WorldWideScience

Sample records for brain tumors targeting

  1. Targeting Malignant Brain Tumors with Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Rok Razpotnik; Neža Novak; Vladka Čurin Šerbec; Uros Rajcevic

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies have been shown to be a potent therapeutic tool. However, their use for targeting brain diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and brain cancers, has been limited, particularly because the blood–brain barrier (BBB) makes brain tissue hard to access by conventional antibody-targeting strategies. In this review, we summarize new antibody therapeutic approaches to target brain tumors, especially malignant gliomas, as well as their potential drawbacks. Many different brain deli...

  2. Targeted toxins in brain tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan Michael; Hall, Walter A

    2010-11-01

    Targeted toxins, also known as immunotoxins or cytotoxins, are recombinant molecules that specifically bind to cell surface receptors that are overexpressed in cancer and the toxin component kills the cell. These recombinant proteins consist of a specific antibody or ligand coupled to a protein toxin. The targeted toxins bind to a surface antigen or receptor overexpressed in tumors, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor or interleukin-13 receptor. The toxin part of the molecule in all clinically used toxins is modified from bacterial or plant toxins, fused to an antibody or carrier ligand. Targeted toxins are very effective against cancer cells resistant to radiation and chemotherapy. They are far more potent than any known chemotherapy drug. Targeted toxins have shown an acceptable profile of toxicity and safety in early clinical studies and have demonstrated evidence of a tumor response. Currently, clinical trials with some targeted toxins are complete and the final results are pending. This review summarizes the characteristics of targeted toxins and the key findings of the important clinical studies with targeted toxins in malignant brain tumor patients. Obstacles to successful treatment of malignant brain tumors include poor penetration into tumor masses, the immune response to the toxin component and cancer heterogeneity. Strategies to overcome these limitations are being pursued in the current generation of targeted toxins.

  3. Targeting Malignant Brain Tumors with Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razpotnik, Rok; Novak, Neža; Čurin Šerbec, Vladka; Rajcevic, Uros

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies have been shown to be a potent therapeutic tool. However, their use for targeting brain diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and brain cancers, has been limited, particularly because the blood-brain barrier (BBB) makes brain tissue hard to access by conventional antibody-targeting strategies. In this review, we summarize new antibody therapeutic approaches to target brain tumors, especially malignant gliomas, as well as their potential drawbacks. Many different brain delivery platforms for antibodies have been studied such as liposomes, nanoparticle-based systems, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), and cell-based approaches. We have already shown the successful delivery of single-chain fragment variable (scFv) with CPP as a linker between two variable domains in the brain. Antibodies normally face poor penetration through the BBB, with some variants sufficiently passing the barrier on their own. A "Trojan horse" method allows passage of biomolecules, such as antibodies, through the BBB by receptor-mediated transcytosis (RMT). Such examples of therapeutic antibodies are the bispecific antibodies where one binding specificity recognizes and binds a BBB receptor, enabling RMT and where a second binding specificity recognizes an antigen as a therapeutic target. On the other hand, cell-based systems such as stem cells (SCs) are a promising delivery system because of their tumor tropism and ability to cross the BBB. Genetically engineered SCs can be used in gene therapy, where they express anti-tumor drugs, including antibodies. Different types and sources of SCs have been studied for the delivery of therapeutics to the brain; both mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and neural stem cells (NSCs) show great potential. Following the success in treatment of leukemias and lymphomas, the adoptive T-cell therapies, especially the chimeric antigen receptor-T cells (CAR-Ts), are making their way into glioma treatment as another type of cell-based therapy using the

  4. Targeting Malignant Brain Tumors with Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rok Razpotnik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies have been shown to be a potent therapeutic tool. However, their use for targeting brain diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and brain cancers, has been limited, particularly because the blood–brain barrier (BBB makes brain tissue hard to access by conventional antibody-targeting strategies. In this review, we summarize new antibody therapeutic approaches to target brain tumors, especially malignant gliomas, as well as their potential drawbacks. Many different brain delivery platforms for antibodies have been studied such as liposomes, nanoparticle-based systems, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs, and cell-based approaches. We have already shown the successful delivery of single-chain fragment variable (scFv with CPP as a linker between two variable domains in the brain. Antibodies normally face poor penetration through the BBB, with some variants sufficiently passing the barrier on their own. A “Trojan horse” method allows passage of biomolecules, such as antibodies, through the BBB by receptor-mediated transcytosis (RMT. Such examples of therapeutic antibodies are the bispecific antibodies where one binding specificity recognizes and binds a BBB receptor, enabling RMT and where a second binding specificity recognizes an antigen as a therapeutic target. On the other hand, cell-based systems such as stem cells (SCs are a promising delivery system because of their tumor tropism and ability to cross the BBB. Genetically engineered SCs can be used in gene therapy, where they express anti-tumor drugs, including antibodies. Different types and sources of SCs have been studied for the delivery of therapeutics to the brain; both mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and neural stem cells (NSCs show great potential. Following the success in treatment of leukemias and lymphomas, the adoptive T-cell therapies, especially the chimeric antigen receptor-T cells (CAR-Ts, are making their way into glioma treatment as another type of cell

  5. Modeling and Targeting MYC Genes in Childhood Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Sonja; Bolin, Sara; Weishaupt, Holger; Swartling, Fredrik J

    2017-03-23

    Brain tumors are the second most common group of childhood cancers, accounting for about 20%-25% of all pediatric tumors. Deregulated expression of the MYC family of transcription factors, particularly c-MYC and MYCN genes, has been found in many of these neoplasms, and their expression levels are often correlated with poor prognosis. Elevated c-MYC/MYCN initiates and drives tumorigenesis in many in vivo model systems of pediatric brain tumors. Therefore, inhibition of their oncogenic function is an attractive therapeutic target. In this review, we explore the roles of MYC oncoproteins and their molecular targets during the formation, maintenance, and recurrence of childhood brain tumors. We also briefly summarize recent progress in the development of therapeutic approaches for pharmacological inhibition of MYC activity in these tumors.

  6. Recent advances in brain tumor-targeted nano-drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Lu, Weiyue

    2012-06-01

    Brain tumors represent one of the most challenging and difficult areas in unmet medical needs. Fortunately, the past decade has seen momentous developments in brain tumor research in terms of brain tumor-targeted novel nano-drug delivery systems with significant important superiority over conventional formulations with respect to decreased toxicity and improved pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics. This review first introduces the characteristics of the two major obstacles in brain-tumor targeted delivery, blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-brain tumor barrier (BBTB), and then reviews recent advances in brain tumor-targeted novel nano-drug delivery systems according to their targeting strategies aimed at different stages of brain tumor development and growth. Based on continuously changing vascular characteristics of brain tumors at different development and growth stages, we propose the concept of 'whole-process targeting' for brain tumor for nano-drug delivery systems, referring to a series of overall targeted drug delivery strategies aimed at key points during the whole development of brain tumors.

  7. Uniform brain tumor distribution and tumor associated macrophage targeting of systemically administered dendrimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Mishra, Manoj K; Mangraviti, Antonella; Hwang, Lee; Zhou, Jinyuan; Hanes, Justin; Brem, Henry; Olivi, Alessandro; Tyler, Betty; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M

    2015-06-01

    Effective blood-brain tumor barrier penetration and uniform solid tumor distribution can significantly enhance therapeutic delivery to brain tumors. Hydroxyl-functionalized, generation-4 poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers, with their small size, near-neutral surface charge, and the ability to selectively localize in cells associated with neuroinflammation may offer new opportunities to address these challenges. In this study we characterized the intracranial tumor biodistribution of systemically delivered PAMAM dendrimers in an intracranial rodent gliosarcoma model using fluorescence-based quantification methods and high resolution confocal microscopy. We observed selective and homogeneous distribution of dendrimer throughout the solid tumor (∼6 mm) and peritumoral area within fifteen minutes after systemic administration, with subsequent accumulation and retention in tumor associated microglia/macrophages (TAMs). Neuroinflammation and TAMs have important growth promoting and pro-invasive effects in brain tumors. The rapid clearance of systemically administered dendrimers from major organs promises minimal off-target adverse effects of conjugated drugs. Therefore, selective delivery of immunomodulatory molecules to TAM, using hydroxyl PAMAM dendrimers, may hold promise for therapy of glioblastoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  9. Conjugation of functionalized SPIONs with transferrin for targeting and imaging brain glial tumors in rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weili Jiang

    Full Text Available Currently, effective and specific diagnostic imaging of brain glioma is a major challenge. Nanomedicine plays an essential role by delivering the contrast agent in a targeted manner to specific tumor cells, leading to improvement in accurate diagnosis by good visualization and specific demonstration of tumor cells. This study investigated the preparation and characterization of a targeted MR contrast agent, transferrin-conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Tf-SPIONs, for brain glioma detection. MR imaging showed the obvious contrast change of brain glioma before and after administration of Tf-SPIONs in C6 glioma rat model in vivo on T2 weighted imaging. Significant contrast enhancement of brain glioma could still be clearly seen even 48 h post injection, due to the retention of Tf-SPIONs in cytoplasm of tumor cells which was proved by Prussian blue staining. Thus, these results suggest that Tf-SPIONs could be a potential targeting MR contrast agent for the brain glioma.

  10. Targeting the PD-1 pathway in pediatric solid tumors and brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner LM

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Lars M Wagner,1 Val R Adams2 1Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, 2Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA Abstract: While remarkable advances have been made in the treatment of pediatric leukemia over the past decades, new therapies are needed for children with advanced solid tumors and high-grade brain tumors who fail standard chemotherapy regimens. Immunotherapy with immune checkpoint inhibitors acting through the programmed cell death-1 (PD-1 pathway has shown efficacy in some chemotherapy-resistant adult cancers, generating interest that these agents may also be helpful to treat certain refractory pediatric malignancies. In this manuscript we review current strategies for targeting the PD-1 pathway, highlighting putative biomarkers and the rationale for investigation of these drugs to treat common pediatric tumors such as sarcoma, neuroblastoma, and high-grade glioma. We summarize the completed and ongoing clinical trial data available, and suggest potential applications for further study. Keywords: PD-1, nivolumab, pembrolizumab, pediatric, sarcoma, neuroblastoma, glioma

  11. Targeted Doxorubicin Delivery to Brain Tumors via Minicells: Proof of Principle Using Dogs with Spontaneously Occurring Tumors as a Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDiarmid, Jennifer A.; Langova, Veronika; Bailey, Dale; Pattison, Scott T.; Pattison, Stacey L.; Christensen, Neil; Armstrong, Luke R.; Brahmbhatt, Vatsala N.; Smolarczyk, Katarzyna; Harrison, Matthew T.; Costa, Marylia; Mugridge, Nancy B.; Sedliarou, Ilya; Grimes, Nicholas A.; Kiss, Debra L.; Stillman, Bruce; Hann, Christine L.; Gallia, Gary L.; Graham, Robert M.; Brahmbhatt, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Background Cytotoxic chemotherapy can be very effective for the treatment of cancer but toxicity on normal tissues often limits patient tolerance and often causes long-term adverse effects. The objective of this study was to assist in the preclinical development of using modified, non-living bacterially-derived minicells to deliver the potent chemotherapeutic doxorubicin via epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeting. Specifically, this study sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of EGFR targeted, doxorubicin loaded minicells (designated EGFRminicellsDox) to deliver doxorubicin to spontaneous brain tumors in 17 companion dogs; a comparative oncology model of human brain cancers. Methodology/Principle Findings EGFRminicellsDox were administered weekly via intravenous injection to 17 dogs with late-stage brain cancers. Biodistribution was assessed using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Anti-tumor response was determined using MRI, and blood samples were subject to toxicology (hematology, biochemistry) and inflammatory marker analysis. Targeted, doxorubicin-loaded minicells rapidly localized to the core of brain tumors. Complete resolution or marked tumor regression (>90% reduction in tumor volume) were observed in 23.53% of the cohort, with lasting anti-tumor responses characterized by remission in three dogs for more than two years. The median overall survival was 264 days (range 49 to 973). No adverse clinical, hematological or biochemical effects were observed with repeated administration of EGFRminicellsDox (30 to 98 doses administered in 10 of the 17 dogs). Conclusions/Significance Targeted minicells loaded with doxorubicin were safely administered to dogs with late stage brain cancer and clinical activity was observed. These findings demonstrate the strong potential for clinical applications of targeted, doxorubicin-loaded minicells for the effective treatment of patients with brain cancer. On

  12. Targeted Doxorubicin Delivery to Brain Tumors via Minicells: Proof of Principle Using Dogs with Spontaneously Occurring Tumors as a Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A MacDiarmid

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic chemotherapy can be very effective for the treatment of cancer but toxicity on normal tissues often limits patient tolerance and often causes long-term adverse effects. The objective of this study was to assist in the preclinical development of using modified, non-living bacterially-derived minicells to deliver the potent chemotherapeutic doxorubicin via epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR targeting. Specifically, this study sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of EGFR targeted, doxorubicin loaded minicells (designated EGFRminicellsDox to deliver doxorubicin to spontaneous brain tumors in 17 companion dogs; a comparative oncology model of human brain cancers.EGFRminicellsDox were administered weekly via intravenous injection to 17 dogs with late-stage brain cancers. Biodistribution was assessed using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Anti-tumor response was determined using MRI, and blood samples were subject to toxicology (hematology, biochemistry and inflammatory marker analysis. Targeted, doxorubicin-loaded minicells rapidly localized to the core of brain tumors. Complete resolution or marked tumor regression (>90% reduction in tumor volume were observed in 23.53% of the cohort, with lasting anti-tumor responses characterized by remission in three dogs for more than two years. The median overall survival was 264 days (range 49 to 973. No adverse clinical, hematological or biochemical effects were observed with repeated administration of EGFRminicellsDox (30 to 98 doses administered in 10 of the 17 dogs.Targeted minicells loaded with doxorubicin were safely administered to dogs with late stage brain cancer and clinical activity was observed. These findings demonstrate the strong potential for clinical applications of targeted, doxorubicin-loaded minicells for the effective treatment of patients with brain cancer. On this basis, we have designed a Phase 1 clinical study of

  13. Targeting brain tumor cAMP: the case for sex-specific therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Warrington

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A relationship between cyclic adenosine 3’, 5’-monophosphate (cAMP levels and brain tumor biology has been evident for nearly as long as cAMP and its synthetase, adenylate cyclase (ADCY have been known. The importance of the pathway in brain tumorigenesis has been demonstrated in vitro and in multiple animal models. Recently, we provided human validation for a cooperating oncogenic role for cAMP in brain tumorigenesis when we found that SNPs in ADCY8 were correlated with glioma (brain tumor risk in individuals with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1. Together, these studies provide a strong rationale for targeting cAMP in brain tumor therapy. However, the cAMP pathway is well known to be sexually dimorphic, and SNPs in ADCY8 affected glioma risk in a sex-specific fashion, elevating the risk for females while protecting males. The cAMP pathway can be targeted at multiple levels in the regulation of its synthesis and degradation. Sex differences in response to drugs that target cAMP regulators indicate that successful targeting of the cAMP pathway for brain tumor patients is likely to require matching specific mechanisms of drug action with patient sex.

  14. Nanobiotechnology-based delivery strategies: New frontiers in brain tumor targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangraviti, Antonella; Gullotti, David; Tyler, Betty; Brem, Henry

    2016-10-28

    Despite recent technological advancements and promising preclinical experiments, brain tumor patients are still met with limited treatment options. Some of the barriers to clinical improvements include the systemic toxicity of cytotoxic compounds, the impedance of the blood brain barrier (BBB), and the lack of therapeutic agents that can selectively target the intracranial tumor environment. To overcome such barriers, a number of chemotherapeutic agents and nucleic acid-based therapies are rapidly being synthesized and tested as new brain tumor-targeted delivery strategies. Novel carriers include liposomal and polymeric nanoparticles, wafers, microchips, microparticle-based nanoplatforms and cells-based vectors. Strong preclinical results suggest that these nanotechnologies are set to transform the therapeutic paradigm for brain tumor treatment. In addition to new tumoricidal agents, parallel work is also being conducted on the BBB front. Preclinical testing of chemical and physical modulation strategies is yielding improved intracranial concentrations. New diagnostic and therapeutic imaging techniques, such as high-intensity focused ultrasound and MRI-guided focused ultrasound, are being used to modulate the BBB in a more precise and non-invasive manner. This review details some of the tremendous advances that are being explored in current brain tumor targeted therapies, including local implant development, nanobiotechnology-based delivery strategies, and techniques of BBB manipulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Kinome Profiling in Pediatric Brain Tumors as a New Approach for Target Discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikkema, Arend H.; Diks, Sander H.; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.; ter Elst, Arja; Scherpen, Frank J. G.; Hoving, Eelco W.; Ruijtenbeek, Rob; Boender, Piet J.; de Wijn, Rik; Kamps, Willem A.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Progression in pediatric brain tumor growth is thought to be the net result of signaling through various protein kinase-mediated networks driving cell proliferation. Defining new targets for treatment of human malignancies, without a priori knowledge on aberrant cell signaling activity, remains

  16. Impacts of Blood-Brain Barrier in Drug Delivery and Targeting of Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadollah Omidi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Entry of blood circulating agents into the brain is highly selectively controlled by specific transport machineries at the blood brain barrier (BBB, whose excellent barrier restrictiveness make brain drug delivery and targeting very challenging. Methods: Essential information on BBB cellular microenvironment were reviewed and discussed towards impacts of BBB on brain drug delivery and targeting. Results: Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs form unique biological structure and architecture in association with astrocytes and pericytes, in which microenvironment the BCECs express restrictive tight junctional complexes that block the paracellular inward/outward traverse of biomolecules/compounds. These cells selectively/specifically control the transportation process through carrier and/or receptor mediated transport machineries that can also be exploited for the delivery of pharmaceuticals into the brain. Intelligent molecular therapies should be designed using such transport machineries for the efficient delivery of designated drugs into the brain. For better clinical outcomes, these smart pharmaceuticals should be engineered as seamless nanosystems to provide simultaneous imaging and therapy (multimodal theranostics. Conclusion: The exceptional functional presence of BBB selectively controls inward and outward transportation mechanisms, thus advanced smart multifunctional nanomedicines are needed for the effective brain drug delivery and targeting. Fully understanding the biofunctions of BBB appears to be a central step for engineering of intelligent seamless therapeutics consisting of homing device for targeting, imaging moiety for detecting, and stimuli responsive device for on-demand liberation of therapeutic agent.

  17. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  18. Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  19. Brain tumor - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  20. Targeted Multifunctional Nanoparticles cure and image Brain Tumors: Selective MRI Contrast Enhancement and Photodynamic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopelman, Raoul

    2008-03-01

    Aimed at targeted therapy and imaging of brain tumors, our approach uses targeted, multi-functional nano-particles (NP). A typical nano-particle contains a biologically inert, non-toxic matrix, biodegradable and bio-eliminable over a long time period. It also contains active components, such as fluorescent chemical indicators, photo-sensitizers, MRI contrast enhancement agents and optical imaging dyes. In addition, its surface contains molecular targeting units, e.g. peptides or antibodies, as well as a cloaking agent, to prevent uptake by the immune system, i.e. enabling control of the plasma residence time. These dynamic nano-platforms (DNP) contain contrast enhancement agents for the imaging (MRI, optical, photo-acoustic) of targeted locations, i.e. tumors. Added to this are targeted therapy agents, such as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT). A simple protocol, for rats implanted with human brain cancer, consists of tail injection with DNPs, followed by 5 min red light illumination of the tumor region. It resulted in excellent cure statistics for 9L glioblastoma.

  1. EAG2 potassium channel with evolutionarily conserved function as a brain tumor target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xi; He, Ye; Dubuc, Adrian M.; Hashizume, Rintaro; Zhang, Wei; Reimand, Jüri; Yang, Huanghe; Wang, Tongfei A.; Stehbens, Samantha J.; Younger, Susan; Barshow, Suzanne; Zhu, Sijun; Cooper, Michael K.; Peacock, John; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Garzia, Livia; Wu, Xiaochong; Remke, Marc; Forester, Craig M.; Kim, Charles C.; Weiss, William A.; James, C. David; Shuman, Marc A.; Bader, Gary D.; Mueller, Sabine; Taylor, Michael D.; Jan, Yuh Nung; Jan, Lily Yeh

    2015-01-01

    Over 20% of the drugs for treating human diseases target ion channels, however, no cancer drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is intended to target an ion channel. Here, we demonstrate the evolutionarily conserved function of EAG2 potassium channel in promoting brain tumor growth and metastasis, delineate downstream pathways and uncover a mechanism for different potassium channels to functionally corporate and regulate mitotic cell volume and tumor progression. We show that EAG2 potassium channel is enriched at the trailing edge of migrating MB cells to regulate local cell volume dynamics, thereby facilitating cell motility. We identify the FDA-approved antipsychotic drug thioridazine as an EAG2 channel blocker that reduces xenografted MB growth and metastasis, and present a case report of repurposing thioridazine for treating a human patient. Our findings thus illustrate the potential of targeting ion channels in cancer treatment. PMID:26258683

  2. Enhanced Delivery of Gold Nanoparticles with Therapeutic Potential for Targeting Human Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etame, Arnold B.

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) remains a major challenge to the advancement and application of systemic anti-cancer therapeutics into the central nervous system. The structural and physiological delivery constraints of the BBB significantly limit the effectiveness of conventional chemotherapy, thereby making systemic administration a non-viable option for the vast majority of chemotherapy agents. Furthermore, the lack of specificity of conventional systemic chemotherapy when applied towards malignant brain tumors remains a major shortcoming. Hence novel therapeutic strategies that focus both on targeted and enhanced delivery across the BBB are warranted. In recent years nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as attractive vehicles for efficient delivery of targeted anti-cancer therapeutics. In particular, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have gained prominence in several targeting applications involving systemic cancers. Their enhanced permeation and retention within permissive tumor microvasculature provide a selective advantage for targeting. Malignant brain tumors also exhibit transport-permissive microvasculature secondary to blood brain barrier disruption. Hence AuNPs may have potential relevance for brain tumor targeting. However, the permeation of AuNPs across the BBB has not been well characterized, and hence is a potential limitation for successful application of AuNP-based therapeutics within the central nervous system (CNS). In this dissertation, we designed and characterized AuNPs and assessed the role of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the physical and biological properties of AuNPs. We established a size-dependent permeation profile with respect to core size as well as PEG length when AuNPs were assessed through a transport-permissive in-vitro BBB. This study was the first of its kind to systematically examine the influence of design on permeation of AuNPs through transport-permissive BBB. Given the significant delivery limitations through the non

  3. Brain tumor (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain tumors are classified depending on the exact site of the tumor, the type of tissue involved, benign ... tendencies of the tumor, and other factors. Primary brain tumors can arise from the brain cells, the meninges ( ...

  4. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Needs a Kidney Transplant Vision Facts and Myths Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors Print A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  5. Brain Tumor Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Young Adult Guidelines For brain tumor information and support Call: 800-886-ABTA (2282) or Complete our contact form Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis Newly Diagnosed Neurological Exam ...

  6. Brain Tumor Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Young Adult Guidelines For brain tumor information and support Call: 800-886-ABTA (2282) or Complete our contact form Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Headaches Seizures Memory Depression Mood ...

  7. Thermosensitive PLA based nanodispersion for targeting brain tumor via intranasal route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Darshana S., E-mail: darshanaj_cup@yahoo.com [C.U. Shah College of Pharmacy, S.N.D.T Women' s University, Juhu Tara Road, Santacruz (West), Mumbai 400 049 (India); Bajaj, Amrita N. [C.U. Shah College of Pharmacy, S.N.D.T Women' s University, Juhu Tara Road, Santacruz (West), Mumbai 400 049 (India); Athawale, Rajani B., E-mail: rajani.athawale@gmail.com [C.U. Shah College of Pharmacy, S.N.D.T Women' s University, Juhu Tara Road, Santacruz (West), Mumbai 400 049 (India); Shikhande, Shruti S. [C.U. Shah College of Pharmacy, S.N.D.T Women' s University, Juhu Tara Road, Santacruz (West), Mumbai 400 049 (India); Pandey, Abhijeet [H. R Patel Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Shirpur, Maharashtra (India); Goel, Peeyush N.; Gude, Rajiv P. [Gude Lab, Advanced Centre for Treatment, Research & Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai 410 210 (India); Patil, Satish; Raut, Preeti [Cipla Pvt. Ltd., Vikhroli (West), Mumbai (India)

    2016-06-01

    Delivery of drugs to the brain via nasal route has been studied by many researchers. However, low residence time, mucociliary clearance and enzymatically active environment of nasal cavity pose many challenges to successful nasal delivery of drugs. We aim to deliver methotrexate by designing thermosensitive nanodispersion exhibiting enhanced residence time in nasal cavity and bypassing the blood brain barrier (BBB). PLA nanoparticles were developed using solvent evaporation technique. The developed nanoparticles were further dispersed in prepared thermosensitive vehicle of poloxamer 188 and Carbopol 934 to impart the property of increased residence time. The formulated nanoparticles demonstrated no interaction with the simulated nasal fluids (SNF), mucin, serum proteins and erythrocytes which demonstrate the safety of developed formulation for nasal administration. The penetration property of nanoparticles though the nasal mucosa was higher than the pure drug due to low mucociliary clearance. The developed nanoparticles diffused though the membrane pores and rapidly distributed into the brain portions compared to the pure drug. There was detectable and quantifiable amount of drug seen in the brain as demonstrated by in vivo brain distribution studies with considerably low amount of drug deposition in the lungs. The pharmacokinetic parameters demonstrated the enhancement in circulation half life, area under curve (AUC) and Cmax of the drug when administered intranasal in encapsulated form. Thus, the thermosensitive nanodispersions are surely promising delivery systems for delivering anticancer agents though the nasal route for potential treatment of brain tumors. - Highlights: • The present investigation explores intra-nasal route as potential route for targeting brain tumor. • Thermosensitive nanodispersion has been formulated for enhancing nasal residence time. • PLA nanoparticles enhance penetration into the brain owing to hydrophobic nature and small size

  8. Targeting BRAF V600E and Autophagy in Pediatric Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    for childhood central nervous system (CNS) tumors, they remain the leading cause of death in pediatric oncology . One potential therapeutic...clinical trial design for pediatric brain tumor patients harboring the mutation. Keywords: Autophagy BRAF Brain tumor Pediatric Resistance...I submitted an abstract of my most recent findings to the Society of Neuro- Oncology Pediatric Neuro- Oncology Basic and Translational Research

  9. Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Target Brain Tumor-Initiating Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung Ah; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Kwon, Sung Eun; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Phi, Ji Hoon; Choi, Jung Won; Jin, Xiong; Lim, Ja Yun; Kim, Hyunggee; Kim, Seung-Ki

    2015-01-01

    In neuro-oncology, the biology of neural stem cells (NSCs) has been pursued in two ways: as tumor-initiating cells (TICs) and as a potential cell-based vehicle for gene therapy. NSCs as well as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been reported to possess tumor tropism capacities. However, there is little data on the migratory capacity of MSCs toward brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs). This study focuses on the ability of human adipose tissue derived MSCs (hAT-MSCs) to target BTICs and their crosstalk in the microenvironment. BTICs were isolated from three different types of brain tumors. The migration capacities of hAT-MSCs toward BTICs were examined using an in vitro migration assay and in vivo bioluminescence imaging analysis. To investigate the crosstalk between hAT-MSCs and BTICs, we analyzed the mRNA expression patterns of cyto-chemokine receptors by RT-qPCR and the protein level of their ligands in co-cultured medium. The candidate cyto-chemokine receptors were selectively inhibited using siRNAs. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments showed that hAT-MSCs possess migratory abilities to target BTICs isolated from medulloblastoma, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (AT/RT) and glioblastoma. Different types of cyto-chemokines are involved in the crosstalk between hAT-MSCs and BTICs (medulloblastoma and AT/RT: CXCR4/SDF-1, CCR5/RANTES, IL6R/IL-6 and IL8R/IL8; glioblastoma: CXCR4/SDF-1, IL6R/IL-6, IL8R/IL-8 and IGF1R/IGF-1). Our findings demonstrated the migratory ability of hAT-MSCs for BTICs, implying the potential use of MSCs as a delivery vehicle for gene therapy. This study also confirmed the expression of hAT-MSCs cytokine receptors and the BTIC ligands that play roles in their crosstalk.

  10. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... navigate their brain tumor diagnosis. WATCH AND SHARE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Central Nervous System Cancers Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  11. Targeting c-Met receptor overcomes TRAIL-resistance in brain tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanlu Du

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL induced apoptosis specifically in tumor cells. However, with approximately half of all known tumor lines being resistant to TRAIL, the identification of TRAIL sensitizers and their mechanism of action become critical to broadly use TRAIL as a therapeutic agent. In this study, we explored whether c-Met protein contributes to TRAIL sensitivity. We found a direct correlation between the c-Met expression level and TRAIL resistance. We show that the knock down c-Met protein, but not inhibition, sensitized brain tumor cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis by interrupting the interaction between c-Met and TRAIL cognate death receptor (DR 5. This interruption greatly induces the formation of death-inducing signaling complex (DISC and subsequent downstream apoptosis signaling. Using intracranially implanted brain tumor cells and stem cell (SC lines engineered with different combinations of fluorescent and bioluminescent proteins, we show that SC expressing a potent and secretable TRAIL (S-TRAIL have a significant anti-tumor effect in mice bearing c-Met knock down of TRAIL-resistant brain tumors. To our best knowledge, this is the first study that demonstrates c-Met contributes to TRAIL sensitivity of brain tumor cells and has implications for developing effective therapies for brain tumor patients.

  12. Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  13. Targeting c-Met receptor overcomes TRAIL-resistance in brain tumors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Du, Wanlu; Uslar, Liubov; Sevala, Sindhura; Shah, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    .... We show that the knock down c-Met protein, but not inhibition, sensitized brain tumor cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis by interrupting the interaction between c-Met and TRAIL cognate death receptor (DR) 5...

  14. Targeting c-Met Receptor Overcomes TRAIL-Resistance in Brain Tumors: e95490

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wanlu Du; Liubov Uslar; Sindhura Sevala; Khalid Shah

    2014-01-01

    .... We show that the knock down c-Met protein, but not inhibition, sensitized brain tumor cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis by interrupting the interaction between c-Met and TRAIL cognate death receptor (DR) 5...

  15. Pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poussaint, Tina Y. [Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Panigrahy, Ashok [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Huisman, Thierry A.G.M. [Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children' s Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology and Pediatric Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Among all causes of death in children from solid tumors, pediatric brain tumors are the most common. This article includes an overview of a subset of infratentorial and supratentorial tumors with a focus on tumor imaging features and molecular advances and treatments of these tumors. Key to understanding the imaging features of brain tumors is a firm grasp of other disease processes that can mimic tumor on imaging. We also review imaging features of a common subset of tumor mimics. (orig.)

  16. HIF-1α- Targeting Acriflavine Provides Long Term Survival and Radiological Tumor Response in Brain Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangraviti, Antonella; Raghavan, Tula; Volpin, Francesco; Skuli, Nicolas; Gullotti, David; Zhou, Jinyuan; Asnaghi, Laura; Sankey, Eric; Liu, Ann; Wang, Yuan; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Gorelick, Noah; Serra, Riccardo; Peters, Michael; Schriefer, Destiny; Delaspre, Fabien; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Eberhart, Charles G; Brem, Henry; Olivi, Alessandro; Tyler, Betty

    2017-11-02

    Tumor progression, limited efficacy of current standard treatments, and the rise in patient mortality are associated with gene expression caused by the synergistic action of intratumoral hypoxia and HIF-1α activation. For this reason, recent investigations have focused on HIF-targeting therapeutic agents, with encouraging preclinical and clinical results in solid tumors. Here we describe the efficacy of a HIF-1α inhibitor, Acriflavine, and demonstrate its potency against brain cancer. This safe antibacterial dye induces cell death and apoptosis in several glioma cell lines, targets HIF-1α-mediated pathways, and decreases the level of PGK1, VEGF and HIF-1α in vitro and in vivo. Administered locally via biodegradable polymers, Acriflavine provides significant benefits in survival resulting in nearly 100% long term survival, confirmed by MRI and histological analyses. This study reports preclinical evidence that this safe, small molecule can contribute to brain tumor therapy and highlights the significance of HIF-1α-targeting molecules.

  17. Children's Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 Family Donate Volunteer Justin's Hope Fund Children’s Brain Tumor Foundation, A non-profit organization, was founded ... and the long term outlook for children with brain and spinal cord tumors through research, support, education, ...

  18. Metastatic brain tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript. A metastatic brain tumor is cancer that started in another part of the body ... of cancer rarely spread to the brain, such as colon cancer and prostate cancer. In other rare cases, a tumor can ...

  19. Polyethyleneimine-modified iron oxide nanoparticles for brain tumor drug delivery using magnetic targeting and intra-carotid administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertok, Beata; David, Allan E.; Yang, Victor C.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the applicability of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified magnetic nanoparticles (GPEI) as a potential vascular drug/gene carrier to brain tumors. In vitro, GPEI exhibited high cell association and low cell toxicity – properties which are highly desirable for intracellular drug/gene delivery. In addition, a high saturation magnetization of 93 emu/g Fe was expected to facilitate magnetic targeting of GPEI to brain tumor lesions. However, following intravenous administration, GPEI could not be magnetically accumulated in tumors of rats harboring orthotopic 9L-gliosarcomas due to its poor pharmacokinetic properties, reflected by a negligibly low plasma AUC of 12 ± 3 μg Fe/ml*min. To improve “passive” GPEI presentation to brain tumor vasculature for subsequent “active” magnetic capture, we examined the intra-carotid route as an alternative for nanoparticle administration. Intra-carotid administration in conjunction with magnetic targeting resulted in 30-fold (p = 0.002) increase in tumor entrapment of GPEI compared to that seen with intravenous administration. In addition, magnetic accumulation of cationic GPEI (ζ-potential = + 37.2 mV) in tumor lesions was 5.2-fold higher (p = 0.004) than that achieved with slightly anionic G100 (ζ-potential = −12 mV) following intra-carotid administration, while no significant accumulation difference was detected between the two types of nanoparticles in the contra-lateral brain (p = 0.187). These promising results warrant further investigation of GPEI as a potential cell-permeable, magnetically-responsive platform for brain tumor delivery of drugs and genes. PMID:20494439

  20. Non-virally engineered human adipose mesenchymal stem cells produce BMP4, target brain tumors, and extend survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangraviti, Antonella; Tzeng, Stephany Y; Gullotti, David; Kozielski, Kristen L; Kim, Jennifer E; Seng, Michael; Abbadi, Sara; Schiapparelli, Paula; Sarabia-Estrada, Rachel; Vescovi, Angelo; Brem, Henry; Olivi, Alessandro; Tyler, Betty; Green, Jordan J; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-09-01

    There is a need for enabling non-viral nanobiotechnology to allow safe and effective gene therapy and cell therapy, which can be utilized to treat devastating diseases such as brain cancer. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) display high anti-glioma tropism and represent a promising delivery vehicle for targeted brain tumor therapy. In this study, we demonstrate that non-viral, biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) can be used to engineer hAMSCs with higher efficacy (75% of cells) than leading commercially available reagents and high cell viability. To accomplish this, we engineered a poly(beta-amino ester) (PBAE) polymer structure to transfect hAMSCs with significantly higher efficacy than Lipofectamine™ 2000. We then assessed the ability of NP-engineered hAMSCs to deliver bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), which has been shown to have a novel therapeutic effect by targeting human brain tumor initiating cells (BTIC), a source of cancer recurrence, in a human primary malignant glioma model. We demonstrated that hAMSCs genetically engineered with polymeric nanoparticles containing BMP4 plasmid DNA (BMP4/NP-hAMSCs) secrete BMP4 growth factor while maintaining their multipotency and preserving their migration and invasion capacities. We also showed that this approach can overcome a central challenge for brain therapeutics, overcoming the blood brain barrier, by demonstrating that NP-engineered hAMSCs can migrate to the brain and penetrate the brain tumor after both intranasal and systemic intravenous administration. Critically, athymic rats bearing human primary BTIC-derived tumors and treated intranasally with BMP4/NP-hAMSCs showed significantly improved survival compared to those treated with control GFP/NP-hAMCSs. This study demonstrates that synthetic polymeric nanoparticles are a safe and effective approach for stem cell-based cancer-targeting therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Tumor Types: Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to reveal the vast diversity of genetic and epigenetic alterations that exist between brain tumors. This biological ... social workers, psychologists, and nurses. A supportive family environment is also helpful. Surgery GBM’s capacity to wildly ...

  2. Modifying the planning target volume to optimize the dose distribution in dynamic conformal arc therapy for large metastatic brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Kengo; Kosaka, Yasuhiro; Imagumbai, Toshiyuki; Ueki, Kazuhito; Narukami, Ryo; Hattori, Takayuki; Kokubo, Masaki

    2017-06-01

    When treating large metastatic brain tumors with stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT), high dose conformity to target is difficult to achieve. Employing a modified planning target volume (mPTV) instead of the original PTV may be one way to improve the dose distribution in linear accelerator-based SRT using a dynamic conformal technique. In this study, we quantitatively analyzed the impact of a mPTV on dose distribution. Twenty-four tumors with a maximum diameter of >2 cm were collected. For each tumor, two plans were created: one used a mPTV and the other did not. The mPTV was produced by shrinking or enlarging the original PTV according to the dose distribution in the original plan. The dose conformity was evaluated and compared between the plans using a two-sided paired t test. The conformity index defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group was 1.34 ± 0.10 and 1.41 ± 0.13, and Paddick's conformity index was 0.75 ± 0.05 and 0.71 ± 0.06, for the plans with and without a mPTV, respectively. All of these improvements were statistically significant (P < 0.05). The use of a mPTV can improve target conformity when planning SRT for large metastatic brain tumors.

  3. Brain Tumor Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tumor surgery include: Seizures Weakness Balance/coordination difficulties Memory or cognitive problems Spinal fluid leakage Meningitis Brain swelling Stroke Excess fluid in the brain Coma Death Recovery Time Recovery time depends on: The procedure performed. ...

  4. Focused ultrasound delivery of Raman nanoparticles across the blood-brain barrier: Potential for targeting experimental brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Roberto Jose; McVeigh, Patrick Z.; O’Reilly, Meaghan A.; Burrell, Kelly; Bebenek, Matthew; Smith, Christian; Etame, Arnold; Zadeh, Gelareh; Hynynen, Kullervo; Wilson, Brian C.; Rutka, James T.

    2014-01-01

    Spectral mapping of nanoparticles with surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) capability in the near-infrared range is an emerging molecular imaging technique. We used magnetic resonance image-guided transcranial focused ultrasound (TcMRgFUS) to reversibly disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB) adjacent to brain tumor margins in rats. Glioma cells were found to internalize SERS capable nanoparticles of 50 nm or 120 nm physical diameter. Surface coating with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody or non-specific human immunoglobulin G, resulted in enhanced cell uptake of nanoparticles in-vitro compared to nanoparticles with methyl terminated 12-unit polyethylene glycol surface. BBB disruption permitted the delivery of SERS capable spherical 50 or 120 nm gold nanoparticles to the tumor margins. Thus, nanoparticles with SERS imaging capability can be delivered across the BBB non-invasively using TcMRgFUS and have the potential to be used as optical tracking agents at the invasive front of malignant brain tumors. PMID:24374363

  5. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenny, P.A.; Lee, G.Y.; Bissell, M.J.

    2006-11-07

    Despite some notable successes cancer remains, for the most part, a seemingly intractable problem. There is, however, a growing appreciation that targeting the tumor epithelium in isolation is not sufficient as there is an intricate mutually sustaining synergy between the tumor epithelial cells and their surrounding stroma. As the details of this dialogue emerge, new therapeutic targets have been proposed. The FDA has already approved drugs targeting microenvironmental components such as VEGF and aromatase and many more agents are in the pipeline. In this article, we describe some of the 'druggable' targets and processes within the tumor microenvironment and review the approaches being taken to disrupt these interactions.

  6. Engineering Novel Targeted Boron-10-Enriched Theranostic Nanomedicine to Combat against Murine Brain Tumors via MR Imaging-Guided Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuthala, Naresh; Vankayala, Raviraj; Li, Yi-Nan; Chiang, Chi-Shiun; Hwang, Kuo Chu

    2017-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a very common type of "incurable" malignant brain tumor. Although many treatment options are currently available, most of them eventually fail due to its recurrence. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) emerges as an alternative noninvasive therapeutic treatment modality. The major challenge in treating GBMs using BNCT is to achieve selective imaging, targeting, and sufficient accumulation of boron-containing drug at the tumor site so that effective destruction of tumor cells can be achieved without harming the normal brain cells. To tackle this challenge, this study demonstrates for the first time that an unprecedented 10 B-enriched (96% 10 B enrichment) boron nanoparticle nanomedicine (10 BSGRF NPs) surface-modified with a Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled RGD-K peptide can pass through the brain blood barrier, selectively target at GBM brain tumor sites, and deliver high therapeutic dosage (50.5 µg 10 B g-1 cells) of boron atoms to tumor cells with a good tumor-to-blood boron ratio of 2.8. The 10 BSGRF NPs not only can enhance the contrast of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to help diagnose the location/size/progress of brain tumor, but also effectively suppress murine brain tumors via MR imaging-guided BNCT, prolonging the half-life of mice from 22 d (untreated group) to 39 d. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Brain Tumors and Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can help calm the mind. Meditation, guided imagery, music therapy, and yoga are just a few worth investigating. Home Donor and Privacy Policies Find Resources Disclaimer Donate Subscribe Login American Brain Tumor Association 8550 W. Bryn Mawr Ave. Ste ...

  8. Brain Tumors - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Brain Tumors URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/braintumors.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  9. Convection-enhanced delivery of targeted quantum dot-immunoliposome hybrid nanoparticles to intracranial brain tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Kevin C; Hashizume, Rintaro; Noble, Charles O; Serwer, Laura P; Drummond, Daryl C; Kirpotin, Dmitri B; Kuwabara, Anne M; Chao, Lucy X; Chen, Fanqing F; James, Charles D; Park, John W

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate combining targeting strategy and convection-enhanced delivery in brain tumor models by imaging quantum dot-immunoliposome hybrid nanoparticles. An EGF receptor-targeted, quantum dot-immunoliposome hybrid nanoparticle (QD-IL) was synthesized. In vitro uptake was measured by flow cytometry and intracellular localization was imaged by confocal microscopy. In the in vivo study, QD-ILs were delivered to intracranial xenografts via convection-enhanced delivery and fluorescence was monitored noninvasively in real-time. QD-ILs exhibited specific and efficient uptake in vitro and exhibited approximately 1.3- to 5.0-fold higher total fluorescence compared with nontargeted counterpart in intracranial brain tumor xenografts in vivo. QD-ILs serve as an effective imaging agent in vitro and in vivo, and the data suggest that ligand-directed liposomal nanoparticles in conjunction with convection-enhanced delivery may offer therapeutic benefits for glioblastoma treatment as a result of specific and efficient uptake by malignant cells.

  10. Epilepsy and brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ENGLOT, DARIO J.; CHANG, EDWARD F.; VECHT, CHARLES J.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common in patients with brain tumors, and epilepsy can significantly impact patient quality of life. Therefore, a thorough understanding of rates and predictors of seizures, and the likelihood of seizure freedom after resection, is critical in the treatment of brain tumors. Among all tumor types, seizures are most common with glioneuronal tumors (70–80%), particularly in patients with frontotemporal or insular lesions. Seizures are also common in individuals with glioma, with the highest rates of epilepsy (60–75%) observed in patients with low-grade gliomas located in superficial cortical or insular regions. Approximately 20–50% of patients with meningioma and 20–35% of those with brain metastases also suffer from seizures. After tumor resection, approximately 60–90% are rendered seizure-free, with most favorable seizure outcomes seen in individuals with glioneuronal tumors. Gross total resection, earlier surgical therapy, and a lack of generalized seizures are common predictors of a favorable seizure outcome. With regard to anticonvulsant medication selection, evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of focal epilepsy should be followed, and individual patient factors should also be considered, including patient age, sex, organ dysfunction, comorbidity, or cotherapy. As concomitant chemotherapy commonly forms an essential part of glioma treatment, enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants should be avoided when possible. Seizure freedom is the ultimate goal in the treatment of brain tumor patients with epilepsy, given the adverse effects of seizures on quality of life. PMID:26948360

  11. Upconversion nanoparticles conjugated with Gd(3+) -DOTA and RGD for targeted dual-modality imaging of brain tumor xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jiefu; Xu, Zhenhua; Zhang, Yue; Gu, Yan-Juan; Lam, Michael Hon-Wah; Wong, Wing-Tak

    2013-11-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant form of primary brain tumors in human. Small molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents are used for GBM diagnosis. However, conventional contrast agents have several limitations, such as low T1 relaxivity, short circulation half lives and absence of tumor targeting. Herein, we develop an upconversion nanoprobe labeled with Gd(3+) -DOTA and RGD (UCNP-Gd-RGD) for dual-modality imaging of glioblastoma. The preparation of UCNP-Gd-RGD starts with amine-functional upconversion nanoparticle core, followed by PEGylation, Gd(3+) DOTA conjugation and RGD labeling. The obtained UCNP-Gd-RGD has improved colloidal stability and reduced cytotoxicity compared with the UCNP core counterpart. Meanwhile, UCNP-Gd-RGD shows strong upconversion luminescence in deep-red region and three times enhancement of T1 relaxivity over Gd(3+) DOTA. Due to the recognition between UCNP-Gd-RGD and integrin αv β3 receptors, the nanoprobe specifically binds to U87MG cells, as evidenced by confocal microscopy and quantified by ICP-MS. Furthermore, UCNP-Gd-RGD demonstrates a preferential retention in subcutaneous U87MG tumor xenograft as shown in both in vivo upconversion fluorescence/MR imaging studies and ex vivo analysis. UCNP-Gd-RGD, conjugated with numerous RGD peptide and T1 contrast enhancing molecules, is promising for MR imaging of glioblastoma and delineating the tumor boundary before surgery. In addition, NIR-to-red upconversion characteristic of UCNP-Gd-RGD facilitates its potential intra-operative use for fluorescence-guided tumor resection. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Targeting Neuronal-like Metabolism of Metastatic Tumor Cells as a Novel Therapy for Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    to reconstruct the brain metastasis landscape in 3D, but also provides new, exceptionally accurate perspectives on phenotypic heterogeneity of... Heterogeneous Metastasis Landscapes ”. This award is acknowledged. 7. Participants & Other Collaborating Organizations…………… What individuals have worked...brain astrocytes, tumor cell, proliferating cell (Edu) and blood vessel. We have conducted 3D reconstruction of brain metastasis landscape . We will

  13. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of cisplatin-containing EGFR targeting bioconjugates as potential therapeutic agents for brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barth RF

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rolf F Barth,1 Gong Wu,1 W Hans Meisen,2 Robin J Nakkula,1 Weilian Yang,1 Tianyao Huo,1 David A Kellough,1 Pravin Kaumaya,3–5 Claudia Turro,6 Lawrence M Agius,7 Balveen Kaur2 1Department of Pathology, 2Department of Neurological Surgery, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 4Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, 5Department of Microbiology, 6Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA; 7Department of Pathology, Mater Dei Hospital, University of Malta Medical School, Msida, Malta Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate four different platinated bioconjugates containing a cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum [cis-DDP] fragment and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-targeting moieties as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of brain tumors using a human EGFR-expressing transfectant of the F98 rat glioma (F98EGFR to assess their efficacy. The first two bioconjugates employed the monoclonal antibody cetuximab (C225 or Erbitux® as the targeting moiety, and the second two used genetically engineered EGF peptides. C225-G5-Pt was produced by reacting cis-DDP with a fifth-generation polyamidoamine dendrimer (G5 and then linking it to C225 by means of two heterobifunctional reagents. The second bioconjugate (C225-PG-Pt employed the same methodology except that polyglutamic acid was used as the carrier. The third and fourth bioconjugates used two different EGF peptides, PEP382 and PEP455, with direct coordination to the Pt center of the cis-DDP fragment. In vivo studies with C225-G5-Pt failed to demonstrate therapeutic activity following intracerebral (ic convection-enhanced delivery (CED to F98EGFR glioma-bearing rats. The second bioconjugate, C225-PG-Pt, failed to show in vitro cytotoxicity. Furthermore, because of its high molecular weight, we decided that lower molecular weight peptides might provide better targeting and microdistribution within the tumor. Both PEP

  14. Dual-Targeting Lactoferrin-Conjugated Polymerized Magnetic Polydiacetylene-Assembled Nanocarriers with Self-Responsive Fluorescence/Magnetic Resonance Imaging for In Vivo Brain Tumor Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jen-Hung; Chiu, Tsung-Lang; Huang, Wei-Chen; Lai, Yen-Ho; Hu, Shang-Hsiu; Chen, You-Yin; Chen, San-Yuan

    2016-03-01

    Maintaining a high concentration of therapeutic agents in the brain is difficult due to the restrictions of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and rapid removal from blood circulation. To enable controlled drug release and enhance the blood-brain barrier (BBB)-crossing efficiency for brain tumor therapy, a new dual-targeting magnetic polydiacetylene nanocarriers (PDNCs) delivery system modified with lactoferrin (Lf) is developed. The PDNCs are synthesized using the ultraviolet (UV) cross-linkable 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid (PCDA) monomers through spontaneous assembling onto the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles to form micelles-polymerized structures. The results demonstrate that PDNCs will reduce the drug leakage and further control the drug release, and display self-responsive fluorescence upon intracellular uptake for cell trafficking and imaging-guided tumor treatment. The magnetic Lf-modified PDNCs with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dual-targeting ability can enhance the transportation of the PDNCs across the BBB for tracking and targeting gliomas. An enhanced therapeutic efficiency can be obtained using Lf-Cur (Curcumin)-PDNCs by improving the retention time of the encapsulated Cur and producing fourfold higher Cur amounts in the brain compared to free Cur. Animal studies also confirm that Lf targeting and controlled release act synergistically to significantly suppress tumors in orthotopic brain-bearing rats. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors Afinitor (Everolimus) Afinitor Disperz (Everolimus) Avastin (Bevacizumab) Becenum ( ...

  16. Metabolic Reprogramming in Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venneti, Sriram; Thompson, Craig B

    2017-01-24

    Next-generation sequencing has substantially enhanced our understanding of the genetics of primary brain tumors by uncovering several novel driver genetic alterations. How many of these genetic modifications contribute to the pathogenesis of brain tumors is not well understood. An exciting paradigm emerging in cancer biology is that oncogenes actively reprogram cellular metabolism to enable tumors to survive and proliferate. We discuss how some of these genetic alterations in brain tumors rewire metabolism. Furthermore, metabolic alterations directly impact epigenetics well beyond classical mechanisms of tumor pathogenesis. Metabolic reprogramming in brain tumors is also influenced by the tumor microenvironment contributing to drug resistance and tumor recurrence. Altered cancer metabolism can be leveraged to noninvasively image brain tumors, which facilitates improved diagnosis and the evaluation of treatment effectiveness. Many of these aspects of altered metabolism provide novel therapeutic opportunities to effectively treat primary brain tumors.

  17. [Markers of brain tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, R; Pezzotta, S; Bernini, F; Racagni, G

    1984-05-19

    Biological markers of tumors are compounds or enzymatic activities measurable in body fluids. Their presence or concentration must be linked to tumoral growth. The markers of the central nervous system tumors are detected in CSF. Alpha-feto-protein, carcinoembryonic antigen, human chorionic gonadotropin, adenohypophyseal peptide hormones, enzymes, etc., have found some application in the early diagnosis of leptomeningeal metastasis. Other applications involve the early detection and recurrency of primary brain tumors, as well as the evaluation of efficacy of their therapy. The tests based on the CSF content of desmosterol and polyamines have been studied extensively. Their rationale is discussed and specificity, sensitivity, efficiency and predictive value are considered. Experimental results concerning a new possible biochemical marker, based on CSF concentration of cyclic adenosine monophosphate, are reported.

  18. VEGF-targeted magnetic nanoparticles for MRI visualization of brain tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abakumov, Maxim A; Nukolova, Natalia V; Sokolsky-Papkov, Marina; Shein, Sergey A; Sandalova, Tatiana O; Vishwasrao, Hemant M; Grinenko, Nadezhda F; Gubsky, Iliya L; Abakumov, Artem M; Kabanov, Alexander V; Chekhonin, Vladimir P

    2015-05-01

    This work is focused on synthesis and characterization of targeted magnetic nanoparticles as magnetic resonance imaging (МRI) agents for in vivo visualization of gliomas. Ferric oxide (Fe3O4) cores were synthesized by thermal decomposition and coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) to form nanoparticles with Deff of 53±9nm. The BSA was further cross-linked to improve colloidal stability. Monoclonal antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor (mAbVEGF) were covalently conjugated to BSA through a polyethyleneglycol linker. Here we demonstrate that 1) BSA coated nanoparticles are stable and non-toxic to different cells at concentration up to 2.5mg/mL; 2) conjugation of monoclonal antibodies to nanoparticles promotes their binding to VEGF-positive glioma С6 cells in vitro; 3) targeted nanoparticles are effective in MRI visualization of the intracranial glioma. Thus, mAbVEGF-targeted BSA-coated magnetic nanoparticles are promising MRI contrast agents for glioma visualization. This work focuses on synthesis and characterization of targeted magnetic nanoparticles as magnetic resonance imaging (МRI) agents for in vivo visualization of gliomas. The authors utilize the fact that high-grade gliomas have extensive areas of necrosis and hypoxia, which results in increased secretion of angiogenesis vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Monoclonal antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor (mAbVEGF) were covalently conjugated to crosslinked BSA coated ferric oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles. The results show that these targeted nanoparticles are effective in MRI visualization of the intracranial glioma and may provide a new and promising contrast agent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Epidemiological features of brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors account for 1.4% of all cancers and 2.4% of all cancer-related deaths. The incidence of brain tumors varies and it is higher in developed countries of Western Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand. In Serbia, according to data from 2009, malignant brain tumors account for 2. 2 of all tumors, and from all cancer­related deaths, 3.2% is caused by malignant brain tumors. According to recent statistical reports, an overall incidence of brain tumors for benign and malignant tumors combined is 18.71 per 100,000 persons/year. The most common benign brain tumor in adults is meningioma, which is most present in women, and the most common malignant tumor is glioblastoma, which is most present in adult men. Due to high mortality, especially in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma and significant brain tumor morbidity, there is a constant interest in understanding its etiology in order to possibly prevent tumor occurrence in future and enable more efficient treatment strategies for this fatal brain disease. Despite the continuously growing number of epidemiological studies on possible factors of tumor incidence, the etiology remains unclear. The only established environmental risk factor of gliomas is ionizing radiation exposure. Exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields via cell phone use has gained a lot of attention as a potential risk factor of brain tumor development. However, studies have been inconsistent and inconclusive, so more definite results are still expected.

  20. A functional screening of the kinome identifies the Polo-like kinase 4 as a potential therapeutic target for malignant rhabdoid tumors, and possibly, other embryonal tumors of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sredni, Simone Treiger; Suzuki, Mario; Yang, Jian-Ping; Topczewski, Jacek; Bailey, Anders W; Gokirmak, Tufan; Gross, Jeffrey N; de Andrade, Alexandre; Kondo, Akihide; Piper, David R; Tomita, Tadanori

    2017-11-01

    Malignant rhabdoid tumors (MRTs) are deadly embryonal tumors of the infancy. With poor survival and modest response to available therapies, more effective and less toxic treatments are needed. We hypothesized that a systematic screening of the kinome will reveal kinases that drive rhabdoid tumors and can be targeted by specific inhibitors. We individually mutated 160 kinases in a well-characterized rhabdoid tumor cell line (MON) using lentiviral clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9). The kinase that most significantly impaired cell growth was further validated. Its expression was evaluated by microarray gene expression (GE) within 111 pediatric tumors, and functional assays were performed. A small molecule inhibitor was tested in multiple rhabdoid tumor cell lines and its toxicity evaluated in zebrafish larvae. The Polo-like kinase 4 (PLK4) was identified as the kinase that resulted in higher impairment of cell proliferation when mutated by CRISPR/Cas9. PLK4 CRISPR-mutated rhabdoid cells demonstrated significant decrease in proliferation, viability, and survival. GE showed upregulation of PLK4 in rhabdoid tumors and other embryonal tumors of the brain. The PLK4 inhibitor CFI-400945 showed cytotoxic effects on rhabdoid tumor cell lines while sparing non-neoplastic human fibroblasts and developing zebrafish larvae. Our findings indicate that rhabdoid tumor cell proliferation is highly dependent on PLK4 and suggest that targeting PLK4 with small-molecule inhibitors may hold a novel strategy for the treatment of MRT and possibly other embryonal tumors of the brain. This is the first time that PLK4 has been described as a potential target for both brain and pediatric tumors. © 2017 The Authors. Pediatric Blood & Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Epilepsy-related brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertürk Çetin, Özdem; İşler, Cihan; Uzan, Mustafa; Özkara, Çiğdem

    2017-01-01

    Seizures are among the most common presentations of brain tumors. Several tumor types can cause seizures in varying rates; neuroglial tumors and the gliomas are the most common ones. Brain tumors are the second most common cause of focal intractable epilepsy in epilepsy surgery series, with the highest frequency being dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors and gangliogliomas. Seizure management is an important part of the treatment of patients with brain tumors. This review discusses clinical features and management of seizures in patients with brain tumors, including, neuroglial tumors, gliomas, meningioma and metastases; with the help of recent literature data. Tumor-related seizures are focal seizures with or without secondary generalization. Seizures may occur either as initial symptom or during the course of the disease. Brain tumors related epilepsy tends to be resistant to antiepileptic drugs and treatment of tumor is main step also for the seizure treatment. Early surgery and extent of the tumor removal are important factors for achieving seizure freedom particularly in neuroglial tumors and low grade gliomas. During selection of the appropriate antiepileptic drug, the general approach to partial epilepsies can be followed. There are several factors influencing epileptogenesis in brain tumor-related epilepsy which also explains clinical heterogeneity of epilepsy among tumor types. Identification of molecular markers may guide future therapeutic approaches and further studies are needed to prove antitumor effects of different antiepileptic drugs. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Notch Signaling and Brain Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie; Kristoffersen, Karina; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2011-01-01

    Human brain tumors are a heterogenous group of neoplasms occurring inside the cranium and the central spinal cord. In adults and children, astrocytic glioma and medulloblastoma are the most common subtypes of primary brain tumors. These tumor types are thought to arise from cells in which Notch s...

  3. Notch Signaling and Brain Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie; Kristoffersen, Karina; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2011-01-01

    Human brain tumors are a heterogenous group of neoplasms occurring inside the cranium and the central spinal cord. In adults and children, astrocytic glioma and medulloblastoma are the most common subtypes of primary brain tumors. These tumor types are thought to arise from cells in which Notch...... and medulloblastoma. In this chapter we will cover the present findings of Notch signaling in human glioma and medulloblastoma and try to create an overall picture of its relevance in the pathogenesis of these tumors....

  4. Segmenting Brain Tumors with Symmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Hejia; Zhu, Xia; Willke, Theodore L.

    2017-01-01

    We explore encoding brain symmetry into a neural network for a brain tumor segmentation task. A healthy human brain is symmetric at a high level of abstraction, and the high-level asymmetric parts are more likely to be tumor regions. Paying more attention to asymmetries has the potential to boost the performance in brain tumor segmentation. We propose a method to encode brain symmetry into existing neural networks and apply the method to a state-of-the-art neural network for medical imaging s...

  5. Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium is an open scientific forum organized to foster the development of multi-center, international and inter-disciplinary collaborations that will lead to a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors.

  6. Brain tumor magnetic targeting and biodistribution of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles linked with 70-kDa heat shock protein study by nonlinear longitudinal response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevtsov, Maxim A., E-mail: shevtsov-max@mail.ru [Institute of Cytology of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Tikhoretsky Ave. 4, St. Petersburg 194064 (Russian Federation); A.L. Polenov Russian Research Scientific Institute of Neurosurgery, Mayakovsky str. 12, St. Petersburg 191014 (Russian Federation); Nikolaev, Boris P. [Research Institute of Highly Pure Biopreparations, Pudozhskaya str. 12, St. Petersburg 197110 (Russian Federation); Ryzhov, Vyacheslav A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, NRC Kurchatov Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Yakovleva, Ludmila Y. [Research Institute of Highly Pure Biopreparations, Pudozhskaya str. 12, St. Petersburg 197110 (Russian Federation); Dobrodumov, Anatolii V. [Institute of Macromolecular Compounds of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Bolshoi pr. 31, St. Petersburg 199004 (Russian Federation); Marchenko, Yaroslav Y. [Research Institute of Highly Pure Biopreparations, Pudozhskaya str. 12, St. Petersburg 197110 (Russian Federation); Margulis, Boris A. [Institute of Cytology of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Tikhoretsky Ave. 4, St. Petersburg 194064 (Russian Federation); Pitkin, Emil [The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, 3730 Walnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Guzhova, Irina V. [Institute of Cytology of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Tikhoretsky Ave. 4, St. Petersburg 194064 (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    Brain tumor targeting efficiency and biodistribution of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles conjugated with heat shock protein Hsp70 (SPION–Hsp70) were evaluated in experimental glioma model. Synthesized conjugates were characterized using the method of longitudinal nonlinear response of magnetic nanoparticles to a weak ac magnetic field with measurements of second harmonic of magnetization (NLR-M{sub 2}). Cellular interaction of magnetic conjugates was analyzed in 9L glioma cell culture. The biodistribution of the nanoparticles and their accumulation in tumors was assessed by the latter approach as well. The efficacy of Hsp70-conjugates for contrast enhancement in the orthotopic model of 9L glioma was assessed by MR imaging (11 T). Magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with Hsp70 had the relaxivity properties of the MR-negative contrast agents. Morphological observation and cell viability test demonstrated good biocompatibility of Hsp70-conjugates. Analysis of the T{sub 2}-weighted MR scans in tumor-bearing rats demonstrated the high efficacy of Hsp70-conjugates in contrast enhancement of the glioma in comparison to non-conjugated nanoparticles. High contrast enhancement of the glioma was provided by the accumulation of the SPION–Hsp70 particles in the glioma tissue (as shown by the histological assay). Biodistribution analysis by NLR-M{sub 2} measurements evidenced the many-fold increase (~40) in the tumor-to-normal brain uptake ratio in the Hsp70-conjugates treated animals. Biodistribution pattern of Hsp70-decorated nanoparticles differed from that of non-conjugated SPIONs. Coating of the magnetic nanoparticles with Hsp70 protein enhances the tumor-targeting ability of the conjugates that could be applied in the MR imaging of the malignant brain tumors. - Highlights: • Second-harmonic nonlinear magnetic response is used for biodistribution analysis. • NLR-M{sub 2} ensures high sensibility in detection of SPIONs in tissue. • SPION–Hsp70 conjugates

  7. Stereotactic Radiosurgery of the Postoperative Resection Cavity for Brain Metastases: Prospective Evaluation of Target Margin on Tumor Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Clara Y.H.; Chang, Steven D. [Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Gibbs, Iris C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Adler, John R.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Lieberson, Robert E. [Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Soltys, Scott G., E-mail: sgsoltys@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Given the neurocognitive toxicity associated with whole-brain irradiation (WBRT), approaches to defer or avoid WBRT after surgical resection of brain metastases are desirable. Our initial experience with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) targeting the resection cavity showed promising results. We examined the outcomes of postoperative resection cavity SRS to determine the effect of adding a 2-mm margin around the resection cavity on local failure (LF) and toxicity. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 120 cavities in 112 patients treated from 1998-2009. Factors associated with LF and distant brain failure (DF) were analyzed using competing risks analysis, with death as a competing risk. The overall survival (OS) rate was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method; variables associated with OS were evaluated using the Cox proportional hazards and log rank tests. Results: The 12-month cumulative incidence rates of LF and DF, with death as a competing risk, were 9.5% and 54%, respectively. On univariate analysis, expansion of the cavity with a 2-mm margin was associated with decreased LF; the 12-month cumulative incidence rates of LF with and without margin were 3% and 16%, respectively (P=.042). The 12-month toxicity rates with and without margin were 3% and 8%, respectively (P=.27). On multivariate analysis, melanoma histology (P=.038) and number of brain metastases (P=.0097) were associated with higher DF. The median OS time was 17 months (range, 2-114 months), with a 12-month OS rate of 62%. Overall, WBRT was avoided in 72% of the patients. Conclusion: Adjuvant SRS targeting the resection cavity of brain metastases results in excellent local control and allows WBRT to be avoided in a majority of patients. A 2-mm margin around the resection cavity improved local control without increasing toxicity compared with our prior technique with no margin.

  8. Brain tumor survivors speak out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson-Green, Bonnie

    2009-01-01

    Although progress has been made in the treatment of childhood brain tumors,work remains to understand the complexities of disease, treatment, and contextual factors that underlie individual differences in outcome. A combination of both an idiographic approach (incorporating observations made by adult survivors of childhood brain tumors) and a nomothetic approach (reviewing the literature for brain tumor survivors as well as childhood cancer survivors) is presented. Six areas of concern are reviewed from both an idiographic and nomothetic perspective, including social/emotional adjustment, insurance, neurocognitive late effects, sexuality and relationships, employment, and where survivors accessed information about their disease and treatment and possible late effects. Guidelines to assist health care professionals working with childhood brain tumor survivors are offered with the goal of improving psychosocial and neurocognitive outcomes in this population.

  9. Inhibition of PlexA1-mediated brain tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis using a transmembrane domain targeting peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Laurent; Goetz, Jacky; Vermot, Julien; Fernandez, Aurore; Baumlin, Nadège; Aci-Sèche, Samia; Orend, Gertraud; Roussel, Guy; Crémel, Gérard; Genest, Monique; Hubert, Pierre; Bagnard, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The neuropilin-plexin receptor complex regulates tumor cell migration and proliferation and thus is an interesting therapeutic target. High expression of neuropilin-1 is indeed associated with a bad prognosis in glioma patients. Q-RTPCR and tissue-array analyses showed here that Plexin-A1 is highly expressed in glioblastoma and that the highest level of expression correlates with the worse survival of patients. We next identified a developmental and tumor-associated pro-angiogenic role of Plexin-A1. Hence, by using molecular simulations and a two-hybrid like assay in parallel with biochemical and cellular assays we developed a specific Plexin-A1 peptidic antagonist disrupting transmembrane domain-mediated oligomerization of the receptor and subsequent signaling and functional activity. We found that this peptide exhibits anti-tumor activity in vivo on different human glioblastoma models including glioma cancer stem cells. Thus, screening Plexin-A1 expression and targeting Plexin-A1 in glioblastoma patients exhibit diagnostic and therapeutic value. PMID:27506939

  10. Targeting thapsigargin towards tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doan, Nhu Thi Quynh; Paulsen, Eleonora Sandholdt; Sehgal, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    substrates for either prostate specific antigen (PSA) or prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) prodrugs were created, which selectively affect prostate cancer cells or neovascular tissue in tumors. One of the prodrug is currently tested in clinical phase II. The prodrug under clinical trial has been...

  11. Craniotomy for supratentorial brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mads; Bundgaard, Helle; Cold, Georg Emil

    2004-01-01

    physiological data) predictive of brain swelling through the dural opening. As a secondary aim the authors attempted to define subdural ICP thresholds associated with brain swelling. METHODS: The study population consisted of 692 patients (mean age 50+/-15 years) scheduled for elective craniotomy...... for supratentorial brain tumors. Brain swelling through the dural opening was estimated according to a four-point scale. The patients were dichotomized as those without cerebral swelling (that is, brain below the dura mater [59 patients] or brain at the level of the dura mater [386 patients]) and those with cerebral...... swelling (that is, moderate brain swelling [205 patients] or pronounced brain swelling [42 patients]). Logistic regression analysis was used to identify subdural ICP (odds ratio [OR] 1.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.72-2.1, p

  12. [Brain tumor immunotherapy: Illusion or hope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, Denis; Dutoit, Valérie; Walker, Paul R; Dietrich, Pierre-Yves

    2017-05-01

    Immunotherapy has proven efficient for many tumors and is now part of standard of care in many indications. What is the picture for brain tumors? The recent development of anti-CTLA-4 and PD1 immune checkpoint inhibitors, which have the ability to restore T lymphocytes activity, has gathered enthusiasm and is now paving the way towards more complex models of immune system manipulation. These models include, among others, vaccination and adoptive T cell transfer technologies. Complementary to those strategies, molecules capable of reshaping the immune tumor microenvironment are currently being investigated in early phase trials. Indeed, the tumor bed is hostile to anti-tumor immune responses due to many escape mechanisms, and this is particularly true in the context of brain tumors, a master in eliciting immunosuppressive cells and molecules. The goal of this review is to describe the hopes and challenges of brain tumors immunotherapy and to propose an inventory of the current clinical research with specific focus on the therapies targeting the tumor microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Brain tumor mutations detected in cerebral spinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wenying; Gu, Wei; Nagpal, Seema; Gephart, Melanie Hayden; Quake, Stephen R

    2015-03-01

    Detecting tumor-derived cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in the blood of brain tumor patients is challenging, presumably owing to the blood-brain barrier. Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) may serve as an alternative "liquid biopsy" of brain tumors by enabling measurement of circulating DNA within CSF to characterize tumor-specific mutations. Many aspects about the characteristics and detectability of tumor mutations in CSF remain undetermined. We used digital PCR and targeted amplicon sequencing to quantify tumor mutations in the cfDNA of CSF and plasma collected from 7 patients with solid brain tumors. Also, we applied cancer panel sequencing to globally characterize the somatic mutation profile from the CSF of 1 patient with suspected leptomeningeal disease. We detected tumor mutations in CSF samples from 6 of 7 patients with solid brain tumors. The concentration of the tumor mutant alleles varied widely between patients, from tumor biopsy. Tumor mutations were detectable in cfDNA from the CSF of patients with different primary and metastatic brain tumors. We designed 2 strategies to characterize tumor mutations in CSF for potential clinical diagnosis: the targeted detection of known driver mutations to monitor brain metastasis and the global characterization of genomic aberrations to direct personalized cancer care. © 2014 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  14. Notch Signaling and Brain Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie; Kristoffersen, Karina; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2011-01-01

    Human brain tumors are a heterogenous group of neoplasms occurring inside the cranium and the central spinal cord. In adults and children, astrocytic glioma and medulloblastoma are the most common subtypes of primary brain tumors. These tumor types are thought to arise from cells in which Notch...... signaling plays a fundamental role during development. Recent findings have shown that Notch signaling is dysregulated, and contributes to the malignant potential of these tumors. Growing evidence point towards an important role for cancer stem cells in the initiation and maintenance of glioma...... and medulloblastoma. In this chapter we will cover the present findings of Notch signaling in human glioma and medulloblastoma and try to create an overall picture of its relevance in the pathogenesis of these tumors....

  15. Effective treatment of glioblastoma requires crossing the blood-brain barrier and targeting tumors including cancer stem cells: The promise of nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Soo; Harford, Joe B; Pirollo, Kathleen F; Chang, Esther H

    2015-12-18

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive and lethal type of brain tumor. Both therapeutic resistance and restricted permeation of drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) play a major role in the poor prognosis of GBM patients. Accumulated evidence suggests that in many human cancers, including GBM, therapeutic resistance can be attributed to a small fraction of cancer cells known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs have been shown to have stem cell-like properties that enable them to evade traditional cytotoxic therapies, and so new CSC-directed anti-cancer therapies are needed. Nanoparticles have been designed to selectively deliver payloads to relevant target cells in the body, and there is considerable interest in the use of nanoparticles for CSC-directed anti-cancer therapies. Recent advances in the field of nanomedicine offer new possibilities for overcoming CSC-mediated therapeutic resistance and thus significantly improving management of GBM. In this review, we will examine the current nanomedicine approaches for targeting CSCs and their therapeutic implications. The inhibitory effect of various nanoparticle-based drug delivery system towards CSCs in GBM tumors is the primary focus of this review. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Tumor targeting via integrin ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udaya Kiran eMarelli

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Selective and targeted delivery of drugs to tumors is a major challenge for an effective cancer therapy and also to overcome the side effects associated with current treatments. Overexpression of various receptors on tumor cells is a characteristic structural and biochemical aspect of tumors and distinguishes them from physiologically normal cells. This abnormal feature is therefore suitable for selectively directing anticancer molecules to tumors by using ligands that can preferentially recognize such receptors. Several subtypes of integrin receptors that are crucial for cell adhesion, cell signaling, cell viability and motility have been shown to have an upregulated expression on cancer cells. Thus, ligands that recognize specific integrin subtypes represent excellent candidates to be conjugated to drugs or drug carrier systems and be targeted to tumors. In this regard, integrins recognizing the RGD cell adhesive sequence have been extensively targeted for tumor specific drug delivery. Here we review key recent examples on the presentation of RGD-based integrin ligands by means of distinct drug delivery systems, and discuss the prospects of such therapies to specifically target tumor cells.

  17. Monitoring Radiographic Brain Tumor Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Sampson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Determining radiographic progression in primary malignant brain tumors has posed a significant challenge to the neuroncology community. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, WHO Grade IV through its inherent heterogeneous enhancement, growth patterns, and irregular nature has been difficult to assess for progression. Our ability to detect tumor progression radiographically remains inadequate. Despite the advanced imaging techniques, detecting tumor progression continues to be a clinical challenge. Here we review the different criteria used to detect tumor progression, and highlight the inherent challenges with detection of progression.

  18. Brain Tumor Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professional Meetings Order Materials Clinical Trials Support Group Leader Training Adolescent and Young Adult Guidelines For brain ... nitrites), cigarette smoking, cell phone use, and residential power line exposure, for example—are true risk factors ...

  19. Brain tumors; Hirntumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langen, K.J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. fuer Neurowissenschaften und Biophysik; Stoffels, G. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). C. und O. Vogt Inst. fuer Hirnforschung

    2007-09-15

    Magnetic Resonance Tomography (MRT) is the method of choice for the diagnostics of cerebral gliomas, but the differentiation of tumour tissue from unspecific tissue changes is limited. Positron emission tomography (PET) and Single-Photon-Emission-Computed Tomography (SPECT) may offer relevant additional information which allows for a more accurate diagnostics in unclear situations. Especially, radiolabeled amino acids offer a better delineation of cerebral gliomas which allows an improved guidance of biopsy, planning of surgery and radiation therapy. Furthermore, amino acid imaging appears to be useful to differentiate tumor recurrence from unspecific posttherapeutic tissue, to predict the prognosis especially in low grade gliomas and to monitor the metabolic response during tumor therapy. (orig.)

  20. Thermal Decomposition Based Synthesis of Ag-In-S/ZnS Quantum Dots and Their Chlorotoxin-Modified Micelles for Brain Tumor Cell Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Siqi; Ahmadiantehrani, Mojtaba; Publicover, Nelson G; Hunter, Kenneth W; Zhu, Xiaoshan

    Cadmium-free silver-indium-sulfide (Ag-In-S or AIS) chalcopyrite quantum dots (QDs) as well as their core-shell structures (AIS/ZnS QDs) are being paid significant attention in biomedical applications because of their low toxicity and excellent optical properties. Here we report a simple and safe synthetic system to prepare high quality AIS and AIS/ZnS QDs using thermal decomposition. The synthetic system simply involves heating a mixture of silver acetate, indium acetate, and oleic acid in dodecanethiol at 170 °C to produce AIS QDs with a 13% quantum yield (QY). After ZnS shell growth, the produced AIS/ZnS QDs achieve a 41% QY. To facilitate phase transfer and bioconjugation of AIS/ZnS QDs for cellular imaging, these QDs were loaded into the core of PLGA-PEG (5k:5k) based micelles to form AIS/ZnS QD-micelles. Cellular imaging studies showed that chlorotoxin-conjugated QD-micelles can be specifically internalized into U-87 brain tumor cells. This work discloses that the scalable synthesis of AIS/ZnS QDs and the facile surface/interface chemistry for phase transfer and bioconjugation of these QDs may open an avenue for the produced QD-micelles to be applied to the detection of endogenous targets expressed on brain tumor cells, or more broadly to cell- or tissue-based diagnosis and therapy.

  1. Pediatric brain tumors; Kindliche Hirntumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reith, W.; Bodea, S. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Muehl-Benninghaus, R.

    2017-09-15

    Brain tumors differ between children and adults both in histology and localization. Malignant gliomas and meningiomas predominate in adults while medulloblastomas and low-grade astrocytomas are the most frequent brain tumors in children. More than one half (50-70%) of pediatric brain tumors have an infratentorial location but only approximately 30% in adults. Brain tumors can be recognized in sonography, cranial computed tomography (CCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by their space-consuming character and by their divergent density and intensity in comparison to normal brain parenchyma. They can grow extrusively, even infiltrate the parenchyma or originate from it. Besides clinical symptoms and diagnostics this article describes the most common pediatric brain tumors, i.e. astrocytoma, medulloblastoma, brainstem glioma, craniopharyngioma, neurofibromatosis and ganglioglioma. The most important imaging criteria are outlined. (orig.) [German] Sowohl Histologie als auch Lokalisation von Hirntumoren unterscheiden sich bei Kindern und Erwachsenen. Waehrend maligne Gliome und Meningeome bei Erwachsenen vorherrschen, kommen bei Kindern ueberwiegend Medulloblastome und niedriggradige Astrozytome vor. Mehr als die Haelfte (50-70 %) aller kindlichen Hirntumoren sind infratentoriell lokalisiert, dagegen sind es bei Erwachsenen nur etwa 30 %. Im Ultraschall, in der kranialen CT (CCT) oder MRT koennen Hirntumoren durch ihren raumfordernden Charakter und ihrer zum normalen Parenchym abweichenden Dichte oder Signalintensitaet erkannt werden. Sie koennen verdraengend wachsen, z. T. auch das Parenchym infiltrieren oder von diesem ausgehen. Neben der klinischen Symptomatik und Diagnostik werden im vorliegenden Artikel die haeufigsten kindlichen Hirntumoren, das Astrozytom, Medulloblastom, Hirnstammgliom, Kraniopharyngeom, die Neurofibromatose und das Gangliogliom beschrieben. Die wichtigsten bildgebende Kriterien werden dargestellt. (orig.)

  2. Pharmacokinetic study of neural stem cell-based cell carrier for oncolytic virotherapy: targeted delivery of the therapeutic payload in an orthotopic brain tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaci, B; Ahmed, A U; Ulasov, I V; Tobias, A L; Han, Y; Aboody, K S; Lesniak, M S

    2012-06-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a promising novel therapy for glioblastoma that needs to be optimized before introduced to clinic. The targeting of conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) can be improved by relying on the tumor-tropic properties of neural stem cells (NSCs). Here, we report the characterization of an FDA approved NSC, HB1.F3-CD, as a cell carrier for CRAd-S-pk7, a glioma-tropic oncolytic adenovirus. We show that NSCs replicate and release infectious CRAd-S-pk7 progeny capable of lysing glioma cell lines. Moreover, ex-vivo-loaded NSCs, injected intracranially in nude mice bearing human glioma xenografts (i) retained their tumor tropism, (ii) continued to replicate CRAd-S-pk7 for more than a week after reaching the tumor site and (iii) successfully handed off CRAd-S-pk7 to glioma cells in vivo. Delivery via carrier cells reduced non-specific adenovirus distribution in the mouse brain. Moreover, we assessed biodistribution of loaded NSCs after intracranial injection in animal models semi-permissive to adenovirus replication, the Syrian hamster and cotton rat. NSCs did not migrate to distant organs and high levels of CRAd-S-pk7 DNA were observed only in the injected hemisphere. In conclusion, this optimized carrier system, with high efficiency of adenovirus delivery and minimal systemic toxicity, poses considerable advantages for anti-glioma oncolytic virotherapy.

  3. Carbonic anhydrase IX in oligodendroglial brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastorekova Silvia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbonic anhydrase IX is a hypoxia-induced enzyme that has many biologically important functions, including its role in cell adhesion and invasion. Methods This study was set out to investigate the role of CA IX in a series of 86 oligodendroglial brain tumors (71 primary and 15 recurrent; 48 pure oligodendrogliomas and 40 mixed oligoastrocytomas. Results 80% of the tumors showed CA IX expression by immunohistochemistry. Tumors with moderate or strong CA IX expression had decreased level of cell proliferation compared to weak or no CA IX expression (median 2.9 vs. 5.8, p = 0.015. CA IX correlated with two antioxidative enzymes, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD and regulatory gammaglutamylcysteine synthetase (GLCL-R: CA IX expression was significantly higher in MnSOD-positive tumors (p = 0.008 and decreased in GLCL-R-positive tumors (p = 0.044. In Cox multivariate analysis CA IX expression, patient age and histological component (pure oligodendroglioma vs. mixed oligoastrocytoma showed independent prognostic values (p = 0.009, p = 0.003 and p = 0.022, respectively, CA IX positivity predicting poorer outcome. Conclusion CA IX was proved to be an independent prognostic indicator in oligodendroglial brain tumors, and it also correlates reversely with cell proliferation. It may have a role in the biology of oligodendrogliomas, and most interestingly, as it is mainly expressed in tumor tissue, CA IX could serve as a target molecule for anticancer treatments.

  4. Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Brain Tumor Diagnosis and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu; Morshed, Ramin; Auffinger, Brenda; Tobias, Alex L.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2013-01-01

    Brain tumors are a diverse group of neoplasms that often carry a poor prognosis for patients. Despite tremendous efforts to develop diagnostic tools and therapeutic avenues, the treatment of brain tumors remains a formidable challenge in the field of neuro-oncology. Physiological barriers including the blood-brain barrier result in insufficient accumulation of therapeutic agents at the site of a tumor, preventing adequate destruction of malignant cells. Furthermore, there is a need for improvements in brain tumor imaging to allow for better characterization and delineation of tumors, visualization of malignant tissue during surgery, and tracking of response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Multifunctional nanoparticles offer the potential to improve upon many of these issues and may lead to breakthroughs in brain tumor management. In this review, we discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic applications of nanoparticles for brain tumors with an emphasis on innovative approaches in tumor targeting, tumor imaging, and therapeutic agent delivery. Clinically feasible nanoparticle administration strategies for brain tumor patients are also examined. Furthermore, we address the barriers towards clinical implementation of multifunctional nanoparticles in the context of brain tumor management. PMID:24060923

  5. Pathological classification of brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollo, B

    2012-04-01

    The tumors of the central nervous system are classified according to the last international classification published by World Health Organization. The Classification of Tumors of the Central Nervous System was done on 2007, based on morphological features, growth pattern and molecular profile of neoplastic cells, defining malignancy grade. The neuropathological diagnosis and the grading of each histotype are based on identification of histopathological criteria and immunohistochemical data. The histopathology, also consisting of findings with prognostic or predictive relevance, plays a critical role in the diagnosis and treatment of brain tumors. The recent progresses on radiological, pathological, immunohistochemical, molecular and genetic diagnosis improved the characterization of brain tumors. Molecular and genetic profiles may identify different tumor subtypes varying in biological and clinical behavior. To investigate new therapeutic approaches is important to study the molecular pathways that lead the processes of proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, anaplastic transformation. Different molecular biomarkers were identified by genetic studies and some of these are used in neuro-oncology for the evaluation of glioma patients, in particular combined deletions of the chromosome arms 1p and 19q in oligodendroglial tumors, methylation status of the O-6 methylguanine- DNA methyltransferase gene promoter and alterations in the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway in adult malignant gliomas, isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 gene mutations in diffuse gliomas, as well as BRAF status in pilocytic astrocytomas. The prognostic evaluation and the therapeutic strategies for patients depend on synthesis of clinical, pathological and biological data: histological diagnosis, malignancy grade, gene-molecular profile, radiological pictures, surgical resection and clinical findings (age, tumor location, "performance status").

  6. SU-E-T-01: (In)dependence of Plan Quality On Treatment Modalities and Target-To-Critical Structure Geometry for Brain Tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruan, D; Shao, W; Low, D; Kupelian, P; Qi, S X [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and test the hypothesis that plan quality may be systematically affected by treatment delivery techniques and target-tocritical structure geometric relationship in radiotherapy for brain tumor. Methods: Thirty-four consecutive brain tumor patients treated between 2011–2014 were analyzed. Among this cohort, 10 were planned with 3DCRT, 11 with RadipArc, and 13 with helical IMRT on TomoTherapy. The selected dosimetric endpoints (i.e., PTV V100, maximum brainstem/chiasm/ optic nerve doses) were considered as a vector in a highdimensional space. A Pareto analysis was performed to identify the subset of Pareto-efficient plans.The geometric relationships, specifically the overlapping volume and centroid-of-mass distance between each critical structure to the PTV were extracted as potential geometric features. The classification-tree analyses were repeated using these geometric features with and without the treatment modality as an additional categorical predictor. In both scenarios, the dominant features to prognosticate the Pareto membership were identified and the tree structures to provide optimal inference were recorded. The classification performance was further analyzed to determine the role of treatment modality in affecting plan quality. Results: Seven Pareto-efficient plans were identified based on dosimetric endpoints (3 from 3DCRT, 3 from RapicArc, 1 from Tomo), which implies that the evaluated treatment modality may have a minor influence on plan quality. Classification trees with/without the treatment modality as a predictor both achieved accuracy of 88.2%: with 100% sensitivity and 87.1% specificity for the former, and 66.7% sensitivity and 96.0% specificity for the latter. The coincidence of accuracy from both analyses further indicates no-to-weak dependence of plan quality on treatment modality. Both analyses have identified the brainstem to PTV distance as the primary predictive feature for Pareto-efficiency. Conclusion: Pareto

  7. What You Need to Know about Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Brain Tumors This booklet is about tumors that begin in the brain. These tumors are called primary brain tumors. Cancer that spreads to the brain from another ...

  8. Lassa-vesicular stomatitis chimeric virus safely destroys brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollmann, Guido; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Davis, John N; Cepko, Connie; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2015-07-01

    High-grade tumors in the brain are among the deadliest of cancers. Here, we took a promising oncolytic virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), and tested the hypothesis that the neurotoxicity associated with the virus could be eliminated without blocking its oncolytic potential in the brain by replacing the neurotropic VSV glycoprotein with the glycoprotein from one of five different viruses, including Ebola virus, Marburg virus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), rabies virus, and Lassa virus. Based on in vitro infections of normal and tumor cells, we selected two viruses to test in vivo. Wild-type VSV was lethal when injected directly into the brain. In contrast, a novel chimeric virus (VSV-LASV-GPC) containing genes from both the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor (GPC) and VSV showed no adverse actions within or outside the brain and targeted and completely destroyed brain cancer, including high-grade glioblastoma and melanoma, even in metastatic cancer models. When mice had two brain tumors, intratumoral VSV-LASV-GPC injection in one tumor (glioma or melanoma) led to complete tumor destruction; importantly, the virus moved contralaterally within the brain to selectively infect the second noninjected tumor. A chimeric virus combining VSV genes with the gene coding for the Ebola virus glycoprotein was safe in the brain and also selectively targeted brain tumors but was substantially less effective in destroying brain tumors and prolonging survival of tumor-bearing mice. A tropism for multiple cancer types combined with an exquisite tumor specificity opens a new door to widespread application of VSV-LASV-GPC as a safe and efficacious oncolytic chimeric virus within the brain. Many viruses have been tested for their ability to target and kill cancer cells. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has shown substantial promise, but a key problem is that if it enters the brain, it can generate adverse neurologic consequences, including death. We tested a series of

  9. Adenoviral virotherapy for malignant brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Suvobroto; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2009-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common form of primary brain cancer. In the past decade, virotherapy of tumors has gained credence, particularly in glioma management, as these tumors are not completely resectable and tend to micro-metastasize. Adenoviral vectors have an advantage over other viral vectors in that they are relatively non-toxic and do not integrate in the genome. However, the lack of coxsackie and adenovirus receptors on surface of gliomas provides for inefficient transduction of wild-type adenoviral vectors in these tumors. By targeting receptors that are overexpressed in gliomas, modified adenoviral constructs have been shown to efficiently infect glioma cells. In addition, by taking advantage of tumor-specific promoter elements, oncolytic adenoviral vectors offer the promise of selective tumor-specific replication. This dual targeting strategy has enabled specificity in both laboratory and pre-clinical settings. This review examines current trends in adenoviral virotherapy of gliomas, with an emphasis on targeting modalities and future clinical applications.

  10. Characterizing and Targeting Bone Marrow-Derived Inflammatory Cells in Driving the Malignancy and Progression of Childhood Astrocytic Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    statistic significances between each group still remains by excluding patients receiving chemotherapy or steroids. 1b. Evaluate the frequency and...adjacent to endothelium . PDGFRα was adjacent to blood vessel marker CD31 and is not co-localized with pericyte marker PDGFRβ (C). Z-stack imaging...in glioma stroma (Figure 2-8). OPCs appears to distribute in perivascular niche and support tumor associate endothelium as pericytes. Deficiency in

  11. Chemo-predictive assay for targeting cancer stem-like cells in patients affected by brain tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Mathis

    Full Text Available Administration of ineffective anticancer therapy is associated with unnecessary toxicity and development of resistant clones. Cancer stem-like cells (CSLCs resist chemotherapy, thereby causing relapse of the disease. Thus, development of a test that identifies the most effective chemotherapy management offers great promise for individualized anticancer treatments. We have developed an ex vivo chemotherapy sensitivity assay (ChemoID, which measures the sensitivity of CSLCs as well as the bulk of tumor cells to a variety of chemotherapy agents. Two patients, a 21-year old male (patient 1 and a 5-month female (patient 2, affected by anaplastic WHO grade-III ependymoma were screened using the ChemoID assay. Patient 1 was found sensitive to the combination of irinotecan and bevacizumab, which resulted in a prolonged disease progression free period of 18 months. Following recurrence, the combination of various chemotherapy drugs was tested again with the ChemoID assay. We found that benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC greatly increased the chemosensitivity of the ependymoma cells to the combination of irinotecan and bevacizumab. After patient 1 was treated for two months with irinotecan, bevacizumab and supplements of cruciferous vegetable extracts containing BITC, we observed over 50% tumoral regression in comparison with pre-ChemoID scan as evidenced by MRI. Patient 2 was found resistant to all treatments tested and following 6 cycles of vincristine, carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and cisplatin in various combinations, the tumor of this patient rapidly progressed and proton beam therapy was recommended. As expected animal studies conducted with patient derived xenografts treated with ChemoID screened drugs recapitulated the clinical observation. This assay demonstrates that patients with the same histological stage and grade of cancer may vary considerably in their clinical response, suggesting that ChemoID testing which measures the sensitivity

  12. Chemoinformatics in multi-target drug discovery for anti-cancer therapy: in silico design of potent and versatile anti-brain tumor agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Kleandrova, Valeria V; Luan, Feng; Cordeiro, M Natália D S

    2012-07-01

    A brain tumor (BT) constitutes a neoplasm located in the brain or the central spinal canal. The number of new diagnosed cases with BT increases with the pass of the time. Understanding the biology of BT is essential for the development of novel therapeutic strategies, in order to prevent or deal with this disease. An active area for the search of new anti-BT therapies is the use of Chemoinformatics and/or Bioinformatics toward the design of new and potent anti-BT agents. The principal limitation of all these approaches is that they consider small series of structurally related compounds and/or the studies are realized for only one target like protein. The present work is an effort to overcome this problem. We introduce here the first Chemoinformatics multi-target approach for the in silico design and prediction of anti-BT agents against several cell lines. Here, a fragment-based QSAR model was developed. The model correctly classified 89.63% and 90.93% of active and inactive compounds respectively, in training series. The validation of the model was carried out by using prediction series which showed 88.00% of correct classification for active and 88.59% for inactive compounds. Some fragments were extracted from the molecules and their contributions to anti-BT activity were calculated. Several fragments were identified as potential substructural features responsible of anti-BT activity and new molecular entities designed from fragments with positive contributions were suggested as possible anti-BT agents.

  13. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Target Volume Delineation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Brain Tumors Using Localized Region-Based Active Contour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslian, Hossein [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, Mahdi [Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabie [Department of Medical Physics, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Babapour Mofrad, Farshid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Astarakee, Mahdi, E-mail: M-Astarakee@Engineer.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khaledi, Navid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fadavi, Pedram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical application of a robust semiautomatic image segmentation method to determine the brain target volumes in radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: A local robust region-based algorithm was used on MRI brain images to study the clinical target volume (CTV) of several patients. First, 3 oncologists delineated CTVs of 10 patients manually, and the process time for each patient was calculated. The averages of the oncologists’ contours were evaluated and considered as reference contours. Then, to determine the CTV through the semiautomatic method, a fourth oncologist who was blind to all manual contours selected 4-8 points around the edema and defined the initial contour. The time to obtain the final contour was calculated again for each patient. Manual and semiautomatic segmentation were compared using 3 different metric criteria: Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance. A comparison also was performed between volumes obtained from semiautomatic and manual methods. Results: Manual delineation processing time of tumors for each patient was dependent on its size and complexity and had a mean (±SD) of 12.33 ± 2.47 minutes, whereas it was 3.254 ± 1.7507 minutes for the semiautomatic method. Means of Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance between manual contours were 0.84 ± 0.02, 2.05 ± 0.66 cm, and 0.78 ± 0.15 cm, and they were 0.82 ± 0.03, 1.91 ± 0.65 cm, and 0.7 ± 0.22 cm between manual and semiautomatic contours, respectively. Moreover, the mean volume ratio (=semiautomatic/manual) calculated for all samples was 0.87. Conclusions: Given the deformability of this method, the results showed reasonable accuracy and similarity to the results of manual contouring by the oncologists. This study shows that the localized region-based algorithms can have great ability in determining the CTV and can be appropriate alternatives for manual approaches in brain cancer.

  15. The perivascular niche microenvironment in brain tumor progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Nikki

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma, the most frequent and aggressive malignant brain tumor, has a very poor prognosis of approximately 1-year. The associated aggressive phenotype and therapeutic resistance of glioblastoma is postulated to be due to putative brain tumor stem-like cells (BTSC). The best hope for improved therapy lies in the ability to understand the molecular biology that controls BTSC behavior. The tumor vascular microenvironment of brain tumors has emerged as important regulators of BTSC behavior. Emerging data have identified the vascular microenvironment as home to a multitude of cell types engaged in various signaling that work collectively to foster a supportive environment for BTSCs. Characterization of the signaling pathways and intercellular communication between resident cell types in the microvascular niche of brain tumors is critical to the identification of potential BTSC-specific targets for therapy. PMID:20714216

  16. Targeting the tumor microenvironment for cancer therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sounni, Nor Eddine; Noel, Agnès

    With the emergence of the tumor microenvironment as an essential ingredient of cancer malignancy, therapies targeting the host compartment of tumors have begun to be designed and applied in the clinic...

  17. Distinctive responses of brain tumor cells to TLR2 ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hee Jung; Jeon, Sae-Bom; Koh, Han Seok; Song, Jae-Young; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, In-Hoo; Park, Eun Jung

    2015-05-01

    Malignant brain tumor mass contains significant numbers of infiltrating glial cells that may intimately interact with tumor cells and influence cancer treatments. Understanding of characteristic discrepancies between normal GLIA and tumor cells would, therefore, be valuable for improving anticancer therapeutics. Here, we report distinct differences in toll-like receptors (TLR)-2-mediated responses between normal glia and primary brain tumor cell lines. We found that tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT1 by TLR2 ligands and its downstream events did not occur in mouse, rat, or human brain tumor cell lines, but were markedly induced in normal primary microglia and astrocytes. Using TLR2-deficient, interferon (IFN)-γ-deficient, and IFNγ-receptor-1-deficient mice, we revealed that the impaired phosphorylation of STAT1 might be linked with defective TLR2 system in tumor cells, and that a TLR2-dependent pathway, not IFNγ-receptor machinery, might be critical for tyrosine STAT1 phosphorylation by TLR2 ligands. We also found that TLR2 and its heterodimeric partners, TLR1 and 6, on brain tumor cells failed to properly respond to TLR2 ligands, and representative TLR2-dependent cellular events, such as inflammatory responses and cell death, were not detected in brain tumor cells. Similar results were obtained in in vitro and in vivo experiments using orthotopic mouse and rat brain tumor models. Collectively, these results suggest that primary brain tumor cells may exhibit a distinctive dysfunction of TLR2-associated responses, resulting in abnormal signaling and cellular events. Careful targeting of this distinctive property could serve as the basis for effective therapeutic approaches against primary brain tumors. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Pediatric Brain Tumors: Genomics and Epigenomics Pave the Way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontebasso, Adam M; Jabado, Nada

    2015-01-01

    Primary malignant brain tumors remain a disproportionate cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. A number of studies exploring the cancer genome of brain tumors across ages using integrated genetics and epigenetics and next-generation sequencing technologies have recently emerged. This has led to considerable advances in the understanding of the basic biology and pathogenesis of brain tumors, including the most malignant and common variants in children: gliomas and medulloblastoma. Notably, studies of pediatric brain tumors have identified unexpected oncogenic pathways implicated in tumorigenesis. These range from a single pathway/molecule defect such as abnormalities of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, considered to be a hallmark of pilocytic astrocytomas, to alterations in the epigenome as a critical component altered in many subgroups of high-grade brain tumors. Importantly, the type, timing, and spatial clustering of these molecular alterations provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of the respective brain tumor they target and critical markers for therapy that will help refine pathological grading. We summarize these novel findings in pediatric brain tumors, which also are put in the context of the evolving notion of molecular pathology, now a mandated tool for proper classification and therapy assignment in the clinical setting.

  19. Endothelial cell marker PAL-E reactivity in brain tumor, developing brain, and brain disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenstra, S.; Troost, D.; Das, P. K.; Claessen, N.; Becker, A. E.; Bosch, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The endothelial cell marker PAL-E is not reactive to vessels in the normal brain. The present study concerns the PAL-E reactivity in brain tumors in contrast to normal brain and nonneoplastic brain disease. A total of 122 specimens were examined: brain tumors (n = 94), nonneoplastic brain disease (n

  20. Bleomycin treatment of brain tumors: an evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnert, Mette; Gehl, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Bleomycin has been used in the treatment of brain tumors for over 30 years. Currently, we are evaluating electrochemotherapy (the use of electric pulses to enhance uptake of bleomycin) for patients with secondary brain tumors. We, therefore, reviewed the literature with specific reference...... to the tolerability and toxicity of bleomycin. Using the keywords 'brain' and 'bleomycin', a database search without date restriction was performed and over 500 articles were found. Twenty-five articles were used for this study based on relevance determined by: (i) clinical studies, (ii) use of bleomycin, and (iii......) direct injection into brain tissue or cysts. There were two main indications for the use of bleomycin directly into the brain: (i) cystic tumors in the form of craniopharyngiomas and (ii) solid brain tumors such as glioblastomas and astrocytomas. The most frequent adverse effects reported were transient...

  1. Brain tumors in children; Hirntumoren beim Kind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harting, I.; Seitz, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Neuroradiologie

    2009-06-15

    Brain tumors are common in children; in Germany approximately 400 children are diagnosed every year. In the posterior fossa, cerebellar neoplasms outnumber brainstem gliomas. In contrast to their rarity in adults, brainstem gliomas are not uncommon in children. Supratentorial tumors can be subdivided by location into neoplasms of the cerebral hemispheres, suprasellar and pineal tumors. Astrocytoma is the most common pediatric brain tumor followed by medulloblastoma, ependymoma and craniopharyngeoma. The combination of imaging morphology, tumor localisation and patient age at manifestation form the basis of the neuroradiological differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  2. Tumor Cells and Micro-environment in Brain Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen ZHONG

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Improvements in survival and quality of life of patients with lung cancer had been achieved due to the progression of early diagnosis and precision medicine at recent years, however, until now, treatments targeted at lesions in central nervous system are far from satisfying, thus threatening livelihood of patients involved. After all, in the issue of prophylaxis and therapeutics of brain metastases, it is crucial to learn about the biological behavior of tumor cells in brain metastases and its mechanism underlying, and the hypothesis ”seed and soil”, that is, tumor cells would generate series of adaptive changes to fit in the new environment, is liable to help explain this process well. In this assay, we reviewed documents concerning tumor cells, brain micro-environments and their interactions in brain metastases, aiming to provide novel insight into the treatments of brain metastases.

  3. Brain tumor stem cell dancing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Bozzuto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Issues regarding cancer stem cell (CSC movement are important in neurosphere biology as cell-cell or cell-environment interactions may have significant impacts on CSC differentiation and contribute to the heterogeneity of the neurosphere. Aims. Despite the growing body of literature data on the biology of brain tumor stem cells, floating CSC-derived neurospheres have been scarcely characterized from a morphological and ultrastructural point of view. Results. Here we report a morphological and ultrastructural characterization performed by live imaging and scanning electron microscopy. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM CSC-derived neurospheres are heterogeneous and are constituted by cells, morphologically different, capable of forming highly dynamic structures. These dynamic structures are regulated by not serendipitous cell-cell interactions, and they synchronously pulsate following a cyclic course made of "fast" and "slow" alternate phases. Autocrine/paracrine non canonical Wnt signalling appears to be correlated with the association status of neurospheres. Conclusions. The results obtained suggest that GBM CSCs can behave both as independents cells and as "social" cells, highly interactive with other members of its species, giving rise to a sort of "multicellular organism".

  4. An Epigenetic Gateway to Brain Tumor Cell Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Stephen C.; Hubert, Christopher G.; Miller, Tyler E.; Taylor, Michael D.; Rich, Jeremy N.

    2017-01-01

    Precise targeting of genetic lesions alone has been insufficient to extend brain tumor patient survival. Brain cancer cells are diverse in their genetic, metabolic, and microenvironmental compositions, accounting for their phenotypic heterogeneity and disparate responses to therapy. These factors converge at the level of the epigenome, representing a unified node that can be disrupted by pharmacologic inhibition. Aberrant epigenomes define many childhood and adult brain cancers, as demonstrated by widespread changes to DNA methylation patterns, redistribution of histone marks, and disruption of chromatin structure. In this review, we describe the convergence of genetic, metabolic, and micro-environmental factors upon mechanisms of epigenetic deregulation in brain cancer. We discuss how aberrant epigenetic pathways identified in brain tumors affect cell identity, cell state, and neoplastic transformation, in addition to the potential to exploit these alterations as novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of brain cancer. PMID:26713744

  5. Toward real-time tumor margin identification in image-guided robotic brain tumor resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Danying; Jiang, Yang; Belykh, Evgenii; Gong, Yuanzheng; Preul, Mark C.; Hannaford, Blake; Seibel, Eric J.

    2017-03-01

    For patients with malignant brain tumors (glioblastomas), a safe maximal resection of tumor is critical for an increased survival rate. However, complete resection of the cancer is hard to achieve due to the invasive nature of these tumors, where the margins of the tumors become blurred from frank tumor to more normal brain tissue, but in which single cells or clusters of malignant cells may have invaded. Recent developments in fluorescence imaging techniques have shown great potential for improved surgical outcomes by providing surgeons intraoperative contrast-enhanced visual information of tumor in neurosurgery. The current near-infrared (NIR) fluorophores, such as indocyanine green (ICG), cyanine5.5 (Cy5.5), 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), are showing clinical potential to be useful in targeting and guiding resections of such tumors. Real-time tumor margin identification in NIR imaging could be helpful to both surgeons and patients by reducing the operation time and space required by other imaging modalities such as intraoperative MRI, and has the potential to integrate with robotically assisted surgery. In this paper, a segmentation method based on the Chan-Vese model was developed for identifying the tumor boundaries in an ex-vivo mouse brain from relatively noisy fluorescence images acquired by a multimodal scanning fiber endoscope (mmSFE). Tumor contours were achieved iteratively by minimizing an energy function formed by a level set function and the segmentation model. Quantitative segmentation metrics based on tumor-to-background (T/B) ratio were evaluated. Results demonstrated feasibility in detecting the brain tumor margins at quasi-real-time and has the potential to yield improved precision brain tumor resection techniques or even robotic interventions in the future.

  6. Recruited brain tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells contribute to brain tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnan, Jinan; Isakson, Pauline; Joel, Mrinal; Cilio, Corrado; Langmoen, Iver A; Vik-Mo, Einar O; Badn, Wiaam

    2014-05-01

    The identity of the cells that contribute to brain tumor structure and progression remains unclear. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have recently been isolated from normal mouse brain. Here, we report the infiltration of MSC-like cells into the GL261 murine glioma model. These brain tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BT-MSCs) are defined with the phenotype (Lin-Sca-1+CD9+CD44+CD166+/-) and have multipotent differentiation capacity. We show that the infiltration of BT-MSCs correlates to tumor progression; furthermore, BT-MSCs increased the proliferation rate of GL261 cells in vitro. For the first time, we report that the majority of GL261 cells expressed mesenchymal phenotype under both adherent and sphere culture conditions in vitro and that the non-MSC population is nontumorigenic in vivo. Although the GL261 cell line expressed mesenchymal phenotype markers in vitro, most BT-MSCs are recruited cells from host origin in both wild-type GL261 inoculated into green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic mice and GL261-GFP cells inoculated into wild-type mice. We show the expression of chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CXCR6 on different recruited cell populations. In vivo, the GL261 cells change marker profile and acquire a phenotype that is more similar to cells growing in sphere culture conditions. Finally, we identify a BT-MSC population in human glioblastoma that is CD44+CD9+CD166+ both in freshly isolated and culture-expanded cells. Our data indicate that cells with MSC-like phenotype infiltrate into the tumor stroma and play an important role in tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Thus, we suggest that targeting BT-MSCs could be a possible strategy for treating glioblastoma patients. © 2013 AlphaMed Press.

  7. Brain's tumor image processing using shearlet transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, Luis; Espinosa, Nikolai; Cadena, Franklin; Korneeva, Anna; Kruglyakov, Alexey; Legalov, Alexander; Romanenko, Alexey; Zotin, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Brain tumor detection is well known research area for medical and computer scientists. In last decades there has been much research done on tumor detection, segmentation, and classification. Medical imaging plays a central role in the diagnosis of brain tumors and nowadays uses methods non-invasive, high-resolution techniques, especially magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scans. Edge detection is a fundamental tool in image processing, particularly in the areas of feature detection and feature extraction, which aim at identifying points in a digital image at which the image has discontinuities. Shearlets is the most successful frameworks for the efficient representation of multidimensional data, capturing edges and other anisotropic features which frequently dominate multidimensional phenomena. The paper proposes an improved brain tumor detection method by automatically detecting tumor location in MR images, its features are extracted by new shearlet transform.

  8. Convection-enhanced delivery for the treatment of brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debinski, Waldemar; Tatter, Stephen B

    2013-01-01

    The brain is highly accessible for nutrients and oxygen, however delivery of drugs to malignant brain tumors is a very challenging task. Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) has been designed to overcome some of the difficulties so that pharmacological agents that would not normally cross the BBB can be used for treatment. Drugs are delivered through one to several catheters placed stereotactically directly within the tumor mass or around the tumor or the resection cavity. Several classes of drugs are amenable to this technology including standard chemotherapeutics or novel experimental targeted drugs. The first Phase III trial for CED-delivered, molecularly targeted cytotoxin in the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme has been accomplished and demonstrated objective clinical efficacy. The lessons learned from more than a decade of attempts at exploiting CED for brain cancer treatment weigh critically for its future clinical applications. The main issues center around the type of catheters used, number of catheters and their exact placement; pharmacological formulation of drugs, prescreening patients undergoing treatment and monitoring the distribution of drugs in tumors and the tumor-infiltrated brain. It is expected that optimizing CED will make this technology a permanent addition to clinical management of brain malignancies. PMID:19831841

  9. Similarity on neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in transgenic brain tumor mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, Guanqun; Li, Qingquan; Peng, Gang; Ma, Jun; Fan, Hongwei; Li, Yingbin

    2013-01-01

    Although it is believed that glioma is derived from brain tumor stem cells, the source and molecular signal pathways of these cells are still unclear. In this study, we used stable doxycycline-inducible transgenic mouse brain tumor models (c-myc+/SV40Tag+/Tet-on+) to explore the malignant trans-formation potential of neural stem cells by observing the differences of neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in the tumor models. Results showed that chromosome instability occurred in brain t...

  10. Magnetic nanoparticles: an emerging technology for malignant brain tumor imaging and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wankhede, Mamta; Bouras, Alexandros; Kaluzova, Milota; Hadjipanayis, Costas G

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) represent a promising nanomaterial for the targeted therapy and imaging of malignant brain tumors. Conjugation of peptides or antibodies to the surface of MNPs allows direct targeting of the tumor cell surface and potential disruption of active signaling pathways present in tumor cells. Delivery of nanoparticles to malignant brain tumors represents a formidable challenge due to the presence of the blood–brain barrier and infiltrating cancer cells in the normal brain. Newer strategies permit better delivery of MNPs systemically and by direct convection-enhanced delivery to the brain. Completion of a human clinical trial involving direct injection of MNPs into recurrent malignant brain tumors for thermotherapy has established their feasibility, safety and efficacy in patients. Future translational studies are in progress to understand the promising impact of MNPs in the treatment of malignant brain tumors. PMID:22390560

  11. Fluorescent Nanoparticle Uptake for Brain Tumor Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Tréhin

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate delineation of tumor margins is vital to the successful surgical resection of brain tumors. We have previously developed a multimodal nanoparticle CLIO-Cy5.5, which is detectable by both magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence, to assist in intraoperatively visualizing tumor boundaries. Here we examined the accuracy of tumor margin determination of orthotopic tumors implanted in hosts with differing immune responses to the tumor. Using a nonuser-based signal intensity method applied to fluorescent micrographs of 9L gliosarcoma green fluorescent protein (GFP tumors, mean overestimations of 2 and 24 µm were obtained using Cy5.5 fluorescence, compared to the true tumor margin determined by GFP fluorescence, in nude mice and rats, respectively. To resolve which cells internalized the nanoparticle and to quantitate degree of uptake, tumors were disaggregated and cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Nanoparticle uptake was seen in both CD11b+ cells (representing activated microglia and macrophages and tumor cells in both animal models by both methods. CD11b+ cells were predominantly found at the tumor margin in both hosts, but were more pronounced at the margin in the rat model. Additional metastatic (CT26 colon and primary (Gli36 glioma brain tumor models likewise demonstrated that the nanoparticle was internalized both by tumor cells and by host cells. Together, these observations suggest that fluorescent nanoparticles provide an accurate method of tumor margin estimation based on a combination of tumor cell and host cell uptake for primary and metastatic tumors in animal model systems and offer potential for clinical translation.

  12. Tumor-colonizing bacteria: a potential tumor targeting therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Chao; Wang, Jiansheng

    2014-08-01

    In 1813, Vautier published his observation of tumor regression in patients who had suffered from gas gangrene. Since then, many publications have described the use of bacteria as antitumor therapy. For example, Bifidobacterium and Clostridium have been shown to selectively colonize tumors and to reduce tumor size. In addition, recent studies have focused on the use of genetic engineering to induce the expression of pro-drug converting enzymes, cytokines, specific antibodies, or suicide genes in tumor-colonizing bacteria. Moreover, some animal experiments have reported the treatment of tumors with engineered bacteria, and few side effects were observed. Therefore, based on these advances in tumor targeting therapy, bacteria may represent the next generation of cancer therapy.

  13. Pharmacokinetic study of neural stem cell-based cell carrier for oncolytic virotherapy: Targeted delivery of the therapeutic payload in an orthotopic brain tumor model

    OpenAIRE

    Thaci, Bart; Ahmed, Atique U.; Ulasov, Ilya V.; Tobias, Alex L.; Han, Yu; Aboody, Karen S.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2012-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a promising novel therapy for glioblastoma that needs to be optimized before introduced to clinic. The targeting of conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) can be improved by relying on the tumor tropic properties of neural stem cells (NSCs). Here, we report the characterization of an FDA approved NSC, HB1.F3-CD, as a cell carrier for CRAd-S-pk7, a glioma-tropic oncolytic adenovirus. We show that NSCs replicate and release infectious CRAd-S-pk7 progeny capable ...

  14. Multiparametric MR assessment of pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzika, A.A. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); NMR Surgical Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital and Shriners Burns Institute, Harvard Medical School, 51 Blossom Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Astrakas, L.G.; Zarifi, M.K.; Petridou, N.; Young-Poussaint, T. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Goumnerova, L.; Black, P.McL. [Department of Neurosurgery, Children' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Zurakowski, D. [Department of Biostatistics, Children' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Anthony, D.C. [Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MR assessment of pediatric brain tumors has expanded to include physiologic information related to cellular metabolites, hemodynamic and diffusion parameters. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between MR and proton MR spectroscopic imaging in children with primary brain tumors. Twenty-one patients (mean age 9 years) with histologically verified brain tumors underwent conventional MR imaging, hemodynamic MR imaging (HMRI) and proton MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). Fourteen patients also had diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWMRI). Metabolic indices including choline-containing compounds (Cho), total creatine (tCr) and lipids/lactate (L) were derived by proton MRSI, relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) by HMRI, and apparent tissue water diffusion coefficients (ADC) by DWMRI. Variables were examined by linear regression and correlation as well as by ANOVA. Cho (suggestive of tumor cellularity and proliferative activity) correlated positively with rCBV, while the relationship between Cho and ADC (suggestive of cellular density) was inverse (P<0.001). The relationship between rCBV and ADC was also inverse (P=0.004). Cho and lipids (suggestive of necrosis and/or apoptosis) were not significantly correlated (P=0.51). A positive relationship was found between lipids and ADC (P=0.002). The relationships between Cho, rCBV, ADC and lipids signify that tumor physiology is influenced by the tumor's physical and chemical environment. Normalized Cho and lipids distinguished high-grade from low-grade tumors (P<0.05). Multiparametric MR imaging using MRSI, HMRI and DWMRI enhances assessment of brain tumors in children and improves our understanding of tumor physiology while promising to distinguish higher- from lower-malignancy tumors, a distinction that is particularly clinically important among inoperable tumors. (orig.)

  15. Proton MRS imaging in pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarifi, Maria [Aghia Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Athens (Greece); Tzika, A.A. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Shriners Burn Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) techniques offer a noninvasive, non-irradiating yet sensitive approach to diagnosing and monitoring pediatric brain tumors. Proton MR spectroscopy (MRS), as an adjunct to MRI, is being more widely applied to monitor the metabolic aspects of brain cancer. In vivo MRS biomarkers represent a promising advance and may influence treatment choice at both initial diagnosis and follow-up, given the inherent difficulties of sequential biopsies to monitor therapeutic response. When combined with anatomical or other types of imaging, MRS provides unique information regarding biochemistry in inoperable brain tumors and can complement neuropathological data, guide biopsies and enhance insight into therapeutic options. The combination of noninvasively acquired prognostic information and the high-resolution anatomical imaging provided by conventional MRI is expected to surpass molecular analysis and DNA microarray gene profiling, both of which, although promising, depend on invasive biopsy. This review focuses on recent data in the field of MRS in children with brain tumors. (orig.)

  16. High efficiency diffusion molecular retention tumor targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan Guo

    Full Text Available Here we introduce diffusion molecular retention (DMR tumor targeting, a technique that employs PEG-fluorochrome shielded probes that, after a peritumoral (PT injection, undergo slow vascular uptake and extensive interstitial diffusion, with tumor retention only through integrin molecular recognition. To demonstrate DMR, RGD (integrin binding and RAD (control probes were synthesized bearing DOTA (for (111 In(3+, a NIR fluorochrome, and 5 kDa PEG that endows probes with a protein-like volume of 25 kDa and decreases non-specific interactions. With a GFP-BT-20 breast carcinoma model, tumor targeting by the DMR or i.v. methods was assessed by surface fluorescence, biodistribution of [(111In] RGD and [(111In] RAD probes, and whole animal SPECT. After a PT injection, both probes rapidly diffused through the normal and tumor interstitium, with retention of the RGD probe due to integrin interactions. With PT injection and the [(111In] RGD probe, SPECT indicated a highly tumor specific uptake at 24 h post injection, with 352%ID/g tumor obtained by DMR (vs 4.14%ID/g by i.v.. The high efficiency molecular targeting of DMR employed low probe doses (e.g. 25 ng as RGD peptide, which minimizes toxicity risks and facilitates clinical translation. DMR applications include the delivery of fluorochromes for intraoperative tumor margin delineation, the delivery of radioisotopes (e.g. toxic, short range alpha emitters for radiotherapy, or the delivery of photosensitizers to tumors accessible to light.

  17. Nanoparticle functionalization for brain targeting drug delivery and diagnostic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomes, Maria João; Mendes, Bárbara; Martins, Susana

    2016-01-01

    carriers to cross the BBB and achieve brain, and their functionalization strategies are described; and finally the delivery of nanoparticles to the target moiety, as diagnostics or therapeutics. Therefore, this chapter is focused on how the nanoparticle surface may be functionalized for drug delivery......Nanobiotechnology has been demonstrated to be an efficient tool for targeted therapy as well as diagnosis, with particular emphasis on brain tumor and neurodegenerative diseases. On this regard, the aim of this chapter is focused on engineered nanoparticles targeted to the brain, so that they have...... the ability to overcome the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and enter the brain tissue. Firstly, it highlighted the difficulty of physically active molecules and colloidal carriers to overcome BBB, which is an impediment for the treatment of several brain diseases; then, the use of nanoparticles as advantageous...

  18. Mitochondrial control by DRP1 in brain tumor initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qi; Wu, Qiulian; Horbinski, Craig M; Flavahan, William A; Yang, Kailin; Zhou, Wenchao; Dombrowski, Stephen M; Huang, Zhi; Fang, Xiaoguang; Shi, Yu; Ferguson, Ashley N; Kashatus, David F; Bao, Shideng; Rich, Jeremy N

    2015-04-01

    Brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs) co-opt the neuronal high affinity glucose transporter, GLUT3, to withstand metabolic stress. We investigated another mechanism critical to brain metabolism, mitochondrial morphology, in BTICs. BTIC mitochondria were fragmented relative to non-BTIC tumor cell mitochondria, suggesting that BTICs increase mitochondrial fission. The essential mediator of mitochondrial fission, dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1), showed activating phosphorylation in BTICs and inhibitory phosphorylation in non-BTIC tumor cells. Targeting DRP1 using RNA interference or pharmacologic inhibition induced BTIC apoptosis and inhibited tumor growth. Downstream, DRP1 activity regulated the essential metabolic stress sensor, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and targeting AMPK rescued the effects of DRP1 disruption. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) phosphorylated DRP1 to increase its activity in BTICs, whereas Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2 (CAMK2) inhibited DRP1 in non-BTIC tumor cells, suggesting that tumor cell differentiation induces a regulatory switch in mitochondrial morphology. DRP1 activation correlated with poor prognosis in glioblastoma, suggesting that mitochondrial dynamics may represent a therapeutic target for BTICs.

  19. Unusual radiological characteristics of teratoid/rhabdoid brain tumor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a case of atypical teratoid rhabdoid brain tumor for 4 months old male child, who presented with unusual radiological findings, that can be confused with other brain tumors ,so we high light these unusual imaging features to aid in making correct diagnosis. Keywords: atypical teratoid–rhabdoid tumor, brain tumor, ...

  20. Adenoviral virotherapy for malignant brain tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Nandi, Suvobroto; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common form of primary brain cancer. In the past decade, virotherapy of tumors has gained credence, particularly in glioma management, as these tumors are not completely resectable and tend to micro-metastasize. Adenoviral vectors have an advantage over other viral vectors in that they are relatively non-toxic and do not integrate in the genome. However, the lack of coxsackie and adenovirus receptors (CAR) on surface of gliomas provides for inefficien...

  1. Within-brain classification for brain tumor segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havaei, Mohammad; Larochelle, Hugo; Poulin, Philippe; Jodoin, Pierre-Marc

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate a framework for interactive brain tumor segmentation which, at its core, treats the problem of interactive brain tumor segmentation as a machine learning problem. This method has an advantage over typical machine learning methods for this task where generalization is made across brains. The problem with these methods is that they need to deal with intensity bias correction and other MRI-specific noise. In this paper, we avoid these issues by approaching the problem as one of within brain generalization. Specifically, we propose a semi-automatic method that segments a brain tumor by training and generalizing within that brain only, based on some minimum user interaction. We investigate how adding spatial feature coordinates (i.e., i, j, k) to the intensity features can significantly improve the performance of different classification methods such as SVM, kNN and random forests. This would only be possible within an interactive framework. We also investigate the use of a more appropriate kernel and the adaptation of hyper-parameters specifically for each brain. As a result of these experiments, we obtain an interactive method whose results reported on the MICCAI-BRATS 2013 dataset are the second most accurate compared to published methods, while using significantly less memory and processing power than most state-of-the-art methods.

  2. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Human Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Gudkov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Targeted radionuclide therapy is one of the most intensively developing directions of nuclear medicine. Unlike conventional external beam therapy, the targeted radionuclide therapy causes less collateral damage to normal tissues and allows targeted drug delivery to a clinically diagnosed neoplastic malformations, as well as metastasized cells and cellular clusters, thus providing systemic therapy of cancer. The methods of targeted radionuclide therapy are based on the use of molecular carriers of radionuclides with high affinity to antigens on the surface of tumor cells. The potential of targeted radionuclide therapy has markedly grown nowadays due to the expanded knowledge base in cancer biology, bioengineering, and radiochemistry. In this review, progress in the radionuclide therapy of hematological malignancies and approaches for treatment of solid tumors is addressed.

  3. Drug-Resistant Brain Metastases: A Role for Pharmacology, Tumor Evolution, and Too-Late Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, Thomas; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2015-11-01

    Two recent studies report deep molecular profiling of matched brain metastases and primary tumors. In both studies, somatic alterations in the brain metastases were frequently discordant with those in the primary tumor, suggesting divergent evolution at metastatic sites and raising questions about the use of biomarkers in patients in clinical trials with targeted therapies. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Carbohydrate plasma expanders for passive tumor targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Stefan; Caysa, Henrike; Kuntsche, Judith

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the suitability of carbohydrate plasma volume expanders as a novel polymer platform for tumor targeting. Many synthetic polymers have already been synthesized for targeted tumor therapy, but potential advantages of these carbohydrates include...... inexpensive synthesis, constant availability, a good safety profile, biodegradability and the long clinical use as plasma expanders. Three polymers have been tested for cytotoxicity and cytokine activation in cell cultures and conjugated with a near-infrared fluorescent dye: hydroxyethyl starches (HES 200 k...

  5. Dynamic Quantitative T1 Mapping in Orthotopic Brain Tumor Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Herrmann

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Human brain tumors such as glioblastomas are typically detected using conventional, nonquantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques, such as T2-weighted and contrast enhanced T1-weighted MRI. In this manuscript, we tested whether dynamic quantitative T1 mapping by MRI can localize orthotopic glioma tumors in an objective manner. Quantitative T1 mapping was performed by MRI over multiple time points using the conventional contrast agent Optimark. We compared signal differences to determine the gadolinium concentration in tissues over time. The T1 parametric maps made it easy to identify the regions of contrast enhancement and thus tumor location. Doubling the typical human dose of contrast agent resulted in a clearer demarcation of these tumors. Therefore, T1 mapping of brain tumors is gadolinium dose dependent and improves detection of tumors by MRI. The use of T1 maps provides a quantitative means to evaluate tumor detection by gadolinium-based contrast agents over time. This dynamic quantitative T1 mapping technique will also enable future quantitative evaluation of various targeted MRI contrast agents.

  6. Tumor-targeted nanomedicines for cancer theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arranja, Alexandra G; Pathak, Vertika; Lammers, Twan; Shi, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic drugs have multiple drawbacks, including severe side effects and suboptimal therapeutic efficacy. Nanomedicines assist in improving the biodistribution and target accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs, and are therefore able to enhance the balance between efficacy and toxicity. Multiple types of nanomedicines have been evaluated over the years, including liposomes, polymer-drug conjugates and polymeric micelles, which rely on strategies such as passive targeting, active targeting and triggered release for improved tumor-directed drug delivery. Based on the notion that tumors and metastases are highly heterogeneous, it is important to integrate imaging properties in nanomedicine formulations in order to enable non-invasive and quantitative assessment of targeting efficiency. By allowing for patient pre-selection, such next generation nanotheranostics are useful for facilitating clinical translation and personalizing nanomedicine treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Rethinking Brain Cancer Therapy: Tumor Enzyme Activatable Theranostic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E

    2017-01-01

    This invited commentary discusses a recent article by Mohanty et al in Molecular Cancer Therapeutics about significant therapeutic efficacies of novel theranostic nanoparticles (TNPs) for the treatment of human brain cancers in mouse models. The TNPs were cleaved by enzymes in the tumor tissue, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-14), which lead to release of a highly potent therapeutic drug, azademethylcolchicine. Data showed that the TNPs caused selective toxic effects in MMP-14-expressing glioblastoma and not normal brain. In addition, the iron oxide nanoparticle backbone enabled in vivo drug tracking with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This commentary discusses previous efforts of MMP-targeted therapeutics as well as opportunities for further refinements of tumor enzyme-activatable TNPs. If successfully translated to clinical applications, the TNPs might hold substantial potential to improving cytotoxic indexes and long-term outcomes of patients with brain cancer compared to standard therapy.

  8. Targeting energy metabolism in brain cancer: review and hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Purna

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malignant brain tumors are a significant health problem in children and adults and are often unmanageable. As a metabolic disorder involving the dysregulation of glycolysis and respiration, malignant brain cancer is potentially manageable through changes in metabolic environment. A radically different approach to brain cancer management is proposed that combines metabolic control analysis with the evolutionarily conserved capacity of normal cells to survive extreme shifts in physiological environment. In contrast to malignant brain tumors that are largely dependent on glycolysis for energy, normal neurons and glia readily transition to ketone bodies (β-hydroxybutyrate for energy in vivo when glucose levels are reduced. The bioenergetic transition from glucose to ketone bodies metabolically targets brain tumors through integrated anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic, and pro-apoptotic mechanisms. The approach focuses more on the genomic flexibility of normal cells than on the genomic defects of tumor cells and is supported from recent studies in orthotopic mouse brain tumor models and in human pediatric astrocytoma treated with dietary energy restriction and the ketogenic diet.

  9. Improved brain tumor segmentation by utilizing tumor growth model in longitudinal brain MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Linmin; Reza, Syed M. S.; Li, Wei; Davatzikos, Christos; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we propose a novel method to improve texture based tumor segmentation by fusing cell density patterns that are generated from tumor growth modeling. To model tumor growth, we solve the reaction-diffusion equation by using Lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM). Computational tumor growth modeling obtains the cell density distribution that potentially indicates the predicted tissue locations in the brain over time. The density patterns is then considered as novel features along with other texture (such as fractal, and multifractal Brownian motion (mBm)), and intensity features in MRI for improved brain tumor segmentation. We evaluate the proposed method with about one hundred longitudinal MRI scans from five patients obtained from public BRATS 2015 data set, validated by the ground truth. The result shows significant improvement of complete tumor segmentation using ANOVA analysis for five patients in longitudinal MR images.

  10. Fetal microchimerism in human brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broestl, Lauren; Rubin, Joshua B; Dahiya, Sonika

    2017-09-18

    Sex differences in cancer incidence and survival, including central nervous system tumors, are well documented. Multiple mechanisms contribute to sex differences in health and disease. Recently, the presence of fetal-in-maternal microchimeric cells has been shown to have prognostic significance in breast and colorectal cancers. The frequency and potential role of these cells has not been investigated in brain tumors. We therefore selected two common primary adult brain tumors for this purpose: meningioma, which is sex hormone responsive and has a higher incidence in women, and glioblastoma, which is sex hormone independent and occurs more commonly in men. Quantitative PCR was used to detect the presence of male DNA in tumor samples from women with a positive history of male pregnancy and a diagnosis of either glioblastoma or meningioma. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for the X and Y chromosomes was used to verify the existence of intact male cells within tumor tissue. Fetal microchimerism was found in approximately 80% of glioblastoma cases and 50% of meningioma cases. No correlations were identified between the presence of microchimerism and commonly used clinical or molecular diagnostic features of disease. The impact of fetal microchimeric cells should be evaluated prospectively. © 2017 International Society of Neuropathology.

  11. Targeting tumor suppressor genes for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunhua; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Han, Cecil; Wang, Liana; Zhang, Xinna; He, Xiaoming; Lu, Xiongbin

    2015-12-01

    Cancer drugs are broadly classified into two categories: cytotoxic chemotherapies and targeted therapies that specifically modulate the activity of one or more proteins involved in cancer. Major advances have been achieved in targeted cancer therapies in the past few decades, which is ascribed to the increasing understanding of molecular mechanisms for cancer initiation and progression. Consequently, monoclonal antibodies and small molecules have been developed to interfere with a specific molecular oncogenic target. Targeting gain-of-function mutations, in general, has been productive. However, it has been a major challenge to use standard pharmacologic approaches to target loss-of-function mutations of tumor suppressor genes. Novel approaches, including synthetic lethality and collateral vulnerability screens, are now being developed to target gene defects in p53, PTEN, and BRCA1/2. Here, we review and summarize the recent findings in cancer genomics, drug development, and molecular cancer biology, which show promise in targeting tumor suppressors in cancer therapeutics. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Targeting tumor microenvironment: crossing tumor interstitial fluid by multifunctional nanomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidi, Yadollah; Barar, Jaleh

    2014-01-01

    The genesis of cancer appears to be a complex matter, which is not simply based upon few genetic abnormalities/alteration. In fact, irregular microvasculature and aberrant interstitium of solid tumors impose significant pathophysiologic barrier functions against cancer treatment modalities, hence novel strategies should holistically target bioelements of tumor microenvironment (TME). In this study, we provide some overview and insights on TME and important strategies used to control the impacts of such pathophysiologic barriers. We reviewed all relevant literature for the impacts of tumor interstitium and microvasculature within the TME as well as the significance of the implemented strategies. While tumorigenesis initiation seems to be in close relation with an emergence of hypoxia and alterations in epigenetic/genetic materials, large panoplies of molecular events emerge as intricate networks during oncogenesis to form unique lenient TME in favor of tumor progression. Within such irregular interstitium, immune system displays defective surveillance functionalities against malignant cells. Solid tumors show multifacial traits with coadaptation and self-regulation potentials, which bestow profound resistance against the currently used conventional chemotherapy and immunotherapy agents that target solely one face of the disease. The cancerous cells attain unique abilities to form its permissive microenvironment, wherein (a) extracellular pH is dysregulated towards acidification, (b) extracellular matrix (ECM) is deformed, (c) stromal cells are cooperative with cancer cells, (d) immune system mechanisms are defective, (e) non-integrated irregular microvasculature with pores (120-1200 nm) are formed, and (h) interstitial fluid pressure is high. All these phenomena are against cancer treatment modalities. As a result, to control such abnormal pathophysiologic traits, novel cancer therapy strategies need to be devised using multifunctional nanomedicines and theranostics.

  13. Heterogeneous data fusion for brain tumor classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metsis, Vangelis; Huang, Heng; Andronesi, Ovidiu C; Makedon, Fillia; Tzika, Aria

    2012-10-01

    Current research in biomedical informatics involves analysis of multiple heterogeneous data sets. This includes patient demographics, clinical and pathology data, treatment history, patient outcomes as well as gene expression, DNA sequences and other information sources such as gene ontology. Analysis of these data sets could lead to better disease diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and drug discovery. In this report, we present a novel machine learning framework for brain tumor classification based on heterogeneous data fusion of metabolic and molecular datasets, including state-of-the-art high-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) proton (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy and gene transcriptome profiling, obtained from intact brain tumor biopsies. Our experimental results show that our novel framework outperforms any analysis using individual dataset.

  14. Edema control by cediranib, a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-targeted kinase inhibitor, prolongs survival despite persistent brain tumor growth in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamoun, Walid S; Ley, Carsten D; Farrar, Christian T

    2009-01-01

    by an increase in plasma collagen IV. These rapid changes in tumor vascular morphology and function led to edema alleviation -- as measured by MRI and by dry/wet weight measurement of water content -- but did not affect tumor growth. By immunohistochemistry, we found a transient decrease in macrophage...... infiltration and significant but minor changes in tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis. Systemically, cediranib increased plasma VEGF and placenta growth factor levels, and the number of circulating CXCR4(+)CD45(+) cells. However, by controlling edema, cediranib significantly increased survival of mice...

  15. Tumor-Targeting Peptides for Therapeutic Gene Delivery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pasqualini, Renata

    2000-01-01

    The identification of markers expressed on specific tumors would give valuable insights into the specialization of tumor vasculature, and would also provide a means of targeting distinct tumor sites...

  16. Brain Tumor Tropism of Transplanted Human Neural Stem Cells Is Induced by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Ole Schmidt

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs offers a new potential therapeutic approach as a cell-based delivery system for gene therapy in brain tumors. This is based on the unique capacity of NSCs to migrate throughout the brain and to target invading tumor cells. However, the signals controlling the targeted migration of transplanted NSCs are poorly defined. We analyzed the in vitro and in vivo effects of angiogenic growth factors and protein extracts from surgical specimens of brain tumor patients on NSC migration. Here, we demonstrate that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is able to induce a long-range attraction of transplanted human NSCs from distant sites in the adult brain. Our results indicate that tumorupregulated VEGF and angiogenic-activated microvasculature are relevant guidance signals for NSC tropism toward brain tumors.

  17. Subacute brain atrophy after radiation therapy for malignant brain tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, A.; Matsutani, M.; Kohno, T.; Nakamura, O.; Tanaka, H.; Fujimaki, T.; Funada, N.; Matsuda, T.; Nagata, K.; Takakura, K.

    1989-05-15

    Brain atrophy with mental and neurologic deterioration developing a few months after radiation therapy in patients without residual or recurrent brain tumors has been recognized. Two illustrative case reports of this pathologic entity are presented. Six autopsy cases with this entity including the two cases were reviewed neurologically, radiographically, and histopathologically. All patients presented progressive disturbances of mental status and consciousness, akinesia, and tremor-like involuntary movement. Computerized tomography (CT) demonstrated marked enlargement of the ventricles, moderate widening of the cortical sulci, and a moderately attenuated CT number for the white matter in all six patients. Four of the six patients had CSF drainage (ventriculoperitoneal shunt or continuous lumbar drainage), however, none of them improved. Histologic examination demonstrated swelling and loss of the myelin sheath in the white matter in all patients, and reactive astrocytosis in three of the six patients. Neither prominent neuronal loss in the cerebral cortex or basal ganglia, nor axonal loss in the white matter was generally identified. The blood vessels of the cerebral cortex and white matter were normal. Ependymal layer and the surrounding brain tissue were normal in all patients. These findings suggested that this pathologic condition results from demyelination secondary to direct neurotoxic effect of irradiation. The authors' previous report was reviewed and the differential diagnoses, the risk factors for this pathologic entity, and the indication for radiation therapy in aged patients with a malignant brain tumor are discussed.

  18. Brain Tumor Database, a free relational database for collection and analysis of brain tumor patient information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamino, Maurizio; Hamilton, David J; Castelletti, Lara; Barletta, Laura; Castellan, Lucio

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we describe the development and utilization of a relational database designed to manage the clinical and radiological data of patients with brain tumors. The Brain Tumor Database was implemented using MySQL v.5.0, while the graphical user interface was created using PHP and HTML, thus making it easily accessible through a web browser. This web-based approach allows for multiple institutions to potentially access the database. The BT Database can record brain tumor patient information (e.g. clinical features, anatomical attributes, and radiological characteristics) and be used for clinical and research purposes. Analytic tools to automatically generate statistics and different plots are provided. The BT Database is a free and powerful user-friendly tool with a wide range of possible clinical and research applications in neurology and neurosurgery. The BT Database graphical user interface source code and manual are freely available at http://tumorsdatabase.altervista.org. © The Author(s) 2013.

  19. Brain Tumor Initiating Cells Adapt to Restricted Nutrition through Preferential Glucose Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavahan, William A.; Wu, Qiulian; Hitomi, Masahiro; Rahim, Nasiha; Kim, Youngmi; Sloan, Andrew E.; Weil, Robert J.; Nakano, Ichiro; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Stringer, Brett W.; Day, Bryan W.; Li, Meizhang; Lathia, Justin D.; Rich, Jeremy N.; Hjelmeland, Anita B.

    2013-01-01

    Like all cancers, brain tumors require a continuous source of energy and molecular resources for new cell production. In normal brain, glucose is an essential neuronal fuel, but the blood-brain barrier limits its delivery. We now report that nutrient restriction contributes to tumor progression by enriching for brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs) due to preferential BTIC survival and adaptation of non-BTICs through acquisition of BTIC features. BTICs outcompete for glucose uptake by co-opting the high affinity neuronal glucose transporter, type 3 (Glut3, SLC2A3). BTICs preferentially express Glut3 and targeting Glut3 inhibits BTIC growth and tumorigenic potential. Glut3, but not Glut1, correlates with poor survival in brain tumors and other cancers; thus, TICs may extract nutrients with high affinity. As altered metabolism represents a cancer hallmark, metabolic reprogramming may instruct the tumor hierarchy and portend poor prognosis. PMID:23995067

  20. Targeting tumor microenvironment: crossing tumor interstitial fluid by multifunctional nanomedicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadollah Omidi

    2014-06-01

    Results: We reviewed all relevant literature for the impacts of tumor interstitium and microvasculature within the TME as well as the significance of the implemented strategies. Results: While tumorigenesis initiation seems to be in close relation with an emergence of hypoxia and alterations in epigenetic/genetic materials, large panoplies of molecular events emerge as intricate networks during oncogenesis to form unique lenient TME in favor of tumor progression. Within such irregular interstitium, immune system displays defective surveillance functionalities against malignant cells. Solid tumors show multifacial traits with coadaptation and self-regulation potentials, which bestow profound resistance against the currently used conventional chemotherapy and immunotherapy agents that target solely one face of the disease. Conclusion: The cancerous cells attain unique abilities to form its permissive microenvironment, wherein (a extracellular pH is dysregulated towards acidification, (b extracellular matrix (ECM is deformed, (c stromal cells are cooperative with cancer cells, (d immune system mechanisms are defective, (e non-integrated irregular microvasculature with pores (120-1200 nm are formed, and (h interstitial fluid pressure is high. All these phenomena are against cancer treatment modalities. As a result, to control such abnormal pathophysiologic traits, novel cancer therapy strategies need to be devised using multifunctional nanomedicines and theranostics.

  1. Deep learning for brain tumor classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Justin S.; Plassard, Andrew J.; Landman, Bennett A.; Fabbri, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Recent research has shown that deep learning methods have performed well on supervised machine learning, image classification tasks. The purpose of this study is to apply deep learning methods to classify brain images with different tumor types: meningioma, glioma, and pituitary. A dataset was publicly released containing 3,064 T1-weighted contrast enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) brain images from 233 patients with either meningioma, glioma, or pituitary tumors split across axial, coronal, or sagittal planes. This research focuses on the 989 axial images from 191 patients in order to avoid confusing the neural networks with three different planes containing the same diagnosis. Two types of neural networks were used in classification: fully connected and convolutional neural networks. Within these two categories, further tests were computed via the augmentation of the original 512×512 axial images. Training neural networks over the axial data has proven to be accurate in its classifications with an average five-fold cross validation of 91.43% on the best trained neural network. This result demonstrates that a more general method (i.e. deep learning) can outperform specialized methods that require image dilation and ring-forming subregions on tumors.

  2. Intraoperative MRI in pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhri, Asim F. [Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Siddiqui, Adeel [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Klimo, Paul; Boop, Frederick A. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Semmes-Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); St. Jude Children' s Hospital, Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) has emerged as an important tool in guiding the surgical management of children with brain tumors. Recent advances have allowed utilization of high field strength systems, including 3-tesla MRI, resulting in diagnostic-quality scans that can be performed while the child is on the operating table. By providing information about the possible presence of residual tumor, it allows the neurosurgeon to both identify and resect any remaining tumor that is thought to be safely accessible. By fusing the newly obtained images with the surgical guidance software, the images have the added value of aiding in navigation to any residual tumor. This is important because parenchyma often shifts during surgery. It also gives the neurosurgeon insight into whether any immediate postoperative complications have occurred. If any complications have occurred, the child is already in the operating room and precious minutes lost in transport and communications are saved. In this article we review the three main approaches to an iMRI system design. We discuss the possible roles for iMRI during intraoperative planning and provide guidance to help radiologists and neurosurgeons alike in the collaborative management of these children. (orig.)

  3. Phosphorylethanolamine content of human brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Y; Yokota, A; Koga, Y

    1994-12-01

    Phosphorylethanolamine (PEA) is the major component of the phosphomonoester peak detected by phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy, but the absolute concentration has not been determined. This study measured the PEA concentration in biopsy specimens of brain tumors and lobectomized cerebral cortex using high-performance liquid chromatography. The concentration of PEA was 118.5 +/- 10.0 mumol/100 g wet wt in cortex, and was significantly higher in malignant gliomas, metastatic pulmonary adenocarcinoma, and neurinoma. The concentration of PEA was especially high in pituitary adenoma, malignant lymphoma, and medulloblastoma.

  4. Artificial Chemical Reporter Targeting Strategy Using Bioorthogonal Click Reaction for Improving Active-Targeting Efficiency of Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hong Yeol; Shin, Min Lee; Shim, Man Kyu; Lee, Sangmin; Na, Jin Hee; Koo, Heebeom; Lee, Hyukjin; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lee, Kuen Yong; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan

    2017-05-01

    Biological ligands such as aptamer, antibody, glucose, and peptide have been widely used to bind specific surface molecules or receptors in tumor cells or subcellular structures to improve tumor-targeting efficiency of nanoparticles. However, this active-targeting strategy has limitations for tumor targeting due to inter- and intraheterogeneity of tumors. In this study, we demonstrated an alternative active-targeting strategy using metabolic engineering and bioorthogonal click reaction to improve tumor-targeting efficiency of nanoparticles. We observed that azide-containing chemical reporters were successfully generated onto surface glycans of various tumor cells such as lung cancer (A549), brain cancer (U87), and breast cancer (BT-474, MDA-MB231, MCF-7) via metabolic engineering in vitro. In addition, we compared tumor targeting of artificial azide reporter with bicyclononyne (BCN)-conjugated glycol chitosan nanoparticles (BCN-CNPs) and integrin α v β 3 with cyclic RGD-conjugated CNPs (cRGD-CNPs) in vitro and in vivo. Fluorescence intensity of azide-reporter-targeted BCN-CNPs in tumor tissues was 1.6-fold higher and with a more uniform distribution compared to that of cRGD-CNPs. Moreover, even in the isolated heterogeneous U87 cells, BCN-CNPs could bind artificial azide reporters on tumor cells more uniformly (∼92.9%) compared to cRGD-CNPs. Therefore, the artificial azide-reporter-targeting strategy can be utilized for targeting heterogeneous tumor cells via bioorthogonal click reaction and may provide an alternative method of tumor targeting for further investigation in cancer therapy.

  5. Targeted Radiotherapy of Estrogen Receptor Positive Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghavan Rajagopalan

    2006-08-31

    The overall objectives of the proposal were to develop estrogen receptor (ER) binding small molecule radiopharmaceuticals for targeted radiotherapy of ER positive (ER+) tumors. In particular, this proposal focused on embedding a {sup 186,188}Re or a {sup 32}P radionuclide into an estrogen steroidal framework by isosteric substitution such that the resulting structure is topologically similar to the estrogen (estrogen mimic). The estrogen mimic molecules expected to bind to the ER and exhibit biodistribution akin to that of native estrogen due to structural mimicry. It is anticipated that the {sup 186,188}Re- or a {sup 32}P-containing estrogen mimics will be useful for targeted molecular radiotherapy of ER+ tumors. It is well established that the in vivo target tissue uptake of estrogen like steroidal molecules is related to the binding of the steroids to sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). SHBG is important in the uptake of estrogens and testosterone in target tissues by SHBG receptors on the cell surface. However, hitherto the design of estrogen like small molecule radiopharmaceuticals was focused on optimizing ER binding characteristics without emphasis on SHBG binding properties. Consequently, even the molecules with good ER affinity in vitro, performed poorly in biodistribution studies. Based on molecular modeling studies the proposal focused on developing estrogen mimics 1-3 which were topologically similar to native estrogens, and form hydrogen bonds in ER and SHBG in the same manner as those of native estrogens. To this end the technical objectives of the proposal focused on synthesizing the rhenium-estrone and estradiol mimics 1 and 2 respectively, and phosphorous estradiol mimic 3 and to assess their stability and in vitro binding characteristics to ER and SHBG.

  6. Fetal antigen 2 in primary and secondary brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, H Boje; Teisner, B; Schrøder, H D

    1991-01-01

    Immunohistochemical deposition and distribution of fetal antigen 2 (FA2) was examined in normal brain tissue and in primary and metastatic tumors of the brain. In normal brain tissue FA2 was exclusively found linearly around the vessels, along pia and in arachnoidea. A similar localization was seen...... in primary brain tumors except in gliosarcoma where FA2 was distributed diffusely in the sarcoma region and was absent in the glioma region. In metastatic carcinoma with tumor stroma a diffuse staining reaction was seen in the stroma and with a basement membrane (BM) like staining at the tumor cell....../stroma interface. Intracytoplasmic FA2 staining of the tumor cells was seen in areas without tumor stroma. In metastatic melanoma a BM like FA2 staining was seen around and between individual tumor cells. The staining patterns seen in the metastatic tumors were in accordance with that of the corresponding primary...

  7. Pineal calcification is associated with pediatric primary brain tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuntapakul, Supinya; Kitkhuandee, Amnat; Kanpittaya, Jaturat; Johns, Jeffrey; Johns, Nutjaree Pratheepawanit

    2016-12-01

    Melatonin has been associated with various tumors, including brain tumor, and shown to inhibit growth of neuroblastoma cells and gliomas in animal models. Likewise, patients with glioblastoma receiving melatonin reported better survival than controls. Pineal calcification may lead to a decreased production of melatonin by calcified glands. This study assessed association between pineal calcification and primary brain tumor in pediatric/adolescent patients. Medical chart review was conducted in 181 patients brain computed tomography (CT) during 2008-2012. Pineal calcification was identified using brain CT scan by an experienced neurosurgeon. Primary brain tumor was confirmed by CT scan and histology, and association with pineal calcification was estimated using multiple logistic regression, adjusted for age and gender. Primary brain tumor was detected in 51 patients (mean age 9.0, standard deviation 4.0 years), with medulloblastoma being the most common (11 patients). Pineal calcification was detected in 12 patients (23.5%) with primary brain tumor, while only 11 patients (8.5%) without tumor had pineal calcification. Adjusted for patients' ages and genders, pineal calcification was associated with an increase in primary brain tumor of 2.82-fold (odds ratio 2.82; 95% confidence interval 1.12-7.08, P = 0.027). Pineal calcification appears to be associated with primary brain tumor. Further studies to explore this link are discussed and warranted. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Brain tumor segmentation with Deep Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havaei, Mohammad; Davy, Axel; Warde-Farley, David; Biard, Antoine; Courville, Aaron; Bengio, Yoshua; Pal, Chris; Jodoin, Pierre-Marc; Larochelle, Hugo

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully automatic brain tumor segmentation method based on Deep Neural Networks (DNNs). The proposed networks are tailored to glioblastomas (both low and high grade) pictured in MR images. By their very nature, these tumors can appear anywhere in the brain and have almost any kind of shape, size, and contrast. These reasons motivate our exploration of a machine learning solution that exploits a flexible, high capacity DNN while being extremely efficient. Here, we give a description of different model choices that we've found to be necessary for obtaining competitive performance. We explore in particular different architectures based on Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN), i.e. DNNs specifically adapted to image data. We present a novel CNN architecture which differs from those traditionally used in computer vision. Our CNN exploits both local features as well as more global contextual features simultaneously. Also, different from most traditional uses of CNNs, our networks use a final layer that is a convolutional implementation of a fully connected layer which allows a 40 fold speed up. We also describe a 2-phase training procedure that allows us to tackle difficulties related to the imbalance of tumor labels. Finally, we explore a cascade architecture in which the output of a basic CNN is treated as an additional source of information for a subsequent CNN. Results reported on the 2013 BRATS test data-set reveal that our architecture improves over the currently published state-of-the-art while being over 30 times faster. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Tumor angiogenesis--a new therapeutic target in gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, E L; Spang-Thomsen, M; Skovgaard-Poulsen, H

    1998-01-01

    Tumor growth is critically dependent on angiogenesis, which is sprouting of new vessels from pre-existing vasculature. This process is regulated by inducers and inhibitors released from tumor cells, endothelial cells, and macrophages. Brain tumors, especially glioblastoma multiforme, have signifi...

  10. Photodynamic therapy for implanted VX2 tumor in rabbit brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Feng, Hua; Lin, Jiangkai; Zhu, Gang; Chen, Zhi; Li, Cong-yan

    2005-07-01

    To evaluate the therapeutic effect and the safety of single photodynamic therapy (PDT) with hematoporphyrin derivative produced in China, 60 New Zealand adult rabbits with VX2 tumor implanted into the brain were divided randomly into non-PDT-group and PDT-group. 36 rabbits of the PDT-group were performed photodynamic therapy. The survival time, neurological deteriorations, intracranial pressure (ICP), histology, pathology, tumor volume and brain water content were measured. Other 12 rabbits were received hematoporphyrin derivative and light irradiation of the normal brain. The ICP, histology, pathology, and brain water content were measured. The result indicated that Simple PDT may elongate the average survival time of the rabbits with VX2 tumors significantly; kill tumor cells; cause transient brain edema and increase ICP, but it is safe to be used in treating brain tumor.

  11. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    MIYATAKE, Shin-Ichi; KAWABATA, Shinji; HIRAMATSU, Ryo; KUROIWA, Toshihiko; SUZUKI, Minoru; KONDO, Natsuko; ONO, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Therefore, BNCT enables the application of a high dose of particle radiation selectively to tumor cells in which boron-10 compound has been accumulated. We applied BNCT using nuclear reactors for 167 cases of malignant brain tumors, including recurrent malignant gliomas, newly diagnosed malignant gliomas, and recurrent high-grade meningiomas from January 2002 to May 2014. Here, we review the principle and history of BNCT. In addition, we introduce fluoride-18-labeled boronophenylalanine positron emission tomography and the clinical results of BNCT for the above-mentioned malignant brain tumors. Finally, we discuss the recent development of accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams. This development could provide an alternative to the current use of specially modified nuclear reactors as a neutron source, and could allow BNCT to be performed in a hospital setting. PMID:27250576

  12. Fractal analysis of tumoral lesions in brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Landrove, Miguel; Pereira, Demian; Caldeira, María E; Itriago, Salvador; Juliac, María

    2007-01-01

    In this work, it is proposed a method for supervised characterization and classification of tumoral lesions in brain, based on the analysis of irregularities at the lesion contour on T2-weighted MR images. After the choice of a specific image, a segmentation procedure with a threshold selected from the histogram of intensity levels is applied to isolate the lesion, the contour is detected through the application of a gradient operator followed by a conversion to a "time series" using a chain code procedure. The correlation dimension is calculated and analyzed to discriminate between normal or malignant structures. The results found showed that it is possible to detect a differentiation between benign (cysts) and malignant (gliomas) lesions suggesting the potential of this method as a diagnostic tool.

  13. Glycan Markers as Potential Immunological Targets in Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Denong; Wu, Lisa; Liu, Xiaohe

    2017-01-01

    We present here an experimental approach for exploring a new class of tumor biomarkers that are overexpressed by circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and are likely targetable in immunotherapy against tumor metastasis. Using carbohydrate microarrays, anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were scanned against a large panel of carbohydrate antigens to identify potential tumor glycan markers. Subsequently, flow cytometry and fiber-optic array scanning technology (FAST) were applied to determine whether the identified targets are tumor-specific cell-surface markers and are, therefore, likely suitable for targeted immunotherapy. Finally, the tumor glycan-specific antibodies identified were validated using cancer patients' blood samples for their performance in CTC-detection and immunotyping analysis. In this article, identifying breast CTC-specific glycan markers and targeting mAbs serve as examples to illustrate this tumor biomarker discovery strategy.

  14. Brain Tumor Trials Collaborative | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain Tumor Trials Collaborative In Pursuit of a Cure The mission of the BTTC is to develop and perform state-of-the-art clinical trials in a collaborative and collegial environment, advancing treatments for patients with brain tumors, merging good scientific method with concern for patient well-being and outcome.

  15. Diagnosis and prognosis of brain tumors in clinical trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.S. Gorlia (Thierry)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAccording to the Central Brain Registry Of The United States (CBTRUS) statistical report (February 2012) the incidence rate of all primary non malignant and malignant brain and central nervous system tumors is 19.89 cases per 100.000 (11.58 for non-malignant tumors and 7.31 for malignant

  16. Anticonvulsant therapy in brain-tumor related epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fröscher Walter

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The lifetime risk of patients with brain tumors to have focal epileptic seizures is 10-100%; the risk depends on different histology. Specific guidelines for drug treatment of brain tumor-related seizures have not yet been established.

  17. Zika Virus Targeting in the Developing Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Pol, Anthony N; Mao, Guochao; Yang, Yang; Ornaghi, Sara; Davis, John N

    2017-02-22

    Zika virus (ZIKV), a positive-sense RNA flavivirus, has attracted considerable attention recently for its potential to cause serious neurological problems, including microcephaly, cortical thinning, and blindness during early development. Recent findings suggest that ZIKV infection of the brain can occur not only during very early stages of development, but also in later fetal/early neonatal stages of maturation. Surprisingly, after peripheral inoculation of immunocompetent mice on the day of birth, the first cells targeted throughout the brain were isolated astrocytes. At later stages, more neurons showed ZIKV immunoreactivity, in part potentially due to ZIKV release from infected astrocytes. In all developing mice studied, we detected infection of retinal neurons; in many mice, this was also associated with infection of the lateral geniculate, suprachiasmatic nuclei, and superior colliculus, suggesting a commonality for the virus to infect cells of the visual system. Interestingly, in mature mice lacking a Type 1 interferon response (IFNR-/-), after inoculation of the eye, the initial majority of infected cells in the visual system were glial cells along the optic tract. ZIKV microinjection into the somatosensory cortex on one side of the normal mouse brain resulted in mirror infection restricted to the contralateral somatosensory cortex without any infection of midline brain regions, indicating the virus can move by axonal transport to synaptically coupled brain loci. These data support the view that ZIKV shows considerable complexity in targeting the CNS and may target different cells at different stages of brain development.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Zika virus (ZIKV) can cause substantial damage to the developing human brain. Here we examine a developmental mouse model of ZIKV infection in the newborn mouse in which the brain is developmentally similar to a second-trimester human fetus. After peripheral inoculation, the virus entered the CNS in all mice tested

  18. Stimulated Raman scattering microscopy for rapid brain tumor histology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Yang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapid histology of brain tissues with sufficient diagnostic information has the great potential to aid neurosurgeons during operations. Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS microscopy is an emerging label-free imaging technique, with the intrinsic chemical resolutions to delineate brain tumors from normal tissues without the need of time-consuming tissue processing. Growing number of studies have shown SRS as a “virtual histology” tool for rapid diagnosis of various types of brain tumors. In this review, we focus on the basic principles and current developments of SRS microscopy, as well as its applications for brain tumor imaging.

  19. Absence of human cytomegalovirus infection in childhood brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardi, Iacopo; Lucchesi, Maurizio; Becciani, Sabrina; Facchini, Ludovica; Guidi, Milena; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Moriondo, Maria; Baroni, Gianna; Stival, Alessia; Farina, Silvia; Genitori, Lorenzo; de Martino, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common human pathogen which induces different clinical manifestations related to the age and the immune conditions of the host. HCMV infection seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of adult glioblastomas. The aim of our study was to detect the presence of HCMV in high grade gliomas and other pediatric brain tumors. This hypothesis might have important therapeutic implications, offering a new target for adjuvant therapies. Among 106 pediatric patients affected by CNS tumors we selected 27 patients with a positive HCMV serology. The serological analysis revealed 7 patients with positive HCMV IGG (≥14 U/mL), whom had also a high HCMV IgG avidity, suggesting a more than 6 months-dated infection. Furthermore, HCMV IGM were positive (≥22 U/mL) in 20 patients. Molecular and immunohistochemical analyses were performed in all the 27 samples. Despite a positive HCMV serology, confirmed by ELISA, no viral DNA was shown at the PCR analysis in the patients' neoplastic cells. At immunohistochemistry, no expression of HCMV antigens was observed in tumoral cells. Our results are in agreement with recent results in adults which did not evidence the presence of HCMV genome in glioblastoma lesions. We did not find any correlation between HCMV infection and pediatric CNS tumors.

  20. Yoga Therapy in Treating Patients With Malignant Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-27

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET); Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  1. Neuropsychiatric presentations of pediatrics brain tumors: cases series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairkar Praveen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors constitute the second most common tumors in the pediatric age group after the leukemias. Symptoms and signs depend on growth rate of tumor, its location in the central nervous system, the extent of peri-tumoral vasogenic edema and the age of the child. Most common neuropsychiatric problems reported in children with brain tumor(s include adjustment problems, anxiety disorder, neurocognitive deficits and depressive disorder as reported by very few case reports and isolated observational data. To the best of our knowledge no similar data or reports are as yet published from India on the similar lines. We wish to report case series of neuropsychiatric presentations in different types of brain tumors observed at our rural tertiary care multi-speciality hospital.

  2. CARS and non-linear microscopy imaging of brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Roberta; Uckermann, Ortrud; Tamosaityte, Sandra; Geiger, Kathrin; Schackert, Gabriele; Steiner, Gerald; Koch, Edmund; Kirsch, Matthias

    2013-06-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy offers a series of techniques that have the potential to be applied in vivo, for intraoperative identification of tumor border and in situ pathology. By addressing the different content of lipids that characterize the tumors with respect to the normal brain tissue, CARS microscopy enables to discern primary and secondary brain tumors from healthy tissue. A study performed in mouse models shows that the reduction of the CARS signal is a reliable quantity to identify brain tumors, irrespective from the tumor type. Moreover it enables to identify tumor borders and infiltrations at a cellular resolution. Integration of CARS with autogenous TPEF and SHG adds morphological and compositional details about the tissue. Examples of multimodal CARS imaging of different human tumor biopsies demonstrate the ability of the technique to retrieve information useful for histopathological diagnosis.

  3. A case of metastatic brain tumor causing multifocal cerebral embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Takuya; Yamanouchi, Yasuo; Numa, Yoshihiro; Sakurai, Yasuo; Yamahara, Takahiro; Seno, Toshitaka; Shikata, Nobuaki; Asai, Akio; Kawamoto, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    The patient was a 72-year-old woman who had previously undergone treatment for femoral chondrosarcoma (histologically rated as myxofibrosarcoma). She suddenly developed left homonymous hemianopsia and was diagnosed with cerebral embolism. Because she had atrial fibrillation, we treated her for cardiogenic cerebral embolism. About 3 months later, however, she developed left hemiplegia, and head magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple tumorous lesions affecting the previously detected infracted area and several new areas. We assumed that a tumor embolus had caused cerebral embolism, which resulted in growth of the tumor from the embolus and formation of a metastatic brain tumor. The metastatic foci formed from the tumor embolus were visualized by diagnostic imaging, and histological examination of the resected tumor confirmed that the brain tumor had occluded the brain vessel (tumorigenic cerebral embolism). No such case has been reported to date, and this case seems to be important.

  4. Endothelin receptors as novel targets in tumor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagnato Anna

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The endotelin (ET axis, that includes ET-1, ET-2, ET-3, and the ET receptors, ETA and ETB, plays an important physiological role, as modulator of vasomotor tone, tissue differentiation and development, cell proliferation, and hormone production. Recently, investigations into the role of the ET axis in mitogenesis, apoptosis inhibition, invasiveness, angiogenesis and bone remodeling have provided evidence of the importance of the ET-1 axis in cancer. Data suggest that ET-1 participates in the growth and progression of a variety of tumors such as prostatic, ovarian, renal, pulmonary, colorectal, cervical, breast carcinoma, Kaposi's sarcoma, brain tumors, melanoma, and bone metastases. ET-1 receptor antagonists beside providing ideal tools for dissecting the ET axis at molecular level have demonstrated their potential in developing novel therapeutic opportunity. The major relevance of ETA receptor in tumor development has led to an extensive search of highly selective antagonists. Atrasentan, one of such antagonists, is orally bioavailable, has suitable pharmacokinetic and toxicity profiles for clinical use. Preliminary data from clinical trials investigating atrasentan in patients with prostate cancer are encouraging. This large body of evidence demonstrates the antitumor activity of endothelin receptor antagonists and provides a rationale for the clinical evaluation of these molecules alone and in combination with cytotoxic drugs or molecular inhibitors leading to a new generation of anticancer therapies targeting endothelin receptors.

  5. Patients With Brain Tumors: Who Receives Postacute Occupational Therapy Services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Vincy; Xiong, Chen; Colantonio, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Data on the utilization of occupational therapy among patients with brain tumors have been limited to those with malignant tumors and small samples of patients outside North America in specialized palliative care settings. We built on this research by examining the characteristics of patients with brain tumors who received postacute occupational therapy services in Ontario, Canada, using health care administrative data. Between fiscal years 2004-2005 and 2008-2009, 3,199 patients with brain tumors received occupational therapy services in the home care setting after hospital discharge; 12.4% had benign brain tumors, 78.2% had malignant brain tumors, and 9.4% had unspecified brain tumors. However, patients with benign brain tumors were older (mean age=63.3 yr), and a higher percentage were female (65.2%). More than 90% of patients received in-home occupational therapy services. Additional research is needed to examine the significance of these differences and to identify factors that influence access to occupational therapy services in the home care setting. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  6. Multifractal texture estimation for detection and segmentation of brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Atiq; Reza, Syed M S; Iftekharuddin, Khan M

    2013-11-01

    A stochastic model for characterizing tumor texture in brain magnetic resonance (MR) images is proposed. The efficacy of the model is demonstrated in patient-independent brain tumor texture feature extraction and tumor segmentation in magnetic resonance images (MRIs). Due to complex appearance in MRI, brain tumor texture is formulated using a multiresolution-fractal model known as multifractional Brownian motion (mBm). Detailed mathematical derivation for mBm model and corresponding novel algorithm to extract spatially varying multifractal features are proposed. A multifractal feature-based brain tumor segmentation method is developed next. To evaluate efficacy, tumor segmentation performance using proposed multifractal feature is compared with that using Gabor-like multiscale texton feature. Furthermore, novel patient-independent tumor segmentation scheme is proposed by extending the well-known AdaBoost algorithm. The modification of AdaBoost algorithm involves assigning weights to component classifiers based on their ability to classify difficult samples and confidence in such classification. Experimental results for 14 patients with over 300 MRIs show the efficacy of the proposed technique in automatic segmentation of tumors in brain MRIs. Finally, comparison with other state-of-the art brain tumor segmentation works with publicly available low-grade glioma BRATS2012 dataset show that our segmentation results are more consistent and on the average outperforms these methods for the patients where ground truth is made available.

  7. Mechanical characterization of human brain tumors from patients and comparison to potential surgical phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Daniel C; Rubiano, Andrés; Dyson, Kyle; Simmons, Chelsey S

    2017-01-01

    While mechanical properties of the brain have been investigated thoroughly, the mechanical properties of human brain tumors rarely have been directly quantified due to the complexities of acquiring human tissue. Quantifying the mechanical properties of brain tumors is a necessary prerequisite, though, to identify appropriate materials for surgical tool testing and to define target parameters for cell biology and tissue engineering applications. Since characterization methods vary widely for soft biological and synthetic materials, here, we have developed a characterization method compatible with abnormally shaped human brain tumors, mouse tumors, animal tissue and common hydrogels, which enables direct comparison among samples. Samples were tested using a custom-built millimeter-scale indenter, and resulting force-displacement data is analyzed to quantify the steady-state modulus of each sample. We have directly quantified the quasi-static mechanical properties of human brain tumors with effective moduli ranging from 0.17-16.06 kPa for various pathologies. Of the readily available and inexpensive animal tissues tested, chicken liver (steady-state modulus 0.44 ± 0.13 kPa) has similar mechanical properties to normal human brain tissue while chicken crassus gizzard muscle (steady-state modulus 3.00 ± 0.65 kPa) has similar mechanical properties to human brain tumors. Other materials frequently used to mimic brain tissue in mechanical tests, like ballistic gel and chicken breast, were found to be significantly stiffer than both normal and diseased brain tissue. We have directly compared quasi-static properties of brain tissue, brain tumors, and common mechanical surrogates, though additional tests would be required to determine more complex constitutive models.

  8. Mechanical characterization of human brain tumors from patients and comparison to potential surgical phantoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel C Stewart

    Full Text Available While mechanical properties of the brain have been investigated thoroughly, the mechanical properties of human brain tumors rarely have been directly quantified due to the complexities of acquiring human tissue. Quantifying the mechanical properties of brain tumors is a necessary prerequisite, though, to identify appropriate materials for surgical tool testing and to define target parameters for cell biology and tissue engineering applications. Since characterization methods vary widely for soft biological and synthetic materials, here, we have developed a characterization method compatible with abnormally shaped human brain tumors, mouse tumors, animal tissue and common hydrogels, which enables direct comparison among samples. Samples were tested using a custom-built millimeter-scale indenter, and resulting force-displacement data is analyzed to quantify the steady-state modulus of each sample. We have directly quantified the quasi-static mechanical properties of human brain tumors with effective moduli ranging from 0.17-16.06 kPa for various pathologies. Of the readily available and inexpensive animal tissues tested, chicken liver (steady-state modulus 0.44 ± 0.13 kPa has similar mechanical properties to normal human brain tissue while chicken crassus gizzard muscle (steady-state modulus 3.00 ± 0.65 kPa has similar mechanical properties to human brain tumors. Other materials frequently used to mimic brain tissue in mechanical tests, like ballistic gel and chicken breast, were found to be significantly stiffer than both normal and diseased brain tissue. We have directly compared quasi-static properties of brain tissue, brain tumors, and common mechanical surrogates, though additional tests would be required to determine more complex constitutive models.

  9. Mechanical characterization of human brain tumors from patients and comparison to potential surgical phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubiano, Andrés; Dyson, Kyle; Simmons, Chelsey S.

    2017-01-01

    While mechanical properties of the brain have been investigated thoroughly, the mechanical properties of human brain tumors rarely have been directly quantified due to the complexities of acquiring human tissue. Quantifying the mechanical properties of brain tumors is a necessary prerequisite, though, to identify appropriate materials for surgical tool testing and to define target parameters for cell biology and tissue engineering applications. Since characterization methods vary widely for soft biological and synthetic materials, here, we have developed a characterization method compatible with abnormally shaped human brain tumors, mouse tumors, animal tissue and common hydrogels, which enables direct comparison among samples. Samples were tested using a custom-built millimeter-scale indenter, and resulting force-displacement data is analyzed to quantify the steady-state modulus of each sample. We have directly quantified the quasi-static mechanical properties of human brain tumors with effective moduli ranging from 0.17–16.06 kPa for various pathologies. Of the readily available and inexpensive animal tissues tested, chicken liver (steady-state modulus 0.44 ± 0.13 kPa) has similar mechanical properties to normal human brain tissue while chicken crassus gizzard muscle (steady-state modulus 3.00 ± 0.65 kPa) has similar mechanical properties to human brain tumors. Other materials frequently used to mimic brain tissue in mechanical tests, like ballistic gel and chicken breast, were found to be significantly stiffer than both normal and diseased brain tissue. We have directly compared quasi-static properties of brain tissue, brain tumors, and common mechanical surrogates, though additional tests would be required to determine more complex constitutive models. PMID:28582392

  10. Gamma Knife Surgery for Metastatic Brain Tumors from Gynecologic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Shigeo; Shuto, Takashi; Sato, Mitsuru

    2016-05-01

    The incidences of metastatic brain tumors from gynecologic cancer have increased. The results of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) for the treatment of patients with brain metastases from gynecologic cancer (ovarian, endometrial, and uterine cervical cancers) were retrospectively analyzed to identify the efficacy and prognostic factors for local tumor control and survival. The medical records were retrospectively reviewed of 70 patients with 306 tumors who underwent GKS for brain metastases from gynecologic cancer between January 1995 and December 2013 in our institution. The primary cancers were ovarian in 33 patients with 147 tumors and uterine in 37 patients with 159 tumors. Median tumor volume was 0.3 cm(3). Median marginal prescription dose was 20 Gy. The local tumor control rates were 96.4% at 6 months and 89.9% at 1 year. There was no statistically significant difference between ovarian and uterine cancers. Higher prescription dose and smaller tumor volume were significantly correlated with local tumor control. Median overall survival time was 8 months. Primary ovarian cancer, controlled extracranial metastases, and solitary brain metastasis were significantly correlated with satisfactory overall survival. Median activities of daily living (ADL) preservation survival time was 8 months. Primary ovarian cancer, controlled extracranial metastases, and higher Karnofsky Performance Status score were significantly correlated with better ADL preservation. GKS is effective for control of tumor progression in patients with brain metastases from gynecologic cancer, and may provide neurologic benefits and preservation of the quality of life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Tackling the vascular heterogeneity issue in tumors : identification of novel targets for tumor therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roodink, I.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the identification of novel vascular targeting agents directed against tumor endothelium and the expression patterns of their targets in (clinical) tumor samples. Tumors obtain their blood supply by the formation of new vessels and/or by the incorporation, and possibly

  12. Brain tumor classification of microscopy images using deep residual learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yota; Washiya, Kiyotada; Aoki, Kota; Nagahashi, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    The crisis rate of brain tumor is about one point four in ten thousands. In general, cytotechnologists take charge of cytologic diagnosis. However, the number of cytotechnologists who can diagnose brain tumors is not sufficient, because of the necessity of highly specialized skill. Computer-Aided Diagnosis by computational image analysis may dissolve the shortage of experts and support objective pathological examinations. Our purpose is to support a diagnosis from a microscopy image of brain cortex and to identify brain tumor by medical image processing. In this study, we analyze Astrocytes that is a type of glia cell of central nerve system. It is not easy for an expert to discriminate brain tumor correctly since the difference between astrocytes and low grade astrocytoma (tumors formed from Astrocyte) is very slight. In this study, we present a novel method to segment cell regions robustly using BING objectness estimation and to classify brain tumors using deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) constructed by deep residual learning. BING is a fast object detection method and we use pretrained BING model to detect brain cells. After that, we apply a sequence of post-processing like Voronoi diagram, binarization, watershed transform to obtain fine segmentation. For classification using CNNs, a usual way of data argumentation is applied to brain cells database. Experimental results showed 98.5% accuracy of classification and 98.2% accuracy of segmentation.

  13. Isolation of targeting nanobodies against co-opted tumor vasculature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roodink, I.; Franssen, M.; Zuidscherwoude, M.; Verrijp, K.; Donk, T. van der; Raats, J.; Leenders, W.P.J.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor vasculature is in general highly heterogeneous. This characteristic is most prominent in high-grade gliomas, which present with areas of angiogenic growth, next to large areas of diffuse infiltrative growth in which tumor cells thrive on pre-existent brain vasculature. This limits the

  14. Brain tumor modeling using the CRISPR/Cas9 system: state of the art and view to the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiao-Yuan; Dai, Jin-Xiang; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Liu, Zhao-Qian; Jin, Wei-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Although brain tumors have been known tremendously over the past decade, there are still many problems to be solved. The etiology of brain tumors is not well understood and the treatment remains modest. There is in great need to develop a suitable brain tumor models that faithfully mirror the etiology of human brain neoplasm and subsequently get more efficient therapeutic approaches for these disorders. In this review, we described the current status of animal models of brain tumors and analyzed their advantages and disadvantages. Additionally, prokaryotic clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9), a versatile genome editing technology for investigating the functions of target genes, and its application were also introduced in our present work. We firstly proposed that brain tumor modeling could be well established via CRISPR/Cas9 techniques. And CRISPR/Cas9-mediated brain tumor modeling was likely to be more suitable for figuring out the pathogenesis of brain tumors, as CRISPR/Cas9 platform was a simple and more efficient biological toolbox for implementing mutagenesis of oncogenes or tumor suppressors that were closely linked with brain tumors. PMID:26993776

  15. Brain tumor modeling using the CRISPR/Cas9 system: state of the art and view to the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiao-Yuan; Dai, Jin-Xiang; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Liu, Zhao-Qian; Jin, Wei-Lin

    2016-05-31

    Although brain tumors have been known tremendously over the past decade, there are still many problems to be solved. The etiology of brain tumors is not well understood and the treatment remains modest. There is in great need to develop a suitable brain tumor models that faithfully mirror the etiology of human brain neoplasm and subsequently get more efficient therapeutic approaches for these disorders. In this review, we described the current status of animal models of brain tumors and analyzed their advantages and disadvantages. Additionally, prokaryotic clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9), a versatile genome editing technology for investigating the functions of target genes, and its application were also introduced in our present work. We firstly proposed that brain tumor modeling could be well established via CRISPR/Cas9 techniques. And CRISPR/Cas9-mediated brain tumor modeling was likely to be more suitable for figuring out the pathogenesis of brain tumors, as CRISPR/Cas9 platform was a simple and more efficient biological toolbox for implementing mutagenesis of oncogenes or tumor suppressors that were closely linked with brain tumors.

  16. Targeted liposomes for cytosolic drug delivery to tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mastrobattista, E.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis, a Trojan horse strategy with antibody-targeted liposomes has been followed to obtain cytosolic delivery of biotherapeutics to tumor cells in vitro. This strategy involves targeting of immunoliposomes to specific receptors on tumor cells that result in receptor-mediated uptake of the

  17. Labeled Putrescine as a Probe in Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkow, Nora; Goldman, Stephen S.; Flamm, Eugene S.; Cravioto, Humberto; Wolf, Alfred P.; Brodie, Jonathan D.

    1983-08-01

    The polyamine metabolism of transplanted N-nitrosomethylurea-derived rat glioma was determined with radiolabeled putrescine used as a marker for malignancy. The uptake of putrescine in vivo was complete within 5 minutes and was specific for tumor tissue. The conversion of putrescine to spermine and other metabolites by the tumor was rapid, in contrast to the case for adjacent normal brain. These results suggest that putrescine labeled with carbon-11 may be used as a positron-emission tomographic tracer for the selective metabolic imaging of brain tumor and may be used in an appropriate model as a marker for tumor growth rate.

  18. Applications of nanotechnology to imaging and therapy of brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohs, Aaron M; Provenzale, James M

    2010-08-01

    In the past decade, numerous advances in the understanding of brain tumor physiology, tumor imaging, and tumor therapy have been attained. In some cases, these advances have resulted from refinements of pre-existing technologies (eg, improvements of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging). In other instances, advances have resulted from development of novel technologies. The development of nanomedicine (ie, applications of nanotechnology to the field of medicine) is an example of the latter. In this review, the authors explain the principles that underlay nanoparticle design and function as well as the means by which nanoparticles can be used for imaging and therapy of brain tumors. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Local specific absorption rate in brain tumors at 7 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restivo, Matthew C; van den Berg, Cornelis A T; van Lier, Astrid L H M W; Polders, Daniël L; Raaijmakers, Alexander J E; Luijten, Peter R; Hoogduin, Hans

    2016-01-01

    MR safety at 7 Tesla relies on accurate numerical simulations of transmit electromagnetic fields to fully assess local specific absorption rate (SAR) safety. Numerical simulations for SAR safety are currently performed using models of healthy patients. These simulations might not be useful for estimating SAR in patients who have large lesions with potentially abnormal dielectric properties, e.g., brain tumors. In this study, brain tumor patient models are constructed based on scans of four patients with high grade brain tumors. Dielectric properties for the modeled tumors are assigned based on electrical properties tomography data for the same patients. Simulations were performed to determine SAR. Local SAR increases in the tumors by as much as 30%. However, the location of the maximum 10-gram averaged SAR typically occurs outside of the tumor, and thus does not increase. In the worst case, if the tumor model is moved to the location of maximum electric field intensity, then we do observe an increase in the estimated peak 10-gram SAR directly related to the tumor. Peak local SAR estimation made on the results of a healthy patient model simulation may underestimate the true peak local SAR in a brain tumor patient. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. From reverse transcription to human brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitrenko V. V.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Reverse transcriptase from avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV was the subject of the study, from which the investi- gations of the Department of biosynthesis of nucleic acids were started. Production of AMV in grams quantities and isolation of AMV reverse transcriptase were established in the laboratory during the seventies of the past cen- tury and this initiated research on the cDNA synthesis, cloning and investigation of the structure and functions of the eukaryotic genes. Structures of salmon insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF family genes and their transcripts were determined during long-term investigations. Results of two modern techniques, microarray-ba- sed hybridization and SAGE, were used for the identification of the genes differentially expressed in astrocytic gliomas and human normal brain. Comparison of SAGE results on the genes overexpressed in glioblastoma with the results of microarray analysis revealed a limited number of common genes. 105 differentially expressed genes, common to both methods, can be included in the list of candidates for the molecular typing of glioblastoma. The first experiments on the classification of glioblastomas based on the data of the 20 genes expression were conducted by using of artificial neural network analysis. The results of these experiments showed that the expression profiles of these genes in 224 glioblastoma samples and 74 normal brain samples could be according to the Koho- nen’s maps. The CHI3L1 and CHI3L2 genes of chitinase-like cartilage protein were revealed among the most overexpressed genes in glioblastoma, which could have prognostic and diagnostic potential. Results of in vitro experiments demonstrated that both proteins, CHI3L1 and CHI3L2, may initiate the phosphorylation of ERK1/ ERK2 and AKT kinases leading to the activation of MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling cascades in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, human glioblastoma U87MG, and U373 cells. The new human cell line

  1. Imaging of brain tumors with histological correlations. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drevelegas, Antonios (ed.)

    2011-07-01

    This volume provides a deeper understanding of the diagnosis of brain tumors by correlating radiographic imaging features with the underlying pathological abnormalities. All modern imaging modalities are used to complete a diagnostic overview of brain tumors with emphasis on recent advances in diagnostic neuroradiology. High-quality illustrations depicting common and uncommon imaging characteristics of a wide range of brain tumors are presented and analysed, drawing attention to the ways in which these characteristics reflect different aspects of pathology. Important theoretical considerations are also discussed. Since the first edition, chapters have been revised and updated and new material has been added, including detailed information on the clinical application of functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging. Radiologists and other clinicians interested in the current diagnostic approach to brain tumors will find this book to be an invaluable and enlightening clinical tool. (orig.)

  2. Imaging cerebral tryptophan metabolism in brain tumor-associated depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosnyák, Edit; Kamson, David O; Behen, Michael E; Barger, Geoffrey R; Mittal, Sandeep; Juhász, Csaba

    2015-12-01

    Depression in patients with brain tumors is associated with impaired quality of life and shorter survival. Altered metabolism of tryptophan to serotonin and kynurenine metabolites may play a role in tumor-associated depression. Our recent studies with alpha[(11)C]methyl-L-tryptophan (AMT)-PET in brain tumor patients indicated abnormal tryptophan metabolism not only in the tumor mass but also in normal-appearing contralateral brain. In the present study, we explored if tryptophan metabolism in such brain regions is associated with depression. Twenty-one patients (mean age: 57 years) with a brain tumor (10 meningiomas, 8 gliomas, and 3 brain metastases) underwent AMT-PET scanning. MRI and AMT-PET images were co-registered, and AMT kinetic parameters, including volume of distribution (VD', an estimate of net tryptophan transport) and K (unidirectional uptake, related to tryptophan metabolism), were measured in the tumor mass and in unaffected cortical and subcortical regions contralateral to the tumor. Depression scores (based on the Beck Depression Inventory-II [BDI-II]) were correlated with tumor size, grade, type, and AMT-PET variables. The mean BDI-II score was 12 ± 10 (range: 2-33); clinical levels of depression were identified in seven patients (33 %). High BDI-II scores were most strongly associated with high thalamic AMT K values both in the whole group (Spearman's rho = 0.63, p = 0.004) and in the subgroup of 18 primary brain tumors (r = 0.68, p = 0.004). Frontal and striatal VD' values were higher in the depressed subgroup than in non-depressed patients (p Tumor size, grade, and tumor type were not related to depression scores. Abnormalities of tryptophan transport and metabolism in the thalamus, striatum, and frontal cortex, measured by PET, are associated with depression in patients with brain tumor. These changes may indicate an imbalance between the serotonin and kynurenine pathways and serve as a molecular imaging marker of

  3. FDTD analysis of a noninvasive hyperthermia system for brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoob, Sulafa M; Hassan, Noha S

    2012-08-14

    Hyperthermia is considered one of the new therapeutic modalities for cancer treatment and is based on the difference in thermal sensitivity between healthy tissues and tumors. During hyperthermia treatment, the temperature of the tumor is raised to 40-45°C for a definite period resulting in the destruction of cancer cells. This paper investigates design, modeling and simulation of a new non-invasive hyperthermia applicator system capable of effectively heating deep seated as well as superficial brain tumors using inexpensive, simple, and easy to fabricate components without harming surrounding healthy brain tissues. The proposed hyperthermia applicator system is composed of an air filled partial half ellipsoidal chamber, a patch antenna, and a head model with an embedded tumor at an arbitrary location. The irradiating antenna is placed at one of the foci of the hyperthermia chamber while the center of the brain tumor is placed at the other focus. The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is used to compute both the SAR patterns and the temperature distribution in three different head models due to two different patch antennas at a frequency of 915 MHz. The obtained results suggest that by using the proposed noninvasive hyperthermia system it is feasible to achieve sufficient and focused energy deposition and temperature rise to therapeutic values in deep seated as well as superficial brain tumors without harming surrounding healthy tissue. The proposed noninvasive hyperthermia system proved suitable for raising the temperature in tumors embedded in the brain to therapeutic values by carefully selecting the systems components. The operator of the system only needs to place the center of the brain tumor at a pre-specified location and excite the antenna at a single frequency of 915 MHz. Our study may provide a basis for a clinical applicator prototype capable of heating brain tumors.

  4. FDTD analysis of a noninvasive hyperthermia system for brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacoob Sulafa M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperthermia is considered one of the new therapeutic modalities for cancer treatment and is based on the difference in thermal sensitivity between healthy tissues and tumors. During hyperthermia treatment, the temperature of the tumor is raised to 40–45°C for a definite period resulting in the destruction of cancer cells. This paper investigates design, modeling and simulation of a new non-invasive hyperthermia applicator system capable of effectively heating deep seated as well as superficial brain tumors using inexpensive, simple, and easy to fabricate components without harming surrounding healthy brain tissues. Methods The proposed hyperthermia applicator system is composed of an air filled partial half ellipsoidal chamber, a patch antenna, and a head model with an embedded tumor at an arbitrary location. The irradiating antenna is placed at one of the foci of the hyperthermia chamber while the center of the brain tumor is placed at the other focus. The finite difference time domain (FDTD method is used to compute both the SAR patterns and the temperature distribution in three different head models due to two different patch antennas at a frequency of 915 MHz. Results The obtained results suggest that by using the proposed noninvasive hyperthermia system it is feasible to achieve sufficient and focused energy deposition and temperature rise to therapeutic values in deep seated as well as superficial brain tumors without harming surrounding healthy tissue. Conclusions The proposed noninvasive hyperthermia system proved suitable for raising the temperature in tumors embedded in the brain to therapeutic values by carefully selecting the systems components. The operator of the system only needs to place the center of the brain tumor at a pre-specified location and excite the antenna at a single frequency of 915 MHz. Our study may provide a basis for a clinical applicator prototype capable of heating brain tumors.

  5. Long-term psychiatric outcomes in pediatric brain tumor survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sumedh Subodh; Dellarole, Anna; Peterson, Eric Cecala; Bregy, Amade; Komotar, Ricardo; Harvey, Philip D; Elhammady, Mohamed Samy

    2015-05-01

    The increased efficacy of cancer treatments has led to a greater survival rate of patients with pediatric brain cancers. Therefore, it is imperative to explore the long-term consequences of therapies employed to treat pediatric brain tumors. The goal of this study was to provide a review of literature regarding the downstream psychological and psychiatric consequences experienced by adult survivors of pediatric brain cancer as a result of treatment, tumor type, or tumor location. A PubMed MeSH search and additional online database searches were conducted to include pertinent studies that discussed psychological deficits in childhood brain cancer survivors. The studies included were subjected to data extraction to quantify relevant information for further analysis. A total of 17 papers with 5320 pediatric brain tumor patients were incorporated in our review. Mean age at diagnosis (8.13 ± 0.77 years), mean follow-up time (9.98 ± 3.05 years), and male-to-female ratios (1.08:1) were compiled from studies reporting this information. Incidences of depression (19 %), anxiety (20 %), suicidal ideation (10.9 %), schizophrenia and its related psychoses (9.8 %), and behavioral problem (28.7 %) were higher among pediatric brain cancer survivors than in the normal population. Craniospinal radiotherapy and/or surgery corresponded to an increased likelihood of developing adverse deficits. Astrocytomas or other glial tumors were linked to poorer outcomes. Physicians treating pediatric brain tumor patients should be aware of the possible consequences associated with treatment. Psychiatric monitoring is warranted in survivors of pediatric brain tumors, but further investigation is needed to elucidate late outcomes regarding tumor type and location.

  6. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue.

  7. Untapped Therapeutic Targets in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    important role in tumor evolution . We hypothesized that conventional chemotherapy for ovarian cancer will be more effective if the microenvironment...tumor evolution . The presence of cancer cells induces a reaction in the surrounding stromal cells similar to fibrosis after an injury. These reactions...Seminar Series. Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Baltimore, MD. November 16, 2016. 12 b. Website(s) or other Internet site(s). N/A

  8. Multiscale CNNs for Brain Tumor Segmentation and Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liya Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Early brain tumor detection and diagnosis are critical to clinics. Thus segmentation of focused tumor area needs to be accurate, efficient, and robust. In this paper, we propose an automatic brain tumor segmentation method based on Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs. Traditional CNNs focus only on local features and ignore global region features, which are both important for pixel classification and recognition. Besides, brain tumor can appear in any place of the brain and be any size and shape in patients. We design a three-stream framework named as multiscale CNNs which could automatically detect the optimum top-three scales of the image sizes and combine information from different scales of the regions around that pixel. Datasets provided by Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation Benchmark (BRATS organized by MICCAI 2013 are utilized for both training and testing. The designed multiscale CNNs framework also combines multimodal features from T1, T1-enhanced, T2, and FLAIR MRI images. By comparison with traditional CNNs and the best two methods in BRATS 2012 and 2013, our framework shows advances in brain tumor segmentation accuracy and robustness.

  9. Novel strategies of Raman imaging for brain tumor research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anna, Imiela; Bartosz, Polis; Lech, Polis; Halina, Abramczyk

    2017-10-17

    Raman diagnostics and imaging have been shown to be an effective tool for the analysis and discrimination of human brain tumors from normal structures. Raman spectroscopic methods have potential to be applied in clinical practice as they allow for identification of tumor margins during surgery. In this study, we investigate medulloblastoma (grade IV WHO) (n= 5), low-grade astrocytoma (grades I-II WHO) (n =4), ependymoma (n=3) and metastatic brain tumors (n= 1) and the tissue from the negative margins used as normal controls. We compare a high grade medulloblastoma, low grade astrocytoma and non-tumor samples from human central nervous system (CNS) tissue. Based on the properties of the Raman vibrational features and Raman images we provide a real-time feedback method that is label-free to monitor tumor metabolism that reveals reprogramming of biosynthesis of lipids, proteins, DNA and RNA. Our results indicate marked metabolic differences between low and high grade brain tumors. We discuss molecular mechanisms causing these metabolic changes, particularly lipid alterations in malignant medulloblastoma and low grade gliomas that may shed light on the mechanisms driving tumor recurrence thereby revealing new approaches for the treatment of malignant glioma. We have found that the high-grade tumors of central nervous system (medulloblastoma) exhibit enhanced level of β-sheet conformation and down-regulated level of α-helix conformation when comparing against normal tissue. We have found that almost all tumors studied in the paper have increased Raman signals of nucleic acids. This increase can be interpreted as increased DNA/RNA turnover in brain tumors. We have shown that the ratio of Raman intensities I 2930 /I 2845 at 2930 and 2845 cm -1 is a good source of information on the ratio of lipid and protein contents. We have found that the ratio reflects the different lipid and protein contents of cancerous brain tissue compared to the non-tumor tissue. We found that

  10. Brain Tumor Segmentation Using a Generative Model with an RBM Prior on Tumor Shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agn, Mikael; Puonti, Oula; Rosenschöld, Per Munck af

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully automated generative method for brain tumor segmentation in multi-modal magnetic resonance images. The method is based on the type of generative model often used for segmenting healthy brain tissues, where tissues are modeled by Gaussian mixture models combined...... with a spatial atlas-based tissue prior. We extend this basic model with a tumor prior, which uses convolutional restricted Boltzmann machines (cRBMs) to model the shape of both tumor core and complete tumor, which includes edema and core. The cRBMs are trained on expert segmentations of training images, without...

  11. Drug and cell encapsulation : Alternative delivery options for the treatment of malignant brain tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhujbal, Swapnil V.; de Vos, Paul; Niclou, Simone P.

    2014-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors including glioblastoma are incurable cancers. Over the last years a number of promising novel treatment approaches have been investigated including the application of inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinases and downstream targets, immune-based therapies and anti-angiogenic

  12. PET imaging in the surgical management of pediatric brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirotte, Benoit; Acerbi, Francesco; Lubansu, Alphonse; Goldman, Serge; Brotchi, Jacques; Levivier, Marc

    2007-07-01

    The present article illustrates whether positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging may improve the surgical management of pediatric brain tumors (PBT) at different steps. Among 400 consecutive PBT treated between 1995 and 2005 at Erasme Hospital, Brussels, Belgium, we have studied with (18) F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-PET and/or L-(methyl-(11)C)methionine (MET)-PET and integrated PET images in the diagnostic workup of 126 selected cases. The selection criteria were mainly based on the lesion appearance on magnetic resonance (MR) sequences. Cases were selected when MR imaging showed limitations for (1) assessing the evolving nature of an incidental lesion (n = 54), (2) selecting targets for contributive and accurate biopsy (n = 32), and (3) delineating tumor tissue for maximal resection (n = 40). Whenever needed, PET images were integrated in the planning of image-guided surgical procedures (frame-based stereotactic biopsies (SB), frameless navigation-based resections, or leksell gamma knife radiosurgery). Like in adults, PET imaging really helped the surgical management of the 126 children explored, which represented about 30% of all PBT, especially when the newly diagnosed brain lesion was (1) an incidental finding so that the choice between surgery and conservative MR follow-up was debated, and (2) so infiltrative or ill-defined on MR that the choice between biopsy and resection was hardly discussed. Integrating PET into the diagnostic workup of these two selected groups helped to (1) take a more appropriate decision in incidental lesions by detecting tumor/evolving tissue; (2) better understand complex cases by differentiating indolent and active components of the lesion; (3) improve target selection and diagnostic yield of stereotactic biopsies in gliomas; (4) illustrate the intratumoral histological heterogeneity in gliomas; (5) provide additional prognostic information; (6) reduce the number of trajectories in biopsies performed in eloquent areas such

  13. Evolution of Brain Tumor and Stability of Geometric Invariants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tawbe

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method to reconstruct and to calculate geometric invariants on brain tumors. The geometric invariants considered in the paper are the volume, the area, the discrete Gauss curvature, and the discrete mean curvature. The volume of a tumor is an important aspect that helps doctors to make a medical diagnosis. And as doctors seek a stable calculation, we propose to prove the stability of some invariants. Finally, we study the evolution of brain tumor as a function of time in two or three years depending on patients with MR images every three or six months.

  14. Brain tumor symptoms as antecedents to uncertainty: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Jennifer; LoBiondo-Wood, Geri; Bergstrom, Nancy; Armstrong, Terri

    2012-06-01

    Uncertainty is a common experience within human cancer. For brain tumor patients, irregular symptom pattern and presentation may promote uncertainties about treatment response, prognosis, and life quality. We sought to identify the somatic symptom experience associated with primary and secondary brain tumors and the potential impact on illness-related uncertainty. An integrative literature search of Medline and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) was performed. Symptom data were excerpted into tables and reviewed critically against the broader uncertainty-focused oncology literature. Twenty-one studies investigated a diverse range of brain tumor symptoms that persist through the now-expanding, post-treatment survival. While symptoms such as fatigue were common, antecedents and patterns were poorly characterized and inconsistent between and within categories of tumor. Symptom investigation is an emerging and rapidly developing area of neuro-oncology. The extent to which symptoms are familiar, predictable, and understandable can mitigate uncertainty. The unstable nature of symptoms across the trajectory of a brain tumor may be a significant corollary to illness-related uncertainty. Because the majority of brain tumor patients cannot be cured of their cancer, understanding the symptom expanse and potential to promote uncertainty could inform alternative nursing strategies to reduce anxiety and distress, and to preserve life quality where cure is often unattainable. © 2012 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  15. Critical Care Management of Cerebral Edema in Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquenazi, Yoshua; Lo, Victor P; Lee, Kiwon

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral edema associated with brain tumors is extremely common and can occur in both primary and metastatic tumors. The edema surrounding brain tumors results from leakage of plasma across the vessel wall into the parenchyma secondary to disruption of the blood-brain barrier. The clinical signs of brain tumor edema depend on the location of the tumor as well as the extent of the edema, which often exceeds the mass effect induced by the tumor itself. Uncontrolled cerebral edema may result in increased intracranial pressure and acute herniation syndromes that can result in permanent neurological dysfunction and potentially fatal herniation. Treatment strategies for elevated intracranial pressure consist of general measures, medical interventions, and surgery. Alhough the definitive treatment for the edema may ultimately be surgical resection of the tumor, the impact of the critical care management cannot be underestimated and thus patients must be vigilantly monitored in the intensive care unit. In this review, we discuss the pathology, pathophysiology, and clinical features of patients presenting with cerebral edema. Imaging findings and treatment modalities used in the intensive care unit are also discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. The social trajectory of brain tumor: a qualitative metasynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubis, Lee; Ownsworth, Tamara; Pinkham, Mark B; Chambers, Suzanne

    2017-04-19

    Research indicates that strong social ties can buffer the adverse effects of chronic illness on psychological well-being. Brain tumor typically leads to serious functional impairments that affect relationships and reduce social participation. This metasynthesis aimed to identify, appraise and integrate the findings of qualitative studies that reveal the impact of brain tumor on social networks. Four major databases (PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane Library and PsycINFO) were systematically searched from inception to September 2016 for qualitative studies that reported findings on the impact of primary brain tumor on social networks during adulthood. Twenty-one eligible studies were identified and appraised according to the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research. Key findings of these studies were integrated to form superordinate themes. The metasynthesis revealed the core themes of: 1) Life disrupted; 2) Navigating the new reality of life; and 3) Social survivorship versus separation. Multiple changes typically occur across the social trajectory of brain tumor, including a loss of pre-illness networks and the emergence of new ones. Understanding the barriers and facilitators for maintaining social connection may guide interventions for strengthening social networks and enhancing well-being in the context of brain tumor. Implications for rehabilitation Social networks and roles are disrupted throughout the entire trajectory of living with brain tumor Physical, cognitive and psychological factors represent barriers to social integration Barriers to social integration may be addressed by supportive care interventions Compensatory strategies, adjusting goals and expectations, educating friends and family and accepting support from others facilitate social reintegration throughout the trajectory of living with brain tumor.

  17. Research of the multimodal brain-tumor segmentation algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yisu; Chen, Wufan

    2015-12-01

    It is well-known that the number of clusters is one of the most important parameters for automatic segmentation. However, it is difficult to define owing to the high diversity in appearance of tumor tissue among different patients and the ambiguous boundaries of lesions. In this study, a nonparametric mixture of Dirichlet process (MDP) model is applied to segment the tumor images, and the MDP segmentation can be performed without the initialization of the number of clusters. A new nonparametric segmentation algorithm combined with anisotropic diffusion and a Markov random field (MRF) smooth constraint is proposed in this study. Besides the segmentation of single modal brain tumor images, we developed the algorithm to segment multimodal brain tumor images by the magnetic resonance (MR) multimodal features and obtain the active tumor and edema in the same time. The proposed algorithm is evaluated and compared with other approaches. The accuracy and computation time of our algorithm demonstrates very impressive performance.

  18. CT-guided laser probe for ablation of brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolhadi Daneshi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available   Abstract  In this study, 22 patients (15-75 years old were selected and transferred to CT scan for tumor ablation. For ablations, after prep and drep under the local anesthesia and mild sedation in proper position, small incision made and special needle inserted and guided by proper direction to the core of the tumor. Then, laser probe inserted through the needle and laser energy delivered. Although we have not a good prognosis in metastatic tumors but post-operative follow up and brain CT scan established the effect of laser on resection and evaporation and diminution of mass effect in tumor lesions.

  19. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for brain tumors in infants and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwama, Junya; Ogiwara, Hideki; Kiyotani, Chikako; Terashima, Keita; Matsuoka, Kentaro; Iwafuchi, Hideto; Morota, Nobuhito

    2015-05-01

    Because of their large size and high vascularity, complete removal of brain tumors in infants and young children is often difficult. In most cases the degree of resection is associated with prognosis. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy may facilitate resection by reducing the vascularity of the tumor. The authors evaluated the effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the management of these tumors. The authors performed a retrospective review of infants and young children who underwent tumor removal after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Nine consecutive patients underwent resection after neoadjuvant chemotherapy during the period February 2004 to December 2012. The mean age at diagnosis was 18 months (range 2-50 months). The average largest tumor diameter was 71 mm (range 30-130 mm) at initial surgery. Five patients underwent partial resection, and 4 underwent biopsy as the initial surgery. The histopathological diagnoses were ependymoma in 2 patients, anaplastic ependymoma in 1, primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) in 2, choroid plexus carcinoma in 1, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) in 1, glioblastoma in 1, and embryonal tumor with abundant neuropil and true rosettes in 1. After 2-4 courses of multiagent chemotherapy (mainly with vincristine, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and cisplatin), the second-look surgery was performed. In 1 patient with a PNET, intratumoral hemorrhage was observed after 2 courses of chemotherapy. The mean interval between the initial and the second-look surgery was 3 months. The tumor volume was reduced to varying degrees in 5 patients (56%) after chemotherapy. Intraoperatively, the vascularity of the tumor was considerably reduced, and the tumor was more circumscribed in all cases. Gross-total resection was achieved in 8 patients (89%) and neartotal resection in 1 (11%). Histopathological examination demonstrated fibrotic tissue circumscribing the tumor in 6 of 9 cases (67%). The average blood loss was 20% of the estimated blood volume, and

  20. Brain and Spinal Tumors: Hope through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... called lobes, which handle different neurological functions. The frontal lobes manage voluntary movement, such as writing, and let us set and prioritize goals. A frontal lobe tumor can cause changes in personality, intellect, reasoning, ...

  1. Computational Modeling of Medical Images of Brain Tumor Patients for Optimized Radiation Therapy Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agn, Mikael

    In brain tumor radiation therapy, the aim is to maximize the delivered radiation dose to the targeted tumor and at the same time minimize the dose to sensitive healthy structures – so-called organs-at-risk (OARs). When planning a radiation therapy session, the tumor and the OARs therefore need...... to be delineated on medical images of the patient’s head, to be able to optimize a radiation dose plan. In clinical practice, the delineation is performed manually with limited assistance from automatic procedures, which is both time-consuming and typically suffers from poor reproducibility. There is, therefore...

  2. Intraoperative fluorescence imaging for personalized brain tumor resection: Current state and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenii Belykh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fluorescence-guided surgery is one of the rapidly emerging methods of surgical theranostics. In this review, we summarize current fluorescence techniques used in neurosurgical practice for brain tumor patients, as well as future applications of recent laboratory and translational studies.Methods: Review of the literature.Results: A wide spectrum of fluorophores that have been tested for brain surgery is reviewed. Beginning with a fluorescein sodium application in 1948 by Moore, fluorescence guided brain tumor surgery is either routinely applied in some centers or is under active study in clinical trials. Besides the trinity of commonly used drugs (fluorescein sodium, 5-ALA and ICG, less studied fluorescent stains, such as tetracyclines, cancer-selective alkylphosphocholine analogs, cresyl violet, acridine orange, and acriflavine can be used for rapid tumor detection and pathological tissue examination. Other emerging agents such as activity-based probes and targeted molecular probes that can provide biomolecular specificity for surgical visualization and treatment are reviewed. Furthermore, we review available engineering and optical solutions for fluorescent surgical visualization. Instruments for fluorescent-guided surgery are divided into wide-field imaging systems and hand-held probes. Recent advancements in quantitative fluorescence-guided surgery are discussed.Conclusion: We are standing on the doorstep of the era of marker-assisted tumor management. Innovations in the fields of surgical optics, computer image analysis, and molecular bioengineering are advancing fluorescence-guided tumor resection paradigms, leading to cell-level approaches to visualization and resection of brain tumors.

  3. Groupwise registration of MR brain images with tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhenyu; Wu, Yihong; Fan, Yong

    2017-09-01

    A novel groupwise image registration framework is developed for registering MR brain images with tumors. Our method iteratively estimates a normal-appearance counterpart for each tumor image to be registered and constructs a directed graph (digraph) of normal-appearance images to guide the groupwise image registration. Particularly, our method maps each tumor image to its normal appearance counterpart by identifying and inpainting brain tumor regions with intensity information estimated using a low-rank plus sparse matrix decomposition based image representation technique. The estimated normal-appearance images are groupwisely registered to a group center image guided by a digraph of images so that the total length of ‘image registration paths’ to be the minimum, and then the original tumor images are warped to the group center image using the resulting deformation fields. We have evaluated our method based on both simulated and real MR brain tumor images. The registration results were evaluated with overlap measures of corresponding brain regions and average entropy of image intensity information, and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were adopted to compare different methods with respect to their regional overlap measures. Compared with a groupwise image registration method that is applied to normal-appearance images estimated using the traditional low-rank plus sparse matrix decomposition based image inpainting, our method achieved higher image registration accuracy with statistical significance (p  =  7.02  ×  10-9).

  4. Factors affecting the cerebral network in brain tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimans, Jan J; Reijneveld, Jaap C

    2012-06-01

    Brain functions, including cognitive functions, are frequently disturbed in brain tumor patients. These disturbances may result from the tumor itself, but also from the treatment directed against the tumor. Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy all may affect cerebral functioning, both in a positive as well as in a negative way. Apart from the anti-tumor treatment, glioma patients often receive glucocorticoids and anti-epileptic drugs, which both also have influence on brain functioning. The effect of a brain tumor on cerebral functioning is often more global than should be expected on the basis of the local character of the disease, and this is thought to be a consequence of disturbance of the cerebral network as a whole. Any network, whether it be a neural, a social or an electronic network, can be described in parameters assessing the topological characteristics of that particular network. Repeated assessment of neural network characteristics in brain tumor patients during their disease course enables study of the dynamics of neural networks and provides more insight into the plasticity of the diseased brain. Functional MRI, electroencephalography and especially magnetoencephalography are used to measure brain function and the signals that are being registered with these techniques can be analyzed with respect to network characteristics such as "synchronization" and "clustering". Evidence accumulates that loss of optimal neural network architecture negatively impacts complex cerebral functioning and also decreases the threshold to develop epileptic seizures. Future research should be focused on both plasticity of neural networks and the factors that have impact on that plasticity as well as the possible role of assessment of neural network characteristics in the determination of cerebral function during the disease course.

  5. Characterization of Heterogeneous Prostate Tumors in Targeted Pten Knockout Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanneke Korsten

    Full Text Available Previously, we generated a preclinical mouse prostate tumor model based on PSA-Cre driven inactivation of Pten. In this model homogeneous hyperplastic prostates (4-5m developed at older age (>10m into tumors. Here, we describe the molecular and histological characterization of the tumors in order to better understand the processes that are associated with prostate tumorigenesis in this targeted mouse Pten knockout model. The morphologies of the tumors that developed were very heterogeneous. Different histopathological growth patterns could be identified, including intraductal carcinoma (IDC, adenocarcinoma and undifferentiated carcinoma, all strongly positive for the epithelial cell marker Cytokeratin (CK, and carcinosarcomas, which were negative for CK. IDC pattern was already detected in prostates of 7-8 month old mice, indicating that it could be a precursor stage. At more than 10 months IDC and carcinosarcoma were most frequently observed. Gene expression profiling discriminated essentially two molecular subtypes, denoted tumor class 1 (TC1 and tumor class 2 (TC2. TC1 tumors were characterized by high expression of epithelial markers like Cytokeratin 8 and E-Cadherin whereas TC2 tumors showed high expression of mesenchyme/stroma markers such as Snail and Fibronectin. These molecular subtypes corresponded with histological growth patterns: where TC1 tumors mainly represented adenocarcinoma/intraductal carcinoma, in TC2 tumors carcinosarcoma was the dominant growth pattern. Further molecular characterization of the prostate tumors revealed an increased expression of genes associated with the inflammatory response. Moreover, functional markers for senescence, proliferation, angiogenesis and apoptosis were higher expressed in tumors compared to hyperplasia. The highest expression of proliferation and angiogenesis markers was detected in TC2 tumors. Our data clearly showed that in the genetically well-defined PSA-Cre;Pten-loxP/loxP prostate tumor

  6. Childhood brain tumors and residential electromagnetic fields (EMF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheifets, L I; Sussman, S S; Preston-Martin, S

    1999-01-01

    There are many recent comprehensive reviews of the residential EMF epidemiologic literature, but they do not attempt to cover the issue of childhood brain tumors and EMF in depth. We present here background information on descriptive epidemiology of known or suspected causes of childhood brain tumors and a detailed review of studies that have examined the associations between EMF as represented by various surrogates, and childhood brain tumors. We evaluated nine studies of childhood brain tumors and residential exposure to EMF based on wire codes, distance, measurements, and modeling, and six studies that examined the use of appliances by children or their mothers during pregnancy. For each study we discussed analytical and methodological issues including choice of cutpoints, nonconcurrent control selection, random digit dialing, differential participation, and ability of a study to detect an association. On the basis of this comprehensive review of all available childhood brain cancer studies, we do not see support for an overall association between EMF and childhood brain cancer. This lack of support applied for all surrogates of past magnetic fields, including wire code, distance, measured or calculated fields, and use of appliances by either child or mother.

  7. Pathology Results at Autopsy in Brain-Dead Patients with Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadegh Beigee, Farahnaz; Shahryari, Shagin; Mojtabaee, Meysam; Pourabdollah Toutkaboni, Mihan

    2017-02-01

    Brain tumors are the most challenging causes of brain deaths due to the lack of pathology results in many cases. It is not uncommon to find a brain tumor in a brain-dead patient with no pathology results or neuroradiology reports available; this would exclude the deceased from organ donation. The mortality that occurs while patients are on transplant wait lists motivated us to find a solution to prevent losing brain-dead patients as potential donors. We present our experiences in autopsy examinations of brain tumors and the results of frozen-section pathology. We performed autopsy examinations of 8 brain-dead patients who were suspected of having highly malignant brain tumors and in whom there were no pathology or radiology reports available. The autopsy process began at the conclusion of organ retrieval. First, we performed a complete brain dissection; the tumor was then removed with its adjacent brain tissue and sent for examination by an expert pathologist. Organ transplant was deferred until the pathology examination was completed. Organ transplant was cancelled if the frozen sections revealed a high-grade tumor. For all other results, the transplant was performed. If a medulloblastoma was confirmed, only the heart was transplanted. The duration of the delay for pathologic examination was 30 to 45 minutes. A total of 21 organs were donated that would otherwise have been rejected. It is worth performing an autopsy and frozen-section pathology examination to prevent losing potential organs from donors with brain tumors who are suspected of having a high-grade neoplasm but have no pathology or neuroradiology reports. This process is simple and has the potential to save lives.

  8. Antibody-IL2 fusion proteins for tumor targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hombach, Andreas A; Abken, Hinrich

    2012-01-01

    Increasing insight into the misbalance and poor activity of tumor infiltrating immune cells raised interest to activate and improve an antitumor immune response by accumulating IL2 in the tumor tissue. IL2 can be targeted as part of an antibody-cytokine fusion protein to the tumor tissue by a single chain fragment of variable regions (scFv) antibody recognizing a tumor-associated antigen. IL2 can moreover be combined with IL12 in a dual cytokine fusion protein, which simultaneously targets both cooperating cytokines to the tumor in order to improve the activation of both T cells and innate immune cells. We here describe in detail the construction, expression, and functional testing of antibody-IL2 fusion proteins and provide a protocol to determine the biodistribution of such proteins in animal models.

  9. Assessment of serum L-fucose in brain tumor cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjula S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glycosylation of altered tumor cell in relation to cellular heterogeneity in human intracranial tumors remains relatively unexposed. Serum protein-bound carbohydrate, L-Fucose is reported to be overexpressed during tumor progression by many investigators. Therefore, there is a need to determine the diagnostic, prognostic, functional significance of glycoprotein elevations in various cases of tumors. Objective: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the clinical utility of serum L-fucose in patients with brain tumor. Materials and Methods: Serum glyco-conjugate levels were estimated in 99 patients with brain tumors. Estimation of L-fucose was carried out colorimetrically by the method of Winzler using cysteine hydrochloride. Results: There was a significant increase in L-fucose level in most of the patients. In the posttreatment cases, the L-fucose levels were apparently low compared to preoperative values. Conclusion: Our results showed that the rise in serum L-fucose may be used as a general marker for brain tumors in addition to other markers.

  10. Photon spectrum and absorbed dose in brain tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva S, A. [General Electric Healthcare, Antonio Dovali Jaime 70, Torre A 3er. piso, Col. Santa Fe, 01210 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria No. 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Using Monte Carlo methods a BOMAB phantom inside a treatment hall with a brain tumor nearby the pituitary gland was treated with photons produced by a Varian 6 MV linac. The photon spectrum and the absorbed dose were calculated in the tumor, pituitary gland and the head. The treatment beam was collimated to illuminate only the tumor volume; however photons were noticed in the gland. Photon fluence reaching the tumor is 78.1 times larger than the fluence in the pituitary gland, on the other hand the absorbed dose in the tumor is 188 times larger than the dose in the gland because photons that reach the pituitary gland are scattered, by the head and the tumor, through Compton effect. (Author)

  11. Macrophages associated with tumors as potential targets and therapeutic intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, Serguei; Warren, Galya; Wei, Xin

    2014-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) form approximately 50% of tumor mass. TAMs were shown to promote tumor growth by suppressing immunocompetent cells, inducing neovascularization and supporting cancer stem cells. TAMs retain mobility in tumor mass, which can potentially be employed for better intratumoral biodistribution of nanocarriers and effective tumor growth inhibition. Due to the importance of TAMs, they are increasingly becoming principal targets of novel therapeutic approaches. In this review, we compare features of macrophages and TAMs that are essential for TAM-directed therapies, and illustrate the advantages of nanomedicine that are related to the preferential capture of nanocarriers by Mϕ in the process of drug delivery. We discuss recent efforts in reprogramming or inhibiting tumor-protecting properties of TAMs, and potential strategies to increase efficacy of conventional chemotherapy by combining with macrophage-associated delivery of nanodrugs.

  12. Targeting the tumor microenvironment to enhance antitumor immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Jeught, Kevin; Bialkowski, Lukasz; Daszkiewicz, Lidia; Broos, Katrijn; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Renmans, Dries; Van Lint, Sandra; Heirman, Carlo; Thielemans, Kris; Breckpot, Karine

    2015-01-01

    The identification of tumor-specific antigens and the immune responses directed against them has instigated the development of therapies to enhance antitumor immune responses. Most of these cancer immunotherapies are administered systemically rather than directly to tumors. Nonetheless, numerous studies have demonstrated that intratumoral therapy is an attractive approach, both for immunization and immunomodulation purposes. Injection, recruitment and/or activation of antigen-presenting cells in the tumor nest have been extensively studied as strategies to cross-prime immune responses. Moreover, delivery of stimulatory cytokines, blockade of inhibitory cytokines and immune checkpoint blockade have been explored to restore immunological fitness at the tumor site. These tumor-targeted therapies have the potential to induce systemic immunity without the toxicity that is often associated with systemic treatments. We review the most promising intratumoral immunotherapies, how these affect systemic antitumor immunity such that disseminated tumor cells are eliminated, and which approaches have been proven successful in animal models and patients. PMID:25682197

  13. Genetic Characterization of Brain Metastases in the Era of Targeted Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine H. Han

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the current era of molecularly targeted therapies and precision medicine, choice of cancer treatment has been increasingly tailored according to the molecular or genomic characterization of the cancer the individual has. Previously, the clinical observation of inadequate control of brain metastases was widely attributed to a lack of central nervous system (CNS penetration of the anticancer drugs. However, more recent data have suggested that there are genetic explanations for such observations. Genomic analyses of brain metastases and matching primary tumor and other extracranial metastases have revealed that brain metastases can harbor potentially actionable driver mutations that are unique to them. Identification of genomic alterations specific to brain metastases and targeted therapies against these mutations represent an important research area to potentially improve survival outcomes for patients who develop brain metastases. Novel approaches in genomic testing such as that using cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF facilitate advancing our understanding of the genomics of brain metastases, which is critical for precision medicine. CSF-derived ctDNA sequencing may be particularly useful in patients who are unfit for surgical resection or have multiple brain metastases, which can harbor mutations that are distinct from their primary tumors. Compared to the traditional chemotherapeutics, novel targeted agents appear to be more effective in controlling the CNS disease with better safety profiles. Several brain metastases-dedicated trials of various targeted therapies are currently underway to address the role of these agents in the treatment of CNS disease. This review focuses on recent advances in genomic profiling of brain metastases and current knowledge of targeted therapies in the management of brain metastases from cancers of the breast, lung, colorectum, kidneys, and ovaries as well as melanoma.

  14. Active targeting of tumor cells using light emitting bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Min; Min, Jung Joon; Hong, Yeong Jin; Kim, Hyun Ju; Le, Uuenchi N.; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Song, Ho Chun; Heo, Young Jun; Bom, Hee Seung; Choy, Hyon E [School of Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The presence of bacteria and viruses in human tumors has been recognized for more than 50 years. Today, with the discovery of bacterial strains that specifically target tumors, and aided by genomic sequencing and genetic engineering, there is new interest in the use of bacteria as tumor vectors. Here, we show that bacteria injected intravenously into live animals entered and replicated in solid tumors and metastases using the novel imaging technology of biophotonics. Bioluminescence operon (LuxCDABE) or fluorescence protein, GFP) has been cloned into pUC19 plasmid to engineer pUC19lux or pUC19gfp. Engineered plasmid was transformed into different kinds of wild type (MG1655) or mutant E. coli (DH5, ppGpp, fnr, purE, crpA, flagella, etc.) strains to construct light emitting bacteria. Xenograft tumor model has been established using CT26 colon cancer cell line. Light emitting bacteria was injected via tail vein into tumor bearing mouse. In vivo bioluminescence imaging has been done after 20 min to 14 days of bacterial injection. We observed localization of tumors by light-emitting E. coli in tumor (CT-26) bearing mice. We confirmed the presence of light-emitting bacteria under the fluorescence microscope with E. coli expressing GFP. Althoug varying mutants strain with deficient invading function has been found in tumor tissues, mutant strains of movement (flagella) couldn't show any light signal from the tumor tissue under the cooled CCD camera, indicating bacteria may actively target the tumor cells. Based on their 'tumor-finding' nature, bacteria may be designed to carry multiple genes or drugs for detection and treatment of cancer, such as prodrug-converting enzymes, toxins, angiogenesis inhibitors and cytokines.

  15. Targeting Killing of Breast Tumor Stem Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Si-Yi

    2005-01-01

    .... Toward the goal, we have prepared HA molecules from human umbilical cord hyaluronic acid by hydrolysed by Bee venom. However, we have encountered the technical difficulty to produce CD44-targeted liposomes that are incorporated with HA molecules. Due to the technical problems, this proposed study has been extended for additional one year.

  16. Targeted Killing of Breast Tumor Stem Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Si-Yi

    2004-01-01

    .... Toward the goal, we have prepared HA molecules from human umbilical cord hyaluronic acid by hydrolysed by Bee venom. However, we have encountered the technical difficulty to produce CD44-targeted liposomes that are incorporated with HA molecules. Due to the technical problems, this proposed study has been extended for additional one year.

  17. Recent technological advances in pediatric brain tumor surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebian, Bassel; Vergani, Francesco; Lavrador, José Pedro; Mukherjee, Soumya; Kitchen, William John; Stagno, Vita; Chamilos, Christos; Pettorini, Benedetta; Mallucci, Conor

    2017-01-01

    X-rays and ventriculograms were the first imaging modalities used to localize intracranial lesions including brain tumors as far back as the 1880s. Subsequent advances in preoperative radiological localization included computed tomography (CT; 1971) and MRI (1977). Since then, other imaging modalities have been developed for clinical application although none as pivotal as CT and MRI. Intraoperative technological advances include the microscope, which has allowed precise surgery under magnification and improved lighting, and the endoscope, which has improved the treatment of hydrocephalus and allowed biopsy and complete resection of intraventricular, pituitary and pineal region tumors through a minimally invasive approach. Neuronavigation, intraoperative MRI, CT and ultrasound have increased the ability of the neurosurgeon to perform safe and maximal tumor resection. This may be facilitated by the use of fluorescing agents, which help define the tumor margin, and intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring, which helps identify and protect eloquent brain.

  18. Multiresolution texture models for brain tumor segmentation in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftekharuddin, Khan M; Ahmed, Shaheen; Hossen, Jakir

    2011-01-01

    In this study we discuss different types of texture features such as Fractal Dimension (FD) and Multifractional Brownian Motion (mBm) for estimating random structures and varying appearance of brain tissues and tumors in magnetic resonance images (MRI). We use different selection techniques including KullBack - Leibler Divergence (KLD) for ranking different texture and intensity features. We then exploit graph cut, self organizing maps (SOM) and expectation maximization (EM) techniques to fuse selected features for brain tumors segmentation in multimodality T1, T2, and FLAIR MRI. We use different similarity metrics to evaluate quality and robustness of these selected features for tumor segmentation in MRI for real pediatric patients. We also demonstrate a non-patient-specific automated tumor prediction scheme by using improved AdaBoost classification based on these image features.

  19. Differential diagnosis of the epileptogenic supratentorial brain tumors in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Khalilov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty-six out of 79 pediatric patients with supratentorial brain tumors were noted to have symptomatic epilepsy. Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNET, diffuse astrocytomas (DA, and gangliogliomas (GG were the most epileptogenic tumors. Seizures were new-onset in all our noted cases of DNET and in 4 patients with GG and the only clinical tumor sign in 6 of 8 cases of DNET. The neuroimaging features of the MRI pattern of DNET, DA, and GG were an iso/hypointense signal on Tl-weighted magnetic resonance images and a signal, the intensity of which varied from heterogeneous to cerebrospinal fluid, on T2-weighted FLAIR images. Cases of DNET and GG displayed no mass effect or perifocal edema, a trend towards location in the temporoinsular regions, and a frequent concurrence with local gray-white matter differentiation disorders and atrophy. The FLAIR images clearly showed the so-called foam-like (multicystic structure with pericystic changes. No significant change in the dimensions of the identified DNET and GG was observed during the follow up period. In low-grade DA, tumor growth was reduced and it is difficult to differentiate minimal perifocal edema from tumor-like tissue. The sensitivity of these tumors to contrast enhancement is ambiguous. Along with DNET (that was epileptogenic in 100% of cases, DA (91,7% and GG (80% were the most common epileptogenic brain tumors.

  20. Enhanced Performance of Brain Tumor Classification via Tumor Region Augmentation and Partition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Cheng

    Full Text Available Automatic classification of tissue types of region of interest (ROI plays an important role in computer-aided diagnosis. In the current study, we focus on the classification of three types of brain tumors (i.e., meningioma, glioma, and pituitary tumor in T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI images. Spatial pyramid matching (SPM, which splits the image into increasingly fine rectangular subregions and computes histograms of local features from each subregion, exhibits excellent results for natural scene classification. However, this approach is not applicable for brain tumors, because of the great variations in tumor shape and size. In this paper, we propose a method to enhance the classification performance. First, the augmented tumor region via image dilation is used as the ROI instead of the original tumor region because tumor surrounding tissues can also offer important clues for tumor types. Second, the augmented tumor region is split into increasingly fine ring-form subregions. We evaluate the efficacy of the proposed method on a large dataset with three feature extraction methods, namely, intensity histogram, gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM, and bag-of-words (BoW model. Compared with using tumor region as ROI, using augmented tumor region as ROI improves the accuracies to 82.31% from 71.39%, 84.75% from 78.18%, and 88.19% from 83.54% for intensity histogram, GLCM, and BoW model, respectively. In addition to region augmentation, ring-form partition can further improve the accuracies up to 87.54%, 89.72%, and 91.28%. These experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is feasible and effective for the classification of brain tumors in T1-weighted CE-MRI.

  1. Aerobic Glycolysis as a Marker of Tumor Aggressiveness: Preliminary Data in High Grade Human Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei G. Vlassenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Glucose metabolism outside of oxidative phosphorylation, or aerobic glycolysis (AG, is a hallmark of active cancer cells that is not directly measured with standard 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG positron emission tomography (PET. In this study, we characterized tumor regions with elevated AG defined based on PET measurements of glucose and oxygen metabolism. Methods. Fourteen individuals with high-grade brain tumors underwent structural MR scans and PET measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF, oxygen (CMRO2 and glucose (CMRGlu metabolism, and AG, using 15O-labeled CO, O2 and H2O, and FDG, and were compared to a normative cohort of 20 age-matched individuals. Results. Elevated AG was observed in most high-grade brain tumors and it was associated with decreased CMRO2 and CBF, but not with significant changes in CMRGlu. Elevated AG was a dramatic and early sign of tumor growth associated with decreased survival. AG changes associated with tumor growth were differentiated from the effects of nonneoplastic processes such as epileptic seizures. Conclusions. Our findings demonstrate that high-grade brain tumors exhibit elevated AG as a marker of tumor growth and aggressiveness. AG may detect areas of active tumor growth that are not evident on conventional FDG PET.

  2. Therapeutic strategies for targeting the ovarian tumor stroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Song Yi; Naora, Honami

    2014-06-16

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most lethal type of gynecologic malignancy. Sixty percent of women who are diagnosed with ovarian cancer present with advanced-stage disease that involves the peritoneal cavity and these patients have a 5-year survival rate of less than 30%. For more than two decades, tumor-debulking surgery followed by platinum-taxane combination chemotherapy has remained the conventional first-line treatment of ovarian cancer. Although the initial response rate is 70%-80%, most patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer eventually relapse and succumb to recurrent chemoresistant disease. A number of molecular aberrations that drive tumor progression have been identified in ovarian cancer cells and intensive efforts have focused on developing therapeutic agents that target these aberrations. However, increasing evidence indicates that reciprocal interactions between tumor cells and various types of stromal cells also play important roles in driving ovarian tumor progression and that these stromal cells represent attractive therapeutic targets. Unlike tumor cells, stromal cells within the tumor microenvironment are in general genetically stable and are therefore less likely to become resistant to therapy. This concise review discusses the biological significance of the cross-talk between ovarian cancer cells and three major types of stromal cells (endothelial cells, fibroblasts, macrophages) and the development of new-generation therapies that target the ovarian tumor microenvironment.

  3. Brain MRI tumor image fusion combined with Shearlet and wavelet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changjiang; Fang, Mingchao

    2017-11-01

    In order to extract the effective information in different modalities of the tumor region in brain Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images, we propose a brain MRI tumor image fusion method combined with Shearlet and wavelet transform. First, the source images are transformed into Shearlet domain and wavelet domain. Second, the low frequency component of Shearlet domain is fused by Laplace pyramid decomposition. Then the low-frequency fusion image is obtained through inverse Shearlet transform. Third, the high frequency subimages in wavelet domain are fused. Then the high-frequency fusion image is obtained through inverse wavelet transform. Finally, the low-frequency fusion image and high-frequency fusion image are summated to get the final fusion image. Through experiments conducted on 10 brain MRI tumor images, the result shown that the proposed fusion algorithm has the best fusion effect in the evaluation indexes of spatial frequency, edge strength and average gradient. The main spatial frequency of 10 images is 29.22, and the mean edge strength and average gradient is 103.77 and 10.42. Compared with different fusion methods, we find that the proposed method effectively fuses the information of multimodal brain MRI tumor images and improves the clarity of the tumor area well.

  4. Episodic Memory Impairments in Primary Brain Tumor Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Thomas; Berzero, Giulia; Bompaire, Flavie; Hoffmann, Sabine; Léger, Isabelle; Jego, Virginie; Baruteau, Marie; Delgadillo, Daniel; Taillia, Hervé; Psimaras, Dimitri; Ricard, Damien

    2018-01-04

    Cognitive investigations in brain tumor patients have mostly explored episodic memory without differentiating between encoding, storage, and retrieval deficits. The aim of this study is to offer insight into the memory sub-processes affected in primary brain tumor patients and propose an appropriate assessment method. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and memory assessments of 158 patients with primary brain tumors who had presented to our departments with cognitive complaints and were investigated using the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test. Retrieval was the process of episodic memory most frequently affected, with deficits in this domain detected in 92% of patients with episodic memory impairments. Storage and encoding deficits were less prevalent, with impairments, respectively, detected in 41% and 23% of memory-impaired patients. The pattern of episodic memory impairment was similar across different tumor histologies and treatment modalities. Although all processes of episodic memory were found to be impaired, retrieval was by far the most widely affected function. A thorough assessment of all three components of episodic memory should be part of the regular neuropsychological evaluation in patients with primary brain tumors.

  5. Black hairy tongue after chemotherapy for malignant brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Yuki; Maruyama, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Keiichi; Kume, Satoshi; Sasaki, Nobuyoshi; Yokoya, Shigeomi; Saito, Kuniaki; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Nagane, Motoo

    2017-01-01

    Black hairy tongue (BHT) developed in five patients (2.6%) among 192 patients undergoing chemotherapy for malignant brain tumors. Three patients with a history of diabetes mellitus developed BHT within 10 days after the initiation of chemotherapy. The other two patients suffered more than 100 days after induction and lymphopenia of grade 3 or worse developed for more than 20 days, which was not observed in the three patients with diabetes. We found that BHT could develop after chemotherapy for malignant brain tumors. Patients with diabetes mellitus presented early after chemotherapy, while patients with longstanding severe lymphopenia presented in late phase.

  6. Air pollution from traffic and risk for brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Aslak Harbo; Sørensen, Mette; Andersen, Zorana J.

    2016-01-01

    to replicate that finding in a large nationwide case-control study. METHODS: We identified all 4,183 adult brain tumor cases in Denmark in the years 2000-2009 and 8,018 risk set sampled population controls matched on gender and year of birth. We extracted residential address histories and estimated mean......PURPOSE: Air pollution is an established lung carcinogen, and there is increasing evidence that air pollution also negatively affects the brain. We have previously reported an association between air pollution and risk of brain tumors in a cohort study based on only 95 cases. We set out...... residential nitrogen oxides (NOx) concentrations since 1971 with a validated dispersion model. Categorical and linear odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI) were calculated with conditional logistic regression models. RESULTS: The highest risk estimates for any brain cancer were observed among...

  7. Expression of iron-related genes in human brain and brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britton Robert S

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Defective iron homeostasis may be involved in the development of some diseases within the central nervous system. Although the expression of genes involved in normal iron balance has been intensively studied in other tissues, little is known about their expression in the brain. We investigated the mRNA levels of hepcidin (HAMP, HFE, neogenin (NEO1, transferrin receptor 1 (TFRC, transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2, and hemojuvelin (HFE2 in normal human brain, brain tumors, and astrocytoma cell lines. The specimens included 5 normal brain tissue samples, 4 meningiomas, one medulloblastoma, 3 oligodendrocytic gliomas, 2 oligoastrocytic gliomas, 8 astrocytic gliomas, and 3 astrocytoma cell lines. Results Except for hemojuvelin, all genes studied had detectable levels of mRNA. In most tumor types, the pattern of gene expression was diverse. Notable findings include high expression of transferrin receptor 1 in the hippocampus and medulla oblongata compared to other brain regions, low expression of HFE in normal brain with elevated HFE expression in meningiomas, and absence of hepcidin mRNA in astrocytoma cell lines despite expression in normal brain and tumor specimens. Conclusion These results indicate that several iron-related genes are expressed in normal brain, and that their expression may be dysregulated in brain tumors.

  8. Analysis of p53- immunoreactivity in astrocytic brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinkarenko T.V.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available P53 is an antioncogene with the frequently occured mutations in human tumor cells, leading to corresponding protein overexpression which can be detected by immunohistochemistry. Researches dedicated to the investigation of possibilities of using this technique gave controversial results. The authors investigated features of p53 protein expression in astrocytic brain tumors with different degrees of malignancy. Analyzed the relationship of the expression level of p53 by tumor cells with clinical parameters and Ki-67 proliferation index (PI as well. Tissues were collected from 52 cases with diagnosed astrocytic brain tumors. The sections were immunohistochemically stained with p53 and Ki-67. For each marker, 1000 tumor cells were counted and the ratio of positive tumor cells was calculated using software package ImageJ 1,47v. In normal brain tissue p53- expression was not identified. p53-immunoreactive tumor cells were detected in 25% (1/4 pilocytic astrocytomas, 33.3% (2/6 of diffuse astrocytomas, 53.8% (7/13 anaplastic astrocytomas, 58.6% (17/29 glioblastomas. A high proportion of p53-immunoreactive cells (> 30% was observed only in glioblastomas. The level of p53-imunoreactivity was not related to the age, gender and Grade WHO (p> 0,05. Spearman correlation coefficient between the relative quantity of ki-67- and p53-immunoreactive nuclei showed weak direct correlation (0.023, but the one was not statistically significant (p> 0,05. The level of p53-imunoreactivity is not dependent from age and sex of patients, Grade (WHO and proliferative activity (p>0,05 but the high level of p53-immunoreactive cells (>30% is found in glioblastoma specimens only, that may be due to the accumulation of mutations in DNA of tumor cells. There is insignificant weak relationship between relative quantities of ki-67- and p53-immunoreactive tumor cells (p>0,05.

  9. Theranostic Probes for Targeting Tumor Microenvironment: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkandhar, Musafar Gani; Nedumaran, Anu Maashaa; Ravichandar, Roopa; Singh, Satnam; Santhakumar, Induja; Goh, Zheng Cong; Mishra, Sachin; Archunan, Govindaraju; Gulyás, Balázs; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman

    2017-05-11

    Long gone is the time when tumors were thought to be insular masses of cells, residing independently at specific sites in an organ. Now, researchers gradually realize that tumors interact with the extracellular matrix (ECM), blood vessels, connective tissues, and immune cells in their environment, which is now known as the tumor microenvironment (TME). It has been found that the interactions between tumors and their surrounds promote tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. The dynamics and diversity of TME cause the tumors to be heterogeneous and thus pose a challenge for cancer diagnosis, drug design, and therapy. As TME is significant in enhancing tumor progression, it is vital to identify the different components in the TME such as tumor vasculature, ECM, stromal cells, and the lymphatic system. This review explores how these significant factors in the TME, supply tumors with the required growth factors and signaling molecules to proliferate, invade, and metastasize. We also examine the development of TME-targeted nanotheranostics over the recent years for cancer therapy, diagnosis, and anticancer drug delivery systems. This review further discusses the limitations and future perspective of nanoparticle based theranostics when used in combination with current imaging modalities like Optical Imaging, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Nuclear Imaging (Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Computer Tomography (SPECT)).

  10. Theranostic Probes for Targeting Tumor Microenvironment: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkandhar, Musafar Gani; Nedumaran, Anu Maashaa; Ravichandar, Roopa; Singh, Satnam; Santhakumar, Induja; Goh, Zheng Cong; Mishra, Sachin; Archunan, Govindaraju; Gulyás, Balázs; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman

    2017-01-01

    Long gone is the time when tumors were thought to be insular masses of cells, residing independently at specific sites in an organ. Now, researchers gradually realize that tumors interact with the extracellular matrix (ECM), blood vessels, connective tissues, and immune cells in their environment, which is now known as the tumor microenvironment (TME). It has been found that the interactions between tumors and their surrounds promote tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. The dynamics and diversity of TME cause the tumors to be heterogeneous and thus pose a challenge for cancer diagnosis, drug design, and therapy. As TME is significant in enhancing tumor progression, it is vital to identify the different components in the TME such as tumor vasculature, ECM, stromal cells, and the lymphatic system. This review explores how these significant factors in the TME, supply tumors with the required growth factors and signaling molecules to proliferate, invade, and metastasize. We also examine the development of TME-targeted nanotheranostics over the recent years for cancer therapy, diagnosis, and anticancer drug delivery systems. This review further discusses the limitations and future perspective of nanoparticle based theranostics when used in combination with current imaging modalities like Optical Imaging, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Nuclear Imaging (Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Computer Tomography (SPECT)). PMID:28492519

  11. Brain tumors and anorexia nervosa syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipkevitch, E

    1994-01-01

    This review presents 21 cases, found in the literature, of a CNS lesion (a tumor in 19 of them) associated with emaciation, anorexia and several psychic symptoms that had led to the diagnosis of anorexia nervosa (AN). Anorexia and psychic disturbances preceded the neurologic signs and/or the correct diagnosis in all patients (by a mean of 2.9 years, range = 0.2-17 years). Anorexia had begun before the age of 25 years in 18 patients of which two-thirds were females. Only a few cases fulfilled the DSM-III-R criteria for AN; the majority could be characterized as 'atypical AN'. Although AN is usually conceived as a primarily psychogenic disorder, structural lesions of the hypothalamus (or other sites involved in food regulation) in animal models and in these human cases mimic many features of AN, suggesting the possibility of an as yet unidentified structural hypothalamic disorder to be implicated in the etiopathogeny of AN. The unusually high incidence of germ-cell tumors in this review (33%) suggests that they are more likely than other tumors to influence the limbic system toward an anorectic syndrome.

  12. Cyclosporin safety in a simplified rat brain tumor implantation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco H. C. Felix

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain cancer is the second neurological cause of death. A simplified animal brain tumor model using W256 (carcinoma 256, Walker cell line was developed to permit the testing of novel treatment modalities. Wistar rats had a cell tumor solution inoculated stereotactically in the basal ganglia (right subfrontal caudate. This model yielded tumor growth in 95% of the animals, and showed absence of extracranial metastasis and systemic infection. Survival median was 10 days. Estimated tumor volume was 17.08±6.7 mm³ on the 7th day and 67.25±19.8 mm³ on 9th day post-inoculation. Doubling time was 24.25 h. Tumor growth induced cachexia, but no hematological or biochemical alterations. This model behaved as an undifferentiated tumor and can be promising for studying tumor cell migration in the central nervous system. Dexamethasone 3.0 mg/kg/day diminished significantly survival in this model. Cyclosporine 10 mg/kg/day administration was safely tolerated.

  13. Application of contact laser in microsurgery of brain stem tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-wen GU

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the therapeutic efficacy of a new type sapphire contact laser using wavelength-shifting technique on microsurgery of brain stem tumors.Methods The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed of 23 patients(13 males and 10 females,aged 6 to 69 years with an average of 38 years,and the duration of disease was 14 to 36 months with average of 22 months with brain stem tumor admitted from Mar.2006 to May 2010.The major symptoms of the patients were cranial nerve impairment,cerebellum function impairment or paralysis.All patients received microsurgical resection of brain stem tumor using sapphire contact laser through median suboccipital incision and posterior brain stem approach,and the tumors were resected with precision operation and vaporization and ablation.Results Of the 23 patients,4 were with glioma,15 with cavernous angioma,2 with angioreticuloma and 2 with metastatic tumor.Total resection was achieved in 15 cases,while subtotal resection(more than 80% in 6 cases.Intraoperative hemorrhage was less and no intraoperative blood transfusion was required.A 6-months follow-up showed symptoms recovered in 15 patients,improved in 4,unchanged in 2,and worsen in 1.One patient died of recurrence of tumor.No postoperative intracranial infection was occurred,and 2 patients were undergone tracheotomy after operation.The average hospital stay was 15d.Conclusion The contact laser can precisely dissect and vaporize the tumors,increase the resection rate,reduce intraoperative hemorrhage and accessory injuries,and has a clear and definite effect.

  14. Polymer-peptide conjugates for angiogenesis targeted tumor radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitra, Amitava [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Center for Nanomedicine and Cellular Delivery, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Nan, Anjan [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Center for Nanomedicine and Cellular Delivery, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Papadimitriou, John C. [Department of Pathology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Ghandehari, Hamidreza [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States) and Center for Nanomedicine and Cellular Delivery, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States) and Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)]. E-mail: hghandeh@rx.umaryland.edus; Line, Bruce R. [Center for Nanomedicine and Cellular Delivery, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States) and Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States) and Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)]. E-mail: bline@umm.edu

    2006-01-15

    Introduction: New methods of delivering radiotherapy to sites of occult or disseminated cancer are needed to control the disease and address the failure of conventional therapy. Because tumor cells rely on angiogenesis for survival, we assessed the effectiveness of {beta}-emitter radiotherapy delivered by polymer-peptide conjugates that target tumor neovasculature. This molecularly targeted radiation is intended to damage both the endothelial bed and surrounding neoplastic cells. Methods: N-(2-Hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA), a biocompatible and water-soluble copolymer, was derivatized to incorporate side chains for {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 9}Y chelation and was further conjugated to a {alpha}{sub V}{beta}{sub 3} integrin-targeting peptide (RGD4C). The HPMA copolymer-RGD4C conjugate was characterized by its side-chain contents, in vitro endothelial cell adhesion assay and its biodistribution and antitumor effectiveness in a SCID mouse xenograft model of human prostate carcinoma. Results: The conjugate contained about 16 RGD4C moieties per polymer backbone. Tumor accumulation significantly increased (P<.01) over time from 1.05{+-}0.03 % injected dose (%ID)/g tissue at 1 h to 4.32{+-}0.32% at 72 h. The activity in major normal tissues significantly decreased (P<.05) during that period. At 21 days, the control tumors increased 442% in volume from baseline. In contrast, a 7% and a 63% decrease of tumor volume were observed for the 100- and 250-{mu}Ci {sup 9}Y treatment groups, respectively. Histopathological examination revealed increased apoptosis in the treated tumors with no acute signs of radiation-induced toxicity to other organs. Conclusion: This copolymer-peptide conjugate targets tumor angiogenic vessels and delivers sufficient radiotherapy to arrest tumor growth.

  15. American brain tumor patients treated with BNCT in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laramore, G.E.; Griffin, B.R.; Spence, A.

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish and maintain a database for patients from the United States who have received BNCT in Japan for malignant gliomas of the brain. This database will serve as a resource for the DOE to aid in decisions relating to BNCT research in the United States, as well as assisting the design and implementation of clinical trials of BNCT for brain cancer patients in this country. The database will also serve as an information resource for patients with brain tumors and their families who are considering this form of therapy.

  16. MR molecular imaging of tumor vasculature and vascular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Arvind P; Penet, Marie-France; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2010-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis and the ability of cancer cells to induce neovasculature continue to be a fascinating area of research. As the delivery network that provides substrates and nutrients, as well as chemotherapeutic agents to cancer cells, but allows cancer cells to disseminate, the tumor vasculature is richly primed with targets and mechanisms that can be exploited for cancer cure or control. The spatial and temporal heterogeneity of tumor vasculature, and the heterogeneity of response to targeting, make noninvasive imaging essential for understanding the mechanisms of tumor angiogenesis, tracking vascular targeting, and detecting the efficacy of antiangiogenic therapies. With its noninvasive characteristics, exquisite spatial resolution and range of applications, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have provided a wealth of functional and molecular information on tumor vasculature in applications spanning from "bench to bedside". The integration of molecular biology and chemistry to design novel imaging probes ensures the continued evolution of the molecular capabilities of MRI. In this review, we have focused on developments in the characterization of tumor vasculature with functional and molecular MRI. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cooperative nanomaterial system to sensitize, target, and treat tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Ho; von Maltzahn, Geoffrey; Xu, Mary Jue; Fogal, Valentina; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Sailor, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    A significant barrier to the clinical translation of systemically administered therapeutic nanoparticles is their tendency to be removed from circulation by the mononuclear phagocyte system. The addition of a targeting ligand that selectively interacts with cancer cells can improve the therapeutic efficacy of nanomaterials, although these systems have met with only limited success. Here, we present a cooperative nanosystem consisting of two discrete nanomaterials. The first component is gold nanorod (NR) “activators” that populate the porous tumor vessels and act as photothermal antennas to specify tumor heating via remote near-infrared laser irradiation. We find that local tumor heating accelerates the recruitment of the second component: a targeted nanoparticle consisting of either magnetic nanoworms (NW) or doxorubicin-loaded liposomes (LP). The targeting species employed in this work is a cyclic nine-amino acid peptide LyP-1 (Cys-Gly-Asn-Lys-Arg-Thr-Arg-Gly-Cys) that binds to the stress-related protein, p32, which we find to be upregulated on the surface of tumor-associated cells upon thermal treatment. Mice containing xenografted MDA-MB-435 tumors that are treated with the combined NR/LyP-1LP therapeutic system display significant reductions in tumor volume compared with individual nanoparticles or untargeted cooperative system. PMID:20080556

  18. Therapeutic Impact of Nanoparticle Therapy Targeting Tumor Associate Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Courtney; Yang, Kun; Zong, Hong; Lim, Jae-Young; Cole, Alex; Yang, Dongli; Baker, James; Goonewardena, Sascha N; Buckanovich, Ronald J

    2017-11-13

    Antiangiogenic therapies, despite initial encouragement, have demonstrated a limited benefit in ovarian cancer. Laboratory studies suggest anti-angiogenic therapy induced hypoxia can induce tumor "stemness' as resistance to antiangiogenic therapy develops and limits the therapeutic benefit. Resistance to antiangiogenic therapy and an induction of tumor stemness may be mediated by proangiogenic tumor associated macrophages (TAMs). As such TAMs have been proposed as a therapeutic target. We demonstrate here that ovarian TAMs express high levels of the folate receptor-2 (FOLR2) and can be selectively targeted using G5-dendrimer nanoparticles using methotrexate as both a ligand and a toxin. G5-methotrexate (G5-MTX) Nps deplete tumor associated macrophages in both solid tumor and ascites models of ovarian cancer. As a therapeutic these nanoparticles are more effective than cisplatin. Importantly, these nanoparticles could (i) overcome resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy, (ii) prevent antiangiogenic therapy induced increases in cancer stem-like cells in both murine and human tumor cell models, and (iii) prevent anti-angiogenic therapy induced increases in VEGF-C (iv) prevent anti-angiogenic therapy induce BRCA1 gene expression. Combine this work strongly supports the development of TAM targeted nanoparticle therapy. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Deep brain stimulation for obesity: past, present, and future targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, Derrick A; Tomycz, Nestor; Oh, Michael Y; Whiting, Donald

    2015-06-01

    The authors review the history of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in patients for treating obesity, describe current DBS targets in the brain, and discuss potential DBS targets and nontraditional stimulation parameters that may improve the effectiveness of DBS for ameliorating obesity. Deep brain stimulation for treating obesity has been performed both in animals and in humans with intriguing preliminary results. The brain is an attractive target for addressing obesity because modulating brain activity may permit influencing both sides of the energy equation--caloric intake and energy expenditure.

  20. Gonadal status in male survivors following childhood brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, M; Lassen, S; Poulsen, H S

    2001-01-01

    The effect of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT) on gonadal function was assessed in males treated for a childhood brain tumor not directly involving the hypothalamus/pituitary (HP) axis in a population-based study with a long follow-up time. All males...

  1. Learning Profiles of Survivors of Pediatric Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkon, Beverly

    2009-01-01

    By 2010 it is predicted that one in 900 adults will be survivors of some form of pediatric cancer. The numbers are somewhat lower for survivors of brain tumors, though their numbers are increasing. Schools mistakenly believe that these children easily fit pre-existing categories of disability. Though these students share some of the…

  2. Life satisfaction in adult survivors of childhood brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crom, Deborah B; Li, Zhenghong; Brinkman, Tara M; Hudson, Melissa M; Armstrong, Gregory T; Neglia, Joseph; Ness, Kirsten K

    2014-01-01

    Adult survivors of childhood brain tumors experience multiple, significant, lifelong deficits as a consequence of their malignancy and therapy. Current survivorship literature documents the substantial impact such impairments have on survivors' physical health and quality of life. Psychosocial reports detail educational, cognitive, and emotional limitations characterizing survivors as especially fragile, often incompetent, and unreliable in evaluating their circumstances. Anecdotal data suggest some survivors report life experiences similar to those of healthy controls. The aim of our investigation was to determine whether life satisfaction in adult survivors of childhood brain tumors differs from that of healthy controls and to identify potential predictors of life satisfaction in survivors. This cross-sectional study compared 78 brain tumor survivors with population-based matched controls. Chi-square tests, t tests, and linear regression models were used to investigate patterns of life satisfaction and identify potential correlates. Results indicated that life satisfaction of adult survivors of childhood brain tumors was similar to that of healthy controls. Survivors' general health expectations emerged as the primary correlate of life satisfaction. Understanding life satisfaction as an important variable will optimize the design of strategies to enhance participation in follow-up care, reduce suffering, and optimize quality of life in this vulnerable population. © 2014 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

  3. Imaging brain tumor proliferative activity with [I-124]iododeoxyuridine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blasberg, RG; Roelcke, U; Weinreich, R; Beattie, B; von Ammon, K; Yonekawa, Y; Landolt, H; Guenther, [No Value; Crompton, NEA; Vontobel, P; Missimer, J; Maguire, RP; Koziorowski, J; Knust, EJ; Finn, RD; Leenders, KL

    2000-01-01

    Iododeoxyuridine (IUdR) uptake and retention was imaged by positron emission tomography (PET) at 0-48 min and 24 h after administration of 28.0-64.4 MBq (0.76-1.74 mCi) of [I-124]IUdR in 20 patients with brain tumors, including meningiomas and gliomas, The PET images were directly compared with

  4. Genetic abnormality predicts benefit for a rare brain tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    A clinical trial has shown that addition of chemotherapy to radiation therapy leads to a near doubling of median survival time in patients with a form of brain tumor (oligodendroglioma) that carries a chromosomal abnormality called the 1p19q co-deletion.

  5. Multi-fractal detrended texture feature for brain tumor classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, Syed M. S.; Mays, Randall; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a novel non-invasive brain tumor type classification using Multi-fractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (MFDFA) [1] in structural magnetic resonance (MR) images. This preliminary work investigates the efficacy of the MFDFA features along with our novel texture feature known as multifractional Brownian motion (mBm) [2] in classifying (grading) brain tumors as High Grade (HG) and Low Grade (LG). Based on prior performance, Random Forest (RF) [3] is employed for tumor grading using two different datasets such as BRATS-2013 [4] and BRATS-2014 [5]. Quantitative scores such as precision, recall, accuracy are obtained using the confusion matrix. On an average 90% precision and 85% recall from the inter-dataset cross-validation confirm the efficacy of the proposed method.

  6. Dynamic Quantitative T1 Mapping in Orthotopic Brain Tumor Xenografts1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Kelsey; Erokwu, Bernadette O.; Johansen, Mette L.; Basilion, James P.; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A.; Flask, Chris A.; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M.

    2016-01-01

    Human brain tumors such as glioblastomas are typically detected using conventional, nonquantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as T2-weighted and contrast enhanced T1-weighted MRI. In this manuscript, we tested whether dynamic quantitative T1 mapping by MRI can localize orthotopic glioma tumors in an objective manner. Quantitative T1 mapping was performed by MRI over multiple time points using the conventional contrast agent Optimark. We compared signal differences to determine the gadolinium concentration in tissues over time. The T1 parametric maps made it easy to identify the regions of contrast enhancement and thus tumor location. Doubling the typical human dose of contrast agent resulted in a clearer demarcation of these tumors. Therefore, T1 mapping of brain tumors is gadolinium dose dependent and improves detection of tumors by MRI. The use of T1 maps provides a quantitative means to evaluate tumor detection by gadolinium-based contrast agents over time. This dynamic quantitative T1 mapping technique will also enable future quantitative evaluation of various targeted MRI contrast agents. PMID:27084431

  7. SRC family kinases as novel therapeutic targets to treat breast cancer brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Siyuan; Huang, Wen-Chien; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Chenyu; Lowery, Frank J; Ding, Zhaoxi; Guo, Hua; Wang, Hai; Huang, Suyun; Sahin, Aysegul A; Aldape, Kenneth D; Steeg, Patricia S; Yu, Dihua

    2013-09-15

    Despite better control of early-stage disease and improved overall survival of patients with breast cancer, the incidence of life-threatening brain metastases continues to increase in some of these patients. Unfortunately, other than palliative treatments there is no effective therapy for this condition. In this study, we reveal a critical role for Src activation in promoting brain metastasis in a preclinical model of breast cancer and we show how Src-targeting combinatorial regimens can treat HER2(+) brain metastases in this model. We found that Src was hyperactivated in brain-seeking breast cancer cells derived from human cell lines or from patients' brain metastases. Mechanistically, Src activation promoted tumor cell extravasation into the brain parenchyma via permeabilization of the blood-brain barrier. When combined with the EGFR/HER2 dual-targeting drug lapatinib, an Src-targeting combinatorial regimen prevented outgrowth of disseminated breast cancer cells through the induction of cell-cycle arrest. More importantly, this combinatorial regimen inhibited the outgrowth of established experimental brain metastases, prolonging the survival of metastases-bearing mice. Our results provide a rationale for clinical evaluation of Src-targeting regimens to treat patients with breast cancer suffering from brain metastasis. ©2013 AACR.

  8. Optical guidance for stereotactic brain tumor biopsy procedures: preliminary clinical evaluation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Hosseini, Neda; Richter, Johan; Milos, Peter; Hallbeck, Martin; Wârdell, Karin

    2017-02-01

    In the routine of stereotactic biopsy on suspected tumors located deep in the brain or patients with multiple lesions, tissue samples are harvested to determine the type of malignancy. Biopsies are taken from pre-calculated positions based on the preoperative radiologic images susceptible to brain shift. In such cases the biopsy procedure may need to be repeated leading to a longer operation time. To provide guidance for targeting diagnostic tumor tissue and to avoid vessel rupture on the insertion path of the tumor, an application specific fiber optic probe was developed. The setup incorporated spectroscopy for 5-aminolevulinic acid induced protopophyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence in the tumor and laser Doppler for measuring microvascular blood flow which recorded backscattered light (TLI) at 780 nm and blood perfusion. The recorded signals were compared to the histopathologic diagnosis of the tissue samples (n=16) and to the preoperative radiologic images. All together 146 fluorescence and 276 laser Doppler signals were recorded along 5 trajectories in 4 patients. On all occasions strong PpIX fluorescence peaks were visible during real-time guidance. Comparing the gliotic tumor marginal zone with the tumor, the PpIX (51 vs. 528 a.u., [0-1790], p 0.05) and blood perfusion (8.3 vs. 17 a.u., [0-254], p > 0.05) were not significantly different. In conclusion, the optical guidance probe made real-time tumor detection and vessel tracking possible during the stereotactic biopsy procedures. Moreover, the fluorescence and blood perfusion in the tumor could be studied at controlled positions in the brain and the tumor.

  9. Development of stereotactic mass spectrometry for brain tumor surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agar, Nathalie Y R; Golby, Alexandra J; Ligon, Keith L; Norton, Isaiah; Mohan, Vandana; Wiseman, Justin M; Tannenbaum, Allen; Jolesz, Ferenc A

    2011-02-01

    Surgery remains the first and most important treatment modality for the majority of solid tumors. Across a range of brain tumor types and grades, postoperative residual tumor has a great impact on prognosis. The principal challenge and objective of neurosurgical intervention is therefore to maximize tumor resection while minimizing the potential for neurological deficit by preserving critical tissue. To introduce the integration of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry into surgery for in vivo molecular tissue characterization and intraoperative definition of tumor boundaries without systemic injection of contrast agents. Using a frameless stereotactic sampling approach and by integrating a 3-dimensional navigation system with an ultrasonic surgical probe, we obtained image-registered surgical specimens. The samples were analyzed with ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and validated against standard histopathology. This new approach will enable neurosurgeons to detect tumor infiltration of the normal brain intraoperatively with mass spectrometry and to obtain spatially resolved molecular tissue characterization without any exogenous agent and with high sensitivity and specificity. Proof of concept is presented in using mass spectrometry intraoperatively for real-time measurement of molecular structure and using that tissue characterization method to detect tumor boundaries. Multiple sampling sites within the tumor mass were defined for a patient with a recurrent left frontal oligodendroglioma, World Health Organization grade II with chromosome 1p/19q codeletion, and mass spectrometry data indicated a correlation between lipid constitution and tumor cell prevalence. The mass spectrometry measurements reflect a complex molecular structure and are integrated with frameless stereotaxy and imaging, providing 3-dimensional molecular imaging without systemic injection of any agents, which can be implemented for surgical margins delineation of

  10. Targeting stromal glutamine synthetase in tumors disrupts tumor microenvironment-regulated cancer cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive stromal cells are an integral part of tumor microenvironment (TME) and interact with cancer cells to regulate their growth. Although targeting stromal cells could be a viable therapy to regulate the communication between TME and cancer cells, identification of stromal targets that make canc...

  11. Banking Brain Tumor Specimens Using a University Core Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregy, Amade; Papadimitriou, Kyriakos; Faber, David A; Shah, Ashish H; Gomez, Carmen R; Komotar, Ricardo J; Egea, Sophie C

    2015-08-01

    Within the past three decades, the significance of banking human cancer tissue for the advancement of cancer research has grown exponentially. The purpose of this article is to detail our experience in collecting brain tumor specimens in collaboration with the University of Miami/Sylvester Tissue Bank Core Facility (UM-TBCF), to ensure the availability of high-quality samples of central nervous system tumor tissue for research. Successful tissue collection begins with obtaining informed consent from patients following institutional IRB and federal HIPAA guidelines, and it needs a well-trained professional staff and continued maintenance of high ethical standards and record keeping. Since starting in 2011, we have successfully banked 225 brain tumor specimens for research. Thus far, the most common tumor histology identified among those specimens has been glioblastoma (22.1%), followed by meningioma (18.1%). The majority of patients were White, non-Hispanics accounting for 45.1% of the patient population; Hispanic/Latinos accounted for 23%, and Black/African Americans accounted for 14%, which represent the particular population of the State of Florida according to the 2010 census data. The most common tumors found in each subgroup were as follows: Black/African American, glioblastoma and meningioma; Hispanic, metastasis and glioblastoma; White, glioblastoma and meningioma. The UM-TBCF is a valuable repository, offering high-quality tumor samples from a unique patient population.

  12. Advance MRI for pediatric brain tumors with emphasis on clinical benefits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Ra, Young Shin [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Conventional anatomic brain MRI is often limited in evaluating pediatric brain tumors, the most common solid tumors and a leading cause of death in children. Advanced brain MRI techniques have great potential to improve diagnostic performance in children with brain tumors and overcome diagnostic pitfalls resulting from diverse tumor pathologies as well as nonspecific or overlapped imaging findings. Advanced MRI techniques used for evaluating pediatric brain tumors include diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, functional MRI, perfusion imaging, spectroscopy, susceptibility-weighted imaging, and chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging. Because pediatric brain tumors differ from adult counterparts in various aspects, MRI protocols should be designed to achieve maximal clinical benefits in pediatric brain tumors. In this study, we review advanced MRI techniques and interpretation algorithms for pediatric brain tumors.

  13. Engineering of magnetic DNA nanoparticles for tumor-targeted therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein, E-mail: hosseinkhani@yahoo.com [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) (China); Chen Yiru [National Yang-Ming University, Department of Biomedical Engineering (China); He Wenjie; Hong Poda [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) (China); Yu, Dah-Shyong [Nanomedicine Research Center, National Defense Medical Center (China); Domb, Abraham J. [Institute of Drug Research, The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2013-01-15

    This study aims to engineer novel targeted delivery system composed of magnetic DNA nanoparticles to be effective as an efficient targeted gene therapy vehicle for tumor therapy. A polysaccharide, dextran, was chosen as the vector of plasmid DNA-encoded NK4 that acts as an HGF-antagonist and anti-angiogenic regulator for inhibitions of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Spermine (Sm) was chemically introduced to the hydroxyl groups of dextran to obtain dextran-Sm. When Fe{sup 2+} solution was added to the mixture of dextran-Sm and a plasmid DNA, homogenous DNA nanoparticles were formed via chemical metal coordination bonding with average size of 230 nm. Characterization of DNA nanoparticles was performed via dynamic light scattering measurement, electrophoretic light scattering measurement, as well as transmission electron microscope. DNA nanoparticles effectively condensed plasmid DNA into nanoparticles and enhanced the stability of DNA, while significantly improved transfection efficiency in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo. In addition, magnetic DNA nanoparticles exhibited high efficiency in antitumor therapy with regards to tumor growth as well as survival of animals evaluated in the presence of external magnetic field. We conclude that the magnetic properties of these DNA nanoparticles would enhance the tracking of non-viral gene delivery systems when administrated in vivo in a test model. These findings suggest that DNA nanoparticles effectively deliver DNA to tumor and thereby inhibiting tumor growth.

  14. The Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation Benchmark (BRATS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menze, Bjoern H.; Jakab, Andras; Bauer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we report the set-up and results of the Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation Benchmark (BRATS) organized in conjunction with the MICCAI 2012 and 2013 conferences. Twenty state-of-the-art tumor segmentation algorithms were applied to a set of 65 multi-contrast MR scans of low......- and high-grade glioma patients – manually annotated by up to four raters – and to 65 comparable scans generated using tumor image simulation software. Quantitative evaluations revealed considerable disagreement between the human raters in segmenting various tumor sub-regions (Dice scores in the range 74...... a hierarchical majority vote yielded segmentations that consistently ranked above all individual algorithms, indicating remaining opportunities for further methodological improvements. The BRATS image data and manual annotations continue to be publicly available through an online evaluation system as an ongoing...

  15. Targeting macrophage anti-tumor activity to suppress melanoma progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huafeng; Zhang, Lijuan; Yang, Luhong; Liu, Chengfang; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Linjing

    2017-03-14

    By phagocytosing cancer cells and their cellular debris, macrophages play a critical role in nonspecific defense (innate immunity) and, as antigen presenters, they help initiate specific defense mechanisms (adaptive immunity). Malignant melanoma is a lethal disease due to its aggressive capacity for metastasis and resistance to therapy. For decades, considerable effort has gone into development of an effective immunotherapy for treatment of metastatic melanoma. In this review, we focus on the anti-tumor activities of macrophages in melanoma and their potential as therapeutic targets in melanoma. Although macrophages can be re-educated through intercellular signaling to promote tumor survival owing to their plasticity, we expect that targeting the anti-tumor activity of macrophages remains a promising strategy for melanoma inhibition. The combination of tumoricidal macrophage activation and other treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, may provide an effective and comprehensive anti-melanoma strategy.

  16. Tailoring nanoparticle designs to target cancer based on tumor pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Edward A.; Dai, Qin; Sarsons, Christopher D.; Chen, Juan; Rocheleau, Jonathan V.; Hwang, David M.; Zheng, Gang; Cramb, David T.; Rinker, Kristina D.; Chan, Warren C. W.

    2016-03-01

    Nanoparticles can provide significant improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. How nanoparticle size, shape, and surface chemistry can affect their accumulation, retention, and penetration in tumors remains heavily investigated, because such findings provide guiding principles for engineering optimal nanosystems for tumor targeting. Currently, the experimental focus has been on particle design and not the biological system. Here, we varied tumor volume to determine whether cancer pathophysiology can influence tumor accumulation and penetration of different sized nanoparticles. Monte Carlo simulations were also used to model the process of nanoparticle accumulation. We discovered that changes in pathophysiology associated with tumor volume can selectively change tumor uptake of nanoparticles of varying size. We further determine that nanoparticle retention within tumors depends on the frequency of interaction of particles with the perivascular extracellular matrix for smaller nanoparticles, whereas transport of larger nanomaterials is dominated by Brownian motion. These results reveal that nanoparticles can potentially be personalized according to a patient's disease state to achieve optimal diagnostic and therapeutic outcomes.

  17. Tumor suppressor miR-1 inhibits tumor growth and metastasis by simultaneously targeting multiple genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cuilian; Zhang, Song; Wang, Qizhi; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2017-01-01

    Cancer progression depends on tumor growth and metastasis, which are activated or suppressed by multiple genes. An individual microRNA may target multiple genes, suggesting that a miRNA may suppress tumor growth and metastasis via simultaneously targeting different genes. However, thus far, this issue has not been explored. In the present study, the findings showed that miR-1 could simultaneously inhibit tumor growth and metastasis of gastric and breast cancers by targeting multiple genes. The results indicated that miR-1 was significantly downregulated in cancer tissues compared with normal tissues. The miR-1 overexpression led to cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase in gastric and breast cancer cells but not in normal cells. Furthermore, the miR-1 overexpression significantly inhibited the metastasis of gastric and breast cancer cells. An analysis of the underlying mechanism revealed that the simultaneous inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis mediated by miR-1 was due to the synchronous targeting of 6 miR-1 target genes encoding cyclin dependent kinase 4, twinfilin actin binding protein 1, calponin 3, coronin 1C, WAS protein family member 2 and thymosin beta 4, X-linked. In vivo assays demonstrated that miR-1 efficiently inhibited tumor growth and metastasis of gastric and breast cancers in nude mice. Therefore, our study contributed novel insights into the miR-1′s roles in tumorigenesis of gastric and breast cancers. PMID:28159933

  18. Optically enhanced blood-brain-barrier crossing of plasmonic-active nanoparticles in preclinical brain tumor animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Wilson, Christy M.; Li, Shuqin; Fales, Andrew M.; Liu, Yang; Grant, Gerald; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2014-02-01

    Nanotechnology provides tremendous biomedical opportunities for cancer diagnosis, imaging, and therapy. In contrast to conventional chemotherapeutic agents where their actual target delivery cannot be easily imaged, integrating imaging and therapeutic properties into one platform facilitates the understanding of pharmacokinetic profiles, and enables monitoring of the therapeutic process in each individual. Such a concept dubbed "theranostics" potentiates translational research and improves precision medicine. One particular challenging application of theranostics involves imaging and controlled delivery of nanoplatforms across blood-brain-barrier (BBB) into brain tissues. Typically, the BBB hinders paracellular flux of drug molecules into brain parenchyma. BBB disrupting agents (e.g. mannitol, focused ultrasound), however, suffer from poor spatial confinement. It has been a challenge to design a nanoplatform not only acts as a contrast agent but also improves the BBB permeation. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of plasmonic gold nanoparticles as both high-resolution optical contrast agent and focalized tumor BBB permeation-inducing agent. We specifically examined the microscopic distribution of nanoparticles in tumor brain animal models. We observed that most nanoparticles accumulated at the tumor periphery or perivascular spaces. Nanoparticles were present in both endothelial cells and interstitial matrices. This study also demonstrated a novel photothermal-induced BBB permeation. Fine-tuning the irradiating energy induced gentle disruption of the vascular integrity, causing short-term extravasation of nanomaterials but without hemorrhage. We conclude that our gold nanoparticles are a powerful biocompatible contrast agent capable of inducing focal BBB permeation, and therefore envision a strong potential of plasmonic gold nanoparticle in future brain tumor imaging and therapy.

  19. History and evolution of brain tumor imaging: insights through radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Mauricio

    2014-11-01

    This review recounts the history of brain tumor diagnosis from antiquity to the present and, indirectly, the history of neuroradiology. Imaging of the brain has from the beginning held an enormous interest because of the inherent difficulty of this endeavor due to the presence of the skull. Because of this, most techniques when newly developed have always been used in neuroradiology and, although some have proved to be inappropriate for this purpose, many were easily incorporated into the specialty. The first major advance in modern neuroimaging was contrast agent-enhanced computed tomography, which permitted accurate anatomic localization of brain tumors and, by virtue of contrast enhancement, malignant ones. The most important advances in neuroimaging occurred with the development of magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-weighted sequences that allowed an indirect estimation of tumor cellularity; this was further refined by the development of perfusion and permeability mapping. From its beginnings with indirect and purely anatomic imaging techniques, neuroradiology now uses a combination of anatomic and physiologic techniques that will play a critical role in biologic tumor imaging and radiologic genomics.

  20. Optical spectroscopy for stereotactic biopsy of brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwardt, Niklas; von Berg, Anna; Fiedler, Sebastian; Goetz, Marcus; Haj-Hosseini, Neda; Polzer, Christoph; Stepp, Herbert; Zelenkov, Petr; Rühm, Adrian

    2015-07-01

    Stereotactic biopsy procedure is performed to obtain a tissue sample for diagnosis purposes. Currently, a fiber-based mechano-optical device for stereotactic biopsies of brain tumors is developed. Two different fluorophores are employed to improve the safety and reliability of this procedure: The fluorescence of intravenously applied indocyanine green (ICG) facilitates the recognition of blood vessels and thus helps minimize the risk of cerebral hemorrhages. 5- aminolevulinic-acid-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence is used to localize vital tumor tissue. ICG fluorescence detection using a 2-fiber probe turned out to be an applicable method to recognize blood vessels about 1.5 mm ahead of the fiber tip during a brain tumor biopsy. Moreover, the suitability of two different PpIX excitation wavelengths regarding practical aspects was investigated: While PpIX excitation in the violet region (at 405 nm) allows for higher sensitivity, red excitation (at 633 nm) is noticeably superior with regard to blood layers obscuring the fluorescence signal. Contact measurements on brain simulating agar phantoms demonstrated that a typical blood coverage of the tumor reduces the PpIX signal to about 75% and nearly 0% for 633 nm and 405 nm excitation, respectively. As a result, 633 nm seems to be the wavelength of choice for PpIX-assisted detection of high-grade gliomas in stereotactic biopsy.

  1. Cytogenomic profiling of breast cancer brain metastases reveals potential for repurposing targeted therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollig-Fischer, Aliccia; Michelhaugh, Sharon K; Wijesinghe, Priyanga; Dyson, Greg; Kruger, Adele; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Choi, Lydia; Alosh, Baraa; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2015-06-10

    Breast cancer brain metastases remain a significant clinical problem. Chemotherapy is ineffective and a lack of treatment options result in poor patient outcomes. Targeted therapeutics have proven to be highly effective in primary breast cancer, but lack of molecular genomic characterization of metastatic brain tumors is hindering the development of new treatment regimens. Here we contribute to fill this void by reporting on gene copy number variation (CNV) in 10 breast cancer metastatic brain tumors, assayed by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Results were compared to a list of cancer genes verified by others to influence cancer. Cancer gene aberrations were identified in all specimens and pathway-level analysis was applied to aggregate data, which identified stem cell pluripotency pathway enrichment and highlighted recurring, significant amplification of SOX2, PIK3CA, NTRK1, GNAS, CTNNB1, and FGFR1. For a subset of the metastatic brain tumor samples (n = 4) we compared patient-matched primary breast cancer specimens. The results of our CGH analysis and validation by alternative methods indicate that oncogenic signals driving growth of metastatic tumors exist in the original cancer. This report contributes support for more rapid development of new treatments of metastatic brain tumors, the use of genomic-based diagnostic tools and repurposed drug treatments.

  2. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Increase Tumor Growth Rates and Modify Tumor Physiology: Relevance for Therapeutic Targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpna Gupta

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cell precursors from human peripheral blood have been shown to home to areas of neovascularization and may assist tumor growth by increasing or fortifying blood vessel growth. In the present study, the influence of these cells on tumor growth and physiology was investigated and the role of these cells as a therapeutic target or in determining treatment sensitivity was tested. After isolation from human blood and expansion in vitro, actively growing cells with verified endothelial phenotype (Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cell, BOEC were injected i.v. into tumor bearing mice for three consecutive days. The growth rate was significantly enhanced in relatively small RERF human lung tumors (i.e., less than 150 mm3 grown in immunocompromised mice by an average of 1.5-fold while it had no effect when injections were given to animals bearing larger tumors. There were no signs of toxicity or unwanted systemic effects. We also observed evidence of increased perfusion, vessel number, response to 15 Gy radiation and oxygenation in RERF tumors of animals injected with BOECs compared to control tumors. In addition, FSaII murine fibrosarcoma tumors were found to grow faster upon injection of BOECs. When FSaII tumors were subjected to a partial thermal ablation treatment using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU there was consistently elevated detection of fluorescently labeled and i.v. injected endothelial precursors in the tumor when analyzed with optical imaging and/or histological preparations. Importantly, we also observed that BOECs treated with the novel anti-angiogenic peptide anginex in-vitro, show decreased proliferation and increased sensitivity to radiation. In vivo, the normal increase in FSaII tumor growth induced by injected BOECs was blunted by the addition of anginex treatment. It appears that endothelial precursors may significantly contribute to tumor vessel growth, tumor progression and/or repair of tumor damage and may improve

  3. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Increase Tumor Growth Rates and Modify Tumor Physiology: Relevance for Therapeutic Targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagan, Jonathan, E-mail: jdpagan@uams.edu; Przybyla, Beata; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Gupta, Kalpna [Vascular Biology Center and Division of Hematology-Oncology Transplantation, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, MN 72223 (United States); Griffin, Robert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2013-02-18

    Endothelial cell precursors from human peripheral blood have been shown to home to areas of neovascularization and may assist tumor growth by increasing or fortifying blood vessel growth. In the present study, the influence of these cells on tumor growth and physiology was investigated and the role of these cells as a therapeutic target or in determining treatment sensitivity was tested. After isolation from human blood and expansion in vitro, actively growing cells with verified endothelial phenotype (Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cell, BOEC) were injected i.v. into tumor bearing mice for three consecutive days. The growth rate was significantly enhanced in relatively small RERF human lung tumors (i.e., less than 150 mm{sup 3}) grown in immunocompromised mice by an average of 1.5-fold while it had no effect when injections were given to animals bearing larger tumors. There were no signs of toxicity or unwanted systemic effects. We also observed evidence of increased perfusion, vessel number, response to 15 Gy radiation and oxygenation in RERF tumors of animals injected with BOECs compared to control tumors. In addition, FSaII murine fibrosarcoma tumors were found to grow faster upon injection of BOECs. When FSaII tumors were subjected to a partial thermal ablation treatment using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) there was consistently elevated detection of fluorescently labeled and i.v. injected endothelial precursors in the tumor when analyzed with optical imaging and/or histological preparations. Importantly, we also observed that BOECs treated with the novel anti-angiogenic peptide anginex in-vitro, show decreased proliferation and increased sensitivity to radiation. In vivo, the normal increase in FSaII tumor growth induced by injected BOECs was blunted by the addition of anginex treatment. It appears that endothelial precursors may significantly contribute to tumor vessel growth, tumor progression and/or repair of tumor damage and may improve the

  4. Targeting Dopamine in Acute Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, James W.; Kline, Anthony E.; Wagner, Amy K.; Dixon, C. Edward

    2010-01-01

    In addition to the initial mechanical damage, traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces a series of secondary insults, such as, but not limited to, excitotoxicity, metabolic disruption, and oxidative stress. Neuroprotective strategies after TBI have traditionally focused on cellular preservation as the measurable endpoint although multiple lines of evidence indicate that even with significant neuronal sparing deficits remain at both the cellular and behavioral level. As such, the development of therapies that can effectively confer both neuronal sparing and post-injury functional benefit is critical to providing the best treatment options for clinical TBI. Targeting dopaminergic signaling pathways is a novel approach in TBI that provides benefits to both neuronal survival and functional outcomes. Dopamine, like glutamate, can cause oxidative stress and significant cellular dysfunction when either depleted or over-expressed, and also plays an important role in central nervous system inflammation. The purpose of this review is to discuss dopamine in acute TBI and the role that dopaminergic therapies have as neuroprotective strategies. PMID:22308176

  5. Evaluation of the increase in permeability of the blood-brain barrier during tumor progression after pulsed focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Lin, Guan-Liang; Lin, Hui-Hsien; Wong, Tai-Tong

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the permeability of the blood-brain barrier after sonication by pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound and to determine if such an approach increases the tumor:ipsilateral brain permeability ratio. F98 glioma-bearing Fischer 344 rats were injected intravenously with Evans blue with or without blood-tumor barrier disruption induced by transcranial pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound. Sonication was applied at a frequency of 1 MHz with a 5% duty cycle and a repetition frequency of 1 Hz. The permeability of the blood-brain barrier was assessed by the extravasation of Evans blue. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images were used to monitor the gadolinium deposition path associated with transcranial pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound, and the influencing size and location was also investigated. In addition, whole brain histological analysis was performed. The results were compared by two-tailed unpaired t-test. The accumulation of Evans blue in brains and the tumor:ipsilateral brain permeability ratio of Evans blue were significantly increased after pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound exposure. Evans blue injection followed by sonication showed an increase in the tumor:ipsilateral brain ratio of the target tumors (9.14:1) of about 2.23-fold compared with the control tumors (x4.09) on day 6 after tumor implantation. Magnetic resonance images showed that pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound locally enhances the permeability of the blood-tumor barrier in the glioma-bearing rats. This method could allow enhanced synergistic effects with respect to other brain tumor treatment regimens.

  6. Technological progress in radiation therapy for brain tumors

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vernimmen, Frederik Jozef

    2014-01-01

    To achieve a good therapeutic ratio the radiation dose to the tumor should be as high as possible with the lowest possible dose to the surrounding normal tissue. This is especially the case for brain tumors. Technological ad- vancements in diagnostic imaging, dose calculations, and radiation delivery systems, combined with a better un- derstanding of the pathophysiology of brain tumors have led to improvements in the therapeutic results. The widely used technology of delivering 3-D conformal therapy with photon beams (gamma rays) produced by Li-near Accelerators has progressed into the use of Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Particle beams have been used for several decades for radiotherapy because of their favorable depth dose characteristics. The introduction of clinically dedicated proton beam therapy facilities has improved the access for cancer patients to this treatment. Proton therapy is of particular interest for pediatric malignancies. These technical improvements are further enhanced by the evolution in tumor physiology imaging which allows for improved delineation of the tumor. This in turn opens the potential to adjust the radiation dose to maximize the radiobiological effects. The advances in both imaging and radiation therapy delivery will be discussed.

  7. Collecting and Storing Blood and Brain Tumor Tissue Samples From Children With Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-21

    Childhood Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Newly Diagnosed Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma

  8. Characterization of tumor vasculature in mouse brain by USPIO contrast-enhanced MRI.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gambarota, G.; Leenders, W.P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Detailed characterization of the tumor vasculature provides a better understanding of the complex mechanisms associated with tumor development and is especially important to evaluate responses to current therapies which target the tumor vasculature. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of tumors

  9. Targeted Imaging of Tumor-Associated Macrophages by Cyanine 7-Labeled Mannose in Xenograft Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Jiang MD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mannose receptor is considered as a hallmark of M2-oriented tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs, but its utility in TAMs was rarely reported. Therefore, deoxymannose (DM, a high-affinity ligand of mannose receptor, was labeled with near-infrared dye cyanine 7 (Cy7, and its feasibility of targeted imaging on TAMs was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The Cy7-DM was synthesized, and its binding affinity with induced TAMs in vitro, whole-body imaging in xenograft tumor mouse model in vivo, and the cellular localization in dissected tissues were evaluated. We demonstrated a high uptake of Cy7-DM by induced M2 macrophages and TAMs in tumor tissues. In vivo near-infrared live imaging visualized abundant TAMs in tumor lesions instead of inflammatory sites by Cy7-DM imaging, and the quantity of Cy7-DM signals in tumors was significantly higher than that shown in inflammatory sites from 1 to 8 hours of imaging. Our results suggest that mannose could rapidly and specifically target TAMs and is a promising candidate for targeted diagnosis of tumor with rich TAMs.

  10. 332 Molecular Characteristics of Tumor Infiltrating Front in Glioblastoma: Insights Into Molecular Heterogeneity and Implications on Targeted Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimappamagan, Arivazhagan; Kruthika; Dawn, Rose; Paturu, Kondaiah; Santosh, Vani

    2016-08-01

    Molecular heterogeneity in glioblastoma (GBM) is a novel area of research recently. Because tumor infiltrating front in GBM is often left behind following tumor decompression, knowledge of its genetic makeup can improve the rationale of potential molecular targets. MRI localized biopsies of the tumor core and peritumoral brain zone (PBZ) were obtained from 25 GBM patients. The PBZ samples containing 15% to 30% tumor cells and core samples with predominantly tumor cells along with 8 nonneoplastic brain tissues were selected for a whole Genome Gene Expression Microarray. The list of differentially expressed genes between the tumor core and PBZ compared with nonneoplastic brain tissue was identified using R Bioconductor. Selected genes were validated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the genes revealed that the tumor core and PBZ samples showed a varied gene expression profile and clustered into 2 distinct groups. Approximately 7123, 5188, and 991 genes were differentially expressed in Core vs Normal, PBZ vs Normal and PBZ vs Core. Novel genes like PBK (role in cell cycle), MELK (stem cell marker), and TOP2A (proliferation marker) were upregulated in PBZ and tumor core compared with normal brain and robustly validated on IHC. Pathways involved in cell cycle, immune response, cell-cell adhesion, cell-matrix interaction, etc, were commonly enriched in periphery and tumor core compared with normal brain. Some of the novel markers were validated by real-time PCR and IHC. We demonstrate that the key genes involved in tumor cell proliferation, invasion, migration, response to immune system, and stemness markers are highly enriched in the PBZ. These genes, probably contribute to the resistance of PBZ cells to standard adjuvant therapy, resulting in tumor recurrence.

  11. Brain tumor segmentation using holistically nested neural networks in MRI images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuge, Ying; Krauze, Andra V; Ning, Holly; Cheng, Jason Y; Arora, Barbara C; Camphausen, Kevin; Miller, Robert W

    2017-10-01

    Gliomas are rapidly progressive, neurologically devastating, largely fatal brain tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely used technique employed in the diagnosis and management of gliomas in clinical practice. MRI is also the standard imaging modality used to delineate the brain tumor target as part of treatment planning for the administration of radiation therapy. Despite more than 20 yr of research and development, computational brain tumor segmentation in MRI images remains a challenging task. We are presenting a novel method of automatic image segmentation based on holistically nested neural networks that could be employed for brain tumor segmentation of MRI images. Two preprocessing techniques were applied to MRI images. The N4ITK method was employed for correction of bias field distortion. A novel landmark-based intensity normalization method was developed so that tissue types have a similar intensity scale in images of different subjects for the same MRI protocol. The holistically nested neural networks (HNN), which extend from the convolutional neural networks (CNN) with a deep supervision through an additional weighted-fusion output layer, was trained to learn the multiscale and multilevel hierarchical appearance representation of the brain tumor in MRI images and was subsequently applied to produce a prediction map of the brain tumor on test images. Finally, the brain tumor was obtained through an optimum thresholding on the prediction map. The proposed method was evaluated on both the Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation (BRATS) Benchmark 2013 training datasets, and clinical data from our institute. A dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and sensitivity of 0.78 and 0.81 were achieved on 20 BRATS 2013 training datasets with high-grade gliomas (HGG), based on a two-fold cross-validation. The HNN model built on the BRATS 2013 training data was applied to ten clinical datasets with HGG from a locally developed database. DSC and sensitivity of

  12. Inhibition of brain tumor growth by intravenous poly (β-L-malic acid) nanobioconjugate with pH-dependent drug release [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hui; Inoue, Satoshi; Ljubimov, Alexander V; Patil, Rameshwar; Portilla-Arias, Jose; Hu, Jinwei; Konda, Bindu; Wawrowsky, Kolja A; Fujita, Manabu; Karabalin, Natalya; Sasaki, Takako; Black, Keith L; Holler, Eggehard; Ljubimova, Julia Y

    2010-10-19

    Effective treatment of brain neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, or tumors should be possible with drug delivery through blood-brain barrier (BBB) or blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB) and targeting specific types of brain cells with drug release into the cell cytoplasm. A polymeric nanobioconjugate drug based on biodegradable, nontoxic, and nonimmunogenic polymalic acid as a universal delivery nanoplatform was used for design and synthesis of nanomedicine drug for i.v. treatment of brain tumors. The polymeric drug passes through the BTB and tumor cell membrane using tandem monoclonal antibodies targeting the BTB and tumor cells. The next step for polymeric drug action was inhibition of tumor angiogenesis by specifically blocking the synthesis of a tumor neovascular trimer protein, laminin-411, by attached antisense oligonucleotides (AONs). The AONs were released into the target cell cytoplasm via pH-activated trileucine, an endosomal escape moiety. Drug delivery to the brain tumor and the release mechanism were both studied for this nanobiopolymer. Introduction of a trileucine endosome escape unit resulted in significantly increased AON delivery to tumor cells, inhibition of laminin-411 synthesis in vitro and in vivo, specific accumulation in brain tumors, and suppression of intracranial glioma growth compared with pH-independent leucine ester. The availability of a systemically active polymeric drug delivery system that passes through the BTB, targets tumor cells, and inhibits glioma growth gives hope for a successful strategy of glioma treatment. This delivery system with drug release into the brain-specific cell type could be useful for treatment of various brain pathologies.

  13. Intelligence deficits in Chinese patients with brain tumor: the impact of tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chao; Xie, Rong; Cao, Xiaoyun; Bao, Weimin; Yang, Bojie; Mao, Ying; Gao, Chao

    2013-01-01

    Intelligence is much important for brain tumor patients after their operation, while the reports about surgical related intelligence deficits are not frequent. It is not only theoretically important but also meaningful for clinical practice. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale was employed to evaluate the intelligence of 103 patients with intracranial tumor and to compare the intelligence quotient (IQ), verbal IQ (VIQ), and performance IQ (PIQ) between the intracerebral and extracerebral subgroups. Although preoperative intelligence deficits appeared in all subgroups, IQ, VIQ, and PIQ were not found to have any significant difference between the intracerebral and extracerebral subgroups, but with VIQ lower than PIQ in all the subgroups. An immediate postoperative follow-up demonstrated a decline of IQ and PIQ in the extracerebral subgroup, but an improvement of VIQ in the right intracerebral subgroup. Pituitary adenoma resection exerted no effect on intelligence. In addition, age, years of education, and tumor size were found to play important roles. Brain tumors will impair IQ, VIQ, and PIQ. The extracerebral tumor resection can deteriorate IQ and PIQ. However, right intracerebral tumor resection is beneficial to VIQ, and transsphenoidal pituitary adenoma resection performs no effect on intelligence.

  14. Genetic tumor profiling and genetically targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetsch, Cathleen M

    2011-02-01

    To discuss how understanding and manipulation of tumor genetics information and technology shapes cancer care today and what changes might be expected in the near future. Published articles, web resources, clinical practice. Advances in our understanding of genes and their regulation provide a promise of more personalized cancer care, allowing selection of the most safe and effective therapy in an individual situation. Rapid progress in the technology of tumor profiling and targeted cancer therapies challenges nurses to keep up-to-date to provide quality patient education and care. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Extracellular Vesicles in Brain Tumors and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Ciregia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs can be classified into apoptotic bodies, microvesicles (MVs, and exosomes, based on their origin or size. Exosomes are the smallest and best characterized vesicles which derived from the endosomal system. These vesicles are released from many different cell types including neuronal cells and their functions in the nervous system are investigated. They have been proposed as novel means for intercellular communication, which takes part not only to the normal neuronal physiology but also to the transmission of pathogenic proteins. Indeed, exosomes are fundamental to assemble and transport proteins during development, but they can also transfer neurotoxic misfolded proteins in pathogenesis. The present review will focus on their roles in neurological diseases, specifically brain tumors, such as glioblastoma (GBM, neuroblastoma (NB, medulloblastoma (MB, and metastatic brain tumors and chronic neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer, Parkinson, multiple sclerosis (MS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Huntington, and Prion diseseases highlighting their involvement in spreading neurotoxicity, in therapeutics, and in pathogenesis.

  16. Extracellular Vesicles in Brain Tumors and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciregia, Federica; Urbani, Andrea; Palmisano, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) can be classified into apoptotic bodies, microvesicles (MVs), and exosomes, based on their origin or size. Exosomes are the smallest and best characterized vesicles which derived from the endosomal system. These vesicles are released from many different cell types including neuronal cells and their functions in the nervous system are investigated. They have been proposed as novel means for intercellular communication, which takes part not only to the normal neuronal physiology but also to the transmission of pathogenic proteins. Indeed, exosomes are fundamental to assemble and transport proteins during development, but they can also transfer neurotoxic misfolded proteins in pathogenesis. The present review will focus on their roles in neurological diseases, specifically brain tumors, such as glioblastoma (GBM), neuroblastoma (NB), medulloblastoma (MB), and metastatic brain tumors and chronic neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer, Parkinson, multiple sclerosis (MS), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Huntington, and Prion diseseases highlighting their involvement in spreading neurotoxicity, in therapeutics, and in pathogenesis. PMID:28912682

  17. Specific features of epilepsy in children with brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Kalmykova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the specific features of epilepsy in children and adolescents with brain tumors and to define the optimal tactics of management and antiepileptic therapy after surgical treatment. Patients and methods. Sixty-one patients aged 5 months to 15 years were examined. All the patients were diagnosed as having a brain tumor found in the presence of symptomatic epilepsy. They were all followed up for 5 years postsurgery or during their lifetime (in case of death. Comprehensive examination encompassing the assessment of history data and concomitant complaints, brain magnetic resonance imaging, video-EEC monitoring, and the neurological status (the presence of cognitive impairments and eye ground changes was done in all the cases. The probability of epileptic seizures in the clinical presentation of the disease, their semiology, and frequency were studied. Results and discussion. Epileptic seizures were the major complaint in all the patients at the first visit to their doctor. The disease occurred with status epilepticus in 9% of the patients. Different types of generalized seizures were more common (53%; p≥0.05. The tumor was located above the tentorium of the cerebellum in most examinees (77% and beneath it in the others (23%; p≤0.05. The significant clinical sign of a brain tumor in the epileptic children is focal neurological symptoms (72% of the cases. MRI was performed in children who had no focal neurological symptoms in the late periods. There was cerebrospinal fluid hypertension in 51% of the patients (p≥0.05 and cognitive impairments in 33% (p<0.05. The maximum number (74% of children with psycho-speech disorders and cognitive impairments were registered in the age group of 7–15 years. Eye ground changes characteristic of intracranial hypertension were identified in 19 epileptic children; they occurred in 27 patients more than 1 year after the onset of seizures. The late (few months-to-14 years diagnosis of a brain

  18. Fusion protein vaccines targeting two tumor antigens generate synergistic anti-tumor effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Fang Cheng

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Human papillomavirus (HPV has been consistently implicated in causing several kinds of malignancies, and two HPV oncogenes, E6 and E7, represent two potential target antigens for cancer vaccines. We developed two fusion protein vaccines, PE(ΔIII/E6 and PE(ΔIII/E7 by targeting these two tumor antigens to test whether a combination of two fusion proteins can generate more potent anti-tumor effects than a single fusion protein. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In vivo antitumor effects including preventive, therapeutic, and antibody depletion experiments were performed. In vitro assays including intracellular cytokine staining and ELISA for Ab responses were also performed. RESULTS: PE(ΔIII/E6+PE(ΔIII/E7 generated both stronger E6 and E7-specific immunity. Only 60% of the tumor protective effect was observed in the PE(ΔIII/E6 group compared to 100% in the PE(ΔIII/E7 and PE(ΔIII/E6+PE(ΔIII/E7 groups. Mice vaccinated with the PE(ΔIII/E6+PE(ΔIII/E7 fusion proteins had a smaller subcutaneous tumor size than those vaccinated with PE(ΔIII/E6 or PE(ΔIII/E7 fusion proteins alone. CONCLUSION: Fusion protein vaccines targeting both E6 and E7 tumor antigens generated more potent immunotherapeutic effects than E6 or E7 tumor antigens alone. This novel strategy of targeting two tumor antigens together can promote the development of cancer vaccines and immunotherapy in HPV-related malignancies.

  19. Telomere length modulation in human astroglial brain tumors.

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    Domenico La Torre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Telomeres alteration during carcinogenesis and tumor progression has been described in several cancer types. Telomeres length is stabilized by telomerase (h-TERT and controlled by several proteins that protect telomere integrity, such as the Telomere Repeat-binding Factor (TRF 1 and 2 and the tankyrase-poli-ADP-ribose polymerase (TANKs-PARP complex. OBJECTIVE: To investigate telomere dysfunction in astroglial brain tumors we analyzed telomeres length, telomerase activity and the expression of a panel of genes controlling the length and structure of telomeres in tissue samples obtained in vivo from astroglial brain tumors with different grade of malignancy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eight Low Grade Astrocytomas (LGA, 11 Anaplastic Astrocytomas (AA and 11 Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM samples were analyzed. Three samples of normal brain tissue (NBT were used as controls. Telomeres length was assessed through Southern Blotting. Telomerase activity was evaluated by a telomere repeat amplification protocol (TRAP assay. The expression levels of TRF1, TRF2, h-TERT and TANKs-PARP complex were determined through Immunoblotting and RT-PCR. RESULTS: LGA were featured by an up-regulation of TRF1 and 2 and by shorter telomeres. Conversely, AA and GBM were featured by a down-regulation of TRF1 and 2 and an up-regulation of both telomerase and TANKs-PARP complex. CONCLUSIONS: In human astroglial brain tumours, up-regulation of TRF1 and TRF2 occurs in the early stages of carcinogenesis determining telomeres shortening and genomic instability. In a later stage, up-regulation of PARP-TANKs and telomerase activation may occur together with an ADP-ribosylation of TRF1, causing a reduced ability to bind telomeric DNA, telomeres elongation and tumor malignant progression.

  20. Epilepsy is related to theta band brain connectivity and network topology in brain tumor patients

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    Douw Linda

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both epilepsy patients and brain tumor patients show altered functional connectivity and less optimal brain network topology when compared to healthy controls, particularly in the theta band. Furthermore, the duration and characteristics of epilepsy may also influence functional interactions in brain networks. However, the specific features of connectivity and networks in tumor-related epilepsy have not been investigated yet. We hypothesize that epilepsy characteristics are related to (theta band connectivity and network architecture in operated glioma patients suffering from epileptic seizures. Included patients participated in a clinical study investigating the effect of levetiracetam monotherapy on seizure frequency in glioma patients, and were assessed at two time points: directly after neurosurgery (t1, and six months later (t2. At these time points, magnetoencephalography (MEG was recorded and information regarding clinical status and epilepsy history was collected. Functional connectivity was calculated in six frequency bands, as were a number of network measures such as normalized clustering coefficient and path length. Results At the two time points, MEG registrations were performed in respectively 17 and 12 patients. No changes in connectivity or network topology occurred over time. Increased theta band connectivity at t1 and t2 was related to a higher total number of seizures. Furthermore, higher number of seizures was related to a less optimal, more random brain network topology. Other factors were not significantly related to functional connectivity or network topology. Conclusions These results indicate that (pathologically increased theta band connectivity is related to a higher number of epileptic seizures in brain tumor patients, suggesting that theta band connectivity changes are a hallmark of tumor-related epilepsy. Furthermore, a more random brain network topology is related to greater vulnerability to

  1. Hitting the Target: How T Cells Detect and Eliminate Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Anthony E; Crawford, Jeremy Chase; Thomas, Paul G

    2018-01-15

    The successes of antitumor immuno-based therapies and the application of next-generation sequencing to mutation profiling have produced insights into the specific targets of antitumor T cells. Mutated proteins have tremendous potential as targets for interventions using autologous T cells or engineered cell therapies and may serve as important correlates of efficacy for immunoregulatory interventions including immune checkpoint blockade. As mutated self, tumors present an exceptional case for host immunity, which has primarily evolved in response to foreign pathogens. Tumor Ags' resemblance to self may limit immune recognition, but key features appear to be the same between antipathogen and antitumor responses. Determining which targets will make efficacious Ags and which responses might be elicited therapeutically are key questions for the field. Here we discuss current knowledge on antitumor specificity, the mutations that provide immunogenic targets, and how cross-reactivity and immunodominance may contribute to variation in immune responses among tumor types. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  2. Computer-Aided Detection of Brain Tumors Using Morphological Reconstruction

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    Buket DOĞAN

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Computer aided detection (CAD systems helps the detection of abnormalities in medical images using advanced image processing and pattern recognition techniques. CAD has advantages in accelerating decision-making and reducing the human error in detection process. In this study, a CAD system is developed which is based on morphological reconstruction and classification methods with the use of morphological features of the regions of interest to detect brain tumors from brain magnetic resonance (MR images. The CAD system consists of four stages: the preprocessing, the segmentation, region of interest specification and tumor detection stages. The system is evaluated on REMBRANDT dataset with 497 MR image slices of 10 patients. In the classification stage the performance of CAD has achieved accuracy of 93.36% with Decision Tree Algorithm, 94.89% with Artificial Neural Network (Multilayer Perceptron, 96.93% with K-Nearest Neighbour Algorithm and 96.93% with  Meta-Learner (Decorate Algorithm. These results show that the proposed technique is effective and promising for detecting tumors in brain MR images and enhances the classification process to be more accurate. The using morphological reconstruction method is useful and adaptive than the methods used in other CAD applications.

  3. Cognitive tasks challenging brain tumor survivors at work.

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    Collins, Courtney; Gehrke, Amanda; Feuerstein, Michael

    2013-12-01

    To identify problematic work tasks involving cognitive function in employed brain tumor survivors. Work tasks involving cognitive functions were compared between employed brain tumor survivors (n = 137) and a disease-free group (n = 96). Multivariable logistic regressions were conducted. In the brain tumor survivors, 44% (26/59) of work tasks were more likely to be problematic. Top five problematic work tasks included were as follows: following the flow of events (odds ratio [OR] = 11.72; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.19 to 43.07), remembering train of thought while speaking (OR = 11.70; 95% CI = 5.25 to 26.10), putting together materials for a task (OR = 10.90; 95% CI = 2.80 to 42.38), shifting between tasks (OR = 10.71; 95% CI = 3.62 to 31.74), and following written instructions (OR = 9.96; 95% CI = 2.65 to 37.41). Findings identified problematic work tasks involving major domains of cognitive function.

  4. APOE polymorphisms and cognitive functions in patients with brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Denise D; Satagopan, Jaya; Baser, Raymond E; Cheung, Kenneth; Richards, Elizabeth; Lin, Michael; Karimi, Sasan; Lyo, John; DeAngelis, Lisa M; Orlow, Irene

    2014-07-22

    The goal of this study was to assess whether the APOE ε4 allele and other APOE single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) influence neuropsychological and neuroimaging outcomes in patients with brain tumors. Two hundred eleven patients with brain tumors participated in the study. All patients completed standardized neuropsychological tests and provided a blood sample for APOE genotyping. Ratings of white matter abnormalities were performed on MRI scans. Patients were classified into 2 groups based on the presence (n = 50) or absence (n = 161) of at least one APOE ε4 allele. Additional APOE SNPs were genotyped in a subset of 150 patients. Patients with at least one APOE ε4 allele had significantly lower scores in verbal learning and delayed recall, and marginally significant lower scores in executive function, in comparison to noncarriers of an ε4 allele. Patients with at least one ε4 allele and history of cigarette smoking had significantly higher scores in working memory and verbal learning than ε4 carriers who never smoked. Nine additional APOE SNPs were significantly associated with attention and executive and memory abilities. There were no significant differences between ε4 carriers and noncarriers on the extent of white matter abnormalities on MRI. The findings suggest that patients with brain tumors who are carriers of the APOE ε4 allele may have increased vulnerability to developing memory and executive dysfunction, and that additional SNPs in the APOE gene may be associated with cognitive outcome. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Cortical plasticity catalyzed by prehabilitation enables extensive resection of brain tumors in eloquent areas.

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    Rivera-Rivera, Paola A; Rios-Lago, Marcos; Sanchez-Casarrubios, Sandra; Salazar, Osman; Yus, Miguel; González-Hidalgo, Mercedes; Sanz, Ana; Avecillas-Chasin, Josué; Alvarez-Linera, Juan; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Oliviero, Antonio; Barcia, Juan A

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE The extent of resection is the most important prognostic factor following brain glioma surgery. However, eloquent areas within tumors limit the extent of resection and, thus, critically affect outcomes. The authors hypothesized that presurgical suppression of the eloquent areas within a tumor by continuous cortical electrical stimulation, coupled with appropriate behavioral training ("prehabilitation"), would induce plastic reorganization and enable a more extensive resection. METHODS The authors report on 5 patients harboring gliomas involving eloquent brain areas within tumors as identified on intraoperative stimulation mapping. A grid of electrodes was placed over the residual tumor, and continuous cortical electrical stimulation was targeted to the functional areas. The stimulation intensity was adjusted daily to provoke a mild functional impairment while the function was intensively trained. RESULTS The stimulation intensity required to impair function increased progressively in all patients, and all underwent another operation a mean of 33.6 days later (range 27-37 days), when the maximal stimulation voltage in all active contacts induced no functional deficit. In all cases, a substantially more extensive resection of the tumor was possible. Intraoperative mapping and functional MRI demonstrated a plastic reorganization, and most previously demonstrated eloquent areas within the tumor were silent, while there was new functional activation of brain areas in the same region or toward the contralateral hemisphere. CONCLUSIONS Prehabilitation with continuous cortical electrical stimulation and appropriate behavioral training prior to surgery in patients with WHO Grade II and III gliomas affecting eloquent areas accelerate plastic changes. This can help maximize tumor resection and, thus, improve survival while maintaining function.

  6. Tumor Metabolism, the Ketogenic Diet and β-Hydroxybutyrate: Novel Approaches to Adjuvant Brain Tumor Therapy.

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    Woolf, Eric C; Syed, Nelofer; Scheck, Adrienne C

    2016-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors are devastating despite aggressive treatments such as surgical resection, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The average life expectancy of patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma is approximately ~18 months. It is clear that increased survival of brain tumor patients requires the design of new therapeutic modalities, especially those that enhance currently available treatments and/or limit tumor growth. One novel therapeutic arena is the metabolic dysregulation that results in an increased need for glucose in tumor cells. This phenomenon suggests that a reduction in tumor growth could be achieved by decreasing glucose availability, which can be accomplished through pharmacological means or through the use of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD). The KD, as the name implies, also provides increased blood ketones to support the energy needs of normal tissues. Preclinical work from a number of laboratories has shown that the KD does indeed reduce tumor growth in vivo. In addition, the KD has been shown to reduce angiogenesis, inflammation, peri-tumoral edema, migration and invasion. Furthermore, this diet can enhance the activity of radiation and chemotherapy in a mouse model of glioma, thus increasing survival. Additional studies in vitro have indicated that increasing ketones such as β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB) in the absence of glucose reduction can also inhibit cell growth and potentiate the effects of chemotherapy and radiation. Thus, while we are only beginning to understand the pluripotent mechanisms through which the KD affects tumor growth and response to conventional therapies, the emerging data provide strong support for the use of a KD in the treatment of malignant gliomas. This has led to a limited number of clinical trials investigating the use of a KD in patients with primary and recurrent glioma.

  7. Tumor Metabolism, the Ketogenic Diet and β-Hydroxybutyrate: Novel Approaches to Adjuvant Brain Tumor Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Eric C.; Syed, Nelofer; Scheck, Adrienne C.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors are devastating despite aggressive treatments such as surgical resection, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The average life expectancy of patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma is approximately ~18 months. It is clear that increased survival of brain tumor patients requires the design of new therapeutic modalities, especially those that enhance currently available treatments and/or limit tumor growth. One novel therapeutic arena is the metabolic dysregulation that results in an increased need for glucose in tumor cells. This phenomenon suggests that a reduction in tumor growth could be achieved by decreasing glucose availability, which can be accomplished through pharmacological means or through the use of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD). The KD, as the name implies, also provides increased blood ketones to support the energy needs of normal tissues. Preclinical work from a number of laboratories has shown that the KD does indeed reduce tumor growth in vivo. In addition, the KD has been shown to reduce angiogenesis, inflammation, peri-tumoral edema, migration and invasion. Furthermore, this diet can enhance the activity of radiation and chemotherapy in a mouse model of glioma, thus increasing survival. Additional studies in vitro have indicated that increasing ketones such as β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB) in the absence of glucose reduction can also inhibit cell growth and potentiate the effects of chemotherapy and radiation. Thus, while we are only beginning to understand the pluripotent mechanisms through which the KD affects tumor growth and response to conventional therapies, the emerging data provide strong support for the use of a KD in the treatment of malignant gliomas. This has led to a limited number of clinical trials investigating the use of a KD in patients with primary and recurrent glioma. PMID:27899882

  8. Tumor metabolism, the ketogenic diet and β-hydroxybutyrate: novel approaches to adjuvant brain tumor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C. Woolf

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Malignant brain tumors are devastating despite aggressive treatments such as surgical resection, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The average life expectancy of patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma is approximately ~18 months. It is clear that increased survival of brain tumor patients requires the design of new therapeutic modalities, especially those that enhance currently available treatments and/or limit tumor growth. One novel therapeutic arena is the metabolic dysregulation that results in an increased need for glucose in tumor cells. This phenomenon suggests that a reduction in tumor growth could be achieved by decreasing glucose availability, which can be accomplished through pharmacological means or through the use of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD. The KD, as the name implies, also provides increased blood ketones to support the energy needs of normal tissues. Preclinical work from a number of laboratories has shown that the KD does indeed reduce tumor growth in vivo. In addition, the KD has been shown to reduce angiogenesis, inflammation, peri-tumoral edema, migration and invasion. Furthermore, this diet can enhance the activity of radiation and chemotherapy in a mouse model of glioma, thus increasing survival. Additional studies in vitro have indicated that increasing ketones such as β-hydroxybutyrate in the absence of glucose reduction can also inhibit cell growth and potentiate the effects of chemotherapy and radiation. Thus, while we are only beginning to understand the pluripotent mechanisms through which the KD affects tumor growth and response to conventional therapies, the emerging data provide strong support for the use of a KD in the treatment of malignant gliomas. This has led to a limited number of clinical trials investigating the use of a KD in patients with primary and recurrent glioma.

  9. EZH2 inhibition: targeting the crossroad of tumor invasion and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crea, Francesco; Fornaro, Lorenzo; Bocci, Guido; Sun, Lei; Farrar, William L; Falcone, Alfredo; Danesi, Romano

    2012-12-01

    Tumor angiogenesis and metastatic spreading are two highly interconnected phenomena, which contribute to cancer-associated deaths. Thus, the identification of novel strategies to target angiogenesis and metastatic spreading is crucial. Polycomb genes are a set of epigenetic effectors, structured in multimeric repressive complexes. EZH2 is the catalytic subunit of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), which methylates histone H3 lysine 27, thereby silencing several tumor-suppressor genes. EZH2 is essential for cancer stem cell self-renewal. Interestingly, cancer stem cells are thought to be the seeds of metastatic spreading and are able to differentiate into tumor-associated endothelial cells. Pre-clinical studies showed that EZH2 is able to silence several anti-metastatic genes (e.g., E-cadherin and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases), thereby favoring cell invasion and anchorage-independent growth. In addition, EZH2 seems to play a crucial role in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis. High EZH2 expression predicts poor prognosis, high grade, and high stage in several cancer types. Recently, a small molecule inhibitor of PRC2 (DZNeP) demonstrated promising anti-tumor activity, both in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, DZNeP was able to inhibit cancer cell invasion and tumor angiogenesis in prostate and brain cancers, respectively. At tumor-inhibiting doses, DZNeP is not harmful for non-transformed cells. In the present manuscript, we review current evidence supporting a role of EZH2 in metastatic spreading and tumor angiogenesis. Using Oncomine datasets, we show that DZNeP targets are specifically silenced in some metastatic cancers, and some of them may inhibit angiogenesis. Based on this evidence, we propose the development of EZH2 inhibitors as anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic therapy.

  10. Multisession stereotactic radiosurgery for large benign brain tumors of >3cm- early clinical outcomes

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    Memon, Muhammad Ali; Ahmed, Usman; Saleem, Muhammad Abid; Bhatti, Amer Iqtidar; Ahmed, Naveed; Hashim, Abdul Sattar M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical outcome of linear accelerator based multisession stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for large benign brain tumors of >3cm. Methods Between June 2009 and May 2011, 35 patients having large benign brain tumors of >3cm (≥15 cm3) were treated by multisession stereotactic radiosurgery. This retrospective study was carried out at Neurospinal & Medical Institute Karachi. There were 17 (48.6 %) males and 18(51.4 %) females. Median age was 36 years (range: 13-65 years). Median target volume was 49.4 cm3 (range: 15-184 cm3). The median marginal dose was 25 Gy (range: 20–27.5Gy) prescribed to a median 75% isodose line (range: 65-100 %). Median number of 5 fractions were used ranging 3-5 fractions. Results All the patients tolerated treatment very well. 21 (58.3%) patients had remarkable clinical improvement of neurological symptoms, 14 (38.9%) patients had stable symptoms, and only one patient had transient worsening of symptoms. No permanent neurological damage or radiation injury was seen. Radiologically, 9 (25.7%) patients achieved reduction in size of the tumor, 26(74.3 %) patients were having stable disease, and overall control rate was found to be 100 %. Median follow-up time from the end of SRS was 6.4 months (range: 1-22.5months). Conclusion Linear accelerator based multisession stereotactic radiosurgery for large benign brain tumors of >3cm is effective and well tolerated. PMID:29296340

  11. Killing of Brain Tumor Cells by Hypoxia-Responsive Element Mediated Expression of BAX

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    Hangjun Ruan

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of radioresistant hypoxic cells in human brain tumors limits the overall effectiveness of conventional fractionated radiation therapy. Tumor-specific therapies that target hypoxic cells are clearly needed. We have investigated the expression of suicide genes under hypoxia by a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE, which can be activated through hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1. We transfected plasmids containing multiple copies of HIRE into U-87 MG and U-251 MG-NCI human brain tumor cells and tested their ability to induce LacZ gene expression under anoxia. Gene expression under anoxia versus oxia was increased about 12-fold for U-87 MG cells and about fourfold for U-251 MG-NCI cells. At intermediate hypoxic conditions, increased LacZ gene expression in U-87 MG cells was induced by the plasmid that contained three HREs, but not by the plasmid with two HREs. Lastly, when we placed a suicide gene BAX under the control of HREs, cells transfected with the BAX plasmids were preferentially killed through apoptosis under anoxia. Our studies demonstrate that HRE-regulated gene expression is active in brain tumor cells, and that the amount of increased gene expression obtained is dependent on the cell line, the HIRE copy number, and the degree of hypoxia.

  12. Headache as a risk factor for neurovascular events in pediatric brain tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranick, Sarah M; Campen, Cynthia J; Kasner, Scott E; Kessler, Sudha K; Zimmerman, Robert A; Lustig, Robert A; Phillips, Peter C; Beslow, Lauren A; Ichord, Rebecca; Fisher, Michael J

    2013-04-16

    To determine whether severe recurrent headache is a risk factor for neurovascular events in children who received radiation for brain tumors. This is a retrospective cohort study of children with brain tumors who received cranial irradiation at a large tertiary care center, aged 0-21 years at diagnosis, with initial treatment between January 1, 1993 and December 31, 2002, and 2 or more follow-up visits. Patients were considered to have severe recurrent headache if this appeared as a complaint on 2 or more visits. Headaches attributed to tumor progression, shunt malfunction, or infection, or appearing at the end of life, were excluded. Medical records were reviewed for events of stroke or TIA. Of 265 subjects followed for a median of 6.0 years (interquartile range 1.7-9.2 years), stroke or TIA occurred in 7/37 (19%) with severe headaches compared to 6/228 (3%) without these symptoms (hazard ratio 5.3, 95% confidence interval 1.8-15.9, p = 0.003). Adjusting for multiple variables did not remove the significance of this risk. Median time to first neurovascular event for the entire cohort was 4.9 years (interquartile range 1.7-5.5 years). Severe recurrent headache appears to be a risk factor or predictor for subsequent cerebral ischemia in pediatric brain tumor survivors treated with radiation. This finding has clinical implications for both monitoring survivors and targeting a specific population for primary stroke prevention.

  13. Preferential targeting of apoptosis in tumor versus normal cells.

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    Woynarowska, Barbara A; Woynarowski, Jan M

    2002-07-18

    Elimination of cancer cells by early apoptosis is preferred over other forms of cell growth inhibition. Apoptosis directly leads to tumor regression and reduces risks of selecting more aggressive and/or drug-resistant phenotypes that are often responsible for tumor regrowth and treatment failure. Although DNA damage by anticancer drugs is commonly recognized as an apoptotic stimulus, there is enormous variability in the magnitude and timing of such effects. Especially potent and rapid apoptosis seems to be a hallmark of various alkylating anticancer drugs that are regarded as DNA-reactive agents but are observed to react mainly with cellular proteins. Our studies with such dual-action drugs (irofulven, oxaliplatin) suggest that not only DNA damage, but also protein damage, contributes to apoptosis induction. DNA damage is well known to initiate death-signaling pathways leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. Protein damage, in turn, can distort cell redox homeostasis, which facilitates apoptosis execution. Such dual effects can be particularly lethal to tumor cells, which tend to function under pro-oxidative conditions. In contrast to tumor cells that are highly susceptible, normal cells show marginal apoptotic responses to the dual action drugs. This protection of normal cells might reflect their greater ability to buffer pro-oxidative changes and quickly restore redox homeostasis, despite substantial drug uptake and macromolecular binding. Importantly, by targeting the death process at multiple points, DNA- and protein-damaging drugs can be less vulnerable to various bypass mechanisms possible with single targets. The reviewed studies provide a proof of concept that differential apoptosis targeting in cancer versus normal cells can be a basis for tumor selectivity of anticancer drugs.

  14. Volumetric multimodality neural network for brain tumor segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvana Castillo, Laura; Alexandra Daza, Laura; Carlos Rivera, Luis; Arbeláez, Pablo

    2017-11-01

    Brain lesion segmentation is one of the hardest tasks to be solved in computer vision with an emphasis on the medical field. We present a convolutional neural network that produces a semantic segmentation of brain tumors, capable of processing volumetric data along with information from multiple MRI modalities at the same time. This results in the ability to learn from small training datasets and highly imbalanced data. Our method is based on DeepMedic, the state of the art in brain lesion segmentation. We develop a new architecture with more convolutional layers, organized in three parallel pathways with different input resolution, and additional fully connected layers. We tested our method over the 2015 BraTS Challenge dataset, reaching an average dice coefficient of 84%, while the standard DeepMedic implementation reached 74%.

  15. Lymphatic drainage system of the brain: A novel target for intervention of neurological diseases.

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    Sun, Bao-Liang; Wang, Li-Hua; Yang, Tuo; Sun, Jing-Yi; Mao, Lei-Lei; Yang, Ming-Feng; Yuan, Hui; Colvin, Robert A; Yang, Xiao-Yi

    2017-09-10

    The belief that the vertebrate brain functions normally without classical lymphatic drainage vessels has been held for many decades. On the contrary, new findings show that functional lymphatic drainage does exist in the brain. The brain lymphatic drainage system is composed of basement membrane-based perivascular pathway, a brain-wide glymphatic pathway, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage routes including sinus-associated meningeal lymphatic vessels and olfactory/cervical lymphatic routes. The brain lymphatic systems function physiological as a route of drainage for interstitial fluid (ISF) from brain parenchyma to nearby lymph nodes. Brain lymphatic drainage helps maintain water and ion balance of the ISF, waste clearance, and reabsorption of macromolecular solutes. A second physiological function includes communication with the immune system modulating immune surveillance and responses of the brain. These physiological functions are influenced by aging, genetic phenotypes, sleep-wake cycle, and body posture. The impairment and dysfunction of the brain lymphatic system has crucial roles in age-related changes of brain function and the pathogenesis of neurovascular, neurodegenerative, and neuroinflammatory diseases, as well as brain injury and tumors. In this review, we summarize the key component elements (regions, cells, and water transporters) of the brain lymphatic system and their regulators as potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of neurologic diseases and their resulting complications. Finally, we highlight the clinical importance of ependymal route-based targeted gene therapy and intranasal drug administration in the brain by taking advantage of the unique role played by brain lymphatic pathways in the regulation of CSF flow and ISF/CSF exchange. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Advancing theranostics with tumor-targeting peptides for precision otolaryngology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadwick L. Wright

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, about 600,000 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC are detected annually, many of which involve high risk human papilloma virus (HPV. Surgery is the primary and desired first treatment option. Following surgery, the existence of cancer cells at the surgical margin is strongly associated with eventual recurrence of cancer and a poor outcome. Despite improved surgical methods (robotics, microsurgery, endoscopic/laparoscopic, and external imaging, surgeons rely only on their vision and touch to locate tumors during surgery. Diagnostic imaging systems like computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and positron-emission tomography (PET are too large, slow and costly to use efficiently during most surgeries and, ultrasound imaging, while fast and portable, is not cancer specific. This purpose of this article is to review the fundamental technologies that will radically advance Precision Otolaryngology practices to the benefit of patients with HNSCC. In particular, this article will address the potential for tumor-targeting peptides to enable more precise diagnostic imaging while simultaneously advancing new therapeutic paradigms for next generation image-guided surgery, tumor-specific chemotherapeutic delivery and tumor-selective targeted radiotherapy (i.e., theranostic. Keywords: Squamous cell carcinoma, Peptide, Optical surgical navigation, Diagnostic imaging, Theranostic

  17. Tumor endothelial markers as a target in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribatti, Domenico; Ranieri, Girolamo; Basile, Antonio; Azzariti, Amalia; Paradiso, Angelo; Vacca, Angelo

    2012-12-01

    Several anti-angiogenic agents have been developed and some of them have been clinically applied in the tumor therapy. Anti-angiogenic therapy faces some hurdles: inherent or acquired resistance, increased invasiveness, and lack of biomarkers. Characterization of tumor endothelial markers may help to target endothelium and to identify potential predictive factors of response to anti-angiogenic therapies. Numerous surrogates, angiogenic and endothelium markers have emerged from recent pre-clinical studies, including physiological and soluble molecules in plasma and from platelets, circulating cells, tumor tissue factors and imaging markers. However, no wholly validated biomarkers currently exist to predict the success or the failure of the anti-angiogenic therapy of cancer. Therefore, the research of suitable and validate biomarkers is currently ongoing. This review provides an overview of the status of our knowledge concerning tumor endothelial markers, therapeutics targeting, possible resistance mechanisms and predictive value of these biomarkers and discuss future strategies to use and identify them in the anti-angiogenic therapy. Anti-angiogenesis is a milestone to improve the treatment of several types of cancer and predictive biomarkers for a response to anti-endothelium therapy are one of the most important challenges for anti-angiogenesis research.

  18. Improved Brain Tumor Classification by Sodium MR Imaging: Prediction of IDH Mutation Status and Tumor Progression.

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    Biller, A; Badde, S; Nagel, A; Neumann, J-O; Wick, W; Hertenstein, A; Bendszus, M; Sahm, F; Benkhedah, N; Kleesiek, J

    2016-01-01

    MR imaging in neuro-oncology is challenging due to inherent ambiguities in proton signal behavior. Sodium-MR imaging may substantially contribute to the characterization of tumors because it reflects the functional status of the sodium-potassium pump and sodium channels. Sodium-MR imaging data of patients with treatment-naïve glioma WHO grades I-IV (n = 34; mean age, 51.29 ± 17.77 years) were acquired by using a 7T MR system. For acquisition of sodium-MR images, we applied density-adapted 3D radial projection reconstruction pulse sequences. Proton-MR imaging data were acquired by using a 3T whole-body system. We demonstrated that the initial sodium signal of a treatment-naïve brain tumor is a significant predictor of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation status (P model confirmed the sodium signal of treatment-naïve brain tumors as a predictor of progression (P = .003). Compared with the molecular signature of IDH mutation status, information criteria of model comparison revealed that the sodium signal is even superior to IDH in progression prediction. In addition, sodium-MR imaging provides a new approach to noninvasive tumor classification. The sodium signal of contrast-enhancing tumor portions facilitates differentiation among most glioma types (P sodium-MR imaging may help to classify neoplasias at an early stage, to reduce invasive tissue characterization such as stereotactic biopsy specimens, and overall to promote improved and individualized patient management in neuro-oncology by novel imaging signatures of brain tumors. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  19. Targeting Survivin Enhances Chemosensitivity in Retinoblastoma Cells and Orthotopic Tumors.

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    Angela Ferrario

    Full Text Available Treatments for retinoblastoma (Rb vary depending on the size and location of the intraocular lesions and include chemotherapy and radiation therapy. We examined whether agents used to treat Rb induce a pro-survival phenotype associated with increased expression of survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis family of proteins. We document that exposure to carboplatin, topotecan or radiation resulted in elevated expression of survivin in two human Rb cell lines but not in normal retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE cells. Cellular levels of survivin were attenuated in Rb cells exposed to an imidazolium-based survivin suppressant, Sepantronium bromide (YM155. Protein expression patterns of survivin in RPE cells were not altered following treatment protocols involving exposure to YM155. Including YM155 with chemotherapy or radiation increased levels of apoptosis in Rb cells but not in RPE cells. Intraocular luciferase expressing Rb tumors were generated from the Rb cell lines and used to evaluate the effects of carboplatin and YM155 on in-vivo survivin expression and tumor growth. Carboplatin induced expression of survivin while carboplatin combined with YM155 reduced survivin expression in tumor bearing eyes. The combination protocol was also most effective in reducing the rate of tumor regrowth. These results indicate that targeted inhibition of the anti-apoptotic protein survivin provides a therapeutic advantage for Rb cells and tumors treated with chemotherapy.

  20. Effects of vascular targeting photodynamic therapy on lymphatic tumor metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fateye, B.; He, C.; Chen, B.

    2009-06-01

    Vascular targeting photodynamic therapy (vPDT) is currently in clinical trial for prostate cancer (PCa) treatment. In order to study the effect of vPDT on tumor metastasis, GFP-PC3 or PC-3 xenografts were treated with verteporfin (BPD) PDT. Vascular function was assessed by ultrasound imaging; lymph node and lung metastasis were assessed by fluorescence imaging. vPDT significantly reduced tumor blood flow within 30minutes to 2 hours of treatment. Sub-curative treatment resulted in re-perfusion within 2 weeks of treatment and increased lymph node metastasis. With curative doses, no metastasis was observed. In order to identify cellular or matrix factors and cytokines implicated, conditioned medium from BPD PDTtreated endothelial cells was incubated with PC3 cells in vitro. Tumor cell proliferation and migration was assessed. By immunoblotting, we evaluated the change in mediators of intracellular signaling or that may determine changes in tumor phenotype. Low sub-curative dose (200ng/ml BPD) of endothelial cells was associated with ~15% greater migration in PC3 cells when compared with control. This dose was also associated with sustained activation of Akt at Ser 473, an upstream effector in the Akt/ mTOR pathway that has been correlated with Gleason scores in PCa and with survival and metastasis in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, the study implicates efficacy of PDT of endothelial cells as an important determinant of its consequences on adjacent tumor proliferation and metastasis.

  1. A Nonparametric model for Brain Tumor Segmentation and Volumetry in Longitudinal MR Sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Alberts, Esther; Charpiat, Guillaume; Tarabalka, Yuliya; Huber, Thomas; Weber, Marc-André; Bauer, Jan; Zimmer, Claus; Menze, Bjoern H.

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Brain tumor image segmentation and brain tumor growth assessment are inter-dependent and benet from a joint evaluation. Starting from a generative model for multimodal brain tumor segmentation, we make use of a nonparametric growth model that is implemented as a conditional random field (CRF) including directed links with infinite weight in order to incorporate growth and inclusion constraints, reflecting our prior belief on tumor occurrence in the dierent image modali...

  2. Prognostic factors for outcomes after whole-brain irradiation of brain metastases from relatively radioresistant tumors: a retrospective analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyners, Thekla; Heisterkamp, Christine; Kueter, Jan-Dirk; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; Schild, Steven E.; Rades, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated potential prognostic factors in patients treated with whole-brain irradiation (WBI) alone for brain metastases from relatively radioresistant tumors such as malignant melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and colorectal cancer. Additionally, a potential benefit from escalating the

  3. Prognostic factors for outcomes after whole-brain irradiation of brain metastases from relatively radioresistant tumors: a retrospective analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyners, T.; Heisterkamp, C.; Kueter, J.D.; Veninga, T.; Stalpers, L.J.A.; Schild, S.E.; Rades, D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study investigated potential prognostic factors in patients treated with whole-brain irradiation (WBI) alone for brain metastases from relatively radioresistant tumors such as malignant melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and colorectal cancer. Additionally, a potential benefit from

  4. Applications of polymeric micelles with tumor targeted in chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Hui; Wang Xiaojun; Zhang Song; Liu Xinli, E-mail: Vip.lxl@163.com [Shandong Polytechnic University, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Microbial Engineering (China)

    2012-11-15

    Polymeric micelles (PMs) have gained more progress as a carrier system with the quick development of biological and nanoparticle techniques. In particular, PMs with smart targeting can deliver anti-cancer drugs directly into tumor cells at a sustained rate. PMs with core-shell structure (with diameters of 10 {approx} 100 nm) have been prepared by a variety of biodegradable and biocompatible polymers via a self-assembly process. The preparation of polymeric micelles with stimuli-responsive block copolymers or modification of target molecules on polymeric micelles' surface are able to significantly improve the efficiency of drug delivery. Polymeric micelles, which have been considered as a novel promising drug carrier for cancer therapeutics, are rapidly evolving and being introduced in an attempt to overcome several limitations of traditional chemotherapeutics, including water solubility, tumor-specific accumulation, anti-tumor efficacy, and non-specific toxicity. This review describes the preparation of polymeric micelles and the targeted modification which greatly enhance the effects of chemotherapeutic agents.

  5. Hybrid Clustering And Boundary Value Refinement for Tumor Segmentation using Brain MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anjali; Pahuja, Gunjan

    2017-08-01

    The method of brain tumor segmentation is the separation of tumor area from Brain Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. There are number of methods already exist for segmentation of brain tumor efficiently. However it’s tedious task to identify the brain tumor from MR images. The segmentation process is extraction of different tumor tissues such as active, tumor, necrosis, and edema from the normal brain tissues such as gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), as well as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). As per the survey study, most of time the brain tumors are detected easily from brain MR image using region based approach but required level of accuracy, abnormalities classification is not predictable. The segmentation of brain tumor consists of many stages. Manually segmenting the tumor from brain MR images is very time consuming hence there exist many challenges in manual segmentation. In this research paper, our main goal is to present the hybrid clustering which consists of Fuzzy C-Means Clustering (for accurate tumor detection) and level set method(for handling complex shapes) for the detection of exact shape of tumor in minimal computational time. using this approach we observe that for a certain set of images 0.9412 sec of time is taken to detect tumor which is very less in comparison to recent existing algorithm i.e. Hybrid clustering (Fuzzy C-Means and K Means clustering).

  6. Differential role of tumor necrosis factor receptors in mouse brain inflammatory responses in cryolesion brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintana, Albert; Giralt, Mercedes; Rojas, Santiago

    2005-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is one of the mediators dramatically increased after traumatic brain injury that leads to the activation, proliferation, and hypertrophy of mononuclear, phagocytic cells and gliosis. Eventually, TNF-alpha can induce both apoptosis and necrosis via intracell...

  7. Mutation Screening of Her-2, N-ras and Nf1 Genes in Brain Tumor Biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapijakis, Christos; Adamopoulou, Maria; Tasiouka, Konstantina; Voumvourakis, Costas; Stranjalis, George

    2016-09-01

    A deeper understanding of the complex molecular pathology of brain malignancies is needed in order to develop more effective and targeted therapies of these highly lethal disorders. In an effort to further enlighten the molecular pathology of brain oncogenesis involving the her-2 (erbB-2/neu/ngl)/N-ras/nf1 pathway, we screened the genotypes of specimens from various types of brain tumors. The studied specimens included 35 biopsies of four general categories: 13 neuroglial tumors (4 astrocytomas, 2 oligodendrogliomas, 7 glioblastomas multiforme), 14 meningiomas, 3 other nervous system tumors (2 schwannomas, 1 craniopharyngioma) and 5 metastatic tumors (such as lung carcinomas and chronic myelocytic leukemia). Screening for most common mutations in oncogenes her-2, N-ras and tumor suppressor gene nf1 was conducted with molecular hybridization techniques (Southern blotting, dot blot and single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, respectively), and was confirmed by DNA sequencing. Gene amplification of her-2 was observed in only two cases (6%), namely in one glioblastoma and in one meningioma. Screening of 3 hot spot codons of the N-ras gene (12, 13 and 61) and subsequent DNA sequencing revealed mutations in 19 biopsies encompassing all categories (54%). Screening for mutations in exons of the nf1 gene by SSCP analysis detected a novel nonsense mutation in exon 31 in a unique case of a glioblastoma biopsy (3%) taken from a patient without neurofibromatosis type I. Activated N-ras appears to be a major oncogene in brain oncogenesis, exhibiting the most important role in the her-2/N-ras/nf1 pathway. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  8. Targeting the notch ligand JAGGED1 in both tumor cells and stroma in ovarian cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Steg, Adam D; Katre, Ashwini A; Goodman, Blake; Han, Hee-Dong; Nick, Alpa M; Stone, Rebecca L; Coleman, Robert L; Alvarez, Ronald D; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K; Landen, Charles N

    2011-01-01

    Jagged1, a Notch ligand, is expressed on both tumor epithelial and endothelial cells and therefore may be amenable to dual targeting of the tumor stroma and malignant cell compartments of the tumor microenvironment...

  9. Expression of metastasis-associated protein 3 in human brain glioma related to tumor prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Shouqin; Hui, Guangyan; Hou, Fanggao; Shi, Hua; Zhou, Guoqing; Yan, Han; Wang, Lu; Liu, Jinfeng

    2015-10-01

    Glioma represents a disparate group of tumors characterized by high invasion ability, and therefore it is of clinical significance to identify molecular markers and therapeutic targets for better clinical management. Previously, metastasis-associated protein family (MTA) is considered to promote tumor cell invasion and metastasis of human malignancies. Recently, the newly identified MTA3 has been shown to play conflicting roles in human malignancies, while the expression pattern and potential clinical significance of MTA3 in human glioma have not been addressed yet. In the present study, we investigated the protein expression of MTA3 by immunohistochemistry assay and analyzed its association with glioma prognosis in 186 cases of patients. Results showed that MTA3 expression was decreased in glioma compared with that in normal brain (P human glioma and negatively associated with prognosis of patients, suggesting that MTA3 may play a tumor suppressor role in glioma.

  10. Targeting B16 tumors in vivo with peptide-conjugated gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Wilson; Zhang, Xuan; Bekah, Devesh; Teodoro, Jose G.; Nadeau, Jay L.

    2015-07-01

    This study examines the effects of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and peptide conjugation on the biodistribution of ultrasmall (2.7 nm) gold nanoparticles in mice bearing B16 melanoma allografts. Nanoparticles were delivered intravenously, and biodistribution was measured at specific timepoints by organ digestion and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. All major organs were examined. Two peptides were tested: the cyclic RGD peptide (cRGD, which targets integrins); and a recently described peptide derived from the myxoma virus. We found the greatest specific tumor delivery using the myxoma peptide, with or without PEGylation. Un-PEGylated cRGD performed poorly, but PEGylated RGD showed a significant transient collection in the tumor. Liver and kidney were the primary targets of all constructs. None of the particles were able to cross the blood-brain barrier. Although it was able to deliver Au to B16 cells, the myxoma peptide did not show any cytotoxic activity against these cells, in contrast to previous reports. These results indicate that the effect of passive targeting by PEGylation and active targeting by peptides can be independent or combined, and that they should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis when designing new nanosystems for targeted therapies. Both myxoma peptide and cRGD should be considered for specific targeting to melanoma, but a thorough investigation of the cytotoxicity of the myxoma peptide to different cell lines remains to be performed.

  11. USE OF LIPOSOMES AND NANOPARTICLES FOR BRAIN DRUG TARGETING

    OpenAIRE

    Goutam Pal; Partha Palit

    2012-01-01

    The Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) poses a obstacle for a drugs, including antineoplastic agent, antibiotics, neuropeptides, CNS active agents, to be delivered to the brain for therapeutic reasons. The use of formulation dependent strategy such as the use of heterogenous pharmaceutical systems for its effective targeting to the brain is being explored recently. Liposomes and Nanoparticles are good possibilities to achieve the goal. Chemically modified liposomes and nanoparticles are tried in recen...

  12. Proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for primary brain tumors and tumors of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Kessel, Kerstin; Habermehl, Daniel; Debus, Jurgen [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany)], e-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Haberer, Thomas [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, Oliver [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    To analyze clinical concepts, toxicity and treatment outcome in patients with brain and skull base tumors treated with photons and particle therapy. Material and methods: In total 260 patients with brain tumors and tumors of the skull base were treated at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT). Patients enrolled in and randomized within prospective clinical trials as well as bony or soft tissue tumors are not included in this analysis. Treatment was delivered as protons, carbon ions, or combinations of photons and a carbon ion boost. All patients are included in a tight follow-up program. The median follow-up time is 12 months (range 2-39 months). Results: Main histologies included meningioma (n = 107) for skull base lesions, pituitary adenomas (n = 14), low-grade gliomas (n = 51) as well as high-grade gliomas (n = 55) for brain tumors. In all patients treatment could be completed without any unexpected severe toxicities. No side effects > CTC Grade III were observed. To date, no severe late toxicities were observed, however, for endpoints such as secondary malignancies or neuro cognitive side effects follow-up time still remains too short. Local recurrences were mainly seen in the group of high-grade gliomas or atypical meningiomas; for benign skull base meningiomas, to date, no recurrences were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: The specific benefit of particle therapy will potentially reduce the risk of secondary malignancies as well as improve neuro cognitive outcome and quality of life (QOL); thus, longer follow-up will be necessary to confirm these endpoints. Indication-specific trials on meningiomas and gliomas are underway to elucidate the role of protons and carbon ions in these indications.

  13. Tumor histology and location predict deep nuclei toxicity: Implications for late effects from focal brain irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaga, Alexis; Shields, Lisa B.E. [Norton Neuroscience Institute, Louisville, KY (United States); Sun, David A.; Vitaz, Todd W. [Norton Neuroscience Institute, Louisville, KY (United States); Brain Tumor Center, Norton Healthcare, Louisville, KY (United States); Spalding, Aaron C., E-mail: acspalding1@gmail.com [Brain Tumor Center, Norton Healthcare, Louisville, KY (United States); Norton Cancer Institute, Radiation Center, Kosair Children' s Hospital, Louisville, KY (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Normal tissue toxicity resulting from both disease and treatment is an adverse side effect in the management of patients with central nervous system malignancies. We tested the hypothesis that despite these improvements, certain tumors place patients at risk for neurocognitive, neuroendocrine, and neurosensory late effects. Defining patient groups at risk for these effects could allow for development of preventive strategies. Fifty patients with primary brain tumors underwent radiation planning with magnetic resonance imaging scan and computed tomography datasets. Organs at risk (OAR) responsible for neurocognitive, neuroendocrine, and neurosensory function were defined. Inverse-planned intensity-modulated radiation therapy was optimized with priority given to target coverage while penalties were assigned to exceeding normal tissue tolerances. Tumor laterality, location, and histology were compared with OAR doses, and analysis of variance was performed to determine the significance of any observed correlation. The ipsilateral hippocampus exceeded dose limits in frontal (74%), temporal (94%), and parietal (100%) lobe tumor locations. The contralateral hippocampus was at risk in the following tumor locations: frontal (53%), temporal (83%), or parietal (50%) lobe. Patients with high-grade glioma were at risk for ipsilateral (88%) and contralateral (73%) hippocampal damage (P <0.05 compared with other histologies). The pituitary gland and hypothalamus exceeded dose tolerances in patients with pituitary tumors (both 100%) and high-grade gliomas (50% and 75%, P <0.05 compared with other histologies), respectively. Despite application of modern radiation therapy, certain tumor locations and histologies continue to place patients at risk for morbidity. Patients with high-grade gliomas or tumors located in the frontal, temporal, or parietal lobes are at risk for neurocognitive decline, likely because of larger target volumes and higher radiation doses. Data from this study

  14. Adaptive Intuitionistic Fuzzy Enhancement of Brain Tumor MR Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, He; Deng, Wankai; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-10-27

    Image enhancement techniques are able to improve the contrast and visual quality of magnetic resonance (MR) images. However, conventional methods cannot make up some deficiencies encountered by respective brain tumor MR imaging modes. In this paper, we propose an adaptive intuitionistic fuzzy sets-based scheme, called as AIFE, which takes information provided from different MR acquisitions and tries to enhance the normal and abnormal structural regions of the brain while displaying the enhanced results as a single image. The AIFE scheme firstly separates an input image into several sub images, then divides each sub image into object and background areas. After that, different novel fuzzification, hyperbolization and defuzzification operations are implemented on each object/background area, and finally an enhanced result is achieved via nonlinear fusion operators. The fuzzy implementations can be processed in parallel. Real data experiments demonstrate that the AIFE scheme is not only effectively useful to have information from images acquired with different MR sequences fused in a single image, but also has better enhancement performance when compared to conventional baseline algorithms. This indicates that the proposed AIFE scheme has potential for improving the detection and diagnosis of brain tumors.

  15. Therapeutic Potential of Curcumin for the Treatment of Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil V. Klinger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain malignancies currently carry a poor prognosis despite the current multimodal standard of care that includes surgical resection and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation. As new therapies are desperately needed, naturally occurring chemical compounds have been studied for their potential chemotherapeutic benefits and low toxicity profile. Curcumin, found in the rhizome of turmeric, has extensive therapeutic promise via its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiproliferative properties. Preclinical in vitro and in vivo data have shown it to be an effective treatment for brain tumors including glioblastoma multiforme. These effects are potentiated by curcumin’s ability to induce G2/M cell cycle arrest, activation of apoptotic pathways, induction of autophagy, disruption of molecular signaling, inhibition of invasion, and metastasis and by increasing the efficacy of existing chemotherapeutics. Further, clinical data suggest that it has low toxicity in humans even at large doses. Curcumin is a promising nutraceutical compound that should be evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of human brain tumors.

  16. MR Vascular Fingerprinting in Stroke and Brain Tumors Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemasson, B.; Pannetier, N.; Coquery, N.; Boisserand, Ligia S. B.; Collomb, Nora; Schuff, N.; Moseley, M.; Zaharchuk, G.; Barbier, E. L.; Christen, T.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we evaluated an MRI fingerprinting approach (MRvF) designed to provide high-resolution parametric maps of the microvascular architecture (i.e., blood volume fraction, vessel diameter) and function (blood oxygenation) simultaneously. The method was tested in rats (n = 115), divided in 3 models: brain tumors (9 L, C6, F98), permanent stroke, and a control group of healthy animals. We showed that fingerprinting can robustly distinguish between healthy and pathological brain tissues with different behaviors in tumor and stroke models. In particular, fingerprinting revealed that C6 and F98 glioma models have similar signatures while 9 L present a distinct evolution. We also showed that it is possible to improve the results of MRvF and obtain supplemental information by changing the numerical representation of the vascular network. Finally, good agreement was found between MRvF and conventional MR approaches in healthy tissues and in the C6, F98, and permanent stroke models. For the 9 L glioma model, fingerprinting showed blood oxygenation measurements that contradict results obtained with a quantitative BOLD approach. In conclusion, MR vascular fingerprinting seems to be an efficient technique to study microvascular properties in vivo. Multiple technical improvements are feasible and might improve diagnosis and management of brain diseases.

  17. Adaptive Intuitionistic Fuzzy Enhancement of Brain Tumor MR Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, He; Deng, Wankai; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Image enhancement techniques are able to improve the contrast and visual quality of magnetic resonance (MR) images. However, conventional methods cannot make up some deficiencies encountered by respective brain tumor MR imaging modes. In this paper, we propose an adaptive intuitionistic fuzzy sets-based scheme, called as AIFE, which takes information provided from different MR acquisitions and tries to enhance the normal and abnormal structural regions of the brain while displaying the enhanced results as a single image. The AIFE scheme firstly separates an input image into several sub images, then divides each sub image into object and background areas. After that, different novel fuzzification, hyperbolization and defuzzification operations are implemented on each object/background area, and finally an enhanced result is achieved via nonlinear fusion operators. The fuzzy implementations can be processed in parallel. Real data experiments demonstrate that the AIFE scheme is not only effectively useful to have information from images acquired with different MR sequences fused in a single image, but also has better enhancement performance when compared to conventional baseline algorithms. This indicates that the proposed AIFE scheme has potential for improving the detection and diagnosis of brain tumors.

  18. Progress in brain targeting drug delivery system by nasal route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdur Rauf; Liu, Mengrui; Khan, Muhammad Wasim; Zhai, Guangxi

    2017-09-06

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts the transport of potential therapeutic moieties to the brain. Direct targeting the brain via olfactory and trigeminal neural pathways by passing the BBB has gained an important consideration for delivery of wide range of therapeutics to brain. Intranasal route of transportation directly delivers the drugs to brain without systemic absorption, thus avoiding the side effects and enhancing the efficacy of neurotherapeutics. Over the last several decades, different drug delivery systems (DDSs) have been studied for targeting the brain by the nasal route. Novel DDSs such as nanoparticles (NPs), liposomes and polymeric micelles have gained potential as useful tools for targeting the brain without toxicity in nasal mucosa and central nervous system (CNS). Complex geometry of the nasal cavity presented a big challenge to effective delivery of drugs beyond the nasal valve. Recently, pharmaceutical firms utilized latest and emerging nasal drug delivery technologies to overcome these barriers. This review aims to describe the latest development of brain targeted DDSs via nasal administration. Carbopol 934p (PubChem CID: 6581) Carboxy methylcellulose (PubChem CID: 24748) Penetratin (PubChem CID: 101111470) Poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PubChem CID: 23111554) Tween 80 (PubChem CID: 5284448). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Chemotherapy synergizes with radioimmunotherapy targeting La autoantigen in tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fares Al-Ejeh

    Full Text Available To date, inefficient delivery of therapeutic doses of radionuclides to solid tumors limits the clinical utility of radioimmunotherapy. We aim to test the therapeutic utility of Yttrium-90 ((90Y-radio-conjugates of a monoclonal antibody, which we showed previously to bind specifically to the abundant intracellular La ribonucleoprotein revealed in dead tumor cells after DNA-damaging treatment.Immunoconjugates of the DAB4 clone of the La-specific monoclonal antibody, APOMAB, were prepared using the metal chelator, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA, and then radiolabeled with (90Y. Mice bearing established subcutaneous tumors were treated with (90Y-DOTA-DAB4 alone or after chemotherapy. Non-radiosensitizing cyclophosphamide/etoposide chemotherapy was used for the syngeneic EL4 lymphoma model. Radiosensitizing cisplatin/gemcitabine chemotherapy was used for the syngeneic Lewis Lung carcinoma (LL2 model, and for the xenograft models of LNCaP prostatic carcinoma and Panc-1 pancreatic carcinoma. We demonstrate the safety, specificity, and efficacy of (90Y-DOTA-DAB4-radioimmunotherapy alone or combined with chemotherapy. EL4 lymphoma-bearing mice either were cured at higher doses of radioimmunotherapy alone or lower doses of radioimmunotherapy in synergy with chemotherapy. Radioimmunotherapy alone was less effective in chemo- and radio-resistant carcinoma models. However, radioimmunotherapy synergized with radiosensitizing chemotherapy to retard significantly tumor regrowth and so prolong the survival of mice bearing LL2, LNCaP, or Panc-1 subcutaneous tumor implants.We report proof-of-concept data supporting a unique form of radioimmunotherapy, which delivers bystander killing to viable cancer cells after targeting the universal cancer antigen, La, created by DNA-damaging treatment in neighboring dead cancer cells. Subsequently we propose that DAB4-targeted ionizing radiation induces additional cycles of tumor cell death

  20. Chemotherapy Synergizes with Radioimmunotherapy Targeting La Autoantigen in Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ejeh, Fares; Darby, Jocelyn M.; Brown, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Background To date, inefficient delivery of therapeutic doses of radionuclides to solid tumors limits the clinical utility of radioimmunotherapy. We aim to test the therapeutic utility of Yttrium-90 (90Y)-radio-conjugates of a monoclonal antibody, which we showed previously to bind specifically to the abundant intracellular La ribonucleoprotein revealed in dead tumor cells after DNA-damaging treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings Immunoconjugates of the DAB4 clone of the La-specific monoclonal antibody, APOMAB®, were prepared using the metal chelator, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), and then radiolabeled with 90Y. Mice bearing established subcutaneous tumors were treated with 90Y-DOTA-DAB4 alone or after chemotherapy. Non-radiosensitizing cyclophosphamide/etoposide chemotherapy was used for the syngeneic EL4 lymphoma model. Radiosensitizing cisplatin/gemcitabine chemotherapy was used for the syngeneic Lewis Lung carcinoma (LL2) model, and for the xenograft models of LNCaP prostatic carcinoma and Panc-1 pancreatic carcinoma. We demonstrate the safety, specificity, and efficacy of 90Y-DOTA-DAB4-radioimmunotherapy alone or combined with chemotherapy. EL4 lymphoma-bearing mice either were cured at higher doses of radioimmunotherapy alone or lower doses of radioimmunotherapy in synergy with chemotherapy. Radioimmunotherapy alone was less effective in chemo- and radio-resistant carcinoma models. However, radioimmunotherapy synergized with radiosensitizing chemotherapy to retard significantly tumor regrowth and so prolong the survival of mice bearing LL2, LNCaP, or Panc-1 subcutaneous tumor implants. Conclusions/Significance We report proof-of-concept data supporting a unique form of radioimmunotherapy, which delivers bystander killing to viable cancer cells after targeting the universal cancer antigen, La, created by DNA-damaging treatment in neighboring dead cancer cells. Subsequently we propose that DAB4-targeted ionizing radiation

  1. ABERRANT SPLICING OF A BRAIN-ENRICHED ALTERNATIVE EXON ELIMINATES TUMOR SUPPRESSOR FUNCTION AND PROMOTES ONCOGENE FUNCTION DURING BRAIN TUMORIGENESIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredel, Markus; Ferrarese, Roberto; Harsh, Griffith R.; Yadav, Ajay K.; Bug, Eva; Maticzka, Daniel; Reichardt, Wilfried; Masilamani, Anie P.; Dai, Fangping; Kim, Hyunsoo; Hadler, Michael; Scholtens, Denise M.; Yu, Irene L.Y.; Beck, Jürgen; Srinivasasainagendra, Vinodh; Costa, Fabrizio; Baxan, Nicoleta; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Elverfeldt, Dominik v.; Backofen, Rolf; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Duarte, Christine W.; He, Xiaolin; Prinz, Marco; Chandler, James P.; Vogel, Hannes; Chakravarti, Arnab; Rich, Jeremy N.; Carro, Maria S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tissue-specific alternative splicing is known to be critical to emergence of tissue identity during development, yet its role in malignant transformation is undefined. Tissue-specific splicing involves evolutionary-conserved, alternative exons, which represent only a minority of total alternative exons. Many, however, have functional features that influence activity in signaling pathways to profound biological effect. Given that tissue-specific splicing has a determinative role in brain development and the enrichment of genes containing tissue-specific exons for proteins with roles in signaling and development, it is thus plausible that changes in such exons could rewire normal neurogenesis towards malignant transformation. METHODS: We used integrated molecular genetic and cell biology analyses, computational biology, animal modeling, and clinical patient profiles to characterize the effect of aberrant splicing of a brain-enriched alternative exon in the membrane-binding tumor suppressor Annexin A7 (ANXA7) on oncogene regulation and brain tumorigenesis. RESULTS: We show that aberrant splicing of a tissue-specific cassette exon in ANXA7 diminishes endosomal targeting and consequent termination of the signal of the EGFR oncoprotein during brain tumorigenesis. Splicing of this exon is mediated by the ribonucleoprotein Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein 1 (PTBP1), which is normally repressed during brain development but, we find, is excessively expressed in glioblastomas through either gene amplification or loss of a neuron-specific microRNA, miR-124. Silencing of PTBP1 attenuates both malignancy and angiogenesis in a stem cell-derived glioblastoma animal model characterized by a high native propensity to generate tumor endothelium or vascular pericytes to support tumor growth. We show that EGFR amplification and PTBP1 overexpression portend a similarly poor clinical outcome, further highlighting the importance of PTBP1-mediated activation of EGFR

  2. Targeting sarcoma tumor-initiating cells through differentiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Han

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-I down-regulation has been reported in many human cancers to be associated with poor clinical outcome. However, its connection to tumor-initiating cells (TICs remains unknown. In this study, we report that HLA-I is down-regulated in a subpopulation of cells that have high tumor initiating capacity in different types of human sarcomas. Detailed characterization revealed their distinct molecular profiles regarding proliferation, apoptosis and stemness programs. Notably, these TICs can be induced to differentiate along distinct mesenchymal lineages, including the osteogenic pathway. The retinoic acid receptor signaling pathway is overexpressed in HLA-1 negative TICs. All-trans retinoic acid treatment successfully induced osteogenic differentiation of this subpopulation, in vitro and in vivo, resulting in significantly decreased tumor formation. Thus, our findings indicate down-regulated HLA-I is a shared feature of TICs in a variety of human sarcomas, and differentiation therapy strategies may specifically target undifferentiated TICs and inhibit tumor formation.

  3. SU-E-T-471: Improvement of Gamma Knife Treatment Planning Through Tumor Control Probability for Metastatic Brain Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Z [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Feng, Y [East Carolina Univ, Rockville, MD (United States); Lo, S [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Grecula, J [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Mayr, N; Yuh, W [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The dose–volume histogram (DVH) has been normally accepted as a tool for treatment plan evaluation. However, spatial information is lacking in DVH. As a supplement to the DVH in three-dimensional treatment planning, the differential DVH (DDVH) provides the spatial variation, the size and magnitude of the different dose regions within a region of interest, which can be incorporated into tumor control probability model. This study was to provide a method in evaluating and improving Gamma Knife treatment planning. Methods: 10 patients with brain metastases from different primary tumors including melanoma (#1,#4,#5, #10), breast cancer (#2), prostate cancer (#3) and lung cancer (#6–9) were analyzed. By using Leksell GammaPlan software, two plans were prepared for each patient. Special attention was given to the DDVHs that were different for different plans and were used for a comparison between two plans. Dose distribution inside target and tumor control probability (TCP) based on DDVH were calculated, where cell density and radiobiological parameters were adopted from literature. The plans were compared based on DVH, DDVH and TCP. Results: Using DVH, the coverage and selectivity were the same between plans for 10 patients. DDVH were different between two plans for each patient. The paired t-test showed no significant difference in TCP between the two plans. For brain metastases from melanoma (#1, #4–5), breast cancer (#2) and lung cancer (#6–8), the difference in TCP was less than 5%. But the difference in TCP was about 6.5% for patient #3 with the metastasis from prostate cancer, 10.1% and 178.7% for two patients (#9–10) with metastasis from lung cancer. Conclusion: Although DVH provides average dose–volume information, DDVH provides differential dose– volume information with respect to different regions inside the tumor. TCP provides radiobiological information and adds additional information on improving treatment planning as well as adaptive

  4. The SOX2-interactome in brain cancer cells identifies the requirement of MSI2 and USP9X for the growth of brain tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse L Cox

    Full Text Available Medulloblastomas and glioblastomas, the most common primary brain tumors in children and adults, respectively, are extremely difficult to treat. Efforts to identify novel proteins essential for the growth of these tumors may help to further our understanding of the biology of these tumors, as well as, identify targets for future therapies. The recent identification of multiple transcription factor-centric protein interaction landscapes in embryonic stem cells has identified numerous understudied proteins that are essential for the self-renewal of these stem cells. To identify novel proteins essential for the fate of brain tumor cells, we examined the protein interaction network of the transcription factor, SOX2, in medulloblastoma cells. For this purpose, Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT identified >280 SOX2-associated proteins in the medulloblastoma cell line DAOY. To begin to understand the roles of SOX2-associated proteins in brain cancer, we focused on two SOX2-associated proteins, Musashi 2 (MSI2 and Ubiquitin Specific Protease 9x (USP9X. Recent studies have implicated MSI2, a putative RNA binding protein, and USP9X, a deubiquitinating enzyme, in several cancers, but not brain tumors. We demonstrate that knockdown of MSI2 significantly reduces the growth of DAOY cells as well as U87 and U118 glioblastoma cells. We also demonstrate that the knockdown of USP9X in DAOY, U87 and U118 brain tumor cells strongly reduces their growth. Together, our studies identify a large set of SOX2-associated proteins in DAOY medulloblastoma cells and identify two proteins, MSI2 and USP9X, that warrant further investigation to determine whether they are potential therapeutic targets for brain cancer.

  5. Targeting tumor-associated macrophages by anti-tumor Chinese materia medica.

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    Pu, Wei-Ling; Sun, Li-Kang; Gao, Xiu-Mei; Rüegg, Curzio; Cuendet, Muriel; Hottiger, Micheal O; Zhou, Kun; Miao, Lin; Zhang, Yun-Sha; Gebauer, Margaret

    2017-10-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play a key role in all stages of tumorigenesis and tumor progression. TAMs secrete different kinds of cytokines, chemokines, and enzymes to affect the progression, metastasis, and resistance to therapy depending on their state of reprogramming. Therapeutic benefit in targeting TAMs suggests that macrophages are attractive targets for cancer treatment. Chinese materia medica (CMM) is an important approach for treating cancer in China and in the Asian region. According to the theory of Chinese medicine (CM) and its practice, some prescriptions of CM regulate the body's internal environment possibly including the remodeling the tumor microenvironment (TME). Here we briefly summarize the pivotal effects of TAMs in shaping the TME and promoting tumorigenesis, invasion, metastasis and immunosuppression. Furthermore, we illustrate the effects and mechanisms of CMM targeting TAMs in antitumor therapy. Finally, we reveal the CMM's dual-regulatory and multi-targeting functions on regulating TAMs, and hopefully, provide the theoretical basis for CMM clinical practice related to cancer therapy.

  6. Permeability of Brain Tumor Vessels Induced by Uniform or Spatially Microfractionated Synchrotron Radiation Therapies.

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    Bouchet, Audrey; Potez, Marine; Coquery, Nicolas; Rome, Claire; Lemasson, Benjamin; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Rémy, Chantal; Laissue, Jean; Barbier, Emmanuel L; Djonov, Valentin; Serduc, Raphael

    2017-08-01

    To compare the blood-brain barrier permeability changes induced by synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT, which relies on spatial fractionation of the incident x-ray beam into parallel micron-wide beams) with changes induced by a spatially uniform synchrotron x-ray radiation therapy. Male rats bearing malignant intracranial F98 gliomas were randomized into 3 groups: untreated, exposed to MRT (peak and valley dose: 241 and 10.5 Gy, respectively), or exposed to broad beam irradiation (BB) delivered at comparable doses (ie, equivalent to MRT valley dose); both applied by 2 arrays, intersecting orthogonally the tumor region. Vessel permeability was monitored in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging 1 day before (T-1) and 1, 2, 7, and 14 days after treatment start. To determine whether physiologic parameters influence vascular permeability, we evaluated vessel integrity in the tumor area with different values for cerebral blood flow, blood volume, edema, and tissue oxygenation. Microbeam radiation therapy does not modify the vascular permeability of normal brain tissue. Microbeam radiation therapy-induced increase of tumor vascular permeability was detectable from T2 with a maximum at T7 after exposure, whereas BB enhanced vessel permeability only at T7. At this stage MRT was more efficient at increasing tumor vessel permeability (BB vs untreated: +19.1%; P=.0467; MRT vs untreated: +44.8%; Ptumor than BB. Microbeam radiation therapy-induced increased tumor vascular permeability is: (1) significantly greater; (2) earlier and more prolonged than that induced by BB irradiation, especially in highly proliferative tumor areas; and (3) targets all tumor areas discriminated by physiologic characteristics, including those not damaged by homogeneous irradiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The adolescent and young adult with cancer: state of the art--brain tumor.

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    Epelman, Sidnei

    2013-08-01

    The management of adolescents and young adults with brain tumors, which consist of many different histologic subtypes, continues to be a challenge. Better outcome with a decrease of the side effects of the disease and therapy and improvement of quality of life has been demonstrated in recent decades for some tumors. Significant differences in survival and cure are also observed between adult and pediatric tumors of the same histologic grade. Genetic, developmental, and environmental factors likely influence the type of tumor and response observed, even though no clear pathologic features differentiate these lesions among children, adolescents, and adults. Similarly, treatment strategies are not identical among these populations; most patients receive surgery, followed by radiation therapy and multiagent chemotherapy. Advances in understanding the biology underlying the distribution of tumors in adolescents and young adults may influence the development of prospective trials. A more individualized view of these tumors will likely influence stratification of patients in future studies as well as selection for targeted agents. Accordingly, outcomes may improve and long-term morbidities may decrease.

  8. The Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation Benchmark (BRATS)

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    Jakab, Andras; Bauer, Stefan; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Farahani, Keyvan; Kirby, Justin; Burren, Yuliya; Porz, Nicole; Slotboom, Johannes; Wiest, Roland; Lanczi, Levente; Gerstner, Elizabeth; Weber, Marc-André; Arbel, Tal; Avants, Brian B.; Ayache, Nicholas; Buendia, Patricia; Collins, D. Louis; Cordier, Nicolas; Corso, Jason J.; Criminisi, Antonio; Das, Tilak; Delingette, Hervé; Demiralp, Çağatay; Durst, Christopher R.; Dojat, Michel; Doyle, Senan; Festa, Joana; Forbes, Florence; Geremia, Ezequiel; Glocker, Ben; Golland, Polina; Guo, Xiaotao; Hamamci, Andac; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.; Jena, Raj; John, Nigel M.; Konukoglu, Ender; Lashkari, Danial; Mariz, José António; Meier, Raphael; Pereira, Sérgio; Precup, Doina; Price, Stephen J.; Raviv, Tammy Riklin; Reza, Syed M. S.; Ryan, Michael; Sarikaya, Duygu; Schwartz, Lawrence; Shin, Hoo-Chang; Shotton, Jamie; Silva, Carlos A.; Sousa, Nuno; Subbanna, Nagesh K.; Szekely, Gabor; Taylor, Thomas J.; Thomas, Owen M.; Tustison, Nicholas J.; Unal, Gozde; Vasseur, Flor; Wintermark, Max; Ye, Dong Hye; Zhao, Liang; Zhao, Binsheng; Zikic, Darko; Prastawa, Marcel; Reyes, Mauricio; Van Leemput, Koen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report the set-up and results of the Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation Benchmark (BRATS) organized in conjunction with the MICCAI 2012 and 2013 conferences. Twenty state-of-the-art tumor segmentation algorithms were applied to a set of 65 multi-contrast MR scans of low- and high-grade glioma patients—manually annotated by up to four raters—and to 65 comparable scans generated using tumor image simulation software. Quantitative evaluations revealed considerable disagreement between the human raters in segmenting various tumor sub-regions (Dice scores in the range 74%–85%), illustrating the difficulty of this task. We found that different algorithms worked best for different sub-regions (reaching performance comparable to human inter-rater variability), but that no single algorithm ranked in the top for all sub-regions simultaneously. Fusing several good algorithms using a hierarchical majority vote yielded segmentations that consistently ranked above all individual algorithms, indicating remaining opportunities for further methodological improvements. The BRATS image data and manual annotations continue to be publicly available through an online evaluation system as an ongoing benchmarking resource. PMID:25494501

  9. Transferrin liposomes of docetaxel for brain-targeted cancer applications: formulation and brain theranostics.

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    Sonali; Singh, Rahul Pratap; Singh, Nitesh; Sharma, Gunjan; Vijayakumar, Mahalingam R; Koch, Biplob; Singh, Sanjay; Singh, Usha; Dash, Debabrata; Pandey, Bajarangprasad L; Muthu, Madaswamy S

    2016-05-01

    Diagnosis and therapy of brain cancer was often limited due to low permeability of delivery materials across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and their poor penetration into the brain tissue. This study explored the possibility of utilizing theranostic d-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate mono-ester (TPGS) liposomes as nanocarriers for minimally invasive brain-targeted imaging and therapy (brain theranostics). The aim of this work was to formulate transferrin conjugated TPGS coated theranostic liposomes, which contain both docetaxel and quantum dots (QDs) for imaging and therapy of brain cancer. The theranostic liposomes with and without transferrin decoration were prepared and characterized for their particle size, polydispersity, morphology, drug encapsulation efficiency, in-vitro release study and brain theranostics. The particle sizes of the non-targeted and targeted theranostic liposomes were found below 200 nm. Nearly, 71% of drug encapsulation efficiency was achieved with liposomes. The drug release from transferrin conjugated theranostic liposomes was sustained for more than 72 h with 70% of drug release. The in-vivo results indicated that transferrin receptor-targeted theranostic liposomes could be a promising carrier for brain theranostics due to nano-sized delivery and its permeability which provided an improved and prolonged brain targeting of docetaxel and QDs in comparison to the non-targeted preparations.

  10. Cryptophycins: cytotoxic cyclodepsipeptides with potential for tumor targeting.

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    Weiss, Christine; Figueras, Eduard; Borbely, Adina N; Sewald, Norbert

    2017-07-01

    Cryptophycins are a class of 16-membered highly cytotoxic macrocyclic depsipeptides isolated from cyanobacteria. The biological activity is based on their ability to interact with tubulin. They interfere with microtubule dynamics and prevent microtubules from forming correct mitotic spindles, which causes cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Their strong antiproliferative activities with 100-fold to 1000-fold potency compared with those of paclitaxel and vinblastine have been observed. Cryptophycins are highly promising drug candidates, as their biological activity is not negatively affected by P-glycoprotein, a drug efflux system commonly found in multidrug-resistant cancer cell lines and solid tumors. Cryptophycin-52 had been investigated in phase II clinical trials but failed because of its high neurotoxicity. Recently, cryptophycin conjugates with peptides and antibodies have been developed for targeted delivery in tumor therapy. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Trends in childhood brain tumor incidence, 1973-2009.

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    McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Razavi, Pedram; Barrington-Trimis, Jessica; Baldwin, Rachel Tobias; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Cockburn, Myles; Tihan, Tarik; Preston-Martin, Susan

    2013-11-01

    In the mid-1980s, there was a rise in incidence rates of childhood brain tumors (CBT) in the United States that appeared to stabilize at a higher rate in the early 1990 s. An updated analysis of the pattern of CBT over the past 2 decades, with commentary on whether the elevated incidence rate has continued, is past due. We used Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data to examine trends in incidence of CBT from 1973 through 2009. We examined age-adjusted incidence rates (AAIRs) and secular trends for all malignant brain tumors combined (SEER classification) by histologic tumor type and anatomic site. The incidence of CBT remained stable from 1987 to 2009 [annual percent change (APC) = 0.10; 95 % confidence intervals (CI) -0.39 to 0.61] with an AAIR for all CBT of 3.32 (95 % CI 3.22-3.42). The stability of rates in these two decades contrast the change that occurred in the mid-1980s (1983-1986), when the incidence of CBT increased by 53 % (APC = 14.06; 95 % CI 4.05-25.0). From 1983 to 1986, statistically significant rate increases were observed for pilocytic astrocytoma, PNET/medulloblastoma, and mixed glioma. Further, the rate of increase in pilocytic astrocytoma was similar to the rate of decrease for astrocytomas NOS from 1981 to 2009, suggesting a change from a more general to more specific classification. After the increase in rates in the mid-1980s, rates of CBT over the past two decades have stabilized. Changes in incidence rates of subtypes of tumors over this time period reflect changes both in classification of CBT and in diagnostic techniques.

  12. Analysis of mobile phone use among young patients with brain tumors in Japan.

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    Sato, Yasuto; Kojimahara, Noriko; Yamaguchi, Naohito

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify ownership and usage of mobile phones among young patients with brain tumors in Japan. The subjects of this study were patients with brain tumors diagnosed between 2006 and 2010 who were between the ages of 6 and 18 years. The target population for the analysis was 82 patients. Patients were divided into two groups: 16 patients who were mobile phone owners 1 year before diagnosis, and 66 patients who did not own mobile phones (non-owners). Using data on the mobile phone ownership rate obtained from three general-population surveys, we calculated the expected number of mobile phone owners. The three age-adjusted standardized ownership ratios were 0.83 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.56-1.22), 0.51 (95% CI: 0.24-1.04), and 0.75 (95% CI: 0.42-1.32). The mobile phone ownership prevalence among the young Japanese patients with brain tumors in the current study does not differ from available estimates for the general population of corresponding age. However, since the use of mobile phones among children is increasing annually, investigations into the health effects of mobile phone use among children should continue. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:349-355, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus Inhibits Pediatric Brain Tumor Migration and Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia V. Cockle

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric high-grade glioma (pHGG and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG are invasive tumors with poor survival. Oncolytic virotherapy, initially devised as a direct cytotoxic treatment, is now also known to act via immune-mediated mechanisms. Here we investigate a previously unreported mechanism of action: the inhibition of migration and invasion in pediatric brain tumors. We evaluated the effect of oncolytic herpes simplex virus 1716 (HSV1716 on the migration and invasion of pHGG and DIPG both in vitro using 2D (scratch assay, live cell imaging and 3D (spheroid invasion in collagen assays and in vivo using an orthotopic xenograft model of DIPG invasion. HSV1716 inhibited migration and invasion in pHGG and DIPG cell lines. pHGG cells demonstrated reduced velocity and changed morphology in the presence of virus. HSV1716 altered pHGG cytoskeletal dynamics by stabilizing microtubules, inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase-3, and preventing localized clustering of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC to the leading edge of cells. HSV1716 treatment also reduced tumor infiltration in a mouse orthotopic xenograft DIPG model. Our results demonstrate that HSV1716 targets the migration and invasion of pHGG and DIPG and indicates the potential of an oncolytic virus (OV to be used as a novel anti-invasive treatment strategy for pediatric brain tumors.

  14. Maintaining older brain functionality: A targeted review.

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    Ballesteros, Soledad; Kraft, Eduard; Santana, Silvina; Tziraki, Chariklia

    2015-08-01

    The unprecedented growth in the number of older adults in our society is accompanied by the exponential increase in the number of elderly people who will suffer cognitive decline and dementia in the next decades. This will create an enormous cost for governments, families and individuals. Brain plasticity and its role in brain adaptation to the process of aging is influenced by other changes as a result of co-morbidities, environmental factors, personality traits (psychosocial variables) and genetic and epigenetic factors. This review summarizes recent findings obtained mostly from interventional studies that aim to prevent and/or delay age-related cognitive decline in healthy adults. There are a multitude of such studies. In this paper, we focused our review on physical activity, computerized cognitive training and social enhancement interventions on improving cognition, physical health, independent living and wellbeing of older adults. The methodological limitations of some of these studies, and the need for new multi-domain synergistic interventions, based on current advances in neuroscience and social-brain theories, are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. SU-C-BRA-06: Automatic Brain Tumor Segmentation for Stereotactic Radiosurgery Applications

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    Liu, Y; Stojadinovic, S; Jiang, S; Timmerman, R; Abdulrahman, R; Nedzi, L; Gu, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), which delivers a potent dose of highly conformal radiation to the target in a single fraction, requires accurate tumor delineation for treatment planning. We present an automatic segmentation strategy, that synergizes intensity histogram thresholding, super-voxel clustering, and level-set based contour evolving methods to efficiently and accurately delineate SRS brain tumors on contrast-enhance T1-weighted (T1c) Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI). Methods: The developed auto-segmentation strategy consists of three major steps. Firstly, tumor sites are localized through 2D slice intensity histogram scanning. Then, super voxels are obtained through clustering the corresponding voxels in 3D with reference to the similarity metrics composited from spatial distance and intensity difference. The combination of the above two could generate the initial contour surface. Finally, a localized region active contour model is utilized to evolve the surface to achieve the accurate delineation of the tumors. The developed method was evaluated on numerical phantom data, synthetic BRATS (Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation challenge) data, and clinical patients’ data. The auto-segmentation results were quantitatively evaluated by comparing to ground truths with both volume and surface similarity metrics. Results: DICE coefficient (DC) was performed as a quantitative metric to evaluate the auto-segmentation in the numerical phantom with 8 tumors. DCs are 0.999±0.001 without noise, 0.969±0.065 with Rician noise and 0.976±0.038 with Gaussian noise. DC, NMI (Normalized Mutual Information), SSIM (Structural Similarity) and Hausdorff distance (HD) were calculated as the metrics for the BRATS and patients’ data. Assessment of BRATS data across 25 tumor segmentation yield DC 0.886±0.078, NMI 0.817±0.108, SSIM 0.997±0.002, and HD 6.483±4.079mm. Evaluation on 8 patients with total 14 tumor sites yield DC 0.872±0.070, NMI 0.824±0

  16. Stereotactic biopsy with electrical monitoring for deep-seated brain tumors.

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    Ooba, Hiroshi; Abe, Tatsuya; Momii, Yasutomo; Fujiki, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    The stereotactic biopsy is widely integrated into clinical practice as an efficient and safe procedure for histologic diagnoses. However, the surgical risk increases when the lesions are close to the eloquence of the adjacent brain. The present report describes two patients with deep-seated brain tumors who underwent a stereotactic biopsy with electrical monitoring and demonstrates the importance of this technique. The tentative target and trajectory were determined on a stereotactic map from the Schaltenbrand and Wahren atlas. A Cosman-Roberts-Wells stereotactic frame was applied to the patient. Electrical recording along a single trajectory was used to identify the circumscribed neuronal structures, and electrical simulation was administered to the target. The biopsy point was decided when no adverse events were observed with a low electric current level. A 34-year-old male patient with anaplastic astrocytoma in the putamen and thalamus and an 81-year-old female patient with malignant lymphoma in the midbrain underwent stereotactic biopsies with electrical monitoring. The biopsies were successfully performed without any resulting neurologic deficits. This report describes two patients with deep-seated brain tumors who underwent stereotactic biopsies with electrical recording and stimulation. The electrical monitoring appears to be a useful technique to complement the ordinary image-guided biopsy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Tumor growth model for atlas based registration of pathological brain MR images

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    Moualhi, Wafa; Ezzeddine, Zagrouba

    2015-02-01

    The motivation of this work is to register a tumor brain magnetic resonance (MR) image with a normal brain atlas. A normal brain atlas is deformed in order to take account of the presence of a large space occupying tumor. The method use a priori model of tumor growth assuming that the tumor grows in a radial way from a starting point. First, an affine transformation is used in order to bring the patient image and the brain atlas in a global correspondence. Second, the seeding of a synthetic tumor into the brain atlas provides a template for the lesion. Finally, the seeded atlas is deformed combining a method derived from optical flow principles and a model for tumor growth (MTG). Results show that an automatic segmentation method of brain structures in the presence of large deformation can be provided.

  18. Profiles of Executive Function Across Children with Distinct Brain Disorders: Traumatic Brain Injury, Stroke, and Brain Tumor.

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    Araujo, Gabriel C; Antonini, Tanya N; Anderson, Vicki; Vannatta, Kathryn A; Salley, Christina G; Bigler, Erin D; Taylor, H Gerry; Gerhardt, Cynthia; Rubin, Kenneth; Dennis, Maureen; Lo, Warren; Mackay, Mark T; Gordon, Anne; Hajek Koterba, Christine; Gomes, Alison; Greenham, Mardee; Owen Yeates, Keith

    2017-08-01

    This study examined whether children with distinct brain disorders show different profiles of strengths and weaknesses in executive functions, and differ from children without brain disorder. Participants were children with traumatic brain injury (N=82; 8-13 years of age), arterial ischemic stroke (N=36; 6-16 years of age), and brain tumor (N=74; 9-18 years of age), each with a corresponding matched comparison group consisting of children with orthopedic injury (N=61), asthma (N=15), and classmates without medical illness (N=68), respectively. Shifting, inhibition, and working memory were assessed, respectively, using three Test of Everyday Attention: Children's Version (TEA-Ch) subtests: Creature Counting, Walk-Don't-Walk, and Code Transmission. Comparison groups did not differ in TEA-Ch performance and were merged into a single control group. Profile analysis was used to examine group differences in TEA-Ch subtest scaled scores after controlling for maternal education and age. As a whole, children with brain disorder performed more poorly than controls on measures of executive function. Relative to controls, the three brain injury groups showed significantly different profiles of executive functions. Importantly, post hoc tests revealed that performance on TEA-Ch subtests differed among the brain disorder groups. Results suggest that different childhood brain disorders result in distinct patterns of executive function deficits that differ from children without brain disorder. Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed. (JINS, 2017, 23, 529-538).

  19. Detection of human brain tumor infiltration with quantitative stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

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    Ji, Minbiao; Lewis, Spencer; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Ramkissoon, Shakti H; Snuderl, Matija; Venneti, Sriram; Fisher-Hubbard, Amanda; Garrard, Mia; Fu, Dan; Wang, Anthony C; Heth, Jason A; Maher, Cormac O; Sanai, Nader; Johnson, Timothy D; Freudiger, Christian W; Sagher, Oren; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Orringer, Daniel A

    2015-10-14

    Differentiating tumor from normal brain is a major barrier to achieving optimal outcome in brain tumor surgery. New imaging techniques for visualizing tumor margins during surgery are needed to improve surgical results. We recently demonstrated the ability of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, a nondestructive, label-free optical method, to reveal glioma infiltration in animal models. We show that SRS reveals human brain tumor infiltration in fresh, unprocessed surgical specimens from 22 neurosurgical patients. SRS detects tumor infiltration in near-perfect agreement with standard hematoxylin and eosin light microscopy (κ = 0.86). The unique chemical contrast specific to SRS microscopy enables tumor detection by revealing quantifiable alterations in tissue cellularity, axonal density, and protein/lipid ratio in tumor-infiltrated tissues. To ensure that SRS microscopic data can be easily used in brain tumor surgery, without the need for expert interpretation, we created a classifier based on cellularity, axonal density, and protein/lipid ratio in SRS images capable of detecting tumor infiltration with 97.5% sensitivity and 98.5% specificity. Quantitative SRS microscopy detects the spread of tumor cells, even in brain tissue surrounding a tumor that appears grossly normal. By accurately revealing tumor infiltration, quantitative SRS microscopy holds potential for improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Adhesion receptors as therapeutic targets for circulating tumor cells.

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    Li, Jiahe; King, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Metastasis contributes to >90% of cancer-associated mortality. Though primary tumors can be removed by surgical resection or chemo/radiotherapy, metastatic disease is a great challenge to treatment due to its systemic nature. As metastatic "seeds," circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are believed to be responsible for dissemination from a primary tumor to anatomically distant organs. Despite the possibility of physical trapping of CTCs in microvessels, recent advances have provided insights into the involvement of a variety of adhesion molecules on CTCs. Such adhesion molecules facilitate direct interaction with the endothelium in specific tissues or indirectly through leukocytes. Importantly, significant progress has been made in understanding how these receptors confer enhanced invasion and survival advantage during hematogenous circulation of CTCs through recruitment of macrophages, neutrophils, platelets, and other cells. This review highlights the identification of novel adhesion molecules and how blocking their function can compromise successful seeding and colonization of CTCs in new microenvironment. Encouraged by existing diagnostic tools to identify and isolate CTCs, strategic targeting of these adhesion molecules to deliver conventional chemotherapeutics or novel apoptotic signals is discussed for the neutralization of CTCs in the circulation.

  1. Adhesion receptors as therapeutic targets for circulating tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiahe eLi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis contributes to >90% of cancer-associated mortality. Though primary tumors can be removed by surgical resection or chemo/radiotherapy, metastatic disease is a great challenge to treatment due to its systemic nature. As metastatic seeds, circulating tumor cells (CTCs are believed to be responsible for dissemination from a primary tumor to anatomically distant organs. Despite the possibility of physical trapping of CTCs in microvessels, recent advances have provided insights into the involvement of a variety of adhesion molecules on CTCs. Such adhesion molecules facilitate direct interaction with the endothelium in specific tissues or indirectly through leukocytes. Importantly, significant progress has been made in understanding how these receptors confer enhanced invasion and survival advantage during hematogenous circulation of CTCs through recruitment of macrophages, neutrophils, platelets, and other cells. This review highlights the identification of novel adhesion molecules and how blocking their function can compromise successful seeding and colonization of CTCs in new microenvironment. Encouraged by existing diagnostic tools to identify and isolate CTCs, strategic targeting of these adhesion molecules to deliver conventional chemotherapeutics or novel apoptotic signals is discussed for the neutralization of CTCs in the circulation.

  2. Pericentriolar Targeting of the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus GAG Protein.

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    Guangzhi Zhang

    Full Text Available The Gag protein of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV is the chief determinant of subcellular targeting. Electron microscopy studies show that MMTV Gag forms capsids within the cytoplasm and assembles as immature particles with MMTV RNA and the Y box binding protein-1, required for centrosome maturation. Other betaretroviruses, such as Mason-Pfizer monkey retrovirus (M-PMV, assemble adjacent to the pericentriolar region because of a cytoplasmic targeting and retention signal in the Matrix protein. Previous studies suggest that the MMTV Matrix protein may also harbor a similar cytoplasmic targeting and retention signal. Herein, we show that a substantial fraction of MMTV Gag localizes to the pericentriolar region. This was observed in HEK293T, HeLa human cell lines and the mouse derived NMuMG mammary gland cells. Moreover, MMTV capsids were observed adjacent to centrioles when expressed from plasmids encoding either MMTV Gag alone, Gag-Pro-Pol or full-length virus. We found that the cytoplasmic targeting and retention signal in the MMTV Matrix protein was sufficient for pericentriolar targeting, whereas mutation of the glutamine to alanine at position 56 (D56/A resulted in plasma membrane localization, similar to previous observations from mutational studies of M-PMV Gag. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy studies showed that MMTV capsids accumulate around centrioles suggesting that, similar to M-PMV, the pericentriolar region may be a site for MMTV assembly. Together, the data imply that MMTV Gag targets the pericentriolar region as a result of the MMTV cytoplasmic targeting and retention signal, possibly aided by the Y box protein-1 required for the assembly of centrosomal microtubules.

  3. Amphiphilic Phospholipid-Based Riboflavin Derivatives for Tumor Targeting Nanomedicines.

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    Beztsinna, Nataliia; Tsvetkova, Yoanna; Bartneck, Matthias; Lammers, Twan; Kiessling, Fabian; Bestel, Isabelle

    2016-09-21

    Riboflavin (RF) is an essential vitamin for cellular metabolism. Recent studies have shown that RF is internalized through RF transporters, which are highly overexpressed by prostate and breast cancer cells, as well as by angiogenic endothelium. Here, we present an optimized synthesis protocol for preparing tailor-made amphiphilic phospholipid-based RF derivatives using phosphoramidite chemistry. The prepared RF amphiphile-RfdiC14-can be inserted into liposome formulations for targeted drug delivery. The obtained liposomes had a hydrodynamic size of 115 ± 5 nm with narrow size distribution (PDI 0.06) and a zeta potential of -52 ± 3 mV. In vitro uptake studies showed that RfdiC14-containing liposomes were strongly internalized in HUVEC, PC3, and A431 cells, in a specific and transporter-mediated manner. To assess the RF targeting potential in vivo, an amphiphile containing PEG spacer between RF and a lipid was prepared-DSPE-PEG-RF. The latter was successfully incorporated into long-circulating near-infrared-labeled liposomes (141 ± 1 nm in diameter, PDI 0.07, zeta potential of -33 ± 1 mV). The longitudinal μCT/FMT biodistribution studies in PC3 xenograft bearing mice demonstrated similar pharmacokinetics profile of DSPE-PEG-RF-functionalized liposomes compared to control. The subsequent histological evaluation of resected tumors revealed higher degree of tumor retention as well as colocalization of targeted liposomes with endothelial cells emphasizing the targeting potential of RF amphiphiles and their utility for the lipid-containing drug delivery systems.

  4. Automatic metastatic brain tumor segmentation for stereotactic radiosurgery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Hrycushko, Brian; Wardak, Zabi; Lu, Weiguo; Yan, Yulong; Jiang, Steve B.; Timmerman, Robert; Abdulrahman, Ramzi; Nedzi, Lucien; Gu, Xuejun

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study is to develop an automatic segmentation strategy for efficient and accurate metastatic brain tumor delineation on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted (T1c) magnetic resonance images (MRI) for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) applications. The proposed four-step automatic brain metastases segmentation strategy is comprised of pre-processing, initial contouring, contour evolution, and contour triage. First, T1c brain images are preprocessed to remove the skull. Second, an initial tumor contour is created using a multi-scaled adaptive threshold-based bounding box and a super-voxel clustering technique. Third, the initial contours are evolved to the tumor boundary using a regional active contour technique. Fourth, all detected false-positive contours are removed with geometric characterization. The segmentation process was validated on a realistic virtual phantom containing Gaussian or Rician noise. For each type of noise distribution, five different noise levels were tested. Twenty-one cases from the multimodal brain tumor image segmentation (BRATS) challenge dataset and fifteen clinical metastases cases were also included in validation. Segmentation performance was quantified by the Dice coefficient (DC), normalized mutual information (NMI), structural similarity (SSIM), Hausdorff distance (HD), mean value of surface-to-surface distance (MSSD) and standard deviation of surface-to-surface distance (SDSSD). In the numerical phantom study, the evaluation yielded a DC of 0.98  ±  0.01, an NMI of 0.97  ±  0.01, an SSIM of 0.999  ±  0.001, an HD of 2.2  ±  0.8 mm, an MSSD of 0.1  ±  0.1 mm, and an SDSSD of 0.3  ±  0.1 mm. The validation on the BRATS data resulted in a DC of 0.89  ±  0.08, which outperform the BRATS challenge algorithms. Evaluation on clinical datasets gave a DC of 0.86  ±  0.09, an NMI of 0.80  ±  0.11, an SSIM of 0.999  ±  0.001, an HD of 8

  5. Stereotactic interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of oligodendroglial brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Majdoub, Faycal; Neudorfer, Clemens; Maarouf, Mohammad [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Cologne (Germany); University of Witten/Herdecke, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Center of Neurosurgery, Cologne-Merheim Medical Center (CMMC), Cologne (Germany); Blau, Tobias; Deckert, Martina [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Neuropathology, Cologne (Germany); Hellmich, Martin [University Hospital of Cologne, Institute of Statistics, Informatics and Epidemiology, Cologne (Germany); Buehrle, Christian [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Cologne (Germany); Sturm, Volker [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Cologne (Germany); University Hospital of Wurzburg, Department of Neurosurgery, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    We evaluated the treatment of oligodendroglial brain tumors with interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) using {sup 125}iodine seeds ({sup 125}I) and analyzed prognostic factors. Between January 1991 and December 2010, 63 patients (median age 43.3 years, range 20.8-63.4 years) suffering from oligodendroglial brain tumors were treated with {sup 125}I IBT either as primary, adjuvantly after incomplete resection, or as salvage therapy after tumor recurrence. Possible prognostic factors influencing disease progression and survival were retrospectively investigated. The actuarial 2-, 5-, and 10-year overall and progression-free survival rates after IBT for WHO II tumors were 96.9, 96.9, 89.8 % and 96.9, 93.8, 47.3 %; for WHO III tumors 90.3, 77, 54.9 % and 80.6, 58.4, 45.9 %, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated complete remission in 2 patients, partial remission in 13 patients, stable disease in 17 patients and tumor progression in 31 patients. Median time to progression for WHO II tumors was 87.6 months and for WHO III tumors 27.8 months. Neurological status improved in 10 patients and remained stable in 20 patients, while 9 patients deteriorated. There was no treatment-related mortality. Treatment-related morbidity was transient in 11 patients. WHO II, KPS ≥ 90 %, frontal location, and tumor surface dose > 50 Gy were associated with increased overall survival (p ≤ 0.05). Oligodendroglioma and frontal location were associated with a prolonged progression-free survival (p ≤ 0.05). Our study indicates that IBT achieves local control rates comparable to surgery and radio-/chemotherapy treatment, is minimally invasive, and safe. Due to the low rate of side effects, IBT may represent an attractive option as part of a multimodal treatment schedule, being supplementary to microsurgery or as a salvage therapy after chemotherapy and conventional irradiation. (orig.) [German] Die Behandlung oligodendroglialer Hirntumoren durch die interstitielle Brachytherapie

  6. Monte Carlo modeling and optimization of contrast-enhanced radiotherapy of brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Lopez, C E; Garnica-Garza, H M, E-mail: hgarnica@cinvestav.mx [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional Unidad Monterrey, Via del Conocimiento 201 Parque de Investigacion e Innovacion Tecnologica, Apodaca NL CP 66600 (Mexico)

    2011-07-07

    Contrast-enhanced radiotherapy involves the use of a kilovoltage x-ray beam to impart a tumoricidal dose to a target into which a radiological contrast agent has previously been loaded in order to increase the x-ray absorption efficiency. In this treatment modality the selection of the proper x-ray spectrum is important since at the energy range of interest the penetration ability of the x-ray beam is limited. For the treatment of brain tumors, the situation is further complicated by the presence of the skull, which also absorbs kilovoltage x-ray in a very efficient manner. In this work, using Monte Carlo simulation, a realistic patient model and the Cimmino algorithm, several irradiation techniques and x-ray spectra are evaluated for two possible clinical scenarios with respect to the location of the target, these being a tumor located at the center of the head and at a position close to the surface of the head. It will be shown that x-ray spectra, such as those produced by a conventional x-ray generator, are capable of producing absorbed dose distributions with excellent uniformity in the target as well as dose differential of at least 20% of the prescribed tumor dose between this and the surrounding brain tissue, when the tumor is located at the center of the head. However, for tumors with a lateral displacement from the center and close to the skull, while the absorbed dose distribution in the target is also quite uniform and the dose to the surrounding brain tissue is within an acceptable range, hot spots in the skull arise which are above what is considered a safe limit. A comparison with previously reported results using mono-energetic x-ray beams such as those produced by a radiation synchrotron is also presented and it is shown that the absorbed dose distributions rendered by this type of beam are very similar to those obtained with a conventional x-ray beam.

  7. Evolution of bombesin conjugates for targeted PET imaging of tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanwen Zhang

    Full Text Available Bombesin receptors are under intense investigation as molecular targets since they are overexpressed in several prevalent solid tumors. We rationally designed and synthesized a series of modified bombesin (BN peptide analogs to study the influence of charge and spacers at the N-terminus, as well as amino acid substitutions, on both receptor binding affinity and pharmacokinetics. This enabled development of a novel (64/67Cu-labeled BN peptide for PET imaging and targeted radiotherapy of BN receptor-positive tumors. Our results show that N-terminally positively charged peptide ligands had significantly higher affinity to human gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPr than negatively charged or uncharged ligands (IC(50: 3.2±0.5 vs 26.3±3.5 vs 41.5±2.5 nM. The replacement of Nle(14 by Met, and deletion of D-Tyr(6, further resulted in 8-fold higher affinity. Contrary to significant changes to human GRPr binding, modifications at the N-terminal and at the 6(th, 11(th, and 14(th position of BN induced only slight influences on affinity to mouse GRPr. [Cu(II]-CPTA-[βAla(11] BN(7-14 ([Cu(II]-BZH7 showed the highest internalization rate into PC-3 cells with relatively slow efflux because of its subnanomolar affinity to GRPr. Interestingly, [(64/67Cu]-BZH7 also displayed similar affinities to the other 2 human BN receptor subtypes. In vivo studies showed that [(64/67Cu]-BZH7 had a high accumulation in PC-3 xenografts and allowed for clear-cut visualization of the tumor in PET imaging. In addition, a CPTA-glycine derivative, forming a hippurane-type spacer, enhanced kidney clearance of the radiotracer. These data indicate that the species variation of BN receptor plays an important role in screening radiolabeled BN. As well, the positive charge from the metallated complex at the N-terminal significantly increases affinity to human GRPr. Application of these observations enabled the novel ligand [(64/67Cu]-BZH7 to clearly visualize PC-3 tumors in vivo

  8. Sleep complaints in survivors of pediatric brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimeyer, Chasity; Adams, Leah; Zhu, Liang; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Wise, Merrill; Hudson, Melissa M; Crabtree, Valerie McLaughlin

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric brain tumor survivors have increased risk of sleep problems, particularly excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Few studies have examined sleep disturbances in this population. 153 children and adolescents ages 8-18 and their parents completed questionnaires (Modified Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Kosair Children's Hospital Sleep Questionnaire, Children's Report of Sleep Patterns, Children's Sleep Hygiene Scale) during clinic visits. Participants were at least 5 years from diagnosis and 2 years post-treatment. Group differences in age at diagnosis, body mass index, type of treatment received, and tumor location were examined. One-third of adolescents and one-fifth of children reported EDS. Children and parents had fair concordance (kappa coefficient = .64) in their report of EDS, while adolescents and parents had poor concordance (kappa coefficient = .37). Per parents, most children slept 8 to 9 h per night. Poor bedtime routines were reported for children, while adolescents endorsed poor sleep stability. Extended weekend sleep was reported across age groups. A BMI in the obese range was related to higher parent-reported EDS in children. Sleep-disordered breathing was associated with elevated BMI in adolescents. While survivors reported achieving recommended amounts of sleep each night, 20 to 30% reported EDS. Poor concordance among parent and adolescent report highlights the importance of obtaining self-report when assessing sleep concerns. Obesity is a modifiable factor in reducing symptoms of EDS in this population. Finally, the lack of association between EDS and brain tumor location, BMI, or treatment received was unexpected and warrants further investigation.

  9. Targeted Therapies for Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyshak Alva Venur

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of various driver pathways and targeted small molecule agents/antibodies have revolutionized the management of metastatic breast cancer. Currently, the major targets of clinical utility in breast cancer include the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptor, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway, and the cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK-4/6 pathway. Brain metastasis, however, remains a thorn in the flesh, leading to morbidity, neuro-cognitive decline, and interruptions in the management of systemic disease. Approximately 20%–30% of patients with metastatic breast cancer develop brain metastases. Surgery, whole brain radiation therapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery are the traditional treatment options for patients with brain metastases. The therapeutic paradigm is changing due to better understanding of the blood brain barrier and the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. Several of these agents are in clinical practice and several others are in early stage clinical trials. In this article, we will review the common targetable pathways in the management of breast cancer patients with brain metastases, and the current state of the clinical development of drugs against these pathways.

  10. Targeted Therapies for Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venur, Vyshak Alva; Leone, José Pablo

    2016-09-13

    The discovery of various driver pathways and targeted small molecule agents/antibodies have revolutionized the management of metastatic breast cancer. Currently, the major targets of clinical utility in breast cancer include the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and the cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK-4/6) pathway. Brain metastasis, however, remains a thorn in the flesh, leading to morbidity, neuro-cognitive decline, and interruptions in the management of systemic disease. Approximately 20%-30% of patients with metastatic breast cancer develop brain metastases. Surgery, whole brain radiation therapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery are the traditional treatment options for patients with brain metastases. The therapeutic paradigm is changing due to better understanding of the blood brain barrier and the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. Several of these agents are in clinical practice and several others are in early stage clinical trials. In this article, we will review the common targetable pathways in the management of breast cancer patients with brain metastases, and the current state of the clinical development of drugs against these pathways.

  11. Gliomatosis cerebri: no evidence for a separate brain tumor entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrlinger, Ulrich; Jones, David T W; Glas, Martin; Hattingen, Elke; Gramatzki, Dorothee; Stuplich, Moritz; Felsberg, Jörg; Bähr, Oliver; Gielen, Gerrit H; Simon, Matthias; Wiewrodt, Dorothee; Schabet, Martin; Hovestadt, Volker; Capper, David; Steinbach, Joachim P; von Deimling, Andreas; Lichter, Peter; Pfister, Stefan M; Weller, Michael; Reifenberger, Guido

    2016-02-01

    Gliomatosis cerebri (GC) is presently considered a distinct astrocytic glioma entity according to the WHO classification for CNS tumors. It is characterized by widespread, typically bilateral infiltration of the brain involving three or more lobes. Genetic studies of GC have to date been restricted to the analysis of individual glioma-associated genes, which revealed mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and tumor protein p53 (TP53) genes in subsets of patients. Here, we report on a genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation and copy number aberrations in 25 GC patients. Results were compared with those obtained for 105 patients with various types of conventional, i.e., non-GC gliomas including diffuse astrocytic gliomas, oligodendrogliomas and glioblastomas. In addition, we assessed the prognostic role of methylation profiles and recurrent DNA copy number aberrations in GC patients. Our data reveal that the methylation profiles in 23 of the 25 GC tumors corresponded to either IDH mutant astrocytoma (n = 6), IDH mutant and 1p/19q codeleted oligodendroglioma (n = 5), or IDH wild-type glioblastoma including various molecular subgroups, i.e., H3F3A-G34 mutant (n = 1), receptor tyrosine kinase 1 (RTK1, n = 4), receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (classic) (RTK2, n = 2) or mesenchymal (n = 5) glioblastoma groups. Two tumors showed methylation profiles of normal brain tissue due to low tumor cell content. While histological grading (WHO grade IV vs. WHO grade II and III) was not prognostic, the molecular classification as classic/RTK2 or mesenchymal glioblastoma was associated with worse overall survival. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed MGMT promoter methylation as a positive prognostic factor. Taken together, DNA-based large-scale molecular profiling indicates that GC comprises a genetically and epigenetically heterogeneous group of diffuse gliomas that carry DNA methylation and copy number profiles closely matching the common molecularly

  12. Genetic and modifying factors that determine the risk of brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montelli, Terezinha de Cresci Braga; Peraçoli, Maria Terezinha Serrão; Rogatto, Silvia Regina

    2011-01-01

    . Mutagen sensitivity is associated with cancer risk. The convincing studies that linked DNA damages and DNA repair alterations with brain tumors are also described. Another important modifying factor is immunity. General immune response against cancer, tumor microenvironment and immune response, mechanisms...... established that there is association between brain tumor risk and mutagen sensitivity, which is highly heritable. Primary brain tumors cause depression in systemic host immunity; local immuno-suppressive factors and immunological characteristics of tumor cells may explain the poor prognosis and DNA damages...

  13. Preoperative functional mapping for rolandic brain tumor surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Vincenzo; Terranova, Carmen; Conti, Alfredo; Germanò, Antonino; Alafaci, Concetta; Raffa, Giovanni; Girlanda, Paolo; Tomasello, Francesco; Quartarone, Angelo

    2014-11-07

    The resection of tumors within or close to eloquent motor areas is usually guided by the compromise between the maximal allowed resection and preservation of neurological functions. Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) is an emerging technology that can be used for preoperative mapping of the motor cortex. We performed pre-surgical mapping by using nTMS in 17 patients with lesions in or close to the precentral gyrus. The study was conducted on consecutive patients scheduled for surgical treatment. nTMS allowed to exactly localize the motor cortex in 88.2% of cases. In 70.6% it provided the surgeon with new unexpected information about functional anatomy of the motor area, influencing the pre-operative planning. Moreover, in 29.4% these functional information had a clear impact on surgery, making necessary a change of surgical strategy to avoid damage to the motor cortex. Our results prove that nTMS has a large benefit in the treatment of rolandic brain tumors. It adds important information about spatial relationship between functional motor cortex and the tumor and reduces surgical-related post-operative motor deficits. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Investigation of the effects of tumor size and type of radionuclide on tumor curability in targeted radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ranjbar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Targeted radiotherapy is one of the important methods of radiotherapy that involves the use of beta-emitting radionuclides to deliver a dose of radiation to tumor cells. An important feature of this method is the tumor size and the finite range of beta particles emitted as a result of radionuclide disintegration those have significant effects for the curability of tumors. Material and Methods: Monte Carlo simulations and mathematical models have been used to investigate the relationship of curability to tumors size for tumors treated with targeted 131I and 90Y. The model assumed that radionuclides are distributed uniformly throughout tumors. Results: The results show that there is an optimal tumor size for cure. For any given cumulated activity, cure probability is greatest for tumors whose diameter is close to the optimum value. There is a maximum value of curability that occurs at a diameter of approximately 3.5 mm for 131I. For 90Y maximum curability occurs at a tumor diameter of approximately 3.5 cm. Tumors smaller than the optimal size are less vulnerable to irradiation from radionuclides because a significant proportion of the disintegration energy escapes and is deposited outside the tumor volume. Tumors larger than the optimal size are less curable because of greater clonogenic cell number. Conclusion: With single radionuclide targeted radiotherapy, there is an optimal tumor size for tumor cure. It is suggested that single agent targeted radiotherapy should not be used for treatment of disseminated disease when multiple tumors of differing size may be present. The use of several radionuclides concurrently would be more effective than reliance on single radionuclide. This approach of using combination of radionuclides with complementary properties could hopefully prepare new measures and improve the efficiency of tumor therapy.

  15. Development and evaluation of vinpocetine inclusion complex for brain targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaojiao Ding

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to prepare vinpocetine (VIN inclusion complex and evaluate its brain targeting effect after intranasal administration. In the present study, VIN inclusion complex was prepared in order to increase its solubility. Stability constant (Kc was used for host selection. Factors influencing properties of the inclusion complex was investigated. Formation of the inclusion complex was identified by solubility study and DSC analysis. The brain targeting effect of the complex after intranasal administration was studied in rats. It was demonstrated that properties of the inclusion complex was mainly influenced by cyclodextrin type, organic acids type, system pH and host/guest molar ratio. Multiple component complexes can be formed by the addition of citric acid, with solubility improved for more than 23 times. Furthermore, In vivo study revealed that after intranasal administration, the absolute bioavailability of vinpocetine inclusion complex was 88%. Compared with intravenous injection, significant brain targeting effect was achieved after intranasal delivery, with brain targeting index 1.67. In conclusion, by intranasal administration of VIN inclusion complex, a fast onset of action and good brain targeting effect can be achieved. Intranasal route is a promising approach for the treatment of CNS diseases.

  16. Effects of tumor microenvironments on targeted delivery of glycol chitosan nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yhee, Ji Young; Jeon, Sangmin; Yoon, Hong Yeol; Shim, Man Kyu; Ko, Hyewon; Min, Jiwoong; Na, Jin Hee; Chang, Hyeyoun; Han, Hyounkoo; Kim, Jong-Ho; Suh, Minah; Lee, Hyukjin; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan

    2017-12-10

    In cancer theranostics, the main strategy of nanoparticle-based targeted delivery system has been understood by enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect of macromolecules. Studies on diverse nanoparticles provide a better understanding of different EPR effects depending on their structure, physicochemical properties, and chemical modifications. Recently the tumor microenvironment has been considered as another important factor for determining tumor-targeted delivery of nanoparticles, but the correlation between EPR effects and tumor microenvironment has not yet been fully elucidated. Herein, ectopic subcutaneous tumor models presenting different tumor microenvironments were established by inoculation of SCC7, U87, HT29, PC3, and A549 cancer cell lines into athymic nude mice, respectively. In the five different types of tumor-bearing mice, tumor-targeted delivery of self-assembled glycol chitosan nanoparticles (CNPs) were comparatively evaluated to identify the correlation between the tumor microenvironments and targeted delivery of CNPs. As a result, neovascularization and extents of intratumoral extracellular matrix (ECM) were both important in determining the tumor targeted delivery of CNPs. The EPR effect was maximized in the tumors which include large extent of angiogenic blood vessels and low intratumoral ECM content. This comprehensive study provides substantial evidence that the EPR effects based tumor-targeted delivery of nanoparticles can be different depending on the tumor microenvironment in individual tumors. To overcome current limitations in clinical nanomedicine, the tumor microenvironment of the patients and EPR effects in clinical tumors should also be carefully studied. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of immune microenvironments between primary tumors and brain metastases in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiya, Rin; Niikura, Naoki; Kumaki, Nobue; Yasojima, Hiroyuki; Iwasa, Tsutomu; Kanbayashi, Chizuko; Oshitanai, Risa; Tsuneizumi, Michiko; Watanabe, Ken-Ichi; Matsui, Akira; Fujisawa, Tomomi; Saji, Shigehira; Masuda, Norikazu; Tokuda, Yutaka; Iwata, Hiroji

    2017-11-28

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are reported to be effective in patients with brain metastases. However, detailed characteristics of the brain metastasis immune microenvironment remain unexplored. The median tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) category in brain metastases was 5% (1-70%). In 46 pair-matched samples, the percentages of TILs were significantly higher in primary breast tumors than in brain metastases (paired t-test, P L1, PD-L2, and HLA class I was also performed. There are significantly fewer TILs in brain metastases than in primary breast tumors.

  18. Brain connectivity study of brain tumor patients using MR-PET data: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Ana Carina [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences of the University of Lisbon (Portugal); Ribeiro, Andre Santos [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences of the University of Lisbon (Portugal); Centre for Neuropsychopharmacology, Division of Brain Sciences, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Oros-Peusquens, Ana Maria; Langen, Karl Josef; Shah, Jon [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine - 4, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Ferreira, Hugo Alexandre [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences of the University of Lisbon (Portugal)

    2015-05-18

    Brain activity results from anatomical and functional connections that can be disrupted or altered due to trauma or lesion. This work presents a first approach on the study of whole-brain connectivity of brain tumor patients using the Multimodal Imaging Brain Connectivity (MIBCA) toolbox. Two patients with glioblastoma lesions located in the left hemisphere (one in the motor cortex and the other in the temporal lobe) underwent simultaneous MRI and dynamic PET scans using a 3T MRI scanner with a BrainPET insert. The following data was acquired: T1-w MPRAGE (1x1x1mm{sup 3}), DTI (dir=30, b=0,800s/mm2, 2x2x2mm{sup 3}), and dynamic 18F-FET PET. The MIBCA toolbox was used to automatically pre-process MRI-PET data and to derive imaging and connectivity metrics from the multimodal data. Computed metrics included: cortical thickness from T1-w data; mean diffusivity (MD), fractional anisotropy (FA), node degree, clustering coefficient and pairwise ROI fibre tracking (structural connectivity) from DTI data; and standardized uptake value (SUV) from PET data. For all the metrics, the differences between left and right hemispherical structures were obtained, followed by a 25% threshold (except for SUV thresholded at 15%). Data was visualized in a connectogram, and both structural connectivity and metrics were studied in regions surrounding lesions. Preliminary results showed increased SUV values in regions surrounding the tumor for both patients. Patients also showed changes in structural connectivity involving these regions and also other more spatially distant regions such as the putamen and the pallidum, including decreased number of fibers between the subcortical structures themselves and with frontal regions. These findings suggest that the presence of a tumor may alter both local and more distant structural connections. Presently, a larger patient sample is being studied along with the inclusion of a control group to test the consistency of the findings.

  19. MicroRNA Signatures as Biomarkers and Therapeutic Target for CNS Embryonal Tumors: The Pros and the Cons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek Shalaby

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Embryonal tumors of the central nervous system represent a heterogeneous group of childhood cancers with an unknown pathogenesis; diagnosis, on the basis of histological appearance alone, is controversial and patients’ response to therapy is difficult to predict. They encompass medulloblastoma, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors and a group of primitive neuroectodermal tumors. All are aggressive tumors with the tendency to disseminate throughout the central nervous system. The large amount of genomic and molecular data generated over the last 5–10 years encourages optimism that new molecular targets will soon improve outcomes. Recent neurobiological studies have uncovered the key role of microRNAs (miRNAs in embryonal tumors biology and their potential use as biomarkers is increasingly being recognized and investigated. However the successful use of microRNAs as reliable biomarkers for the detection and management of pediatric brain tumors represents a substantial challenge. This review debates the importance of miRNAs in the biology of central nervous systemembryonal tumors focusing on medulloblastoma and atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors and highlights the advantages as well as the limitations of their prospective application as biomarkers and candidates for molecular therapeutic targets.

  20. Spectroscopic optical coherence tomography for ex vivo brain tumor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Marcel; Krug, Robin; Dillmann, Christopher; Gerling, Alexandra; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Welp, Hubert; Schmieder, Kirsten; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2017-02-01

    For neurosurgeries precise tumor resection is essential for the subsequent recovery of the patients since nearby healthy tissue that may be harmed has a huge impact on the life quality after the surgery. However, so far no satisfying methodology has been established to assist the surgeon during surgery to distinguish between healthy and tumor tissue. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) potentially enables non-contact in vivo image acquisition at penetration depths of 1-2 mm with a resolution of approximately 1-15 μm. To analyze the potential of OCT for distinction between brain tumors and healthy tissue, we used a commercially available Thorlabs Callisto system to measure healthy tissue and meningioma samples ex vivo. All samples were measured with the OCT system and three dimensional datasets were generated. Afterwards they were sent to the pathology for staining with hematoxylin and eosin and then investigated with a bright field microscope to verify the tissue type. This is the actual gold standard for ex vivo analysis. The images taken by the OCT system exhibit variations in the structure for different tissue types, but these variations may not be objectively evaluated from raw OCT images. Since an automated distinction between tumor and healthy tissue would be highly desirable to guide the surgeon, we applied Spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography to further enhance the differences between the tissue types. Pattern recognition and machine learning algorithms were applied to classify the derived spectroscopic information. Finally, the classification results are analyzed in comparison to the histological analysis of the samples.

  1. Determination of intra-axial brain tumors cellularity through the analysis of T2 Relaxation time of brain tumors before surgery using MATLAB software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolmohammadi, Jamil; Shafiee, Mohsen; Faeghi, Fariborz; Arefan, Douman; Zali, Alireza; Motiei-Langroudi, Rouzbeh; Farshidfar, Zahra; Nazarlou, Ali Kiani; Tavakkoli, Ali; Yarham, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    Timely diagnosis of brain tumors could considerably affect the process of patient treatment. To do so, para-clinical methods, particularly MRI, cannot be ignored. MRI has so far answered significant questions regarding tumor characteristics, as well as helping neurosurgeons. In order to detect the tumor cellularity, neuro-surgeons currently have to sample specimens by biopsy and then send them to the pathology unit. The aim of this study is to determine the tumor cellularity in the brain. In this cross-sectional study, 32 patients (18 males and 14 females from 18-77 y/o) were admitted to the neurosurgery department of Shohada-E Tajrish Hospital in Tehran, Iran from April 2012 to February 2014. In addition to routine pulse sequences, T2W Multi echo pulse sequences were taken and the images were analyzed using the MATLAB software to determine the brain tumor cellularity, compared with the biopsy. These findings illustrate the need for more T2 relaxation time decreases, the higher classes of tumors will stand out in the designed table. In this study, the results show T2 relaxation time with a 85% diagnostic weight, compared with the biopsy, to determine the brain tumor cellularity (p<0.05). Our results indicate that the T2 relaxation time feature is the best method to distinguish and present the degree of intra-axial brain tumors cellularity (85% accuracy compared to biopsy). The use of more data is recommended in order to increase the percent accuracy of this techniques.

  2. The Profile of Tumor Antigens Which Can be Targeted by Immunotherapy Depends Upon the Tumor's Anatomical Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Rajani, Karishma; Kottke, Timothy; Rommelfanger-Konkol, Diana; Zaidi, Shane; Thompson, Jill; Pulido, Jose; Ilett, Elizabeth; Donnelly, Oliver; Selby, Peter; Pandha, Hardev; Melcher, Alan; Harrington, Kevin; Diaz, Rosa Maria; Vile, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we showed that vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) engineered to express a cDNA library from human melanoma cells (ASMEL, Altered Self Melanoma Epitope Library) was an effective systemic therapy to treat subcutaneous (s.c.) murine B16 melanomas. Here, we show that intravenous treatment with the same ASMEL VSV-cDNA library was an effective treatment for established intra-cranial (i.c.) melanoma brain tumors. The optimal combination of antigens identified from the ASMEL which treated s.c. B16 tumors (VSV-N-RAS+VSV-CYTC-C+VSV-TYRP-1) was ineffective against i.c. B16 brain tumors. In contrast, combination of VSV-expressed antigens—VSV-HIF-2α+VSV-SOX-10+VSV-C-MYC+VSV-TYRP1—from ASMEL which was highly effective against i.c. B16 brain tumors, had no efficacy against the same tumors growing subcutaneously. Correspondingly, i.c. B16 tumors expressed a HIF-2αHi, SOX-10Hi, c-mycHi, TYRP1, N-RASloCytclo antigen profile, which differed significantly from the HIF-2αlo, SOX-10lo, c-myclo, TYRP1, N-RASHiCytcHi phenotype of s.c. B16 tumors, and was imposed upon the tumor cells by CD11b+ cells within the local brain tumor microenvironment. Combining T-cell costimulation with systemic VSV-cDNA treatment, long-term cures of mice with established i.c. tumors were achieved in about 75% of mice. Our data show that the anatomical location of a tumor profoundly affects the profile of antigens that it expresses. PMID:25059678

  3. Development of risperidone liposomes for brain targeting through intranasal route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Reema; Singh, Mohan; Ranjan, OmPrakash; Nayak, Yogendra; Garg, Sanjay; Shavi, Gopal V; Nayak, Usha Y

    2016-10-15

    The present paper is aimed at development of functionalized risperidone liposomes for brain targeting through nasal route for effective therapeutic management of schizophrenia. The risperidone liposomes were prepared by thin film hydration method. Various parameters such as lipid ratio and lipid to drug ratio were optimized by using Design-Expert(®) Software to obtain high entrapment with minimum vesicle size. The surface of the optimized liposomes was modified by coating stearylamine and MPEG-DSPE for enhanced penetration to the brain. The formulations were evaluated for vesicle size, zeta potential, and entrapment efficiency. The morphology was studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). In vivo efficacy was assessed by performing pharmacokinetic study in Wistar albino rats following intranasal administration of the formulations in comparison to intravenous bolus administration of pure drug. The mean vesicle size of optimized liposomes ranged from 90 to 100nm with low polydispersity index (risperidone into the brain than plasma. High brain targeting efficiency index for LP-16 indicating preferential transport of the drug to brain. The study demonstrated successful formulation of surface modified risperidone liposomes for nasal delivery with brain targeting potential. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mutant IDH1 Disrupts the Mouse Subventricular Zone and Alters Brain Tumor Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirozzi, Christopher J; Carpenter, Austin B; Waitkus, Matthew S; Wang, Catherine Y; Zhu, Huishan; Hansen, Landon J; Chen, Lee H; Greer, Paula K; Feng, Jie; Wang, Yu; Bock, Cheryl B; Fan, Ping; Spasojevic, Ivan; McLendon, Roger E; Bigner, Darell D; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai

    2017-05-01

    IDH1 mutations occur in the majority of low-grade gliomas and lead to the production of the oncometabolite, D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG). To understand the effects of tumor-associated mutant IDH1 (IDH1-R132H) on both the neural stem cell (NSC) population and brain tumorigenesis, genetically faithful cell lines and mouse model systems were generated. Here, it is reported that mouse NSCs expressing Idh1-R132H displayed reduced proliferation due to p53-mediated cell-cycle arrest as well as a decreased ability to undergo neuronal differentiation. In vivo , Idh1-R132H expression reduced proliferation of cells within the germinal zone of the subventricular zone (SVZ). The NSCs within this area were dispersed and disorganized in mutant animals, suggesting that Idh1-R132H perturbed the NSCs and the microenvironment from which gliomas arise. In addition, tumor-bearing animals expressing mutant Idh1 displayed a prolonged survival and also overexpressed Olig2, features consistent with IDH1-mutated human gliomas. These data indicate that mutant Idh1 disrupts the NSC microenvironment and the candidate cell-of-origin for glioma; thus, altering the progression of tumorigenesis. In addition, this study provides a mutant Idh1 brain tumor model that genetically recapitulates human disease, laying the foundation for future investigations on mutant IDH1 -mediated brain tumorigenesis and targeted therapy. Implications: Through the use of a conditional mutant mouse model that confers a less aggressive tumor phenotype, this study reveals that mutant Idh1 impacts the candidate cell-of-origin for gliomas. Mol Cancer Res; 15(5); 507-20. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Radiotherapy, especially at young age, increases the risk for de novo brain tumors in patients treated for pituitary tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burman, Pia; Van Beek, André P.; Biller, Beverly M.K.; Camacho-Hubner, Cecilia; Mattsson, Anders F.

    Background: Excess mortality due to de novo malignant brain tumors was recently found in a national study of patients with hypopituitarism following treatment of pituitary tumors. Here, we examined a larger multi-national cohort to corroborate and extend this observation. Objective: To investigate

  6. Doxycycline directly targets PAR1 to suppress tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Weilong; Chen, Shuang; Zhang, Qiang; Xiao, Ting; Qin, Yuan; Gu, Ju; Sun, Bo; Liu, Yanrong; Jing, Xiangyan; Hu, Xuejiao; Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Honggang; Sun, Tao; Yang, Cheng

    2017-03-07

    Doxycycline have been reported to exert anti-cancer activity and have been assessed as anti-cancer agents in clinical trials. However, the direct targets of doxycycline in cancer cells remain unclear. In this study, we used a chemical proteomics approach to identify the Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) as a specific target of inhibition of doxycycline. Binding assays and single-molecule imaging assays were performed to confirm the inhibition of doxycycline to PAR1. The effect of doxycycline on multi-omics and cell functions were assessed based on a PAR1/thrombin model. Molecular docking and molecular dynamic simulations revealed that doxycycline interacts with key amino acids in PAR1. Mutation of PAR1 further confirmed the computation-based results. Moreover, doxycycline provides highly selective inhibition of PAR1 signaling in tumors in vitro and in vivo. Using pathological clinical samples co-stained for doxycycline and PAR1, it was found that doxycycline fluorescence intensity and PAR1 expression shown a clear positive correlation. Thus, doxycycline may be a useful targeted anti-cancer drug that should be further investigated in clinical trials.

  7. Role of magnetic resonance spectroscopy & diffusion weighted imaging in differentiation of supratentorial brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel Monem Nooman Darwiesh

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Intra-lesional ADC values are not useful in the differentiation between primary and metastatic tumors. Perilesional ADC values can differentiate between primary & metastatic brain tumors. Intralesional MRS values (CHO/Cr ratio were able to grade the tumor and differentiate between high and low grade tumors, while Perilesional MRS values (CHO/Cr ratio could be able to differentiate primary tumors from metastasis.

  8. A murine model for virotherapy of malignant brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gambini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas (GBMs are very aggressive and almost incurable brain tumors. The development of new therapeutical approaches capable of selectively killing cancer cells could represent a step forward to fight cancer. With this aim we tested the efficacy of a novel oncolytic therapy based on recombinant herpes simplex viruses (HSVs infecting exclusively cells expressing the human receptor HER-2 [1, 2], overexpressed in about 15% of GBM model based on PDGF-B embryonic transduction [4, 5]. We engineered cell cultures derived from this model to express HER-2 and we injected intracranically such cultures in NOD/SCID mice. We evaluated the efficacy of R-LM113, a recombinant HSV directed to HER-2, in this glioma model expressing HER-2. We demostrated that mice injected with engineered glioma cells infected with R-LM113 developed glioma with a statistically significant delay compared to mice injected with non-infected engineered glioma cells.

  9. Significant predictors of patients' uncertainty in primary brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Chien, Lung-Chang; Acquaye, Alvina A; Vera-Bolanos, Elizabeth; Gilbert, Mark R; Armstrong, Terri S

    2015-05-01

    Patients with primary brain tumors (PBT) face uncertainty related to prognosis, symptoms and treatment response and toxicity. Uncertainty is correlated to negative mood states and symptom severity and interference. This study identified predictors of uncertainty during different treatment stages (newly-diagnosed, on treatment, followed-up without active treatment). One hundred eighty six patients with PBT were accrued at various points in the illness trajectory. Data collection tools included: a clinical checklist/a demographic data sheet/the Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale-Brain Tumor Form. The structured additive regression model was used to identify significant demographic and clinical predictors of illness-related uncertainty. Participants were primarily white (80 %) males (53 %). They ranged in age from 19-80 (mean = 44.2 ± 12.6). Thirty-two of the 186 patients were newly-diagnosed, 64 were on treatment at the time of clinical visit with MRI evaluation, 21 were without MRI, and 69 were not on active treatment. Three subscales (ambiguity/inconsistency; unpredictability-disease prognoses; unpredictability-symptoms and other triggers) were different amongst the treatment groups (P uncertainty during active treatment was as high as in newly-diagnosed period. Other than treatment stages, change of employment status due to the illness was the most significant predictor of illness-related uncertainty. The illness trajectory of PBT remains ambiguous, complex, and unpredictable, leading to a high incidence of uncertainty. There was variation in the subscales of uncertainty depending on treatment status. Although patients who are newly diagnosed reported the highest scores on most of the subscales, patients on treatment felt more uncertain about unpredictability of symptoms than other groups. Due to the complexity and impact of the disease, associated symptoms, and interference with functional status, comprehensive assessment of patients is necessary throughout the

  10. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallery, F.; Michel, D.; Constans, J.M.; Gondry-Jouet, C. [University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Amiens (France); Bouzerar, R.; Promelle, V.; Baledent, O. [University Hospital, Department of Imaging and Biophysics, Amiens (France); Attencourt, C. [University Hospital, Departement of Pathology, Amiens (France); Peltier, J. [University Hospital, Departement of Neurosurgery, Amiens (France)

    2017-11-15

    The use of DSC-MR imaging in pediatric neuroradiology is gradually growing. However, the number of studies listed in the literature remains limited. We propose to assess the perfusion and permeability parameters in pediatric brain tumor grading. Thirty children with a brain tumor having benefited from a DSC-MR perfusion sequence have been retrospectively explored. Relative CBF and CBV were computed on the ROI with the largest lesion coverage. Assessment of the lesion's permeability was also performed through the semi-quantitative PSR parameter and the K2 model-based parameter on the whole-lesion ROI and a reduced ROI drawn on the permeability maps. A statistical comparison of high- and low-grade groups (HG, LG) as well as a ROC analysis was performed on the histogram-based parameters. Our results showed a statistically significant difference between LG and HG groups for mean rCBV (p < 10{sup -3}), rCBF (p < 10{sup -3}), and for PSR (p = 0.03) but not for the K2 factor (p = 0.5). However, the ratio K2/PSR was shown to be a strong discriminating factor between the two groups of lesions (p < 10{sup -3}). For rCBV and rCBF indicators, high values of ROC AUC were obtained (> 0.9) and mean value thresholds were observed at 1.07 and 1.03, respectively. For K2/PSR in the reduced area, AUC was also superior to 0.9. The implementation of a dynamic T2* perfusion sequence provided reliable results using an objective whole-lesion ROI. Perfusion parameters as well as a new permeability indicator could efficiently discriminate high-grade from low-grade lesions in the pediatric population. (orig.)

  11. Cerebral effect of acute normovolemic hemodilution during brain tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daif, Ahmed Attia Atwa; Hassan, Younis Mohamed Abd El Mageed; Ghareeb, Nawal Abd El-Galil; Othman, Mahmoud Mahmoud; Mohamed, Sherif Abdo Mousa

    2012-01-01

    Acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH) is used in major surgery expected to be accompanied by excessive blood loss. Reducing the hemoglobin content may disturb cerebral oxygen balance. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of ANH on cerebral oxygen balance in patients subjected to brain tumor resection. Forty patients were randomly allocated into 2 groups (hemodilution and control). In the hemodilution group (HG), 1000 mL of blood was drawn and replaced with the same volume of HES 130/0.4 (6%, Voluven) colloid. In the control group (CG), no blood was drawn, and hemodynamics were stabilized using normal saline until allogenic blood was needed. Arterial and jugular bulb blood samples obtained after induction (basal, sample 1), 40 minutes after induction (or on completion of hemodilution, sample 2), after surgical hemostasis (sample 3), and just before extubation (sample 4) were used for the calculation of arterial-jugular oxygen content difference "Ca-jO(2)," cerebral oxygen extraction "CEO(2)," estimated cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen "eCMRO(2)," cerebral blood flow equivalent "CBFe," and jugular-arterial lactate difference "J-ALD" in both groups. Jugular oxygen saturation "SjvO(2)", CEO(2), and J-ALD showed no significant difference when the 2 groups were compared at the corresponding time points and when the values obtained at different time points were compared with the basal value in the same group. In CG, "Ca-jO(2)" significantly decreased at the end of surgery and before tracheal extubation (Pcerebral oxygenation parameters in patients subjected to brain tumor resection.

  12. UPA-sensitive ACPP-conjugated nanoparticles for multi-targeting therapy of brain glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Yujie; Liao, Ziwei; Jiang, Ting; Zhao, Jingjing; Tuo, Yanyan; She, Xiaojian; Shen, Shun; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Qizhi; Jiang, Xinguo; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing

    2015-01-01

    Now it is well evidenced that tumor growth is a comprehensive result of multiple pathways, and glioma parenchyma cells and stroma cells are closely associated and mutually compensatory. Therefore, drug delivery strategies targeting both of them simultaneously might obtain more promising therapeutic benefits. In the present study, we developed a multi-targeting drug delivery system modified with uPA-activated cell-penetrating peptide (ACPP) for the treatment of brain glioma (ANP). In vitro experiments demonstrated nanoparticles (NP) decorated with cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) or ACPP could significantly improve nanoparticles uptake by C6 glioma cells and nanoparticles penetration into glioma spheroids as compared with traditional NP and thus enhanced the therapeutic effects of its payload when paclitaxel (PTX) was loaded. In vivo imaging experiment revealed that ANP accumulated more specifically in brain glioma site than NP decorated with or without CPP. Brain slides further showed that ACPP contributed to more nanoparticles accumulation in glioma site, and ANP could co-localize not only with glioma parenchyma cells, but also with stroma cells including neo-vascular cells and tumor associated macrophages. The pharmacodynamics results demonstrated ACPP could significantly improve the therapeutic benefits of nanoparticles by significantly prolonging the survival time of glioma bearing mice. In conclusion, the results suggested that nanoparticles modified with uPA-sensitive ACPP could reach multiple types of cells in glioma tissues and provide a novel strategy for glioma targeted therapy.

  13. Brain Tumor Epidemiology - A Hub within Multidisciplinary Neuro-oncology. Report on the 15th Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC) Annual Meeting, Vienna, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woehrer, Adelheid; Lau, Ching C; Prayer, Daniela; Bauchet, Luc; Rosenfeld, Myrna; Capper, David; Fisher, Paul G; Kool, Marcel; Müller, Martin; Kros, Johan M; Kruchko, Carol; Wiemels, Joseph; Wrensch, Margaret; Danysh, Heather E; Zouaoui, Sonia; Heck, Julia E; Johnson, Kimberly J; Qi, Xiaoyang; O'Neill, Brian P; Afzal, Samina; Scheurer, Michael E; Bainbridge, Matthew N; Nousome, Darryl; Bahassi, El Mustapha; Hainfellner, Johannes A; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S

    2015-01-01

    The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC) is an open scientific forum, which fosters the development of multi-center, international and inter-disciplinary collaborations. BTEC aims to develop a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors (http://epi.grants.cancer.gov/btec/). The 15th annual Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium Meeting, hosted by the Austrian Societies of Neuropathology and Neuro-oncology, was held on September 9 - 11, 2014 in Vienna, Austria. The meeting focused on the central role of brain tumor epidemiology within multidisciplinary neuro-oncology. Knowledge of disease incidence, outcomes, as well as risk factors is fundamental to all fields involved in research and treatment of patients with brain tumors; thus, epidemiology constitutes an important link between disciplines, indeed the very hub. This was reflected by the scientific program, which included various sessions linking brain tumor epidemiology with clinical neuro-oncology, tissue-based research, and cancer registration. Renowned experts from Europe and the United States contributed their personal perspectives stimulating further group discussions. Several concrete action plans evolved for the group to move forward until next year's meeting, which will be held at the Mayo Clinic at Rochester, MN, USA.

  14. Blood-brain barrier transport machineries and targeted therapy of brain diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Barar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Desired clinical outcome of pharmacotherapy of brain diseases largely depends upon the safe drug delivery into the brain parenchyma. However, due to the robust blockade function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, drug transport into the brain is selectively controlled by the BBB formed by brain capillary endothelial cells and supported by astrocytes and pericytes. Methods: In the current study, we have reviewed the most recent literature on the subject to provide an insight upon the role and impacts of BBB on brain drug delivery and targeting. Results: All drugs, either small molecules or macromolecules, designated to treat brain diseases must adequately cross the BBB to provide their therapeutic properties on biological targets within the central nervous system (CNS. However, most of these pharmaceuticals do not sufficiently penetrate into CNS, failing to meet the intended therapeutic outcomes. Most lipophilic drugs capable of penetrating BBB are prone to the efflux functionality of BBB. In contrast, all hydrophilic drugs are facing severe infiltration blockage imposed by the tight cellular junctions of the BBB. Hence, a number of strategies have been devised to improve the efficiency of brain drug delivery and targeted therapy of CNS disorders using multimodal nanosystems (NSs. Conclusion: In order to improve the therapeutic outcomes of CNS drug transfer and targeted delivery, the discriminatory permeability of BBB needs to be taken under control. The carrier-mediated transport machineries of brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs can be exploited for the discovery, development and delivery of small molecules into the brain. Further, the receptor-mediated transport systems can be recruited for the delivery of macromolecular biologics and multimodal NSs into the brain.

  15. The efficiency of adjusted-da-chai-ling-tang in radiation-induced brain edema in patients with brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Tong Ju

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brain edema induced by radiotherapy is a common complication in patients with brain tumors, for which medical treatment is the treatment of choice. Adjusted-Da-Chai-Ling-Tang, a Chinese herbal formulation, has been confirmed to be protective against the radiation-induced edema. In this study, we investigated the efficiency of adjusted-Da-Chai-Ling-Tang in radiation-induced brain edema in patients with brain tumors. Materials and Methods: A total of 46 patients with brain tumors treated with radiotherapy alone or combined with surgery were enrolled. These patients were divided into two groups: The experimental group with adjusted-Da-Chai-Ling-Tang and the control group with conventional medical treatment. Clinical data including symptoms and serologic results were collected pretreatment and on the 4 th , 7 th and 10 th day posttreatment. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was performed to investigate changes in brain edema. Results: Clinical symptoms including headache, dizziness, nausea/vomiting and fatigue significantly improved in the experimental group (P < 0.05. No difference in serological results was observed. Brain edema was significantly reduced in the experimental group in magnetic resonance imaging (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Adjusted-Da-Chai-Ling-Tang is effective in the treatment of radiation-induced brain edema in patients with brain tumors. No obvious side effects were observed.

  16. Overcoming the blood-brain tumor barrier for effective glioblastoma treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tellingen, O. van; Yetkin-Arik, B.; Gooijer, M.C. de; Wesseling, P.; Wurdinger, T.; Vries, H.E. de

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. Particularly in adult patients, the vast majority of gliomas belongs to the heterogeneous group of diffuse gliomas, i.e. glial tumors characterized by diffuse infiltrative growth in the preexistent brain tissue. Unfortunately, glioblastoma, the most

  17. Timed performance weaknesses on computerized tasks in pediatric brain tumor survivors: A comparison with sibling controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, M.A. de; Grootenhuis, M.A.; Mourik, R. van; Maurice-Stam, H.; Breteler, M.H.M.; Gidding, C.E.M.; Beek, L.R.; Granzen, B.; Vuurden, D.G. van; Schouten-van Meeteren, A.Y.N.; Oosterlaan, J.

    2017-01-01

    With more children surviving a brain tumor, insight into the late effects of the disease and treatment is of high importance. This study focused on profiling the neurocognitive functions that might be affected after treatment for a pediatric brain tumor, using a broad battery of computerized tests.

  18. Health-related quality of life in long-term survivors of childhood brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, Tonny Solveig; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Nysom, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To identify predictors for health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in survivors of childhood brain tumors and its relationship to cognitive function. PROCEDURE: One hundred twenty-six consecutive Danish childhood brain tumor patients treated 1970-1997 and being 7.9-40.4 years at follow...

  19. Brain tumors in children and adolescents and exposure to animals and farm life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeppe Schultz; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Röösli, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The etiology of brain tumors in children and adolescents is largely unknown, and very few environmental risk factors have been identified. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between pre- or postnatal animal contacts or farm exposures and the risk of childhood brain tumors (CBTs...

  20. Caring for patients with brain tumor: The patient and care giver ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Patients with brain tumors form a heterogeneous group in terms of clinical presentation and pathology. However, the impact of the disease on patients' families is often more homogenous and frequently quite profound. A considerable body of literature is available on the management of brain tumors and ...

  1. Cognitive deficits in long-term survivors of childhood brain tumors: Identification of predictive factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, Tonny Solveig; Ehrenfels, Susanne; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2003-01-01

    To describe cognitive function and to evaluate the association between potentially predictive factors and cognitive outcome in an unselected population of survivors of childhood brain tumors.......To describe cognitive function and to evaluate the association between potentially predictive factors and cognitive outcome in an unselected population of survivors of childhood brain tumors....

  2. RGD and interleukin-13 peptide functionalized nanoparticles for enhanced glioblastoma cells and neovasculature dual targeting delivery and elevated tumor penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Huile; Xiong, Yang; Zhang, Shuang; Yang, Zhi; Cao, Shijie; Jiang, Xinguo

    2014-03-03

    As the most common malignant brain tumors, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was characterized by angiogenesis and tumor cells proliferation. Dual targeting to neovasculature and GBM cells could deliver cargoes to these two kinds of cells, leading to a combination treatment. In this study, polymeric nanoparticles were functionalized with RGD and interleukin-13 peptide (IRNPs) to construct a neovasculature and tumor cell dual targeting delivery system in which RGD could target αvβ3 on neovasculature and interleukin-13 peptide could target IL13Rα2 on GBM cells. In vitro, interleukin-13 peptide and RGD could enhance the uptake by corresponding cells (C6 and human umbilical vein endothelial cells). Due to the expression of both receptors on C6 cells, RGD also could enhance the uptake by C6 cells. Through receptor labeling, it clearly showed that αvβ3 could mediate the internalization of RGD modified nanoparticles and IL13Rα2 could mediate the internalization of interleukin-13 peptide modified nanoparticles. The ligand functionalization also resulted in a modification on endocytosis pathways, which changed the main endocytosis pathways from macropinocytosis for unmodified nanoparticles to clathrin-mediated endocytosis for IRNPs. IRNPs also displayed the strongest penetration ability according to tumor spheroid analysis. In vivo, IRNPs could effectively deliver cargoes to GBM with higher intensity than monomodified nanoparticles. After CD31-staining, it demonstrated IRNPs could target both neovasculature and GBM cells. In conclusion, IRNPs showed promising ability in dual targeting both neovasculature and GBM cells.

  3. MicorRNA targeting to modulate tumor microenvironment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuninty, Praneeth Reddy; Schnittert, Jonas; Storm, Gerrit; Prakash, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Communication between stromal cells and tumor cells initiates tumor growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Stromal cells include cancer-associated fibroblasts, tumor-associated macrophages, pericytes, endothelial cells, and infiltrating immune cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) in the tumor

  4. MicroRNA targeting to modulate tumor microenvironment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuninty, Praneeth R.; Schnittert, Jonas; Storm, G|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073356328; Prakash, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Communication between stromal cells and tumor cells initiates tumor growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Stromal cells include cancer-associated fibroblasts, tumor-associated macrophages, pericytes, endothelial cells, and infiltrating immune cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) in the tumor

  5. Analysis of tumor- and stroma-supplied proteolytic networks reveals a brain metastasis-promoting role for cathepsin S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevenich, Lisa; Bowman, Robert L.; Mason, Steven D.; Quail, Daniela F.; Rapaport, Franck; Elie, Benelita T.; Brogi, Edi; Brastianos, Priscilla K.; Hahn, William C.; Holsinger, Leslie J.; Massagué, Joan; Leslie, Christina S.; Joyce, Johanna A.

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis remains the most common cause of death in most cancers, with limited therapies for combating disseminated disease. While the primary tumor microenvironment is an important regulator of cancer progression, it is less well understood how different tissue environments influence metastasis. We analyzed tumor-stroma interactions that modulate organ tropism of brain, bone and lung metastasis in xenograft models. We identified a number of potential modulators of site-specific metastasis, including cathepsin S as a regulator of breast-to-brain metastasis. High cathepsin S expression at the primary site correlated with decreased brain metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients. Both macrophages and tumor cells produce cathepsin S, and only the combined depletion significantly reduced brain metastasis in vivo. Cathepsin S specifically mediates blood-brain barrier transmigration via proteolytic processing of the junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-B. Pharmacological inhibition of cathepsin S significantly reduced experimental brain metastasis, supporting its consideration as a therapeutic target for this disease. PMID:25086747

  6. [A case of cerebral syphilitic gumma mimicking a brain tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamauchi, Akiko; Abe, Takenori; Nihira, Atsuko; Mizobuchi, Masahiro; Sako, Kazuya; Ito, Tamio

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of young immunocompetent woman who was presented with a left parieto-temporal mass as the first and single manifestation of syphilis. A 23 year-old woman with no significant past medical history was reffered to our hospital due to 3 month history of headache. She had a single unprotected sexual intercourse with a promiscuous man 6 month before the time of admission. Physical and neurological examinations revealed no obvious abnormalities. A brain tumor was firstly suggested according to the findings of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, the serologic and cerebrospinal fluid test of syphilis proved to be positive, syphilitic gumma was most likely suspected. She responded dramatically to benzylpenicillin potassium. Cerebral syphilitic gumma is a rare manifestations of the neurosyphilis. Treponemal invasion of the cerebrospinal fluid occurs in approximately 25 to 60% of patients after the infection, but most cases spend asymptomatic. Cerebral gumma should be considered in differential diagnosis of any intracranial mass lesions, even in the early syphilitic stages.

  7. Recent Advances and Strategies in Tumor Vasculature Targeted Nano-Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Man; Chen, Guanyu; Lu, Weiyue

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, targeted nano-drug delivery systems have attracted extensive attention in cancer therapy for their efficient drug delivery and tumor site specificity. Tumor vasculature, including angiogenesis and vasculogenic mimicry is associated tightly with tumor growth, progression and metastasis. Therefore, nano-drug delivery systems targeting tumor vasculature are becoming a promising approach for tumor treatment. As complicated mechanisms and various factors are involved in the tumor vasculature, different ligands modified on the surface of nanocarriers acquire active targeting through binding to the receptors over-expressed by cancer cells or angiogenic endothelial cells. In this review, the tumor vasculature characteristics are briefly described and the recent advances and potential strategies in tumor vasculature targeted nano-drug delivery systems are introduced.

  8. (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/Computed Tomography for Primary Brain Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen Segtnan, Eivind; Hess, Søren; Grupe, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Structural imaging with computed tomography (CT) and MR imaging is the mainstay in primary diagnosis of primary brain tumors, but these modalities depend on morphologic appearance and an intact blood-brain barrier, and important aspects of tumor biology are not addressed. Such issues may...... be alleviated by (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET and FDG-PET/CT imaging, which may provide clinically important information with regard to primary differentiation between tumor types, initial staging and risk stratification, therapy planning, response evaluation, and recurrence detection. This article...... describes some of the potential contemporary applications of FDG and PET in primary brain tumors....

  9. Glycoengineered mesenchymal stem cells as an enabling platform for two-step targeting of solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layek, Buddhadev; Sadhukha, Tanmoy; Prabha, Swayam

    2016-05-01

    Current tumor targeted drug and diagnostic delivery systems suffer from a lack of selectivity for tumor cells. Here, we propose a two-step tumor targeting strategy based on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which actively traffic to tumors. We developed glycoengineering protocols to induce expression of non-natural azide groups on the surface of MSCs without affecting their viability or tumor homing properties. Glycoengineered MSCs demonstrated active tumor homing in subcutaneous and orthotopic lung and ovarian tumor models. Subsequent systemic administration of dibenzyl cyclooctyne (DBCO)-labeled fluorophores or nanoparticles to MSC pretreated mice resulted in enhanced tumor accumulation of these agents through bio-orthogonal copper-free click chemistry. Further, administration of glycoengineered MSCs along with paclitaxel-loaded DBCO-functionalized nanoparticles resulted in significant (p step targeting strategy to improve the tumor specificity of diagnostic agents and drugs, and thus potentially improve the treatment outcomes for patients diagnosed with cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Separation of the tumor and brain surface by "water jet" in cases of meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, S; Vajda, J; Pasztor, E; Toth, Z

    1987-01-01

    In the surgery of meningiomas one of the most delicate problems is the separation of the tumor from the brain surface. The authors generally recommend microsurgery to preserve the brain surface anatomically and functionally. For this purpose we have developed a new surgical technique according to our concepts of tissue care. After excavating the tumor from inside the tumor brain surface was separated by repeated "water jets" into the tumor arachnoideal space. The "water jet" was produced by an ordinary bulb syringe. The front pressure of the jets was 300-1000 mm of water and the side pressure 100-300 mm of water. In the tumor-arachnoideal space the spreading water (phys. NaCl) separates the brain from the tumor with utmost care. We operated on 55 meningiomas of different types with the "water jet" technique. The immediate results were anatomically excellent. Intraoperative and postoperative acute and late edemas appeared only in a few cases. The functions of the nearby brain were generally preserved. The surgery was uneventful when the tumor surface was smooth and the tumor was spherical. When the tumor surface was uneven, one part of the tumor extended under the dura as a thin layer or the tumor was multilobulated with expanded vessels between the lobules, more microseparation was necessary. We compared the results of the "water jet" technique with the results of the "pre-water jet" series. The surgery with the "water jet" technique was much shorter and its results were better than those of microsurgery alone.

  11. Tumor-specific RNA interference targeting Pokemon suppresses tumor growth and induces apoptosis in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yining; Xu, Shuxiong; Wang, Xiangwei; Shi, Hua; Sun, Zhaolin; Yang, Zhao

    2013-02-01

    To explore the exact mechanism of Pokemon in prostate cancer. Pokemon is a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Its main function is suppression of the p14ARF (alternate reading frame) tumor suppressor gene. Although Pokemon expression has been found to be increased in various types of lymphoma, the exact mechanism of the gene in prostate cancer is not clear. In the present study, prostate cancer cells were transfected with the specific short hairpin ribonucleic acid (RNA) expression vector targeting Pokemon. The expression of Pokemon messenger RNA and its protein was detected by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. The cell growth and cell apoptosis were also examined using the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and flow cytometry. The results demonstrated that specific RNA interference (RNAi) could decrease the expression levels of Pokemon gene messenger RNA and protein in prostate cancer cells. In addition, that specific RNAi significantly inhibited the cell proliferation and increased the apoptotic rate. In vivo experiments showed that specific RNAi inhibited the tumorigenicity of prostate cancer cells and significantly suppressed tumor growth. Therefore, an RNAi-targeted Pokemon gene strategy could be a potential approach to prostate cancer therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Treating brain tumor-initiating cells using a combination of myxoma virus and rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemp, Franz J; Lun, Xueqing; McKenzie, Brienne A; Zhou, Hongyuan; Maxwell, Lori; Sun, Beichen; Kelly, John J P; Stechishin, Owen; Luchman, Artee; Weiss, Samuel; Cairncross, J Gregory; Hamilton, Mark G; Rabinovich, Brian A; Rahman, Masmudur M; Mohamed, Mohamed R; Smallwood, Sherin; Senger, Donna L; Bell, John; McFadden, Grant; Forsyth, Peter A

    2013-07-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) poses a significant barrier to therapy in certain subpopulation such as the tumor-initiating cell population, being shown to be refractory to conventional therapies. Oncolytic virotherapy has the potential to target multiple compartments within the tumor and thus circumvent some of the barriers facing conventional therapies. In this study, we investigate the oncolytic potential of myxoma virus (MYXV) alone and in combination with rapamycin in vitro and in vivo using human brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs). We cultured fresh GBM specimens as neurospheres and assayed their growth characteristics in vivo. We then tested the susceptibility of BTICs to MYXV infection with or without rapamycin in vitro and assessed viral biodistribution/survival in vivo in orthotopic xenografts. The cultured neurospheres were found to retain stem cell markers in vivo, and they closely resembled human infiltrative GBM. In this study we determined that (i) all patient-derived BTICs tested, including those resistant to temozolomide, were susceptible to MYXV replication and killing in vitro; (ii) MYXV replicated within BTICs in vivo, and intratumoral administration of MYXV significantly prolonged survival of BTIC-bearing mice; (iii) combination therapy with MYXV and rapamycin improved antitumor activity, even in mice bearing "advanced" BTIC tumors; (iv) MYXV treatment decreased expression of stem cell markers in vitro and in vivo. Our study suggests that MYXV in combination with rapamycin infects and kills both the BTICs and the differentiated compartments of GBM and may be an effective treatment even in TMZ-resistant patients.

  13. Double-echo perfusion-weighted MR imaging: basic concepts and application in brain tumors for the assessment of tumor blood volume and vascular permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Hidemasa; Maeda, Masayuki

    2006-01-01

    Perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging using contrast agents plays a key role in characterizing tumors of the brain. We have shown that double-echo perfusion-weighted MR imaging (DEPWI) is potentially useful in assessing brain tumors. Quantitative indices, such as tumor blood volume, are obtained using DEPWI, which allows correction of underestimation of tumor blood volume due to leakage of contrast agents from tumor vessels, in addition to simultaneous acquisition of tumor vessel permeability. This article describes basic concepts of DEPWI and demonstrates clinical applications in brain tumors.

  14. Target definition by C11-methionine-PET for the radiotherapy of brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Masayuki; Miwa, Kazuhiro; Shinoda, Jun; Kako, Nobuo; Nishibori, Hironori; Sakurai, Kouta; Yano, Hirohito; Iwama, Toru; Kanematsu, Masayuki

    2009-07-01

    To evaluate the ability of 11C-methionine positron emission tomography (MET-PET) to delineate target volumes for brain metastases and to investigate to what extent tumor growth is presented by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MET-PET. Three observers undertook target definition in 19 patients with 95 brain metastases by MRI and MET-PET images. MRI gross target volume (GTV) (GTV-MRI) was defined as the contrast-enhanced area on gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MRI. MET-PET GTV (GTV-PET) was defined as the area of an accumulation of MET-PET apparently higher than that of normal tissue on MET-PET images. The size of occupation ratio was determined using the following equation: SOR (%) of MET are within x mm margin outside GTV-MRI = the volume of the GTV-PET within x mm outside the GTV-MRI/the volume of the GTV-PET. For GTV-MRI volumes of 0.5 mL, GTV-PET volumes were larger than GTV-MRI volumes and a significant correlation was found between these variables by linear regression. For all tumor sizes and tumor characteristics, a 2-mm margin outside the GTV-MRI significantly improved the coverage of the GTV-PET. Although there were some limitations in our study associated with spatial resolution, blurring effect, and image registrations with PET images, MET-PET was supposed to have a potential as a promising tool for the precise delineation of target volumes in radiotherapy planning for brain metastases.

  15. Engineering tumor cell targeting in nanoscale amyloidal materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unzueta, Ugutz; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Virtudes Céspedes, María; Saccardo, Paolo; Cortés, Francisco; Rueda, Fabián; Garcia-Fruitós, Elena; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Mangues, Ramon; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial inclusion bodies are non-toxic, mechanically stable and functional protein amyloids within the nanoscale size range that are able to naturally penetrate into mammalian cells, where they deliver the embedded protein in a functional form. The potential use of inclusion bodies in protein delivery or protein replacement therapies is strongly impaired by the absence of specificity in cell binding and penetration, thus preventing targeting. To address this issue, we have here explored whether the genetic fusion of two tumor-homing peptides, the CXCR4 ligands R9 and T22, to an inclusion body-forming green fluorescent protein (GFP), would keep the interaction potential and the functionality of the fused peptides and then confer CXCR4 specificity in cell binding and further uptake of the materials. The fusion proteins have been well produced in Escherichia coli in their full-length form, keeping the potential for fluorescence emission of the partner GFP. By using specific inhibitors of CXCR4 binding, we have demonstrated that the engineered protein particles are able to penetrate CXCR4+ cells, in a receptor-mediated way, without toxicity or visible cytopathic effects, proving the availability of the peptide ligands on the surface of inclusion bodies. Since no further modification is required upon their purification, the biological production of genetically targeted inclusion bodies opens a plethora of cost-effective possibilities in the tissue-specific intracellular transfer of functional proteins through the use of structurally and functionally tailored soft materials.

  16. Donepezil in Treating Young Patients With Primary Brain Tumors Previously Treated With Radiation Therapy to the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-31

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Cognitive/Functional Effects; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Children; Neurotoxicity; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Radiation Toxicity

  17. 3D variational brain tumor segmentation using Dirichlet priors on a clustered feature set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popuri, Karteek; Cobzas, Dana; Murtha, Albert; Jägersand, Martin

    2012-07-01

    Brain tumor segmentation is a required step before any radiation treatment or surgery. When performed manually, segmentation is time consuming and prone to human errors. Therefore, there have been significant efforts to automate the process. But, automatic tumor segmentation from MRI data is a particularly challenging task. Tumors have a large diversity in shape and appearance with intensities overlapping the normal brain tissues. In addition, an expanding tumor can also deflect and deform nearby tissue. In our work, we propose an automatic brain tumor segmentation method that addresses these last two difficult problems. We use the available MRI modalities (T1, T1c, T2) and their texture characteristics to construct a multidimensional feature set. Then, we extract clusters which provide a compact representation of the essential information in these features. The main idea in this work is to incorporate these clustered features into the 3D variational segmentation framework. In contrast to previous variational approaches, we propose a segmentation method that evolves the contour in a supervised fashion. The segmentation boundary is driven by the learned region statistics in the cluster space. We incorporate prior knowledge about the normal brain tissue appearance during the estimation of these region statistics. In particular, we use a Dirichlet prior that discourages the clusters from the normal brain region to be in the tumor region. This leads to a better disambiguation of the tumor from brain tissue. We evaluated the performance of our automatic segmentation method on 15 real MRI scans of brain tumor patients, with tumors that are inhomogeneous in appearance, small in size and in proximity to the major structures in the brain. Validation with the expert segmentation labels yielded encouraging results: Jaccard (58%), Precision (81%), Recall (67%), Hausdorff distance (24 mm). Using priors on the brain/tumor appearance, our proposed automatic 3D variational

  18. •Primary brain tumors: Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis and histopathological correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrahim Dusak

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Recent advances in treatment of primary brain tumors have increased the interest in radiological imaging in respect to both the diagnosis of tumor and the evaluation of the efficiency of therapy. Conventional Magnetic Resonance (MR imaging is commonly used for diagnosis and follows up of the primary brain tumors, but it fails in grading of the tumors. MR spectroscopy permits in-vivo biochemical evaluation of brain lesions. Methods: Twenty three patients with histopathologic diagnosis of primary brain tumor and control group consisting of 23 healthy volunteers were investigated. In addition to conventional MR imaging of all patients were underwent point resolved spectroscopy (PRESS sequence via single voxel MR spectroscopy. Using MR spectroscopy, metabolites [N-acetyl aspartate (NAA, choline (Cho, myo-inositol (mI, lipid, lactate and alanine] and their ratio to creatine (Cr were measured quantitatively. Results: MR spectroscopic imaging of neuroglial primary brain tumors revealed that the NAA/Cr and mI/Cr ratios were decreased. In extra axial primary brain tumors, which consist of meningioma, NAA wasn’t detected, Cho/Cr ratio was remarkably increased, mI/Cr, lipid/Cr and lactate/Cr ratios were mildly increased. Alanine peak was detected only in meningioma. In high grade neuroglial tumors in proportion to low grade ones NAA/Cr and mI/Cr ratios were decreased, Cho/Cr, lipid/Cr and lactate/Cr ratios were remarkably increased. Conclusion: MR spectroscopy provides extra information in classification of primary brain tumors as intra-axial and extra-axial, and in grading of neuroglial primary brain tumors as high grade or low grade. It was concluded that using conventional MR imaging in cooperation with MR spectroscopy is beneficial in differential diagnosis and in grading of primary brain tumors. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (2: 233-241

  19. The use of amino acid PET and conventional MRI for monitoring of brain tumor therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galldiks, Norbert; Law, Ian; Pope, Whitney B

    2017-01-01

    Routine diagnostics and treatment monitoring of brain tumors is usually based on contrast-enhanced MRI. However, the capacity of conventional MRI to differentiate tumor tissue from posttherapeutic effects following neurosurgical resection, chemoradiation, alkylating chemotherapy, radiosurgery, and......),O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine (FET) and 3,4-dihydroxy-6-[18F]-fluoro-l-phenylalanine (FDOPA) and summarizes investigations regarding monitoring of brain tumor therapy....

  20. Halofuginone Inhibits Angiogenesis and Growth in Implanted Metastatic Rat Brain Tumor Model-an MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinat Abramovitch

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor growth and metastasis depend on angiogenesis; therefore, efforts are made to develop specific angiogenic inhibitors. Halofuginone (HF is a potent inhibitor of collagen type α1(I. In solid tumor models, HF has a potent antitumor and antiangiogenic effect in vivo, but its effect on brain tumors has not yet been evaluated. By employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we monitored the effect of HF on tumor progression and vascularization by utilizing an implanted malignant fibrous histiocytoma metastatic rat brain tumor model. Here we demonstrate that treatment with HF effectively and dose-dependently reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis. On day 13, HF-treated tumors were fivefold smaller than control (P < .001. Treatment with HF significantly prolonged survival of treated animals (142%; P = .001. In HF-treated rats, tumor vascularization was inhibited by 30% on day 13 and by 37% on day 19 (P < .05. Additionally, HF treatment inhibited vessel maturation (P = .03. Finally, in HF-treated rats, we noticed the appearance of a few clusters of satellite tumors, which were distinct from the primary tumor and usually contained vessel cores. This phenomenon was relatively moderate when compared to previous reports of other antiangiogenic agents used to treat brain tumors. We therefore conclude that HF is effective for treatment of metastatic brain tumors.

  1. Hierarchical non-negative matrix factorization to characterize brain tumor heterogeneity using multi-parametric MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sauwen, Nicolas; Sima, Diana M.; Van Cauter, Sofie; Veraart, Jelle; Leemans, Alexander; Maes, Frederik; Himmelreich, Uwe; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Tissue characterization in brain tumors and, in particular, in high-grade gliomas is challenging as a result of the co-existence of several intra-tumoral tissue types within the same region and the high spatial heterogeneity. This study presents a method for the detection of the relevant tumor

  2. Metabolic connectomics targeting brain pathology in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminiti, Silvia P; Tettamanti, Marco; Sala, Arianna; Presotto, Luca; Iannaccone, Sandro; Cappa, Stefano F; Magnani, Giuseppe; Perani, Daniela

    2017-04-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies is characterized by α-synuclein accumulation and degeneration of dopaminergic and cholinergic pathways. To gain an overview of brain systems affected by neurodegeneration, we characterized the [18F]FDG-PET metabolic connectivity in 42 dementia with Lewy bodies patients, as compared to 42 healthy controls, using sparse inverse covariance estimation method and graph theory. We performed whole-brain and anatomically driven analyses, targeting cholinergic and dopaminergic pathways, and the α-synuclein spreading. The first revealed substantial alterations in connectivity indexes, brain modularity, and hubs configuration. Namely, decreases in local metabolic connectivity within occipital cortex, thalamus, and cerebellum, and increases within frontal, temporal, parietal, and basal ganglia regions. There were also long-range disconnections among these brain regions, all supporting a disruption of the functional hierarchy characterizing the normal brain. The anatomically driven analysis revealed alterations within brain structures early affected by α-synuclein pathology, supporting Braak's early pathological staging in dementia with Lewy bodies. The dopaminergic striato-cortical pathway was severely affected, as well as the cholinergic networks, with an extensive decrease in connectivity in Ch1-Ch2, Ch5-Ch6 networks, and the lateral Ch4 capsular network significantly towards the occipital cortex. These altered patterns of metabolic connectivity unveil a new in vivo scenario for dementia with Lewy bodies underlying pathology in terms of changes in whole-brain metabolic connectivity, spreading of α-synuclein, and neurotransmission impairment.

  3. Evaluation of 18F-FDG PET and MRI associations in pediatric diffuse intrinsic brain stem glioma: a report from the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukotynski, Katherine A; Fahey, Frederic H; Kocak, Mehmet; Alavi, Abass; Wong, Terence Z; Treves, S Ted; Shulkin, Barry L; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A; Geyer, Jeffrey R; Vajapeyam, Sridhar; Boyett, James M; Kun, Larry E; Poussaint, Tina Young

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess (18)F-FDG uptake in children with a newly diagnosed diffuse intrinsic brain stem glioma (BSG) and to investigate associations with progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and MRI indices. Two Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium (PBTC) therapeutic trials in children with newly diagnosed BSG were designed to test radiation therapy combined with molecularly targeted agents (PBTC-007: phase I/II study of gefitinib; PBTC-014: phase I/II study of tipifarnib). Baseline brain (18)F-FDG PET scans were obtained in 40 children in these trials. Images were evaluated by consensus between 2 PET experts for intensity and uniformity of tracer uptake. Associations of (18)F-FDG uptake intensity and uniformity with both PFS and OS, as well as associations with tumor MRI indices at baseline (tumor volume on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, baseline intratumoral enhancement, diffusion and perfusion values), were evaluated. In most of the children, BSG (18)F-FDG uptake was less than gray-matter uptake. Survival was poor, irrespective of intensity of (18)F-FDG uptake, with no association between intensity of (18)F-FDG uptake and PFS or OS. However, hyperintense (18)F-FDG uptake in the tumor, compared with gray matter, suggested poorer survival rates. Patients with (18)F-FDG uptake in 50% or more of the tumor had shorter PFS and OS than did patients with (18)F-FDG uptake in less than 50% of the tumor. There was some evidence that tumors with higher (18)F-FDG uptake were more likely to show enhancement, and when the diffusion ratio was lower, the uniformity of (18)F-FDG uptake appeared higher. Children with BSG for which (18)F-FDG uptake involves at least half the tumor appear to have poorer survival than children with uptake in less than 50% of the tumor. A larger independent study is needed to verify this hypothesis. Intense tracer uptake in the tumors, compared with gray matter, suggests decreased survival. Higher (18)F-FDG uptake

  4. Brain Metastasis from Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Naoe

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST into the central nervous system is extremely rare. We report a patient with synchronous GIST and brain metastasis. At disease onset, there was left hemiplegia and ptosis of the right eyelids. Resection cytology of the brain tumor was reported as metastasis of GIST. After positron emission tomography examination, another tumor in the small bowel was discovered, which suggested a small bowel GIST associated with intracranial metastasis. Immunohistochemical analysis of the intestinal tumor specimen obtained by double balloon endoscopy showed a pattern similar to the brain tumor, with the tumors subsequently identified as intracranial metastases of jejunal GIST. After surgical resection of one brain tumor, the patient underwent whole brain radiation therapy followed by treatment with imatinib mesylate (Gleevec; Novartis Pharma, Basel, Switzerland. Mutational analysis of the original intestinal tumor revealed there were no gene alterations in KIT or PDGFRα. Since the results indicated the treatment had no apparent effect on either of the tumors, and because ileus developed due to an intestinal primary tumor, the patient underwent surgical resection of the intestinal lesion. However, the patient’s condition gradually worsen and she subsequently died 4 months after the initial treatment.

  5. Symptoms and management of pediatric patients with incurable brain tumors in palliative home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlen, Michaela; Hoell, Jessica; Balzer, Stefan; Borkhardt, Arndt; Janssen, Gisela

    2016-03-01

    Brain tumors have the highest disease-related mortality rate of all pediatric cancers. The goal of this study was to determine whether all children with incurable brain tumors cared for by a pediatric palliative care team in a home setting suffer from the same symptoms towards the end of their lives or whether there are differences between the tumor localizations with implications for palliative care. This study was conducted as a retrospective, single center chart review including all patients treated between January 1st 2000 and December 31st 2013. 70 children, adolescents and young adults were included in the analysis. Symptom burden was high with a mean number of symptoms of 7.2 per patient. 74% of the symptoms already existed one week before death. Within the last week of life, impaired consciousness (75.7%) most often occurred. Furthermore, symptoms considerably depended on tumor localization. Patients with supratentorial tumors presented more frequently with seizures (p paralysis (p brain stem tumors. 84.3% of the patients needed analgesics, only 64.4% WHO class III analgesics. Anticonvulsants were given more often in supratentorial tumors (p child suffering from a brain tumor needs increased awareness of the neurological deterioration. The symptom pattern strongly depends on the tumor localization and significantly differs between supratentorial, infratentorial and brain stem tumors. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Changes in neurocognitive functioning and quality of life in adult patients with brain tumors treated with radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoccianti, Silvia; Detti, Beatrice; Cipressi, Samantha; Iannalfi, Alberto; Franzese, Ciro; Biti, Giampaolo

    2012-06-01

    This review aims to summarize what is currently known about neurocognitive outcome and quality of life in patients with brain tumors treated with radiotherapy. Whether potential tumor-controlling benefits of radiotherapy outweigh its potential toxicity in the natural history of brain tumors is a matter of debate. This review focuses on some of the adult main brain tumors, for which the issue of neurocognitive decline has been thoroughly studied: low-grade gliomas, brain metastases, and primary central nervous system lymphomas. The aims of this review are: (1) the analysis of existing data regarding the relationship between radiotherapy and neurocognitive outcome; (2) the identification of strategies to minimize radiotherapy-related neurotoxicity by reducing the dose or the volume; (3) the evidence-based data concerning radiotherapy withdrawal; and (4) the definition of patients subgroups that could benefit from immediate radiotherapy. For high grade gliomas, the main findings from literature are summarized and some strategies to reduce the neurotoxicity of the treatment are presented. Although further prospective studies with adequate neuropsychological follow-up are needed, this article suggests that cognitive deficits in patients with brain tumor have a multifactorial genesis: radiotherapy may contribute to the neurocognitive deterioration, but the causes of this decline include the tumor itself, disease progression, other treatment modalities and comorbidities. Treatment variables, such as total and fractional dose, target volume, and irradiation technique can dramatically affect the safety of radiotherapy: optimizing radiation parameters could be an excellent approach to improve outcome and to reduce neurotoxicity. At the same time, delayed radiotherapy could be a valid option for highly selected patients.

  7. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of brain tumors; MR-Spektroskopie bei Hirntumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditter, P.; Hattingen, E. [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, FE Neuroradiologie, Radiologische Klinik, Bonn (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) under consideration of clinical information enables the correct diagnosis and therapy for the majority of cerebral space-occupying lesions. Some important differential diagnoses, e. g. low vs. high-grade tumors, require additional MRI methods. This article critically discusses the importance of magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS) in brain tumors. The concentration of normal and pathological brain metabolites can be non-invasively measured by {sup 1}H-MRS. It is based on the principle that chemical proton compounds of certain brain metabolites focally attenuate the external magnetic field and change the proton resonance frequency according to typical patterns. In addition, parameter maps of MRS imaging (MRSI) can show the tumor heterogeneity as well as changes in the surrounding brain tissue. In this context, the patterns of N-acetylaspartate, total choline (tCho) and creatine are relatively robust, whereas the patterns of other metabolites, such as myoinositol, glutamate, lactate or lipids greatly depend on the external field strength and echo time. The signal intensity of tCho in vital tumor tissue increases with the WHO grade of the brain tumor, i.e. increases with the level of malignancy. The use of MRSI facilitates the WHO grading of gliomas by determining target points in biopsies. Different distribution patterns and specific metabolite signals enable a better differentiation between abscesses, metastases, central nervous system (CNS) lymphomas and gliomas. The use of {sup 1}H-MRS provides valuable information on the differential diagnosis and graduation of brain tumors; however, so far artefacts, signal strength, parameter selection and a lack of standardization impede the establishment of {sup 1}H-MRS for use in clinical routine diagnostics. (orig.) [German] Die konventionelle MRT ermoeglicht unter Beruecksichtigung klinischer Information bei einem Grossteil zerebraler Raumforderungen die richtige

  8. Reduction sensitive nanosystems for tumor targeted imaging and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Yaqin

    2017-01-01

    Nanomedicines based on biodegradable polymers for tumor imaging and therapy receive more and more attention due to their improved water solibility, bioavailability, and extended blood circulation times. Advanced polymer chemistry combined with a thorough understanding of the tumor microenvironment,

  9. Targeting distinct tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells by inhibiting CSF-1 receptor: combating tumor evasion of antiangiogenic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priceman, Saul J; Sung, James L; Shaposhnik, Zory; Burton, Jeremy B; Torres-Collado, Antoni X; Moughon, Diana L; Johnson, Mai; Lusis, Aldons J; Cohen, Donald A; Iruela-Arispe, M Luisa; Wu, Lily

    2010-02-18

    Tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells (TIMs) support tumor growth by promoting angiogenesis and suppressing antitumor immune responses. CSF-1 receptor (CSF1R) signaling is important for the recruitment of CD11b(+)F4/80(+) tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and contributes to myeloid cell-mediated angiogenesis. However, the impact of the CSF1R signaling pathway on other TIM subsets, including CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), is unknown. Tumor-infiltrating MDSCs have also been shown to contribute to tumor angiogenesis and have recently been implicated in tumor resistance to antiangiogenic therapy, yet their precise involvement in these processes is not well understood. Here, we use the selective pharmacologic inhibitor of CSF1R signaling, GW2580, to demonstrate that CSF-1 regulates the tumor recruitment of CD11b(+)Gr-1(lo)Ly6C(hi) mononuclear MDSCs. Targeting these TIM subsets inhibits tumor angiogenesis associated with reduced expression of proangiogenic and immunosuppressive genes. Combination therapy using GW2580 with an anti-VEGFR-2 antibody synergistically suppresses tumor growth and severely impairs tumor angiogenesis along with reverting at least one TIM-mediated antiangiogenic compensatory mechanism involving MMP-9. These data highlight the importance of CSF1R signaling in the recruitment and function of distinct TIM subsets, including MDSCs, and validate the benefits of targeting CSF1R signaling in combination with antiangiogenic drugs for the treatment of solid cancers.

  10. Deep Brain Stimulation Target Selection for Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey, Christopher R; Hamani, Clement; Kalia, Suneil K; Sankar, Tejas; Picillo, Marina; Munhoz, Renato P; Fasano, Alfonso; Panisset, Michel

    2017-01-01

    During the "DBS Canada Day" symposium held in Toronto July 4-5, 2014, the scientific committee invited experts to discuss three main questions on target selection for deep brain stimulation (DBS) of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). First, is the subthalamic nucleus (STN) or the globus pallidus internus (GPi) the ideal target? In summary, both targets are equally effective in improving the motor symptoms of PD. STN allows a greater medications reduction, while GPi exerts a direct antidyskinetic effect. Second, are there further potential targets? Ventral intermediate nucleus DBS has significant long-term benefit for tremor control but insufficiently addresses other motor features of PD. DBS in the posterior subthalamic area also reduces tremor. The pedunculopontine nucleus remains an investigational target. Third, should DBS for PD be performed unilaterally, bilaterally or staged? Unilateral STN DBS can be proposed to asymmetric patients. There is no evidence that a staged bilateral approach reduces the incidence of DBS-related adverse events.

  11. 18F-FDG PET and MR Imaging Associations Across a Spectrum of Pediatric Brain Tumors: A Report from the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukotynski, Katherine; Fahey, Frederic; Kocak, Mehmet; Kun, Larry; Boyett, James; Fouladi, Maryam; Vajapeyam, Sridhar; Treves, Ted; Poussaint, Tina Y.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe 18F-FDG uptake across a spectrum of pediatric brain tumors and correlate 18F-FDG PET with MR imaging variables, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted of children enrolled in phase I/II clinical trials through the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium from August 2000 to June 2010. PET variables were summarized within diagnostic categories using descriptive statistics. Associations of PET with MR imaging variables and PFS and OS by tumor types were evaluated. Results Baseline 18F-FDG PET was available in 203 children; 66 had newly diagnosed brain tumors, and 137 had recurrent/refractory brain tumors before enrolling in a Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium trial. MR imaging was performed within 2 wk of PET and before therapy in all cases. The 18F-FDG uptake pattern and MR imaging contrast enhancement (CE) varied by tumor type. On average, glioblastoma multiforme and medulloblastoma had uniform, intense uptake throughout the tumor, whereas brain stem gliomas (BSGs) had low uptake in less than 50% of the tumor and ependymoma had low uptake throughout the tumor. For newly diagnosed BSG, correlation of 18F-FDG uptake with CE portended reduced OS (P = 0.032); in refractory/recurrent BSG, lack of correlation between 18F-FDG uptake and CE suggested decreased PFS (P = 0.023). In newly diagnosed BSG for which more than 50% of the tumor had 18F-FDG uptake, there was a suggestion of lower apparent diffusion coefficient (P = 0.061) and decreased PFS (P = 0.065). Conclusion 18F-FDG PET and MR imaging showed a spectrum of patterns depending on tumor type. In newly diagnosed BSG, the correlation of 18F-FDG uptake and CE suggested decreased OS, likely related to more aggressive disease. When more than 50% of the tumor had 18F-FDG uptake, the apparent diffusion coefficient was lower, consistent with increased cellularity. In refractory/recurrent BSG, poor correlation between 18F

  12. A pathology-based substrate for target definition in radiosurgery of brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumert, Brigitta G; Rutten, Isabelle; Dehing-Oberije, Cary; Twijnstra, Albert; Dirx, Miranda J M; Debougnoux-Huppertz, Ria M T L; Lambin, Philippe; Kubat, Bela

    2006-09-01

    To investigate the need of a margin other than for accuracy reasons in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of brain metastases by means of histopathology. Evaluation of 45 patients from two pathology departments having had brain metastases and an autopsy of the brain. Growth patterns were reviewed with a focus on infiltration beyond the metastases boundary and made visible with immunohistochemical staining: the metastasis itself with tumor-specific markers, surrounding normal brain tissue with a glial marker, and a possible capsule with a soft tissue marker. Measurements were corrected by a tissue-shrinkage correction factor taken from literature. Outcomes parameters for infiltration were mean and maximum depths of infiltration and number of measured infiltration sites. In 48 of 76 metastases, an infiltration was present. The largest group of metastases was lung cancer. Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and melanoma showed a maximum depth of infiltration of > or =1 mm, and other histologies melanoma, and sarcoma, the highest number of infiltrative sites were observed (median, 2; range, 1-8). SCLC showed significantly larger infiltrative growth, compared with other diagnostic groups. In NSCLC, the highest percentage of infiltration was present (70%). Infiltrative growth beyond the border of the brain metastasis was demonstrated in 63% of the cases evaluated. Infiltrative growth, therefore, has an impact in defining the clinical target volume for SRS of brain metastases, and a margin of approximately 1 mm should be added to the visible lesion.

  13. EGFRvIII-specific chimeric antigen receptor T cells migrate to and kill tumor deposits infiltrating the brain parenchyma in an invasive xenograft model of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Hongsheng; Choi, Bryan D; Suryadevara, Carter M; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Yang, Shicheng; De Leon, Gabriel; Sayour, Elias J; McLendon, Roger; Herndon, James E; Healy, Patrick; Archer, Gary E; Bigner, Darell D; Johnson, Laura A; Sampson, John H

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults and is uniformly lethal. T-cell-based immunotherapy offers a promising platform for treatment given its potential to specifically target tumor tissue while sparing the normal brain. However, the diffuse and infiltrative nature of these tumors in the brain parenchyma may pose an exceptional hurdle to successful immunotherapy in patients. Areas of invasive tumor are thought to reside behind an intact blood brain barrier, isolating them from effective immunosurveillance and thereby predisposing the development of "immunologically silent" tumor peninsulas. Therefore, it remains unclear if adoptively transferred T cells can migrate to and mediate regression in areas of invasive GBM. One barrier has been the lack of a preclinical mouse model that accurately recapitulates the growth patterns of human GBM in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that D-270 MG xenografts exhibit the classical features of GBM and produce the diffuse and invasive tumors seen in patients. Using this model, we designed experiments to assess whether T cells expressing third-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting the tumor-specific mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFRvIII, would localize to and treat invasive intracerebral GBM. EGFRvIII-targeted CAR (EGFRvIII+ CAR) T cells demonstrated in vitro EGFRvIII antigen-specific recognition and reactivity to the D-270 MG cell line, which naturally expresses EGFRvIII. Moreover, when administered systemically, EGFRvIII+ CAR T cells localized to areas of invasive tumor, suppressed tumor growth, and enhanced survival of mice with established intracranial D-270 MG tumors. Together, these data demonstrate that systemically administered T cells are capable of migrating to the invasive edges of GBM to mediate antitumor efficacy and tumor regression.

  14. A comparison of brain activity associated with language production in brain tumor patients with left and right sided language laterality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansma, J. M.; Ramsey, N.; Rutten, G.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Language dominance is an important factor for clinical decision making in brain tumor surgery. Functional MM can provide detailed information about the organization of language in the brain. One often used measure derived from fMRI data is the laterality index (LI). The LI is typically based on

  15. Quantitative assessment of Cerenkov luminescence for radioguided brain tumor resection surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Justin S.; Mitchell, Gregory S.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2017-05-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is a developing imaging modality that detects radiolabeled molecules via visible light emitted during the radioactive decay process. We used a Monte Carlo based computer simulation to quantitatively investigate CLI compared to direct detection of the ionizing radiation itself as an intraoperative imaging tool for assessment of brain tumor margins. Our brain tumor model consisted of a 1 mm spherical tumor remnant embedded up to 5 mm in depth below the surface of normal brain tissue. Tumor to background contrast ranging from 2:1 to 10:1 were considered. We quantified all decay signals (e±, gamma photon, Cerenkov photons) reaching the brain volume surface. CLI proved to be the most sensitive method for detecting the tumor volume in both imaging and non-imaging strategies as assessed by contrast-to-noise ratio and by receiver operating characteristic output of a channelized Hotelling observer.

  16. Social competence in pediatric brain tumor survivors: application of a model from social neuroscience and developmental psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Matthew C; McCurdy, Mark; Turner, Elise; Kazak, Anne E; Noll, Robert B; Phillips, Peter; Barakat, Lamia P

    2015-03-01

    Pediatric brain tumor (BT) survivors are at risk for psychosocial late effects across many domains of functioning, including neurocognitive and social. The literature on the social competence of pediatric BT survivors is still developing and future research is needed that integrates developmental and cognitive neuroscience research methodologies to identify predictors of survivor social adjustment and interventions to ameliorate problems. This review discusses the current literature on survivor social functioning through a model of social competence in childhood brain disorder and suggests future directions based on this model. Interventions pursuing change in survivor social adjustment should consider targeting social ecological factors. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Social Competence in Pediatric Brain Tumor Survivors: Application of a Model from Social Neuroscience and Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Matthew C.; McCurdy, Mark; Turner, Elise; Kazak, Anne E.; Noll, Robert B.; Phillips, Peter; Barakat, Lamia P.

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric brain tumor (BT) survivors are at risk for psychosocial late effects across many domains of functioning, including neurocognitive and social. The literature on the social competence of pediatric BT survivors is still developing and future research is needed that integrates developmental and cognitive neuroscience research methodologies to identify predictors of survivor social adjustment and interventions to ameliorate problems. This review discusses the current literature on survivor social functioning through a model of social competence in childhood brain disorder and suggests future directions based on this model. Interventions pursuing change in survivor social adjustment should consider targeting social ecological factors. PMID:25382825

  18. Implications of neurovascular uncoupling in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Rebecca W; Hadjiabadi, Darian H; Senarathna, Janaka; Agarwal, Shruti; Thakor, Nitish V; Pillai, Jay J; Pathak, Arvind P

    2017-11-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) serves as a critical tool for presurgical mapping of eloquent cortex and changes in neurological function in patients diagnosed with brain tumors. However, the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) contrast mechanism underlying fMRI assumes that neurovascular coupling remains intact during brain tumor progression, and that measured changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) are correlated with neuronal function. Recent preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated that even low-grade brain tumors can exhibit neurovascular uncoupling (NVU), which can confound interpretation of fMRI data. Therefore, to avoid neurosurgical complications, it is crucial to understand the biophysical basis of NVU and its impact on fMRI. Here we review the physiology of the neurovascular unit, how it is remodeled, and functionally altered by brain cancer cells. We first discuss the latest findings about the components of the neurovascular unit. Next, we synthesize results from preclinical and clinical studies to illustrate how brain tumor induced NVU affects fMRI data interpretation. We examine advances in functional imaging methods that permit the clinical evaluation of brain tumors with NVU. Finally, we discuss how the suppression of anomalous tumor blood vessel formation with antiangiogenic therapies can "normalize" the brain tumor vasculature, and potentially restore neurovascular coupling.

  19. Preclinical impact of bevacizumab on brain and tumor distribution of irinotecan and temozolomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwirt, Lauriane; Beccaria, Kevin; Carpentier, Alexandre; Idbaih, Ahmed; Schmitt, Charlotte; Levasseur, Camille; Labussiere, Marianne; Milane, Aline; Farinotti, Robert; Fernandez, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumour in adults. Prognosis of GBM patients is poor with median overall survival around 15 months. Temozolomide is the chemotherapeutic agent used in the standard of care of newly diagnosed GBM patients relying on radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy followed by chemotherapy alone. Irinotecan has shown some efficacy in recurrent malignant gliomas. Bevacizumab has been combined with irinotecan in the treatment of recurrent GBM and with temozolomide in newly diagnosed GBM. As the efficacy of GBM treatments relies on their brain distribution through the blood brain barrier, the aim of the present preclinical work was to study, in in vivo models, the impact of bevacizumab on brain and tumor distribution of temozolomide and irinotecan. Our results show that bevacizumab pre-treatment was associated with a reduced temozolomide brain distribution in tumor-free mice. In tumor bearing mice, bevacizumab increased temozolomide tumor distribution, although not statistically significant. In both tumor-free and tumor-bearing mice, bevacizumab does not modify brain distribution of irinotecan and its metabolite SN-38. Bevacizumab impacts brain distribution of some anti-tumor drugs and potentially their efficacy in GBM. Further studies are warranted to investigate other therapeutic combination.

  20. Tumor targeting with a (99m)Tc-labeled AS1411 aptamer in prostate tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noaparast, Zohreh; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal; Piramoon, Majid; Abedi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    AS1411, a 26-base guanine-rich oligonucleotide aptamer, has high affinity to nucleolin, mainly on tumor cell surfaces. In this study, a modified AS1411 was labeled with (99m)Tc and evaluated as a potential tumor-targeting agent for imaging. The AS1411 aptamer was conjugated with HYNIC and labeled with (99m)Tc in the presence a co-ligand. Radiochemical purity and stability testing of the (99m)Tc-HYNIC-AS1411 aptamer were carried out with thin layer chromatography and a size-exclusion column in normal saline and human serum. Cellular nucleolin-specific binding, cellular internalization in DU-145 cells, as high levels of nucleolin expression, were performed. Additionally, biodistribution in normal mice and DU-145 tumour-bearing mice was assessed. Radiolabeling of the aptamer resulted in a reasonable yield and radiochemical purity after purification. The aptamer was stable in normal saline and human serum, and cellular experiments demonstrated specific binding of the AS1411 aptamer to the nucleolin protein. Based on biodistribution assessment of (99m)Tc-HYNIC-AS1411, rapid blood clearance was seen after injection and it appears that the excretion route was via the urinary system at 1 h post-injection. Tumours also showed a higher accumulation of radioactivity with this labeled aptamer. (99m)Tc-AS1411 can be a potential tool for the molecular imaging of nucleolin-overexpressing cancers.

  1. Targeting Phosphatidylserine for Radioimmunotherapy of Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    autoradiograph film . After 12 hr incubation, autoradiograph images showed multiple hot spots on the tumor brain, while clean background signal observed on the...Contents …………………………………………………………….……...3 Introduction…………………………………………………………….…………....4 Body …………………………………………………………………………………….4 Key Research...treatment for breast cancer brain metastasis. Body : The Statement of Work in this period had two major tasks: Task 1. To study phosphatidylserine

  2. Targeting cancer stem cells in solid tumors by vitamin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Jae Young; Suh, Nanjoo

    2015-04-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subset of cells that may be responsible for initiation, progression, and recurrence of tumors. Recent studies have demonstrated that CSCs are highly tumorigenic and resistant to conventional chemotherapies, making them a promising target for the development of preventive/therapeutic agents. A single or combination of various markers, such as CD44, EpCAM, CD49f, CD133, CXCR4, ALDH-1, and CD24, were utilized to isolate CSCs from various types of human cancers. Notch, Hedgehog, Wnt, and TGF-β signalingregulate self-renewal and differentiation of normal stem cells andare aberrantly activated in CSCs. In addition, many studies have demonstrated that these stem cell-associated signaling pathways are required for the maintenance of CSCs in different malignancies, including breast, colorectal, prostate, and pancreatic cancers. Accumulating evidence has shown inhibitory effects of vitamin D and its analogs on the cancer stem cell signaling pathways, suggesting vitamin D as a potential preventive/therapeutic agent against CSCs. In this review, we summarize recent findings about the roles of Notch, Hedgehog, Wnt, and TGF-β signaling in CSCs as well as the effects of vitamin D on these stem cell signaling pathways. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Altered brain anatomical networks and disturbed connection density in brain tumor patients revealed by diffusion tensor tractography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhou; Tao, Ling; Qian, Zhiyu; Wu, Jiangfen; Liu, Hongyi; Yu, Yun; Song, Jiantai; Wang, Shaobo; Sun, Jinyang

    2016-11-01

    Brain tumor patients are usually accompanied by impairments in cognitive functions, and these dysfunctions arise from the altered diffusion tensor of water molecules and disrupted neuronal conduction in white matter. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a powerful noninvasive imaging technique that can reflect diffusion anisotropy of water and brain white matter neural connectivity in vivo. This study was aimed to analyze the topological properties and connection densities of the brain anatomical networks in brain tumor patients based on DTI and provide new insights into the investigation of the structural plasticity and compensatory mechanism of tumor patient's brain. In this study, the brain anatomical networks of tumor patients and healthy controls were constructed using the tracking of white matter fiber bundles based on DTI and the topological properties of these networks were described quantitatively. The statistical comparisons were performed between two groups with six DTI parameters: degree, regional efficiency, local efficiency, clustering coefficient, vulnerability, and betweenness centrality. In order to localize changes in structural connectivity to specific brain regions, a network-based statistic approach was utilized. By comparing the edge connection density of brain network between two groups, the edges with greater difference in connection density were associated with three functional systems. Compared with controls, tumor patients show a significant increase in small-world feature of cerebral structural network. Two-sample two-tailed t test indicates that the regional properties are altered in 17 regions ([Formula: see text]). Study reveals that the positive and negative changes in vulnerability take place in the 14 brain areas. In addition, tumor patients lose 3 hub regions and add 2 new hubs when compared to normal controls. Eleven edges show much significantly greater connection density in the patients than in the controls. Most of the edges with

  4. Intranasal Delivery of Camptothecin-Loaded Tat-Modified Nanomicells for Treatment of Intracranial Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuuki Takashima

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier is a substantial obstacle for delivering anticancer agents to brain tumors, and new strategies for bypassing it are sorely needed for brain tumor therapy. Intranasal delivery provides a practical, noninvasive method for delivering therapeutic agents to the brain. Intranasal application of nano-sized micelles that have been modified with Tat peptide facilitates brain delivery of fluorescent model materials. In this study, we evaluated a nose-to-brain delivery system for brain tumor therapy. We nasally administered the anti-tumor drug camptothecin (CPT in solution and in methoxy poly(ethylene glycol (MPEG/poly(e-caprolactone (PCL amphiphilic block copolymers (MPEG-PCL and cell penetrating peptide, Tat analog-modified MPEG-PCL (MPEG-PCL-Tat MPEG-PCL-Tat to rats bearing intracranial glioma tumors and quantified the cytotoxicity against glioma cells, and the therapeutic effects. CPT-loaded MPEG-PCL-Tat micelles showed higher cytotoxicity than CPT-loaded MPEG-PCL. CPT-free MPEG-PCL-Tat didn’t show any cytotoxicity, even at high concentrations (2 mmol/mL. CPT-loaded MPEG-PCL-Tat micelles significantly prolonged the median survival of rats. These results indicate that intranasal delivery of anti-cancer drugs with cell penetrating peptide-modified nanomicelles might be an effective therapy for brain tumors.

  5. 2016 Updates to the WHO Brain Tumor Classification System: What the Radiologist Needs to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Derek R; Guerin, Julie B; Giannini, Caterina; Morris, Jonathan M; Eckel, Lawrence J; Kaufmann, Timothy J

    2017-01-01

    Radiologists play a key role in brain tumor diagnosis and management and must stay abreast of developments in the field to advance patient care and communicate with other health care providers. In 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) released an update to its brain tumor classification system that included numerous significant changes. Several previously recognized brain tumor diagnoses, such as oligoastrocytoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor, and gliomatosis cerebri, were redefined or eliminated altogether. Conversely, multiple new entities were recognized, including diffuse leptomeningeal glioneuronal tumor and multinodular and vacuolating tumor of the cerebrum. The glioma category has been significantly reorganized, with several infiltrating gliomas in children and adults now defined by genetic features for the first time. These changes were driven by increased understanding of important genetic factors that directly impact tumorigenesis and influence patient care. The increased emphasis on genetic factors in brain tumor diagnosis has important implications for radiology, as we now have tools that allow us to evaluate some of these alterations directly, such as the identification of 2-hydroxyglutarate within infiltrating gliomas harboring mutations in the genes for the isocitrate dehydrogenases. For other tumors, such as medulloblastoma, imaging can demonstrate characteristic patterns that correlate with particular disease subtypes. The purpose of this article is to review the changes to the WHO brain tumor classification system that are most pertinent to radiologists. ©RSNA, 2017.

  6. Pediatric Brain Tumors: Innovative Genomic Information Is Transforming the Diagnostic and Clinical Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajjar, Amar; Bowers, Daniel C; Karajannis, Matthias A; Leary, Sarah; Witt, Hendrik; Gottardo, Nicholas G

    2015-09-20

    Pediatric neuro-oncology has undergone an exciting and dramatic transformation during the past 5 years. This article summarizes data from collaborative group and institutional trials that have advanced the science of pediatric brain tumors and survival of patients with these tumors. Advanced genomic analysis of the entire spectrum of pediatric brain tumors has heralded an era in which stakeholders in the pediatric neuro-oncology community are being challenged to reconsider their current research and diagnostic and treatment strategies. The incorporation of this new information into the next-generation treatment protocols will unleash new challenges. This review succinctly summarizes the key advances in our understanding of the common pediatric brain tumors (ie, medulloblastoma, low- and high-grade gliomas, diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, and ependymoma) and some selected rare tumors (ie, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor and CNS primitive neuroectodermal tumor). The potential impact of this new information on future clinical protocols also is discussed. Cutting-edge genomics technologies and the information gained from such studies are facilitating the identification of molecularly defined subgroups within patients with particular pediatric brain tumors. The number of evaluable patients in each subgroup is small, particularly in the subgroups of rare diseases. Therefore, international collaboration will be crucial to draw meaningful conclusions about novel approaches to treating pediatric brain tumors. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  7. Clinical experience with nimotuzumab in cuban pediatric patients with brain tumors, 2005 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurez, Giselle; Cabanas, Ricardo; Zaldívar, Melba; Garnier, Tania; Iglesias, Bárbara; Piedra, Patricia; Castillo, Martha Ríos; Longchong, Martha; Iznaga, Normando; Lage, Agustín

    2009-07-01

    Introduction Nimotuzumab, developed in Cuba, is a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). It has been evaluated in malignant brain tumors in adults and children, and shown to be therapeutically safe and effective in terms of increased survival and improved quality of life. Objective Describe nimotuzumab's safety profile and clinical benefits in terms of disease control and survival in pediatric patients with progressive or recurrent primary brain tumors who were included in an expanded access program. Methods An open, prospective clinical study was designed. Between December 2005 and December 2007, 22 patients were included, all of whom had an histological and/or radiological diagnosis of progressive or recurrent primary brain tumor, classified as high-grade malignant glioblastoma (n=6), diffuse brain stem glioma (n=6), ependymoblastoma (n=5), low-grade glioma (n=4), or thalamic tumor (n=1); life expectancy of at least 4 weeks; and a Karnofsky or Lansky Performance Status score of ≥50. Nimotuzumab was administered on a 100 mg weekly intravenous infusion schedule for 6 to 8 weeks, followed by a bi-weekly maintenance phase, as long as there was no deterioration in the patient's functional capacity. Therapeutic protocols were followed for administration as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. All patients received clinical and imaging follow-up. Results Nimotuzumab was well tolerated in all therapeutic modalities, even with prolonged exposure. A minority of patients reported slight or moderate adverse events, such as vomiting, mucositis and chills, as classified by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). The disease was controlled in 64% (14/22) of patients; 6-month and 1-year survival rates were 82% and 64%, respectively; average survival was 20.3 months and median survival, 19 months. Recovery of neurological functions and improvement in general status were notable

  8. Tumor vascular endothelium : Barrier or target in tumor directed drug delivery and immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molema, Ingrid; de Leij, Lou; Meijer, D.K F

    The therapy of solid tumors with conventional chemotherapeutics, drug delivery preparations and immunomodulatory agents directed against the tumor cells is corrupted by a major barrier presented by the tumor vasculature. Permeability of the tumor blood vessels for transport of small molecules and

  9. EGF receptor-targeted synthetic double-stranded RNA eliminates glioblastoma, breast cancer, and adenocarcinoma tumors in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei Shir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most lethal form of brain cancer. With the available treatments, survival does not exceed 12-14 mo from the time of diagnosis. We describe a novel strategy to selectively induce the death of glioblastoma cells and other cancer cells that over-express the EGF receptor. Using a non-viral delivery vector that homes to the EGF receptor, we target synthetic anti-proliferative dsRNA (polyinosine-cytosine [poly IC], a strong activator of apoptosis, selectively to cancer cells. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Poly IC was delivered by means of a non-viral vector: 25kDa polyethylenimine-polyethyleneglycol-EGF (PEI25-PEG-EGF. EGFR-targeted poly IC induced rapid apoptosis in the target cells in vitro and in vivo. Expression of several cytokines and "bystander killing" of untransfected tumor cells was detected in vitro and in vivo. Intra-tumoral delivery of the EGFR-targeted poly IC induced the complete regression of pre-established intracranial tumors in nude mice, with no obvious adverse toxic effects on normal brain tissue. A year after treatment completion the treated mice remain cancer-free and healthy. Similarly, non-viral delivery of poly IC completely eliminated pre-established breast cancer and adenocarcinoma xenografts derived from EGFR over-expressing cancer cell lines, suggesting that the strategy is applicable to other EGFR-over-expressing tumors. CONCLUSION: The strategy described has yielded an effective treatment of EGFR over-expressing GBM in an animal model. If this strategy is translated successfully to the clinical setting, it may actually offer help to GBM patients. Moreover the elimination of two additional EGFR over-expressing cancers in vivo suggests that in principle this strategy can be applied to treat other tumors that over-express EGFR.

  10. A seemingly most effective target for early detection and intervention of prostate tumor invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-gao Man

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This commentary proposes that budding tumor cell projections from focally disrupted tumor capsules represent a most effective target for early detection and intervention of prostate tumor invasion. The rationale, supporting data, and clinical applications of the hypothesis are discussed.

  11. Evaluation of Novel Antimouse VEGFR2 Antibodies as Potential Antiangiogenic or Vascular Targeting Agents for Tumor Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Ran

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available We generated a panel of eight rat IgG2a monoclonal antibodies with high affinity for mouse VEGFR2 (KDR/Flk-1, the main receptor that mediates the angiogenic effect of VEGF-A. The antibodies (termed RAFL, Rat Anti Flk bound to dividing endothelial cells more strongly than they did to nondividing cells. Most of the RAFL antibodies blocked [125I]VEGF165 binding to VEGFR2. Three of eight antibodies localized to VEGFR2-positive tumor endothelium after intravenous injection into mice bearing orthotopic MDA-MB-231 breast carcinomas, as judged by indirect immunohistochemistry. An average of 60% of vessels in the tumors was stained. The majority (50–80% of vessels were also stained in a variety of other human and murine tumors growing in mice. The antibodies did not bind detectably to the vascular endothelium in normal heart, lung, liver, and brain cortex, whereas the vascular endothelium in kidney glomerulus and pancreatic islets was stained. Treatment of mice bearing orthotopic MDA-MB-231 tumors with RAFL-1 antibody inhibited tumor growth by an average of 48% and reduced vascular density by 65%, compared to tumors in mice treated with control IgG. Vascular damage was not observed in normal organs, including kidneys and pancreas. These studies demonstrate that anti-VEGFR2 antibodies have potential for vascular targeting and imaging of tumors in vivo.

  12. A novel brain metastasis xenograft model for convection‑enhanced delivery of targeted toxins via a micro‑osmotic pump system enabled for real‑time bioluminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jun; Li, Yan Michael; Cheng, Quan; Vallera, Daniel A; Hall, Walter A

    2015-10-01

    Brain metastasis is a common cause of mortality in patients with cancer, and is associated with poor prognosis. There is a current requirement for the identification of relevant brain metastasis tumor models, which may be used to test novel therapeutic agents and delivery systems in pre‑clinical studies. The present study aimed to investigate the development of a murine model of brain metastasis, and the application of bioluminescence imaging (BLI) for monitoring tumor growth and response to targeted toxins (TT). A luciferase‑modified human brain metastasis cell line was implanted into the caudate‑putamen of athymic mice using a stereotactic frame. Tumor growth was monitored by BLI, and tumor volume was calculated from three‑dimensional measurements of serial histopathological sections. Histopathological analyses revealed the presence of tumor growth within the caudate‑putamen of all of the mice, and BLI was shown to be correlated with tumor volume. To evaluate whether this model would allow the detection of a therapeutic response, mice bearing metastatic brain tumor cell xenografts were treated with TT delivered by convection‑enhanced delivery (CED), via a micro‑osmotic pump system. The TT‑treated groups were submitted to metastatic brain tumor cell experiments, the results of which suggested that TT treatment delayed tumor growth, as determined by BLI monitoring, and significantly extended the survival of the mice. The results of the present study demonstrated the efficacy of a brain metastasis model for CED of TT via a micro‑osmotic pump system in athymic mice, in which tumor growth and response to therapy were accurately monitored by BLI. In conclusion, this model may be well‑suited for pre‑clinical testing of potential therapeutics for the treatment of patients with metastatic brain tumors.

  13. RGD-TPGS decorated theranostic liposomes for brain targeted delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonali; Singh, Rahul Pratap; Sharma, Gunjan; Kumari, Lakshmi; Koch, Biplob; Singh, Sanjay; Bharti, Shreekant; Rajinikanth, Paruvathanahalli Siddalingam; Pandey, Bajarangprasad L; Muthu, Madaswamy S

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to formulate RGD-TPGS decorated theranostic liposomes, which contain both docetaxel (DTX) and quantum dots (QDs) for brain cancer imaging and therapy. RGD conjugated TPGS (RGD-TPGS) was synthesized and conjugation was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and electrospray ionisation (ESI) mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS). The theranostic liposomes were prepared by the solvent injection method and characterized for their particle size, polydispersity, zeta-potential, surface morphology, drug encapsulation efficiency, and in-vitro release study. Biocompatibility and safety of theranostic liposomes were studied by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation study and histopathology of brain. In-vivo study was performed for determination of brain theranostic effects in comparison with marketed formulation (Docel™) and free QDs. The particle sizes of the non-targeted and targeted theranostic liposomes were found in between 100 and 200nm. About 70% of drug encapsulation efficiency was achieved with liposomes. The drug release from RGD-TPGS decorated liposomes was sustained for more than 72h with 80% of drug release. The in-vivo results demonstrated that RGD-TPGS decorated theranostic liposomes were 6.47- and 6.98-fold more effective than Docel™ after 2h and 4h treatments, respectively. Further, RGD-TPGS decorated theranostic liposomes has reduced ROS generation effectively, and did not show any signs of brain damage or edema in brain histopathology. The results of this study have indicated that RGD-TPGS decorated theranostic liposomes are promising carrier for brain theranostics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Cognitive functions and personality traits in patients with brain tumors: the role of lesion localization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumnikova, O M; Perfil'ev, A M; Stupak, V V

    2014-01-01

    Personality traits and cognitive functions were studied depending on a tumor localization in the brain in 21 neurosurgical patients and the results were compared with a control group. In patients with brain damage, mostly affected were personality traits associated with emotion regulation and social interaction (neuroticism, psychoticism and social conformity). Increases in psychoticism and decreases in neuroticism were more expressed in patients with a left-hemisphere localization of tumors. The tumor-induced decrease in cognitive abilities was more presented in performing figurative tasks and less in verbal ones. Verbal functions were more decreased in the group with frontal localization of tumor compared to that with parietal localization.

  15. Recent Trends in Multifunctional Liposomal Nanocarriers for Enhanced Tumor Targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Perche

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Liposomes are delivery systems that have been used to formulate a vast variety of therapeutic and imaging agents for the past several decades. They have significant advantages over their free forms in terms of pharmacokinetics, sensitivity for cancer diagnosis and therapeutic efficacy. The multifactorial nature of cancer and the complex physiology of the tumor microenvironment require the development of multifunctional nanocarriers. Multifunctional liposomal nanocarriers should combine long blood circulation to improve pharmacokinetics of the loaded agent and selective distribution to the tumor lesion relative to healthy tissues, remote-controlled or tumor stimuli-sensitive extravasation from blood at the tumor’s vicinity, internalization motifs to move from tumor bounds and/or tumor intercellular space to the cytoplasm of cancer cells for effective tumor cell killing. This review will focus on current strategies used for cancer detection and therapy using liposomes with special attention to combination therapies.

  16. RGD-targeted paramagnetic liposomes for early detection of tumor: In vitro and in vivo studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Wei; Su Bo; Meng Shuyan; Ju Lixia; Yan Linghua; Ding Yongmei; Song Yin; Zhou Wei; Li Heyan; Tang Liang; Zhao Yinmin [Research Institute of Oncology, Tongji University Medical School, 507 Zhenmin Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhou Caicun, E-mail: caicunzhou@yahoo.com.cn [Research Institute of Oncology, Tongji University Medical School, 507 Zhenmin Road, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Magnetic resonance molecular imaging has emerged as a potential approach for tumor diagnosis in the last few decades. This approach consists of the delivery of MR contrast agents to the tumor by specific targeted carriers. For this purpose, a lipopeptide was constructed by using a cyclic RGD peptide headgroup coupled to palmitic acid anchors via a KGG tripeptide spacer. Targeted paramagnetic liposomes were then prepared by the incorporation of RGD-coupled-lipopeptides into lipid bilayers for specific bounding to tumor. In vitro, study demonstrated that RGD-targeted liposomes exhibited a better binding affinity to targeted cells than non-targeted liposomes. MR imaging of mice bearing A549 tumors with the RGD-targeted paramagnetic liposomes also resulted in a greater signal enhancement of tumor compared to non-targeted liposomes and pure contrast agents groups. In addition, biodistribution study also showed specific tumor targeting of RGD-targeted paramagnetic liposomes in vivo. Therefore, RGD-targeted paramagnetic liposomes prepared in the present study may be a more promising method for early tumor diagnosis.

  17. Glucose metabolism via the pentose phosphate pathway, glycolysis and Krebs cycle in an orthotopic mouse model of human brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Cho, Steve K; Rakheja, Dinesh; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Kapur, Payal; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Jindal, Ashish; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Good, Levi B; Raisanen, Jack; Sun, Xiankai; Mickey, Bruce; Choi, Changho; Takahashi, Masaya; Togao, Osamu; Pascual, Juan M; Deberardinis, Ralph J; Maher, Elizabeth A; Malloy, Craig R; Bachoo, Robert M

    2012-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that increased flux through the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is required to support the metabolic demands of rapid malignant cell growth. Using orthotopic mouse models of human glioblastoma (GBM) and renal cell carcinoma metastatic to brain, we estimated the activity of the PPP relative to glycolysis by infusing [1,2-(13) C(2) ]glucose. The [3-(13) C]lactate/[2,3-(13) C(2) ]lactate ratio was similar for both the GBM and brain metastasis and their respective surrounding brains (GBM, 0.197 ± 0.011 and 0.195 ± 0.033, respectively (p = 1); metastasis: 0.126 and 0.119 ± 0.033, respectively). This suggests that the rate of glycolysis is significantly greater than the PPP flux in these tumors, and that the PPP flux into the lactate pool is similar in both tumors. Remarkably, (13) C-(13) C coupling was observed in molecules derived from Krebs cycle intermediates in both tumor types, denoting glucose oxidation. In the renal cell carcinoma, in contrast with GBM, (13) C multiplets of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) differed from its precursor glutamate, suggesting that GABA did not derive from a common glutamate precursor pool. In addition, the orthotopic renal tumor, the patient's primary renal mass and brain metastasis were all strongly immunopositive for the 67-kDa isoform of glutamate decarboxylase, as were 84% of tumors on a renal cell carcinoma tissue microarray of the same histology, suggesting that GABA synthesis is cell autonomous in at least a subset of renal cell carcinomas. Taken together, these data demonstrate that (13) C-labeled glucose can be used in orthotopic mouse models to study tumor metabolism in vivo and to ascertain new metabolic targets for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. The role of Intravenous Levetiracetam in Treatment of Seizures in Brain Tumor Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekokobe eFonkem

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Levetiracetam, tradename Keppra, is a new second generation antiepileptic drug that is being used increasingly in brain tumor patients. In patients suffering with brain tumors, seizures are one of the leading neurologic complications seen in more than 30% of patients. Levetiracetam is a pyrollidine-derivative drug, which has a unique mechanism of action. Unlike other antiepileptic drugs, Levetiracetam is proposed to bind to a synaptic vesicle protein inhibiting calcium release. Brain tumor patients are frequently on chemotherapy or other drugs that induce cytochrome P450, causing significant drug interactions. However, levetiracetam does not induce the P450 system and does not exhibit any relevant drug interactions. Intravenous delivery is as bioavailable as the oral medication allowing it to be used in emergency situations. Levetiracetam is an attractive option for brain tumor patients suffering from seizures, but also can be used prophylactically in patients with brain tumors or patients undergoing neurological surgery. Emerging studies have also demonstrated that levetiracetam can increase the sensitivity of Glioblastoma tumors to the chemotherapy drug Temozolomide. Levetiracetam is a safe alternative to conventional Antiepileptic drugs and an emerging tool for brain tumor patients combating seizures.

  19. Targeting Extracellular Matrix Glycoproteins in Metastases for Tumor-Initiating Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0041 TITLE: Targeting Extracellular Matrix Glycoproteins in Metastases for Tumor- Initiating Cell Therapy PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting Extracellular Matrix Glycoproteins in Metastases for Tumor-Initiating Cell Therapy 5b. GRANT

  20. Dietary Selenium Supplementation Modulates Growth of Brain Metastatic Tumors and Changes the Expression of Adhesion Molecules in Brain Microvessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, Jagoda K; Wolff, Gretchen; Xiao, Rijin; Power, Ronan F; Toborek, Michal

    2016-08-01

    Various dietary agents can modulate tumor invasiveness. The current study explored whether selenoglycoproteins (SeGPs) extracted from selenium-enriched yeast affect tumor cell homing and growth in the brain. Mice were fed diets enriched with specific SeGPs (SeGP40 or SeGP65, 1 mg/kg Se each), glycoproteins (GP40 or GP65, 0.2-0.3 mg/kg Se each) or a control diet (0.2-0.3 mg/kg Se) for 12 weeks. Then, murine Lewis lung carcinoma cells were infused into the brain circulation. Analyses were performed at early (48 h) and late stages (3 weeks) post tumor cell infusion. Imaging of tumor progression in the brain revealed that mice fed SeGP65-enriched diet displayed diminished metastatic tumor growth, fewer extravasating tumor cells and smaller metastatic lesions. While administration of tumor cells resulted in a significant upregulation of adhesion molecules in the early stage of tumor progression, overexpression of VCAM-1 (vascular call adhesion molecule-1) and ALCAM (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule) messenger RNA (mRNA) was diminished in SeGP65 supplemented mice. Additionally, mice fed SeGP65 showed decreased expression of acetylated NF-κB p65, 48 h post tumor cell infusion. The results indicate that tumor progression in the brain can be modulated by specific SeGPs. Selenium-containing compounds were more effective than their glycoprotein controls, implicating selenium as a potential negative regulator of metastatic process.

  1. Patient-derived xenografts from non-small cell lung cancer brain metastases are valuable translational platforms for the development of personalized targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Won; Lee, Jung-Il; Lee, Se Jeong; Cho, Hyun Jung; Song, Hye Jin; Jeong, Da Eun; Seo, Yun Jee; Shin, Sang; Joung, Je-Gun; Kwon, Yong-Jun; Choi, Yoon-La; Park, Woong-Yang; Lee, Hyun Moo; Seol, Ho Jun; Shim, Young Mog; Joo, Kyeung Min; Nam, Do-Hyun

    2015-03-01

    The increasing prevalence of distant metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) indicates an urgent need for novel therapeutic modalities. Brain metastasis is particularly common in NSCLC, with severe adverse effects on clinical prognosis. Although the molecular heterogeneity of NSCLC and availability of various targeted agents suggest personalized therapeutic approaches for such brain metastases, further development of appropriate preclinical models is needed to validate the strategies. We established patient-derived xenografts (PDX) using NSCLC brain metastasis surgical samples and elucidated their possible preclinical and clinical implications for personalized treatment. NSCLC brain metastases (n = 34) showed a significantly higher successful PDX establishment rate than primary specimens (n = 64; 74% vs. 23%). PDXs derived from NSCLC brain metastases recapitulated the pathologic, genetic, and functional properties of corresponding parental tumors. Furthermore, tumor spheres established in vitro from the xenografts under serum-free conditions maintained their in vivo brain metastatic potential. Differential phenotypic and molecular responses to 20 targeted agents could subsequently be screened in vitro using these NSCLC PDXs derived from brain metastases. Although PDX establishment from primary NSCLCs was significantly influenced by histologic subtype, clinical aggressiveness, and genetic alteration status, the brain metastases exhibited consistently adequate in vivo tumor take rate and in vitro tumor sphere formation capacity, regardless of clinical and molecular conditions. Therefore, PDXs from NSCLC brain metastases may better represent the heterogeneous advanced NSCLC population and could be utilized as preclinical models to meet unmet clinical needs such as drug screening for personalized treatments. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Targeting MUC1 mediated tumor stromal metabolic interaction in Triple negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0315 TITLE: Targeting MUC1-mediated tumor -stromal metabolic interaction in Triple- negative breast cancer PRINCIPAL...2013- 14 Aug 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0315 Targeting MUC1-mediated tumor -stromal metabolic...recurrence within 1-3 years and a high mortality rate [3]. Therefore, identifying factors that facilitate tumor growth and metastases have the

  3. Targeting MUC1-Mediated Tumor-Stromal Metabolic Interaction in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0315 TITLE: Targeting MUC1-mediated tumor -stromal metabolic interaction in Triple- negative breast cancer PRINCIPAL...2013- 14 Aug 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0315 Targeting MUC1-mediated tumor -stromal metabolic...recurrence within 1-3 years and a high mortality rate [3]. Therefore, identifying factors that facilitate tumor growth and metastases have the

  4. Tumor cell endocytosis imaging facilitates delineation of the glioma-brain interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, C; Wright, S C; Engelhardt, R T; Johnson, G A; Kramm, C; Breakefield, X O; Weissleder, R

    1997-01-01

    We describe a method for measuring tumor cell endocytosis in vivo and provide the anatomic correlate of this tumor cell function using a superparamagnetic and histologically detectable marker for cell uptake (MION). Rats (n = 22) were intrahemispherically implanted with a thymidine kinase (TK)-positive 9L gliosarcoma cell line, where TK served as the tumor marker. Twenty-four hours after intravenous injection of 10 mg Fe/kg of MION, rat brains were removed and underwent MR imaging ex vivo at near-microscopic resolution (isotropic voxel size of 86 microm, 9.4 T) prior to histologic processing. The imaging probe accumulated within tumor cells adjacent to the hyperpermeable tumor-brain interface including microscopic deposits and along finger-like invasions of the tumor into brain, facilitating the demarcation of the true histologic tumor border in three dimensions by MR microscopy. The method has potential research and clinical implications for delineating the tumor-brain interface prior to therapy and/or for providing a rational basis for imaging nanocolloid drug delivery to solid tumors.

  5. Targets for active immunotherapy against pediatric solid tumors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, J.F.M.; Coulie, P.G.; Figdor, C.G.; Adema, G.J.; Vries, I.J.M. de; Hoogerbrugge, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    The potential role of antibodies and T lymphocytes in the eradication of cancer has been demonstrated in numerous animal models and clinical trials. In the last decennia new strategies have been developed for the use of tumor-specific T cells and antibodies in cancer therapy. Effective anti-tumor

  6. Emerging Techniques in Brain Tumor Imaging: What Radiologists Need to Know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Minjae; Kim, Ho Sung [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Among the currently available brain tumor imaging, advanced MR imaging techniques, such as diffusion-weighted MR imaging and perfusion MR imaging, have been used for solving diagnostic challenges associated with conventional imaging and for monitoring the brain tumor treatment response. Further development of advanced MR imaging techniques and postprocessing methods may contribute to predicting the treatment response to a specific therapeutic regimen, particularly using multi-modality and multiparametric imaging. Over the next few years, new imaging techniques, such as amide proton transfer imaging, will be studied regarding their potential use in quantitative brain tumor imaging. In this review, the pathophysiologic considerations and clinical validations of these promising techniques are discussed in the context of brain tumor characterization and treatment response.

  7. Analysis of Brain Tumors Due to the Usage of Mobile Phones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOOBIA SAEED

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The impact of cellular phone radiation on human health is the subject of current mindfulness and is an outcome of the huge increase in phone usage throughout the world. Phones use electromagnetic radiation in the microwave range. The issue is associated with wireless use for 50 minutes and above. The excessive use of mobile phone may cause brain tumors. Nowadays the most commonly developed brain tumor type is GBM (Glioblastoma in multiform and Malignant Astrocytoma. In this paper, we focus on the causes of brain tumor (cancer due to the cell phone as this increase in glucose metabolism. The aim of the study is to address the aforementioned problems associated with the cell phone. MATLAB programming to detect a brain tumor has been used. We have conducted MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging study to get the best images and results.

  8. Surviving a brain tumor in childhood: impact on family functioning in adolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, Laura; Schappin, Renske; Gooskens, Rob; Huisman, Jaap; Jongmans, Marian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate family functioning in families with an adolescent survivor of a pediatric brain tumor. We explored whether adolescent, parent, disease and treatment factors, and demographic characteristics predicted family functioning. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, 45 adolescent

  9. Emerging techniques in brain tumor imaging: What radiologists need to know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Jae; Kim, Ho Sung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Among the currently available brain tumor imaging, advanced MR imaging techniques, such as diffusion-weighted MR imaging and perfusion MR imaging, have been used for solving diagnostic challenges associated with conventional imaging and for monitoring the brain tumor treatment response. Further development of advanced MR imaging techniques and postprocessing methods may contribute to predicting the treatment response to a specific therapeutic regimen, particularly using multi-modality and multiparametric imaging. Over the next few years, new imaging techniques, such as amide proton transfer imaging, will be studied regarding their potential use in quantitative brain tumor imaging. In this review, the pathophysiologic considerations and clinical validations of these promising techniques are discussed in the context of brain tumor characterization and treatment response.

  10. The targeting mechanism of DHA ligand and its conjugate with Gemcitabine for the enhanced tumor therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siwen; Qin, Jingyi; Tian, Caiping; Cao, Jie; Fida, Guissi; Wang, Zhaohui; Chen, Haiyan; Qian, Zhiyu; Chen, Wei R; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 C22 natural fatty acid serving as a precursor for metabolic and biochemical pathways, was reported as a targeting ligand of anticancer drugs. However, its tumor targeting ability and mechanism has not been claimed. Here we hypothesized that the uptake of DHA by tumor cells is related to the phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) contents in cell membranes. Thus, in this manuscript, the tumor-targeting ability of DHA was initially demonstrated in vitro and in vivo on different tumor cell lines by labeling DHA with fluorescence dyes. Subsequently, the tumor targeting ability was then correlated with the contents of PE in cell membranes to study the uptake mechanism. Further, DHA was conjugated with anticancer drug gemcitabine (DHA-GEM) for targeted tumor therapy. Our results demonstrated that DHA exhibited high tumor targeting ability and PE is the main mediator, which confirmed our hypothesis. The DHA-GEM displayed enhanced therapeutic efficacy than that of GEM itself, indicating that DHA is a promising ligand for tumor targeted therapy. PMID:25004114

  11. Primary brain tumors and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya-Matsuoka, Carlos; Cachia, David; Olar, Adriana; Armstrong, Terri S; Gilbert, Mark R

    2014-12-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neurotoxic encephalopathic state associated with reversible cerebral vasogenic edema. It is an increasingly recognized occurrence in the oncology population. However, it is very uncommon in patients with primary brain tumors (PBTs). The aim of this study was to analyze the clinicoradiological features and report the clinical outcomes of PRES in PBT patients. We identified 4 cases with PBT who developed PRES at MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) between 2012 and 2014. Clinical and radiological data were abstracted from their records. In addition, we also solicited 8 cases from the literature. The median age at PRES onset was 19 years, male-to-female ratio was 1:1, and the syndrome occurred in patients with ependymoma (n = 4), glioblastoma (n = 3), diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG; n = 3), juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (n = 1), and atypical meningioma (n = 1). Two glioblastomas and 2 DIPG cases received bevacizumab and vandetanib before the onset of symptoms, respectively. The most common clinical presentation was seizures (n = 7). Three MDACC patients recovered completely in 3-4 weeks after the onset of symptoms. One patient died due to active cancer and several comorbidities including PRES. Hypertension seems to be the most important coexisting risk factor for development of PRES; however, the potential effects of chemotherapeutic agents in the pathogenesis of PRES should also be examined. The clinicoradiological course of PRES in PBT patients did not vary from the classical descriptions of PRES found in other causes. PRES must be considered as part of the differential diagnosis in patients with PBTs presenting with seizures or acute encephalopathy.

  12. Tumor Bed Dynamics After Surgical Resection of Brain Metastases: Implications for Postoperative Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, Lesley A., E-mail: lesley.a.jarvis@hitchcock.org [Section of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Simmons, Nathan E. [Section of Neurosurgery, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Bellerive, Marc [Section of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Erkmen, Kadir [Section of Neurosurgery, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Eskey, Clifford J. [Department of Radiology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Gladstone, David J. [Section of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Hug, Eugen B. [Procure, New York, New York (United States); Roberts, David W. [Section of Neurosurgery, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Hartford, Alan C. [Section of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze 2 factors that influence timing of radiosurgery after surgical resection of brain metastases: target volume dynamics and intracranial tumor progression in the interval between surgery and cavity stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Three diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were retrospectively analyzed for 41 patients with a total of 43 resected brain metastases: preoperative MRI scan (MRI-1), MRI scan within 24 hours after surgery (MRI-2), and MRI scan for radiosurgery planning, which is generally performed {<=}1 week before SRS (MRI-3). Tumors were contoured on MRI-1 scans, and resection cavities were contoured on MRI-2 and MRI-3 scans. Results: The mean tumor volume before surgery was 14.23 cm{sup 3}, and the mean cavity volume was 8.53 cm{sup 3} immediately after surgery and 8.77 cm{sup 3} before SRS. In the interval between surgery and SRS, 20 cavities (46.5%) were stable in size, defined as a change of {<=}2 cm{sup 3}; 10 cavities (23.3%) collapsed by >2 cm{sup 3}; and 13 cavities (30.2%) increased by >2 cm{sup 3}. The unexpected increase in cavity size was a result of local progression (2 cavities), accumulation of cyst-like fluid or blood (9 cavities), and nonspecific postsurgical changes (2 cavities). Finally, in the interval between surgery and SRS, 5 cavities showed definite local tumor progression, 4 patients had progression elsewhere in the brain, 1 patient had both local progression and progression elsewhere, and 33 patients had stable intracranial disease. Conclusions: In the interval between surgical resection and delivery of SRS, surgical cavities are dynamic in size; however, most cavities do not collapse, and nearly one-third are larger at the time of SRS. These observations support obtaining imaging for radiosurgery planning as close to SRS delivery as possible and suggest that delaying SRS after surgery does not offer the benefit of cavity collapse in most patients. A prospective, multi

  13. Analysis of Brain Tumors Due to the Usage of Mobile Phones

    OpenAIRE

    SOOBIA SAEED; ASADULLAH SHAIKH; SHABAZ AHMED NOOR

    2017-01-01

    The impact of cellular phone radiation on human health is the subject of current mindfulness and is an outcome of the huge increase in phone usage throughout the world. Phones use electromagnetic radiation in the microwave range. The issue is associated with wireless use for 50 minutes and above. The excessive use of mobile phone may cause brain tumors. Nowadays the most commonly developed brain tumor type is GBM (Glioblastoma) in multiform and Malignant Astrocytoma. In this paper, we focus ...

  14. Neurosurgical virtual reality simulation metrics to assess psychomotor skills during brain tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarnoush, Hamed; Alzhrani, Gmaan; Winkler-Schwartz, Alexander; Alotaibi, Fahad; Gelinas-Phaneuf, Nicholas; Pazos, Valérie; Choudhury, Nusrat; Fares, Jawad; DiRaddo, Robert; Del Maestro, Rolando F

    2015-05-01

    Virtual reality simulator technology together with novel metrics could advance our understanding of expert neurosurgical performance and modify and improve resident training and assessment. This pilot study introduces innovative metrics that can be measured by the state-of-the-art simulator to assess performance. Such metrics cannot be measured in an operating room and have not been used previously to assess performance. Three sets of performance metrics were assessed utilizing the NeuroTouch platform in six scenarios with simulated brain tumors having different visual and tactile characteristics. Tier 1 metrics included percentage of brain tumor resected and volume of simulated "normal" brain tissue removed. Tier 2 metrics included instrument tip path length, time taken to resect the brain tumor, pedal activation frequency, and sum of applied forces. Tier 3 metrics included sum of forces applied to different tumor regions and the force bandwidth derived from the force histogram. The results outlined are from a novice resident in the second year of training and an expert neurosurgeon. The three tiers of metrics obtained from the NeuroTouch simulator do encompass the wide variability of technical performance observed during novice/expert resections of simulated brain tumors and can be employed to quantify the safety, quality, and efficiency of technical performance during simulated brain tumor resection. Tier 3 metrics derived from force pyramids and force histograms may be particularly useful in assessing simulated brain tumor resections. Our pilot study demonstrates that the safety, quality, and efficiency of novice and expert operators can be measured using metrics derived from the NeuroTouch platform, helping to understand how specific operator performance is dependent on both psychomotor ability and cognitive input during multiple virtual reality brain tumor resections.

  15. Coffee and green tea consumption in relation to brain tumor risk in a Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Takahiro; Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Budhathoki, Sanjeev; Hidaka, Akihisa; Yamaji, Taiki; Shimazu, Taichi; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Narita, Yoshitaka; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-12-15

    Few prospective studies have investigated the etiology of brain tumor, especially among Asian populations. Both coffee and green tea are popular beverages, but their relation with brain tumor risk, particularly with glioma, has been inconsistent in epidemiological studies. In this study, we evaluated the association between coffee and greed tea intake and brain tumor risk in a Japanese population. We evaluated a cohort of 106,324 subjects (50,438 men and 55,886 women) in the Japan Public Health Center-Based Prospective Study (JPHC Study). Subjects were followed from 1990 for Cohort I and 1993 for Cohort II until December 31, 2012. One hundred and fifty-seven (70 men and 87 women) newly diagnosed cases of brain tumor were identified during the study period. Hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) for the association between coffee or green tea consumption and brain tumor risk were assessed using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. We found a significant inverse association between coffee consumption and brain tumor risk in both total subjects (≥3 cups/day; HR = 0.47, 95%CI = 0.22-0.98) and in women (≥3 cups/day; HR = 0.24, 95%CI = 0.06-0.99), although the number of cases in the highest category was small. Furthermore, glioma risk tended to decrease with higher coffee consumption (≥3 cups/day; HR = 0.54, 95%CI = 0.16-1.80). No association was seen between green tea and brain tumor risk. In conclusion, our study suggested that coffee consumption might reduce the risk of brain tumor, including that of glioma, in the Japanese population. © 2016 UICC.

  16. Nanobody-Based Delivery Systems for Diagnosis and Targeted Tumor Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaozhong Hu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of innovative targeted therapeutic approaches are expected to surpass the efficacy of current forms of treatments and cause less damage to healthy cells surrounding the tumor site. Since the first development of targeting agents from hybridoma’s, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs have been employed to inhibit tumor growth and proliferation directly or to deliver effector molecules to tumor cells. However, the full potential of such a delivery strategy is hampered by the size of mAbs, which will obstruct the targeted delivery system to access the tumor tissue. By serendipity, a new kind of functional homodimeric antibody format was discovered in camelidae, known as heavy-chain antibodies (HCAbs. The cloning of the variable domain of HCAbs produces an attractive minimal-sized alternative for mAbs, referred to as VHH or nanobodies (Nbs. Apart from their dimensions in the single digit nanometer range, the unique characteristics of Nbs combine a high stability and solubility, low immunogenicity and excellent affinity and specificity against all possible targets including tumor markers. This stimulated the development of tumor-targeted therapeutic strategies. Some autonomous Nbs have been shown to act as antagonistic drugs, but more importantly, the targeting capacity of Nbs has been exploited to create drug delivery systems. Obviously, Nb-based targeted cancer therapy is mainly focused toward extracellular tumor markers, since the membrane barrier prevents antibodies to reach the most promising intracellular tumor markers. Potential strategies, such as lentiviral vectors and bacterial type 3 secretion system, are proposed to deliver target-specific Nbs into tumor cells and to block tumor markers intracellularly. Simultaneously, Nbs have also been employed for in vivo molecular imaging to diagnose diseased tissues and to monitor the treatment effects. Here, we review the state of the art and focus on recent developments with Nbs as

  17. Family history of cancer in benign brain tumor subtypes versus gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinn eOstrom

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Family history is associated with gliomas, but this association has not ben established for benign brain tumors. Using information from newly diagnosed primary brain tumor patients, we describe patterns of family cancer histories in patients with benign brain tumors and compare those to patients with gliomas. Methods: Newly diagnosed primary brain tumor patients were identified as part of the Ohio Brain Tumor Study (OBTS. Each patient was asked to participate in a telephone interview about personal medical history, family history of cancer, and other exposures. Information was available from 33 acoustic neuroma (65%, 78 meningioma (65%, 49 pituitary adenoma (73.1% and 152 glioma patients (58.2%. The association between family history of cancer and each subtype was compared with gliomas using unconditional logistic regression models generating odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. Results: There was no significant difference in family history of cancer between patients with glioma and benign subtypes. Conclusions: The results suggest that benign brain tumor may have an association with family history of cancer. More studies are warranted to disentangle the potential genetic and/or environmental causes for these diseases.

  18. Family History of Cancer in Benign Brain Tumor Subtypes Versus Gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrom, Quinn T.; McCulloh, Christopher; Chen, Yanwen; Devine, Karen; Wolinsky, Yingli; Davitkov, Perica; Robbins, Sarah; Cherukuri, Rajesh; Patel, Ashokkumar; Gupta, Rajnish; Cohen, Mark; Barrios, Jaime Vengoechea; Brewer, Cathy; Schilero, Cathy; Smolenski, Kathy; McGraw, Mary; Denk, Barbara; Naska, Theresa; Laube, Frances; Steele, Ruth; Greene, Dale; Kastl, Alison; Bell, Susan; Aziz, Dina; Chiocca, E. A.; McPherson, Christopher; Warnick, Ronald; Barnett, Gene H.; Sloan, Andrew E.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Family history is associated with gliomas, but this association has not been established for benign brain tumors. Using information from newly diagnosed primary brain tumor patients, we describe patterns of family cancer histories in patients with benign brain tumors and compare those to patients with gliomas. Methods: Newly diagnosed primary brain tumor patients were identified as part of the Ohio Brain Tumor Study. Each patient was asked to participate in a telephone interview about personal medical history, family history of cancer, and other exposures. Information was available from 33 acoustic neuroma (65%), 78 meningioma (65%), 49 pituitary adenoma (73.1%), and 152 glioma patients (58.2%). The association between family history of cancer and each subtype was compared with gliomas using unconditional logistic regression models generating odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals. Results: There was no significant difference in family history of cancer between patients with glioma and benign subtypes. Conclusion: The results suggest that benign brain tumor may have an association with family history of cancer. More studies are warranted to disentangle the potential genetic and/or environmental causes for these diseases. PMID:22649779

  19. Comparison of resilience in adolescent survivors of brain tumors and healthy adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chin-Mi; Chen, Yueh-Chih; Wong, Tai-Tong

    2014-01-01

    Resilience is essential for the psychological adjustment of adolescents experiencing difficulty. Comparing differences in resilience between adolescent survivors of brain tumors and healthy adolescents may help identify factors related to resilience in adolescents. The purpose of this study was to clarify how illness impacts the normative development of adolescent survivors of brain tumors by comparing them to healthy adolescents in terms of resilience and how it is affected by various health problems. This cross-sectional, case-control study used convenience sampling to recruit 13- to 18-year-old adolescent survivors of brain tumors and healthy adolescents matched by school level, gender, and living area. Data were collected by structured questionnaires. The sample included 60 adolescent survivors and 120 healthy adolescents. Participants in both groups were predominantly male adolescents (63.3%) and junior high school students (55%). The 2 groups did not differ significantly in resilience, but survivors without emotional problems had a higher mean resilience score than did healthy adolescents and survivors with emotional problems (F = 8.65, P adolescent survivors of brain tumors and healthy adolescents. In addition, the impact of emotional problems on resilience was more severe in brain tumor survivors than in healthy adolescents. Our results suggest that pediatric oncology nurses design interdisciplinary school-based interventions to reduce the impact of emotional problems on resilience in both healthy adolescents and those who survived brain tumors.

  20. Association rule mining based study for identification of clinical parameters akin to occurrence of brain tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Dipankar; Sood, Meemansa; Vijayvargia, Poorvika; Hota, Sunil; Naik, Pradeep K

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare sector is generating a large amount of information corresponding to diagnosis, disease identification and treatment of an individual. Mining knowledge and providing scientific decision-making for the diagnosis & treatment of disease from the clinical dataset is therefore increasingly becoming necessary. Aim of this study was t