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Sample records for brain natruretic peptide

  1. The relationship between heart rate recovery and brain natruretic Peptide in patients with chest discomfort: a study for relationship between heart rate recovery and pre-exercise, post-exercise levels of brain natruretic Peptide in patients with normal systolic function and chest discomfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Eun; Kim, Bum Soo; Park, Wan; Huh, Jung Kwon; Kim, Byung Jin; Sung, Ki Chul; Kang, Jin Ho; Lee, Man Ho; Park, Jung Ro

    2010-04-01

    The correlation between brain natruretic peptide (BNP) level and cardiac autonomic function has been studied in type 2 diabetic patients. However, there is limited data from patients with normal systolic function. We evaluated the association between heart rate recovery (HRR) representing autonomic dysfunction and three plasma BNP levels: pre-exercise, post-exercise, and change during exercise in patients with normal systolic function. Subjects included 105 patients with chest pain and normal systolic function. HRR was defined as the difference between the peak heart rate and the rate measured two minutes after completion of a treadmill exercise test. We measured plasma BNP levels before exercise, 5 minutes after completion of exercise, and during exercise (absolute value of difference between pre- and post-exercise BNP levels). Patients with abnormal HRR values (heart rates, and higher pre- and post-exercise BNP levels than patients with normal HRR values. The patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) had abnormal HRR. However, no significant differences were found between the two groups in terms of history of hypertension (HTN), diabetes, and peak systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). HRR was significantly associated with pre-exercise BNP (r=-0.36, p=0.004) and post-exercise BNP (r=-0.27, p=0.006), but not BNP changes. Further, pre-exercise BNP levels showed a greater association with HRR than post-exercise BNP levels. HRR is independently associated with pre-exercise and post-exercise BNP levels, even in patients with normal systolic function.

  2. Brain natriutetic peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007509.htm Brain natriuretic peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) test is a blood test that measures ...

  3. NT-pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels after valve replacement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elasfar, Abdelfatah A

    2011-01-01

    .... To assess whether changes in N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels after mitral, aortic, and double-valve replacement reflect changes in heart failure symptoms, a prospective observational...

  4. Endogenous Opioid Peptides and Epilepsy: Quieting the Seizing Brain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    H. K. etal. (1988) Brain Res. 441, 381-385; "Lee, P. H K. etal. J. Neurosc. (in press) n.t., not tested masticatory jaw movements have activity and...there may be an increased model) (Table IV) opioid peptide- the brain. It seems possible that functional effect of the peptide2’. induced seizure...protection can be these general inhibitory properties Numerous preclinical studies have selectivity mediated by g- and on CNS neurons could function

  5. Delivery of peptides to the brain: emphasis on therapeutic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, William A

    2008-01-01

    Peptides and regulatory proteins hold great promise as therapeutic agents for the central nervous system (CNS). However, the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a major obstacle to the delivery of these potential therapeutics to their site of action. We concentrate here on the vascular BBB, which is comprised of the capillary bed of the brain specially modified to prevent the production of a plasma ultrafiltrate. For many peptides and proteins, this physical barrier is reinforced by enzymatic activities at the BBB, CNS, and peripheral tissues, short half-lives and large volumes of distribution in the blood, binding proteins in blood, and brain-to-blood efflux systems. Nevertheless, there are pathways through which substances can cross. Small, lipid soluble substances cross by the nonsaturable mechanism of transmembrane diffusion, but even water-soluble peptides can cross to some degree. Many endogenous peptides and regulatory proteins cross the BBB by way of selective, saturable transport systems. For enzymatically resistant substances with long circulating half-lives and small volumes of distribution, such as antibodies, erythropoietin, and enzymes, substances can enter the CNS in therapeutic amounts through the residual leak of the BBB, termed the extracellular pathways. Recent examples show that the BBB transporters for peptides and regulatory substances are modifiable. This provides both a therapeutic opportunity and the potential for disease to arise from BBB dysfunctions. In the last case, the BBB itself is a therapeutic target. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Soy peptide ingestion augments the synthesis and metabolism of noradrenaline in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Haruka; Moriyasu, Kazuki; Nakahata, Akane; Maebuchi, Motohiro; Ichinose, Takashi; Furuya, Shigeki

    2017-05-01

    To examine whether edible peptide intake affects neurotransmitter metabolism in the brain, we evaluated the effect of peptides derived from soy proteins or fish collagen on free amino acids and monoamines in the mouse brain. Ingestion of soy peptides led to markedly higher levels of tyrosine, a catecholamine precursor, in the serum, and cerebral cortex compared to those following ingestion of vehicle alone or collagen peptides. Soy peptide ingestion also effectively increased 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol and normetanephrine, the principal metabolites of noradrenaline, in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and brainstem, whereas collagen peptides did not exert such effects. Further, soy peptide ingestion led to a significant increase in noradrenaline itself in the brainstem, where noradrenergic neurons are present. Noradrenergic turnover was also markedly stimulated in these regions after soy peptide ingestion. These in vivo observations suggest that soy peptide ingestion can maintain and promote the synthesis and metabolism of noradrenaline in the brain.

  7. Comparison between Brain Natriuretic Peptide and Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide in Children with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Mohammad Noori

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM is revealed with the left ventricular dilatation and systolic dysfunction. This study was performed to determine the level of Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP and Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP in children with dilated cardiomyopathy and controls and comparison of these two biomarkers in patients. Materials and Methods: This case-control study was performed from April 2014 to March 2015 on patients with DCM. The levels of BNP and CGRP were measured by ELISA and final amounts of biomarkers were compared with echocardiographic finding.37 DCM patients compared with 30 healthy children selected randomly from those who referred to the hospital for routine checkup. Results: In this study the mean age was 10.567± 5.50 and 12.135 ± 4.626 years for controls and cases, respectively (P=0.321. The majority of echocardiography indices in the left and right heart had different means in case and controls (P

  8. N-terminal-pro-brain natriuretic peptide, but not brain natriuretic peptide, is increased in patients with severe obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fernandes

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Elevated body mass index (BMI has been reported as a risk factor for heart failure. Prevention of heart failure through identification and management of risk factors and preclinical phases of the disease is a priority. Levels of natriuretic peptides as well as activity of their receptors have been found altered in obese persons with some conflicting results. We investigated cardiac involvement in severely obese patients by determining N-terminal-pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP and attempting to correlate the levels of these peptides in serum and plasma, respectively, with BMI, duration of obesity, waist circumference, and echocardiographic parameters. Thirty-three patients with severe obesity (mean BMI: 46.39 kg/m², mean age: 39 years were studied. The control group contained 30 healthy age-matched individuals (BMI: <25 kg/m², mean age: 43 years. The t-test and Spearman correlation were used for statistical analysis. Log-NT-proBNP was significantly higher (P = 0.003 in obese patients (mean 1.67, 95% CI: 1.50-1.83 log pg/mL compared to controls (mean: 1.32, 95% CI: 1.17-1.47 log pg/mL. The Log-NT-proBNP concentration correlated with duration of obesity (r = 0.339, P < 0.004. No difference was detected in the Log-BNP concentration (P = 0.63 of obese patients (mean: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.46-1.00 log pg/mL compared to controls (mean: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.51-0.81 log pg/mL. NT-proBNP, but not BNP, is increased in severely obese patients and its concentration in serum is correlated with duration of obesity. NT-proBNP may be useful as an early diagnostic tool for the detection of cardiac burden due to severe obesity.

  9. Improved brain uptake of peptide-based CNS drugs via alternative routes of administrations of its nanocarrier delivery systems: a promising strategy for CNS targeting delivery of peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Shuai; Wang, Qianwen; Zuo, Zhong

    2014-11-01

    Recently, developing peptide-based drugs to treat CNS diseases has gained increasing attention in both academics and pharmaceutical industry. However, targeting delivery of peptides to brain is one of the most challenging problems faced in the treatment of CNS diseases. After explaining the brain barriers limiting the delivery of peptides, the current review focuses on summarizing the most promising approaches for the enhancement of peptide and brain uptake, including delivery via alternative routes of administrations or using nanocarriers or intranasal administration of nanocarriers loaded with peptide. In addition, the biopharmaceutic, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic details of several successful peptide-based CNS drugs are highlighted. Although using nanocarriers or delivery via alternative routes could improve to a certain extent the brain uptake of peptides, the magnitude of changes remains moderate. Alternatively, intranasal administration of nanocarriers loaded with peptide has been demonstrated to be an effective approach for CNS-targeted delivery of peptides.

  10. The usefulness of brain natriuretic peptide in simple congenital heart disease-a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Eindhoven (Jannet); A.E. van den Bosch (Annemien); H. Boersma (Eric); J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBrain natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide are two well-established markers for cardiac failure in acquired heart disease. Nevertheless, the clinical utility of these markers in patients with congenital heart disease remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of this

  11. The usefulness of brain natriuretic peptide in complex congenital heart disease: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Eindhoven (Jannet); A.E. van den Bosch (Annemien); P.R. Jansen (Philip); H. Boersma (Eric); J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBrain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) are well-established markers for heart failure in the general population. However, the value of BNP as a diagnostic and prognostic marker for patients with structural congenital heart disease (CHD)

  12. Bioimpedance and brain natriuretic peptide in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepaldi, Carlo; Lamas, Elena Iglesias; Martino, Francesca Katiana; Rodighiero, Maria Pia; Scalzotto, Elisa; Wojewodzka-Zelezniakowicz, Marzena; Rosner, Mitchell H; Ronco, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of ideal body weight in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients is important for clinical practice. Fluid overload may produce hypertension, reduced arterial distensibility, left ventricular hypertrophy. All these are risk factors for mortality in PD patients: cardio- and cerebrovascular events are the main causes of morbidity and mortality in PD population. Nowadays, a clear and widely accepted definition of ideal body weight in PD patients does not exist. Probably the ideal body weight is the weight at which the extra cellular volume is normal. Many different tools have been used to assess the hydration status in dialysis patients. Ultrasonic evaluation of inferior vena cava diameter only assesses intravascular volume, and is also influenced by diastolic dysfunction and is thus a reflection of preload and not of tissue hydration. Direct measurement of extra cellular and total body water by dilution methods is considered as the golden standard, but these techniques are laborious and expensive. Parameters, such as brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) or NT-proBNP can reflect changes in hydration status and may help the nephrologist to estimate it. Natriuretic peptides are influenced both by preload and ventricular abnormalities and in patients with renal failure accumulation can occur. Bioimpedance is an accurate, reproducible, not expensive and not invasive technique that permits a good evaluation of hydration status in PD and can drive the nephrologist in his clinical choices. Clinical evaluation, strict control of body weight, diuresis, sodium and fluids intakes, bioimpedance monitoring and serum levels of natriuretic peptides may all together help us to maintain the PD patient euvolemic. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Porcine brain natriuretic peptide receptor in bovine adrenal cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, K.; Hashiguchi, T.; Ohashi, M.; Takayanagi, R.; Haji, M.; Matsuo, H.; Nawata, H.

    1989-01-01

    The action of porcine brain natriuretic peptide (pBNP) on the steroidogenesis was investigated in cultured bovine adrenocortical cells. Porcine BNP induced a significant dose-dependent inhibition of both ACTH- and A II-stimulated aldosterone secretion. 10/sup /minus/8/M and 10/sup /minus/7/M pBNP also significantly inhibited ACTH-stimulated cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) secretions. Binding studies of (/sup 125/I)-pBNP to bovine adrenocortical membrane fractions showed that adrenal cortex had high-affinity and low-capacity pBNP binding sites, with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.70 x 10/sup /minus/10/M and a maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 19.9 fmol/mg protein. Finally, the 135 Kd radioactive band was specially visualized in the affinity labeling of bovine adrenal cortex with disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS). These results suggest that pBNP may have receptor-mediated suppressive actions on bovine adrenal steroidogenesis, similar to that in atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP).

  14. Brain Natriuretic Peptide Concentrations After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Relationship with Hypovolemia and Hyponatremia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mees, Sanne M. Dorhout; Hoff, Reinier G.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Algra, Ale; van den Bergh, Walter M.

    2011-01-01

    Hyponatremia and hypovolemia occur often after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and are associated with poor outcome. The authors investigated whether brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is related to hypovolemia and hyponatremia after SAH and whether it can differentiate between hypovolemic and

  15. Preparation and Characterization of Biocompatible Chitosan Nanoparticles for Targeted Brain Delivery of Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yemisci, Muge; Caban, Secil; Fernandez-Megia, Eduardo; Capan, Yilmaz; Couvreur, Patrick; Dalkara, Turgay

    2018-01-01

    Here, we describe a nanocarrier system that can transfer chitosan nanoparticles loaded with either small peptides such as the caspase inhibitor Z-DEVD-FMK or a large peptide like basic fibroblast growth factor across the blood-brain barrier. The nanoparticles are selectively directed to the brain and are not measurably taken up by the liver and spleen. Intravital fluorescent microscopy provides an opportunity to study the penetration kinetics of nanoparticles loaded with fluorescent agents such as Nile red. Nanoparticles functionalized with anti-transferrin antibody and loaded with peptides efficiently provided neuroprotection when systemically administered either as a formulation bearing a single peptide or a mixture of them. Failure of brain permeation of the nanoparticles after inhibition of vesicular transcytosis by imatinib as well as when nanoparticles were not functionalized with anti-transferrin antibody indicates that this nanomedicine formulation is rapidly transported across the blood-brain barrier by receptor-mediated transcytosis.

  16. Regulation of expression of atrial and brain natriuretic peptide, biomarkers for heart development and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sergeeva, Irina A.; Christoffels, Vincent M.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian heart expresses two closely related natriuretic peptide (NP) hormones, atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). The excretion of the NPs and the expression of their genes strongly respond to a variety of cardiovascular disorders. NPs act to increase

  17. Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Delivery of Peptides to the Brain: Reversal of Anxiety during Drug Withdrawal

    OpenAIRE

    Nathan Vinzant; Scholl, Jamie L.; Chia-Ming Wu; Trevor Kindle; Ranjit Koodali; Gina L. Forster

    2017-01-01

    Targeting neuropeptide systems is important for future advancements in treatment of neurological and psychiatric illnesses. However, many of the peptides and their analogs do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) efficiently. Nanoparticles such as iron oxide can cross the BBB, and here we describe a novel method for the conjugation of a peptide antisauvagine-30 (ASV-30) to iron oxide nanoparticles. Previous research has shown that direct infusion of ASV-30 into the brain reduces anxiety-lik...

  18. A nanoengineered peptidic delivery system with specificity for human brain capillary endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Linping; Moghimi, Seyed Moein

    2016-01-01

    avidity of the majority of the so-called ‘brain-specific’ nanoparticles to the brain capillary endothelial cells has been poor, even during in vitro conditions. We have addressed this issue and designed a versatile peptidic nanoplatform with high binding avidity to the human cerebral capillary endothelial...... cells. This was achieved by selecting an appropriate phage-derived peptide with high specificity for human brain capillary endothelial cells, which following careful structural modifications spontaneously formed a nanoparticle-fiber network. The peptidic network was characterized fully and its uptake...... by the human brain capillary endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 was confirmed by live-cell fluorescent microscopy and quantified by flow cytometry. Recognition and internalization was medicated by two receptors leading to endolysosomal accumulation. Furthermore, the network was capable of delivering functional si...

  19. Profiles of VGF Peptides in the Rat Brain and Their Modulations after Phencyclidine Treatment

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    Barbara Noli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available From the VGF precursor protein originate several low molecular weight peptides, whose distribution in the brain and blood circulation is not entirely known. Among the VGF peptides, those containing the N-terminus portion were altered in the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF and hypothalamus of schizophrenia patients. “Hence, we aimed to better investigate the involvement of the VGF peptides in schizophrenia by studying their localization in the brain regions relevant for the disease, and revealing their possible modulations in response to certain neuronal alterations occurring in schizophrenia”. We produced antibodies against different VGF peptides encompassing the N-terminus, but also C-terminus-, TLQP-, GGGE- peptide sequences, and the so named NERP-3 and -4. These antibodies were used to carry out specific ELISA and immunolocalization studies while mass spectrometry (MS analysis was also performed to recognize the intact brain VGF fragments. We used a schizophrenia rat model, in which alterations in the prepulse inhibition (PPI of the acoustic startle response occurred after PCP treatment. In normal rats, all the VGF peptides studied were distributed in the brain areas examined including hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, accumbens and amygdaloid nuclei and also in the plasma. By liquid chromatography-high resolution mass, we identified different intact VGF peptide fragments, including those encompassing the N-terminus and the NERPs. PCP treatment caused behavioral changes that closely mimic schizophrenia, estimated by us as a disruption of PPI of the acoustic startle response. The PCP treatment also induced selective changes in the VGF peptide levels within certain brain areas. Indeed, an increase in VGF C-terminus and TLQP peptides was revealed in the prefrontal cortex (p < 0.01 where they were localized within parvoalbumin and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH containing neurons, respectively. Conversely, in the nucleus accumbens, PCP

  20. Peptide Transport through the Blood-Brain Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    cause glomerular nephropathies , (c) the potential antigenicity of the vector, i.e., some cationized heterologous proteins are highly immunogenic, (d...I diabetes . N. Enctl. J. Med. 312:1078-1084. 12. Pardridge, W.M. (1988): Recent advances in blood-brain barrier transport. Ann. Rev. Pharmacol...barrier. In: Pathophysiology of the Blood-Brain Barrier: Long Term Consequences of Barrier Dysfunction for the Brain (B.B. Johansson, C. Owman, and H

  1. Nose-to-brain delivery of macromolecules mediated by cell-penetrating peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Lin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain delivery of macromolecular therapeutics (e.g., proteins remains an unsolved problem because of the formidable blood–brain barrier (BBB. Although a direct pathway of nose-to-brain transfer provides an answer to circumventing the BBB and has already been intensively investigated for brain delivery of small drugs, new challenges arise for intranasal delivery of proteins because of their larger size and hydrophilicity. In order to overcome the barriers and take advantage of available pathways (e.g., epithelial tight junctions, uptake by olfactory neurons, transport into brain tissues, and intra-brain diffusion, a low molecular weight protamine (LMWP cell-penetrating peptide was utilized to facilitate nose-to-brain transport. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP have been widely used to mediate macromolecular delivery through many kinds of biobarriers. Our results show that conjugates of LMWP–proteins are able to effectively penetrate into the brain after intranasal administration. The CPP-based intranasal method highlights a promising solution for protein therapy of brain diseases.

  2. [Interaction of C60 fullerene-polyvinylpyrrolidone complex and brain Aβ(1-42)-peptide in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobylev, A G; Shatalin, Iu V; Vikhliantsev, I M; Bobyleva, L G; Gudkov, S V; Podlubnaia, Z A

    2014-01-01

    Using a spectrophotometric method changes occurring in solution containing brain Aβ(1-42)-peptide, fullerene C60, and polyvinylpyrrolidone were analyzed. Using the Bent-French method relative binding constants of fullerene C60 with Aβ(1-42)-peptide and polyvinylpyrrolidone with Aβ(1-42)- peptide were determined. These data suggest that Aβ(1-42)-peptide interacting with the C60 fullerene-polyvinylpyrrolidone complex partially displaces polyvinylpyrrolidone and generates a new three molecular compound.

  3. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) raises blood-brain glucose transfer capacity and hexokinase activity in human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gejl, Michael; Lerche, Susanne; Egefjord, Lærke

    2013-01-01

    In hyperglycemia, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) lowers brain glucose concentration together with increased net blood-brain clearance and brain metabolism, but it is not known whether this effect depends on the prevailing plasma glucose (PG) concentration. In hypoglycemia, glucose depletion...... potentially impairs brain function. Here, we test the hypothesis that GLP-1 exacerbates the effect of hypoglycemia. To test the hypothesis, we determined glucose transport and consumption rates in seven healthy men in a randomized, double-blinded placebo-controlled cross-over experimental design. The acute...... effect of GLP-1 on glucose transfer in the brain was measured by positron emission tomography (PET) during a hypoglycemic clamp (3 mM plasma glucose) with (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose (FDG) as tracer of glucose. In addition, we jointly analyzed cerebrometabolic effects of GLP-1 from the present...

  4. Cre Fused with RVG Peptide Mediates Targeted Genome Editing in Mouse Brain Cells In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhiyuan; Sun, Zhaolin; Li, Pan; Feng, Tao; Wu, Sen

    2016-12-14

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short peptides that can pass through cell membranes. CPPs can facilitate the cellular entry of proteins, macromolecules, nanoparticles and drugs. RVG peptide (RVG hereinafter) is a 29-amino-acid CPP derived from a rabies virus glycoprotein that can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and enter brain cells. However, whether RVG can be used for genome editing in the brain has not been reported. In this work, we combined RVG with Cre recombinase for bacterial expression. The purified RVG-Cre protein cut plasmids in vitro and traversed cell membranes in cultured Neuro2a cells. By tail vein-injecting RVG-Cre into Cre reporter mouse lines mTmG and Rosa26lacZ, we demonstrated that RVG-Cre could target brain cells and achieve targeted somatic genome editing in adult mice. This direct delivery of the gene-editing enzyme protein into mouse brains with RVG is much safer than plasmid- or viral-based methods, holding promise for further applications in the treatment of various brain diseases.

  5. Diagnostic Usefulness of N-terminal Pro-brain Natriuretic Peptide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) is useful in the diagnosis and management of adult patients with heart failure. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to determine the usefulness of NT-proBNP in diagnosing congestive heart failure (CHF) in children and its correlation with left ...

  6. Immunohistochemical distribution of corticotropin-like intermediate lobe peptide (CLIP) immunoreactivity in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaphiropoulos, A; Charnay, Y; Vallet, P; Constantinidis, J; Bouras, C

    1991-01-01

    The immunocytochemical distribution of CLIP (corticotropin-like intermediate lobe peptide) or ACTH(18-39), a small biologically active peptide, was examined in the human brain, using a monoclonal antibody against this peptide. Groups of CLIP-immunoreactive cell bodies, small to medium size and bipolar or triangular in shape, were found in the basal hypothalamus extending from the retrochiasmatic region to the premammillary nuclei area. Immunoreactive fibers with varicosities, terminals and "pipe shape" structures, were distributed within the hypothalamus, limbic structures, the brainstem and spinal cord nuclei, forming a particularly rich network in the hypothalamus, the preoptic area, the septal region, the amygdala and the upper brainstem periaqueductal gray matter. The above neuroanatomical observations confirm and extend previous findings in animals, strengthening even more the possibility that this peptide may be involved in numerous behavioral, autonomic and physiological functions such as regulation of sleep-waking cycle, pain control and respiratory and cardiovascular regulation.

  7. Neuropeptide Y, peptide YY and pancreatic polypeptide in the gut-brain axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Peter; Reichmann, Florian; Farzi, Aitak

    2012-12-01

    The gut-brain axis refers to the bidirectional communication between the gut and the brain. Four information carriers (vagal and spinal afferent neurons, immune mediators such as cytokines, gut hormones and gut microbiota-derived signalling molecules) transmit information from the gut to the brain, while autonomic neurons and neuroendocrine factors carry outputs from the brain to the gut. The members of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) family of biologically active peptides, NPY, peptide YY (PYY) and pancreatic polypeptide (PP), are expressed by cell systems at distinct levels of the gut-brain axis. PYY and PP are exclusively expressed by endocrine cells of the digestive system, whereas NPY is found at all levels of the gut-brain and brain-gut axis. The major systems expressing NPY comprise enteric neurons, primary afferent neurons, several neuronal pathways throughout the brain and sympathetic neurons. In the digestive tract, NPY and PYY inhibit gastrointestinal motility and electrolyte secretion and in this way modify the input to the brain. PYY is also influenced by the intestinal microbiota, and NPY exerts, via stimulation of Y1 receptors, a proinflammatory action. Furthermore, the NPY system protects against distinct behavioural disturbances caused by peripheral immune challenge, ameliorating the acute sickness response and preventing long-term depression. At the level of the afferent system, NPY inhibits nociceptive input from the periphery to the spinal cord and brainstem. In the brain, NPY and its receptors (Y1, Y2, Y4, Y5) play important roles in regulating food intake, energy homeostasis, anxiety, mood and stress resilience. In addition, PP and PYY signal to the brain to attenuate food intake, anxiety and depression-related behaviour. These findings underscore the important role of the NPY-Y receptor system at several levels of the gut-brain axis in which NPY, PYY and PP operate both as neural and endocrine messengers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  8. Neuropeptide Y, peptide YY and pancreatic polypeptide in the gut–brain axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Peter; Reichmann, Florian; Farzi, Aitak

    2012-01-01

    The gut–brain axis refers to the bidirectional communication between the gut and the brain. Four information carriers (vagal and spinal afferent neurons, immune mediators such as cytokines, gut hormones and gut microbiota-derived signalling molecules) transmit information from the gut to the brain, while autonomic neurons and neuroendocrine factors carry outputs from the brain to the gut. The members of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) family of biologically active peptides, NPY, peptide YY (PYY) and pancreatic polypeptide (PP), are expressed by cell systems at distinct levels of the gut–brain axis. PYY and PP are exclusively expressed by endocrine cells of the digestive system, whereas NPY is found at all levels of the gut–brain and brain–gut axis. The major systems expressing NPY comprise enteric neurons, primary afferent neurons, several neuronal pathways throughout the brain and sympathetic neurons. In the digestive tract, NPY and PYY inhibit gastrointestinal motility and electrolyte secretion and in this way modify the input to the brain. PYY is also influenced by the intestinal microbiota, and NPY exerts, via stimulation of Y1 receptors, a proinflammatory action. Furthermore, the NPY system protects against distinct behavioural disturbances caused by peripheral immune challenge, ameliorating the acute sickness response and preventing long-term depression. At the level of the afferent system, NPY inhibits nociceptive input from the periphery to the spinal cord and brainstem. In the brain, NPY and its receptors (Y1, Y2, Y4, Y5) play important roles in regulating food intake, energy homeostasis, anxiety, mood and stress resilience. In addition, PP and PYY signal to the brain to attenuate food intake, anxiety and depression-related behaviour. These findings underscore the important role of the NPY-Y receptor system at several levels of the gut–brain axis in which NPY, PYY and PP operate both as neural and endocrine messengers. PMID:22979996

  9. Collecting peptide release from the brain using porous polymer monolith-based solid phase extraction capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannacone, Jamie M.; Ren, Shifang; Hatcher, Nathan G.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2010-01-01

    Porous polymer monolithic (PPM) columns are employed to collect and concentrate neuronal release from invertebrate and vertebrate model systems, prior to their characterization with mass spectrometry. The monoliths are fabricated in fused silica capillaries from lauryl methacrylate (LMA) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA). The binding capacities for fluorescein and for fluorescently labeled peptides are on the order of nanomoles per millimeter length of monolith material for a 200 μm inner diameter capillary. To evaluate this strategy for collecting peptides from physiological solutions, angiotensin I and insulin in artificial seawater are loaded onto, and then released from the monoliths after a desalination rinse, resulting in femtomole limits of detection via matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Positioned in the extracellular media near Aplysia californica bag cell neurons, upon electrical stimulation, these LMA-EDMA monoliths are also used to collect and concentrate peptide release, with egg laying hormone and acidic peptide detected. In addition, the collection of several known peptides secreted from chemically stimulated mouse brain slices demonstrates their ability to collect releasates from a variety of neuronal tissues. When compared to collection approaches using individual beads placed on brain slices, the PPM capillaries offer greater binding capacity. Moreover, they maintain higher spatial resolution as compared to the larger-volume, solid phase extraction collection strategies. PMID:19485405

  10. Distribution and characterization of two non-opiod peptides with morphine modulating activity in brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majane, E.A.; Yang, H.Y.T.

    1986-03-05

    Two peptides which are immunoreactive to Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH/sub 2/ (FMRF-NH/sub 2/) antiserum were purified from bovine brain, chemically characterized and synthesized. These two peptides, octapeptide octadecapeptide, can reduce rat tail flick latencies; octapeptide can also attenuate morphine induced analgesia. The distribution of these two peptides in brain was studied by radioimmunoassay. Octapeptide antiserum shows high affinity for synthetic octapeptide, PYY and FMRF-NH/sub 2/. The antiserum is almost totally inactive to ..gamma../sub 1/-MSH. Octadecapeptide antiserum shows high affinity for octadecapeptide, some cross-reaction for the octapeptide (50%), ..gamma../sub 1/-MSH (10%) and FMRF-NH/sub 2/ (0.01%). NPY, PYY, Met/sup 5/-Enk-Arg-Phe and CCk are inactive. Octa and Octadecapeptide immunoreactivities are unevenly distributed in bovine brain. The highest concentrations (pmol g/sup -1/) are found in dorsal spinal cord (9.8 and 16.4 respectively), periaqueductal gray (8.6 and 6.8) and pons medulla (7.0 and 8.9); non-detectable amounts in cortex and cerebellum. The enrichment of these peptides in dorsal cord and PAG, areas important in opoid-mediated pain perception, suggest that they may play a role in mediating antinociception. Furthermore, using these two antisera, it is now possible to differentiate mammalian FMRF-NH/sub 2/-like and NPY.

  11. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors in the brain: controlling food intake and body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggio, Laurie L; Drucker, Daniel J

    2014-10-01

    The peptide hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) enhances glucose-induced insulin secretion and inhibits both gastric emptying and glucagon secretion. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists control glycemia via glucose-dependent mechanisms of action and promote weight loss in obese and diabetic individuals. Nevertheless, the mechanisms and cellular targets transducing the weight loss effects remain unclear. Two recent studies in the JCI provide insight into the neurons responsible for this effect. Sisley et al. reveal that GLP-1R agonist-induced weight loss requires GLP-1Rs in the CNS, while Secher et al. reveal that a small peptide GLP-1R agonist penetrates the brain and activates a subset of GLP-1R-expressing neurons in the arcuate nucleus to produce weight loss. Together, these two studies elucidate pathways that inform strategies coupling GLP-1R signaling to control of body weight in patients with diabetes or obesity.

  12. Role of opioid peptides in brain mechanisms regulating blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, W; Petty, M A; Sitsen, J M

    1983-02-01

    Beta-endorphin and related opioid peptides are neuropeptides which appear to play a role in cardiovascular regulation which is supported by altered nociceptive responsiveness in hypertensive animals. In spontaneously hypertensive rats the pain threshold for electric stimulation is elevated; these rats show increased response latency time in a hot plate test. The opiate antagonist naloxone reverses these values to that of the normotensive controls. In other forms of experimental hypertension, eg, renal hypertension (one-clip, two-kidney model), no change in pain sensitivity is apparent. Sinoaortic baroreceptor denervation causes a labile hypertension without changes in hot plate response. Administration of beta-endorphin into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) gradually decreases blood pressure and heart rate without affecting respiratory frequency. These cardiovascular effects are blocked by naloxone as well as by an antibody to beta-endorphin. In contrast to the effects of beta-endorphin, microinjection of enkephalins into the NTS increases blood pressure and heart rate. The data suggest the existence of two separate endorphin systems at the level of the NTS, one a depressor and another a pressor system. The depressor influence of beta-endorphin may play a role in the mechanism of action of antihypertensive agents such as methyldopa and clonidine. Our data support a role of endorphins as neuropeptides involved in cardiovascular regulation, exerting a dual influence at the level of the NTS.

  13. A New Noncanonical Anionic Peptide That Translocates a Cellular Blood–Brain Barrier Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Neves-Coelho

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The capacity to transport therapeutic molecules across the blood–brain barrier (BBB represents a breakthrough in the development of tools for the treatment of many central nervous system (CNS-associated diseases. The BBB, while being protective against infectious agents, hinders the brain uptake of many drugs. Hence, finding safe shuttles able to overcome the BBB is of utmost importance. Herein, we identify a new BBB-translocating peptide with unique properties. For years it was thought that cationic sequences were mandatory for a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP to achieve cellular internalization. Despite being anionic at physiological pH, PepNeg (sequence (SGTQEEY is an efficient BBB translocator that is able to carry a large cargo (27 kDa, while maintaining BBB integrity. In addition, PepNeg is able to use two distinct methods of translocation, energy-dependent and -independent, suggesting that direct penetration might occur when low concentrations of peptide are presented to cells. The discovery of this new anionic trans-BBB peptide allows the development of new delivery systems to the CNS and contributes to the need to rethink the role of electrostatic attraction in BBB-translocation.

  14. Maternal serum atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Mehmet Aytac; Alici Davutoglu, Ebru; Temel Yuksel, Ilkbal; Kucur, Mine; Ekmekci, Hakan; Balci Ekmekci, Ozlem; Uludag, Sezin; Uludag, Seyfettin; Madazli, Riza

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate maternal serum atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels in patients with getational diabetes mellitus compared with a control group. We have measured maternal serum ANP and BNP levels in 35 otherwise healthy and 45 gestational diabetic women between gestational week 24 and 28 referred to our unit in a cross-sectional study. Independent samples t-test or the Mann-Whitney U-test was used for comparison of two groups where appropriate. Mean maternal serum homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), HbA1c, fasting glucose and insulin levels in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) group were significantly higher than the control group (p ANP and BNP levels of women with GDM were significantly lower than the control group (12.9 ± 9.9 versus 34.8 ± 16.9 pg/ml, p ANP and BNP levels were negatively correlated with insulin levels, HbA1c and HOMA-IR values (p ANP and BNP levels are significantly lower in patients with GDM. These biomarkers might be valuable in clinical setting for identifying high-risk women for developing diabetes during pregnancy.

  15. Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Delivery of Peptides to the Brain: Reversal of Anxiety during Drug Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinzant, Nathan; Scholl, Jamie L.; Wu, Chia-Ming; Kindle, Trevor; Koodali, Ranjit; Forster, Gina L.

    2017-01-01

    Targeting neuropeptide systems is important for future advancements in treatment of neurological and psychiatric illnesses. However, many of the peptides and their analogs do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) efficiently. Nanoparticles such as iron oxide can cross the BBB, and here we describe a novel method for the conjugation of a peptide antisauvagine-30 (ASV-30) to iron oxide nanoparticles. Previous research has shown that direct infusion of ASV-30 into the brain reduces anxiety-like behavior in animal models via actions on corticotropin releasing factor type 2 (CRF2) receptors. Therefore, we tested whether iron oxide+ASV-30 complexes cross the BBB of rats and then determined whether iron oxide+ASV-30 nanoparticles are localized with CRF2-expressing neurons. Finally we tested the hypothesis that systemic infusion of iron oxide+ASV-30 can reduce anxiety-like behavior. First we describe the synthesis and demonstrate the stability of iron oxide-peptide nanoparticle complexes. Next, nanoparticles (87.7 μg/kg Fe2O3) with or without ASV-30 (200 μg/kg, ip) were injected into male rats 30 min prior to transcardial perfusion and brain fixation for immunohistochemical analysis, or before testing on the elevated plus maze (EPM) in an amphetamine withdrawal model of anxiety. Systemically administered iron oxide+ASV-30 particles were present in the brain and associated with neurons, including those that express CRF2 receptors, but did not localize with the iron storage protein ferritin. Furthermore, systemic administration of ironoxide+ASV-30 reduced amphetamine withdrawal-induced anxiety without affecting locomotion, suggesting that the anxiolytic effects of ASV-30 were preserved and the bioavailability of ASV-30 was sufficient. The findings demonstrate a novel approach to peptide delivery across the BBB and provide insight as to the neural distribution and efficacy of this nanotechnology. PMID:29163012

  16. Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Delivery of Peptides to the Brain: Reversal of Anxiety during Drug Withdrawal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Vinzant

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Targeting neuropeptide systems is important for future advancements in treatment of neurological and psychiatric illnesses. However, many of the peptides and their analogs do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB efficiently. Nanoparticles such as iron oxide can cross the BBB, and here we describe a novel method for the conjugation of a peptide antisauvagine-30 (ASV-30 to iron oxide nanoparticles. Previous research has shown that direct infusion of ASV-30 into the brain reduces anxiety-like behavior in animal models via actions on corticotropin releasing factor type 2 (CRF2 receptors. Therefore, we tested whether iron oxide+ASV-30 complexes cross the BBB of rats and then determined whether iron oxide+ASV-30 nanoparticles are localized with CRF2-expressing neurons. Finally we tested the hypothesis that systemic infusion of iron oxide+ASV-30 can reduce anxiety-like behavior. First we describe the synthesis and demonstrate the stability of iron oxide-peptide nanoparticle complexes. Next, nanoparticles (87.7 μg/kg Fe2O3 with or without ASV-30 (200 μg/kg, ip were injected into male rats 30 min prior to transcardial perfusion and brain fixation for immunohistochemical analysis, or before testing on the elevated plus maze (EPM in an amphetamine withdrawal model of anxiety. Systemically administered iron oxide+ASV-30 particles were present in the brain and associated with neurons, including those that express CRF2 receptors, but did not localize with the iron storage protein ferritin. Furthermore, systemic administration of ironoxide+ASV-30 reduced amphetamine withdrawal-induced anxiety without affecting locomotion, suggesting that the anxiolytic effects of ASV-30 were preserved and the bioavailability of ASV-30 was sufficient. The findings demonstrate a novel approach to peptide delivery across the BBB and provide insight as to the neural distribution and efficacy of this nanotechnology.

  17. 3D printing of layered brain-like structures using peptide modified gellan gum substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Rodrigo; Stevens, Leo; Thompson, Brianna C; Gilmore, Kerry J; Gorkin, Robert; Stewart, Elise M; in het Panhuis, Marc; Romero-Ortega, Mario; Wallace, Gordon G

    2015-10-01

    The brain is an enormously complex organ structured into various regions of layered tissue. Researchers have attempted to study the brain by modeling the architecture using two dimensional (2D) in vitro cell culturing methods. While those platforms attempt to mimic the in vivo environment, they do not truly resemble the three dimensional (3D) microstructure of neuronal tissues. Development of an accurate in vitro model of the brain remains a significant obstacle to our understanding of the functioning of the brain at the tissue or organ level. To address these obstacles, we demonstrate a new method to bioprint 3D brain-like structures consisting of discrete layers of primary neural cells encapsulated in hydrogels. Brain-like structures were constructed using a bio-ink consisting of a novel peptide-modified biopolymer, gellan gum-RGD (RGD-GG), combined with primary cortical neurons. The ink was optimized for a modified reactive printing process and developed for use in traditional cell culturing facilities without the need for extensive bioprinting equipment. Furthermore the peptide modification of the gellan gum hydrogel was found to have a profound positive effect on primary cell proliferation and network formation. The neural cell viability combined with the support of neural network formation demonstrated the cell supportive nature of the matrix. The facile ability to form discrete cell-containing layers validates the application of this novel printing technique to form complex, layered and viable 3D cell structures. These brain-like structures offer the opportunity to reproduce more accurate 3D in vitro microstructures with applications ranging from cell behavior studies to improving our understanding of brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Intracerebroventricular galanin-like peptide induces different brain activation compared with galanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Catherine B; Williams, Torrie; Luckman, Simon M

    2003-09-01

    Like galanin, the 60-amino-acid peptide, galanin-like peptide (GALP), has orexigenic actions, demonstrated by an acute increase in feeding after central injection in rodents. However, in contrast to galanin, GALP causes a prolonged rise in core body temperature and a reduction in body weight over 24 h. In an attempt to identify potential explanations for the observed differences between GALP and galanin, this study examined which brain areas were activated by these peptides. Intracerebroventricular injection of GALP into conscious rats significantly stimulated feeding over 0-1 h, increased core body temperature, but reduced body weight gain over 24 h. Immunohistochemistry to detect c-fos demonstrated that intracerebroventricular injection of GALP or galanin activated several brain regions in common, including the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus, lateral hypothalamus, and nucleus tractus solitarius of the brainstem. However, GALP also induced c-fos expression in the periventricular hypothalamic region and supraoptic hypothalamic nucleus. Cell activation induced by GALP in the supraoptic hypothalamic nucleus and nucleus tractus solitarius was dependent on food intake but independent of food consumption in all other brain regions. Double immunohistochemistry indicated that small cells expressing c-fos in the periventricular hypothalamic region after GALP were astrocytes and not microglia.

  19. Escitalopram regulates expression of TRH and TRH-like peptides in rat brain and peripheral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattin, Albert; Pekary, Albert E; Blood, James

    2008-01-01

    Escitalopram (eCIT) is a highly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) that can be an effective treatment for a number of neuropsychiatric disorders including major depression. We, and others, have previously reported that thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH, pGlu-His-Pro-NH(2)) and TRH-like peptides with the general structure pGlu-X-Pro-NH(2), where 'X' can be any amino acid residue, have neuroprotective, antidepressant, analeptic, arousal, and anti-epileptic effects that could mediate the neuropsychiatric and therapeutic effects of a variety of neurotropic agents. The present work explores the possible mediation of the therapeutic effects of eCIT by TRH and TRH-like peptides. In order to extend our understanding of the range of neurotransmitter systems that are modulated by and, in turn, influence the expression of TRH and TRH-like peptides, 16 male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected i.p. with eCIT (24 mg/kg BW) and the brain levels of TRH and TRH-like peptides in various brain regions involved in mood regulation and peripheral tissues with serotonergic innervation were measured 0, 2, 4, and 6 h later by combined HPLC and RIA. Remarkable 3- to 25-fold increases in TRH and TRH-like peptide levels were observed 2 h after i.p. eCIT in the epididymis. This reproductive tissue has the highest level of serotonin found in most mammals. The acute (2 h) effect of eCIT in brain regions involved in mood regulation, particularly the nucleus accumbens and medulla oblongata, cerebellum, and striatum was to increase the levels of TRH-like peptides, most consistently Phe-TRH. An important exception was a decrease in the level of TRH in the nucleus accumbens. These responses, in general, were the opposite of those we have previously observed after acute restraint stress in this same rat strain. We conclude that some of the therapeutic effects of inhibition of serotonin reuptake are mediated by altered release of TRH and TRH-like peptides. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Combined autoradiographic-immunocytochemical analysis of opioid receptors and opioid peptide neuronal systems in brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, M.E.; Khachaturian, H.; Watson, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    Using adjacent section autoradiography-immunocytochemistry, the distribution of (TH)naloxone binding sites was studied in relation to neuronal systems containing (Leu)enkephalin, dynorphin A, or beta-endorphin immunoreactivity in rat brain. Brain sections from formaldehyde-perfused rats show robust specific binding of (TH)naloxone, the pharmacological (mu-like) properties of which appear unaltered. In contrast, specific binding of the delta ligand (TH)D-Ala2,D-Leu5-enkephalin was virtually totally eliminated as a result of formaldehyde perfusion. Using adjacent section analysis, the authors have noted associations between (TH)naloxone binding sites and one, two, or all three opioid systems in different brain regions; however, in some areas, no apparent relationship could be observed. Within regions, the relationship was complex. The complexity of the association between (TH)naloxone binding sites and the multiple opioid systems, and previous reports of co-localization of mu and kappa receptors in rat brain, are inconsistent with a simple-one-to-one relationship between a given opioid precursor and opioid receptor subtype. Instead, since differential processing of the three precursors gives rise to peptides of varying receptor subtype potencies and selectivities, the multiple peptide-receptor relationships may point to a key role of post-translational processing in determining the physiological consequences of opioid neurotransmission.

  1. Efficient Cargo Delivery into Adult Brain Tissue Using Short Cell-Penetrating Peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caghan Kizil

    Full Text Available Zebrafish brains can regenerate lost neurons upon neurogenic activity of the radial glial progenitor cells (RGCs that reside at the ventricular region. Understanding the molecular events underlying this ability is of great interest for translational studies of regenerative medicine. Therefore, functional analyses of gene function in RGCs and neurons are essential. Using cerebroventricular microinjection (CVMI, RGCs can be targeted efficiently but the penetration capacity of the injected molecules reduces dramatically in deeper parts of the brain tissue, such as the parenchymal regions that contain the neurons. In this report, we tested the penetration efficiency of five known cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs and identified two- polyR and Trans - that efficiently penetrate the brain tissue without overt toxicity in a dose-dependent manner as determined by TUNEL staining and L-Plastin immunohistochemistry. We also found that polyR peptide can help carry plasmid DNA several cell diameters into the brain tissue after a series of coupling reactions using DBCO-PEG4-maleimide-based Michael's addition and azide-mediated copper-free click reaction. Combined with the advantages of CVMI, such as rapidness, reproducibility, and ability to be used in adult animals, CPPs improve the applicability of the CVMI technique to deeper parts of the central nervous system tissues.

  2. Glucagon-like peptide-1 inhibits blood-brain glucose transfer in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Susanne; Brock, Birgitte; Rungby, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has many effects on glucose homeostasis, and GLP-1 receptors are broadly represented in many tissues including the brain. Recent research in rodents suggests a protective effect of GLP-1 on brain tissue. The mechanism is unknown. We therefore tested...... whether these neuroprotective effects could relate to changes of glucose transport and consumption. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We studied 10 healthy men in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over experiment. We used positron emission tomography to determine the acute insulin......-independent effect of GLP-1 on unidirectional glucose transport into the brain during a pituitary-pancreatic normoglycemic (plasma glucose approximately 4.5 mmol/l) clamp with 18-fluoro-deoxy-glucose as tracer. RESULTS: On average, GLP-1 reduced cerebral glucose transport by 27% in total cerebral gray matter (P = 0...

  3. Dexamethasone increases production of C-type natriuretic peptide in the sheep brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michele O; McNeill, Bryony A; Barrell, Graham K; Prickett, Timothy C R; Espiner, Eric A

    2017-10-01

    Although C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) has high abundance in brain tissues and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), the source and possible factors regulating its secretion within the central nervous system (CNS) are unknown. Here we report the dynamic effects of a single IV bolus of dexamethasone or saline solution on plasma, CSF, CNS and pituitary tissue content of CNP products in adult sheep, along with changes in CNP gene expression in selected tissues. Both CNP and NTproCNP (the amino-terminal product of proCNP) in plasma and CSF showed dose-responsive increases lasting 12-16 h after dexamethasone, whereas other natriuretic peptides were unaffected. CNS tissue concentrations of CNP and NTproCNP were increased by dexamethasone in all of the 12 regions examined. Abundance was highest in limbic tissues, pons and medulla oblongata. Relative to controls, CNP gene expression (NPPC) was upregulated by dexamethasone in 5 of 7 brain tissues examined. Patterns of responses differed in pituitary tissue. Whereas the abundance of CNP in both lobes of the pituitary gland greatly exceeded that of brain tissues, neither CNP nor NTproCNP concentration was affected by dexamethasone, despite an increase in NPPC expression. This is the first report of enhanced production and secretion of CNP in brain tissues in response to a corticosteroid. Activation of CNP secretion within CNS tissues by dexamethasone, not exhibited by other natriuretic peptides, suggests an important role for CNP in settings of acute stress. Differential findings in pituitary tissues likely relate to altered processing of proCNP storage and secretion. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  4. The effect of beta-turn structure on the permeation of peptides across monolayers of bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, M; Steenberg, B; Knipp, G T

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of the beta-turn structure of a peptide on its permeation via the paracellular and transcellular routes across cultured bovine brain microvessel endothelial cell (BBMEC) monolayers, an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). METHODS: The effective...

  5. Melanin-concentrating hormone: unique peptide neuronal systems in the rat brain and pituitary gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamir, N.; Skofitsch, G.; Bannon, M.J.; Jacobowitz, D.M.

    1986-03-01

    A unique neuronal system was detected in the rat central nervous system by immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay with antibodies to salmon melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH). MCH-like immunoreactive (MCH-LI) cell bodies were confined to the hypothalamus. MCH-LI fibers were found throughout the brain but were most prevalent in hypothalamus, mesencephalon, and pons-medulla regions. High concentrations of MCH-LI were measured in the hypothalamic medial forebrain bundle (MFB), posterior hypothalamic nucleus, and nucleus of the diagonal band. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography of MFB extracts from rat brain indicate that MCH-like peptide from the rat has a different retention time than that of the salmon MCH. An osmotic stimuls (2% NaCl as drinking water for 120 hr) caused a marked increase in MCH-LI concentrations in the lateral hypothalamus and neurointermediate lobe. The present studies establish the presence of MCH-like peptide in the rat brain. The MCH-LI neuronal system is well situated to coordinate complex functions such as regulation of water intake.

  6. Effects of Wen Dan Tang on insomnia-related anxiety and levels of the brain-gut peptide Ghrelin

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Liye; Song, Yuehan; Li, Feng; Liu, Yan; Ma, Jie; Mao, Meng; Wu, Fengzhi; Wu, Ying; Li, Sinai; Guan, Binghe; Liu, Xiaolan

    2014-01-01

    Ghrelin, a brain-gut peptide that induces anxiety and other abnormal emotions, contributes to the effects of insomnia on emotional behavior. In contrast, the traditional Chinese Medicine remedy Wen Dan Tang reduces insomnia-related anxiety, which may perhaps correspond to changes in the brain-gut axis. This suggests a possible relationship between Wen Dan Tang's pharmacological mechanism and the brain-gut axis. Based on this hypothesis, a sleep-deprived rat model was induced and Wen Dan Tang ...

  7. Structure-internalization relationship for adsorptive-mediated endocytosis of basic peptides at the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, I; Sai, Y; Kobayashi, H; Kamata, M; Wakamiya, T; Tsuji, A

    1997-01-01

    For the purpose of the brain delivery of peptides, the structural specificity of adsorptive-mediated endocytosis at the blood-brain barrier was studied by measuring transport of a newly synthesized basic peptide 001-C8, H-MeTyr-Arg-MeArg-D-Leu-NH(CH2)aNH2, using primary cultured bovine brain capillary endothelial cells. The apparent uptake of [125I]001-C8 increased time-dependently and reached a steady-state at 60 min. The steady-state uptake of [125I]001-C8 was temperature and concentration dependent and was significantly decreased in the presence of dansylcadaverine, protamine or poly-L-lysine. Uptakes of peptides modified by 1,8-octanediamine, 1,5-pentanediamine, 1,2-ethanediamine or ethylamide and peptides with a free carboxyl terminal were significantly higher than, and similar to, that of [3H]PEG900, respectively. The half-saturation constants and the maximal uptake capacities of these peptides were in the ranges of 0.2 to 134 microM and 1.1 to 408 pmol/mg protein, respectively. These values were correlated with the basicity of the molecules. In conclusion, not the number of constituent amino acids of peptides, but rather the C-terminal structure and the basicity of the molecules are the most important determinants for the uptake by the adsorptive-mediated endocytosis system at the blood brain barrier.

  8. Rapid modulation of TRH and TRH-like peptide release in rat brain and peripheral tissues by prazosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattin, Albert; Pekary, Albert Eugene; Blood, James

    2011-08-01

    Hyperresponsiveness to norepinephrine contributes to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Prazosin, a brain-active blocker of α(1)-adrenoceptors, originally used for the treatment of hypertension, has been reported to alleviate trauma nightmares, sleep disturbance and improve global clinical status in war veterans with PTSD. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH, pGlu-His-Pro-NH(2)) may play a role in the pathophysiology and treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders such as major depression, and PTSD (an anxiety disorder). To investigate whether TRH or TRH-like peptides (pGlu-X-Pro-NH(2), where "X" can be any amino acid residue) participate in the therapeutic effects of prazosin, male rats were injected with prazosin and these peptides then measured in brain and endocrine tissues. Prazosin stimulated TRH and TRH-like peptide release in those tissues with high α(1)-adrenoceptor levels suggesting that these peptides may play a role in the therapeutic effects of prazosin. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. The response of circulating brain natriuretic peptide to academic stress in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Offer; Sagiv, Moran; Eynon, Nir; Yamin, Chen; Rogowski, Ori; Gerzy, Yishay; Amir, Ruthie E

    2010-01-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), a cardiac peptide, has been implicated in the regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) responses to psychological stressors. The influence of academic stress on circulating concentration of the N-terminal fragment of BNP precursor (NT-proBNP), and in relation to the stress hormone (cortisol) response was studied in 170 college students undergoing major examinations. Just prior to the examination, we measured self-estimated stress level, systolic, and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP), heart rate (HR), plasma levels of cortisol, and NT-proBNP. These parameters were compared to the participants' baseline measurements, taken at the same hour of a different 'control day', without a major examination to induce stress. Hemodynamic variables (SBP, DBP, and HR) increased on the examination day compared with baseline values ( p stress was marked by a significant decrease in plasma NT-proBNP concentration (-40%, p stress and the NT-proBNP reduction ( p = 0.02). In response to academic stress, the plasma cortisol elevation was accompanied by a marked reduction in plasma NT-proBNP level. These data may indicate that mental stress entails an interface between the HPA axis and the peripheral natriuretic peptide system, leading to reciprocating changes in circulating levels of the corresponding hormones.

  10. peptide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    have shown that while infusion of β-amyloid has effects on behaviour, it does not necessarily induce neurodegenerative effects. The effects on memory formation and cognitive abilities due to injection of amyloid fragments into the brain have been very inconsistent until now. It has been proposed that the aggregation state of ...

  11. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in brain microvessel endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitson, P. A.; Huls, M. H.; Sams, C. F.

    1991-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binding and ANP-induced increases in cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels have been observed in brain microvessels (Chabrier et al., 1987; Steardo and Nathanson, 1987), suggesting that this fluid-regulating hormone may play a role in the fluid homeostasis of the brain. This study was initiated to characterize the ANP receptors in primary cultures of brain microvessel endothelial cells (BMECs). The apparent equilibrium dissociation constant, Kd, for ANP increased from 0.25 nM to 2.5 nM, and the number of ANP binding sites as determined by Scatchard analysis increased from 7,100 to 170,000 sites/cell between 2 and 10 days of culture following monolayer formation. Time- and concentration-dependent studies on the stimulation of cGMP levels by ANP indicated that guanylate cyclase-linked ANP receptors were present in BMECs. The relative abilities of ANP, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and a truncated analog of ANP containing amino acids 5-27 (ANP 5-27) to modulate the accumulation of cGMP was found to be ANP greater than BNP much greater than ANP 5-27. Affinity cross-linking with disuccinimidyl suberate and radiolabeled ANP followed by gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions demonstrated a single band corresponding to the 60-70 kD receptor, indicating the presence of the nonguanylate cyclase-linked ANP receptor. Radiolabeled ANP binding was examined in the presence of various concentrations of either ANP, BNP, or ANP 5-27 and suggested that a large proportion of the ANP receptors present in blood-brain barrier endothelial cells bind all of these ligands similarly. These data indicate both guanylate cyclase linked and nonguanylate cyclase linked receptors are present on BMECs and that a higher proportion of the nonguanylate cyclase linked receptors is expressed. This in vitro culture system may provide a valuable tool for the examination of ANP receptor expression and function in blood-brain barrier endothelial cells.

  12. Blood-brain barrier to peptides: (/sup 3/H)gonadotropin-releasing hormone accumulation by eighteen regions of the rat brain and by anterior pituitary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermisch, A.; Ruehle, H.J. (Karl-Marx-Universitaet, Leipzig (German Democratic Republic). Sektion Biowissenschaften); Klauschenz, E.; Kretzschmar, R. (Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin. Inst. fuer Wirkstofforschung)

    1984-01-01

    After intracarotid injection of (/sup 3/H)gonadotropin-releasing hormone ((/sup 3/H)GnRH) the mean accumulation of radioactivity per unit wet weight of 18 brain samples investigated and the anterior pituitary was 0.38 +- 0.11% g/sup -1/ of the injected tracer dose. This indicates a low but measurable brain uptake of the peptide. The brain uptake of (/sup 3/H)GnRH in blood-brain barrier (BBB)-protected regions is 5% of that of separately investigated (/sup 3/H)OH. In BBB-free regions the accumulation of radioactivity was more than 25-fold higher than in BBB-protected regions. The accumulation of (/sup 3/H)GnRH among regions with BBB varies less than among regions with leaky endothelia. The data presented for (/sup 3/H)GnRH are similar to those for other peptides so far investigated.

  13. Altered expression of BDNF, BDNF pro-peptide and their precursor proBDNF in brain and liver tissues from psychiatric disorders: rethinking the brain?liver axis

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, B; Ren, Q; Zhang, J-c; Chen, Q-X; Hashimoto, K

    2017-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has a role in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. The precursor proBDNF is converted to mature BDNF and BDNF pro-peptide, the N-terminal fragment of proBDNF; however, the precise function of these proteins in psychiatric disorders is unknown. We sought to determine whether expression of these proteins is altered in the brain and peripheral tissues from patients with psychiatric disorders. We measured protein expression of proBDNF, mature BDNF...

  14. Detection of left ventricular enlargement and impaired systolic function with plasma N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønning, Bjørn Aaris; Nilsson, Jens C.; Søndergaard, Lars

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain- and N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) have been identified as promising markers for heart failure. However, previous studies have revealed that they may hold insufficient diagnostic power for implementation into clinical practice because of a significant...... and magnetic resonance imaging along with 20 age-matched and gender-matched healthy control subjects. RESULTS: NT-proBNP was associated with LV end-diastolic (r = 0.69; P

  15. Regional differences in the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) pro-peptide, proBDNF and preproBDNF in the brain confer stress resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bangkun; Yang, Chun; Ren, Qian; Zhang, Ji-Chun; Chen, Qian-Xue; Shirayama, Yukihiko; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    Using learned helplessness (LH) model of depression, we measured protein expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) pro-peptide, BDNF precursors (proBDNF and preproBDNF) in the brain regions of LH (susceptible) and non-LH rats (resilience). Expression of preproBDNF, proBDNF and BDNF pro-peptide in the medial prefrontal cortex of LH rats, but not non-LH rats, was significantly higher than control rats, although expression of these proteins in the nucleus accumbens of LH rats was significantly lower than control rats. This study suggests that regional differences in conversion of BDNF precursors into BDNF and BDNF pro-peptide by proteolytic cleavage may contribute to stress resilience.

  16. Chondroitin Sulfate is the Primary Receptor for a Peptide-Modified AAV That Targets Brain Vascular Endothelium In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoghegan, James C; Keiser, Nicholas W; Okulist, Anna; Martins, Inês; Wilson, Matthew S; Davidson, Beverly L

    2014-10-14

    Recently, we described a peptide-modified AAV2 vector (AAV-GMN) containing a capsid-displayed peptide that directs in vivo brain vascular targeting and transduction when delivered intravenously. In this study, we sought to identify the receptor that mediates transduction by AAV-GMN. We found that AAV-GMN, but not AAV2, readily transduces the murine brain endothelial cell line bEnd.3, a result that mirrors previously observed in vivo transduction profiles of brain vasculature. Studies in vitro revealed that the glycosaminoglycan, chondroitin sulfate C, acts as the primary receptor for AAV-GMN. Unlike AAV2, chondroitin sulfate expression is required for cell transduction by AAV-GMN, and soluble chondroitin sulfate C can robustly inhibit AAV-GMN transduction of brain endothelial cells. Interestingly, AAV-GMN retains heparin-binding properties, though in contrast to AAV2, it poorly transduces cells that express heparan sulfate but not chondroitin sulfate, indicating that the peptide insertion negatively impacts heparan-mediated transduction. Lastly, when delivered directly, this modified virus can transduce multiple brain regions, indicating that the potential of AAV-GMN as a therapeutic gene delivery vector for central nervous system disorders is not restricted to brain vascular endothelium.

  17. Chondroitin Sulfate is the Primary Receptor for a Peptide-Modified AAV That Targets Brain Vascular Endothelium In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C Geoghegan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we described a peptide-modified AAV2 vector (AAV-GMN containing a capsid-displayed peptide that directs in vivo brain vascular targeting and transduction when delivered intravenously. In this study, we sought to identify the receptor that mediates transduction by AAV-GMN. We found that AAV-GMN, but not AAV2, readily transduces the murine brain endothelial cell line bEnd.3, a result that mirrors previously observed in vivo transduction profiles of brain vasculature. Studies in vitro revealed that the glycosaminoglycan, chondroitin sulfate C, acts as the primary receptor for AAV-GMN. Unlike AAV2, chondroitin sulfate expression is required for cell transduction by AAV-GMN, and soluble chondroitin sulfate C can robustly inhibit AAV-GMN transduction of brain endothelial cells. Interestingly, AAV-GMN retains heparin-binding properties, though in contrast to AAV2, it poorly transduces cells that express heparan sulfate but not chondroitin sulfate, indicating that the peptide insertion negatively impacts heparan-mediated transduction. Lastly, when delivered directly, this modified virus can transduce multiple brain regions, indicating that the potential of AAV-GMN as a therapeutic gene delivery vector for central nervous system disorders is not restricted to brain vascular endothelium.

  18. [Relaxin-3 and relaxin family peptide receptors--from structure to functions of a newly discovered mammalian brain system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kania, Alan; Lewandowski, Marian H; Błasiak, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Relaxin-3, a member of the relaxin peptide family, was discovered in 2001 as a homologue of relaxin--a well-known reproductive hormone. However, it is the brain which turned out to be a major expression site of this newly discovered peptide. Both its molecular structure and expression pattern were shown to be very conserved among vertebrates. Extensive research carried out since the discovery of relaxin-3 contributed to the significant progress in our knowledge regarding this neuropeptide. The endogenous relaxin-3 receptor (RXFP3) was identified and the anatomy of the yet uncharacterized mammalian brain system was described, with nucleus incertus as the main center of relaxin-3 expression. Not only its diffusive projections throughout the whole brain, which reach various brain structures such as the hippocampus, septum, intergeniculate leaflet or amygdala, but also functional studies of the relaxin-3/RXFP3 signaling system, allowed this brain network to be classified as one of the ascending nonspecific brain systems. Thus far, research depicts the connection of relaxin-3 with phenomena such as feeding behavior, spatial memory, sleep/wake cycle or modulation of pituitary gland hormone secretion. Responsiveness of relaxin-3 neurons to stress factors and the strong orexigenic effect exerted by this peptide suggest its participation in modulation of feeding by stress, in particular of the chronic type. The discovery of relaxin-3 opened a new research field which will contribute to our better understanding of the neurobiological basis of feeding disorders.

  19. Association between brain natriuretic peptide, markers of inflammation and the objective and subjective response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouwers, Corline; Versteeg, Henneke; Meine, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Studies suggest that cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) can induce a decrease in brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and systemic inflammation, which may be associated with CRT-response. However, the evidence is inconclusive. We examined levels of BNP and inflammatory markers from...

  20. Prevalence and prognosis of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and elevated N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Christian Malchau; Bay, Morten; Kirk, Vibeke

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the epidemiological features and prognosis of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) and to compare these findings with those from patients with reduced ejection fraction. Furthermore the effects of N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (NT-p...

  1. Induction of the Antimicrobial Peptide CRAMP in the Blood-Brain Barrier and Meninges after Meningococcal Infection▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Peter; Johansson, Linda; Wan, Hong; Jones, Allison; Gallo, Richard L.; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H.; Hökfelt, Tomas; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Agerberth, Birgitta

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are present in most living species and constitute important effector molecules of innate immunity. Recently, we and others have detected antimicrobial peptides in the brain. This is an organ that is rarely infected, which has mainly been ascribed to the protective functions of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and meninges. Since the bactericidal properties of the BBB and meninges are not known, we hypothesized that antimicrobial peptides could play a role in these barriers. We addressed this hypothesis by infecting mice with the neuropathogenic bacterium Neisseria meningitidis. Brains were analyzed for expression of the antimicrobial peptide CRAMP by immunohistochemistry in combination with confocal microscopy. After infection, we observed induction of CRAMP in endothelial cells of the BBB and in cells of the meninges. To explore the functional role of CRAMP in meningococcal disease, we infected mice deficient of the CRAMP gene. Even though CRAMP did not appear to protect the brain from invasion of meningococci, CRAMP knockout mice were more susceptible to meningococcal infection than wild-type mice and exhibited increased meningococcal growth in blood, liver, and spleen. Moreover, we could demonstrate that carbonate, a compound that accumulates in the circulation during metabolic acidosis, makes meningococci more susceptible to CRAMP. PMID:17030578

  2. Maternal hypertrophy and diastolic disfunction and brain natriuretic peptide concentration in early and late Pre-Eclampsia.

    OpenAIRE

    Borges, VTM; Zanati, SG; PeraÇoli, MTS; Poiati, JR; Romão-Veiga, M; PeraÇoli, JC; Thilaganathan, B

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pre-eclampsia is associated with maternal cardiac remodelling and diastolic dysfunction. The aim of this study was to assess and compare maternal left ventricular structure and diastolic function and Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) levels in women with early-onset pre-eclampsia (

  3. Association between psychological measures and brain natriuretic peptide in heart failure patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouwers, Corline; Spindler, Helle; Larsen, Mogens Lytken

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a promising marker for heart failure diagnosis and prognosis. Although psychological factors also influence heart failure (HF) prognosis, this might be attributed to confounding by BNP. Our aim was to examine the association between multiple...... psychological markers using a prospective study design with repeated NT-proBNP measurements. Design: The sample comprised 94 outpatients with systolic HF (80% men; mean age=62.2±9.32). The psychological markers (i.e., anxiety, depression and Type D personality), assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression.......6% (BDI) and 21.3% (DS14), respectively. At baseline, none of the psychological risk markers were associated with NT-proBNP levels (all ps≥.05). In the subset of patients with scores on psychological risk markers both at baseline and at 9 months there were no association between anxiety (p=0...

  4. BDNF and its pro-peptide are stored in presynaptic dense core vesicles in brain neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieni, Sandra; Matsumoto, Tomoya; Dekkers, Martijn; Rauskolb, Stefanie; Ionescu, Mihai S; Deogracias, Ruben; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Kojima, Masami; Nestel, Sigrun; Frotscher, Michael; Barde, Yves-Alain

    2012-03-19

    Although brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates numerous and complex biological processes including memory retention, its extremely low levels in the mature central nervous system have greatly complicated attempts to reliably localize it. Using rigorous specificity controls, we found that antibodies reacting either with BDNF or its pro-peptide both stained large dense core vesicles in excitatory presynaptic terminals of the adult mouse hippocampus. Both moieties were ~10-fold more abundant than pro-BDNF. The lack of postsynaptic localization was confirmed in Bassoon mutants, a seizure-prone mouse line exhibiting markedly elevated levels of BDNF. These findings challenge previous conclusions based on work with cultured neurons, which suggested activity-dependent dendritic synthesis and release of BDNF. They instead provide an ultrastructural basis for an anterograde mode of action of BDNF, contrasting with the long-established retrograde model derived from experiments with nerve growth factor in the peripheral nervous system.

  5. Prognostic value of brain natriuretic peptide in acute heart failure: mortality and hospital readmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Julio; Núñez, Eduardo; Robles, Rocío; Bodí, Vicent; Sanchis, Juan; Carratalá, Arturo; Aparici, Manuel; Llàcer, Angel

    2008-12-01

    The prognostic value of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) measurement in patients with acute heart failure is not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the BNP level and mortality and readmission for acute heart failure. We studied 569 consecutive patients who were admitted with a diagnosis of acute heart failure. The BNP level was measured after the patient became clinically stable. The relationship between the BNP level and mortality was assessed by Cox regression analysis, and the relationship with readmission, by competing risks regression analysis. During a median follow-up period of 9 (range, 3-18) months, 156 deaths (27.4%) and 140 readmissions (24.6%) occurred. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a positive linear association between the risk of death and the BNP quintile. In contrast, the BNP level did not predict readmission for acute heart failure, mainly because of the effect of death as a competing outcome.

  6. The efficacy of brain natriuretic peptide levels in differentiating constrictive pericarditis from restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leya, Ferdinand S; Arab, Dinesh; Joyal, Dominique; Shioura, Krystyna M; Lewis, Bruce E; Steen, Lowell H; Cho, Leslie

    2005-06-07

    We sought to determine the usefulness of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) measurements to differentiate constrictive pericarditis (CP) from restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCMP). The differentiation of CP from RCMP may be clinically difficult and often requires hemodynamic assessment. No laboratory marker has been shown to differentiate the two conditions. We measured BNP levels in 11 patients suspected of having either CP or RCMP. All patients had hemodynamic assessment the day of BNP measurements. Six patients had CP and five patients had RCMP based on established hemodynamic criteria. Both CP and RCMP patients had similar elevation in intracardiac pressures. Despite similar pressures, the mean plasma BNP levels were significantly higher in RCMP compared to CP (825.8 +/- 172.2 pg/ml vs. 128.0 +/- 52.7 pg/ml, p RCMP compared to CP patients; BNP may prove to be a useful noninvasive marker for the differentiation of the two conditions.

  7. Regulation of expression of atrial and brain natriuretic peptide, biomarkers for heart development and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeeva, Irina A; Christoffels, Vincent M

    2013-12-01

    The mammalian heart expresses two closely related natriuretic peptide (NP) hormones, atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). The excretion of the NPs and the expression of their genes strongly respond to a variety of cardiovascular disorders. NPs act to increase natriuresis and decrease vascular resistance, thereby decreasing blood volume, systemic blood pressure and afterload. Plasma levels of BNP are used as diagnostic and prognostic markers for hypertrophy and heart failure (HF), and both ANF and BNP are widely used in biomedical research to assess the hypertrophic response in cell culture or the development of HF related diseases in animal models. Moreover, ANF and BNP are used as specific markers for the differentiating working myocardium in the developing heart, and the ANF promoter serves as platform to investigate gene regulatory networks during heart development and disease. However, despite decades of research, the mechanisms regulating the NP genes during development and disease are not well understood. Here we review current knowledge on the regulation of expression of the genes for ANF and BNP and their role as biomarkers, and give future directions to identify the in vivo regulatory mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart failure pathogenesis and emerging diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. © 2013.

  8. Rapid modulation of TRH and TRH-like peptide release in rat brain and peripheral tissues by leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekary, A E; Sattin, Albert; Blood, James

    2010-07-23

    Leptin is not only a feedback modulator of feeding and energy expenditure but also regulates reproductive functions, CNS development and mood. Obesity and major depression are growing public health concerns which may derive, in part, from disregulation of leptin feedback at the level of the hypothalamic feeding centers and mood regulators within the limbic system. Identifying downstream mediators of leptin action may provide therapeutic opportunities. We and others have previously reported that thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH, pGlu-His-Pro-NH(2)) and TRH-like peptides (pGlu-X-Pro-NH(2), where "X" can be any amino acid residue) have neuroprotective, antidepressant, anti-epileptic, analeptic, anti-ataxic, and anorectic properties. For this reason, young, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected ip with 1mg/kg rat leptin and peptide and protein levels were measured in brain and peripheral tissues at 0, 0.5, 1 and 2h later. Eleven brain regions: pyriform cortex (PYR), entorhinal cortex (ENT), cerebellum (CBL), nucleus accumbens (NA), frontal cortex (FCX), amygdala (AY), posterior cingulate (PCNG), striatum (STR), hippocampus (HC), medulla oblongata (MED) and anterior cingulate (ACNG) and five peripheral tissues (adrenals, testes, epididymis, pancreas and prostate) were analyzed. TRH and six TRH-like peptide levels in STR fell by 0.5h consistent with leptin-induced release of these peptides: STR (7 downward arrow). Significant changes in TRH and TRH-like peptide levels for other brain regions were: CBL (5 downward arrow), ENT (5 downward arrow), HC (4 downward arrow), AY (4 downward arrow), FCX (3 downward arrow), and ACNG (1 downward arrow). The rapid modulation of TRH and TRH-like peptide release combined with their similarity in behavioral, neuroendocrine, immunomodulatory, metabolic and steroidogenic effects to that of leptin is consistent with these peptides participating in downstream signaling. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. The usefulness of brain natriuretic peptide in complex congenital heart disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eindhoven, Jannet A; van den Bosch, Annemien E; Jansen, Philip R; Boersma, Eric; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W

    2012-11-20

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) are well-established markers for heart failure in the general population. However, the value of BNP as a diagnostic and prognostic marker for patients with structural congenital heart disease (CHD) is still unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of BNP in patients with CHD. We executed a PubMed literature search and included 49 articles that focused on complex congenital heart defects such as tetralogy of Fallot, systemic right ventricle, and univentricular hearts. Data on BNP measurements and cardiac function parameters were extracted. In all patients after correction for tetralogy of Fallot, BNP levels were elevated and correlated significantly with right ventricular end-diastolic dimensions and severity of pulmonary valve regurgitation. Patients with a systemic right ventricle had elevated BNP levels, and positive correlations between BNP and right ventricular function were seen. In patients with a univentricular heart, elevated BNP levels were observed before completion of the Fontan circulation or when patients were symptomatic; a clear association between BNP and New York Heart Association functional class was demonstrated. In conclusion, this review shows an overall increase in BNP values in complex CHD, although differences between types of congenital heart anomaly are present. As BNP values differ widely, conclusions for individual patients should be drawn with caution. Further investigation with sequential BNP measurement in a large, prospective study is warranted to elucidate the prognostic value of BNP assessment in patients with CHD. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hormones in the mentally disturbed brain: steroids and peptides in the development and treatment of psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, George Townsend; Maloney, Susan; Dearborn, Joshua; Weiss, Juergen

    2009-12-01

    One of the more fascinating recent discoveries in neuroscience is the widespread influence of hormones on brain regions and functions underlying pathological behaviors. A story is unfolding that points to critical roles played by hypothalamic - pituitary - gonadal (HPG) and hypothalamic - pituitary - adrenal (HPA) axes on a startling array of mental disorders, from depression to dementia. The influence of peptides and steroids does not end with hormones released from the two axes, however. It is now clear that the brain has adapted, "highjacked" is more descriptive, HPG and HPA hormones for uses unrelated to their original functions in reproduction and responses to stress. Findings of neuromodulatory effects of HPA and HPG hormones on monoamine, GABA, glutamate and opioid pathways and of hormone receptors and enzymes involved in hormone synthesis, particularly of steroids, in the hippocampus, amygdala and other subcortical brain regions provide the brain with multiple evolutionary means to adapt to new functions. The complexity of the metabolic cascade for the steroids also leaves open mechanisms by which endogenous errors and exogenous chemicals could be involved in the etiology of psychopathologies. The planned review will examine the recent literature for evidence of steroidal and peptidergic influences on basic biological functions and on mood disorders, anxiety and PTSD, schizophrenia, substance abuse and dementia. Emphasis will be placed on animal models, although findings with patient populations will be prominently included. Special attention will be paid to novel pathways by which the precursors and metabolites of sex steroids can influence psychopathologies. We also will speculate on promising treatments with hormone modulators that may be useful in mollifying the symptomology of the mental disorders.

  11. Reversible Opening of Intercellular Junctions of Intestinal Epithelial and Brain Endothelial Cells With Tight Junction Modulator Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocsik, Alexandra; Walter, Fruzsina R; Gyebrovszki, Andrea; Fülöp, Lívia; Blasig, Ingolf; Dabrowski, Sebastian; Ötvös, Ferenc; Tóth, András; Rákhely, Gábor; Veszelka, Szilvia; Vastag, Monika; Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Deli, Mária A

    2016-02-01

    The intercellular junctions restrict the free passage of hydrophilic compounds through the paracellular clefts. Reversible opening of the tight junctions of biological barriers is investigated as one of the ways to increase drug delivery to the systemic circulation or the central nervous system. Six peptides, ADT-6, HAV-6, C-CPE, 7-mer (FDFWITP, PN-78), AT-1002, and PN-159, acting on different integral membrane and linker junctional proteins were tested on Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell line and a coculture model of the blood-brain barrier. All peptides tested in nontoxic concentrations showed a reversible tight junctions modulating effect and were effective to open the paracellular pathway for the marker molecules fluorescein and albumin. The change in the structure of cell-cell junctions was verified by immunostaining for occludin, claudin-4,-5, ZO-1, β-catenin, and E-cadherin. Expression levels of occludin and claudins were measured in both models. We could demonstrate a selectivity of C-CPE, ADT-6, and HAV-6 peptides for epithelial cells and 7-mer and AT-1002 peptides for brain endothelial cells. PN-159 was the most effective modulator of junctional permeability in both models possibly acting via claudin-1 and -5. Our results indicate that these peptides can be effectively and selectively used as potential pharmaceutical excipients to improve drug delivery across biological barriers. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Complement peptide C3a stimulates neural plasticity after experimental brain ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokowska, Anna; Atkins, Alison L; Morán, Javier; Pekny, Tulen; Bulmer, Linda; Pascoe, Michaela C; Barnum, Scott R; Wetsel, Rick A; Nilsson, Jonas A; Dragunow, Mike; Pekna, Marcela

    2017-02-01

    Ischaemic stroke induces endogenous repair processes that include proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells and extensive rewiring of the remaining neural connections, yet about 50% of stroke survivors live with severe long-term disability. There is an unmet need for drug therapies to improve recovery by promoting brain plasticity in the subacute to chronic phase after ischaemic stroke. We previously showed that complement-derived peptide C3a regulates neural progenitor cell migration and differentiation in vitro and that C3a receptor signalling stimulates neurogenesis in unchallenged adult mice. To determine the role of C3a-C3a receptor signalling in ischaemia-induced neural plasticity, we subjected C3a receptor-deficient mice, GFAP-C3a transgenic mice expressing biologically active C3a in the central nervous system, and their respective wild-type controls to photothrombotic stroke. We found that C3a overexpression increased, whereas C3a receptor deficiency decreased post-stroke expression of GAP43 (P plasticity, in the peri-infarct cortex. To verify the translational potential of these findings, we used a pharmacological approach. Daily intranasal treatment of wild-type mice with C3a beginning 7 days after stroke induction robustly increased synaptic density (P neural plasticity and intranasal treatment with C3a receptor agonists is an attractive approach to improve functional recovery after ischaemic brain injury. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Brain-natriuretic peptide and cyclic guanosine monophosphate as biomarkers of myxomatous mitral valve disease in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, Sophia Gry; Falk, Bo Torkel; Teerlink, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Elevations in the plasma concentrations of natriuretic peptides correlate with increased severity of myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) in dogs. This study correlates the severity of MMVD with the plasma concentrations of the biomarkers N-terminal fragment of the pro-brain-natriuretic peptide...... by clinical examination and echocardiography. Plasma NT-proBNP and cGMP concentrations increased with increasing valve dysfunction and were significantly elevated in dogs with heart failure. The cGMP:NT-proBNP ratio decreased significantly in dogs with heart failure, suggesting the development of natriuretic...

  14. Association between psychological measures and brain natriuretic peptide in heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, Corline; Spindler, Helle; Larsen, Mogens Lytken; Eiskær, Hans; Videbæk, Lars; Pedersen, Mette Storgaard; Aagard, Bitten; Pedersen, Susanne S

    2012-06-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a promising marker for heart failure diagnosis and prognosis. Although psychological factors also influence heart failure (HF) prognosis, this might be attributed to confounding by BNP. Our aim was to examine the association between multiple psychological markers using a prospective study design with repeated N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) measurements. The sample comprised 94 outpatients with systolic HF (80% men; mean age =62.2 ± 9.3). The psychological markers (i.e., anxiety, depression, and Type D personality), assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Type D Scale (DS14) were assessed only at baseline. Plasma NT-proBNP levels were measured at baseline and at 9 months. The prevalence of anxiety, depression, and Type D personality at baseline was 23.4% (HADS-A), 17.0% (HADS-D), 46.6% (BDI), and 21.3% (DS14), respectively. At baseline, none of the psychological risk markers were associated with NT-proBNP levels (all p >.05). In the subset of patients with scores on psychological risk markers both at baseline and at 9 months, there were no association between anxiety (p =0.44), depression (HADS-D: p =0.90; BDI: p =0.85), and Type D (p =0.63) with NT-proBNP levels using ANOVA for repeated measures. Our findings indicate that measures frequently used in HF to assess psychological risk markers are unconfounded by NT-proBNP. Futher studies are warranted to replicate these findings and examine whether psychological risk markers are independent predictors of prognosis in HF or an artifact that may be attributed to other biological or behavioral mechanisms.

  15. A novel bioassay for the activity determination of therapeutic human brain natriuretic peptide (BNP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide (rhBNP is an important peptide-based therapeutic drug indicated for the treatment of acute heart failure. Accurate determination of the potency of therapeutic rhBNP is crucial for the safety and efficacy of the drug. The current bioassay involves use of rabbit aortic strips, with experiments being complicated and time-consuming and markedly variable in results. Animal-less methods with better precision and accuracy should be explored. We have therefore developed an alternative cell-based assay, which relies on the ability of BNP to induce cGMP production in HEK293 cells expressing BNP receptor guanylyl cyclase-A. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An alternative assay based on the measurement of BNP-induced cGMP production was developed. Specifically, the bioassay employs cells engineered to express BNP receptor guanylyl cyclase-A (GCA. Upon rhBNP stimulation, the levels of the second messager cGMP in these cells drastically increased and subsequently secreted into culture supernatants. The quantity of cGMP, which corresponds to the rhBNP activity, was determined using a competitive ELISA developed by us. Compared with the traditional assay, the novel cell-based assay demonstrated better reproducibility and precision. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The optimized cell-based assay is much simpler, more rapid and precise compared with the traditional assay using animal tissues. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a novel and viable alternative assay for rhBNP potency analysis.

  16. Some Brain Peptides Regulating the Secretion of Digestive Enzymes in the Indian Meal Moth, Plodia Interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjadian Seyede Minoo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae is a destructive polyphagous pest of many stored products. To interfere with the physiological processes, especially digestion, of the larval pest, more information on the regulatory mechanisms is needed. The brain extract from 1-day-old last instar larvae of P. interpunctella was examined. In the bioassays, the midguts were treated with the brain extract, and the carbohydrase and protease activities were measured. The brain extract showed increasing dose-dependent effects on α-amylase, α-glucosidase, β-glucosidase, α-galactosidase, β-galactosidase, and trypsin secretion in the larval midgut. The extract was further characterised and partially purified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Several peptides were determined in the brain extract regulating hydrolase activities in the larval midgut of the pest.

  17. Alzheimer's disease and amyloid beta-peptide deposition in the brain: a matter of 'aging'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Maria Luisa; Collins, Matthew J; Cappellini, Enrico

    2010-04-01

    Biomolecules can experience aging processes that limit their long-term functionality in organisms. Typical markers of protein aging are spontaneous chemical modifications, such as AAR (amino acid racemization) and AAI (amino acid isomerization), mainly involving aspartate and asparagine residues. Since these modifications may affect folding and turnover, they reduce protein functionality over time and may be linked to pathological conditions. The present mini-review describes evidence of AAR and AAI involvement in the misfolding and brain accumulation of Abeta (amyloid beta-peptide), a central event in AD (Alzheimer's disease) synaptic dysfunctions. Structural alterations introduced by site-specific modifications linked to protein aging may affect Abeta production, polymerization and clearance, and therefore play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of sporadic and genetic forms of AD. Early changes associated with molecular aging also have significant long-term consequences for Abeta folding and turnover. New fast, reproducible and accurate methods for the screening of protein aging markers in biological samples may contribute to improve diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in AD.

  18. Oxygen uptake efficiency slope correlates with brain natriuretic peptide in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straburzyńska-Migaj, Ewa; Gwizdała, Adrian; Siniawski, Andrzej; Ochotny, Romuald; Grajek, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing is a well-established tool for clinical and prognostic assessment of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Recently, a new parameter of this examination--oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES)--has been described and proposed as a new prognostic factor in patients with CHF. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is an established prognostic factor in CHF. The purpose of the study was to assess OUES in patients with CHF in relation to other cardiopulmonary parameters and BNP levels. The study group consisted of 42 patients with CHF and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) slope (35.7 +/- 7.8 vs 25.7 +/- 2.7). In patients, OUES was significantly (p slope (r = -0.59). BNP was independently related to OUES in multivariate regression analysis. Oxygen uptake efficiency slope is significantly reduced in patients with CHF and correlates with peak VO(2) and other parameters of cardiopulmonary exercise treadmill test. It is not related to age. BNP is an independent marker of OUES in patients with CHF.

  19. Biologic variability of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in adult healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Autumn N; Estrada, Amara H; Gallagher, Alexander E; Winter, Brandy; Lamb, Kenneth E; Bohannon, Mary; Hanscom, Jancy; Mainville, Celine A

    2017-02-01

    Objectives The biologic variability of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and its impact on diagnostic utility is unknown in healthy cats and those with cardiac disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the biologic variation of NT-proBNP within-day and week-to-week in healthy adult cats. Methods Adult cats were prospectively evaluated by complete blood count (CBC), biochemistry, total thyroxine, echocardiography, electrocardiography and blood pressure, to exclude underlying systemic or cardiac disease. Adult healthy cats were enrolled and blood samples were obtained at 11 time points over a 6 week period (0, 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 8 h, 10 h and at weeks 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6). The intra-individual (coefficient of variation [CVI]) biologic variation along with index of individuality and reference change values (RCVs) were calculated. Univariate models were analyzed and included comparison of the six different time points for both daily and weekly samples. This was followed by a Tukey's post-hoc adjustment, with a P value of cats. Further research is warranted to evaluate NT-proBNP variability, particularly how serial measurements of NT-proBNP may be used in the diagnosis and management of cats with cardiac disease.

  20. A brain-targeting lipidated peptide for neutralizing RNA-mediated toxicity in Polyglutamine Diseases.

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    Zhang, Qian; Yang, Mengbi; Sørensen, Kasper K; Madsen, Charlotte S; Boesen, Josephine T; An, Ying; Peng, Shao Hong; Wei, Yuming; Wang, Qianwen; Jensen, Knud J; Zuo, Zhong; Chan, Ho Yin Edwin; Ngo, Jacky Chi Ki

    2017-09-21

    Polyglutamine (PolyQ) diseases are progressive neurodegenerative disorders caused by both protein- and RNA-mediated toxicities. We previously showed that a peptidyl inhibitor, P3, which binds directly to expanded CAG RNA can inhibit RNA-induced nucleolar stress and suppress RNA-induced neurotoxicity. Here we report a N-acetylated and C-amidated derivative of P3, P3V8, that showed a more than 20-fold increase in its affinity for expanded CAG RNA. The P3V8 peptide also more potently alleviated expanded RNA-induced cytotoxicity in vitro, and suppressed polyQ neurodegeneration in Drosophila with no observed toxic effects. Further N-palmitoylation of P3V8 (L1P3V8) not only significantly improved its cellular uptake and stability, but also facilitated its systemic exposure and brain uptake in rats via intranasal administration. Our findings demonstrate that concomitant N-acetylation, C-amidation and palmitoylation of P3 significantly improve both its bioactivity and pharmacological profile. L1P3V8 possesses drug/lead-like properties that can be further developed into a lead inhibitor for the treatment of polyQ diseases.

  1. Performance characteristics of the Architect brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) assay: a two site study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongia, Shella K; La'ulu, Sonia L; Apple, Fred S; Ler, Ranka; Murakami, MaryAnn M; Roberts, William L

    2008-05-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is produced by the ventricles of the heart and is a biomarker for heart failure. Several commercial assays are now available. We evaluated the performance characteristics of the ARCHITECT BNP assay. We evaluated the limit of blank, limit of detection, linearity and imprecision. Method comparison studies were performed with 3 other automated BNP assays including the ADVIA Centaur, AxSYM, and UniCel DxI 800 methods. The mean LOB and LOD of the Architect assay were 3.5 and 5.8 ng/L, respectively. Imprecision studies yielded within run CVs of 1.1 to 5.1% and total CVs of 2.3 to 5.3% using human plasma based multi-constituent controls at concentrations of 92, 500, and 3500 ng/L. The maximum deviation from the target recovery for dilution linearity was 9.6%. Concordance with other BNP assays at a 100 ng/l cutoff was 91 to 98% and kappa statistics were 0.78 to 0.96. The mean difference between the Architect and Advia Centaur methods was positive. For the other methods, the mean difference with the Architect was negative. The Architect BNP assay shows good performance characteristics with total imprecision UniCel DxI BNP assays.

  2. N-terminal-pro brain natriuretic peptides in dogs and cats: A technical and clinical review

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    Gabriela Vieira de Lima

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are quantitative indicators of biological processes performed by an organ or system. In recent years, natriuretic peptides (NPs have emerged as important tools in the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of heart diseases. Research has shown that serum and plasma levels of N-terminal pro brain NP (NT-proBNP in dogs and cats are the only biomarkers that afford to diagnose and monitor congestive processes and, indirectly, the myocardial function of small animals. The present review discusses the peer-reviewed specialized literature about NT-proBNP and presents and compares the potential clinical applications of this NP in veterinary medicine of small animals, considering diagnosis, follow-up, and prognosis of myocardial or systemic diseases. The relevance of NT-proBNP is associated with sample stability, easy determination in laboratory, sensitivity, accuracy, and the possibility to analyze myocardial function. These advantages are specially important when NT-proBNP is compared with other cardiac biomarkers, mostly those that indicate the integrity of the myocardial cell. Fast NT-proBNP assays are marketed today and may be used in association with complementary tests. Together, these methods are an important source of information in differential diagnosis of heart and lung diseases as well in the early diagnosis of cardiopathy in dogs and cats, proving valuable tools in treatment and prognosis.

  3. Regulation of brain insulin mRNA by glucose and glucagon-like peptide 1.

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    Madadi, Golnaz; Dalvi, Prasad S; Belsham, Denise D

    2008-11-28

    Whether the brain synthesizes insulin is currently debated. Two clonal, immortalized mouse hypothalamic cell lines from e17, mHypoE-39 and mHypoE-46, express insulin 2 (Ins2), but not Ins1. We analyzed regions necessary for basal gene activity and found that the mouse Ins2 region -110/+183 bp stimulates promoter activity in hypothalamic neurons. The rat Ins2 showed moderate activity, whereas the human promoter construct is repressed below basal levels. In MIN6 pancreatic beta-cells, all of the Ins1 and Ins2 promoter constructs display high levels of transcriptional activity. The cell lines also express components of glucose-sensing machinery and the endogenous glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (Glp-1R). We observed that 16.7 mM glucose induces Ins2 mRNA, while forskolin and a Glp-1 agonist, exendin-4, induce a biphasic Ins2 mRNA response in mHypoE-39 neurons. The insulin cis-regulatory regions differ between the pancreas and the hypothalamus, and glucose and Glp-1 regulate the expression of hypothalamic insulin.

  4. Erythropoietin-Derived Peptide Protects Against Acute Lung Injury After Rat Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Yuan Liu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI can be complicated by TBI-triggered acute lung injury (ALI, in which inflammation plays a central role. It has been reported that an Erythropoietin-derived peptide (pHBSP was able to ameliorate TBI; however, its function in TBI-caused ALI has not been reported yet. Methods: In this study, we studied the effect of pHBSP on TBI-caused ALI by using a weight-drop induced TBI model. At 8 h and 24 h post-TBI, pulmonary edema (PE and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF proteins were measured, and haematoxylin and eosin (H&E staining of lung sections was carried out. At 24 h following TBI, the lungs were harvested for immunofluorescence staining and qRT-PCR analysis. Results: At 8 h and 24 h post-TBI, pHBSP treatment significantly decreased wet/dry ratios, decreased total BALF protein, and attenuated the histological signs of pulmonary injury. At 24 h post-TBI, pHBSP treatment decreased the accumulation of CD68+ macrophages in the lung and reduced the mRNA levels of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and iNOS in the lung. Conclusions: We identified the protective role that pHBSP played in TBI-caused ALI, suggesting that pHBSP is a potent candidate for systemic therapy in TBI patients.

  5. Design and physicochemical characterization of poly(amidoamine) nanoparticles and the toxicological evaluation in human endothelial cells: applications to peptide delivery to the brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coué, G.M.J.P.C.; Freese, C.; Unger, R.E.; Kirkpatrick, C.J.; Pickl, K.E.; Sinner, F.M.; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated nanoparticles formulated by self-assembly of a biodegradable poly(amidoamine) (PAA) and a fluorescently labeled peptide, in their capacity to internalize in endothelial cells and deliver the peptide, with possible applications for brain drug delivery. The nanoparticles

  6. ProSAAS-derived peptides are differentially processed and sorted in mouse brain and AtT-20 cells.

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    Jonathan H Wardman

    Full Text Available ProSAAS is the precursor for some of the most abundant peptides found in mouse brain and other tissues, including peptides named SAAS, PEN, and LEN. Both SAAS and LEN are found in big and little forms due to differential processing. Initial processing of proSAAS is mediated by furin (and/or furin-like enzymes and carboxypeptidase D, while the smaller forms are generated by secretory granule prohormone convertases and carboxypeptidase E. In mouse hypothalamus, PEN and big LEN colocalize with neuropeptide Y. In the present study, little LEN and SAAS were detected in mouse hypothalamus but not in cell bodies of neuropeptide Y-expressing neurons. PEN and big LEN show substantial colocalization in hypothalamus, but big LEN and little LEN do not. An antiserum to SAAS that detects both big and little forms of this peptide did not show substantial colocalization with PEN or big LEN. To further study this, the AtT-20 cells mouse pituitary corticotrophic cell line was transfected with rat proSAAS and the distribution of peptides examined. As found in mouse hypothalamus, only some of the proSAAS-derived peptides colocalized with each other in AtT-20 cells. The two sites within proSAAS that are known to be efficiently cleaved by furin were altered by site-directed mutagenesis to convert the P4 Arg into Lys; this change converts the sequences from furin consensus sites into prohormone convertase consensus sites. Upon expression of the mutated form of proSAAS in AtT-20 cells, there was significantly more colocalization of proSAAS-derived peptides PEN and SAAS. Taken together, these results indicate that proSAAS is initially cleaved in the Golgi or trans-Golgi network by furin and/or furin-like enzymes and the resulting fragments are sorted into distinct vesicles and further processed by additional enzymes into the mature peptides.

  7. Increased TRH and TRH-like peptide release in rat brain and peripheral tissues during proestrus/estrus.

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    Pekary, A E; Sattin, Albert

    2014-02-01

    Women are at greater risk for major depression, PTSD, and other anxiety disorders. ERβ-selective agonists for the treatment of these disorders are the focus of pharmacologic development and clinical testing. Estradiol and its metabolites contribute to the neuroprotective effects of this steroid class, particularly in men, due to local conversion of testosterone to estiradiol in key brain regions which are predisposed to neurodegenerative diseases. We have used young adult female Sprague-Dawley rats to assess the role of TRH and TRH-like peptides, with the general structure pGlu-X-Pro-NH2 where "X" can be any amino acid residue, as mediators of the neurobiochemical effects of estradiol. The neuroprotective TRH and TRH-like peptides are coreleased with excitotoxic glutamate by glutamatergic neurons which contribute importantly to the regulation of the estrus cycle. The levels of TRH and TRH-like peptides during proestrus and/or estrus in the 12 brain regions analyzed were significantly decreased (due to accelerated release) 106 times but increased only 25 times when compared to the corresponding levels during diestrus days 1 and 2. These changes, listed by brain region in the order of decreasing number of significant decreases (↓) and/or increases (↑), were: striatum (20↓,1↑), medulla oblongata (16↓,2↑), amygdala (14↓,1↑), cerebellum (13↓,1↑), hypothalamus (12↓,1↑), entorhinal cortex (6↓,6↑), posterior cingulate (10↓,1↑), frontal cortex (3↓,5↑), nucleus accumbens (5↓,3↑), hippocampus (5↓,2↑), anterior cingulate (2↓,1↑), and piriform cortex (1↑). In peripheral tissues the corresponding changes were: ovaries (23↓), uterus (16↓,1↑), adrenals (11↓,3↑), and pancreas (1↓,6↑). We conclude that these peptides may be downstream mediators of some of the therapeutic effects of estrogen. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Brain Natriuretic Peptide Is a Powerful Predictor of Outcome in Stroke Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

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    Kenji Maruyama

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since stroke patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF have poor outcomes in general, the prediction of outcomes following discharge is of utmost concern for these patients. We previously reported that brain natriuretic peptide (BNP levels were significantly higher in NVAF patients with larger infarcts, higher modified Rankin Scale (mRS score, and higher CHADS2 score. In the present study, we evaluated an array of variables, including BNP, in order to determine significant predictors for functional outcome in patients with NVAF after acute ischemic stroke (AIS. Methods: A total of 615 consecutive patients with AIS within 48 h of symptom onset, admitted to our hospital between April 2010 and October 2015, were retrospectively searched. Among these patients, we enrolled consecutive patients with NVAF. We evaluated the mRS score 3 months after onset of stroke and investigated associations between mRS score and the following clinical and echocardiographic variables. Categorical variables included male sex, current smoking, alcohol intake, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, use of antiplatelet drugs, anticoagulants, or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA, and infarct size. Continuous variables included age, systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure, hemoglobin, creatinine, D-dimer, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP, left atrial diameter, left ventricular ejection fraction (EF, and early mitral inflow velocity/diastolic mitral annular velocity (E/e’. We also analyzed the association of prestroke CHADS2, CHA2DS2-VASc, and R2CHADS2 scores, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score on admission with mRS score 3 months after the onset of stroke. Patients were classified into 2 groups according to mRS score: an mRS score ≤2 was defined as good outcome, an mRS score ≥3 was defined as poor outcome. To clarify the correlations between

  9. Design and physicochemical characterization of poly(amidoamine) nanoparticles and the toxicological evaluation in human endothelial cells: applications to peptide delivery to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coué, Grégory; Freese, Christian; Unger, Ronald E; Kirkpatrick, C James; Pickl, Karin E; Sinner, Frank M; Engbersen, Johan F J

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated nanoparticles formulated by self-assembly of a biodegradable poly(amidoamine) (PAA) and a fluorescently labeled peptide, in their capacity to internalize in endothelial cells and deliver the peptide, with possible applications for brain drug delivery. The nanoparticles were characterized in terms of size, surface charge, and loading efficiency, and were applied on human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (Huvec) cells. Cell-internalization and cytotoxicity experiments showed that the PAA-based nanocomplexes were essentially nontoxic, and the peptide was successfully internalized into cells. The results indicate that these PAAs have an excellent property as nontoxic carriers for intracellular protein and peptide delivery, and provide opportunities for novel applications in the delivery of peptides to endothelial cells of the brain.

  10. Kadar N-Terminal Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide sebagai Prediktor Luaran Klinis Sindrom Koroner Akut

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    Florencia Idajanti Tandhana

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma levels of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP levels may reflect the severity of ischemia, although there is no necrosis. A transient ischemia which can increase the heart wall stretch would induces BNP synthesis and release. Synthesis and release of BNP are comparable with the severity of ischemia. The aim of this study was to analyze whether NT-proBNP levels in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS can be used as a predictor for clinical outcome. Studies was held since January to March 2010. Subject were patients with ACS who came to emergency room Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung and were clinically diagnosed according to World Health Organization criteria. Subjects which were suited with the inclusion criteria, stored until assayed. NT-pro BNP concentration was examined by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay method along with creatine kinase muscle brain (enzymatic method and cardiac troponin T (quantitative method. Statistical analysis was performed using the one-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for verifying normality, normally distributed data were analyzed using parametric analysis and abnormal distributed data was assayed using multiple logistic regression analysis to determine the parameters which can be used as predictor for clinical outcome in patients with ACS. Multiple logistic regression analysis on 83 subjects showed predictive value of NT-proBNP levels with OR=1.00, which mean there was no different likelihood in patients with high and low concentration of NT-proBNP to have longer hospitality duration. NT-proBNP β coefficient of 0.001 states that every addition of 1,000 pg/mL of NT-proBNP concentration will increase the length of hospitality duration for one day. On convalesce subjects, the most significant predictive value for predicting clinical outcome cTnT was more better than NT-proBNP concentration in patients with ACS (OR=32.53, 95%CI; 0.58–1,819.26. In conclusions, NT-proBNP is not a major

  11. Brain natriuretic peptide correlates with troponin T in patients with renal failure.

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    Sahinarslan, Asife; Guz, Galip; Okyay, Kaan; Torer, Nihan; Bali, Musa; Sindel, Sükrü; Cengel, Atiye

    2007-04-01

    In patients with chronic renal failure, the main cause of mortality is cardiovascular disease. Cardiac troponin T (cTnT) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) are found to be related with decreased survival in both the normal population and in patients with chronic renal failure in different studies. Our aim is to investigate the relationship between cTnT and BNP in patients with chronic renal failure. 58 chronic haemodialysis patients were enrolled prospectively for the study. Blood samples for measurement of cTnT and BNP were collected after the haemodialysis. The patients are divided into 3 groups according to cTnT measurements. Group I included the patients with cTnT 0. 1 ng/ml. We performed echocardiography in all patients to measure the left ventricular ejection fraction and thickness of septum and posterior wall. When BNP levels were compared among the 3 groups, we found that the BNP level was lowest in group I and highest in group III (165.13 +/- 125.44 pg/dl; 236.0 +/- 107.83 pg/dl; 280.71 +/- 153.25 pg/dl, respectively) (P = 0.01).The difference in BNP levels among groups was statistically significant and independent from left ventricular hypertrophy, left ventricular ejection fraction and volume overload in multiple regression analysis. We also searched the relationship between plasma cTnT and BNP levels and found a positive correlation (r = 0.3; P = 0.023). cTnT and BNP levels were related to each other in patients with chronic renal failure.These parameters can help to identify the patients with a high risk for cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Alteration of Plasma Brain Natriuretic Peptide Level After Acute Moderate Exercise in Professional Athletes

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    Homa Sheikhani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiac fatigue or myocardial damage following exercise until complete exhaustion can increase blood levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP in athletes. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of resistance and acute moderate aerobic exercise on alterations in BNP levels in professional athletes. Materials and Methods: Forty professional athletes who had at least 3 years of a championship background in track and field (aerobic group or body building (resistance group volunteered to participate in the present study. Track and field athletes (n = 20 were requested to run 8 km at 60% to 70% of maximum heart rate. Body building athletes (n = 20 performed a resistance training session of 5 exercises in 3 sets of 10 repetitions at 75% of 1 RM (bench press, seated row, leg extension, leg curl, and leg press. Before and immediately after the exercise, plasma BNP levels of both groups of athletes were measured by PATHFASTTM NT-proBNP assay, an immunochemiluminescent assay using two polyclonal antibodies in sandwich test format, on a PATHFASTTM automated analyzer. Results: Plasma BNP levels immediately following exercise increased significantly as compared with baseline values. Plasma BNP concentrations in the aerobic group were significantly higher than in the resistance group before and after exercise. Moreover, the increase in mean BNP concentrations in aerobic athletes was 7 times more than in resistance athletes. Conclusions: BNP levels in athlete who performed distance exercises increased significantly compared with resistance training. Possibly exercise program type, intensity of exercise, volume of exercise program, and field sport can be factors of changes in BNP levels

  13. The association between brain natriuretic peptide and tissue Doppler parameters in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

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    Taliha Öner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the association between brain natriuretic peptide (BNP levels and tissue Doppler imaging measurements and also screening for deadly mutations in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM. We enrolled 20 patients diagnosed with HCM (age:10.7±5 years (1-17, 85% male, weight:42.25±23.10 kg, height:141.80±32.45 cm and 20 age, gender and body weight-matched control subjects. We performed electrocardiography, transthoracic echocardiography, and tissue Doppler echocardiography in each group, as well as genetic tests (for Arg403Gln, Arg453Cys, Arg719Trp and Arg719Gln mutations in MYH7 Exons 13, 14, 19 and BNP in the patients. The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence (Group 1 or absence (Group 2 of left ventricular (LV outflow tract obstruction. QTc dispersion and the LV ejection fraction and left atrial (LA volume index were increased in Group 1. The LA volume index and the mitral and septal E/Ea ratio and septum Z-score were increased while the mitral lateral annulus and septal annulus Ea wave velocities and the mitral and tricuspid E/A ratio were decreased in patients with high levels of BNP compared to those with normal BNP levels. There were no mutations that are associated with increased risk of sudden death found in patients included in this study. In the light of our data, we conclude that such parameters BNP levels above the 98 pg/mL, septal thickness Z-score ˃6, and higher mitral and septal E/Ea ratios can be used for management of patients with HCM according to life-threatening conditions.

  14. Evaluation of Brain Natriuretic Peptide plasma levels in children with Congenital Heart Diseases

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    Noor Mohammad Noori

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveThis study aimed to assess Brain Natriuretic Peptide in early diagnose of cardiac function in children with Congenital Heart Diseases.MethodologyThis study was performed on children with CHD and healthy. Severity of heart failure modified Ross classification system was used for grouping patients in four classes. For all participants, height, weight and head circumference were measured. From participants 3 cc blood samples was taken and after separation, the plasma placed at temperature of -80 c. After collecting all samples they were in testing using an ELISA BNP kit. For 50 children in control group statistical methods used to generate RV and PA pressure randomly. The data were analyzed using SPSS for Windows, Version, 15.0 (Chicago,SPSS Inc. USA with 0.05 for the level of significant. ResultsBNP, RV pressure, PA pressure, HB and O2 saturation had different means in cyanotic, Acyanotic and and control significantly. BNP, RV, PA , HB and O2Sat had different means in case and control significantly. , RV, HB and O2 saturation had different means significantly acordance with the sevirity of disease.BNP had correlation with PA and PA had correlation with Qp/Qs ratio ,Rp/Rs ratio , RV and O2Sat significantly .ConclusionAt the end from the results of the study concluded that BNP levels in children with chd increased. in patients with pulmonary hypertension , with increasing the level of pulmonary hypertension the BNP will increase. BNP increasing had high association with the severity of heart failure.

  15. Brain Natriuretic Peptide Is a Marker of Fluid Overload in Incident Hemodialysis Patients.

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    Chazot, Charles; Rozes, Margaux; Vo-Van, Cyril; Deleaval, Patrik; Hurot, Jean-Marc; Lorriaux, Christie; Mayor, Brice; Zaoui, Eric; Jean, Guillaume

    2017-06-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is secreted by cardiomyocytes under stretch condition. High blood levels are associated with decreased patient survival in heart failure patients and in hemodialysis (HD) patients. We report the monthly BNP change in the first months of HD therapy in incident patients and its relationship with fluid removal and cardiac history (CH). All patients starting HD therapy in our unit from May 2008 to December 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Every month (M1 to M6), BNP was assessed before a midweek dialysis session. CH, monthly pre- and postdialysis blood pressure, and postdialysis body weight were collected. A total of 236 patients were included in the analysis. The median BNP at HD start was 593 (175-1,433) pg/mL, with a significant difference between CH- and CH+ patients (291 vs. 731 pg/mL, p < 0.0001). Mortality was significantly higher in patients in the higher BNP tertile. BNP decreased significantly between M1 and M2 and then plateaued. The BNP change between M1 and M2 and between M1 and M6 was significantly correlated with the initial fluid removal. Applying stepwise multiple regression, the BNP change between M1 and M2 was significantly and independently related to fluid removal. The BNP level at M6 was also related to patient survival. We confirm that in incident HD patients, BNP level is related to fluid excess and cardiac status. The BNP decrease in the first months of HD therapy is related to fluid excess correction. BNP appears as an important tool to evaluate hydration status correction after HD onset.

  16. BRAIN NATRIURETIC PEPTIDE (BNP: BIOMARKER FOR RISK STRATIFICATION AND FUNCTIONAL RECOVERY PREDICTION IN ISCHEMIC STROKE

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    STANESCU Ioana

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Functional outcome after cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events is traditionally predicted using demographic and clinical variables like age, gender, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, diabetes status, smoking habits or pre-existing morbidity. Identification of new variables will improve the risk stratification of specific categories of patients. Numerous blood-based biomarkers associated with increased cardiovascular risk have been identified; some of them even predict cardiovascular events. Investigators have tried to produce prediction models by incorporating traditional risk factors and biomarkers. (1. Widely-available, rapidly processed and less expensive biomarkers could be used in the future to guide management of complex cerebrovascular patients in order to maximize their recovery (2 Recently, studies have demonstrated that biomarkers can predict not only the risk for a specific clinical event, but also the risk of death of vascular cause and the functional outcome after cardiovascular or cerebrovascular events. Early prediction of fatal outcome after stroke may improve therapeutic strategies (such as the use of more aggressive treatments or inclusion of patients in clinical trials and guide decision-making processes in order to maximize patient’s chances for survival and recovery. (3 Long term functional outcome after stroke is one of the most difficult variables to predict. Elevated serum levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP are powerful predictor of outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease (heart failure, atrial fibrillation. Potential role of BNP in predicting atrial fibrillation occurrence, cardio-embolic stroke and post-stroke mortality have been proved in many studies. However, data concerning the potential role of BNP in predicting short term and long term functional outcomes after stroke remain controversial.

  17. Attenuation of Post-Shock Increases in Brain Natriuretic Peptide with Post Shock Overdrive Pacing

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    Marco Budeus

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Predischarge defibrillation threshold testing is often performed a few days after ICD implantation in order to validate defibrillation thresholds obtained at the time of implant. Ventricular fibrillation is induced with such testing and causes an increase in serum Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP levels. BNP is an indicator for cardiac stress. We wanted to examine the feasibility to alter the trend of BNP after predischarge testing in VVI, DDD and CRT ICD´s.Methods: We measured BNP before predischarge testing and 5, 10, 20 and 40 minutes after predischarge testing in 13 groups with each 20 patients. We evaluated patients without post shock pacing and patients with a post shock pacing frequency of 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100 bpm and a duration of 30 and 60 sec as well as a post shock pacing frequency of 80 and 90 bpm and a duration of 120 sec post shock pacing. Results: Patients without post shock pacing showed the highest BNP during the follow-up. The percentage values of BNP increased consistent significantly after 5 minutes compared with BNP before predischarge testing. The percentage values of BNP trend was significantly lower with a post shock pacing of 90 bpm and duration of 60 sec. In addition, we excluded a cardiac necrosis by predischarge testing because of similar values of myoglobin, cardiac troponin I and creatine kinase during the follow-up.Conclusions: Our results suggested that post shock pacing with 90 bpm and duration of 60 sec as the best optimized post shock pacing frequency and duration for VVI, DDD and CRT ICD´s. A reduction of cardiac stress is going to be achieved with the optimization of the post shock pacing frequency and duration.

  18. Effects of Wen Dan Tang on insomnia-related anxiety and levels of the brain-gut peptide Ghrelin.

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    Wang, Liye; Song, Yuehan; Li, Feng; Liu, Yan; Ma, Jie; Mao, Meng; Wu, Fengzhi; Wu, Ying; Li, Sinai; Guan, Binghe; Liu, Xiaolan

    2014-01-15

    Ghrelin, a brain-gut peptide that induces anxiety and other abnormal emotions, contributes to the effects of insomnia on emotional behavior. In contrast, the traditional Chinese Medicine remedy Wen Dan Tang reduces insomnia-related anxiety, which may perhaps correspond to changes in the brain-gut axis. This suggests a possible relationship between Wen Dan Tang's pharmacological mechanism and the brain-gut axis. Based on this hypothesis, a sleep-deprived rat model was induced and Wen Dan Tang was administered using oral gavage during model establishment. Wen Dan Tang significantly reduced insomnia-related anxiety and prevented Ghrelin level decreases following sleep deprivation, especially in the hypothalamus. Increased expression of Ghrelin receptor mRNA in the hypothalamus was also observed, suggesting that reduced anxiety may be a result of Wen Dan Tang's regulation of Ghrelin-Ghrelin receptors.

  19. Ketamine modulates TRH and TRH-like peptide turnover in brain and peripheral tissues of male rats.

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    Pekary, A Eugene; Sattin, Albert; Lloyd, Robert L

    2015-07-01

    Major depression is the largest single healthcare burden with treatments of slow onset and often limited efficacy. Ketamine, a NMDA antagonist used extensively as a pediatric and veterinary anesthetic, has recently been shown to be a rapid acting antidepressant, making it a potential lifesaver for suicidal patients. Side effects and risk of abuse limit the chronic use of ketamine. More complete understanding of the neurobiochemical mechanisms of ketamine should lead to safer alternatives. Some of the physiological and pharmacological actions of ketamine are consistent with increased synthesis and release of TRH (pGlu-His-Pro-NH2), and TRH-like peptides (pGlu-X-Pro-NH2) where "X" can be any amino acid residue. Moreover, TRH-like peptides are themselves potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of major depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, epilepsy, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. For these reasons, male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized with 162 mg/kg ip ketamine and then infused intranasally with 20 μl of sterile saline containing either 0 or 5 mg/ml Glu-TRH. One, 2 or 4h later, the brain levels of TRH and TRH-like peptides were measured in various brain regions and peripheral tissues. At 1h in brain following ketamine only, the levels of TRH and TRH-like peptides were significantly increased in 52 instances (due to increased biosynthesis and/or decreased release) or decreased in five instances. These changes, listed by brain region in order of decreasing number of significant increases (↑) and/or decreases (↓), were: hypothalamus (9↑); piriform cortex (8↑); entorhinal cortex (7↑); nucleus accumbens (7↑); posterior cingulate (5↑); striatum (4↑); frontal cortex (2↑,3↓); amygdala (3↑); medulla oblongata (1↑,2↓); cerebellum (2↑); hippocampus (2↑); anterior cingulate (2↑). The corresponding changes in peripheral tissues were: adrenals (8↑); epididymis (4↑); testis (1↑,3↓); pancreas (1↑); prostate (1↑). We

  20. Brain reward-system activation in response to anticipation and consumption of palatable food is altered by glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activation in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bloemendaal, L.; Veltman, D. J.; ten Kulve, J. S.; Groot, P. F. C.; Ruhe, H. G.; Barkhof, F.; Sloan, J. H.; Diamant, M.; Ijzerman, R. G.

    AimTo test the hypothesis that food intake reduction after glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor activation is mediated through brain areas regulating anticipatory and consummatory food reward. MethodsAs part of a larger study, we determined the effects of GLP-1 receptor activation on brain

  1. Brain reward-system activation in response to anticipation and consumption of palatable food is altered by glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activation in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bloemendaal, L.; Veltman, D.J.; ten Kulve, J.S.; Groot, P.F.C.; Ruhe, H.G.; Barkhof, F.; Sloan, J.H.; Diamant, M.; IJzerman, R.G.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To test the hypothesis that food intake reduction after glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor activation is mediated through brain areas regulating anticipatory and consummatory food reward. Methods: As part of a larger study, we determined the effects of GLP-1 receptor activation on brain

  2. Brain reward-system activation in response to anticipation and consumption of palatable food is altered by glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activation in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bloemendaal, L.; Veltman, D. J.; ten Kulve, J. S.; Groot, P. F. C.; Ruhé, H. G.; Barkhof, F.; Sloan, J. H.; Diamant, M.; Ijzerman, R. G.

    2015-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that food intake reduction after glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor activation is mediated through brain areas regulating anticipatory and consummatory food reward. As part of a larger study, we determined the effects of GLP-1 receptor activation on brain responses to

  3. Delivery of a peptide-drug conjugate targeting the blood brain barrier improved the efficacy of paclitaxel against glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Zheng, Xuemin; Gong, Min; Zhang, Jianning

    2016-11-29

    The challenge of effectively delivering therapeutic agents to the brain has created an entire field of active research devoted to overcoming the blood brain barrier (BBB) and efficiently delivering drugs to the brain. Angiopep-2 can trigger transcytosis and traverse the BBB by recognizing low-density lipoprotein related protein-1 (LRP-1) expressed on the brain capillary endothelial cells. Here, we designed a novel strategy for the delivery of drugs to the brain. The novel drug delivery system was a combination of a receptor-targeting ligand, such as low-density lipoprotein related protein 1, and a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP). It was hypothesized that this conjugate will enhance the delivery of associated therapeutic cargo across the BBB and increase the permeability of a solid tumor. Our findings indicate that the combination of these two agents in a delivery vehicle significantly improved translocation of small molecules (paclitaxel) into the brain compared to the vehicle treatment, which contained only receptor-targeting ligand. The application of this strategy could potentially expand the horizons for the treatment of central nervous system disorders.

  4. Vector synthesis high-resolution electrocardiography, atrial natriuretic peptide and N-terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide for estimation of cardiac load in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shino; Oyama, Rie; Fukushima, Akimune; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Sugiyama, Toru

    2016-12-01

    We analyzed atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and vector synthesis high-resolution electrocardiography (ECG), to estimate cardiac load with circulatory dynamic change from pregnancy through the post-partum period. The subjects were singleton pregnant women (n = 19), who were divided into three stages: stage 1, 34-36 weeks of gestation; stage 2, 2-6 post-partum days; and stage 3, 1-3 months after delivery. Vector synthesis high-resolution ECG, ANP and NT-proBNP were analyzed for all subjects. A pregnant woman with massive uterin liomyoma expressed largest the corrected recover time (RTc) dispersion in I + II of tow Dimensional (2D) color distribution map ANP and NT-proBNP were significantly higher in stage 2 than in stages 1 and 3. ANP, NT-proBNP and vector synthesis high-resolution ECG there might be able to evaluate cardiac load of normal pregnancy. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  5. Proangiogenic functions of an RGD-SLAY-containing osteopontin icosamer peptide in HUVECs and in the postischemic brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hahnbie; Jin, Yin-Chuan; Kim, Seung-Woo; Kim, Il-Doo; Lee, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Ja-Kyeong

    2018-01-19

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a phosphorylated glycoprotein secreted into body fluids by various cell types. OPN contains arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) and serine-leucine-alanine-tyrosine (SLAY) motifs that bind to several integrins and mediate a wide range of cellular processes. In the present study, the proangiogenic effects of a 20-amino-acid OPN peptide (OPNpt20) containing RGD and SLAY motifs were examined in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and in a rat focal cerebral ischemia model. OPNpt20 exerted robust proangiogenic effects in HUVECs by promoting proliferation, migration and tube formation. These effects were significantly reduced in OPNpt20-RAA (RGD->RAA)-treated cells, but only slightly reduced in OPNpt20-SLAA (SLAY->SLAA)-treated cells. Interestingly, a mutant peptide without both motifs failed to induce these proangiogenic processes, indicating that the RGD motif is crucial and that SLAY also has a role. In OPNpt20-treated HUVEC cultures, AKT and ERK signaling pathways were activated, but activation of these pathways and tube formation were suppressed by anti-αvβ3 antibody, indicating that OPNpt20 stimulates angiogenesis via the αvβ3-integrin/AKT and ERK pathways. The proangiogenic function of OPNpt20 was further confirmed in a rat middle cerebral artery occlusion model. Total vessel length and vessel densities were markedly greater in OPNpt20-treated ischemic brains, accompanied by induction of proangiogenic markers. Together, these results demonstrate that the 20-amino-acid OPN peptide containing RGD and SLAY motifs exerts proangiogenic effects, wherein both motifs have important roles, and these effects appear to contribute to the neuroprotective effects of this peptide in the postischemic brain.

  6. Natriuretic Peptides, Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Rutten, Joost

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn humans, the natriuretic peptide family consists of three different types of peptides: atrial natriuretic peptide (synonym: atrial natriuretic factor), B-type natriuretic peptide (synonym: brain natriuretic peptide) and C-natriuretic peptide.1 Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was the fi rst natriuretic peptide to be discovered and in humans ANP is predominantly formed in the cardiomyocytes of the atria.2 B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) was fi rst discovered in porcine brain hen...

  7. Prognostic usefulness of anemia and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in outpatients with systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Gustafsson, Finn; Kistorp, Caroline N

    2007-01-01

    N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) and anemia are predictors of outcome in systolic heart failure. It is currently unclear how these 2 markers interact in particular with regard to the prognostic information carried by each risk marker. We therefore tested the hypothesis...... that anemia (World Health Organization criteria, hemoglobin levels marker. Clinical data from 345 patients with systolic heart failure were obtained...... prospectively at the baseline visit to our heart failure clinic (inclusion criterion left ventricular ejection fraction

  8. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels associated with severe hand, foot and mouth disease

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Hui-Ling; Zhang, Yu-Feng; Li, Ya-Ping; Zhang, Yu; Xie, Yan; Wang, Jun; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Dang, Shuang-Suo

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is sometimes associated with serious complications such as acute heart failure that can cause substantial child mortality. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is a sensitive and specific biomarker of congestive heart failure. The aim of this study was to use plasma NT-proBNP levels to establish the severity of childhood HFMD. Methods A retrospective study was performed in 128 Chinese patients with severe HFMD and 88 patie...

  9. N-terminal Pro-brain Natriuretic Peptide Levels in Dichorionic Diamniotic Twins with Selective Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Fujioka, Kazumichi; Mizobuchi, Masami; Sakai Hitomi; Iwatani Sota; Wada Keiko; Yoshimoto Seiji; Nakao Hideto

    2013-01-01

    Monochorionic diamniotic (MD) twins with selective intrauterine growth restriction (sIUGR) have known associations with cardiac complications. However, the cardiac load of dichorionic diamniotic (DD) twins with sIUGR (DD-sIUGR) remains unclear. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro BNP) is a convenient marker of cardiac dysfunction in neonates, and is elevated in MD twins with sIUGR (MD-sIUGR). However, there are no reports assessing serum NT-pro BNP levels in DD-sIUGR. Here, we ai...

  10. Evidence that a synthetic amyloid-ß oligomer-binding peptide (ABP) targets amyloid-ß deposits in transgenic mouse brain and human Alzheimer's disease brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Balu; Ito, Shingo; Atkinson, Trevor; Gaudet, Chantal; Ménard, Michel; Brown, Leslie; Whitfield, James

    2014-03-14

    The synthetic ~5 kDa ABP (amyloid-ß binding peptide) consists of a region of the 228 kDa human pericentrioloar material-1 (PCM-1) protein that selectively and avidly binds in vitro Aβ1-42 oligomers, believed to be key co-drivers of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but not monomers (Chakravarthy et al., (2013) [3]). ABP also prevents Aß1-42 from triggering the apoptotic death of cultured human SHSY5Y neuroblasts, likely by sequestering Aß oligomers, suggesting that it might be a potential AD therapeutic. Here we support this possibility by showing that ABP also recognizes and binds Aβ1-42 aggregates in sections of cortices and hippocampi from brains of AD transgenic mice and human AD patients. More importantly, ABP targets Aβ1-42 aggregates when microinjected into the hippocampi of the brains of live AD transgenic mice. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors in the brain: controlling food intake and body weight

    OpenAIRE

    Baggio, Laurie L.; Drucker, Daniel. J.

    2014-01-01

    The peptide hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) enhances glucose-induced insulin secretion and inhibits both gastric emptying and glucagon secretion. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists control glycemia via glucose-dependent mechanisms of action and promote weight loss in obese and diabetic individuals. Nevertheless, the mechanisms and cellular targets transducing the weight loss effects remain unclear. Two recent studies in the JCI provide insight into the neurons responsible for this effec...

  12. The brain decade in debate: VIII. Peptide hormones and behavior: cholecystokinin and prolactin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Beinfeld

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is a transcription of an electronic symposium held on November 28, 2000 in which active researchers were invited by the Brazilian Society of Neuroscience and Behavior (SBNeC to discuss the advances of the last decade in the peptide field with particular focus on central actions of prolactin and cholecystokinin. The comments in this symposium reflect the diversity of prolactin and cholecystokinin research and demonstrate how the field has matured. Since both peptides play a role in reproductive behaviors, particularly mother-infant interactions, this was the starting point of the discussion. Recent findings on the role of the receptor subtypes as well as interaction with other peptides in this context were also discussed. Another issue discussed was the possible role of these peptides in dopamine-mediated rewarding systems. Both prolactin and cholecystokinin are involved in mechanisms controlling food intake and somatic pain thresholds. The role of peripheral inputs through vagal afferents modulating behavior was stressed. The advent of knockout animals as potential generators of new knowledge in this field was also addressed. Finally, interactions with other neuropeptides and investigation of the role of these peptides in other fields such as immunology were mentioned. Knowledge about the central functions of prolactin and cholecystokinin has shown important advances. The role of these peptides in neurological and psychiatric syndromes such as anorexia, drug abuse and physiological disturbances that lead to a compromised maternal behavior seems relevant.

  13. Nano neuro knitting: Peptide nanofiber scaffold for brain repair and axon regeneration with functional return of vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis-Behnke, Rutledge G.; Liang, Yu-Xiang; You, Si-Wei; Tay, David K. C.; Zhang, Shuguang; So, Kwok-Fai; Schneider, Gerald E.

    2006-03-01

    Nanotechnology is often associated with materials fabrication, microelectronics, and microfluidics. Until now, the use of nanotechnology and molecular self assembly in biomedicine to repair injured brain structures has not been explored. To achieve axonal regeneration after injury in the CNS, several formidable barriers must be overcome, such as scar tissue formation after tissue injury, gaps in nervous tissue formed during phagocytosis of dying cells after injury, and the failure of many adult neurons to initiate axonal extension. Using the mammalian visual system as a model, we report that a designed self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold creates a permissive environment for axons not only to regenerate through the site of an acute injury but also to knit the brain tissue together. In experiments using a severed optic tract in the hamster, we show that regenerated axons reconnect to target tissues with sufficient density to promote functional return of vision, as evidenced by visually elicited orienting behavior. The peptide nanofiber scaffold not only represents a previously undiscovered nanobiomedical technology for tissue repair and restoration but also raises the possibility of effective treatment of CNS and other tissue or organ trauma. CNS regeneration | tissue repair | nanomedicine

  14. Cell-Penetrating Peptide-Modified Gold Nanoparticles for the Delivery of Doxorubicin to Brain Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed, Ramin A; Muroski, Megan E; Dai, Qing; Wegscheid, Michelle L; Auffinger, Brenda; Yu, Dou; Han, Yu; Zhang, Lingjiao; Wu, Meijing; Cheng, Yu; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-06-06

    As therapies continue to increase the lifespan of patients with breast cancer, the incidence of brain metastases has steadily increased, affecting a significant number of patients with metastatic disease. However, a major barrier toward treating these lesions is the inability of therapeutics to penetrate into the central nervous system and accumulate within intracranial tumor sites. In this study, we designed a cell-penetrating gold nanoparticle platform to increase drug delivery to brain metastatic breast cancer cells. TAT peptide-modified gold nanoparticles carrying doxorubicin led to improved cytotoxicity toward two brain metastatic breast cancer cell lines with a decrease in the IC50 of at least 80% compared to free drug. Intravenous administration of these particles led to extensive accumulation of particles throughout diffuse intracranial metastatic microsatellites with cleaved caspase-3 activity corresponding to tumor foci. Furthermore, intratumoral administration of these particles improved survival in an intracranial MDA-MB-231-Br xenograft mouse model. Our results demonstrate the promising application of gold nanoparticles for improving drug delivery in the context of brain metastatic breast cancer.

  15. Pregnancy Vaccination with Gold Glyco-Nanoparticles Carrying Listeria monocytogenes Peptides Protects against Listeriosis and Brain- and Cutaneous-Associated Morbidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Calderón-Gonzalez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Listeriosis is a fatal infection for fetuses and newborns with two clinical main morbidities in the neonatal period, meningitis and diffused cutaneous lesions. In this study, we vaccinated pregnant females with two gold glyconanoparticles (GNP loaded with two peptides, listeriolysin peptide 91–99 (LLO91–99 or glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1–22 peptide (GAPDH1–22. Neonates born to vaccinated mothers were free of bacteria and healthy, while non-vaccinated mice presented clear brain affections and cutaneous diminishment of melanocytes. Therefore, these nanoparticle vaccines are effective measures to offer pregnant mothers at high risk of listeriosis interesting therapies that cross the placenta.

  16. Targeting metastatic breast cancer with ANG1005, a novel peptide-paclitaxel conjugate that crosses the blood-brain-barrier (BBB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We devoted this short interview piece with Dr Shou-Ching Tang at Augusta University to feature some promising results from a clinical phase II trial on a novel brain-penetrating peptide-paclitaxel-conjugate, ANG1005, in treating brain metastatic breast cancer. These results were presented by Dr. Tang at the recent annual meeting of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO 2016 Congress. This development heralds an important step forward towards the development of effective chemotherapeutic agents, which can cross the blood-brain-barrier and effectively treat and prevent the brain metastatic cancers.

  17. A brain-targeting lipidated peptide for neutralizing RNA-mediated toxicity in Polyglutamine Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Qian; Yang, Mengbi; Sørensen, Kasper K.

    2017-01-01

    -induced neurotoxicity. Here we report a N-acetylated and C-amidated derivative of P3, P3V8, that showed a more than 20-fold increase in its affinity for expanded CAG RNA. The P3V8 peptide also more potently alleviated expanded RNA-induced cytotoxicity in vitro, and suppressed polyQ neurodegeneration in Drosophila...

  18. Natriuretic Peptides, Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.W. Rutten (Joost)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn humans, the natriuretic peptide family consists of three different types of peptides: atrial natriuretic peptide (synonym: atrial natriuretic factor), B-type natriuretic peptide (synonym: brain natriuretic peptide) and C-natriuretic peptide.1 Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was

  19. Distribution of vasotocin- and vasoactive intestinal peptide-like immunoreactivity in the brain of blue tit (Cyanistes coeruleus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnese, Catherine M.; Székely, Tamás; Csillag, András; Zachar, Gergely

    2015-01-01

    Blue tits (Cyanistes coeruleus) are songbirds, used as model animals in numerous studies covering a wide field of research. Nevertheless, the distribution of neuropeptides in the brain of this avian species remains largely unknown. Here we present some of the first results on distribution of Vasotocine (AVT) and Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the brain of males and females of this songbird species, using immunohistochemistry mapping. The bulk of AVT-like cells are found in the hypothalamic supraoptic, paraventricular and suprachiasmatic nuclei, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and along the lateral forebrain bundle. Most AVT-like fibers course toward the median eminence, some reaching the arcopallium, and lateral septum. Further terminal fields occur in the dorsal thalamus, ventral tegmental area and pretectal area. Most VIP-like cells are in the lateral septal organ and arcuate nucleus. VIP-like fibers are distributed extensively in the hypothalamus, preoptic area, lateral septum, diagonal band of Broca. They are also found in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, amygdaloid nucleus of taenia, robust nucleus of the arcopallium, caudo-ventral hyperpallium, nucleus accumbens and the brainstem. Taken together, these results suggest that both AVT and VIP immunoreactive structures show similar distribution to other avian species, emphasizing evolutionary conservatism in the history of vertebrates. The current study may enable future investigation into the localization of AVT and VIP, in relation to behavioral and ecological traits in the brain of tit species. PMID:26236200

  20. Distribution of Vasotocin- and Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide-like Immunoreactivity in the Brain of Blue Tit (Cyanistes coeruleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Monique Montagnese

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Blue tits (Cyanistes coeruleus are songbirds, used as model animals in numerous studies covering a wide field of research. Nevertheless, the distribution of neuropeptides in the brain of this avian species remains largely unknown. Here we present some of the first results on distribution of Vasotocine (AVT and Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP in the brain of males and females of this songbird species, using immunohistochemistry mapping.The bulk of AVT-like cells are found in the hypothalamic supraoptic, paraventricular and suprachiasmatic nuclei, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and along the lateral forebrain bundle. Most AVT-like fibers course toward the median eminence, some reaching the arcopallium, and lateral septum. Further terminal fields occur in the dorsal thalamus, ventral tegmental area and pretectal area. Most VIP-like cells are in the lateral septal organ and arcuate nucleus. VIP-like fibers are distributed extensively in the hypothalamus, preoptic area, lateral septum, diagonal band of Broca. They are also found in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, amygdaloid nucleus of taenia, robust nucleus of the arcopallium, caudo-ventral hyperpallium, nucleus accumbens and the brainstem. Taken together, these results suggest that both AVT and VIP immunoreactive structures show similar distribution to other avian species, emphasizing evolutionary conservatism in the history of vertebrates. The current study may enable future investigation into the localization of AVT and VIP, in relation to behavioral and ecological traits in the brain of tit species.

  1. Alterations in brain Protein Kinase A activity and reversal of morphine tolerance by two fragments of native Protein Kinase A inhibitor peptide (PKI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, George D; Smith, Forrest L; Smith, Paul A; Dewey, William L

    2005-04-01

    Two peptide fragments of native Protein Kinase A inhibitor (PKI), PKI-(6-22)-amide and PKI-(Myr-14-22)-amide, significantly reversed low-level morphine antinociceptive tolerance in mice. The inhibition of Protein Kinase A (PKA) activity by both peptide fragments was then measured in specific brain regions (thalamus, periaqueductal gray (PAG), and medulla) and in lumbar spinal cord (LSC), which in previous studies have been shown to play a role in morphine-induced analgesia. In drug naive animals, cytosolic PKA activity was greater than particulate PKA activity in each region, while cytosolic and particulate PKA activities were greater in thalamus and PAG compared to medulla and LSC. The addition of both peptides to homogenates from each region completely abolished cytosolic and particulate PKA activities in vitro. Following injection into the lateral ventricle of the brain of drug naive mice and morphine-tolerant mice, both peptides inhibited PKA activity in the cytosolic, but not the particulate fraction of LSC. In addition, cytosolic and particulate PKA activities were inhibited by both peptides in thalamus. These results demonstrate that the inhibition of PKA reverses morphine tolerance. Moreover, the inhibition of PKA activity in specific brain regions and LSC from morphine-tolerant mice by PKI analogs administered i.c.v. is evidence that PKA plays a role in morphine tolerance.

  2. Plasma pro-brain natriuretic peptide and electrocardiographic changes in combination improve risk prediction in persons without known heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter G; Jensen, Jan S; Appleyard, Merete

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Though the electrocardiogram(ECG) and plasma pro-brain-natriuretic-peptide (pro-BNP) are widely used markers of subclinical cardiac injury and can be used to predict future cardiovascular disease(CVD), they could merely be markers of the same underlying pathology. We aimed to determine...... if ECG changes and pro-BNP are independent predictors of CVD and if the combination improves risk prediction in persons without known heart disease. METHODS: Pro-BNP and ECG were obtained on 5454 persons without known heart disease from the 4th round of the Copenhagen City Heart Study, a prospective...... cohort study. Median follow-up was 10.4 years. High pro-BNP was defined as above 90th percentile of age and sex adjusted levels. The end-points were all-cause mortality and the combination of admission with ischemic heart disease, heart failure or CVD death. RESULTS: ECG changes were present in 907...

  3. Peptide carrier-mediated non-covalent delivery of unmodified cisplatin, methotrexate and other agents via intravenous route to the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobinda Sarkar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rapid pre-clinical evaluation of chemotherapeutic agents against brain cancers and other neurological disorders remains largely unattained due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, which limits transport of most therapeutic compounds to the brain. A synthetic peptide carrier, K16ApoE, was previously developed that enabled transport of target proteins to the brain by mimicking a ligand-receptor system. The peptide carrier was found to generate transient BBB permeability, which was utilized for non-covalent delivery of cisplatin, methotrexate and other compounds to the brain. APPROACH: Brain delivery of the chemotherapeutics and other agents was achieved either by injecting the carrier peptide and the drugs separately or as a mixture, to the femoral vein. A modification of the method comprised injection of K16ApoE pre-mixed with cetuximab, followed by injection of a 'small-molecule' drug. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Seven-of-seven different small molecules were successfully delivered to the brain via K16ApoE. Depending on the method, brain uptake with K16ApoE was 0.72-1.1% for cisplatin and 0.58-0.92% for methotrexate (34-50-fold and 54-92 fold greater for cisplatin and methotrexate, respectively, with K16ApoE than without. Visually intense brain-uptake of Evans Blue, Light Green SF and Crocein scarlet was also achieved. Direct intracranial injection of EB show locally restricted distribution of the dye in the brain, whereas K16ApoE-mediated intravenous injection of EB resulted in the distribution of the dye throughout the brain. Experiments with insulin suggest that ligand-receptor signaling intrinsic to the BBB provides a natural means for passive transport of some molecules across the BBB. SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that the carrier peptide can non-covalently transport various chemotherapeutic agents to the brain. Thus, the method offers an avenue for pre-clinical evaluation of various small and large therapeutic molecules

  4. Amyloid-β peptides and tau protein as biomarkers in cerebrospinal and interstitial fluid following traumatic brain injury: A review of experimental and clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmenion P. Tsitsopoulos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI survivors frequently suffer from life-long deficits in cognitive functions and a reduced quality of life. Axonal injury, observed in most severe TBI patients, results in accumulation of amyloid precursor protein (APP. Post-injury enzymatic cleavage of APP can generate amyloid-β (Aβ peptides, a hallmark finding in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. At autopsy, brains of AD and a subset of TBI victims display some similarities including accumulation of Aβ peptides and neurofibrillary tangles of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Most epidemiological evidence suggests a link between TBI and AD, implying that TBI has neurodegenerative sequelae. Aβ peptides and tau may be used as biomarkers in interstitial fluid (ISF using cerebral microdialysis and/or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF following clinical TBI. In the present review, the available clinical and experimental literature on Aβ peptides and tau as potential biomarkers following TBI is comprehensively analyzed. Elevated CSF and ISF tau protein levels have been observed following severe TBI and suggested to correlate with clinical outcome. Although Aβ peptides are produced by normal neuronal metabolism, high levels of long and/or fibrillary Aβ peptides may be neurotoxic. Increased CSF and/or ISF Aβ levels post-injury may be related to neuronal activity and/or the presence of axonal injury. The heterogeneity of animal models, clinical cohorts, analytical techniques and the complexity of TBI in available studies make the clinical value of tau and Aβ as biomarkers uncertain at present. Additionally, the link between early post-injury changes in tau and Aβ peptides and the future risk of developing AD remains unclear. Future studies using e.g. rapid biomarker sampling combined with enhanced analytical techniques and/or novel pharmacological tools could provide additional information on the importance of Aβ peptides and tau protein in both the acute pathophysiology and long

  5. The synthetic NCAM-derived peptide, FGL, modulates the transcriptional response to traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Volmer; Helweg-Larsen, Rehannah Borup; Nielsen, Finn Cilius

    2008-01-01

    Cerebral responses to traumatic brain injury (TBI) include up- and downregulation of a vast number of proteins involved in endogenous inflammatory responses and defense mechanisms developing postinjury. The present study analyzed the global gene expression profile in response to cryo-induced TBI...

  6. Differential expression patterns of PQRFamide peptide and its two receptor genes in the brain and pituitary of grass puffer during the reproductive cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahjahan, Md; Doi, Hiroyuki; Ando, Hironori

    2015-01-01

    Pain-modulatory neuropeptides, PQRFamide (PQRFa) peptides, have recently been implicated in the regulation of reproduction in fish. As a first step toward investigating the role of PQRFa peptides on reproductive function in the grass puffer Takifugu niphobles, which is a semilunar spawner, we cloned genes encoding PQRFa peptide precursor (pqrfa) and its two types of receptors (pqrfa-r1 and pqrfa-r2), and examined changes in their expression levels in the brain and pituitary over several months during the reproductive cycle. The grass puffer PQRFa peptide precursor of 126 amino acid residues contains two putative PQRFa peptides, PQRFa-1 and PQRFa-2, which correspond to NPFF and NPAF in other vertebrates, respectively. The grass puffer PQRFa-R1 and PQRFa-R2 consist of 426 and 453 amino acid residues, respectively, and contain distinct characteristics of G-protein coupled receptors. These three genes were exclusively expressed in the brain and pituitary. The expression levels of pqrfa and pqrfa-r1 were significantly increased during the late stage of sexual maturation, but low in the spawning fish just after releasing sperms and eggs. Therefore, the grass puffer PQRFa peptide may have a role in the late stage of sexual maturation before spawning via PQRFa-R1. In contrast, the pqrfa-r2 expression showed maximum levels in the spawning fish and in the post-spawning period. The present results provide fundamental data suggesting that the grass puffer PQRFa peptide may have multiple roles in the control of reproduction that are dependent on the reproductive stages. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Rapid modulation of TRH and TRH-like peptide release in rat brain and peripheral tissues by ghrelin and 3-TRP-ghrelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekary, A Eugene; Sattin, Albert

    2012-08-01

    Ghrelin is not only a modulator of feeding and energy expenditure but also regulates reproductive functions, CNS development and mood. Obesity and major depression are growing public health concerns which may derive, in part, from dysregulation of ghrelin feedback at brain regions regulating feeding and mood. We and others have previously reported that thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH, pGlu-His-Pro-NH(2)) and TRH-like peptides (pGlu-X-Pro-NH(2), where "X" can be any amino acid residue) have neuroprotective, antidepressant, anti-epileptic, analeptic, anti-ataxic, and anorectic properties. For this reason male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected ip with 0.1mg/kg rat ghrelin or 0.9mg/kg 3-Trp-rat ghrelin. Twelve brain regions: cerebellum, medulla oblongata, anterior cingulate, posterior cingulate, frontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, hypothalamus, entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, striatum, amygdala, piriform cortex and 5 peripheral tissues (adrenals, testes, epididymis, pancreas and prostate) were analyzed. Rapid and profound decreases in TRH and TRH-like peptide levels (increased release) occurred throughout brain and peripheral tissues following ip ghrelin. Because ghrelin is rapidly deacylated in vivo we also studied 3-Trp-ghrelin which cannot be deacylated. Significant increases in TRH and TRH-like peptide levels following 3-Trp-ghrelin, relative to those after ghrelin were observed in all brain regions except posterior cingulate and all peripheral tissues except prostate and testis. The rapid stimulation of TRH and TRH-like peptide release by ghrelin in contrast with the inhibition of such release by 3-Trp-TRH is consistent with TRH and TRH-like peptides modulating the downstream effects of both ghrelin and unacylated ghrelin. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Rapid modulation of TRH and TRH-like peptide release in rat brain, pancreas, and testis by a GSK-3beta inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekary, Albert Eugene; Stevens, Schetema A; Blood, James D; Sattin, Albert

    2010-06-01

    Antidepressants have been shown to be neuroprotective and able to reverse damage to glia and neurons. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) is an endogenous antidepressant-like neuropeptide that reduces the expression of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta), an enzyme that hyperphosphorylates tau and is implicated in bipolar disorder, diabetes and Alzheimer's disease. In order to understand the potential role of GSK-3beta in the modulation of depression by TRH and TRH-like peptides and the therapeutic potential of GSK-3beta inhibitors for neuropsychiatric and metabolic diseases, young adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were (a) injected ip with 1.8mg/kg of GSK-3beta inhibitor VIII (GSKI) and sacrificed 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8h later or (b) injected with 0, 0.018, 0.18 or 1.8mg/kg GSKI and bled 4h later. Levels of TRH and TRH-like peptides were measured in various brain regions involved in mood regulation, pancreas and reproductive tissues. Large, 3-15-fold, increases of TRH and TRH-like peptide levels in cerebellum, for example, as well as other brain regions were noted at 2 and 4h. In contrast, a nearly complete loss of TRH and TRH-like peptides from testis within 2h and pancreas by 4h following GSKI injection was observed. We have previously reported similar acute effects of corticosterone in brain and peripheral tissues. Incubation of a decapsulated rat testis with either GSKI or corticosterone accelerated release of TRH, and TRH-like peptides. Glucocorticoids, via inhibition of GSK3-beta activity, may thus be involved in the inhibition of TRH and TRH-like peptide release in brain, thereby contributing to the depressogenic effect of this class of steroids. Corticosterone-induced acceleration of release of these peptides from testis may contribute to the decline in reproductive function and redirection of energy needed during life-threatening emergencies. These contrasting effects of glucocorticoid on peptide release appear to be mediated by GSK-3beta. Published

  9. Brain Activation by Peptide Pro-Leu-Gly-NH (MIF-1

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    Reas S. Khan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available MIF-1 (Pro-Leu-Gly-NH2 is a tripeptide for which the therapeutic potential in Parkinson's disease and depression has been indicated by many studies. However, the cellular mechanisms of action of MIF-1 are not yet clear. Here, we show the specific brain regions responsive to MIF-1 treatment by c-Fos mapping, and determine the kinetics of cellular signaling by western blotting of pERK, pSTAT3, and c-Fos in cultured neurons. The immunoreactivity of c-Fos was increased 4 hours after MIF-1 treatment in brain regions critically involved in the regulation of mood, anxiety, depression, and memory. The number of cells activated was greater after peripheral treatment (intravenous delivery than after intracerebroventricular injection. In cultured SH-SY5Y neuronal cells, c-Fos was induced time- and dose-dependently. The activation of cellular c-Fos was preceded by a transient increase of mitogen-activated protein kinase pERK but a reduction of phosphorylated Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (pSTAT3 initially. We conclude that MIF-1 can modulate multiple cellular signals including pERK, and pSTAT3 to activate c-Fos. The cellular activation in specific brain regions illustrates the biochemical and neuroanatomical basis underlying the therapeutic effect of MIF-1 in Parkinson's disease and depression.

  10. Peptide YY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandarana, Keval; Batterham, Rachel

    2008-02-01

    This review discusses recent studies examining the effects of peptide YY on energy homeostasis, highlights the emerging hedonic effects of peptide YY and evaluates the therapeutic potential of the peptide YY system. A role for exogenous PYY3-36 as an anorectic agent in obese humans and rodents has been established and weight loss effects demonstrated in obese rodents. New lines of evidence support a role for endogenous peptide YY in regulating energy homeostasis. The NPY-Y2 receptor mediates the anorectic actions of PYY3-36 with rodent studies implicating the hypothalamus, vagus and brainstem as key target sites. Functional imaging in humans has confirmed that PYY3-36 activates brainstem and hypothalamic regions. The greatest effects, however, were observed within the orbitofrontal cortex, a brain region involved in reward processing. Further evidence for a hedonic role for PYY3-36 is supported by rodent studies showing that PYY3-36 decreases the motivation to seek high-fat food. Rodent studies using selective Y2 agonists and strategies combining PYY3-36/Y2 agonists with other anorectic agents have revealed increased anorectic and weight-reducing effects. Peptide YY plays a role in the integrative regulation of metabolism. The emerging hedonic effects of peptide YY together with the weight-reducing effects observed in obese rodents suggest that targeting the peptide YY system may offer a therapeutic strategy for obesity.

  11. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide and high-sensitivity troponin in the evaluation of acute chest pain of uncertain etiology. A PITAGORAS substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis, Juan; Bardají, Alfredo; Bosch, Xavier; Loma-Osorio, Pablo; Marín, Francisco; Sánchez, Pedro L; Calvo, Francisco; Avanzas, Pablo; Hernández, Carolina; Serrano, Silvia; Carratalá, Arturo; Barrabés, José A

    2013-07-01

    High-sensitivity troponin assays have improved the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome in patients presenting with chest pain and normal troponin levels as measured by conventional assays. Our aim was to investigate whether N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide provides additional information to troponin determination in these patients. A total of 398 patients, included in the PITAGORAS study, presenting to the emergency department with chest pain and normal troponin levels as measured by conventional assay in 2 serial samples (on arrival and 6 h to 8h later) were studied. The samples were also analyzed in a central laboratory for high-sensitivity troponin T (both samples) and for N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (second sample). The endpoints were diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome and the composite endpoint of in-hospital revascularization or a 30-day cardiac event. Acute coronary syndrome was adjudicated to 79 patients (20%) and the composite endpoint to 59 (15%). When the N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide quartile increased, the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome also increased (12%, 16%, 23% and 29%; P=.01), as did the risk of the composite endpoint (6%, 13%, 16% and 24%; P=.004). N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide elevation (>125ng/L) was associated with both endpoints (relative risk= 2.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-3.3; P=.02; relative risk=2.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-4.2; P=.004). However, in the multivariable models adjusted by clinical and electrocardiographic data, a predictive value was found for high-sensitivity T troponin but not for N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide. In low-risk patients with chest pain of uncertain etiology evaluated using high-sensitivity T troponin, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide does not contribute additional predictive value to diagnosis or the prediction of short-term outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights

  12. The Appetite-Inducing Peptide, Ghrelin, Induces Intracellular Store-Mediated Rises in Calcium in Addiction and Arousal-Related Laterodorsal Tegmental Neurons in Mouse Brain Slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauberg, Katrine; Kohlmeier, Kristi Anne

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin, a gut and brain peptide, has recently been shown to be involved in motivated behavior and regulation of the sleep and wakefulness cycle. The laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) is involved in appetitive behavior and control of the arousal state of an organism, and accordingly, behavioral...... actions of ghrelin could be mediated by direct cellular actions within this nucleus. Consistent with this interpretation, postsynaptically mediated depolarizing membrane actions of ghrelin on LDT neurons have been reported. Direct actions were ascribed solely to closure of a potassium conductance however...... this peptide has been shown in other cell types to lead to rises in calcium via release of calcium from intracellular stores. To determine whether ghrelin induced intracellular calcium rises in mouse LDT neurons, we conducted calcium imaging studies in LDT brain slices loaded with the calcium binding dye, Fura...

  13. Effect of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide-assisted interventional treatment on prognosis of acute myocardial infarction patients complicated with cardiogenic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Zhou Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the effect of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide-assisted interventional treatment on prognosis of acute myocardial infarction patients complicated with cardiogenic shock. Methods: A total of 112 cases of inpatients treated in Cardiology Department of our hospital from March 2013 to March 2015 were selected, all of whom had acute myocardial infarction within 12 hours of onset and received direct PCI treatment. They were divided into observation group and control group according to random number table, each group with 56 cases, control group received conventional interventional treatment and observation group received recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide-assisted interventional treatment. Then differences of regional myocardial deformability, myocardial enzyme spectrum indicators, brain natriuretic peptide and inflammatory factors, blood sugar and stress hormones as well as myocardial infarction prognosis-associated indexes, etc, between two groups after treatment were compared. Results: After treatment, LVEF, SRs, SRe and Sra levels of observation group were higher than those of control group, WMSI level was lower than that of control group; serum myocardial enzyme spectrum indicators CK, CK-MB, AST and LDH values were lower than those of control group; serum BNP, CRP, TNF-α and IL-6 levels were lower than those of control group; serum cortisol, growth hormone and glucagon levels were lower than those of control group, insulin level was higher than that of control group; FT3 and IGF-1 levels were higher than those of control group, sPLA2 and Hcy levels were lower than those of control group. Conclusion: Recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide-assisted interventional treatment for acute myocardial infarction patients complicated with cardiogenic shock can reduce myocardial function injury, protect normal myocardial function and optimize patients’ long-term prognosis; it has active clinical significance.

  14. N-terminal-pro-brain natriuretic peptide: a guide for early targeted indomethacin therapy for patent ductus arteriosus in preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuntnarumit, Pracha; Chongkongkiat, Prapaiporn; Khositseth, Anant

    2011-09-01

    To determine whether N-terminal-pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) level could be an effective guide for early targeted indomethacin therapy for patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in preterm infants. An interventional study involved preterm infants, born at guide for early targeted indomethacin therapy reduced later onset of hsPDA and the number of unnecessary exposures to indomethacin. © 2011 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2011 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  15. Blood N-terminal Pro-brain Natriuretic Peptide and Interleukin-17 for Distinguishing Incomplete Kawasaki Disease from Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling; Chen, Yuanling; Zhong, Shiling; Li, Yunyan; Dai, Xiahua; Di, Yazhen

    2015-06-01

    To explore the diagnostic value of blood N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and interleukin-17(IL-17) for incomplete Kawasaki disease. Patients with Kawasaki disease, Incomplete Kawasaki disease and unclear infectious fever were included in this retrospective study. Their clinical features, and laboratory test results of blood NT-proBNP and IL-17 were collected and compared. 766 patients with complete clinical information were recruited, consisting of 291 cases of Kawasaki disease, 74 cases of incomplete Kawasaki disease, and 401 cases of unclear infectious diseases. When the consistency with indicator 2 and 3 in Kawasaki disease diagnosis criteria was assessed with blood IL-17 ?11.55 pg/mL and blood NT-proBNP ? 225.5 pg/dL as the criteria, the sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing incomplete Kawasaki disease and infectious diseases reached 86.5% and 94.8%, respectively. When we chose the consistency with indicator 1 and 2 in Kawasaki disease diagnosis criteria, the appearance of decrustation and/or the BCG erythema, blood IL-17 ?11.55 pg/mL and blood NT-Pro BNP ?225.5 pg/dL as the criteria, the sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing incomplete Kawasaki disease and infectious diseases was 43.2% and 100%, respectively. Blood NT-proBNP and IL-17 are useful laboratory indicators for distinguishing incomplete Kawasaki disease and infectious diseases at the early stage.

  16. Clinical value of early serum procalcitonin, C-reactive protein and brain natriuretic peptide on prognosis of patients with sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-li JIANG

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore clinical value of early serum procalcitonin (PCT, C-reactive protein (CRP and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP on the prognosis of patients with sepsis. Methods The data of 45 ICU patients with sepsis in General Hospital of PLA admitted from Jan. 2011 to Jan. 2014 were retrospectively analyzed, and they were divided into survival group (n=36 and death group (n=9. The difference between serum PCT, CRP and BNP levels on the first day of their admission between the two groups was compared, and the relationship between the PCT, CRP, BNP levels and APACHEⅡ scores was also analyzed. Finally the positive predictive value of these biomarkers was assessed by using ROC curve. Results Significant differences were found in the serum BNP level and APACHE Ⅱ score between the two groups on the first day of their admission (P0.05, also the serum PCT and CRP levels showed no significant correlation with the APACHEⅡ score (P>0.05. Analysis of ROC curve showed that the sensitivity and specificity of serum BNP level showed a statistically significant predictive value in prognosis of sepsis (P=0.002, AUC=0.775, 95%CI: 0.626-0.886. Conclusion The serum BNP level may be used as a critical parameter in predicting the prognosis of sepsis. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.07.06

  17. Comparison of usefulness of tissue Doppler imaging versus brain natriuretic peptide for differentiation of constrictive pericardial disease from restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Partho P; Krishnamoorthy, Vijay K; Abhayaratna, Walter P; Korinek, Josef; Belohlavek, Marek; Sundt, Thoralf M; Chandrasekaran, Krishnaswamy; Seward, James B; Tajik, A Jamil; Khandheria, Bijoy K

    2008-08-01

    Brain (B-type) natriuretic peptide (BNP) and tissue Doppler imaging may distinguish restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCMP) from idiopathic constrictive pericardial disease (CP). However, their comparative efficacy is unknown for patients with CP from secondary causes (e.g., surgery or radiotherapy). We compared the efficacy of tissue Doppler imaging and BNP for differentiation of RCMP (n = 15) and CP (n = 16) were compared. BNP was higher in patients with RCMP than CP (p = 0.008), but the groups overlapped, particularly for BNP RCMP (139 +/- 50 vs 595 +/- 499 pg/ml; p RCMP (293 +/- 69 vs 595 +/- 499 pg/ml; p = 0.1). Patients with CP and RCMP had less overlap in early diastolic and isovolumic contraction tissue Doppler imaging velocities compared with BNP, with clear separation of groups evident with mean early diastolic annular velocities (averaged from 4 walls). Early diastolic tissue Doppler imaging velocity was superior to BNP for differentiation of CP and RCMP (area under the curve 0.97 vs 0.76, respectively; p = 0.01). In conclusion, mean early diastolic mitral annular velocity correctly distinguished CP from RCMP even when there was a large overlap of BNP between the 2 groups.

  18. Elevated pro-brain natriuretic peptide, troponin T and malnutrition inflammatory score in chronic hemodialysis patients with overt cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimarchi, Hernán; Muryan, Alexis; Campolo-Girard, Vicente; Dicugno, Mariana; Barucca, Nanci; Lombi, Fernando; Young, Pablo; Pomeranz, Vanesa; Forrester, Mariano; Alonso, Mirta; Iriarte, Romina; Díaz, Marisa Luisa; Lindholm, Bengt

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the relationship between pro-brain natriuretic peptide (pro-BNP), troponin T (TropT) and nutritional status. A total of 48 chronic hemodialysis patients were grouped according to the presence [group A (GA); n = 24] or not [group B (GB)] of cardiovascular disease. Compared to GB subjects, GA subjects were older, had been on hemodialysis for a longer period and had higher prevalences of vascular grafts, hypertension and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) [GA vs. GB: 1.1 (range 0.1-32.9) vs. 0.4 (0-28.1) mg/dl; p = 0.028], malnutrition inflammatory score (MIS) (GA vs. GB: 7.50 vs. 4.00; p = 0.001), pro-BNP [GA vs. GB: 6,760 (601-103,200) vs. 686 (75-83,700) pg/ml; p GB: 0.3650 (0.011-0.199) vs. 0.010 (0.0-0.290) ng/ml; p = 0.002]. Pro-BNP correlated with TropT (rho 0.539; p Pro-BNP levels were lower in GB patients as the body mass index increased; the opposite occurred in GA. Patients with cardiovascular disease had elevated pro-BNP and TropT levels. In patients without cardiovascular disease, malnutrition and inflammation were associated with vascular prostheses, while pro-BNP was lower in obese patients. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Liposomes bi-functionalized with phosphatidic acid and an ApoE-derived peptide affect A beta aggregation features and cross the blood-brain-barrier: Implications for therapy of Alzheimer disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bana, l.; Minniti, S.; Sesana, S.; Zambelli, V.; Cagnotto, A.; Orlando, A.; Cazzaniga, M.; Zwart, R.; Scheper, W.; Masserini, M.; Re, F.

    2014-01-01

    Targeting amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) within the brain is a strategy actively sought for therapy of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated the ability of liposomes bi-functionalized with phosphatidic acid and with a modified ApoE-derived peptide (mApoE-PA-LIP) to affect Aβ aggregation/disaggregation

  20. Effect of compound danshen dropping pill on angina as well as serum c-reactive protein (CRP and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Ye

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of Compound Danshen Dropping Pill on angina as well as serum C-reactive protein (CRP and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP so as to provide reference for clinical treatment. Methods: Patients with angina treated in our hospital from February 2010 to August 2015 were enrolled in this research. The effect of Compound Danshen Dropping Pill on angina as well as serum C reaction protein (CRP and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP were analyzed. 110 cases of healthy subjects receiving physical examination in our hospital during the same period were taken as control. Results: After treatment, the duration of angina significantly decreased, the frequency of angina pectoris attack significantly decreased, and serum inflammatory factors IL1, IL2 and IL6 as well as Hcy, TG, TC and LDL levels significantly decreased while HDL, folic acid and vitamin B12 levels significantly increased, and compared with before treatment, differences were with notable statistical significance. Conclusion: Compound Danshen Dropping Pill can effectively treat angina, which is related to its regulation of serum C-reactive protein, brain natriuretic peptide and inflammatory factor levels.

  1. Analysis of peptides in the brain and corpora cardiaca-corpora allata of the honey bee, Apis mellifera using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audsley, Neil; Weaver, Robert J

    2006-03-01

    The neuropeptide profiles and diversity of the brain and retrocerebral organs (corpora cardiaca-corpora allata; CC-CA) of adult workers of the honey bee Apis mellifera carnica (dark European strain) were investigated using a combination of HPLC and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) with post-source decay (PSD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation. Using evidence from genomic sources, including BLAST searches of the honey bee genome, comparisons with other species and de novo sequencing by PSD and CID fragmentation, a total of 13 mass ions could be assigned to peptides predicted from the A. mellifera genomic database. Peptides positively identified were A. mellifera tachykinin-related peptides 3 and 4 (APMGFQGMRa; APMGFYGTRa) and leucomyosuppressin (pEDVDHVFLRFa). Peptides tentatively identified were A. mellifera tachykinin-related peptides 2 and 5 (ALMGFQGVRa; ARMGFHGMRa), A. mellifera allatostatins 2, 3 and 4 (GRDYSFGLa; RQYSFGLa; GRQPYSFGLa), A1-SIFamide (AYRKPPFNGSIFa), Q1-leucomyosuppressin (QDVDHVFLRFa) and A. mellifera pyrokinins PK 1, PK 2 and Q1-PK 2 (TSQDITSGMWFGPRLa; pEITQFTPRLa; QITQFTPRLa). Allatostatins, tachykinin-related peptides and A1-SIFamide were not detected in CC-CA extract, which appears to contain predominantly leucomyosuppressin, Q1-leucomyosuppressin, PK 1, PK 2, Q1-PK 2 and some unidentified masses. No ion signal was detected that would correspond to the hypertrehalosaemic peptide (=Manse-AKH), which has been isolated from the Italian race of the honey bee (A. mellifera ligustica), but not from A. mellifera carnica.

  2. Brain natriuretic peptide in acute myocardial infarction: a marker of cardio-renal interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moltrasio, Marco; Cosentino, Nicola; De Metrio, Monica; Rubino, Mara; Cabiati, Angelo; Milazzo, Valentina; Discacciati, Andrea; Marana, Ivana; Bonomi, Alice; Veglia, Fabrizio; Lauri, Gianfranco; Marenzi, Giancarlo

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac and renal functions are major independent predictors of outcomes in both ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). As B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) seems to be a major mediator in the cross-talk between heart and kidneys, we aimed at evaluating its capacity to reflect cardiac and renal function in patients with STEMI and NSTEMI. We measured BNP plasma levels at hospital admission in 619 patients with STEMI (n = 346) and NSTEMI (n = 273), grouped according to left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF; > or ≤40%) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR; > or ≤ 60 ml/min/1.73 m). Median BNP values were 82 (38-186), 121 (40-342), 219 (80-685), and 474 (124-1263) pg/ml in patients with normal LVEF and eGFR (n = 347), with LVEF 40% or less and eGFR higher than 60 ml/min/1.73 m (n = 120), with LVEF higher than 40% and eGFR 60 ml/min/1.73 m or less (n = 86), and with combined LVEF and eGFR reductions (n = 66), respectively (P < 0.0001). At general linear model, both LVEF higher than 40% (P < 0.0001) and eGFR 60 ml/min/1.73 m or less (P < 0.0001) independently predicted BNP values. At multivariable analysis, BNP, LVEF 40% or less, and eGFR 60 ml/min/1.73 m or less were found to be independent predictors of the combined end point of in-hospital death, cardiogenic shock, need for renal replacement therapy, or mechanical ventilation (P = 0.003; P < 0.0001; P = 0.01, respectively). BNP plasma levels are closely related to LVEF and eGFR at hospital admission, in both STEMI and NSTEMI patients. Future studies should investigate whether BNP levels can summarize in a single parameter the prognostic information provided separately by cardiac and renal dysfunction.

  3. The proton permeability of self-assembled polymersomes and their neuroprotection by enhancing a neuroprotective peptide across the blood-brain barrier after modification with lactoferrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuan; Jiang, Xinguo; Gong, Shuyu; Feng, Liang; Zhong, Yanqiang; Pang, Zhiqing

    2014-02-01

    Biotherapeutics such as peptides possess strong potential for the treatment of intractable neurological disorders. However, because of their low stability and the impermeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), biotherapeutics are difficult to transport into brain parenchyma via intravenous injection. Herein, we present a novel poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) polymersome-based nanomedicine with self-assembled bilayers, which was functionalized with lactoferrin (Lf-POS) to facilitate the transport of a neuroprotective peptide into the brain. The apparent diffusion coefficient (D*) of H+ through the polymersome membrane was 5.659 × 10-26 cm2 s-1, while that of liposomes was 1.017 × 10-24 cm2 s-1. The stability of the polymersome membrane was much higher than that of liposomes. The uptake of polymersomes by mouse brain capillary endothelial cells proved that the optimal density of lactoferrin was 101 molecules per polymersome. Fluorescence imaging indicated that Lf101-POS was effectively transferred into the brain. In pharmacokinetics, compared with transferrin-modified polymersomes and cationic bovine serum albumin-modified polymersomes, Lf-POS obtained the greatest BBB permeability surface area and percentage of injected dose per gram (%ID per g). Furthermore, Lf-POS holding S14G-humanin protected against learning and memory impairment induced by amyloid-β25-35 in rats. Western blotting revealed that the nanomedicine provided neuroprotection against over-expression of apoptotic proteins exhibiting neurofibrillary tangle pathology in neurons. The results indicated that polymersomes can be exploited as a promising non-invasive nanomedicine capable of mediating peptide therapeutic delivery and controlling the release of drugs to the central nervous system.

  4. Hypocretin and brain β-amyloid peptide interactions in cognitive disorders and narcolepsy

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    Yves A Dauvilliers

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine relationships between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF Alzheimer’ disease (AD biomarkers and hypocretin-1 levels in patients with cognitive abnormalities and hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy-cataplexy (NC, estimate diagnostic accuracy, and determine correlations with sleep disturbances. Background: Sleep disturbances are frequent in AD. Interactions between brain β-amyloid (Aβ aggregation and a wake-related neurotransmitter hypocretin have been reported in a mouse model of AD. Methods: Ninety-one cognitive patients (37 AD, 16 mild cognitive impairment – MCI that converts to AD, 38 other dementias and 15 elderly patients with NC were recruited. Patients were diagnosed blind to CSF results. CSF A42, total tau, ptau181, and hypocretin-1 were measured. Sleep disturbances were assessed with questionnaires in 32 cognitive patients. Results: Lower CSF Aβ42 but higher tau and P-tau levels were found in AD and MCI compared to other dementias. CSF hypocretin-1 levels were higher in patients with MCI due to AD compared to other dementias, with a similar tendency for patients with advanced AD. CSF hypocretin-1 was significantly and independently associated with AD/MCI due to AD, with an OR of 2.70 after full adjustment, exceeding that for Aβ42. Aβ42 correlated positively with hypocretin-1 levels in advanced stage AD. No association was found between sleep disturbances and CSF biomarkers. No patients with NC achieved pathological cutoffs for Aβ42, with respectively one and four patients with NC above tau and P-tau cutoffs and no correlations between hypocretin-1 and other biomarkers. Conclusions: Our results suggest a pathophysiological relationship between Aβ42 and hypocretin-1 in the AD process, with higher CSF hypocretin-1 levels in early disease stages. Further longitudinal studies are needed to validate these biomarker interactions and to determine the cause-effect relationship and the role of wake/sleep behavior in amyloid

  5. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels associated with severe hand, foot and mouth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hui-Ling; Zhang, Yu-Feng; Li, Ya-Ping; Zhang, Yu; Xie, Yan; Wang, Jun; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Dang, Shuang-Suo

    2016-10-19

    Severe hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is sometimes associated with serious complications such as acute heart failure that can cause substantial child mortality. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is a sensitive and specific biomarker of congestive heart failure. The aim of this study was to use plasma NT-proBNP levels to establish the severity of childhood HFMD. A retrospective study was performed in 128 Chinese patients with severe HFMD and 88 patients with mild HFMD treated between January 2014 and October 2015. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were used to analyze the risk factors for severe HFMD. NT-proBNP levels were analyzed in 128 severe HFMD patients, and the predictive value of NT-proBNP was assessed by receiver operating characteristic analyses. Multivariate analysis controlling for several potential confounders showed that enterovirus 71 infection [odds ratio (OR) 19.944, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 6.492-61.271], peripheral WBC count (OR 3.428, 95 % CI 1.186-9.914), fasting glucose (OR 19.428, 95 % CI 2.236-168.784), procalcitonin (OR 9.084, 95 % CI 3.462-23.837, and NT-proBNP (>125 pg/mL) (OR 16.649, 95 % CI 4.731-58.585) were each associated with the severity of HFMD. The 45 dead severe patients had higher pre-procedural levels of NT-proBNP than the 83 cured severe patients (12776 ± 13115 versus 1435 ± 4201 pg/mL, P marker for predicting the severity and mortality of HFMD.

  6. N-terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP as a noninvasive marker for restrictive syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mady

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Constrictive pericarditis (CP and restrictive cardiomyopathy share many similarities in both their clinical and hemodynamic characteristics and N-terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP is a sensitive marker of cardiac diastolic dysfunction. The objectives of the present study were to determine whether serum NT-proBNP was high in patients with endomyocardial fibrosis (EMF and CP, and to investigate how this relates to diastolic dysfunction. Thirty-three patients were divided into two groups: CP (16 patients and EMF (17 patients. The control group consisted of 30 healthy individuals. Patients were evaluated by bidimensional echocardiography, with restriction syndrome evaluated by pulsed Doppler of the mitral flow and serum NT-proBNP measured by immunoassay and detected by electrochemiluminescence. Spearman correlation coefficient was used to analyze the association between log NT-proBNP and echocardiographic parameters. Log NT-proBNP was significantly higher (P < 0.05 in CP patients (log mean: 2.67 pg/mL; 95%CI: 2.43-2.92 log pg/mL and in EMF patients (log mean: 2.91 pg/mL; 95%CI: 2.70-3.12 log pg/mL compared with the control group (log mean: 1.45; 95%CI: 1.32-1.60 log pg/mL. There were no statistical differences between EMF and CP patients (P = 0.689 in terms of NT-proBNP. The NT-proBNP log tended to correlate with peak velocity of the E wave (r = 0.439; P = 0.060, but not with A wave (r = -0.399; P = 0.112. Serum NT-proBNP concentration can be used as a marker to detect the presence of diastolic dysfunction in patients with restrictive syndrome; however, serum NT-proBNP levels cannot be used to differentiate restrictive cardiomyopathy from CP.

  7. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in the assessment of respiratory distress in term neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic-Sovtic, Gordana; Kosutic, Jovan; Jankovic, Borisav; Bojanin, Dragana; Sovtic, Aleksandar; Radojicic, Zoran; Rakonjac, M Zorica

    2014-06-01

    N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is used as a biomarker to differentiate congestive heart failure from lung disease in adults and children. The clinical significance of its use in term neonates has not yet been extensively studied. NT-proBNP level was measured in 62 term neonates admitted for respiratory distress (RD): 38 with congenital heart disease (CHD) and 24 with pulmonary disease. The control group consisted of 28 healthy neonates. Findings of auscultation, chest radiography, Silverman-Anderson score and echocardiography were recorded for each patient. Blood samples for measuring NT-proBNP were collected on admission, when blood sampling was indicated for the clinical management of the newborn. In the control group NT-proBNP was significantly higher during the first week of life compared to the rest of the neonatal period (P < 0.001). The RD group, regardless of etiology, had significantly higher NT-proBNP than the control group (P < 0.001). Neonates with more severe RD had significantly higher NT-proBNP (P = 0.002). No significant difference was found between the RD group with CHD and those with pulmonary disease. Neonates with CHD and myocardial hypocontractility had significantly higher NT-proBNP than those with normal contractility (P = 0.022). Term neonates with RD have significantly higher NT-proBNP than healthy neonates. A single measurement of NT-proBNP level cannot be used as the sole biomarker for distinguishing between cardiac and pulmonary cause of RD in term neonates. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  8. Maternal hypertrophy and diastolic disfunction and brain natriuretic peptide concentration in early and late Pre-Eclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, V T M; Zanati, S G; PeraÇoli, M T S; Poiati, J R; Romão-Veiga, M; PeraÇoli, J C; Thilaganathan, B

    2017-04-23

    Pre-eclampsia is associated with maternal cardiac remodelling and diastolic dysfunction. The aim of this study was to assess and compare maternal left ventricular structure and diastolic function and Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) levels in women with early-onset pre-eclampsia (pre-eclampsia (≥34weeks of gestation). A prospective, cross-sectional observational study was performed in 30 women with early-onset pre-eclampsia, 32 with late-onset pre-eclampsia and 23 normotensive controls. Maternal cardiac structure and diastolic function as assessed by echocardiography and plasma levels of BNP were measured by enzyme immunoassay. Pre-eclampsia was associated with an increased left ventricular mass index and relative wall thickness in early-onset pre-eclampsia compared with late-onset pre-eclampsia and normotensive controls. The prevalence of concentric hypertrophy (40%) and diastolic dysfunction (23%) was also significantly higher in early-onset pre-eclampsia than in late-onset pre-eclampsia (16% for both, all p pre-eclampsia (p pre-eclampsia has more severe cardiac impairment than late-onset pre-eclampsia as evidenced by increased prevalence of concentric hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction and high concentrations BNP. These findings suggest that early-onset pre-eclampsia causes greater myocardial damage increasing the risk of both peripartum and postpartum cardiovascular morbidity. Although these cardiovascular effects are easily identified by echocardiographic parameters and measuring BNP, further studies are needed to assess their clinical utility. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Chagas cardiomyopathy: the potential of diastolic dysfunction and brain natriuretic peptide in the early identification of cardiac damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Garcia-Alvarez

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Chagas disease remains a major cause of mortality in several countries of Latin America and has become a potential public health problem in non-endemic countries as a result of migration flows. Cardiac involvement represents the main cause of mortality, but its diagnosis is still based on nonspecific criteria with poor sensitivity. Early identification of patients with cardiac involvement is desirable, since early treatment may improve prognosis. This study aimed to assess the role of diastolic dysfunction, abnormal myocardial strain and elevated brain natriuretic peptide (BNP in the early identification of cardiac involvement in Chagas disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fifty-four patients divided into 3 groups--group 1 (undetermined form: positive serology without ECG or 2D-echocardiographic abnormalities; N = 32, group 2 (typical ECG abnormalities of Chagas disease but normal 2D-echocardiography; N = 14, and group 3 (regional wall motion abnormalities, left ventricular [LV] end-diastolic diameter >55 mm or LV ejection fraction 37 pg/ml were noted in 0%, 13%, 29% and 63% in controls and groups 1 to 3, respectively. Half of patients in the undetermined form had impaired relaxation patterns, whereas half of patients with ECG abnormalities suggestive of Chagas cardiomyopathy had normal diastolic function. In group 1, BNP levels were statistically higher in patients with diastolic dysfunction as compared to those with normal diastolic function (27 ± 26 vs. 11 ± 8 pg/ml, p = 0.03. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, the combination of diastolic function and BNP measurement adds important information that could help to better stratify patients with Chagas disease.

  10. Non-linear Equation using Plasma Brain Natriuretic Peptide Levels to Predict Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients with Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Hiroki; Suwa, Hideaki; Nakano, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Mari; Imazu, Miki; Hasegawa, Takuya; Takahama, Hiroyuki; Amaki, Makoto; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Anzai, Toshihisa; Mochizuki, Naoki; Ishii, Akira; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Asakura, Masanori; Washio, Takashi; Kitakaze, Masafumi

    2016-11-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is the most effective predictor of outcomes in chronic heart failure (CHF). This study sought to determine the qualitative relationship between the BNP levels at discharge and on the day of cardiovascular events in CHF patients. We devised a mathematical probabilistic model between the BNP levels at discharge (y) and on the day (t) of cardiovascular events after discharge for 113 CHF patients (Protocol I). We then prospectively evaluated this model on another set of 60 CHF patients who were readmitted (Protocol II). P(t|y) was the probability of cardiovascular events occurring after >t, the probability on t was given as p(t|y) = -dP(t|y)/dt, and p(t|y) = pP(t|y) = αyβP(t|y), along with p = αyβ (α and β were constant); the solution was p(t|y) = αyβ exp(-αyβt). We fitted this equation to the data set of Protocol I using the maximum likelihood principle, and we obtained the model p(t|y) = 0.000485y0.24788 exp(-0.000485y0.24788t). The cardiovascular event-free rate was computed as P(t) = 1/60Σi=1,…,60 exp(-0.000485yi0.24788t), based on this model and the BNP levels yi in a data set of Protocol II. We confirmed no difference between this model-based result and the actual event-free rate. In conclusion, the BNP levels showed a non-linear relationship with the day of occurrence of cardiovascular events in CHF patients.

  11. TRH-like peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bílek, R; Bičíková, M; Šafařík, L

    2011-01-01

    TRH-like peptides are characterized by substitution of basic amino acid histidine (related to authentic TRH) with neutral or acidic amino acid, like glutamic acid, phenylalanine, glutamine, tyrosine, leucin, valin, aspartic acid and asparagine. The presence of extrahypothalamic TRH-like peptides was reported in peripheral tissues including gastrointestinal tract, placenta, neural tissues, male reproductive system and certain endocrine tissues. Work deals with the biological function of TRH-like peptides in different parts of organisms where various mechanisms may serve for realisation of biological function of TRH-like peptides as negative feedback to the pituitary exerted by the TRH-like peptides, the role of pEEPam such as fertilization-promoting peptide, the mechanism influencing the proliferative ability of prostatic tissues, the neuroprotective and antidepressant function of TRH-like peptides in brain and the regulation of thyroid status by TRH-like peptides.

  12. Brain reward-system activation in response to anticipation and consumption of palatable food is altered by glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bloemendaal, L; Veltman, D J; Ten Kulve, J S; Groot, P F C; Ruhé, H G; Barkhof, F; Sloan, J H; Diamant, M; Ijzerman, R G

    2015-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that food intake reduction after glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor activation is mediated through brain areas regulating anticipatory and consummatory food reward. As part of a larger study, we determined the effects of GLP-1 receptor activation on brain responses to anticipation and receipt of chocolate milk versus a tasteless solution, using functional MRI (fMRI). Obese subjects with type 2 diabetes, and obese and lean subjects with normoglycaemia (n = 48) underwent three fMRI sessions at separate visits with intravenous infusion of the GLP-1 receptor agonist exenatide, exenatide with prior GLP-1 receptor blockade by exendin-9-39 or placebo, during somatostatin pituitary-pancreatic clamps. Body mass index negatively correlated with brain responses to receipt of chocolate milk and positively correlated with anticipation of receipt of chocolate milk in brain areas regulating reward, appetite and motivation. Exenatide increased brain responses to receipt of chocolate milk and decreased anticipation of receipt of chocolate milk compared with placebo, paralleled by reductions in food intake. Exendin-9-39 largely prevented these effects. Our findings show that GLP-1 receptor activation decreases anticipatory food reward, which may reduce cravings for food and increases consummatory food reward, which may prevent overeating. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Right and left cardiac function in HIV-infected patients investigated using radionuclide ventriculography and brain natriuretic peptide: a 5-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, U.S.; Lebech, A.M.; Gerstoft, J.

    2008-01-01

    ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), as well as measurement of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). Between July 2005 and January 2007, 63 patients (69%) agreed to participate in a follow-up study with a mean follow-up of 4.5 years. RESULTS: All patients had normal......OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to determine the incidence of myocardial dysfunction in an HIV-infected population receiving state-of-the-art treatment. METHODS: Between April 2001 and July 2002, 91 HIV-infected patients had a radionuclide ventriculography performed with determination of right...

  14. Delivery of siRNA silencing P-gp in peptide-functionalized nanoparticles causes efflux modulation at the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomes, Maria João; Kennedy, Patrick J; Martins, Susana

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Explore the use of transferrin-receptor peptide-functionalized nanoparticles (NPs) targeting blood-brain barrier (BBB) as siRNA carriers to silence P-glycoprotein (P-gp). MATERIALS & METHODS: Permeability experiments were assessed through a developed BBB cell-based model; P-gp mRNA expression...... was evaluated in vitro; rhodamine 123 permeability was assessed after cell monolayer treatment with siRNA NPs. RESULTS: Beyond their ability to improve siRNA permeability through the BBB by twofold, 96-h post-transfection, functionalized polymeric NPs successfully reduced P-gp mRNA expression up to 52...

  15. Effects of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide on renal function in patients with acute heart failure following myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanbo; Gu, Xinshun; Fan, Weize; Fan, Yanming; Li, Wei; Fu, Xianghua

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effect of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide (rhBNP) on renal function in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) following acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Consecutive patients with AHF following AMI were enrolled in this clinical trial. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to receive rhBNP (rhBNP group) or nitroglycerin (NIT group). Patients in the rhBNP group received rhBNP 0.15 μg /kg bolus injection after randomization followed by an adjusted-dose (0.0075-0.020 μg/kg/min) for 72 hours, while patients in NIT received infusion of nitroglycerin with an adjusted-dose (10-100 μg/kg/min) for 72 hours in NIT group. Standard clinical and laboratory data were collected. The levels of serum creatinine (SCr), urea, β-2 microglobulin and cystatin C were measured at baseline and repeated at the end of the 24, 48 and 72 hours after infusion. The primary end point was the incidence of acute renal dysfunction, which was defined as an increase in SCr > 0.5 mg/dl (> 44.2 μmol/L) or 25% above baseline SCr value. The occurrence of major adverse cardiac event (MACE) was followed up for 1 month. Of the 50 patients enrolled, 26 were randomly assigned to rhBNP and 24 to nitroglycerin (NIT). There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups (all P > 0.05). The baseline concentrations of SCr, urea, β-2 microglobulin and cystatin C at admission were similar in the two groups. However, the concentrations of SCr and urea were significantly higher in rhBNP group than those in NIT group at hour 24 and 48 after treatments (all P acute renal dysfuntion in rhBNP group was higher (9/26 vs. 2/24, P = 0.040). The results of multiple logistic regression found that the use of rhBNP was an independent predictor of acute renal dysfunction in patients with AHF following AMI (OR, 0.162; 95% CI, 0.029 to 0.909; P = 0.039). the incidence of acute renal dysfuntion in rhBNP group was higher, and the use of rhBNP was an

  16. Hospitalization and medical cost of patients with elevated serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiro Kitagawa

    Full Text Available Patients with heart failure (HF are reportedly at high risk for 'all-cause' re-hospitalization. A biomarker for HF, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP, enables to simply detect patients with possible HF (pHF. We examined the hospitalization and medical cost of Japanese patients detected by an elevated serum NT-proBNP, and also evaluated the effects of institutional team approaches for HF on their all-cause hospitalizations.We retrospectively extracted all adult patients with serum NT-proBNP ≥400 pg/ml measured between January and March 2012 in Hiroshima University Hospital as pHF-positive patients. We studied their all-cause hospitalization records during the past 3-year period. We also extracted all pHF-negative patients with NT-proBNP <400 pg/ml and studied as well. In the pHF-positive patients followed for 3 years after starting interprofessional team approaches to prevent the onset and exacerbation of HF in the hospital, we compared the hospitalization and medical cost between the 3-year periods before and after the start of the team approaches.We enrolled 432 pHF-positive and 485 pHF-negative patients with one or more hospitalization records. Compared to the pHF-negative patients, the pHF-positive patients had longer total hospitalization days (median [interquartile range], 30 [13-58] versus. 18 [8-39], p <0.0001 and higher total medical cost for hospitalizations (2.42 [1.07-5.08] versus. 1.80 [0.79-3.65] million yen, p <0.0001. A subset of 303 pHF-positive patients was followed for 3 years after starting the team approaches, and we found that both total hospitalization days (30 [13-57] to 8 [0-31] and medical cost for hospitalizations (2.59 [1.37-5.05] to 0.76 [0-2.38] million yen showed marked reduction in them.Patients with an elevated serum NT-proBNP have longer hospitalizations and higher costs for all-cause hospitalizations than those without. Institutional team approaches for HF may reduce them.

  17. brain natriuretic peptide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    like pneumonia and bronchiolitis can have similar clinical pictures. Therefore, BNP can have a valuable role in the acute care setting (6). Grading the severity of CHF is important for clinical as well as research purposes. The previous clinical scores used in infants like Ross score included up to ten variables, therefore.

  18. brain natriuretic peptide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Sixty seven patients were enrolled, 39 (58%) had congenital heart disease. (CHD), 27 (32%) had rheumatic heart disease (RHD), and seven (10%) had dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). ... Echo-cardiographic (echo) scores were designed according to the type of cardiac disease (Table2). The maximum score is six.

  19. Cloning and expression of genes enocoding antimicrobial peptides and bradykinin from the skin and brain of Oki Tago's brown frog, Rana tagoi okiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazato, Shoro; Conlon, J Michael; Iwamuro, Shawichi

    2010-08-01

    Previous studies led to the isolation from skin extracts of Oki Tago's brown frog, Rana tagoi okiensis of five antimicrobial peptides belonging to the brevinin-1 (brevinin-1TOa), temporin (temporin-TOa and -TOb), and ranatuerin-2 (ranatuerin-2TOa and -2TOb) families, and bradykinin (BK) identical to mammalian BK. Using the reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we have now cloned from skin total RNA preparations cDNAs encoding biosynthetic precursors of brevinin-1TOa and brevinin-1TOb (containing the substitution Gly(1)-->Val), temporin-TOa and -TOb, and ranatuerin-2TOa and -2TOb. In addition, three cDNA clones encoding preprobradykinins were obtained that contained either one, two, or three tandem repeats of the sequence of BK followed by the sequence of [Thr(6)]-BK. In tissue expression analyses, preprobrevinin-1, preprotemporin, and preproranatuerin-2 gene transcripts were detected at higher levels in brain compared with peripheral tissues (heart, small intestine, kidney, liver lung, skeletal muscle, stomach, and testis). RT-PCR of brain RNA resulted in the amplification of cDNAs encoding ranatuerin-2TOc and ranatuerin-2TOd that contained the amino acid substitutions Lys(6)-->Arg and Ala(14)-->Thr, respectively compared with ranatuerin-2TOb. cDNAs encoding preprobrevinin-1TOa and preprotemporin-TOa were amplified from brain RNA as well as a second preprotemporin cDNA that contained a 10-nucleotide insertion that introduced a frame shift resulting in a premature stop codon. A cDNA encoding a novel peptide, DK25 (DVNDLKNLCAKTHNLLPMCAMFGKK) was amplified from brain RNA but neither DK25 nor its putative post-translationally modified form, DF22-amide (DVNDLKNLCAKTHNLLPMCAMF.NH(2)) displayed antimicrobial or hemolytic activities. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Nutrient-Responsive Hormone CCHamide-2 Controls Growth by Regulating Insulin-like Peptides in the Brain of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Sano

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The coordination of growth with nutritional status is essential for proper development and physiology. Nutritional information is mostly perceived by peripheral organs before being relayed to the brain, which modulates physiological responses. Hormonal signaling ensures this organ-to-organ communication, and the failure of endocrine regulation in humans can cause diseases including obesity and diabetes. In Drosophila melanogaster, the fat body (adipose tissue has been suggested to play an important role in coupling growth with nutritional status. Here, we show that the peripheral tissue-derived peptide hormone CCHamide-2 (CCHa2 acts as a nutrient-dependent regulator of Drosophila insulin-like peptides (Dilps. A BAC-based transgenic reporter revealed strong expression of CCHa2 receptor (CCHa2-R in insulin-producing cells (IPCs in the brain. Calcium imaging of brain explants and IPC-specific CCHa2-R knockdown demonstrated that peripheral-tissue derived CCHa2 directly activates IPCs. Interestingly, genetic disruption of either CCHa2 or CCHa2-R caused almost identical defects in larval growth and developmental timing. Consistent with these phenotypes, the expression of dilp5, and the release of both Dilp2 and Dilp5, were severely reduced. Furthermore, transcription of CCHa2 is altered in response to nutritional levels, particularly of glucose. These findings demonstrate that CCHa2 and CCHa2-R form a direct link between peripheral tissues and the brain, and that this pathway is essential for the coordination of systemic growth with nutritional availability. A mammalian homologue of CCHa2-R, Bombesin receptor subtype-3 (Brs3, is an orphan receptor that is expressed in the islet β-cells; however, the role of Brs3 in insulin regulation remains elusive. Our genetic approach in Drosophila melanogaster provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, that bombesin receptor signaling with its endogenous ligand promotes insulin production.

  1. A new brain metalloendopeptidase which degrades the Alzheimer ß-amyloid 1-40 peptide producing soluble fragments without neurotoxic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.M. Carvalho

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available A new metalloendopeptidase was purified to apparent homogeneity from a homogenate of normal human brain using successive steps of chromatography on DEAE-Trisacryl, hydroxylapatite and Sephacryl S-200. The purified enzyme cleaved the Gly33-Leu34 bond of the 25-35 neurotoxic sequence of the Alzheimer ß-amyloid 1-40 peptide producing soluble fragments without neurotoxic effects. This enzyme activity was only inhibited by divalent cation chelators such as EDTA, EGTA and o-phenanthroline (1 mM and was insensitive to phosphoramidon and captopril (1 µM concentration, specific inhibitors of neutral endopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.11 and angiotensin-converting enzyme (EC 3.4.15.1, respectively. The high affinity of this human brain endopeptidase for ß-amyloid 1-40 peptide (Km = 5 µM suggests that it may play a physiological role in the degradation of this substance produced by normal cellular metabolism. It may also be hypothesized that the abnormal accumulation of the amyloid ß-protein in Alzheimer's disease may be initiated by a defect or an inactivation of this enzyme.

  2. [Protein and RNA concentration in the supraoptic nucleus of the rat brain during sleep induced by delta-hypnogenic peptide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demin, N N; Karmanova, I G; Maksimuk, V F; Rubinskaia, N L

    1980-01-01

    It has been shown that specific sleep induced by suboccipital injection of a synthetic delta-hypnogen peptide (delta-sleep inducing peptide, according to M. Monnier) is not accompanied in rats by accumulation of proteins and RNA in the supraoptic nuclear glia--the anabolic process characteristic for natural sleep. At the same time, during this artificial sleep protein concentration in the cytoplasm of the neurones in this nucleus increased due to the corresponding reduction of cytoplasmic volume which is absent during natural sleep. These phenomena, observed during the sleep induced by delta-hypnogen peptide, are similar to those described during phylogenetically more ancient type of rest, i. e. cataleptiform immobility, which is typical of the lower vertebrates only.

  3. Urine albumin/creatinine ratio, high sensitivity C-reactive protein and N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide--three new cardiovascular risk markers--do they improve risk prediction and influence treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Michael H; Sehestedt, Thomas; Lyngbaek, Stig

    2010-01-01

    In order to prioritize limited health resources in a time of increasing demands optimal cardiovascular risk stratification is essential. We tested the additive prognostic value of 3 relatively new, but established cardiovascular risk markers: N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (Nt-proBNP), ......In order to prioritize limited health resources in a time of increasing demands optimal cardiovascular risk stratification is essential. We tested the additive prognostic value of 3 relatively new, but established cardiovascular risk markers: N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (Nt...... of 48% with extremely high cardiovascular risk who should be referred for specialist care to optimize treatment....

  4. Some Brain Peptides Regulating the Secretion of Digestive Enzymes in the Indian Meal Moth, Plodia Interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sajjadian, SeyedeMinoo; Hosseininaveh, Vahid; Jahromi, Khalil Talebi

    2014-01-01

    .... The brain extract showed increasing dose-dependent effects on alpha -amylase, alpha -glucosidase, beta -glucosidase, alpha -galactosidase, beta -galactosidase, and trypsin secretion in the larval midgut...

  5. Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) enhances neurogenesis and neurite outgrowth of immature neurons in adult mice by up-regulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Shi-Wei; Zhang, Yue; Wu, Xue-Fei; Peng, Yan; Cao, Zhen; Ge, Bi-Ying; Wang, Xi; Wu, Qiong; Lin, Jin-Tao; Zhang, Wan-Qin; Li, Shao; Zhao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) is a component purified from Buthus martensii Karsch scorpion venom. Although scorpions and their venom have been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) to treat chronic neurological disorders, the underlying mechanisms of these treatments remain unknown. We applied SVHRP in vitro and in vivo to understand its effects on the neurogenesis and maturation of adult immature neurons and explore associated molecular mechanisms. SVHRP administration increased the number of 5-bromo-2'-dexoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells, BrdU-positive/neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN)-positive neurons, and polysialylated-neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM)-positive immature neurons in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ) of hippocampus. Furthermore immature neurons incubated with SVHRP-pretreated astrocyte-conditioned medium exhibited significantly increased neurite length compared with those incubated with normal astrocyte-conditioned medium. This neurotrophic effect was further confirmed in vivo by detecting an increased average single area and whole area of immature neurons in the SGZ, SVZ and olfactory bulb (OB) in the adult mouse brain. In contrast to normal astrocyte-conditioned medium, higher concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) but not nerve growth factor (NGF) or glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was detected in the conditioned medium of SVHRP-pretreated astrocytes, and blocking BDNF using anti-BDNF antibodies eliminated these SVHRP-dependent neurotrophic effects. In SVHRP treated mouse brain, more glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells were detected. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry revealed increased numbers of GFAP/BDNF double-positive cells, which agrees with the observed changes in the culture system. This paper describes novel effects of scorpion venom-originated peptide on the stem cells and suggests the potential therapeutic values of SVHRP.

  6. Peptide derived from HIV-1 TAT protein destabilizes a monolayer of endothelial cells in an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier and allows permeation of high molecular weight proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Itzik; Sasson, Keren; Teichberg, Vivian I; Schnaider-Beeri, Michal; Fridkin, Mati; Shechter, Yoram

    2012-12-28

    Most chemotherapeutic agents are blood-brain barrier (BBB) impermeants. HIV-1-derived TAT protein variants contain a transmembrane domain, which may enable them to cross the BBB and reach the brain. Here we synthesized CAYGRKKRRQRRR, a peptide containing a cysteine moiety attached to the N terminus of the transmembrane domain (C-TAT peptide), and studied its effects in an in vitro BBB model, which we found to reflect penetration by a receptor-independent pathway. Incubation of the brain capillary endothelial cell monolayer with 0.3-0.6 μmol/ml of this C-TAT peptide, for a period of 1-2 h, destabilizes brain capillary endothelial cell monolayer and introduces the ability of impermeant therapeutic agents including high molecular weight proteins to penetrate it substantially. The cysteinyl moiety at position 1 of the C-TAT peptide contributes largely to the destabilizing potency and the penetration efficacy of impermeant substances. The destabilizing effect was reversed using heparin. In summary, experimental conditions allowing a significant increase in entry of impermeant low and high molecular weight substances from the luminal (blood) to the abluminal side (brain) were found in an in vitro BBB model reflecting in vivo protein penetrability by a receptor-independent pathway.

  7. The gut-brain axis in the critically ill: Is glucagon-like peptide-1 protective in neurocritical care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Enteral nutrient is a potent glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretagogue. In vitro and animal studies indicate that GLP-1 has immune-modulatory and neuroprotective effects. To determine whether these immune-modulatory and neuroprotective effects of GLP-1 are beneficial in the critically ill, studies achieving pharmacological GLP-1 concentrations are warranted. PMID:23837691

  8. Analgesic efficacy and safety of DALDA peptide analog delivery to the brain using oil-in-water nanoemulsion formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Lipa; Kulkarni, Praveen; Ferris, Craig; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2014-10-01

    The main objective of this study was to develop and evaluate therapeutic efficacy and safety following systemic delivery of a peptide analgesic into the CNS using an oil-in-water nanoemulsion system. We have formulated a safe and effective, omega-3 rich polyunsaturated fatty acid containing oil-in-water nanoemulsion formulation, for encapsulating and delivering chemically-modified DALDA, a potent mu-opioid peptide analogue, to the CNS. One of the challenges with CNS delivery is the lack of a non-invasive bioanalytical technique to confirm CNS uptake and therapeutic efficacy. Using blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) functional magenetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we provide quantitative evidence of nanoemulsion-based delivery and analgesic activity of DALDA analogue in capsaicin-induced awake rat model of pain. Nanoemulsion formulation effectively encapsulated the modified analgesic peptide and demonstrated efficacy in the capsaicin- pain induced functional magnetic resonance imaging model in rodents. Preliminary safety evaluations show that the nanoemulsion system was well tolerated and did not cause any acute negative effects. Overall, these results show tremendous opportunity for the development of modified peptide analgesic-encapsulated nanoemulsion formulations for CNS delivery and therapeutic efficacy.

  9. A New Treatment Strategy for Parkinson's Disease through the Gut-Brain Axis: The Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Seok; Choi, Ho-Il; Wang, Yun; Luo, Yu; Hoffer, Barry J; Greig, Nigel H

    2017-09-01

    Molecular communications in the gut-brain axis, between the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract, are critical for maintaining healthy brain function, particularly in aging. Epidemiological analyses indicate type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's diseases (PD) for which aging shows a major correlative association. Common pathophysiological features exist between T2DM, AD, and PD, including oxidative stress, inflammation, insulin resistance, abnormal protein processing, and cognitive decline, and suggest that effective drugs for T2DM that positively impact the gut-brain axis could provide an effective treatment option for neurodegenerative diseases. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based antidiabetic drugs have drawn particular attention as an effectual new strategy to not only regulate blood glucose but also decrease body weight by reducing appetite, which implies that GLP-1 could affect the gut-brain axis in normal and pathological conditions. The neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects of GLP-1 receptor (R) stimulation have been characterized in numerous in vitro and in vivo preclinical studies using GLP-1R agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors. Recently, the first open label clinical study of exenatide, a long-acting GLP-1 agonist, in the treatment of PD showed long-lasting improvements in motor and cognitive function. Several double-blind clinical trials of GLP-1R agonists including exenatide in PD and other neurodegenerative diseases are already underway or are about to be initiated. Herein, we review the physiological role of the GLP-1R pathway in the gut-brain axis and the therapeutic strategy of GLP-1R stimulation for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases focused on PD, for which age is the major risk factor.

  10. Peptide gH625 enters into neuron and astrocyte cell lines and crosses the blood–brain barrier in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiante, Salvatore; Falanga, Annarita; Cigliano, Luisa; Iachetta, Giuseppina; Busiello, Rosa Anna; La Marca, Valeria; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Lombardi, Assunta; Galdiero, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Peptide gH625, derived from glycoprotein H of herpes simplex virus type 1, can enter cells efficiently and deliver a cargo. Nanoparticles armed with gH625 are able to cross an in vitro model of the blood–brain barrier (BBB). In the present study, in vitro experiments were performed to investigate whether gH625 can enter and accumulate in neuron and astrocyte cell lines. The ability of gH625 to cross the BBB in vivo was also evaluated. gH625 was administered in vivo to rats and its presence in the liver and in the brain was detected. Within 3.5 hours of intravenous administration, gH625 can be found beyond the BBB in proximity to cell neurites. gH625 has no toxic effects in vivo, since it does not affect the maximal oxidative capacity of the brain or the mitochondrial respiration rate. Our data suggest that gH625, with its ability to cross the BBB, represents a novel nanocarrier system for drug delivery to the central nervous system. These results open up new possibilities for direct delivery of drugs into patients in the field of theranostics and might address the treatment of several human diseases. PMID:25792823

  11. Diagnostic potential of circulating natriuretic peptides in chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mark, PB; Stewart, GA; Gansevoort, RT; Petrie, CJ; McDonagh, TA; Dargie, HJ; Rodger, RSC; Jardine, AG

    Background. Measurement of natriuretic peptides, particularly brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is an established method for the diagnosis of cardiovascular disorders, chiefly left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. The influence of renal function on the diagnostic utility of natriuretic peptides is

  12. Effect of Leu-enkephalin and delta sleep inducing peptide (DSIP) on endogenous noradrenaline release by rat brain synaptosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozhanets, V.V.; Anosov, A.K.

    1986-01-01

    The nonapeptide delta-sleep inducing peptide (DSIP) causes specific changes in the encephalogram of recipient animals: It prolongs the phase of long-wave or delta sleep. The cellular mechanism of action of DSIP has not yet been explained. To test the hyporhesis that this peptide or its degradation product may be presynaptic regulators of catecholamine release, the action of Leu-enkephaline, DSIP, and amino acids composing DSIP on release of endogenous noradrenalin (NA) from synaptosomes during depolarization was compared. Subcellular fractions from cerebral hemisphere of noninbred male albino rats were isolated. Lactate dehydrogenase activity was determined in the suspension of synaptosomes before and after addition of 0.5% Triton X-100. The results were subjected to statistical analysis, using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney nonparametric test.

  13. Hemoglobin and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide: Independent and synergistic predictors of mortality in patients with acute heart failure Results from the International Collaborative of NT-proBNP (ICON) Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baggish, Aaron L.; van Kimmenade, Roland; Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Davis, Mark; Lainchbury, John G.; Frampton, Chris; Pinto, Yigal; Richards, Mark A.; Januzzi, James L.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hemoglobin and amino-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) are both independent predictors of mortality in patients with chronic HF. Their combined predictive power for mortality in the setting of acute HF is uncertain. METHODS: In an international prospective cohort design,

  14. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide for additional risk stratification in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome and an elevated troponin T: an Invasive versus Conservative Treatment in Unstable coronary Syndromes (ICTUS) substudy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windhausen, Fons; Hirsch, Alexander; Sanders, Gerard T.; Cornel, Jan Hein; Fischer, Johan; van Straalen, Jan P.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Verheugt, Freek W. A.; de Winter, Robbert J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: New evidence has emerged that the assessment of multiple biomarkers such as cardiac troponin T (cTnT) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome (nSTE-ACS) provides unique prognostic information. The purpose of this

  15. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide for additional risk stratification in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome and an elevated troponin T: an Invasive versus Conservative Treatment in Unstable coronary Syndromes (ICTUS) substudy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windhausen, F.; Hirsch, A.; Sanders, G.T.B.; Cornel, J.H.; Fischer, J.; Straalen, J.P. van; Tijssen, J.G.P.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Winter, R.J. de

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: New evidence has emerged that the assessment of multiple biomarkers such as cardiac troponin T (cTnT) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome (nSTE-ACS) provides unique prognostic information. The purpose of this

  16. Brain and Whole-Body Imaging of Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Peptide Receptor in Humans Using the PET Ligand 11C-NOP-1A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohith, Talakad G.; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Morse, Cheryl L.; Araneta, Maria F.; Barth, Vanessa N.; Goebl, Nancy A.; Tauscher, Johannes T.; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B.; Fujita, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) receptor is a new class of opioid receptor that may play a pathophysiologic role in anxiety and drug abuse and is a potential therapeutic target in these disorders. We previously developed a high-affinity PET ligand, 11C-NOP-1A, which yielded promising results in monkey brain. Here, we assessed the ability of 11C-NOP-1A to quantify NOP receptors in human brain and estimated its radiation safety profile. Methods After intravenous injection of 11C-NOP-1A, 7 healthy subjects underwent brain PET for 2 h and serial sampling of radial arterial blood to measure parent radioligand concentrations. Distribution volume (VT; a measure of receptor density) was determined by compartmental (1- and 2-tissue) and noncompartmental (Logan analysis and Ichise’s bilinear analysis [MA1]) methods. A separate group of 9 healthy subjects underwent whole-body PET to estimate whole-body radiation exposure (effective dose). Results After 11C-NOP-1A injection, the peak concentration of radioactivity in brain was high (~5–7 standardized uptake values), occurred early (~10 min), and then washed out quickly. The unconstrained 2-tissue-compartment model gave excellent VT identifiability (~1.1% SE) and fitted the data better than a 1-tissue-compartment model. Regional VT values (mL·cm−3) ranged from 10.1 in temporal cortex to 5.6 in cerebellum. VT was well identified in the initial 70 min of imaging and remained stable for the remaining 50 min, suggesting that brain radioactivity was most likely parent radioligand, as supported by the fact that all plasma radiometabolites of 11C-NOP-1A were less lipophilic than the parent radioligand. Voxel-based MA1 VT values correlated well with results from the 2-tissue-compartment model, showing that parametric methods can be used to compare populations. Whole-body scans showed radioactivity in brain and in peripheral organs expressing NOP receptors, such as heart, pancreas, and spleen. 11C-NOP-1A was significantly

  17. Some Brain Peptides Regulating the Secretion of Digestive Enzymes in the Indian Meal Moth, Plodia Interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Sajjadian Seyede Minoo; Hosseininaveh Vahid; Jahromi Khalil Talebi

    2014-01-01

    The Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) is a destructive polyphagous pest of many stored products. To interfere with the physiological processes, especially digestion, of the larval pest, more information on the regulatory mechanisms is needed. The brain extract from 1-day-old last instar larvae of P. interpunctella was examined. In the bioassays, the midguts were treated with the brain extract, and the carbohydrase and protease activities were measured. ...

  18. Prehospital triage of patients suffering severe dyspnoea using N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, the PreBNP trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtker, Morten Thingemann; Jørgensen, Maren T; Stengaard, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine whether the addition of brain natriuretic peptide measurement to the routine diagnostic work-up by prehospital critical care team physicians improves triage in patients with severe dyspnoea. METHODS: Prehospital critical care team physicians...... origin triaged directly to a department of cardiology. RESULTS: A total of 747 patients were randomly assigned and 711 patients consented to participate, 350 were randomly assigned to the NT-proBNP group and 361 to the routine work-up group. NT-proBNP was measured in 90% (315/350) of patients in the NT......-proBNP group and in 19% (70/361) of patients in the routine work-up group. There was no difference in the proportion of patients with dyspnoea of primary cardiac origin triaged directly to a department of cardiology between the NT-proBNP group and the routine work-up group (75% vs. 69%, P=0...

  19. The N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide is the best predictor of mortality during hospitalization in patients with low risk of sepsis-related organ failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Villalba, Eva; Bernal Morell, Enrique; Egea, Mari Paz; Marín, Irene; Alcaraz Garcia, Antonia; Muñoz, Angeles; Vera, MariCarmen; Valero, Salvador; Martinez, Monica; Callejo Hurtado, Victoria; Gomez Verdu, Jose Miguel; Santo, Angela; Cano Sanchez, Alfredo

    2017-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the value of N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) in predicting mortality in septic patients during hospitalization with mortality risk1,330pg/ml (OR=23.23; 95% CI 2.92-182.25; P=.003) and to have predisposing factors (OR=3.05; 95% CI 1.3-9.3; P=.044) CONCLUSIONS: In patients with low mortality risk according to SOFA score, NT-proBNP obtained in the first 72h after admission prove to be a powerful predictor of mortality. Their implementations in clinical practice would improve the predictive ability of clinical severity scores. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Growth-differentiation factor-15, endoglin and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide induction in athletes participating in an ultramarathon foot race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchou, Isabelle; Margeli, Alexandra; Tsironi, Maria; Skenderi, Katerina; Barnet, Marc; Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina; Papassotiriou, Ioannis; Beris, Photis

    2009-09-01

    We investigated the actions of growth-differentiation factor (GDF)-15, endoglin and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) in 15 male athletes who participated in the ultradistance foot race of the 246 km 'Sparthathlon'. Measurements were performed before (phase I), at the end of the race (phase II) and 48 h post-race (phase III). GDF-15 and endoglin serum concentrations were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and NT-pro-BNP plasma levels by electrochemiluminescence. GDF-15 levels were increased from phase I (563.9 +/- 57.1 pg ml(-1)) to phase II (2311.1 +/- 462.3 pg ml(-1)) and decreased at phase III (862.0 +/- 158.0 pg ml(-1)) (p foot race consisting of continuous, prolonged and brisk exercise.

  1. Comparison of prognostic value of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in septic and non-septic intensive care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Namik; Ozcan, Ayse; Kaymak, Cetin; Basar, Hulya; Kotanoglu, Mustafa; Kose, Bektas

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the prognostic value of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels in septic and non-septic intensive care patients. Fifty consecutive patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) were enrolled in either the septic or non-septic group according to the criteria in the International Sepsis Definitions Conference in 2001. Demographic and clinical data, procalcitonin and lactate levels at admission, and death within 28 days were registered. Five blood samples were collected from all patients for NT-proBNP measurements. Septic patients had higher APACHE II (19 (16.00-24.25) vs. 16 (13.00-18.25)), and SOFA (8 (5-10) vs. 6 (4-7)) scores (p care patients.

  2. Human anti-Aβ IgGs target conformational epitopes on synthetic dimer assemblies and the AD brain-derived peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzel, Alfred T; Williams, Angela D; McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P; Acero, Luis; Weber, Alfred; Blinder, Veronika; Mably, Alex; Bunk, Sebastian; Hermann, Corinna; Farrell, Michael A; Ehrlich, Hartmut J; Schwarz, Hans P; Walsh, Dominic M; Solomon, Alan; O'Nuallain, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Soluble non-fibrillar assemblies of amyloid-beta (Aβ) and aggregated tau protein are the proximate synaptotoxic species associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Anti-Aβ immunotherapy is a promising and advanced therapeutic strategy, but the precise Aβ species to target is not yet known. Previously, we and others have shown that natural human IgGs (NAbs) target diverse Aβ conformers and have therapeutic potential. We now demonstrate that these antibodies bound with nM avidity to conformational epitopes on plate-immobilized synthetic Aβ dimer assemblies, including synaptotoxic protofibrils, and targeted these conformers in solution. Importantly, NAbs also recognized Aβ extracted from the water-soluble phase of human AD brain, including species that migrated on denaturing PAGE as SDS-stable dimers. The critical reliance on Aβ's conformational state for NAb binding, and not a linear sequence epitope, was confirmed by the antibody's nM reactivity with plate-immobilized protofibrills, and weak uM binding to synthetic Aβ monomers and peptide fragments. The antibody's lack of reactivity against a linear sequence epitope was confirmed by our ability to isolate anti-Aβ NAbs from intravenous immunoglobulin using affinity matrices, immunoglobulin light chain fibrils and Cibacron blue, which had no sequence similarity with the peptide. These findings suggest that further investigations on the molecular basis and the therapeutic/diagnostic potential of anti-Aβ NAbs are warranted.

  3. Association between resting heart rate and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in a community-based population study in Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ruihua Cao, Yongyi Bai, Ruyi Xu, Ping Ye Department of Geriatric Cardiology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Background: N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP is associated with an increased risk of cardiac insufficiency, which possibly leads to heart failure. However, the relationship between resting heart rate and NT-proBNP is unclear.Objective: This study focuses on this relativity between resting heart rate and plasma NT-proBNP levels in a surveyed community-based population.Methods: We evaluated the relativity between resting heart rate and plasma levels of NT-proBNP in 1,567 participants (mean age 61.0 years, range 21–96 years from a community-based population in Beijing, People’s Republic of China.Results: In patients with high resting heart rate (≥75 beats/min, NT-proBNP was higher than in those having low resting heart rate (<75 beats/min. In multiple linear stepwise regression analysis, plasma NT-proBNP was associated with resting heart rate (partial correlation coefficient, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.18–1.51; P=0.011. A subsequent subgroup analysis revealed that the association between resting heart rate and plasma NT-proBNP was strengthened in subjects over 60 years old (partial correlation coefficient 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 0.49–2.36; P=0.031; while the relativity between resting heart rate and plasma NT-proBNP was not emerged in the younger subgroup (<60 years old.Conclusions: Resting heart rate was associated with plasma NT-proBNP in the elderly, which indicated a relationship between resting heart rate and cardiac function damage. Keywords: resting heart rate, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, epidemiology, cardiac function, relationship

  4. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide can be an adjunctive diagnostic marker of hyper-acute phase of Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuksool; Lee, Jin Hee; Jung, Jae Yun; Kwak, Young Ho; Kim, Do Kyun; Jung, Jin Hee; Chang, Ikwan; Kim, Kyuseok

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) level could be a useful marker for Kawasaki disease in the pediatric emergency department (PED) and in the presence of fever duration of 4 days or less (hyper-acute phase of Kawasaki disease). Medical records of patients who were 1 month to 15 years old of age and presented at the PED with suspected Kawasaki disease from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2014, were collected retrospectively. Two hundred thirty-nine patients with a history of fever for 4 days or less were diagnosed with Kawasaki disease, as well as 111 patients with other febrile diseases, and were enrolled. The NT-proBNP level was significantly higher in patients with Kawasaki disease (Kawasaki disease vs. other febrile disease group, 444.8 (189.7-951.5) vs. 153.4 (68.9-287.6) pg/mL; p marker for hyper-acute phase of Kawasaki disease in the PED. What is Known: • N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide level has been reported as a useful marker for diagnosis in patients with the acute phase of Kawasaki disease. • But, in the cases of less than 5 days of fever, the appropriate level of NT-proBNP for differentiating Kawasaki disease in PED has not been yet evaluated. What is New: • NT-proBNP might be an adjunctive laboratory marker for hyper-acute phase of Kawasaki disease.

  5. Calcitonin gene-related peptide modulates heat nociception in the human brain - An fMRI study in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar, Mohammad Sohail; Becerra, Lino; Larsson, Henrik B.W.

    2016-01-01

    blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) signals in the brain by functional MRI after infusion of CGRP in a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study of 27 healthy volunteers. BOLD-signals were recorded in response to noxious heat stimuli in the V1-area of the trigeminal nerve. In addition, we...... measured BOLD-signals after injection of sumatriptan (5-HT1B/1D antagonist). Results: Brain activation to noxious heat stimuli following CGRP infusion compared to baseline resulted in increased BOLD-signal in insula and brainstem, and decreased BOLD-signal in the caudate nuclei, thalamus and cingulate...

  6. Sialic acid deposition impairs the utility of AAV9, but not peptide-modified AAVs for brain gene therapy in a mouse model of lysosomal storage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong Hong; Claflin, Kristin; Geoghegan, James C; Davidson, Beverly L

    2012-07-01

    Recombinant vector systems have been recently identified that when delivered systemically can transduce neurons, glia, and endothelia in the central nervous system (CNS), providing an opportunity to develop therapies for diseases affecting the brain without performing direct intracranial injections. Vector systems based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) include AAV serotype 9 (AAV9) and AAVs that have been re-engineered at the capsid level for CNS tropism. Here, we performed a head-to-head comparison of AAV9 and a capsid modified AAV for their abilities to rescue CNS and peripheral disease in an animal model of lysosomal storage disease (LSD), the mucopolysacharidoses (MPS) VII mouse. While the peptide-modified AAV reversed cognitive deficits, improved storage burden in the brain, and substantially prolonged survival, we were surprised to find that AAV9 provided no CNS benefit. Additional experiments demonstrated that sialic acid, a known inhibitor of AAV9, is elevated in the CNS of MPS VII mice. These studies highlight how disease manifestations can dramatically impact the known tropism of recombinant vectors, and raise awareness to assuming similar transduction profiles between normal and disease models.

  7. Role of signal peptide-Cub-Egf domain-containing protein-1 in serum as a predictive biomarker of outcome after severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi-Han; Lin, Dan; Zhou, Jian; Deng, Gang

    2016-05-01

    Signal peptide-Cub-Epidermal growth factor domain-containing protein 1 (SCUBE1), a marker for coagulation, is secreted under hypoxia and inflammatory conditions from platelet α granules. This study was designed to determine the associations of serum SCUBE1 concentrations with trauma severity and prognosis after severe traumatic brain injury. Serum SCUBE1 concentrations of 113 patients and 113 controls were measured. An unfavorable outcome was defined as Glasgow Outcome Scale score of 1-3. Serum SCUBE1 concentrations were significantly higher in patients than in controls (15.5 ± 6.0 vs. 1.1 ± 0.3 ng/ml, P < 0.001) and were associated with Glasgow coma scale scores (r = -0.439, P < 0.001) and blood platelet count (r = 0.420, P < 0.001). SCUBE1 was identified as an independent prognostic marker of 6-month unfavorable outcome (odds ratio, 1.357; 95% confidence interval, 1.159-1.589; P < 0.001), and had high predictive value according to receiver operating characteristic curve (area under curve, 0.830; 95% confidence interval, 0.748-0.890; P < 0.001). Increased serum SCUBE1 concentrations are associated highly with trauma severity, platelet activation and poor outcome, suggesting that SCUBE1 might be a novel prognostic biomarker after traumatic brain injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Retest imaging of [11C]NOP-1A binding to nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) receptors in brain of healthy humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohith, Talakad G.; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Morse, Cheryl L.; Araneta, Maria D. Ferraris; Barth, Vanessa N.; Goebl, Nancy A.; Tauscher, Johannes T.; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B.; Fujita, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    [11C]NOP-1A is a novel high-affinity PET ligand for imaging nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) receptors. Here, we report reproducibility and reliability measures of binding parameter estimates for [11C]NOP-1A binding in brain of healthy humans. After intravenous injection of [11C]NOP-1A, PET scans were conducted twice on eleven healthy volunteers on the same (10/11 subjects) or different (1/11 subjects) days. Subjects underwent serial sampling of radial arterial blood to measure parent radioligand concentrations. Distribution volume (VT; a measure of receptor density) was determined by compartmental (one- and two-tissue) modeling in large regions and by simpler regression methods (graphical Logan and bilinear MA1) in both large regions and voxel data. Retest variability and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of VT were determined as measures of reproducibility and reliability, respectively. Regional [11C]NOP-1A uptake in brain was high, with a peak radioactivity concentration of 4 – 7 SUV (standardized uptake value) and a rank order of putamen > cingulate cortex > cerebellum. Brain time-activity curves fitted well in 10 of 11 subjects by unconstrained two-tissue compartmental model. The retest variability of VT was moderately good across brain regions except cerebellum, and was similar across different modeling methods, averaging 12% for large regions and 14% for voxel-based methods. The retest reliability of VT was also moderately good in most brain regions, except thalamus and cerebellum, and was similar across different modeling methods averaging 0.46 for large regions and 0.48 for voxels having gray matter probability > 20%. The lowest retest variability and highest retest reliability of VT was achieved by compartmental modeling for large regions, and by the parametric Logan method for voxel-based methods. Moderately good reproducibility and reliability measures of VT for [11C]NOP-1A make it a useful PET ligand for comparing NOP receptor binding

  9. Hyaluronic acid hydrogels with IKVAV peptides for tissue repair and axonal regeneration in an injured rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Y T [Biomaterials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Tian, W M [Biomaterials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Yu, X [Biomaterials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Cui, F Z [Biomaterials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Hou, S P [Beijing Institute of Neuroscience, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 100054 (China); Xu, Q Y [Beijing Institute of Neuroscience, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 100054 (China); Lee, In-Seop [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics, and Atomic-scale Surface Science Research Center, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    A biocompatible hydrogel of hyaluronic acid with the neurite-promoting peptide sequence of IKVAV was synthesized. The characterization of the hydrogel shows an open porous structure and a large surface area available for cell interaction. Its ability to promote tissue repair and axonal regeneration in the lesioned rat cerebrum is also evaluated. After implantation, the polymer hydrogel repaired the tissue defect and formed a permissive interface with the host tissue. Axonal growth occurred within the microstructure of the network. Within 6 weeks the polymer implant was invaded by host-derived tissue, glial cells, blood vessels and axons. Such a hydrogel matrix showed the properties of neuron conduction. It has the potential to repair tissue defects in the central nervous system by promoting the formation of a tissue matrix and axonal growth by replacing the lost tissue.

  10. Pharmacological Therapy in the Heart as an Alternative to Cellular Therapy: A Place for the Brain Natriuretic Peptide?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Rosenblatt-Velin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery that stem cells isolated from different organs have the ability to differentiate into mature beating cardiomyocytes has fostered considerable interest in developing cellular regenerative therapies to treat cardiac diseases associated with the loss of viable myocardium. Clinical studies evaluating the potential of stem cells (from heart, blood, bone marrow, skeletal muscle, and fat to regenerate the myocardium and improve its functional status indicated that although the method appeared generally safe, its overall efficacy has remained modest. Several issues raised by these studies were notably related to the nature and number of injected cells, as well as the route and timing of their administration, to cite only a few. Besides the direct administration of cardiac precursor cells, a distinct approach to cardiac regeneration could be based upon the stimulation of the heart’s natural ability to regenerate, using pharmacological approaches. Indeed, differentiation and/or proliferation of cardiac precursor cells is controlled by various endogenous mediators, such as growth factors and cytokines, which could thus be used as pharmacological agents to promote regeneration. To illustrate such approach, we present recent results showing that the exogenous administration of the natriuretic peptide BNP triggers “endogenous” cardiac regeneration, following experimental myocardial infarction.

  11. The gut-brain peptide cyclo(His-Pro) is secreted in a pulsatile fashion in fasting humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herminghuysen, D; Cook, C; Thompson, H; Bostick, D; Lee, F; Stokes, L; Hilton, C; Prasad, C

    1994-04-01

    Histidyl-proline diketopiperazine (CHP) is a cyclic dipeptide that is found in many animal tissues, most notably brain and gut. It has been found to have a variety of biologic actions and has been postulated to play a role in appetitive behavior and energy metabolism. This study was conducted in order to characterize the secretory pattern of CHP during a 24 h fast. Four subjects (2 obese and 2 lean) were studied during the latter 24 h of a 36 h fast. Blood was sampled every 10-15 min and assayed for CHP concentration using a specific radioimmunoassay. Analysis revealed that circulating CHP oscillates in humans and that diurnal variation occurred but only in the obese subjects.

  12. Cardiovascular risk prediction by N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide and high sensitivity C-reactive protein is affected by age and sex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, M.H.; Hansen, T.W.; Christensen, M.K.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that the urine albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (Nt-proBNP) predict cardiovascular events in a general population aged 41, 51, 61 or 71 years. This study investigated...... factors, UACR, hsCRP and Nt-proBNP. The composite cardiovascular endpoint (CEP) of cardiovascular death and non-fatal stroke or myocardial infarction was assessed after 9.5 years. RESULTS: In Cox regression analyses predicting CEP, the effects of log(hsCRP) and log(Nt-proBNP) were modulated by sex (P ....05) and age (P effect of logUACR was not significantly modulated by age or sex. Log(hsCRP)/SD did not predict CEP in women, but did predict CEP in 41 plus 51-year-old men [hazard ratio (HR) 1.71; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-2.6; P

  13. NEW POSSIBILITIES FOR EVALUATION OF SEVERITY AND PROGNOSIS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE BASED ON N-TERMINAL PRO-BRAIN NATRIURETIC PEPTIDE PLASMA LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Galjavich

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study an importance of plasma N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (N-proBNP in evaluation of severity and prognosis in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF of ischemic genesis.Material and methods. 77 patients (60 men and 17 women; 59,4±10,7 y.o. with CHF of ischemic genesis were included in the study. All patients had sinus rhythm and history of Q wave myocardial infarction. Standard examination was performed to all patients. Besides N-proBNP plasma level and patients yearly survival were evaluated.Results. N-proBNP plasma level had direct correlation with clinical indices (exercise tolerance, blood pressure, heart rate and echocardiographic heart sizes. N-proBNP plasma level had relationship with prognosis of CHF patients. Baseline N-proBNP level was more than 2 times higher in died patients in comparison with survived patients. The yearly survival rate of CHF patients was 51,3% if N-proBNP level had been more than 400 fmol/ml (>15% of normal value. The clinico-laboratory index (based on N-proBNP plasma level of severity and prognosis in CHF patients was developed.Conclusion. The clinico-laboratory index based on N-proBNP plasma level is easy to use and can improve medical practice.

  14. NEW POSSIBILITIES FOR EVALUATION OF SEVERITY AND PROGNOSIS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE BASED ON N-TERMINAL PRO-BRAIN NATRIURETIC PEPTIDE PLASMA LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Galjavich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study an importance of plasma N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (N-proBNP in evaluation of severity and prognosis in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF of ischemic genesis.Material and methods. 77 patients (60 men and 17 women; 59,4±10,7 y.o. with CHF of ischemic genesis were included in the study. All patients had sinus rhythm and history of Q wave myocardial infarction. Standard examination was performed to all patients. Besides N-proBNP plasma level and patients yearly survival were evaluated.Results. N-proBNP plasma level had direct correlation with clinical indices (exercise tolerance, blood pressure, heart rate and echocardiographic heart sizes. N-proBNP plasma level had relationship with prognosis of CHF patients. Baseline N-proBNP level was more than 2 times higher in died patients in comparison with survived patients. The yearly survival rate of CHF patients was 51,3% if N-proBNP level had been more than 400 fmol/ml (>15% of normal value. The clinico-laboratory index (based on N-proBNP plasma level of severity and prognosis in CHF patients was developed.Conclusion. The clinico-laboratory index based on N-proBNP plasma level is easy to use and can improve medical practice.

  15. Dynamics of electrocardiographic changes, brain-natriuretic peptide and cortisol levels in a patient with stress (takotsubo cardiomyopathy: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurić Ivica

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a transient acute heart failure syndrome caused by stress that provokes left ventricular mid-apical akinesis and mimics acute coronary syndrome. Case report. A 66-year-old woman had chest pain and dispnoea a few hours before hospitalization. A sudden emotional stressful event preceded the symptoms. Electrocardiographic abnormalities - precordial ST elevation and modest increase of cardiac troponin mimiced acute myocardial infarction. However, echocardiographic examination showed apical ballooning with markedly diminished left ventricle ejection fraction and the obstruction in the outflow tract of the left ventricle. Coronary angiography at admission showed no coronary stenosis and slower blood flow through the left anterior descending artery. According to anamnesis, echocardiography and coronarography finding we established the diagnosis of stress cardiomyopathy - takotsubo cardiomyopathy. We described in details the slow but dynamic electrocardiographic changes, levels of brain natriuretic peptide, cortisol and echocardiography evolution of disease during a 4-month follow-up till the full recovery. Conclusion. Stress (takotsubo cardiomyopathy - became an important differential diagnosis of acute anterior myocardial infarction and it should be reconsidered every time when emotionally stressed patients with transient-apical akinesis or dyskinesis of the LV are present.

  16. Neurofibrillary tangles and the deposition of a beta amyloid peptide with a novel N-terminal epitope in the brains of wild Tsushima leopard cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, James K; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Harada, Tomoyuki; Tsuboi, Masaya; Sato, Masumi; Kubo, Masahito; Kawaguchi, Hiroaki; Miyoshi, Noriaki; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Beta amyloid (Aβ) deposits are seen in aged individuals in many of the mammalian species that possess the same Aβ amino acid sequence as humans. Conversely, neurofibrillary tangles (NFT), the other hallmark lesion of Alzheimer's disease (AD), are extremely rare in these animals. We detected Aβ deposits in the brains of Tsushima leopard cats (Prionailurus bengalensis euptilurus) that live exclusively on Tsushima Island, Japan. Aβ42 was deposited in a granular pattern in the neuropil of the pyramidal cell layer, but did not form argyrophilic senile plaques. These Aβ deposits were not immunolabeled with antibodies to the N-terminal of human Aβ. Sequence analysis of the amyloid precursor protein revealed an amino acid substitution at the 7th residue of the Aβ peptide. In a comparison with other mammalian animals that do develop argyrophilic senile plaques, we concluded that the alternative Aβ amino acid sequence displayed by leopard cats is likely to be related to its distinctive deposition pattern. Interestingly, most of the animals with these Aβ deposits also developed NFTs. The distributions of hyperphosphorylated tau-positive cells and the two major isoforms of aggregated tau proteins were quite similar to those seen in Alzheimer's disease. In addition, the unphosphorylated form of GSK-3β colocalized with hyperphosphorylated tau within the affected neurons. In conclusion, this animal species develops AD-type NFTs without argyrophilic senile plaques.

  17. Neurofibrillary tangles and the deposition of a beta amyloid peptide with a novel N-terminal epitope in the brains of wild Tsushima leopard cats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K Chambers

    Full Text Available Beta amyloid (Aβ deposits are seen in aged individuals in many of the mammalian species that possess the same Aβ amino acid sequence as humans. Conversely, neurofibrillary tangles (NFT, the other hallmark lesion of Alzheimer's disease (AD, are extremely rare in these animals. We detected Aβ deposits in the brains of Tsushima leopard cats (Prionailurus bengalensis euptilurus that live exclusively on Tsushima Island, Japan. Aβ42 was deposited in a granular pattern in the neuropil of the pyramidal cell layer, but did not form argyrophilic senile plaques. These Aβ deposits were not immunolabeled with antibodies to the N-terminal of human Aβ. Sequence analysis of the amyloid precursor protein revealed an amino acid substitution at the 7th residue of the Aβ peptide. In a comparison with other mammalian animals that do develop argyrophilic senile plaques, we concluded that the alternative Aβ amino acid sequence displayed by leopard cats is likely to be related to its distinctive deposition pattern. Interestingly, most of the animals with these Aβ deposits also developed NFTs. The distributions of hyperphosphorylated tau-positive cells and the two major isoforms of aggregated tau proteins were quite similar to those seen in Alzheimer's disease. In addition, the unphosphorylated form of GSK-3β colocalized with hyperphosphorylated tau within the affected neurons. In conclusion, this animal species develops AD-type NFTs without argyrophilic senile plaques.

  18. Serum Brain Natriuretic Peptide Concentration 60 Days after Surgery as a Predictor of Long-term Prognosis in Patients Implanted with a Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takuma; Seguchi, Osamu; Iwashima, Yoshio; Yanase, Masanobu; Nakajima, Seiko; Hieda, Michinari; Watanabe, Takuya; Sunami, Haruki; Murata, Yoshihiro; Hata, Hiroki; Fujita, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Nakatani, Takeshi

    2015-04-23

    Mechanical circulatory support by a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is used to bridge patients with advanced heart failure to transplant or as a definitive treatment. We retrospectively sought predictors of long-term outcome in a cohort of 83 patients who had undergone LVAD treatment. We subjected patients' perioperative clinical data to statistical analysis to establish parameters associated with all-cause mortality, and the cut-off values, sensitivity and specificity of those that had a statistically significant relationship with survival. Mean follow up was 717 days (standard deviation 334 days, range 17-1592 days). Fourteen patients (16.8%) died, but nine (10.8%) were weaned from support. Serum brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) concentration measured 60 days after implantation was significantly associated with all-cause mortality. The optimal BNP cut-off value to predict death during LVAD support was 322 pg/ml, with a sensitivity of 71.4% and specificity of 79.8%. Two-year survival was 92.0% in those with 60-day serum BNP concentration Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives 3.0 License, where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially.

  19. Increases in plasma levels of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides after running a marathon: are their effects partly counterbalanced by adrenocortical steroids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessner, Alexander; Ziegler, Sophie; Slany, Jörg; Billensteiner, Elke; Woloszczuk, Wolfgang; Geyer, Georg

    2003-12-01

    Long-distance running results in considerable stress. Little evidence exists about the role of the atrial and brain natriuretic peptides, ANP and BNP, deriving from the myocardium. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of running 42.195 km on changes in circulating natriuretic propeptides and adrenocortical steroids. We studied 17 male and 2 female runners (age: 28-62 Years) participating in a marathon. Blood samples were obtained before and immediately after the competition. proANP(1-98) and proANP(1-30) as well as Nt-proBNP(8-29) were determined by enzyme immunoassays. Runners finished the competition between 2 h 58 min and 4 h 25 min. We observed a more pronounced increase in proANP(1-98) (+58%) and proANP(1-30) (+99%, both Prunning may explain the pronounced increase in proANP. Other explanations for the observed rise in plasma levels might be a change in the permeability of myocardial cells and an impaired clearance. A rise in adrenocortical steroids may compensate for the negative influence of ANP on natriuresis and blood pressure. Positive effects of ANP during a marathon could be the regulation of body temperature by influencing sweat glands as well as the stimulation of lipolysis compensating for the enormous energy demand.

  20. Relationship between cardio-ankle vascular index and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in hypertension and coronary heart disease subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyu; Liu, Jinbo; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhou, Yingyan; Zhao, Xujing; Song, Yuejie; Li, Lihong; Shi, Hongyan

    2014-09-01

    Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor for vascular diseases. Cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is a new index of arterial stiffness. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is a strong prognostic marker in advanced stage of coronary heart disease (CHD). In the present study, we investigated the relationship between CAVI and NT-proBNP in hypertension and CHD subjects. Five hundred one subjects (male/female, 209/292) from Vascular Medicine of Peking University Shougang Hospital were divided into four groups: healthy group (n = 186), hypertension group (n = 159), CHD group (n = 45), and hypertension with CHD group (n = 111). CAVI was measured using VS-1000 apparatus. Our results showed that CAVI was significantly higher in hypertension subjects with CHD than in healthy and hypertension group, respectively (8.42 ± 1.51 vs. 7.77 ± 1.19; 8.42 ± 1.51 vs. 7.92 ± 1.11; both P vascular-related diseases. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Association between resting heart rate and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in a community-based population study in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ruihua; Bai, Yongyi; Xu, Ruyi; Ye, Ping

    2015-01-01

    N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is associated with an increased risk of cardiac insufficiency, which possibly leads to heart failure. However, the relationship between resting heart rate and NT-proBNP is unclear. This study focuses on this relativity between resting heart rate and plasma NT-proBNP levels in a surveyed community-based population. We evaluated the relativity between resting heart rate and plasma levels of NT-proBNP in 1,567 participants (mean age 61.0 years, range 21-96 years) from a community-based population in Beijing, People's Republic of China. In patients with high resting heart rate (≥75 beats/min), NT-proBNP was higher than in those having low resting heart rate (heart rate (partial correlation coefficient, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.18-1.51; P=0.011). A subsequent subgroup analysis revealed that the association between resting heart rate and plasma NT-proBNP was strengthened in subjects over 60 years old (partial correlation coefficient 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 0.49-2.36; P=0.031); while the relativity between resting heart rate and plasma NT-proBNP was not emerged in the younger subgroup (heart rate was associated with plasma NT-proBNP in the elderly, which indicated a relationship between resting heart rate and cardiac function damage.

  2. The role of ghrelin, neuropeptide Y and leptin peptides in weight gain after deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markaki, Elli; Ellul, John; Kefalopoulou, Zinovia; Trachani, Eftichia; Theodoropoulou, Anastasia; Kyriazopoulou, Venetsana; Constantoyannis, Constantine

    2012-01-01

    The exact mechanism of weight gain (WG) after deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease remains unknown. To investigate a possible involvement of ghrelin, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and leptin in WG after DBS. Twenty-three Parkinson patients were submitted for body composition measurements and blood sampling 3 days before, and 3 and 6 months after STN DBS. Peripheral concentrations of ghrelin, NPY, and leptin were determined, as well as the L-dopa equivalent daily dose. Patients were clinically evaluated using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. Three months after surgery, a significant WG was observed (3.09 ± 5.00 kg; p = 0.007) with no further increase at 6 months. Three months postoperatively, NPY circulating levels increased significantly (p = 0.05), while the increase of ghrelin levels reached statistical significance at 6 months (p = 0.001). WG was significantly associated with changes of ghrelin and leptin levels at 3 and 6 months, respectively. STN DBS seems to temporarily dysregulate the hypothalamic secretion of NPY and ghrelin. The variation of weight may be attributed to an increased production of ghrelin and leptin. A possible neuroprotective role of DBS, exerted through the increase of ghrelin levels, should be further studied. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Biologic variability of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in healthy dogs and dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Randolph L; Saunders, Ashley B; Gordon, Sonya G; Buch, Jesse S; Miller, Matthew W

    2017-04-01

    To determine the biologic variability of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) in healthy dogs and dogs with various stages of myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD). Thirty-eight privately owned dogs: 28 with MMVD and 10 healthy controls. Prospective clinical study with comprehensive evaluation used to group dogs as healthy or into three stages of MMVD based on current guidelines. NTproBNP was measured hourly, daily, and weekly. For each group, analytical (CV A ), within-subject (CV I ), and between-subject (CV G ) coefficients of variability were calculated in addition to percent critical change value (CCV) and index of individuality (IoI). For healthy dogs, calculated NTproBNP values were: CV A  = 4.2%; CV I  = 25.2%; CV G  = 49.3%; IoI = 0.52, and CCV = 70.8%. For dogs with MMVD, calculated NTproBNP values were: CV A  = 6.2%; CV I  = 20.0%; CV G  = 61.3%; IoI = 0.34, and CCV = 58.2%. Biologic variability affects NTproBNP concentrations in healthy dogs and dogs with MMVD. Monitoring serial individual changes in NTproBNP may be clinically relevant in addition to using population-based reference ranges to determine changes in disease status. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Relationship between N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, obesity and the risk of heart failure in middle-aged German adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Janine; Buijsse, Brian; di Giuseppe, Romina; Fritsche, Andreas; Hense, Hans W; Westphal, Sabine; Isermann, Berend; Boeing, Heiner; Weikert, Cornelia

    2014-01-01

    Both high concentrations of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and obesity are related to higher heart failure risk. However, inverse relationships between NT-proBNP and obesity have been reported. Therefore, it was investigated whether the association between NT-proBNP and the risk of heart failure differed according to obesity status. A case-cohort study was conducted within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam, comprising a random sub-cohort (non-cases = 1,150, cases = 13, mean age: 50.5±9.0 years) and heart failure cases outside the sub-cohort (n = 197). Weighted Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine the association between NT-proBNP and heart failure risk during a mean follow-up time of 8 years. Stratified analyses were performed according to obesity status as defined by body mass index (heart failure after multivariable adjustment (hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.56 (1.49-4.41) for the top versus bottom tertile of NT-proBNP, ptrend:obese and U-shaped in obese participants: HRs (95%CI) from the first to the third tertile of NT-proBNP for non-obese: reference, 1.72 (0.85-3.49), 2.72 (1.42-5.22), and for obese: 3.29 (1.04-10.40), reference, 3.74 (1.52-9.21). Although high circulating concentrations of NT-proBNP were positively associated with incident heart failure in the entire sample, the association differed according to obesity status. In obese, an increased risk of heart failure was also observed in those with low NT-proBNP concentrations. If confirmed, this observation warrants further investigation to understand underlying pathophysiological mechanisms.

  5. N-Terminal Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide and Heart Failure Risk Among Individuals With and Without Obesity: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndumele, Chiadi E; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Sang, Yingying; Lazo, Mariana; Agarwal, Sunil K; Nambi, Vijay; Deswal, Anita; Blumenthal, Roger S; Ballantyne, Christie M; Coresh, Josef; Selvin, Elizabeth

    2016-02-16

    Obesity is a risk factor for heart failure (HF) but is associated with lower N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels. It is unclear whether the prognostic value and implications of NT-proBNP levels for HF risk differ across body mass index (BMI) categories. We followed up 12 230 ARIC participants free of prior HF at baseline (visit 2, 1990-1992) with BMI ≥18.5 kg/m(2). We quantified and compared the relative and absolute risk associations of NT-proBNP with incident HF across BMI categories. There were 1861 HF events during a median 20.6 years of follow-up. Despite increased HF risk in obesity, a weak inverse association was seen between baseline BMI and NT-proBNP levels (r=-0.10). Nevertheless, higher baseline NT-proBNP was associated with increased HF risk in all BMI categories. NT-proBNP improved HF risk prediction overall, even among those with severe obesity (BMI ≥35 kg/m(2); improvement in C statistic, 0.032; 95% confidence interval, 0.011-0.053). However, given the higher HF rates among those with obesity, at each NT-proBNP level, higher BMI was associated with greater absolute HF risk. Indeed, among those with NT-proBNP of 100 to 10% among the severely obese. Despite its inverse relationship with BMI, NT-proBNP provides significant prognostic information on the risk of developing HF even among individuals with obesity. Given the higher baseline HF risk among persons with obesity, even slight elevations in NT-proBNP may have implications for increased absolute HF risk in this population. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. A combination of P wave electrocardiography and plasma brain natriuretic peptide level for predicting the progression to persistent atrial fibrillation: comparisons of sympathetic activity and left atrial size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutsu, Yasushi; Kaneko, Kyouichi; Kodama, Yusuke; Miyoshi, Fumito; Li, Hui-Ling; Watanabe, Norikazu; Asano, Taku; Tanno, Kaoru; Suyama, Jumpei; Namiki, Atsuo; Gokan, Takehiko; Kobayashi, Youichi

    2013-11-01

    Development of atrial fibrillation (AF) is complexly associated with electrical and structural remodeling and other factors every stage of AF development. We hypothesized that P wave electrocardiography with an elevated brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level would be associated with the progression to persistence from paroxysmal AF. P wave electrocardiography such as a maximum P wave duration (MPWD) and dispersion by 12-leads ECG, heart/mediastinum (H/M) ratio by delayed iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphic imaging, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and left atrial dimension (LAD) by echocardiography, and plasma BNP level were measured to evaluate the electrical and structural properties and sympathetic activity in 71 patients (mean ± standard deviation, age: 67 ± 13 years, 63.4 % males) with idiopathic paroxysmal AF. Over a 12.9-year follow-up period, AF developed into persistent AF in 30 patients. A wider MPWD (>129 ms) (p = 0.001), wider P wave dispersion (>60 ms) (p = 0.001), LAD enlargement (>40 mm) (p = 0.001), higher BNP level (>72 pg/mL) (p = 0.002), lower H/M ratio (≤2.7) (p = 0.025), and lower LVEF (≤60 %) (p = 0.035) were associated with the progression to persistent AF, and the wide MPWD was an independently powerful predictor of the progression to persistent AF with a hazard ratio (HR) of 5.49 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 2.38-12.7, p < 0.0001] after adjusting for potential confounding variables, such as age and sex. The combination of wide MPWD and elevated BNP level was additive and incremental prognostic power with 13.3 [2.16-13, p < 0.0001]. The wide MPWD with elevated BNP level was associated with the progression to persistent AF.

  7. Association of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide with cognitive function and depression in elderly people with type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insa Feinkohl

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with risk of congestive heart failure (CHF, cognitive dysfunction and depression. CHF itself is linked both to poor cognition and depression. The ventricular N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP is a marker of CHF, suggesting potential as a marker for cognitive impairment and/or depression. This was tested in the Edinburgh Type 2 Diabetes Study (ET2DS.Cross-sectional analysis of 1066 men and women aged 60-75 with type 2 diabetes. Results from seven neuropsychological tests were combined in a standardised general cognitive ability factor, 'g'. A vocabulary-based test estimated pre-morbid cognitive ability. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS assessed possible depression. After adjustment for age and sex, raised plasma NT-proBNP was weakly associated with lower 'g' and higher depression scores (ß -0.09, 95% CI -0.13 to -0.03, p = 0.004 and ß 0.08, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.12, p0.05 for 'g'; β 0.03, 95% CI -0.02 to 0.07, p>0.05 for depression scores.Raised plasma NT-proBNP was weakly but statistically significantly associated with poorer cognitive function and depression. The prospective phases of the ET2DS will help determine whether or not NT-proBNP can be considered a risk marker for subsequent cognitive impairment and incident depression and whether it provides additional information over and above traditional risk factors for these conditions.

  8. Effect of physical training on exercise capacity, gas exchange and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria Sarullo, Filippo; Gristina, Tommaso; Brusca, Ignazio; Milia, Salvatore; Raimondi, Raffaella; Sajeva, Massimo; Maria La Chiusa, Stella; Serio, Gesualdo; Paterna, Salvatore; Di Pasquale, Pietro; Castello, Antonio

    2006-10-01

    Decreased exercise capacity is the main factor restricting the daily life of patients with chronic heart failure. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT pro-BNP) is strongly related to the severity of and is an independent predictor of outcome in chronic heart failure. The study aimed to evaluate the effect of exercise training on functional capacity and on changes in NT pro-BNP levels and to assess the effect of exercise training on quality of life. Sixty patients (45 men/15 women, mean age 52.7 years; +/-5.3 SD), with stable heart failure (45 ischaemic/hypertensive and 15 idiopathic patients), in New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class II (n=35) to III (n=25), with an ejection fraction less than 40%, were randomly assigned to a training (n=30) and a control group (n=30). The training group (30 patients) performed 3 months of supervised physical training programme using a bicycle ergometer for 30 min three times a week at a load corresponding to 60-70% of their oxygen consumption (VO2) peak. The control group did not change their previous physical activity. A graded maximal exercise test with respiratory gas analysis and an endurance test with constant workload corresponding to 85% of the peak oxygen load at the baseline and after 3 months were performed, and at the same times NT pro-BNP levels were measured. The exercise capacity increased from 15.8 (+/-2.3 SD) to 29.9 (+/-2.1 SD) min (Pfunctional class. Physical training of moderate intensity significantly improves the exercise capacity and neurohormonal modulation in patients with chronic heart failure. This is associated with an alleviation of symptoms and improvement in quality of life.

  9. Combination of Urinary Sodium/Creatinine Ratio and Plasma Brain Natriuretic Peptide Level Predicts Successful Tolvaptan Therapy in Patients With Heart Failure and Volume Overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuichi; Dohi, Kaoru; Watanabe, Kiyotaka; Tanimura, Muneyoshi; Takeuchi, Tetsushiro; Sugiura, Emiyo; Sugimoto, Tadafumi; Kumagai, Naoto; Ogura, Toru; Nakamori, Shiro; Fujimoto, Naoki; Yamada, Norikazu; Ito, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the short-term clinical and hemodynamic effects of tolvaptan therapy and to identify predictors of the therapeutic outcomes, we retrospectively recruited 60 consecutive hospitalized heart failure (HF) patients (70 ± 11 years) with volume overload. The subjects were divided into two groups on the basis of the changes in HF symptom scores and hemodynamic status assessed by right heart catheterization after tolvaptan therapy (median: 7 days). The majority of patients were successfully treated (group 1). However, 22% of patients (group 2) were unsuccessfully treated, in whom 1) the HF symptom score worsened or 2) there was a stationary HF symptom score ≥ 6 points, and mean PCWP > 18 mmHg and mean RAP > 10 mmHg, after tolvaptan therapy. HF symptom scores, hemodynamic parameters, and plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level improved in group 1, but all of these parameters remained unchanged in group 2. Lower urine sodium/creatinine ratio (UNa/UCr) and higher BNP level at baseline were independently associated with unsuccessful tolvaptan therapy, and UNa/UCr best predicts unsuccessful tolvaptan therapy with a cut-off value of 46.5 mEq/g·Cr (AUC 0.847, 95% CI: 0.718-0.976, sensitivity 77%, specificity 81%, P 778 pg/mL predicted unsuccessful tolvaptan therapy with high diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity 54%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, negative predictive value 89%, and accuracy 90%). In summary, short-term tolvaptan therapy ameliorated HF symptoms and provided hemodynamic improvement in the majority of patients, and UNa/UCr and BNP level strongly predicted the therapeutic outcomes.

  10. Measurement of Urinary Amino-Terminal Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide in Childhood Lower Respiratory Tract Infections: An Indicator of Clinical Severity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisa Eda Çullas İlarslan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Prompt diagnosis and determination of the clinical severity and intervention of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI is essential for the prevention and management of life-threatening complications. Laboratory tests do not serve as accurate indicators of clinical severity. Our aim was to evaluate the contribution of urinary amino-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-ProBNP concentrations in children with LRTI to clinical assessment in terms of determining clinical severity and the necessity of hospitalization. Materials and Methods: This prospective non-randomised study included a total of 160 patients, aged 0-6 years, diagnosed with LRTI [(group 1=outpatient group (n=108, and (group 2=hospitalized patients (n=52]. The control group (group 3 was comprised of 46 healthy children. Urinary NT-ProBNP level of each participant was measured by ELISA method. Results: Although not significant, the mean urinary NT-ProBNP level of all patients was higher than that of the control group (p=0.322. When we compared the three groups separately, the highest levels belonged to outpatients whereas hospitalized patients showed slightly lower levels than the control group without any statistical significance (p=0.128. As for newborns (n=16, patients showed higher levels than the controls (p=0.041. P value <0.05 was considered significant. Conclusion: Although urinary NT-ProBNP level tends to increase to some extent in childhood LRTI, this alteration does not seem to be valuable in the prediction of the severity of the disease. We believe that the establishment of further studies including larger series of patients, especially neonates, is warranted.

  11. Methods of assessing the functional status of patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction in interventional studies: can brain natriuretic peptide measurement be used as surrogate for the traditional methods?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdulla, Jawdat; Køber, Lars; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To review whether brain natriuretic peptides (BNP) can be used as a surrogate for the traditional methods of assessing functional status in interventional studies of patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD). METHODS AND RESULTS: The traditional methods for assessing...... functional status including New York Heart Association (NYHA) class, exercise intolerance and quality of life were reviewed in relation to BNP measurements in patients with LVSD. A meta-analysis of four studies evaluating BNP levels versus exercise peak oxygen uptake or 6-minute walking distance showed...

  12. Incremental value of a combination of cardiac troponin T, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide and C-reactive protein for prediction of mortality in end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallén, Jonas; Madsen, Lene Helleskov; Ladefoged, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective. To determine the relative prognostic merits of C-reactive protein (CRP), cardiac troponin T (cTnT) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) for prediction of all-cause death in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) receiving haemodialysis. Material...... and methods. This prospective, controlled cohort study included 109 patients. Biomarkers were sampled at inclusion and considered as categorical and continuous variables in Cox proportional hazard models. Results. Mean follow-up ± SD was 926 ± 385 days, during which 52 patients (48%) died. All three markers...

  13. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide is a useful prognostic marker in patients with pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension and renal insufficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Harbaum

    Full Text Available N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP is a routinely used prognostic parameter in patients with pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension (PH. As it accumulates in the presence of impaired renal function, the clinical utility of NT-proBNP in PH patients with concomitant renal insufficiency remains unclear. In a retrospective approach, patients with pre-capillary PH (group I or IV and concomitant renal insufficiency at time of right heart catheterization (glomerular filtration rate (GFR ≤60 ml/min/1.73 m2 were identified out of all prevalent pre-capillary PH patients treated at a single center. Forty patients with renal insufficiency (25.8% were identified and matched regarding hemodynamic parameters with a control group of 56 PH patients with normal renal function (GFR >60 ml/min/1.73 m2. Correlations of NT-proBNP levels with hemodynamic and prognostic parameters (time to clinical worsening and overall survival were assessed. Overall, GFR correlated inversely with NT-proBNP and had the strongest influence on NT-proBNP levels in a stepwise multiple linear regression model including hemodynamic parameters and age (r2 = 0.167. PH patients with renal insufficiency had significant higher levels of NT-proBNP (median: 1935 ng/l vs. 573 ng/l, p = 0.001. Nevertheless, NT-proBNP correlated with invasive hemodynamic parameters in these patients. Using higher cut-off values than in patients with preserved renal function, NT-proBNP levels were significantly associated with time to clinical worsening (>1660 ng/l, p = 0.001 and survival (>2212 ng/l, p = 0.047 in patients with renal insufficiency. Multivariate Cox's proportional hazards analysis including established prognostic parameters, age and GFR confirmed NT-proBNP as an independent risk factor for clinical worsening in PH patients with renal insufficiency (hazard ratio 4.8, p = 0.007. Thus, in a retrospective analysis we showed that NT-proBNP levels correlated with

  14. Does Serum N-Terminal pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide Level Predict the Severity of Angiographic Lesions in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome?

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    Afsaneh Rajabiani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP, a polypeptide secreted by ventricular myocytes in response to stretch, was suggested as a predictor of adverse prognosis of the acute coronary syndrome (ACS. We examined the association between NT-proBNP level and angiographic findings in ACS patients to determine whether it could be used as a predictor of the severity of angiographic lesions.Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 126 patients with chest pain or other ischemic heart symptoms suggestive  of ACS.  Venous  blood  samples  were  drawn  to  measure  serum  levels  of  NT-proBNP. Afterward,  coronary angiography was performed and the patients were categorized into four groups according to the number of coronary vessels with significant stenosis. The severity of angiographic lesions was assessed with the Gensini scoring system.Results: According to angiographic diagnosis, 11 (8.7% patients had normal coronary arteries (no coronary artery disease [CAD] and 115 (91.3% had CAD, of whom 108 (85.7% had obstructive CAD and 7 (5.6% had minimal CAD. The serum NT-proBNP concentration was higher in the CAD group than in the non-CAD group (p value <0.01. A progressive significant increase in the NT-proBNP concentration according to the Gensini score and the number of involved vessels was reported after adjustment for sex and age. Furthermore, the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (ROC analysis indicated that an NT-proBNP cut-point of 400 pg/ml could predict obstructive CAD with a sensitivity of 65% and a specificity of 78%.Conclusion: Higher levels of NT-proBNP among our ACS patients were associated with the severity of angiographic lesions in terms of both the Gensini score and the number of involved vessels. This finding underscores the potential role of NT-proBNP in predicting the severity of CAD before performing angiography.

  15. [Effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Acupoint Stimulation on Post-surgical Gastrointestinal Function, Autonomic Nerve Activities and Plasma Brain-gut Peptide Levels in Patients Undergoing Gastrointestinal Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Jin; Zhao, Wen-Sheng; Shao, Xiao-Mei; Yang, Ai-Ming; Zhang, Fang-Fang; Fang, Jian-Qiao

    2016-06-25

    To observe the effect of transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation (TEAS) on ileus-postope-rative gastrointestinal functions and plasma ghrelin, motilin, and gastrin contents, and heart rate variability (HRV) in patients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery, so as to explore the interaction of vagus-brain-gut peptide. A total of 58 patients undergoing elective gastrointestinal surgery were randomly assigned to TEAS (n=29) and sham-TEAS group (n=29, patients had no subjective sensation to 1 mA TEAS, thus, being considered to be sham-TEAS). TEAS (2 Hz/100 Hz, 6-8 mA for LI 4-PC 6, 12-18 mA for ST 36-SP 6) was applied to bilateral Hegu (LI 4)-Neiguan (PC 6) from 30 min pre-operation to the end of the operation and to bilateral LI 4-PC 6 and Zusanli (ST 36)-Sanyinjiao (SP 6) for 30 minutes twice daily in 3 consecutive post-operative days. ECGs of 12 leads were recorded to analyze different parameters of HRV from 2 days before and 4 days after surgery. Plasma ghrelin, motilin and gastrin contents were assayed by radioimmunoassay, and the patients' first bowel sound, first independent walk, first flatus, first solid food-intake and first defecation were recorded to evaluate the recovery state of gastrointestinal motility. Postoperative gastrointestinal motility:compared with the sham-TEAS group, the first bowel sound and the first defecation after surgery appeared apparently earlier in the TEAS group (P0.05). HRV domains:in comparison with pre-surgery, the levels of low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) of frequency domain (FD) and root mean square of successive differences (rMSSD) of the time domain (TD) of HRV 4 days after surgery were significantly decreased in the sham-TEAS group (P0.05). Compared with the sham-TEAS group, the HF and rMSSD levels were significantly increased in the TEAS group 4 days after the surgery (P<0.05). No significant differences were found between the two groups in the levels of very low frequency, LF and LF/HF levels of FD, and

  16. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide is related with coronary flow velocity reserve and diastolic dysfunction in patients with asymmetric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesic, Milorad; Seferovic, Jelena; Trifunovic, Danijela; Djordjevic-Dikic, Ana; Giga, Vojislav; Jovanovic, Ivana; Petrovic, Olga; Marinkovic, Jelena; Stankovic, Sanja; Stepanovic, Jelena; Ristic, Arsen; Petrovic, Milan; Mujovic, Nebojsa; Vujisic-Tesic, Bosiljka; Beleslin, Branko; Vukcevic, Vladan; Stankovic, Goran; Seferovic, Petar

    2017-10-01

    The relations of elevated N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) and cardiac ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients is uncertain. Therefore we designed the study with the following aims: (1) to analyze plasma concentrations of NT-pro-BNP in various subsets of HCM patients; (2) to reveal the correlations of NT-pro-BNP, myocardial ischemia, and diastolic dysfunction; (3) to assess predictors of the elevated plasma levels of NT-pro-BNP. In 61 patients (mean age 48.9±16.3 years; 26 male) with asymmetric HCM plasma levels of NT-pro-BNP were obtained. Standard transthoracic examination, tissue Doppler echocardiography with measurement of transthoracic coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR) in left anterior descending artery (LAD) was done. Mean natural logarithm value of NT-pro-BNP was 7.11±0.95pg/ml [median value 1133 (interquartile range 561-2442)pg/ml]. NT-pro-BNP was significantly higher in patients with higher NYHA class, in obstructive HCM, more severe mitral regurgitation, increased left atrial volume index (LAVI), presence of calcified mitral annulus, elevated left ventricular (LV) filling pressure and in decreased CFVR. Levels of NT-pro-BNP significantly correlated with the ratio of E/e' (r=0.534, p<0.001), LV outflow tract gradient (r=0.503, p=0.024), LAVI (r=0.443, p<0.001), while inversely correlated with CFVR LAD (r=-0.569, p<0.001). When multivariate analysis was done only CFVR LAD and E/e' emerged as independent predictors of NT-pro-BNP. Plasma levels of NT-pro-BNP were significantly higher in HCM patients with more advanced disease. Elevated NT-pro-BNP not only reflects the diastolic impairment of the LV, but it might also be the result of cardiac ischemia in patients with HCM. Copyright © 2017 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Bioactive Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Banan-Mwine Daliri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development.

  18. Bioactive Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daliri, Eric Banan-Mwine; Oh, Deog H; Lee, Byong H

    2017-04-26

    The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development.

  19. Utility of amino-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, galectin-3, and apelin for the evaluation of patients with acute heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kimmenade, Roland R.; Januzzi, James L.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Sharma, Umesh C.; Bakker, Jaap A.; Low, Adrian F.; Martinez, Abelardo; Crijns, Harry J.; MacRae, Calum A.; Menheere, Paul P.; Pinto, Yigal M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to explore the role of new biomarkers in heart failure (HF). BACKGROUND: We investigated the utility of novel serum markers alone or together with natriuretic peptide testing for diagnosis and short-term prognosis estimation in subjects with acute HF. METHODS: Plasma

  20. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, C-reactive protein, and urinary albumin levels as predictors of mortality and cardiovascular events in older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kistorp, Caroline; Raymond, Ilan; Pedersen, Frants

    2005-01-01

    B-type natriuretic peptides have been shown to predict cardiovascular disease in apparently healthy individuals but their predictive ability for mortality and future cardiovascular events compared with C-reactive protein (CRP) and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio is unknown....

  1. N-terminal-pro-brain natriuretic peptide elevations in the course of septic and non-septic shock reflect systolic left ventricular dysfunction assessed by transpulmonary thermodilution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Groeneveld; R.J. Trof (R.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The cardiac correlates, if any, of N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels in septic and non-septic shock patients remain controversial. Methods: In the 38 septic and 22 non-septic shock patients in the transpulmonary thermodilution arm of a previous

  2. Roles of Amyloid β-Peptide-Associated Oxidative Stress and Brain Protein Modifications in the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Butterfield, D. Allan; Reed, Tanea; Newman, Shelley F.; Sultana, Rukhsana

    2007-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, and ischemia just to name a few. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder that is recognized as the most common form of dementia. AD is histopathologically characterized by the presence of extracellular amyloid plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, the presence of oligomers of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), and ...

  3. Functional characterization of mouse organic anion transporting peptide 1a4 in the uptake and efflux of drugs across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ose, Atsushi; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Endo, Chihiro; Tohyama, Kimio; Miyajima, Mari; Kitamura, Satoshi; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the role of a multispecific organic anion transporter, Oatp1a4/Slco1a4, in drug transport across the blood-brain barrier. In vitro transport studies using human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing mouse Oatp1a4 identified the following compounds as Oatp1a4 substrates: pitavastatin (K(m) = 8.3 microM), rosuvastatin (K(m) = 12 microM), pravastatin, taurocholate (K(m) = 40 microM), digoxin, ochratoxin A, and [d-penicillamine(2,5)]-enkephalin. Double immunohistochemical staining of Oatp1a4 with P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or glial fibrillary acidic protein demonstrated that Oatp1a4 signals colocalized with P-gp signals partly but not with glial fibrillary acidic protein, suggesting that Oatp1a4 is expressed in both the luminal and the abluminal membranes of mouse brain capillary endothelial cells. The brain-to-blood transport of pitavastatin, rosuvastatin, pravastatin, and taurocholate after microinjection into the cerebral cortex was significantly decreased in Oatp1a4(-/-) mice compared with that in wild-type mice. The blood-to-brain transport of pitavastatin, rosuvastatin, taurocholate, and ochratoxin A, determined by in situ brain perfusion, was significantly lower in Oatp1a4(-/-) mice than in wild-type mice, whereas transport of pravastatin and [D-penicillamine(2,5)]-enkephalin was unchanged. The blood-to-brain transport of digoxin was significantly lower in Oatp1a4(-/-) mice than in wild-type mice only when P-gp was inhibited by N-(4-[2-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-6,7-dimethoxy-2-isoquinolinyl)ethyl]-phenyl)-9,10-dihydro-5-methoxy-9-oxo-4-acridine carboxamide (GF120918). Taken together, these results show that Oatp1a4 can mediate the brain-to-blood and blood-to-brain transport of its substrate drugs across the blood-brain barrier. The brain-to-plasma ratio of taurocholate, pitavastatin, and rosuvastatin was close to the capillary volume in wild-type mice, and it was not affected by Oatp1a4 dysfunction. Whether Oatp1a4 can deliver drugs from the blood

  4. Role of Troponins I and T and N-Terminal Prohormone of Brain Natriuretic Peptide in Monitoring Cardiac Safety of Patients With Early-Stage Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Breast Cancer Receiving Trastuzumab : A Herceptin Adjuvant Study Cardiac Marker Substudy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zardavas, Dimitrios; Suter, Thomas M.; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Steinseifer, Jutta; Noe, Johannes; Lauer, Sabine; Al-Sakaff, Nedal; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine J.; de Azambuja, Evandro

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Women receiving trastuzumab with chemotherapy are at risk for trastuzumab-related cardiac dysfunction (TRCD). We explored the prognostic value of cardiac markers (troponins I and T, N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide [NT-proBNP]) to predict baseline susceptibility to develop

  5. Plasma levels of N terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide as a prognostic value in primary graft dysfunction and a predictor of mortality in the immediate postoperative period of lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, I; Vicente, R; Moreno, I; Ramos, F; Solé, A; Morales, P; Vicente, J L; Barberá, M

    2009-01-01

    Primary graft dysfunction (PGD) is a form of acute lung injury secondary to lung transplantation (LT). The objective of our study was to analyse N terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) as a prognostic marker of morbidity and mortality and its possible relationship with the development of PGD. This prospective study of 50 consecutive lung transplantation patients used blood samples obtained at baseline, 24, 48, and 72 hours after admission. We analyzed the amino terminal fraction of the BNP prohormone (NT-pro-BNP). The development of PGD was defined following the criteria of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT). In this study 72% of patients developed PGD at T24, 42% of whom had severe grade III. There was no relationship between the development of PGD at any grade and NT-pro-BNP levels. Elevated levels of NT-pro-BNP were accompanied by greater postoperative mortality (P < .05).

  6. Enhancing Anticancer Effect of Gefitinib across the Blood–Brain Barrier Model Using Liposomes Modified with One α-Helical Cell-Penetrating Peptide or Glutathione and Tween 80

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Hung Lin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI, such as gefitinib, have been demonstrated to effectively treat the patients of extracranial non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. However, these patients often develop brain metastasis (BM during their disease course. The major obstacle to treat BM is the limited penetration of anticancer drugs across the blood–brain barrier (BBB. In the present study, we utilized gefitinib-loaded liposomes with different modifications to improve gefitinib delivery across the in vitro BBB model of bEnd.3 cells. Gefitinib was encapsulated in small unilamellar liposomes modified with glutathione (GSH and Tween 80 (SUV-G+T; one ligand plus one surfactant or RF (SUV-RF; one α-helical cell-penetrating peptide. GSH, Tween 80, and RF were tested by the sulforhodamine B (SRB assay to find their non-cytotoxic concentrations on bEnd.3 cells. The enhancement on gefitinib across the BBB was evaluated by cytotoxicity assay on human lung adenocarcinoma PC9 cells under the bEnd.3 cells grown on the transwell inserts. Our findings showed that gefitinib incorporated in SUV-G+T or SUV-RF across the bEnd.3 cells significantly reduced the viability of PC9 cells more than that of free gefitinib. Furthermore, SUV-RF showed no cytotoxicity on bEnd.3 cells and did not affect the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER and transendothelial permeability of sodium fluorescein across the BBB model. Moreover, flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy were employed to evaluate the endocytosis pathways of SUV-RF. The results indicated that the uptake into bEnd.3 cells was mainly through adsorptive-mediated mechanism via electrostatic interaction and partially through clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In conclusion, cell penetrating peptide-conjugated SUV-RF shed light on improving drug transport across the BBB via modulating the transcytosis pathway(s.

  7. Enhancing Anticancer Effect of Gefitinib across the Blood–Brain Barrier Model Using Liposomes Modified with One α-Helical Cell-Penetrating Peptide or Glutathione and Tween 80

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuan-Hung; Hong, Shu-Ting; Wang, Hsiang-Tsui; Lo, Yu-Li; Lin, Anya Maan-Yuh; Yang, James Chih-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), such as gefitinib, have been demonstrated to effectively treat the patients of extracranial non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, these patients often develop brain metastasis (BM) during their disease course. The major obstacle to treat BM is the limited penetration of anticancer drugs across the blood–brain barrier (BBB). In the present study, we utilized gefitinib-loaded liposomes with different modifications to improve gefitinib delivery across the in vitro BBB model of bEnd.3 cells. Gefitinib was encapsulated in small unilamellar liposomes modified with glutathione (GSH) and Tween 80 (SUV-G+T; one ligand plus one surfactant) or RF (SUV-RF; one α-helical cell-penetrating peptide). GSH, Tween 80, and RF were tested by the sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay to find their non-cytotoxic concentrations on bEnd.3 cells. The enhancement on gefitinib across the BBB was evaluated by cytotoxicity assay on human lung adenocarcinoma PC9 cells under the bEnd.3 cells grown on the transwell inserts. Our findings showed that gefitinib incorporated in SUV-G+T or SUV-RF across the bEnd.3 cells significantly reduced the viability of PC9 cells more than that of free gefitinib. Furthermore, SUV-RF showed no cytotoxicity on bEnd.3 cells and did not affect the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and transendothelial permeability of sodium fluorescein across the BBB model. Moreover, flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy were employed to evaluate the endocytosis pathways of SUV-RF. The results indicated that the uptake into bEnd.3 cells was mainly through adsorptive-mediated mechanism via electrostatic interaction and partially through clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In conclusion, cell penetrating peptide-conjugated SUV-RF shed light on improving drug transport across the BBB via modulating the transcytosis pathway(s). PMID:27916828

  8. Disaggregation of amyloid plaque in brain of Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice with daily subcutaneous administration of a tetravalent bispecific antibody that targets the transferrin receptor and the Abeta amyloid peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumbria, Rachita K; Hui, Eric Ka-Wai; Lu, Jeff Zhiqiang; Boado, Ruben J; Pardridge, William M

    2013-09-03

    Anti-amyloid antibodies (AAA) are under development as new therapeutics that disaggregate the amyloid plaque in brain in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the AAAs are large molecule drugs that do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), in the absence of BBB disruption. In the present study, an AAA was re-engineered for receptor-mediated transport across the BBB via the endogenous BBB transferrin receptor (TfR). A single chain Fv (ScFv) antibody form of an AAA was fused to the carboxyl terminus of each heavy chain of a chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) against the mouse TfR, and this produced a tetravalent bispecific antibody designated the cTfRMAb-ScFv fusion protein. Unlike a conventional AAA, which has a plasma half-time of weeks, the cTfRMAb-ScFv fusion protein is cleared from plasma in mice with a mean residence time of about 3 h. Therefore, a novel protocol was developed for the treatment of one year old presenilin (PS)-1/amyloid precursor protein (APP) AD double transgenic PSAPP mice, which were administered daily subcutaneous (sc) injections of 5 mg/kg of the cTfRMAb-ScFv fusion protein for 12 consecutive weeks. At the end of the treatment, brain amyloid plaques were quantified with confocal microscopy using both Thioflavin-S staining and immunostaining with the 6E10 antibody against Abeta amyloid fibrils. Fusion protein treatment caused a 57% and 61% reduction in amyloid plaque in the cortex and hippocampus, respectively. No increase in plasma immunoreactive Abeta amyloid peptide, and no cerebral microhemorrhage, was observed. Chronic daily sc treatment of the mice with the fusion protein caused no immune reactions and only a low titer antidrug antibody response. In conclusion, re-engineering AAAs for receptor-mediated BBB transport allows for reduction in brain amyloid plaque without cerebral microhemorrhage following daily sc treatment for 12 weeks.

  9. Acyl peptide hydrolase degrades monomeric and oligomeric amyloid-beta peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connor Peter B

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The abnormal accumulation of amyloid-beta peptide is believed to cause malfunctioning of neurons in the Alzheimer's disease brain. Amyloid-beta exists in different assembly forms in the aging mammalian brain including monomers, oligomers, and aggregates, and in senile plaques, fibrils. Recent findings suggest that soluble amyloid-beta oligomers may represent the primary pathological species in Alzheimer's disease and the most toxic form that impairs synaptic and thus neuronal function. We previously reported the isolation of a novel amyloid-beta-degrading enzyme, acyl peptide hydrolase, a serine protease that degrades amyloid-beta, and is different in structure and activity from other amyloid-beta-degrading enzymes. Results Here we report the further characterization of acyl peptide hydrolase activity using mass spectrometry. Acyl peptide hydrolase cleaves the amyloid-beta peptide at amino acids 13, 14 and 19. In addition, by real-time PCR we found elevated acyl peptide hydrolase expression in brain areas rich in amyloid plaques suggesting that this enzyme's levels are responsive to increases in amyloid-beta levels. Lastly, tissue culture experiments using transfected CHO cells expressing APP751 bearing the V717F mutation indicate that acyl peptide hydrolase preferentially degrades dimeric and trimeric forms of amyloid-beta. Conclusion These data suggest that acyl peptide hydrolase is involved in the degradation of oligomeric amyloid-beta, an activity that, if induced, might present a new tool for therapy aimed at reducing neurodegeneration in the Alzheimer's brain.

  10. Long-term treatment of aged Long Evans rats with a dietary supplement containing neuroprotective peptides (N-PEP-12) to prevent brain aging: effects of three months daily treatment by oral gavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter-Paier, B; Reininger-Gutmann, B; Wronski, R; Doppler, E; Moessler, H

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with morphological and functional changes in the brain, resulting in the deterioration of cognitive performance. Growth factors like BDNF are suggested to be involved in the regulation of age-related processes in the brain. A novel dietary supplement produced from purified nerve cell proteins, N-PEP-12, has shown to share properties with naturally occurring peptide growth factors by stimulating neurite outgrowth and beneficial effects on neuronal survival and protection against metabolic stress in cell cultures. The current study investigates the effects of long-term intake on age-dependent memory decline by assessing cognitive performance and synaptic density. All the experiments were performed in aged Long Evans rats randomly assigned to saline or N-PEP-12 once daily by gavage over a period of three months. Behavioral tests were performed in the Morris Water Maze after one, two and three months of treatment. Histological examinations were performed in the hippocampal formation and in the entorhinal cortex by measuring the synaptic density. This study shows that the oral intake of N-PEP-12 has beneficial effects on the cognitive performance of aged animals and that these effects go along with an increase in the synaptic density. Thus, N-PEP-12 may help maintain memory and learning performance during the aging process.

  11. Inhibition of PlexA1-mediated brain tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis using a transmembrane domain targeting peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Laurent; Goetz, Jacky; Vermot, Julien; Fernandez, Aurore; Baumlin, Nadège; Aci-Sèche, Samia; Orend, Gertraud; Roussel, Guy; Crémel, Gérard; Genest, Monique; Hubert, Pierre; Bagnard, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The neuropilin-plexin receptor complex regulates tumor cell migration and proliferation and thus is an interesting therapeutic target. High expression of neuropilin-1 is indeed associated with a bad prognosis in glioma patients. Q-RTPCR and tissue-array analyses showed here that Plexin-A1 is highly expressed in glioblastoma and that the highest level of expression correlates with the worse survival of patients. We next identified a developmental and tumor-associated pro-angiogenic role of Plexin-A1. Hence, by using molecular simulations and a two-hybrid like assay in parallel with biochemical and cellular assays we developed a specific Plexin-A1 peptidic antagonist disrupting transmembrane domain-mediated oligomerization of the receptor and subsequent signaling and functional activity. We found that this peptide exhibits anti-tumor activity in vivo on different human glioblastoma models including glioma cancer stem cells. Thus, screening Plexin-A1 expression and targeting Plexin-A1 in glioblastoma patients exhibit diagnostic and therapeutic value. PMID:27506939

  12. An optimized method for measuring hypocretin-1 peptide in the mouse brain reveals differential circadian regulation of hypocretin-1 levels rostral and caudal to the hypothalamus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justinussen, Jessica; Holm, A; Kornum, B R

    2015-01-01

    as does prepro-hypocretin mRNA in the hypothalamus. However, in midbrain and brainstem tissue caudal to the hypothalamus, there was less circadian fluctuation and a tendency for higher levels during the light phase. These data suggest that regulation of the hypocretin system differs between brain areas....

  13. Propeptide big-endothelin, N-terminal-pro brain natriuretic peptide and mortality. The Ludwigshafen risk and cardiovascular health (LURIC) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergei, Ingrid; Krämer, Bernhard K; Scharnagl, Hubert; Stojakovic, Tatjana; März, Winfried; Mondorf, Ulrich

    The endothelin system (Big-ET-1) is a key regulator in cardiovascular (CV) disease and congestive heart failure (CHF). We have examined the incremental value of Big-ET-1 in predicting total and CV mortality next to the well-established CV risk marker N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide (NT-proBNP). Big-ET-1 and NT-proBNP were determined in 2829 participants referred for coronary angiography (follow-up 9.9 years). Big-ET-1 is an independent predictor of total, CV mortality and death due to CHF. The conjunct use of Big-ET-1 and NT-proBNP improves the risk stratification of patients with intermediate to high risk of CV death and CHF. Big-ET-1improves risk stratification in patients referred for coronary angiography.

  14. The biological variation of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes: a case control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana González

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The incidence of heart failure in type 2 diabetes is high and it has poorer prognosis when compared with patients without diabetes. Access to echocardiography is limited and alternative methods to identify early heart failure such as the measurement of natriuretic peptides levels have been proposed. However, their wide biological variation could limit their clinical utility. Our aim was to determine if the intrinsic biological variation of one of these peptides, N-terminal proBNP, is as wide in type 2 diabetes as it is in health and to calculate the critical difference values that could be utilised in clinical practice to ensure changes observed between two samples are due to intervention rather than to its biological variability. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 12 postmenopausal women with diet controlled type 2 diabetes and without heart failure were compared with 11 control postmenopausal women without diabetes. N-terminal proBNP levels were measured on 10 occasions. The biological variation was calculated according to Fraser's methods. The mean NT-proBNP level was similar in both groups (mean ± standard deviation; type 2 diabetes, 10.7 pmol/L± 8.5 versus 8.49±6.0 pmol/L, p = 0.42. The biological variation was also similarly wide. The critical difference in patients with type 2 diabetes was between -70% and ±236%. CONCLUSIONS: Type 2 diabetes does not appear to significantly influence the marked biological variation of N-terminal proBNP in postmenopausal women. The critical difference values reported in this study could be used to titrate therapy or monitor response to interventions although the change required in between samples is wide and this might limit its utility.

  15. Characterization of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor in male mouse brain using a novel antibody and in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Bo; Pyke, Charles; Rasch, Morten Grønbech

    2017-01-01

    for immunohistochemistry with murine tissue and show detailed distribution of GLP-1R expression as well as mapping of GLP-1R mRNA by non-radioactive in situ hybridization. Semi-automated image analysis was performed to map the GLP-1R distribution to atlas plates from the Allen Institute of Brain Science (AIBS). The GLP-1R...... knowledge on GLP-1R expression in neuronal cell bodies and neuronal projections....

  16. Sialic Acid Deposition Impairs the Utility of AAV9, but Not Peptide-modified AAVs for Brain Gene Therapy in a Mouse Model of Lysosomal Storage Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yong Hong; Claflin, Kristin; Geoghegan, James C.; Davidson, Beverly L.

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant vector systems have been recently identified that when delivered systemically can transduce neurons, glia, and endothelia in the central nervous system (CNS), providing an opportunity to develop therapies for diseases affecting the brain without performing direct intracranial injections. Vector systems based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) include AAV serotype 9 (AAV9) and AAVs that have been re-engineered at the capsid level for CNS tropism. Here, we performed a head-to-head comp...

  17. Natriuretic Peptides: Biochemistry, Physiology, Clinical Implication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Kozlova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past years, the interest of theorists and clinicians has steadily increased in the myocardially secreted hormones – natriuretic peptides. At the Congress of the European Society of Anesthesiology (Munich, 2007, B-type natriuretic peptides were included into the list of the parameters of perioperative laboratory monitoring that is expedient in the practice of anesthetists and resuscitation specialists. The literature review shows the history of discovery and identification of different types of natriuretic peptides and considers the matters of their biochemistry. It also details information on the synthesis, secretion, and clearance of these peptides, as well as their receptor apparatus in various organs and tissues. The physiology of the regulatory system is described, as applied to the cardiovascular, excretory, central nervous systems, and the neuroendocrine one. Special attention is given to the current publications on the control of B-type natriuretic peptides as biomarkers of cardiac dysfunction. The diagnostic and prognostic values of peptides are analyzed in chronic circulatory insufficiency, coronary heart disease, and other car-diological and non-cardiological diseases. The prognostic value of elevated B-type natriuretic peptide levels in cardiac surgery is separately considered. It is concluded that the changes in the level of B-type natriuretic peptides in different clinical situations are the subject of numerous researches mainly made in foreign countries. The bulk of these researches are devoted to the study of peptides in cardiology and other areas of therapy. Studies on the use of peptides in reanimatology are relatively few and their results are rather discordant. The foregoing opens up wide prospects for studying the use of B-type natriuretic peptides in Russian intensive care and anesthesiology. Key words: natriuretic peptides, brain nautriuretic peptides, NT-proBNP.

  18. The Role of “Mixed” Orexigenic and Anorexigenic Signals and Autoantibodies Reacting with Appetite-Regulating Neuropeptides and Peptides of the Adipose Tissue-Gut-Brain Axis: Relevance to Food Intake and Nutritional Status in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvido Smitka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Eating disorders such as anorexia (AN and bulimia nervosa (BN are characterized by abnormal eating behavior. The essential aspect of AN is that the individual refuses to maintain a minimal normal body weight. The main features of BN are binge eating and inappropriate compensatory methods to prevent weight gain. The gut-brain-adipose tissue (AT peptides and neutralizing autoantibodies play an important role in the regulation of eating behavior and growth hormone release. The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve an interplay between gut, brain, and AT. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and serotoninergic systems are required for communication between brain satiety centre, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include neuropeptides ghrelin, neuropeptide Y (NPY, peptide YY (PYY, cholecystokinin (CCK, leptin, putative anorexigen obestatin, monoamines dopamine, norepinephrine (NE, serotonin, and neutralizing autoantibodies. This extensive and detailed report reviews data that demonstrate that hunger-satiety signals play an important role in the pathogenesis of eating disorders. Neuroendocrine dysregulations of the AT-gut-brain axis peptides and neutralizing autoantibodies may result in AN and BN. The circulating autoantibodies can be purified and used as pharmacological tools in AN and BN. Further research is required to investigate the orexigenic/anorexigenic synthetic analogs and monoclonal antibodies for potential treatment of eating disorders in clinical practice.

  19. The Role of “Mixed” Orexigenic and Anorexigenic Signals and Autoantibodies Reacting with Appetite-Regulating Neuropeptides and Peptides of the Adipose Tissue-Gut-Brain Axis: Relevance to Food Intake and Nutritional Status in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papezova, Hana; Vondra, Karel; Hill, Martin; Hainer, Vojtech; Nedvidkova, Jara

    2013-01-01

    Eating disorders such as anorexia (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are characterized by abnormal eating behavior. The essential aspect of AN is that the individual refuses to maintain a minimal normal body weight. The main features of BN are binge eating and inappropriate compensatory methods to prevent weight gain. The gut-brain-adipose tissue (AT) peptides and neutralizing autoantibodies play an important role in the regulation of eating behavior and growth hormone release. The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve an interplay between gut, brain, and AT. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and serotoninergic systems are required for communication between brain satiety centre, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include neuropeptides ghrelin, neuropeptide Y (NPY), peptide YY (PYY), cholecystokinin (CCK), leptin, putative anorexigen obestatin, monoamines dopamine, norepinephrine (NE), serotonin, and neutralizing autoantibodies. This extensive and detailed report reviews data that demonstrate that hunger-satiety signals play an important role in the pathogenesis of eating disorders. Neuroendocrine dysregulations of the AT-gut-brain axis peptides and neutralizing autoantibodies may result in AN and BN. The circulating autoantibodies can be purified and used as pharmacological tools in AN and BN. Further research is required to investigate the orexigenic/anorexigenic synthetic analogs and monoclonal antibodies for potential treatment of eating disorders in clinical practice. PMID:24106499

  20. Neuroprotective peptide drug delivery and development: potential new therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozes, I

    2001-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative disorders are prevalent among the elderly and might be considered as the plague of the 21st century. It is thus imperative to find cures for these conditions. The use of nerve growth factor proteins as neuroprotective therapeutics is limited by their hindered mobility through the blood-brain barrier. Peptides provide an attractive alternative. However, do peptide derivatives retain the activity of the entire protein? Are they stable? Would peptides cross the blood-brain barrier and what are the potential side effects? Examples are put forth to strengthen our opinion that peptides are important candidates for future drug development.

  1. Peptides and Food Intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  2. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide for additional risk stratification in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome and an elevated troponin T: an Invasive versus Conservative Treatment in Unstable coronary Syndromes (ICTUS) substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windhausen, Fons; Hirsch, Alexander; Sanders, Gerard T; Cornel, Jan Hein; Fischer, Johan; van Straalen, Jan P; Tijssen, Jan G P; Verheugt, Freek W A; de Winter, Robbert J

    2007-04-01

    New evidence has emerged that the assessment of multiple biomarkers such as cardiac troponin T (cTnT) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome (nSTE-ACS) provides unique prognostic information. The purpose of this study was to assess the association between baseline NT-proBNP levels and outcome in patients who have nSTE-ACS with an elevated cTnT and to determine whether patients with elevated NT-proBNP levels benefit from an early invasive treatment strategy. Baseline samples for NT-proBNP measurements were available in 1141 patients who have nSTE-ACS with an elevated cTnT randomized to an early or a selective invasive strategy. Patients were followed-up for the occurrence of death, myocardial infarction (MI), and rehospitalization for angina. We showed that increased levels of NT-proBNP were associated with several indicators of risk and severe coronary artery disease. Mortality by 1 year was 7.3% in the highest quartile (> or = 1170 ng/L for men, > or = 2150 ng/L for women) compared with 1.1% of patients in the lower 3 quartiles (P < .0001). N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (highest quartile vs lower 3 quartiles) was a strong independent predictor of mortality (hazard ratio 5.0, 95% CI 2.1-11.6, P = .0002). However, NT-proBNP levels were not associated with the incidence of recurrent MI by 1 year. Furthermore, we could not demonstrate a benefit of an early invasive strategy compared with a selective invasive strategy in patients with an elevated NT-proBNP level. We confirmed that NT-proBNP is a strong independent predictor of mortality by 1 year but not of recurrent MI in patients who have nSTE-ACS with an elevated cTnT. We could not demonstrate a benefit of an early invasive strategy compared with a selective invasive strategy.

  3. Peptide-Lipid Interactions: Experiments and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdiero, Stefania; Falanga, Annarita; Cantisani, Marco; Vitiello, Mariateresa; Morelli, Giancarlo; Galdiero, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    The interactions between peptides and lipids are of fundamental importance in the functioning of numerous membrane-mediated cellular processes including antimicrobial peptide action, hormone-receptor interactions, drug bioavailability across the blood-brain barrier and viral fusion processes. Moreover, a major goal of modern biotechnology is obtaining new potent pharmaceutical agents whose biological action is dependent on the binding of peptides to lipid-bilayers. Several issues need to be addressed such as secondary structure, orientation, oligomerization and localization inside the membrane. At the same time, the structural effects which the peptides cause on the lipid bilayer are important for the interactions and need to be elucidated. The structural characterization of membrane active peptides in membranes is a harsh experimental challenge. It is in fact accepted that no single experimental technique can give a complete structural picture of the interaction, but rather a combination of different techniques is necessary. PMID:24036440

  4. Human peptide transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    2002-01-01

    Peptide transporters are epithelial solute carriers. Their functional role has been characterised in the small intestine and proximal tubules, where they are involved in absorption of dietary peptides and peptide reabsorption, respectively. Currently, two peptide transporters, PepT1 and PepT2...... to peptide transporters, as well as their role in drug delivery and in potential future drug design and targeted tissue delivery of peptides and peptidomimetics....

  5. An electrochemical immunosensor for brain natriuretic peptide prepared with screen-printed carbon electrodes nanostructured with gold nanoparticles grafted through aryl diazonium salt chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafín, V; Torrente-Rodríguez, R M; González-Cortés, A; García de Frutos, P; Sabaté, M; Campuzano, S; Yáñez-Sedeño, P; Pingarrón, J M

    2018-03-01

    A sensitive amperometric immunosensor has been prepared by immobilization of capture antibodies onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) grafted on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) through aryl diazonium salt chemistry using 4-aminothiophenol (AuNPs-S-Phe-SPCE). The immunosensor was designed for the accurate determination of clinically relevant levels of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in human serum samples. The nanostructured electrochemical platform resulted in an ordered layer of AuNPs onto SPCEs which combined the advantages of high conductivity and improved stability of immobilized biomolecules. The resulting disposable immunosensor used a sandwich type immunoassay involving a peroxidase-labeled detector antibody. The amperometric transduction was carried out at -0.20V (vs the Ag pseudo-reference electrode) upon the addition of hydroquinone (HQ) as electron transfer mediator and H2O2 as the enzyme substrate. The nanostructured immunosensors show a storage stability of at least 25 days, a linear range between 0.014 and 15ngmL-1, and a LOD of 4pgmL-1, which is 100 times lower than the established cut-off value for heart failure (HF) diagnosis. The performance of the immunosensor is advantageously compared with that provided with immunosensors prepared by grafting SPCE with p-phenylendiamine (H2N-Phe-SPCE) and attaching AuNPs by immersion into an AuNPs suspension or by electrochemical deposition, as well as with immunosensors constructed using commercial AuNPs-modified SPCEs. The developed immunosensor was applied to the successful analysis of human serum from heart failure (HF) patients upon just a 10-times dilution as sample treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Serum Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Is Associated with Low Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction and Elevated Plasma Brain-Type Natriuretic Peptide Level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ichi Fujita

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested that soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR, a biomarker of subclinical levels of inflammation, is significantly correlated with cardiovascular events.We investigated the association between suPAR and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, left ventricular mass index (LVMI, and plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP among cardiac inpatients.In total, 242 patients (mean age 71.3 ± 9.8 years; 70 women admitted to the cardiology department were enrolled in the study. suPAR was significantly correlated with LVEF (R = -0.24, P 3236 pg/mL was associated with low LVEF ( 300 pg/mL with an odds ratio of 3.84 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22-12.1 and 5.36 (95% CI, 1.32-21.8, respectively, after adjusting for age, sex, log-transformed estimated glomerular filtration rate (log(eGFR, C-reactive protein, and diuretic use. The association between suPAR and LVMI was not statistically significant. In multivariate receiver operating characteristic analysis, addition of log(suPAR to the combination of age, sex, log(eGFR and CRP incrementally improved the prediction of low LVEF (area under the curve [AUC], 0.827 to 0.852, P = 0.046 and BNP ≥ 300 pg/mL (AUC, 0.869 to 0.906; P = 0.029.suPAR was associated with low LVEF and elevated BNP, but not with left ventricular hypertrophy, independent of CRP, renal function, and diuretic use among cardiac inpatients who were not undergoing chronic hemodialysis.

  7. Assessment of plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), activity-dependent neurotrophin protein (ADNP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) concentrations in treatment-naïve humans with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanowski, Jan; Uchman, Dorota; Litwiniuk, Anna; Kalisz, Malgorzata; Wolinska-Witort, Ewa; Martynska, Lidia; Baranowska, Boguslawa; Bik, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by coexisting processes of inflammation, demyelination, axonal neurodegeneration and gliosis. Autoimmune processes play a pivotal role in the disease. The immune system may be modulated by neurotrophins and neurotrophin factors. Aim of the study was to assess plasma levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), activity-dependent neurotrophin protein (ADNP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in treatment-naïve humans with newly diagnosed multiple sclerosis. We also elucidated the potential influence of selected inflammatory agents on peripheral concentration of BDNF and ADNP. The study population comprised of 31 untreated patients with MS and 36 controls from a single hospital centre. Assessment of BDNF and ADNP was performed with use of ELISA methods. VIP was measured with RIA. Selected cytokine levels (IL 6, IL 10, and TNF α) were evaluated with ELISA tests. Statistical analyses were performed. We failed to find any significant differences between ADNP, BDNF, VIP, CRP levels and concentration of cytokines between individuals with MS and the controls. No correlation was observed between ADNP, BDNF and VIP as the first parameter and CRP, IL 6, IL 10, TNFα levels and the Expanded Disability Status Scale score in MS. Newly diagnosed, treatment-naïve patients with MS have comparable levels of plasma BDNF, ADNP and VIP to those of healthy controls.

  8. The association of N-terminal pro-brain-type natriuretic peptide with hemodynamics and functional capacity in therapy-naive precapillary pulmonary hypertension: results from a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghaus, T M; Kutsch, J; Faul, C; von Scheidt, W; Schwaiblmair, M

    2017-12-04

    N-terminal pro-brain-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is currently used as a surrogate marker for disease severity in pulmonary hypertension (PH). However, NT-proBNP tends to have a high variability and may insufficiently correlate with hemodynamics and exercise capacity. To investigate the association of NT-proBNP with hemodynamics and cardio-pulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in 84 therapy-naive patients with precapillary PH. NT-proBNP levels were significantly correlated with hemodynamics and CPET parameters except for cardiac index, diffusion capacity, PaO2 at peak exercise, and peak minute ventilation. NT-proBNP correlated best with hemodynamics and CPET in women and patients >65 years. NT-proBNP correlated better with CPET in pulmonary arterial hypertension compared to chronic thromboembolic PH (CTEPH). NT-proBNP is associated with disease severity in precapillary PH. The association might be age- and gender-dependent. NT-proBNP may insufficiently correlate with disease severity in CTEPH, possibly due to comorbidity.

  9. An investigation of appetite-related peptide transcript expression in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) brain following a Camelina sativa meal-supplemented feeding trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuziak, Sarah M; Rise, Matthew L; Volkoff, Hélène

    2014-10-25

    Camelina sativa is a hardy oilseed crop with seeds that contain high levels of ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and protein, which are critical components of fish feed. Camelina might thus be used as a cheaper and more sustainable supplement to fish-based products in aquaculture. Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, is a species of interest in the aquaculture industry due to a decrease in wild populations and subsequent collapse of some cod fisheries. As cod are carnivorous fish, it is necessary to determine how this species physiologically tolerates plant-based diets. In this study, juvenile Atlantic cod were subjected to 13 weeks of either 15 or 30% camelina meal (CM)-supplemented diets or a control fish meal feed. Growth and food intake were evaluated and the mRNA expression of appetite-related hormones [pro-melanin-concentrating hormone (pmch), hypocretin (synonym: orexin, hcrt), neuropeptide Y (npy) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (cart)] was assessed using quantitative real-time PCR in brain regions related to food intake regulation (telencephalon/preoptic area, optic tectum/thalamus and hypothalamus). CM inclusion diets caused decreases in both growth and food intake in Atlantic cod. Optic tectum pmch transcript expression was significantly higher in fish fed the 30% CM diet compared to fish fed the 15% CM diet. In the hypothalamus, compared to fish fed the control diet, hcrt expression was significantly higher in fish fed the 30% CM diet, while npy transcript expression was significantly higher in fish fed the 15% CM diet. cart mRNA expression was not affected by diet in any brain region. Further studies are needed to determine which factors (e.g. anti-nutritional factors, palatability and nutritional deficits) contribute to reduced feed intake and growth, as well as the maximum CM inclusion level that does not negatively influence feed intake, growth rate and the transcript expression of appetite-related factors in Atlantic cod. Copyright © 2014

  10. Elevated admission N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide level predicts the development of atrial fibrillation in general surgical intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokengarmwong, Nalin; Yeh, Daniel Dante; Chang, Yuchiao; Ortiz, Luis Alfonso; Kaafarani, Haytham M A; Fagenholz, Peter; King, David R; DeMoya, Marc; Butler, Kathryn; Lee, Jarone; Velmahos, George; Januzzi, James Louis; Lee-Lewandrowski, Elizabeth; Lewandrowski, Kent

    2017-09-01

    New onset atrial fibrillation (AF) in critically ill surgical patients is associated with significant morbidity and increased mortality. N-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is released by cardiomyocytes in response to stress and may predict AF development after surgery. We hypothesized that elevated NT-proBNP level at surgical intensive care unit (ICU) admission predicts AF development in a general surgical and trauma population. From July to October 2015, NT-proBNP concentrations were measured at ICU admission. Abnormal NT-proBNP concentrations were defined by age-adjusted cut-offs. We examined the relationship between the development of AF and demographics, clinical variables, and NT-proBNP level using univariate analysis and a multivariable logistic regression model. Three hundred eighty-seven subjects were included in the cohort, none of whom were in AF at ICU admission. The median age was 63 years (52-73 years), and 40.3% were women. The risk of developing AF was higher for abnormal versus normal NT-proBNP (22% vs. 4%; p < 0.0001). Using optimal derived cutoffs (regardless of age), the risk of developing AF was 2% for NT-proBNP less than 600 ng/L, 15% for NT-proBNP of 600 ng/L to 1,999 ng/L, and 27% for NT-proBNP of 2,000 ng/L or greater. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified three independent predictors for new-onset AF: age, older than 70 years (odds ratio [OR], 3.7, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5-9.3), history of AF (OR, 25.3; 95% CI, 9.6-67.0), and NT-proBNP of 600 or greater (OR, 4.3; 95% CI, 1.3-14.2). When none or only one predictor was present, AF incidence was less than 1%. When all three predictors were present, AF incidence was 66%. For subjects 70 years or older but no history of AF, AF incidence was 12.8% when NT-proBNP was 600 or greater compared with 0% when NT-proBNP was less than 600. For subjects younger than 70 years with a history of AF, AF incidence was 44.4% when NT-proBNP was 600 or higher compared to 0

  11. Antimicrobial peptides in action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leontiadou, Hari; Mark, Alan E.; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2006-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the magainin MG-H2 peptide interacting with a model phospholipid membrane have been used to investigate the mechanism by which antimicrobial peptides act. Multiple copies of the peptide were randomly placed in solution close to the membrane. The peptide readily

  12. Relationship Between Prohormone Brain Natriuretic Peptide (NT-proBNP Level and Severity of Pulmonary Dysfunction in Patients With Chronic Congestive Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazemiyeh Masoud

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Congestive heart failure (CHF is a common disease and its prevalence is increasingin industrialized countries. NT-proBNP measurement is an established diagnostic test fordiagnosis of CHF in patients who present to emergency room with acute dyspnea. The primaryobject of this study was to determine the relationship between levels of brain natriuretic peptideprecursor and severity of lung function impairment in patients with chronic CHF.Methods: This cross-sectional and analytical study that performed in Tuberculosis andLung Disease Research Center of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences on 95 patients withchronic heart failure, and relation between NT-proBNP levels and pulmonary functionparameters were examined.Results: Sixty-four patients were male and 31 were female. The average age of male and femaleswas 62.90 ± 11.54 and 61.61 ± 11.98 years, respectively. A significant inverse linear correlationwas found between NT-proBNP and FEV1 (P<0.001, r = -0.367, FVC (P<0.001, r = -0.444,TLC (P=0.022, r = -0.238, maximal midexpiratory flow (MMEF (P=0.047, r = -0.207 andleft ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF (P<0.001, r = -0.461. A significant positive linearcorrelation was found between NT-proBNP and FEV1/FVC (P =0.013, r = 0.257, RV/TLC (P =0.003, r=0.303 and 5 Hz Raw (r = 0.231, P = 0.024.Conclusion: This study showed that, both restrictive and obstructive ventilator impairments canoccur in chronic CHF and as NT-proBNP increases appropriate to hemodynamic deterioration,pulmonary dysfunction increases.

  13. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP) in early pregnancy is associated with development of preeclampsia in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Ringholm; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Thorsteinsson, Birger

    2011-01-01

    The vasoactive markers of cardiac overload Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP) and Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) are elevated in preeclampsia. This study documents higher ANP concentrations as early as at 9 weeks in type 1 diabetic women subsequently developing preeclampsia suggesting...

  14. Plasma coenzyme Q10 concentration, antioxidant status, and serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide concentration in dogs with various cardiovascular diseases and the effect of cardiac treatment on measured variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svete, Alenka Nemec; Verk, Barbara; Seliškar, Alenka; Tomsič, Katerina; Križman, Petra Jazbec; Petrič, Aleksandra Domanjko

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the plasma total antioxidant capacity, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity, whole blood glutathione peroxidase activity, and plasma coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) concentration in dogs with various stages of cardiovascular diseases and in healthy dogs; assess the influence of cardiac treatment on the levels of antioxidant variables, plasma CoQ10 concentration, and serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) concentration, and determine any correlation between the disease severity (NT-proBNP concentration) and antioxidant variables or CoQ10 concentration. ANIMALS 43 dogs with various types and stages of cardiovascular diseases (congenital and acquired) and 29 healthy dogs. PROCEDURES Blood samples were collected from all dogs for spectrophotometric assessment of antioxidant variables. Plasma CoQ10 concentration was determined with a high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method. Serum NT-proBNP concentration was measured with an ELISA. RESULTS Values for antioxidant variables did not differ among groups of dogs with cardiovascular diseases, regardless of disease stage or treatment. Plasma CoQ10 concentration was significantly increased in treated dogs with congestive heart failure (CHF), compared with untreated patients. However, plasma CoQ10 concentration did not differ among heart failure classes. A significant, negative correlation between serum NT-proBNP and plasma CoQ10 concentrations was identified in treated CHF-affected dogs, suggesting that low plasma CoQ10 concentration may be associated with increased severity of CHF. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The antioxidant variables evaluated were not altered in dogs with CHF, regardless of cardiac disease stage or treatment. Further investigation into the possible effects of CoQ10 supplementation in dogs with advanced stages of CHF is warranted.

  15. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide and cardiac troponin I for the prognostic utility in elderly patients with severe sepsis or septic shock in intensive care unit: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hui; Fan, Wei-Ze; Wang, Sheng-Chi; Liu, Zhao-Hui; Zang, Hui-Ling; Wang, Li-Zhong; Liu, Hong-Juan; Shen, Xiao-Hui; Liang, Shao-Qing

    2015-06-01

    Using biomarkers to predict mortality in patient with severe sepsis or septic shock is of importance, as these patients frequently have high mortality and unsatisfied outcome. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) play extremely important roles in prognostic value in the mortality of severe sepsis and septic shock. The present study was retrospectively designed to evaluate the predicting mortality of NT-proBNP and cTnI in elderly patients with severe sepsis or septic shock administered in the intensive care unit (ICU) and also to evaluate whether the predicting ability of Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE-II) score or C-reactive protein (CRP) was increased in combination with the biomarkers. A cohort of 430 patients (aged ≥65 years) with severe sepsis or septic shock admitted to our ICU between October 2011 and December 2013 was included in the study. Patient data including clinical, laboratory, and survival and mortality were collected. All patients were examined with NT-proBNP, cTnI, CRP, and APACHE-II score and were categorized as the survived and deceased groups according to the outcome 30 days after ICU treatment. The levels of NT-proBNP and cTnI (P APACHE-II score alone was low but largely improved, when it was combined with both NT-proBNP and cTnI (P APACHE-II score was improved only when combined with NT-proBNP and cTnI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Prediction of clinical outcome in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) using the TIMI risk score extended by N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarai, Rudolf; Iordanova, Nelly; Jarai, Robert; Jarai, Ferenc; Raffetseder, Annamaria; Woloszczuk, Wolfgang; Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Geyer, Georg; Wojta, Johann; Huber, Kurt

    2007-01-01

    N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (Nt-proBNP) is a strong independent predictor of death in acute coronary syndromes. In order to improve risk assessment in patients with unstable coronary artery disease we investigated the role of the additional determination of Nt-proBNP levels in patients sub-grouped into high-, medium- and low-risk groups according to the TIMI risk score. Nt-proBNP was determined in 145 consecutive patients admitted to our clinic with typical anginal pain in the past 24 hours and normal left ventricular function. Using classification and regression tree analysis, we investigated whether Nt-proBNP levels provide clinically relevant prognostic information in addition to the TIMI risk score. Nt-proBNP concentrations were determined using a commercially available assay from Biomedica, Austria. The normal range of this assay is TIMI scores and Nt-proBNP levels are independent predictors of mortality (P = 0.001 and P 5225 pg/ml had the highest mortality rate, independent of their TIMI risk classification. In the subset of patients with Nt-proBNP TIMI medium risk but with Nt-proBNP above 2827 pg/ml had significantly higher mortality than patients with lower levels of Nt-proBNP (P = 0.03). Accordingly, we developed a combined risk score consisting of four risk groups: very high (Nt-proBNP > or =5225 pg/ml), high (TIMI high-risk group or TIMI medium-risk group and Nt-proBNP >2827 pg/ml), medium (TIMI medium-risk group and Nt-proBNP TIMI low-risk group). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.772 for the TIMI score alone and 0.863 for the combined risk score (P TIMI risk classification by creating a combined risk score significantly improves risk assessment of patients with unstable coronary artery disease.

  17. Elevated N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels predict an enhanced anti-hypertensive and anti-proteinuric benefit of dietary sodium restriction and diuretics, but not angiotensin receptor blockade, in proteinuric renal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagman, Maartje C J; Waanders, Femke; Vogt, Liffert; Damman, Kevin; Hemmelder, Marc; Navis, Gerjan; Laverman, Gozewijn D

    2012-03-01

    Renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade only partly reduces blood pressure, proteinuria and renal and cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease (CKD) but often requires sodium targeting [i.e. low sodium diet (LS) and/or diuretics] for optimal efficacy. However, both under- and overtitration of sodium targeting can easily occur. We evaluated whether N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), a biomarker of volume expansion, predicts the benefits of sodium targeting in CKD patients. In a cross-over randomized controlled trial, 33 non-diabetic CKD patients (proteinuria 3.8 ± 0.4 g/24 h, blood pressure 143/86 ± 3/2 mmHg, creatinine clearance 89 ± 5 mL/min) were treated during 6-week periods with placebo, angiotensin receptor blockade (ARB; losartan 100 mg/day) and ARB plus diuretics (losartan 100 mg/day plus hydrochlorothiazide 25 mg/day), combined with LS (93 ± 52 mmol Na(+)/24 h) and regular sodium diet (RS; 193 ± 62 mmol Na(+)/24 h, P diuretics and was normalized by ARB + diuretic + LS [39 (26-59) pg/mL, P = 0.65 versus controls]. NT-proBNP levels above the upper limit of normal (>125 pg/mL) predicted a larger reduction of blood pressure and proteinuria by LS and diuretics but not by ARB, during all steps of the titration regimen. Elevated NT-proBNP levels predict an enhanced anti-hypertensive and anti-proteinuric benefit of sodium targeting, but not RAAS blockade, in proteinuric CKD patients. Importantly, this applies to the untreated condition, as well as to the subsequent treatment steps, consisting of RAAS blockade and even RAAS blockade combined with diuretics. NT-proBNP can be a useful tool to identify CKD patients in whom sodium targeting can improve blood pressure and proteinuria.

  18. Correlation between arterial wall stiffness, N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide, functional and structural myocardial abnormalities in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiac autonomic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoriya Aleksandrovna Serhiyenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess arterial wall stiffness, plasma levels of of N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP, as well as functional state and structure of the myocardium in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN.Materials and Methods. The study involved a total of 65 patients with T2DM. 12 had no evidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD or CAN, 14 were diagnosed with subclinical stage of CAN, 18 – with functional stage, and 21 – with organic stage. We measured aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV, aortic augmentation index (AIx, brachial artery AIx, ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI and plasma levels of NT-proBNP. Clinical examination included ECG, Holter monitoring, ambulatory BP measurement and echocardiography.Results. Patients with isolated T2DM showed a trend for increased vascular wall stiffness. PWV was increased in patients with subclinical stage of CAN. Aortic and brachial AIx, PWV and AASI were elevated in patients with functional stage of CAN, PWV being significantly higher vs. subclinical CAN subgroup. Organic stage was characterized by pathologically increased values of all primary parameters; PWV and AASI were significantly higher compared with other groups. Development and progression of CAN was accompanied by an increase in NT-proBNP plasma levels. Concentration of NT-proBNP was in direct correlation with left ventricular mass (LVM and PWV. PWV and LVM values also directly correlated between themselves.Conclusion. Development and progression of CAN in patients with T2DM is accompanied by an increase in vascular wall stiffness. The elevation of plasma NT-proBNP in patients with T2DM correlates with the development of CAN and is significantly and independently associated with an increase in LVM and PWV. Our data suggests the pathophysiological interconnection between metabolic, functional and structural myocardial abnormalities in patients with T2DM and CAN.

  19. Vasoactive intestinal peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003508.htm Vasoactive intestinal peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a test that measures the amount ...

  20. PeptideAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — PeptideAtlas is a multi-organism, publicly accessible compendium of peptides identified in a large set of tandem mass spectrometry proteomics experiments. Mass...

  1. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  2. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  3. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  4. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  6. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  7. C-Peptide Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weisenberger, J. (2013 March) Why Does a C-Peptide Test Matter? Diabetes Forecast [On-line information]. Available online at http:// ... Updated). What is c-peptide? What do c-peptide levels mean? Misc.health.diabetes, diabetes FAQ [On-line information from newsgroup]. Available ...

  8. Operation Brain Trauma Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    OBTT.85 However, blunting of hyperglycemia that is seen in CNS insults could play some role in the observed benefit. 18 Beam Balance Days Post...62. Abrahamson EE, Ikonomovic MD, Dixon CE, DeKosky ST. Simvastatin therapy prevents brain trauma- induced increases in β-amyloid peptide levels

  9. N-Terminal Prohormone of Brain Natriuretic Peptide but not C-Terminal Pre-Pro Vasopressin (Copeptin Level is Associated with the Response to Antihypertensive Therapy in Haemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Wyskida

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Volume overload, frequently clinically asymptomatic is considered as a causative factor limiting the effectiveness of antihypertensive therapy in haemodialysis (HD patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess plasma levels of N-terminal fragment of the prohormone brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP and a C-terminal portion of the precursor of vasopressin (CT-proAVP, copeptin, surrogate markers of volume overload in HD patients in relation to the number of antihypertensive drugs used in the hypertension treatment. Methods: One hundred and fifty adult HD patients (92 males were enrolled into this study. Clinical data concerning blood pressure (BP measurements prior haemodialysis session and pharmacotherapy were collected from all patients. In addition to routine laboratory parameters, plasma levels of NT-proBNP and CT-proAVP were measured, and daily sodium and water consumption were estimated with a portion-size food frequency questionnaire. Results: Among 145 (96.7% hypertensive HD patients, 131 were receiving antihypertensive medication. Despite antihypertensive therapy, 31.0% had inadequate BP control. Plasma concentration of NT-proBNP was associated with systolic (R=0.19; p=0.02 but not diastolic BP values and with the number of received antihypertensive drugs (R=0.21; p=0.01. The highest NT-proBNP values were observed in patients receiving 3 or more antihypertensive drugs. In contrast, no significant correlation was found between plasma CT-proAVP concentrations and BP values as well as and the number of antihypertensive drugs. Receiver operator curve analysis showed that NT-proBNP values over 13,184 pg/mL predicted the use of at least 3 antihypertensive drugs in maximal doses in the therapy of hypertension, similar analyses performed for CT-proAVP showed much less specificity. Conclusions: 1. Increased levels of NT-proBNP seems to be a better biomarker of multidrug antihypertensive therapy requirement than CT

  10. Efficacy and Safety of Outpatient Treatment Based on the Hestia Clinical Decision Rule with or without N-Terminal Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide Testing in Patients with Acute Pulmonary Embolism. A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Exter, Paul L; Zondag, Wendy; Klok, Frederikus A; Brouwer, Rolf E; Dolsma, Janneke; Eijsvogel, Michiel; Faber, Laura M; van Gerwen, Marijke; Grootenboers, Marco J; Heller-Baan, Roxane; Hovens, Marcel M; Jonkers, Gé J P M; van Kralingen, Klaas W; Melissant, Christian F; Peltenburg, Henny; Post, Judith P; van de Ree, Marcel A; Vlasveld, L Th Tom; de Vreede, Mariëlle J; Huisman, Menno V

    2016-10-15

    Outpatient treatment of pulmonary embolism (PE) may lead to improved patient satisfaction and reduced healthcare costs. However, trials to assess its safety and the optimal method for patient selection are scarce. To validate the utility and safety of selecting patients with PE for outpatient treatment by the Hestia criteria and to compare the safety of the Hestia criteria alone with the Hestia criteria combined with N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) testing. We performed a randomized noninferiority trial in 17 Dutch hospitals. We randomized patients with PE without any of the Hestia criteria to direct discharge or additional NT-proBNP testing. We discharged the latter patients as well if NT-proBNP did not exceed 500 ng/L or admitted them if NT-proBNP was greater than 500 ng/L. The primary endpoint was 30-day adverse outcome defined as PE- or bleeding-related mortality, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or intensive care unit admission. The noninferiority margin for the primary endpoint was 3.4%. We randomized 550 patients. In the NT-proBNP group, 34 of 275 (12%) had elevated NT-proBNP values and were managed as inpatients. No patient (0 of 34) with an elevated NT-proBNP level treated in hospital (0%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0-10.2%), versus no patient (0 of 23) with a post hoc-determined elevated NT-proBNP level from the direct discharge group (0%; 95% CI, 0-14.8%), experienced the primary endpoint. In both trial cohorts, the primary endpoint occurred in none of the 275 patients (0%; 95% CI, 0-1.3%) subjected to NT-proBNP testing, versus in 3 of 275 patients (1.1%; 95% CI, 0.2-3.2%) in the direct discharge group (P = 0.25). During the 3-month follow-up, recurrent venous thromboembolism occurred in two patients (0.73%; 95% CI, 0.1-2.6%) in the NT-proBNP group versus three patients (1.1%; 95% CI, 0.2-3.2%) in the direct discharge group (P = 0.65). Outpatient treatment of patients with PE selected on the basis of the Hestia criteria

  11. Evaluation by N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide concentrations and ross scoring of the efficacy of digoxin in the treatment of heart failure secondary to congenital heart disease with left-to-right shunts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkiran, Ozlem; Sandikkaya, Ayse; Kocak, Gulendam; Karakurt, Cemsit; Taskapan, Cagatay; Yologlu, Saim

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of digoxin in children with heart failure secondary to left-to-right shunt lesions and normal left ventricular systolic function. The study registered 37 such patients (ages 10 days to 24 months, groups 1 and 2) and used 20 healthy children as a control group (group 3). Left ventricular systolic function, as assessed by conventional echocardiography, was normal in all the subjects. Congestive heart failure was diagnosed by clinical evaluation and modified Ross scoring. Plasma N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) concentrations and complete blood counts were assessed in all the children. Group 1 was treated with digoxin, enalapril, and furosemide and group 2 with enalapril and furosemide. Approximately 1 month after starting treatment, the patients were reevaluated by physical and echocardiographic examinations, modified Ross scoring, plasma NT-proBNP concentrations, and complete blood counts. The pre- and posttreatment Ross scores of group 1 (p = 0.377) and group 2 (p = 0.616) did not differ significantly. The NT-proBNP values in both groups decreased after treatment (p = 0.0001). The pre- and posttreatment NT-proBNP values did not differ significantly in group 1 (p = 0.094)) and group 2 (p = 0.372). The pretreatment NT-proBNP values in groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.0001) were significantly higher than in the control group (p = 0.003). A smaller difference was observed between posttreatment NT-proBNP values in group 1 and the control group (p = 0.045). We found no significant difference between the posttreatment NT-proBNP values of group 2 and those of the control group (p = 0.271). The study showed that both treatments currently used to treat heart failure secondary to congenital heart disease with left-to-right shunts and preserved left ventricular systolic function are effective and do not differ significantly. Thus, digoxin does not provide any extra benefit in the treatment of such patients.

  12. Hyponatremia and brain injury: absence of alterations of serum brain natriuretic peptide and vasopressin Hiponatremia e traumatismo cranioencefálico: ausência de alteração sanguínea do peptídeo natriurético cerebral e hormônio antidiurético

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Nascimento Costa

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study any possible relation between hyponatremia following brain injury and the presence of cerebral salt-wasting syndrome (CSWS or the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH, and if vasopressin, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP and aldosterone have a role in its mechanism. METHOD: Patients with brain injury admitted to the intensive care unit were included and had their BNP, aldosterone and vasopressin levels dosed on day 7. RESULTS: Twenty six adult patients were included in the study. Nine (34.6% had hyponatremia and presented with a negative water balance and higher values of urinary sodium, serum potassium and diuresis than patients with normonatremia. The serum levels of BNP, aldosterone, and vasopressin were normal and no relation was observed between plasma sodium and BNP, aldosterone or vasopressin. CONCLUSION: The most likely cause of hyponatremia was CSWS and there was no correlation between BNP, aldosterone and vasopressin with serum sodium level.OBJETIVO: Estudar a possível relação entre a hiponatremia seguindo traumatismo cranioencefálico e a presença da síndrome cerebral perdedora de sal (SCPS ou a síndrome da secreção inapropriada do hormônio antidiurético (SSIHAD, e se a vasopressina, peptídeo natriurético cerebral (BNP e aldosterona têm um papel nesse mecanismo. MÉTODO: Foram incluídos pacientes com traumatismo cranioencefálico admitidos na unidade de terapia intensiva e foram dosados no sétimo dia seguindo o trauma, BNP, aldosterona e vasopressina. RESULTADOS: Vinte e seis pacientes foram incluídos no estudo. Nove (34,6% tiveram hiponatremia e apresentaram um balanço hídrico mais negativo e altos valores de sódio urinário, potássio sérico e diurese quando comparados com o grupo que apresentou normonatremia. Os níveis séricos de BNP, aldosterona e vasopressina foram normais e não foi observada relação entre o sódio sérico e BNP, aldosterona e vasopressina

  13. New insights into the role of natriuretic peptides in the regulation of apoptosis in cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Pan; Huang, Lan

    2009-05-01

    Natriuretic peptides NPs are a family of structurally similar but genetically distinct peptides with paracrine and autocrine functions of regulating blood volume, blood pressure, ventricular hypertrophy, pulmonary hypertension, fat metabolism, and long bone growth. There are 3 main natriuretic peptides: atria natriuretic peptides ANP, brain natriuretic peptides BNP and C-type natriuretic peptides CNP. As investigations of the in vivo activities of natriuretic peptides were expanded, evidence suggested that natriuretic peptides might function as regulators of cell proliferation and/or death in a variety of tissues and cell types. Natriuretic peptides are much more frequently observed in cardiovascular system, the present discussion is focus on cell death in cardiovascular system, especially vascular endothelial cells ECs, vascular smooth muscle cells VSMCs, cardiac myocyte.

  14. Topical peptides as cosmeceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varadraj Vasant Pai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Peptides are known to have diverse biological roles, most prominently as signaling/regulatory molecules in a broad variety of physiological processes including defense, immunity, stress, growth, homeostasis and reproduction. These aspects have been used in the field of dermatology and cosmetology to produce short, stable and synthetic peptides for extracellular matrix synthesis, pigmentation, innate immunity and inflammation. The evolution of peptides over the century, which started with the discovery of penicillin, has now extended to their usage as cosmeceuticals in recent years. Cosmeceutical peptides may act as signal modulators of the extracellular matrix component, as structural peptides, carrier peptides and neurotransmitter function modulators. Transdermal delivery of peptides can be made more effective by penetration enhancers, chemical modification or encapsulation of peptides. The advantages of using peptides as cosmeceuticals include their involvement in many physiological functions of the skin, their selectivity, their lack of immunogenicity and absence of premarket regulatory requirements for their use. However, there are disadvantages: clinical evidence for efficacy is often weak, absorption may be poor due to low lipophilicity, high molecular weight and binding to other ingredients, and prices can be quite high.

  15. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain ... called the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life— ...

  17. Developing a Dissociative Nanocontainer for Peptide Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Kelly

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The potency, selectivity, and decreased side effects of bioactive peptides have propelled these agents to the forefront of pharmacological research. Peptides are especially promising for the treatment of neurological disorders and pain. However, delivery of peptide therapeutics often requires invasive techniques, which is a major obstacle to their widespread application. We have developed a tailored peptide drug delivery system in which the viral capsid of P22 bacteriophage is modified to serve as a tunable nanocontainer for the packaging and controlled release of bioactive peptides. Recent efforts have demonstrated that P22 nanocontainers can effectively encapsulate analgesic peptides and translocate them across blood-brain-barrier (BBB models. However, release of encapsulated peptides at their target site remains a challenge. Here a Ring Opening Metathesis Polymerization (ROMP reaction is applied to trigger P22 nanocontainer disassembly under physiological conditions. Specifically, the ROMP substrate norbornene (5-Norbornene-2-carboxylic acid is conjugated to the exterior of a loaded P22 nanocontainer and Grubbs II Catalyst is used to trigger the polymerization reaction leading to nanocontainer disassembly. Our results demonstrate initial attempts to characterize the ROMP-triggered release of cargo peptides from P22 nanocontainers. This work provides proof-of-concept for the construction of a triggerable peptide drug delivery system using viral nanocontainers.

  18. Determinação do peptídeo natriurético cerebral humano em portadores da doença de Chagas Measurement of human brain natriuretic peptide in patients with Chagas' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Railton Bezerra de Melo

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar os níveis séricos do peptídeo natriurético cerebral (PNB em pacientes com cardiopatia chagásica crônica e em indivíduos com sorologia positiva para doença de Chagas sem comprometimento cardíaco, e correlacionar os níveis de PNB com o grau de comprometimento cardíaco, dimensões cardíacas, presença de marcapasso e fração de ejeção. MÉTODOS: Concentrações séricas de PNB foram determinadas através do Triage® - BNP Test, produzido pela BIOSITE®. Foi avaliado o PNB sérico de 25 indivíduos do ambulatório de doença de Chagas do Hospital Universitário Oswaldo Cruz, distribuídos em 2 grupos, um, G1; composto por 13 portadores de sorologia positiva para doença de Chagas, assintomáticos e sem cardiopatia detectável pelo eletrocardiograma, radiografia do tórax e ecocardiograma, o outro, G2; por 12 portadores da doença de Chagas com comprometimento cardíaco. RESULTADOS: Níveis significativamente mais elevados de PNB foram detectados nos pacientes chagásicos com comprometimento cardíaco: (G1=4,4±4,4 pg/ml, G2=293,0±460,2 pg/ml pOBJECTIVE: To measure the serum levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP in patients with chronic chagasic heart disease and in individuals with positive serology for Chagas' disease and no heart impairment, and to correlate the serum BNP levels with the degree of cardiac impairment, cardiac dimensions, presence of a pacemaker, and ejection fraction. METHODS: Serum BNP concentrations were determined by use of the Triage - BNP Test produced by BIOSITE. Serum BNP was assessed in 25 patients from the Chagas' disease outpatient clinic of the Hospital Universitário Oswaldo Cruz, who were divided into 2 groups as follows: 1 G1 - comprising 13 assymptomatic patients with positive serology for Chagas' disease and no heart disease detectable on electrocardiography, chest X-ray, and echocardiography; and 2 G2 - comprising 12 patients with Chagas' disease and heart impairment. RESULTS

  19. The prognostic value of the plasma N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide level on all-cause death and major cardiovascular events in a community-based population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Q

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Qiwei Zhu,1 Wenkai Xiao,1,* Yongyi Bai,1,* Ping Ye,1 Leiming Luo,1 Peng Gao,1 Hongmei Wu,1 Jie Bai2 1Department of Geriatric Cardiology, 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Despite growing evidence that N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP has an important prognostic value for patients with cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, etc, the prognostic significance of NT-proBNP levels in the general population has not been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical significance of NT-proBNP in a community population.Methods: This is a community-based prospective survey of residents from two communities in Beijing conducted for a routine health status checkup. Out of 1,860 individuals who were eligible for inclusion from 2007 to 2009, 1,499 completed a follow-up and were assessed for the prognostic value of NT-proBNP in 2013. A questionnaire was used for end point events. Anthropometry and blood pressure were measured. Plasma NT-proBNP, creatinine, lipids, and glucose were determined.Results: A total of 1,499 subjects with complete data were included in the analysis. Participants were divided into four groups according to baseline NT-proBNP levels (quartile 1, <19.8 pg/mL; quartile 2, 19.8–41.6 pg/mL; quartile 3, 41.7–81.8 pg/mL; quartile 4, ≥81.9 pg/mL. During a median 4.8-year follow-up period, the all-cause mortality rate rose from 0.8% in the lowest concentration NT-proBNP group (<19.8 pg/mL to 7.8% in the highest NT-proBNP group (≥81.9 pg/mL; P<0.001. The incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs increased from 3.1% in the lowest NT-proBNP group to 18.9% in the highest group (P<0.001. Individuals in the highest NT-proBNP group (≥81.9 pg/mL were associated with higher risk of all-cause death and MACEs compared with the lowest NT-proBNP group

  20. Peptides and Food Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sobrino Crespo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nutrients created by the digestion of food are proposed to active G protein coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells e.g. the L-cell. This stimulates the release of gut hormones. Hormones released from the gut and adipose tissue play an important rol in the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure (1.Many circulating signals, including gut hormones, can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC neurons directly, after passing across the median eminence. The ARC is adjacent to the median eminence, a circumventricular organ with fenestrated capillaries and hence an incomplete blood-brain barrier (2. The ARC of the hypothalamus is believed to play a crucial role in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. The ARC contains two populations of neurons with opposing effect on food intake (3. Medially located orexigenic neurons (i.e those stimulating appetite express neuropeptide Y (NPY and agouti-related protein (AgRP (4-5. Anorexigenic neurons (i.e. those inhibiting appetite in the lateral ARC express alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH derived from pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC and cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART (6. The balance between activities of these neuronal circuits is critical to body weight regulation.In contrast, other peripheral signals influence the hypothalamus indirectly via afferent neuronal pathway and brainstem circuits. In this context gastrointestinal’s vagal afferents are activated by mechanoreceptors and chemoreceptors, and converge in the nucleus of the tractus solitaries (NTS of the brainstem. Neuronal projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypotalamus (1, 7. Gut hormones also alter the activity of the ascending vagal pathway from the gut to the brainstem. In the cases of ghrelin and Peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY, there are evidences for both to have a direct action on the arcuate nucleus and an action via the vagus nerve a

  1. New peptides players in metabolic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Mierzwicka

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Among new peptides responsible for the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders and carbohydrate metabolism, adipokines are of great importance. Adipokines are substances of hormonal character, secreted by adipose tissue. Apart from the well-known adipokines, adropin and preptin are relatively newly discovered, hence their function is not fully understood. They are peptides not secreted by adipose tissue but their role in the metabolic regulations seems to be significant. Preptin is a 34-amino acid peptide, a derivative of proinsulin growth factor II (pro-IGF-II, secreted by pancreatic β cells, considered to be a physiological enhancer of insulin secretion. Additionally, preptin has a stimulating effect on osteoblasts, inducing their proliferation, differentiation and survival. Adropin is a 76-amino acid peptide, encoded by the energy homeostasis associated gene (Enho, mainly in liver and brain, and its expression is dependent on a diet. Adropin is believed to play an important role in metabolic homeostasis, fatty acids metabolism control, insulin resistance prevention, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance. The results of studies conducted so far show that the diseases resulting from metabolic syndrome, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, polycystic ovary syndrome, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, or cardiovascular disease are accompanied by significant changes in the concentration of these peptides. It is also important to note that preptin has an anabolic effect on bone tissue, which might be preventive in osteoporosis.

  2. Interactions of Gastrointestinal Peptides: Ghrelin and Its Anorexigenic Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Sophia Wisser

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Food intake behaviour and energy homeostasis are strongly regulated by a complex system of humoral factors and nerval structures constituting the brain-gut-axis. To date the only known peripherally produced and centrally acting peptide that stimulates food intake is ghrelin, which is mainly synthesized in the stomach. Recent data indicate that the orexigenic effect of ghrelin might be influenced by other gastrointestinal peptides such as cholecystokinin (CCK, bombesin, desacyl ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY, as well as glucagon-like peptide (GLP. Therefore, we will review on the interactions of ghrelin with several gastrointestinal factors known to be involved in appetite regulation in order to elucidate the interdependency of peripheral orexigenic and anorexigenic peptides in the control of appetite.

  3. Peptide array X-linking (PAX: a new peptide-protein identification approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Okada

    Full Text Available Many protein interaction domains bind short peptides based on canonical sequence consensus motifs. Here we report the development of a peptide array-based proteomics tool to identify proteins directly interacting with ligand peptides from cell lysates. Array-formatted bait peptides containing an amino acid-derived cross-linker are photo-induced to crosslink with interacting proteins from lysates of interest. Indirect associations are removed by high stringency washes under denaturing conditions. Covalently trapped proteins are subsequently identified by LC-MS/MS and screened by cluster analysis and domain scanning. We apply this methodology to peptides with different proline-containing consensus sequences and show successful identifications from brain lysates of known and novel proteins containing polyproline motif-binding domains such as EH, EVH1, SH3, WW domains. These results suggest the capacity of arrayed peptide ligands to capture and subsequently identify proteins by mass spectrometry is relatively broad and robust. Additionally, the approach is rapid and applicable to cell or tissue fractions from any source, making the approach a flexible tool for initial protein-protein interaction discovery.

  4. PNA Peptide chimerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, T.; Næsby, M.; Wittung, P.

    1995-01-01

    Radioactive labelling of PNA has been performed try linking a peptide segment to the PNA which is substrate for protein kinase A. The enzymatic phosphorylation proceeds in almost quantitative yields.......Radioactive labelling of PNA has been performed try linking a peptide segment to the PNA which is substrate for protein kinase A. The enzymatic phosphorylation proceeds in almost quantitative yields....

  5. GROUPS IN PEPTIDE SYNTHESIS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to improve the synthesis of peptides with asparagine and glutamine residues, various carboxamide ... protecting groups in solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). This method eliminates all .... to the filtrate, the solution was washed with three 9 mL portions of 5% aqueous citric acid, three 12 mL portions of 5% ...

  6. Multidimensional Design of Anticancer Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Lin YC; Lim YF; Russo E.; Schneider P; Bolliger L; Edenharter A; Altmann KH; Halin C; Hiss JA; Schneider G

    2015-01-01

    The computer assisted design and optimization of peptides with selective cancer cell killing activity was achieved through merging the features of anticancer peptides cell penetrating peptides and tumor homing peptides. Machine learning classifiers identified candidate peptides that possess the predicted properties. Starting from a template amino acid sequence peptide cytotoxicity against a range of cancer cell lines was systematically optimized while minimizing the effects on primary human e...

  7. Acylation of Therapeutic Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Sofie; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Jensen, Simon Bjerregaard

    Oral administration of therapeutic peptides could benefit millions of chronically ill people worldwide, through easier and less stigmatized therapy, and likely improve the long-term effects of currently widespread disease mismanagement. However, oral peptide delivery is a formidable task due......, but it is not widely studied in an oral context. As acylation furthermore increases interactions with the lipid membranes of mammalian cells, it offers several potential benefits for oral delivery of therapeutic peptides, and we hypothesize that tailoring the acylation may be used to optimize intestinal translocation...... to the harsh and selective gastrointestinal system, and development has lacked far behind injection therapy. Peptide acylation is a powerful tool to alter the pharmacokinetics, biophysical properties and chemical stability of injectable peptide drugs, primarily used to prolong blood circulation...

  8. Descriptors for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: A frightening increase in the number of isolated multidrug resistant bacterial strains linked to the decline in novel antimicrobial drugs entering the market is a great cause for concern. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have lately been introduced as a potential new class...... of antimicrobial drugs, and computational methods utilizing molecular descriptors can significantly accelerate the development of new peptide drug candidates. Areas covered: This paper gives a broad overview of peptide and amino-acid scale descriptors available for AMP modeling and highlights which...... examples of different peptide QSAR studies, this review highlights some of the missing links and illuminates some of the questions that would be interesting to challenge in a more systematic fashion. Expert opinion: Computer-aided peptide QSAR using molecular descriptors may provide the necessary edge...

  9. Peptidomic Analysis of the Brain and Corpora Cardiaca-Corpora Allata Complex in the Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoguang; Ning, Xia; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Wenfeng; Zhao, Zhangwu; Zhang, Qingwen

    2012-01-01

    The silkworm, Bombyx mori, is an important economic insect for silk production. However, many of the mature peptides relevant to its various life stages remain unknown. Using RP-HPLC, MALDI-TOF MS, and previously identified peptides from B. mori and other insects in the transcriptome database, we created peptide profiles showing a total of 6 ion masses that could be assigned to peptides in eggs, including one previously unidentified peptide. A further 49 peptides were assigned to larval brains. 17 new mature peptides were identified in isolated masses. 39 peptides were found in pupal brains with 8 unidentified peptides. 48 were found in adult brains with 12 unidentified peptides. These new unidentified peptides showed highly significant matches in all MS analysis. These matches were then searched against the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database to provide new annotations for these mature peptides. In total, 59 mature peptides in 19 categories were found in the brains of silkworms at the larval, pupal, and adult stages. These results demonstrate that peptidomic variation across different developmental stages can be dramatic. Moreover, the corpora cardiaca-corpora allata (CC-CA) complex was examined during the fifth larval instar. A total of 41 ion masses were assigned to peptides.

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses ...

  11. Brain Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  13. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

  14. Insulin C-peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003701.htm Insulin C-peptide test To use the sharing features ... a product that is created when the hormone insulin is produced and released into the body. The ...

  15. Tumor penetrating peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambet eTeesalu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC, contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular zip code of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is

  16. Innovative Therapeutics: Designer Natriuretic Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meems, Laura M G; Burnett, John C

    2016-12-01

    Endogenous natriuretic peptides serve as potent activators of particulate guanylyl cyclase receptors and the second messenger cGMP. Natriuretic peptides are essential in maintenance of volume homeostasis, and can be of myocardial, renal and endothelial origin. Advances in peptide engineering have permitted the ability to pursue highly innovative drug discovery strategies. This has resulted in designer natriuretic peptides that go beyond native peptides in efficacy, specificity, and resistance to enzymatic degradation. Together with recent improvements in peptide delivery systems, which have improved bioavailability, further advances in this field have been made. Therefore, designer natriuretic peptides with pleotropic actions together with strategies of chronic delivery have provided an unparalleled opportunity for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. In this review, we report the conceptual framework of peptide engineering of the natriuretic peptides that resulted in designer peptides for cardiovascular disease. We specifically provide an update on those currently in clinical trials for heart failure and hypertension, which include Cenderitide, ANX042 and ZD100.

  17. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands, and generally do so more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands while exhibiting increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from a...... a group consisting of naturally-occurring nucleobases and non-naturally-occurring nucleobases, including 2,6-diaminopurine, attached to a polyamide backbone, and contain alkyl amine side chains....

  18. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    peptides has only been elucidated during the last decade. The cellular synthesis including amino acid modifications and proteolytic cleavages has proven considerably more complex than initially perceived. Consequently, the elimination phase of the peptide products in circulation is not yet well...... competent endocrine cells. The structurally related atrial natriuretic peptide will be mentioned where appropriate, whereas C-type natriuretic peptide will not be considered as a cardiac peptide of relevance in mammalian physiology....

  19. Delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins to the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salameh, Therese S; Banks, William A

    2014-01-01

    Peptides and proteins have potent effects on the brain after their peripheral administration, suggesting that they may be good substrates for the development of CNS therapeutics. Major hurdles to such development include their relation to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and poor pharmacokinetics. Some peptides cross the BBB by transendothelial diffusion and others cross in the blood-to-brain direction by saturable transporters. Some regulatory proteins are also transported across the BBB and antibodies can enter the CNS via the extracellular pathways. Glycoproteins and some antibody fragments can be taken up and cross the BBB by mechanisms related to adsorptive endocytosis/transcytosis. Many peptides and proteins are transported out of the CNS by saturable efflux systems and enzymatic activity in the blood, CNS, or BBB are substantial barriers to others. Both influx and efflux transporters are altered by various substances and in disease states. Strategies that manipulate these interactions between the BBB and peptides and proteins provide many opportunities for the development of therapeutics. Such strategies include increasing transendothelial diffusion of small peptides, upregulation of saturable influx transporters with allosteric regulators and other posttranslational means, use of vectors and other Trojan horse strategies, inhibition of efflux transporters including with antisense molecules, and improvement in pharmacokinetic parameters to overcome short half-lives, tissue sequestration, and enzymatic degradation. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide in hepatic cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fábrega, E; Crespo, J; Rivero, M; Casafont, F; Castro, B; García-Unzueta, M T; Amado, J A; Pons-Romero, F

    2001-09-01

    Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP) is a novel peptide that is structurally similar to atrial, brain, and C-type natriuretic peptides. Many natriuretic peptides are increased in hepatic cirrhosis, but the role of DNP in cirrhosis is unknown at present. The aim of the study was to investigate plasma levels of dendroaspis natriuretic-like immunoreactivity in cirrhosis. We measured plasma concentrations of DNP by radioimmunoassay methods in 12 cirrhotic patients without ascites and 44 cirrhotic patients with ascites, and compared these values with 20 age-matched healthy subjects. Renal function, plasma cGMP concentration, plasma renin activity, and plasma endothelin concentration were measured in each patient. Patients without ascites had circulating levels of DNP similar to those of healthy subjects. By contrast, patients with ascites had increased circulating DNP levels compared to both patients without ascites and healthy subjects. In addition, circulating levels of DNP increased in relation to the severity of cirrhosis. Significant positive correlations were also found between DNP levels, endothelin concentrations, and plasma renin activity. The results of this study indicate that plasma DNP is increased in cirrhotic patients with ascites.

  1. Brain herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  2. Muramyl Peptide-Enhanced Sleep: Pharmacological Optimization of Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    Brain 80: 77-117, 1957. 19. Bush, K., P. R. Henry, and D. S. Slusarchyk. Muraceins - muramyl pep- tides produced by Nocardia orientalis as angiotensin...muramyl peptides produced by Nocardia orientalis as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. II. Isolation and structure determination. J

  3. Granin-derived peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troger, Josef; Theurl, Markus; Kirchmair, Rudolf; Pasqua, Teresa; Tota, Bruno; Angelone, Tommaso; Cerra, Maria C; Nowosielski, Yvonne; Mätzler, Raphaela; Troger, Jasmin; Gayen, Jaur R; Trudeau, Vance; Corti, Angelo; Helle, Karen B

    2017-07-01

    The granin family comprises altogether 7 different proteins originating from the diffuse neuroendocrine system and elements of the central and peripheral nervous systems. The family is dominated by three uniquely acidic members, namely chromogranin A (CgA), chromogranin B (CgB) and secretogranin II (SgII). Since the late 1980s it has become evident that these proteins are proteolytically processed, intragranularly and/or extracellularly into a range of biologically active peptides; a number of them with regulatory properties of physiological and/or pathophysiological significance. The aim of this comprehensive overview is to provide an up-to-date insight into the distribution and properties of the well established granin-derived peptides and their putative roles in homeostatic regulations. Hence, focus is directed to peptides derived from the three main granins, e.g. to the chromogranin A derived vasostatins, betagranins, pancreastatin and catestatins, the chromogranin B-derived secretolytin and the secretogranin II-derived secretoneurin (SN). In addition, the distribution and properties of the chromogranin A-derived peptides prochromacin, chromofungin, WE14, parastatin, GE-25 and serpinins, the CgB-peptide PE-11 and the SgII-peptides EM66 and manserin will also be commented on. Finally, the opposing effects of the CgA-derived vasostatin-I and catestatin and the SgII-derived peptide SN on the integrity of the vasculature, myocardial contractility, angiogenesis in wound healing, inflammatory conditions and tumors will be discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Peptide Optical waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelman, Amir; Apter, Boris; Shostak, Tamar; Rosenman, Gil

    2017-02-01

    Small-scale optical devices, designed and fabricated onto one dielectric substrate, create integrated optical chip like their microelectronic analogues. These photonic circuits, based on diverse physical phenomena such as light-matter interaction, propagation of electromagnetic waves in a thin dielectric material, nonlinear and electro-optical effects, allow transmission, distribution, modulation, and processing of optical signals in optical communication systems, chemical and biological sensors, and more. The key component of these optical circuits providing both optical processing and photonic interconnections is light waveguides. Optical confinement and transmitting of the optical waves inside the waveguide material are possible due to the higher refractive index of the waveguides in comparison with their surroundings. In this work, we propose a novel field of bionanophotonics based on a new concept of optical waveguiding in synthetic elongated peptide nanostructures composed of ordered peptide dipole biomolecules. New technology of controllable deposition of peptide optical waveguiding structures by nanofountain pen technique is developed. Experimental studies of refractive index, optical transparency, and linear and nonlinear waveguiding in out-of-plane and in-plane diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes have been conducted. Optical waveguiding phenomena in peptide structures are simulated by the finite difference time domain method. The advantages of this new class of bio-optical waveguides are high refractive index contrast, wide spectral range of optical transparency, large optical nonlinearity, and electro-optical effect, making them promising for new applications in integrated multifunctional photonic circuits. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Control of Food Intake by Gastrointestinal Peptides: Mechanisms of Action and Possible Modulation in the Treatment of Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, Philip; Stengel, Andreas

    2017-04-30

    This review focuses on the control of appetite by food intake-regulatory peptides secreted from the gastrointestinal tract, namely cholecystokinin, glucagon-like peptide 1, peptide YY, ghrelin, and the recently discovered nesfatin-1 via the gut-brain axis. Additionally, we describe the impact of external factors such as intake of different nutrients or stress on the secretion of gastrointestinal peptides. Finally, we highlight possible conservative-physical activity and pharmacotherapy-treatment strategies for obesity as well as surgical techniques such as deep brain stimulation and bariatric surgery also altering these peptidergic pathways.

  6. Diversity-oriented peptide stapling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Thu Phuong; Larsen, Christian Ørnbøl; Røndbjerg, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of macrocyclic constraints in peptides (peptide stapling) is an important tool within peptide medicinal chemistry for stabilising and pre-organising peptides in a desired conformation. In recent years, the copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) has emerged...... as a powerful method for peptide stapling. However, to date CuAAC stapling has not provided a simple method for obtaining peptides that are easily diversified further. In the present study, we report a new diversity-oriented peptide stapling (DOPS) methodology based on CuAAC chemistry. Stapling of peptides...... incorporating two azide-modified amino acids with 1,3,5-triethynylbenzene efficiently provides (i, i+7)- and (i, i+9)-stapled peptides with a single free alkyne positioned on the staple, that can be further conjugated or dimerised. A unique feature of the present method is that it provides easy access...

  7. Applications and Challenges for Use of Cell-Penetrating Peptides as Delivery Vectors for Peptide and Protein Cargos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Mie; Birch, Ditlev; Mørck Nielsen, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    -penetrating peptides (CPPs) constitute a promising tool and have shown applications for peptide and protein delivery into cells as well as across various epithelia and the blood-brain barrier (BBB). CPP-mediated delivery of peptides and proteins may be pursued via covalent conjugation of the CPP to the cargo peptide...... or protein or via physical complexation obtained by simple bulk-mixing of the CPP with its cargo. Both approaches have their pros and cons, and which is the better choice likely relates to the physicochemical properties of the CPP and its cargo as well as the route of administration, the specific barrier...... are believed to involve both endocytosis and direct translocation, but are still widely investigated and discussed. The fact that multiple factors influence the mechanisms responsible for cellular CPP internalization and the lack of sensitive methods for detection of the CPP, and in some cases the cargo...

  8. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Tam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic, lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms.

  9. Peptide Integrated Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelman, Amir; Lapshina, Nadezda; Apter, Boris; Rosenman, Gil

    2018-02-01

    Bio-nanophotonics is a wide field in which advanced optical materials, biomedicine, fundamental optics, and nanotechnology are combined and result in the development of biomedical optical chips. Silk fibers or synthetic bioabsorbable polymers are the main light-guiding components. In this work, an advanced concept of integrated bio-optics is proposed, which is based on bioinspired peptide optical materials exhibiting wide optical transparency, nonlinear and electrooptical properties, and effective passive and active waveguiding. Developed new technology combining bottom-up controlled deposition of peptide planar wafers of a large area and top-down focus ion beam lithography provides direct fabrication of peptide optical integrated circuits. Finding a deep modification of peptide optical properties by reconformation of biological secondary structure from native phase to β-sheet architecture is followed by the appearance of visible fluorescence and unexpected transition from a native passive optical waveguiding to an active one. Original biocompatibility, switchable regimes of waveguiding, and multifunctional nonlinear optical properties make these new peptide planar optical materials attractive for application in emerging technology of lab-on-biochips, combining biomedical photonic and electronic circuits toward medical diagnosis, light-activated therapy, and health monitoring. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, and ongoing research that helps ...

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics ... depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies ... medication. This information may someday make it possible to predict who ...

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics ... fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" response to confront or escape from a dangerous ...

  13. Brain Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms Brain lesions By Mayo Clinic Staff A brain lesion is an abnormality seen on a brain-imaging test, such as ... tomography (CT). On CT or MRI scans, brain lesions appear as dark or light spots that don' ...

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  15. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News & Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) ...

  16. Biomimetic peptide nanosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yue; Kim, Sang N; Naik, Rajesh R; McAlpine, Michael C

    2012-05-15

    The development of a miniaturized sensing platform tailored for sensitive and selective detection of a variety of biochemical analytes could offer transformative fundamental and technological opportunities. Due to their high surface-to-volume ratios, nanoscale materials are extremely sensitive sensors. Likewise, peptides represent robust substrates for selective recognition due to the potential for broad chemical diversity within their relatively compact size. Here we explore the possibilities of linking peptides to nanosensors for the selective detection of biochemical targets. Such systems raise a number of interesting fundamental challenges: What are the peptide sequences, and how can rational design be used to derive selective binders? What nanomaterials should be used, and what are some strategies for assembling hybrid nanosensors? What role does molecular modeling play in elucidating response mechanisms? What is the resulting performance of these sensors, in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, and response time? What are some potential applications? This Account will highlight our early attempts to address these research challenges. Specifically, we use natural peptide sequences or sequences identified from phage display as capture elements. The sensors are based on a variety of nanomaterials including nanowires, graphene, and carbon nanotubes. We couple peptides to the nanomaterial surfaces via traditional surface functionalization methods or self-assembly. Molecular modeling provides detailed insights into the hybrid nanostructure, as well as the sensor detection mechanisms. The peptide nanosensors can distinguish chemically camouflaged mixtures of vapors and detect chemical warfare agents with sensitivities as low as parts-per-billion levels. Finally, we anticipate future uses of this technology in biomedicine: for example, devices based on these sensors could detect disease from the molecular components in human breath. Overall, these results provide a

  17. CART peptide induces neuroregeneration in stroke rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yu; Shen, Hui; Liu, Hua-Shan; Yu, Seong-Jin; Reiner, David J; Harvey, Brandon K; Hoffer, Barry J; Yang, Yihong; Wang, Yun

    2013-02-01

    Utilizing a classic stroke model in rodents, middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo), we describe a novel neuroregenerative approach using the repeated intranasal administration of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide starting from day 3 poststroke for enhancing the functional recovery of injured brain. Adult rats were separated into two groups with similar infarction sizes, measured by magnetic resonance imaging on day 2 after MCAo, and were treated with CART or vehicle. The CART treatment increased CART level in the brain, improved behavioral recovery, and reduced neurological scores. In the subventricular zone (SVZ), CART enhanced immunolabeling of bromodeoxyuridine, a neural progenitor cell marker Musashi-1, and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen, as well as upregulated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA. AAV-GFP was locally applied to the SVZ to examine migration of SVZ cells. The CART enhanced migration of GFP(+) cells from SVZ toward the ischemic cortex. In SVZ culture, CART increased the size of neurospheres. The CART-mediated cell migration from SVZ explants was reduced by anti-BDNF blocking antibody. Using (1)H-MRS (proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy), increases in N-acetylaspartate levels were found in the lesioned cortex after CART treatment in stroke brain. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript increased the expression of GAP43 and fluoro-ruby fluorescence in the lesioned cortex. In conclusion, our data suggest that intranasal CART treatment facilitates neuroregeneration in stroke brain.

  18. Immunotherapy with Allergen Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larché Mark

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Specific allergen immunotherapy (SIT is disease-modifying and efficacious. However, the use of whole allergen preparations is associated with frequent allergic adverse events during treatment. Many novel approaches are being designed to reduce the allergenicity of immunotherapy preparations whilst maintaining immunogenicity. One approach is the use of short synthetic peptides which representing dominant T cell epitopes of the allergen. Short peptides exhibit markedly reduced capacity to cross link IgE and activate mast cells and basophils, due to lack of tertiary structure. Murine pre-clinical studies have established the feasibility of this approach and clinical studies are currently in progress in both allergic and autoimmune diseases.

  19. Therapeutic HIV Peptide Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to control chronic HIV infection and eliminate the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therapeutic HIV vaccine is being pursued as part of a functional cure for HIV/AIDS. We have outlined a basic protocol for inducing new T cell immunity during chronic HIV-1...... infection directed to subdominant conserved HIV-1 epitopes restricted to frequent HLA supertypes. The rationale for selecting HIV peptides and adjuvants are provided. Peptide subunit vaccines are regarded as safe due to the simplicity, quality, purity, and low toxicity. The caveat is reduced immunogenicity...

  20. Correlated Inflammatory Responses and Neurodegeneration in Peptide-Injected Animal Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G. McLarnon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD which emphasize activation of microglia may have particular utility in correlating proinflammatory activity with neurodegeneration. This paper reviews injection of amyloid-β (Aβ into rat brain as an alternative AD animal model to the use of transgenic animals. In particular, intrahippocampal injection of Aβ1-42 peptide demonstrates prominent microglial mobilization and activation accompanied by a significant loss of granule cell neurons. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of inflammatory reactivity is demonstrated by a broad spectrum of drugs with a common endpoint in conferring neuroprotection in peptide-injected animals. Peptide-injection models provide a focus on glial cell responses to direct peptide injection in rat brain and offer advantages in the study of the mechanisms underlying neuroinflammation in AD brain.

  1. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac-derived peptide hormones were identified more than 25 years ago. An astonishing amount of clinical studies have established cardiac natriuretic peptides and their molecular precursors as useful markers of heart disease. In contrast to the clinical applications, the biogenesis of cardiac....... An inefficient post-translational prohormone maturation will also affect the biology of the cardiac natriuretic peptide system. This review aims at summarizing the myocardial synthesis of natriuretic peptides focusing on B-type natriuretic peptide, where new data has disclosed cardiac myocytes as highly...... competent endocrine cells. The structurally related atrial natriuretic peptide will be mentioned where appropriate, whereas C-type natriuretic peptide will not be considered as a cardiac peptide of relevance in mammalian physiology....

  2. Quantitative evaluation of peptide analogue distribution in mouse tissue using 3D computer modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Bo

    histology sections. The work demonstrates the use of automated image analysis based on image registration to quantify LSFM data of the peptide brain distribution following peripheral administration. The methodology was expanded during the PhD work to also include study of receptor mapping and brain...

  3. GROUPS IN PEPTIDE SYNTHESIS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    carboxamide protecting group in peptide synthesis. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION l-Tetralinylamines used as precursors to prepare the carboxamide derivatives of asparagine and glutamine are shown in Table 1: Table 1. Summary of l-tetralinyl amines. Amines Aromatic ring NHZ. X Y Z Z. 1 H H H. 2 OCH; H H. 3 H OCH ...

  4. Natriuretic peptides and cerebral hemodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Song; Barringer, Filippa; Zois, Nora Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides have emerged as important diagnostic and prognostic tools for cardiovascular disease. Plasma measurement of the bioactive peptides as well as precursor-derived fragments is a sensitive tool in assessing heart failure. In heart failure, the peptides are used as treatment...

  5. NCAM Mimetic Peptides: An Update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    of combinatorial peptide libraries. The C3 and NBP10 peptides target the first Ig module whereas the ENFIN2 and ENFIN11 peptides target fibronectin type III (FN3) modules of NCAM. A number of NCAM mimetics can induce neurite outgrowth and exhibit neuroprotective and synaptic plasticity modulating properties...

  6. 'optimization' of animal peptide toxins

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    peptides of ca. 4 to 70 amino acid residues, with a number of potential therapeutic applications.[1]. Because of the intrinsic structural complexities of these peptides (different types of fold and 1-5 disulfide bridges), this size range implicates that only a fraction of them (< 50-mer peptides) can routinely be produced by ...

  7. Peptide vectors for gene delivery: from single peptides to multifunctional peptide nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raad, Markus de; Teunissen, Erik A; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2014-07-01

    The therapeutic use of nucleic acids relies on the availability of sophisticated delivery systems for targeted and intracellular delivery of these molecules. Such a gene delivery should possess essential characteristics to overcome several extracellular and intracellular barriers. Peptides offer an attractive platform for nonviral gene delivery, as several functional peptide classes exist capable of overcoming these barriers. However, none of these functional peptide classes contain all the essential characteristics required to overcome all of the barriers associated with successful gene delivery. Combining functional peptides into multifunctional peptide vectors will be pivotal for improving peptide-based gene delivery systems. By using combinatorial strategies and high-throughput screening, the identification of multifunctional peptide vectors will accelerate the optimization of peptide-based gene delivery systems.

  8. [Biosynthesis of opioid peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossier, J

    1988-01-01

    The endogenous opioid peptides all contain the enkephalin sequence Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Met and Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu at their aminoterminus. Three distinct families of these peptides (endorphins, enkephalins and dynorphins) are present in different neuronal pathways within the central nervous system. Molecular genetics have shown that these three families of opioid peptides are derived from three distinct precursors. Pro-opiomelanocortin gives rise to the endorphins, as well as adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and the melanotropic hormones (MSH's). [Met] enkephalin, [Leu] enkephalin and the related heptapeptide [Met] enkephalin-Arg6-Phe7 and octapeptide [Met] enkephalin-Arg6-Gly7-Leu8 are derived from proenkephalin. The third family is derived from prodynorphin and includes dynorphin A, dynorphin B (also known as rimorphin) and alpha- and beta-neo-endorphin. The structure of the genes coding for these precursors are similar, suggesting the possibility of one common ancestral gene. The most common scheme for enzymatic maturation of precursors proposes the action of a trypsin-like endopeptidase followed by a carboxypeptidase B-like exopeptidase. However, we have provided evidence that this combination of trypsin-like and carboxypeptidase B-like enzymes may not be the only mechanism for liberating enkephalin from low molecular weight enkephalin-containing peptides. Indeed, endo-oligopeptidase A, an enzyme, known to hydrolyze the Phe5-Ser6 bond of bradykinin and the Arg8-Arg9 bond of neurotensin, has been shown to produce, by a single cleavage, [Leu] enkephalin or [Met] enkephalin from small enkephalin-containing peptides, (Camargo et al., 1987, J. Neurochem. 48, 1258-1263).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Antagonistic peptide technology for functional dissection of CLE peptides revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyzewicz, Nathan; Wildhagen, Mari; Cattaneo, Pietro; Stahl, Yvonne; Pinto, Karine Gustavo; Aalen, Reidunn B; Butenko, Melinka A; Simon, Rüdiger; Hardtke, Christian S; De Smet, Ive

    2015-08-01

    In the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, over 1000 putative genes encoding small, presumably secreted, signalling peptides can be recognized. However, a major obstacle in identifying the function of genes encoding small signalling peptides is the limited number of available loss-of-function mutants. To overcome this, a promising new tool, antagonistic peptide technology, was recently developed. Here, this antagonistic peptide technology was tested on selected CLE peptides and the related IDA peptide and its usefulness in the context of studies of peptide function discussed. Based on the analyses, it was concluded that the antagonistic peptide approach is not the ultimate means to overcome redundancy or lack of loss-of-function lines. However, information collected using antagonistic peptide approaches (in the broad sense) can be very useful, but these approaches do not work in all cases and require a deep insight on the interaction between the ligand and its receptor to be successful. This, as well as peptide ligand structure considerations, should be taken into account before ordering a wide range of synthetic peptide variants and/or generating transgenic plants. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  10. Involvement of the Blood-Brain Barrier in Metabolic Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastin, Abba J; Pan, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    Pertinent to pandemic obesity, the discovery of endogenous peptides that affect the ingestion of food has led to the question of how these ingestive peptides exert their actions in the brain. Whereas peripheral sources provide a ready reserve, the availability of ingestive peptides to their central nervous system targets can be regulated by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Some of the peptides/polypeptides are transported by saturable mechanisms from blood to brain. Examples include leptin, insulin, mahogany, and pancreatic polypeptide. Some enter the brain by passive diffusion, such as neuropeptide Y, orexin A, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript, cyclo His-Pro, and amylin. Some others may have essentially no penetration of the BBB; this class includes agouti-related protein, melanin-concentrating hormone, and urocortin. The regulatory function of the BBB can be seen in various physiological states. Hyperglycemia may upregulate transport systems for leptin, urocortin, and galanin-like peptide, whereas fasting can down-regulate those for leptin and galanin-like peptide. Thus, the BBB plays a dynamic role in modulating the passage of ingestive peptides from blood to brain.

  11. Tailored delivery of analgesic ziconotide across a blood brain barrier model using viral nanocontainers

    OpenAIRE

    Prachi Anand; Alison O’Neil; Emily Lin; Trevor Douglas; Mandë Holford

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is often an insurmountable obstacle for a large number of candidate drugs, including peptides, antibiotics, and chemotherapeutic agents. Devising an adroit delivery method to cross the BBB is essential to unlocking widespread application of peptide therapeutics. Presented here is an engineered nanocontainer for delivering peptidic drugs across the BBB encapsulating the analgesic marine snail peptide ziconotide (Prialt?). We developed a bi-functional viral nanocon...

  12. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  13. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics ... basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by neurons that carries ...

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: ... of the brain communicate and work with each other How changes in the brain ...

  15. Radiolabelled peptides for oncological diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverman, Peter; Boerman, Otto C.; Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Sosabowski, Jane K. [Queen Mary University of London, Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    Radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides targeting receptors (over)expressed on tumour cells are widely under investigation for tumour diagnosis and therapy. The concept of using radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides to target receptor-expressing tissues in vivo has stimulated a large body of research in nuclear medicine. The {sup 111}In-labelled somatostatin analogue octreotide (OctreoScan trademark) is the most successful radiopeptide for tumour imaging, and was the first to be approved for diagnostic use. Based on the success of these studies, other receptor-targeting peptides such as cholecystokinin/gastrin analogues, glucagon-like peptide-1, bombesin (BN), chemokine receptor CXCR4 targeting peptides, and RGD peptides are currently under development or undergoing clinical trials. In this review, we discuss some of these peptides and their analogues, with regard to their potential for radionuclide imaging of tumours. (orig.)

  16. Multidimensional Design of Anticancer Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Chu; Lim, Yi Fan; Russo, Erica; Schneider, Petra; Bolliger, Lea; Edenharter, Adriana; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Halin, Cornelia; Hiss, Jan A; Schneider, Gisbert

    2015-08-24

    The computer-assisted design and optimization of peptides with selective cancer cell killing activity was achieved through merging the features of anticancer peptides, cell-penetrating peptides, and tumor-homing peptides. Machine-learning classifiers identified candidate peptides that possess the predicted properties. Starting from a template amino acid sequence, peptide cytotoxicity against a range of cancer cell lines was systematically optimized while minimizing the effects on primary human endothelial cells. The computer-generated sequences featured improved cancer-cell penetration, induced cancer-cell apoptosis, and were enabled a decrease in the cytotoxic concentration of co-administered chemotherapeutic agents in vitro. This study demonstrates the potential of multidimensional machine-learning methods for rapidly obtaining peptides with the desired cellular activities. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Design of a PKCδ-specific small peptide as a theragnostic agent for glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jun-Haeng; Ha, Na-Reum; Koh, Seong-Ho; Yoon, Moon-Young

    2016-03-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive malignant brain tumor that starts in the brain or spine and frequently recurs after anticancer treatment. The development of an accurate diagnostic system combined with effective cancer therapy is essential to improve prognosis of glioma patients. Peptides, produced from phage display, are attractive biomolecules for glioma treatment because of their biostability, nontoxicity, and small size. In this study, we employed phage display methodology to screen for peptides that specifically recognize the target PKCδ as a novel biomarker for glioma. The phage library screening yielded four different peptides displayed on phages with a 20- to 200-pM Kd value for the recombinant PKCδ catalytic domain. Among these four phage peptides, we selected one to synthesize and tagged it with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) based on the sequence of the PKCδ-binding phage clone. The synthetic peptide showed a relative binding affinity for antibody and localization in the U373 glioma cell. The kinase activity of PKCδ was inhibited by FITC-labeled peptide with an IC50 of 1.4 μM in vitro. Consequently, the peptide found in this study might be a promising therapeutic agent against malignant brain tumor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP) in early pregnancy is associated with development of preeclampsia in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Ringholm; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Thorsteinsson, Birger

    2011-01-01

    The vasoactive markers of cardiac overload Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP) and Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) are elevated in preeclampsia. This study documents higher ANP concentrations as early as at 9 weeks in type 1 diabetic women subsequently developing preeclampsia suggesting...... that preeclampsia is associated with cardiovascular changes in early pregnancy....

  19. Approaches to transport therapeutic drugs across the blood-brain barrier to treat brain diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabathuler, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The central nervous system is protected by barriers which control the entry of compounds into the brain, thereby regulating brain homeostasis. The blood-brain barrier, formed by the endothelial cells of the brain capillaries, restricts access to brain cells of blood-borne compounds and facilitates nutrients essential for normal metabolism to reach brain cells. This very tight regulation of the brain homeostasis results in the inability of some small and large therapeutic compounds to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Therefore, various strategies are being developed to enhance the amount and concentration of therapeutic compounds in the brain. In this review, we will address the different approaches used to increase the transport of therapeutics from blood into the brain parenchyma. We will mainly concentrate on the physiologic approach which takes advantage of specific receptors already expressed on the capillary endothelial cells forming the BBB and necessary for the survival of brain cells. Among all the approaches used for increasing brain delivery of therapeutics, the most accepted method is the use of the physiological approach which takes advantage of the transcytosis capacity of specific receptors expressed at the BBB. The low density lipoprotein receptor related protein (LRP) is the most adapted for such use with the engineered peptide compound (EPiC) platform incorporating the Angiopep peptide in new therapeutics the most advanced with promising data in the clinic.

  20. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Sadredinamin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are extensive group of molecules that produced by variety tissues of invertebrate, plants, and animal species which play an important role in their immunity response. AMPs have different classifications such as; biosynthetic machines, biological sources, biological functions, molecular properties, covalent bonding patterns, three dimensional structures, and molecular targets.These molecules have multidimensional properties including antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, antifungal activity, anti-parasite activity, biofilm control, antitumor activity, mitogens activity and linking innate to adaptive immunity that making them promising agents for therapeutic drugs. In spite of this advantage of AMPs, their clinical developments have some limitation for commercial development. But some of AMPs are under clinical trials for the therapeutic purpose such as diabetic foot ulcers, different bacterial infections and tissue damage. In this review, we emphasized on the source, structure, multidimensional properties, limitation and therapeutic applications of various antimicrobial peptides.

  1. Brain Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  2. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ... grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do ...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children ...

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that brain ... imaging technique that uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure. mutation —A change in ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain ... specialized for the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes ...

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children ...

  9. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. She ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ...

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function ... chart how the brain develops over time in healthy people and are working to compare that with ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Outreach Home Stakeholder Engagement Outreach Partnership Program Alliance for Research Progress Coalition ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ...

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video ... and epigenetic changes can be passed on to future generations. Further understanding of genes and epigenetics may ...

  15. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can lead to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits ... tailored treatments, and possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything we do relies on ...

  16. Antimicrobial peptides in annelids

    OpenAIRE

    Tasiemski, A.

    2008-01-01

    Gene encoded antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are widely distributed among living organisms including plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. They constitute important effectors of the innate immune response by exerting multiple roles as mediators of inflammation with impact on epithelial and inflammatory cells influencing diverse processes such as cytokine release, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, wound healing, chemotaxis and immune induction. In invertebrates, most of the data describe the ch...

  17. The P42 peptide and Peptide-based therapies for Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelli, Cecilia; Maschat, Florence

    2016-03-17

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative hereditary disease clinically characterised by the presence of involuntary movements, behavioural problems and cognitive decline. The disease-onset is usually between 30 and 50 years of age. HD is a rare disorder affecting approximately 1.3 in 10,000 people in the European Union. It is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the first exon of the Huntingtin (HTT) gene, leading to an abnormal form of the Huntingtin protein (Htt) (polyQHtt), containing N-terminus, enlarged polyglutamine strands of variable length that stick together to form aggregates and nuclear inclusions in the damaged brain cells. Treatments currently used for Huntington's disease are symptomatic and aimed at temporally relieving the symptoms of the disease; although some promising therapies are on study, there is no drug capable of stopping disease progression either in the form of delaying onset or slowing disability progression. The utilization of peptides interacting with polyQ stretches or with Htt protein to prevent misfolding and aggregation of the expanded polyQ protein is a fascinating idea, because of low potential toxicity and ability to target very initial steps in the pathophysiological cascade of the disease, such as aggregation or cleavage process. Indeed, several therapeutic peptides have been developed and were found to significantly slow down the progression of symptoms in experimental models of Huntington's disease. This review is essentially focusing on the latest development concerning peptide strategy. In particular, we focused on a 23aa peptide P42, which is a part of the Htt protein. It is expected to work principally by preventing the abnormal Htt protein from sticking together, thereby preventing pathological consequences of aggregation and improving the symptoms of the disease. In the meantime, as P42 is part of the Htt protein, some therapeutic properties might be linked to the physiological actions of the

  18. Peptide-enhanced oral delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Mie; Foged, Camilla; Berthelsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Systemic therapy upon oral delivery of biologics, such as peptide and protein drugs is limited due to their large molecular size, their low enzymatic stability and their inability to cross the intestinal epithelium. Ways to overcome the epithelial barrier include the use of peptide-based excipients...... throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, chemical stability is an inherent challenge when employing amino acid-based excipients for oral delivery, and multiple approaches have been investigated to improve this. The exact mechanisms of transepithelial translocation are discussed, and it is believed...... for oral delivery of peptide and protein drugs highlighting recent studies and the most promising compounds from these classes of peptide excipients....

  19. Some aspects of physiology and pharmacology of endogenous opioid peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przewłocki, R

    1984-01-01

    The review, based largely on our own results describes the present state of knowledge of some aspects of opioid peptides and their physiological role. Studies on the effect of opioid peptides and opiates on brain function and the changes of brain level of endogenous opioids under various conditions have demonstrated, among others, the role of opioids in stress and stress-induced analgesia, the involvement of various opioid receptors in spinal mechanisms of analgesia, the inhibitory role of dynorphin in seizures in contrast to proconvulsant action of beta-endorphin system and mu receptor, and led to postulation of the role of beta-endorphin interaction with serotonin for ingestive behavior and a possible involvement of beta-endorphin system in the mechanism of action of antidepressant treatments.

  20. Solid-phase peptide synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides an introduction to and overview of peptide chemistry with a focus on solid-phase peptide synthesis. The background, the most common reagents, and some mechanisms are presented. This chapter also points to the different chapters and puts them into perspective.......This chapter provides an introduction to and overview of peptide chemistry with a focus on solid-phase peptide synthesis. The background, the most common reagents, and some mechanisms are presented. This chapter also points to the different chapters and puts them into perspective....

  1. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  2. Antitumor Peptides from Marine Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Sun

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The biodiversity of the marine environment and the associated chemical diversity constitute a practically unlimited resource of new antitumor agents in the field of the development of marine bioactive substances. In this review, the progress on studies of antitumor peptides from marine sources is provided. The biological properties and mechanisms of action of different marine peptides are described; information about their molecular diversity is also presented. Novel peptides that induce apoptosis signal pathway, affect the tubulin-microtubule equilibrium and inhibit angiogenesis are presented in association with their pharmacological properties. It is intended to provide useful information for further research in the fields of marine antitumor peptides.

  3. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology.

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah ... axis —A brain-body circuit which plays a critical role in the body's response to stress. impulse — ...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... time in healthy people and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental ... the brain than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures ...

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of cells in the body, the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading ... the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of conducting messages. ... specialized brain systems. We have many specialized brain systems that work ... research are listed below. Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which ...

  8. Targeting B16 tumors in vivo with peptide-conjugated gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Wilson; Zhang, Xuan; Bekah, Devesh; Teodoro, Jose G.; Nadeau, Jay L.

    2015-07-01

    This study examines the effects of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and peptide conjugation on the biodistribution of ultrasmall (2.7 nm) gold nanoparticles in mice bearing B16 melanoma allografts. Nanoparticles were delivered intravenously, and biodistribution was measured at specific timepoints by organ digestion and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. All major organs were examined. Two peptides were tested: the cyclic RGD peptide (cRGD, which targets integrins); and a recently described peptide derived from the myxoma virus. We found the greatest specific tumor delivery using the myxoma peptide, with or without PEGylation. Un-PEGylated cRGD performed poorly, but PEGylated RGD showed a significant transient collection in the tumor. Liver and kidney were the primary targets of all constructs. None of the particles were able to cross the blood-brain barrier. Although it was able to deliver Au to B16 cells, the myxoma peptide did not show any cytotoxic activity against these cells, in contrast to previous reports. These results indicate that the effect of passive targeting by PEGylation and active targeting by peptides can be independent or combined, and that they should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis when designing new nanosystems for targeted therapies. Both myxoma peptide and cRGD should be considered for specific targeting to melanoma, but a thorough investigation of the cytotoxicity of the myxoma peptide to different cell lines remains to be performed.

  9. A high throughput screen for 17 Dermorphin peptides in equine and human urine and equine plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Rohan; Timms, Mark; Levina, Vita; Vine, John

    2014-09-01

    The Dermorphins are a family of peptides that act as potent agonists of the opioid μ receptor. Originally identified as a seven amino acid peptide on the skin of the South American Phyllomedusa frog, peptide chemists have since developed a large number of Dermorphin variants, many with superior opioid activity to the original peptide. Dermorphins are unique among the peptide opioid agonists as they appear to have a limited ability to cross the blood brain barrier, producing effects on both the central and peripheral nervous systems. It is this ability of Dermorphins to provide central anaesthesia after intravenous or subcutaneous administration that allows their use as analogues of the opioid class of drugs. Recently, illicit use of the Dermorphin peptide in the racing industry has shown the need for an analytical method to control the use of these peptides. We present a high-throughput liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry screen for 17 Dermorphin peptides in equine urine and plasma with limits of detection down to 5 pg/mL. The peptide extraction technique is also suitable for use in human urine. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Anticancer peptides from bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz M. Karpiński

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of death in the world. The rapid development of medicine and pharmacology allows to create new and effective anticancer drugs. Among modern anticancer drugs are bacterial proteins. Until now has been shown anticancer activity among others azurin and exotoxin A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pep27anal2 from Streptococcus pneumoniae, diphtheria toxin from Corynebacterium diphtheriae, and recently discovered Entap from Enterococcus sp. The study presents the current data regarding the properties, action and anticancer activity of listed peptides.

  11. Peptide Vaccines for Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kono K

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In general, the preferable characteristic of the target molecules for development of cancer vaccines are high immunogenicity, very common expression in cancer cells, specific expression in cancer cells and essential molecules for cell survival (to avoid loss of expression. We previously reported that three novel HLA-A24-restricted immunodominant peptides, which were derived from three different oncoantigens, TTK, LY6K, and IMP-3,were promising targets for cancer vaccination for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCCpatients. Then, we had performed a phase I clinical trial using three HLA-A24-binding peptides and the results had been shown to be promising for ESCC. Therefore, we further performed a multicenter, non-randomized phase II clinical trial. Patients and Methods: Sixty ESCC patients were enrolled to evaluate OS, PFS, immunological response employing ELISPOT and pentamer assays. Each of the three peptides was administered with IFA weekly. All patients received the vaccination without knowing an HLA-A type, and the HLA types were key-opened at the analysis point. Hence, the endpoints were set to evaluate differences between HLA-A*2402-positive (24(+ and -negative (24(- groups. Results: The OS in the 24 (+ group (n=35 tended to be better than that in the 24(- group (n=25 (MST 4.6 vs. 2.6 month, respectively, p = 0.121, although the difference was not statistically significant. However, the PFS in the 24(+ group was significantly better than that in the 24(- group (p = 0.032. In the 24(+ group, ELISPOT assay indicated that the LY6K-, TTK-, and IMP3-specific CTL responses were observed after the vaccination in 63%, 45%, and 60% of the 24(+ group, respectively. The patients having LY6K-, TTK-, and IMP3-specific CTL responses revealed the better OS than those not having CTL induction, respectively. The patients showing the CTL induction for multiple peptides have better clinical responses. Conclusion: The immune response induced

  12. ApoE mimetic peptide decreases Aβ production in vitro and in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Pak Daniel TS; Turner R Scott; Dakshanamurthy Sivanesan; Davis Gary C; Babus Lenard W; Tesoriero Joseph A; Cirrito John R; Cordova Antoinette; Minami S Sakura; Rebeck G William; Paige Mikell; Hoe Hyang-Sook

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is postulated to affect brain Aβ levels through multiple mechanisms--by altering amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing, Aβ degradation, and Aβ clearance. We previously showed that an apoE-derived peptide containing a double repeat of the receptor-binding region was similarly effective in increasing APP processing in vivo. Here, we further examined whether peptides containing tandem repeats of the apoE receptor-binding region (amino acids 141-14...

  13. Effect of natriuretic peptides on cerebral artery blood flow in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Song; Gøtze, Jens Peter; Jeppesen, Jørgen L

    2015-01-01

    ) by transcranial Doppler. In addition, we measured temporal and radial artery diameters, headache response and plasma concentrations of the NPs. In guinea pigs, ANP and BNP but not CNP showed significant dose-dependent relaxation of cerebral arteries. In healthy humans, NP infusion had no effect on mean VMCA......The natriuretic peptides (NPs), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), have vasoactive functions that concern humans and most animals, but their specific effects on cerebral circulation are poorly understood. We therefore examined...... the responsiveness of cerebral arteries to different doses of the natriuretic peptides in animals and humans. We conducted a dose-response experiment in guinea pigs (in vitro) and a double-blind, three-way cross-over study in healthy volunteers (in vivo). In the animal experiment, we administered cumulative doses...

  14. Neuroactive peptides as putative mediators of antiepileptic ketogenic diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela eGiordano

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Various ketogenic diet (KD therapies, including classic KD, medium chain triglyceride administration, low glycemic index treatment, and a modified Atkins diet, have been suggested as useful in patients affected by pharmacoresistant epilepsy. A common goal of these approaches is to achieve an adequate decrease in the plasma glucose level combined with ketogenesis, in order to mimic the metabolic state of fasting. Although several metabolic hypotheses have been advanced to explain the anticonvulsant effect of KDs, including changes in the plasma levels of ketone bodies, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and brain pH, direct modulation of neurotransmitter release, especially purinergic (i.e., adenosine and γ-aminobutyric acidergic neurotransmission, was also postulated. Neuropeptides and peptide hormones are potent modulators of synaptic activity, and their levels are regulated by metabolic states. This is the case for neuroactive peptides such as neuropeptide Y, galanin, cholecystokinin and peptide hormones such as leptin, adiponectin, and growth hormone-releasing peptides (GHRPs. In particular, the GHRP ghrelin and its related peptide des-acyl ghrelin are well-known controllers of energy homeostasis, food intake, and lipid metabolism. Notably, ghrelin has also been shown to regulate the neuronal excitability and epileptic activation of neuronal networks. Several lines of evidence suggest that GHRPs are upregulated in response to starvation and, particularly, in patients affected by anorexia and cachexia, all conditions in which also ketone bodies are upregulated. Moreover, starvation and anorexia nervosa are accompanied by changes in other peptide hormones such as adiponectin, which has received less attention. Adipocytokines such as adiponectin have also been involved in modulating epileptic activity. Thus, neuroactive peptides whose plasma levels and activity change in the presence of ketogenesis might be potential candidates for elucidating the

  15. Natriuretic peptides in cardiometabolic regulation and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zois, Nora E; Bartels, Emil D; Hunter, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    these conditions can coexist and potentially lead to heart failure, a syndrome associated with a functional natriuretic peptide deficiency despite high circulating concentrations of immunoreactive peptides. Therefore, dysregulation of the natriuretic peptide system, a 'natriuretic handicap', might be an important...

  16. The Peptide Vaccine Combined with Prior Immunization of a Conventional Diphtheria-Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine Induced Amyloid β Binding Antibodies on Cynomolgus Monkeys and Guinea Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of brain amyloid beta (Aβ peptides by anti-Aβ antibodies is one of the possible therapies for Alzheimer’s disease. We previously reported that the Aβ peptide vaccine including the T-cell epitope of diphtheria-tetanus combined toxoid (DT induced anti-Aβ antibodies, and the prior immunization with conventional DT vaccine enhanced the immunogenicity of the peptide. Cynomolgus monkeys were given the peptide vaccine subcutaneously in combination with the prior DT vaccination. Vaccination with a similar regimen was also performed on guinea pigs. The peptide vaccine induced anti-Aβ antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys and guinea pigs without chemical adjuvants, and excessive immune responses were not observed. Those antibodies could preferentially recognize Aβ40, and Aβ42 compared to Aβ fibrils. The levels of serum anti-Aβ antibodies and plasma Aβ peptides increased in both animals and decreased the brain Aβ40 level of guinea pigs. The peptide vaccine could induce a similar binding profile of anti-Aβ antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys and guinea pigs. The peptide vaccination could be expected to reduce the brainpeptides and their toxic effects via clearance of Aβ peptides by generated antibodies.

  17. Chemical Synthesis of Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzker, Lena; Oddo, Alberto; Hansen, Paul R

    2017-01-01

    Solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) is the method of choice for chemical synthesis of peptides. In this nonspecialist review, we describe commonly used resins, linkers, protecting groups, and coupling reagents in 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (Fmoc) SPPS. Finally, a detailed protocol for manual Fmoc SPPS is presented.

  18. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  19. Peptides: A new class of anticancer drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Ryszard Smolarczyk; Tomasz Cichoń; Stanisław Szala

    2009-01-01

    Peptides are a novel class of anticancer agents embracing two distinct categories: natural antibacterial peptides, which are preferentially bound by cancer cells, and chemically synthesized peptides, which bind specifically to precise molecular targets located on the surface of tumor cells. Antibacterial peptides bind to both cell and mitochondrial membranes. Some of these peptides attach to the cell membrane, resulting in its disorganization. Other antibacterial peptides penetrate cancer cel...

  20. Peptide-LNA oligonucleotide conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup; Vester, Birte

    2013-01-01

    Although peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates (POCs) are well-known for nucleic acids delivery and therapy, reports on internal attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides are limited in number. To develop a convenient route for preparation of internally labeled POCs with improved biomedical...... properties, peptides were introduced into oligonucleotides via a 2'-alkyne-2'-amino-LNA scaffold. Derivatives of methionine- and leucine-enkephalins were chosen as model peptides of mixed amino acid content, which were singly and doubly incorporated into LNA/DNA strands using highly efficient copper......(i)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) "click" chemistry. DNA/RNA target binding affinity and selectivity of the resulting POCs were improved in comparison to LNA/DNA mixmers and unmodified DNA controls. This clearly demonstrates that internal attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides can significantly...

  1. The Equine PeptideAtlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Louise; Jacobsen, Stine; Sorensen, Mette A.

    2014-01-01

    Progress in MS-based methods for veterinary research and diagnostics is lagging behind compared to the human research, and proteome data of domestic animals is still not well represented in open source data repositories. This is particularly true for the equine species. Here we present a first...... Equine PeptideAtlas encompassing high-resolution tandem MS analyses of 51 samples representing a selection of equine tissues and body fluids from healthy and diseased animals. The raw data were processed through the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline to yield high quality identification of proteins and peptides....... The current release comprises 24 131 distinct peptides representing 2636 canonical proteins observed at false discovery rates of 0.2% at the peptide level and 1.4% at the protein level. Data from the Equine PeptideAtlas are available for experimental planning, validation of new datasets, and as a proteomic...

  2. Maize Bioactive Peptides against Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Gómez, Jorge L.; Castorena-Torres, Fabiola; Preciado-Ortiz, Ricardo E.; García-Lara, Silverio

    2017-06-01

    Cancer is one of the main chronic degenerative diseases worldwide. In recent years, consumption of whole-grain cereals and their derived food products has been associated with reduction risks of various types of cancer. Cereals main biomolecules includes proteins, peptides, and amino acids present in different quantities within the grain. The nutraceutical properties associated with peptides exerts biological functions that promote health and prevent this disease. In this review, we report the current status and advances on maize peptides regarding bioactive properties that have been reported such as antioxidant, antihypertensive, hepatoprotective, and anti-tumour activities. We also highlighted its biological potential through which maize bioactive peptides exert anti-cancer activity. Finally, we analyse and emphasize the possible areas of application for maize peptides.

  3. Cathepsin-Mediated Cleavage of Peptides from Peptide Amphiphiles Leads to Enhanced Intracellular Peptide Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Handan; Samaeekia, Ravand; Schnorenberg, Mathew R; Sasmal, Dibyendu K; Huang, Jun; Tirrell, Matthew V; LaBelle, James L

    2017-09-20

    Peptides synthesized in the likeness of their native interaction domain(s) are natural choices to target protein-protein interactions (PPIs) due to their fidelity of orthostatic contact points between binding partners. Despite therapeutic promise, intracellular delivery of biofunctional peptides at concentrations necessary for efficacy remains a formidable challenge. Peptide amphiphiles (PAs) provide a facile method of intracellular delivery and stabilization of bioactive peptides. PAs consisting of biofunctional peptide headgroups linked to hydrophobic alkyl lipid-like tails prevent peptide hydrolysis and proteolysis in circulation, and PA monomers are internalized via endocytosis. However, endocytotic sequestration and steric hindrance from the lipid tail are two major mechanisms that limit PA efficacy to target intracellular PPIs. To address these problems, we have constructed a PA platform consisting of cathepsin-B cleavable PAs in which a selective p53-based inhibitory peptide is cleaved from its lipid tail within endosomes, allowing for intracellular peptide accumulation and extracellular recycling of the lipid moiety. We monitor for cleavage and follow individual PA components in real time using a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based tracking system. Using this platform, we provide a better understanding and quantification of cellular internalization, trafficking, and endosomal cleavage of PAs and of the ultimate fates of each component.

  4. Purification and use of E. coli peptide deformylase for peptide deprotection in chemoenzymatic peptide synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Toma, Claudia; Sonke, Theo; Quaedflieg, Peter J.; Janssen, Dick B.

    Peptide deformylases (PDFs) catalyze the removal of the formyl group from the N-terminal methionine residue in nascent polypeptide chains in prokaryotes. Its deformylation activity makes PDF an attractive candidate for the biocatalytic deprotection of formylated peptides that are used in

  5. Cathepsin-Mediated Cleavage of Peptides from Peptide Amphiphiles Leads to Enhanced Intracellular Peptide Accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acar, Handan [Institute; Department; Samaeekia, Ravand [Institute; Department; Schnorenberg, Mathew R. [Institute; Department; Medical; Sasmal, Dibyendu K. [Institute; Huang, Jun [Institute; Tirrell, Matthew V. [Institute; Institute; LaBelle, James L. [Department

    2017-08-24

    Peptides synthesized in the likeness of their native interaction domain(s) are natural choices to target protein protein interactions (PPIs) due to their fidelity of orthostatic contact points between binding partners. Despite therapeutic promise, intracellular delivery of biofunctional peptides at concentrations necessary for efficacy remains a formidable challenge. Peptide amphiphiles (PAs) provide a facile method of intracellular delivery and stabilization of bioactive peptides. PAs consisting of biofunctional peptide headgroups linked to hydrophobic alkyl lipid-like tails prevent peptide hydrolysis and proteolysis in circulation, and PA monomers are internalized via endocytosis. However, endocytotic sequestration and steric hindrance from the lipid tail are two major mechanisms that limit PA efficacy to target intracellular PPIs. To address these problems, we have constructed a PA platform consisting of cathepsin-B cleavable PAs in which a selective p53-based inhibitory peptide is cleaved from its lipid tail within endosomes, allowing for intracellular peptide accumulation and extracellular recycling of the lipid moiety. We monitor for cleavage and follow individual PA components in real time using a resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based tracking system. Using this platform, components in real time using a Forster we provide a better understanding and quantification of cellular internalization, trafficking, and endosomal cleavage of PAs and of the ultimate fates of each component.

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News New BRAIN Grants BRAIN Cell Census Launched ... human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of ...

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    Full Text Available ... Careers at NIMH Staff Directories Getting to NIMH Transforming the understanding and treatment of mental illnesses. Search ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

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    Full Text Available ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain involved in creating and filing new memories. hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) ...

  10. Brain Diseases

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    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

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    Full Text Available ... may help improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex ( ... brain. Using MEG, some scientists have found a specific pattern of brain activity that may help predict ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, and ongoing research that helps us better understand and treat disorders. Mental disorders are common. You may have a ...

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    Full Text Available ... Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in understanding how the brain functions. Another type of brain scan called magnetoencephalography, or MEG, can ...

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    Full Text Available ... front of the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ...

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... symptoms and family medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early-life experiences may have made it ...

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    Full Text Available ... The basic structure of the brain How different parts of the brain communicate and work with each ... of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes the nucleus, cytoplasm, and ...

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    Full Text Available ... Opportunities & Announcements Funding Strategy for Grants Application Process Managing Grants Clinical Research Training Labs at NIMH Labs ... normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain Basics will introduce you ...

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    Full Text Available ... the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

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    Full Text Available ... normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain Basics will introduce you ... of DNA. Sometimes this copying process is imperfect, leading to a gene mutation that causes the gene ...

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... her feelings. Brain Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists a more detailed understanding of ...

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

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    Full Text Available ... the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions of cells in the body, the results can affect many ... unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of conducting ...

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    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ... the body's response to stress. impulse —An electrical communication signal sent between neurons by which neurons communicate ...

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... in her life. She began to think of suicide because she felt like things weren't going ...

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    Full Text Available ... in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... the basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells ... A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes ...

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... and her husband questions about Sarah's symptoms and family medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early- ...

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  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... it increases the chance that the neuron will fire. This enhances the electrical flow among brain cells ... This area of the brain also helps to control the amygdala during stressful events. Some research shows ...

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    Full Text Available ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in understanding how the brain functions. Another type of brain scan called magnetoencephalography, ...

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    Full Text Available ... depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of ... but sometimes give rise to disabilities or diseases. neural circuit —A network of neurons and their interconnections. ...

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    Full Text Available ... treatment for a person's specific conditions. Such brain research help increase the understanding of how the brain grows and works and the effects of genes and environment on mental health. This knowledge is allowing scientists ...

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    Full Text Available ... How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the ... inside contents of the cell from its surrounding environment and controls what enters and leaves the cell, ...

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    Full Text Available ... depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of ... of contact for receiving impulses on a neuron, branching off from the cell body. dopamine —A neurotransmitter ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Publications Help for Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News & Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The ...

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    Full Text Available ... a major mood circuit called the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain ... in creating and filing new memories. hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis —A brain-body circuit which plays ...

  3. Brain Aneurysm

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    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate have been ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain involved in ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain involved in creating and filing new memories. hypothalmic- ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain Regions Just as many neurons working together form ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah ... having trouble coping with the stresses in her life. She began to think of suicide because she ...

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's early 20s. ... that regulates many functions, including mood, appetite, and sleep. synapse —The tiny gap between neurons, where nerve impulses are sent from one neuron to ... of Deep Brain Stimulation Brain’s Alertness Circuitry Revealed New BRAIN Grants ...

  9. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inside of the brain (ventricles) or surrounding your brain and spinal cord to drain the excess fluid into an external bag. Sometimes it may then be necessary to introduce a shunt system — which consists of a ... brain and ending in your abdominal cavity. Rehabilitative therapy. ...

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow there are differences in ...

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... another important research tool in understanding how the brain functions. Another type of brain scan called magnetoencephalography, or ... highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, ...

  12. Neurogenic and neurotrophic effects of BDNF peptides in mouse hippocampal primary neuronal cell cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria del Carmen Cardenas-Aguayo

    Full Text Available The level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a member of the neurotrophin family, is down regulated in Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD, depression, stress, and anxiety; conversely the level of this neurotrophin is increased in autism spectrum disorders. Thus, modulating the level of BDNF can be a potential therapeutic approach for nervous system pathologies. In the present study, we designed five different tetra peptides (peptides B-1 to B-5 corresponding to different active regions of BDNF. These tetra peptides were found to be non-toxic, and they induced the expression of neuronal markers in mouse embryonic day 18 (E18 primary hippocampal neuronal cultures. Additionally, peptide B-5 induced the expression of BDNF and its receptor, TrkB, suggesting a positive feedback mechanism. The BDNF peptides induced only a moderate activation (phosphorylation at Tyr 706 of the TrkB receptor, which could be blocked by the Trk's inhibitor, K252a. Peptide B-3, when combined with BDNF, potentiated the survival effect of this neurotrophin on H(2O(2-treated E18 hippocampal cells. Peptides B-3 and B-5 were found to work as partial agonists and as partial antagonists competing with BDNF to activate the TrkB receptor in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that the described BDNF tetra peptides are neurotrophic, can modulate BDNF signaling in a partial agonist/antagonist way, and offer a novel therapeutic approach to neural pathologies where BDNF levels are dysregulated.

  13. Radiopharmaceutical development of radiolabelled peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fani, Melpomeni; Maecke, Helmut R. [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Receptor targeting with radiolabelled peptides has become very important in nuclear medicine and oncology in the past few years. The overexpression of many peptide receptors in numerous cancers, compared to their relatively low density in physiological organs, represents the molecular basis for in vivo imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy with radiolabelled peptide-based probes. The prototypes are analogs of somatostatin which are routinely used in the clinic. More recent developments include somatostatin analogs with a broader receptor subtype profile or with antagonistic properties. Many other peptide families such as bombesin, cholecystokinin/gastrin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)/exendin, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) etc. have been explored during the last few years and quite a number of potential radiolabelled probes have been derived from them. On the other hand, a variety of strategies and optimized protocols for efficient labelling of peptides with clinically relevant radionuclides such as {sup 99m}Tc, M{sup 3+} radiometals ({sup 111}In, {sup 86/90}Y, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 67/68}Ga), {sup 64/67}Cu, {sup 18}F or radioisotopes of iodine have been developed. The labelling approaches include direct labelling, the use of bifunctional chelators or prosthetic groups. The choice of the labelling approach is driven by the nature and the chemical properties of the radionuclide. Additionally, chemical strategies, including modification of the amino acid sequence and introduction of linkers/spacers with different characteristics, have been explored for the improvement of the overall performance of the radiopeptides, e.g. metabolic stability and pharmacokinetics. Herein, we discuss the development of peptides as radiopharmaceuticals starting from the choice of the labelling method and the conditions to the design and optimization of the peptide probe, as well as some recent developments, focusing on a selected list of peptide families, including somatostatin

  14. Left Brain. Right Brain. Whole Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    2004-01-01

    As the United States student population is becoming more diverse, library media specialists need to find ways to address these distinctive needs. However, some of these differences transcend culture, touching on variations in the brain itself. Most people have a dominant side of the brain, which can affect their personality and learning style.…

  15. Tryptathionine bridges in peptide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Jonathan P; Perrin, David M

    2007-01-01

    The tryptathionine linkage is a crosslink formed between tryptophan and cysteine. This feature is characteristic of the bicyclic peptides: the phallotoxins and the amatoxins. These peptides both bind to protein folds of their respective targets (F-actin and RNA pol II, respectively) with extremely high affinities. Studies on these peptides have shown that the tryptathionine crosslink is essential for this binding affinity. Tryptathionines have been investigated for many years and several syntheses exist for their formation. In this review, we report on the various methodologies employed in tryptathionine synthesis, and discuss some of the advantages and disadvantages associated with each of them. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Next generation natriuretic peptide measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, Ingrid; Goetze, Jens P

    2012-01-01

    Plasma measurement of natriuretic peptides is a "must" for clinical laboratories. For the next generation measurement, the unraveling of the molecular complexity of the peptides points toward a more qualitative assessment, as the posttranslational processing also changes with disease. Changes...... in the molecular heterogeneity could in itself contain valuable information of clinical status, and the time seems right for industry and dedicated researchers in the field to get together and discuss the next generation natriuretic peptide measurement. In such an environment, new strategies can be developed...

  17. Targeted Disruption of Guanylyl Cyclase-A/Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A Gene Provokes Renal Fibrosis and Remodeling in Null Mutant Mice: Role of Proinflammatory Cytokines

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Subhankar; Au, Edward; Krazit, Stephen T.; Pandey, Kailash N.

    2010-01-01

    Binding of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides to guanylyl cyclase-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A produces second messenger cGMP, which plays an important role in maintaining renal and cardiovascular homeostasis. Mice carrying a targeted disruption of the Npr1 gene coding for guanylyl cyclase-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A exhibit changes that are similar to those that occur in untreated human hypertension, including elevated blood pressure, cardiac hypertrophy, and congestive heart fai...

  18. Targeting the Eph System with Peptides and Peptide Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, Stefan J; Pasquale, Elena B

    2015-01-01

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and ephrin ligands constitute an important cell communication system that controls development, tissue homeostasis and many pathological processes. Various Eph receptors/ephrins are present in essentially all cell types and their expression is often dysregulated by injury and disease. Thus, the 14 Eph receptors are attracting increasing attention as a major class of potential drug targets. In particular, agents that bind to the extracellular ephrin-binding pocket of these receptors show promise for medical applications. This pocket comprises a broad and shallow groove surrounded by several flexible loops, which makes peptides particularly suitable to target it with high affinity and selectivity. Accordingly, a number of peptides that bind to Eph receptors with micromolar affinity have been identified using phage display and other approaches. These peptides are generally antagonists that inhibit ephrin binding and Eph receptor/ ephrin signaling, but some are agonists mimicking ephrin-induced Eph receptor activation. Importantly, some of the peptides are exquisitely selective for single Eph receptors. Most identified peptides are linear, but recently the considerable advantages of cyclic scaffolds have been recognized, particularly in light of potential optimization towards drug leads. To date, peptide improvements have yielded derivatives with low nanomolar Eph receptor binding affinity, high resistance to plasma proteases and/or long in vivo half-life, exemplifying the merits of peptides for Eph receptor targeting. Besides their modulation of Eph receptor/ephrin function, peptides can also serve to deliver conjugated imaging and therapeutic agents or various types of nanoparticles to tumors and other diseased tissues presenting target Eph receptors.

  19. Photoperiod Regulates vgf-Derived Peptide Processing in Siberian Hamsters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Noli

    Full Text Available VGF mRNA is induced in specific hypothalamic areas of the Siberian hamster upon exposure to short photoperiods, which is associated with a seasonal decrease in appetite and weight loss. Processing of VGF generates multiple bioactive peptides, so the objective of this study was to determine the profile of the VGF-derived peptides in the brain, pituitary and plasma from Siberian hamsters, and to establish whether differential processing might occur in the short day lean state versus long day fat. Antisera against short sequences at the C- or N- termini of proVGF, as well as against NERP-1, TPGH and TLQP peptides, were used for analyses of tissues, and both immunohistochemistry and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA coupled with high-performance liquid (HPLC or gel chromatography were carried out. VGF peptide immunoreactivity was found within cortex cholinergic perikarya, in multiple hypothalamic nuclei, including those containing vasopressin, and in pituitary gonadotrophs. ELISA revealed that exposure to short day photoperiod led to a down-regulation of VGF immunoreactivity in the cortex, and a less pronounced decrease in the hypothalamus and pituitary, while the plasma VGF levels were not affected by the photoperiod. HPLC and gel chromatography both confirmed the presence of multiple VGF-derived peptides in these tissues, while gel chromatography showed the presence of the VGF precursor in all tissues tested except for the cortex. These observations are consistent with the view that VGF-derived peptides have pleiotropic actions related to changing photoperiod, possibly by regulating cholinergic systems in the cortex, vasopressin hypothalamic pathways, and the reproductive axis.

  20. Novel peptides with tyrosinase inhibitory activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurink, M.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Wichers, H.J.; Boeriu, C.G.

    2007-01-01

    Tyrosinase inhibition by peptides may find its application in food, cosmetics or medicine. In order to identify novel tyrosinase inhibitory peptides, protein-based peptide libraries made by SPOT synthesis were used to screen for peptides that show direct interaction with tyrosinase. One of the

  1. Fmoc Solid-Phase Peptide Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Paul R; Oddo, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are important as drugs and in research. Currently, the method of choice for producing these compounds is solid-phase peptide synthesis. In this nonspecialist review, we describe the scope and limitations of Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis. Furthermore, we provide a detailed protocol for Fmoc peptide synthesis.

  2. Neuropeptides and the microbiota-gut-brain axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Peter; Farzi, Aitak

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptides are important mediators both within the nervous system and between neurons and other cell types. Neuropeptides such as substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, somatostatin and corticotropin-releasing factor are also likely to play a role in the bidirectional gut-brain communication. In this capacity they may influence the activity of the gastrointestinal microbiota and its interaction with the gut-brain axis. Current efforts in elucidating the implication of neuropeptides in the microbiota-gut-brain axis address four information carriers from the gut to the brain (vagal and spinal afferent neurons; immune mediators such as cytokines; gut hormones; gut microbiota-derived signalling molecules) and four information carriers from the central nervous system to the gut (sympathetic efferent neurons; parasympathetic efferent neurons; neuroendocrine factors involving the adrenal medulla; neuroendocrine factors involving the adrenal cortex). Apart from operating as neurotransmitters, many biologically active peptides also function as gut hormones. Given that neuropeptides and gut hormones target the same cell membrane receptors (typically G protein-coupled receptors), the two messenger roles often converge in the same or similar biological implications. This is exemplified by NPY and peptide YY (PYY), two members of the PP-fold peptide family. While PYY is almost exclusively expressed by enteroendocrine cells, NPY is found at all levels of the gut-brain and brain-gut axis. The function of PYY-releasing enteroendocrine cells is directly influenced by short chain fatty acids generated by the intestinal microbiota from indigestible fibre, while NPY may control the impact of the gut microbiota on inflammatory processes, pain, brain function and behaviour. Although the impact of neuropeptides on the interaction between the gut microbiota and brain awaits to be analysed, biologically active peptides

  3. The Pig PeptideAtlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselager, Marianne O.; Codrea, Marius C.; Sun, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    underrepresented in existing repositories. We here present a significantly improved build of the Pig PeptideAtlas, which includes pig proteome data from 25 tissues and three body fluid types mapped to 7139 canonical proteins. The content of the Pig PeptideAtlas reflects actively ongoing research within...... the veterinary proteomics domain, and this article demonstrates how the expression of isoform-unique peptides can be observed across distinct tissues and body fluids. The Pig PeptideAtlas is a unique resource for use in animal proteome research, particularly biomarker discovery and for preliminary design of SRM...... assays, which are equally important for progress in research that supports farm animal production and veterinary health, as for developing pig models with relevance to human health research....

  4. Structural Characterization of Peptide Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    can be modified to obtain desired properties or conformation, tagged for purification, isotopically labeled for protein quantitation or conjugated to immunogens for antibody production. The antibodies that bind to these peptides represent an invaluable tool for biological research and discovery...

  5. Therapeutical Potential of Venom Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlker Kelle

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The term of pharmazooticals is known as a few amount of drugs derived from natural sources such as plants, venomous species of snakes, spiders, scorpions, frogs, lizards and cone snails. Peptide components of venoms are directed against wide variety of pharmacological targets such as ion channels and receptors. At the beginning, a number of these peptides have been used in experimental studies for defining the physiological, biochemical and immunological activities of organisms like mammalians. In recent studies, it has been shown that venom peptides can be valuable in treatment of acute and chronic pain, autoimmune and cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders and chronic inflammatory and tumoral processes. Therefore particularly in clinical approaches, these peptide molecules or their synthetic analogues are considered as alternative agents that can be used instead of classical drugs for many clinical disorders due to their potent activity besides very few side effects.

  6. Hemolytic Activity of Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Alberto; Hansen, Paul R

    2017-01-01

    For antimicrobial peptides to be interesting for systemic applications, they must show low toxicity against erythrocytes. In this chapter, we describe a protocol for measuring the ability of AMPs to lyse human red blood cells, using melittin as positive control.

  7. Moonlighting peptides with emerging function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan G Rodríguez Plaza

    Full Text Available Hunter-killer peptides combine two activities in a single polypeptide that work in an independent fashion like many other multi-functional, multi-domain proteins. We hypothesize that emergent functions may result from the combination of two or more activities in a single protein domain and that could be a mechanism selected in nature to form moonlighting proteins. We designed moonlighting peptides using the two mechanisms proposed to be involved in the evolution of such molecules (i.e., to mutate non-functional residues and the use of natively unfolded peptides. We observed that our moonlighting peptides exhibited two activities that together rendered a new function that induces cell death in yeast. Thus, we propose that moonlighting in proteins promotes emergent properties providing a further level of complexity in living organisms so far unappreciated.

  8. Biomedical Applications of Organometal-Peptide Conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler-Nolte, Nils

    Peptides are well suited as targeting vectors for the directed delivery of metal-based drugs or probes for biomedical investigations. This chapter describes synthetic strategies for the preparation of conjugates of medically interesting peptides with covalently bound metal complexes. Peptides that were used include neuropeptides (enkephalin, neuropeptide Y, neurotensin), uptake peptides (TAT and poly-Arg), and intracellular localization sequences. To these peptides, a whole variety of transition metal complexes has been attached in recent years by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) techniques. The metal complex can be attached to the peptide on the resin as part of the SPPS scheme. Alternatively, the metal complex may be attached to the peptide as a postsynthetic modification. Advantages as well as disadvantages for either strategy are discussed. Biomedical applications include radiopharmaceutical applications, anticancer and antibacterial activity, metal-peptide conjugates as targeted CO-releasing molecules, and metal-peptide conjugates in biosensor applications.

  9. Production and characterization of peptide antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Hansen, P. R.; Houen, G.

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are effective immunogens for generation of antibodies. However, occasionally the native protein is known but not available for antibody production. In such cases synthetic peptides derived from the native protein are good alternatives for antibody production. These peptide antibodies...... are powerful tools in experimental biology and are easily produced to any peptide of choice. A widely used approach for production of peptide antibodies is to immunize animals with a synthetic peptide coupled to a carrier protein. Very important is the selection of the synthetic peptide, where factors......, including solid-phase peptide-carrier conjugation and peptide-carrier conjugation in solution. Upon immunization, adjuvants such as Al(OH)(3) are added together with the immunogenic peptide-carrier conjugate, which usually leads to high-titred antisera. Following immunization and peptide antibody...

  10. The greening of peptide synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrenson, Stefan B.; Arav, Roy; North, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of peptides by amide bond formation between suitably protected amino acids is a fundamental part of the drug discovery process. However, the required coupling and deprotection reactions are routinely carried out in dichloromethane and DMF, both of which have serious toxicity concerns and generate waste solvent which constitutes the vast majority of the waste generated during peptide synthesis. In this work, propylene carbonate has been shown to be a green polar aprotic solvent w...

  11. Material Binding Peptides for Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urartu Ozgur Safak Seker

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Remarkable progress has been made to date in the discovery of material binding peptides and their utilization in nanotechnology, which has brought new challenges and opportunities. Nowadays phage display is a versatile tool, important for the selection of ligands for proteins and peptides. This combinatorial approach has also been adapted over the past decade to select material-specific peptides. Screening and selection of such phage displayed material binding peptides has attracted great interest, in particular because of their use in nanotechnology. Phage display selected peptides are either synthesized independently or expressed on phage coat protein. Selected phage particles are subsequently utilized in the synthesis of nanoparticles, in the assembly of nanostructures on inorganic surfaces, and oriented protein immobilization as fusion partners of proteins. In this paper, we present an overview on the research conducted on this area. In this review we not only focus on the selection process, but also on molecular binding characterization and utilization of peptides as molecular linkers, molecular assemblers and material synthesizers.

  12. Matrix-assisted peptide synthesis on nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandadash, Raz; Machtey, Victoria; Weiss, Aryeh; Byk, Gerardo

    2014-09-01

    We report a new method for multistep peptide synthesis on polymeric nanoparticles of differing sizes. Polymeric nanoparticles were functionalized via their temporary embedment into a magnetic inorganic matrix that allows multistep peptide synthesis. The matrix is removed at the end of the process for obtaining nanoparticles functionalized with peptides. The matrix-assisted synthesis on nanoparticles was proved by generating various biologically relevant peptides. Copyright © 2014 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Harnessing glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists for the pharmacological treatment of overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcelin, R; Gourdy, P

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, there has been a dramatic rise in global obesity prevalence, resulting in significant economic and social consequences. Attempts to develop pharmacological agents to treat obesity have met with many obstacles including the lack of long-term effectiveness and the potential for adverse effects. Historically, there have been limited treatment options for overweight and obesity; however, since 2012, a number of new drugs have become available. A number of peptides produced in the gut act as key mediators of the gut-brain axis, which is involved in appetite regulation. This review discusses the role of the gut-brain axis in appetite regulation with special focus on glucagon-like peptide-1. Liraglutide 3.0 mg, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist that targets this pathway, is now approved for the treatment of obesity and overweight (body mass index ≥27 kg/m2 ) with comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol or obstructive sleep apnoea. In addition, other glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists offer promise for obesity management in the future. This review examines how glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists promote weight loss and summarizes the clinical data on weight loss with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists. © 2016 The Authors Obesity Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Obesity Federation.

  14. Alzheimer's disease against peptides products of enzymatic cleavage APP protein: Biological, pathobiological and physico-chemical properties of fibrillating peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marszałek, Małgorzata

    2017-05-17

    Various peptides products of enzymatic cleavage of key for Alzheimer's disease Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) are well known, but still are matter of scientific debate. The Aβ type products are especially challenging for experimental and medical research. This paper outlines several, still poorly known, biological and medical processes such as peptides biology, i.e., formation, biodistribution, translocation, transport and finally removal from brain compartments and body fluids like Intracellular Fluid (ICF), Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF), Interstitial Fluid (ISF), blood serum or urine. In addition, the following studies concerning AD patients might prove challenging and simultaneously promising: peptides translocation through Blood-Brain - Barrier (BBB) and Blood-Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier (BCSFB) and their removal from the brain according to a new concept of glymphatic system; - diagnostic difficulties that stem from physico-chemical properties and the nature of proteins or fibrillating peptides itself like low concentration, short half-live and from experimental-technical problems as well like high adsorption or low solubility of Aβ, tau or amylin. The study of diagnostic parameters is very important, as it may better reflect early changes before the disease develops; one such parameter is the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio, or the ratio with the total tau concentration combination and other new biomarkers like Aβ1-38; other factors include oxidative stress and inflammation process proteins, complement factor H, alpha-2-macroglobulin, or clusterin. The study of various forms of pathological amyloid deposits that emerge in different but specific brain regions AD patients seems to be crucial as well. The composition of the first initial pathological, pre-fibrillating monomers of fibrillating peptides and their role in AD development and disease progression have been described as well. They are even more challenging for science and simultaneously might be more promising in

  15. Effect of Xiaoyao San on the brain-gut axis in rats after chronic immobilization stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun Liu

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: Xiaoyao San attenuates CIS-induced gastrointestinal dysregulation by regulating the peptides secreted by both the hypothalamus and the gastrointestinal tract (GIT, suggesting that its effects are associated with the brain-gut axis.

  16. [Markers of brain tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, R; Pezzotta, S; Bernini, F; Racagni, G

    1984-05-19

    Biological markers of tumors are compounds or enzymatic activities measurable in body fluids. Their presence or concentration must be linked to tumoral growth. The markers of the central nervous system tumors are detected in CSF. Alpha-feto-protein, carcinoembryonic antigen, human chorionic gonadotropin, adenohypophyseal peptide hormones, enzymes, etc., have found some application in the early diagnosis of leptomeningeal metastasis. Other applications involve the early detection and recurrency of primary brain tumors, as well as the evaluation of efficacy of their therapy. The tests based on the CSF content of desmosterol and polyamines have been studied extensively. Their rationale is discussed and specificity, sensitivity, efficiency and predictive value are considered. Experimental results concerning a new possible biochemical marker, based on CSF concentration of cyclic adenosine monophosphate, are reported.

  17. Identification of peptide-cross-linked trisdisaccharide peptide trimers in murein of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Gmeiner, J

    1980-01-01

    Purified murein from Escherichia coli K-12 was degraded into disaccharide peptide fragments by endo-N-acetylmuramidase from Chalaropsis. About 5% of the total murein fragments were recovered as peptide-cross-linked trisdisaccharide peptide trimers.

  18. Versatile Peptide C-Terminal Functionalization via a Computationally Engineered Peptide Amidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Bian; Wijma, Hein J.; Song, Lu; Rozeboom, Henriette J.; Poloni, Claudia; Tian, Yue; Arif, Muhammad I.; Nuijens, Timo; Quaedflieg, Peter J. L. M.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Feringa, Ben L.; Janssen, Dick B.

    The properties of synthetic peptides, including potency, stability, and bioavailability, are strongly influenced by modification of the peptide chain termini. Unfortunately, generally applicable methods for selective and mild C-terminal peptide functionalization are lacking. In this work, we

  19. A rapid and clean synthetic approach to cyclic peptides via micro-flow peptide chain elongation and photochemical cyclization: synthesis of a cyclic RGD peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifune, Yuto; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Fuse, Shinichiro

    2016-11-29

    A cyclic RGD peptide was efficiently synthesized based on micro-flow, triphosgene-mediated peptide chain elongation and micro-flow photochemical macrolactamization. Our approach enabled a rapid (amidation for peptide chain elongation peptide.

  20. Brain glycogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Linea Lykke Frimodt; Müller, Margit S; Walls, Anne B

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g., liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia....... In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies-it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e., synaptic...... activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms...

  1. Brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresford, H R

    1999-05-01

    Current law in the United States authorizes physicians to diagnose brain death by applying generally accepted neurologic criteria for determining loss of function of the entire brain. This article offers a medical-legal perspective on problems that may arise with respect to the determination of brain death. These include the possibility of diagnostic error, conceptual disagreements that may constrain the use of neurologic criteria to diagnose death, and the conflation of brain death and loss of consciousness. This article also addresses legal aspects of the debate over whether to expand the definition of brain death to include permanent unconsciousness. Although existing laws draw a clear distinction between brain death and the persistent vegetative state, many courts have authorized removal of life support from individuals whose unconsciousness is believed to be permanent on proof that removal accords with preferences expressed before sentience was lost.

  2. Procalcitonin and midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide as biomarkers of subclinical cerebrovascular damage: the northern manhattan study

    OpenAIRE

    Katan, Mira; Moon, Yeseon; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Spanaus, Kathartina; DeRosa, Janet; Gutierrez, Jose; DeCarli, Charles; Wright, Clinton; Sacco, Ralph; Elkind, Mitchell

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Chronic infections and cardiac dysfunction are risk factors for stroke. We hypothesized that blood biomarkers of infection (procalcitonin) and cardiac dysfunction (midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide [MR-proANP]), previously associated with small vessel stroke and cardioembolic stroke are also associated with subclinical cerebrovascular damage, including silent brain infarcts and white matter hyperintensity volume. METHODS: The NOMAS (Northern Manhattan Study)...

  3. In silico studies of the early stages of aggregation of A peptides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prabir Khatua

    Parkinson's disease, Type II diabetes, Huntington's dis- ease, etc.1,2 In general, such diseases are believed to be caused by the accumulation of β-sheet-rich structures termed as amyloid fibrils in the brain. Alzheimer's dis- ease (AD) associated with the deposition of plaques or fibrils composed of 39 to 43 residue peptide ...

  4. Automated solid-phase peptide synthesis to obtain therapeutic peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Mäde

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The great versatility and the inherent high affinities of peptides for their respective targets have led to tremendous progress for therapeutic applications in the last years. In order to increase the drugability of these frequently unstable and rapidly cleared molecules, chemical modifications are of great interest. Automated solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS offers a suitable technology to produce chemically engineered peptides. This review concentrates on the application of SPPS by Fmoc/t-Bu protecting-group strategy, which is most commonly used. Critical issues and suggestions for the synthesis are covered. The development of automated methods from conventional to essentially improved microwave-assisted instruments is discussed. In order to improve pharmacokinetic properties of peptides, lipidation and PEGylation are described as covalent conjugation methods, which can be applied by a combination of automated and manual synthesis approaches. The synthesis and application of SPPS is described for neuropeptide Y receptor analogs as an example for bioactive hormones. The applied strategies represent innovative and potent methods for the development of novel peptide drug candidates that can be manufactured with optimized automated synthesis technologies.

  5. Neuroactive Peptides as Putative Mediators of Antiepileptic Ketogenic Diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Carmela; Marchiò, Maddalena; Timofeeva, Elena; Biagini, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Various ketogenic diet (KD) therapies, including classic KD, medium chain triglyceride administration, low glycemic index treatment, and a modified Atkins diet, have been suggested as useful in patients affected by pharmacoresistant epilepsy. A common goal of these approaches is to achieve an adequate decrease in the plasma glucose level combined with ketogenesis, in order to mimic the metabolic state of fasting. Although several metabolic hypotheses have been advanced to explain the anticonvulsant effect of KDs, including changes in the plasma levels of ketone bodies, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and brain pH, direct modulation of neurotransmitter release, especially purinergic (i.e., adenosine) and γ-aminobutyric acidergic neurotransmission, was also postulated. Neuropeptides and peptide hormones are potent modulators of synaptic activity, and their levels are regulated by metabolic states. This is the case for neuroactive peptides such as neuropeptide Y, galanin, cholecystokinin, and peptide hormones such as leptin, adiponectin, and growth hormone-releasing peptides (GHRPs). In particular, the GHRP ghrelin and its related peptide des-acyl ghrelin are well-known controllers of energy homeostasis, food intake, and lipid metabolism. Notably, ghrelin has also been shown to regulate the neuronal excitability and epileptic activation of neuronal networks. Several lines of evidence suggest that GHRPs are upregulated in response to starvation and, particularly, in patients affected by anorexia and cachexia, all conditions in which also ketone bodies are upregulated. Moreover, starvation and anorexia nervosa are accompanied by changes in other peptide hormones such as adiponectin, which has received less attention. Adipocytokines such as adiponectin have also been involved in modulating epileptic activity. Thus, neuroactive peptides whose plasma levels and activity change in the presence of ketogenesis might be potential candidates for elucidating the neurohormonal

  6. Role of Troponins I and T and N-Terminal Prohormone of Brain Natriuretic Peptide in Monitoring Cardiac Safety of Patients With Early-Stage Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Breast Cancer Receiving Trastuzumab: A Herceptin Adjuvant Study Cardiac Marker Substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zardavas, Dimitrios; Suter, Thomas M; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Steinseifer, Jutta; Noe, Johannes; Lauer, Sabine; Al-Sakaff, Nedal; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine J; de Azambuja, Evandro

    2017-03-10

    Purpose Women receiving trastuzumab with chemotherapy are at risk for trastuzumab-related cardiac dysfunction (TRCD). We explored the prognostic value of cardiac markers (troponins I and T, N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide [NT-proBNP]) to predict baseline susceptibility to develop TRCD. We examined whether development of cardiac end points or significant left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) drop was associated with markers' increases. Patients and Methods Cardiac marker assessments were coupled with LVEF measurements at different time points for 533 patients from the Herceptin Adjuvant (HERA) study who agreed to participate in this study. Patients with missing marker assessments were excluded, resulting in 452 evaluable patients. A primary cardiac end point was defined as symptomatic congestive heart failure of New York Heart Association class III or IV, confirmed by a cardiologist, and a significant LVEF drop, or death of definite or probable cardiac causes. A secondary cardiac end point was defined as a confirmed significant asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic LVEF drop. Results Elevated baseline troponin I (> 40 ng/L) and T (> 14 ng/L), occurring in 56 of 412 (13.6%) and 101 of 407 (24.8%) patients, respectively, were associated with an increased significant LVEF drop risk (univariate analysis: hazard ratio, 4.52; P < .001 and hazard ratio, 3.57; P < .001, respectively). Few patients had their first elevated troponin value recorded during the study (six patients for troponin I and 25 patients for troponin T). Two patients developed a primary and 31 patients a secondary cardiac end point (recovery rate of 74%, 23 of 31). For NT-proBNP, higher increases from baseline were seen in patients with significant LVEF drop. Conclusion Elevated troponin I or T before trastuzumab is associated with increased risk for TRCD. A similar conclusion for NT-proBNP could not be drawn because of the lack of a well-established elevation threshold; however

  7. How does serum brain natriuretic peptide level change under nasal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, which can be improved by using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. However, the pathophysiological links between the two kinds of disease and the mechanism of the CPAP ...

  8. Recent advances in solid-phase peptide synthesis and preparation of antibodies to synthetic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaue, S; Muller, S; Briand, J P; Van Regenmortel, M H

    1990-07-01

    Peptides prepared by the solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) approach are used increasingly in biological research, for instance to elicit anti-peptide antibodies that will recognize the intact, cognate protein. Recent advances in SPPS are reviewed, including the use of new coupling reagents, new methods for evaluating peptide purity and new techniques of automated and multiple peptide synthesis. Methods for enhancing peptide immunogenicity are discussed such as the use of adjuvants and liposomes, and of synthetic branched polypeptides as carriers.

  9. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry and analysis of endogenous peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterji, Bijon; Pich, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) has developed as a promising tool to investigate the spatial distribution of biomolecules in intact tissue specimens. Ion densities of various molecules can be displayed as heat maps while preserving anatomical structures. In this short review, an overview of different biomolecules that can be analyzed by MALDI-IMS is given. Many reviews have covered imaging of lipids, small metabolites, whole proteins and enzymatically digested proteins in the past. However, little is known about imaging of endogenous peptides, for example, in the rat brain, and this will therefore be highlighted in this review. Furthermore, sample preparation of frozen or formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is crucial for imaging experiments. Therefore, some aspects of sample preparation will be addressed, including washing and desalting, the choice of MALDI matrix and its deposition. Apart from mapping endogenous peptides, their reliable identification in situ still remains challenging and will be discussed as well.

  10. Hormone-like peptides in the venoms of marine cone snails

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robinson, Samuel D.; Li, Qing; Bandyopadhyay, Pradip K.

    2017-01-01

    , paralysis and sensory overload. Most conotoxins target the prey's nervous system but evidence of venom peptides targeting neuroendocrine processes is emerging. Examples include vasopressin, RFamide neuropeptides and recently also insulin. To investigate the diversity of hormone/neuropeptide-like molecules...... in the venoms of cone snails we systematically mined the venom gland transcriptomes of several cone snail species and examined secreted venom peptides in dissected and injected venom of the Australian cone snail Conus victoriae. Using this approach we identified several novel hormone/neuropeptide-like toxins......, including peptides similar to the bee brain hormone prohormone-4, the mollusc ganglia neuropeptide elevenin, and thyrostimulin, a member of the glycoprotein hormone family, and confirmed the presence of insulin. We confirmed that at least two of these peptides are not only expressed in the venom gland...

  11. Natriuretic peptides in the monitoring of anthracycline induced reduction in left ventricular ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Gedske; Lassen, Ulrik; Bie, Peter

    2005-01-01

    peptide (N-ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP)) for monitoring and predicting anthracycline induced cardiotoxicity using radionuclide left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) measurements as reference. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 107 consecutive patients receiving anthracycline as part...... of their chemotherapy for malignant disease were studied. Plasma concentrations of the peptides were measured by radioimmunoassay and EF by radionuclide cardiography. For reduced EF values, i.e. below 0.50 a fairly strong correlation was found between N-ANP or BNP and EF. Of 48 patients with serial EF and peptide...... measurements, 19% showed a significant EF decrease (>0.10) and ended with a final EF value below 0.50. Baseline EF was no predictor of a change in EF during treatment. Neither baseline levels of N-ANP or BNP nor a change in the same variables during therapy were predictive of a change in EF. CONCLUSIONS...

  12. Human DMBT1-Derived Cell-Penetrating Peptides for Intracellular siRNA Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuttolomondo, Martina; Casella, Cinzia; Hansen, Pernille Lund

    2017-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a promising molecule for gene therapy, but its therapeutic administration remains problematic. Among the recently proposed vectors, cell-penetrating peptides show great promise in in vivo trials for siRNA delivery. Human protein DMBT1 (deleted in malignant brain...... tumor 1) is a pattern recognition molecule that interacts with polyanions and recognizes and aggregates bacteria. Taking advantage of these properties, we investigated whether specific synthetic DMBT1-derived peptides could be used to formulate nanoparticles for siRNA administration. Using...... an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and UV spectra, we identified two DMBT1 peptides that could encapsulate the siRNA with a self- and co-assembly mechanism. The complexes were stable for at least 2 hr in the presence of either fetal bovine serum (FBS) or RNase A, with peptide-dependent time span protection. ζ...

  13. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have been linked to many mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain Regions Just as many neurons working together form ...

  14. Perspectives and Peptides of the Next Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogden, Kim A.

    Shortly after their discovery, antimicrobial peptides from prokaryotes and eukaryotes were recognized as the next potential generation of pharmaceuticals to treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections and septic shock, to preserve food, or to sanitize surfaces. Initial research focused on identifying the spectrum of antimicrobial agents, determining the range of antimicrobial activities against bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens, and assessing the antimicrobial activity of synthetic peptides versus their natural counterparts. Subsequent research then focused on the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in model membrane systems not only to identify the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in microorganisms but also to discern differences in cytotoxicity for prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Recent, contemporary work now focuses on current and future efforts to construct hybrid peptides, peptide congeners, stabilized peptides, peptide conjugates, and immobilized peptides for unique and specific applications to control the growth of microorganisms in vitro and in vivo.

  15. [Peptides: a new class of anticancer drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarczyk, Ryszard; Cichoń, Tomasz; Szala, Stanisław

    2009-07-22

    Peptides are a novel class of anticancer agents embracing two distinct categories: natural antibacterial peptides, which are preferentially bound by cancer cells, and chemically synthesized peptides, which bind specifically to precise molecular targets located on the surface of tumor cells. Antibacterial peptides bind to both cell and mitochondrial membranes. Some of these peptides attach to the cell membrane, resulting in its disorganization. Other antibacterial peptides penetrate cancer cells without causing cell membrane damage, but they disrupt mitochondrial membranes. Thanks to phage and aptamer libraries, it has become possible to obtain synthetic peptides blocking or activating some target proteins found in cancer cells as well as in cells forming the tumor environment. These synthetic peptides can feature anti-angiogenic properties, block enzymes indispensable for sustained tumor growth, and reduce tumor ability to metastasize. In this review the properties of peptides belonging to both categories are discussed and attempts of their application for therapeutic purposes are outlined.

  16. Peptides: A new class of anticancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Smolarczyk

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Peptides are a novel class of anticancer agents embracing two distinct categories: natural antibacterial peptides, which are preferentially bound by cancer cells, and chemically synthesized peptides, which bind specifically to precise molecular targets located on the surface of tumor cells. Antibacterial peptides bind to both cell and mitochondrial membranes. Some of these peptides attach to the cell membrane, resulting in its disorganization. Other antibacterial peptides penetrate cancer cells without causing cell membrane damage, but they disrupt mitochondrial membranes. Thanks to phage and aptamer libraries, it has become possible to obtain synthetic peptides blocking or activating some target proteins found in cancer cells as well as in cells forming the tumor environment. These synthetic peptides can feature anti-angiogenic properties, block enzymes indispensable for sustained tumor growth, and reduce tumor ability to metastasize. In this review the properties of peptides belonging to both categories are discussed and attempts of their application for therapeutic purposes are outlined.

  17. Peptide Selection for Targeted Protein Quantitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiva, Cristina; Sabidó, Eduard

    2017-03-03

    Targeted proteomics methods in their different flavors rely on the use of a few peptides as proxies for protein quantitation, which need to be specified either prior to or after data acquisition. However, in contrast with discovery methods that use all identified peptides for a given protein to estimate its abundance, targeted proteomics methods are limited in the number of peptides that are used for protein quantitation. Because only a few peptides per protein are acquired or extracted in targeted experiments, the selection of peptides that are used for targeted protein quantitation becomes crucial. Several rules have been proposed to guide peptide selection for targeted proteomics studies, which have generally been based on the amino acidic composition of the peptide sequences. However, the compliance of these rules does not imply that not-conformed peptides are not reproducibly generated nor do they guarantee that the selected peptides correctly represent the behavior of the protein abundance under different conditions.

  18. Peptide pool immunization and CD8+ T cell reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Susanne B; Harndahl, Mikkel N; Buus, Anette Stryhn

    2013-01-01

    peptides induced normal peptide immunity i.e. the specific T cell reactivity in the Elispot culture was strictly dependent on exposure to the immunizing peptide ex vivo. However, immunization with two of the peptides, a VSV- and a Mycobacterium-derived peptide, resulted in IFNγ spot formation without...... peptide in the Elispot culture. Immunization with a mixture of the VSV-peptide and a "normal" peptide also resulted in IFNγ spot formation without addition of peptide to the assay culture. Peptide-tetramer staining of CD8(+) T cells from mice immunized with a mixture of VSV-peptide and "normal" peptide...

  19. Fluorescence imaging of the interaction of amyloid beta 40 peptides with live cells and model membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamasbi, Elaheh; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Tan, Marsha; Separovic, Frances; Ciccotosto, Giuseppe D

    2018-02-07

    Amyloid beta peptides (Aβ) found in plaques in the brain have been widely recognised as a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease although the underlying mechanism is still unknown. Aβ40 and Aβ40(A2T) peptides were synthesized and their effects on neuronal cells are reported together with the effect of tetramer forms of the peptides. ThT assay revealed that mutation affected the lag time and aggregation and the presence of lipid vesicles changed the fibril formation profile for both peptides. The A2T mutation appeared to reduce cytotoxicity and lessen binding of Aβ40 peptides to neuronal cells. Fluorescence microscopy of the interaction between Aβ40 peptides and giant unilamellar vesicles revealed that both peptides led to formation of smaller vesicles although the tetramer of Aβ(A2T) appeared to promote vesicle aggregation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Aggregation and Misfolding at the Cell Membrane Interface edited by Ayyalusamy Ramamoorthy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Successful adjuvant-free vaccination of BALB/c mice with mutated amyloid β peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahi Monika M

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent human clinical trial of an Alzheimer's disease (AD vaccine using amyloid beta (Aβ 1–42 plus QS-21 adjuvant produced some positive results, but was halted due to meningoencephalitis in some participants. The development of a vaccine with mutant Aβ peptides that avoids the use of an adjuvant may result in an effective and safer human vaccine. Results All peptides tested showed high antibody responses, were long-lasting, and demonstrated good memory response. Epitope mapping indicated that peptide mutation did not lead to epitope switching. Mutant peptides induced different inflammation responses as evidenced by cytokine profiles. Ig isotyping indicated that adjuvant-free vaccination with peptides drove an adequate Th2 response. All anti-sera from vaccinated mice cross-reacted with human Aβ in APP/PS1 transgenic mouse brain tissue. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that an adjuvant-free vaccine with different Aβ peptides can be an effective and safe vaccination approach against AD. This study represents the first report of adjuvant-free vaccines utilizing Aβ peptides carrying diverse mutations in the T-cell epitope. These largely positive results provide encouragement for the future of the development of human vaccinations for AD.