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Sample records for brain normal volunteers

  1. Stereoselective disposition of flurbiprofen in normal volunteers.

    OpenAIRE

    Knadler, M P; Brater, D C; Hall, S. D.

    1992-01-01

    1. The concentrations of the R- and S-enantiomers of flurbiprofen and its metabolites were measured in plasma and urine following the oral administration of 50 mg racemic flurbiprofen to six normal volunteers. 2. The AUC and half-life of the R-enantiomer were significantly lower than the corresponding S-enantiomer values reflecting the greater clearance of R-flurbiprofen (20.42 +/- 4.71 vs 16.12 +/- 3.60 ml min-1). 3. Ex vivo protein binding studies indicated that the percent unbound of R-flu...

  2. Volunteers for biomedical research. Recruitment and screening of normal controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtasel, D L; Gur, R E; Mozley, P D; Richards, J; Taleff, M M; Heimberg, C; Gallacher, F; Gur, R C

    1991-11-01

    We examined the process of accruing healthy control subjects for biomedical research on brain function. Of 1670 responders to newspaper advertising, 23.1% were uninterested when learning more about the studies, and 50.9% of those remaining were found by structured telephone screening to meet exclusionary criteria for having a history of psychiatric, neurologic, or medical disease that might affect brain function. Of 312 volunteers passing the telephone screening who came to an in-person evaluation by a physician and agreed to participate, 49.7% were found to meet exclusionary criteria, and only 157 were admitted to the study. This underscores the importance of attending to the issue of screening and assessment of "normal volunteers." Alternative strategies should be considered for enriching the pool.

  3. The effects of long-term administration of guarana on the cognition of normal, elderly volunteers

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    Jose Carlos Fernandes Galduróz

    Full Text Available Paulinia cupana (guarana is a Brazilian plant given great prestige in popular medicine, for example as being a potent stimulator of brain functions. The authors assessed the effects of the long-term administration of guarana on the cognition of normal, elderly volunteers. Forty-five volunteers were studied, with a random distribution in three experimental groups: placebo (n=15, caffeine (n=15, and guarana (n=15, in a double-blind study. There were no significant cognitive alterations in these volunteers.

  4. Normal range values for thromboelastography in healthy adult volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpelini, S; Rhind, S G; Nascimento, B; Tien, H; Shek, P N; Peng, H T; Huang, H; Pinto, R; Speers, V; Reis, M; Rizoli, S B

    2009-12-01

    Thromboelastography (TEG) provides a functional evaluation of coagulation. It has characteristics of an ideal coagulation test for trauma, but is not frequently used, partially due to lack of both standardized techniques and normal values. We determined normal values for our population, compared them to those of the manufacturer and evaluated the effect of gender, age, blood type, and ethnicity. The technique was standardized using citrated blood, kaolin and was performed on a Haemoscope 5000 device. Volunteers were interviewed and excluded if pregnant, on anticoagulants or having a bleeding disorder. The TEG parameters analyzed were R, K, alpha, MA, LY30, and coagulation index. All volunteers outside the manufacturer's normal range underwent extensive coagulation investigations. Reference ranges for 95% for 118 healthy volunteers were R: 3.8-9.8 min, K: 0.7-3.4 min, alpha: 47.8-77.7 degrees, MA: 49.7-72.7 mm, LY30: -2.3-5.77%, coagulation index: -5.1-3.6. Most values were significantly different from those of the manufacturer, which would have diagnosed coagulopathy in 10 volunteers, for whom additional investigation revealed no disease (81% specificity). Healthy women were significantly more hypercoagulable than men. Aging was not associated with hypercoagulability and East Asian ethnicity was not with hypocoagulability. In our population, the manufacturer's normal values for citrated blood-kaolin had a specificity of 81% and would incorrectly identify 8.5% of the healthy volunteers as coagulopathic. This study supports the manufacturer's recommendation that each institution should determine its own normal values before adopting TEG, a procedure which may be impractical. Consideration should be given to a multi-institutional study to establish wide standard values for TEG.

  5. Want a Sharper Brain as You Age? Volunteer!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162899.html Want a Sharper Brain as You Age? Volunteer! Study finds slight improvement in ... sharper mental skills at the age of 50, a new study suggests. British researchers said their findings ...

  6. Normal language in abnormal brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piattelli-Palmarini, Massimo

    2017-02-27

    There is little doubt that, in the adult, specific brain lesions cause specific language deficits. Yet, brain localizations of linguistic functions are made problematic by several reported cases of normal language in spite of major brain anomalies, mostly, but not exclusively, occurring early in life. The signal cases are hydrocephaly, spina bifida and hemispherectomy. These cases are discussed and possible solutions are suggested: namely a vast redundancy of neurons and/or the role of microtubules as neuron-internal processors and key factors in signaling and guiding the growth and reconfiguration of the brain.

  7. Human brain : biochemical lateralization in normal subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayasundar R

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemical asymmetries in normal human brain were studied using the non-invasive technique of volume localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS. The technique of STEAM was used to acquire water-suppressed proton spectra from 8 ml voxels placed in bilaterally symmetrical positions in the two hemispheres of the brain. One hundred and sixty eight right-handed male volunteers were studied for six different regions in the brain (n=28, for each region. Parietal, occipital, temporal, frontal, thalamus and cerebellum regions were studied. The focus was on metabolites such as N-acetyl aspartate (NAA, creatine/phosphocreatine (Cr/PCr and choline (Cho containing compounds. Ratios of the peak areas were calculated for them. Quantitation of the metabolites were carried for data on 18 volunteers. Significant interhemispheric differences in the distribution of metabolites were observed for all the regions studied. There were statistically significant differences on right and left side for the metabolite ratios in all the regions studied. The study has shown the existence of significant lateralization in the distribution of proton MR visible metabolites for all the regions studied.

  8. Volunteering

    OpenAIRE

    Hustinx, Lesley; Handy, Femida; Cnaan, Ram A

    2010-01-01

    In recent decades, there has been a burgeoning interest in the study of volunteering, and the number of publications devoted to volunteering has grown exponentially. In this chapter, we examine emerging theories and new directions in volunteering research. First, we discuss multi-level perspectives that try to understand volunteering in complex interaction with the organizational and institutional context. Next, we present process-oriented approaches that focus on the experience of volunteeri...

  9. Interaction between oral ciprofloxacin and caffeine in normal volunteers.

    OpenAIRE

    Healy, D P; Polk, R E; Kanawati, L; Rock, D T; Mooney, M L

    1989-01-01

    The influence of multiple doses of ciprofloxacin on the disposition of caffeine and its major metabolite, paraxanthine, was investigated in healthy volunteers. Ten xanthine-free, fasting males were given 100 mg of caffeine orally 24 h before being given ciprofloxacin and again with the third dose of ciprofloxacin (750 mg administered every 12 h). Blood samples were serially collected after both doses of caffeine and after the first and last doses of ciprofloxacin. Ciprofloxacin significantly ...

  10. Thoracic costotransverse joint pain patterns: a study in normal volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wainner Robert S

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain referral patterns of asymptomatic costotransverse joints have not been established. The objective of this study was to determine the pain referral patterns of asymptomatic costotransverse joints via provocative intra-articular injection. Methods Eight asymptomatic male volunteers received a combined total of 21 intra-articular costotransverse joint injections. Fluoroscopic imaging was used to identify and isolate each costotransverse joint and guide placement of a 25 gauge, 2.5 inch spinal needle into the costotransverse joint. Following contrast medium injection, the quality, intensity, and distribution of the resultant pain produced were recorded. Results Of the 21 costotransverse joint injections, 16 (76% were classified as being intra-articular via arthrograms taken at the time of injection, and 14 of these injections produced a pain sensation distinctly different from that of needle placement. Average pain produced was 3.3/10 on a 0–10 verbal pain scale. Pain was described generally as a deep, dull ache, and pressure sensation. Pain patterns were located superficial to the injected joint, with only the right T2 injections showing referred pain 2 segments cranially and caudally. No chest wall, upper extremity or pseudovisceral pains were reported. Conclusion This study provides preliminary data of the pain referral patterns of costotransverse joints. Further research is needed to compare these findings with those elicited from symptomatic subjects.

  11. Proteomic analysis of normal murine brain parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taraslia, Vasiliki K; Kouskoukis, Alexandros; Anagnostopoulos, Athanasios K; Stravopodis, Dimitrios J; Margaritis, Lukas H; Tsangaris, George Th

    2013-01-01

    Murine brain is an excellent tool for studying protein expression and brain function in mammals. Although mice are an extensively used model to recapitulate various pathological conditions, the proteome of the normal mouse brain has not been yet reported. In the present study, we identified the total proteins of different parts of the brain of CB7BL/6 mice, a widely used strain, by applying proteomic methodologies. The adult mouse brain was dissected anatomically into the following regions: frontal cortex, olfactory bulb, hippocampus, midbrain, cerebellum, hypothalamus and medulla. Total protein extracts of these regions were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry, following in-gel digestion with trypsin. Protein identification was carried out by peptide mass fingerprint. Thus, 515 different single-gene products were identified in total, 54 expressed specifically in the olfactory bulb, 62 in the hippocampus, 36 in the frontal cortex, five in the cerebellum, nine in the midbrain, eight in the hypothamamus and 10 in the medulla. The majority of the proteins were enzymes, structural proteins and transporters. Moreover, the distribution of these molecules appears to exhibit direct correlation with the function of the brain regions where they were expressed. This study leads to the complete characterization of the normal mouse brain proteome as well as the protein expression profile of the different brain regions. These results will aid in addressing unmet scientific needs regarding physiological and pathological brain functions.

  12. Acute efects of the Paulinia cupana, "Guaraná" on the cognition of normal volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Fernandes Galduróz

    Full Text Available The authors studied the acute effects of "Guaraná", when compared to caffeine and placebo, (double blind study on cognition, anxiety and sleep in 30 normal volunteers. Although results were negative it cannot be concluded that "Guaraná" is harmless. Other studies shall be undertaken, administering "Guaraná" on a long term basis, as popularly proclaimed.

  13. Lymphoreticular cells in human brain tumours and in normal brain.

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation, using various rosetting assays of cell suspensions prepared by mechanical disaggregation or collagenase digestion, demonstrated lymphoreticular cells in human normal brain (cerebral cortex and cerebellum) and in malignant brain tumours. The study revealed T and B lymphocytes and their subsets (bearing receptors for Fc(IgG) and C3) in 5/14 glioma suspensions, comprising less than 15% of the cell population. Between 20-60% of cells in tumour suspensions morphologicall...

  14. STUDY OF REGIONAL STABILITY OF ECD DISTRIBUTION IN NORMAL BRAIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李培勇; 陈刚; 朱承谟

    2001-01-01

    Objective To evaluate in vivo stability of ethylenedylbis cysteine diethylester ( ECD ) brain SPECT. Methods Each of13 normal volunteers (31.2±11.8 years) has12 dynamic SPECT scans acquired in 60min 1h after an injection of 99mTc-ECD using a triple headed gamma camera equipped with ultra high resolution fan beam collimators. Average counts per pixel were measured from frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital regions, cerebellum, basal ganglia, thalamus and white matter. Regional ECD clearance rates, regional gray-to-white matter (G/W) ratios and the change of the G /W ratio were calculated. Results The average ECD clearance rate was 4.2%/h, ranged from 3.03%/h to 5.41%/h corresponding to white matter and occipital. There was no significant difference between regional ECD clearance rates. Regional G/W ratio was between 1.27 to 1.75. The G /W ratio of temporal lobe was lower than the occipital (P<0.05). The change of regional G /W ratio with time is slow. Cbnclusion Regional ECD distribution is stable in normal brain. ECD clearance from brain is slow and no significant regional difference.

  15. Regional cerebral blood flow pattern in normal young and aged volunteers: a {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catafau, A.M. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Clinic, Univ. of Barcelona (Spain); Lomena, J. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Clinic, Univ. of Barcelona (Spain); Pavia, J. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Clinic, Univ. of Barcelona (Spain); Parellada, E. [Dept. of Psychiatry, Hospital Clinic, Univ. of Barcelona (Spain); Bernardo, M. [Dept. of Psychiatry, Hospital Clinic, Univ. of Barcelona (Spain); Setoain, J. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Clinic, Univ. of Barcelona (Spain); Tolosa, E. [Dept. of Neurology, Hospital Clinic, Univ. of Barcelona (Spain)

    1996-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the normal pattern of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) distribution in normal young and aged volunteers using technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime ({sup 99m}-Tc-HMPAO) as a tracer. The region brain perfusion of young and aged subjects was compared, especially regarding rCBF differences due to age and gender, and interhemispheric rCBF asymmetries. Sixty-eight right-handed normal volunteers - 40 young (mean age 29.5{+-}6.3 years) and 28 aged (mean age 71.2{+-}4.3 years) - were included in the study. rCBF was estimated on the basis of a semiquantitative approach by means of a left-right index and two region/reference ratios, using the cerebellum and the whole brain activity as references. A good correlation between these two region/reference ratios was found (P<0.005 in all cerebral regions). The highest rCBF ratios corresponded to the cerebellum, followed by the occipital lobe. The remaining cortical regions (temporal, parietal, frontal and basal ganglia) showed slightly lower values. The white matter showed rCBF ratios substantially lower than the grey matter. In neighter young nor aged subjects were significant rCBF differences between the genders found in any of the two region/reference indices employed. Aged sugjects showed significantly lower rCBF ratios than young subjects in the left frontal lobe and in the posterior region of the left temporal lobe. In both young and aged subjects, lower perfusion was found in the left hemisphere, except for the white matter region in both age groups and the frontal lobe in the young subjects. Aged subjects presented a slightly higher interhemispheric asymmetry in the frontal lobe. However, interhemispheric asymmetry was minimal (-1.01% to 3.14%). Consequently, a symmetrical rCBF distribution can be assumed between homologous regions, independent of age. (orig.)

  16. Spatial normalization of brain images and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangin, J-F; Lebenberg, J; Lefranc, S; Labra, N; Auzias, G; Labit, M; Guevara, M; Mohlberg, H; Roca, P; Guevara, P; Dubois, J; Leroy, F; Dehaene-Lambertz, G; Cachia, A; Dickscheid, T; Coulon, O; Poupon, C; Rivière, D; Amunts, K; Sun, Z Y

    2016-10-01

    The deformable atlas paradigm has been at the core of computational anatomy during the last two decades. Spatial normalization is the variant endowing the atlas with a coordinate system used for voxel-based aggregation of images across subjects and studies. This framework has largely contributed to the success of brain mapping. Brain spatial normalization, however, is still ill-posed because of the complexity of the human brain architecture and the lack of architectural landmarks in standard morphological MRI. Multi-atlas strategies have been developed during the last decade to overcome some difficulties in the context of segmentation. A new generation of registration algorithms embedding architectural features inferred for instance from diffusion or functional MRI is on the verge to improve the architectural value of spatial normalization. A better understanding of the architectural meaning of the cortical folding pattern will lead to use some sulci as complementary constraints. Improving the architectural compliance of spatial normalization may impose to relax the diffeomorphic constraint usually underlying atlas warping. A two-level strategy could be designed: in each region, a dictionary of templates of incompatible folding patterns would be collected and matched in a way or another using rare architectural information, while individual subjects would be aligned using diffeomorphisms to the closest template. Manifold learning could help to aggregate subjects according to their morphology. Connectivity-based strategies could emerge as an alternative to deformation-based alignment leading to match the connectomes of the subjects rather than images.

  17. CBF/CBV maps in normal volunteers studied with (15)O PET: a possible index of cerebral perfusion pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watabe, Tadashi; Shimosegawa, Eku; Kato, Hiroki; Isohashi, Kayako; Ishibashi, Mana; Hatazawa, Jun

    2014-10-01

    Local cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) is a primary factor controlling cerebral circulation and previous studies have indicated that the ratio of cerebral blood flow (CBF) to cerebral blood volume (CBV) can be used as an index of the local CPP. In this study, we investigated whether the CBF/CBV ratio differs among different brain structures under physiological conditions, by means of (15)O positron emission tomography. Nine healthy volunteers (5 men and 4 women; mean age, 47.0 ± 1.2 years) were studied by H2 (15)O bolus injection for CBF measurement and by C(15)O inhalation for CBV measurement. The CBF/CBV ratio maps were created by dividing the CBF images by the CBV images after anatomical normalization. Regions of interest were placed on the CBF/CBV maps and comparing the regions. The mean CBF/CBV ratio was highest in the cerebellum (19.3 ± 5.2/min), followed by the putamen (18.2 ± 3.9), pons (16.4 ± 4.6), thalamus (14.5 ± 3.3), cerebral cortices (13.2 ± 2.4), and centrum semiovale (11.5 ± 2.1). The cerebellum and putamen showed significantly higher CBF/CBV ratios than the cerebral cortices and centrum semiovale. We created maps of the CBF/CBV ratio in normal volunteers and demonstrated higher CBF/CBV ratios in the cerebellum and putamen than in the cerebral cortices and deep cerebral white matter. The CBF/CBV may reflect the local CPP and should be studied in hemodynamically compromised patients and in patients with risk factors for small-artery diseases of the brain.

  18. Plasma metabolomic profiles enhance precision medicine for volunteers of normal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lining; Milburn, Michael V; Ryals, John A; Lonergan, Shaun C; Mitchell, Matthew W; Wulff, Jacob E; Alexander, Danny C; Evans, Anne M; Bridgewater, Brandi; Miller, Luke; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L; Caskey, C Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Precision medicine, taking account of human individuality in genes, environment, and lifestyle for early disease diagnosis and individualized therapy, has shown great promise to transform medical care. Nontargeted metabolomics, with the ability to detect broad classes of biochemicals, can provide a comprehensive functional phenotype integrating clinical phenotypes with genetic and nongenetic factors. To test the application of metabolomics in individual diagnosis, we conducted a metabolomics analysis on plasma samples collected from 80 volunteers of normal health with complete medical records and three-generation pedigrees. Using a broad-spectrum metabolomics platform consisting of liquid chromatography and GC coupled with MS, we profiled nearly 600 metabolites covering 72 biochemical pathways in all major branches of biosynthesis, catabolism, gut microbiome activities, and xenobiotics. Statistical analysis revealed a considerable range of variation and potential metabolic abnormalities across the individuals in this cohort. Examination of the convergence of metabolomics profiles with whole-exon sequences (WESs) provided an effective approach to assess and interpret clinical significance of genetic mutations, as shown in a number of cases, including fructose intolerance, xanthinuria, and carnitine deficiency. Metabolic abnormalities consistent with early indications of diabetes, liver dysfunction, and disruption of gut microbiome homeostasis were identified in several volunteers. Additionally, diverse metabolic responses to medications among the volunteers may assist to identify therapeutic effects and sensitivity to toxicity. The results of this study demonstrate that metabolomics could be an effective approach to complement next generation sequencing (NGS) for disease risk analysis, disease monitoring, and drug management in our goal toward precision care.

  19. Influence of social activity on regional cerebral blood flow and mental function in the normal aged volunteers

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    Kobayashi, Shotai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Katsube, Tomoko; Kitani, Kohaku; Okada, Masanori (Shimane Medical University (Japan))

    1983-12-01

    The infuence of social activity on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and mental function was studied by Xe133 inhalation method in normal aged volunteers. Subjects: The first group consisted of 33 aged volunteers living in nursing home and exposed to little social stimuli. There were 15 males (mean age of 77 years) and 18 females (77 years). The second group consisted of 49 aged community volunteers who were confirmed socially active. There were 25 males (76 years) and 24 females (72 years). All subjects were healthy persons without a past history of cerebral diseases and lung diseases. There were no difference in blood pressure and hematocrit between the two groups. The rCBF was measured by 16-ch-Novo-cerebrograph. Verbal intelligence was evaluated by the Hasegawa Simple Intelligence Scale for Aged. Performance intelligence was evaluated with the Kohs' Block Design Test. The mean rCBF in group I showed significantly lower value than that of group II, especially in the frontotemporal region. The performance intelligence was decreased in group I. However, there were no significant difference in the verbal intelligence between the two groups. 2) The aging effect on rCBF and intelligences was more prominent in group II. 3) In males, hemispheric rCBF of group I decreased bilaterally associated with the decrease of both intelligences. While the left hemispheric rCBF in females was relatively preserved as well as the preservation of verbal intelligence. These results indicate that the social environmental factors may have significant influence to aging of the brain especially in the males.

  20. Establishing a normal reference range for thromboelastography in North Indian healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arulselvi Subramanian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thromboelastography (TEG is relatively recent assay to analyze the coagulation state of a blood sample, providing a continuous visualization of physical changes occurring during blood coagulation. There is a paucity of published literature on assessment of coagulation status using TEG in Indian population. Aim: The primary aim of the following study is to establish normal reference values for TEG in North Indian healthy volunteers and secondary aim is to compare them with conventional plasma-based routine coagulation tests and the manufacturers reference range. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 healthy volunteers comprised of 100 males and 100 females of age groups between 20 and 50 years, were enrolled over a period of 1 year, i.e., 2011-2012. Thromboelastometry (TEM was performed on TEM-A automated thromboelastometer (Framar Biomedica, Rome, Italy, using whole blood non-additive (360 µl. TEG parameters analyzed were r-time, k-time, α-angle, maximal amplitude (MA. Prothrombin time (PT, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT and platelet count was performed for all volunteers. The 95% reference range was calculated as (mean-1.96 standard deviation [SD] to (mean + 1.96 SD. Results: Our reference values for 95% of 200 volunteers were r-time: 1.8-14.2 min, k-time: 0.7-7.3 min, α-angle: 27.3-72.3° and MA: 32.1-87.9 mm. Maximum clot strength was higher in women compared with men, however statistically insignificant. Overall 14.5% (29/200 of the volunteers had at least one abnormal parameter while 74% (149/200 had deranged TEG values using the manufacturer′s reference range. Statistically significant variation was seen in r-time for 84.8% (P < 0.001, for k-time, in 87.1% (P < 0.001, for α-angle in 83.7% (P < 0.001 and for MA in 84% (P < 0.001, between the manufacturer and our reference range. Conclusion: The efficacy of classical coagulation test has been well-established; on the contrary TEG is a fairly recent assay and

  1. Effects of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine on neuroendocrine and behavioral responses in male schizophrenic patients and normal volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, M; Meltzer, H Y

    1996-10-16

    Functional alterations in the central serotonergic system, including presynaptic and postsynaptic function, have been reported in schizophrenia. Recently, there have been conflicting reports that the increase in plasma cortisol or prolactin concentrations induced by meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) was significantly blunted in schizophrenic patients compared with normal volunteers. Studies of the behavioral effects of mCPP, a serotonin (5-HT) receptor partial agonist with high affinity for 5-HT1C binding sites, have also yielded conflicting results in schizophrenic patients. The purpose of this study was to examine plasma levels of prolactin and cortisol, body temperature, and behavioral responses to mCPP and placebo in a single-blind study in 25 schizophrenic and 15 normal men. No differences either between schizophrenic patients and normal volunteers or between paranoid and undifferentiated/residual subtypes of schizophrenia were found in mCPP-induced prolactin, cortisol, or temperature responses. Schizophrenic patients and normal volunteers reported significant increases in feeling calm and feeling strange of comparable magnitude following mCPP. No significant differences between normal volunteers and schizophrenic patients were found in post-mCPP behavioral ratings, such as anxiety, irritability, depression, restlessness, or arousal.

  2. Histamine and Nt-methylhistamine in the circulation during intravenous infusion of histamine in normal volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinman, B D; Devalia, J L; Wylie, G; Davies, R J

    1988-12-01

    Plasma levels of histamine and Nt-methylhistamine were measured simultaneously by high performance liquid chromatography during the intravenous infusion of histamine acid phosphate in six normal volunteers. Progressive, dose-related increases in plasma histamine were noted, reaching a maximum value of 3.1 +/- 0.14 ng ml-1 corresponding to a maximum infusion rate of 180 ng kg-1 min-1 (means +/- SEM). Increases in plasma histamine were accompanied by a significant dose-related fall in mean diastolic blood pressure (baseline 74.0 +/- 4.4 mm Hg falling to 60.0 +/- 3.3 mm Hg at maximum infusion rate, p less than 0.001) and an increase in pulse rate (baseline 76.3 +/- 2.8 beats min-1 rising to 89.24 beats min-1 at maximum infusion rate, p less than 0.05). All subjects exhibited facial flushing, the threshold plasma histamine level for this effect being 1.3 +/- 0.15 ng ml-1 corresponding to an infusion rate of 60 ng kg-1 min-1. Elevation of plasma Nt-methylhistamine was seen in only one subject, who exhibited a level of 0.5 ng ml-1 at the highest infusion rate. These results suggest that measurements of plasma Nt-methylhistamine are unlikely to provide a useful index of histamine release into the circulation.

  3. Axial lower-limb alignment: comparison of knee geometry in normal volunteers and osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, D; Scudamore, A; Li, J; Wyss, U; Bryant, T; Costigan, P

    1997-01-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee is associated with deformities of the lower limb and malalignment of the limb segments. Pathogenetic relationships between the two are poorly understood. Alignment was studied by standardized radiography in 167 symptomatic Canadian osteoarthritis patients, and compared with 119 healthy adult volunteers. In healthy adults overall alignment (hip-knee-ankle angle) was principally determined by distal femoral valgus (condylar hip angle) and proximal tibial-plateau varus (plateau-ankle angle): the angle between the joint surfaces (condylar plateau) was relatively constant. In osteoarthritis, disease-associated differences included condylar-plateau angles that were divergent: accentuated medial convergence in varus osteoarthritis and lateral convergence in valgus osteoarthritis. This was interpreted as change arising from focal loss of cartilage in the medial (varus osteoarthritis) or lateral (valgus osteoarthritis) compartments of the knee. The changes would contribute to increasing limb malalignment during disease progression. But differences of limb geometry also contributed to malalignment. These were the average trends: in varus osteoarthritis there was abnormal femoral geometry (lesser femoral condylar valgus), but tibial surface geometry was the same. In valgus osteoarthritis, the opposite was true: abnormal tibial geometry (lesser plateau varus), but normal femoral geometry. A possible explanation is that these abnormal knee geometries pre-exist and predispose to osteoarthritis, although it is not impossible that they (like condylar-plateau angle) change as disease progresses. Further approaches to population studies are discussed based on these findings, along with their implications for knee surgery.

  4. Psychomotor slowing, neuroendocrine responses, and behavioral changes after oral administration of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine in normal volunteers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabbe, B.G.C.; Hulstijn, W.; Maes, M.; Pier, M.P.B.I.; Scharpé, S.; Zitman, F.G.

    2001-01-01

    The mixed 5-HT receptor agonist/antagonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) is known to suppress locomotor activity in mice and rats. This study aimed: (1) to determine whether mCPP induces cognitive and motor changes in normal human volunteers and how these changes relate to the neuroendocrine ef

  5. Psychomotor slowing, neuroendocrine responses, and behavioral changes after oral administration of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine in normal volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabbe, B.G.C.; Hulstijn, W.; Maes, M.; Pier, M.P.B.I.; Scharpé, S.; Zitman, F.G.

    2001-01-01

    The mixed 5-HT receptor agonist/antagonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) is known to suppress locomotor activity in mice and rats. This study aimed: (1) to determine whether mCPP induces cognitive and motor changes in normal human volunteers and how these changes relate to the neuroendocrine ef

  6. Age dependent white matter lesions and brain volume changes in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, P; Larsson, H B; Thomsen, C

    1994-01-01

    The brain of 142 healthy volunteers aged 21 to 80 years were investigated using MR imaging. The number and size of the white matter hyperintensity lesions (WMHL) in the cerebral hemispheres were determined. Furthermore, the volume of the cerebral hemispheres and of the lateral ventricles...... was measured. An almost linear increase in the number of volunteers with WMHL was seen with aging for males and females. With aging a significant decrease in the volume of the cerebral hemispheres was found for males, and a significant increase in the volume of the lateral ventricles was seen for both males...... and females. Our results suggest that with aging central atrophy increases more (relatively) than cortical atrophy. No correlation was found between the decreasing volume of the cerebral hemispheres and the increasing number and size of WMHL, nor between the increasing volume of the lateral ventricles...

  7. Auditory event-related brain potentials for an early discrimination between normal and pathological brain aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juliana Dushanova; Mario Christov

    2013-01-01

    The brain as a system with gradually decreasing resources maximizes its chances by reorganizing neural networks to ensure efficient performance. Auditory event-related potentials were recorded in 28 healthy volunteers comprising 14 young and 14 elderly subjects in auditory discrimination motor task (low frequency tone – right hand movement and high frequency tone – left hand movement). The amplitudes of the sensory event-related potential components (N1, P2) were more pronounced with increasing age for either tone and this effect for P2 amplitude was more pronounced in the frontal region. The latency relationship of N1 between the groups was tone-dependent, while that of P2 was tone-independent with a prominent delay in the elderly group over all brain regions. The amplitudes of the cognitive components (N2, P3) diminished with increasing age and the hemispheric asymmetry of N2 (but not for P3) reduced with increasing age. Prolonged N2 latency with increasing age was widespread for either tone while between-group difference in P3 latency was tone-dependent. High frequency tone stimulation and movement requirements lead to P3 delay in the elderly group. The amplitude difference of the sensory components between the age groups could be due to a general greater alertness, less expressed habituation, or decline in the ability to retreat attentional resources from the stimuli in the elderly group. With aging, a neural circuit reorganization of the brain activity affects the cognitive processes. The approach used in this study is useful for an early discrimination between normal and pathological brain aging for early treatment of cognitive alterations and dementia.

  8. Adolescent brain development in normality and psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciana, Monica

    2013-11-01

    Since this journal's inception, the field of adolescent brain development has flourished, as researchers have investigated the underpinnings of adolescent risk-taking behaviors. Explanations based on translational models initially attributed such behaviors to executive control deficiencies and poor frontal lobe function. This conclusion was bolstered by evidence that the prefrontal cortex and its interconnections are among the last brain regions to structurally and functionally mature. As substantial heterogeneity of prefrontal function was revealed, applications of neuroeconomic theory to adolescent development led to dual systems models of behavior. Current epidemiological trends, behavioral observations, and functional magnetic resonance imaging based brain activity patterns suggest a quadratic increase in limbically mediated incentive motivation from childhood to adolescence and a decline thereafter. This elevation occurs in the context of immature prefrontal function, so motivational strivings may be difficult to regulate. Theoretical models explain this patterning through brain-based accounts of subcortical-cortical integration, puberty-based models of adolescent sensation seeking, and neurochemical dynamics. Empirically sound tests of these mechanisms, as well as investigations of biology-context interactions, represent the field's most challenging future goals, so that applications to psychopathology can be refined and so that developmental cascades that incorporate neurobiological variables can be modeled.

  9. Head repositioning errors in normal student volunteers: a possible tool to assess the neck's neuromuscular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudavalli M Ram

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A challenge for practitioners using spinal manipulation is identifying when an intervention is required. It has been recognized that joint pain can interfere with the ability to position body parts accurately and that the recent history of muscle contraction can play a part in that interference. In this study, we tested whether repositioning errors could be induced in a normal population by contraction or shortening of the neck muscles. Methods In the experimental protocol, volunteers free of neck problems first found a comfortable neutral head posture with eyes closed. They deconditioned their cervical muscles by moving their heads 5 times in either flexion/extension or lateral flexion and then attempted to return to the same starting position. Two conditioning sequences were interspersed within the task: hold the head in an extended or laterally flexed position for 10 seconds; or hold a 70% maximum voluntary contraction in the same position for 10 seconds. A computer-interfaced electrogoniometer was used to measure head position while a force transducer coupled to an auditory alarm signaled the force of isometric contraction. The difference between the initial and final head orientation was calculated in 3 orthogonal planes. Analysis of variance (1-way ANOVA with a blocking factor (participants was used to detect differences in proprioceptive error among the conditioning sequences while controlling for variation between participants. Results Forty-eight chiropractic students participated: 36 males and 12 females, aged 28.2 ± 4.8 yrs. During the neck extension test, actively contracting the posterior neck muscles evoked an undershoot of the target position by 2.1° (p Conclusion The results suggest that the recent history of cervical paraspinal muscle contraction can influence head repositioning in flexion/extension. To our knowledge this is the first time that muscle mechanical history has been shown to influence

  10. Variation within the Huntington's disease gene influences normal brain structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Mühlau

    Full Text Available Genetics of the variability of normal and diseased brain structure largely remains to be elucidated. Expansions of certain trinucleotide repeats cause neurodegenerative disorders of which Huntington's disease constitutes the most common example. Here, we test the hypothesis that variation within the IT15 gene on chromosome 4, whose expansion causes Huntington's disease, influences normal human brain structure. In 278 normal subjects, we determined CAG repeat length within the IT15 gene on chromosome 4 and analyzed high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance images by the use of voxel-based morphometry. We found an increase of GM with increasing long CAG repeat and its interaction with age within the pallidum, which is involved in Huntington's disease. Our study demonstrates that a certain trinucleotide repeat influences normal brain structure in humans. This result may have important implications for the understanding of both the healthy and diseased brain.

  11. Psychomotor slowing, neuroendocrine responses, and behavioral changes after oral administration of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine in normal volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbe, B; Hulstijn, W; Maes, M; Pier, M; Scharpé, S; Zitman, F

    2001-12-31

    The mixed 5-HT receptor agonist/antagonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) is known to suppress locomotor activity in mice and rats. This study aimed: (1) to determine whether mCPP induces cognitive and motor changes in normal human volunteers and how these changes relate to the neuroendocrine effects of mCPP; and (2) to compare these cognitive and motor changes to the known cognitive and motor slowing patterns in depression and schizophrenia. A computerized method (used in previous research) analyzed fine motor behavior during figure-copying tasks. In 14 normal male volunteers behavioral responses, body temperature, plasma levels of prolactin and cortisol, and cognitive and motor performance during figure-copying tasks were measured after a single oral dose of mCPP (0.5 mg/kg). mCPP-induced prolongation of the reaction times in all copying tasks, parallel to increases in cortisol and prolactin and some self-reported behavioral effects. There were no changes in the movement times or the velocities of the writing movements. In conclusion, mCPP induced cognitive, but not motor slowing, in normal male volunteers. This indicates that the human serotonin system is also implicated in psychomotor behavior. This pattern of slowing was different from that in depressed and schizophrenic patients.

  12. Selection of appropriate template for spatial normalization of brain images: tensor based morphometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Dong Soo; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Although there have been remarkable advances in spatial normalization techniques, the differences in the shape of the hemispheres and the sulcal pattern of brains relative to age, gender, races, and diseases cannot be fully overcome by the nonlinear spatial normalization techniques. T1 SPGR MR images in 16 elderly male normal volunteers (>55 y. mean age: = 61.8 {+-} 3.5 y) were spatially normalized onto the age/gender specific Korean templates, and the Caucasian MNI template and the extent of the deformations were compared. These particular subjects were never included in the development of the templates. First , the images were matched into the templates using an affine transformation to eliminate the global difference between the templates and source images. Second the affine registration was followed by an estimation of nonlinear deformation. Determinants of the Jacobian matrices of the nonlinear deformation were then calculated for every voxel to estimate the regional volume change during the nonlinear transformation Jacobian determinant images highlighted the great magnitude of the relative local volume changes obtained when the elderly brains were spatially normalized onto the young/midlife male or female templates. They reflect the enlargement of CSF space in the lateral ventricles, sylvian fissures and cisterna magna, and the shrinkage of the cortex noted mainly in frontal, insular and lateral temporal cortexes, and the cerebellums in the aged brains. In the Jacobian determinant images, a regional shrinkage of the brain in the left middle prefrontal cortex was observed in addition to the regional expansion in the ventricles and sylvian fissures, which may be due to the age differences between the template and source images. The regional anatomical difference between template and source images could impose an extreme deformation of the source images during the spatial normalization and therefore. Individual brains should be placed into the appropriate

  13. Effects of food on the central and peripheral haemodynamic response to upright exercise in normal volunteers.

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, J. J.; Fullwood, L.; Stainer, K; Cowley, A. J.; Hampton, J R

    1990-01-01

    The central and peripheral haemodynamic effects of a modest meal were investigated in healthy volunteers at rest and in response to submaximal exercise. The meal increased heart rate, cardiac output, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and minute ventilation at rest and during exercise. The effects of food were additive to those induced by the exercise. Food had no effect on limb blood flow and lowered total systemic vascular resistance suggesting that there were no compensatory ch...

  14. [Neuroethics (I): moral pathways in normal brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvaro-González, Luis C

    2014-03-01

    Introduccion. La moralidad es el conjunto de normas y valores que guian la conducta. Se mantienen en muy diferentes culturas. Permiten alcanzar logros sociales que solo se entienden bajo el desarrollo moral, con un sentido de justicia que penetra toda accion humana. Las funciones morales, fruto del desarrollo evolutivo, asientan en circuitos neuronales propios. Objetivo. Describir su aparicion, puesta en marcha y mecanismos operativos en el cerebro normal. Desarrollo. Las respuestas morales, en lo esencial homogeneas, estan muy vinculadas al desarrollo emocional, tanto basico e individual (miedo o ira) como social (compasion o justicia). Aparecen a partir de los binomios emocionales placer/dolor y recompensa/castigo, que conducen al binomio moral basico bueno/malo. En su puesta en marcha intervienen la corteza prefrontal (ventromedial y dorsolateral), la corteza cingular anterior y el sulco temporal superior, que serian evaluativos y elaborativos, utilitaristas; tambien la insula, la amigdala y el hipotalamo, ejecutivos de las respuestas morales mas emocionales puras y rapidas. Asimismo, es importante el sistema de neuronas espejo (frontoparietal), que permite el aprendizaje motor y las conductas empaticas, con las que se vincula con la teoria de la mente. Conclusiones. El desarrollo del sentido moral y sus respuestas nos han permitido alcanzar una complejidad y convivencia social que redundan en beneficio de la especie e individuos. El conocimiento del funcionamiento moral esta influyendo tambien en territorios diversos de la neurocultura.

  15. Brain targeted transcranial administration of diazepam and shortening of sleep latency in healthy human volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Pathirana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of medicated oils on scalp had been practiced for centuries in the Ayurvedic system of medicine in diseases associated with the central nervous system. It is possible that the effectiveness of the therapy may be a result of targeted delivery of active compounds to the brain transcranially. Evidence also comes from two previous studies with positive results on brain targeted transcranial delivery of methadone base and diazepam on rat models. Possibility of transcranial drug delivery was investigated in healthy human volunteers using electroencephalography techniques by assessing the ability of transcranially administered diazepam in bringing about β activity in the electroencephalographic wave patterns and shortening of the sleep latency period. Non polar drug molecules dissolved in a non-aqueous sesame oil based vehicle is a significant feature in the transcranial dosage design. The study was under taken in two phases. In the Phase-I study scalp application of a single dose of 2 mg/3 ml of the oil was employed and in the Phase-II study repeat application of three doses 24 h apart were employed. Sleep latency changes were monitored with Multiple Sleep Latency Tests with 5 naps employing the standard electroencephalography, electroocculography and electromyography electrodes. Sleep onset was identified with the first epoch of any sleep stage non rapid eye movement 1, 2, 3, 4 or rapid eye movement using electroencephalography, electroocculography and electromyography criteria. In both phases of the study there was significant reduction in the sleep latencies. It was much more pronounced in the Phase-II study. None of the subjects however displayed beta activity in the electroencephalography. Sleep latency reduction following scalp application in both the phases are suggestive of transcranial migration of diazepam molecules to the receptor sites of the nerve tissue of the brain eliciting its pharmacological effect of sedation

  16. Dilation by CGRP of middle meningeal artery and reversal by sumatriptan in normal volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar, M S; Hansen, A E; Kapijimpanga, T;

    2010-01-01

    and whether the migraine-specific abortive drug sumatriptan, a 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B/1D agonist, inhibits CGRP-induced immediate vasodilation and headache. METHODS: We performed a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study in 18 healthy volunteers. We recorded circumference changes...... significant dilation of MMA (p = 0.006) and no dilation of MCA (p = 0.69). Sumatriptan caused a marked contraction of MMA (15%-25.2%) and marginal contraction of MCA (3.9% to 5.3%). Explorative analysis revealed that sumatriptan had a more selective action on MMA compared with MCA on the CGRP day (p

  17. Neither cimetidine nor probenecid affect the pharmacokinetics of tenoxicam in normal volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, R O; Geisslinger, G; Paull, P; Williams, K M

    1994-01-01

    The effect of pretreatment with cimetidine (1 g day-1, 7 days) and of probenecid (1 g twice daily, 4 days) on the pharmacokinetics of tenoxicam (single oral dose, 20 mg) was studied in six healthy volunteers. Cmax was increased significantly when tenoxicam was given with probenecid (2.8 micrograms ml-1 alone, 3.5 micrograms ml-1 after probenecid; P < 0.005). No other pharmacokinetic parameters were altered significantly by either drug. It is concluded that neither cimetidine nor probenecid affects the pharmacokinetics of tenoxicam in a clinically important way. PMID:8148224

  18. Effects of GUASHA on Heart Rate Variability in Healthy Male Volunteers under Normal Condition and Weightlifters after Weightlifting Training Sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingze Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This paper aims at exploring the effects of GUASHA on heart rate variability between healthy volunteers under normal condition and weightlifters after training sessions. Methods. Ten healthy male volunteers under normal condition and 15 male weightlifters after weightlifting training sessions were recruited into two groups. Electrocardiography was recorded before and immediately after 20-minute GUASHA. HRV was calculated in both the time domain and the frequency domain. Results. Stress index was reduced, while standard deviation of N-N intervals (SDNN, proportion derived by dividing the number of interval differences of successive N-N intervals greater than 50 ms, and root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD were enhanced after GUASHA therapy in the two groups. The changes in SDNN and RMSSD were higher in the healthy men group than in the weightlifters group. In addition, low frequency was decreased whereas high frequency was significantly increased in healthy men after the GUASHA session. Conclusions. GUASHA therapy facilitates the parasympathetic nervous activity and modulates the balance between parasympathetic and sympathetic activities in both healthy men under normal condition and weightlifters after training sessions as indicated. Although the changes of the HRV parameters were similar in both groups, the responsiveness was more pronounced in healthy men than in male weightlifters.

  19. Brain areas activated by uncertain reward-based decision-making in healthy volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zongjun Guo; Juan Chen; Shien Liu; Yuhuan Li; Bo Sun; Zhenbo Gao

    2013-01-01

    Reward-based decision-making has been found to activate several brain areas, including the ven-trolateral prefrontal lobe, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, ventral striatum, and meso-limbic dopaminergic system. In this study, we observed brain areas activated under three degrees of uncertainty in a reward-based decision-making task (certain, risky, and ambiguous). The tasks were presented using a brain function audiovisual stimulation system. We conducted brain scans of 15 healthy volunteers using a 3.0T magnetic resonance scanner. We used SPM8 to analyze the location and intensity of activation during the reward-based decision-making task, with respect to the three conditions. We found that the orbitofrontal cortex was activated in the certain reward con-dition, while the prefrontal cortex, precentral gyrus, occipital visual cortex, inferior parietal lobe, ce-rebel ar posterior lobe, middle temporal gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, limbic lobe, and midbrain were activated during the ‘risk’ condition. The prefrontal cortex, temporal pole, inferior temporal gyrus, occipital visual cortex, and cerebel ar posterior lobe were activated during ambiguous deci-sion-making. The ventrolateral prefrontal lobe, frontal pole of the prefrontal lobe, orbitofrontal cortex, precentral gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, fusiform gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, inferior parietal lo-bule, and cerebel ar posterior lobe exhibited greater activation in the‘risk’ than in the‘certain’ con-dition (P<0.05). The frontal pole and dorsolateral region of the prefrontal lobe, as wel as the ce-rebel ar posterior lobe, showed significantly greater activation in the ‘ambiguous’ condition com-pared to the ‘risk’ condition (P < 0.05). The prefrontal lobe, occipital lobe, parietal lobe, temporal lobe, limbic lobe, midbrain, and posterior lobe of the cerebel um were activated during deci-sion-making about uncertain rewards. Thus, we observed different levels and regions of

  20. Dilation by CGRP of middle meningeal artery and reversal by sumatriptan in normal volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar, M S; Hansen, A E; Kapijimpanga, T;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) plays a fundamental role in the pathophysiology of neurovascular headaches. CGRP infusion causes headache and dilation of cranial vessels. However, it is unknown to what extent CGRP-induced vasodilation contributes to immediate head pain and whet......BACKGROUND: Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) plays a fundamental role in the pathophysiology of neurovascular headaches. CGRP infusion causes headache and dilation of cranial vessels. However, it is unknown to what extent CGRP-induced vasodilation contributes to immediate head pain...... and whether the migraine-specific abortive drug sumatriptan, a 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B/1D agonist, inhibits CGRP-induced immediate vasodilation and headache. METHODS: We performed a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study in 18 healthy volunteers. We recorded circumference changes...

  1. Do brain image databanks support understanding of normal ageing brain structure? A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickie, David Alexander; Job, Dominic E.; Wardlaw, Joanna M. [University of Edinburgh, Division of Clinical Neurosciences, Western General Hospital, Brain Research Imaging Centre (BRIC), Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Scottish Imaging Network, A Platform for Scientific Excellence (SINAPSE), Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Poole, Ian [Toshiba Medical Visualisation Systems Europe, Ltd., Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Ahearn, Trevor S.; Staff, Roger T.; Murray, Alison D. [University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen Biomedical Imaging Centre, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Scottish Imaging Network, A Platform for Scientific Excellence (SINAPSE), Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    To document accessible magnetic resonance (MR) brain images, metadata and statistical results from normal older subjects that may be used to improve diagnoses of dementia. We systematically reviewed published brain image databanks (print literature and Internet) concerned with normal ageing brain structure. From nine eligible databanks, there appeared to be 944 normal subjects aged {>=}60 years. However, many subjects were in more than one databank and not all were fully representative of normal ageing clinical characteristics. Therefore, there were approximately 343 subjects aged {>=}60 years with metadata representative of normal ageing, but only 98 subjects were openly accessible. No databank had the range of MR image sequences, e.g. T2*, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), required to effectively characterise the features of brain ageing. No databank supported random subject retrieval; therefore, manual selection bias and errors may occur in studies that use these subjects as controls. Finally, no databank stored results from statistical analyses of its brain image and metadata that may be validated with analyses of further data. Brain image databanks require open access, more subjects, metadata, MR image sequences, searchability and statistical results to improve understanding of normal ageing brain structure and diagnoses of dementia. (orig.)

  2. Phase 1 study of an inactivated vaccine against American tegumentary leishmaniasis in normal volunteers in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzochi, K B; Marzochi, M A; Silva, A F; Grativol, N; Duarte, R; Confort, E M; Modabber, F

    1998-01-01

    A Phase 1 double-blind placebo-controlled study was performed to evaluate a vaccine against American tegumentary leishmaniasis in 61 healthy male volunteers. Side effects and the immune response to the vaccine were evaluated, with 1- and 2- dose schemes, with intervals of 7 or 21 days, each dose containing 1440 mg of protein N antigen of a single strain of Leishmania amazonensis (PH8) diluted in merthiolated saline (1:10,000). Merthiolated saline and an inert substance were used as placebos. No significant clinical alterations were found following the respective injections in the vaccinated individuals as compared to the placebos, except for local pain, which was associated significantly with injection of the vaccine. The laboratory alterations we observed bore no association with the clinical findings and were unimportant. We observed no differences between the groups with regard to seroconversion of the Montenegro skin test. However, the group that received a single dose of the vaccine and the one that received two doses with a 21-day interval displayed cutaneous induration significantly larger than in the control group, with 100%, 100%, and 66% conversion in the skin test, respectively. We concluded that the vaccine does not present any major side effect that would contraindicate its use in healthy individuals.

  3. A quantitative transcriptome reference map of the normal human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracausi, Maria; Vitale, Lorenza; Pelleri, Maria Chiara; Piovesan, Allison; Bruno, Samantha; Strippoli, Pierluigi

    2014-10-01

    We performed an innovative systematic meta-analysis of 60 gene expression profiles of whole normal human brain, to provide a quantitative transcriptome reference map of it, i.e. a reference typical value of expression for each of the 39,250 known, mapped and 26,026 uncharacterized (unmapped) transcripts. To this aim, we used the software named Transcriptome Mapper (TRAM), which is able to generate transcriptome maps based on gene expression data from multiple sources. We also analyzed differential expression by comparing the brain transcriptome with those derived from human foetal brain gene expression, from a pool of human tissues (except the brain) and from the two normal human brain regions cerebellum and cerebral cortex, which are two of the main regions severely affected when cognitive impairment occurs, as happens in the case of trisomy 21. Data were downloaded from microarray databases, processed and analyzed using TRAM software and validated in vitro by assaying gene expression through several magnitude orders by 'real-time' reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The excellent agreement between in silico and experimental data suggested that our transcriptome maps may be a useful quantitative reference benchmark for gene expression studies related to the human brain. Furthermore, our analysis yielded biological insights about those genes which have an intrinsic over-/under-expression in the brain, in addition offering a basis for the regional analysis of gene expression. This could be useful for the study of chromosomal alterations associated to cognitive impairment, such as trisomy 21, the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability.

  4. Normal feline brain: clinical anatomy using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogicato, G; Conchou, F; Layssol-Lamour, C; Raharison, F; Sautet, J

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a clinical anatomy atlas of the feline brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Brains of twelve normal cats were imaged using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance unit and an inversion/recovery sequence (T1). Fourteen relevant MRI sections were chosen in transverse, dorsal, median and sagittal planes. Anatomic structures were identified and labelled using anatomical texts and Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria, sectioned specimen heads, and previously published articles. The MRI sections were stained according to the major embryological and anatomical subdivisions of the brain. The relevant anatomical structures seen on MRI will assist clinicians to better understand MR images and to relate this neuro-anatomy to clinical signs.

  5. Computed tomographic imaging of the brain of normal neonatal foals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Cabrera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to provide a more complete description of normal cross-sectional anatomy of the neonatal brain of the foal and associated structures by computed tomography (CT and gross anatomical sections. Using a fourth-generation CT scanner, 2-mm contiguous transverse images were acquired from two neonatal 5-days-old Quarter horse foals. After the study the animals were euthanised for reasons unrelated to head pathology. To assist in the accurate identification of brain and associated structures, transverse CT images were obtained and compared with the corresponding frozen cross-sections of the head. CT images matched well with their corresponding transverse gross sections and provided good differentiation between the bones and the soft tissues of the head. These CT images are intended to be a useful initial anatomic reference in the interpretation for clinical CT imaging studies of the brain and associated structures in live neonatal foals.

  6. Tau protein in normal and Alzheimer's disease brain: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, G V; Hartigan, J A

    1999-11-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein that, in a hyperphosphorylated form, comprises the main component of the paired helical filaments and neurofibrillary tangles found in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) brain. It is therefore important to understand the normal functioning and processing of tau protein, and the abnormal posttranslational processing of tau in AD pathology. In 1996, Johnson and Jenkins reviewed the literature on the biochemistry, function, and phosphorylation of tau in normal and AD brain. Since that time, numerous publications have come out further elucidating the properties of tau. The present review updates the topics originally covered in the 1996 review, as well as presents a number of new topics. For example, mutations in the tau gene have been found in several non-AD, autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorders that exhibit extensive neurofibrillary pathology. In addition, there is increasing evidence that tau may be involved in signal transduction, organelle transport, and cell growth, independent of its microtubule-binding functions. Taken together, the research reviewed here demonstrates that tau is a very complex protein with various functions that are intricately regulated. It is clear that more research is required to completely understand the functions and regulation of tau in normal and AD brain.

  7. Effects of active music therapy on the normal brain: fMRI based evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raglio, Alfredo; Galandra, Caterina; Sibilla, Luisella; Esposito, Fabrizio; Gaeta, Francesca; Di Salle, Francesco; Moro, Luca; Carne, Irene; Bastianello, Stefano; Baldi, Maurizia; Imbriani, Marcello

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the neurophysiological bases of Active Music Therapy (AMT) and its effects on the normal brain. Twelve right-handed, healthy, non-musician volunteers were recruited. The subjects underwent 2 AMT sessions based on the free sonorous-music improvisation using rhythmic and melodic instruments. After these sessions, each subject underwent 2 fMRI scan acquisitions while listening to a Syntonic (SP) and an A-Syntonic (AP) Production from the AMT sessions. A 3 T Discovery MR750 scanner with a 16-channel phased array head coil was used, and the image analysis was performed with Brain Voyager QX 2.8. The listening to SP vs AP excerpts mainly activated: (1) the right middle temporal gyrus and right superior temporal sulcus, (2) the right middle frontal gyrus and in particular the right precentral gyrus, (3) the bilateral precuneus, (4) the left superior temporal sulcus and (5) the left middle temporal gyrus. These results are consistent with the psychological bases of the AMT approach and with the activation of brain areas involved in memory and autobiographical processes, and also in personal or interpersonal significant experiences. Further studies are required to confirm these findings and to explain possible effects of AMT in clinical settings.

  8. Characterization of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma NPY levels in normal volunteers over a 24-h timeframe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Dewleen G; Bertram, Tobias Moeller; Patel, Piyush M; Barkauskas, Donald A; Clopton, Paul; Patel, Sejal; Geracioti, Thomas D; Haji, Uzair; O'Connor, Daniel T; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Hauger, Richard L

    2013-10-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is abundant in mammals, where it contributes to diverse behavioral and physiological functions, centrally and peripherally, but little information is available in regard to NPY cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/plasma concentration relationships and dynamics. Since plasma NPY levels are commonly used as proxy "biomarkers" for central NPY activity in stress and mental health research in humans this study aims to better characterize the CSF/plasma NPY relationships. Subjects were eleven healthy male volunteers, admitted to the clinical research center for placement of an indwelling CSF catheter, as well as venous catheter, for 24-h collection of CSF NPY (cNPY) and plasma NPY (pNPY) samples. As observed in prior studies, group mean (SE) cNPY concentrations [792.1 (7.80) pg/mL] were higher than pNPY concentrations [220.0 (3.63) pg/mL]. For the eleven normal volunteers who had sufficient common (hourly) pNPY and cNPY data points, analysis of pNPY/cNPY concentration ratios and lagged cross-correlation analysis was completed. Average pNPY/cNPY concentration ratios ranged from .20 to .40 across study subjects, with a mean of .29. pNPY/cNPY cross correlation analyses, computed at varying time lags, were non-significant. An attempt was made to analyze the circadian rhythmicity of NPY secretion, but circadian components were not detectable. Using 24-h data collection, we characterized CSF/plasma NPY relationships, including presentation of evidence of weak CSF and plasma correlations, an important consideration for study design of NPY in stress or mental health.

  9. [Normal and pathological ultrasonography of the fetal brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, H; Levi, S

    1984-01-01

    Advanced ultrasonic technology enabled the bidimensional imaging of fetal brain throughout pregnancy. The number of visible structures increases with gestational age. In order to certify the described items they were compared to similar anatomical sections available from brain specimens or an atlas of anatomy. Real-time as well as automatic compound scanning machines were used to obtain echographic images of fetal brain anatomy in utero. Many different scans were collected along three orthogonal directions: every 2 mm, with the automated compound scan and as close from each other as possible with the linear array real-time scanner. The material included 59 normal fetuses between the 15th and 40th week of gestation. Eight typical sections are made but the only structures identified are those being visible on every section obtained at the same level. Brain structures such as grey and white matter, nuclei, vessels and ventricles have different sonic properties. They are subsequently distinguishable on the ultrasonic image if the equipment is capable of detecting and showing such differences. Grey matter is more echogenic than white, choroid plexuses are very reflective as are vessel walls which also pulsate. Four horizontal sections are described in detail (Figs. 2-7). The coronal planes are demonstrated at three different levels (Figs. 8-12) and the sagittal plane is represented by Fig. 13. Thirty five structures were identified (Table 2). In the second section some brain and skull anomalies are briefly described. The principal signs of the abnormalities and possible encountered variations are listed such as cranial defects in anencephaly, acrania, encephalocele, iniencephaly; the anomaly of size and shape of head and ventricle, as in hydrocephaly and microcephaly, cystic-like- and solid-tumor lesions and Dandy Walker syndrome and hydranencephaly. Attention is drawn to possible artifacts and pitfalls in the differential diagnosis between similar looking pictures

  10. Diffusion-weighted imaging in normal fetal brain maturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, J.F. [University Children' s Hospital UKBB, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Basel (Switzerland); Confort-Gouny, S.; Le Fur, Y.; Viout, P.; Cozzone, P. [UMR-CNRS 6612, Faculte de Medecine, Universite de la Mediterranee, Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale, Marseille (France); Bennathan, M.; Chapon, F.; Fogliarini, C.; Girard, N. [Universite de la Mediterranee, Department of Neuroradiology AP-HM Timone, Marseille (France)

    2007-09-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provides information about tissue maturation not seen on conventional magnetic resonance imaging. The aim of this study is to analyze the evolution over time of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of normal fetal brain in utero. DWI was performed on 78 fetuses, ranging from 23 to 37 gestational weeks (GW). All children showed at follow-up a normal neurological evaluation. ADC values were obtained in the deep white matter (DWM) of the centrum semiovale, the frontal, parietal, occipital and temporal lobe, in the cerebellar hemisphere, the brainstem, the basal ganglia (BG) and the thalamus. Mean ADC values in supratentorial DWM areas (1.68 {+-} 0.05 mm{sup 2}/s) were higher compared with the cerebellar hemisphere (1.25 {+-} 0.06 mm{sup 2}/s) and lowest in the pons (1.11 {+-} 0.05 mm{sup 2}/s). Thalamus and BG showed intermediate values (1.25 {+-} 0.04 mm{sup 2}/s). Brainstem, cerebellar hemisphere and thalamus showed a linear negative correlation with gestational age. Supratentorial areas revealed an increase in ADC values, followed by a decrease after the 30th GW. This study provides a normative data set that allows insights in the normal fetal brain maturation in utero, which has not yet been observed in previous studies on premature babies. (orig.)

  11. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of normal human brain and glioma:a quantitive in vivo study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Zhi-yong; YAMAKI Toshiaki; WANG Yun-jie

    2005-01-01

    Background In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides a noninvasive method of examining a wide variety of cerebral metabolites in both healthy subjects and patients with various brain diseases.Absolute metabolite concentrations have been determined using external and internal standards with known concentrations.When an external standard is placed beside the head, variations in signal amplitudes due to B1 field inhomogeneity and static field inhomogeneity may occur.Hence an internal standard is preferable.The purpose of this study was to quantitatively analyze the metabolite concentrations in normal adult brains and gliomas by in vivo proton MRS using the fully relaxed water signal as an internal standard.Methods Between January 1998 and October 2001, 28 healthy volunteers and 16 patients with gliomas were examined by in vivo proton MRS.Single-voxel spectra were acquired using the point-resolved spectroscopic pulse sequence with a 1.5 T scanner (TR/TE/Ave=3000 ms/30 ms/64).Results The calculated concentrations of N-acetyl-asparatate (NAA), creatine (Cre), choline (Cho), and water (H2O) in the normal hemispheric white matter were (23.59±2.62) mmol/L, (13.06±1.8) mmol/L, (4.28±0.8) mmol/L, and (47 280.96±5414.85) mmol/L, respectively.The metabolite concentrations were not necessarily uniform in different parts of the brain.The concentrations of NAA and Cre decreased in all gliomas (P<0.001).The ratios of NAA/Cho and NAA/H2O showed a significant difference between the normal brain and gliomas, and also between the high and low grades (P<0.001).Conclusions Quantitative analysis of in vivo proton MR spectra using the fully relaxed water signal as an internal standard is useful.The concentrations of NAA and the ratios of NAA/H2O and NAA/Cho conduce to discriminating between the glioma and normal brain, and also between the low-grade glioma and high-grade glioma.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and steady-state bioequivalence of treprostinil sodium (Remodulin) administered by the intravenous and subcutaneous route to normal volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laliberte, Kevin; Arneson, Carl; Jeffs, Roger; Hunt, Thomas; Wade, Michael

    2004-08-01

    Treprostinil sodium is a chemically stable analogue of prostacyclin administered as a chronic, continuous subcutaneous infusion for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). There has been significant clinical interest in determining the feasibility of delivering treprostinil by intravenous infusion. Therefore, a bioequivalence and comparative pharmacokinetics study of the two routes of administration was conducted in normal volunteers. A randomized, two-period, crossover study design was employed. Each subject was dosed at 10 ng/kg/min for 72 hours by each route, with the infusions separated by a 4-day wash-out period. In the 51 subjects who received at least 24 hours of treprostinil administered subcutaneously and intravenously, the steady-state ratios of the geometric means (i.v./s.c.) and 90% confidence intervals for AUCss and Cmaxss were 92.9% (89.8-96.1%) and 106% (99.4-113%), respectively. Secondary pharmacokinetic assessments confirmed the comparability of the two routes of administration at steady state, and also demonstrated that the elimination half-life of treprostinil was 4.4 and 4.6 hours following intravenous and subcutaneous administration, respectively. Based on these findings it was concluded that intravenously and subcutaneously administered treprostinil are bioequivalent at steady state.

  13. Short echo time proton spectroscopy of the brain in healthy volunteers using an insert gradient head coil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Danielsen, E R; Schneider, M

    1995-01-01

    An insert gradient head coil with built-in X, Y, and Z gradients was used for localized proton spectroscopy in the brain of healthy volunteers, using short echo time stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) sequences. Volume of interest size was 3.4 ml, repetition time was 6.0 s, and echo times w....../glutamate and myo-inositols. These compounds were more prominent within grey matter than within white matter. Rough estimations of metabolite concentrations using water as an internal standard were in good agreement with previous reports....

  14. Short echo time proton spectroscopy of the brain in healthy volunteers using an insert gradient head coil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Danielsen, E R; Schneider, M;

    1995-01-01

    An insert gradient head coil with built-in X, Y, and Z gradients was used for localized proton spectroscopy in the brain of healthy volunteers, using short echo time stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) sequences. Volume of interest size was 3.4 ml, repetition time was 6.0 s, and echo times...... were 10 and 20 ms, respectively. Good quality proton spectra with practically no eddy current artefacts were acquired allowing observation of strongly coupled compounds, and compounds with short T2 relaxation times. The gradient head coil thus permits further studies of compounds such as glutamine...

  15. The transcription factor Nfix is essential for normal brain development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litwack E David

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Nuclear Factor I (NFI multi-gene family encodes site-specific transcription factors essential for the development of a number of organ systems. We showed previously that Nfia-deficient mice exhibit agenesis of the corpus callosum and other forebrain defects; Nfib-deficient mice have defects in lung maturation and show callosal agenesis and forebrain defects resembling those seen in Nfia-deficient animals, while Nfic-deficient mice have defects in tooth root formation. Recently the Nfix gene has been disrupted and these studies indicated that there were largely uncharacterized defects in brain and skeletal development in Nfix-deficient mice. Results Here we show that disruption of Nfix by Cre-recombinase mediated excision of the 2nd exon results in defects in brain development that differ from those seen in Nfia and Nfib KO mice. In particular, complete callosal agenesis is not seen in Nfix-/- mice but rather there appears to be an overabundance of aberrant Pax6- and doublecortin-positive cells in the lateral ventricles of Nfix-/- mice, increased brain weight, expansion of the cingulate cortex and entire brain along the dorsal ventral axis, and aberrant formation of the hippocampus. On standard lab chow Nfix-/- animals show a decreased growth rate from ~P8 to P14, lose weight from ~P14 to P22 and die at ~P22. If their food is supplemented with a soft dough chow from P10, Nfix-/- animals show a lag in weight gain from P8 to P20 but then increase their growth rate. A fraction of the animals survive to adulthood and are fertile. The weight loss correlates with delayed eye and ear canal opening and suggests a delay in the development of several epithelial structures in Nfix-/- animals. Conclusion These data show that Nfix is essential for normal brain development and may be required for neural stem cell homeostasis. The delays seen in eye and ear opening and the brain morphology defects appear independent of the nutritional

  16. Optimisation of brain SPET and portability of normal databases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnden, Leighton R.; Behin-Ain, Setayesh; Goble, Elizabeth A. [The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Hatton, Rochelle L.; Hutton, Brian F. [Westmead Hospital, Sydney (Australia)

    2004-03-01

    Use of a normal database in quantitative regional analysis of brain single-photon emission tomography (SPET) facilitates the detection of functional defects in individual or group studies by accounting for inter-subject variability. Different reconstruction methods and suboptimal attenuation and scatter correction methods can introduce additional variance that will adversely affect such analysis. Similarly, processing differences across different instruments and/or institutions may invalidate the use of external normal databases. The object of this study was to minimise additional variance by comparing reconstructions of a physical phantom with its numerical template so as to optimise processing parameters. Age- and gender-matched normal scans acquired on two different systems were compared using SPM99 after processing with both standard and optimised parameters. For three SPET systems we have optimised parameters for attenuation correction, lower window scatter subtraction, reconstructed pixel size and fanbeam focal length for both filtered back-projection (FBP) and iterative (OSEM) reconstruction. Both attenuation and scatter correction improved accuracy for all systems. For single-iteration Chang attenuation correction the optimum attenuation coefficient (mu) was 0.45-0.85 of the narrow beam value (Nmu) before, and 0.75-0.85 Nmu after, scatter subtraction. For accurately modelled OSEM attenuation correction, optimum mu was 0.6-0.9 Nmu before and 0.9-1.1 Nmu after scatter subtraction. FBP appeared to change in-plane voxel dimensions by about 2% and this was confirmed by line phantom measurements. Improvement in accuracy with scatter subtraction was most marked for the highest spatial resolution system. Optimised processing reduced but did not remove highly significant regional differences between normal databases acquired on two different SPET systems. (orig.)

  17. Brain Painting: first evaluation of a new brain-computer interface application with ALS patients and healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana I. Muenssinger

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interfaces (BCI enable paralyzed patients to communicate; however, up to date, no creative expression was possible. The current study investigated the accuracy and user friendliness of P300-Brain Painting, a new BCI-application developed to paint pictures using brain activity only. Two different versions of the P300-Brain Painting application were tested: A coloured matrix tested by a group of ALS-patients (n = 3 and healthy participants (n = 10, and a black & white matrix tested by healthy participants (n = 10. The three ALS-patients achieved high accuracies; two of them reaching above 89% accuracy. In healthy subjects, a comparison between the P300-Brain Painting application (coloured matrix and the P300-Spelling application revealed significantly lower accuracy and P300 amplitudes for the P300-Brain Painting application. This drop in accuracy and P300 amplitudes was not found when comparing the P300-Spelling application to an adapted, black & white matrix of the P300-Brain Painting application. By employing a black and white matrix, the accuracy of the P300-Brain Painting application was significantly enhanced and reached the accuracy of the P300-Spelling application. ALS patients greatly enjoyed P300-Brain Painting and were able to use the application with the same accuracy as healthy subjects. P300-Brain Painting enables paralyzed patients to express themselves creatively and to participate in the prolific society through exhibitions.

  18. {sup 18}F-Alfatide II PET/CT in healthy human volunteers and patients with brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Chunjing; Mi, Baoming; Wan, Weixing [Affiliated Hospital of Jiangnan University (Wuxi No. 4 People' s Hospital), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi (China); Pan, Donghui; Xu, Yuping; Yang, Min [Jiangsu Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Key Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, Ministry of Health, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi (China); Lang, Lixin; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We report the biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of an integrin α{sub v}β{sub 3} specific PET tracer {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-E[PEG{sub 4}-c(RGDfk)]{sub 2} (denoted as {sup 18}F-Alfatide II). We also assessed the value of {sup 18}F-Alfatide II in patients with brain metastases. A series of torso (from the skull to the thigh) static images were acquired in five healthy volunteers (3 M, 2 F) at 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, and 60 min after injection of {sup 18}F-Alfatide II (257 ± 48 MBq). Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn manually, and the time-activity curves (TACs) were obtained for major organs. Nine patients with brain metastases were examined by static PET imaging with {sup 18}F-FDG (5.55 MBq/kg) and {sup 18}F-Alfatide II. Injection of {sup 18}F-Alfatide II was well tolerated in all healthy volunteers, with no serious tracer-related adverse events found. {sup 18}F-Alfatide II showed rapid clearance from the blood pool and kidneys. The total effective dose equivalent (EDE) and effective dose (ED) were 0.0277 ± 0.003 mSv/MBq and 0.0198 ± 0.002 mSv/MBq, respectively. The organs with the highest absorbed dose were the kidneys and the spleen. Nine patients with 20 brain metastatic lesions identified by MRI and/or CT were enrolled in this study. All 20 brain lesions were visualized by {sup 18}F-Alfatide II PET, while only ten lesions were visualized by {sup 18}F-FDG, and 13 by CT. F-Alfatide II is a safe PET tracer with a favorable dosimetry profile. The observed ED suggests that {sup 18}F-Alfatide II is feasible for human studies. {sup 18}F-Alfatide II has potential value in finding brain metastases of different cancers as a biomarker of angiogenesis. (orig.)

  19. Intravenous lipid emulsion given to volunteers does not affect symptoms of lidocaine brain toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Juho A; Litonius, Erik; Salmi, Tapani; Haasio, Juhani; Tarkkila, Pekka; Backman, Janne T; Rosenberg, Per H

    2015-04-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsion has been suggested as treatment for local anaesthetic toxicity, but the exact mechanism of action is still uncertain. Controlled studies on the effect of lipid emulsion on toxic doses of local anaesthetics have not been performed in man. In randomized, subject-blinded and two-phase cross-over fashion, eight healthy volunteers were given a 1.5 ml/kg bolus of 20% Intralipid(®) (200 mg/ml) or Ringer's acetate solution intravenously, followed by a rapid injection of lidocaine 1.0 mg/kg. Then, the same solution as in the bolus was infused at a rate of 0.25 ml/kg/min. for 30 min. Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded, and 5 min. after lidocaine injection, the volunteers were asked to report subjective symptoms. Total and un-entrapped lidocaine plasma concentrations were measured from venous blood samples. EEG band power changes (delta, alpha and beta) after the lidocaine bolus were similar during lipid and during Ringer infusion. There were no differences between infusions in the subjective symptoms of central nervous system toxicity. Lidocaine was only minimally entrapped in the plasma by lipid emulsion, but the mean un-entrapped lidocaine area under concentration-time curve from 0 to 30 min. was clearly smaller during lipid than Ringer infusion (16.4 versus 21.3 mg × min/l, p = 0.044). Intravenous lipid emulsion did not influence subjective toxicity symptoms nor affect the EEG changes caused by lidocaine.

  20. Expression and relevant research of MGMT and XRCC1 gene in differentgrades of brain glioma and normal brain tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Fei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore and analyze expression and relevant research of MGMT and XRCC1 gene in different grades of brain glioma and normal brain tissues. Methods: 52 cases of patients with brain glioma treated in our hospital from December 2013 to December 2014, and 50 cases of normal brain-tissue patients with intracranial hypertension were selected, and proceeding test to the surgical resection of brain tissue of the above patients to determine its MGMT and XRCC1 protein content, sequentially to record the expression of MGMT and XRCC1 of both groups. Grading of tumors to brain glioma after operation was carried out, and the expression of MGMT and XRCC1 gene in brain tissues of different patients was analyzed and compared;finally the contingency tables of X2 test was used to analyze the correlation of XRCC1and MGMT. Results:Positive rate of MGMT expression in normal brain tissue was 2%,while positive rate of MGMT expression in brain glioma was 46.2%,which was obviously higher than that in normal brain tissues (χ2=26.85, P0.05), which had no statistical significance. There were 12 cases of patients whose MGMT protein expression was positive and XRCC1 protein expression was positive; there were 18 cases of patients whose MGMT protein expression was negative and XRCC1 protein expression was negative. Contingency tables of X2 test was used to analyze the correlation of XRCC1 and MGMT, which indicated that the expression of XRCCI and MGMT in brain glioma had no correlation (r=0.9%, P=0.353), relevancy of both was r=0.9%. Conclusions: Positive rate of the expression of MGMT and XRCC1 in brain glioma was obviously higher than that in normal brain tissues, but the distribution of different grades of brain glioma had no obvious difference, and MGMT and XRCC1 expression had no obvious correlation, which needed further research.

  1. Zika Babies May Look Normal At Birth, Display Brain Defects Later: CDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162159.html Zika Babies May Look Normal at Birth, Display Brain ... 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Babies exposed to the Zika virus in the womb can look normal at ...

  2. Gastric potential difference and pH in ulcer patients and normal volunteers during Stroop's colour word conflict test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, L; Bendtsen, Flemming

    1989-01-01

    mucosal electrical potential difference (PD). In 13 healthy volunteers and 12 duodenal ulcer patients gastric PD, pH, and heart rate were measured continuously during basal conditions, during mental stress evoked by the Stroop's colour word conflict test, and after return to basal conditions...... declined significantly during sympathetic activation (delta PD = -5 (2)mV, p less than 0.05). Gastric pH increased. Eleven of 12 ulcer patients had sympathetic activation accompanied by a decline in PD, and an increased pH. Sympathetic activation in ulcer patients and volunteers impaired gastric mucosal......Whether mental stress is important in the pathogenesis of gastric mucosal disorders is not clearly established. This study investigated the relationship between sympathetic activation caused by the Stroop's colour word conflict test and gastric mucosal function, monitored by measuring the gastric...

  3. Age-related changes of normal adult brain structure: analysed with diffusion tensor imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yun-ting; ZHANG Chun-yan; ZHANG Jing; LI Wei

    2005-01-01

    Background It is known that the brain structure changes with normal aging. The objective of this study was to quantify the anisotropy and average diffusion coefficient (DCavg) of the brain in normal adults to demonstrate the microstructure changes of brain with aging.Methods One hundred and six normal adults were examined with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The fractional anisotropy (FA), 1-volume ratio (1-VR), relative anisotropy (RA) and average diffusion coefficient (DCavg) of different anatomic sites of brain were measured, correlated with age and compared among three broad age groups.Results Except in lentiform nucleus, the anisotropy increased and DCavg decreased with aging. Both anisotropy and DCavg of lentiform nucleus increased with aging. The normal reference values of DTI parameters of normal Chinese adult in major anatomic sites were acquired. Conclusions DTI data obtained noninvasively can reflect the microstructural changes with aging. The normal reference values acquired can serve as reference standards in differentiation of brain white matter diseases.

  4. Brain-Modulated Effects of Auricular Acupressure on the Regulation of Autonomic Function in Healthy Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Yan Gao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Auricular acupuncture has been described in ancient China as well as Egypt, Greece, and Rome. At the end of the 1950s, ear acupuncture was further developed by the French physician Dr. Paul Nogier. The goal of this study was to develop a new system for ear acupressure (vibration stimulation and to perform pilot investigations on the possible acute effects of vibration and manual ear acupressure on heart rate (HR, heart rate variability (HRV, pulse wave velocity (PWV, and the augmentation index (AIx using new noninvasive recording methods. Investigations were performed in 14 healthy volunteers (mean age ± SD: 26.3±4.3 years; 9 females, 5 males before, during, and after acupressure vibration and manual acupressure stimulation at the “heart” auricular acupuncture point. The results showed a significant decrease in HR (≤0.001 and a significant increase in HRV total (=0.008 after manual ear acupressure. The PWV decreased markedly (yet insignificantly whereas the AIx increased immediately after both methods of stimulation. The increase in the low-frequency band of HRV was mainly based on the intensification of the related mechanism of blood pressure regulation (10-s-rhythm. Further studies in Beijing using animal models and investigations in Graz using human subjects are already in progress.

  5. Quantitative volumetric analysis of the optic radiation in the normal human brain using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging-based tractography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Hoon Lee; Ji-Won Park; Cheol-Pyo Hong

    2014-01-01

    To attain the volumetric information of the optic radiation in normal human brains, we per-formed diffusion tensor imaging examination in 13 healthy volunteers. Simultaneously, we used a brain normalization method to reduce individual brain variation and increase the accuracy of volumetric information analysis. In addition, tractography-based group mapping method was also used to investigate the probability and distribution of the optic radiation pathways. Our results showed that the measured optic radiation ifber tract volume was a range of about 0.16%and that the fractional anisotropy value was about 0.53. Moreover, the optic radiation probability ifber pathway that was determined with diffusion tensor tractography-based group mapping was able to detect the location relatively accurately. We believe that our methods and results are help-ful in the study of optic radiation ifber tract information.

  6. Hemispherical dominance of glucose metabolic rate in the brain of the 'normal' ageing population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutts, DA; Maguire, RP; Leenders, KL; Spyrou, NM

    2004-01-01

    In the 'normal' ageing brain a decrease in the cerebral metabolic rate has been determined across many brain regions. This study determines whether age differences would affect metabolic rates in regions and different hemispheres of the brain. The regional metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRGlu) was exa

  7. Gastric potential difference and pH in ulcer patients and normal volunteers during Stroop's colour word conflict test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, L; Bendtsen, Flemming

    1989-01-01

    Whether mental stress is important in the pathogenesis of gastric mucosal disorders is not clearly established. This study investigated the relationship between sympathetic activation caused by the Stroop's colour word conflict test and gastric mucosal function, monitored by measuring the gastric...... mucosal electrical potential difference (PD). In 13 healthy volunteers and 12 duodenal ulcer patients gastric PD, pH, and heart rate were measured continuously during basal conditions, during mental stress evoked by the Stroop's colour word conflict test, and after return to basal conditions...

  8. The brain signature of paracetamol in healthy volunteers: a double-blind randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pickering G

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gisèle Pickering,1–3 Adrian Kastler,4 Nicolas Macian,1,2 Bruno Pereira,5 Romain Valabrègue,6 Stéphane Lehericy,6 Louis Boyer,4,7 Claude Dubray,1–3 Betty Jean4 1CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Centre de Pharmacologie Clinique, 2Centre d’Investigation Clinique – Inserm 1405, 3Clermont Université, Laboratoire de Pharmacologie, Faculté de médecine, 4CHU Gabriel Montpied, Clermont-Ferrand, Service d’Imagerie Ostéo-articulaire thoracique et neurologique, 5CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Délégation Recherche Clinique et à l’Innovation, Clermont-Ferrand, France; 6Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle epiniere – ICM, Centre de NeuroImagerie de Recherche CENIR, Inserm U1127, CNRS UMR 7225, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC University Paris, Paris, France, Department of Neuroradiology, Groupe Hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris, France; 7UMR CNRS UdA 6284, Clemont-Ferrand, France Background: Paracetamol’s (APAP mechanism of action suggests the implication of supraspinal structures but no neuroimaging study has been performed in humans.Methods and results: This randomized, double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled trial in 17 healthy volunteers (NCT01562704 aimed to evaluate how APAP modulates pain-evoked functional magnetic resonance imaging signals. We used behavioral measures and functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the response to experimental thermal stimuli with APAP or placebo administration. Region-of-interest analysis revealed that activity in response to noxious stimulation diminished with APAP compared to placebo in prefrontal cortices, insula, thalami, anterior cingulate cortex, and periaqueductal gray matter.Conclusion: These findings suggest an inhibitory effect of APAP on spinothalamic tracts leading to a decreased activation of higher structures, and a top-down influence on descending inhibition. Further binding and connectivity studies are needed to evaluate how APAP modulates pain, especially in the context of repeated

  9. Confirming the diversity of the brain after normalization: an approach based on identity authentication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanglin Chen

    Full Text Available During the development of neuroimaging, numerous analyses were performed to identify population differences, such as studies on age, gender, and diseases. Researchers first normalized the brain image and then identified features that represent key differences between groups. In these studies, the question of whether normalization (a pre-processing step widely used in neuroimaging studies reduces the diversity of brains was largely ignored. There are a few studies that identify the differences between individuals after normalization. In the current study, we analyzed brain diversity on an individual level, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The main idea was to utilize brain images for identity authentication. First, the brain images were normalized and registered. Then, a pixel-level matching method was developed to compute the identity difference between different images for matching. Finally, by analyzing the performance of the proposed brain recognition strategy, the individual differences in brain images were evaluated. Experimental results on a 150-subject database showed that the proposed approach could achieve a 100% identification ratio, which indicated distinct differences between individuals after normalization. Thus, the results proved that after the normalization stage, brain images retain their main distinguishing information and features. Based on this result, we suggest that diversity (individual differences should be considered when conducting group analysis, and that this approach may facilitate group pattern classification.

  10. Variance in brain volume with advancing age: implications for defining the limits of normality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Alexander Dickie

    Full Text Available Statistical models of normal ageing brain tissue volumes may support earlier diagnosis of increasingly common, yet still fatal, neurodegenerative diseases. For example, the statistically defined distribution of normal ageing brain tissue volumes may be used as a reference to assess patient volumes. To date, such models were often derived from mean values which were assumed to represent the distributions and boundaries, i.e. percentile ranks, of brain tissue volume. Since it was previously unknown, the objective of the present study was to determine if this assumption was robust, i.e. whether regression models derived from mean values accurately represented the distributions and boundaries of brain tissue volume at older ages.We acquired T1-w magnetic resonance (MR brain images of 227 normal and 219 Alzheimer's disease (AD subjects (aged 55-89 years from publicly available databanks. Using nonlinear regression within both samples, we compared mean and percentile rank estimates of whole brain tissue volume by age.In both the normal and AD sample, mean regression estimates of brain tissue volume often did not accurately represent percentile rank estimates (errors=-74% to 75%. In the normal sample, mean estimates generally underestimated differences in brain volume at percentile ranks below the mean. Conversely, in the AD sample, mean estimates generally underestimated differences in brain volume at percentile ranks above the mean. Differences between ages at the 5(th percentile rank of normal subjects were ~39% greater than mean differences in the AD subjects.While more data are required to make true population inferences, our results indicate that mean regression estimates may not accurately represent the distributions of ageing brain tissue volumes. This suggests that percentile rank estimates will be required to robustly define the limits of brain tissue volume in normal ageing and neurodegenerative disease.

  11. Assessment of doxylamine influence on mixed function oxidase activity upon multiple dose oral administration to normal volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, G A; St Peter, J V; Heise, M A; Horowitz, Z D; Salyers, G C; Charles, T T; Brezovic, C; Russell, D A; Skare, J A; Powell, J H

    1996-11-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to assess the influence of doxylamine and phenobarbital on antipyrine/metabolites pharmacokinetics and 6 beta-hydroxycortisol urinary excretion. This study was conducted in 48 healthy male human volunteers (16 per treatment group) using a parallel study design. Treatment groups consisted of 12.5 mg of doxylamine succinate, placebo, or 30 mg of phenobarbital administered orally every 6 h for 17 days. Results indicate that no statistically significant differences were observed between the doxylamine and placebo groups that are indicative of enzyme induction. For the phenobarbital group, a significant increase for antipyrine total (36 versus 45 mL/h/kg) and nonrenal (35 versus 44 mL/h/kg) clearances and 6 beta-hydroxycortisol excretion (338 versus 529 micrograms) and a significant decrease in the terminal exponential half-life (11 versus 9 h) of antipyrine were observed.

  12. Whole-brain in-vivo measurements of the axonal g-ratio in a group of 37 healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siawoosh eMohammadi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The g-ratio, quantifying the ratio between the inner and outer diameters of a fiber, is an important microstructural characteristic of fiber pathways and is functionally related to conduction velocity. We introduce a novel method for estimating the MR g-ratio non-invasively across the whole brain using high-fidelity magnetization transfer (MT imaging and single-shell diffusion MRI. These methods enabled us to map the MR g-ratio in vivo across the brain’s prominent fiber pathways in a group of 37 healthy volunteers and to estimate the inter-subject variability. Effective correction of susceptibility-related distortion artifacts was essential before combining the MT and diffusion data, in order to reduce partial volume and edge artifacts. The MR g-ratio is in good qualitative agreement with histological findings despite the different resolution and spatial coverage of MRI and histology. The MR g-ratio holds promise as an important non-invasive biomarker due to its microstructural and functional relevance in neurodegeneration.

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression is higher in brain tissue from patients with refractory epilepsy than in normal controls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yudan Lv; Jiqing Qiu; Zan Wang; Li Cui; Hongmei Meng; Weihong Lin

    2011-01-01

    The role of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor in epilepsy remains controversial. The present study utilized light and electron microscopy to investigate pathological and ultrastructural changes in brain tissue obtained from the seizure foci of 24 patients with temporal epilepsy. We found that epileptic tissue showed neuronal degeneration, glial cell proliferation, nuclear vacuolization, and neural cell tropism. Immunoelectron microscopy and immunohistochemistry showed that brain-derived neurotrophic factor was expressed at significantly higher levels in patients with refractory temporal epilepsy compared with normal controls, demonstrating that the pathological changes within seizure foci in patients with refractory epilepsy are associated with brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression alterations.

  14. Use of EPO as an adjuvant in PDT of brain tumors to reduce damage to normal brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendon, Cesar A.; Lilge, Lothar

    2004-10-01

    In order to reduce damage to surrounding normal brain in the treatment of brain tumors with photodynamic therapy (PDT), we have investigated the use of the cytokine erythropoietin (EPO) to exploit its well-established role as a neuroprotective agent. In vitro experiments demonstrated that EPO does not confer protection from PDT to rat glioma cells. In vivo testing of the possibility of EPO protecting normal brain tissue was carried out. The normal brains of Lewis rats were treated with Photofrin mediated PDT (6.25 mg/Kg B.W. 22 hours pre irradiation) and the outcome of the treatment compared between animals that received EPO (5000 U/Kg B.W. 22 hours pre irradiation) and controls. This comparison was made based on the volume of necrosis, as measured with the viability stain 2,3,5- Triphenyl tetrazoium chloride (TTC), and incidence of apoptosis, as measured with in situ end labeling assay (ISEL). Western blotting showed that EPO reaches the normal brain and activates the anti-apoptotic protein PKB/AKT1 within the brain cortex. The comparison based on volume of necrosis showed no statistical significance between the two groups. No clear difference was observed in the ISEL staining between the groups. A possible lack of responsivity in the assays that give rise to these results is discussed and future corrections are described.

  15. High-field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals metabolic effects of normal brain aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Janna L; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Swerdlow, Russell H; Choi, In-Young; Lee, Phil; Brooks, William M

    2014-07-01

    Altered brain metabolism is likely to be an important contributor to normal cognitive decline and brain pathology in elderly individuals. To characterize the metabolic changes associated with normal brain aging, we used high-field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo to quantify 20 neurochemicals in the hippocampus and sensorimotor cortex of young adult and aged rats. We found significant differences in the neurochemical profile of the aged brain when compared with younger adults, including lower aspartate, ascorbate, glutamate, and macromolecules, and higher glucose, myo-inositol, N-acetylaspartylglutamate, total choline, and glutamine. These neurochemical biomarkers point to specific cellular mechanisms that are altered in brain aging, such as bioenergetics, oxidative stress, inflammation, cell membrane turnover, and endogenous neuroprotection. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy may be a valuable translational approach for studying mechanisms of brain aging and pathology, and for investigating treatments to preserve or enhance cognitive function in aging.

  16. Cardiac MRI. Estimation of changes in normalized myocardial gadolinium accumulation over time after contrast injection in patients with acute myocarditis and healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuckmann, F.; Buhr, C. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Internal Medicine II; Maderwald, S. [Duisburg-Essen Univ. (Germany). Erwin L. Hahn Inst. for Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Bruder, O. [Elisabeth Hospital Essen (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology and Angiology; Schlosser, T.; Nassenstein, K. [University Hospital Essen (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology; Erbel, R. [University Hospital Essen (Germany). West German Heart Center Essen; Barkhausen, J. [University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein (Germany). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2011-10-15

    An increased normalized gadolinium accumulation (NGA) in the myocardium during early washout has been used for the diagnosis of acute myocarditis (AM). Due to the fact that the pharmacokinetics of contrast agents are complex, time-related changes in NGA after contrast injection are likely. Because knowledge about time-related changes of NGA may improve the diagnostic accuracy of MR, our study aimed to estimate the time course of NGA after contrast injection in patients as well as in healthy volunteers. An ECG-triggered inversion recovery SSFP sequence with incrementally increasing inversion times was repetitively acquired over the 15 minutes after injection of 0.2 Gd-DTPA per kg body weight in a 4-chamber view in 15 patients with AM and 20 volunteers. The T 1relaxation times and the longitudinal relaxation rates (R1) of the myocardium and skeletal musculature were calculated for each point in time after contrast injection. The time course of NGA was estimated based on the linear relationship between R 1 and tissue Gd concentration. NGA decreased over time in the form of a negative power function in patients with AM and in healthy controls. NGA in AM tended to be higher than in controls (p > 0.05). NGA rapidly changes after contrast injection, which must be considered when measuring NGA. Although we observed a trend towards higher NGA values in patients with AM with a maximum difference one minute after contrast injection, NGA did not allow us to differentiate patients with AM from healthy volunteers, because the observed differences did not reach a level of significance. (orig.)

  17. Test-retest variability of multifocal electroretinography in normal volunteers and short-term variability in hydroxychloroquine users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Browning DJ

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available David J Browning,1 Chong Lee2 1Charlotte Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Associates, 2University of North Carolina – Charlotte, Charlotte, NC, USA Purpose: To determine measurement variability of N1P1 amplitudes and the R1/R2 ratio in normal subjects and hydroxychloroquine users without retinopathy. Design: Retrospective, observational study. Subjects: Normal subjects (n=21 and 44 patients taking hydroxychloroquine (n=44 without retinopathy. Methods: Multifocal electroretinography (mfERG was performed twice in one session in the 21 normal subjects and twice within 1 year in the hydroxychloroquine users, during which time no clinical change in macular status occurred. Main outcome measures: N1P1 amplitudes of rings R1–R5, the R1/R2 ratio, and coefficients of repeatability (COR for these measurements. Results: Values for N1P1 amplitudes in hydroxychloroquine users were reduced compared with normal subjects by the known effect of age, but R1/R2 was not affected by age. The COR for R1–R5 ranged from 43% to 52% for normal subjects and from 43% to 59% for hydroxychloroquine users; for R1/R2 the COR was 29% in normal subjects and 45% in hydroxychloroquine users. Conclusion: mfERG measurements show high test-retest variability, limiting the ability of a single mfERG test to influence a decision to stop hydroxychloroquine; corroborative evidence with a different ancillary test is recommended in a suspicious case. Keywords: multifocal electroretinography, hydroxychloroquine, test-retest variability 

  18. Reference genes for normalization: A study of rat brain tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, Birgit; Elfving, Betina; Wegener, Gregers

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) has become a widely used tool in the search for disease genes. When examining gene expression with qPCR in psychiatric diseases, endogenous reference gene(s) must be used for normalization. Traditionally, genes such as beta-actin (ActB), Gap...

  19. The Ventricular System of the Brain: Anatomy and Normal Variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratchko, Lindsay; Filatova, Irina; Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam

    2016-04-01

    The cerebral ventricular system is intimately associated with the forebrain and brainstem. The ventricular system functions to produce and circulate cerebrospinal fluid, which plays an important role in mechanical protection and regulation of homeostasis in the central nervous system. This article discusses anatomy and neuroimaging of the ventricular system and highlights normal anatomical variations that may be mistaken for pathology. Applied surgical anatomy is reviewed with emphasis on operative approach and potential risk to adjacent central nervous system structures.

  20. Differentiation of cancerous and normal brain tissue using label free fluorescence and Stokes shift spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Wang, Leana; Liu, Cheng-hui; He, Yong; Yu, Xinguang; Cheng, Gangge; Wang, Peng; Shu, Cheng; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    In this report, optical biopsy was applied to diagnose human brain cancer in vitro for the identification of brain cancer from normal tissues by native fluorescence and Stokes shift spectra (SSS). 77 brain specimens including three types of human brain tissues (normal, glioma and brain metastasis of lung cancers) were studied. In order to observe spectral changes of fluorophores via fluorescence, the selected excitation wavelength of UV at 300 and 340 nm for emission spectra and a different Stokes Shift spectra with intervals Δλ = 40 nm were measured. The fluorescence spectra and SSS from multiple key native molecular markers, such as tryptophan, collagen, NADH, alanine, ceroid and lipofuscin were observed in normal and diseased brain tissues. Two diagnostic criteria were established based on the ratios of the peak intensities and peak position in both fluorescence and SSS spectra. It was observed that the ratio of the spectral peak intensity of tryptophan (340 nm) to NADH (440 nm) increased in glioma, meningioma (benign), malignant meninges tumor, and brain metastasis of lung cancer tissues in comparison with normal tissues. The ratio of the SS spectral peak (Δλ = 40 nm) intensities from 292 nm to 366 nm had risen similarly in all grades of tumors.

  1. Differential effects of energy stress on AMPK phosphorylation and apoptosis in experimental brain tumor and normal brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiles Thomas C

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is a known physiological cellular energy sensor and becomes phosphorylated at Thr-172 in response to changes in cellular ATP levels. Activated AMPK acts as either an inducer or suppressor of apoptosis depending on the severity of energy stress and the presence or absence of certain functional tumor suppressor genes. Results Here we show that energy stress differentially affects AMPK phosphorylation and cell-death in brain tumor tissue and in tissue from contra-lateral normal brain. We compared TSC2 deficient CT-2A mouse astrocytoma cells with syngeneic normal astrocytes that were grown under identical condition in vitro. Energy stress induced by glucose withdrawal or addition of 2-deoxyglucose caused more ATP depletion, AMPK phosphorylation and apoptosis in CT-2A cells than in the normal astrocytes. Under normal energy conditions pharmacological stimulation of AMPK caused apoptosis in CT-2A cells but not in astrocytes. TSC2 siRNA treated astrocytes are hypersensitive to apoptosis induced by energy stress compared to control cells. AMPK phosphorylation and apoptosis were also greater in the CT-2A tumor tissue than in the normal brain tissue following implementation of dietary energy restriction. Inefficient mTOR and TSC2 signaling, downstream of AMPK, is responsible for CT-2A cell-death, while functional LKB1 may protect normal brain cells under energy stress. Conclusion Together these data demonstrates that AMPK phosphorylation induces apoptosis in mouse astrocytoma but may protect normal brain cells from apoptosis under similar energy stress condition. Therefore, using activator of AMPK along with glycolysis inhibitor could be a potential therapeutic approach for TSC2 deficient human malignant astrocytoma.

  2. Comparison of normal adult and children brain SPECT imaging using statistical parametric mapping(SPM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung Hoon; Yoon, Seok Nam; Joh, Chul Woo; Lee, Dong Soo [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Sung [Seoul national University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    This study compared rCBF pattern in normal adult and normal children using statistical parametric mapping (SPM). The purpose of this study was to determine distribution pattern not seen visual analysis in both groups. Tc-99m ECD brain SPECT was performed in 12 normal adults (M:F=11:1, average age 35 year old) and 6 normal control children (M:F=4:2, 10.5{+-}3.1y) who visited psychiatry clinic to evaluate ADHD. Their brain SPECT revealed normal rCBF pattern in visual analysis and they were diagnosed clinically normal. Using SPM method, we compared normal adult group's SPECT images with those of 6 normal children subjects and measured the extent of the area with significant hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion (p<0.001, extent threshold=16). The areas of both angnlar gyrus, both postcentral gyrus, both superior frontal gyrus, and both superior parietal lobe showed significant hyperperfusion in normal adult group compared with normal children group. The areas of left amygdala gyrus, brain stem, both cerebellum, left globus pallidus, both hippocampal formations, both parahippocampal gyrus, both thalamus, both uncus, both lateral and medial occipitotemporal gyrus revealed significantly hyperperfusion in the children. These results demonstrated that SPM can say more precise anatomical area difference not seen visual analysis.

  3. The levels of soluble versus insoluble brain Abeta distinguish Alzheimer's disease from normal and pathologic aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Dickson, D W; Trojanowski, J Q; Lee, V M

    1999-08-01

    The abundance and solubility of Abeta peptides are critical determinants of amyloidosis in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hence, we compared levels of total soluble, insoluble, and total Abeta1-40 and Abeta1-42 in AD brains with those in age-matched normal and pathologic aging brains using a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Since the measurement of Abeta1-40 and Abeta1-42 depends critically on the specificity of the monoclonal antibodies used in the sandwich ELISA, we first demonstrated that each assay is specific for Abeta1-40 or Abeta1-42 and the levels of these peptides are not affected by the amyloid precursor protein in the brain extracts. Thus, this sandwich ELISA enabled us to show that the average levels of total cortical soluble and insoluble Abeta1-40 and Abeta1-42 were highest in AD, lowest in normal aging, and intermediate in pathologic aging. Remarkably, the average levels of insoluble Abeta1-40 were increased 20-fold while the average levels of insoluble Abeta1-42 were increased only 2-fold in the AD brains compared to pathologic aging brains. Further, the soluble pools of Abeta1-40 and Abeta1-42 were the largest fractions of total Abeta in the normal brain (i.e., 50 and 23%, respectively), but they were the smallest in the AD brain (i.e., 2.7 and 0.7%, respectively) and intermediate (i.e., 8 and 0.8%, respectively) in pathologic aging brains. Thus, our data suggest that pathologic aging is a transition state between normal aging and AD. More importantly, our findings imply that a progressive shift of brain Abeta1-40 and Abeta1-42 from soluble to insoluble pools and a profound increase in the levels of insoluble Abeta1-40 plays mechanistic roles in the onset and/or progression of AD.

  4. Changes in topological organization of functional PET brain network with normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiliang; Ke, Lining; Liu, Huafeng; Huang, Wenhua; Hu, Zhenghui

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies about brain network have suggested that normal aging is associated with alterations in coordinated patterns of the large-scale brain functional and structural systems. However, age-related changes in functional networks constructed via positron emission tomography (PET) data are still barely understood. Here, we constructed functional brain networks composed of 90 regions in younger (mean age 36.5 years) and older (mean age 56.3 years) age groups with PET data. 113 younger and 110 older healthy individuals were separately selected for two age groups, from a physical examination database. Corresponding brain functional networks of the two groups were constructed by thresholding average cerebral glucose metabolism correlation matrices of 90 regions and analysed using graph theoretical approaches. Although both groups showed normal small-world architecture in the PET networks, increased clustering and decreased efficiency were found in older subjects, implying a degeneration process that brain system shifts from a small-world network to regular one along with normal aging. Moreover, normal senescence was related to changed nodal centralities predominantly in association and paralimbic cortex regions, e.g. increasing in orbitofrontal cortex (middle) and decreasing in left hippocampus. Additionally, the older networks were about equally as robust to random failures as younger counterpart, but more vulnerable against targeted attacks. Finally, methods in the construction of the PET networks revealed reasonable robustness. Our findings enhanced the understanding about the topological principles of PET networks and changes related to normal aging.

  5. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of degenerating brain: a comparison of normal aging, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubisavljevic, M R; Ismail, F Y; Filipovic, S

    2013-07-01

    Although the brain's ability to change constantly in response to external and internal inputs is now well recognized the mechanisms behind it in normal aging and neurodegeneration are less well understood. To gain a better understanding, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used extensively to characterize non-invasively the cortical neurophysiology of the aging and degenerating brain. Furthermore, there has been a surge of studies examining whether repetitive TMS (rTMS) can be used to improve functional deficits in various conditions including normal aging, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. The results of these studies in normal aging and neurodegeneration have emerged reasonably coherent in delineating the main pathology in spite of considerable technical limitations, omnipresent methodological variability, and extraordinary patient heterogeneity. Nevertheless, comparing and integrating what is known about TMS measurements of cortical excitability and plasticity in disorders that predominantly affect cortical brain structures with disorders that predominantly affect subcortical brain structures may provide better understanding of normal and abnormal brain aging fostering new. The present review provides a TMS perspective of changes in cortical neurophysiology and neurochemistry in normal aging and neurodegeneration by integrating what is revealed in individual TMS measurements of cortical excitability and plasticity in physiological aging, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's, disease. The paper also reflects on current developments in utilizing TMS as a physiologic biomarker to discriminate physiologic aging from neurodegeneration and its potential as a method of therapeutic intervention.

  6. A randomized control trial of the effect of yoga on Gunas (personality and Health in normal healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshpande Sudheer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To study the efficacy of yoga on Guna (yogic personality measure and general health in normal adults. Methods : Of the 1228 persons who attended introductory lectures, 226 subjects aged 18-71 years, of both sexes, who satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria and who consented to participate in the study were randomly allocated into two groups. The Yoga(Y group practised an integrated yoga module that included asanas , pranayama , meditation, notional correction and devotional sessions. The control group practised mild to moderate physical exercises (PE. Both groups had supervised practice sessions (by trained experts for one hour daily, six days a week for eight weeks. Guna (yogic personality was assessed before and after eight weeks using the self-administered Vedic Personality Inventory (VPI which assesses Sattva (gentle and controlled, Rajas (violent and uncontrolled and Tamas (dull and uncontrolled. The general health status (total health, which includes four domains namely somatic symptoms (SS, anxiety and insomnia (AI, social dysfunction (SF and severe depression (SP, was assessed using a General Health Questionnaire (GHQ. Results : Baseline scores for all the domains for both the groups did not differ significantly ( P > 0.05, independent samples t test. Sattva showed a significant difference within the groups and the effect size was more in the Y than in the PE group. Rajas showed a significant decrease within and between the groups with a higher effect size in the PE group. Tamas showed significant reduction within the PE group only. The GHQ revealed that there was significant decrease in SS, AI, SF and SP in both Y and PE groups (Wilcoxcon Singed Rank t test. SS showed a significant difference between the groups (Mann Whitney U Test. Conclusions : There was an improvement in Sattva in both the Yoga and control groups with a trend of higher effect size in Yoga; Rajas reduced in both but significantly better in PE than

  7. A randomized control trial of the effect of yoga on Gunas (personality and Health in normal healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshpande Sudheer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the efficacy of yoga on Guna (yogic personality measure and general health in normal adults. Methods: Of the 1228 persons who attended introductory lectures, 226 subjects aged 18-71 years, of both sexes, who satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria and who consented to participate in the study were randomly allocated into two groups. The Yoga(Y group practised an integrated yoga module that included asanas , pranayama , meditation, notional correction and devotional sessions. The control group practised mild to moderate physical exercises (PE. Both groups had supervised practice sessions (by trained experts for one hour daily, six days a week for eight weeks. Guna (yogic personality was assessed before and after eight weeks using the self-administered Vedic Personality Inventory (VPI which assesses Sattva (gentle and controlled, Rajas (violent and uncontrolled and Tamas (dull and uncontrolled. The general health status (total health, which includes four domains namely somatic symptoms (SS, anxiety and insomnia (AI, social dysfunction (SF and severe depression (SP, was assessed using a General Health Questionnaire (GHQ. Results: Baseline scores for all the domains for both the groups did not differ significantly ( P > 0.05, independent samples t test. Sattva showed a significant difference within the groups and the effect size was more in the Y than in the PE group. Rajas showed a significant decrease within and between the groups with a higher effect size in the PE group. Tamas showed significant reduction within the PE group only. The GHQ revealed that there was significant decrease in SS, AI, SF and SP in both Y and PE groups (Wilcoxcon Singed Rank t test. SS showed a significant difference between the groups (Mann Whitney U Test. Conclusions: There was an improvement in Sattva in both the Yoga and control groups with a trend of higher effect size in Yoga; Rajas reduced in both but significantly better in PE than in

  8. β-amyloid, hippocampal atrophy and their relation to longitudinal brain change in cognitively normal individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Evan; Villeneuve, Sylvia; Maillard, Pauline; Harvey, Danielle; Reed, Bruce; Jagust, William; DeCarli, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Recent literature has examined baseline hippocampal volume and extent of brain amyloidosis to test potential synergistic effects on worsening cognition and extent of brain atrophy. Use of hippocampal volume in prior studies was based on the notion that limbic circuit degeneration is an early manifestation of the Alzheimer's Disease (AD) pathophysiology. To clarify these interactions early in the AD process, we tested the effects of amyloid and baseline normalized hippocampal volume on longitudinal brain atrophy rates in a group of cognitively normal individuals. Results showed that the combination of elevated β-amyloid and baseline hippocampal atrophy is associated with increased rates specific to the limbic circuit and splenium. Importantly, this atrophy pattern emerged from a voxelwise analysis, corroborated by regression models over region of interests in native space. The results are broadly consistent with previous studies of the effects of amyloid and baseline hippocampal atrophy in normals, while pointing to accelerated atrophy of AD-vulnerable regions detectable at the preclinical stage.

  9. Prenatal magnetic resonance imaging: brain normal linear biometric values below 24 gestational weeks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parazzini, C.; Righini, A.; Triulzi, F. [Children' s Hospital ' ' V. Buzzi' ' , Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); Rustico, M. [Children' s Hospital ' ' V. Buzzi' ' , Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Milan (Italy); Consonni, D. [Fondazione IRCCS Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Unit of Epidemiology, Milan (Italy)

    2008-10-15

    Prenatal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is currently used to measure quantitative data concerning brain structural development. At present, morphometric MR imaging studies have been focused mostly on the third trimester of gestational age. However, in many countries, because of legal restriction on abortion timing, the majority of MR imaging fetal examination has to be carried out during the last part of the second trimester of pregnancy (i.e., before the 24th week of gestation). Accurate and reliable normative data of the brain between 20 and 24 weeks of gestation is not available. This report provides easy and practical parametric support to assess those normative data. From a database of 1,200 fetal MR imaging studies, we retrospectively selected 84 studies of the brain of fetuses aged 20-24 weeks of gestation that resulted normal on clinical and radiological follow-up. Fetuses with proved or suspected infections, twin pregnancy, and fetuses of mothers affected by pathology that might have influenced fetal growth were excluded. Linear biometrical measurements of the main cerebral structures were obtained by three experienced pediatric neuroradiologists. A substantial interobserver agreement for each measurements was reached, and normative data with median, maximum, and minimum value were obtained for brain structures. The knowledge of a range of normality and interindividual variability of linear biometrical values for the developing brain between 20th and 24th weeks of gestation may be valuable in assessing normal brain development in clinical settings. (orig.)

  10. Quantification of human brain benzodiazepine receptors using [{sup 18}F]fluoroethylflumazenil: a first report in volunteers and epileptic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, Philippe [Unite de Tomographie par Positrons, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Unite de Chimie Pharmaceutique et de Radiopharmacie, CMFA/REMA, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 73-40 Avenue Mounier, 1200, Bruxelles (Belgium); Sanabria-Bohorquez, Sandra [Imaging Research, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, Philadelphia (United States); Bol, Anne; Volder, Anne de; Labar, Daniel [Unite de Tomographie par Positrons, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Rijckevorsel, K. van [Service de Neurologie, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Bruxelles (Belgium); Gallez, Bernard [Unite de Chimie Pharmaceutique et de Radiopharmacie, CMFA/REMA, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 73-40 Avenue Mounier, 1200, Bruxelles (Belgium); Unite de Resonance Magnetique Biomedicale, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2003-12-01

    Fluorine-18 fluoroethylflumazenil ([{sup 18}F]FEF) is a tracer for central benzodiazepine (BZ) receptors which is proposed as an alternative to carbon-11 flumazenil for in vivo imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) in humans. In this study, [{sup 18}F]FEF kinetic data were acquired using a 60-min two-injection protocol on three normal subjects and two patients suffering from mesiotemporal epilepsy as demonstrated by abnormal magnetic resonance imaging and [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. First, a tracer bolus injection was performed and [{sup 18}F]FEF rapidly distributed in the brain according to the known BZ receptor distribution. Thirty minutes later a displacement injection of 0.01 mg/kg of unlabelled flumazenil was performed. Activity was rapidly displaced from all BZ receptor regions demonstrating the specific binding of [{sup 18}F]FEF. No displacement was observed in the pons. Plasma input function was obtained from arterial blood sampling, and metabolite analysis was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Metabolite quantification revealed a fast decrease in tracer plasma concentration, such that at 5 min post injection about 70% of the total radioactivity in plasma corresponded to [{sup 18}F]FEF, reaching 24% at 30 min post injection. The interactions between [{sup 18}F]FEF and BZ receptors were described using linear compartmental models with plasma input and reference tissue approaches. Binding potential values were in agreement with the known distribution of BZ receptors in human brain. Finally, in two patients with mesiotemporal sclerosis, reduced uptake of [{sup 18}F]FEF was clearly observed in the implicated left hippocampus. (orig.)

  11. Trigeminal neuralgia: how often are trigeminal nerve-vessel contacts found by MRI in normal volunteers; Trigeminusneuralgie: Wie haeufig gibt es einen Gefaess-Nerven-Kontakt bei schmerzfreien Probanden?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, B.; Schindler, M.; Haehnel, S.; Sartor, K. [Abt. Neuroradiologie, Neurologische Klinik, Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany); Rasche, D.; Tronnier, V. [Neurochirurgische Klinik, Universitaetsklinik Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To assess prospectively how often contacts are found between the trigeminal nerve and arteries or veins in the perimesencephalic cistern via MRI in normal volunteers. Materials and methods: 48 volunteers without a history of trigeminal neuralgia were examined prospectively (MRI at 1.5T; T2-CISS sequence, coronal orientation, 0.9 mm slice thickness). Two radiologists decided by consensus whether there was a nerve-vessel contact in the perimesencephalic cistern. Results: In 27% of the volunteers, no contact was found between the trigeminal nerve and regional vessels, while in 73%, such a contact was present. In 61% of the cases, the offending vessel was an artery, in 39%, it was a vein. In 2 volunteers, a deformation of the nerve was noted. Conclusion: Contrary to what has been suggested by retrospective studies, the majority of normal volunteers, if studied prospectively, do show a contact between the trigeminal nerve and local vessels. A close proximity between the nerve and regional vessels is thus normal and is not necessarily proof of a pathological nerve-vessel conflict. (orig.)

  12. Uptake of radiolabeled ions in normal and ischemia-damaged brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienel, G A; Pulsinelli, W A

    1986-05-01

    The regional concentrations of nine radiochemicals were measured in rat brain after induction of cerebral ischemia to identify tracers concentrated by brain undergoing selective neuronal necrosis. Transient (30 minute) forebrain ischemia was produced in the rat; 24 hours after cerebral recirculation the radiochemicals were injected intravenously and allowed to circulate for 5 hours. The brain concentrations of the radiochemicals in dissected regions were determined by scintillation counting. Forebrain ischemia of this nature will produce extensive injury to striatal neurons but will spare the great majority of neocortical neurons at 24 hours. The regional concentrations of these radiochemicals varied considerably in both control and ischemic animals. In postischemic animals, 4 radionuclides (63Ni, 99TcO4, 22Na, and [3H]tetracycline) were concentrated in the irreversibly damaged striatum in amounts ranging from 1.4 to 2.4 times greater than in normal tissue. The concentrations of 65Zn, 59Fe, 32PO4, and 147Pm in postischemic brain were similar to or less than those in normal brain. The concentration of [14C]EDTA was increased in injured and uninjured brain of postischemic rats. Autoradiographic analysis of the distribution patterns of some of these ions in normal animals showed that 99TcO4, 22Na, 65Zn, and 59Fe were distributed more uniformly throughout the brain than were 32PO4, 63Ni, and 147Pm. At 24 or 48 hours after ischemia, 63Ni, 99TcO4, and 22Na were preferentially concentrated in the damaged striatum and hippocampus, whereas 65Zn, 59Fe, 32PO4, and 147Pm did not accumulate in irreversibly injured tissue. Of the radiochemicals tested to date, Ni, TcO4, and tetracycline may be useful for diagnosing ischemic brain injury in humans, using positron emission tomography.

  13. Effects of ticlopidine or ticlopidine plus aspirin on platelet aggregation and ATP release in normal volunteers: why aspirin improves ticlopidine antiplatelet activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, R; Scazziota, A; Rouvier, J; Gonzalez, C

    1999-10-01

    Aspirin and ticlopidine are used to prevent arterial thrombosis. In some clinical settings ticlopidine is administered with aspirin for improving antithrombotic effect. We administered aspirin (100 mg/day), ticlopidine (500 mg/day), or ticlopidine and aspirin for 7 days to healthy volunteers. Platelet aggregation and ATP release induced by sodium arachidonate, ADP, or a combination of both were measured. Sodium arachidonate (0.25 mmol/L), which produces no platelet aggregation, combined with adenosine diphosphate (1 mumol/L), which produced a reversible platelet aggregation of 20% after ticlopidine, resulted in a synergistic platelet aggregation response in normal (74.6 +/- 9.2%) and in ticlopidine platelet-rich plasma (59.1% +/- 14.9%, p < 0.0001). Synergism after sodium arachidonate (0.75 mmol/L) plus adenosine diphosphate (4 mumol/L) fell from 75.8% +/- 11.0% and 59.1% +/- 15.6% after ticlopidine or aspirin, respectively, to 14.8% +/- 18.0% (p < 0.0001) after ticlopidine plus aspirin. Aspirin and ticlopidine alone did not inhibit adenosine triphosphate release as thoroughly as did aspirin plus ticlopidine. Aspirin or ticlopidine does not adequately prevent platelet activity as ticlopidine plus aspirin do. Addition of aspirin to treatment with ticlopidine improves their antiplatelet activity and better results could be obtained in arterial thrombotic prevention strategies.

  14. Characterization of normal brain and brain tumor pathology by chisquares parameter maps of diffusion-weighted image data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, Stephan E. E-mail: stephan@bwh.harvard.edu; Mamata, Hatsuho; Mulkern, Robert V

    2003-03-01

    Objective: To characterize normal and pathologic brain tissue by quantifying the deviation of diffusion-related signal from a simple monoexponential decay, when measured over a wider than usual range of b-factors. Methods and materials: Line scan diffusion imaging (LSDI), with diffusion weighting at multiple b-factors between 100 and 5000 s/mm{sup 2}, was performed on 1.5 T clinical scanners. Diffusion data of single slice sections were acquired in five healthy subjects and 19 brain tumor patients. In-patients, conventional T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images were obtained for reference purposes. The chisquare ({chi}{sup 2}) error parameter associated with the monoexponential fits of the measured tissue water signals was then used to quantify the departure from a simple monoexponential signal decay on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Results: Diffusion-weighted images over a wider b-factor range than typically used were successfully obtained in all healthy subjects and patients. Normal and pathologic tissues demonstrated signal decays, which clearly deviate from a simple monoexponential behavior. The {chi}{sup 2} of cortical and deep grey matter was considerably lower than in white matter. In peritumoral edema, however, {chi}{sup 2} was 68% higher than in normal white matter. In highly malignant brain tumors, such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) or anaplastic astrocytoma, {chi}{sup 2} values were on average almost 400% higher than in normal white matter, while for one low grade astrocytoma and two cases of metastasis, {chi}{sup 2} was not profoundly different from the {chi}{sup 2} value of white matter. Maps of the {chi}{sup 2} values provide good visualization of spatial details. However, the tumor tissue contrast generated appeared in many cases to be different from the enhancement produced by paramagnetic contrast agents. For example, in cases where the contrast agent only highlighted the rim of the tumor, {chi}{sup 2} enhancement was present within the

  15. Morphometric connectivity analysis to distinguish normal, mild cognitive impaired, and Alzheimer subjects based on brain MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erleben, Lene Lillemark; Sørensen, Lauge; Mysling, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This work investigates a novel way of looking at the regions in the brain and their relationship as possible markers to classify normal control (NC), mild cognitive impaired (MCI), and Alzheimer Disease (AD) subjects. MRI scans from a subset of 101 subjects from the ADNI study at baseline was used...

  16. Whole brain N-acetylaspartate concentration is conserved throughout normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, William E; Gass, Achim; Glodzik, Lidia; Babb, James S; Hirsch, Jochen; Sollberger, Marc; Achtnichts, Lutz; Amann, Michael; Monsch, Andreas U; Gonen, Oded

    2012-10-01

    We hypothesize that normal aging implies neuronal durability, reflected by age-independent concentrations of their marker--the amino acid derivative N-acetylaspartate (NAA). To test this, we obtained the whole-brain and whole-head N-acetylaspartate concentrations (WBNAA and WHNAA) with proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy; and the fractional brain parenchyma volume (fBPV)--a metric of atrophy, by segmenting the magnetic resonance image (MRI) from 42 (18 male) healthy young (31.9 ± 5.8 years old) and 100 (64 male, 72.6 ± 7.3 years old) cognitively normal elderly. The 12.8 ± 1.9 mM WBNAA of the young was not significantly different from the 13.1 ± 3.1 mM in the elderly (p > 0.05). In contrast, both fBPV (87.3 ± 4.7% vs. 74.8 ± 4.8%) and WHNAA (11.1 ± 1.7 mM vs. 9.8 ± 2.4 mM) were significantly higher in the young (approximately 14%; p normal aging apart suggests that neuronal integrity is maintained across the lifespan. Clinically, WBNAA could be used as a marker for normal (hence, also abnormal) brain aging. In contrast, WHNAA and fBPV seem age-related suggesting that brain atrophy may occur without compromising the remaining tissue.

  17. Brain gray and white matter differences in healthy normal weight and obese children

    Science.gov (United States)

    To compare brain gray and white matter development in healthy normal weight and obese children. Twenty-four healthy 8- to 10-year-old children whose body mass index was either 95th percentile (obese) completed an MRI examination which included T1-weighted three-d...

  18. Brain Tumor Therapy-Induced Changes in Normal-Appearing Brainstem Measured With Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua Chiaho, E-mail: Chia-Ho.Hua@stjude.org [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Gajjar, Amar; Broniscer, Alberto [Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Zhang, Yong [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Li Yimei [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Glenn, George R.; Kun, Larry E.; Ogg, Robert J. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To characterize therapy-induced changes in normal-appearing brainstems of childhood brain tumor patients by serial diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Methods and Materials: We analyzed 109 DTI studies from 20 brain tumor patients, aged 4 to 23 years, with normal-appearing brainstems included in the treatment fields. Those with medulloblastomas, supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (n = 10) received postoperative craniospinal irradiation (23.4-39.6 Gy) and a cumulative dose of 55.8 Gy to the primary site, followed by four cycles of high-dose chemotherapy. Patients with high-grade gliomas (n = 10) received erlotinib during and after irradiation (54-59.4 Gy). Parametric maps of fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were computed and spatially registered to three-dimensional radiation dose data. Volumes of interest included corticospinal tracts, medial lemnisci, and the pons. Serving as an age-related benchmark for comparison, 37 DTI studies from 20 healthy volunteers, aged 6 to 25 years, were included in the analysis. Results: The median DTI follow-up time was 3.5 years (range, 1.6-5.0 years). The median mean dose to the pons was 56 Gy (range, 7-59 Gy). Three patterns were seen in longitudinal FA and apparent diffusion coefficient changes: (1) a stable or normal developing time trend, (2) initial deviation from normal with subsequent recovery, and (3) progressive deviation without evidence of complete recovery. The maximal decline in FA often occurred 1.5 to 3.5 years after the start of radiation therapy. A full recovery time trend could be observed within 4 years. Patients with incomplete recovery often had a larger decline in FA within the first year. Radiation dose alone did not predict long-term recovery patterns. Conclusions: Variations existed among individual patients after therapy in longitudinal evolution of brainstem white matter injury and recovery. Early response in

  19. [Shh signal and its functional roles in normal and diseased brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruat, Martial; Angot, Elodie; Traiffort, Elisabeth

    2011-11-01

    The identification of a Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway in the adult vertebrate central nervous system has paved the way to the characterization of the functional roles of Shh signals in normal and diseased brain. This morphogen is proposed to play a key role in the establishment and maintenance of adult neurogenic niches and to modulate the proliferation of neuronal or glial precursors. Consistent with its role during embryogenesis, alteration of Shh signaling is associated with tumorigenesis while its recruitment in damaged neural tissue might be part of the regenerating process. We will discuss the most recent data of the Hedgehog pathway in the adult brain and its relevance as a novel therapeutic approach for brain diseases including brain tumors.

  20. R2* mapping for brain iron: associations with cognition in normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadery, Christine; Pirpamer, Lukas; Hofer, Edith; Langkammer, Christian; Petrovic, Katja; Loitfelder, Marisa; Schwingenschuh, Petra; Seiler, Stephan; Duering, Marco; Jouvent, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Fazekas, Franz; Mangin, Jean-Francois; Chabriat, Hugues; Dichgans, Martin; Ropele, Stefan; Schmidt, Reinhold

    2015-02-01

    Brain iron accumulates during aging and has been associated with neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Magnetic resonance (MR)-based R2* mapping enables the in vivo detection of iron content in brain tissue. We investigated if during normal brain aging iron load relates to cognitive impairment in region-specific patterns in a community-dwelling cohort of 336 healthy, middle aged, and older adults from the Austrian Stroke Prevention Family Study. MR imaging and R2* mapping in the basal ganglia and neocortex were done at 3T. Comprehensive neuropsychological testing assessed memory, executive function, and psychomotor speed. We found the highest iron concentration in the globus pallidus, and pallidal and putaminal iron was significantly and inversely associated with cognitive performance in all cognitive domains, except memory. These associations were iron load dependent. Vascular brain lesions and brain volume did not mediate the relationship between iron and cognitive performance. We conclude that higher R2*-determined iron in the basal ganglia correlates with cognitive impairment during brain aging independent of concomitant brain abnormalities. The prognostic significance of this finding needs to be determined.

  1. Increased brain edema following 5-aminolevulinic acid mediated photodynamic in normal and tumor bearing rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschberg, Henry; Angell-Petersen, Even; Spetalen, Signe; Mathews, Marlon; Madsen, Steen J.

    2007-02-01

    Introduction: Failure of treatment for high grade gliomas is usually due to local recurrence at the site of surgical resection indicating that a more aggressive form of local therapy, such as PDT, could be of benefit. PDT causes damage to both tumor cells as well as cerebral blood vessels leading to degradation of the blood brain barrier with subsequent increase of brain edema. The increase in brain edema following ALA-PDT was evaluated in terms of animal survival, histopatological changes in normal brain and tumor tissue and MRI scanning. The effect of steroid treatment, to reduce post-treatment PDT induced edema, was also examined. Methods:Tumors were established in the brains of inbred BD-IX and Fisher rats. At various times following tumor induction the animals were injected with ALA ip. and four hours later light treatment at escalating fluences and fluence rates were given. Nontumor bearing control animals were also exposed to ALA-PDT in a similar manner to evaluate damage to normal brain and degree of blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption. Results: Despite a very low level of PpIX production in normal brain, with a 200:1 tumor to normal tissue selectivity ratio measured at a distance of 2 mm from the tumor border, many animals succumbed shortly after treatment. A total radiant energy of 54 J to non-tumor bearing animals resulted in 50% mortality within 5 days of treatment. Treatment of tumor bearing animals with moderate fluence levels produced similar brain edema compared to higher fluence levels. ALA PDT in nontumor bearing animals produced edema that was light dose dependent. PDT appeared to open the BBB for a period of 24-48 hrs after which it was restored. The addition of post operative steroid treatment reduced the incident of post treatment morbidity and mortality. Conclusions: T2 and contrast enhanced T1 MRI scanning proved to be a highly effective and non-evasive modality in following the development of the edema reaction and the degree and time

  2. Static jaw collimation settings to minimize radiation dose to normal brain tissue during stereotactic radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Eun Young; Zhang, Xin; Yan, Yulong; Sharma, Sunil; Penagaricano, Jose; Moros, Eduardo; Corry, Peter

    2012-01-01

    At the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is performed by using a linear accelerator with an add-on micromultileaf collimator (mMLC). In our clinical setting, static jaws are automatically adapted to the furthest edge of the mMLC-defined segments with 2-mm (X jaw) and 5-mm (Y jaw) margin and the same jaw values are applied for all beam angles in the treatment planning system. This additional field gap between the static jaws and the mMLC allows additional radiation dose to normal brain tissue. Because a radiosurgery procedure consists of a single high dose to the planning target volume (PTV), reduction of unnecessary dose to normal brain tissue near the PTV is important, particularly for pediatric patients whose brains are still developing or when a critical organ, such as the optic chiasm, is near the PTV. The purpose of this study was to minimize dose to normal brain tissue by allowing minimal static jaw margin around the mMLC-defined fields and different static jaw values for each beam angle or arc. Dose output factors were measured with various static jaw margins and the results were compared with calculated doses in the treatment planning system. Ten patient plans were randomly selected and recalculated with zero static jaw margins without changing other parameters. Changes of PTV coverage, mean dose to predefined normal brain tissue volume adjacent to PTV, and monitor units were compared. It was found that the dose output percentage difference varied from 4.9-1.3% for the maximum static jaw opening vs. static jaw with zero margins. The mean dose to normal brain tissue at risk adjacent to the PTV was reduced by an average of 1.9%, with negligible PTV coverage loss. This dose reduction strategy may be meaningful in terms of late effects of radiation, particularly in pediatric patients. This study generated clinical knowledge and tools to consistently minimize dose to normal brain tissue.

  3. Doses delivered to normal brain under different treatment protocols at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capala, J.; Coderre, J.A.; Liu, H.B. [and others

    1996-12-31

    As of October 31, 1996, 23 glioblastoma multiforme patients underwent BNCT under several treatment protocols at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor. For treatment planning and dosimetry purposes, these protocols may be divided into four groups. The first group comprises protocols that used an 8-cm collimator and allowed a peak normal brain dose of 10.5 Gy-Eq to avolume of 1 cm{sup 3} were the thermal neutron flux was maximal (even if it happened to be in the tumor volume). The second group differs from the first in that it allowed a peak normal brain dose of 12.6 Gy-Eq. The protocols of the third and fourth groups allowed the prescribed peak normal brain dose of 12.6 Gy-Eq to be outside of the tumor volume, used a 12-cm collimator and, respectively, uni- or bilateral irradiations. We describe the treatment planning procedures and report the doses delivered to various structures of the brain.

  4. Alteration of brain viscoelasticity after shunt treatment in normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freimann, Florian Baptist; Sprung, Christian [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Neurosurgical Department, Berlin (Germany); Streitberger, Kaspar-Josche; Klatt, Dieter; Sack, Ingolf [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Campus Charite Mitte, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Lin, Kui; McLaughlin, Joyce [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Mathematics Department, Troy, NY (United States); Braun, Juergen [Charite - University Medicine Campus Benjamin Franklin, Institute of Medical Informatics, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) represents a chronic neurological disorder with increasing incidence. The symptoms of NPH may be relieved by surgically implanting a ventriculoperitoneal shunt to drain excess cerebrospinal fluid. However, the pathogenesis of NPH is not yet fully elucidated, and the clinical response of shunt treatment is hard to predict. According to current theories of NPH, altered mechanical properties of brain tissue seem to play an important role. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a unique method for measuring in vivo brain mechanics. In this study cerebral MRE was applied to test the viscoelastic properties of the brain in 20 patients with primary (N = 14) and secondary (N = 6) NPH prior and after (91 {+-} 16 days) shunt placement. Viscoelastic parameters were derived from the complex modulus according to the rheological springpot model. This model provided two independent parameters {mu} and {alpha}, related to the inherent rigidity and topology of the mechanical network of brain tissue. The viscoelastic parameters {mu} and {alpha} were found to be decreased with -25% and -10%, respectively, compared to age-matched controls (P < 0.001). Interestingly, {alpha} increased after shunt placement (P < 0.001) to almost normal values whereas {mu} remained symptomatically low. The results indicate the fundamental role of altered viscoelastic properties of brain tissue during disease progression and tissue repair in NPH. Clinical improvement in NPH is associated with an increasing complexity of the mechanical network whose inherent strength, however, remains degraded. (orig.)

  5. Trace element determinations in brain tissues from normal and clinically demented individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiki, Mitiko; Genezini, Frederico A., E-mail: mitiko@ipen.br, E-mail: fredzini@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro do Reator de Pesquisas; Leite, Renata E.P.; Grinberg, Lea T.; Ferretti, Renata E.L.; Suemoto, Claudia; Pasqualucci, Carlos A.; Jacob-Filho, Wilson, E-mail: renataleite@usp.br, E-mail: lea@grinberg.com.br, E-mail: reloah@usp.br, E-mail: farfel@usp.br, E-mail: csuemoto@gmail.com, E-mail: cpasqua@usp.br, E-mail: wijac@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina

    2013-07-01

    Studies on trace element levels in human brains under normal and pathological conditions have indicated a possible correlation between some trace element concentrations and neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, analysis of brain tissues was carried out to investigate if there are any differences in elemental concentrations between brain tissues from a normal population above 50 years of age presenting Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) equal to zero (CDR=0) and that cognitively affected population ( CDR=3). The tissues were dissected, ground, freeze-dried and then analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis. Samples and elemental standards were irradiated in a neutron flux at the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor for Br, Fe, K, Na, Rb, Se and Zn determinations. The induced gamma ray activities were measured using a hyperpure Ge detector coupled to a gamma ray spectrometer. The one-way ANOVA test (p< 0.05) was used to compare the results. All the elements determined in the hippocampus brain region presented differences between the groups presenting CDR=0 and CDR=3. In the case of frontal region only the elements Na, Rb and Zn showed differences between these two groups. These findings proved the correlation between elemental levels present in brain tissues neurodegenerative diseases. Biological standard reference materials SRM 1566b Oyster Tissue and SRM 1577b Bovine Liver analyzed for quality control indicated good accuracy and precision of the results. (author)

  6. Brain capillary transit time heterogeneity in healthy volunteers measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced T1 -weighted perfusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Henrik B W; Vestergaard, Mark B; Lindberg, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    impulse response function was compatible with the adiabatic tissue homogeneity model. In two patients with complete occlusion of the internal carotid artery and in the patient with a brain tumor CTH was increased with values up to 6 s in the affected brain tissue, with an exponential like residue impulse...

  7. Early complement activation increases in the brain in some aged normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, David A; Camp, Dianne M; Schonberger, Michael B; Singer, Daniel J; LeWitt, Peter A

    2004-09-01

    Complement activation is increased in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may contribute to the development and progression of this disorder. To compare early complement activation between normal and AD brain specimens, C4d and iC3b concentrations were measured in hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, temporal cortex, parietal cortex, and cerebellum from aged normal and AD subjects n=10-14 for both), and in hippocampus and entorhinal cortex from younger normal subjects (n=5-6). C4d and iC3b levels increased 2.3- to 4.6-fold in AD versus aged normal specimens (all P hippocampus or entorhinal cortex. However, the concentrations of these proteins were markedly increased in several aged normal specimens. Normal subject age was moderately associated with both C4d (r=0.49) and iC3b (r=0.53) concentrations in the hippocampus. Increased brain complement activation in some elderly individuals may promote the subsequent development of AD.

  8. Whole-brain functional networks in cognitively normal, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Hyun Seo

    Full Text Available The conceptual significance of understanding functional brain alterations and cognitive deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD process has been widely established. However, the whole-brain functional networks of AD and its prodromal stage, mild cognitive impairment (MCI, are not well clarified yet. In this study, we compared the characteristics of the whole-brain functional networks among cognitively normal (CN, MCI, and AD individuals by applying graph theoretical analyses to [(18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET data. Ninety-four CN elderly, 183 with MCI, and 216 with AD underwent clinical evaluation and FDG-PET scan. The overall small-world property as seen in the CN whole-brain network was preserved in MCI and AD. In contrast, individual parameters of the network were altered with the following patterns of changes: local clustering of networks was lower in both MCI and AD compared to CN, while path length was not different among the three groups. Then, MCI had a lower level of local clustering than AD. Subgroup analyses for AD also revealed that very mild AD had lower local clustering and shorter path length compared to mild AD. Regarding the local properties of the whole-brain networks, MCI and AD had significantly decreased normalized betweenness centrality in several hubs regionally associated with the default mode network compared to CN. Our results suggest that the functional integration in whole-brain network progressively declines due to the AD process. On the other hand, functional relatedness between neighboring brain regions may not gradually decrease, but be the most severely altered in MCI stage and gradually re-increase in clinical AD stages.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of neonatal brain. Assessment of normal and abnormal findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Koh; Kadono, Naoko; Kawase, Shohji; Kihara, Minako; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Kinugasa, Akihiko; Sawada, Tadashi (Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan))

    1994-11-01

    To establish the normal MRI appearance of the neonatal brain, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 124 neonates who admitted to our neonatal intensive care unit. Degree of myelination, ventricular size, width of the extracerebral space and focal lesion in the brain were evaluated to investigate the relationship between MRI findings of neonatal brain and the neurological prognosis. 85 neonates underwent MRI both at neonatal period and at the corrected age of one year. The change of abnormal MRI findings was evaluated. 19 neonates had abnormal neurological outcome on subsequent examinations. Delayed myelination, ventriculomegaly and large extracerebral space were seen in 13, 7 and 9 neonates respectively. 4, 3 and 5 neonates out of them showed abnormal neurological prognosis respectively. Of the 19 neonates with focal lesion in MRI, 2 had parenchymal hematoma in the brain, 2 had subdural hematoma, 5 had chronic hematoma following subependymal hemorrhage, 6 had cystic formation following subependymal hemorrhage, 2 had subcortical leukomalacia, one had periventricular leukomalacia and one had cyst in the parenchyma of cerebellum. 4 neonates of 19 with focal lesion in MRI showed abnormal development. Of the neonates who had abnormal neurological prognosis, 7 neonates showed no abnormal finding in MRI at neonatal period. 3 of them had mild mental retardation. MRI shows promise in the neonatal period. It facilitates recognition of abnormalities of neonatal brain and may be used to predict abnormal neurologic outcome. However physiological change in the brain of neonates, especially of premature neonates, should be considered on interpreting these findings. Awareness of developmental features should help to minimize misinterpretation of normal changes in the neonatal brain. (author).

  10. SOX2+ cell population from normal human brain white matter is able to generate mature oligodendrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Oliver-De La Cruz

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: A number of neurodegenerative diseases progress with a loss of myelin, which makes them candidate diseases for the development of cell-replacement therapies based on mobilisation or isolation of the endogenous neural/glial progenitor cells, in vitro expansion, and further implantation. Cells expressing A2B5 or PDGFRA/CNP have been isolated within the pool of glial progenitor cells in the subcortical white matter of the normal adult human brain, all of which demonstrate glial progenitor features. However, the heterogeneity and differentiation potential of this pool of cells is not yet well established. METHODS: We used diffusion tensor images, histopathology, and immunostaining analysis to demonstrate normal cytoarchitecture and the absence of abnormalities in human temporal lobe samples from patients with mesial temporal sclerosis. These samples were used to isolate and enrich glial progenitor cells in vitro, and later to detect such cells in vivo. RESULTS: We have identified a subpopulation of SOX2+ cells, most of them co-localising with OLIG2, in the white matter of the normal adult human brain in vivo. These cells can be isolated and enriched in vitro, where they proliferate and generate immature (O4+ and mature (MBP+ oligodendrocytes and, to a lesser extent, astrocytes (GFAP+. CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate the existence of a new glial progenitor cell subpopulation that expresses SOX2 in the white matter of the normal adult human brain. These cells might be of use for tissue regeneration procedures.

  11. Enantioselective effects of levodropropizine and dropropizine on psychomotor functions in normal volunteers: a placebo-controlled, double-blind comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, G; Barzaghi, N; Dominijanni, R; Cordaro, C; Perucca, E

    1993-01-01

    Levodropropizine is the l-isomer of dropropizine, a racemic drug widely used as a cough suppressant. Compared with the racemate, levodropropizine retains equal antitussive activity but exhibits considerably lower central nervous system (CNS) depressant effects in animal models. In order to assess whether the same differential pharmacodynamic profile also applies to man, a double-blind placebo-controlled study was carried out to investigate the effects of single oral doses (60 and 120 mg) of levodropropizine and dropropizine on subjective alertness (scored on visual analogue scales), general tolerability and psychomotor function tests (cancellation, tapping, choice reaction times and critical flicker fusion frequency) in ten normal volunteers. Treatments were administered in random sequence at intervals of at least one week, evaluation procedures being carried out at times 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 h after dosing. Following intake of a 60 mg levodropizine dose, subjective effects and objective estimates of psychomotor function were superimposable to those recorded after placebo. There was a trend for 60 mg dropropizine and 120 mg levodropropizine to produce detrimental effects at occasional evaluations, although the changes associated with these treatments could not be differentiated from placebo on the basis of most subjective scores and psychomotor function tests. Conversely, administration of 120 mg dropropizine was consistently associated with subjective CNS impairment and with reduced performance (compared to baseline) in recognition time, critical flicker fusion thresholds and possibly tapping rate, for up to three hours after dosing. These data are consistent with evidence that racemic dropropizine adversely affects central nervous system function to a greater extent compared with the levo-isomer.

  12. Sex differences in brain activation pattern during a visuospatial cognitive task: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, E; Siedentopf, C M; Hofer, A; Deisenhammer, E A; Hoptman, M J; Kremser, C; Golaszewski, S; Felber, S; Fleischhacker, W W; Delazer, M

    2003-07-03

    Sex differences in mental rotation tasks, favoring men, have been noted in behavioral studies and functional imaging studies. In the present study ten female and ten male volunteers underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging in a conventional block design. Regions of activation were detected after performance of a mental rotation task inside the scanner. In contrast to previous studies, confounding factors such as performance differences between genders or high error rates were excluded. Men showed significantly stronger parietal activation, while women showed significantly greater right frontal activation. Our results point to gender specific differences in the neuropsychological processes involved in mental rotation tasks.

  13. A longitudinal study of structural brain network changes with normal aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai eWu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate age-related changes in the topological organization of structural brain networks by applying a longitudinal design over 6 years. Structural brain networks were derived from measurements of regional gray matter volume and were constructed in age-specific groups from baseline and follow-up scans. The structural brain networks showed economical small-world properties, providing high global and local efficiency for parallel information processing at low connection costs. In the analysis of the global network properties, the local and global efficiency of the baseline scan were significantly lower compared to the follow-up scan. Moreover, the annual rate of changes in local and global efficiency showed a positive and negative quadratic correlation with the baseline age, respectively; both curvilinear correlations peaked at approximately the age of 50. In the analysis of the regional nodal properties, significant negative correlations between the annual rate of changes in nodal strength and the baseline age were found in the brain regions primarily involved in the visual and motor/ control systems, whereas significant positive quadratic correlations were found in the brain regions predominately associated with the default-mode, attention, and memory systems. The results of the longitudinal study are consistent with the findings of our previous cross-sectional study: the structural brain networks develop into a fast distribution from young to middle age (approximately 50 years old and eventually became a fast localization in the old age. Our findings elucidate the network topology of structural brain networks and its longitudinal changes, thus enhancing the understanding of the underlying physiology of normal aging in the human brain.

  14. Association of structural global brain network properties with intelligence in normal aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian U Fischer

    Full Text Available Higher general intelligence attenuates age-associated cognitive decline and the risk of dementia. Thus, intelligence has been associated with cognitive reserve or resilience in normal aging. Neurophysiologically, intelligence is considered as a complex capacity that is dependent on a global cognitive network rather than isolated brain areas. An association of structural as well as functional brain network characteristics with intelligence has already been reported in young adults. We investigated the relationship between global structural brain network properties, general intelligence and age in a group of 43 cognitively healthy elderly, age 60-85 years. Individuals were assessed cross-sectionally using Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R and diffusion-tensor imaging. Structural brain networks were reconstructed individually using deterministic tractography, global network properties (global efficiency, mean shortest path length, and clustering coefficient were determined by graph theory and correlated to intelligence scores within both age groups. Network properties were significantly correlated to age, whereas no significant correlation to WAIS-R was observed. However, in a subgroup of 15 individuals aged 75 and above, the network properties were significantly correlated to WAIS-R. Our findings suggest that general intelligence and global properties of structural brain networks may not be generally associated in cognitively healthy elderly. However, we provide first evidence of an association between global structural brain network properties and general intelligence in advanced elderly. Intelligence might be affected by age-associated network deterioration only if a certain threshold of structural degeneration is exceeded. Thus, age-associated brain structural changes seem to be partially compensated by the network and the range of this compensation might be a surrogate of cognitive reserve or brain resilience.

  15. Association of structural global brain network properties with intelligence in normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Florian U; Wolf, Dominik; Scheurich, Armin; Fellgiebel, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Higher general intelligence attenuates age-associated cognitive decline and the risk of dementia. Thus, intelligence has been associated with cognitive reserve or resilience in normal aging. Neurophysiologically, intelligence is considered as a complex capacity that is dependent on a global cognitive network rather than isolated brain areas. An association of structural as well as functional brain network characteristics with intelligence has already been reported in young adults. We investigated the relationship between global structural brain network properties, general intelligence and age in a group of 43 cognitively healthy elderly, age 60-85 years. Individuals were assessed cross-sectionally using Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) and diffusion-tensor imaging. Structural brain networks were reconstructed individually using deterministic tractography, global network properties (global efficiency, mean shortest path length, and clustering coefficient) were determined by graph theory and correlated to intelligence scores within both age groups. Network properties were significantly correlated to age, whereas no significant correlation to WAIS-R was observed. However, in a subgroup of 15 individuals aged 75 and above, the network properties were significantly correlated to WAIS-R. Our findings suggest that general intelligence and global properties of structural brain networks may not be generally associated in cognitively healthy elderly. However, we provide first evidence of an association between global structural brain network properties and general intelligence in advanced elderly. Intelligence might be affected by age-associated network deterioration only if a certain threshold of structural degeneration is exceeded. Thus, age-associated brain structural changes seem to be partially compensated by the network and the range of this compensation might be a surrogate of cognitive reserve or brain resilience.

  16. Quantitative study of MR T1 and T2 relaxation times and 1 HMRS in gray matter of normal adult brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范国光; 吴振华; 潘诗农; 郭启勇

    2003-01-01

    Objective To evaluate magnetic resonance (MR) Imaging and 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1 HMRS) in the study of normal biochemical process of the brain, as well as differentiation of normal senile brain from cerebral diseases related to senility. Methods One hundred and eighty healthy adult volunteers were selected for MR examination and 60 other healthy subjects for 1 HMRS examination. Ages of subjects ranged from 18 to 80 years. They were divided into six age groups. A 0.35 T superconductive MR system was used to perform MR examination. Point resolved spectroscopy sequence was required for 1 HMRS. The metabolites in the spectra included: N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline compounds (CHO), creatine compounds (CR), myo-inositol (MI), glutamate and glutamine (Glu-n). Results In 180 cases of MR, the shortest T2 relaxation time occurred in the deep gray matter within the same age group while the length of T1 relaxation time was ordered from low to high compared to age groups. T2 relaxation time decreased as age increased. The peaks, ordered from high to low, were as follows in 60 cases of 1 HMRS: NAA, CR, CHO, MI, Glu-n. The ratios of NAA/CR and Glu-n/CR were higher in the senile age group, while that of MI/CR was lower. The ratio of CHO/CR was increased as age decreased. The ratio of NAA/CR and MI/CR gradually decreased in relation to movement from the anterior to the posterior part of the brain; the ratio of CHO/CR was highest in the occipital cortex. Correlation of T1 relaxation time and partial metabolite ratios to age were present in gray matter.Conclusions Quantitative studies of MR T1 and T2 relaxation times and 1 HMRS are essential to evaluation of normal myelinization processes, neuronal integrity and age-related biochemical changes in the brain.

  17. Calbindin distribution in cortical and subcortical brain structures of normal and rabies-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Fernández, Orlando; Yepes, Gloria E; Gómez, Javier E; Pimienta, Hernán J

    2005-10-01

    Rabies has been an enigmatic disease of the nervous system because microscopic findings in the brain tissue are not paralleled by the severity of the clinical illness. The calcium binding protein calbindin (CB) is a neuronal marker of great interest in neuroanatomy and neuropathology. CB-ir neurons in the striatum and cerebral cortex are gabaergic cells. In the present work CB-immunoreactivity was evaluated in brains of normal and rabies-infected mice. Rabies infection caused loss of CB-immunostaining in the cortical supragranular layers as well as in the striatum. Loss of CB in the brains of mice infected with rabies virus can produce impairment in Ca++ homeostasis and in the gabaergic neurotransmission.

  18. Uptake of radiolabeled ions in normal and ischemia-damaged brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dienel, G.A.; Pulsinelli, W.A.

    1986-05-01

    The regional concentrations of nine radiochemicals were measured in rat brain after induction of cerebral ischemia to identify tracers concentrated by brain undergoing selective neuronal necrosis. Transient (30 minute) forebrain ischemia was produced in the rat; 24 hours after cerebral recirculation the radiochemicals were injected intravenously and allowed to circulate for 5 hours. The brain concentrations of the radiochemicals in dissected regions were determined by scintillation counting. Forebrain ischemia of this nature will produce extensive injury to striatal neurons but will spare the great majority of neocortical neurons at 24 hours. The regional concentrations of these radiochemicals varied considerably in both control and ischemic animals. In postischemic animals, 4 radionuclides (/sup 63/Ni, /sup 99/TcO/sub 4/, /sup 22/Na, and (/sup 3/H)tetracycline) were concentrated in the irreversibly damaged striatum in amounts ranging from 1.4 to 2.4 times greater than in normal tissue. The concentrations of /sup 65/Zn, /sup 59/Fe, /sup 32/PO/sub 4/, and /sup 147/Pm in postischemic brain were similar to or less than those in normal brain. The concentration of (14C)EDTA was increased in injured and uninjured brain of postischemic rats. Autoradiographic analysis of the distribution patterns of some of these ions in normal animals showed that /sup 99/TcO/sub 4/, /sup 22/Na, /sup 65/Zn, and /sup 59/Fe were distributed more uniformly throughout the brain than were /sup 32/PO/sub 4/, /sup 63/Ni, and /sup 147/Pm. At 24 or 48 hours after ischemia, /sup 63/Ni, /sup 99/TcO/sub 4/, and /sup 22/Na were preferentially concentrated in the damaged striatum and hippocampus, whereas /sup 65/Zn, /sup 59/Fe, /sup 32/PO/sub 4/, and /sup 147/Pm did not accumulate in irreversibly injured tissue. Of the radiochemicals tested to date, Ni, TcO/sub 4/, and tetracycline may be useful for diagnosing ischemic brain injury in humans, using positron emission tomography.

  19. Classification of normal and pathological aging processes based on brain MRI morphology measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Gonzalez, J. L.; Yanez-Suarez, O.; Medina-Bañuelos, V.

    2014-03-01

    Reported studies describing normal and abnormal aging based on anatomical MRI analysis do not consider morphological brain changes, but only volumetric measures to distinguish among these processes. This work presents a classification scheme, based both on size and shape features extracted from brain volumes, to determine different aging stages: healthy control (HC) adults, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Three support vector machines were optimized and validated for the pair-wise separation of these three classes, using selected features from a set of 3D discrete compactness measures and normalized volumes of several global and local anatomical structures. Our analysis show classification rates of up to 98.3% between HC and AD; of 85% between HC and MCI and of 93.3% for MCI and AD separation. These results outperform those reported in the literature and demonstrate the viability of the proposed morphological indexes to classify different aging stages.

  20. Effects of stress hormones on the brain and cognition: Evidence from normal to pathological aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Nery de Souza-Talarico

    Full Text Available Abstract Several studies have demonstrated a wide cognitive variability among aged individuals. One factor thought to be associated with this heterogeneity is exposure to chronic stress throughout life. Animal and human evidence demonstrates that glucocorticoids (GCs, the main class of stress hormones, are strongly linked to memory performance whereby elevated GC levels are associated with memory performance decline in both normal and pathological cognitive aging. Accordingly, it is believed that GCs may increase the brain's vulnerability to the effects of internal and external insults, and thus may play a role in the development of age-related cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD. The aim of this review article was to investigate the effects of GCs on normal and pathological cognitive aging by showing how these hormones interact with different brain structures involved in cognitive abilities, subsequently worsen memory performance, and increase the risk for developing dementia.

  1. CSF Flow in the Brain in the Context of Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, W G

    2015-05-01

    CSF normally flows back and forth through the aqueduct during the cardiac cycle. During systole, the brain and intracranial vasculature expand and compress the lateral and third ventricles, forcing CSF craniocaudad. During diastole, they contract and flow through the aqueduct reverses. Hyperdynamic CSF flow through the aqueduct is seen when there is ventricular enlargement without cerebral atrophy. Therefore, patients presenting with clinical normal pressure hydrocephalus who have hyperdynamic CSF flow have been found to respond better to ventriculoperitoneal shunting than those with normal or decreased CSF flow. Patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus have also been found to have larger intracranial volumes than sex-matched controls, suggesting that they may have had benign external hydrocephalus as infants. While their arachnoidal granulations clearly have decreased CSF resorptive capacity, it now appears that this is fixed and that the arachnoidal granulations are not merely immature. Such patients appear to develop a parallel pathway for CSF to exit the ventricles through the extracellular space of the brain and the venous side of the glymphatic system. This pathway remains functional until late adulthood when the patient develops deep white matter ischemia, which is characterized histologically by myelin pallor (ie, loss of lipid). The attraction between the bare myelin protein and the CSF increases resistance to the extracellular outflow of CSF, causing it to back up, resulting in hydrocephalus. Thus idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus appears to be a "2 hit" disease: benign external hydrocephalus in infancy followed by deep white matter ischemia in late adulthood.

  2. Risk of multiple sclerosis after optic neuritis in patients with normal baseline brain MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Inês Brás; Matias, Fernando; Silva, Eduardo Duarte; Cunha, Luis; Sousa, Lívia

    2014-04-01

    When assessing and managing a patient with optic neuritis (ON), the risk of future development of multiple sclerosis (MS) is an important issue, as this can be the first presentation of the disease. Although the presence of lesions on baseline brain MRI is the strongest predictor of MS conversion, some patients with normal imaging also develop MS. We aimed to estimate MS risk in patients with ON and a normal baseline MRI and identify individuals with higher risk of conversion. We performed a retrospective study including patients with idiopathic ON and normal baseline brain MRI who presented to our hospital over an 8 year period. Of a total of 42 patients, 10 converted to MS: five during the first follow-up year, seven during the first 2 years and all of the patients within the first 5 years, with a 5 year MS conversion rate of 23.8%. MS conversion rates were significantly higher in patients with history of previous symptoms suggestive of demyelination (p=0.002), cerebrospinal fluid oligoclonal bands unmatched in serum (p=0.004) and incomplete visual acuity recovery (≤6/12) after 1 year (p=0.002). Lower conversion rates were found in patients with optic disc edema (p=0.022). According to these results, a significant proportion of patients with idiopathic ON and a normal baseline brain MRI will develop MS, with a higher risk during the first 5 years. Therefore, in the presence of factors in favor of MS conversion, close follow-up, including semestral medical consultations and yearly brain MRI, can be recommended. Early immunomodulatory treatment may be individually considered as it can delay conversion and reduce new lesion development rate.

  3. The impact of normalization and segmentation on resting-state brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Ricardo; Marques, Paulo; Soares, José; Alves, Victor; Sousa, Nuno

    2015-04-01

    Graph theory has recently received a lot of attention from the neuroscience community as a method to represent and characterize brain networks. Still, there is a lack of a gold standard for the methods that should be employed for the preprocessing of the data and the construction of the networks, as well as a lack of knowledge on how different methodologies can affect the metrics reported. The authors used graph theory analysis applied to resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the influence of different node-defining strategies and the effect of normalizing the functional acquisition on several commonly reported metrics used to characterize brain networks. The nodes of the network were defined using either the individual FreeSurfer segmentation of each subject or the FreeSurfer segmented Montreal National Institute (MNI) 152 template, using the Destrieux and subcortical atlas. The functional acquisition was either kept on the functional native space or normalized into MNI standard space. The comparisons were done at three levels: on the connections, on the edge properties, and on the network properties levels. The results reveal that different registration and brain parcellation strategies have a strong impact on all the levels of analysis, possibly favoring the use of individual segmentation strategies and conservative registration approaches. In conclusion, several technical aspects must be considered so that graph theoretical analysis of connectivity MRI data can provide a framework to understand brain pathologies.

  4. Moderate whisky consumption in combination with an evening meal reduces tryptophan availability to the brain but does not influence performance in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, C Rob; Sierksma, Aafje; Verbeek, Cees; van Rooijen, Jan J M; Patel, Hamina J; Brand, A Nico; Hendriks, Henk F J

    2004-12-01

    Brain serotonin (5-HT) synthesis is controlled by nutrients that influence the availability of plasma tryptophan (Trp) as compared with the sum of the other large neutral amino acids (LNAA; Trp:LNAA). Alcohol consumption is found to change mood and performance and this might well be due to alterations in the plasma Trp:LNAA ratio and brain 5-HT. In the present study, we tested whether whisky consumption as part of a meal may alter the plasma Trp:LNAA ratio and influence mood and performance in healthy volunteers. Twenty-four healthy male subjects participated in a within-subjects cross-over study. Subjects consumed whisky (125 ml; 40 g alcohol) or water (125 ml) as part of a standard evening meal. Effects of whisky consumption were tested on mood and choice reaction time and blood samples were taken to measure changes in plasma amino acids, glucose and insulin. The plasma Trp:LNAA ratio showed a significant decline 2 h after whisky consumption of alcohol (Pwhisky consumption alters available plasma Trp for uptake into the brain, whereas there were no effects on mood and performance.

  5. Brain herniation in a patient with apparently normal intracranial pressure: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahlqvist Mats B

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Intracranial pressure monitoring is commonly implemented in patients with neurologic injury and at high risk of developing intracranial hypertension, to detect changes in intracranial pressure in a timely manner. This enables early and potentially life-saving treatment of intracranial hypertension. Case presentation An intraparenchymal pressure probe was placed in the hemisphere contralateral to a large basal ganglia hemorrhage in a 75-year-old Caucasian man who was mechanically ventilated and sedated because of depressed consciousness. Intracranial pressures were continuously recorded and never exceeded 17 mmHg. After sedation had been stopped, our patient showed clinical signs of transtentorial brain herniation, despite apparently normal intracranial pressures (less than 10 mmHg. Computed tomography revealed that the size of the intracerebral hematoma had increased together with significant unilateral brain edema and transtentorial herniation. The contralateral hemisphere where the intraparenchymal pressure probe was placed appeared normal. Our patient underwent emergency decompressive craniotomy and was tracheotomized early, but did not completely recover. Conclusions Intraparenchymal pressure probes placed in the hemisphere contralateral to an intracerebral hematoma may dramatically underestimate intracranial pressure despite apparently normal values, even in the case of transtentorial brain herniation.

  6. Characterizing structural association alterations within brain networks in normal aging using Gaussian Bayesian networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Wang, Yan; Chen, Kewei; Wu, Xia; Zhang, Jiacai; Li, Ke; Jin, Zhen; Yao, Li

    2014-01-01

    Recent multivariate neuroimaging studies have revealed aging-related alterations in brain structural networks. However, the sensory/motor networks such as the auditory, visual and motor networks, have obtained much less attention in normal aging research. In this study, we used Gaussian Bayesian networks (BN), an approach investigating possible inter-regional directed relationship, to characterize aging effects on structural associations between core brain regions within each of these structural sensory/motor networks using volumetric MRI data. We then further examined the discriminability of BN models for the young (N = 109; mean age =22.73 years, range 20-28) and old (N = 82; mean age =74.37 years, range 60-90) groups. The results of the BN modeling demonstrated that structural associations exist between two homotopic brain regions from the left and right hemispheres in each of the three networks. In particular, compared with the young group, the old group had significant connection reductions in each of the three networks and lesser connection numbers in the visual network. Moreover, it was found that the aging-related BN models could distinguish the young and old individuals with 90.05, 73.82, and 88.48% accuracy for the auditory, visual, and motor networks, respectively. Our findings suggest that BN models can be used to investigate the normal aging process with reliable statistical power. Moreover, these differences in structural inter-regional interactions may help elucidate the neuronal mechanism of anatomical changes in normal aging.

  7. Probiotics normalize the gut-brain-microbiota axis in immunodeficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carli J; Emge, Jacob R; Berzins, Katrina; Lung, Lydia; Khamishon, Rebecca; Shah, Paarth; Rodrigues, David M; Sousa, Andrew J; Reardon, Colin; Sherman, Philip M; Barrett, Kim E; Gareau, Mélanie G

    2014-10-15

    The gut-brain-microbiota axis is increasingly recognized as an important regulator of intestinal physiology. Exposure to psychological stress causes activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and causes altered intestinal barrier function, intestinal dysbiosis, and behavioral changes. The primary aim of this study was to determine whether the effects of psychological stress on intestinal physiology and behavior, including anxiety and memory, are mediated by the adaptive immune system. Furthermore, we wanted to determine whether treatment with probiotics would normalize these effects. Here we demonstrate that B and T cell-deficient Rag1(-/-) mice displayed altered baseline behaviors, including memory and anxiety, accompanied by an overactive HPA axis, increased intestinal secretory state, dysbiosis, and decreased hippocampal c-Fos expression. Both local (intestinal physiology and microbiota) and central (behavioral and hippocampal c-Fos) changes were normalized by pretreatment with probiotics, indicating an overall benefit on health conferred by changes in the microbiota, independent of lymphocytes. Taken together, these findings indicate a role for adaptive immune cells in maintaining normal intestinal and brain health in mice and show that probiotics can overcome this immune-mediated deficit in the gut-brain-microbiota axis.

  8. Normal saline influences coagulation and endothelial function after traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dekker, Simone E; Sillesen, Martin; Bambakidis, Ted

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) are the leading causes of trauma-related deaths. These insults disrupt coagulation and endothelial systems. This study investigated whether previously reported differences in lesion size and brain swelling during normal saline (NS...... of endothelial activation (E-selectin, Intercellular adhesion molecule [ICAM]-1), coagulation activation (prothrombin fragment 1 + 2), and natural anticoagulation (activated protein C [aPC]) were determined in serum and brain whole cell lysates. RESULTS: Serum levels of aPC were greater in the NS group (203 ± 30...... pg/mL) compared with HEX (77 ± 28 pg/mL; P = .02) and FFP (110 ± 28 pg/mL; P = .09), as was PF 1 + 2 in the brain when compared with FFP (PF 1 + 2, 89 ± 46 vs 37 ± 14 ng/mL; P = .035). Brain E-selectin was greater in the NS group compared with FFP (3.36 ± 0.02 vs 3.31 ± 0.01 ng/mL; P = .029...

  9. Imaging brain effects of APOE4 in cognitively normal individuals across the lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouquet, Marine; Besson, Florent L; Gonneaud, Julie; La Joie, Renaud; Chételat, Gaël

    2014-09-01

    The ε4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (APOE4) is associated with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hence, several studies have compared the brain characteristics of APOE4 carriers versus non-carriers in presymptomatic stages to determine early AD biomarkers. The present review provides an overview on APOE4-related brain changes in cognitively normal individuals, focusing on the main neuroimaging biomarkers for AD, i.e. cortical beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition, hypometabolism and atrophy. The most consistent findings are observed with Aβ deposition as most studies report significantly higher cortical Aβ load in APOE4 carriers compared with non-carriers. Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography studies are rare and tend to show hypometabolism in brain regions typically impaired in AD. Structural magnetic resonance imaging findings are the most numerous and also the most discrepant, showing atrophy in AD-sensitive regions in some studies but contradicting results as well. Altogether, this suggests a graded effect of APOE4, with a predominant effect on Aβ over brain structure and metabolism. Multimodal studies confirm this view and also suggest that APOE4 effects on brain structure and function are mediated by both Aβ-dependent and Aβ-independent pathological processes. Neuroimaging studies on asymptomatic APOE4 carriers offer relevant information to the understanding of early pathological mechanisms of the disease, although caution is needed as to whether APOE4 effects reflect AD pathological processes, and are representative of these effects in non-carriers.

  10. Periodontal disease associates with higher brain amyloid load in normal elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamer, Angela R; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Tsui, Wai; Rusinek, Henry; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Mosconi, Lisa; Yi, Li; McHugh, Pauline; Craig, Ronald G; Svetcov, Spencer; Linker, Ross; Shi, Chen; Glodzik, Lidia; Williams, Schantel; Corby, Patricia; Saxena, Deepak; de Leon, Mony J

    2015-02-01

    The accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques is a central feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). First reported in animal models, it remains uncertain if peripheral inflammatory and/or infectious conditions in humans can promote Aβ brain accumulation. Periodontal disease, a common chronic infection, has been previously reported to be associated with AD. Thirty-eight cognitively normal, healthy, and community-residing elderly (mean age, 61 and 68% female) were examined in an Alzheimer's Disease Research Center and a University-Based Dental School. Linear regression models (adjusted for age, apolipoprotein E, and smoking) were used to test the hypothesis that periodontal disease assessed by clinical attachment loss was associated with brain Aβ load using (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) positron emission tomography imaging. After adjusting for confounders, clinical attachment loss (≥3 mm), representing a history of periodontal inflammatory/infectious burden, was associated with increased PIB uptake in Aβ vulnerable brain regions (p = 0.002). We show for the first time in humans an association between periodontal disease and brain Aβ load. These data are consistent with the previous animal studies showing that peripheral inflammation/infections are sufficient to produce brain Aβ accumulations.

  11. Measurement of blood flow in the superior sagittal sinus in healthy volunteers, and in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus and idiopathic intracranial hypertension with phase-contrast cine MR imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Thomsen, C; Gjerris, F

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To measure blood flow and velocity in the superior sagittal ++sinus. MATERIAL AND METHODS: MR velocity mapping was used to examine 14 healthy volunteers, 15 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), 3 patients with high pressure hydrocephalus (HPH), and 11 patients with idiopathic...... intracranial hypertension (IIH). RESULTS: Mean blood flow was 443 ml/min in healthy volunteers with a tendency towards reduced blood flow with increasing age. In NPH patients significantly lower superior sagittal sinus blood flow values were found, but this difference was no longer significant when patients...... and controls were matched for age. In HPH and IIH patients blood flow and velocity were within the normal range. In one patient with thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus the blood flow was reduced to 40 ml/min. CONCLUSION: MR velocity mapping methods may be of value in the assessment of blood flow...

  12. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Modulates Heat Nociception in the Human Brain - An fMRI Study in Healthy Volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar, Mohammad Sohail; Becerra, Lino; Larsson, Henrik B W

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intravenous infusion of calcitonin-gene-related-peptide (CGRP) provokes headache and migraine in humans. Mechanisms underlying CGRP-induced headache are not fully clarified and it is unknown to what extent CGRP modulates nociceptive processing in the brain. To elucidate this we record...... cortex. Sumatriptan injection reversed these changes. CONCLUSION: The changes in BOLD-signals in the brain after CGRP infusion suggests that systemic CGRP modulates nociceptive transmission in the trigeminal pain pathways in response to noxious heat stimuli.......BACKGROUND: Intravenous infusion of calcitonin-gene-related-peptide (CGRP) provokes headache and migraine in humans. Mechanisms underlying CGRP-induced headache are not fully clarified and it is unknown to what extent CGRP modulates nociceptive processing in the brain. To elucidate this we recorded...

  13. Fractal description and quantitative analysis of normal brain development in infants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hehong Li; Liangping Luo; Li Huang

    2011-01-01

    We examined the fractal pattern of cerebral computerized tomography images in 158 normal infants, aged 0-3 years, based on the quantitative analysis of chaotic theory. Results showed that the fractal dimension of cerebral computerized tomography images in normal infants remained stable from 1.86-1.91. The normal distribution range in the neonatal period, 1-2 months old infants, 1-2 year old infants, and of 2-3 year old infants was 1.88-1.90 (mean: 1.891 3 ± 0.006 4), 1.89-1.90 (mean: 1.892 7 ± 0.004 5), 1.86-1.90 (mean: 1.886 3 ± 0.008 5), and 1.88-1.91 (mean: 1.895 8 ± 0.008 3), respectively. The spectrum width of the multifractal spectrum (△α) in normal infants was 1.4618. These data suggest that the spectral width parameters of the multifractal spectrum and the fractal dimension criteria in normal children may be useful as a practical specific parameter for assessing the fractal mode of brain development in normal infants.

  14. Brain structural correlates of reward sensitivity and impulsivity in adolescents with normal and excess weight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Moreno-López

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Neuroscience evidence suggests that adolescent obesity is linked to brain dysfunctions associated with enhanced reward and somatosensory processing and reduced impulse control during food processing. Comparatively less is known about the role of more stable brain structural measures and their link to personality traits and neuropsychological factors on the presentation of adolescent obesity. Here we aimed to investigate regional brain anatomy in adolescents with excess weight vs. lean controls. We also aimed to contrast the associations between brain structure and personality and cognitive measures in both groups. METHODS: Fifty-two adolescents (16 with normal weight and 36 with excess weight were scanned using magnetic resonance imaging and completed the Sensitivity to Punishment and Sensitivity to Reward Questionnaire (SPSRQ, the UPPS-P scale, and the Stroop task. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM was used to assess possible between-group differences in regional gray matter (GM and to measure the putative differences in the way reward and punishment sensitivity, impulsivity and inhibitory control relate to regional GM volumes, which were analyzed using both region of interest (ROI and whole brain analyses. The ROIs included areas involved in reward/somatosensory processing (striatum, somatosensory cortices and motivation/impulse control (hippocampus, prefrontal cortex. RESULTS: Excess weight adolescents showed increased GM volume in the right hippocampus. Voxel-wise volumes of the second somatosensory cortex (SII were correlated with reward sensitivity and positive urgency in lean controls, but this association was missed in excess weight adolescents. Moreover, Stroop performance correlated with dorsolateral prefrontal cortex volumes in controls but not in excess weight adolescents. CONCLUSION: Adolescents with excess weight have structural abnormalities in brain regions associated with somatosensory processing and motivation.

  15. Differentiating shunt-responsive normal pressure hydrocephalus from Alzheimer disease and normal aging: pilot study using automated MRI brain tissue segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serulle, Yafell; Rusinek, Henry; Kirov, Ivan I; Milch, Hannah; Fieremans, Els; Baxter, Alexander B; McMenamy, John; Jain, Rajan; Wisoff, Jeffrey; Golomb, James; Gonen, Oded; George, Ajax E

    2014-10-01

    Evidence suggests that normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is underdiagnosed in day to day radiologic practice, and differentiating NPH from cerebral atrophy due to other neurodegenerative diseases and normal aging remains a challenge. To better characterize NPH, we test the hypothesis that a prediction model based on automated MRI brain tissue segmentation can help differentiate shunt-responsive NPH patients from cerebral atrophy due to Alzheimer disease (AD) and normal aging. Brain segmentation into gray and white matter (GM, WM), and intracranial cerebrospinal fluid was derived from pre-shunt T1-weighted MRI of 15 shunt-responsive NPH patients (9 men, 72.6 ± 8.0 years-old), 17 AD patients (10 men, 72.1 ± 11.0 years-old) chosen as a representative of cerebral atrophy in this age group; and 18 matched healthy elderly controls (HC, 7 men, 69.7 ± 7.0 years old). A multinomial prediction model was generated based on brain tissue volume distributions. GM decrease of 33% relative to HC characterized AD (P normal GM volumes characterized NPH. A multinomial regression model based on gender, GM and ventricular volume had 96.3% accuracy differentiating NPH from AD and HC. In conclusion, automated MRI brain tissue segmentation differentiates shunt-responsive NPH with high accuracy from atrophy due to AD and normal aging. This method may improve diagnosis of NPH and improve our ability to distinguish normal from pathologic aging.

  16. MTR variations in normal adult brain structures using balanced steady-state free precession

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Meritxell; Wetzel, Stephan G.; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm [University of Basel Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Radiology, Basel (Switzerland); Gloor, Monika; Bieri, Oliver; Scheffler, Klaus [University of Basel Hospital, Division of Radiological Physics, Institute of Radiology, Basel (Switzerland)

    2011-03-15

    Magnetization transfer (MT) is sensitive to the macromolecular environment of water protons and thereby provides information not obtainable from conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Compared to standard methods, MT-sensitized balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) offers high-resolution images with significantly reduced acquisition times. In this study, high-resolution magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) images from normal appearing brain structures were acquired with bSSFP. Twelve subjects were studied on a 1.5 T scanner. MTR values were calculated from MT images acquired in 3D with 1.3 mm isotropic resolution. The complete MT data set was acquired within less than 3.5 min. Forty-one brain structures of the white matter (WM) and gray matter (GM) were identified for each subject. MTR values were higher for WM than GM. In general, MTR values of the WM and GM structures were in good accordance with the literature. However, MTR values showed more homogenous values within WM and GM structures than previous studies. MT-sensitized bSSFP provides isotropic high-resolution MTR images and hereby allows assessment of reliable MTR data in also very small brain structures in clinically feasible acquisition times and is thus a promising sequence for being widely used in the clinical routine. The present normative data can serve as a reference for the future characterization of brain pathologies. (orig.)

  17. Role of 5-hydroxytryptamine in the regulation of brain neuropeptides in normal and diabetic rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolta, Malak G.; Williams, Byron B.; Soliman, Karam F. A.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) alteration on brain dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), beta-endorphin (beta-E), and immunoreactive insulin was studied in Sprague-Dawley diabetic and control rats. Diabetes was induced using alloxan (45 mg/kg), 15 days prior to sacrificing. Both control and diabetic animals were treated with either p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 300 mg/kg) three days prior to sacrificing or fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) twice daily for three days. PCPA treatment significantly decreased brain content of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindolel acetic acid, while it caused significant increase and decrease in brain beta-E and insulin levels, respectively, in both normal and diabetic rat. Meanwhile, the administration of fluoxetine resulted in significant increase in brain content of 5-HT, DA, NE and insulin but significant decline of beta-E in diabetic and saline control rats. The results of this experiment indicate that 5-HT may be regulating both beta-E and insulin regardless of the availability of pancreatic insulin.

  18. Normalization of coagulopathy is associated with improved outcome after isolated traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Daniel S; Mitra, Biswadev; Cameron, Peter A; Fitzgerald, Mark; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V

    2016-07-01

    Acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) has been reported in the setting of isolated traumatic brain injury (iTBI) and is associated with poor outcomes. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of procoagulant agents administered to patients with ATC and iTBI during resuscitation, hypothesizing that timely normalization of coagulopathy may be associated with a decrease in mortality. A retrospective review of the Alfred Hospital trauma registry, Australia, was conducted and patients with iTBI (head Abbreviated Injury Score [AIS] ⩾3 and all other body AIS normalized ratio ⩾1.3) were selected for analysis. Data on procoagulant agents used (fresh frozen plasma, platelets, cryoprecipitate, prothrombin complex concentrates, tranexamic acid, vitamin K) were extracted. Among patients who had achieved normalization of INR or survived beyond 24hours and were not taking oral anticoagulants, the association of normalization of INR and death at hospital discharge was analyzed using multivariable logistic regression analysis. There were 157 patients with ATC of whom 68 (43.3%) received procoagulant products within 24hours of presentation. The median time to delivery of first products was 182.5 (interquartile range [IQR] 115-375) minutes, and following administration of coagulants, time to normalization of INR was 605 (IQR 274-1146) minutes. Normalization of INR was independently associated with significantly lower mortality (adjusted odds ratio 0.10; 95% confidence interval 0.03-0.38). Normalization of INR was associated with improved mortality in patients with ATC in the setting of iTBI. As there was a substantial time lag between delivery of products and eventual normalization of coagulation, specific management of coagulopathy should be implemented as early as possible.

  19. SU-E-T-568: Improving Normal Brain Sparing with Increasing Number of Arc Beams for Volume Modulated Arc Beam Radiosurgery of Multiple Brain Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, S; Hildebrand, K; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Larson, D; Ma, L [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Sahgal, A [University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated arc beams have been newly reported for treating multiple brain metastases. The purpose of this study was to determine the variations in the normal brain doses with increasing number of arc beams for multiple brain metastases treatments via the TrueBeam Rapidarc system (Varian Oncology, Palo Alto, CA). Methods: A patient case with 12 metastatic brain lesions previously treated on the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (GK) was used for the study. All lesions and organs at risk were contoured by a senior radiation oncologist and treatment plans for a subset of 3, 6, 9 and all 12 targets were developed for the TrueBeam Rapidarc system via 3 to 7 intensity modulated arc-beams with each target covered by at least 99% of the prescribed dose of 20 Gy. The peripheral normal brain isodose volumes as well as the total beam-on time were analyzed with increasing number of arc beams for these targets. Results: All intensisty modulated arc-beam plans produced efficient treatment delivery with the beam-on time averaging 0.6–1.5 min per lesion at an output of 1200 MU/min. With increasing number of arc beams, the peripheral normal brain isodose volumes such as the 12-Gy isodose line enclosed normal brain tissue volumes were on average decreased by 6%, 11%, 18%, and 28% for the 3-, 6-, 9-, 12-target treatment plans respectively. The lowest normal brain isodose volumes were consistently found for the 7-arc treatment plans for all the cases. Conclusion: With nearly identical beam-on times, the peripheral normal brain dose was notably decreased when the total number of intensity modulated arc beams was increased when treating multiple brain metastases. Dr Sahgal and Dr Ma are currently serving on the board of international society of stereotactic radiosurgery.

  20. ROI measurement of the signal intensity of precentral cortex in the normal brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaarslan, Ercan E-mail: arzuarslan@netscape.net; Arslan, Arzu

    2004-12-01

    Objective: It has recently been described that perirolandic cortex generally had a low signal intensity (SI) in neurologically normal brain. The aim of this study was to confirm this finding by an objective quantitative study. Materials and methods: Turbo fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance (MR) images of 24 neurologically normal patients were evaluated retrospectively. Signal intensity measurements of the precentral and superior frontal cortices (SFCs) were obtained at a manually traced irregular region-of-interest (ROI). t-Test for paired samples was used to evaluate the significance of differences between signal intensity measurements. Results: Mean signal intensities of precentral and superior frontal cortices were 349.5 and 380.7, respectively, on the right, and 351.7 and 374.1 on the left hemisphere. The difference between the mean signal intensities of the side-matched precentral and superior frontal cortices was statistically significant (P<0.001). Conclusion: Low signal intensity of the precentral cortex (PCC) in normal brain on turbo FLAIR images is an objective finding, confirmed by ROI measurement.

  1. Evaluation of normal and pathologic appearance in skull base and brain stem with metrizamide CT cisternography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimura, Tatsuo; Nakano, Masaru; Maeda, Yukio; Yokota, Masayuki; Kokubu, Kiyokazu; Shimada, Tatsuji (Hyogo College of Medicine (Japan))

    1985-02-01

    Metrizamide CT cisternography was performed in accordance with prone 60/sup 0/ head-down method, to study the normal anatomy of the skull base and brain stem. Cases of empty sellae, Rathke's cleft cyst, mucocele trigeminal neurinoma, pons glioma, acoustic neurinoma and jugular foramen tumor were studied together. As side effects of MCTC there were headache, vomiting and appearance of slow waves on EEG, but no convulsion. Transient encephalopathy was noted when 250 mgI/ml, 12 ml, was used. Using MCTC, it is possible to identify the vertebral artery, posterior inferior cerebellar artery, basillar artery, vessels forming Willis ring as well as II, III, V, VII and VIII cranial nerves. Further, by measuring the brain stem parts on various levels, it may become possible to detect early changes of degenerative disease.

  2. Post-contrast FLAIR MR imaging of the brain in children: normal and abnormal intracranial enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Choi, Choong-Gon [Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Poongnap-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea)

    2003-12-01

    To describe the normally enhancing intracranial structures on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI and evaluate the usefulness of postcontrast FLAIR images of the brain in the assessment of enhancing lesions by comparing postcontrast FLAIR imaging with postcontrast T1-weighted (T1-W) imaging in children. In 218 children, 249 pre- and postcontrast FLAIR MRI examinations of the brain were obtained consecutively between August 2001 and April 2002. The normally enhancing intracranial structures on FLAIR imaging were assessed in 77 MRI studies of 74 children who showed normal intracranial imaging findings. In 86 MRI studies in 68 children who showed enhancing intracranial lesions, lesion conspicuity on postcontrast FLAIR imaging was compared with that on postcontrast T1-W imaging for all lesions (n=107), intra-axial lesions (n=40), or extra-axial lesions (n=67). The normally enhancing intracranial structures on FLAIR MRI were the choroid plexus (99%, 76/77), pituitary stalk (84%, 65/77), pineal gland (71%, 55/77), dural sinuses (26%, 20/77), and cortical veins (9%, 7/77). Of all the enhancing lesions, lesion conspicuousness on postcontrast FLAIR imaging was better than postcontrast T1-weighted imaging in 42, equal in 28, and worse in 37. Of 40 intra-axial lesions, lesion conspicuousness on postcontrast FLAIR imaging was better in 6, equal in 10, and worse in 24. Of 67 extra-axial lesions, lesion conspicuity on postcontrast FLAIR imaging was better in 36, equal in 18, and worse in 13. Conspicuousness of extra-axial lesions was significantly better than that of intra-axial lesions on postcontrast FLAIR imaging (P<0.001). The choroid plexus, pituitary stalk, pineal gland, dural sinuses, and cortical veins show normal enhancement on postcontrast FLAIR MRI in children, and postcontrast FLAIR imaging appears better than postcontrast T1-W imaging in the assessment of extra-axial enhancing lesions in children. (orig.)

  3. Free magnesium levels in normal human brain and brain tumors: sup 31 P chemical-shift imaging measurements at 1. 5 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.S.; Vigneron, D.B.; Murphy-Boesch, J.; Nelson, S.J.; Kessler, H.B.; Coia, L.; Curran, W.; Brown, T.R. (Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1991-08-01

    The authors have studied a series of normal subjects and patients with brain tumors, by using {sup 31}P three-dimensional chemical shift imaging to obtain localized {sup 31}P spectra of the brain. A significant proportion of brain cytosolic ATP in normal brain is not complexed to Mg{sup 2+}, as indicated by the chemical shift {delta} of the {beta}-P resonance of ATP. The ATP {beta}P resonance position in brain thus is sensitive to changes in intracellular free Mg{sup 2+} concentration and in the proportion of ATP complexed with Mg because this shift lies on the rising portion of the {delta} vs. Mg{sup 2+} titration curve for ATP. They have measured the ATP {beta}-P shift and compared intracellular free Mg{sup 2+} concentration and fractions of free ATP for normal individuals and a limited series of patients with brain tumors. In four of the five spectra obtained from brain tissue containing a substantial proportion of tumor, intracellular free Mg{sup 2+} was increased, and the fraction of free ATP was decreased, compared with normal brain.

  4. Bioactive form of resveratrol in glioblastoma cells and its safety for normal brain cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hong Shu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBackground: Resveratrol, a plant polyphenol existing in grapes and many other natural foods, possesses a wide range of biological activities including cancer prevention. It has been recognized that resveratrol is intracellularly biotransformed to different metabolites, but no direct evidence has been available to ascertain its bioactive form because of the difficulty to maintain resveratrol unmetabolized in vivo or in vitro. It would be therefore worthwhile to elucidate the potential therapeutic implications of resveratrol metabolism using a reliable resveratrol-sensitive cancer cells.Objective: To identify the real biological form of trans-resveratrol and to evaluate the safety of the effective anticancer dose of resveratrol for the normal brain cells.Methods: The samples were prepared from the condition media and cell lysates of human glioblastoma U251 cells, and were purified by solid phase extraction (SPE. The samples were subjected to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS analysis. According to the metabolite(s, trans-resveratrol was biotransformed in vitro by the method described elsewhere, and the resulting solution was used to treat U251 cells. Meanwhile, the responses of U251 and primarily cultured rat normal brain cells (glial cells and neurons to 100μM trans-resveratrol were evaluated by multiple experimental methods.Results: The results revealed that resveratrol monosulfate was the major metabolite in U251 cells. About half fraction of resveratrol monosulfate was prepared in vitro and this trans-resveratrol and resveratrol monosulfate mixture showed little inhibitory effect on U251 cells. It is also found that rat primary brain cells (PBCs not only resist 100μM but also tolerate as high as 200μM resveratrol treatment.Conclusions: Our study thus demonstrated that trans-resveratrol was the bioactive form in glioblastoma cells and, therefore, the biotransforming

  5. Thermoregulatory Instability in Childhood: Linking the Normal Brain to Hypothalamic Storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Alves Martins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Central core temperature is tightly controlled by hypothalamic centers, a feature that makes sudden changes in body temperature very unusual. A dysfunction of these hypothalamic pathways leads to Shapiro’s syndrome, comprising spontaneous hypothermia, hyperhidrosis, and corpus callosum dysgenesis. Although it may affect any age, usually it presents in childhood. Variants to this syndrome with completely normal brain anatomy have been consistently reported, expanding the clinical spectrum of the syndrome. Herein, we report the case of a 4-year-old girl with Shapiro’s syndrome and unaffected corpus callosum.

  6. Complete adrenocorticotropin deficiency after radiation therapy for brain tumor with a normal growth hormone reserve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Haruna; Yoshioka, Katsunobu; Yamagami, Keiko [Osaka City General Hospital (Japan)] (and others)

    2002-06-01

    A 34-year-old man with neurofibromatosis type 1, who had received radiation therapy after the excision of a brain tumor 5 years earlier, was admitted to our hospital with vomiting and weight loss. Cortisol and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) were undetectable before and after administration of 100 {mu}g corticotropin releasing hormone. The level of growth hormone without stimulation was 24.7 ng/ml. We diagnosed him to have complete ACTH deficiency attributable to radiation therapy. This is the first known case of a patient with complete ACTH deficiency after radiation therapy and a growth hormone reserve that remained normal. (author)

  7. Clinical NMR imaging of the brain in children: normal and neurologic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, M.A, (Hammersmith Hospital, London, England); Pennock, J.M.; Bydder, G.M.; Steiner, R.E.; Thomas, D.J.; Hayward, R.; Bryant, D.R.T.; Payne, J.A.; Levene, M.I.; Whitelaw, A.; Dubowitz, L.M.S.; Dubowitz, V.

    1983-11-01

    The results of initial clinical nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in eight normal and 52 children with a wide variety of neurologic diseases were reviewed. The high level of gray-white matter contrast available with inversion-recovery sequences provided a basis for visualizing normal myelination as well as delays or deficits in this process. The appearances seen in cases of parenchymal hemorrhage, cerebral infarction, and proencephalic cysts are described. Ventricular enlargement was readily identified and marginal edema was demonstrated with spin-echo sequences. Abnormalities were seen in cerebral palsy, congenital malformations, Hallervorden-Spatz disease, aminoaciduria, and meningitis. Space-occupying lesions were identified by virtue of their increased relaxation times and mass effects. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging has considerable potential in pediatric neuroradiologic practice, in some conditions supplying information not available by computed tomography or sonography.

  8. Hierarchical clustering of Alzheimer and "normal" brains using elemental concentrations and glucose metabolism determined by PIXE, INAA and PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutts, DA; Spyrou, NM; Maguire, RP; Leenders, KL

    2001-01-01

    Brain tissue samples, obtained from the Alzheimer Disease Brain Bank, Institute of Psychiatry, London, were taken from both left and right hemispheres of three regions of the cerebrum, namely the frontal, parietal and occipital lobes for both Alzheimer and 'normal' subjects. Trace element concentrat

  9. Genetic basis of neurocognitive decline and reduced white-matter integrity in normal human brain aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glahn, David C; Kent, Jack W; Sprooten, Emma; Diego, Vincent P; Winkler, Anderson M; Curran, Joanne E; McKay, D Reese; Knowles, Emma E; Carless, Melanie A; Göring, Harald H H; Dyer, Thomas D; Olvera, Rene L; Fox, Peter T; Almasy, Laura; Charlesworth, Jac; Kochunov, Peter; Duggirala, Ravi; Blangero, John

    2013-11-19

    Identification of genes associated with brain aging should markedly improve our understanding of the biological processes that govern normal age-related decline. However, challenges to identifying genes that facilitate successful brain aging are considerable, including a lack of established phenotypes and difficulties in modeling the effects of aging per se, rather than genes that influence the underlying trait. In a large cohort of randomly selected pedigrees (n = 1,129 subjects), we documented profound aging effects from young adulthood to old age (18-83 y) on neurocognitive ability and diffusion-based white-matter measures. Despite significant phenotypic correlation between white-matter integrity and tests of processing speed, working memory, declarative memory, and intelligence, no evidence for pleiotropy between these classes of phenotypes was observed. Applying an advanced quantitative gene-by-environment interaction analysis where age is treated as an environmental factor, we demonstrate a heritable basis for neurocognitive deterioration as a function of age. Furthermore, by decomposing gene-by-aging (G × A) interactions, we infer that different genes influence some neurocognitive traits as a function of age, whereas other neurocognitive traits are influenced by the same genes, but to differential levels, from young adulthood to old age. In contrast, increasing white-matter incoherence with age appears to be nongenetic. These results clearly demonstrate that traits sensitive to the genetic influences on brain aging can be identified, a critical first step in delineating the biological mechanisms of successful aging.

  10. Regional distribution of potassium, calcium, and six trace elements in normal human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duflou, H.; Maenhaut, W.; De Reuck, J. (Institute for Nuclear Sciences, Gent (Belgium))

    1989-11-01

    Eight elements (i.e. K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, and Rb) were measured in 50 different regions of 12 normal human brains by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. The dry weight concentrations of K, Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, and Rb were consistently higher for gray than for white matter areas. The K, Zn and Se concentrations for the regions of mixed composition and, to some extent, also the Rb concentrations, were intermediate between the gray and white matter values, and they tended to decrease with decreasing neuron density. The mean dry weight concentrations of K, Ca, Zn, Se, and Rb in the various brain regions were highly correlated with the mean wet-to-dry weight ratios of these regions. For Mn, Fe, and Cu, however, such a correlation was not observed, and these elements exhibited elevated levels in several structures of the basal ganglia. For K, Fe, and Se the concentrations seemed to change with age. A hierarchical cluster analysis indicated that the structures clustered into two large groups, one comprising gray and mixed matter regions, the other white and mixed matter areas. Brain structures involved in the same physiological function or morphologically similar regions often conglomerated in a single subcluster.

  11. Microstructure, length, and connection of limbic tracts in normal human brain development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaowen eYu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The cingulum and fornix play an important role in memory, attention, spatial orientation and feeling functions. Both microstructure and length of these limbic tracts can be affected by mental disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, depression, autism, anxiety, and schizophrenia. To date, there has been little systematic characterization of their microstructure, length and functional connectivity in normally developing brains. In this study, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI data from 65 normally developing right-handed subjects from birth to young adulthood was acquired. After cingulate gyrus part of the cingulum (cgc, hippocampal part of the cingulum (cgh and fornix (fx were traced with DTI tractography, absolute and normalized tract lengths and DTI-derived metrics including fractional anisotropy, mean, axial and radial diffusivity were measured for traced limbic tracts. Free water elimination (FWE algorithm was adopted to improve accuracy of the measurements of DTI-derived metrics. The role of these limbic tracts in the functional network at birth and adulthood was explored. We found a logarithmic age-dependent trajectory for FWE-corrected DTI metric changes with fast increase of microstructural integrity from birth to 2-year-old followed by a slow increase to 25-year-old. Normalized tract length of cgc increases with age, while no significant relationship with age was found for normalized tract lengths of cgh and fx. Stronger microstructural integrity on the left side compared to that of right side was found. With integrated DTI and rs-fMRI, the key connectional role of cgc and cgh in the default mode network (DMN was confirmed as early as birth. Systematic characterization of length and DTI metrics after FWE correction of limbic tracts offers insight into their morphological and microstructural developmental trajectories. These trajectories may serve as a normal reference for pediatric patients with

  12. Microstructure, length, and connection of limbic tracts in normal human brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiaowen; Peng, Yun; Mishra, Virendra; Ouyang, Austin; Li, Hang; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Min; Liu, Shuwei; Huang, Hao

    2014-01-01

    The cingulum and fornix play an important role in memory, attention, spatial orientation, and feeling functions. Both microstructure and length of these limbic tracts can be affected by mental disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, depression, autism, anxiety, and schizophrenia. To date, there has been little systematic characterization of their microstructure, length, and functional connectivity in normally developing brains. In this study, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) data from 65 normally developing right-handed subjects from birth to young adulthood was acquired. After cingulate gyrus part of the cingulum (cgc), hippocampal part of the cingulum (cgh) and fornix (fx) were traced with DTI tractography, absolute and normalized tract lengths and DTI-derived metrics including fractional anisotropy, mean, axial, and radial diffusivity were measured for traced limbic tracts. Free water elimination (FWE) algorithm was adopted to improve accuracy of the measurements of DTI-derived metrics. The role of these limbic tracts in the functional network at birth and adulthood was explored. We found a logarithmic age-dependent trajectory for FWE-corrected DTI metric changes with fast increase of microstructural integrity from birth to 2 years old followed by a slow increase to 25 years old. Normalized tract length of cgc increases with age, while no significant relationship with age was found for normalized tract lengths of cgh and fx. Stronger microstructural integrity on the left side compared to that of the right side was found. With integrated DTI and rs-fMRI, the key connectional role of cgc and cgh in the default mode network was confirmed as early as birth. Systematic characterization of length and DTI metrics after FWE correction of limbic tracts offers insight into their morphological and microstructural developmental trajectories. These trajectories may serve as a normal reference for pediatric patients with mental

  13. Age sensitivity of behavioral tests and brain substrates of normal aging in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennard, John A; Woodruff-Pak, Diana S

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of age sensitivity, the capacity of a behavioral test to reliably detect age-related changes, has utility in the design of experiments to elucidate processes of normal aging. We review the application of these tests in studies of normal aging and compare and contrast the age sensitivity of the Barnes maze, eyeblink classical conditioning, fear conditioning, Morris water maze, and rotorod. These tests have all been implemented to assess normal age-related changes in learning and memory in rodents, which generalize in many cases to age-related changes in learning and memory in all mammals, including humans. Behavioral assessments are a valuable means to measure functional outcomes of neuroscientific studies of aging. Highlighted in this review are the attributes and limitations of these measures in mice in the context of age sensitivity and processes of brain aging. Attributes of these tests include reliability and validity as assessments of learning and memory, well-defined neural substrates, and sensitivity to neural and pharmacological manipulations and disruptions. These tests engage the hippocampus and/or the cerebellum, two structures centrally involved in learning and memory that undergo functional and anatomical changes in normal aging. A test that is less well represented in studies of normal aging, the context pre-exposure facilitation effect (CPFE) in fear conditioning, is described as a method to increase sensitivity of contextual fear conditioning to changes in the hippocampus. Recommendations for increasing the age sensitivity of all measures of normal aging in mice are included, as well as a discussion of the potential of the under-studied CPFE to advance understanding of subtle hippocampus-mediated phenomena.

  14. Age Sensitivity of Behavioral Tests and Brain Substrates of Normal Aging in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Kennard

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of age sensitivity, the capacity of a behavioral test to reliably detect age-related changes, has utility in the design of experiments to elucidate processes of normal aging. We review the application of these tests in studies of normal aging and compare and contrast the age sensitivity of the Barnes maze, eyeblink classical conditioning, fear conditioning, Morris water maze and rotorod. These tests have all been implemented to assess normal age-related changes in learning and memory in rodents, which generalize in many cases to age-related changes in learning and memory in all mammals, including humans. Behavioral assessments are a valuable means to measure functional outcomes of neuroscientific studies of aging. Highlighted in this review are the attributes and limitations of these measures in mice in the context of age sensitivity and processes of brain aging. Attributes of these tests include reliability and validity as assessments of learning and memory, well-defined neural substrates, and sensitivity to neural and pharmacological manipulations and disruptions. These tests engage the hippocampus and/or the cerebellum, two structures centrally involved in learning and memory that undergo functional and anatomical changes in normal aging. A test that is less well represented in studies of normal aging, the context pre-exposure facilitation effect (CPFE in fear conditioning, is described as a method to increase sensitivity of contextual fear conditioning to changes in the hippocampus. Recommendations for increasing the age sensitivity of all measures of normal aging in mice are included, as well as a discussion of the potential of the under-studied CPFE to advance understanding of subtle hippocampus-mediated phenomena.

  15. Oscillating gradient measurements of water diffusion in normal and globally ischemic rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Does, Mark D; Parsons, Edward C; Gore, John C

    2003-02-01

    Oscillating gradients were used to probe the diffusion-time/frequency dependence of water diffusion in the gray matter of normal and globally ischemic rat brain. In terms of a conventional definition of diffusion time, the oscillating gradient measurements provided the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water with diffusion times between 9.75 ms and 375 micros, an order of magnitude shorter than previously studied in vivo. Over this range, ADCs increased as much as 24% in vivo and 50% postmortem, depending on the nature of the oscillating gradient waveform used. Novel waveforms were employed to sample narrow frequency bands of the so-called diffusion spectrum. This spectral description of ADC includes the effects of restriction and/or flow, and is independent of experimental parameters, such as diffusion time. The results in rat brain were found to be consistent with restricted diffusion and the known micro-anatomy of gray matter. Differences between normal and postmortem data were consistent with an increase in water restriction and/or a decrease in flow, and tentatively suggest that physical changes following the onset of ischemia occur on a scale of about 2 microm, similar to a typical cellular dimension in gray matter.

  16. Tractographic reconstruction protocol optimization in the rat brain in-vivo: towards a normal atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preti, Maria Giulia; Di Marzio, Alessandro; Mastropietro, Alfonso; Aquino, Domenico; Baselli, Giuseppe; Laganà, Maria Marcella; Zucca, Ileana; Frassoni, Carolina; Spreafico, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    The tractographic reconstruction of anatomical and microstructural features provided by Magnetic Resonance (MR) Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) gives essential information of brain damage in several pathological animal models. The optimization of a tractographic protocol is undertaken in normal rats for the future construction of a reference atlas, as prerequisite for preclinical pathological in-vivo studies. High field, preclinical in-vivo DTI faces important difficulties relevant to Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), distortion, high required resolution, movement sensitivity. Given a pixel-size of 0.17 mm and TE/TR = 29/6500 ms, b value and slice thickness were fixed at 700 s/mm(2) and 0.58 mm, respectively, on preventive ex-vivo studies. In-vivo studies led to the choice of 30 diffusion directions, averaged on 16 runs. The final protocol required 51 min scanning and permitted a reliable reconstruction of main rat brain bundles. Tract reconstruction stopping rules required proper setting. In conclusion, the viability of DTI tractography on in-vivo rat studies was shown, towards the construction of a normal reference atlas.

  17. Brain perfusion SPECT in the mouse: normal pattern according to gender and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolova, Ivayla; Wunder, Andreas; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Michel, Roger; Stemmer, Nina; Lukas, Mathias; Derlin, Thorsten; Gregor-Mamoudou, Betina; Goldschmidt, Jürgen; Brenner, Winfried; Buchert, Ralph

    2012-12-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) is a useful surrogate marker of neuronal activity and a parameter of primary interest in the diagnosis of many diseases. The increasing use of mouse models spawns the demand for in vivo measurement of rCBF in the mouse. Small animal SPECT provides excellent spatial resolution at adequate sensitivity and is therefore a promising tool for imaging the mouse brain. This study evaluates the feasibility of mouse brain perfusion SPECT and assesses the regional pattern of normal Tc-99m-HMPAO uptake and the impact of age and gender. Whole-brain kinetics was compared between Tc-99m-HMPAO and Tc-99m-ECD using rapid dynamic planar scans in 10 mice. Assessment of the regional uptake pattern was restricted to the more suitable tracer, HMPAO. Two HMPAO SPECTs were performed in 18 juvenile mice aged 7.5 ± 1.5weeks, and in the same animals at young adulthood, 19.1 ± 4.0 weeks (nanoSPECT/CTplus, general purpose mouse apertures: 1.2kcps/MBq, 0.7mm FWHM). The 3-D MRI Digital Atlas Database of an adult C57BL/6J mouse brain was used for region-of-interest (ROI) analysis. SPECT images were stereotactically normalized using SPM8 and a custom made, left-right symmetric HMPAO template in atlas space. For testing lateral asymmetry, each SPECT was left-right flipped prior to stereotactical normalization. Flipped and unflipped SPECTs were compared by paired testing. Peak brain uptake was similar for ECD and HMPAO: 1.8 ± 0.2 and 2.1 ± 0.6 %ID (p=0.357). Washout after the peak was much faster for ECD than for HMPAO: 24 ± 7min vs. 4.6 ± 1.7h (p=0.001). The general linear model for repeated measures with gender as an intersubject factor revealed an increase in relative HMPAO uptake with age in the neocortex (p=0.018) and the hippocampus (p=0.012). A decrease was detected in the midbrain (p=0.025). Lateral asymmetry, with HMPAO uptake larger in the left hemisphere, was detected primarily in the neocortex, both at juvenile age (asymmetry index AI=2.7 ± 1

  18. The action sites of propofol in the normal human brain revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Zhijing; Ge, Yali; Zhang, Jinsong; Yu, Daihua; Chai, Wei; Wu, Shengxi; Xu, Lixian

    2010-12-01

    Propofol has been used for many years but its functional target in the intact brain remains unclear. In the present study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to demonstrate blood oxygen level dependence signal changes in the normal human brain during propofol anesthesia and explored the possible action targets of propofol. Ten healthy subjects were enrolled in two experimental sessions. In session 1, the Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation Scale was performed to evaluate asleep to awake/alert status. In session 2, images with blood oxygen level dependence contrast were obtained with echo-planar imaging on a 1.5-T Philips Gyroscan Magnetic Resonance System and analyzed. In both sessions, subjects were intravenously administered with saline (for 3 min) and then propofol (for 1.5 min) and saline again (for 10.5 min) with a constant speed infusion pump. Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation Scale scoring showed that the subjects experienced conscious–sedative–unconscious–analepsia, which correlated well with the signal decreases in the anesthesia states. Propofol induced significant signal decreases in hypothalamus (18.2%±3.6%), frontal lobe (68.5%±11.2%), and temporal lobe (34.7%±6.1%). Additionally, the signals at these three sites were fulminant and changed synchronously. While in the thalamus, the signal decrease was observed in 5 of 10 of the subjects and the magnitude of decrease was 3.9%±1.6%. These results suggest that there is most significant inhibition in hypothalamus, frontal lobe, and temporal in propofol anesthesia and moderate inhibition in thalamus. These brain regions might be the targets of propofol anesthesia in human brain.

  19. Simulations of exercise and brain effects of acute exposure to carbon monoxide in normal and vascular-diseased persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    At some level, carboxyhemoglobin (RbCO) due to inhalation of carbon monoxide (CO) reduces maximum exercise duration in normal and ischemic heart patients. At high RbCO levels in normal subjects, brain function is also affected and behavioral performance is impaired. These are fin...

  20. From homogeneous to fractal normal and tumorous microvascular networks in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, Laurent; Plouraboué, Franck; Steyer, Alexandre; Cloetens, Peter; Le Duc, Géraldine; Fonta, Caroline

    2007-02-01

    We studied normal and tumorous three-dimensional (3D) microvascular networks in primate and rat brain. Tissues were prepared following a new preparation technique intended for high-resolution synchrotron tomography of microvascular networks. The resulting 3D images with a spatial resolution of less than the minimum capillary diameter permit a complete description of the entire vascular network for volumes as large as tens of cubic millimeters. The structural properties of the vascular networks were investigated by several multiscale methods such as fractal and power-spectrum analysis. These investigations gave a new coherent picture of normal and pathological complex vascular structures. They showed that normal cortical vascular networks have scale-invariant fractal properties on a small scale from 1.4 mum up to 40 to 65 mum. Above this threshold, vascular networks can be considered as homogeneous. Tumor vascular networks show similar characteristics, but the validity range of the fractal regime extend to much larger spatial dimensions. These 3D results shed new light on previous two dimensional analyses giving for the first time a direct measurement of vascular modules associated with vessel-tissue surface exchange.

  1. Clinical significance of brain SPECT abnormalities of thalami and cerebellum in cerebral palsy with normal MRI

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    Park, C. H.; Lim, S. Y.; Lee, I. Y.; Kim, O. H.; Bai, M. S.; Kim, S. J.; Yoon, S. N.; Cho, C. W. [College of Medicine, Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    The cerebral palsy(CP) encephalopathies are often of uncertain etiology and various functional image findings comparing with anatomical image findings have been reported. However, only a few have mentioned its clinical implications. The purpose of our report is to compare clinical severity and functional SPECT abnormalities of thalami and cerebellum in CP patients with normal MRI. Thirty six CP patients with bilateral spastic palsy who had normal MRI and brain SPECT were studied from July 1996 to September 1997. The patients' age at the time of SPECT was 22.84{+-}17.69 months. The patients were divided into two groups according to motor quotient(MQ); moderate defect (>50MQ : n=27 MQ=22.78{+-}10.36), mild defect (<50MQ : n=9, MQ=66.11{+-}13.87). The degree of rCBF decrease between the two groups was evaluated by {chi}{sup 2} test. Brain SPECT was performed following IV administration of 0.05-0.1 mCi/kg (minimum 2.0 mCi) of Tc-99m ECD and chloral hydrate sedation (50-80 mg/kg p.o) using a triple head system (MS 3, Siemens). Interpretation of brain SPECT was visual analysis: severe decrease is defined when the defect is moderate to marked and mild decrease in rCBF as mild. Seven of 36 (19.4%) showed unilateral or bilateral moderate decrease in rCBF in thalami, 20(55.6%) showed mild decrease, and 9(25.0%) showed no decreased rCBF. All 7 who had moderate thalamic defect reveled moderate motor defect clinically. Ten of 36(27.9%) revealed unilateral or bilateral moderate rCBF defect, 23 (63.9%) depicted mild defect, and 3(8.3%) showed no defect. Sixteen with moderate thalamic rCBF defect showed moderate motor defect in 15 patients. There was statistically significant (p=0.02605) relationship between rCBF defect and motor defect in our CP patients. In conclusion, brain SPECT appears sensitive, non-invasive tool in the evaluation as well as in the prognostication of bilateral spastic cerebral palsy patients and deserves further study using larger number of patients.

  2. Ruta 6 selectively induces cell death in brain cancer cells but proliferation in normal peripheral blood lymphocytes: A novel treatment for human brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Sen; Multani, Asha S; Banerji, Pratip; Banerji, Prasanta

    2003-10-01

    Although conventional chemotherapies are used to treat patients with malignancies, damage to normal cells is problematic. Blood-forming bone marrow cells are the most adversely affected. It is therefore necessary to find alternative agents that can kill cancer cells but have minimal effects on normal cells. We investigated the brain cancer cell-killing activity of a homeopathic medicine, Ruta, isolated from a plant, Ruta graveolens. We treated human brain cancer and HL-60 leukemia cells, normal B-lymphoid cells, and murine melanoma cells in vitro with different concentrations of Ruta in combination with Ca3(PO4)2. Fifteen patients diagnosed with intracranial tumors were treated with Ruta 6 and Ca3(PO4)2. Of these 15 patients, 6 of the 7 glioma patients showed complete regression of tumors. Normal human blood lymphocytes, B-lymphoid cells, and brain cancer cells treated with Ruta in vitro were examined for telomere dynamics, mitotic catastrophe, and apoptosis to understand the possible mechanism of cell-killing, using conventional and molecular cytogenetic techniques. Both in vivo and in vitro results showed induction of survival-signaling pathways in normal lymphocytes and induction of death-signaling pathways in brain cancer cells. Cancer cell death was initiated by telomere erosion and completed through mitotic catastrophe events. We propose that Ruta in combination with Ca3(PO4)2 could be used for effective treatment of brain cancers, particularly glioma.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarker and brain biopsy findings in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus.

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    Okko T Pyykkö

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The significance of amyloid precursor protein (APP and neuroinflammation in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH and Alzheimer's disease (AD is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of soluble APP (sAPP and amyloid beta (Aβ isoforms, proinflammatory cytokines, and biomarkers of neuronal damage in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in relation to brain biopsy Aβ and hyperphosphorylated tau (HPτ findings. METHODS: The study population comprised 102 patients with possible NPH with cortical brain biopsies, ventricular and lumbar CSF samples, and DNA available. The final clinical diagnoses were: 53 iNPH (91% shunt-responders, 26 AD (10 mixed iNPH+AD, and 23 others. Biopsy samples were immunostained against Aβ and HPτ. CSF levels of AD-related biomarkers (Aβ42, p-tau, total tau, non-AD-related Aβ isoforms (Aβ38, Aβ40, sAPP isoforms (sAPPα, sAPPβ, proinflammatory cytokines (several interleukins (IL, interferon-gamma, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and biomarkers of neuronal damage (neurofilament light and myelin basic protein were measured. All patients were genotyped for APOE. RESULTS: Lumbar CSF levels of sAPPα were lower (p<0.05 in patients with shunt-responsive iNPH compared to non-iNPH patients. sAPPβ showed a similar trend (p = 0.06. CSF sAPP isoform levels showed no association to Aβ or HPτ in the brain biopsy. Quantified Aβ load in the brain biopsy showed a negative correlation with CSF levels of Aβ42 in ventricular (r = -0.295, p = 0.003 and lumbar (r = -0.356, p = 0.01 samples, while the levels of Aβ38 and Aβ40 showed no correlation. CSF levels of proinflammatory cytokines and biomarkers of neuronal damage did not associate to the brain biopsy findings, diagnosis, or shunt response. Higher lumbar/ventricular CSF IL-8 ratios (p<0.001 were seen in lumbar samples collected after ventriculostomy compared to the samples collected before the procedure

  4. 健康志愿者头部MR弹性成像研究%MR elastography study of the brain in healthy volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘光锐; 高培毅; 林燕; 王效春; 薛静; 隋滨滨; 马丽; 王晨; 沈宓

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the shear stiffness of brain by MR elastography (MRE) in healthy Chinese volunteers and to assess the association between the cerebral shear stiffness and age. Methods Brain MRE studies were performed on 105 healthy volunteers. The shear stiffness of brain parencham was measured by local frequency estimation (LFE) algorithm. The differences of the shear stiffness between white matter(WM) and grey matter(GM) were analyzed by independent sample t test; the differences of brain parenchyma shear stiffness between male and female were estimated by independent sample t test. Spearman test was used to analyze the correlation between age and the shear stiffness of parenchyma; the volunteers were divided into two groups (age ≤ 40 and age > 40) and the correlation between age and shear stiffness of parencbyma in each group were analyzed separately. Results The shear stiffness of whiter matter [(23.1±5.7) kPa] was higher than that of grey matter[(11.3±2.6) kPa], and the difference was significant (t = 19.34, P 0.05). An age-dependent trend was observed in the stiffness of grey matter(r =0.315, P 0.05). When the shear stiffness of subjects no more than 40 years old was analysed, the age-dependent trend of shear stiffness was found both in white matter and gray matter(r = 0.251,0.235, P 0.05). Conclusions The shear stiffness of WM is significantly higher than that of GM. No obvious sex difference was found in the stiffness of brain parenchyma. The shear stiffness of GM increases with age; the age-related increase of shear stiffness of WM was only found in subjects under 40 years old.%目的 应用MR弹性成像(MRE)技术评估健康志愿者脑组织的剪切模量,并了解脑组织剪切模量与年龄间是否存在相关性.方法 选取105名健康志愿者,其中男42名、女63名,行头部MRE检查.通过局部频率估算法(LFE)分别测量志愿者脑灰质与脑白质的剪切模量.采用独立样本t检验评估脑灰质与脑白质剪

  5. Brain aging in normal Egyptians: cognition, education, personality, genetic and immunological study.

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    Elwan, Osamah; Madkour, Obsis; Elwan, Fadia; Mostafa, Mervat; Abbas Helmy, Azza; Abdel-Naseer, Maged; Abdel Shafy, Sanaa; El Faiuomy, Nervana

    2003-07-15

    Studying the cognitive and immunological changes that occur in old age as well as genetic function have been considered an important subject to differentiate between normal brain aging and early dementia especially Alzheimer's disease. The aim of this study is to stress on age-related neuropsychological and electrophysiological (P(300)) changes in normal Egyptian subjects, to throw light on the value of genetic (Apo-E(4) genotype) and immunological markers [interleukin-6 (IL-6) and intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAM-1) in the serum] as tools used in early detection of cognitive decline in cerebral aging. Ninety-four normal Egyptian subjects (below and above 60 years) were submitted to the following: (1) neuropsychological tests for testing memory, perception, psychomotor performance and attention, (2) Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ) for personality traits, (3) event-related potential study (P(300), latency and amplitude), (4) genetic test for detection of Apolipoprotein E genotype and (5) immunological studies including detection of the level of IL-6 and ICAM-1 in serum. There was a significant impairment of memory, psychomotor performance and perception in elderly subjects particularly males and subjects with low level of education. Regarding personality, significantly high scores were obtained in neuroticism scale of EPQ in elderly subjects. Apo-E(3)/E(3) was the most common genotype encountered in Egyptian subjects (49.1%). It was found that subjects with Apo-E(4) genotype did significantly worse in scores of intentional memory test (sensory memory) when compared with other genotypes. Statistically significant impairment in attention and sensory memory was found in subjects with high IL-6 level. This could not be detected in subjects with high ICAM-1 level. In conclusion, advancing age and lower levels of education are considered risk factors for cognitive decline in normal brain aging. Neuropsychological tests remain as the highly sensitive tools

  6. Acetylome regulation by sirtuins in the brain: from normal physiology to aging and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michan, Shaday

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the magnitude and physiological significance of proteome lysine acetylation remained incipient for five decades since it was first described. State-of-the-art methodologies, ranging from functional genomics to large-scale proteomics, have recently uncovered that this modification is more broadly represented in proteins than previously recognized, thus constituting the "acetylome." At present, it is estimated that acetylome covers only one tenth of the proteome, however, due its potential significance in physiology is capturing great attention. The first components of the cellular machinery, which finely orchestrate acetylome homeostasis, were identified by the end of last century. Since then, the majority of our growing knowledge concerning the physiological relevance of proteome reversible acetylation comes from the study of sirtuins, a unique type of lysine deacetylase that uses NAD(+). Sirtuins participate in a variety of cellular processes, ranging from transcription, DNA repair, energy balance, mitochondrial biogenesis and cell division, to apoptosis, autophagy and aging. Within the brain, besides their widespread epigenetic effects of dynamically modifying histones, sirtuins also target a variety of non-histone proteins either commonly deregulated in pathologies, or that participate in normal cerebral functions. For example, they modulate critical elements of the circadian rhythms, neurogenesis, synapses, cognition, serotonin synthesis, myelination, and proteins involved in neuropathology. Acetylome dynamics, and its regulation by sirtuins, may also help to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying brain aging. This work reviews the pathways as orchestrated by the interplay between acetylome and sirtuins in the brain, from physiology involvement, to aging processes, and pathological settings.

  7. TNF signaling inhibition in the CNS: implications for normal brain function and neurodegenerative disease

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    Tansey Malú G

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF as an immune mediator has long been appreciated but its function in the brain is still unclear. TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1 is expressed in most cell types, and can be activated by binding of either soluble TNF (solTNF or transmembrane TNF (tmTNF, with a preference for solTNF; whereas TNFR2 is expressed primarily by microglia and endothelial cells and is preferentially activated by tmTNF. Elevation of solTNF is a hallmark of acute and chronic neuroinflammation as well as a number of neurodegenerative conditions including ischemic stroke, Alzheimer's (AD, Parkinson's (PD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, and multiple sclerosis (MS. The presence of this potent inflammatory factor at sites of injury implicates it as a mediator of neuronal damage and disease pathogenesis, making TNF an attractive target for therapeutic development to treat acute and chronic neurodegenerative conditions. However, new and old observations from animal models and clinical trials reviewed here suggest solTNF and tmTNF exert different functions under normal and pathological conditions in the CNS. A potential role for TNF in synaptic scaling and hippocampal neurogenesis demonstrated by recent studies suggest additional in-depth mechanistic studies are warranted to delineate the distinct functions of the two TNF ligands in different parts of the brain prior to large-scale development of anti-TNF therapies in the CNS. If inactivation of TNF-dependent inflammation in the brain is warranted by additional pre-clinical studies, selective targeting of TNFR1-mediated signaling while sparing TNFR2 activation may lessen adverse effects of anti-TNF therapies in the CNS.

  8. Nicotine enhances but does not normalize visual sustained attention and the associated brain network in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, L Elliot; Schroeder, Matthew; Ross, Thomas J; Buchholz, Brittany; Salmeron, Betty Jo; Wonodi, Ikwunga; Thaker, Gunvant K; Stein, Elliot A

    2011-03-01

    Sustained attention abnormality in schizophrenia is usually refractory to available treatment. Nicotine can transiently improve sustained attention in schizophrenia patients, although its neural mechanisms are unknown. Understanding the neural basis of this effect may lead to new treatment strategies for this cognitive deficit. Twenty schizophrenia patients and 24 healthy comparison smokers participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover, randomized functional magnetic resonance imaging study comparing nicotine vs placebo patch on sustained attention, using the rapid visual information-processing task. Schizophrenia patients had impaired visual sustained attention accuracy and processing speed (all P's attention network compared with healthy comparison subjects. Nicotine administration enhanced accuracy and processing speed compared with placebo (all P's ≤.006), with no drug × diagnosis interactions. However, schizophrenia patients' task performance remained impaired during the nicotine condition, even when compared with healthy comparison subjects in the placebo condition (all P's ≤.01). Nicotine exerted no significant reversal of the impaired attention network associated with schizophrenia. Activations in brain regions associated with nicotine-induced behavioral improvement were not significantly different between patients and comparison subjects. Thus, nicotine transiently enhanced sustained attention similarly in schizophrenia patients and in healthy comparison smokers. The neural mechanisms for this nicotinic effect in schizophrenia appear similar to those for healthy comparison subjects. However, nicotine, at least in a single sustained dose, does not normalize impaired sustained attention and its associated brain network in schizophrenia. These findings provide guidance for developing new treatment strategies for the sustained attention deficit in schizophrenia.

  9. Soybean andtempeh total isolfavones improved antioxidant activities in normal and scopolamine-induced rat brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aliya Ahmad; Vasudevan Mani; Kalavathy Ramasamy; Atish Prakash; Abu Bakar Abdul Majeed

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To highlight the comparative studies between total isoflavone extracts from soybean and tempeh on the neuronal oxidative stress and antioxidant activities. Methods: The total isoflavones were administered orally for 15 days with 3 selected doses (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg). Piracetam (400 mg/kg,p.o.) was used as a standard drug while scopolamine (1 mg/kg,i.p.) was used as a drug that promoted amnesia in selected groups. The oxidative markers (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and nitric oxide) were measured in brain homogenate. The antioxidant activities evaluated were catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and glutathione. Results: Our results showed that soybean and tempeh isoflavones significantly improved the levels of catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and glutathione while decreased levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and nitric oxide in both the brain of normal as well as scopolamine-induced animals. Conclusions: Our findings suggested that soybean and tempeh isoflavones could be useful in the management and prevention of age-related neurodegenerative changes including Alzheimer’s disease through its antioxidant activities.

  10. MRI and brain spect findings in patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy and normal CT scan

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    P.G. Carrilho

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available 26 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy clinically documented by several abnormal interictal surface EEGs with typical unitemporal epileptiform activity and a normal CT scan were studied. Interictal99mTC HMPAO brain SPECT and MRI were performed in all subjects. Abnormalities were shown in 61.5% of MRI (n=16 and 65.4% of SPECT (n=17. Hippocampal atrophy associated to a high signal on T2-weighted MRI slices suggesting mesial temporal sclerosis was the main finding (n=12; 75% of abnormal MRI. MRI correlated well to surface EEG in 50% (n=13. There was also a good correlation between MRI and SPECT in 30.7% (n=8. SPECT and EEG were in agreement in 57.7% (n=l5. MRI, SPECT and EEG were congruent in 26.9% (n=7. These results support the usefulness of interictal brain SPECT and MRI in detecting lateralized abnormalities in temporal lobe epilepsy. On the other hand, in two cases, interictal SPECT correlated poorly with surface EEG. This functional method should not be used isolately in the detection of temporal lobe foci. MRI is more useful than CT as a neuroimaging technique in temporal lobe epilepsy. It may detect small structural lesions and mesial temporal lobe sclerosis which are not easily seen with traditional CT scanning.

  11. Soybean and tempeh total isoflvones improved antioxidant activities in normal and scopolamine-induced rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliya Ahmad

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To highlight the comparative studies between total isoflavone extracts from soybean and tempeh on the neuronal oxidative stress and antioxidant activities. Methods: The total isoflavones were administered orally for 15 days with 3 selected doses (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg. Piracetam (400 mg/kg, p.o. was used as a standard drug while scopolamine (1 mg/kg, i.p. was used as a drug that promoted amnesia in selected groups. The oxidative markers (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and nitric oxide were measured in brain homogenate. The antioxidant activities evaluated were catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and glutathione. Results: Our results showed that soybean and tempeh isoflavones significantly improved the levels of catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and glutathione while decreased levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and nitric oxide in both the brain of normal as well as scopolamine-induced animals. Conclusions: Our findings suggested that soybean and tempeh isoflavones could be useful in the management and prevention of age-related neurodegenerative changes including Alzheimer’s disease through its antioxidant activities.

  12. Selection of Candidate Housekeeping Genes for Normalization in Human Postmortem Brain Samples

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    Aldo Pagano

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The most frequently used technique to study the expression profile of genes involved in common neurological disorders is quantitative real-time RT-PCR, which allows the indirect detection of very low amounts of selected mRNAs in tissue samples. Expression analysis by RT-qPCR requires an appropriate normalization to the expression level of genes characterized by a stable, constitutive transcription. However, the identification of a gene transcribed at a very stable level is difficult if not impossible, since significant fluctuations of the level of mRNA synthesis often accompanies changes of cell behavior. The aim of this study is to identify the most stable genes in postmortem human brain samples of patients affected by Alzheimer’s disease (AD suitable as reference genes. The experiments analyzed 12 commonly used reference genes in brain samples from eight individuals with AD and seven controls. After a careful analysis of the results calculated by geNorm and NormFinder algorithms, we found that CYC1 and EIF4A2 are the best reference genes. We remark on the importance of the determination of the best reference genes for each sample to be analyzed and suggest a practical combination of reference genes to be used in the analysis of human postmortem samples.

  13. Normal cerebral perfusion of {sup 99m}Tc-ECD brain SPECT. Evaluation by an anatomical standardization technique

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    Kawashima, Ryuta; Koyama, Masamichi; Ito, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Seiro; Sato, Kazunori; Ono, Shuichi; Goto, Ryoi; Sato, Tachio; Fukuda, Hiroshi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. of Development, Aging and Cancer

    1996-01-01

    A single photon emitter labeled tracer, {sup 99m}Tc-ethyl cysteinate dimer ({sup 99m}Tc-ECD), has now been used for rCBF studies with SPECT. However, normal distribution pattern of this agent in the brain still remains unclear. Therefore, the specific purpose of this study was to investigate the normal distribution pattern of {sup 99m}Tc-ECD SPECT image. Regional cerebral distribution was measured with SPECT and 984{+-}17 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-ECD in ten normal subjects. During the SPECT measurement, subjects were placed comfortably in a supine position with their eyes closed. Each SPECT image was anatomically standardized using a computerized brain atlas system of Roland et al. (HBA: Human Brain Atlas) and X-CT image. Anatomically standardized SPECT images were globally normalized to 100 count/voxel. Then, the mean and SD images of brain SPECT were calculated voxel-by-voxel basis. The highest radioactivity was found in the medial aspect of the occipital lobe. The results indicate that the normal distribution pattern of {sup 99m}Tc-ECD in the human brain may be not simply reflect the regional cerebral blood flow. (author).

  14. Altered blood-brain barrier permeability in rats with prehepatic portal hypertension turns to normal when portal pressure is lowered

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francisco Eizayaga; Camila Scorticati; Juan P Prestifilippo; Salvador Romay; Maria A Fernandez; José L Castro; Abraham Lemberg; Juan C Perazzo

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the blood-brain barrier integrity in prehepatic portal hypertensive rats induced by partial portal vein ligation, at 14 and 40 d after ligation when portal pressure is spontaneously normalized.METHODS: Adult male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: Group Ⅰ: Sham14d, sham operated; Group Ⅱ: PH14d, portal vein stenosis; (both groups were used 14 days after surgery); Group Ⅲ: Sham40d, Sham operated and Group Ⅳ: PH40d Portal vein stenosis (Groups Ⅱ and Ⅳ used 40 d after surgery). Plasma ammonia,plasma and cerebrospinal fluid protein and liver enzymes concentrations were determined. Trypan and Evans blue dyes, systemically injected, were investigated in hippocampus to study blood-brain barrier integrity. Portal pressure was periodically recorded.RESULTS: Forty days after stricture, portal pressure was normalized, plasma ammonia was moderately high,and both dyes were absent in central nervous system parenchyma. All other parameters were reestablished.When portal pressure was normalized and ammonia level was lowered, but not normal, the altered integrity of blood-brain barrier becomes reestablished.CONCLUSION: The impairment of blood-brain barrier and subsequent normalization could be a mechanism involved in hepatic encephalopathy reversibility. Hemodynamic changes and ammonia could trigger blood-brain barrier alterations and its reestablishment.

  15. The effect of regadenoson-induced transient disruption of the blood-brain barrier on temozolomide delivery to normal rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Sadhana; Anders, Nicole M; Mangraviti, Antonella; Wanjiku, Teresia M; Sankey, Eric W; Liu, Ann; Brem, Henry; Tyler, Betty; Rudek, Michelle A; Grossman, Stuart A

    2016-02-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) significantly reduces the delivery of many systemically administered agents to the central nervous system. Although temozolomide is the only chemotherapy to improve survival in patients with glioblastoma, its concentration in brain is only 20 % of that in blood. Regadenoson, an FDA approved adenosine receptor agonist used for cardiac stress testing, transiently disrupts rodent BBB allowing high molecular weight dextran (70 kD) to enter the brain. This study was conducted to determine if regadenoson could facilitate entry of temozolomide into normal rodent brain. Temozolomide (50 mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage to non-tumor bearing F344 rats. Two-thirds of the animals received a single dose of intravenous regadenoson 60-90 min later. All animals were sacrificed 120 or 360 min after temozolomide administration. Brain and plasma temozolomide concentrations were determined using HPLC/MS/MS. Brain temozolomide concentrations were significantly higher at 120 min when it was given with regadenoson versus alone (8.1 ± 2.7 and 5.1 ± 3.5 µg/g, P temozolomide administration. No differences were seen in plasma temozolomide concentrations with or without regadenoson. These results suggest co-administration of regadenoson with temozolomide results in 60% higher temozolomide levels in normal brain without affecting plasma concentrations. This novel approach to increasing intracranial concentrations of systemically administered agents has potential to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy in neuro-oncologic disorders.

  16. mTOR signaling and its roles in normal and abnormal brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Nobuyuki; Nawa, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) was first identified in yeast as a target molecule of rapamycin, an anti-fugal and immunosuppressant macrolide compound. In mammals, its orthologue is called mammalian TOR (mTOR). mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase that converges different extracellular stimuli, such as nutrients and growth factors, and diverges into several biochemical reactions, including translation, autophagy, transcription, and lipid synthesis among others. These biochemical reactions govern cell growth and cause cells to attain an anabolic state. Thus, the disruption of mTOR signaling is implicated in a wide array of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and obesity. In the central nervous system, the mTOR signaling cascade is activated by nutrients, neurotrophic factors, and neurotransmitters that enhances protein (and possibly lipid) synthesis and suppresses autophagy. These processes contribute to normal neuronal growth by promoting their differentiation, neurite elongation and branching, and synaptic formation during development. Therefore, disruption of mTOR signaling may cause neuronal degeneration and abnormal neural development. While reduced mTOR signaling is associated with neurodegeneration, excess activation of mTOR signaling causes abnormal development of neurons and glia, leading to brain malformation. In this review, we first introduce the current state of molecular knowledge of mTOR complexes and signaling in general. We then describe mTOR activation in neurons, which leads to translational enhancement, and finally discuss the link between mTOR and normal/abnormal neuronal growth during development.

  17. Relationships between brain metabolism decrease in normal aging and changes in structural and functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chételat, Gaël; Landeau, Brigitte; Salmon, Eric; Yakushev, Igor; Bahri, Mohamed Ali; Mézenge, Florence; Perrotin, Audrey; Bastin, Christine; Manrique, Alain; Scheurich, Armin; Scheckenberger, Mathias; Desgranges, Béatrice; Eustache, Francis; Fellgiebel, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    Normal aging is characterized by brain glucose metabolism decline predominantly in the prefrontal cortex. The goal of the present study was to assess whether this change was associated with age-related alteration of white matter (WM) structural integrity and/or functional connectivity. FDG-PET data from 40 young and 57 elderly healthy participants from two research centers (n=49/48 in Center 1/2) were analyzed. WM volume from T1-weighted MRI (Center 1), fractional anisotropy from diffusion-tensor imaging (Center 2), and resting-state fMRI data (Center 1) were also obtained. Group comparisons were performed within each imaging modality. Then, positive correlations were assessed, within the elderly, between metabolism in the most affected region and the other neuroimaging modalities. Metabolism decline in the elderly predominated in the left inferior frontal junction (LIFJ). LIFJ hypometabolism was significantly associated with macrostructural and microstructural WM disturbances in long association fronto-temporo-occipital fibers, while no relationship was found with functional connectivity. The findings offer new perspectives to understand normal aging processes and open avenues for future studies to explore causality between age-related metabolism and connectivity changes.

  18. mTOR signaling and its roles in normal and abnormal brain development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki eTakei

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Target of rapamycin (TOR was first identified in yeast as a target molecule of rapamycin, an anti-fugal and immunosuppressant macrolide compound. In mammals, its orthologue is called mTOR (mammalian TOR. mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase that converges different extracellular stimuli, such as nutrients and growth factors, and diverges into several biochemical reactions, including translation, autophagy, transcription, and lipid synthesis among others. These biochemical reactions govern cell growth and cause cells to attain an anabolic state. Thus, the disruption of mTOR signaling is implicated in a wide array of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and obesity. In the central nervous system (CNS, the mTOR signaling cascade is activated by nutrients, neurotrophic factors, and neurotransmitters that enhances protein (and possibly lipid synthesis and suppresses autophagy. These processes contribute to normal neuronal growth by promoting their differentiation, neurite elongation and branching, and synaptic formation during development. Therefore, disruption of mTOR signaling may cause neuronal degeneration and abnormal neural development. While reduced mTOR signaling is associated with neurodegeneration, excess activation of mTOR signaling causes abnormal development of neurons and glia, leading to brain malformation. In this review, we first introduce the current state of molecular knowledge of mTOR complexes and signaling in general. We then describe mTOR activation in neurons, which leads to translational enhancement, and finally discuss the link between mTOR and normal/abnormal neuronal growth during development.

  19. The effect of regadenoson-induced transient disruption of the blood–brain barrier on temozolomide delivery to normal rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Sadhana; Anders, Nicole M.; Mangraviti, Antonella; Wanjiku, Teresia M.; Sankey, Eric W.; Liu, Ann; Brem, Henry; Tyler, Betty; Rudek, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) significantly reduces the delivery of many systemically administered agents to the central nervous system. Although temozolomide is the only chemotherapy to improve survival in patients with glioblastoma, its concentration in brain is only 20 % of that in blood. Regadenoson, an FDA approved adenosine receptor agonist used for cardiac stress testing, transiently disrupts rodent BBB allowing high molecular weight dextran (70 kD) to enter the brain. This study was conducted to determine if regadenoson could facilitate entry of temozolomide into normal rodent brain. Temozolomide (50 mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage to non-tumor bearing F344 rats. Two-thirds of the animals received a single dose of intravenous regadenoson 60–90 min later. All animals were sacrificed 120 or 360 min after temozolomide administration. Brain and plasma temozolomide concentrations were determined using HPLC/MS/MS. Brain temozolomide concentrations were significantly higher at 120 min when it was given with regadenoson versus alone (8.1 ± 2.7 and 5.1 ± 3.5 μg/g, P <0.05). A similar trend was noted in brain:plasma ratios (0.45 ± 0.08 and 0.29 ± 0.09, P < 0.05). Brain concentrations and brain:plasma ratios were not significantly different 360 min after temozolomide administration. No differences were seen in plasma temozolomide concentrations with or without regadenoson. These results suggest co-administration of regadenoson with temozolomide results in 60 % higher temozolomide levels in normal brain without affecting plasma concentrations. This novel approach to increasing intracranial concentrations of systemically administered agents has potential to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy in neuro-oncologic disorders. PMID:26626489

  20. Quantitation of regional cerebral blood flow by single photon emission computed tomography of CBF-tracer combined with whole-brain CBF; A comparison between [sup 123]I-IMP and [sup 99m]Tc-HMPAO in healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaka, Yoshinari; Imaizumi, Masatoshi; Ashida, Keiichi; Ohe, Yosuke; Okamoto, Masaya; Abe, Tohru; Tanaka, Seiji (Osaka National Hospital (Japan))

    1994-05-01

    A simple, noninvasive method of measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF) that uses single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of CBF-tracer and whole brain CBF obtained by xenon-133 ([sup 133]Xe) clearance technique was developed. In nine healthy volunteers, SPECT data were normalized to the count density of [sup 123]I-IMP or [sup 99m]Tc-HMPAO uptake in the whole-brain, and then converted to the absolute units of CBF by multiplying average [sup 133]Xe-CBF in the whole brain. The CBF values measured by [sup 99m]Tc-HMPA CBF-SPECT was significantly lower in the high flow regions of cortical gray matter (bilateral frontal lobe; p<0.05 and right occipital lobe; p<0.05), and was significantly higher in the bilateral white matter (p<0.05 or 0.01) and the cerebellum (p<0.005) compared with the flow values measured by [sup 123]I-IMP CBF-SPECT. Whereas, the IMP-CBF values were significantly lower in the bilateral striatum (p<0.02 or 0.05) compared with the HMPAO-CBF values. Good correlations were found between IMP-CBF and the HMPAO-CBF values in the cortical gray matter (r[sub s]=0.761; p<0.001, n=108), the white matter (r[sub s]=0.739; p<0.001, n=18) and the cerebellum (r[sub s]=0.731; p<0.001, n=18). In the striatum (r[sub s]=0.58; p<0.05, n=18) and the thalamus (r[sub s]=0.628; p<0.05, n=18), the correlations between IMP-CBF and HMPAO-CBF values were inferior to those of the other three regions. The results indicated that the contrast between high and low CBF regions in the HMPAO CBF-SPECT was significantly less than that in the IMP CBF-SPECT. However, this assumption is not applicable in all of the cerebral regions. (author).

  1. Assessment of Left Ventricular 2D Flow Pathlines during Early Diastole Using Spatial Modulation of Magnetization with Polarity Alternating Velocity Encoding (SPAMM-PAV): a study in normal volunteers and canine animals with myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziheng; Friedman, Daniel; Dione, Donald P.; Lin, Ben A.; Duncan, James S.; Sinusas, Albert J.; Sampath, Smita

    2013-01-01

    A high temporal resolution 2D flow pathline analysis method that describes the spatio-temporal distribution of blood entering the left ventricle during early diastolic filling is presented. Filling patterns in normal volunteers (n=8) and canine animals (baseline (n=1) and infarcted (n=6)) are studied using this approach. Data is acquired using our recently reported MR technique, SPAMM-PAV, which permits simultaneous quantification of blood velocities and myocardial strain at high temporal resolution of 14 ms. Virtual emitter particles, released from the mitral valve plane every time frame during rapid filling, are tracked to depict the propagation of 2D pathlines on the imaged plane. The pathline regional distribution patterns are compared with regional myocardial longitudinal strains and regional chamber longitudinal pressure gradients. Our results demonstrate strong spatial inter-dependence between left ventricular (LV) filling patterns and LV mechanical function. Significant differences in pathline-described filling patterns are observed in the infarcted animals. Quantitative analysis of net kinetic energy for each set of pathlines is performed. Peak net kinetic energy of 0.06±0.01 mJ in normal volunteers, 0.043 mJ in baseline dog, 0.143±0.03 mJ in three infarcted dogs with nominal flow dysfunction, and 0.016±0.007 mJ in three infarcted dogs with severe flow dysfunction is observed. PMID:23044637

  2. Longitudinal study of callosal microstructure in the normal adult aging brain using quantitative DTI fiber tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Edith V; Rohlfing, Torsten; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2010-01-01

    We present a review of neuroimaging studies of normal adult aging conducted with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and data from one of the first longitudinal studies using DTI to study normal aging. To date, virtually all DTI studies of normal adult aging have been cross-sectional and have identified several patterns of white matter microstructural sparing and compromise that differentiate regional effects, fiber type, and diffusivity characteristics: (1) fractional anisotropy (FA) is lower and mean diffusivity is higher in older than younger adults, (2) aging is characterized by an anterior-to-posterior gradient of greater-to-lesser compromise also seen in superior-to-inferior fiber systems, and (3) association fibers connecting cortical sites appear to be more vulnerable to aging than projection fibers. The results of this longitudinal study of the macrostructure and microstructure of the corpus callosum yielded a consistent pattern of differences between healthy, young (20s to 30s) and elderly (60s to 70s) men and women without change over 2 years. We then divided the fibers of the corpus callosum into the midsagittal strip and the lateral distal fibers in an attempt to identify the locus of the age-related differences. The results indicated that, on average, mean values of FA and longitudinal diffusivity (lambdaL) were lower in the distal than midsagittal fibers in both groups, but the age effects and the anterior-to-posterior gradients were more pronounced for the distal than midsagittal fibers and extended more posteriorly in the distal than midsagittal fibers. Despite lack of evidence for callosal aging over 2 years, ventricular enlargement occurred and was disproportionately greater in the elderly relative to the young group, being 8.2% in the elderly but only 1.2% in the young group. Thus, different brain regions can express different rates of change with aging. Our longitudinal DTI data indicate that normal aging is associated with declining FA and

  3. Different coexpressions of arthritis-relevant genes between different body organs and different brain regions in the normal mouse population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanhong; Huang, Yue; Wang, Lishi; Zhu, Jiaqian; Gu, Weikuan

    2013-02-25

    Structural changes in different parts of the brain in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients have been reported. RA is not regarded as a brain disease. Body organs such as spleen and lung produce RA-relevant genes. We hypothesized that the structural changes in the brain are caused by changes of gene expression in body organs. Changes in different parts of the brain may be affected by altered gene expressions in different body organs. This study explored whether an association between gene expressions of an organ or a body part varies in different brain structures. By examining the association of the 10 most altered genes from a mouse model of spontaneous arthritis in a normal mouse population, we found two groups of gene expression patterns between five brain structures and spleen. The correlation patterns between the prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and spleen were similar, while the associations between the other three parts of the brain and spleen showed a different pattern. Among overall patterns of the associations between body organs and brain structures, spleen and lung had a similar pattern, and patterns for kidney and liver were similar. Analysis of the five additional known arthritis-relevant genes produced similar results. Analysis of 10 nonrelevant-arthritis genes did not result in a strong association of gene expression or clearly segregated patterns. Our data suggest that abnormal gene expressions in different diseased body organs may influence structural changes in different brain parts.

  4. Volunteers in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, Richard; Johnson, Judith

    The results of nine studies evaluating the effectiveness of volunteer programs in the schools were reviewed in an attempt to answer three questions: What is the value of volunteers to schools? Why do people volunteer to work in classrooms? What is the effect of volunteering on the volunteer? The studies involved were originally intended to…

  5. Comparison of dopamine turnover, dopamine influx constant and activity ratio of striatum and occipital brain with {sup 18}F-dopa brain PET in normal controls and patients with Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehme, Liane; Perick, Maria; Kotzerke, Joerg [Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Dresden (Germany); Beuthien-Baumann, Bettina; Hoff, Joerg van den [Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Dresden (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PET-Zentrum, Dresden (Germany); Wolz, Martin; Storch, Alexander; Loehle, Matthias; Herting, Birgit; Reichmann, Heinz [Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurologie, Dresden (Germany); Langner, Jens [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PET-Zentrum, Dresden (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    The aim of the study was to estimate normal ranges and test-retest measures for various parameters characterising dopamine metabolism from a prolonged {sup 18}F-dopa positron emission tomography (PET) measurement using a reference tissue model and compare their value for the detection of early Parkinson's disease (PD). Healthy volunteers (n = 9) and patients (n = 36) in an early stage of PD underwent an {sup 18}F-dopa PET measurement lasting 4 h. The influx rate constant k{sub occ} and the effective distribution volume ratio (EDVR, its inverse is an indicator for dopamine turnover) were estimated by a graphical approach using dynamic data in the striatum and, as a reference region, the occipital cortex. Furthermore, ratios of activity concentrations between striatum and occipital brain taken for three time intervals completed the data analysis. All parameters were determined both in eight small volumes of interest placed in the striatum as well as averaged for caudate nucleus and putamen. For the control group, reproducibility was checked in a second study 3 months later and ranges for normal values were derived from mean {+-} 2 standard deviations. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were performed to assess the value of the parameters for diagnostic purposes. Patients with early-stage PD and healthy volunteers could be separated by the values of the putamen, not the caudate nucleus. The normal ranges of the putamen were 0.0151-0.0216/min for the influx rate constant k{sub occ} and 2.02-3.00 for EDVR. For the various time intervals used the striato-occipital ratios yielded 2.24-3.06, 2.43-3.42 and 2.35-3.21, respectively. Patients were characterised by significantly lower values (p < 0.001) and significant differences between ipsi- and contralateral sides (p < 0.001) with regard to their clinical symptoms and a rostrocaudal gradient. EDVR as well as k{sub occ} for the putamen were able to effectively differentiate between groups (sensitivity >97

  6. White matter hyperintensities and normal-appearing white matter integrity in the aging brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; Clayden, Jonathan D; Royle, Natalie A; Murray, Catherine; Morris, Zoe; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Gow, Alan J; Starr, John M; Bastin, Mark E; Deary, Ian J; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2015-02-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMH) of presumed vascular origin are a common finding in brain magnetic resonance imaging of older individuals and contribute to cognitive and functional decline. It is unknown how WMH form, although white matter degeneration is characterized pathologically by demyelination, axonal loss, and rarefaction, often attributed to ischemia. Changes within normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) in subjects with WMH have also been reported but have not yet been fully characterized. Here, we describe the in vivo imaging signatures of both NAWM and WMH in a large group of community-dwelling older people of similar age using biomarkers derived from magnetic resonance imaging that collectively reflect white matter integrity, myelination, and brain water content. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) were significantly lower, whereas mean diffusivity (MD) and longitudinal relaxation time (T1) were significantly higher, in WMH than NAWM (p < 0.0001), with MD providing the largest difference between NAWM and WMH. Receiver operating characteristic analysis on each biomarker showed that MD differentiated best between NAWM and WMH, identifying 94.6% of the lesions using a threshold of 0.747 × 10(-9) m(2)s(-1) (area under curve, 0.982; 95% CI, 0.975-0.989). Furthermore, the level of deterioration of NAWM was strongly associated with the severity of WMH, with MD and T1 increasing and FA and MTR decreasing in NAWM with increasing WMH score, a relationship that was sustained regardless of distance from the WMH. These multimodal imaging data indicate that WMH have reduced structural integrity compared with surrounding NAWM, and MD provides the best discriminator between the 2 tissue classes even within the mild range of WMH severity, whereas FA, MTR, and T1 only start reflecting significant changes in tissue microstructure as WMH become more severe.

  7. Age-related changes of task-specific brain activity in normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming-Chung; Chou, Chia-Yi; Huang, Chin-Fei; Lin, Yu-Te; Shih, Ching-Sen; Han, Shiang-Yi; Shen, Ming-Hsun; Chen, Tsung-Ching; Liang, Chi-lin; Lu, Ming-Chi; Liu, Chia-Ju

    2012-01-17

    An important question in healthcare for older patients is whether age-related changes in cortical reorganization can be measured with advancing age. This study investigated the factors behind such age-related changes, using time-frequency analysis of event-related potentials (ERPs). We hypothesized that brain rhythms was affected by age-related changes, which could be reflected in the ERP indices. An oddball task was conducted in two experimental groups, namely young participants (N=15; mean age 23.7±2.8 years) and older participants (N=15; mean age 70.1±7.9 years). Two types of stimuli were used: the target (1 kHz frequency) and standard (2 kHz frequency). We scrutinized three ERP indices: event-related spectral power (ERPSP), inter-trial phase-locking (ITPL), and event-related cross-phase coherence (ERPCOH). Both groups performed equally well for correct response rate. However, the results revealed a statistically significant age difference for inter-trial comparison. Compared with the young, the older participants showed the following age-related changes: (a) power activity decreased; however, an increase was found only in the late (P3, 280-450 ms) theta (4-7 Hz) component over the bilateral frontal and temporo-frontal areas; (b) low phase-locking in the early (N1, 80-140 ms) theta band over the parietal/frontal (right) regions appeared; (c) the functional connections decreased in the alpha (7-13 Hz) and beta (13-30 Hz) bands, but no difference emerged in the theta band between the two groups. These results indicate that age-related changes in task-specific brain activity for a normal aging population can be depicted using the three ERP indices.

  8. Effect of electronic toilet system (bidet) on anorectal pressure in normal healthy volunteers: influence of different types of water stream and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoo, Seungbum; Song, Yoon Suk; Seo, Mi Sun; Oh, Heung-Kwon; Choe, Eun Kyung; Park, Kyu Joo

    2011-01-01

    Although bidets are widely used in Korea, its effects on anorectal pressures have not been studied in detail in terms of the water settings used. Twenty healthy volunteers were placed on a toilet equipped with a bidet, and anorectal pressures were measured with a manometry catheter inserted into the rectum and anal canal before and after using the bidet at different water forces (40, 80, 160, 200 mN), temperatures (24°C vs 38°C), and water jet widths (narrow vs wide). The pressure at anal high pressure zone decreased from 96.1 ± 22.5 to 81.9 ± 23.3 mmHg at water jet pressure of 40 mN and 38°C wide water jet (P bidet could be used to reduce anal resting pressure in the same manner as the traditional warm sitz bath under the conditions of low or medium water jet pressure, a warm water temperature, and a wide type water jet.

  9. Differential effects of fresh frozen plasma and normal saline on secondary brain damage in a large animal model of polytrauma, hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwabejire, John O; Imam, Ayesha M; Jin, Guang

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that the extent of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in large animal models can be reduced with early infusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP), but the precise mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated whether resuscitation with FFP or normal saline differed...

  10. Why Volunteer? Understanding Motivations for Student Volunteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Clare

    2010-01-01

    The profile of volunteering in English Higher Education (HE) has been enhanced in recent years through various initiatives that have not only funded activities, but have sought to expand the range of volunteering opportunities available to students and recognise the contribution that volunteering can make to students' employability. This expansion…

  11. Volunteering and Volunteers: Benefit-Cost Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handy, Femida; Mook, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the phenomenon of volunteering from a benefit-cost perspective. Both the individual making a decision to volunteer and the organization making a decision to use volunteer labor face benefits and costs of their actions, yet these costs and benefits almost always remain unarticulated, perhaps because the common perception of…

  12. Identification of the boundary between normal brain tissue and ischemia region using two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Huiping; Wang, Shu; Wang, Xingfu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-10-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the common neurological diseases, and it is becoming the leading causes of death and permanent disability around the world. Early and accurate identification of the potentially salvageable boundary region of ischemia brain tissues may enable selection of the most appropriate candidates for early stroke therapies. In this work, TPEF microscopy was used to image the microstructures of normal brain tissues, ischemia regions and the boundary region between normal and ischemia brain tissues. The ischemia brain tissues from Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were subjected to 6 hours of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Our study demonstrates that TPEF microscopy has the ability to not only reveal the morphological changes of the neurons but also identify the boundary between normal brain tissue and ischemia region, which correspond well to the hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) stained images. With the development of miniaturized TPEF microscope imaging devices, TPEF microscopy can be developed into an effectively diagnostic and monitoring tool for cerebral ischemia.

  13. Radiation damage to the normal monkey brain: experimental study induced by interstitial irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishima N

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiation damage to normal brain tissue induced by interstitial irradiation with iridium-192 seeds was sequentially evaluated by computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and histological examination. This study was carried out in 14 mature Japanese monkeys. The experimental area received more than 200-260 Gy of irradiation developed coagulative necrosis. Infiltration of macrophages to the periphery of the necrotic area was seen. In addition, neovascularization, hyalinization of vascular walls, and gliosis were found in the periphery of the area invaded by the macrophages. All sites at which the vascular walls were found to have acute stage fibrinoid necrosis eventually developed coagulative necrosis. The focus of necrosis was detected by MRI starting 1 week after the end of radiation treatment, and the size of the necrotic area did not change for 6 months. The peripheral areas showed clear ring enhancement with contrast material. Edema surrounding the lesions was the most significant 1 week after radiation and was reduced to a minimum level 1 month later. However, the edema then expanded once again and was sustained for as long as 6 months. CT did not provide as clear of a presentation as MRI, but it did reveal similar findings for the most part, and depicted calcification in the necrotic area. This experimental model is considered useful for conducting basic research on brachytherapy, as well as for achieving a better understanding of delayed radiation necrosis.

  14. Synaptic genes are extensively downregulated across multiple brain regions in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchtold, Nicole C; Coleman, Paul D; Cribbs, David H; Rogers, Joseph; Gillen, Daniel L; Cotman, Carl W

    2013-06-01

    Synapses are essential for transmitting, processing, and storing information, all of which decline in aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Because synapse loss only partially accounts for the cognitive declines seen in aging and AD, we hypothesized that existing synapses might undergo molecular changes that reduce their functional capacity. Microarrays were used to evaluate expression profiles of 340 synaptic genes in aging (20-99 years) and AD across 4 brain regions from 81 cases. The analysis revealed an unexpectedly large number of significant expression changes in synapse-related genes in aging, with many undergoing progressive downregulation across aging and AD. Functional classification of the genes showing altered expression revealed that multiple aspects of synaptic function are affected, notably synaptic vesicle trafficking and release, neurotransmitter receptors and receptor trafficking, postsynaptic density scaffolding, cell adhesion regulating synaptic stability, and neuromodulatory systems. The widespread declines in synaptic gene expression in normal aging suggests that function of existing synapses might be impaired, and that a common set of synaptic genes are vulnerable to change in aging and AD.

  15. Optimization of Treatment Geometry to Reduce Normal Brain Dose in Radiosurgery of Multiple Brain Metastases with Single–Isocenter Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qixue; Snyder, Karen Chin; Liu, Chang; Huang, Yimei; Zhao, Bo; Chetty, Indrin J.; Wen, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of patients with multiple brain metastases using a single-isocenter volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has been shown to decrease treatment time with the tradeoff of larger low dose to the normal brain tissue. We have developed an efficient Projection Summing Optimization Algorithm to optimize the treatment geometry in order to reduce dose to normal brain tissue for radiosurgery of multiple metastases with single-isocenter VMAT. The algorithm: (a) measures coordinates of outer boundary points of each lesion to be treated using the Eclipse Scripting Application Programming Interface, (b) determines the rotations of couch, collimator, and gantry using three matrices about the cardinal axes, (c) projects the outer boundary points of the lesion on to Beam Eye View projection plane, (d) optimizes couch and collimator angles by selecting the least total unblocked area for each specific treatment arc, and (e) generates a treatment plan with the optimized angles. The results showed significant reduction in the mean dose and low dose volume to normal brain, while maintaining the similar treatment plan qualities on the thirteen patients treated previously. The algorithm has the flexibility with regard to the beam arrangements and can be integrated in the treatment planning system for clinical application directly. PMID:27688047

  16. Functional mapping of language networks in the normal brain using a word-association task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Shantanu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Language functions are known to be affected in diverse neurological conditions, including ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, and brain tumors. Because language networks are extensive, interpretation of functional data depends on the task completed during evaluation. Aim: The aim was to map the hemodynamic consequences of word association using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in normal human subjects. Materials and Methods: Ten healthy subjects underwent fMRI scanning with a postlexical access semantic association task vs lexical processing task. The fMRI protocol involved a T2FNx01-weighted gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (GE-EPI sequence (TR 4523 ms, TE 64 ms, flip angle 90º with alternate baseline and activation blocks. A total of 78 scans were taken (interscan interval = 3 s with a total imaging time of 587 s. Functional data were processed in Statistical Parametric Mapping software (SPM2 with 8-mm Gaussian kernel by convolving the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD signal with an hemodynamic response function estimated by general linear method to generate SPM{t} and SPM{F} maps. Results: Single subject analysis of the functional data (FWE-corrected, P≤0.001 revealed extensive activation in the frontal lobes, with overlaps among middle frontal gyrus (MFG, superior, and inferior frontal gyri. BOLD activity was also found in the medial frontal gyrus, middle occipital gyrus (MOG, anterior fusiform gyrus, superior and inferior parietal lobules, and to a smaller extent, the thalamus and right anterior cerebellum. Group analysis (FWE-corrected, P≤0.001 revealed neural recruitment of bilateral lingual gyri, left MFG, bilateral MOG, left superior occipital gyrus, left fusiform gyrus, bilateral thalami, and right cerebellar areas. Conclusions: Group data analysis revealed a cerebellar-occipital-fusiform-thalamic network centered around bilateral lingual gyri for word association, thereby indicating how these

  17. Incidental findings on brain MRI of cognitively normal first-degree descendants of patients with Alzheimer's disease: a cross-sectional analysis from the ALFA (Alzheimer and Families) project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugulat-Serrat, Anna; Rojas, Santiago; Bargalló, Nuria; Conesa, Gerardo; Minguillón, Carolina; Fauria, Karine; Gramunt, Nina; Molinuevo, José Luis; Gispert, Juan Domingo

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To describe the prevalence of brain MRI incidental findings (IF) in a cohort of cognitively normal first-degree descendants of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Design Cross-sectional observational study. Setting All scans were obtained with a 3.0 T scanner. Scans were evaluated by a single neuroradiologist and IF recorded and categorised. The presence of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) was determined with the Fazekas scale and reported as relevant if ≥2. Participants 575 participants (45–75 years) underwent high-resolution structural brain MRI. Participants were cognitively normal and scored over the respective cut-off values in all the following neuropsychological tests: Mini-Mental State Examination (≥26), Memory Impairment Screen (≥6), Time Orientation Subtest of the Barcelona Test II (≥68), verbal semantic fluency (naming animals ≥12). Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) had to be 0. Results 155 participants (27.0%) presented with at least one IF. Relevant WMH were present in 7.8% of the participants, and vascular abnormalities, cyst and brain volume loss in 10.7%, 3.1% and 6.9% of the study volunteers, respectively. Neoplastic brain findings were found in 2.4% of participants and within these, meningiomas were the most common (1.7%) and more frequently found in women. A positive correlation between increasing age and the presence of IF was found. Additionally, brain atrophy greater than that expected by age was significantly more prevalent in participants without a parental history of AD. Conclusions Brain MRIs of healthy middle-aged participants show a relatively high prevalence of IF even when study participants have been screened for subtle cognitive alterations. Most of our participants are first-degree descendants of patients with AD, and therefore these results are of special relevance for novel imaging studies in the context of AD prevention in cognitively healthy middle-aged participants. Trial registration number NCT

  18. Diffusion tensor imaging reliably differentiates patients with schizophrenia from healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardekani, Babak A; Tabesh, Ali; Sevy, Serge; Robinson, Delbert G; Bilder, Robert M; Szeszko, Philip R

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine whether fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) maps derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the brain are able to reliably differentiate patients with schizophrenia from healthy volunteers. DTI and high resolution structural magnetic resonance scans were acquired in 50 patients with schizophrenia and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. FA and MD maps were estimated from the DTI data and spatially normalized to the Montreal Neurologic Institute standard stereotactic space. Individuals were divided randomly into two groups of 50, a training set, and a test set, each comprising 25 patients and 25 healthy volunteers. A pattern classifier was designed using Fisher's linear discriminant analysis (LDA) based on the training set of images to categorize individuals in the test set as either patients or healthy volunteers. Using the FA maps, the classifier correctly identified 94% of the cases in the test set (96% sensitivity and 92% specificity). The classifier achieved 98% accuracy (96% sensitivity and 100% specificity) when using the MD maps as inputs to distinguish schizophrenia patients from healthy volunteers in the test dataset. Utilizing FA and MD data in combination did not significantly alter the accuracy (96% sensitivity and specificity). Patterns of water self-diffusion in the brain as estimated by DTI can be used in conjunction with automated pattern recognition algorithms to reliably distinguish between patients with schizophrenia and normal control subjects.

  19. Classification of Brain Signals in Normal Subjects and Patients with Epilepsy Using Mixture of Experts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Amoozegar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available EEG is one of the most important and common sources for study of brain function and neurological disorders. Automated systems are under study for many years to detect EEG changes. Because of the importance of making correct decision, we are looking for better classification methods for EEG signals. In this paper a smart compound system is used for classifying EEG signals to different groups. Since in each classification the system accuracy of making decision is very important, in this study we look for some methods to improve the accuracy of EEG signals classification. In this paper the use of Mixture of Experts for improving the EEG signals classification of normal subjects and patients with epilepsy is shown and the classification accuracy is evaluated. Decision making was performed in two stages: 1 feature extractions with different methods of eigenvector and 2 Classification using the classifier trained by extracted features. This smart system inputs are formed from composites features that are selected appropriate with network structure. In this study tree methods based on eigenvectors (Minimum Norm, MUSIC, Pisarenko are chosen for the estimation of Power Spectral Density (PSD. After the implementation of ME and train it on composite features, we propose that this technique can reach high classification accuracy. Hence, EEG signals classification of epilepsy patients in different situations and control subjects is available. In this study, Mixture of Experts structure was used for EEG signals classification. Proper performance of Neural Network depends on the size of train and test data. Combination of multiple Neural Networks even without using the probable structure in obtaining weights in classification problem can produce high accuracy in less time, which is important and valuable in the classification point of view.

  20. Effects of methylphenidate on resting-state brain activity in normal adults: an fMRI study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yihong Zhu; Bin Gao; Jianming Hua; Weibo Liu; Yichao Deng; Lijie Zhang; Biao Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is one of the most commonly used stimulants for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).Although several studies have evaluated the effects of MPH on human brain activation during specific cognitive tasks using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI),few studies have focused on spontaneous brain activity.In the current study,we investigated the effect of MPH on the intra-regional synchronization of spontaneous brain activity during the resting state in 18normal adult males.A handedness questionnaire and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale were applied before medication,and a resting-state fMRI scan was obtained 1 h after medication (20 mg MPH or placebo,order counterbalanced between participants).We demonstrated that:(1) there were no significant differences in the performance of behavioral tasks between the MPH and placebo groups; (2) the left middle and superior temporal gyri had stronger MPH-related regional homogeneity (ReHo); and (3) the left lingual gyrus had weaker MPH-related ReHo.Our findings showed that the ReHo in some brain areas changes with MPH compared to placebo in normal adults,even though there are no behavioral differences.This method can be applied to patients with mental illness who may be treated with MPH,and be used to compare the difference between patients taking MPH and normal participants,to help reveal the mechanism of how MPH works.

  1. Prevalence of lateral ventricle asymmetry in brain MRI studies of neurologically normal dogs and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivetta, Mauro; De Risio, Luisa; Newton, Richard; Dennis, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetry of the cerebral lateral ventricles is a common finding in cross-sectional imaging of otherwise normal canine brains and has been assumed to be incidental. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare the prevalence of ventricular asymmetry in brain MRI studies of normal dogs and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Brain MRI archives were searched for 100 neurologically normal dogs (Group 1) and 100 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (Group 2). For each dog, asymmetry of the lateral ventricles was subjectively classified as absent, mild, moderate, and severe based on a consensus of two observers who were unaware of group status. Ventricular areas were measured from transverse T1W images at the level of the interthalamic adhesion. An asymmetry ratio was calculated as the ratio of the larger to smaller ventricular transverse area. There was excellent agreement between subjective assessments of ventricular asymmetry and quantitative assessments using asymmetry ratios (k = 0.995). The prevalence of asymmetry was 38% in Group 1 dogs and 44% in Group 2 dogs. Assymmetry was scored as mild in the majority of Group 2 dogs. There was no significant association between presence/absence and degree of ventricular asymmetry vs. dog group, age, gender, or skull conformation. Findings from the current study supported previously published assumptions that asymmetry of the lateral cerebral ventricles is an incidental finding in MRI studies of the canine brain.

  2. SEXUAL DIMORPHISM IN VOLUME OF INSULAR CORTEX IN NORMAL AND NEURODEGENERATIVE HUMAN BRAINS : A STEREOLOGIC AND MACROSCOPIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Haghir

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Lillie is known about the sexual differences in volume of human insular cortex in normal subjects and those suffering from ncurodcgcncrativc diseases. The objective of this study is 10 investigate the sex difference in volume of the left insular cortex in normal right-handed subjects versus subjects suffering from Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases. This study was performed on 72 normal human brains (38 males. 34 females. II brains suffered from Alzheimer (4 males. 7 females, and 13 brains suffered from Parkinson (9 males, 4 females. The right hemispheres were used for neuropathologic studies. The volumes of the len insular cortex in the male and female normal subjects were 6.65 :.:: 1.55 em: and 5.X3 ,t: 1.12 em'. respectively (P = 0.0 I. The volumes of the left insular cortex in the male and female subjects suffering from Alzheimer were 5.6X :i.: !.49 ern' and 4.49 :i: (l.X6 em'. respectively (P = 0.2 I. The volumes of the left insular cortex in the male and female subjects suffering from Parkinson were 5.99 ± 1.05 em' und 5.37 ::: 0.51 em'. respectively (P =:= O. I8. The present study shows a significant larger left insular cortex volume in normal right-handed males than in females. No significant sexual difference in volume of the left insular cortex in subjects suffering from Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases W,IS observed. Disappearance of the normal sexual dimorphism in the volume of the insular cortex may be due to a more severe degeneration of this conical area in males during thc ncurodcgcncrativc disorders.

  3. Total and regional brain volumes in a population-based normative sample from 4 to 18 years: the NIH MRI Study of Normal Brain Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Using a population-based sampling strategy, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Normal Brain Development compiled a longitudinal normative reference database of neuroimaging and correlated clinical/behavioral data from a demographically representative sample of healthy children and adolescents aged newborn through early adulthood. The present paper reports brain volume data for 325 children, ages 4.5-18 years, from the first cross-sectional time point. Measures included volumes of whole-brain gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM), left and right lateral ventricles, frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital lobe GM and WM, subcortical GM (thalamus, caudate, putamen, and globus pallidus), cerebellum, and brainstem. Associations with cross-sectional age, sex, family income, parental education, and body mass index (BMI) were evaluated. Key observations are: 1) age-related decreases in lobar GM most prominent in parietal and occipital cortex; 2) age-related increases in lobar WM, greatest in occipital, followed by the temporal lobe; 3) age-related trajectories predominantly curvilinear in females, but linear in males; and 4) small systematic associations of brain tissue volumes with BMI but not with IQ, family income, or parental education. These findings constitute a normative reference on regional brain volumes in children and adolescents.

  4. Ⅰ期临床药物试验中健康志愿者一般状况分析%Analysis about the general healthy situation of normal healthy volunteers in phase Ⅰ new drug clinical trail

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭月梅; 王宏山; 易嘉龙; 李玲芝; 宓为峰

    2011-01-01

    Objective To analyse the healthy situation of the normal healthy volunteers in phase Ⅰ new drug clinical trail. Methods One hundred and seventy- seven healthy volunteers who came to the Sixth Hospital of Peking University for screening of phase Ⅰ new drug chnical trail were elected, from January/2009 to August/2010. Results The ratio of male and female was 2. 53 (170: 70). The rate of abnormality red blood cell count and hemoglobin of male healthy volunteers was higher than females, and the rate of hemoglobin abnormality of lower age ( < 28 years) group had a higher than the elder group ( > 28 years) ( P <0. 05 ). The rate of neutrophilic granulocyte count abnormality male group person had a lower than females (6. 5% vs 15.7%, x2 = 3.90, P <0. 05 ). The abnormality rate of blood glucose in male was 34. 6%, higher than that in female group 20. 0% (x2 = 4. 39, P = 0. 036 < 0. 05 ).Conclusion During the screening of normal healthy volunteers in phase Ⅰ new drug clinical trail, it is necessary to monitor the red blood cell count, hemoglobin, blood glucose in male or younger ( < 28 years)groups, and monitor neutrophilic granulocyte count in female group.%目的 分析Ⅰ期临床药物试验中健康志愿者的一般状况.方法 选择2009年1月到2010年8月在本院药物临床试验机构参加Ⅰ期临床药物试验筛选的177名健康志愿者,对一般资料及实验室、体格检查、心电图检查进行汇总分析.结果 参加筛选的健康志愿者男女性别比值为2.53(170:70),红细胞计数及血红蛋白异常的比例男性均比女性高(P<0.05),且低年龄组(<28岁)血红蛋白异常的比例更高(P<0.05);男性的中性粒细胞计数异常的比例为6.5%(女性:15.7%),与女性比较差别有统计学意义(x2=3.90,P<0.05);男性的血糖异常比例为34.6%(女性:20.0%),与女性比较差别有统计学意义(x2=4.39,P=0.036<0.05).结论 筛选Ⅰ期临床药物试验的健康志

  5. Biondi ring tangles in the choroid plexus of Alzheimer's disease and normal aging brains: a quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, G Y; Wisniewski, H M; Kascsak, R J

    1999-06-19

    The choroid plexus (CP) performs the vital function of producing up to 90% (450-1000 ml/day) of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to nourish and to protect the brain in the CSF suspension. The CP also acts as a selective barrier between blood and CSF to regulate ions and other essential molecules. However, the accumulation of intracellular inclusions called Biondi ring tangles (BRTs) in CP cells of Alzheimer's disease (AD)/aging brains may affect these vital functions of the CP. Statistical analysis of quantitative data on the numbers of CP cells containing BRTs from 54 brains (29 AD and 25 normal control), age range 1-100 years, indicated a significant difference (pbiomarker for AD in addition to NPs and NFTs.

  6. Diffusional anisotropy of the human brain assessed with diffusion-weighted MR: Relation with normal brain development and aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Toshiyuki; Sakuma, Hajime; Takeda, Kan; Tagami, Tomoyasu; Okuda, Yasuyuki; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi (Mie Univ. School of Medicine (Japan))

    1994-02-01

    To analyze diffusional anisotropy in frontal and occipital white matter of human brain quantitatively as a function of age by using diffusion-weighted MR imaging. Ten neonates (<1 month), 13 infants (1-10 months), 9 children (1-11 years), and 16 adults (20-79 years) were examined. After taking axial spin-echo images of the brain, diffusion-sensitive gradients were added parallel or perpendicular to the orientation of nerve fibers. The apparent diffusion coefficient parallel to the nerve fibers (0) and that perpendicular to the fibers (90) were computed. The anisotropic ratio (90/0) was calculated as a function of age. Anisotropic ratios of frontal white matter were significantly larger in neonates as compared with infants, children, or adults. The ratios showed rapid decrease until 6 months and thereafter were identical in all subjects. In the occipital lobe, the ratios were also greater in neonates, but the differences from other age groups were not so prominent as in the frontal lobe. Comparing anisotropic ratios between frontal and occipital lobes, a significant difference was observed only in neonates. Diffusion-weighted images demonstrated that the myelination process starts earlier in the occipital lobe than in the frontal lobe. The changes of diffusional anisotropy in white matter are completed within 6 months after birth. Diffusion-weighted imaging provides earlier detection of brain myelination compared with the conventional T1- and T2-weighted images. 18 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Comparing Cognitive Failures and Metacognitive Beliefs in Mild Traumatic Brain Injured Patients and Normal Controls in Kashan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zargar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Head trauma is associated with multiple destructive cognitive symptoms and cognitive failure. Cognitive failures include problems with memory, attention and operation. Cognitive failures are considered as a process associated with metacognition. Objectives This study aimed to compare cognitive failures and metacognitive beliefs in mild Traumatic Brain Injured (TBI patients and normal controls in Kashan. Patients and Methods The study was performed on 40 TBI patients referred to the Shahid Beheshti Hospital of Kashan city and 40 normal controls in Kashan. Traumatic brain injured patients and normal controls were selected by convenience sampling. Two groups filled out the demographic sheet, Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ and Meta-Cognitions Questionnaire 30 (MCQ-30. The data were analyzed by the SPSS-19 software with multivariate analysis of variance. Results The results of this study showed that there were no significant differences between TBI and controls in total scores and subscales of CFQ and MCQ (F = 0.801, P = 0.61. Conclusions Based on these findings, it seems that mild brain injuries don't make significant metacognitive problems and cognitive failures.

  8. Mapping metals in Parkinson's and normal brain using rapid-scanning x-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Bogdan F. Gh; George, Martin J.; Bergmann, Uwe; Garachtchenko, Alex V.; Kelly, Michael E.; McCrea, Richard P. E.; Lüning, Katharina; Devon, Richard M.; George, Graham N.; Hanson, Akela D.; Harder, Sheri M.; Chapman, L. Dean; Pickering, Ingrid J.; Nichol, Helen

    2009-02-01

    Rapid-scanning x-ray fluorescence (RS-XRF) is a synchrotron technology that maps multiple metals in tissues by employing unique hardware and software to increase scanning speed. RS-XRF was validated by mapping and quantifying iron, zinc and copper in brain slices from Parkinson's disease (PD) and unaffected subjects. Regions and structures in the brain were readily identified by their metal complement and each metal had a unique distribution. Many zinc-rich brain regions were low in iron and vice versa. The location and amount of iron in brain regions known to be affected in PD agreed with analyses using other methods. Sample preparation is simple and standard formalin-fixed autopsy slices are suitable. RS-XRF can simultaneously and non-destructively map and quantify multiple metals and holds great promise to reveal metal pathologies associated with PD and other neurodegenerative diseases as well as diseases of metal metabolism.

  9. Structural and functional MRI of normal and compromised rat brain development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marel, K. van der

    2013-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric illness constitutes a major disease burden worldwide, yet its neurobiological substrates remain elusive. It is increasingly believed that early disturbances during critical and sensitive periods of brain development contribute to a delayed manifestation of psychiatric disease. This

  10. Gene expression changes in the course of normal brain aging are sexually dimorphic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchtold, Nicole C; Cribbs, David H; Coleman, Paul D; Rogers, Joseph; Head, Elizabeth; Kim, Ronald; Beach, Tom; Miller, Carol; Troncoso, Juan; Trojanowski, John Q; Zielke, H Ronald; Cotman, Carl W

    2008-10-07

    Gene expression profiles were assessed in the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, superior-frontal gyrus, and postcentral gyrus across the lifespan of 55 cognitively intact individuals aged 20-99 years. Perspectives on global gene changes that are associated with brain aging emerged, revealing two overarching concepts. First, different regions of the forebrain exhibited substantially different gene profile changes with age. For example, comparing equally powered groups, 5,029 probe sets were significantly altered with age in the superior-frontal gyrus, compared with 1,110 in the entorhinal cortex. Prominent change occurred in the sixth to seventh decades across cortical regions, suggesting that this period is a critical transition point in brain aging, particularly in males. Second, clear gender differences in brain aging were evident, suggesting that the brain undergoes sexually dimorphic changes in gene expression not only in development but also in later life. Globally across all brain regions, males showed more gene change than females. Further, Gene Ontology analysis revealed that different categories of genes were predominantly affected in males vs. females. Notably, the male brain was characterized by global decreased catabolic and anabolic capacity with aging, with down-regulated genes heavily enriched in energy production and protein synthesis/transport categories. Increased immune activation was a prominent feature of aging in both sexes, with proportionally greater activation in the female brain. These data open opportunities to explore age-dependent changes in gene expression that set the balance between neurodegeneration and compensatory mechanisms in the brain and suggest that this balance is set differently in males and females, an intriguing idea.

  11. Neuronal networks and mediators of cortical neurovascular coupling responses in normal and altered brain states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecrux, C; Hamel, E

    2016-10-05

    Brain imaging techniques that use vascular signals to map changes in neuronal activity, such as blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging, rely on the spatial and temporal coupling between changes in neurophysiology and haemodynamics, known as 'neurovascular coupling (NVC)'. Accordingly, NVC responses, mapped by changes in brain haemodynamics, have been validated for different stimuli under physiological conditions. In the cerebral cortex, the networks of excitatory pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons generating the changes in neural activity and the key mediators that signal to the vascular unit have been identified for some incoming afferent pathways. The neural circuits recruited by whisker glutamatergic-, basal forebrain cholinergic- or locus coeruleus noradrenergic pathway stimulation were found to be highly specific and discriminative, particularly when comparing the two modulatory systems to the sensory response. However, it is largely unknown whether or not NVC is still reliable when brain states are altered or in disease conditions. This lack of knowledge is surprising since brain imaging is broadly used in humans and, ultimately, in conditions that deviate from baseline brain function. Using the whisker-to-barrel pathway as a model of NVC, we can interrogate the reliability of NVC under enhanced cholinergic or noradrenergic modulation of cortical circuits that alters brain states.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'.

  12. Channels of the corpus callosum. Evidence from simple reaction times to lateralized flashes in the normal and the split brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacoboni, M; Zaidel, E

    1995-06-01

    We studied 75 normal subjects and three commissurotomized patients using unimanual simple reaction times to lateralized flashes as a behavioural estimate of interhemispheric transmission time. Three different versions of the paradigm were performed: (i) the basic task; (ii) a motor task, with an increased complexity of the motor response; and (iii) a visual task, with an increased complexity of the visual stimulus presentation. We tested two hypotheses. First, that the new versions of the simple reaction time task result in shifts in hemispheric specialization for processing motor output (indicated by a main effect of response hand) or visual input (indicated by a main effect of visual field) alone, without affecting callosal transmission. In that case normals and split brain patients would show no significant task by response hand by visual field interaction and no significant task by crossed-uncrossed difference interaction. Secondly, that the new versions of the task affect callosal transfer. In that case, normals, but not split brain patients, would show a significant task by response hand by visual field interaction and a significant task by crossed-uncrossed difference interaction. Results are consistent with the latter hypothesis, showing that the motor task significantly changed the response hand by visual field interaction and the crossed-uncrossed difference, but only in normal subjects, perhaps producing a switch in the callosal channel subserving the interhemispheric transfer.

  13. Normal cerebral perfusion of {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT. Evaluation by an anatomical standardization technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Masamichi; Kawashima, Ryuta; Ito, Hiroshi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. of Development, Aging and Cancer] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Single photon labeled tracer {sup 99m}Tc-hexamethyl-propylene amine oxime (HMPAO) has been used for rCBF studies by SPECT. However, normal perfusion pattern of this agent still remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate normal {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPECT image voxel by voxel. Eighteen male subjects without any prior or present history of medical illness participated in this study. All SPECT images were globally normalized to 100 count/voxel. Each subject had an X-ray CT scan at the same day of SPECT measurement. All subjects had normal X-ray CT scans. The standard anatomical structures of the computerized brain atlas of Roland et al. were fitted to X-ray CT images of a subject by linear and non-linear parameters. These parameters were subsequently used to transform SPECT images of the subject. After the anatomical standardization, mean and SD images of eight standardized images were calculated voxel-by-voxel basis. In the mean image, following structures showed relatively higher radioactivity; the putamen, the cerebellum, and the frontal lobe. In addition, the occipital lobe, parietal lobe, frontal lobe, and the putamen showed large degree of SD. Anatomical standardization of SPECT images may be useful as a reference to diagnose and evaluate various brain disorders. (author).

  14. Age Sensitivity of Behavioral Tests and Brain Substrates of Normal Aging in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kennard, John A.; Woodruff-Pak, Diana S.

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of age sensitivity, the capacity of a behavioral test to reliably detect age-related changes, has utility in the design of experiments to elucidate processes of normal aging. We review the application of these tests in studies of normal aging and compare and contrast the age sensitivity of the Barnes maze, eyeblink classical conditioning, fear conditioning, Morris water maze, and rotorod. These tests have all been implemented to assess normal age-related changes in learning and memo...

  15. Laminar distribution of synaptopodin in normal and reeler mouse brain depends on the position of spine-bearing neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deller, Thomas; Haas, Carola A; Deissenrieder, Kathrin; Del Turco, Domenico; Coulin, Carola; Gebhardt, Carl; Drakew, Alexander; Schwarz, Karin; Mundel, Peter; Frotscher, Michael

    2002-11-04

    Synaptopodin is the first member of a novel class of proline-rich actin-associated proteins. In brain, it is present in the neck of a subset of mature telencephalic spines and is associated closely with the spine apparatus, a Ca(2+) storing organelle within the spine compartment. The characteristic region- and lamina-specific distribution of synaptopodin in rat brain suggested that the distribution pattern of synaptopodin depends on the cytoarchitectonic arrangement of spine-bearing neurons. To test this hypothesis, synaptopodin was studied in the cortex, striatum, and hippocampus of normal and reeler mice, in which developmental cell migration defects have disrupted the normal array of cells. In situ hybridization histochemistry as well as light- and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry were used. In brain of normal mice, the pattern of synaptopodin mRNA-expressing cells corresponds to that of spine-bearing neurons and synaptopodin protein is found in a region- and lamina-specific distribution pattern. It is specifically sorted to the spine neck where it is associated closely with the spine apparatus. In brain of reeler mice, the pattern of synaptopodin mRNA-expressing cells corresponds to that of the abnormally positioned spine-bearing neurons and the region- and lamina-specific distribution pattern is absent or altered. Nevertheless, synaptopodin was specifically sorted to the spine neck, as in controls. These data demonstrate that the light microscopic distribution pattern of synaptopodin protein depends on the position and orientation of the spine-bearing neurons. The intracellular sorting process, however, is independent of positional cues.

  16. Apolipoprotein ε4 is associated with lower brain volume in cognitively normal Chinese but not white older adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S Yokoyama

    Full Text Available Studying ethnically diverse groups is important for furthering our understanding of biological mechanisms of disease that may vary across human populations. The ε4 allele of apolipoprotein E (APOE ε4 is a well-established risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD, and may confer anatomic and functional effects years before clinical signs of cognitive decline are observed. The allele frequency of APOE ε4 varies both across and within populations, and the size of the effect it confers for dementia risk may be affected by other factors. Our objective was to investigate the role APOE ε4 plays in moderating brain volume in cognitively normal Chinese older adults, compared to older white Americans. We hypothesized that carrying APOE ε4 would be associated with reduced brain volume and that the magnitude of this effect would be different between ethnic groups. We performed whole brain analysis of structural MRIs from Chinese living in America (n = 41 and Shanghai (n = 30 and compared them to white Americans (n = 71. We found a significant interaction effect of carrying APOE ε4 and being Chinese. The APOE ε4xChinese interaction was associated with lower volume in bilateral cuneus and left middle frontal gyrus (Puncorrected<0.001, with suggestive findings in right entorhinal cortex and left hippocampus (Puncorrected<0.01, all regions that are associated with neurodegeneration in AD. After correction for multiple testing, the left cuneus remained significantly associated with the interaction effect (PFWE = 0.05. Our study suggests there is a differential effect of APOE ε4 on brain volume in Chinese versus white cognitively normal elderly adults. This represents a novel finding that, if verified in larger studies, has implications for how biological, environmental and/or lifestyle factors may modify APOE ε4 effects on the brain in diverse populations.

  17. Volunteering, income and health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detollenaere, Jens; Willems, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Separate literatures have related volunteering to health gains and income gains. We study the association between volunteering, income and health within one statistical framework. A state-of-the-art mediation analysis is conducted on data concerning the health, volunteering and sociodemographic characteristics of 42926 individuals within 29 European countries. We find that volunteering is positively associated to self-rated health. This association is partially mediated by household income. PMID:28273163

  18. Acidity and Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Normal and Alzheimer's Disease Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Eric B; Sumien, Nathalie

    2017-02-15

    Alzheimer's disease prevalence has reached epidemic proportion with very few treatment options, which are associated with a multitude of side effects. A potential avenue of research for new therapies are protons, and their associated receptor: acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC). Protons are often overlooked neurotransmitters, and proton-gated currents have been identified in the brain. Furthermore, ASICs have been determined to be crucial for proper brain function. While there is more work to be done, this review is intended to highlight protons as neurotransmitters and their role along with the role of ASICs within physiological functioning of the brain. We will also cover the pathophysiological associations between ASICs and modulators of ASICs. Finally, this review will sum up how the studies of protons, ASICs and their modulators may generate new therapeutic molecules for Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Co-localization of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and wild-type huntingtin in normal and quinolinic acid-lesioned rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Francesca R; Zuccato, Chiara; Tartari, Marzia; Martorana, Alessandro; De March, Zena; Giampà, Carmela; Cattaneo, Elena; Bernardi, Giorgio

    2003-09-01

    Loss of huntingtin-mediated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene transcription has been described in Huntington's disease (HD) [Zuccato et al. (2001) Science, 293, 493-498]. It has been shown that BDNF is synthesized in the pyramidal layer of cerebral cortex and released in the striatum [Altar et al. (1997) Nature, 389, 856-860; Conner et al. (1997) J. Neurosci., 17, 2295-2313]. Here we show the cellular localization of BDNF in huntingtin-containing neurons in normal rat brain; our double-label immunofluorescence study shows that huntingtin and BDNF are co-contained in approximately 99% of pyramidal neurons of motor cortex. In the striatum, huntingtin is expressed in 75% of neurons containing BDNF. In normal striatum we also show that BDNF is contained in cholinergic and in NOS-containing interneurons, which are relatively resistant to HD degeneration. Furthermore, we show a reduction in huntingtin and in BDNF immunoreactivity in cortical neurons after striatal excitotoxic lesion. Our data are confirmed by an ELISA study of BDNF and by a Western blot analysis of huntingtin in cortex of quinolic acid (QUIN)-lesioned hemispheres. In the lesioned striatum we describe that the striatal subpopulation of cholinergic neurons, surviving degeneration, contain BDNF. The finding that BDNF is contained in nearly all neurons that contain huntingtin in the normal cortex, along with the reduced expression of BDNF after QUIN injection of the striatum, shows that huntingtin may be required for BDNF production in cortex.

  20. Intergenerational Transmission of Volunteering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, René

    2007-01-01

    In this article, I investigate the strength of intergenerational transmission of volunteering for non-profit associations in The Netherlands. Data from the Family Survey of the Dutch Population 2000 reveal that there are significant relations between current volunteering and parental volunteering in

  1. My Volunteer Life

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FengAi

    2004-01-01

    SEVERAL years ago, I read a notice soliciting volunteer teachers to work in the west.It caught my interest and I clipped it. Upon graduation in August 2000, 1 postponed my graduate stud-ies in sociology and joined the Fudan Team of China Youth Volunteer Aid.My one-year volunteer life began in

  2. Age-related white matter degradation rule of normal human brain: the evidence from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xiang; Li Baoqing; Shan Baoci

    2014-01-01

    Background Diffusion tensor imaging can evaluate white matter function in human brain.Fractional anisotropy is the most important parameter.This study aimed to find regional reduction of fractional anisotropy (FA) with aging in the whole brain and the changing rules of anisotropy with aging.Methods Fifty volunteers from 20 to 75 years old were divided into five consecutive age groups; a young group and four senior groups.FA values were calculated with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studio software.The difference of FA between the young group and the four senior groups were analyzed by analysis of voxel-level height threshold in Statistic Parametric Mapping (SPM),and the regions with decreased FA were obtained.The FA values of these regions were then extracted using an in-house developed program,and a multiple linear regression model was built to assess the influence of age and sex on the FA values of these regions.Results Eight regions,including frontal lobe,postcentral gyrus,optic radiation,hippocampus,cerebella hemisphere,corona radiate,corpus callosum and internal capsule,were found to have decreased FA.There was a strong negative correlation between age and the FA in the frontal lobe,postcentral gyrus,optic radiation,hippocampus,and cerebella hemisphere,while a weaker negative correlation in the corona radiate,corpus callosum,and internal capsule was found.The FA reduction in the frontal lobe,postcentral gyrus,optic radiation,hippocampus and cerebella hemisphere were found earlier than in the corona radiate,corpus callosum and internal capsule.There was no correlation between sex and FA in these regions.Conclusions The FA in the subcortical white matter area reduces earlier than that in deep white matter.The areas with decreased FA continuously enlarge with aqing.The FAs in these regions have a strong negative correlation with age.

  3. Differentiation in boron distribution in adult male and female rats' normal brain: A BNCT approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodarzi, Samereh, E-mail: samere.g@gmail.com [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 19395-1943, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pazirandeh, Ali, E-mail: paziran@yahoo.com [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 19395-1943, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jameie, Seyed Behnamedin, E-mail: behnamjameie@tums.ac.ir [Basic Science Department, Faculty of Allied Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Baghban Khojasteh, Nasrin, E-mail: khojasteh_n@yahoo.com [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 19395-1943, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Boron distribution in adult male and female rats' normal brain after boron carrier injection (0.005 g Boric Acid+0.005 g Borax+10 ml distilled water, pH: 7.4) was studied in this research. Coronal sections of control and trial animal tissue samples were irradiated with thermal neutrons. Using alpha autoradiography, significant differences in boron concentration were seen in forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain sections of male and female animal groups with the highest value, four hours after boron compound injection. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Boron distribution in male and female rats' normal brain was studied in this research. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coronal sections of animal tissue samples were irradiated with thermal neutrons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alpha and Lithium tracks were counted using alpha autoradiography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different boron concentration was seen in brain sections of male and female rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The highest boron concentration was seen in 4 h after boron compound injection.

  4. Landmark-based morphometrics of the normal adult brain using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Free, S L; O'Higgins, P; Maudgil, D D; Dryden, I L; Lemieux, L; Fish, D R; Shorvon, S D

    2001-05-01

    We describe the application of statistical shape analysis to homologous landmarks on the cortical surface of the adult human brain. Statistical shape analysis has a sound theoretical basis. Landmarks are identified on the surface of a 3-D reconstruction of the segmented cortical surface from magnetic resonance image (MRI) data. Using publicly available software (morphologika) the location and size dependence of the landmarks are removed and the differences in landmark distribution across subjects are analysed using principal component analysis. These differences, representing shape differences between subjects, can be visually assessed using wireframe models and transformation grids. The MRI data of 58 adult brains (27 female and 15 left handed) were examined. Shape differences in the whole brain are described which concern the relative orientation of frontal lobe sulci. Analysis of all 116 hemispheres revealed a statistically significant difference (P < 0.001) between left and right hemispheres. This finding was significant for right- but not left-handed subjects alone. No other significant age, gender, handedness, or brain-size correlations with shape differences were found.

  5. Repeated verum but not placebo acupuncture normalizes connectivity in brain regions dysregulated in chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Egorova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture, an ancient East Asian therapy, is aimed at rectifying the imbalance within the body caused by disease. Studies evaluating the efficacy of acupuncture with neuroimaging tend to concentrate on brain regions within the pain matrix, associated with acute pain. We, however, focused on the effect of repeated acupuncture treatment specifically on brain regions known to support functions dysregulated in chronic pain disorders. Transition to chronic pain is associated with increased attention to pain, emotional rumination, nociceptive memory and avoidance learning, resulting in brain connectivity changes, specifically affecting the periaqueductal gray (PAG, medial frontal cortex (MFC and bilateral hippocampus (Hpc. We demonstrate that the PAG–MFC and PAG–Hpc connectivity in patients with chronic pain due to knee osteoarthritis indeed correlates with clinical severity scores and further show that verum acupuncture-induced improvement in pain scores (compared to sham is related to the modulation of PAG–MFC and PAG–Hpc connectivity in the predicted direction. This study shows that repeated verum acupuncture might act by restoring the balance in the connectivity of the key pain brain regions, altering pain-related attention and memory.

  6. Repeated verum but not placebo acupuncture normalizes connectivity in brain regions dysregulated in chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, Natalia; Gollub, Randy L; Kong, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture, an ancient East Asian therapy, is aimed at rectifying the imbalance within the body caused by disease. Studies evaluating the efficacy of acupuncture with neuroimaging tend to concentrate on brain regions within the pain matrix, associated with acute pain. We, however, focused on the effect of repeated acupuncture treatment specifically on brain regions known to support functions dysregulated in chronic pain disorders. Transition to chronic pain is associated with increased attention to pain, emotional rumination, nociceptive memory and avoidance learning, resulting in brain connectivity changes, specifically affecting the periaqueductal gray (PAG), medial frontal cortex (MFC) and bilateral hippocampus (Hpc). We demonstrate that the PAG-MFC and PAG-Hpc connectivity in patients with chronic pain due to knee osteoarthritis indeed correlates with clinical severity scores and further show that verum acupuncture-induced improvement in pain scores (compared to sham) is related to the modulation of PAG-MFC and PAG-Hpc connectivity in the predicted direction. This study shows that repeated verum acupuncture might act by restoring the balance in the connectivity of the key pain brain regions, altering pain-related attention and memory.

  7. Topographical Distribution of Arsenic, Manganese, and Selenium in the Normal Human Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Agersnap; Pakkenberg, H.; Damsgaard, Else;

    1979-01-01

    activation analysis with radiochemical separation. Distinct patterns of distribution were shown for each of the 3 elements. Variations between individuals were found for some but not all brain areas, resulting in coefficients of variation between individuals of about 30% for arsenic, 10% for manganese and 20...

  8. Volunteers in Sport Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VESNA CILERDZIC

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is done in order to describe student’s attitudes on volunteering in sport. The sample consists of 231 students from Serbia, average age 21,06±3,12years. They were from eight colleges and faculties. For nominal and ordinal variables, frequencies were determined. Many of examined students have volunteering experiences. The results confirm that students believe that we live in a society which his generally thought only to its own benefit; they think that volunteering can not solve the problems in society; that people do not have enough experience with volunteering and people do not have time to volunteering; volunteering is for young people; in their family and among friends, there are no volunteers; everyone could be volunteer only if that wishes; do not believe that volunteering is a waste of time and it helps in future career. The prevalent number of students, regardless of the Faculty which they belong, rarely volunteered in areas outside of sport. Results also shows that students from sport faculties have less experience in volunteering in sport than students from other faculties, but this difference is not dramatic.

  9. The INIA19 template and NeuroMaps atlas for primate brain image parcellation and spatial normalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten eRohlfing

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The INIA19 is a new, high-quality template for imaging-based studies of non-human primate brains created from high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR images of 19 rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta animals. Combined with the comprehensive cortical and subcortical label map of the NeuroMaps atlas, the INIA19 is equally suitable for studies requiring both spatial normalization and atlas label propagation. Population-averaged template images are provided for both the brain and the whole head, to allow alignment of the atlas with both skull-stripped and unstripped data, and thus to facilitate its use for skull stripping of new images. This article describes the construction of the template using freely-available software tools, as well as the template itself, which is being made available to the scientific community (http://nitrc.org/projects/inia19/.

  10. Utilização da algometria de pressão na determinação dos limiares de percepção dolorosa trigeminal em voluntários sadios: um novo protocolo de estudos Using algometry of pressure measuring the threshold of trigeminal pain perception in normal volunteers: a new protocol of studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elcio Juliato Piovesan

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Algometria de pressão é uma técnica que mensura a fisiologia do sistema nociceptivo. Atuando diretamente sobre os nociceptores periféricos responsívos aos estímulos pressóricos esta técnica permite o estudo da integridade nociceptiva em indivíduos normais ou portadores de diferentes síndromes álgicas. Foram testados 29 voluntários assintomáticos em que pesquisamos os limiares de percepção dolorosa, mensurando-os de forma direta sobre a emergência dos nervos supra-orbital, infra-orbital, mental. Registramos os seguintes valores médios algométricos: nervo mental direito 46,2 Kg/cm² e esquerdo 48,6 Kg/cm²; nervo supra-orbital direito 47,7 Kg/cm² e esquerdo 45,2 Kg/cm²; nervo infra-orbital direito 53,9 Kg/cm² e esquerdo 55,4 Kg/cm². Após revisão dos princípios de utilização da algometria, validamos este protocolo apresentando os valores médios obtidos pela mensuração do sistema trigeminal comparando-os posteriormente com uma região inervada pelos primeiros ramos cervicais (nervo occipital maior e região do músculo temporal.Algometry of pressure is a technique that measures the physiology of the nociceptive system. Acting directly on the responsive peripheral nociceptors to pressure stimuli, this technique allows the study on nociceptive integrity in normal subjects or having different algic syndromes. Utilizing 29 asymptomatic volunteers, the threshold of the painful perception was studied, measuring them in a direct way over the emergence of the supra-orbital, infra-orbital and mental nerves. The following algometric average were recorded: right mental nerve 46.2 Kg/cm² and left 48.6 Kg/cm² ; right supra-orbital nerve 47.7 Kg/cm² and left 45.2 Kg/cm²; right infra-orbital nerve 53.9 Kg/cm² and left 55.4 Kg/cm². After reviewing the principles of the algometry utilization, we have validated this protocol, showing the average values obtained by measuring the trigeminal system, afterwards comparing them with an

  11. Normal neurochemistry in the prefrontal and cerebellar brain of adults with attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique eEndres

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is a common neurodevelopmental disorder. In an attempt to extend earlier neurochemical findings, we organized a magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS study as part of a large, government-funded, prospective, randomized, multicenter clinical trial comparing the effectiveness of specific psychotherapy with counseling and stimulant treatment with placebo treatment (COMPAS study. We report the baseline neurochemical data for the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC and the cerebellum in a case-control setting. For the trial, 1 480 adult patients were contacted for participation, 518 were assessed for eligibility, 433 were randomized, and 187 were potentially eligible for neuroimaging. The control group included 119 healthy volunteers. Single-voxel proton MRS was performed. In the patient group, 113 ACC and 104 cerebellar spectra fulfilled all quality criteria for inclusion in statistical calculations, as did 82 ACC and 78 cerebellar spectra in the control group. We did not find any significant neurometabolic differences between the ADHD and control group in the ACC (Wilks’ lambda test: p = 0.97 or in the cerebellum (p = 0.62. Thus, we were unable to replicate earlier findings in this methodologically sophisticated study. We discuss our findings in the context of a comprehensive review of other MRS studies on ADHD and a somewhat skeptical neuropsychiatric research perspective. As in other neuropsychiatric disorders, the unclear nosological status of ADHD might be an explanation for false-negative findings.

  12. Serial Post-mortem Relaxometry in the Normal Rat Brain and Following Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Fagan, Andrew J.; Mullin, JM; Gallagher, L; Hadley, DM; Macrae, IM; Condon, B

    2008-01-01

    PUBLISHED Purpose: Investigation of MRI for non-invasive autopsy via measurements of serial changes in relaxation parameters of the rat brain during the post-mortem interval. Materials and Methods: Post-mortem relaxometry measurements were performed before and hourly after death for 24 hours on five control rats and five rats which underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Analyses were performed on representative regions of grey, white, and mixed grey/white matter structures. ...

  13. Texture analysis in quantitative MR imaging. Tissue characterisation of normal brain and intracranial tumours at 1.5 T

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Ring, P; Thomsen, C

    1995-01-01

    of common first-order and second-order grey level statistics. Tissue differentiation in the images was estimated by the presence or absence of significant differences between tissue types. A fine discrimination was obtained between white matter, cortical grey matter, and cerebrospinal fluid in the normal...... brain, and white matter was readily separated from the tumour lesions. Moreover, separation of solid tumour tissue and peritumoural oedema was suggested for some tumour types. Mutual comparison of all tumour types revealed extensive differences, and even specific tumour differentiation turned out...

  14. Volumetric analysis of the normal infant brain and in intrauterine growth retardation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, P B; Leth, H; Ring, P B

    1995-01-01

    and the volumes were determined by encircling each structure of interest on every slice. Segmentation into grey matter, white matter and CSF was done by semi-automatic discriminant analysis. Growth charts for the cerebrum, cerebellum, corpora striata, thalami, ventricles, and grey and white matter are provided...... for infants with appropriate birth weight. The striatal (P = 0.02) and thalamic (P grey matter to white matter (G/W-ratio) increased (P = 0.01). In the neonatal patients, brain volumes were independently associated...... growth retardation reduces grey matter volume more than white matter....

  15. Induction of systemic TH1-like innate immunity in normal volunteers following subcutaneous but not intravenous administration of CPG 7909, a synthetic B-class CpG oligodeoxynucleotide TLR9 agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, Arthur M; Efler, Susan M; Wittpoth, Michael; Al Adhami, Mohammed J; Davis, Heather L

    2004-01-01

    Subcutaneous injection of normal human volunteers with a B-class CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) TLR9 agonist, CPG 7909, induced a TH1-like pattern of systemic innate immune activation manifested by expression of IL-6, IL-12p40, IFN-alpha, and IFN-inducible chemokines. Serum IP-10 was found to be the most sensitive assay for subcutaneous CPG 7909 stimulation; its level was significantly increased in all subjects at all dose levels, including the lowest tested dose of just 0.0025 mg/kg. This pattern of chemokine and cytokine induction was markedly different from that previously reported to be induced by TLR9 stimulation in rodents, most likely reflecting species-specific differences in the cell types expressing TLR9. Subcutaneous CPG 7909 injection induced transient shifts in blood neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes, consistent with the increased chemokine expression. Levels of acute phase reactants such as C-reactive protein were also increased. A second subcutaneous CPG 7909 injection administered 2 weeks after the first elicited similar immune responses, showing little or no tolerance to the effects of repeated in vivo TLR9 stimulation. Subjects developed dose-dependent transient injection site reactions and flu-like symptoms but otherwise tolerated injection well, with no evidence of organ toxicity or systemic autoimmunity. The activation of innate immunity was dependent on the route of ODN administration, since intravenous injection caused no such effects. These studies indicate that in vivo activation of TLR9 by subcutaneous administration of CPG 7909 could be a well-tolerated immunotherapeutic approach for induction of TH1 innate immune activation.

  16. Computed tomography of the brain in the diagnosis of and prognosis in normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikkelsoe, C.; Blomstrand, C.; Andersson, H.; Matousek, M.; Svendsen, P.

    1989-05-01

    Thirty-eight patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus were examined by CT before and after a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt operation. Evans ratio, periventricular hypodensity and width of hemispheric sulci, sylvian fissures, cella media, temporal horns and third and fourth ventricle were examined. Twenty-eight patients improved after the operation while 10 were unchanged (non responders). Those patients who improved had more often enlarged third ventricle, enlarged temporal horns and normal sylvian fissures than those who did not improve. No single CT parameter or combination of CT parameters alone could identify responders and non-responders. The ventriculo-peritoneal shunt operation reduced ventricular size (Evans ratio, cella media width), abolished periventricular hypodensity and reduced width of the temporal horns and third ventricle in both responders and non-responders. Reduction of the width of the third ventricle correlated to clinical improvement.

  17. Gain in brain immunity in the oldest-old differentiates cognitively normal from demented individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Katsel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent findings suggest that Alzheimer's disease (AD neuropathological features (neuritic plaques and NFTs are not strongly associated with dementia in extreme old (over 90 years of age and compel a search for neurobiological indices of dementia in this rapidly growing segment of the elderly population. We sought to characterize transcriptional and protein profiles of dementia in the oldest-old. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Gene and protein expression changes relative to non-demented age-matched controls were assessed by two microarray platforms, qPCR and Western blot in different regions of the brains of oldest-old and younger old persons who died at mild or severe stages of dementia. Our results indicate that: i consistent with recent neuropathological findings, gene expression changes associated with cognitive impairment in oldest-old persons are distinct from those in cognitively impaired youngest-old persons; ii transcripts affected in young-old subjects with dementia participate in biological pathways related to synaptic function and neurotransmission while transcripts affected in oldest-old subjects with dementia are associated with immune/inflammatory function; iii upregulation of immune response genes in cognitively intact oldest-old subjects and their subsequent downregulation in dementia suggests a potential protective role of the brain immune-associated system against dementia in the oldest-old; iv consistent with gene expression profiles, protein expression of several selected genes associated with the inflammatory/immune system in inferior temporal cortex is significantly increased in cognitively intact oldest-old persons relative to cognitively intact young-old persons, but impaired in cognitively compromised oldest-old persons relative to cognitively intact oldest-old controls. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that disruption of the robust immune homeostasis that is characteristic of oldest-old individuals who avoided

  18. Evaluation of auditory brain-stem evoked response in middle: Aged type 2 diabetes mellitus with normal hearing subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debadatta Mahallik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM is commonly metabolic disorders of carbohydrate in which blood glucose levels are abnormally high due to relative or absolute insulin deficiency. In addition, it is characterized by abnormal metabolism of fat, protein resulting from insulin deficit or insulin action, or both. There are two broad categories of DM are designated as type 1 and type 2. Type 2 diabetes is due to predominantly insulin resistance with relative insulin deficiency noninsulin-dependent DM. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than insulin-dependent DM. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess, if there is any abnormality in neural conduction in auditory brain-stem pathway in type 2 DM patients having normal hearing sensitivity when compared to age-matched healthy populations. Materials and Methods: This study included middle - aged 25 subjects having normal hearing with diabetes type 2 mellitus. All were submitted to the full audiological history taking, otological examination, basic audiological evaluation and auditory brain-stem response audiometry which was recorded in both ears, followed by calculation of the absolute latencies of wave I, III and V, as well as interpeak latencies I-III, III-V, I-V. Results: Type 2 DM patients showed significant prolonged absolute latencies of I, III (P = 0.001 and interpeak latencies I-III, III-V and I-V in left ear (P = 0.001 and absolute latencies of I, V (P = 0.001, interpeak latencies III-V was statistically significant in right ear. Conclusions: The prolonged absolute latencies and interpeak latencies suggests abnormal neural firing synchronization or in the transmission in the auditory pathways in normal hearing type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

  19. Sustained expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor is required for maintenance of dendritic spines and normal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigers, A J; Amin, D S; Talley-Farnham, T; Gorski, J A; Xu, B; Jones, K R

    2012-06-14

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays important roles in the development, maintenance, and plasticity of the mammalian forebrain. These functions include regulation of neuronal maturation and survival, axonal and dendritic arborization, synaptic efficacy, and modulation of complex behaviors including depression and spatial learning. Although analysis of mutant mice has helped establish essential developmental functions for BDNF, its requirement in the adult is less well documented. We have studied late-onset forebrain-specific BDNF knockout (CaMK-BDNF(KO)) mice, in which BDNF is lost primarily from the cortex and hippocampus in early adulthood, well after BDNF expression has begun in these structures. We found that although CaMK-BDNF(KO) mice grew at a normal rate and can survive more than a year, they had smaller brains than wild-type siblings. The CaMK-BDNF(KO) mice had generally normal behavior in tests for ataxia and anxiety, but displayed reduced spatial learning ability in the Morris water task and increased depression in the Porsolt swim test. These behavioral deficits were very similar to those we previously described in an early-onset forebrain-specific BDNF knockout. To identify an anatomical correlate of the abnormal behavior, we quantified dendritic spines in cortical neurons. The spine density of CaMK-BDNF(KO) mice was normal at P35, but by P84, there was a 30% reduction in spine density. The strong similarities we find between early- and late-onset BDNF knockouts suggest that BDNF signaling is required continuously in the CNS for the maintenance of some forebrain circuitry also affected by developmental BDNF depletion.

  20. Evaluation of MRI and cannabinoid type 1 receptor PET templates constructed using DARTEL for spatial normalization of rat brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronfeld, Andrea; Müller-Forell, Wibke [Institute of Neuroradiology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Langenbeckstraße 1, Mainz 55131 (Germany); Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Maus, Stephan; Reuss, Stefan; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Miederer, Isabelle, E-mail: isabelle.miederer@unimedizin-mainz.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Langenbeckstraße 1, Mainz 55131 (Germany); Lutz, Beat [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Duesbergweg 6, Mainz 55128 (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Image registration is one prerequisite for the analysis of brain regions in magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) or positron-emission-tomography (PET) studies. Diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) is a nonlinear, diffeomorphic algorithm for image registration and construction of image templates. The goal of this small animal study was (1) the evaluation of a MRI and calculation of several cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor PET templates constructed using DARTEL and (2) the analysis of the image registration accuracy of MR and PET images to their DARTEL templates with reference to analytical and iterative PET reconstruction algorithms. Methods: Five male Sprague Dawley rats were investigated for template construction using MRI and [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 PET for CB1 receptor representation. PET images were reconstructed using the algorithms filtered back-projection, ordered subset expectation maximization in 2D, and maximum a posteriori in 3D. Landmarks were defined on each MR image, and templates were constructed under different settings, i.e., based on different tissue class images [gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and GM + WM] and regularization forms (“linear elastic energy,” “membrane energy,” and “bending energy”). Registration accuracy for MRI and PET templates was evaluated by means of the distance between landmark coordinates. Results: The best MRI template was constructed based on gray and white matter images and the regularization form linear elastic energy. In this case, most distances between landmark coordinates were <1 mm. Accordingly, MRI-based spatial normalization was most accurate, but results of the PET-based spatial normalization were quite comparable. Conclusions: Image registration using DARTEL provides a standardized and automatic framework for small animal brain data analysis. The authors were able to show that this method works with high reliability and validity. Using DARTEL

  1. Increased concentrations of glutamate and glutamine in normal-appearing white matter of patients with multiple sclerosis and normal MR imaging brain scans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Tisell

    Full Text Available In Multiple Sclerosis (MS the relationship between disease process in normal-appearing white matter (NAWM and the development of white matter lesions is not well understood. In this study we used single voxel proton 'Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy' (qMRS to characterize the NAWM and thalamus both in atypical 'Clinically Definite MS' (CDMS patients, MRI(neg (N = 15 with very few lesions (two or fewer lesions, and in typical CDMS patients, MRI(pos (N = 20 with lesions, in comparison with healthy control subjects (N = 20. In addition, the metabolite concentrations were also correlated with extent of brain atrophy measured using Brain Parenchymal Fraction (BPF and severity of the disease measured using 'Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score' (MSSS. Elevated concentrations of glutamate and glutamine (Glx were observed in both MS groups (MRI(neg 8.12 mM, p<0.001 and MRI(pos 7.96 mM p<0.001 compared to controls, 6.76 mM. Linear regressions of Glx and total creatine (tCr with MSSS were 0.16 ± 0.06 mM/MSSS (p = 0.02 for Glx and 0.06 ± 0.03 mM/MSSS (p = 0.04 for tCr, respectively. Moreover, linear regressions of tCr and myo-Inositol (mIns with BPF were -6.22 ± 1.63 mM/BPF (p<0.001 for tCr and -7.71 ± 2.43 mM/BPF (p = 0.003 for mIns. Furthermore, the MRI(pos patients had lower N-acetylaspartate and N-acetylaspartate-glutamate (tNA and elevated mIns concentrations in NAWM compared to both controls (tNA: p = 0.04 mIns p<0.001 and MRI(neg (tNA: p = 0.03 , mIns: p = 0.002. The results suggest that Glx may be an important marker for pathology in non-lesional white matter in MS. Moreover, Glx is related to the severity of MS independent of number of lesions in the patient. In contrast, increased glial density indicated by increased mIns and decreased neuronal density indicated by the decreased tNA, were only observed in NAWM of typical CDMS patients with white matter lesions.

  2. Protection of normal brain cells from γ-irradiation-induced apoptosis by a mitochondria-targeted triphenyl-phosphonium-nitroxide: a possible utility in glioblastoma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhentai; Jiang, Jianfei; Belikova, Natalia A; Stoyanovsky, Detcho A; Kagan, Valerian E; Mintz, Arlan H

    2010-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most frequent and aggressive primary brain tumor. A strong rationale to identify innovative approaches to treat these tumors is required since treatment failures result in local recurrences and median survivals range from 9 to 12 months. Glioma cells are reported to have less mitochondrial content compared to adjacent normal brain cells. Based on this difference, we suggest a new strategy, utilizing protection of normal brain cells by mitochondria-targeted electron scavengers and antioxidants-nitroxides-thus allowing for the escalation of the radiation doses. In this paper, we report that a conjugate of nitroxide with a hydrophobic cation, triphenyl-phosphonium (TPEY-Tempo), significantly protected brain endothelial cells from γ-irradiation-induced apoptosis while radiosensitizing brain tumor cells. Thus, TPEY-Tempo may be a promising adjunct in the treatment of glioblastoma with the potential to not only prolong survival but also to maintain quality of life and reduce treatment toxicity.

  3. Moderate whisky consumption in combination with an evening meal reduces tryptophan availability to the brain but does not influence performance in healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markus, C.R.; Sierksma, A.; Verbeek, C.; Rooijen, J.J.M. van; Patel, H.J.; Brand, A.N.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2004-01-01

    Brain serotonin (5-HT) synthesis is controlled by nutrients that influence the availability of plasma tryptophan (Trp) as compared with the sum of the other large neutral amino acids (LNAA; Trp:LNAA). Alcohol consumption is found to change mood and performance and this might well be due to alteratio

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in normal and regenerating olfactory epithelium of Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontera, Jimena Laura; Cervino, Ailen Soledad; Jungblut, Lucas David; Paz, Dante Agustín

    2015-03-01

    Olfactory epithelium has the capability to continuously regenerate olfactory receptor neurons throughout life. Adult neurogenesis results from proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells, and consequently, olfactory neuroepithelium offers an excellent opportunity to study neural regeneration and the factors involved in the maintenance and regeneration of all their cell types. We analyzed the expression of BDNF in the olfactory system under normal physiological conditions as well as during a massive regeneration induced by chemical destruction of the olfactory epithelium in Xenopus laevis larvae. We described the expression and presence of BDNF in the olfactory epithelium and bulb. In normal physiological conditions, sustentacular (glial) cells and a few scattered basal (stem) cells express BDNF in the olfactory epithelium as well as the granular cells in the olfactory bulb. Moreover, during massive regeneration, we demonstrated a drastic increase in basal cells expressing BDNF as well as an increase in BDNF in the olfactory bulb and nerve. Together these results suggest an important role of BDNF in the maintenance and regeneration of the olfactory system.

  5. SU-E-J-212: MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Assessment of Tumor and Normal Brain Tissue Responses of Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma Treated by Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, P; Park, P; Li, H; Zhu, X; Mahajan, A; Grosshans, D [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can measure molecular mobility at the cellular level, quantified by the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). DTI may also reveal axonal fiber directional information in the white matter, quantified by the fractional anisotropy (FA). Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA) is a rare brain tumor that occurs in children and young adults. Proton therapy (PT) is increasingly used in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors including JPA. However, the response of both tumors and normal tissues to PT is currently under investigation. We report tumor and normal brain tissue responses for a pediatric case of JPA treated with PT assessed using DTI. Methods: A ten year old male with JPA of the left thalamus received passive scattered PT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in 28 fractions. Post PT, the patient has been followed up in seven years. At each follow up, MRI imaging including DTI was performed to assess response. MR images were registered to the treatment planning CT and the GTV mapped onto each MRI. The GTV contour was then mirrored to the right side of brain through the patient’s middle line to represent normal brain tissue. ADC and FA were measured within the ROIs. Results: Proton therapy can completely spare contra lateral brain while the target volume received full prescribed dose. From a series of MRI ADC images before and after PT at different follow ups, the enhancement corresponding to GTV had nearly disappeared more than 2 years after PT. Both ADC and FA demonstrate that contralateral normal brain tissue were not affect by PT and the tumor volume reverted to normal ADC and FA values. Conclusion: DTI allowed quantitative evaluation of tumor and normal brain tissue responses to PT. Further study in a larger cohort is warranted.

  6. Differential responses of tumors and normal brain to the combined treatment of 2-DG and radiation in glioablastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna, Venkatesh K; Venkataramana, Neelam K; Dwarakanath, B S; Santhosh, Vani

    2009-09-01

    2-Deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), an inhibitor of glucose transport and glycolysis, enhances radiation damage selectively in tumor cells by modulating damage response pathways resulting in cell death in vitro and local tumor control. Phase I and II clinical trials in patients with malignant glioma have shown excellent tolerance to a combined treatment of orally administered 2-DG and hypofractionated radiotherapy without any acute toxicity and late radiation damage. Phase III efficacy trials are currently at an advanced stage. Re-exploratory surgery performed in 13 patients due to persistent symptoms of elevated ICP and mass effect at different follow-up periods revealed extensive tumor necrosis with well-preserved normal brain tissue adjoining the tumor included in the treatment volume as revealed by a histological examination. These observations are perhaps the first clinical evidences for differential effects of 2-DG on tumors and normal tissues in conformity with earlier in vitro and in vivo studies in normal and tumor-bearing mice.

  7. A Triple Network Connectivity Study of Large-Scale Brain Systems in Cognitively Normal APOE4 Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xia; Li, Qing; Yu, Xinyu; Chen, Kewei; Fleisher, Adam S.; Guo, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Jiacai; Reiman, Eric M.; Yao, Li; Li, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The triple network model, consisting of the central executive network (CEN), salience network (SN) and default mode network (DMN), has been recently employed to understand dysfunction in core networks across various disorders. Here we used the triple network model to investigate the large-scale brain networks in cognitively normal apolipoprotein e4 (APOE4) carriers who are at risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To explore the functional connectivity for each of the three networks and the effective connectivity among them, we evaluated 17 cognitively normal individuals with a family history of AD and at least one copy of the APOE4 allele and compared the findings to those of 12 individuals who did not carry the APOE4 gene or have a family history of AD, using independent component analysis (ICA) and Bayesian network (BN) approach. Our findings indicated altered within-network connectivity that suggests future cognitive decline risk, and preserved between-network connectivity that may support their current preserved cognition in the cognitively normal APOE4 allele carriers. The study provides novel sights into our understanding of the risk factors for AD and their influence on the triple network model of major psychopathology. PMID:27733827

  8. Envelhecimento cerebral: o problema dos limites entre o normal e o patológico Brain ageing: problems of differential diagnosis between normal and pathologic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BENITO PEREIRA DAMASCENO

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available O autor relata três casos de pseudodemência e discute o problema dos limites entre o normal e o patológico no sujeito idoso. O envelhecimento cerebral acompanha-se de alterações mentais e neuropatológicas superponíveis às da demência de Alzheimer (DA, levando a problemas de diagnóstico diferencial. Ainda não existe um marcador biológico seguro de DA e os testes psicométricos podem dar resultados falso-positivos ou falso-negativos. No idoso normal, o declínio da memória operacional e memória secundária é maior que o das memórias primária e terciária, de modo similar ao encontrado nas fases iniciais da DA. Os testes de evocação retardada de lista de palavras, memória lógica, pensamento categórico, destreza visuo-motora-espacial e o Teste de Nomeação de Boston têm sido apontados como os mais discriminativos entre demência incipiente e normalidade. Na neuroimagem, os achados de atrofia ou hipoperfusão em regiões entorrinais-hipocampais ou temporo-parietais são sugestivos de DA, mas podem estar ausentes nas fases iniciais desta doença. O autor conclui sugerindo passos decisivos para o diagnóstico diferencial: avaliação neuropsicológica e comportamental abrangente (com levantamento do nível pré-mórbido de funcionamento cognitivo e sócio-ocupacional do paciente, bem como exames laboratoriais e de neuroimagem; e, se preciso, reavaliação após 4 a 6 meses, para verificar a consistência dos achados.The author reports three cases of pseudodementia and discuss the difficulties in establishing limits between normality and illness in the elderly. The mental and neuropathological changes that accompany the normal ageing of the brain are similar to those of early Alzheimer's dementia (AD. These similarities often lead to difficulties in the differential diagnosis, hence the search for consensus criteria. The decline of working and secondary memory is greater than that of primary and tertiary memory, as is found in AD

  9. Normal myelination of the child brain on MRI - a meta-analysis; Die normale Myelinisierung des kindlichen Gehirns in der MRT - eine Metaanalyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staudt, M.; Grodd, W. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie; Kraegeloh-Mann, I. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. Entwicklungsneurologie und Neuropaediatrie

    2000-10-01

    Purpose: To establish age limits for the assessment of normal myelination of the brain on T{sub 1}-weighted (T{sub 1}w) and T{sub 2}-weighted (T{sub 2}w) images. Method: Comparison of previous publications (Barkovich et al. 1988, Grodd 1993, Hayakawa et al. 1990, Hittmair et al. 1994, Martin et al. 1988/1990/1991, Nakagawa et al. 1998, Staudt et al. 1993/1994, Stricker et al. 1990). Results: Despite technical and methodological differences, these studies principally agreed on the timing of myelination for most regions of the brain. Thus, a common timetable could be established: At 1 month, myelin is visible on both T{sub 1}w and T{sub 2}w in the medulla oblongata, tegmentum pontis, cerebellar peduncles and vermis, quadrigeminal plate, decussation of superior cerebellar peduncles, thalamus, posterior limb of internal capsule, optic radiation, corona radiata. Thereafter, the myelin-typical signal in the different regions of the brain should be present at the following ages (M=months): Anterior limb of internal capsule (2 M: T{sub 1}w; 7 M: T{sub 2}w), splenium of corpus callosum (4 M: T{sub 1}w; 6 M: T{sub 2}w), genu of corpus callosum (6 M: T{sub 1}w; 8 M: T{sub 2}w), centrum semiovale (2 M: T{sub 1}w; 7 M: T{sub 2}w). Branching of myelin into the gyri of the telencephalon (=arborization) appears at the latest at: occipital lobe (5 M: T{sub 1}w; 12 M: T{sub 2}w) and frontal lobe (7 M: T{sub 1}w; 14 M: T{sub 2}w). Conclusion: These extracted age limits can be used for a more reliable assessment of myelination than the time-tables from a single study. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Ermittlung von Altersgrenzen fuer die MR-tomographisch erfassbare Myelinisierung des kindlichen Gehirns in T{sub 1}- und T{sub 2}-gewichteten Aufnahmen (T{sub 1}w, T{sub 2}w). Methode: Vergleich bisher publizierter Zeitangaben (Barkovich et al 1988, Grodd 1993, Hayakawa et al 1990, Hittmair et al 1994, Martin et al 1988/1990/1991, Nakagawa et al 1998, Staudt et al 1993/1994, Stricker et al 1990

  10. Intra- and interhemispheric variations of diffusivity in subcortical white matter in normal human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshiura, Takashi; Noguchi, Tomoyuki; Hiwatashi, Akio; Togao, Osamu; Yamashita, Koji; Nagao, Eiki; Kamano, Hironori; Honda, Hiroshi [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2010-01-15

    Our purpose was to reveal potential regional variations in water molecular diffusivity within each cerebral hemisphere and across the right and left hemispheres. Diffusion-weighted images of 44 healthy right-handed adult male subjects were obtained using a diffusion tensor imaging sequence. Mean diffusivity (MD) values in subcortical white matter (WM) within 39 regions in each hemisphere were measured using an automated method. Intrahemispheric comparisons of MDs in subcortical WM were performed among six brain regions (frontal, parietal, occipital and temporal lobes and pre- and postcentral gyri). Interhemispheric comparisons of MDs were performed between the right and left counterparts of the 39 regions. In both hemispheres, diffusivity in the precentral gyrus was lower than those in other regions, while diffusivity in the parietal lobe was higher than others. MD asymmetry in which the left was lower than the right was found in the parietal lobe, middle occipital gyrus, and medial and orbital aspects of the frontal lobe. The converse asymmetry was revealed in the frontal operculum, supplementary motor cortex, temporal lobe, limbic cortices, precuneus and cuneus. Our results revealed significant intra- and interhemispheric regional variations in MD in subcortical WM, which may be related to different densities of axons and myelin sheaths. (orig.)

  11. College Students' Volunteering: Factors Related to Current Volunteering, Volunteer Settings, and Motives for Volunteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Erin W.; Warta, Samantha; Erichsen, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    Research has not explored the types of settings that college students prefer to volunteer for and how these settings might be influenced by personal factors (e.g., demographic, academic major, volunteering motivation, religiosity). Students from a Midwestern university (N = 406, 71.9% female) completed a survey that inquired about their…

  12. Committed Sport Event Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Keunsu; Quarterman, Jerome; Strigas, Ethan; Ha, Jaehyun; Lee, Seungbum

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among selected demographic characteristics (income, education and age), motivation and commitment of volunteers at a sporting event. Three-hundred and five questionnaires were collected from volunteers in a marathon event and analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). Based on…

  13. Volunteering and Organizational Diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Lars Skov; Rosdahl, David

    2008-01-01

    be explained by the same set of mechanisms and social theories. Hence, few analyses of determinants of volunteering try to break down the dependent variable into different types (Janoski and Wilson 1995; Grønbjerg and Never 2004). In many cases this is probably also due to a lack of sufficient data...... others work for ‘interest organizations' who try to influence policies and improve the conditions of their own membership. However, the common denominator is the effort to improve the welfare of others. Our third type called ‘societal volunteering' comprises the more ideological and political kind...... volunteering (Wilson and Musick 1997, 1998, 1999; Janoski and Wilson 1995). The model starts from the preposition that volunteer work is a productive activity. The fact that volunteer work is freely undertaken, uncommodified and unpaid does not make it unproductive (Wilson and Musick 1997:694). The idea...

  14. PRUNE is crucial for normal brain development and mutated in microcephaly with neurodevelopmental impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollo, Massimo; Ahmed, Mustafa; Ferrucci, Veronica; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Asadzadeh, Fatemeh; Carotenuto, Marianeve; Maroofian, Reza; Al-Amri, Ahmed; Singh, Royana; Scognamiglio, Iolanda; Mojarrad, Majid; Musella, Luca; Duilio, Angela; Di Somma, Angela; Karaca, Ender; Rajab, Anna; Al-Khayat, Aisha; Mohan Mohapatra, Tribhuvan; Eslahi, Atieh; Ashrafzadeh, Farah; Rawlins, Lettie E.; Prasad, Rajniti; Gupta, Rashmi; Kumari, Preeti; Srivastava, Mona; Cozzolino, Flora; Kumar Rai, Sunil; Monti, Maria; Harlalka, Gaurav V.; Simpson, Michael A.; Rich, Philip; Al-Salmi, Fatema; Patton, Michael A.; Chioza, Barry A.; Efthymiou, Stephanie; Granata, Francesca; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Wiethoff, Sarah; Borgione, Eugenia; Scuderi, Carmela; Mankad, Kshitij; Hanna, Michael G.; Pucci, Piero; Houlden, Henry; Lupski, James R.; Crosby, Andrew H.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract PRUNE is a member of the DHH (Asp-His-His) phosphoesterase protein superfamily of molecules important for cell motility, and implicated in cancer progression. Here we investigated multiple families from Oman, India, Iran and Italy with individuals affected by a new autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental and degenerative disorder in which the cardinal features include primary microcephaly and profound global developmental delay. Our genetic studies identified biallelic mutations of PRUNE1 as responsible. Our functional assays of disease-associated variant alleles revealed impaired microtubule polymerization, as well as cell migration and proliferation properties, of mutant PRUNE. Additionally, our studies also highlight a potential new role for PRUNE during microtubule polymerization, which is essential for the cytoskeletal rearrangements that occur during cellular division and proliferation. Together these studies define PRUNE as a molecule fundamental for normal human cortical development and define cellular and clinical consequences associated with PRUNE mutation. PMID:28334956

  15. An investigation of body part as object (BPO) responses in normal and brain-damaged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, R J; Duffy, J R

    1989-07-01

    A test of simple pantomime was administered to three groups of adults and comparisons were made across groups of the incidence of subjects who exhibited body part as object (BPO) responses and of the mean frequency of occurrence of BPO in each group. The three groups were left-hemisphere-damaged aphasics (N = 28), right-hemisphere-damaged (N = 24), and normal controls (N = 28). The results indicated no significant differences among groups on the BPO measures. Also, to test the strength of association between the frequency of occurrence of BPO and measures of limb apraxia and severity of aphasia for the left-hemisphere-damaged aphasic group, correlation coefficients were obtained. The correlations were low and nonsignificant. The results of this investigation do not support the common clinical assumption that the occurrence of BPO during the performance of simple pantomimes is pathognomic for left-hemisphere pathology or associated with limb apraxia.

  16. Plasticity in the development of handedness: evidence from normal development and early asymmetric brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbetta, Daniela; Williams, Joshua; Snapp-Childs, Winona

    2006-09-01

    Previous research revealed that shifting patterns of hand preference in the first year of life are linked to infants' sensory-motor experiences as they learn to sit, creep, and walk. In this report, we examine whether new and different forms of locomotion and sensory-motor experiences similarly contribute to alter patterns of hand preference in early development. We examined the cases of three infants with unique developmental histories. Two infants adopted distinctive forms of locomotion in lieu of typical hands-and-knees crawling. One infant scooted using both hands and legs in a coupled fashion, while the other infant performed an asymmetrical, left-biased belly-crawl using only one arm to drag his body. The third infant suffered damage to his left-brain hemisphere shortly after birth and received intense physical therapy to his right arm as a result of it. We followed all three infants on a weekly basis and tracked changes in their reaching behavior, mode of locomotion, and postural achievements. The two infants with unique locomotor patterns displayed changes in hand preference that reciprocated the arm patterns that they used during locomotion. The infant who coupled his body for scooting began to reach bimanually, while the infant who adopted the left-biased belly-crawl developed a strong unimanual, right-hand, preference. The infant with left-hemisphere damage initially displayed a right-hand preference, then a temporary decline in preferred hand use as he began to cruise and walk, and ultimately resumed a right-hand preference in the 2nd year of life. This data is consistent with previous work showing that the development of hand preference in the 1st year of life is highly malleable and sensitive to a variety of new sensory-motor experiences.

  17. The diversity of GABA(A) receptor subunit distribution in the normal and Huntington's disease human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldvogel, H J; Faull, R L M

    2015-01-01

    GABA(A) receptors are assembled into pentameric receptor complexes from a total of 19 different subunits derived from a variety of different subunit classes (α1-6, β1-3, γ1-3, δ, ɛ, θ, and π) which surround a central chloride ion channel. GABA(A) receptor complexes are distributed heterogeneously throughout the brain and spinal cord and are activated by the extensive GABAergic inhibitory system. In this chapter, we describe the heterogeneous distribution of six of the most widely distributed subunits (α1, α2, α3, β2,3, and γ2) throughout the human basal ganglia. This review describes the studies we have carried out on the normal and Huntington's disease human basal ganglia using autoradiographic labeling and immunohistochemistry in the human basal ganglia. GABA(A) receptors are known to react to changing conditions in the brain in neurological disorders, especially in Huntington's disease and display a high degree of plasticity which is thought to compensate for loss of function caused by disease. In Huntington's disease, the variable loss of GABAergic medium spiny striatopallidal projection neurons is associated with a loss of GABA(A) receptor subunits in the striosome and/or the matrix compartments of the striatum. By contrast in the globus pallidus, a loss of the GABAergic striatal projection neurons results in a dramatic upregulation of subunits on the large postsynaptic pallidal neurons; this is thought to be a compensatory plastic mechanism resulting from the loss of striatal GABAergic input. Most interestingly, our studies have revealed that the subventricular zone overlying the caudate nucleus contains a variety of proliferating progenitor stem cells that possess a heterogeneity of GABA(A) receptor subunits which may play a role in human brain repair mechanisms.

  18. Development and calculation of an energy dependent normal brain tissue neutron RBE for evaluating neutron fields for BNCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollard, J E; Blue, T E; Gupta, N; Gahbauer, R A

    2001-06-01

    In Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of malignant brain tumors, the energy dependence of a clinically relevant Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) for epithermal neutrons, RBE(En), is important in neutron field design. In the first half of this paper, we present the development of an expression for the energy dependent normal-tissue RBE, RBE(En). We then calculate a reasonable estimate for RBE(En) for adult brain tissue. In the second half of the paper, two separate RBE expressions are developed, one for the RBE of the neutrons that interact in tissue via the 14N(n,p)14C reaction, denoted RBE(N), and one for the RBE of the neutrons which interact in tissue via the 1H(n,n')1H reaction, denoted RBE(H). The absorbed-dose-averaged values of these expressions are calculated for the neutron flux spectrum in phantom for the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) epithermal neutron beam. The calculated values, [RBE(norm)N] = 3.4 and [RBE(norm)H] = 3.2, are within 6% of being equal, and support the use of equal values for RBEN and RBE(H) by researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Finally, values of [RBE(norm)N] and [RBE(norm)H], along with the absorbed-dose-averaged RBE for brain, [RBE(norm)b], were calculated as a function of depth along the centerline of an ellipsoidal head phantom using flux spectra calculated for our Accelerator-Based Neutron Source (ABNS). These values remained essentially constant with depth, supporting the use of constant values for RBE, as is done at BNL.

  19. Microstructural callosal abnormalities in normal-appearing brain of children with developmental delay detected with diffusion tensor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Xiao-Qi [Hannover Medical School, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hannover (Germany); University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); Sun, Yimeng; Illies, Till; Zeumer, Hermann; Fiehler, Jens [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); Kruse, Bernd [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Pediatrics, Hamburg (Germany); Lanfermann, Heinrich [Hannover Medical School, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hannover (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Callosal fibres play an important role in psychomotor and cognitive functions. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible microstructural abnormalities of the corpus callosum in children with developmental delay, who have normal conventional brain MR imaging results. Seventeen pediatric patients (aged 1-9 years) with developmental delay were studied. Quantitative T2 and fractional anisotropy (FA) values were measured at the genu and splenium of the corpus callosum (CC). Fibre tracking, volumetric determination, as well as fibre density calculations of the CC were also carried out. The results were compared with those of the age-matched healthy subjects. A general elevation of T2 relaxation times (105 ms in patients vs. 95 ms in controls) and reduction of the FA values (0.66 in patients vs. 0.74 in controls) at the genu of the CC were found in patients. Reductions of the fibre numbers (5,464 in patients vs. 8,886 in controls) and volumes (3,415 ml in patients vs. 5,235 ml in controls) of the CC were found only in patients older than 5 years. The study indicates that despite their inconspicuous findings in conventional MRI microstructural brain abnormalities are evident in these pediatric patients suffering from developmental delay. (orig.)

  20. mTOR and autophagy in normal brain aging and caloric restriction ameliorating age-related cognition deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fengying; Chu, Xiaolei; Yin, Miaomiao; Liu, Xiaolei; Yuan, Hairui; Niu, Yanmei; Fu, Li

    2014-05-01

    Defect of autophagy is common to many neurodegenerative disorders because it serves as a major degradation pathway for the clearance of various aggregate-prone proteins. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, which is recognized as the most important negative regulator of autophagy, is also involved in neurodegenerative diseases. However, the role of mTOR and its dependent autophagy in normal brain during aging remains unknown. Furthermore, caloric restriction (CR) is frequently used as a tool to study mechanisms behind aging and age-associated diseases because CR can prevent age-related diseases and prolong lifespan in several model organisms. Inhibiting mTOR and promoting autophagy activity play roles in aging delayed by CR. However, whether CR can ameliorate age-related cognition deficits by inhibiting mTOR and activate autophagy in hippocampus needs to be further investigated. Here we showed a decline of autophagic degradation in mice hippocampus in correlation with age-dependent cognitive dysfunction, whereas the activity of mTOR and its upstream brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling was decreased with aging. In addition, facilitating the mTOR pathway successfully declines and sustains autophagic degradation with aging in hippocampus by CR treatment and is involved in CR by ameliorating age-related cognitive deficits.

  1. Breakdown of the normal optic nerve head blood-brain barrier following acute elevation of intraocular pressure in experimental animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, R L; Anderson, D R

    1980-03-01

    Five hours of elevated intraocular pressure produced evidence of an altered blood-brain barrier at the optic nerve head in 27 of 29 monkey eyes. The change in vascular permeability was documented by fluorescein angiography (18 of 21 eyes), by Evans blue fluorescence microscopy (21 of 23 eyes), or by both methods. Leakage occurred from major blood vessels as well as from microvasculature of the nerve head. In 22 eyes, rapid axonal transport was studied after intravitreal injection of tritiated leucine. In 18 of these 22 eyes, autoradiography demonstrated a local interruption of axonal transport. In 15 eyes examined by all three methods, leakage from microvasculature (as opposed to leakage from the major vessels) was loosely associated with severe and widespread blockade of axonal transport at the lamina cribrosa. Although cause-and-effect relationships are not proved, ischemia may be responsible both for the focal endothelial damage with breakdown of the normal blood-brain barrier and for the local abnormalities of axonal transport.

  2. Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging Protocol of the Normal Canine Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Krystina L.; Pease, Anthony P.; Ballegeer, Elizabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically dynamic susceptibility MRI (DSC-MRI) is routinely performed as a supplement to conventional MRI in human medicine for patients with intracranial neoplasia and cerebrovascular events. There is minimal data on the use of DSC-MRI in veterinary patients and a DSC-MRI protocol in the veterinary patient has not been described. Sixteen normal dogs, 6 years or older were recruited for this study. The sample population included 11 large dogs (>11 kg) and 5 small dogs (11 kg, a useable AIF and perfusion map was generated. One dog less than 11 kg received the same contrast dose and rate. In this patient, the protocol did not generate a useable AIF. The remainder of the dogs less than 11 kg followed a protocol of 0.2 mmol/kg gadolinium-based contrast media at 1.5 ml/s with a 10 ml saline flush at 1.5 ml/s. A useable AIF and perfusion map was generated in the remaining dogs <11 kg using the higher contrast dose and slower rate protocol. This study establishes a contrast dose and administration rate for canine DSC-MRI imaging that is different in dogs greater than 11 kg compared to dogs less than 11 kg. These protocols may be used for future applications to evaluate hemodynamic disturbances in canine intracranial pathology.

  3. Are left fronto-temporal brain areas a prerequisite for normal music-syntactic processing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammler, Daniela; Koelsch, Stefan; Friederici, Angela D

    2011-06-01

    An increasing number of neuroimaging studies in music cognition research suggest that "language areas" are involved in the processing of musical syntax, but none of these studies clarified whether these areas are a prerequisite for normal syntax processing in music. The present electrophysiological experiment tested whether patients with lesions in Broca's area (N=6) or in the left anterior temporal lobe (N=7) exhibit deficits in the processing of structure in music compared to matched healthy controls (N=13). A chord sequence paradigm was applied, and the amplitude and scalp topography of the Early Right Anterior Negativity (ERAN) was examined, an electrophysiological marker of musical syntax processing that correlates with activity in Broca's area and its right hemisphere homotope. Left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) (but not anterior superior temporal gyrus - aSTG) patients with lesions older than 4 years showed an ERAN with abnormal scalp distribution, and subtle behavioural deficits in detecting music-syntactic irregularities. In one IFG patient tested 7 months post-stroke, the ERAN was extinguished and the behavioural performance remained at chance level. These combined results suggest that the left IFG, known to be crucial for syntax processing in language, plays also a functional role in the processing of musical syntax. Hence, the present findings are consistent with the notion that Broca's area supports the processing of syntax in a rather domain-general way.

  4. My volunteer work

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卫子辰

    2015-01-01

    <正>As we all know,being a volunteer can help us learn many things,such as new skills,staying active,improving our social skills,accumulating work experience,making new friends with those who have the same topic,helping us grow more rapidly...I can still recall the days when I worked as a volunteer in a hospital in my city.The unforgetable experience was not only a volunteer work,but also a small society to me.It was in the summer vocation after high school entrance examination,when I had nothing to do but to play computer

  5. The DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin counteracts stroke in the normal and diabetic mouse brain: a comparison with glimepiride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darsalia, Vladimer; Ortsäter, Henrik; Olverling, Anna; Darlöf, Emilia; Wolbert, Petra; Nyström, Thomas; Klein, Thomas; Sjöholm, Åke; Patrone, Cesare

    2013-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a strong risk factor for stroke. Linagliptin is a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor in clinical use against type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine the potential antistroke efficacy of linagliptin in type 2 diabetic mice. To understand whether efficacy was mediated by glycemia regulation, a comparison with the sulfonylurea glimepiride was done. To determine whether linagliptin-mediated efficacy was dependent on a diabetic background, experiments in nondiabetic mice were performed. Type 2 diabetes was induced by feeding the mice a high-fat diet for 32 weeks. Mice were treated with linagliptin/glimepiride for 7 weeks. Stroke was induced at 4 weeks into the treatment by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. Blood DPP-4 activity, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels, glucose, body weight, and food intake were assessed throughout the experiments. Ischemic brain damage was measured by determining stroke volume and by stereologic quantifications of surviving neurons in the striatum/cortex. We show pronounced antistroke efficacy of linagliptin in type 2 diabetic and normal mice, whereas glimepiride proved efficacious against stroke in normal mice only. These results indicate a linagliptin-mediated neuroprotection that is glucose-independent and likely involves GLP-1. The findings may provide an impetus for the development of DPP-4 inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of stroke in diabetic patients.

  6. Dual-isotope single-photon emission computed tomography for dopamine and serotonin transporters in normal and parkinsonian monkey brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, I-H. [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China); Huang, W.-S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, 114, Taiwan (China); Yeh, C.-B. [Department of Psychiatry, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, 114, Taiwan (China); Liao, M.-H.; Chen, C.-C.; Shen, L.-H. [Division of Isotope Application, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyaun, 325 Taiwan (China); Liu, J.-C. [Department of Biology and Anatomy, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China); Ma, K.-H. [Department of Biology and Anatomy, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: kuohsing91@yahoo.com.tw

    2009-08-15

    Introduction: Parkinson's disease (PD) affects both dopaminergic and serotonergic systems. In this study, we simultaneously evaluated dopamine and serotonin transporters in primates using dual-isotope single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and compared the results with traditional single-isotope imaging. Methods: Four healthy and one 6-OHDA-induced PD monkeys were used for this study. SPECT was performed over 4 h after individual or simultaneous injection of [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1 (a dopamine transporter imaging agent) and [{sup 123}I]ADAM (a serotonin transporter imaging agent). Results: The results showed that the image quality and uptake ratios in different brain regions were comparable between single- and dual-isotope studies. The striatal [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1 uptake in the PD monkey was markedly lower than that in normal monkeys. The uptake of [{sup 123}I]ADAM in the midbrain of the PD monkey was comparable to that in the normal monkeys, but there were decreased uptakes in the thalamus and striatum of the PD monkey. Conclusions: Our results suggest that dual-isotope SPECT using [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1 and [{sup 123}I]ADAM can simultaneously evaluate changes in dopaminergic and serotonergic systems in a PD model.

  7. Volunteering, Happiness and Public Policy

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Is the activity of volunteering something that benefits the volunteer as well as the recipient of the volunteer's activities? We analyze this relationship and apply matching estimators to the large- scale British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) data set to estimate the causal impact of volunteering on happiness. We take into account personality traits that could jointly determine volunteering behaviour and happiness. We find that the causal impact of volunteering on happiness is positive and in...

  8. Voxel-based analysis of Tc-99 m ECD brain perfusion SPECT in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Bora [Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Dong-Won [Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: neuroman@catholic.ac.kr; Shim, Yong-Soo; Chung, Sung-Woo [Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Kook-Jin; O, Joo-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Sohn, Hyung-Sun; Chung, Soo-Kyo [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yong-An [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); East-West Research Institute of Translational Medicine (EWTM), Incheon St. Mary' s Hospital, Incheon 403-720 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: nm@catholic.ac.kr

    2009-07-15

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is a reversible dementia characterized by gait disturbance, incontinence and dementia. This study investigates the neuropsychological characteristics and changes of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with iNPH. Ten patients who met the criteria of probable iNPH and 13 normal control subjects were evaluated. The general cognitive function and detailed neuropsychological functions were measured by K-MMSE and comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Tc-99m-ethyl cysteinate dimmer (Tc-99m-ECD) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed to measure the rCBF and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and statistical probabilistic brain anatomic map (SPAM) was applied to the objective analysis of SPECT data. On the neuropsychological examination, all the patients showed abnormality in memory, psychomotor speed and frontal executive function. SPM analysis of SPECT images revealed that rCBF in bilateral thalami, right prefrontal area, bilateral anterior and posterior cingulate gyri, right caudate nucleus, and left parahippocampal gyrus was significantly decreased in patients with iNPH compared to normal controls (uncorrected P<0.005). In SPAM analysis, rCBF reduction was observed in bilateral prefrontal area, anterior, posterior cingulate gyri and caudate nuclei. We have found that rCBF changes occurred predominantly in prefrontal and subcortical areas, the changes were associated with frontal subcortical circuit, and the affected frontal subcortical circuit may contribute to the cognitive decline seen in the iNPH patients. The reduction of rCBF and clinical cognitive impairment are closely connected in patients with iNPH.

  9. NASTEP Volunteer Request (CSA) -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Allows users to add themselves to a Service Area wide ?volunteer for emergency duty? list (was created after Gulf Coast Hurricanes). Approval and email by managers,...

  10. The Effective Volunteer Teacher

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This publication provides information for volunteer teachers of adults and older youth on how to conduct an effective presentation. Topics include focus of presentation, characteristics of the learners, teaching methods, visual aides and evaluations.

  11. [Comparison of the brain pharmacokinetics of nasal tetramethylpyrazine phosphate pH-sensitive in situ gel in normal rats and model rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Wei; Yan, Yi-Lin; Zhou, Li-Ling

    2012-05-01

    The study is to investigate the brain pharmacokinetics change of nasal tetramethylpyrazine phosphate (TMPP) pH-sensitive in situ gel in normal and model rats. Acute cerebral ischemia rat model was successfully established by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) method. Both normal and model rats were given nasal TMPP pH-sensitive in situ gel (10 mg x kg(-1)). Perfusates of brain striatum area were collected at each time point by microdialysis. The content of TMPP was determined by HPLC. The pharmacokinetics parameters were calculated by Kinetica 4.4 software at each time point of the brain drug concentration. The main pharmacokinetics parameters of TMPP were fitted with compartments 2. After nasal TMPP pH-sensitive in situ gel the values of C(max) and AUC of both components in brain showed as follows: the value of model group > that of normal group. Significant difference can be observed in the process of brain pharmacokinetics in normal and model rats after giving nasal TMPP pH-sensitive in situ gel.

  12. De novo development of gliomas in a child with neurofibromatosis type 1, fragile X and previously normal brain magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Rabia; Hsiao, Esther Y.; Botteron, Kelly N.; McKinstry, Robert C.; Gutmann, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen to 20% of children with neurofibromatosis type 1 develop low-grade glial neoplasms. However, since neuroimaging is not routinely obtained until a child is clinically symptomatic, little is known about presymptomatic radiographic characteristics of gliomas in this at-risk population. Herein, we describe a child with neurofibromatosis type 1 who initially had normal brain imaging before the development of multifocal gliomas. Comparison of these serial images demonstrated that brain tumors can arise de novo in children with this cancer predisposition syndrome, further underscoring the limited prognostic value of normal baseline magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26973730

  13. De novo development of gliomas in a child with neurofibromatosis type 1, fragile X and previously normal brain magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabia Zafar, MD, PhD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen to 20% of children with neurofibromatosis type 1 develop low-grade glial neoplasms. However, since neuroimaging is not routinely obtained until a child is clinically symptomatic, little is known about presymptomatic radiographic characteristics of gliomas in this at-risk population. Herein, we describe a child with neurofibromatosis type 1 who initially had normal brain imaging before the development of multifocal gliomas. Comparison of these serial images demonstrated that brain tumors can arise de novo in children with this cancer predisposition syndrome, further underscoring the limited prognostic value of normal baseline magnetic resonance imaging.

  14. De novo development of gliomas in a child with neurofibromatosis type 1, fragile X and previously normal brain magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Rabia; Hsiao, Esther Y; Botteron, Kelly N; McKinstry, Robert C; Gutmann, David H

    2016-03-01

    Fifteen to 20% of children with neurofibromatosis type 1 develop low-grade glial neoplasms. However, since neuroimaging is not routinely obtained until a child is clinically symptomatic, little is known about presymptomatic radiographic characteristics of gliomas in this at-risk population. Herein, we describe a child with neurofibromatosis type 1 who initially had normal brain imaging before the development of multifocal gliomas. Comparison of these serial images demonstrated that brain tumors can arise de novo in children with this cancer predisposition syndrome, further underscoring the limited prognostic value of normal baseline magnetic resonance imaging.

  15. Institutional Facilitation in Sustained Volunteering among Older Adult Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fengyan; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Hong, Songiee

    2009-01-01

    As more nonprofit organizations rely on older adult volunteers to provide services, it is important to retain volunteers for an extended period of time to ensure service quality and the beneficial outcomes of volunteering. Nonprofit organizations are positioned to facilitate older adult volunteers' role performance. Based on an institutional…

  16. Quantitative sodium MRI of the human brain at 9.4 T provides assessment of tissue sodium concentration and cell volume fraction during normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thulborn, Keith; Lui, Elaine; Guntin, Jonathan; Jamil, Saad; Sun, Ziqi; Claiborne, Theodore C; Atkinson, Ian C

    2016-02-01

    Sodium ion homeostasis is a fundamental property of viable tissue, allowing the tissue sodium concentration to be modeled as the tissue cell volume fraction. The modern neuropathology literature using ex vivo tissue from selected brain regions indicates that human brain cell density remains constant during normal aging and attributes the volume loss that occurs with advancing age to changes in neuronal size and dendritic arborization. Quantitative sodium MRI performed with the enhanced sensitivity of ultrahigh-field 9.4 T has been used to investigate tissue cell volume fraction during normal aging. This cross-sectional study (n = 49; 21-80 years) finds that the in vivo tissue cell volume fraction remains constant in all regions of the brain with advancing age in individuals who remain cognitively normal, extending the ex vivo literature reporting constant neuronal cell density across the normal adult age range. Cell volume fraction, as measured by quantitative sodium MRI, is decreased in diseases of cell loss, such as stroke, on a time scale of minutes to hours, and in response to treatment of brain tumors on a time scale of days to weeks. Neurodegenerative diseases often have prodromal periods of decades in which regional neuronal cell loss occurs prior to clinical presentation. If tissue cell volume fraction can detect such early pathology, this quantitative parameter may permit the objective measurement of preclinical disease progression. This current study in cognitively normal aging individuals provides the basis for the pursuance of investigations directed towards such neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Ex-Vivo Characterization of Bioimpedance Spectroscopy of Normal, Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Rabbit Brain Tissue at Frequencies from 10 Hz to 1 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin; Zhang, Ge; Song, Jiali; Dai, Meng; Xu, Canhua; Dong, Xiuzhen; Fu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a severe cerebrovascular disease and is the second greatest cause of death worldwide. Because diagnostic tools (CT and MRI) to detect acute stroke cannot be used until the patient reaches the hospital setting, a portable diagnostic tool is urgently needed. Because biological tissues have different impedance spectra under normal physiological conditions and different pathological states, multi-frequency electrical impedance tomography (MFEIT) can potentially detect stroke. Accurate impedance spectra of normal brain tissue (gray and white matter) and stroke lesions (ischemic and hemorrhagic tissue) are important elements when studying stroke detection with MFEIT. To our knowledge, no study has comprehensively measured the impedance spectra of normal brain tissue and stroke lesions for the whole frequency range of 1 MHz within as short as possible an ex vivo time and using the same animal model. In this study, we established intracerebral hemorrhage and ischemic models in rabbits, then measured and analyzed the impedance spectra of normal brain tissue and stroke lesions ex vivo within 15 min after animal death at 10 Hz to 1 MHz. The results showed that the impedance spectra of stroke lesions significantly differed from those of normal brain tissue; the ratio of change in impedance of ischemic and hemorrhagic tissue with regard to frequency was distinct; and tissue type could be discriminated according to its impedance spectra. These findings further confirm the feasibility of detecting stroke with MFEIT and provide data supporting further study of MFEIT to detect stroke. PMID:27869707

  18. Mild cognitive disorders are associated with different patterns of brain asymmetry than normal ageing: the PATH through life study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Cherbuin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Defining how brain structures differ in pre-clinical dementia is important to better understand the pathological processes involved and to inform clinical practice. The aim of this study was to identify significant brain correlates (volume and asymmetry in volume of mild cognitive disorders when compared to normal controls in a large community-based sample of young-old individuals who were assessed for cognitive impairment. Methods: Cortical and sub-cortical volumes were measured using a semi-automated method in 398 participants aged 65-70 years who were selected from a larger randomly sampled cohort and who agreed to undergo an MRI scan. Diagnoses were reached based on established protocols for MCI and a more inclusive category of any Mild Cognitive Disorder (any-MCD: which includes AAMI, AACD, OCD, MNC, CDR, MCI. Logistic regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between volume and asymmetry of theoretically relevant cerebral structures (predictors and MCI or any-MCD while controlling for age, sex, and intra-cranial volume. Results: The main correlates of cognitive impairment assessed in multivariate analyses were hippocampal asymmetry (more to left, MCI: OR 0.83, 95%CI 0.71-0.96, p = .013; MCD: OR 0.86, 95%CI 0.77-0.97, p = .011, lateral ventricle asymmetry (more to left, MCI: OR 0.95, 95%CI 0.91-0.99, p = .009; MCD: OR 0.95, 95%CI 0.92-0.98, p = .004, and cerebellar cortex asymmetry (more to left, MCI: OR 1.51, 95%CI 1.13-2.01, p = .005. Conclusions: In this population-based cohort stronger associations were found between asymmetry measures, rather than raw volumes in cerebral structures, and mild cognitive disorders.

  19. Exposure to (12)C particles alters the normal dynamics of brain monoamine metabolism and behaviour in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Oleg V; Belokopytova, Ksenia V; Bazyan, Ara S; Kudrin, Vladimir S; Narkevich, Viktor B; Ivanov, Aleksandr A; Severiukhin, Yury S; Timoshenko, Gennady N; Krasavin, Eugene A

    2016-09-01

    Planning of the deep-space exploration missions raises a number of questions on the radiation protection of astronauts. One of the medical concerns is associated with exposure of a crew to highly energetic particles of galactic cosmic rays. Among many other health disorders, irradiation with these particles has a substantial impact on the central nervous system (CNS). Although radiation damage to CNS has been addressed extensively during the last years, the mechanisms underlying observed impairments remain mostly unknown. The present study reveals neurochemical and behavioural alterations induced in rats by 1Gy of 500MeV/u (12)C particles with a relatively moderate linear energy transfer (10.6keV/μm). It is found that exposure to carbon ions leads to significant modification of the normal monoamine metabolism dynamics as well as the locomotor, exploratory, and anxiety-like behaviours during a two-month period. The obtained results indicate an abnormal redistribution of monoamines and their metabolites in different brain regions after exposure. The most pronounced impairments are detected in the prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and hypothalamus that illustrate the sensitivity of these brain regions to densely ionizing radiations. It is also shown that exposure to (12)C particles enhances the anxiety in animals and accelerates the age-related reduction in their exploratory capability. The observed monoamine metabolism pattern may indicate the presence of certain compensatory mechanisms being induced in response to irradiation and capable of partial restoration of monoaminergic systems' functions. Overall, these findings support a possibility of CNS damage by space-born particles of a relatively moderate linear energy transfer.

  20. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... local chapter Join our online community Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH) Normal pressure hydrocephalus is a brain disorder ... Symptoms Diagnosis Causes & risks Treatments About Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Normal pressure hydrocephalus occurs when excess cerebrospinal fluid ...

  1. Wasted Resources: Volunteers and Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    included using proven human resource management techniques, to include screening and providing handbooks of what to expect before volunteers are...the relief & recovery stages.  Operates volunteer centers to serve as clearing houses for relief teams. American Radio Relay League ( ARRL ...cellular and other infrastructure-dependent systems.  ARRL volunteers act as communications volunteers with local public safety organizations. In

  2. Different Coexpressions of Arthritis-Relevant Genes between Different Body Organs and Different Brain Regions in the Normal Mouse Population

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Yanhong; Huang, Yue; Wang, Lishi; Zhu, JiaQian; Gu, Weikuan

    2012-01-01

    Structural changes in different parts of the brain in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients have been reported. RA is not regarded as a brain disease. Body organs such as spleen and lung produce RA-relevant genes. We hypothesized that the structural changes in the brain are caused by changes of gene expression in body organs. Changes in different parts of the brain may be affected by altered gene expressions in different body organs. This study explored whether an association between gene expres...

  3. Structural brain mutant of Drosophila melanogaster with reduced cell number in the medulla cortex and with normal optomotor yaw response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, K. F.; Heisenberg, M.

    1981-01-01

    KS58, one out of six known alleles of the small optic lobes (sol) gene in Drosophila melanogaster, reduces the cell number in the medulla cortex by degeneration of ganglion cells in the pupae to about 50%. Also, about half the volume of the medulla and lobula complex neuropils is missing. Many Golgistained cells in the mutant optic lobes resemble their homologues in wild type. However, special classes of transmedullary columnar neurons projecting to the lobula or to both lobula and lobula plate are not seen in the mutant. Some neurons linking the lobula complex to the central brain send branches to the medulla (the branches do not exist in wild type); some other types seem to be missing. The fate mapping of the KS58 focus reveals a location ventral to the head bristles and in sine oculis (so) flies the mutation further reduces the rudiments of the optic lobes normally seen. Therefore the sol phenotype is not induced by mutant eyes and the primary gene action seems to be on nervous tissue. The structural alterations of the small optic lobes are reflected in visual orientation behavior. The optomotor yaw response, however, is almost quantitatively preserved. The respective neural network should still be present in the mutant optic lobes. Images PMID:16592962

  4. Meningoencephalitis and new onset of seizures in an patient with normal brain CT and multiple lesions on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal, Jose E.; Spichler, Anne; Oliveira, Augusto C.P. de; Lomar, Andre Villela [Instituto de Infectologia Emilio Ribas, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2004-02-01

    Toxoplasmic encephalitis is the most common cerebral mass lesion in patients with AIDS. The definitive diagnosis requires direct demonstration of the tachyzoite form of Toxoplasma gondii in cerebral tissue. The presumptive diagnosis is based on serology, clinical and radiological features, and on response to anti-Toxoplasma therapy. Typically, patients have a subacute presentation of focal neurological signs, with multiple lesions in computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, the neurological and CT scan spectrum is broad. We report a case of toxoplasmic encephalitis in a heterosexual man without prior history of HIV infection. He was admitted with four days of headache, confusion, and new onset of seizures. His brain CT disclosed no alterations and MRI revealed multiple lesions. Empirical specific anti-Toxoplasma therapy was initiated and the patient experienced excellent clinical and radiological improvement. His HIV tests were positive and the CD{sub 4}{sup +} cell count was 74 cells/ml (8.5 %). On follow up, three months later, the general state of the patient was good, without neurological sequelae and with a normal MRI. We concluded that toxoplasmic encephalitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of meningoencephalitis in sexually active individuals, including cases without prior history or suspicion of HIV infection, and no abnormalities on CT scan. (author)

  5. A computer tomography-based spatial normalization for the analysis of [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose position emission tomography of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hanna; Choi, Jae Yong; Ryu, Young Hoon; Lyoo, Chul Hyoung [Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Su [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute Radiological and Medical Science, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    We developed a new computed tomography (CT)-based spatial normalization method and CT template to demonstrate its usefulness in spatial normalization of positron emission tomography (PET) images with [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET studies in healthy controls. Seventy healthy controls underwent brain CT scan (120 KeV, 180 mAs, and 3 mm of thickness) and [{sup 18}F] FDG PET scans using a PET/CT scanner. T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images were acquired for all subjects. By averaging skull-stripped and spatially-normalized MR and CT images, we created skull-stripped MR and CT templates for spatial normalization. The skull-stripped MR and CT images were spatially normalized to each structural template. PET images were spatially normalized by applying spatial transformation parameters to normalize skull-stripped MR and CT images. A conventional perfusion PET template was used for PET-based spatial normalization. Regional standardized uptake values (SUV) measured by overlaying the template volume of interest (VOI) were compared to those measured with FreeSurfer-generated VOI (FSVOI). All three spatial normalization methods underestimated regional SUV values by 0.3-20% compared to those measured with FSVOI. The CT-based method showed slightly greater underestimation bias. Regional SUV values derived from all three spatial normalization methods were correlated significantly (p < 0.0001) with those measured with FSVOI. CT-based spatial normalization may be an alternative method for structure-based spatial normalization of [18F] FDG PET when MR imaging is unavailable. Therefore, it is useful for PET/CT studies with various radiotracers whose uptake is expected to be limited to specific brain regions or highly variable within study population.

  6. A comparative study in Alzheimer's and normal brains of trace element distribution using PIXE and INA analyses and glucose metabolism by positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutts, DA; Maguire, RP; Stedman, JD; Leenders, KL; Spyrou, NM

    1999-01-01

    The onset of Alzheimer's disease has been shown to affect trace element concentrations in the brain when compared to "normal" subjects in ex vivo samples. The techniques used to determine trace element concentrations were proton-induced X-ray emission and instrumental neutron activation analysis. Wi

  7. Parametric mapping of 5HT1A receptor sites in the human brain with the Hypotime method: theory and normal values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Mette; Rodell, Anders; Gjedde, Albert

    2009-01-01

    analysis. METHODS: A total of 19 healthy volunteers (age range, 23-73 y) underwent PET to test the Hypotime application of the chemical microsphere properties of (11)C-WAY to identify regions of binding and nonbinding on the exclusive basis of the rate of washout of (11)C-WAY. RESULTS: The results...... of the Hypotime method were compared with the simplified but multilinearized reference tissue method (MLSRTM). The distribution of receptor BP(ND) obtained with Hypotime was consistent with previous autoradiography of postmortem brain tissue, with the highest values of BP(ND) recorded in the medial temporal lobe...... and decline of receptor availability with age. The values in the basal ganglia and cerebellum were negligible. The MLSRTM, in contrast, yielded lower BP(ND) in all regions and only weakly revealed the decline with age. CONCLUSION: The simple and computationally efficient Hypotime method gave reliable values...

  8. Cerebral circulation and metabolism in the patients with higher brain dysfunction caused by chronic minor traumatic brain injury. A study by the positron emission tomography in twenty subjects with normal MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabasawa, Hidehiro; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Iida, Akihiko; Matsubara, Michitaka [Nagoya City Rehabilitation and Sports Center (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    Many individuals are affected on their higher brain functions, such as intelligence, memory, and attention, even after minor traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Although higher brain dysfunction is based on impairment of the cerebral circulation and metabolism, the precise relationship between them remains unknown. This study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between the cerebral circulation or cerebral metabolism and higher brain dysfunction. Twenty subjects with higher brain dysfunction caused by chronic MTBI were studied. They had no abnormal MRI findings. The full-scale intelligence quotient (FIQ) were quantitatively evaluated by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R), and the subjects were classified into the normal group and the impaired group. Concurrent with the evaluation of FIQ, positron emission tomography (PET) was performed by the steady state method with {sup 15}O gases inhalation. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO{sub 2}) were calculated in the bilateral frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobe. First, of all twenty subjects, we investigated rCBF, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} in all regions. Then we compared rCBF, OEF, and CMRO{sub 2} between the normal group and the impaired group based on FIQ score. We also studied the change of FIQ score of 13 subjects 9.3 months after the first evaluation. In addition, we investigated the change of rCBF, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} along with the improvement of FIQ score. Although rCBF and OEF of all subjects were within the normal range in all regions, CMRO{sub 2} of more than half of subjects was under the lower normal limit in all regions except in the right occipital lobe, showing the presence of ''relative luxury perfusion''. Comparison of rCBF, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} between normal group and impaired group revealed that CMRO{sub 2} of the impaired group was significantly lower than that of the

  9. Be a Volunteer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴世纪

    2016-01-01

    I’m writing to recommend myself as a volunteer for"Help You Know More about Lianyungang".I’m a student in Class 1,Grade 7.I like English and I’m good at it.I am also good at sports.I am good with my classmates and teachers.I have plenty of free time after school.I also know Lianyungang well.I’d like to be a volunteer because it’s a good chance for me to help others.I can help the tourists

  10. Retired RNs: perceptions of volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocca-Bates, Katherine C; Neal-Boylan, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative study was done to explore the perceptions of volunteering among retired registered nurses (RNs) in Kansas. Participants were volunteers in formal nursing roles or were using their nursing knowledge and experience in non-nursing roles, such as church work. Regardless of the type of volunteer position, retired RNs reported that they use what they have learned as nurses when they volunteer. Volunteering benefits include enhanced self-worth, intellectual stimulation, reduced social isolation, and opportunities to help others. Increased paperwork, new technology, difficulty finding nursing-specific volunteer opportunities, resistance from health care organizations, and a lack of respect for what these nurses know are challenges and barriers to volunteering. Retired RNs have accumulated years of clinical nursing experience and can be helpful to employed nurses. Health care organizations should launch targeted efforts to recruit and utilize retired RN volunteers. Health care professionals who care for older adults should recommend volunteering as a healthful endeavor.

  11. Call for volunteers

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    CERN is calling for volunteers from all members of the Laboratory for organizing the two exceptional Open days.CERN is calling for volunteers from all members of the Laboratory’s personnel to help with the organisation of these two exceptional Open Days, for the visits of CERN personnel and their families on the Saturday and above all for the major public Open Day on the Sunday. As for the 50th anniversary in 2004, the success of the Open Days will depend on a large number of volunteers. All those working for CERN as well as retired members of the personnel can contribute to making this event a success. Many guides will be needed at the LHC points, for the activities at the surface and to man the reception and information points. The aim of these major Open Days is to give the local populations the opportunity to discover the fruits of almost 20 years of work carried out at CERN. We are hoping for some 2000 volunteers for the two Open Days, on the Saturday from 9 a.m. to ...

  12. Making room for volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Kleis

    2012-01-01

    that is singleminded in its instrumental pursuit of victory can thus be less effective than one that is more accommodating- a campaign that makes room for volunteers by accepting that, unlike staffers, they come to politics with a different perspective and conception of what is and ought to be going on....

  13. Volunteers who care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeroen Devilee

    2008-01-01

    Original title: Vrijwillig verzorgd. Everyone knows them: volunteers from churches and other civil-society organisations who visit the chronically sick, lonely elderly and other people in need. This service is provided from a wide array of organisations. Unfortunately, it is by no means always clea

  14. Neuroanatomical localization and quantification of amyloid precursor protein mRNA by in situ hybridization in the brains of normal, aneuploid, and lesioned mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendotti, C.; Forloni, G.L.; Morgan, R.A.; O' Hara, B.F.; Oster-Granite, M.L.; Reeves, R.H.; Gearhart, J.D.; Coyle, J.T. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1988-05-01

    Amyloid precursor protein mRNA was localized in frozen sections from normal and experimentally lesioned adult mouse brain and from normal and aneuploid fetal mouse brain by in situ hybridization with a {sup 35}S-labeled mouse cDNA probe. The highest levels of hybridization in adult brain were associated with neurons, primarily in telencephalic structures. The dense labeling associated with hippocampal pyramidal cells was reduced significantly when the cells were eliminated by injection of the neurotoxin ibotenic acid but was not affected when electrolytic lesions were placed in the medial septum. Since the gene encoding amyloid precursor protein has been localized to mouse chromosome 16, the authors also examined the expression of this gene in the brains of mouse embryos with trisomy 16 and trisomy 19 at 15 days of gestation. RNA gel blot analysis and in situ hybridization showed a marked increase in amyloid precursor protein mRNA in the trisomy 16 mouse head and brain when compared with euploid littermates or with trisomy 19 mice.

  15. Fresh frozen plasma resuscitation provides neuroprotection compared to normal saline in a large animal model of traumatic brain injury and polytrauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, Ayesha; Jin, Guang; Sillesen, Martin; Dekker, Simone E; Bambakidis, Ted; Hwabejire, John O; Jepsen, Cecilie H; Halaweish, Ihab; Alam, Hasan B

    2015-03-01

    We have previously shown that early treatment with fresh frozen plasma (FFP) is neuroprotective in a swine model of hemorrhagic shock (HS) and traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, it remains unknown whether this strategy would be beneficial in a more clinical polytrauma model. Yorkshire swine (42-50 kg) were instrumented to measure hemodynamic parameters, brain oxygenation, and intracranial pressure (ICP) and subjected to computer-controlled TBI and multi-system trauma (rib fracture, soft-tissue damage, and liver injury) as well as combined free and controlled hemorrhage (40% blood volume). After 2 h of shock (mean arterial pressure, 30-35 mm Hg), animals were resuscitated with normal saline (NS; 3×volume) or FFP (1×volume; n=6/group). Six hours postresuscitation, brains were harvested and lesion size and swelling were evaluated. Levels of endothelial-derived vasodilator endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 (ET-1) were also measured. FFP resuscitation was associated with reduced brain lesion size (1005.8 vs. 2081.9 mm(3); p=0.01) as well as swelling (11.5% vs. 19.4%; p=0.02). Further, FFP-resuscitated animals had higher brain oxygenation as well as cerebral perfusion pressures. Levels of cerebral eNOS were higher in the FFP-treated group (852.9 vs. 816.4 ng/mL; p=0.03), but no differences in brain levels of ET-1 were observed. Early administration of FFP is neuroprotective in a complex, large animal model of polytrauma, hemorrhage, and TBI. This is associated with a favorable brain oxygenation and cerebral perfusion pressure profile as well as higher levels of endothelial-derived vasodilator eNOS, compared to normal saline resuscitation.

  16. In normal rat, intraventricularly administered insulin-like growth factor-1 is rapidly cleared from CSF with limited distribution into brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorevic Peter D

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Putatively active drugs are often intraventricularly administered to gain direct access to brain and circumvent the blood-brain barrier. A few studies on the normal central nervous system (CNS have shown, however, that the distribution of materials after intraventricular injections is much more limited than presumed and their exit from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF is more rapid than generally believed. In this study, we report the intracranial distribution and the clearance from CSF and adjacent CNS tissue of radiolabeled insulin-like growth factor-1 after injection into one lateral ventricle of the normal rat brain. Methods Under barbiturate anesthesia, 125I-labeled insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 was injected into one lateral ventricle of normal Sprague-Dawley rats. The subsequent distribution of IGF-1 through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF system and into brain, cerebral blood vessels, and systemic blood was measured over time by gamma counting and quantitative autoradiography (QAR. Results Within 5 min of infusion, IGF-1 had spread from the infused lateral ventricle into and through the third and fourth ventricles. At this time, 25% of the infused IGF-1 had disappeared from the CSF-brain-meningeal system; the half time of this loss was 12 min. The plasma concentration of cleared IGF-1 was, however, very low from 2 to 9 min and only began to rise markedly after 20 min. This delay between loss and gain plus the lack of radiotracer in the cortical subarachnoid space suggested that much of the IGF-1 was cleared into blood via the cranial and/or spinal nerve roots and their associated lymphatic systems rather than periventricular tissue and arachnoid villi. Less than 10% of the injected radioactivity remained in the CSF-brain system after 180 min. The CSF and arteries and arterioles within the subarachnoid cisterns were labeled with IGF-1 within 10 min. Between 60 and 180 min, most of the radioactivity within the cranium was

  17. Volunteering and the State

    OpenAIRE

    Hackl, Franz; Halla, Martin; Pruckner, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the capability of the state to affect the individual’s decision to work for free. For this purpose we combine individual-level data from the European and World Values Survey with macroeconomic and political variables for OECD member countries. Empirically we identify three channels for crowding out of voluntary labor. Firstly, an increase in public social expenditure decreases the probability that the individual will volunteer (fiscal crowding out). Secondly, a political c...

  18. Recruiting and Supporting Latino Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Beverly B.

    This booklet is intended to help volunteer recruiters better understand characteristics of the Latino community that might impact volunteering. It also suggests strategies or steps to use in successfully recruiting and supporting Latino volunteers. Information is based on a study of Latinos and volunteerism conducted in Oregon in 1999. The…

  19. Special Report: Volunteers in Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Noel

    1976-01-01

    Many New York librarians view volunteers as a serious job threat; their unions back them in their opposition to volunteers; and some administrators are afraid to launch volunteer programs during the budget crunch because of their probably adverse effect on staff morale. (Author)

  20. Enhancing Leadership Skills in Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockett, Landry L.; Boyd, Barry

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how professionals leading volunteers can purposefully work toward developing the "leadership identity" of individual volunteers. These concepts and the application of them are presented in the context of Cooperative Extension volunteer groups. Specific methods of developing the leadership identity and capacity of individual…

  1. Computed tomography of the dog's brain: normal aspects and anatomical correlation; Tomografia computadorizada do encefalo do cao: aspectos da normalidade e correlacao anatomica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorigados, C.A.B., E-mail: clorigados@usp.br [Faculdades Metropolitanas Unidas (UniFMU), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pinto, A.C.B.F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia

    2013-06-15

    Normal tomographic images of dog's heads were obtained, aimed to familiarize them with the normal aspects of the brain and correlate these findings with the relevant anatomy of the region studied. Several anatomical structures, such as the parenchyma of the frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobes, the longitudinal fissure, the ventricular system, the cerebellum, the olfactory bulb, the corpus callosum, diencephalon, the pons, the medulla oblongata and the chiasmatic sulcus were directly identified or were related to neighboring structures which helped in their identification. (author)

  2. Effect of brain-derived neurotropic factor released from hypoxic astrocytes on gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor function in normal hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongliang Liu; Tijun Dai

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes can release increased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor during cerebral ischemia, but it is unclear whether brain-derived neurotrophic factor affects γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor function in normal neurons. Results from this study demonstrated that γ-aminobutyric acid at 100 μmol/L concentration raised the intracellular calcium level in neurons treated with medium from cultured hypoxic astrocytes, and the rise in calcium level could be inhibited by γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor antagonist bicuculline or brain-derived neurotrophic factor receptor antagonist k252a. Γ-aminobutyric acid type A-gated current induced by 100 μmol/L γ-aminobutyric acid was in an inward direction in physiological conditions, but shifted to the outward direction in neurons when treated with the medium from cultured hypoxic astrocytes, and this effect could be inhibited by k252a. The reverse potential was shifted leftward to -93 Mv, which could be inhibited by k252a and Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter inhibitor bumetanide. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor was released from hypoxic astrocytes at a high level. It shifted the reverse potential of γ-aminobutyric acid type A-gated currents leftward in normal neurons by enhancing the function of Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter, and caused γ-aminobutyric acid to exert an excitatory effect by activating γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor.

  3. Automated Spatial Brain Normalization and Hindbrain White Matter Reference Tissue Give Improved [(18)F]-Florbetaben PET Quantitation in Alzheimer's Model Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overhoff, Felix; Brendel, Matthias; Jaworska, Anna; Korzhova, Viktoria; Delker, Andreas; Probst, Federico; Focke, Carola; Gildehaus, Franz-Josef; Carlsen, Janette; Baumann, Karlheinz; Haass, Christian; Bartenstein, Peter; Herms, Jochen; Rominger, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical PET studies of β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation are of growing importance, but comparisons between research sites require standardized and optimized methods for quantitation. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate systematically the (1) impact of an automated algorithm for spatial brain normalization, and (2) intensity scaling methods of different reference regions for Aβ-PET in a large dataset of transgenic mice. PS2APP mice in a 6 week longitudinal setting (N = 37) and another set of PS2APP mice at a histologically assessed narrow range of Aβ burden (N = 40) were investigated by [(18)F]-florbetaben PET. Manual spatial normalization by three readers at different training levels was performed prior to application of an automated brain spatial normalization and inter-reader agreement was assessed by Fleiss Kappa (κ). For this method the impact of templates at different pathology stages was investigated. Four different reference regions on brain uptake normalization were used to calculate frontal cortical standardized uptake value ratios (SUVRCTX∕REF), relative to raw SUVCTX. Results were compared on the basis of longitudinal stability (Cohen's d), and in reference to gold standard histopathological quantitation (Pearson's R). Application of an automated brain spatial normalization resulted in nearly perfect agreement (all κ≥0.99) between different readers, with constant or improved correlation with histology. Templates based on inappropriate pathology stage resulted in up to 2.9% systematic bias for SUVRCTX∕REF. All SUVRCTX∕REF methods performed better than SUVCTX both with regard to longitudinal stability (d≥1.21 vs. d = 0.23) and histological gold standard agreement (R≥0.66 vs. R≥0.31). Voxel-wise analysis suggested a physiologically implausible longitudinal decrease by global mean scaling. The hindbrain white matter reference (R mean = 0.75) was slightly superior to the brainstem (R mean = 0.74) and the cerebellum (R mean = 0.73). Automated

  4. Automated spatial brain normalization and hindbrain white matter reference tissue give improved [18F]-florbetaben PET quantitation in Alzheimer´s model mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix eOverhoff

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical PET studies of β-amyloid (Aβ accumulation are of growing importance, but comparisons between research sites require standardized and optimized methods for quantitation. Therefore we aimed to evaluate systematically the 1 impact of an automated algorithm for spatial brain normalization, and 2 intensity scaling methods of different reference regions for Aβ-PET in a large dataset of transgenic mice. PS2APP mice in a six week longitudinal setting (N = 37 and another set of PS2APP mice at a histologically assessed narrow range of Aβ burden (N = 40 were investigated by [18F]-florbetaben PET. Manual spatial normalization by three readers at different training levels was performed prior to application of an automated brain spatial normalization and inter-reader agreement was assessed by Fleiss Kappa (κ. For this method the impact of templates at different pathology stages was investigated. Four different reference regions on brain uptake normalization were used to calculate frontal cortical standardized uptake value ratios (SUVRCTX/REF, relative to raw SUVCTX. Results were compared on the basis of longitudinal stability (Cohen’s d, and in reference to gold standard histopathological quantitation (Pearson’s R.Application of an automated brain spatial normalization resulted in nearly perfect agreement (all κ ≥ 0.99 between different readers, with constant or improved correlation with histology. Templates based on inappropriate pathology stage resulted in up to 2.9% systematic bias for SUVRCTX/REF. All SUVRCTX/REF methods performed better than SUVCTX both with regard to longitudinal stability (d ≥ 1.21 vs. d = 0.23 and histological gold standard agreement (R ≥ 0.66 vs. R ≥ 0.31. Voxel-wise analysis suggested a physiologically implausible longitudinal decrease of global mean scaling. The hindbrain white matter reference (Rmean = 0.75 was slightly superior to the brainstem (Rmean = 0.74 and the cerebellum (Rmean = 0

  5. High-resolution three-dimensional quantitative map of the macromolecular proton fraction distribution in the normal rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna V. Naumova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The presented dataset provides a normative high-resolution three-dimensional (3D macromolecular proton fraction (MPF map of the healthy rat brain in vivo and source images used for its reconstruction. The images were acquired using the protocol described elsewhere (Naumova, et al. High-resolution three-dimensional macromolecular proton fraction mapping for quantitative neuroanatomical imaging of the rodent brain in ultra-high magnetic fields. Neuroimage (2016 doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.09.036. The map was reconstructed from three source images with different contrast weightings (proton density, T1, and magnetization transfer using the single-point algorithm with a synthetic reference image. Source images were acquired from a living animal on an 11.7 T small animal MRI scanner with isotropic spatial resolution of 170 µm3 and total acquisition time about 1.5 h. The 3D dataset can be used for multiple purposes including interactive viewing of rat brain anatomy, measurements of reference MPF values in various brain structures, and development of image processing techniques for the rodent brain segmentation. It also can serve as a gold standard image for implementation and optimization of rodent brain MRI protocols.

  6. 正常人音乐欣赏的脑功能磁共振激活模式研究%The study of fMRI activation pattern of normal brain music appreciation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘明; 赵晶; 和清源; 庞冉; 陈云翔; 王志群

    2016-01-01

    目的:采用血氧水平依赖的脑功能磁共振成像技术( BOLD-fMRI)技术,研究正常人欣赏欢快音乐时的脑功能区定位,探讨可能的神经网络调节机制。方法选择15例正常健康受试者,年龄25~50岁,在欣赏欢快音乐同时,用BOLD-fMRI技术进行脑功能磁共振成像检查,采用SPM软件对原始数据进行统计学处理,获得平均激活图,分析激活增高的脑区。结果15例受试者在欣赏欢快音乐时大脑显著激活了视觉注意网络、默认网络、运动感觉网络、认知记忆网络的相关脑区,这些脑区可能参与了音乐的感知、注意、记忆、情绪反应等过程。结论功能磁共振成像技术在音乐欣赏的功能定位方面具有独特的价值,欢快音乐欣赏可激活大脑多种功能神经网络参与处理。%Objective By using the blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging ( BOLD-fMRI ) technique, to study the normal brain function localization when listening cheerful music , and then to explore the possible neural network adjustment mechanism .Methods We selected 15 volunteers with normal mental health , age between 25~50 .While listening the cheerful music , BOLD-fMRI examinations were performed and the original image data were obtained for statistical processing by using SPM software .And then, the average activation graph was analyzed to acquire the activated brain regions . Results While the subjects listening the cheerful music , several brain networks were activated including visual attention net-work, default mode network , sensorimoter network and cognitive network .These brain regions probably involved in the Music per-ception, attention, memory, and emotional reaction process .Conclusion The application of fMRI technique in music apprecia-tion has unique value in the respect of functional localization , cheerful music can activate the brain functions involved in several neural networks .

  7. Volunteers in the experience economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudiksen, Sune Klok

    2012-01-01

    and discussed. The Questions addressed is how to enlist, motivate and reward volunteers a long the way and how to manage and guide volunteers. Furthermore what kind of special relationship does the volunteer have in the making of the experience design and in the experience of that design. This paper combines......The use of volunteers is becoming more visible and important in the experience economy also in the light of the financial crisis. From a management perspective within both public and private organizations the use of volunteers is an important element partly because they strengthen the brand...... economy volunteers create a new set of dimensions, because they shift between being part of the experience producer and being one of the experience consumers. Volunteers are becoming increasingly more important in the experience economy as they contribute to the overall experience for users or customers...

  8. A methodology for generating normal and pathological brain perfusion SPECT images for evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods: application in epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grova, C.; Jannin, P.; Biraben, A.; Buvat, I.; Benali, H.; Bernard, A. M.; Scarabin, J. M.; Gibaud, B.

    2003-12-01

    Quantitative evaluation of brain MRI/SPECT fusion methods for normal and in particular pathological datasets is difficult, due to the frequent lack of relevant ground truth. We propose a methodology to generate MRI and SPECT datasets dedicated to the evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods and illustrate the method when dealing with ictal SPECT. The method consists in generating normal or pathological SPECT data perfectly aligned with a high-resolution 3D T1-weighted MRI using realistic Monte Carlo simulations that closely reproduce the response of a SPECT imaging system. Anatomical input data for the SPECT simulations are obtained from this 3D T1-weighted MRI, while functional input data result from an inter-individual analysis of anatomically standardized SPECT data. The method makes it possible to control the 'brain perfusion' function by proposing a theoretical model of brain perfusion from measurements performed on real SPECT images. Our method provides an absolute gold standard for assessing MRI/SPECT registration method accuracy since, by construction, the SPECT data are perfectly registered with the MRI data. The proposed methodology has been applied to create a theoretical model of normal brain perfusion and ictal brain perfusion characteristic of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. To approach realistic and unbiased perfusion models, real SPECT data were corrected for uniform attenuation, scatter and partial volume effect. An anatomic standardization was used to account for anatomic variability between subjects. Realistic simulations of normal and ictal SPECT deduced from these perfusion models are presented. The comparison of real and simulated SPECT images showed relative differences in regional activity concentration of less than 20% in most anatomical structures, for both normal and ictal data, suggesting realistic models of perfusion distributions for evaluation purposes. Inter-hemispheric asymmetry coefficients measured on simulated data were found within

  9. 正常健康者不确定奖赏抉择加工过程激活脑区分析%Analysis of activated brain areas in uncertain rewarding processing of decision making on healthy volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈娟; 郭宗君; 刘世恩; 李玉焕; 孙波; 高振波

    2013-01-01

    目的 分析正常健康者不确定奖赏抉择加工过程的激活脑区情况.方法 15名正常健康者进行3种不同程度(确定、风险、含糊)奖赏抉择实验,通过GE3.0T磁共振与脑功能视听觉刺激系统对受试者进行大脑同步扫描.采用SPM8分析获得相关激活脑区和激活强度值.结果 确定奖赏抉择时眶额叶被激活,平均激活强度2.4328 ±0.1949(P< 0.05);风险奖赏抉择时前额叶、中央前回、枕叶联合视皮层、顶下小叶、小脑后叶、颞中回、颞下回、边缘叶及中脑被激活,平均激活强度2.4228±1.3762 (P< 0.05);含糊奖赏抉择时前额叶、颞极区及颞下回、枕叶视皮层、小脑后叶被激活,平均激活强度2.4056±0.4222(P<0.05).风险奖赏抉择与确定奖赏抉择比较,腹外侧前额叶、前额叶额极、眶额叶、中央前回、颞下回及梭状回、缘上回、顶下小叶、小脑后叶显著被激活(P<0.05);含糊奖赏抉择与确定奖赏抉择比较,前额叶额极显著被激活(P<0.05);与风险奖赏抉择比较,背外侧前额叶、小脑后叶显著被激活(P<0.05).结论 不确定性奖赏程度不同,参与加工的脑区存在显著差异.%Objective To research the activated brain areas of decision making under uncertainty reward processing on healthy volunteers.Method The E-Prime programs were presented 3 kinds of tasks of the decision under uncertain reward processing.15 right-handed healthy volunteers made a response after receiving the task.At the same time,the GE 3.0T magnetic resonance scanner scanned the brains areas of subjects.Individual analysis and group analysis was done with SPM8 software,then the brain activating regions and the peak intensity were gotten.Results Orbitofrontal cortex was activated in certainty,peak intensity 2.4328 ± 0.1949 (P < 0.05).Prefrontal cortex,occipital lobe,parietal lobe,posterior lobe of cerebellum,limbic lobe and midbrain were activated under the risk reward

  10. Volunteer Team Management

    OpenAIRE

    Monych, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This thesis looked into volunteer team management in a project in AIESEC in Finland through the action research method. AIESEC in Finland is a non-profit non-government organization with a purpose of “peace and fulfilment of humankinds potential” through development of the youth’s future leadership. AIESEC was not a commissioning party; the project was the basis for the thesis without the supervision of the company. The thesis is based on a project that the author was in charge of, in ...

  11. Challenges in volunteering from cancer care volunteers perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaludin, Kauthar Mohamad; Muhammad, Mazanah; Wahat, Nor Wahiza Abdul; Ibrahim, Rahimah

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of non-government organizations (NGOs) and support groups has helped strengthen public health services in addressing cancer care burden. Owing to the contribution of volunteers in cancer care, this article documents a qualitative study that examined challenges in attracting and retaining cancer care volunteers as part of the effort to develop a volunteer recruitment model. Data were collected through three focus group discussions involving 19 cancer support group members in Malaysia. Findings of the study revealed that mobility and locality appeared to be significant in Malaysian context, while the need for financial support and time flexibility are challenges faced by cancer support groups to attract and retain volunteers. The findings imply that cancer care initiatives can benefit from more local volunteers but at the same time these volunteers require flexibility and financial support to sustain their engagement.

  12. Quantitative characterization of brain β-amyloid in 718 normal subjects using a joint PiB/FDG PET image histogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jon J.; Hanson, Dennis P.; Lowe, Val J.; Kemp, Bradley J.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Murray, Melissa E.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Robb, Richard A.; Holmes, David R.

    2016-03-01

    We have previously described an automated system for the co-registration of PiB and FDG PET images with structural MRI and a neurological anatomy atlas to produce region-specific quantization of cortical activity and amyloid burden. We also reported a global joint PiB/FDG histogram-based measure (FDG-Associated PiB Uptake Ratio - FAPUR) that performed as well as regional PiB ratio in stratifying Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Lewy Body Dementia (LBD) patients from normal subjects in an autopsy-verified cohort of 31. In this paper we examine results of this analysis on a clinically-verified cohort of 718 normal volunteers. We found that the global FDG ratio correlated negatively with age (r2 = 0.044) and global PiB ratio correlated positively with age (r2=0.038). FAPUR also correlated negatively with age (r2-.025), and in addition, we introduce a new metric - the Pearson's correlation coefficient (r2) of the joint PiB/FDG histogram which correlates positively (r2=0.014) with age. We then used these measurements to construct age-weighted Z-scores for all measurements made on the original autopsy cohort. We found similar stratification using Z-scores compared to raw values; however, the joint PiB/FDG r2 Z-score showed the greatest stratification ability.

  13. An in vivo microdialysis study of FLZ penetration through the blood-brain barrier in normal and 6-hydroxydopamine induced Parkinson's disease model rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jinfeng; Liu, Qian; Li, Yingfei; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Jinlan

    2014-01-01

    FLZ (N-[2-(4-hydroxy-phenyl)-ethyl]-2-(2,5-dimethoxy-phenyl)-3-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenyl)-acrylamide) is a novel synthetic squamosamide derivative and a potential anti-Parkinson's disease (PD) agent. The objective of the present study was to investigate the penetration of free FLZ across the BBB and the effects of P-gp inhibition on FLZ transport in normal and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced PD model rats. In vivo microdialysis was used to collect FLZ containing brain and blood dialysates following intravenous (i.v.) drug administration either with or without pretreatment with the specific P-gp inhibitor, zosuquidar trihydrochloride (zosuquidar·3HCl). A sensitive, rapid, and reliable ultraperformance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) technique was developed and validated to quantitate free FLZ levels in the dialysates. No significant differences were observed in the brain/blood FLZ area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) ratio between normal and PD model rats. However, pretreatment with zosuquidar·3HCl markedly increased the AUC ratio in both rat models. In addition, FLZ penetration was similar in zosuquidar·3HCl-pretreated normal and PD rats. These results suggest that P-gp inhibition increases BBB permeability to FLZ, thereby supporting the hypothesis that P-gp normally restricts FLZ transfer to the brain. These findings could provide reference data for future clinical trials and may aid investigation of the BBB permeability of other CNS-active substances.

  14. 7-Tesla Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging to Assess the Effects of Radiotherapy on Normal-Appearing Brain in Patients With Glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupo, Janine M., E-mail: janine.lupo@ucsf.edu [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Chuang, Cynthia F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Chang, Susan M. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Barani, Igor J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Jimenez, Bert; Hess, Christopher P. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nelson, Sarah J. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the intermediate- and long-term imaging manifestations of radiotherapy on normal-appearing brain tissue in patients with treated gliomas using 7T susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Methods and Materials: SWI was performed on 25 patients with stable gliomas on a 7 Tesla magnet. Microbleeds were identified as discrete foci of susceptibility that did not correspond to vessels. The number of microbleeds was counted within and outside of the T2-hyperintense lesion. For 3 patients, radiation dosimetry maps were reconstructed and fused with the 7T SWI data. Results: Multiple foci of susceptibility consistent with microhemorrhages were observed in patients 2 years after chemoradiation. These lesions were not present in patients who were not irradiated. The prevalence of microhemorrhages increased with the time since completion of radiotherapy, and these lesions often extended outside the boundaries of the initial high-dose volume and into the contralateral hemisphere. Conclusions: High-field SWI has potential for visualizing the appearance of microbleeds associated with long-term effects of radiotherapy on brain tissue. The ability to visualize these lesions in normal-appearing brain tissue may be important in further understanding the utility of this treatment in patients with longer survival.

  15. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to glycaemic carbohydrates and maintenance of normal brain function pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    an opinion on the scientific substantiation of health claims related to glycaemic carbohydrates and maintenance of normal brain function. The scope of the applications was proposed to fall under health claims based on newly developed scientific evidence. The Panel considers that the food constituent......, glycaemic carbohydrates, which is the subject of the health claims, is sufficiently characterised in relation to the claimed effect. Maintenance of normal brain function is a beneficial physiological effect. A claim on glycaemic carbohydrates and maintenance of normal brain function has already been...

  16. Cognitive patterns of normal elderly subjects are consistent with frontal cortico-subcortical and fronto-parietal neuropsychological models of brain aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawron, Natalia; Łojek, Emilia; Kijanowska-Haładyna, Beata; Nestorowicz, Jakub; Harasim, Andrzej; Pluta, Agnieszka; Sobańska, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Three neuropsychological theories have been developed according to a possible existence of a similar pattern of cognitive decline in elderly individuals and patients with brain damage. The respective neuropsychological theories attribute age-related deficits to: (a) dysfunction of the frontal lobes, (b) temporo-parietal dysfunction, or (c) decline of right-hemisphere functions. In the present study, we examined which of these theories best explains the cognitive patterns of normal elderly subjects older than 80 years of age (old elderly). Thirty normal old elderly subjects, 14 patients with subcortical vascular dementia, 14 with mild Alzheimer's disease, 15 with damage of the right hemisphere of the brain, and 20 young elderly controls participated. A test battery covering the main cognitive domains was administered to all participants. A hierarchical cluster analysis revealed five groups of individuals with different cognitive patterns across the whole sample. Old elderly subjects were assigned to four groups according to: (a) preserved overall cognitive performance, (b) processing speed decline, (c) attention decline, or (d) executive impairment. The results of the study are most congruent with models emphasizing frontal-lobe cortical-subcortical and fronto-parietal changes in old age. The results also indicate considerable heterogeneity in the cognitive patterns of normal old elderly adults.

  17. Initial contact of glioblastoma cells with existing normal brain endothelial cells strengthen the barrier function via fibroblast growth factor 2 secretion: a new in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Keisuke; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Nakagawa, Shinsuke; Thuy, Dinh Ha Duy; Ujifuku, Kenta; Kamada, Kensaku; Hayashi, Kentaro; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Niwa, Masami

    2013-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells invade along the existing normal capillaries in brain. Normal capillary endothelial cells function as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that limits permeability of chemicals into the brain. To investigate whether GBM cells modulate the BBB function of normal endothelial cells, we developed a new in vitro BBB model with primary cultures of rat brain endothelial cells (RBECs), pericytes, and astrocytes. Cells were plated on a membrane with 8 μm pores, either as a monolayer or as a BBB model with triple layer culture. The BBB model consisted of RBEC on the luminal side as a bottom, and pericytes and astrocytes on the abluminal side as a top of the chamber. Human GBM cell line, LN-18 cells, or lung cancer cell line, NCI-H1299 cells, placed on either the RBEC monolayer or the BBB model increased the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) values against the model, which peaked within 72 h after the tumor cell application. The TEER value gradually returned to baseline with LN-18 cells, whereas the value quickly dropped to the baseline in 24 h with NCI-H1299 cells. NCI-H1299 cells invaded into the RBEC layer through the membrane, but LN-18 cells did not. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) strengthens the endothelial cell BBB function by increased occludin and ZO-1 expression. In our model, LN-18 and NCI-H1299 cells secreted FGF-2, and a neutralization antibody to FGF-2 inhibited LN-18 cells enhanced BBB function. These results suggest that FGF-2 would be a novel therapeutic target for GBM in the perivascular invasive front.

  18. Demonstration of Normal and Abnormal Fetal Brains Using 3D Printing from In Utero MR Imaging Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, D; Griffiths, P D; Majewski, C

    2016-09-01

    3D printing is a new manufacturing technology that produces high-fidelity models of complex structures from 3D computer-aided design data. Radiology has been particularly quick to embrace the new technology because of the wide access to 3D datasets. Models have been used extensively to assist orthopedic, neurosurgical, and maxillofacial surgical planning. In this report, we describe methods used for 3D printing of the fetal brain by using data from in utero MR imaging.

  19. Cellular resilience: 5-HT neurons in Tph2(-/-) mice retain normal firing behavior despite the lack of brain 5-HT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalbano, Alberto; Waider, Jonas; Barbieri, Mario; Baytas, Ozan; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Corradetti, Renato; Mlinar, Boris

    2015-11-01

    Considerable evidence links dysfunction of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) transmission to neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders characterized by compromised "social" cognition and emotion regulation. It is well established that the brain 5-HT system is under autoregulatory control by its principal transmitter 5-HT via its effects on activity and expression of 5-HT system-related proteins. To examine whether 5-HT itself also has a crucial role in the acquisition and maintenance of characteristic rhythmic firing of 5-HT neurons, we compared their intrinsic electrophysiological properties in mice lacking brain 5-HT, i.e. tryptophan hydroxylase-2 null mice (Tph2(-/-)) and their littermates, Tph2(+/-) and Tph2(+/+), by using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in a brainstem slice preparation and single unit recording in anesthetized animals. We report that the active properties of dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) 5-HT neurons in vivo (firing rate magnitude and variability; the presence of spike doublets) and in vitro (firing in response to depolarizing current pulses; action potential shape) as well as the resting membrane potential remained essentially unchanged across Tph2 genotypes. However, there were subtle differences in subthreshold properties, most notably, an approximately 25% higher input conductance in Tph2(-/-) mice compared with Tph2(+/-) and Tph2(+/+) littermates (presilience to complete brain 5-HT deficiency.

  20. Gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry detection of extracellular kynurenine and related metabolites in normal and lesioned rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarangelo, Francesca M; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Macherone, Anthony; Graham, David R; Schwarcz, Robert

    2012-02-15

    We describe here a gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS) method for the sensitive and concurrent determination of extracellular tryptophan and the kynurenine pathway metabolites kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK), and quinolinic acid (QUIN) in rat brain. This metabolic cascade is increasingly linked to the pathophysiology of several neurological and psychiatric diseases. Methodological refinements, including optimization of MS conditions and the addition of deuterated standards, resulted in assay linearity to the low nanomolar range. Measured in samples obtained by striatal microdialysis in vivo, basal levels of tryptophan, kynurenine, and QUIN were 415, 89, and 8 nM, respectively, but 3-HK levels were below the limit of detection (<2 nM). Systemic injection of kynurenine (100 mg/kg, i.p.) did not affect extracellular tryptophan but produced detectable levels of extracellular 3-HK (peak after 2-3 h: ~50 nM) and raised extracellular QUIN levels (peak after 2h: ~105 nM). The effect of this treatment on QUIN, but not on 3-HK, was potentiated in the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-lesioned striatum. Our results indicate that the novel methodology, which allowed the measurement of extracellular kynurenine and 3-HK in the brain in vivo, will facilitate studies of brain kynurenines and of the interplay between peripheral and central kynurenine pathway functions under physiological and pathological conditions.

  1. Psychosocial Differences between Elderly Volunteers and Non-Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, K.I.; Linn, Margaret W.

    1980-01-01

    Volunteer workers over sixty-five were compared to retired elderly who did not engage in work activity. Volunteers had significantly higher degree of life satisfaction, stronger will to live, and fewer symptoms of depression, anxiety, and somatization. No differences were found on demographics or background. (Author)

  2. 5D CNS+ Software for Automatically Imaging Axial, Sagittal, and Coronal Planes of Normal and Abnormal Second-Trimester Fetal Brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Giuseppe; Capponi, Alessandra; Persico, Nicola; Ghi, Tullio; Nazzaro, Giovanni; Boito, Simona; Pietrolucci, Maria Elena; Arduini, Domenico

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to test new 5D CNS+ software (Samsung Medison Co, Ltd, Seoul, Korea), which is designed to image axial, sagittal, and coronal planes of the fetal brain from volumes obtained by 3-dimensional sonography. The study consisted of 2 different steps. First in a prospective study, 3-dimensional fetal brain volumes were acquired in 183 normal consecutive singleton pregnancies undergoing routine sonographic examinations at 18 to 24 weeks' gestation. The 5D CNS+ software was applied, and the percentage of adequate visualization of brain diagnostic planes was evaluated by 2 independent observers. In the second step, the software was also tested in 22 fetuses with cerebral anomalies. In 180 of 183 fetuses (98.4%), 5D CNS+ successfully reconstructed all of the diagnostic planes. Using the software on healthy fetuses, the observers acknowledged the presence of diagnostic images with visualization rates ranging from 97.7% to 99.4% for axial planes, 94.4% to 97.7% for sagittal planes, and 92.2% to 97.2% for coronal planes. The Cohen κ coefficient was analyzed to evaluate the agreement rates between the observers and resulted in values of 0.96 or greater for axial planes, 0.90 or greater for sagittal planes, and 0.89 or greater for coronal planes. All 22 fetuses with brain anomalies were identified among a series that also included healthy fetuses, and in 21 of the 22 cases, a correct diagnosis was made. 5D CNS+ was efficient in successfully imaging standard axial, sagittal, and coronal planes of the fetal brain. This approach may simplify the examination of the fetal central nervous system and reduce operator dependency.

  3. Volunteering for charity: pride, respect, and the commitment of volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boezeman, Edwin J; Ellemers, Naomi

    2007-05-01

    This study builds upon and extends the social-identity-based model of cooperation with the organization (T. R. Tyler, 1999; T. R. Tyler & S. L. Blader, 2000) to examine commitment and cooperative intent among fundraising volunteers. In Study 1, structural equation modeling indicated that pride and respect related to the intent to remain a volunteer with an organization, and that this relation was mediated primarily by normative organizational commitment. In Study 2, structural equation modeling indicated that the perceived importance of volunteer work was related to pride, that perceived organizational support related to the experience of respect, and that pride and respect mediated the relation between perceived importance and support on the one hand and organizational commitment on the other. Overall, the results suggest that volunteer organizations may do well to implement pride and respect in their volunteer policy, for instance to address the reliability problem (J. L. Pearce, 1993).

  4. L-Phenylalanine preloading reduces the (10)B(n, α)(7)Li dose to the normal brain by inhibiting the uptake of boronophenylalanine in boron neutron capture therapy for brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tsubasa; Tanaka, Hiroki; Fukutani, Satoshi; Suzuki, Minoru; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ono, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a cellular-level particle radiation therapy that combines the selective delivery of boron compounds to tumour tissue with neutron irradiation. Previously, high doses of one of the boron compounds used for BNCT, L-BPA, were found to reduce the boron-derived irradiation dose to the central nervous system. However, injection with a high dose of L-BPA is not feasible in clinical settings. We aimed to find an alternative method to improve the therapeutic efficacy of this therapy. We examined the effects of oral preloading with various analogues of L-BPA in a xenograft tumour model and found that high-dose L-phenylalanine reduced the accumulation of L-BPA in the normal brain relative to tumour tissue. As a result, the maximum irradiation dose in the normal brain was 19.2% lower in the L-phenylalanine group relative to the control group. This study provides a simple strategy to improve the therapeutic efficacy of conventional boron compounds for BNCT for brain tumours and the possibility to widen the indication of BNCT to various kinds of other tumours.

  5. To volunteer or not to volunteer? A cross-country study of volunteering

    OpenAIRE

    Sardinha, Boguslawa Maria Barszczak; Pires, Cesaltina Pacheco

    2011-01-01

    Comunicação apresentada em 5th Annal Meeting of the Portuguese Economic Journal - Aveiro, 8-9 July 2011 This paper uses data from the 4th wave of the European Values Survey (EVS) to inves- tigate the factors that in uence the decision to participate in volunteering activities, con- sidering both volunteering in general as well as volunteering in particular types of activities. Like previous studies we include several socioeconomic and demographic variables. However our study al...

  6. Analyzing Ph value, energy and phospholipid metabolism of various cerebral tumors and normal brain tissue with 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Tan; Guangyao Wu; Junmo Sun

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS) can be used to non-injuredly and dynamicly detect various metabolites including phosphorus in organis and reflect changes of phospholipid metabolism and energy metabolism in tissue and pH value in cells.OBJECTIVE: To observe changes of pH value, phospholipid metabolism and energy metabolism of various cerebral tumors and normal brain tissue with 31P MRS.DESIGN: Semi-quantitative contrast observation.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 44 patients with cerebral tumor diagnosed with surgery operation were selected from the Department of Magnetic Resonance, Central South Hospital, Wuhan University from September 2004 to June 2006. All the subjects had complete 31P MRS data before steroid and operation. Among them,16 patients had glioma of grade Ⅱ-Ⅲ, 12 spongioblastoma and 16 meningioma. The mean age was (45±6)years. Another 36 subjects without focus on cerebral MRI were regarded as normal group, including 19 males and 18 females, and the mean age was (41±4) years. Included subjects were consent.METHODS: Eclipse1.5T MRS (Philips Company) was used to collect wave spectrum; jMRUI(1.3) was used to analyze experimental data and calculate pH value in voxel and ratios of phosphocreatine (PCr)/inorganic phosphate (Pi), PCr/phosphodiesterase (PDE) and phosphomonoesterase (PME)/β-adenosine triphosphate (β-ATP) of various metabolites. 31P MRS results were compared with t test between tumor patients and normal subjects.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes of phospholipid metabolism (PME/PDE), energy metabolism (PCr/ATP) and pH value of various cerebral tumors and normal brain tissues.RESULTS: A total of 44 cases with cerebral tumor and 36 normal subjects were involved in the final analysis. pH value and semi-quantitative measurements of normal brain tissues and various cerebral tumors: ① pH value at top occipital region and temple occipital region of normal brain tissue was 7.04±0.02;PCt/β-ATP was 1.51 ±0.03; PCt/Pi was 2.85

  7. A gene necessary for normal male courtship, yellow, acts downstream of fruitless in the Drosophila melanogaster larval brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapeau, Mark David; Radovic, Anna; Wittkopp, Patricia J; Long, Anthony D

    2003-04-01

    The fruitless (fru) gene is a member of the Drosophila melanogaster somatic sex determination genetic pathway. Although it has been hypothesized that the primary function of fru is to regulate a genetic hierarchy specifying development of adult male courtship behavior, genes acting downstream of fru have not yet been identified. Here we demonstrate that the yellow (y) gene is genetically downstream of fru in the 3(rd)-instar larval brain. Yellow protein is present at elevated levels in neuroblasts, which also show expression of male-specific FRU proteins, compared to control neuroblasts without FRU. A location for y downstream of fru in a genetic pathway was experimentally demonstrated by analysis of fru mutants lacking transcription of zinc-finger DNA binding domains, and of animals with temporal, spatial, or sexual mis-expression of male-specific FRU. A subset of fru and y mutants is known to reduce levels of a specific behavioral component of the male courtship ritual, wing extension, and FRU and Yellow were detected in the general region of the brain whose maleness is necessary for development of that behavior. We therefore hypothesized that ectopic expression of Yellow in the 3(rd)-instar brain, in a y null background, would rescue low levels of wing extension and male competitive mating success, and this was found to be the case. Overall, these data suggest that y is a downstream member of the fru branch of the D. melanogaster sex determination hierarchy, where it plays a currently unknown role in the development of adult male wing extension during courtship.

  8. Global developmental gene expression and pathway analysis of normal brain development and mouse models of human neuronal migration defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramparo, Tiziano; Libiger, Ondrej; Jain, Sonia; Li, Hong; Youn, Yong Ha; Hirotsune, Shinji; Schork, Nicholas J; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2011-03-01

    Heterozygous LIS1 mutations are the most common cause of human lissencephaly, a human neuronal migration defect, and DCX mutations are the most common cause of X-linked lissencephaly. LIS1 is part of a protein complex including NDEL1 and 14-3-3ε that regulates dynein motor function and microtubule dynamics, while DCX stabilizes microtubules and cooperates with LIS1 during neuronal migration and neurogenesis. Targeted gene mutations of Lis1, Dcx, Ywhae (coding for 14-3-3ε), and Ndel1 lead to neuronal migration defects in mouse and provide models of human lissencephaly, as well as aid the study of related neuro-developmental diseases. Here we investigated the developing brain of these four mutants and wild-type mice using expression microarrays, bioinformatic analyses, and in vivo/in vitro experiments to address whether mutations in different members of the LIS1 neuronal migration complex lead to similar and/or distinct global gene expression alterations. Consistent with the overall successful development of the mutant brains, unsupervised clustering and co-expression analysis suggested that cell cycle and synaptogenesis genes are similarly expressed and co-regulated in WT and mutant brains in a time-dependent fashion. By contrast, focused co-expression analysis in the Lis1 and Ndel1 mutants uncovered substantial differences in the correlation among pathways. Differential expression analysis revealed that cell cycle, cell adhesion, and cytoskeleton organization pathways are commonly altered in all mutants, while synaptogenesis, cell morphology, and inflammation/immune response are specifically altered in one or more mutants. We found several commonly dysregulated genes located within pathogenic deletion/duplication regions, which represent novel candidates of human mental retardation and neurocognitive disabilities. Our analysis suggests that gene expression and pathway analysis in mouse models of a similar disorder or within a common pathway can be used to define

  9. Georg N. Koskinas (1885-1975) and his scientific contributions to the normal and pathological anatomy of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triarhou, Lazaros C

    2005-12-30

    Georg N. Koskinas is invariably recognised by neuroanatomists as Constantin von Economo's co-author on the celebrated Die Cytoarchitektonik der Hirnrinde des erwachsenen Menschen, published 80 years ago in Vienna and Berlin. That text and Atlas are generally accepted as a monumental landmark in the evolution of morphological brain research. A number of neuroanatomists and neurophysiologists continue to use to this day the parcellation scheme of the cerebral cortex into 107 areas, proposed by von Economo and Koskinas (and logically denoted by alphabetical characters from the initials of the respective lobes), despite the commoner adoption of Brodmann's scheme of 52, randomly numbered, areas. Several works have been written about the life and work of von Economo; on the other hand, virtually nothing can be found in the biomedical literature about Koskinas. This study aims at posthumously restoring part of the fame due this illustrious man of 20th century science -- and giant figure of brain anatomy -- whom history has not treated in the fairest of ways. We present newly gathered biographical data, as well as lesser known aspects of his scientific productivity. Koskinas' neuropathological studies, in collaboration with Ernst Sträussler -- of Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease fame -- include findings from patients inoculated with malaria as a form of therapy for progressive general paresis (research related to psychiatrist Wagner von Jauregg's 1927 Nobel Prize), colloid degeneration, and the laminar distribution of status spongiosus lesions. Koskinas' neuropsychiatric activities in Greece upon his return from Vienna in 1927, and until his parting in 1975, are further related, including his successful -- and "Hippocratic" -- practice in the suburbs of Athens, his association with the Vogt Institute for Brain Research at Neustadt, and lesser known neuroanatomical works.

  10. Managing Library Volunteers, Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driggers, Preston; Dumas, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    Volunteers are essential to a successful library program--and at a time when deep budget cuts are the norm, there are many libraries that depend on the help of dedicated volunteers, who do everything from shelving books to covering the phones. Whether these are friends, trustees, or community members, managing them effectively is the key to…

  11. My Days as a Volunteer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾晓玲; 杨梦倩; 许文侠; 陈丽敏; 陈丽琼; 陈昊; 李雯

    2009-01-01

    Volunteer, a word derived from Latin, carries the meaning of "will". A volunteer is someone who works for a community or for the benefit of environment. There are various forms of voluntary work including "serving food at the local homeless shelter,

  12. Does Silent Reading Speed in Normal Adult Readers Depend on Early Visual Processes? Evidence from Event-Related Brain Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korinth, Sebastian Peter; Sommer, Werner; Breznitz, Zvia

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the relationship of reading speed and early visual processes in normal readers. Here we examined the association of the early P1, N170 and late N1 component in visual event-related potentials (ERPs) with silent reading speed and a number of additional cognitive skills in a sample of 52 adult German readers utilizing a Lexical…

  13. Increased adult hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor and normal levels of neurogenesis in maternal separation rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greisen, Mia H; Altar, C Anthony; Bolwig, Tom G; Whitehead, Richard; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2005-03-15

    Repeated maternal separation of rat pups during the early postnatal period may affect brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or neurons in brain areas that are compromised by chronic stress. In the present study, a highly significant increase in hippocampal BDNF protein concentration was found in adult rats that as neonates had been subjected to 180 min of daily separation compared with handled rats separated for 15 min daily. BDNF protein was unchanged in the frontal cortex and hypothalamus/paraventricular nucleus. Expression of BDNF mRNA in the CA1, CA3, or dentate gyrus of the hippocampus or in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus was not affected by maternal separation. All animals displayed similar behavioral patterns in a forced-swim paradigm, which did not affect BDNF protein concentration in the hippocampus or hypothalamus. Repeated administration of bromodeoxyuridine revealed equal numbers of surviving, newly generated granule cells in the dentate gyrus of adult rats from the 15 min or 180 min groups. The age-dependent decline in neurogenesis from 3 months to 7 months of age did not differ between the groups. Insofar as BDNF can stimulate neurogenesis and repair, we propose that the elevated hippocampal protein concentration found in maternally deprived rats might be a compensatory reaction to separation during the neonatal period, maintaining adult neurogenesis at levels equal to those of the handled rats.

  14. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR) expression in the developing human brain: comparative immunohistochemical study between patients with normal and mutated CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcorelles, Pascale; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Uguen, Arnaud; Ledé, Françoise; Férec, Claude; Laquerrière, Annie

    2014-11-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) protein has recently been shown to be expressed in the human adult central nervous system (CNS). As CFTR expression has also been documented during embryonic development in several organs, such as the respiratory tract, the intestine and the male reproductive system, suggesting a possible role during development we decided to investigate the expression of CFTR in the human developing CNS. In addition, as some, although rare, neurological symptoms have been reported in patients with CF, we compared the expression of normal and mutated CFTR at several fetal stages. Immunohistochemistry was performed on brain and spinal cord samples of foetuses between 13 and 40 weeks of gestation and compared with five patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) of similar ages. We showed in this study that CFTR is only expressed in neurons and has an early and widespread distribution during development. Although we did not observe any cerebral abnormality in patients with CF, we observed a slight delay in the maturation of several brain structures. We also observed different expression and localization of CFTR depending on the brain structure or the cell maturation stage. Our findings, along with a literature review on the neurological phenotypes of patients with CF, suggest that this gene may play previously unsuspected roles in neuronal maturation or function.

  15. Activated regulatory T cell regulates neural stem cell proliferation in the subventricular zone of normal and ischemic mouse brain through interleukin 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jixian; Xie, Luokun; Yang, Chenqi; Ren, Changhong; Zhou, Kaijing; Wang, Brian; Zhang, Zhijun; Wang, Yongting; Jin, Kunlin; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the depletion of Regulatory T cells (Tregs) inhibits neural progenitor cell migration after brain ischemia. However, whether Tregs affect neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation is unclear. We explored the effect of Tregs on neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) after ischemia. Tregs were isolated and activated in vitro. Adult male C57BL/6 mice underwent 60 min transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Then Tregs (1 × 105) were injected into the left lateral ventricle (LV) of normal and ischemic mouse brain. Neurogenesis was determined by immunostaining. The mechanism was examined by inhibiting interleukin 10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor (TGF-β) signaling. We found that the number of BrdU+ cells in the SVZ was significantly increased in the activated Tregs-treated mice. Double immunostaining showed that these BrdU+ cells expressed Mash1. Blocking IL-10 reduced the number of Mash1+/BrdU+ cells, but increased the amount of GFAP+/BrdU+ cells. Here, we conclude that activated Tregs enhanced neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation in the SVZ of normal and ischemic mice; blockage of IL-10 abolished Tregs-mediated NSC proliferation in vivo and in vitro. Our results suggest that activated Tregs promoted NSC proliferation via IL-10, which provides a new therapeutic approach for ischemic stroke. PMID:26441532

  16. Activated regulatory T cell regulates neural stem cell proliferation in the subventricular zone of normal and ischemic mouse brain through interleukin 10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jixian eWang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that the depletion of Regulatory T cells (Tregs inhibits neural progenitor cell migration after brain ischemia. However, whether Tregs affect neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation is unclear. We explored the effect of Tregs on neurogenesis in the subventricular zone after ischemia. Tregs were isolated and activated in vitro. Adult male C57BL/6 mice underwent 60 minutes transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO. Then Tregs (1x105 were injected into the left lateral ventricle of normal and ischemic mouse brain. Neurogenesis was determined by immunostaining. The mechanism was examined by inhibiting interleukin 10 (IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF- signaling. We found that the number of BrdU+ cells in the subventricular zone was significantly increased in the activated Tregs-treated mice. Double immunostaining showed that these BrdU+ cells expressed Mash1. Blocking IL-10 reduced the number of Mash1+/BrdU+ cells, but increased the amount of GFAP+/BrdU+ cells. Here we conclude that activated Tregs enhanced neural stem cell proliferation in the subventricular zone of normal and ischemic mice; blockage of IL-10 abolished Tregs-mediated neural stem cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. Our results suggest that activated Tregs promoted neural stem cell proliferation via IL-10, which provides a new therapeutic approach for ischemic stroke.

  17. Regulation of endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells for neural repair - factors that promote neurogenesis and gliogenesis in the normal and damaged brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly eChristie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem/precursor cells in the adult brain reside in the subventricular zone (SVZ of the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus. These cells primarily generate neuroblasts that normally migrate to the olfactory bulb and the dentate granule cell layer respectively. Following brain damage, such as traumatic brain injury, ischemic stroke or in degenerative disease models, neural precursor cells from the SVZ in particular, can migrate from their normal route along the rostral migratory stream to the site of neural damage. This neural precursor cell response to neural damage is mediated by release of endogenous factors, including cytokines and chemokines produced by the inflammatory response at the injury site, and by the production of growth and neurotrophic factors. Endogenous hippocampal neurogenesis is frequently also directly or indirectly affected by neural damage. Administration of a variety of factors that regulate different aspects of neural stem/precursor biology often leads to improved functional motor and/or behavioural outcomes. Such factors can target neural stem/precursor proliferation, survival, migration and differentiation into appropriate neuronal or glial lineages. Newborn cells also need to subsequently survive and functionally integrate into extant neural circuitry, which may be the major bottleneck to the current therapeutic potential of neural stem/precursor cells. This review will cover the effects of a range of intrinsic and extrinsic factors that regulate neural stem /precursor cell functions. In particular it focuses on factors that may be harnessed to enhance the endogenous neural stem/precursor cell response to neural damage, highlighting those that have already shown evidence of preclinical effectiveness and discussing others that warrant further preclinical investigation.

  18. [{sup 18}F]DPA-714 PET imaging of translocator protein TSPO (18 kDa) in the normal and excitotoxically-lesioned nonhuman primate brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavisse, S.; Inoue, K.; Jan, C.; Petit, F.; Dauguet, J.; Guillermier, M.; Rbah-Vidal, L.; Van Camp, N.; Aron-Badin, R.; Hantraye, P. [CEA, I2BM, MIRCen, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); CEA, CNRS, URA2210, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Peyronneau, M.A.; Goutal, S.; Dolle, F. [CEA, I2BM, Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Orsay (France); Remy, P. [CEA, I2BM, MIRCen, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); CEA, CNRS, URA2210, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Service de Neurologie, CHU Henri Mondor, Creteil (France)

    2014-12-09

    We aimed to characterize pharmacologically the TSPO- radioligand [{sup 18}F]DPA-714 in the brain of healthy cynomolgus monkeys and evaluate the cellular origin of its binding in a model of neurodegeneration induced by intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid (QA). [{sup 18}F]DPA-714 PET images were acquired before and at 2, 7, 14, 21, 49, 70, 91 days after putaminal lesioning. Blocking and displacement studies were carried out (PK11195). Different modelling approaches estimated rate constants and V{sub T} (total distribution volume) which was used to measure longitudinal changes in the lesioned putamen. Sections for immunohistochemical labelling were prepared at the same time-points to evaluate correlations between in vivo [{sup 18}F]DPA-714 binding and microglial/astrocytic activation. [{sup 18}F]DPA-714 showed a widespread distribution with a higher signal in the thalamus and occipital cortex and lower binding in the cerebellum. TSPO was expressed throughout the whole brain and about 73 % of [{sup 18}F]DPA-714 binding was specific for TSPO in vivo. The one-tissue compartment model (1-TCM) provided good and reproducible estimates of V{sub T} and rate constants, and V{sub T} values from the 1-TCM and the Logan approach were highly correlated (r {sup 2} = 0.85). QA lesioning induced an increase in V{sub T}, which was +17 %, +54 %, +157 % and +39 % higher than baseline on days 7, 14, 21 and 91 after QA injection, respectively. Immunohistochemistry revealed an early microglial and a delayed astrocytic activation after QA injection. [{sup 18}F]DPA-714 binding matched TSPO immunopositive areas and showed a stronger colocalization with CD68 microglia than with GFAP-activated astrocytes. [{sup 18}F]DPA-714 binds to TSPO with high specificity in the primate brain under normal conditions and in the QA model. This tracer provides a sensitive tool for assessing neuroinflammation in the human brain. (orig.)

  19. Age- and Sex-Associated Changes in Cerebral Glucose Metabolism in Normal Healthy Subjects: Statistical Parametric Mapping Analysis of F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Brain Positron Emission Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In-Ju; Kim, Seong-Jang; Kim, Yong-Ki (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Pusan National Univ. Hospital, Busan (Korea); Medical Research Institute, Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea)). e-mail: growthkim@daum.net/growthkim@pusan.ac.kr)

    2009-12-15

    Background: The age- and sex-associated changes of brain development are unclear and controversial. Several previous studies showed conflicting results of a specific pattern of cerebral glucose metabolism or no differences of cerebral glucose metabolism in association with normal aging process and sex. Purpose: To investigate the effects of age and sex on changes in cerebral glucose metabolism in healthy subjects using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) brain positron emission tomography (PET) and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis. Material and Methods: Seventy-eight healthy subjects (32 males, mean age 46.6+-18.2 years; 46 females, mean age 40.6+-19.8 years) underwent F-18 FDG brain PET. Using SPM, age- and sex-associated changes in cerebral glucose metabolism were investigated. Results: In males, a negative correlation existed in several gray matter areas, including the right temporopolar (Brodmann area [BA] 38), right orbitofrontal (BA 47), left orbitofrontal gyrus (BA 10), left dorsolateral frontal gyrus (BA 8), and left insula (BA 13) areas. A positive relationship existed in the left claustrum and left thalamus. In females, negative changes existed in the left caudate body, left temporopolar area (BA 38), right orbitofrontal gyri (BA 47 and BA 10), and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 46). A positive association was demonstrated in the left subthalamic nucleus and the left superior frontal gyrus. In white matter, an age-associated decrease in FDG uptake in males was shown in the left insula, and increased FDG uptake was found in the left corpus callosum. The female group had an age-associated negative correlation of FDG uptake only in the right corpus callosum. Conclusion: Using SPM, we found not only similar areas of brain, but also sex-specific cerebral areas of age-associated changes of FDG uptake

  20. Calorie restriction down-regulates expression of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin in normal and D-galactose-induced aging mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shougang; Shi, Wenli; Li, Man; Gao, Qian

    2014-02-01

    It has been shown that iron progressively accumulates in the brain with age. Calorie restriction (CR) may allay many of the adverse effects of aging on the brain, yet the underlying mechanisms, in particular in relation to brain iron metabolism, remain unclear. This study aimed to investigate the role of CR in the regulation of cerebral cellular iron homeostasis. C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into four groups of eight. The control group was fed a conventional diet ad libitum; the CR group received 70% of the calories of the control mouse intake per day; the D-galactose (D-gal) group received subcutaneous injection of D-gal at a dose of 100 mg/kg once daily to produce mouse model of aging; the D-gal plus CR group received both of the two interventions for 14 weeks. The Morris water maze (MWM) was employed to test the cognitive performance of all animals, and the expression of iron regulatory genes, ferroportin and hepcidin, in the cortex and hippocampus were detected by quantitative real-time PCR. Compared to the controls, the D-gal group mice showed significant spatial reference memory deficits in the MWM test, whereas the D-gal-CR group mice exhibited almost normal cognitive function, indicating that CR protects against D-gal-induced learning and memory impairment. Hepcidin mRNA expression was increased in the D-gal group, decreased in the CR group, and was basically unchanged in the D-gal-CR group. There was no statistical difference in the transmembrane iron exporter ferroportin expression between control and any of the experimental groups. The results suggest that the anti-aging effects of CR might partially lie in its capacity to reduce or avoid age-related iron accumulation in the brain through down-regulating expression of brain hepcidin--the key negative regulator for intracellular iron efflux--and that facilitating the balance of brain iron metabolism may be a promising anti-aging measure.

  1. The essential role of AMPA receptor GluR2 subunit RNA editing in the normal and diseased brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Lorraine Wright

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available AMPA receptors are comprised of different combinations of GluR1-GluR4 (also known as GluA1-GluA4 and GluR-A to GluR-D subunits. The GluR2 subunit is subject to Q/R site RNA editing by the ADAR2 enzyme, which converts a codon for glutamine (Q, present in the GluR2 gene, to a codon for arginine (R found in the mRNA. AMPA receptors are calcium (Ca2+-permeable if they contain the unedited GluR2(Q subunit or if they lack the GluR2 subunit. While most AMPA receptors in the brain contain the edited GluR2(R subunit and are therefore Ca2+-impermeable, recent evidence suggests that Ca2+-permeable GluR2-lacking AMPA receptors are important in synaptic plasticity and learning. However, the presence of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors containing unedited GluR2 leads to excitotoxic cell loss. Recent studies have indicated that RNA editing of GluR2 is deregulated in diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, as well in acute neurodegenerative conditions, such as ischemia. More recently, studies have investigated the regulation of RNA editing and possible causes for its deregulation during disease. In this review, we will explore the role of GluR2 RNA editing in the healthy and diseased brain and outline new insights into the mechanisms that control this process.

  2. Volunteer Program for the WSIS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    PALEXPO, GENEVA, from 4 - 13 December Are you concerned by the digital divide between the North and the South? Would you like to contribute personally to the success of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS), in particular the activities of civil society? Join the team of volunteers and/or offer accommodation to an international volunteer! Contact: Charlotte (Project Coordinator WSIS) Kathy (Volunteer Coordinator) ICVolunteers PO Box 755 - CH-1211 Genève 4 Phone: +41 22 800 1436 - Fax: +41 22 800 14 37 E-mail: charlotte@icvolunteers.org kathy@icvolunteers.org For further information, please consult the website: http://www.icvolunteers.org

  3. Variable ATP yields and uncoupling of oxygen consumption in human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Albert; Aanerud, Joel; Peterson, Ericka;

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of brain oxidative metabolism values among healthy humans is astoundingly wide for a measure that reflects normal brain function and is known to change very little with most changes of brain function. It is possible that the part of the oxygen consumption rate that is coupled...... to ATP turnover is the same in all healthy human brains, with different degrees of uncoupling explaining the variability of total oxygen consumption among people. To test the hypothesis that about 75% of the average total oxygen consumption of human brains is common to all individuals, we determined...... the variability in a large group of normal healthy adults. To establish the degree of variability in different regions of the brain, we measured the regional cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen in 50 healthy volunteers aged 21-66 and projected the values to a common age of 25.Within each subject and region, we...

  4. Vowels and Consonants in the Brain: Evidence from Magnetoencephalographic Studies on the N1m in Normal-Hearing Listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manca, Anna Dora; Grimaldi, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    Speech sound perception is one of the most fascinating tasks performed by the human brain. It involves a mapping from continuous acoustic waveforms onto the discrete phonological units computed to store words in the mental lexicon. In this article, we review the magnetoencephalographic studies that have explored the timing and morphology of the N1m component to investigate how vowels and consonants are computed and represented within the auditory cortex. The neurons that are involved in the N1m act to construct a sensory memory of the stimulus due to spatially and temporally distributed activation patterns within the auditory cortex. Indeed, localization of auditory fields maps in animals and humans suggested two levels of sound coding, a tonotopy dimension for spectral properties and a tonochrony dimension for temporal properties of sounds. When the stimulus is a complex speech sound, tonotopy and tonochrony data may give important information to assess whether the speech sound parsing and decoding are generated by pure bottom-up reflection of acoustic differences or whether they are additionally affected by top-down processes related to phonological categories. Hints supporting pure bottom-up processing coexist with hints supporting top-down abstract phoneme representation. Actually, N1m data (amplitude, latency, source generators, and hemispheric distribution) are limited and do not help to disentangle the issue. The nature of these limitations is discussed. Moreover, neurophysiological studies on animals and neuroimaging studies on humans have been taken into consideration. We compare also the N1m findings with the investigation of the magnetic mismatch negativity (MMNm) component and with the analogous electrical components, the N1 and the MMN. We conclude that N1 seems more sensitive to capture lateralization and hierarchical processes than N1m, although the data are very preliminary. Finally, we suggest that MEG data should be integrated with EEG data in the

  5. Alterations of diffusion tensor MRI parameters in the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease compared with normal brains: possible diagnostic use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chin-Song; Weng, Yi-Hsin; Lin, Wey-Yil [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Division of Movement Disorders,Department of Neurology, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Neuroscience Research Center, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Taoyuan (China); Ng, Shu-Hang [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Linkou (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taoyuan County (China); Cheng, Jur-Shan [Chang Gung University, Clinical Informatics and Medical Statistics Research Center,College of Medicine, Taoyuan (China); Wai, Yau-Yau [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Keelung (China); Chen, Yao-Liang [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Linkou (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Keelung (China); Wang, Jiun-Jie [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Neuroscience Research Center, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Linkou (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taoyuan County (China); Chang Gung University / Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Medical Imaging Research Center, Institute for Radiological Research, Taoyuan (China)

    2016-11-15

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of diffusion tensor imaging in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We examined a total of 126 PD patients (68 males/58 females, mean age: 62.0 ±7.6 years) and 91 healthy controls (43 males/48 females, mean age: 59.8 ±7.2 years). Images were acquired on a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner. The Camino software was used to normalize and parcellate diffusion-weighted images into 90 cerebral regions based on the automatic anatomical labelling template. The minimum, median, and maximum values of the mean/radial/axial diffusivity/fractional anisotropy were determined. The diagnostic performance was assessed by receiver operating characteristic analysis. The associations of imaging parameters with disease severity were tested using Pearson's correlation coefficients after adjustment for disease duration. Compared with healthy controls, PD patients showed increased diffusivity in multiple cortical regions that extended beyond the basal ganglia. An area under curve of 85 % was identified for the maximum values of mean diffusivity in the ipsilateral middle temporal gyrus. The most significant intergroup difference was 26.8 % for the ipsilateral inferior parietal gyrus. The measurement of water diffusion from the parcellated cortex may be clinically useful for the assessment of PD patients. (orig.)

  6. Cognitive Deficits, Changes in Synaptic Function, and Brain Pathology in a Mouse Model of Normal Aging(1,2,3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Martin; Wu, Tiffany; Hanson, Jesse E; Alam, Nazia M; Solanoy, Hilda; Ngu, Hai; Lauffer, Benjamin E; Lin, Han H; Dominguez, Sara L; Reeder, Jens; Tom, Jennifer; Steiner, Pascal; Foreman, Oded; Prusky, Glen T; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly

    2015-09-01

    Age is the main risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer's disease. Yet, cognitive decline in aged rodents has been less well studied, possibly due to concomitant changes in sensory or locomotor function that can complicate cognitive tests. We tested mice that were 3, 11, and 23 months old in cognitive, sensory, and motor measures, and postmortem measures of gliosis and neural activity (c-Fos). Hippocampal synaptic function was also examined. While age-related impairments were detectable in tests of spatial memory, greater age-dependent effects were observed in tests of associative learning [active avoidance (AA)]. Gross visual function was largely normal, but startle responses to acoustic stimuli decreased with increased age, possibly due to hearing impairments. Therefore, a novel AA variant in which light alone served as the conditioning stimuli was used. Age-related deficits were again observed. Mild changes in vision, as measured by optokinetic responses, were detected in 19- versus 4-month-old mice, but these were not correlated to AA performance. Thus, deficits in hearing or vision are unlikely to account for the observed deficits in cognitive measures. Increased gliosis was observed in the hippocampal formation at older ages. Age-related changes in neural function and plasticity were observed with decreased c-Fos in the dentate gyrus, and decreased synaptic strength and paired-pulse facilitation in CA1 slices. This work, which carefully outlines age-dependent impairments in cognitive and synaptic function, c-Fos activity, and gliosis during normal aging in the mouse, suggests robust translational measures that will facilitate further study of the biology of aging.

  7. Comparison of molecular signatures in large scale protein interaction networks in normal and cancer conditions of brain, cervix, lung, ovary and prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat Suvra Banik

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Cancer, the disease of intricateness, has remained beyond our complete perception so far. Network systems biology (termed NSB is one of the most recent approaches to understand the unsolved problems of cancer development. From this perspective, differential protein networks (PINs have been developed based on the expression and interaction data of brain, cervix, lung, ovary and prostate for normal and cancer conditions. Methods Differential expression database GeneHub-GEPIS and interaction database STRING were applied for primary data retrieval. Cytoscape platform and related plugins named network analyzer; MCODE and ModuLand were used for visualization of complex networks and subsequent analysis. Results Significant differences were observedamong different common network parameters between normal and cancer states. Moreover, molecular complex numbers and overlapping modularization found to be varying significantly between normal and cancerous tissues. The number of the ranked molecular complex and the nodes involved in the overlapping modules were meaningfully higher in cancer condition.We identified79 commonly up regulated and 6 down regulated proteins in all five tissues. Number of nodes, edges; multi edge node pair, and average number of neighbor are found with significant fluctuations in case of cervix and ovarian tissues.Cluster analysis showed that the association of Myc and Cdk4 proteins is very close with other proteins within the network.Cervix and ovarian tissue showed higher increment of the molecular complex number and overlapping module network during cancer in comparison to normal state. Conclusions The differential molecular signatures identified from the work can be studied further to understand the cancer signaling process, and potential therapeutic and detection approach. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(4.000: 605-615

  8. Diverging mechanisms for TNF-alpha receptors in normal mouse brains and in functional recovery after injury: From gene to behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Albert; Molinero, Amalia; Florit, Sergi; Manso, Yasmina; Comes, Gemma; Carrasco, Javier; Giralt, Mercedes; Borup, Rehannah; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Campbell, Iain L; Penkowa, Milena; Hidalgo, Juan

    2007-09-01

    Cytokines, such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and lymphotoxin-alpha, have been described widely to play important roles in the brain in physiologic conditions and after traumatic injury. However, the exact mechanisms involved in their function have not been fully elucidated. We give some insight on their role by using animals lacking either Type 1 receptor (TNFR1KO) or Type 2 (TNFR2KO) and their controls (C57Bl/6). Both TNFR1KO and to a greater extent TNFR2KO mice showed increased exploration/activity neurobehavioral traits in the hole board test, such as rearings, head dippings, and ambulations, compared with wild-type mice, suggesting an inhibitory role of TNFR1/TNFR2 signaling. In contrast, no significant differences were observed in the elevated plus maze test, ruling out a major role of these receptors in the control of anxiety. We next evaluated the response to a freeze injury to the somatosensorial cortex. The effect of the cryolesion on motor function was evaluated with the horizontal ladder beam test, and the results showed that both TNFR1KO and TNFR2KO mice made fewer errors, suggesting a detrimental role for TNFR1/TNFR2 signaling for coping with brain damage. Expression of approximately 22600 genes was analyzed using an Affymetrix chip (MOE430A) at 0 (unlesioned), 1, or 4 days post-lesion in the three strains. The results show a unique and major role of both TNF receptors on the pattern of gene expression elicited by the injury but also in normal conditions, and suggest that blocking of TNFR1/TNFR2 receptors may be beneficial after a traumatic brain injury.

  9. The effect of scatter correction on {sup 123}I-IMP brain perfusion SPET with the triple energy window method in normal subjects using SPM analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiga, Tohru; Takano, Akihiro; Tsukamoto, Eriko; Tamaki, Nagara [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Kubo, Naoki [Department of Radiological Technology, College of Medical Technology, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Kobayashi, Junko; Takeda, Yoji; Nakamura, Fumihiro; Koyama, Tsukasa [Department of Psychiatry and Neurology, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Katoh, Chietsugu [Department of Tracer Kinetics, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    Scatter correction (SC) using the triple energy window method (TEW) has recently been applied for brain perfusion single-photon emission tomography (SPET). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of scatter correction using TEW on N-isopropyl-p-[{sup 123}I]iodoamphetamine ({sup 123}I-IMP) SPET in normal subjects. The study population consisted of 15 right-handed normal subjects. SPET data were acquired from 20 min to 40 min after the injection of 167 MBq of IMP, using a triple-head gamma camera. Images were reconstructed with and without SC. 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images were also obtained with a 1.5-Tesla scanner. First, IMP images with and without SC were co-registered to the 3D MRI. Second, the two co-registered IMP images were normalised using SPM96. A t statistic image for the contrast condition effect was constructed. We investigated areas using a voxel-level threshold of 0.001, with a corrected threshold of 0.05. Compared with results obtained without SC, the IMP distribution with SC was significantly decreased in the peripheral areas of the cerebellum, the cortex and the ventricle, and also in the lateral occipital cortex and the base of the temporal lobe. On the other hand, the IMP distribution with SC was significantly increased in the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex, the insular cortex and the medial part of the thalamus. It is concluded that differences in the IMP distribution with and without SC exist not only in the peripheral areas of the cerebellum, the cortex and the ventricle but also in the occipital lobe, the base of the temporal lobe, the insular cortex, the medial part of the thalamus, and the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex. This needs to be recognised for adequate interpretation of IMP brain perfusion SPET after scatter correction. (orig.)

  10. Brain catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibition by tolcapone counteracts recognition memory deficits in normal and chronic phencyclidine-treated rats and in COMT-Val transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detrait, Eric R; Carr, Greg V; Weinberger, Daniel R; Lamberty, Yves

    2016-08-01

    The critical involvement of dopamine in cognitive processes has been well established, suggesting that therapies targeting dopamine metabolism may alleviate cognitive dysfunction. Catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) is a catecholamine-degrading enzyme, the substrates of which include dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. The present work illustrates the potential therapeutic efficacy of COMT inhibition in alleviating cognitive impairment. A brain-penetrant COMT inhibitor, tolcapone, was tested in normal and phencyclidine-treated rats and COMT-Val transgenic mice. In a novel object recognition procedure, tolcapone counteracted a 24-h-dependent forgetting of a familiar object as well as phencyclidine-induced recognition deficits in the rats at doses ranging from 7.5 to 30 mg/kg. In contrast, entacapone, a COMT inhibitor that does not readily cross the blood-brain barrier, failed to show efficacy at doses up to 30 mg/kg. Tolcapone at a dose of 30 mg/kg also improved novel object recognition performance in transgenic mice, which showed clear recognition deficits. Complementing earlier studies, our results indicate that central inhibition of COMT positively impacts recognition memory processes and might constitute an appealing treatment for cognitive dysfunction related to neuropsychiatric disorders.

  11. Immunohistochemical investigation of voltage-gated potassium channel-interacting protein 1 in normal rat brain and Pentylenettrazole-induced seizures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao SU; Ai-Hua LUO; Wen-Dong CONG; Wei-Wen SUN; Wei-Yi DENG; Qi-Hua ZHAO; Zhuo-Hua ZHANG; Wei-Ping LIAO

    2006-01-01

    Objective To explore the possible role of voltage-gated potassium channel-interacting protein 1 (KChIP1) in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Methods Sprague Dawley female adult rats were treated with pentylenettrazole (PTZ) to develop acute and chronic epilepsy models. The approximate coronal sections of normal and epilepsy rat brain were processed for immunohistochemistry. Double-labeling confocal microscopy was used to determine the coexistence of KChIP1 and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Results KChIP1 was expressed abundantly throughout adult rat brain.KChIP1 is highly co-localize with GABA transmitter in hippocampus and cerebral cortex. In the acute PTZ-induced convulsive rats, the number of KChIP1-postive cells was significantly increased especially in the regions of CA 1 and CA3 (P < 0.05); whereas the chronic PTZ-induced convulsive rats were found no changes. The number of GABA-labeled and co-labeled neurons in the hippocampus appeared to have no significant alteration responding to the epilepsy-genesis treatments. Conclusion KChIP1 might be involved in the PTZ-induced epileptogenesis process as a regulator to neuronal excitability through influencing the properties of potassium channels. KChIP1 is preferentially expressed in GABAergic neurons, but its changes did not couple with GABA in the epileptic models.

  12. Holistic face categorization in higher-level cortical visual areas of the normal and prosopagnosic brain: towards a non-hierarchical view of face perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Rossion

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available How a visual stimulus is initially categorized as a face in a network of human brain areas remains largely unclear. Hierarchical neuro-computational models of face perception assume that the visual stimulus is first decomposed in local parts in lower order visual areas. These parts would then be combined into a global representation in higher order face-sensitive areas of the occipito-temporal cortex. Here we tested this view in fMRI with visual stimuli that are categorized as faces based on their global configuration rather than their local parts (2-tones Mooney figures and Arcimboldo’s facelike paintings. Compared to the same inverted visual stimuli that are not categorized as faces, these stimuli activated the right middle fusiform gyrus (Fusiform face area, FFA and superior temporal sulcus (pSTS, with no significant activation in the posteriorly located inferior occipital gyrus (i.e., no occipital face area, OFA. This observation is strengthened by behavioral and neural evidence for normal face categorization of these stimuli in a brain-damaged prosopagnosic patient (PS whose intact right middle fusiform gyrus and superior temporal sulcus are devoid of any potential face-sensitive inputs from the lesioned right inferior occipital cortex. Together, these observations indicate that face-preferential activation may emerge in higher order visual areas of the right hemisphere without any face-preferential inputs from lower order visual areas, supporting a non-hierarchical view of face perception in the visual cortex.

  13. FDG-PET changes in brain glucose metabolism from normal cognition to pathologically verified Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosconi, Lisa [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New York (United States); New York University School of Medicine, Center for Brain Health, MHL 400, New York, NY (United States); Mistur, Rachel; Switalski, Remigiusz; Glodzik, Lidia; Li, Yi; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; De Santi, Susan; Reisberg, Barry [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New York (United States); Tsui, Wai Hon; De Leon, Mony J. [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New York (United States); Nathan Kline Institute, Orangeburg, NY (United States); Wisniewski, Thomas [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New York (United States); New York University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, New York (United States); New York University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, New York (United States)

    2009-05-15

    We report the first clinicopathological series of longitudinal FDG-PET scans in post-mortem (PM) verified cognitively normal elderly (NL) followed to the onset of Alzheimer's-type dementia (DAT), and in patients with mild DAT with progressive cognitive deterioration. Four NL subjects and three patients with mild DAT received longitudinal clinical, neuropsychological and dynamic FDG-PET examinations with arterial input functions. NL subjects were followed for 13 {+-} 5 years, received FDG-PET examinations over 7 {+-} 2 years, and autopsy 6 {+-} 3 years after the last FDG-PET. Two NL declined to mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and two developed probable DAT before death. DAT patients were followed for 9 {+-} 3 years, received FDG-PET examinations over 3 {+-} 2 years, and autopsy 7 {+-} 1 years after the last FDG-PET. Two DAT patients progressed to moderate-to-severe dementia and one developed vascular dementia. The two NL subjects who declined to DAT received a PM diagnosis of definite AD. Their FDG-PET scans indicated a progression of deficits in the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRglc) from the hippocampus to the parietotemporal and posterior cingulate cortices. One DAT patient showed AD with diffuse Lewy body disease (LBD) at PM, and her last in vivo PET was indicative of possible LBD for the presence of occipital as well as parietotemporal hypometabolism. Progressive CMRglc reductions on FDG-PET occur years in advance of clinical DAT symptoms in patients with pathologically verified disease. The FDG-PET profiles in life were consistent with the PM diagnosis. (orig.)

  14. Exploring Volunteering of Committed Young Catholics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a study of volunteer levels of Catholics from various World regions who attended an international youth Catholic festival. Volunteering levels, types of volunteering, reason for volunteering, Catholic group membership and pro-social values are analysed. An online survey was administered five months after the Festival to…

  15. Volunteering among Young People. Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mark Hugo; Marcelo, Karlo Barrios

    2007-01-01

    This fact sheet presents information on the frequency of volunteering, trends in volunteering, and the organizations for which young people volunteer, utilizing data from multiple sources. Unlike many surveys, it shows that volunteering rates among young people are generally higher than they are among adults 26 and older. Findings of the Civic and…

  16. Volunteering Among Young People. CIRCLE Fact Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mark Hugo

    2004-01-01

    Volunteering rates among young people are generally higher than they are among adults 26 and older. However, measuring volunteer rates among all adults is a difficult task. In recent years, efforts at measuring volunteering have produced widely different estimates, largely because of the methods employed to measure volunteering. For example, the…

  17. Volunteering among High School Students. Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelo, Karlo Barrios

    2007-01-01

    This fact sheet explores volunteering among high school students, ages 16-18. Overall, volunteering among high school students was down slightly in 2006 as compared to 2005. Additional information includes types of volunteer organizations and activities, and ways that high school students become involved in these activities. Volunteer rate vary by…

  18. Parallel Volunteer Learning during Youth Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesmeister, Marilyn K.; Green, Jeremy; Derby, Amy; Bothum, Candi

    2012-01-01

    Lack of time is a hindrance for volunteers to participate in educational opportunities, yet volunteer success in an organization is tied to the orientation and education they receive. Meeting diverse educational needs of volunteers can be a challenge for program managers. Scheduling a Volunteer Learning Track for chaperones that is parallel to a…

  19. Performance of Junctional Tourniquets in Normal Human Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Institute of Surgical Research (USAISR), JBSA Fort Sam Houston, Texas (JFK, RSK, APC, JKA, TJW, BSK, RAD , HFP, LCC), and Medical Evacuation Fusion Cell, U.S...tions. Furthermore, the American College of Surgeon’s Committee on Trauma has an External Hemorrhage Control Guideline whose authors specifically mention...improving com- bat casualty care. J Trauma . 2011;71:S4–8. 5. Eastridge BJ, Mabry RL, Seguin P, et al. Death on the battlefield (2001–2011): implications for

  20. Personality Traits and Motives for Volunteering

    OpenAIRE

    Marija Juzbasic; Tena Vukasovic Hlupic

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the possibility of predicting volunteer motives based on five-factor model of personality in a sample of 159 volunteers from Zagreb, Osijek and Split. Data was collected using IPIP-300 personality questionnaire and Volunteer Functions Inventory. Results indicate that Croatian volunteers are agreeable, conscientious, altruistic, dutiful, and moral persons with artistic interests. Their most salient motives for volunteering are understanding and values. Hierarc...

  1. Brain energy metabolism and blood flow differences in healthy aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanerud, Joel; Borghammer, Per; Chakravarty, M Mallar

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO(2)), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) are important indices of healthy aging of the brain. Although a frequent topic of study, changes of CBF and CMRO(2) during normal aging are still controversial, as some authors...... find decreases of both CBF and CMRO(2) but increased OEF, while others find no change, and yet other find divergent changes. In this reanalysis of previously published results from positron emission tomography of healthy volunteers, we determined CMRO(2) and CBF in 66 healthy volunteers aged 21 to 81......, and in the temporal cortex. Because of the inverse relation between OEF and capillary oxygen tension, increased OEF can compromise oxygen delivery to neurons, with possible perturbation of energy turnover. The results establish a possible mechanism of progression from healthy to unhealthy brain aging, as the regions...

  2. North Central Region 4-H Volunteers: Documenting Their Contributions and Volunteer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nippolt, Pamela Larson; Pleskac, Sue; Schwartz, Vicki; Swanson, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Documenting volunteer contributions strengthens Extension partnerships with volunteers. A team of North Central Region 4-H volunteer specialists collaborated to conduct a study of 4-H volunteer contributions and impacts related to working with youth within the 4-H program. Over three thousand (3,332) 4-H volunteers from throughout the 12-state…

  3. More than Volunteering: Active Citizenship through Youth Volunteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learning and Skills Network (NJ1), 2007

    2007-01-01

    This pack aims to provide materials to help all those involved in youth volunteering and post-16 citizenship education to ensure that there are some citizenship learning outcomes from these valuable experiences. The pack has been produced by the Post-16 Citizenship Support Programme to help the integration of citizenship education into post-16…

  4. The brain-specific RasGEF very-KIND is required for normal dendritic growth in cerebellar granule cells and proper motor coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kanehiro; Furuya, Asako; Sakamaki, Yuriko; Akagi, Takumi; Shinoda, Yo; Sadakata, Tetsushi; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Shimizu, Kazuki; Minami, Haruka; Sano, Yoshitake; Nakayama, Manabu

    2017-01-01

    Very-KIND/Kndc1/KIAA1768 (v-KIND) is a brain-specific Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factor carrying two sets of the kinase non-catalytic C-lobe domain (KIND), and is predominantly expressed in cerebellar granule cells. Here, we report the impact of v-KIND deficiency on dendritic and synaptic growth in cerebellar granule cells in v-KIND knockout (KO) mice. Furthermore, we evaluate motor function in these animals. The gross anatomy of the cerebellum, including the cerebellar lobules, layered cerebellar cortex and densely-packed granule cell layer, in KO mice appeared normal, and was similar to wild-type (WT) mice. However, KO mice displayed an overgrowth of cerebellar granule cell dendrites, compared with WT mice, resulting in an increased number of dendrites, dendritic branches and terminals. Immunoreactivity for vGluT2 (a marker for excitatory presynapses of mossy fiber terminals) was increased in the cerebellar glomeruli of KO mice, compared with WT mice. The postsynaptic density around the terminals of mossy fibers was also increased in KO mice. Although there were no significant differences in locomotor ability between KO and WT animals in their home cages or in the open field, young adult KO mice had an increased grip strength and a tendency to exhibit better motor performance in balance-related tests compared with WT animals. Taken together, our results suggest that v-KIND is required for compact dendritic growth and proper excitatory synaptic connections in cerebellar granule cells, which are necessary for normal motor coordination and balance. PMID:28264072

  5. Normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrocephalus - occult; Hydrocephalus - idiopathic; Hydrocephalus - adult; Hydrocephalus - communicating; Dementia - hydrocephalus; NPH ... Ferri FF. Normal pressure hydrocephalus. In: Ferri FF, ed. ... Elsevier; 2016:chap 648. Rosenberg GA. Brain edema and disorders ...

  6. Global and regional brain volumes normalization in weight-recovered adolescents with anorexia nervosa: preliminary findings of a longitudinal voxel-based morphometry study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bomba M

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Monica Bomba,1,* Anna Riva,1,* Sabrina Morzenti,2 Marco Grimaldi,3 Francesca Neri,1 Renata Nacinovich1 1Child and Adolescent Mental Health Department, San Gerardo Hospital, University of Milano-Bicocca, Monza, Italy; 2Medical Physics Department, San Gerardo Hospital, Monza, Italy; 3Department of Radiology, Humanitas Research Hospital, Milan, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The recent literature on anorexia nervosa (AN suggests that functional and structural abnormalities of cortico-limbic areas might play a role in the evolution of the disease. We explored global and regional brain volumes in a cross-sectional and follow-up study on adolescents affected by AN. Eleven adolescents with AN underwent a voxel-based morphometry study at time of diagnosis and immediately after weight recovery. Data were compared to volumes carried out in eight healthy, age and sex matched controls. Subjects with AN showed increased cerebrospinal fluid volumes and decreased white and gray matter volumes, when compared to controls. Moreover, significant regional gray matter decrease in insular cortex and cerebellum was found at time of diagnosis. No regional white matter decrease was found between samples and controls. Correlations between psychological evaluation and insular volumes were explored. After weight recovery gray matter volumes normalized while reduced global white matter volumes persisted. Keywords: anorexia nervosa, adolescent, gray matter, insula, voxel-based morphometry study

  7. Diverging mechanisms for TNF-alpha receptors in normal mouse brains and in functional recovery after injury: From gene to behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintana, Albert; Molinero, Amalia; Florit, Sergi;

    2007-01-01

    insight on their role by using animals lacking either Type 1 receptor (TNFR1KO) or Type 2 (TNFR2KO) and their controls (C57Bl/6). Both TNFR1KO and to a greater extent TNFR2KO mice showed increased exploration/activity neurobehavioral traits in the hole board test, such as rearings, head dippings...... to the somatosensorial cortex. The effect of the cryolesion on motor function was evaluated with the horizontal ladder beam test, and the results showed that both TNFR1KO and TNFR2KO mice made fewer errors, suggesting a detrimental role for TNFR1/TNFR2 signaling for coping with brain damage. Expression of approximately...... 22600 genes was analyzed using an Affymetrix chip (MOE430A) at 0 (unlesioned), 1, or 4 days post-lesion in the three strains. The results show a unique and major role of both TNF receptors on the pattern of gene expression elicited by the injury but also in normal conditions, and suggest that blocking...

  8. Simple models of human brain functional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vértes, Petra E; Alexander-Bloch, Aaron F; Gogtay, Nitin; Giedd, Jay N; Rapoport, Judith L; Bullmore, Edward T

    2012-04-10

    Human brain functional networks are embedded in anatomical space and have topological properties--small-worldness, modularity, fat-tailed degree distributions--that are comparable to many other complex networks. Although a sophisticated set of measures is available to describe the topology of brain networks, the selection pressures that drive their formation remain largely unknown. Here we consider generative models for the probability of a functional connection (an edge) between two cortical regions (nodes) separated by some Euclidean distance in anatomical space. In particular, we propose a model in which the embedded topology of brain networks emerges from two competing factors: a distance penalty based on the cost of maintaining long-range connections; and a topological term that favors links between regions sharing similar input. We show that, together, these two biologically plausible factors are sufficient to capture an impressive range of topological properties of functional brain networks. Model parameters estimated in one set of functional MRI (fMRI) data on normal volunteers provided a good fit to networks estimated in a second independent sample of fMRI data. Furthermore, slightly detuned model parameters also generated a reasonable simulation of the abnormal properties of brain functional networks in people with schizophrenia. We therefore anticipate that many aspects of brain network organization, in health and disease, may be parsimoniously explained by an economical clustering rule for the probability of functional connectivity between different brain areas.

  9. The hubs of the human connectome are generally implicated in the anatomy of brain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Nicolas A; Mechelli, Andrea; Scott, Jessica; Carletti, Francesco; Fox, Peter T; McGuire, Philip; Bullmore, Edward T

    2014-08-01

    Brain networks or 'connectomes' include a minority of highly connected hub nodes that are functionally valuable, because their topological centrality supports integrative processing and adaptive behaviours. Recent studies also suggest that hubs have higher metabolic demands and longer-distance connections than other brain regions, and therefore could be considered biologically costly. Assuming that hubs thus normally combine both high topological value and high biological cost, we predicted that pathological brain lesions would be concentrated in hub regions. To test this general hypothesis, we first identified the hubs of brain anatomical networks estimated from diffusion tensor imaging data on healthy volunteers (n = 56), and showed that computational attacks targeted on hubs disproportionally degraded the efficiency of brain networks compared to random attacks. We then prepared grey matter lesion maps, based on meta-analyses of published magnetic resonance imaging data on more than 20 000 subjects and 26 different brain disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging lesions that were common across all brain disorders were more likely to be located in hubs of the normal brain connectome (P brain disorders had lesions that were significantly more likely to be located in hubs (P human brain networks are more likely to be anatomically abnormal than non-hubs in many (if not all) brain disorders.

  10. 正常成人处于"气功态"和"催眠态"时的脑诱发电位实验%Experiment of brain evoked potentials in "Qigong state" and "hypnosis" of normal adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶明毅; 张明岛; 陈兴时

    2005-01-01

    态和气功入静态相比波幅降低[(2.01±1.28),(2.71±1.83),(2.73±1.34)μV,P<0.05];催眠状态下视觉诱发电位(P2,P3)波幅与正常态以及气功态相比降低[(3.47±2.69),(4.76±2.78),(4.30±2.64)μV;(1.68±0.95),(1.18±1.08),(2.01±1.48)μV,P<0.05].结论:处于催眠状态时,感觉诱发电位出现低波幅,而气功入静态和正常态未出现此种改变,说明催眠诱导对大脑生理过程的影响与气功发功所产生的影响存在差别.在气功界被广泛认同的"气功态"即"催眠态"这一假说不能为上述实验结果所证实.%BACKGROUND: Since the diagnostic unit is established in "mental disorder due to Qigong", it has been lack of comparative analysis of experimental observation on whether Qigong exercise affects physiological state in central nerve system, on what the difference are between Qigong and hypnotic induction in the effects on central system.OBJECTIVE: To observe the changes in brain evoked potentials in "normal state", "Qigong meditation" and "hypnosis" so as to analyze the difference between Qigong release and hypnotic induction in cerebral physiological effects in normal adults.DESIGN: Brain evoked potential experiment was designed, in which, normal adults were employed.SETTING: Shanghai Mental Health Center.PARTICIPANTS: They were staffs, interns and volunteers in Shanghai Mental Health Center, of either gender, at any age and with any educational background, totally 52 people.METHODS: ① American Nicolet Spirit evoked brain electrophysiological meter was used. The electrodes were attached according to 10/20 system on Cz, C3, C4, Pz and Fz of scalp. Verbal or fixation inductive hypnosis was applied. Hypnosis lasted 20 to 30 minutes, in which, the induction lasted 10to 15 minutes. The experimental observation were performed when the receptors were determined to be in hypnosis. ② The Qigong meditation was co-performed by the Qigong masters from Shanghai Qigong Institute or Qigong folk masters

  11. Towards trusted volunteer grid environments

    CERN Document Server

    Khemakhem, Maher; University, Sousse; Tunisia,; University, Manouba; Tunisia),; 10.5121/ijcnc.2010.2207

    2010-01-01

    Intensive experiences show and confirm that grid environments can be considered as the most promising way to solve several kinds of problems relating either to cooperative work especially where involved collaborators are dispersed geographically or to some very greedy applications which require enough power of computing or/and storage. Such environments can be classified into two categories; first, dedicated grids where the federated computers are solely devoted to a specific work through its end. Second, Volunteer grids where federated computers are not completely devoted to a specific work but instead they can be randomly and intermittently used, at the same time, for any other purpose or they can be connected or disconnected at will by their owners without any prior notification. Each category of grids includes surely several advantages and disadvantages; nevertheless, we think that volunteer grids are very promising and more convenient especially to build a general multipurpose distributed scalable enviro...

  12. 大学生参与社区志愿服务的现状调查--以上海师范大学为例%A Survey on the Participation Situation of College Students in Community Volunteer Service--A Case Study of Shanghai Normal University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘庆

    2013-01-01

    College students to participate in community volunteer activities both is helping others, service to the community, but also is to spread love and civilization, and thus influence and improve the moral standards of society as a whole. The survey showed that the atmosphere of students to participate in community volunteer service is not thick, the volunteer service contents are relatively simple and lack of continuity, motivation to participate in volunteer community service is more mature, with more emphasis on mental stimulation. To carry out in-depth the community volunteer service of college students, it is necessary to step up publicity efforts to create a good volunteer service atmosphere on campus;expand the field of community volunteer service;promote volunteer service legislative process; establish a platform for college students volunteer community service activities, and off-campus volunteer organizational structure.%  大学生参与社区志愿服务活动既是在帮助他人、服务社会,也是在传递爱心和传播文明,进而影响和改善整个社会的道德水平。调查表明,目前大学生参与社区志愿服务的氛围不浓,志愿服务的内容较单一、缺乏服务持续性,参与社区志愿服务的动机较成熟,更为注重精神激励。为使大学生社区志愿服务深入开展,需要加强宣传力度,在校园中营造良好的志愿服务氛围;拓展社区志愿服务的领域;推进志愿服务立法进程;建立大学生社区志愿服务活动的平台,与校外的志愿组织结对。

  13. 76 FR 20215 - National Volunteer Week, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... real and lasting impact on the lives of millions of women and men across the globe. Last year, nearly... they see a need. During National Volunteer Week, we celebrate the profound impact of volunteers and... week by volunteering in service projects across our country and pledging to make service a part...

  14. The Contribution of Social Resources To Volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John; Musick, Marc

    1998-01-01

    Outlines a theory of how social capital contributes to volunteering, hypothesizing that social capital has a stronger effect on volunteering among people with more human capital and socioeconomic status. Specifies a test (of the effects) of social capital on volunteering and discusses the findings (of the test) in detail. (CMK)

  15. Student Volunteering in English Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Clare; Quinn, Jocey

    2010-01-01

    Volunteering in English higher education has come under political scrutiny recently, with strong cross-party support for schemes to promote undergraduate volunteering in particular. Recent targeted initiatives and proposals have sought to strengthen both the role of volunteering in higher education and synergies between higher education and…

  16. Nurses' perceptions of hospice palliative care volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen; Hastings, Emily; Claxton-Oldfield, Jane

    2008-01-01

    A total of 50 nurses (hospital and home care) responded to a survey designed to measure: (1) their attitudes toward, and knowledge of, hospice palliative care volunteers; (2) the types of tasks they felt it was appropriate for volunteers to perform; and (3) how valuable they felt different members of the hospice palliative care team are. In addition, they were asked to respond to some open-ended questions (eg, "Do you feel that it is appropriate for hospice palliative care volunteers to know patient medical information?"). The nurses' responses to the "Attitude/Knowledge" part of the survey revealed that they generally held positive attitudes toward volunteers. The majority of the nurses felt that it was appropriate for volunteers to perform most of the tasks listed, except for hands-on patient care. Nurses rated the value of nurses, family members, doctors, and pharmacists significantly higher than volunteers. Fifty-three percent of the nurses felt that volunteers should know patient medical information, and 77% thought that volunteers should have the opportunity to provide input regarding patient care. Also, 75% of the nurses felt that volunteers made their jobs easier, and 56% felt that volunteers should be included in team meetings. When asked to list the topics covered in a hospice palliative care volunteer training program, 73% of the nurses indicated that they were not sure or did not know what topics were covered, indicating a lack of knowledge regarding volunteer training.

  17. Engaged anthropology and corporate volunteering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Blahová

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present engaged anthropology and its methodological tools with a specific perspective of the research field and the position of the researcher with regard to research subjects. The study focuses on corporate volunteering as one of the forms of collaboration between the non-profit and the private sectors seeking solutions to social problems and community development. Volunteering projects contribute to the interlinking of the knowledge, skills, experience and resources of corporate employees and the representatives of the non-profit or the public sector. It is a part of the philanthropic strategy of companies which are willing to present themselves as entities responsible towards the environment in which they run their business, and towards their employees, partners and customers. Engaged anthropology can bring, through its methodological tools, a new perspective of corporate volunteering. Community-based participatory research on the process of knowledge creation includes all partners on an equal basis and identifies their unique contribution to problem solution and community development.

  18. The Understanding of Volunteer Tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Arbuzova, K. I.; Арбузова, К. И.

    2012-01-01

    The article considers the notion of volunteer tourism. The author identifies the main meaning of the term, considers the main problems of volunteer tourism and identifies relevant of volunteer tourism. В статье рассматривается понятие волонтерского туризма. Автор статьи определяет основные значения термина, рассматривает основные проблемы волонтерского туризма и определяет значимость волонтерского туризма....

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene: a gender-specific role in cognitive function during normal cognitive aging of the MEMO-Study?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Katharine R; Mitchell, David; Wersching, Heike; Czira, Maria E; Berger, Klaus; Baune, Bernhard T

    2012-08-01

    Cognitive aging processes are underpinned by multiple processes including genetic factors. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been suggested to be involved in age-related cognitive decline in otherwise healthy individuals. The gender-specific role of the BDNF gene in cognitive aging remains unclear. The identification of genetic biomarkers might be a useful approach to identify individuals at risk of cognitive decline during healthy aging processes. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the BDNF gene and domains of cognitive functioning in normal cognitive aging. The sample, comprising 369 participants (M = 72.7 years, SD = 4.45 years), completed an extensive neuropsychological test battery measuring memory, motor function, and perceptual speed. The relationships between the SNPs rs6265, rs7103411, and rs7124442 and cognitive domains were examined. While significant main effects of BDNF SNPs on cognitive function were found for the association between rs7103411 and memory performance, gender-specific analyses revealed for females significant main effects of rs7103411 for memory and of rs6265 for perceptual speed independent of the APOE*E4 status and education. The finding for the association between rs6265 and perceptual speed in females remained significant after Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. None of the analyses showed significant results for males. This study is the first to implicate that the SNPs rs6265 and rs7103411 affect cognitive function in the elderly in a gender-specific way.

  20. Normalization of nano-sized TiO2-induced clastogenicity, genotoxicity and mutagenicity by chlorophyllin administration in mice brain, liver, and bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ghor, Akmal A; Noshy, Magda M; Galal, Ahmad; Mohamed, Hanan Ramadan H

    2014-11-01

    The intensive uses of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in sunscreens, toothpaste, sweats, medications, etc. making humans exposed to it daily by not little amounts and also increased its risks including genotoxicity. Thus, the present study was designed as one way to reduce nano-titanium-induced clastogenicity, genotoxicity, and mutagenicity in mice by co-administration of the free radical scavenger chlorophyllin (CHL). In addition, markers of oxidative stress were detected to shed more light on mechanism(s) underlying nano-sized TiO2 genotoxicity. Male mice were exposed to multiple injection into the abdominal cavity for five consecutive days with either CHL (40 mg/kg bw/day), or each of three dose levels of nano-sized TiO2 (500, 1000, or 2000 mg/kg bw/day) alone, or both simultaneously and sacrificed by cervical dislocation 24 h after the last treatment. After CHL co-administration, the observed dose-dependent genotoxicity of TiO2 nanoparticles indicated by the significant elevations in frequencies of both micronuclei and DNA damage induction was significantly decreased and returned to the negative control level. The observed induced mutations in p53 exons 5, 7, & 8 and 5 & 8 in the liver and brain, respectively, were declined in most cases. Moreover, CHL significantly decreased hepatic malondialdehyde level and significantly increased glutathione level and superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities that were significantly disrupted in animal groups treated with nano-TiO2 alone. In conclusion, the evidenced in vivo genotoxicity of nano-TiO2 in the present study was normalized after CHL co-administration which supports the previously suggested oxidative stress as the possible mechanism for titanium toxicity.

  1. Volume measurement of brain using 3.0T MRI in 140 normal Chinese and data analysis%采用3.0T MRI 对正常人脑体积定量测量研究(附140例分析)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔彩霞; 周存河; 崔慧先; 刘怀军; 周立霞; 黄渤源; 贺丹

    2014-01-01

    目的:采用3.0T MRI 对正常志愿者脑体积进行定量测量,确定正常值参考范围,并探讨其与年龄和性别的相关性。方法采用CE Signa EXCITE 3.0T高分辨MRI对140例健康志愿者(男性73例,女性67例,年龄10~84岁,平均45.8±18.3)进行头颅MRI 3DT1成像,在AW4.2工作站上采用半自动方法计算脑体积。并对不同性别、年龄进行统计分析。结果脑体积95%可信区间:男性为1480.15±141.04cm 3,女性为1322.91±110.11cm 3。脑体积与性别间差异有统计学意义(p<0.05),男性的脑体积要大于女性。脑体积在各年龄段之间差异无统计学意义( p>0.05)。结论头颅MRI 3D可以提供更准确的大脑容积定量,为各种相关疾病的临床诊断和治疗方案的制定提供客观依据。%Objective To measure the brain volume in normal Chinese , try to explore the relationship Methods 140 volunteers were examined with 3D T1 weighted images to obtain the between that with gender and age . whole brain image .The volume of whole brain was calculated on AW 4.1 workstation in semi-auto manner .Data of whole brain volume were analyzed in different gender and age with test and variance analysis .Results Volumes of the whole brain (The 95%confidence interval) were 1480.15±141.04 cm3 for male and 1322.91±110.11cm3 for . There was significant statistical correlation between whole brain volume and gender ( p0.05).Conclusion Whole brain MRI3D can provide quantitative brain volume more accurately , and provide objective basis for clinical diagnosis and treatment of various diseases .

  2. Volunteer Tourism in Japan: Its Potential in Transforming “Non-volunteers” to Volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Yoda, Mami

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the potential of volunteer tourism to transform “non-volunteers” to volunteers in Japan. Volunteer tourism is defined as travel to a location outside the immediate vicinity of daily life in order to engage in organized volunteer activities. In-depth interviews and a survey were conducted to the employees of Haagen-Dazs Japan, Inc., who participated to volunteer tours to the Kiritappu Wetland Trust in Hokkaido. The study closely examines the motivations of the participants...

  3. Three-dimensional reconstruction of functional brain images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Masato; Shoji, Kazuhiko; Kojima, Hisayoshi; Hirano, Shigeru; Naito, Yasushi; Honjo, Iwao [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    We consider PET (positron emission tomography) measurement with SPM (Statistical Parametric Mapping) analysis to be one of the most useful methods to identify activated areas of the brain involved in language processing. SPM is an effective analytical method that detects markedly activated areas over the whole brain. However, with the conventional presentations of these functional brain images, such as horizontal slices, three directional projection, or brain surface coloring, makes understanding and interpreting the positional relationships among various brain areas difficult. Therefore, we developed three-dimensionally reconstructed images from these functional brain images to improve the interpretation. The subjects were 12 normal volunteers. The following three types of images were constructed: routine images by SPM, three-dimensional static images, and three-dimensional dynamic images, after PET images were analyzed by SPM during daily dialog listening. The creation of images of both the three-dimensional static and dynamic types employed the volume rendering method by VTK (The Visualization Toolkit). Since the functional brain images did not include original brain images, we synthesized SPM and MRI brain images by self-made C++ programs. The three-dimensional dynamic images were made by sequencing static images with available software. Images of both the three-dimensional static and dynamic types were processed by a personal computer system. Our newly created images showed clearer positional relationships among activated brain areas compared to the conventional method. To date, functional brain images have been employed in fields such as neurology or neurosurgery, however, these images may be useful even in the field of otorhinolaryngology, to assess hearing and speech. Exact three-dimensional images based on functional brain images are important for exact and intuitive interpretation, and may lead to new developments in brain science. Currently, the surface

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that contains codes to make proteins and other important body chemicals. DNA also includes information to control ... cells required for normal function and plays an important role during early brain development. It may also ...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct ... comparing such children to those with normal brain development may help scientists to pinpoint when and where mental disorders begin and perhaps how to slow or stop ...

  6. Padrões de ativação cerebral em idosos sadios durante tarefa de memória verbal de reconhecimento: a single-photon emission computerized tomography study Brain activation patterns during verbal recognition memory in elderly healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Busatto Filho

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Estudos que utilizam as técnicas de PET, SPECT e ressonância magnética funcional têm permitido o mapeamento dos circuitos cerebrais ativados durante diversas tarefas cognitivas. O campo da memória declarativa tem sido um dos mais intensamente estudados. No presente estudo, usa-se a técnica de mapeamento do fluxo sangüíneo cerebral regional (FSCr por SPECT para investigar mudanças na atividade cerebral durante uma tarefa de memória episódica, em voluntários idosos sadios (n=15. MÉTODOS: Duas avaliações de SPECT foram realizadas na mesma sessão, usando a técnica de dose dividida do traçador 99 m-Tc-HMPAO. Medidas de FSCr foram registradas durante uma tarefa de reconhecimento de material verbal previamente aprendido e durante uma tarefa-controle mais simples. Comparações de FSCr foram realizadas automaticamente, utilizando o programa Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM. RESULTADOS: Observou-se aumento de FSCr durante a tarefa de memória em várias regiões cerebrais, incluindo: córtex pré-frontal lateral bilateralmente (mais acentuadamente à esquerda; porções posteriores e mediais de córtex parieto-occipital à esquerda; hemisférios cerebelares bilateralmente; e córtex temporal lateral bilateralmente (pINTRODUCTION: PET, SPECT and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have allowed the delineation of brain circuits activated during several types of cognitive tasks. The field of declarative memory has been one of the most extensively investigated. In the present study, the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF SPECT technique was used to investigate changes in brain activity during a verbal memory task in a group of elderly healthy volunteers (n=15. METHODS:Two SPECT acquisitions were performed in the same session, using the split-dose 99mTc-HMPAO technique. Measures of rCBF were taken during a recognition memory task and a simpler control task. Between-task comparisons were performed automatically

  7. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to glycaemic carbohydrates and maintenance of normal brain function pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    OpenAIRE

    Tetens, Inge

    2015-01-01

    Following applications from Dextro Energy GmbH & Co. KG, submitted for the authorisation of health claims pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of Germany, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of health claims related to glycaemic carbohydrates and maintenance of normal brain function. The scope of the applications was proposed to fall under health...

  8. Construction of a standard reference for PET studies of methionine accumulation using a computerised brain atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanowski, C.A.J. [Department of Neuroradiology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield S10 2JF (United Kingdom); Leslie, D.F. [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Neuroradiology, Karolinska Hospital, S-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Thurfjell, L. [Centre for Image Analysis, University of Uppsala (Sweden); Ericson, K. [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Neuroradiology, Karolinska Hospital, S-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Stone-Elander, S. [Karolinska Pharmacy, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is valuable for assessing the biochemistry and physiology of the human brain. A computerised brain atlas has been developed which allows demonstration of anatomical regions on PET images and manipulation of these images into a standardised anatomical space. Once the images are in this standardised three-dimensional space it is possible to make comparisons between individuals and groups of individuals. We describe the use of this atlas in the generation of a set of mean reference images using methionine PET images of normal volunteers. (orig.). With 5 figs.

  9. Brain activation and connectivity of social cognition using diffuse optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Banghe; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2009-02-01

    In the current research, diffuse optical imaging (DOI) is used for the first time towards studies related to sociocommunication impairments, which is a characteristic feature of autism. DOI studies were performed on normal adult volunteers to determine the differences in the brain activation (cognitive regions) in terms of the changes in the cerebral blood oxygenation levels in response to joint and non-joint attention based stimulus (i.e. socio-communicative paradigms shown as video clips). Functional connectivity models are employed to assess the extent of synchronization between the left and right pre-frontal regions of the brain in response to the above stimuli.

  10. Cryptosporidium muris: Infectivity and Illness in Healthy Adult Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Cynthia L.; Okhuysen, Pablo C.; Langer-Curry, Rebecca C.; Lupo, Philip J.; Widmer, Giovanni; Tzipori, Saul

    2015-01-01

    Although Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis cause the majority of human cryptosporidiosis cases, other Cryptosporidium species are also capable of infecting humans, particularly when individuals are immunocompromised. Ten C. muris cases have been reported, primarily in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) -positive patients with diarrhea. However, asymptomatic cases were reported in two HIV-negative children, and in another case, age and immune status were not described. This study examines the infectivity of C. muris in six healthy adults. Volunteers were challenged with 105 C. muris oocysts and monitored for 6 weeks for infection and/or illness. All six patients became infected. Two patients experienced a self-limited diarrheal illness. Total oocysts shed during the study ranged from 6.7 × 106 to 4.1 × 108, and the number was slightly higher in volunteers with diarrhea (2.8 × 108) than asymptomatic shedders (4.4 × 107). C. muris-infected subjects shed oocysts longer than occurred with other species studied in healthy volunteers. Three volunteers shed oocysts for 7 months. Physical examinations were normal, with no reported recurrence of diarrhea or other gastrointestinal complaints. Two persistent shedders were treated with nitazoxanide, and the infection was resolved. Thus, healthy adults are susceptible to C. muris, which can cause mild diarrhea and result in persistent, asymptomatic infection. PMID:25311695

  11. A Review of the Bender Gestalt Test as a Screening Instrument for Brain Damage with School-Aged Children of Normal Intelligence Since 1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eno, Larry; Deichmann, John

    1980-01-01

    All methods reviewed significantly discriminate between groups of brain damaged and unimpaired children. No method, however, provides successful predictive rates high enough to warrant the use of the Bender as the sole diagnostic instrument in individual cases. (Author)

  12. 20 CFR 10.730 - What are the conditions of coverage for Peace Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders injured...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders injured while serving outside the United States? 10.730 Section... Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders injured while serving outside the United States? (a) Any injury sustained by a volunteer or volunteer leader while he or she is located abroad shall be presumed to...

  13. Consumption of tyrosine in royal jelly increases brain levels of dopamine and tyramine and promotes transition from normal to reproductive workers in queenless honey bee colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Syuhei; Nagao, Takashi; Sasaki, Ken

    2015-01-15

    Dopamine (DA) and tyramine (TA) have neurohormonal roles in the production of reproductive workers in queenless colonies of honey bees, but the regulation of these biogenic amines in the brain are still largely unclear. Nutrition is an important factor in promoting reproduction and might be involved in the regulation of these biogenic amines in the brain. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of oral treatments of tyrosine (Tyr; a common precursor of DA, TA and octopamine, and a component of royal jelly) in queenless workers and quantified the resulting production of biogenic amines. Tyrosine treatments enhanced the levels of DA, TA and their metabolites in the brain. Workers fed royal jelly had significantly larger brain levels of Tyr, DA, TA and the metabolites in the brains compared with those bees fed honey or sucrose (control). Treatment with Tyr also inhibited the behavior of workers outside of the hive and promoted ovarian development. These results suggest that there is a link between nutrition and the regulation of DA and TA in the brain to promote the production of reproductive workers in queenless honey bee colonies.

  14. Post-Event Volunteering Legacy: Did the London 2012 Games Induce a Sustainable Volunteer Engagement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niki Koutrou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The hosting of the London 2012 Olympic Games was seen as an opportunity to harness the enthusiasm of the 70,000 volunteers involved and to provide a post-event volunteer legacy. A total of 77 individuals who had acted as volunteers in London 2012 were contacted approximately four years after the Games and agreed to complete a web-based open-ended survey. The participants were asked to indicate their level of current volunteering engagement and whether volunteering at the Games had an impact on their current volunteering levels. The study found that the London Olympics were the first volunteer experience for most of the volunteers who completed the survey, with the main motivation to volunteer being anything related to the Olympic Games. Just over half of the respondents are currently volunteering. Lack of time is shown to be the main barrier towards further volunteering commitment. Only half of respondents had been contacted by a volunteering scheme after London 2012. The implications of the findings for a potential volunteering legacy are then explored.

  15. Normal cognitive aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Caroline N; Natelson Love, Marissa C; Triebel, Kristen L

    2013-11-01

    Even those who do not experience dementia or mild cognitive impairment may experience subtle cognitive changes associated with aging. Normal cognitive changes can affect an older adult's everyday function and quality of life, and a better understanding of this process may help clinicians distinguish normal from disease states. This article describes the neurocognitive changes observed in normal aging, followed by a description of the structural and functional alterations seen in aging brains. Practical implications of normal cognitive aging are then discussed, followed by a discussion of what is known about factors that may mitigate age-associated cognitive decline.

  16. The Effect of Volunteer Work on Employability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrovski, Erik; Dencker-Larsen, Sofie; Holm, Anders

    In addition to benefiting others, volunteer work is argued to supply volunteers themselves with skills, reputation, and social connections that increase overall employability. We test this hypothesized link between volunteer work and employability with a high-quality 2012 Danish survey sample of 1......,796 individuals of working age. The survey data is linked to administrative registers with individual level data on unemployment. A combination of detailed controls, lagged dependent variables, and instrumental variable regression is used in order to determine cause and effect. Our findings show that volunteers...

  17. Exploratory study to evaluate tolerability, safety, and activity of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) in healthy volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Raut, Ashwinikumar A.; Rege, Nirmala N.; Tadvi, Firoz M.; Solanki, Punita V.; Kene, Kirti R.; Shirolkar, Sudatta G.; Shefali N Pandey; Vaidya, Rama A.; Ashok B Vaidya

    2012-01-01

    Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) (WS), a “rasayana” drug, is recommended for balavardhan and mamsavardhan. The study was intended to evaluate dose-related tolerability, safety, and activity of WS formulation in normal individuals. The design was prospective, open-labeled, variable doses in volunteers. Eighteen apparently healthy volunteers (12M:6F, age:18-30 years, and BMI: 19-30) were enrolled. After baseline investigations, they received WS capsules (Rx) (aqueous extract, 8:1) daily in two ...

  18. Pain perception in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janum, Susanne; Nielsen, Signe T; Werner, Mads U;

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to study the relationship between pain perception and cytokine release during systemic inflammation. We present a randomized crossover trial in healthy volunteers (n = 17) in 37 individual trials. Systemic inflammation was induced by an i.v. bolus of Escherichia coli LPS (2 ng/kg) on two...... separate trial days, with or without a nicotine patch applied 10 h previously. Pain perception at baseline, and 2 and 6 h after LPS was assessed by pressure algometry and tonic heat stimulation at an increasing temperature (45-48℃) during both trials. Compared with baseline, pain pressure threshold...... was reduced 2 and 6 h after LPS, while heat pain perception was accentuated at all testing temperatures after 2 but not 6 h. The magnitude of changes in pain perception did not correlate to cytokine release. No effect of transdermal nicotine or training status was observed. In conclusion, LPS administration...

  19. Motivations and Benefits of Student Volunteering: Comparing Regular, Occasional, and Non-Volunteers in Five Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Smith

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Programmes targeting student volunteering and service learning are part of encouraging civic behaviour amongst young people. This article reports on a large scale international survey comparing volunteering amongst tertiary students at universities in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America. The data revealed high rates of student volunteering and the popularity of occasional or episodic volunteering. There were strong commonalities in student volunteering behaviour, motivations and benefits across the five Western predominately English-speaking countries. Altruism and self-orientated career motivations and benefits were most important to students; however volunteering and non-volunteering students differed in the relative value they attached to volunteering for CV-enhancement and social factors.

  20. Aging, Brain Size, and IQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Whether cross-sectional rates of decline for brain volume and the Performance Intellectual Quotient of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised were equivalent over the years 16 to 65 was studied with 196 volunteers. Results indicate remarkably similar rates of decline in perceptual-motor functions and aging brain volume loss. (SLD)

  1. Creation and evaluation of complementary composite three-dimensional image in various brain diseases. An application of three-dimensional brain SPECT image and three-dimensional CT image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiki, Yoshikatsu; Shibata, Iekado; Mito, Toshiaki; Sugo, Nobuo [Toho Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop 3D composite images for use in functional and anatomical evaluation of various cerebral pathologies. Imaging studies were performed in normal volunteers, patients with hydrocephalus and patients with brain tumor (meningioma and metastatic tumor) using a three-detector SPECT system (Prism 3000) and helical CT scanner (Xvigor). {sup 123}I-IMP was used in normal volunteers and patients with hydrocephalus, and {sup 201}TLCL in patients with brain tumor. An Application Visualization System-Medical Viewer (AVS-MV) was used on a workstation (Titan 2) to generate 3D images. A new program was developed by synthesizing surface rendering and volume rendering techniques. The clinical effects of shunt operations were successfully evaluated in patients with hydrocephalus by means of translucent 3D images of the deep brain. Changes in the hypoperfusion area around the cerebral ventricle were compared with morphological changes in the cerebral ventricle on CT. In addition to the information concerning the characteristics of brain tumors and surrounding edemas, hemodynamic changes and changeable hypoperfusion areas around the tumors were visualized on 3D composite CT and SPECT images. A new method of generating 3D composite images of CT and SPECT was developed by combining graphic data from different systems on the same workstation. Complementary 3D composite images facilitated quantitative analysis of brain volume and functional analysis in various brain diseases. (author)

  2. The Volunteering Legacy of London 2012 Games. A Pilot Study.

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The hosting of the London 2012 Olympic Games was seen as an opportunity to harness the enthusiasm of the 70000 volunteers involved and to provide a volunteer legacy post event. A total of 77 London 2012 volunteers completed a web-based open-ended survey. The participants were asked to indicate their level of current volunteering engagement and whether volunteering at the Games had an impact on their current volunteering levels. The study found that the London Olympics were the first volunteer...

  3. Motivations and Benefits of Student Volunteering: Comparing Regular, Occasional, and Non-Volunteers in Five Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Karen Smith; Kirsten Holmes; Debbie Haski-Leventhal; Cnaan, Ram A; Femida Handy; Brudney, Jeffrey L

    2010-01-01

    Programmes targeting student volunteering and service learning are part of encouraging civic behaviour amongst young people. This article reports on a large scale international survey comparing volunteering amongst tertiary students at universities in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America. The data revealed high rates of student volunteering and the popularity of occasional or episodic volunteering. There were strong commonalities in student volu...

  4. Do monetary rewards undermine intrinsic motivations of volunteers? Some empirical evidence for Italian volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Fiorillo, Damiano

    2007-01-01

    Empirical studies show that intrinsic motivations increase the volunteer labour supply. This paper studies how monetary rewards to volunteers affect their intrinsic motivations. Using a sample of Italian volunteers, allowing to distinguish the type of volunteer, the paper shows that monetary rewards (extrinsic motivations) influence positively the choice to donate voluntary hours, while a low intrinsic motivation seems to decrease hours per week. Moreover, monetary rewards increase the hours ...

  5. Fresh Frozen Plasma Resuscitation Provides Neuroprotection Compared to Normal Saline in a Large Animal Model of Traumatic Brain Injury and Polytrauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imam, Ayesha; Jin, Guang; Sillesen, Martin;

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We have previously shown that early treatment with fresh frozen plasma (FFP) is neuroprotective in a swine model of hemorrhagic shock (HS) and traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, it remains unknown whether this strategy would be beneficial in a more clinical polytrauma model. Yorkshire...... as well as cerebral perfusion pressures. Levels of cerebral eNOS were higher in the FFP-treated group (852.9 vs. 816.4 ng/mL; p=0.03), but no differences in brain levels of ET-1 were observed. Early administration of FFP is neuroprotective in a complex, large animal model of polytrauma, hemorrhage...

  6. A Guide for Co-ordinators of Volunteers and Volunteer Services in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Janet W., Comp.

    This manual for those responsible for matching teacher requests and student needs to volunteer services is applicable to a variety of school volunteer programs but concentrates on the type of volunteer service which evolved from the Winnetka, Illinois, project in which older citizens in the community form a "talent pool" to work to enrich the…

  7. Comparative study of brain function tests between patients with schizophrenia and normal controls%精神分裂症患者与正常对照脑功能检查对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白丽娟; 高红锐; 王艳; 赵钊; 王瑞明; 郭峰; 焦玉翔; 张瑞林; 王继禹

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate differences in brain function tests between patients with schizophrenia and normal controls.Methods 80 patients who met diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia of International Classification of Diseases (10th edition) received brain function tests,for the same period 52 cases of normal control also received brain function tests.Test results were compared to analyze differences in brain neurotransmitters.Results There were statistically significant differences in GABA and Glu neurotransmitters power between schizophrenia group and normal control group (t =-1.991,P =0.049; t =-2.228,P =0.028).There was statistically significant difference in glutamate neurotransmitter relative power between two groups (t =-2.115,P =0.036).There was statistically significant difference in neurotransmitters total power between two groups (t =-2.631,P =0.010).Conclusion Glutamate neurotransmitter power,relative neurotransmitters power and total neurotransmitters power in schizophrenia group were higher than those in normal control group,which suggested abnormal brain neurotransmitters function in patients with schizophrenia.%目的 探讨精神分裂症患者与正常人脑功能检查结果究竟有何不同.方法 对符合《国际疾病分类(第10版)》精神分裂症诊断标准的80例患者给予脑功能检查,对同期52例正常对照组也进行脑功能检查,比较两组检查结果,分析两组脑神经递质差异.结果 精神分裂症组与正常对照组相比:GABA及Glu递质功率差异有统计学意义(t=-1.991,P=0.049;t=-2.228,P--0.028),Glu递质相对功率差异有统计学意义(t=-2.115,P=0.036),递质总功率差异有统计学意义(t=-2.631,P=0.010).结论 精神分裂症患者Glu递质功率、递质相对功率及总功率均高于正常对照组,提示精神分裂症患者大脑递质功能存在异常.

  8. Meaningful Commitment: Finding Meaning in Volunteer Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Tatjana; Hoof, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that volunteer work is associated with various aspects of meaning making by employing a multi-dimensional model of meaning operationalized by the "Sources of Meaning and Meaning in Life Questionnaire" ("SoMe"). An empirical study comparing 168 volunteers with a representative sample of the general population (N =…

  9. Skill Development for Volunteering in Rural Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Sue; Stirling, Christine; Orpin, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the skills required of volunteers in the voluntary sector organisations that operate in three rural Tasmanian communities. It reports how volunteers acquire those skills and reveals the challenges faced by voluntary sector organisations in rural communities whose industries and, following from this, community members have a…

  10. Sumatriptan and cerebral perfusion in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, A K; Grimes, S; Ng, K; Critchley, M; Breckenridge, A M; Thomson, C; Pilgrim, A J

    1992-04-01

    1. The effect of sumatriptan on regional cerebral perfusion was studied in healthy volunteers. 2. Intravenous sumatriptan (2 mg) had no detectable effect on regional cerebral perfusion as measured using a SPECT system with 99technetiumm labelled hexemethylpropyleneamineoxime. 3. Sumatriptan had no effect on pulse, blood pressure or ECG indices. 4. All six volunteers experienced minor adverse effects during the intravenous infusion.

  11. Training Shelter Volunteers to Teach Dog Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Veronica J.; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the degree to which training procedures influenced the integrity of behaviorally based dog training implemented by volunteers of an animal shelter. Volunteers were taught to implement discrete-trial obedience training to teach 2 skills (sit and wait) to dogs. Procedural integrity during the baseline and written instructions…

  12. Corporate volunteering - motivation for voluntary work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Azevedo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, when the welfare state is a responsibility of the entire society, organizations in the private sector assume co-responsibility for social issues. They are also pressured by the challenges presented by technological advances and the globalization , involving new parameters and requirements for quality. In this context, the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (RSC emerges as an option for solutions to the issues related to the company and the whole community. Among the actions of the RSC is the Corporate Volunteering-program, which aims to promote / encourage employes to do voluntary work. A central issue when talking about volunteering is the withdrawal of these (SILVA and FEITOSA, 2002; TEODÓSIO, 1999 and, in accordance with the Community Solidarity (1997, one of the possible causes for the withdrawal is the lack of clarity as to the motives and expectations that lead the person to volunteer themselves. This study uses qualitative research and triangulation of feedback from volunteers, coordinators of volunteers and social organizations, to present a framework from which it is possible to analyze the various motivations for the volunteer work. Key words: Corporate Volunteering program. Volunteering. Corporate social responsibility.

  13. Volunteer map data collection at the USGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric, B. Wolf; Poore, Barbara S.; Caro, Holly K.; Matthews, Greg D.

    2011-01-01

    Since 1994, citizen volunteers have helped the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) improve its topographic maps. Through the Earth Science Corps program, citizens were able to "adopt a quad" and collect new information and update existing map features. Until its conclusion in 2001, as many as 300 volunteers annotated paper maps which were incorporated into the USGS topographic-map revision process.

  14. Student Volunteering in England: A Critical Moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwen, Jamie; Rannard, Andrea Grace

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the current state of student volunteering in English universities, and show how it contributes to some of the core activities of higher education, including teaching and learning, employability, and public engagement. The paper goes on to describe challenges currently faced by student volunteering,…

  15. Senior Volunteers: Helping Hands & Willing Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessely, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Volunteers and other community-based assistants can relieve some of the financial burden brought on by school-budget cutbacks. This publication describes how enlisting the help of senior volunteers and workers benefits both children and seniors, and it presents some guidelines for implementation of intergeneration programs. The programs provide…

  16. Matching Expectations for Successful University Student Volunteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paull, Megan; Omari, Maryam; MacCallum, Judith; Young, Susan; Walker, Gabrielle; Holmes, Kirsten; Haski-Leventha, Debbie; Scott, Rowena

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of expectation formation and matching for university student volunteers and their hosts. Design/methodology/approach: This research involved a multi-stage data collection process including interviews with student volunteers, and university and host representatives from six…

  17. Age-related changes in intracranial compartment volumes in normal adults assessed by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumae, M; Kikinis, R; Mórocz, I A; Lorenzo, A V; Sándor, T; Albert, M S; Black, P M; Jolesz, F A

    1996-06-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) image-based computerized segmentation was used to measure various intracranial compartments in 49 normal volunteers ranging in age from 24 to 80 years to determine age-related changes in brain, ventricular, and extraventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes. The total intracranial volume (sum of brain, ventricular, and extraventricular CSF) averaged 1469 +/- 102 cm3 in men and 1289 +/- 111 cm3 in women. The difference was attributable primarily to brain volume, which accounted for 88.6% of the respective intracranial volumes in both sexes, but was significantly larger in men (1302 +/- 112 cm3) than in women (1143 +/- 105 cm3). In both, the cranial CSF volume averaged 11.4%. Total intracranial volume did not change with age, although the normalized brain volume of both men and women began to decrease after the age of 40 years. This decrease was best reflected by expansion of the extraventricular CSF volume which, after the age of 50 years, was more marked in men than in women. The volume of the cranial CSF, as determined by MR image-based computerized segmentation, is considerably larger than traditionally accepted and resides mostly extraventricularly. Expansion of CSF volume with age provides a good index of brain shrinkage although evolving changes and growth of the head with age tend to confound the results.

  18. Personality Traits and Motives for Volunteering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Juzbasic

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to test the possibility of predicting volunteer motives based on five-factor model of personality in a sample of 159 volunteers from Zagreb, Osijek and Split. Data was collected using IPIP-300 personality questionnaire and Volunteer Functions Inventory. Results indicate that Croatian volunteers are agreeable, conscientious, altruistic, dutiful, and moral persons with artistic interests. Their most salient motives for volunteering are understanding and values. Hierarchical regression analysis confirmed that the five-factor model personality traits independently predict 17% of protective motive variance, 12% of values motive, 18% of career motive, 10% of understanding motive, and 12% of enhancement motive. Social motive was not explained by personality traits.

  19. Organizational Support and Volunteering Benefits for Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fengyan; Choi, Eunhee; Morrow-Howell, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study tested a theoretical model of volunteering benefits and examined the mechanism through which volunteering benefits older adults. Design and Methods: This is a 2-wave study of 253 older adult volunteers serving in 10 volunteer programs. Older volunteers completed the mailed surveys in 2005 and 2006. Structural equation modeling…

  20. Top Ten Myths and Realities of Working with Teen Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Kellie

    1998-01-01

    Discusses misconceptions about teen volunteers in public libraries: teens who hang out make good volunteers; teens who apply want to work; parents aren't important; incorporating volunteers is easy; enthusiasm means commitment; volunteers will tell you if they don't enjoy the job; non-performers are easy to fire; teens volunteer because they need…

  1. 45 CFR 1217.6 - Roles of volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Roles of volunteers. 1217.6 Section 1217.6 Public... VISTA VOLUNTEER LEADER § 1217.6 Roles of volunteers. VISTA volunteer leaders may have the following roles: (a) Primary contact with VISTA volunteers on personal and administrative matters. (b) Aid...

  2. Program Evaluation of "Young at Heart": Examining Elderly Volunteers' Generativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jean Pearson; Reifman, Alan; Mulsow, Miriam; Feng, Du

    2003-01-01

    Elderly volunteers in the Young at Heart child care program (n=14), Meals on Wheels (n=14), other volunteer activities (n=24), and nonvolunteers (n=49) were compared. Although child-care volunteers were expected to score highest in generativity, volunteers in other activities did, followed by Young at Heart volunteers. (Contains 10 references.)…

  3. Characterization of Physiologic (18)F FSPG Uptake in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosci, Camila; Kumar, Meena; Smolarz, Kamilla; Koglin, Norman; Stephens, Andrew W; Schwaiger, Markus; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Mittra, Erik S

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To evaluate the normal biodistribution and kinetics of (S)-4-(3-[18F]fluoropropyl)-l-glutamic acid ((18)F FSPG) in healthy volunteers and to compare (18)F FSPG mean and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmean and SUVmax, respectively) with those of (18)F fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) across a variety of organs. Materials and Methods This protocol was reviewed and approved by all appropriate regulatory authorities. An 8-mCi (±10%) dose of (18)F FSPG was given to five subjects (three women, two men), and seven whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) scans were performed 5, 10, 20, 30, 45, 150, and 240 minutes after injection. Regions of interest were analyzed on the resultant (18)F FSPG images to evaluate the kinetics of this radiotracer. The images obtained 45 minutes after injection were used to measure SUVmean and SUVmax in additional regions of the body. These values were compared with similar values obtained with (18)F FDG PET published previously. Descriptive statistics, including average and standard deviation across the five subjects, were used. (18)F FSPG SUVmean and SUVmax were compared. Results On the (18)F FSPG images obtained 45 minutes after injection, there was only low-grade background activity in the majority of analyzed regions. Prominent activity was seen throughout the pancreas. Clearance of the radiotracer through the kidneys and collection in the bladder also were seen. SUV quantification shows notable differences between (18)F FSPG and (18)F FDG in the pancreas ((18)F FSPG SUVmean, 8.2; (18)F FDG SUVmean, 1.3), stomach ((18)F FSPG SUVmax, 3.6; (18)F FDG SUVmax, 1.6), and brain ((18)F FSPG SUVmean, 0.08; (18)F FDG SUVmean, 7.8). The kinetic data showed rapid clearance of the radiotracer from the blood pool and most organs, except the pancreas. Conclusion (18)F FSPG is a PET radiopharmaceutical characterized by rapid clearance from most healthy tissues, except the pancreas and kidneys. A consistent biodistribution pattern was

  4. Volunteers for Researchers’ Night wanted

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Every year, on the last Friday of September, the European Researchers’ Night (see here) takes place in about 300 cities all over Europe - promoting research in engaging and fun ways for the general public. This year, CERN will be participating once again, hosting dozens of events across the Balexert shopping centre – and we’ll need YOUR help to make the celebration a success.   From film screenings and celebrity Q&A sessions to “Ask a Researcher” and build-your-own LEGO LHC events, this year’s Researchers’ Night is going to be jam-packed! The fun will kick off prior to the night itself with a mock-up of the LHC tunnel installed in the central court of the Balexert shopping centre, 8-12 September*. CERN people will be on hand to speak to shoppers about the LHC, and to encourage them to participate in Researchers’ Night! The CERN organisers are recruiting volunteers and support staff for Researchers’ ...

  5. Altered Regulation of Protein Kinase A Activity in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex of Normal and Brain-Injured Animals Actively Engaged in a Working Memory Task

    OpenAIRE

    Kobori, Nobuhide; Moore, Anthony N.; Pramod K Dash

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) signaling is required for short- and long-term memory. In contrast, enhanced PKA activity has been shown to impair working memory, a prefrontal cortex (PFC)-dependent, transient form of memory critical for cognition and goal-directed behaviors. Working memory can be impaired after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the absence of overt damage to the PFC. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to this deficit ar...

  6. Dietary long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids prevent impaired social behaviour and normalize brain dopamine levels in food allergic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Theije, Caroline G M; van den Elsen, Lieke W J; Willemsen, Linette E M; Milosevic, Vanja; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien A H; Lopes da Silva, Sofia; Broersen, Laus M; Korte, S Mechiel; Olivier, Berend; Garssen, Johan; Kraneveld, Aletta D

    2015-03-01

    Allergy is suggested to exacerbate impaired behaviour in children with neurodevelopmental disorders. We have previously shown that food allergy impaired social behaviour in mice. Dietary fatty acid composition may affect both the immune and nervous system. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFA) on food allergy-induced impaired social behaviour and associated deficits in prefrontal dopamine (DA) in mice. Mice were fed either control or n-3 LCPUFA-enriched diet before and during sensitization with whey. Social behaviour, acute allergic skin response and serum immunoglobulins were assessed. Monoamine levels were measured in brain and intestine and fatty acid content in brain. N-3 LCPUFA prevented impaired social behaviour of allergic mice. Moreover, n-3 LCPUFA supplementation increased docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) incorporation into the brain and restored reduced levels of prefrontal DA and its metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, 3-methoxytyramine and homovanillic acid in allergic mice. In addition to these brain effects, n-3 LCPUFA supplementation reduced the allergic skin response and restored decreased intestinal levels of serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in allergic mice. N-3 LCPUFA may have beneficial effects on food allergy-induced deficits in social behaviour, either indirectly by reducing the allergic response and restoring intestinal 5-HT signalling, or directly by DHA incorporation into neuronal membranes, affecting the DA system. Therefore, it is of interest to further investigate the relevance of food allergy-enhanced impairments in social behaviour in humans and the potential benefits of dietary n-3 LCPUFA supplementation.

  7. Brain core temperature of patients with mild traumatic brain injury as assessed by DWI-thermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tazoe, Jun; Yamada, Kei; Akazawa, Kentaro [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto City, Kyoto (Japan); Sakai, Koji [Kyoto University, Department of Human Health Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Mineura, Katsuyoshi [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto City, Kyoto (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the brain core temperature of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) using a noninvasive temperature measurement technique based on the diffusion coefficient of the cerebrospinal fluid. This retrospective study used the data collected from April 2008 to June 2011. The patient group comprised 20 patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 14 or 15 who underwent magnetic resonance imaging within 30 days after head trauma. The normal control group comprised 14 subjects who volunteered for a brain checkup (known in Japan as ''brain dock''). We compared lateral ventricular (LV) temperature between patient and control groups. Follow-up studies were performed for four patients. LV temperature measurements were successfully performed for both patients and controls. Mean (±standard deviation) measured LV temperature was 36.9 ± 1.5 C in patients, 38.7 ± 1.8 C in follow-ups, and 37.9 ± 1.2 C in controls, showing a significant difference between patients and controls (P = 0.017). However, no significant difference was evident between patients and follow-ups (P = 0.595) or between follow-ups and controls (P = 0.465). A reduction in brain core temperature was observed in patients with mTBI, possibly due to a global decrease in metabolism. (orig.)

  8. The normal posterior atlantoaxial relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovelock, J.E. (Rochester General Hospital, NY (USA)); Schuster, J.A. (Rochester Univ. Medical Center, NY (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The relationship of the posterior aspects of the atlas and the axis were studied in 100 normal adult volunteers. The ratio of the height of the atlantal spinolaminar line to the atlantoaxial interspinous distance was found to be remarkably constant and was less than 2.0 in all men and women. This ratio should prove helpful in detecting hyperflexion injuries isolated to the atlantoaxial level. (orig.).

  9. Becoming an Older Volunteer: A Grounded Theory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Witucki Brown

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This Grounded Theory study describes the process by which older persons “become” volunteers. Forty interviews of older persons who volunteered for Habitat for Humanity were subjected to secondary content analysis to uncover the process of “becoming” a volunteer. “Helping out” (core category for older volunteers occurs within the context of “continuity”, “commitment” and “connection” which provide motivation for volunteering. When a need arises, older volunteers “help out” physically and financially as health and resources permit. Benefits described as “blessings” of volunteering become motivators for future volunteering. Findings suggest that older volunteering is a developmental process and learned behavior which should be fostered in older persons by personally inviting them to volunteer. Intergenerational volunteering projects will allow older persons to pass on knowledge and skills and provide positive role modeling for younger volunteers.

  10. 'Making a Difference': Volunteer Tourism and Development,

    OpenAIRE

    Butcher, Jim; Smith, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: \\ud \\ud In recent decades there has been a boom in international volunteer tourism, mainly in the form of the growth of gap-year companies offering placements, linked to conservation and community well-being goals. This paper makes two points: firstly, it argues that the growth of volunteer tourism is in part a product of the politics of the current period – the decline of grand narratives and the growth of ‘life political’ alternative forms of agency. Hence volunteer tourism, motiv...

  11. Safety evaluation of saffron (Crocus sativus) tablets in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modaghegh, Mohammad-Hadi; Shahabian, Masoud; Esmaeili, Habib-Allah; Rajbai, Omid; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2008-12-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus) stigma tablets were evaluated for short-term safety and tolerability in healthy adult volunteers. The study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled design consisting of a 1 week treatment of saffron tablets. Volunteers were divided into 3 groups of 10 each (5 males and 5 females). Group I received placebo; groups 2 and 3 received 200 and 400mg saffron tablets, respectively, for 7 days. General measures of health were recorded during the study such as hematological, biochemical and electrocardiographic parameters done in pre- and post-treatment periods. Clinical examination showed no gross changes in all volunteers after intervention. Saffron with higher dose (400mg) decreased standing systolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressures significantly. Saffron decreased slightly some hematological parameters such as red blood cells, hemoglobin, hematocrit and platelets. Saffron increased sodium, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine. This study showed that saffron tablets may change some hematological and biochemical parameters. However, these alterations were in normal ranges and they were not important clinically.

  12. Dynamic magnetic resonance defecography in 10 asymptomatic volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas G Schreyer; Christian Paetzel; Alois Fürst; Lena M Dendl; Elisabeth Hutzel; René Müller-Wille; Philipp Wiggermann

    2012-01-01

    AIM:Evaluation of the wide range of normal findings in asymptomatic women undergoing dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) defecography.METHODS:MR defecography of 10 healthy female volunteers (median age:31 years) without previous pregnancies or history of surgery were evaluated.The rectum was filled with 180 mL gadolinium ultrasound gel mixture.MR defecography was performed in the supine position.The pelvic floor was visualized with a dynamic T2-weighted sagittal plane where all relevant pelvic floor organs were acquired during defecation.The volunteers were instructed to relax and then to perform straining maneuvers to empty the rectum.The pubococcygeal line (PCGL) was used as the line of reference.The movement of pelvic floor organs was measured as the vertical distance to this reference line.Data were recorded in the resting position as well as during the defecation process with maximal straining.Examinations were performed and evaluated by two experienced abdominal radiologists without knowledge of patient history.RESULTS:Average position of the anorectal junction was located at-5.3 mm at rest and-29.9 mm during straining.The anorectal angle widened significantly from 93° at rest to 109° during defecation.A rectocele was diagnosed in eight out of 10 volunteers showing an average diameter of 25.9 mm.The bladder base was located at a position of +23 mm at rest and descended to-8.1 mm during defecation in relation to the PCGL.The bladder base moved below the PCGL in six out of 10 volunteers,which was formally defined as a cystocele.The uterocervical junction was located at an average level of +43.1 mm at rest and at +7.9 mm during straining.The uterocervical junction of three volunteers fell below the PCGL; described formally as uterocervical prolapse.CONCLUSION:Based on the range of standard values in asymptomatic volunteers,MR defecography values for pathological changes have to be re-evaluated.

  13. NOVEL SPLICED VARIANTS OF IONOTROPIC GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR GLUR6 IN NORMAL HUMAN FIBROBLAST AND BRAIN CELLS ARE TRANSCRIBED BY TISSUE SPECIFIC PROMOTERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhawar, Vikramjit K.; Kaur, Gurpreet; deRiel, Jon K.; Kaur, G. Pal; Kandpal, Raj P.; Athwal, Raghbir S.

    2010-01-01

    The members of the ionotropic glutamate receptor family, namely, a-amino-3-hydroxy-S-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA), kainate, and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, are important mediators of the rapid synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. We have investigated the splicing pattern and expression of the kainate receptor subunit GluR6 in human fibroblast cell lines and brain tissue. We demonstrate the expression of GluR6A variant specifically in brain, and four variants, namely, GluR6B, GluR6C, GluR6D and GluR6E in fibroblast cell lines. The variants GluR6D and GluR6E have not been described before, and appear to be specific for non-neuronal cells. Genomic analysis and cloning of the sequence preceding the transcribed region led to the identification of two tissue specific promoters designated as neuronal promoter PN and non-neuronal promoter PNN. We have used RNA ligase mediated RACE and in silico analyses to locate two sets of transcription start sites, and confirmed specific transcripts initiated by PN and PNN in brain cells and fibroblasts, respectively. The domain structure of variants GluR6D and GluR6E revealed the absence of three transmembrane domains. The lack of these domains suggests that the mature receptors arising from these variant subunits may not function as active channels. Based on these structural features in GluR6D and GluR6E, and the observations that GluR6B, GluR6C, GluR6D and GluR6E are exclusively expressed in non-neuronal cells, it is likely that these receptor subunits function as non-channel signaling proteins. PMID:20230879

  14. Brain peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompier, D; Vejux, A; Zarrouk, A; Gondcaille, C; Geillon, F; Nury, T; Savary, S; Lizard, G

    2014-03-01

    Peroxisomes are essential organelles in higher eukaryotes as they play a major role in numerous metabolic pathways and redox homeostasis. Some peroxisomal abnormalities, which are often not compatible with life or normal development, were identified in severe demyelinating and neurodegenerative brain diseases. The metabolic roles of peroxisomes, especially in the brain, are described and human brain peroxisomal disorders resulting from a peroxisome biogenesis or a single peroxisomal enzyme defect are listed. The brain abnormalities encountered in these disorders (demyelination, oxidative stress, inflammation, cell death, neuronal migration, differentiation) are described and their pathogenesis are discussed. Finally, the contribution of peroxisomal dysfunctions to the alterations of brain functions during aging and to the development of Alzheimer's disease is considered.

  15. 基于体素的健康中国成人概率性弥散张量成像脑图谱的建立%Construction of a voxel-based probabilistic diffusion tensor image brain atlas for normal Chinese adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈艳玲; 陈碧娟; 李文生

    2012-01-01

    目的 使用计算机医学图像处理技术在标准人脑空间建立基于体素的健康中国成人概率性弥散张量成像(DTI)脑图谱,以期为脑白质的功能研究和相关疾病的诊治提供基础信息. 方法 选择50例健康成年志愿者进行常规MRI扫描,确认未发现异常后,再行DTI扫描,获取相应图像数据.首先使用MRIcron软件包中的相关程序,将原始的DICOM数据格式转换为图像处理所需要的格式,然后运用DtiStudio和DiffeoMap软件,结合自动图像配准算法对DTI数据进行数据预处理、张量计算和图像归一化,最后在MATLAB中对图像进行平均计算,构建图谱. 结果 成功构建出基于50例健康中国成人的概率性DTI脑图谱,图谱清晰.各向异性(FA)图和彩色编码图上均可见脑白质结构和纤维束走向,在彩色编码图上以特定颜色代表了不同纤维束的走行方向. 结论 运用图像处理技术可以构建国入概率性DTI脑图谱.该图谱以通用数据格式保存,可被大部分医学图像处理软件及分析软件识别读取,能为研究脑白质正常结构功能及相关疾病服务.%Objective To construct a voxel-based probabilistic diffusion tensor image (DTI) brain atlas in a standard space using medical image processing techniques in order to provide basic data for the white matter function research and the diagnosis and treatment of related diseases. Methods DTI data from 50 normal volunteers were acquired after excluding the existence of neurological diseases. The DICOM data were converted into the needed data format using one of the procedures in MRIcron software package. DtiStudio, DiffeoMap and AIR software were used for pre-processing, tensor calculation and normalization of the images. Average calculation was performed and the atlas was constructed in MATLAB software platform. Results A general DTI brain atlas was successfully developed from the 50 healthy adults and the maps were very clear. The white

  16. Clarifying Normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    Confusion exists among database textbooks as to the goal of normalization as well as to which normal form a designer should aspire. This article discusses such discrepancies with the intention of simplifying normalization for both teacher and student. This author's industry and classroom experiences indicate such simplification yields quicker…

  17. 75 FR 20891 - National Volunteer Week, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ... nothing in return. The American story is a story of volunteers--of patriots who fought for our founding... Americans are answering that call. From mentoring a student and feeding the homeless, to rebuilding after...

  18. Monitoring and Evaluation of Volunteer Tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taplin, Jessica; Dredge, Dianne; Scherrer, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    in the project planning and implementation cycles of volunteer tourism organisations and destination managements. However, they can be both value-laden and politically charged, making an understanding of context, purpose and various approaches to monitoring and evaluation important. Drawing from evaluation......The rapid expansion and commercialisation of the volunteer tourism sector and the potential for negative impacts on host communities have put the sector under increasing scrutiny. Monitoring and evaluation are key aspects of sustainable tourism planning and management, and play important roles...... highlights the important influence of context (the issue the volunteer tourism programme is addressing, the nature of the intervention, the setting, the evaluation context and the decision-making context), and identifies four dimensions of volunteer tourism (stakeholders, organisations, markets...

  19. Measuring the Dollar Value of Volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ironmonger, Duncan

    1998-01-01

    Describes the use of sample surveys to estimate the amount of time spent volunteering. States that it is necessary to estimate the number of hours involved and to establish an appropriate value per hour. (SK)

  20. Volunteering Internationally: Why, Where and How.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, David E; Kelly, Nancy A

    2015-12-01

    Oral health volunteers have an important role in addressing oral health care shortages around the world, but to be effective they need to understand and prepare for the challenges of working overseas.

  1. Holding on to what you have got: keeping hospice palliative care volunteers volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen; Jones, Richard

    2013-08-01

    In all, 119 hospice palliative care volunteers from 3 community-based hospice programs completed the Volunteer Retention Questionnaire (VRQ), a 33-item survey designed for this study. The VRQ asks volunteers to rate the importance of each item to their decision to continue volunteering. The items that received the highest mean importance ratings included enjoying the work they do, feeling adequately prepared/trained to perform their role, and learning from their patients' experiences/listening to their patients' life stories. Being recognized (eg, pins for years of service or being profiled in the hospice newsletter), receiving phone calls/cards from their volunteer coordinator on special occasions, and being reimbursed for out-of-pocket expenses were among the items that received the lowest mean importance ratings. Suggestions for improving volunteer retention are provided.

  2. Motivations, Death Anxiety, and Empathy in Hospice Volunteers in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbay, Meriem; Gay, Marie-Claire; Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the motivations for volunteering of hospice volunteers in France. In addition, their levels of death anxiety and empathy were measured and compared with those of French non-hospice volunteers and non-volunteers. Three questionnaires-the Inventory of Motivations for Hospice Palliative Care Volunteerism (IMHPCV), the Templer/McMordie Death Anxiety Scale, and the Interpersonal Reactivity Index-were sent via an Internet link to 2 hospice volunteer associations and to non-hospice volunteers and non-volunteers (only the hospice volunteers received the IMHPCV). Altruistic motives had the most influence on the respondents' decision to become a hospice volunteer. French hospice volunteers scored significantly lower on 3 categories of motives on the IMHPCV compared to a sample of Canadian hospice palliative care volunteers (study 2), suggesting that cultural differences may be involved. No significant differences were found in levels of death anxiety or empathy between the 3 groups of respondents of the study.

  3. Central swallowing in normal adults using functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shasha Li; Cheng Luo; Chengqi He; Qiyong Gong; Dong Zhou

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While brain-imaging studies in healthy adults have indicated that multiple cortical regions are involved in swallowing, these functional imaging techniques have not been extensively applied to the complete understand neurophysiology of swallowing in China. A full understanding of normal swallowing neurophysiology is important for improving functional outcomes for dysphagia due to neurologic disorders or damage with increasing age. Thus the interpretations of the functional contributions of various brain areas in swallowing should be scientifically researched.OBJECTIVE: To identify the activation and characteristic of swallowing center in healthy adults using functional magnetic resonance imaging.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: An uncontrolled neuroimaging study was performed at the Outpatient Clinic, Department of Radiology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University between March and November 2008.PARTICIPANTS: Ten healthy right-handed volunteers, aged over 20 years with a mean age of (34.2 ±8.1) years, a range of 25-45 years and including five males and five females participated. A medical history was obtained from all potential subjects and all subjects were free of systemic diseases and neurological disorders.METHODS: The healthy volunteers were examined with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging of blood oxygenation level-dependent while laryngeal swallow-related movements were recorded. Subjects were scanned during voluntary saliva swallowing and water bolus swallowing activation tasks. Data was processed using the General Linear Model. A voxel by voxel group comparison was performed using random effect analysis. Any cluster with a corrected P < 0.05 for spatial extent was considered significant.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The cerebral cortical activation maps of voluntary swallowing of saliva and swallowing of water bolus in healthy adults were observed.RESULTS: A multifocal cortical representation of swallowing was in the precentral gyrus

  4. Metabolic changes in the anterior and posterior cingulate cortices of the normal aging brain: proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study at 3 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Pui-Wai; Mak, Henry Ka-Fung; Yau, Kelvin Kai-Wing; Chan, Queenie; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; Chu, Leung-Wing

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can explore aging at a molecular level. In this study, we investigated the relationships between regional concentrations of metabolites (such as choline, creatine, myo-inositol, and N-acetyl-aspartate) and normal aging in 30 cognitively normal subjects (15 women and 15 men, age range 22-82, mean = 49.9 ± 18.3 years) using quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All MR scans were performed using a 3 T scanner. Point resolved spectroscopy was used as the volume selection method for the region-of-interest and the excitation method for water suppression. Single voxel spectroscopy with short echo time of 39 ms and repetition time of 2,000 ms was employed. Single voxels were placed in the limbic regions, i.e., anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and left and right hippocampi. Cerebrospinal fluid normalization and T1 and T2 correction factors were implemented in the calculation of absolute metabolite concentrations. A standardized T1W 3D volumetric fast field echo and axial T2-weighted fast spin-echo images were also acquired. Our results showed significant positive correlation of choline (r = 0.545, p = 0.002), creatine (r = 0.571, p = 0.001), and N-acetyl-aspartate (r = 0.674, p age. No significant gender effect on metabolite concentrations was found. In aging, increases in choline and creatine might suggest glial proliferation, and an increase in N-acetyl-aspartate might indicate neuronal hypertrophy. Such findings highlight the metabolic changes of ACC and PCC with age, which could be compensatory to an increased energy demand coupled with a lower cerebral blood flow.

  5. Vowels and consonants in the brain: Evidence from the magnetoencephalographic studies on the N1m in normal-hearing listeners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Dora Manca

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Speech sound perception is one of the most fascinating tasks performed by the human brain. It involves a mapping from continuous acoustic waveforms onto the discrete phonological units computed to store words in the mental lexicon. In this article, we review the magnetoencephalographic studies that have explored the timing and morphology of the N1m component to investigate how vowels and consonants are computed and represented within the auditory cortex. The neurons that are involved in the N1m act to construct a sensory memory of the stimulus due to spatially and temporally distributed activation patterns within the auditory cortex. Indeed, localization of auditory fields maps in animals and humans suggested two levels of sound coding, a tonotopy dimension for spectral properties and a tonochrony dimension for temporal properties of sounds. When the stimulus is a complex speech sound, tonotopy and tonochrony data may give important information to assess whether the speech sound parsing and decoding are generated by pure bottom-up reflection of acoustic differences or whether they are additionally affected by top-down processes related to phonological categories. Hints supporting pure bottom-up processing coexist with hints supporting top-down abstract phoneme representation. Actually, N1m data (amplitude, latency, source generators, and hemispheric distribution are limited and do not help to disentangle the issue. The nature of these limitations is discussed. Moreover, neurophysiological studies on animals and neuroimaging studies on humans have been taken into consideration. We compare also the N1m findings with the investigation of the magnetic mismatch negativity (MMNm component and with the analogous electrical components, the N1 and the MMN. We conclude that N1 seems more sensitive to capture lateralization and hierarchical processes than N1m, although the data are very preliminary. Finally, we suggest that MEG data should be integrated

  6. Neighbourly Acts--Volunteering, Social Capital and Democracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Jennifer; Bittman, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Robert Putnam's view of social capital considers the decline in volunteering as a crisis for democracy. However, data on volunteering in Australia from 1974-1997 indicate that there is likely to be a significant increase in total volunteer hours. Beyond the contribution to democratic society, the values implicit in volunteering increase the…

  7. Characteristics of the Essence of Volunteering in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagurova, Angelina Alexandrovna; Ivanovna, Efremova Galina; Aleksandrovna, Bochkovskaya Irina; Denisenko, Sergey Ivanovich; Valerievich, Tarasov Mihail; Viktorovna, Nekrasova Marina; Potutkova, Svetlana Anatolievna

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses the basic ideas of volunteering; it analyzes the data of psychological studies on social activity and it highlights the importance of studying the motivational part of volunteering. The conclusion on structure and content of volunteering is made. Key focus is on the fact that volunteering is of particular importance in the…

  8. 常态脑老化认知功能障碍及相关代谢机制研究进展%A Review of Cognitive Impairment in Normal Brain Aging and the Metabolic Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王彦永; 耿媛; 王培芝; 王铭维

    2014-01-01

    Normal brain aging (NBA) is the greatest risk factor of dementia in the old age .It shares part of the common basis with the pathological brain aging .While advanced age alone is not sufficient to cause the dementia in the old age , aging status increased the sensitivity of the brain to the negative external stimuli ,furthermore ,make the elderly more prone to cognitive impairment .There's little we can do to treat Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia but to get the earlier prevention .Therefore ,we put the emphasis on the normal brain aging stage-much earlier than the dementia , and reviewed the performance ,pathologic mechanism and metabolic mechanism ,aiming to provide a theoretical basis to early prevent the cognitive decline before the dementia in the old age .%常态脑老化(NBA )是老年期痴呆的首要危险因素,与病态性脑老化有相似的病理基础,但并不完全相同。虽然单一的“脑老化”因素并不足以成为导致老年期痴呆的独立原因,但脑老化状态确实使得大脑对外界负性刺激的敏感性增加,进而使老年人更容易发生认知障碍。阿尔茨海默病等老年痴呆症状的治疗方面尚无逆转的方法,而是重在预防。因此,我们将重点放在痴呆发生之前更早的阶段---常态脑老化阶段,就常态脑老化状态下与认知功能障碍的表现、发生机理及代谢相关机制进行综述,旨在为早期寻找措施防止老年期痴呆性认知功能下降提供理论基础。

  9. Birkhoff normalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, H.; Hoveijn, I.; Lunter, G.; Vegter, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Birkhoff normal form procedure is a widely used tool for approximating a Hamiltonian systems by a simpler one. This chapter starts out with an introduction to Hamiltonian mechanics, followed by an explanation of the Birkhoff normal form procedure. Finally we discuss several algorithms for comput

  10. The White Lion Volunteer Program in South Africa: A Study of Volunteer Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boretti Tanya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Volunteer tourists are motivated to participate in volunteer programs due to their need to ‘do something different’, ‘see another culture’ and ‘to escape’, amongst others. The research aims to determine the internal and external factors that motivate individuals to participate in the Tsau! Global White Lion Protection Trust’s (GWLPT volunteer program. Maslow’s theory of human motivation and Frankl’s study of human behaviour are used to explore intrinsic factors whereas extrinsic or macro environmental factors of influence are also investigated. A mixed method approach with focus group discussions and an online survey is followed. A background to the volunteer program is presented with the activities available to volunteers. The key findings indicate that most volunteers are young females that volunteer for a minimum of two weeks; are internally motivated to ‘give back and be useful’ and ‘to work with the white lions’ for the purpose of self-actualisation. External motivation is mainly social in terms of concern about the well-being of the lions, and South Africa being an economically affordable destination. The GWLPT strives to fulfil the needs of volunteers, especially intrinsic needs associated with self-actualisation and self-transcendence.

  11. Loss of Spatial Memory, Learning, and Motor Function During Normal Aging Is Accompanied by Changes in Brain Presenilin 1 and 2 Expression Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaja, Simon; Sumien, Nathalie; Shah, Vidhi V; Puthawala, Imran; Maynard, Alexandra N; Khullar, Nitasha; Payne, Andrew J; Forster, Michael J; Koulen, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in presenilin (PS) proteins cause familial Alzheimer's disease. We herein tested the hypothesis that the expression levels of PS proteins are differentially affected during healthy aging, in the absence of pathological mutations. We used a preclinical model for aging to identify associations between PS expression and quantitative behavioral parameters for spatial memory and learning and motor function. We identified significant changes of PS protein expression in both cerebellum and forebrain that correlated with the performance in behavioral paradigms for motor function and memory and learning. Overall, PS1 levels were decreased, while PS2 levels were increased in aged mice compared with young controls. Our study presents novel evidence for the differential expression of PS proteins in a nongenetic model for aging, resulting in an overall increase of the PS2 to PS1 ratio. Our findings provide a novel mechanistic basis for molecular and functional changes during normal aging.

  12. THE STUDY OF SELF-CONCEPT BETWEEN VOLUNTEER AND NON-VOLUNTEER STUDENTS IN SPORT OF UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Andam

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding personality characteristics of volunteers are important for their recruitment and retention in sport associations. This study compared self-concept as a personality characteristic between volunteer and non-volunteer students in sport associations. The method of this research was survey and descriptive. The statistical population consisted of volunteer and non-volunteer students in sport associations of Iran universities. Two hundred and fifty two students (120 volunteers and 132 non-volunteers from 10 universities were selected as subjects by using random clustered sampling method. Pyryt and Mandaglio Self Perceived Survey (PMSPS was used to collect the data. The content and face reliability of questionnaire was checked and confirmed. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was used to test the reliability of the questionnaire (alfa=0.90. Independent t test and U Mann-Whitney test were used for comparison of the factors between volunteers and non-volunteers. Findings of this study indicated that there was a significant difference between volunteer and non-volunteer students in social and athletic self-concept. The mean of scientific and value factors were higher in volunteers than non-volunteers, however, they were not statistically significant. We concluded that the nature of sport (active and sport volunteering (social encourage students who have higher self-concept for volunteering. Moreover, the characteristics of sport associations can increase self-concept in sport volunteers.

  13. The relationship between volunteer tourism and development in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Kontogeorgopoulos, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Short-term international voluntary service is frequently linked to development discourse in the literature on volunteer tourism and the marketing materials of organizations that offer short-term volunteer opportunities. This paper explores the relationship between volunteer tourism and development in Thailand, and assesses the role played by development in the motivations and experiences of volunteers. Based on interviews with 55 volunteer tourists in the northern Thai province of Chiang Mai,...

  14. Volunteer Computing Experience with ATLAS@Home

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, David; The ATLAS collaboration; Bourdarios, Claire; Lan\\c con, Eric

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS@Home is a volunteer computing project which allows the public to contribute to computing for the ATLAS experiment through their home or office computers. The project has grown continuously since its creation in mid-2014 and now counts almost 100,000 volunteers. The combined volunteers' resources make up a sizable fraction of overall resources for ATLAS simulation. This paper takes stock of the experience gained so far and describes the next steps in the evolution of the project. These improvements include running natively on Linux to ease the deployment on for example university clusters, using multiple cores inside one job to reduce the memory requirements and running different types of workload such as event generation. In addition to technical details the success of ATLAS@Home as an outreach tool is evaluated.

  15. Volunteer Computing Experience with ATLAS@Home

    CERN Document Server

    Bourdarios, Claire; The ATLAS collaboration; Cameron, David; Filip\\v{c}i\\v{c}, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS@Home is a volunteer computing project which allows the public to contribute to computing for the ATLAS experiment through their home or office computers. The project has grown continuously since its creation in mid-2014 and now counts almost 100,000 volunteers. The combined volunteers' resources make up a sizeable fraction of overall resources for ATLAS simulation. This paper takes stock of the experience gained so far and describes the next steps in the evolution of the project. These improvements include running natively on Linux to ease the deployment on for example university clusters, using multiple cores inside one task to reduce the memory requirements and running different types of workload such as event generation. In addition to technical details the success of ATLAS@Home as an outreach tool is evaluated.

  16. Maximum (prior brain size, not atrophy, correlates with cognition in community-dwelling older people: a cross-sectional neuroimaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deary Ian J

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain size is associated with cognitive ability in adulthood (correlation ~ .3, but few studies have investigated the relationship in normal ageing, particularly beyond age 75 years. With age both brain size and fluid-type intelligence decline, and regional atrophy is often suggested as causing decline in specific cognitive abilities. However, an association between brain size and intelligence may be due to the persistence of this relationship from earlier life. Methods We recruited 107 community-dwelling volunteers (29% male aged 75–81 years for cognitive testing and neuroimaging. We used principal components analysis to derived a 'general cognitive factor' (g from tests of fluid-type ability. Using semi-automated analysis, we measured whole brain volume, intracranial area (ICA (an estimate of maximal brain volume, and volume of frontal and temporal lobes, amygdalo-hippocampal complex, and ventricles. Brain atrophy was estimated by correcting WBV for ICA. Results Whole brain volume (WBV correlated with general cognitive ability (g (r = .21, P Conclusion The association between brain regions and specific cognitive abilities in community dwelling people of older age is due to the life-long association between whole brain size and general cognitive ability, rather than atrophy of specific regions. Researchers and clinicians should therefore be cautious of interpreting global or regional brain atrophy on neuroimaging as contributing to cognitive status in older age without taking into account prior mental ability and brain size.

  17. Density abnormalities in normal-appearing gray matter in the middle-aged brain with white matter hyperintense lesions: a DARTEL-enhanced voxel-based morphometry study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Y

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yan Peng,1,* Shenhong Li,2,* Ying Zhuang,3,* Xiaojia Liu,4 Lin Wu,2 Honghan Gong,2 Dewu Liu,1 Fuqing Zhou2 1Burn Center, 2Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanchang University, 3Department of Oncology, The Second Hospital of Nanchang, Nanchang, Jiangxi Province, 4Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background and purpose: Little is known about the structural alterations within gray matter (GM in middle-aged subjects with white matter hyperintense (WMH lesions. Here, we aimed to examine the anatomical changes within the GM and their relationship to WMH lesion loads in middle-aged subjects. Participants and methods: Twenty-three middle-aged subjects with WMH lesions (WMH group and 23 demographically matched healthy control subjects participated in the study. A Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Liealgebra-enhanced voxel-based morphometry was used to measure the GM density, and the correlations between WMH lesion volume and extracted GM values in abnormal regions were identified by voxel-based morphometry analysis. Results: Compared with the healthy control subjects, the WMH group had a significantly decreased GM density in the left middle frontal gyrus, bilateral anterior cingulate cortex, left and right premotor cortex, and left and right middle cingulate cortex and an increased GM density in the bilateral cerebellum anterior lobe, left middle temporal gyrus, right temporoparietal junction, left and right prefrontal cortex (PFC, and left inferior parietal lobule. A relationship was observed between the normalized WMH lesion volume and the decreased GM density, including the left middle frontal gyrus (ρ=-0.629, P=0.002, bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ρ=-0.507, P=0.019, right middle cingulate cortex (ρ=-0.484, P=0.026, and

  18. Volunteered Cloud Computing for Disaster Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J. D.; Hao, W.; Chettri, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Disaster management relies increasingly on interpreting earth observations and running numerical models; which require significant computing capacity - usually on short notice and at irregular intervals. Peak computing demand during event detection, hazard assessment, or incident response may exceed agency budgets; however some of it can be met through volunteered computing, which distributes subtasks to participating computers via the Internet. This approach has enabled large projects in mathematics, basic science, and climate research to harness the slack computing capacity of thousands of desktop computers. This capacity is likely to diminish as desktops give way to battery-powered mobile devices (laptops, smartphones, tablets) in the consumer market; but as cloud computing becomes commonplace, it may offer significant slack capacity -- if its users are given an easy, trustworthy mechanism for participating. Such a "volunteered cloud computing" mechanism would also offer several advantages over traditional volunteered computing: tasks distributed within a cloud have fewer bandwidth limitations; granular billing mechanisms allow small slices of "interstitial" computing at no marginal cost; and virtual storage volumes allow in-depth, reversible machine reconfiguration. Volunteered cloud computing is especially suitable for "embarrassingly parallel" tasks, including ones requiring large data volumes: examples in disaster management include near-real-time image interpretation, pattern / trend detection, or large model ensembles. In the context of a major disaster, we estimate that cloud users (if suitably informed) might volunteer hundreds to thousands of CPU cores across a large provider such as Amazon Web Services. To explore this potential, we are building a volunteered cloud computing platform and targeting it to a disaster management context. Using a lightweight, fault-tolerant network protocol, this platform helps cloud users join parallel computing projects

  19. Pulsar Discovery by Global Volunteer Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knispel, B.; Allen, B.; Cordes, J. M.; Deneva, J. S.; Anderson, D.; Aulbert, C.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bock, O.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Champion, D. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Crawford, F.; Demorest, P. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Freire, P. C. C.; Gonzalez, M. E.; Hammer, D.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jenet, F. A.; Kasian, L.; Kaspi, V. M.; Kramer, M.; Lazarus, P.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lyne, A. G.; Machenschalk, B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Messenger, C.; Nice, D. J.; Papa, M. A.; Pletsch, H. J.; Prix, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; Stovall, K.; Venkataraman, A.

    2010-09-01

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries to mine large data sets. It has now found a 40.8-hertz isolated pulsar in radio survey data from the Arecibo Observatory taken in February 2007. Additional timing observations indicate that this pulsar is likely a disrupted recycled pulsar. PSR J2007+2722’s pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period; the pulsar likely has closely aligned magnetic and spin axes. The massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many more such discoveries.

  20. Pulsar Discovery by Global Volunteer Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Knispel, B; Cordes, J M; Deneva, J S; Anderson, D; Aulbert, C; Bhat, N D R; Bock, O; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Champion, D J; Chatterjee, S; Crawford, F; Demorest, P B; Fehrmann, H; Freire, P C C; Gonzalez, M E; Hammer, D; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F A; Kasian, L; Kaspi, V M; Kramer, M; Lazarus, P; van Leeuwen, J; Lorimer, D R; Machenschalk, A G Lyne B; McLaughlin, M A; Messenger, C; Nice, D J; Papa, M A; Pletsch, H J; Prix, R; Ransom, S M; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Stovall, K; Venkataraman, A

    2010-01-01

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries to "mine" large data sets. It has now found a 40.8 Hz isolated pulsar in radio survey data from the Arecibo Observatory taken in February 2007. Additional timing observations indicate that this pulsar is likely a disrupted recycled pulsar. PSR J2007+2722's pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period; the pulsar likely has closely aligned magnetic and spin axes. The massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many more such discoveries.

  1. Beliefs about Volunteerism, Volunteering Intention, Volunteering Behavior, and Purpose in Life among Chinese Adolescents in Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The relationships among beliefs about volunteerism, volunteering intention, volunteering behavior, and purpose in life were examined in this study. A total of 5,946 participants completed a series of scales, including the Revised Personal Functions of Volunteerism Scale, Volunteering Intention Scale, and Purpose in Life Scale. The results showed that participants whose purpose in life had different levels also had varied prosocial beliefs about volunteerism, volunteering intention, and volunt...

  2. BOINC service for volunteer cloud computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høimyr, N.; Blomer, J.; Buncic, P.; Giovannozzi, M.; Gonzalez, A.; Harutyunyan, A.; Jones, P. L.; Karneyeu, A.; Marquina, M. A.; Mcintosh, E.; Segal, B.; Skands, P.; Grey, F.; Lombraña González, D.; Zacharov, I.

    2012-12-01

    Since a couple of years, a team at CERN and partners from the Citizen Cyberscience Centre (CCC) have been working on a project that enables general physics simulation programs to run in a virtual machine on volunteer PCs around the world. The project uses the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) framework. Based on CERNVM and the job management framework Co-Pilot, this project was made available for public beta-testing in August 2011 with Monte Carlo simulations of LHC physics under the name “LHC@home 2.0” and the BOINC project: “Test4Theory”. At the same time, CERN's efforts on Volunteer Computing for LHC machine studies have been intensified; this project has previously been known as LHC@home, and has been running the “Sixtrack” beam dynamics application for the LHC accelerator, using a classic BOINC framework without virtual machines. CERN-IT has set up a BOINC server cluster, and has provided and supported the BOINC infrastructure for both projects. CERN intends to evolve the setup into a generic BOINC application service that will allow scientists and engineers at CERN to profit from volunteer computing. This paper describes the experience with the two different approaches to volunteer computing as well as the status and outlook of a general BOINC service.

  3. The Benefits of Volunteering for Psychology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromnick, Rachel; Horowitz, Ava; Shepherd, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Within the current economic climate students are seen as needing more than a degree to succeed in securing graduate employment. One way that students chose to enhance their employability is through engaging in voluntary work. In this empirical study, undergraduate psychology students' reasons for volunteering are explored within the context of…

  4. International Volunteering: Employability, Leadership and More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, Andrew; Charleston, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the experiences of individuals in transition between education and work during international volunteering expeditions. While it was expected that outcomes might include employability enhancement and skill development, the authors aimed to clarify what the main factors were, examine employability…

  5. Dynamics of Volunteering in Older Europeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hank, Karsten; Erlinghagen, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dynamics of volunteering in the population aged 50 years or older across 11 Continental European countries. Design and Methods: Using longitudinal data from the first 2 waves of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe, we run multivariate regressions on a set of binary-dependent variables indicating…

  6. The Invention and Institutionalization of Volunteer Centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Håkon; Henriksen, Lars Skov

    2014-01-01

    This article presents and explains differences in governmental implementation strategies of volunteer centers in Norway and Denmark. In the first part, we describe the emergence of centers, focusing on shifting policies and governmental initiatives. The second part aims at explaining the observed...

  7. Pulsar discovery by global volunteer computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knispel, B.; Allen, B.; Cordes, J.M.; Deneva, J.S.; Anderson, D.; Aulbert, C.; Bhat, N.D.R.; Bock, O.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Champion, D.J.; Chatterjee, S.; Crawford, F.; Demorest, P.B.; Fehrmann, H.; Freire, P.C.C.; Gonzalez, M.E.; Hammer, D.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Jenet, F.A.; Kasian, L.; Kaspi, V.M.; Kramer, M.; Lazarus, P.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lorimer, D.R.; Lyne, A.G.; Machenschalk, B.; McLaughlin, M.A.; Messenger, C.; Nice, D.J.; Papa, M.A.; Pletsch, H.J.; Prix, R.; Ransom, S.M.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I.H.; Stappers, B.W.; Stovall, K.; Venkataraman, A.

    2010-01-01

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries to mine large data sets. It has now found a 40.8-hertz isolated pulsar in radio survey data from the Arecibo Observatory taken in February 2007. Additional timing observations indicate that this pul

  8. Statistical parametric mapping in brain single photon computed emission tomography after carbon monoxide intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, N; Nohara, S; Matsuda, H; Sumiya, H; Noguchi, K; Shimizu, M; Tsuji, S; Kinuya, S; Shuke, N; Yokoyama, K; Seto, H

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to assess regional cerebral blood flow in patients after carbon monoxide intoxication by using brain single photon emission computed tomography and statistical parametric mapping. Eight patients with delayed neuropsychiatric sequelae and ten patients with no neuropsychiatric symptoms after carbon monoxide intoxication were studied with brain single photon emission tomography imaging with 99mTc-hexamethyl-propyleneamine oxime. Forty-four control subjects were also studied. We used the adjusted regional cerebral blood flow images in relative flow distribution (normalization of global cerebral blood flow for each subject to 50 ml x 100 g(-1) x min(-1) with proportional scaling) to compare these groups with statistical parametric mapping. Using this technique, significantly decreased regional cerebral blood flow was noted extensively in the bilateral frontal lobes as well as the bilateral insula and a part of the right temporal lobe in the patients with delayed neuropsychiatric sequelae as compared with normal volunteers (Pparametric mapping is a useful technique for highlighting differences in regional cerebral blood flow in patients following carbon monoxide intoxication as compared with normal volunteers. The selectively reduced blood flow noted in this investigation supports the contention that the decrease following carbon monoxide intoxication may be prolonged and further worsen in the frontal lobe. In addition, the present study may help to clarify the characteristics of the pathophysiological alteration underlying delayed neuropsychiatric sequelae.

  9. Tympanic displacement analysis in healthy volunteers after indomethacin administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsted, Alice; Wagner, Niels; Andersen, Kim Møller

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a tympanic displacement analyser could detect decreases in cerebral blood flow and intracranial pressure after administration of indomethacin in healthy volunteers. In a double-blind crossover study involving 14 healthy volunteers all subjects first underwent a test-retest evaluation to investigate reproducibility followed by tests performed in sitting and supine positions to confirm intracranial-cochlear pressure transfer. In two further sessions tests were performed before and 90 min after subjects were blindly administered a suppository containing either 100 mg of indomethacin or placebo. It was found that tympanic membrane analysis performed 90 min after administration of such a suppository did not mirror the induced reduction in cerebral blood flow after administration of active drug. After administration of indomethacin eight of the subjects experienced discomfort and dizziness; after placebo none experienced subjective symptoms. After administration of indomethacin a statistically significant decrease in heart rate was demonstrated. The exponential form of the intracranial pressure-volume curve may explain why a decrease in intracranial pressure was not detected using the tympanic membrane displacement method, because the measurements were made in subjects with normal intracranial pressure. More significant findings may be found in patients with elevated intracranial pressure.

  10. In vivo relaxation of N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine plus phosphocreatine, and choline containing compounds during the course of brain infarction: a proton MRS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Henriksen, O

    1992-01-01

    Localized water suppressed proton spectroscopy has opened up a new field of pathophysiological studies of severe brain ischemia. The signals obtained with the pulse sequences used so far are both T1 and T2 weighted. In order to evaluate the extent to which changes in metabolite signals during...... containing compounds (CHO) in a 27-ml voxel located in the affected area of the brain. Ten healthy volunteers served as controls. We found no difference in T1 or T2 of the metabolites between the patients and the normal controls. The T2 of CHO was longer than that of NAA and Cr+PCr. Our results indicate...... that spectra obtained in brain infarcts and normal tissue with the same acquisition parameters are directly comparable with respect to relative signal intensities as well as signals scaled with internal and external standards....

  11. Broadband criticality of human brain network synchronization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred G Kitzbichler

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Self-organized criticality is an attractive model for human brain dynamics, but there has been little direct evidence for its existence in large-scale systems measured by neuroimaging. In general, critical systems are associated with fractal or power law scaling, long-range correlations in space and time, and rapid reconfiguration in response to external inputs. Here, we consider two measures of phase synchronization: the phase-lock interval, or duration of coupling between a pair of (neurophysiological processes, and the lability of global synchronization of a (brain functional network. Using computational simulations of two mechanistically distinct systems displaying complex dynamics, the Ising model and the Kuramoto model, we show that both synchronization metrics have power law probability distributions specifically when these systems are in a critical state. We then demonstrate power law scaling of both pairwise and global synchronization metrics in functional MRI and magnetoencephalographic data recorded from normal volunteers under resting conditions. These results strongly suggest that human brain functional systems exist in an endogenous state of dynamical criticality, characterized by a greater than random probability of both prolonged periods of phase-locking and occurrence of large rapid changes in the state of global synchronization, analogous to the neuronal "avalanches" previously described in cellular systems. Moreover, evidence for critical dynamics was identified consistently in neurophysiological systems operating at frequency intervals ranging from 0.05-0.11 to 62.5-125 Hz, confirming that criticality is a property of human brain functional network organization at all frequency intervals in the brain's physiological bandwidth.

  12. The Vaccine Candidate Vibrio cholerae 638 Is Protective against Cholera in Healthy Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Luis; Jidy, Manuel Díaz; García, Hilda; Rodríguez, Boris L.; Fernández, Roberto; Año, Gemma; Cedré, Bárbara; Valmaseda, Tania; Suzarte, Edith; Ramírez, Margarita; Pino, Yadira; Campos, Javier; Menéndez, Jorge; Valera, Rodrigo; González, Daniel; González, Irma; Pérez, Oliver; Serrano, Teresita; Lastre, Miriam; Miralles, Fernando; del Campo, Judith; Maestre, Jorge Luis; Pérez, José Luis; Talavera, Arturo; Pérez, Antonio; Marrero, Karen; Ledón, Talena; Fando, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae 638 is a living candidate cholera vaccine strain attenuated by deletion of the CTXΦ prophage from C7258 (O1, El Tor Ogawa) and by insertion of the Clostridium thermocellum endoglucanase A gene into the hemagglutinin/protease coding sequence. This vaccine candidate was previously found to be well tolerated and immunogenic in volunteers. This article reports a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted to test short-term protection conferred by 638 against subsequent V. cholerae infection and disease in volunteers in Cuba. A total of 45 subjects were enrolled and assigned to receive vaccine or placebo. The vaccine contained 109 CFU of freshly harvested 638 buffered with 1.3% NaHCO3, while the placebo was buffer alone. After vaccine but not after placebo intake, 96% of volunteers had at least a fourfold increase in vibriocidal antibody titers, and 50% showed a doubling of at least the lipopolysaccharide-specific immunoglobulin A titers in serum. At 1 month after vaccination, five volunteers from the vaccine group and five from the placebo group underwent an exploratory challenge study with 109 CFU of ΔCTXΦ attenuated mutant strain V. cholerae 81. Only two volunteers from the vaccine group shed strain 81 in their feces, but none of them experienced diarrhea; in the placebo group, all volunteers excreted the challenge strain, and three had reactogenic diarrhea. An additional 12 vaccinees and 9 placebo recipients underwent challenge with 7 × 105 CFU of virulent strain V. cholerae 3008 freshly harvested from a brain heart infusion agar plate and buffered with 1.3% NaHCO3. Three volunteers (25%) from the vaccine group and all from the placebo group shed the challenge agent in their feces. None of the 12 vaccinees but 7 volunteers from the placebo group had diarrhea, and 2 of the latter exhibited severe cholera (>5,000 g of diarrheal stool). These results indicate that at 1 month after ingestion of a single oral dose (109 CFU) of strain

  13. Who will volunteer? Analysing individual and structural factors of volunteering in Swiss sports clubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Torsten; Nagel, Siegfried

    2013-01-01

    This article analyses the conditions influencing volunteering in sports clubs. It focuses not only on individual characteristics of volunteers but also on the corresponding structural conditions of sports clubs. It proposes a model of voluntary work in sports clubs based on economic behaviour theory. The influences of both the individual and context levels on the decision to engage in voluntary work are estimated in different multilevel models. Results of these multilevel analyses indicate that volunteering is not just an outcome of individual characteristics such as lower workloads, higher income, children belonging to the sports club, longer club memberships, or a strong commitment to the club. It is also influenced by club-specific structural conditions; volunteering is more probable in rural sports clubs whereas growth-oriented goals in clubs have a destabilising effect.

  14. 磷酸川芎嗪鼻用pH敏感型原位凝胶在正常大鼠和模型大鼠的脑部药动学比较研究%Comparison of the brain pharmacokinetics of nasal tetramethylpyrazine phosphate pH-sensitive in situ gel in normal rats and model rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宏伟; 晏亦林; 周莉玲

    2012-01-01

    The study is to investigate the brain pharmacokinetics change of nasal tetramethylpyrazine phosphate (TMPP) pH-sensitive in situ gel in normal and model rats. Acute cerebral ischemia rat model was successfully established by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) method. Both normal and model rats were given nasal TMPP pH-sensitive in situ gel (10 mg·kg-1). Perfusates of brain striatum area were collected at each time point by microdialysis. The content of TMPP was determined by HPLC. The pharmacokinetics parameters were calculated by Kinetica 4.4 software at each time point of the brain drug concentration. The main pharmacokinetics parameters of TMPP were fitted with compartments 2. After nasal TMPP pH-sensitive in situ gel the values of Cmax and AUC of both components in brain showed as follows: the value of model group > that of normal group. Significant difference can be observed in the process of brain pharmacokinetics in normal and model rats after giving nasal TMPP pH-sensitive in situ gel.

  15. Exploratory study to evaluate tolerability, safety, and activity of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Ashwinikumar A; Rege, Nirmala N; Tadvi, Firoz M; Solanki, Punita V; Kene, Kirti R; Shirolkar, Sudatta G; Pandey, Shefali N; Vaidya, Rama A; Vaidya, Ashok B

    2012-07-01

    Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) (WS), a "rasayana" drug, is recommended for balavardhan and mamsavardhan. The study was intended to evaluate dose-related tolerability, safety, and activity of WS formulation in normal individuals. The design was prospective, open-labeled, variable doses in volunteers. Eighteen apparently healthy volunteers (12M:6F, age:18-30 years, and BMI: 19-30) were enrolled. After baseline investigations, they received WS capsules (Rx) (aqueous extract, 8:1) daily in two divided doses with increase in daily dosage every 10 days for 30 days (750 mg/day ×10 days, 1 000 mg/day × 10 days, 1 250 mg/day × 10 days). Volunteers were assessed for symptoms/signs, vital functions, hematological and biochemical organ function tests. Muscle activity was measured by hand grip strength, quadriceps strength, and back extensor force. Exercise tolerance was determined using cycle ergometry. Lean body weight and fat% were computed from skin fold thickness measurement. Adverse events were recorded, as volunteered by the subjects. Repeated measures ANOVA, McNemar's test, and paired t test were employed. All but one volunteer tolerated WS without any adverse event. One volunteer showed increased appetite, libido, and hallucinogenic effects with vertigo at the lowest dose and was withdrawn from study. In six subjects, improvement in quality of sleep was found. Organ function tests were in normal range before and after the intervention. Reduction in total- and LDL- cholesterol and increase of strength in muscle activity was significant. Total body fat percentage showed a reduction trend. WS, in escalated dose, was tolerated well. The formulation appeared safe and strengthened muscle activity. In view of its traditional Rasayana use, further studies are planned to evaluate potential of this drug in patients of sarcopenia.

  16. Exploratory study to evaluate tolerability, safety, and activity of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwinikumar A Raut

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera (WS, a "rasayana" drug, is recommended for balavardhan and mamsavardhan. The study was intended to evaluate dose-related tolerability, safety, and activity of WS formulation in normal individuals. The design was prospective, open-labeled, variable doses in volunteers. Eighteen apparently healthy volunteers (12M:6F, age:18-30 years, and BMI: 19-30 were enrolled. After baseline investigations, they received WS capsules (Rx (aqueous extract, 8:1 daily in two divided doses with increase in daily dosage every 10 days for 30 days (750 mg/day x10 days, 1 000 mg/day x 10 days, 1 250 mg/day x 10 days. Volunteers were assessed for symptoms/signs, vital functions, hematological and biochemical organ function tests. Muscle activity was measured by hand grip strength, quadriceps strength, and back extensor force. Exercise tolerance was determined using cycle ergometry. Lean body weight and fat% were computed from skin fold thickness measurement. Adverse events were recorded, as volunteered by the subjects. Repeated measures ANOVA, McNemar′s test, and paired t test were employed. All but one volunteer tolerated WS without any adverse event. One volunteer showed increased appetite, libido, and hallucinogenic effects with vertigo at the lowest dose and was withdrawn from study. In six subjects, improvement in quality of sleep was found. Organ function tests were in normal range before and after the intervention. Reduction in total- and LDL- cholesterol and increase of strength in muscle activity was significant. Total body fat percentage showed a reduction trend. WS, in escalated dose, was tolerated well. The formulation appeared safe and strengthened muscle activity. In view of its traditional Rasayana use, further studies are planned to evaluate potential of this drug in patients of sarcopenia.

  17. 正常成年SD大鼠脑内CXCR4免疫阳性细胞的形态学观察%Morphological observation of CXCR4 immnopositve cell of brain in normal adult rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁红海; 潘三强; 王海树; 宿宝贵

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study morphological feature of expression CXCR4 cell of adult brain in rats. Methods Immuno-hisochemistry was used to identiy cells of expression CXCR4 and light microscopy was used to observe their distribution and shape. Results In normal adult rat brain cells of expression CXCR4 distributed all neocortex each layer and each region. In external granular layer cells of CXCR4 immunopositive were more concentration and make cell band but in other layer the positive cell was distracted by varies ship. In the neocotex region, CXCR4 positive cell were seen, for example, frontal cortex, parietal cortex, temporal cortex, and amygdaloid cortex. In subcortal region, there were many cells of expression CXCR4, for example, third paraven-tricular gray, choroid plexuses, ventricular tube membrane, medial and lateral hebunular nucle, paraventricular and supraoptical nucleus of hypothalamus, thalamus neuclei complex, and lateral geniculate bodies, globul pallidus and putamen. In archi-paleo-cortex, hippocampal formation and amygloid complex body were expression CXCR4. Conclusion In normal rat brain expression CXCR4 cells are show in choroid plexuses, ventricular tube membrane, habenular nuclei and hippocampal formation as well as amygdaloid complex bodies except reported brain region and nuclei.%目的 研究成年大鼠脑内表达CXCR4细胞的形态学特征.方法 用免疫组织细胞化学方法对成年大鼠脑内表达CXCR4细胞的分布和形态特点.结果 在成年大鼠脑内,CXCR4免疫阳性细胞广泛分布于新皮质各层和各区.在皮层上,外颗粒层阳性细胞相对比较集中,形成一个深染的阳性细胞带,而其它各层阳性细胞比较分散.在各区皮质,如压部皮质、额叶、顶叶、嗅皮质区以及杏仁周皮质区.在皮质下区,CXCR4免疫阳性细胞相对集中见于第三脑室脉络丛、室管膜和内、外侧僵核、室周灰质、丘脑核群、外侧膝状体核、尾壳核

  18. 68Ga-NOTA-Aca-BBN(7–14) PET/CT in Healthy Volunteers and Glioma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Li, Deling; Lang, Lixin; Zhu, Zhaohui; Wang, Ling; Wu, Peilin; Niu, Gang; Li, Fang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    This work was designed to study the safety, biodistribution, and radiation dosimetry of a gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR)– targeting, 68Ga-labeled bombesin (BBN) peptide derivative PET tracer, NOTA-Aca-BBN(7–14) (denoted as 68Ga-BBN) in healthy volunteers and to assess the level of receptor expression in glioma patients. Methods Four healthy volunteers (2 male and 2 female) underwent whole-body PET/CT at multiple time points after a bolus injection of 68Ga-BBN (111 ± 148 MBq). Regions of interest were drawn manually over major organs, and time–activity curves were obtained. Dosimetry was calculated using the OLINDA/EXM software. Twelve patients with glioma diagnosed by contrast-enhanced MRI underwent PET/CT at 30–45 min after 68Ga-BBN injection. Within 1 wk afterward, the tumor was surgically removed and immunohistochemical staining of tumor samples against GRPR was performed and correlated with the PET/CT results. Results 68Ga-BBN was well tolerated in all healthy volunteers, with no adverse symptoms being noticed or reported. 68Ga-BBN cleared rapidly from the circulation and was excreted mainly through the kidneys and urinary tract. The total effective dose equivalent and effective dose were 0.0335 ± 0.0079 and 0.0276 ± 0.0066 mSv/MBq, respectively. In glioma patients, all MRI-identified lesions showed high signal intensity on 68Ga-BBN PET/CT. SUVmax and SUVmean were 2.08 ± 0.58 and 1.32 ± 0.37, respectively. With normal brain tissue as background, tumor-to-background ratios were 24.0 ± 8.85 and 13.4 ± 4.54 based on SUVmax and SUVmean, respectively. The immunohistochemical staining confirmed a positive correlation between SUV and GRPR expression level (r2 = 0.71, P < 0.001). Conclusion 68Ga-BBN is a PET tracer with favorable pharmacokinetics and a favorable dosimetry profile. It has the potential to evaluate GRPR expression in glioma patients and guide GRPR-targeted therapy of glioma. PMID:26449838

  19. Stress and Burnout: Concerns for the Hospice Volunteer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, J. Conrad, Jr.; Hastings, Janice L.

    1992-01-01

    Sources of stress for hospice volunteers are environmental, ideological, and personal. Attention to volunteer stress and burnout involves defining job requirements and responsibilities, frequent communication and feedback, stress management techniques, flexibility in assignments, and opportunities to verbalize emotions. (SK)

  20. [Features of emotional stability in volunteers of gerontology programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgova, V I

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents an analysis of the characteristics of emotional stability in volunteers of gerontology programs (among the students of the Faculty of Psychology), depending on the structure of their life meaning and values, personal factors and professional important qualities. It is shown that the emotional stability of volunteers determines the main directions to explore the potential of the psyche of volunteers; modeling appropriate professiogram; organization of volunteer work in a particular program.