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Sample records for brain microvascular endothelial

  1. Transcellular transport of CCL2 across brain microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Ge, Shujun; Song, Li; Serwanski, David R; Kuziel, William A; Pachter, Joel S

    2008-03-01

    The means by which the chemokine CCL2 produced in the brain parenchyma can recruit leukocytes lying behind the highly impervious endothelium of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has remained a paradox. As other chemokines have been evidenced to stimulate their own synthesis and release by peripheral microvascular endothelial cells, and/or undergo transcytosis in the abluminal-to-luminal direction, we determined whether CCL2 experiences similar fates across brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC). Using cultured BMEC as a paradigm of the BBB, it was observed that exogenous unlabeled CCL2 actually depressed the release of endogenous CCL2, and further caused diminished CCL2 mRNA levels in these cells. On the other hand, exogenous (125)I-labeled CCL2 exhibited transport across BMEC in a manner that was sensitive to temperature, competition by excess unlabeled CCL2 but not unlabeled CCL3, knockdown of caveolin-1/caveolae, and elimination of the cognate CCL2 receptor CCR2. These results implied a facet of CCL2 transport by a transcellular mechanism partly involving binding of CCL2 to CCR2, and subsequent transfer to caveolae vesicles for transcytosis. This notion was supported by double-label immuno-electronmicroscopy, which revealed co-localization of caveolin-1 with exogenous CCL2, during this chemokine's transit across BMEC. Collectively, these findings provide a rationale by which CCL2, deposited on the abluminal side of the brain microvasculature during inflammatory episodes, can be relayed across the BBB to foster leukocyte recruitment.

  2. Shear Stress Inhibits Apoptosis of Ischemic Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

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    Xiafeng Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As a therapeutic strategy for ischemic stroke, to restore or increase cerebral blood flow (CBF is the most fundamental option. Laminar shear stress (LS, as an important force generated by CBF, mainly acts on brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs. In order to study whether LS was a protective factor in stroke, we investigated LS-intervented ischemic apoptosis of rat BMECs (rBMECs through PE Annexin V/7-AAD, JC-1 and Hoechst 33258 staining to observe the membranous, mitochondrial and nuclear dysfunction. Real-time PCR and western blot were also used to test the gene and protein expressions of Tie-2, Bcl-2 and Akt, which were respectively related to maintain membranous, mitochondrial and nuclear norm. The results showed that LS could be a helpful stimulus for ischemic rBMECs survival. Simultaneously, membranous, mitochondrial and nuclear regulation played an important role in this process.

  3. Neuropilin-1 modulates interferon-γ-stimulated signaling in brain microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Wang, Ying; Cao, Ying; Mangalam, Ashutosh K; Guo, Yong; LaFrance-Corey, Reghann G; Gamez, Jeffrey D; Atanga, Pascal Aliihnui; Clarkson, Benjamin D; Zhang, Yuebo; Wang, Enfeng; Angom, Ramcharan Singh; Dutta, Kirthica; Ji, Baoan; Pirko, Istvan; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Howe, Charles L; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2016-10-15

    Inflammatory response of blood-brain barrier (BBB) endothelial cells plays an important role in pathogenesis of many central nervous system inflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis; however, the molecular mechanism mediating BBB endothelial cell inflammatory response remains unclear. In this study, we first observed that knockdown of neuropilin-1 (NRP1), a co-receptor of several structurally diverse ligands, suppressed interferon-γ (IFNγ)-induced C-X-C motif chemokine 10 expression and activation of STAT1 in brain microvascular endothelial cells in a Rac1-dependent manner. Moreover, endothelial-specific NRP1-knockout mice, VECadherin-Cre-ERT2/NRP1flox/flox mice, showed attenuated disease progression during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a mouse neuroinflammatory disease model. Detailed analysis utilizing histological staining, quantitative PCR, flow cytometry and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that deletion of endothelial NRP1 suppressed neuron demyelination, altered lymphocyte infiltration, preserved BBB function and decreased activation of the STAT1-CXCL10 pathway. Furthermore, increased expression of NRP1 was observed in endothelial cells of acute multiple sclerosis lesions. Our data identify a new molecular mechanism of brain microvascular endothelial inflammatory response through NRP1-IFNγ crosstalk that could be a potential target for intervention of endothelial cell dysfunction in neuroinflammatory diseases. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Interleukin 2 Activates Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Resulting in Destabilization of Adherens Junctions.

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    Wylezinski, Lukasz S; Hawiger, Jacek

    2016-10-28

    The pleiotropic cytokine interleukin 2 (IL2) disrupts the blood-brain barrier and alters brain microcirculation, underlying vascular leak syndrome that complicates cancer immunotherapy with IL2. The microvascular effects of IL2 also play a role in the development of multiple sclerosis and other chronic neurological disorders. The mechanism of IL2-induced disruption of brain microcirculation has not been determined previously. We found that both human and murine brain microvascular endothelial cells express constituents of the IL2 receptor complex. Then we established that signaling through this receptor complex leads to activation of the transcription factor, nuclear factor κB, resulting in expression of proinflammatory interleukin 6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1. We also discovered that IL2 induces disruption of adherens junctions, concomitant with cytoskeletal reorganization, ultimately leading to increased endothelial cell permeability. IL2-induced phosphorylation of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin), a constituent of adherens junctions, leads to dissociation of its stabilizing adaptor partners, p120-catenin and β-catenin. Increased phosphorylation of VE-cadherin was also accompanied by a reduction of Src homology 2 domain-containing protein-tyrosine phosphatase 2, known to maintain vascular barrier function. These results unravel the mechanism of deleterious effects induced by IL2 on brain microvascular endothelial cells and may inform the development of new measures to improve IL2 cancer immunotherapy, as well as treatments for autoimmune diseases affecting the central nervous system. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Rescue of Brain Function Using Tunneling Nanotubes Between Neural Stem Cells and Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

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    Wang, Xiaoqing; Yu, Xiaowen; Xie, Chong; Tan, Zijian; Tian, Qi; Zhu, Desheng; Liu, Mingyuan; Guan, Yangtai

    2016-05-01

    Evidence indicates that neural stem cells (NSCs) can ameliorate cerebral ischemia in animal models. In this study, we investigated the mechanism underlying one of the neuroprotective effects of NSCs: tunneling nanotube (TNT) formation. We addressed whether the control of cell-to-cell communication processes between NSCs and brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) and, particularly, the control of TNT formation could influence the rescue function of stem cells. In an attempt to mimic the cellular microenvironment in vitro, a co-culture system consisting of terminally differentiated BMECs from mice in a distressed state and NSCs was constructed. Additionally, engraftment experiments with infarcted mouse brains revealed that control of TNT formation influenced the effects of stem cell transplantation in vivo. In conclusion, our findings provide the first evidence that TNTs exist between NSCs and BMECs and that regulation of TNT formation alters cell function.

  6. Mechanisms of modulation of brain microvascular endothelial cells function by thrombin.

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    Brailoiu, Eugen; Shipsky, Megan M; Yan, Guang; Abood, Mary E; Brailoiu, G Cristina

    2017-02-15

    Brain microvascular endothelial cells are a critical component of the blood-brain barrier. They form a tight monolayer which is essential for maintaining the brain homeostasis. Blood-derived proteases such as thrombin may enter the brain during pathological conditions like trauma, stroke, and inflammation and further disrupts the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, via incompletely characterized mechanisms. We examined the underlying mechanisms evoked by thrombin in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMVEC). Our results indicate that thrombin, acting on protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) increases cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration in RBMVEC via Ca(2+) release from endoplasmic reticulum through inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors and Ca(2+) influx from extracellular space. Thrombin increases nitric oxide production; the effect is abolished by inhibition of the nitric oxide synthase or by antagonism of PAR1 receptors. In addition, thrombin increases mitochondrial and cytosolic reactive oxygen species production via PAR1-dependent mechanisms. Immunocytochemistry studies indicate that thrombin increases F-actin stress fibers, and disrupts the tight junctions. Thrombin increased the RBMVEC permeability assessed by a fluorescent flux assay. Taken together, our results indicate multiple mechanisms by which thrombin modulates the function of RBMVEC and may contribute to the blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Zika Virus Infects, Activates, and Crosses Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells, without Barrier Disruption

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    Michelle P. Papa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV has been associated to central nervous system (CNS harm, and virus was detected in the brain and cerebrospinal fluids of microcephaly and meningoencephalitis cases. However, the mechanism by which the virus reaches the CNS is unclear. Here, we addressed the effects of ZIKV replication in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs, as an in vitro model of blood brain barrier (BBB, and evaluated virus extravasation and BBB integrity in an in vivo mouse experimental model. HBMECs were productively infected by African and Brazilian ZIKV strains (ZIKVMR766 and ZIKVPE243, which induce increased production of type I and type III IFN, inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Infection with ZIKVMR766 promoted earlier cellular death, in comparison to ZIKVPE243, but infection with either strain did not result in enhanced endothelial permeability. Despite the maintenance of endothelial integrity, infectious virus particles crossed the monolayer by endocytosis/exocytosis-dependent replication pathway or by transcytosis. Remarkably, both viruses' strains infected IFNAR deficient mice, with high viral load being detected in the brains, without BBB disruption, which was only detected at later time points after infection. These data suggest that ZIKV infects and activates endothelial cells, and might reach the CNS through basolateral release, transcytosis or transinfection processes. These findings further improve the current knowledge regarding ZIKV dissemination pathways.

  8. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells resist elongation due to shear stress.

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    Reinitz, Adam; DeStefano, Jackson; Ye, Mao; Wong, Andrew D; Searson, Peter C

    2015-05-01

    Endothelial cells in straight sections of vessels are known to elongate and align in the direction of flow. This phenotype has been replicated in confluent monolayers of bovine aortic endothelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in cell culture under physiological shear stress. Here we report on the morphological response of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) in confluent monolayers in response to shear stress. Using a microfluidic platform we image confluent monolayers of HBMECs and HUVECs under shear stresses up to 16 dyne cm(-2). From live-cell imaging we quantitatively analyze the cell morphology and cell speed as a function of time. We show that HBMECs do not undergo a classical transition from cobblestone to spindle-like morphology in response to shear stress. We further show that under shear stress, actin fibers are randomly oriented in the cells indicating that there is no cytoskeletal remodeling. These results suggest that HBMECs are programmed to resist elongation and alignment under shear stress, a phenotype that may be associated with the unique properties of the blood-brain barrier. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A simple method for isolating and culturing the rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Liu, Yang; Xue, Qiang; Tang, Qing; Hou, Min; Qi, Hongyi; Chen, Gang; Chen, Weihai; Zhang, Jifen; Chen, Yi; Xu, Xiaoyu

    2013-11-01

    Brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), a main component of the blood-brain barrier, play a critical role in the pathogenesis of many brain diseases. The primary culture of BMECs has been used in various models for studying cerebrovascular diseases in vitro. However, there are still several problems existing in the isolation and cultivation of primary rat BMECs, such as low yield, contamination with other cell types, and requirement of a large number of animals and expensive growth factor. In this study, we describe a simple, economical (without any growth factor) and repeatable method to obtain endothelial cells with high purity (>99%) and yield (about 2.2×10(7) per rat) from cerebral cortexes of neonatal rat, mainly from gray matter. In vitro examinations determined that the isolated cells expressed typical phenotypic markers of differentiated brain endothelium such as multiple drug resistant protein, von Willebrand factor, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1/CD31), and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM). These cells also possessed morphological and ultra-structural characteristics that were observed by phase contrast microscope and electric microscope. Then GFAP and α-SMA were used, respectively, to identify astrocyte and pericyte which were potential to contaminate primary culturing of BMECs. And specific reaction of endothelial cells to external stimulation was tested by culture with TNF-α for 24h. All these results of our experiments supply that our protocol provides an effective and reliable method to obtain high purity and yield of rat BMECs and offers a useful tool for studying cellular physiology, cerebrovascular diseases, brain tumors, blood-brain barrier and neurovascular units, etc. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Increased susceptibility to amyloid-β toxicity in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells under hyperglycemic conditions.

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    Carvalho, Cristina; Katz, Paige S; Dutta, Somhrita; Katakam, Prasad V G; Moreira, Paula I; Busija, David W

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that hyperglycemia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are closely associated with amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) toxicity in endothelial cells. Brain microvascular endothelial cells from rat (RBMEC) and mice (MBMEC) were isolated from adult Sprague-Dawley rats and homozygous db/db (Leprdb/Leprdb) and heterozygous (Dock7m/Leprdb) mice, and cultured under normo- and hyperglycemic conditions for 7 d followed by 24 h exposure to Aβ1-40. Some experiments were also performed with two mitochondrial superoxide (O2•-) scavengers, MitoTempo and Peg-SOD. Cell viability was measured by the Alamar blue assay and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) by confocal microscopy. Mitochondrial O2•- and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production was assessed by fluorescence microscopy and H2O2 production was confirmed by microplate reader. Hyperglycemia or Aβ1-40 alone did not affect cell viability in RBMEC. However, the simultaneous presence of high glucose and Aβ1-40 reduced cell viability and ΔΨm, and enhanced mitochondrial O2•- and H2O2 production. MitoTempo and PEG-SOD prevented Aβ1-40 toxicity. Interestingly, MBMEC presented a similar pattern of alterations with db/db cultures presenting higher susceptibility to Aβ1-40. Overall, our results show that high glucose levels increase the susceptibility of brain microvascular endothelial cells to Aβ toxicity supporting the idea that hyperglycemia is a major risk factor for vascular injury associated with AD.

  11. Galectin-1 suppresses methamphetamine induced neuroinflammation in human brain microvascular endothelial cells: Neuroprotective role in maintaining blood brain barrier integrity.

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    Parikh, Neil U; Aalinkeel, R; Reynolds, J L; Nair, B B; Sykes, D E; Mammen, M J; Schwartz, S A; Mahajan, S D

    2015-10-22

    Methamphetamine (Meth) abuse can lead to the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity leading to compromised CNS function. The role of Galectins in the angiogenesis process in tumor-associated endothelial cells (EC) is well established; however no data are available on the expression of Galectins in normal human brain microvascular endothelial cells and their potential role in maintaining BBB integrity. We evaluated the basal gene/protein expression levels of Galectin-1, -3 and -9 in normal primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) that constitute the BBB and examined whether Meth altered Galectin expression in these cells, and if Galectin-1 treatment impacted the integrity of an in-vitro BBB. Our results showed that BMVEC expressed significantly higher levels of Galectin-1 as compared to Galectin-3 and -9. Meth treatment increased Galectin-1 expression in BMVEC. Meth induced decrease in TJ proteins ZO-1, Claudin-3 and adhesion molecule ICAM-1 was reversed by Galectin-1. Our data suggests that Galectin-1 is involved in BBB remodeling and can increase levels of TJ proteins ZO-1 and Claudin-3 and adhesion molecule ICAM-1 which helps maintain BBB tightness thus playing a neuroprotective role. Galectin-1 is thus an important regulator of immune balance from neurodegeneration to neuroprotection, which makes it an important therapeutic agent/target in the treatment of drug addiction and other neurological conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of calcium signaling during infection of Neisseria meningitidis to human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Asmat, Tauseef M; Tenenbaum, Tobias; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Schwerk, Christian; Schroten, Horst

    2014-01-01

    The pili and outer membrane proteins of Neisseria meningitidis (meningococci) facilitate bacterial adhesion and invasion into host cells. In this context expression of meningococcal PilC1 protein has been reported to play a crucial role. Intracellular calcium mobilization has been implicated as an important signaling event during internalization of several bacterial pathogens. Here we employed time lapse calcium-imaging and demonstrated that PilC1 of meningococci triggered a significant increase in cytoplasmic calcium in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, whereas PilC1-deficient meningococci could not initiate this signaling process. The increase in cytosolic calcium in response to PilC1-expressing meningococci was due to efflux of calcium from host intracellular stores as demonstrated by using 2-APB, which inhibits the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, pre-treatment of host cells with U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor) abolished the cytosolic calcium increase caused by PilC1-expressing meningococci demonstrating that active phospholipase C (PLC) is required to induce calcium transients in host cells. Furthermore, the role of cytosolic calcium on meningococcal adherence and internalization was documented by gentamicin protection assay and double immunofluorescence (DIF) staining. Results indicated that chelation of intracellular calcium by using BAPTA-AM significantly impaired PilC1-mediated meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host endothelial cells. However, buffering of extracellular calcium by BAPTA or EGTA demonstrated no significant effect on meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host cells. Taken together, these results indicate that meningococci induce calcium release from intracellular stores of host endothelial cells via PilC1 and cytoplasmic calcium concentrations play a critical role during PilC1 mediated meningococcal adherence to and subsequent invasion into host endothelial cells.

  13. Impact of calcium signaling during infection of Neisseria meningitidis to human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Tauseef M Asmat

    Full Text Available The pili and outer membrane proteins of Neisseria meningitidis (meningococci facilitate bacterial adhesion and invasion into host cells. In this context expression of meningococcal PilC1 protein has been reported to play a crucial role. Intracellular calcium mobilization has been implicated as an important signaling event during internalization of several bacterial pathogens. Here we employed time lapse calcium-imaging and demonstrated that PilC1 of meningococci triggered a significant increase in cytoplasmic calcium in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, whereas PilC1-deficient meningococci could not initiate this signaling process. The increase in cytosolic calcium in response to PilC1-expressing meningococci was due to efflux of calcium from host intracellular stores as demonstrated by using 2-APB, which inhibits the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, pre-treatment of host cells with U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor abolished the cytosolic calcium increase caused by PilC1-expressing meningococci demonstrating that active phospholipase C (PLC is required to induce calcium transients in host cells. Furthermore, the role of cytosolic calcium on meningococcal adherence and internalization was documented by gentamicin protection assay and double immunofluorescence (DIF staining. Results indicated that chelation of intracellular calcium by using BAPTA-AM significantly impaired PilC1-mediated meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host endothelial cells. However, buffering of extracellular calcium by BAPTA or EGTA demonstrated no significant effect on meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host cells. Taken together, these results indicate that meningococci induce calcium release from intracellular stores of host endothelial cells via PilC1 and cytoplasmic calcium concentrations play a critical role during PilC1 mediated meningococcal adherence to and subsequent invasion into host endothelial cells.

  14. Differentiation and characterization of human pluripotent stem cell-derived brain microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Stebbins, Matthew J; Wilson, Hannah K; Canfield, Scott G; Qian, Tongcheng; Palecek, Sean P; Shusta, Eric V

    2016-05-15

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a critical component of the central nervous system (CNS) that regulates the flux of material between the blood and the brain. Because of its barrier properties, the BBB creates a bottleneck to CNS drug delivery. Human in vitro BBB models offer a potential tool to screen pharmaceutical libraries for CNS penetration as well as for BBB modulators in development and disease, yet primary and immortalized models respectively lack scalability and robust phenotypes. Recently, in vitro BBB models derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have helped overcome these challenges by providing a scalable and renewable source of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs). We have demonstrated that hPSC-derived BMECs exhibit robust structural and functional characteristics reminiscent of the in vivo BBB. Here, we provide a detailed description of the methods required to differentiate and functionally characterize hPSC-derived BMECs to facilitate their widespread use in downstream applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Tick-borne encephalitis virus infects human brain microvascular endothelial cells without compromising blood-brain barrier integrity.

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    Palus, Martin; Vancova, Marie; Sirmarova, Jana; Elsterova, Jana; Perner, Jan; Ruzek, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Alteration of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a hallmark of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE), a life-threating human viral neuroinfection. However, the mechanism of BBB breakdown during TBE, as well as TBE virus (TBEV) entry into the brain is unclear. Here, primary human microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) were infected with TBEV to study interactions with the BBB. Although the number of infected cells was relatively low in culture (10 6 pfu/ml). Infection did not induce any significant changes in the expression of key tight junction proteins or upregulate the expression of cell adhesion molecules, and did not alter the highly organized intercellular junctions between HBMECs. In an in vitro BBB model, the virus crossed the BBB via a transcellular pathway without compromising the integrity of the cell monolayer. The results indicate that HBMECs may support TBEV entry into the brain without altering BBB integrity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Resistance of human brain microvascular endothelial cells in culture to methylmercury: cell-density-dependent defense mechanisms.

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    Hirooka, Takashi; Fujiwara, Yasuyuki; Shinkai, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Chika; Yasutake, Akira; Satoh, Masahiko; Eto, Komyo; Kaji, Toshiyuki

    2010-06-01

    Vascular toxicity is important for understanding the neurotoxicity of methylmercury, because microvessels strongly influence the construction of microenvironment around neurons. Previously, we found that low density-human brain microvascular pericytes are markedly susceptible to methylmercury cytotoxicity due to high expression levels of the L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT-1) that transports methylmercury into the cells. Although LAT-1 can be, in general, highly expressed in sparse cells that require amino acids for growth, we found that human brain microvascular endothelial cells, regardless of cell density, were resistant to methylmercury cytotoxicity. To investigate the mechanisms underlying this resistance, we exposed the endothelial cells at low and high cell densities to methylmercury and determined the extent of nonspecific cell damage, intracellular accumulation of methylmercury, expression of LAT-1 and LAT-2 mRNAs, and intracellular expression of reduced glutathione and metallothionein. These experiments indicate that sparse endothelial cells intracellularly accumulate more methylmercury via the highly expressed LAT-1, but are resistant to methylmercury cytotoxicity by higher expression of the protective sulfhydryl peptides, namely, reduced glutathione and metallothionein. It is suggested that both nonspecific and functional damage is caused in pericytes, whereas functional abnormalities rather than nonspecific damage may occur to a greater extent in the endothelial cells in the brain microvessels exposed to methylmercury. The previous and present data also suggest that methylmercury exhibits toxicity in endothelial cells in a manner different from that in pericytes in the brain microvessels.

  17. Adhesive properties of Enterobacter sakazakii to human epithelial and brain microvascular endothelial cells

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    Pospischil Andreas

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterobacter sakazakii is an opportunistic pathogen that has been associated with sporadic cases and outbreaks causing meningitis, necrotizing enterocolitis and sepsis especially in neonates. However, up to now little is known about the mechanisms of pathogenicity in E. sakazakii. A necessary state in the successful colonization, establishment and ultimately production of disease by microbial pathogens is the ability to adhere to host surfaces such as mucous membranes, gastric and intestinal epithelial or endothelial tissue. This study examined for the first time the adherence ability of 50 E. sakazakii strains to the two epithelial cell lines HEp-2 and Caco-2, as well as the brain microvascular endothelial cell line HBMEC. Furthermore, the effects of bacterial culture conditions on the adherence behaviour were investigated. An attempt was made to characterize the factors involved in adherence. Results Two distinctive adherence patterns, a diffuse adhesion and the formation of localized clusters of bacteria on the cell surface could be distinguished on all three cell lines. In some strains, a mixture of both patterns was observed. Adherence was maximal during late exponential phase, and increased with higher MOI. The adhesion capacity of E. sakazakii to HBMEC cells was affected by the addition of blood to the bacteria growth medium. Mannose, hemagglutination, trypsin digestion experiments and transmission electron microscopy suggested that the adhesion of E. sakazakii to the epithelial and endothelial cells is mainly non-fimbrial based. Conclusion Adherence experiments show heterogeneity within different E. sakazakii strains. In agreement with studies on E. cloacae, we found no relationship between the adhesive capacities in E. sakazakii and the eventual production of specific fimbriae. Further studies will have to be carried out in order to determine the adhesin(s involved in the interaction of E. sakazakii with cells and to

  18. Multiple protocadherins are expressed in brain microvascular endothelial cells and might play a role in tight junction protein regulation.

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    Dilling, Christina; Roewer, Norbert; Förster, Carola Y; Burek, Malgorzata

    2017-10-01

    Protocadherins (Pcdhs) are a large family of cadherin-related molecules. They play a role in cell adhesion, cellular interactions, and development of the central nervous system. However, their expression and role in endothelial cells has not yet been characterized. Here, we examined the expression of selected clustered Pcdhs in endothelial cells from several vascular beds. We analyzed human and mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell (BMEC) lines and primary cells, mouse myocardial microvascular endothelial cell line, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We examined the mRNA and protein expression of selected Pcdhs using RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunostaining. A strong mRNA expression of Pcdhs was observed in all endothelial cells tested. At the protein level, Pcdhs-gamma were detected using an antibody against the conserved C-terminal domain of Pcdhs-gamma or an antibody against PcdhgC3. Deletion of highly expressed PcdhgC3 led to differences in the tight junction protein expression and mRNA expression of Wnt/mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) pathway genes as well as lower transendothelial electrical resistance. Staining of PcdhgC3 showed diffused cytoplasmic localization in mouse BMEC. Our results suggest that Pcdhs may play a critical role in the barrier-stabilizing pathways at the blood-brain barrier.

  19. The anti-apoptotic effect of fluid mechanics preconditioning by cells membrane and mitochondria in rats brain microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Tian, Shan; Zhu, Fengping; Hu, Ruiping; Tian, Song; Chen, Xingxing; Lou, Dan; Cao, Bing; Chen, Qiulei; Li, Bai; Li, Fang; Bai, Yulong; Wu, Yi; Zhu, Yulian

    2018-01-01

    Exercise preconditioning is a simple and effective way to prevent ischemia. This paper further provided the mechanism in hemodynamic aspects at the cellular level. To study the anti-apoptotic effects of fluid mechanics preconditioning, Cultured rats brain microvascular endothelial cells were given fluid intervention in a parallel plate flow chamber before oxygen glucose deprivation. It showed that fluid mechanics preconditioning could inhibit the apoptosis of endothelial cells, and this process might be mediated by the shear stress activation of Tie-2 on cells membrane surface and Bcl-2 on the mitochondria surface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Fermented Chinese Formula Shuan-Tong-Ling Protects Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells against Oxidative Stress Injury

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    Lingjing Tan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fermented Chinese formula Shuan-Tong-Ling (STL, composed of fourteen medicinal herbs, was an experiential formula by Dr. Zhigang Mei for treating vascular encephalopathy, but the underlying mechanisms remained unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the protective effects of fermented STL on hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2- induced injury in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs and the possible mechanisms. Cultured BMECs were treated with H2O2, STL, or nicotinamide (NAM, a SIRT1 inhibitor. Then, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay was employed to detect cell proliferation and senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-β-gal was used to examine cell senescence. Cell nuclei were observed by 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole. Additionally, changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and glutathione (GSH levels were measured. Expression of SIRT1, p21, and PGC-1α was determined by western blot. Cell proliferation significantly increased with STL treatment in a dose-dependent manner. H2O2 treatment could intensify cell senescence and nuclei splitting or pyknosis. With STL treatment, the reduced ROS level was accompanied by increased SOD and GSH activity. Further assays showed upregulation of SIRT1 and PGC-1α and downregulation of p21 after STL treatment. The results revealed that STL could protect BMECs against oxidative stress injury at least partially through the SIRT1 pathway.

  1. Piperine Decreases Binding of Drugs to Human Plasma and Increases Uptake by Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

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    Dubey, Raghvendra K; Leeners, Brigitte; Imthurn, Bruno; Merki-Feld, Gabriele Susanne; Rosselli, Marinella

    2017-09-26

    We previously reported that piperine, an active alkaloidal principal of black and long peppers, enhances drug bioavailability by inhibiting drug metabolism. Another mechanism influencing drug availability/uptake is its free fraction. Since piperine is highly lipophilic, we hypothesize that it could also interact with drugs through binding displacement and influence their bioavailability. Accordingly, using equilibrium dialysis, we investigated whether piperine alters the binding of model drug ligands, that is flunitrazepam, diazepam, warfarin, salicylic acid, propranolol, lidocaine, and disopyramide to human plasma (n = 4). Since alterations in binding influence drug disposition, we also studied the effects of piperine on the uptake of plasma bound (3) H-propranolol and (14) C-warfarin by cultured bovine brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs). Piperine (1-1000 μM) increased the free fraction (fu) of both albumin and alpha-acid glycoprotein bound drugs in a concentration-dependent manner (p piperine (10 μM) increased the uptake of (3) H-propranolol and (14) C-warfarin by BMECs (p piperine displaces plasma bound drugs from both albumin and alpha-acid glycoprotein and facilitates drug uptake across biological membranes (e.g. BMEC). Moreover, it is feasible that piperine may similarly facilitate the transport of drugs into tissues, in vivo, and alter both pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of administered drugs. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Infectomic Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Infected with Cryptococcus neoformans

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    Ambrose Jong

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to dissect the pathogenesis of Cryptococcus neoformans meningoencephalitis, a genomic survey of the changes in gene expression of human brain microvascular endothelial cells infected by C. neoformans was carried out in a time-course study. Principal component analysis (PCA revealed sigificant fluctuations in the expression levels of different groups of genes during the pathogen-host interaction. Self-organizing map (SOM analysis revealed that most genes were up- or downregulated 2 folds or more at least at one time point during the pathogen-host engagement. The microarray data were validated by Western blot analysis of a group of genes, including β-actin, Bcl-x, CD47, Bax, Bad, and Bcl-2. Hierarchical cluster profile showed that 61 out of 66 listed interferon genes were changed at least at one time point. Similarly, the active responses in expression of MHC genes were detected at all stages of the interaction. Taken together, our infectomic approaches suggest that the host cells significantly change the gene profiles and also actively participate in immunoregulations of the central nervous system (CNS during C. neoformans infection.

  3. Oxytocin inhibits ox-LDL-induced adhesion of monocytic THP-1 cells to human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Liu, Shuyan; Pan, Shengying; Tan, Jing; Zhao, Weina; Liu, Fengguo

    2017-12-15

    The attachment of monocytes to human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVEs) caused by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is associated with an early event and the pathological progression of cerebrovascular diseases. Oxytocin (OT) is a human peptide hormone that is traditionally used as a medication to facilitate childbirth. However, little information is available regarding the physiological function of OT in brain endothelial dysfunction. In the present study, our results indicate that the oxytocin receptor (OTR) was expressed in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVEs) and was upregulated in response to ox-LDL in a concentration-dependent manner. Notably, OT significantly suppressed ox-LDL-induced attachment of THP-1 monocytes to HBMVEs. Furthermore, we found that OT reduced the expression of adhesion molecules, such as VCAM-1 and E-selectin. Interestingly, it was shown that OT could restore ox-LDL-induced reduction of KLF4 in HBMVEs. Importantly, knockdown of KLF4 abolished the inhibitory effects of OT on ox-LDL-induced expressions of VCAM-1 and E-selectin as well as the adhesion of human monocytic THP-1 cells to endothelial HBMVEs. Mechanistically, we found that the stimulatory effects of OT on KLF4 expression are mediated by the MEK5/MEF2A pathway. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Zika Virus Persistently Infects and Is Basolaterally Released from Primary Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

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    Megan C. Mladinich

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is a mosquito-borne Flavivirus that has emerged as the cause of encephalitis and fetal microencephaly in the Americas. ZIKV uniquely persists in human bodily fluids for up to 6 months, is sexually transmitted, and traverses the placenta and the blood-brain barrier (BBB to damage neurons. Cells that support persistent ZIKV replication and mechanisms by which ZIKV establishes persistence remain enigmatic but central to ZIKV entry into protected neuronal compartments. The endothelial cell (EC lining of capillaries normally constrains transplacental transmission and forms the BBB, which selectively restricts access of blood constituents to neurons. We found that ZIKV (strain PRVABC59 persistently infects and continuously replicates in primary human brain microvascular ECs (hBMECs, without cytopathology, for >9 days and following hBMEC passage. ZIKV did not permeabilize hBMECs but was released basolaterally from polarized hBMECs, suggesting a direct mechanism for ZIKV to cross the BBB. ZIKV-infected hBMECs were rapidly resistant to alpha interferon (IFN-α and transiently induced, but failed to secrete, IFN-β and IFN-λ. Global transcriptome analysis determined that ZIKV constitutively induced IFN regulatory factor 7 (IRF7, IRF9, and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs 1 to 9 days postinfection, despite persistently replicating in hBMECs. ZIKV constitutively induced ISG15, HERC5, and USP18, which are linked to hepatitis C virus (HCV persistence and IFN regulation, chemokine CCL5, which is associated with immunopathogenesis, as well as cell survival factors. Our results reveal that hBMECs act as a reservoir of persistent ZIKV replication, suggest routes for ZIKV to cross hBMECs into neuronal compartments, and define novel mechanisms of ZIKV persistence that can be targeted to restrict ZIKV spread.

  5. Protease activated receptor signaling is required for African trypanosome traversal of human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Dennis J Grab

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs as an in vitro model for how African trypanosomes cross the human blood-brain barrier (BBB we recently reported that the parasites cross the BBB by generating calcium activation signals in HBMECs through the activity of parasite cysteine proteases, particularly cathepsin L (brucipain. In the current study, we examined the possible role of a class of protease stimulated HBMEC G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs known as protease activated receptors (PARs that might be implicated in calcium signaling by African trypanosomes.Using RNA interference (RNAi we found that in vitro PAR-2 gene (F2RL1 expression in HBMEC monolayers could be reduced by over 95%. We also found that the ability of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense to cross F2RL1-silenced HBMEC monolayers was reduced (39%-49% and that HBMECs silenced for F2RL1 maintained control levels of barrier function in the presence of the parasite. Consistent with the role of PAR-2, we found that HBMEC barrier function was also maintained after blockade of Galpha(q with Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT. PAR-2 signaling has been shown in other systems to have neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective roles and our data implicate a role for proteases (i.e. brucipain and PAR-2 in African trypanosome/HBMEC interactions. Using gene-profiling methods to interrogate candidate HBMEC pathways specifically triggered by brucipain, several pathways that potentially link some pathophysiologic processes associated with CNS HAT were identified.Together, the data support a role, in part, for GPCRs as molecular targets for parasite proteases that lead to the activation of Galpha(q-mediated calcium signaling. The consequence of these events is predicted to be increased permeability of the BBB to parasite transmigration and the initiation of neuroinflammation, events precursory to CNS disease.

  6. Zika Virus Persistently Infects and Is Basolaterally Released from Primary Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

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    Mladinich, Megan C.; Schwedes, John

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne Flavivirus that has emerged as the cause of encephalitis and fetal microencephaly in the Americas. ZIKV uniquely persists in human bodily fluids for up to 6 months, is sexually transmitted, and traverses the placenta and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to damage neurons. Cells that support persistent ZIKV replication and mechanisms by which ZIKV establishes persistence remain enigmatic but central to ZIKV entry into protected neuronal compartments. The endothelial cell (EC) lining of capillaries normally constrains transplacental transmission and forms the BBB, which selectively restricts access of blood constituents to neurons. We found that ZIKV (strain PRVABC59) persistently infects and continuously replicates in primary human brain microvascular ECs (hBMECs), without cytopathology, for >9 days and following hBMEC passage. ZIKV did not permeabilize hBMECs but was released basolaterally from polarized hBMECs, suggesting a direct mechanism for ZIKV to cross the BBB. ZIKV-infected hBMECs were rapidly resistant to alpha interferon (IFN-α) and transiently induced, but failed to secrete, IFN-β and IFN-λ. Global transcriptome analysis determined that ZIKV constitutively induced IFN regulatory factor 7 (IRF7), IRF9, and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) 1 to 9 days postinfection, despite persistently replicating in hBMECs. ZIKV constitutively induced ISG15, HERC5, and USP18, which are linked to hepatitis C virus (HCV) persistence and IFN regulation, chemokine CCL5, which is associated with immunopathogenesis, as well as cell survival factors. Our results reveal that hBMECs act as a reservoir of persistent ZIKV replication, suggest routes for ZIKV to cross hBMECs into neuronal compartments, and define novel mechanisms of ZIKV persistence that can be targeted to restrict ZIKV spread. PMID:28698279

  7. Co-culture model consisting of human brain microvascular endothelial and peripheral blood mononuclear cells

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    Strazza, Marianne; Maubert, Monique E.; Pirrone, Vanessa; Wigdahl, Brian; Nonnemacher, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Numerous systems exist to model the blood-brain barrier (BBB) with the goal of understanding the regulation of passage into the central nervous system (CNS) and the potential impact of selected insults on BBB function. These models typically focus on the intrinsic cellular properties of the BBB, yet studies of peripheral cell migration are often excluded due to technical restraints. New Method This method allows for the study of in vitro cellular transmigration following exposure to any treatment of interest through optimization of co-culture conditions for the human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC) cell line, hCMEC/D3, and primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results hCMEC/D3 cells form functionally confluent monolayers on collagen coated polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) transwell inserts, as assessed by microscopy and tracer molecule (FITC-dextran (FITC-D)) exclusion. Two components of complete hCMEC/D3 media, EBM-2 base-media and hydrocortisone (HC), were determined to be cytotoxic to PBMCs. By combining the remaining components of complete hCMEC/D3 media with complete PBMC media a resulting co-culture media was established for use in hCMEC/D3 – PBMC co-culture functional assays. Comparison with existing methods Through this method, issues of extensive differences in culture media conditions are resolved allowing for treatments and functional assays to be conducted on the two cell populations co-cultured simultaneously. Conclusion Described here is an in vitro co-culture model of the BBB, consisting of the hCMEC/D3 cell line and primary human PBMCs. The co-culture media will now allow for the study of exposure to potential insults to BBB function over prolonged time courses. PMID:27216631

  8. Quercetin protects human brain microvascular endothelial cells from fibrillar β-amyloid1–40-induced toxicity

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    Yongjie Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid beta-peptides (Aβ are known to undergo active transport across the blood-brain barrier, and cerebral amyloid angiopathy has been shown to be a prominent feature in the majority of Alzheimer׳s disease. Quercetin is a natural flavonoid molecule and has been demonstrated to have potent neuroprotective effects, but its protective effect on endothelial cells under Aβ-damaged condition is unclear. In the present study, the protective effects of quercetin on brain microvascular endothelial cells injured by fibrillar Aβ1–40 (fAβ1–40 were observed. The results show that fAβ1–40-induced cytotoxicity in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs can be relieved by quercetin treatment. Quercetin increases cell viability, reduces the release of lactate dehydrogenase, and relieves nuclear condensation. Quercetin also alleviates intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and increases superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, it strengthens the barrier integrity through the preservation of the transendothelial electrical resistance value, the relief of aggravated permeability, and the increase of characteristic enzyme levels after being exposed to fAβ1–40. In conclusion, quercetin protects hBMECs from fAβ1–40-induced toxicity.

  9. Cocaine inhibits store-operated Ca2+ entry in brain microvascular endothelial cells: critical role for sigma-1 receptors.

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    Brailoiu, G Cristina; Deliu, Elena; Console-Bram, Linda M; Soboloff, Jonathan; Abood, Mary E; Unterwald, Ellen M; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is an intracellular chaperone protein with many ligands, located at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Binding of cocaine to Sig-1R has previously been found to modulate endothelial functions. In the present study, we show that cocaine dramatically inhibits store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), a Ca(2+) influx mechanism promoted by depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores, in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMVEC). Using either Sig-1R shRNA or pharmacological inhibition with the unrelated Sig-1R antagonists BD-1063 and NE-100, we show that cocaine-induced SOCE inhibition is dependent on Sig-1R. In addition to revealing new insight into fundamental mechanisms of cocaine-induced changes in endothelial function, these studies indicate an unprecedented role for Sig-1R as a SOCE inhibitor. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  10. Effect of shear stress on iPSC-derived human brain microvascular endothelial cells (dhBMECs).

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    DeStefano, Jackson G; Xu, Zinnia S; Williams, Ashley J; Yimam, Nahom; Searson, Peter C

    2017-08-04

    The endothelial cells that form the lumen of capillaries and microvessels are an important component of the blood-brain barrier. Cell phenotype is regulated by transducing a range of biomechanical and biochemical signals in the local microenvironment. Here we report on the role of shear stress in modulating the morphology, motility, proliferation, apoptosis, and protein and gene expression, of confluent monolayers of human brain microvascular endothelial cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. To assess the response of derived human brain microvascular endothelial cells (dhBMECs) to shear stress, confluent monolayers were formed in a microfluidic device. Monolayers were subjected to a shear stress of 4 or 12 dyne cm -2 for 40 h. Static conditions were used as the control. Live cell imaging was used to assess cell morphology, cell speed, persistence, and the rates of proliferation and apoptosis as a function of time. In addition, immunofluorescence imaging and protein and gene expression analysis of key markers of the blood-brain barrier were performed. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells exhibit a unique phenotype in response to shear stress compared to static conditions: (1) they do not elongate and align, (2) the rates of proliferation and apoptosis decrease significantly, (3) the mean displacement of individual cells within the monolayer over time is significantly decreased, (4) there is no cytoskeletal reorganization or formation of stress fibers within the cell, and (5) there is no change in expression levels of key blood-brain barrier markers. The characteristic response of dhBMECs to shear stress is significantly different from human and animal-derived endothelial cells from other tissues, suggesting that this unique phenotype that may be important in maintenance of the blood-brain barrier. The implications of this work are that: (1) in confluent monolayers of dhBMECs, tight junctions are formed under static conditions, (2) the formation

  11. Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells and Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells Differentially Facilitate Leukocyte Recruitment and Utilize Chemokines for T Cell Migration

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    Shumei Man

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells that functionally express blood brain barrier (BBB properties are useful surrogates for studying leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions at the BBB. In this study, we compared two different endothelial cellular models: transfected human brain microvascular endothelial cells (THBMECs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. With each grow under optimal conditions, confluent THBMEC cultures showed continuous occludin and ZO-1 immunoreactivity, while HUVEC cultures exhibited punctate ZO-1 expression at sites of cell-cell contact only. Confluent THBMEC cultures on 24-well collagen-coated transwell inserts had significantly higher transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER and lower solute permeability than HUVECs. Confluent THBMECs were more restrictive for mononuclear cell migration than HUVECs. Only THBMECs utilized abluminal CCL5 to facilitate T-lymphocyte migration in vitro although both THBMECs and HUVECs employed CCL3 to facilitate T cell migration. These data establish baseline conditions for using THBMECs to develop in vitro BBB models for studying leukocyte-endothelial interactions during neuroinflammation.

  12. Activation of sonic hedgehog signaling attenuates oxidized low-density lipoprotein-stimulated brain microvascular endothelial cells dysfunction in vitro.

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    Jiang, Xiu-Long; Chen, Ting; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    The study was performed to investigate the role of sonic hedgehog (SHH) in the oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. The primary mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (MBMECs) were exposed to oxLDL. The results indicated that treatment of MBMECs with oxLDL decreased the cell viability, and oxidative stress was involved in oxLDL-induce MBMECs dysfunction with increasing intracellular ROS and MDA formation as well as decreasing NO release and eNOS mRNA expression. In addition, SHH signaling components, such as SHH, Smo and Gli1, mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased after incubation with increasing concentrations of oxLDL. Treatment with oxLDL alone or SHH loss-of-function significantly increased the permeability of MBMECs, and overexpression of SHH attenuated oxLDL-induced elevation of permeability in MBMECs. Furthermore, SHH gain-of-function could reverse oxLDL-induced apoptosis through inhibition caspase3 and caspase8 levels in MBMECs. Taken together, these results demonstrated that the suppression of SHH in MBMECs might contribute to the oxLDL-induced disruption of endothelial barrier. However, the overexpression of SHH could reverse oxLDL-induced endothelial cells dysfunction in vitro.

  13. Morphine induces expression of platelet-derived growth factor in human brain microvascular endothelial cells: implication for vascular permeability.

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    Hongxiu Wen

    Full Text Available Despite the advent of antiretroviral therapy, complications of HIV-1 infection with concurrent drug abuse are an emerging problem. Morphine, often abused by HIV-infected patients, is known to accelerate neuroinflammation associated with HIV-1 infection. Detailed molecular mechanisms of morphine action however, remain poorly understood. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF has been implicated in a number of pathological conditions, primarily due to its potent mitogenic and permeability effects. Whether morphine exposure results in enhanced vascular permeability in brain endothelial cells, likely via induction of PDGF, remains to be established. In the present study, we demonstrated morphine-mediated induction of PDGF-BB in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, an effect that was abrogated by the opioid receptor antagonist-naltrexone. Pharmacological blockade (cell signaling and loss-of-function (Egr-1 approaches demonstrated the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, PI3K/Akt and the downstream transcription factor Egr-1 respectively, in morphine-mediated induction of PDGF-BB. Functional significance of increased PDGF-BB manifested as increased breach of the endothelial barrier as evidenced by decreased expression of the tight junction protein ZO-1 in an in vitro model system. Understanding the regulation of PDGF expression may provide insights into the development of potential therapeutic targets for intervention of morphine-mediated neuroinflammation.

  14. Binding characteristics of S fimbriated Escherichia coli to isolated brain microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Stins, M. F.; Prasadarao, N. V.; Ibric, L.; Wass, C. A.; Luckett, P.; Kim, K. S.

    1994-01-01

    To assess the role of S fimbriae in the pathogenesis of Escherichia coli meningitis, transformants of E. coli strains with or without S fimbriae plasmid were compared for their binding to microvessel endothelial cells isolated from bovine brain cortices (BMEC). The BMEC's displayed a cobblestone appearance, were positive for factor VIII, carbonic anhydrase IV, took up fluorescent-labeled acetylated low density lipoprotein, and exhibited gamma glutamyl transpeptidase activity. Binding of S fimbriated E. coli to BMEC was approximately threefold greater than nonfimbriated E. coli Similarly S fimbriated E. coli bound to human brain endothelial cells approximately threefold greater than nonfimbriated E. coli. Binding was reduced approximately 60% by isolated S fimbriae and about 80% by anti-S adhesin antibody. Mutating the S adhesin gene resulted in a complete loss of the binding, whereas mutagenesis of the major S fimbriae subunit gene sfaA did not significantly affect binding. Pretreatment of BMEC with neuraminidase or prior incubation of S fimbriated E. coli with NeuAc alpha 2,3-sialyl lactose completely abolished binding. These findings indicate that S fimbriated E. coli bind to NeuAc alpha 2,3-galactose containing glycoproteins on brain endothelial cells via a lectin-like activity of SfaS adhesin. This might be an important early step in the penetration of bacteria across the blood-brain barrier in the development of E. coli meningitis. Images Figure 6 PMID:7977653

  15. Functional expression of choline transporter like-protein 1 (CTL1) and CTL2 in human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Iwao, Beniko; Yara, Miki; Hara, Naomi; Kawai, Yuiko; Yamanaka, Tsuyoshi; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takeshi; Inazu, Masato

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we examined the molecular and functional characterization of choline transporter in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs). Choline uptake into hBMECs was a saturable process that was mediated by a Na(+)-independent, membrane potential and pH-dependent transport system. The cells have two different [(3)H]choline transport systems with Km values of 35.0 ± 4.9 μM and 54.1 ± 8.1 μM, respectively. Choline uptake was inhibited by choline, acetylcholine (ACh) and the choline analog hemicholinium-3 (HC-3). Various organic cations also interacted with the choline transport system. Choline transporter-like protein 1 (CTL1) and CTL2 mRNA were highly expressed, while mRNA for high-affinity choline transporter 1 (CHT1) and organic cation transporters (OCTs) were not expressed in hBMECs. CTL1 and CTL2 proteins were localized to brain microvascular endothelial cells in human brain cortical sections. Both CTL1 and CTL2 proteins were expressed on the plasma membrane and mitochondria. CTL1 and CTL2 proteins are mainly expressed in plasma membrane and mitochondria, respectively. We conclude that choline is mainly transported via an intermediate-affinity choline transport system, CTL1 and CTL2, in hBMECs. These transporters are responsible for the uptake of extracellular choline and organic cations. CTL2 participate in choline transport mainly in mitochondria, and may be the major site for the control of choline oxidation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Exposure to lipopolysaccharide and/or unconjugated bilirubin impair the integrity and function of brain microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Cardoso, Filipa L; Kittel, Agnes; Veszelka, Szilvia; Palmela, Inês; Tóth, Andrea; Brites, Dora; Deli, Mária A; Brito, Maria A

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis and jaundice are common conditions in newborns that can lead to brain damage. Though lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is known to alter the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), little is known on the effects of unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) and even less on the joint effects of UCB and LPS on brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC). Monolayers of primary rat BMEC were treated with 1 µg/ml LPS and/or 50 µM UCB, in the presence of 100 µM human serum albumin, for 4 or 24 h. Co-cultures of BMEC with astroglial cells, a more complex BBB model, were used in selected experiments. LPS led to apoptosis and UCB induced both apoptotic and necrotic-like cell death. LPS and UCB led to inhibition of P-glycoprotein and activation of matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 in mono-cultures. Transmission electron microscopy evidenced apoptotic bodies, as well as damaged mitochondria and rough endoplasmic reticulum in BMEC by either insult. Shorter cell contacts and increased caveolae-like invaginations were noticeable in LPS-treated cells and loss of intercellular junctions was observed upon treatment with UCB. Both compounds triggered impairment of endothelial permeability and transendothelial electrical resistance both in mono- and co-cultures. The functional changes were confirmed by alterations in immunostaining for junctional proteins β-catenin, ZO-1 and claudin-5. Enlargement of intercellular spaces, and redistribution of junctional proteins were found in BMEC after exposure to LPS and UCB. LPS and/or UCB exert direct toxic effects on BMEC, with distinct temporal profiles and mechanisms of action. Therefore, the impairment of brain endothelial integrity upon exposure to these neurotoxins may favor their access to the brain, thus increasing the risk of injury and requiring adequate clinical management of sepsis and jaundice in the neonatal period.

  17. Caveolin-1 mediates tissue plasminogen activator-induced MMP-9 up-regulation in cultured brain microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Jin, Xinchun; Sun, Yanyun; Xu, Ji; Liu, Wenlan

    2015-03-01

    Thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) increases matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in the ischemic brain, which exacerbates blood-brain barrier injury and increases the risk of symptomatic cerebral hemorrhage. The mechanism through which tPA enhances MMP-9 activity is not well understood. Here we report an important role of caveolin-1 in mediating tPA-induced MMP-9 synthesis. Brain microvascular endothelial cell line bEnd3 cells were incubated with 5 or 20 μg/ml tPA for 24 hrs before analyzing MMP-9 levels in the conditioned media and cellular extracts by gelatin zymography. tPA at a dose of 20 μg/mL tPA, but not 5 μg/mL, significantly increased MMP-9 level in cultured media while decreasing it in cellular extracts. Concurrently, tPA treatment induced a 2.3-fold increase of caveolin-1 protein levels in endothelial cells. Interestingly, knockdown of Cav-1 with siRNA inhibited tPA-induced MMP-9 mRNA up-regulation and MMP-9 increase in the conditioned media, but did not affect MMP-9 decrease in cellular extracts. These results suggest that caveolin-1 critically contributes to tPA-mediated MMP-9 up-regulation, but may not facilitate MMP-9 secretion in endothelial cells. Thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) increases matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in the ischemic brain, which exacerbates ischemic blood brain barrier (BBB) injury and increases the risk of symptomatic cerebral hemorrhage. Our results suggest a novel mechanism underlying this tPA-MMP 9 axis. In response to tPA treatment, caveolin-1 protein levels increased in endothelial cells, which mediate MMP-9 mRNA up-regulation and its secretion into extracellular space. Caveolin-1 may, however, not facilitate MMP-9 secretion in endothelial cells. Our data suggest caveolin-1 as a novel therapeutic target for protecting the BBB against ischemic damage. The schematic outlines tPA-induced MMP-9 upreguation. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  18. Listeriolysin O mediates cytotoxicity against human brain microvascular

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    Penetration of the brain microvascular endothelial layer is one of the routes L. monocytogenes use to breach the blood-brain barrier. Because host factors in the blood severely limit direct invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) by L. monocytogenes, alternative mechanisms m...

  19. The Multifaceted Responses of Primary Human Astrocytes and Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells to the Lyme Disease Spirochete, Borrelia Burgdorferi

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    Catherine A. Brissette

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The vector-borne pathogen, Borrelia burgdorferi, causes a multi-system disorder including neurological complications. These neurological disorders, collectively termed neuroborreliosis, can occur in up to 15% of untreated patients. The neurological symptoms are probably a result of a glial-driven, host inflammatory response to the bacterium. However, the specific contributions of individual glial and other support cell types to the pathogenesis of neuroborreliosis are relatively unexplored. The goal of this project was to characterize specific astrocyte and endothelial cell responses to B. burgdorferi. Primary human astrocytes and primary HBMEC (human brain microvascular endothelial cells were incubated with B. burgdorferi over a 72-h period and the transcriptional responses to the bacterium were analyzed by real-time PCR arrays. There was a robust increase in several surveyed chemokine and related genes, including IL (interleukin-8, for both primary astrocytes and HBMEC. Array results were confirmed with individual sets of PCR primers. The production of specific chemokines by both astrocytes and HBMEC in response to B. burgdorferi, including IL-8, CXCL-1, and CXCL-10, were confirmed by ELISA. These results demonstrate that primary astrocytes and HBMEC respond to virulent B. burgdorferi by producing a number of chemokines. These data suggest that infiltrating phagocytic cells, particularly neutrophils, attracted by chemokines expressed at the BBB (blood–brain barrier may be important contributors to the early inflammatory events associated with neuroborreliosis.

  20. Regulation of monocarboxylic acid transporter-1 by cAMP dependent vesicular trafficking in brain microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Uhernik, Amy L; Li, Lun; LaVoy, Nathan; Velasquez, Micah J; Smith, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a detailed characterization of Monocarboxylic Acid Transporter-1 (Mct1) in cytoplasmic vesicles of cultured rat brain microvascular endothelial cells shows them to be a diverse population of endosomes intrinsic to the regulation of the transporter by a brief 25 to 30 minute exposure to the membrane permeant cAMP analog, 8Br-cAMP. The vesicles are heterogeneous in size, mobility, internal pH, and co-localize with discreet markers of particular types of endosomes including early endosomes, clathrin coated vesicles, caveolar vesicles, trans-golgi, and lysosomes. The vesicular localization of Mct1 was not dependent on its N or C termini, however, the size and pH of Mct1 vesicles was increased by deletion of either terminus demonstrating a role for the termini in vesicular trafficking of Mct1. Using a novel BCECF-AM based assay developed in this study, 8Br-cAMP was shown to decrease the pH of Mct1 vesicles after 25 minutes. This result and method were confirmed in experiments with a ratiometric pH-sensitive EGFP-mCherry dual tagged Mct1 construct. Overall, the results indicate that cAMP signaling reduces the functionality of Mct1 in cerebrovascular endothelial cells by facilitating its entry into a highly dynamic vesicular trafficking pathway that appears to lead to the transporter's trafficking to autophagosomes and lysosomes.

  1. Neisseria meningitidis induces brain microvascular endothelial cell detachment from the matrix and cleavage of occludin: a role for MMP-8.

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    Alexandra Schubert-Unkmeir

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB is a hallmark event in the pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis. Several inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha, nitric oxide and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, contribute to this disruption. Here we show that infection of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC with Neisseria meningitidis induced an increase of permeability at prolonged time of infection. This was paralleled by an increase in MMP-8 activity in supernatants collected from infected cells. A detailed analysis revealed that MMP-8 was involved in the proteolytic cleavage of the tight junction protein occludin, resulting in its disappearance from the cell periphery and cleavage to a lower-sized 50-kDa protein in infected HBMEC. Abrogation of MMP-8 activity by specific inhibitors as well as transfection with MMP-8 siRNA abolished production of the cleavage fragment and occludin remained attached to the cell periphery. In addition, MMP-8 affected cell adherence to the underlying matrix. A similar temporal relationship was observed for MMP activity and cell detachment. Injury of the HBMEC monolayer suggested the requirement of direct cell contact because no detachment was observed when bacteria were placed above a transwell membrane or when bacterial supernatant was directly added to cells. Inhibition of MMP-8 partially prevented detachment of infected HBMEC and restored BBB permeability. Together, we established that MMP-8 activity plays a crucial role in disassembly of cell junction components and cell adhesion during meningococcal infection.

  2. Dexamethasone suppresses JMJD3 gene activation via a putative negative glucocorticoid response element and maintains integrity of tight junctions in brain microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Na, Wonho; Shin, Jee Y; Lee, Jee Y; Jeong, Sangyun; Kim, Won-Sun; Yune, Tae Y; Ju, Bong-Gun

    2017-12-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) exhibits a highly selective permeability to support the homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS). The tight junctions in the BBB microvascular endothelial cells seal the paracellular space to prevent diffusion. Thus, disruption of tight junctions results in harmful effects in CNS diseases and injuries. It has recently been demonstrated that glucocorticoids have beneficial effects on maintaining tight junctions in both in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. In the present study, we found that dexamethasone suppresses the expression of JMJD3, a histone H3K27 demethylase, via the recruitment of glucocorticoid receptor α (GRα) and nuclear receptor co-repressor (N-CoR) to the negative glucocorticoid response element (nGRE) in the upstream region of JMJD3 gene in brain microvascular endothelial cells subjected to TNFα treatment. The decreased JMJD3 gene expression resulted in the suppression of MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 gene activation. Dexamethasone also activated the expression of the claudin 5 and occludin genes. Collectively, dexamethasone attenuated the disruption of the tight junctions in the brain microvascular endothelial cells subjected to TNFα treatment. Therefore, glucocorticoids may help to preserve the integrity of the tight junctions in the BBB via transcriptional and post-translational regulation following CNS diseases and injuries.

  3. Metformin induces up-regulation of blood-brain barrier functions by activating AMP-activated protein kinase in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Takata, Fuyuko; Dohgu, Shinya; Matsumoto, Junichi; Machida, Takashi; Kaneshima, Shuji; Matsuo, Mai; Sakaguchi, Shinya; Takeshige, Yuki; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Kataoka, Yasufumi

    2013-04-19

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption occurs frequently in CNS diseases and injuries. Few drugs have been developed as therapeutic candidates for facilitating BBB functions. Here, we examined whether metformin up-regulates BBB functions using rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBECs). Metformin, concentration- and time-dependently increased transendothelial electrical resistance of RBEC monolayers, and decreased RBEC permeability to sodium fluorescein and Evans blue albumin. These effects of metformin were blocked by compound C, an inhibitor of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK stimulation with an AMPK activator, AICAR, enhanced BBB functions. These findings indicate that metformin induces up-regulation of BBB functions via AMPK activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Carnosine protects brain microvascular endothelial cells against rotenone-induced oxidative stress injury through histamine H₁ and H₂ receptors in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luyi; Yao, Ke; Fan, Yanying; He, Ping; Wang, Xiaofen; Hu, Weiwei; Chen, Zhong

    2012-12-01

    Although it is believed that carnosine has protective effects on various cell types, its effect on microvascular endothelial cells has not been well defined. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of carnosine in microvascular endothelial cells using an in vitro rotenone-induced oxidative stress model. Mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells were exposed to 1 μmol/L rotenone for 18 h. In some experiments, carnosine (100 nmol/L-1 mmol/L) was added 30 min prior to rotenone exposure. When used, histamine receptor antagonists (100 nmol/L-10 μmol/L) were added 15 min before carnosine treatment. After rotenone exposure, apoptosis of microvascular cells was analysed by Hoechst 33342 staining, whereas mitochondrial membrane potential was assessed by JC-1 staining. Intracellular carnosine and histamine levels were determined using HPLC or ultra-HPLC. Over the range 1 μmol/L-1 mmol/L, carnosine concentration-dependently decreased the number of apoptotic cells after 18 h exposure to rotenone. This effect was reversed by the histamine H1 receptor antagonists pyrilamine and diphenhydramine (1 and 10 μmol/L) and the H2 receptor antagonists cimetidine (100 nmol/L-10 μmol/L) and zolatidine (10 μmol/L). α-Fluoromethylhistidine (100 μmol/L), a selective and irreversible inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase, also significantly inhibited the protective effects of carnosine. At 0.1 mmol/L, carnosine restored the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential after 6 h exposure to 1 μmol/L rotenone and this effect was also reversed by the H1 and H2 receptor antagonists. Moreover, intracellular carnosine levels increased as early as 1 h after carnosine treatment, whereas intracellular histamine levels increased 18 h after carnosine treatment. The results of the present study indicate that carnosine protects brain microvascular endothelial cells against rotenone-induced oxidative stress injury via histamine H1 and H2 receptors. The

  5. West Nile virus infection modulates human brain microvascular endothelial cells tight junction proteins and cell adhesion molecules: Transmigration across the in vitro blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Saguna; Lo, Yeung; Chapagain, Moti; Lum, Stephanie; Kumar, Mukesh; Gurjav, Ulziijargal; Luo, Haiyan; Nakatsuka, Austin; Nerurkar, Vivek R

    2009-03-15

    Neurological complications such as inflammation, failure of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and neuronal death contribute to the mortality and morbidity associated with WNV-induced meningitis. Compromised BBB indicates the ability of the virus to gain entry into the CNS via the BBB, however, the underlying mechanisms, and the specific cell types associated with WNV-CNS trafficking are not well understood. Brain microvascular endothelial cells, the main component of the BBB, represent a barrier to virus dissemination into the CNS and could play key role in WNV spread via hematogenous route. To investigate WNV entry into the CNS, we infected primary human brain microvascular endothelial (HBMVE) cells with the neurovirulent strain of WNV (NY99) and examined WNV replication kinetics together with the changes in the expressions of key tight junction proteins (TJP) and cell adhesion molecules (CAM). WNV infection of HBMVE cells was productive as analyzed by plaque assay and qRT-PCR, and did not induce cytopathic effect. Increased mRNA and protein expressions of TJP (claudin-1) and CAM (vascular cell adhesion molecule and E-selectin) were observed at days 2 and 3 after infection, respectively, which coincided with the peak in WNV replication. Further, using an in vitro BBB model comprised of HBMVE cells, we demonstrate that cell-free WNV can cross the BBB, without compromising the BBB integrity. These data suggest that infection of HBMVE cells can facilitate entry of cell-free virus into the CNS without disturbing the BBB, and increased CAM may assist in the trafficking of WNV-infected immune cells into the CNS, via 'Trojan horse' mechanism, thereby contributing to WNV dissemination in the CNS and associated pathology.

  6. Circulating Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells (cBMECs) as Potential Biomarkers of the Blood–Brain Barrier Disorders Caused by Microbial and Non-Microbial Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun-Hua; Cao, Hong; Zhang, Aimin; Jong, Ambrose

    2013-01-01

    Despite aggressive research, central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including blood-brain barrier (BBB) injury caused by microbial infection, stroke, abused drugs [e.g., methamphetamine (METH) and nicotine], and other pathogenic insults, remain the world's leading cause of disabilities. In our previous work, we found that dysfunction of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), which are a major component of the BBB, could be caused by nicotine, meningitic pathogens and microbial factors, including HIV-1 virulence factors gp41 and gp120. One of the most challenging issues in this area is that there are no available cell-based biomarkers in peripheral blood for BBB disorders caused by microbial and non-microbial insults. To identify such cellular biomarkers for BBB injuries, our studies have shown that mice treated with nicotine, METH and gp120 resulted in increased blood levels of CD146+(endothelial marker)/S100B+ (brain marker) circulating BMECs (cBMECs) and CD133+[progenitor cell (PC) marker]/CD146+ endothelial PCs (EPCs), along with enhanced Evans blue and albumin extravasation into the brain. Nicotine and gp120 were able to significantly increase the serum levels of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase 1 (UCHL1) (a new BBB marker) as well as S100B in mice, which are correlated with the changes in cBMECs and EPCs. Nicotine- and meningitic E. coli K1-induced enhancement of cBMEC levels, leukocyte migration across the BBB and albumin extravasation into the brain were significantly reduced in alpha7 nAChR knockout mice, suggesting that this inflammatory regulator plays an important role in CNS inflammation and BBB disorders caused by microbial and non-microbial factors. These results demonstrated that cBMECs as well as EPCs may be used as potential cell-based biomarkers for indexing of BBB injury. PMID:23637989

  7. Circulating brain microvascular endothelial cells (cBMECs) as potential biomarkers of the blood-brain barrier disorders caused by microbial and non-microbial factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng-He; Wang, Lin; Chi, Feng; Wu, Chun-Hua; Cao, Hong; Zhang, Aimin; Jong, Ambrose

    2013-01-01

    Despite aggressive research, central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including blood-brain barrier (BBB) injury caused by microbial infection, stroke, abused drugs [e.g., methamphetamine (METH) and nicotine], and other pathogenic insults, remain the world's leading cause of disabilities. In our previous work, we found that dysfunction of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), which are a major component of the BBB, could be caused by nicotine, meningitic pathogens and microbial factors, including HIV-1 virulence factors gp41 and gp120. One of the most challenging issues in this area is that there are no available cell-based biomarkers in peripheral blood for BBB disorders caused by microbial and non-microbial insults. To identify such cellular biomarkers for BBB injuries, our studies have shown that mice treated with nicotine, METH and gp120 resulted in increased blood levels of CD146+(endothelial marker)/S100B+ (brain marker) circulating BMECs (cBMECs) and CD133+[progenitor cell (PC) marker]/CD146+ endothelial PCs (EPCs), along with enhanced Evans blue and albumin extravasation into the brain. Nicotine and gp120 were able to significantly increase the serum levels of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase 1 (UCHL1) (a new BBB marker) as well as S100B in mice, which are correlated with the changes in cBMECs and EPCs. Nicotine- and meningitic E. coli K1-induced enhancement of cBMEC levels, leukocyte migration across the BBB and albumin extravasation into the brain were significantly reduced in alpha7 nAChR knockout mice, suggesting that this inflammatory regulator plays an important role in CNS inflammation and BBB disorders caused by microbial and non-microbial factors. These results demonstrated that cBMECs as well as EPCs may be used as potential cell-based biomarkers for indexing of BBB injury.

  8. Circulating brain microvascular endothelial cells (cBMECs as potential biomarkers of the blood-brain barrier disorders caused by microbial and non-microbial factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-He Huang

    Full Text Available Despite aggressive research, central nervous system (CNS disorders, including blood-brain barrier (BBB injury caused by microbial infection, stroke, abused drugs [e.g., methamphetamine (METH and nicotine], and other pathogenic insults, remain the world's leading cause of disabilities. In our previous work, we found that dysfunction of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs, which are a major component of the BBB, could be caused by nicotine, meningitic pathogens and microbial factors, including HIV-1 virulence factors gp41 and gp120. One of the most challenging issues in this area is that there are no available cell-based biomarkers in peripheral blood for BBB disorders caused by microbial and non-microbial insults. To identify such cellular biomarkers for BBB injuries, our studies have shown that mice treated with nicotine, METH and gp120 resulted in increased blood levels of CD146+(endothelial marker/S100B+ (brain marker circulating BMECs (cBMECs and CD133+[progenitor cell (PC marker]/CD146+ endothelial PCs (EPCs, along with enhanced Evans blue and albumin extravasation into the brain. Nicotine and gp120 were able to significantly increase the serum levels of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase 1 (UCHL1 (a new BBB marker as well as S100B in mice, which are correlated with the changes in cBMECs and EPCs. Nicotine- and meningitic E. coli K1-induced enhancement of cBMEC levels, leukocyte migration across the BBB and albumin extravasation into the brain were significantly reduced in alpha7 nAChR knockout mice, suggesting that this inflammatory regulator plays an important role in CNS inflammation and BBB disorders caused by microbial and non-microbial factors. These results demonstrated that cBMECs as well as EPCs may be used as potential cell-based biomarkers for indexing of BBB injury.

  9. Edaravone protected human brain microvascular endothelial cells from methylglyoxal-induced injury by inhibiting AGEs/RAGE/oxidative stress.

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    Wenlu Li

    Full Text Available Subjects with diabetes experience an increased risk of cerebrovascular disease and stroke compared with nondiabetic age-matched individuals. Increased formation of reactive physiological dicarbonyl compound methylglyoxal (MGO seems to be implicated in the development of diabetic vascular complication due to its protein glycation and oxidative stress effect. Edaravone, a novel radical scavenger, has been reported to display the advantageous effects on ischemic stroke both in animals and clinical trials; however, little is known about whether edaravone has protective effects on diabetic cerebrovascular injury. Using cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC, protective effects of edaravone on MGO and MGO enhancing oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD induced injury were investigated. Cell injury was measured by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT formation, cell account, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release and Rhodamine 123 staining. Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs formation and receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE expression were measured by western blotting. Cellular oxidative stress was measured by reactive oxygen species (ROS release. Treatment of MGO for 24 h significantly induced HBMEC injury, which was inhibited by pretreatment of edaravone from 10-100 µmol/l. What's more, treatment of MGO enhanced AGEs accumulation, RAGE expression and ROS release in the cultured HBMEC, which were inhibited by 100 µmol/l edaravone. Finally, treatment of MGO for 24 h and then followed by 3 h OGD insult significantly enhanced cell injury when compared with OGD insult only, which was also protected by 100 µmol/l edaravone. Thus, edaravone protected HBMEC from MGO and MGO enhancing OGD-induced injury by inhibiting AGEs/RAGE/oxidative stress.

  10. PJ-34 inhibits PARP-1 expression and ERK phosphorylation in glioma-conditioned brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Carla; D'Angeli, Floriana; Scalia, Marina; Satriano, Cristina; Barbagallo, Davide; Naletova, Irina; Anfuso, Carmelina Daniela; Lupo, Gabriella; Spina-Purrello, Vittoria

    2015-08-15

    Inhibitors of PARP-1(Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1) act by competing with NAD(+), the enzyme physiological substrate, which play a protective role in many pathological conditions characterized by PARP-1 overactivation. It has been shown that PARP-1 also promotes tumor growth and progression through its DNA repair activity. Since angiogenesis is an essential requirement for these activities, we sought to determine whether PARP inhibition might affect rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (GP8.3) migration, stimulated by C6-glioma conditioned medium (CM). Through wound-healing experiments and MTT analysis, we demonstrated that PARP-1 inhibitor PJ-34 [N-(6-Oxo-5,6-dihydrophenanthridin-2-yl)-N,N-dimethylacetamide] abolishes the migratory response of GP8.3 cells and reduces their viability. PARP-1 also acts in a DNA independent way within the Extracellular-Regulated-Kinase (ERK) signaling cascade, which regulates cell proliferation and differentiation. By western analysis and confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM), we analyzed the effects of PJ-34 on PARP-1 expression, phospho-ERK and phospho-Elk-1 activation. The effect of MEK (mitogen-activated-protein-kinase-kinase) inhibitor PD98059 (2-(2-Amino-3-methoxyphenyl)-4 H-1-benzopyran-4-one) on PARP-1 expression in unstimulated and in CM-stimulated GP8.3 cells was analyzed by RT-PCR. PARP-1 expression and phospho-ERK activation were significantly reduced by treatment of GP8.3 cells with PJ-34 or PD98059. By LSM, we further demonstrated that PARP-1 and phospho-ERK are coexpressed and share the same subcellular localization in GP8.3 cells, in the cytoplasm as well as in nucleoplasm. Based on these data, we propose that PARP-1 and phospho-ERK interact in the cytosol and then translocate to the nucleus, where they trigger a proliferative response. We also propose that PARP-1 inhibition blocks CM-induced endothelial migration by interfering with ERK signal-transduction pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  11. Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Derived from the BC1 iPS Cell Line Exhibit a Blood-Brain Barrier Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katt, Moriah E; Xu, Zinnia S; Gerecht, Sharon; Searson, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial cells that form capillaries in the brain are highly specialized, with tight junctions that minimize paracellular transport and an array of broad-spectrum efflux pumps that make drug delivery to the brain extremely challenging. One of the major limitations in blood-brain barrier research and the development of drugs to treat central nervous system diseases is the lack of appropriate cell lines. Recent reports indicate that the derivation of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may provide a solution to this problem. Here we demonstrate the derivation of hBMECs extended to two new human iPSC lines: BC1 and GFP-labeled BC1. These hBMECs highly express adherens and tight junction proteins VE-cadherin, ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5. The addition of retinoic acid upregulates VE-cadherin expression, and results in a significant increase in transendothelial electrical resistance to physiological values. The permeabilities of tacrine, rhodamine 123, and Lucifer yellow are similar to values obtained for MDCK cells. The efflux ratio for rhodamine 123 across hBMECs is in the range 2-4 indicating polarization of efflux transporters. Using the rod assay to assess cell organization in small vessels and capillaries, we show that hBMECs resist elongation with decreasing diameter but show progressive axial alignment. The derivation of hBMECs with a blood-brain barrier phenotype from the BC1 cell line highlights that the protocol is robust. The expression of GFP in hBMECs derived from the BC1-GFP cell line provides an important new resource for BBB research.

  12. Reprogramming of TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 expression profiles in brain microvascular endothelial cells and astrocytes in response to proinflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugno, M; Witek, B; Bereta, J; Bereta, M; Edwards, D R; Kordula, T

    1999-04-01

    Cytokine-dependent regulation of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) expression provides an important mechanism for controlling the activity of matrix metalloproteinases. We present data indicating that during inflammatory processes TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 may be involved in the proteolytic remodeling of subendothelial basement membrane of the brain microvascular system, a key step during leukocyte migration into the brain perivascular tissue. In brain endothelial cells the expression of TIMP-1 is dramatically up-regulated by major proinflammatory cytokines, with the combination of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) exhibiting the strongest synergistic stimulation. Simultaneously, IL-1beta/TNF alpha almost completely blocks TIMP-3 expression. Both synergistic effects are dose-dependent within the concentration range 0.05-5 ng/ml of both cytokines and correlate with the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, an endothelial cell activation marker. Down-regulation of TIMP-3 expression is also detected in astrocytes treated with TNF alpha or IFN-gamma whereas oncostatin M as well as TNF alpha up-regulate TIMP-1 mRNA level. We propose that the cytokine-modified balance between TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 expression provides a potential mechanism involved in the regulation of microvascular basement membrane proteolysis.

  13. Generation of Brain Microvascular Endothelial-Like Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Co-Culture with C6 Glioma Cells.

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    Haruka Minami

    Full Text Available The blood brain barrier (BBB is formed by brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs and tightly regulates the transport of molecules from blood to neural tissues. In vitro BBB models from human pluripotent stem cell (PSCs-derived BMECs would be useful not only for the research on the BBB development and function but also for drug-screening for neurological diseases. However, little is known about the differentiation of human PSCs to BMECs. In the present study, human induced PSCs (iPSCs were differentiated into endothelial cells (ECs, and further maturated to BMECs. Interestingly, C6 rat glioma cell-conditioned medium (C6CM, in addition to C6 co-culture, induced the differentiation of human iPSC-derived ECs (iPS-ECs to BMEC-like cells, increase in the trans-endothelial electrical resistance, decreased in the dextran transport and up-regulation of gene expression of tight junction molecules in human iPS-ECs. Moreover, Wnt inhibitors attenuated the effects of C6CM. In summary, we have established a simple protocol of the generation of BMEC-like cells from human iPSCs, and have demonstrated that differentiation of iPS-ECs to BMEC-like cells is induced by C6CM-derived signals, including canonical Wnt signals.

  14. Inflammation stimulates thrombopoietin (Tpo) expression in rat brain-derived microvascular endothelial cells, but suppresses Tpo in astrocytes and microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Freyer, Dorette; Rung, Olga; Im, Ae-Rie; Hoffmann, Olaf; Dame, Christof

    2010-07-01

    Thrombopoietin (Tpo) and its receptor (c-Mpl; TpoR), which primary regulate megakaryopoiesis and platelet production, are also expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). Increased Tpo concentrations are present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of some patients with bacterial or viral meningitis. Since previous data implicated a proapoptotic role of Tpo on newly generated neuronal cells, we herein elucidated the regulation of Tpo in primary rat neurons (e17), astrocytes, and microglia (p0-p3), as well as in brain-derived vascular endothelial cells of 3-week-old rats after exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS inhibited Tpo gene expression in astrocytes and microglia, but not in neurons, most likely due to absence of Toll-like receptor 4 in neurons. While Tpo mRNA expression recovered in astrocytes after 24 h, it remained suppressed in microglia. Furthermore, we detected Tpo mRNA expression in primary brain-derived vascular endothelial cells, which also express the TpoR. In these cells, LPS significantly up-regulated Tpo mRNA expression. TpoR mRNA and protein expression remained constitutive in all cell types. Thus, our data provide evidence for a cell-type-specific modulation of Tpo mRNA expression by inflammation in brain-derived cells. Transient down-regulation of Tpo expression in astrocytes and microglia may limit Tpo-induced neuronal cell death in inflammatory brain disorders.

  15. Let-7i attenuates human brain microvascular endothelial cell damage in oxygen glucose deprivation model by decreasing toll-like receptor 4 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Wei; Tian, Canhui; Peng, Shunli; Zhou, Liang; Pan, Suyue; Deng, Zhen

    2017-11-04

    The let-7 family of microRNAs (miRNAs) plays an important role on endothelial cell function. However, there have been few studies on their role under ischemic conditions. In this study, we demonstrate that let-7i, belonging to the let-7 family, rescues human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) in an oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model. Our data show that the expression of let-7 family miRNAs was downregulated after OGD. Overexpression of let-7i significantly alleviated cell death and improved survival of OGD-treated HBMECs. Let-7i also protected permeability in an in vitro blood brain barrier (BBB) model. Further, let-7i downregulated the expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), an inflammation trigger. Moreover, overexpression of let-7i decreased matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression under OGD. Upon silencing TLR4 expression in HBMECs, the anti-inflammatory effect of let-7i was abolished. Our research suggests that let-7i promotes OGD-induced inflammation via downregulating TLR4 expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) on brain microvascular endothelial cells in rat ischemic cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Siren, A L; Liu, Y; Yue, T L; Barone, F C; Feuerstein, G Z

    1994-10-01

    The expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) was studied in rat focal ischemic cortex. A significant increase in ICAM-1 mRNA expression in the ischemic cortex over levels in contralateral (nonischemic) site was observed by means of Northern blot analysis following either permanent or temporary occlusion with reperfusion of the middle cerebral artery (PMCAO or MCAO with reperfusion) in spontaneously hypertensive rats. In the ischemic cortex, levels of ICAM-1 mRNA increased significantly at 3 h (2.6-fold, n = 3, P hypertensive rats than in two normotensive rat strains. Immunostaining using anti-ICAM-1 antibodies indicated that upregulated ICAM-1 expression was localized to endothelial cells of intraparenchymal blood vessels in the ischemic but not contralateral cortex. The data suggest that an upregulation of ICAM-1 mRNA and protein on brain capillary endothelium may play an important role in leukocyte migration into ischemic brain tissue.

  17. Comparative study of expression and activity of glucose transporters between stem cell-derived brain microvascular endothelial cells and hCMEC/D3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ahmad, Abraham J

    2017-10-01

    Glucose constitutes a major source of energy of mammalian brains. Glucose uptake at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) occurs through a facilitated glucose transport, through glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), although other isoforms have been described at the BBB. Mutations in GLUT1 are associated with the GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, yet none of the current in vitro models of the human BBB maybe suited for modeling such a disorder. In this study, we investigated the expression of glucose transporters and glucose diffusion across brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) derived from healthy patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We investigated the expression of different glucose transporters at the BBB using immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry and measured glucose uptake and diffusion across BMEC monolayers obtained from two iPSC lines and from hCMEC/D3 cells. BMEC monolayers showed expression of several glucose transporters, in particular GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4. Diffusion of glucose across the monolayers was mediated via a saturable transcellular mechanism and partially inhibited by pharmacological inhibitors. Taken together, our study suggests the presence of several glucose transporters isoforms at the human BBB and demonstrates the feasibility of modeling glucose across the BBB using patient-derived stem cells. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  18. In vitro model of cerebral ischemia by using brain microvascular endothelial cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubu, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Kawabata, Kenji

    2017-04-29

    Brain-derived microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), which play a central role in blood brain barrier (BBB), can be used for the evaluation of drug transport into the brain. Although human BMEC cell lines have already been reported, they lack original properties such as barrier integrity. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) can be used for various applications such as regenerative therapy, drug screening, and pathological study. In the recent study, an induction method of BMECs from PSCs has been established, making it possible to more precisely study the in vitro human BBB function. Here, using induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived BMECs, we examined the effects of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and OGD/reoxygenation (OGD/R) on BBB permeability. OGD disrupted the barrier function, and the dysfunction was rapidly restored by re-supply of the oxygen and glucose. Interestingly, TNF-α, which is known to be secreted from astrocytes and microglia in the cerebral ischemia, prevented the restoration of OGD-induced barrier dysfunction in an apoptosis-independent manner. Thus, we could establish the in vitro BBB disease model that mimics the cerebral ischemia by using iPS cell-derived BMECs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Tetramethylpyrazine Protects Against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation-Induced Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Injury via Rho/Rho-kinase Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Qian, Chen; Wang, Ning; Lin, Chenyu; Wang, Yan; Wang, Guangyun; Piao, Xinxin

    2017-05-01

    Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP, also known as Ligustrazine), which is isolated from Chinese Herb Medicine Ligustium wollichii Franchat (Chuan Xiong), has been widely used in China for the treatment of ischemic stroke by Chinese herbalists. Brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) are the integral parts of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), protecting BMECs against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) which is important for the treatment of ischemic stroke. Here, we investigated the protective mechanisms of TMP, focusing on OGD-injured BMECs and the Rho/Rho-kinase (Rho-associated kinases, ROCK) signaling pathway. The model of OGD-injured BMECs was established in this study. BMECs were identified by von Willebrand factor III staining and exposed to fasudil, or TMP at different concentrations (14.3, 28.6, 57.3 µM) for 2 h before 24 h of OGD injury. The effect of each treatment was examined by cell viability assays, measurement of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and transendothelial electric resistance and western blot analysis (caspase-3, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), RhoA, Rac1). Our results show that TMP significantly attenuated apoptosis and the permeability of BMECs induced by OGD. In addition, TMP could notably down-regulate the characteristic proteins in Rho/ROCK signaling pathway such as RhoA and Rac1, which triggered abnormal changes of eNOS and ROS, respectively. Altogether, our results show that TMP has a strong protective effect against OGD-induced BMECs injury and suggest that the mechanism might be related to the inhibition of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway.

  20. Hyperglycaemia promotes human brain microvascular endothelial cell apoptosis via induction of protein kinase C-βI and prooxidant enzyme NADPH oxidase

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    Beili Shao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood–brain barrier disruption represents a key feature in hyperglycaemia-aggravated cerebral damage after an ischaemic stroke. Although the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown, activation of protein kinase C (PKC is thought to play a critical role. This study examined whether apoptosis of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC might contribute to hyperglycaemia-evoked barrier damage and assessed the specific role of PKC in this phenomenon. Treatments with hyperglycaemia (25 mM or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA, a protein kinase C activator, 100 nM significantly increased NADPH oxidase activity, O2•− generation, proapoptotic protein Bax expression, TUNEL-positive staining and caspase-3/7 activities. Pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase, PKC-α, PKC-β or PKC-βI via their specific inhibitors and neutralisation of O2•− by a cell-permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic, MnTBAP normalised all the aforementioned increases induced by hyperglycaemia. Suppression of these PKC isoforms also negated the stimulatory effects of hyperglycaemia on the protein expression of NADPH oxidase membrane-bound components, Nox2 and p22-phox which determine the overall enzymatic activity. Silencing of PKC-βI gene through use of specific siRNAs abolished the effects of both hyperglycaemia and PMA on endothelial cell NADPH oxidase activity, O2•− production and apoptosis and consequently improved the integrity and function of an in vitro model of human cerebral barrier comprising HBMEC, astrocytes and pericytes. Hyperglycaemia-mediated apoptosis of HBMEC contributes to cerebral barrier dysfunction and is modulated by sequential activations of PKC-βI and NADPH oxidase.

  1. In vitro characterization of pralidoxime transport and acetylcholinesterase reactivation across MDCK cells and stem cell-derived human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BC1-hBMECs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Erin; Minn, Il; Chambers, Janice E; Searson, Peter C

    2016-07-11

    Current therapies for organophosphate poisoning involve administration of oximes, such as pralidoxime (2-PAM), that reactivate the enzyme acetylcholinesterase. Studies in animal models have shown a low concentration in the brain following systemic injection. To assess 2-PAM transport, we studied transwell permeability in three Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCKII) cell lines and stem cell-derived human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BC1-hBMECs). To determine whether 2-PAM is a substrate for common brain efflux pumps, experiments were performed in the MDCKII-MDR1 cell line, transfected to overexpress the P-gp efflux pump, and the MDCKII-FLuc-ABCG2 cell line, transfected to overexpress the BCRP efflux pump. To determine how transcellular transport influences enzyme reactivation, we developed a modified transwell assay where the inhibited acetylcholinesterase enzyme, substrate, and reporter are introduced into the basolateral chamber. Enzymatic activity was inhibited using paraoxon and parathion. The permeability of 2-PAM is about 2 × 10(-6) cm s(-1) in MDCK cells and about 1 × 10(-6) cm s(-1) in BC1-hBMECs. Permeability is not influenced by pre-treatment with atropine. In addition, 2-PAM is not a substrate for the P-gp or BCRP efflux pumps. The low permeability explains poor brain penetration of 2-PAM and therefore the slow enzyme reactivation. This elucidates one of the reasons for the necessity of sustained intravascular (IV) infusion in response to organophosphate poisoning.

  2. Differentiation state determines neural effects on microvascular endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muffley, Lara A., E-mail: muffley@u.washington.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Pan, Shin-Chen, E-mail: pansc@mail.ncku.edu.tw [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Smith, Andria N., E-mail: gnaunderwater@gmail.com [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Ga, Maricar, E-mail: marga16@uw.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Hocking, Anne M., E-mail: ahocking@u.washington.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Gibran, Nicole S., E-mail: nicoleg@u.washington.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Growing evidence indicates that nerves and capillaries interact paracrinely in uninjured skin and cutaneous wounds. Although mature neurons are the predominant neural cell in the skin, neural progenitor cells have also been detected in uninjured adult skin. The aim of this study was to characterize differential paracrine effects of neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons on dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our results suggest that neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons have unique secretory profiles and distinct effects on dermal microvascular endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and nitric oxide production. Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons secrete different proteins related to angiogenesis. Specific to neural progenitor cells were dipeptidyl peptidase-4, IGFBP-2, pentraxin-3, serpin f1, TIMP-1, TIMP-4 and VEGF. In contrast, endostatin, FGF-1, MCP-1 and thrombospondin-2 were specific to dorsal root ganglion neurons. Microvascular endothelial cell proliferation was inhibited by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. In contrast, microvascular endothelial cell migration in a scratch wound assay was inhibited by neural progenitor cells and unaffected by dorsal root ganglion neurons. In addition, nitric oxide production by microvascular endothelial cells was increased by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate microvascular endothelial cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells, not dorsal root ganglion neurons, regulate microvascular endothelial cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons do not effect microvascular endothelial tube formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate

  3. Effect of full flavor and denicotinized cigarettes exposure on the brain microvascular endothelium: a microarray-based gene expression study using a human immortalized BBB endothelial cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Pooja; Sajja, Ravi K; Prasad, Shikha; Cucullo, Luca

    2015-06-23

    Tobacco smoke (TS) toxicity to the brain microvasculature is still an understudied area till date. NF-E2 related factor (Nrf2) is a key transcription factor responsible for activating the antioxidant response element (ARE) genes following an oxidative insult. Till date, several studies targeting the blood brain barrier (BBB) have shown some protective role of Nrf2 in ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury, however, its functional role in chronic smokers subjected to a life-long oxidative stress has never been addressed. This is of crucial importance since smokers have a much higher risk for cerebrovascular stroke and tobacco smoke exposure has been clearly shown to enhance BBB damage following an ischemia/reperfusion injury. Thus, the goal of our study was to investigate the defense pathways activated at the BBB endothelial level by TS exposure. Specifically we focused on Nrf2 and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B signaling response (NF-κβ) as the central protective mechanisms related to oxidative insult. With the exception of Nicotine, both full flavor (3R4F) and decotinized (ULN) cigarettes activated Nrf2 and NFκβ pathways in hCMEC/D3 endothelial cells. Several detoxification and anti-oxidant genes including downstream products were also activated including NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone 1 (NQO-1), heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX-1), catalytic and modifier subunits of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL), solute carrier-SLC7A11). Gene expression levels of cytochrome P450s (CYP2S1 and CYP51A1) and efflux transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multi-drug resistance protein-4 (MRP4) were also enhanced. Increase of P-gp functional activity and depletion of GSH were also observed. Strikingly, toxicity of denicotinized ("reduced exposure") cigarettes was equivalent to 3R4F (or worse). This study provides a detailed analysis of Nrf2-related cytoprotective mechanisms activated in response to 3R4F and ULN-derived TS exposure correlating the results with their

  4. West Nile virus-induced cell adhesion molecules on human brain microvascular endothelial cells regulate leukocyte adhesion and modulate permeability of the in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Roe

    Full Text Available Characterizing the mechanisms by which West Nile virus (WNV causes blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption, leukocyte infiltration into the brain and neuroinflammation is important to understand the pathogenesis of WNV encephalitis. Here, we examined the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs in mediating the adhesion and transendothelial migration of leukocytes across human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVE. Infection with WNV (NY99 strain significantly induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin in human endothelial cells and infected mice brain, although the levels of their ligands on leukocytes (VLA-4, LFA-1and MAC-1 did not alter. The permeability of the in vitro BBB model increased dramatically following the transmigration of monocytes and lymphocytes across the models infected with WNV, which was reversed in the presence of a cocktail of blocking antibodies against ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin. Further, WNV infection of HBMVE significantly increased leukocyte adhesion to the HBMVE monolayer and transmigration across the infected BBB model. The blockade of these CAMs reduced the adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes across the infected BBB model. Further, comparison of infection with highly neuroinvasive NY99 and non-lethal (Eg101 strain of WNV demonstrated similar level of virus replication and fold-increase of CAMs in HBMVE cells suggesting that the non-neuropathogenic response of Eg101 is not because of its inability to infect HBMVE cells. Collectively, these results suggest that increased expression of specific CAMs is a pathological event associated with WNV infection and may contribute to leukocyte infiltration and BBB disruption in vivo. Our data further implicate that strategies to block CAMs to reduce BBB disruption may limit neuroinflammation and virus-CNS entry via 'Trojan horse' route, and improve WNV disease outcome.

  5. West Nile virus-induced cell adhesion molecules on human brain microvascular endothelial cells regulate leukocyte adhesion and modulate permeability of the in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Kelsey; Orillo, Beverly; Verma, Saguna

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing the mechanisms by which West Nile virus (WNV) causes blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, leukocyte infiltration into the brain and neuroinflammation is important to understand the pathogenesis of WNV encephalitis. Here, we examined the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) in mediating the adhesion and transendothelial migration of leukocytes across human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVE). Infection with WNV (NY99 strain) significantly induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin in human endothelial cells and infected mice brain, although the levels of their ligands on leukocytes (VLA-4, LFA-1and MAC-1) did not alter. The permeability of the in vitro BBB model increased dramatically following the transmigration of monocytes and lymphocytes across the models infected with WNV, which was reversed in the presence of a cocktail of blocking antibodies against ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin. Further, WNV infection of HBMVE significantly increased leukocyte adhesion to the HBMVE monolayer and transmigration across the infected BBB model. The blockade of these CAMs reduced the adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes across the infected BBB model. Further, comparison of infection with highly neuroinvasive NY99 and non-lethal (Eg101) strain of WNV demonstrated similar level of virus replication and fold-increase of CAMs in HBMVE cells suggesting that the non-neuropathogenic response of Eg101 is not because of its inability to infect HBMVE cells. Collectively, these results suggest that increased expression of specific CAMs is a pathological event associated with WNV infection and may contribute to leukocyte infiltration and BBB disruption in vivo. Our data further implicate that strategies to block CAMs to reduce BBB disruption may limit neuroinflammation and virus-CNS entry via 'Trojan horse' route, and improve WNV disease outcome.

  6. Transcellular targeting of fiber- and hexon-modified adenovirus vectors across the brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakkonen, Johanna P; Engler, Tatjana; Romero, Ignacio A; Weksler, Babette; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Kreppel, Florian; Kochanek, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    In central nervous system (CNS)-directed gene therapy, efficient targeting of brain parenchyma through the vascular route is prevented by the endothelium and the epithelium of the blood-brain and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers, respectively. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of the combined genetic and chemical adenovirus capsid modification technology to enable transcellular delivery of targeted adenovirus (Ad) vectors across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro models. As a proof-of-principle ligand, maleimide-activated full-length human transferrin (hTf) was covalently attached to cysteine-modified Ad serotype 5 vectors either to its fiber or hexon protein. In transcytosis experiments, hTf-coupled vectors were shown to be redirected across the BBB models, the transcytosis activity of the vectors being dependent on the location of the capsid modification and the in vitro model used. The transduction efficiency of hTf-targeted vectors decreased significantly in confluent, polarized cells, indicating that the intracellular route of the vectors differed between unpolarized and polarized cells. After transcellular delivery the majority of the hTf-modified vectors remained intact and partly capable of gene transfer. Altogether, our results demonstrate that i) covalent attachment of a ligand to Ad capsid can mediate transcellular targeting across the cerebral endothelium in vitro, ii) the attachment site of the ligand influences its transcytosis efficiency and iii) combined genetic/chemical modification of Ad vector can be used as a versatile platform for the development of Ad vectors for transcellular targeting.

  7. Antiproliferative effect of elevated glucose in human microvascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, K.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    Diabetic microangiopathy has been implicated as a fundamental feature of the pathological complications of diabetes including retinopathy, neuropathy, and diabetic foot ulceration. However, previous studies devoted to examining the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on the endothelium have been performed largely in primary cultured cells of macrovessel origin. Difficulty in the harvesting and maintenance of microvascular endothelial cells in culture have hindered the study of this relevant population. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the effect of elevated glucose on the proliferation and involved signaling pathways of an immortalized human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) that possess similar characteristics to their in vivo counterparts. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) were grown in the presence of normal (5 mM) or high D-glucose (20 mM) for 14 days. The proliferative response of HMEC-1 was compared under these conditions as well as the cAMP and PKC pathways by in vitro assays. Elevated glucose significantly inhibited (P cyclic AMP accumulation, PKA, and PKC activity but was not associated with the activation of downstream events such as CRE and AP-1 binding activity. These data support the hypothesis that HMEC-1 is a suitable model to study the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on microvascular endothelial cells. Continued studies with HMEC-1 may prove advantageous in delineation of the molecular pathophysiology associated with diabetic microangiopathy.

  8. Fumaric Acid Esters Do Not Reduce Inflammatory NF-κB/p65 Nuclear Translocation, ICAM-1 Expression and T-Cell Adhesiveness of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarmann, Axel; Nehen, Mathias; Deiß, Annika; Buttmann, Mathias

    2015-08-13

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is approved for disease-modifying treatment of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Animal experiments suggested that part of its therapeutic effect is due to a reduction of T-cell infiltration of the central nervous system (CNS) by uncertain mechanisms. Here we evaluated whether DMF and its primary metabolite monomethyl fumarate (MMF) modulate pro-inflammatory intracellular signaling and T-cell adhesiveness of nonimmortalized single donor human brain microvascular endothelial cells at low passages. Neither DMF nor MMF at concentrations of 10 or 50 µM blocked the IL-1β-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB/p65, whereas the higher concentration of DMF inhibited the nuclear entry of p65 in human umbilical vein endothelium cultured in parallel. DMF and MMF also did not alter the IL-1β-stimulated activation of p38 MAPK in brain endothelium. Furthermore, neither DMF nor MMF reduced the basal or IL-1β-inducible expression of ICAM-1. In accordance, both fumaric acid esters did not reduce the adhesion of activated Jurkat T cells to brain endothelium under basal or inflammatory conditions. Therefore, brain endothelial cells probably do not directly mediate a potential blocking effect of fumaric acid esters on the inflammatory infiltration of the CNS by T cells.

  9. Fumaric Acid Esters Do Not Reduce Inflammatory NF-κB/p65 Nuclear Translocation, ICAM-1 Expression and T-Cell Adhesiveness of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Haarmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Dimethyl fumarate (DMF is approved for disease-modifying treatment of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Animal experiments suggested that part of its therapeutic effect is due to a reduction of T-cell infiltration of the central nervous system (CNS by uncertain mechanisms. Here we evaluated whether DMF and its primary metabolite monomethyl fumarate (MMF modulate pro-inflammatory intracellular signaling and T-cell adhesiveness of nonimmortalized single donor human brain microvascular endothelial cells at low passages. Neither DMF nor MMF at concentrations of 10 or 50 µM blocked the IL-1β-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB/p65, whereas the higher concentration of DMF inhibited the nuclear entry of p65 in human umbilical vein endothelium cultured in parallel. DMF and MMF also did not alter the IL-1β-stimulated activation of p38 MAPK in brain endothelium. Furthermore, neither DMF nor MMF reduced the basal or IL-1β-inducible expression of ICAM-1. In accordance, both fumaric acid esters did not reduce the adhesion of activated Jurkat T cells to brain endothelium under basal or inflammatory conditions. Therefore, brain endothelial cells probably do not directly mediate a potential blocking effect of fumaric acid esters on the inflammatory infiltration of the CNS by T cells.

  10. Rosetting Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes bind to human brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro, demonstrating a dual adhesion phenotype mediated by distinct P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Yvonne; Kuhnrae, Pongsak; Higgins, Matthew K; Ghumra, Ashfaq; Rowe, J Alexandra

    2014-03-01

    Adhesion interactions between Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IE) and human cells underlie the pathology of severe malaria. IE cytoadhere to microvascular endothelium or form rosettes with uninfected erythrocytes to survive in vivo by sequestering IE in the microvasculature and avoiding splenic clearance mechanisms. Both rosetting and cytoadherence are mediated by the parasite-derived IE surface protein family Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1). Rosetting and cytoadherence have been widely studied as separate entities; however, the ability of rosetting P. falciparum strains to cytoadhere has received little attention. Here, we show that IE of the IT/R29 strain expressing a rosette-mediating PfEMP1 variant (IT4var09) cytoadhere in vitro to a human brain microvascular endothelial cell line (HBEC-5i). Cytoadherence was inhibited by heparin and by treatment of HBEC-5i with heparinase III, suggesting that the endothelial receptors for IE binding are heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Antibodies to the N-terminal regions of the IT4var09 PfEMP1 variant (NTS-DBL1α and DBL2γ domains) specifically inhibited and reversed cytoadherence down to low concentrations (experiments showed that the NTS-DBLα and DBL2γ domains bind strongly to heparin, with half-maximal binding at a concentration of ∼0.5 μM in both cases. Therefore, cytoadherence of IT/R29 IE is distinct from rosetting, which is primarily mediated by NTS-DBL1α interactions with complement receptor 1. These data show that IT4var09-expressing parasites are capable of dual interactions with both endothelial cells and uninfected erythrocytes via distinct receptor-ligand interactions.

  11. Endothelial progenitor cells physiology and metabolic plasticity in brain angiogenesis and blood-brain barrier modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Malinovskaya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is a considerable interest to the assessment of blood-brain barrier (BBB development as a part of cerebral angiogenesis developmental program. Embryonic and adult angiogenesis in the brain is governed by the coordinated activity of endothelial progenitor cells, brain microvascular endothelial cells, and non-endothelial cells contributing to the establishment of the BBB (pericytes, astrocytes, neurons. Metabolic and functional plasticity of endothelial progenitor cells controls their timely recruitment, precise homing to the brain microvessels, and efficient support of brain angiogenesis. Deciphering endothelial progenitor cells physiology would provide novel engineering approaches to establish adequate microfluidically-supported BBB models and brain microphysiological systems for translational studies.

  12. Reduction in cardiolipin decreases mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity and increases glucose transport into and across human brain cerebral microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hieu M; Mejia, Edgard M; Chang, Wenguang; Wang, Ying; Watson, Emily; On, Ngoc; Miller, Donald W; Hatch, Grant M

    2016-10-01

    Microvessel endothelial cells form part of the blood-brain barrier, a restrictively permeable interface that allows transport of only specific compounds into the brain. Cardiolipin is a mitochondrial phospholipid required for function of the electron transport chain and ATP generation. We examined the role of cardiolipin in maintaining mitochondrial function necessary to support barrier properties of brain microvessel endothelial cells. Knockdown of the terminal enzyme of cardiolipin synthesis, cardiolipin synthase, in hCMEC/D3 cells resulted in decreased cellular cardiolipin levels compared to controls. The reduction in cardiolipin resulted in decreased mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity, increased pyruvate kinase activity, and increased 2-deoxy-[(3) H]glucose uptake and glucose transporter-1 expression and localization to membranes in hCMEC/D3 cells compared to controls. The mechanism for the increase in glucose uptake was an increase in adenosine-5'-monophosphate kinase and protein kinase B activity and decreased glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta activity. Knockdown of cardiolipin synthase did not affect permeability of fluorescent dextran across confluent hCMEC/D3 monolayers grown on Transwell(®) inserts. In contrast, knockdown of cardiolipin synthase resulted in an increase in 2-deoxy-[(3) H]glucose transport across these monolayers compared to controls. The data indicate that in hCMEC/D3 cells, spare respiratory capacity is dependent on cardiolipin. In addition, reduction in cardiolipin in these cells alters their cellular energy status and this results in increased glucose transport into and across hCMEC/D3 monolayers. Microvessel endothelial cells form part of the blood-brain barrier, a restrictively permeable interface that allows transport of only specific compounds into the brain. In human adult brain endothelial cell hCMEC/D3 monolayers cultured on Transwell(®) plates, knockdown of cardiolipin synthase results in decrease in mitochondrial

  13. Antiproliferative effect of elevated glucose in human microvascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, K.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    Diabetic microangiopathy has been implicated as a fundamental feature of the pathological complications of diabetes including retinopathy, neuropathy, and diabetic foot ulceration. However, previous studies devoted to examining the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on the endothelium have been performed largely in primary cultured cells of macrovessel origin. Difficulty in the harvesting and maintenance of microvascular endothelial cells in culture have hindered the study of this relevant population. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the effect of elevated glucose on the proliferation and involved signaling pathways of an immortalized human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) that possess similar characteristics to their in vivo counterparts. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) were grown in the presence of normal (5 mM) or high D-glucose (20 mM) for 14 days. The proliferative response of HMEC-1 was compared under these conditions as well as the cAMP and PKC pathways by in vitro assays. Elevated glucose significantly inhibited (P pathophysiology associated with diabetic microangiopathy.

  14. Development and Validation of an In-Cell Western for Quantifying P-Glycoprotein Expression in Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial (hCMEC/D3) Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, Mitchell P; Pan, Yijun; Short, Jennifer L; Nicolazzo, Joseph A

    2017-09-01

    An in-cell western (ICW) protocol detecting the relative expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in human cerebro-microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) was developed and optimized, with the intention of improving throughput relative to western blotting (WB). For validation of the ICW protocol, hCMEC/D3 cells were incubated with known P-gp upregulators (10 μM rifampicin and 5 μM SR12813) and treated with siRNA targeted against MDR1, before measuring changes in P-gp expression, using both ICW and WB in parallel. To confirm a relationship between the detected P-gp expression and function, the uptake of the P-gp substrate rhodamine-123 was assessed following SR12813 treatment. Rifampicin and SR12813 significantly upregulated P-gp expression (1.5-fold and 1.9-fold, respectively) compared to control, as assessed by the ICW protocol. WB analysis of the same treatments revealed 1.4-fold and 1.5-fold upregulations. MDR1 siRNA reduced P-gp abundance by 20% and 35% when assessed by ICW and WB, respectively. SR12813 treatment reduced rhodamine-123 uptake by 18%, indicating that the observed changes in P-gp expression by ICW were associated with comparable functional changes. The correlation of P-gp upregulation by WB, rhodamine-123 uptake, and the ICW protocol provide validation of a new ICW method as an alternative method for quantification of P-gp in hCMEC/D3 cells. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Brain endothelial dysfunction in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musolino, Patricia L; Gong, Yi; Snyder, Juliet M T; Jimenez, Sandra; Lok, Josephine; Lo, Eng H; Moser, Ann B; Grabowski, Eric F; Frosch, Matthew P; Eichler, Florian S

    2015-11-01

    See Aubourg (doi:10.1093/awv271) for a scientific commentary on this article.X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene leading to accumulation of very long chain fatty acids. Its most severe neurological manifestation is cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy. Here we demonstrate that progressive inflammatory demyelination in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy coincides with blood-brain barrier dysfunction, increased MMP9 expression, and changes in endothelial tight junction proteins as well as adhesion molecules. ABCD1, but not its closest homologue ABCD2, is highly expressed in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, far exceeding its expression in the systemic vasculature. Silencing of ABCD1 in human brain microvascular endothelial cells causes accumulation of very long chain fatty acids, but much later than the immediate upregulation of adhesion molecules and decrease in tight junction proteins. This results in greater adhesion and transmigration of monocytes across the endothelium. PCR-array screening of human brain microvascular endothelial cells after ABCD1 silencing revealed downregulation of both mRNA and protein levels of the transcription factor c-MYC (encoded by MYC). Interestingly, MYC silencing mimicked the effects of ABCD1 silencing on CLDN5 and ICAM1 without decreasing the levels of ABCD1 protein itself. Together, these data demonstrate that ABCD1 deficiency induces significant alterations in brain endothelium via c-MYC and may thereby contribute to the increased trafficking of leucocytes across the blood-brain barrier as seen in cerebral adrenouleukodystrophy. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Diabetic Microvascular Complications: Friends or Foes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Guo Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite being featured as metabolic disorder, diabetic patients are largely affected by hyperglycemia-induced vascular abnormality. Accumulated evidence has confirmed the beneficial effect of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs in coronary heart disease. However, antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF treatment is the main therapy for diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy, indicating the uncertain role of EPCs in the pathogenesis of diabetic microvascular disease. In this review, we first illustrate how hyperglycemia induces metabolic and epigenetic changes in EPCs, which exerts deleterious impact on their number and function. We then discuss how abnormal angiogenesis develops in eyes and kidneys under diabetes condition, focusing on “VEGF uncoupling with nitric oxide” and “competitive angiopoietin 1/angiopoietin 2” mechanisms that are shared in both organs. Next, we dissect the nature of EPCs in diabetic microvascular complications. After we overview the current EPCs-related strategies, we point out new EPCs-associated options for future exploration. Ultimately, we hope that this review would uncover the mysterious nature of EPCs in diabetic microvascular disease for therapeutics.

  17. Are retinal microvascular abnormalities associated with large artery endothelial dysfunction and intima-media thickness? The Hoorn Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hecke, M.V.; Dekker, J.M.; Nijpels, G.; Stolk, R.P.; Henry, R.M.A.; Heine, R.J.; Bouter, L.M.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.; Polak, B.C.P.

    It has been hypothesized that microvascular dysfunction affects endothelial dysfunction of the large arteries, which may explain the relationship of microvascular disease with macrovascular disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship of retinal microvascular disorders

  18. Protein kinase C-α signals P115RhoGEF phosphorylation and RhoA activation in TNF-α-induced mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell barrier dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Xiaolu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, a proinflammatory cytokine, is capable of activating the small GTPase RhoA, which in turn contributes to endothelial barrier dysfunction. However, the underlying signaling mechanisms remained undefined. Therefore, we aimed to determine the role of protein kinase C (PKC isozymes in the mechanism of RhoA activation and in signaling TNF-α-induced mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell (BMEC barrier dysfunction. Methods Bend.3 cells, an immortalized mouse brain endothelial cell line, were exposed to TNF-α (10 ng/mL. RhoA activity was assessed by pull down assay. PKC-α activity was measured using enzyme assasy. BMEC barrier function was measured by transendothelial electrical resistance (TER. p115RhoGEF phosphorylation was detected by autoradiography followed by western blotting. F-actin organization was observed by rhodamine-phalloidin staining. Both pharmacological inhibitors and knockdown approaches were employed to investigate the role of PKC and p115RhoGEF in TNF-α-induced RhoA activation and BMEC permeability. Results We observed that TNF-α induces a rapid phosphorylation of p115RhoGEF, activation of PKC and RhoA in BMECs. Inhibition of conventional PKC by Gö6976 mitigated the TNF-α-induced p115RhoGEF phosphorylation and RhoA activation. Subsequently, we found that these events are regulated by PKC-α rather than PKC-β by using shRNA. In addition, P115-shRNA and n19RhoA (dominant negative mutant of RhoA transfections had no effect on mediating TNF-α-induced PKC-α activation. These data suggest that PKC-α but not PKC-β acts as an upstream regulator of p115RhoGEF phosphorylation and RhoA activation in response to TNF-α. Moreover, depletion of PKC-α, of p115RhoGEF, and inhibition of RhoA activation also prevented TNF-α-induced stress fiber formation and a decrease in TER. Conclusions Taken together, our results show that PKC-α phosphorylation of p115RhoGEF mediates TNF

  19. Methylene blue modulates adhesion molecule expression on microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Isabella; Guo, Fengwei; Stock, Ulrich A; Lupinski, Michèle; Meybohm, Patrick; Moritz, Anton; Beiras-Fernandez, Andres

    2014-08-01

    As methylene blue (MB) has been recently proposed to preserve blood pressure in case of vasoplegic syndrome and shock, an entity directly related to systemic inflammation, we aimed to elucidate the effect of MB on the expression of adhesion-molecules in endothelial-cells. Human microvascular endothelial-cells (HuMEC-1) were treated with 10, 30 or 60 µM MB for 30 min and 2 h each. Additionally, the treated HuMEC-1 were co-cultured with either human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) or Jurkat cells (human T-lymphocytes) for 2 h. HuMEC-1 were analyzed after MB treatment and after co-culture experiments for expression of different adhesion-molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, L-selectin, E-selectin) via FACS measurement and western blot analysis. The supernatants of the experiments were analyzed with regard to the soluble forms of the adhesion molecules. We found that MB is able to modulate the expression of adhesion-molecules on EC. Administration of MB increases the expression of E-selectin and VCAM-1 depending on the dosage and time of exposure. ICAM-1 measurements provide evidence that different circulating blood cells can differently alter the adhesion-molecule expression on EC after MB exposure. Our results provide evidence regarding the immunomodulatory effect of MB upon endothelial-cells after inflammation.

  20. In vitro analysis of human periodontal microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubokawa, Mizuki; Sato, Soh

    2014-08-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) participate in key aspects of vascular biology, such as maintenance of capillary permeability, initiation of coagulation, and regulation of inflammation. According to previous reports, ECs have revealed highly specific characteristics depending on the organs and tissues. However, some reports have described the characteristics of the capillaries formed by human periodontal ECs. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to examine the functional characteristics of the periodontal microvascular ECs in vitro. Human periodontal ligament-endothelial cells (HPDL-ECs) and human gingiva-endothelial cells (HG-ECs) were isolated by immunoprecipitation with magnetic beads conjugated to a monoclonal anti-CD31 antibody. The isolated HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs were characterized to definitively demonstrate that these cell cultures represented pure ECs. Human umbilical-vein ECs and human dermal microvascular ECs were used for comparison. These cells were compared according to the proliferation potential, the formation of capillary-like tubes, the transendothelial electric resistance (TEER), and the expression of tight junction proteins. HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs with characteristic cobblestone monolayer morphology were obtained, as determined by light microscopy at confluence. Furthermore, the HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs expressed the EC markers platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (also known as CD31), von Willebrand factor, and Ulex europaeus agglutinin 1, and the cells stained strongly positive for CD31 and CD309. In addition, the HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs were observed to form capillary-like tubes, and they demonstrated uptake of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. Functional analyses of the HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs showed that, compared to the control cells, tube formation persisted for only a brief period of time, and TEER was substantially reduced at confluence. Furthermore, the cells exhibited delocalization of zonula occludens-1 and occludin at cell-cell contact sites

  1. Upcyte® Microvascular Endothelial Cells Repopulate Decellularized Scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dally, Iris; Hartmann, Nadja; Münst, Bernhard; Braspenning, Joris; Walles, Heike

    2013-01-01

    A general problem in tissue engineering is the poor and insufficient blood supply to guarantee tissue cell survival as well as physiological tissue function. To address this limitation, we have developed an in vitro vascularization model in which a decellularized porcine small bowl segment, representing a capillary network within a collagen matrix (biological vascularized scaffold [BioVaSc]), is reseeded with microvascular endothelial cells (mvECs). However, since the supply of mvECs is limited, in general, and as these cells rapidly dedifferentiate, we have applied a novel technology, which allows the generation of large batches of quasi-primary cells with the ability to proliferate, whilst maintaining their differentiated functionality. These so called upcyte mvECs grew for an additional 15 population doublings (PDs) compared to primary cells. Upcyte mvECs retained endothelial characteristics, such as von Willebrandt Factor (vWF), CD31 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression, as well as positive Ulex europaeus agglutinin I staining. Upcyte mvECs also retained biological functionality such as tube formation, cell migration, and low density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake, which were still evident after PD27. Initial experiments using MTT and Live/Dead staining indicate that upcyte mvECs repopulate the BioVaSc Scaffold. As with conventional cultures, these cells also express key endothelial molecules (vWF, CD31, and eNOS) in a custom-made bioreactor system even after a prolonged period of 14 days. The combination of upcyte mvECs and the BioVaSc represents a novel and promising approach toward vascularizing bioreactor models which can better reflect organs, such as the liver. PMID:22799502

  2. Effect of full flavor and denicotinized cigarettes exposure on the brain microvascular endothelium: a microarray-based gene expression study using a human immortalized BBB endothelial cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Naik, Pooja; Sajja, Ravi K; Prasad, Shikha; Cucullo, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Background Tobacco smoke (TS) toxicity to the brain microvasculature is still an understudied area till date. NF-E2 related factor (Nrf2) is a key transcription factor responsible for activating the antioxidant response element (ARE) genes following an oxidative insult. Till date, several studies targeting the blood brain barrier (BBB) have shown some protective role of Nrf2 in ischemia?reperfusion (IR) injury, however, its functional role in chronic smokers subjected to a life-long oxidative...

  3. Dobesilate enhances endothelial nitric oxide synthase-activity in macro- and microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suschek, C; Kolb, H; Kolb-Bachofen, V

    1997-12-01

    1. Dobesilate is used for normalizing vascular dysfunction in a number of diseases. In search for an effect on endothelial NO production, macrovascular endothelial cells from rat aorta, microvascular endothelial cells from rat exocrine pancreatic tissue, and capillary endothelial cells from rat islets, were cultured in the presence or absence of Mg-Dobesilate. The activity of constitutive nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS) in resident cells as well as of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in cytokine-activated cells was measured indirectly by recording the citrulline concentrations in culture supernatants. 2. In each of the different endothelial cells Mg-Dobesilate incubation (0.25-1 mM) for 24 h led to a significant and concentration-dependent increase in ecNOS-activities. With cytokine-activated endothelial cell cultures only moderate effects were seen with little or no concentration-dependency. Addition of the NOS-inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine led to a significant suppression of citrulline formation in all cultures as an evidence for the enzyme specificity of these effects. 3. iNOS- and ecNOS-specific reverse transcription and semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with RNA from resident or cytokine-activated endothelial cells gave no evidence for an increase in NOS-specific mRNA after Mg-Dobesilate-treatment. Furthermore, Dobesilate-mediated enhancement of NO synthesis in resting endothelial cells was not due to iNOS induction in these cells, as no iNOS-specific signal was found by RT-PCR.

  4. Stathmin expression in glioma-derived microvascular endothelial cells: a novel therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Baijing; Mu, Luyan; Qin, Xiangying; Qiao, Wanchen; Liu, Xiaodong; Yang, Liming; Xue, Li; Rainov, Nikolai G; Liu, Xiaoqian

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate stathmin expression and its mechanisms of action in GDMEC. Microvascular endothelial cells were isolated from human gliomas (n=68) and normal brain specimans (n=20), and purified by magnetic beads coated with anti-CD105 antibody. The expression of stathmin mRNA and protein were detected by RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. Stathmin expression was silenced by application of specific siRNA in high grade GDMEC. The proliferation, apoptosis and invasion behavior of GDMEC were investigated. The stathmin positive rate of endothelial cells in normal brain, grade I-II glioma and grade III-IV glioma was 20, 66 and 95.5%, respectively (P<0.05). When cells were treated with siRNA to silence stathmin, cell viability was reduced, the apoptosis rate increased and the migration of vascular endothelial cells was suppressed significantly (P<0.05). Down-regulation of stathmin suppressed neoangiogenesis of glioma and provides a potential target for glioma treatment.

  5. Metformin improves endothelial function in aortic tissue and microvascular endothelial cells subjected to diabetic hyperglycaemic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Suparna; Lakshmanan, Arun P; Hwang, Mu Ji; Kubba, Haidar; Mushannen, Ahmed; Triggle, Chris R; Ding, Hong

    2015-12-01

    The cellular mechanisms whereby metformin, the first line drug for type 2 diabetes (T2DM), mediates its antidiabetic effects remain elusive, particularly as to whether metformin has a direct protective action on the vasculature. This study was designed to determine if a brief 3-h exposure to metformin protects endothelial function against the effects of hyperglycaemia. We investigated the protective effects of metformin on endothelial-dependent vasodilatation (EDV) in thoracic aortae from T2DM db/db mice and on high glucose (HG, 40 mM) induced changes in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) signaling in mouse microvascular endothelial cells (MMECs) in culture. Exposure of aortae from db+/? non-diabetic control mice to high glucose (HG, 40 mM) containing Krebs for 3-h significantly (Pmetformin; metformin also improved ACh-induced EDV in aortae from diabetic db/db mice. Immunoblot analysis of MMECs cultured in HG versus NG revealed a significant reduction of the ratio of phosphorylated (p-eNOS)/eNOS and p-Akt/Akt, but not the expression of total eNOS or Akt. The 3-h exposure of MMECs to metformin significantly (Pmetformin can reverse/reduce the impact of HG on endothelial function, via mechanisms linked to increased phosphorylation of eNOS and Akt. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Time lapse phase contrast video microscopy of directed migration of human microvascular endothelial cells on matrigel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meade-Tollin, L. C.; van Noorden, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    Migration of microvascular endothelial cells is an early and critical step in angiogenesis. Formation of branching and polygonal cellular aggregates by endothelial cells on matrigel has often been considered to be an in vitro model for angiogenesis, although formation of lumens has not always been

  7. The effects of anti-obesity intervention with orlistat and sibutramine on microvascular endothelial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tahami, Belqes Abdullah Mohammad; Ismail, Ab Aziz Al-Safi; Bee, Yvonne Tee Get; Awang, Siti Azima; Salha Wan Abdul Rani, Wan Rimei; Sanip, Zulkefli; Rasool, Aida Hanum Ghulam

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with impaired microvascular endothelial function. We aimed to determine the effects of orlistat and sibutramine treatment on microvascular endothelial function, anthropometric and lipid profile, blood pressure (BP), and heart rate (HR). 76 subjects were recruited and randomized to receive orlistat 120 mg three times daily or sibutramine 10 mg daily for 9 months. Baseline weight, BMI, BP, HR and lipid profile were taken. Microvascular endothelial function was assessed using laser Doppler fluximetry and iontophoresis process. Maximum change (max), percent change (% change) and peak flux (peak) in perfusion to acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) iontophoresis were used to quantify endothelium dependent and independent vasodilatations. 24 subjects in both groups completed the trial. After treatment, weight and BMI were decreased for both groups. AChmax, ACh % change and ACh peak were increased in orlistat-treated group but no difference was observed for sibutramine-treated group. BP and total cholesterol (TC) were reduced for orlistat-treated group. HR was reduced for orlistat-treated group but was increased in sibutramine-treated group. 9 months treatment with orlistat significantly improved microvascular endothelial function. This was associated with reductions in weight, BMI, BP, HR, TC and low density lipoprotein cholesterol. No effect was seen in microvascular endothelial function with sibutramine.

  8. Gene expression microarray data from human microvascular endothelial cells supplemented with a low concentration of niacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Hughes-Large

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The systemic lipid modifying drug, niacin, can directly improve human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function under lipotoxic conditions, possibly through activation of niacin receptors “Niacin receptor activation improves human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function during lipotoxicity” (Hughes-Large et al. 2014. Here we provide accompanying data collected using Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays to identify changes in gene expression in human microvascular endothelial cells treated with 10 μM niacin. Statistical analyses of robust multi-array average (RMA values revealed that only 16 genes exhibited greater than 1.3-fold differential expression. Of these 16, only 5 were identified protein coding genes, while 3 of the remaining 11 genes appeared to be small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs. Altered expression of EFCAB4B, NAP1L2, and OR13C8 was confirmed by real time quantitative PCR.

  9. Cardiotoxic drugs Herceptin and doxorubicin inhibit cardiac microvascular endothelial cell barrier formation resulting in increased drug permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma L. Wilkinson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiotoxicity induced by anti-cancer therapeutics is a severe, and potentially fatal, adverse reaction of the heart in response to certain drugs. Current in vitro approaches to assess cardiotoxicity have focused on analysing cardiomyocytes. More recently it has become apparent that non-cardiomyocyte cells of the heart can potentially contribute to cardiotoxicity. Herceptin and doxorubicin are known to induce cardiotoxicity in the clinic. The effect of these drugs on the endothelial tight junction barrier was tested by analysing tight junction formation and zona occludens-1 (ZO-1 levels, revealing that Herceptin and doxorubicin are able to induce barrier perturbment and decrease barrier function in human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs leading to increased permeability. Herceptin treatment had no effect on the tight junction barrier function in human dermal and human brain microvascular endothelial cells. HCMECs showed detectable levels of HER2 compared with the other endothelial cells suggesting that Herceptin binding to HER2 in these cells may interfere with tight junction formation. Our data suggests that doxorubicin and Herceptin can affect tight junction formation in the cardiac microvasculature leading to increased drug permeability and adverse effects on the cardiac myocytes.

  10. Microvascular coronary artery spasm presents distinctive clinical features with endothelial dysfunction as nonobstructive coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Keisuke; Sugiyama, Seigo; Sumida, Hitoshi; Nozaki, Toshimitsu; Matsubara, Junichi; Matsuzawa, Yasushi; Konishi, Masaaki; Akiyama, Eiichi; Kurokawa, Hirofumi; Maeda, Hirofumi; Sugamura, Koichi; Nagayoshi, Yasuhiro; Morihisa, Kenji; Sakamoto, Kenji; Tsujita, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Yamamuro, Megumi; Kojima, Sunao; Kaikita, Koichi; Tayama, Shinji; Hokimoto, Seiji; Matsui, Kunihiko; Sakamoto, Tomohiro; Ogawa, Hisao

    2012-10-01

    Angina without significant stenosis, or nonobstructive coronary artery disease, attracts clinical attention. Microvascular coronary artery spasm (microvascular CAS) can cause nonobstructive coronary artery disease. We investigated the clinical features of microvascular CAS and the therapeutic efficacy of calcium channel blockers. Three hundred seventy consecutive, stable patients with suspected angina presenting nonobstructive coronary arteries (coronary angiography were investigated with the intracoronary acetylcholine provocation test, with simultaneous measurements of transcardiac lactate production and of changes in the quantitative coronary blood flow. We diagnosed microvascular CAS according to lactate production and a decrease in coronary blood flow without epicardial vasospasm during the acetylcholine provocation test. We prospectively followed up the patients with calcium channel blockers for microvascular coronary artery disease. We identified 50 patients with microvascular CAS who demonstrated significant impairment of the endothelium-dependent vascular response, which was assessed by coronary blood flow during the acetylcholine provocation test. Administration of isosorbide dinitrate normalized the abnormal coronary flow pattern in the patients with microvascular CAS. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that female sex, a lower body mass index, minor-borderline ischemic electrocardiogram findings at rest, limited-baseline diastolic-to-systolic velocity ratio, and attenuated adenosine triphosphate-induced coronary flow reserve were independently correlated with the presence of microvascular CAS. Receiver-operating characteristics curve analysis revealed that the aforementioned 5-variable model showed good correlation with the presence of microvascular CAS (area under the curve: 0.820). No patients with microvascular CAS treated with calcium channel blockers developed cardiovascular events over 47.8±27.5 months. Microvascular CAS causes

  11. Regulation of microvascularization in heart failure - an endothelial cell, non-coding RNAs and exosome liaison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rio P. Juni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is a complex syndrome involving various pathophysiological processes. An increasing body of evidence shows that the myocardial microvasculature is essential for the homeostasis state and that a decompensated heart is associated with microvascular dysfunction as a result of impaired endothelial angiogenic capacity. The intercellular communication between endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes through various signaling molecules, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, nitric oxide, and non-coding RNAs is an important determinant of cardiac microvascular function. Non-coding RNAs are transported from endothelial cells to cardiomyocytes, and vice versa, regulating microvascular properties and angiogenic processes in the heart. Small-exocytosed vesicles, called exosomes, which are secreted by both cell types, can mediate this intercellular communication. The purpose of this review is to highlight the contribution of the microvasculature to proper heart function maintenance by focusing on the interaction between cardiac endothelial cells and myocytes with a specific emphasis on non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs in this form of cell-to-cell communication. Finally, the potential of ncRNAs as targets for angiogenesis therapy will also be discussed.

  12. Nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBT), a nucleoside transport inhibitor, protects against Shiga toxin cytotoxicity in human microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmi, K; Kiyokawa, N; Sekino, T; Suzuki, T; Mimori, K; Taguchi, T; Nakajima, H; Katagiri, Y U; Fujimoto, J; Nakao, H; Takeda, T

    2001-01-01

    Infections with Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) cause microvascular endothelial cell damage, resulting in hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. The prevention of endothelial cell damage is therefore a crucial step in overcoming this disorder. Here, we report that nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBT), a nucleoside transport inhibitor, has a protective effect against the cytotoxicity of Stxs in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs). The relative viability of cells treated with 1.5-15 pM of Stx1 was reduced to 10-20% of that without Stx1. However, the viability of cells treated with NBT (10-100 microM) remained higher than 80%, even in the presence of Stx1. NBT also protected against Stx1 cytotoxicity in sodium butyrate-treated hypersensitive HMVECs. The protective effect of NBT against Stx cytotoxicity may be due to the depletion of ATP in the cells, thereby inhibiting the entry of Stx1.

  13. Effects of Parietaria judaica pollen extract on human microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverna, Simona; Flugy, Anna; Colomba, Paolo; Barranca, Marilisa; De Leo, Giacomo; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2008-08-08

    Pollinosis from Parietaria judaica is one of the main causes of allergy in the Mediterranean area. The present study is designed to assess if P. judaica pollens contain bioactive compounds able to elicit a functional response in endothelial cells. We have demonstrated that addition of pollen extract to human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-L) induces a modification of cell morphology, actin cytoskeletal rearrangements and an increase in endothelial cell permeability. We further showed that the treatment of endothelial cells with pollen extract causes an increase of E-selectin and VCAM-1 protein levels as well as an increase of IL-8 production. The stimulation of cell-cell adhesion molecules was paralleled by a dose-dependent increase of adhesion of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) to HMVEC-L monolayer. Our results suggest for the first time that pollen affect directly endothelial cells (EC) modulating critical functions related to the inflammatory response.

  14. Radiation-induced apoptosis in microvascular endothelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Langley, R. E.; Bump, E A; Quartuccio, S. G.; Medeiros, D; Braunhut, S. J.

    1997-01-01

    The response of the microvasculature to ionizing radiation is thought to be an important factor in the overall response of both normal tissues and tumours. It has recently been reported that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a potent mitogen for endothelial cells, protects large vessel endothelial cells from radiation-induced apoptosis in vitro. Microvessel cells are phenotypically distinct from large vessel cells. We studied the apoptotic response of confluent monolayers of capillary en...

  15. Protective effects of vascular endothelial growth factor in cultured brain endothelial cells against hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fei; Deng, Jiangshan; Yu, Xiaoyan; Li, Dawei; Shi, Hong; Zhao, Yuwu

    2015-08-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common and serious problem among patients with type 1 diabetes receiving treatment with insulin. Clinical studies have demonstrated that hypoglycemic edema is involved in the initiation of hypoglycemic brain damage. However, the mechanisms of this edema are poorly understood. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a potent regulator of blood vessel function, has been observed an important candidate hormone induced by hypoglycemia to protect neurons by restoring plasma glucose. Whether VEGF has a protective effect against hypoglycemia-induced damage in brain endothelial cells is still unknown. To investigate the effects of hypoglycemia on cerebral microvascular endothelial cells and assess the protective effect of exogenous VEGF on endothelial cells during hypoglycemia, confluent monolayers of the brain endothelial cell line bEnd.3 were treated with normal (5.5 mM glucose), hypoglycemic (0, 0.5, 1 mM glucose) medium or hypoglycemic medium in the presence of VEGF. The results clearly showed that hypoglycemia significantly downregulated the expression of claudin-5 in bEnd.3 cells, without affecting ZO-1 and occludin expression and distribution. Besides, transendothelial permeability significantly increased under hypoglycemic conditions compared to that under control conditions. Moreover, the hypoglycemic medium in presence of VEGF decreased endothelial permeability via the inhibition of claudin-5 degradation and improved hypoglycemia-induced cell toxicity. Furthermore, Glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) and apoptosis regulator Bcl-2 expression were significantly upregulated. Taken together, hypoglycemia can significantly increase paraendocellular permeability by downregulating claudin-5 expression. We further showed that VEGF protected brain endothelial cells against hypoglycemia by enhancing glucose passage, reducing endothelial cell death, and ameliorating paraendocellular permeability.

  16. Clopidogrel improves microvascular endothelial function in subjects with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Scott R; Luu, Lee-Jen; Cameron, James D; Nelson, Adam J; Schultz, Carlee D; Worthley, Stephen G; Worthley, Matthew I

    2014-06-01

    Clopidogrel therapy has recently been shown to reduce cardiovascular events in patients with stable vascular disease. This benefit may be due to effects not exclusively related to platelet aggregation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of clopidogrel therapy on microvascular endothelial function in subjects with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Forty subjects with stable CAD were randomised to clopidogrel therapy (75mg/day) or control. Blood and endothelial function testing occurred at baseline, one week and three months following randomisation. Microvascular endothelial function was assessed via reactive hyperaemic index (RHI). Platelet function was assessed by adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced whole blood aggregation and the VerifyNow™ system. Plasma markers of endothelial function (asymmetric dimethylarginine, ADMA) and oxidative stress (myeloperoxidase, MPO) were also tested. The primary endpoint was endothelial function assessment (RHI) at three months. At one week RHI increased by 20±10% in the clopidogrel group; this effect was maintained at three months (21±9% increase from baseline; Pmicrovascular endothelial function in patients with stable CAD. This effect is independent of its effects on ADP-induced platelet reactivity. Copyright © 2014 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. MRI assessment of coronary microvascular endothelial nitric oxide synthase function using myocardial T1 mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Sophia X; Epstein, Frederick H

    2017-08-07

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays a central role in regulating vascular tone, blood flow, and microvascular permeability. Endothelial dysfunction, including eNOS dysfunction, is an early biomarker of vascular disease. This study aimed to show that myocardial T1 mapping during nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition could assess coronary microvascular eNOS function. Wild-type mice, eNOS-/- mice, and wild-type mice fed a high-fat diet underwent T1 mapping at baseline and for 20 min after injection of NG -nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (LNAME), a NOS inhibitor. First-pass perfusion MRI was performed in wild-type mice at baseline and 5 min after LNAME injection. T1 mapping detected an increase in myocardial T1 5 min after an injection of 4 mg/kg LNAME compared with baseline in control mice (T1  = 1515 ± 30 ms with LNAME versus T1  = 1402 ± 30 ms at baseline, P coronary microvascular eNOS dysfunction in high-fat-diet mice. T1 mapping during NOS inhibition may be useful in preclinical studies aiming to investigate mechanisms underlying and therapies for coronary microvascular eNOS dysfunction. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  18. Transcellular migration of neutrophils is a quantitatively significant pathway across dermal microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmon, Shana; Cammer, Michael; Raine, Cedric S; Lisanti, Michael P

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophil extravasation is central to inflammatory skin diseases like psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. In vivo, neutrophils have been shown to migrate through cell-to-cell junctions (paracellular pathway) or directly through the body of the endothelial cell (transcellular pathway). In vitro, however, neutrophil migration is a largely paracellular process where cells preferentially cross at tricellular corners devoid of tight junctions. To approximate the type of cells encountered by extravasating neutrophils in vivo, we developed a neutrophil-migration assay using primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. We show here that a large proportion of migrating neutrophils traverse a monolayer of microvascular endothelium using a purely transcellular pathway. In addition, we demonstrate that F-actin is rearranged similarly in neutrophils undergoing diapedesis along either route. This in vitro model closely simulates the physiological process of neutrophil extravasation in vivo and can be further utilized to evaluate the relative contribution of distinct migratory pathways to the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin disease.

  19. Microvascular endothelial dysfunction is associated with albuminuria and CKD in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seliger, Stephen L; Salimi, Shabnam; Pierre, Valerie; Giffuni, Jamie; Katzel, Leslie; Parsa, Afshin

    2016-07-13

    Impairment in glomerular endothelial function likely plays a major role in the development of albuminuria and CKD progression. Glomerular endothelial dysfunction may reflect systemic microvascular dysfunction, accounting in part for the greater cardiovascular risk in patients with albuminuria. Prior studies of vascular function in CKD have focused on conduit artery function or those with ESRD, and have not examined microvascular endothelial function with albuminuria. We conducted a cross-sectional study among older hypertensive male veterans with stage 1-4 CKD, and hypertensive controls without CKD. Microvascular function was quantified by two distinct Laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) measures: peak responses to 1) post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) and 2) thermal hyperemia (TH), measured on forearm skin. Associations of each LDF measure with albuminuria, eGFR, and CKD status were estimated using correlation coefficients and multiple linear regression, accounting for potential confounders. Among 66 participants (mean age 69.2 years), 36 had CKD (mean eGFR 46.1 cc/min/1.73 m(2); 30.6 % with overt albuminuria). LDF responses to PORH and TH were 43 and 39 % significantly lower in multivariate analyses among those with macroalbuminuria compared to normoalbuminuria, (β= - 0.42, p = 0.009 and β= -0.37, p = 0.01, respectively). Those with CKD had a 23.9 % lower response to PORH compared to controls (p = 0.02 after adjustment). In contrast, TH responses did not differ between those with and without CKD. Microvascular endothelial function was strongly associated with greater albuminuria and CKD, independent of diabetes and blood pressure. These findings may explain in part the excess systemic cardiovascular risk associated with albuminuria and CKD.

  20. Early gene response of human brain endothelial cells to Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The gene expression of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) to Listeria monocytogenes at 4 hour infection was analyzed. Four hours after infection, the expression of 456 genes of HBMEC had changed (p<0.05). We noted that many active genes were involved in the formyl-methionylleucylph...

  1. Role of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell apoptosis in murine sepsis-induced lung injury in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Sean E; Rohan, Marta; Mehta, Sanjay

    2015-09-16

    Sepsis remains a common and serious condition with significant morbidity and mortality due to multiple organ dysfunction, especially acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Sepsis-induced ALI is characterized by injury and dysfunction of the pulmonary microvasculature and pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVEC), resulting in enhanced pulmonary microvascular sequestration and pulmonary infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) as well as disruption of the normal alveolo-capillary permeability barrier with leak of albumin-rich edema fluid into pulmonary interstitium and alveoli. The role of PMVEC death and specifically apoptosis in septic pulmonary microvascular dysfunction in vivo has not been established. In a murine cecal ligation/perforation (CLP) model of sepsis, we quantified and correlated time-dependent changes in pulmonary microvascular Evans blue (EB)-labeled albumin permeability with (1) PMVEC death (propidium iodide [PI]-staining) by both fluorescent intravital videomicroscopy (IVVM) and histology, and (2) PMVEC apoptosis using histologic fluorescent microscopic assessment of a panel of 3 markers: cell surface phosphatidylserine (detected by Annexin V binding), caspase activation (detected by FLIVO labeling), and DNA fragmentation (TUNEL labeling). Compared to sham mice, CLP-sepsis resulted in pulmonary microvascular barrier dysfunction, quantified by increased EB-albumin leak, and PMVEC death (PI+ staining) as early as 2 h and more marked by 4 h after CLP. Septic PMVEC also exhibited increased presence of all 3 markers of apoptosis (Annexin V+, FLIVO+, TUNEL+) as early as 30 mins--1 h after CLP-sepsis, which all similarly increased markedly until 4 h. The time-dependent changes in septic pulmonary microvascular albumin-permeability barrier dysfunction were highly correlated with PMVEC death (PI+; r = 0.976, p pulmonary microvascular dysfunction, including both albumin-permeability barrier dysfunction and

  2. Microvascular endothelial dysfunction predicts the development of erectile dysfunction in men with coronary atherosclerosis without critical stenoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reriani, Martin; Flammer, Andreas J; Li, Jing; Prasad, Megha; Rihal, Charanjit; Prasad, Abhiram; Lennon, Ryan; Lerman, Lilach O; Lerman, Amir

    2014-11-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, stroke, and all-cause mortality, independent of conventional cardiovascular risk factors. Coronary endothelial dysfunction is independently associated with ED in men with early coronary atherosclerosis. We aimed to investigate whether coronary microvascular dysfunction predicts development of ED in patients presenting with coronary atherosclerosis without critical stenoses. Coronary microvascular function was evaluated in 130 men with coronary atherosclerosis without critical stenoses by administration of intracoronary acetylcholine at the time of diagnostic study. After a mean follow-up of 8.4 years, patients were assessed for the development of ED by administration of a questionnaire. In all, 68 (50%) men had microvascular endothelial dysfunction at baseline; 35 (51%) men with microvascular endothelial dysfunction developed ED on follow-up compared with 19 (31%) men without microvascular endothelial dysfunction. Men who developed ED had a lower coronary blood flow response (% [INCREMENT]CBF) compared with men who did not develop ED, with mean±SD of 25.4±71.3 versus 81.7±120 (P=0.003). In univariate analysis, microvascular endothelial dysfunction was a predictor for the development of ED, with relative risk of 2.4 (1.2-4.9) (P=0.016). In multivariate logistic regression adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors (age, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, vascular disease, and family history of coronary artery disease), only microvascular endothelial dysfunction (P=0.027) and age (P=0.044) remained significant predictors of development of ED. Coronary microvascular dysfunction is a predictor of the development of ED in men with coronary atherosclerosis without critical stenoses. This study underscores the systemic involvement of the endothelial function in vascular disease.

  3. Gene delivery of therapeutic polypeptides into brain capillary endothelial cells for protein secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Moos, Torben

    cells (BCECs) and their intermingling tight junctions. Polypeptides like brain derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), erythropoietin (EPO), and FGL peptide (part of Neuronal adhesion molecule (NCAM)) are acknowledged for their neuroprotective and neurogenerative effects. Generally, however...... has been to investigate the usage of BCEC as factories for recombinant protein production. A non-viral gene carrier was prepared from pullulan-spermine conjugated with plasmid DNA (Thomsen et al., 2011). In vitro transfection of Rat Brain Endothelial Cells (RBE4) and Human Brain Microvascular......, Moos T. Gene delivery by pullulan derivatives in brain capillary endothelial cells for protein secretion. J Control Release. 2011 Jan 18....

  4. Microvascular brain pathology on high resolution MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veluw, S.J. van

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a common finding in the aging human brain and is associated with stroke, cognitive decline, and dementia. On autopsy, SVD encompasses pathological processes affecting small arteries and arterioles. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detects the consequences of

  5. The impact of early aerobic exercise on brain microvascular alterations induced by cerebral hypoperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leardini-Tristão, Marina; Borges, Juliana Pereira; Freitas, Felipe; Rangel, Raquel; Daliry, Anissa; Tibiriçá, Eduardo; Estato, Vanessa

    2017-02-15

    The therapeutic potential of early exercise training following cerebral hypoperfusion was investigated on brain perfusion and inflammation in rats with permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (2VO). Wistar rats were subjected to 2VO or sham surgery and each group was then subdivided randomly into sedentary or exercise groups. Early exercise training was initiated after three days of 2VO or sham surgery and consisted of seven days of treadmill training (30min/day at ∼60% of maximal exercise test), composing four groups: 1) Sham sedentary (Sham-Sed), 2) Sham exercised (Sham-Ex), 3) 2VO sedentary (2VO-Sed) and 4) 2VO exercised (2VO-Ex). Microvascular cerebral blood flow (MCBF) and NADPH oxidase and eNOS gene expression were evaluated by laser speckle contrast imaging and RT-PCR, respectively, and brain functional capillary density and endothelial-leukocyte interactions were evaluated by fluorescence intravital video-microscopy. The 2VO-Sed group presented a decrease in MCBF (Sham-Sed: 230.9±12.2 vs. 2VO-Sed: 183.6±10.6 arbitrary perfusion units, Pphysical exercise was able to prevent the cerebral microvascular inflammation by decreasing endothelial-leukocyte interactions (2VO-Ex: 0.9±0.3 vs. 2VO-Sed: 5±0.6cells/min/100μm, Pbrain NADPH oxidase gene expression (2VO-Ex: 1.7±0.1 arbitrary units, Pphysical exercise may represent a means of preventing the microvascular alterations induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Penile microvascular endothelial function in hypertensive patients: effects of acute type 5 phosphodiesterase inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verri, V.; Brandão, A.A.; Tibirica, E.

    2018-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate penile endothelial microvascular function in patients with primary arterial hypertension and age-matched normotensive subjects using laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI). Additionally, we analyzed the acute penile microvascular effects induced by oral phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor (sildenafil; SIL) administration. Endothelium-dependent microvascular reactivity was evaluated in the penises and forearms of hypertensive patients (aged 58.8±6.6 years, n=34) and age-matched healthy volunteers (n=33) at rest and 60 min following oral SIL (100 mg) administration. LSCI was coupled with cutaneous acetylcholine (ACh) iontophoresis using increasing anodal currents. Basal penile cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) values were not significantly different between control subjects and hypertensive individuals. Penile CVC values increased significantly after SIL administration in control (Phypertensive (Phypertensive subjects after SIL administration (P=0.0427). Penile endothelium-dependent microvascular function is, to some extent, preserved in patients presenting with primary arterial hypertension under effective anti-hypertensive treatment. LSCI may be a valuable non-invasive tool for the evaluation of penile vascular responses to phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor. PMID:29340522

  7. Penile microvascular endothelial function in hypertensive patients: effects of acute type 5 phosphodiesterase inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Verri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of this study was to evaluate penile endothelial microvascular function in patients with primary arterial hypertension and age-matched normotensive subjects using laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI. Additionally, we analyzed the acute penile microvascular effects induced by oral phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor (sildenafil; SIL administration. Endothelium-dependent microvascular reactivity was evaluated in the penises and forearms of hypertensive patients (aged 58.8±6.6 years, n=34 and age-matched healthy volunteers (n=33 at rest and 60 min following oral SIL (100 mg administration. LSCI was coupled with cutaneous acetylcholine (ACh iontophoresis using increasing anodal currents. Basal penile cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC values were not significantly different between control subjects and hypertensive individuals. Penile CVC values increased significantly after SIL administration in control (P<0.0001 and hypertensive (P<0.0001 subjects. Peak CVC values were not different between the two groups during penile ACh iontophoresis before SIL administration (P=0.2052. Peak CVC values were higher in control subjects than in hypertensive subjects after SIL administration (P=0.0427. Penile endothelium-dependent microvascular function is, to some extent, preserved in patients presenting with primary arterial hypertension under effective anti-hypertensive treatment. LSCI may be a valuable non-invasive tool for the evaluation of penile vascular responses to phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor.

  8. Uptake of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Conjugated with DNA by Microvascular Endothelial Cells

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    Joseph Harvey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs have been proposed to have great therapeutic potential. SWCNTs conjugated with drugs or genes travel in the systemic circulation to reach target cells or tissues following extravasation from microvessels although the interaction between SWCNT conjugates and the microvascular endothelial cells (ECs remains unknown. We hypothesized that SWCNT-DNA conjugates would be taken up by microvascular ECs and that this process would be facilitated by SWCNTs compared to facilitation by DNA alone. ECs were treated with various concentrations of SWCNT-DNA-FITC conjugates, and the uptake and intracellular distribution of these conjugates were determined by a confocal microscope imaging system followed by quantitative analysis of fluorescence intensity. The uptake of SWCNT-DNA-FITC conjugates (2 μg/mL by microvascular ECs was significantly greater than that of DNA-FITC (2 μg/mL, observed at 6 hrs after treatment. For the intracellular distribution, SWCNT-DNA-FITC conjugates were detected in the nucleus of ECs, while DNA-FITC was restricted to the cytoplasm. The fluorescence intensity and distribution of SWCNTs were concentration and time independent. The findings demonstrate that SWCNTs facilitate DNA delivery into microvascular ECs, thus suggesting that SWCNTs serving as drug and gene vehicles have therapeutic potential.

  9. Apicobasal polarity of brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worzfeld, Thomas; Schwaninger, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Normal brain homeostasis depends on the integrity of the blood-brain barrier that controls the access of nutrients, humoral factors, and immune cells to the CNS. The blood-brain barrier is composed mainly of brain endothelial cells. Forming the interface between two compartments, they are highly polarized. Apical/luminal and basolateral/abluminal membranes differ in their lipid and (glyco-)protein composition, allowing brain endothelial cells to secrete or transport soluble factors in a polarized manner and to maintain blood flow. Here, we summarize the basic concepts of apicobasal cell polarity in brain endothelial cells. To address potential molecular mechanisms underlying apicobasal polarity in brain endothelial cells, we draw on investigations in epithelial cells and discuss how polarity may go awry in neurological diseases. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Decreased endothelial nitric oxide bioavailability, impaired microvascular function, and increased tissue oxygen consumption in children with falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Tsin W; Lampah, Daniel A; Kenangalem, Enny; Tjitra, Emiliana; Weinberg, J Brice; Granger, Donald L; Price, Ric N; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2014-11-15

    Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, microvascular function, and host oxygen consumption have not been assessed in pediatric malaria. We measured NO-dependent endothelial function by using peripheral artery tonometry to determine the reactive hyperemia index (RHI), and microvascular function and oxygen consumption (VO2) using near infrared resonance spectroscopy in 13 Indonesian children with severe falciparum malaria and 15 with moderately severe falciparum malaria. Compared with 19 controls, children with severe malaria and those with moderately severe malaria had lower RHIs (P = .03); 12% and 8% lower microvascular function, respectively (P = .03); and 29% and 25% higher VO2, respectively. RHIs correlated with microvascular function in all children with malaria (P function and increased oxygen consumption, likely contributing to the pathogenesis of the disease. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Microvascular endothelial cells from preeclamptic women exhibit altered expression of angiogenic and vasopressor factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dennis K; Nevo, Ori

    2016-06-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a severe complication of pregnancy associated with maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The underlying pathophysiology involves maternal systemic vascular and endothelial dysfunction associated with circulating antiangiogenic factors, although the specific etiology of the disease remains elusive. Our aim was to investigate the maternal endothelium in PE by exploring the expression of genes involved with endothelial function in a novel platform of maternal primary endothelial cells. Adipose tissue was sampled at the time of caesarean section from both normal and preeclamptic patients. Maternal microvascular endothelial cells were isolated by tissue digestion and CD31 magnetic Dynabeads. Cell purity was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Western analyses revealed VEGF activation of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and ERK in primary cells. Quantitative PCR analyses revealed significantly altered mRNA levels of various genes involved with angiogenesis and blood pressure control in preeclamptic cells, including soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1, endoglin, VEGFR2, angiotensin receptor 1, and endothelin compared with cells isolated from normal pregnancies. Overall, maternal endothelial cells from preeclamptic patients exhibit extensive alteration of expression of factors associated with antiangiogenic and vasoconstrictive phenotypes, shedding light on the underlying mechanisms associated with the vascular dysfunction characteristic of PE. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. The effect of magnesium sulfate on gene expression in maternal microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dennis K; Sengupta, Anindita; Nevo, Ori

    2017-11-27

    Preeclampsia is a severe complication of pregnancy associated with maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. To date, magnesium sulfate remains the preferred method of treatment used to reduce the development of eclampsia. Our aim was to investigate the effects of magnesium sulfate on the expression of genes involved with endothelial function in maternal microvascular endothelial cells from both normal and preeclamptic pregnancies. Primary cells from normal pregnancies treated with 80 mg/L magnesium sulfate for 6 h revealed an overall trend of increased expression of angiogenic and vasopressor-related factors by qPCR analyses. Primary cells from preeclamptic pregnancies revealed an overall trend of decreased expression, with significantly lowered levels for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, endothelin, and vascular cell adhesion protein-1. A comparison of treated cells revealed significantly increased levels for endoglin, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1, prostacyclin synthase, tumor necrosis factor α, tumor necrosis factor receptor 1, and endothelin in normal versus preeclamptic cells following treatment. These results reveal disparate activation of overall expression activity by magnesium sulfate in maternal endothelial cells from normal pregnancies over preeclamptic pregnancies.

  13. Long-term effects of bariatric surgery on peripheral endothelial function and coronary microvascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarzia, Pierpaolo; Lanza, Gaetano A; Sestito, Alfonso; Villano, Angelo; Russo, Giulio; Figliozzi, Stefano; Lamendola, Priscilla; De Vita, Antonio; Crea, Filippo

    We previously demonstrated that bariatric surgery (BS) leads to a short-term significant improvement of endothelial function and coronary microvascular function. In this study we assessed whether BS maintains its beneficial effect at long-term follow up. We studied 19 morbidly obese patients (age 43±9years, 12 women) without any evidence of cardiovascular disease who underwent BS. Patients were studied before BS, at 3 months and at 4.0±1.5years follow up. Peripheral vascular function was assessed by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and nitrate-mediated dilation (NMD), i.e., brachial artery diameter changes in response to post-ischemic forearm hyperhaemia and to nitroglycerin administration, respectively. Coronary microvascular function was assessed by measuring coronary blood flow (CBF) response to intravenous adenosine and to cold pressor test (CPT) in the left anterior descending coronary artery. Together with improvement of anthropometric and metabolic profile, at long-term follow-up patients showed a significant improvement of FMD (6.43±2.88 vs. 8.21±1.73%, p=0.018), and CBF response to both adenosine (1.73±0.48 vs. 2.58±0.54; pfunction and on coronary microvascular dilator function. Copyright © 2016 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The brain microvascular endothelium supports T cell proliferation and has potential for alloantigen presentation.

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    Julie Wheway

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells (EC form the inner lining of blood vessels and are positioned between circulating lymphocytes and tissues. Hypotheses have formed that EC may act as antigen presenting cells based on the intimate interactions with T cells, which are seen in diseases like multiple sclerosis, cerebral malaria (CM and viral neuropathologies. Here, we investigated how human brain microvascular EC (HBEC interact with and support the proliferation of T cells. We found HBEC to express MHC II, CD40 and ICOSL, key molecules for antigen presentation and co-stimulation and to take up fluorescently labeled antigens via macropinocytosis. In co-cultures, we showed that HBEC support and promote the proliferation of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells, which both are key in CM pathogenesis, particularly following T cell receptor activation and co-stimulation. Our findings provide novel evidence that HBEC can trigger T cell activation, thereby providing a novel mechanism for neuroimmunological complications of infectious diseases.

  15. Coronary microvascular endothelial dysfunction is an independent predictor of development of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Megha; Reriani, Martin; Khosla, Sundeep; Gössl, Mario; Lennon, Ryan; Gulati, Rajiv; Prasad, Abhiram; Lerman, Lilach O; Lerman, Amir

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of evidence links coronary artery atherosclerosis and calcification to osteoporosis in women. The endothelium plays a critical role in maintaining vascular integrity and may play a role in bone metabolism. We aimed to determine whether early coronary atherosclerosis, as detected by coronary microvascular endothelial dysfunction (CMED), predicts the development of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Coronary vascular reactivity was evaluated in 194 postmenopausal women greater than 50 years of age and with non-obstructive coronary arteries by administration of intracoronary acetylcholine during diagnostic angiography. CMED was defined as ≤50% increase in coronary blood flow from baseline in response to maximal dose. After a median follow-up of 7.0±0.3 years, patients were assessed by a questionnaire for development of osteoporosis. The average age of the cohort was 60.9±7.4 years. Women with CMED were twice as likely to develop osteoporosis compared with women without endothelial dysfunction after adjustment for potential confounders (relative risk, 2.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1, 5.6, P=0.02). Epicardial endothelial dysfunction was not associated with development of osteoporosis. Early coronary atherosclerosis with endothelial dysfunction is an independent marker for increased risk of developing osteoporosis in postmenopausal women greater than 50 years of age without obstructive coronary artery disease. The current study supports a link between coronary atherosclerosis and osteoporosis.

  16. Evaluating the involvement of cerebral microvascular endothelial Na+/K+-ATPase and Na+-K+-2Cl- co-transporter in electrolyte fluxes in an in vitro blood-brain barrier model of dehydration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Kasper; Assentoft, Mette; Hørlyck, Sofie

    2018-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is involved in brain water and salt homeostasis. Blood osmolarity increases during dehydration and water is osmotically extracted from the brain. The loss of water is less than expected from pure osmotic forces, due to brain electrolyte accumulation. Although...

  17. Microvascular endothelial dysfunction predicts the development of erectile dysfunction in men with coronary atherosclerosis without critical stenoses

    OpenAIRE

    Reriani, M; Flammer, A. J.; Li, J; M. Prasad; Rihal, C; Prasad, A.; Lennon, R; Lerman, L.O.; Lerman, A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, stroke, and all-cause mortality, independent of conventional cardiovascular risk factors. Coronary endothelial dysfunction is independently associated with ED in men with early coronary atherosclerosis. We aimed to investigate whether coronary microvascular dysfunction predicts development of ED in patients presenting with coronary atherosclerosis without critical stenoses. PATIENTS AND METH...

  18. Human liver endothelial cells, but not macrovascular or microvascular endothelial cells, engraft in the mouse liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filali, Ebtisam El; Hiralall, Johan K.; van Veen, Henk A.; Stolz, Donna B.; Seppen, Jurgen

    2013-01-01

    Liver cell transplantation has had limited clinical success so far, partly due to poor engraftment of hepatocytes. Instead of hepatocytes. other cell types, such as endothelial cells, could be used in ex vivo liver gene therapy. The goal of the present study was to compare the grafting and

  19. Niacin receptor activation improves human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function during lipotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Large, Jennifer M; Pang, Dominic K T; Robson, Debra L; Chan, Pak; Toma, Jelena; Borradaile, Nica M

    2014-12-01

    Niacin (nicotinic acid) as a monotherapy can reduce vascular disease risk, but its mechanism of action remains controversial, and may not be dependent on systemic lipid modifying effects. Niacin has recently been shown to improve endothelial function and vascular regeneration, independent of correcting dyslipidemia, in rodent models of vascular injury and metabolic disease. As a potential biosynthetic precursor for NAD(+), niacin could elicit these vascular benefits through NAD(+)-dependent, sirtuin (SIRT) mediated responses. Alternatively, niacin may act through its receptor, GPR109A, to promote endothelial function, though endothelial cells are not known to express this receptor. We hypothesized that niacin directly improves endothelial cell function during exposure to lipotoxic conditions and sought to determine the potential mechanism(s) involved. Angiogenic function in excess palmitate was assessed by tube formation following treatment of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) with either a relatively low concentration of niacin (10 μM), or nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) (1 μM), a direct NAD(+) precursor. Although both niacin and NMN improved HMVEC tube formation during palmitate overload, only NMN increased cellular NAD(+) and SIRT1 activity. We further observed that HMVEC express GRP109A. Activation of this receptor with either acifran or MK-1903 recapitulated niacin-induced improvements in HMVEC tube formation, while GPR109A siRNA diminished the effect of niacin. Niacin, at a low concentration, improves HMVEC angiogenic function under lipotoxic conditions, likely independent of NAD(+) biosynthesis and SIRT1 activation, but rather through niacin receptor activation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Action of shiga toxin type-2 and subtilase cytotoxin on human microvascular endothelial cells.

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    María M Amaral

    Full Text Available The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS associated with diarrhea is a complication of Shiga toxin (Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC infection. In Argentina, HUS is endemic and responsible for acute and chronic renal failure in children younger than 5 years old. The human kidney is the most affected organ due to the presence of very Stx-sensitive cells, such as microvascular endothelial cells. Recently, Subtilase cytotoxin (SubAB was proposed as a new toxin that may contribute to HUS pathogenesis, although its action on human glomerular endothelial cells (HGEC has not been described yet. In this study, we compared the effects of SubAB with those caused by Stx2 on primary cultures of HGEC isolated from fragments of human pediatric renal cortex. HGEC were characterized as endothelial since they expressed von Willebrand factor (VWF and platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1. HGEC also expressed the globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 receptor for Stx2. Both, Stx2 and SubAB induced swelling and detachment of HGEC and the consequent decrease in cell viability in a time-dependent manner. Preincubation of HGEC with C-9 -a competitive inhibitor of Gb3 synthesis-protected HGEC from Stx2 but not from SubAB cytotoxic effects. Stx2 increased apoptosis in a time-dependent manner while SubAB increased apoptosis at 4 and 6 h but decreased at 24 h. The apoptosis induced by SubAB relative to Stx2 was higher at 4 and 6 h, but lower at 24 h. Furthermore, necrosis caused by Stx2 was significantly higher than that induced by SubAB at all the time points evaluated. Our data provide evidence for the first time how SubAB could cooperate with the development of endothelial damage characteristic of HUS pathogenesis.

  1. Brain microvascular endothelium induced-annexin A1 secretion contributes to small cell lung cancer brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Liu, Yong-Shuo; Wu, Peng-Fei; Li, Qiang; Dai, Wu-Min; Yuan, Shuai; Xu, Zhi-Hua; Liu, Ting-Ting; Miao, Zi-Wei; Fang, Wen-Gang; Chen, Yu-Hua; Li, Bo

    2015-09-01

    Small cell lung cancer is the most aggressive histologic subtype of lung cancer, with a strong predilection for metastasizing to brain early. However, the cellular and molecular basis is poorly known. Here, we provided evidence to reveal the role of annexin A1 in small cell lung cancer metastasis to brain. Firstly, the elevated annexin A1 serum levels in small cell lung cancer patients were associated with brain metastasis. The levels of annexin A1 were also upregulated in NCI-H446 cells, a small cell lung cancer cell line, upon migration into the mice brain. More interestingly, annexin A1 was secreted by NCI-H446 cells in a time-dependent manner when co-culturing with human brain microvascular endothelial cells, which was identified with the detections of annexin A1 in the co-cultured cellular supernatants by ELISA and western blot. Further results showed that blockage of annexin A1 in the co-cultured cellular supernatants using a neutralized antibody significantly inhibited NCI-H446 cells adhesion to brain endothelium and its transendothelial migration. Conversely, the addition of Ac2-26, an annexin A1 mimic peptide, enhanced these effects. Furthermore, knockdown of annexin A1 in NCI-H446 cells prevented its transendothelial migration in vitro and metastasis to mice brain in vivo. Our data showed that small cell lung cancer cell in brain microvasculature microenvironment could express much more annexin A1 and release it outside, which facilitated small cell lung cancer cell to gain malignant properties of entry into brain. These findings provided a potential target for the management of SCLC brain metastasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Inhibition of Murine Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cell Apoptosis Promotes Recovery of Barrier Function under Septic Conditions

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    Lefeng Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is characterized by injury of the pulmonary microvasculature and the pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVEC, leading to barrier dysfunction and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Our recent work identified a strong correlation between PMVEC apoptosis and microvascular leak in septic mice in vivo, but the specific role of apoptosis in septic PMVEC barrier dysfunction remains unclear. Thus, we hypothesize that PMVEC apoptosis is likely required for PMVEC barrier dysfunction under septic conditions in vitro. Septic stimulation (mixture of tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β, and interferon γ [cytomix] of isolated murine PMVEC resulted in a significant loss of barrier function as early as 4 h after stimulation, which persisted until 24 h. PMVEC apoptosis, as reflected by caspase activation, DNA fragmentation, and loss of membrane polarity, was first apparent at 8 h after cytomix. Pretreatment of PMVEC with the pan-caspase inhibitor Q-VD significantly decreased septic PMVEC apoptosis and was associated with reestablishment of PMVEC barrier function at 16 and 24 h after stimulation but had no effect on septic PMVEC barrier dysfunction over the first 8 h. Collectively, our data suggest that early septic murine PMVEC barrier dysfunction driven by proinflammatory cytokines is not mediated through apoptosis, but PMVEC apoptosis contributes to late septic PMVEC barrier dysfunction.

  3. Isolation and Culture of Human Microvascular endothelium for comparison of the morphological and molecular characteristics of Microvascular endothelial cells under normal gravity against simulated micro gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tholcopiyan L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vascular endothelial cells play a major role in wound healing and also in growth of the tumors. Angiogenesis can be a target for treating diseases that are due to either poor vascularisation or decreased blood supply as in stroke, ulcers, heart disease, etc or abnormal and increased vasculature like in tumours. Application of specific compounds that may inhibit or induce the creation of new blood vessels in the body may help in the treatment of such diseases (1. Ex vivo generation of blood vessels may offer an excellent alternative to the synthetic valves that are being currently used in cardiology. Micro gravity also referred to, as weightlessness is not essentially zero gravity but rather minimal gravity. According to cell type, micro gravity causes variety of changes in proliferation and differentiation of cells while also affecting the migration of cells and cellular functions (2, 3. Siamwala et al from AUKBC have already studied the effects of microgravity on the microvascular endothelial cells from bovine lung and macrovascular endothelial cells from the bovine pulmonary artery. It was observed that the proliferation and migration of macrovascular endothelial cells were increased in microgravity (4, 5. Nitric oxide production was also studied and observed that microgravity treatment did not change nitric oxide production by microvascular endothelial cells (4OBJECTIVE: Isolation and Comparison of culture characteristics of Human microvascular endothelium cultured conventionally and in novel nanomaterial scaffold and further study the morphological and molecular characteristics of microvascular endothelial cells under normal gravity against simulated micro gravityMATERIALS AND METHODS: The human Omentum samples were obtained using surgical procedures after informed consent. The microvascular endothelial cells were isolated following the protocol described by Scott et al (6.The isolated cells were seeded in two groups; Group I

  4. Thalidomide inhibits inflammatory and angiogenic activation of human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (HIMEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Daniel J.; Nelson, Victoria M.; Otterson, Mary F.; Shaker, Reza; Binion, David G.

    2010-01-01

    The glutamic acid derivative thalidomide is a transcriptional inhibitor of TNF-α but is also known to affect human blood vessels, which may underlie its teratogenicity. Thalidomide has been used in the treatment of refractory Crohn's disease (CD), but the therapeutic mechanism is not defined. We examined the effect of thalidomide on primary cultures of human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (HIMEC), the relevant endothelial cell population in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), to determine its effect on endothelial activation, leukocyte interaction, and VEGF-induced angiogenesis. HIMEC cultures were pretreated with thalidomide before activation with either TNF-α/LPS or VEGF. A low-shear-stress flow adhesion assay with either U-937 or whole blood was used to assess HIMEC activation following TNF-α/LPS, and a Wright's stain identified adherent leukocytes. Expression of cell adhesion molecules (E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) was assessed using radioimmunoassay. Effects of thalidomide on NF-κB activation, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in TNF-α/LPS-activated HIMEC were determined by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Thalidomide blocked adhesion of both U-937 and whole blood leukocytes by 50% in HIMEC, inhibiting binding of all classes of leukocytes. Thalidomide also blocked NF-κB and cell adhesion molecule expression in HIMEC. In marked contrast, thalidomide did not affect either iNOS or COX-2 expression, two key molecules that play a role in the downregulation of HIMEC activation. VEGF-induced HIMEC transmigration, growth, proliferation, tube formation, and Akt phosphorylation were significantly inhibited by thalidomide. In summary, thalidomide exerted a potent effect on HIMEC growth and activation, suggesting that it may also function via an endothelial mechanism in the treatment of CD. PMID:19926820

  5. Drag-Reducing Polymer Enhances Microvascular Perfusion in the Traumatized Brain with Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragin, Denis E; Thomson, Susan; Bragina, Olga; Statom, Gloria; Kameneva, Marina V; Nemoto, Edwin M

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments for traumatic brain injury (TBI) have not focused on improving microvascular perfusion. Drag-reducing polymers (DRP), linear, long-chain, blood-soluble, nontoxic macromolecules, may offer a new approach to improving cerebral perfusion by primary alteration of the fluid dynamic properties of blood. Nanomolar concentrations of DRP have been shown to improve hemodynamics in animal models of ischemic myocardium and ischemic limb, but have not yet been studied in the brain. We recently demonstrated that DRP improved microvascular perfusion and tissue oxygenation in a normal rat brain. We hypothesized that DRP could restore microvascular perfusion in hypertensive brain after TBI. Using in vivo two-photon laser scanning microscopy we examined the effect of DRP on microvascular blood flow and tissue oxygenation in hypertensive rat brains with and without TBI. DRP enhanced and restored capillary flow, decreased microvascular shunt flow, and, as a result, reduced tissue hypoxia in both nontraumatized and traumatized rat brains at high intracranial pressure. Our study suggests that DRP could constitute an effective treatment for improving microvascular flow in brain ischemia caused by high intracranial pressure after TBI.

  6. Cultivation of Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells on Topographical Substrates to Mimic the Human Corneal Endothelium

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    Jie Shi Chua

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Human corneal endothelial cells have a limited ability to replicate in vivo and in vitro. Allograft transplantation becomes necessary when an accident or trauma results in excessive cell loss. The reconstruction of the cornea endothelium using autologous cell sources is a promising alternative option for therapeutic or in vitro drug testing applications. The native corneal endothelium rests on the Descemet’s membrane, which has nanotopographies of fibers and pores. The use of synthetic topographies mimics the native environment, and it is hypothesized that this can direct the behavior and growth of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs to resemble the corneal endothelium. In this study, HMVECs are cultivated on substrates with micron and nano-scaled pillar and well topographies. Closely packed HMVEC monolayers with polygonal cells and well-developed tight junctions were formed on the topographical substrates. Sodium/potassium (Na+/K+ adenine triphosphatase (ATPase expression was enhanced on the microwells substrate, which also promotes microvilli formation, while more hexagonal-like cells are found on the micropillars samples. The data obtained suggests that the use of optimized surface patterning, in particular, the microtopographies, can induce HMVECs to adopt a more corneal endothelium-like morphology with similar barrier and pump functions. The mechanism involved in cell contact guidance by the specific topographical features will be of interest for future studies.

  7. Microvascular Endothelial Dysfunction in Obesity Is Driven by Macrophage-Dependent Hydrogen Sulfide Depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Joseph; Wang, Rui; White, Carl

    2017-05-01

    The function of perivascular adipose tissue as an anticontractile mediator in the microvasculature is lost during obesity. Obesity results in inflammation and recruitment of proinflammatory macrophages to the perivascular adipose tissue that is paralleled by depletion of the vasorelaxant signaling molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the vessel. The current objective was to assess the role of macrophages in determining vascular [H2S] and defining how this impinged on vasodilation. Contractility and [H2S] were measured in mesenteric resistance arterioles from lean and obese mice by using pressure myography and confocal microscopy, respectively. Vasodilation was impaired and smooth muscle and endothelial [H2S] decreased in vessels from obese mice compared with those from lean controls. Coculturing vessels from lean mice with macrophages from obese mice, or macrophage-conditioned media, recapitulated obese phenotypes in vessels. These effects were mediated by low molecular weight species and dependent on macrophage inducible nitric oxide synthase activity. The inducible nitric oxide synthase activity of perivascular adipose tissue-resident proinflammatory macrophages promotes microvascular endothelial dysfunction by reducing the bioavailability of H2S in the vessel. These findings support a model in which vascular H2S depletion underpins the loss of perivascular adipose tissue anticontractile function in obesity. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. A unique pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell niche revealed by Weibel-Palade bodies and Griffonia simplicifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songwei; Zhou, Chun; King, Judy A C; Stevens, Troy

    2014-03-01

    Pulmonary endothelium displays considerable heterogeneity along the vascular axis, from arteries to capillaries to veins. Griffonia simplicifolia is a lectin that recognizes pulmonary microvascular endothelium with preference over extra-alveolar endothelium in both arteries and veins, yet the precise vascular location where this phenotypic shift occurs is poorly resolved. We gelatin-filled the circulation and agarose-loaded the airways and then labeled the lung with Griffonia lectin to enable visualization of the endothelial transition zone. Endothelium in vessels with internal diameters less than 38 μm were uniformly Griffonia positive, whereas vessels with internal diameters greater than 60 μm were always Griffonia negative. Two populations of endothelium were identified in vessels ranging from 38 to 60 μm in diameter, including some that were positive and others that were negative for binding to G. simplicifolia. To better resolve this endothelial transition zone, we performed morphology studies to measure the distribution of Weibel-Palade bodies (WPbs), since WPbs are present in conduit vessel endothelium and absent in capillary endothelium. WPbs were found in endothelium with vascular dimensions as small as 18 μm in diameter but were not found in capillaries. Thus, we identify with precision that the endothelial phenotype transition from a cell that does not interact with Griffonia lectin to one that does occurs in blood vessels with internal diameters of approximately 38 μm, and we reveal an unappreciated vascular zone, between 18 and 38 μm in diameter, where endothelium both is Griffonia positive and possesses WPbs.

  9. M3 receptor is involved in the effect of penehyclidine hydrochloride reduced endothelial injury in LPS-stimulated human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qinghong; Xiao, Fei; Liu, Qiangsheng; Zheng, Fei; Shen, Shiwen; He, Qianwen; Chen, Kai; Wang, Yanlin; Zhang, Zongze; Zhan, Jia

    2017-11-17

    LPS has been recently shown to induce muscarinic acetylcholine 3 receptor (M3 receptor) expression and penehyclidine hydrochloride (PHC) is an anticholinergic drug which could block the expression of M3 receptor. PHC has been demonstrated to perform protective effect on cell injury. This study is to investigate whether the effect of PHC on microvascular endothelial injury is related to its inhibition of M3 receptor or not. HPMVECs were treated with specific M3 receptor shRNA or PBS, and randomly divided into LPS group (A group), LPS+PHC group (B group), LPS + M3 shRNA group (C group) and LPS + PHC + M3 shRNA group (D group). Cells were collected at 60 min after LPS treatment to measure levels of LDH, endothelial permeability, TNF-α and IL-6 levels, NF-κB p65 activation, I-κB protein expression, p38MAPK, and ERK1/2 activations as well as M3 mRNA expression. PHC could decrease LDH levels, cell permeability, TNF-α and IL-6 levels, p38 MAPK, ERK1/2, NF-κB p65 activations and M3 mRNA expressions compared with LPS group. When M3 receptor was silence, the changes of these indices were much more obvious. These findings suggest that M3 receptor plays an important role in LPS-induced pulmonary microvascular endothelial injury, which is regulated through NF-κB p65 and MAPK activation. And knockout of M3 receptor could attenuate LPS-induced pulmonary microvascular endothelial injury. Regulative effects of PHC on pulmonary microvascular permeability and NF-κB p65 as well as MAPK activations are including but not limited to inhibition of M3 receptor. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Microvascular Coronary Artery Spasm Presents Distinctive Clinical Features With Endothelial Dysfunction as Nonobstructive Coronary Artery Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ohba, Keisuke; Sugiyama, Seigo; Sumida, Hitoshi; Nozaki, Toshimitsu; Matsubara, Junichi; Matsuzawa, Yasushi; Konishi, Masaaki; Akiyama, Eiichi; Kurokawa, Hirofumi; Maeda, Hirofumi; Sugamura, Koichi; Nagayoshi, Yasuhiro; Morihisa, Kenji; Sakamoto, Kenji; Tsujita, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    Background Angina without significant stenosis, or nonobstructive coronary artery disease, attracts clinical attention. Microvascular coronary artery spasm (microvascular CAS) can cause nonobstructive coronary artery disease. We investigated the clinical features of microvascular CAS and the therapeutic efficacy of calcium channel blockers. Methods and Results Three hundred seventy consecutive, stable patients with suspected angina presenting nonobstructive coronary arteries (

  11. Impact of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction Therapy on Myocardial Function and Endothelial Dysfunction in Female Patients with Microvascular Angina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong Joon; Cho, In Suk; Cho, Kyoung Im

    2017-12-01

    Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is a structured group program that employs mindfulness meditation to alleviate suffering associated with physical, psychosomatic, and psychiatric disorders. In this study, we investigate the impact of MBSR on left ventricular (LV) and endothelial function in female patients with microvascular angina. A total of 34 female patients (mean age 52.2 ± 13.8 years) diagnosed with microvascular angina underwent a MBSR program with anti-anginal medication for 8 weeks. The global longitudinal strain (GLS) of the LV was used as a parameter to assess myocardial function and reactive brachial flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) was used to assess endothelial function. Symptoms were analyzed by the Symptom Checklist 90 Revised to determine emotional stress. Changes in GLS and FMD between baseline and post-MBSR were analyzed. After 8 weeks of programmed MBSR treatment, stress parameters were significantly decreased. In addition, GLS (-19.5 ± 2.1% vs. -16.6 ± 2.5%, p < 0.001) and reactive FMD significantly improved (8.9 ± 3.0% vs. 6.9 ± 2.6%, p = 0.005) after MBSR compared to baseline. The changes in GLS correlated to changes in FMD (r = 0.120, p = 0.340) and with the changes in most stress parameters. MBSR has beneficial impacts on myocardial and endothelial function in female patients with microvascular angina.

  12. Effect of interleukin-6 inhibition on coronary microvascular and endothelial function in myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holte, Espen; Kleveland, Ola; Ueland, Thor; Kunszt, Gabor; Bratlie, Marte; Broch, Kaspar; Michelsen, Annika E; Bendz, Bjørn; Amundsen, Brage H; Aakhus, Svend; Damås, Jan Kristian; Gullestad, Lars; Aukrust, Pål; Wiseth, Rune

    2017-10-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a driver of inflammation and associated endothelial cell activation in acute coronary syndromes. We evaluated the effect of the IL-6 receptor antagonist tocilizumab on coronary microvascular function and endothelial dysfunction measured by coronary flow reserve (CFR) and markers of endothelial cell activation in patients with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). This substudy was part of a two-centre, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial evaluating the effect of a single dose of tocilizumab in NSTEMI. Markers of endothelial cell activation (vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and von Willebrand factor) were assessed in 117 patients. In 42 of these patients, 20 assigned to placebo and 22 to tocilizumab, we measured CFR. Blood samples were obtained at seven consecutive time points between day 1 and 3. CFR was measured by transthoracic echocardiography during hospitalisation and after 6 months. Tocilizumab did not affect CFR during hospitalisation (tocilizumab: 3.4±0.8 vs placebo: 3.3±1.2, p=0.80). CFR improved significantly in both groups at 6 months. Patients in the tocilizumab group had significantly higher area under the curve for VCAM-1 (median 622 vs 609 ng/mL/hour, tocilizumab and placebo respectively, p=0.003). There were inverse correlations between VCAM-1 and CFR in the placebo (hospitalisation: r=-0.74, p<0.01, 6 months: r=-0.59, p<0.01), but not in the tocilizumab group (hospitalisation: r=0.20, p=0.37, 6 months r=-0.28, p=0.20). Tocilizumab did not affect CFR during hospitalisation or after 6 months. Tocilizumab increased VCAM-1 levels during hospitalisation, but this was not associated with reduced CFR in these patients. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Autophagy inhibits high glucose induced cardiac microvascular endothelial cells apoptosis by mTOR signal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Shenwei; Wang, Yong; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Ning; Jin, Zhitao; Ding, Liping; Jiang, Wei; Yang, Junke; Sun, Zhimin; Qiu, Chunguang; Hu, Taohong

    2017-08-20

    Cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs) dysfunction is an important pathophysiological event in the cardiovascular complications induced by diabetes. However, the underlying mechanism is not fully clarified. Autophagy is involved in programmed cell death. Here we investigated the potential role of autophagy on the CMECs injury induced by high glucose. CMECs were cultured in normal or high glucose medium for 6, 12 and 24 h respectively. The autophagy of CMECs was measured by green fluorescence protein (GFP)-LC3 plasmid transfection. Moreover, the apoptosis of CMEC was determined by flow cytometry. Furthermore, 3-Methyladenine (3MA), ATG7 siRNA and rapamycin were administrated to regulate the autophagy state. Moreover, Western blotting assay was performed to measure the expressions of Akt, mTOR, LC3 and p62. High glucose stress decreased the autophagy, whereas increased the apoptosis in CMECs time dependently. Meanwhile, high glucose stress activated the Akt/mTOR signal pathway. Furthermore, autophagy inhibitor, 3-MA and ATG7 siRNA impaired the autophagy and increased the apoptosis in CMECs induced by high glucose stress. Conversely, rapamycin up-regulated the autophagy and decreased the apoptosis in CMECs under high glucose condition. Our data provide evidence that high glucose directly inhibits autophagy, as a beneficial adaptive response to protect CMECs against apoptosis. Furthermore, the autophagy was mediated, at least in part, by mTOR signaling.

  14. Heparanase mediates vascular endothelial growth factor gene transcription in high-glucose human retinal microvascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingwei; Leng, Xuan; Hu, Yijun; Shen, Huangxuan; Song, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To observe the nuclear expression and interaction of heparanase and RNA polymerase II (RNA Pol II), an enzyme that catalyzes the transcription of DNA in eukaryotic cells) in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRECs) under high glucose condition and to investigate the association of heparanase with the transcription activity of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene promoter. Methods Cultured HRECs were maintained for 3 days in media with high or normal glucose. The expressions of heparanase and RNA Pol II in each group were analyzed with immunofluorescence. Co-immunoprecipitation was applied to detect the interaction of heparanase and Pol II proteins. Cells in both groups were used for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with anti-heparanase and anti-RNA Pol II antibodies to identify high-confidence heparanase-binding regions across the entire VEGF gene promoter. Moreover, real-time PCR was used to demonstrate the interaction between heparanase and the VEGF gene promoter region. Results The immunofluorescence studies showed that the nuclear expression of heparanase was intense in high-glucose HRECs but faint in the normal group; RNA Pol II in the nucleus was also intense in high glucose HRECs, and the distribution of heparanase was consistent with that of RNA Pol II. The co-immunoprecipitation data showed that heparanase combined with RNA Pol II in HRECs cells treated with high glucose, and the molecular size of HPA interacted with RNA Pol II was 50 kDa, while no combination of two proteins was evident in normal HRECs cells. Real-time PCR–based ChIP results showed that the high-confidence HPA-binding region was −1155 to −1018 (containing hypoxia response element) in the VEGF gene promoter, and the cells treated with high glucose showed increases in heparanase and RNA Pol II in the VEGF gene promoter region compared with the normal glucose treated cells (t = –3.244, p = 0.032; t = –6.096, p = 0.004, respectively

  15. Glioblastoma cell-secreted interleukin-8 induces brain endothelial cell permeability via CXCR2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Dwyer

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma constitutes the most aggressive and deadly of brain tumors. As yet, both conventional and molecular-based therapies have met with limited success in treatment of this cancer. Among other explanations, the heterogeneity of glioblastoma and the associated microenvironment contribute to its development, as well as resistance and recurrence in response to treatments. Increased vascularity suggests that tumor angiogenesis plays an important role in glioblastoma progression. However, the molecular crosstalk between endothelial and glioblastoma cells requires further investigation. To examine the effects of glioblastoma-derived signals on endothelial homeostasis, glioblastoma cell secretions were collected and used to treat brain endothelial cells. Here, we present evidence that the glioblastoma secretome provides pro-angiogenic signals sufficient to disrupt VE-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions and promote endothelial permeability in brain microvascular endothelial cells. An unbiased angiogenesis-specific antibody array screen identified the chemokine, interleukin-8, which was further demonstrated to function as a key factor involved in glioblastoma-induced permeability, mediated through its receptor CXCR2 on brain endothelia. This underappreciated interface between glioblastoma cells and associated endothelium may inspire the development of novel therapeutic strategies to induce tumor regression by preventing vascular permeability and inhibiting angiogenesis.

  16. Endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide II in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus: Relation to micro-vascular complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adly, Amira A M; Ismail, Eman A; Tawfik, Lamis M; Ebeid, Fatma S E; Hassan, Asmaa A S

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial monocyte-activating polypeptide II (EMAP II) is a multifunctional polypeptide with proinflammatory and antiangiogenic activity. Hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia appears to be significant factors contributing to increased EMAP-II levels. We determined serum EMAP II in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes as a potential marker for micro-vascular complications and assessed its relation to inflammation and glycemic control. Eighty children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes were divided into 2 groups according to the presence of micro-vascular complications and compared with 40 healthy controls. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and EMAP II levels were assessed. Serum EMAP II levels were significantly increased in patients with micro-vascular complications (1539 ± 321.5 pg/mL) and those without complications (843.6 ± 212.6 pg/mL) compared with healthy controls (153.3 ± 28.3 pg/mL; pII was increased in patients with microalbuminuria than normoalbuminuric group (pII levels and body mass index, fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, serum creatinine, triglycerides, total cholesterol, urinary albumin creatinine ratio (UACR) and hs-CRP (pII at 1075 pg/mL could differentiate diabetic patients with and without micro-vascular complications with a sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 82%. We suggest that EMAP II is elevated in type 1 diabetic patients, particularly those with micro-vascular complications. EMAP II levels are related to inflammation, glycemic control, albuminuria level of patients and the risk of micro-vascular complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Relationship between Endothelial Progenitor Cell Populations and Epicardial and Microvascular Coronary Disease—A Cellular, Angiographic and Physiologic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kim H.; Simpson, Philippa J. L.; Yong, Andy S.; Dunn, Louise L.; Chawantanpipat, Chirapan; Hsu, Chijen; Yu, Young; Keech, Anthony C.; Celermajer, David S.; Ng, Martin K. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are implicated in protection against vascular disease. However, studies using angiography alone have reported conflicting results when relating EPCs to epicardial coronary artery disease (CAD) severity. Moreover, the relationship between different EPC types and the coronary microcirculation is unknown. We therefore investigated the relationship between EPC populations and coronary epicardial and microvascular disease. Methods Thirty-three patients with a spectrum of isolated left anterior descending artery disease were studied. The coronary epicardial and microcirculation were physiologically interrogated by measurement of fractional flow reserve (FFR), index of microvascular resistance (IMR) and coronary flow reserve (CFR). Two distinct EPC populations (early EPC and late outgrowth endothelial cells [OECs]) were isolated from these patients and studied ex vivo. Results There was a significant inverse relationship between circulating OEC levels and epicardial CAD severity, as assessed by FFR and angiography (r = 0.371, p = 0.04; r = -0.358, p = 0.04; respectively). More severe epicardial CAD was associated with impaired OEC migration and tubulogenesis (r = 0.59, p = 0.005; r = 0.589, p = 0.004; respectively). Patients with significant epicardial CAD (FFRcoronary microvascular disease. PMID:24736282

  18. The relationship between endothelial progenitor cell populations and epicardial and microvascular coronary disease-a cellular, angiographic and physiologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kim H; Simpson, Philippa J L; Yong, Andy S; Dunn, Louise L; Chawantanpipat, Chirapan; Hsu, Chijen; Yu, Young; Keech, Anthony C; Celermajer, David S; Ng, Martin K C

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are implicated in protection against vascular disease. However, studies using angiography alone have reported conflicting results when relating EPCs to epicardial coronary artery disease (CAD) severity. Moreover, the relationship between different EPC types and the coronary microcirculation is unknown. We therefore investigated the relationship between EPC populations and coronary epicardial and microvascular disease. Thirty-three patients with a spectrum of isolated left anterior descending artery disease were studied. The coronary epicardial and microcirculation were physiologically interrogated by measurement of fractional flow reserve (FFR), index of microvascular resistance (IMR) and coronary flow reserve (CFR). Two distinct EPC populations (early EPC and late outgrowth endothelial cells [OECs]) were isolated from these patients and studied ex vivo. There was a significant inverse relationship between circulating OEC levels and epicardial CAD severity, as assessed by FFR and angiography (r=0.371, p=0.04; r=-0.358, p=0.04; respectively). More severe epicardial CAD was associated with impaired OEC migration and tubulogenesis (r=0.59, p=0.005; r=0.589, p=0.004; respectively). Patients with significant epicardial CAD (FFRcoronary microvascular disease.

  19. Endothelial cell marker PAL-E reactivity in brain tumor, developing brain, and brain disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenstra, S.; Troost, D.; Das, P. K.; Claessen, N.; Becker, A. E.; Bosch, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The endothelial cell marker PAL-E is not reactive to vessels in the normal brain. The present study concerns the PAL-E reactivity in brain tumors in contrast to normal brain and nonneoplastic brain disease. A total of 122 specimens were examined: brain tumors (n = 94), nonneoplastic brain disease (n

  20. LPS Induces Occludin Dysregulation in Cerebral Microvascular Endothelial Cells via MAPK Signaling and Augmenting MMP-2 Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan-hui Qin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Disrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB integrity contributes to cerebral edema during central nervous system infection. The current study explored the mechanism of lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced dysregulation of tight junction (TJ proteins. Human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3 were exposed to LPS, SB203580 (p38MAPK inhibitor, or SP600125 (JNK inhibitor, and cell vitality was determined by MTT assay. The proteins expressions of p38MAPK, JNK, and TJs (occludin and zonula occludens- (ZO- 1 were determined by western blot. The mRNA levels of TJ components and MMP-2 were measured with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, and MMP-2 protein levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. LPS, SB203580, and SP600125 under respective concentrations of 10, 7.69, or 0.22 µg/mL had no effects on cell vitality. Treatment with LPS decreased mRNA and protein levels of occludin and ZO-1 and enhanced p38MAPK and JNK phosphorylation and MMP-2 expression. These effects were attenuated by pretreatment with SB203580 or SP600125, but not in ZO-1 expression. Both doxycycline hyclate (a total MMP inhibitor and SB-3CT (a specific MMP-2 inhibitor partially attenuated the LPS-induced downregulation of occludin. These data suggest that MMP-2 overexpression and p38MAPK/JNK pathways are involved in the LPS-mediated alterations of occludin in hCMEC/D3; however, ZO-1 levels are not influenced by p38MAPK/JNK.

  1. A Unique Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cell Niche Revealed by Weibel-Palade Bodies and Griffonia Simplicifolia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Songwei; Zhou, Chun; King, Judy A. C; Stevens, Troy

    2014-01-01

    .... Griffonia simplicifolia is a lectin that recognizes pulmonary microvascular endothelium with preference over extra-alveolar endothelium in both arteries and veins, yet the precise vascular location...

  2. Brain microvascular pericytes are immunoactive in culture: cytokine, chemokine, nitric oxide, and LRP-1 expression in response to lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erickson Michelle A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain microvascular pericytes are important constituents of the neurovascular unit. These cells are physically the closest cells to the microvascular endothelial cells in brain capillaries. They significantly contribute to the induction and maintenance of the barrier functions of the blood-brain barrier. However, very little is known about their immune activities or their roles in neuroinflammation. Here, we focused on the immunological profile of brain pericytes in culture in the quiescent and immune-challenged state by studying their production of immune mediators such as nitric oxide (NO, cytokines, and chemokines. We also examined the effects of immune challenge on pericyte expression of low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1, a protein involved in the processing of amyloid precursor protein and the brain-to-blood efflux of amyloid-β peptide. Methods Supernatants were collected from primary cultures of mouse brain pericytes. Release of nitric oxide (NO was measured by the Griess reaction and the level of S-nitrosylation of pericyte proteins measured with a modified "biotin-switch" method. Specific mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway inhibitors were used to determine involvement of these pathways on NO production. Cytokines and chemokines were analyzed by multianalyte technology. The expression of both subunits of LRP-1 was analyzed by western blot. Results Lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced release of NO by pericytes in a dose-dependent manner that was mediated through MAPK pathways. Nitrative stress resulted in S-nitrosylation of cellular proteins. Eighteen of twenty-three cytokines measured were released constitutively by pericytes or with stimulation by LPS, including interleukin (IL-12, IL-13, IL-9, IL-10, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor, eotaxin, chemokine (C-C motif ligand (CCL-3, and CCL-4. Pericyte expressions of both subunits of

  3. Metformin represses glucose starvation induced autophagic response in microvascular endothelial cells and promotes cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Samson Mathews; Ghosh, Suparna; Majeed, Yasser; Arunachalam, Gnanapragasam; Emara, Mohamed M; Ding, Hong; Triggle, Chris R

    2017-05-15

    Metformin, the most frequently administered drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, is being investigated for its potential in the treatment of various types of cancer; however, the cellular basis for this putative anti-cancer action remains controversial. In the current study we examined the effect of metformin on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy in glucose-starved micro-vascular endothelial cells (MECs). The rationale for our experimental protocol is that in a growing tumor MECs are subjected to hypoxia and nutrient/glucose starvation that results from the reduced supply and relatively high consumption of glucose. Mouse MECs (MMECs) were glucose-starved for up to 48h in the absence or presence of metformin (50μM and 2mM) and the status of ER stress, autophagic, cell survival and apoptotic markers were assessed. Activation of ER stress and autophagy was observed in glucose starved MECs as evidenced by the significant increase in the levels of ER stress and autophagic markers while accumulation of LC3B stained punctae in the MECs confirmed autophagic activation. Treatment with 2mM metformin, independent of AMPK, significantly reversed glucose starvation induced ER stress and autophagy in MECs, but, at 24h, did not decrease cell viability; however, at 48h, persistent ER stress and metformin associated inhibition of autophagy decreased cell viability, caused cell cycle arrest in G2/M and increased the number of cells in the sub-G0/G1 phase of cell cycle. Treatment with metformin reduced phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR and inhibited downstream targets of mTOR. Our findings support the argument that treatment with metformin when used in combination with glycolytic inhibitors will inhibit pro-survival autophagy and promote cell death and potentially prove to be the basis for an effective anti-cancer strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. BMPRII influences the response of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells to inflammatory mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengethasamy, Leanda; Hautefort, Aurélie; Tielemans, Birger; Belge, Catharina; Perros, Frédéric; Verleden, Stijn; Fadel, Elie; Van Raemdonck, Dirk; Delcroix, Marion; Quarck, Rozenn

    2016-11-01

    Mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor (BMPR2) gene have been observed in 70 % of patients with heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (HPAH) and in 11-40 % with idiopathic PAH (IPAH). However, carriers of a BMPR2 mutation have only 20 % risk of developing PAH. Since inflammatory mediators are increased and predict survival in PAH, they could act as a second hit inducing the development of pulmonary hypertension in BMPR2 mutation carriers. Our specific aim was to determine whether inflammatory mediators could contribute to pulmonary vascular cell dysfunction in PAH patients with and without a BMPR2 mutation. Pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMEC) and arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC) were isolated from lung parenchyma of transplanted PAH patients, carriers of a BMPR2 mutation or not, and from lobectomy patients or lung donors. The effects of CRP and TNFα on mitogenic activity, adhesiveness capacity, and expression of adhesion molecules were investigated in PMECs and PASMCs. PMECs from BMPR2 mutation carriers induced an increase in PASMC mitogenic activity; moreover, endothelin-1 secretion by PMECs from carriers was higher than by PMECs from non-carriers. Recruitment of monocytes by PMECs isolated from carriers was higher compared to PMECs from non-carriers and from controls, with an elevated ICAM-1 expression. CRP increased adhesion of monocytes to PMECs in carriers and non-carriers, and TNFα only in carriers. PMEC from BMPR2 mutation carriers have enhanced adhesiveness for monocytes in response to inflammatory mediators, suggesting that BMPR2 mutation could generate susceptibility to an inflammatory insult in PAH.

  5. Biomarkers of microvascular endothelial dysfunction predict incident dementia: a population-based prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, H; Nägga, K; Nilsson, E D; Ricci, F; Melander, O; Hansson, O; Bachus, E; Magnusson, M; Fedorowski, A

    2017-07-01

    Cerebral endothelial dysfunction occurs in a spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases. Whether biomarkers of microvascular endothelial dysfunction can predict dementia is largely unknown. We explored the longitudinal association of midregional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), C-terminal endothelin-1 (CT-proET-1) and midregional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM) with dementia and subtypes amongst community-dwelling older adults. A population-based cohort of 5347 individuals (men, 70%; age, 69 ± 6 years) without prevalent dementia provided plasma for determination of MR-proANP, CT-proET-1 and MR-proADM. Three-hundred-and-seventy-three patients (7%) were diagnosed with dementia (120 Alzheimer's disease, 83 vascular, 102 mixed, and 68 other aetiology) over a period of 4.6 ± 1.3 years. Relations between baseline biomarker plasma concentrations and incident dementia were assessed using multivariable Cox regression analysis. Higher levels of MR-proANP were significantly associated with increased risk of all-cause and vascular dementia (hazard ratio [HR] per 1 SD: 1.20, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-1.36; P = 0.002, and 1.52; 1.21-1.89; P dementia increased across the quartiles of MR-proANP (p for linear trend = 0.004; Q4, 145-1681 pmol L -1 vs. Q1, 22-77 pmol L -1 : HR: 1.83; 95%CI: 1.23-2.71) and was most pronounced for vascular type (p for linear trend = 0.005: HR: 2.71; 95%CI: 1.14-6.46). Moreover, the two highest quartiles of CT-proET-1 predicted vascular dementia with a cut-off value at 68 pmol L -1 (Q3-Q4, 68-432 pmol L -1 vs. Q1-Q2,4-68 pmol L -1 ; HR: 1.94; 95%CI: 1.12-3.36). Elevated levels of MR-proADM indicated no increased risk of developing dementia after adjustment for traditional risk factors. Elevated plasma concentration of MR-proANP is an independent predictor of all-cause and vascular dementia. Pronounced increase in CT-proET-1 indicates higher risk of vascular dementia. © 2017 The Association for the Publication of the

  6. [Effects of transient exposure to high glucose on biological behaviors of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, L; Yang, H Z; Li, X C; Huang, X Q; Yuan, B; Zhou, Z D

    2017-02-20

    Objective: To observe the effects of transient exposure to high glucose on biological behaviors of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells cultured in vitro. Methods: The dividing method and treatment of cells for the detection of all indexes in this study were as follows. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells of the 4th passage were divided into 3 groups according to the random number table, with 12 wells in each group. Cells in control group (C) were cultured with complete culture solution containing 5 mmol/L D-glucose for 7 d. Cells in transient high glucose group (THG) were cultured with complete culture solution containing 30 mmol/L D-glucose for 2 d and complete culture solution containing 5 mmol/L D-glucose for 5 d. Cells in prolonged high glucose group (PHG) were cultured with complete culture solution containing 30 mmol/L D-glucose for 7 d. (1) The cell morphology in groups C and PHG on culture day 7 and that in group THG on culture day 2 and 7 was observed by inverted optical microscope. (2) On culture day 0, 2, 4, and 7, cell proliferation rate was determined by cell viability analyzing counter. (3) After culture day 2, the scratch experiment was performed, and the cells were further cultured. At post scratch hour (PSH) 0, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120, the scratch area was measured, and the cell migration rates of the latter 5 time points were calculated. (4) On culture day 0, 2, 4, and 7, the cell apoptosis rate was determined by cell analyzer. (5) Cells were seeded into Matrigel to culture for 24 h after culture day 7. The formation of vessel-like structure was observed by inverted optical microscope. The length and number of branch point of vessel-like structure were calculated. (6) On culture day 2, 4, and 7, mRNA expression of vascularization-related gene tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP-3) was determined with real-time fluorescent quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Data were processed with

  7. Streptococcal-vimentin cross-reactive antibodies induce microvascular cardiac endothelial proinflammatory phenotype in rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delunardo, F; Scalzi, V; Capozzi, A; Camerini, S; Misasi, R; Pierdominici, M; Pendolino, M; Crescenzi, M; Sorice, M; Valesini, G; Ortona, E; Alessandri, C

    2013-09-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is characterized by the presence of anti-streptococcal group A antibodies and anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECA). Molecular mimicry between streptococcal antigens and self proteins is a hallmark of the pathogenesis of rheumatic fever. We aimed to identify, in RHD patients, autoantibodies specific to endothelial autoantigens cross-reactive with streptococcal proteins and to evaluate their role in inducing endothelial damage. We used an immunoproteomic approach with endothelial cell-surface membrane proteins in order to identify autoantigens recognized by AECA of 140 RHD patients. Cross-reactivity of purified antibodies with streptococcal proteins was analysed. Homologous peptides recognized by serum cross-reactive antibodies were found through comparing the amino acid sequence of streptococcal antigens with human antigens. To investigate interleukin (IL)-1R-associated kinase (IRAK1) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, we performed a Western blot analysis of whole extracts proteins from unstimulated or stimulated human microvascular cardiac endothelial cells (HMVEC-C). Adhesion molecule expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors were studied by multiplex bead based immunoassay kits. We observed anti-vimentin antibodies in sera from 49% RHD AECA-positive patients. Cross-reactivity of purified anti-vimentin antibodies with heat shock protein (HSP)70 and streptopain streptococcal proteins was shown. Comparing the amino acid sequence of streptococcal HSP70 and streptopain with human vimentin, we found two homologous peptides recognized by serum cross-reactive antibodies. These antibodies were able to stimulate HMVEC-C inducing IRAK and NF-κB activation, adhesion molecule expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors. In conclusion, streptococcal-vimentin cross-reactive antibodies were able to activate microvascular cardiac endothelium by amplifying the inflammatory response

  8. Ca2+ homeostasis in microvascular endothelial cells from an insulin-dependent diabetic model: role of endosomes/lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanka, Shankar C.; Bennett, David C.; Rojas, Jose D.; Tasby, Geraldine B.; Meininger, Cynthia J.; Wu, Guoyao; Wesson, Donald E.; Pfarr, Curtis M.; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul

    2000-04-01

    Cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt) regulates several cellular functions, e.g. cell growth, contraction, secretion, etc. In many cell types, ion homeostasis appears to be coupled with glucose metabolism. In certain cell types, a strict coupling between glycolysis and the activity of Sarcoplasmic/Endoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCA) has been suggested. Glucose metabolism is altered in diabetes. We hypothesize that: (1) Ca2+ homeostasis is altered in microvascular endothelial cells from diabetic animals due to the dysfunction of glycolysis coupling the activity of SERCA; (2) endosomal/lysosomal compartments expressing SERCA are involved in the dysfunction associated with diabetes.

  9. Adenosine receptors regulate gap junction coupling of the human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells hCMEC/D3 by Ca2+influx through cyclic nucleotide-gated channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Almke; Bintig, Willem; Begandt, Daniela; Klett, Anne; Siller, Ina G; Gregor, Carola; Schaarschmidt, Frank; Weksler, Babette; Romero, Ignacio; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Hell, Stefan W; Ngezahayo, Anaclet

    2017-04-15

    Gap junction channels are essential for the formation and regulation of physiological units in tissues by allowing the lateral cell-to-cell diffusion of ions, metabolites and second messengers. Stimulation of the adenosine receptor subtype A 2B increases the gap junction coupling in the human blood-brain barrier endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. Although the increased gap junction coupling is cAMP-dependent, neither the protein kinase A nor the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP were involved in this increase. We found that cAMP activates cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels and thereby induces a Ca 2+ influx, which leads to the increase in gap junction coupling. The report identifies CNG channels as a possible physiological link between adenosine receptors and the regulation of gap junction channels in endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. The human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 was used to characterize the physiological link between adenosine receptors and the gap junction coupling in endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. Expressed adenosine receptor subtypes and connexin (Cx) isoforms were identified by RT-PCR. Scrape loading/dye transfer was used to evaluate the impact of the A 2A and A 2B adenosine receptor subtype agonist 2-phenylaminoadenosine (2-PAA) on the gap junction coupling. We found that 2-PAA stimulated cAMP synthesis and enhanced gap junction coupling in a concentration-dependent manner. This enhancement was accompanied by an increase in gap junction plaques formed by Cx43. Inhibition of protein kinase A did not affect the 2-PAA-related enhancement of gap junction coupling. In contrast, the cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel inhibitor l-cis-diltiazem, as well as the chelation of intracellular Ca 2+ with BAPTA, or the absence of external Ca 2+ , suppressed the 2-PAA-related enhancement of gap junction coupling. Moreover, we observed a 2-PAA-dependent activation of CNG channels by a combination of

  10. Induction of angiogenesis and modulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 by simvastatin after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongtao; Jiang, Hao; Lu, Dunyue; Qu, Changsheng; Xiong, Ye; Zhou, Dong; Chopp, Michael; Mahmood, Asim

    2011-05-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that simvastatin reduced neuronal death, increased neurogenesis, and promoted functional recovery after traumatic brain injury (TBI). To investigate the effect of simvastatin on angiogenesis after TBI and the related signaling pathways. Saline or simvastatin (1 mg/kg) was administered orally to rats starting at day 1 after TBI or sham surgery and then daily for 14 days. Rats were sacrificed at 3 and 14 days after treatment. Brain sections and tissues were prepared for immunohistochemical staining, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and Western blot analysis. Cultured rat brain microvascular endothelial cells were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation followed by immunocytochemical staining with phallotoxins and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). Western blot analysis was carried out to examine the simvastatin-induced activation of the v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (Akt) signaling pathway. The expression of VEGFR-2 was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Simvastatin significantly increased the length of vascular perimeter, promoted the proliferation of endothelial cells, and improved the sensorimotor function after TBI. Simvastatin stimulated endothelial cell tube formation after oxygen-glucose deprivation in vitro. VEGFR-2 expression in both brain tissues and cultured rat brain microvascular endothelial cells was enhanced after simvastatin treatment, which may be modulated by activation of Akt. Akt-dependent endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation was also induced by simvastatin in vivo and in vitro. Simvastatin augments TBI-induced angiogenesis in the lesion boundary zone and hippocampus and improves functional recovery. Simvastatin also promotes angiogenesis in vitro. These beneficial effects on angiogenesis may be related to simvastatin-induced activation of the VEGFR-2/Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase signaling pathway.

  11. The secretome of endothelial progenitor cells promotes brain endothelial cell activity through PI3-kinase and MAP-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Santo, Stefano; Seiler, Stefanie; Fuchs, Anna-Lena; Staudigl, Jennifer; Widmer, Hans Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis and vascular remodelling are crucial events in tissue repair mechanisms promoted by cell transplantation. Current evidence underscores the importance of the soluble factors secreted by stem cells in tissue regeneration. In the present study we investigated the effects of paracrine factors derived from cultured endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) on rat brain endothelial cell properties and addressed the signaling pathways involved. Endothelial cells derived from rat brain (rBCEC4) were incubated with EPC-derived conditioned medium (EPC-CM). The angiogenic response of rBCEC4 to EPC-CM was assessed as effect on cell number, migration and tubular network formation. In addition, we have compared the outcome of the in vitro experiments with the effects on capillary sprouting from rat aortic rings. The specific PI3K/AKT inhibitor LY294002 and the MEK/ERK inhibitor PD98059 were used to study the involvement of these two signaling pathways in the transduction of the angiogenic effects of EPC-CM. Viable cell number, migration and tubule network formation were significantly augmented upon incubation with EPC-CM. Similar findings were observed for aortic ring outgrowth with significantly longer sprouts. The EPC-CM-induced activities were significantly reduced by the blockage of the PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK signaling pathways. Similarly to the outcome of the rBCEC4 experiments, inhibition of the PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK pathways significantly interfered with capillary sprouting induced by EPC-CM. The present study demonstrates that EPC-derived paracrine factors substantially promote the angiogenic response of brain microvascular endothelial cells. In addition, our findings identified the PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK pathways to play a central role in mediating these effects.

  12. Differential effects of Bartonella henselae on human and feline macro- and micro-vascular endothelial cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berrich, Moez; Kieda, Claudine; Grillon, Catherine; Monteil, Martine; Lamerant, Nathalie; Gavard, Julie; Boulouis, Henri Jean; Haddad, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    ... lines.To this purpose, we have developed nine feline EC lines which allowed comparing the effects of Bartonella strains on human and feline micro-vascular ECs representative of the infection development...

  13. DRAG REDUCING POLYMER ENCHANCES MICROVASCULAR PERFUSION IN THE TRAUMATIZED BRAIN WITH INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION

    OpenAIRE

    Bragin, Denis E.; Thomson, Susan; Bragina, Olga; Statom, Gloria; Kameneva, Marina V.; Nemoto, Edwin M.

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments for traumatic brain injury (TBI) have not focused on improving microvascular perfusion. Drag-reducing polymers (DRP), linear, long-chain, blood soluble non-toxic macromolecules, may offer a new approach to improving cerebral perfusion by primary alteration of the fluid dynamic properties of blood. Nanomolar concentrations of DRP have been shown to improve hemodynamics in animal models of ischemic myocardium and limb, but have not yet been studied in the brain. Recently, we ...

  14. Transcriptional Profile of HIV-induced Nuclear Translocation of Amyloid β in Brain Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    András, Ibolya E.; Rampersaud, Evadnie; Eum, Sung Yong; Toborek, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Increased amyloid deposition in HIV-infected brains may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurocognitive dysfunction in infected patients. We have previously shown that exposure to HIV results in enhanced amyloid β (Aβ) levels in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, suggesting that brain endothelial cells contribute to accumulation of Aβ in HIV-infected brains. Importantly, Aβ not only accumulates in the cytoplasm of HIV-exposed cells but also enters the nuclei of brain endothelial cells. Methods cDNA microarray analysis was performed in order to examine changes in the transcriptional profile associated with Aβ nuclear entry in the presence of HIV-1. Results Gene network analysis indicated that inhibition of nuclear entry of Aβ resulted in enrichment in gene sets involved in apoptosis and survival, endoplasmic reticulum stress response, immune response, cell cycle, DNA damage, oxidative stress, cytoskeleton remodeling and transforming growth factor b (TGFβ) receptor signaling. Conclusions The obtained data indicate that HIV-induced Aβ nuclear uptake affects several cellular stress-related pathways relevant for HIV-induced Aβ pathology. PMID:25446617

  15. Exosomal signaling during hypoxia mediates microvascular endothelial cell migration and vasculogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Salomon

    Full Text Available Vasculogenesis and angiogenesis are critical processes in fetal circulation and placental vasculature development. Placental mesenchymal stem cells (pMSC are known to release paracrine factors (some of which are contained within exosomes that promote angiogenesis and cell migration. The aims of this study were: to determine the effects of oxygen tension on the release of exosomes from pMSC; and to establish the effects of pMSC-derived exosomes on the migration and angiogenic tube formation of placental microvascular endothelial cells (hPMEC. pMSC were isolated from placental villi (8-12 weeks of gestation, n = 6 and cultured under an atmosphere of 1%, 3% or 8% O2. Cell-conditioned media were collected and exosomes (exo-pMSC isolated by differential and buoyant density centrifugation. The dose effect (5-20 µg exosomal protein/ml of pMSC-derived exosomes on hPMEC migration and tube formation were established using a real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte™. The exosome pellet was resuspended in PBS and protein content was established by mass spectrometry (MS. Protein function and canonical pathways were identified using the PANTHER program and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, respectively. Exo-pMSC were identified, by electron microscopy, as spherical vesicles, with a typical cup-shape and diameters around of 100 nm and positive for exosome markers: CD63, CD9 and CD81. Under hypoxic conditions (1% and 3% O2 exo-pMSC released increased by 3.3 and 6.7 folds, respectively, when compared to the controls (8% O2; p<0.01. Exo-pMSC increased hPMEC migration by 1.6 fold compared to the control (p<0.05 and increased hPMEC tube formation by 7.2 fold (p<0.05. MS analysis identified 390 different proteins involved in cytoskeleton organization, development, immunomodulatory, and cell-to-cell communication. The data obtained support the hypothesis that pMSC-derived exosomes may contribute to placental vascular adaptation to low oxygen tension under both

  16. PINK1 and its familial Parkinson's disease-associated mutation regulate brain vascular endothelial inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunfu, Wang; Guangjian, Liu; Ping, Zhong; Yanpeng, Sun; Xiaoxia, Fang; Wei, Hu; Jiang, Yuan; Jingquan, Hu; Songlin, Wang; Hongyan, Zhang; Yong, Liu; Shi, Chen

    2014-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a debilitating disorder that affects movement. Inflammation-mediated endothelial dysfunction has been found to be involved in neurodegenerative diseases, including PD. More than 40 PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) mutations have been found in PD patients. The effects of PINK1 in vascular inflammation are as yet unknown. In this study, our findings revealed that PINK1 can be increased by the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α in primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs). We found that wild-type PINK1 prevents expression of the adhesion molecule vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), thus inhibiting the attachment of monocytes to brain endothelial cells. However, PINK1G309D, the loss-of-function mutation associated with early-onset familial PD, promotes expression of VCAM-1 and exacerbates attachment of monocytes to brain endothelial cells. Mechanism studies revealed that overexpression of wild-type PINK1 inhibits the VCAM-1 promoter by inhibiting the transcriptional activity of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1). However, PINK1G309D promotes the VCAM-1 promoter by increasing the transcriptional activity of IRF-1.

  17. Influenza H5N1 virus infection of polarized human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen Kit M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus is entrenched in poultry in Asia and Africa and continues to infect humans zoonotically causing acute respiratory disease syndrome and death. There is evidence that the virus may sometimes spread beyond respiratory tract to cause disseminated infection. The primary target cell for HPAI H5N1 virus in human lung is the alveolar epithelial cell. Alveolar epithelium and its adjacent lung microvascular endothelium form host barriers to the initiation of infection and dissemination of influenza H5N1 infection in humans. These are polarized cells and the polarity of influenza virus entry and egress as well as the secretion of cytokines and chemokines from the virus infected cells are likely to be central to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. Aim To study influenza A (H5N1 virus replication and host innate immune responses in polarized primary human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells and its relevance to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. Methods We use an in vitro model of polarized primary human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells grown in transwell culture inserts to compare infection with influenza A subtype H1N1 and H5N1 viruses via the apical or basolateral surfaces. Results We demonstrate that both influenza H1N1 and H5N1 viruses efficiently infect alveolar epithelial cells from both apical and basolateral surface of the epithelium but release of newly formed virus is mainly from the apical side of the epithelium. In contrast, influenza H5N1 virus, but not H1N1 virus, efficiently infected polarized microvascular endothelial cells from both apical and basolateral aspects. This provides a mechanistic explanation for how H5N1 virus may infect the lung from systemic circulation. Epidemiological evidence has implicated ingestion of virus-contaminated foods as the source of infection in some instances and our

  18. Endo-MitoEGFP mice: a novel transgenic mouse with fluorescently marked mitochondria in microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Pickles

    Full Text Available Blood vessel-specific fluorescent transgenic mice are excellent tools to study the development of the vasculature and angiogenic processes. There is growing interest in the biological processes relevant to endothelial cells but limited tools exist to selectively evaluate subcellular functions of this cell type in vivo. Here, we report a novel transgenic animal model that expresses mitochondrially targeted enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP via the Hb9 promoter, a homeobox transcription factor with limited known involvement in the vasculature. Random integration of the transgene, containing the entire mouse Hb9 promoter, was found to be expressed in a variety of vascularised tissues. Further inspection revealed that Mito-EGFP localizes to the endothelial cells (ECs of a subset of microvascular blood vessels, especially in the central nervous system (CNS, heart, spleen, thymus, lymph nodes and skin. We demonstrate the utility of this novel transgenic mouse, named Endo-MitoEGFP, in the detection, imaging, and isolation of microvascular ECs and evaluation of EC mitochondrial function isolated from adult animals. These transgenic mice will be useful to studies of ECs in development, physiology, and pathology.

  19. Endo-MitoEGFP mice: a novel transgenic mouse with fluorescently marked mitochondria in microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickles, Sarah; Cadieux-Dion, Maxime; Alvarez, Jorge I; Lécuyer, Marc-Andre; Peyrard, Sarah L; Destroismaisons, Laurie; St-Onge, Lydia; Terouz, Simone; Cossette, Patrick; Prat, Alexandre; Vande Velde, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Blood vessel-specific fluorescent transgenic mice are excellent tools to study the development of the vasculature and angiogenic processes. There is growing interest in the biological processes relevant to endothelial cells but limited tools exist to selectively evaluate subcellular functions of this cell type in vivo. Here, we report a novel transgenic animal model that expresses mitochondrially targeted enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) via the Hb9 promoter, a homeobox transcription factor with limited known involvement in the vasculature. Random integration of the transgene, containing the entire mouse Hb9 promoter, was found to be expressed in a variety of vascularised tissues. Further inspection revealed that Mito-EGFP localizes to the endothelial cells (ECs) of a subset of microvascular blood vessels, especially in the central nervous system (CNS), heart, spleen, thymus, lymph nodes and skin. We demonstrate the utility of this novel transgenic mouse, named Endo-MitoEGFP, in the detection, imaging, and isolation of microvascular ECs and evaluation of EC mitochondrial function isolated from adult animals. These transgenic mice will be useful to studies of ECs in development, physiology, and pathology.

  20. The Balance Between Metalloproteinases and TIMPs: Critical Regulator of Microvascular Endothelial Cell Function in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masciantonio, Marcello G; Lee, Christopher K S; Arpino, Valerie; Mehta, Sanjay; Gill, Sean E

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC), especially the microvascular EC (MVEC), have critical functions in health and disease. For example, healthy MVEC provide a barrier between the fluid and protein found within the blood, and the surrounding tissue. Following tissue injury or infection, the microvascular barrier is often disrupted due to activation and dysfunction of the MVEC. Multiple mechanisms promote MVEC activation and dysfunction, including stimulation by cytokines, mechanical interaction with activated leukocytes, and exposure to harmful leukocyte-derived molecules, which collectively result in a loss of MVEC barrier function. However, MVEC activation is also critical to facilitate recruitment of inflammatory cells, such as neutrophils (PMNs) and monocytes, into the injured or infected tissue. Metalloproteinases, including the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the closely related, a disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs), have been implicated in regulating both MVEC barrier function, through cleavage of adherens and tight junctions proteins between adjacent MVEC and through degradation of the extracellular matrix, as well as PMN-MVEC interaction, through shedding of cell surface PMN receptors. Moreover, the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), which collectively inhibit most MMPs and ADAMs, are critical regulators of MVEC activation and dysfunction through their ability to inhibit metalloproteinases and thereby promote MVEC stability. However, TIMPs have been also found to modulate MVEC function through metalloproteinase-independent mechanisms, such as regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling. This chapter is focused on examining the role of the metalloproteinases and TIMPs in regulation of MVEC function in both health and disease. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hepatocyte growth factor suppresses hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced XO activation in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingqian; Hu, Shunying; Chen, Yundai

    2015-07-01

    Hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) is one of the cellular stresses in pathological conditions, such as myocardial infarction, stroke and organ transplantation. Oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a crucial element of H/R injury in vascular endothelial cells (ECs). Xanthine oxidase (XO) has been recognized to contribute to H/R injury. Of note, xanthine oxidoreductase is synthesized as xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) and needs to be converted to XO to become a source of superoxide. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has been found to protect ECs against H/R injury. The relation, however, between HGF and XO in ECs under H/R conditions remains to be determined. Primary cultured rat cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs) were exposed to 4 h of hypoxia and followed by 1 h of reoxygenation. Generation of ROS and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration was measured by flow cytometry qualification of DCFHDA and fluo-3 AM staining cells, respectively. XDH mRNA was qualified by qRT-PCR analysis. XO activity was determined by colorimetric assay and XO protein levels were determined by Western blot. Cell apoptosis was assessed by caspase-3 activity and Annexin V/PI staining. After H/R, cellular ROS production significantly increased. Both XO activity and XO protein increased after H/R. Cellular ROS elevation was inhibited by allopurinol (a potent XO inhibitor), indicting XO accounting for the generation of ROS after H/R. In addition, XDH mRNA increased after H/R, indicating a de novo XDH synthesis, which needs to be converted to XO to become a source of superoxide. Pretreatment of HGF inhibited the elevation of XO activity and XO protein level after H/R; however, HGF has no effect on the increase of XDH mRNA. We also find an increase of the cytosolic Ca2+ in CMECs after H/R. BAPTA-AM, a cell-permeable Ca2+ chelator, prevented the increase of XO activity and XO protein levels, implicating the elevated cytosolic Ca2+ concentration involvement in XO conversion and XO

  2. NKX2-3 transcriptional regulation of endothelin-1 and VEGF signaling in human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: NKX2-3 is associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. NKX2-3 is expressed in microvascular endothelial cells and the muscularis mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. Human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (HIMECs are actively involved in the pathogenesis of IBD and IBD-associated microvascular dysfunction. To understand the cellular function of NKX2-3 and its potential role underlying IBD pathogenesis, we investigated the genes regulated by NKX2-3 in HIMEC using cDNA microarray. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: NKX2-3 expression was suppressed by shRNA in two HIMEC lines and gene expression was profiled by cDNA microarray. Pathway Analysis was used to identify gene networks according to biological functions and associated pathways. Validation of microarray and genes expression in intestinal tissues was assessed by RT-PCR. NKX2-3 regulated genes are involved in immune and inflammatory response, cell proliferation and growth, metabolic process, and angiogenesis. Several inflammation and angiogenesis related signaling pathways that play important roles in IBD were regulated by NKX2-3, including endothelin-1 and VEGF-PI3K/AKT-eNOS. Expression levels of NKX2-3, VEGFA, PI3K, AKT, and eNOS are increased in intestinal tissues from IBD patients and expression levels of EDN1 are decreased in intestinal tissues from IBD patients. These results demonstrated the important roles of NKX2-3, VEGF, PI3K, AKT, eNOS, and EDN1 in IBD pathogenesis. Correlation analysis showed a positive correlation between mRNA expression of NKX2-3 and VEGFA and a negative correlation between mRNA expression of NKX2-3 and EDN1 in intestinal tissues from IBD patients. CONCLUSION/RELEVANCE: NKX2-3 may play an important role in IBD pathogenesis by regulating endothelin-1 and VEGF signaling in HIMECs.

  3. Apigenin Isolated from the Medicinal Plant Elsholtzia rugulosa Prevents β-Amyloid 25–35-Induces Toxicity in Rat Cerebral Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingshan Liu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells of cerebral capillaries forming the blood-brain barrier play an important role in the pathogenesis and therapy of Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid-β peptides are key pathological elements in the development of this disease. Apigenin (4’,5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone is a plant flavonoid and pharmacologically active agent that can be isolated from several plant species. In the present study, effects of apigenin obtained from the medicinal plant Elsholtzia rugulosa (Labiatae on primary cultured rat cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs mediated by amyloid-β peptide 25–35 (Aβ25–35 were examined. Aβ25–35 showed toxic effects on CMECs, involving reduction of cell viability, release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, increase of nuclear condensation, over-production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS, decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD activity, and breakage of the barrier integrity and function. Based on this model, we demonstrated that apigenin from the medicinal plant Elsholtzia rugulosa protected cultured rat CMECs by increasing cell viability, reducing LDH release, relieving nuclear condensation, alleviating intracellular ROS generation, increasing SOD activity, and strengthening the barrier integrity through the preservation of transendothelial electrical resistance, permeability property and characteristic enzymatic activity after being exposed to Aβ25–35. In conclusion, apigenin isolated from Elsholtzia rugulosa has the ability to protect rat CMECs against Aβ25–35-induced toxicity.

  4. Decreased expression of serum and microvascular vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 in meningococcal sepsis*.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flier, M. van der; Baerveldt, E.M.; Miedema, A.; Hartwig, N.G.; Hazelzet, J.A.; Emonts, M.; Groot, R. de; Prens, E.P.; Vught, A.J. van; Jansen, N.J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the skin microvessel expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and serum-soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 levels in children with meningococcal sepsis. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: Two tertiary academic children hospital PICUs.

  5. Regulation of human cerebro-microvascular endothelial baso-lateral adhesion and barrier function by S1P through dual involvement of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltshire, Rachael; Nelson, Vicky; Kho, Dan Ting; Angel, Catherine E; O'Carroll, Simon J; Graham, E Scott

    2016-01-27

    Herein we show that S1P rapidly and acutely reduces the focal adhesion strength and barrier tightness of brain endothelial cells. xCELLigence biosensor technology was used to measure focal adhesion, which was reduced by S1P acutely and this response was mediated through both S1P1 and S1P2 receptors. S1P increased secretion of several pro-inflammatory mediators from brain endothelial cells. However, the magnitude of this response was small in comparison to that mediated by TNFα or IL-1β. Furthermore, S1P did not significantly increase cell-surface expression of any key cell adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte recruitment, included ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Finally, we reveal that S1P acutely and dynamically regulates microvascular endothelial barrier tightness in a manner consistent with regulated rapid opening followed by closing and strengthening of the barrier. We hypothesise that the role of the S1P receptors in this process is not to cause barrier dysfunction, but is related to controlled opening of the endothelial junctions. This was revealed using real-time measurement of barrier integrity using ECIS ZΘ TEER technology and endothelial viability using xCELLigence technology. Finally, we show that these responses do not occur simply though the pharmacology of a single S1P receptor but involves coordinated action of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

  6. Endothelin-1 Mediates Brain Microvascular Dysfunction Leading to Long-Term Cognitive Impairment in a Model of Experimental Cerebral Malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandi D Freeman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum infection causes a wide spectrum of diseases, including cerebral malaria, a potentially life-threatening encephalopathy. Vasculopathy is thought to contribute to cerebral malaria pathogenesis. The vasoactive compound endothelin-1, a key participant in many inflammatory processes, likely mediates vascular and cognitive dysfunctions in cerebral malaria. We previously demonstrated that C57BL6 mice infected with P. berghei ANKA, our fatal experimental cerebral malaria model, sustained memory loss. Herein, we demonstrate that an endothelin type A receptor (ETA antagonist prevented experimental cerebral malaria-induced neurocognitive impairments and improved survival. ETA antagonism prevented blood-brain barrier disruption and cerebral vasoconstriction during experimental cerebral malaria, and reduced brain endothelial activation, diminishing brain microvascular congestion. Furthermore, exogenous endothelin-1 administration to P. berghei NK65-infected mice, a model generally regarded as a non-cerebral malaria negative control for P. berghei ANKA infection, led to experimental cerebral malaria-like memory deficits. Our data indicate that endothelin-1 is critical in the development of cerebrovascular and cognitive impairments with experimental cerebral malaria. This vasoactive peptide may thus serve as a potential target for adjunctive therapy in the management of cerebral malaria.

  7. Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor is required for amyloid pathology in brain endothelial cells induced by Glycoprotein 120, methamphetamine and nicotine

    OpenAIRE

    Liqun Liu; Jingyi Yu; Li Li; Bao Zhang; Lingjuan Liu; Chun-Hua Wu; Ambrose Jong; Ding-An Mao; Sheng-He Huang

    2017-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) caused by HIV-1 virotoxins and drug abuse is the lack of understanding the underlying mechanisms that are commonly associated with disorders of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which mainly consists of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC). Here, we hypothesized that Glycoprotein 120 (gp120), methamphetamine (METH) and nicotine (NT) can enhance amyloid-beta (A?) accumulation in BMEC through Alpha7 nicoti...

  8. RNA-seq reveals novel transcriptome of genes and their isoforms in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells treated with thrombin.

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    Li Qin Zhang

    Full Text Available The dysregulation of vascular endothelial cells by thrombin has been implicated in the development of a number of pathologic disorders such as inflammatory conditions, cancer, diabetes, coronary heart disease. However, transcriptional regulation of vascular endothelial cells by thrombin is not completely understood. In the present study, Illumina RNA-seq was used to profile the transcriptome in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-L treated with thrombin for 6 h to gain insight into thrombin's direct effects on the endothelial function. Out of 100 million total reads from a paired end sequencing assay, 91-94% of the reads were aligned to over 16,000 genes in the reference human genome. Thrombin upregulated 150 known genes and 480 known isoforms, and downregulated 2,190 known genes and 3,574 known isoforms by at least 2 fold. Of note, thrombin upregulated 1,775 previously unknown isoforms and downregulated 12,202 previously unknown isoforms by at least 2 fold. Many genes displayed isoform specific differential expression levels and different usage of transcriptional start sites after the thrombin treatment. The cross comparisons between our RNA-seq data and those of DNA microarray analysis of either 6 h thrombin treated HUVEC or 5 h TNFα treated HMVEC have provided a significant overlapping list of differentially expressed genes, supporting the robust utility of our dataset. Further in-depth follow-up analysis of the transcriptional regulation reported in this study may shed light on molecular pathogenic mechanisms underlying thrombin mediated endothelial dysfunction in various diseases and provide new leads of potential therapeutic targets.

  9. RNA-seq Reveals Novel Transcriptome of Genes and Their Isoforms in Human Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells Treated with Thrombin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li Qin; Cheranova, Dilyara; Gibson, Margaret; Ding, Shinghua; Heruth, Daniel P.; Fang, Deyu; Ye, Shui Qing

    2012-01-01

    The dysregulation of vascular endothelial cells by thrombin has been implicated in the development of a number of pathologic disorders such as inflammatory conditions, cancer, diabetes, coronary heart disease. However, transcriptional regulation of vascular endothelial cells by thrombin is not completely understood. In the present study, Illumina RNA-seq was used to profile the transcriptome in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-L) treated with thrombin for 6 h to gain insight into thrombin's direct effects on the endothelial function. Out of 100 million total reads from a paired end sequencing assay, 91–94% of the reads were aligned to over 16,000 genes in the reference human genome. Thrombin upregulated 150 known genes and 480 known isoforms, and downregulated 2,190 known genes and 3,574 known isoforms by at least 2 fold. Of note, thrombin upregulated 1,775 previously unknown isoforms and downregulated 12,202 previously unknown isoforms by at least 2 fold. Many genes displayed isoform specific differential expression levels and different usage of transcriptional start sites after the thrombin treatment. The cross comparisons between our RNA-seq data and those of DNA microarray analysis of either 6 h thrombin treated HUVEC or 5 h TNFα treated HMVEC have provided a significant overlapping list of differentially expressed genes, supporting the robust utility of our dataset. Further in-depth follow-up analysis of the transcriptional regulation reported in this study may shed light on molecular pathogenic mechanisms underlying thrombin mediated endothelial dysfunction in various diseases and provide new leads of potential therapeutic targets. PMID:22359579

  10. Vitamin E isoforms differentially regulate intercellular adhesion molecule-1 activation of PKCα in human microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiam Abdala-Valencia

    Full Text Available ICAM-1-dependent leukocyte recruitment in vivo is inhibited by the vitamin E isoform d-α-tocopherol and elevated by d-γ-tocopherol. ICAM-1 is reported to activate endothelial cell signals including protein kinase C (PKC, but the PKC isoform and the mechanism for ICAM-1 activation of PKC are not known. It is also not known whether ICAM-1 signaling in endothelial cells is regulated by tocopherol isoforms. We hypothesized that d-α-tocopherol and d-γ-tocopherol differentially regulate ICAM-1 activation of endothelial cell PKC.ICAM-1 crosslinking activated the PKC isoform PKCα but not PKCβ in TNFα-pretreated human microvascular endothelial cells. ICAM-1 activation of PKCα was blocked by the PLC inhibitor U73122, ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059, and xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol. ERK1/2 activation was blocked by inhibition of XO and PLC but not by inhibition of PKCα, indicating that ERK1/2 is downstream of XO and upstream of PKCα during ICAM-1 signaling. During ICAM-1 activation of PKCα, the XO-generated ROS did not oxidize PKCα. Interestingly, d-α-tocopherol inhibited ICAM-1 activation of PKCα but not the upstream signal ERK1/2. The d-α-tocopherol inhibition of PKCα was ablated by the addition of d-γ-tocopherol.Crosslinking ICAM-1 stimulated XO/ROS which activated ERK1/2 that then activated PKCα. ICAM-1 activation of PKCα was inhibited by d-α-tocopherol and this inhibition was ablated by the addition of d-γ-tocopherol. These tocopherols regulated ICAM-1 activation of PKCα without altering the upstream signal ERK1/2. Thus, we identified a mechanism for ICAM-1 activation of PKC and determined that d-α-tocopherol and d-γ-tocopherol have opposing regulatory functions for ICAM-1-activated PKCα in endothelial cells.

  11. mCRP triggers angiogenesis by inducing F3 transcription and TF signalling in microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Esther; de la Torre, Raquel; Arderiu, Gemma; Slevin, Mark; Badimon, Lina

    2017-01-26

    Inflammation contributes to vascular disease progression. However, the role of circulating inflammatory molecules on microvascular endothelial cell (mECs) is not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the short pentraxin CRP on microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function. Subcutaneously implanted collagen plugs seeded with human mECs exposed to monomeric CRP (mCRP) in mice showed formation of an extended network of microvessels both in the plug and the overlying skin tissue, while mECs exposure to pentameric native CRP (nCRP) induced a much milder effect. To understand the mechanisms behind this angiogenic effects, mECs were exposed to both CRP forms and cell migration, wound repair and tube-like formation were investigated. nCRP effects were moderate and of slow-onset whereas mCRP induced rapid, and highly significant effects. We investigated how circulating nCRP is transformed into mCRP by confocal microscopy and western blot. nCRP is transformed into mCRP on the mECs membranes in a time dependent fashion. This transformation is specific and in part receptor dependent, and the formed mCRP triggers F3 gene transcription and TF-protein expression in mECs to induce angiogenesis. F3-silenced mECs are unable to form angiotubes. In agreement, mCRP induced upregulation of the TF signalling pathway in mECs with downstream phosphorylation of AKT and activation of the transcription factor ETS1 leading to increased CCL2 release. The circulating pentraxin nCRP with little pro-angiogenic effect when dissociated into mCRP on the surface of mECs is able to trigger potent proangiogenic effects by inducing F3-gene upregulation and TF signalling.

  12. Effect of penehyclidine hydrochloride on β-arrestin-1 expression in lipopolysaccharide-induced human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan, J. [Department of Anesthesiology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Xiao, F. [Department of Osteology, Pu Ai Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Zhang, Z.Z.; Wang, Y.P.; Chen, K.; Wang, Y.L. [Department of Anesthesiology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei (China)

    2013-12-02

    β-arrestins are expressed proteins that were first described, and are well-known, as negative regulators of G protein-coupled receptor signaling. Penehyclidine hydrochloride (PHC) is a new anti-cholinergic drug that can inhibit biomembrane lipid peroxidation, and decrease cytokines and oxyradicals. However, to date, no reports on the effects of PHC on β-arrestin-1 in cells have been published. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of PHC on β-arrestin-1 expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC). Cultured HPMEC were pretreated with PHC, followed by LPS treatment. Muscarinic receptor mRNAs were assayed by real-time quantitative PCR. Cell viability was assayed by the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) conversion test. The dose and time effects of PHC on β-arrestin-1 expression in LPS-induced HPMEC were determined by Western blot analysis. Cell malondialdehyde (MDA) level and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured. It was found that the M{sub 3} receptor was the one most highly expressed, and was activated 5 min after LPS challenge. Furthermore, 2 μg/mL PHC significantly upregulated expression of β-arrestin-1 within 10 to 15 min. Compared with the control group, MDA levels in cells were remarkably increased and SOD activities were significantly decreased in LPS pretreated cells, while PHC markedly decreased MDA levels and increased SOD activities. We conclude that PHC attenuated ROS injury by upregulating β-arrestin-1 expression, thereby implicating a mechanism by which PHC may exert its protective effects against LPS-induced pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell injury.

  13. Impairment of systemic microvascular endothelial and smooth muscle function in individuals with early-onset coronary artery disease: studies with laser speckle contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Elaine G; De Lorenzo, Andrea; Huguenin, Grazielle; Oliveira, Glaucia M M; Tibiriçá, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of systemic microvascular reactivity is currently considered to be critical in the stratification of cardiovascular risk. In the present study, we compared skin microvascular function in individuals with early-onset (premature) coronary artery disease (EOCAD, n=30) with that of age-matched and sex-matched healthy individuals (n=30). Using laser speckle contrast imaging, cutaneous blood flow was assessed in the forearm at rest and during reactivity tests, including postocclusive reactive hyperemia and the iontophoresis of acetylcholine or sodium nitroprusside with increasing currents of 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 μA for 10-s intervals spaced 1 min apart. Carotid intima-media thickness was evaluated using an ultrasound system and a 7.5 MHz ultrasound transducer. The endothelium-dependent skin microvascular vasodilator responses that were induced by both acetylcholine and postocclusive reactive hyperemia were significantly reduced in patients with EOCAD compared with healthy individuals. The vasodilator responses that were induced by sodium nitroprusside were also significantly reduced in individuals with EOCAD. These systemic microvascular alterations were concurrent with increased carotid intima-media thickness in these patients. Laser speckle contrast imaging identifies endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent microvascular dysfunction in individuals presenting with EOCAD, and thus could be valuable as an early peripheral marker of atherothrombotic disease.

  14. C5a induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in brain vascular endothelial cells in experimental lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Supriya D; Tutino, Vincent M; Redae, Yonas; Meng, Hui; Siddiqui, Adnan; Woodruff, Trent M; Jarvis, James N; Hennon, Teresa; Schwartz, Stanley; Quigg, Richard J; Alexander, Jessy J

    2016-08-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction complicates central nervous system lupus, an important aspect of systemic lupus erythematosus. To gain insight into the underlying mechanism, vascular corrosion casts of brain were generated from the lupus mouse model, MRL/lpr mice and the MRL/MpJ congenic controls. Scanning electron microscopy of the casts showed loss of vascular endothelial cells in lupus mice compared with controls. Immunostaining revealed a significant increase in caspase 3 expression in the brain vascular endothelial cells, which suggests that apoptosis could be an important mechanism causing cell loss, and thereby loss of BBB integrity. Complement activation occurs in lupus resulting in increased generation of circulating C5a, which caused the endothelial layer to become 'leaky'. In this study, we show that C5a and lupus serum induced apoptosis in cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVECs), whereas selective C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1) antagonist reduced apoptosis in these cells, demonstrating C5a/C5aR1-dependence. Gene expression of initiator caspases, caspase 1 and caspase 8, and pro-apoptotic proteins death-associated protein kinase 1, Fas-associated protein (FADD), cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor 45 000 MW subunit A-like effector B (CIDEB) and BCL2-associated X protein were increased in HBMVECs treated with lupus serum or C5a, indicating that both the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways could be critical mediators of brain endothelial cell apoptosis in this setting. Overall, our findings suggest that C5a/C5aR1 signalling induces apoptosis through activation of FADD, caspase 8/3 and CIDEB in brain endothelial cells in lupus. Further elucidation of the underlying apoptotic mechanisms mediating the reduced endothelial cell number is important in establishing the potential therapeutic effectiveness of C5aR1 inhibition that could prevent and/or reduce BBB alterations and preserve the physiological function of BBB in

  15. Differential cytotoxic actions of Shiga toxin 1 and Shiga toxin 2 on microvascular and macrovascular endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauwens, Andreas; Bielaszewska, Martina; Kemper, Björn; Langehanenberg, Patrik; von Bally, Gert; Reichelt, Rudolf; Mulac, Dennis; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Friedrich, Alexander W; Kim, Kwang S; Karch, Helge; Müthing, Johannes

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-mediated injury to vascular endothelial cells in the kidneys, brain and other organs underlies the pathogenesis of haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) caused by enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC). We present a direct and comprehensive comparison of cellular injury induced by

  16. Increased microparticle production and impaired microvascular endothelial function in aldosterone-salt-treated rats: protective effects of polyphenols.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia López Andrés

    Full Text Available We aimed to characterize circulating microparticles in association with arterial stiffness, inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in aldosterone-salt-induced hypertension in rats and to investigate the preventive effects of red wine polyphenols. Uninephrectomized male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with aldosterone-salt (1 µg.h(-1, with or without administration of either red wine polyphenols, Provinols™ (20 mg.kg(-1.day(-1, or spironolactone (30 mg.kg(-1.day(-1 for 4 weeks. Microparticles, arterial stiffness, nitric oxide (NO spin trapping, and mesenteric arterial function were measured. Aldosterone-salt rats showed increased microparticle levels, including those originating from platelets, endothelium and erythrocytes. Hypertension resulted in enhanced aortic stiffness accompanied by increased circulating and aortic NO levels and an upregulation of aortic inducible NO-synthase, NFκB, superoxide anions and nitrotyrosine. Flow-induced dilatation was reduced in mesenteric arteries. These effects were prevented by spironolactone. Provinols™ did not reduce arterial stiffness or systolic hypertension but had effects similar to those of spironolactone on endothelial function assessed by flow-mediated vasodilatation, microparticle generation, aortic NO levels and oxidative stress and apoptosis in the vessel wall. Neither the contractile response nor endothelium-dependent relaxation in mesenteric arteries differed between groups. The in vivo effects of Provinols™ were not mediated by mineralocorticoid receptors or changes in shear stress. In conclusion, vascular remodelling and endothelial dysfunction in aldosterone-salt-mediated hypertension are associated with increased circulating microparticles. Polyphenols prevent the enhanced release of microparticles, macrovascular inflammation and oxidative stress, and microvascular endothelial dysfunction independently of blood pressure, shear stress and mineralocorticoid receptor activation in a

  17. Selenoglycoproteins attenuate adhesion of tumor cells to the brain microvascular endothelium via a process involving NF-κB activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, Jagoda K; Choi, Jeong June; Xiao, Rijin; Eum, Sung Yong; Kwiatkowski, Stefan; Wolff, Gretchen; Spangler, Leya; Power, Ronan F; Toborek, Michal

    2015-02-01

    Selenium-containing compounds and selenized yeast have anticancer properties. In order to address possible mechanisms involved in these effects, selenoglycoproteins (SGPs) were extracted from selenium-enriched yeast at pH 4.0 and 6.5 (the fractions are called SGP40 and SGP65, respectively), followed by evaluation of their impact on the interactions of lung and breast tumor cells with human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs). Extracted SGPs, especially SGP40, significantly inhibited adhesion of tumor cells to HBMECs and their transendothelial migration. Because the active components of SGPs are unknown, small selenium-containing compounds [leucyl-valyl-selenomethionyl-arginine (LVSe-MR) and methylselenoadenosine (M-Se-A)], which are normally present in selenized yeast, were introduced as additional treatment groups. Treatment of HBMECs with SGP40, LVSe-MR and M-Se-A induced changes in gene signatures, which suggested a central involvement of nuclear factor (NF)-κB-dependent pathway. These observations were confirmed in the subsequent analysis of NF-κB DNA binding activity, quantitative measurements of the expression of selected genes and proteins, and tumor cell adhesion assay with a specific NF-κB inhibitor as the additional treatment factor. These findings indicate that specific organic selenium-containing compounds have the ability to inhibit tumor cell adhesion to brain endothelial cells via down-regulation of NF-κB. SGPs appear to be more effective than small selenium-containing compounds, suggesting the role of not only selenium but also the glycoprotein component in the observed protective impact. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Iron oxide nanoparticles induce human microvascular endothelial cell permeability through reactive oxygen species production and microtubule remodeling

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    Shi Xianglin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engineered iron nanoparticles are being explored for the development of biomedical applications and many other industry purposes. However, to date little is known concerning the precise mechanisms of translocation of iron nanoparticles into targeted tissues and organs from blood circulation, as well as the underlying implications of potential harmful health effects in human. Results The confocal microscopy imaging analysis demonstrates that exposure to engineered iron nanoparticles induces an increase in cell permeability in human microvascular endothelial cells. Our studies further reveal iron nanoparticles enhance the permeability through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the stabilization of microtubules. We also showed Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathways are involved in iron nanoparticle-induced cell permeability. The inhibition of ROS demonstrate ROS play a major role in regulating Akt/GSK-3β – mediated cell permeability upon iron nanoparticle exposure. These results provide new insights into the bioreactivity of engineered iron nanoparticles which can inform potential applications in medical imaging or drug delivery. Conclusion Our results indicate that exposure to iron nanoparticles induces an increase in endothelial cell permeability through ROS oxidative stress-modulated microtubule remodeling. The findings from this study provide new understandings on the effects of nanoparticles on vascular transport of macromolecules and drugs.

  19. Molecular and Cellular Characterization of Space Flight Effects on Microvascular Endothelial Cell Function - PreparatoryWork for the SFEF Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsamo, Michele; Barravecchia, Ivana; Mariotti, Sara; Merenda, Alessandra; De Cesari, Chiara; Vukich, Marco; Angeloni, Debora

    2014-12-01

    Exposure to microgravity during space flight (SF) of variable length induces suffering of the endothelium (the cells lining all blood vessels), mostly responsible for health problems found in astronauts and animals returning from space. Of interest to pre-nosological medicine, the effects of microgravity on astronauts are strikingly similar to the consequences of sedentary life, senescence and degenerative diseases on Earth, although SF effects are accelerated and reversible. Thus, microgravity is a significant novel model for better understanding of common pathologies. A comprehensive cell and molecular biology study is needed in order to explain pathophysiological findings after SFs. This project will study the effects of microgravity and cosmic radiation on endothelial cells (ECs) cultured on the International Space Station through analysis of 1) cell transcriptome, 2) DNA methylome, 3) DNA damage and cell senescence, 4) variations in cell cycle and cell morphology. This project has been selected by the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency and is presently in preparation. The ground study presented here was performed to determine the biological and engineering requirements that will allow us to retrieve suitable samples after culturing, fixing and storing ECs in space. We expect to identify molecular pathways activated by space microgravity in microvascular ECs, which may shed light on pathogenic molecular mechanisms responsible for endothelial suffering shared by astronauts and individuals affected with aging, degenerative and sedentary life-associated pathologies on Earth.

  20. Prostaglandin F2-alpha receptor (FPr expression on porcine corpus luteum microvascular endothelial cells (pCL-MVECs

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    Forni Monica

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The corpus luteum (CL is a transient endocrine gland and prostaglandin F2-alpha is considered to be the principal luteolysin in pigs. In this species, the in vivo administration of prostaglandin F2-alpha induces apoptosis in large vessels as early as 6 hours after administration. The presence of the prostaglandin F2-alpha receptor (FPr on the microvascular endothelial cells (pCL-MVECs of the porcine corpus luteum has not yet been defined. The aim of the study was to assess FPr expression in pCL-MVECs in the early and mid-luteal phases (EL-p, ML-p, and during pregnancy (P-p. Moreover, the effectiveness of prostaglandin F2-alpha treatment in inducing pCL-MVEC apoptosis was tested. Methods Porcine CLs were collected in the EL and ML phases and during P-p. All CLs from each animal were minced together and the homogenates underwent enzymatic digestion. The pCL-MVECs were then positively selected by an immunomagnetic separation protocol using Dynabeads coated with anti-CD31 monoclonal antibody and seeded in flasks in the presence of EGM 2-MV (Microvascular Endothelial Cell Medium-2. After 4 days of culture, the cells underwent additional immunomagnetic selection and were seeded in flasks until the confluent stage. PCR Real time, western blot and immunodetection assays were utilized to assess the presence of FPr on pCL-MVEC primary cultures. Furthermore, the influence of culture time (freshly isolated, cultured overnight and at confluence and hormonal treatment (P4 and E2 on FPr expression in pCL-MVECs was also investigated. Apoptosis was detected by TUNEL assay of pCL-MVECs exposed to prostaglandin F2-alpha. Results We obtained primary cultures of pCL-MVECs from all animals. FPr mRNA and protein levels showed the highest value (ANOVA in CL-MVECs derived from the early-luteal phase. Moreover, freshly isolated MVECs showed a higher FPr mRNA value than those cultured overnight and confluent cells (ANOVA. prostaglandin F2-alpha

  1. Body Mass Index Is Associated With Microvascular Endothelial Dysfunction in Patients With Treated Metabolic Risk Factors and Suspected Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Dirk J; van Leeuwen, Maarten A H; Janssens, Gladys N; Lenzen, Mattie J; van de Ven, Peter M; Eringa, Etto C; van Royen, Niels

    2017-09-14

    Obesity is key feature of the metabolic syndrome and is associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity is associated with macrovascular endothelial dysfunction, a determinant of outcome in patients with coronary artery disease. Here, we compared the influence of obesity on microvascular endothelial function to that of established cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and smoking in patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Endothelial function was assessed during postocclusive reactive hyperemia of the brachial artery and downstream microvascular beds in 108 patients who were scheduled for coronary angiography. In all patients, microvascular vasodilation was assessed using peripheral arterial tonometry; laser Doppler flowmetry and digital thermal monitoring were performed. Body mass index was significantly associated with decreased endothelium-dependent vasodilatation measured with peripheral arterial tonometry (r=0.23, P=0.02), laser Doppler flowmetry (r=0.30, Pmicrovascular vasodilatation. Especially in diabetic patients, endothelial function was not significantly reduced (control versus diabetes mellitus, mean±SEM or median [interquartile range], peripheral arterial tonometry: 1.90±0.20 versus 1.67±0.20, P=0.19, laser Doppler flowmetry: 728% [interquartile range, 427-1110] versus 589% [interquartile range, 320-1067] P=0.28, and digital thermal monitoring: 6.6±1.0% versus 2.5±1.7%, P=0.08). In multivariate linear regression analysis, body mass index was the only risk factor that significantly attenuated endothelium-dependent vasodilatation using all 3 microvascular function tests. Higher body mass index is associated with reduced endothelial function in patients with suspected coronary artery disease, even after adjustment for treated diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and smoking. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association

  2. Activated Brain Endothelial Cells Cross-Present Malaria Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Shanshan W; Poh, Chek Meng; Rénia, Laurent

    2015-06-01

    In the murine model of cerebral malaria caused by P. berghei ANKA (PbA), parasite-specific CD8+ T cells directly induce pathology and have long been hypothesized to kill brain endothelial cells that have internalized PbA antigen. We previously reported that brain microvessel fragments from infected mice cross-present PbA epitopes, using reporter cells transduced with epitope-specific T cell receptors. Here, we confirm that endothelial cells are the population responsible for cross-presentation in vivo, not pericytes or microglia. PbA antigen cross-presentation by primary brain endothelial cells in vitro confers susceptibility to killing by CD8+ T cells from infected mice. IFNγ stimulation is required for brain endothelial cross-presentation in vivo and in vitro, which occurs by a proteasome- and TAP-dependent mechanism. Parasite strains that do not induce cerebral malaria were phagocytosed and cross-presented less efficiently than PbA in vitro. The main source of antigen appears to be free merozoites, which were avidly phagocytosed. A human brain endothelial cell line also phagocytosed P. falciparum merozoites. Besides being the first demonstration of cross-presentation by brain endothelial cells, our results suggest that interfering with merozoite phagocytosis or antigen processing may be effective strategies for cerebral malaria intervention.

  3. Activated Brain Endothelial Cells Cross-Present Malaria Antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan W Howland

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the murine model of cerebral malaria caused by P. berghei ANKA (PbA, parasite-specific CD8+ T cells directly induce pathology and have long been hypothesized to kill brain endothelial cells that have internalized PbA antigen. We previously reported that brain microvessel fragments from infected mice cross-present PbA epitopes, using reporter cells transduced with epitope-specific T cell receptors. Here, we confirm that endothelial cells are the population responsible for cross-presentation in vivo, not pericytes or microglia. PbA antigen cross-presentation by primary brain endothelial cells in vitro confers susceptibility to killing by CD8+ T cells from infected mice. IFNγ stimulation is required for brain endothelial cross-presentation in vivo and in vitro, which occurs by a proteasome- and TAP-dependent mechanism. Parasite strains that do not induce cerebral malaria were phagocytosed and cross-presented less efficiently than PbA in vitro. The main source of antigen appears to be free merozoites, which were avidly phagocytosed. A human brain endothelial cell line also phagocytosed P. falciparum merozoites. Besides being the first demonstration of cross-presentation by brain endothelial cells, our results suggest that interfering with merozoite phagocytosis or antigen processing may be effective strategies for cerebral malaria intervention.

  4. Activated Brain Endothelial Cells Cross-Present Malaria Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Shanshan W.; Poh, Chek Meng; Rénia, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    In the murine model of cerebral malaria caused by P. berghei ANKA (PbA), parasite-specific CD8+ T cells directly induce pathology and have long been hypothesized to kill brain endothelial cells that have internalized PbA antigen. We previously reported that brain microvessel fragments from infected mice cross-present PbA epitopes, using reporter cells transduced with epitope-specific T cell receptors. Here, we confirm that endothelial cells are the population responsible for cross-presentation in vivo, not pericytes or microglia. PbA antigen cross-presentation by primary brain endothelial cells in vitro confers susceptibility to killing by CD8+ T cells from infected mice. IFNγ stimulation is required for brain endothelial cross-presentation in vivo and in vitro, which occurs by a proteasome- and TAP-dependent mechanism. Parasite strains that do not induce cerebral malaria were phagocytosed and cross-presented less efficiently than PbA in vitro. The main source of antigen appears to be free merozoites, which were avidly phagocytosed. A human brain endothelial cell line also phagocytosed P. falciparum merozoites. Besides being the first demonstration of cross-presentation by brain endothelial cells, our results suggest that interfering with merozoite phagocytosis or antigen processing may be effective strategies for cerebral malaria intervention. PMID:26046849

  5. Visfatin Mediates SCLC Cells Migration across Brain Endothelial Cells through Upregulation of CCL2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Liu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC is characterized as an aggressive tumor with brain metastasis. Although preventing SCLC metastasis to the brain is immensely important for survival, the molecular mechanisms of SCLC cells penetrating the blood–brain barrier (BBB are largely unknown. Recently, visfatin has been considered as a novel pro-inflammatory adipocytokine involved in various cancers. Herein, we present evidence that elevated levels of visfatin in the serum of SCLC patients were associated with brain metastasis, and visfain was increased in NCI-H446 cells, a SCLC cell line, during interacting with human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC. Using in vitro BBB model, we found that visfatin could promote NCI-H446 cells migration across HBMEC monolayer, while the effect was inhibited by knockdown of visfatin. Furthermore, our findings indicated that CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2 was involved in visfatin-mediated NCI-H446 cells transendothelial migtation. Results also showed that the upregulation of CCL2 in the co-culture system was reversed by blockade of visfatin. In particular, visfatin-induced CCL2 was attenuated by specific inhibitor of PI3K/Akt signaling in NCI-H446 cells. Taken together, we demonstrated that visfatin was a prospective target for SCLC metastasis to brain, and understanding the molecular mediators would lead to effective strategies for inhibition of SCLC brain metastasis.

  6. Methylxanthines and calcium-mobilizing agents inhibit the expression of cytokine-inducible nitric oxide synthase and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in murine microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereta, M; Bereta, J; Georgoff, I; Coffman, F D; Cohen, S; Cohen, M C

    1994-06-01

    In response to exposure to the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), murine brain microvascular endothelial cells (MME) synthesize the cell surface molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and the intracellular enzyme, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). However, iNOS synthesis requires the presence of both TNF and IFN-gamma, while VCAM-1 can be induced by either cytokine alone. We examined the induction of VCAM-1 and iNOS under a variety of conditions to better define the regulation of TNF and IFN-gamma signal transduction pathways in MME. We utilized the analysis of steady-state levels of iNOS mRNA as well as the measurement of MME-released NO-EDRF (nitric oxide as an endothelium-derived relaxing factor) activity and accumulation of nitrite in the culture medium to define iNOS expression and activity. VCAM-1 expression was determined by flow cytometric analysis. Our data indicate that low density lipoproteins inhibited cytokine-induced iNOS activity by affecting the steady-state levels of iNOS mRNA. Methylxanthines (caffeine and theophylline) as well as several calcium-mobilizing agents inhibited the expression/activity of both iNOS and VCAM-1 in MME. The effectiveness of these agents was dependent upon the degree of disruption in cell calcium homeostasis during cytokine treatment. Cells which had been pretreated with calcium-modulating drugs and then washed and allowed to return to normal calcium homeostasis showed little to no effect from these agents. In addition, our results suggest that NO produced by iNOS acts as a metabolic switch during inflammation by inhibiting oxidative phosphorylation and forcing vascular endothelial cells to temporarily utilize anaerobic energy metabolism.

  7. Human breast microvascular endothelial cells retain phenotypic traits in long-term finite life span culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdsson, Valgardur; Fridriksdottir, Agla J R; Kjartansson, Jens

    2007-01-01

    uptake of low-density lipoprotein, and had E-selectin induced upon treatment with tumor necrosis factor-alpha. The first signs of senescence in passage 14 were accompanied by gain of trisomy 11. At passage 18 cells showed chromosomal aberrations and growth arrest as revealed by beta......Attempts to study endothelial-epithelial interactions in the human breast have been hampered by lack of protocols for long-term cultivation of breast endothelial cells (BRENCs). The aim of this study was to establish long-term cultures of BRENCs and to compare their phenotypic traits......-galactosidase staining. We demonstrate here that breast microvasculature may serve as a large-scale source for expansion of BRENCs with molecular and functional traits preserved. These cells will form the basis for studies on the role of endothelial cells in breast morphogenesis....

  8. Effects of Aging on Parasite Biomass, Inflammation, Endothelial Activation, Microvascular Dysfunction and Disease Severity in Plasmodium knowlesi and Plasmodium falciparum Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Bridget E; Grigg, Matthew J; William, Timothy; Piera, Kim A; Boyle, Michelle J; Yeo, Tsin W; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2017-06-15

    In populations pauci-immune to malaria, risk of severe malaria increases with age. This is particularly apparent in Plasmodium knowlesi malaria. However, pathophysiological mechanisms underlying knowlesi malaria, and of the age-related increase in risk of severe malaria in general, are poorly understood. In Malaysian patients aged ≥12 years with severe (n = 47) and nonsevere (n = 99) knowlesi malaria, severe (n = 21) and nonsevere (n = 109) falciparum malaria, and healthy controls (n = 50), we measured parasite biomass, systemic inflammation (interleukin 6 [IL-6]), endothelial activation (angiopoietin-2), and microvascular function, and evaluated the effects of age. Plasmodium knowlesi parasitemia correlated with age (Spearman's correlation coefficient [rs] = 0.36; P malaria, IL-6, angiopoietin-2, and microvascular dysfunction were increased in severe compared to nonsevere disease, and all correlated with age, independent of parasitemia. In falciparum malaria, angiopoietin-2 increased with age, independent of parasite biomass (histidine-rich protein 2 [HRP2]). Independent risk factors for severe malaria included parasitemia and angiopoietin-2 in knowlesi malaria, and HRP2, angiopoietin-2, and microvascular dysfunction in falciparum malaria. Parasite biomass, endothelial activation, and microvascular dysfunction are associated with severe disease in knowlesi malaria and likely contribute to pathogenesis. The association of each of these processes with aging may account for the greater severity of malaria observed in older adults in low-endemic regions.

  9. Design and physicochemical characterization of poly(amidoamine) nanoparticles and the toxicological evaluation in human endothelial cells: applications to peptide delivery to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coué, Grégory; Freese, Christian; Unger, Ronald E; Kirkpatrick, C James; Pickl, Karin E; Sinner, Frank M; Engbersen, Johan F J

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated nanoparticles formulated by self-assembly of a biodegradable poly(amidoamine) (PAA) and a fluorescently labeled peptide, in their capacity to internalize in endothelial cells and deliver the peptide, with possible applications for brain drug delivery. The nanoparticles were characterized in terms of size, surface charge, and loading efficiency, and were applied on human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (Huvec) cells. Cell-internalization and cytotoxicity experiments showed that the PAA-based nanocomplexes were essentially nontoxic, and the peptide was successfully internalized into cells. The results indicate that these PAAs have an excellent property as nontoxic carriers for intracellular protein and peptide delivery, and provide opportunities for novel applications in the delivery of peptides to endothelial cells of the brain.

  10. Targeted siRNA Delivery to Diseased Microvascular Endothelial Cells-Cellular and Molecular Concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowalski, Piotr S.; Leus, Niek G. J.; Scherphof, Gerrit L.; Ruiters, Marcel H. J.; Kamps, Jan A. A. M.; Molema, Grietje

    Increased insight in the role of endothelial cells in the pathophysiology of cancer, inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases, has drawn great interest in pharmacological interventions aiming at the endothelium in diseased sites. Their location in the body makes them suitable targets for therapeutic

  11. ESCRT-0 Component Hrs Promotes Macropinocytosis of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus in Human Dermal Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Kumar, Binod; Ansari, Mairaj Ahmed; Dutta, Dipanjan; Iqbal, Jawed; Gjyshi, Olsi; Bottero, Virginie; Chandran, Bala

    2016-04-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) enters human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-d), its naturalin vivotarget cells, by lipid raft-dependent macropinocytosis. The internalized viral envelope fuses with the macropinocytic membrane, and released capsid is transported to the nuclear vicinity, resulting in the nuclear entry of viral DNA. The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) proteins, which include ESCRT-0, -I, -II, and -III, play a central role in endosomal trafficking and sorting of internalized and ubiquitinated receptors. Here, we examined the role of ESCRT-0 component Hrs (hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate) in KSHV entry into HMVEC-d by macropinocytosis. Knockdown of Hrs by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) transduction resulted in significant decreases in KSHV entry and viral gene expression. Immunofluorescence analysis (IFA) and plasma membrane isolation and proximity ligation assay (PLA) demonstrated the translocation of Hrs from the cytosol to the plasma membrane of infected cells and association with α-actinin-4. In addition, infection induced the plasma membrane translocation and activation of the serine/threonine kinase ROCK1, a downstream target of the RhoA GTPase. Hrs knockdown reduced these associations, suggesting that the recruitment of ROCK1 is an Hrs-mediated event. Interaction between Hrs and ROCK1 is essential for the ROCK1-induced phosphorylation of NHE1 (Na(+)/H(+)exchanger 1), which is involved in the regulation of intracellular pH. Thus, our studies demonstrate the plasma membrane association of ESCRT protein Hrs during macropinocytosis and suggest that KSHV entry requires both Hrs- and ROCK1-dependent mechanisms and that ROCK1-mediated phosphorylation of NHE1 and pH change is an essential event required for the macropinocytosis of KSHV. Macropinocytosis is the major entry pathway of KSHV in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells, the natural target cells of KSHV

  12. Thiram activates NF-kappaB and enhances ICAM-1 expression in human microvascular endothelial HMEC-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpios-Piec, Dagmara; Grosicka-Maciąg, Emilia; Woźniak, Katarzyna; Kowalewski, Cezary; Kiernozek, Ewelina; Szumiło, Maria; Rahden-Staroń, Iwonna

    2015-02-01

    Thiram (TMTD) is a fungicidal and bactericidal agent used as antiseptic, seed disinfectant and animal repellent. In the light of known properties, thiram is considered to be used as an inhibitor of angiogenesis and/or inflammation. Since angiogenesis requires the growth of vascular endothelial cells we have used microvascular endothelial cell line HMEC-1 to elucidate the effect of thiram on normal and stimulated cells. We cultured HMEC-1 cells in the presence of thiram at low concentration (0.5 µg/mL or 2 µg/mL) (0.2 µM or 0.8 µM) or TNF-α (10 ng/mL) alone, and thiram together with TNF-α. TNF-α was used as a cytokine that triggers changes characteristic for inflammatory state of the cell. We carried out an in vitro study aimed at assessing generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), activation of NF-κB, and expression of cell adhesion molecules ICAM-1, VCAM-1, PECAM-1. It was found that TMTD produced ROS and activated NF-κB. Activation of NF-κB was concurrent with an increase in ICAM-1 expression on the surface of HMEC-1 cells. ICAM-1 reflects intensity of inflammation in endothelial cell milieu. The expression of VCAM-1 and PECAM-1 on these cells was not changed by thiram. It was also found that stimulation of the HMEC-1 cells with the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α caused activation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression with concomitant decrease of PECAM-1 cell surface expression above the control levels. Treatment with thiram and TNF-α changed cellular response compared with effects observed after treatment with TNF-α alone, i.e. further increase of ICAM-1 expression and impairment of the TNF-α effect on PECAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. This study demonstrated that thiram acts as a pro-oxidant, and elicits in endothelial cell environment effects characteristic for inflammation. However, when it is present concurrently with pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α interferes with its action. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessment of endothelial function by brachial artery flow mediated dilatation in microvascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naidu Otikunta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac syndrome X is an important therapeutic and diagnostic challenge to physician. Study of Csx patients may help to understand the pathophysiology of coronary microcirculation and to gain an insight on the management of these group patients. Methods We measured the flow mediated dilation of the brachial artery both endothelium dependent and independent vasodilatation by high resolution ultrasound in 30 cardiac syndrome X patients and matched with 30 healthy control subjects. Results Significantly decreased flow mediated dilatation was observed in patients when compared to control (9.42 ± 7.20 vs 21.11 ± 9.16 p 11.11(p Conclusions The study suggests impairment of endothelial function in cardiac syndrome X patients. Increased Systolic blood pressure and body mass index may increase the risk of impairment of endothelial function in this group of patients.

  14. Stimulated mast cells promote maturation of myocardial microvascular endothelial cell neovessels by modulating the angiopoietin-Tie-2 signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z.H. [Division of Cardiology, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China, Division of Cardiology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China); Yancheng People' s First Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Yancheng, Jiangsu, China, Division of Cardiology, Yancheng People’s First Hospital, Yancheng, Jiangsu (China); Zhu, W.; Tao, J.P.; Zhang, Q.Y.; Wei, M. [Division of Cardiology, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China, Division of Cardiology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China)

    2013-10-22

    Angiopoietin (Ang)-1 and Ang-2 interact in angiogenesis to activate the Tie-2 receptor, which may be involved in new vessel maturation and regression. Mast cells (MCs) are also involved in formation of new blood vessels and angiogenesis. The present study was designed to test whether MCs can mediate angiogenesis in myocardial microvascular endothelial cells (MMVECs). Using a rat MMVEC and MC co-culture system, we observed that Ang-1 protein levels were very low even though its mRNA levels were increased by MCs. Interestingly, MCs were able to enhance migration, proliferation, and capillary-like tube formation, which were associated with suppressed Ang-2 protein expression, but not Tie-2 expression levels. These MCs induced effects that could be reversed by either tryptase inhibitor [N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK)] or chymase inhibitor (N-tosyl-L-phenylalanyl chloromethyl ketone), with TLCK showing greater effects. In conclusion, our data indicated that MCs can interrupt neovessel maturation via suppression of the Ang-2/Tie-2 signaling pathway.

  15. EGb 761 Protects Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells against Hypoxia/Reoxygenation Injury and Exerts Inhibitory Effect on the ATM Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Wang, Deng-Feng; Zhang, Zhuang; Han, Dong; Yang, Kan

    2017-03-28

    Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb 761) has been widely used clinically to reduce myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury (MIRI). Microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) may be a proper cellular model in vitro for the effect and mechanism study against MIRI. However, the protective effect of EGb 761 on MVECs resisting hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury is little reported. In this study, H/R-injured MVECs were treated with EGb 761, and then the cell viability, apoptosis, ROS production, SOD activity, caspase-3 activity, and protein level of ATM, γ-H2AX, p53, and Bax were measured. ATM siRNA was transfected to study the changes of protein in the ATM pathway. EGb 761 presented protective effect on H/R-injured MVECs, with decreasing cell death, apoptosis, and ROS, and elevated SOD activity. Next, EGb 761 could inhibit H/R-induced ATM, γ-H2AX, p53, and Bax in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, ATM siRNA also could inhibit H/R-induced ATM, γ-H2AX, p53, and Bax. Overall, these findings verify that EGb 761 protects cardiac MVECs from H/R injury, and for the first time, illustrate the influence on the ATM pathway and apoptosis by EGb 761 via dampening ROS.

  16. [Transposition technique of microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm without using a brain retractor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeno, Taku; Kumai, Junichiro; Horikawa, Hiroshi; Aihara, Kouki; Endo, Masaru; Oya, Soichi; Ishikawa, Osamu; Nishido, Hajime; Sakamoto, Masayuki

    2009-01-01

    A unique transposition technique in microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm (HFS) was employed in patients with compression by either the peripheral artery or the main trunk of the vertebral artery. Complete transposition that secured free space between the offending artery and the root exit zone (REZ) was accomplished by introducing GORE-TEX tape around the artery and suturing it to the petrous dura. An adequate working space, as if operating in a shallow basin, was essential. Throughout the procedure, it was not necessary to use a brain retractor. Instead, a gentle wrapping retraction technique using a sucker was employed over the brain covered by a sheet of Gelfoam (Pfizer Japan Inc., Tokyo) and cotton. All patients showed complete cure of HFS immediately after surgery with this technique. The difficulty of transposing the vertebral artery can be overcome by well-designed surgical strategy and skillfulness.

  17. Characterization of angiogenin receptors on bovine brain capillary endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoux, M; Dehouck, M P; Fruchart, J C; Spik, G; Montreuil, J; Cecchelli, R

    1991-04-30

    The mitogenic effect of bovine milk angiogenin was studied on bovine brain capillary and aortic endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. The proliferation of only bovine brain capillary endothelial cells was detected at concentrations ranging from 10 to 1,000 ng/ml, with a maximum effect at 100 ng/ml. This mitogenic activity may be correlated with a specific binding of angiogenin which was demonstrated only to bovine brain capillary endothelial cells. [125I]-labeled angiogenin binding was time and concentration dependent and saturable. Scatchard analyses of binding data showed evidence of a single class of binding sites with an apparent dissociation constant of 5.10(-10)M. The molecular mass of the angiogenin receptor (49 kDa) was determined by ligand blotting.

  18. Reelin expression in brain endothelial cells: an electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Costas, Emma; Fenton, Erin Y; Caruncho, Hector J

    2015-03-24

    Reelin expression and function have been extensively studied in the brain, although its expression has been also reported in other tissues including blood. This raises the possibility that reelin might be able to cross the blood-brain barrier, which could be functionally relevant. Up-to-date no studies have been conducted to assess if reelin is present in the blood-brain barrier, which is mainly constituted by tightly packed endothelial cells. In this report we assessed the expression of reelin in brain capillaries using immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy. At the light microscope, reelin immunolabeling appeared in specific endothelial cells in brain areas that presented abundant diffuse labeling for this protein (e.g., layer I of the cortex, or the stratum lacunosum moleculare of the hippocampus), while it was mostly absent from capillaries in other brain areas (e.g., deeper cortical layers, or the CA1 layer of the hippocampus). As expected, at the electron microscope reelin labeling was observed in neurons of the cortex, where most of the labeling was associated with the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Importantly, reelin was also observed in some endothelial cells located in small capillaries, which confirmed the findings obtained at the light microscope. In these cells, reelin labeling was located primarily in caveolae (i.e., vesicles of transcytosis), and associated with the plasma membrane of the luminal side of endothelial cells. In addition, some scarce labeling was observed in the nuclear membrane. The presence of reelin immunolabeling in brain endothelial cells, and particularly in caveolar vesicles within these cells, suggests that reelin and/or reelin peptides may be able to cross the blood-brain barrier, which could have important physiological, pathological, and therapeutic implications.

  19. New concepts and materials in microvascular grafting: prosthetic graft endothelial cell seeding and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Lio, A L; Jones, N F

    1998-01-01

    Microsurgical free tissue transfer is currently associated with very high success rates and few complications. While interposition vein grafting is clearly an important adjunct to the microsurgeon's armamentarium, it has been associated with higher free flap/replantation failures and complication rates. With appropriate flap planning and surgical techniques, the need for interposition vein grafting should be quite infrequent and hopefully avoided if at all possible. Nevertheless, when necessary, the vein graft remains the gold standard, with virtually all alternative interposition grafts demonstrating lower patency rates. One of the more promising areas of research is the concept of genetic manipulation of the endothelial cell via molecular biological techniques. It is likely that in the near future this may become a clinical reality, not only improving the patency of microsurgical anastomoses and interposition vein grafts, but quite possibly altering the target organ functionally as well.

  20. Endothelial glycocalyx on brain endothelial cells is lost in experimental cerebral malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Hyttel, Poul; Kurtzhals, Jørgen Al

    2014-01-01

    electron microscopy and measured circulating glycosaminoglycans by dot blot and ELISA. The glycocalyx was degraded in brain vasculature in cerebral and to a lesser degree uncomplicated malaria. It was affected on both intact and apoptotic endothelial cells. Circulating glycosaminoglycan levels suggested...

  1. Effects of selenium supplementation on expression of endothelin-1 and its receptors in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells from chick embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianfeng; Zhang, Ding; Zhang, Kerong; Liu, Mengyuan; Han, Zhaoqing; Li, Jiakui

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of supplemental selenium (Se) on expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and its receptors in cultured chick embryos pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs). To accomplish this, PMVECs were treated in Se-deficient or Se-supplement (12, 24, 50, 100 ng/ml) culture medium for 48 h. Low Se medium was achieved by reducing serum concentrations and the essential growth factors were added. After the incubation, the effects of supplemental Se on ET-1 and its receptors gene expression were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Compared with the control group, our results showed that among the different concentrations of Se supplement, the levels of ET-1 gene expression treated with both the moderate Se doses (24, 50 ng/ml, P doses (100 ng/ml, P dose group (12 ng/ml), which showed no changes. Meanwhile, Se supplement (24, 50, 100 ng/ml) was found to be effective in reducing the expression levels of ETA (P  0.05) in ETB mRNA levels during the cell proliferation. These observations indicated that Se may play both direct and indirect role in the regulation of ET-1 and its receptors gene expression and their production in avian PMVECs. Se supplement decreases in ET-1 and ETA production in Se-deficient PMVECs may partly explain the mechanism of the protective effects of the Se on the cardiovascular system.

  2. High glucose induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells are regulated by FoxO3a.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoming Peng

    Full Text Available Cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs dysfunction contributes to cardiovascular complications in diabetes, whereas, the underlying mechanism is not fully clarified. FoxO transcription factors are involved in apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS production. Therefore, the present study was designed to elucidate the potential role of FoxO3a on the CMECs injury induced by high glucose.CMECs were isolated from hearts of adult rats and cultured in normal or high glucose medium for 6 h, 12 h and 24 h respectively. To down-regulate FoxO3a expression, CMECs were transfected with FoxO3a siRNA. ROS accumulation and apoptosis in CMECs were assessed by dihydroethidine (DHE staining and TUNEL assay respectively. Moreover, the expressions of Akt, FoxO3a, Bim and BclxL in CMECs were assessed by Western blotting assay.ROS accumulation in CMECs was significantly increased after high glucose incubation for 6 to 24 h. Meanwhile, high glucose also increased apoptosis in CMECs, correlated with decreased the phosphorylation expressions of Akt and FoxO3a. Moreover, high glucose incubation increased the expression of Bim, whereas increased anti-apoptotic protein BclxL. Furthermore, siRNA target FoxO3a silencing enhanced the ROS accumulation, whereas suppressed apoptosis in CMECs. FoxO3a silencing also abolished the disturbance of Bcl-2 proteins induced by high glucose in CMECs.Our data provide evidence that high glucose induced FoxO3a activation which suppressed ROS accumulation, and in parallel, resulted in apoptosis of CMECs.

  3. The interaction between circulating complement proteins and cutaneous microvascular endothelial cells in the development of childhood Henoch-Schonlein Purpura.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Hsu Yang

    Full Text Available In addition to IgA, the deposition of complement (C3 in dermal vessels is commonly found in Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP. The aim of this study is to elucidate the role of circulating complement proteins in the pathogenesis of childhood HSP.Plasma levels of C3a, C4a, C5a, and Bb in 30 HSP patients and 30 healthy controls were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The expression of C3a receptor (C3aR, C5a receptor (CD88, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1, C3, C5, interleukin (IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1, and RANTES by human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-d was evaluated either by flow cytometry or by ELISA.At the acute stage, HSP patients had higher plasma levels of C3a (359.5 ± 115.3 vs. 183.3 ± 94.1 ng/ml, p < 0.0001, C5a (181.4 ± 86.1 vs. 33.7 ± 26.3 ng/ml, p < 0.0001, and Bb (3.7 ± 2.6 vs. 1.0 ± 0.6 μg/ml, p < 0.0001, but not C4a than healthy controls. Although HSP patient-derived acute phase plasma did not alter the presentation of C3aR and CD88 on HMVEC-d, it enhanced the production of endothelial C3 and C5. Moreover, C5a was shown in vitro to up-regulate the expression of IL-8, MCP-1, E-selectin, and ICAM-1 by HMVEC-d with a dose-dependent manner.In HSP, the activation of the complement system in part through the alternative pathway may have resulted in increased plasma levels of C3a and C5a, which, especially C5a, may play a role in the disease pathogenesis by activating endothelium of cutaneous small vessels.

  4. Microvascular pathology and morphometrics of sporadic and hereditary small vessel diseases of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craggs, Lucinda J L; Yamamoto, Yumi; Deramecourt, Vincent; Kalaria, Raj N

    2014-09-01

    Small vessel diseases (SVDs) of the brain are likely to become increasingly common in tandem with the rise in the aging population. In recent years, neuroimaging and pathological studies have informed on the pathogenesis of sporadic SVD and several single gene (monogenic) disorders predisposing to subcortical strokes and diffuse white matter disease. However, one of the limitations toward studying SVD lies in the lack of consistent assessment criteria and lesion burden for both clinical and pathological measures. Arteriolosclerosis and diffuse white matter changes are the hallmark features of both sporadic and hereditary SVDs. The pathogenesis of the arteriopathy is the key to understanding the differential progression of disease in various SVDs. Remarkably, quantification of microvascular abnormalities in sporadic and hereditary SVDs has shown that qualitatively the processes involved in arteriolar degeneration are largely similar in sporadic SVD compared with hereditary disorders such as cerebral autosomal arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL). Important significant regional differences in lesion location within the brain may enable one to distinguish SVDs, where frontal lobe involvement appears consistently with almost every SVD, but others bear specific pathologies in other lobes, such as the temporal pole in CADASIL and the pons in pontine autosomal dominant microangiopathy and leukoencephalopathy or PADMAL. Additionally, degenerative changes in the vascular smooth muscle cells, the cerebral endothelium and the basal lamina are often rapid and more aggressive in genetic disorders. Further quantification of other microvascular elements and even neuronal cells is needed to fully characterize SVD pathogenesis and to differentiate the usefulness of vascular interventions and treatments on the resulting pathology. © 2014 International Society of Neuropathology.

  5. Vascular endothelial growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 expression in mdx mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nico, Beatrice; Corsi, Patrizia; Vacca, Angelo; Roncali, Luisa; Ribatti, Domenico

    2002-10-25

    Recent data have demonstrated that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is expressed by subsets of neurons, coincident with angiogenesis within its developing cerebral cortex. In this study, with the aim of elucidating the mechanisms of vascular involvement during brain impairment in Duchenne muscular distrophy (DMD), we have correlated the vascular density with VEGF and VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) expression in the brain cortex of normal and mdx mouse, an animal model with a genetic defect in a region homologous with the human DMD gene. Results showed that in mdx mouse, tissue area occupied by microvessels positive to factor VIII related antigen and VEGFR-2 increased in parallel to the tissue area occupied by neurons positive to VEGF. Our data suggest that increased vascularity in the brain of mdx mouse may be due, at least in part, to proliferation of endothelial cells in response to VEGF secreted by neuronal cells.

  6. Blocking of α1β1 and α2β1 adhesion molecules inhibits eosinophil migration through human lung microvascular endothelial cell monolayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisława Bazan-Socha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In cell trafficking to the airways in asthma, among integrins the most important are those containing α4 and β2 subunits. We have previously shown that also blocking of collagen receptors, α1β1 and α2β1 integrins, inhibits transmigration of eosinophils of asthmatic subjects through a monolayer of skin microvascular endothelial cells seeded on collagen IV coated inserts. However, it was not clear whether this observation was limited to asthma or depended on the type of microvascular cell and collagen IV used as a base. In the current study we performed a transmigration assay using human lung microvascular endothelial cells seeded directly on a plastic surface as a base and blood cells isolated from 12 representatives of each of two groups, asthmatics and healthy donors, by gradient centrifugation, followed by immunomagnetic negative separation of eosinophils. Isolated eosinophils and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC were inhibited by snake venom-derived integrin antagonists including viperistatin and VP12, as inhibitors of α1β1 and α2β1 integrin, respectively, and VLO5 and VLO4, as inhibitors of α4β1 and α5β1 integrin, respectively. All snake venom-derived anti-adhesive proteins were effective in inhibiting eosinophil transmigration, whilst only VLO5 and VLO4 reduced PBMC mobility in this assay. This observation was similar in both groups of subjects studied. α1β1 and α2β1 integrins could be involved in transmigration of eosinophil to the inflammatory site. Migratory inhibition was observed in asthma subjects as well as in healthy donors, and did not depend on origin of endothelial cells or the extracellular matrix component used as a base.

  7. Trafficking of adeno-associated virus vectors across a model of the blood-brain barrier; a comparative study of transcytosis and transduction using primary human brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Steven F; Andrews, Allison M; Lutton, Evan M; Mu, Dakai; Hudry, Eloise; Hyman, Bradley T; Maguire, Casey A; Ramirez, Servio H

    2017-01-01

    Developing therapies for central nervous system (CNS) diseases is exceedingly difficult because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Notably, emerging technologies may provide promising new options for the treatment of CNS disorders. Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) has been shown to transduce cells in the CNS following intravascular administration in rodents, cats, pigs, and non-human primates. These results suggest that AAV9 is capable of crossing the BBB. However, mechanisms that govern AAV9 transendothelial trafficking at the BBB remain unknown. Furthermore, possibilities that AAV9 may transduce brain endothelial cells or affect BBB integrity still require investigation. Using primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells as a model of the human BBB, we performed transduction and transendothelial trafficking assays comparing AAV9 to AAV2, a serotype that does not cross the BBB or transduce endothelial cells effectively in vivo. Results of our in vitro studies indicate that AAV9 penetrates brain microvascular endothelial cells barriers more effectively than AAV2, but has reduced transduction efficiency. In addition, our data suggest that (i) AAV9 penetrates endothelial barriers through an active, cell-mediated process, and (ii) AAV9 fails to disrupt indicators of BBB integrity such as transendothelial electrical resistance, tight junction protein expression/localization, and inflammatory activation status. Overall, this report shows how human brain endothelial cells configured in BBB models can be utilized for evaluating transendothelial movement and transduction kinetics of various AAV capsids. Importantly, the use of a human in vitro BBB model can provide import insight into the possible effects that candidate AVV gene therapy vectors may have on the status of BBB integrity. Read the Editorial Highlight for this article on page 192. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  8. Differential Effects of Bartonella henselae on Human and Feline Macro- and Micro-Vascular Endothelial Cells: e20204

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moez Berrich; Claudine Kieda; Catherine Grillon; Martine Monteil; Nathalie Lamerant; Julie Gavard; Henri Jean Boulouis; Nadia Haddad

    2011-01-01

    .... To this purpose, we have developed nine feline EC lines which allowed comparing the effects of Bartonella strains on human and feline micro-vascular ECs representative of the infection development...

  9. Early peripheral endothelial dysfunction predicts myocardial infarct extension and microvascular obstruction in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo Baptista, Sérgio; Faustino, Mariana; Brizida, Luís; Loureiro, José; Augusto, João; Abecasis, João; Monteiro, Célia; Leal, Paulo; Nédio, Maura; Farto E Abreu, Pedro; Gil, Victor; Morais, Carlos

    2017-10-01

    The role of endothelial dysfunction (ED) in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is poorly understood. Peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT) allows non-invasive evaluation of ED, but has never been used for this purpose early after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (P-PCI). Our purpose was to analyze the relation between ED assessed by PAT and both the presence of microvascular obstruction (MVO) and infarct extension in STEMI patients. ED was assessed by the reactive hyperemia index (RHI), measured by PAT and defined as RHI extension was assessed by troponin I (TnI) release and contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (ceCMR). MVO was assessed by ceCMR and by indirect angiographic and ECG indicators. An echocardiogram was also performed in the first 12 h. We included 38 patients (mean age 60.0±13.7 years, 29 male). Mean RHI was 1.87±0.60 and 16 patients (42.1%) had ED. Peak TnI (median 118 mg/dl, IQR 186 vs. 67/81, p=0.024) and AUC of TnI (median 2305, IQR 2486 vs. 1076/1042, p=0.012) were significantly higher in patients with ED, who also showed a trend for more transmural infarcts (63.6% vs. 22.2%, p=0.06) and larger infarct mass on ceCMR (median 17.5%, IQR 15.4 vs. 10.1/10.3, p=0.08). Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was lower and wall motion score index (WMSI) was higher on both echocardiogram and ceCMR in patients with ED. On ceCMR, MVO was more frequent in patients with RHI <1.67 (54.5% vs. 11.1%, p=0.03). ECG and angiographic indicators of MVO all showed a trend toward worse results in these patients. The presence of ED assessed by PAT 24 h after P-PCI in patients with STEMI is associated with larger infarcts, lower LVEF, higher WMSI and higher prevalence of MVO. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. A novel paradigm for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: comorbidities drive myocardial dysfunction and remodeling through coronary microvascular endothelial inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Walter J; Tschöpe, Carsten

    2013-07-23

    Over the past decade, myocardial structure, cardiomyocyte function, and intramyocardial signaling were shown to be specifically altered in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF). A new paradigm for HFPEF development is therefore proposed, which identifies a systemic proinflammatory state induced by comorbidities as the cause of myocardial structural and functional alterations. The new paradigm presumes the following sequence of events in HFPEF: 1) a high prevalence of comorbidities such as overweight/obesity, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and salt-sensitive hypertension induce a systemic proinflammatory state; 2) a systemic proinflammatory state causes coronary microvascular endothelial inflammation; 3) coronary microvascular endothelial inflammation reduces nitric oxide bioavailability, cyclic guanosine monophosphate content, and protein kinase G (PKG) activity in adjacent cardiomyocytes; 4) low PKG activity favors hypertrophy development and increases resting tension because of hypophosphorylation of titin; and 5) both stiff cardiomyocytes and interstitial fibrosis contribute to high diastolic left ventricular (LV) stiffness and heart failure development. The new HFPEF paradigm shifts emphasis from LV afterload excess to coronary microvascular inflammation. This shift is supported by a favorable Laplace relationship in concentric LV hypertrophy and by all cardiac chambers showing similar remodeling and dysfunction. Myocardial remodeling in HFPEF differs from heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, in which remodeling is driven by loss of cardiomyocytes. The new HFPEF paradigm proposes comorbidities, plasma markers of inflammation, or vascular hyperemic responses to be included in diagnostic algorithms and aims at restoring myocardial PKG activity. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of mir-21 on Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells After Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rats: Role of Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog (PTEN)/Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Signal Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Feng; Liu, Wenwei; Yan, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Hanyun; Zhang, Hongshen; Liu, Jianfei; Yu, Ming; Zhu, Xiaoshan; Ma, Kezhong

    2016-01-01

    Background This study investigated how miR-21 expression is reflected in acute myocardial infarction and explored the role of miR-21 and the PTEN/VEGF signaling pathway in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells. Material/Methods We used an in vivo LAD rat model to simulate acute myocardial infarction. MiR-21 mimics and miR-21 inhibitors were injected and transfected into model rats in order to alter miR-21 expression. Cardiac functions were evaluated using echocardiographic measurement, ELIS...

  12. Dabigatran abrogates brain endothelial cell permeability in response to thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Brian Thomas; Gu, Yu-Huan; Izawa, Yoshikane; del Zoppo, Gregory John

    2015-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases the risk and severity of thromboembolic stroke. Generally, antithrombotic agents increase the hemorrhagic risk of thromboembolic stroke. However, significant reductions in thromboembolism and intracerebral hemorrhage have been shown with the antithrombin dabigatran compared with warfarin. As thrombin has been implicated in microvessel injury during cerebral ischemia, we hypothesized that dabigatran decreases the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage by direct inhibition of the thrombin-mediated increase in cerebral endothelial cell permeability. Primary murine brain endothelial cells (mBECs) were exposed to murine thrombin before measuring permeability to 4-kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran. Thrombin increased mBEC permeability in a concentration-dependent manner, without significant endothelial cell death. Pretreatment of mBECs with dabigatran completely abrogated the effect of thrombin on permeability. Neither the expressions of the endothelial cell β1-integrins nor the tight junction protein claudin-5 were affected by thrombin exposure. Oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) also increased permeability; this effect was abrogated by treatment with dabigatran, as was the additive effect of thrombin and OGD on permeability. Taken together, these results indicate that dabigatran could contribute to a lower risk of intracerebral hemorrhage during embolism-associated ischemia from AF by protection of the microvessel permeability barrier from local thrombin challenge.

  13. Barrier Functionality of Porcine and Bovine Brain Capillary Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailar Nakhlband

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To date, isolated cell based blood-brain barrier (BBB models have been widely used for brain drug delivery and targeting, due to their relatively proper bioelectrical and permeability properties. However, primary cultures of brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs isolated from different species vary in terms of bioelectrical and permeability properties. Methods: To pursue this, in the current investigation, primary porcine and bovine BCECs (PBCECs and BBCECs, respectively were isolated and used as an in vitro BBB model. The bioelectrical and permeability properties were assessed in BCECs co-cultured with C6 cells with/without hydrocortisone (550 nM. The bioelectrical properties were further validated by means of the permeability coefficients of transcellular and paracellular markers. Results: The primary PBCECs displayed significantly higher trans-endothelial electrical resistance (~900 W.cm2 than BBCECs (~700 W.cm2 - both co-cultured with C6 cells in presence of hydrocortisone. Permeability coefficients of propranolol/diazepam and mannitol/sucrose in PBCECs were ~21 and ~2 (×10-6 cm.sec-1, where these values for BBCECs were ~25 and ~5 (×10-6 cm.sec-1. Conclusion: Upon our bioelectrical and permeability findings, both models display discriminative barrier functionality but porcine BCECs seem to provide a better platform than bovine BCECs for drug screening and brain targeting.

  14. Protein C activation peptide inhibits the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and interleukin-8 induced by TNF-α in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina-Canseco, María Del Socorro; Páez-Arenas, Araceli; Massó, Felipe; Pérez-Campos, Eduardo; Martínez-Cruz, Ruth; Hernández-Cruz, Pedro; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham; Martínez-Cruz, Margarito; Pérez-Campos Mayoral, Laura; Pérez-Santiago, Alma Dolores; Zenteno, Edgar

    2012-10-08

    Activated protein C (APC) is generated from the cleavage of protein C by thrombin coupled to thrombomodulin and, subsequently, is released as protein C activation peptide (papC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of papC on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1), activated with 5 ng//mL TNF-α. Flow cytometry showed that papC inhibited the expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1, after activation with TNF-a. Similarly, RT-PCR analysis revealed that 2 and 4 pM papC inhibited the expression of VCAM-1 and IL-8 mRNA in TNF-α-treated HMEC-1. In addition, the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase(eNOS) increased in HMEC-1 treated with papC, compared to those without treatment. Furthermore, Jurkat cell adhesion to HMEC-1 induced by TNF-a was significantly inhibited after the addition of papC, compared to HMEC-1 without papC (p = 0.03). Finally, a control peptide analog to papC showed no effect on the expression of ICAM and VCAM on the surface of HMEC-1. In conclusion, our results suggest that papC exerts anti-inflammatory effects on endothelial cells.

  15. Contacting co-culture of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells alters barrier function of human embryonic stem cell derived retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skottman, H; Muranen, J; Lähdekorpi, H; Pajula, E; Mäkelä, K; Koivusalo, L; Koistinen, A; Uusitalo, H; Kaarniranta, K; Juuti-Uusitalo, K

    2017-10-01

    Here we evaluated the effects of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (hREC) on mature human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derived retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. The hESC-RPE cells (Regea08/017, Regea08/023 or Regea11/013) and hREC (ACBRI 181) were co-cultured on opposite sides of transparent membranes for up to six weeks. Thereafter barrier function, small molecule permeability, localization of RPE and endothelial cell marker proteins, cellular fine structure, and growth factor secretion of were evaluated. After co-culture, the RPE specific CRALBP and endothelial cell specific von Willebrand factor were appropriately localized. In addition, the general morphology, pigmentation, and fine structure of hESC-RPE cells were unaffected. Co-culture increased the barrier function of hESC-RPE cells, detected both with TEER measurements and cumulative permeability of FD4 - although the differences varied among the cell lines. Co-culturing significantly altered VEGF and PEDF secretion, but again the differences were cell line specific. The results of this study showed that co-culture with hREC affects hESC-RPE functionality. In addition, co-culture revealed drastic cell line specific differences, most notably in growth factor secretion. This model has the potential to be used as an in vitro outer blood-retinal barrier model for drug permeability testing. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of microvascular disruption in brain damage from traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logsdon, Aric F.; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.; Turner, Ryan C.; Huber, Jason D.; Rosen, Charles L.; Simpkins, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is acquired from an external force, which can inflict devastating effects to the brain vasculature and neighboring neuronal cells. Disruption of vasculature is a primary effect that can lead to a host of secondary injury cascades. The primary effects of TBI are rapidly occurring while secondary effects can be activated at later time points and may be more amenable to targeting. Primary effects of TBI include diffuse axonal shearing, changes in blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability, and brain contusions. These mechanical events, especially changes to the BBB, can induce calcium perturbations within brain cells producing secondary effects, which include cellular stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. These secondary effects can be potentially targeted to preserve the tissue surviving the initial impact of TBI. In the past, TBI research had focused on neurons without any regard for glial cells and the cerebrovasculature. Now a greater emphasis is being placed on the vasculature and the neurovascular unit following TBI. A paradigm shift in the importance of the vascular response to injury has opened new avenues of drug treatment strategies for TBI. However, a connection between the vascular response to TBI and the development of chronic disease has yet to be elucidated. Long-term cognitive deficits are common amongst those sustaining severe or multiple mild TBIs. Understanding the mechanisms of cellular responses following TBI is important to prevent the development of neuropsychiatric symptoms. With appropriate intervention following TBI, the vascular network can perhaps be maintained and the cellular repair process possibly improved to aid in the recovery of cellular homeostasis. PMID:26140712

  17. β2 integrin-mediated crawling on endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 is a prerequisite for transcellular neutrophil diapedesis across the inflamed blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorina, Roser; Lyck, Ruth; Vestweber, Dietmar; Engelhardt, Britta

    2014-01-01

    In acute neuroinflammatory states such as meningitis, neutrophils cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and contribute to pathological alterations of cerebral function. The mechanisms that govern neutrophil migration across the BBB are ill defined. Using live-cell imaging, we show that LPS-stimulated BBB endothelium supports neutrophil arrest, crawling, and diapedesis under physiological flow in vitro. Investigating the interactions of neutrophils from wild-type, CD11a(-/-), CD11b(-/-), and CD18(null) mice with wild-type, junctional adhesion molecule-A(-/-), ICAM-1(null), ICAM-2(-/-), or ICAM-1(null)/ICAM-2(-/-) primary mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells, we demonstrate that neutrophil arrest, polarization, and crawling required G-protein-coupled receptor-dependent activation of β2 integrins and binding to endothelial ICAM-1. LFA-1 was the prevailing ligand for endothelial ICAM-1 in mediating neutrophil shear resistant arrest, whereas Mac-1 was dominant over LFA-1 in mediating neutrophil polarization on the BBB in vitro. Neutrophil crawling was mediated by endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 and neutrophil LFA-1 and Mac-1. In the absence of crawling, few neutrophils maintained adhesive interactions with the BBB endothelium by remaining either stationary on endothelial junctions or displaying transient adhesive interactions characterized by a fast displacement on the endothelium along the direction of flow. Diapedesis of stationary neutrophils was unchanged by the lack of endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 and occurred exclusively via the paracellular pathway. Crawling neutrophils, although preferentially crossing the BBB through the endothelial junctions, could additionally breach the BBB via the transcellular route. Thus, β2 integrin-mediated neutrophil crawling on endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 is a prerequisite for transcellular neutrophil diapedesis across the inflamed BBB.

  18. Platelets alter gene expression profile in human brain endothelial cells in an in vitro model of cerebral malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Barbier

    Full Text Available Platelet adhesion to the brain microvasculature has been associated with cerebral malaria (CM in humans, suggesting that platelets play a role in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. In vitro co-cultures have shown that platelets can act as a bridge between Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (pRBC and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBEC and potentiate HBEC apoptosis. Using cDNA microarray technology, we analyzed transcriptional changes of HBEC in response to platelets in the presence or the absence of tumor necrosis factor (TNF and pRBC, which have been reported to alter gene expression in endothelial cells. Using a rigorous statistical approach with multiple test corrections, we showed a significant effect of platelets on gene expression in HBEC. We also detected a strong effect of TNF, whereas there was no transcriptional change induced specifically by pRBC. Nevertheless, a global ANOVA and a two-way ANOVA suggested that pRBC acted in interaction with platelets and TNF to alter gene expression in HBEC. The expression of selected genes was validated by RT-qPCR. The analysis of gene functional annotation indicated that platelets induce the expression of genes involved in inflammation and apoptosis, such as genes involved in chemokine-, TREM1-, cytokine-, IL10-, TGFβ-, death-receptor-, and apoptosis-signaling. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that platelets play a pathogenic role in CM.

  19. Upregulation of the low density lipoprotein receptor at the blood-brain barrier: intercommunications between brain capillary endothelial cells and astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    In contrast to the endothelial cells in large vessels where LDL receptors are downregulated, brain capillary endothelial cells in vivo express an LDL receptor. Using a cell culture model of the blood-brain barrier consisting of a coculture of brain capillary endothelial cells and astrocytes, we observed that the capacity of endothelial cells to bind LDL is enhanced threefold when cocultured with astrocytes. We next investigated the ability of astrocytes to modulate endothelial cell LDL recept...

  20. Experimental inflammation following dural application of complete Freund's adjuvant or inflammatory soup does not alter brain and trigeminal microvascular passage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundblad, Cornelia; Haanes, Kristian A; Grände, Gustaf

    2015-01-01

    , following dural application of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) or inflammatory soup (IS) on brain and trigeminal microvascular passage. METHODS: In order to address this issue, we induced local inflammation in male Sprague-Dawley-rats dura mater by the addition of CFA or IS directly on the dural surface......) in a major way. However, [(51)Cr]-EDTA readily passed the TG by >30 times compared to the CNS. Application of CFA or IS did not show altered transfer constants. CONCLUSIONS: With these experiments we show that dural IS/CFA triggered TG inflammation, did not increase the BBB passage, and that the TG...

  1. Effects of mir-21 on Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells After Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rats: Role of Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog (PTEN)/Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Signal Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Liu, Wenwei; Yan, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Hanyun; Zhang, Hongshen; Liu, Jianfei; Yu, Ming; Zhu, Xiaoshan; Ma, Kezhong

    2016-01-01

    Background This study investigated how miR-21 expression is reflected in acute myocardial infarction and explored the role of miR-21 and the PTEN/VEGF signaling pathway in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells. Material/Methods We used an in vivo LAD rat model to simulate acute myocardial infarction. MiR-21 mimics and miR-21 inhibitors were injected and transfected into model rats in order to alter miR-21 expression. Cardiac functions were evaluated using echocardiographic measurement, ELISA, and Masson staining. In addition, lenti-PTEN and VEGF siRNA were transfected into CMEC cells using standard procedures for assessing the effect of PTEN and VEGE on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. MiR-21, PTEN, and VEGF expressions were examined by RT-PCR and Western blot. The relationship between miR-21 and PTEN was determined by the luciferase activity assay. Results We demonstrated that miR-21 bonded with the 3′-UTR of PTEN and suppressed PTEN expressions. Established models significantly induced cardiac infarct volume and endothelial injury marker expressions as well as miR-21 and PTEN expressions (Pcell proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis (P<0.05). Conclusions MiR-21 exerts protective effects on endothelial injury through the PTEN/VEGF pathway after acute myocardial infarction. PMID:27708252

  2. Real-time imaging of VCAM-1 mRNA in TNF-α activated retinal microvascular endothelial cells using antisense hairpin-DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Md Imam; Jayagopal, Ashwath; Wong, Alexis; McCollum, Gary W; Wright, David W; Penn, John S

    2018-01-01

    Vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) is an important inflammatory biomarker correlating with retinal disease progression. Thus, detection of VCAM-1 mRNA expression levels at an early disease stage could be an important predictive biomarker to assess the risk of disease progression and monitoring treatment response. We have developed VCAM-1 targeted antisense hairpin DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AS-VCAM-1 hAuNP) for the real time detection of VCAM-1 mRNA expression levels in retinal endothelial cells. The AS-VCAM-1 hAuNP fluorescence enhancement clearly visualized the TNF-α induced cellular VCAM-1 mRNA levels with high signal to noise ratios compared to normal serum treated cells. The scrambled hAuNP probes were minimally detectable under same image acquisition conditions. Intracellular hAuNPs were detected using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of the intact cells. In addition, the AS-VCAM-1 hAuNP probes exhibited no acute toxicity to the retinal microvascular endothelial cells as measured by live-dead assay. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects ofPlasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes on matrix metalloproteinase-9 regulation in human microvascular endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah D Alessandro; Nicoletta Basilico; Mauro Prato

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the regulation of matrix metalloproteinases(MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases(TIMPs) in human microvascular endothelium(HMEC-1) exposed to erythrocytes infected by different strains ofPlasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum).Methods:HMEC-1 cells were co-incubated for72 h with erythrocytes infected by late stage trophozoite of D10(chloroquine-sensitive) orW2(chloroquine-resistant)P. falciparum strains.Cell supernatants were then collected and the levels of pro- or active gelatinasesMMP-9 andMMP-2 were evaluated by gelatin zymography and densitometry.The release of pro-MMP-9,MMP-3,MMP-1 andTIMP-1 proteins was analyzed by western blotting and densitometry.Results:Infected erythrocytes inducedde novo proMMP-9 andMMP-9 release.Neither basal levels of proMMP-2 were altered, nor activeMMP-2 was found.MMP-3 andMMP-1 secretion was significantly enhanced, whereas basalTIMP-1 was unaffected.All effects were similar for both strains. Conclusions:P. falciparum parasites, either chloroquine-sensitive or -resistant, induce the release of activeMMP-9 protein from human microvascular endothelium, by impairing balances between proMMP-9 and its inhibitor, and by enhancing the levels of its activators.This work provides new evidence onMMP involvement in malaria, pointing atMMP-9 as a possible target in adjuvant therapy.

  4. Overexpression of pregnane X and glucocorticoid receptors and the regulation of cytochrome P450 in human epileptic brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Chaitali; Hossain, Mohammed; Solanki, Jesal; Najm, Imad M; Marchi, Nicola; Janigro, Damir

    2017-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests a metabolic contribution of cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) to the drug-resistant phenotype in human epilepsy. However, the upstream molecular regulators of CYP in the epileptic brain remain understudied. We therefore investigated the expression and function of pregnane xenobiotic (PXR) and glucocorticoid (GR) nuclear receptors in endothelial cells established from post-epilepsy surgery brain samples. PXR/GR localization was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in specimens from subjects who underwent temporal lobe resections to relieve drug-resistant seizures. We used primary cultures of endothelial cells obtained from epileptic brain tissues (EPI-ECs; n = 8), commercially available human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs; n = 8), and human hepatocytes (n = 3). PXR/GR messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in brain ECs was initially determined by complementary DNA (cDNA) microarrays. The expression of PXR/GR proteins was quantified by Western blot. PXR and GR silencing was performed in EPI-ECs (n = 4), and the impact on downstream CYP expression was determined. PXR/GR expression was detected by immunofluorescence in ECs and neurons in the human temporal lobe samples analyzed. Elevated mRNA and protein levels of PXR and GR were found in EPI-ECs versus control HBMECs. Hepatocytes, used as a positive control, displayed the highest levels of PXR/GR expression. We confirmed expression of PXR/GR in cytoplasmic-nuclear subcellular fractions, with a significant increase of PXR/GR in EPI-ECs versus controls. CYP3A4, CYP2C9, and CYP2E1 were overexpressed in EPI-ECs versus control, whereas CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 were downregulated or absent in EPI-ECs. GR silencing in EPI-ECs led to decreased CYP3A4, CYP2C9, and PXR expression. PXR silencing in EPI-ECs resulted in the specific downregulation of CYP3A4 expression. Our results indicate increased PXR and GR in primary ECs derived from human epileptic brains. PXR or GR may be responsible for a local drug brain

  5. Tesmilifene modifies brain endothelial functions and opens the blood-brain/blood-glioma barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Fruzsina R; Veszelka, Szilvia; Pásztói, Mária; Péterfi, Zoltán A; Tóth, András; Rákhely, Gábor; Cervenak, László; Ábrahám, Csongor S; Deli, Mária A

    2015-09-01

    Tesmilifene, a tamoxifen analog with antihistamine action, has chemopotentiating properties in experimental and clinical cancer studies. In our previous works, tesmilifene increased the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in animal and culture models. Our aim was to investigate the effects of tesmilifene on brain microvessel permeability in the rat RG2 glioma model and to reveal its mode of action in brain endothelial cells. Tesmilifene significantly increased fluorescein extravasation in the glioma. Short-term treatment with tesmilifene reduced the resistance and increased the permeability for marker molecules in a rat triple co-culture BBB model. Tesmilifene also affected the barrier integrity in brain endothelial cells co-cultured with RG2 glioblastoma cells. Tesmilifene inhibited the activity of P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 efflux pumps and down-regulated the mRNA expression of tight junction proteins, efflux pumps, solute carriers, and metabolic enzymes important for BBB functions. Among the possible signaling pathways that regulate BBB permeability, tesmilifene activated the early nuclear translocation of NFκB. The MAPK/ERK and PI3K/Akt kinase pathways were also involved. We demonstrate for the first time that tesmilifene increases permeability marker molecule extravasation in glioma and inhibits efflux pump activity in brain endothelial cells, which may have therapeutic relevance. Tesmilifene, a chemopotentiator in experimental and clinical cancer studies increases vascular permeability in RG2 glioma in rats and permeability for marker molecules in a culture model of the blood-brain barrier. Tesmilifene inhibits the activity of efflux pumps and down-regulates the mRNA expression of tight junction proteins, transporters, and metabolic enzymes important for the blood-brain barrier functions, which may have therapeutic relevance. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  6. An isogenic blood-brain barrier model comprising brain endothelial cells, astrocytes, and neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Scott G; Stebbins, Matthew J; Morales, Bethsymarie Soto; Asai, Shusaku W; Vatine, Gad D; Svendsen, Clive N; Palecek, Sean P; Shusta, Eric V

    2017-03-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is critical in maintaining a physical and metabolic barrier between the blood and the brain. The BBB consists of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) that line the brain vasculature and combine with astrocytes, neurons and pericytes to form the neurovascular unit. We hypothesized that astrocytes and neurons generated from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) could induce BBB phenotypes in iPSC-derived BMECs, creating a robust multicellular human BBB model. To this end, iPSCs were used to form neural progenitor-like EZ-spheres, which were in turn differentiated to neurons and astrocytes, enabling facile neural cell generation. The iPSC-derived astrocytes and neurons induced barrier tightening in primary rat BMECs indicating their BBB inductive capacity. When co-cultured with human iPSC-derived BMECs, the iPSC-derived neurons and astrocytes significantly elevated trans-endothelial electrical resistance, reduced passive permeability, and improved tight junction continuity in the BMEC cell population, while p-glycoprotein efflux transporter activity was unchanged. A physiologically relevant neural cell mixture of one neuron: three astrocytes yielded optimal BMEC induction properties. Finally, an isogenic multicellular BBB model was successfully demonstrated employing BMECs, astrocytes, and neurons from the same donor iPSC source. It is anticipated that such an isogenic facsimile of the human BBB could have applications in furthering understanding the cellular interplay of the neurovascular unit in both healthy and diseased humans. Read the Editorial Highlight for this article on page 843. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  7. Cancer-associated fibroblast promote transmigration through endothelial brain cells in three-dimensional in vitro models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Pyo; Lee, Joo Hyun; Gao, Ming-Qing; Kim, Baek Gil; Kang, Suki; Kim, Se Hoon; Cho, Nam Hoon

    2014-11-01

    Brain metastases are associated with high morbidity as well as with poor prognosis and survival in breast cancer patients. Despite its clinical importance, metastasis of breast cancer cells through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is poorly understood. The objective of our study was to investigate whether cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play crucial roles in breast cancer brain metastasis. Using a cell adhesion assays, in vitro BBB permeability and transmigration assays and soft agar colony formation assays, we investigated the physical roles of CAFs in breast cancer brain metastasis. We also performed immunofluorescence, flow cytometric analysis, Droplet Digital PCR and Simon™ Simple Western System to confirm changes in expression levels. We established two novel three-dimensional (3D) culture systems using a perpendicular slide chamber and applying 3D embedded culture method to reflect brain metastasis conditions. With a newly developed device, CAFs was proven to promote cell adhesion to human brain microvascular endothelial cells, in vitro BBB permeability and transmigration and colony formation of breast cancer cells. Furthermore, CAFs enhanced the invasive migration of breast cancer cells in two kinds of 3D cultures. These 3D models also reliably recapitulate the initial steps of BBB transmigration, micro-metastasis and colonization. Expression of integrin α5β1 and αvβ3, c-MET and α2,6-siayltransferase was increased in breast cancer cells that migrated through the BBB. In conclusion, based on our in vitro BBB and co-culture models, our data suggest that CAFs may play a role in breast cancer brain metastasis. © 2014 UICC.

  8. Identification of CiaR Regulated Genes That Promote Group B Streptococcal Virulence and Interaction with Brain Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Rong; Cutting, Andrew S; Del Rosario, Yvette; Villarino, Nicholas; Stewart, Lara; Weston, Thomas A; Patras, Kathryn A; Doran, Kelly S

    2016-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major causative agent of neonatal meningitis due to its ability to efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and enter the central nervous system (CNS). It has been demonstrated that GBS can invade human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMEC), a primary component of the BBB; however, the mechanism of intracellular survival and trafficking is unclear. We previously identified a two component regulatory system, CiaR/H, which promotes GBS intracellular survival in hBMEC. Here we show that a GBS strain deficient in the response regulator, CiaR, localized more frequently with Rab5, Rab7 and LAMP1 positive vesicles. Further, lysosomes isolated from hBMEC contained fewer viable bacteria following initial infection with the ΔciaR mutant compared to the WT strain. To characterize the contribution of CiaR-regulated genes, we constructed isogenic mutant strains lacking the two most down-regulated genes in the CiaR-deficient mutant, SAN_2180 and SAN_0039. These genes contributed to bacterial uptake and intracellular survival. Furthermore, competition experiments in mice showed that WT GBS had a significant survival advantage over the Δ2180 and Δ0039 mutants in the bloodstream and brain.

  9. Atorvastatin prevents hypoxia-induced inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression but does not affect heme oxygenase-1 in human microvascular endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loboda, Agnieszka; Jazwa, Agnieszka; Jozkowicz, Alicj A.; Dorosz, Jerzy; Balla, Jozsef; Molema, Grietje; Dulak, Jozef

    Beneficial cardiovascular effects of statins, the inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, are particularly assigned to the modulation of inflammation. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) are listed among the crucial protective,

  10. Exosomes from iPSCs Delivering siRNA Attenuate Intracellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Expression and Neutrophils Adhesion in Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Zhihai; Ma, Jinhui; Wang, Chen; Yu, Jie; Qiao, Yeru; Hei, Feilong

    2017-04-01

    The pro-inflammatory activation of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells resulting in continuous expression of cellular adhesion molecules, and subsequently recruiting primed neutrophils to form a firm neutrophils-endothelium (PMN-EC) adhesion, has been examined and found to play a vital role in acute lung injury (ALI). RNA interference (RNAi) is a cellular process through harnessing a natural pathway silencing target gene based on recognition and subsequent degradation of specific mRNA sequences. It opens a promising approach for precision medicine. However, this application was hampered by many obstacles, such as immunogenicity, instability, toxicity problems, and difficulty in across the biological membrane. In this study, we reprogrammed urine exfoliated renal epithelial cells into human induced pluripotent stem cells (huiPSCs) and purified the exosomes (Exo) from huiPSCs as RNAi delivery system. Through choosing the episomal system to deliver transcription factors, we obtained a non-integrating huiPSCs. Experiments in both vitro and vivo demonstrated that these huiPSCs possess the pluripotent properties. The exosomes of huiPSCs isolated by differential centrifugation were visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showing a typical exosomal appearance with an average diameter of 122 nm. Immunoblotting confirmed the presence of the typical exosomal markers, including CD63, TSG 101, and Alix. Co-cultured PKH26-labeled exosomes with human primary pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) confirmed that they could be internalized by recipient cells at a time-dependent manner. Then, electroporation was used to introduce siRNA against intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) into exosomes to form an Exo/siRNA compound. The Exo/siRNA compound efficiently delivered the target siRNA into HMVECs causing selective gene silencing, inhibiting the ICAM-1 protein expression, and PMN-EC adhesion induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These data suggest

  11. Microvascular Angina

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or chest pain, may be a symptom of coronary microvascular disease (MVD) . Coronary MVD is heart disease that affects ... Learn more: What is angina or chest pain? Coronary microvascular disease (MVD) Stable Angina Unstable Angina Variant Angina This ...

  12. Somatic GNAQ Mutation is Enriched in Brain Endothelial Cells in Sturge-Weber Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lan; Couto, Javier A; Pinto, Anna; Alexandrescu, Sanda; Madsen, Joseph R; Greene, Arin K; Sahin, Mustafa; Bischoff, Joyce

    2017-02-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is a rare congenital neurocutaneous disorder characterized by facial and extracraniofacial capillary malformations and capillary-venule malformations in the leptomeninges. A somatic mosaic mutation in GNAQ (c.548G>A; p.R183Q) was found in SWS brain and skin capillary malformations. Our laboratory showed endothelial cells in skin capillary malformations are enriched for the GNAQ mutation. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the GNAQ mutation is also enriched in endothelial cells in affected SWS brain. Two human SWS brain specimens were fractionated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting into hematopoietic (CD45), endothelial (CD31, VE-Cadherin, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2), and perivascular (platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta) cells and cells negative for all markers. The sorted cell populations were analyzed for GNAQ p.R183Q mutation by droplet digital polymerase chain reaction. SWS patient-derived brain endothelial cells were selected by anti-CD31-coated magnetic beads and cultured in endothelial growth medium in vitro. The GNAQ p.R183Q mutation was present in brain endothelial cells in two SWS specimens, with mutant allelic frequencies of 34.7% and 24.0%. Cells negative for all markers also harbored the GNAQ mutation. The mutant allelic frequencies in these unidentified cells were 9.2% and 8.4%. SWS patient-derived brain endothelial cells with mutant allelic frequencies of 14.7% and 21% survived and proliferated in vitro. Our study provides evidence that GNAQ p.R183Q mutation is enriched in endothelial cells in SWS brain lesions and thereby reveals endothelial cells as a source of aberrant Gαq signaling. This will help to understand the pathophysiology of SWS, to discover biomarkers for predicting cerebral involvement, and to develop therapeutic targets to prevent neurological impairments in SWS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Blood-brain barrier permeability imaging using perfusion computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avsenik Jernej

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The blood-brain barrier represents the selective diffusion barrier at the level of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Other functions of blood-brain barrier include transport, signaling and osmoregulation. Endothelial cells interact with surrounding astrocytes, pericytes and neurons. These interactions are crucial to the development, structural integrity and function of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Dysfunctional blood-brain barrier has been associated with pathologies such as acute stroke, tumors, inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury-Modulated Proteins in Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells and the Protective Role of Tongxinluo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The protection of endothelial cells (ECs against reperfusion injury has received little attention. In this study, we used Tandem Mass Tag (TMT labeling proteomics to investigate the modulated proteins in an in vitro model of cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs subjected to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury and their alteration by traditional Chinese medicine Tongxinluo (TXL. Methods: Human CMECs were subjected to 2 h of hypoxia followed by 2 h of reoxygenation with different concentrations of TXL Protein expression profiles of CMECs were determined using tandem mass spectrometry. We evaluated several proteins with altered expression in I/R injury and summarized some reported proteins related to I/R injury. Results: TXL dose-dependently decreased CMEC apoptosis, and the optimal concentration was 800 µg/mL. I/R significantly altered proteins in CMECs, and 30 different proteins were detected between a normal group and a hypoxia and serum deprivation group. In I/R injury, TXL treatment up-regulated 6 types of proteins including acyl-coenzyme A synthetase ACSM2B mitochondrial (ACSM2B, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1B, heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1, transcription factor SOX-17 (SOX17, sequestosome-1 isoform 1 (SQSTM1, and TBC1 domain family member 10B (TBC1D10B. Also, TXL down-regulated 5 proteins including angiopoietin-2 isoform c precursor (ANGPT2, cytochrome c oxidase assembly factor 5 (COA5, connective tissue growth factor precursor (CTGF, cathepsin L1 isoform 2 (CTSL, and eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (LOC101930123. These types of proteins mainly had vital functions, including cell proliferation, stress response, and regulation of metabolic process. Conclusions: The study presented differential proteins upon I/R injury through a proteomic analysis. TXL modulated the expression of proteins in CMECs and has a protective role in response to I/R.

  15. Modulation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cell and human gingival fibroblast behavior by micropatterned silica coating surfaces for zirconia dental implant applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta S Laranjeira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dental ceramic implants have shown superior esthetic behavior and the absence of induced allergic disorders when compared to titanium implants. Zirconia may become a potential candidate to be used as an alternative to titanium dental implants if surface modifications are introduced. In this work, bioactive micropatterned silica coatings were produced on zirconia substrates, using a combined methodology of sol–gel processing and soft lithography. The aim of the work was to compare the in vitro behavior of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs on three types of silica-coated zirconia surfaces: flat and micropatterned (with pillars and with parallel grooves. Our results showed that cells had a higher metabolic activity (HGF, HDMEC and increased gene expression levels of fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1 and collagen type I (COL I on surfaces with pillars. Nevertheless, parallel grooved surfaces were able to guide cell growth. Even capillary tube-like networks of HDMEC were oriented according to the surface geometry. Zirconia and silica with different topographies have shown to be blood compatible and silica coating reduced bacteria adhesion. All together, the results indicated that microstructured bioactive coating seems to be an efficient strategy to improve soft tissue integration on zirconia implants, protecting implants from peri-implant inflammation and improving long-term implant stabilization. This new approach of micropatterned silica coating on zirconia substrates can generate promising novel dental implants, with surfaces that provide physical cues to guide cells and enhance their behavior.

  16. Assessment of Heparanase-Mediated Angiogenesis Using Microvascular Endothelial Cells: Identification of λ-Carrageenan Derivative as a Potent Anti Angiogenic Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Poupard

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Heparanase is overexpressed by tumor cells and degrades the extracellular matrix proteoglycans through cleavage of heparan sulfates (HS, allowing pro-angiogenic factor release and thus playing a key role in tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. Here we propose new HS analogs as potent heparanase inhibitors: Heparin as a positive control, Dextran Sulfate, λ-Carrageenan, and modified forms of them obtained by depolymerization associated to glycol splitting (RD-GS. After heparanase activity assessment, 11 kDa RD-GS-λ-Carrageenan emerged as the most effective heparanase inhibitor with an IC50 of 7.32 ng/mL compared to 10.7 ng/mL for the 16 kDa unfractionated heparin. The fractionated polysaccharides were then tested in a heparanase-rich medium-based in vitro model, mimicking tumor microenvironment, to determine their effect on microvascular endothelial cells (HSkMEC angiogenesis. As a preliminary study, we identified that under hypoxic and nutrient poor conditions, MCF-7 cancer cells released much more mature heparanase in their supernatant than in normal conditions. Then a MatrigelTM assay using HSkMEC cultured under hypoxic conditions in the presence (or not of this heparanase-rich supernatant was realized. Adding heparanase-rich media strongly enhanced angiogenic network formation with a production of twice more pseudo-vessels than with the control. When sulfated polysaccharides were tested in this angiogenesis assay, RD-GS-λ-Carrageenan was identified as a promising anti-angiogenic agent.

  17. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase 27VNTR (4b/4a) gene polymorphism and the risk of diabetic microvascular complications in Chinese populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Yang, Z; Chen, X

    2017-10-31

    To access the association of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene 27VNTR (4b/4a) polymorphism with diabetic microvascular complications (DMI) susceptibility in Chinese populations. Data were retrieved in a systematic manner on PubMed database, ISI Web of Knowledge, the Cochrane Library, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang, as well as manual searching of the references of the identified articles. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval were used to evaluate the strength of associations. Potential sources of heterogeneity and publication bias were explored. Twelve published articles with thirteen outcomes including 1484 DMI patients and 1225 diabetic controls were included in the meta-analysis. The results showed no evidence for significant association of 27VNTR (4b/4a) polymorphism with DMI risk in dominant model (OR=1.36, 95% CI=0.90-2.06, P=0.15), and similar results were obtained in the allelic, additive and the recessive models (P﹥0.05). Our meta-analysis suggests that eNOS gene 27VNTR (4b/4a) polymorphism might not be a risk factor for DMI in Chinese populations.

  18. Modulation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cell and human gingival fibroblast behavior by micropatterned silica coating surfaces for zirconia dental implant applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laranjeira, Marta S.; Carvalho, Ângela; Pelaez-Vargas, Alejandro; Hansford, Derek; Ferraz, Maria Pia; Coimbra, Susana; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Monteiro, Fernando Jorge

    2014-04-01

    Dental ceramic implants have shown superior esthetic behavior and the absence of induced allergic disorders when compared to titanium implants. Zirconia may become a potential candidate to be used as an alternative to titanium dental implants if surface modifications are introduced. In this work, bioactive micropatterned silica coatings were produced on zirconia substrates, using a combined methodology of sol-gel processing and soft lithography. The aim of the work was to compare the in vitro behavior of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) on three types of silica-coated zirconia surfaces: flat and micropatterned (with pillars and with parallel grooves). Our results showed that cells had a higher metabolic activity (HGF, HDMEC) and increased gene expression levels of fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1) and collagen type I (COL I) on surfaces with pillars. Nevertheless, parallel grooved surfaces were able to guide cell growth. Even capillary tube-like networks of HDMEC were oriented according to the surface geometry. Zirconia and silica with different topographies have shown to be blood compatible and silica coating reduced bacteria adhesion. All together, the results indicated that microstructured bioactive coating seems to be an efficient strategy to improve soft tissue integration on zirconia implants, protecting implants from peri-implant inflammation and improving long-term implant stabilization. This new approach of micropatterned silica coating on zirconia substrates can generate promising novel dental implants, with surfaces that provide physical cues to guide cells and enhance their behavior.

  19. Protective Effects of Scutellarin on Human Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells against Hypoxia-Reoxygenation Injury and Its Possible Target-Related Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meina Shi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Scutellarin (SCU is one of the main components of traditional Chinese medicine plant Erigeron breviscapus (Vant. Hand.-Mazz. In this paper, we studied the protective effects of SCU on human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs against hypoxia-reoxygenation (HR injury and its possible target-related proteins. Results of MTT assay showed that pretreatment of SCU at doses of 1, 5, and 10 μM for 2 h could significantly inhibit the decrease in cell viability of HCMECs induced by HR injury. Subcellular fractions of cells treated with vehicle control, 1 μM SCU, HR injury, or 1 μM SCU + HR injury were separated by ultracentrifugation. The protein expression profiles of cytoplasm and membrane/nuclei fractions were checked using protein two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE. Proteins differentially expressed between control and SCU-treated group, control and HR group, or HR and SCU + HR group were identified using mass spectrometry (MS/MS. Possible interaction network of these target-related proteins was predicted using bioinformatic analysis. The influence of SCU on the expression levels of these proteins was confirmed using Western blotting assay. The results indicated that proteins such as p27BBP protein (EIF6, heat shock 60 kDa protein 1 (HSPD1, and chaperonin containing TCP1 subunit 6A isoform (CCT6A might play important roles in the effects of SCU.

  20. The NR1 subunit of NMDA receptor regulates monocyte transmigration through the brain endothelial cell barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijerkerk, A.; Kooij, G.; van der Pol, S.M.A.; Leyen, T.A.; Lakeman, K.; Van Het Hof, B; Vivien, D.; de Vries, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    Normal neuronal functioning is dependent on the blood-brain barrier. This barrier is confined to specialized brain endothelial cells lining the inner vessel wall, and tightly controlling transport of nutrients, efflux of potentially harmful molecules and entry of immune cells into the brain. Loss of

  1. Immortalized endothelial cell lines for in vitro blood-brain barrier models: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Nurul Adhwa; Rasil, Alifah Nur'ain Haji Mat; Meyding-Lamade, Uta; Craemer, Eva Maria; Diah, Suwarni; Tuah, Ani Afiqah; Muharram, Siti Hanna

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial cells play the most important role in construction of the blood-brain barrier. Many studies have opted to use commercially available, easily transfected or immortalized endothelial cell lines as in vitro blood-brain barrier models. Numerous endothelial cell lines are available, but we do not currently have strong evidence for which cell lines are optimal for establishment of such models. This review aimed to investigate the application of immortalized endothelial cell lines as in vitro blood-brain barrier models. The databases used for this review were PubMed, OVID MEDLINE, ProQuest, ScienceDirect, and SpringerLink. A narrative systematic review was conducted and identified 155 studies. As a result, 36 immortalized endothelial cell lines of human, mouse, rat, porcine and bovine origins were found for the establishment of in vitro blood-brain barrier and brain endothelium models. This review provides a summary of immortalized endothelial cell lines as a guideline for future studies and improvements in the establishment of in vitro blood-brain barrier models. It is important to establish a good and reproducible model that has the potential for multiple applications, in particular a model of such a complex compartment such as the blood-brain barrier. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A nanoengineered peptidic delivery system with specificity for human brain capillary endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Linping; Moghimi, Seyed Moein

    2016-01-01

    avidity of the majority of the so-called ‘brain-specific’ nanoparticles to the brain capillary endothelial cells has been poor, even during in vitro conditions. We have addressed this issue and designed a versatile peptidic nanoplatform with high binding avidity to the human cerebral capillary endothelial...... cells. This was achieved by selecting an appropriate phage-derived peptide with high specificity for human brain capillary endothelial cells, which following careful structural modifications spontaneously formed a nanoparticle-fiber network. The peptidic network was characterized fully and its uptake...... by the human brain capillary endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 was confirmed by live-cell fluorescent microscopy and quantified by flow cytometry. Recognition and internalization was medicated by two receptors leading to endolysosomal accumulation. Furthermore, the network was capable of delivering functional si...

  3. Activation of RARα, RARγ, or RXRα Increases Barrier Tightness in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Brain Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Matthew J; Lippmann, Ethan S; Faubion, Madeline G; Daneman, Richard; Palecek, Sean P; Shusta, Eric V

    2017-09-28

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is critical to central nervous system (CNS) health. Brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) are often used as in vitro BBB models for studying BBB dysfunction and therapeutic screening applications. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can be differentiated to cells having key BMEC barrier and transporter properties, offering a renewable, scalable source of human BMECs. hPSC-derived BMECs have previously been shown to respond to all-trans retinoic acid (RA), and the goal of this study was to identify the stages at which differentiating human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) respond to activation of RA receptors (RARs) to impart BBB phenotypes. Here the authors identified that RA application to iPSC-derived BMECs at days 6-8 of differentiation led to a substantial elevation in transendothelial electrical resistance and induction of VE-cadherin expression. Specific RAR agonists identified RARα, RARγ, and RXRα as receptors capable of inducing barrier phenotypes. Moreover, RAR/RXRα costimulation elevated VE-cadherin expression and improved barrier fidelity to levels that recapitulated the effects of RA. This study elucidates the roles of RA signaling in iPSC-derived BMEC differentiation, and identifies directed agonist approaches that can improve BMEC fidelity for drug screening studies while also distinguishing potential nuclear receptor targets to explore in BBB dysfunction and therapy. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. p130Cas scaffolds the signalosome to direct adaptor-effector cross talk during Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus trafficking in human microvascular dermal endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Chirosree; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Dutta, Sujoy; Chandran, Bala

    2014-12-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) interacts with cell surface receptors, such as heparan sulfate, integrins (α3β1, αVβ3, and αVβ5), and EphrinA2 (EphA2), and activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Src, phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), c-Cbl, and RhoA GTPase signal molecules early during lipid raft (LR)-dependent productive macropinocytic entry into human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our recent studies have identified CIB1 as a signal amplifier facilitating EphA2 phosphorylation and subsequent cytoskeletal cross talk during KSHV macropinocytosis. Although CIB1 lacks an enzymatic activity and traditional adaptor domain or known interacting sequence, it associated with the KSHV entry signal complex and the CIB1-KSHV association was sustained over 30 min postinfection. To identify factors scaffolding the EphA2-CIB1 signal axis, the role of major cellular scaffold protein p130Cas (Crk-associated substrate of Src) was investigated. Inhibitor and small interfering RNA (siRNA) studies demonstrated that KSHV induced p130Cas in an EphA2-, CIB1-, and Src-dependent manner. p130Cas and Crk were associated with KSHV, LRs, EphA2, and CIB1 early during infection. Live-cell microscopy and biochemical studies demonstrated that p130Cas knockdown did not affect KSHV entry but significantly reduced productive nuclear trafficking of viral DNA and routed KSHV to lysosomal degradation. p130Cas aided in scaffolding adaptor Crk to downstream guanine nucleotide exchange factor phospho-C3G possibly to coordinate GTPase signaling during KSHV trafficking. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that p130Cas acts as a bridging molecule between the KSHV-induced entry signal complex and the downstream trafficking signalosome in endothelial cells and suggest that simultaneous targeting of KSHV entry receptors with p130Cas would be an attractive potential avenue for therapeutic intervention in KSHV infection. Eukaryotic cell adaptor molecules, without any intrinsic

  5. Aggressive Antioxidant Reductive Stress Impairs Brain Endothelial Cell Angiogenesis and Blood Brain Barrier Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentor, Shireen; Fisher, David

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress in the brain microvasculature is a common characteristic in models of cerebrovascular disease. Considering the effects of reactive oxygen species activity in vascular-derived insults, it is naturally prudent to hypothesize those interventions inhibiting reactive oxygen species activity, such as antioxidant supplementation, may be beneficial for cerebrovascular disease. Hyper doses of antioxidant supplements, and foods with high antioxidant concentrations, are commonly used as an ongoing remedial and 'over-the-counter' treatments for most seasonal ailments. For the first time, this study reports the adverse effects of excess antioxidants on angiogenic properties of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) which have clinical implications. A medicinal tea, known as Rooibos, commonly used in South Africa and marketed globally, for its prominent antioxidant profile, demonstrated its effects on brain endothelial cellular proliferation, toxicology, mitochondrial activity and permeability. Mouse brain endothelial cells were seeded at cell densities ranging from 103-106 cells/ml and were incubated at pre-determined time intervals of 24 to120 hours. Daily exposure of a selected concentration range of fermented Rooibos tea caused dose-related decreases in cellular proliferation, and unequivocally decreased permeability across our in vitro BBB model. Despite the negative effects on cellular proliferation, no toxicity was observed for all selected fermented Rooibos concentrations. Our data conclusively shows that the use of excess antioxidants perturbs BBB functionality and angiogenic properties, adversely implicating the homeostatic regulation of the brain microenvironment, while suppression in cellular proliferation impacts both the maintenance and repair function of brain capillaries. Our study indicates that excess antioxidants will lead to an impaired response to mechanical-induced injury and pathogenic infection of the BBB, compromising patient recovery. Copyright

  6. Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate augments blood-brain barrier and tight junction protein expression in brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Dimitrios; Scheiner-Bobis, Georgios

    2017-08-01

    Tight junctions (TJ) between brain endothelial cells are essential for formation and maintenance of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Although loss of BBB integrity is associated with several neuropathological disorders, treatments that augment or stabilise the BBB are scarce. Here we show that physiological concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) stimulate the expression of the TJ proteins zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-3 in the brain-derived endothelial cell line bEnd.3 and promote TJ formation between neighbouring cells, demonstrated by augmented transendothelial resistance across cell monolayers. Silencing androgen receptor expression by siRNA does not prevent DHEAS-induced stimulation of ZO-1 expression, indicating that conversion of DHEAS into testosterone is not required for its actions. Suppression of Gnα11 expression by siRNA prevents DHEAS actions, pointing towards a G-protein-coupled receptor as being a mediator of the DHEAS effects. These results are consistent with the idea that DHEAS, acting as a hormone in its own right, supports the integrity of the BBB. The current findings might help in developing new strategies for the prevention or treatment of neurological disorders associated with BBB defects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Circulating IGF-1 deficiency exacerbates hypertension-induced microvascular rarefaction in the mouse hippocampus and retrosplenial cortex: implications for cerebromicrovascular and brain aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantini, Stefano; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Valcarcel-Ares, M Noa; Toth, Peter; Gautam, Tripti; Giles, Cory B; Ballabh, Praveen; Wei, Jeanne Y; Wren, Jonathan D; Ashpole, Nicole M; Sonntag, William E; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna

    2016-08-01

    Strong epidemiological and experimental evidence indicate that both age and hypertension lead to significant functional and structural impairment of the cerebral microcirculation, predisposing to the development of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and Alzheimer's disease. Preclinical studies establish a causal link between cognitive decline and microvascular rarefaction in the hippocampus, an area of brain important for learning and memory. Age-related decline in circulating IGF-1 levels results in functional impairment of the cerebral microvessels; however, the mechanistic role of IGF-1 deficiency in impaired hippocampal microvascularization remains elusive. The present study was designed to characterize the additive/synergistic effects of IGF-1 deficiency and hypertension on microvascular density and expression of genes involved in angiogenesis and microvascular regression in the hippocampus. To achieve that goal, we induced hypertension in control and IGF-1 deficient mice (Igf1 (f/f)  + TBG-Cre-AAV8) by chronic infusion of angiotensin II. We found that circulating IGF-1 deficiency is associated with decreased microvascular density and exacerbates hypertension-induced microvascular rarefaction both in the hippocampus and the neocortex. The anti-angiogenic hippocampal gene expression signature observed in hypertensive IGF-1 deficient mice in the present study provides important clues for subsequent studies to elucidate mechanisms by which hypertension may contribute to the pathogenesis and clinical manifestation of VCI. In conclusion, adult-onset, isolated endocrine IGF-1 deficiency exerts deleterious effects on the cerebral microcirculation, leading to a significant decline in cortical and hippocampal capillarity and exacerbating hypertension-induced cerebromicrovascular rarefaction. The morphological impairment of the cerebral microvasculature induced by IGF-1 deficiency and hypertension reported here, in combination with neurovascular uncoupling, increased

  8. CD146 coordinates brain endothelial cell-pericyte communication for blood-brain barrier development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianan; Luo, Yongting; Hui, Hui; Cai, Tanxi; Huang, Hongxin; Yang, Fuquan; Feng, Jing; Zhang, Jingjing; Yan, Xiyun

    2017-09-05

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) establishes a protective interface between the central neuronal system and peripheral blood circulation and is crucial for homeostasis of the CNS. BBB formation starts when the endothelial cells (ECs) invade the CNS and pericytes are recruited to the nascent vessels during embryogenesis. Despite the essential function of pericyte-EC interaction during BBB development, the molecular mechanisms coordinating the pericyte-EC behavior and communication remain incompletely understood. Here, we report a single cell receptor, CD146, that presents dynamic expression patterns in the cerebrovasculature at the stages of BBB induction and maturation, coordinates the interplay of ECs and pericytes, and orchestrates BBB development spatiotemporally. In mouse brain, CD146 is first expressed in the cerebrovascular ECs of immature capillaries without pericyte coverage; with increased coverage of pericytes, CD146 could only be detected in pericytes, but not in cerebrovascular ECs. Specific deletion of Cd146 in mice ECs resulted in reduced brain endothelial claudin-5 expression and BBB breakdown. By analyzing mice with specific deletion of Cd146 in pericytes, which have defects in pericyte coverage and BBB integrity, we demonstrate that CD146 functions as a coreceptor of PDGF receptor-β to mediate pericyte recruitment to cerebrovascular ECs. Moreover, we found that the attached pericytes in turn down-regulate endothelial CD146 by secreting TGF-β1 to promote further BBB maturation. These results reveal that the dynamic expression of CD146 controls the behavior of ECs and pericytes, thereby coordinating the formation of a mature and stable BBB.

  9. Signaling mechanisms in tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced death of microvascular endothelial cells of the corpus luteum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rueda Bo R

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The microvasculature of the corpus luteum (CL, which comprises greater than 50% of the total number of cells in the CL, is thought to be the first structure to undergo degeneration via apoptosis during luteolysis. These studies compared the apoptotic potential of various cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α, TNFα; interferon gamma, IFNγ; soluble Fas ligand, sFasL, a FAS activating antibody (FasAb, and the luteolytic hormone prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α on CL-derived endothelial (CLENDO cells. Neither sFasL, FasAb nor PGF2α had any effect on CLENDO cell viability. Utilizing morphological and biochemical parameters it was evident that TNFα and IFNγ initiated apoptosis in long-term cultures. However, TNFα was the most potent stimulus for CLENDO cell apoptosis at early time points. Unlike many other studies described in non-reproductive cell types, TNFα induced apoptosis of CLENDO cells occurs in the absence of inhibitors of protein synthesis. TNFα-induced death is typically associated with acute activation of distinct intracellular signaling pathways (e.g. MAPK and sphingomyelin pathways. Treatment with TNFα for 5–30 min activated MAPKs (ERK, p38, and JNK, and increased ceramide accumulation. Ceramide, a product of sphingomyelin hydrolysis, can serve as an upstream activator of members of the MAPK family independently in numerous cell types, and is a well-established pro-apoptotic second messenger. Like TNFα, treatment of CLENDO cells with exogenous ceramide significantly induced endothelial apoptosis. Ceramide also activated the JNK pathway, but had no effect on ERK and p38 MAPKs. Pretreatment of CLENDO cells with glutathione (GSH, an intracellular reducing agent and known inhibitor of reactive oxygen species (ROS or TNFα-induced apoptosis, significantly attenuated TNFα-induced apoptosis. It is hypothesized that TNFα kills CLENDO cells through elevation of reactive oxygen species, and intracellular signals that promote

  10. Protein C activation peptide inhibits the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and interleukin-8 induced by TNF-a in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells Protein C activation peptide inhibits the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and interleukin-8 induced by TNF-a in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Del Socorro Pina-Canseco

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Activated protein C (APC is generated from the cleavage of protein C by thrombin coupled to thrombomodulin
    and, subsequently, is released as protein C activation peptide (papC. The aim of this study was to
    evaluate the effect of papC on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1, activated with 5 ng/
    /mL TNF-a. Flow cytometry showed that papC inhibited the expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1, after activation
    with TNF-a. Similarly, RT-PCR analysis revealed that 2 and 4 pM papC inhibited the expression of VCAM-1
    and IL-8 mRNA in TNF-a-treated HMEC-1. In addition, the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase
    (eNOS increased in HMEC-1 treated with papC, compared to those without treatment. Furthermore, Jurkat
    cell adhesion to HMEC-1 induced by TNF-a was significantly inhibited after the addition of papC, compared to
    HMEC-1 without papC (p = 0.03. Finally, a control peptide analog to papC showed no effect on the expression
    of ICAM and VCAM on the surface of HMEC-1. In conclusion, our results suggest that papC exerts antiinflammatory
    effects on endothelial cells.Activated protein C (APC is generated from the cleavage of protein C by thrombin coupled to thrombomodulin
    and, subsequently, is released as protein C activation peptide (papC. The aim of this study was to
    evaluate the effect of papC on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1, activated with 5 ng/
    /mL TNF-a. Flow cytometry showed that papC inhibited the expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1, after activation
    with TNF-a. Similarly, RT-PCR analysis revealed that 2 and 4 pM papC inhibited the expression of VCAM-1
    and IL-8 mRNA in TNF-a-treated HMEC-1. In addition, the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase
    (eNOS increased in HMEC-1 treated with papC, compared to those without treatment. Furthermore, Jurkat
    cell adhesion to HMEC-1 induced by TNF-a was significantly inhibited after the

  11. Organization of Endothelial Cells, Pericytes, and Astrocytes into a 3D Microfluidic in Vitro Model of the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jack D; Khafagy, El-Sayed; Khanafer, Khalil; Takayama, Shuichi; ElSayed, Mohamed E H

    2016-03-07

    The endothelial cells lining the capillaries supplying the brain with oxygen and nutrients form a formidable barrier known as the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which exhibits selective permeability to small drug molecules and virtually impermeable to macromolecular therapeutics. Current in vitro BBB models fail to replicate this restrictive behavior due to poor integration of the endothelial cells with supporting cells (pericytes and astrocytes) following the correct anatomical organization observed in vivo. We report the coculture of mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (b.End3), pericytes, with/without C8-D1A astrocytes in layered microfluidic channels forming three-dimensional (3D) bi- and triculture models of the BBB. The live/dead assay indicated high viability of all cultured cells up to 21 days. Trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) values confirmed the formation of intact monolayers after 3 days in culture and showed statistically higher values for the triculture model compared to the single and biculture models. Screening the permeability of [(14)C]-mannitol and [(14)C]-urea showed the ability of bi- and triculture models to discriminate between different markers based on their size. Further, permeability of [(14)C]-mannitol across the triculture model after 18 days in culture matched its reported permeability across the BBB in vivo. Mathematical calculations also showed that the radius of the tight junctions pores (R) in the triculture model is similar to the reported diameter of the BBB in vivo. Finally, both the bi- and triculture models exhibited functional expression of the P-glycoprotein efflux pump, which increased with the increase in the number of days in culture. These results collectively indicate that the triculture model is a robust in vitro model of the BBB.

  12. Immune-induced fever is mediated by IL-6 receptors on brain endothelial cells coupled to STAT3-dependent induction of brain endothelial prostaglandin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskilsson, Anna; Mirrasekhian, Elahe; Dufour, Sylvie; Schwaninger, Markus; Engblom, David; Blomqvist, Anders

    2014-11-26

    The cytokine IL-6, which is released upon peripheral immune challenge, is critical for the febrile response, but the mechanism by which IL-6 is pyrogenic has remained obscure. Here we generated mice with deletion of the membrane bound IL-6 receptor α (IL-6Rα) on neural cells, on peripheral nerves, on fine sensory afferent fibers, and on brain endothelial cells, respectively, and examined its role for the febrile response to peripherally injected lipopolysaccharide. We show that IL-6Rα on neural cells, peripheral nerves, and fine sensory afferents are dispensable for the lipopolysaccharide-induced fever, whereas IL-6Rα in the brain endothelium plays an important role. Hence deletion of IL-6Rα on brain endothelial cells strongly attenuated the febrile response, and also led to reduced induction of the prostaglandin synthesizing enzyme Cox-2 in the hypothalamus, the temperature-regulating center in the brain, as well as reduced expression of SOCS3, suggesting involvement of the STAT signaling pathway. Furthermore, deletion of STAT3 in the brain endothelium also resulted in attenuated fever. These data show that IL-6, when endogenously released during systemic inflammation, is pyrogenic by binding to IL-6Rα on brain endothelial cells to induce prostaglandin synthesis in these cells, probably in concerted action with other peripherally released cytokines. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3415957-05$15.00/0.

  13. Qi-Shen-Yi-Qi Dripping Pills Promote Angiogenesis of Ischemic Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells by Regulating MicroRNA-223-3p Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Hua Dai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM research shows that Qi-Shen-Yi-Qi Dripping Pills (QSYQ can promote ischemic cardiac angiogenesis. Studies have shown that microRNAs (miRNAs are the key component of gene regulation networks, which play a vital role in angiogenesis and cardiovascular disease. Mechanisms involving miRNA by which TCM promotes ischemic cardiac angiogenesis have not been reported. We found that microRNA-223-3p (mir-223-3p was the core miRNA of angiogenesis of rats ischemic cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs and inhibited angiogenesis by affecting RPS6KB1/HIF-1α signal pathway in previous study. Based on the results, we observed biological characteristics and optimal dosage for QSYQ intervening in rats ischemic CMECs angiogenesis and concluded that QSYQ low-dose group had the strongest ability to promote angiogenesis of ischemic myocardium. Using miRNA chip and real-time PCR techniques in this study, we identified mir-223-3p as the pivotal miRNA in QSYQ that regulated angiogenesis of ischemic CMECs. From real-time PCR and western blot analysis, research showed that gene and protein expression of factors located RPS6KB1/HIF-1α signaling pathway, including HIF-1α, VEGF, MAPK, PI3K, and AKT, were significantly upregulated by QSYQ to regulate angiogenesis of ischemic CMECs. This study showed that QSYQ promote ischemic cardiac angiogenesis by downregulating mir-223-3p expression in rats ischemic CMECs.

  14. Impairment of brain endothelial glucose transporter by methamphetamine causes blood-brain barrier dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murrin L Charles

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methamphetamine (METH, an addictive psycho-stimulant drug with euphoric effect is known to cause neurotoxicity due to oxidative stress, dopamine accumulation and glial cell activation. Here we hypothesized that METH-induced interference of glucose uptake and transport at the endothelium can disrupt the energy requirement of the blood-brain barrier (BBB function and integrity. We undertake this study because there is no report of METH effects on glucose uptake and transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB to date. Results In this study, we demonstrate that METH-induced disruption of glucose uptake by endothelium lead to BBB dysfunction. Our data indicate that a low concentration of METH (20 μM increased the expression of glucose transporter protein-1 (GLUT1 in primary human brain endothelial cell (hBEC, main component of BBB without affecting the glucose uptake. A high concentration of 200 μM of METH decreased both the glucose uptake and GLUT1 protein levels in hBEC culture. Transcription process appeared to regulate the changes in METH-induced GLUT1 expression. METH-induced decrease in GLUT1 protein level was associated with reduction in BBB tight junction protein occludin and zonula occludens-1. Functional assessment of the trans-endothelial electrical resistance of the cell monolayers and permeability of dye tracers in animal model validated the pharmacokinetics and molecular findings that inhibition of glucose uptake by GLUT1 inhibitor cytochalasin B (CB aggravated the METH-induced disruption of the BBB integrity. Application of acetyl-L-carnitine suppressed the effects of METH on glucose uptake and BBB function. Conclusion Our findings suggest that impairment of GLUT1 at the brain endothelium by METH may contribute to energy-associated disruption of tight junction assembly and loss of BBB integrity.

  15. Exogenous arachidonic acid mediates permeability of human brain microvessel endothelial cells through prostaglandin E2 activation of EP3 and EP4 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalvi, Siddhartha; Nguyen, Hieu H; On, Ngoc; Mitchell, Ryan W; Aukema, Harold M; Miller, Donald W; Hatch, Grant M

    2015-12-01

    The blood-brain barrier, formed by microvessel endothelial cells, is the restrictive barrier between the brain parenchyma and the circulating blood. Arachidonic acid (ARA; 5,8,11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid) is a conditionally essential polyunsaturated fatty acid [20:4(n-6)] and is a major constituent of brain lipids. The current study examined the transport processes for ARA in confluent monolayers of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). Addition of radioactive ARA to the apical compartment of HBMEC cultured on Transwell(®) inserts resulted in rapid incorporation of radioactivity into the basolateral medium. Knock down of fatty acid transport proteins did not alter ARA passage into the basolateral medium as a result of the rapid generation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ), an eicosanoid known to facilitate opening of the blood-brain barrier. Permeability following ARA or PGE2 exposure was confirmed by an increased movement of fluorescein-labeled dextran from apical to basolateral medium. ARA-mediated permeability was attenuated by specific cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors. EP3 and EP4 receptor antagonists attenuated the ARA-mediated permeability of HBMEC. The results indicate that ARA increases permeability of HBMEC monolayers likely via increased production of PGE2 which acts upon EP3 and EP4 receptors to mediate permeability. These observations may explain the rapid influx of ARA into the brain previously observed upon plasma infusion with ARA. The blood-brain barrier, formed by microvessel endothelial cells, is a restrictive barrier between the brain parenchyma and the circulating blood. Radiolabeled arachidonic acid (ARA) movement across, and monolayer permeability in the presence of ARA, was examined in confluent monolayers of primary human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMECs) cultured on Transwell(®) plates. Incubation of HBMECs with ARA resulted in a rapid increase in HBMEC monolayer permeability. The mechanism was mediated, in part

  16. Impact of commercial cigarette smoke condensate on brain tissue co-cultured with astrocytes and blood-brain barrier endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seon-Bong; Kim, Ju-Hyeong; Cho, Myung-Haing; Choe, Eun-Sang; Kim, Kwang-Sik; Shim, Soon-Mi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of two commercial cigarette smoke condensates (CCSC) on oxidative stress and cell cytotoxicity in human brain (T98G) or astrocytes (U-373 MG) in the presence of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). Cell viability of mono-culture of T98G or U-373 MG was markedly decreased in a concentration-dependent manner, and T98G was more susceptible than U-373 MG to CCSC exposure. Cytotoxicity was less prominent when T98G was co-cultured with HBMEC than when T98G was co-cultured with U-373 MG. Significant reduction in trans-epithelial electric resistance (TEER), a biomarker of cellular integrity was noted in HBMEC co-cultured with T98G (HBMEC-T98G co-culture) and U-373 MG co-cultured with T98G (U-373 MG-T98G co-culture) after 24 or 48 hr CCSC exposure, respectively. TEER value of U-373 MG co-cultured with T98G (79-84%) was higher than HBMEC co-cultured with T98G (62-63%) within 120-hr incubation with CCSC. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by CCSC in mono-culture of T98G and U-373 MG reached highest levels at 4 and 16 mg/ml, respectively. ROS production by T98G fell when co-cultured with HBMEC or U-373MG. These findings suggest that adverse consequences of CCSC treatment on brain cells may be protected by blood-brain barrier or astrocytes, but with chronic exposure toxicity may be worsened due to destruction of cellular integrity.

  17. Generation of primary cultures of bovine brain endothelial cells and setup of cocultures with rat astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Hans C; Brodin, Birger

    2014-01-01

    In vitro models of the blood-brain barrier are useful tools to study blood-brain barrier function as well as drug permeation from the systemic circulation to the brain parenchyma. However, a large number of the available in vitro models fail to reflect the tightness of the in vivo blood-brain...... barrier. The present protocol describes the setup of an in vitro coculture model based on primary cultures of endothelial cells from bovine brain microvessels and primary cultures of rat astrocytes. The model displays a high electrical tightness and expresses blood-brain barrier marker proteins....

  18. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Inhibits Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Expression in Interleukin-1β-Treated Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Katsuhiro; Obinata, Yusuke; Konishi, Akihiro; Kajiya, Mikihito; Matsuda, Shinji; Mizuno, Noriyoshi; Sasaki, Shinya; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Kurihara, Hidemi

    2016-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances periodontal tissue regeneration. Tissue regeneration is characterized by inflammation, which directs the quality of tissue repair. The objective of this study is to propose the relevance of BDNF to inflammation. In this study, we investigated the effect of BDNF on intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, which is an inflammatory marker, expressed in interleukin (IL)-1β-treated human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs). In addition, we studied the effect of BDNF on the adhesion of neutrophil-like differentiated HL-60 cells to HMVECs in a cell adhesion assay. We demonstrated that BDNF attenuates the IL-1β-induced ICAM-1 mRNA and protein expression. Treatment of HMVECs with IL-1β led to an increase in the number of adherent neutrophil-like HL-60 cells. BDNF significantly decreased the number of neutrophil-like HL-60 cells attached to HMVECs. In conclusion, BDNF may reduce excess inflammation through reduced neutrophil recruitment by regulating ICAM-1 expression.

  19. Low density lipoprotein inhibits accumulation of nitrites in murine brain endothelial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereta, M; Bereta, J; Cohen, S; Cohen, M C

    1992-07-15

    Endothelial cells produce nitric oxide which is considered to serve as a major source of endothelial derived relaxing factor activity. It has been demonstrated that activation of mouse brain endothelium by TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma led to accumulation of nitrite which is presumably formed by oxidation of nitric oxide. A number of studies suggest that reactive oxygen species produced by cytokine-activated cells are involved in the conversion of nitric oxide to nitrites and nitrates. We investigated whether low density lipoprotein (LDL), acting as a radical scavenger, is able to inhibit nitrite accumulation in mouse brain endothelial cell cultures and in a cell-free system in which sodium nitroprusside was used as a source of nitric oxide. A comparison of these two models indicates the active involvement of LDL in suppressing nitrite accumulation in murine endothelial cultures.

  20. Circulating IGF-1 deficiency exacerbates hypertension-induced microvascular rarefaction in the mouse hippocampus and retrosplenial cortex: implications for cerebromicrovascular and brain aging

    OpenAIRE

    Tarantini, Stefano; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Valcarcel-Ares, M. Noa; Toth, Peter; Gautam, Tripti; Giles, Cory B.; Ballabh, Praveen; Wei, Jeanne Y.; Wren, Jonathan D.; Ashpole, Nicole M.; Sonntag, William E.; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Strong epidemiological and experimental evidence indicate that both age and hypertension lead to significant functional and structural impairment of the cerebral microcirculation, predisposing to the development of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and Alzheimer’s disease. Preclinical studies establish a causal link between cognitive decline and microvascular rarefaction in the hippocampus, an area of brain important for learning and memory. Age-related decline in circulating IGF-1 levels r...

  1. Normal saline influences coagulation and endothelial function after traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dekker, Simone E; Sillesen, Martin; Bambakidis, Ted

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) are the leading causes of trauma-related deaths. These insults disrupt coagulation and endothelial systems. This study investigated whether previously reported differences in lesion size and brain swelling during normal saline (NS......), colloids (Hextend [HEX]), and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) resuscitation are associated with differential effects on coagulation and endothelial systems. METHODS: We subjected 15 Yorkshire swine to TBI and HS (40% blood volume), and kept in HS for 2 hours before resuscitation with NS, HEX, or FFP. Markers...... of endothelial activation (E-selectin, Intercellular adhesion molecule [ICAM]-1), coagulation activation (prothrombin fragment 1 + 2), and natural anticoagulation (activated protein C [aPC]) were determined in serum and brain whole cell lysates. RESULTS: Serum levels of aPC were greater in the NS group (203 ± 30...

  2. Morphology and endothelial function of microvessels in microvascular angina. With special reference to the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) before and after treatment with K{sub ATP} channel opener

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akao, Hironobu [Kanazawa Medical Univ., Uchinada, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    In patients with microvascular angina (MVA), we studied myocardial metabolic disturbance, morphological characteristics of microvessels and the presence or absence of the expression of eNOS before and after treatment with K{sub ATP} channel opener. The study population consisted of 21 patients with MVA, and 8 patients with valvular disease and without ischemic lesions who served as the control. Myocardial metabolic disturbance was assessed by calculating the standardized uptake value (SUV) of {sup 18}FDG from glucose metabolism using nuclear imaging by {sup 18}FDG-PET, and quantitatively determining the severity of ischemia. Before treatment with K{sub ATP} channel opener, {sup 18}FDG uptake was detected in all 21 patients (100%) with MVA, by fasting {sup 18}FDG-PET during rest. After treatment, improvement at the site of uptake was detected in 19 of the 21 patients (90.5%). Before treatment, SUV of all 21 patients was 1.43{+-}0.76 and, after treatment, SUV was 0.39{+-}0.17; a statistically significant improvement (p<0.001). Histologically, the right ventricular myocardial specimens obtained by biopsy were studied for morphological changes under light and electron microscopes. In all MVA patients, histological examination revealed severe narrowing of the lumen with marked thickening of the media and swelling and proliferation of the endothelial cells in many arterioles, most of which also showed thickening of the basement membrane in all MVA patients. Many capillary vessels also showed the appearance of medial smooth muscle cells and swelling and proliferating of endothelial cells, resulting in narrowing of the lumen. This narrowing is the likely cause of ischemia. The eNOS expression in the arterioles and capillaries was immnohistochemically determined in 11 of the 21 patients. Before treatment, the eNOS expression was barely observable. After treatment, it was increased markedly to a level similar to that of the controls. In conclusion, the eNOS expression in the

  3. Transfection of brain capillary endothelial cells in primary culture with defined blood-brain barrier properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Annette; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Thomsen, Maj Schneider; Lichota, Jacek; Fazakas, Csilla; Krizbai, István; Moos, Torben

    2015-08-07

    Primary brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) are a promising tool to study the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro, as they maintain many important characteristics of the BBB in vivo, especially when co-cultured with pericytes and/or astrocytes. A novel strategy for drug delivery to the brain is to transform BCECs into protein factories by genetic modifications leading to secretion of otherwise BBB impermeable proteins into the central nervous system. However, a huge challenge underlying this strategy is to enable transfection of non-mitotic BCECs, taking a non-viral approach. We therefore aimed to study transfection in primary, non-mitotic BCECs cultured with defined BBB properties without disrupting the cells' integrity. Primary cultures of BCECs, pericytes and astrocytes were generated from rat brains and used in three different in vitro BBB experimental arrangements, which were characterised based on a their expression of tight junction proteins and other BBB specific proteins, high trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER), and low passive permeability to radiolabeled mannitol. Recombinant gene expression and protein synthesis were examined in primary BCECs. The BCECs were transfected using a commercially available transfection agent Turbofect™ to express the red fluorescent protein HcRed1-C1. The BCECs were transfected at different time points to monitor transfection in relation to mitotic or non-mitotic cells, as indicated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis after 5-and 6-carboxylfluorescein diacetate succinidyl ester incorporation. The cell cultures exhibited important BBB characteristics judged from their expression of BBB specific proteins, high TEER values, and low passive permeability. Among the three in vitro BBB models, co-culturing with BCECs and astrocytes was well suited for the transfection studies. Transfection was independent of cell division and with equal efficacy between the mitotic and non-mitotic BCECs. Importantly

  4. Effect of steroid hormones and retinoids on the formation of capillary-like tubular structures of human microvascular endothelial cells in fibrin matrices is related to urokinase expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansink, M; Koolwijk, P; van Hinsbergh, V; Kooistra, T

    1998-08-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new capillary blood vessels, is a feature of a variety of pathological processes. To study the effects of a specific group of hormones (all ligands of the steroid/retinoid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily) on the angiogenic process in humans, we have used a model system in which human microvascular endothelial cells from foreskin (hMVEC) are cultured on top of a human fibrin matrix in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. This model mimics the in vivo situation where fibrin appears to be a common component of the matrix present at sites of chronic inflammation and tumor stroma. Our results show that testosterone and dexamethasone are strong inhibitors and all-trans retinoic acid (at-RA) and 9-cis retinoic acid (9-cis RA) are potent stimulators of the formation of capillary-like tubular structures. These effects are mediated by their respective nuclear hormone receptors as demonstrated by the use of specific synthetic receptor agonists and antagonists. 17beta-estradiol, progesterone, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 did not affect or only weakly affected in vitro angiogenesis, which may be related to the lack of significant nuclear receptor expression. Although hMVEC express both thyroid hormone receptors alpha and beta, no effect of thyroid hormone on tube formation was found. The effects of testosterone, dexamethasone, at-RA, and 9-cis RA on tube formation were accompanied by parallel changes in urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) expression, at both mRNA and antigen levels. Exogenous suppletion of the medium with single chain u-PA enhances tube formation in our in vitro model, whereas quenching of u-PA activity (but not of tissue-type plasminogen activator activity) or of u-PA binding to u-PA receptor by specific antibodies suppressed basal and retinoid-stimulated tube formation. Moreover, addition of scu-PA to testosterone- or dexamethasone-treated hMVEC restored the suppressed

  5. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor is necessary to protect fetal human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells against hyperoxic injury: Mechanistic roles of antioxidant enzymes and RelB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shaojie; Patel, Ananddeep; Chu, Chun; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Welty, Stephen E.; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Shivanna, Binoy, E-mail: shivanna@bcm.edu

    2015-07-15

    Hyperoxia contributes to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants. Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) protects adult and newborn mice against hyperoxic lung injury by mediating increases in the expression of phase I (cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A) and phase II (NADP(H) quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)) antioxidant enzymes (AOE). AhR positively regulates the expression of RelB, a component of the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) protein that contributes to anti-inflammatory processes in adult animals. Whether AhR regulates the expression of AOE and RelB, and protects fetal primary human lung cells against hyperoxic injury is unknown. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that AhR-deficient fetal human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC) will have decreased RelB activation and AOE, which will in turn predispose them to increased oxidative stress, inflammation, and cell death compared to AhR-sufficient HPMEC upon exposure to hyperoxia. AhR-deficient HPMEC showed increased hyperoxia-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and cell death compared to AhR-sufficient HPMEC. Additionally, AhR-deficient cell culture supernatants displayed increased macrophage inflammatory protein 1α and 1β, indicating a heightened inflammatory state. Interestingly, loss of AhR was associated with a significantly attenuated CYP1A1, NQO1, superoxide dismutase 1(SOD1), and nuclear RelB protein expression. These findings support the hypothesis that decreased RelB activation and AOE in AhR-deficient cells is associated with increased hyperoxic injury compared to AhR-sufficient cells. - Highlights: • AhR deficiency potentiates oxygen toxicity in human fetal lung cells. • Deficient AhR signaling increases hyperoxia-induced cell death. • AhR deficiency increases hyperoxia-induced ROS generation and inflammation. • Anti-oxidant enzyme levels are attenuated in AhR-deficient lung cells

  6. CIB1 synergizes with EphrinA2 to regulate Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus macropinocytic entry in human microvascular dermal endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirosree Bandyopadhyay

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available KSHV envelope glycoproteins interact with cell surface heparan sulfate and integrins, and activate FAK, Src, PI3-K, c-Cbl, and Rho-GTPase signal molecules in human microvascular dermal endothelial (HMVEC-d cells. c-Cbl mediates the translocation of virus bound α3β1 and αVβ3 integrins into lipid rafts (LRs, where KSHV interacts and activates EphrinA2 (EphA2. EphA2 associates with c-Cbl-myosin IIA and augmented KSHV-induced Src and PI3-K signals in LRs, leading to bleb formation and macropinocytosis of KSHV. To identify the factor(s coordinating the EphA2-signal complex, the role of CIB1 (calcium and integrin binding protein-1 associated with integrin signaling was analyzed. CIB1 knockdown did not affect KSHV binding to HMVEC-d cells but significantly reduced its entry and gene expression. In contrast, CIB1 overexpression increased KSHV entry in 293 cells. Single virus particle infection and trafficking during HMVEC-d cell entry was examined by utilizing DiI (envelope and BrdU (viral DNA labeled virus. CIB1 was associated with KSHV in membrane blebs and in Rab5 positive macropinocytic vesicles. CIB1 knockdown abrogated virus induced blebs, macropinocytosis and virus association with the Rab5 macropinosome. Infection increased the association of CIB1 with LRs, and CIB1 was associated with EphA2 and KSHV entry associated signal molecules such as Src, PI3-K, and c-Cbl. CIB1 knockdown significantly reduced the infection induced EphA2, Src and Erk1/2 activation. Mass spectrometry revealed the simultaneous association of CIB1 and EphA2 with the actin cytoskeleton modulating myosin IIA and alpha-actinin 4 molecules, and CIB1 knockdown reduced EphA2's association with myosin IIA and alpha-actinin 4. Collectively, these studies revealed for the first time that CIB1 plays a role in virus entry and macropinocytosis, and suggested that KSHV utilizes CIB1 as one of the key molecule(s to coordinate and sustain the EphA2 mediated signaling involved in its

  7. Placental growth factor enhances angiogenesis in human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells via PI3K/Akt pathway: Potential implications of inflammation bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yi, E-mail: mondayzy@126.com; Tu, Chuantao, E-mail: tu.chuantao@zs-hospital.sh.cn; Zhao, Yuan, E-mail: zhao.yuan@zs-hospital.sh.cn; Liu, Hongchun, E-mail: liuhch@aliyun.com; Zhang, Shuncai, E-mail: zhang.shuncai@zs-hospital.sh.cn

    2016-02-19

    Background: Angiogenesis plays a major role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Placental growth factor (PlGF) is a specific regulator of pathological angiogenesis and is upregulated in the sera of IBD patients. Therefore, the role of PlGF in IBD angiogenesis was investigated here using HIMECs. Methods: The expression of PlGF and its receptors in human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (HIMECs) and inflamed mucosa of IBD patients were examined using quantitative PCR and western blot analysis and the role of PlGF in IBD HIMECs was further explored using small interfering RNA (siRNA). The induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine by PlGF in HIMECs was confirmed by ELISA. The capacity of PlGF to induce angiogenesis in HIMECs was tested through proliferation, cell-migration, matrigel tubule-formation assays and its underlying signaling pathway were explored by western blot analysis of ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt phosphorylation. Results: mRNA and protein expression of PlGF and its receptor NRP-1 were significantly increased in IBD HIMECs. Inflamed mucosa of IBD patients also displayed higher expression of PIGF. The production of IL-6 and TNF-α in culture supernatant of HIMECs treated with exogenous recombinant human PlGF-1 (rhPlGF-1) were increased. Furthermore, rhPlGF-1 significantly induced HIMECs migration and tube formation in a dose-dependent manner and knockdown of endogenous PlGF in IBD HIMECs using siRNA substantially reduced these angiogenesis activities. PlGF induced PI3K/Akt phosphorylation in HIMECs and pretreatment of PlGF-stimulated HIMECs with PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) significantly inhibited the PlGF-induced cell migration and tube formation. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated the pro-inflammatory and angiogenic effects of PlGF on HIMECs in IBD through activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. PlGF/PI3K/Akt signaling may serve as a potential therapeutic target for IBD. - Highlights: • Expression of PlGF and its receptor NRP-1

  8. Blood-based biomarkers of microvascular pathology in Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ewers, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) is a genetically complex and chronically progressive neurodegenerative disorder with molecular mechanisms and neuropathologies centering around the amyloidogenic pathway, hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of tau protein, and neurofibrillary degeneration. While cerebrovascular changes have not been traditionally considered to be a central part of AD pathology, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that they may, in fact, be a characteristic feature of the AD brain as well. In particular, microvascular abnormalities within the brain have been associated with pathological AD hallmarks and may precede neurodegeneration. In vivo assessment of microvascular pathology provides a promising approach to develop useful biological markers for early detection and pathological characterization of AD. This review focuses on established blood-based biological marker candidates of microvascular pathology in AD. These candidates include plasma concentration of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) that are increased in AD. Measures of endothelial vasodilatory function including endothelin (ET-1), adrenomedullin (ADM), and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), as well as sphingolipids are significantly altered in mild AD or during the predementia stage of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), suggesting sensitivity of these biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis. In conclusion, the emerging clinical diagnostic evidence for the value of blood-based microvascular biomarkers in AD is promising, however, still requires validation in phase II and III diagnostic trials. Moreover, it is still unclear whether the described protein dysbalances are early or downstream pathological events and how the detected systemic microvascular alterations relate to cerebrovascular and neuronal pathologies in the AD brain.

  9. Method for isolation and molecular characterization of extracellular microvesicles released from brain endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haqqani Arsalan S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to possessing intracellular vesicles, eukaryotic cells also produce extracellular microvesicles, ranging from 50 to 1000 nm in diameter that are released or shed into the microenvironment under physiological and pathological conditions. These membranous extracellular organelles include both exosomes (originating from internal vesicles of endosomes and ectosomes (originating from direct budding/shedding of plasma membranes. Extracellular microvesicles contain cell-specific collections of proteins, glycoproteins, lipids, nucleic acids and other molecules. These vesicles play important roles in intercellular communication by acting as carrier for essential cell-specific information to target cells. Endothelial cells in the brain form the blood–brain barrier, a specialized interface between the blood and the brain that tightly controls traffic of nutrients and macromolecules between two compartments and interacts closely with other cells forming the neurovascular unit. Therefore, brain endothelial cell extracellular microvesicles could potentially play important roles in ‘externalizing’ brain-specific biomarkers into the blood stream during pathological conditions, in transcytosis of blood-borne molecules into the brain, and in cell-cell communication within the neurovascular unit. Methods To study cell-specific molecular make-up and functions of brain endothelial cell exosomes, methods for isolation of extracellular microvesicles using mass spectrometry-compatible protocols and the characterization of their signature profiles using mass spectrometry -based proteomics were developed. Results A total of 1179 proteins were identified in the isolated extracellular microvesicles from brain endothelial cells. The microvesicles were validated by identification of almost 60 known markers, including Alix, TSG101 and the tetraspanin proteins CD81 and CD9. The surface proteins on isolated microvesicles could potentially

  10. Flavonoids targeting of IκB phosphorylation abrogates carcinogen-induced MMP-9 and COX-2 expression in human brain endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahanian E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Tahanian¹, Luis Arguello Sanchez¹, Tze Chieh Shiao², René Roy², Borhane Annabi¹¹Centre de Recherche BioMED, ²Centre de Recherche PharmaQAM, Département de chimie, Université du Québec à Montréal, QC, CanadaAbstract: Brain endothelial cells play an essential role as structural and functional components of the blood–brain barrier (BBB. Increased BBB breakdown and brain injury are associated with neuroinflammation and are thought to trigger mechanisms involving matrix metalloproteinase upregulation. Emerging evidence also indicates that cyclooxygenase (COX inhibition limits BBB disruption, but the mechanisms linking metalloproteinase to COX remain unknown. In this study, we sought to investigate the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB signaling pathway, a common pathway in both the regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 and COX-2 expression, and the inhibitory properties of several chemopreventive flavonoids. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells were treated with a combination of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, a carcinogen documented to increase MMP-9 and COX-2 through NF-κB, and several naturally occurring flavonoids. Among the molecules tested, we found that fisetin, apigenin, and luteolin specifically and dose-dependently antagonized PMA-induced COX-2 and MMP-9 gene and protein expressions as assessed by qRT-PCR, immunoblotting, and zymography respectively. We further demonstrate that flavonoids impact on IκK-mediated phosphorylation activity as demonstrated by the inhibition of PMA-induced IκB phosphorylation levels. Our results suggest that BBB disruption during neuroinflammation could be pharmacologically reduced by a specific class of flavonoids acting as NF-κB signal transduction inhibitors.Keywords: blood–brain barrier, flavonoids, neuroinflammation, NF-κB signal transduction inhibitors

  11. Diabetes : Brain changes in T1DM—a microvascular complication?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biessels, Geert Jan

    2015-01-01

    A recent study indicates that type 1 diabetes mellitus is associated with vascular brain lesions that affect cognition and might represent a target for preventive measures. This commentary discusses methods to ascertain vascular contributions to cerebral dysfunction in diabetes mellitus and

  12. [Changes in the morphometric indices of the microvascular bed of the brain in experimental hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, T B; Rodionov, I M; Shinkarenko, V S

    1984-09-01

    Brain stem microvessels up to 15 microns in diameter of spontaneously hypertensive rats and rats with experimental renal hypertension were investigated in histological sections with the aid of a texture analysis system. Hypertensive animals showed a reduction in the vascular diameter per unit volume of cerebral tissue, in the mean vascular diameter as well as in the area occupied by the vessels, thus attesting to the lessened density of brain vascularization. The proportion of the vessels measuring from 6 to 15 microns in diameter per unit volume of cerebral tissue decreased whereas the proportion of the vessels measuring up to 5 microns in diameter remained unchanged. The characteristics under study demonstrated the same line of changes in both spontaneous and experimental renal hypertension.

  13. Gene delivery of therapeutic polypeptides to brain capillary endothelial cells for protein secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Moos, Torben

    Background: The potential for treatment of chronic disorders affecting the CNS is complicated by the inability of several drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). None-viral gene therapy applied to brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) denotes a novel approach to overcome the restraints...... in this passage, as turning BCECs into recombinant protein factories by transfection could result in protein secretion into the brain. Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the possibility of transfection to primary rat brain capillary endothelial cells (RBEC) for recombinant protein synthesis....... Results: mRNA expression of proteins with neuroprotective potential in RBEC were enabled. Their expression patters were compared with those of RBE4 and HeLa cells using RT-qPCR analyzes. The evidence for protein synthesis and secretion was obtained by detection of FLAG-tagged to the C-terminal of any...

  14. Low intracellular ATP levels exacerbate carcinogen-induced inflammatory stress response and inhibit in vitro tubulogenesis in human brain endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Tahanian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Tahanian, Sabrina Peiro, Borhane AnnabiLaboratoire d'Oncologie Moléculaire, Centre de Recherche BioMED, Département de Chimie, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, Québec, CanadaAbstract: Solid tumor development requires angiogenesis and is correlated to the expression of inflammatory markers through cellular metabolic and energetic adaptation. While high glycolysis rates enable the cancer cell compartment to generate adenosine triphosphate (ATP, very little is known about the impact of low intracellular ATP concentrations within the vascular endothelial cell compartment, which is responsible for tumor angiogenesis. Here, we investigated the effect of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG, a glucose analog that inhibits glycolysis through intracellular ATP depletion, on human brain microvascular endothelial cell (HBMEC angiogenic properties. While preformed capillaries remained unaffected, we found that in vitro tubulogenesis was dose-dependently decreased by 2-DG and that this correlated with reduced intracellular ATP levels. Procarcinogenic signaling was induced with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA and found to trigger the proinflammatory marker cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress marker GRP78 expression, whose inductions were potentiated when PMA was combined with 2-DG treatment. Inversely, PMA-induced matrix-metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 gene expression and protein secretion were abrogated in the presence of 2-DG, and this can be partially explained by reduced nuclear factor-κB signaling. Collectively, we provide evidence for an intracellular ATP requirement in order for tubulogenesis to occur, and we link increases in ER stress to inflammation. A better understanding of the metabolic adaptations of the vascular endothelial cells that mediate tumor vascularization will help the development of new drugs and therapies.Keywords: endoplasmic reticulum stress, MMP-9, COX-2, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, endothelial

  15. Brain endothelial cells control fertility through ovarian-steroid-dependent release of semaphorin 3A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giacobini, Paolo; Parkash, Jyoti; Campagne, Céline; Messina, Andrea; Casoni, Filippo; Vanacker, Charlotte; Langlet, Fanny; Hobo, Barbara; Cagnoni, Gabriella; Gallet, Sarah; Hanchate, Naresh Kumar; Mazur, Danièle; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Verhaagen, J.; Ciofi, Philippe; Bouret, Sébastien G; Tamagnone, Luca; Prevot, Vincent

    Neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) guides the development of the nervous and vascular systems, but its role in the mature brain remains to be explored. Here we report that the expression of the 65 kDa isoform of Sema3A, the ligand of Nrp1, by adult vascular endothelial cells, is regulated during the ovarian cycle

  16. Label-free quantitative cell division monitoring of endothelial cells by digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Björn; Bauwens, Andreas; Vollmer, Angelika; Ketelhut, Steffi; Langehanenberg, Patrik; Müthing, Johannes; Karch, Helge; von Bally, Gert

    2010-05-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) enables quantitative multifocus phase contrast imaging for nondestructive technical inspection and live cell analysis. Time-lapse investigations on human brain microvascular endothelial cells demonstrate the use of DHM for label-free dynamic quantitative monitoring of cell division of mother cells into daughter cells. Cytokinetic DHM analysis provides future applications in toxicology and cancer research.

  17. Cryopreservation of Brain Endothelial Cells Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Is Enhanced by Rho-Associated Coiled Coil-Containing Kinase Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Hannah K; Faubion, Madeline G; Hjortness, Michael K; Palecek, Sean P; Shusta, Eric V

    2016-12-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) maintains brain homeostasis but also presents a major obstacle to brain drug delivery. Brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) form the principal barrier and therefore represent the major cellular component of in vitro BBB models. Such models are often used for mechanistic studies of the BBB in health and disease and for drug screening. Recently, human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have emerged as a new source for generating BMEC-like cells for use in in vitro human BBB studies. However, the inability to cryopreserve iPSC-BMECs has impeded implementation of this model by requiring a fresh differentiation to generate cells for each experiment. Cryopreservation of differentiated iPSC-BMECs would have a number of distinct advantages, including enabling production of larger scale lots, decreasing lead time to generate purified iPSC-BMEC cultures, and facilitating use of iPSC-BMECs in large-scale screening. In this study, we demonstrate that iPSC-BMECs can be successfully cryopreserved at multiple differentiation stages. Cryopreserved iPSC-BMECs retain high viability, express standard endothelial and BBB markers, and reach a high transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) of ∼3000 Ω·cm2, equivalent to nonfrozen controls. Rho-associated coiled coil-containing kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632 substantially increased survival and attachment of cryopreserved iPSC-BMECs, as well as stabilized TEER above 800 Ω·cm2 out to 7 days post-thaw. Overall, cryopreservation will ease handling and storage of high-quality iPSC-BMECs, reducing a key barrier to greater implementation of these cells in modeling the human BBB.

  18. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockade abolishes brain microvascular inflammation and heat shock protein responses in hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Ando, Hiromichi; Macova, Miroslava; Dou, Jingtao; Saavedra, Juan M

    2005-07-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and inflammation enhance vulnerability to hypertensive brain damage. To explore the participation of Angiotensin II (Ang II) in the mechanism of vulnerability to cerebral ischemia during hypertension, we examined the expression of inflammatory factors and the heat shock protein (HSP) response in cerebral microvessels from spontaneously hypertensive rats and their normotensive controls, Wistar Kyoto rats. We treated animals with vehicle or the Ang II AT(1) receptor antagonist candesartan, 0.3 mg/kg/day, via subcutaneously implanted osmotic minipumps for 4 weeks. Spontaneously hypertensive rats expressed higher Angiotensin II AT(1) receptor protein and mRNA than normotensive controls. Candesartan decreased the macrophage infiltration and reversed the enhanced tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta mRNA and nuclear factor-kappaB in microvessels in hypertensive rats. The transcription of many HSP family genes, including HSP60, HSP70 and HSP90, and heat shock factor-1 was higher in hypertensive rats and was downregulated by AT(1) receptor blockade. Our results suggest a proinflammatory action of Ang II through AT(1) receptor stimulation in cerebral microvessels during hypertension, and very potent antiinflammatory effects of the Ang II AT(1) receptor antagonist. These compounds might be considered as potential therapeutic agents against ischemic and inflammatory diseases of the brain.

  19. Microvascular inflammation in atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Vitiello

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Atherogenesis is the pathogenetic process leading to formation of the atheroma lesion. It is associated to a chronic inflammatory state initially stimulated by an aberrant accumulation of lipid molecules beyond the endothelial barrier. This event triggers a cascade of deleterious events mainly through immune cell stimulation with the consequent liberation of potent pro-inflammatory and tissue damaging mediators. The atherogenetic process implies marked modifications of endothelial cell functions and a radical change in the endothelial–leukocyte interaction pattern. Moreover, accumulating evidence shows an important link between microvascular and inflammatory responses and major cardiovascular risk factors. This review illustrates the current knowledge on the effects of obesity, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes on microcirculation; their pathophysiological implications will be discussed.

  20. Murine brain endothelial cells differently modulate interferon-γ and interleukin-17 production in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momčilović Miljana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain endothelial cells (BEC are the major constituents of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, the structure that controls entrance of immune cells into CNS parenchyma. Our aim was to investigate the influence of BEC on production of IL-17 and IFN-γ-cytokines that are important for CNS inflammation. To that end, co-cultivations of the bEnd.3 brain endothelial cell line and lymph node cells (LNC were performed, and gene expression and production of IL-17 and IFN-γ were determined. It was found that bEnd.3 cells inhibited expression and production of IFN-γ, but not of IL-17. Additionally, bEnd.3 cells also reduced production of the major IFN-γ-promoting cytokine - IL-12 - in LNC. The observed variation in modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines by BEC could be of importance for the understanding of CNS inflammation.

  1. Endothelial calcium dynamics, connexin channels and blood-brain barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bock, Marijke; Wang, Nan; Decrock, Elke; Bol, Mélissa; Gadicherla, Ashish K; Culot, Maxime; Cecchelli, Romeo; Bultynck, Geert; Leybaert, Luc

    2013-09-01

    Situated between the circulation and the brain, the blood-brain barrier (BBB) protects the brain from circulating toxins while securing a specialized environment for neuro-glial signaling. BBB capillary endothelial cells exhibit low transcytotic activity and a tight, junctional network that, aided by the cytoskeleton, restricts paracellular permeability. The latter is subject of extensive research as it relates to neuropathology, edema and inflammation. A key determinant in regulating paracellular permeability is the endothelial cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) that affects junctional and cytoskeletal proteins. Ca(2+) signals are not one-time events restricted to a single cell but often appear as oscillatory [Ca(2+)]i changes that may propagate between cells as intercellular Ca(2+) waves. The effect of Ca(2+) oscillations/waves on BBB function is largely unknown and we here review current evidence on how [Ca(2+)]i dynamics influence BBB permeability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Gene delivery of the therapeutic polypeptide erythropoietin to primary brain capillary endothelial cells for protein secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Moos, Torben

    2016-01-01

    The potential for treatment of chronic disorders affecting the CNS is complicated by the inability of several drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). None-viral gene therapy applied to brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) denotes a novel approach to overcome the restraints...... in this passage, as turning BCECs into recombinant protein factories by transfection could result in protein secretion into the brain. The non-mitotic BCECs might, however, not be very susceptible to non-viral gene therapy in vivo, since this strategy is believed to be dependent on active cell division. We have...

  3. Delivery of Small Interfering RNA to Inhibit Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Zebrafish Using Natural Brain Endothelia Cell-Secreted Exosome Nanovesicles for the Treatment of Brain Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianzhi; Fogarty, Brittany; LaForge, Bret; Aziz, Salma; Pham, Thuy; Lai, Leanne; Bai, Shuhua

    2017-03-01

    Although small interfering RNA (siRNA) holds great therapeutic promise, its delivery to the disease site remains a paramount obstacle. In this study, we tested whether brain endothelial cell-derived exosomes could deliver siRNA across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in zebrafish. Natural exosomes were isolated from brain endothelial bEND.3 cell culture media and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) siRNA was loaded in exosomes with the assistance of a transfection reagent. While fluorescence-activated cell flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry staining studies indicated that wild-type exosomes significantly increased the uptake of fluorescence-labeled siRNA in the autologous brain endothelial cells, decreased fluorescence intensity was observed in the cells treated with the tetraspanin CD63 antibody-blocked exosome-delivered formulation (p brain endothelial bEND.3 cell and astrocyte. Inhibition at the expression of VEGF RNA and protein levels was observed in glioblastoma-astrocytoma U-87 MG cells treated with exosome-delivered siRNAs. Imaging results showed that exosome delivered more siRNAs across the BBB in Tg(fli1:GFP) zebrafish. In a xenotransplanted brain tumor model, exosome-delivered VEGF siRNAs decreased the fluorescence intensity of labeled cancer cells in the brain of zebrafish. Brain endothelial cell-derived exosomes could be potentially used as a natural carrier for the brain delivery of exogenous siRNA.

  4. Endothelial cells derived from the blood-brain barrier and islets of Langerhans differ in their response to the effects of bilirubin on oxidative stress under hyperglycemic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime eKapitulnik

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Unconjugated bilirubin (UCB is a neurotoxic degradation product of heme. Its toxic effects include induction of apoptosis, and ultimately neuronal cell death. However, at low concentrations, UCB is a potent antioxidant that may protect cells and tissues against oxidative stress by neutralizing toxic metabolites such as reactive oxygen species (ROS. High glucose levels (hyperglycemia generate reactive metabolites. Endothelial cell dysfunction, an early vascular complication in diabetes, has been associated with hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. Both glucose and UCB are substrates for transport proteins in microvascular endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. In the current study we show that UCB (1-40 M induces apoptosis and reduces survival of bEnd3 cells, a mouse brain endothelial cell line which serves as an in vitro model of the BBB. These deleterious effects of UCB were enhanced in the presence of high glucose (25 mM levels. Interestingly, the bEnd3 cells exhibited an increased sensitivity to the apoptotic effects of UCB when compared to the MS1 microcapillary endothelial cell line. MS1 cells originate from murine pancreatic islets of Langherans, and are devoid of the barrier characteristics of BBB-derived endothelial cells. ROS production was increased in both bEnd3 and MS1 cells exposed to high glucose, as compared with cells exposed to normal (5.5 mM glucose levels. While UCB (0.1-40 M did not alter ROS production in cells exposed to normal glucose, relatively low ('physiological' UCB concentrations (0.1-5 M attenuated ROS generation in both cell lines exposed to high glucose levels. Most strikingly, higher UCB concentrations (20-40 M increased ROS generation in bEnd3 cells exposed to high glucose, but not in similarly treated MS1 cells. These results may be of critical importance for understanding the vulnerability of the BBB endothelium upon exposure to increasing UCB levels under hyperglycemic conditions.

  5. Inflammation-induced brain endothelial activation leads to uptake of electrostatically stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles via sulfated glycosaminoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Dominique; Millward, Jason M; Schnorr, Jörg; Taupitz, Matthias; Stangl, Verena; Paul, Friedemann; Wagner, Susanne; Wuerfel, Jens T; Sack, Ingolf; Ludwig, Antje; Infante-Duarte, Carmen

    2017-05-01

    Based on our previous data on the presence of very small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (VSOP) on brain endothelial structures during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), we investigated the mechanisms of VSOP binding on inflamed brain endothelial cells in vivo and in vitro. After intravenous application, VSOP were detected in brain endothelial cells of EAE animals at peak disease and prior to clinical onset. In vitro, inflammatory stimuli increased VSOP uptake by brain endothelial bEnd.3 cells, which we confirmed in primary endothelial cells and in bEnd.3 cells cultured under shear stress. Transmission electron microscopy and blocking experiments revealed that during inflammation VSOP were endocytosed by bEnd.3. Modified sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAG) on inflamed brain endothelial cells were the primary binding site for VSOP, as GAG degradation and inhibition of GAG sulfation reduced VSOP uptake. Thus, VSOP-based MRI is sensitive to visualize early neuroinflammatory processes such as GAG modifications on brain endothelial cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Amplification and propagation of interleukin-1β signaling by murine brain endothelial and glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnow, Stephanie M; Knoll, J Gabriel; Verghese, Santhosh Chakkaramakkil; Levasseur, Peter R; Marks, Daniel L

    2017-07-01

    During acute infections and chronic illnesses, the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) acts within the brain to elicit metabolic derangements and sickness behaviors. It is unknown which cells in the brain are the proximal targets for IL-1β with respect to the generation of these illness responses. We performed a series of in vitro experiments to (1) investigate which brain cell populations exhibit inflammatory responses to IL-1β and (2) examine the interactions between different IL-1β-responsive cell types in various co-culture combinations. We treated primary cultures of murine brain microvessel endothelial cells (BMEC), astrocytes, and microglia with PBS or IL-1β, and then performed qPCR to measure inflammatory gene expression or immunocytochemistry to evaluate nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) activation. To evaluate whether astrocytes and/or BMEC propagate inflammatory signals to microglia, we exposed microglia to astrocyte-conditioned media and co-cultured endothelial cells and glia in transwells. Treatment groups were compared by Student's t tests or by ANOVA followed by Bonferroni-corrected t tests. IL-1β increased inflammatory gene expression and NF-κB activation in primary murine-mixed glia, enriched astrocyte, and BMEC cultures. Although IL-1β elicited minimal changes in inflammatory gene expression and did not induce the nuclear translocation of NF-κB in isolated microglia, these cells were more robustly activated by IL-1β when co-cultured with astrocytes and/or BMEC. We observed a polarized endothelial response to IL-1β, because the application of IL-1β to the abluminal endothelial surface produced a more complex microglial inflammatory response than that which occurred following luminal IL-1β exposure. Inflammatory signals are detected, amplified, and propagated through the CNS via a sequential and reverberating signaling cascade involving communication between brain endothelial cells and

  7. Prostacyclin mediates endothelial COX-2-dependent neuroprotective effects during excitotoxic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Y

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ying An,1,2 Natalya Belevych,1,2 Yufen Wang,1,2 Hao Zhang,1 Jason S Nasse,3 Harvey Herschman,4 Qun Chen,1,2 Andrew Tarr,1,2 Xiaoyu Liu,1,2 Ning Quan1,21Institute for Behavior Medicine Research, 2Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, 3Neuroscience Graduate Studies Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA; 4Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: In a previous study, we found that intracerebral administration of excitotoxin (RS-(tetrazole-5yl glycine caused increased neural damage in the brain in an endothelial COX-2 deleted mouse line (Tie2Cre COX-2flox/flox. In this study, we investigated whether prostacyclin might mediate this endothelial COX-2-dependent neuroprotection. Administration of excitotoxin into the striatum induced the production of prostacyclin (PGI2 in wild type, but not in endothelial COX-2 deleted mice. Inhibition of PGI2 synthase exacerbated brain lesions induced by the excitotoxin in wild type, but not in endothelial COX-2 deleted mice. Administration of a PGI2 agonist reduced neural damage in both wild type and endothelial COX-2 deleted mice. Increased PGI2 synthase expression was found in infiltrating neutrophils. In an ex vivo assay, PGI2 reduced the excitotoxin-induced calcium influx into neurons, suggesting a cellular mechanism for PGI2 mediated neuroprotection. These results reveal that PGI2 mediates endothelial COX-2 dependent neuroprotection.Keywords: neural injury, prostaglandins, neutrophil, conditional COX-2 deletion, PGI2

  8. Early events in kidney donation : Progression of endothelial activation, oxidative stress and tubular injury after brain death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morariu, Aurora M.; Schuurs, Theo A.; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.; van Oeveren, Wim; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Ploeg, Rutger J.

    Cerebral injury leading to brain death (BD) causes major physiologic derangements in potential organ donors, which may result in vascular-endothelial activation and affect posttransplant graft function. We investigated the kinetic of pro-coagulatory and pro-inflammatory endothelial activation and

  9. Brain Tumor Tropism of Transplanted Human Neural Stem Cells Is Induced by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Ole Schmidt

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs offers a new potential therapeutic approach as a cell-based delivery system for gene therapy in brain tumors. This is based on the unique capacity of NSCs to migrate throughout the brain and to target invading tumor cells. However, the signals controlling the targeted migration of transplanted NSCs are poorly defined. We analyzed the in vitro and in vivo effects of angiogenic growth factors and protein extracts from surgical specimens of brain tumor patients on NSC migration. Here, we demonstrate that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is able to induce a long-range attraction of transplanted human NSCs from distant sites in the adult brain. Our results indicate that tumorupregulated VEGF and angiogenic-activated microvasculature are relevant guidance signals for NSC tropism toward brain tumors.

  10. Uptake mechanism of ApoE-modified nanoparticles on brain capillary endothelial cells as a blood-brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Sylvia; Zensi, Anja; Wien, Sascha L; Tschickardt, Sabrina E; Maier, Wladislaw; Vogel, Tikva; Worek, Franz; Pietrzik, Claus U; Kreuter, Jörg; von Briesen, Hagen

    2012-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) represents an insurmountable obstacle for most drugs thus obstructing an effective treatment of many brain diseases. One solution for overcoming this barrier is a transport by binding of these drugs to surface-modified nanoparticles. Especially apolipoprotein E (ApoE) appears to play a major role in the nanoparticle-mediated drug transport across the BBB. However, at present the underlying mechanism is incompletely understood. In this study, the uptake of the ApoE-modified nanoparticles into the brain capillary endothelial cells was investigated to differentiate between active and passive uptake mechanism by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Furthermore, different in vitro co-incubation experiments were performed with competing ligands of the respective receptor. This study confirms an active endocytotic uptake mechanism and shows the involvement of low density lipoprotein receptor family members, notably the low density lipoprotein receptor related protein, on the uptake of the ApoE-modified nanoparticles into the brain capillary endothelial cells. This knowledge of the uptake mechanism of ApoE-modified nanoparticles enables future developments to rationally create very specific and effective carriers to overcome the blood-brain barrier.

  11. The Contribution Of Toll-Like Receptors In The Pathogenesis Of Diabetic Retinopathy In Human Microvascular Retinal Endothelial Cells In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Dad Bakhsh, Fadheela

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes Mellitus is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease including the eye causing macrovascular as well as microvascular complications known as diabetic retinopathy (DR), thus increasing the risk of vision impairment and blindness among working adults. The activation of the innate immune system during diabetes leads to an increase in certain biomarkers which in turn can antagonize the immune system leading to more complications. Toll like receptors (TLRs) are receptors of the...

  12. Major involvement of Na(+) -dependent multivitamin transporter (SLC5A6/SMVT) in uptake of biotin and pantothenic acid by human brain capillary endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Yasuo; Ito, Katsuaki; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Takashi; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the expression of Na(+) -dependent multivitamin transporter (SLC5A6/SMVT) and its contribution to the supply of biotin and pantothenic acid to the human brain via the blood-brain barrier. DNA microarray and immunohistochemical analyses confirmed that SLC5A6 is expressed in microvessels of human brain. The absolute expression levels of SLC5A6 protein in isolated human and monkey brain microvessels were 1.19 and 0.597 fmol/μg protein, respectively, as determined by a quantitative targeted absolute proteomics technique. Using an antibody-free method established by Kubo et al. (2015), we found that SLC5A6 was preferentially localized at the luminal membrane of brain capillary endothelium. Knock-down analysis using SLC5A6 siRNA showed that SLC5A6 accounts for 88.7% and 98.6% of total [(3) H]biotin and [(3) H]pantothenic acid uptakes, respectively, by human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. SLC5A6-mediated transport in hCMEC/D3 was markedly inhibited not only by biotin and pantothenic acid, but also by prostaglandin E2, lipoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, indomethacin, ketoprofen, diclofenac, ibuprofen, phenylbutazone, and flurbiprofen. This study is the first to confirm expression of SLC5A6 in human brain microvessels and to provide evidence that SLC5A6 is a major contributor to luminal uptake of biotin and pantothenic acid at the human blood-brain barrier. In humans, it was unclear (not concluded) about what transport system at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is responsible for the brain uptakes of two vitamins, biotin and pantothenic acid, which are necessary for brain proper function. This study clarified for the first time that the solute carrier 5A6/Na(+) -dependent multivitamin transporter SLC5A6/SMVT is responsible for the supplies of biotin and pantothenic acid into brain across the BBB in humans. DHA, docosahexaenoic acid; NSAID, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug; PGE2, prostaglandin E2. © 2015

  13. In vitro models of the blood–brain barrier: An overview of commonly used brain endothelial cell culture models and guidelines for their use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Hans C; Abbott, N Joan; Burek, Malgorzata; Cecchelli, Romeo; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Deli, Maria A; Förster, Carola; Galla, Hans J; Romero, Ignacio A; Shusta, Eric V; Stebbins, Matthew J; Vandenhaute, Elodie; Weksler, Babette

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial cells lining the brain capillaries separate the blood from the brain parenchyma. The endothelial monolayer of the brain capillaries serves both as a crucial interface for exchange of nutrients, gases, and metabolites between blood and brain, and as a barrier for neurotoxic components of plasma and xenobiotics. This “blood-brain barrier” function is a major hindrance for drug uptake into the brain parenchyma. Cell culture models, based on either primary cells or immortalized brain endothelial cell lines, have been developed, in order to facilitate in vitro studies of drug transport to the brain and studies of endothelial cell biology and pathophysiology. In this review, we aim to give an overview of established in vitro blood–brain barrier models with a focus on their validation regarding a set of well-established blood–brain barrier characteristics. As an ideal cell culture model of the blood–brain barrier is yet to be developed, we also aim to give an overview of the advantages and drawbacks of the different models described. PMID:26868179

  14. Complement component C3a plays a critical role in endothelial activation and leukocyte recruitment into the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fengjiao; Zou, Qiang; Ding, Xiaodan; Shi, Dongyan; Zhu, Xingxing; Hu, Weiguo; Liu, Lixin; Zhou, Hong

    2016-01-28

    The complement system is becoming increasingly recognized as a key participant in many neurodegenerative diseases of the brain. Complement-deficient animals exhibit reduced neuroinflammation. In the present study, we administered intracerebroventricularly lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to mimic local infection of the brain and investigated the role of key complement component C3 in brain vasculature endothelial activation and leukocyte recruitment. The degree of neutrophil infiltration was determined by esterase staining. Leukocyte-endothelial interactions were measured using intravital microscopy. Cerebral endothelial activation was evaluated using real-time PCR and Western blotting. Neutrophil infiltration into the brain cortex and hippocampus was significantly reduced in C3(-/-) mice and C3aR(-/-) mice but not in C6(-/-) mice. We detected markedly attenuated leukocyte-endothelial interactions in the brain microvasculature of C3(-/-) mice. Accordingly, in response to LPS administration, the brain microvasculature in these mice had decreased expression of P-selectin, E-selectin, intercellular cell adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1). Depletion of C3 from the circulation also caused reduction in VCAM-1 and E-selectin expression and leukocyte recruitment, suggesting that C3 in the circulation contributed to brain endothelial activation. Furthermore, C3(-/-) mice exhibited decreased leukocyte recruitment into the brain upon tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) stimulation. C3a activated the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and induced the upregulation of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression in murine primary cerebral endothelial cells in vitro. Our study provides the first evidence that C3a plays a critical role in cerebral endothelial activation and leukocyte recruitment during inflammation in the brain.

  15. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator enhances microparticle release from mouse brain-derived endothelial cells through plasmin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraud, Marie; Khacef, Kahina; Vion, Anne-Clémence; Leconte, Claire; Yin, Min; Renard, Jean-Marie; Marchand-Leroux, Catherine; Boulanger, Chantal M; Margaill, Isabelle; Beray-Berthat, Virginie

    2016-11-15

    Thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is currently the only approved pharmacological strategy for acute ischemic stroke. However, rt-PA exhibits vascular toxicity mainly due to endothelial damage. To investigate the mechanisms underlying rt-PA-induced endothelial alterations, we assessed the role of rt-PA in the generation of endothelial microparticles (EMPs), emerging biological markers and effectors of endothelial dysfunction. The mouse brain-derived endothelial cell line bEnd.3 was used. Cells were treated with rt-PA at 20, 40 or 80μg/ml for 15 or 24h, and EMPs were quantified in the culture media using Annexin-V staining coupled with flow cytometry. Rt-PA enhanced EMP release from bEnd.3 cells with a maximal increase at the 40μg/ml dose for 24h (+78% compared to controls). Using tranexamic acid and aprotinin we demonstrated that plasmin is responsible for rt-PA-induced EMP release. The p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 and the poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) inhibitor PJ34 also reduced rt-PA-induced EMP production, suggesting that p38 MAPK and PARP are downstream intracellular effectors of rt-PA/plasmin. Rt-PA also altered through plasmin the morphology and the confluence of bEnd.3 cells. By contrast, these changes did not implicate p38 MAPK and PARP. This study demonstrates that rt-PA induces the production of microparticles by cerebral endothelial cells, through plasmin, p38 MAPK and PARP pathways. Determining the phenotype of these EMPs to clarify their role on the endothelium in ischemic conditions could thus be of particular interest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. HIV-1/cocaine induced oxidative stress disrupts tight junction protein-1 in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells: role of Ras/ERK1/2 pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranjali Dalvi

    Full Text Available Intravenous drug use (IVDU is the major risk factor in the development of HIV-related pulmonary arterial hypertension (HRPAH; however, the pathogenesis of HRPAH in association with IVDU has yet to be characterized. Endothelial injury is considered to be an initiating factor for pulmonary vascular remodeling in animal models of PAH. Our previous study shows that simultaneous exposure to HIV-Trans-activator of transcription (Tat and cocaine exacerbates both disruption of tight junction proteins and permeability of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells compared with either treatment alone. We here now demonstrate that this HIV-Tat and cocaine mediated endothelial dysfunction accompanies with increase in hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radicals generation and involves redox sensitive signaling pathway. Pretreatment with antioxidant cocktail attenuated the cocaine and Tat mediated disassembly of Zonula Occludens (ZO-1 and enhancement of endothelial monolayer permeability. Furthermore, inhibition of NADPH oxidase by apocynin or siRNA-mediated knockdown of gp-91(phox abolished the Tat/cocaine-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS production, suggesting the NADPH oxidase mediated generation of oxidative radicals. In addition, ROS dependent activation of Ras and ERK1/2 Kinase was observed to be mediating the TJP-1 disassembly, and endothelial dysfunction in response to cocaine and Tat exposure. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that Tat/cocaine -mediated production of ROS activate Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 pathway that contributes to disruption of tight junction protein leading to pulmonary endothelial dysfunction associated with pulmonary vascular remodeling.

  17. Measuring antigen presentation in mouse brain endothelial cells ex vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Shanshan W; Gun, Sin Yee; Claser, Carla; Poh, Chek Meng; Rénia, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    We have recently demonstrated that brain endothelial cells cross-present parasite antigen during mouse experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). Here we describe a 2-d protocol to detect cross-presentation by isolating the brain microvessels and incubating them with a reporter cell line that expresses lacZ upon detection of the relevant peptide-major histocompatibility complex. After X-gal staining, a typical positive result consists of hundreds of blue spots, compared with fewer than 20 spots from a naive brain. The assay is generalizable to other disease contexts by using reporter cells that express appropriate specific T cell receptors. Also described is the protocol for culturing endothelial cells from brain microvessels isolated from naive mice. After 7-10 d, an in vitro cross-presentation assay can be performed by adding interferon-γ, antigen (e.g., Plasmodium berghei-infected red blood cells) and reporter cells in sequence over 3 d. This is useful for comparing different antigen forms or for probing the effects of various interventions.

  18. The effect of beta-turn structure on the permeation of peptides across monolayers of bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, M; Steenberg, B; Knipp, G T

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of the beta-turn structure of a peptide on its permeation via the paracellular and transcellular routes across cultured bovine brain microvessel endothelial cell (BBMEC) monolayers, an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). METHODS: The effective...

  19. Reactive oxygen species alter brain endothelial tight junction dynamics via RhoA, PI3 kinase, and PKB signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreibelt, Gerty; Kooij, Gijs; Reijerkerk, Arie; van Doorn, Ruben; Gringhuis, Sonja I.; van der Pol, Susanne; Weksler, Babette B.; Romero, Ignacio A.; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Piontek, Jörg; Blasig, Ingolf E.; Dijkstra, Christine D.; Ronken, Eric; de Vries, Helga E.

    2007-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) prevents the entrance of circulating molecules and immune cells into the central nervous system. The barrier is formed by specialized brain endothelial cells that are interconnected by tight junctions (TJ). A defective function of the BBB has been described for a

  20. Reactive oxygen species alter brain endothelial tight junction dynamics via RhoA, PI3 kinase, and PKB signaling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreibelt, G.; Kooij, G.; Reijerkerk, A.; Doorn, R. van; Gringhuis, S.I.; Pol, S. van der; Weksler, B.B.; Romero, I.A.; Couraud, P.O.; Piontek, J.; Blasig, I.E.; Dijkstra, C.D.; Ronken, E.; Vries, H.E. de

    2007-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) prevents the entrance of circulating molecules and immune cells into the central nervous system. The barrier is formed by specialized brain endothelial cells that are interconnected by tight junctions (TJ). A defective function of the BBB has been described for a

  1. The role of shear stress in Blood-Brain Barrier endothelial physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puvenna Vikram

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the most important and often neglected physiological stimuli contributing to the differentiation of vascular endothelial cells (ECs into a blood-brain barrier (BBB phenotype is shear stress (SS. With the use of a well established humanized dynamic in vitro BBB model and cDNA microarrays, we have profiled the effect of SS in the induction/suppression of ECs genes and related functions. Results Specifically, we found a significant upregulation of tight and adherens junctions proteins and genes. Trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER and permeability measurements to know substances have shown that SS promoted the formation of a tight and highly selective BBB. SS also increased the RNA level of multidrug resistance transporters, ion channels, and several p450 enzymes. The RNA level of a number of specialized carrier-mediated transport systems (e.g., glucose, monocarboxylic acid, etc. was also upregulated. RNA levels of modulatory enzymes of the glycolytic pathway (e.g., lactate dehydrogenase were downregulated by SS while those involved in the Krebs cycle (e.g., lactate and other dehydrogenases were upregulated. Measurements of glucose consumption versus lactate production showed that SS negatively modulated the glycolytic bioenergetic pathways of glucose metabolism in favor of the more efficient aerobic respiration. BBB ECs are responsive to inflammatory stimuli. Our data showed that SS increased the RNA levels of integrins and vascular adhesion molecules. SS also inhibited endothelial cell cycle via regulation of BTG family proteins encoding genes. This was paralleled by significant increase in the cytoskeletal protein content while that of membrane, cytosol, and nuclear sub-cellular fractions decreased. Furthermore, analysis of 2D gel electrophoresis (which allows identifying a large number of proteins per sample of EC proteins extracted from membrane sub-cellular endothelial fractions showed that SS increased

  2. Body mass index is associated with microvascular endothelial dysfunction in patients with treated metabolic risk factors and suspected coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J. Van Der Heijden (Dirk J.); M.A.H. van Leeuwen (Maarten); G.N. Janssens (Gladys N.); M.J. Lenzen (Mattie); P.M. van de Ven (Peter); E.C. Eringa (Etto ); N. van Royen (Niels)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground--Obesity is key feature of the metabolic syndrome and is associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity is associated with macrovascular endothelial dysfunction, a determinant of outcome in patients with coronary artery disease. Here, we compared the

  3. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Sections What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? ... Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Treatment What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es una Parálisis ...

  4. Effect of rosuvastatin on fasting and postprandial endothelial biomarker levels and microvascular reactivity in patients with type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Min; Jung, Kyong Yeun; Yun, Han Mi; Lee, Seo Young; Oh, Tae Jung; Jang, Hak Chul; Lim, Soo

    2017-11-09

    The cardiovascular benefits of statins have been proven, but their effect on circulation in small vessels has not been examined fully. We investigated the effect of 20 mg rosuvastatin on biomarkers, including paraoxonase-1 (PON-1) and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), and on microvascular reactivity. We enrolled 20 dyslipidemic patients with type 2 diabetes and 20 age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched healthy controls. Rosuvastatin (20 mg/day) was given to the patient group for 12 weeks. Biochemical parameters, including PON-1 and ADMA, were compared between the patient and control groups, and before and after rosuvastatin treatment in the patient group. Fasting and 2 h postprandial levels of PON-1 and ADMA after mixed-meal challenge were also compared. Microvascular reactivity in a peripheral artery was examined using laser Doppler flowmetry. The respective mean ± standard deviation of age and BMI were 50.1 ± 3.8 year and 25.8 ± 3.7 kg/m(2) in the patients and 50.2 ± 3.2 year and 25.4 ± 3.4 kg/m(2) in the controls. The patient group had worse profiles of cardiometabolic biomarkers, including PON-1 and ADMA, than the controls. In the patients treated with 20 mg rosuvastatin, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol decreased from 147.2 ± 26.5 to 68.3 ± 24.5 mg/dL and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol increased from 42.4 ± 5.2 to 44.7 ± 6.2 mg/dL (both P fasting and 2 h postprandial levels of PON-1 increased and those of ADMA decreased after treatment with rosuvastatin for 12 weeks. The changes in postprandial levels of both biomarkers were greater than those after fasting. Microcirculation assessed as reactive hyperemia in the patients after an ischemic challenge increased significantly from 335.3 ± 123.4 to 402.7 ± 133.4% after rosuvastatin treatment. The postprandial changes in the biomarkers were significantly associated with improvement of microvascular reactivity. Rosuvastatin treatment for 12

  5. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in brain microvessel endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitson, P. A.; Huls, M. H.; Sams, C. F.

    1991-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binding and ANP-induced increases in cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels have been observed in brain microvessels (Chabrier et al., 1987; Steardo and Nathanson, 1987), suggesting that this fluid-regulating hormone may play a role in the fluid homeostasis of the brain. This study was initiated to characterize the ANP receptors in primary cultures of brain microvessel endothelial cells (BMECs). The apparent equilibrium dissociation constant, Kd, for ANP increased from 0.25 nM to 2.5 nM, and the number of ANP binding sites as determined by Scatchard analysis increased from 7,100 to 170,000 sites/cell between 2 and 10 days of culture following monolayer formation. Time- and concentration-dependent studies on the stimulation of cGMP levels by ANP indicated that guanylate cyclase-linked ANP receptors were present in BMECs. The relative abilities of ANP, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and a truncated analog of ANP containing amino acids 5-27 (ANP 5-27) to modulate the accumulation of cGMP was found to be ANP greater than BNP much greater than ANP 5-27. Affinity cross-linking with disuccinimidyl suberate and radiolabeled ANP followed by gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions demonstrated a single band corresponding to the 60-70 kD receptor, indicating the presence of the nonguanylate cyclase-linked ANP receptor. Radiolabeled ANP binding was examined in the presence of various concentrations of either ANP, BNP, or ANP 5-27 and suggested that a large proportion of the ANP receptors present in blood-brain barrier endothelial cells bind all of these ligands similarly. These data indicate both guanylate cyclase linked and nonguanylate cyclase linked receptors are present on BMECs and that a higher proportion of the nonguanylate cyclase linked receptors is expressed. This in vitro culture system may provide a valuable tool for the examination of ANP receptor expression and function in blood-brain barrier endothelial cells.

  6. Lipocalin-2 enhances angiogenesis in rat brain endothelial cells via reactive oxygen species and iron-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Limin; Du, Yang; Lok, Josephine; Lo, Eng H; Xing, Changhong

    2015-03-01

    Inflammation is a key part of central nervous system pathophysiology. However, inflammatory factors are now thought to have both beneficial and deleterious effects. Here, we examine the hypothesis that lipocalin-2 (LCN2), an inflammatory molecule that can be up-regulated in the distressed central nervous system, may enhance angiogenesis in brain endothelial cells. Adding LCN2 (0.5-2.0 μg/mL) to RBE (Rat brain endothelial cells). 4 rat brain endothelial cells significantly increased matrigel tube formation and scratch migration, and also elevated levels of iron and reactive oxygen species. Co-treatment with a radical scavenger (U83836E), a Nox inhibitor (apocynin) and an iron chelating agent (deferiprone) significantly dampened the ability of LCN2 to enhance tube formation and scratch migration in brain endothelial cells. These findings provide in vitro proof of the concept that LCN2 can promote angiogenesis via iron- and reactive oxygen species-related pathways, and support the idea that LCN2 may contribute to the neurovascular recovery aspects of inflammation. Angiogenesis is an important part of stroke recovery. In the present study, we examined the hypothesis that lipocalin-2 (LCN2) may enhance angiogenesis in brain endothelial cells. LCN2 promoted tube formation and migration via iron and ROS-related pathways in rat brain endothelial cells. ROS scavengers, Nox inhibitors and iron chelators all dampened the ability of LCN2 to enhance in vitro angiogenesis. These findings support the idea that LCN2 that is released by damaged neurons may act as a 'help me' signal that promotes neurovascular recovery after stroke and brain injury. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  7. Microvascular Dysfunction and Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, T. Michael; Faraci, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    The impact of vascular risk factors on cognitive function has garnered much interest in recent years. The appropriate distribution of oxygen, glucose and other nutrients by the cerebral vasculature is critical for proper cognitive performance. The cerebral microvasculature is a key site of vascular resistance and a preferential target for small vessel disease. While deleterious effects of vascular risk factors on microvascular function are known, the contribution of this dysfunction to cognitive deficits is less clear. In this review, we summarize current evidence for microvascular dysfunction in brain. We highlight effects of select vascular risk factors (hypertension, diabetes and hyperhomocysteinemia) on the pial and parenchymal circulation. Lastly, we discuss potential links between microvascular disease and cognitive function, highlighting current gaps in our understanding. PMID:26988697

  8. Distribution of a 69-kD laminin-binding protein in aortic and microvascular endothelial cells: modulation during cell attachment, spreading, and migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yannariello-Brown, J; Wewer, U; Liotta, L

    1988-01-01

    Affinity chromatography and immunolocalization techniques were used to investigate the mechanism(s) by which endothelial cells interact with the basement membrane component laminin. Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) membranes were solubilized and incubated with a laminin-Sepharose affinity...... column. SDS-PAGE analysis of the eluted proteins identified a 69-kD band as the major binding protein, along with minor components migrating at 125, 110, 92, 85, 75, 55, and 30 kD. Polyclonal antibodies directed against a peptide sequence of the 69-kD laminin-binding protein isolated from human tumor...... cells identified this protein in BAEC lysates. In frozen sections, these polyclonal antibodies and monoclonal antibodies raised against human tumor 69-kD stained the endothelium of bovine aorta and the medial smooth muscle cells, but not surrounding connective tissue or elastin fibers. When...

  9. Effects of propranolol and clonidine on brain edema, blood-brain barrier permeability, and endothelial glycocalyx disruption after fluid percussion brain injury in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genét, Gustav Folmer; Bentzer, Peter; Hansen, Morten Bagge

    2018-01-01

    ), vehicle (n = 16), or sham (n = 5) for 24 hours. Primary outcome was brain water content at 24 hours. Secondary outcomes were blood-brain barrier permeability and plasma levels of syndecan-1 (glycocalyx disruption), cell damage (histone-complexed DNA fragments), epinephrine, norepinephrine, and animal.......555). We found no effect of propranolol and propranolol/clonidine on blood-brain barrier permeability and animal motor scores. Unexpectedly, propranolol and propranolol/clonidine caused an increase in epinephrine and syndecan-1 levels. CONCLUSION: This study does not provide any support for unselective......BACKGROUND: Traumatic brain injury causes a disruption of the vascular endothelial glycocalyx layer that is associated with an overactivation of the sympathoadrenal system. We hypothesized that early and unselective beta-blockade with propranolol alone or in combination with the alfa2-agonist...

  10. Functional role of endothelial adhesion molecules in the early stages of brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Manuel Sarmiento; Serres, Sébastien; Anthony, Daniel C; Sibson, Nicola R

    2014-04-01

    Cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs), which are normally associated with leukocyte trafficking, have also been shown to play an essential role in tumor metastasis to non-CNS sites. However, the role played by CAMs in brain metastasis is largely unexplored. It is known that leukocyte recruitment to the brain is very atypical and that mechanisms of disease in peripheral tissues cannot be extrapolated to the brain. Here, we have established the spatiotemporal expression of 12 key CAMs in the initial phases of tumor seeding in 2 different models of brain metastasis. BALB/c or SCID mice were injected intracardially (10(5) cells/100 μL phosphate-buffered saline with either 4T1-GFP or MDA231BR-GFP cells, respectively (n = 4-6/group), and expression of the CAMs was determined by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence colocalisation. Endothelial expression of E-selectin, VCAM-1, ALCAM, ICAM-1, VLA-4, and β4 integrin was markedly increased early in tumor seeding. At the same time, the natural ligands to these adhesion molecules were highly expressed on the metastatic tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. Two of these ligands showed particularly high tumor cell expression (ALCAM and VLA-4), and consequently their functional role in tumor seeding was determined. Antibody neutralization of either ALCAM or VLA-4 significantly reduced tumor seeding within the brain (>60% decrease in tumor number/mm(2) brain; P seeding in the brain. Moreover, this work identifies a specific subset of ligand-receptor interactions that may yield new therapeutic and diagnostic targets for brain metastasis.

  11. Vascular endothelial growth factors enhance the permeability of the mouse blood-brain barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shize Jiang

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB impedes entry of many drugs into the brain, limiting clinical efficacy. A safe and efficient method for reversibly increasing BBB permeability would greatly facilitate central nervous system (CNS drug delivery and expand the range of possible therapeutics to include water soluble compounds, proteins, nucleotides, and other large molecules. We examined the effect of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF on BBB permeability in Kunming (KM mice. Human VEGF165 was administered to treatment groups at two concentrations (1.6 or 3.0 µg/mouse, while controls received equal-volume saline. Changes in BBB permeability were measured by parenchymal accumulation of the contrast agent Gd-DTPA as assessed by 7 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Mice were then injected with Evans blue, sacrificed 0.5 h later, and perfused transcardially. Brains were removed, fixed, and sectioned for histological study. Both VEGF groups exhibited a significantly greater signal intensity from the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia than controls (P<0.001. Evans blue fluorescence intensity was higher in the parenchyma and lower in the cerebrovasculature of VEGF-treated animals compared to controls. No significant brain edema was observed by diffusion weighted MRI (DWI or histological staining. Exogenous application of VEGF can increase the permeability of the BBB without causing brain edema. Pretreatment with VEGF may be a feasible method to facilitate drug delivery into the CNS.

  12. Simvastatin Combined with Antioxidant Attenuates the Cerebral Vascular Endothelial Inflammatory Response in a Rat Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI leads to important and deleterious neuroinflammation, as evidenced by indicators such as edema, cytokine production, induction of nitric oxide synthase, and leukocyte infiltration. After TBI, cerebral vascular endothelial cells play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of inflammation. In our previous study, we proved that simvastatin could attenuate cerebral vascular endothelial inflammatory response in a rat traumatic brain injury. This purpose of this study was to determine whether simvastatin combined with an antioxidant could produce the same effect or greater and to examine affected surrogate biomarkers for the neuroinflammation after traumatic brain injury in rat. In our study, cortical contusions were induced, and the effect of acute and continuous treatment of simvastatin and vitamin C on behavior and inflammation in adult rats following experimental TBI was evaluated. The results demonstrated that simvastatin combined with an antioxidant could provide neuroprotection and it may be attributed to a dampening of cerebral vascular endothelial inflammatory response.

  13. Interleukin-34 restores blood-brain barrier integrity by upregulating tight junction proteins in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijie Jin

    Full Text Available Interleukin-34 (IL-34 is a newly discovered cytokine as an additional ligand for colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R, and its functions are expected to overlap with colony stimulating factor-1/macrophage-colony stimulating factor. We have previously shown that the IL-34 is primarily produced by neurons in the central nervous system (CNS and induces proliferation and neuroprotective properties of microglia which express CSF1R. However, the functions of IL-34 in the CNS are still elucidative. Here we show that CNS capillary endothelial cells also express CSF1R. IL-34 protected blood-brain barrier integrity by restored expression levels of tight junction proteins, which were downregulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. The novel function of IL-34 on the blood-brain barrier may give us a clue for new therapeutic strategies in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Plasma from preeclamptic women increases blood-brain barrier permeability: role of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amburgey, Odül A; Chapman, Abbie C; May, Victor; Bernstein, Ira M; Cipolla, Marilyn J

    2010-11-01

    Circulating factors in preeclamptic women are thought to cause endothelial dysfunction and thereby contribute to the progression of this hypertensive condition. Despite the involvement of neurological complications in preeclampsia, there is a paucity of data regarding the effect of circulating factors on cerebrovascular function. Using a rat model of pregnancy, we investigated blood-brain barrier permeability, myogenic activity, and the influence of endothelial vasodilator mechanisms in cerebral vessels exposed intraluminally to plasma from normal pregnant or preeclamptic women. In addition, the role of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in mediating changes in permeability in response to plasma was investigated. A 3-hour exposure to 20% normal pregnant or preeclamptic plasma increased blood-brain barrier permeability by ≈6.5- and 18.0-fold, respectively, compared with no plasma exposure (Pvascular endothelial growth factor receptor kinase activity prevented the increase in permeability in response to preeclamptic plasma but had no effect on changes in permeability of vessels exposed to normal pregnant plasma. Circulating factors in preeclamptic plasma did not affect myogenic activity or the influence of endothelium on vascular tone. These findings demonstrate that acute exposure to preeclamptic plasma has little effect on reactivity of cerebral arteries but significantly increases blood-brain barrier permeability. Prevention of increased permeability by inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling suggests that activation of this pathway may be responsible for increased blood-brain barrier permeability after exposure to preeclamptic plasma.

  15. Efficient introduction of macromolecules and oligonucleotides into brain capillary endothelial cells using HVJ-liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, H; Okamura, T; Chen, J; Takanaga, H; Ohtani, H; Kaneda, Y; Naito, M; Tsuruo, T; Sawada, Y

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we examined the feasibility of introducing macromolecules into cultured mouse brain capillary endothelial cells (MBEC4 cells) by utilizing the hemagglutating virus of Japan (HVJ)-liposomes with fusogenic activity. We used fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-Dextran) and FITC-labeled oligodeoxynucleotide (FITC-ODN) as models of a macromolecule and an ODN, respectively. Intracellular fluorescence appeared rapidly after the exposure of MBEC4 cells to FITC-Dextran-containing HVJ-liposomes, and remained detectable for at least 3 days. Only a control level of intracellular fluorescence was seen after treatment with FITC-Dextran alone, FITC-Dextran with empty HVJ-liposomes or FITC-Dextran-containing liposomes without fusogenic activity. In the early phase after administration (0-30 min), the introduction of FITC-Dextran into MBEC4 cells by the HVJ-liposome method resulted in a rapid and time-dependent increase of intracellular fluorescence intensity. Moreover, FITC-ODN was also introduced into MBEC4 cells by the HVJ-liposome method, although FITC-ODN alone was not introduced. These results indicate that the HVJ-liposome method is useful for the efficient introduction of macromolecules, including ODN, into brain capillary endothelial cells.

  16. Expression and deposition of basement membrane proteins by brain capillary endothelial cells in a primary murine model of the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Maj Schneider; Birkelund, Svend; Larsen, Annette Burkhart

    2016-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) represents the interface between the blood and the brain parenchyma and consists of endothelial cells which are tightly sealed together by tight junction proteins. The endothelial cells are in addition supported by pericytes, which are embedded in the vascular basement...... membrane, and astrocyte endfeet. To study the interaction of the different cells of the BBB, construction of in vitro BBB models is valuable. However, the modulation and contribution of the cells of the BBB to the synthesis of basement membrane proteins in vitro is not fully elaborated. Thus, the aim...... of the present study was to create four different in vitro constructs of the murine BBB to characterise if the expression and secretion of basement membrane proteins by the murine brain capillary endothelial cells (mBCECs) was affected by co-culturing with pericytes, mixed glial cells, or both. Primary m...

  17. Surface Characteristics of Nanoparticles Determine Their Intracellular Fate in and Processing by Human Blood-Brain Barrier Endothelial Cells In Vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgieva, Julia V.; Kalicharan, Dharamdajal; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Romero, Ignacio A.; Weksler, Babette; Hoekstra, Dick; Zuhorn, Inge S.

    A polarized layer of endothelial cells that comprises the blood-brain barrier (BBB) precludes access of systemically administered medicines to brain tissue. Consequently, there is a need for drug delivery vehicles that mediate transendothelial transport of such medicines. Endothelial cells use a

  18. Transfection of primary brain capillary endothelial cells for protein synthesis and secretion of recombinant erythropoietin: a strategy to enable protein delivery to the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burkhart, Annette; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Aigner, Achim

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of chronic disorders affecting the central nervous system (CNS) is complicated by the inability of drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Non-viral gene therapy applied to brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) denotes a novel approach to overcome the restraints in this passage......, as turning BCECs into recombinant protein factories by transfection could result in protein secretion further into the brain. The present study aims to investigate the possibility of transfecting primary rat brain endothelial cells (RBECs) for recombinant protein synthesis and secretion...... into the cell culture medium both luminally and abluminally, and despite lower levels of EPO reaching the abluminal chamber, the amount of recombinant EPO was sufficient to evolve a biological effect on astrocytes cultured at the abluminal side in terms of upregulated gene expression of brain...

  19. Ethanol suppression of peripheral blood mononuclear cell trafficking across brain endothelial cells in immunodeficiency virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lola C Hudson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lola C Hudson1, Brenda A Colby1, Rick B Meeker21Department of Molecular Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA; 2Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USAAbstract: Earlier studies suggested that the combination of alcohol use and immunodeficiency virus infection resulted in more severe neurologic disease than either condition individually. These deleterious interactions could be due to increased immune cell and virus trafficking or may result from interactions between ethanol and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-associated toxicity within the brain. To determine the extent to which increased trafficking played a role, we examined the effect of ethanol on the migration of different peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMCs subsets across a brain endothelial cell monolayer. We utilized combinations of feline brain endothelial cells with astrocytes, and/or microglia with either acute exposure to 0.08 g/dL ethanol, a combination of ethanol and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV, or FIV alone. Adherence of PBMCs to endothelium was increased in all combinations of cells with the addition of ethanol. Despite increased PBMC adhesion with ethanol treatment, transmigration of B cells, monocytes, CD4 T cells and CD8 T cells was not increased and was actually decreased in the presence of astrocytes. Expression of three common adhesion molecules, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM1, ICAM2, and vascular cell adhesion molecule, was unchanged or slightly decreased by ethanol. This indicated that although adherence is increased by ethanol it is not due to an increased expression of adhesion molecules. RANTES, MIP1α, MIP1β, and MCP-1 mRNA expression was also studied in brain endothelial cells, astrocytes and microglia by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Ethanol treatment of astrocytes resulted in modest changes of

  20. Transluminal gene transfer into brain capillary endothelial cells in vivo with HVJ-liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chen; Matsuo, Hirotami; Koyabu, Noriko; Ohtani, Hisakazu; Fujimoto, Hidenori; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Narro, Mikihiko; Tsuruo, Takashi; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2002-06-01

    Bioactive proteins or peptides cannot be effectively delivered into brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) or brain parenchyma. In this study, we selectively transferred Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase gene (beta-gal) as a model gene into BCECs by using the hemagglutination virus of Japan (HVJ)-liposomes. HVJ-liposomes encapsulating a beta-gal plasmid were used to transfect MBEC4 cells in vitro, and were administrated via the internal carotid artery to rat in vivo. Success of the procedure was confirmed by the detection of 116 kDa beta-gal protein in transfected MBEC4 cells and in brain capillaries isolated from transfected rats, by Western blot analysis and histological staining. The enzymatic activities of beta-galactosidase were 5- to 10-fold and 20-fold higher than when beta-gal-containing liposomes without fusogenic activity (uncoated liposomes) or plasmid alone were employed in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Thus, HVJ-liposomes were demonstrated to be a useful vector to transfer a foreign gene into the brain capillary endothelium in vivo via the transluminal route.

  1. Modeling the ischemic blood-brain barrier; the effects of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) on endothelial cells in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornabene, Erica; Helms, Hans Christian Cederberg; Berndt, Philipp

    Introduction - The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a physical, transport and metabolic barrier which plays a key role in preventing uncontrolled exchanges between blood and brain, ensuring an optimal environment for neurons activity. This extent interface is created by the endothelial cells forming...... pathways across the barrier in ischemic and postischemic brain endothelium is important for developing new medical therapies capable to exploit the barrier changes occurring during/after ischemia to permeate in the brain and treat this devastating disease. Materials and Methods - Primary cultures...

  2. Effects of propranolol and clonidine on brain edema, blood-brain barrier permeability, and endothelial glycocalyx disruption after fluid percussion brain injury in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genét, Gustav Folmer; Bentzer, Peter; Hansen, Morten Bagge; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Johansson, Pär Ingemar

    2018-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury causes a disruption of the vascular endothelial glycocalyx layer that is associated with an overactivation of the sympathoadrenal system. We hypothesized that early and unselective beta-blockade with propranolol alone or in combination with the alfa2-agonist clonidine would decrease brain edema, blood-brain barrier permeability, and glycocalyx disruption at 24 hours after trauma. We subjected 53 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats to lateral fluid percussion brain injury and randomized infusion with propranolol (n = 16), propranolol + clonidine (n = 16), vehicle (n = 16), or sham (n = 5) for 24 hours. Primary outcome was brain water content at 24 hours. Secondary outcomes were blood-brain barrier permeability and plasma levels of syndecan-1 (glycocalyx disruption), cell damage (histone-complexed DNA fragments), epinephrine, norepinephrine, and animal motor function. We found no difference in brain water content (mean ± SD) between propranolol (80.8 ± 0.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 80.7-81.0) and vehicle (81.1 ± 0.6%; 95% CI, 80.8-81.4) (p = 0.668) or between propranolol/clonidine (80.8 ± 0.3%; 95% CI, 80.7-81.0) and vehicle (p = 0.555). We found no effect of propranolol and propranolol/clonidine on blood-brain barrier permeability and animal motor scores. Unexpectedly, propranolol and propranolol/clonidine caused an increase in epinephrine and syndecan-1 levels. This study does not provide any support for unselective beta-blockade with propranolol or the combination of propranolol and the alfa2-agonist clonidine on brain water content. The novel finding of an increase in plasma concentrations of epinephrine and syndecan-1 after propranolol treatment in traumatic brain injury is of unclear significance and should be investigated further.

  3. Low extracellular Ca2+ conditions induce an increase in brain endothelial permeability that involves intercellular Ca2+ waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bock, Marijke; Culot, Maxime; Wang, Nan; da Costa, Anaelle; Decrock, Elke; Bol, Mélissa; Bultynck, Geert; Cecchelli, Romeo; Leybaert, Luc

    2012-12-03

    The intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) is an important factor determining the permeability of endothelial barriers including the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, nothing is known concerning the effect of spatially propagated intercellular Ca(2+) waves (ICWs). The propagation of ICWs relies in large part on channels formed by connexins that are present in endothelia. We hypothesized that ICWs may result in a strong disturbance of endothelial function, because the [Ca(2+)](i) changes are coordinated and involve multiple cells. Thus, we aimed to investigate the effect of ICWs on endothelial permeability. ICW activity was triggered in immortalized and primary brain endothelial cells by lowering the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Low extracellular Ca(2+) increased the endothelial permeability and this was significantly suppressed by buffering [Ca(2+)](i) with BAPTA-AM, indicating a central role of [Ca(2+)](i) changes. The endothelial permeability increase was furthermore inhibited by the connexin channel blocking peptide Gap27, which also blocked the ICWs, and by inhibiting protein kinase C (PKC), Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) and actomyosin contraction. We compared these observations with the [Ca(2+)](i) changes and permeability alterations provoked by the inflammatory agent bradykinin (BK), which triggers oscillatory [Ca(2+)](i) changes without wave activity. BK-associated [Ca(2+)](i) changes and the endothelial permeability increase were significantly smaller than those associated with ICWs, and the permeability increase was not influenced by inhibition of PKC, CaMKII or actomyosin contraction. We conclude that ICWs significantly increase endothelial permeability and therefore, the connexins that underlie wave propagation form an interesting target to limit BBB alterations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Electrical Synapses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Adult human dental pulp stem cells promote blood-brain barrier permeability through vascular endothelial growth factor-a expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winderlich, Joshua N; Kremer, Karlea L; Koblar, Simon A

    2016-06-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising new treatment option for stroke. Intravascular administration of stem cells is a valid approach as stem cells have been shown to transmigrate the blood-brain barrier. The mechanism that causes this effect has not yet been elucidated. We hypothesized that stem cells would mediate localized discontinuities in the blood-brain barrier, which would allow passage into the brain parenchyma. Here, we demonstrate that adult human dental pulp stem cells express a soluble factor that increases permeability across an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier. This effect was shown to be the result of vascular endothelial growth factor-a. The effect could be amplified by exposing dental pulp stem cell to stromal-derived factor 1, which stimulates vascular endothelial growth factor-a expression. These findings support the use of dental pulp stem cell in therapy for stroke. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Differential effects of vascular endothelial growth factor A isoforms in a mouse brain metastasis model of human melanoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusters, B.; Waal, R.M.W. de; Wesseling, P.; Verrijp, K.; Maass, C.N.; Heerschap, A.; Barentsz, J.O.; Sweep, C.G.J.; Ruiter, D.J.; Leenders, W.P.J.

    2003-01-01

    We reported previously that vascular endothelial growth factor isoform A (VEGF-A) expression by Mel57 human melanoma cells led to tumor progression in a murine brain metastasis model in an angiogenesis-independent fashion by dilation of co-opted, pre-existing vessels and concomitant enhanced blood

  6. Differential activation of acid sphingomyelinase and ceramide release determines invasiveness of Neisseria meningitidis into brain endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Simonis

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The interaction with brain endothelial cells is central to the pathogenicity of Neisseria meningitidis infections. Here, we show that N. meningitidis causes transient activation of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM followed by ceramide release in brain endothelial cells. In response to N. meningitidis infection, ASM and ceramide are displayed at the outer leaflet of the cell membrane and condense into large membrane platforms which also concentrate the ErbB2 receptor. The outer membrane protein Opc and phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C that is activated upon binding of the pathogen to heparan sulfate proteoglycans, are required for N. meningitidis-mediated ASM activation. Pharmacologic or genetic ablation of ASM abrogated meningococcal internalization without affecting bacterial adherence. In accordance, the restricted invasiveness of a defined set of pathogenic isolates of the ST-11/ST-8 clonal complex into brain endothelial cells directly correlated with their restricted ability to induce ASM and ceramide release. In conclusion, ASM activation and ceramide release are essential for internalization of Opc-expressing meningococci into brain endothelial cells, and this segregates with invasiveness of N. meningitidis strains.

  7. Systemic and cerebral vascular endothelial growth factor levels increase in murine cerebral malaria along with increased Calpain and caspase activity and can be reduced by erythropoietin treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Hoyer, Nils; Kildemoes, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cerebral malaria (CM) includes compromised microvascular perfusion, increased inflammation, cytoadhesion, and endothelial activation. These events cause blood-brain barrier disruption and neuropathology and associations with the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF...... increased levels of VEGF in brain and plasma and decreased plasma levels of soluble VEGF receptor 2. EPO treatment normalized VEGF receptor 2 levels and reduced brain VEGF levels. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α was significantly upregulated whereas cerebral HIF-2α and EPO levels remained unchanged...

  8. Biotin and biocytin uptake into cultured primary calf brain microvessel endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, B; Baumgartner, E R

    2000-03-10

    The uptake of biotin and the closely related biocytin was characterized in primary cultures of calf brain microvessel endothelial (CBME) cells. Biotin uptake was found to be Na(+)-gradient dependent and independent of changes in the membrane potential. Concentration dependence revealed a single saturation mechanism with a K(m) of 47 microM and a V(max) of 101 pmol/min/mg. Inhibition studies demonstrated dependence on metabolic energy and the necessity for a free carboxyl group for transport activity. The anticonvulsants primidone and carbamazepine had no inhibitory effect. Biotin uptake into CBME cells is a secondary active, electroneutral, saturable and specific process. Biocytin which accumulates in biotinidase deficiency, a human congenital disorder, did not inhibit biotin uptake and was not transported into these cells. The presence of human serum with normal biotinidase activity significantly reduced biotin uptake by about 50%. Further, added biocytin was hydrolyzed to biotin, which accumulated intracellularly but to a lesser extent than added free biotin. Biotin uptake after addition of plasma of biotinidase-deficient patients was not different from that in the presence of normal serum. These results indicate that the absence of biotinidase activity in serum does not reduce blood-brain barrier transport of biotin.

  9. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in rat brain is downregulated by sub-chronic antidepressant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Yuta; Ochi, Shinichiro; Yamazaki, Kiyohiro; Nakata, Shunsuke; Iga, Jun-Ichi; Ueno, Shu-Ichi

    2017-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a neurotransmitter that may be related to major depressive disorder (MDD) because the selective neuronal NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole, induces a dose-dependent antidepressant-like effect. NO modulates major neurotransmitters involved in the neurobiology of MDD, such as norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine, and glutamate. In this study, we investigated the effects of antidepressants as NO modulators in acute and sub-chronic treatments. Rats were injected with the SSRI paroxetine (PAR, 10 mg/kg), the SNRI milnacipran (MIL, 30 mg/kg), or the NaSSA mirtazapine (MIR, 10 mg/kg) for acute (1 h) or sub-chronic (3 weeks) treatment prior to analysis of nine brain regions (frontal cortex, temporal cortex, striatum, thalamus, hippocampus, midbrain, pons, cerebellum, and olfactory bulb). The mRNA expression levels of three NOS subtypes (neuronal: nNOS, inducible: iNOS, and endothelial: eNOS) were analyzed using real-time PCR with Taqman probes. Acute MIR treatment significantly increased nNOS mRNA expression in the hippocampus, midbrain, cerebellum and olfactory bulb, and iNOS mRNA expression in the frontal cortex and midbrain. Acute PAR and MIR treatments significantly increased eNOS mRNA expression in most brain regions. Conversely, sub-chronic treatment with all types of antidepressants resulted in significant decreases of eNOS mRNA expression in most brain regions. Sub-chronic treatment with the three types of antidepressants consistently decreased eNOS mRNA expression levels in the rat brain. These effects may be associated with the involvement of the NO system in the mechanism of action of antidepressants.

  10. Bidirectional apical-basal traffic of the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor in brain endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siupka, Piotr; Hersom, Maria N. S.; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin

    2017-01-01

    in the process. Here, we elucidate the endosomal trafficking of the retrograde transported cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (MPR300) in primary cultures of brain endothelial cells (BECs) of porcine and bovine origin. Receptor expression and localisation of MPR300 in the endo-lysosomal system......Brain capillary endothelium mediates the exchange of nutrients between blood and brain parenchyma. This barrier function of the brain capillaries also limits passage of pharmaceuticals from blood to brain, which hinders treatment of several neurological disorders. Receptor-mediated transport has...... been suggested as a potential pharmaceutical delivery route across the brain endothelium, e.g. reports have shown that the transferrin receptor (TfR) facilitates transcytosis of TfR antibodies, but it is not known whether this recycling receptor itself traffics from apical to basal membrane...

  11. n-3 long-chain fatty acids and regulation of glucose transport in two models of rat brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifferi, Fabien; Jouin, Mélanie; Alessandri, Jean-Marc; Roux, Françoise; Perrière, Nicolas; Langelier, Bénédicte; Lavialle, Monique; Cunnane, Stephen; Guesnet, Philippe

    2010-04-01

    Several in vivo studies suggest that docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 n-3), the main n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) of brain membranes, could be an important regulator of brain energy metabolism by affecting glucose utilization and the density of the two isoforms of the glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) (endothelial and astrocytic). This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that 22:6 n-3 in membranes may modulate glucose metabolism in brain endothelial cells. It compared the impact of 22:6 n-3 and the other two main LC-PUFA, arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6) and eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 n-3), on fatty acid composition of membrane phospholipids, glucose uptake and expression of 55-kDa GLUT1 isoform in two models of rat brain endothelial cells (RBEC), in primary culture and in the immortalized rat brain endothelial cell line RBE4. Without PUFA supplementation, both types of cerebral endothelial cells were depleted in 22:6 n-3, RBE4 being also particularly low in 20:4 n-6. After exposure to supplemental 20:4 n-6, 20:5 n-3 or 22:6 n-3 (15microM, i.e. a physiological dose), RBEC and RBE4 avidly incorporated these PUFA into their membrane phospholipids thereby resembling physiological conditions, i.e. the PUFA content of rat cerebral microvessels. However, RBE4 were unable to incorporate physiological level of 20:4 n-6. Basal glucose transport in RBEC (rate of [(3)H]-3-o-methylglucose uptake) was increased after 20:5 n-3 or 22:6 n-3 supplementation by 50% and 35%, respectively, whereas it was unchanged with 20:4 n-6. This increase of glucose transport was associated with an increased GLUT1 protein, while GLUT1 mRNA was not affected. The different PUFA did not impact on glucose uptake in RBE4. Due to alterations in n-6 PUFA metabolism and weak expression of GLUT1, RBE4 seems to be less adequate than RBEC to study PUFA metabolism and glucose transport in brain endothelial cells. Physiological doses of n-3 LC-PUFA have a direct and positive effect on glucose

  12. Lactate dehydrogenase a expression is necessary to sustain rapid angiogenesis of pulmonary microvascular endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenda Parra-Bonilla

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is a fundamental property of endothelium, yet not all endothelial cells display equivalent angiogenic responses; pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells undergo rapid angiogenesis when compared to endothelial cells isolated from conduit vessels. At present it is not clear how pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells fulfill the bioenergetic demands that are necessary to sustain such rapid blood vessel formation. We have previously established that pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells utilize aerobic glycolysis to generate ATP during growth, a process that requires the expression of lactate dehydrogenase A to convert pyruvate to lactate. Here, we test the hypothesis that lactate dehydrogenase A is required for pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells to sustain rapid angiogenesis. To test this hypothesis, Tet-On and Tet-Off conditional expression systems were developed in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells, where doxycycline is utilized to induce lactate dehydrogenase A shRNA expression. Expression of LDH-A shRNA induced a time-dependent decrease in LDH-A protein, which corresponded with a decrease in glucose consumption from the media, lactate production and cell growth; re-expression of LDH-A rescued each of these parameters. LDH-A silencing greatly reduced network formation on Matrigel in vitro, and decreased blood vessel formation in Matrigel in vivo. These findings demonstrate that LDH-A is critically important for sustaining the rapid angiogenesis of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells.

  13. Interaction between Endothelial Protein C Receptor and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 to Mediate Binding of Plasmodium falciparum-Infected Erythrocytes to Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avril, Marion; Bernabeu, Maria; Benjamin, Maxwell; Brazier, Andrew Jay; Smith, Joseph D

    2016-07-12

    Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) are candidate receptors for the deadly complication cerebral malaria. However, it remains unclear if Plasmodium falciparum parasites with dual binding specificity are involved in cytoadhesion or different parasite subpopulations bind in brain microvessels. Here, we investigated this issue by studying different subtypes of ICAM-1-binding parasite lines. We show that two parasite lines expressing domain cassette 13 (DC13) of the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family have dual binding specificity for EPCR and ICAM-1 and further mapped ICAM-1 binding to the first DBLβ domain following the PfEMP1 head structure in both proteins. As PfEMP1 head structures have diverged between group A (EPCR binders) and groups B and C (CD36 binders), we also investigated how ICAM-1-binding parasites with different coreceptor binding traits influence P. falciparum-infected erythrocyte binding to endothelial cells. Whereas levels of binding to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-stimulated endothelial cells from the lung and brain by all ICAM-1-binding parasite lines increased, group A (EPCR and ICAM-1) was less dependent than group B (CD36 and ICAM-1) on ICAM-1 upregulation. Furthermore, both group A DC13 parasite lines had higher binding levels to brain endothelial cells (a microvascular niche with limited CD36 expression). This study shows that ICAM-1 is a coreceptor for a subset of EPCR-binding parasites and provides the first evidence of how EPCR and ICAM-1 interact to mediate parasite binding to both resting and TNF-α-activated primary brain and lung endothelial cells. Cerebral malaria is a severe neurological complication of P. falciparum infection associated with infected erythrocyte (IE) binding in cerebral vessels. Yet little is known about the mechanisms by which parasites adhere in the brain or other microvascular sites. Here, we studied parasite lines

  14. Transferrin Receptor 1 Facilitates Poliovirus Permeation of Mouse Brain Capillary Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Taketoshi; Ishizaka, Aya; Nihei, Coh-Ichi

    2016-02-05

    As a possible route for invasion of the CNS, circulating poliovirus (PV) in the blood is believed to traverse the blood-brain barrier (BBB), resulting in paralytic poliomyelitis. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that mouse transferrin receptor 1 (mTfR1) is responsible for PV attachment to the cell surface, allowing invasion into the CNS via the BBB. PV interacts with the apical domain of mTfR1 on mouse brain capillary endothelial cells (MBEC4) in a dose-dependent manner via its capsid protein (VP1). We found that F-G, G-H, and H-I loops in VP1 are important for this binding. However, C-D, D-E, and E-F loops in VP1-fused Venus proteins efficiently penetrate MBEC4 cells. These results imply that the VP1 functional domain responsible for cell attachment is different from that involved in viral permeation of the brain capillary endothelium. We observed that co-treatment of MBEC4 cells with excess PV particles but not dextran resulted in blockage of transferrin transport into cells. Using the Transwell in vitro BBB model, transferrin co-treatment inhibited permeation of PV into MBEC4 cells and delayed further viral permeation via mTfR1 knockdown. With mTfR1 as a positive mediator of PV-host cell attachment and PV permeation of MBEC4 cells, our results indicate a novel role of TfR1 as a cellular receptor for human PV receptor/CD155-independent PV invasion of the CNS. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Fatty Acid-Binding Protein 5 Mediates the Uptake of Fatty Acids, but not Drugs, Into Human Brain Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gordon S; Pan, Yijun; Scanlon, Martin J; Porter, Christopher J H; Nicolazzo, Joseph A

    2017-12-14

    The purpose of this study was to examine the involvement of fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5), a lipid-binding protein expressed at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), in fatty acid and drug uptake into human brain endothelial cells. Following transfection with siRNA against hFABP5, human brain endothelial cell (hCMEC/D3) uptake of lipophilic ligands with varying affinity to FABP5 was assessed with intracellular concentrations quantified by liquid scintillation counting, HPLC, or LCMS/MS. The in situ BBB transport of [3H]-diazepam was also assessed in wild type and FABP5-deficient mice. hFABP5 siRNA reduced FABP5 expression in hCMEC/D3 cells by 39.9 ± 3.8% (mRNA) and 38.8 ± 6.6% (protein; mean ± SEM), leading to a reduction in uptake of [14C]-lauric acid, [3H]-oleic acid, and [14C]-stearic acid by 37.5 ± 8.8%, 41.7 ± 11.6%, and 50.7 ± 13.6%, respectively, over 1 min. No significant changes in [14C]-diazepam, pioglitazone, and troglitazone uptake were detected following FABP5 knockdown in hCMEC/D3 cells. Similarly, no difference in BBB transport of [3H]-diazepam was observed between wild type and FABP5-deficient mice. Therefore, although FABP5 facilitates brain endothelial cell uptake of fatty acids, it has limited effects on brain endothelial cell uptake and BBB transport of drugs with lower affinity for FABP5. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Acid Sphingomyelinase-Derived Ceramide Regulates ICAM-1 Function during T Cell Transmigration across Brain Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Pinheiro, Melissa A; Kroon, Jeffrey; Hoogenboezem, Mark; Geerts, Dirk; van Het Hof, Bert; van der Pol, Susanne M A; van Buul, Jaap D; de Vries, Helga E

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disorder of the CNS characterized by immune cell infiltration across the brain vasculature into the brain, a process not yet fully understood. We previously demonstrated that the sphingolipid metabolism is altered in MS lesions. In particular, acid sphingomyelinase (ASM), a critical enzyme in the production of the bioactive lipid ceramide, is involved in the pathogenesis of MS; however, its role in the brain vasculature remains unknown. Transmigration of T lymphocytes is highly dependent on adhesion molecules in the vasculature such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). In this article, we hypothesize that ASM controls T cell migration by regulating ICAM-1 function. To study the role of endothelial ASM in transmigration, we generated brain endothelial cells lacking ASM activity using a lentiviral shRNA approach. Interestingly, although ICAM-1 expression was increased in cells lacking ASM activity, we measured a significant decrease in T lymphocyte adhesion and consequently transmigration both in static and under flow conditions. As an underlying mechanism, we revealed that upon lack of endothelial ASM activity, the phosphorylation of ezrin was perturbed as well as the interaction between filamin and ICAM-1 upon ICAM-1 clustering. Functionally this resulted in reduced microvilli formation and impaired transendothelial migration of T cells. In conclusion, in this article, we show that ASM coordinates ICAM-1 function in brain endothelial cells by regulating its interaction with filamin and phosphorylation of ezrin. The understanding of these underlying mechanisms of T lymphocyte transmigration is of great value to develop new strategies against MS lesion formation. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. Prognostic significance of Ki67 proliferation index, HIF1 alpha index and microvascular density in patients with non-small cell lung cancer brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berghoff, A.S. [Medical University of Vienna, Institute of Neurology, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medicine I, Vienna (Austria); Ilhan-Mutlu, A.; Preusser, M. [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medicine I, Vienna (Austria); Woehrer, A.; Hainfellner, J.A. [Medical University of Vienna, Institute of Neurology, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Hackl, M. [Austrian National Cancer Registry, Statistics Austria, Vienna (Austria); Widhalm, G. [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Neurosurgery, Vienna (Austria); Dieckmann, K. [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiotherapy, Vienna (Austria); Melchardt, T. [Paracelsus Medical University Hospital Salzburg, Third Medical Department, Salzburg (Austria); Dome, B. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Heinzl, H. [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Intelligent Systems, Vienna (Austria); Birner, P. [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Institute of Clinical Pathology, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-07-15

    Survival upon diagnosis of brain metastases (BM) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is highly variable and established prognostic scores do not include tissue-based parameters. Patients who underwent neurosurgical resection as first-line therapy for newly diagnosed NSCLC BM were included. Microvascular density (MVD), Ki67 tumor cell proliferation index and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1 alpha) index were determined by immunohistochemistry. NSCLC BM specimens from 230 patients (151 male, 79 female; median age 56 years; 199 nonsquamous histology) and 53/230 (23.0 %) matched primary tumor samples were available. Adjuvant whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) was given to 153/230 (66.5 %) patients after neurosurgical resection. MVD and HIF-1 alpha indices were significantly higher in BM than in matched primary tumors. In patients treated with adjuvant WBRT, low BM HIF-1 alpha expression was associated with favorable overall survival (OS), while among patients not treated with adjuvant WBRT, BM HIF-1 alpha expression did not correlate with OS. Low diagnosis-specific graded prognostic assessment score (DS-GPA), low Ki67 index, high MVD, low HIF-1 alpha index and administration of adjuvant WBRT were independently associated with favorable OS. Incorporation of tissue-based parameters into the commonly used DS-GPA allowed refined discrimination of prognostic subgroups. Ki67 index, MVD and HIF-1 alpha index have promising prognostic value in BM and should be validated in further studies. (orig.) [German] Die Ueberlebensprognose von Patienten mit zerebralen Metastasen eines nicht-kleinzelligen Lungenkarzinoms (NSCLC) ist sehr variabel. Bisher werden gewebsbasierte Parameter nicht in die prognostische Beurteilung inkludiert. Neurochirurgische Resektate zerebraler NSCLC-Metastasen wurden in dieser Studie untersucht. Die Gefaessdichte (''microvascular density'', MVD), der Ki67-Proliferationsindex sowie der HIF-1α-Index wurden mittels

  18. Vestibular, balance, microvascular and white matter neuroimaging characteristics of blast injuries and mild traumatic brain injury: Four case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattu, Ramtilak; Akin, Faith W; Cacace, Anthony T; Hall, Courtney D; Murnane, Owen D; Haacke, E Mark

    2016-01-01

    Case reports are presented on four Veterans, aged 29-46 years, who complained of chronic dizziness and/or postural instability following blast exposures. Two of the four individuals were diagnosed with mild traumatic brain injury and three of the four were exposed to multiple blasts. Comprehensive vestibular, balance, gait, audiometry and neuroimaging procedures were used to characterize their injuries. Vestibular assessment included videonystagmography, rotary chair and cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials. Balance and gait testing included the sensory organization test, preferred gait speed and the dynamic gait index. Audiometric studies included pure tone audiometry and middle-ear measurements. Neuroimaging procedures included high resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging, susceptibility-weighted imaging and diffusion-tensor imaging. Based on the neuroimaging and vestibular and balance test results, it was found that all individuals had diffuse axonal injuries and all had one or more micro-hemorrhages or vascular anomalies. Three of the four individuals had abnormal vestibular function, all had abnormally slow walking speeds and two had abnormal gait and balance dysfunction. The use of contemporary neuroimaging studies in conjunction with comprehensive vestibular and balance assessment provided a better understanding of the pathophysiology and pathoanatomy of dizziness following blast exposures than standard vestibular and balance testing alone.

  19. Protective Effects of MicroRNA-126 on Human Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells Against Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced Injury and Inflammatory Response by Activating PI3K/Akt/eNOS Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong-Hui; Chen, Yan; Gao, Chuan-Yu; Cui, Zhen-Tian; Yao, Jian-Min

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the protective effects of the microRNA-126 (miR-126)-mediated PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway on human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs) against hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R)-induced injury and the inflammatory response. Untreated HCMECs were selected for the control group. After H/R treatment and cell transfection, the HCMECs were assigned to the H/R, miR-126 mimic, mimic-negative control (NC), miR-126 inhibitor, inhibitor-NC, wortmannin (an inhibitor of PI3K) and miR-126 mimic + wortmannin groups. Super oxide dismutase (SOD), nitric oxide (NO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured utilizing commercial kits. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were performed to detect miR-126 expression and the mRNA and protein expression of inflammatory factors. Western blotting was used to determine the expression of key members in the PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway. ACCK-8 assay and flow cytometry were employed to examine cell proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. The angiogenic ability in each group was detected by the lumen formation test. Compared to the control group, p/t-PI3K, p/t-Akt and p/t-eNOS expression, NO, VEGF and SOD levels, cell proliferation and in vitro lumen formation ability were decreased, while the ROS content, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression and cell apoptosis were significantly increased in the H/R, mimic-NC, miR-126 inhibitor, inhibitor-NC, wortmannin and miR-126 mimic + wortmannin groups. Additionally, in comparison with the H/R group, the miR-126 mimic group had elevated p/t-PI3K, p/t-Akt and p/t-eNOS expression, increased NO, VEGF and SOD contents, and strengthened cell proliferation and lumen formation abilities but also exhibited decreased ROS content, reduced IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α expressions, and weakened cell apoptosis, while the miR-126 inhibitor

  20. Protective Effects of MicroRNA-126 on Human Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells Against Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced Injury and Inflammatory Response by Activating PI3K/Akt/eNOS Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Hui Yang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study explored the protective effects of the microRNA-126 (miR-126-mediated PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway on human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs against hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R-induced injury and the inflammatory response. Methods: Untreated HCMECs were selected for the control group. After H/R treatment and cell transfection, the HCMECs were assigned to the H/R, miR-126 mimic, mimic-negative control (NC, miR-126 inhibitor, inhibitor-NC, wortmannin (an inhibitor of PI3K and miR-126 mimic + wortmannin groups. Super oxide dismutase (SOD, nitric oxide (NO, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and reactive oxygen species (ROS were measured utilizing commercial kits. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA were performed to detect miR-126 expression and the mRNA and protein expression of inflammatory factors. Western blotting was used to determine the expression of key members in the PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway. ACCK-8 assay and flow cytometry were employed to examine cell proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. The angiogenic ability in each group was detected by the lumen formation test. Results: Compared to the control group, p/t-PI3K, p/t-Akt and p/t-eNOS expression, NO, VEGF and SOD levels, cell proliferation and in vitro lumen formation ability were decreased, while the ROS content, interleukin (IL-6, IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α expression and cell apoptosis were significantly increased in the H/R, mimic-NC, miR-126 inhibitor, inhibitor-NC, wortmannin and miR-126 mimic + wortmannin groups. Additionally, in comparison with the H/R group, the miR-126 mimic group had elevated p/t-PI3K, p/t-Akt and p/t-eNOS expression, increased NO, VEGF and SOD contents, and strengthened cell proliferation and lumen formation abilities but also exhibited decreased ROS content, reduced IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α expressions, and weakened cell

  1. Large field-of-view and depth-specific cortical microvascular imaging underlies regional differences in ischemic brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jia; Shi, Lei; Dziennis, Suzan; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-02-01

    Ability to non-invasively monitor and quantify of blood flow, blood vessel morphology, oxygenation and tissue morphology is important for improved diagnosis, treatment and management of various neurovascular disorders, e.g., stroke. Currently, no imaging technique is available that can satisfactorily extract these parameters from in vivo microcirculatory tissue beds, with large field of view and sufficient resolution at defined depth without any harm to the tissue. In order for more effective therapeutics, we need to determine the area of brain that is damaged but not yet dead after focal ischemia. Here we develop an integrated multi-functional imaging system, in which SDW-LSCI (synchronized dual wavelength laser speckle imaging) is used as a guiding tool for OMAG (optical microangiography) to investigate the fine detail of tissue hemodynamics, such as vessel flow, profile, and flow direction. We determine the utility of the integrated system for serial monitoring afore mentioned parameters in experimental stroke, middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in mice. For 90 min MCAO, onsite and 24 hours following reperfusion, we use SDW-LSCI to determine distinct flow and oxygenation variations for differentiation of the infarction, peri-infarct, reduced flow and contralateral regions. The blood volumes are quantifiable and distinct in afore mentioned regions. We also demonstrate the behaviors of flow and flow direction in the arterials connected to MCA play important role in the time course of MCAO. These achievements may improve our understanding of vascular involvement under pathologic and physiological conditions, and ultimately facilitate clinical diagnosis, monitoring and therapeutic interventions of neurovascular diseases, such as ischemic stroke.

  2. GLP-1 inhibits VEGFA-mediated signaling in isolated human endothelial cells and VEGFA-induced dilation of rat mesenteric arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotbøl, Cecilie Egholm; Khammy, Makhala Michell; Dalsgaard, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    to PLCγ activation, Src, and endothelial NOS (eNOS) signaling, thereby controlling endothelial vessel tone. By using RT-PCR analysis, we found mRNA for the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC), human retinal microvascular endothelial cells, and rat arteries...

  3. Anesthetic propofol overdose causes endothelial cytotoxicity in vitro and endothelial barrier dysfunction in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Ming-Chung [Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Department of Anesthesiology, Chi Mei Medical Center, Liouying, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chia-Ling [Center of Infectious Disease and Signaling Research, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Yang, Tsan-Tzu; Choi, Pui-Ching [Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Hsing, Chung-Hsi [Department of Anesthesiology, Chi Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Department of Anesthesiology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chiou-Feng, E-mail: cflin@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Center of Infectious Disease and Signaling Research, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-01

    An overdose and a prolonged treatment of propofol may cause cellular cytotoxicity in multiple organs and tissues such as brain, heart, kidney, skeletal muscle, and immune cells; however, the underlying mechanism remains undocumented, particularly in vascular endothelial cells. Our previous studies showed that the activation of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3 is pro-apoptotic in phagocytes during overdose of propofol treatment. Regarding the intravascular administration of propofol, we therefore hypothesized that propofol overdose also induces endothelial cytotoxicity via GSK-3. Propofol overdose (100 μg/ml) inhibited growth in human arterial and microvascular endothelial cells. After treatment, most of the endothelial cells experienced caspase-independent necrosis-like cell death. The activation of cathepsin D following lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) determined necrosis-like cell death. Furthermore, propofol overdose also induced caspase-dependent apoptosis, at least in part. Caspase-3 was activated and acted downstream of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP) loss; however, lysosomal cathepsins were not required for endothelial cell apoptosis. Notably, activation of GSK-3 was essential for propofol overdose-induced mitochondrial damage and apoptosis, but not necrosis-like cell death. Intraperitoneal administration of a propofol overdose in BALB/c mice caused an increase in peritoneal vascular permeability. These results demonstrate the cytotoxic effects of propofol overdose, including cathepsin D-regulated necrosis-like cell death and GSK-3-regulated mitochondrial apoptosis, on endothelial cells in vitro and the endothelial barrier dysfunction by propofol in vivo. Highlights: ► Propofol overdose causes apoptosis and necrosis in endothelial cells. ► Propofol overdose triggers lysosomal dysfunction independent of autophagy. ► Glycogen synthase kinase-3 facilitates propofol overdose-induced apoptosis. ► Propofol overdose causes an increase

  4. Characterizing responses to gamma radiation by a highly clonogenic fish brain endothelial cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Nguyen T K; Sokeechand, Bibi S H; Seymour, Colin B; Mothersill, Carmel E

    2017-07-01

    The clonogenic property and radiobiological responses of a fish brain endothelial cell line, eelB, derived from the American eel were studied. Clonogenic assays were performed to determine the plating efficiency of the eelB cells and to evaluate the clonogenic survival fractions after direct irradiation to low-dose low-LET gamma radiation or receiving irradiated cell conditioned medium in the bystander effect experiments. eelB had the second highest plating efficiency ever reported to date for fish cell lines. Large eelB macroscopic colonies could be formed in a short period of time and were easy to identify and count. Unlike with other fish clonogenic cell lines, which had a relatively slow proliferation profile, clonogenic assays with the eelB cells could be completed as early as 12 days in culture. After direct irradiation with gamma rays at low doses ranging from 0.1Gy to 5Gy, the dose-clonogenic survival curve of the eelB cell line showed a linear trend and did not develop a shoulder region. A classical radio-adaptive response was not induced with the clonogenic survival endpoint when the priming dose (0.1 or 0.5Gy) was delivered 6h before the challenge dose (3 or 5Gy). However, a radio-adaptive response was observed in progeny cells that survived 5Gy and developed lethal mutations. eelB appeared to lack the ability to produce damaging radiation-induced bystander signals on both eelB and HaCaT recipient cells. eelB cell line could be a very useful cell model in the study of radiation impacts on the aquatic health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Bidirectional apical-basal traffic of the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor in brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siupka, Piotr; Hersom, Maria Ns; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin; Johnsen, Kasper B; Thomsen, Louiza B; Andresen, Thomas L; Moos, Torben; Abbott, N Joan; Brodin, Birger; Nielsen, Morten S

    2017-07-01

    Brain capillary endothelium mediates the exchange of nutrients between blood and brain parenchyma. This barrier function of the brain capillaries also limits passage of pharmaceuticals from blood to brain, which hinders treatment of several neurological disorders. Receptor-mediated transport has been suggested as a potential pharmaceutical delivery route across the brain endothelium, e.g. reports have shown that the transferrin receptor (TfR) facilitates transcytosis of TfR antibodies, but it is not known whether this recycling receptor itself traffics from apical to basal membrane in the process. Here, we elucidate the endosomal trafficking of the retrograde transported cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (MPR300) in primary cultures of brain endothelial cells (BECs) of porcine and bovine origin. Receptor expression and localisation of MPR300 in the endo-lysosomal system and trafficking of internalised receptor are analysed. We also demonstrate that MPR300 can undergo bidirectional apical-basal trafficking in primary BECs in co-culture with astrocytes. This is, to our knowledge, the first detailed study of retrograde transported receptor trafficking in BECs, and the study demonstrates that MPR300 can be transported from the luminal to abluminal membrane and reverse. Such trafficking of MPR300 suggests that retrograde transported receptors in general may provide a mechanism for transport of pharmaceuticals into the brain.

  6. Quantification of vascular endothelial growth factor and neuropilins mRNAs during rat brain maturation by real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adris, Soraya; Ojeda, Elizabeth; Genero, Mario; Argibay, Pablo

    2005-09-01

    1. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been related with several brain functions such as angiogenesis, neuroprotection, and neurogenesis. 2. We studied the mRNA expression of the two most important isoforms of VEGF (VEGF120 and VEGF164) as well as one type of VEGF receptors, neuropilins (NRP), during maturation in the rat brain using real-time PCR. 3. Today, real-time PCR is the method of choice for rapid and reliable quantification of mRNA transcription. 4. VEGF120 has little changes in its expression between P5 and P30. 5. However, VEGF164 increased its expression 2-folds at P15 in comparison to P5, remaining at this level in the adult brain (P30). 6. Both types of NRP, NRP-1 and NRP-2, which only bind VEGF164, increased their expression about 2-folds only at P30, at levels similar to those observed for VEGF164.

  7. Shear Stress Induces Differentiation of Endothelial Lineage Cells to Protect Neonatal Brain from Hypoxic-Ischemic Injury through NRP1 and VEGFR2 Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Wei Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI brain injuries disrupt the integrity of neurovascular structure and lead to lifelong neurological deficit. The devastating damage can be ameliorated by preserving the endothelial network, but the source for therapeutic cells is limited. We aim to evaluate the beneficial effect of mechanical shear stress in the differentiation of endothelial lineage cells (ELCs from adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs and the possible intracellular signals to protect HI injury using cell-based therapy in the neonatal rats. The ASCs expressed early endothelial markers after biochemical stimulation of endothelial growth medium. The ELCs with full endothelial characteristics were accomplished after a subsequential shear stress application for 24 hours. When comparing the therapeutic potential of ASCs and ELCs, the ELCs treatment significantly reduced the infarction area and preserved neurovascular architecture in HI injured brain. The transplanted ELCs can migrate and engraft into the brain tissue, especially in vessels, where they promoted the angiogenesis. The activation of Akt by neuropilin 1 (NRP1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2 was important for ELC migration and following in vivo therapeutic outcomes. Therefore, the current study demonstrated importance of mechanical factor in stem cell differentiation and showed promising protection of brain from HI injury using ELCs treatment.

  8. Wnt activation of immortalized brain endothelial cells as a tool for generating a standardized model of the blood brain barrier in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Paolinelli

    Full Text Available Reproducing the characteristics and the functional responses of the blood-brain barrier (BBB in vitro represents an important task for the research community, and would be a critical biotechnological breakthrough. Pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries provide strong demand for inexpensive and easy-to-handle in vitro BBB models to screen novel drug candidates. Recently, it was shown that canonical Wnt signaling is responsible for the induction of the BBB properties in the neonatal brain microvasculature in vivo. In the present study, following on from earlier observations, we have developed a novel model of the BBB in vitro that may be suitable for large scale screening assays. This model is based on immortalized endothelial cell lines derived from murine and human brain, with no need for co-culture with astrocytes. To maintain the BBB endothelial cell properties, the cell lines are cultured in the presence of Wnt3a or drugs that stabilize β-catenin, or they are infected with a transcriptionally active form of β-catenin. Upon these treatments, the cell lines maintain expression of BBB-specific markers, which results in elevated transendothelial electrical resistance and reduced cell permeability. Importantly, these properties are retained for several passages in culture, and they can be reproduced and maintained in different laboratories over time. We conclude that the brain-derived endothelial cell lines that we have investigated gain their specialized characteristics upon activation of the canonical Wnt pathway. This model may be thus suitable to test the BBB permeability to chemicals or large molecular weight proteins, transmigration of inflammatory cells, treatments with cytokines, and genetic manipulation.

  9. Transferrin receptor expression and role in transendothelial transport of transferrin in cultured brain endothelial monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersom, Maria; Helms, Hans Christian; Pretzer, Natasia

    2016-01-01

    receptor localization patterns in mono-cultures and co-cultures. The endothelial cells demonstrated an up-regulation of transferrin receptor mRNA after treatment with the iron chelator deferoxamine. The association of [125I]holo-transferrin and [59Fe]-transferrin to the endothelial cells was inhibited...... by an excess of unlabeled holo-transferrin, indicating receptor mediated association. However, over time the cell associated [59Fe]-label exceeded that of [125I]holo-transferrin, which could indicate release of iron in the endothelial cells and receptor recycling. Luminal-to-abluminal transport of [125I...

  10. Renal and cardiac microvascular endothelium: injury and repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhuis, NR|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338923020

    2016-01-01

    Injury to the capillary endothelium can be devastating for renal and cardiac function. To halt the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and heart failure (HF) preservation of the microvascular endothelial cell (EC) function and structure is of great importance.1 Increasing knowledge about

  11. Role of prostacyclin signaling in endothelial production of soluble amyloid precursor protein-α in cerebral microvessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tongrong; Santhanam, Anantha Vijay R; Lu, Tong; d'Uscio, Livius V; Katusic, Zvonimir S

    2017-01-01

    We tested hypothesis that activation of the prostacyclin (PGI2) receptor (IP receptor) signaling pathway in cerebral microvessels plays an important role in the metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP). In human brain microvascular endothelial cells activation of IP receptor with the stable analogue of PGI2, iloprost, stimulated expression of amyloid precursor protein and a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10), resulting in an increased production of the neuroprotective and anticoagulant molecule, soluble APPα (sAPPα). Selective agonist of IP receptor, cicaprost, and adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin, also enhanced expression of amyloid precursor protein and ADAM10. Notably, in cerebral microvessels of IP receptor knockout mice, protein levels of APP and ADAM10 were reduced. In addition, iloprost increased protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) in human brain microvascular endothelial cells. PPARδ-siRNA abolished iloprost-augmented protein expression of ADAM10. In contrast, GW501516 (a selective agonist of PPARδ) upregulated ADAM10 and increased production of sAPPα. Genetic deletion of endothelial PPARδ (ePPARδ-/-) in mice significantly reduced cerebral microvascular expression of ADAM10 and production of sAPPα. In vivo treatment with GW501516 increased sAPPα content in hippocampus of wild type mice but not in hippocampus of ePPARδ-/- mice. Our findings identified previously unrecognized role of IP-PPARδ signal transduction pathway in the production of sAPPα in cerebral microvasculature. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Role of astrocytic leptin receptor subtypes on leptin permeation across hCMEC/D3 human brain endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hsuchou, Hung; Kastin, Abba J.; Tu, Hong; Abbott, N. Joan; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Pan, Weihong

    2010-01-01

    Astrocytic leptin receptors (ObR) can be upregulated in conditions such as adult-onset obesity. To determine whether the levels and subtypes of astrocytic ObR modulate leptin transport, we co-cultured hCMEC/D3 human brain endothelial cells and C6 astrocytoma cells in the Transwell system, and tested leptin permeation from apical to basolateral chambers. In comparison with hCMEC alone, co-culture of C6 cells reduced the permeability of paracellular markers and leptin. Unexpectedly, ObRb overex...

  13. Role of mitochondrial dysfunction in hyperglycaemia-induced coronary microvascular dysfunction: Protective role of resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Mandar S; Williams, David; Horlock, Duncan; Samarasinghe, Thilini; Andrews, Karen L; Jefferis, Ann-Maree; Berger, Philip J; Chin-Dusting, Jaye P; Kaye, David M

    2015-05-01

    Microvascular complications are now recognized to play a major role in diabetic complications, and understanding the mechanisms is critical. Endothelial dysfunction occurs early in the course of the development of complications; the precise mechanisms remain poorly understood. Mitochondrial dysfunction may occur in a diabetic rat heart and may act as a source of the oxidative stress. However, the role of endothelial cell-specific mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetic vascular complications is poorly studied. Here, we studied the role of diabetes-induced abnormal endothelial mitochondrial function and the resultant endothelial dysfunction. Understanding the role of endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetic vasculature is critical in order to develop new therapies. We demonstrate that hyperglycaemia leads to mitochondrial dysfunction in microvascular endothelial cells, and that mitochondrial inhibition induces endothelial dysfunction. Additionally, we show that resveratrol acts as a protective agent; resveratrol-mediated mitochondrial protection may be used to prevent long-term diabetic cardiovascular complications. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Transfection of primary brain capillary endothelial cells for protein synthesis and secretion of recombinant erythropoietin: a strategy to enable protein delivery to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Annette; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Aigner, Achim; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Moos, Torben

    2017-07-01

    Treatment of chronic disorders affecting the central nervous system (CNS) is complicated by the inability of drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Non-viral gene therapy applied to brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) denotes a novel approach to overcome the restraints in this passage, as turning BCECs into recombinant protein factories by transfection could result in protein secretion further into the brain. The present study aims to investigate the possibility of transfecting primary rat brain endothelial cells (RBECs) for recombinant protein synthesis and secretion of the neuroprotective protein erythropoietin (EPO). We previously showed that 4% of RBECs with BBB properties can be transfected without disrupting the BBB integrity in vitro, but it can be questioned whether this is sufficient to enable protein secretion at therapeutic levels. The present study examined various transfection vectors, with regard to increasing the transfection efficiency without disrupting the BBB integrity. Lipofectamine 3000™ was the most potent vector compared to polyethylenimine (PEI) and Turbofect. When co-cultured with astrocytes, the genetically modified RBECs secreted recombinant EPO into the cell culture medium both luminally and abluminally, and despite lower levels of EPO reaching the abluminal chamber, the amount of recombinant EPO was sufficient to evolve a biological effect on astrocytes cultured at the abluminal side in terms of upregulated gene expression of brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF). In conclusion, non-viral gene therapy to RBECs leads to protein secretion and signifies a method for therapeutic proteins to target cells inside the CNS otherwise omitted due to the BBB.

  15. Microvascular dysfunction as a link between obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Ü; Schram, M T; Houben, A J H M; Muris, D M J; Stehouwer, C D A

    2014-03-01

    Impaired microvascular dilatation from any cause and impaired insulin-mediated capillary recruitment in particular result in suboptimal delivery of glucose and insulin to skeletal muscle, and subsequently impairment of glucose disposal (insulin resistance). In addition, microvascular dysfunction, through functional and/or structural arteriolar and capillary drop-out, and arteriolar constriction, increases peripheral resistance and thus blood pressure. Microvascular dysfunction may thus constitute a pathway that links insulin resistance and hypertension. Overweight and obesity may be an important cause of microvascular dysfunction. Mechanisms linking overweight and obesity to microvascular dysfunction include changes in the secretion of adipokines leading to increased levels of free fatty acids and inflammatory mediators, and decreased levels of adiponectin all of which may impair endothelial insulin signaling. Microvascular dysfunction may thus constitute a new treatment target in the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Fucoidan Extracted from Hijiki Protects Brain Microvessel Endothelial Cells Against Diesel Exhaust Particle Exposure-Induced Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young-Sook; Eom, Sang-Yong; Kim, In-Soo; Ali, Syed F; Kleinman, Michael T; Kim, Yong-Dae; Kim, Heon

    2016-05-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the protective effects of fucoidan against the decreased function of primary cultured bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells (BBMECs) after exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). BBMECs were extracted from bovine brains and cultured until confluent. To evaluate the function of BBMECs, we performed a permeability test using cell-by-cell equipment and by Western blot analysis for zonular occludens-1 (ZO-1), which is a tight junction protein of BMECs, and evaluated oxidative stress in BBMECs using the DCFH-DA assay and the CUPRAC-BCS assay. The increased oxidative stress in BBMECs following DEP exposure was suppressed by fucoidan. In addition, permeability of BBMECs induced by DEP exposure was decreased by fucoidan treatment. Our results showed that fucoidan protects against BBMEC disruption induced by DEP exposure. This study provides evidence that fucoidan might protect the central nervous system (CNS) against DEP exposure.

  17. Hypoxic stress up-regulates Kir2.1 expression and facilitates cell proliferation in brain capillary endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamura, Hideto; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Yamamura, Hisao [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Asai, Kiyofumi [Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Imaizumi, Yuji, E-mail: yimaizum@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan)

    2016-08-05

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is mainly composed of brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs), astrocytes and pericytes. Brain ischemia causes hypoxic encephalopathy and damages BBB. However, it remains still unclear how hypoxia affects BCECs. In the present study, t-BBEC117 cells, an immortalized bovine brain endothelial cell line, were cultured under hypoxic conditions at 4–5% oxygen for 72 h. This hypoxic stress caused hyperpolarization of resting membrane potential. Patch-clamp recordings revealed a marked increase in Ba{sup 2+}-sensitive inward rectifier K{sup +} current in t-BBEC117 cells after hypoxic culture. Western blot and real-time PCR analyses showed that Kir2.1 expression was significantly up-regulated at protein level but not at mRNA level after the hypoxic culture. Ca{sup 2+} imaging study revealed that the hypoxic stress enhanced store-operated Ca{sup 2+} (SOC) entry, which was significantly reduced in the presence of 100 μM Ba{sup 2+}. On the other hand, the expression of SOC channels such as Orai1, Orai2, and transient receptor potential channels was not affected by hypoxic stress. MTT assay showed that the hypoxic stress significantly enhanced t-BBEC117 cell proliferation, which was inhibited by approximately 60% in the presence of 100 μM Ba{sup 2+}. We first show here that moderate cellular stress by cultivation under hypoxic conditions hyperpolarizes membrane potential via the up-regulation of functional Kir2.1 expression and presumably enhances Ca{sup 2+} entry, resulting in the facilitation of BCEC proliferation. These findings suggest potential roles of Kir2.1 expression in functional changes of BCECs in BBB following ischemia. -- Highlights: •Hypoxic culture of brain endothelial cells (BEC) caused membrane hyperpolarization. •This hyperpolarization was due to the increased expression of Kir2.1 channels. •Hypoxia enhanced store-operated Ca{sup 2+} (SOC) entry via Kir2.1 up-regulation. •Expression levels of putative SOC

  18. Hypoxic stress up-regulates Kir2.1 expression and facilitates cell proliferation in brain capillary endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Hideto; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Yamamura, Hisao; Asai, Kiyofumi; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2016-08-05

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is mainly composed of brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs), astrocytes and pericytes. Brain ischemia causes hypoxic encephalopathy and damages BBB. However, it remains still unclear how hypoxia affects BCECs. In the present study, t-BBEC117 cells, an immortalized bovine brain endothelial cell line, were cultured under hypoxic conditions at 4-5% oxygen for 72 h. This hypoxic stress caused hyperpolarization of resting membrane potential. Patch-clamp recordings revealed a marked increase in Ba(2+)-sensitive inward rectifier K(+) current in t-BBEC117 cells after hypoxic culture. Western blot and real-time PCR analyses showed that Kir2.1 expression was significantly up-regulated at protein level but not at mRNA level after the hypoxic culture. Ca(2+) imaging study revealed that the hypoxic stress enhanced store-operated Ca(2+) (SOC) entry, which was significantly reduced in the presence of 100 μM Ba(2+). On the other hand, the expression of SOC channels such as Orai1, Orai2, and transient receptor potential channels was not affected by hypoxic stress. MTT assay showed that the hypoxic stress significantly enhanced t-BBEC117 cell proliferation, which was inhibited by approximately 60% in the presence of 100 μM Ba(2+). We first show here that moderate cellular stress by cultivation under hypoxic conditions hyperpolarizes membrane potential via the up-regulation of functional Kir2.1 expression and presumably enhances Ca(2+) entry, resulting in the facilitation of BCEC proliferation. These findings suggest potential roles of Kir2.1 expression in functional changes of BCECs in BBB following ischemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Increases during Blood-Brain Barrier-Enhanced Permeability Caused by Phoneutria nigriventer Spider Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique C. P. Mendonça

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phoneutria nigriventer spider accidental envenomation provokes neurotoxic manifestations, which when critical, results in epileptic-like episodes. In rats, P. nigriventer venom (PNV causes blood-brain barrier breakdown (BBBb. The PNV-induced excitotoxicity results from disturbances on Na+, K+ and Ca2+ channels and glutamate handling. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, beyond its angiogenic effect, also, interferes on synaptic physiology by affecting the same ion channels and protects neurons from excitotoxicity. However, it is unknown whether VEGF expression is altered following PNV envenomation. We found that adult and neonates rats injected with PNV showed immediate neurotoxic manifestations which paralleled with endothelial occludin, β-catenin, and laminin downregulation indicative of BBBb. In neonate rats, VEGF, VEGF mRNA, and Flt-1 receptors, glutamate decarboxylase, and calbindin-D28k increased in Purkinje neurons, while, in adult rats, the BBBb paralleled with VEGF mRNA, Flk-1, and calbindin-D28k increases and Flt-1 decreases. Statistically, the variable age had a role in such differences, which might be due to age-related unequal maturation of blood-brain barrier (BBB and thus differential cross-signaling among components of the glial neurovascular unit. The concurrent increases in the VEGF/Flt-1/Flk-1 system in the cerebellar neuron cells and the BBBb following PNV exposure might imply a cytokine modulation of neuronal excitability consequent to homeostatic perturbations induced by ion channels-acting PNV neuropeptides. Whether such modulation represents neuroprotection needs further investigation.

  20. TNAP and EHD1 are over-expressed in bovine brain capillary endothelial cells after the re-induction of blood-brain barrier properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Deracinois

    Full Text Available Although the physiological properties of the blood-brain barrier (BBB are relatively well known, the phenotype of the component brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs has yet to be described in detail. Likewise, the molecular mechanisms that govern the establishment and maintenance of the BBB are largely unknown. Proteomics can be used to assess quantitative changes in protein levels and identify proteins involved in the molecular pathways responsible for cellular differentiation. Using the well-established in vitro BBB model developed in our laboratory, we performed a differential nano-LC MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS study of Triton X-100-soluble protein species from bovine BCECs displaying either limited BBB functions or BBB functions re-induced by glial cells. Due to the heterogeneity of the crude extract, we increased identification yields by applying a repeatable, reproducible fractionation process based on the proteins' relative hydrophobicity. We present proteomic and biochemical evidence to show that tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP and Eps15 homology domain-containing protein 1(EDH1 are over-expressed by bovine BCECs after the re-induction of BBB properties. We discuss the impact of these findings on current knowledge of endothelial and BBB permeability.

  1. Gene delivery into primary brain capillary endothelial cells for protein secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Lichota, Jacek

    -endothelial electrical resistance above 200 ohm*cm2, indicating that the BCECs formed a tight polar monolayer with functional tight junctions. This was confirmed by immunostaining for the thigh junction protein ZO-1. Rat BCECs were transfected with a red fluorescence protein Hc-RED for 24 hours. Positive transfection...

  2. Vascular endothelial growth factor A protein level and gene expression in intracranial meningiomas with brain edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nassehi, Damoun; Dyrbye, Henrik; Andresen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    (VEGF) is an endothelial cell-specific mitogen and angiogen. VEGF-A protein, which is identical to vascular permeability factor, is a regulator of angiogenesis. In this study, 101 patients with meningiomas, and possible co-factors to PTBE, such as meningioma subtypes and tumor location, were examined...

  3. Diabetes-related microvascular and macrovascular diseases in the physical therapy setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade, W Todd

    2008-11-01

    Physical therapists commonly treat people with diabetes for a wide variety of diabetes-associated impairments, including those from diabetes-related vascular disease. Diabetes is associated with both microvascular and macrovascular diseases affecting several organs, including muscle, skin, heart, brain, and kidneys. A common etiology links the different types of diabetes-associated vascular disease. Common risk factors for vascular disease in people with diabetes, specifically type 2 diabetes, include hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, tobacco use, and obesity. Mechanisms for vascular disease in diabetes include the pathologic effects of advanced glycation end product accumulation, impaired vasodilatory response attributable to nitric oxide inhibition, smooth muscle cell dysfunction, overproduction of endothelial growth factors, chronic inflammation, hemodynamic dysregulation, impaired fibrinolytic ability, and enhanced platelet aggregation. It is becoming increasingly important for physical therapists to be aware of diabetes-related vascular complications as more patients present with insulin resistance and diabetes. The opportunities for effective physical therapy interventions (such as exercise) are significant.

  4. Effect of low-dose methylprednisolone on peripheral blood endothelial progenitor cells and its significance in rats after brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin ZHANG

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the effects of low-dose methylprednisolone(MP treatment after traumatic brain injury(TBI in rats on the number of peripheral blood endothelial progenitor cells(EPCs and injury area of the brain.Methods One hundred and fifty-four adult male Wistar rats were involved in the present study,and they were randomly divided into normal control group(n=18,TBI control group(n=38,MP control group(n=30,MP+TBI group(n=30 and TBI+MP group(n=38.The TBI model was reproduced by fluid percussion injury(FPI.MP(5mg/kg was intraperitoneally administered once a day for 4 days.Peripheral venous blood samples were taken on day 1,3,7 and 14,and the counts of EPCs were determined by flow cytometry.The rats were sacrificed on day 1 and 3,brain edema was estimated by dry-wet weight method,and the blood-brain barrier(BBB permeability was determined by Evans-blue extravasation.Results The counts of peripheral blood EPCs were significantly higher in MP control group,MP+TBI group and TBI+MP group on day 1,3 and 7 than that in normal control and TBI control group,and it returned to the level of normal control group on day 14.The BBB permeability was improved and brain edema alleviated in MP+TBI and TBI+MP group on day 3.Conclusion The administration of low-dose MP may increase the count of peripheral blood EPCs in rats,decrease BBB damage,and alleviate brain edema.

  5. In vitro discrimination of the role of LRP1 at the BBB cellular level: focus on brain capillary endothelial cells and brain pericytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Pietra; Saint-Pol, Julien; Kuntz, Mélanie; Boucau, Marie-Christine; Lamartiniere, Yordenca; Gosselet, Fabien; Fenart, Laurence

    2015-01-12

    Several studies have demonstrated that the blood-brain barrier (BBB) (dynamic cellular complex composed by brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) and surrounded by astrocytic end feet and pericytes) regulates the exchanges of amyloid β (Aβ) peptide between the blood and the brain. Deregulation of these exchanges seems to be a key trigger for the brain accumulation of Aβ peptide observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whereas the involvement of receptor for advanced glycation end-products in Aβ peptide transcytosis has been demonstrated in our laboratory, low-density lipoprotein receptor's role at the cellular level needs to be clarified. For this, we used an in vitro BBB model that consists of a co-culture of bovine BCECs and rat glial cells. This model has already been used to characterize low-density lipoprotein receptor-related peptide (LRP)'s involvement in the transcytosis of molecules such as tPA and angiopep-2. Our results suggest that Aβ peptide efflux across the BCEC monolayer involves a transcellular transport. However, the experiments with RAP discard an involvement of LRP family members at BCECs level. In contrast, our results show a strong transcriptional expression of LRP1 in pericytes and suggest its implication in Aβ endocytosis. Moreover, the observations of pericytes contraction and local downregulation of LRP1 in response to Aβ treatment opens up perspectives for studying this cell type with respect to Aβ peptide metabolism and AD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Acute alcohol intoxication-induced microvascular leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggett, Travis M; Breslin, Jerome W

    2014-09-01

    Alcohol intoxication can increase inflammation and worsen injury, yet the mechanisms involved are not clear. We investigated whether acute alcohol intoxication increases microvascular permeability and investigated potential signaling mechanisms in endothelial cells that may be involved. Conscious rats received a 2.5 g/kg alcohol bolus via gastric catheters to produce acute intoxication. Microvascular leakage of intravenously administered fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated albumin (FITC-albumin) from the mesenteric microcirculation was assessed by intravital microscopy. Endothelial-specific mechanisms were studied using cultured endothelial cell monolayers. Transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) served as an index of barrier function, before and after treatment with alcohol or its metabolite acetaldehyde. Pharmacologic agents were used to test the roles of alcohol metabolism, oxidative stress, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK), rho kinase (ROCK), and exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac). VE-cadherin localization was investigated to assess junctional integrity. Rac1 and RhoA activation was assessed by ELISA assays. Alcohol significantly increased FITC-albumin extravasation from the mesenteric microcirculation. Alcohol also significantly decreased TER and disrupted VE-cadherin organization at junctions. Acetaldehyde significantly decreased TER, but inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase or application of a superoxide dismutase mimetic failed to prevent alcohol-induced decreases in TER. Inhibition of p38 MAPK, but not MLCK or ROCK, significantly attenuated the alcohol-induced barrier dysfunction. Alcohol rapidly decreased GTP-bound Rac1 but not RhoA during the drop in TER. Activation of Epac increased TER, but did not prevent alcohol from decreasing TER. However, activation of Epac after initiation of alcohol-induced barrier dysfunction quickly resolved TER to baseline levels. Our results suggest that

  7. Delivering minocycline into brain endothelial cells with liposome-based technology

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Changhong; Levchenko, Tatyana; Guo, Shuzhen; Stins, Monique; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Lo, Eng H.

    2012-01-01

    Minocycline has been proposed as a way to blunt neurovascular injury from matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) during stroke. However, recent clinical trials suggest that high levels of minocycline may have deleterious side-effects. Here, we showed that very high minocycline concentrations damage endothelial cells via calpain/caspase pathways. To alleviate this potential cytotoxicity, we encapsulated minocycline in liposomes. Low concentrations of minocycline could not reduce tumor necrosis facto...

  8. Cardiovascular risk factors as determinants of retinal and skin microvascular function: The Maastricht Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben M Sörensen

    Full Text Available Microvascular dysfunction is an important underlying mechanism of microvascular diseases. Determinants (age, sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, obesity, and smoking of macrovascular diseases affect large-artery endothelial function. These risk factors also associate with microvascular diseases. We hypothesized that they are also determinants of microvascular (endothelial function.In The Maastricht Study, a type 2 diabetes-enriched population-based cohort study (n = 1991, 51% men, aged 59.7±8.2 years, we determined microvascular function as flicker light-induced retinal arteriolar %-dilation and heat-induced skin %-hyperemia. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to assess the associations of cardiovascular risk factors (age, sex, waist circumference, total-to-high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol ratio, fasting plasma glucose (FPG, 24-h systolic blood pressure, and cigarette smoking with retinal and skin microvascular function.In multivariate analyses, age and FPG were inversely associated with retinal and skin microvascular function (regression coefficients per standard deviation (SD were -0.11SD (95%CI: -0.15;-0.06 and -0.12SD (-0.17;-0.07 for retinal arteriolar %-dilation and -0.10SD (-0.16;-0.05 and -0.11SD (-0.17;-0.06 for skin %-hyperemia, respectively. Men and current smokers had -0.43SD (-0.58;-0.27 and -0.32SD (-0.49;-0.15 lower skin %-hyperemia, respectively. 24-h systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, and total-to-HDL cholesterol ratio were not statistically significantly associated with these microvascular functions.Associations between cardiovascular risk factors and retinal and skin microvascular function show a pattern that is partly similar to the associations between cardiovascular risk factors and macrovascular function. Impairment of microvascular function may constitute a pathway through which an adverse cardiovascular risk factor pattern may increase risk of diseases that are partly or wholly

  9. Cardiovascular risk factors as determinants of retinal and skin microvascular function: The Maastricht Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houben, Alfons J. H. M.; Berendschot, Tos T. J. M.; Schouten, Jan S. A. G.; Kroon, Abraham A.; van der Kallen, Carla J. H.; Henry, Ronald M. A.; Koster, Annemarie; Dagnelie, Pieter C.; Schaper, Nicolaas C.; Schram, Miranda T.; Stehouwer, Coen D. A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Microvascular dysfunction is an important underlying mechanism of microvascular diseases. Determinants (age, sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, obesity, and smoking) of macrovascular diseases affect large-artery endothelial function. These risk factors also associate with microvascular diseases. We hypothesized that they are also determinants of microvascular (endothelial) function. Methods In The Maastricht Study, a type 2 diabetes-enriched population-based cohort study (n = 1991, 51% men, aged 59.7±8.2 years), we determined microvascular function as flicker light-induced retinal arteriolar %-dilation and heat-induced skin %-hyperemia. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to assess the associations of cardiovascular risk factors (age, sex, waist circumference, total-to-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol ratio, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 24-h systolic blood pressure, and cigarette smoking) with retinal and skin microvascular function. Results In multivariate analyses, age and FPG were inversely associated with retinal and skin microvascular function (regression coefficients per standard deviation (SD) were -0.11SD (95%CI: -0.15;-0.06) and -0.12SD (-0.17;-0.07) for retinal arteriolar %-dilation and -0.10SD (-0.16;-0.05) and -0.11SD (-0.17;-0.06) for skin %-hyperemia, respectively. Men and current smokers had -0.43SD (-0.58;-0.27) and -0.32SD (-0.49;-0.15) lower skin %-hyperemia, respectively. 24-h systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, and total-to-HDL cholesterol ratio were not statistically significantly associated with these microvascular functions. Conclusions Associations between cardiovascular risk factors and retinal and skin microvascular function show a pattern that is partly similar to the associations between cardiovascular risk factors and macrovascular function. Impairment of microvascular function may constitute a pathway through which an adverse cardiovascular risk factor pattern may increase risk of

  10. Design and physicochemical characterization of poly(amidoamine) nanoparticles and the toxicological evaluation in human endothelial cells: applications to peptide delivery to the brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coué, G.M.J.P.C.; Freese, C.; Unger, R.E.; Kirkpatrick, C.J.; Pickl, K.E.; Sinner, F.M.; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated nanoparticles formulated by self-assembly of a biodegradable poly(amidoamine) (PAA) and a fluorescently labeled peptide, in their capacity to internalize in endothelial cells and deliver the peptide, with possible applications for brain drug delivery. The nanoparticles

  11. PDCD10 (CCM3) regulates brain endothelial barrier integrity in cerebral cavernous malformation type 3: role of CCM3-ERK1/2-cortactin cross-talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatovic, Svetlana M; Sladojevic, Nikola; Keep, Richard F; Andjelkovic, Anuska V

    2015-11-01

    Impairment of brain endothelial barrier integrity is critical for cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) lesion development. The current study investigates changes in tight junction (TJ) complex organization when PDCD10 (CCM3) is mutated/depleted in human brain endothelial cells. Analysis of lesions with CCM3 mutation and brain endothelial cells transfected with CCM3 siRNA (CCM3-knockdown) showed little or no increase in TJ transmembrane and scaffolding proteins mRNA expression, but proteins levels were generally decreased. CCM3-knockdown cells had a redistribution of claudin-5 and occludin from the membrane to the cytosol with no alterations in protein turnover but with diminished protein-protein interactions with ZO-1 and ZO-1 interaction with the actin cytoskeleton. The most profound effect of CCM3 mutation/depletion was on an actin-binding protein, cortactin. CCM3 depletion caused cortactin Ser-phosphorylation, dissociation from ZO-1 and actin, redistribution to the cytosol and degradation. This affected cortical actin ring organization, TJ complex stability and consequently barrier integrity, with constant hyperpermeability to inulin. A potential link between CCM3 depletion and altered cortactin was tonic activation of MAP kinase ERK1/2. ERK1/2 inhibition increased cortactin expression and incorporation into the TJ complex and improved barrier integrity. This study highlights the potential role of CCM3 in regulating TJ complex organization and brain endothelial barrier permeability.

  12. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Hemolysin Employs Outer Membrane Vesicles to Target Mitochondria and Cause Endothelial and Epithelial Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunsmann, Lisa; Greune, Lilo; Bauwens, Andreas; Zhang, Wenlan; Kuczius, Thorsten; Kim, Kwang Sik; Mellmann, Alexander; Schmidt, M. Alexander; Karch, Helge

    2013-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strains cause diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome resulting from toxin-mediated microvascular endothelial injury. EHEC hemolysin (EHEC-Hly), a member of the RTX (repeats-in-toxin) family, is an EHEC virulence factor of increasingly recognized importance. The toxin exists as free EHEC-Hly and as EHEC-Hly associated with outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by EHEC during growth. Whereas the free toxin is lytic towards human endothelium, the biological effects of the OMV-associated EHEC-Hly on microvascular endothelial and intestinal epithelial cells, which are the major targets during EHEC infection, are unknown. Using microscopic, biochemical, flow cytometry and functional analyses of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and Caco-2 cells we demonstrate that OMV-associated EHEC-Hly does not lyse the target cells but triggers their apoptosis. The OMV-associated toxin is internalized by HBMEC and Caco-2 cells via dynamin-dependent endocytosis of OMVs and trafficked with OMVs into endo-lysosomal compartments. Upon endosome acidification and subsequent pH drop, EHEC-Hly is separated from OMVs, escapes from the lysosomes, most probably via its pore-forming activity, and targets mitochondria. This results in decrease of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and translocation of cytochrome c to the cytosol, indicating EHEC-Hly-mediated permeabilization of the mitochondrial membranes. Subsequent activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 leads to apoptotic cell death as evidenced by DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation in the intoxicated cells. The ability of OMV-associated EHEC-Hly to trigger the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in human microvascular endothelial and intestinal epithelial cells indicates a novel mechanism of EHEC-Hly involvement in the pathogenesis of EHEC diseases. The OMV-mediated intracellular delivery represents a newly recognized mechanism for a bacterial toxin to enter host cells in

  13. Endothelial Cells Derived from Non-malignant Tissues Are of Limited Value as Models for Brain Tumor Vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, Jennifer; Mock, Andreas; Beckhove, Philipp; Herold-Mende, Christel

    2015-05-01

    Human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are commonly chosen over freshly isolated endothelial cells from glioblastomas (GECs) due to accessibility and costs. To test their suitability for in vitro studies, we comprehensively compared the transcriptomes and responses to major angiogenic cytokines of HUVECs (n=2) and GECs (n=5). Purity of GEC cultures was confirmed by uptake of acetylated low-density protein and immunostaining. Unsupervised analysis revealed a distinct grouping. We identified 854 differentially expressed genes. Pathway and gene ontology enrichment analyses pointed to clear differences in angiogenesis and leukocyte transmigration. Comparing the expression of cell adhesion molecules in five major angiogenic cytokines revealed that HUVECs in contrast to GECs did not exhibit a previously described down-regulation of cell adhesion molecules upon incubation with transforming growth factor betas, but rather with basic fibroblast growth factor. Given our findings, we strongly recommend the use of GECs as model cells for brain tumor endothelium for experiments investigating angiogenesis and immunobiology. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  14. Antecedent ethanol ingestion prevents postischemic microvascular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Kazuma; Dayton, Catherine B; Yamaguchi, Taiji; Korthuis, Ronald J

    2004-04-01

    Prolonged ischemia followed by reperfusion (I/R) results in impaired endothelial cell function in all segments of the microvasculature. Moreover, microcirculatory dysfunction plays a major role in the genesis of the reperfusion component of total tissue injury in I/R. Thus, preservation of endothelial function is an important therapeutic goal for ameliorating injury in tissues subjected to I/R. An accumulating body of evidence indicates that low to moderate ethanol consumption produces an adaptive transformation to a protected phenotype in both microvascular endothelium and parenchymal cells such that they are rendered resistant to the pathologic effects of I/R. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of the signaling pathways underlying the development of the preconditioned state induced by antecedent ethanol in arteriolar, capillary, and venular endothelium. In addition, we will highlight understudied areas with regard to microvascular protection afforded by antecedent ethanol in the hopes that this will stimulate investigation of its underlying mechanisms. Understanding these signaling pathways may provide a mechanistic rationale for the development of novel treatment interventions that target both the microcirculatory and parenchymal sequelae to I/R, thereby maximizing the therapeutic potential of the protected phenotypes produced by pharmacologic preconditioning.

  15. Lipid rafts regulate PCB153-induced disruption of occludin and brain endothelial barrier function through protein phosphatase 2A and matrix metalloproteinase-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eum, Sung Yong, E-mail: seum@miami.edu; Jaraki, Dima; András, Ibolya E.; Toborek, Michal

    2015-09-15

    Occludin is an essential integral transmembrane protein regulating tight junction (TJ) integrity in brain endothelial cells. Phosphorylation of occludin is associated with its localization to TJ sites and incorporation into intact TJ assembly. The present study is focused on the role of lipid rafts in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced disruption of occludin and endothelial barrier function. Exposure of human brain endothelial cells to 2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) induced dephosphorylation of threonine residues of occludin and displacement of occludin from detergent-resistant membrane (DRM)/lipid raft fractions within 1 h. Moreover, lipid rafts modulated the reduction of occludin level through activation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) after 24 h PCB153 treatment. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity by okadaic acid or fostriecin markedly protected against PCB153-induced displacement of occludin and increased permeability of endothelial cells. The implication of lipid rafts and PP2A signaling in these processes was further defined by co-immunoprecipitation of occludin with PP2A and caveolin-1, a marker protein of lipid rafts. Indeed, a significant MMP-2 activity was observed in lipid rafts and was increased by exposure to PCB153. The pretreatment of MMP-2 inhibitors protected against PCB153-induced loss of occludin and disruption of lipid raft structure prevented the increase of endothelial permeability. Overall, these results indicate that lipid raft-associated processes, such as PP2A and MMP-2 activation, participate in PCB153-induced disruption of occludin function in brain endothelial barrier. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to brain endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to exposure to environmental pollutants, such as ortho-substituted PCBs. - Highlights: • PCB153 disturbed human brain endothelial barrier through disruption of occludin. • Lipid raft-associated PP

  16. Atg7 Regulates Brain Angiogenesis via NF-κB-Dependent IL-6 Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Fang Zhuang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The formation of brain vasculature is an essential step during central nervous system development. The molecular mechanism underlying brain angiogenesis remains incompletely understood. The role of Atg7, an autophagy-related protein, in brain angiogenesis was investigated in this study. We found that the microvessel density in mice brains with endothelial-specific knockout of Atg7 (Atg7 EKO was significantly decreased compared to wild-type control. Consistently, in vitro angiogenesis assays showed that Atg7 knockdown impaired angiogenesis in brain microvascular endothelial cells. Further results indicated that knockdown of Atg7 reduced interleukin-6 (IL-6 expression in brain microvascular endothelial cells, which is mediated by NF-κB-dependent transcriptional control. Interestingly, exogenous IL-6 restored the impaired angiogenesis and reduced cell motility caused by Atg7 knockdown. These results demonstrated that Atg7 has proangiogenic activity in brain angiogenesis which is mediated by IL-6 production in a NF-κB-dependent manner.

  17. Regulation of Monocarboxylic Acid Transporter 1 Trafficking by the Canonical Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway in Rat Brain Endothelial Cells Requires Cross-talk with Notch Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zejian; Sneve, Mary; Haroldson, Thomas A; Smith, Jeffrey P; Drewes, Lester R

    2016-04-08

    The transport of monocarboxylate fuels such as lactate, pyruvate, and ketone bodies across brain endothelial cells is mediated by monocarboxylic acid transporter 1 (MCT1). Although the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway is required for rodent blood-brain barrier development and for the expression of associated nutrient transporters, the role of this pathway in the regulation of brain endothelial MCT1 is unknown. Here we report expression of nine members of the frizzled receptor family by the RBE4 rat brain endothelial cell line. Furthermore, activation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway in RBE4 cells via nuclear β-catenin signaling with LiCl does not alter brain endothelialMct1mRNA but increases the amount of MCT1 transporter protein. Plasma membrane biotinylation studies and confocal microscopic examination of mCherry-tagged MCT1 indicate that increased transporter results from reduced MCT1 trafficking from the plasma membrane via the endosomal/lysosomal pathway and is facilitated by decreased MCT1 ubiquitination following LiCl treatment. Inhibition of the Notch pathway by the γ-secretase inhibitorN-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycinet-butyl ester negated the up-regulation of MCT1 by LiCl, demonstrating a cross-talk between the canonical Wnt/β-catenin and Notch pathways. Our results are important because they show, for the first time, the regulation of MCT1 in cerebrovascular endothelial cells by the multifunctional canonical Wnt/β-catenin and Notch signaling pathways. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Association of Microvascular Dysfunction With Late-Life Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Agtmaal, Marnix J M; Houben, Alfons J H M; Pouwer, Frans

    2017-01-01

    estimates of microvascular dysfunction were considered in participants with or without depression: plasma markers of endothelial function, albuminuria, measurements of skin and muscle microcirculation, retinal arteriolar and venular diameter, and markers for cerebral small vessel disease. Data are reported......Importance: The etiologic factors of late-life depression are still poorly understood. Recent evidence suggests that microvascular dysfunction is associated with depression, which may have implications for prevention and treatment. However, this association has not been systematically reviewed....... Objective: To examine the associations of peripheral and cerebral microvascular dysfunction with late-life depression. Data Sources: A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE and EMBASE for and longitudinal studies published since inception to October 16, 2016, that assessed the associations...

  19. Protection of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor to Brain Edema Following Intracerebral Hemorrhage and Its Involved Mechanisms: Effect of Aquaporin-4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heling Chu

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF has protective effects on many neurological diseases. However, whether VEGF acts on brain edema following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH is largely unknown. Our previous study has shown aquaporin-4 (AQP4 plays an important role in brain edema elimination following ICH. Meanwhile, there is close relationship between VEGF and AQP4. In this study, we aimed to test effects of VEGF on brain edema following ICH and examine whether they were AQP4 dependent. Recombinant human VEGF165 (rhVEGF165 was injected intracerebroventricularly 1 d after ICH induced by microinjecting autologous whole blood into striatum. We detected perihemotomal AQP4 protein expression, then examined the effects of rhVEGF165 on perihemotomal brain edema at 1 d, 3 d, and 7 d after injection in wild type (AQP4(+/+ and AQP4 knock-out (AQP4(-/- mice. Furthermore, we assessed the possible signal transduction pathways activated by VEGF to regulate AQP4 expression via astrocyte cultures. We found perihemotomal AQP4 protein expression was highly increased by rhVEGF165. RhVEGF165 alleviated perihemotomal brain edema in AQP4(+/+ mice at each time point, but had no effect on AQP4(-/- mice. Perihemotomal EB extravasation was increased by rhVEGF165 in AQP4(-/- mice, but not AQP4(+/+ mice. RhVEGF165 reduced neurological deficits and increased Nissl's staining cells surrounding hemotoma in both types of mice and these effects were related to AQP4. RhVEGF165 up-regulated phospharylation of C-Jun amino-terminal kinase (p-JNK and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK and AQP4 protein in cultured astrocytes. The latter was inhibited by JNK and ERK inhibitors. In conclusion, VEGF reduces neurological deficits, brain edema, and neuronal death surrounding hemotoma but has no influence on BBB permeability. These effects are closely related to AQP4 up-regulation, possibly through activating JNK and ERK pathways. The current study may present new insights to

  20. miR-Let7A Controls the Cell Death and Tight Junction Density of Brain Endothelial Cells under High Glucose Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juhyun; Yoon, So Ra; Kim, Oh Yoen

    2017-01-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced stress in the brain of patients with diabetes triggers the disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB), leading to diverse neurological diseases including stroke and dementia. Recently, the role of microRNA becomes an interest in the research for deciphering the mechanism of brain endothelial cell damage under hyperglycemia. Therefore, we investigated whether mircoRNA Let7A (miR-Let7A) controls the damage of brain endothelial (bEnd.3) cells against high glucose condition. Cell viability, cell death marker expressions (p-53, Bax, and cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase), the loss of tight junction proteins (ZO-1 and claudin-5), proinflammatory response (interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α), inducible nitric oxide synthase, and nitrite production were confirmed using MTT, reverse transcription-PCR, quantitative-PCR, Western blotting, immunofluorescence, and Griess reagent assay. miR-Let7A overexpression significantly prevented cell death and loss of tight junction proteins and attenuated proinflammatory response and nitrite production in the bEnd.3 cells under high glucose condition. Taken together, we suggest that miR-Let7A may attenuate brain endothelial cell damage by controlling cell death signaling, loss of tight junction proteins, and proinflammatory response against high glucose stress. In the future, the manipulation of miR-Let7A may be a novel solution in controlling BBB disruption which leads to the central nervous system diseases.

  1. Live-cell imaging to detect phosphatidylserine externalization in brain endothelial cells exposed to ionizing radiation: implications for the treatment of brain arteriovenous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhenjun; Johnson, Michael S; Chen, Biyi; Grace, Michael; Ukath, Jaysree; Lee, Vivienne S; McRobb, Lucinda S; Sedger, Lisa M; Stoodley, Marcus A

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an established intervention for brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The processes of AVM vessel occlusion after SRS are poorly understood. To improve SRS efficacy, it is important to understand the cellular response of blood vessels to radiation. The molecular changes on the surface of AVM endothelial cells after irradiation may also be used for vascular targeting. This study investigates radiation-induced externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) on endothelial cells using live-cell imaging. METHODS An immortalized cell line generated from mouse brain endothelium, bEnd.3 cells, was cultured and irradiated at different radiation doses using a linear accelerator. PS externalization in the cells was subsequently visualized using polarity-sensitive indicator of viability and apoptosis (pSIVA)-IANBD, a polarity-sensitive probe. Live-cell imaging was used to monitor PS externalization in real time. The effects of radiation on the cell cycle of bEnd.3 cells were also examined by flow cytometry. RESULTS Ionizing radiation effects are dose dependent. Reduction in the cell proliferation rate was observed after exposure to 5 Gy radiation, whereas higher radiation doses (15 Gy and 25 Gy) totally inhibited proliferation. In comparison with cells treated with sham radiation, the irradiated cells showed distinct pseudopodial elongation with little or no spreading of the cell body. The percentages of pSIVA-positive cells were significantly higher (p = 0.04) 24 hours after treatment in the cultures that received 25- and 15-Gy doses of radiation. This effect was sustained until the end of the experiment (3 days). Radiation at 5 Gy did not induce significant PS externalization compared with the sham-radiation controls at any time points (p > 0.15). Flow cytometric analysis data indicate that irradiation induced growth arrest of bEnd.3 cells, with cells accumulating in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. CONCLUSIONS Ionizing radiation

  2. Reversible Opening of Intercellular Junctions of Intestinal Epithelial and Brain Endothelial Cells With Tight Junction Modulator Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocsik, Alexandra; Walter, Fruzsina R; Gyebrovszki, Andrea; Fülöp, Lívia; Blasig, Ingolf; Dabrowski, Sebastian; Ötvös, Ferenc; Tóth, András; Rákhely, Gábor; Veszelka, Szilvia; Vastag, Monika; Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Deli, Mária A

    2016-02-01

    The intercellular junctions restrict the free passage of hydrophilic compounds through the paracellular clefts. Reversible opening of the tight junctions of biological barriers is investigated as one of the ways to increase drug delivery to the systemic circulation or the central nervous system. Six peptides, ADT-6, HAV-6, C-CPE, 7-mer (FDFWITP, PN-78), AT-1002, and PN-159, acting on different integral membrane and linker junctional proteins were tested on Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell line and a coculture model of the blood-brain barrier. All peptides tested in nontoxic concentrations showed a reversible tight junctions modulating effect and were effective to open the paracellular pathway for the marker molecules fluorescein and albumin. The change in the structure of cell-cell junctions was verified by immunostaining for occludin, claudin-4,-5, ZO-1, β-catenin, and E-cadherin. Expression levels of occludin and claudins were measured in both models. We could demonstrate a selectivity of C-CPE, ADT-6, and HAV-6 peptides for epithelial cells and 7-mer and AT-1002 peptides for brain endothelial cells. PN-159 was the most effective modulator of junctional permeability in both models possibly acting via claudin-1 and -5. Our results indicate that these peptides can be effectively and selectively used as potential pharmaceutical excipients to improve drug delivery across biological barriers. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. eEF-2 Phosphorylation Down-Regulates P-Glycoprotein Over-Expression in Rat Brain Microvessel Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Hua Tang

    Full Text Available We investigated whether glutamate, NMDA receptors, and eukaryote elongation factor-2 kinase (eEF-2K/eEF-2 regulate P-glycoprotein expression, and the effects of the eEF-2K inhibitor NH125 on the expression of P-glycoprotein in rat brain microvessel endothelial cells (RBMECs.Cortex was obtained from newborn Wistar rat brains. After surface vessels and meninges were removed, the pellet containing microvessels was resuspended and incubated at 37°C in culture medium. Cell viability was assessed by the MTT assay. RBMECs were identified by immunohistochemistry with anti-vWF. P-glycoprotein, phospho-eEF-2, and eEF-2 expression were determined by western blot analysis. Mdr1a gene expression was analyzed by RT-PCR.Mdr1a mRNA, P-glycoprotein and phospho-eEF-2 expression increased in L-glutamate stimulated RBMECs. P-glycoprotein and phospho-eEF-2 expression were down-regulated after NH125 treatment in L-glutamate stimulated RBMECs.eEF-2K/eEF-2 should have played an important role in the regulation of P-glycoprotein expression in RBMECs. eEF-2K inhibitor NH125 could serve as an efficacious anti-multidrug resistant agent.

  4. In Vitro Endothelialization Test of Biomaterials Using Immortalized Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Kono

    Full Text Available Functionalizing biomaterials with peptides or polymers that enhance recruitment of endothelial cells (ECs can reduce blood coagulation and thrombosis. To assess endothelialization of materials in vitro, primary ECs are generally used, although the characteristics of these cells vary among the donors and change with time in culture. Recently, primary cell lines immortalized by transduction of simian vacuolating virus 40 large T antigen or human telomerase reverse transcriptase have been developed. To determine whether immortalized ECs can substitute for primary ECs in material testing, we investigated endothelialization on biocompatible polymers using three lots of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC and immortalized microvascular ECs, TIME-GFP. Attachment to and growth on polymer surfaces were comparable between cell types, but results were more consistent with TIME-GFP. Our findings indicate that TIME-GFP is more suitable for in vitro endothelialization testing of biomaterials.

  5. Microvascular Coronary Dysfunction and Ischemic Heart Disease – Where Are We in 2014?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, John W.; Pepine, Carl J.

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with angina and signs of myocardial ischemia on stress testing have no significant obstructive epicardial coronary disease. There are many potential coronary and non-coronary mechanisms for ischemia without obstructive epicardial coronary disease, and prominent among these is coronary microvascular and/or endothelial dysfunction. Patients with coronary microvascular and/or endothelial dysfunction are often at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events, including ischemic events and heart failure despite preserved ventricular systolic function. In this article, we will review the diagnosis and treatment of coronary microvascular and endothelial dysfunction, discuss their potential contribution to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, and highlight recent advances in the evaluation of atherosclerotic morphology in these patients, many of whom have non-obstructive epicardial disease. PMID:25454903

  6. Microvascular coronary dysfunction and ischemic heart disease: where are we in 2014?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, John W; Pepine, Carl J

    2015-02-01

    Many patients with angina and signs of myocardial ischemia on stress testing have no significant obstructive epicardial coronary disease. There are many potential coronary and non-coronary mechanisms for ischemia without obstructive epicardial coronary disease, and prominent among these is coronary microvascular and/or endothelial dysfunction. Patients with coronary microvascular and/or endothelial dysfunction are often at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events, including ischemic events and heart failure despite preserved ventricular systolic function. In this article, we will review the diagnosis and treatment of coronary microvascular and endothelial dysfunction, discuss their potential contribution to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, and highlight recent advances in the evaluation of atherosclerotic morphology in these patients, many of whom have non-obstructive epicardial disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Parenchymal microvascular systems and cerebral atrophy in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesztelyi, G; Finnegan, W; DeMaro, J A; Wang, J Y; Chen, J L; Fenstermacher, J

    1993-05-21

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) are hypertensive, hyperactive, and hydrocephalic; furthermore SHR have smaller brain volume and weight than age-matched, normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). At 6-7 months of age, local cerebral glucose is sizably lower in SHR than WKY. The hypothesis that these several abnormalities of SHR lead to variations in cerebral microvascular bed morphology was tested in 6-7-month-old SHR and WKY by quantitating various parameters of small, intermediate, and large parenchymal microvessels (grouped by luminal diameter) in 21 brain areas. Within each rat strain, the microvascular bed properties such as vessel profile frequency (density) varied considerably among the 21 brain areas. In opposition to the hypothesis, mean luminal diameter as well as profile frequency, surface area, and luminal volume of the microvascular beds per unit tissue mass were virtually identical in each brain area of SHR and WKY for the three groups of microvessels. These findings coupled with the reports of less tissue per structure but similar density of neurons throughout the brain of SHR and WKY indicate that there are fewer neurons and less vascular tissue per brain structure in 6-7-month-old SHR than WKY; in addition, they suggest a linkage between the size of parenchymal microvascular beds and the surrounding nervous tissue.

  8. Vascular endothelial growth factor A protein level and gene expression in intracranial meningiomas with brain edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nassehi, Damoun; Dyrbye, Henrik; Andresen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    (VEGF) is an endothelial cell-specific mitogen and angiogen. VEGF-A protein, which is identical to vascular permeability factor, is a regulator of angiogenesis. In this study, 101 patients with meningiomas, and possible co-factors to PTBE, such as meningioma subtypes and tumor location, were examined....... Forty-three patients had primary, solitary, supratentorial meningiomas with PTBE. In these, correlations in PTBE, edema index, VEGF-A protein, VEGF gene expression, capillary length, and tumor water content were investigated. DNA-branched hybridization was used for measuring VEGF gene expression...... in tissue homogenates prepared from frozen tissue samples. The method for VEGF-A analysis resembled an ELISA assay, but was based on chemiluminescence. The edema index was positively correlated to VEGF-A protein (p = 0.014) and VEGF gene expression (p

  9. The Physiochemistry of Capped Nanosilver Predicts Its Biological Activity in Rat Brain Endothelial Cells (REBEC4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The “capping” or coating of nanosilver (nanoAg) extends its potency by limiting its oxidation and aggregation and stabilizing its size and shape. The ability of such coated nanoAg to alter the permeability and activate oxidative stress pathways in rat brain endothelia...

  10. Sphingosine 1 Phosphate at the Blood Brain Barrier: Can the Modulation of S1P Receptor 1 Influence the Response of Endothelial Cells and Astrocytes to Inflammatory Stimuli?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona F Spampinato

    Full Text Available The ability of the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB to maintain proper barrier functions, keeping an optimal environment for central nervous system (CNS activity and regulating leukocytes' access, can be affected in CNS diseases. Endothelial cells and astrocytes are the principal BBB cellular constituents and their interaction is essential to maintain its function. Both endothelial cells and astrocytes express the receptors for the bioactive sphingolipid S1P. Fingolimod, an immune modulatory drug whose structure is similar to S1P, has been approved for treatment in multiple sclerosis (MS: fingolimod reduces the rate of MS relapses by preventing leukocyte egress from the lymph nodes. Here, we examined the ability of S1P and fingolimod to act on the BBB, using an in vitro co-culture model that allowed us to investigate the effects of S1P on endothelial cells, astrocytes, and interactions between the two. Acting selectively on endothelial cells, S1P receptor signaling reduced cell death induced by inflammatory cytokines. When acting on astrocytes, fingolimod treatment induced the release of a factor, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF that reduced the effects of cytokines on endothelium. In an in vitro BBB model incorporating shear stress, S1P receptor modulation reduced leukocyte migration across the endothelial barrier, indicating a novel mechanism that might contribute to fingolimod efficacy in MS treatment.

  11. Long noncoding RNA-MEG3 is involved in diabetes mellitus-related microvascular dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Gui-Zhen [Department of Health, Linyi People' s Hospital, Shandong University, Shandong (China); Tian, Wei [Department of Nursing, Linyi Oncosurgical Hospital, Shandong (China); Fu, Hai-Tao [Department of Ophthalmology, Linyi People' s Hospital, Shandong University, Shandong (China); Li, Chao-Peng, E-mail: lcpcn@163.com [Eye Institute of Xuzhou, Jiangsu (China); Liu, Ban, E-mail: liuban@126.com [Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Tenth People' s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China)

    2016-02-26

    Microvascular dysfunction is an important characteristic of diabetic retinopathy. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in diverse biological processes. In this study, we investigated the role of lncRNA-MEG3 in diabetes-related microvascular dysfunction. We show that MEG3 expression level is significantly down-regulated in the retinas of STZ-induced diabetic mice, and endothelial cells upon high glucose and oxidative stress. MEG3 knockdown aggravates retinal vessel dysfunction in vivo, as shown by serious capillary degeneration, and increased microvascular leakage and inflammation. MEG3 knockdown also regulates retinal endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in vitro. The role of MEG3 in endothelial cell function is mainly mediated by the activation of PI3k/Akt signaling. MEG3 up-regulation may serve as a therapeutic strategy for treating diabetes-related microvascular complications. - Highlights: • LncRNA-MEG3 level is down-regulated upon diabetic stress. • MEG3 knockdown aggravates retinal vascular dysfunction in vivo. • MEG3 regulates retinal endothelial cell function in vitro. • MEG3 regulates endothelial cell function through PI3k/Akt signaling.

  12. Brain perfusion in sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Scolletta, Sabino; Franchi, Federico; Donadello, Katia; Oddo, Mauro

    2013-03-01

    Brain dysfunction is a frequent complication of sepsis, usually defined as "sepsis-associated encephalopathy" (SAE). Its pathophysiology is complex and related to numerous processes and pathways, while the exact mechanisms producing neurological impairment in septic patients remain incompletely elucidated. Alterations of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) may represent a key component for the development of SAE. Reduction of CBF may be caused by cerebral vasoconstriction, either induced by inflammation or hypocapnia. Endothelial dysfunction associated with sepsis leads to impairment of microcirculation and cerebral metabolic uncoupling that may further reduce brain perfusion so that CBF becomes inadequate to satisfy brain cellular needs. The natural autoregulatory mechanisms that protect the brain from reduced/ inadequate CBF can be impaired in septic patients, especially in those with shock or delirium, and this further contributes to cerebral ischemia if blood pressure drops below critical thresholds. Sedative agents alter cerebro-vascular reactivity and may significantly reduce CBF. Although disorders of brain perfusion and alteration of CBF and cerebral autoregulation are frequently observed in humans with sepsis, their exact role in the pathogenesis of SAE remains unknown. Brain perfusion can further become inadequate due to cerebral microcirculatory dysfunction, as evidenced in the experimental setting. Microvascular alterations can be implicated in the development of electrophysiological abnormalities observed during sepsis and contribute to neurological alterations in septic animals. The aim of this review is to provide an update on the pathophysiology of brain perfusion in sepsis, with a particular focus on human clinical investigation and novel tools for CBF monitoring in septic patients.

  13. Role of astrocytic leptin receptor subtypes on leptin permeation across hCMEC/D3 human brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsuchou, Hung; Kastin, Abba J; Tu, Hong; Joan Abbott, N; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Pan, Weihong

    2010-12-01

    Astrocytic leptin receptors (ObR) can be up-regulated in conditions such as adult-onset obesity. To determine whether the levels and subtypes of astrocytic ObR modulate leptin transport, we co-cultured hCMEC/D3 human brain endothelial cells and C6 astrocytoma cells in the Transwell system, and tested leptin permeation from apical to basolateral chambers. In comparison with hCMEC alone, co-culture of C6 cells reduced the permeability of paracellular markers and leptin. Unexpectedly, ObRb over-expression in C6 cells increased leptin permeation whereas ObRa over-expression showed no effect when compared with the control group of pcDNA-transfected C6 cells. By contrast, the paracellular permeability to the sodium fluorescein control was unchanged by over-expression of ObR subtypes. Leptin remained intact after crossing the monolayer as shown by HPLC and acid precipitation, and this was not affected by C6 cell co-culture or the over-expression of different ObR subtypes. Thus, increased expression of ObRb (and to a lesser extent ObRe) in C6 cells specifically increased the permeation of leptin across the hCMEC monolayer. Consistent with the evidence that the most apparent regulatory changes of ObR during obesity and inflammation occur in astrocytes, the results indicate that astrocytes actively regulate leptin transport across the blood-brain barrier, a mechanism independent of reduction of paracellular permeability. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2010 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  14. Effect of resistance training on microvascular density and eNOS content in skeletal muscle of sedentary men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocks, Matthew; Shaw, Christopher S; Shepherd, Sam O; Fisher, James P; Ranasinghe, Aaron M; Barker, Thomas A; Tipton, Kevin D; Wagenmakers, Anton J M

    2014-11-01

    The effects of RT on muscle mass, strength, and insulin sensitivity are well established, but the underlying mechanisms are only partially understood. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether RT induces changes in endothelial enzymes of the muscle microvasculature, which would increase NO bioavailability and could contribute to improved insulin sensitivity. Eight previously sedentary males (age 20 ± 0.4 years, BMI 24.5 ± 0.9 kg/m(2) ) completed six weeks of RT 3x/week. Muscle biopsies were taken from the m. vastus lateralis and microvascular density; and endothelial-specific eNOS content, eNOS Ser(1177) phosphorylation, and NOX2 content were assessed pre- and post-RT using quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy. Whole-body insulin sensitivity (measured as Matsuda Index), microvascular Kf (functional measure of the total available endothelial surface area), and arterial stiffness (AIx, central, and pPWV) were also measured. Measures of microvascular density, microvascular Kf , microvascular eNOS content, basal eNOS phosphorylation, and endothelial NOX2 content did not change from pre-RT to post-RT. RT increased insulin sensitivity (p < 0.05) and reduced resting blood pressure and AIx (p < 0.05), but did not change central or pPWV. RT did not change any measure of muscle microvascular structure or function. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Protective Effects of Inducible HO-1 on Oxygen Toxicity in Rat Brain Endothelial Microvessel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Jun Yoo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundReperfusion in ischemia is believed to generate cytotoxic oxidative stress, which mediates reperfusion injury. These stress conditions can initiate lipid peroxidation and damage to proteins, as well as promote DNA strand breaks. As biliverdin and bilirubin produced by heme oxygenase isoform 1 (HO-1 have antioxidant properties, the production of both antioxidants by HO-1 may help increase the resistance of the ischemic brain to oxidative stress. In the present study, the survival effect of HO-1 was confirmed using hemin.MethodsTo confirm the roles of HO-1, carbon monoxide, and cyclic guanosine monophosphate further in the antioxidant effect of HO-1 and bilirubin, cells were treated with cycloheximide, desferoxamine, and zinc deuteroporphyrin IX 2,4 bis glycol, respectively.ResultsHO-1 itself acted as an antioxidant. Furthermore, iron, rather than carbon monoxide, was involved in the HO-1-mediated survival effect. HO-1 activity was also important in providing bilirubin as an antioxidant.ConclusionOur results suggested that HO-1 helped to increase the resistance of the ischemic brain to oxidative stress.

  16. Endotoxin-activated microglia injure brain derived endothelial cells via NF-κB, JAK-STAT and JNK stress kinase pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yenari Midori A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously showed that microglia damage blood brain barrier (BBB components following ischemic brain insults, but the underlying mechanism(s is/are not well known. Recent work has established the contribution of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 activation to several brain pathologies including ischemia, neurodegeneration and sepsis. The present study established the requirement of microglia for lipopolysaccharide (LPS mediated endothelial cell death, and explored pathways involved in this toxicity. LPS is a classic TLR4 agonist, and is used here to model aspects of brain conditions where TLR4 stimulation occurs. Methods/Results In monocultures, LPS induced death in microglia, but not brain derived endothelial cells (EC. However, LPS increased EC death when cocultured with microglia. LPS led to nitric oxide (NO and inducible NO synthase (iNOS induction in microglia, but not in EC. Inhibiting microglial activation by blocking iNOS and other generators of NO or blocking reactive oxygen species (ROS also prevented injury in these cocultures. To assess the signaling pathway(s involved, inhibitors of several downstream TLR-4 activated pathways were studied. Inhibitors of NF-κB, JAK-STAT and JNK/SAPK decreased microglial activation and prevented cell death, although the effect of blocking JNK/SAPK was rather modest. Inhibitors of PI3K, ERK, and p38 MAPK had no effect. Conclusions We show that LPS-activated microglia promote BBB disruption through injury to endothelial cells, and the specific blockade of JAK-STAT, NF-κB may prove to be especially useful anti-inflammatory strategies to confer cerebrovascular protection.

  17. Endotoxin-activated microglia injure brain derived endothelial cells via NF-κB, JAK-STAT and JNK stress kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacimi, Rachid; Giffard, Rona G; Yenari, Midori A

    2011-03-07

    We previously showed that microglia damage blood brain barrier (BBB) components following ischemic brain insults, but the underlying mechanism(s) is/are not well known. Recent work has established the contribution of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation to several brain pathologies including ischemia, neurodegeneration and sepsis. The present study established the requirement of microglia for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediated endothelial cell death, and explored pathways involved in this toxicity. LPS is a classic TLR4 agonist, and is used here to model aspects of brain conditions where TLR4 stimulation occurs. In monocultures, LPS induced death in microglia, but not brain derived endothelial cells (EC). However, LPS increased EC death when cocultured with microglia. LPS led to nitric oxide (NO) and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) induction in microglia, but not in EC. Inhibiting microglial activation by blocking iNOS and other generators of NO or blocking reactive oxygen species (ROS) also prevented injury in these cocultures. To assess the signaling pathway(s) involved, inhibitors of several downstream TLR-4 activated pathways were studied. Inhibitors of NF-κB, JAK-STAT and JNK/SAPK decreased microglial activation and prevented cell death, although the effect of blocking JNK/SAPK was rather modest. Inhibitors of PI3K, ERK, and p38 MAPK had no effect. We show that LPS-activated microglia promote BBB disruption through injury to endothelial cells, and the specific blockade of JAK-STAT, NF-κB may prove to be especially useful anti-inflammatory strategies to confer cerebrovascular protection.

  18. Regulation of store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry activity by cell cycle dependent up-regulation of Orai2 in brain capillary endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kito, Hiroaki [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Pharmacology, Division of Pathological Sciences, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Kyoto (Japan); Yamamura, Hisao; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Yamamura, Hideto [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Ohya, Susumu [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Pharmacology, Division of Pathological Sciences, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Kyoto (Japan); Asai, Kiyofumi [Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Imaizumi, Yuji, E-mail: yimaizum@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan)

    2015-04-10

    Store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE) via Orai1 and STIM1 complex is supposed to have obligatory roles in the regulation of cellular functions of vascular endothelial cells, while little is known about the contribution of Orai2. Quantitative PCR and Western blot analyses indicated the expression of Orai2 and STIM2, in addition to Orai1 and STIM1 in bovine brain capillary endothelial cell line, t-BBEC117. During the exponential growth of t-BBEC117, the knockdown of Orai1 and STIM1 significantly reduced the SOCE activity, whereas Orai2 and STIM2 siRNAs had no effect. To examine whether endogenous SOCE activity contributes to the regulation of cell cycle progression, t-BBEC117 were synchronized using double thymidine blockage. At the G2/M phase, Ca{sup 2+} influx via SOCE was decreased and Orai2 expression was increased compared to the G0/G1 phase. When Orai2 was knocked down at the G2/M phase, the decrease in SOCE was removed, and cell proliferation was partly attenuated. Taken together, Orai1 significantly contributes to cell proliferation via the functional expression, which is presumably independent of the cell cycle phases. In construct, Orai2 is specifically up-regulated during the G2/M phase, negatively modulates the SOCE activity, and may contribute to the regulation of cell cycle progression in brain capillary endothelial cells. - Highlights: • Orai1 is essential for SOCE activity in brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs). • Cell cycle independent expression of Orai1 regulated SOCE and cell proliferation. • Orai2 was up-regulated only at G2/M phase and this consequently reduced SOCE. • Orai2 as well as Orai1 is a key player controlling SOCE and proliferation in BCECs.

  19. Lack of relationship between microvascular and macrovascular disease in heart transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Qaoud, Mohamed S; Stoletniy, Liset N; Chen, David; Kerstetter, Justin; Kuhn, Michael; Pai, Ramdas G

    2012-11-15

    A key determinant of long-term survival in heart transplant recipients is the development of coronary vasculopathy. Both coronary macrovascular and microvascular disease are prognostically important. However, the relationship between these in transplant patients and the determinants of microvascular disease are not known. We reviewed the simultaneously obtained endomyocardial biopsies and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images of coronary arteries in 33 heart transplant recipients. Coronary microvascular disease was classified by light microscopy into four grades based on thickening of endothelial cell layer and stenotic versus nonstenotic medial wall thickening. Macrovascular disease was evaluated from IVUS studies and assigned into one of five grades based on the Stanford classification. Coronary microvascular and macrovascular diseases were compared. Age at transplantation was 26 (18) years; 67% were men, and the average time to posttransplantation study was 4 years. Endomyocardial biopsy revealed more advanced grade C and D microvascular disease in 45% and 36% of the patients, respectively. However, IVUS analysis for macrovascular disease revealed mostly lesser changes with grade 1 in 12%, grade 2 in 61%, and grade 3 in 21%. There was no significant correlation between grades of microvascular and macrovascular disease (P=0.10). Microvascular disease correlated positively with donor age (P=0.06) and treatment with tacrolimus (0=0.02) and statins (P=0.05). There is a poor relationship between coronary microvascular and macrovascular disease in patients with cardiac transplants, likely indicating divergent pathogenetic mechanisms. Microvascular disease increases with donor age. There is an intriguing positive relationship between microvascular disease and treatment with statins and tacrolimus.

  20. Microvascular alterations in transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khairoun, Meriem

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial injury and repair are most important concepts for our understanding of renal disease and allograft injury. The concept that injury to the endothelium may precede renal fibrosis strongly suggests that interventions to maintain vascular integrity are of major importance for renal function.

  1. Intercellular Interactomics of Human Brain Endothelial Cells and Th17 Lymphocytes: A Novel Strategy for Identifying Therapeutic Targets of CNS Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsalan S. Haqqani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukocyte infiltration across an activated brain endothelium contributes to the neuroinflammation seen in many neurological disorders. Recent evidence shows that IL-17-producing T-lymphocytes (e.g., Th17 cells possess brain-homing capability and contribute to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and cerebral ischemia. The leukocyte transmigration across the endothelium is a highly regulated, multistep process involving intercellular communications and interactions between the leukocytes and endothelial cells. The molecules involved in the process are attractive therapeutic targets for inhibiting leukocyte brain migration. We hypothesized and have been successful in demonstrating that molecules of potential therapeutic significance involved in Th17-brain endothelial cell (BEC communications and interactions can be discovered through the combination of advanced membrane/submembrane proteomic and interactomic methods. We describe elements of this strategy and preliminary results obtained in method and approach development. The Th17-BEC interaction network provides new insights into the complexity of the transmigration process mediated by well-organized, subcellularly localized molecular interactions. These molecules and interactions are potential diagnostic, therapeutic, or theranostic targets for treatment of neurological conditions accompanied or caused by leukocyte infiltration.

  2. Characterisation of extracellular vesicle-subsets derived from brain endothelial cells and analysis of their protein cargo modulation after TNF exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozio, Vito; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the composition and functional differences between extracellular vesicle (EV) subsets, such as microvesicles (MVs) and exosomes (EXOs), nor to what extent their cargo reflects the phenotypic state of the cell of origin. Brain endothelial cells are the constitutive part of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a selective barrier that maintains brain homeostasis. BBB impairment is associated with several neuroinflammatory diseases with the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF) often playing a key role. In the present study, shotgun proteomics and parallel reaction monitoring (PRM)-based targeted mass spectrometry were used to characterise brain endothelial cell-released EVs, and to study how TNF exposure modulated EV protein cargoes. MVs were found to be enriched in mitochondrial and cytoskeletal proteins, whereas EXOs were enriched in adhesion, histone and ribosomal proteins. After stimulation with TNF, several proteins involved in TNF and NF-κB signalling pathways, that were found to be differentially expressed in cells, were also differentially expressed in both MVs and EXOs. Thus, our results revealed some novel proteins as potentially useful candidates for discriminating between MVs and EXOs, together with additional evidence that cells "package" proteins in EVs systematically and according to their phenotypic state.

  3. Vascular islands during microvascular regression and regrowth in adult networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Rose Kelly-Goss

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Angiogenesis is the growth of new vessels from pre-existing vessels and commonly associated with two modes: capillary sprouting and capillary splitting. Our previous work suggests vascular island incorporation might be another endothelial cell dynamic involved in microvascular remodeling. Vascular islands are defined as endothelial cell segments disconnected from nearby networks, and their origin remains unclear. The objective of this study was to determine whether vascular islands associated with microvascular regression are involved in network regrowth.Methods: Mesenteric tissues were harvested from adult male Wistar rats according to the experimental groups: unstimulated, post stimulation (10 and 70 days, and 70 days post stimulation + restimulation (3 and 10 days. Stimulation was induced by mast cell degranulation via intraperitoneal injections of compound 48/80. Tissues were immunolabeled for PECAM (endothelial cells, NG2 (pericytes, collagen IV (basement membrane, and BrdU (proliferation.Results: Vascular area per tissue area and length density increased by day 10 post stimulation compared to the unstimulated group. At day 70, vascular area and length density were then decreased, indicating vascular regression compared to day 10. The number of vascular islands at day 10 post stimulation was dramatically reduced compared to the unstimulated group. During regression at day 70, the number of islands increased. The disconnected endothelial cells were commonly bridged to surrounding networks by collagen IV labeling. NG2-positive pericytes were observed along both the islands and the collagen IV tracks. At 3 days post restimulation, vascular islands contained BrdU-positive cells. By day 10 post restimulation, the number of vascular islands was dramatically reduced.Conclusion: The results suggest that vascular islands originating during microvascular regression are capable of proliferation and incorporation into nearby networks during

  4. Cell proliferation along vascular islands during microvascular network growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly-Goss Molly R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Observations in our laboratory provide evidence of vascular islands, defined as disconnected endothelial cell segments, in the adult microcirculation. The objective of this study was to determine if vascular islands are involved in angiogenesis during microvascular network growth. Results Mesenteric tissues, which allow visualization of entire microvascular networks at a single cell level, were harvested from unstimulated adult male Wistar rats and Wistar rats 3 and 10 days post angiogenesis stimulation by mast cell degranulation with compound 48/80. Tissues were immunolabeled for PECAM and BRDU. Identification of vessel lumens via injection of FITC-dextran confirmed that endothelial cell segments were disconnected from nearby patent networks. Stimulated networks displayed increases in vascular area, length density, and capillary sprouting. On day 3, the percentage of islands with at least one BRDU-positive cell increased compared to the unstimulated level and was equal to the percentage of capillary sprouts with at least one BRDU-positive cell. At day 10, the number of vascular islands per vascular area dramatically decreased compared to unstimulated and day 3 levels. Conclusions These results show that vascular islands have the ability to proliferate and suggest that they are able to incorporate into the microcirculation during the initial stages of microvascular network growth.

  5. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of ICAM-1 through modulation of toll-like receptor-4 signaling in brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Sun Mi; Park, Tae Yeop; Park, Hye-Si; Baik, Eun Joo; Lee, Soo Hwan

    2015-05-01

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) is a glycolytic intermediate with salutary effects in various brain injury models, but its neuroprotective mechanism is incompletely understood. In this study, we examined the effects of FBP on the expression of adhesion molecules in cerebrovascular endothelial cells and explored the possible mechanisms therein involved. FBP significantly down-regulated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of adhesion molecules and leukocyte adhesion to brain endothelial cells and inhibited NF-κB activity, which is implicated in the expression of adhesion molecules. FBP abrogated ICAM-1 expression and NF-κB activation induced by macrophage-activating lipopeptide 2-kDa (MALP-2) or overexpression of MyD88 or TRAF6. FBP suppressed TRAF6-induced phosphorylation of TAK1, IKKβ and IκBα, but fail to affect NF-κB activity induced by ectopic expression of IKKβ. In addition, LPS-induced IRAK-1 phosphorylation was inhibited by FBP, suggesting the presence of multiple molecular targets of FBP in MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. FBP significantly attenuated ICAM-1 expression and NF-κB activity induced by poly[I:C] or overexpression of TRIF or TBK1. FBP significantly repressed the expression of interferon-β (IFN-β) and the activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) induced by LPS, poly[I:C] or overexpression of TRIF or TBK1, but fail to affect IRF3 activity induced by ectopic expression of constitutively active IRF3. Overall, our results demonstrate that FBP modulates both MyD88- and TRIF-dependent signaling pathways of TLR4 and subsequent inflammatory responses in brain endothelial cells, providing insight into its neuroprotective mechanism in brain injury associated with inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor increases vascular endothelial growth factor expression and enhances angiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Yang; Hung, Shih-Ya; Chen, Hsien-Te; Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Fong, Yi-Chin; Wang, Shih-Wei; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2014-10-15

    Chondrosarcomas are a type of primary malignant bone cancer, with a potent capacity for local invasion and distant metastasis. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is commonly upregulated during neurogenesis. The aim of the present study was to examine the mechanism involved in BDNF-mediated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and angiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma cells. Here, we knocked down BDNF expression in chondrosarcoma cells and assessed their capacity to control VEGF expression and angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. We found knockdown of BDNF decreased VEGF expression and abolished chondrosarcoma conditional medium-mediated angiogenesis in vitro as well as angiogenesis effects in vivo in the chick chorioallantoic membrane and Matrigel plug nude mouse models. In addition, in the xenograft tumor angiogenesis model, the knockdown of BDNF significantly reduced tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis. BDNF increased VEGF expression and angiogenesis through the TrkB receptor, PLCγ, PKCα, and the HIF-1α signaling pathway. Finally, we analyzed samples from chondrosarcoma patients by immunohistochemical staining. The expression of BDNF and VEGF protein in 56 chondrosarcoma patients was significantly higher than in normal cartilage. In addition, the high level of BDNF expression correlated strongly with VEGF expression and tumor stage. Taken together, our results indicate that BDNF increases VEGF expression and enhances angiogenesis through a signal transduction pathway that involves the TrkB receptor, PLCγ, PKCα, and the HIF-1α. Therefore, BDNF may represent a novel target for anti-angiogenic therapy for human chondrosarcoma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Initial contact of glioblastoma cells with existing normal brain endothelial cells strengthen the barrier function via fibroblast growth factor 2 secretion: a new in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Keisuke; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Nakagawa, Shinsuke; Thuy, Dinh Ha Duy; Ujifuku, Kenta; Kamada, Kensaku; Hayashi, Kentaro; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Niwa, Masami

    2013-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells invade along the existing normal capillaries in brain. Normal capillary endothelial cells function as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that limits permeability of chemicals into the brain. To investigate whether GBM cells modulate the BBB function of normal endothelial cells, we developed a new in vitro BBB model with primary cultures of rat brain endothelial cells (RBECs), pericytes, and astrocytes. Cells were plated on a membrane with 8 μm pores, either as a monolayer or as a BBB model with triple layer culture. The BBB model consisted of RBEC on the luminal side as a bottom, and pericytes and astrocytes on the abluminal side as a top of the chamber. Human GBM cell line, LN-18 cells, or lung cancer cell line, NCI-H1299 cells, placed on either the RBEC monolayer or the BBB model increased the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) values against the model, which peaked within 72 h after the tumor cell application. The TEER value gradually returned to baseline with LN-18 cells, whereas the value quickly dropped to the baseline in 24 h with NCI-H1299 cells. NCI-H1299 cells invaded into the RBEC layer through the membrane, but LN-18 cells did not. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) strengthens the endothelial cell BBB function by increased occludin and ZO-1 expression. In our model, LN-18 and NCI-H1299 cells secreted FGF-2, and a neutralization antibody to FGF-2 inhibited LN-18 cells enhanced BBB function. These results suggest that FGF-2 would be a novel therapeutic target for GBM in the perivascular invasive front.

  8. Strategies to reverse endothelial dysfunction in diabetic nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Badal, Shawn S.; Danesh, Farhad R.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction underlies the basic pathophysiology of microvascular complications of diabetes. Endothelial dysfunction is associated with impaired nitric oxide (NO) availability. Since NO production is tightly regulated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), several therapeutic strategies have been investigated and proposed to improve eNOS bioavailability in the vasculature. The findings of Cheng et al. suggest that increased availability of eNOS may be an effective strategy in...

  9. Unpredictable Chronic Mild Stress Paradigm Established Effects of Pro- and Anti-inflammatory Cytokine on Neurodegeneration-Linked Depressive States in Hamsters with Brain Endothelial Damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avolio, Ennio; Fazzari, Gilda; Mele, Maria; Alò, Raffaella; Zizza, Merylin; Jiao, Wei; Di Vito, Anna; Barni, Tullio; Mandalà, Maurizio; Canonaco, Marcello

    2017-10-01

    The mechanisms by which inflammation affects the different emotional moods are only partially known. Previous works have pointed to stress hormones like glucocorticoids plus the vascular factor endothelin-1 as key factors evoking stressful states especially in relation to endothelial dysfunctions. With this work, it was our intention to establish the role of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine expression variations towards depression-like behaviors and consequently the development of neurodegeneration events caused by endothelial damages in the hamster (Mesocricetus auratus). Such a rodent, which is considered a valuable animal model to test depression and anxiety states, exhibited a variety of depression-like behaviors including reduction in sucrose consumption, locomotion, and exploration (p < 0.01) following exposure to unpredictable chronic mild stress. Contextually, a tight correlation between unpredictable chronic mild stress-induced depressive states and expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines was detected as shown by marked expression levels (p < 0.01) of IL-1β and NF-kB in the hippocampus, amygdala, and prefrontal cortex. Even the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 supplied notably significant (p < 0.001) expression levels in the same areas of resilient hamsters. Application of hemodynamic and endothelial functional studies pointed to altered arterial endothelial activities in depressed with respect to resilient animals. Moreover, evident damaged neuronal fields in the above areas of depressed hamsters allowed us to correlate such a behavioral phenomenon to the upregulation of IL-1β and NF-κB. Overall, the differing roles of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines on depressive states, especially in view of brain endothelial damages, may provide novel therapeutic measures against mood disorders linked to neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Protective effects of quercetin on rat pial microvascular changes during transient bilateral common carotid artery occlusion and reperfusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominga eLapi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the in vivo effects of quercetin on pial microvascular responses during transient bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO and reperfusion. Rat pial microcirculation was visualized by fluorescence microscopy through a closed cranial window. Pial arterioles were classified in five orders of branchings. Capillaries were assigned order 0, the smallest arterioles order 1 and the largest ones order 5. In ischemic rats, 30 min BCCAO and 60 min reperfusion caused arteriolar diameter decrease (by 14.5 ± 3.3% of baseline in order 2, microvascular leakage (0.47 ± 0.04 NGL: Normalized Grey Levels, leukocyte adhesion in venules (9 ± 2/100 µm venular length, v.l./30s and reduction of capillary perfusion (by 40 ± 7% of baseline. Moreover, at the end of BCCAO and reperfusion there was a significant increase in reactive oxygen species formation (ROS when compared with baseline. Quercetin highest dose determined dilation in all arteriolar orders (by 40 ± 4 % of baseline in order 2 and prevented microvascular permeability (0.15 ± 0.02 NGL, leukocyte adhesion (3 ± 1/100 µm v.l./30s as well as ROS formation, while capillary perfusion was protected. Inhibition of endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS prior to quercetin reduced arteriolar dilation (order 2 diameter increase by 10.3 ± 2.5% of baseline and caused permeability increase (0.29 ± 0.03 NGL; inhibition of neuronal NOS or inducible NOS did not affect quercetin-induced effects. Inhibition of guanylyl cyclase prior to quercetin reversed the quercetin’s effects on pial arteriolar diameter and leakage. In conclusion, quercetin was able to protect pial microcirculation from ischemia-reperfusion damage inducing arteriolar dilation likely by nitric oxide release. Moreover, quercetin scavenger activity blunted reactive oxygen species formation preserving the blood-brain barrier integrity.

  11. Leukocyte recruitment and ischemic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Gokhan; Granger, D Neil

    2010-06-01

    Leukocytes are recruited into the cerebral microcirculation following an ischemic insult. The leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion manifested within a few hours after ischemia (followed by reperfusion, I/R) largely reflects an infiltration of neutrophils, while other leukocyte populations appear to dominate the adhesive interactions with the vessel wall at 24 h of reperfusion. The influx of rolling and adherent leukocytes is accompanied by the recruitment of adherent platelets, which likely enhances the cytotoxic potential of the leukocytes to which they are attached. The recruitment of leukocytes and platelets in the postischemic brain is mediated by specific adhesion glycoproteins expressed by the activated blood cells and on cerebral microvascular endothelial cells. This process is also modulated by different signaling pathways (e.g., CD40/CD40L, Notch) and cytokines (e.g., RANTES) that are activated/released following I/R. Some of the known risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including hypercholesterolemia and obesity appear to exacerbate the leukocyte and platelet recruitment elicited by brain I/R. Although lymphocyte-endothelial cell and -platelet interactions in the postischemic cerebral microcirculation have not been evaluated to date, recent evidence in experimental animals implicate both CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes in the cerebral microvascular dysfunction, inflammation, and tissue injury associated with brain I/R. Evidence implicating regulatory T-cells as cerebroprotective modulators of the inflammatory and tissue injury responses to brain I/R support a continued focus on leukocytes as a target for therapeutic intervention in ischemic stroke.

  12. Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes (pRBC induce endothelial cell apoptosis via a heme-mediated signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu M

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mingli Liu, Carmen Dickinson-Copeland, Salifu Hassana, Jonathan K Stiles Department of Microbiology, Biochemistry and Immunology, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Heme is cytotoxic to the plasmodium parasite, which converts it to an insoluble crystalline form called hemozoin (malaria pigment in erythrocytes during replication. The increased serum levels of free heme cause tissue damage, activation of microvascular endothelial and glial cells, focal inflammation, activation of apoptotic pathways, and neuronal tissue damage. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain how these causative factors exacerbate fatal malaria. However, none of them fully explain the detailed mechanisms leading to the high morbidity and mortality associated with malaria. We have previously reported that heme-induced brain microvascular endothelial cell (HBVEC apoptosis is a major contributor to severe malaria pathogenesis. Here, we hypothesized that heme (at clinically relevant levels induces inflammation and apoptosis in HBVEC, a process that is mediated by independent proinflammatory and proapoptotic signaling pathways. In this study, we determined the key signaling molecules associated with heme-mediated apoptosis in HBVEC in vitro using RT2 profiler polymerase chain reaction array technology and confirmed results using immunostaining techniques. While several expressed genes in HBVEC were altered upon heme stimulation, we determined that the apoptotic effects of heme were mediated through p73 (tumor protein p73. The results provide an opportunity to target heme-mediated apoptosis therapeutically in malaria-infected individuals. Keywords: heme, endothelial cells, signaling pathways, cerebral malaria

  13. Characteristics of L-citrulline transport through blood-brain barrier in the brain capillary endothelial cell line (TR-BBB cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeong-Eun; Kang, Young-Sook

    2017-05-10

    L-Citrulline is a neutral amino acid and a major precursor of L-arginine in the nitric oxide (NO) cycle. Recently it has been reported that L-citrulline prevents neuronal cell death and protects cerebrovascular injury, therefore, L-citrulline may have a neuroprotective effect to improve cerebrovascular dysfunction. Therefore, we aimed to clarify the brain transport mechanism of L-citrulline through blood-brain barrier (BBB) using the conditionally immortalized rat brain capillary endothelial cell line (TR-BBB cells), as an in vitro model of the BBB. The uptake study of [14C] L-citrulline, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis, and rLAT1, system b0,+, and CAT1 small interfering RNA study were performed in TR-BBB cells. The uptake of [14C] L-citrulline was a time-dependent, but ion-independent manner in TR-BBB cells. The transport process involved two saturable components with a Michaelis-Menten constant of 30.9 ± 1.0 μM (Km1) and 1.69 ± 0.43 mM (Km2). The uptake of [14C] L-citrulline in TR-BBB cells was significantly inhibited by neutral and cationic amino acids, but not by anionic amino acids. In addition, [14C]L-citrulline uptake in the cells was markedly inhibited by 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH), which is the inhibitor of the large neutral amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1), B0, B0,+ and harmaline, the inhibitor of system b0,+. Gabapentin and L-dopa as the substrates of LAT1 competitively inhibited the uptake of [14C] L-citrulline. IC50 values for L-dopa, gabapentin, L-phenylalanine and L-arginine were 501 μM, 223 μM, 68.9 μM and 33.4 mM, respectively. The expression of mRNA for LAT1 was predominantly increased 187-fold in comparison with that of system b0,+ in TR-BBB cells. In the studies of LAT1, system b0,+ and CAT1 knockdown via siRNA transfection into TR-BBB cells, the transcript level of LAT1 and [14C] L-citrulline uptake by LAT1 siRNA were significantly reduced compared with those by

  14. Modelling the endothelial blood-CNS barriers: a method for the production of robust in vitro models of the rat blood-brain barrier and blood-spinal cord barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, P Marc D; Paterson, Judy C; Thom, George; Ginman, Ulrika; Lundquist, Stefan; Webster, Carl I

    2013-06-18

    Modelling the blood-CNS barriers of the brain and spinal cord in vitro continues to provide a considerable challenge for research studying the passage of large and small molecules in and out of the central nervous system, both within the context of basic biology and for pharmaceutical drug discovery. Although there has been considerable success over the previous two decades in establishing useful in vitro primary endothelial cell cultures from the blood-CNS barriers, no model fully mimics the high electrical resistance, low paracellular permeability and selective influx/efflux characteristics of the in vivo situation. Furthermore, such primary-derived cultures are typically labour-intensive and generate low yields of cells, limiting scope for experimental work. We thus aimed to establish protocols for the high yield isolation and culture of endothelial cells from both rat brain and spinal cord. Our aim was to optimise in vitro conditions for inducing phenotypic characteristics in these cells that were reminiscent of the in vivo situation, such that they developed into tight endothelial barriers suitable for performing investigative biology and permeability studies. Brain and spinal cord tissue was taken from the same rats and used to specifically isolate endothelial cells to reconstitute as in vitro blood-CNS barrier models. Isolated endothelial cells were cultured to expand the cellular yield and then passaged onto cell culture inserts for further investigation. Cell culture conditions were optimised using commercially available reagents and the resulting barrier-forming endothelial monolayers were characterised by functional permeability experiments and in vitro phenotyping by immunocytochemistry and western blotting. Using a combination of modified handling techniques and cell culture conditions, we have established and optimised a protocol for the in vitro culture of brain and, for the first time in rat, spinal cord endothelial cells. High yields of both CNS

  15. In inflammatory reactive astrocytes co-cultured with brain endothelial cells nicotine-evoked Ca(2+) transients are attenuated due to interleukin-1beta release and rearrangement of actin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbro, D; Westerlund, A; Björklund, U; Hansson, E

    2009-03-17

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether nicotine acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are expressed in a more pronounced way in astrocytes co-cultured with microvascular endothelial cells from adult rat brain, compared with monocultured astrocytes, as a sign of a more developed signal transduction system. Also investigated was whether nicotine plays a role in the control of neuroinflammatory reactivity in astrocytes. Ca(2+) imaging experiments were performed using cells loaded with the Ca(2+) indicator Fura-2/AM. Co-cultured astrocytes responded to lower concentrations of nicotine than did monocultured astrocytes, indicating that they are more sensitive to nicotine. Co-cultured astrocytes also expressed a higher selectivity for alpha7nAChR and alpha4/beta2 subunits and evoked higher Ca(2+) transients compared with monocultured astrocytes. The Ca(2+) transients referred to are activators of Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores, both IP(3) and ryanodine, triggered by influx through receptor channels. The nicotine-induced Ca(2+) transients were attenuated after incubation with the inflammatory mediator lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but were not attenuated after incubation with the pain-transmitting peptides substance P and calcitonin-gene-related peptide, nor with the infection and inflammation stress mediator, leptin. Furthermore, LPS-induced release of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was more pronounced in co-cultured versus monocultured astrocytes. Incubation with both LPS and IL-1beta further attenuated nicotine-induced Ca(2+) response. We also found that LPS and IL-1beta induced rearrangement of the F-actin filaments, as measured with an Alexa488-conjugated phalloidin probe. The rearrangements consisted of increases in ring formations and a more dispersed appearance of the filaments. These results indicate that there is a connection between a dysfunction of nicotine Ca(2+) signaling in

  16. Sex‐Specific Association of Obstructive Sleep Apnea With Retinal Microvascular Signs: The Multi‐Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lin, Gen‐Min; Redline, Susan; Klein, Ronald; Colangelo, Laura A; Cotch, Mary Frances; Wong, Tien Y; Klein, Barbara E. K; Patel, Sanjay R; Shea, Steven J; Liu, Kiang

    2016-01-01

    ... microvascular disease may be a potential mediator for the association between OSA and clinical CVD. However, current evidence for the association of OSA with microvascular disease is conflicting. Some brain imaging studies revealed inconsistent results for the association between OSA and cerebral small‐vessel disease. In additio...

  17. Methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) induce differential cytotoxic effects in bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Hernandez, Hector; Cuevas, Elvis; Lantz, Susan M; Rice, Kenner C; Gannon, Brenda M; Fantegrossi, William E; Gonzalez, Carmen; Paule, Merle G; Ali, Syed F

    2016-08-26

    Designer drugs such as synthetic psychostimulants are indicative of a worldwide problem of drug abuse and addiction. In addition to methamphetamine (METH), these drugs include 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA) and commercial preparations of synthetic cathinones including 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), typically referred to as "bath salts." These psychostimulants exert neurotoxic effects by altering monoamine systems in the brain. Additionally, METH and MDMA adversely affect the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB): there are no current reports on the effects of MDPV on the BBB. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of METH, MDMA and MDPV on bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells (bBMVECs), an accepted in vitro model of the BBB. Confluent bBMVEC monolayers were treated with METH, MDMA and MDPV (0.5mM-2.5mM) for 24h. METH and MDMA increased lactate dehydrogenase release only at the highest concentration (2.5mM), whereas MDPV induced cytotoxicity at all concentrations. MDMA and METH decreased cellular proliferation only at 2.5mM, with similar effects observed after MDPV exposures starting at 1mM. Only MDPV increased reactive oxygen species production at all concentrations tested whereas all 3 drugs increased nitric oxide production. Morphological analysis revealed different patterns of compound-induced cell damage. METH induced vacuole formation at 1mM and disruption of the monolayer at 2.5mM. MDMA induced disruption of the endothelial monolayer from 1mM without vacuolization. On the other hand, MDPV induced monolayer disruption at doses ≥0.5mM without vacuole formation; at 2.5mM, the few remaining cells lacked endothelial morphology. These data suggest that even though these synthetic psychostimulants alter monoaminergic systems, they each induce BBB toxicity by different mechanisms with MDPV being the most toxic. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Malvidin’s Effects on Rat Pial Microvascular Permeability Changes Due to Hypoperfusion and Reperfusion Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapi, Dominga; Chiurazzi, Martina; Di Maro, Martina; Mastantuono, Teresa; Battiloro, Laura; Sabatino, Lina; Ricci, Serena; Di Carlo, Angelina; Starita, Noemy; Guida, Bruna; Santillo, Mariarosaria; Colantuoni, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the malvidin’s protective effects on damage induced by 30 min bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) and 60 min reperfusion (RE) in rat pial microcirculation. Rat pial microcirculation was observed using fluorescence microscopy through a closed cranial window. Western blotting analysis was performed to investigate the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), phosphorylated eNOS (p-eNOS) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) expression. Moreover, MMP-9 activity was evaluated by zymography. Finally, neuronal damage and radical oxygen species (ROS) formation were assessed. In all animals, pial arterioles were classified in five orders of branching according to Strahler’s method. In hypoperfused rats, 30 min BCCAO and 60 min RE caused a decrease in arteriolar diameter, an increase in microvascular leakage and leukocyte adhesion, accompanied by decreased capillary perfusion and red blood cell velocity (VRBC). Moreover, marked neuronal damage and evident ROS generation were detected. Conversely, malvidin administration induced arteriolar dilation in dose-related manner, reducing microvascular leakage as well as leukocyte adhesion. Capillary perfusion and VRBC were protected. Nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibition significantly attenuated malvidin’s effects on arteriolar diameter. Western blotting analysis revealed an increase in eNOS and p-eNOS expression, while zymography indicated a decrease in MMP-9 activity after malvidin’s administration. Furthermore, malvidin was able to prevent neuronal damage and to decrease ROS generation. In conclusion, malvidin protects rat pial microcirculation against BCCAO/RE injury, preventing blood-brain impairment and neuronal loss. Malvidin’s effects appear to be mediated by eNOS activation and scavenger activity. PMID:27445688

  19. Malvidin's Effects on Rat Pial Microvascular Permeability Changes Due to Hypoperfusion and Reperfusion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapi, Dominga; Chiurazzi, Martina; Di Maro, Martina; Mastantuono, Teresa; Battiloro, Laura; Sabatino, Lina; Ricci, Serena; Di Carlo, Angelina; Starita, Noemy; Guida, Bruna; Santillo, Mariarosaria; Colantuoni, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the malvidin's protective effects on damage induced by 30 min bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) and 60 min reperfusion (RE) in rat pial microcirculation. Rat pial microcirculation was observed using fluorescence microscopy through a closed cranial window. Western blotting analysis was performed to investigate the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), phosphorylated eNOS (p-eNOS) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) expression. Moreover, MMP-9 activity was evaluated by zymography. Finally, neuronal damage and radical oxygen species (ROS) formation were assessed. In all animals, pial arterioles were classified in five orders of branching according to Strahler's method. In hypoperfused rats, 30 min BCCAO and 60 min RE caused a decrease in arteriolar diameter, an increase in microvascular leakage and leukocyte adhesion, accompanied by decreased capillary perfusion and red blood cell velocity (VRBC). Moreover, marked neuronal damage and evident ROS generation were detected. Conversely, malvidin administration induced arteriolar dilation in dose-related manner, reducing microvascular leakage as well as leukocyte adhesion. Capillary perfusion and VRBC were protected. Nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibition significantly attenuated malvidin's effects on arteriolar diameter. Western blotting analysis revealed an increase in eNOS and p-eNOS expression, while zymography indicated a decrease in MMP-9 activity after malvidin's administration. Furthermore, malvidin was able to prevent neuronal damage and to decrease ROS generation. In conclusion, malvidin protects rat pial microcirculation against BCCAO/RE injury, preventing blood-brain impairment and neuronal loss. Malvidin's effects appear to be mediated by eNOS activation and scavenger activity.

  20. Geometrical Complexity of Cortical Microvascularization in Moyamoya Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Katsuya; Mikami, Takeshi; Suzuki, Hime; Akiyama, Yukinori; Enatsu, Rei; Wanibuchi, Masahiko; Mikuni, Nobuhiro

    2017-10-01

    Dilatation of the microvascular diameter is recognized in moyamoya disease and referred to as microvascularization. The purpose of this study was to characterize the cortical microvascularization in moyamoya disease using imaging analysis, and to explore the developmental mechanism of the collateral network around the cortical surface. A total of 20 hemispheric sides of 14 patients with moyamoya disease were included in this study. From the intraoperative images, cortical surface images were extracted, and binary images were subsequently created. Then the ratio of the microvessels of the brain surface (vascular fraction; VF) and the box-counting fractal dimension (Db) values were calculated. The VF and Db values in the moyamoya disease group were then compared with those in atherosclerotic disease and nonischemic disease groups, and assessed in terms of clinical and radiologic factors. VF was significantly higher in the moyamoya disease group compared with the atherosclerotic disease group, and Db was significantly higher in the moyamoya disease group compared with the atherosclerotic disease and nonischemic disease groups. In the moyamoya disease group, VF showed a moderate correlation with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) score. Moreover, Db was significantly higher in the pediatric patients, in the presence of ischemic symptoms, and in the presence of ivy sign, and Db showed a moderate correlation with MRA score and cerebral blood flow in moyamoya disease. In the patients with moyamoya disease, the cortical microvascularization exhibited increased Db and dilatation of the pial arteries. In moyamoya disease, cortical microvascularization is associated with clinical and radiologic factors. This microvascularization might be a compensatory mechanism in the ischemic condition in moyamoya disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Microvascular Recruitment in Insulin Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøberg, Kim Anker

    In this PhD work a new method for measuring microvascular recruitment was developed and evaluated, using continues real-time imaging of contrast enhanced ultrasound. Gas-filled microbubbles were infused intravenously and by taking advantage of the echogenic properties of the microbubbles the reso......In this PhD work a new method for measuring microvascular recruitment was developed and evaluated, using continues real-time imaging of contrast enhanced ultrasound. Gas-filled microbubbles were infused intravenously and by taking advantage of the echogenic properties of the microbubbles...... the resonating sound from the microbubbles in the systemic circulation were recorded for determination of microvascular recruitment in designated muscle segments. Results showed that microvascular recruitment increased with insulin stimulation by ~30% in rats and ~40% in humans (study I). Furthermore...... hormone glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) in the microcirculation. Glucagon-like-peptide-1 analogs are drugs used for treatments of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes but the vascular effects of GLP-1 in vivo are elusive. Here it was shown that GLP-1 rapidly increased the microvascular recruitment...

  2. Retinal microvascular structure and function in patients with risk factors of atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fiadh, Ali H; Farouque, Omar; Kawasaki, Ryo; Nguyen, T T; Uddin, Nazim; Freeman, Melanie; Patel, Sheila K; Burrell, Louise M; Wong, Tien Y

    2014-04-01

    Retinal microvascular signs are markers of cardiovascular disease risk. There are limited data, on relationships between retinal microvascular signs and retinal microvascular endothelial function. We sought to determine the relationship of retinal vascular signs with retinal microvascular endothelial function in patients with or at high risk of coronary artery disease. Participants with atherosclerosis risk factors and coronary disease (n=258; mean age 57±11 years) were recruited to have static and dynamic retinal vascular assessment. Retinal arteriolar dilatation in response to flicker light (FI-RAD) was measured using the Digital Vessel Analyser and expressed as percentage increase over baseline diameter. Static retinal photographs were acquired utilising a digital fundus camera for measurement of central retinal artery and vein equivalent (CRAE and CRVE), arteriovenous nicking (AVN) and focal arteriolar narrowing (FAN). Intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.82 for flicker-light induced retinal arteriolar dilatation. There were modest associations in retinal vascular measurements between eyes. For each 10 μm decrease in retinal arteriolar diameter, the absolute increase in FI-RAD was 0.28% (95% CI 0.11, 0.45; p=0.002) independent of age, gender and atherosclerosis risk factors. AVN and FAN were associated with attenuated FI-RAD (β=-0.67%; 95% CI -1.20, -0.15; p=0.012) and (β=-0.83%; 95% CI -1.44, -0.23; p=0.007) respectively after adjustment for age and gender. Assessment of retinal microvascular endothelial function is reproducible and correlated with retinal microvascular structure and signs, independent of atherosclerosis risk factors. Assessment of retinal vascular structure and function may provide insights into atherosclerotic disease. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevalence of Coronary Microvascular Dysfunction Among Patients With Chest Pain and Nonobstructive Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara, Jaskanwal D; Widmer, R Jay; Matsuzawa, Yasushi; Lennon, Ryan J; Lerman, Lilach O; Lerman, Amir

    2015-09-01

    This study assessed the prevalence of coronary microvascular abnormalities in patients presenting with chest pain and nonobstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). Coronary microvascular abnormalities mediate ischemia and can lead to an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Using an intracoronary Doppler guidewire, endothelial-dependent microvascular function was examined by evaluating changes in coronary blood flow in response to acetylcholine, whereas endothelial-independent microvascular function was examined by evaluating changes in coronary flow velocity reserve in response to intracoronary adenosine. Patients were divided into 4 groups depending on whether they had a normal (+) or abnormal (-) coronary blood flow (CBF) in response to acetylcholine (Ach) and a normal (+) or abnormal (-) coronary flow velocity reserve (CFR) in response to adenosine (Adn): CBFAch+, CFRAdn+ (n = 520); CBFAch-, CFRAdn+ (n = 478); CBFAch+, CFRAdn- (n = 173); and CBFAch-, CFRAdn- (n = 268). Two-thirds of all patients had some sort of microvascular dysfunction. Women were more prevalent in each group (56% to 82%). Diabetes was uncommon in all groups (7% to 12%), whereas hypertension and hyperlipidemia were relatively more prevalent in each group, although rates for most conventional cardiovascular risk factors did not differ significantly between groups. There were no significant differences in the findings of noninvasive functional testing between groups. In a multivariable analysis, age was the only variable that independently predicted abnormal microvascular function. Patients with chest pain and nonobstructive CAD have a high prevalence of coronary microvascular abnormalities. These abnormalities correlate poorly with conventional cardiovascular risk factors and are dissociated from the findings of noninvasive functional testing. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Up-regulation of K{sub ir}2.1 by ER stress facilitates cell death of brain capillary endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kito, Hiroaki [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Yamazaki, Daiju [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Biological Chemistry, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Ohya, Susumu; Yamamura, Hisao [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Asai, Kiyofumi [Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Imaizumi, Yuji, E-mail: yimaizum@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We found that application of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress with tunicamycin to brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) induced cell death. {yields} The ER stress facilitated the expression of inward rectifier K{sup +} channel (K{sub ir}2.1) and induced sustained membrane hyperpolarization. {yields} The membrane hyperpolarization induced sustained Ca{sup 2+} entry through voltage-independent nonspecific cation channels and consequently facilitated cell death. {yields} The K{sub ir}2.1 up-regulation by ER stress is, at least in part, responsible for cell death of BCECs under pathological conditions. -- Abstract: Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) form blood brain barrier (BBB) to maintain brain homeostasis. Cell turnover of BCECs by the balance of cell proliferation and cell death is critical for maintaining the integrity of BBB. Here we found that stimuli with tunicamycin, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducer, up-regulated inward rectifier K{sup +} channel (K{sub ir}2.1) and facilitated cell death in t-BBEC117, a cell line derived from bovine BCECs. The activation of K{sub ir} channels contributed to the establishment of deeply negative resting membrane potential in t-BBEC117. The deep resting membrane potential increased the resting intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration due to Ca{sup 2+} influx through non-selective cation channels and thereby partly but significantly regulated cell death in t-BBEC117. The present results suggest that the up-regulation of K{sub ir}2.1 is, at least in part, responsible for cell death/cell turnover of BCECs induced by a variety of cellular stresses, particularly ER stress, under pathological conditions.

  5. Modified Continuous Loop Technique for microvascular anastomosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified method of continuous loop technique for microvascular anastomosis is described. The handling of loop is easier & even last suture is placed under vision. This makes the microvascular anastomosis easier and simpler.

  6. Infection of human endothelial cells by Japanese encephalitis virus: increased expression and release of soluble HLA-E.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shwetank

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV is a single stranded RNA virus that infects the central nervous system leading to acute encephalitis in children. Alterations in brain endothelial cells have been shown to precede the entry of this flavivirus into the brain, but infection of endothelial cells by JEV and their consequences are still unclear. Productive JEV infection was established in human endothelial cells leading to IFN-β and TNF-α production. The MHC genes for HLA-A, -B, -C and HLA-E antigens were upregulated in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, the endothelial-like cell line, ECV 304 and human foreskin fibroblasts upon JEV infection. We also report the release/shedding of soluble HLA-E (sHLA-E from JEV infected human endothelial cells for the first time. This shedding of sHLA-E was blocked by an inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP. In addition, MMP-9, a known mediator of HLA solubilisation was upregulated by JEV. In contrast, human fibroblasts showed only upregulation of cell-surface HLA-E. Addition of UV inactivated JEV-infected cell culture supernatants stimulated shedding of sHLA-E from uninfected ECV cells indicating a role for soluble factors/cytokines in the shedding process. Antibody mediated neutralization of TNF-α as well as IFNAR receptor together not only resulted in inhibition of sHLA-E shedding from uninfected cells, it also inhibited HLA-E and MMP-9 gene expression in JEV-infected cells. Shedding of sHLA-E was also observed with purified TNF-α and IFN-β as well as the dsRNA analog, poly (I:C. Both IFN-β and TNF-α further potentiated the shedding when added together. The role of soluble MHC antigens in JEV infection is hitherto unknown and therefore needs further investigation.

  7. Clock upregulates intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression and promotes mononuclear cells adhesion to endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yinghua; Meng, Dan; Sun, Ning; Zhu, Zhu; Zhao, Ran; Lu, Chao; Chen, Sifeng; Hua, Luchun; Qian, Ruizhe

    2014-01-10

    Clock is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor that plays important role in circadian rhythms of various physiological functions. Previous study showed that the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was reduced in the liver tissues of Clock mutant mice. However, how Clock regulates ICAM-1 expression and whether Clock affects cell adhesion function remain unknown. In the present study, we found that exogenous expression of Clock upregulated the gene expressions of ICAM-1 and other adhesion-related genes including VCAM1 and CCL-2, and increased the transcriptional activity of ICAM-1 in mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell lines. In contrast, loss of Clock decreased these gene expressions and ICAM-1 transcriptional activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay revealed that Clock binds to the E-box-like enhancer of ICAM-1 gene. ICAM-1 gene showed rhythmic expression in endothelial cells after serum shock in vitro, suggesting ICAM-1 may be a Clock-controlled gene. Clock regulates the adhesion of mononuclear cells to endothelial cells via ICAM-1. Together, our findings show that Clock is a positive regulator of ICAM-1, and promotes the adhesion of mononuclear cells to endothelial cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Targeting Cells With MR Imaging Probes: Cellular Interaction And Intracellular Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Uptake In Brain Capillary Endothelial and Choroidal Plexus Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambianica, I.; Bossi, M.; Gasco, P.; Gonzalez, W.; Idee, J. M.; Miserocchi, G.; Rigolio, R.; Chanana, M.; Morjan, I.; Wang, D.; Sancini, G.

    2010-10-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are considered for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications in brain including their use as contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. In delivery application, the critical step is the transport across cell layers and the internalization of NPs into specific cells, a process often limited by poor targeting specificity and low internalization efficiency. The development of the models of brain endothelial cells and choroidal plexus epithelial cells in culture has allowed us to investigate into these mechanisms. Our strategy is aimed at exploring different routes to the entrapment of iron oxide NPs in these brain related cells. Here we demonstrated that not only cells endowed with a good phagocytic activity like activated macrophages but also endothelial brain capillary and choroidal plexus epithelial cells do internalize iron oxide NPs. Our study of the intracellular trafficking of NPs by TEM, and confocal microscopy revealed that NPs are mainly internalized by the endocytic pathway. Iron oxide NPs were dispersed in water and coated with 3,4-dihydroxyl-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) using standard procedures. Magnetic lipid NPs were prepared by NANOVECTOR: water in oil in water (W/O/W) microemulsion process has been applied to directly coat different iron based NPs by lipid layer or to encapsulate them into Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs). By these coating/loading the colloidal stability was improved without strong alteration of the particle size distribution. Magnetic lipid NPs could be reconstituted after freeze drying without appreciable changes in stability. L-DOPA coated NPs are stable in PBS and in MEM (Modified Eagle Medium) medium. The magnetic properties of these NPs were not altered by the coating processes. We investigated the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and interaction of these NPs with rat brain capillary endothelial (REB4) and choroidal plexus epithelial (Z310) cells. By means of widefield, confocal

  9. Vascular endothelial growth factor blockade alters magnetic resonance imaging biomarkers of vascular function and decreases barrier permeability in a rat model of lung cancer brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishko, Gregory L; Muldoon, Leslie L; Pagel, Michael A; Schwartz, Daniel L; Neuwelt, Edward A

    2015-02-17

    Blockade of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to promote vascular normalization and inhibit angiogenesis has been proposed for the treatment of brain metastases; however, vascular normalization has not been well-characterized in this disease. We investigated the effect of treatment with bevacizumab anti-VEGF antibody on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) biomarkers of brain tumor vascular characteristics in comparison to small molecule delivery in a rat model of human lung cancer brain metastasis. Athymic rats with A549 human lung adenocarcinoma intracerebral xenografts underwent MRI at 11.75 T before and one day after treatment with bevacizumab (n = 8) or saline control (n = 8) to evaluate tumor volume, free water content (edema), blood volume and vascular permeability (Ktrans). One day later, permeability to 14C-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was measured in tumor and brain to assess the penetration of a small drug-like molecule. In saline control animals, tumor volume, edema and permeability increased over the two day assessment period. Compared to controls, bevacizumab treatment slowed the rate of tumor growth (P = 0.003) and blocked the increase in edema (P = 0.033), but did not alter tumor blood volume. Bevacizumab also significantly reduced Ktrans (P = 0.033) and AIB passive permeability in tumor (P = 0.04), but not to peritumoral tissue or normal brain. Post-treatment Ktrans correlated with AIB levels in the bevacizumab-treated rats but not in the saline controls. The correlation of an MRI biomarker for decreased vascular permeability with decreased AIB concentration in tumor after antiangiogenic treatment suggests that bevacizumab partially restored the normal low permeability characteristics of the blood-brain barrier in a model of human lung cancer brain metastasis.

  10. Contribution of thrombin-reactive brain pericytes to blood-