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Sample records for brain lipid binding

  1. Mapping of brain lipid binding protein (Blbp) in the brain of adult zebrafish, co-expression with aromatase B and links with proliferation.

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    Diotel, Nicolas; Vaillant, Colette; Kah, Olivier; Pellegrini, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Adult fish exhibit a strong neurogenic capacity due to the persistence of radial glial cells. In zebrafish, radial glial cells display well-established markers such as the estrogen-synthesizing enzyme (AroB) and the brain lipid binding protein (Blbp), which is known to strongly bind omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). While Blpb is mainly described in the telencephalon of adult zebrafish, its expression in the remaining regions of the brain is poorly documented. The present study was designed to further investigate Blbp expression in the brain, its co-expression with AroB, and its link with radial glial cells proliferation in zebrafish. We generated a complete and detailed mapping of Blbp expression in the whole brain and show its complete co-expression with AroB, except in some tectal and hypothalamic regions. By performing PCNA and Blbp immunohistochemistry on cyp19a1b-GFP (AroB-GFP) fish, we also demonstrated preferential Blbp expression in proliferative radial glial cells in almost all regions studied. To our knowledge, this is the first complete and detailed mapping of Blbp-expressing cells showing strong association between Blbp and radial glial cell proliferation in the adult brain of fish. Given that zebrafish is now recognized models for studying neurogenesis and brain repair, our data provide detailed characterization of Blbp in the entire brain and open up a broad field of research investigating the role of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in neural stem cell activity in fish. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Size-exclusion chromatographic reconstitution of the bovine brain benzodiazepine receptor : Effects of lipid environment on the binding characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viel, G.T; Yang, Q; Lundahl, P; Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, R.A

    1997-01-01

    The benzodiazepine receptor from calf brain was solubilized with sodium deoxycholate (2 mg/ml) in the presence of 0.5 M KCl and protease inhibitors, and bound flunitrazepam with an equilibrium dissociation constant (K-d) of 2.7+/-1.2 nM and with 0.40+/-0.04 pmol binding sites per mg protein (B-max).

  3. R7-binding protein targets the G protein β5/R7-regulator of G protein signaling complex to lipid rafts in neuronal cells and brain

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    Zhang Jian-Hua

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins, composed of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, are positioned at the inner face of the plasma membrane and relay signals from activated G protein-coupled cell surface receptors to various signaling pathways. Gβ5 is the most structurally divergent Gβ isoform and forms tight heterodimers with regulator of G protein signalling (RGS proteins of the R7 subfamily (R7-RGS. The subcellular localization of Gβ 5/R7-RGS protein complexes is regulated by the palmitoylation status of the associated R7-binding protein (R7BP, a recently discovered SNARE-like protein. We investigate here whether R7BP controls the targeting of Gβ5/R7-RGS complexes to lipid rafts, cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains where conventional heterotrimeric G proteins and some effector proteins are concentrated in neurons and brain. Results We show that endogenous Gβ5/R7-RGS/R7BP protein complexes are present in native neuron-like PC12 cells and that a fraction is targeted to low-density, detergent-resistant membrane lipid rafts. The buoyant density of endogenous raft-associated Gβ5/R7-RGS protein complexes in PC12 cells was similar to that of lipid rafts containing the palmitoylated marker proteins PSD-95 and LAT, but distinct from that of the membrane microdomain where flotillin was localized. Overexpression of wild-type R7BP, but not its palmitoylation-deficient mutant, greatly enriched the fraction of endogenous Gβ5/R7-RGS protein complexes in the lipid rafts. In HEK-293 cells the palmitoylation status of R7BP also regulated the lipid raft targeting of co-expressed Gβ5/R7-RGS/R7BP proteins. A fraction of endogenous Gβ5/R7-RGS/R7BP complexes was also present in lipid rafts in mouse brain. Conclusion A fraction of Gβ5/R7-RGS/R7BP protein complexes is targeted to low-density, detergent-resistant membrane lipid rafts in PC12 cells and brain. In cultured cells, the palmitoylation status of

  4. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

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    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  5. Long-Term Effect of Docosahexaenoic Acid Feeding on Lipid Composition and Brain Fatty Acid-Binding Protein Expression in Rats

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    Marwa E. Elsherbiny

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Arachidonic (AA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA brain accretion is essential for brain development. The impact of DHA-rich maternal diets on offspring brain fatty acid composition has previously been studied up to the weanling stage; however, there has been no follow-up at later stages. Here, we examine the impact of DHA-rich maternal and weaning diets on brain fatty acid composition at weaning and three weeks post-weaning. We report that DHA supplementation during lactation maintains high DHA levels in the brains of pups even when they are fed a DHA-deficient diet for three weeks after weaning. We show that boosting dietary DHA levels for three weeks after weaning compensates for a maternal DHA-deficient diet during lactation. Finally, our data indicate that brain fatty acid binding protein (FABP7, a marker of neural stem cells, is down-regulated in the brains of six-week pups with a high DHA:AA ratio. We propose that elevated levels of DHA in developing brain accelerate brain maturation relative to DHA-deficient brains.

  6. Lipid transport and human brain development.

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    Betsholtz, Christer

    2015-07-01

    How the human brain rapidly builds up its lipid content during brain growth and maintains its lipids in adulthood has remained elusive. Two new studies show that inactivating mutations in MFSD2A, known to be expressed specifically at the blood-brain barrier, lead to microcephaly, thereby offering a simple and surprising solution to an old enigma.

  7. Binding of Serotonin to Lipid Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Wang, Chunhua; Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is a prevalent neurotransmitter throughout the animal kingdom. It exerts its effect through the specific binding to the serotonin receptor, but recent research has suggested that neural transmission may also be affected by its nonspecific interactions...... with the lipid matrix of the synaptic membrane. However, membrane–5-HT interactions remain controversial and superficially investigated. Fundamental knowledge of this interaction appears vital in discussions of putative roles of 5-HT, and we have addressed this by thermodynamic measurements and molecular...... dynamics (MD) simulations. 5-HT was found to interact strongly with lipid bilayers (partitioning coefficient ∼1200 in mole fraction units), and this is highly unusual for a hydrophilic solute like 5-HT which has a bulk, oil–water partitioning coefficient well below unity. It follows that membrane affinity...

  8. Spastin binds to lipid droplets and affects lipid metabolism.

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    Chrisovalantis Papadopoulos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in SPAST, encoding spastin, are the most common cause of autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP. HSP is characterized by weakness and spasticity of the lower limbs, owing to progressive retrograde degeneration of the long corticospinal axons. Spastin is a conserved microtubule (MT-severing protein, involved in processes requiring rearrangement of the cytoskeleton in concert to membrane remodeling, such as neurite branching, axonal growth, midbody abscission, and endosome tubulation. Two isoforms of spastin are synthesized from alternative initiation codons (M1 and M87. We now show that spastin-M1 can sort from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER to pre- and mature lipid droplets (LDs. A hydrophobic motif comprised of amino acids 57 through 86 of spastin was sufficient to direct a reporter protein to LDs, while mutation of arginine 65 to glycine abolished LD targeting. Increased levels of spastin-M1 expression reduced the number but increased the size of LDs. Expression of a mutant unable to bind and sever MTs caused clustering of LDs. Consistent with these findings, ubiquitous overexpression of Dspastin in Drosophila led to bigger and less numerous LDs in the fat bodies and increased triacylglycerol levels. In contrast, Dspastin overexpression increased LD number when expressed specifically in skeletal muscles or nerves. Downregulation of Dspastin and expression of a dominant-negative variant decreased LD number in Drosophila nerves, skeletal muscle and fat bodies, and reduced triacylglycerol levels in the larvae. Moreover, we found reduced amount of fat stores in intestinal cells of worms in which the spas-1 homologue was either depleted by RNA interference or deleted. Taken together, our data uncovers an evolutionarily conserved role of spastin as a positive regulator of LD metabolism and open up the possibility that dysfunction of LDs in axons may contribute to the pathogenesis of HSP.

  9. Bilirubin Binding to PPARα Inhibits Lipid Accumulation

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    Stec, David E.; John, Kezia; Trabbic, Christopher J.; Luniwal, Amarjit; Hankins, Michael W.; Baum, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Numerous clinical and population studies have demonstrated that increased serum bilirubin levels protect against cardiovascular and metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Bilirubin is a potent antioxidant, and the beneficial actions of moderate increases in plasma bilirubin have been thought to be due to the antioxidant effects of this bile pigment. In the present study, we found that bilirubin has a new function as a ligand for PPARα. We show that bilirubin can bind directly to PPARα and increase transcriptional activity. When we compared biliverdin, the precursor to bilirubin, on PPARα transcriptional activation to known PPARα ligands, WY 14,643 and fenofibrate, it showed that fenofibrate and biliverdin have similar activation properties. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with biliverdin suppressed lipid accumulation and upregulated PPARα target genes. We treated wild-type and PPARα KO mice on a high fat diet with fenofibrate or bilirubin for seven days and found that both signal through PPARα dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, the effect of bilirubin on lowering glucose and reducing body fat percentage was blunted in PPARα KO mice. These data demonstrate a new function for bilirubin as an agonist of PPARα, which mediates the protection from adiposity afforded by moderate increases in bilirubin. PMID:27071062

  10. Relation between plasma and brain lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellington, Cheryl L; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    : Plasma levels of traditional lipids and lipoproteins are not consistently associated with risk of dementia even though low plasma levels of apolipoprotein E, through unknown mechanisms, robustly predict future dementia. Experimental evidence suggests neuroprotective roles of several brain...... and cerebrospinal fluid apolipoproteins. Whether plasma levels of apolipoprotein E, or any other apolipoprotein with possible central nervous system and/or blood-brain barrier functions (apolipoproteins J, A-I, A-II, A-IV, D, C-I, and C-III) may become accessible biomarker components that improve risk prediction...

  11. Binding of Neurotransmitters to Lipid Membranes

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    Peters, Günther H.J.; Werge, Mikkel; Elf-Lind, Maria Northved

    2014-01-01

    / acetylated g-aminobutyrate (GABAneu) with a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer. This study was motivated by recent research results that suggested that neural transmission may also be affected by nonspecific interactions of NTs with the lipid matrix of the synaptic membrane. Our results revealed...... backbone of the phospholipids. It is surprising that hydrophilic solutes can deeply penetrate into the membrane pointing to the fact that membrane affinity is governed by specific interactions. Our MD simulations identified the salt-bridge between the primary amine of NTs and the lipid phosphate group...

  12. Brain Glucose Metabolism Controls Hepatic Glucose and Lipid Production

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    Lam, Tony K.T.

    2007-01-01

    Brain glucose-sensing mechanisms are implicated in the regulation of feeding behavior and hypoglycemic-induced hormonal counter-regulation. This commentary discusses recent findings indicating that the brain senses glucose to regulate both hepatic glucose and lipid production.

  13. Structural Determinants of Specific Lipid Binding to Potassium Channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weingarth, M.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330985655; Prokofyev, A.; van der Cruijsen, E.A.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330826743; Nand, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/337731403; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113691238; Pongs, O.; Baldus, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314410864

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated specific lipid binding to the pore domain of potassium channels KcsA and chimeric KcsAKv1.3 on the structural and functional level using extensive coarse-grained and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, solid-state NMR, and single channel measurements. We show that, while

  14. Lipid alterations in lipid rafts from Alzheimer's disease human brain cortex.

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    Martín, Virginia; Fabelo, Noemí; Santpere, Gabriel; Puig, Berta; Marín, Raquel; Ferrer, Isidre; Díaz, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains intimately associated with cell signaling. These biochemical microstructures are characterized by their high contents of sphingolipids, cholesterol and saturated fatty acids and a reduced content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Here, we have purified lipid rafts of human frontal brain cortex from normal and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and characterized their biochemical lipid composition. The results revealed that lipid rafts from AD brains exhibit aberrant lipid profiles compared to healthy brains. In particular, lipid rafts from AD brains displayed abnormally low levels of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA, mainly 22:6n-3, docosahexaenoic acid) and monoenes (mainly 18:1n-9, oleic acid), as well as reduced unsaturation and peroxidability indexes. Also, multiple relationships between phospholipids and fatty acids were altered in AD lipid rafts. Importantly, no changes were observed in the mole percentage of lipid classes and fatty acids in rafts from normal brains throughout the lifespan (24-85 years). These indications point to the existence of homeostatic mechanisms preserving lipid raft status in normal frontal cortex. The disruption of such mechanisms in AD brains leads to a considerable increase in lipid raft order and viscosity, which may explain the alterations in lipid raft signaling observed in AD.

  15. Clostridium Perfringens Epsilon Toxin Binds to Membrane Lipids and Its Cytotoxic Action Depends on Sulfatide.

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    Carles Gil

    Full Text Available Epsilon toxin (Etx is one of the major lethal toxins produced by Clostridium perfringens types B and D, being the causal agent of fatal enterotoxemia in animals, mainly sheep and goats. Etx is synthesized as a non-active prototoxin form (proEtx that becomes active upon proteolytic activation. Etx exhibits a cytotoxic effect through the formation of a pore in the plasma membrane of selected cell targets where Etx specifically binds due to the presence of specific receptors. However, the identity and nature of host receptors of Etx remain a matter of controversy. In the present study, the interactions between Etx and membrane lipids from the synaptosome-enriched fraction from rat brain (P2 fraction and MDCK cell plasma membrane preparations were analyzed. Our findings show that both Etx and proEtx bind to lipids extracted from lipid rafts from the two different models as assessed by protein-lipid overlay assay. Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Binding of proEtx to sulfatide, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol (3-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol (5-phosphate was detected. Removal of the sulphate groups via sulfatase treatment led to a dramatic decrease in Etx-induced cytotoxicity, but not in proEtx-GFP binding to MDCK cells or a significant shift in oligomer formation, pointing to a role of sulfatide in pore formation in rafts but not in toxin binding to the target cell membrane. These results show for the first time the interaction between Etx and membrane lipids from host tissue and point to a major role for sulfatides in C. perfringens epsilon toxin pathophysiology.

  16. Effect of cadmium on lipid metabolism of brain

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    Gulati, S.; Gill, K.D.; Nath, R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of early postnatal cadmium exposure on the in vivo incorporation of (1- 14 C) sodium acetate into various lipid classes of the weanling rat brain was studied. A stimulated incorporation of the label was observed in total lipids, phospholipids, cholesterol, cerebrosides and sulphatides of the brain of Cd-exposed animals compared to controls. (author)

  17. Comparative structural analysis of lipid binding START domains.

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    Ann-Gerd Thorsell

    Full Text Available Steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR protein related lipid transfer (START domains are small globular modules that form a cavity where lipids and lipid hormones bind. These domains can transport ligands to facilitate lipid exchange between biological membranes, and they have been postulated to modulate the activity of other domains of the protein in response to ligand binding. More than a dozen human genes encode START domains, and several of them are implicated in a disease.We report crystal structures of the human STARD1, STARD5, STARD13 and STARD14 lipid transfer domains. These represent four of the six functional classes of START domains.Sequence alignments based on these and previously reported crystal structures define the structural determinants of human START domains, both those related to structural framework and those involved in ligand specificity.This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web plugin is required to access this enhanced functionality. Instructions for the installation and use of the web plugin are available in Text S1.

  18. Effect of cadmium on lipid metabolism of brain. In vivo incorporation of labelled acetate into lipids

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    Gulati, S; Gill, K D; Nath, R

    1987-01-01

    The effect of early postnatal cadmium exposure on the in vivo incorporation of (1-/sup 14/C) sodium acetate into various lipid classes of the weanling rat brain was studied. A stimulated incorporation of the label was observed in total lipids, phospholipids, cholesterol, cerebrosides and sulphatides of the brain of Cd-exposed animals compared to controls.

  19. Probing the binding of cationic lipids with dendrimers.

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    Mandeville, J S; Bourassa, P; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2013-01-14

    Polycationic polymers are used extensively in biology to disrupt cell membranes and thus enhance the transport of materials into the cell. We report the bindings of several lipids cholesterol (Chol), 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane(DOTAP), dioctadecyldimethylammoniumbromide (DDAB), and dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) to dendrimers of different compositions such as mPEG-PAMAM (G3), mPEG-PAMAM (G4), and PAMAM (G4) under physiological conditions. FTIR, UV-visible spectroscopic, methods and molecular modeling were used to analyze the lipid binding mode, the binding constant, and the effects of lipid complexation on the dendrimer structure. The structural analysis showed that lipids bind dendrimers through both hydrophilic and hydrophobic contacts with overall binding constants of K(chol-mPEG-G3) = 1.7 × 10(3) M(-1), K(chol-mPEG-PAMAM-G4) = 2.7 × 10(3) M(-1), K(chol-PAMAM-G4) = 1.0 × 10(3) M(-1), K(DOPE-mPEG-G3) = 1.5 × 10(3) M(-1), K(DOPE-mPEG-PAMAM-G4) = 1.6 × 10(3) M(-1), K(DOPE-PAMAM-G4) = 5.3 × 10(2) M(-1), K(DDAB-mPEG-G3) = 1.5 × 10(3) M(-1), K(DDAB-mPEG-PAMAM-G4) = 1.9 × 10(2) M(-1), K(DDAB-PAMAM-G4) = 7.0 × 10(2) M(-1), K(DOTAP-mPEG-G3) = 1.9 × 10(3) M(-1), K(DOTAP-mPEG-PAMAM-G4) = 1.5 × 10(3) M(-1), and K(DOTAP-PAMAM-G4) = 5.7 × 10(2) M(-1). Weaker interaction was observed as dendrimer cationic charges increased. The free binding energies from docking were -5.15 (cholesterol), -5.79 (DDAB), and -5.36 kcal/mol (DOTAP) with the order of stability DDAB-PAMAM-G-4 > DOTAP-PAMAM-G4 > cholesterol-PAMAM-G4, consistent with the spectroscopic results. Dendrimers might act as carriers to transport lipids in vitro.

  20. A lipid binding domain in sphingosine kinase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Don, Anthony S.; Rosen, Hugh

    2009-01-01

    The lipid second messenger sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a critical mediator of cellular proliferation and survival signals, and is essential for vasculogenesis and neurogenesis. S1P formation is catalysed by sphingosine kinases 1 and 2 (Sphk1 and Sphk2). We have found that the endogenous glycolipid sulfatide (3-O-sulfogalactosylceramide) binds to and inhibits the activity of Sphk2 and the closely related ceramide kinase (Cerk), but not Sphk1. Using sulfatide as a probe, we mapped the lipid binding domain to the N-terminus of Sphk2 (residues 1-175), a region of sequence that is absent in Sphk1, but aligns with a pleckstrin homology domain in Cerk. Accordingly, Sphk2 bound to phosphatidylinositol monophosphates but not to abundant cellular phospholipids. Deleting the N-terminal domain reduced Sphk2 membrane localisation in cells. We have therefore identified a lipid binding domain in Sphk2 that is important for the enzyme's sub-cellular localisation.

  1. The role of ATP-binding cassette transporters in neuro-inflammation: relevance for bioactive lipids

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    Gijs eKooij

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters are highly expressed by brain endothelial cells that form the blood-brain barrier (BBB. These efflux pumps play an important role in maintaining brain homeostasis as they actively hinder the entry of unwanted blood-derived compounds into the central nervous system (CNS. Consequently, their high activity at the BBB has been a major hurdle for the treatment of several brain diseases, as they prevent numerous drugs to reach their site of action within the brain. Importantly, recent data indicate that endogenous substrates for ABC transporters may include inflammatory mediators, such as prostaglandins, leukotrienes, cytokines, chemokines and bioactive lipids, suggesting a potential role for ABC transporters in immunological responses, and more specifically in inflammatory brain disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS. In this review, we will give a comprehensive overview of recent findings that illustrate this novel role for ABC transporters in neuro-inflammatory processes. Moreover, we will provide first insights into underlying mechanisms and focus on the importance for bioactive lipids, in particular platelet-activating factor (PAF, herein. A thorough understanding of these events may form the basis for the development for selective treatment modalities to dampen the neuro-inflammatory attack in MS and thereby reducing tissue damage.

  2. Analysis of lipid raft molecules in the living brain slices.

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    Kotani, Norihiro; Nakano, Takanari; Ida, Yui; Ito, Rina; Hashizume, Miki; Yamaguchi, Arisa; Seo, Makoto; Araki, Tomoyuki; Hojo, Yasushi; Honke, Koichi; Murakoshi, Takayuki

    2017-08-24

    Neuronal plasma membrane has been thought to retain a lot of lipid raft components which play important roles in the neural function. Although the biochemical analyses of lipid raft using brain tissues have been extensively carried out in the past 20 years, many of their experimental conditions do not coincide with those of standard neuroscience researches such as neurophysiology and neuropharmacology. Hence, the physiological methods for lipid raft analysis that can be compatible with general neuroscience have been required. Herein, we developed a system to physiologically analyze ganglioside GM1-enriched lipid rafts in brain tissues using the "Enzyme-Mediated Activation of Radical Sources (EMARS)" method that we reported (Kotani N. et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U S A 105, 7405-7409 (2008)). The EMARS method was applied to acute brain slices prepared from mouse brains in aCSF solution using the EMARS probe, HRP-conjugated cholera toxin subunit B, which recognizes ganglioside GM1. The membrane molecules present in the GM1-enriched lipid rafts were then labeled with fluorescein under the physiological condition. The fluorescein-tagged lipid raft molecules called "EMARS products" distributed differentially among various parts of the brain. On the other hand, appreciable differences were not detected among segments along the longitudinal axis of the hippocampus. We further developed a device to label the lipid raft molecules in acute hippocampal slices under two different physiological conditions to detect dynamics of the lipid raft molecules during neural excitation. Using this device, several cell membrane molecules including Thy1, known as a lipid raft resident molecule in neurons, were confirmed by the EMARS method in living hippocampal slices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Determining Membrane Protein-Lipid Binding Thermodynamics Using Native Mass Spectrometry.

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    Cong, Xiao; Liu, Yang; Liu, Wen; Liang, Xiaowen; Russell, David H; Laganowsky, Arthur

    2016-04-06

    Membrane proteins are embedded in the biological membrane where the chemically diverse lipid environment can modulate their structure and function. However, the thermodynamics governing the molecular recognition and interaction of lipids with membrane proteins is poorly understood. Here, we report a method using native mass spectrometry (MS), to determine thermodynamics of individual ligand binding events to proteins. Unlike conventional methods, native MS can resolve individual ligand binding events and, coupled with an apparatus to control the temperature, determine binding thermodynamic parameters, such as for protein-lipid interactions. We validated our approach using three soluble protein-ligand systems (maltose binding protein, lysozyme, and nitrogen regulatory protein) and obtained similar results to those using isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance. We also determined for the first time the thermodynamics of individual lipid binding to the ammonia channel (AmtB), an integral membrane protein from Escherichia coli. Remarkably, we observed distinct thermodynamic signatures for the binding of different lipids and entropy-enthalpy compensation for binding lipids of variable chain length. Additionally, using a mutant form of AmtB that abolishes a specific phosphatidylglycerol (PG) binding site, we observed distinct changes in the thermodynamic signatures for binding PG, implying these signatures can identify key residues involved in specific lipid binding and potentially differentiate between specific lipid binding sites.

  4. Estrogen Interactions With Lipid Rafts Related to Neuroprotection. Impact of Brain Ageing and Menopause

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    Raquel Marin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Estrogens (E2 exert a plethora of neuroprotective actions against aged-associated brain diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD. Part of these actions takes place through binding to estrogen receptors (ER embedded in signalosomes, where numerous signaling proteins are clustered. Signalosomes are preferentially located in lipid rafts which are dynamic membrane microstructures characterized by a peculiar lipid composition enriched in gangliosides, saturated fatty acids, cholesterol, and sphingolipids. Rapid E2 interactions with ER-related signalosomes appear to trigger intracellular signaling ultimately leading to the activation of molecular mechanisms against AD. We have previously observed that the reduction of E2 blood levels occurring during menopause induced disruption of ER-signalosomes at frontal cortical brain areas. These molecular changes may reduce neuronal protection activities, as similar ER signalosome derangements were observed in AD brains. The molecular impairments may be associated with changes in the lipid composition of lipid rafts observed in neurons during menopause and AD. These evidences indicate that the changes in lipid raft structure during aging may be at the basis of alterations in the activity of ER and other neuroprotective proteins integrated in these membrane microstructures. Moreover, E2 is a homeostatic modulator of lipid rafts. Recent work has pointed to this relevant aspect of E2 activity to preserve brain integrity, through mechanisms affecting lipid uptake and local biosynthesis in the brain. Some evidences have demonstrated that estrogens and the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA exert synergistic effects to stabilize brain lipid matrix. DHA is essential to enhance molecular fluidity at the plasma membrane, promoting functional macromolecular interactions in signaling platforms. In support of this, DHA detriment in neuronal lipid rafts has been associated with the most common age-associated neuropathologies

  5. Single Molecule Kinetics of ENTH Binding to Lipid Membranes

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    Rozovsky, Sharon [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Forstner, Martin B. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Sondermann, Holger [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Groves, Jay T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-04-03

    Transient recruitment of proteins to membranes is a fundamental mechanism by which the cell exerts spatial and temporal control over proteins’ localization and interactions. Thus, the specificity and the kinetics of peripheral proteins’ membrane residence are an attribute of their function. In this article, we describe the membrane interactions of the interfacial epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain with its target lipid phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2). The direct visualization and quantification of interactions of single ENTH molecules with supported lipid bilayers is achieved using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) with a time resolution of 13 ms. This enables the recording of the kinetic behavior of ENTH interacting with membranes with physiologically relevant concentrations of PtdIns(4,5)P2 despite the low effective binding affinity. Subsequent single fluorophore tracking permits us to build up distributions of residence times and to measure ENTH dissociation rates as a function of membrane composition. In addition, due to the high time resolution, we are able to resolve details of the motion of ENTH associated with a simple, homogeneous membrane. In this case ENTH’s diffusive transport appears to be the result of at least three different diffusion processes.

  6. Effect of cadmium exposure on lipids, lipid peroxidation and metal distribution in rat brain regions

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    Hussain, T; Ali, M M; Chandra, S V

    1985-01-01

    Effect of cadmium treatment on brain lipids, lipid peroxidation and distribution of Zn, Cu and Fe in rat brain regions was investigated. Adult male rats were exposed to Cd (100 ppm Cd as cadmium acetate) in drinking water for 30 days. The Cd exposure resulted in a significant decrease in the phospholipid content and an increase in the lipid peroxidation in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. The total lipid content was not affected in any of the regions but a significant decrease in cholesterol and cerebroside contents were observed only in the cerebral cortex. A positive correlation between the increase in lipid peroxidation and decrease in the phospholipid content in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum was observed. A maximum accumulation of Cd occurred in the cerebral cortex. The Cu and Fe contents were significantly increased but the Zn levels decreased in the Cd-treated rats in all but the midbrain region. Results suggest that the increased peroxidation decomposition of structural lipids and the altered distribution of the essential trace metals in brain may play a significant role in Cd-induced neurotoxicity. 27 references, 2 tables.

  7. Binding of long-lasting local anesthetics to lipid emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazoit, Jean-Xavier; Le Guen, Régine; Beloeil, Hélène; Benhamou, Dan

    2009-02-01

    Rapid infusion of lipid emulsion has been proposed to treat local anesthetic toxicity. The authors wanted to test the buffering properties of two commercially available emulsions made of long- and of long- and medium-chain triglycerides. Using the shake-flask method, the authors measured the solubility and binding of racemic bupivacaine, levobupivacaine, and ropivacaine to diluted Intralipid (Fresenius Kabi, Paris, France) and Medialipide (B-Braun, Boulogne, France). The apparent distribution coefficient expressed as the ratio of mole fraction was 823 +/- 198 and 320 +/- 65 for racemic bupivacaine and levobupivacaine, and ropivacaine, respectively, at 500 mg in the Medialipide/buffer emulsion; and 1,870 +/- 92 and 1,240 +/- 14 for racemic bupivacaine and levobupivacaine, and ropivacaine, respectively, in the Intralipid/buffer emulsion. Decreasing the pH from 7.40 to 7.00 of the Medialipide/buffer emulsion led to a decrease in ratio of molar concentration from 121 +/- 3.8 to 46 +/- 2.8 for bupivacaine, and to a lesser extent from 51 +/- 4.0 to 31 +/- 1.6 for ropivacaine. The capacity of the 1% emulsions was 871 and 2,200 microM for the 1% Medialipide and Intralipid emulsions, respectively. The dissociation constant was 818 and 2,120 microM for racemic bupivacaine and levobupivacaine, and ropivacaine, respectively. Increasing the temperature from 20 to 37 degrees C led to a greater increase in affinity for ropivacaine (55%) than for bupivacaine (27%). When the pH of the buffer was decreased from 7.40 to 7.00, the affinity was decreased by a factor of 1.68, similar for both anesthetics. The solubility of long-acting local anesthetics in lipid emulsions and the high capacity of binding of these emulsions most probably explain their clinical efficacy in case of toxicity. The long-chain triglyceride emulsion Intralipid appears to be about 2.5 times more efficacious than the 50/50 medium-chain/long-chain Medialipide emulsion. Also, because of their higher hydrophobicity

  8. Binding of tritiated corticosterone in brain sections of adrenalectomized rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrieau, A.; Vial, M.; Dussaillant, M.; Rostene, W.; Philibert, P.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique which permits to study the specific binding of tritiated corticosterone in brain sections of adrenalectomized rats is described. Under these conditions, the specific binding of the glucocorticoid represents 60 to 70% of the initial binding. The apparent dissociation constant and the number of binding sites, determined by Scatchard analysis, are in the range of 10 -8 M and 100 fmoles/mg of protein respectively [fr

  9. Phloem proteomics reveals new lipid-binding proteins with a putative role in lipid-mediated signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Marie Barbaglia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Global climate changes inversely affect our ability to grow the food required for an increasing world population. To combat future crop loss due to abiotic stress, we need to understand the signals responsible for changes in plant development and the resulting adaptations, especially the signaling molecules traveling long-distance through the plant phloem. Using a proteomics approach, we had identified several putative lipid-binding proteins in the phloem exudates. Simultaneously, we identified several complex lipids as well as jasmonates. These findings prompted us to propose that phloem (phospho- lipids could act as long-distance developmental signals in response to abiotic stress, and that they are released, sensed, and moved by phloem lipid-binding proteins (Benning et al., 2012. Indeed, the proteins we identified include lipases that could release a signaling lipid into the phloem, putative receptor components, and proteins that could mediate lipid-movement. To test this possible protein-based lipid-signaling pathway, three of the proteins, which could potentially act in a relay, are characterized here: (I a putative GDSL-motif lipase (II a PIG-P-like protein, with a possible receptor-like function; (III and PLAFP (phloem lipid-associated family protein, a predicted lipid-binding protein of unknown function. Here we show that all three proteins bind lipids, in particular phosphatidic acid (PtdOH, which is known to participate in intracellular stress signaling. Genes encoding these proteins are expressed in the vasculature, a prerequisite for phloem transport. Cellular localization studies show that the proteins are not retained in the endoplasmic reticulum but surround the cell in a spotted pattern that has been previously observed with receptors and plasmodesmatal proteins. Abiotic signals that induce the production of PtdOH also regulate the expression of GDSL-lipase and PLAFP, albeit in opposite patterns. Our findings suggest that while

  10. Expression, purification, crystallization and structure of human adipocyte lipid-binding protein (aP2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marr, Eric; Tardie, Mark; Carty, Maynard; Brown Phillips, Tracy; Wang, Ing-Kae; Soeller, Walt; Qiu, Xiayang; Karam, George

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structure of human adipocyte lipid-binding protein (aP2) with a bound palmitate is reported at 1.5 Å resolution. Human adipocyte lipid-binding protein (aP2) belongs to a family of intracellular lipid-binding proteins involved in the transport and storage of lipids. Here, the crystal structure of human aP2 with a bound palmitate is described at 1.5 Å resolution. Unlike the known crystal structure of murine aP2 in complex with palmitate, this structure shows that the fatty acid is in a folded conformation and that the loop containing Phe57 acts as a lid to regulate ligand binding by excluding solvent exposure to the central binding cavity

  11. Mu opioid receptor binding sites in human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilapil, C.; Welner, S.; Magnan, J.; Zamir, N.; Quirion, R.

    1986-01-01

    Our experiments focused on the examination of the distribution of mu opioid receptor binding sites in normal human brain using the highly selective ligand [ 3 H]DAGO, in both membrane binding assay and in vitro receptor autoradiography. Mu opioid binding sites are very discretely distributed in human brain with high densities of sites found in the posterior amygdala, caudate, putamen, hypothalamus and certain cortical areas. Moreover the autoradiographic distribution of [ 3 H]DAGO binding sites clearly reveals the discrete lamination (layers I and III-IV) of mu sites in cortical areas

  12. Specific binding of atrial natriuretic factor in brain microvessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabrier, P.E.; Roubert, P.; Braquet, P.

    1987-01-01

    Cerebral capillaries constitute the blood-brain barrier. Studies of specific receptors (neurotransmitters or hormones) located on this structure can be performed by means of radioligand-binding techniques on isolated brain microvessels. The authors examined on pure bovine cerebral microvessel preparations the binding of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), using 125 I-labeled ANF. Saturation and competition experiments demonstrated the presence of a single class of ANF-binding sites with high affinity and with a binding capacity of 58 fmol/mg of protein. The binding of 125 I-labeled ANF to brain microvessels is specific, reversible, and time dependent, as is shown by association-dissociation experiments. The demonstration of specific ANF-binding sites on brain microvessels supposes a physiological role of ANF on brain microvasculature. The coexistence of ANF and angiotensin II receptors on this cerebrovascular tissue suggests that the two circulating peptides may act as mutual antagonists in the regulation of brain microcirculation and/or blood-brain barrier function

  13. SH2 Domains Serve as Lipid-Binding Modules for pTyr-Signaling Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi-Jeong; Sheng, Ren; Silkov, Antonina; Jung, Da-Jung; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Xin, Yao; Kim, Hyunjin; Thiagarajan-Rosenkranz, Pallavi; Song, Seohyeon; Yoon, Youngdae; Nam, Wonhee; Kim, Ilshin; Kim, Eui; Lee, Dong-Gyu; Chen, Yong; Singaram, Indira; Wang, Li; Jang, Myoung Ho; Hwang, Cheol-Sang; Honig, Barry; Ryu, Sungho; Lorieau, Justin; Kim, You-Me; Cho, Wonhwa

    2016-04-07

    The Src-homology 2 (SH2) domain is a protein interaction domain that directs myriad phosphotyrosine (pY)-signaling pathways. Genome-wide screening of human SH2 domains reveals that ∼90% of SH2 domains bind plasma membrane lipids and many have high phosphoinositide specificity. They bind lipids using surface cationic patches separate from pY-binding pockets, thus binding lipids and the pY motif independently. The patches form grooves for specific lipid headgroup recognition or flat surfaces for non-specific membrane binding and both types of interaction are important for cellular function and regulation of SH2 domain-containing proteins. Cellular studies with ZAP70 showed that multiple lipids bind its C-terminal SH2 domain in a spatiotemporally specific manner and thereby exert exquisite spatiotemporal control over its protein binding and signaling activities in T cells. Collectively, this study reveals how lipids control SH2 domain-mediated cellular protein-protein interaction networks and suggest a new strategy for therapeutic modulation of pY-signaling pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Autoradiographic localization of benzomorphan binding sites in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crain, B.J.; Kwenjen Chang; McNamara, J.O.; Valdes, F.

    1985-07-17

    The benzomorphan subpopulation of opiate binding sites was labeled by (TH)diprenorphine in the presence of unlabeled ligands selected to quench and delta opiate binding sites. The distribution of benzomorphan binding sites was then localized autoradiographically. The distribution differs from the distributions of , delta and kappa opiate binding and is quite similar to the distribution of US -endorphin immunoreactivity. These observations support the hypothesis, based on biochemical studies in brain membranes, that benzomorphan binding sites may represent the ligand recognition sites of putative epsilon receptors. (Auth.). 34 refs.; 3 figs.

  15. Membrane proteins bind lipids selectively to modulate their structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Reading, Eamonn; Allison, Timothy M; Ulmschneider, Martin B; Degiacomi, Matteo T; Baldwin, Andrew J; Robinson, Carol V

    2014-06-05

    Previous studies have established that the folding, structure and function of membrane proteins are influenced by their lipid environments and that lipids can bind to specific sites, for example, in potassium channels. Fundamental questions remain however regarding the extent of membrane protein selectivity towards lipids. Here we report a mass spectrometry approach designed to determine the selectivity of lipid binding to membrane protein complexes. We investigate the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and aquaporin Z (AqpZ) and the ammonia channel (AmtB) from Escherichia coli, using ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS), which reports gas-phase collision cross-sections. We demonstrate that folded conformations of membrane protein complexes can exist in the gas phase. By resolving lipid-bound states, we then rank bound lipids on the basis of their ability to resist gas phase unfolding and thereby stabilize membrane protein structure. Lipids bind non-selectively and with high avidity to MscL, all imparting comparable stability; however, the highest-ranking lipid is phosphatidylinositol phosphate, in line with its proposed functional role in mechanosensation. AqpZ is also stabilized by many lipids, with cardiolipin imparting the most significant resistance to unfolding. Subsequently, through functional assays we show that cardiolipin modulates AqpZ function. Similar experiments identify AmtB as being highly selective for phosphatidylglycerol, prompting us to obtain an X-ray structure in this lipid membrane-like environment. The 2.3 Å resolution structure, when compared with others obtained without lipid bound, reveals distinct conformational changes that re-position AmtB residues to interact with the lipid bilayer. Our results demonstrate that resistance to unfolding correlates with specific lipid-binding events, enabling a distinction to be made between lipids that merely bind from those that modulate membrane

  16. [18F]haloperidol binding in baboon brain in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousef, Khalil A.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Volkow, Nora D.; Dewey, Stephen L.; Shea, Colleen; Schlyer, David J.; Gatley, S. John; Logan, Jean; Wolf, Alfred P.

    1996-01-01

    The binding of [ 18 F]haloperidol to dopamine D2 and to sigma recognition sites in baboon brain was examined using positron emission tomography (PET). Studies were performed at baseline and after treatment with either haloperidol (to evaluate saturability), (+)-butaclamol (which has specificity for dopamine D2 receptors) or (-)-butaclamol (which has specificity for sigma sites). Binding was widespread. Treatment with (-)-butaclamol had no effect, whereas (+)-butaclamol selectively reduced the uptake in striatum. Haloperidol increased the clearance rate from all brain regions. These results indicate that the binding profile of [ 18 F]haloperidol does not permit the selective examination of either dopamine D2 or sigma sites using PET

  17. PICK1 regulates the trafficking of ASIC1a and acidotoxicity in a BAR domain lipid binding-dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wenying

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acid-sensing ion channel 1a (ASIC1a is the major ASIC subunit determining acid-activated currents in brain neurons. Recent studies show that ASIC1a play critical roles in acid-induced cell toxicity. While these studies raise the importance of ASIC1a in diseases, mechanisms for ASIC1a trafficking are not well understood. Interestingly, ASIC1a interacts with PICK1 (protein interacting with C-kinase 1, an intracellular protein that regulates trafficking of several membrane proteins. However, whether PICK1 regulates ASIC1a surface expression remains unknown. Results Here, we show that PICK1 overexpression increases ASIC1a surface level. A BAR domain mutant of PICK1, which impairs its lipid binding capability, blocks this increase. Lipid binding of PICK1 is also required for PICK1-induced clustering of ASIC1a. Consistent with the effect on ASIC1a surface levels, PICK1 increases ASIC1a-mediated acidotoxicity and this effect requires both the PDZ and BAR domains of PICK1. Conclusions Taken together, our results indicate that PICK1 regulates trafficking and function of ASIC1a in a lipid binding-dependent manner.

  18. The TULIP superfamily of eukaryotic lipid-binding proteins as a mediator of lipid sensing and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva, Vikram; Lupas, Andrei N

    2016-08-01

    The tubular lipid-binding (TULIP) superfamily has emerged in recent years as a major mediator of lipid sensing and transport in eukaryotes. It currently encompasses three protein families, SMP-like, BPI-like, and Takeout-like, which share a common fold. This fold consists of a long helix wrapped in a highly curved anti-parallel β-sheet, enclosing a central, lipophilic cavity. The SMP-like proteins, which include subunits of the ERMES complex and the extended synaptotagmins (E-Syts), appear to be mainly located at membrane contacts sites (MCSs) between organelles, mediating inter-organelle lipid exchange. The BPI-like proteins, which include the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI), the LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-binding protein (LBP), the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), and the phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), are either involved in innate immunity against bacteria through their ability to sense lipopolysaccharides, as is the case for BPI and LBP, or in lipid exchange between lipoprotein particles, as is the case for CETP and PLTP. The Takeout-like proteins, which are comprised of insect juvenile hormone-binding proteins and arthropod allergens, transport, where known, lipid hormones to target tissues during insect development. In all cases, the activity of these proteins is underpinned by their ability to bind large, hydrophobic ligands in their central cavity and segregate them away from the aqueous environment. Furthermore, where they are involved in lipid exchange, recent structural studies have highlighted their ability to establish lipophilic, tubular channels, either between organelles in the case of SMP domains or between lipoprotein particles in the case of CETP. Here, we review the current knowledge on the structure, versatile functions, and evolution of the TULIP superfamily. We propose a deep evolutionary split in this superfamily, predating the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor, between the SMP-like proteins, which act on

  19. Direct observation of the influence of cardiolipin and antibiotics on lipid II binding to MurJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolla, Jani Reddy; Sauer, Joshua B.; Wu, Di; Mehmood, Shahid; Allison, Timothy M.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2018-03-01

    Translocation of lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is essential in peptidoglycan biogenesis. Although most steps are understood, identifying the lipid II flippase has yielded conflicting results, and the lipid II binding properties of two candidate flippases—MurJ and FtsW—remain largely unknown. Here we apply native mass spectrometry to both proteins and characterize lipid II binding. We observed lower levels of lipid II binding to FtsW compared to MurJ, consistent with MurJ having a higher affinity. Site-directed mutagenesis of MurJ suggests that mutations at A29 and D269 attenuate lipid II binding to MurJ, whereas chemical modification of A29 eliminates binding. The antibiotic ramoplanin dissociates lipid II from MurJ, whereas vancomycin binds to form a stable complex with MurJ:lipid II. Furthermore, we reveal cardiolipins associate with MurJ but not FtsW, and exogenous cardiolipins reduce lipid II binding to MurJ. These observations provide insights into determinants of lipid II binding to MurJ and suggest roles for endogenous lipids in regulating substrate binding.

  20. The Role of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters in Neuro-Inflammation: Relevance for Bioactive Lipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, G.; van Horssen, J.; Bandaru, V.V.R.; Haughey, N.J.; de Vries, H.E.

    2012-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are highly expressed by brain endothelial cells that form the blood-brain barrier (BBB). These efflux pumps play an important role in maintaining brain homeostasis as they actively hinder the entry of unwanted blood-derived compounds into the central nervous

  1. Amyloidogenesis abolished by proline substitutions but enhanced by lipid binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Jiang

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of lipid molecules on the aggregation of a highly amyloidogenic segment of human islet amyloid polypeptide, hIAPP20-29, and the corresponding sequence from rat has been studied by all-atom replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD simulations with explicit solvent model. hIAPP20-29 fragments aggregate into partially ordered beta-sheet oligomers and then undergo large conformational reorganization and convert into parallel/antiparallel beta-sheet oligomers in mixed in-register and out-of-register patterns. The hydrophobic interaction between lipid tails and residues at positions 23-25 is found to stabilize the ordered beta-sheet structure, indicating a catalysis role of lipid molecules in hIAPP20-29 self-assembly. The rat IAPP variants with three proline residues maintain unstructured micelle-like oligomers, which is consistent with non-amyloidogenic behavior observed in experimental studies. Our study provides the atomic resolution descriptions of the catalytic function of lipid molecules on the aggregation of IAPP peptides.

  2. Species differences in [11C]clorgyline binding in brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Ding, Yu-Shin; Logan, Jean; MacGregor, Robert R.; Shea, Colleen; Garza, Victor; Gimi, Raomond; Volkow, Nora D.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Schlyer, David; Ferrieri, Richard; Gatley, S. John; Alexoff, David; Carter, Pauline; King, Payton; Pappas, Naomi; Arnett, Carroll D.

    2001-01-01

    [ 11 C]Clorgyline selectively binds to MAO A in the human brain. This contrasts with a recent report that [ 11 C]clorgyline (in contrast to other labeled MAO A inhibitors) is not retained in the rhesus monkey brain . To explore this difference, we compared [ 11 C]clorgyline in the baboon brain before and after clorgyline pretreatment and we also synthesized deuterium substituted [ 11 C]clorgyline (and its nor-precursor) for comparison. [ 11 C]Clorgyline was not retained in the baboon brain nor was it influenced by clorgyline pretreatment or by deuterium substitution, contrasting to results in humans. This suggests a species difference in the susceptibility of MAO A to inhibition by clorgyline and represents an unusual example of where the behavior of a radiotracer in the baboon brain does not predict its behavior in the human brain

  3. Thrombin binding to human brain and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, M.; Snider, R.M.; Richelson, E.

    1983-01-01

    Thrombin, a serine protease that regulates hemostasis, has been shown to stimulate the formation of cGMP in murine neuroblastoma cells. The nervous system in vivo thus may be postulated to respond to this blood-borne factor after it breaches the blood-brain barrier, as in trauma. Human alpha-thrombin was radiolabeled with 125I and shown to bind rapidly, reversibly, and with high affinity to human brain and spinal cord. These findings indicate the presence of specific thrombin-binding sites in nervous tissue and may have important clinical implications

  4. Visualization of specific binding sites of benzodiazepine in human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinotoh, H.; Yamasaki, T.; Inoue, O.; Itoh, T.; Suzuki, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Tateno, Y.; Ikehira, H.

    1986-01-01

    Using 11C-labeled Ro15-1788 and positron emission tomography, studies of benzodiazepine binding sites in the human brain were performed on four normal volunteers. Rapid and high accumulation of 11C activity was observed in the brain after i.v. injection of [11C]Ro15-1788, the maximum of which was within 12 min. Initial distribution of 11C activity in the brain was similar to the distribution of the normal cerebral blood flow. Ten minutes after injection, however, a high uptake of 11C activity was observed in the cerebral cortex and moderate uptake was seen in the cerebellar cortex, the basal ganglia, and the thalamus. The accumulation of 11C activity was low in the brain stem. This distribution of 11C activity was approximately parallel to the known distribution of benzodiazepine receptors. Saturation experiments were performed on four volunteers with oral administration of 0.3-1.8 mg/kg of cold Ro15-1788 prior to injection. Initial distribution of 11C activity following injection peaked within 2 min and then the accumulation of 11C activity decreased rapidly and remarkably throughout the brain. The results indicated that [11C] Ro15-1788 associates and dissociates to specific and nonspecific binding sites rapidly and has a high ratio of specific receptor binding to nonspecific binding in vivo. Carbon-11 Ro15-1788 is a suitable radioligand for the study of benzodiazepine receptors in vivo in humans

  5. Phenylalanine-coupled solid lipid nanoparticles for brain tumor targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharya, Parul; Jain, Ashish; Gulbake, Arvind; Shilpi, Satish; Jain, Ankit; Hurkat, Pooja [Dr. Hari Singh Gour University, Pharmaceutical Research Projects Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India); Majumdar, Subrata [Bose Institute, Division of Molecular Medicine (India); Jain, Sanjay K., E-mail: drskjainin@yahoo.com [Dr. Hari Singh Gour University, Pharmaceutical Research Projects Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India)

    2013-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the targeting potential of amino acid (phenylalanine)-coupled solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) loaded with ionically complexed doxorubicin HCl (Dox). Ionic complexation was used to enhance the loading efficiency and release characteristics of water soluble form of Dox. l-Type amino acid transporters (LAT1) are highly expressed on blood brain barrier as well as on many brain cancer cells, thus targeting LAT1 using phenylalanine improved anticancer activity of prepared nanocarrier. The phenylalanine-coupled SLN were characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscopy, particle size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency and in vitro release. The particle size of the resulting SLN was found to be in the range of 163.3 ± 5.2 to 113.0 ± 2.6 nm, with a slightly negative surface charge. In ex vivo study on C6 glioma cell lines, the cellular cytotoxicity of the SLN was highly increased when coupled with phenylalanine. In addition, stealthing sheath of PEG present on the surface of the SLN enhanced the cellular uptake of the SLN on C6 glioma cell line. Results of biodistribution and fluorescence studies clearly revealed that phenylalanine-coupled SLN could deliver high amount of drug into the brain tumor cells and showed the brain-targeting potential.

  6. The Role of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters in Neuro-Inflammation: Relevance for Bioactive Lipids

    OpenAIRE

    Kooij, Gijs; van Horssen, Jack; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Haughey, Norman J.; de Vries, Helga E.

    2012-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are highly expressed by brain endothelial cells that form the blood-brain barrier (BBB). These efflux pumps play an important role in maintaining brain homeostasis as they actively hinder the entry of unwanted blood-derived compounds into the central nervous system (CNS). Consequently, their high activity at the BBB has been a major hurdle for the treatment of several brain diseases, as they prevent numerous drugs to reach their site of action within th...

  7. Prion protein accumulation in lipid rafts of mouse aging brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Agostini

    Full Text Available The cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C is a normal constituent of neuronal cell membranes. The protein misfolding causes rare neurodegenerative disorders known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases. These maladies can be sporadic, genetic or infectious. Sporadic prion diseases are the most common form mainly affecting aging people. In this work, we investigate the biochemical environment in which sporadic prion diseases may develop, focusing our attention on the cell membrane of neurons in the aging brain. It is well established that with aging the ratio between the most abundant lipid components of rafts undergoes a major change: while cholesterol decreases, sphingomyelin content rises. Our results indicate that the aging process modifies the compartmentalization of PrP(C. In old mice, this change favors PrP(C accumulation in detergent-resistant membranes, particularly in hippocampi. To confirm the relationship between lipid content changes and PrP(C translocation into detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs, we looked at PrP(C compartmentalization in hippocampi from acid sphingomyelinase (ASM knockout (KO mice and synaptosomes enriched in sphingomyelin. In the presence of high sphingomyelin content, we observed a significant increase of PrP(C in DRMS. This process is not due to higher levels of total protein and it could, in turn, favor the onset of sporadic prion diseases during aging as it increases the PrP intermolecular contacts into lipid rafts. We observed that lowering sphingomyelin in scrapie-infected cells by using fumonisin B1 led to a 50% decrease in protease-resistant PrP formation. This may suggest an involvement of PrP lipid environment in prion formation and consequently it may play a role in the onset or development of sporadic forms of prion diseases.

  8. Sex Differences in Serotonin 1 Receptor Binding in Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischette, Christine T.; Biegon, Anat; McEwen, Bruce S.

    1983-10-01

    Male and female rats exhibit sex differences in binding by serotonin 1 receptors in discrete areas of the brain, some of which have been implicated in the control of ovulation and of gonadotropin release. The sex-specific changes in binding, which occur in response to the same hormonal (estrogenic) stimulus, are due to changes in the number of binding sites. Castration alone also affects the number of binding sites in certain areas. The results lead to the conclusion that peripheral hormones modulate binding by serotonin 1 receptors. The status of the serotonin receptor system may affect the reproductive capacity of an organism and may be related to sex-linked emotional disturbances in humans.

  9. Lipid binding defects and perturbed synaptogenic activity of a Collybistin R290H mutant that causes epilepsy and intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Theofilos; Schemm, Rudolf; Grubmüller, Helmut; Brose, Nils

    2015-03-27

    Signaling at nerve cell synapses is a key determinant of proper brain function, and synaptic defects--or synaptopathies--are at the basis of many neurological and psychiatric disorders. In key areas of the mammalian brain, such as the hippocampus or the basolateral amygdala, the clustering of the scaffolding protein Gephyrin and of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors at inhibitory neuronal synapses is critically dependent upon the brain-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor Collybistin (Cb). Accordingly, it was discovered recently that an R290H missense mutation in the diffuse B-cell lymphoma homology domain of Cb, which carries the guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity, leads to epilepsy and intellectual disability in human patients. In the present study, we determined the mechanism by which the Cb(R290H) mutation perturbs inhibitory synapse formation and causes brain dysfunction. Based on a combination of biochemical, cell biological, and molecular dynamics simulation approaches, we demonstrate that the R290H mutation alters the strength of intramolecular interactions between the diffuse B-cell lymphoma homology domain and the pleckstrin homology domain of Cb. This defect reduces the phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate binding affinity of Cb, which limits its normal synaptogenic activity. Our data indicate that impairment of the membrane lipid binding activity of Cb and a consequent defect in inhibitory synapse maturation represent a likely molecular pathomechanism of epilepsy and mental retardation in humans. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. A Global Map of Lipid-Binding Proteins and Their Ligandability in Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niphakis, Micah J; Lum, Kenneth M; Cognetta, Armand B; Correia, Bruno E; Ichu, Taka-Aki; Olucha, Jose; Brown, Steven J; Kundu, Soumajit; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Rosen, Hugh; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2015-06-18

    Lipids play central roles in physiology and disease, where their structural, metabolic, and signaling functions often arise from interactions with proteins. Here, we describe a set of lipid-based chemical proteomic probes and their global interaction map in mammalian cells. These interactions involve hundreds of proteins from diverse functional classes and frequently occur at sites of drug action. We determine the target profiles for several drugs across the lipid-interaction proteome, revealing that its ligandable content extends far beyond traditionally defined categories of druggable proteins. In further support of this finding, we describe a selective ligand for the lipid-binding protein nucleobindin-1 (NUCB1) and show that this compound perturbs the hydrolytic and oxidative metabolism of endocannabinoids in cells. The described chemical proteomic platform thus provides an integrated path to both discover and pharmacologically characterize a wide range of proteins that participate in lipid pathways in cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Discriminating binding and positioning of amphiphiles to lipid bilayers by {sup 1}H NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evanics, F. [Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, UTM, 3359 Mississauga Rd. North Mississauga, Ont., L5L 1C6 (Canada); Prosser, R.S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, UTM, 3359 Mississauga Rd. North Mississauga, Ont., L5L 1C6 (Canada)]. E-mail: sprosser@utm.utoronto.ca

    2005-04-04

    The binding and positioning in lipid bilayers of three well-known drugs--imipramine, nicotine, and caffeine--have been studied using {sup 1}H NMR. The membrane model system consisted of 'fast-tumbling' lipid bicelles, in which a bilayered lipid domain, composed of the unsaturated lipid, 1,2-dimyristelaidoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMLPC) was surrounded by a rim of deuterated detergent-like lipids, consisting of 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC-d22). Binding and immersion depth information was obtained by three experiments. (1) {sup 1}H chemical shift perturbations, upon transfer of the amphiphiles from water to a bicelle mixture, were used to estimate regions of the amphiphiles that interact with the membrane. (2) Water contact to resolvable protons was measured through a Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) between water and resolvable drug and lipid resonances. In the case of both lipids and membrane bound drugs, positive NOEs with large cross-relaxation rates were measured for most resonances originating from the membrane hydrophilic region, while negative NOEs were observed predominantly to resonances in the hydrophobic region of the membrane. (3) {sup 1}H NMR measurements of oxygen-induced (paramagnetic) spin-lattice relaxation rates, which are known to increase with membrane immersion depth, were used to corroborate conclusions based on chemical shift perturbations and water-ligand NOEs.

  12. Pet imaging of peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites in brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junck, L.; Jewett, D.M.; Olsen, J.M.; Kilbourn, M.R.; Koeppe, R.A.; Young, A.B.; Greenberg, H.S.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    Studies in vitro have shown that the peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding site (PBBS) is present in moderate to high density on malignant gliomas as well as in areas of reactive gliosis, but in low density in normal brain. PK 11195 is an isoquinoline derivative that binds selectively to the PBBS but not to the central benzodiazepine receptor. We have used [ 11 C]PK 11195 with positron emission tomography (PET) to study brain tumors and cerebral infarcts. Preliminary results showed that, in 13 of 18 patients with astrocytomas, [ 11 C]PK 11195 radioactivity was increased in tumor compared to remote brain and that the concentration ratios of tumor-to-remote brain were higher for high grade astrocytomas than for low grade astrocytomas. Pharmacokinetic analysis suggests that the increased activity in tumor probably does not result from alterations in blood flow or vascular permeability. Patients with lymphoma, meningioma, medulloblastoma, brain metastasis, and neurosarcoidosis have also shown increased radioactivity in tumor. Among eight patients with acute and subacute cerebral infarcts, activity in the infarct was increased in seven and was often greatest at the periphery. We conclude that [ 11 C]PK 11195 is a promising radiopharmaceutical for further investigation of brain tumors as well as diseases characterized by reactive gliosis

  13. (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houghten, R.A.; Johnson, N.; Pasternak, G.W.

    1984-10-01

    The binding of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin to rat brain homogenates is complex. Although Scatchard analysis of saturation studies yields a straight line, detailed competition studies are multiphasic, suggesting that even at low concentrations of the compound, the /sup 3/H-ligand is binding to more than one class of site. A portion of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding is sensitive to low concentrations of morphine or D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin (less than 5 nM). The inhibition observed with each compound alone (5 nM) is the same as that seen with both together (each at 5 nM). Thus, the binding remaining in the presence of both morphine and the enkephalin does not correspond to either mu or delta sites. The portion of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding that is inhibited under these conditions appears to be equally sensitive to both morphine and the enkephalin and may correspond to mu1 sites. Treating membrane homogenates with naloxonazine, a mu1 selective antagonist, lowers (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding to the same degree as morphine and D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin alone or together. This possible binding of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin to mu1 sites is consistent with the role of mu1 sites in beta-endorphin analgesia and catalepsy in vivo.

  14. [3H]-beta-endorphin binding in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houghten, R.A.; Johnson, N.; Pasternak, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    The binding of [ 3 H]-beta-endorphin to rat brain homogenates is complex. Although Scatchard analysis of saturation studies yields a straight line, detailed competition studies are multiphasic, suggesting that even at low concentrations of the compound, the 3 H-ligand is binding to more than one class of site. A portion of [ 3 H]-beta-endorphin binding is sensitive to low concentrations of morphine or D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin (less than 5 nM). The inhibition observed with each compound alone (5 nM) is the same as that seen with both together (each at 5 nM). Thus, the binding remaining in the presence of both morphine and the enkephalin does not correspond to either mu or delta sites. The portion of [ 3 H]-beta-endorphin binding that is inhibited under these conditions appears to be equally sensitive to both morphine and the enkephalin and may correspond to mu1 sites. Treating membrane homogenates with naloxonazine, a mu1 selective antagonist, lowers [ 3 H]-beta-endorphin binding to the same degree as morphine and D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin alone or together. This possible binding of [ 3 H]-beta-endorphin to mu1 sites is consistent with the role of mu1 sites in beta-endorphin analgesia and catalepsy in vivo

  15. Identification and in silico analysis of helical lipid binding regions in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In supplementary table 1, all the results of the lipid binding region analysis for SecA from a number of ..... For those interested, a more detailed description will now be given for this particular analysis. First of ... MCPep Job Status Page Finished.

  16. Risperidone treatment increases CB1 receptor binding in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Anna; Husum, Henriette; Holst, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    , the ghrelin receptor, neuropeptide Y, adiponectin and proopiomelanocortin. We investigated whether the expression of these factors was affected in rats chronically treated with the antipsychotic risperidone. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with risperidone (1.0 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (20...... showed that risperidone treatment altered CB(1) receptor binding in the rat brain. Risperidone-induced adiposity and metabolic dysfunction in the clinic may be explained by increased CB(1) receptor density in brain regions involved in appetite and regulation of metabolic function....

  17. Binding of kappa- and sigma-opiates in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolozin, B.L.; Nishimura, S.; Pasternak, G.W.

    1982-01-01

    Detailed displacements of [ 3 H]dihydromorphine by ketocyclazocine and SKF 10,047, [ 3 H]ethylketocyclazocine by SKF 10,047, and [ 3 H]SKF 10,047 by ketocyclazocine are all multiphasic, suggesting multiple binding sites. After treating brain tissue in vitro with naloxazone, all displacements lose the initial inhibition of 3 H-ligand binding by low concentrations of unlabeled drugs. Together with Scatchard analysis of saturation experiments, these studies suggest a common site which binds mu-, kappa, and sigma-opiates and enkephalins equally well and with highest affinity (KD less than 1 nM). The ability of unlabeled drugs to displace the low affinity binding of [ 3 H]dihydromorphine (KD . 3 nM), [ 3 H]ethylketocyclazocine (KD . 4 nM), [ 3 H]SKF 10,047 (KD . 6 nM), and D-Ala2-D-Leu5-[ 3 H]enkephalin (KD . 5 nM) remaining after treating tissue with naloxazone demonstrates unique pharmacological profiles for each. These results suggest the existence of distinct binding sites for kappa- and sigma-opiates which differ from those sites which selectively bind morphine (mu) and enkephalin

  18. Nanodisc-Targeted STD NMR Spectroscopy Reveals Atomic Details of Ligand Binding to Lipid Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-García, Juan C; Inacio Dos Reis, Rosana; Taylor, Richard J; Henry, Alistair J; Watts, Anthony

    2018-05-18

    Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy is one of the most popular ligand-based NMR techniques for the study of protein-ligand interactions. This is due to its robustness and the fact that it is focused on the signals of the ligand, without any need for NMR information on the macromolecular target. This technique is most commonly applied to systems involving different types of ligands (e.g., small organic molecules, carbohydrates or lipids) and a protein as the target, in which the latter is selectively saturated. However, only a few examples have been reported where membrane mimetics are the macromolecular binding partners. Here, we have employed STD NMR spectroscopy to investigate the interactions of the neurotransmitter dopamine with mimetics of lipid bilayers, such as nanodiscs, by saturation of the latter. In particular, the interactions between dopamine and model lipid nanodiscs formed either from charged or zwitterionic lipids have been resolved at the atomic level. The results, in agreement with previous isothermal titration calorimetry studies, show that dopamine preferentially binds to negatively charged model membranes, but also provide detailed atomic insights into the mode of interaction of dopamine with membrane mimetics. Our findings provide relevant structural information for the design of lipid-based drug carriers of dopamine and its structural analogues and are of general applicability to other systems. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Lipid-regulated sterol transfer between closely apposed membranes by oxysterol-binding protein homologues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Timothy A; Choi, Mal-Gi; Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Mears, Jason A; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Hinshaw, Jenny E; Prinz, William A

    2009-12-14

    Sterols are transferred between cellular membranes by vesicular and poorly understood nonvesicular pathways. Oxysterol-binding protein-related proteins (ORPs) have been implicated in sterol sensing and nonvesicular transport. In this study, we show that yeast ORPs use a novel mechanism that allows regulated sterol transfer between closely apposed membranes, such as organelle contact sites. We find that the core lipid-binding domain found in all ORPs can simultaneously bind two membranes. Using Osh4p/Kes1p as a representative ORP, we show that ORPs have at least two membrane-binding surfaces; one near the mouth of the sterol-binding pocket and a distal site that can bind a second membrane. The distal site is required for the protein to function in cells and, remarkably, regulates the rate at which Osh4p extracts and delivers sterols in a phosphoinositide-dependent manner. Together, these findings suggest a new model of how ORPs could sense and regulate the lipid composition of adjacent membranes.

  20. A calorimetric study of the thermotropic behaviour of mixtures of brain cerebrosides with other brain lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, D S; Chapman, D

    1988-04-22

    We have used a computer-controlled differential scanning calorimeter to determine the phases present in mixtures of the brain galactocerebrosides with other representative brain lipids. There are two types of brain galactocerebroside, those which possess an alpha-hydroxy substituent on the acyl chain (HFA) and those that do not (NFA). In the liquid crystalline state both cerebrosides were miscible with all the lipids studied, but in the gel state they were immiscible with cholesterol and the brain phosphatidylcholines. However, cholesterol mixtures in which the cholesterol mole fraction exceeded one third formed homogeneous metastable gel states on cooling from above the melting point of the cerebroside. Relaxation to the stable two phase state took place slowly over several hours. The solubilities of the galactocerebrosides in the other main brain sphingolipid, sphingomyelin, were much higher. Only in the case of the NFA galactocerebroside and at low mole fractions of sphingomyelin was immiscibility detected. Ternary mixtures of the two cerebrosides with sphingomyelin/cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol (PC/Chol) showed different miscibility characteristics. On cooling from 80 degrees C all mixtures formed homogeneous gel states. However, on standing the cerebrosides separated into discrete gel phases in all mixtures but one, that in which HFA galactocerebrosides were mixed with sphingomyelin and cholesterol. The cerebroside in the mixture with the composition closest to that of myelin, HFA/PC/Chol, melted at 38 degrees C. On scanning guinea pig CNS myelin which had been equilibrated at 5 degrees C a transition was detected with Tmax 33 degrees C. On the basis of comparison with the HFA/PC/Chol mixture we propose that the transition in myelin at this temperature is due to the melting of a galactocerebroside gel phase.

  1. Immunochemical characterization of the brain glutamate binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S.

    1986-01-01

    A glutamate binding protein (GBP) was purified from bovine and rat brain to near homogeneity. Polyclonal antibodies were raised against this protein. An enzyme-linked-immunosorbent-assay was used to quantify and determine the specificity of the antibody response. The antibodies were shown to strongly react with bovine brain GBP and the analogous protein from rat brain. The antibodies did not show any crossreactivity with the glutamate metabolizing enzymes, glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamine synthetase and glutamyl transpeptidase, however it crossreacted moderately with glutamate decarboxylase. The antibodies were also used to define the possible physiologic activity of GBP in synaptic membranes. The antibodies were shown: (i) to inhibit the excitatory amino-acid stimulation of thiocyanate (SCN)flux, (ii) had no effect on transport of L-Glutamic acid across the synaptic membrane, and (iii) had no effect on the depolarization-induced release of L-glutamate. When the anti-GBP antibodies were used to localize and quantify the GBP distribution in various subcellular fractions and in brain tissue samples, it was found that the hippocampus had the highest immunoreactivity followed by the cerebral cortex, cerebellar cortex and caudate-putamen. The distribution of immunoreactivity in the subcellular fraction were as follows: synaptic membranes > crude mitochondrial fraction > homogenate > myelin. In conclusion these studies suggest that: (a) the rat brain GBP and the bovine brain GBP are immunologically homologous protein, (b) there are no structural similarities between the GBP and the glutamate metabolizing enzymes with the exception of glutamate decarboxylase and (c) the subcellular and regional distribution of the GBP immunoreactivity followed a similar pattern as observed for L-[ 3 H]-binding

  2. Snake cytotoxins bind to membranes via interactions with phosphatidylserine head groups of lipids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia G Konshina

    Full Text Available The major representatives of Elapidae snake venom, cytotoxins (CTs, share similar three-fingered fold and exert diverse range of biological activities against various cell types. CT-induced cell death starts from the membrane recognition process, whose molecular details remain unclear. It is known, however, that the presence of anionic lipids in cell membranes is one of the important factors determining CT-membrane binding. In this work, we therefore investigated specific interactions between one of the most abundant of such lipids, phosphatidylserine (PS, and CT 4 of Naja kaouthia using a combined, experimental and modeling, approach. It was shown that incorporation of PS into zwitterionic liposomes greatly increased the membrane-damaging activity of CT 4 measured by the release of the liposome-entrapped calcein fluorescent dye. The CT-induced leakage rate depends on the PS concentration with a maximum at approximately 20% PS. Interestingly, the effects observed for PS were much more pronounced than those measured for another anionic lipid, sulfatide. To delineate the potential PS binding sites on CT 4 and estimate their relative affinities, a series of computer simulations was performed for the systems containing the head group of PS and different spatial models of CT 4 in aqueous solution and in an implicit membrane. This was done using an original hybrid computational protocol implementing docking, Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. As a result, at least three putative PS-binding sites with different affinities to PS molecule were delineated. Being located in different parts of the CT molecule, these anion-binding sites can potentially facilitate and modulate the multi-step process of the toxin insertion into lipid bilayers. This feature together with the diverse binding affinities of the sites to a wide variety of anionic targets on the membrane surface appears to be functionally meaningful and may adjust CT action against

  3. Inhibition of fatty acid binding proteins elevates brain anandamide levels and produces analgesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kaczocha

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA is an antinociceptive lipid that is inactivated through cellular uptake and subsequent catabolism by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH. Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs are intracellular carriers that deliver AEA and related N-acylethanolamines (NAEs to FAAH for hydrolysis. The mammalian brain expresses three FABP subtypes: FABP3, FABP5, and FABP7. Recent work from our group has revealed that pharmacological inhibition of FABPs reduces inflammatory pain in mice. The goal of the current work was to explore the effects of FABP inhibition upon nociception in diverse models of pain. We developed inhibitors with differential affinities for FABPs to elucidate the subtype(s that contributes to the antinociceptive effects of FABP inhibitors. Inhibition of FABPs reduced nociception associated with inflammatory, visceral, and neuropathic pain. The antinociceptive effects of FABP inhibitors mirrored their affinities for FABP5, while binding to FABP3 and FABP7 was not a predictor of in vivo efficacy. The antinociceptive effects of FABP inhibitors were mediated by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα and FABP inhibition elevated brain levels of AEA, providing the first direct evidence that FABPs regulate brain endocannabinoid tone. These results highlight FABPs as novel targets for the development of analgesic and anti-inflammatory therapeutics.

  4. Interplay of electrostatics and lipid packing determines the binding of charged polymer coated nanoparticles to model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Nupur; Bhattacharya, Rupak; Saha, Arindam; Jana, Nikhil R; Basu, Jaydeep K

    2015-10-07

    Understanding of nanoparticle-membrane interactions is useful for various applications of nanoparticles like drug delivery and imaging. Here we report on the studies of interaction between hydrophilic charged polymer coated semiconductor quantum dot nanoparticles with model lipid membranes. Atomic force microscopy and X-ray reflectivity measurements suggest that cationic nanoparticles bind and penetrate bilayers of zwitterionic lipids. Penetration and binding depend on the extent of lipid packing and result in the disruption of the lipid bilayer accompanied by enhanced lipid diffusion. On the other hand, anionic nanoparticles show minimal membrane binding although, curiously, their interaction leads to reduction in lipid diffusivity. It is suggested that the enhanced binding of cationic QDs at higher lipid packing can be understood in terms of the effective surface potential of the bilayers which is tunable through membrane lipid packing. Our results bring forth the subtle interplay of membrane lipid packing and electrostatics which determine nanoparticle binding and penetration of model membranes with further implications for real cell membranes.

  5. Air pollutant sulfur dioxide-induced alterations on the levels of lipids, lipid peroxidation and lipase activity in various regions of the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haider, S S; Hasan, M; Khan, N H

    1982-07-01

    The exposure of rats to SO/sub 2/ (10 p.p.m.) for one hour daily for 30 days caused depletion of total lipids in all brain areas. The contents of phospholipid were elevated in cerebellum and brain stem, but were depleted in cerebral hemisphere. Cholesterol levels showed an increase in various brain regions. On the other hand, gangliosides were increased in cerebellum and brain stem, but were decreased in cerebral hemisphere. Interestingly, cholesterol/phospholipid ratio was increased in different regions of the brain. Lipase activity was elevated in cerebral hemisphere. Lipid peroxidation showed marked increment in whole brain and in all the brain areas studied. The results suggest that SO/sub 2/-exposure induces degradation of lipids. Interestingly, the lipid contents are affected differentially in the various parts of the brain.

  6. Binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine to human platelet membranes with compensation for saturable binding to filters and its implication for binding studies with brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, O.M.; Wood, K.M.; Williams, D.C.

    1984-08-01

    Apparent specific binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine to human platelet membranes at high concentrations of imipramine showed deviation from that expected of a single binding site, a result consistent with a low-affinity binding site. The deviation was due to displaceable, saturable binding to the glass fibre filters used in the assays. Imipramine, chloripramine, desipramine, and fluoxetine inhibited binding to filters whereas 5-hydroxytryptamine and ethanol were ineffective. Experimental conditions were developed that eliminated filter binding, allowing assay of high- and low-affinity binding to membranes. Failure to correct for filter binding may lead to overestimation of binding parameters, Bmax and KD for high-affinity binding to membranes, and may also be misinterpreted as indicating a low-affinity binding component in both platelet and brain membranes. Low-affinity binding (KD less than 2 microM) of imipramine to human platelet membranes was demonstrated and its significance discussed.

  7. Lipid Binding of the Amphipathic Helix Serving as Membrane Anchor of Pestivirus Glycoprotein Erns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberle, Daniel; Oetter, Kay-Marcus; Meyers, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Pestiviruses express a peculiar protein named Erns representing envelope glycoprotein and RNase, which is important for control of the innate immune response and persistent infection. The latter functions are connected with secretion of a certain amount of Erns from the infected cell. Retention/secretion of Erns is most likely controlled by its unusual membrane anchor, a long amphipathic helix attached in plane to the membrane. Here we present results of experiments conducted with a lipid vesicle sedimentation assay able to separate lipid-bound from unbound protein dissolved in the water phase. Using this technique we show that a protein composed of tag sequences and the carboxyterminal 65 residues of Erns binds specifically to membrane vesicles with a clear preference for compositions containing negatively charged lipids. Mutations disturbing the helical folding and/or amphipathic character of the anchor as well as diverse truncations and exchange of amino acids important for intracellular retention of Erns had no or only small effects on the proteins membrane binding. This result contrasts the dramatically increased secretion rates observed for Erns proteins with equivalent mutations within cells. Accordingly, the ratio of secreted versus cell retained Erns is not determined by the lipid affinity of the membrane anchor.

  8. Lipid Binding of the Amphipathic Helix Serving as Membrane Anchor of Pestivirus Glycoprotein Erns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Aberle

    Full Text Available Pestiviruses express a peculiar protein named Erns representing envelope glycoprotein and RNase, which is important for control of the innate immune response and persistent infection. The latter functions are connected with secretion of a certain amount of Erns from the infected cell. Retention/secretion of Erns is most likely controlled by its unusual membrane anchor, a long amphipathic helix attached in plane to the membrane. Here we present results of experiments conducted with a lipid vesicle sedimentation assay able to separate lipid-bound from unbound protein dissolved in the water phase. Using this technique we show that a protein composed of tag sequences and the carboxyterminal 65 residues of Erns binds specifically to membrane vesicles with a clear preference for compositions containing negatively charged lipids. Mutations disturbing the helical folding and/or amphipathic character of the anchor as well as diverse truncations and exchange of amino acids important for intracellular retention of Erns had no or only small effects on the proteins membrane binding. This result contrasts the dramatically increased secretion rates observed for Erns proteins with equivalent mutations within cells. Accordingly, the ratio of secreted versus cell retained Erns is not determined by the lipid affinity of the membrane anchor.

  9. Multiple [3H]-nemonapride binding sites in calf brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmeste, D M; Tang, S W; Li, M; Fang, H

    1997-07-01

    [3H]-Nemonapride has been the ligand of choice to label D4 dopamine receptors. Its specificity was questioned when it was discovered that sigma (sigma) sites were also labeled by [3H]-nemonapride. To further characterize the binding of [3H]-nemonapride, three areas of calf brain (striatum, frontal cortex and cerebellum) were examined. In all three areas, [3H]-nemonapride labeled multiple sites. Dopaminergic and sigma sites were the most prominent. The sigma binding profile was sigma-1 like with a Ki binding profile as follows (in order of decreasing potency): haloperidol, PPAP, pentazocine, DTG, U-50488, R(+)-3-PPP. Experiments using sulpiride and pentazocine to block striatal dopaminergic and sigma sites, respectively, revealed additional, not previously characterized binding sites for [3H]-nemonapride. One component which was present in striatum but not in frontal cortex or cerebellum, had affinity for some neuroleptics and WB-4101, but not for typical serotonergic agents. Thus, [3H]-nemonapride has no selectivity for dopamine receptors unless stringent experimental conditions are met.

  10. Structure and mechanism of calmodulin binding to a signaling sphingolipid reveal new aspects of lipid-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Erika; Harmat, Veronika; Tóth, Judit; Vértessy, Beáta G.; Módos, Károly; Kardos, József; Liliom, Károly

    2010-01-01

    Lipid-protein interactions are rarely characterized at a structural molecular level due to technical difficulties; however, the biological significance of understanding the mechanism of these interactions is outstanding. In this report, we provide mechanistic insight into the inhibitory complex formation of the lipid mediator sphingosylphosphorylcholine with calmodulin, the most central and ubiquitous regulator protein in calcium signaling. We applied crystallographic, thermodynamic, kinetic, and spectroscopic approaches using purified bovine calmodulin and bovine cerebral microsomal fraction to arrive at our conclusions. Here we present 1) a 1.6-Å resolution crystal structure of their complex, in which the sphingolipid occupies the conventional hydrophobic binding site on calmodulin; 2) a peculiar stoichiometry-dependent binding process: at low or high protein-to-lipid ratio calmodulin binds lipid micelles or a few lipid molecules in a compact globular conformation, respectively, and 3) evidence that the sphingolipid displaces calmodulin from its targets on cerebral microsomes. We have ascertained the specificity of the interaction using structurally related lipids as controls. Our observations reveal the structural basis of selective calmodulin inhibition by the sphingolipid. On the basis of the crystallographic and biophysical characterization of the calmodulin–sphingosylphosphorylcholine interaction, we propose a novel lipid-protein binding model, which might be applicable to other interactions as well.—Kovacs, E., Harmat, V., Tóth, J., Vértessy, B. G., Módos, K., Kardos, J., Liliom, K. Structure and mechanism of calmodulin binding to a signaling sphingolipid reveal new aspects of lipid-protein interactions. PMID:20522785

  11. In vivo binding of tritiated dopaminergic ligands in mouse brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudry, Michel; Martres, M.-P.; Le Sellin, Michel; Schwartz, J.-C.; Guyon, Anne; Morgat, J.-L.

    1977-01-01

    The regional distribution of various dopaminergic radiolabelled ligands has been studied in the mouse brain after their intravenous injections. Among them, 3 H-pimozide and, to a lesser extent, 3 H-apomorphine are preferentially accumulated in the striatum, a region rich in dopaminergic receptors, as compared to cerebellum, a region believed not to contain dopaminergic receptors. For 3 H-pimozide, this preferential retention is due to a more rapid disappearance from the cerebellum than from the striatum. Moreover, prior administration of various neuroleptics which do not modify 3 H-pimozide levels recovered in the cerebellum, abolishes the differential retention of 3 H-pimozide in the striatum. These results indicate that the retention of 3 H-pimozide in the brain may be regarded as the sum of two components: a non-specific retention evaluated by 3 H-pimozide level in the cerebellum and the binding to dopaminergic receptors [fr

  12. Small substrate transport and mechanism of a molybdate ATP binding cassette transporter in a lipid environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Austin J; Harrison, Alistair; Alvarez, Frances J D; Davidson, Amy L; Pinkett, Heather W

    2014-05-23

    Embedded in the plasma membrane of all bacteria, ATP binding cassette (ABC) importers facilitate the uptake of several vital nutrients and cofactors. The ABC transporter, MolBC-A, imports molybdate by passing substrate from the binding protein MolA to a membrane-spanning translocation pathway of MolB. To understand the mechanism of transport in the biological membrane as a whole, the effects of the lipid bilayer on transport needed to be addressed. Continuous wave-electron paramagnetic resonance and in vivo molybdate uptake studies were used to test the impact of the lipid environment on the mechanism and function of MolBC-A. Working with the bacterium Haemophilus influenzae, we found that MolBC-A functions as a low affinity molybdate transporter in its native environment. In periods of high extracellular molybdate concentration, H. influenzae makes use of parallel molybdate transport systems (MolBC-A and ModBC-A) to take up a greater amount of molybdate than a strain with ModBC-A alone. In addition, the movement of the translocation pathway in response to nucleotide binding and hydrolysis in a lipid environment is conserved when compared with in-detergent analysis. However, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy indicates that a lipid environment restricts the flexibility of the MolBC translocation pathway. By combining continuous wave-electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and substrate uptake studies, we reveal details of molybdate transport and the logistics of uptake systems that employ multiple transporters for the same substrate, offering insight into the mechanisms of nutrient uptake in bacteria. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Semisynthetic Lipopeptides Derived from Nisin Display Antibacterial Activity and Lipid II Binding on Par with That of the Parent Compound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Timo; Wood, Thomas M.; 't Hart, Peter; Kleijn, Laurens H. J.; Hendrickx, Antoni P. A.; Willems, Rob J. L.; Breukink, Eefjan; Martin, Nathaniel I.

    2015-01-01

    The lipid II-binding N-terminus of nisin, comprising the so-called A/B ring system, was synthetically modified to provide antibacterially active and proteolytically stable derivatives. A variety of lipids were coupled to the C-terminus of the nisin A/B ring system to generate semisynthetic

  14. Mass Spectrometry Imaging Shows Cocaine and Methylphenidate Have Opposite Effects on Major Lipids in Drosophila Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipsen, Mai H; Phan, Nhu T N; Fletcher, John S; Malmberg, Per; Ewing, Andrew G

    2018-03-20

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to study the effects of cocaine versus methylphenidate administration on both the localization and abundance of lipids in Drosophila melanogaster brain. A J105 ToF-SIMS with a 40 keV gas cluster primary ion source enabled us to probe molecular ions of biomolecules on the fly with a spatial resolution of ∼3 μm, giving us unique insights into the effect of these drugs on molecular lipids in the nervous system. Significant changes in phospholipid composition were observed in the central brain for both. Principal components image analysis revealed that changes occurred mainly for phosphatidylcholines, phosphatidylethanolamines, and phosphatidylinositols. When the lipid changes caused by cocaine were compared with those induced by methylphenidate, it was shown that these drugs exert opposite effects on the brain lipid structure. We speculate that this might relate to the molecular mechanism of cognition and memory.

  15. MR spectroscopy detection of lactate and lipid signals in the brains of healthy elderly people

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sijens, P.E.; Heijboer, R.J.J.; Oudkerk, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital Groningen (Netherlands); Heijer, T. den; Leeuw, F.E. de; Groot, J.C. de; Hofman, A.; Breteler, M.M.B. [Dept. of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Erasmus University Medical School, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Achten, E. [Dept. of Magnetic Resonance, Gent University Hospital (Belgium)

    2001-08-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to assess the presence of brain lactate and lipid signals, frequently associated with the presence of pathology, in healthy persons of 60-90 years old (n=540). Lactate and lipid signals were observed in, respectively, 25 and 6% of women, and 18 and 2% of men. Upon adjustment for age, and for MRI-detected cerebral atrophy and white matter lesions, the gender differences in lactate and lipid remained the same (p=0.05 and p=0.03, respectively). Brain lactate and lipid signals appear to be intrinsic to aging. However, the presence of these metabolites in very focal areas only, rather than in any distributed fashion within the brain (the latter generally the case with cerebral atrophy and white matter lesions), strongly suggests the existence of asymptomatic focal pathology not shown on MRI. (orig.)

  16. Lactoferrin bioconjugated solid lipid nanoparticles: a new drug delivery system for potential brain targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Indu; Swami, Rajan; Pooja, Deep; Jeengar, Manish Kumar; Khan, Wahid; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Delivery of drugs to brain is a subtle task in the therapy of many severe neurological disorders. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) easily diffuse the blood-brain barrier (BBB) due to their lipophilic nature. Furthermore, ligand conjugation on SLN surface enhances the targeting efficiency. Lactoferin (Lf) conjugated SLN system is first time attempted for effective brain targeting in this study. Preparation of Lf-modified docetaxel (DTX)-loaded SLN for proficient delivery of DTX to brain. DTX-loaded SLN were prepared using emulsification and solvent evaporation method and conjugation of Lf on SLN surface (C-SLN) was attained through carbodiimide chemistry. These lipidic nanoparticles were evaluated by DLS, AFM, FTIR, XRD techniques and in vitro release studies. Colloidal stability study was performed in biologically simulated environment (normal saline and serum). These lipidic nanoparticles were further evaluated for its targeting mechanism for uptake in brain tumour cells and brain via receptor saturation studies and distribution studies in brain, respectively. Particle size of lipidic nanoparticles was found to be optimum. Surface morphology (zeta potential, AFM) and surface chemistry (FTIR) confirmed conjugation of Lf on SLN surface. Cytotoxicity studies revealed augmented apoptotic activity of C-SLN than SLN and DTX. Enhanced cytotoxicity was demonstrated by receptor saturation and uptake studies. Brain concentration of DTX was elevated significantly with C-SLN than marketed formulation. It is evident from the cytotoxicity, uptake that SLN has potential to deliver drug to brain than marketed formulation but conjugating Lf on SLN surface (C-SLN) further increased the targeting potential for brain tumour. Moreover, brain distribution studies corroborated the use of C-SLN as a viable vehicle to target drug to brain. Hence, C-SLN was demonstrated to be a promising DTX delivery system to brain as it possessed remarkable biocompatibility, stability and efficacy than

  17. Drug binding and mobility relating to the thermal fluctuation in fluid lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Emiko; Yoshii, Noriyuki

    2008-12-01

    Drug binding and mobility in fluid lipid bilayer membranes are quantified in situ by using the multinuclear solution NMR combined with the pulsed-field-gradient technique. One-dimensional and pulsed-field-gradient F19 and H1 NMR signals of an anticancer drug, 5-fluorouracil (5FU) are analyzed at 283-313 K in the presence of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) of egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) as model cell membranes. The simultaneous observation of the membrane-bound and free 5FU signals enables to quantify in what amount of 5FU is bound to the membrane and how fast 5FU is moving within the membrane in relation to the thermal fluctuation of the soft, fluid environment. It is shown that the mobility of membrane-bound 5FU is slowed down by almost two orders of magnitude and similar to the lipid movement in the membrane, the movement closely related to the intramembrane fluidity. The mobility of 5FU and EPC is, however, not similar at 313 K; the 5FU movement is enhanced in the membrane as a result of the loose binding of 5FU in the lipid matrices. The membrane-bound fraction of 5FU is ˜0.1 and almost unaltered over the temperature range examined. It is also independent of the 5FU concentration from 2 to 30 mM with respect to the 40-50 mM LUV. The free energy of the 5FU binding is estimated at -4 to -2 kJ/mol, the magnitude always close to the thermal fluctuation, 2.4-2.6 kJ/mol.

  18. Lipid binding to cytoglobin leads to a change in haem co-ordination: a role for cytoglobin in lipid signalling of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, Brandon J; Svistunenko, Dimitri A; Wilson, Michael T

    2011-03-15

    Cytoglobin is a recently discovered hexa-co-ordinate haemoglobin that does not appear to function as a classical oxygen-binding protein. Its function is unknown and studies on the effects of changes in its expression have not decisively determined its role within the cell. In the present paper, we report that the protein is transformed from hexa-co-ordinate to penta-co-ordinate on binding a lipid molecule. This transformation occurs with the ferric oxidation state of the protein, but not the ferrous state, indicating that this process only occurs under an oxidative environment and may thus be related to redox-linked cell signalling mechanisms. Oleate binds to the protein in a 1:1 stoichiometry and with high affinity (K(d)=0.7 μM); however, stopped-flow kinetic measurements yield a K(d) value of 110 μM. The discrepancy between these K(d) values may be rationalized by recognizing that cytoglobin is a disulfide-linked dimer and invoking co-operativity in oleate binding. The lipid-induced transformation of cytoglobin from hexa-co-ordinate to penta-co-ordinate does not occur with similar hexa-co-ordinate haemoglobins such as neuroglobin, and therefore appears to be a unique property of cytoglobin among the haemoglobin superfamily. The lipid-derived transformation may explain why cytoglobin has enhanced peroxidatic activity, converting lipids into various oxidized products, a property virtually absent from neuroglobin and much decreased in myoglobin. We propose that the binding of ferric cytoglobin to lipids and their subsequent transformation may be integral to the physiological function of cytoglobin, generating cell signalling lipid molecules under an oxidative environment.

  19. A novel lipid transfer protein from the pea Pisum sativum: isolation, recombinant expression, solution structure, antifungal activity, lipid binding, and allergenic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, Ivan V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Finkina, Ekaterina I; Melnikova, Daria N; Rumynskiy, Eugene I; Arseniev, Alexander S; Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V

    2016-04-30

    Plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) assemble a family of small (7-9 kDa) ubiquitous cationic proteins with an ability to bind and transport lipids as well as participate in various physiological processes including defense against phytopathogens. They also form one of the most clinically relevant classes of plant allergens. Nothing is known to date about correlation between lipid-binding and IgE-binding properties of LTPs. The garden pea Pisum sativum is widely consumed crop and important allergenic specie of the legume family. This work is aimed at isolation of a novel LTP from pea seeds and characterization of its structural, functional, and allergenic properties. Three novel lipid transfer proteins, designated as Ps-LTP1-3, were found in the garden pea Pisum sativum, their cDNA sequences were determined, and mRNA expression levels of all the three proteins were measured at different pea organs. Ps-LTP1 was isolated for the first time from the pea seeds, and its complete amino acid sequence was determined. The protein exhibits antifungal activity and is a membrane-active compound that causes a leakage from artificial liposomes. The protein binds various lipids including bioactive jasmonic acid. Spatial structure of the recombinant uniformly (13)C,(15)N-labelled Ps-LTP1 was solved by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. In solution the unliganded protein represents the mixture of two conformers (relative populations ~ 85:15) which are interconnected by exchange process with characteristic time ~ 100 ms. Hydrophobic residues of major conformer form a relatively large internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity (van der Waals volume comes up to ~1000 Å(3)). The minor conformer probably corresponds to the protein with the partially collapsed internal cavity. For the first time conformational heterogeneity in solution was shown for an unliganded plant lipid transfer protein. Heat denaturation profile and simulated gastrointestinal digestion assay showed that Ps

  20. The effect of infectious brain edema on NMDA receptor binding in rat's brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Guansheng; Chen Jianfang; Chen Xiang

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: The effect of the infectious brain edema (IBE) induced by Bordetella Pertussis (BP) on the specific binding of 3 H MK-801 in rat's brain in vivo was determined. METHODS: BP was injected via left internal carotid artery in rat model of infectious brain edema. Male SD rats were divided into three groups: 1) Group control (NS, n = 11); 2) Group IBF (BP, n = 12); 3) Group pretreatment of MK-801 + PB (MK-801, n = 4). Normal saline or BP 0.2 ml/kg was injected into left internal carotid artery in NS and BP group respectively. MK-801 0.5 mg/kg per day was injected i.p. two days before injection of BP in group MK-801. Rats were killed by decapitation at 24 hours after injection of BP. The specific binding of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor were measured with 3 H-MK-801 in the neuronal membrane of cerebral cortex. The Scatchard plots were performed. RESULTS: The B max values were 0.623 +- 0.082 and 0.606 +- 0.087 pmol/mg protein in group NS and BP respectively (t = 0.48, P>0.05). The Kd values were 43.1 +- 4.2 and 30.5 +- 3.0 nmol/L in group NS and BP respectively (t = 7.8, P<0.05). The specific binding of NMDA receptor was decreased by pretreatment of MK-801. CONCLUSIONS: The total number of NMDA receptor had not changed, whereas its affinity increased significantly in the model of brain edema induced by pertussis bacilli in rat. The increase of affinity of NMDA receptor can be blockaded by MK-801 pretreatment in vivo

  1. Bidirectional lipid droplet velocities are controlled by differential binding strengths of HCV core DII protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney K Lyn

    Full Text Available Host cell lipid droplets (LD are essential in the hepatitis C virus (HCV life cycle and are targeted by the viral capsid core protein. Core-coated LDs accumulate in the perinuclear region and facilitate viral particle assembly, but it is unclear how mobility of these LDs is directed by core. Herein we used two-photon fluorescence, differential interference contrast imaging, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopies, to reveal novel core-mediated changes to LD dynamics. Expression of core protein's lipid binding domain II (DII-core induced slower LD speeds, but did not affect directionality of movement on microtubules. Modulating the LD binding strength of DII-core further impacted LD mobility, revealing the temporal effects of LD-bound DII-core. These results for DII-core coated LDs support a model for core-mediated LD localization that involves core slowing down the rate of movement of LDs until localization at the perinuclear region is accomplished where LD movement ceases. The guided localization of LDs by HCV core protein not only is essential to the viral life cycle but also poses an interesting target for the development of antiviral strategies against HCV.

  2. Evaluation of the application of chemical shift for the detection of lipid in brain lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, C.J. [Department of Biomedical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ng, K.H., E-mail: ngkh@um.edu.m [Department of Biomedical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ramli, N.; Azman, R.R. [Department of Biomedical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2011-02-15

    Non-invasive detection of the presence of lipids is particularly important in staging of intracranial tumours. Presence of lipid peak in aggressive intracranial tumours has been reported widely using MR spectroscopy. However this method has limitation due to long imaging time and artefacts formed by adjacent bones. Chemical shift MR imaging (with has shorter imaging time) is an alternative method that had been used to detect presence of lipid in vivo by means of signal intensity loss. The purpose of this study was to evaluate gradient echo in- and opposed-phase chemical shift pulse sequences for detection of lipid elements in brain lesion. Ten cylindered phantoms measuring 3 x 3 cm were filled with various mixtures of lipid and water: 0-90% lipid, in 10% step by weight. The gradient echo in- and opposed-phase chemical shift sequences were performed using a 1.5 T MRI (Magnetom Vision, Siemens) with a head coil. In addition, we performed MRI and chemical shift studies on 32 patients with brain lesion. We then analysed the association between out of phase intensity value and classification of the lesions. For phantom containing 50% lipid, maximum signal loss on opposed-phase images was observed. There were significant differences between in- and opposed-phase lipid-water phantom images (P = 0.0054). Most of the benign lesions fall into the positive out of phase intensity value, and malignant lesions fall into negative out of phase intensity value. We conclude that chemical shift artefact can be applied in detecting and characterising lipid elements in brain lesion.

  3. Evaluation of the application of chemical shift for the detection of lipid in brain lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, C.J.; Ng, K.H.; Ramli, N.; Azman, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    Non-invasive detection of the presence of lipids is particularly important in staging of intracranial tumours. Presence of lipid peak in aggressive intracranial tumours has been reported widely using MR spectroscopy. However this method has limitation due to long imaging time and artefacts formed by adjacent bones. Chemical shift MR imaging (with has shorter imaging time) is an alternative method that had been used to detect presence of lipid in vivo by means of signal intensity loss. The purpose of this study was to evaluate gradient echo in- and opposed-phase chemical shift pulse sequences for detection of lipid elements in brain lesion. Ten cylindered phantoms measuring 3 x 3 cm were filled with various mixtures of lipid and water: 0-90% lipid, in 10% step by weight. The gradient echo in- and opposed-phase chemical shift sequences were performed using a 1.5 T MRI (Magnetom Vision, Siemens) with a head coil. In addition, we performed MRI and chemical shift studies on 32 patients with brain lesion. We then analysed the association between out of phase intensity value and classification of the lesions. For phantom containing 50% lipid, maximum signal loss on opposed-phase images was observed. There were significant differences between in- and opposed-phase lipid-water phantom images (P = 0.0054). Most of the benign lesions fall into the positive out of phase intensity value, and malignant lesions fall into negative out of phase intensity value. We conclude that chemical shift artefact can be applied in detecting and characterising lipid elements in brain lesion.

  4. Sex hormone binding globulin, free estradiol index, and lipid profiles in girls with precocious puberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Wook Chae

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available PurposeSex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG modulates the availability of biologically active free sex hormones. The regulatory role of SHBG might be important in the relationship between hormone levels and the modification of lipid profiles in girls with precocious puberty. However, few studies have evaluated the relationship of SHBG, free estradiol index (FEI, and lipid levels in these girls.MethodsOne hundred and nine girls less than 8 years of age with pubertal development were enrolled. FEI was calculated with SHBG and estradiol (E2. We analyzed SHBG between peak luteinizing hormone (LH≥5 (IU/L (group 1 and LH<5 (IU/L (group 2 through a gonadotropin releasing hormone stimulation test.ResultsBody mass index (BMI standard deviation score (SDS was higher in group 2 than in group 1 (P=0.004. Serum SHBG levels did not differ and FEI was not higher in group 1 (P=0.122. Serum cholesterol, HDL, and LDL did not differ; however, triglyceride levels were higher in group 2 (P=0.023. SHBG was negatively correlated with bone age advancement, BMI, BMI SDS, and FEI, and was positively correlated with HDL. However, SHBG was not correlated with E2 or peak LH.ConclusionSerum SHBG itself might not be associated with precocious puberty in girls, but it might be related to BMI and lipid profiles. Further studies are needed to reveal the relationship between sex hormone and obesity in girls with precocious puberty.

  5. Brain Levels of Prostaglandins, Endocannabinoids, and Related Lipids Are Affected by Mating Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordyn M. Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Endogenous cannabinoids (eCBs are involved in the development and regulation of reproductive behaviors. Likewise, prostaglandins (PGs drive sexual differentiation and initiation of ovulation. Here, we use lipidomics strategies to test the hypotheses that mating immediately activates the biosynthesis and/or metabolism of eCBs and PGs and that specific mating strategies differentially regulate these lipids in the brain. Methods. Lipid extractions and tandem mass spectrometric analysis were performed on brains from proestrous rats that had experienced one of two mating strategies (paced or standard mating and two nonmated groups (chamber exposed and home cage controls. Levels of PGs (PGE2 and PGF2alpha, eCBs (AEA and 2-AG, N-arachidonoyl glycine, and 4 related lipids (4 N-acylethanolamides were measured in olfactory bulb, hypothalamus, hippocampus, thalamus, striatum, midbrain, cerebellum, and brainstem. Results. Overall, levels of these lipids were significantly lower among paced compared to standard mated rats with the most dramatic decreases observed in brainstem, hippocampus, midbrain, and striatum. However, chamber exposed rats had significantly higher levels of these lipids compared to home cage controls and paced mated wherein the hippocampus showed the largest increases. Conclusions. These data demonstrate that mating strategies and exposure to mating arenas influence lipid signaling in the brain.

  6. Tailoring Lipid and Polymeric Nanoparticles as siRNA Carriers towards the Blood-Brain Barrier - from Targeting to Safe Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Maria João; Fernandes, Carlos; Martins, Susana; Borges, Fernanda; Sarmento, Bruno

    2017-03-01

    Blood-brain barrier is a tightly packed layer of endothelial cells surrounding the brain that acts as the main obstacle for drugs enter the central nervous system (CNS), due to its unique features, as tight junctions and drug efflux systems. Therefore, since the incidence of CNS disorders is increasing worldwide, medical therapeutics need to be improved. Consequently, aiming to surpass blood-brain barrier and overcome CNS disabilities, silencing P-glycoprotein as a drug efflux transporter at brain endothelial cells through siRNA is considered a promising approach. For siRNA enzymatic protection and efficient delivery to its target, two different nanoparticles platforms, solid lipid (SLN) and poly-lactic-co-glycolic (PLGA) nanoparticles were used in this study. Polymeric PLGA nanoparticles were around 115 nm in size and had 50 % of siRNA association efficiency, while SLN presented 150 nm and association efficiency close to 52 %. Their surface was functionalized with a peptide-binding transferrin receptor, in a site-oriented manner confirmed by NMR, and their targeting ability against human brain endothelial cells was successfully demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The interaction of modified nanoparticles with brain endothelial cells increased 3-fold compared to non-modified lipid nanoparticles, and 4-fold compared to non-modified PLGA nanoparticles, respectively. These nanosystems, which were also demonstrated to be safe for human brain endothelial cells, without significant cytotoxicity, bring a new hopeful breath to the future of brain diseases therapies.

  7. Brain-targeted solid lipid nanoparticles containing riluzole: preparation, characterization and biodistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondì, Maria Luisa; Craparo, Emanuela Fabiola; Giammona, Gaetano; Drago, Filippo

    2010-01-01

    Developments within nanomedicine have revealed a great potential for drug delivery to the brain. In this study nanoparticulate systems as drug carriers for riluzole, with sufficiently high loading capacity and small particle size, were prepared to a reach therapeutic drug level in the brain. Solid lipid nanoparticles containing riluzole have great potential as drug-delivery systems for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and were produced by using the warm oil-in-water microemulsion technique. The resulting systems obtained were approximately 88 nm in size and negatively charged. Drug-release profiles demonstrated that a drug release was dependent on medium pH. Biodistribution of riluzole blended into solid lipid nanoparticles was carried out after administration to rats and the results were compared with those obtained by riluzole aqueous dispersion administration. Rats were sacrificed at time intervals of 8, 16 and 30 h, and the riluzole concentration in the blood and organs such as the brain, liver, spleen, heart and kidney was determined. It was demonstrated that these solid lipid nanoparticles were able to successfully carry riluzole into the CNS. Moreover, a low drug biodistribution in organs such as the liver, spleen, heart, kidneys and lung was found when riluzole was administered as drug-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles. Riluzole-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles showed colloidal size and high drug loading, a greater efficacy than free riluzole in rats, a higher capability to carry the drug into the brain and a lower indiscriminate biodistribution.

  8. An autoradiographic map of (3H)diprenorphine binding in rat brain: effects of social interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panksepp, J.; Bishop, P.

    1981-01-01

    (3H)Diprenorphine binding was analyzed autoradiographically in the brains of 33 day old rat pups. A photographic atlas of diprenorphine binding in the coronal plane is provided to highlight the dispersion of opioid receptor systems through the brain. To determine whether brain opioid release may be induced by social interactions, half the animals were sacrificed following a 30 min period of social interaction while the other half were sacrificed following 30 min of social isolation. Opioid binding was higher in isolate-tested animals than socially-tested ones, suggesting that social interaction may promote endogenous brain opioid release

  9. Effect of dietary docosahexaenoic acid connecting phospholipids on the lipid peroxidation of the brain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Seiichi; Ishihara, Kenji; Kitagawa, Tomoko; Wada, Shun; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko

    2008-12-01

    The effect of dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3) with two lipid types on lipid peroxidation of the brain was investigated in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. Each group of female Balb/c mice was fed a diet containing DHA-connecting phospholipids (DHA-PL) or DHA-connecting triacylglycerols (DHA-TG) for 5 wk. Safflower oil was fed as the control. The lipid peroxide level of the brain was significantly lower in the mice fed the DHA-PL diet when compared to those fed the DHA-TG and safflower oil diets, while the alpha-tocopherol level was significantly higher in the mice fed the DHA-PL diet than in those fed the DHA-TG and safflower oil diets. The DHA level of phosphatidylethanolamine in the brain was significantly higher in the mice fed the DHA-PL diet than in those fed the safflower oil diet. The dimethylacetal levels were significantly higher in the mice fed the DHA-PL diet than in those fed the safflower oil and DHA-TG diets. These results suggest that the dietary DHA-connecting phospholipids have an antioxidant activity on the brain lipids in mice, and the effect may be related to the brain plasmalogen.

  10. Regional brain [(11)C]carfentanil binding following tobacco smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, Edward F; Hirasawa-Fujita, Mika; Ni, Lisong; Guthrie, Sally K; Zubieta, Jon Kar

    2015-06-03

    To determine if overnight tobacco abstinent carriers of the AG or GG (*G) vs. the AA variant of the human mu opioid receptor (OPRM1) A118G polymorphism (rs1799971) differ in [(11)C]carfentanil binding after tobacco smoking. Twenty healthy American male smokers who abstained from tobacco overnight were genotyped and completed positron emission tomography (PET) scans with the mu opioid receptor agonist, [(11)C]carfentanil. They smoked deniconized (denic) and average nicotine (avnic) cigarettes during the PET scans. Smoking avnic cigarette decreased the binding potential (BPND) of [(11)C]carfentanil in the right medial prefrontal cortex (mPfc; 6, 56, 18), left anterior medial prefrontal cortex (amPfc; -2, 46, 44), right ventral striatum (vStr; 16, 3, -10), left insula (Ins; -42, 10, -12), right hippocampus (Hippo; 18, -6, -14) and left cerebellum (Cbl; -10, -88, -34), and increased the BPND in left amygdala (Amy; -20, 0, -22), left putamen (Put; -22, 10, -6) and left nucleus accumbens (NAcc; -10, 12, -8). In the AA allele carriers, avnic cigarette smoking significantly changed the BPND compared to after denic smoking in most brain areas listed above. However in the *G carriers the significant BPND changes were confirmed in only amPfc and vStr. Free mu opioid receptor availability was significantly less in the *G than the AA carriers in the Amy and NAcc. The present study demonstrates that BPND changes induced by avnic smoking in OPRM1 *G carriers were blunted compared to the AA carriers. Also *G smokers had less free mu opioid receptor availability in Amy and NAcc. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Binding, folding and insertion of a β-hairpin peptide at a lipid bilayer surface: Influence of electrostatics and lipid tail packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Keon A; Davis, Caitlin M; Dyer, R Brian; Kindt, James T

    2018-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) act as host defenses against microbial pathogens. Here we investigate the interactions of SVS-1 (KVKVKVKV d P l PTKVKVKVK), an engineered AMP and anti-cancer β-hairpin peptide, with lipid bilayers using spectroscopic studies and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. In agreement with literature reports, simulation and experiment show preferential binding of SVS-1 peptides to anionic over neutral bilayers. Fluorescence and circular dichroism studies of a Trp-substituted SVS-1 analogue indicate, however, that it will bind to a zwitterionic DPPC bilayer under high-curvature conditions and folds into a hairpin. In bilayers formed from a 1:1 mixture of DPPC and anionic DPPG lipids, curvature and lipid fluidity are also observed to promote deeper insertion of the fluorescent peptide. Simulations using the CHARMM C36m force field offer complementary insight into timescales and mechanisms of folding and insertion. SVS-1 simulated at an anionic mixed POPC/POPG bilayer folded into a hairpin over a microsecond, the final stage in folding coinciding with the establishment of contact between the peptide's valine sidechains and the lipid tails through a "flip and dip" mechanism. Partial, transient folding and superficial bilayer contact are seen in simulation of the peptide at a zwitterionic POPC bilayer. Only when external surface tension is applied does the peptide establish lasting contact with the POPC bilayer. Our findings reveal the influence of disruption to lipid headgroup packing (via curvature or surface tension) on the pathway of binding and insertion, highlighting the collaborative effort of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions on interaction of SVS-1 with lipid bilayers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of cytidine-diphosphate choline (CDP-choline) on brain lipid changes during aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Medio, G.E.; Trovarelli, G.; Piccinin, G.L.; Porcellati, G.

    1984-01-01

    Lipid synthesis has been tested in vivo in different brain areas of 12-month-old male rats. Cortex, striatum, brainstem, and subcortex of brain have been examined. The cerebellum was discarded. Mixtures of (2- 3 H)glycerol and (Me- 14 C)choline were injected into the lateral ventricle of the brain as lipid precursors, and their incorporation into total lipid, water-soluble intermediates and choline-containing phospholipids was examined 1 hr after isotope injection. In another series of experiments cytidine-5'-diphosphate choline (CDP-choline) was injected intraventricularly to the aged rats 10 min before sacrifice with a simultaneous injection, and radioactivity assays were performed as above. Distribution of radioactivity content of CDP-choline among brain areas 10 min after its administration showed a noticeable enrichment of the nucleotide and water-soluble-related compounds in the examined areas, but to a lesser degree in the cerebral cortex. The incorporation of labelled glycerol, which is severely depressed in aged rats in all four areas [Gaiti et al, 1982, 1983], was increased only in the cortex, and apparently decreased in the other areas. This last result is probably due to a dilution effect brought about by the administered cold CDP-choline upon the ( 14 C)-containing water-soluble metabolites. As a consequence, the ( 3 H)/( 14 C) ratio in total lipid and in isolated phosphatidylcholine and choline plasmalogen increased after CDP-choline treatment

  13. Characterization of the binding of the Ptychodiscus brevis neurotoxin T17 to sodium channels in rat brain synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poli, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The lipid-soluble polyether neurotoxins isolated from the marine dinoflagellate Ptychodiscus brevis (formerly Gymnodinium breve) have been determined to bind to a unique receptor site associated with the voltage-sensitive sodium channel in rat brain synaptosomes. Reduction of the C 42 aldehyde function of T34 to the alcohol function of T17 using NaB 3 H 4 yielded 3 H-T17 with a specific activity of 15 Ci;/mmol. Using this specific probe, binding to sodium channels was measured at 4 0 CC, 22 0 C, and 37 0 C. Rosenthal analysis of the binding data yielded a K/sub d/ of 2.9 nM and B/sub max/ of 6.8 pmoles 3 H-T17 per mg of synaptosomal protein at 4 0 C. Both K/sub d/ and B/sub max/ were found to be temperature dependent. Depolarization of the synaptosomes by osmotic lysis resulted in the loss of 34% of the available receptor sites, with no decrease in binding affinity. Unlabeled T17, T34, and synthetic T17 (reduced T34) were equipotent in their ability to displace 3 H-T17 from its specific receptor site. Competition experiments using natural toxin probes specific for sites I-IV on the voltage-sensitive sodium channel demonstrate that 3 H-T17 does not bind to any of the previously-described neurotoxin receptor sites. A fifth site is proposed

  14. Opiate receptor binding in the brain of the seizure sensitive Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R J; Olsen, R W; Lomax, P; McCabe, R T; Wamsley, J K

    1984-12-01

    Opiate receptor binding was studied in seizure sensitive (SS) and seizure resistant (SR) strains of the Mongolian gerbil. Cryostat sections of the brain were labeled with [3H]-dihydromorphine, subjected to autoradiography and analysed by microdensitometry. SS gerbils, prior to seizure induction, demonstrated overall greater brain opiate binding when compared to SR animals. Immediately following a seizure, binding in the interpeduncular nucleus fell to levels found in SR animals. The increased opiate binding in the SS (pre-seizure) compared to SR gerbils could reflect a deficit of endogenous ligand which could underlie the seizure diathesis in the gerbil.

  15. Mixed bilayer containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine: lipid complexation, ion binding, and electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Sagar A; Bostick, David; Berkowitz, Max L

    2003-11-01

    Two mixed bilayers containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine at a ratio of 5:1 are simulated in NaCl electrolyte solutions of different concentration using the molecular dynamics technique. Direct NH.O and CH.O hydrogen bonding between lipids was observed to serve as the basis of interlipid complexation. It is deduced from our results and previous studies that dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine alone is less likely to form interlipid complexes than in the presence of bound ions or other bilayer "impurities" such as dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine. The binding of counterions is observed and quantitated. Based upon the calculated ion binding constants, the Gouy-Chapman surface potential (theta) is calculated. In addition we calculated the electrostatic potential profile (Phi) by twice integrating the system charge distribution. A large discrepancy between and the value of Phi at the membrane surface is observed. However, at "larger" distance from the bilayer surface, a qualitative similarity in the z-profiles of Phi and psi(GC) is seen. The discrepancy between the two potential profiles near the bilayer surface is attributed to the discrete and nonbulk-like nature of water in the interfacial region and to the complex geometry of this region.

  16. Evolution of the duplicated intracellular lipid-binding protein genes of teleost fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachalam, Ananda B; Parmar, Manoj B; Wright, Jonathan M

    2017-08-01

    Increasing organismal complexity during the evolution of life has been attributed to the duplication of genes and entire genomes. More recently, theoretical models have been proposed that postulate the fate of duplicated genes, among them the duplication-degeneration-complementation (DDC) model. In the DDC model, the common fate of a duplicated gene is lost from the genome owing to nonfunctionalization. Duplicated genes are retained in the genome either by subfunctionalization, where the functions of the ancestral gene are sub-divided between the sister duplicate genes, or by neofunctionalization, where one of the duplicate genes acquires a new function. Both processes occur either by loss or gain of regulatory elements in the promoters of duplicated genes. Here, we review the genomic organization, evolution, and transcriptional regulation of the multigene family of intracellular lipid-binding protein (iLBP) genes from teleost fishes. Teleost fishes possess many copies of iLBP genes owing to a whole genome duplication (WGD) early in the teleost fish radiation. Moreover, the retention of duplicated iLBP genes is substantially higher than the retention of all other genes duplicated in the teleost genome. The fatty acid-binding protein genes, a subfamily of the iLBP multigene family in zebrafish, are differentially regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) isoforms, which may account for the retention of iLBP genes in the zebrafish genome by the process of subfunctionalization of cis-acting regulatory elements in iLBP gene promoters.

  17. Implications of formulation design on lipid-based nanostructured carrier system for drug delivery to brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salunkhe, Sachin S; Bhatia, Neela M; Bhatia, Manish S

    2016-05-01

    The aim of present investigation was to formulate and develop lipid-based nanostructured carriers (NLCs) containing Idebenone (IDE) for delivery to brain. Attempts have been made to evaluate IDE NLCs for its pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile through the objective of enhancement in bioavailability and effectivity of drug. Nanoprecipitation technique was used for development of drug loaded NLCs. The components solid lipid Precirol ATO 5, oil Miglyol 840, surfactants Tween 80 and Labrasol have been screened out for formulation development by consideration of preformulation parameters including solubility, Required Hydrophilic lipophilic balance (HLB) of lipids and stability study. Developed IDE NLCs were subjected for particle size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency (%EE), crystallographic investigation, transmission electron microscopy, in vitro drug release, pharmacokinetics, in vivo and stability study. Formulation under investigation has particle size 174.1 ± 2.6 nm, zeta potential -18.65 ± 1.13 mV and% EE 90.68 ± 2.90. Crystallographic studies exemplified for partial amorphization of IDE by molecularly dispersion within lipid crust. IDE NLCs showed drug release 93.56 ± 0.39% at end of 24 h by following Higuchi model which necessitates for appropriate drug delivery with enhancement in bioavailability of drug by 4.6-fold in plasma and 2.8-fold in brain over plain drug loaded aqueous dispersions. In vivo studies revealed that effect of drug was enhanced by prepared lipid nanocarriers. IDE lipid-based nanostructured carriers could have potential for efficient drug delivery to brain with enhancement in bioavailability of drug over the conventional formulations.

  18. [3H]cytisine binding to nicotinic cholinergic receptors in brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pabreza, L.A.; Dhawan, S.; Kellar, K.J.

    1991-01-01

    Cytisine, a ganglionic agonist, competes with high affinity for brain nicotinic cholinergic receptors labeled by any of several nicotinic 3 H-agonist ligands. Here we have examined the binding of [ 3 H]cytisine in rat brain homogenates. [ 3 H]Cytisine binds with high affinity (Kd less than 1 nM), and specific binding represented 60-90% of total binding at all concentrations examined up to 15 nM. The nicotinic cholinergic agonists nicotine, acetylcholine, and carbachol compete with high affinity for [ 3 H]cytisine binding sites, whereas among nicotinic receptor antagonists only dihydro-beta-erythroidine competes with high affinity (in the nanomolar range). Comparison of binding in several brain regions showed that [ 3 H]cytisine binding is higher in the thalamus, striatum, and cortex than in the hippocampus, cerebellum, or hypothalamus. The pharmacology and brain regional distribution of [ 3 H]cytisine binding sites are those predicted for neuronal nicotinic receptor agonist recognition sites. The high affinity and low nonspecific binding of [ 3 H]cytisine should make it a very useful ligand for studying neuronal nicotinic receptors

  19. N-isopropyl-[123I]p-iodoamphetamine: single-pass brain uptake and washout; binding to brain synaptosomes; and localization in dog and monkey brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winchell, H.S.; Horst, W.D.; Braun, L.; Oldendorf, W.H.; Hattner, R.; Parker, H.

    1980-01-01

    The kinetics of N-isopropyl-p-[ 123 I]iodoamphetamine in rat brains were determined by serial measurements of brain uptake index (BUI) after intracarotid injection; also studied were its effects on amine uptake and release in rat's brain cortical synaptosomes; and its in vivo distribution in the dog and monkey. No specific localization in brain nuclei of the dog was seen, but there was progressive accumulation in the eyes. Rapid initial brain uptake in the ketamine-sedated monkey was noted, and further slow brain uptake occurred during the next 20 min but without retinal localization. High levels of brain activity were maintained for several hours. The quantitative initial single-pass clearance of the agent in the brain suggests its use in evaluation of regional brain perfusion. Its interaction with brain amine-binding sites suggests its possible application in studies of cerebral amine metabolism

  20. Insulin sensitivity is independent of lipid binding protein trafficking at the plasma membrane in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordy, Andreas Børsting; Serup, Annette Karen; Karstoft, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate lipid-induced regulation of lipid binding proteins in human skeletal muscle and the impact hereof on insulin sensitivity. Eleven healthy male subjects underwent a 3-day hyper-caloric and high-fat diet regime. Muscle biopsies were taken before......-regulated by increased fatty acid availability. This suggests a time dependency in the up-regulation of FAT/CD36 and FABPpm protein during high availability of plasma fatty acids. Furthermore, we did not detect FATP1 and FATP4 protein in giant sarcolemmal vesicles obtained from human skeletal muscle. In conclusion......, this study shows that a short-term lipid-load increases mRNA content of key lipid handling proteins in human muscle. However, decreased insulin sensitivity after high-fat diet is not accompanied with relocation of FAT/CD36 or FABPpm protein to the sarcolemma. Finally, FATP1 and FATP4 protein could...

  1. Probing the interaction of brain fatty acid binding protein (B-FABP with model membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Dyszy

    Full Text Available Brain fatty acid-binding protein (B-FABP interacts with biological membranes and delivers polyunsaturated fatty acids (FAs via a collisional mechanism. The binding of FAs in the protein and the interaction with membranes involve a motif called "portal region", formed by two small α-helices, A1 and A2, connected by a loop. We used a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and electron spin resonance to probe the changes in the protein and in the membrane model induced by their interaction. Spin labeled B-FABP mutants and lipidic spin probes incorporated into a membrane model confirmed that B-FABP interacts with micelles through the portal region and led to structural changes in the protein as well in the micelles. These changes were greater in the presence of LPG when compared to the LPC models. ESR spectra of B-FABP labeled mutants showed the presence of two groups of residues that responded to the presence of micelles in opposite ways. In the presence of lysophospholipids, group I of residues, whose side chains point outwards from the contact region between the helices, had their mobility decreased in an environment of lower polarity when compared to the same residues in solution. The second group, composed by residues with side chains situated at the interface between the α-helices, experienced an increase in mobility in the presence of the model membranes. These modifications in the ESR spectra of B-FABP mutants are compatible with a less ordered structure of the portal region inner residues (group II that is likely to facilitate the delivery of FAs to target membranes. On the other hand, residues in group I and micelle components have their mobilities decreased probably as a result of the formation of a collisional complex. Our results bring new insights for the understanding of the gating and delivery mechanisms of FABPs.

  2. Characterization of [3H] oxymorphone binding sites in mouse brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoo, Ji Hoon; Borsodi, Anna; Tóth, Géza

    2017-01-01

    Oxymorphone, one of oxycodone's metabolic products, is a potent opioid receptor agonist which is thought to contribute to the analgesic effect of its parent compound and may have high potential abuse liability. Nonetheless, the in vivo pharmacological binding profile of this drug is still unclear....... This study uses mice lacking mu (MOP), kappa (KOP) or delta (DOP) opioid receptors as well as mice lacking all three opioid receptors to provide full characterisation of oxymorphone binding sites in the brain. Saturation binding studies using [3H]oxymorphone revealed high affinity binding sites in mouse......]Oxymorphone binding was completely abolished across the majority of the brain regions in mice lacking MOP as well as in mice lacking all three opioid receptors. DOP and KOP knockout mice retained [3H]oxymorphone binding sites suggesting oxymorphone may not target DOP or KOP. These results confirm that the MOP...

  3. Agonist and antagonist binding to rat brain muscarinic receptors: influence of aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurwitz, D.; Egozi, Y.; Henis, Y.I.; Kloog, Y.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the binding properties of muscarinic receptors in six brain regions in mature and old rats of both sexes by employing direct binding of [ 3 H]-antagonist as well as of the labeled natural neurotransmitter, [ 3 H]-acetylcholine [( 3 H]-AcCh). In addition, age-related factors were evaluated in the modulation processes involved in agonist binding. The results indicate that as the rat ages the density of the muscarinic receptors is altered differently in the various brain regions: it is decreased in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum and olfactory bulb of both male and female rats, but is increased (58%) in the brain stem of senescent males while no significant change is observed for females. The use of the highly sensitive technique measuring direct binding of [ 3 H]-AcCh facilitated the separate detection of age-related changes in the two classes (high- and low-affinity) of muscarinic agonist binding sites. In old female rats the density of high-affinity [ 3 H]-AcCh binding sites was preserved in all tissues studied, indicating that the decreases in muscarinic receptor density observed with [ 3 H]-antagonist represent a loss of low-affinity agonist binding sites. In contrast, [ 3 H]-AcCh binding is decreased in the hypothalamus and increased in the brain stem of old male rats. These data imply sexual dimorphism of the aging process in central cholinergic mechanisms

  4. Safety profile of the intravenous administration of brain-targeted stable nucleic acid lipid particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Conceição

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In a clinical setting, where multiple administrations of the therapeutic agent are usually required to improve the therapeutic outcome, it is crucial to assess the immunogenicity of the administered nanoparticles. In this data work, we investigated the safety profile of the repeated intravenous administration of brain-targeted stable nucleic acid lipid particles (RVG-9r-targeted SNALPs. To evaluate local activation of the immune system, we performed analysis of mouse tissue homogenates and sections from cerebellum. To investigate peripheral activation of the immune system, we used serum of mice that were intravenously injected with RVG-9r-targeted SNALPs. These data are related and were discussed in the accompanying research article entitled “Intravenous administration of brain-targeted stable nucleic acid lipid particles alleviates Machado–Joseph disease neurological phenotype” (Conceição et al., in press [1].

  5. Specific binding of 125I-salmon calcitonin to rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamuta, Hiromichi; Furukawa, Shinichi; Koida, Masao; Yajima, Haruaki; Orlowski, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Rat brain particulate fraction was found to contain binding sites for 125 I-Salmon Calcitonin-I ( 125 I-SCT). Maximum binding occurred in the physiological pH range of 7.25 - 7.5. The binding reaction proceeded in a temperature-dependent manner. Binding sites were broadly distributed among the various rat brain regions and considerable regional differences existed in the affinity and density as detected by Scatchard analysis. The highest affinity was recorded in the case of the hypothalamus and the lowest in the case of the cerebellum. The KD (nM) and Bmax (pmole/mg protein) estimated for the binding to four regions were as follows: hypothalamus: 1.4 and 0.19, midbrain, hippocampus plus striatum: 1.5 and 0.08, pon plus medulla oblongata: 3.0 and 0.15 and cerebellum: 8.3 and 0.20. Using a particulate fraction of rat brain void of cerebellum and cortices, a binding assay for calcitonins was developed. Binding of 125 I-SCT was inhibited by unlabeled salmon, [Asu sup(1,7)]-eel and porcine calcitonins in a dose-dependent manner and the IC50s were 2.0, 8.0 and 30 nM, respectively. The IC50s were comparable to those estimated using a kidney particulate fraction. Human calcitonin, β-endorphin and substance P were weak inhibitors of the binding. Other peptides, drugs and putative neurotransmitters tested (totally 23 substances) failed to inhibit the binding at concentrations of 1.0 μM. The physiological significance of brain binding sites for calcitonin, with the possibility that the brain may possess endogenous ligands for these sites are discussed. (author)

  6. [{sup 18}F]haloperidol binding in baboon brain in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousef, Khalil A; Fowler, Joanna S; Volkow, Nora D; Dewey, Stephen L; Shea, Colleen; Schlyer, David J; Gatley, S John; Logan, Jean; Wolf, Alfred P

    1996-01-01

    The binding of [{sup 18}F]haloperidol to dopamine D2 and to sigma recognition sites in baboon brain was examined using positron emission tomography (PET). Studies were performed at baseline and after treatment with either haloperidol (to evaluate saturability), (+)-butaclamol (which has specificity for dopamine D2 receptors) or (-)-butaclamol (which has specificity for sigma sites). Binding was widespread. Treatment with (-)-butaclamol had no effect, whereas (+)-butaclamol selectively reduced the uptake in striatum. Haloperidol increased the clearance rate from all brain regions. These results indicate that the binding profile of [{sup 18}F]haloperidol does not permit the selective examination of either dopamine D2 or sigma sites using PET.

  7. Insulin Regulates Hepatic Triglyceride Secretion and Lipid Content via Signaling in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Thomas; Lindtner, Claudia; O'Hare, James; Hackl, Martina; Zielinski, Elizabeth; Freudenthaler, Angelika; Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina; Tödter, Klaus; Heeren, Joerg; Krššák, Martin; Scheja, Ludger; Fürnsinn, Clemens; Buettner, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    Hepatic steatosis is common in obesity and insulin resistance and results from a net retention of lipids in the liver. A key mechanism to prevent steatosis is to increase secretion of triglycerides (TG) packaged as VLDLs. Insulin controls nutrient partitioning via signaling through its cognate receptor in peripheral target organs such as liver, muscle, and adipose tissue and via signaling in the central nervous system (CNS) to orchestrate organ cross talk. While hepatic insulin signaling is known to suppress VLDL production from the liver, it is unknown whether brain insulin signaling independently regulates hepatic VLDL secretion. Here, we show that in conscious, unrestrained male Sprague Dawley rats the infusion of insulin into the third ventricle acutely increased hepatic TG secretion. Chronic infusion of insulin into the CNS via osmotic minipumps reduced the hepatic lipid content as assessed by noninvasive (1)H-MRS and lipid profiling independent of changes in hepatic de novo lipogenesis and food intake. In mice that lack the insulin receptor in the brain, hepatic TG secretion was reduced compared with wild-type littermate controls. These studies identify brain insulin as an important permissive factor in hepatic VLDL secretion that protects against hepatic steatosis. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  8. Neural network and SVM classifiers accurately predict lipid binding proteins, irrespective of sequence homology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiarizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Moradi-Shahrbabak, Mohammad; Ebrahimi, Mansour; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2014-09-07

    Due to the central roles of lipid binding proteins (LBPs) in many biological processes, sequence based identification of LBPs is of great interest. The major challenge is that LBPs are diverse in sequence, structure, and function which results in low accuracy of sequence homology based methods. Therefore, there is a need for developing alternative functional prediction methods irrespective of sequence similarity. To identify LBPs from non-LBPs, the performances of support vector machine (SVM) and neural network were compared in this study. Comprehensive protein features and various techniques were employed to create datasets. Five-fold cross-validation (CV) and independent evaluation (IE) tests were used to assess the validity of the two methods. The results indicated that SVM outperforms neural network. SVM achieved 89.28% (CV) and 89.55% (IE) overall accuracy in identification of LBPs from non-LBPs and 92.06% (CV) and 92.90% (IE) (in average) for classification of different LBPs classes. Increasing the number and the range of extracted protein features as well as optimization of the SVM parameters significantly increased the efficiency of LBPs class prediction in comparison to the only previous report in this field. Altogether, the results showed that the SVM algorithm can be run on broad, computationally calculated protein features and offers a promising tool in detection of LBPs classes. The proposed approach has the potential to integrate and improve the common sequence alignment based methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Systematic Approach for the Formulation and Optimization of Solid Lipid Nanoparticles of Efavirenz by High Pressure Homogenization Using Design of Experiments for Brain Targeting and Enhanced Bioavailability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shweta; Kesarla, Rajesh; Chotai, Narendra; Misra, Ambikanandan

    2017-01-01

    The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, used for the treatment of HIV infections, are reported to have low bioavailability pertaining to high first-pass metabolism, high protein binding, and enzymatic metabolism. They also show low permeability across blood brain barrier. The CNS is reported to be the most important HIV reservoir site. In the present study, solid lipid nanoparticles of efavirenz were prepared with the objective of providing increased permeability and protection of drug due to biocompatible lipidic content and nanoscale size and thus developing formulation having potential for enhanced bioavailability and brain targeting. Solid lipid nanoparticles were prepared by high pressure homogenization technique using a systematic approach of design of experiments (DoE) and evaluated for particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, and entrapment efficiency. Particles of average size 108.5 nm having PDI of 0.172 with 64.9% entrapment efficiency were produced. Zeta potential was found to be −21.2 mV and the formulation was found stable. The in-vivo pharmacokinetic studies revealed increased concentration of the drug in brain, as desired, when administered through intranasal route indicating its potential for an attempt towards complete eradication of HIV and cure of HIV-infected patients. PMID:28243600

  10. Autoradiographic analysis of tritiated imipramine binding in the human brain post mortem: effects of suicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross-Isseroff, R.; Israeli, M.; Biegon, A.

    1989-01-01

    In vitro quantitative autoradiography of high-affinity tritiated imipramine binding sites was performed on brains of 12 suicide victims and 12 matched controls. Region-specific differences in imipramine binding were found between the two groups. Thus, the pyramidal and molecular layers of the cornu ammoni hippocampal fields and the hilus of the dentate gyrus exhibited 80%, 60%, and 90% increases in binding in the suicide group, respectively. The postcentral cortical gyrus, insular cortex, and claustrum had 45%, 28%, and 75% decreases in binding in the suicide group, respectively. No difference in imipramine binding was observed in prefrontal cortical regions, in the basal ganglia, and in mesencephalic nuclei. No sex and postmortem delay effects on imipramine binding were found. Imipramine binding was positively correlated with age, the effect of age being most pronounced in portions of the basal ganglia and temporal cortex

  11. Lipid-binding proteins modulate ligand-dependent trans-activation by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and localize to the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helledie, T; Antonius, M; Sorensen, R V

    2000-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are activated by a variety of fatty acids, eicosanoids, and hypolipidemic and insulin-sensitizing drugs. Many of these compounds bind avidly to members of a family of small lipid-binding proteins, the fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs). Fatty...

  12. Quantitative autoradiography of [3H]ouabain binding sites in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spyropoulos, A.C.; Rainbow, T.C.

    1984-01-01

    In vitro quantitative autoradiography was used to localize in rat brain binding sites for [ 3 H]ouabain, an inhibitor of the Na + ,K + -ATPase. High levels of [ 3 H]ouabain sites were found in the superior and inferior colliculi, the mammillary nucleus, the interpeduncular nucleus, and in various divisions of the olfactory, auditory and somatomotor systems. The heterogeneous distribution of [ 3 H]ouabain binding closely parallels the regional brain glucose consumption as determined by the [ 14 C]deoxyglucose method. Lesion studies of the rat hippocampus using the excitotoxin, ibotenic acid, showed both a marked decrease of neuronal cell types on the injected side and a corresponding decrease in [ 3 H]ouabain binding, indicating that some of the [ 3 H]ouabain binding sites are localized to neurons. The close correlation between [ 3 H]ouabain binding and regional glucose utilization provides further evidence for a linkage between glucose utilization and the neuronal Na + ,K + -ATPase. (Auth.)

  13. Physicochemical characterization and in vivo bioluminescence imaging of nanostructured lipid carriers for targeting the brain: apomorphine as a model drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Shu-Hui [Department of Pharmacy, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan 717, Taiwan (China); Wen, Chih-Jen; Yen, Tzu-Chen [Animal Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Al-Suwayeh, S A; Fang, Jia-You [Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Chang, Hui-Wen, E-mail: fajy@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Pharmaceutics Laboratory, Graduate Institute of Natural Products, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2010-10-08

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) were prepared to investigate whether the duration of brain targeting and accumulation of drugs in the brain can be improved by intravenous delivery. NLCs were developed using cetyl palmitate as the lipid matrix, squalene as the cationic surfactant, and Pluronic F68, polysorbate 80 and polyethylene glycol as the interfacial additives. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and lipid emulsions (LEs) were also prepared for comparison. An anti-Parkinson's drug, apomorphine, was used as the model drug. Nuclear magnetic resonance and differential scanning calorimetry showed possible interactions between the solid and liquid lipids in the inner core. The lipid nanoparticles with different compositions were characterized by mean size, zeta potential, apomorphine encapsulation and in vitro drug release. NLCs were 370-430 nm in size, which was between the sizes of the SLNs and LEs. A cationic surfactant was used to produce a positive surface charge of 42-50 mV. The base form of apomorphine was successfully entrapped by NLCs with an entrapment percentage of > 60%. The loading of apomorphine in nanoparticles resulted in a slower release behavior compared to the aqueous solution, with LEs showing the lowest release. In vivo real-time bioluminescence imaging of the rat brain revealed that NLCs could be targeted, through certain vessels, to selected brain regions. This effect was further confirmed by imaging the entire brain and brain slices. The results indicated that NLCs with moderate additives are a promising controlled-release and drug-targeting system.

  14. Physicochemical characterization and in vivo bioluminescence imaging of nanostructured lipid carriers for targeting the brain: apomorphine as a model drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Shu-Hui; Wen, Chih-Jen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Al-Suwayeh, S A; Fang, Jia-You; Chang, Hui-Wen

    2010-01-01

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) were prepared to investigate whether the duration of brain targeting and accumulation of drugs in the brain can be improved by intravenous delivery. NLCs were developed using cetyl palmitate as the lipid matrix, squalene as the cationic surfactant, and Pluronic F68, polysorbate 80 and polyethylene glycol as the interfacial additives. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and lipid emulsions (LEs) were also prepared for comparison. An anti-Parkinson's drug, apomorphine, was used as the model drug. Nuclear magnetic resonance and differential scanning calorimetry showed possible interactions between the solid and liquid lipids in the inner core. The lipid nanoparticles with different compositions were characterized by mean size, zeta potential, apomorphine encapsulation and in vitro drug release. NLCs were 370-430 nm in size, which was between the sizes of the SLNs and LEs. A cationic surfactant was used to produce a positive surface charge of 42-50 mV. The base form of apomorphine was successfully entrapped by NLCs with an entrapment percentage of > 60%. The loading of apomorphine in nanoparticles resulted in a slower release behavior compared to the aqueous solution, with LEs showing the lowest release. In vivo real-time bioluminescence imaging of the rat brain revealed that NLCs could be targeted, through certain vessels, to selected brain regions. This effect was further confirmed by imaging the entire brain and brain slices. The results indicated that NLCs with moderate additives are a promising controlled-release and drug-targeting system.

  15. Localization of cellular retinol-binding protein and retinol-binding protein in cells comprising the blood-brain barrier of rat and human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, P.N.; Ong, D.E.; Bok, D.

    1990-01-01

    Brain is not generally recognized as an organ that requires vitamin A, perhaps because no obvious histologic lesions have been observed in severely vitamin A-deficient animals. However, brain tissue does contain cellular vitamin A-binding proteins and a nuclear receptor protein for retinoic acid. In the present study, immunohistochemical techniques were used to determine the cell-specific location of cellular retinol-binding protein in human and rat brain tissue. Cellular retinol-binding protein was localized specifically within the cuboidal epithelial cells of the choroid plexus, two primary sites of the mammalian blood-brain barrier. In addition, autoradiographic procedures demonstrated binding sites for serum retinol-binding protein in the choroidal epithelium. These observations suggest that a significant movement of retinol across the blood-brain barrier may occur

  16. Radioligand binding analysis of α 2 adrenoceptors with [11C]yohimbine in brain in vivo: Extended Inhibition Plot correction for plasma protein binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phan, Jenny-Ann; Landau, Anne M.; Jakobsen, Steen

    2017-01-01

    We describe a novel method of kinetic analysis of radioligand binding to neuroreceptors in brain in vivo, here applied to noradrenaline receptors in rat brain. The method uses positron emission tomography (PET) of [11C]yohimbine binding in brain to quantify the density and affinity of α 2...... Inhibition Plot introduced here yielded an estimate of the volume of distribution of non-displaceable ligand in brain tissue that increased with the increase of the free fraction of the radioligand in plasma. The resulting binding potentials of the radioligand declined by 50-60% in the presence of unlabeled...

  17. Metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by inhibiting FOXO1-mediated transcription of fatty acid-binding protein 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jun; Ren, Pingping; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Xing Li; Chen, Li; Shen, Ying H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The accumulation of lipids in macrophages contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Strategies to reduce lipid accumulation in macrophages may have therapeutic potential for preventing and treating atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. The antidiabetic drug metformin has been reported to reduce lipid accumulation in adipocytes. In this study, we examined the effects of metformin on lipid accumulation in macrophages and investigated the mechanisms involved. Methods and results: We observed that metformin significantly reduced palmitic acid (PA)-induced intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages. Metformin promoted the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-1), while reduced the expression of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4) which was involved in PA-induced lipid accumulation. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that metformin regulates FABP4 expression at the transcriptional level. We identified forkhead transcription factor FOXO1 as a positive regulator of FABP4 expression. Inhibiting FOXO1 expression with FOXO1 siRNA significantly reduced basal and PA-induced FABP4 expression. Overexpression of wild-type FOXO1 and constitutively active FOXO1 significantly increased FABP4 expression, whereas dominant negative FOXO1 dramatically decreased FABP4 expression. Metformin reduced FABP4 expression by promoting FOXO1 nuclear exclusion and subsequently inhibiting its activity. Conclusions: Taken together, these results suggest that metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by repressing FOXO1-mediated FABP4 transcription. Thus, metformin may have a protective effect against lipid accumulation in macrophages and may serve as a therapeutic agent for preventing and treating atherosclerosis in metabolic syndrome.

  18. Metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by inhibiting FOXO1-mediated transcription of fatty acid-binding protein 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jun [Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke' s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Ren, Pingping; Zhang, Lin [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke' s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Wang, Xing Li [Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke' s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Chen, Li [Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Shen, Ying H., E-mail: hyshen@bcm.edu [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke' s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, TX (United States)

    2010-02-26

    Objective: The accumulation of lipids in macrophages contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Strategies to reduce lipid accumulation in macrophages may have therapeutic potential for preventing and treating atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. The antidiabetic drug metformin has been reported to reduce lipid accumulation in adipocytes. In this study, we examined the effects of metformin on lipid accumulation in macrophages and investigated the mechanisms involved. Methods and results: We observed that metformin significantly reduced palmitic acid (PA)-induced intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages. Metformin promoted the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-1), while reduced the expression of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4) which was involved in PA-induced lipid accumulation. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that metformin regulates FABP4 expression at the transcriptional level. We identified forkhead transcription factor FOXO1 as a positive regulator of FABP4 expression. Inhibiting FOXO1 expression with FOXO1 siRNA significantly reduced basal and PA-induced FABP4 expression. Overexpression of wild-type FOXO1 and constitutively active FOXO1 significantly increased FABP4 expression, whereas dominant negative FOXO1 dramatically decreased FABP4 expression. Metformin reduced FABP4 expression by promoting FOXO1 nuclear exclusion and subsequently inhibiting its activity. Conclusions: Taken together, these results suggest that metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by repressing FOXO1-mediated FABP4 transcription. Thus, metformin may have a protective effect against lipid accumulation in macrophages and may serve as a therapeutic agent for preventing and treating atherosclerosis in metabolic syndrome.

  19. Characterization of (/sup 3/H)paroxetine binding in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcusson, J.O.; Bergstroem, M.E.; Eriksson, K.; Ross, S.B.

    1988-06-01

    The binding of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) uptake inhibitor (3H)paroxetine to rat cortical homogenates has been characterized. The effect of tissue concentration was examined and, with 0.75 mg wet weight tissue/ml in a total volume of 1,600 microliter, the binding was optimized with an apparent dissociation constant (KD) of 0.03-0.05 nM. Competition experiments with 5-HT, citalopram, norzimeldine, and desipramine revealed a high (90%) proportion of displaceable binding that fitted a single-site binding model. Fluoxetine and imipramine revealed, in addition to a high-affinity (nanomolar) site, also a low-affinity (micromolar) site representing approximately 10% of the displaceable binding. The specificity of the (3H)paroxetine binding was emphasized by the fact that 5-HT was the only active neurotransmitter bound and that the serotonin S1 and S2 antagonist methysergide was without effect on the binding. Both 5-HT- and fluoxetine-sensitive (3H)paroxetine binding was completely abolished after protease treatment, suggesting that the binding site is of protein nature. Saturation studies with 5-HT (100 microM) sensitive (3H)paroxetine binding were also consistent with a single-site binding model, and the binding was competitively inhibited by 5-HT and imipramine. The number of binding sites (Bmax) for 5-HT-sensitive (3H)paroxetine and (3H)imipramine binding was the same, indicating that the radioligands bind to the same sites. Lesion experiments with p-chloroamphetamine resulted in a binding in frontal and parietal cortices becoming undetectable and a greater than 60% reduction in the striatum and hypothalamus, indicating a selective localization on 5-HT terminals. Together these findings suggest that (3H)paroxetine specifically and selectively labels the substrate recognition site for 5-HT uptake in rat brain.

  20. Effect of dietary poly unsaturated fatty acids on total brain lipid concentration and anxiety levels of electron beam irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchetha Kumari; Bekal, Mahesh

    2013-01-01

    The whole brain irradiation causes injury to the nervous system at various levels. Omega-3 poly unsaturated fatty acids are very much essential for the growth and development of nervous system. Dietary supplementation of these nutrients will promote the development of injured neuronal cells. Therefore this study was undertaken to establish the role of Omega-3 poly unsaturated fatty acids on total brain lipid concentration, lipid peroxidation and anxiety levels in the irradiated mice. The effect of Electron Beam Radiation (EBR) on total brain lipid concentration, lipid peroxidation and anxiety level were investigated in male Swiss albino mice. The study groups were subjected to a sub-lethal dose of EBR and also the flax seed extract and fish oil were given orally to the irradiated mice. Irradiated groups show significant elevation in anxiety levels when compared to control group, indicating the acute radiation effects on the central nervous system. But the oral supplementation of dietary PUFA source decrees the anxiety level in the irradiated group. The analysis of lipid peroxidation showed a significant level of changes when compared between control and radiation groups. Dietary PUFA supplementation showed a significant level of decrease in the lipid peroxidation in the irradiated groups. The observation of total lipids in brain shows decrease in concentration in the irradiated groups, the differences in the variables follow the similar patterns as of that the MDA levels. This study suggests that the dietary intake of PUFAs may help in prevention and recovery of the oxidative stress caused by radiation. (author)

  1. Characterization of the binding of the Ptychodiscus brevis neurotoxin T17 to sodium channels in rat brain synaptosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poli, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The lipid-soluble polyether neurotoxins isolated from the marine dinoflagellate Ptychodiscus brevis (formerly Gymnodinium breve) have been determined to bind to a unique receptor site associated with the voltage-sensitive sodium channel in rat brain synaptosomes. Reduction of the C/sub 42/ aldehyde function of T34 to the alcohol function of T17 using NaB/sup 3/H/sub 4/ yielded /sup 3/H-T17 with a specific activity of 15 Ci;/mmol. Using this specific probe, binding to sodium channels was measured at 4/sup 0/CC, 22/sup 0/C, and 37/sup 0/C. Rosenthal analysis of the binding data yielded a K/sub d/ of 2.9 nM and B/sub max/ of 6.8 pmoles /sup 3/H-T17 per mg of synaptosomal protein at 4/sup 0/C. Both K/sub d/ and B/sub max/ were found to be temperature dependent. Depolarization of the synaptosomes by osmotic lysis resulted in the loss of 34% of the available receptor sites, with no decrease in binding affinity. Unlabeled T17, T34, and synthetic T17 (reduced T34) were equipotent in their ability to displace /sup 3/H-T17 from its specific receptor site. Competition experiments using natural toxin probes specific for sites I-IV on the voltage-sensitive sodium channel demonstrate that /sup 3/H-T17 does not bind to any of the previously-described neurotoxin receptor sites. A fifth site is proposed.

  2. Tween 80 containing lipid nanoemulsions for delivery of indinavir to brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandadi Prabhakar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Indinavir is a protease inhibitor used in the treatment of HIV infection. However, it has limited efficacy in eradicating the virus in the brain due to efflux by P-glycoprotein (P-gp expressed at the blood–brain barrier (BBB. The objective of this work was to develop an o/w lipid nanoemulsion (LNE of indinavir using Tween 80 as co-emulsifier to improve its brain specific delivery. LNEs were prepared with different compositions and were characterized for globule size, polydispersity index, zeta potential and in vitro drug release. Five formulations were then evaluated for drug content, entrapment efficiency and stability after which brain uptake studies were carried out using fluorescent labeled LNEs and pharmacokinetic (PK and tissue distribution studies were conducted after intravenous administration in mice. Brain uptake of indinavir was shown to be improved for a 1% Tween 80 containing formulation (F5 compared to a formulation containing 0.3% cholesterol (F2. In PK studies, the brain level of indinavir subsequent to administration of F5 was significantly (P<0.05 higher than produced by administration of a drug solution (2.44-fold or a control nanoemulsion (F1 (1.48-fold or formulation F2 (1.6-fold. The increased brain specific accumulation of indinavir from F5 is probably due to enhanced low density lipoprotein-mediated endocytosis and P-gp inhibition by Tween 80 at the BBB. These results suggest Tween 80 containing LNEs could provide a simple but effective means of delivering indinavir to brain.

  3. Identifying lipidic emulsomes for improved oxcarbazepine brain targeting: In vitro and rat in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Zaafarany, Ghada M; Soliman, Mahmoud E; Mansour, Samar; Awad, Gehanne A S

    2016-04-30

    Lipid-based nanovectors offer effective carriers for brain delivery by improving drug potency and reducing off-target effects. Emulsomes are nano-triglyceride (TG) carriers formed of lipid cores supported by at least one phospholipid (PC) sheath. Due to their surface active properties, PC forms bilayers at the aqueous interface, thereby enabling encapsulated drug to benefit from better bioavailability and stability. Emulsomes of oxcarbazepine (OX) were prepared, aimed to offer nanocarriers for nasal delivery for brain targeting. Different TG cores (Compritol(®), tripalmitin, tristearin and triolein) and soya phosphatidylcholine in different amounts and ratios were used for emulsomal preparation. Particles were modulated to generate nanocarriers with suitable size, charge, encapsulation efficiency and prolonged release. Cytotoxicity and pharmacokinetic studies were also implemented. Nano-spherical OX-emulsomes with maximal encapsulation of 96.75% were generated. Stability studies showed changes within 30.6% and 11.2% in the size and EE% after 3 months. MTT assay proved a decrease in drug toxicity by its encapsulation in emulsomes. Incorporation of OX into emulsomes resulted in stable nanoformulations. Tailoring emulsomes properties by modulating the surface charge and particle size produced a stable system for the lipophilic drug with a prolonged release profile and mean residence time and proved direct nose-to-brain transport in rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Radioligand binding analysis of α 2 adrenoceptors with [11C]yohimbine in brain in vivo: Extended Inhibition Plot correction for plasma protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Jenny-Ann; Landau, Anne M; Jakobsen, Steen; Wong, Dean F; Gjedde, Albert

    2017-11-22

    We describe a novel method of kinetic analysis of radioligand binding to neuroreceptors in brain in vivo, here applied to noradrenaline receptors in rat brain. The method uses positron emission tomography (PET) of [ 11 C]yohimbine binding in brain to quantify the density and affinity of α 2 adrenoceptors under condition of changing radioligand binding to plasma proteins. We obtained dynamic PET recordings from brain of Spraque Dawley rats at baseline, followed by pharmacological challenge with unlabeled yohimbine (0.3 mg/kg). The challenge with unlabeled ligand failed to diminish radioligand accumulation in brain tissue, due to the blocking of radioligand binding to plasma proteins that elevated the free fractions of the radioligand in plasma. We devised a method that graphically resolved the masking of unlabeled ligand binding by the increase of radioligand free fractions in plasma. The Extended Inhibition Plot introduced here yielded an estimate of the volume of distribution of non-displaceable ligand in brain tissue that increased with the increase of the free fraction of the radioligand in plasma. The resulting binding potentials of the radioligand declined by 50-60% in the presence of unlabeled ligand. The kinetic unmasking of inhibited binding reflected in the increase of the reference volume of distribution yielded estimates of receptor saturation consistent with the binding of unlabeled ligand.

  5. Selective binding of 2-[125I]iodo-nisoxetine to norepinephrine transporters in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, M.-P.; Choi, Seok-Rye; Hou, Catherine; Zhuang, Z.-P.; Foulon, Catherine; Kung, Hank F.

    2004-01-01

    A radioiodinated ligand, (R)-N-methyl-(2-[ 125 I]iodo-phenoxy)-3-phenylpropylamine, [ 125 I]2-INXT, targeting norepinephrine transporters (NET), was successfully prepared. A no-carrier-added product, [ 125 I]2-INXT, displayed a saturable binding with a high affinity (K d =0.06 nM) in the homogenates prepared from rat cortical tissues as well as from LLC-PK 1 cells expressing NET. A relatively low number of binding sties (B max =55 fmol/mg protein) measured with [ 125 I]2-INXT in rat cortical homogenates is consistent with the value reported for a known NET ligand, [ 3 H]nisoxetine. Competition studies with various compounds on [ 125 I]2-INXT binding clearly confirmed the pharmacological specificity and selectivity for NET binding sites. Following a tail-vein injection of [ 125 I]2-INXT in rats, a good initial brain uptake was observed (0.56% dose at 2 min) followed by a slow washout from the brain (0.2% remained at 3 hours post-injection). The hypothalamus (a NET-rich region) to striatum (a region devoid of NET) ratio was 1.5 at 3 hours post-i.v. injection. Pretreatment of rats with nisoxetine significantly inhibited the uptake of [ 125 I]2-INXT (70-100% inhibition) in locus coeruleus, hypothalamus and raphe nuclei, regions known to have a high density of NET; whereas escitalopram, a serotonin transporter ligand, did not show a similar effect. Ex vivo autoradiography of rat brain sections of [ 125 I]2-INXT (at 3 hours after an i.v. injection) displayed an excellent regional brain localization pattern corroborated to the specific NET distribution in the brain. The specific brain localization was significantly reduced by a dose of nisoxetine pretreatment. Taken together, the data suggest that [ 123 I]2-INXT may be useful for mapping NET binding sites in the brain

  6. Species differences in [{sup 11}C]clorgyline binding in brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, Joanna S. E-mail: fowler@bnl.gov; Ding, Yu-Shin; Logan, Jean; MacGregor, Robert R.; Shea, Colleen; Garza, Victor; Gimi, Raomond; Volkow, Nora D.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Schlyer, David; Ferrieri, Richard; Gatley, S. John; Alexoff, David; Carter, Pauline; King, Payton; Pappas, Naomi; Arnett, Carroll D

    2001-10-01

    [{sup 11}C]Clorgyline selectively binds to MAO A in the human brain. This contrasts with a recent report that [{sup 11}C]clorgyline (in contrast to other labeled MAO A inhibitors) is not retained in the rhesus monkey brain . To explore this difference, we compared [{sup 11}C]clorgyline in the baboon brain before and after clorgyline pretreatment and we also synthesized deuterium substituted [{sup 11}C]clorgyline (and its nor-precursor) for comparison. [{sup 11}C]Clorgyline was not retained in the baboon brain nor was it influenced by clorgyline pretreatment or by deuterium substitution, contrasting to results in humans. This suggests a species difference in the susceptibility of MAO A to inhibition by clorgyline and represents an unusual example of where the behavior of a radiotracer in the baboon brain does not predict its behavior in the human brain.

  7. Protection against Mitochondrial and Metal Toxicity Depends on Functional Lipid Binding Sites in ATP13A2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun Martin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The late endo-/lysosomal P-type ATPase ATP13A2 (PARK9 is implicated in Parkinson’s disease (PD and Kufor-Rakeb syndrome, early-onset atypical Parkinsonism. ATP13A2 interacts at the N-terminus with the signaling lipids phosphatidic acid (PA and phosphatidylinositol (3,5 bisphosphate (PI(3,5P2, which modulate ATP13A2 activity under cellular stress conditions. Here, we analyzed stable human SHSY5Y cell lines overexpressing wild-type (WT or ATP13A2 mutants in which three N-terminal lipid binding sites (LBS1–3 were mutated. We explored the regulatory role of LBS1–3 in the cellular protection by ATP13A2 against mitochondrial stress induced by rotenone and found that the LBS2-3 mutants displayed an abrogated protective effect. Moreover, in contrast to WT, the LBS2 and LBS3 mutants responded poorly to pharmacological inhibition of, respectively, PI(3,5P2 and PA formation. We further demonstrate that PA and PI(3,5P2 are also required for the ATP13A2-mediated protection against the toxic metals Mn2+, Zn2+, and Fe3+, suggesting a general lipid-dependent activation mechanism of ATP13A2 in various PD-related stress conditions. Our results indicate that the ATP13A2-mediated protection requires binding of PI(3,5P2 to LBS2 and PA to LBS3. Thus, targeting the N-terminal lipid binding sites of ATP13A2 might offer a therapeutic approach to reduce cellular toxicity of various PD insults including mitochondrial stress.

  8. Insulin binding to brain capillaries is reduced in genetically obese, hyperinsulinemic Zucker rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, M.W.; Figlewicz, D.F.; Kahn, S.E.; Baskin, D.G.; Greenwood, M.R.; Porte, D. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    In order to study the role of plasma insulin in regulating the binding of insulin to the endothelium of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), insulin binding to a purified preparation of brain capillaries was measured in both genetically obese Zucker rats and lean Zucker controls. We found a reduction of 65% in brain capillary insulin binding site number in the obese compared to lean rats with no change in receptor affinity. Furthermore, specific insulin binding to brain capillaries was negatively correlated (p less than 0.05) to the plasma insulin level, suggesting a role for plasma insulin in regulating insulin binding. A similar relationship was observed between insulin receptor number in liver membranes and the plasma insulin level. We conclude that obese, hyperinsulinemic Zucker rats exhibit a reduction in the number of BBB insulin receptors, which parallels the reduction seen in other peripheral tissues. Since insulin receptors have been hypothesized to participate in the transport of insulin across the BBB, the reduction observed in the obese rats may account for the decrease in cerebrospinal fluid insulin uptake previously demonstrated in these animals

  9. Enhanced insulin binding to blood-brain barrier in vivo and to brain microvessels in vitro in newborn rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, H.J.; Jankovic-Vokes, T.; Pardridge, W.M.; Morris, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Insulin is a known growth factor in nonneural tissue, and recent studies have shown that there are insulin receptors throughout the adult and fetal central nervous system. Since insulin has only limited access to the adult brain, this study was undertaken to determine if insulin has increased availability to the newborn brain where it may act as a neonatal brain growth promoter. In vivo brain uptake of 125 I-insulin after a single-pass carotid injection was measured in newborn, 3-wk-old and 11-wk-old (adult) rabbits. The brain uptake index (BUI) relative to a 3 HOH reference was 22.0 +/- 1.1% (mean +/- SEM) for newborn, 12.8 +/- 0.6% for 3-wk-old, and 6.5 +/- 0.1% for adults. Specific 125 I-insulin binding to isolated cerebral microvessels was similarly increased in the newborn compared with the 3-wk-old and adult animals. Scatchard analysis revealed that the difference was due to an increase in receptor number with only minimal changes in the affinity. The increased availability of circulating insulin to the newborn brain was further corroborated by elevated CSF/serum and brain/serum insulin ratios in the newborn versus adult. These results suggest that insulin has increased access to the newborn brain where it may function as a growth factor

  10. Cationic solid-lipid nanoparticles can efficiently bind and transfect plasmid DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olbrich, C; Bakowsky, U; Muller, RH; Kneuer, C

    2001-01-01

    The suitability of cationically modified solid-lipid nanoparticles (SLN) as a novel transfection agent was investigated. SLN were produced by hot homogenisation using either Compritol ATO 888 or paraffin as matrix lipid, a mixture of Tween 80 and Span 85 as tenside and either EQ1

  11. Distribution of [{sup 3}H]diadenosine tetraphosphate binding sites in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miras-Portugal, M.T. [Departamento de Bioquimica, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Palacios, J.M. [Laboratorios Almirall, Research Center, Cardener 68, 08024 Barcelona (Spain); Torres, M. [Departamento de Bioquimica, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Cortes, R. [Departamento de Neuroquimica, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo, CSIC Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Rodriguez-Pascual, F. [Departamento de Bioquimica, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    1997-01-06

    The distribution of the diadenosine tetraphosphate high-affinity binding sites has been studied in rat brain by an autoradiographic method using [{sup 3}H]diadenosine tetraphosphate as the ligand. The binding characteristics are comparable to those described in studies performed on rat brain synaptosomes. White matter is devoid of specific binding. The range of binding site densities in gray matter varies from 3 to 15 fmol/mg of tissue, exhibiting a widespread but heterogeneous distribution. The highest densities correspond to the seventh cranial nerve, medial superior olive, pontine nuclei, glomerular and external plexiform layers of the olfactory bulb, and the granule cell layer of the cerebellar cortex. Intermediate density levels of binding correspond to different cortical areas, several nuclei of the amygdala, and the oriens and pyramidal layers of the hippocampal formation.The localization of diadenosine tetraphosphate binding sites in the brain may provide information on the places where diadenosine polyphosphate compounds can be expected to function in the central nervous system. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  12. Distribution of [3H]diadenosine tetraphosphate binding sites in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miras-Portugal, M.T.; Palacios, J.M.; Torres, M.; Cortes, R.; Rodriguez-Pascual, F.

    1997-01-01

    The distribution of the diadenosine tetraphosphate high-affinity binding sites has been studied in rat brain by an autoradiographic method using [ 3 H]diadenosine tetraphosphate as the ligand. The binding characteristics are comparable to those described in studies performed on rat brain synaptosomes. White matter is devoid of specific binding. The range of binding site densities in gray matter varies from 3 to 15 fmol/mg of tissue, exhibiting a widespread but heterogeneous distribution. The highest densities correspond to the seventh cranial nerve, medial superior olive, pontine nuclei, glomerular and external plexiform layers of the olfactory bulb, and the granule cell layer of the cerebellar cortex. Intermediate density levels of binding correspond to different cortical areas, several nuclei of the amygdala, and the oriens and pyramidal layers of the hippocampal formation.The localization of diadenosine tetraphosphate binding sites in the brain may provide information on the places where diadenosine polyphosphate compounds can be expected to function in the central nervous system. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  13. Impact of Estrogens and Estrogen Receptor Alpha (ESR1) in Brain Lipid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, Eugenia; de Souza Santos, Roberta; Gao, Su; Ávalos, Yenniffer; Criollo, Alfredo; Palmer, Biff F; Clegg, Deborah J

    2018-03-06

    Estrogens and their receptors play key roles in regulating body weight, energy expenditure, and metabolic homeostasis. It is known that lack of estrogens promotes increased food intake and induces the expansion of adipose tissues, for which much is known. An area of estrogenic research that has received less attention is the role of estrogens and their receptors in influencing intermediary lipid metabolism in organs such as the brain. In this review, we highlight the actions of estrogens and their receptors in regulating their impact on modulating fatty acid content, utilization, and oxidation through their direct impact on intracellular signaling cascades within the central nervous system.

  14. Lipid peroxidation in neonatal mouse brain subjected to two different types of hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, K; Yoshioka, H; Sawada, T; Nishikawa, H

    1991-01-01

    To elucidate the role of free radicals in the pathogenesis of neonatal hypoxic encephalopathy, we determined the content of thiobarbituric acid reactants (TBARs), as an index of lipid peroxidation related with a free radical reaction, in the brains of newborn mice during hypoxia and recovery from hypoxia. Hypoxic stress was induced by 100% nitrogen gas breathing (N2 group) or 100% carbon dioxide gas breathing (CO2 group). TBARs increased with 20 minutes of hypoxia and returned to the control level during the recovery period in both groups. The increase in TBARs in the CO2 group was greater than that in the N2 group. These results may suggest that free radical reaction occurs during the hypoxic period and that CO2 hypoxia is more effective on free radical production in the newborn brain than N2 hypoxia.

  15. Aging-induced changes in brain regional serotonin receptor binding: Effect of Carnosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, S; Poddar, M K

    2016-04-05

    Monoamine neurotransmitter, serotonin (5-HT) has its own specific receptors in both pre- and post-synapse. In the present study the role of carnosine on aging-induced changes of [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding in different brain regions in a rat model was studied. The results showed that during aging (18 and 24 months) the [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding was reduced in hippocampus, hypothalamus and pons-medulla with a decrease in their both Bmax and KD but in cerebral cortex the [(3)H]-5-HT binding was increased with the increase of its only Bmax. The aging-induced changes in [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding with carnosine (2.0 μg/kg/day, intrathecally, for 21 consecutive days) attenuated in (a) 24-month-aged rats irrespective of the brain regions with the attenuation of its Bmax except hypothalamus where both Bmax and KD were significantly attenuated, (b) hippocampus and hypothalamus of 18-month-aged rats with the attenuation of its Bmax, and restored toward the [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding that observed in 4-month-young rats. The decrease in pons-medullary [(3)H]-5-HT binding including its Bmax of 18-month-aged rats was promoted with carnosine without any significant change in its cerebral cortex. The [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding with the same dosages of carnosine in 4-month-young rats (a) increased in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus with the increase in their only Bmax whereas (b) decreased in hypothalamus and pons-medulla with a decrease in their both Bmax and KD. These results suggest that carnosine treatment may (a) play a preventive role in aging-induced brain region-specific changes in serotonergic activity (b) not be worthy in 4-month-young rats in relation to the brain regional serotonergic activity. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. White Matter Lipids as a Ketogenic Fuel Supply in Aging Female Brain: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosinski, Lauren P; Yao, Jia; Yin, Fei; Fonteh, Alfred N; Harrington, Michael G; Christensen, Trace A; Trushina, Eugenia; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2015-12-01

    White matter degeneration is a pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's. Age remains the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer's and the prevalence of age-related late onset Alzheimer's is greatest in females. We investigated mechanisms underlying white matter degeneration in an animal model consistent with the sex at greatest Alzheimer's risk. Results of these analyses demonstrated decline in mitochondrial respiration, increased mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide production and cytosolic-phospholipase-A2 sphingomyelinase pathway activation during female brain aging. Electron microscopic and lipidomic analyses confirmed myelin degeneration. An increase in fatty acids and mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism machinery was coincident with a rise in brain ketone bodies and decline in plasma ketone bodies. This mechanistic pathway and its chronologically phased activation, links mitochondrial dysfunction early in aging with later age development of white matter degeneration. The catabolism of myelin lipids to generate ketone bodies can be viewed as a systems level adaptive response to address brain fuel and energy demand. Elucidation of the initiating factors and the mechanistic pathway leading to white matter catabolism in the aging female brain provides potential therapeutic targets to prevent and treat demyelinating diseases such as Alzheimer's and multiple sclerosis. Targeting stages of disease and associated mechanisms will be critical.

  17. Supplementation with complex milk lipids during brain development promotes neuroplasticity without altering myelination or vascular density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosamond B. Guillermo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Supplementation with complex milk lipids (CML during postnatal brain development has been shown to improve spatial reference learning in rats. Objective: The current study examined histo-biological changes in the brain following CML supplementation and their relationship to the observed improvements in memory. Design: The study used the brain tissues from the rats (male Wistar, 80 days of age after supplementing with either CML or vehicle during postnatal day 10–80. Immunohistochemical staining of synaptophysin, glutamate receptor-1, myelin basic protein, isolectin B-4, and glial fibrillary acidic protein was performed. The average area and the density of the staining and the numbers of astrocytes and capillaries were assessed and analysed. Results: Compared with control rats, CML supplementation increased the average area of synaptophysin staining and the number of GFAP astrocytes in the CA3 sub-region of the hippocampus (p<0.01, but not in the CA4 sub-region. The supplementation also led to an increase in dopamine output in the striatum that was related to nigral dopamine expression (p<0.05, but did not alter glutamate receptors, myelination or vascular density. Conclusion: CML supplementation may enhance neuroplasticity in the CA3 sub-regions of the hippocampus. The brain regions-specific increase of astrocyte may indicate a supporting role for GFAP in synaptic plasticity. CML supplementation did not associate with postnatal white matter development or vascular remodelling.

  18. White Matter Lipids as a Ketogenic Fuel Supply in Aging Female Brain: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren P. Klosinski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available White matter degeneration is a pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's. Age remains the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer's and the prevalence of age-related late onset Alzheimer's is greatest in females. We investigated mechanisms underlying white matter degeneration in an animal model consistent with the sex at greatest Alzheimer's risk. Results of these analyses demonstrated decline in mitochondrial respiration, increased mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide production and cytosolic-phospholipase-A2 sphingomyelinase pathway activation during female brain aging. Electron microscopic and lipidomic analyses confirmed myelin degeneration. An increase in fatty acids and mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism machinery was coincident with a rise in brain ketone bodies and decline in plasma ketone bodies. This mechanistic pathway and its chronologically phased activation, links mitochondrial dysfunction early in aging with later age development of white matter degeneration. The catabolism of myelin lipids to generate ketone bodies can be viewed as a systems level adaptive response to address brain fuel and energy demand. Elucidation of the initiating factors and the mechanistic pathway leading to white matter catabolism in the aging female brain provides potential therapeutic targets to prevent and treat demyelinating diseases such as Alzheimer's and multiple sclerosis. Targeting stages of disease and associated mechanisms will be critical.

  19. Lipid composition of microdomains is altered in neuronopathic Gaucher disease sheep brain and spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Leanne K; Rozaklis, Tina; Adams, Melissa K; Hopwood, John J; Karageorgos, Litsa

    2017-07-01

    Gaucher disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency in glucocerebrosidase activity that leads to accumulation of glucosylceramide and glucosylsphingosine. Membrane raft microdomains are discrete, highly organized microdomains with a unique lipid composition that provide the necessary environment for specific protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions to take place. In this study we purified detergent resistant membranes (DRM; membrane rafts) from the occipital cortex and spleen from sheep affected with acute neuronopathic Gaucher disease and wild-type controls. We observed significant increases in the concentrations of glucosylceramide, hexosylsphingosine, BMP and gangliosides and decreases in the percentage of cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine leading to an altered DRM composition. Altered sphingolipid/cholesterol homeostasis would dramatically disrupt DRM architecture making them less ordered and more fluid. In addition, significant changes in the length and degree of lipid saturation within the DRM microdomains in the Gaucher brain were also observed. As these DRM microdomains are involved in many cellular events, an imbalance or disruption of the cell membrane homeostasis may impair normal cell function. This disruption of membrane raft microdomains and imbalance within the environment of cellular membranes of neuronal cells may be a key factor in initiating a cascade process leading to neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of thyroid hormones in regulating of fatty acid spectrum of brain lipids: ontogenetic aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodynskiy A.G.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In experiments on rats of three age groups the role of thyroid hormones in the regulation of fatty acid spectrum of cortical and hippocampus lipids was studied. It was found that on the background of decreased thyroid status content of polyunsaturated fractions of free fatty acids, significantly changed depending on the age of the animals. In particular, in juvenile rats hypothyroidism was accompanied by a decrease almost twice the number of pentacodan acid decreased lipids viscosity in neurocortex. In old rats reduce of pentacodan acid in the cortex (38% was supplemented by significant (77% decrease in linoleic and linolenic acids. Unlike the two age groups deficiency of thyroid hormones in young animals caused accumulation of free polyunsatarated fatty acids (C18: 2.3 in the cerebral cortex by 74%, which may be associated with a decrease of this fraction in fatty acid spectrum of lipids and increase of viscosity properties of the membranes. These restruc­turing may be associated with modulation of synaptic transmission of specific neurotransmitter systems in the brain.

  1. Identification and in silico analysis of helical lipid binding regions in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-10-20

    Oct 20, 2014 ... The role of protein-lipid interactions is increasingly recognized to be of importance in numerous biological ... 2.1 Primary and secondary structures identification ..... sity for a new terminology in the classification of proteins.

  2. Autoradiographic localization of (125I-Tyr4)bombesin-binding sites in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarbin, M.A.; Kuhar, M.J.; O'Donohue, T.L.; Wolf, S.S.; Moody, T.W.

    1985-01-01

    The binding of ( 125 I-Tyr 4 )bombesin to rat brain slices was investigated. Radiolabeled (Tyr 4 )bombesin bound with high affinity (K/sub d/ . 4 nM) to a single class of sites (B/sub max/ . 130 fmol/mg of protein); the ratio of specific to nonspecific binding was 6/1. Also, pharmacology studies indicated that the C-terminal of bombesin was important for the high affinity binding activity. Autoradiographic studies indicated that the ( 125 I-Tyr4)bombesin-binding sites were discretely distributed in certain gray but not white matter regions of rat brain. Highest grain densities were present in the olfactory bulb and tubercle, nucleus accumbens, suprachiasmatic and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, central medial thalamic nucleus, medial amygdaloid nucleus, hippocampus, dentate gyrus, subiculum, nucleus of the solitary tract, and substantia gelatinosa. Moderate grain densities were present in the parietal cortex, deep layers of the neocortex, rhinal cortex, caudate putamen, stria terminalis, locus ceruleus, parabrachial nucleus, and facial nucleus. Low grain densities were present in the globus pallidus, lateral thalamus, and midbrain. Negligible grain densities were present in the cerebellum, corpus callosum, and all regions treated with 1 microM unlabeled bombesin. The discrete regional distribution of binding suggests that endogenous bombesin-like peptides may function as important regulatory agents in certain brain loci

  3. Characterization of [125I]omega-conotoxin binding to brain N calcium channels and (-)[3H] desmethoxyverapamil binding to novel calcium channels in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    This dissertation provides molecular evidence for a diversity of Ca 2+ channels in neuronal and non-neuronal tissues. First, I demonstrated specific, reversible, saturable binding sites for omega [ 125 I]conotoxin GVIA (omega[ 125 I]CTX) in rat brain and rabbit sympathetic ganglion. Omega [ 125 I]CTX binding has a unique pharmacology, ion selectivity, and anatomical distribution in rat brain. Omega [ 125 I]CTX binding was solubilized, retaining an appropriate pharmacology and ion selectivity. Omega[ 125 I]CTX binding may be associated with a Ca 2+ channel because the K/sub D/ of omega [ 125 I]CTX is similar to the IC 50 of inhibition of depolarization-induced 45 Ca 2+ flux into rat brain synaptosomes. Specific (-)[ 3 H]desmethoxyverapamil ((-)[ 3 H]DMV) binding sites were demonstrated on osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cell membranes

  4. Low 5-HT1B receptor binding in the migraine brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deen, Marie; Hansen, Hanne D; Hougaard, Anders

    2018-01-01

    Background The pathophysiology of migraine may involve dysfunction of serotonergic signaling. In particular, the 5-HT1B receptor is considered a key player due to the efficacy of 5-HT1B receptor agonists for treatment of migraine attacks. Aim To examine the cerebral 5-HT1B receptor binding....... Patients who reported migraine brain regions involved in pain modulation as regions of interest and applied a latent variable model (LVM) to assess the group effect on binding across these regions. Results Our data...... support a model wherein group status predicts the latent variable ( p = 0.038), with migraine patients having lower 5-HT1B receptor binding across regions compared to controls. Further, in a whole-brain voxel-based analysis, time since last migraine attack correlated positively with 5-HT1B receptor...

  5. Heterogeneous binding of sigma radioligands in the rat brain and liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, S.B.

    1991-01-01

    The binding of four sigma receptor ligands, 3 H-(+)-N-allyl-N-normetazocine ( 3 H-(+)-SKF 10,047), 3 H-(+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine ( 3 H-(+)-3-PPP), 3 H-haloperidol and 3 H-N,N'-di(o-totyl)guanidine ( 3 H-DTG), and the cytochrome P450IID6 ligand and dopamine uptake inhibitor 3 H-1-[2-(diphenylmethoxy)ethyl]-4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazine ( 3 H-GBR 12935) to membranal preparations of rat liver or whole rat brain was examined regarding kinetical properties and inhibition by various compounds with affinity for sigma binding sites or cytochrome P-450. In rat brain the density of binding sites was increased in order (+)-SKF 10,047 3 H-(+)-SKF 10,047 there were quite marked differences between the ligands studied. Multiple binding sites were also indicated by the low Hill coefficients found for most of the compounds studied. It was found that the cytochrome P-450 inhibitor proadifen (SKF 525A), like haloperidol, was a potent inhibitor of the binding of 3 H-(+)-SKF 10,047, 3 H-(+)-3-PPP and 3 H-haloperidol to the liver and brain preparations, less active in inhibiting the binding of 3 H-DTG and least effective on the binding of 3 H-GBR 12935. Another cytochrome P-450 inhibitor, L-lobeline, was particularly potent in inhibiting the binding of 3 H-DTG but was also quite potent inhibitor of the binding of the other sigma ligands. It was less potent in inhibiting the binding of 3 H-GBR 12935. The binding of the latter ligand was potently inhibited by the analogous compound GBR 12909 but of the other compounds examined only L-lobeline, proadifen, haloperidol, DTG and (+)-3-PPP had IC50 values below 10 μM. The possibility that the sigma binding sites are identical with some subforms of cytochrome P-450 is discussed. (author)

  6. Coupling ligand recognition to protein folding in an engineered variant of rabbit ileal lipid binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouvatsos, Nikolaos; Meldrum, Jill K; Searle, Mark S; Thomas, Neil R

    2006-11-28

    We have engineered a variant of the beta-clam shell protein ILBP which lacks the alpha-helical motif that caps the central binding cavity; the mutant protein is sufficiently destabilised that it is unfolded under physiological conditions, however, it unexpectedly binds its natural bile acid substrates with high affinity forming a native-like beta-sheet rich structure and demonstrating strong thermodynamic coupling between ligand binding and protein folding.

  7. Serotonin 2A receptor agonist binding in the human brain with [C]Cimbi-36

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, A.; da Cunha-Bang, S.; McMahon, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    [C]Cimbi-36 was recently developed as a selective serotonin 2A (5-HT) receptor agonist radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging. Such an agonist PET radioligand may provide a novel, and more functional, measure of the serotonergic system and agonist binding is more likely ....... Thus, we here describe [C]Cimbi-36 as the first agonist PET radioligand to successfully image and quantify 5-HT receptors in the human brain.Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism advance online publication, 30 April 2014; doi:10.1038/jcbfm.2014.68....... than antagonist binding to reflect 5-HT levels in vivo. Here, we show data from a first-in-human clinical trial with [C]Cimbi-36. In 29 healthy volunteers, we found high brain uptake and distribution according to 5-HT receptors with [C]Cimbi-36 PET. The two-tissue compartment model using arterial input...

  8. The interaction of substituted benzamides with brain benzodiazepine binding sites in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, R W; Lowther, S; Chivers, J; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D; Testa, B

    1988-08-01

    1. The interaction of substituted benzamides with brain benzodiazepine (BDZ) binding sites was examined by their ability to displace [3H]-flunitrazepam ([3H]-FNM) from specific binding sites in bovine cortical membranes in vitro. 2. Clebopride, Delagrange 2674, Delagrange 2335 and BRL 20627 displayed concentration-dependent displacement of [3H]-FNM with IC50 values of 73 nM, 132 nM, 7.7 microM and 5.9 microM, respectively. Other substituted benzamides including metoclopramide, sulpiride, tiapride, sultopride and cisapride were inactive at 10(-5) M. 3. Inhibition by clebopride and Delagrange 2674 of [3H]-FNM binding was apparently competitive and readily reversible. 4. In the presence of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the ability of diazepam and Delagrange 2674 to displace [3H]-Ro 15-1788 binding was increased 3.6 and 1.6 fold respectively, compared to the absence of GABA, while ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta CCE) and clebopride were less potent in the presence of GABA. 5. Diazepam was 30 fold less potent at displacing [3H]-Ro 15-1788 in membranes that had been photoaffinity labelled with FNM than in control membranes, whereas the potency of beta CCE did not differ. Clebopride and Delagrange 2674 showed a less than two fold loss of potency in photoaffinity labelled membranes. 6. The pattern of binding of clebopride and Delagrange 2674 in these in vitro tests is similar to that found previously with partial agonists or antagonists at BDZ binding sites. 7. Clebopride and Delagrange 2674 inhibited [3H]-FNM binding with similar potency in rat cerebellar and hippocampal membranes, suggesting they have no selectivity for BDZ1 and BDZ2 binding sites. 8. Clebopride and Delagrange 2674 are structurally dissimilar to other BDZ ligands and represent another chemical structure to probe brain BDZ binding sites.

  9. Nanodiscs for immobilization of lipid bilayers and membrane receptors: kinetic analysis of cholera toxin binding to a glycolipid receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Jonas; Torta, Federico; Sligar, Stephen G

    2008-01-01

    nanodiscs and their incorporated membrane receptors can be attached to surface plasmon resonance sensorchips and used to measure the kinetics of the interaction between soluble molecules and membrane receptors inserted in the bilayer of nanodiscs. Cholera toxin and its glycolipid receptor G(M1) constitute...... a system that can be considered a paradigm for interactions of soluble proteins with membrane receptors. In this work, we have investigated different technologies for capturing nanodiscs containing the glycolipid receptor G(M1) in lipid bilayers, enabling measurements of binding of its soluble interaction...

  10. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nye, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which delta 9 tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9 THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5'-Trimethylammonium-delta 8 THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta- 8 THC modified on the 5' carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of [ 3 H]-5'-trimethylammonium-delta- 8 THC ([ 3 H]TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. [ 3 H]TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of [ 3 H]TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight

  11. Characterization of a high affinity cocaine binding site in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calligaro, D.; Eldefrawi, M.

    1986-01-01

    Binding of [ 3 H]cocaine to synaptic membranes from whole rat brain was reversible and saturable. Nonlinear regression analysis of binding isotherms indicated two binding affinities: one with k/sub d/ = 16 nM, B/sub max/ = 0.65 pmoles/mg protein and the other with K/sub d/ = 660 nM, B/sub max/ = 5.1 pmoles/mg protein. The high-affinity binding of [ 3 H]cocaine was sensitive to the actions of trypsin and chymotrypsin but not carboxypeptidase, and was eliminated by exposure of the membranes to 95 0 C for 5 min. Specific binding at 2 nM was higher at pH 8.8 than at pH 7.0. Binding of [ 3 H]cocaine (15 nM) was inhibited by increasing concentrations of Na + ions. Several cocaine analogues, neurotransmitter uptake inhibitors and local anesthetics displaced specific [ 3 H]cocaine binding at 2 nM with various potencies. The cocaine analogue (-)-norcocaine was the most potent (IC 50 = 10 nM), while the local anesthetic tetracaine was the least potent in inhibiting [ 3 H]cocaine binding. Several biogenic amine uptake inhibitors, including tricyclic antidepressants and phencyclidine, had IC 50 values below μM concentrations

  12. Differentiation of human keratinocytes: changes in lipid synthesis, plasma membrane lipid composition, and 125I-EGF binding upon administration of 25-hydroxycholesterol and mevinolin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponec, M.; Kempenaar, J.; Weerheim, A.; Boonstra, J.

    1987-01-01

    We have studied the relationship between differentiation capacity, plasma membrane composition, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor expression of normal keratinocytes in vitro. The plasma membrane composition of the cells was modulated experimentally by cholesterol depletion, using specific inhibitors of cholesterol synthesis, such as 25-hydroxycholesterol and mevinolin. Exposure of the cells towards these inhibitors resulted in a drastic decrease of cholesterol biosynthesis, as determined from 14 C-acetate incorporation into the various lipid fractions. This effect on cholesterol biosynthesis was reflected by changes in plasma membrane composition, as determined by lipid analysis of isolated plasma membrane fractions, these resulting in a decreased cholesterol-phospholipid ratio. The experimental modulation of plasma membrane composition by 25-hydroxycholesterol or mevinolin were accompanied by a decreased cornified envelope formation and by high expression of EGF binding sites. These phenomena were more pronounced in cells induced to differentiate by exposure of cells grown under low Ca2+ to normal Ca2+ concentrations, as compared to cells grown persistently under low Ca2+ concentrations. These results suggest a close correlation between plasma membrane composition, differentiation capacity, and EGF receptor expression

  13. Serine 77 in the PDZ domain of PICK1 is a protein kinase Cα phosphorylation site regulated by lipid membrane binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Thorsen, Thor Seneca; Gether, Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) contains an N-terminal protein binding PDZ domain and a C-terminal lipid binding BAR domain. PICK1 plays a key role in several physiological processes, including synaptic plasticity. However, little is known about the cellular mechanisms governing the a...... lipid binding and/or polymerization capacity. We propose that PICK1 is phosphorylated at Ser77 by PKCα preferentially when bound to membrane vesicles and that this phosphorylation in turn modulates its cellular distribution....

  14. Brain serotonin and dopamine transporter bindings in adults with high-functioning autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Sekine, Yoshimoto; Ouchi, Yasuomi; Tsujii, Masatsugu; Yoshikawa, Etsuji; Futatsubashi, Masami; Tsuchiya, Kenji J; Sugihara, Genichi; Iwata, Yasuhide; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Suda, Shiro; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Takei, Nori; Mori, Norio

    2010-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by repetitive and/or obsessive interests and behavior and by deficits in sociability and communication. Although its neurobiological underpinnings are postulated to lie in abnormalities of the serotoninergic and dopaminergic systems, the details remain unknown. To determine the occurrence of changes in the binding of serotonin and dopamine transporters, which are highly selective markers for their respective neuronal systems. Using positron emission tomography, we measured the binding of brain serotonin and dopamine transporters in each individual with the radioligands carbon 11 ((11)C)-labeled trans-1,2,3,5,6,10-beta-hexahydro-6-[4-(methylthio)phenyl]pyrrolo-[2,1-a]isoquinoline ([(11)C](+)McN-5652) and 2beta-carbomethoxy-3-beta-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane ([(11)C]WIN-35,428), respectively. Statistical parametric mapping was used for between-subject analysis and within-subject correlation analysis with respect to clinical variables. Participants recruited from the community. Twenty men (age range, 18-26 years; mean [SD] IQ, 99.3 [18.1]) with autism and 20 age- and IQ-matched control subjects. Serotonin transporter binding was significantly lower throughout the brain in autistic individuals compared with controls (P dopamine transporter binding was significantly higher in the orbitofrontal cortex of the autistic group (P dopamine transporter binding was significantly inversely correlated with serotonin transporter binding (r = -0.61; P = .004). The brains of autistic individuals have abnormalities in both serotonin transporter and dopamine transporter binding. The present findings indicate that the gross abnormalities in these neurotransmitter systems may underpin the neurophysiologic mechanism of autism. Our sample was not characteristic or representative of a typical sample of adults with autism in the community.

  15. Methodological issues in protein and lipidic expressions in brain tissue exposed to Co60 based on DESI/MALDI-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Matheus F.; Campos, Tarcísio P.R.; Augusti, Rodinei; Eberlin, Marcos N.; Vendramini, Pedro H.

    2017-01-01

    The present paper attempts to present some issues in the methodology of identifying lipid and protein changes in brain tissue induced by radiation. The goal was to address the analysis of the methodology and to investigate the feasibility of the generation of lipid/protein profiles of irradiated brain tissue, in order to identify radioinduced changes. Lipids and proteins are biomolecules with diverse structures and functionalities that participate in important intracellular processes. Changes in the lipid and the tissue protein profiles may indicate a cellular response to an external stimulus as well as the emergence of neoplasms or neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. DESI-MS is a convenient method for identifying lipids and their spatial distribution in tissue beyond analytical quantification. DESI-MS allows the creation of an image of several low lipid m/z classes. MALDI-MS has already been a method used in the study of macromolecules as structural, membrane, hormone, neuromediator and immunological peptides. Through a full-scan matrix scan, with a m/z spectrum between 500-1000 for lipids and with a mass spectrum of 1000-15000 Da for proteins, the molecular profile can be analyzed. Generated pixel shape 2D chemical image. The produced image allows to associate the tissue distribution of the lipids and proteins with their chemical profile identified, allowing the verification of the changes radioinduced. Radiation triggers intense oxidative stress by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and free radicals, causing DNA damage with consequent alterations in proteomics and cellular lipid explaining such changes in the lipid and protein expressions. The cellular morphophysiological changes are responsible for both the clonogenic inhibition and the induction of the apoptotic process. The images's production was directly dependent on the rigorous execution of the methodological procedures. Innumerable interferences could impair the image

  16. Brain-targeted delivery of trans-activating transcriptor-conjugated magnetic PLGA/lipid nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangru Wen

    Full Text Available Magnetic poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA/lipid nanoparticles (MPLs were fabricated from PLGA, L-α-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-amino (polyethylene glycol (DSPE-PEG-NH2, and magnetic nanoparticles (NPs, and then conjugated to trans-activating transcriptor (TAT peptide. The TAT-MPLs were designed to target the brain by magnetic guidance and TAT conjugation. The drugs hesperidin (HES, naringin (NAR, and glutathione (GSH were encapsulated in MPLs with drug loading capacity (>10% and drug encapsulation efficiency (>90%. The therapeutic efficacy of the drug-loaded TAT-MPLs in bEnd.3 cells was compared with that of drug-loaded MPLs. The cells accumulated higher levels of TAT-MPLs than MPLs. In addition, the accumulation of QD-loaded fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-labeled TAT-MPLs in bEnd.3 cells was dose and time dependent. Our results show that TAT-conjugated MPLs may function as an effective drug delivery system that crosses the blood brain barrier to the brain.

  17. The serotonin transporter in rhesus monkey brain: comparison of DASB and citalopram binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Zhizhen [Imaging Department, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States)]. E-mail: zhizhen_zeng@merck.com; Chen, T.-B. [Imaging Department, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Miller, Patricia J. [Imaging Department, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Dean, Dennis [Labeled Compound Synthesis Group, Drug Metabolism, Merck Research Laboratories, Rahway, NJ 07065-0900 (United States); Tang, Y.S. [Labeled Compound Synthesis Group, Drug Metabolism, Merck Research Laboratories, Rahway, NJ 07065-0900 (United States); Sur, Cyrille [Imaging Department, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Williams, David L. [Imaging Department, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    We have characterized the interaction of the serotonin transporter ligand [{sup 3}H]-N,N-dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-cyanophenylthio)-benzylamine (DASB) with rhesus monkey brain in vitro using tissue homogenate binding and autoradiographic mapping. [{sup 3}H]-DASB, a tritiated version of the widely used [{sup 11}C] positron emission tomography tracer, was found to selectively bind to a single population of sites with high affinity (K {sub d}=0.20{+-}0.04 nM). The serotonin transporter density (B {sub max}) obtained for rhesus frontal cortex was found to be 66{+-}8 fmol/mg protein using [{sup 3}H]-DASB, similar to the B {sub max} value obtained using the reference radioligand [{sup 3}H]-citalopram, a well-characterized and highly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (83{+-}22 fmol/mg protein). Specific binding sites of both [{sup 3}H]-DASB and [{sup 3}H]-citalopram were similarly and nonuniformly distributed throughout the rhesus central nervous system, in a pattern consistent with serotonin transporter localization reported for human brain. Regional serotonin transporter densities, estimated from optical densities of the autoradiographic images, were well correlated between the two radioligands. Finally, DASB and fluoxetine showed dose-dependent full inhibition of [{sup 3}H]-citalopram binding in a competition autoradiographic study, with K {sub i} values in close agreement with those obtained from rhesus brain homogenates. This side-by-side comparison of [{sup 3}H]-DASB and [{sup 3}H]-citalopram binding sites in rhesus tissue homogenates and in adjacent rhesus brain slices provides additional support for the use of [{sup 11}C]-DASB to assess the availability and distribution of serotonin transporters in nonhuman primates.

  18. The serotonin transporter in rhesus monkey brain: comparison of DASB and citalopram binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Zhizhen; Chen, T.-B.; Miller, Patricia J.; Dean, Dennis; Tang, Y.S.; Sur, Cyrille; Williams, David L.

    2006-01-01

    We have characterized the interaction of the serotonin transporter ligand [ 3 H]-N,N-dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-cyanophenylthio)-benzylamine (DASB) with rhesus monkey brain in vitro using tissue homogenate binding and autoradiographic mapping. [ 3 H]-DASB, a tritiated version of the widely used [ 11 C] positron emission tomography tracer, was found to selectively bind to a single population of sites with high affinity (K d =0.20±0.04 nM). The serotonin transporter density (B max ) obtained for rhesus frontal cortex was found to be 66±8 fmol/mg protein using [ 3 H]-DASB, similar to the B max value obtained using the reference radioligand [ 3 H]-citalopram, a well-characterized and highly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (83±22 fmol/mg protein). Specific binding sites of both [ 3 H]-DASB and [ 3 H]-citalopram were similarly and nonuniformly distributed throughout the rhesus central nervous system, in a pattern consistent with serotonin transporter localization reported for human brain. Regional serotonin transporter densities, estimated from optical densities of the autoradiographic images, were well correlated between the two radioligands. Finally, DASB and fluoxetine showed dose-dependent full inhibition of [ 3 H]-citalopram binding in a competition autoradiographic study, with K i values in close agreement with those obtained from rhesus brain homogenates. This side-by-side comparison of [ 3 H]-DASB and [ 3 H]-citalopram binding sites in rhesus tissue homogenates and in adjacent rhesus brain slices provides additional support for the use of [ 11 C]-DASB to assess the availability and distribution of serotonin transporters in nonhuman primates

  19. Reconstitution of high-affinity opioid agonist binding in brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remmers, A.E.; Medzihradsky, F. (Univ. of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1991-03-15

    In synaptosomal membranes from rat brain cortex, the {mu} selective agonist ({sup 3}H)dihydromorphine in the absence of sodium, and the nonselective antagonist ({sup 3}H)naltrexone in the presence of sodium, bound to two populations of opioid receptor sites with K{sub d} values of 0.69 and 8.7 nM for dihydromorphine, and 0.34 and 5.5 nM for naltrexone. The addition of 5 {mu}M guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)) strongly reduced high-affinity agonist but not antagonist binding. Exposure of the membranes to high pH reduced the number of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding sites by 90% and low K{sub m}, opioid-sensitive GTPase activity by 95%. In these membranes, high-affinity agonist binding was abolished and modulation of residual binding by GTP({gamma}S) was diminished. Alkali treatment of the glioma cell membranes prior to fusion inhibited most of the low K{sub m} GTPase activity and prevented the reconstitution of agonist binding. The results show that high-affinity opioid agonist binding reflects the ligand-occupied receptor - guanine nucleotide binding protein complex.

  20. The unusual lipid binding proteins of parasitic helminths and their potential roles in parasitism and as therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, Gisela R; Pórfido, Jorge L; Ibáñez Shimabukuro, Marina; Rey Burusco, María F; Bélgamo, Julián A; Smith, Brian O; Kennedy, Malcolm W; Córsico, Betina

    2015-02-01

    In this review paper we aim at presenting the current knowledge on structural aspects of soluble lipid binding proteins (LBPs) found in parasitic helminths and to discuss their potential role as novel drug targets. Helminth parasites produce and secrete a great variety of LBPs that may participate in the acquisition of nutrients from their host, such as fatty acids and cholesterol. It is also postulated that LBPs might interfere in the regulation of the host׳s immune response by sequestering lipidic intermediates or delivering bioactive lipids. A detailed comprehension of the structure of these proteins, as well as their interactions with ligands and membranes, is important to understand host-parasite relationships that they may mediate. This information could also contribute to determining the role that these proteins may play in the biology of parasitic helminths and how they modulate the immune systems of their hosts, and also towards the development of new therapeutics and prevention of the diseases caused by these highly pathogenic parasites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Long-term reproducibility of in vivo measures of specific binding of radioligands in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilbourn, Michael R. E-mail: mkilbour@umich.edu

    2004-07-01

    The long-term reproducibility of measures of in vivo specific binding of radiolabeled forms of (+)-{alpha}-dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) and d-threo-methylphenidate (MPH) in rat brain was examined. All studies were done using a consistent bolus plus infusion protocol and calculation of equilibrium distribution volume ratios (DVR). Over a period of eight years striatal DVR values for DTBZ binding to the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) in young adult (8-10 wks old) rats showed very good reproducibility (3.62{+-}0.33, N=35). Equivalent values were obtained using either tritiated or carbon-11 labeled DTBZ, and were irrespective of sex of animals. Older animals (78 wks old) showed losses (-45%) of specific binding. Striatal binding of MPH to the dopamine transporter (DAT) showed a similar reproducibility over a five year period (DVR=2.17{+-}0.39, N=52), again irrespective of radionuclide or sex. These studies demonstrate that use of a consistent in vivo technique can provide reliable measures of specific binding of radioligands to high affinity sites in the rat brain.

  2. Selective binding of 2-[{sup 125}I]iodo-nisoxetine to norepinephrine transporters in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kung, M.-P.; Choi, Seok-Rye; Hou, Catherine; Zhuang, Z.-P.; Foulon, Catherine; Kung, Hank F. E-mail: kunghf@sunmac.spect.upenn.edu

    2004-07-01

    A radioiodinated ligand, (R)-N-methyl-(2-[{sup 125}I]iodo-phenoxy)-3-phenylpropylamine, [{sup 125}I]2-INXT, targeting norepinephrine transporters (NET), was successfully prepared. A no-carrier-added product, [{sup 125}I]2-INXT, displayed a saturable binding with a high affinity (K{sub d}=0.06 nM) in the homogenates prepared from rat cortical tissues as well as from LLC-PK{sub 1} cells expressing NET. A relatively low number of binding sties (B{sub max}=55 fmol/mg protein) measured with [{sup 125}I]2-INXT in rat cortical homogenates is consistent with the value reported for a known NET ligand, [{sup 3}H]nisoxetine. Competition studies with various compounds on [{sup 125}I]2-INXT binding clearly confirmed the pharmacological specificity and selectivity for NET binding sites. Following a tail-vein injection of [{sup 125}I]2-INXT in rats, a good initial brain uptake was observed (0.56% dose at 2 min) followed by a slow washout from the brain (0.2% remained at 3 hours post-injection). The hypothalamus (a NET-rich region) to striatum (a region devoid of NET) ratio was 1.5 at 3 hours post-i.v. injection. Pretreatment of rats with nisoxetine significantly inhibited the uptake of [{sup 125}I]2-INXT (70-100% inhibition) in locus coeruleus, hypothalamus and raphe nuclei, regions known to have a high density of NET; whereas escitalopram, a serotonin transporter ligand, did not show a similar effect. Ex vivo autoradiography of rat brain sections of [{sup 125}I]2-INXT (at 3 hours after an i.v. injection) displayed an excellent regional brain localization pattern corroborated to the specific NET distribution in the brain. The specific brain localization was significantly reduced by a dose of nisoxetine pretreatment. Taken together, the data suggest that [{sup 123}I]2-INXT may be useful for mapping NET binding sites in the brain.

  3. The comparison of lipid profiling in mouse brain and liver after starvation and a high-fat diet: A medical systems biology approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginneken, V.J.T. van; Verheij, E.; Hekman, M.; Greef, J. van der; Feskens, E.J.M.; Poelmann, R.E.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated with LC-MS techniques, measuring approximately 109 lipid compounds, in mouse brain and liver tissue after 48 hours of starvation and a High-Fat Diet if brain and liver lipid composition changed. We measured Cholesterolesters (ChE), Lysophosphatidyl-cholines (LPC), Phosphatidylcholine

  4. Polyunsaturated fatty acids synergize with lipid droplet binding thalidomide analogs to induce oxidative stress in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madácsi Ramóna

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytoplasmic lipid-droplets are common inclusions of eukaryotic cells. Lipid-droplet binding thalidomide analogs (2,6-dialkylphenyl-4/5-amino-substituted-5,6,7-trifluorophthalimides with potent anticancer activities were synthesized. Results Cytotoxicity was detected in different cell lines including melanoma, leukemia, hepatocellular carcinoma, glioblastoma at micromolar concentrations. The synthesized analogs are non-toxic to adult animals up to 1 g/kg but are teratogenic to zebrafish embryos at micromolar concentrations with defects in the developing muscle. Treatment of tumor cells resulted in calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS, ER stress and cell death. Antioxidants could partially, while an intracellular calcium chelator almost completely diminish ROS production. Exogenous docosahexaenoic acid or eicosapentaenoic acid induced calcium release and ROS generation, and synergized with the analogs in vitro, while oleic acid had no such an effect. Gene expression analysis confirmed the induction of ER stress-mediated apoptosis pathway components, such as GADD153, ATF3, Luman/CREB3 and the ER-associated degradation-related HERPUD1 genes. Tumor suppressors, P53, LATS2 and ING3 were also up-regulated in various cell lines after drug treatment. Amino-phthalimides down-regulated the expression of CCL2, which is implicated in tumor metastasis and angiogenesis. Conclusions Because of the anticancer, anti-angiogenic action and the wide range of applicability of the immunomodulatory drugs, including thalidomide analogs, lipid droplet-binding members of this family could represent a new class of agents by affecting ER-membrane integrity and perturbations of ER homeostasis.

  5. The interaction of substituted benzamides with brain benzodiazepine binding sites in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Horton, R. W.; Lowther, S.; Chivers, J.; Jenner, P.; Marsden, C. D.; Testa, B.

    1988-01-01

    1. The interaction of substituted benzamides with brain benzodiazepine (BDZ) binding sites was examined by their ability to displace [3H]-flunitrazepam ([3H]-FNM) from specific binding sites in bovine cortical membranes in vitro. 2. Clebopride, Delagrange 2674, Delagrange 2335 and BRL 20627 displayed concentration-dependent displacement of [3H]-FNM with IC50 values of 73 nM, 132 nM, 7.7 microM and 5.9 microM, respectively. Other substituted benzamides including metoclopramide, sulpiride, tiap...

  6. Characterization of [(3)H]harmane binding to rat whole brain membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, N J; Robinson, E S J; Husbands, S M; Delagrange, P; Nutt, D J; Hudson, A L

    2003-12-01

    This study investigates the binding of [(3)H]harmane to rat whole brain homogenates. Saturation studies revealed [(3)H]harmane labels a single, saturable, high-capacity population with high affinity. All the test compounds displaced [(3)H]harmane completely and in an apparently monophasic manner. The displacement profile of the test ligands indicated labeling of MAO-A. Given the high level of MAO-A binding, it is unlikely that a low-capacity I(2) site would be distinguishable from the total [(3)H]harmane population.

  7. [3H]muscimol binding sites increased in autopsied brains of chronic schizophrenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanada, S.; Mita, T.; Nishino, N.; Tanaka, C.

    1987-01-01

    [ 3 H]muscimol binding and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) activity in the prefrontal cortex and caudate nucleus of autopsied brains from 19 chronic schizophrenics and 17 control subjects were investigated. In the schizophrenics, saturation analysis with varying concentrations of [ 3 H]muscimol revealed an increase in the number GABA/sub A/ receptors, but there was no significant difference in the affinity. In addition, the enhancement of [ 3 H]muscimol binding by diazepam was significantly greater in schizophrenics than in controls. GAD activity did not differ between controls and schizophrenics. The possibility that GABAergic mechanisms might play a role in case of chronic schizophrenia should be given further attention

  8. Repeated mild traumatic brain injury in female rats increases lipid peroxidation in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Nathanael J; Lydiard, Stephen; Fehily, Brooke; Weir, Gillian; Chin, Aaron; Bartlett, Carole A; Alderson, Jacqueline; Fitzgerald, Melinda

    2017-07-01

    Negative outcomes of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) can be exacerbated by repeated insult. Animal models of repeated closed-head mTBI provide the opportunity to define acute pathological mechanisms as the number of mTBI increases. Furthermore, little is known about the effects of mTBI impact site, and how this may affect brain function. We use a closed head, weight drop model of mTBI that allows head movement following impact, in adult female rats to determine the role of the number and location of mTBI on brain pathology and behaviour. Biomechanical assessment of two anatomically well-defined mTBI impact sites were used, anterior (bregma) and posterior (lambda). Location of the impact had no significant effect on impact forces (450 N), and the weight impact locations were on average 5.4 mm from the desired impact site. No between location vertical linear head kinematic differences were observed immediately following impact, however, in the 300 ms post-impact, significantly higher mean vertical head displacement and velocity were observed in the mTBI lambda trials. Breaches of the blood brain barrier were observed with three mTBI over bregma, associated with immunohistochemical indicators of damage. However, an increased incidence of hairline fractures of the skull and macroscopic haemorrhaging made bregma an unsuitable impact location to model repeated mTBI. Repeated mTBI over lambda did not cause skull fractures and were examined more comprehensively, with outcomes following one, two or three mTBI or sham, delivered at 1 day intervals, assessed on days 1-4. We observe a mild behavioural phenotype, with subtle deficits in cognitive function, associated with no identifiable neuroanatomical or inflammatory changes. However, an increase in lipid peroxidation in a subset of cortical neurons following two mTBI indicates increasing oxidative damage with repeated injury in female rats, supported by increased amyloid precursor protein immunoreactivity with three m

  9. Vaccinia Virus Immunomodulator A46: A Lipid and Protein-Binding Scaffold for Sequestering Host TIR-Domain Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofiya Fedosyuk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus interferes with early events of the activation pathway of the transcriptional factor NF-kB by binding to numerous host TIR-domain containing adaptor proteins. We have previously determined the X-ray structure of the A46 C-terminal domain; however, the structure and function of the A46 N-terminal domain and its relationship to the C-terminal domain have remained unclear. Here, we biophysically characterize residues 1-83 of the N-terminal domain of A46 and present the X-ray structure at 1.55 Å. Crystallographic phases were obtained by a recently developed ab initio method entitled ARCIMBOLDO_BORGES that employs tertiary structure libraries extracted from the Protein Data Bank; data analysis revealed an all β-sheet structure. This is the first such structure solved by this method which should be applicable to any protein composed entirely of β-sheets. The A46(1-83 structure itself is a β-sandwich containing a co-purified molecule of myristic acid inside a hydrophobic pocket and represents a previously unknown lipid-binding fold. Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the presence of long-chain fatty acids in both N-terminal and full-length A46; mutation of the hydrophobic pocket reduced the lipid content. Using a combination of high resolution X-ray structures of the N- and C-terminal domains and SAXS analysis of full-length protein A46(1-240, we present here a structural model of A46 in a tetrameric assembly. Integrating affinity measurements and structural data, we propose how A46 simultaneously interferes with several TIR-domain containing proteins to inhibit NF-κB activation and postulate that A46 employs a bipartite binding arrangement to sequester the host immune adaptors TRAM and MyD88.

  10. [(3)H]-YM-09151-2 binding sites in human brain postmortem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marazziti, Donatella; Baroni, Stefano; Masala, Irene; Giannaccini, Gino; Betti, Laura; Palego, Lionella; Catena Dell'Osso, Mario; Consoli, Giorgio; Castagna, Maura; Lucacchini, Antonio

    2009-12-01

    The controversial and limited data on the distribution of dopamine (DA) receptors of type 4 (D(4)) in the human brain prompted us to explore their density and pharmacological characteristics in the prefrontal cortex, striatum and hippocampus, through a series of binding assays. Brain samples were taken during autopsy from seven subjects. Tissue homogenates were incubated with increasing concentration of [(3)H]-YM-09151-2, a D(2)-like receptor antagonist, and L-745,870 and/or sulpiride to define the non-specific binding, while PPAP was used to block sigma receptors. The results showed a low density of D(4) receptors in the hippocampus only, with a preponderance of D(2)/D(3) and sigma receptors in the prefrontal cortex and striatum. In conclusion, these findings underline that it is possible to label D(4) receptors by means of [(3)H]-YM-09151-2, provided that D(2), D(3) and sigma receptors are blocked.

  11. PPAR-α, a lipid-sensing transcription factor, regulates blood-brain barrier efflux transporter expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Vijay R; Campos, Christopher R; Evans, Rebecca A; Oliver, Keith D; Chan, Gary Ny; Miller, David S; Cannon, Ronald E

    2017-04-01

    Lipid sensor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR- α) is the master regulator of lipid metabolism. Dietary release of endogenous free fatty acids, fibrates, and certain persistent environmental pollutants, e.g. perfluoroalkyl fire-fighting foam components, are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha ligands. Here, we define a role for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha in regulating the expression of three ATP-driven drug efflux transporters at the rat and mouse blood-brain barriers: P-glycoprotein (Abcb1), breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp/Abcg2), and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2/Abcc2). Exposing isolated rat brain capillaries to linoleic acid, clofibrate, or PKAs increased the transport activity and protein expression of the three ABC transporters. These effects were blocked by the PPAR- α antagonist, GW6471. Dosing rats with 20 mg/kg or 200 mg/kg of clofibrate decreased the brain accumulation of the P-glycoprotein substrate, verapamil, by 50% (in situ brain perfusion; effects blocked by GW6471) and increased P-glycoprotein expression and activity in capillaries ex vivo. Fasting C57Bl/6 wild-type mice for 24 h increased both serum lipids and brain capillary P-glycoprotein transport activity. Fasting did not alter P-glycoprotein activity in PPAR- α knockout mice. These results indicate that hyperlipidemia, lipid-lowering fibrates and exposure to certain fire-fighting foam components activate blood-brain barrier peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, increase drug efflux transporter expression and reduce drug delivery to the brain.

  12. Identifying the Interaction of Vancomycin With Novel pH-Responsive Lipids as Antibacterial Biomaterials Via Accelerated Molecular Dynamics and Binding Free Energy Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shaimaa; Vepuri, Suresh B; Jadhav, Mahantesh; Kalhapure, Rahul S; Govender, Thirumala

    2018-06-01

    Nano-drug delivery systems have proven to be an efficient formulation tool to overcome the challenges with current antibiotics therapy and resistance. A series of pH-responsive lipid molecules were designed and synthesized for future liposomal formulation as a nano-drug delivery system for vancomycin at the infection site. The structures of these lipids differ from each other in respect of hydrocarbon tails: Lipid1, 2, 3 and 4 have stearic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acid hydrocarbon chains, respectively. The impact of variation in the hydrocarbon chain in the lipid structure on drug encapsulation and release profile, as well as mode of drug interaction, was investigated using molecular modeling analyses. A wide range of computational tools, including accelerated molecular dynamics, normal molecular dynamics, binding free energy calculations and principle component analysis, were applied to provide comprehensive insight into the interaction landscape between vancomycin and the designed lipid molecules. Interestingly, both MM-GBSA and MM-PBSA binding affinity calculations using normal molecular dynamics and accelerated molecular dynamics trajectories showed a very consistent trend, where the order of binding affinity towards vancomycin was lipid4 > lipid1 > lipid2 > lipid3. From both normal molecular dynamics and accelerated molecular dynamics, the interaction of lipid3 with vancomycin is demonstrated to be the weakest (∆G binding  = -2.17 and -11.57, for normal molecular dynamics and accelerated molecular dynamics, respectively) when compared to other complexes. We believe that the degree of unsaturation of the hydrocarbon chain in the lipid molecules may impact on the overall conformational behavior, interaction mode and encapsulation (wrapping) of the lipid molecules around the vancomycin molecule. This thorough computational analysis prior to the experimental investigation is a valuable approach to guide for predicting the encapsulation

  13. Long-term music training tunes how the brain temporally binds signals from multiple senses

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, HweeLing; Noppeney, Uta

    2011-01-01

    Practicing a musical instrument is a rich multisensory experience involving the integration of visual, auditory, and tactile inputs with motor responses. This combined psychophysics–fMRI study used the musician's brain to investigate how sensory-motor experience molds temporal binding of auditory and visual signals. Behaviorally, musicians exhibited a narrower temporal integration window than nonmusicians for music but not for speech. At the neural level, musicians showed increased audiovisua...

  14. Neuropeptide Y binding sites in rat brain identified with purified neuropeptide Y-I125

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, M.W.; Miller, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a widely distributed neuronally localized peptide with 36 amino acids, 5 of which are tyrosines. The authors wished to investigate the properties of specific receptors for NPY. They therefore labeled the tyrosines with I125 using chloramine T and then purified the peptide using HPLC. A single mono-iodinated species of NPY which yielded > 85% specific binding in rat forebrain synaptosomes was selected as the ligand for all subsequent experiments. A time course of binding showed that equilibrium conditions were reached in 60 minutes at 21 0 C. Scatchard plots revealed a single class of binding sites with a Kd and a Bmax of 3 x 10-10 M and 28 pmol/mg, respectively. Competition binding with unlabeled NPY showed 50% displacement of bound ligand at 1 x 10-10 M NPY. Competition binding with rat pancreatic polypeptide (RPP), a homologous peptide possessing little NPY-like activity, showed 50% displacement of bound ligand at 2 x 10 -7 M RPP. No binding was observed on F-11 or PC12 neuronal cell lines, or on HSWP fibroblast cells. They conclude that NPY-I125 purified to homogeneity with HPLC is a highly selective ligand for NPY receptor sites. They are currently investigating such sites in brain, gut, and other tissues

  15. Effect of anchor positioning on binding and diffusion of elongated 3D DNA nanostructures on lipid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khmelinskaia, Alena; Franquelim, Henri G; Petrov, Eugene P; Schwille, Petra

    2016-01-01

    DNA origami is a state-of-the-art technology that enables the fabrication of nano-objects with defined shapes, to which functional moieties, such as lipophilic anchors, can be attached with a nanometre scale precision. Although binding of DNA origami to lipid membranes has been extensively demonstrated, the specific requirements necessary for membrane attachment are greatly overlooked. Here, we designed a set of amphipathic rectangular-shaped DNA origami structures with varying placement and number of chol-TEG anchors used for membrane attachment. Single- and multiple-cholesteryl-modified origami nanostructures were produced and studied in terms of their membrane localization, density and dynamics. We show that the positioning of at least two chol-TEG moieties near the corners is essential to ensure efficient membrane binding of large DNA nanostructures. Quantitative fluorescence correlation spectroscopy data further confirm that increasing the number of corner-positioned chol-TEG anchors lowers the dynamics of flat DNA origami structures on freestanding membranes. Taken together, our approach provides the first evidence of the importance of the location in addition to the number of hydrophobic moieties when rationally designing minimal DNA nanostructures with controlled membrane binding. (paper)

  16. Fatty acid composition of total lipids and phospholipids of muscular tissue and brain of rats under the impact of vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Kostyshyn

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acids are important structural components of biological membranes, energy substrate of cells involved in fixing phospholipid bilayer proteins, and acting as regulators and modulators of enzymatic activity. Under the impact of vibration oscillations there can occur shifts in the ratio of different groups of fatty acids, and degrees of their saturation may change. The imbalance between saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, which occurs later in the cell wall, disrupts fluidity and viscosity of lipid phase and causes abnormal cellular metabolism. Aim. In order to study the impact of vibration on the level of fatty acids of total lipids in muscular tissue and fatty acid composition of phospholipids in muscles and brain, experimental animals have been exposed to vertical vibration oscillations with different frequency for 28 days. Methods and results. Tissues fragments of hip quadriceps and brain of rats were used for obtaining methyl esters of fatty acids studied by the method of gas-liquid chromatography. It was found that the lipid content, ratio of its separate factions and fatty acid composition in muscular tissue and brain of animals with the action of vibration considerably varies. With the increase of vibration acceleration tendency to increase in absolute quantity of total lipids fatty acids can be observed at the account of increased level of saturated and monounsaturated ones. These processes are caused by activation of self-defense mechanisms of the body under the conditions of deviations from stabilized physiological norm, since adaptation requires certain structural and energy costs. Increase in the relative quantity of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids in phospholipids of muscles and brain and simultaneous reduction in concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids are observed. Conclusion. These changes indicate worsening of structural and functional organization of muscles and brain cell membranes of

  17. Alcohol-Binding Sites in Distinct Brain Proteins: The Quest for Atomic Level Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Rebecca J.; Slesinger, Paul A.; Davies, Daryl L.; Das, Joydip; Trudell, James R.; Harris, R. Adron

    2011-01-01

    Defining the sites of action of ethanol on brain proteins is a major prerequisite to understanding the molecular pharmacology of this drug. The main barrier to reaching an atomic-level understanding of alcohol action is the low potency of alcohols, ethanol in particular, which is a reflection of transient, low-affinity interactions with their targets. These mechanisms are difficult or impossible to study with traditional techniques such as radioligand binding or spectroscopy. However, there has been considerable recent progress in combining X-ray crystallography, structural modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis to define the sites and mechanisms of action of ethanol and related alcohols on key brain proteins. We review such insights for several diverse classes of proteins including inwardly rectifying potassium, transient receptor potential, and neurotransmit-ter-gated ion channels, as well as protein kinase C epsilon. Some common themes are beginning to emerge from these proteins, including hydrogen bonding of the hydroxyl group and van der Waals interactions of the methylene groups of ethanol with specific amino acid residues. The resulting binding energy is proposed to facilitate or stabilize low-energy state transitions in the bound proteins, allowing ethanol to act as a “molecular lubricant” for protein function. We discuss evidence for characteristic, discrete alcohol-binding sites on protein targets, as well as evidence that binding to some proteins is better characterized by an interaction region that can accommodate multiple molecules of ethanol. PMID:21676006

  18. Nicotinic cholinergic receptor in brain detected by binding of. cap alpha. -(/sup 3/H)bungarotoxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eterovic, V A; Bennett, E L

    1974-01-01

    ..cap alpha..-(/sup 3/H)bungarotoxin was prepared by catalytic reduction of iodinated ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin with tritium gas. Crude mitochondrial fraction from rat cerebral cortex bound 40 x 10/sup -15/ to 60 x 10/sup -15/ moles of ..cap alpha..-(/sup 3/H)bungarotoxin per mg of protein. This binding was reduced by 50% in the presence of approx. 10/sup -6/ M d-tubocurarine or nicotine, 10/sup -5/ M acetylcholine, 10/sup -4/ M carbamylcholine or decamethonium or 10/sup -3/ M atropine. Hexamethonium and eserine were the least effective of the drugs tested. Crude mitochondrial fraction was separated into myelin, nerve endings, and mitochondria. The highest binding of toxin per mg of protein was found in nerve endings, as well as the greatest inhibition of toxin binding by d-tubocurarine. Binding of ..cap alpha..-(/sup 3/H)bungarotoxin to membranes obtained by osmotic shock of the crude mitochondrial fraction indicates that the receptor for the toxin is membrane bound. /sup 125/I-labeled ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin, prepared with Na/sup 125/I and chloramine T, was highly specific for the acetylcholine receptor in diaphragm, however, it was less specific and less reliable than ..cap alpha..-(/sup 3/H)bungarotoxin in brain. It is concluded that a nicotinic cholinergic receptor exists in brain, and that ..cap alpha..-(/sup 3/H)bungarotoxin is a suitable probe for this receptor.

  19. Serotoninergic receptors in brain tissue: properties and identification of various 3H-ligand binding sites in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leysen, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    In vitro binding studies to serotoninergic receptors were performed using 3 H-LSD, 3 H-5-HT and 3 H-spiperone. An overwiew is given on findings using these three ligands with respect to the following: localization of specific binding sites, in various animal species, the regional distribution in the brain and periphery, the subcellular and cellular distribution. Properties of the binding sites, influence of the composition of the assay medium, binding kinetic properties, receptor regulation in vivo. Identity of the binding sites, differences between site for various 3 H-ligands, pharmacological specificity of the membranous binding sites, chemical composition of the macromolecular complex constituting the binding site. Function of the receptor. Binding affinities of 44 compounds were measured in binding assays using 3 H-spiperone and 3 H-LSD with rat frontal cortex membrane preparations and using 3 H-5-HT and 3 H-LSD with rat hippocampal membrane preparations

  20. Lysosomal lipid storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Heike; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2011-06-01

    Lysosomal lipid storage diseases, or lipidoses, are inherited metabolic disorders in which typically lipids accumulate in cells and tissues. Complex lipids, such as glycosphingolipids, are constitutively degraded within the endolysosomal system by soluble hydrolytic enzymes with the help of lipid binding proteins in a sequential manner. Because of a functionally impaired hydrolase or auxiliary protein, their lipid substrates cannot be degraded, accumulate in the lysosome, and slowly spread to other intracellular membranes. In Niemann-Pick type C disease, cholesterol transport is impaired and unesterified cholesterol accumulates in the late endosome. In most lysosomal lipid storage diseases, the accumulation of one or few lipids leads to the coprecipitation of other hydrophobic substances in the endolysosomal system, such as lipids and proteins, causing a "traffic jam." This can impair lysosomal function, such as delivery of nutrients through the endolysosomal system, leading to a state of cellular starvation. Therapeutic approaches are currently restricted to mild forms of diseases with significant residual catabolic activities and without brain involvement.

  1. Radioautographic localization of somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28 binding sites in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroux, P.; Pelletier, G.

    1984-01-01

    Somatostatin-14 (S14) and its precursor, somatostatin-28 (S28), are widely distributed throughout the rat brain, suggesting that they could act as neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the central nervous system. The present study was undertaken to study the localization of S14 and S28 receptors in the rat brain determined by ''in vitro'' radioautography. The study performed on slide mounted frozen brain section with iodinated S14 and S28 analogs revealed an identical distribution of binding sites for the two forms of somatostatin. A good correlation could be observed between receptor distribution and immunohistologically localized neuropeptides except for striatum and hypothalamus. However, receptors were not detectable in the hypothalamus and were found in low concentration in the caudate-putamen nucleus, two regions containing high amounts of S28 and S14, suggesting a high occupancy of receptors in these areas by endogenous peptides or an inverse correlation between receptor and peptide concentrations

  2. Effects of anesthesia on [11C]raclopride binding in the rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Simonsen, Mette; Møller, Arne

    Background Very often rats are anesthetized prior to micro positron emission tomography (microPET) brain imaging in order to prevent head movements. Anesthesia can be administered by inhalation agents, such as isoflurane, or injection mixtures, such as fentanyl-fluanisone-midazolam. Unfortunately......, anesthesia affects a variety of physiological variables, including in the brain. Aim The aim of this study was to compare the effects of inhalation and injection anesthesia on the binding potential of the dopaminergic D2/3 tracer [11C]raclopride used for PET brain imaging in human and animal studies....... Materials & Methods Nine male Lew/Mol rats were assigned to either inhalation (isoflurane; N=4) or injection (fentanyl-fluanisone-midazolam; N=5) anesthesia. Catheters were surgically placed in femoral arteries and veins for blood sampling and tracer injection. After a short attenuation scan, the rats were...

  3. Brain delivery of camptothecin by means of solid lipid nanoparticles: Formulation design, in vitro and in vivo studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, S.; Tho, I.; Reimold, I.

    2012-01-01

    that fluorescently labelled SLN were detected in the brain after i.v. administration. This study indicates that the camptothecin-loaded SLN are a promising drug brain delivery system worth to explore further for brain tumour therapy. (C) 2012 Elsevier B. V. All rights reserved.......For the purpose of brain delivery upon intravenous injection, formulations of camptothecin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), prepared by hot high pressure homogenisation, were designed. Incorporation of camptothecin in the hydrophobic and acidic environment of SLN matrix was chosen...... to stabilise the lactone ring, which is essential for its antitumour activity, and for avoiding premature loss of drug on the way to target camptothecin to the brain. A multivariate approach was used to assess the influence of the qualitative and quantitative composition on the physicochemical properties...

  4. Minimizing the non-specific binding of nanoparticles to the brain enables active targeting of Fn14-positive glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Craig S; Perez, Jimena G; Cheng, Emily; Zhang, Clark; Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Hanes, Justin; Winkles, Jeffrey A; Woodworth, Graeme F; Kim, Anthony J

    2015-02-01

    A major limitation in the treatment of glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and deadly primary brain cancer, is delivery of therapeutics to invading tumor cells outside of the area that is safe for surgical removal. A promising way to target invading GBM cells is via drug-loaded nanoparticles that bind to fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14), thereby potentially improving efficacy and reducing toxicity. However, achieving broad particle distribution and nanoparticle targeting within the brain remains a significant challenge due to the adhesive extracellular matrix (ECM) and clearance mechanisms in the brain. In this work, we developed Fn14 monoclonal antibody-decorated nanoparticles that can efficiently penetrate brain tissue. We show these Fn14-targeted brain tissue penetrating nanoparticles are able to (i) selectively bind to recombinant Fn14 but not brain ECM proteins, (ii) associate with and be internalized by Fn14-positive GBM cells, and (iii) diffuse within brain tissue in a manner similar to non-targeted brain penetrating nanoparticles. In addition, when administered intracranially, Fn14-targeted nanoparticles showed improved tumor cell co-localization in mice bearing human GBM xenografts compared to non-targeted nanoparticles. Minimizing non-specific binding of targeted nanoparticles in the brain may greatly improve the access of particulate delivery systems to remote brain tumor cells and other brain targets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of different commercial fat sources on brain, liver and blood lipid profiles of rats in growth phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis-Pereira, Michel Cardoso de; Barcelos, Maria de Fátima Píccolo; Pereira, Juciane de Abreu Ribeiro; Pereira, Rafaela Corrêa; Souza, Raimundo Vicente de

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the fatty acid content of different fat sources and evaluate the effect of them on plasma and hepatic lipids and on the fatty acid profile of the brain tissue of Wistar rats. Thirty male albino Wistar rats received for 59 days, the following diets: diet added of margarine with low content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA); diet added of margarine with high content of PUFA; diet added of butter; diet added of hydrogenated vegetable fat; diet added of soybean oil. Fatty acid profile of the lipid sources, blood and hepatic lipids fractions and fatty acid profile of the brain tissue were determined. Margarine consumption of provided different responses as to concentrations of blood and hepatic lipid fractions. Intake of butter and hydrogenated increased LDL-c/HDL-c ratio, being the steepest increase promoted by hydrogenated vegetable fat, which also raised LDL-c levels expressively. All fats used in the treatments reduced the cerebral concentration of docosahexaenoic acid when compared to soybean oil (control). The different fat sources commonly consumed by population provided different responses in vivo. This is particularly relevant considering the role of these lipids in the incidence and prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Cholecystokinin-8 suppressed /sup 3/H-etorphine binding to rat brain opiate receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.J.; Fan, S.G.; Ren, M.F.; Han, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    Radioreceptor assay (RRA) was adopted to analyze the influence of CCK-8 on /sup 3/H-etorphine binding to opiate receptors in rat brain synaptosomal membranes (P2). In the competition experiment CCK-8 suppressed the binding of /sup 3/H-etorphine. This effect was completely reversed by proglumide at 1/mu/M. Rosenthal analysis for saturation revealed two populations of /sup 3/H-etorphine binding sites. CCK-8 inhibited /sup 3/H-etorphine binding to the high affinity sites by an increase in Kd and decrease in Bmax without significant changes in the Kd and Bmax of the low affinity sites. This effect of CCK-8 was also completely reversed by proglumide at 1/mu/M. Unsulfated CCK-8 produced only a slight increase in Kd of the high affinity sites without affecting Bmax. The results suggest that CCK-8 might be capable of suppressing the high affinity opioid binding sites via the activation of CCK receptor.

  7. Membrane morphology is actively transformed by covalent binding of the protein Atg8 to PE-lipids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland L Knorr

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a cellular degradation pathway involving the shape transformation of lipid bilayers. During the onset of autophagy, the water-soluble protein Atg8 binds covalently to phosphatdylethanolamines (PEs in the membrane in an ubiquitin-like reaction coupled to ATP hydrolysis. We reconstituted the Atg8 conjugation system in giant and nm-sized vesicles with a minimal set of enzymes and observed that formation of Atg8-PE on giant vesicles can cause substantial tubulation of membranes even in the absence of Atg12-Atg5-Atg16. Our findings show that ubiquitin-like processes can actively change properties of lipid membranes and that membrane crowding by proteins can be dynamically regulated in cells. Furthermore we provide evidence for curvature sorting of Atg8-PE. Curvature generation and sorting are directly linked to organelle shapes and, thus, to biological function. Our results suggest that a positive feedback exists between the ubiquitin-like reaction and the membrane curvature, which is important for dynamic shape changes of cell membranes, such as those involved in the formation of autophagosomes.

  8. Guanine nucleotide-binding protein regulation of melatonin receptors in lizard brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivkees, S.A.; Carlson, L.L.; Reppert, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    Melatonin receptors were identified and characterized in crude membrane preparations from lizard brain by using 125 I-labeled melatonin ( 125 I-Mel), a potent melatonin agonist. 125 I-Mel binding sites were saturable; Scatchard analysis revealed high-affinity and lower affinity binding sites, with apparent K d of 2.3 ± 1.0 x 10 -11 M and 2.06 ± 0.43 x 10 -10 M, respectively. Binding was reversible and inhibited by melatonin and closely related analogs but not by serotonin or norepinephrine. Treatment of crude membranes with the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanosine 5'-[γ-thio]triphosphate (GTP[γS]), significantly reduced the number of high-affinity receptors and increased the dissociation rate of 125 I-Mel from its receptor. Furthermore, GTP[γS] treatment of ligand-receptor complexes solubilized by Triton X-100 also led to a rapid dissociation of 125 I-Mel from solubilized ligand-receptor complexes. Gel filtration chromatography of solubilized ligand-receptor complexes revealed two major peaks of radioactivity corresponding to M r > 400,000 and M r ca. 110,000. This elution profile was markedly altered by pretreatment with GTP[γS] before solubilization; only the M r 110,000 peak was present in GTP[γS]-pretreated membranes. The results strongly suggest that 125 I-mel binding sites in lizard brain are melatonin receptors, with agonist-promoted guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) coupling and that the apparent molecular size of receptors uncoupled from G proteins is about 110,000

  9. Interaction of D-LSD with binding sites in brain: a study in vivo and in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebersole, B.L.J.

    1985-01-01

    The localization of [ 3 H]-d-lysergic acid diethylamide ([ 3 H]LSD) binding sites in the mouse brain was compared in vivo and in vitro. Radioautography of brain sections incubated with [ 3 H]LSD in vitro revealed substantial specific [ 3 H]LSD binding in cortical layers III-IV and areas CA1 and dentate gyrus in hippocampus. In contrast, in brain sections from animals that received [ 3 H]LSD in vivo, binding in hippocampus was scant and diffuse, although the pattern of labeling in cortex was similar to that seen in vitro. The low specific binding in hippocampus relative to cortex was confirmed by homogenate filtration studies of brain areas from mice that received injections of [ 3 H]LSD. Time-course studies established that peak specific binding at ten minutes was the same in cortex and hippocampus. At all times, binding in hippocampus was about one-third of that in cortex; in contrast, the concentration of free [ 3 H]LSD did not vary between regions. This finding was unexpected, because binding studies in vitro in membrane preparations indicated that the density and affinity of [ 3 H]LSD binding sites were similar in both brain regions. Saturation binding studies in vivo showed that the lower amount of [ 3 H]LSD binding in hippocampus was attributable to a lower density of sites labeled by [ 3 H]LSD. The pharmacological identify of [ 3 H]LSD binding sites in vivo may be relevant to the hallucinogenic properties of LSD and of other related hallucinogens

  10. Characterization of the binding of /sup 3/H-norzimeldine, a 5-HT uptake inhibitor, to rat brain homogenates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, H. (Department of Biochemical Neuropharmacology, Research and Development Laboratories, Astra Laekemedel, Soedertaelje, Sweden)

    1984-01-01

    The binding of radiolabelled norzimeldine, a potent selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor, to rat brain homogenates is described. /sup 3/H-Norzimeldine binds to a site with high affinity (Ksub(D) = 10.5 nM) in a saturable manner (Bsub(max) = 15.4 pmol/g wet weight in the cerebral cortex). The number of binding sites in the various regions of the brain parallels the capacity of the 5-HT reuptake mechanism. Drugs that inhibit the reuptake of 5-HT are also potent inhibitors of the /sup 3/H-norzimeldine binding, as are the tricyclic antidepressants, which are non-specific inhibitors of the noradrenaline and the 5-HT reuptake. Lesioning experiments using DSP4 (a NA neurotoxin) and p-chloroamphetamine (a 5-HT neurotoxin) suggest that the binding site is located on the presynaptic 5-HT nerve terminal, although a small component of the binding may be to noradrenergic uptake sites as well.

  11. Characterization of the binding of 3H-norzimeldine, a 5-HT uptake inhibitor, to rat brain homogenates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, H.

    1984-01-01

    The binding of radiolabelled norzimeldine, a potent selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor, to rat brain homogenates is described. 3 H-Norzimeldine binds to a site with high affinity (Ksub(D) = 10.5 nM) in a saturable manner (Bsub(max) = 15.4 pmol/g wet weight in the cerebral cortex). The number of binding sites in the various regions of the brain parallels the capacity of the 5-HT reuptake mechanism. Drugs that inhibit the reuptake of 5-HT are also potent inhibitors of the 3 H-norzimeldine binding, as are the tricyclic antidepressants, which are non-specific inhibitors of the noradrenaline and the 5-HT reuptake. Lesioning experiments using DSP4 (a NA neurotoxin) and p-chloroamphetamine (a 5-HT neurotoxin) suggest that the binding site is located on the presynaptic 5-HT nerve terminal, although a small component of the binding may be to noradrenergic uptake sites as well.(author)

  12. Interaction between LSD and dopamine D2/3 binding sites in pig brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minuzzi, Luciano; Nomikos, George G; Wade, Mark R; Jensen, Svend B; Olsen, Aage K; Cumming, Paul

    2005-06-15

    The psychoactive properties of the hallucinogen LSD have frequently been attributed to high affinity interactions with serotonin 5HT2 receptors in brain. Possible effects of LSD on dopamine D2/3 receptor availability have not previously been investigated in living brain. Therefore, we used PET to map the binding potential (pB) of [11C]raclopride in brain of three pigs, first in a baseline condition, and again at 1 and 4 h after administration of LSD (2.5 microg/kg, i.v.). There was a progressive treatment effect in striatum, where the pB was significantly reduced by 19% at 4 h after LSD administration. Concomitant maps of cerebral blood flow did not reveal significant changes in perfusion during this interval. Subsequent in vitro studies showed that LSD displaced [3H]raclopride (2 nM) from pig brain cryostat sections with an IC50 of 275 nM according to a one-site model. Fitting of a two-site model to the data suggested the presence of a component of the displacement curves with a subnanomolar IC50, comprising 20% of the total [3H]raclopride binding. In microdialysis experiments, LSD at similar and higher doses did not evoke changes in the interstitial concentration of dopamine or its acidic metabolites in rat striatum. Together, these results are consistent with a direct interaction between LSD and a portion of dopamine D2/3 receptors in pig brain, possibly contributing to the psychopharmacology of LSD. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Alterations in substance P binding in brain nuclei of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigematsu, K.; Niwa, M.; Kurihara, M.; Castren, E.; Saavedra, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Substance P binding sites were characterized in brain nuclei of young (4-wk-old) and adult (16-wk-old) spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and age-matched normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) control rats by quantitative autoradiography. Young SHR presented higher affinity constants (K/sub A/) than young WKY. The changes were restricted to locus coeruleus, the area postrema, the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, and to discrete areas located in lobes 9 and 10 of the vermis cerebelli of SHR. There were no differences in the maximal binding capacity (B/sub max/) except in the nucleus ambiguus where the B/sub max/ was lower than WKY. Conversely, the number of substance P binding sites was higher in the locus coeruleus, the nucleus tegmentalis dorsalis, the nucleus ambiguus, the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, the hypoglossal nucleus, the inferior olivary nucleus, and lobes 9 and 10 of the vermis cerebelli of adult SHR when compared with adult WKY. The results support the hypothesis of a role for brain substance P in blood pressure regulation and in genetic hypertension in rats

  14. Quantitative localization of (/sup 3/H)TCP binding in rat brain by light microscopy autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sircar, R; Zukin, S R

    1985-09-30

    The anatomical localization of phencyclidine (PCP)/sigma-opiate receptors in rat brain was determined by quantitative light microscopy autoradiography using the new ligand N-(1-(2-thienyl) cyclohexyl(/sup 3/H) piperidine ((/sup 3/H)TCP). TCP is a potent analog of PCP which possesses a higher affinity for PCP/sigma-opiate receptor than does PCP itself. The highest level of (/sup 3/H)TCP binding was detected in the hippocampus. Intermediate levels were found in frontal cortex, striatum, amygdala and cerebellum. Specific (/sup 3/H)TCP binding was undetectable in anterior commissure and corpus callosum. The distribution pattern of (/sup 3/H)TCP binding sites is similar to the pattern obtained with (/sup 3/H)PCP but more sharply defined. On the basis of its greater potency and specificity, (/sup 3/H)TCP may prove superior to (/sup 3/H)PCP as a molecular probe for the study of brain sigma opiate/phencyclidine receptors. 13 refs.; 1 figure; 1 table.

  15. Effects of dopaminergic drug treatments on in vivo radioligand binding to brain vesicular monoamine transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilbourn, Michael R; Frey, Kirk A; Vander Borght, Thierry; Sherman, Phillip S

    1996-05-01

    The effects of various dopaminergic drug treatments on the in vivo regional brain distribution of high-affinity radioligands ([{sup 11}C]dihydrotetrabenazine and [{sup 11}C]methoxytetrabenazine) for the rat brain vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) were determined. Acute treatments with reserpine (2 mg/kg i.p.), tetrabenazine (10 mg/kg i.v.) or related benzoisoquinolines significantly reduced radiotracer binding in vivo. In contrast, radiotracer distributions remained unchanged after treatments with other dopaminergic drugs, whether given by single injection (haloperidol, 1 mg/kg i.p., pargyline 80 mg/kg), repeatedly (pargyline, 80 mg/kg s.c., 14 days), or by continuous infusion (deprenyl, 10 mg/kg/day, 5 days; L-DOPA methyl ester 100 mg/kg/day, 5 days). Repeated injections of tetrabenazine (5 mg/kg i.p., twice daily, 3 days) did not alter in vivo radioligand binding measured after allowing drug washout from the brain. These studies support the proposal that in vivo PET imaging of VMAT2 radioligands in patients with extrapyramidal movement disorders will not be affected by concurrent use of L-DOPA or deprenyl.

  16. Sexually dimorphic development and binding characteristics of NMDA receptors in the brain of the platyfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, K. M.; Schreibman, M. P.; Yablonsky-Alter, E.; Banerjee, S. P.

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated age- and gender-specific variations in properties of the glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in a freshwater teleost, the platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus). Prior localization of the immunoreactive (ir)-R1 subunit of the NMDAR protein (R1) in cells of the nucleus olfactoretinalis (NOR), a primary gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-containing brain nucleus in the platyfish, suggests that NMDAR, as in mammals, is involved in modulation of the platyfish brain-pituitary-gonad (BPG) axis. The current study shows that the number of cells in the NOR displaying ir-R1 is significantly increased in pubescent and mature female platyfish when compared to immature and senescent animals. In males, there is no significant change in ir-R1 expression in the NOR at any time in their lifespan. The affinity of the noncompetitive antagonist ((3)H)MK-801 for the NMDAR is significantly increased in pubescent females while maximum binding of ((3)H)MK-801 to the receptor reaches a significant maximum in mature females. In males, both MK-801 affinity and maximum binding remain unchanged throughout development. This is the first report of gender differences in the association of NMDA receptors with neuroendocrine brain areas during development. It is also the first report to suggest NMDA receptor involvement in the development of the BPG axis in a nonmammalian vertebrate. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  17. Nanoscale orientation and lateral organization of chimeric metal-binding green fluorescent protein on lipid membrane determined by epifluorescence and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Isarankura Na Ayudhya, Chartchalerm; Tantimongcolwat, Tanawut; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Epifluorescence microscopy as well as atomic force microscopy was successfully applied to explore the orientation and lateral organization of a group of chimeric green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) on lipid membrane. Incorporation of the chimeric GFP carrying Cd-binding region (His6CdBP4GFP) to the fluid phase of DPPC monolayer resulted in a strong fluorescence intensity at the air-water interface. Meanwhile, non-specific adsorption of the GFP having hexahistidine (His6GFP) led to the perturbation of the protein structure in which very low fluorescence was observed. Specific binding of both of the chimeric GFPs to immobilized zinc ions underneath the metal-chelating lipid membrane was revealed. This specific binding could be reversibly controlled by addition of metal ions or metal chelator. Binding of the chimeric GFPs to the metal-chelating lipid membrane was proven to be the end-on orientation while the side-on adsorption was contrarily noted in the absence of metal ions. Increase of lateral mobility owing to the fluidization effect on the chelating lipid membrane subsequently facilitated crystal formation. All these findings have opened up a potential approach for a specific orientation of immobilization of protein at the membrane interface. This could have accounted for a better opportunity of sensor development

  18. Characterization and localization of 3H-arginine8-vasopressin binding to rat kidney and brain tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorsa, D.M.; Majumdar, L.A.; Petracca, F.M.; Baskin, D.G.; Cornett, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    Anatomic, behavioral and pharmacologic evidence suggests that arginine8-vasopressin (AVP) serves as a CNS neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. AVP binding to membrane and tissue slice preparations from brain and kidney was characterized, and the anatomical distribution of these binding sites was examined. Conditions for the binding assay were optimized using kidney medullary tissue. Binding of 3 H-AVP (S.A. . 30-51 Ci/mmol, NEN) to brain and kidney membranes and tissue slices was saturable, temperature dependent, linearly related to protein concentration (or number of tissue slices), reversible, and specific since the ability of cold AVP to displace 3 H-AVP from binding was greater than oxytocin and other related peptide fragments. Autoradiographic localization of 3 H-AVP binding was restricted to kidney medullary tissue. In brain tissue, 3 H-AVP binding was found to occur in concentrated foci. Brainstem areas such as the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) showed a high density of AVP binding sites. Since local injections of AVP into the NTS have been shown to influence blood pressure, the present study presents the first anatomical evidence for the presence of AVP specific binding sites which might mediate this effect

  19. Interaction of red pepper (Capsicum annum, Tepin) polyphenols with Fe(II)-induced lipid peroxidation in brain and liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oboh, G [Biochemistry Department, Federal University of Technology, Akure, Ondo State (Nigeria); [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), Campus Universitario - Camobi, Santa Maria RS (Brazil); [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)]. E-mail: goboh2001@yahoo.com; Rocha, J B.T. [Campus Universitario - Camobi, Santa Maria RS (Brazil)

    2006-03-15

    Polyphenols exhibit a wide range of biological effects because of their antioxidant properties. Several types of polyphenols (phenolic acids, hydrolyzable tannins, and flavonoids) show anticarcinogenic and antimutagenic effects. Comparative studies were carried on the protective ability of free and bound polyphenol extracts of red Capsicum annuum Tepin (CAT) on brain and liver - In vitro. Free polyphenols of red Capsicum annuum Tepin (CAT) were extracted with 80% acetone, while the bound polyphenols were extracted with ethyl acetate from acid and alkaline hydrolysis of the pepper residue from free polyphenols extract. The phenol content, Fe (II) chelating ability, OH radical scavenging ability and protective ability of the extract against Fe (II)-induced lipid peroxidation in brain and liver was subsequently determined. The results of the study revealed that the free polyphenols (218.2mg/100g) content of the pepper were significantly higher than the bound polyphenols (42.5mg/100g). Furthermore, the free polyphenol extract had a significantly higher (<0.05) Fe (II) chelating ability, OH radical scavenging ability than the bound polyphenols. In addition, both extracts significantly inhibited (P<0.05) basal and 25{mu}M Fe (II)- induced lipid peroxidation in Rat's brain and liver in a dose dependent. However, the free polyphenols caused a significantly higher inhibition in the MDA (Malondialdehyde) production in the brain and liver homogenates than the bound phenols. Furthermore, the polyphenols protected the liver more than the brain. In conclusion, free polyphenols from Capsicum annuum protects both the liver and brain from Fe{sup 2+} induced lipid peroxidation, and this is probably due to the higher Fe (II) chelating ability and OH radical scavenging ability of the free polyphenols from the pepper. (author)

  20. Receptor macroautoradiography of 3H-spiroperidol binding in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hirofumi; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Tsuji, Shiro; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Hisada, Kinichi; Kojima, Kazuhiko

    1985-01-01

    The kinetic and pharmacological characteristics of 3 H-spiroperidol binding sites were studied in slide mounted sections of rat forebrain, and optical binding conditions were defined. Using the receptor macroautoradiographic techniques with tritium-sensitive LKB sheet film, the distribution of dopamine (D 2 ) receptor was determined in slices including striatum of rat brain. The autoradiograms were analyzed using Video Digitizer System combined with video camera and minicomputer, and the subtraction images were obtained. These studies suggest that this quantitative receptor macroautoradiography might be useful in the explanation of etiology in the field of neuro-psychiatric diseases and the fundamental studies of positron emission computed tomography, since this method has several advantages over in vivo autoradiography and in vitro receptor assay. (author)

  1. The effect of deferoxamine on brain lipid peroxide levels and Na-K ATPase activity following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgihan, A; Türközkan, N; Aricioğlu, A; Aykol, S; Cevik, C; Göksel, M

    1994-05-01

    1. In the present study we have studied the effects of deferoxamine treatment on lipid peroxidation and Na-K ATPase activity after experimental induction of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) in guinea pigs. 2. We assessed the extent of lipid peroxidation by measuring the level of malondialdehyde and Na-K ATPase activity in 3 different groups (sham-operated, SAH, SAH + deferoxamine). 3. There was no significant difference in lipid peroxide content between sham-operated and haemorrhagic animals, but Na-K ATPase activity decreased after SAH. 4. Deferoxamine treatment reduced the malondialdehyde content and induced the recovery of Na-K ATPase activity, exerting a brain protective role against the detrimental effects of the haemorrhage.

  2. Potential Adverse Effects of Prolonged Sevoflurane Exposure on Developing Monkey Brain: From Abnormal Lipid Metabolism to Neuronal Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Rainosek, Shuo W; Frisch-Daiello, Jessica L; Patterson, Tucker A; Paule, Merle G; Slikker, William; Wang, Cheng; Han, Xianlin

    2015-10-01

    Sevoflurane is a volatile anesthetic that has been widely used in general anesthesia, yet its safety in pediatric use is a public concern. This study sought to evaluate whether prolonged exposure of infant monkeys to a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane is associated with any adverse effects on the developing brain. Infant monkeys were exposed to 2.5% sevoflurane for 9 h, and frontal cortical tissues were harvested for DNA microarray, lipidomics, Luminex protein, and histological assays. DNA microarray analysis showed that sevoflurane exposure resulted in a broad identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the monkey brain. In general, these genes were associated with nervous system development, function, and neural cell viability. Notably, a number of DEGs were closely related to lipid metabolism. Lipidomic analysis demonstrated that critical lipid components, (eg, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylglycerol) were significantly downregulated by prolonged exposure of sevoflurane. Luminex protein analysis indicated abnormal levels of cytokines in sevoflurane-exposed brains. Consistently, Fluoro-Jade C staining revealed more degenerating neurons after sevoflurane exposure. These data demonstrate that a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane (2.5%) is capable of inducing and maintaining an effective surgical plane of anesthesia in the developing nonhuman primate and that a prolonged exposure of 9 h resulted in profound changes in gene expression, cytokine levels, lipid metabolism, and subsequently, neuronal damage. Generally, sevoflurane-induced neuronal damage was also associated with changes in lipid content, composition, or both; and specific lipid changes could provide insights into the molecular mechanism(s) underlying anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity and may be sensitive biomarkers for the early detection of anesthetic-induced neuronal damage. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  3. Reduction in (/sup 3/H)-corticosterone binding to cytoplasmic receptors in the brain of diabetic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fridman, O; Foglia, V G; de Nicola, A F [Instituto de Biologia y Medicina Experimental, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Lab. de Esteroides

    1978-07-01

    The binding of (1,2,6,7-/sup 3/H)-corticosterone was studied in brain cytosol from normal and streptozotocin-diabetic male rats. The experiments were performed under conditions of incubation time (4h), temperature (0-4/sup 0/C), time after adrenalectomy (6 days) and corticosterone concentrations (1.2 x 10/sup -8/ and 1.15 x 10/sup -9/M) previously established for determining binding activity in the brain of normal rats. The binding of (/sup 3/H)-corticosterone was found invariably lower in cytosol of the brain from diabetic rats, studied under three different conditions in non-adrenalectomized animals, in adrenalectomized using a non-saturating corticosterone concentration, and in adrenalectomized plus a saturating steroid concentration. These results support previous contentions that the diminished sensitivity to the negative feedback for steroids which is present in diabetics, may be related to a reduction in binding capacity for corticoids in the central nervous system.

  4. Characterization of kappa 1 and kappa 2 opioid binding sites in frog (Rana esculenta) brain membrane preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benyhe, S.; Varga, E.; Hepp, J.; Magyar, A.; Borsodi, A.; Wollemann, M.

    1990-09-01

    The distribution and properties of frog brain kappa-opioid receptor subtypes differ not only from those of the guinea pig brain, but also from that of the rat brain. In guinea pig cerebellum the kappa 1 is the dominant receptor subtype, frog brain contains mainly the kappa 2 subtype, and the distribution of the rat brain subtypes is intermediate between the two others. In competition experiments it has been established that ethylketocyclazocine and N-cyclopropylmethyl-norazidomorphine, which are nonselective kappa-ligands, have relatively high affinities to frog brain membranes. The kappa 2 ligands (Met5)enkephalin-Arg6-Phe7 and etorphine also show high affinities to the frog brain. Kappa 1 binding sites measured in the presence of 5 microM/D-Ala2-Leu5/enkephalin represent 25-30% of (3H)ethylketocyclazocine binding in frog brain membranes. The kappa 2 subtype in frog brain resembles more to the mu subtype than the delta subtype of opioid receptors, but it differs from the mu subtype in displaying low affinity toward beta-endorphin and /D-Ala2-(Me)Phe4-Gly5-ol/enkephalin (DAGO). From our data it is evident that the opioid receptor subtypes are already present in the amphibian brain but the differences among them are less pronounced than in mammalian brain.

  5. Characterization of kappa 1 and kappa 2 opioid binding sites in frog (Rana esculenta) brain membrane preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benyhe, S.; Varga, E.; Hepp, J.; Magyar, A.; Borsodi, A.; Wollemann, M.

    1990-01-01

    The distribution and properties of frog brain kappa-opioid receptor subtypes differ not only from those of the guinea pig brain, but also from that of the rat brain. In guinea pig cerebellum the kappa 1 is the dominant receptor subtype, frog brain contains mainly the kappa 2 subtype, and the distribution of the rat brain subtypes is intermediate between the two others. In competition experiments it has been established that ethylketocyclazocine and N-cyclopropylmethyl-norazidomorphine, which are nonselective kappa-ligands, have relatively high affinities to frog brain membranes. The kappa 2 ligands (Met5)enkephalin-Arg6-Phe7 and etorphine also show high affinities to the frog brain. Kappa 1 binding sites measured in the presence of 5 microM/D-Ala2-Leu5/enkephalin represent 25-30% of [3H]ethylketocyclazocine binding in frog brain membranes. The kappa 2 subtype in frog brain resembles more to the mu subtype than the delta subtype of opioid receptors, but it differs from the mu subtype in displaying low affinity toward beta-endorphin and /D-Ala2-(Me)Phe4-Gly5-ol/enkephalin (DAGO). From our data it is evident that the opioid receptor subtypes are already present in the amphibian brain but the differences among them are less pronounced than in mammalian brain

  6. (+)- and (-)-N-allylnormetazocine binding sites in mouse brain: in vitro and in vivo characterization and regional distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compton, D.R.; Bagley, R.B.; Katzen, J.S.; Martin, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    In vivo and in vitro binding studies, both in whole brain and in selected areas, indicate that non-identical (+)- and (-)-NANM sites exist in the mouse brain, and each exhibits a different regional distribution. The in vivo binding of (+)- 3 H-NANM was found to be saturable at pharmacologically relevant doses, and represents a relatively small (10 - 22%) portion of total brain (+)- 3 H-NANM concentrations. The in vivo binding of (+)- 3 H-NANM was selectively displaced by (+)-NANM and PCP, and more sensitive to haloperidol and (+)-ketocyclazocine than the (-)- 3 H-NANM site. The in vivo binding of (-)- 3 H-NANM was selectively displaced by (-)-NANM, and more sensitive to naloxone and (-) ketocyclazocine than the (+)- 3 H-NANM site, and insensitive to PCP. This study indicates that the investigation of NANM binding sites is possible using in vivo binding techniques, and that each isomer apparently binds, in the mouse brain, to a single class of distinct sites. 32 references, 4 figures, 2 tables

  7. Inhibition of lipid peroxidation induced by γ- radiation and AAPH in rat liver and brain mitochondria by mushrooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakshmi, B.; Janardhanan, K.K.; Tilak, J.C.; Devasagayam, T.P.A.; Adhikari, S.

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to radiation or 2.2' Azobis(2-amidopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) induces generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) especially hydroxyl radical ( . OH) and peroxyl radical (ROO . ), which are capable of inducing lipid peroxidation. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that extracts of the medicinal and edible mushrooms Ganoderma lucidum, Pleurotus florida, Pleurotus sajor-caju and Phellinus rimosus possessed significant antioxidant activity, measured as radical scavenging. In the present study, we examined the protective effect of these mushroom extracts against radiation- and AAPH-induced lipid peroxidation using rat liver and brain mitochondria as model systems. The results obtained showed that the investigated mushroom extracts significantly inhibited the formation of lipid hydroperoxide and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, indicating membrane protective effects. The finding suggests the profound protective effect of the extracts of the fruiting bodies of G. lucidum, P. florida, P. sajor-caju and P. rimosus against lipid peroxidation by two major forms of ROS capable of inducing this type of damage in a major organelle, the mitochondria from both rat liver and brain. This observation can possibly explain the health benefits of these mushrooms. (author)

  8. Effect of different commercial fat sources on brain, liver and blood lipid profiles of rats in growth phase

    OpenAIRE

    Angelis-Pereira, Michel Cardoso de; Barcelos, Maria de Fátima Píccolo; Pereira, Juciane de Abreu Ribeiro; Pereira, Rafaela Corrêa; Souza, Raimundo Vicente de

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To investigate the fatty acid content of different fat sources and evaluate the effect of them on plasma and hepatic lipids and on the fatty acid profile of the brain tissue of Wistar rats. Methods: Thirty male albino Wistar rats received for 59 days, the following diets: diet added of margarine with low content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA); diet added of margarine with high content of PUFA; diet added of butter; diet added of hydrogenated vegetable fat; diet ad...

  9. The influence of L-DOPA on the accumulation of lipid peroxidation products in some brain structures affected by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaev, R.A.; Kocharli, R.Kh.; Akhmedova, G.Sh.; Gasanova, A.A.; Babaev, Kh.F.

    1990-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of L-DOPA on the dynamics of changes in lipid peroxidation products (LPP) and the content of various types of SH-groups in certain brain structures (oblongata, cerebellum, visual and sensorimotor cortex) and their synaptosomal fractions upon irradiation. The preadministration of L-DOPA to irradiated rats inhibited LPP accumulation, prevented the decrease in the content of various types of thiols and thus exerted an antioxidant effect

  10. Radioprotection by dipyridamole in the aging mouse. Effects on lipid peroxidation in mouse liver, spleen and brain after whole-body X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, Noritaka

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the radioprotective effect of dipyridamole in the aging mouse, the lipid peroxide content in aging mouse liver, spleen and brain irradiated by X-ray were measured both before and after injection of dipyridamole. The lipid peroxide content increased with aging from 2 months old to 16 months old in the mouse liver, spleen and brain. The content of lipid peroxide in the liver and spleen of the aging mouse was significantly increased in 7 days after whole-body irradiation with 8 Gy, but was unchanged in the brain. Dipyridamole, given before irradiation, significantly inhibited the increase of lipid peroxide after irradiation. These results suggest that dipyridamole may have radioprotective effects on aging mouse liver and spleen as well as on young mouse, and that inhibition of lipid peroxidation is a possible factor in the radioprotective effect of dipyridamole. (author)

  11. Lipid-laden cells differentially distributed in the aging brain are functionally active and correspond to distinct phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimabukuro, Marilia Kimie; Langhi, Larissa Gutman Paranhos; Cordeiro, Ingrid; Brito, José M; Batista, Claudia Maria de Castro; Mattson, Mark P; Mello Coelho, Valeria de

    2016-03-31

    We characterized cerebral Oil Red O-positive lipid-laden cells (LLC) of aging mice evaluating their distribution, morphology, density, functional activities and inflammatory phenotype. We identified LLC in meningeal, cortical and neurogenic brain regions. The density of cerebral LLC increased with age. LLC presenting small lipid droplets were visualized adjacent to blood vessels or deeper in the brain cortical and striatal parenchyma of aging mice. LLC with larger droplets were asymmetrically distributed in the cerebral ventricle walls, mainly located in the lateral wall. We also found that LLC in the subventricular region co-expressed beclin-1 or LC3, markers for autophagosome or autophagolysosome formation, and perilipin (PLIN), a lipid droplet-associated protein, suggesting lipophagic activity. Some cerebral LLC exhibited β galactosidase activity indicating a senescence phenotype. Moreover, we detected production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α in cortical PLIN(+) LLC. Some cortical NeuN(+) neurons, GFAP(+) glia limitans astrocytes, Iba-1(+) microglia and S100β(+) ependymal cells expressed PLIN in the aging brain. Our findings suggest that cerebral LLC exhibit distinct cellular phenotypes and may participate in the age-associated neuroinflammatory processes.

  12. Lipid-laden cells differentially distributed in the aging brain are functionally active and correspond to distinct phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimabukuro, Marilia Kimie; Langhi, Larissa Gutman Paranhos; Cordeiro, Ingrid; Brito, José M.; Batista, Claudia Maria de Castro; Mattson, Mark P.; de Mello Coelho, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    We characterized cerebral Oil Red O-positive lipid-laden cells (LLC) of aging mice evaluating their distribution, morphology, density, functional activities and inflammatory phenotype. We identified LLC in meningeal, cortical and neurogenic brain regions. The density of cerebral LLC increased with age. LLC presenting small lipid droplets were visualized adjacent to blood vessels or deeper in the brain cortical and striatal parenchyma of aging mice. LLC with larger droplets were asymmetrically distributed in the cerebral ventricle walls, mainly located in the lateral wall. We also found that LLC in the subventricular region co-expressed beclin-1 or LC3, markers for autophagosome or autophagolysosome formation, and perilipin (PLIN), a lipid droplet-associated protein, suggesting lipophagic activity. Some cerebral LLC exhibited β galactosidase activity indicating a senescence phenotype. Moreover, we detected production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α in cortical PLIN+ LLC. Some cortical NeuN+ neurons, GFAP+ glia limitans astrocytes, Iba-1+ microglia and S100β+ ependymal cells expressed PLIN in the aging brain. Our findings suggest that cerebral LLC exhibit distinct cellular phenotypes and may participate in the age-associated neuroinflammatory processes. PMID:27029648

  13. Uncoupling of Metabolic Health from Longevity through Genetic Alteration of Adipose Tissue Lipid-Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanichi N. Charles

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Deterioration of metabolic health is a hallmark of aging and generally assumed to be detrimental to longevity. Exposure to a high-calorie diet impairs metabolism and accelerates aging; conversely, calorie restriction (CR prevents age-related metabolic diseases and extends lifespan. However, it is unclear whether preservation of metabolic health is sufficient to extend lifespan. We utilized a genetic mouse model lacking Fabp4/5 that confers protection against metabolic diseases and shares molecular and lipidomic features with CR to address this question. Fabp-deficient mice exhibit extended metabolic healthspan, with protection against insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, inflammation, deterioration of adipose tissue integrity, and fatty liver disease. Surprisingly, however, Fabp-deficient mice did not exhibit any extension of lifespan. These data indicate that extension of metabolic healthspan in the absence of CR can be uncoupled from lifespan, indicating the potential for independent drivers of these pathways, at least in laboratory mice. : Deterioration of metabolic health is a hallmark of aging and generally thought to be detrimental to longevity. Charles et al. utilize FABP-deficient mice as a model to demonstrate that the preservation of metabolic health in this model persists throughout life, even under metabolic stress, but does not increase longevity. Keywords: fatty acid binding protein, aging, calorie restriction, metabolic health, inflammation, metaflammation, diabetes, obesity, de novo lipogenesis

  14. Microspectroscopy (μFTIR) reveals co-localization of lipid oxidation and amyloid plaques in human Alzheimer disease brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benseny-Cases, Núria; Klementieva, Oxana; Cotte, Marine; Ferrer, Isidre; Cladera, Josep

    2014-12-16

    Amyloid peptides are the main component of one of the characteristic pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD): senile plaques. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis, amyloid peptides may play a central role in the sequence of events that leads to neurodegeneration. However, there are other factors, such as oxidative stress, that may be crucial for the development of the disease. In the present paper, we show that it is possible, by using Fourier tranform infrared (FTIR) microscopy, to co-localize amyloid deposits and lipid peroxidation in tissue slides from patients affected by Alzheimer's disease. Plaques and lipids can be analyzed in the same sample, making use of the characteristic infrared bands for peptide aggregation and lipid oxidation. The results show that, in samples from patients diagnosed with AD, the plaques and their immediate surroundings are always characterized by the presence of oxidized lipids. As for samples from non-AD individuals, those without amyloid plaques show a lower level of lipid oxidation than AD individuals. However, it is known that plaques can be detected in the brains of some non-AD individuals. Our results show that, in such cases, the lipid in the plaques and their surroundings display oxidation levels that are similar to those of tissues with no plaques. These results point to lipid oxidation as a possible key factor in the path that goes from showing the typical neurophatological hallmarks to suffering from dementia. In this process, the oxidative power of the amyloid peptide, possibly in the form of nonfibrillar aggregates, could play a central role.

  15. Inhibitory effect of magnesium sulfate on reaction of lipid hyperoxidation after radiation-induced acute brain injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lili; Zhou Juying; Yu Zhiying; Qin Songbing; Xu Xiaoting; Li Li; Tu Yu

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the protection of magnesium sulfate (MgSO 4 ) on radiation-induced acute brain injuries. Methods: 60 maturity Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: blank control group, experimental control group and experimental-therapeutic group. The whole brain of SD rats of experimental control group and experimental-therapeutic group was irradiated to a dose of 20 Gy using 6 MeV electron. MgSO 4 was injected intraperitoneally into the rats of experimental-therapeutic group before and after irradiation for five times. At different time points ranging from the 1 d, 7 d, 14 d, 30 d after irradiation, the brain tissue were taken. The xanthine oxidase and colorimetric examination were used to measure the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malonyldialdehyde (MDA) respectively in the rat brain respectively. Results: Compared with blank control group, the SOD in brain of experimental control group decreased significantly (P 4 used in early stage can inhibit the lipid peroxidation after radiation-induced acute brain injuries and alleviate the damage induced by free radicals to brain tissue. (authors)

  16. 2.5D Representations Combining in vivo 3D MRI and ex vivo 2D MSI Approaches to Study the Lipid Distribution in the Whole Sheep Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Labas , Valérie; Teixeira-Gomes , Ana Paula; Andersson , Frédéric; Ménigot , Sébastien; Batailler , Martine; Adriaensen , Hans; Migaud , Martine; Chaillou , Elodie

    2015-01-01

    National audience; Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) provides easily high spatially resolved masses allowing characterization of endogenous lipids. These latter constitute about 70% of the composition of the white matter of the brain which can be implicated in developmental and/or cognitive troubles. In order to examine the molecular distribution of lipids in whole sheep brain, and especially in white/grey matter, we combined in vivo and ex vivo images, obtained in the same animals, using Magne...

  17. Autoradiographic determination of catechol estrogen binding sites in brain, pituitary and uterus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvizi, N.; Sar, M.; Duncan, G.E.; Stumpf, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    The anatomical pattern of nuclear binding of 2-OH[6,9- 3 H]estradiol ([ 3 H]2-OHE 2 ) in brain, pituitary and uterus have been studied autoradiographically. Autoradiograms of forebrain, pituitary and uterus show nuclear concentrations of radioactivity in certain cells. This nuclear concentration is abolished when unlabelled 2-OHE 2 or E 2 was injected prior to the injection of [ 3 H]2-OHE 2 . In the brain nuclear labelling is observed in the septal-preoptic region, in the anterior hypothalamic area, and in the central hypothalamic area. Some estrogen-sensitive nuclear groups, such as lateral septum and hippocampus, do not show accumulation of radioactivity. In the uterus, luminal and glandular epithelium, stromal cell and muscle cells are labelled. A comparison of the quantitative nuclear uptake of radioactivity and of the different time intervals after the injection of different doses shows similar uptake of nuclear radioactivity. This is comparable to data obtained after [6,7- 3 H]estradiol ([ 3 H]E 2 ) injection. The results provide clear evidence for nuclear binding of catechol estrogens of the same magnitude as [ 3 H]E 2 after in vivo treatment. (Auth.).0

  18. Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Binding in Brain of Cannabis Users: Imaging with the Novel Radiotracer [11C]CURB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boileau, Isabelle; Mansouri, Esmaeil; Williams, Belinda; Le Foll, Bernard; Rusjan, Pablo; Mizrahi, Romina; Tyndale, Rachel F.; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Payer, Doris E.; Wilson, Alan A.; Houle, Sylvain; Kish, Stephen J.; Tong, Junchao

    2016-01-01

    Background One of the major mechanisms for terminating the actions of the endocannabinoid anandamide is hydrolysis by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and inhibitors of the enzyme were suggested as potential treatment for human cannabis dependence. However, the status of brain FAAH in cannabis use disorder is unknown. Methods Brain FAAH binding was measured with positron emission tomography and [11C]CURB in 22 healthy control subjects and ten chronic, frequent cannabis users during early abstinence. The FAAH genetic polymorphism (rs324420) and blood, urine and hair levels of cannabinoids and metabolites were determined. Results In cannabis users FAAH binding was significantly lower by 14–20% across the brain regions examined as compared to matched control subjects (overall Cohen’s d=0.96). Lower binding was negatively correlated with cannabinoid concentrations in blood and urine and was associated with higher trait impulsiveness. Conclusions Lower FAAH binding levels in the brain may be a consequence of chronic and recent cannabis exposure and could contribute to cannabis withdrawal. This effect should be considered in the development of novel treatment strategies for cannabis use disorder that target FAAH and endocannabinoids. Further studies are needed to examine possible changes in FAAH binding during prolonged cannabis abstinence and whether lower FAAH binding predates drug use. PMID:27345297

  19. Quantitative pharmacological analysis of 2-125I-iodomelatonin binding sites in discrete areas of the chicken brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siuciak, J.A.; Krause, D.N.; Dubocovich, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have localized and characterized 2-125I-iodomelatonin binding sites in the chicken brain using in vitro quantitative autoradiography. Binding sites were widely distributed throughout the chicken brain, predominantly in regions associated with the visual system. The specific binding of 2-125I-iodomelatonin to discrete chicken brain areas was found to be saturable, reversible, and of high affinity. The specific binding of 2-125I-iodomelatonin (75 pm) was quantitated for 40 identifiable brain regions. Eight brain regions were chosen for binding characterization and pharmacological analysis: optic tectum, Edinger-Westphal nucleus, oculomotor nucleus, nucleus rotundus, ventral supraoptic decussation, ventrolateral geniculate nucleus, neostriatum, and ectostriatum. These regions showed no rostral-caudal gradient in 2-125I-iodomelatonin specific binding, and saturation analysis revealed a single class of high-affinity sites with KD values in the range of 33-48 pM and receptor site density (Bmax) ranging from 31 to 58 fmol/mg protein. Competition experiments carried out with various indoles revealed a similar order of pharmacological affinities in these areas: melatonin greater than 6-chloromelatonin greater than methoxyluzindole greater than N-acetylserotonin greater than luzindole much greater than 5-HT greater than 5-methoxytryptamine. The affinity constants determined by quantitative autoradiography for these compounds to compete for 2-125I-iodomelatonin binding in the optic tectum correlated well with the affinities in chicken brain membranes at 25 degrees C (r = 0.966; slope = 0.845; n = 7) and 0 degree C (r = 0.946; slope = 0.379; n = 7), chicken retinal membranes (r = 0.973; slope = 0.759; n = 7), and the potency or affinity of these compounds to affect the calcium-dependent release of 3H-dopamine from the rabbit retina (r = 0.902; slope = 0.506; n = 6)

  20. The effect of ethanol on 35-S-TBPS binding to mouse brain membranes in the presence of chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liljequist, S.; Culp, S.; Tabakoff, B.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of in vitro and in vivo administration of ethanol on the binding of 35 S-t-butyl-bicyclophosphorothionate ( 35 S-TBPS) to cortical brain membranes of C57B1 mice was investigated using KCl (100 mM) containing assay media. The in vitro addition of ethanol produced a dose-dependent inhibition of basal 35 S-TBPS binding. In the presence of chloride ions, GABA and pentobarbital had a biphasic action (stimulation followed by inhibition) on 35 S-TBPS binding, whereas diazepam only stimulated the binding. Ethanol reduced the stimulatory effects of GABA and pentobarbital in a dose-dependent manner, but had no effect on the enhancement of 35 S-TBPS binding produced by diazepam. 35 S-TBPS binding to cortical brain membranes was inhibited by the putative Cl - channel blocking agent DIDS. This inhibitory action of DIDS was significantly, and dose-dependently reduced by ethanol (≤ 100 mM ethanol). Chronic ethanol ingestion in vivo, which produced tolerance to and physical dependence on ethanol in the animals, did not alter the stimulatory and inhibitory effects of GABA and pentobarbital on 35 S-TBPS binding. The enhancement of 35 S-TBPS binding produced by diazepam was slightly, but significantly, enhanced in brain membranes from animals which had undergone 24 hours of ethanol withdrawal. Chronic ethanol treatment did not change the potency of picrotoxin and of the peripheral BDZ-receptor ligand RO 5-4864 to competitively inhibit 35 S-TBPS binding. Our results suggest that in vitro addition of ethanol alters the activity of the activity of the GABA benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptor complex. Although there was no change in basal 35 S-TBPS binding following chronic in vivo ethanol administration, our curent data suggest that chronic ethanol ingestion may cause specific changes of the GABA BDZ receptor proteins, in this study revealed as an altered modulation of 35 S-TBPS binding by diazepam. (author)

  1. The effect of ethanol on sup 35 -S-TBPS binding to mouse brain membranes in the presence of chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liljequist, S.; Culp, S.; Tabakoff, B. (Laboratory for Studies of Neuroadaptive Processes, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH, Bethesda (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The effect of in vitro and in vivo administration of ethanol on the binding of {sup 35}S-t-butyl-bicyclophosphorothionate ({sup 35}S-TBPS) to cortical brain membranes of C57B1 mice was investigated using KCl containing assay media. The in vitro addition of ethanol produced a dose-dependent inhibition of basal {sup 35}S-TBPS binding. In the presence of chloride ions, GABA and pentobarbital had a biphasic action on {sup 35}S-TBPS binding, whereas diazepam only stimulated the binding. Ethanol reduced the stimulatory effects of GABA and pentobarbital in a dose-dependent manner, but had no effect on the enhancement of {sup 35}S-TBPS binding produced by diazepam. {sup 35}S-TBPS binding to cortical brain membranes was inhibited by the putative Cl{sup -} channel blocking agent DIDS. This inhibitory action of DIDS was significantly, and dose-dependently reduced by ethanol. Chronic ethanol ingestion in vivo, which produced tolerance to and physical dependence on ethanol in the animals, did not alter the stimulatory and inhibitory effects of GABA and pentobarbital on {sup 35}S-TBPS binding. The enhancement of {sup 35}S-TBPS binding produced by diazepam was slightly, but significantly, enhanced in brain membranes from animals which had undergone 24 hours of ethanol withdrawal. Chronic ethanol treatment did not change the potency of picrotoxin and of the peripheral BDZ-receptor ligand RO 5-4864 to competitively inhibit {sup 35}S-TBPS binding. Our results suggest that in vitro addition of ethanol alters the activity of the activity of the GABA benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptor complex. Although there was no change in basal {sup 35}S-TBPS binding following chronic in vivo ethanol administration, our curent data suggest that chronic ethanol ingestion may cause specific changes of the GABA BDZ receptor proteins, in this study revealed as an altered modulation of {sup 35}S-TBPS binding by diazepam.

  2. β-chain of ATP synthase as a lipophorin binding protein and its role in lipid transfer in the midgut of Panstrongylus megistus (Hemiptera: Reduviidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruttero, Leonardo L; Demartini, Diogo R; Rubiolo, Edilberto R; Carlini, Célia R; Canavoso, Lilián E

    2014-09-01

    Lipophorin, the main lipoprotein in the circulation of the insects, cycles among peripheral tissues to exchange its lipid cargo at the plasma membrane of target cells, without synthesis or degradation of its apolipoprotein matrix. Currently, there are few characterized candidates supporting the functioning of the docking mechanism of lipophorin-mediated lipid transfer. In this work we combined ligand blotting assays and tandem mass spectrometry to characterize proteins with the property to bind lipophorin at the midgut membrane of Panstrongylus megistus, a vector of Chagas' disease. We further evaluated the role of lipophorin binding proteins in the transfer of lipids between the midgut and lipophorin. The β subunit of the ATP synthase complex (β-ATPase) was identified as a lipophorin binding protein. β-ATPase was detected in enriched midgut membrane preparations free of mitochondria. It was shown that β-ATPase partially co-localizes with lipophorin at the plasma membrane of isolated enterocytes and in the sub-epithelial region of the midgut tissue. The interaction of endogenous lipophorin and β-ATPase was also demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation assays. Blocking of β-ATPase significantly diminished the binding of lipophorin to the isolated enterocytes and to the midgut tissue. In vivo assays injecting the β-ATPase antibody significantly reduced the transfer of [(3)H]-diacylglycerol from the midgut to the hemolymph in insects fed with [9,10-(3)H]-oleic acid, supporting the involvement of lipophorin-β-ATPase association in the transfer of lipids. In addition, the β-ATPase antibody partially impaired the transfer of fatty acids from lipophorin to the midgut, a less important route of lipid delivery to this tissue. Taken together, the findings strongly suggest that β-ATPase plays a role as a docking lipophorin receptor at the midgut of P. megistus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. FMRFamide: low affinity inhibition of opioid binding to rabbit brain membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, X.Z.; Raffa, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    FMRFamide (Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH 2 ) was first isolated from the ganglia of molluscs by Price and Greenberg in 1977. The peptide was subsequently shown to have diverse actions on various types of molluscan and mammalian tissues. The presence of immunoreactive FMRFamide-like material (irFMRF) in multiple areas of rat brain, spinal cord, and gastrointestinal tract suggests that irFMRF may have a physiological role in mammals. Tang, Yang and Costa recently demonstrated that FMRFamide attenuates morphine antinociception in rats and postulated, based on this and several other lines of evidence, that irFMRF might be an endogenous opioid antagonist. In the present study, they tested the ability of FMRFamide to inhibit the binding of opioid receptor ligands to rabbit membrane preparations. FMRFamide inhibited the specific binding of both 3 [H]-dihydromorphine and 3 [H]-ethylketocyclazocine (IC 50 = 14 μM and 320 μM, respectively) in a dose-related manner, suggesting that FMRFamide may affect binding to at least two types of opioid receptors (mu and kappa). These data are consistent with the concept that irFMRF might act as an endogenous opioid antagonist. However, the low affinity of FMRFamide leaves open the possibility of another mechanism of opioid antagonism, such as neuromodulation

  4. FMRFamide: low affinity inhibition of opioid binding to rabbit brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, X.Z.; Raffa, R.B.

    1986-03-05

    FMRFamide (Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH/sub 2/) was first isolated from the ganglia of molluscs by Price and Greenberg in 1977. The peptide was subsequently shown to have diverse actions on various types of molluscan and mammalian tissues. The presence of immunoreactive FMRFamide-like material (irFMRF) in multiple areas of rat brain, spinal cord, and gastrointestinal tract suggests that irFMRF may have a physiological role in mammals. Tang, Yang and Costa recently demonstrated that FMRFamide attenuates morphine antinociception in rats and postulated, based on this and several other lines of evidence, that irFMRF might be an endogenous opioid antagonist. In the present study, they tested the ability of FMRFamide to inhibit the binding of opioid receptor ligands to rabbit membrane preparations. FMRFamide inhibited the specific binding of both /sup 3/(H)-dihydromorphine and /sup 3/(H)-ethylketocyclazocine (IC/sub 50/ = 14 ..mu..M and 320 ..mu..M, respectively) in a dose-related manner, suggesting that FMRFamide may affect binding to at least two types of opioid receptors (mu and kappa). These data are consistent with the concept that irFMRF might act as an endogenous opioid antagonist. However, the low affinity of FMRFamide leaves open the possibility of another mechanism of opioid antagonism, such as neuromodulation.

  5. Restoration of dietary-fat induced blood–brain barrier dysfunction by anti-inflammatory lipid-modulating agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallebage-Gamarallage Menuka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have identified use of non-steroidal-anti-inflammatory drugs and statins for prevention of dementia, but their efficacy in slowing progression is not well understood. Cerebrovascular disturbances are common pathological feature of Alzheimer’s disease. We previously reported chronic ingestion of saturated fatty acids (SFA compromises blood–brain barrier (BBB integrity resulting in cerebral extravasation of plasma proteins and inflammation. However, the SFA-induced parenchymal accumulation of plasma proteins could be prevented by co-administration of some cholesterol lowering agents. Restoration of BBB dysfunction is clinically relevant, so the purpose of this study was to explore lipid-lowering agents could reverse BBB disturbances induced by chronic ingestion of SFA’s. Methods Wild-type mice were fed an SFA diet for 12 weeks to induce BBB dysfunction, and then randomised to receive atorvastatin, pravastatin or ibuprofen in combination with the SFA-rich diet for 2 or 8 weeks. Abundance of plasma-derived immunoglobulin-G (IgG and amyloid-β enriched apolipoprotein (apo-B lipoproteins within brain parenchyme were quantified utilising immunofluorescence microscopy. Results Atorvastatin treatment for 2 and 8 weeks restored BBB integrity, indicated by a substantial reduction of IgG and apo B, particularly within the hippocampus. Pravastatin, a water-soluble statin was less effective than atorvastatin (lipid-soluble. Statin effects were independent of changes in plasma lipid homeostasis. Ibuprofen, a lipid-soluble cyclooxygenase inhibitor attenuated cerebral accumulation of IgG and apo B as effectively as atorvastatin. Our findings are consistent with the drug effects being independent of plasma lipid homeostasis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that BBB dysfunction induced by chronic ingestion of SFA is reversible with timely introduction and sustained treatment with agents that suppress inflammation.

  6. Brain Information Sharing During Visual Short-Term Memory Binding Yields a Memory Biomarker for Familial Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Mario A; Mikulan, Ezequiel; Trujillo, Natalia; Sala, Sergio Della; Lopera, Francisco; Manes, Facundo; Starr, John; Ibanez, Agustin

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) as a disconnection syndrome which disrupts both brain information sharing and memory binding functions. The extent to which these two phenotypic expressions share pathophysiological mechanisms remains unknown. To unveil the electrophysiological correlates of integrative memory impairments in AD towards new memory biomarkers for its prodromal stages. Patients with 100% risk of familial AD (FAD) and healthy controls underwent assessment with the Visual Short-Term Memory binding test (VSTMBT) while we recorded their EEG. We applied a novel brain connectivity method (Weighted Symbolic Mutual Information) to EEG data. Patients showed significant deficits during the VSTMBT. A reduction of brain connectivity was observed during resting as well as during correct VSTM binding, particularly over frontal and posterior regions. An increase of connectivity was found during VSTM binding performance over central regions. While decreased connectivity was found in cases in more advanced stages of FAD, increased brain connectivity appeared in cases in earlier stages. Such altered patterns of task-related connectivity were found in 89% of the assessed patients. VSTM binding in the prodromal stages of FAD are associated to altered patterns of brain connectivity thus confirming the link between integrative memory deficits and impaired brain information sharing in prodromal FAD. While significant loss of brain connectivity seems to be a feature of the advanced stages of FAD increased brain connectivity characterizes its earlier stages. These findings are discussed in the light of recent proposals about the earliest pathophysiological mechanisms of AD and their clinical expression. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Effect of hypoxia on the incorporation of [2-3H] glycerol and [1-14C[-palmitate into lipids of various brain regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberghina, M.; Giuffrida, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The lipid metabolism in guinea pig brain after intermittent hypoxia, prolonged for 80 hrs, was markedly impaired. The in vivo incorporation of [2-3H] glycerol and [1-14C] palmitate into lipids of microsomes, mitochondria, myelin, and synaptosomes, purified form cerebral hemispheres, was significantly lower in the hypoxic animals than in the controls. The same effect was observed on the incorporation of labeled precursors into lipids of mitochondria purified from cerebellum and brainstem. In particular, the labeling of th major phospholipids present - ie, phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) - in the mitochondria of the three brain regions examined decreased after hypoxic treatment

  8. Ropizine concurrently enhances and inhibits [3H] dextromethorpan binding to different structures of the guinea pig brain: Autoradiographic evidence for multiple binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canoll, P.D.; Smith, P.R.; and Musacchio, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Ropizine produces a simultaneous enhancement and inhibition of [ 3 H] dextromethorphan (DM) high-affinity binding to different areas of the guinea pig brain. These results imply that there are two distinct types of high-affinity [ 3 H]DM binding sites, which are present in variable proportions in different brain structures. The ropizine-enhances [ 3 H]DM binding type was preferentially inhibited by (+)-pentazocine. This is consistent with the presumption that the (+)-pentazocine-sensitive site is identical with the common site for DM and 3-(-3-Hydroxphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine ((+)-3-PPP). The second binding type, which is inhibited by ropizine and is not so sensitive to (+)- pentazocine, has not been fully characterized. This study demonstrates that the biphasic effects to ropizine are due, at least in part, to the effects of ropizine on two different types of [ 3 H]DM binding sites. However, this study does not rule out that the common DM/(+)-3-PPP site also might be inhibited by higher concentrations of ropizine

  9. Water extractable phytochemicals from Capsicum pubescens (tree pepper) inhibit lipid peroxidation induced by different pro-oxidant agents in brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oboh, G.; Rocha, J.B.T.

    2006-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is the cause of neurodegenerative disorders such as Lou Gehrig's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease; one practical way to prevent and manage neurodegenerative diseases is through the eating of food rich in antioxidants (dietary means). In this study, the antioxidant and neuroprotective properties of aqueous extract of ripe and unripe Capsicum pubescens (popularly known as tree pepper) on different pro-oxidant induced lipid peroxidation in Rat's brain (in vitro) is been investigated. Aqueous extract of freshly harvested pepper was prepared, and the total phenol content, vitamin C, ferric reducing antioxidant property (FRAP) and Fe (II) chelating ability was determined. In addition, the ability of the extracts to protect the Rat's brain against some pro-oxidant FeSO 4 , Sodium nitroprusside and Quinolinic acid) - induced oxidative stress was also determined. The results of the study revealed that ripe Capsicum pubescens had a significantly higher (P 2 O 2 induced decomposition of deoxyribose. Therefore, ripe and unripe Capsicum pubescens would inhibit lipid peroxidation in vitro. However, the ripe potent was a more potent inhibitor of lipid peroxidation, which is probably due to its higher vitamin C and phenol content, reducing power and Fe (II) chelating ability. (author)

  10. Effect of antemortem and postmortem factors on [3H]MK-801 binding in the human brain: Transient elevation during early childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornhuber, J.; Mack-Burkhardt, F.; Konradi, C.; Fritze, J.; Riederer, P.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of a number of antemortem and postmortem factors on [ 3 H]MK-801 binding was investigated under equilibrium conditions in the frontal cortex of human brains of 38 controls. Binding values transiently increased during the early postnatal period reaching a maximum at the age of about 2 years. After age 10 years [ 3 H]MK-801 binding sites disappeared at 5.7% per decade. The storage time of brain tissue had a reducing effect on these binding sites. There was no effect of gender, brain weight or postmortem time interval and the binding sites were bilaterally symmetrically distributed in the frontal cortex

  11. Autoradiographic imaging and quantification of the high-affinity GHB binding sites in rodent brain using (3)H-HOCPCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, A B; Bay, T; Villumsen, I S

    2016-01-01

    analogue, 3-hydroxycyclopent-1-enecarboxylic acid (HOCPCA) as a tritiated version ((3)H-HOCPCA) to radioactively label the specific GHB high-affinity binding site and gain further insight into the density, distribution and developmental profile of this protein. We show that, in low nanomolar concentrations...... brain development. Due to the high sensitivity of this radioligand, we were able to detect low levels of specific binding already at E15 in mouse brain, which increased progressively until adulthood. Collectively, we show that (3)H-HOCPCA is a highly sensitive radioligand, offering advantages over...

  12. Lipid microbubbles as a vehicle for targeted drug delivery using focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Carlos; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry; Wu, Shih-Ying; Karakatsani, Maria E; Bernal, Manuel; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2017-04-01

    Focused ultrasound in conjunction with lipid microbubbles has fully demonstrated its ability to induce non-invasive, transient, and reversible blood-brain barrier opening. This study was aimed at testing the feasibility of our lipid-coated microbubbles as a vector for targeted drug delivery in the treatment of central nervous system diseases. These microbubbles were labeled with the fluorophore 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein. Focused ultrasound targeted mouse brains in vivo in the presence of these microbubbles for trans-blood-brain barrier delivery of 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein. This new approach, compared to previously studies of our group, where fluorescently labeled dextrans and microbubbles were co-administered, represents an appreciable improvement in safety outcome and targeted drug delivery. This novel technique allows the delivery of 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein at the region of interest unlike the alternative of systemic exposure. 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein delivery was assessed by ex vivo fluorescence imaging and by in vivo transcranial passive cavitation detection. Stable and inertial cavitation doses were quantified. The cavitation dose thresholds for estimating, a priori, successful targeted drug delivery were, for the first time, identified with inertial cavitation were concluded to be necessary for successful delivery. The findings presented herein indicate the feasibility and safety of the proposed microbubble-based targeted drug delivery and that, if successful, can be predicted by cavitation detection in vivo.

  13. Lipid microbubbles as a vehicle for targeted drug delivery using focused ultrasound-induced blood–brain barrier opening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Carlos; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry; Wu, Shih-Ying; Karakatsani, Maria E; Bernal, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Focused ultrasound in conjunction with lipid microbubbles has fully demonstrated its ability to induce non-invasive, transient, and reversible blood–brain barrier opening. This study was aimed at testing the feasibility of our lipid-coated microbubbles as a vector for targeted drug delivery in the treatment of central nervous system diseases. These microbubbles were labeled with the fluorophore 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein. Focused ultrasound targeted mouse brains in vivo in the presence of these microbubbles for trans-blood–brain barrier delivery of 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein. This new approach, compared to previously studies of our group, where fluorescently labeled dextrans and microbubbles were co-administered, represents an appreciable improvement in safety outcome and targeted drug delivery. This novel technique allows the delivery of 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein at the region of interest unlike the alternative of systemic exposure. 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein delivery was assessed by ex vivo fluorescence imaging and by in vivo transcranial passive cavitation detection. Stable and inertial cavitation doses were quantified. The cavitation dose thresholds for estimating, a priori, successful targeted drug delivery were, for the first time, identified with inertial cavitation were concluded to be necessary for successful delivery. The findings presented herein indicate the feasibility and safety of the proposed microbubble-based targeted drug delivery and that, if successful, can be predicted by cavitation detection in vivo. PMID:27278929

  14. Characterization of kappa opioid binding using dynorphin A1-13 and U69,593 in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, T.; Shoemaker, W.J. (Univ. of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Previous studies of kappa opioid binding sites have suggested heterogeneous binding to this class of opioid receptors. To further investigate kappa receptor heterogeneity, we analyzed the binding properties of various kappa-selective ligands in rat brain homogenates. Displacement assays were carried out using (3H)bremazocine in the presence of various displacing ligands under mu and delta receptor-blocked conditions. Homologous displacement of (3H)bremazocine produced shallow displacement which best fit a two-site model of drug-receptor interaction. Dynorphin A1-13 and U69,593 exhibited similar biphasic displacement of (3H)bremazocine. Maximal displacement by these ligands, however, represented only approximately 55% of total (3H)bremazocine binding, which suggests the existence of a third component of (3H)bremazocine binding. Biphasic displacement by dynorphin A1-13 was detected in tissue throughout the brain and the spinal cord, whereas the dynorphin-resistant component of (3H)bremazocine binding was uniquely absent in the spinal cord. U50,488H, tifluadom and ethylketocyclazocine appeared to displace from additional, dynorphin-insensitive sites, as their maximal displacement exceeded that seen with either dynorphin A1-13 or U69,593. These results strongly suggest the existence of at least three components of non-mu, non-delta (3H)bremazocine binding in the rat brain: two with differential affinity for dynorphin A1-13 and U69-593 (kappa-1 and kappa-2 sites), and a third (termed here R1) that was further resolved into two binding sites by bremazocine. Preliminary analysis of the R1 component using naloxone revealed one high-affinity site, which may be opiate in nature, and a second site whose binding properties closely resemble those of the sigma receptor described by others.

  15. Interaction analysis of chimeric metal-binding green fluorescent protein and artificial solid-supported lipid membrane by quartz crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Na Ayudhya, Chartchalerm Isarankura; Hilterhaus, Lutz; Hinz, Andreas; Tantimongcolwat, Tanawut; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Non-specific adsorption and specific interaction between a chimeric green fluorescent protein (GFP) carrying metal-binding region and the immobilized zinc ions on artificial solid-supported lipid membranes was investigated using the quartz crystal microbalance technique and the atomic force microscopy (AFM). Supported lipid bilayer, composed of octanethiol and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-[N- (5-amino-1-carboxypentyl iminodiacetic acid)succinyl] (NTA-DOGS)-Zn 2+ , was formed on the gold electrode of quartz resonator (5 MHz). Binding of the chimeric GFP to zinc ions resulted in a rapid decrease of resonance frequency. Reversibility of the process was demonstrated via the removal of metal ions by EDTA. Nanoscale structural orientation of the chimeric GFP on the membrane was imaged by AFM. Association constant of the specific binding to metal ions was 2- to 3-fold higher than that of the non-specific adsorption, which was caused by the fluidization effect of the metal-chelating lipid molecules as well as the steric hindrance effect. This infers a possibility for a further development of biofunctionalized membrane. However, maximization is needed in order to attain closer advancement to a membrane-based sensor device

  16. Influence of electromagnetic field (1800 MHz on lipid peroxidation in brain, blood, liver and kidney in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Bodera

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study is the evaluation of the influence of repeated (5 times for 15 min exposure to electromagnetic field (EMF of 1800 MHz frequency on tissue lipid peroxidation (LPO both in normal and inflammatory state, combined with analgesic treatment. Material and Methods: The concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA as the end-product of the lipid peroxidation (LPO was estimated in blood, liver, kidneys, and brain of Wistar rats, both healthy and those with complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA-induced persistent paw inflammation. Results: The slightly elevated levels of the MDA in blood, kidney, and brain were observed among healthy rats in electromagnetic field (EMF-exposed groups, treated with tramadol (TRAM/EMF and exposed to the EMF. The malondialdehyde remained at the same level in the liver in all investigated groups: the control group (CON, the exposed group (EMF, treated with tramadol (TRAM as well as exposed to and treated with tramadol (TRAM/EMF. In the group of animals treated with the complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA we also observed slightly increased values of the MDA in the case of the control group (CON and the exposed groups (EMF and TRAM/EMF. The MDA values concerning kidneys remained at the same levels in the control, exposed, and not-exposed group treated with tramadol. Results for healthy rats and animals with inflammation did not differ significantly. Conclusions: The electromagnetic field exposure (EMF, applied in the repeated manner together with opioid drug tramadol (TRAM, slightly enhanced lipid peroxidation level in brain, blood, and kidneys.

  17. Perilipin-mediated lipid droplet formation in adipocytes promotes sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 processing and triacylglyceride accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Takahashi

    Full Text Available Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1 has been thought to be a critical factor that assists adipogenesis. During adipogenesis SREBP-1 stimulates lipogenic gene expression, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ enhances perilipin (plin gene expression, resulting in generating lipid droplets (LDs to store triacylglycerol (TAG in adipocytes. Plin coats adipocyte LDs and protects them from lipolysis. Here we show in white adipose tissue (WAT of plin-/- mice that nuclear active SREBP-1 and its target gene expression, but not nuclear SREBP-2, significantly decreased on attenuated LD formation. When plin-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs differentiated into adipocytes, attenuated LDs were formed and nuclear SREBP-1 decreased, but enforced plin expression restored them to their original state. Since LDs are largely derived from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, alterations in the ER cholesterol content were investigated during adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 cells. The ER cholesterol greatly reduced in differentiated adipocytes. The ER cholesterol level in plin-/- WAT was significantly higher than that of wild-type mice, suggesting that increased LD formation caused a change in ER environment along with a decrease in cholesterol. When GFP-SREBP-1 fusion proteins were exogenously expressed in 3T3-L1 cells, a mutant protein lacking the S1P cleavage site was poorly processed during adipogenesis, providing evidence of the increased canonical pathway for SREBP processing in which SREBP-1 is activated by two cleavage enzymes in the Golgi. Therefore, LD biogenesis may create the ER microenvironment favorable for SREBP-1 activation. We describe the novel interplay between LD formation and SREBP-1 activation through a positive feedback loop.

  18. Sterol regulatory element binding protein and dietary lipid regulation of fatty acid synthesis in the mammary epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Michael C; Monks, Jenifer; Burns, Valerie; Phistry, Meridee; Marians, Russell; Foote, Monica R; Bauman, Dale E; Anderson, Steven M; Neville, Margaret C

    2010-12-01

    The lactating mammary gland synthesizes large amounts of triglyceride from fatty acids derived from the blood and from de novo lipogenesis. The latter is significantly increased at parturition and decreased when additional dietary fatty acids become available. To begin to understand the molecular regulation of de novo lipogenesis, we tested the hypothesis that the transcription factor sterol regulatory element binding factor (SREBF)-1c is a primary regulator of this system. Expression of Srebf1c mRNA and six of its known target genes increased ≥2.5-fold at parturition. However, Srebf1c-null mice showed only minor deficiencies in lipid synthesis during lactation, possibly due to compensation by Srebf1a expression. To abrogate the function of both isoforms of Srebf1, we bred mice to obtain a mammary epithelial cell-specific deletion of SREBF cleavage-activating protein (SCAP), the SREBF escort protein. These dams showed a significant lactation deficiency, and expression of mRNA for fatty acid synthase (Fasn), insulin-induced gene 1 (Insig1), mitochondrial citrate transporter (Slc25a1), and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 2 (Scd2) was reduced threefold or more; however, the mRNA levels of acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1α (Acaca) and ATP citrate lyase (Acly) were unchanged. Furthermore, a 46% fat diet significantly decreased de novo fatty acid synthesis and reduced the protein levels of ACACA, ACLY, and FASN significantly, with no change in their mRNA levels. These data lead us to conclude that two modes of regulation exist to control fatty acid synthesis in the mammary gland of the lactating mouse: the well-known SREBF1 system and a novel mechanism that acts at the posttranscriptional level in the presence of SCAP deletion and high-fat feeding to alter enzyme protein.

  19. [3H]opipramol labels a novel binding site and sigma receptors in rat brain membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, C.D.; Hirsch, D.J.; Brooks, B.P.; Snowman, A.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1991-01-01

    Opipramol (OP), a clinically effective antidepressant with a tricyclic structure, is inactive as an inhibitor of biogenic amine uptake. [ 3 H]Opipramol binds saturably to rat brain membranes (apparent KD = 4 nM, Bmax = 3 pmol/mg of protein). [ 3 H]Opipramol binding can be differentiated into haloperidol-sensitive and -resistant components, with Ki values for haloperidol of 1 nM (Bmax = 1 pmol/mg of protein) and 350 nM (Bmax = 1.9 pmol/mg of protein), respectively. The drug specificity of the haloperidol-sensitive component is the same as that of sigma receptors labeled with (+)-[ 3 H]3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperdine. The haloperidol-resistant component does not correspond to any known neurotransmitter receptor or uptake recognition site. It displays high affinity for phenothiazines and related structures such as perphenazine, clopenthixol, and flupenthixol, whose potencies are comparable to that of opipramol. Because certain of these drugs are more potent at the haloperidol-resistant opipramol site than in exerting any other action, it is possible that this opipramol-selective site may mediate their therapeutic effects

  20. Brain delivery of valproic acid via intranasal administration of nanostructured lipid carriers: in vivo pharmacodynamic studies using rat electroshock model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharareh Eskandari

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Sharareh Eskandari1, Jaleh Varshosaz1, Mohsen Minaiyan2, Majid Tabbakhian11Department of Pharmaceutics, 2Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy and Isfahan Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, IranAbstract: The treatment of brain disorders is one of the greatest challenges in drug delivery because of a variety of main barriers in effective drug transport and maintaining therapeutic concentrations in the brain for a prolonged period. The objective of this study was delivery of valproic acid (VPA to the brain by intranasal route. For this purpose, nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs were prepared by solvent diffusion method followed by ultrasonication and characterized for size, zeta potential, drug-loading percentage, and release. Six groups of rats each containing six animals received drug-loaded NLCs intraperitoneally (IP or intranasally. Brain responses were then examined by using maximal electroshock (MES. The hind limb tonic extension:flexion inhibition ratio was measured at 15-, 30-, 60-, 90-, and 120-minute intervals. The drug concentration was also measured in plasma and brain at the most protective point using gas chromatography method. The particle size of NLCs was 154 ± 16 nm with drug-loading percentage of 47% ± 0.8% and drug release of 75% ± 1.9% after 21 days. In vivo results showed that there was a significant difference between protective effects of NLCs of VPA and control group 15, 30, 60, and 90 minutes after treatment via intranasal route (P < 0.05. Similar protective effect was observed in rats treated with NLCs of VPA in intranasal route and positive control in IP route (P > 0.05. Results of drug determination in brain and plasma showed that brain:plasma concentration ratio was much higher after intranasal administration of NLCs of VPA than the positive control group (IP route. In conclusion, intranasal administration of NLCs of VPA provided a better protection

  1. Evidence that a synthetic amyloid-ß oligomer-binding peptide (ABP) targets amyloid-ß deposits in transgenic mouse brain and human Alzheimer's disease brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Balu; Ito, Shingo; Atkinson, Trevor; Gaudet, Chantal; Ménard, Michel; Brown, Leslie; Whitfield, James

    2014-03-14

    The synthetic ~5 kDa ABP (amyloid-ß binding peptide) consists of a region of the 228 kDa human pericentrioloar material-1 (PCM-1) protein that selectively and avidly binds in vitro Aβ1-42 oligomers, believed to be key co-drivers of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but not monomers (Chakravarthy et al., (2013) [3]). ABP also prevents Aß1-42 from triggering the apoptotic death of cultured human SHSY5Y neuroblasts, likely by sequestering Aß oligomers, suggesting that it might be a potential AD therapeutic. Here we support this possibility by showing that ABP also recognizes and binds Aβ1-42 aggregates in sections of cortices and hippocampi from brains of AD transgenic mice and human AD patients. More importantly, ABP targets Aβ1-42 aggregates when microinjected into the hippocampi of the brains of live AD transgenic mice. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Fine print in isotope effects: the glucose anomeric equilibrium and binding of glucose to human brain hexokinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, B.E; Schramm, V.L.

    2002-01-01

    Binding isotope effects are a sensitive measure of changes in molecular vibrational character that occur during ligand-receptor binding. In this study, we have measured isotope effects on the binding of glucose to human brain hexokinase using the ultrafiltration method, with the following results: 0.991±0.001, 0.908±0.003, 1.010±0.001, 0.974±0.002, 1.022±0.002 for [ 14 C]-glucose mixed with [1- 3 H]-, [2- 3 H]-, [3- 3 H]-, [5- 3 H]-, [6,6- 3 H]-glucose, respectively. Comparing the observed data with isotope effects on the anomeric equilibrium in glucose reported previously proves the existence of binding isotope effects in this system. Preliminary computational results are presented to explain the observed binding isotope effects in terms of hydrogen bond patterns and molecular crowding found in the binary complex of sugar and enzyme. (author)

  3. Water extractable phytochemicals from Capsicum pubescens (tree pepper) inhibit lipid peroxidation induced by different pro-oxidant agents in brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oboh, G [Biochemistry Department, Federal University of Technology, Akure, Ondo State (Nigeria); [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), Campus Universitario - Camobi, Santa Maria RS (Brazil); [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)]. E-mail: goboh2001@yahoo.com; Rocha, J B.T. [Campus Universitario - Camobi, Santa Maria RS (Brazil)

    2006-03-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is the cause of neurodegenerative disorders such as Lou Gehrig's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease; one practical way to prevent and manage neurodegenerative diseases is through the eating of food rich in antioxidants (dietary means). In this study, the antioxidant and neuroprotective properties of aqueous extract of ripe and unripe Capsicum pubescens (popularly known as tree pepper) on different pro-oxidant induced lipid peroxidation in Rat's brain (in vitro) is been investigated. Aqueous extract of freshly harvested pepper was prepared, and the total phenol content, vitamin C, ferric reducing antioxidant property (FRAP) and Fe (II) chelating ability was determined. In addition, the ability of the extracts to protect the Rat's brain against some pro-oxidant FeSO{sub 4}, Sodium nitroprusside and Quinolinic acid - induced oxidative stress was also determined. The results of the study revealed that ripe Capsicum pubescens had a significantly higher (P<0.05) total phenol [ripe (113.7mg/100g), unripe (70.5mg/100g)] content and ferric reducing antioxidant property than the unripe pepper. However, there was no significant difference in the vitamin C [ripe (231.5{mu}g/g), unripe (224.4{mu}g/g)] content and Fe (II) chelating ability. Furthermore, the pepper extracts caused a significant decrease (P<0.05) in 25{mu}M Fe(II), 7{mu}M Sodium Nitroprusside and 1mM Quinolinic acid induced lipid peroxidation in the Rat's brain in a dose-dependent manner. However, the ripe pepper inhibited MDA (Malondialdehyhide) production in the Rat's brain than the unripe pepper. Conversely, both extract did not significantly inhibit Fe (II)/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induced decomposition of deoxyribose. Therefore, ripe and unripe Capsicum pubescens would inhibit lipid peroxidation in vitro. However, the ripe potent was a more potent inhibitor of lipid peroxidation, which is probably due to its higher vitamin C and phenol content, reducing power and Fe

  4. 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding sites in hamster brain membranes: pharmacological characteristics and regional distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, M.J.; Takahashi, J.S.; Dubocovich, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    Studies in a variety of seasonally breeding mammals have shown that melatonin mediates photoperiodic effects on reproduction. Relatively little is known, however, about the site(s) or mechanisms of action of this hormone for inducing reproductive effects. Although binding sites for [3H]melatonin have been reported previously in bovine, rat, and hamster brain, the pharmacological selectivity of these sites was never demonstrated. In the present study, we have characterized binding sites for a new radioligand, 2-[125I]iodomelatonin, in brains from a photoperiodic species, the Syrian hamster. 2-[125I]Iodomelatonin labels a high affinity binding site in hamster brain membranes. Specific binding of 2-[125I]iodomelatonin is rapid, stable, saturable, and reversible. Saturation studies demonstrated that 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binds to a single class of sites with an affinity constant (Kd) of 3.3 +/- 0.5 nM and a total binding capacity (Bmax) of 110.2 +/- 13.4 fmol/mg protein (n = 4). The Kd value determined from kinetic analysis (3.1 +/- 0.9 nM; n = 5) was very similar to that obtained from saturation experiments. Competition experiments showed that the relative order of potency of a variety of indoles for inhibition of 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding site to hamster brain membranes was as follows: 6-chloromelatonin greater than or equal to 2-iodomelatonin greater than N-acetylserotonin greater than or equal to 6-methoxymelatonin greater than or equal to melatonin greater than 6-hydroxymelatonin greater than or equal to 6,7-dichloro-2-methylmelatonin greater than 5-methoxytryptophol greater than 5-methoxytryptamine greater than or equal to 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine greater than N-acetyltryptamine greater than serotonin greater than 5-methoxyindole (inactive)

  5. The Hepatitis C Virus-induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activates the Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) and Regulates Lipid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Steven; Iqbal, Jawed; Sarkar-Dutta, Mehuli; Lane, Samantha; Nagaraj, Abhiram; Ali, Naushad; Waris, Gulam

    2016-02-12

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) relies on host lipids and lipid droplets for replication and morphogenesis. The accumulation of lipid droplets in infected hepatocytes manifests as hepatosteatosis, a common pathology observed in chronic hepatitis C patients. One way by which HCV promotes the accumulation of intracellular lipids is through enhancing de novo lipogenesis by activating the sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs). In general, activation of SREBPs occurs during cholesterol depletion. Interestingly, during HCV infection, the activation of SREBPs occurs under normal cholesterol levels, but the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Our previous study has demonstrated the activation of the inflammasome complex in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells. In this study, we elucidate the potential link between chronic hepatitis C-associated inflammation and alteration of lipid homeostasis in infected cells. Our results reveal that the HCV-activated NLRP3 inflammasome is required for the up-regulation of lipogenic genes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase, fatty acid synthase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase. Using pharmacological inhibitors and siRNA against the inflammasome components (NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD, and caspase-1), we further show that the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role in lipid droplet formation. NLRP3 inflammasome activation in HCV-infected cells enables caspase-1-mediated degradation of insulin-induced gene proteins. This subsequently leads to the transport of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein·SREBP complex from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi, followed by proteolytic activation of SREBPs by S1P and S2P in the Golgi. Typically, inflammasome activation leads to viral clearance. Paradoxically, here we demonstrate how HCV exploits the NLRP3 inflammasome to activate SREBPs and host lipid metabolism, leading to liver disease pathogenesis associated with

  6. Heterogeneous binding of sigma radioligands in the rat brain and liver; Possible relationship to subforms of cytochrome P-450

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, S B [Research Laboratories, Astra Research Centre AB, Soedertaejle (Sweden)

    1991-01-01

    The binding of four sigma receptor ligands, {sup 3}H-(+)-N-allyl-N-normetazocine ({sup 3}H-(+)-SKF 10,047), {sup 3}H-(+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine ({sup 3}H-(+)-3-PPP), {sup 3}H-haloperidol and {sup 3}H-N,N'-di(o-totyl)guanidine ({sup 3}H-DTG), and the cytochrome P450IID6 ligand and dopamine uptake inhibitor {sup 3}H-1-(2-(diphenylmethoxy)ethyl)-4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazine ({sup 3}H-GBR 12935) to membranal preparations of rat liver or whole rat brain was examined regarding kinetical properties and inhibition by various compounds with affinity for sigma binding sites or cytochrome P-450. In rat brain the density of binding sites was increased in order (+)-SKF 10,047<(+)-3-PPPbrain and liver. With the exception of {sup 3}H-(+)-SKF 10,047 there were quite marked differences between the ligands studied. Multiple binding sites were also indicated by the low Hill coefficients found for most of the compounds studied. It was found that the cytochrome P-450 inhibitor proadifen (SKF 525A), like haloperidol, was a potent inhibitor of the binding of {sup 3}H-(+)-SKF 10,047, {sup 3}H-(+)-3-PPP and {sup 3}H-haloperidol to the liver and brain preparations, less active in inhibiting the binding of {sup 3}H-DTG and least effective on the binding of {sup 3}H-GBR 12935. Another cytochrome P-450 inhibitor, L-lobeline, was particularly potent in inhibiting the binding of {sup 3}H-DTG but was also quite potent inhibitor of the binding of the other sigma ligands. It was less potent in inhibiting the binding of {sup 3}H-GBR 12935. The binding of the latter ligand was potently inhibited by the analogous compound GBR 12909 but of the other compounds examined only L-lobeline, proadifen, haloperidol, DTG and (+)-3-PPP had IC50 values below 10 {mu}M. (Abstract Truncated)

  7. The Structural Basis for Lipid and Endotoxin Binding in RP105-MD-1, and Consequences for Regulation of Host Lipopolysaccharide Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Suarez, Maite L; Bond, Peter J

    2016-01-05

    MD-1 is a member of the MD-2-related lipid-recognition (ML) family, and associates with RP105, a cell-surface protein that resembles Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). The RP105⋅MD-1 complex has been proposed to play a role in fine-tuning the innate immune response to endotoxin such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) via TLR4⋅MD-2, but controversy surrounds its mechanism. We have used atomically detailed simulations to reveal the structural basis for ligand binding and consequent functional dynamics of MD-1 and the RP105 complex. We rationalize reports of endogenous phospholipid binding, by showing that they prevent collapse of the malleable MD-1 fold, before refining crystallographic models and uncovering likely binding modes for LPS analogs. Subsequent binding affinity calculations reveal that endotoxin specificity arises from the entropic cost of expanding the MD-1 cavity to accommodate bulky lipid tails, and support the role of MD-1 as a "sink" that sequesters endotoxin from TLR4 and stabilizes RP105/TLR4 interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of gamma emitting receptor-binding radiotracers for imaging the brain and pancreas. Progress report, February 1983-September 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reba, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of measuring the change in receptor concentration as a function of disease by external imaging was investigated. The structure-binding-relationship which provides optimal localization of radiolabelled antagonist of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain was studied. These relationships were also studied with respect to localization in the pancreas

  9. Fenfluramine Reduces [11C]Cimbi-36 Binding to the 5-HT2A Receptor in the Nonhuman Primate Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Kai-Chun; Stepanov, Vladimir; Martinsson, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Background: [11C]Cimbi-36 is a serotonin 2A receptor agonist positron emission tomography radioligand that has recently been examined in humans. The binding of agonist radioligand is expected to be more sensitive to endogenous neurotransmitter concentrations than antagonist radioligands. In the c...... sensitive radioligands. [11C]Cimbi-36 is a promising radioligand to examine serotonin release in the primate brain....

  10. Brain-specific fatty acid-binding protein is elevated in serum of patients with dementia-related diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, C.E.; Veerhuis, R.; de Vente, J.; Verhey, F.R.J.; Vreeling, F.; van Boxtel, M.P.J.; Glatz, J.F.C.; Pelsers, M.A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is a need for biomarkers in accessible matrices, such as blood, for the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this study was to measure the serum levels of brain-type fatty acid-binding protein (FABP) and heart-type FABP in patients with dementia-involving diseases.

  11. Oxygen Mapping within Healthy and Acutely Infarcted Brain Tissue in Humans Using the NMR Relaxation of Lipids: A Proof-Of-Concept Translational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliez, Florence; Safronova, Marta M; Magat, Julie; Joudiou, Nicolas; Peeters, André P; Jordan, Bénédicte F; Gallez, Bernard; Duprez, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The clinical applicability of brain oxygenation mapping using the MOBILE (Mapping of Oxygen By Imaging Lipids relaxation Enhancement) magnetic resonance (MR) technique was assessed in the clinical setting of normal brain and of acute cerebral ischemia as a founding proof-of-concept translational study. Changes in the oxygenation level within healthy brain tissue can be detected by analyzing the spin-lattice proton relaxation ('Global T1' combining water and lipid protons) because of the paramagnetic properties of molecular oxygen. It was hypothesized that selective measurement of the relaxation of the lipid protons ('Lipids T1') would result in enhanced sensitivity of pO2 mapping because of higher solubility of oxygen in lipids than in water, and this was demonstrated in pre-clinical models using the MOBILE technique. In the present study, 12 healthy volunteers and eight patients with acute (48-72 hours) brain infarction were examined with the same clinical 3T MR system. Both Lipids R1 (R1 = 1/T1) and Global R1 were significantly different in the infarcted area and the contralateral unaffected brain tissue, with a higher statistical significance for Lipids R1 (median difference: 0.408 s-1; pbrain tissue of stroke patients were not significantly different from the R1 values calculated in the brain tissue of healthy volunteers. The main limitations of the present prototypic version of the MOBILE sequence are the long acquisition time (4 min), hampering robustness of data in uncooperative patients, and a 2 mm slice thickness precluding accurate measurements in small infarcts because of partial volume averaging effects.

  12. Inhibition of [11C]mirtazapine binding by alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists studied by positron emission tomography in living porcine brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Donald F; Dyve, Suzan; Minuzzi, Luciano

    2006-01-01

    Inhibition of [11C]mirtazapine binding by alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists studied by positron emission tomography in living porcine brain......Inhibition of [11C]mirtazapine binding by alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists studied by positron emission tomography in living porcine brain...

  13. Oxytocin receptor ligand binding in embryonic tissue and postnatal brain development of the C57BL/6J mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth eHammock

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin (OXT has drawn increasing attention as a developmentally relevant neuropeptide given its role in the brain regulation of social behavior. It has been suggested that OXT plays an important role in the infant brain during caregiver attachment in nurturing familial contexts, but there is incomplete experimental evidence. Mouse models of OXT system genes have been particularly informative for the role of the OXT system in social behavior, however, the developing brain areas that could respond to ligand activation of the OXT receptor (OXTR have yet to be identified in this species. Here we report new data revealing dynamic ligand-binding distribution of OXTR in the developing mouse brain. Using male and female C57BL/6J mice at postnatal days (P 0, 7, 14, 21, 35, and 60 we quantified OXTR ligand binding in several brain areas which changed across development. Further, we describe OXTR ligand binding in select tissues of the near-term whole embryo at E18.5. Together, these data aid in the interpretation of findings in mouse models of the OXT system and generate new testable hypotheses for developmental roles for OXT in mammalian systems. We discuss our findings in the context of developmental disorders (including autism, attachment biology, and infant physiological regulation.

  14. Inhibition of HCV replication by oxysterol-binding protein-related protein 4 (ORP4 through interaction with HCV NS5B and alteration of lipid droplet formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Woo Park

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA replication involves complex interactions among the 3'x RNA element within the HCV 3' untranslated region, viral and host proteins. However, many of the host proteins remain unknown. In this study, we devised an RNA affinity chromatography /2D/MASS proteomics strategy and identified nine putative 3' X-associated host proteins; among them is oxysterol-binding protein-related protein 4 (ORP4, a cytoplasmic receptor for oxysterols. We determined the relationship between ORP4 expression and HCV replication. A very low level of constitutive ORP4 expression was detected in hepatocytes. Ectopically expressed ORP4 was detected in the endoplasmic reticulum and inhibited luciferase reporter gene expression in HCV subgenomic replicon cells and HCV core expression in JFH-1-infected cells. Expression of ORP4S, an ORP4 variant that lacked the N-terminal pleckstrin-homology domain but contained the C-terminal oxysterol-binding domain also inhibited HCV replication, pointing to an important role of the oxysterol-binding domain in ORP4-mediated inhibition of HCV replication. ORP4 was found to associate with HCV NS5B and its expression led to inhibition of the NS5B activity. ORP4 expression had little effect on intracellular lipid synthesis and secretion, but it induced lipid droplet formation in the context of HCV replication. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ORP4 is a negative regulator of HCV replication, likely via interaction with HCV NS5B in the replication complex and regulation of intracellular lipid homeostasis. This work supports the important role of lipids and their metabolism in HCV replication and pathogenesis.

  15. Solid lipid nanoparticles carrying chemotherapeutic drug across the blood-brain barrier through insulin receptor-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yung-Chih; Shih-Huang, Chun-Yuan

    2013-09-01

    Carmustine (BCNU)-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) were grafted with 83-14 monoclonal antibody (MAb) (83-14 MAb/BCNU-SLNs) and applied to the brain-targeting delivery. Human brain-microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) incubated with 83-14 MAb/BCNU-SLNs were stained to demonstrate the interaction between the nanocarriers and expressed insulin receptors (IRs). The results revealed that the particle size of 83-14 MAb/BCNU-SLNs decreased with an increasing weight percentage of Dynasan 114 (DYN). Storage at 4 °C for 6 weeks slightly deformed the colloidal morphology. In addition, poloxamer 407 on 83-14 MAb/BCNU-SLNs induced cytotoxicity to RAW264.7 cells and inhibited phagocytosis by RAW264.7 cells. An increase in the weight percentage of DYN from 0% to 67% slightly reduced the viability of RAW264.7 cells and promoted phagocytosis. Moreover, the transport ability of 83-14 MAb/BCNU-SLNs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro enhanced with an increasing weight percentage of Tween 80. 83-14 MAb on MAb/BCNU-SLNs stimulated endocytosis by HBMECs via IRs and enhanced the permeability of BCNU across the BBB. 83-14 MAb/BCNU-SLNs can be a promising antitumor drug delivery system for transporting BCNU to the brain.

  16. Transferrin-tailored solid lipid nanoparticles as vectors for site-specific delivery of temozolomide to brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Aviral, E-mail: draviraljain@gmail.com; Singhai, Priyanka; Gurnany, Ekta; Updhayay, Satish; Mody, Nishi [Adina Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Pharmaceutics Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutics (India)

    2013-03-15

    Blood-brain barrier restricts the uptake of many important hydrophilic drugs and limits their efficacy in the treatment of brain diseases because of the presence of tight junctions, high metabolic capacity, low pinocytic vesicular traffic, and efficient efflux mechanisms. In the present project, transferrin (Tf)-conjugated solid lipid nanoparticles (Tf-SLNs) were investigated for their ability to deliver temozolomide (TMZ) to the brain. SLNs were prepared by an ethanol injection method using hydrogenated soya phosphatidylcholine, triolein, cholesterol and distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine. Conjugation of SLNs with Tf was achieved by incubation of Tf with TMZ-loaded SLNs in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4) as a cross linker. SLNs preparation were characterized for particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, surface morphology, percent drug entrapment efficiency, in vitro drug release, and hemolytic toxicity studies. In vitro cytotoxicity studies were performed on human cancer cell lines. The average size was found to be 221 {+-} 3.22 nm with entrapment efficiency of 69.83 {+-} 2.52 and 249 {+-} 2.61 nm with entrapment efficiency decreased to 64.21 {+-} 2.27 % for unconjugated SLNs and Tf-SLNs, respectively. Fluorescence studies revealed the enhanced uptake of Tf-SLNs in brain tissue compared with unconjugated SLNs.

  17. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen on lipid peroxidation and visual development in neonatal rats with hypoxia-ischemia brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Chen, Yan-Hui; Lv, Hong-Yan; Chen, Li-Ting

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) on lipid peroxidation and visual development in a neonatal rat model of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD). The rat models of HIBD were established by delayed uterus dissection and were divided randomly into two groups (10 rats each): HIBD and HBO-treated HIBD (HIBD+HBO) group. Another 20 rats that underwent sham-surgery were also divided randomly into the HBO-treated and control groups. The rats that underwent HBO treatment received HBO (0.02 MPa, 1 h/day) 24 h after the surgery and this continued for 14 days. When rats were 4 weeks old, their flash visual evoked potentials (F-VEPs) were monitored and the ultrastructures of the hippocampus were observed under transmission electron microscope. The levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malonyldialdehyde (MDA) in the brain tissue homogenate were detected by xanthine oxidase and the thiobarbituric acid colorimetric method. Compared with the control group, the ultrastructures of the pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA3 area were distorted, the latencies of F-VEPs were prolonged (P0.05). HBO enhances antioxidant capacity and reduces the ultrastructural damage induced by hypoxic-ischemia, which may improve synaptic reconstruction and alleviate immature brain damage to promote the habilitation of brain function.

  18. Transferrin-tailored solid lipid nanoparticles as vectors for site-specific delivery of temozolomide to brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Aviral; Singhai, Priyanka; Gurnany, Ekta; Updhayay, Satish; Mody, Nishi

    2013-03-01

    Blood-brain barrier restricts the uptake of many important hydrophilic drugs and limits their efficacy in the treatment of brain diseases because of the presence of tight junctions, high metabolic capacity, low pinocytic vesicular traffic, and efficient efflux mechanisms. In the present project, transferrin (Tf)-conjugated solid lipid nanoparticles (Tf-SLNs) were investigated for their ability to deliver temozolomide (TMZ) to the brain. SLNs were prepared by an ethanol injection method using hydrogenated soya phosphatidylcholine, triolein, cholesterol and distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine. Conjugation of SLNs with Tf was achieved by incubation of Tf with TMZ-loaded SLNs in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4) as a cross linker. SLNs preparation were characterized for particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, surface morphology, percent drug entrapment efficiency, in vitro drug release, and hemolytic toxicity studies. In vitro cytotoxicity studies were performed on human cancer cell lines. The average size was found to be 221 ± 3.22 nm with entrapment efficiency of 69.83 ± 2.52 and 249 ± 2.61 nm with entrapment efficiency decreased to 64.21 ± 2.27 % for unconjugated SLNs and Tf-SLNs, respectively. Fluorescence studies revealed the enhanced uptake of Tf-SLNs in brain tissue compared with unconjugated SLNs.

  19. Developmental changes of protein, RNA, DNA, lipid, and glycogen in the liver, skeletal muscle, and brain of the piglet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakkarainen, J.

    1975-01-01

    A scheme for the sequential quantitative separation and determination of protein, RNA, DNA, lipid, and glycogen from rat-liver homogenate is modified for application to frozen tissues of the piglet. The biochemical methods, including the biuret method, used in the present investigation are described and thoroughly checked. The effects of freezing and storage on the recovery of major tissue constituents are recorded. The modified scheme is applied to the determination of protein, RNA, DNA, lipid, and glycogen in the liver, skeletal muscle, and brain of the developing piglet. Developmental changes for these major tissue constituents, including the biuret protein, are described with special reference to protein synthesis and physiology of growth at the cellular level from 45 days of foetal age to 35-42 days of postnatal age for liver and skeletal muscle, and from birth to 31-40 days of postnatal age for the cerebrum and cerebellum. The uniformly labelled amino acid, 14 C-L-leucine, is used to study protein synthesis. Developmental patterns of labelling of protein and lipid in the liver, skeletal muscle, cerebrum, and cerebellum of the piglet from birth up to the age of two weeks are described. The results of the methodological, developmental, and experimental studies are thoroughly discussed in the light of the relevant literature and compared with those obtained in developmental and experimental studies on rats and other mammal species. (author)

  20. Differences between high-affinity forskolin binding sites in dopamine-riche and other regions of rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poat, J.A.; Cripps, H.E.; Iversen, L.L.

    1988-01-01

    Forskolin labelled with [ 3 H] bound to high- and low-affinity sites in the rat brain. The high-affinity site was discretely located, with highest densities in the striatum, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercule, substantia nigra, hippocampus, and the molecular layers of the cerebellum. This site did not correlate well with the distribution of adenylate cyclase. The high-affinity striatal binding site may be associated with a stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein. Thus, the number of sites was increased by the addition of Mg 2+ and guanylyl imidodiphosphate. Cholera toxin stereotaxically injected into rat striatum increased the number of binding sites, and no further increase was noted following the subsequent addition of guanyl nucleotide. High-affinity forskolin binding sites in non-dopamine-rich brain areas (hippocampus and cerebullum) were modulated in a qualitatively different manner by guanyl nucleotides. In these areas the number of binding sites was significantly reduced by the addition of guanyl nucleotide. These results suggest that forskolin may have a potential role in identifying different functional/structural guanine nucleotide-binding proteins

  1. Identification and properties of very high affinity brain membrane-binding sites for a neurotoxic phospholipase from the taipan venom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambeau, G.; Barhanin, J.; Schweitz, H.; Qar, J.; Lazdunski, M. (Centre de Biochimie, Nice (France))

    1989-07-05

    Four new monochain phospholipases were purified from the Oxyuranus scutellatus (taipan) venom. Three of them were highly toxic when injected into mice brain. One of these neurotoxic phospholipases, OS2, was iodinated and used in binding experiments to demonstrate the presence of two families of specific binding sites in rat brain synaptic membranes. The affinities were exceptionally high, Kd1 = 1.5 +/- 0.5 pM and Kd2 = 45 +/- 10 pM, and the maximal binding capacities were Bmax 1 = 1 +/- 0.4 and Bmax 2 = 3 +/- 0.5 pmol/mg of protein. Both binding sites were sensitive to proteolysis and demonstrated to be located on proteins of Mr 85,000-88,000 and 36,000-51,000 by cross-linking and photoaffinity labeling techniques. The binding of {sup 125}I-OS2 to synaptic membranes was dependent on Ca2+ ions and enhanced by Zn2+ ions which inhibit phospholipase activity. Competition experiments have shown that, except for beta-bungarotoxin, a number of known toxic snake or bee phospholipases have very high affinities for the newly identified binding sites. A good correlation (r = 0.80) was observed between toxicity and affinity but not between phospholipase activity and affinity.

  2. Identification and properties of very high affinity brain membrane-binding sites for a neurotoxic phospholipase from the taipan venom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambeau, G.; Barhanin, J.; Schweitz, H.; Qar, J.; Lazdunski, M.

    1989-01-01

    Four new monochain phospholipases were purified from the Oxyuranus scutellatus (taipan) venom. Three of them were highly toxic when injected into mice brain. One of these neurotoxic phospholipases, OS2, was iodinated and used in binding experiments to demonstrate the presence of two families of specific binding sites in rat brain synaptic membranes. The affinities were exceptionally high, Kd1 = 1.5 +/- 0.5 pM and Kd2 = 45 +/- 10 pM, and the maximal binding capacities were Bmax 1 = 1 +/- 0.4 and Bmax 2 = 3 +/- 0.5 pmol/mg of protein. Both binding sites were sensitive to proteolysis and demonstrated to be located on proteins of Mr 85,000-88,000 and 36,000-51,000 by cross-linking and photoaffinity labeling techniques. The binding of 125 I-OS2 to synaptic membranes was dependent on Ca2+ ions and enhanced by Zn2+ ions which inhibit phospholipase activity. Competition experiments have shown that, except for beta-bungarotoxin, a number of known toxic snake or bee phospholipases have very high affinities for the newly identified binding sites. A good correlation (r = 0.80) was observed between toxicity and affinity but not between phospholipase activity and affinity

  3. Interaction of red pepper (Capsicum annum, Tepin) polyphenols with Fe(II)-induced lipid peroxidation in brain and liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oboh, G.; Rocha, J.B.T.

    2006-03-01

    Polyphenols exhibit a wide range of biological effects because of their antioxidant properties. Several types of polyphenols (phenolic acids, hydrolyzable tannins, and flavonoids) show anticarcinogenic and antimutagenic effects. Comparative studies were carried on the protective ability of free and bound polyphenol extracts of red Capsicum annuum Tepin (CAT) on brain and liver - In vitro. Free polyphenols of red Capsicum annuum Tepin (CAT) were extracted with 80% acetone, while the bound polyphenols were extracted with ethyl acetate from acid and alkaline hydrolysis of the pepper residue from free polyphenols extract. The phenol content, Fe (II) chelating ability, OH radical scavenging ability and protective ability of the extract against Fe (II)-induced lipid peroxidation in brain and liver was subsequently determined. The results of the study revealed that the free polyphenols (218.2mg/100g) content of the pepper were significantly higher than the bound polyphenols (42.5mg/100g). Furthermore, the free polyphenol extract had a significantly higher ( 2+ induced lipid peroxidation, and this is probably due to the higher Fe (II) chelating ability and OH radical scavenging ability of the free polyphenols from the pepper. (author)

  4. Schistosoma mansoni venom allergen-like protein 4 (SmVAL4) is a novel lipid-binding SCP/TAPS protein that lacks the prototypical CAP motifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelleher, Alan [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Darwiche, Rabih [University of Fribourg, Chemin du Musée 10, CH 1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Rezende, Wanderson C. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Farias, Leonardo P.; Leite, Luciana C. C. [Instituto Butantan, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Schneiter, Roger [University of Fribourg, Chemin du Musée 10, CH 1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Asojo, Oluwatoyin A., E-mail: asojo@bcm.edu [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The first structure of an S. mansoni venom allergen-like protein is presented. Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease that affects over 200 million people. Vaccine candidates have been identified, including Schistosoma mansoni venom allergen-like proteins (SmVALs) from the SCP/TAPS (sperm-coating protein/Tpx/antigen 5/pathogenesis related-1/Sc7) superfamily. The first SmVAL structure, SmVAL4, was refined to a resolution limit of 2.16 Å. SmVAL4 has a unique structure that could not be predicted from homologous structures, with longer loops and an unusual C-terminal extension. SmVAL4 has the characteristic α/β-sandwich and central SCP/TAPS cavity. Furthermore, SmVAL4 has only one of the signature CAP cavity tetrad amino-acid residues and is missing the histidines that coordinate divalent cations such as Zn{sup 2+} in other SCP/TAPS proteins. SmVAL4 has a cavity between α-helices 1 and 4 that was observed to bind lipids in tablysin-15, suggesting the ability to bind lipids. Subsequently, SmVAL4 was shown to bind cholesterol in vitro. Additionally, SmVAL4 was shown to complement the in vivo sterol-export phenotype of yeast mutants lacking their endogenous CAP proteins. Expression of SmVAL4 in yeast cells lacking endogenous CAP function restores the block in sterol export. These studies suggest an evolutionarily conserved lipid-binding function shared by CAP proteins such as SmVAL4 and yeast CAP proteins such as Pry1.

  5. Biochemical studies of mouse brain tubulin: colchicine binding (DEAE-cellulose filter) assay and subunits (α and β) biosynthesis and degradation (in newborn brain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tse, C.F.

    1978-01-01

    A DEAE-cellulose filter assay, measuring [ 3 H]colchicine bound to colchicine binding protein (CBP) absorbed on filter discs, has been modified to include lM sucrose in the incubation medium for complexing colchicine to CBP in samples before applying the samples to filter discs (single point assay). Due to the much greater stability of colchicine binding capacity in the presence of lM sucrose, multiple time-point assays and least squares linear regression analysis were not necessary for accurate determination of CBP in hybrid mouse brain at different stages of development. The highest concentrations of CBP were observed in the 160,000g supernatant and pellet of newborn brain homogenate. Further studies of the modified filter assay documented that the assay has an overall counting efficiency of 27.3%, that DEAE-cellulose filters bind and retain all tubulin in the assay samples, and that one molecule of colchicine binds approximately one molecule of tubulin dimer. Therefore, millimoles of colchicine bound per milligram total protein can be used to calculate tubulin content. With this technique tubulin content of brain supernatant was found to be 11.9% for newborn, and 7.15% for 11 month old mice. Quantitative densitometry was also used to measure mouse brain supernatant actin content for these two stages. In vivo synthesis and degradation rates of tubulin α and β subunits of two day mouse brain 100,000g supernatant were studied after intracerebral injection of [ 3 H]leucine. Quantitative changes of the ratio of tritium specific activities of tubulin α and β subunits with time were determined. The pattern of change was biphasic. During the first phase the ratio decreased; during the second phase the ratio increased continuously. An interpretation consistent with all the data in this study is that the α subunit is synthesized at a more rapid rate than the β subunit

  6. Biochemical studies of mouse brain tubulin: colchicine binding (DEAE-cellulose filter) assay and subunits ( α and β) biosynthesis and degradation (in newborn brain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tse, Cek-Fyne [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1978-01-01

    A DEAE-cellulose filter assay, measuring (3H)colchicine bound to colchicine binding protein (CBP) absorbed on filter discs, has been modified to include lM sucrose in the incubation medium for complexing colchicine to CBP in samples before applying the samples to filter discs (single point assay). Due to the much greater stability of colchicine binding capacity in the presence of lM sucrose, multiple time-point assays and least squares linear regression analysis were not necessary for accurate determination of CBP in hybrid mouse brain at different stages of development. The highest concentrations of CBP were observed in the 160,000g supernatant and pellet of newborn brain homogenate. Further studies of the modified filter assay documented that the assay has an overall counting efficiency of 27.3%, that DEAE-cellulose filters bind and retain all tubulin in the assay samples, and that one molecule of colchicine binds approximately one molecule of tubulin dimer. Therefore, millimoles of colchicine bound per milligram total protein can be used to calculate tubulin content. With this technique tubulin content of brain supernatant was found to be 11.9% for newborn, and 7.15% for 11 month old mice. Quantitative densitometry was also used to measure mouse brain supernatant actin content for these two stages. In vivo synthesis and degradation rates of tubulin ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of two day mouse brain 100,000g supernatant were studied after intracerebral injection of (3H)leucine. Quantitative changes of the ratio of tritium specific activities of tubulin ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits with time were determined. The pattern of change was biphasic. During the first phase the ratio decreased; during the second phase the ratio increased continuously. An interpretation consistent with all the data in this study is that the ..cap alpha.. subunit is synthesized at a more rapid rate than the ..beta.. subunit. (ERB)

  7. (/sup 3/H)diprenorphine binding to kappa-sites in guinea-pig and rat brain: Evidence for apparent heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, M.S.; Traynor, J.R.

    1989-07-01

    The binding of the unselective opioid antagonist (/sup 3/H)diprenorphine to homogenates prepared from rat brain and from guinea-pig brain and cerebellum has been studied in HEPES buffer containing 10 mM Mg2+ ions. Sequential displacement of bound (/sup 3/H)diprenorphine by ligands with selectivity for mu-, delta-, and kappa-opioid receptors uncovers the multiple components of binding. In the presence of cold ligands that occupy all mu-, delta-, and kappa-sites, opioid binding still remains. This binding represents 20% of total specific sites and is displaced by naloxone. The nature of these undefined opioid binding sites is discussed.

  8. Temperature dependence and GABA modulation of [3H]triazolam binding in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, M.E.; Concas, A.; Wamsley, J.K.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1987-01-01

    The hypnotic triazolam (TZ), a triazolobenzodiazepine displays a short physiological half life and has been used for the treatment of insomnia related to anxiety states. The authors major objectives were the direct measurement of the temperature dependence and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) effect of [ 3 H]TZ binding in the rat brain. Saturation studies showed a shift to lower affinity with increasing temperatures (K/sub d/ = 0.27 +/- 08 nM at 0 0 C; K/sub d/ = 1.96 +/- 0.85 nM at 37 0 C) while the B/sub max/ values remained unchanged (1220 +/- 176 fmoles/mg protein at 0 0 C and 1160 +/- 383 fmoles/mg protein at 37 0 C). Saturation studies of [ 3 H]TZ binding in the presence or absence of GABA (100μM) showed a GABA-shift. At 0 0 C the K/sub d/ values were (K/sub d/ = 0.24 +/- 0.03 nM/-GABA; K/sub d/ = 0.16 +/- 0.04/+GABA) and at 37 0 C the K/sub d/ values were (K/sub d/ = 1.84 +/- 0.44 nM/-GABA; K/sub d/ = 0.95 +/- 0.29 nM/+GABA). In contrast to reported literature, the authors findings show that TZ interacts with benzodiazepine receptors with a temperature dependence and GABA-shift consistent with predicted behavior for benzodiazepine agonists. 20 references, 3 tables

  9. Analysis of zinc oxide nanoparticles binding proteins in rat blood and brain homogenate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shim KH

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Kyu Hwan Shim,1 John Hulme,1 Eun Ho Maeng,2 Meyoung-Kon Kim,3 Seong Soo A An1 1Department of Bionano Technology, Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gachon University, Sungnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea; 2Department of Analysis, KTR, Kimpo, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea; 3Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University Medical School and College, Seoul, South Korea Abstract: Nanoparticles (NPs are currently used in chemical, cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and electronic products. Nevertheless, limited safety information is available for many NPs, especially in terms of their interactions with various binding proteins, leading to potential toxic effects. Zinc oxide (ZnO NPs are included in the formulation of new products, such as adhesives, batteries, ceramics, cosmetics, cement, glass, ointments, paints, pigments, and supplementary foods, resulting in increased human exposures to ZnO. Hence, we investigated the potential ZnO nanotoxic pathways by analyzing the adsorbed proteins, called protein corona, from blood and brain from four ZnO NPs, ZnOSM20(-, ZnOSM20(+, ZnOAE100(-, and ZnOAE100(+, in order to understand their potential mechanisms in vivo. Through this study, liquid chromatography–mass spectroscopy/mass spectroscopy technology was employed to identify all bound proteins. Totals of 52 and 58 plasma proteins were identified as being bound to ZnOSM20(- and ZnOSM20(+, respectively. For ZnOAE100(- and ZnOAE100(+, 58 and 44 proteins were bound, respectively. Similar numbers of proteins were adsorbed onto ZnO irrespective of size or surface charge of the nanoparticle. These proteins were further analyzed with ClueGO, a Cytoscape plugin, which provided gene ontology and the biological interaction processes of identified proteins. Interactions between diverse proteins and ZnO nanoparticles could result in an alteration of their functions, conformation, and clearance, eventually affecting many biological processes. Keywords: brain

  10. Lipid rafts regulate PCB153-induced disruption of occludin and brain endothelial barrier function through protein phosphatase 2A and matrix metalloproteinase-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eum, Sung Yong, E-mail: seum@miami.edu; Jaraki, Dima; András, Ibolya E.; Toborek, Michal

    2015-09-15

    Occludin is an essential integral transmembrane protein regulating tight junction (TJ) integrity in brain endothelial cells. Phosphorylation of occludin is associated with its localization to TJ sites and incorporation into intact TJ assembly. The present study is focused on the role of lipid rafts in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced disruption of occludin and endothelial barrier function. Exposure of human brain endothelial cells to 2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) induced dephosphorylation of threonine residues of occludin and displacement of occludin from detergent-resistant membrane (DRM)/lipid raft fractions within 1 h. Moreover, lipid rafts modulated the reduction of occludin level through activation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) after 24 h PCB153 treatment. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity by okadaic acid or fostriecin markedly protected against PCB153-induced displacement of occludin and increased permeability of endothelial cells. The implication of lipid rafts and PP2A signaling in these processes was further defined by co-immunoprecipitation of occludin with PP2A and caveolin-1, a marker protein of lipid rafts. Indeed, a significant MMP-2 activity was observed in lipid rafts and was increased by exposure to PCB153. The pretreatment of MMP-2 inhibitors protected against PCB153-induced loss of occludin and disruption of lipid raft structure prevented the increase of endothelial permeability. Overall, these results indicate that lipid raft-associated processes, such as PP2A and MMP-2 activation, participate in PCB153-induced disruption of occludin function in brain endothelial barrier. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to brain endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to exposure to environmental pollutants, such as ortho-substituted PCBs. - Highlights: • PCB153 disturbed human brain endothelial barrier through disruption of occludin. • Lipid raft-associated PP

  11. Quantitative in vivo detection of brain cell death after hypoxia ischemia using the lipid peak at 1.3 ppm of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, So Yoon; Yoo, Hye Soo; Lee, Jang Hoon; Sung, Dong Kyung; Jung, Yu Jin; Sung, Se In; Lim, Keun Ho; Chang, Yun Sil; Lee, Jung Hee; Kim, Ki Soo; Park, Won Soon

    2013-07-01

    This study was performed to determine the accuracy of proton magnetic spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) lipid peak as a noninvasive tool for quantitative in vivo detection of brain cell death. Seven day-old Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to 8% oxygen following a unilateral carotid artery ligation. For treatment, cycloheximide was given immediately after hypoxic ischemia (HI). Lipid peak was measured using (1)H-MRS at 24 hr after HI, and then brains were harvested for fluorocytometric analyses with annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) and fluorescent probe JC-1, and for adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) and lactate. Increased lipid peak at 1.3 ppm measured with (1)H-MRS, apoptotic and necrotic cells, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ) at 24 hr after HI were significantly improved with cycloheximide treatment. Significantly reduced brain ATP and increased lactate levels observed at 24 hr after HI showed a tendency to improve without statistical significance with cycloheximide treatment. Lipid peak at 1.3 ppm showed significant positive correlation with both apoptotic and necrotic cells and loss of ΔΨ, and negative correlation with normal live cells. Lipid peak at 1.3 ppm measured by (1)H-MRS might be a sensitive and reliable diagnostic tool for quantitative in vivo detection of brain cell death after HI.

  12. Cultured bovine brain capillary endothelial cells (BBCEC) - a blood-brain barrier model for studying the binding and internalization of insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, B.T.; Borchardt, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    Cultured bovine brain capillary endothelial cells (BBCEC) have previously been reported by their laboratory as a working model for studying nutrient and drug transport and metabolism at the blood-brain barrier. In the present study, they have utilized this culture system to investigate the binding and internalization of [ 125 I]-labelled insulin (INS) and insulin-like growth factor 1(IGF-1) by BBCEC. After 2 hrs at 23 0 C, the specific binding of INS and IGF-1 was 1.6% and 13.6%, respectively. At 37 0 C, the maximum specific binding was 0.9% for INS and 5.8% for IGF-1. Using an acid-wash technique to assess peptide internalization, it was observed that, at 37 0 C, approximately 60% of the bound INS rapidly became resistant to acid treatment, a value which was constant over 2 hr. With IGF-1, a similar proportion of the bound material, 62%, became resistant by 30 min, but subsequently decreased to 45% by 2 hr. Scatchard analysis of competitive binding studies indicated the presence of two binding sites for each protein, having K/sub d/'s of 0.82 nM and 19.2 nM for INS and 0.39 nM and 3.66 nM for IGF-1. Little change in the amount of INS binding was observed over a four-day interval as the cultures became a confluent monolayer. The present report of binding and internalization of these proteins suggests that the BBCEC may utilize a receptor-mediated process to internalize and/or transport (transcytosis) INS and IGF-1 from the circulation

  13. Opiate antagonist binding sites in discrete brain regions of spontaneously hypertensive and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmani, N.H.; Gulati, A.; Bhargava, H.N.

    1991-01-01

    The binding of 3 H-naltrexone, an opiate receptor antagonist, to membranes of discrete brain regions and spinal cord of 10 week old spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats was determined. The brain regions examined were hypothalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, corpus striatum, pons and medulla, midbrain and cortex. 3 H-Naltrexone bound to membranes of brain regions and spinal cord at a single high affinity site with an apparent dissociation constant value of 3 nM. The highest density of 3 H-naltrexone binding sites were in hippocampus and lowest in the cerebral cortex. The receptor density (B max value) and apparent dissociation constant (K d value) values of 3 H-naltrexone to bind to opiate receptors on the membranes of amygdala, hippocampus, corpus striatum, pons and medulla, midgrain, cortex and spinal cord of WKY and SHR rates did not differ. The B max value of 3 H-naltrexone binding to membranes of hypothalamus of SHR rates was 518% higher than WKY rats but the K d values in the two strains did not differ. It is concluded that SHR rats have higher density of opiate receptors labeled with 3 H-naltrexone in the hypothalamus only, in comparison with WKY rats, and that such a difference in the density of opiate receptors may be related to the elevated blood pressure in SHR rats

  14. Opiate antagonist binding sites in discrete brain regions of spontaneously hypertensive and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmani, N.H.; Gulati, A.; Bhargava, H.N. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The binding of {sup 3}H-naltrexone, an opiate receptor antagonist, to membranes of discrete brain regions and spinal cord of 10 week old spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats was determined. The brain regions examined were hypothalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, corpus striatum, pons and medulla, midbrain and cortex. {sup 3}H-Naltrexone bound to membranes of brain regions and spinal cord at a single high affinity site with an apparent dissociation constant value of 3 nM. The highest density of {sup 3}H-naltrexone binding sites were in hippocampus and lowest in the cerebral cortex. The receptor density (B{sub max}value) and apparent dissociation constant (K{sub d} value) values of {sup 3}H-naltrexone to bind to opiate receptors on the membranes of amygdala, hippocampus, corpus striatum, pons and medulla, midgrain, cortex and spinal cord of WKY and SHR rates did not differ. The B{sub max} value of {sup 3}H-naltrexone binding to membranes of hypothalamus of SHR rates was 518% higher than WKY rats but the K{sub d} values in the two strains did not differ. It is concluded that SHR rats have higher density of opiate receptors labeled with {sup 3}H-naltrexone in the hypothalamus only, in comparison with WKY rats, and that such a difference in the density of opiate receptors may be related to the elevated blood pressure in SHR rats.

  15. Tailoring Lipid and Polymeric Nanoparticles as siRNA Carriers towards the Blood-Brain Barrier – from Targeting to Safe Administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomes, Maria João; Fernandes, Carlos; Martins, Susana

    2017-01-01

    . The interaction of modified nanoparticles with brain endothelial cells increased 3-fold compared to non-modified lipid nanoparticles, and 4-fold compared to non-modified PLGA nanoparticles, respectively. These nanosystems, which were also demonstrated to be safe for human brain endothelial cells, without...... and efficient delivery to its target, two different nanoparticles platforms, solid lipid (SLN) and poly-lactic-co-glycolic (PLGA) nanoparticles were used in this study. Polymeric PLGA nanoparticles were around 115 nm in size and had 50 % of siRNA association efficiency, while SLN presented 150 nm...

  16. Methodological issues in protein and lipidic expressions in brain tissue exposed to Co{sup 60} based on DESI/MALDI-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Matheus F.; Campos, Tarcísio P.R.; Augusti, Rodinei, E-mail: matheus.soares@gmail.com, E-mail: tprcampos@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: augusti.rodinei@gmail.com, E-mail: augusti@ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Eberlin, Marcos N.; Vendramini, Pedro H., E-mail: eberlin@iqm.unicamp.br, E-mail: ph_vendramini@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Thompson Mass Spectroscopy Laboratory

    2017-07-01

    The present paper attempts to present some issues in the methodology of identifying lipid and protein changes in brain tissue induced by radiation. The goal was to address the analysis of the methodology and to investigate the feasibility of the generation of lipid/protein profiles of irradiated brain tissue, in order to identify radioinduced changes. Lipids and proteins are biomolecules with diverse structures and functionalities that participate in important intracellular processes. Changes in the lipid and the tissue protein profiles may indicate a cellular response to an external stimulus as well as the emergence of neoplasms or neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. DESI-MS is a convenient method for identifying lipids and their spatial distribution in tissue beyond analytical quantification. DESI-MS allows the creation of an image of several low lipid m/z classes. MALDI-MS has already been a method used in the study of macromolecules as structural, membrane, hormone, neuromediator and immunological peptides. Through a full-scan matrix scan, with a m/z spectrum between 500-1000 for lipids and with a mass spectrum of 1000-15000 Da for proteins, the molecular profile can be analyzed. Generated pixel shape 2D chemical image. The produced image allows to associate the tissue distribution of the lipids and proteins with their chemical profile identified, allowing the verification of the changes radioinduced. Radiation triggers intense oxidative stress by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and free radicals, causing DNA damage with consequent alterations in proteomics and cellular lipid explaining such changes in the lipid and protein expressions. The cellular morphophysiological changes are responsible for both the clonogenic inhibition and the induction of the apoptotic process. The images's production was directly dependent on the rigorous execution of the methodological procedures. Innumerable interferences could impair the image

  17. Prevalence, specificity and determinants of lipid-interacting PDZ domains from an in-cell screen and in vitro binding experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ylva Ivarsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: PDZ domains are highly abundant protein-protein interaction modules involved in the wiring of protein networks. Emerging evidence indicates that some PDZ domains also interact with phosphoinositides (PtdInsPs, important regulators of cell polarization and signaling. Yet our knowledge on the prevalence, specificity, affinity, and molecular determinants of PDZ-PtdInsPs interactions and on their impact on PDZ-protein interactions is very limited. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We screened the human proteome for PtdInsPs interacting PDZ domains by a combination of in vivo cell-localization studies and in vitro dot blot and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR experiments using synthetic lipids and recombinant proteins. We found that PtdInsPs interactions contribute to the cellular distribution of some PDZ domains, intriguingly also in nuclear organelles, and that a significant subgroup of PDZ domains interacts with PtdInsPs with affinities in the low-to-mid micromolar range. In vitro specificity for the head group is low, but with a trend of higher affinities for more phosphorylated PtdInsPs species. Other membrane lipids can assist PtdInsPs-interactions. PtdInsPs-interacting PDZ domains have generally high pI values and contain characteristic clusters of basic residues, hallmarks that may be used to predict additional PtdInsPs interacting PDZ domains. In tripartite binding experiments we established that peptide binding can either compete or cooperate with PtdInsPs binding depending on the combination of ligands. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our screen substantially expands the set of PtdInsPs interacting PDZ domains, and shows that a full understanding of the biology of PDZ proteins will require a comprehensive insight into the intricate relationships between PDZ domains and their peptide and lipid ligands.

  18. A new optimized formulation of cationic solid lipid nanoparticles intended for gene delivery: development, characterization and DNA binding efficiency of TCERG1 expression plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fàbregas, Anna; Sánchez-Hernández, Noemí; Ticó, Josep Ramon; García-Montoya, Encarna; Pérez-Lozano, Pilar; Suñé-Negre, Josep M; Hernández-Munain, Cristina; Suñé, Carlos; Miñarro, Montserrat

    2014-10-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) are being considered as a new approach for therapeutics for many known diseases. In addition to drug delivery, their use as non-viral vectors for gene delivery can be achieved by the inclusion of cationic lipids, which provide a positive surface potential that favours binding to the DNA backbone. This work is based on the idea that the optimization of the components is required as the first step in simplifying the qualitative and quantitative composition of SLNs as much as possible without affecting the essential properties that define SLNs as optimal non-viral vectors for gene delivery. We selected the best lipids and surfactants in terms of particle size and zeta potential and characterized the properties of the resulting nanoparticles using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The SLNs had a particle size of approximately 120 nm and a positive surface charge of 42 mV. In addition, we analysed the main physicochemical characteristics of the bulk components of the nanoparticles using X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and mass spectrometry (MS). The suitability of the optimized SLNs for DNA binding was evaluated after the lyophilisation process using a carboxyl-terminal region of the TCERG1 gene, a human factor that has been implicated in several diseases. We show that the SLNs presented high efficiency in the binding of DNA, and importantly, they presented no toxicity when assayed in an in vivo system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A high-affinity inhibitor of yeast carboxypeptidase Y is encoded by TFS1 and shows homology to a family of lipid binding proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, A W; Svendsen, I; Sørensen, S O

    1998-01-01

    signals for transport into the endoplasmic reticulum. Surprisingly, Ic is encoded by TFS1, which has previously been isolated as a high-copy suppressor of cdc25-1. CDC25 encodes the putative GTP exchange factor for Ras1p/Ras2p in yeast. In an attempt to rationalize this finding, we looked...... degree of specificity, showing a 200-fold higher Ki toward a carboxypeptidase from Candida albicans which is highly homologous to carboxypeptidase Y. The TFS1 gene product shows extensive similarity to a class of proteins termed "21-23-kDa lipid binding proteins", members of which are found in several...

  20. Hypoxia-induced lipid peroxidation in rat brain and protective effect of carnitine and phosphocreatine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rauchová, Hana; Koudelová, J.; Drahota, Zdeněk; Mourek, J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 9 (2002), s. 899-904 ISSN 0364-3190 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A069 Grant - others:GA UK(XC) 22/2001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : hypobaric hypoxia-lipid peroxidation * carnitine * lactate/pyruvate ratio Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.672, year: 2002

  1. Effects of trihexyphenidyl and L-dopa on brain muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding measured by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinotoh, H; Asahina, M; Hirayama, K [Dept. of Neurology, School of Medicine, Chiba Univ., Chiba (Japan); Inoue, O; Suhara, T; Tateno, Y [Division of Clinical Research, National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1994-01-01

    The effects of pharmacological intervention on brain muscarinic cholinergic receptor (mAChR) binding were assessed in seven patients with Parkinson's disease by positron emission tomography and carbon-11 labelled N-methyl-4-piperidyl benzilate ([[sup 11]C]NMPB). [[sup 11]C]NMPB was injected twice, approximately 2 hours apart, in each patient, to assess the effect of single doses of 4 mg of trihexyphenidyl (n=5) or 400 mg of L-dopa with 57 mg of benserazide (n=2) on the binding parameter of mAChRs (K[sub 3]). There was a mean 28% inhibition of K[sub 3] values in the brain in the presence of trihexyphenidyl, which was assumed to reflect mAChR occupancy. No significant change in K[sub 3] was observed in the presence of L-dopa. This study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring mAChR occupancy by an anticholinergic medication with PET.

  2. Autoradiographic localization of glucocorticosteriod binding sites in rat brain after in vivo injection of [3H]RU 28362

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrieau, Alain; Dussaillant, Monique; Rostene, William

    1988-01-01

    The autoradiographic distribution of glucocorticosteriod binding sites in the brain of adrenalectomized rats was studied following in vivo injection of a potent synthetic glucocorticosteriod agonist [ 3 H]RU 28362. Analysis of the autoradiograms revealed a specific and dense labelling in the pyramidal cell layer of the Ammon's horn and in the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. In the hypothalmus, the labelling was particularly high in the paraventricular nucleus (site of CRF synthesis), the arcuate, periventricular and the supraoptic nuclei as well as in the median eminence. Autoradiograms also revealed the presence of[ 3 H]RU 28362 binding sites in several brain regions including the amygdala, the pineal gland, the entorhinal cortex, the interpeduncular, interfascicular and dorsal raphe nuclei, the central grey and the substantia nigra suggesting possible effects of glucocorticosteriods in these structures (author)

  3. Effect of ethanol in utero on higher nervous activity and protein and lipid metabolism in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabbudovskii, A.L.; Zhulin, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    The authors study parameters of protein phosphorylation and glycoprotein and phospholipid synthesis in the neocortex and hippocampus of adult rats and compare the findings with the results of an investigation of formation and preservation of defensive conditioned reflexes. The pattern of changes in these metabolic parameters are studied in response to stress. For the biochemical tests, the animals were lightly anesthetized with ether and injected with a mixture of (P 32)-orthophosphate and (H 3)-fucose. Phospholipids were identified with molybdate reagent and radioactivity of the protein digest and lipids was measured in Bray's scintillator. The study shows that the use of stress brought metabolic differences between the brain of the experimental and control rats more clearly to light

  4. Development and optimization of transferrin-conjugated nanostructured lipid carriers for brain delivery of paclitaxel using Box-Behnken design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami, Jaber; Rezazadeh, Mahboubeh; Sadeghi, Hojjat; Khadivar, Khashayar

    2017-05-01

    The treatment of brain cancer remains one of the most difficult challenges in oncology. The purpose of this study was to develop transferrin-conjugated nanostructured lipid carriers (Tf-NLCs) for brain delivery of paclitaxel (PTX). PTX-loaded NLCs (PTX-NLCs) were prepared using solvent evaporation method and the impact of various formulation variables were assessed using Box-Behnken design. Optimized PTX-NLC was coupled with transferrin as targeting ligand and in vitro cytotoxicity of it was investigated against U-87 brain cancer cell line. As a result, 14.1 mg of cholesterol, 18.5 mg of triolein, and 0.5% poloxamer were used to prepare the optimal formulation. Mean particle size (PS), zeta potential (ZP), entrapment efficiency (EE), drug loading (DL), mean release time (MRT) of adopted formulation were confirmed to be 205.4 ± 11 nm, 25.7 ± 6.22 mV, 91.8 ± 0.5%, 5.38 ± 0.03% and 29.3 h, respectively. Following conjugation of optimized PTX-NLCs with transferrin, coupling efficiency was 21.3 mg transferrin per mmol of stearylamine; PS and MRT were increased while ZP, EE and DL decreased non-significantly. Tf-PTX-NLCs showed higher cytotoxic activity compared to non-targeted NLCs and free drug. These results indicated that the Tf-PTX-NLCs could potentially be exploited as a delivery system in brain cancer cells.

  5. Deleted in malignant brain tumors-1 protein (DMBT1): a pattern recognition receptor with multiple binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; Karlsson, Niclas G; Veerman, Enno C I

    2010-01-01

    Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors-1 protein (DMBT1), salivary agglutinin (DMBT1(SAG)), and lung glycoprotein-340 (DMBT1(GP340)) are three names for glycoproteins encoded by the same DMBT1 gene. All these proteins belong to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily of proteins: a superfamily of secreted or membrane-bound proteins with SRCR domains that are highly conserved down to sponges, the most ancient metazoa. In addition to SRCR domains, all DMBT1s contain two CUB domains and one zona pellucida domain. The SRCR domains play a role in the function of DMBT1s, which is the binding of a broad range of pathogens including cariogenic streptococci, Helicobacter pylori and HIV. Mucosal defense proteins like IgA, surfactant proteins and lactoferrin also bind to DMBT1s through their SRCR domains. The binding motif on the SRCR domains comprises an 11-mer peptide in which a few amino acids are essential for binding (GRVEVLYRGSW). Adjacent to each individual SRCR domain are glycosylation domains, where the attached carbohydrate chains play a role in the binding of influenza A virus and Helicobacter pylori. The composition of the carbohydrate chains is not only donor specific, but also varies between different organs. These data demonstrate a role for DMBT1s as pattern recognition molecules containing various peptide and carbohydrate binding motifs.

  6. Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors-1 Protein (DMBT1: A Pattern Recognition Receptor with Multiple Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enno C. I. Veerman

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors-1 protein (DMBT1, salivary agglutinin (DMBT1SAG, and lung glycoprotein-340 (DMBT1GP340 are three names for glycoproteins encoded by the same DMBT1 gene. All these proteins belong to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR superfamily of proteins: a superfamily of secreted or membrane-bound proteins with SRCR domains that are highly conserved down to sponges, the most ancient metazoa. In addition to SRCR domains, all DMBT1s contain two CUB domains and one zona pellucida domain. The SRCR domains play a role in the function of DMBT1s, which is the binding of a broad range of pathogens including cariogenic streptococci, Helicobacter pylori and HIV. Mucosal defense proteins like IgA, surfactant proteins and lactoferrin also bind to DMBT1s through their SRCR domains. The binding motif on the SRCR domains comprises an 11-mer peptide in which a few amino acids are essential for binding (GRVEVLYRGSW. Adjacent to each individual SRCR domain are glycosylation domains, where the attached carbohydrate chains play a role in the binding of influenza A virus and Helicobacter pylori. The composition of the carbohydrate chains is not only donor specific, but also varies between different organs. These data demonstrate a role for DMBT1s as pattern recognition molecules containing various peptide and carbohydrate binding motifs.

  7. [123I]FP-CIT binding in rat brain after acute and sub-chronic administration of dopaminergic medication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavalaye, J.; Knol, R.J.J.; Bruin, K. de; Reneman, L.; Booij, J.; Janssen, A.G.M.

    2000-01-01

    The recently developed radioligand [ 123 I]FP-CIT is suitable for clinical single-photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging of the dopamine (DA) transporter in vivo. To date it has remained unclear whether dopaminergic medication influences the striatal [ 123 I]FP-CIT binding. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of this medication on [ 123 I]FP-CIT binding in the brain. We used an animal model in which we administered dopaminomimetics, antipsychotics and an antidepressant. In vivo [ 123 I]FP-CIT binding to the DA and serotonin transporters was evaluated after sub-chronic and acute administration of the drugs. The administered medication induced small changes in striatal [ 123 I]FP-CIT binding which were not statistically significant. As expected, the DA reuptake blocker GBR 12,909 induced a significant decrease in [ 123 I]FP-CIT binding. [ 123 I]FP-CIT binding in the serotonin-rich hypothalamus was decreased only after acute administration of fluvoxamine. The results of this study suggest that dopaminergic medication will not affect the results of DA transporter SPET imaging with [ 123 I]FP-CIT. (orig.)

  8. Serotonin 2A receptor agonist binding in the human brain with [11C]Cimbi-36

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, Anders; Svarer, Claus; McMahon, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: [(11)C]Cimbi-36 is a recently developed serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor agonist positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand that has been successfully applied for human neuroimaging. Here, we investigate the test-retest variability of cerebral [(11)C]Cimbi-36 PET and compare [(11)C...... test-retest variability in [(11)C]Cimbi-36 binding measures, and another eight were scanned after a bolus plus constant infusion with [(18)F]altanserin. Regional differences in the brain distribution of [(11)C]Cimbi-36 and [(18)F]altanserin were assessed with a correlation of regional binding measures...... and with voxel-based analysis. RESULTS: Test-retest variability of [(11)C]Cimbi-36 non-displaceable binding potential (BPND) was consistently correlation between regional...

  9. Receptor binding of somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28 in rat brain: differential modulation by nucleotides and ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikant, C B; Dahan, A; Craig, C

    1990-02-04

    The tissue-selective binding of the two principal bioactive forms of somatostatin, somatostatin-14 (SS-14) and somatostatin-28 (SS-28), their ability to modulate cAMP-dependent and -independent regulation of post-receptor events to different degrees and the documentation of specific labelling of SS receptor subtypes with SS-28 but not SS-14 in discrete regions of rat brain suggest the existence of distinct SS-14 and SS-28 binding sites. Receptor binding of SS-14 ligands has been shown to be modulated by nucleotides and ions, but the effect of these agents on SS-28 binding has not been studied. In the present study we investigated the effects of adenine and guanine nucleotides as well as monovalent and divalent cations on rat brain SS receptors quantitated with radioiodinated analogs of SS-14 ([125I-Tyr11]SS14, referred to in this paper as SS-14) and SS-28 ([Leu8, D-Trp22, 125I-Tyr25] SS-28, referred to as LTT* SS-28) in order to determine if distinct receptor sites for SS-14 and SS-28 could be distinguished on the basis of their modulation by nucleotides and ions. GTP as well as ATP exerted a dose-dependent inhibition (over a concentration range of 10(-7)-10(-3) M) of the binding of the two radioligands. The nucleotide inhibition of binding resulted in a decrease the Bmax of the SS receptors, the binding affinity remaining unaltered. GTP (10(-4) M) decreased the Bmax of LTT* SS-28 binding sites to a greater extent than ATP (145 +/- 10 and 228 +/- 16 respectively, compared to control value of 320 +/- 20 pmol mg-1). Under identical conditions GTP was less effective than ATP in reducing the number of T* SS-14 binding sites (Bmax = 227 +/- 8 and 182 +/- 15, respectively, compared to 340 +/- 15 pmol mg-1 in the absence of nucleotides). Monovalent cations inhibited the binding of both radioligands, Li+ and Na+ inhibited the binding of T* SS-14 to a greater extent than K+. The effect of divalent cations on the other hand was varied. At low concentration (2 mM) Mg2+, Ba2

  10. Preparation of biologically active 32P-labeled human relaxin. Displaceable binding to rat uterus, cervix, and brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osheroff, P.L.; Ling, V.T.; Vandlen, R.L.; Cronin, M.J.; Lofgren, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Relaxin is a member of the insulin family of polypeptide hormones and is known to exert its biological effects on various parts of the mammalian reproductive system. Biologically active human relaxin has been chemically synthesized based on the nucleotide sequence obtained from an ovarian cDNA clone. In the present study synthetic human relaxin was radiolabled by phosphorylation with cAMP-dependent protein kinase and [gamma-32P]ATP to a specific activity of 5000 Ci/mmol. The phosphorylated relaxin was purified on cation exchange high performance liquid chromatography and was shown to co-migrate with relaxin on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Mass spectrometry revealed a single phosphorylated site on the B chain of relaxin. The 32P-relaxin was able to bind to a goat anti-relaxin antibody, and this binding could be displaced by unlabeled relaxin in a concentration-dependent manner. A comparison of the concentration responses of cellular cAMP production stimulated by relaxin and phosphorylated relaxin in a primary human uterine cell line showed that phosphorylation did not affect the in vitro biological efficacy of relaxin. This made it suitable for in situ autoradiographic localization of relaxin binding sites in rat uterine, cervical, and brain tissue sections. Displacement of the binding of 100 pM 32P-relaxin by 100, 10, and 3 nM unlabeled relaxin, but not by 100 nM insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I, and an insulin-like growth factor-I analog, demonstrated the high affinity and specificity of such binding. We conclude that 32P-labeled human relaxin is biologically and immunologically active and that this novel probe binds reversibly and with high affinity to classical (e.g. uterus) and unpredicted (e.g. brain) tissues

  11. Effects of chronic delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) administration on neurotransmitter concentrations and receptor binding in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.F.; Newport, G.D.; Scallet, A.C.; Gee, K.W.; Paule, M.G.; Brown, R.M.; Slikker, W. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    THC is the major psychoactive constituent of marijuana and is also known as an hallucinogenic compound. Numerous reports have shown that large doses of THC produce significant alterations in various neurotransmitter systems. The present study was designed to determine whether chronic exposure to THC produces significant alterations in selected neurotransmitter systems (dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, GABAergic, benzodiazepine, and opiate) in the rat brain. In Experiment 1, male Sprague-Dawley rats were gavaged with vehicle, 10 or 20 mg THC/kg body weight daily, 5 days/week for 90 days. Animals were killed either 24 hours or two months after the last dose. Brains were dissected into different regions for neurochemical analyses. Two months after the cessation of chronic administration, there was a significant decrease in GABA receptor binding in the hippocampus of animals in the high dose group. However, no other significant changes were found in neurotransmitter receptor binding characteristics in the hippocampus or in neurotransmitter concentrations in the caudate nucleus, hypothalamus or septum after chronic THC administration. In an attempt to replicate the GABA receptor binding changes and also to determine the [35S]TBPS binding in hippocampus, we designed Experiment 2. In this experiment, we dosed the animals by gavage with 0, 5, 10 or 20 mg THC/kg daily, 5 days/week or with 20 mg THC/kg Monday through Thursday and 60 mg/kg on Friday for 90 days. Results from this experiment failed to replicate the dose-dependent effect of THC on GABA receptor binding in hippocampus. Modulation of [35S]TBPS binding by GABA or 3 alpha-OH-DHP or inhibition by cold TBPS in frontal cortex did not show any significant dose-related effects

  12. A role for neuronal cAMP responsive-element binding (CREB)-1 in brain responses to calorie restriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Salvatore; Ripoli, Cristian; Podda, Maria Vittoria; Ranieri, Sofia Chiatamone; Leone, Lucia; Toietta, Gabriele; McBurney, Michael W.; Schütz, Günther; Riccio, Antonella; Grassi, Claudio; Galeotti, Tommaso; Pani, Giovambattista

    2012-01-01

    Calorie restriction delays brain senescence and prevents neurodegeneration, but critical regulators of these beneficial responses other than the NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase Sirtuin-1 (Sirt-1) are unknown. We report that effects of calorie restriction on neuronal plasticity, memory and social behavior are abolished in mice lacking cAMP responsive-element binding (CREB)-1 in the forebrain. Moreover, CREB deficiency drastically reduces the expression of Sirt-1 and the induction of genes relevant to neuronal metabolism and survival in the cortex and hippocampus of dietary-restricted animals. Biochemical studies reveal a complex interplay between CREB and Sirt-1: CREB directly regulates the transcription of the sirtuin in neuronal cells by binding to Sirt-1 chromatin; Sirt-1, in turn, is recruited by CREB to DNA and promotes CREB-dependent expression of target gene peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α and neuronal NO Synthase. Accordingly, expression of these CREB targets is markedly reduced in the brain of Sirt KO mice that are, like CREB-deficient mice, poorly responsive to calorie restriction. Thus, the above circuitry, modulated by nutrient availability, links energy metabolism with neurotrophin signaling, participates in brain adaptation to nutrient restriction, and is potentially relevant to accelerated brain aging by overnutrition and diabetes. PMID:22190495

  13. Binding of the GTPase Sar1 to a Lipid Membrane Monolayer: Insertion and Orientation Studied by Infrared Reflection–Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Schwieger

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Membrane-interacting proteins are polyphilic polymers that engage in dynamic protein–protein and protein–lipid interactions while undergoing changes in conformation, orientation and binding interfaces. Predicting the sites of interactions between such polypeptides and phospholipid membranes is still a challenge. One example is the small eukaryotic GTPase Sar1, which functions in phospholipid bilayer remodeling and vesicle formation as part of the multimeric coat protein complex (COPII. The membrane interaction of Sar1 is strongly dependent on its N-terminal 23 amino acids. By monolayer adsorption experiments and infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS, we elucidate the role of lipids in inducing the amphipathicity of this N-terminal stretch, which inserts into the monolayer as an amphipathic helix (AH. The AH inserting angle is determined and is consistent with the philicities and spatial distribution of the amino acid monomers. Using an advanced method of IRRAS data evaluation, the orientation of Sar1 with respect to the lipid layer prior to the recruitment of further COPII proteins is determined. The result indicates that only a slight reorientation of the membrane-bound Sar1 is needed to allow coat assembly. The time-course of the IRRAS analysis corroborates a role of slow GTP hydrolysis in Sar1 desorption from the membrane.

  14. Complement component 1, q subcomponent binding protein (C1QBP) in lipid rafts mediates hepatic metastasis of pancreatic cancer by regulating IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Haojun; Fang, Winston; Liu, Minda; Fu, Deliang

    2017-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer shows a remarkable predilection for hepatic metastasis. Complement component 1, q subcomponent binding protein (C1QBP) can mediate growth factor-induced cancer cell chemotaxis and distant metastasis by activation of receptor tyrosine kinases. Coincidentally, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) derived from the liver and cancer cells itself has been recognized as a critical inducer of hepatic metastasis. However, the mechanism underlying IGF-1-dependent hepatic metastasis of pancreatic cancer, in which C1QBP may be involved, remains unknown. In the study, we demonstrated a significant association between C1QBP expression and hepatic metastasis in patients with pancreatic cancer. IGF-1 induced the translocation of C1QBP from cytoplasm to lipid rafts and further drove the formation of CD44 variant 6 (CD44v6)/C1QBP complex in pancreatic cancer cells. C1QBP interacting with CD44v6 in lipid rafts promoted phosphorylation of IGF-1R and thus activated downstream PI3K and MAPK signaling pathways which mediated metastatic potential of pancreatic cancer cells including proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, adhesion and energy metabolism. Furthermore, C1QBP knockdown suppressed hepatic metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells in nude mice. We therefore conclude that C1QBP in lipid rafts serves a key regulator of IGF-1/IGF-1R-induced hepatic metastasis from pancreatic cancer. Our findings about C1QBP in lipid rafts provide a novel strategy to block IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling in pancreatic cancer and a reliable premise for more efficient combined modality therapies. © 2017 UICC.

  15. Seasonal difference in brain serotonin transporter binding predicts symptom severity in patients with seasonal affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mc Mahon, Brenda; Andersen, Sofie B.; Madsen, Martin K.

    2016-01-01

    controls with low seasonality scores and 17 patients diagnosed with seasonal affective disorder were scanned in both summer and winter to investigate differences in cerebral serotonin transporter binding across groups and across seasons. The two groups had similar cerebral serotonin transporter binding...... between summer and winter (Psex-(P = 0.02) and genotype-(P = 0.04) dependent. In the patients with seasonal affective disorder, the seasonal change in serotonin transporter binding was positively associated with change in depressive symptom...

  16. The effect of chronic ethanol on glutamate binding in human and rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummins, J.T.; Sack, M.; von Hungen, K.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiographic techniques demonstrate that chronic alcohol administration causes a decrease in [ 3 H]-glutamate binding to hippocampal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. A 14% decrease in [ 3 H]-glutamate binding in the hippocampal CA 1 region is seen both in the rat after five days of ethanol administration and in postmortem hippocampal tissues from alcoholics. In the rat, 24 hr ethanol withdrawal values are intermediate between control and alcohol binding levels. There was no significant effect of ethanol on [ 3 H]-glutamate binding in the cortex or caudate

  17. Characterization and autoradiographic visualization of (+)-[3H]SKF10,047 binding in rat and mouse brain: further evidence for phencyclidine/sigma opiate receptor commonality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sircar, R.; Nichtenhauser, R.; Ieni, J.R.; Zukin, S.R.

    1986-01-01

    The binding specificity of (+)-[ 3 H]N-allylnormetazocine, the dextrorotatory isomer of the prototypical sigma opiate SKF10,047, was determined in rat and mouse brain and the neuroanatomical distribution of its binding sites elucidated by quantitative autoradiography in sections of rat brain. Computer-assisted Scatchard analysis revealed an apparent two-site fit of the binding data in both species and in all rat brain regions examined. In whole rat brain, the Kd values were 3.6 and 153 nM and the maximum binding values were 40 fmol and 1.6 pmol/mg of protein for the apparent high- and low-affinity binding sites, respectively. (+)-SKF10,047, haloperidol and pentazocine were among the most potent inhibitors of 7 nM (+)-[ 3 H]SKF10,047 binding to the higher affinity sites; rank orders of ligand potencies at these sites differ sharply from those that have been reported for the [ 3 H]phencyclidine (PCP) site, or for eliciting PCP-like or SKF10,047-like behaviors. By contrast, rank orders of potency of sigma opiods, PCP derivatives and dioxolanes for displacement of 100 nM (+)-[ 3 H]SKF10,047 from the more numerous lower affinity sites in the presence of 100 nM haloperidol agreed closely with their potencies in the [ 3 H]PCP binding assay as well as their potencies in exerting PCP- or SKF10,047-like behavioral effects. In order to compare directly the anatomical localizations of PCP and (+)-SKF10,047 binding sites, quantitative light microscopy autoradiography utilizing tritium-labeled PCP and (+)-SKF10,047 was carried out in rat brain sections. (+)-[ 3 H]SKF10,047 binding was observed to follow the regional pattern of [3H]PCP binding but also to bind in other regions not associated with PCP receptors

  18. Phospho-specific binding of 14-3-3 proteins to phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase III beta protects from dephosphorylation and stabilizes lipid kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausser, Angelika; Link, Gisela; Hoene, Miriam; Russo, Chiara; Selchow, Olaf; Pfizenmaier, Klaus

    2006-09-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase-IIIbeta (PI4KIIIbeta) is activated at the Golgi compartment by PKD-mediated phosphorylation. Subsequent mechanisms responsible for continuous PtdIns(4)P production at Golgi membranes and potential interaction partners of activated PI4KIIIbeta are unknown. Here we identify phosphoserine/-threonine binding 14-3-3 proteins as novel regulators of PI4KIIIbeta activity downstream of this phosphorylation. The PI4KIIIbeta-14-3-3 interaction, evident from GST pulldowns, co-immunoprecipitations and bimolecular fluorescence complementation, was augmented by phosphatase inhibition with okadaic acid. Binding of 14-3-3 proteins to PI4KIIIbeta involved the PKD phosphorylation site Ser294, evident from reduced 14-3-3 binding to a S294A PI4KIIIbeta mutant. Expression of dominant negative 14-3-3 proteins resulted in decreased PI4KIIIbeta Ser294 phosphorylation, whereas wildtype 14-3-3 proteins increased phospho-PI4KIIIbeta levels. This was because of protection of PI4KIIIbeta Ser294 phosphorylation from phosphatase-mediated dephosphorylation. The functional significance of the PI4KIIIbeta-14-3-3 interaction was evident from a reduction of PI4KIIIbeta activity upon dominant negative 14-3-3 protein expression. We propose that 14-3-3 proteins function as positive regulators of PI4KIIIbeta activity by protecting the lipid kinase from active site dephosphorylation, thereby ensuring a continuous supply of PtdIns(4)P at the Golgi compartment.

  19. Measuring specific receptor binding of a PET radioligand in human brain without pharmacological blockade: The genomic plot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, Mattia; Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Rizzo, Gaia; Bertoldo, Alessandra; Innis, Robert B; Turkheimer, Federico E

    2016-04-15

    PET studies allow in vivo imaging of the density of brain receptor species. The PET signal, however, is the sum of the fraction of radioligand that is specifically bound to the target receptor and the non-displaceable fraction (i.e. the non-specifically bound radioligand plus the free ligand in tissue). Therefore, measuring the non-displaceable fraction, which is generally assumed to be constant across the brain, is a necessary step to obtain regional estimates of the specific fractions. The nondisplaceable binding can be directly measured if a reference region, i.e. a region devoid of any specific binding, is available. Many receptors are however widely expressed across the brain, and a true reference region is rarely available. In these cases, the nonspecific binding can be obtained after competitive pharmacological blockade, which is often contraindicated in humans. In this work we introduce the genomic plot for estimating the nondisplaceable fraction using baseline scans only. The genomic plot is a transformation of the Lassen graphical method in which the brain maps of mRNA transcripts of the target receptor obtained from the Allen brain atlas are used as a surrogate measure of the specific binding. Thus, the genomic plot allows the calculation of the specific and nondisplaceable components of radioligand uptake without the need of pharmacological blockade. We first assessed the statistical properties of the method with computer simulations. Then we sought ground-truth validation using human PET datasets of seven different neuroreceptor radioligands, where nonspecific fractions were either obtained separately using drug displacement or available from a true reference region. The population nondisplaceable fractions estimated by the genomic plot were very close to those measured by actual human blocking studies (mean relative difference between 2% and 7%). However, these estimates were valid only when mRNA expressions were predictive of protein levels (i

  20. Modulation of intestinal and liver fatty acid-binding proteins in Caco-2 cells by lipids, hormones and cytokines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dube, N.; Delvin, E.; Yotov, W.; Garofalo, C.; Bendayan, M.; Veerkamp, J.H.; Levy, E.

    2001-01-01

    Intestinal and liver fatty acid binding proteins (I- and L-FABP) are thought to play a role in enterocyte fatty acid (FA) trafficking. Their modulation by cell differentiation and various potential effectors was investigated in the human Caco-2 cell line. With the acquisition of enterocytic

  1. Evaluation of the binding of the radiolabeled antidepressant drug, {sup 18}F-fluoxetine in the rodent brain: an in vitro and in vivo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Jogeshwar E-mail: jogeshwar_mukherjee@ketthealth.com; Das, Malay K.; Yang Zhiying; Lew, Robert

    1998-10-01

    We have developed {sup 18}F-fluoxetine as a radiotracer analog of the antidepressant drug fluoxetine (Prozac). In vitro saturation experiments of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine were carried out on rat midbrain tissue and citalopram was used for measuring nonspecific binding. A saturation curve for the binding of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine was not obtained. Even when fluoxetine (10 {mu}M) was used for measurements of nonspecific binding, a saturation curve was difficult to obtain. Other compounds, such as deprenyl, clorgyline, amphetamine, and reserpine were also not able to reduce the binding of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine. Ex vivo autoradiographic experiments with {sup 18}F-fluoxetine did not reveal any specific uptake in various brain regions. In vivo administration of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine in rats showed similar uptake in all the brain regions with little regional selectivity. A subcellular analysis of rat brain tissue after intravenous (IV) administration of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine indicated significant amounts of binding in mitochondria and synaptosomes. In summary, in vitro experiments with {sup 18}F-fluoxetine indicate little specific binding. Binding to the serotonin transporter was not identifiable. High nonspecific binding of the tracer resulting from its subcellular nature in the brain masks the ability to detect binding to the serotonin uptake sites in vivo. These findings indicate that a large portion of the binding of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine in rat brains is subcellular and clears slowly out of the cells. Other sites, such as monoamine oxidase, may also play a significant role in the action of fluoxetine.

  2. Evaluation of the binding of the radiolabeled antidepressant drug, 18F-fluoxetine in the rodent brain: an in vitro and in vivo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Das, Malay K.; Yang Zhiying; Lew, Robert

    1998-01-01

    We have developed 18 F-fluoxetine as a radiotracer analog of the antidepressant drug fluoxetine (Prozac). In vitro saturation experiments of 18 F-fluoxetine were carried out on rat midbrain tissue and citalopram was used for measuring nonspecific binding. A saturation curve for the binding of 18 F-fluoxetine was not obtained. Even when fluoxetine (10 μM) was used for measurements of nonspecific binding, a saturation curve was difficult to obtain. Other compounds, such as deprenyl, clorgyline, amphetamine, and reserpine were also not able to reduce the binding of 18 F-fluoxetine. Ex vivo autoradiographic experiments with 18 F-fluoxetine did not reveal any specific uptake in various brain regions. In vivo administration of 18 F-fluoxetine in rats showed similar uptake in all the brain regions with little regional selectivity. A subcellular analysis of rat brain tissue after intravenous (IV) administration of 18 F-fluoxetine indicated significant amounts of binding in mitochondria and synaptosomes. In summary, in vitro experiments with 18 F-fluoxetine indicate little specific binding. Binding to the serotonin transporter was not identifiable. High nonspecific binding of the tracer resulting from its subcellular nature in the brain masks the ability to detect binding to the serotonin uptake sites in vivo. These findings indicate that a large portion of the binding of 18 F-fluoxetine in rat brains is subcellular and clears slowly out of the cells. Other sites, such as monoamine oxidase, may also play a significant role in the action of fluoxetine

  3. Immune labeling and purification of a 71-kDa glutamate-binding protein from brain synaptic membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.W.; Cunningham, M.D.; Galton, N.; Michaelis, E.K.

    1988-01-01

    Immunoblot studies of synaptic membranes isolated from rat brain using antibodies raised against a previously purified glutamate-binding protein (GBP) indicated labeling of an ∼ 70-kDa protein band. Since the antibodies used were raised against a 14-kDa GBP, the present studies were undertaken to explore the possibility that the 14-kDa protein may have been a proteolytic fragment of a larger M/sub r/ protein in synaptic membranes. The major protein enriched in the most highly purified fractions was a 71-kDa glycoprotein, but a 63-kDa protein was co-purified during most steps of the isolation procedure. The glutamate-binding characteristics of these isolated protein fractions were very similar to those previously described for the 14-kDa GBP, including estimated dissociation constants for L-glutamate binding of 0.25 and 1 + M, inhibition of glutamate binding by azide and cyanide, and a selectivity of the ligand binding site for L-glutamate and L-aspartate. The neuroexcitatory analogs of L-glutamate and L-aspartate, ibotenate, quisqualate, and D-glutamate, inhibited L[ 3 H]glutamate binding to the isolated proteins, as did the antagonist of L-glutamate-induced neuronal excitation, L-glutamate diethylester. On the basis of the lack of any detectable glutamate-related enzyme activity associated with the isolated proteins and the presence of distinguishing sensitivities to analogs that inhibit glutamate transport carriers in synaptic membranes, it is proposed that the 71-kDa protein may be a component of a physiologic glutamate receptor complex in neuronal membranes

  4. Binding of glycoprotein Srr1 of Streptococcus agalactiae to fibrinogen promotes attachment to brain endothelium and the development of meningitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Seong Seo

    Full Text Available The serine-rich repeat glycoprotein Srr1 of Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS is thought to be an important adhesin for the pathogenesis of meningitis. Although expression of Srr1 is associated with increased binding to human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMEC, the molecular basis for this interaction is not well defined. We now demonstrate that Srr1 contributes to GBS attachment to hBMEC via the direct interaction of its binding region (BR with human fibrinogen. When assessed by Far Western blotting, Srr1 was the only protein in GBS extracts that bound fibrinogen. Studies using recombinant Srr1-BR and purified fibrinogen in vitro confirmed a direct protein-protein interaction. Srr1-BR binding was localized to amino acids 283-410 of the fibrinogen Aα chain. Structural predictions indicated that the conformation of Srr1-BR is likely to resemble that of SdrG and other related staphylococcal proteins that bind to fibrinogen through a "dock, lock, and latch" mechanism (DLL. Deletion of the predicted latch domain of Srr1-BR abolished the interaction of the BR with fibrinogen. In addition, a mutant GBS strain lacking the latch domain exhibited reduced binding to hBMEC, and was significantly attenuated in an in vivo model of meningitis. These results indicate that Srr1 can bind fibrinogen directly likely through a DLL mechanism, which has not been described for other streptococcal adhesins. This interaction was important for the pathogenesis of GBS central nervous system invasion and subsequent disease progression.

  5. Brain serotonin 4 receptor binding is inversely associated with verbal memory recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenbæk, Dea S; Fisher, Patrick M; Ozenne, Brice; Andersen, Emil; Hjordt, Liv V; McMahon, Brenda; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Frokjaer, Vibe G; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2017-04-01

    We have previously identified an inverse relationship between cerebral serotonin 4 receptor (5-HT 4 R) binding and nonaffective episodic memory in healthy individuals. Here, we investigate in a novel sample if the association is related to affective components of memory, by examining the association between cerebral 5-HT 4 R binding and affective verbal memory recall. Twenty-four healthy volunteers were scanned with the 5-HT 4 R radioligand [ 11 C]SB207145 and positron emission tomography, and were tested with the Verbal Affective Memory Test-24. The association between 5-HT 4 R binding and affective verbal memory was evaluated using a linear latent variable structural equation model. We observed a significant inverse association across all regions between 5-HT 4 R binding and affective verbal memory performances for positive ( p  = 5.5 × 10 -4 ) and neutral ( p  = .004) word recall, and an inverse but nonsignificant association for negative ( p  = .07) word recall. Differences in the associations with 5-HT 4 R binding between word categories (i.e., positive, negative, and neutral) did not reach statistical significance. Our findings replicate our previous observation of a negative association between 5-HT 4 R binding and memory performance in an independent cohort and provide novel evidence linking 5-HT 4 R binding, as a biomarker for synaptic 5-HT levels, to the mnestic processing of positive and neutral word stimuli in healthy humans.

  6. Vasoactive intestinal peptide binding sites and fibers in the brain of the pigeon Columba livia: An autoradiographic and immunohistochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hof, P.R.; Dietl, M.M.; Charnay, Y.; Martin, J.L.; Bouras, C.; Palacios, J.M.; Magistretti, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The distribution of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) binding sites in the pigeon brain was examined by in vitro autoradiography on slide-mounted sections. A fully characterized monoiodinated form of VIP, which maintains the biological activity of the native peptide, was used throughout this study. The highest densities of binding sites were observed in the hyperstriatum dorsale, archistriatum, auditory field L of neostriatum, area corticoidea dorsolateralis and temporo-parieto-occipitalis, area parahippocampalis, tectum opticum, nucleus dorsomedialis anterior thalami, and in the periventricular area of the hypothalamus. Lower densities of specific binding occurred in the neostriatum, hyperstriatum ventrale and nucleus septi lateralis, dorsolateral area of the thalamus, and lateral and posteromedial hypothalamus. Very low to background levels of VIP binding were detected in the ectostriatum, paleostriatum primitivum, paleostriatum augmentatum, lobus parolfactorius, nucleus accumbens, most of the brainstem, and the cerebellum. The distribution of VIP-containing fibers and terminals was examined by indirect immunofluorescence using a polyclonal antibody against porcine VIP. Fibers and terminals were observed in the area corticoidea dorsolateralis, area parahippocampalis, hippocampus, hyperstriatum accessorium, hyperstriatum dorsale, archistriatum, tuberculum olfactorium, nuclei dorsolateralis and dorsomedialis of the thalamus, and throughout the hypothalamus and the median eminence. Long projecting fibers were visualized in the tractus septohippocampalis. In the brainstem VIP immunoreactive fibers and terminals were observed mainly in the substantia grisea centralis, fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, lemniscus lateralis, and in the area surrounding the nuclei of the 7th, 9th, and 10th cranial nerves

  7. A strategy for increasing the brain uptake of a radioligand in animals: use of a drug that inhibits plasma protein binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haradahira, Terushi E-mail: terushi@nirs.go.jp; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Maeda, Jun; Okauchi, Takashi; Kawabe, Kouichi; Kida, Takayo; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2000-05-01

    A positron-emitter labeled radioligand for the glycine-binding site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, [{sup 11}C]L-703,717, was examined for its ability to penetrate the brain in animals by simultaneous use with drugs having high-affinity separate binding sites on human serum albumin. [{sup 11}C]L-703,717 has poor blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability because it binds tightly to plasma proteins. Co-injection of warfarin (50-200 mg/kg), a drug that binds to albumin and resembles L-703,717 in structure, dose-dependently enhanced the penetration by [{sup 11}C]L-703,717 in mice, resulting in a five-fold increase in the brain radioactivity at 1 min after the injection. Drugs structurally unrelated to L-703,717, salicylate, phenol red, and L-tryptophan, were less effective or ineffective in increasing the uptake of [{sup 11}C]L-703,717. These results suggest that the simultaneous use of a drug that inhibits the binding of a radioligand to plasma proteins is a useful way to overcome the poor BBB permeability of the radioligand triggered by its tight binding to plasma proteins. In brain distribution studies in rodents, it was found that, after the increase in brain uptake with warfarin, much of the glycine site antagonist accumulates in the cerebellum but its pharmacological specificity did not match the glycine site of NMDA receptors.

  8. A strategy for increasing the brain uptake of a radioligand in animals: use of a drug that inhibits plasma protein binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haradahira, Terushi; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Maeda, Jun; Okauchi, Takashi; Kawabe, Kouichi; Kida, Takayo; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2000-01-01

    A positron-emitter labeled radioligand for the glycine-binding site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, [ 11 C]L-703,717, was examined for its ability to penetrate the brain in animals by simultaneous use with drugs having high-affinity separate binding sites on human serum albumin. [ 11 C]L-703,717 has poor blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability because it binds tightly to plasma proteins. Co-injection of warfarin (50-200 mg/kg), a drug that binds to albumin and resembles L-703,717 in structure, dose-dependently enhanced the penetration by [ 11 C]L-703,717 in mice, resulting in a five-fold increase in the brain radioactivity at 1 min after the injection. Drugs structurally unrelated to L-703,717, salicylate, phenol red, and L-tryptophan, were less effective or ineffective in increasing the uptake of [ 11 C]L-703,717. These results suggest that the simultaneous use of a drug that inhibits the binding of a radioligand to plasma proteins is a useful way to overcome the poor BBB permeability of the radioligand triggered by its tight binding to plasma proteins. In brain distribution studies in rodents, it was found that, after the increase in brain uptake with warfarin, much of the glycine site antagonist accumulates in the cerebellum but its pharmacological specificity did not match the glycine site of NMDA receptors

  9. Multicompartmental study of fluorine-18 altanserin binding to brain 5HT2 receptors in humans using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biver, F.; Goldman, S.; Luxen, A.; Monclus, M.; Forestini, M.; Mendlewicz, J.; Lotstra, F.

    1994-01-01

    Serotoninergic type 2 (5HT 2 ) receptors have been implicated in the regulation of many brain functions in humans and may play a role in several neurological and psychiatric diseases. Fluorine-18 altanserin has been proposed as a new radiotracer for the study of 5HT 2 receptors by PET because of its high affinity for 5HT 2 receptors (Ki: 0.13 nM) and its good specificity in in vitro studies. Dynamic PET studies were carried out in 12 healthy volunteers after intravenous injection of 0.1 mCi/kg [ 18 F] altanserin. Ninety minutes after injection, we observed mainly cortical binding. Basal ganglia and cerebellum showed very low uptake and the frontal cortex to cerebellum ratio was about 3. To evaluate the quantitative distribution of this ligand in the brain, we used two different methods of data analysis: a four-compartment model was used to achieve quantitative evaluation of rate constants (K 1 and k 2 through k 6 ) by non-linear regression, and a multiple-time graphical analysis technique for reversible binding was employed for the measurement of k 1 /k 2 and k 3 /k 4 ratios. Using both methods, we found significant differences in binding capacity (estimated by k 3 /k 4 = B max /K d ) between regions, the values increasing as follows: occipital, limbic, parietal, frontal and temporal cortex. After correction of values obtained by the graphical method for the existence of non-specific binding, results generated by the two methods were consistent. (orig.)

  10. Autoradiographic analysis of the in vivo distribution of 3H-imipramine and 3H-desipramine in brain: Comparison to in vitro binding patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, G.E.; Paul, I.A.; Fassberg, J.B.; Powell, K.R.; Stumpf, W.E.; Breese, G.R.

    1991-01-01

    Using high resolution autoradiographic techniques, the distribution of radioactivity in forebrain and brainstem was assessed after 4 injection of 3H-impramine or 3H-desipramine. Results were compared with regional binding of the drugs to brain sections in vitro. Similar topographic binding of 3H-imipramine and 3H-desipramine was observed in vitro among brain regions, except in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and locus coeruleus, where binding was greater for 3H-desipramine. For both 3H-desipramine and 3H-imipramine, some brain regions that exhibited high binding in vitro also showed high accumulation after in vivo injection. However, certain regions that contained high densities of binding sites for the antidepressant drugs as measured by in vitro binding showed very low accumulation of radioactivity after in vivo treatment. Such regions included the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, layer 1 of piriform cortex, caudate-putamen, pontine and midbrain central gray, and cerebellar granular layer. Compared to in vitro binding of the drugs, the distribution of imipramine and desipramine in vivo appears more anatomically selective. For imipramine, primary sites of action in vivo, as indicated by the topographic distribution in brain, appear to be the locus coeruleus, hippocampus, lateral septal nucleus, and amygdala. For desipramine, the greatest accumulation in vivo was found in the locus coeruleus, paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, and anterior thalamic nuclei

  11. The kinetics of specific [3H]flunitrazepam ([3H]FNZ) binding in the brain of the epaulette shark (hemiscyllium ocellatum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, G.; Renshaw, G.M.C.; Dodd, P.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: We have previously established that the epaulette shark is tolerant to hypoxia and that the resulting brain hypometabolism appears to be correlated with increased levels of GABA. It is of interest to determine whether there is a change in GABA A receptor number and/or binding characteristics in response to hypoxia. The focus of this initial study is to determine the kinetics of [ 3 H]FNZ binding to the benzodiazapine binding site on the GABA A receptor in the brain, so that the effect of hypoxia on GABA A receptors can be determined. Adult epaulette sharks were anaesthetised with 80mg/L of MS222 and the brain was dissected and rapidly frozen. Membranes were prepared at 4 deg C by homogenising the dissected tissue in 0.32M sucrose and centrifuging the homogenate for 10 min at 6 000g. The supernatant was layered onto an aliquat of 0.8M sucrose then centrifuged for 30 min at 40 000g. After washing the membranes, the binding characteristics of [ 3 H]FNZ were examined using in vitro centrifugation assays. This method revealed that [ 3 H]FNZ bound specifically to low-affinity binding sites in an elasmobranch brain. This finding is in contrast with previous reports of little to no specific binding of [ 3 H]FNZ in elasmobranchs, which precluded an estimation of binding parameters. Copyright (1998) Australian Neuroscience Society

  12. Brain serotonin 4 receptor binding is inversely associated with verbal memory recall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenbæk, Dea S; Fisher, Patrick M; Ozenne, Brice

    2017-01-01

    the association between cerebral 5-HT 4R binding and affective verbal memory recall. METHODS: Twenty-four healthy volunteers were scanned with the 5-HT 4R radioligand [11C]SB207145 and positron emission tomography, and were tested with the Verbal Affective Memory Test-24. The association between 5-HT 4R binding...... and affective verbal memory was evaluated using a linear latent variable structural equation model. RESULTS: We observed a significant inverse association across all regions between 5-HT 4R binding and affective verbal memory performances for positive (p = 5.5 × 10-4) and neutral (p = .004) word recall......BACKGROUND: We have previously identified an inverse relationship between cerebral serotonin 4 receptor (5-HT 4R) binding and nonaffective episodic memory in healthy individuals. Here, we investigate in a novel sample if the association is related to affective components of memory, by examining...

  13. Interfacial binding of cutinase rather than its catalytic activity determines the steady state interfacial tension during oil drop lipid hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flipsen, J A; van Schaick, M A; Dijkman, R; van der Hijden, H T; Verheij, H M; Egmond, M R

    1999-02-01

    Hydrolysis of triglycerides by cutinase from Fusarium solani pisi causes in oil drop tensiometer experiments a decrease of the interfacial tension. A series of cutinase variants with amino acid substitutions at its molecular surface yielded different values of the steady state interfacial tension. This tension value poorly correlated with the specific activity as such nor with the total activity (defined as the specific activity multiplied by the amount of enzyme bound) of the cutinase variants. Moreover, it appeared that at activity levels above 15% of that of wild type cutinase the contribution of hydrolysis to the decrease of the tension is saturating. A clear positive correlation was found between the interfacial tension plateau value and the interfacial binding of cutinase, as determined with attenuated total reflection Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). These results indicate that the interfacial steady state level is not determined by the rate of hydrolysis, but mainly by the interfacial binding of cutinase.

  14. Quantitative autoradiography of the binding sites for [125I] iodoglyburide, a novel high-affinity ligand for ATP-sensitive potassium channels in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehlert, D.R.; Gackenheimer, S.L.; Mais, D.E.; Robertson, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a high specific activity ligand for localization of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the brain. When brain sections were incubated with [ 125 I]iodoglyburide (N-[2-[[[(cyclohexylamino)carbonyl]amino]sulfonyl]ethyl]-5- 125 I-2- methoxybenzamide), the ligand bound to a single site with a KD of 495 pM and a maximum binding site density of 176 fmol/mg of tissue. Glyburide was the most potent inhibitor of specific [ 125 I]iodoglyburide binding to rat forebrain sections whereas iodoglyburide and glipizide were slightly less potent. The binding was also sensitive to ATP which completely inhibited binding at concentrations of 10 mM. Autoradiographic localization of [ 125 I]iodoglyburide binding indicated a broad distribution of the ATP-sensitive potassium channel in the brain. The highest levels of binding were seen in the globus pallidus and ventral pallidum followed by the septohippocampal nucleus, anterior pituitary, the CA2 and CA3 region of the hippocampus, ventral pallidum, the molecular layer of the cerebellum and substantia nigra zona reticulata. The hilus and dorsal subiculum of the hippocampus, molecular layer of the dentate gyrus, cerebral cortex, lateral olfactory tract nucleus, olfactory tubercle and the zona incerta contained relatively high levels of binding. A lower level of binding (approximately 3- to 4-fold) was found throughout the remainder of the brain. These results indicate that the ATP-sensitive potassium channel has a broad presence in the rat brain and that a few select brain regions are enriched in this subtype of neuronal potassium channels

  15. Comparison of (/sup 125/I)beta-endorphin binding to rat brain and NG108-15 cells using a monoclonal antibody directed against the opioid receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidlack, J.M.; O' Malley, W.E.; Schulz, R.

    1988-02-01

    The properties of (/sup 125/I)beta h-endorphin-binding sites from rat brain membranes and membranes from the NG108-15 cell line were compared using a monoclonal antibody directed against the opioid receptor and opioid peptides as probes. The binding of (/sup 125/I)beta h-endorphin to both rat brain and NG108-15 membranes yielded linear Scatchard plots with Kd values of 1.2 nM and 1.5 nM, respectively, and Bmax values of 865 fmol/mg rat brain membrane protein and 1077 fmol/mg NG108-15 membrane protein. A monoclonal antibody, OR-689.2.4, capable of inhibiting mu and delta binding but not kappa binding to rat brain membranes, noncompetitively inhibited the binding of 1 nM (/sup 125/I)beta h-endorphin to rat brain and NG108-15 membranes with an IC50 value of 405 nM for rat brain membranes and 543 nM for NG108-15 membranes. The monoclonal antibody also inhibited the binding of 3 nM (/sup 3/H) (D-penicillamine2, D-penicillamine5) enkephalin to NG108-15 membranes with an IC50 value of 370 nM. In addition to blocking the binding of (/sup 125/I)beta h-endorphin to brain membranes, the antibody also displaced (/sup 125/I)beta h-endorphin from membranes. Site-specific opioid peptides had large variations in their IC50 values depending on whether they were inhibiting (/sup 125/I)beta h-endorphin binding to rat brain or the NG108-15 membranes. When the peptides were tested with the monoclonal antibody for their combined ability to inhibit (/sup 125/I)beta h-endorphin binding to both membrane preparations, the peptides and antibody blocked binding as though they were acting at allosterically coupled sites, not two totally independent sites. These studies suggest that mu-, delta-, and beta-endorphin-binding sites share some sequence homology with the 35,000-dalton protein that the antibody is directed against.

  16. Kinetic analysis of transport and opioid receptor binding of ( sup 3 H)(-)-cyclofoxy in rat brain in vivo: Implications for human studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, Y.; Kawai, R.; McManaway, M.; Otsuki, H.; Rice, K.C.; Patlak, C.S.; Blasberg, R.G. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1991-03-01

    (3H)Cyclofoxy (CF: 17-cyclopropylmethyl-3,14-dihydroxy-4,5-alpha-epoxy-6-beta-fluoromorp hinan) is an opioid antagonist with affinity to both mu and kappa subtypes that was synthesized for quantitative evaluation of opioid receptor binding in vivo. Two sets of experiments in rats were analyzed. The first involved determining the metabolite-corrected blood concentration and tissue distribution of CF in brain 1 to 60 min after i.v. bolus injection. The second involved measuring brain washout for 15 to 120 s following intracarotid artery injection of CF. A physiologically based model and a classical compartmental pharmacokinetic model were compared. The models included different assumptions for transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB); estimates of nonspecific tissue binding and specific binding to a single opiate receptor site were found to be essentially the same with both models. The nonspecific binding equilibrium constant varied modestly in different brain structures (Keq = 3-9), whereas the binding potential (BP) varied over a much broader range (BP = 0.6-32). In vivo estimates of the opioid receptor dissociation constant were similar for different brain structures (KD = 2.1-5.2 nM), whereas the apparent receptor density (Bmax) varied between 1 (cerebellum) and 78 (thalamus) pmol/g of brain. The receptor dissociation rate constants in cerebrum (k4 = 0.08-0.16 min-1; koff = 0.16-0.23 min-1) and brain vascular permeability (PS = 1.3-3.4 ml/min/g) are sufficiently high to achieve equilibrium conditions within a reasonable period of time. Graphical analysis of the data is inappropriate due to the high tissue-loss rate constant for CF in brain. From these findings, CF should be a very useful opioid receptor ligand for the estimation of the receptor binding parameters in human subjects using (18F)CF and positron emission tomography.

  17. Kinetic analysis of transport and opioid receptor binding of [3H](-)-cyclofoxy in rat brain in vivo: Implications for human studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Y.; Kawai, R.; McManaway, M.; Otsuki, H.; Rice, K.C.; Patlak, C.S.; Blasberg, R.G.

    1991-01-01

    [3H]Cyclofoxy (CF: 17-cyclopropylmethyl-3,14-dihydroxy-4,5-alpha-epoxy-6-beta-fluoromorp hinan) is an opioid antagonist with affinity to both mu and kappa subtypes that was synthesized for quantitative evaluation of opioid receptor binding in vivo. Two sets of experiments in rats were analyzed. The first involved determining the metabolite-corrected blood concentration and tissue distribution of CF in brain 1 to 60 min after i.v. bolus injection. The second involved measuring brain washout for 15 to 120 s following intracarotid artery injection of CF. A physiologically based model and a classical compartmental pharmacokinetic model were compared. The models included different assumptions for transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB); estimates of nonspecific tissue binding and specific binding to a single opiate receptor site were found to be essentially the same with both models. The nonspecific binding equilibrium constant varied modestly in different brain structures (Keq = 3-9), whereas the binding potential (BP) varied over a much broader range (BP = 0.6-32). In vivo estimates of the opioid receptor dissociation constant were similar for different brain structures (KD = 2.1-5.2 nM), whereas the apparent receptor density (Bmax) varied between 1 (cerebellum) and 78 (thalamus) pmol/g of brain. The receptor dissociation rate constants in cerebrum (k4 = 0.08-0.16 min-1; koff = 0.16-0.23 min-1) and brain vascular permeability (PS = 1.3-3.4 ml/min/g) are sufficiently high to achieve equilibrium conditions within a reasonable period of time. Graphical analysis of the data is inappropriate due to the high tissue-loss rate constant for CF in brain. From these findings, CF should be a very useful opioid receptor ligand for the estimation of the receptor binding parameters in human subjects using [18F]CF and positron emission tomography

  18. NADPH oxidase and lipid raft-associated redox signaling are required for PCB153-induced upregulation of cell adhesion molecules in human brain endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eum, Sung Yong; Andras, Ibolya; Hennig, Bernhard; Toborek, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to persistent organic pollutants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), can lead to chronic inflammation and the development of vascular diseases. Because cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) of the cerebrovascular endothelium regulate infiltration of inflammatory cells into the brain, we have explored the molecular mechanisms by which ortho-substituted polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), such as PCB153, can upregulate CAMs in brain endothelial cells. Exposure to PCB153 increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), as well as elevated adhesion of leukocytes to brain endothelial cells. These effects were impeded by inhibitors of EGFR, JAKs, or Src activity. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase or disruption of lipid rafts by cholesterol depleting agents blocked PCB153-induced phosphorylation of JAK and Src kinases and upregulation of CAMs. In contrast, silencing of caveolin-1 by siRNA interference did not affect upregulation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in brain endothelial cells stimulated by PCB153. Results of the present study indicate that lipid raft-dependent NADPH oxidase/JAK/EGFR signaling mechanisms regulate the expression of CAMs in brain endothelial cells and adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial monolayers. Due to its role in leukocyte infiltration, induction of CAMs may contribute to PCB-induced cerebrovascular disorders and neurotoxic effects in the CNS.

  19. Fatty acid binding protein 3 (fabp3) is associated with insulin, lipids and cardiovascular phenotypes of the metabolic syndrome through epigenetic modifications in a Northern European family population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Kent, Jack W; Lee, Adam; Cerjak, Diana; Ali, Omar; Diasio, Robert; Olivier, Michael; Blangero, John; Carless, Melanie A; Kissebah, Ahmed H

    2013-03-19

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) play regulatory roles at the nexus of lipid metabolism and signaling. Dyslipidemia in clinical manifestation frequently co-occurs with obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension in the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). Animal studies have suggested FABPs play regulatory roles in expressing MetS phenotypes. In our family cohort of Northern European descent, transcript levels in peripheral white blood cells (PWBCs) of a key FABPs, FABP3, is correlated with the MetS leading components. However, evidence supporting the functions of FABPs in humans using genetic approaches has been scarce, suggesting FABPs may be under epigenetic regulation. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that CpG methylation status of a key regulator of lipid homeostasis, FABP3, is a quantitative trait associated with status of MetS phenotypes in humans. We used a mass-spec based quantitative method, EpiTYPER®, to profile a CpG island that extends from the promoter to the first exon of the FABP3 gene in our family-based cohort of Northern European descent (n=517). We then conducted statistical analysis of the quantitative relationship of CpG methylation and MetS measures following the variance-component association model. Heritability of each methylation and the effect of age and sex on CpG methylation were also assessed in our families. We find that methylation levels of individual CpG units and the regional average are heritable and significantly influenced by age and sex. Regional methylation was strongly associated with plasma total cholesterol (p=0.00028) and suggestively associated with LDL-cholesterol (p=0.00495). Methylation at individual units was significantly associated with insulin sensitivity, lipid particle sizing and diastolic blood pressure (pmetabolism (βWHR=-0.72; βLDL-c=-0.53) while positively correlated with plasma adiponectin (β=0.24). Further, we show that differential methylation of FABP3 affects binding activity with

  20. The 5-HT2A receptor binding pattern in the human brain is strongly genetically determined

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinborg, Lars H; Arfan, Haroon; Haugbol, Steven

    2007-01-01

    With the appropriate radiolabeled tracers, positron emission tomography (PET) enables in vivo human brain imaging of markers for neurotransmission, including neurotransmitter synthesis, receptors, and transporters. Whereas structural imaging studies have provided compelling evidence that the human...... brain anatomy is largely genetically determined, it is currently unknown to what degree neuromodulatory markers are subjected to genetic and environmental influence. Changes in serotonin 2A (5-HT(2A)) receptors have been reported to occur in various neuropsychiatric disorders and an association between...

  1. The Mammalian "Obesogen" Tributyltin Targets Hepatic Triglyceride Accumulation and the Transcriptional Regulation of Lipid Metabolism in the Liver and Brain of Zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeliki Lyssimachou

    Full Text Available Recent findings indicate that different Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs interfere with lipid metabolic pathways in mammals and promote fat accumulation, a previously unknown site of action for these compounds. The antifoulant and environmental pollutant tributyltin (TBT, which causes imposex in gastropod snails, induces an "obesogenic" phenotype in mammals, through the activation of the nuclear receptors retinoid X receptor (RXR and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ. In teleosts, the effects of TBT on the lipid metabolism are poorly understood, particularly following exposure to low, environmental concentrations. In this context, the present work shows that exposure of zebrafish to 10 and 50 ng/L of TBT (as Sn from pre-hatch to 9 months of age alters the body weight, condition factor, hepatosomatic index and hepatic triglycerides in a gender and dose related manner. Furthermore, TBT modulated the transcription of key lipid regulating factors and enzymes involved in adipogenesis, lipogenesis, glucocorticoid metabolism, growth and development in the brain and liver of exposed fish, revealing sexual dimorphic effects in the latter. Overall, the present study shows that the model mammalian obesogen TBT interferes with triglyceride accumulation and the transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolism in zebrafish and indentifies the brain lipogenic transcription profile of fish as a new target of this compound.

  2. The Mammalian “Obesogen” Tributyltin Targets Hepatic Triglyceride Accumulation and the Transcriptional Regulation of Lipid Metabolism in the Liver and Brain of Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyssimachou, Angeliki; Santos, Joana G.; André, Ana; Soares, Joana; Lima, Daniela; Guimarães, Laura; Almeida, C. Marisa R.; Teixeira, Catarina; Castro, L. Filipe C.; Santos, Miguel M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that different Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) interfere with lipid metabolic pathways in mammals and promote fat accumulation, a previously unknown site of action for these compounds. The antifoulant and environmental pollutant tributyltin (TBT), which causes imposex in gastropod snails, induces an “obesogenic” phenotype in mammals, through the activation of the nuclear receptors retinoid X receptor (RXR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). In teleosts, the effects of TBT on the lipid metabolism are poorly understood, particularly following exposure to low, environmental concentrations. In this context, the present work shows that exposure of zebrafish to 10 and 50 ng/L of TBT (as Sn) from pre-hatch to 9 months of age alters the body weight, condition factor, hepatosomatic index and hepatic triglycerides in a gender and dose related manner. Furthermore, TBT modulated the transcription of key lipid regulating factors and enzymes involved in adipogenesis, lipogenesis, glucocorticoid metabolism, growth and development in the brain and liver of exposed fish, revealing sexual dimorphic effects in the latter. Overall, the present study shows that the model mammalian obesogen TBT interferes with triglyceride accumulation and the transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolism in zebrafish and indentifies the brain lipogenic transcription profile of fish as a new target of this compound. PMID:26633012

  3. The hydroxylated form of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA-H) modifies the brain lipid composition in a model of Alzheimer's disease, improving behavioral motor function and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohaibes, Raheem J; Fiol-deRoque, María A; Torres, Manuel; Ordinas, Margarita; López, David J; Castro, José A; Escribá, Pablo V; Busquets, Xavier

    2017-09-01

    We have compared the effect of the commonly used ω-3 fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid ethyl ester (DHA-EE), and of its 2-hydroxylated DHA form (DHA-H), on brain lipid composition, behavior and lifespan in a new human transgenic Drosophila melanogaster model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The transgenic flies expressed human Aβ42 and tau, and the overexpression of these human transgenes in the CNS of these flies produced progressive defects in motor function (antigeotaxic behavior) while reducing the animal's lifespan. Here, we demonstrate that both DHA-EE and DHA-H increase the longer chain fatty acids (≥18C) species in the heads of the flies, although only DHA-H produced an unknown chromatographic peak that corresponded to a non-hydroxylated lipid. In addition, only treatment with DHA-H prevented the abnormal climbing behavior and enhanced the lifespan of these transgenic flies. These benefits of DHA-H were confirmed in the well characterized transgenic PS1/APP mouse model of familial AD (5xFAD mice), mice that develop defects in spatial learning and in memory, as well as behavioral deficits. Hence, it appears that the modulation of brain lipid composition by DHA-H could have remedial effects on AD associated neurodegeneration. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo V. Escribá. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. The Mammalian "Obesogen" Tributyltin Targets Hepatic Triglyceride Accumulation and the Transcriptional Regulation of Lipid Metabolism in the Liver and Brain of Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyssimachou, Angeliki; Santos, Joana G; André, Ana; Soares, Joana; Lima, Daniela; Guimarães, Laura; Almeida, C Marisa R; Teixeira, Catarina; Castro, L Filipe C; Santos, Miguel M

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that different Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) interfere with lipid metabolic pathways in mammals and promote fat accumulation, a previously unknown site of action for these compounds. The antifoulant and environmental pollutant tributyltin (TBT), which causes imposex in gastropod snails, induces an "obesogenic" phenotype in mammals, through the activation of the nuclear receptors retinoid X receptor (RXR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). In teleosts, the effects of TBT on the lipid metabolism are poorly understood, particularly following exposure to low, environmental concentrations. In this context, the present work shows that exposure of zebrafish to 10 and 50 ng/L of TBT (as Sn) from pre-hatch to 9 months of age alters the body weight, condition factor, hepatosomatic index and hepatic triglycerides in a gender and dose related manner. Furthermore, TBT modulated the transcription of key lipid regulating factors and enzymes involved in adipogenesis, lipogenesis, glucocorticoid metabolism, growth and development in the brain and liver of exposed fish, revealing sexual dimorphic effects in the latter. Overall, the present study shows that the model mammalian obesogen TBT interferes with triglyceride accumulation and the transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolism in zebrafish and indentifies the brain lipogenic transcription profile of fish as a new target of this compound.

  5. In vivo binding of 125I-LSD to serotonin 5-HT2 receptors in mouse brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartig, P.R.; Scheffel, U.; Frost, J.J.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The binding of 125 I-LSD (2-[ 125 I]-lysergic acid diethylamide) was studied in various mouse brain regions following intravenous injection of the radioligand. The high specific activity of 125 I-LSD enabled the injection of low mass doses (14ng/kg), which are well below the threshold for induction of any known physiological effect of the probe. The highest levels of 125 I-LSD binding were found in the frontal cortex, olfactory tubercles, extra-frontal cortex and striatum while the lowest level was found in the cerebellum. Binding was saturable in the frontal cortex but increased linearly in the cerebellum with increasing doses of 125 I-LSD. Serotonergic compounds potently inhibited 125 I-LSD binding in cortical regions, olfactory tubercles, and hypothalamus but had no effect in the cerebellum. Dopaminergic compounds caused partial inhibition of binding in the striatum while adrenergic compounds were inactive. From these studies the authors conclude that 125 I-LSD labels serotonin 5-HT 2 receptor sites in cortical regions with no indication that other receptor sites are labeled. In the olfactory tubercles and hypothalamus, 125 I-LSD labeling occurs predominantly or entirely at serotonic 5-HT 2 sites. In the striatum, 125 I-LSD labels approximately equal proportions of serotonergic and dopaminergic sites. These data indicate that 125 I-LSD labels serotonin receptors in vivo and suggests that appropriate derivatives of 2I-LSD may prove useful for tomographic imaging of serotonin 5-HT 2 receptors in the mammalian cortex

  6. Conformational Plasticity of the Influenza A M2 Transmembrane Helix in Lipid Bilayers Under Varying pH, Drug Binding and Membrane Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fanghao; Luo, Wenbin; Cady, Sarah D.; Hong, Mei

    2010-01-01

    Membrane proteins change their conformations to respond to environmental cues, thus conformational plasticity is important for function. The influenza A M2 protein forms an acid-activated proton channel important for the virus lifecycle. Here we have used solid-state NMR spectroscopy to examine the conformational plasticity of membrane-bound transmembrane domain of M2 (M2TM). 13C and 15N chemical shifts indicate coupled conformational changes of several pore-facing residues due to changes in bilayer thickness, drug binding and pH. The structural changes are attributed to the formation of a well-defined helical kink at G34 in the drug-bound state and in thick lipid bilayers, non-ideal backbone conformation of the secondary-gate residue V27 in the presence of drug, and non-ideal conformation of the proton-sensing residue H37 at high pH. The chemical shifts constrained the (ϕ, ψ) torsion angles for three basis states, the equilibrium among which explains the multiple resonances per site in the NMR spectra under different combinations of bilayer thickness, drug binding and pH conditions. Thus, conformational plasticity is important for the proton conduction and inhibition of M2TM. The study illustrates the utility of NMR chemical shifts for probing the structural plasticity and folding of membrane proteins. PMID:20883664

  7. Brain serotonin 2A receptor binding: Relations to body mass index, tobacco and alcohol use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erritzoe, D.; Frokjaer, V. G.; Haugbol, S.

    2009-01-01

    receptor (5-HT(2A)) in humans, we tested in 136 healthy human subjects if body mass index (BMI), degree of alcohol consumption and tobacco smoking was associated to the cerebral in vivo 5-HT(2A) receptor binding as measured with (18)F-altanserin PET. The subjects' BMI's ranged from 18.4 to 42.8 (25.......2+/-4.3) kg/m(2). Cerebral cortex 5-HT(2A) binding was significantly positively correlated to BMI, whereas no association between cortical 5-HT(2A) receptor binding and alcohol or tobacco use was detected. We suggest that our observation is driven by a lower central 5-HT level in overweight people, leading...

  8. Harmaline competitively inhibits [3H]MK-801 binding to the NMDA receptor in rabbit brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, W; Aloyo, V J; Harvey, J A

    1997-10-03

    Harmaline, a beta-carboline derivative, is known to produce tremor through a direct activation of cells in the inferior olive. However, the receptor(s) through which harmaline acts remains unknown. It was recently reported that the tremorogenic actions of harmaline could be blocked by the noncompetitive NMDA channel blocker, MK-801. This study examined whether the blockade of harmaline's action, in the rabbit, by MK-801 was due to a pharmacological antagonism at the MK-801 binding site. This was accomplished by measurement of [3H]MK-801 binding in membrane fractions derived from tissue containing the inferior olivary nucleus and from cerebral cortex. Harmaline completely displaced saturable [3H]MK-801 binding in both the inferior olive and cortex with apparent IC50 values of 60 and 170 microM, respectively. These IC50 values are consistent with the high doses of harmaline required to produce tremor, e.g., 10-30 mg/kg. Non-linear curve fitting analysis of [3H]MK-801 saturation experiments indicated that [3H]MK-801 bound to a single site and that harmaline's displacement of [3H]MK-801 binding to the NMDA receptor was competitive as indicated by a shift in Kd but not in Bmax. In addition, a Schild plot gave a slope that was not significantly different from 1 indicating that harmaline was producing a displacement of [3H]MK-801 from its binding site within the NMDA cation channel and not through an action at the glutamate or other allosteric sites on the NMDA receptor. These findings provide in vitro evidence that the competitive blockade of harmaline-induced tremor by MK-801 occurs within the calcium channel coupled to the NMDA receptor. Our hypothesis is that harmaline produces tremor by acting as an inverse agonist at the MK-801 binding site and thus opening the cation channel.

  9. [11C]Harmine Binding to Brain Monoamine Oxidase A: Test-Retest Properties and Noninvasive Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanderigo, Francesca; D'Agostino, Alexandra E; Joshi, Nandita; Schain, Martin; Kumar, Dileep; Parsey, Ramin V; DeLorenzo, Christine; Mann, J John

    2018-02-08

    Inhibition of the isoform A of monoamine oxidase (MAO-A), a mitochondrial enzyme catalyzing deamination of monoamine neurotransmitters, is useful in treatment of depression and anxiety disorders. [ 11 C]harmine, a MAO-A PET radioligand, has been used to study mood disorders and antidepressant treatment. However, [ 11 C]harmine binding test-retest characteristics have to date only been partially investigated. Furthermore, since MAO-A is ubiquitously expressed, no reference region is available, thus requiring arterial blood sampling during PET scanning. Here, we investigate [ 11 C]harmine binding measurements test-retest properties; assess effects of using a minimally invasive input function estimation on binding quantification and repeatability; and explore binding potentials estimation using a reference region-free approach. Quantification of [ 11 C]harmine distribution volume (V T ) via kinetic models and graphical analyses was compared based on absolute test-retest percent difference (TRPD), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and identifiability. The optimal procedure was also used with a simultaneously estimated input function in place of the measured curve. Lastly, an approach for binding potentials quantification in absence of a reference region was evaluated. [ 11 C]harmine V T estimates quantified using arterial blood and kinetic modeling showed average absolute TRPD values of 7.7 to 15.6 %, and ICC values between 0.56 and 0.86, across brain regions. Using simultaneous estimation (SIME) of input function resulted in V T estimates close to those obtained using arterial input function (r = 0.951, slope = 1.073, intercept = - 1.037), with numerically but not statistically higher test-retest difference (range 16.6 to 22.0 %), but with overall poor ICC values, between 0.30 and 0.57. Prospective studies using [ 11 C]harmine are possible given its test-retest repeatability when binding is quantified using arterial blood. Results with SIME of

  10. Homo sapiens-Specific Binding Site Variants within Brain Exclusive Enhancers Are Subject to Accelerated Divergence across Human Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehra, Rabail; Abbasi, Amir Ali

    2018-03-01

    Empirical assessments of human accelerated noncoding DNA frgaments have delineated presence of many cis-regulatory elements. Enhancers make up an important category of such accelerated cis-regulatory elements that efficiently control the spatiotemporal expression of many developmental genes. Establishing plausible reasons for accelerated enhancer sequence divergence in Homo sapiens has been termed significant in various previously published studies. This acceleration by including closely related primates and archaic human data has the potential to open up evolutionary avenues for deducing present-day brain structure. This study relied on empirically confirmed brain exclusive enhancers to avoid any misjudgments about their regulatory status and categorized among them a subset of enhancers with an exceptionally accelerated rate of lineage specific divergence in humans. In this assorted set, 13 distinct transcription factor binding sites were located that possessed unique existence in humans. Three of 13 such sites belonging to transcription factors SOX2, RUNX1/3, and FOS/JUND possessed single nucleotide variants that made them unique to H. sapiens upon comparisons with Neandertal and Denisovan orthologous sequences. These variants modifying the binding sites in modern human lineage were further substantiated as single nucleotide polymorphisms via exploiting 1000 Genomes Project Phase3 data. Long range haplotype based tests laid out evidence of positive selection to be governing in African population on two of the modern human motif modifying alleles with strongest results for SOX2 binding site. In sum, our study acknowledges acceleration in noncoding regulatory landscape of the genome and highlights functional parts within it to have undergone accelerated divergence in present-day human population.

  11. Modification by oxazepam of the diurnal variations in brain 125I-melatonin binding sites in sham-operated and pinealectomized rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anis, Y.; Zisapel, N.; Nir, I.; Schmidt, U.

    1992-01-01

    Sham-operated and pinealectomized male rats were maintained at 14 h light: 10 h dark cycles (lights-on 5.00 h) and injected daily, for 14 days, with oxazepam or vehicle. 125 I-melatonin binding was recorded in synaptosomes prepared at 10.00, 18.00, and 24.00 h from the hypothalamus, hippocampus and medulla-pons of the rats. In the sham-operated, vehicle treated rats, specific 125 I-melatonin binding in all brain areas studied was higher at 18.00 h, whereas in the oxazepam-treated animals, binding was higher at 24.00 h than at the other times tested. In the pinealectomized, vehicle-treated rats, the binding recorded at 18.00 h in all three brain areas, was lower than at the other times of day tested. Oxazepam treatment decreased 125 I-melatonin binding at 24.00 h in the hippocampus and medulla-pons of the pinealectomized rats and did not significantly affect the binding in the hypothalamus. These results indicate the ability of oxazepam, pinealectomy and their combination, to manipulate the diurnal variations in 125 I-melatonin binding sites in the rat brain

  12. Brain serotonin 4 receptor binding is associated with the cortisol awakening response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Gustav R; Fisher, Patrick M; Dyssegaard, Agnete

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin signalling is considered critical for an appropriate and dynamic adaptation to stress. Previously, we have shown that prefrontal serotonin transporter (SERT) binding is positively associated with the cortisol awakening response (CAR) (Frokjaer et al., 2013), which is an index of hypotha...

  13. Binding and functional pharmacological characteristics of gepant-type antagonists in rat brain and mesenteric arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheykhzade, Majid; Amandi, Nilofar; Pla, Monica Vidal

    2017-01-01

    AIM: The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is found in afferent sensory nerve fibers innervating the resistance arteries and plays a pivotal role in a number of neurovascular diseases such as migraine and subarachnoid bleedings. The present study investigates the binding and ant...

  14. Lipid Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gijsje Koenderink

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology is a multidisciplinary field that covers a vast and diverse array of devices and machines derived from engineering, physics, materials science, chemistry and biology. These devices have found applications in biomedical sciences, such as targeted drug delivery, bio-imaging, sensing and diagnosis of pathologies at early stages. In these applications, nano-devices typically interface with the plasma membrane of cells. On the other hand, naturally occurring nanostructures in biology have been a source of inspiration for new nanotechnological designs and hybrid nanostructures made of biological and non-biological, organic and inorganic building blocks. Lipids, with their amphiphilicity, diversity of head and tail chemistry, and antifouling properties that block nonspecific binding to lipid-coated surfaces, provide a powerful toolbox for nanotechnology. This review discusses the progress in the emerging field of lipid nanotechnology.

  15. Opioid transport by ATP-binding cassette transporters at the blood-brain barrier: implications for neuropsychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournier, Nicolas; Declèves, Xavier; Saubaméa, Bruno; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Cisternino, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Some of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters like P-glycoprotein (P-gp; ABCB1, MDR1), BCRP (ABCG2) and MRPs (ABCCs) that are present at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) influence the brain pharmacokinetics (PK) of their substrates by restricting their uptake or enhancing their clearance from the brain into the blood, which has consequences for their CNS pharmacodynamics (PD). Opioid drugs have been invaluable tools for understanding the PK-PD relationships of these ABC-transporters. The effects of morphine, methadone and loperamide on the CNS are modulated by P-gp. This review examines the ways in which other opioid drugs and some of their active metabolites interact with ABC transporters and suggests new mechanisms that may be involved in the variability of the response of the CNS to these drugs like carrier-mediated system belonging to the solute carrier (SLC) superfamily. Exposure to opioids may also alter the expression of ABC transporters. P-gp can be overproduced during morphine treatment, suggesting that the drug has a direct or, more likely, an indirect action. Variations in cerebral neurotransmitters during exposure to opioids and the release of cytokines during pain could be new endogenous stimuli affecting transporter synthesis. This review concludes with an analysis of the pharmacotherapeutic and clinical impacts of the interactions between ABC transporters and opioids.

  16. Characterization of high affinity [3H]triazolam binding in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, M.; Concas, A.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1986-01-01

    The hypnotic Triazolam (TZ), a triazolo (1,4)-benzodiazepine, displays a short physiological half life and has been used for the treatment of insomnia related to anxiety states. Specific binding properties of this recently tritiated TZ were characterized. The authors major objectives were the direct measurement of the temperature dependence and the GABA effect on [ 3 H]TZ binding. Saturation studies showed a shift to lower affinity at 37 0 C (K/sub d/ = 0.25 +/- 0.01 nM at O 0 C; K/sub d/ = 1.46 +/- 0.03 nM at 37 0 C) while the B/sub max/ values remained unchanged (1003 +/- 37 fmoles/mg prot. at 0 0 C and 1001 +/- 43 fmoles/mg prot. at 37 0 C). Inhibition studies showed that [ 3 H]TZ binding displayed no GABA shift at 0 0 C(K/sub i/ 0.37 +/- 0.03 nM/- GABA and K/sub i/ = 0.55 +/- 0.13 nM/+GABA) but a nearly two-fold shift was apparent at 37 0 C (K/sub i/ = 2.92 +/- 0.2 nM/-GABA; K/sub i/ = 1.37 +/- 0.11 mM/+GABA). These results were also confirmed by saturation studies in the presence or absence of GABA showing a shift to higher affinity in the presence of GABA only at 37 0 C. In Ro 15-1788/[ 3 H]TZ competition experiments the presence of GABA did not affect the inhibitory potency of Ro 15-1788 on [ 3 H]TZ binding at both temperatures. In conclusion [ 3 H]TZ binding showed an extremely high affinity for benzodiazepine receptors. In contrast to reported literature, the findings suggest that TZ interacts with benzodiazepine receptors similar to other benzodiazepine agonists

  17. The brain 5-HT4 receptor binding is down-regulated in the Flinders Sensitive Line depression model and in response to paroxetine administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Cecilie Löe; Marcussen, Anders Bue; Wegener, Gregers

    2009-01-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT(4)) receptor may be implicated in depression and is a new potential target for antidepressant treatment. We have investigated the brain 5-HT(4) receptor [(3)H]SB207145 binding in the Flinders Sensitive Line rat depression model by quantitative receptor autoradiography....... In the Flinders Sensitive Line, the 5-HT(4) receptor and 5-HT transporter binding were decreased in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus, and the changes in binding were directly correlated within the dorsal hippocampus. Chronic but not acute paroxetine administration caused a 16-47% down-regulation of 5-HT(4......) receptor binding in all regions evaluated including the basal ganglia and hippocampus, while 5-HT depletion increased the 5-HT(4) receptor binding in the dorsal hippocampus, hypothalamus, and lateral globus pallidus. In comparison, the 5-HT(2A) receptor binding was decreased in the frontal and cingulate...

  18. Regional blockade by neuroleptic drugs of in vivo /sup 3/H-spiperone binding in the rat brain. Relation to blockade of apomorphine induced hyperactivity and stereotypies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, C; Haglund, L; Oegren, S O; Aengeby, T [Astra Lackemedel AB, Soedertaelje (Sweden). Dept. of Pharmacology

    1981-01-01

    The regional prevention by neuroleptic drugs of specific in vivo /sup 3/H-spiperone binding was studied in the rat brain. L-sulpiride, thioridazine and clozapine were found to reduce the /sup 3/H-spiperone bindings selectively in the olfactory tubercle, septum, substantia nigra and frontal cortex but not the striatum at dose levels which preferentially block apomorphine (APO) induced hyperactivity. The maximal prevention of specific /sup 3/H-spiperone binding by l-sulpiride and clozapine reached 60-80% in the former structures while the displacement of striatal /sup 3/H-spiperone binding did not exceed 40%. In contrast to l-sulpiride, thioridazine and clozapine both chlorpromazine and haloperidol reduced the /sup 3/H-spiperone binding to the same extent in all regions studied. Chlorpromazine and haloperidol were potent in prevention of striatal /sup 3/H-spiperone binding in vivo which reached 60-80% in this structure.

  19. Regional blockade by neuroleptic drugs of in vivo 3H-spiperone binding in the rat brain. Relation to blockade of apomorphine induced hyperactivity and stereotypies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, C.; Haglund, L.; Oegren, S.-O.; Aengeby, T.

    1981-01-01

    The regional prevention by neuroleptic drugs of specific in vivo 3 H-spiperone binding was studied in the rat brain. L-sulpiride, thioridazine and clozapine were found to reduce the 3 H-spiperone bindings selectively in the olfactory tubercle, septum, substantia nigra and frontal cortex but not the striatum at dose levels which preferentially block apomorphine (APO) induced hyperactivity. The maximal prevention of specific 3 H-spiperone binding by l-sulpiride and clozapine reached 60-80% in the former structures while the displacement of striatal 3 H-spiperone binding did not exceed 40%. In contrast to l-sulpiride, thioridazine and clozapine both chlorpromazine and haloperidol reduced the 3 H-spiperone binding to the same extent in all regions studied. Chlorpromazine and haloperidol were potent in prevention of striatal 3 H-spiperone binding in vivo which reached 60-80% in this structure. (Author)

  20. Association of Lipid Peroxidation and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor with Executive Function in Adolescent Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Dwight F; Naiberg, Melanie R; Andreazza, Ana C; Scola, Gustavo; Dickstein, Daniel P; Goldstein, Benjamin I

    2017-02-01

    Executive dysfunction is common and impairing in youth bipolar disorder (BD), and oxidative stress (OS) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have been implicated in executive deficits of adult BD. This study aimed to determine the association between OS and executive dysfunction in BD adolescents and the influence of BDNF on this association. Serum levels of lipid hydroperoxides (LPH) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) and BDNF levels were measured in 29 BD and 25 control adolescents. The intra-extra-dimensional (IED) set-shifting task assessed executive function. Lower IED scores indicated better performance. High and low BDNF subgroups were defined by median split. IED Z-scores were impaired in the BD group compared to controls, whereas biomarker levels were not significantly different between groups. LPH-BDNF correlations were significantly different between BD and controls (Z = 2.046, p = 0.041). In high BDNF BD subjects, LPH was significantly positively correlated with IED completed stage trials (ρ = 0.755, p = 0.001) and pre-extra-dimensional shift errors (ρ = 0.588, p = 0.017). Correlations were opposite in controls. In a linear model, LPH, BDNF, and the LPH-BDNF interaction each significantly explained variance of IED total trials (adjusted) (model r 2  = 0.187, F = 2.811, p = 0.035). There is a negative association between LPH and executive function in BD adolescents, which may be modulated by BDNF. LPH and BDNF may be useful biomarkers of executive function in BD. These findings highlight the importance of examining multiple peripheral biomarkers in relation to cognitive functions in BD adolescents. Future studies should explore these factors in longitudinal designs to determine the directionality of observed associations.

  1. [H-3]dihydroalprenolol binding to beta adrenergic receptors in multiple sclerosis brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeinstra, E; Wilczak, N; De Keyser, J

    2000-01-01

    By using immunocytochemistry we previously reported the absence of beta(2) adrenergic receptors on astrocytes in multiple sclerosis (MS) white matter. Here, we measured beta(1) and beta(2) adrenergic receptor concentrations in postmortem brain sections of six MS patients and six controls by using

  2. Binding characteristics of brain-derived neurotrophic factor to its receptors on neurons from the chick embryo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Tebar, A.; Barde, Y.A.

    1988-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein known to support the survival of embryonic sensory neurons and retinal ganglion cells, was derivatized with 125I-Bolton-Hunter reagent and obtained in a biologically active, radioactive form (125I-BDNF). Using dorsal root ganglion neurons from chick embryos at 9 d of development, the basic physicochemical parameters of the binding of 125I-BDNF with its receptors were established. Two different classes of receptors were found, with dissociation constants of 1.7 x 10(-11) M (high-affinity receptors) and 1.3 x 10(-9) M (low-affinity receptors). Unlabeled BDNF competed with 125I-BDNF for binding to the high-affinity receptors with an inhibition constant essentially identical to the dissociation constant of the labeled protein: 1.2 x 10(-11) M. The association and dissociation rates from both types of receptors were also determined, and the dissociation constants calculated from these kinetic experiments were found to correspond to the results obtained from steady-state binding. The number of high-affinity receptors (a few hundred per cell soma) was 15 times lower than that of low-affinity receptors. No high-affinity receptors were found on sympathetic neurons, known not to respond to BDNF, although specific binding of 125I-BDNF to these cells was detected at a high concentration of the radioligand. These results are discussed and compared with those obtained with nerve growth factor on the same neuronal populations.

  3. Binding characteristics of brain-derived neurotrophic factor to its receptors on neurons from the chick embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Tebar, A.; Barde, Y.A.

    1988-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein known to support the survival of embryonic sensory neurons and retinal ganglion cells, was derivatized with 125I-Bolton-Hunter reagent and obtained in a biologically active, radioactive form (125I-BDNF). Using dorsal root ganglion neurons from chick embryos at 9 d of development, the basic physicochemical parameters of the binding of 125I-BDNF with its receptors were established. Two different classes of receptors were found, with dissociation constants of 1.7 x 10(-11) M (high-affinity receptors) and 1.3 x 10(-9) M (low-affinity receptors). Unlabeled BDNF competed with 125I-BDNF for binding to the high-affinity receptors with an inhibition constant essentially identical to the dissociation constant of the labeled protein: 1.2 x 10(-11) M. The association and dissociation rates from both types of receptors were also determined, and the dissociation constants calculated from these kinetic experiments were found to correspond to the results obtained from steady-state binding. The number of high-affinity receptors (a few hundred per cell soma) was 15 times lower than that of low-affinity receptors. No high-affinity receptors were found on sympathetic neurons, known not to respond to BDNF, although specific binding of 125I-BDNF to these cells was detected at a high concentration of the radioligand. These results are discussed and compared with those obtained with nerve growth factor on the same neuronal populations

  4. SAXS Study of Sterically Stabilized Lipid Nanocarriers Functionalized by DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelov, Borislav; Angelova, Angelina; Filippov, Sergey; Karlsson, Göran; Terrill, Nick; Lesieur, Sylviane; Štěpánek, Petr

    2012-03-01

    The structure of novel spontaneously self-assembled plasmid DNA/lipid complexes is investigated by means of synchrotron radiation small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and Cryo-TEM imaging. Liquid crystalline (LC) hydrated lipid systems are prepared using the non-ionic lipids monoolein and DOPE-PEG2000 and the cationic amphiphile CTAB. The employed plasmid DNA (pDNA) is encoding for the human protein brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). A coexistence of nanoparticulate objects with different LC inner organizations is established. A transition from bicontinuous membrane sponges, cubosome intermediates and unilamelar liposomes to multilamellar vesicles, functionalized by pDNA, is favoured upon binding and compaction of pBDNF onto the cationic PEGylated lipid nanocarriers. The obtained sterically stabilized multicompartment nanoobjects, with confined supercoiled plasmid DNA (pBDNF), are important in the context of multicompartment lipid nanocarriers of interest for gene therapy of neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. SAXS Study of Sterically Stabilized Lipid Nanocarriers Functionalized by DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelov, Borislav; Filippov, Sergey; Štepánek, Petr; Angelova, Angelina; Lesieur, Sylviane; Karlsson, Göran; Terrill, Nick

    2012-01-01

    The structure of novel spontaneously self-assembled plasmid DNA/lipid complexes is investigated by means of synchrotron radiation small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and Cryo-TEM imaging. Liquid crystalline (LC) hydrated lipid systems are prepared using the non-ionic lipids monoolein and DOPE-PEG 2000 and the cationic amphiphile CTAB. The employed plasmid DNA (pDNA) is encoding for the human protein brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). A coexistence of nanoparticulate objects with different LC inner organizations is established. A transition from bicontinuous membrane sponges, cubosome intermediates and unilamelar liposomes to multilamellar vesicles, functionalized by pDNA, is favoured upon binding and compaction of pBDNF onto the cationic PEGylated lipid nanocarriers. The obtained sterically stabilized multicompartment nanoobjects, with confined supercoiled plasmid DNA (pBDNF), are important in the context of multicompartment lipid nanocarriers of interest for gene therapy of neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Multiple [3H]imipramine binding sites in brains of male and female Fawn-Hooded and Long-Evans rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ieni, J.R.; Zukin, S.R.; Praag, H.M. van; Tobach, E.; Barr, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    Comparisons of high- and low-affinity [ 3 H]imipramine binding to whole brain homogenates from adult male and female rats of the Fawn-Hooded and Long-Evans strains were performed. Most strikingly, no significant differences were observed between the two strains in any of the binding parameters, indicating that brain [ 3 H]imipramine binding sites, which may be related to the serotonergic uptake process, appear normal in a strain of rats with serotonin platelet storage pool disease. However, a significant sex difference in high- but not low-affinity whole brain [ 3 H]imipramine Bsub(max) values was observed, with females of both strains having higher densities than males. (Auth.)

  7. Quantitative autoradiography of brain binding sites for the vesicular acetylcholine transport blocker 2-(4-phenylpiperidino)cyclohexanol (AH5183)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marien, M.R.; Parsons, S.M.; Altar, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    2-(4-Phenylpiperidino)cyclohexanol (AH5183) is a noncompetitive and potent inhibitor of high-affinity acetylcholine transport into cholinergic vesicles. It is reported here that [ 3 H]AH5183 binds specifically and saturably to slide-mounted sections of the rat forebrain (Kd = 1.1 to 2.2 X 10(-8) M; Bmax = 286 to 399 fmol/mg of protein). The association and dissociation rate constants for [ 3 H]AH5183 binding are 8.6 X 10(6) M-1 X min-1 and 0.18 min-1, respectively. Bound [ 3 H]AH5183 can be displaced by nonradioactive AH5183 and by the structural analog (2 alpha,3 beta,4A beta,8A alpha)-decahydro-3-(4-phenyl-1-piperidinyl)-2- naphthalenol but not by 10 microM concentrations of the cholinergic drugs acetylcholine, choline, atropine, hexamethonium, eserine, or hemicholinium-3 or by the structurally related compounds 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine, (+/-)-N-allylnormetazocine (SKF 10,047), levoxadrol, or dexoxadrol. Quantitative autoradiography reveals that [ 3 H]AH5183 binding sites are distributed heterogenously throughout the rat forebrain and are highly localized to cholinergic nerve terminal regions. At the level of the caudate nucleus-putamen, the highest concentrations of saturable [ 3 H]AH5183 binding (713-751 fmol/mg of protein) are found in the vertical limb of the diagonal band and the olfactory tubercle, with lesser amounts (334-516 fmol/mg of protein) in the caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, superficial layers of the cerebral cortex, and the primary olfactory cortex. At day 7 after transsection of the left fimbria, [ 3 H]AH5183 binding and choline acetyltransferase activity in the left hippocampus were reduced by 33 +/- 6% and 61 +/- 7%, respectively. These findings indicate that [ 3 H]AH5183 binds to a unique recognition site in rat brain that is topographically associated with cholinergic nerve terminals

  8. Retinol-Binding Protein 4 and Lipids Prospectively Measured During Early to Mid-Pregnancy in Relation to Preeclampsia and Preterm Birth Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendola, Pauline; Ghassabian, Akhgar; Mills, James L; Zhang, Cuilin; Tsai, Michael Y; Liu, Aiyi; Yeung, Edwina H

    2017-06-01

    Maternal retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) and lipids may relate to preeclampsia and preterm birth risk but longitudinal data are lacking. This study examines these biomarkers longitudinally during pregnancy in relation to preeclampsia and preterm birth risk. Maternal serum samples from the Calcium for Preeclampsia Prevention (CPEP) trial were analyzed at baseline: average 15 gestational weeks; mid-pregnancy: average 27 weeks; and at >34 weeks. We measured RBP4, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides and lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a)). Cross-sectional logistic regression analyses estimated the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for preterm preeclampsia (n = 63), term preeclampsia (n = 104), and preterm delivery (n = 160) associated with RBP4 and lipids at baseline and mid-pregnancy compared with controls (n = 136). Longitudinal trajectories across pregnancy were assessed using mixed linear models with fixed effects. Adjusted models included clinical and demographic factors. RBP4 concentrations at baseline and mid-pregnancy were associated with a 4- to 8-fold increase in preterm preeclampsia risk but were not associated with term preeclampsia. RBP4 measured mid-pregnancy was also associated with preterm birth (OR = 6.67, 95% CI: 1.65, 26.84). Higher triglyceride concentrations in mid-pregnancy were associated with a 2- to 4-fold increased risk for both preeclampsia and preterm birth. Longitudinal models demonstrate that both preterm preeclampsia and preterm birth cases had elevated RBP4 throughout gestation. Elevated RBP4 is detectable early in pregnancy and its strong relation with preterm preeclampsia merits further investigation and confirmation to evaluate its potential use as a predictor, particularly among high-risk women. © Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of American Journal of Hypertension Ltd 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employees(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  9. Identification of binding sites for an insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) in the median eminence of the rat brain by quantitative autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohannon, N.J.; Figlewicz, D.P.; Corp, E.S.; Wilcox, B.J.; Porte, D. Jr.; Baskin, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    The microanatomical location of IGF-I binding in the rat brain was determined by in vitro autoradiography with slide-mounted sections of frozen brain. Sections incubated in 0.1 nM [ 125 I]-iodo-IGF-I produced a dense grain concentration in regions of the autoradiographic image corresponding to the external palisade zone of the median eminence; other hypothalamic regions were not so heavily labeled. This reaction was significantly reduced in the presence of 100 nM IGF-I. Measurement of binding by computer digital image analysis of autoradiographic images showed that specific binding for IGF-I in the median eminence was 41.3 +/- 8 X 10(-3) fmol/mm2 (mean +/- SEM); nonspecific binding was 11.9 +/- 1.8 X 10(-3) fmol/mm2. In contrast, specific binding to other hypothalamic regions was uniformly lower. In a separate experiment, 1000 nM unlabeled insulin was added. Without insulin, specific binding was 23 +/- 0.9 X 10(-3) fmol/mm2; nonspecific binding was 8 +/- 0.5 X 10(-3) fmol/mm2. In the presence of 1000 nM unlabeled insulin, specific binding for [ 125 I]-iodo-IGF-I was 23 +/- 1 X 10(-3) fmol/mm2. The results suggest that a high concentration of receptors for an IGF-I-like molecule is present in the median eminence

  10. Effects of hypoxia-ischemia and MK-801 treatment on the binding of a phencyclidine analogue in the developing rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverstein, F.S.; McDonald, J.W. III; Bommarito, M.; Johnston, M.V.

    1990-01-01

    The phencyclidine analogue [ 3 H](1-[2-thienyl]cyclohexyl)piperidine ( 3 H-TCP) binds to the ion channel associated with the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channel complex. In vitro autoradiography indicates that the distribution of 3 H-TCP binding in brain closely parallels that of [ 3 H]glutamate binding to the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. In nine 7-day-old rats, an acute focal hypoxic-ischemic insult produced by unilateral carotid artery ligation and subsequent exposure to 8% oxygen acutely reduced 3 H-TCP binding ipsilateral to the ligation by 30% in the CA1, by 27% in the CA3, by 26% in the dentate gyrus, and by 17% in the striatum compared with values from the contralateral hemisphere. In 10 littermates that received 1 mg/kg of the neuroprotective noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist MK-801 immediately before hypoxic exposure, the regional distribution of 3 H-TCP binding in hypoxic-ischemic brain was relatively preserved and there were no interhemispheric asymmetries in 3 H-TCP binding densities. In addition, in three unoperated rats decapitated 24 hours after MK-801 treatment, 3 H-TCP binding was reduced by 15-35%; similar bilateral suppression of 3 H-TCP binding was detected in MK-801-treated ligates. Our data indicate that 3 H-TCP autoradiography can be used to assay the efficacy of neuroprotective agents in this experimental model of perinatal stroke

  11. (/sup 3/H)Spiperone binding sites in brain: autoradiographic localization of multiple receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacios, J M; Niehoff, D L; Kuhar, M J [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA). School of Medicine

    1981-01-01

    (/sup 3/H)Spiperone ((/sup 3/H)SP) binding sites were localized by light microscopic autoradiography, after in vitro labelling. The kinetic and pharmacological characteristics of these binding sites were studied in slide-mounted sections of rat forebrain, and optimal labeling conditions were defined. Autoradiograms were obtained by apposing emulsion-coated coverslips to labeled sections. Differential drug sensitivity allowed the selective displacement of (/sup 3/H)SP from dopamine receptors by ADTN, from serotonin receptors by cinanserin, from both by haloperidol and from unique spiperone sites by unlabeled spiperone. The various sites presented a differential anatomical localization. For example, only dopaminergic sites were found in the glomerular layer of the olfactory bulb; only serotonergic sites were found in lamina IV of the neocortex, and a high concentration of unique spiperone sites were found in parts of the hippocampus.

  12. Brain Serotonin Transporter Binding In a Minipig Model of Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillethorup, Thea Pinholt; Glud, Andreas Nørgaard; Sørensen, Jens Christian Hedemann

    minipigs were implanted in the cisterna magna with a catheter connected to a subcutaneous titanium injection port under sterile conditions. Six-eight weeks after recovery from the catheter implant, and after injections of sterile saline alone to verify patency, minipigs were scanned at baseline with [11C......]-3-amino-4-(2-dimethylaminomethyl-phenylsulfanyl)-benzonitrile (11C-DASB), a label of SERT availability. Four pigs then received eight weekly injections of lactacystin dissolved in sterile saline, and one pig received saline alone, directly into the CSF through the access port. They were scanned...... with DASB again after a cumulative dose of 200μg lactacystin. PET data were registered to an average minipig MRI atlas and processed using PMOD software. The binding potential (BPND) of DASB was obtained with the Logan graphical analysis and cerebellum activity as a region of non-displaceable binding...

  13. Kinetic analysis of [11C]vorozole binding in the human brain with positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Jean; Kim, Sung Won; Pareto, Deborah; Telang, Frank; Wang, Gene-Jack; Fowler, Joanna S; Biegon, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Using positron emission tomography, we investigated the kinetics of [11C]vorozole ([11C]VOR), a radiotracer for the enzyme aromatase that catalyzes the last step in estrogen biosynthesis. Six subjects were scanned under baseline conditions followed by retest 2 weeks later. The retest was followed by a blocking study with 2.5 mg of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole. The binding potential (BP(A)ND) was estimated from a Lassen plot using the total tissue distribution volume (VT) for baseline and blocked. for the thalamus was found to be 15 times higher than that for the cerebellum. From the letrozole studies, we found that [11C]VOR exhibits a slow binding compartment (small k4) that has a nonspecific and a blockable component. Because of the sensitivity of VT to variations in k4, a common value was used for the four highest binding regions. We also considered the tissue uptake to plasma ratio for 60 to 90 minutes as an outcome measure. Using the ratio method, the difference between the highest and lowest was 2.4 compared to 3.5 for the VT. The ratio method underestimates the high regions but is less variable and may be more suitable for patient studies. Because of its kinetics and distribution, this tracer is not a candidate for a bolus infusion or reference tissue methods.

  14. Biological sex influences learning strategy preference and muscarinic receptor binding in specific brain regions of prepubertal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissom, Elin M; Hawley, Wayne R; Hodges, Kelly S; Fawcett-Patel, Jessica M; Dohanich, Gary P

    2013-04-01

    According to the theory of multiple memory systems, specific brain regions interact to determine how the locations of goals are learned when rodents navigate a spatial environment. A number of factors influence the type of strategy used by rodents to remember the location of a given goal in space, including the biological sex of the learner. We recently found that prior to puberty male rats preferred a striatum-dependent stimulus-response strategy over a hippocampus-dependent place strategy when solving a dual-solution task, while age-matched females showed no strategy preference. Because the cholinergic system has been implicated in learning strategy and is known to be sexually dimorphic prior to puberty, we explored the relationship between learning strategy and muscarinic receptor binding in specific brain regions of prepubertal males and female rats. We confirmed our previous finding that at 28 days of age a significantly higher proportion of prepubertal males preferred a stimulus-response learning strategy than a place strategy to solve a dual-solution visible platform water maze task. Equal proportions of prepubertal females preferred stimulus-response or place strategies. Profiles of muscarinic receptor binding as assessed by autoradiography varied according to strategy preference. Regardless of biological sex, prepubertal rats that preferred stimulus-response strategy exhibited lower ratios of muscarinic receptor binding in the hippocampus relative to the dorsolateral striatum compared to rats that preferred place strategy. Importantly, much of the variance in this ratio was related to differences in the ventral hippocampus to a greater extent than the dorsal hippocampus. The ratios of muscarinic receptors in the hippocampus relative to the basolateral amygdala also were lower in rats that preferred stimulus-response strategy over place strategy. Results confirm that learning strategy preference varies with biological sex in prepubertal rats with males

  15. Binding kinetics of 11C-N-methyl piperidyl benzilate (11C-NMPB) in a rhesus monkey brain using the cerebellum as a reference region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Takashi; Tanaka, Masayasu; Suzuki, Kasutoshi; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Inoue, Osamu

    2005-01-01

    The binding kinetics of' 11 C-N-methyl piperidyl benzilate ( 11 C-NMPB) in rhesus monkey brain were studied using animal positron emission tomography (PET) (SHR2000). This study is intended to assess the validity of the method using the cerebellum as a reference region, and to evaluate the effects of anesthesia on 11 C -NMPB binding. Two monkeys, anesthetized with ketamine, received intravenous 11 C-NMPB alone (370-760 MBq, 11 C-NMPB accumulated densely in the striatum and cerebral cortex with time. In contrast, the tracer accumulation significantly decreased with increased doses of nonradioactive NMPB. In the cerebellum, on the other hand, the accumulation of 11 C-NMPB remained low and the tracer was slowly eliminated from the brain following the injection. 11 C-NMPB binding in the cerebellum was barely affected by the increased dose of nonradioactive NMPB. We thus concluded that the specific 11 C-NMPB binding was negligible in the cerebellum, and performed simplified evaluation of 11 C-NMPB binding in each brain region by a graphical method using the cerebellum as a reference region. PET was conducted 26 times, in total both in ketamine-anesthetized and awake monkeys (n=3 each). Measurements of 11 C-NMPB binding showed good run-to-run reproducibility within individual animals. When 11 C-NMPB binding was compared between ketamine-treated and awake animals, a significant increase in 11 C-NMPB binding was observed in the striatum but not in other brain regions of ketamine-treated animals. (author)

  16. Binding proteins for the regulatory subunit (RII-B) of brain cAMP-dependent protein kinase II: isolation and initial characterization of cDNA clones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregman, D.B.; Hu, E.; Rubin, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    In mammalian brain several proteins bind RII-B with high affinity. An example is P75, which co-purifies with RII-B and also complexes Ca 2+ -calmodulin. Thus, RII-B binding proteins (RBPs) might play a role in integrating the Ca 2+ and cAMP signalling pathways in the CNS. In order to study the structure and function of these polypeptides they have isolated cloned cDNAs for RBPs by screening brain λgt11 expression libraries using a functional assay: the binding of 32 P-labeled RII to fusion proteins produced by recombinants expressing RII binding domains. Inserts from rat brain recombinant clones λ7B and λ10B both hybridize to a brain mRNA of 7000 nucleotides. Northern gel analyses indicate that the putative RBP mRNA is also expressed in lung, but not in several other tissues. The λ7B insert was subcloned into the expression plasmid pINIA. A 50 kDa high affinity RII-B binding polypeptide accumulated in E. coli transformed with pINIA-7B. Two RBP cDNAs (λ77, λ100A) have been retrieved from a bovine λgt 11 library using a monoclonal antibody directed against P75 and the binding assay respectively. On Southern blots the insert from λ100A hybridizes to the cDNA insert from clones λ77, suggesting that λ 77 cDNA might contain sequences coding for both an RII binding domain and a P75 epitope. The bovine λ100A insert also hybridizes with the rat λ7B clone indicating that an RII binding domain is conserved in the two species

  17. Investigation and characterization of receptors for pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide in human brain by radioligand binding and chemical cross-linking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suda, K.; Smith, D.M.; Ghatei, M.A.; Murphy, J.K.; Bloom, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a novel peptide of hypothalamic origin which increases adenylate cyclase activity in rat anterior pituitary cell cultures. The 38-amino acid peptide shows a close sequence homology to vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Binding sites for PACAP in membranes from postmortem human brain tissue were studied using [ 125 I]PACAP27 as the radioligand. High specific binding sites (amount of specific binding measured at 0.25 nM [ 125 I]PACAP27 in femtomoles per mg protein +/- SEM; n = 4) were present in hypothalamus (344.5 +/- 13.0), brain stem (343.0 +/- 29.3), cerebellum (292.0 +/- 21.1), cortex (259.6 +/- 19.8), and basal ganglia (259.2 +/- 50.3). Specific binding sites in pituitary, although present, were less abundant (35.0 +/- 8.9). Binding of [ 125 I]PACAP27 was reversible and time, pH, and temperature dependent. Despite the homology with VIP, VIP was a poor inhibitor of [ 125 I]PACAP27 binding (IC50, greater than 1 microM) compared with PACAP27 (IC50, 0.5-1.3 nM) and PACAP38 (IC50, 0.2-1.3 nM). Scatchard plots of [ 125 I]PACAP27 binding showed the presence of both high and lower affinity sites. Chemical cross-linking of PACAP-binding sites revealed that [ 125 I]PACAP27 was bound to polypeptide chains of 67,000 and 48,000 mol wt. Thus, we have demonstrated the presence of PACAP-specific receptors in human brain which are not VIP receptors. This opens the possibility of PACAP functioning as a novel neurotransmitter/neuromodulator in human brain

  18. The influence of serotonin depletion on rat behavior in the Vogel test and brain 3H-zolpidem binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazar, M; Siemiatkowski, M; Bidziński, A; Członkowska, A; Sienkiewicz-Jarosz, H; Płaźnik, A

    1999-01-01

    The influence of p-chlorophenylalanine (p-CPA) and 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT)-induced serotonin depletion on rat behavior as well as on zolpidem's the behavioral effects and binding to some brain areas of zolpidem, was examined with the help of Vogel's punished drinking test and autoradiography, respectively. Moreover, changes in the serotonin levels and turnover rate were studied in the forebrain and brainstem of rats pretreated with various ligands at the benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptors (midazolam, bretazenil, abecarnil, zolpidem). These drugs were given at doses shown previously to significantly disinhibit animal behavior suppressed by punishment in the Vogel test (Nazar et al., 1997). It was found that serotonin decrease in the frontal cortex and hippocampus after p-CPA significantly and inversely correlated with rat behavior controlled by fear in the VT. p-CPA produced an anticonflict activity in the absence of effect on spontaneous drinking, pain threshold and motility of animals. All applied benzodiazepine receptor ligands decreased the 5-HT turnover rate in the frontal cortex and hippocampus, whereas in the brainstem only abecarnil and zolpidem diminished 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels. This part of the study replicated earlier data with neurotoxins and indicated that the anxiolytic-like effect of 5-HT depletion in some models of anxiety did not depend on changes in animal appetitive behavior or stimulus control. Moreover, the fact that all nonselective and selective (zolpidem) agonists of the type 1 benzodiazepine receptors seemed to produce the same anticonflict effect and decreasing 5-HT turnover indicates that this subtype of benzodiazepine receptor may be important for the interaction between brain 5-HT and GABA/BDZ systems. Accordingly, it was found that serotonin decrease enhanced the anticonflict effect of zolpidem in the Vogel test and increased 3H-zolpidem binding to the occipital cortex and substantia nigra. Altogether, the present study

  19. Analysis of specific 3H-diazepam binding in the brain of emotionally difference mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blednov, Yu.A.; Gordei, M.L.; Seredenin, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    A study of the behavior of inbred animals under conditions of emotional stress, of the biochemical parameters of the stress reaction, and of the effects of benzodiazepine tranquilizers, conducted in the authors' laboratory, showed that the character of the response to stress and the manifestation of the action of benzodiazepine depend on hereditary factors. The aim of this investigation was to study reception of tritium-labelled diazepam by brain cell membranes of C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice

  20. Different sensitivities to competitive inhibition of benzodiazepine receptor binding of {sup 11}C-iomazenil and {sup 11}C-flumazenil in rhesus monkey brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Osamu; Hosoi, Rie; Kobayashi, Kaoru [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Medical School; Itoh, Takashi; Gee, A.; Suzuki, Kazutoshi

    2001-04-01

    The in vivo binding kinetics of {sup 11}C-iomazenil were compared with those of {sup 11}C-flumazenil binding in rhesus monkey brain. The monkey was anesthetized with ketamine and intravenously injected with either {sup 11}C-iomazenil or {sup 11}C-flumazenil in combination with the coadministration of different doses of non-radioactive flumazenil (0, 5 and 20 {mu}g/kg). The regional distribution of {sup 11}C-iomazenil in the brain was similar to that of {sup 11}C-flumazenil, but the sensitivity of {sup 11}C-iomazenil binding to competitive inhibition by non-radioactive flumazenil was much less than that of {sup 11}C-flumazenil binding. A significant reduction in {sup 11}C-flumazenil binding in the cerebral cortex was observed with 20 {mu}g/kg of flumazenil, whereas a relatively smaller inhibition of {sup 11}C-iomazenil binding in the same region was observed with the same dose of flumazenil. These results suggest that {sup 11}C-flumazenil may be a superior radiotracer for estimating benzodiazepine receptor occupancy in the intact brain. (author)

  1. LIBP-Pred: web server for lipid binding proteins using structural network parameters; PDB mining of human cancer biomarkers and drug targets in parasites and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Munteanu, Cristian R; Postelnicu, Lucian; Prado-Prado, Francisco; Gestal, Marcos; Pazos, Alejandro

    2012-03-01

    Lipid-Binding Proteins (LIBPs) or Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins (FABPs) play an important role in many diseases such as different types of cancer, kidney injury, atherosclerosis, diabetes, intestinal ischemia and parasitic infections. Thus, the computational methods that can predict LIBPs based on 3D structure parameters became a goal of major importance for drug-target discovery, vaccine design and biomarker selection. In addition, the Protein Data Bank (PDB) contains 3000+ protein 3D structures with unknown function. This list, as well as new experimental outcomes in proteomics research, is a very interesting source to discover relevant proteins, including LIBPs. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are no general models to predict new LIBPs based on 3D structures. We developed new Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models based on 3D electrostatic parameters of 1801 different proteins, including 801 LIBPs. We calculated these electrostatic parameters with the MARCH-INSIDE software and they correspond to the entire protein or to specific protein regions named core, inner, middle, and surface. We used these parameters as inputs to develop a simple Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) classifier to discriminate 3D structure of LIBPs from other proteins. We implemented this predictor in the web server named LIBP-Pred, freely available at , along with other important web servers of the Bio-AIMS portal. The users can carry out an automatic retrieval of protein structures from PDB or upload their custom protein structural models from their disk created with LOMETS server. We demonstrated the PDB mining option performing a predictive study of 2000+ proteins with unknown function. Interesting results regarding the discovery of new Cancer Biomarkers in humans or drug targets in parasites have been discussed here in this sense.

  2. A polyether biotoxin binding site on the lipid-exposed face of the pore domain of Kv channels revealed by the marine toxin gambierol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopljar, Ivan; Labro, Alain J.; Cuypers, Eva; Johnson, Henry W. B.; Rainier, Jon D.; Tytgat, Jan; Snyders, Dirk J.

    2009-01-01

    Gambierol is a marine polycyclic ether toxin belonging to the group of ciguatera toxins. It does not activate voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) but inhibits Kv1 potassium channels by an unknown mechanism. While testing whether Kv2, Kv3, and Kv4 channels also serve as targets, we found that Kv3.1 was inhibited with an IC50 of 1.2 ± 0.2 nM, whereas Kv2 and Kv4 channels were insensitive to 1 μM gambierol. Onset of block was similar from either side of the membrane, and gambierol did not compete with internal cavity blockers. The inhibition did not require channel opening and could not be reversed by strong depolarization. Using chimeric Kv3.1–Kv2.1 constructs, the toxin sensitivity was traced to S6, in which T427 was identified as a key determinant. In Kv3.1 homology models, T427 and other molecular determinants (L348, F351) reside in a space between S5 and S6 outside the permeation pathway. In conclusion, we propose that gambierol acts as a gating modifier that binds to the lipid-exposed surface of the pore domain, thereby stabilizing the closed state. This site may be the topological equivalent of the neurotoxin site 5 of VGSCs. Further elucidation of this previously undescribed binding site may explain why most ciguatoxins activate VGSCs, whereas others inhibit voltage-dependent potassium (Kv) channels. This previously undescribed Kv neurotoxin site may have wide implications not only for our understanding of channel function at the molecular level but for future development of drugs to alleviate ciguatera poisoning or to modulate electrical excitability in general. PMID:19482941

  3. Ameliorating reactive oxygen species-induced in vitro lipid peroxidation in brain, liver, mitochondria and DNA damage by Zingiber officinale Roscoe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajith, T A

    2010-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for a number of cellular activities. However, excess cellular iron can be toxic by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide anion (O(2) (-)) and hydroxyl radical (HO(·)) that damage proteins, lipids and DNA. Mutagenic and genotoxic end products of lipid peroxidation can induce the decline of mitochondrial respiration and are associated with various human ailments including aging, neurodegenerative disorders, cancer etc. Zingiber officinale Roscoe (ginger) is a widely used spice around the world. The protective effect of aqueous ethanol extract of Z. officinale against ROS-induced in vitro lipid peroxidation and DNA damage was evaluated in this study. The lipid peroxidation was induced by hydroxyl radical generated from Fenton's reaction in rat liver and brain homogenates and mitochondrial fraction (isolated from rat liver). The DNA protection was evaluated using H(2)O(2)-induced changes in pBR-322 plasmid and Fenton reaction-induced DNA fragmentation in rat liver. The results indicated that Z. officinale significantly (Pofficinale in the liver homogenate was 94 %. However, the extract could partially alleviate the DNA damage. The protective mechanism can be correlated to the radical scavenging property of Z. officinale. The results of the study suggest the possible nutraceutical role of Z. officinale against the oxidative stress induced human ailments.

  4. ( sup 3 H)opipramol labels a novel binding site and sigma receptors in rat brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferris, C.D.; Hirsch, D.J.; Brooks, B.P.; Snowman, A.M.; Snyder, S.H. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Opipramol (OP), a clinically effective antidepressant with a tricyclic structure, is inactive as an inhibitor of biogenic amine uptake. ({sup 3}H)Opipramol binds saturably to rat brain membranes (apparent KD = 4 nM, Bmax = 3 pmol/mg of protein). ({sup 3}H)Opipramol binding can be differentiated into haloperidol-sensitive and -resistant components, with Ki values for haloperidol of 1 nM (Bmax = 1 pmol/mg of protein) and 350 nM (Bmax = 1.9 pmol/mg of protein), respectively. The drug specificity of the haloperidol-sensitive component is the same as that of sigma receptors labeled with (+)-({sup 3}H)3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperdine. The haloperidol-resistant component does not correspond to any known neurotransmitter receptor or uptake recognition site. It displays high affinity for phenothiazines and related structures such as perphenazine, clopenthixol, and flupenthixol, whose potencies are comparable to that of opipramol. Because certain of these drugs are more potent at the haloperidol-resistant opipramol site than in exerting any other action, it is possible that this opipramol-selective site may mediate their therapeutic effects.

  5. In vivo binding in rat brain and radiopharmaceutical preparation of radioiodinated HEAT, an alpha-1 adrenoceptor ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couch, M.W.; Greer, D.M.; Thonoor, C.M.; Williams, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    In vivo binding of [ 125 I]-2-[beta-(3-iodo-4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylaminomethyl tetralone) ([ 125 I]HEAT) to alpha-1 adrenoceptors in the rat brain was determined over 4 hr. Uptake in the thalamus and frontal cortex was approximately 0.1% injected dose per gram tissue. Thalamus/cerebellum ratios of 10:1 and frontal cortex/cerebellum ratios of 5:1 were found at 4 hr. Pretreatment with prazosin, an alpha-1 antagonist, completely inhibited the accumulation of [ 125 I]HEAT in thalamus and frontal cortex; yet uptake of radioactivity was not significantly affected by antagonists and agonists for other receptors classes (propranolol, beta-1; apomorphine, D-1; spiperone, D-2). Binding of [ 125 I]HEAT is saturable. At 4 hr, [ 125 I]HEAT or [ 123 I]HEAT was shown to be the only radioactive material in rat thalamus and frontal cortex. Iodine-123 HEAT and [ 125 I]HEAT were synthesized as radiopharmaceuticals within 3 hr in 99% radiochemical purity

  6. Effects of anesthetics on vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 binding to 18F-FP-(+)-DTBZ: a biodistribution study in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhengping; Tang, Jie; Liu, Chunyi; Li, Xiaomin; Huang, Hongbo; Xu, Xijie; Yu, Huixin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The in vivo binding analysis of vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2) to radioligand has provided a means of investigating related disorders. Anesthesia is often inevitable when the investigations are performed in animals. In the present study, we tested effects of four commonly-used anesthetics: isoflurane, pentobarbital, chloral hydrate and ketamine, on in vivo VMAT2 binding to 18 F-FP-(+)-DTBZ, a specific VMAT2 radioligand, in rat brain. Methods: The transient equilibrium time window for in vivo binding of 18 F-FP-(+)-DTBZ after a bolus injection was firstly determined. The brain biodistribution studies under anesthetized and awake rats were then performed at the equilibrium time. Standard uptake values (SUVs) of the interest brain regions: the striatum (ST), hippocampus (HP), cortex (CX) and cerebellum (CB) were obtained; and ratios of tissue to cerebellum were calculated. Results: Isoflurane and pentobarbital did not alter distribution of 18 F-FP-(+)-DTBZ in the brain relative to the awake group; neither SUVs nor ratios of ST/CB and HP/CB were altered significantly. Chloral hydrate significantly increased SUVs of all the brain regions, but did not significantly alter ratios of ST/CB and HP/CB. Ketamine significantly increased SUVs of the striatum, hippocampus and cortex, and insignificantly increased the SUV of the cerebellum; consequently, ketamine significantly increased ratios of ST/CB and HP/CB. Conclusions: It is concluded that in vivo VMAT2 binding to 18 F-FP-(+)-DTBZ are not altered by isoflurane and pentobarbital, but altered by chloral hydrate and ketamine. Isoflurane and pentobarbital may be promising anesthetic compounds for investigating in vivo VMAT2 binding. Further studies are warranted to investigate the interactions of anesthetics with VMAT2 binding potential with in vivo PET studies.

  7. Attenuation of Streptozotocin-Induced Lipid Profile Anomalies in the Heart, Brain, and mRNA Expression of HMG-CoA Reductase by Diosgenin in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shuang; Xu, Rihao; Li, Dan; Zhu, Zhicheng; Wang, Tiance; Liu, Kexiang

    2015-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with significant morbidity and mortality that contributes to pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Diosgenin, a naturally occurring aglycone, is present abundantly in fenugreek. The steroidal saponin is being used as a traditional medicine for diabetes. The present study has investigated the effects of diosgenin on lipid profile in the heart and brain, mRNA expression, and hepatic HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) activity of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In our study, diosgenin was administered (40 mg/kg b.w.) orally for 45 days to control animals and experimentally induced diabetic rats. The effects of diosgenin on glucose, plasma insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, and phospholipids (PLs) in the heart and brain were studied. The levels of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, PLs, and HMGR activity were increased significantly (P rats. Administration of diosgenin to diabetic rats significantly reduced blood glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, PLs levels, and also HMGR activity. In addition, the plasma insulin level was increased in diosgenin-treated diabetic rats. The above findings were correlated with histological observations of the heart and brain. The results showed that administration of diosgenin remarkably increased plasma insulin level with absolute reduction of blood glucose, lipid profile, and HMGR level when compared to diabetic control rats. The results have suggested that diosgenin prevents hypercholesterolemia and hepatosteatosis by modulation of enzymatic expression that is associated with cholesterol metabolism.

  8. Brain dopamine and serotonin transporter binding are associated with visual attention bias for food in lean men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, K E; Roefs, A; Elbers, D C E; Fliers, E; Booij, J; Serlie, M J; la Fleur, S E

    2016-06-01

    In rodents, the striatal dopamine (DA) system and the (hypo)thalamic serotonin (5-HT) system are involved in the regulation of feeding behavior. In lean humans, little is known about the relationship between these brain neurotransmitter systems and feeding. We studied the relationship between striatal DA transporters (DAT) and diencephalic 5-HT transporters (SERT), behavioral tasks and questionnaires, and food intake. We measured striatal DAT and diencephalic SERT binding with [123I]FP-CIT SPECT in 36 lean male subjects. Visual attention bias for food (detection speed and distraction time) and degree of impulsivity were measured using response-latency-based computer tasks. Craving and emotional eating were assessed with questionnaires and ratings of hunger by means of VAS scores. Food intake was assessed through a self-reported online diet journal. Striatal DAT and diencephalic SERT binding negatively correlated with food detection speed (p = 0.008, r = -0.50 and p = 0.002, r = -0.57, respectively), but not with food distraction time, ratings of hunger, craving or impulsivity. Striatal DAT and diencephalic SERT binding did not correlate with free choice food intake, whereas food detection speed positively correlated with total caloric intake (p = 0.001, r = 0.60), protein intake (p = 0.01, r = 0.44), carbohydrate intake (p = 0.03, r = 0.39) and fat intake (p = 0.06, r = 0.35). These results indicate a role for the central 5-HT and DA system in the regulation of visual attention bias for food, which contributes to the motivation to eat, in non-obese, healthy humans. In addition, this study confirms that food detection speed, measured with the latency-based computer task, positively correlates with total food and macronutrient intake.

  9. Stealth lipid polymer hybrid nanoparticles loaded with rutin for effective brain delivery - comparative study with the gold standard (Tween 80): optimization, characterization and biodistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Rania A H; Mostafa, Nada M; Kamel, Amany O

    2017-11-01

    The blood-brain barrier is considered the leading physiological obstacle hindering the transport of neurotherapeutics to brain cells. The application of nanotechnology coupled with surfactant coating is one of the efficacious tactics overcoming this barrier. The aim of this study was to develop lipid polymer hybrid nanoparticles (LPHNPs), composed of a polymeric core and a phospholipid shell entangled, for the first time, with PEG-based surfactants (SAA) viz. TPGS or Solutol HS 15 in comparison with the gold standard Tween 80, aiming to enhance brain delivery and escape opsonization. LPHNPs were successfully prepared using modified single-step nanoprecipitation technique, loaded with the flavonoid rutin (RU), extracted from the flowers of Calendula officinalis L., and recently proved as a promising anti-Alzheimer. The effect of the critical process parameters (CPP) viz. PLGA amount, W lecithin /W PLGA ratio, and Tween 80 concentration on critical quality attributes (CQA); entrapment, size and size distribution, was statistically analyzed via design of experiments, and optimized using the desirability function. The optimized CPP were maintained while substituting Tween 80 with other PEG-SAA. All hybrid particles exhibited spherical shape with perceptible lipid shells. The biocompatibility of the prepared NPs was confirmed by hemolysis test. The pharmacokinetic assessments, post-intravenous administration to rats, revealed a significant higher RU bioavailability for NPs relative to drug solution. Biodistribution studies proved non-significant differences in RU accumulation within brain, but altered phagocytic uptake among various LPHNPs. The present study endorses the successful development of LPHNPs using PEG-SAA, and confirms the prospective applicability of TPGS and Solutol in enhancing brain delivery.

  10. Enhanced phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element binding protein in Brain of mice following repetitive hypoxic exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yanan; Gao Ge; Long Caixia; Han Song; Zu Pengyu; Fang Li; Li Junfa

    2006-01-01

    Cerebral ischemic/hypoxic preconditioning (I/HPC) is a phenomenon of endogenous protection that renders Brain tolerant to sustained ischemia/hypoxia. This profound protection induced by I/HPC makes it an attractive target for developing potential clinical therapeutic approaches. However, the molecular mechanism of I/HPC is unclear. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB), a selective nuclear transcriptional factor, plays a key role in the neuronal functions. Phosphorylation of CREB on Ser-133 may facilitate its transcriptional activity in response to various stresses. In the current study, we observed the changes in CREB phosphorylation (Ser-133) and protein expression in Brain of auto-hypoxia-induced HPC mice by using Western blot analysis. We found that the levels of phosphorylated CREB (Ser-133), but not protein expression of CREB, increased significantly (p < 0.05) in the hippocampus and the frontal cortex of mice after repetitive hypoxic exposure (H2-H4, n = 6 for each group), when compared to that of the normoxic (H0, n = 6) or hypoxic exposure once group (H1, n = 6). In addition, a significant enhancement (p < 0.05) of CREB phosphorylation (Ser-133) could also be found in the nuclear extracts from the whole hippocampus of hypoxic preconditioned mice (H2-H4, n = 6 for each group). These results suggest that the phosphorylation of CREB might be involved in the development of cerebral hypoxic preconditioning

  11. sigma opiates and certain antipsychotic drugs mutually inhibit (+)-[3H]SKF 10,047 and [3H]haloperidol binding in guinea pig brain membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, S.W.; Cook, L.

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between binding of antipsychotic drugs and sigma psychotomimetic opiates to binding sites for the sigma agonist (+)-[ 3 H]SKF 10,047 (N-allylnormetazocine) and to dopamine D 2 sites was investigated. In guinea pig brain membranes, (+)-[ 3 H]SKF 10,047 bound to single class of sites with a K/sub d/ of 4 x 10 -8 M and a B/sub max/ of 333 fmol/mg of protein. This binding was different from μ, kappa, or delta opiate receptor binding. It was inhibited by opiates that produce psychotomimetic activities but not by opiates that lack such activities. Some antipsychotic drugs inhibited (+)-[ 3 H]SKF 10,047 binding with high to moderate affinities in the following order of potency: haloperidol > perphenazine > fluphenazine > acetophenazine > trifluoperazine > molindone greater than or equal to pimozide greater than or equal to thioridazine greater than or equal to chlorpromazine greater than or equal to triflupromazine. However, there were other antipsychotic drugs such as spiperone and clozapine that showed low affinity for the (+)-[ 3 H]SKF 10,047 binding sites. Affinities of antipsychotic drugs for (+)-[ 3 H]SKF 10,047 binding sites did not correlate with those for [ 3 H]spiperone (dopamine D 2 ) sites. [ 3 H]-Haloperidol binding in whole brain membranes was also inhibited by the sigma opiates pentazocine, cyclazocine, and (+)-[ 3 H]SKF 10,047. In the striatum, about half of the saturable [ 3 H]haloperidol binding was to [ 3 H]spiperone (D 2 ) sites and the other half was to sites similar to (+)-[ 3 H]SKF 10,047 binding sites. 15 references, 4 figures, 1 table

  12. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose accumulation in the heart, brain and skeletal muscle of rats; the influence of time after injection, depressed lipid metabolism and glucose-insulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasalicky, J.; Konopkova, M.; Melichar, F.

    2001-01-01

    To study the effect of lipid depressing drugs on 18 FDG myocardial concentration. The changes of 18 FDG uptake in myocardium, brain and skeletal muscle of rats were compared as influenced by acipimox, tyloxapol and glucose with insulin. 5.55 MBq of 18 FDG were administered to Wistar rats. Control rats were killed 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes following intravenous injection and the radioactivity concentration (cpm/g of tissue) in relation to injected cpm was determined in a well crystal adjusted to 511 KeV in order to check the time of maximal 18 FDG tissue uptake. The radioactivity in myocardium, skeletal muscle and brain in intact animals was compared with that of rats treated with tyloxapol (tritton WR 1339, 125 mg intravenously immediately before 18 FDG injection), acipimox (nicotinic acid derivative, 25 mg by stomach cannula 15 minutes before 18 FDG), or glucose with insulin (intravenous injection of 0.04 g and 0.04 UI immediately before 18 FDG). The animals were killed 45 minutes following 18 FDG injection. Tyloxapol and acipimox significantly elevated myocardial 18 FDG concentration (tyloxapol +37% and acipimox +48%), but the increase in 18 FDG concentration after glucose and insulin was slight and insignificant. The changes in skeletal muscle after lipid depressing agents were quite contrasting; the decrease in 18 FDG concentration was -74% after tyloxapol and -44% following acipimox administration. The accumulation of 18 FDG in brain was not influenced markedly by the drugs used or by glucose with insulin. The highest 18 FDG uptake in myocardium could be achieved by depressing the lipid metabolism and not by administration of glucose with insulin only. A marked increase in glucose accumulation in myocardium is not possible without previous shift from the utilisation of fatty acids. This finding is fully in agreement with present knowledge about energetic metabolism of myocardium. (author)

  13. Influence of alcoholism and cholesterol on TSPO binding in brain: PET [11C]PBR28 studies in humans and rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Won; Wiers, Corinde E; Tyler, Ryan; Shokri-Kojori, Ehsan; Jang, Yeon Joo; Zehra, Amna; Freeman, Clara; Ramirez, Veronica; Lindgren, Elsa; Miller, Gregg; Cabrera, Elizabeth A; Stodden, Tyler; Guo, Min; Demiral, Şükrü B; Diazgranados, Nancy; Park, Luke; Liow, Jeih-San; Pike, Victor; Morse, Cheryl; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Innis, Robert B; Koob, George F; Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D

    2018-05-03

    Neuroinflammation appears to contribute to neurotoxicity observed with heavy alcohol consumption. To assess whether chronic alcohol results in neuroinflammation we used PET and [ 11 C]PBR28, a ligand that binds to the 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO), to compare participants with an alcohol use disorder (AUD: n = 19) with healthy controls (HC: n = 17), and alcohol-dependent (n = 9) with -nondependent rats (n = 10). Because TSPO is implicated in cholesterol's transport for steroidogenesis, we investigated whether plasma cholesterol levels influenced [ 11 C]PBR28 binding. [ 11 C]PBR28 binding did not differ between AUD and HC. However, when separating by TSPO genotype rs6971, we showed that medium-affinity binders AUD participants showed lower [ 11 C]PBR28 binding than HC in regions of interest (whole brain, gray and white matter, hippocampus, and thalamus), but no group differences were observed in high-affinity binders. Cholesterol levels inversely correlated with brain [ 11 C]PBR28 binding in combined groups, due to a correlation in AUD participants. In rodents, we observed no differences in brain [ 11 C]PBR28 uptake between alcohol-dependent and -nondependent rats. These findings, which are consistent with two previous [ 11 C]PBR28 PET studies, may indicate lower activation of microglia in AUD, whereas failure to observe alcohol effects in the rodent model indicate that species differences do not explain the discrepancy with prior rodent autoradiographic studies reporting increases in TSPO binding with chronic alcohol. However, reduced binding in AUD participants could also reflect competition from endogenous TSPO ligands such as cholesterol; and since the rs6971 polymorphism affects the cholesterol-binding domain of TSPO this could explain why differences were observed only in medium-affinity binders.

  14. Synthesis and binding of [125I2]philanthotoxin-343, [125I2]philanthotoxin-343-lysine, and [125I2]philanthotoxin-343-arginine to rat brain membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodnow, R.A. Jr.; Bukownik, R.; Nakanishi, K.; Usherwood, P.N.; Eldefrawi, A.T.; Anis, N.A.; Eldefrawi, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    125I2-iodinated philanthotoxin-343 (PhTX-343), [125I2]PhTX-343-arginine, and [125I2]PhTX-343-lysine were synthesized and evaluated as probes for glutamate receptors in rat brain synaptic membranes. It was found that these probes were not specific for the glutamate receptors but may be useful for investigating the polyamine binding site. Filtration assays with Whatman GF/B fiber glass filters were unsuitable because the iodinated PhTX-343 analogues exhibited high nonspecific binding to the filters, thus hindering detection of specific binding to membranes. When binding was measured by a centrifugal assay, [125I2]PhTX-343-lysine bound with low affinity (KD = 11.4 ± 2 microM) to a large number of sites (37.2 ± 9.1 nmol/mg of protein). The binding of [125I2]PhTX-343-lysine was sensitive only to the polyamines spermine and spermidine, which displaced [125I2]PhTX-343-lysine with Ki values of (3.77 ± 1.4) x 10(-5) M and (7.51 ± 0.77) x 10(-5) M, respectively. The binding was insensitive to glutamate receptor agonists and antagonists. Binding results with [125I2]PhTX-343-arginine were similar to those of [125I2]-PhTX-343-lysine. Considering the high number of toxin binding sites (10000-fold more than glutamate) in these membranes and the insensitivity of the binding to almost all drugs that bind to glutamate receptors, it is evident that most of the binding observed is not to glutamate receptors. On the other hand, PhTX analogues with photoaffinity labels may be useful in the isolation/purification of various glutamate and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors; they could also be useful in structural studies of receptors and their binding sites

  15. Avanti lipid tools: connecting lipids, technology, and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Kacee H; Tytler, Ewan M; Tipton, John; Hill, Kasey L; Burgess, Stephen W; Shaw, Walter A

    2014-08-01

    Lipid research is challenging owing to the complexity and diversity of the lipidome. Here we review a set of experimental tools developed for the seasoned lipid researcher, as well as, those who are new to the field of lipid research. Novel tools for probing protein-lipid interactions, applications for lipid binding antibodies, enhanced systems for the cellular delivery of lipids, improved visualization of lipid membranes using gold-labeled lipids, and advances in mass spectrometric analysis techniques will be discussed. Because lipid mediators are known to participate in a host of signal transduction and trafficking pathways within the cell, a comprehensive lipid toolbox that aids the science of lipidomics research is essential to better understand the molecular mechanisms of interactions between cellular components. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Tools to study lipid functions. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Brain atrophy and lesion load are related to CSF lipid-specific IgM oligoclonal bands in clinically isolated syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magraner, Maria Jose; Bosca, Isabel; Simo-Castello, Maria; Casanova, Bonaventura; Garcia-Marti, Gracian; Alberich-Bayarri, Angel; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Coret, Francisco; Alvarez-Cermeno, Jose C.; Villar, Luisa M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study the relationship between the presence of lipid-specific oligoclonal IgM bands (LS-OCMB) in CSF, with both T2 lesion volume (T2LV) accumulation and brain atrophy (percentage change of brain volume-PCBV-and brain parenchyma fraction-BPF) in patients with clinically isolated syndromes (CIS) suggestive of demyelination. Twenty-four CIS patients were included in this prospective study. IgG oligoclonal bands (OCGB) and LS-OCMB were determined in paired serum and CSF samples within 3 months since clinical onset. Brain MRI studies were scheduled at baseline, 3 months, first and second years after CIS onset. Differences in T2LV, PCBV and BPF between CIS patients according to the type of OCB were studied. Nine patients had no OCB; 15 had only OCGB, and seven had OCGB + LS-OCMB present in the CSF. LS-OCMB were associated with greater T2LV in all scheduled MRI studies. At the end of follow-up (year 2), it was threefold higher in patients with these antibodies than in those without LS-OCMB (3.95 cm 3 vs. 1.36 cm 3 , p = 0.001). At that point, brain atrophy was also higher in patients with LS-OCMB (BPF, 0.73 in LS-OCMB+ patients vs. 0.76 in negative ones, p = 0.03). The rate in brain atrophy was higher in the first group of patients as well. Considering only patients with OCGB, the presence of LS-OCMB was also related to greater T2LV, T2LV increase and a trend towards higher atrophy rate. The presence of LS-OCMB in the first event suggestive of demyelination is related to an early increase in lesion load and brain atrophy. These data are in line with prospective studies showing the clinical prognostic value of LS-OCMB. (orig.)

  17. Comparison of the binding of the irreversible monoamine oxidase tracers, [11C]clorgyline and [11C]l-deprenyl in brain and peripheral organs in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.; Telang, Frank; Ding Yushin; Shea, Colleen; Garza, Victor; Xu Youwen; Li Zizhong; Alexoff, David; Vaska, Paul; Ferrieri, Richard; Schlyer, David; Zhu Wei; John Gatley, S.

    2004-01-01

    The monoamine oxidase A and B (MAO A and B) radiotracers [ 11 C]clorgyline (CLG) and [ 11 C]L-deprenyl (DEP) and their deuterium labeled counterparts (CLG-D and DEP-D) were compared to determine whether their distribution and kinetics in humans are consistent with their physical, chemical and pharmacological properties and the reported ratios of MAO A:MAO B in post-mortem human tissues. Irreversible binding was consistently higher for DEP in brain, heart, kidneys and spleen but not lung where CLG >DEP and not in thyroid where there is no DEP binding. The generally higher DEP binding is consistent with its higher enzyme affinity and larger free fraction in plasma while differences in regional distribution for CLG and DEP in brain, heart, thyroid and lungs are consistent with different relative ratios of MAO A and B in humans

  18. A subset of group A-like var genes encodes the malaria parasite ligands for binding to human brain endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claessens, Antoine; Adams, Yvonne; Ghumra, Ashfaq

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is the most deadly manifestation of infection with Plasmodium falciparum. The pathology of cerebral malaria is characterized by the accumulation of infected erythrocytes (IEs) in the microvasculature of the brain caused by parasite adhesins on the surface of IEs binding to human...... receptors on microvascular endothelial cells. The parasite and host molecules involved in this interaction are unknown. We selected three P. falciparum strains (HB3, 3D7, and IT/FCR3) for binding to a human brain endothelial cell line (HBEC-5i). The whole transcriptome of isogenic pairs of selected.......029) but not by antibodies from controls with uncomplicated malaria (Mann-Whitney test, P = 0.58). This work describes a binding phenotype for virulence-associated group A P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 variants and identifies targets for interventions to treat or prevent cerebral malaria....

  19. Preliminary assessment of extrastriatal dopamine d-2 receptor binding in the rodent and nonhuman primate brains using the high affinity radioligand, {sup 18}F-fallypride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Jogeshwar E-mail: jogeshwar-mukherjee@ketthealth.com; Yang, Z.-Y.; Brown, Terry; Lew, Robert; Wernick, Miles; Ouyang Xiaohu; Yasillo, Nicholas; Chen, C.-T.; Mintzer, Robert; Cooper, Malcolm

    1999-07-01

    We have identified the value of {sup 18}F-fallypride {l_brace}(S)-N-[(1-allyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl]-5-(3-[{sup 18}F]fluoropropyl)-2,3-dim= ethoxybenzamide{r_brace}, as a dopamine D-2 receptor radiotracer for the study of striatal and extrastriatal receptors. Fallypride exhibits high affinities for D-2 and D-3 subtypes and low affinity for D-4 ({sup 3}H-spiperone IC{sub 50}s: D-2=0.05 nM [rat striata], D-3=0.30 nM [SF9 cell lines, rat recombinant], and D-4=240 nM [CHO cell lines, human recombinant]). Biodistribution in the rat brain showed localization of {sup 18}F-fallypride in striata and extrastriatal regions such as the frontal cortex, parietal cortex, amygdala, hippocampus, thalamus, and hypothalamus. In vitro autoradiographic studies in sagittal slices of the rat brain showed localization of {sup 18}F-fallypride in striatal and several extrastriatal regions, including the medulla. Positron emission tomography (PET) experiments with {sup 18}F-fallypride in male rhesus monkeys were carried out in a PET VI scanner. In several PET experiments, apart from the specific binding seen in the striatum, specific binding of {sup 18}F-fallypride was also identified in extracellular regions (in a lower brain slice, possibly the thalamus). Specific binding in the extrastriata was, however, significantly lower compared with that observed in the striata of the monkeys (extrastriata/cerebellum = 2, striata/cerebellum = 10). Postmortem analysis of the monkey brain revealed significant {sup 18}F-fallypride binding in the striata, whereas binding was also observed in extrastriatal regions such as the thalamus, cortical areas, and brain stem.

  20. Nicotinic binding in rat brain: autoradiographic comparison of [3H]acetylcholine, [3H]nicotine, and [125I]-alpha-bungarotoxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, P.B.; Schwartz, R.D.; Paul, S.M.; Pert, C.B.; Pert, A.

    1985-01-01

    Three radioligands have been commonly used to label putative nicotinic cholinoceptors in the mammalian central nervous system: the agonists [ 3 H]nicotine and [ 3 H]acetylcholine ([ 3 H]ACh--in the presence of atropine to block muscarinic receptors), and the snake venom extract, [ 125 I]-alpha-bungarotoxin([ 125 I]BTX), which acts as a nicotinic antagonist at the neuromuscular junction. Binding studies employing brain homogenates indicate that the regional distributions of both [ 3 H]nicotine and [ 3 H]ACh differ from that of [ 125 I]BTX. The possible relationship between brain sites bound by [ 3 H]nicotine and [ 3 H]ACh has not been examined directly. The authors have used the technique of autoradiography to produce detailed maps of [ 3 H]nicotine, [ 3 H]ACh, and [ 125 I]BTX labeling; near-adjacent tissue sections were compared at many levels of the rat brain. The maps of high affinity agonist labeling are strikingly concordant, with highest densities in the interpeduncular nucleus, most thalamic nuclei, superior colliculus, medial habenula, presubiculum, cerebral cortex (layers I and III/IV), and the substantia nigra pars compacta/ventral tegmental area. The pattern of [ 125 I]BTX binding is strikingly different, the only notable overlap with agonist binding being the cerebral cortex (layer I) and superior colliculus. [ 125 I]BTX binding is also dense in the inferior colliculus, cerebral cortex (layer VI), hypothalamus, and hippocampus, but is virtually absent in thalamus. Various lines of evidence suggest that the high affinity agonist-binding sites in brain correspond to nicotinic cholinergic receptors similar to those found at autonomic ganglia; BTX-binding sites may also serve as receptors for nicotine and are possibly related to neuromuscular nicotinic cholinoceptors

  1. Light-enhanced inhibition of ouabain binding to digitalis receptor in rat brain and guinea pig heart by the food dye erythrosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hnatowich, M.; LaBella, F.S.

    1982-01-01

    Erythrosine (ERY) (FD and C red no. 3) inhibited specific binding of [ 3 H]ouabain to rat brain homogenates with an IC50 of 23 microM in the dark and 1 microM in ordinary fluorescent light. Competition studies demonstrated the presence of two components, only one of which was affected by light. Lineweaver-Burk analysis indicated that ERY preferentially antagonizes [ 3 H]ouabain binding at a high-affinity site in the light, whereas in the dark the dye inhibits binding in a manner qualitatively similar to inhibition by ouabain. Light enhancement of ERY potency occurred only when dye and tissue were present together in the incubation medium, pointing to participation of transient molecular species. However, neither superoxide dismutase nor catalase altered the effects of ERY in the light or dark, suggesting the absence of oxygen free radicals. When oxygen levels were raised, there was enhancement of inhibition by ERY at a high-affinity receptor accompanied by disappearance of [ 3 H]ouabain binding at one of lower affinity. In contrast to brain, membranes from guinea pig heart showed only one binding site for [ 3 H]ouabain, and antagonism by ERY at this site was markedly enhanced by light. Structural differences between classes of ouabain binding regions probably accounts for the discrimination exhibited by ERY in the presence of light and oxygen. Our findings also caution that metabolic transformation of this common food dye, light decomposition, or photoreaction with foodstuff may yield more toxic derivatives

  2. Cholesterol is necessary both for the toxic effect of Abeta peptides on vascular smooth muscle cells and for Abeta binding to vascular smooth muscle cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasinghe, Supundi; Unabia, Sharon; Barrow, Colin J; Mok, Su San; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel; Small, David H

    2003-02-01

    Accumulation of beta amyloid (Abeta) in the brain is central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Abeta can bind to membrane lipids and this binding may have detrimental effects on cell function. In this study, surface plasmon resonance technology was used to study Abeta binding to membranes. Abeta peptides bound to synthetic lipid mixtures and to an intact plasma membrane preparation isolated from vascular smooth muscle cells. Abeta peptides were also toxic to vascular smooth muscle cells. There was a good correlation between the toxic effect of Abeta peptides and their membrane binding. 'Ageing' the Abeta peptides by incubation for 5 days increased the proportion of oligomeric species, and also increased toxicity and the amount of binding to lipids. The toxicities of various Abeta analogs correlated with their lipid binding. Significantly, binding was influenced by the concentration of cholesterol in the lipid mixture. Reduction of cholesterol in vascular smooth muscle cells not only reduced the binding of Abeta to purified plasma membrane preparations but also reduced Abeta toxicity. The results support the view that Abeta toxicity is a direct consequence of binding to lipids in the membrane. Reduction of membrane cholesterol using cholesterol-lowering drugs may be of therapeutic benefit because it reduces Abeta-membrane binding.

  3. Regional GABA concentration and [3H]-diazepam binding in rat brain following repeated electroconvulsive shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowdler, J.M.; Green, A.R.; Minchin, M.C.W.; Nutt, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    It has been confirmed that 24 hours following a series of electroconvulsive shocks (ECS) given once daily for 10 days (ECS x 10) to rats there is an increase in GABA concentration in the corpus striatum. A similar change was seen after the ECS had been given to rats anaesthetised with halothane, or when 5 ECS were given spread out over 10 days, the rats being anaesthetised during the ECS. A daily convulsion for 10 days elicited by flurothyl exposure resulted in an increased striatal GABA concentration, but also increased the GABA concentration in the hypothalamus, hippocampus and cortex. The increase in striatal GABA concentration was present 24 hours after ECS daily for 5 days or 3 days after ECS daily for 10 days. No change in [ 3 H]-diazepam binding was seen in hippocampus, cortex or corpus striatum 24 hours after the last of 10 once daily ECS. The increase in striatal GABA concentration was therefore seen at all times when enhanced monoaminemediated behaviours have been demonstrated following seizures. (Author)

  4. Binding neutral information to emotional contexts: Brain dynamics of long-term recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura-Bort, Carlos; Löw, Andreas; Wendt, Julia; Moltó, Javier; Poy, Rosario; Dolcos, Florin; Hamm, Alfons O; Weymar, Mathias

    2016-04-01

    There is abundant evidence in memory research that emotional stimuli are better remembered than neutral stimuli. However, effects of an emotionally charged context on memory for associated neutral elements is also important, particularly in trauma and stress-related disorders, where strong memories are often activated by neutral cues due to their emotional associations. In the present study, we used event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate long-term recognition memory (1-week delay) for neutral objects that had been paired with emotionally arousing or neutral scenes during encoding. Context effects were clearly evident in the ERPs: An early frontal ERP old/new difference (300-500 ms) was enhanced for objects encoded in unpleasant compared to pleasant and neutral contexts; and a late central-parietal old/new difference (400-700 ms) was observed for objects paired with both pleasant and unpleasant contexts but not for items paired with neutral backgrounds. Interestingly, objects encoded in emotional contexts (and novel objects) also prompted an enhanced frontal early (180-220 ms) positivity compared to objects paired with neutral scenes indicating early perceptual significance. The present data suggest that emotional--particularly unpleasant--backgrounds strengthen memory for items encountered within these contexts and engage automatic and explicit recognition processes. These results could help in understanding binding mechanisms involved in the activation of trauma-related memories by neutral cues.

  5. Evaluation of the in vitro differential protein adsorption patterns of didanosine-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) for potential targeting to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasongo, Kasongo Wa; Jansch, Mirko; Müller, Rainer H; Walker, Roderick B

    2011-09-01

    The preferential in vitro adsorption of apolipoprotein E (Apo E) onto the surface of colloidal drug carriers may be used as a strategy to evaluate the in vivo potential for such systems to transport drugs to the brain. The aim of this research was to investigate the in vitro protein adsorption patterns of didanosine-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (DDI-NLCs), using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE), in order to establish the potential for NLCs to deliver DDI to the brain. NLC formulations were manufactured using high-pressure homogenization using a lipid matrix consisting of a mixture of Precirol(®) ATO 5 and Transcutol(®) HP. The 2-D PAGE analysis revealed that NLCs in formulations stabilized using Solutol(®) HS 15 alone or with a ternary surfactant system consisting of Solutol(®) HS 15, Tween(®) 80, and Lutrol(®) F68, preferentially adsorbed proteins, such as Apo E. Particles stabilized with Tween(®) 80 and Lutrol(®) F68 did not adsorb Apo E in these studies, which could be related to the relatively large particle size and hence small surface area observed for these NLCs. These findings have revealed that DDI-loaded NLCs may have the potential to deliver DDI to the brain in vivo and, in addition, to Tween(®) 80, which has already been shown to have the ability to facilitate the targeting of colloidal drug delivery systems to the brain. Solutol(®) HS 15-stabilized nanoparticles may also achieve a similar purpose.

  6. Analysis of SiO2 nanoparticles binding proteins in rat blood and brain homogenate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shim KH

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Kyu Hwan Shim,1 John Hulme,1 Eun Ho Maeng,2 Meyoung-Kon Kim,3 Seong Soo A An1 1Department of Bionano Technology, Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gachon University, Sungnam-si, 2Department of Analysis, KTR, Kimpo, Gyeonggi-do, 3Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University Medical School and College, Seoul, South Korea Abstract: A multitude of nanoparticles, such as titanium oxide (TiO2, zinc oxide, aluminum oxide, gold oxide, silver oxide, iron oxide, and silica oxide, are found in many chemical, cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and electronic products. Recently, SiO2 nanoparticles were shown to have an inert toxicity profile and no association with an irreversible toxicological change in animal models. Hence, exposure to SiO2 nanoparticles is on the increase. SiO2 nanoparticles are routinely used in numerous materials, from strengthening filler for concrete and other construction composites, to nontoxic platforms for biomedical application, such as drug delivery and theragnostics. On the other hand, recent in vitro experiments indicated that SiO2 nanoparticles were cytotoxic. Therefore, we investigated these nanoparticles to identify potentially toxic pathways by analyzing the adsorbed protein corona on the surface of SiO2 nanoparticles in the blood and brain of the rat. Four types of SiO2 nanoparticles were chosen for investigation, and the protein corona of each type was analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry technology. In total, 115 and 48 plasma proteins from the rat were identified as being bound to negatively charged 20 nm and 100 nm SiO2 nanoparticles, respectively, and 50 and 36 proteins were found for 20 nm and 100 nm arginine-coated SiO2 nanoparticles, respectively. Higher numbers of proteins were adsorbed onto the 20 nm sized SiO2 nanoparticles than onto the 100 nm sized nanoparticles regardless of charge. When proteins were compared between the two charges, higher numbers of proteins were

  7. Age and sex differences in oxytocin and vasopressin V1a receptor binding densities in the rat brain: focus on the social decision-making network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caroline J W; Poehlmann, Max L; Li, Sara; Ratnaseelan, Aarane M; Bredewold, Remco; Veenema, Alexa H

    2017-03-01

    Oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) regulate various social behaviors via activation of the OT receptor (OTR) and the AVP V1a receptor (V1aR) in the brain. Social behavior often differs across development and between the sexes, yet our understanding of age and sex differences in brain OTR and V1aR binding remains incomplete. Here, we provide an extensive analysis of OTR and V1aR binding density throughout the brain in juvenile and adult male and female rats, with a focus on regions within the social decision-making network. OTR and V1aR binding density were higher in juveniles than in adults in regions associated with reward and socio-spatial memory and higher in adults than in juveniles in key regions of the social decision-making network and in cortical regions. We discuss possible implications of these shifts in OTR and V1aR binding density for the age-specific regulation of social behavior. Furthermore, sex differences in OTR and V1aR binding density were less numerous than age differences. The direction of these sex differences was region-specific for OTR but consistently higher in females than in males for V1aR. Finally, almost all sex differences in OTR and V1aR binding density were already present in juveniles and occurred in regions with denser binding in adults compared to juveniles. Possible implications of these sex differences for the sex-specific regulation of behavior, as well potential underlying mechanisms, are discussed. Overall, these findings provide an important framework for testing age- and sex-specific roles of OTR and V1aR in the regulation of social behavior.

  8. Transfer of C-terminal residues of human apolipoprotein A-I to insect apolipophorin III creates a two-domain chimeric protein with enhanced lipid binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, James V C; Ellena, Rachel A; Tran, Jesse J; Beck, Wendy H J; Narayanaswami, Vasanthy; Weers, Paul M M

    2017-08-01

    Apolipophorin III (apoLp-III) is an insect apolipoprotein (18kDa) that comprises a single five-helix bundle domain. In contrast, human apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) is a 28kDa two-domain protein: an α-helical N-terminal domain (residues 1-189) and a less structured C-terminal domain (residues 190-243). To better understand the apolipoprotein domain organization, a novel chimeric protein was engineered by attaching residues 179 to 243 of apoA-I to the C-terminal end of apoLp-III. The apoLp-III/apoA-I chimera was successfully expressed and purified in E. coli. Western blot analysis and mass spectrometry confirmed the presence of the C-terminal domain of apoA-I within the chimera. While parent apoLp-III did not self-associate, the chimera formed oligomers similar to apoA-I. The chimera displayed a lower α-helical content, but the stability remained similar compared to apoLp-III, consistent with the addition of a less structured domain. The chimera was able to solubilize phospholipid vesicles at a significantly higher rate compared to apoLp-III, approaching that of apoA-I. The chimera was more effective in protecting phospholipase C-treated low density lipoprotein from aggregation compared to apoLp-III. In addition, binding interaction of the chimera with phosphatidylglycerol vesicles and lipopolysaccharides was considerably improved compared to apoLp-III. Thus, addition of the C-terminal domain of apoA-I to apoLp-III created a two-domain protein, with self-association, lipid and lipopolysaccharide binding properties similar to apoA-I. The apoA-I like behavior of the chimera indicate that these properties are independent from residues residing in the N-terminal domain of apoA-I, and that they can be transferred from apoA-I to apoLp-III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Loss of the zona pellucida-binding protein 2 (Zpbp2) gene in mice impacts airway hypersensitivity and lung lipid metabolism in a sex-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagaratham, Cynthia; Chiwara, Victoria; Ho, Bianca; Moussette, Sanny; Youssef, Mina; Venuto, David; Jeannotte, Lucie; Bourque, Guillaume; de Sanctis, Juan Bautista; Radzioch, Danuta; Naumova, Anna K

    2018-04-01

    The human chromosomal region 17q12-q21 is one of the best replicated genome-wide association study loci for childhood asthma. The associated SNPs span a large genomic interval that includes several protein-coding genes. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the zona pellucida-binding protein 2 (ZPBP2) gene residing in this region contributes to asthma pathogenesis using a mouse model. We tested the lung phenotypes of knock-out (KO) mice that carry a deletion of the Zpbp2 gene. The deletion attenuated airway hypersensitivity (AHR) in female, but not male, mice in the absence of allergic sensitization. Analysis of the lipid profiles of their lungs showed that female, but not male, KO mice had significantly lower levels of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), very long-chain ceramides (VLCCs), and higher levels of long-chain ceramides compared to wild-type controls. Furthermore, in females, lung resistance following methacholine challenge correlated with lung S1P levels (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.57) suggesting a link between reduced AHR in KO females, Zpbp2 deletion, and S1P level regulation. In livers, spleens and blood plasma, however, VLCC, S1P, and sphingosine levels were reduced in both KO females and males. We also find that the Zpbp2 deletion was associated with gain of methylation in the adjacent DNA regions. Thus, we demonstrate that the mouse ortholog of ZPBP2 has a role in controlling AHR in female mice. Our data also suggest that Zpbp2 may act through regulation of ceramide metabolism. These findings highlight the importance of phospholipid metabolism for sexual dimorphism in AHR.

  10. Intraperitoneal Exposure to Nano/Microparticles of Fullerene (C60) Increases Acetylcholinesterase Activity and Lipid Peroxidation in Adult Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Forno, Gonzalo Ogliari; Kist, Luiza Wilges; de Azevedo, Mariana Barbieri; Fritsch, Rachel Seemann; Pereira, Talita Carneiro Brandão; Britto, Roberta Socoowski; Guterres, Sílvia Stanisçuaski; Külkamp-Guerreiro, Irene Clemes; Bonan, Carla Denise; Monserrat, José María; Bogo, Maurício Reis

    2013-01-01

    Even though technologies involving nano/microparticles have great potential, it is crucial to determine possible toxicity of these technological products before extensive use. Fullerenes C60 are nanomaterials with unique physicochemical and biological properties that are important for the development of many technological applications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the consequences of nonphotoexcited fullerene C60 exposure in brain acetylcholinesterase expression and activity, antioxidant responses, and oxidative damage using adult zebrafish as an animal model. None of the doses tested (7.5, 15, and 30 mg/kg) altered AChE activity, antioxidant responses, and oxidative damage when zebrafish were exposed to nonphotoexcited C60 nano/microparticles during 6 and 12 hours. However, adult zebrafish exposed to the 30 mg/kg dose for 24 hours have shown enhanced AChE activity and augmented lipid peroxidation (TBARS assays) in brain. In addition, the up-regulation of brain AChE activity was neither related to the transcriptional control (RT-qPCR analysis) nor to the direct action of nonphotoexcited C60 nano/microparticles on the protein (in vitro results) but probably involved a posttranscriptional or posttranslational modulation of this enzymatic activity. Taken together these findings provided further evidence of toxic effects on brain after C60 exposure. PMID:23865059

  11. Long-Term Supplementation with Beta Serum Concentrate (BSC, a Complex of Milk Lipids, during Post-Natal Brain Development Improves Memory in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Guan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that the supplementation of ganglioside-enriched complex-milk-lipids improves cognitive function and that a phospholipid-enriched complex-milk-lipid prevents age-related cognitive decline in rats. This current study evaluated the effects of post-natal supplementation of ganglioside- and phospholipid-enriched complex-milk-lipids beta serum concentrate (BSC on cognitive function in young rats. The diet of male rats was supplemented with either gels formulated BSC (n = 16 or blank gels (n = 16 from post-natal day 10 to day 70. Memory and anxiety-like behaviors were evaluated using the Morris water maze, dark–light boxes, and elevated plus maze tests. Neuroplasticity and white matter were measured using immunohistochemical staining. The overall performance in seven-day acquisition trials was similar between the groups. Compared with the control group, BSC supplementation reduced the latency to the platform during day one of the acquisition tests. Supplementation improved memory by showing reduced latency and improved path efficiency to the platform quadrant, and smaller initial heading error from the platform zone. Supplemented rats showed an increase in striatal dopamine terminals and hippocampal glutamate receptors. Thus BSC supplementation during post-natal brain development improved learning and memory, independent from anxiety. The moderately enhanced neuroplasticity in dopamine and glutamate may be biological changes underlying the improved cognitive function.

  12. Effects of buspirone, diazepam, and zolpidem on open field behavior, and brain [3H]muscimol binding after buspirone pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemiatkowski, M; Sienkiewicz-Jarosz, H; Członkowska, A I; Bidziński, A; Płaźnik, A

    2000-07-01

    The effects of 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist buspirone, a nonselective (diazepam), and a selective (zolpidem) GABA(A) receptor agonist were compared in the open field test of neophobia. Unhabituated rats were pretreated with the drugs once, prior to a first exposure to the open field, and their behavior was recorded both during this test and during a second trial 24 h later. It has been hypothesized that the decrease in exploratory activity observed during the second test session may be considered an adaptive reaction to the first day aversive experience (neophobia). If so, a selective modulation of 5-HT and GABA systems activity during the test could bring about significant changes in animal behavior on the retest. Buspirone at the lowest dose of 0.3 mg/kg revealed anxiolytic-like properties on the first day, whereas the action of diazepam and zolpidem was modulated by the dose-related sedative effect. At the dose of 2.4 mg/kg buspirone elicited delayed in time anxiolytic-like action, i.e., produced the antithigmotactic effect during the retrial 24 h later. Diazepam and zolpidem failed to exhibit similar profile of action. Autoradiography of [3H]muscimol binding after pretreatment of rats with buspirone showed a significant increase in the selective radioligand binding within the frontal cortex and a similar, near-significant tendency in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. The behavioral data validate buspirone as important drug for the treatment of anxiety disorders, devoid of disruptive influence on motor and cognitive processes. The open field test, as modified by us, appeared sensitive in distinguishing the behavioral profiles of action of different anxiolytic compounds, including 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist. The present results support the assumption that reduced turnover of 5-HT due to stimulation of 5-HT(1A) autoreceptors, may bring about changes in GABA(A) receptor system activity, in some brain structures, leading to the anxiolytic effect.

  13. Effect of soy oil, orange (Citrus sinensis) peel oil and their blends on total phospholipid, lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant defense system in brain tissues of normo rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erukainure, O.L.; Ajiboye, J.A.; Davis, F.F.; Obabire, K.; Okoro, E.E.; Adenekan, S.O.; Adegbola, M.V.; Awogbemi, B.J.; Odjobo, B.O.; Zaruwa, M.Z.

    2016-07-01

    Soy and orange peel (C. sinensis) oils were fed to albino male rats to determine their effects on malondialdehyde (MDA), total phospholipid (TP) content and oxidative stress biomarkers of brain tissue. Beside mouse chow, four diets were designed to contain 50% of their energy as carbohydrate, 35% as fat, and 15% as protein, and one lipid-free diet which had distilled water substituted for fat. Groups of five rats were each fed one of these diets, while a fifth group was fed pelletized mouse chow. A significant difference (p < 0.05) was observed in the TP of the mouse chow group. The TP was highest (p < 0.05) in those fed the soy and orange peel oil blend as compared to those fed these oils separately. Feeding soy oil led to decreased MDA in brain tissues and influenced the TP content. Significantly lower (p < 0.05) GSH and SOD activities were observed in the groups fed soy oil+orange peel oil, and soy oil diets respectively. Higher significant (p < 0.05) activities were observed in the orange oil fed group. Significantly higher (p < 0.05) catalase activity was observed in the lipid free diet fed group, which was followed by orange peel oil, and soy oil+orange peel oil diets, respectively. A combination of both oils may be useful in the management of certain neurological diseases or illnesses and protect against other oxidative stress complications. (Author)

  14. Regional in vivo binding of (/sup 3/H)N-propylnorapomorphine in the mouse brain. Evidence for labelling of central dopamine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, C; Fuxe, K; Ross, S B [Astra Pharmaceuticals AB, Soedertaelje (Sweden)

    1981-07-10

    Tail vein injections of (/sup 3/H)N-propylnorapomorphine ((/sup 3/H)NPA) in male mice resulted in a dose-related accumulation of radioactivity in the following brain regions: striatum (max), olfactory tubercle and cerebellum (min). The specific binding was saturable with increasing concentrations of the drug and stereospecifically displaced by (+)butaclamol. Dopamine agonists (apomorphine, NPA and bromocriptine) and antagonists (spiperone, haloperidol, (+)butaclamol and l-sulpiride) all caused dose-dependent prevention of (/sup 3/H)NPA binding. Mianserin, phenoxybenzamine and propranolol did not prevent the in vivo (/sup 3/H)NPA binding suggesting that (/sup 3/H)NPA binds specifically to dopamine receptors in the striatum and the olfactory tubercle of the mouse.

  15. Specific in vivo binding in the rat brain of [18F]RP 62203: A selective 5-HT2A receptor radioligand for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besret, Laurent; Dauphin, Francois; Huard, Cecile; Lasne, Marie-Claire; Vivet, Richard; Mickala, Patrick; Barbelivien, Alexandra; Baron, Jean-Claude

    1996-01-01

    In vivo pharmacokinetic and brain binding characteristics of [ 18 F]RP 62203, a selective high-affinity serotonergic 5-HT 2A receptor antagonist, were assessed in the rat following intravenous injection of trace amount of the radioligand. The radioactive distribution profile observed in the brain 60 min after injection was characterized by greater than fourfold higher uptake in neocortex as compared to cerebellum (0.38 ± 0.07% injected dose/g, % ID/g and 0.08 ± 0.01 ID/g, respectively), consistent with in vivo specific binding to the 5-HT 2A receptor. Furthermore, specific [ 18 F]RP 62203 binding significantly correlated with the reported in vitro distribution of 5-HT 2A receptors, but not with known concentration profiles of dopaminergic D 2 or adrenergic α 1 receptors. Finally, detectable specific binding was abolished by pretreatment with large doses of ritanserin, a selective 5-HT 2A antagonist, which resulted in uniform uptakes across cortical, striatal and cerebellar tissues. Thus, [ 18 F]RP 62203 appears to be a promising selective tool to visualize and quantify 5-HT 2A brain receptors in vivo with positron emission tomography

  16. Gemfibrozil and Fenofibrate, Food and Drug Administration-approved Lipid-lowering Drugs, Up-regulate Tripeptidyl-peptidase 1 in Brain Cells via Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arunava; Corbett, Grant T.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Pahan, Kalipada

    2012-01-01

    The classical late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (LINCLs) is an autosomal recessive disease, where the defective gene is Cln2, encoding tripeptidyl-peptidase I (TPP1). At the molecular level, LINCL is caused by accumulation of autofluorescent storage materials in neurons and other cell types. Currently, there is no established treatment for this fatal disease. This study reveals a novel use of gemfibrozil and fenofibrate, Food and Drug Administration-approved lipid-lowering drugs, in up-regulating TPP1 in brain cells. Both gemfibrozil and fenofibrate up-regulated mRNA, protein, and enzymatic activity of TPP1 in primary mouse neurons and astrocytes as well as human astrocytes and neuronal cells. Because gemfibrozil and fenofibrate are known to activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα), the role of PPARα in gemfibrozil- and fenofibrate-mediated up-regulation of TPP1 was investigated revealing that both drugs up-regulated TPP1 mRNA, protein, and enzymatic activity both in vitro and in vivo in wild type (WT) and PPARβ−/−, but not PPARα−/−, mice. In an attempt to delineate the mechanism of TPP1 up-regulation, it was found that the effects of the fibrate drugs were abrogated in the absence of retinoid X receptor-α (RXRα), a molecule known to form a heterodimer with PPARα. Accordingly, all-trans-retinoic acid, alone or together with gemfibrozil, up-regulated TPP1. Co-immunoprecipitation and ChIP studies revealed the formation of a PPARα/RXRα heterodimer and binding of the heterodimer to an RXR-binding site on the Cln2 promoter. Together, this study demonstrates a unique mechanism for the up-regulation of TPP1 by fibrate drugs via PPARα/RXRα pathway. PMID:22989886

  17. Gemfibrozil and fenofibrate, Food and Drug Administration-approved lipid-lowering drugs, up-regulate tripeptidyl-peptidase 1 in brain cells via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α: implications for late infantile Batten disease therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arunava; Corbett, Grant T; Gonzalez, Frank J; Pahan, Kalipada

    2012-11-09

    The classical late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (LINCLs) is an autosomal recessive disease, where the defective gene is Cln2, encoding tripeptidyl-peptidase I (TPP1). At the molecular level, LINCL is caused by accumulation of autofluorescent storage materials in neurons and other cell types. Currently, there is no established treatment for this fatal disease. This study reveals a novel use of gemfibrozil and fenofibrate, Food and Drug Administration-approved lipid-lowering drugs, in up-regulating TPP1 in brain cells. Both gemfibrozil and fenofibrate up-regulated mRNA, protein, and enzymatic activity of TPP1 in primary mouse neurons and astrocytes as well as human astrocytes and neuronal cells. Because gemfibrozil and fenofibrate are known to activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα), the role of PPARα in gemfibrozil- and fenofibrate-mediated up-regulation of TPP1 was investigated revealing that both drugs up-regulated TPP1 mRNA, protein, and enzymatic activity both in vitro and in vivo in wild type (WT) and PPARβ(-/-), but not PPARα(-/-), mice. In an attempt to delineate the mechanism of TPP1 up-regulation, it was found that the effects of the fibrate drugs were abrogated in the absence of retinoid X receptor-α (RXRα), a molecule known to form a heterodimer with PPARα. Accordingly, all-trans-retinoic acid, alone or together with gemfibrozil, up-regulated TPP1. Co-immunoprecipitation and ChIP studies revealed the formation of a PPARα/RXRα heterodimer and binding of the heterodimer to an RXR-binding site on the Cln2 promoter. Together, this study demonstrates a unique mechanism for the up-regulation of TPP1 by fibrate drugs via PPARα/RXRα pathway.

  18. Neonatal domoic acid decreases in vivo binding of [11C]yohimbine to α2 adrenoceptors in adult rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Majken; Lillethorup, Thea Pinholt; Jakobsen, Steen

    -quantitative analysis. MicroPET images were analyzed using PMOD software and registered to an average Sprague-Dawley rat MRI brain atlas to acquire data in limbic and cortical regions of interest. Results: In behavioural testing DOM60, and to a lesser extent DOM20 rats, spent more time in the periphery during the open......-Dawley rats (n=6-7 per group) were injected (s.c.) daily from postnatal day 8-14 with saline or one of two low sub-convulsive doses, 20µg/kg [DOM20] or 60µg/kg [DOM60] of DOM, an AMPA/kainate receptor agonist. The behaviour of the rats was observed in an open field test, a social interaction test...... and the forced swim test at day 50, 75 and 98, respectively. At ~120 days of age 3-4 rats per group were injected with [11C]yohimbine, an α2 adrenergic receptor antagonist, and scanned in a Mediso micro positron emission tomography (PET) scanner, to measure α2 adrenoceptor binding. The volume of distribution (VT...

  19. Resveratrol Directly Binds to Mitochondrial Complex I and Increases Oxidative Stress in Brain Mitochondria of Aged Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naïg Gueguen

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is often described as a promising therapeutic molecule for numerous diseases, especially in metabolic and neurodegenerative disorders. While the mechanism of action is still debated, an increasing literature reports that resveratrol regulates the mitochondrial respiratory chain function. In a recent study we have identified mitochondrial complex I as a direct target of this molecule. Nevertheless, the mechanisms and consequences of such an interaction still require further investigation. In this study, we identified in silico by docking study a binding site for resveratrol at the nucleotide pocket of complex I. In vitro, using solubilized complex I, we demonstrated a competition between NAD+ and resveratrol. At low doses (<5μM, resveratrol stimulated complex I activity, whereas at high dose (50 μM it rather decreased it. In vivo, in brain mitochondria from resveratrol treated young mice, we showed that complex I activity was increased, whereas the respiration rate was not improved. Moreover, in old mice with low antioxidant defenses, we demonstrated that complex I activation by resveratrol led to oxidative stress. These results bring new insights into the mechanism of action of resveratrol on mitochondria and highlight the importance of the balance between pro- and antioxidant effects of resveratrol depending on its dose and age. These parameters should be taken into account when clinical trials using resveratrol or analogues have to be designed.

  20. Neonatal domoic acid decreases in vivo binding of [11C]yohimbine to α2 adrenoceptors in adult rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Majken; Lillethorup, Thea Pinholt; Jakobsen, Steen

    day 8-14 with saline or one of two low sub-convulsive doses, 20µg/kg [DOM20] or 60µg/kg [DOM60] of DOM, an AMPA/kainate receptor agonist. The behaviour of the rats was observed in an open field test, a social interaction test and the forced swim test at day 50, 75 and 98, respectively. At ~120 days...... of age 3-4 rats per group were injected with [11C]yohimbine, an α2 adrenergic receptor antagonist and scanned in a micro positron emission tomography (PET) scanner. DOM60 spent more time in the periphery during the open field test and less time struggling in the forced swim test compared to the saline...... treated rats. microPET data revealed that DOM60 rats had a 40-47 % reduction in [11C]yohimbine binding in limbic and cortical brain regions relative to saline treated rats. We conclude that neonatal administration of DOM combined with the potential stress associated with behavioural testing results...

  1. Effects of thyroid status on presynaptic. cap alpha. 2-adrenoceptor and. beta. -adrenoceptor binding in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atterwill, C.K.; Bunn, S.J.; Atkinson, D.J. (Development Neurobiology Unit, London (UK). Inst. of Neurology); Smith, S.L.; Heal, D.J. (Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (UK))

    1984-01-01

    The effect of thyroid status on noradrenergic synaptic function in the mature brain was examined by measuring presynaptic ..cap alpha..2- and postsynaptic ..beta..-adrenoceptors. Repeated triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) administration to rats (100..mu..g/kg x 14 days hyperthyroid) caused an 18% increase in striatal ..beta..-adrenoceptors as shown by (/sup 3/H)-dihydroalprenolol binding with no change in membranes from cerebral cortex or hypothalamus. In contrast, hypothyroidism (propylthiouracil, PTU x 14 days) produced significant 12% and 30% reductions in striatal and hypothalamic ..beta..-adrenoceptors respectively with no change in the cerebral cortex. Presynaptic ..cap alpha..2-adrenoceptor function was measured in the two dysthyroid states using the clonidine-induced hypoactivity model. Experimental hyperthyroidism increased the degree of clonidine-induced hypoactivity, and suggests increased presynaptic ..cap alpha..2-adrenoceptor function compared with control rats, whereas hypothyroidism suppressed presynaptic ..cap alpha..2-adrenoceptor function. These results show firstly that changes of thyroid status in the mature rat may produce homeostatic alterations at central noradrenergic synapses as reflected by changes in pre- and postsynaptic adrenoceptor function. Secondly, there appear to be T/sub 3/-induced changes in ..beta..-adrenoceptors in the striatum where changes in dopaminergic neuronal activity have previously been demonstrated.

  2. Effects of thyroid status on presynaptic α2-adrenoceptor and β-adrenoceptor binding in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atterwill, C.K.; Bunn, S.J.; Atkinson, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of thyroid status on noradrenergic synaptic function in the mature brain was examined by measuring presynaptic α2- and postsynaptic β-adrenoceptors. Repeated triiodothyronine (T 3 ) administration to rats (100μg/kg X 14 days hyperthyroid) caused an 18% increase in striatal β-adrenoceptors as shown by [ 3 H]-dihydroalprenolol binding with no change in membranes from cerebral cortex or hypothalamus. In contrast, hypothyroidism (propylthiouracil, PTU X 14 days) produced significant 12% and 30% reductions in striatal and hypothalamic β-adrenoceptors respectively with no change in the cerebral cortex. Presynaptic α2-adrenoceptor function was measured in the two dysthyroid states using the clonidine-induced hypoactivity model. Experimtal hyperthyroidism increased the degree of clonidine-induced hypoactivity, and suggests increased presynaptic α2-adrenoceptor function compared with control rats, whereas hypothyroidism suppressed presynaptic α2-adrenoceptor function. These results show firstly that changes of thyroid status in the mature rat may produce homeostatic alterations at central noradrenergic synapses as reflected by changes in pre- and postsynaptic adrenoceptor function. Secondly, there appear to be T 3 -induced changes in β-adrenoceptors in the striatum where changes in dopaminergic neuronal activity have previously been demonstrated. (Author)

  3. Systemic injection of kainic acid: Gliosis in olfactory and limbic brain regions quantified with [3H]PK 11195 binding autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altar, C.A.; Baudry, M.

    1990-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases may result from excessive stimulation of excitatory amino acid receptors by endogenous ligands. Because neuronal degeneration is associated with glial proliferation and hypertrophy, the degenerative changes throughout rat brain following the systemic administration of kainic acid (12 mg/kg) were mapped with quantitative autoradiography of [3H]PK 11195. This radioligand binds to a mitochondrial benzodiazepine binding site (MBBS) on microglia and astrocytes. Analysis of eight horizontal and four coronal brain levels revealed up to 16-fold increases in [3H]PK 11195 binding from 1 to 5 weeks but not 1 day after kainate injection. Increases in [3H]PK 11195 binding were predominantly in ventral limbic brain regions and olfactory projections to neocortical areas, with the olfactory cortex greater than subiculum/CA1 greater than anterior olfactory nucleus, medial thalamic nucleus, and piriform cortex greater than cingulate cortex and rostral hippocampus greater than dentate gyrus, septum, and amygdala greater than entorhinal cortex and temporal cortex. Little or no enhancement of [3H]PK 11195 binding was observed in numerous regions including the caudate-putamen, substantia nigra, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, cerebellum, thalamic nuclei, choroid plexus, medulla, parietal or occipital cortex, or pons. A 2-fold greater extent of neurodegeneration was obtained in ventral portions of the olfactory bulb, entorhinal cortex, temporal cortex, and dentate gyrus compared with the dorsal portions of these structures. The pattern of increase in [3H]PK 11195 binding closely matched the patterns of neuronal degeneration reported following parenteral kainate injection. These findings strengthen the notion that quantitative autoradiography of [3H]PK 11195 is a valuable tool to quantify the extent of neuronal degeneration

  4. Effects of vanadium on different adenosinetriphosphatases and binding of 3H-labeled ouabain and calcium-45 to rat brain synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, S.K.; Osborn, R.L.; Desaiah, D.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of vanadium chloride on rat brain synaptosomal adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) activities was determined in vitro and in rats treated at 1 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg for 10 d. Additional experiments were conducted to determine the effect of vanadium chloride on binding of [ 3 H]ouabain and 45 Ca to rat brain synaptosomes. Na + + K + - and Ca 2+ -ATPase activities were inhibited significantly in a concentration-dependent manner by V in vitro. Mg 2+ -ATPase inhibition was neither dose-dependent nor significant except at 10 -5 M. Na + + K + -ATPase inhibition by V was more pronounced than that of other ATPases studied. Vanadium inhibited [ 3 H]ouabain binding to synaptosomes by 90% at 10 -3 M; the inhibition was concentration-dependent. Binding of 45 Ca was inhibited 50% at 10 -4 M; but concentration-dependent inhibition was not evident. Rats treated with vanadium chloride neither became myotonic nor showed any changes in ATPase activities or binding of [ 3 H]ouabain and 45 Ca to brain synaptosomes. Line-weaver-Burke plots of the in vitro inhibition of Na + + K + -ATPase and [ 3 H]ouabain binding revealed that (1) Na + + K + -ATPase activation by ATP was inhibited by V with an increase in K/sub m/ and a decrease in V/sub max/; (2) Na + activation was inhibited noncompetitively by V, as evidenced by a decrease in V/sub max/ and no change in K/sub m/; (3) K + activation was inhibited by V with a decrease in both V/sub max/ and K/sub m/; (4) noncompetitive inhibition of Mg 2+ -ATPase by V was observed; and (5) the kinetic behavior of [ 3 H]ouabain binding inhibition by V with respect to ATP and Na + activation was mixed and noncompetitive, respectively

  5. Light-enhanced inhibition of ouabain binding to digitalis receptor in rat brain and guinea pig heart by the food dye erythrosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hnatowich, M.; LaBella, F.S.

    1982-01-01

    Erythrosine (ERY) (FD and C red no. 3) inhibited specific binding of [ 3 H]ouabain to rat brain homogenates with an IC50 of 23 mM in the dark and 1 mM in ordinary fluorescent light. Competition studies demonstrated the presence of two components, only one of which was affected by light. Lineweaver-Burk analysis indicated that ERY preferentially antagonizes [ 3 H]ouabain binding at a high-affinity site in the light, whereas in the dark the dye inhibits binding in a manner qualitatively similar to inhibition by ouabain. Light enhancement of ERY potency occurred only when dye and tissue were present together in the incubation medium, pointing to participation of transient molecular species. However, neither superoxide dismutase nor catalase altered the effects of ERY in the light or dark, suggesting the absence of oxygen free radicals. In contrast to brain, membranes from guinea pig heart showed only one binding site for [ 3 H]ouabain, and antagonism by ERY at this site was markedly enhanced by light. Structural differences between classes of ouabain binding regions probably accounts for the discrimination exhibited by ERY in the presence of light and oxygen. Our findings also caution that metabolic transformation of this common food dye, light decomposition, or photoreaction with foodstuff may yield more toxic derivatives

  6. Neurokinin-3 Receptor Binding in Guinea Pig, Monkey, and Human Brain: In Vitro and in Vivo Imaging Using the Novel Radioligand, [18F]Lu AF10628.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnäs, Katarina; Finnema, Sjoerd J; Stepanov, Vladimir; Takano, Akihiro; Tóth, Miklós; Svedberg, Marie; Møller Nielsen, Søren; Khanzhin, Nikolay A; Juhl, Karsten; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Halldin, Christer; Farde, Lars

    2016-08-01

    Previous autoradiography studies have suggested a marked interspecies variation in the neuroanatomical localization and expression levels of the neurokinin 3 receptor, with high density in the brain of rat, gerbil, and guinea pig, but at the time offered no conclusive evidence for its presence in the human brain. Hitherto available radioligands have displayed low affinity for the human neurokinin 3 receptor relative to the rodent homologue and may thus not be optimal for cross-species analyses of the expression of this protein. A novel neurokinin 3 receptor radioligand, [(18)F]Lu AF10628 ((S)-N-(cyclobutyl(3-fluorophenyl)methyl)-8-fluoro-2-((3-[(18)F]-fluoropropyl)amino)-3-methyl-1-oxo-1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-4-carboxamide), was synthesized and used for autoradiography studies in cryosections from guinea pig, monkey, and human brain as well as for positron emission tomography studies in guinea pig and monkey. The results confirmed previous observations of interspecies variation in the neurokinin 3 receptor brain localization with more extensive distribution in guinea pig than in primate brain. In the human brain, specific binding to the neurokinin 3 receptor was highest in the amygdala and in the hypothalamus and very low in other regions examined. Positron emission tomography imaging showed a pattern consistent with that observed using autoradiography. The radioactivity was, however, found to accumulate in skull bone, which limits the use of this radioligand for in vivo quantification of neurokinin 3 receptor binding. Species differences in the brain distribution of neurokinin 3 receptors should be considered when using animal models for predicting human neurokinin 3 receptor pharmacology. For positron emission tomography imaging of brain neurokinin 3 receptors, additional work is required to develop a radioligand with more favorable in vivo properties. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  7. The effect of ingested sulfite on visual evoked potentials, lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant status of brain in normal and sulfite oxidase-deficient aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsoy, Ozlem; Aras, Sinem; Ozkan, Ayse; Parlak, Hande; Aslan, Mutay; Yargicoglu, Piraye; Agar, Aysel

    2016-07-01

    Sulfite, commonly used as a preservative in foods, beverages, and pharmaceuticals, is a very reactive and potentially toxic molecule which is detoxified by sulfite oxidase (SOX). Changes induced by aging may be exacerbated by exogenous chemicals like sulfite. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ingested sulfite on visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and brain antioxidant statuses by measuring superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. Brain lipid oxidation status was also determined via thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in normal- and SOX-deficient aged rats. Rats do not mimic the sulfite responses seen in humans because of their relatively high SOX activity level. Therefore this study used SOX-deficient rats since they are more appropriate models for studying sulfite toxicity. Forty male Wistar rats aged 24 months were randomly assigned to four groups: control (C), sulfite (S), SOX-deficient (D) and SOX-deficient + sulfite (DS). SOX deficiency was established by feeding rats with low molybdenum (Mo) diet and adding 200 ppm tungsten (W) to their drinking water. Sulfite in the form of sodium metabisulfite (25 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) was given by gavage. Treatment continued for 6 weeks. At the end of the experimental period, flash VEPs were recorded. Hepatic SOX activity was measured to confirm SOX deficiency. SOX-deficient rats had an approximately 10-fold decrease in hepatic SOX activity compared with the normal rats. The activity of SOX in deficient rats was thus in the range of humans. There was no significant difference between control and treated groups in either latence or amplitude of VEP components. Brain SOD, CAT, and GPx activities and brain TBARS levels were similar in all experimental groups compared with the control group. Our results indicate that exogenous administration of sulfite does not affect VEP components and the antioxidant/oxidant status of aged rat brains. © The Author

  8. Insulin: its binding to specific receptors and its stimulation of DNA synthesis and 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide phosphohydrolase in embryonic mouse brain cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanker, G.; Pieringer, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Previously, the authors demonstrated that ornithine decarboxylase was stimulated by insulin in cultures of embryonic mouse brain cells. In the present work, they have investigated the presence and specificity of insulin receptors in these cultures. A time study showed that maximum binding of 125 [I] labelled insulin was around 75 min. Other studies measured the influence of concentration and age on insulin binding. A displacement study using increasing concentrations of cold insulin, glucagon or growth hormone demonstrated that the specificity of the receptors for insulin was rather high. It was also found that insulin displayed a clear dose-dependent stimulation of thymidine incorporation into the brain cells. Insulin also stimulated the glial enzyme 2':3'-cyclic nucleotide phosphohydrolase (CNP-ase). The results suggest a dual role for insulin; it regulates both cell proliferation as well as differentiation

  9. Protective effect of serotonin on phospholipids and lipid peroxides contents in brain and liver of gamma irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, M.A.; Saada, H.A.

    1999-01-01

    Treatment of normal rats with serotonin (2 mg/100 g body weight) produced no significant change in levels of phospholipids and lipid peroxides of the cerebral hemispheres and liver 1,3 and days after treatment. The content of lipid peroxides was measured as malondialdehyde (MDA). Whole body gamma-irradiation of rats at 8 Gy resulted in significant decrease in the level of phospholipids and significant increase in MDA level in cerebral hemispheres and lever. Changes were more pronounced in liver. Treatment with serotonin, 15 minutes before irradiation, had a pronounced protective effect against the radiation induced changes in the levels of phospholipids and MDA only in the liver through all the experimental period

  10. SKF 525-A and cytochrome P-450 ligands inhibit with high affinity the binding of [3H]dextromethorphan and σligands to guinea pig brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.; Canoll, P.D.; Musacchio, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The DM 1 /σ 1 site binds dextromethorphan (DM) and σ receptor ligands. The broad binding specificity of this site and its peculiar subcellular distribution prompted us to explore the possibility that this site is a member of the cytochrome P-450 superfamily of enzymes. We tested the effects of the liver microsomal monooxygenase inhibitor SKF 525-A (Proadifen), and other P-450 substrates on the binding of [ 3 H]dextromethorphan, [ 3 H]3-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine and (+)-[ 3 H]1,3-Di-o-tolyl-guanidine ([ 3 H]DTG) to the guinea pig brain. SKF 525-A, l-lobeline and GBR-12909 inhibited the binding of the three labeled ligands with nM affinity. Each drug has identical nM K i values for the high-affinity site labeled by the three ligands. This indicated that they displaced the labeled ligands from the common DM 1 σ 1 site. Debrisoquine and sparteine, prototypical substrates for liver debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase, displayed K i values of 9-13 and 3-4 μM respectively against the three labeled ligands. These results, the broad specificity of the DM 1 /σ 1 binding site, and its peculiar subcellular distribution, raises the possibility that this binding site is a member of the cytochrome P-450 superfamily of isozymes, rather than a neurotransmitter receptor

  11. Measurement of {sup 11}C-raclopride binding in micropig brain with high and low specific activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Jin; Lee, Jae Sung; Eo, Jae Seon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2005-07-01

    In vitro, a saturation hyperbola or Scatchard plot is applied for the determination of receptor density (Bmax) and affinity (Kd). Simillary, Bmax and Kd could be obtained in vivo by performing two or more PET experiments with high and low specific activities (SA). To measure these parameters, the binding potential (BP) of 11C-raclopride for striatal D2 receptor in micropig brain at high and low SA was measured in this study. A normal male PWG micropig (weight: 38 kg, age: 24 months) was used in this study. The animals were anesthetized with ketamine (2 mL/10 kg, i.m.) and xylazine (1mL/10kg, i.m.), and placed in a supine position. Dynamic PET data was acquired for 60 min after injection of 11C-raclopride (2.5 mCi) through the catheter placed in a femoral vein. High SA and low SA (6.8 uCi/nmol) PET and T1 SPGR MRI scans were performed. MR image was co-registered to the static PET images and ROIs were drawn on striatum and cerebellum to obtain the time activity curve. The BP in striatum was computed by both the Lammertsma and Logan reference tissue methods using cerebellum tissue input function. BP parametric images were also generated using the Logan method. The value of striatum BP was 1.46/0.32 (high SA / low SA) and 1.34/0.31 in Lammertsma and Logan methods, respectively. The D2 occupancy by the cold raclopride was approximately 78% in micropig striatum. The Logan BP parametric image visualized well the change of receptor occupancy between the two scans. In this study, BP values at high and low SA and their percent change estimated by the two different methods were correlated well. This preliminary result suggests that the experimental procedures established in this study would be useful for the quantification of the density of D2 receptor and affinity in the micropig brain.

  12. [11C]Doxepin binding to histamine H1 receptors in living human brain in association with attentive waking and circadian rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko eYanai

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging in neuroscience is a new research field that enables visualization of the impact of molecular events on brain structure and function in humans. While magnetic resonance-based imaging techniques can provide complex information at the level of system, positron emission tomography (PET enables determination of the distribution and density of receptor and enzyme in the human brain. Previous studies using [11C]raclopride revealed that the release of neuronal dopamine was increased in human brain by psychostimulants or reward stimuli. Following on from these previous studies, we examined whether the levels of neuronal release of histamine might change [11C]doxepin binding to the H1 receptors under the influence of physiological stimuli. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of quantitative measurement of [11C]doxepin binding between morning and afternoon and between resting and attentive waking conditions in healthy human subjects. There was a trend for a decrease in [11C]doxepin binding during attentive calculation tasks compared with that in resting conditions, but the difference (approximately 10% was not significant. In contrast, the binding potential of [11C]doxepin in the anterior cingulate gyrus was significantly higher in the morning than that in the afternoon (approximately 19%, suggesting that higher histamine release in the morning would decrease the [11C]doxepin binding in the afternoon. This study suggests that non-invasive measurement of neuronal histamine release is feasible in humans by PET ligand-activation study, although the development of a tracer with better signal-to-noise properties is needed.

  13. Interleukin-1 interaction with neuroregulatory systems: selective enhancement by recombinant human and mouse interleukin-1 of in vitro opioid peptide receptor binding in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedermann, C.J.

    1989-02-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) exerts a wide variety of biological effects on various cell types and may be regarded as a pleiotropic peptide hormone. Biological evidence suggests that IL-1 participates in the modulation of central nervous system physiology and behavior in a fashion characteristic of neuroendocrine hormones. In this investigation, recombinant (r) human (h) IL-1 and r mouse (m) IL-1 were examined for their modulation of opioid peptide receptor binding in vitro. Experiments were performed on frozen sections of rat brain. Receptor binding of radiolabeled substance P and of radiolabeled neurotensin were not significantly affected by the presence of rIL-1s. Recombinant IL-1s, however, significantly enhanced specific binding of 125I-beta-endorphin (125I-beta-END) and of D-ala2-(tyrosyl-3,5-3H)enkephalin-(5-D-leucine) (3H-D-ALA), equipotently and in a concentration-dependent manner with maximal activity occurring at a concentration of 10 LAF units/ml. The increased binding of 125I-beta-END and 3H-D-ALA was blocked steroselectively by (-)-naloxone and by etorphine, suggesting detection of opiate receptors. In addition, brain distribution patterns of receptors labeled in the presence of rIL-1s corresponded to patterns previously published for opiate receptors. Autoradiographic visualization of receptors revealed that rIL-1s in the different areas of the brain exert their effect on opioid binding with comparable potencies. The data suggest that certain central nervous system effects of IL-1s may be mediated by their selective interaction with opiatergic systems at the receptor level.

  14. Quantification of [11C]yohimbine binding to α2 adrenoceptors in rat brain in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phan, Jenny-Ann; Landau, Anne M.; Wong, Dean F.

    2015-01-01

    We quantified the binding potentials (BPND) of [11C]yohimbine binding in rat brain to alpha-2 adrenoceptors to evaluate [11C]yohimbine as an in vivo marker of noradrenergic neurotransmission and to examine its sensitivity to the level of noradrenaline. Dual [11C]yohimbine dynamic positron emissio...... is sensitive to a challenge known to increase the extracellular level of noradrenaline, which can benefit future PET investigations of pathologic conditions related to disrupted noradrenergic neurotransmission....... challenge with amphetamine induced a significant decline of [11C]yohimbine BPND of ∼38% in all volumes of interest. The BPND was greatest in the thalamus and striatum, followed in descending order by, frontal cortex, pons, and cerebellum. The experimental data demonstrate that [11C]yohimbine binding...

  15. Increasing brain serotonin corrects CO2 chemosensitivity in methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (Mecp2)-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toward, Marie A.; Abdala, Ana P.; Knopp, Sharon J.; Paton, Julian F. R.; Bissonnette, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Mice deficient in the transcription factor methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (Mecp2), a mouse model of Rett syndrome, display reduced CO2 chemosensitivity, which may contribute to their breathing abnormalities. In addition, patients with Rett syndrome and male mice that are null for Mecp2 show reduced levels of brain serotonin (5-HT). Serotonin is known to play a role in central chemosensitivity, and we hypothesized that increasing the availability of 5-HT in this mouse model would improve their respiratory response to CO2. Here we determined the apnoeic threshold in heterozygous Mecp2-deficient female mice and examined the effects of blocking 5-HT reuptake on the CO2 response in Mecp2-null male mice. Studies were performed in B6.129P2(C)-Mecp2τm1.1Bird null males and heterozygous females. In an in situ preparation, seven of eight Mecp2-deficient heterozygous females showed arrest of phrenic nerve activity when arterial CO2 was lowered to 3%, whereas the wild-types maintained phrenic nerve amplitude at 53 ± 3% of maximal. In vivo plethysmography studies were used to determine CO2 chemosensitivity in null males. These mice were exposed sequentially to 1, 3 and 5% CO2. The percentage increase in minute ventilation in response to increased inspired CO2 was less in Mecp2−/y than in Mecp2+/y mice. Pretreatment with citalopram, a selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor (2.5 mg kg−1 I.P.), 40 min prior to CO2 exposure, in Mecp2−/y mice resulted in an improvement in CO2 chemosensitivity to wild-type levels. These results suggest that decreased 5-HT in Mecp2-deficient mice reduces CO2 chemosensitivity, and restoring 5-HT levels can reverse this effect. PMID:23180809

  16. Recurrent De Novo Mutations Disturbing the GTP/GDP Binding Pocket of RAB11B Cause Intellectual Disability and a Distinctive Brain Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, Ideke J C; Reijnders, Margot R F; Venselaar, Hanka; Kraus, Alison; Jansen, Sandra; de Vries, Bert B A; Houge, Gunnar; Gradek, Gyri Aasland; Seo, Jieun; Choi, Murim; Chae, Jong-Hee; van der Burgt, Ineke; Pfundt, Rolph; Letteboer, Stef J F; van Beersum, Sylvia E C; Dusseljee, Simone; Brunner, Han G; Doherty, Dan; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Roepman, Ronald

    2017-11-02

    The Rab GTPase family comprises ∼70 GTP-binding proteins, functioning in vesicle formation, transport and fusion. They are activated by a conformational change induced by GTP-binding, allowing interactions with downstream effectors. Here, we report five individuals with two recurrent de novo missense mutations in RAB11B; c.64G>A; p.Val22Met in three individuals and c.202G>A; p.Ala68Thr in two individuals. An overlapping neurodevelopmental phenotype, including severe intellectual disability with absent speech, epilepsy, and hypotonia was observed in all affected individuals. Additionally, visual problems, musculoskeletal abnormalities, and microcephaly were present in the majority of cases. Re-evaluation of brain MRI images of four individuals showed a shared distinct brain phenotype, consisting of abnormal white matter (severely decreased volume and abnormal signal), thin corpus callosum, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, optic nerve hypoplasia and mild ventriculomegaly. To compare the effects of both variants with known inactive GDP- and active GTP-bound RAB11B mutants, we modeled the variants on the three-dimensional protein structure and performed subcellular localization studies. We predicted that both variants alter the GTP/GDP binding pocket and show that they both have localization patterns similar to inactive RAB11B. Evaluation of their influence on the affinity of RAB11B to a series of binary interactors, both effectors and guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), showed induction of RAB11B binding to the GEF SH3BP5, again similar to inactive RAB11B. In conclusion, we report two recurrent dominant mutations in RAB11B leading to a neurodevelopmental syndrome, likely caused by altered GDP/GTP binding that inactivate the protein and induce GEF binding and protein mislocalization. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. All rights reserved.

  17. Protein and lipid oxidative damage and complex I content are lower in the brain of budgerigar and canaries than in mice. Relation to aging rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Reinald; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Sanz, Alberto; Ayala, Victoria; Vasileva, Ekaterina; Barja, Gustavo

    2005-12-01

    What are the mechanisms determining the rate of animal aging? Of the two major classes of endothermic animals, bird species are strikingly long-lived compared to mammals of similar body size and metabolic rate. Thus, they are ideal models to identify longevity-related characteristics not linked to body size or low metabolic rates. Since oxidative stress seems to be related to the basic aging process, we measured specific markers of different kinds of oxidative damage to proteins, like glutamic and aminoadipic semialdehydes (GSA and AASA, specific protein carbonyls), Nɛ-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL), Nɛ-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), and Nɛ-(malondialdehyde)lysine (MDAL), as well as mitochondrial Complex I content and amino acid and membrane fatty acyl composition, in the brain of short-lived mice (maximum life span [MLSP] 3.5 years) compared with those of long-lived budgerigar 'parakeets' (MLSP, 21 years) and canaries (MLSP, 24 years). The brains of both bird species had significantly lower levels of compounds formed as a result of oxidative (GSA and AASA), glycoxidative (CEL and CML), and lipoxidative (CML and MDAL) protein modifications, as well as a lower levels of mitochondrial complex I protein. Although it is known that fatty acid unsaturation is lower in many tissues of long-lived compared to short-lived mammals, this is not true in the particular case of brain. In agreement with this, we also found that the brain tissue of bugerigars and canaries contains no fewer double bonds than that of mice. Amino acid composition analyses revealed that bird proteins have a significantly lower content of His, Leu and Phe, as well as, interestingly, of methionine, whereas Asp, Glu, Ala, Val, and Lys contents were higher than in the mammals. These results, together with those previously described in other tissues of pigeons (MLSP, 35 years) compared to rats (MLSP, 4 years), indicate that oxidative damage to proteins, lipids and mitochondrial DNA are lower in birds (very

  18. Effects of acute nicotine on hemodynamics and binding of [11C]raclopride to dopamine D2,3 receptors in pig brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, Paul; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Watanabe, Hideaki; Smith, Donald; Bender, Dirk; Clarke, Paul B S; Gjedde, Albert

    2003-07-01

    Positive reinforcing properties of nicotine and the psychostimulants have been attributed to elevated dopamine release in the basal ganglia. It is well known that the specific binding of [(11)C]raclopride to dopamine D(2,3) receptors in living striatum is reduced by cocaine and amphetamines, revealing increased competition between endogenous dopamine and [(11)C]raclopride for dopamine D(2,3) receptors. However, the sensitivity of [(11)C]raclopride binding to nicotine-induced dopamine release is less well documented. In order to provide the basis for mapping effects of nicotine, we first optimized reference tissue methods for quantifying [(11)C]raclopride binding sites in striatum of living pigs (n = 16). In the same animals, the rate of cerebral blood flow (CBF) was mapped using [(15)O]water. Neither a low dose of nicotine (50 mu kg(-1), iv) nor a high dose of nicotine (500 microg kg(-1), iv) altered CBF in the pig brain, an important condition for calculating the binding of radioligands when using a reference tissue to estimate the free ligand concentration. The methods of Logan and of Lammertsma were compared using the cerebellum or the occipital cortex as reference tissues for calculating the binding potential (pB) of [(11)C]raclolpride in brain. Irrespective of the method used, the mean undrugged baseline pB in striatum (ca. 2.0) was significantly asymmetric, with highest binding in the left caudate and right putamen. Test-retest estimates of pB were stable. Subtraction of Logan pB maps revealed that the low dose of nicotine reduced the pB of [(11)C]raclopride by 10% in a cluster of voxels in the left anteroventral striatum, but this effect did not persist after correction for multiple comparisons. The high dose of nicotine (n = 9) acutely reduced pB by 10% bilaterally in the ventral striatum; 3 h after the high nicotine dose, the reductions had shifted dorsally and caudally into the caudate and putamen. Evidently, nicotine challenge enhances the competition

  19. Investigation of enzyme-sensitive lipid nanoparticles for delivery of siRNA to blood–brain barrier and glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruun J

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Jonas Bruun,1 Trine B Larsen,1 Rasmus I Jølck,1 Rasmus Eliasen,1 René Holm,2 Torben Gjetting,1 Thomas L Andresen11Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Center for Nanomedicine and Theranostics, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Nanotech, Lyngby, Denmark; 2H Lundbeck A/S, Biologics and Pharmaceutical Science, Valby, DenmarkAbstract: Clinical applications of siRNA for treating disorders in the central nervous system require development of systemic stable, safe, and effective delivery vehicles that are able to cross the impermeable blood–brain barrier (BBB. Engineering nanocarriers with low cellular interaction during systemic circulation, but with high uptake in targeted cells, is a great challenge and is further complicated by the BBB. As a first step in obtaining such a delivery system, this study aims at designing a lipid nanoparticle (LNP able to efficiently encapsulate siRNA by a combination of titratable cationic lipids. The targeted delivery is obtained through the design of a two-stage system where the first step is conjugation of angiopep to the surface of the LNP for targeting the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 expressed on the BBB. Second, the positively charged LNPs are masked with a negatively charged PEGylated (poly(ethylene glycol cleavable lipopeptide, which contains a recognition sequence for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, a class of enzymes often expressed in the tumor microenvironment and inflammatory BBB conditions. Proteolytic cleavage induces PEG release, including the release of four glutamic acid residues, providing a charge switch that triggers a shift of the LNP charge from weakly negative to positive, thus favoring cellular endocytosis and release of siRNA for high silencing efficiency. This work describes the development of this two-stage nanocarrier-system and evaluates the performance in brain endothelial and glioblastoma cells with respect to uptake and gene silencing efficiency. The

  20. The amphiphilic peptide adenoregulin enhances agonist binding to A1-adenosine receptors and [35S]GTP gamma S to brain membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moni, R W; Romero, F S; Daly, J W

    1995-08-01

    1. Adenoregulin is an amphilic peptide isolated from skin mucus of the tree frog, Phyllomedusa bicolor. Synthetic adenoregulin enhanced the binding of agonists to several G-protein-coupled receptors in rat brain membranes. 2. The maximal enhancement of agonist binding, and in parentheses, the concentration of adenoregulin affording maximal enhancement were as follows: 60% (20 microM) for A1-adenosine receptors, 30% (100 microM) for A2a-adenosine receptors, 20% (2 microM) for alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, and 30% (10 microM) for 5HT1A receptors. High affinity agonist binding for A1-, alpha 2-, and 5HT1A-receptors was virtually abolished by GTP gamma S in the presence of adenoregulin, but was only partially abolished in its absence. Magnesium ions increased the binding of agonists to receptors and reduced the enhancement elicited by adenoregulin. 3. The effect of adenoregulin on binding of N6-cyclohexyladenosine ([3H]CHA) to A1-receptors was relatively slow and was irreversible. Adenoregulin increased the Bmax value for [3H]CHA binding sites, and the proportion of high affinity states, and slowed the rate of [3H]CHA dissociation. Binding of the A1-selective antagonist, [3H]DPCPX, was maximally enhanced by only 13% at 2 microM adenoregulin. Basal and A1-adenosine receptor-stimulated binding of [35S]GTP gamma S were maximally enhanced 45% and 23%, respectively, by 50 microM adenoregulin. In CHAPS-solubilized membranes from rat cortex, the binding of both [3H]CHA and [3H]DPCPX were enhanced by adenoregulin. Binding of [3H]CHA to membranes from DDT1 MF-2 cells was maximally enhanced 17% at 20 microM adenoregulin. In intact DDT1 MF-2 cells, 20 microM adenoregulin did not potentiate the inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation mediated via the adenosine A1 receptor. 4. It is proposed that adenoregulin enhances agonist binding through a mechanism involving enhancement of guanyl nucleotide exchange at G-proteins, resulting in a conversion of receptors into a high affinity state

  1. The multiple roles of Fatty Acid Handling Proteins in brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentine SF Moullé

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Lipids are essential components of a living organism as energy source but also as constituent of the membrane lipid bilayer. In addition fatty acid (FA derivatives interact with many signaling pathways. FAs have amphipathic properties and therefore require being associated to protein for both transport and intracellular trafficking. Here we will focus on several fatty acid handling proteins, among which the fatty acid translocase/CD36 (FAT/CD36, members of fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs, and lipid chaperones fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs. A decade of extensive studies has helped decipher the mechanism of action of these proteins in peripheral tissue with high lipid metabolism. However, considerably less information is available regarding their role in the brain, despite the high lipid content of this tissue. This review will primarily focus on the recent studies that have highlighted the crucial role of lipid handling proteins in brain FA transport, neuronal differentiation and development, cognitive processes and brain diseases. Finally a special focus will be made on the recent studies that have revealed the role of FAT/CD36 in brain lipid sensing and nervous control of energy balance.

  2. Effect of dietary linoleate/alpha-linolenate balance on the brain lipid composition, reproductive outcome and behavior of rats during their prenatal and postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, S H; Huh, M H; Lee, Y B; Park, J S; Sohn, H S; Chung, C W

    2000-11-01

    The effect of the dietary linoleate (LA)/alpha-linolenate (LNA) balance during development on the brain lipid composition, reproductive outcome and behavior of rats was studied. Female rats were fed on experimental diets during pregnancy and the resulting pups for 16 weeks. The dietary LA/LNA ratios were 1.07 (LA1), 2.64 (LA2), 4.45 (LA3), 7.68 (LA4) and 10.35 (LA5). The relative content of docosahexaenoate (DHA) in the brain of pups tended to increase with decreasing LA/LNA ratio at 0 and 3 weeks, while the level of DHA was maintained constant at 16 weeks regardless of the dietary LA/LNA ratio. The learning ability was measured at 12 weeks of age, and there was no difference among the groups. In an open field test, the exploratory index was significantly lower in the LA1 group than in the LA2 group. The LA1 group had a smaller litter size and lower survival rate than the other groups. We conclude that if the diet contained appropriate amounts and balance of LA and LNA, it was possible for rats to synthesize an appropriate amount of DHA and have normal behavioral activity without DHA supplementation.

  3. Specific Binding of Adamantane Drugs and Direction of their Polar Amines in the Pore of the Influenza M2 Transmembrane Domain in Lipid Bilayers and Dodecylphosphocholine Micelles Determined by NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Sarah D.; Wang, Jun; Wu, Yibing; DeGrado, William F.; Hong, Mei

    2011-01-01

    The transmembrane domain of the influenza M2 protein (M2TM) forms a tetrameric proton channel important for the virus lifecycle. The proton-channel activity is inhibited by amine-containing adamantyl drugs amantadine and rimantadine, which have been shown to bind specifically to the pore of M2TM near Ser31. However, whether the polar amine points to the N- or C-terminus of the channel has not yet been determined. Elucidating the polar group direction will shed light on the mechanism by which drug binding inhibits this proton channel and will facilitate rational design of new inhibitors. In this study, we determine the polar amine direction using M2TM reconstituted in lipid bilayers as well as DPC micelles. 13C-2H rotational-echo double-resonance NMR experiments of 13C-labeled M2TM and methyl-deuterated rimantadine in lipid bilayers showed that the polar amine pointed to the C-terminus of the channel, with the methyl group close to Gly34. Solution NMR experiments of M2TM in dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles indicate that drug binding causes significant chemical shift perturbations of the protein that are very similar to those seen for M2TM and M2(18–60) bound to lipid bilayers. Specific 2H-labeling of the drugs permitted the assignment of drug-protein cross peaks, which indicate that amantadine and rimantadine bind to the pore in the same fashion as for bilayer-bound M2TM. These results strongly suggest that adamantyl inhibition of M2TM is achieved not only by direct physical occlusion of the pore but also by perturbing the equilibrium constant of the proton-sensing residue His37. The reproduction of the pharmacologically relevant specific pore-binding site in DPC micelles, which was not observed with a different detergent, DHPC, underscores the significant influence of the detergent environment on the functional structure of membrane proteins. PMID:21381693

  4. Inhibition of β-bungarotoxin binding to brain membranes by mast cell degranulating peptide, toxin I, and ethylene glycol bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.R.; Betz, H.; Rehm, H.

    1988-01-01

    The presynaptically active snake venom neurotoxin β-bungarotoxin (β-Butx) is known to affect neurotransmitter release by binding to a subtype of voltage-activated K + channels. Here the authors show that mast cell degranulating (MCD) peptide from bee venom inhibits the binding of 125 I-labeled β-Butx to chick and rat brain membranes with apparent K/sub i/ values of 180 nM and 1100 nM, respectively. The mechanisms of inhibition of MCD peptide is noncompetitive, as is inhibition of 125 I-β-Butx binding by the protease inhibitor homologue from mamba venom, toxin I. β-Butx and its binding antagonists thus bind to different sites of the same membrane protein. Removal of Ca 2+ by ethylene glycol bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid inhibits the binding of 125 I-β-Butx by lowering its affinity to brain membranes

  5. Hippocampal lipid differences in Alzheimer's disease: a human brain study using matrix?assisted laser desorption/ionization?imaging mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Mendis, Lakshini H. S.; Grey, Angus C.; Faull, Richard L. M.; Curtis, Maurice A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Alzheimer's disease (AD), the leading cause of dementia, is pathologically characterized by ??amyloid plaques and tau tangles. However, there is also evidence of lipid dyshomeostasis?mediated AD pathology. Given the structural diversity of lipids, mass spectrometry is a useful tool for studying lipid changes in AD. Although there have been a few studies investigating lipid changes in the human hippocampus in particular, there are few reports on how lipids change in each ...

  6. Effects of autoshaping procedures on 3H-8-OH-DPAT-labeled 5-HT1a binding and 125I-LSD-labeled 5-HT2a binding in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomie, Arthur; Di Poce, Jason; Aguado, Allison; Janes, Amy; Benjamin, Daniel; Pohorecky, Larissa

    2003-06-13

    Effects of experience with Pavlovian autoshaping procedures on lever-press autoshaping conditioned response (CR) performance and 3H-8-OH-DPAT-labeled binding of 5-HT(1a) receptors as well as 125I-LSD-labeled binding of 5-HT(2a) receptors were evaluated in four groups of male Long-Evans hooded rats. Two groups of rats (Group Paired High CR and Group Paired Low CR) received Pavlovian autoshaping procedures wherein the presentation of a lever (conditioned stimulus, CS) was followed by the response-independent presentation of food (unconditioned stimulus, US). Rats in Group Paired High CR (n=12) showed more rapid CR acquisition and higher asymptotic levels of lever-press autoshaping CR performance relative to rats in Group Low CR (n=12). Group Omission (n=9) received autoshaping with an omission contingency, such that performing the lever-press autoshaping CR resulted in the cancellation the food US, while Group Random (n=9) received presentations of lever CS and food US randomly with respect to one another. Though Groups Omission and Random did not differ in lever-press autoshaping CR performance, Group Omission showed significantly lower levels of 3H-8-OH-DPAT-labeled 5-HT(1a) binding in post-synaptic areas (frontal cortex, septum, caudate putamen), as well as significantly higher plasma corticosterone levels than Group Random. In addition, Group Random showed higher levels of 3H-8-OH-DPAT-labeled 5-HT(1a) binding in pre-synaptic somatodendritic autoreceptors on dorsal raphe nucleus relative to each of the other three groups. Autoradiographic analysis of 125I-LSD-labeled 5-HT(2a) receptor binding revealed no significant differences between Groups Paired High CR and Paired Low CR or between Groups Omission and Random in any brain regions.

  7. Concentrations of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, soluble CD14 and plasma lipids in relation to endotoxaemia in patients with alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäfer, C.; Parlesak, Alexandr; Schütt, C.

    2002-01-01

    of endotoxin on its target cells (LPS-binding protein and sCD14) were increased. Endotoxin antagonists, such as bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein and high-density lipoprotein, were increased in the pre-cirrhotic stages, whereas a significant reduction of the latter was observed in cirrhosis. Low......-density lipoprotein remained unchanged. The elevation of binding factors in the pre-cirrhotic stages of alcoholic liver disease might attenuate the effects of endotoxaemia, whereas in cirrhosis the reduction of high density lipoprotein, to which large quantities of endotoxin bind, may contribute to its pro...

  8. Quantitative analyses of regional [{sup 11}C]PE2I binding to the dopamine transporter in the human brain: a PET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jucaite, Aurelija [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Woman and Child Health, Stockholm (Sweden); Odano, Ikuo [Niigata University, Department of Sensory and Integrative Medicine, Asahimachi-dori Niigata (Japan); Olsson, Hans; Pauli, Stefan; Halldin, Christer; Farde, Lars [Karolinska Institutet, Psychiatry Section, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-06-15

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a plasma membrane protein of central interest in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders and is known to be a target for psychostimulant drugs. [{sup 11}C]PE2I is a new radioligand which binds selectively and with moderate affinity to central DAT, as has been demonstrated in vitro by autoradiography and in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET). The aims of the present PET study were to quantify regional [{sup 11}C]PE2I binding to DAT in the human brain and to compare quantitative methods with regard to suitability for applied clinical studies. One PET measurement was performed in each of eight healthy male subjects. The binding potential (BP) values were obtained by applying kinetic compartment analysis, which uses the metabolite-corrected arterial plasma curve as an input function. They were compared with the BP values quantified by two reference tissue approaches, using cerebellum as a reference region representing free and non-specific radioligand binding. The radioactivity concentration was highest in the striatum, lower in the midbrain and very low in the cerebellum. The regional [{sup 11}C]PE2I binding could be interpreted by kinetic compartment models. However, the BP values in the striatum obtained by the compartment analyses were about 30% higher than the BP values obtained using reference tissue methods. We suggest that the difference may be explained by the inaccurate metabolite correction, small amounts of radioactive metabolites that could account for the presence of non-specific binding in the cerebellum and insufficient data acquisition time. (orig.)

  9. Hedonic Eating and the “Delicious Circle”: From Lipid-Derived Mediators to Brain Dopamine and Back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Coccurello

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Palatable food can be seductive and hedonic eating can become irresistible beyond hunger and negative consequences. This is witnessed by the subtle equilibrium between eating to provide energy intake for homeostatic functions, and reward-induced overeating. In recent years, considerable efforts have been devoted to study neural circuits, and to identify potential factors responsible for the derangement of homeostatic eating toward hedonic eating and addiction-like feeding behavior. Here, we examined recent literature on “old” and “new” players accountable for reward-induced overeating and possible liability to eating addiction. Thus, the role of midbrain dopamine is positioned at the intersection between selected hormonal signals involved in food reward information processing (namely, leptin, ghrelin, and insulin, and lipid-derived neural mediators such as endocannabinoids. The impact of high fat palatable food and dietary lipids on endocannabinoid formation is reviewed in its pathogenetic potential for the derangement of feeding homeostasis. Next, endocannabinoid signaling that regulates synaptic plasticity is discussed as a key mechanism acting both at hypothalamic and mesolimbic circuits, and affecting both dopamine function and interplay between leptin and ghrelin signaling. Outside the canonical hypothalamic feeding circuits involved in energy homeostasis and the notion of “feeding center,” we focused on lateral hypothalamus as neural substrate able to confront food-associated homeostatic information with food salience, motivation to eat, reward-seeking, and development of compulsive eating. Thus, the lateral hypothalamus-ventral tegmental area-nucleus accumbens neural circuitry is reexamined in order to interrogate the functional interplay between ghrelin, dopamine, orexin, and endocannabinoid signaling. We suggested a pivotal role for endocannabinoids in food reward processing within the lateral hypothalamus, and for orexin

  10. Subnanomolar indazole-5-carboxamide inhibitors of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) continued: indications of iron binding, experimental evidence for optimised solubility and brain penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzvetkov, Nikolay T; Antonov, Liudmil

    2017-12-01

    Pharmacological and physicochemical studies of N-unsubstituted indazole-5-carboxamides (subclass I) and their structurally optimised N1-methylated analogues (subclass II), initially developed as drug and radioligand candidates for the treatment and diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD), are presented. The compounds are highly brain permeable, selective, reversible, and competitive monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitors with improved water-solubility and subnanomolar potency (pIC 50  >8.8). Using a well-validated, combined X-ray/modelling technology platform, we performed a semi-quantitative analysis of the binding modes of all compounds and investigated the role of the indazole N1 position for their MAO-B inhibitory activity. Moreover, compounds NTZ-1006, 1032, and 1441 were investigated for their ability to bind Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ ions using UV-visible spectroscopy.

  11. Differences between seizure-prone and non-seizure-prone mice with regard to glutamate and GABA receptor binding in the hippocampus and other regions of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, A; Belhage, B; Schousboe, A

    1987-01-01

    Quisqualate-preferring glutamate receptors were determined in membranes from frontal cortex, occipital cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, from seizure-prone DBA/2J BOM and seizure-resistant C57/BL mice. The animals were studied 21, 27 and 40 days postnatally, i.e., before, during and after the age...... at which DBA mice are most susceptible to seizures. Radio-binding assays were performed using [3H]AMPA in the presence of 100 nM glutamate. Except for the occipital cortex, where no significant differences between the two strains were observed, all areas of the brain of DBA mice exhibited significantly (P...... less than 0.001, t test) higher AMPA binding than the corresponding areas of C57/BL mice at 27 days of age. At pre- and post-susceptible ages, the two strains showed no significant differences in the hippocampus and occipital cortex. A significant difference was observed, however, in the frontal cortex...

  12. A PET [18F]altanserin study of 5-HT2A receptor binding in the human brain and responses to painful heat stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kupers, Ronny Clement Florent; Frokjaer, Vibe G; Naert, Arne

    2009-01-01

    There is a large body of evidence that serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] plays an important role in the transmission and regulation of pain. Here we used positron emission tomography (PET) to study the relationship between baseline 5-HT(2A) binding in the brain and responses to noxious heat...... stimulation in a group of young healthy volunteers. Twenty-one healthy subjects underwent PET scanning with the 5-HT(2A) antagonist, [(18)F]altanserin. In addition, participants underwent a battery of pain tests using noxious heat stimulation to assess pain threshold, pain tolerance and response to short......-lasting phasic and long-lasting (7-minute) tonic painful stimulation. Significant positive correlations were found between tonic pain ratings and [(18)F]altanserin binding in orbitofrontal (r=0.66; p=0.005), medial inferior frontal (r=0.60; p=0.014), primary sensory-motor (r=0.61; p=0.012) and posterior...

  13. Gene expression of fatty acid transport and binding proteins in the blood-brain barrier and the cerebral cortex of the rat: differences across development and with different DHA brain status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pélerin, Hélène; Jouin, Mélanie; Lallemand, Marie-Sylvie; Alessandri, Jean-Marc; Cunnane, Stephen C; Langelier, Bénédicte; Guesnet, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Specific mechanisms for maintaining docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) concentration in brain cells but also transporting DHA from the blood across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) are not agreed upon. Our main objective was therefore to evaluate the level of gene expression of fatty acid transport and fatty acid binding proteins in the cerebral cortex and at the BBB level during the perinatal period of active brain DHA accretion, at weaning, and until the adult age. We measured by real time RT-PCR the mRNA expression of different isoforms of fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs), long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs), fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) and the fatty acid transporter (FAT)/CD36 in cerebral cortex and isolated microvessels at embryonic day 18 (E18) and postnatal days 14, 21 and 60 (P14, P21 and P60, respectively) in rats receiving different n-3 PUFA dietary supplies (control, totally deficient or DHA-supplemented). In control rats, all the genes were expressed at the BBB level (P14 to P60), the mRNA levels of FABP5 and ACSL3 having the highest values. Age-dependent differences included a systematic decrease in the mRNA expressions between P14-P21 and P60 (2 to 3-fold), with FABP7 mRNA abundance being the most affected (10-fold). In the cerebral cortex, mRNA levels varied differently since FATP4, ACSL3 and ACSL6 and the three FABPs genes were highly expressed. There were no significant differences in the expression of the 10 genes studied in n-3 deficient or DHA-supplemented rats despite significant differences in their brain DHA content, suggesting that brain DHA uptake from the blood does not necessarily require specific transporters within cerebral endothelial cells and could, under these experimental conditions, be a simple passive diffusion process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Metallothionein-II Inhibits Lipid Peroxidation and Improves Functional Recovery after Transient Brain Ischemia and Reperfusion in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli Diaz-Ruiz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available After transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R, damaging mechanisms, such as excitotoxicity and oxidative stress, lead to irreversible neurological deficits. The induction of metallothionein-II (MT-II protein is an endogenous mechanism after I/R. Our aim was to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of MT-II after I/R in rats. Male Wistar rats were transiently occluded at the middle cerebral artery for 2 h, followed by reperfusion. Rats received either MT (10 μg per rat i.p. or vehicle after ischemia. Lipid peroxidation (LP was measured 22 h after reperfusion in frontal cortex and hippocampus; also, neurological deficit was evaluated after ischemia, using the Longa scoring scale. Infarction area was analyzed 72 hours after ischemia. Results showed increased LP in frontal cortex (30.7% and hippocampus (26.4%, as compared to control group; this effect was fully reversed by MT treatment. Likewise, we also observed a diminished neurological deficit assessed by the Longa scale in those animals treated with MT compared to control group values. The MT-treated group showed a significant (P<0.05 reduction of 39.9% in the infarction area, only at the level of hippocampus, as compared to control group. Results suggest that MT-II may be a novel neuroprotective treatment to prevent ischemia injury.

  15. Naloxone-sensitive, haloperidol-sensitive, [3H](+)SKF-10047-binding protein partially purified from rat liver and rat brain membranes: an opioid/sigma receptor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, L I; Su, T P

    1997-02-01

    A naloxone-sensitive, haloperidol-sensitive, [3H](+)SKF-10047-binding protein was partially purified from rat liver and rat brain membranes in an affinity chromatography originally designed to purify sigma receptors. Detergent-solubilized extracts from membranes were adsorbed to Sephadex G-25 resin containing an affinity ligand for sigma receptors: N-(2- 3,4-dichlorophenyl]ethyl)-N-(6-aminohexyl)-(2-[1-pyrrolidinyl]) ethylamine (DAPE). After eluting the resin with haloperidol, a protein that bound [3H](+)SKF-10047 was detected in the eluates. However, the protein was not the sigma receptor. [3H](+)SKF-10047 binding to the protein was inhibited by the following compounds in the order of decreasing potency: (+)pentazocine > (-) pentazocine > (+/-)cyclazocine > (-)morphine > (-)naloxone > haloperidol > (+)SKF-10047 > DADLE > (-)SKF-10047. Further, the prototypic sigma receptor ligands, such as 1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG), (+)3-PPP, and progesterone, bound poorly to the protein. Tryptic digestion and heat treatment of the affinity-purified protein abolished radioligand binding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS/PAGE) of the partially-purified protein from the liver revealed a major diffuse band with a molecular mass of 31 kDa, a polypeptide of 65 kDa, and another polypeptide of > 97 kDa. This study demonstrates the existence of a novel protein in the rat liver and rat brain which binds opioids, benzomorphans, and haloperidol with namomolar affinity. The protein resembles the opioid/sigma receptor originally proposed by Martin et al. [(1976): J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther., 197:517-532.]. A high degree of purification of this protein has been achieved in the present study.

  16. Reduced number of (/sup 3/H)nicotine and (/sup 3/H)acelylcholine binding sites in the frontal cortex of Alzheimer brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordberg, A; Winblad, B

    1986-12-03

    Nicotinic cholinergic receptors were measured in human frontal cortex using (/sup 3/H)nicotine and (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine (in the presence of atropine) as receptor ligands. A parallel marked reduction in number of (/sup 3/H)nicotine (52%, P<0.01) and (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine (-55%, P<0.05) binding was found in the frontal cortex of Alzheimer brains (AD/SDAT) when compared to age-matched control brains. As a comparison the number of muscarinic receptors was quantified using (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate and found to be significantly increased (+23%, P<0.01) in AD/SDAT compared to controls. 26 refs.

  17. Imaging MALDI mass spectrometry using an oscillating capillary nebulizer matrix coating system and its application to analysis of lipids in brain from a mouse model of Tay-Sachs/Sandhoff disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanfeng; Allegood, Jeremy; Liu, Ying; Wang, Elaine; Cachón-Gonzalez, Begoña; Cox, Timothy M; Merrill, Alfred H; Sullards, M Cameron

    2008-04-15

    The quality of tissue imaging by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) depends on the effectiveness of the matrix deposition, especially for lipids that may dissolve in the solvent used for the matrix application. This article describes the use of an oscillating capillary nebulizer (OCN) to spray small droplets of matrix aerosol onto the sample surface for improved matrix homogeneity, reduced crystal size, and controlled solvent effects. This system was then applied to the analysis of histological slices of brains from mice with homozygous disruption of the hexb gene (hexb-/-), a model of Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff disease, versus the functionally normal heterozygote (hexb+/-) by imaging MALDI-MS. This allowed profiling and localization of many different lipid species, and of particular interest, ganglioside GM2, asialo-GM2 (GA2), and sulfatides (ST). The presence of these compounds was confirmed by analysis of brain extracts using electrospray ionization in conjunction with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The major fatty acid of the ceramide backbone of both GM2 and GA2 was identified as stearic acid (18:0) versus nervonic acid (24:1) for ST by both tissue-imaging MS and ESI-MS/MS. GM2 and GA2 were highly elevated in hexb-/- and were both localized in the granular cell region of the cerebellum. ST, however, was localized mainly in myelinated fiber (white matter) region of the cerebellum as well as in the brain stem with a relatively uniform distribution and had similar relative signal intensity for both hexb+/- and hexb-/- brain. It was also observed that there were distinct localizations for numerous other lipid subclasses; hence, imaging MALDI-MS could be used for "lipidomic" studies. These results illustrate the usefulness of tissue-imaging MALDI-MS with matrix deposition by OCN for histologic comparison of lipids in tissues such as brains from this mouse model of Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff disease.

  18. [Changes of neurotransmitter, lipid peroxide and their metabolic related enzyme activities in the brain of rats exposed to noise and vitamin E].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, N

    1984-09-01

    Effects of noise on locomotor activities were analysed in rat. In addition, changes in lipid peroxide (LPX), their metabolic related enzyme activities, and neurotransmitter in the rat brain due to noise exposure and the effects of vitamin E on the rats were studied. The results obtained were as follows: After white noise exposure of 95 dB (A), the locomotor activities of rat increased. But 3 weeks after noise exposure, the activities began to decrease. LPX and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities in hypothalamus and cortex increased at the 14th day after noise exposure or at the 21st day after noise exposure. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities increased in hippocampus at the 4th day after noise exposure, and decreased in midbrain and thalamus at the 14th day and the 21th day after noise exposure. Norepinephrine (NE) increased in hypothalamus at the 1st day, the 2nd day and the 7th day after noise exposure, and increased in striatum at the 7th day after noise exposure, in cortex at the 4th day and the 7th day after exposure. At the 14th day after noise exposure, NE decreased in cerebellum, in medulla and pons, in midbrain and thalamus, and in cortex. In cortex NE also decreased at the 21st day after noise exposure. Serotonin increased in hypothalamus and in midbrain and thalamus at the 1st and 4th day after noise exposure, and increased in striatum at the 7th day after noise exposure. Decrease in serotonin was observed in cerebellum at the 14th day after noise exposure. Vitamin E decreased LPX in rat brain and the liver.

  19. Quantitative light microscopic autoradiographic localization of binding sites labelled with [3H]vasopressin antagonist d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)VP in the rat brain, pituitary and kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeuwen, F.W. van; Beek, E.M. van der; Heerikhuize, J.J. van; Wolters, P.; Meulen, G. van der; Wan, Yieh-Ping

    1987-01-01

    Binding sites for the vasopressin (VP) antagonist d(CH 2 ) 5 Tyr(Me)VP, were located in various brain areas (e.g. the lateral septum, amygdala, choroid plexus and nucleus of the solitary tract) using light microscopic autoradiography. A number of areas (e.g. suprachiasmatic and arcuate nucleus, pineal gland) which previously showed no VP binding were labelled in the present study. The olfactory nucleus and ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus were not labelled. It therefore appears that d(CH 2 ) 5 Tyr(Me)VP is capable of discriminating between VP and oxytocin binding sites and more sensitive means of detecting VP binding sites than VP alone. (Author)

  20. Oxidative stress and damage in liver, but not in brain, of Fischer 344 rats subjected to dietary iron supplementation with lipid-soluble[(3,5,5-Trimethylhexanoyl)ferrocene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Morgan, Evan; Christen, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    Accumulation of iron probably predisposes the aging brain to progressive neuronal loss. We examined various markers of oxidative stress and damage in the brain and liver of 3- and 24-month old rats following supplementationwith the lipophilic iron derivative [(3,5,5-trimethylhexanoyl)ferrocene] (......, they also demonstrated that the brain is well protected against dietary iron overload by using iron in a lipid-soluble formulation.......Accumulation of iron probably predisposes the aging brain to progressive neuronal loss. We examined various markers of oxidative stress and damage in the brain and liver of 3- and 24-month old rats following supplementationwith the lipophilic iron derivative [(3,5,5-trimethylhexanoyl......)ferrocene] (TMHF), which is capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier. At both ages, iron concentration increased markedly in the liver but failed to increase in the brain. In the liver of TMHF-treated young rats, levels of a- and ¿-tocopherols and glutathione (GSH) were also higher. In contrast, the brain...

  1. Regional specific binding of [11C]RO 15 1788 to central type benzodiazepine receptors in human brain: quantitative evaluation by PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappata, S.; Samson, Y.; Chavoix, C.; Prenant, C.; Maziere, M.; Baron, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The central type benzodiazepine receptors were studied in 17 healthy human subjects with 11 C-RO 15 1788 and positron emission tomography (PET). The brain regional distribution of the tracer in eight control studies performed after injection of trace doses of 11 C-RO 15 1788 was consistent with that of benzodiazepine receptors. Saturation studies with co-injected cold RO 15 1788 in the remaining subjects showed a dose-dependent decrease of brain radiotracer until full inhibition of specific binding was achieved with doses above 0.1 mg/kg (four studies). Based on the results, a simple method to estimate the specifically bound 11 C-RO 15 1788 regionally in a single PET study is proposed, using the data from the full-saturation studies as a stable estimate of the nondisplaceable radioligand concentration. Using this method, it was found that quasiequilibrium between the estimated specifically bound and nondisplaceable components was achieved at times equal to or longer than 20 min after tracer administration. The validity of this method was partly supported by further results, showing a good agreement between the regional specific binding so calculated and postmortem data of receptor density

  2. Determination of hydrophobic coenzyme a esters and other lipids using a biosensor comprising a modified coenzyme a- and acyl-coa binding protein (acbp)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    , food and feed preparations, tissue extracts, acyl-CoA synthetase reaction media and various laboratory conditions using a modified Coenzyme A- and acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) is provided. Furthermore the invention relates to a construct comprising a peptide and a signal moiety for performing...

  3. Neuroimaging of Lipid Storage Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Deborah; Auerbach, Sarah; Robinson, Paul; Gropman, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Lipid storage diseases, also known as the lipidoses, are a group of inherited metabolic disorders in which there is lipid accumulation in various cell types, including the central nervous system, because of the deficiency of a variety of enzymes. Over time, excessive storage can cause permanent cellular and tissue damage. The brain is particularly…

  4. Hippocampal lipid differences in Alzheimer's disease: a human brain study using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendis, Lakshini H S; Grey, Angus C; Faull, Richard L M; Curtis, Maurice A

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the leading cause of dementia, is pathologically characterized by β-amyloid plaques and tau tangles. However, there is also evidence of lipid dyshomeostasis-mediated AD pathology. Given the structural diversity of lipids, mass spectrometry is a useful tool for studying lipid changes in AD. Although there have been a few studies investigating lipid changes in the human hippocampus in particular, there are few reports on how lipids change in each hippocampal subfield (e.g., Cornu Ammonis [CA] 1-4, dentate gyrus [DG] etc.). Since each subfield has its own function, we postulated that there could be lipid changes that are unique to each. We used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-imaging mass spectrometry to investigate specific lipid changes in each subfield in AD. Data from the hippocampus region of six age- and gender-matched normal and AD pairs were analyzed with SCiLS lab 2015b software (SCiLS GmbH, Germany; RRID:SCR_014426), using an analysis workflow developed in-house. Hematoxylin, eosin, and luxol fast blue staining were used to precisely delineate each anatomical hippocampal subfield. Putative lipid identities, which were consistent with published data, were assigned using MS/MS. Both positively and negatively charged lipid ion species were abundantly detected in normal and AD tissue. While the distribution pattern of lipids did not change in AD, the abundance of some lipids changed, consistent with trends that have been previously reported. However, our results indicated that the majority of these lipid changes specifically occur in the CA1 region. Additionally, there were many lipid changes that were specific to the DG. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-imaging mass spectrometry and our analysis workflow provide a novel method to investigate specific lipid changes in hippocampal subfields. Future work will focus on elucidating the role that specific lipid differences in each subfield play in AD pathogenesis.

  5. Alterations of retinol-binding protein 4 species in patients with different stages of chronic kidney disease and their relation to lipid parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henze, Andrea; Frey, Simone K; Raila, Jens

    2010-01-01

    ) was assessed in serum of 45 healthy controls and 52 patients with stage 2-5 of CKD using ELISA and RBP4 immunoprecipitation with subsequent MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. A reduction of glomerular filtration rate was accompanied by a gradual elevation of RBP4 serum levels and relative amounts of RBP4-LL. Correlation...... analysis revealed a strong association of the RBP4-TTR ratio with parameters of lipid metabolism and with diabetes-related factors. In conclusion, RBP4 serum concentration and the appearance of RBP4-LL seem to be influenced by kidney function. Furthermore, the RBP4-TTR ratio may provide diagnostic...

  6. Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 is up-regulated in bacterial endocarditis and binds to components of vegetations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Hanna; Renner, Marcus; Helmke, Burkhard M

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Bacterial endocarditis is a frequent infectious cardiac disease, especially in patients with congenital or acquired heart defects. It is characterized by bacterial colonization of the heart valves and the appearance of vegetations consisting of fibrin, blood cells, and bacteria....... The glycoprotein Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 is a scavenger receptor cysteine-rich protein with functions in innate immunity and epithelial differentiation. Because of the aggregating capacity of Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1, we hypothesized that an up-regulation in bacterial endocardi