascular conditions are presented. Whole-brain CT perfusion enables the detection and focused haemodynamic analyses of acute and chronic arterial conditions in the central nervous system without the limitation of partial anatomical coverage of the brain.

  11. Whole-brain dynamic CT angiography and perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of whole brain computed tomography (CT) perfusion has expanded the opportunities for analysing the haemodynamic parameters associated with varied neurological conditions. Examples demonstrating the clinical utility of whole-brain CT perfusion imaging in selected acute and chronic ischaemic arterial neurovascular conditions are presented. Whole-brain CT perfusion enables the detection and focused haemodynamic analyses of acute and chronic arterial conditions in the central nervous system without the limitation of partial anatomical coverage of the brain.

  12. 3D visualisation of a Jurassic oolitic system with GPR data, Isle of Portland (UK)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Hansen, Trine Lykke; Nielsen, Lars

    architecture to be the result of mixed hydrodynamic conditions associated with wave activity and tidal currents. The Isle shows a island barrier complex which migrates basinwards but also expands laterally, filling up the available space and cannibalising itself. More proximal facies are effectively observed...

  13. Reporting of the air pollution situation in Norway according to EU's new air quality directives. Proposal of a GIS-based tool for reporting on visualisation of the air pollution situation in Norway; Rapportering av forurensningstilstanden i Norge etter EUs nye luftkvalitetsdirektiver. Forslag til verktoey for rapportering og visualisering av forurensningstilstanden i Norge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larssen, Steinar; Thanh, The Nguyen; Hagen, Leif Otto; Endregard, Geir

    1999-12-01

    Norway shall, after 2001, annually report to the EU on the air quality situation in all zones. This report presents a proposal on a data (GIS)-based tool that will make this reporting more efficient. the concept is to visualise the AQ situation in the zones by means of values and isolines on maps, with zooming possibilities. (author)

  14. Visualisation by vital staining with trypan blue of wounds punctured by Varroa destructor mites in pupae of the honey bee (Apis mellifera)

    OpenAIRE

    Kanbar, Ghazwan; ENGELS, Wolf

    2004-01-01

    After invading a honey bee brood cell shortly before capping, female Varroa destructor mites puncture the integument of the host bee in order to suck haemolymph. The perforations used as feeding sites are difficult to detect. We developed a method of vital staining with trypan blue to visualise the wounds. The dye is taken up by damaged epidermal cells in the margin of repeatedly used punctures. This new coloration method allows localisation of wounds in prepupal and especially in all pupal s...

  15. Enhancing watching experience of football matches on TV via modes of interaction and types of visualisation of match-related information on second screen

    OpenAIRE

    Sezen, Ege

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of a doctoral research that is into enhancing user experience of watching football matches on TV through second screen. The focus of investigation, in this regard, is on the modes of interaction and types of visualisation of match-related information on second screen. The process started with a literature review. It is found out that user behaviour of accessing to non-TV- provided match-related information on second screen during the activity of watching football...

  16. Development of a Moodle VLE Plug-in to Support Simultaneous Visualisation of a Collection of Multi-Media Sign Language Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Nolan, Brian

    2010-01-01

    PUBLISHED Using Virtual Learning Environments (VLE) to support blended learning is very common in educational institutes. Delivering learning material in a flexible and semi-structured manner to the learner transforms such systems into powerful eLearning tools. However, the presentation and visualisation of individual or multiple learning objects is mostly dictated by the system and cannot be altered easily. This paper reports on a project between Trinity College Dublin (TCD) and ...

  17. Deep Brain Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Perlmutter, Joel. S.; Mink, Jonathan W.

    2006-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has provided remarkable benefits for people with a variety of neurologic conditions. Stimulation of the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus can dramatically relieve tremor associated with essential tremor or Parkinson disease (PD). Similarly, stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus or the internal segment of the globus pallidus can substantially reduce bradykinesia, rigidity, tremor, and gait difficulties in people with PD. Multiple groups are attempting t...

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" response to confront or escape ... husband questions about Sarah's symptoms and family medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early-life experiences ...

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... managing proper emotional reactions. Reduced ACC activity or damage to this brain area has been linked to ... can diagnose mental disorders are psychologists or clinical social ... —A network of neurons and their interconnections. neuron —A nerve ...

  20. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research ... magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure. mutation —A change in the code for a ...